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Sample records for additional methane methane

  1. 30 CFR 75.151 - Tests for methane; qualified person; additional requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tests for methane; qualified person; additional... Certified Persons § 75.151 Tests for methane; qualified person; additional requirement. Notwithstanding the... methane unless he demonstrates to the satisfaction of an authorized representative of the Secretary...

  2. 30 CFR 75.151 - Tests for methane; qualified person; additional requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tests for methane; qualified person; additional... Certified Persons § 75.151 Tests for methane; qualified person; additional requirement. Notwithstanding the... methane unless he demonstrates to the satisfaction of an authorized representative of the Secretary...

  3. 30 CFR 75.151 - Tests for methane; qualified person; additional requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tests for methane; qualified person; additional... Certified Persons § 75.151 Tests for methane; qualified person; additional requirement. Notwithstanding the... methane unless he demonstrates to the satisfaction of an authorized representative of the Secretary...

  4. Stimulation of methane generation from nonproductive coal by addition of nutrients or a microbial consortium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Elizabeth J.P.; Voytek, Mary A.; Corum, Margo D.; Orem, William H.

    2010-01-01

    Biogenic formation of methane from coal is of great interest as an underexploited source of clean energy. The goal of some coal bed producers is to extend coal bed methane productivity and to utilize hydrocarbon wastes such as coal slurry to generate new methane. However, the process and factors controlling the process, and thus ways to stimulate it, are poorly understood. Subbituminous coal from a nonproductive well in south Texas was stimulated to produce methane in microcosms when the native population was supplemented with nutrients (biostimulation) or when nutrients and a consortium of bacteria and methanogens enriched from wetland sediment were added (bioaugmentation). The native population enriched by nutrient addition included Pseudomonas spp., Veillonellaceae, and Methanosarcina barkeri. The bioaugmented microcosm generated methane more rapidly and to a higher concentration than the biostimulated microcosm. Dissolved organics, including long-chain fatty acids, single-ring aromatics, and long-chain alkanes accumulated in the first 39 days of the bioaugmented microcosm and were then degraded, accompanied by generation of methane. The bioaugmented microcosm was dominated by Geobacter sp., and most of the methane generation was associated with growth of Methanosaeta concilii. The ability of the bioaugmentation culture to produce methane from coal intermediates was confirmed in incubations of culture with representative organic compounds. This study indicates that methane production could be stimulated at the nonproductive field site and that low microbial biomass may be limiting in situ methane generation. In addition, the microcosm study suggests that the pathway for generating methane from coal involves complex microbial partnerships.

  5. Additively Manufactured Combustion Devices Components for LOX/Methane Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Sandra Elam; Protz, Christopher; Garcia, Chance; Goodman, Dwight; Baker, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has designed, fabricated, and hot-fire tested a variety of successful injectors, chambers, and igniters for potential liquid oxygen (LOX) and methane (CH4) systems since 2005. The most recent efforts have focused on components with additive manufacturing (AM) to include unique design features, minimize joints, and reduce final machining efforts. Inconel and copper alloys have been used with AM processes to produce a swirl coaxial injector and multiple methane cooled thrust chambers. The initial chambers included unique thermocouple ports for measuring local coolant channel temperatures along the length of the chamber. Results from hot-fire testing were used to anchor thermal models and generate a regeneratively cooled thruster for a 4,000 lbf LOX/CH4 engine. The completed thruster will be hot-fire tested in the summer of 2016 at MSFC. The thruster design can also be easily scaled and used on a 25,000 lbf engine. To further support the larger engine design, an AM gas generator injector has been designed. Hot-fire testing on this injector is planned for the summer of 2016 at MSFC.

  6. Methane conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C.A.; Leonard, J.J.; Sofranko, J.A.

    1984-04-17

    Another version of Arco's process for reforming methane or natural gas into a synthesis gas uses bismuth oxide as the reforming agent; it also requires no nickel or noble metal catalyst. The methane-containing gas contacts bismuth oxide at temperatures of 900/sup 0/-1560/sup 0/F. The oxide is reduced by methane and easily regenerated with an oxygen-containing gas. The oxide Bi/sub 2/O/sub 3/ is a particularly effective synthesizing agent.

  7. Up with methane

    SciTech Connect

    Barlaz, M.A.; Milke, M.W.; Ham, R.K.

    1986-12-01

    Methane production from municipal refuse represents a rapidly developing source of energy which remains underutilized. Part of the problem is the small amount of methane which is typically collected relative to the refuse's methane generation potential. This study was undertaken to define the parameters which affect the onset of methane production and methane yields in sanitary landfills. Ultimately, we need to develop refuse disposal methods which enhance its methane production potential. Included in the study were tests of how introduction of old refuse, use of sterile cover soil, addition of acetate to refuse, and use of leachate, recycling and neutralization affect methane generation. A more thorough understanding of how the microbes present in refuse react to different variables is the first step in the development of techniques for stimulating methane production in sanitary landfills.

  8. Sinking methane.

    PubMed

    Reay, David S

    2003-02-01

    Concentrations of the powerful greenhouse gas, methane, in our atmosphere have doubled since the beginning of the industrial age. Reducing these levels is a vital part of global efforts to combat global warming. Could we make use of the Earth's own methane sinks?

  9. 30 CFR 77.102 - Tests for methane; oxygen deficiency; qualified person, additional requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tests for methane; oxygen deficiency; qualified... methane; oxygen deficiency; qualified person, additional requirement. Notwithstanding the provisions of... and oxygen deficiency unless he has demonstrated to the satisfaction of an authorized...

  10. 30 CFR 77.102 - Tests for methane; oxygen deficiency; qualified person, additional requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tests for methane; oxygen deficiency; qualified... methane; oxygen deficiency; qualified person, additional requirement. Notwithstanding the provisions of... and oxygen deficiency unless he has demonstrated to the satisfaction of an authorized...

  11. 30 CFR 77.102 - Tests for methane; oxygen deficiency; qualified person, additional requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tests for methane; oxygen deficiency; qualified... methane; oxygen deficiency; qualified person, additional requirement. Notwithstanding the provisions of... and oxygen deficiency unless he has demonstrated to the satisfaction of an authorized...

  12. 30 CFR 77.102 - Tests for methane; oxygen deficiency; qualified person, additional requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tests for methane; oxygen deficiency; qualified... methane; oxygen deficiency; qualified person, additional requirement. Notwithstanding the provisions of... and oxygen deficiency unless he has demonstrated to the satisfaction of an authorized...

  13. 30 CFR 77.102 - Tests for methane; oxygen deficiency; qualified person, additional requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tests for methane; oxygen deficiency; qualified... methane; oxygen deficiency; qualified person, additional requirement. Notwithstanding the provisions of... and oxygen deficiency unless he has demonstrated to the satisfaction of an authorized...

  14. Stimulation of Methane Generation from Nonproductive Coal by Addition of Nutrients or a Microbial Consortium▿

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Elizabeth J. P.; Voytek, Mary A.; Corum, Margo D.; Orem, William H.

    2010-01-01

    Biogenic formation of methane from coal is of great interest as an underexploited source of clean energy. The goal of some coal bed producers is to extend coal bed methane productivity and to utilize hydrocarbon wastes such as coal slurry to generate new methane. However, the process and factors controlling the process, and thus ways to stimulate it, are poorly understood. Subbituminous coal from a nonproductive well in south Texas was stimulated to produce methane in microcosms when the native population was supplemented with nutrients (biostimulation) or when nutrients and a consortium of bacteria and methanogens enriched from wetland sediment were added (bioaugmentation). The native population enriched by nutrient addition included Pseudomonas spp., Veillonellaceae, and Methanosarcina barkeri. The bioaugmented microcosm generated methane more rapidly and to a higher concentration than the biostimulated microcosm. Dissolved organics, including long-chain fatty acids, single-ring aromatics, and long-chain alkanes accumulated in the first 39 days of the bioaugmented microcosm and were then degraded, accompanied by generation of methane. The bioaugmented microcosm was dominated by Geobacter sp., and most of the methane generation was associated with growth of Methanosaeta concilii. The ability of the bioaugmentation culture to produce methane from coal intermediates was confirmed in incubations of culture with representative organic compounds. This study indicates that methane production could be stimulated at the nonproductive field site and that low microbial biomass may be limiting in situ methane generation. In addition, the microcosm study suggests that the pathway for generating methane from coal involves complex microbial partnerships. PMID:20817801

  15. Breaking methane

    PubMed Central

    Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2015-01-01

    The most powerful oxidant found in nature is compound Q, an enzymatic intermediate that oxidizes methane. New spectroscopic data have resolved the long-running controversy about Q’s chemical structure. PMID:25607367

  16. Harnessing methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    The total methane resource in hydrates—ice-like substances found in deep ocean sediments and Arctic permafrost—exceeds the energy content of all other fossil fuel resources,such as coal, oil, and conventional gas, according to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).The Methane Hydrate Research and Development Act, signed into law by U.S. President Bill Clinton on May 3, establishes a new federal commitment to developing methane hydrates, which has been touted as a potentially clean energy source that could make the U.S. less dependent on foreign sources of energy. The bill authorizes $47.5 million over five years for the Department of Energy to establish a federal methane hydrate research and development program.

  17. The positive effects of waste leachate addition on methane fermentation from food waste in batch trials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wanli; Zhang, Lei; Li, Aimin

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to investigate the effect of waste leachate (WL) addition on batch anaerobic digestion of food waste (FW), and to examine the influence of mixture ratio on the co-digestion process. The results showed that anaerobic digestion of FW was greatly enhanced by WL addition, as indicated by the higher methane yield, higher methane content, more volatile solids (VS) destruction, and higher stability. Although WL was rich in volatile fatty acids (VFA), its addition did not cause VFA inhibition. It was found that WL addition was beneficial to accelerate the start-up and shorten the long reaction time of the batch anaerobic process. The time to reach the peak methane yield was reduced by 1, 2, and 4 days with WL addition. The optimum FW to WL ratio was 77.9:22.1 with the highest methane yield (416 mL/g VS), the highest methane content (64.3%), the greatest VS removal (77.6%), and stable performance. These results confirmed the positive effects of WL addition on methane fermentation from FW.

  18. Methane emissions from cattle.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K A; Johnson, D E

    1995-08-01

    Increasing atmospheric concentrations of methane have led scientists to examine its sources of origin. Ruminant livestock can produce 250 to 500 L of methane per day. This level of production results in estimates of the contribution by cattle to global warming that may occur in the next 50 to 100 yr to be a little less than 2%. Many factors influence methane emissions from cattle and include the following: level of feed intake, type of carbohydrate in the diet, feed processing, addition of lipids or ionophores to the diet, and alterations in the ruminal microflora. Manipulation of these factors can reduce methane emissions from cattle. Many techniques exist to quantify methane emissions from individual or groups of animals. Enclosure techniques are precise but require trained animals and may limit animal movement. Isotopic and nonisotopic tracer techniques may also be used effectively. Prediction equations based on fermentation balance or feed characteristics have been used to estimate methane production. These equations are useful, but the assumptions and conditions that must be met for each equation limit their ability to accurately predict methane production. Methane production from groups of animals can be measured by mass balance, micrometeorological, or tracer methods. These techniques can measure methane emissions from animals in either indoor or outdoor enclosures. Use of these techniques and knowledge of the factors that impact methane production can result in the development of mitigation strategies to reduce methane losses by cattle. Implementation of these strategies should result in enhanced animal productivity and decreased contributions by cattle to the atmospheric methane budget.

  19. Suppression of methane/air explosion by ultrafine water mist containing sodium chloride additive.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xingyan; Ren, Jingjie; Zhou, Yihui; Wang, Qiuju; Gao, Xuliang; Bi, Mingshu

    2015-03-21

    The suppression effect of ultrafine mists on methane/air explosions with methane concentrations of 6.5%, 8%, 9.5%, 11%, and 13.5% were experimentally studied in a closed visual vessel. Ultrafine water/NaCl solution mist as well as pure water mist was adopted and the droplet sizes of mists were measured by phase doppler particle analyzer (PDPA). A high speed camera was used to record the flame evolution processes. In contrast to pure water mist, the flame propagation speed, the maximum explosion overpressure (ΔP(max)), and the maximum pressure rising rate ((dP/dt)max) decreased significantly, with the "tulip" flame disappearing and the flame getting brighter. The results show that the suppressing effect on methane explosion by ultrafine water/NaCl solution mist is influenced by the mist amount and methane concentration. With the increase of the mist amount, the pressure, and the flame speed both descended significantly. And when the mist amount reached 74.08 g/m(3) and 37.04 g/m(3), the flames of 6.5% and 13.5% methane explosions can be absolutely suppressed, respectively. All of results indicate that addition of NaCl can improve the suppression effect of ultrafine pure water mist on the methane explosions, and the suppression effect is considered due to the combination effect of physical and chemical inhibitions. PMID:25528229

  20. Suppression of methane/air explosion by ultrafine water mist containing sodium chloride additive.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xingyan; Ren, Jingjie; Zhou, Yihui; Wang, Qiuju; Gao, Xuliang; Bi, Mingshu

    2015-03-21

    The suppression effect of ultrafine mists on methane/air explosions with methane concentrations of 6.5%, 8%, 9.5%, 11%, and 13.5% were experimentally studied in a closed visual vessel. Ultrafine water/NaCl solution mist as well as pure water mist was adopted and the droplet sizes of mists were measured by phase doppler particle analyzer (PDPA). A high speed camera was used to record the flame evolution processes. In contrast to pure water mist, the flame propagation speed, the maximum explosion overpressure (ΔP(max)), and the maximum pressure rising rate ((dP/dt)max) decreased significantly, with the "tulip" flame disappearing and the flame getting brighter. The results show that the suppressing effect on methane explosion by ultrafine water/NaCl solution mist is influenced by the mist amount and methane concentration. With the increase of the mist amount, the pressure, and the flame speed both descended significantly. And when the mist amount reached 74.08 g/m(3) and 37.04 g/m(3), the flames of 6.5% and 13.5% methane explosions can be absolutely suppressed, respectively. All of results indicate that addition of NaCl can improve the suppression effect of ultrafine pure water mist on the methane explosions, and the suppression effect is considered due to the combination effect of physical and chemical inhibitions.

  1. Project identification for methane reduction options

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, T.

    1996-12-31

    This paper discusses efforts directed at reduction in emission of methane to the atmosphere. Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, which on a 20 year timeframe may present a similar problem to carbon dioxide. In addition, methane causes additional problems in the form of smog and its longer atmospheric lifetime. The author discusses strategies for reducing methane emission from several major sources. This includes landfill methane recovery, coalbed methane recovery, livestock methane reduction - in the form of ruminant methane reduction and manure methane recovery. The author presents examples of projects which have implemented these ideas, the economics of the projects, and additional gains which come from the projects.

  2. Characteristics of slush and boiling methane and methane mixtures.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sindt, C. F.; Ludtke, P. R.

    1971-01-01

    Methane gas of two purities, 99.97% and 99%, was condensed to study the characteristics of the boiling liquid and the slush. In addition, binary mixtures of nitrogen and methane, and those of ethane and methane, and propane and methane, were also studied. Potential advantages of these gases when employed as fuels for high-performance aircraft, rocket engines, and motor vehicles are emphasized.

  3. Methane formation and methane oxidation by methanogenic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Zehnder, A J; Brock, T D

    1979-01-01

    Methanogenic bacteria were found to form and oxidize methane at the same time. As compared to the quantity of methane formed, the amount of methane simultaneously oxidized varied between 0.3 and 0.001%, depending on the strain used. All the nine tested strains of methane producers (Methanobacterium ruminantium, Methanobacterium strain M.o.H., M. formicicum, M. thermoautotrophicum, M. arbophilicum, Methanobacterium strain AZ, Methanosarcina barkeri, Methanospirillum hungatii, and the "acetate organism") reoxidized methane to carbon dioxide. In addition, they assimilated a small part of the methane supplied into cell material. Methanol and acetate also occurred as oxidation products in M. barkeri cultures. Acetate was also formed by the "acetate organism," a methane bacterium unable to use methanogenic substrates other than acetate. Methane was the precursor of the methyl group of the acetate synthesized in the course of methane oxidation. Methane formation and its oxidation were inhibited equally by 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid. Short-term labeling experiments with M. thermoautotrophicum and M. hungatii clearly suggest that the pathway of methane oxidation is not identical with a simple back reaction of the methane formation process. Images PMID:762019

  4. Enzymatic Oxidation of Methane

    SciTech Connect

    Sirajuddin, S; Rosenzweig, AC

    2015-04-14

    Methane monooxygenases (MMOs) are enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of methane to methanol in methanotrophic bacteria. As potential targets for new gas-to-liquid methane bioconversion processes, MMOs have attracted intense attention in recent years. There are two distinct types of MMO, a soluble, cytoplasmic MMO (sMMO) and a membrane-bound, particulate MMO (pMMO). Both oxidize methane at metal centers within a complex, multisubunit scaffold, but the structures, active sites, and chemical mechanisms are completely different. This Current Topic review article focuses on the overall architectures, active site structures, substrate reactivities, proteinprotein interactions, and chemical mechanisms of both MMOs, with an emphasis on fundamental aspects. In addition, recent advances, including new details of interactions between the sMMO components, characterization of sMMO intermediates, and progress toward understanding the pMMO metal centers are highlighted. The work summarized here provides a guide for those interested in exploiting MMOs for biotechnological applications.

  5. Effect of urea addition on giant reed ensilage and subsequent methane production by anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shan; Ge, Xumeng; Liew, Lo Niee; Liu, Zhe; Li, Yebo

    2015-09-01

    The effect of urea addition on giant reed ensilage and sequential anaerobic digestion (AD) of the ensiled giant reed was evaluated. The dry matter loss during ensilage (up to 90 days) with or without urea addition was about 1%. Addition of 2% urea enhanced production of lactic acid by about 4 times, and reduced production of propionic acid by 2-8 times. Besides, urea addition reduced degradation of cellulose and hemicellulose, and increased degradation of lignin in giant reed during ensilage. Ensilage with or without urea addition had no significant effects on the enzymatic digestibility of giant reed, but ensilage with urea addition achieved a cumulative methane yield of 173 L/kg VS, which was 18% higher than that of fresh giant reed. The improved methane yield of giant reed could be attributed to the production of organic acids and ethanol during ensilage.

  6. Effect of the chlortetracycline addition method on methane production from the anaerobic digestion of swine wastewater.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lu; Wen, Xin; Wang, Yan; Zou, Yongde; Ma, Baohua; Liao, Xindi; Liang, Juanboo; Wu, Yinbao

    2014-10-01

    Effects of antibiotic residues on methane production in anaerobic digestion are commonly studied using the following two antibiotic addition methods: (1) adding manure from animals that consume a diet containing antibiotics, and (2) adding antibiotic-free animal manure spiked with antibiotics. This study used chlortetracycline (CTC) as a model antibiotic to examine the effects of the antibiotic addition method on methane production in anaerobic digestion under two different swine wastewater concentrations (0.55 and 0.22mg CTC/g dry manure). The results showed that CTC degradation rate in which manure was directly added at 0.55mg CTC/g (HSPIKE treatment) was lower than the control values and the rest of the treatment groups. Methane production from the HSPIKE treatment was reduced (p<0.05) by 12% during the whole experimental period and 15% during the first 7days. The treatments had no significant effect on the pH and chemical oxygen demand value of the digesters, and the total nitrogen of the 0.55mg CTC/kg manure collected from mediated swine was significantly higher than the other values. Therefore, different methane production under different antibiotic addition methods might be explained by the microbial activity and the concentrations of antibiotic intermediate products and metabolites. Because the primary entry route of veterinary antibiotics into an anaerobic digester is by contaminated animal manure, the most appropriate method for studying antibiotic residue effects on methane production may be using manure from animals that are given a particular antibiotic, rather than adding the antibiotic directly to the anaerobic digester.

  7. Effect of combined herbal feed additives on methane, total gas production and rumen fermentation.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Indu; Dutta, Tapas Kumar; Singh, Pawan Kumar; Sharma, Ashwani

    2015-01-01

    The present study was to evaluate effect of herbal feed additives on methane and total gas production during the rumen fermentation for environment and animal health concern. Different parts of the five medicinal plants were selected such as leaf and small stems of Ocimum sanctum (Tulsi), roots of Curcuma longa (Haldi), fruits of Emblica officinalis (Amla), leaves of Azadirachta indica (Neem) and leaves and small stem of Clerodendrum phlomidis (Arni) for our study. Addition of different herbal additive combinations did not influence IVDMD and total gas production however methane production (mg/g of substrate DM) was significantly (P<0.05) reduced in Amla: Neem and Neem: Arni combinations. Total nitrogen significantly (P<0.01) increased in the combinations of Tulsi: Haldi and Amla: Neem. TCA-ppt-N is significantly (P<0.01) increased in Tulsi: Haldi, Haldi: Amla, Amla: Neem and Neem: Arni however NH3-N (mg/dl) significantly decreased in all treatments. We conclude that the screening of plant combinations, Amla: Neem and Neem: Arni have potential to decrease methane production and our herbal feed supplements have no side-effects on the ruminant in small amount. PMID:26124571

  8. Effect of biochar addition on hydrogen and methane production in two-phase anaerobic digestion of aqueous carbohydrates food waste.

    PubMed

    Sunyoto, Nimas M S; Zhu, Mingming; Zhang, Zhezi; Zhang, Dongke

    2016-11-01

    Effect of biochar addition on hydrogen and methane production in two-phase anaerobic digestion of aqueous carbohydrates was studied using bench-scale bioreactors. The cultures with biochar additions were placed in 100ml reactors and incubated at 35°C and pH 5 for hydrogen production. The residual cultures were then used for methane production, incubated at 35°C and pH 7. Daily yields of hydrogen and methane and weekly yield of volatile fatty acids (VFA) were measured. The hydrogen and methane production potentials, rate and lag phases of the two phases were analysed using the Gompertz model. The results showed that biochar addition increased the maximum production rates of hydrogen by 32.5% and methane 41.6%, improved hydrogen yield by 31.0% and methane 10.0%, and shortened the lag phases in the two phases by 36.0% and 41.0%, respectively. Biochar addition also enhanced VFA generation during hydrogen production and VFA degradation in methane production.

  9. Effect of biochar addition on hydrogen and methane production in two-phase anaerobic digestion of aqueous carbohydrates food waste.

    PubMed

    Sunyoto, Nimas M S; Zhu, Mingming; Zhang, Zhezi; Zhang, Dongke

    2016-11-01

    Effect of biochar addition on hydrogen and methane production in two-phase anaerobic digestion of aqueous carbohydrates was studied using bench-scale bioreactors. The cultures with biochar additions were placed in 100ml reactors and incubated at 35°C and pH 5 for hydrogen production. The residual cultures were then used for methane production, incubated at 35°C and pH 7. Daily yields of hydrogen and methane and weekly yield of volatile fatty acids (VFA) were measured. The hydrogen and methane production potentials, rate and lag phases of the two phases were analysed using the Gompertz model. The results showed that biochar addition increased the maximum production rates of hydrogen by 32.5% and methane 41.6%, improved hydrogen yield by 31.0% and methane 10.0%, and shortened the lag phases in the two phases by 36.0% and 41.0%, respectively. Biochar addition also enhanced VFA generation during hydrogen production and VFA degradation in methane production. PMID:27474855

  10. Methane Plumes on Mars

    NASA Video Gallery

    Spectrometer instruments attached to several telescopes detect plumes of methane emitted from Mars during its summer and spring seasons. High levels of methane are indicated by warmer colors. The m...

  11. Combustion of Methane Hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshandell, Melika

    A significant methane storehouse is in the form of methane hydrates on the sea floor and in the arctic permafrost. Methane hydrates are ice-like structures composed of water cages housing a guest methane molecule. This caged methane represents a resource of energy and a potential source of strong greenhouse gas. Most research related to methane hydrates has been focused on their formation and dissociation because they can form solid plugs that complicate transport of oil and gas in pipelines. This dissertation explores the direct burning of these methane hydrates where heat from the combustion process dissociates the hydrate into water and methane, and the released methane fuels the methane/air diffusion flame heat source. In contrast to the pipeline applications, very little research has been done on the combustion and burning characteristics of methane hydrates. This is the first dissertation on this subject. In this study, energy release and combustion characteristics of methane hydrates were investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The experimental study involved collaboration with another research group, particularly in the creation of methane hydrate samples. The experiments were difficult because hydrates form at high pressure within a narrow temperature range. The process can be slow and the resulting hydrate can have somewhat variable properties (e.g., extent of clathration, shape, compactness). The experimental study examined broad characteristics of hydrate combustion, including flame appearance, burning time, conditions leading to flame extinguishment, the amount of hydrate water melted versus evaporated, and flame temperature. These properties were observed for samples of different physical size. Hydrate formation is a very slow process with pure water and methane. The addition of small amounts of surfactant increased substantially the hydrate formation rate. The effects of surfactant on burning characteristics were also studied. One finding

  12. Heat pipe methanator

    DOEpatents

    Ranken, William A.; Kemme, Joseph E.

    1976-07-27

    A heat pipe methanator for converting coal gas to methane. Gravity return heat pipes are employed to remove the heat of reaction from the methanation promoting catalyst, transmitting a portion of this heat to an incoming gas pre-heat section and delivering the remainder to a steam generating heat exchanger.

  13. Nitrate but not tea saponin feed additives decreased enteric methane emissions in nonlactating cows.

    PubMed

    Guyader, J; Eugène, M; Doreau, M; Morgavi, D P; Gérard, C; Loncke, C; Martin, C

    2015-11-01

    Tea saponin is considered a promising natural compound for reducing enteric methane emissions in ruminants. A trial was conducted to study the effect of this plant extract fed alone or in combination with nitrate on methane emissions, total tract digestive processes, and ruminal characteristics in cattle. The experiment was conducted as a 2 × 2 factorial design with 4 ruminally cannulated nonlactating dairy cows. Feed offer was restricted to 90% of voluntary intake and diets consisted of (DM basis): 1) control (CON; 50% hay and 50% pelleted concentrates), 2) CON with 0.5% tea saponin (TEA), 3) CON with 2.3% nitrate (NIT), and 4) CON with 0.5% tea saponin and 2.3% nitrate (TEA+NIT). Tea saponin and nitrate were included in pelleted concentrates. Diets contained similar amounts of CP (12.2%), starch (26.0%), and NDF (40.1%). Experimental periods lasted 5 wk including 2 wk of measurement (wk 4 and 5), during which intake was measured daily. In wk 4, daily methane emissions were quantified for 4 d using open circuit respiratory chambers. In wk 5, total tract digestibility, N balance, and urinary excretion of purine derivatives were determined from total feces and urine collected separately for 6 d. Ruminal fermentation products and protozoa concentration were analyzed from samples taken after morning feeding for 2 nonconsecutive days in wk 5. Tea saponin and nitrate supplementation decreased feed intake ( < 0.05), with an additive effect when fed in combination. Compared with CON, tea saponin did not modify methane emissions (g/kg DMI; > 0.05), whereas nitrate-containing diets (NIT and TEA+NIT) decreased methanogenesis by 28%, on average ( < 0.001). Total tract digestibility, N balance, and urinary excretion of purine derivatives were similar among diets. Ruminal fermentation products were not affected by tea saponin, whereas nitrate-containing diets increased acetate proportion and decreased butyrate proportion and ammonia concentration ( < 0.05). Under the

  14. Methane photochemistry and methane production on Neptune

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romani, P. N.; Atreya, S. K.

    1988-06-01

    The Neptune stratosphere's methane photochemistry is presently studied by means of a numerical model in which the observed mixing ratio of methane prompts photolysis near the CH4 homopause. Haze generation by methane photochemistry has its basis in the formation of hydrocarbon ices and polyacetylenes; the hazes can furnish the requisite aerosol haze at the appropriate pressure levels required by observations of Neptune in the visible and near-IR. Comparisons of model predictions with Uranus data indicate a lower ratio of polyacetylene production to hydrocarbon ice, as well as a lower likelihood of UV postprocessing of the acetylene ice to polymers on Neptune, compared to Uranus.

  15. Methane photochemistry and methane production on Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romani, P. N.; Atreya, S. K.

    1988-01-01

    The Neptune stratosphere's methane photochemistry is presently studied by means of a numerical model in which the observed mixing ratio of methane prompts photolysis near the CH4 homopause. Haze generation by methane photochemistry has its basis in the formation of hydrocarbon ices and polyacetylenes; the hazes can furnish the requisite aerosol haze at the appropriate pressure levels required by observations of Neptune in the visible and near-IR. Comparisons of model predictions with Uranus data indicate a lower ratio of polyacetylene production to hydrocarbon ice, as well as a lower likelihood of UV postprocessing of the acetylene ice to polymers on Neptune, compared to Uranus.

  16. Methane photochemistry and methane production on Neptune

    SciTech Connect

    Romani, P.N.; Atreya, S.K.

    1988-06-01

    The Neptune stratosphere's methane photochemistry is presently studied by means of a numerical model in which the observed mixing ratio of methane prompts photolysis near the CH4 homopause. Haze generation by methane photochemistry has its basis in the formation of hydrocarbon ices and polyacetylenes; the hazes can furnish the requisite aerosol haze at the appropriate pressure levels required by observations of Neptune in the visible and near-IR. Comparisons of model predictions with Uranus data indicate a lower ratio of polyacetylene production to hydrocarbon ice, as well as a lower likelihood of UV postprocessing of the acetylene ice to polymers on Neptune, compared to Uranus. 65 references.

  17. Effect of acetylene and ammonia as reburn fuel additions to methane in nitric oxide reburning

    SciTech Connect

    Kumpaty, S.K.; Nokku, V.P.; Subramanian, K.

    1996-12-31

    Presented in this paper are the computational results of NO reburning with (a) a combination of methane and acetylene and (b) a combination of methane and ammonia. An updated reaction mechanism that was more comprehensive in terms of predicting the ammonia and isocyanic acid oxidation chemistry was employed to run the CKINTERP program. Using the binary file created by executing the above program and the input stoichiometric ratio conditions, the CHEMKIN package predicted the exit concentrations of various species involved in NO reburning.

  18. Methane emission from sewers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiwen; Ni, Bing-Jie; Sharma, Keshab R; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2015-08-15

    Recent studies have shown that sewer systems produce and emit a significant amount of methane. Methanogens produce methane under anaerobic conditions in sewer biofilms and sediments, and the stratification of methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria may explain the simultaneous production of methane and sulfide in sewers. No significant methane sinks or methanotrophic activities have been identified in sewers to date. Therefore, most of the methane would be emitted at the interface between sewage and atmosphere in gravity sewers, pumping stations, and inlets of wastewater treatment plants, although oxidation of methane in the aeration basin of a wastewater treatment plant has been reported recently. Online measurements have also revealed highly dynamic temporal and spatial variations in methane production caused by factors such as hydraulic retention time, area-to-volume ratio, temperature, and concentration of organic matter in sewage. Both mechanistic and empirical models have been proposed to predict methane production in sewers. Due to the sensitivity of methanogens to environmental conditions, most of the chemicals effective in controlling sulfide in sewers also suppress or diminish methane production. In this paper, we review the recent studies on methane emission from sewers, including the production mechanisms, quantification, modeling, and mitigation. PMID:25889543

  19. Methane emission from sewers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiwen; Ni, Bing-Jie; Sharma, Keshab R; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2015-08-15

    Recent studies have shown that sewer systems produce and emit a significant amount of methane. Methanogens produce methane under anaerobic conditions in sewer biofilms and sediments, and the stratification of methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria may explain the simultaneous production of methane and sulfide in sewers. No significant methane sinks or methanotrophic activities have been identified in sewers to date. Therefore, most of the methane would be emitted at the interface between sewage and atmosphere in gravity sewers, pumping stations, and inlets of wastewater treatment plants, although oxidation of methane in the aeration basin of a wastewater treatment plant has been reported recently. Online measurements have also revealed highly dynamic temporal and spatial variations in methane production caused by factors such as hydraulic retention time, area-to-volume ratio, temperature, and concentration of organic matter in sewage. Both mechanistic and empirical models have been proposed to predict methane production in sewers. Due to the sensitivity of methanogens to environmental conditions, most of the chemicals effective in controlling sulfide in sewers also suppress or diminish methane production. In this paper, we review the recent studies on methane emission from sewers, including the production mechanisms, quantification, modeling, and mitigation.

  20. Coal mine methane global review

    SciTech Connect

    2008-07-01

    This is the second edition of the Coal Mine Methane Global Overview, updated in the summer of 2008. This document contains individual, comprehensive profiles that characterize the coal and coal mine methane sectors of 33 countries - 22 methane to market partners and an additional 11 coal-producing nations. The executive summary provides summary tables that include statistics on coal reserves, coal production, methane emissions, and CMM projects activity. An International Coal Mine Methane Projects Database accompanies this overview. It contains more detailed and comprehensive information on over two hundred CMM recovery and utilization projects around the world. Project information in the database is updated regularly. This document will be updated annually. Suggestions for updates and revisions can be submitted to the Administrative Support Group and will be incorporate into the document as appropriate.

  1. Methane-Powered Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Liquid methane is beginning to become an energy alternative to expensive oil as a power source for automotive vehicles. Methane is the principal component of natural gas, costs less than half as much as gasoline, and its emissions are a lot cleaner than from gasoline or diesel engines. Beech Aircraft Corporation's Boulder Division has designed and is producing a system for converting cars and trucks to liquid methane operation. Liquid methane (LM) is a cryogenic fuel which must be stored at a temperature of 260 degrees below zero Fahrenheit. The LM system includes an 18 gallon fuel tank in the trunk and simple "under the hood" carburetor conversion equipment. Optional twin-fuel system allows operator to use either LM or gasoline fuel. Boulder Division has started deliveries for 25 vehicle conversions and is furnishing a liquid methane refueling station. Beech is providing instruction for Northwest Natural Gas, for conversion of methane to liquid state.

  2. Mars methane engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bui, Hung; Coletta, Chris; Debois, Alain

    1994-01-01

    The feasibility of an internal combustion engine operating on a mixture of methane, carbon dioxide, and oxygen has been verified by previous design groups for the Mars Methane Engine Project. Preliminary stoichiometric calculations examined the theoretical fuel-air ratios needed for the combustion of methane. Installation of a computer data acquisition system along with various ancillary components will enable the performance of the engine, running on the described methane mixture, to be optimized with respect to minimizing excess fuel. Theoretical calculations for stoichiometric combustion of methane-oxygen-carbon dioxide mixtures yielded a ratio of 1:2:4.79 for a methane-oxygen-carbon dioxide mixture. Empirical data shows the values to be closer to 1:2.33:3.69 for optimum operation.

  3. Detecting Methane Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, W. B.; Hinkley, E. D.

    1984-01-01

    Remote sensor uses laser radiation backscattered from natural targets. He/Ne Laser System for remote scanning of Methane leaks employs topographic target to scatter light to receiver near laser transmitter. Apparatus powered by 1.5kW generator transported to field sites and pointed at suspected methane leaks. Used for remote detection of natural-gas leaks and locating methane emissions in landfill sites.

  4. Seafloor methane: Atlantic bubble bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, John

    2014-09-01

    The release of large quantities of methane from ocean sediments might affect global climate change. The discovery of expansive methane seeps along the US Atlantic margin provides an ideal test bed for such a marine methane-climate connection.

  5. The future of methane

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, D.G.

    1995-12-31

    Natural gas, mainly methane, produces lower CO{sub 2}, CO, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2} and particulate emissions than either oil or coal; thus further substitutions of methane for these fuels could help mitigate air pollution. Methane is, however, a potent greenhouse gas and the domestication of ruminants, cultivation of rice, mining of coal, drilling for oil, and transportation of natural gas have all contributed to a doubling of the amount of atmospheric methane since 1800. Today nearly 300,000 wells yearly produce ca. 21 trillion cubic feet of methane. Known reserves suggest about a 10 year supply at the above rates of recovery; and the potential for undiscovered resources is obscured by uncertainty involving price, new technologies, and environmental restrictions steming from the need to drill an enormous number of wells, many in ecologically sensitive areas. Until all these aspects of methane are better understood, its future role in the world`s energy mix will remain uncertain. The atomic simplicity of methane, composed of one carbon and four hydrogen atoms, may mask the complexity and importance of this, the most basic of organic molecules. Within the Earth, methane is produced through thermochemical alteration of organic materials, and by biochemical reactions mediated by metabolic processes of archaebacteria; some methane may even be primordial, a residue of planetary accretion. Methane also occurs in smaller volumes in landfills, rice paddies, termite complexes, ruminants, and even many humans. As an energy source, its full energy potential is controversial. Methane is touted by some as a viable bridge to future energy systems, fueled by the sun and uranium and carried by electricity and hydrogen.

  6. Methanation assembly using multiple reactors

    DOEpatents

    Jahnke, Fred C.; Parab, Sanjay C.

    2007-07-24

    A methanation assembly for use with a water supply and a gas supply containing gas to be methanated in which a reactor assembly has a plurality of methanation reactors each for methanating gas input to the assembly and a gas delivery and cooling assembly adapted to deliver gas from the gas supply to each of said methanation reactors and to combine water from the water supply with the output of each methanation reactor being conveyed to a next methanation reactor and carry the mixture to such next methanation reactor.

  7. Methane drizzle on Titan.

    PubMed

    Tokano, Tetsuya; McKay, Christopher P; Neubauer, Fritz M; Atreya, Sushil K; Ferri, Francesca; Fulchignoni, Marcello; Niemann, Hasso B

    2006-07-27

    Saturn's moon Titan shows landscapes with fluvial features suggestive of hydrology based on liquid methane. Recent efforts in understanding Titan's methane hydrological cycle have focused on occasional cloud outbursts near the south pole or cloud streaks at southern mid-latitudes and the mechanisms of their formation. It is not known, however, if the clouds produce rain or if there are also non-convective clouds, as predicted by several models. Here we show that the in situ data on the methane concentration and temperature profile in Titan's troposphere point to the presence of layered optically thin stratiform clouds. The data indicate an upper methane ice cloud and a lower, barely visible, liquid methane-nitrogen cloud, with a gap in between. The lower, liquid, cloud produces drizzle that reaches the surface. These non-convective methane clouds are quasi-permanent features supported by the global atmospheric circulation, indicating that methane precipitation occurs wherever there is slow upward motion. This drizzle is a persistent component of Titan's methane hydrological cycle and, by wetting the surface on a global scale, plays an active role in the surface geology of Titan.

  8. Effects of phosphate addition on methane fermentation in the batch and upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Sho; Shintani, Masaki; Sanchez, Zoe Kuizon; Kimura, Kohei; Numata, Mitsuru; Yamazoe, Atsushi; Kimbara, Kazuhide

    2015-12-01

    Ammonia inhibition of methane fermentation is one of the leading causes of failure of anaerobic digestion reactors. In a batch anaerobic digestion reactor with 429 mM NH3-N/L of ammonia, the addition of 25 mM phosphate resulted in an increase in methane production rate. Similar results were obtained with the addition of disodium phosphate in continuous anaerobic digestion using an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor. While methane content and production rate decreased in the presence of more than 143 mM NH3-N/L of ammonium chloride in UASB, the addition of 5 mM disodium phosphate suppressed ammonia inhibition at 214 mM NH3-N/L of ammonium chloride. The addition prevented acetate/propionate accumulation, which might be one of the effects of the phosphate on the ammonia inhibition. The effects on the microbial community in the UASB reactor was also assessed, which was composed of Bacteria involved in hydrolysis, acidogenesis, acetogenesis, and dehydrogenation, as well as Archaea carrying out methanogenesis. The change in the microbial community was observed by ammonia inhibition and the addition of phosphate. The change indicates that the suppression of ammonia inhibition by disodium phosphate addition could stimulate the activity of methanogens, reduce shift in bacterial community, and enhance hydrogen-producing bacteria. The addition of phosphate will be an important treatment for future studies of methane fermentation.

  9. Methane conversion process

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffney, A.M.; Jones, C.A.; Sofranko, J.A.

    1989-01-03

    This patent describes a process for the conversion of methane to higher hydrocarbons and coproduct water wherein methane is contacted at reactive conditions with a conversion catalyst comprised of a reducible metal oxide selected from the group consisting of an oxide of manganese, tin, indium, germanium, antimony, leads, bismuth, cerium, praseodymium, terbium, iron, and ruthenium. The improvement consists of: pretreating the catalyst before use in the conversion of methane to higher hydrocarbons and coproduct water with a reducing agent at 650/sup 0/C to 1200/sup 0/C for a time sufficient to improve the bulk density and attrition resistance of the catalyst and thereafter contacting the pretreated catalyst with methane at methane conversion conditions effective to form higher hydrocarbons and coproduct water.

  10. The effects of leachate recirculation with supplemental water addition on methane production and waste decomposition in a simulated tropical landfill.

    PubMed

    Sanphoti, N; Towprayoon, S; Chaiprasert, P; Nopharatana, A

    2006-10-01

    In order to increase methane production efficiency, leachate recirculation is applied in landfills to increase moisture content and circulate organic matter back into the landfill cell. In the case of tropical landfills, where high temperature and evaporation occurs, leachate recirculation may not be enough to maintain the moisture content, therefore supplemental water addition into the cell is an option that could help stabilize moisture levels as well as stimulate biological activity. The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of leachate recirculation and supplemental water addition on municipal solid waste decomposition and methane production in three anaerobic digestion reactors. Anaerobic digestion with leachate recirculation and supplemental water addition showed the highest performance in terms of cumulative methane production and the stabilization period time required. It produced an accumulated methane production of 54.87 l/kg dry weight of MSW at an average rate of 0.58 l/kg dry weight/d and reached the stabilization phase on day 180. The leachate recirculation reactor provided 17.04 l/kg dry weight at a rate of 0.14l/kg dry weight/d and reached the stabilization phase on day 290. The control reactor provided 9.02 l/kg dry weight at a rate of 0.10 l/kg dry weight/d, and reached the stabilization phase on day 270. Increasing the organic loading rate (OLR) after the waste had reached the stabilization phase made it possible to increase the methane content of the gas, the methane production rate, and the COD removal. Comparison of the reactors' efficiencies at maximum OLR (5 kgCOD/m(3)/d) in terms of the methane production rate showed that the reactor using leachate recirculation with supplemental water addition still gave the highest performance (1.56 l/kg dry weight/d), whereas the leachate recirculation reactor and the control reactor provided 0.69 l/kg dry weight/d and 0.43 l/kg dry weight/d, respectively. However, when considering

  11. Methane on Triton - Physical state and distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, D. P.; Apt, J.

    1984-01-01

    Infrared spectrophotometric measurements of Neptune's satellite Triton obtained between 1980 and 1982 in the spectral range 0.8-2.5 microns show six individual absorption bands attributable to methane. An additional band in the Triton data is not methane. The Triton spectral data conform more closely to a laboratory spectrum of frozen methane than to a synthetic spectrum of methane gas computed for conditions of low temperature expected at the satellite. Additionally, the strength of the bands vary with Triton's orbital position. The data thus suggest that methane in the ice phase is mostly responsible for the bands in Triton's spectrum, and that the ice is distributed nonuniformly around the satellite's surface.

  12. Methane production in terrestrial arthropods

    SciTech Connect

    Hackstein, J.H.P.; Stumm, C.K. )

    1994-06-07

    The authors have screened more than 110 representatives of the different taxa of terrestrial arthropods for methane production in order to obtain additional information about the origins of biogenic methane. Methanogenic bacteria occur in the hindguts of nearly all tropical representatives of millipedes (Diplopoda), cockroaches (Blattaria), termites (Isoptera), and scarab beetles (Scarabaeidae), while such methanogens are absent from 66 other arthropod species investigated. Three types of symbiosis were found: in the first type, the arthropod's hindgut is colonized by free methanogenic bacteria; in the second type, methanogens are closely associated with chitinous structures formed by the host's hindgut; the third type is mediated by intestinal anaerobic protists with intracellular methanogens. Such symbiotic associations are likely to be a characteristic property of the particular taxon. Since these taxa represent many families with thousands of species, the world populations of methane-producing arthropods constitute an enormous biomass. The authors show that arthropod symbionts can contribute substantially to atmospheric methane.

  13. Methane production in terrestrial arthropods.

    PubMed

    Hackstein, J H; Stumm, C K

    1994-06-01

    We have screened more than 110 representatives of the different taxa of terrestrial arthropods for methane production in order to obtain additional information about the origins of biogenic methane. Methanogenic bacteria occur in the hindguts of nearly all tropical representatives of millipedes (Diplopoda), cockroaches (Blattaria), termites (Isoptera), and scarab beetles (Scarabaeidae), while such methanogens are absent from 66 other arthropod species investigated. Three types of symbiosis were found: in the first type, the arthropod's hindgut is colonized by free methanogenic bacteria; in the second type, methanogens are closely associated with chitinous structures formed by the host's hindgut; the third type is mediated by intestinal anaerobic protists with intracellular methanogens. Such symbiotic associations are likely to be a characteristic property of the particular taxon. Since these taxa represent many families with thousands of species, the world populations of methane-producing arthropods constitute an enormous biomass. We show that arthropod symbionts can contribute substantially to atmospheric methane.

  14. Methane production in terrestrial arthropods.

    PubMed Central

    Hackstein, J H; Stumm, C K

    1994-01-01

    We have screened more than 110 representatives of the different taxa of terrestrial arthropods for methane production in order to obtain additional information about the origins of biogenic methane. Methanogenic bacteria occur in the hindguts of nearly all tropical representatives of millipedes (Diplopoda), cockroaches (Blattaria), termites (Isoptera), and scarab beetles (Scarabaeidae), while such methanogens are absent from 66 other arthropod species investigated. Three types of symbiosis were found: in the first type, the arthropod's hindgut is colonized by free methanogenic bacteria; in the second type, methanogens are closely associated with chitinous structures formed by the host's hindgut; the third type is mediated by intestinal anaerobic protists with intracellular methanogens. Such symbiotic associations are likely to be a characteristic property of the particular taxon. Since these taxa represent many families with thousands of species, the world populations of methane-producing arthropods constitute an enormous biomass. We show that arthropod symbionts can contribute substantially to atmospheric methane. Images PMID:8202505

  15. Methane emission by camelids.

    PubMed

    Dittmann, Marie T; Runge, Ullrich; Lang, Richard A; Moser, Dario; Galeffi, Cordula; Kreuzer, Michael; Clauss, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Methane emissions from ruminant livestock have been intensively studied in order to reduce contribution to the greenhouse effect. Ruminants were found to produce more enteric methane than other mammalian herbivores. As camelids share some features of their digestive anatomy and physiology with ruminants, it has been proposed that they produce similar amounts of methane per unit of body mass. This is of special relevance for countrywide greenhouse gas budgets of countries that harbor large populations of camelids like Australia. However, hardly any quantitative methane emission measurements have been performed in camelids. In order to fill this gap, we carried out respiration chamber measurements with three camelid species (Vicugna pacos, Lama glama, Camelus bactrianus; n = 16 in total), all kept on a diet consisting of food produced from alfalfa only. The camelids produced less methane expressed on the basis of body mass (0.32±0.11 L kg⁻¹ d⁻¹) when compared to literature data on domestic ruminants fed on roughage diets (0.58±0.16 L kg⁻¹ d⁻¹). However, there was no significant difference between the two suborders when methane emission was expressed on the basis of digestible neutral detergent fiber intake (92.7±33.9 L kg⁻¹ in camelids vs. 86.2±12.1 L kg⁻¹ in ruminants). This implies that the pathways of methanogenesis forming part of the microbial digestion of fiber in the foregut are similar between the groups, and that the lower methane emission of camelids can be explained by their generally lower relative food intake. Our results suggest that the methane emission of Australia's feral camels corresponds only to 1 to 2% of the methane amount produced by the countries' domestic ruminants and that calculations of greenhouse gas budgets of countries with large camelid populations based on equations developed for ruminants are generally overestimating the actual levels.

  16. Use of Lysozyme as a Feed Additive on In vitro Rumen Fermentation and Methane Emission

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Ashraf A.; Lee, Sung Sill; Mamuad, Lovelia L.; Kim, Seon-Ho; Choi, Yeon-Jae; Bae, Gui-Seck; Lee, Kichoon; Sung, Ha-Guyn; Lee, Sang-Suk

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of lysozyme addition on in vitro rumen fermentation and to identify the lysozyme inclusion rate for abating methane (CH4) production. An in vitro ruminal fermentation technique was done using a commercial concentrate to rice straw ratio of 8:2 as substrate. The following treatments were applied wherein lysozyme was added into 1 mg dry matter substrate at different levels of inclusion: Without lysozyme, 2,000, 4,000, and 8,000 U lysozyme. Results revealed that, lysozyme addition had a significant effect on pH after 24 h of incubation, with the highest pH (p<0.01) observed in 8,000 U lysozyme, followed by the 4,000 U, 2,000 U, and without lysozyme. The highest amounts of acetic acid, propionic acid (p<0.01) and total volatile fatty acid (TVFA) (p<0.05) were found in 8,000 U after 24 h of incubation. The CH4 concentration was the lowest in the 8,000 U and the highest in the without lysozyme addition after 24 h of incubation. There was no significant differences in general bacteria, methanogen, or protozoan DNA copy number. So far, addition of lysozyme increased the acetate, propionate, TVFA, and decreased CH4 concentration. These results suggest that lysozyme supplementation may improve in vitro rumen fermentation and reduce CH4 emission. PMID:27703130

  17. Methane production in Minnesota peatlands

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.T.; Crawford, R.L.

    1984-06-01

    Rates of methane production in Minnesota peats were studied. Surface (10- to 25-cm) peats produced an average of 228 nmol of CH/sub 4/ per g (dry weight) per h at 25/sup 0/C and ambient pH. Methanogenesis rates generally decreased with depth in ombrotrophic peats, but on occasion were observed to rise within deeper layers of certain fen peats. Methane production was temperature dependent, increasing with increasing temperature (4 to 30/sup 0/C), except in peats from deeper layers. Maximal methanogenesis from these deeper regions occurred at 12/sup 0/C. Methane production rates were also pH dependent. Two peats with pHs of 3.8 and 4.3 had an optimum rate of methane production at pH 6.0. The addition to peat of glucose and H/sub 2/-CO/sub 2/ stimulated methanogenesis, whereas the addition of acetate inhibited methanogenesis. Cysteine-sulfide, nitrogen-phosphorus-trace metals, and vitamins-yeast extract affected methane production very little. Various gases were found to be trapped or dissolved (or both) within peatland waters. Dissolved methane increased linearly to a depth of 210 cm. The accumulation of metabolic end products produced within peat bogs appears to be an important mechanism limiting turnover in peatland environments.

  18. Methane emissions from MBT landfills

    SciTech Connect

    Heyer, K.-U. Hupe, K.; Stegmann, R.

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • Compilation of methane generation potential of mechanical biological treated (MBT) municipal solid waste. • Impacts and kinetics of landfill gas production of MBT landfills, approach with differentiated half-lives. • Methane oxidation in the waste itself and in soil covers. • Estimation of methane emissions from MBT landfills in Germany. - Abstract: Within the scope of an investigation for the German Federal Environment Agency (“Umweltbundesamt”), the basics for the estimation of the methane emissions from the landfilling of mechanically and biologically treated waste (MBT) were developed. For this purpose, topical research including monitoring results regarding the gas balance at MBT landfills was evaluated. For waste treated to the required German standards, a methane formation potential of approximately 18–24 m{sup 3} CH{sub 4}/t of total dry solids may be expected. Monitoring results from MBT landfills show that a three-phase model with differentiated half-lives describes the degradation kinetics in the best way. This is due to the fact that during the first years of disposal, the anaerobic degradation processes still proceed relatively intensively. In addition in the long term (decades), a residual gas production at a low level is still to be expected. Most of the soils used in recultivation layer systems at German landfills show a relatively high methane oxidation capacity up to 5 l CH{sub 4}/(m{sup 2} h). However, measurements at MBT disposal sites indicate that the majority of the landfill gas (in particular at non-covered areas), leaves the landfill body via preferred gas emission zones (hot spots) without significant methane oxidation. Therefore, rather low methane oxidation factors are recommended for open and temporarily covered MBT landfills. Higher methane oxidation rates can be achieved when the soil/recultivation layer is adequately designed and operated. Based on the elaborated default values, the First Order Decay (FOD

  19. Optical constants of solid methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N.; Thompson, W. R.; Sagan, C.; Arakawa, E. T.; Bruel, C.; Judish, J. P.; Khanna, R. K.; Pollack, J. B.

    1989-01-01

    Methane is the most abundant simple organic molecule in the outer solar system bodies. In addition to being a gaseous constituent of the atmospheres of the Jovian planets and Titan, it is present in the solid form as a constituent of icy surfaces such as those of Triton and Pluto, and as cloud condensate in the atmospheres of Titan, Uranus, and Neptune. It is expected in the liquid form as a constituent of the ocean of Titan. Cometary ices also contain solid methane. The optical constants for both solid and liquid phases of CH4 for a wide temperature range are needed for radiative transfer calculations, for studies of reflection from surfaces, and for modeling of emission in the far infrared and microwave regions. The astronomically important visual to near infrared measurements of solid methane optical constants are conspicuously absent from the literature. Preliminary results are presented of the optical constants of solid methane for the 0.4 to 2.6 micron region. K is reported for both the amorphous and the crystalline (annealed) states. Using the previously measured values of the real part of the refractive index, n, of liquid methane at 110 K n is computed for solid methane using the Lorentz-Lorentz relationship. Work is in progress to extend the measurements of optical constants n and k for liquid and solid to both shorter and longer wavelengths, eventually providing a complete optical constants database for condensed CH4.

  20. Mars Methane Plume Tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mischna, M. A.; Banfield, D.; Sykes, I.

    2014-07-01

    Putative releases of methane from the martian surface may be challenging to detect from orbit. Successful detections depend on the character of the plume itself (duration, magnitude, expanse), but also on the observing platform.

  1. Methane heat transfer investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, R. T.

    1984-01-01

    Future high chamber pressure LOX/hydrocarbon booster engines require copper-base alloy main combustion chamber coolant channels similar to the SSME to provide adequate cooling and resuable engine life. Therefore, it is of vital importance to evaluate the heat transfer characteristics and coking thresholds for LNG (94% methane) cooling, with a copper-base alloy material adjacent to the fuel coolant. High-pressure methane cooling and coking characteristics were recently evaluated using stainless-steel heated tubes at methane bulk temperatures and coolant wall temperatures typical of advanced engine operation except at lower heat fluxes as limited by the tube material. As expected, there was no coking observed. However, coking evaluations need be conducted with a copper-base surface exposed to the methane coolant at higher heat fluxes approaching those of future high chamber pressure engines.

  2. Methane heat transfer investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Future high chamber pressure LOX/hydrocarbon booster engines require copper base alloy main combustion chamber coolant channels similar to the SSME to provide adequate cooling and reusable engine life. Therefore, it is of vital importance to evaluate the heat transfer characteristics and coking thresholds for LNG (94% methane) cooling, with a copper base alloy material adjacent to he fuel coolant. High pressure methane cooling and coking characteristics recently evaluated at Rocketdyne using stainless steel heated tubes at methane bulk temperatures and coolant wall temperatures typical of advanced engine operation except at lower heat fluxes as limited by the tube material. As expected, there was no coking observed. However, coking evaluations need be conducted with a copper base surface exposed to the methane coolant at higher heat fluxes approaching those of future high chamber pressure engines.

  3. Electrochemical methane sensor

    DOEpatents

    Zaromb, S.; Otagawa, T.; Stetter, J.R.

    1984-08-27

    A method and instrument including an electrochemical cell for the detection and measurement of methane in a gas by the oxidation of methane electrochemically at a working electrode in a nonaqueous electrolyte at a voltage about 1.4 volts vs R.H.E. (the reversible hydrogen electrode potential in the same electrolyte), and the measurement of the electrical signal resulting from the electrochemical oxidation.

  4. Laser beam methane detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, E. D., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Instrument uses infrared absorption to determine methane concentration in liquid natural gas vapor. Two sensors measure intensity of 3.39 mm laser beam after it passes through gas; absorption is proportional to concentration of methane. Instrument is used in modeling spread of LNG clouds and as leak detector on LNG carriers and installations. Unit includes wheels for mobility and is both vertically and horizontally operable.

  5. Effect of Hydrogen Addition on Methane HCCI Engine Ignition Timing and Emissions Using a Multi-zone Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zi-han; Wang, Chun-mei; Tang, Hua-xin; Zuo, Cheng-ji; Xu, Hong-ming

    2009-06-01

    Ignition timing control is of great importance in homogeneous charge compression ignition engines. The effect of hydrogen addition on methane combustion was investigated using a CHEMKIN multi-zone model. Results show that hydrogen addition advances ignition timing and enhances peak pressure and temperature. A brief analysis of chemical kinetics of methane blending hydrogen is also performed in order to investigate the scope of its application, and the analysis suggests that OH radical plays an important role in the oxidation. Hydrogen addition increases NOx while decreasing HC and CO emissions. Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) also advances ignition timing; however, its effects on emissions are generally the opposite. By adjusting the hydrogen addition and EGR rate, the ignition timing can be regulated with a low emission level. Investigation into zones suggests that NOx is mostly formed in core zones while HC and CO mostly originate in the crevice and the quench layer.

  6. Methane Emissions from Upland Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megonigal, Patrick; Pitz, Scott; Wang, Zhi-Ping

    2016-04-01

    Global budgets ascribe 4-10% of atmospheric methane sinks to upland soils and assume that soils are the sole surface for methane exchange between upland forests and the atmosphere. The dogma that upland forests are uniformly atmospheric methane sinks was challenged a decade ago by the discovery of abiotic methane production from plant tissue. Subsequently a variety of relatively cryptic microbial and non-microbial methane sources have been proposed that have the potential to emit methane in upland forests. Despite the accumulating evidence of potential methane sources, there are few data demonstrating actual emissions of methane from a plant surface in an upland forest. We report direct observations of methane emissions from upland tree stems in two temperate forests. Stem methane emissions were observed from several tree species that dominate a forest located on the mid-Atlantic coast of North America (Maryland, USA). Stem emissions occurred throughout the growing season while soils adjacent to the trees simultaneously consumed methane. Scaling fluxes by stem surface area suggested the forest was a net methane source during a wet period in June, and that stem emissions offset 5% of the soil methane sink on an annual basis. High frequency measurements revealed diurnal cycles in stem methane emission rates, pointing to soils as the methane source and transpiration as the most likely pathway for gas transport. Similar observations were made in an upland forest in Beijing, China. However, in this case the evidence suggested the methane was not produced in soils, but in the heartwood by microbial or non-microbial processes. These data challenge the concept that forests are uniform sinks of methane, and suggest that upland forests are smaller methane sinks than previously estimated due to stem emissions. Tree emissions may be particularly important in upland tropical forests characterized by high rainfall and transpiration.

  7. Methane flux in non-wetland soils in response to nitrogen addition: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Aronson, E L; Helliker, B R

    2010-11-01

    The controls on methane (CH4) flux into and out of soils are not well understood. Environmental variables including temperature, precipitation, and nitrogen (N) status can have strong effects on the magnitude and direction (e.g., uptake vs. release) of CH4 flux. To better understand the interactions between CH4-cycling microorganisms and N in the non-wetland soil system, a meta-analysis was performed on published literature comparing CH4 flux in N amended and matched control plots. An appropriate study index was developed for this purpose. It was found that smaller amounts of N tended to stimulate CH4 uptake while larger amounts tended to inhibit uptake by the soil. When all other variables were accounted for, the switch occurred at 100 kg N x ha(-1) x yr(-1). Managed land and land with a longer duration of fertilization showed greater inhibition of CH4 uptake with added N. These results support the hypotheses that large amounts of available N can inhibit methanotrophy, but also that methanotrophs in upland soils can be N limited in their consumption of CH4 from the atmosphere. There were interactions between other variables and N addition on the CH4 flux response: lower temperature and, to a lesser extent, higher precipitation magnified the inhibition of CH4 uptake due to N addition. Several mechanisms that may cause these trends are discussed, but none could be conclusively supported with this approach. Further controlled and in situ study should be undertaken to isolate the correct mechanism(s) responsible and to model upland CH4 flux. PMID:21141185

  8. Methane Hydrates: Chapter 8

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boswell, Ray; Yamamoto, Koji; Lee, Sung-Rock; Collett, Timothy S.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Dallimore, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Gas hydrate is a solid, naturally occurring substance consisting predominantly of methane gas and water. Recent scientific drilling programs in Japan, Canada, the United States, Korea and India have demonstrated that gas hydrate occurs broadly and in a variety of forms in shallow sediments of the outer continental shelves and in Arctic regions. Field, laboratory and numerical modelling studies conducted to date indicate that gas can be extracted from gas hydrates with existing production technologies, particularly for those deposits in which the gas hydrate exists as pore-filling grains at high saturation in sand-rich reservoirs. A series of regional resource assessments indicate that substantial volumes of gas hydrate likely exist in sand-rich deposits. Recent field programs in Japan, Canada and in the United States have demonstrated the technical viability of methane extraction from gas-hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs and have investigated a range of potential production scenarios. At present, basic reservoir depressurisation shows the greatest promise and can be conducted using primarily standard industry equipment and procedures. Depressurisation is expected to be the foundation of future production systems; additional processes, such as thermal stimulation, mechanical stimulation and chemical injection, will likely also be integrated as dictated by local geological and other conditions. An innovative carbon dioxide and methane swapping technology is also being studied as a method to produce gas from select gas hydrate deposits. In addition, substantial additional volumes of gas hydrate have been found in dense arrays of grain-displacing veins and nodules in fine-grained, clay-dominated sediments; however, to date, no field tests, and very limited numerical modelling, have been conducted with regard to the production potential of such accumulations. Work remains to further refine: (1) the marine resource volumes within potential accumulations that can be

  9. Attributing Atmospheric Methane to Anthropogenic Emission Sources.

    PubMed

    Allen, David

    2016-07-19

    Methane is a greenhouse gas, and increases in atmospheric methane concentration over the past 250 years have driven increased radiative forcing of the atmosphere. Increases in atmospheric methane concentration since 1750 account for approximately 17% of increases in radiative forcing of the atmosphere, and that percentage increases by approximately a factor of 2 if the effects of the greenhouse gases produced by the atmospheric reactions of methane are included in the assessment. Because of the role of methane emissions in radiative forcing of the atmosphere, the identification and quantification of sources of methane emissions is receiving increased scientific attention. Methane emission sources include biogenic, geogenic, and anthropogenic sources; the largest anthropogenic sources are natural gas and petroleum systems, enteric fermentation (livestock), landfills, coal mining, and manure management. While these source categories are well-known, there is significant uncertainty in the relative magnitudes of methane emissions from the various source categories. Further, the overall magnitude of methane emissions from all anthropogenic sources is actively debated, with estimates based on source sampling extrapolated to regional or national scale ("bottom-up analyses") differing from estimates that infer emissions based on ambient data ("top-down analyses") by 50% or more. To address the important problem of attribution of methane to specific sources, a variety of new analytical methods are being employed, including high time resolution and highly sensitive measurements of methane, methane isotopes, and other chemical species frequently associated with methane emissions, such as ethane. This Account describes the use of some of these emerging measurements, in both top-down and bottom-up methane emission studies. In addition, this Account describes how data from these new analytical methods can be used in conjunction with chemical mass balance (CMB) methods for source

  10. Attributing Atmospheric Methane to Anthropogenic Emission Sources.

    PubMed

    Allen, David

    2016-07-19

    Methane is a greenhouse gas, and increases in atmospheric methane concentration over the past 250 years have driven increased radiative forcing of the atmosphere. Increases in atmospheric methane concentration since 1750 account for approximately 17% of increases in radiative forcing of the atmosphere, and that percentage increases by approximately a factor of 2 if the effects of the greenhouse gases produced by the atmospheric reactions of methane are included in the assessment. Because of the role of methane emissions in radiative forcing of the atmosphere, the identification and quantification of sources of methane emissions is receiving increased scientific attention. Methane emission sources include biogenic, geogenic, and anthropogenic sources; the largest anthropogenic sources are natural gas and petroleum systems, enteric fermentation (livestock), landfills, coal mining, and manure management. While these source categories are well-known, there is significant uncertainty in the relative magnitudes of methane emissions from the various source categories. Further, the overall magnitude of methane emissions from all anthropogenic sources is actively debated, with estimates based on source sampling extrapolated to regional or national scale ("bottom-up analyses") differing from estimates that infer emissions based on ambient data ("top-down analyses") by 50% or more. To address the important problem of attribution of methane to specific sources, a variety of new analytical methods are being employed, including high time resolution and highly sensitive measurements of methane, methane isotopes, and other chemical species frequently associated with methane emissions, such as ethane. This Account describes the use of some of these emerging measurements, in both top-down and bottom-up methane emission studies. In addition, this Account describes how data from these new analytical methods can be used in conjunction with chemical mass balance (CMB) methods for source

  11. Photocatalytic conversion of methane to methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C.E.; Noceti, R.P.; D`Este, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    A long-term goal of our research group is the exploration of novel pathways for the direct oxidation of methane to liquid fuels, chemicals, and intermediates. The use of three relatively abundant and inexpensive reactants, light, water, and methane, to produce methanol is attractive. The products of reaction, methanol and hydrogen, are both commercially desirable, methanol being used as is or converted to a variety of other chemicals, and the hydrogen could be utilized in petroleum and/or chemical manufacturing. Methane is produced as a by-product of coal gasification. Depending upon reactor design and operating conditions, up to 18% of total gasifier product may be methane. In addition, there are vast proven reserves of geologic methane in the world. Unfortunately, a large fraction of these reserves are in regions where there is little local demand for methane and it is not economically feasible to transport it to a market. There is a global research effort under way in academia, industry, and government to find methods to convert methane to useful, more readily transportable and storable materials. Methanol, the initial product of methane oxidation, is a desirable product of conversion because it retains much of the original energy of the methane while satisfying transportation and storage requirements. Investigation of direct conversion of methane to transportation fuels has been an ongoing effort at PETC for over 10 years. One of the current areas of research is the conversion of methane to methanol, under mild conditions, using light, water, and a semiconductor photocatalyst. The use of three relatively abundant and inexpensive reactants, light, water, and methane, to produce methanol, is attractive. Research in the laboratory is directed toward applying the techniques developed for the photocatalytic splitting of the water and the photochemical conversion of methane.

  12. Enhanced coalbed methane recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzotti, M.; Pini, R.; Storti, G.

    2009-01-15

    The recovery of coalbed methane can be enhanced by injecting CO{sub 2} in the coal seam at supercritical conditions. Through an in situ adsorption/desorption process the displaced methane is produced and the adsorbed CO{sub 2} is permanently stored. This is called enhanced coalbed methane recovery (ECBM) and it is a technique under investigation as a possible approach to the geological storage of CO{sub 2} in a carbon dioxide capture and storage system. This work reviews the state of the art on fundamental and practical aspects of the technology and summarizes the results of ECBM field tests. These prove the feasibility of ECBM recovery and highlight substantial opportunities for interdisciplinary research at the interface between earth sciences and chemical engineering.

  13. Transformations in methane hydrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chou, I.-Ming; Sharma, A.; Burruss, R.C.; Shu, J.; Mao, Ho-kwang; Hemley, R.J.; Goncharov, A.F.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2000-01-01

    Detailed study of pure methane hydrate in a diamond cell with in situ optical, Raman, and x-ray microprobe techniques reveals two previously unknown structures, structure II and structure H, at high pressures. The structure II methane hydrate at 250 MPa has a cubic unit cell of a = 17.158(2) A?? and volume V = 5051.3(13) A??3; structure H at 600 MPa has a hexagonal unit cell of a = 11.980(2) A??, c = 9.992(3) A??, and V = 1241.9(5) A??3. The compositions of these two investigated phases are still not known. With the effects of pressure and the presence of other gases in the structure, the structure II phase is likely to dominate over the known structure I methane hydrate within deep hydrate-bearing sediments underlying continental margins.

  14. Coalbed methane production case histories

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-02-01

    The production of methane gas from coal and coal-bearing rocks is one of the prime objectives of the Department of Energy's Methane Recovery from Coalbeds Project. This report contains brief description of wells that are presently producing gas from coal or coal-bearing rocks. Data from three gob gas production areas in Illinois, an in-mine horizontal borehole degasification, and eleven vertical boreholes are presented. Production charts and electric logs of the producing zones are included for some of the wells. Additional information on dry gas production from the San Juan Basin, Colorado/New Mexico and the Greater Green River Coal Region, Colorado/Wyoming is also included.

  15. Methane-Powered Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Beech Aircraft's Corporation's Boulder Division developed expertise in producing superinsulated virtually leak-proof cryogenic equipment for storing liquid oxygen and hydrogen fuels in NASA's Apollo, Skylab and Space Shuttle programs. Boulder Division used this experience in designing a fuel storage tank for liquid methane, a "cryogenic" fuel that must be supercooled to keep it liquid. Beech Aircraft is producing a four-place lightplane powered by liquid methane (LM) which is stored in two of these specially designed cryogenic storage tanks holding 18 gallons each.

  16. Biomimetic methane oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, B.E.; Droege, M.W.; Taylor, R.T.; Satcher, J.H.

    1992-06-12

    Methane monooxygenase (MMO) is an enzyme found in methanotrophs that catalyses the selective oxidation of methane to methanol. MMO is protein complex one component of which is a binuclear metal center containing oxygenase. We have completed one round of a design/synthesis/evaluation cycle in the development of coordination complexes that mimic the structure/function of the MMO active site. One of these, a binuclear, coordinately-asymmetric copper complex, is capable of oxidizing cyclohexane to a mixture of cyclohexanol and cyclohexanone in the presence of hydrogen peroxide.

  17. High selective conversion of methane to carbon monoxide and the effects of chlorine additives in the gas and solid phases on the oxidation of methane on strontium hydroxyapatites

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, Shigeru; Minami, Toshimitsu; Higaki, Tomonori; Hayashi, Hiromu; Moffat, J.B.

    1997-02-01

    Selectivities to carbon monoxide higher than 90% for conversions of methane greater than 10% were obtained from the partial oxidation of methane on stoichiometric strontium hydroxyapatite (SrHAp1.67) at 873 K during 6 h on stream. However, the activities decreased gradually with increasing the time-on-stream to 78 h due to the transformation of the apatite to Sr{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}. With small quantities of tetrachloromethane (TCM) added to the feedstream, the high selectivity to CO was retained while the conversion suffered a marked decrease with increasing the times-on-stream. In the presence of TCM the catalytic solid consists of a complex mixture of hydroxyapatite, chlorapatite, phosphate and chloride, each of which contributes dissimilarly to the catalytic process.

  18. Carbon isotope fractionation during microbial methane oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, James F.; Fritz, Peter

    1981-09-01

    Methane, a common trace constituent of groundwaters, occasionally makes up more than 20% of the total carbon in groundwaters1,2. In aerobic environments CH4-rich waters can enable microbial food chain supporting a mixed culture of bacteria with methane oxidation as the primary energy source to develop3. Such processes may influence the isotopic composition of the residual methane and because 13C/12C analyses have been used to characterize the genesis of methanes found in different environments, an understanding of the magnitude of such effects is necessary. In addition, carbon dioxide produced by the methane-utilizing bacteria can be added to the inorganic carbon pool of affected groundwaters. We found carbon dioxide experimentally produced by methane-utilizing bacteria to be enriched in 12C by 5.0-29.6‰, relative to the residual methane. Where methane-bearing groundwaters discharged into aerobic environments microbial methane oxidation occurred, with the residual methane becoming progressively enriched in 13C. Various models have been proposed to explain the 13C/12C and 14C content of the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of groundwaters in terms of additions or losses during flow in the subsurface4,5. The knowledge of both stable carbon isotope ratios in various pools and the magnitude of carbon isotope fractionation during various processes allows geochemists to use the 13C/12C ratio of the DIC along with water chemistry to estimate corrected 14C groundwater ages4,5. We show here that a knowledge of the carbon isotope fractionation between CH4 and CO2 during microbial methane-utilization could modify such models for application to groundwaters affected by microbial methane oxidation.

  19. Brazilian propolis extract used as an additive to decrease methane emissions from the rumen microbial population in vitro.

    PubMed

    Santos, Nadine Woruby; Zeoula, Lucia Maria; Yoshimura, Emerson Henri; Machado, Erica; Macheboeuf, Didier; Cornu, Agnès

    2016-06-01

    Propolis is a product that is rich in phenolic compounds and can be utilized in animal nutrition as a dietary additive. In this study, the effects of a Brazilian green propolis extract on rumen fermentation and gas production were determined. The fate of propolis phenolic compounds in the rumen medium was also investigated. Fermentation was done in 24-h batches over three periods. Inoculates were obtained from cows fed on grassland hay and concentrate. Propolis extract in a hydroalcoholic solution was applied at increasing doses to the substrate (1 to 56 g/kg). The fermentation substrate consisted on a mixture of alfalfa hay, soybean meal, and wheat grain mixture in dry matter. After 24 h of fermentation, seven new compounds were observed in the medium in amounts that correlated to the propolis dose. The dose of propolis extract linearly decreased the pH of the medium and linearly increased propionate production, which reduced the acetate-to-propionate ratio and influenced the total production of short-chain fatty acids. Propolis also linearly reduced methane production and increased the carbon dioxide-to-methane ratio. Ammonia nitrogen levels and in vitro digestibility of organic matter were similar among the treatments. The combination of increased propionate production and decreased methane production suggests better energy utilization from the feed. PMID:27105625

  20. Inhibition of Methane Oxidation by Methylococcus capsulatus with Hydrochlorofluorocarbons and Fluorinated Methanes

    PubMed Central

    Matheson, L. J.; Jahnke, L. L.; Oremland, R. S.

    1997-01-01

    The inhibition of methane oxidation by cell suspensions of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) exposed to hydrochlorofluorocarbon 21 (HCFC-21; difluorochloromethane [CHF(inf2)Cl]), HCFC-22 (fluorodichloromethane [CHFCl(inf2)]), and various fluorinated methanes was investigated. HCFC-21 inhibited methane oxidation to a greater extent than HCFC-22, for both the particulate and soluble methane monooxygenases. Among the fluorinated methanes, both methyl fluoride (CH(inf3)F) and difluoromethane (CH(inf2)F(inf2)) were inhibitory while fluoroform (CHF(inf3)) and carbon tetrafluoride (CF(inf4)) were not. The inhibition of methane oxidation by HCFC-21 and HCFC-22 was irreversible, while that by methyl fluoride was reversible. The HCFCs also proved inhibitory to methanol dehydrogenase, which suggests that they disrupt other aspects of C(inf1) catabolism in addition to methane monooxygenase activity. PMID:16535662

  1. Optical constants of solid methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N.; Thompson, W. R.; Sagan, C.; Arakawa, E. T.; Bruel, C.; Judish, J. P.; Khanna, R. K.; Pollack, J. B.

    1990-01-01

    Methane is the most abundant simple organic molecule in the outer solar system bodies. In addition to being a gaseous constituent of the atmospheres of the Jovian planets and Titan, it is present in the solid form as a constituent of icy surfaces such as those of Triton and Pluto, and as cloud condensate in the atmospheres of Titan, Uranus, and Neptune. It is expected in the liquid form as a constituent of the ocean of Titan. Cometary ices also contain solid methane. The optical constants for both solid and liquid phases of CH4 for a wide temperature range are needed for radiative transfer calculations, for studies of reflection from surfaces, and for modeling of emission in the far infrared and microwave regions. The astronomically important visual to near infrared measurements of solid methane optical constants are conspicuously absent from the literature. Preliminary results are presented on the optical constants of solid methane for the 0.4 to 2.6 micrometer region. Deposition onto a substrate at 10 K produces glassy (semi-amorphous) material. Annealing this material at approximately 33 K for approximately 1 hour results in a crystalline material as seen by sharper, more structured bands and negligible background extinction due to scattering. The constant k is reported for both the amorphous and the crystalline (annealed) states. Typical values (at absorption maxima) are in the .001 to .0001 range. Below lambda = 1.1 micrometers the bands are too weak to be detected by transmission through the films less than or equal to 215 micrometers in thickness, employed in the studies to date. Using previously measured values of the real part of the refractive index, n, of liquid methane at 110 K, n is computed for solid methane using the Lorentz-Lorenz relationship. Work is in progress to extend the measurements of optical constants n and k for liquid and solid to both shorter and longer wavelengths, eventually providing a complete optical constants database for

  2. Methane Pyrolysis and Disposing Off Resulting Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, P. K.; Rapp, D.; Rahotgi, N. K.

    1999-01-01

    Sabatier/Electrolysis (S/E) is a leading process for producing methane and oxygen for application to Mars ISPP. One significant problem with this process is that it produces an excess of methane for combustion with the amount of oxygen that is produced. Therefore, one must discard roughly half of the methane to obtain the proper stoichiometric methane/oxygen mixture for ascent from Mars. This is wasteful of hydrogen, which must be brought from Earth and is difficult to transport to Mars and store on Mars. To reduced the problem of transporting hydrogen to Mars, the S/E process can be augmented by another process which reduces overall hydrogen requirement. Three conceptual approaches for doing this are (1) recover hydrogen from the excess methane produced by the S/E process, (2) convert the methane to a higher hydrocarbon or other organic with a lower H/C ratio than methane, and (3) use a separate process (such as zirconia or reverse water gas shift reaction) to produce additional oxygen, thus utilizing all the methane produced by the Sabatier process. We report our results here on recovering hydrogen from the excess methane using pyrolysis of methane. Pyrolysis has the advantage that it produces almost pure hydrogen, and any unreacted methane can pass through the S/E process reactor. It has the disadvantage that disposing of the carbon produced by pyrolysis presents difficulties. Hydrogen may be obtained from methane by pyrolysis in the temperature range 10000-12000C. The main reaction products are hydrogen and carbon, though very small amounts of higher hydrocarbons, including aromatic hydrocarbons are formed. The conversion efficiency is about 95% at 12000C. One needs to distinguish between thermodynamic equilibrium conversion and conversion limited by kinetics in a finite reactor.

  3. Evaluation of methane emissions from Taiwanese paddies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen-Wuing; Wu, Chung-Yi

    2004-10-15

    The main greenhouse gases are carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide. Methane is the most important because the warming effect of methane is 21 times greater than that of carbon dioxide. Methane emitted from rice paddy fields is a major source of atmospheric methane. In this work, a methane emission model (MEM), which integrates climate change, plant growth and degradation of soil organic matter, was applied to estimate the emission of methane from rice paddy fields in Taiwan. The estimated results indicate that much methane is emitted during the effective tillering and booting stages in the first crop season and during the transplanting stage in the second crop season in a year. Sensitivity analysis reveals that the temperature is the most important parameter that governs the methane emission rate. The order of the strengths of the effects of the other parameters is soil pH, soil water depth (SWD) and soil organic matter content. The masses of methane emitted from rice paddy fields of Taiwan in the first and second crop seasons are 28,507 and 350,231 tons, respectively. The amount of methane emitted during the second crop season is 12.5 times higher than that emitted in the first crop season. With a 12% reduction in planted area during the second crop season, methane emission could be reduced by 21%. In addition, removal of rice straw left from the first crop season and increasing the depth of flooding to 25 cm are also strategies that could help reduce annual emission by up to 18%.

  4. Light-Dependent Aerobic Methane Oxidation Reduces Methane Emissions from Seasonally Stratified Lakes

    PubMed Central

    Oswald, Kirsten; Milucka, Jana; Brand, Andreas; Littmann, Sten; Wehrli, Bernhard; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.; Schubert, Carsten J.

    2015-01-01

    Lakes are a natural source of methane to the atmosphere and contribute significantly to total emissions compared to the oceans. Controls on methane emissions from lake surfaces, particularly biotic processes within anoxic hypolimnia, are only partially understood. Here we investigated biological methane oxidation in the water column of the seasonally stratified Lake Rotsee. A zone of methane oxidation extending from the oxic/anoxic interface into anoxic waters was identified by chemical profiling of oxygen, methane and δ13C of methane. Incubation experiments with 13C-methane yielded highest oxidation rates within the oxycline, and comparable rates were measured in anoxic waters. Despite predominantly anoxic conditions within the zone of methane oxidation, known groups of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea were conspicuously absent. Instead, aerobic gammaproteobacterial methanotrophs were identified as the active methane oxidizers. In addition, continuous oxidation and maximum rates always occurred under light conditions. These findings, along with the detection of chlorophyll a, suggest that aerobic methane oxidation is tightly coupled to light-dependent photosynthetic oxygen production both at the oxycline and in the anoxic bottom layer. It is likely that this interaction between oxygenic phototrophs and aerobic methanotrophs represents a widespread mechanism by which methane is oxidized in lake water, thus diminishing its release into the atmosphere. PMID:26193458

  5. Methane emissions from natural wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, J.L.; Burke, R.A. Jr.

    1993-09-01

    Analyses of air trapped in polar ice cores in conjunction with recent atmospheric measurements, indicate that the atmospheric methane concentration increased by about 250% during the past two or three hundred years (Rasmussen and Khalil, 1984). Because methane is a potent ``greenhouse`` gas, the increasing concentrations are expected to contribute to global warning (Dickinson and Cicerone, 1986). The timing of the methane increase suggests that it is related to the rapid growth of the human population and associated industrialization and agricultural development. The specific causes of the atmospheric methane concentration increase are not well known, but may relate to either increases in methane sources, decreases in the strengths of the sinks, or both.

  6. Direct Aromaization of Methane

    SciTech Connect

    George Marcelin

    1997-01-15

    The thermal decomposition of methane offers significant potential as a means of producing higher unsaturated and aromatic hydrocarbons when the extent of reaction is limited. Work in the literature previous to this project had shown that cooling the product and reacting gases as the reaction proceeds would significantly reduce or eliminate the formation of solid carbon or heavier (Clo+) materials. This project studied the effect and optimization of the quenching process as a means of increasing the amount of value added products during the pyrolysis of methane. A reactor was designed to rapidly quench the free-radical combustion reaction so as to maximize the yield of aromatics. The use of free-radical generators and catalysts were studied as a means of lowering the reaction temperature. A lower reaction temperature would have the benefits of more rapid quenching as well as a more feasible commercial process due to savings realized in energy and material of construction costs. It was the goal of the project to identify promising routes from methane to higher hydrocarbons based on the pyrolysis of methane.

  7. Methane Clathrate Hydrate Prospecting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duxbury, N.; Romanovsky, V.

    2003-01-01

    A method of prospecting for methane has been devised. The impetus for this method lies in the abundance of CH4 and the growing shortages of other fuels. The method is intended especially to enable identification of subpermafrost locations where significant amounts of methane are trapped in the form of methane gas hydrate (CH4(raised dot)6H2O). It has been estimated by the U.S. Geological Survey that the total CH4 resource in CH4(raised dot) 6H2O exceeds the energy content of all other fossil fuels (oil, coal, and natural gas from non-hydrate sources). Also, CH4(raised dot)6H2O is among the cleanest-burning fuels, and CH4 is the most efficient fuel because the carbon in CH4 is in its most reduced state. The method involves looking for a proxy for methane gas hydrate, by means of the combination of a thermal-analysis submethod and a field submethod that does not involve drilling. The absence of drilling makes this method easier and less expensive, in comparison with prior methods of prospecting for oil and natural gas. The proposed method would include thermoprospecting in combination with one more of the other non-drilling measurement techniques, which could include magneto-telluric sounding and/or a subsurface-electrical-resistivity technique. The method would exploit the fact that the electrical conductivity in the underlying thawed region is greater than that in the overlying permafrost.

  8. Additive methane-mitigating effect between linseed oil and nitrate fed to cattle.

    PubMed

    Guyader, J; Eugène, M; Meunier, B; Doreau, M; Morgavi, D P; Silberberg, M; Rochette, Y; Gerard, C; Loncke, C; Martin, C

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to test the effect of linseed oil and nitrate fed alone or in combination on methane (CH4) emissions and diet digestibility in cows. The experiment was conducted as a 2 × 2 factorial design using 4 multiparous nonlactating Holstein cows (initial BW 656 ± 31 kg). Each experimental period lasted 5 wk, with measures performed in the final 3 wk (wk 3 to 5). Diets given on a DM basis were 1) control (CON; 50% natural grassland hay and 50% concentrate), 2) CON with 4% linseed oil (LIN), 3) CON with 3% calcium nitrate (NIT), and 4) CON with 4% linseed oil plus 3% calcium nitrate (LIN+NIT). Diets were offered twice daily and were formulated to deliver similar amounts (DM basis) of CP (12.2%), starch (25.5%), and NDF (39.5%). Feed offer was restricted to 90% of voluntary intake (12.4 kg DMI/d). Total tract digestibility and N balance were determined from total feces and urine collected separately for 6 d during wk 4. Daily CH4 emissions were quantified using open chambers for 4 d during wk 5. Rumen fermentation and microbial parameters were analyzed from samples taken before and 3 h after the morning feeding. Rumen concentrations of dissolved hydrogen (H2) were measured continuously up to 6 h after feeding using a H2 sensor. Compared with the CON diet linseed oil and nitrate decreased (P < 0.01) CH4 emissions (g/kg DMI) by 17 and 22%, respectively, when fed alone and by 32% when combined. The LIN diet reduced CH4 production throughout the day, increased (P = 0.02) propionate proportion, and decreased (P = 0.03) ruminal protozoa concentration compared with CON diet. The NIT diet strongly reduced CH4 production 3 h after feeding, with a simultaneous increase in rumen dissolved H2 concentration, suggesting that nitrate does not act only as an electron acceptor. As a combined effect, linseed plus nitrate also increased H2 concentrations in the rumen. Diets had no effect (P > 0.05) on total tract digestibility of nutrients, except linseed oil

  9. Methane capture from livestock manure.

    PubMed

    Tauseef, S M; Premalatha, M; Abbasi, Tasneem; Abbasi, S A

    2013-03-15

    It has been estimated that livestock manure contributes about 240 million metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent of methane to the atmosphere and represents one of the biggest anthropogenic sources of methane. Considering that methane is the second biggest contributor to global warming after carbon dioxide, it is imperative that ways and means are developed to capture as much of the anthropogenic methane as possible. There is a major associated advantage of methane capture: its use as a source of energy which is comparable in 'cleanness' to natural gas. The present review dwells upon the traditional ways of methane capture used in India, China, and other developing countries for providing energy to the rural poor. It then reviews the present status of methane capture from livestock manure in developed countries and touches upon the prevalent trends.

  10. Future methane emissions from animals

    SciTech Connect

    Anastasi, C.; Simpson, V.J. )

    1993-04-20

    The authors project future methane emissions from animals to the year 2025. They review the present estimated sources of methane from enteric fermentation in animals. Ruminant animals produce the highest concentrations of methane. Methane is a byproduct of anaerobic breakdown of carbohydrates by microbes in the digestive tract of herbatious animals. In general the methane production depends on the variety of animal, the quality of the feed, and the feeding level. Since cattle, sheep, and buffalo account for roughly 91% of all animal methane emission, they only study these animals in detail. Results suggest a rise in methane production of roughly 1% per year averaged through 2025. Increasing levels are found to originate from developed countries even though the feedstock levels are lower.

  11. Global Methane Biogeochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeburgh, W. S.

    2003-12-01

    . Methane absorbs infrared radiation in the troposphere, as do CO2 and H2O, and is an important greenhouse gas (Lacis et al., 1981; Ramanathan et al., 1985).A number of review articles on atmospheric CH4 have appeared during the last 15 years. Cicerone and Oremland (1988) reviewed evidence for the temporal atmospheric increase, updated source estimates in the global CH4 budget, and placed constraints on the global budget, emphasizing that the total is well constrained, but that the constituent sources may be uncertain by a factor of 2 or more. This paper was part of a special section in Global Biogeochemical Cycles that resulted from a 1987 American Chemical Society Symposium, "Atmospheric Methane: Formation and Fluxes form the Biosphere and Geosphere." Tyler (1991) and Wahlen (1993) emphasized new information on stable isotopes of CH4 and 14CH4, respectively. Several reviews deal with the microbially mediated CH4 oxidation. King (1992) reviewed the ecology of microbial CH4 oxidation, emphasizing the important role of this process in global CH4 dynamics. R. S. Hanson and T. E. Hanson (1996) reviewed the physiology and taxonomy of methylotrophic bacteria, their role in the global carbon cycle, and the ecology of methanotrophic bacteria. Conrad (1996) reviewed the role of soils and soil microbial communities as controllers of CH4 fluxes, as well as those of H2, CO, OCS, N2O, and NO. Two meetings focusing on CH4 biogeochemistry were held in 1991: an NATO Advanced Science Workshop held at Mt. Hood, OR, and the Tenth International Symposium on Environmental Biogeochemistry (ISEB). A dedicated issue of Chemosphere (26(1-4), 1993) contains contributions from the NATO workshop; two additional volumes (Khalil, 1993 and Khalil, 2000) contain a report of the workshop and updates of important topics. Contributions to the ISEB meeting are presented in Oremland (1993). Wuebbles and Hayhoe (2002) reviewed the effects of CH4 on atmospheric chemistry and examined the direct and indirect

  12. Methane cycling. Nonequilibrium clumped isotope signals in microbial methane.

    PubMed

    Wang, David T; Gruen, Danielle S; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Stewart, Lucy C; Holden, James F; Hristov, Alexander N; Pohlman, John W; Morrill, Penny L; Könneke, Martin; Delwiche, Kyle B; Reeves, Eoghan P; Sutcliffe, Chelsea N; Ritter, Daniel J; Seewald, Jeffrey S; McIntosh, Jennifer C; Hemond, Harold F; Kubo, Michael D; Cardace, Dawn; Hoehler, Tori M; Ono, Shuhei

    2015-04-24

    Methane is a key component in the global carbon cycle, with a wide range of anthropogenic and natural sources. Although isotopic compositions of methane have traditionally aided source identification, the abundance of its multiply substituted "clumped" isotopologues (for example, (13)CH3D) has recently emerged as a proxy for determining methane-formation temperatures. However, the effect of biological processes on methane's clumped isotopologue signature is poorly constrained. We show that methanogenesis proceeding at relatively high rates in cattle, surface environments, and laboratory cultures exerts kinetic control on (13)CH3D abundances and results in anomalously elevated formation-temperature estimates. We demonstrate quantitatively that H2 availability accounts for this effect. Clumped methane thermometry can therefore provide constraints on the generation of methane in diverse settings, including continental serpentinization sites and ancient, deep groundwaters. PMID:25745067

  13. Understanding the Recent Methane Budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruhwiler, L.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Masarie, K.

    2010-12-01

    Anthropogenic sources are thought to account for roughly 2/3 of the global atmospheric methane budget, with natural sources making up the other 1/3. Emissions from wetlands are the largest contribution from natural sources while agriculture (rice and ruminants) and waste dominate anthropogenic emissions. Fugitive emissions from fossil fuel extraction are thought to make up about 20% of the global atmospheric methane budget. It is generally recognized that observed inter-annual variability in global network observations can be attributed to natural sources such as wetlands and biomass burning, while longer-term trends likely indicate changes in anthropogenic sources. Exceptions include an abrupt decrease in fossil fuel emissions in the early 1990s associated with political changes in the Former Soviet Union, and long-term trends in emissions from the Arctic due to a warming climate. The growth rate of global average atmospheric methane since the 1980s shows a steady decline until recent years when it started to increase again. Superimposed on these trends are episodes of higher growth rates. The cause of the recent increase is not currently well-understood, although climate-driven increases in wetland emissions likely played an important role, especially in the tropics. Recent increases in anthropogenic emissions, especially from rapidly expanding Asian economies cannot be ruled out. In addition, trends in the photochemical lifetime of methane must also be considered. In this paper we use both traditional data analysis of observations of methane and related species, and a state-of-the-art ensemble data assimilation system (CarbonTracker-CH4) to attribute methane variability and trends to anthropogenic and natural source processes. We pay particular attention to the Arctic, where some recent years have been the warmest on record, and to the tropics and the potential role of ENSO in driving variability of wetland emissions. Finally, we explore whether a signal in

  14. Methane from acetate.

    PubMed

    Ferry, J G

    1992-09-01

    The general features are known for the pathway by which most methane is produced in nature. All acetate-utilizing methanogenic microorganisms contain CODH which catalyzes the cleavage of acetyl-CoA; however, the pathway differs from all other acetate-utilizing anaerobes in that the methyl group is reduced to methane with electrons derived from oxidation of the carbonyl group of acetyl-CoA to CO2. The current understanding of the methanogenic fermentation of acetate provides impressions of nature's novel solutions to problems of methyl transfer, electron transport, and energy conservation. The pathway is now at a level of understanding that will permit productive investigations of these and other interesting questions in the near future. PMID:1512186

  15. Coal Bed Methane Primer

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Arthur; Bruce Langhus; Jon Seekins

    2005-05-25

    During the second half of the 1990's Coal Bed Methane (CBM) production increased dramatically nationwide to represent a significant new source of income and natural gas for many independent and established producers. Matching these soaring production rates during this period was a heightened public awareness of environmental concerns. These concerns left unexplained and under-addressed have created a significant growth in public involvement generating literally thousands of unfocused project comments for various regional NEPA efforts resulting in the delayed development of public and fee lands. The accelerating interest in CBM development coupled to the growth in public involvement has prompted the conceptualization of this project for the development of a CBM Primer. The Primer is designed to serve as a summary document, which introduces and encapsulates information pertinent to the development of Coal Bed Methane (CBM), including focused discussions of coal deposits, methane as a natural formed gas, split mineral estates, development techniques, operational issues, producing methods, applicable regulatory frameworks, land and resource management, mitigation measures, preparation of project plans, data availability, Indian Trust issues and relevant environmental technologies. An important aspect of gaining access to federal, state, tribal, or fee lands involves education of a broad array of stakeholders, including land and mineral owners, regulators, conservationists, tribal governments, special interest groups, and numerous others that could be impacted by the development of coal bed methane. Perhaps the most crucial aspect of successfully developing CBM resources is stakeholder education. Currently, an inconsistent picture of CBM exists. There is a significant lack of understanding on the parts of nearly all stakeholders, including industry, government, special interest groups, and land owners. It is envisioned the Primer would being used by a variety of

  16. Methane flux from coastal salt marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, K. B.; Harriss, R. C.; Sebacher, D. I.

    1985-06-01

    It is thought that biological methanogenesis in natural and agricultural wetlands and enteric fermentation in animals are the dominant sources of global tropospheric methane. It is pointed out that the anaerobic soils and sediments, where methanogenesis occurs, predominate in coastal marine wetlands. Coastal marine wetlands are generally believed to be approximately equal in area to freshwater wetlands. For this reason, coastal marine wetlands may be a globally significant source of atmospheric methane. The present investigation is concerned with the results of a study of direct measurements of methane fluxes to the atmosphere from salt marsh soils and of indirect determinations of fluxes from tidal creek waters. In addition, measurements of methane distributions in coastal marine wetland sediments and water are presented. The results of the investigation suggest that marine wetlands provide only a minor contribution to atmospheric methane on a global scale.

  17. Methane flux from coastal salt marshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, K. B.; Harriss, R. C.; Sebacher, D. I.

    1985-01-01

    It is thought that biological methanogenesis in natural and agricultural wetlands and enteric fermentation in animals are the dominant sources of global tropospheric methane. It is pointed out that the anaerobic soils and sediments, where methanogenesis occurs, predominate in coastal marine wetlands. Coastal marine wetlands are generally believed to be approximately equal in area to freshwater wetlands. For this reason, coastal marine wetlands may be a globally significant source of atmospheric methane. The present investigation is concerned with the results of a study of direct measurements of methane fluxes to the atmosphere from salt marsh soils and of indirect determinations of fluxes from tidal creek waters. In addition, measurements of methane distributions in coastal marine wetland sediments and water are presented. The results of the investigation suggest that marine wetlands provide only a minor contribution to atmospheric methane on a global scale.

  18. Effects of dietary cellulase and xylanase addition on digestion, rumen fermentation and methane emission in growing goats.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qi; Jiao, Jinzhen; Tang, Shaoxun; He, Zhixiong; Zhou, Chuanshe; Han, Xuefeng; Wang, Min; Kang, Jinhe; Odongo, N E; Tan, Zhiliang

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of supplementation of cellulase and xylanase to diets of growing goats to improve nutrient digestibility, utilisation of energy and mitigation of enteric methane emissions. The experiment was conducted in a 5 × 5 Latin square design using five goats with permanent rumen fistulae and five treatments consisted of two levels of cellulase crossed over with two levels of xylanase plus unsupplemented Control. The cellulase (243 U/g) derived from Neocallimastix patriciarum was added at 0.8 and 1.6 g/kg dry matter intake (DMI) and the xylanase (31,457 U/ml) derived from Aspergillus oryzae was fed at 1.4 and 2.2 ml/kg DMI. There were no differences in apparent digestibility of organic matter, neutral detergent fibre, acid detergent fibre and rumen fermentation parameters (i.e. ammonia-nitrogen [N], volatile fatty acids) among all treatments. Dietary cellulase and xylanase addition did not influence energy and N utilisation. But compared to xylanase addition at the higher dose, at the low xylanase dose the retained N, the availability of retained N and digested N were increased (p < 0.01). Moreover, enzyme addition did not affect the enteric methane emission and community diversity of ruminal methanogens. The present results indicated that previous in vitro findings were not confirmed in ruminant trials.

  19. Genome-Centric Analysis of Microbial Populations Enriched by Hydraulic Fracture Fluid Additives in a Coal Bed Methane Production Well.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Steven J; Evans, Paul N; Parks, Donovan H; Golding, Suzanne D; Tyson, Gene W

    2016-01-01

    Coal bed methane (CBM) is generated primarily through the microbial degradation of coal. Despite a limited understanding of the microorganisms responsible for this process, there is significant interest in developing methods to stimulate additional methane production from CBM wells. Physical techniques including hydraulic fracture stimulation are commonly applied to CBM wells, however the effects of specific additives contained in hydraulic fracture fluids on native CBM microbial communities are poorly understood. Here, metagenomic sequencing was applied to the formation waters of a hydraulically fractured and several non-fractured CBM production wells to determine the effect of this stimulation technique on the in-situ microbial community. The hydraulically fractured well was dominated by two microbial populations belonging to the class Phycisphaerae (within phylum Planctomycetes) and candidate phylum Aminicenantes. Populations from these phyla were absent or present at extremely low abundance in non-fractured CBM wells. Detailed metabolic reconstruction of near-complete genomes from these populations showed that their high relative abundance in the hydraulically fractured CBM well could be explained by the introduction of additional carbon sources, electron acceptors, and biocides contained in the hydraulic fracture fluid. PMID:27375557

  20. Genome-Centric Analysis of Microbial Populations Enriched by Hydraulic Fracture Fluid Additives in a Coal Bed Methane Production Well.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Steven J; Evans, Paul N; Parks, Donovan H; Golding, Suzanne D; Tyson, Gene W

    2016-01-01

    Coal bed methane (CBM) is generated primarily through the microbial degradation of coal. Despite a limited understanding of the microorganisms responsible for this process, there is significant interest in developing methods to stimulate additional methane production from CBM wells. Physical techniques including hydraulic fracture stimulation are commonly applied to CBM wells, however the effects of specific additives contained in hydraulic fracture fluids on native CBM microbial communities are poorly understood. Here, metagenomic sequencing was applied to the formation waters of a hydraulically fractured and several non-fractured CBM production wells to determine the effect of this stimulation technique on the in-situ microbial community. The hydraulically fractured well was dominated by two microbial populations belonging to the class Phycisphaerae (within phylum Planctomycetes) and candidate phylum Aminicenantes. Populations from these phyla were absent or present at extremely low abundance in non-fractured CBM wells. Detailed metabolic reconstruction of near-complete genomes from these populations showed that their high relative abundance in the hydraulically fractured CBM well could be explained by the introduction of additional carbon sources, electron acceptors, and biocides contained in the hydraulic fracture fluid.

  1. Genome-Centric Analysis of Microbial Populations Enriched by Hydraulic Fracture Fluid Additives in a Coal Bed Methane Production Well

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Steven J.; Evans, Paul N.; Parks, Donovan H.; Golding, Suzanne D.; Tyson, Gene W.

    2016-01-01

    Coal bed methane (CBM) is generated primarily through the microbial degradation of coal. Despite a limited understanding of the microorganisms responsible for this process, there is significant interest in developing methods to stimulate additional methane production from CBM wells. Physical techniques including hydraulic fracture stimulation are commonly applied to CBM wells, however the effects of specific additives contained in hydraulic fracture fluids on native CBM microbial communities are poorly understood. Here, metagenomic sequencing was applied to the formation waters of a hydraulically fractured and several non-fractured CBM production wells to determine the effect of this stimulation technique on the in-situ microbial community. The hydraulically fractured well was dominated by two microbial populations belonging to the class Phycisphaerae (within phylum Planctomycetes) and candidate phylum Aminicenantes. Populations from these phyla were absent or present at extremely low abundance in non-fractured CBM wells. Detailed metabolic reconstruction of near-complete genomes from these populations showed that their high relative abundance in the hydraulically fractured CBM well could be explained by the introduction of additional carbon sources, electron acceptors, and biocides contained in the hydraulic fracture fluid. PMID:27375557

  2. Methane ocean on Titan?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    There was an impressive list of names on a recent scientific communication that argues for the existence on Titan of an ocean of liquid methane (CH4) perhaps several hundred meters deep. C. Sagan and S. Dermott with helpful comments by S. Oter, S. Ostro, S. Peale, C. Yoder, W. Thompson, S. Squyres, G. Pettengill, P. Gierasch, and B. Khare speculate that such a methanic ocean, with its Saturnian tides and its tholinian floor, should exist all over Titan's surface; it should unless, they conclude, there is the ‘distracting coincidence [that] … the position of the surface of Titan [is] … near the liquidus in the CH4phase diagram [and, consequently, there is] …almost no methane ocean at all’ (Nature, 300, 731, 1982).We know very little about Titan and its surface; the way of checking into Sagan and Dermott's ideas appears to rest on the interpretation of radar reflectivity data. Preliminary attempts to obtain radar data were made in 1979 with the 305-m Arecibo telescope, but only broad limits resulted. The next opportunity for a measurement at Arecibo comes in the 1990's. Of course, the ideal circumstance would be to send spacecraft equipped with a radar reflectometer for a Titan flyby.

  3. Trimethylamine and Organic Matter Additions Reverse Substrate Limitation Effects on the δ13C Values of Methane Produced in Hypersaline Microbial Mats

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Brooke E.; Beaudoin, Claire S.; Detweiler, Angela M.; Bebout, Brad M.

    2014-01-01

    Methane production has been observed in a number of hypersaline environments, and it is generally thought that this methane is produced through the use of noncompetitive substrates, such as the methylamines, dimethylsulfide and methanol. Stable isotope measurements of the produced methane have also suggested that the methanogens are operating under conditions of substrate limitation. Here, substrate limitation in gypsum-hosted endoevaporite and soft-mat hypersaline environments was investigated by the addition of trimethylamine, a noncompetitive substrate for methanogenesis, and dried microbial mat, a source of natural organic matter. The δ13C values of the methane produced after amendments were compared to those in unamended control vials. At all hypersaline sites investigated, the δ13C values of the methane produced in the amended vials were statistically lower (by 10 to 71‰) than the unamended controls, supporting the hypothesis of substrate limitation at these sites. When substrates were added to the incubation vials, the methanogens within the vials fractionated carbon isotopes to a greater degree, resulting in the production of more 13C-depleted methane. Trimethylamine-amended samples produced lower methane δ13C values than the mat-amended samples. This difference in the δ13C values between the two types of amendments could be due to differences in isotope fractionation associated with the dominant methane production pathway (or substrate used) within the vials, with trimethylamine being the main substrate used in the trimethylamine-amended vials. It is hypothesized that increased natural organic matter in the mat-amended vials would increase fermentation rates, leading to higher H2 concentrations and increased CO2/H2 methanogenesis. PMID:25239903

  4. The Effects of Trimethylamine and Organic Matter Additions on the Stable Carbon Isotopic Composition of Methane Produced in Hypersaline Microbial Mat Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, C. A.; Nicholson, B. E.; Beaudoin, C. S.; Detweiler, A. M.; Bebout, B.

    2014-12-01

    Methane production has been observed in a number of hypersaline environments, and it is generally thought that this methane is produced through the use of non-competitive substrates, such as the methylamines, methanol and dimethylsulfide. The stable carbon isotopic composition of the produced methane has suggested that the methanogens are operating under conditions of substrate limitation. We investigated substrate limitation in gypsum-hosted endoevaporite and soft mat hypersaline environments by the additions of trimethylamine, a non-competitive substrate for methanogenesis, and dried microbial mat, a source of natural organic matter. The δ13C values of the methane produced after amendments were compared to those in unamended control vials. At all hypersaline sites investigated, the δ13C values of the methane produced in the amended vials were statistically lower (by 10 to 71 ‰) than the unamended controls, supporting the hypothesis of substrate limitation at these sites. When substrates were added to the incubation vials, the methanogens within the vials fractionated carbon isotopes to a greater degree, resulting in the production of more 13C-depleted methane. Trimethylamine-amended samples produced lower methane δ13C values than the mat-amended samples. This difference in the δ13C values between the two types of amendments could be due to differences in isotope fractionation associated with the dominant methane production pathway (or substrate used) within the vials, with trimethylamine being the main substrate used in the trimethylamine-amended vials. We hypothesize that increased natural organic matter in the mat-amended vials would increase fermentation rates, leading to higher H2 concentrations and increased CO2/H2 methanogenesis.

  5. Optimization of the integrated citric acid-methane fermentation process by air stripping and glucoamylase addition.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Chen, Yang-Qiu; Zhang, Hong-Jian; Wang, Ke; Tang, Lei; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Chen, Xu-Sheng; Mao, Zhong-Gui

    2015-03-01

    To solve the problem of extraction wastewater in citric acid industry, an integrated citric acid-methane fermentation process was proposed. In the integrated process, extraction wastewater was treated by mesophilic anaerobic digestion and then reused to make mash for the next batch of citric acid fermentation. In this study, an Aspergillus niger mutant strain exhibiting resistance to high metal ions concentration was used to eliminate the inhibition of 200 mg/L Na(+) and 300 mg/L K(+) in anaerobic digestion effluent (ADE) and citric acid production increased by 25.0 %. Air stripping was used to remove ammonium, alkalinity, and part of metal ions in ADE before making mash. In consequence, citric acid production was significantly improved but still lower by 6.1 % than the control. Results indicated that metal ions in ADE synergistically inhibited the activity of glucoamylase, thus reducing citric acid production. When 130 U/g glucoamylase was added before fermentation, citric acid production was 141.5 g/L, which was even higher than the control (140.4 g/L). This process could completely eliminate extraction wastewater discharge and reduce water resource consumption.

  6. Investigation of effect of particle size and rumen fluid addition on specific methane yields of high lignocellulose grass silage.

    PubMed

    Wall, D M; Straccialini, B; Allen, E; Nolan, P; Herrmann, C; O'Kiely, P; Murphy, J D

    2015-09-01

    This work examines the digestion of advanced growth stage grass silage. Two variables were investigated: particle size (greater than 3 cm and less than 1cm) and rumen fluid addition. Batch studies indicated particle size and rumen fluid addition had little effect on specific methane yields (SMYs). In continuous digestion of 3 cm silage the SMY was 342 and 343 L CH4 kg(-1)VS, respectively, with and without rumen fluid addition. However, digester operation was significantly affected through silage floating on the liquor surface and its entanglement in the mixing system. Digestion of 1cm silage with no rumen fluid addition struggled; volatile fatty acid concentrations rose and SMYs dropped. The best case was 1cm silage with rumen fluid addition, offering higher SMYs of 371 L CH4 kg(-1)VS and stable operation throughout. Thus, physical and biological treatments benefited continuous digestion of high fibre grass silage.

  7. Methane/nitrogen separation process

    DOEpatents

    Baker, R.W.; Lokhandwala, K.A.; Pinnau, I.; Segelke, S.

    1997-09-23

    A membrane separation process is described for treating a gas stream containing methane and nitrogen, for example, natural gas. The separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and rejecting nitrogen. The authors have found that the process is able to meet natural gas pipeline specifications for nitrogen, with acceptably small methane loss, so long as the membrane can exhibit a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 4, 5 or more. This selectivity can be achieved with some rubbery and super-glassy membranes at low temperatures. The process can also be used for separating ethylene from nitrogen. 11 figs.

  8. Methane/nitrogen separation process

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Richard W.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.; Pinnau, Ingo; Segelke, Scott

    1997-01-01

    A membrane separation process for treating a gas stream containing methane and nitrogen, for example, natural gas. The separation process works by preferentially permeating methane and rejecting nitrogen. We have found that the process is able to meet natural gas pipeline specifications for nitrogen, with acceptably small methane loss, so long as the membrane can exhibit a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 4, 5 or more. This selectivity can be achieved with some rubbery and super-glassy membranes at low temperatures. The process can also be used for separating ethylene from nitrogen.

  9. On methane pyrolysis special applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toncu, D. C.; Toncu, G.; Soleimani, S.

    2015-11-01

    Methane pyrolysis represents one of the most important processes in industrial use, with applications rising from the chemical and petrochemical industry, combustion, materials and protective coatings. Despite the intense research, experimental data lack kinetic aspects, and the thermodynamics involved often leads to inaccurate results when applied to various systems. Carrying out a comparative analysis of several available data on methane pyrolysis, the paper aims to study the phenomenon of methane pyrolysis under different environments (combustion and plasma), concluding on the most possible reaction pathways involved in many of its applications. Computer simulation using different database underlines the conclusion, helping to the understanding of methane pyrolysis importance in future technologies.

  10. Turbulent burning rates of methane and methane-hydrogen mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Fairweather, M.; Ormsby, M.P.; Sheppard, C.G.W.; Woolley, R.

    2009-04-15

    Methane and methane-hydrogen (10%, 20% and 50% hydrogen by volume) mixtures have been ignited in a fan stirred bomb in turbulence and filmed using high speed cine schlieren imaging. Measurements were performed at 0.1 MPa (absolute) and 360 K. A turbulent burning velocity was determined for a range of turbulence velocities and equivalence ratios. Experimental laminar burning velocities and Markstein numbers were also derived. For all fuels the turbulent burning velocity increased with turbulence velocity. The addition of hydrogen generally resulted in increased turbulent and laminar burning velocity and decreased Markstein number. Those flames that were less sensitive to stretch (lower Markstein number) burned faster under turbulent conditions, especially as the turbulence levels were increased, compared to stretch-sensitive (high Markstein number) flames. (author)

  11. Redefining the isotopic boundaries of biogenic methane: Methane from endoevaporites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tazaz, Amanda M.; Bebout, Brad M.; Kelley, Cheryl A.; Poole, Jennifer; Chanton, Jeffrey P.

    2013-06-01

    The recent reports of methane in the atmosphere of Mars, as well as the findings of hypersaline paleoenvironments on that planet, have underscored the need to evaluate the importance of biological (as opposed to geological) trace gas production and consumption, particularly in hypersaline environments. Methane in the atmosphere of Mars may be an indication of extant life, but it may also be a consequence of geologic activity and/or the thermal alteration of ancient organic matter. On Earth these methane sources can be distinguished using stable isotopic analyses and the ratio of methane (C1) to C2 and C3 alkanes present in the gas source (C1/(C2 + C3)). We report here that methane produced in hypersaline environments on Earth has an isotopic composition and alkane content outside the values presently considered to indicate a biogenic origin. Methane-rich bubbles released from sub-aqueous substrates contained δ13CCH4 and δ2HCH4 values ranging from -65‰ to -35‰ and -350‰ to -140‰ respectively. Higher salinity endoevaporites yielded what would be considered non-biogenic methane based upon stable isotopic and alkane content, however incubation of crustal and algal mat samples resulted in methane production with similar isotopic values. Radiocarbon analysis indicated that the production of the methane was from recently fixed carbon. An extension of the isotopic boundaries of biogenic methane is necessary in order to avoid the possibility of false negatives returned from measurements of methane on Mars and other planetary bodies.

  12. Biochemically enhanced methane production from coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opara, Aleksandra

    For many years, biogas was connected mostly with the organic matter decomposition in shallow sediments (e.g., wetlands, landfill gas, etc.). Recently, it has been realized that biogenic methane production is ongoing in many hydrocarbon reservoirs. This research examined microbial methane and carbon dioxide generation from coal. As original contributions methane production from various coal materials was examined in classical and electro-biochemical bench-scale reactors using unique, developed facultative microbial consortia that generate methane under anaerobic conditions. Facultative methanogenic populations are important as all known methanogens are strict anaerobes and their application outside laboratory would be problematic. Additional testing examined the influence of environmental conditions, such as pH, salinity, and nutrient amendments on methane and carbon dioxide generation. In 44-day ex-situ bench-scale batch bioreactor tests, up to 300,000 and 250,000 ppm methane was generated from bituminous coal and bituminous coal waste respectively, a significant improvement over 20-40 ppm methane generated from control samples. Chemical degradation of complex hydrocarbons using environmentally benign reagents, prior to microbial biodegradation and methanogenesis, resulted in dissolution of up to 5% bituminous coal and bituminous coal waste and up to 25% lignite in samples tested. Research results confirm that coal waste may be a significant underutilized resource that could be converted to useful fuel. Rapid acidification of lignite samples resulted in low pH (below 4.0), regardless of chemical pretreatment applied, and did not generate significant methane amounts. These results confirmed the importance of monitoring and adjusting in situ and ex situ environmental conditions during methane production. A patented Electro-Biochemical Reactor technology was used to supply electrons and electron acceptor environments, but appeared to influence methane generation in a

  13. Synthesis gas production with an adjustable H{sub 2}/CO ratio through the coal gasification process: effects of coal ranks and methane addition

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Cao; Zhengyang Gao; Jing Jin; Hongchang Zhou; Marten Cohron; Houying Zhao; Hongying Liu; Weiping Pan

    2008-05-15

    Direct production of synthesis gas using coal as a cheap feedstock is attractive but challenging due to its low H{sub 2}/CO ratio of generated synthesis gas. Three typical U.S. coals of different ranks were tested in a 2.5 in. coal gasifier to investigate their gasification reactivity and adjustability on H{sub 2}/CO ratio of generated synthesis gas with or without the addition of methane. Tests indicated that lower-rank coals (lignite and sub-bituminous) have higher gasification reactivity than bituminous coals. The coal gasification reactivity is correlated to its synthesis-gas yield and the total percentage of H{sub 2} and CO in the synthesis gas, but not to the H{sub 2}/CO ratio. The H{sub 2}/CO ratio of coal gasification was found to be correlated to the rank of coals, especially the H/C ratio of coals. Methane addition into the dense phase of the pyrolysis and gasification zone of the cogasification reactor could make the best use of methane in adjusting the H{sub 2}/CO ratio of the generated synthesis gas. The maximum methane conversion efficiency, which was likely correlated to its gasification reactivity, could be achieved by 70% on average for all tested coals. The actual catalytic effect of generated coal chars on methane conversion seemed coal-dependent. The coal-gasification process benefits from methane addition and subsequent conversion on the adjustment of the H{sub 2}/CO ratio of synthesis gas. The methane conversion process benefits from the use of coal chars due to their catalytic effects. This implies that there were likely synergistic effects on both. 25 refs., 3 figs., 3

  14. Consumption of atmospheric methane by tundra soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, S. C.; Reeburgh, W. S.

    1990-01-01

    The results of field and laboratory experiments on methane consumption by tundra soils are reported. For methane concentrations ranging from below to well above ambient, moist soils are found to consume methane rapidly; in nonwaterlogged soils, equilibration with atmospheric methane is fast relative to microbial oxidation. It is concluded that lowering of the water table in tundra as a resulting from a warmer, drier climate will decrease methane fluxes and could cause these areas to provide negative feedback for atmospheric methane.

  15. Methane emissions from canopy wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinson, G. O.; Conrad, R.

    2012-12-01

    Ground wetlands are the main natural source of methane but they fail to explain the observed amounts of methane over tropical forests. Bromeliad tanks are discrete habitats for aquatic organisms and up to several thousand of bromeliad individuals per hectare of tropical forest create a unique canopy wetland ecosystem in neotropical forests. Recently, we have discovered that canopy wetlands inhabit methanogenic archaea, emit substantial amounts of methane and may help to explain the high amounts of methane over neotropical forests. However, the pathway of methane formation and potential methane production in canopy wetlands of different tropical forest ecosystems have not yet been studied. In this study, we investigated the stable carbon isotope fractionation, methanogenic pathway and potential methane production of bromeliad tanks along an elevation gradient in neotropical forests for the first time. We sampled the bromeliad tank-substrate of 3 tank bromeliads per functional type and elevation (1000 m, 2000 m and 3000 m above the sea level). We distinguished three functional types of tank bromeliads, based on plant architecture and ecological niche preference. Functional type I-tank bromeliads are concentrated in the understory and on the ground. Functional type II and type III are concentrated in the mid and overstory. We conducted tank-substrate incubation experiments and measured CH4, CO2, 13CH4 and 13CO2 at regular time intervals during the incubation period. The methane production potential of bromeliad tanks correlated positively with tank-substrate carbon concentration and decreased with increasing canopy height and increasing elevation. The dominant pathway of methane formation in bromeliad tanks was hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis (>50%) and this dominance increased with increasing canopy height and increasing elevation. Our results provide novel insights into the pathway of methane formation in neotropical canopy wetlands and suggest that canopy height is

  16. Dielectric Barrier Discharge Methane Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chong; Fridman, Alexander; Rabinovich, Alexander; Dobrynin, Danil

    2015-09-01

    With the large amount of nature gas discovery every year, there is an increasing interest on modification of methane. The fact that methane is gaseous makes it less economic and efficient than liquid fuel. Here we propose a new way of converting methane from gas phase to liquid phase. Dielectric barrier discharge is used to treat methane and nitrogen mixture bubbles inside of liquid fuel. Nitrogen is here to help activate methane into an excited state, then it is possible for the excited molecules to react with other liquid hydrocarbon. Gaseous methane is converted in to liquid phase when excited methane replace a hydrogen and add onto the carbon chain. In this study some preliminary experiments is done to verify this hypothesis. There is equivalent weight increases with methane and nitrogen mixture discharging in diesel when compare to only nitrogen discharging in diesel. The same experiment have also been done with gas mixture discharged in 1-methylnaphthalene. And FTIR analysis of the after treatment hydrocarbon liquid all indicates that there is an increasing in C-H bond concentration and a decreasing in phenyl ring structure.

  17. A Methane Balloon Inflation Chamber

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czerwinski, Curtis J.; Cordes, Tanya J.; Franek, Joe

    2005-01-01

    The various equipments, procedure and hazards in constructing the device for inflating a methane balloon using a standard methane outlet in a laboratory are described. This device is fast, safe, inexpensive, and easy to use as compared to a hydrogen gas cylinder for inflating balloons.

  18. Constraining Methane Flux Estimates Using Atmospheric Observations of Methane and 1^3C in Methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikaloff Fletcher, S. E.; Tans, P. P.; Miller, J. B.; Bruhwiler, L. M.

    2002-12-01

    Understanding the budget of methane is crucial to predicting climate change and managing earth's carbon reservoirs. Methane is responsible for approximately 15% of the anthropogenic greenhouse forcing and has a large impact on the oxidative capacity of Earth's atmosphere due to its reaction with hydroxyl radical. At present, many of the sources and sinks of methane are poorly understood due in part to the large spatial and temporal variability of the methane flux. Model simulations of methane mixing ratios using most process-based source estimates typically over-predict the latitudinal gradient of atmospheric methane relative to the observations; however, the specific source processes responsible for this discrepancy have not been identified definitively. The aim of this work is to use the isotopic signatures of the sources to attribute these discrepancies to a source process or group of source processes and create global and regional budget estimates that are in agreement with both the atmospheric observations of methane and 1^3C in methane. To this end, observations of isotopic ratios of 1^3C in methane and isotopic signatures of methane source processes are used in conjunction with an inverse model of the methane budget. Inverse modeling is a top-down approach which uses observations of trace gases in the atmosphere, an estimate of the spatial pattern of trace gas fluxes, and a model of atmospheric transport to estimate the sources and sinks. The atmospheric transport was represented by the TM3 three-dimensional transport model. The GLOBALVIEW 2001 methane observations were used along with flask measurements of 1^3C in methane at six of the CMDL-NOAA stations by INSTAAR. Initial results imply interesting differences from previous methane budget estimates. For example, the 1^3C isotope observations in methane call for an increase in southern hemisphere sources with a bacterial isotopic signature such as wetlands, rice paddies, termites, and ruminant animals. The

  19. Quantifying the flux and fate of methane into the Hudson Canyon at the edge of methane clathrate hydrate stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, J. D.; Leonte, M.; Garcia-Tigreros Kodovska, F.; Chan, E. W.; Valentine, D. L.; Kellermann, M. Y.; Arrington, E. C.; Navarrete, L. C.; Weinstein, A.; Chepigin, A.; Weber, T.; Ruppel, C. D.; Scranton, M. I.

    2015-12-01

    Methane seeps were investigated in the Hudson Canyon, along the northern US Atlantic Margin on the R/V Endeavor in July 2014. These seeps are located along the upper feather-edge of the methane clathrate hydrate stability zone. Water column samples were collected guided by the acoustic identification of bubble streams in a 32 km2 region. This presentation details the measurements of dissolved methane concentration, natural stable isotopes, potential methane oxidation rates, and current velocity which were used in chemical and isotopic models to quantify (1) the total emission of methane to the water column in this region and (2) the extent of aerobic methane oxidation. In addition, the timing, efficiency, and kinetics of aerobic methane oxidation were investigated with mesocosm incubations of seawater in a unique experimental design that enabled high temporal resolution data acquisition. Finally, the ultimate fate of methane carbon was assessed with high precision measurements of pH.

  20. Oxygen-Methane Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickens, Tim

    2012-01-01

    An oxygen-methane thruster was conceived with integrated igniter/injector capable of nominal operation on either gaseous or liquid propellants. The thruster was designed to develop 100 lbf (approximately 445 N) thrust at vacuum conditions and use oxygen and methane as propellants. This continued development included refining the design of the thruster to minimize part count and manufacturing difficulties/cost, refining the modeling tools and capabilities that support system design and analysis, demonstrating the performance of the igniter and full thruster assembly with both gaseous and liquid propellants, and acquiring data from this testing in order to verify the design and operational parameters of the thruster. Thruster testing was conducted with gaseous propellants used for the igniter and thruster. The thruster was demonstrated to work with all types of propellant conditions, and provided the desired performance. Both the thruster and igniter were tested, as well as gaseous propellants, and found to provide the desired performance using the various propellant conditions. The engine also served as an injector testbed for MSFC-designed refractory combustion chambers made of rhenium.

  1. Making methane visible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gålfalk, Magnus; Olofsson, Göran; Crill, Patrick; Bastviken, David

    2016-04-01

    Methane (CH4) is one of the most important greenhouse gases, and an important energy carrier in biogas and natural gas. Its large scale emission patterns have been unpredictable and the source and sink distributions are poorly constrained. Remote assessment of CH4 with high sensitivity at m2 spatial resolution would allow detailed mapping of near ground distribution and anthropogenic sources and sinks in landscapes but has hitherto not been possible. Here we show that CH4 gradients can be imaged on methane imaging will include a lake, barn, sewage sludge deposit, waste incineration plant, and controlled gas releases. We will also present successful simultaneous imaging of another important greenhouse gas, nitrous oxide, with the same instrument.

  2. Search for interstellar methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knacke, R. F.; Kim, Y. H.; Noll, K. S.; Geballe, T. R.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers searched for interstellar methane in the spectra of infrared sources embedded in molecular clouds. New observations of several lines of the P and R branches of the nu 3 band of CH4 near 3.3 microns give column densities in the range N less than 1(-2) times 10 to the minus 16th power cm(-2). Resulting abundance ratios are (CH4)/(CO) less than 3.3 times 10 to the minus 2nd power toward GL961 in NGC 2244 and less than 2.4 times 10 to the minus 3rd power toward GL989 in the NGC 2264 molecular cloud. The limits, and those determined in earlier observations of BN in Orion and GL490, suggest that there is little methane in molecular clouds. The result agrees with predictions of chemical models. Exceptions could occur in clouds where oxygen may be depleted, for example by H2O freezing on grains. The present observations probably did not sample such regions.

  3. Methane Pyrolysis and Disposing Off Resulting Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, P. K.; Rapp, D.; Rahotgi, N. K.

    1999-01-01

    Sabatier/Electrolysis (S/E) is a leading process for producing methane and oxygen for application to Mars ISPP. One significant problem with this process is that it produces an excess of methane for combustion with the amount of oxygen that is produced. Therefore, one must discard roughly half of the methane to obtain the proper stoichiometric methane/oxygen mixture for ascent from Mars. This is a waste of hydrogen, which must be brought from Earth and is difficult to transport to Mars and store on Mars. To reduce the problem of transporting hydrogen to Mars, the S/E process can be augmented by another process which reduces overall hydrogen requirement. Three conceptual approaches for doing this are (i) recover hydrogen from the excess methane produced by the S/E process, (ii) convert the methane to a higher hydrocarbon or other organic with a lower H/C ratio than methane, and (iii) use a separate process (such as zirconia or reverse water gas shift reaction) to produce additional oxygen, thus utilizing all the methane produced by the Sabatier process. We report our results here on recovering hydrogen from the excess methane using pyrolysis of methane. Pyrolysis has the advantage that it produces almost pure hydrogen, and any unreacted methane can pass through the S/E process reactor. It has the disadvantage that disposing of the carbon produced by pyrolysis presents difficulties. The goals of a research program on recovery of hydrogen from methane are (in descending priority order): 1) Study the kinetics of pyrolysis to arrive at a pyrolysis reactor design that produces high yields in a confined volume at the lowest possible operating temperature; 2) Study the kinetics of carbon burnoff to determine whether high yields can be obtained in a confined volume at acceptable operating temperatures; and 3) Investigate catalytic techniques for depositing carbon as a fine soot which can be physically separated from the reactor. In the JPL program, we have made significant

  4. Hydroxylation of methane through component interactions in soluble methane monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Jae

    2016-04-01

    Methane hydroxylation through methane monooxygenases (MMOs) is a key aspect due to their control of the carbon cycle in the ecology system and recent applications of methane gas in the field of bioenergy and bioremediation. Methanotropic bacteria perform a specific microbial conversion from methane, one of the most stable carbon compounds, to methanol through elaborate mechanisms. MMOs express particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) in most strains and soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) under copper-limited conditions. The mechanisms of MMO have been widely studied from sMMO belonging to the bacterial multicomponent monooxygenase (BMM) superfamily. This enzyme has diiron active sites where different types of hydrocarbons are oxidized through orchestrated hydroxylase, regulatory and reductase components for precise control of hydrocarbons, oxygen, protons, and electrons. Recent advances in biophysical studies, including structural and enzymatic achievements for sMMO, have explained component interactions, substrate pathways, and intermediates of sMMO. In this account, oxidation of methane in sMMO is discussed with recent progress that is critical for understanding the microbial applications of C-H activation in one-carbon substrates.

  5. Methane oxidation coupled to oxygenic photosynthesis in anoxic waters

    PubMed Central

    Milucka, Jana; Kirf, Mathias; Lu, Lu; Krupke, Andreas; Lam, Phyllis; Littmann, Sten; Kuypers, Marcel MM; Schubert, Carsten J

    2015-01-01

    Freshwater lakes represent large methane sources that, in contrast to the Ocean, significantly contribute to non-anthropogenic methane emissions to the atmosphere. Particularly mixed lakes are major methane emitters, while permanently and seasonally stratified lakes with anoxic bottom waters are often characterized by strongly reduced methane emissions. The causes for this reduced methane flux from anoxic lake waters are not fully understood. Here we identified the microorganisms and processes responsible for the near complete consumption of methane in the anoxic waters of a permanently stratified lake, Lago di Cadagno. Interestingly, known anaerobic methanotrophs could not be detected in these waters. Instead, we found abundant gamma-proteobacterial aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria active in the anoxic waters. In vitro incubations revealed that, among all the tested potential electron acceptors, only the addition of oxygen enhanced the rates of methane oxidation. An equally pronounced stimulation was also observed when the anoxic water samples were incubated in the light. Our combined results from molecular, biogeochemical and single-cell analyses indicate that methane removal at the anoxic chemocline of Lago di Cadagno is due to true aerobic oxidation of methane fuelled by in situ oxygen production by photosynthetic algae. A similar mechanism could be active in seasonally stratified lakes and marine basins such as the Black Sea, where light penetrates to the anoxic chemocline. Given the widespread occurrence of seasonally stratified anoxic lakes, aerobic methane oxidation coupled to oxygenic photosynthesis might have an important but so far neglected role in methane emissions from lakes. PMID:25679533

  6. Methane oxidation coupled to oxygenic photosynthesis in anoxic waters.

    PubMed

    Milucka, Jana; Kirf, Mathias; Lu, Lu; Krupke, Andreas; Lam, Phyllis; Littmann, Sten; Kuypers, Marcel M M; Schubert, Carsten J

    2015-09-01

    Freshwater lakes represent large methane sources that, in contrast to the Ocean, significantly contribute to non-anthropogenic methane emissions to the atmosphere. Particularly mixed lakes are major methane emitters, while permanently and seasonally stratified lakes with anoxic bottom waters are often characterized by strongly reduced methane emissions. The causes for this reduced methane flux from anoxic lake waters are not fully understood. Here we identified the microorganisms and processes responsible for the near complete consumption of methane in the anoxic waters of a permanently stratified lake, Lago di Cadagno. Interestingly, known anaerobic methanotrophs could not be detected in these waters. Instead, we found abundant gamma-proteobacterial aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria active in the anoxic waters. In vitro incubations revealed that, among all the tested potential electron acceptors, only the addition of oxygen enhanced the rates of methane oxidation. An equally pronounced stimulation was also observed when the anoxic water samples were incubated in the light. Our combined results from molecular, biogeochemical and single-cell analyses indicate that methane removal at the anoxic chemocline of Lago di Cadagno is due to true aerobic oxidation of methane fuelled by in situ oxygen production by photosynthetic algae. A similar mechanism could be active in seasonally stratified lakes and marine basins such as the Black Sea, where light penetrates to the anoxic chemocline. Given the widespread occurrence of seasonally stratified anoxic lakes, aerobic methane oxidation coupled to oxygenic photosynthesis might have an important but so far neglected role in methane emissions from lakes.

  7. Improving methane production in cow dung and corn straw co-fermentation systems via enhanced degradation of cellulose by cabbage addition.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenyang; Chen, Yong; Faisal, Shah; Khan, Aman; Chen, Zhengjun; Ling, Zhenmin; Liu, Pu; Li, Xiangkai

    2016-09-19

    The effects of cabbage waste (CW) addition on methane production in cow dung and corn straw co-fermentation systems were investigated. Four experimental groups, each containing 55 g of substrate, were set up as follows: 100% cow dung (C); 36% cabbage and 64% cow dung (CC); 36% straw and 64% cow dung (SC); and 18% cabbage, 18% straw, and 64% cow dung (CSC). After seven days of fermentation, the maximum methane yield was 134 mL in the CSC group, which was 2.81-fold, 1.78-fold, and 1340-fold higher than that obtained in the CC, SC, and C groups, respectively. CW treatment of the CSC group enhanced cellulase activity and enriched culturable cellulose-degrading bacterial strains. Miseq sequencing data revealed that the predominant phylum in the CSC group was Bacteroidetes, which contains most of the cellulose-degrading bacteria. Our results suggested that CW treatment elevated cellulose degradation and promoted methane production.

  8. Archaebacterial Fuel Production: Methane from Biomass.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennox, John E.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Discusses microbial production of methane from biomass. Topics include methogens (bacteria producing methane), ecology of methanogenesis, methanogenesis in ruminant/nonruminant and other environments, role of methanogenesis in nature, and methane production in sewage treatment plants. Also discusses construction of methane digesters (and related…

  9. 75 FR 9886 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Methane... meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee. Federal... Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee is to provide advice on potential applications of methane hydrate...

  10. Oceanic Methane Concentrations in Three Mexican Regions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The atmospheric concentration of methane has increased significantly over the last several decades. Methane is an important greenhouse gas, and it is important to better quantify methane sources and sinks. Dissolved methane in the ocean is produced by biological and hydrothermal ...

  11. Tetraperchlorate of methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schack, C. J.

    1972-01-01

    The preparation of the tetraperchlorate of methane (TPM) was attempted. Displacement of halogen from carbon tetrahalides was accomplished with either CCl4 or CBr4 using the halogen perchlorates, ClOClO3, and BOClO3. Although the displacement process was successful, the generated carbon perchlorate intermediates were not isolated. Instead, these species decomposed to COCl2, CO2, and Cl2O7. The vigorous displacement reaction that often occurred required moderation. Fluorocarbon solvents and chlorine perchlorate were successfully tested for compatibility, permitting their use in these synthetic reactions. While the sought for moderating effect was obtained, the net result of the displacement of halogen from CX sub 4 substrates was the same as before. Thus only CO2, COCl2, and Cl2O7 were isolated.

  12. (Methane digester). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Waybright, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of the grant was to construct and operate a methane digester for dairy manure involving the latest state-of-the-art technics. The first step taken was to empty out the existing digester to evaluate its performance and to gain ideas of how to build the next digester so it would operate more efficiently. Next, the design criteria was set up in order to eliminate some problems involved with the first digester and also new ideas as to how to build the next one without a protective building and testing simplified construction technics. After this the digester construction was started with the completion date in late January. The digester was then filled and operated at different temperatures attempting to achieve the optimum operating range.

  13. Large methane reserves beneath Antarctica?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadham, J. L.; Tulaczyk, S. M.; Stibal, M.; Arndt, S.; Telling, J.; Lis, G.; Lawson, E. C.; Dubnick, A.; Tranter, M.; Sharp, M. J.; Anesio, A.

    2010-12-01

    Once thought to be devoid of life, the Antarctic Ice Sheet is now known to be a dynamic reservoir of metabolically active microbial cells and organic carbon. Its potential to support the degradation of organic carbon to methane, however, has not yet been evaluated. Large marine sedimentary basins beneath the ice sheet (estimated to cover up to 50% by area and contain sedimentary sequences up to 3 km thick) remain thawed during glaciation. These basins are estimated to contain ~7000 Pg of organic carbon, assuming that sedimentary basins account for 1 and 2 M km2 of the West and East Antarctic Ice Sheets respectively, the organic carbon content of overridden marine sediments is 0.5 % and the mean sediment depth is 1 km. We predict that this carbon is microbially cycled to methane under anoxic conditions beneath the ice sheet. Laboratory experimental data are consistent with this and show that organic carbon overridden by glaciers and ice sheets produces methane under anoxic conditions, and at rates similar to those observed in sub-seafloor sediments. We numerically model the accumulation of methane in Antarctic sedimentary basins and show that sediment porewaters become over-saturated with methane over >1 Myr and that typical pressure/temperature conditions favour methane hydrate formation down to between ~500m and ~1000m in the sedimentary column. We calculate conservatively that a minimum of ~70 and ~360 PgC of releasable methane (clathrate + free gas) could be produced beneath the West and East Antarctic Ice Sheets over 3 and 30 Myr of glaciation respectively, which is of a similar order of magnitude to methane present as hydrate in Arctic permafrost. The stability of this releasable methane reserve depends sensitively upon in situ pressure conditions, and hence ice thickness. We show that only modest ice sheet retreat rates (700-2000 km2 a-1) are required to stimulate out gassing of releasable methane from Antarctic sedimentary basins at rates sufficient to

  14. Phase behavior of methane haze.

    PubMed

    Signorell, R; Jetzki, M

    2007-01-01

    Methane aerosols play a fundamental role in the atmospheres of Neptune, Uranus, and Saturn's moon Titan as borne out by the recent Cassini-Huygens mission. Here we present the first study of the phase behavior of free methane aerosol particles combining collisional cooling with rapid-scan infrared spectroscopy in situ. We find fast (within minutes) phase transitions to crystalline states directly after particle formation and characteristic surface effects for nanometer-sized particles. From our results, we conclude that in atmospheric clouds solid methane particles are crystalline.

  15. Phase behavior of methane haze.

    PubMed

    Signorell, R; Jetzki, M

    2007-01-01

    Methane aerosols play a fundamental role in the atmospheres of Neptune, Uranus, and Saturn's moon Titan as borne out by the recent Cassini-Huygens mission. Here we present the first study of the phase behavior of free methane aerosol particles combining collisional cooling with rapid-scan infrared spectroscopy in situ. We find fast (within minutes) phase transitions to crystalline states directly after particle formation and characteristic surface effects for nanometer-sized particles. From our results, we conclude that in atmospheric clouds solid methane particles are crystalline. PMID:17358473

  16. Quasielastic electron scattering from methane, methane-d4, methane-d2, ethylene, and 2-methylpropane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, G.; Christensen, E.; Hitchcock, A. P.

    2007-08-01

    Quasielastic electron scattering from gaseous species at high momentum transfer was recently reported for the first time [Cooper et al., J. Electron Spectrosc. Relat. Phenom. 155, 28 (2007)]. The first results for CH4 and CD4 were well explained by a classical electron Compton scattering picture in which the electron scatters independently from each atom rather than the molecule as a whole. However, an alternative possible interpretation in terms of nondipole molecular vibrational excitation is suggested by previously published quantum mechanical calculations on high momentum transfer electron scattering from diatomic molecules [Bonham and de Souza, J. Chem. Phys. 79, 134 (1983)]. In order to determine which of these two interpretations best fits the experimental results, we have measured the quasielastic spectra of gaseous 2-methylpropane, ethylene, methane, and two isotopically substituted methanes, CH2D2 and CD4, at a momentum transfer of ˜20a.u. (2.25keV impact energy and 100° scattering angle). The experimental spectra are found to be composed of as many peaks as there are different atomic isotopes in the molecule (two for CH4, C2H4, 2-methylpropane, and CD4 and three for CH2D2). The peak positions are predicted accurately by the independent atom electron Compton scattering model, and the relative intensities are in reasonable agreement. The experimental results thus support classical electron Compton scattering as the origin of the signal.

  17. Methane generation from animal wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Fulton, E.L.

    1980-06-01

    The conversion of manure to biogas via anaerobic digestion is described. The effluent resulting from the conversion retains fertilizer value and is environmentally acceptable. Discussion is presented under the headings: methane formation in the digester; the Tarleton State Poultry Waste to Methane production system; operating experience at Tarleton State; economics of biogas production from poultry waste; construction cost and biogas value; energy uses; feed and waste processing; and advantages of anaerobic digestion. (DMC)

  18. In situ methane enrichment in anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Hayes, T D; Isaacson, H R; Pfeffer, J T; Liu, Y M

    1990-01-01

    A major cost consideration in the use of anaerobic digestion to convert biomass and waste to utility-grade gas is the expense of separating CO(2) from the product gas. Anaerobic digestion has a number of inherent properties that can be exploited to increase the methane content of the gas directly produced by the digester, the most important of which is the high solubility of CO(2)(40-60 times that of methane) in water under digestion conditions. The methane enrichment concept examined in this study involved the recirculation of a liquid stream from the digester through a CO(2) desorption process and the return of the liquid stream back to the digester for absorption of additional CO(2) produced by the conversion of organic materials. A steady-state equilibrium model predicted that a digester gas methane content exceeding 94% could be achieved with this scheme using modest recirculation rates provided a desorption process could be designed to achieve a 60+% CO(2) removal efficiency in the degassing of the liquid recycle stream. Using fixed-film laboratory digesters operated on synthetic feedstocks, the technique of methane enrichment was tested under pressurized and unpressurized conditions. A 93 + 2% methane gas stream was produced from a volatile-acid-fed bench-scale digester simulating the methanogenic stage of two-phase digestion under conditions of (1) a pH swing achieved without caustic addition that allowed digestion at pH 7. 5 and air stripping at pH 6. 5-7. 0, (2) digester pressurization to 30 psig, and (3) a recycle rate of 0. 33 L/L reactor/day. Significant but lower levels of methane enrichment were achieved with the single-stage digester at the low experimental recycle rate. However, the narrow range among all experiments of CO(2) desorption efficiencies achieved in air stripping the recycle stream (35-60% CO(2) removal) suggests that comparable methane enrichment-may be achieved with unpressurized single-stage digestion using greater recycle rates. A

  19. Carbon isotope ratios suggest no additional methane from boreal wetlands during the rapid Greenland Interstadial 21.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperlich, Peter; Schaefer, Hinrich; Mikaloff Fletcher, Sara E.; Guillevic, Myriam; Lassey, Keith; Sapart, Célia J.; Röckmann, Thomas; Blunier, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Samples from two Greenland ice cores (NEEM and NGRIP) have been measured for methane carbon isotope ratios (δ13C-CH4) to investigate the CH4 mixing ratio anomaly during Greenland Interstadial (GI) 21.2 (85,000 years before present). This extraordinarily rapid event occurred within 150 years, comprising a CH4 mixing ratio pulse of 150 ppb (˜25%). Our new measurements disclose a concomitant shift in δ13C-CH4 of 1‰. Keeling plot analyses reveal the δ13C of the additional CH4 source constituting the CH4 anomaly as -56.8 ± 2.8‰, which we confirm by means of a previously published box model. We propose tropical wetlands as the most probable additional CH4 source during GI-21.2 and present independent evidence that suggests that tropical wetlands in South America and Asia have played a key role. We find no evidence that boreal CH4 sources, such as permafrost degradation, contributed significantly to the atmospheric CH4 increase, despite the pronounced warming in the Northern Hemisphere during GI-21.2.

  20. Is methane a new therapeutic gas?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Methane is an attractive fuel. Biologically, methanogens in the colon can use carbon dioxide and hydrogen to produce methane as a by-product. It was previously considered that methane is not utilized by humans. However, in a recent study, results demonstrated that methane could exert anti-inflammatory effects in a dog small intestinal ischemia-reperfusion model. Point of view Actually, the bioactivity of methane has been investigated in gastrointestinal diseases, but the exact mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory effects is required to be further elucidated. Methane can cross the membrane and is easy to collect due to its abundance in natural gas. Although methane is flammable, saline rich in methane can be prepared for clinical use. These seem to be good news in application of methane as a therapeutic gas. Conclusion Several problems should be resolved before its wide application in clinical practice. PMID:23009320

  1. Phase states of methane in fossil coals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeev, A. D.; Vasylenko, T. A.; Ul'yanova, E. V.

    2004-06-01

    NMR measurements have revealed that methane can exist in coal samples in the state of solid solution rather than only adsorbed gas, opening new ways to prevention of gas dynamic accidents in underground coal mines and true estimation of coalbed methane resources. Understanding molecular structure of coal constituents and forms of methane occurrence in coal is the only way of extracting safely either coal or methane. We had studied nuclear magnetic resonance lines in various coals at room or low temperatures and have found that there exist three species of methane molecules differing in molecular mobility. Based on estimated diffusion parameters, these species were attributed to free methane, adsorbed methane, and solid solution of methane in crystalline coal substance. While first two phases are well known and can be analyzed by many different techniques, the last one hardly can be studied by methods other than NMR, resulting in inadequate estimations of methane resources.

  2. Atmospheric distribution of methane on Mars: A model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viscardy, Sébastien; Daerden, Frank; Neary, Lori

    2016-10-01

    In the past decade, the detection of methane (CH4) in the atmosphere of Mars has been reported several times. These observations have strongly drawn the attention of the scientific community and triggered a renewed interest in Mars as their implications for the geochemical or biological activities are remarkable. However, given that methane is expected to have a photochemical lifetime of several centuries, the relatively fast loss rates of methane estimated from Earth-based measurements remain unexplained. Although this gave rise to objections against the validity of those observations, recent in situ measurements confirmed that methane is being occasionally released into the atmosphere from an unknown source (possibly from the ground). Additionally, ExoMars/TGO was launched to Mars in March 2016. NOMAD, one of the instruments onboard TGO, will provide the first global detailed observations of methane on Mars. It is in this context that we present a model study of the behavior of methane plumes.A general circulation model for the atmosphere of Mars is applied to simulate surface emission of methane and to investigate its vertical distribution during the first weeks after the release. Such surface emissions were suggested to explain observations of methane. Previous GCM simulations focused on the horizontal evolution of the methane, but the present study focuses on the three-dimensional dispersion of methane throughout the atmosphere after the surface release. It is found that a highly nonuniform vertical distribution, including distinct vertical layers, can appear throughout the atmosphere during the first weeks after the emission. This is explained by the global circulation patterns in the atmosphere at the time of the emission. Large Hadley cells transport the methane rapidly to other locations over the planet, and methane will be stretched out in layers along the general circulation streamlines at heights corresponding to strong zonal jets.This result changes

  3. Making methane visible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gålfalk, Magnus; Olofsson, Göran; Crill, Patrick; Bastviken, David

    2016-04-01

    Methane (CH4) is one of the most important greenhouse gases, and an important energy carrier in biogas and natural gas. Its large-scale emission patterns have been unpredictable and the source and sink distributions are poorly constrained. Remote assessment of CH4 with high sensitivity at a m2 spatial resolution would allow detailed mapping of the near-ground distribution and anthropogenic sources in landscapes but has hitherto not been possible. Here we show that CH4 gradients can be imaged on the

  4. Methane monooxygenase: functionalizing methane at iron and copper.

    PubMed

    Sazinsky, Matthew H; Lippard, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Methane monooxygenases (MMOs) catalyze the conversion of methane to methanol as the first committed step in the assimilation of this hydrocarbon into biomass and energy by methanotrophs, thus playing a significant role in the biogeochemistry of this potent greenhouse gas. Two distinct enzymes, a copper-dependent membrane protein, particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO), and an iron-dependent cytosolic protein, soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO), carry out this transformation using large protein scaffolds that help to facilitate the timely transport of hydrocarbon, O₂, proton, and electron substrates to buried dimetallic active sites. For both enzymes, reaction of the reduced metal centers with O₂leads to intermediates that activate the relatively inert C-H bonds of hydrocarbons to yield oxidized products. Among synthetic and biological catalysts, MMOs are unique because they are the only ones known to hydroxylate methane at ambient temperatures. As a need for new industrial catalysts and green chemical transformations increases, understanding how the different MMO metal centers efficiently accomplish this challenging chemistry has become the focus of intense study. This chapter examines current understanding of the sMMO and pMMO protein structures, their methods for substrate channeling, and mechanisms for the dimetallic activation of O₂and C-H bonds. PMID:25707469

  5. A five-year study of the impact of nitrogen addition on methane uptake in alpine grassland.

    PubMed

    Yue, Ping; Li, Kaihui; Gong, Yanming; Hu, Yukun; Mohammat, Anwar; Christie, Peter; Liu, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    It remains unclear how nitrogen (N) deposition affects soil methane (CH4) uptake in semiarid and arid zones. An in situ field experiment was conducted from 2010 to 2014 to systematically study the effect of various N application rates (0, 10, 30, and 90 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1)) on CH4 flux in alpine grassland in the Tianshan Mountains. No significant influence of N addition on CH4 uptake was found. Initially the CH4 uptake rate increased with increasing N application rate by up to 11.5% in 2011 and then there was gradual inhibition by 2014. However, the between-year variability in CH4 uptake was very highly significant with average uptake ranging from 52.9 to 106.6 μg C m(-2) h(-1) and the rate depended largely on seasonal variability in precipitation and temperature. CH4 uptake was positively correlated with soil temperature, air temperature and to a lesser extent with precipitation, and was negatively correlated with soil moisture and NO3(-)-N content. The results indicate that between-year variability in CH4 uptake was impacted by precipitation and temperature and was not sensitive to elevated N deposition in alpine grassland. PMID:27571892

  6. A five-year study of the impact of nitrogen addition on methane uptake in alpine grassland

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Ping; Li, Kaihui; Gong, Yanming; Hu, Yukun; Mohammat, Anwar; Christie, Peter; Liu, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    It remains unclear how nitrogen (N) deposition affects soil methane (CH4) uptake in semiarid and arid zones. An in situ field experiment was conducted from 2010 to 2014 to systematically study the effect of various N application rates (0, 10, 30, and 90 kg N ha−1 yr−1) on CH4 flux in alpine grassland in the Tianshan Mountains. No significant influence of N addition on CH4 uptake was found. Initially the CH4 uptake rate increased with increasing N application rate by up to 11.5% in 2011 and then there was gradual inhibition by 2014. However, the between-year variability in CH4 uptake was very highly significant with average uptake ranging from 52.9 to 106.6 μg C m−2 h−1 and the rate depended largely on seasonal variability in precipitation and temperature. CH4 uptake was positively correlated with soil temperature, air temperature and to a lesser extent with precipitation, and was negatively correlated with soil moisture and NO3−-N content. The results indicate that between-year variability in CH4 uptake was impacted by precipitation and temperature and was not sensitive to elevated N deposition in alpine grassland. PMID:27571892

  7. Methane production from steam-exploded bamboo.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Fumihisa; Take, Harumi; Asada, Chikako; Nakamura, Yoshitoshi

    2004-01-01

    To convert unutilized plant biomass into a useful energy source, methane production from bamboo was investigated using a steam explosion pretreatment. Methane could not be produced from raw bamboo but methane production was enhanced by steam explosion. The maximum amount of methane produced, i.e., about 215 ml, was obtained from 1 g of exploded bamboo at a steam pressure of 3.53 MPa and a steaming time of 5 min. A negative correlation between the amount of methane produced and the amount of Klason lignin was observed in the methane fermentation of steam-exploded bamboo.

  8. Methane Emission from Tropical Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawakuchi, H. O.; Rasera, M. F. F. L.; Krusche, A. V.; Ballester, M. V. R.

    2012-04-01

    Inland water is already known as an important source of methane to atmosphere. Methane is produced in anaerobic environments usually find in lakes and floodplain bottom sediment. It is the main reason that almost all information regarding methane flux come from this environments. However, while floodplain dries during low water season reducing methanogenesis, rivers keep the capacity to emit methane throughout the year. Here we present preliminary results of CH4 flux measurements done in 6 large tropical rivers within the Amazon basin. We measured 17 areas using floating chamber during dry (low water) season, between September and November of 2011, in Amazon river mainstem, Araguaia, Xingu, Tapajós, Madeira, and Negro Rivers. Measured fluxes of all rivers ranged from 59.3 to 2974.4 mmol m-2 yr-1. Geomorphologic structure of channels is one important factor that contributes to this high heterogeneity due to development of low flow velocity depositional settings allowing formation of anoxic zones in rivers. Hydraulic and sediment barriers in the confluence of river channels promote the generation of natural dams which function as a trap for the suspension load favoring the deposition of organic rich muds. This kind of environment is very different from common river channels and has a stronger potential of methane emission. Average values of our flux measurements for this two river environments show that depositional areas can have much higher fluxes than the main channel, 1089.6 and 163.1 mmol m-2 yr-1, respectively. Hence, CH4 flux from these depositional zones is similar to some tropical floodplain lakes and reservoirs. Although the low flux from channel, the area covered by water is very large resulting in a significant contribution to the regional methane emission to the atmosphere. Moreover, mapping the area of these depositional river zones will give us a better idea of the magnitude of methane flux from tropical rivers.

  9. Extracting value from coal mine methane

    SciTech Connect

    Liebert, B.

    2009-06-15

    Emerging US policy to regulate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through a cap-and-trade program presents mine managers with a new opportunity to explore and develop methane utilization or abatement projects that generate value from the anodization of carbon offset credits. In addition, the rising focus on US energy security and domestic energy supply is promoting mine managers and engineers to give further consideration to the importance of their methane gas by-products. The market through which coal mine methane offset projects can be developed and carbon offset credits monetized is quickly maturing. While many methane utilization projects have previously been uneconomical, the carbon offset credit market provides a new set of financing tools for mine engineers to capitalize these projects today. Currently , there are two certification programs that have approved project protocols for CMM projects. The Voluntary Carbon Standard (VCS) offers a methodology approved under the Clean Development Mechanism, the international compliance based offset market under the Kyoto Protocol. The VCS protocol is applicable to projects that combust ventilation air methane (VAM) and methane extracted from pre-and post-mine drainage systems. The Chicago Climate Exchange (CCX), which operates a voluntary yet binding cap-and-trade market, also has an approved protocol for CMM projects. CCX's protocol can be applied to projects combusting VAM, and methane extracted from pre-and-post-mine drainage systems, as well as abandoned mines. The article describes two case studies - Developing a gob gas utilization project financed by carbon offset credits and First VAM oxidation system to be commissioned at an operating mine in the US. 1 tab., 4 photos.

  10. Characterization of Methane Degradation and Methane-Degrading Microbes in Alaska Coastal Water

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchman, David L.

    2012-03-29

    The net flux of methane from methane hydrates and other sources to the atmosphere depends on methane degradation as well as methane production and release from geological sources. The goal of this project was to examine methane-degrading archaea and organic carbon oxidizing bacteria in methane-rich and methane-poor sediments of the Beaufort Sea, Alaska. The Beaufort Sea system was sampled as part of a multi-disciplinary expedition (Methane in the Arctic Shelf or MIDAS) in September 2009. Microbial communities were examined by quantitative PCR analyses of 16S rRNA genes and key methane degradation genes (pmoA and mcrA involved in aerobic and anaerobic methane degradation, respectively), tag pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes to determine the taxonomic make up of microbes in these sediments, and sequencing of all microbial genes (metagenomes ). The taxonomic and functional make-up of the microbial communities varied with methane concentrations, with some data suggesting higher abundances of potential methane-oxidizing archaea in methane-rich sediments. Sequence analysis of PCR amplicons revealed that most of the mcrA genes were from the ANME-2 group of methane oxidizers. According to metagenomic data, genes involved in methane degradation and other degradation pathways changed with sediment depth along with sulfate and methane concentrations. Most importantly, sulfate reduction genes decreased with depth while the anaerobic methane degradation gene (mcrA) increased along with methane concentrations. The number of potential methane degradation genes (mcrA) was low and inconsistent with other data indicating the large impact of methane on these sediments. The data can be reconciled if a small number of potential methane-oxidizing archaea mediates a large flux of carbon in these sediments. Our study is the first to report metagenomic data from sediments dominated by ANME-2 archaea and is one of the few to examine the entire microbial assemblage potentially involved in

  11. 1,4-Addition of bis(iodozincio)methane to α,β-unsaturated ketones: chemical and theoretical/computational studies.

    PubMed

    Sada, Mutsumi; Furuyama, Taniyuki; Komagawa, Shinsuke; Uchiyama, Masanobu; Matsubara, Seijiro

    2010-09-10

    1,4-Addition of bis(iodozincio)methane to simple α,β-unsaturated ketones does not proceed well; the reaction is slightly endothermic according to DFT calculations. In the presence of chlorotrimethylsilane, the reaction proceeded efficiently to afford a silyl enol ether of β-zinciomethyl ketone. The C--Zn bond of the silyl enol ether could be used in a cross-coupling reaction to form another C--C bond in a one-pot reaction. In contrast, 1,4-addition of the dizinc reagent to enones carrying an acyloxy group proceeded very efficiently without any additive. In this case, the product was a 1,3-diketone, which was generated in a novel tandem reaction. A theoretical/computational study indicates that the whole reaction pathway is exothermic, and that two zinc atoms of bis(iodozincio)methane accelerate each step cooperatively as effective Lewis acids. PMID:20645344

  12. Anaerobic Methane Oxidation: Occurrence and Ecology

    PubMed Central

    Zehnder, Alexander J. B.; Brock, Thomas D.

    1980-01-01

    Anoxic sediments and digested sewage sludge anaerobically oxidized methane to carbon dioxide while producing methane. This strictly anaerobic process showed a temperature optimum between 25 and 37°C, indicating an active microbial participation in this reaction. Methane oxidation in these anaerobic habitats was inhibited by oxygen. The rate of the oxidation followed the rate of methane production. The observed anoxic methane oxidation in Lake Mendota and digested sewage sludge was more sensitive to 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid than the simultaneous methane formation. Sulfate diminished methane formation as well as methane oxidation. However, in the presence of iron and sulfate the ratio of methane oxidized to methane formed increased markedly. Manganese dioxide and higher partial pressures of methane also stimulated the oxidation. The rate of methane oxidation in untreated samples was approximately 2% of the CH4 production rate in Lake Mendota sediments and 8% of that in digested sludge. This percentage could be increased up to 90% in sludge in the presence of 10 mM ferrous sulfate and at a partial pressure of methane of 20 atm (2,027 kPa). PMID:16345488

  13. Temporal Dynamics of Methane Fluxes in Temperate Urban Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafer, K. V.; Bohrer, G.; Naor, L.; Mouser, P. J.; Mitsch, W. J.; Wu, M.

    2011-12-01

    Recent concerns about wetland restoration have highlighted the potential conflict of the hydrological and ecological benefits of wetlands and greenhouse gas emissions particularly methane. Therefore it is pivotal to quantify emission rates and effects of meteorological, hydrological and ecological drivers of methane fluxes in wetlands. Novel fast methane (CH4) gas analyzers are now enabling continuous ecosystem scale measurements and assessment. We have set up two eddy flux stations - one in a constructed freshwater wetland in the Olentangy River Wetland Research Park (ORWRP) Ohio and one in a restored tidal salt marsh in the Meadowlands of New Jersey (MNJ). Continuous methane fluxes were measured with the LI7700 over one growing season and additional measurements with chambers were conducted at several locations in each site. Methane emissions were highly variable in space and time. The mean daily dynamics of methane emission are related to major drivers of methane production. In ORWRP a late afternoon peak of methane emission is correlated to soil temperature and no other meteorological or hydrological driver seem to explain the pattern observed. In MNJ a correlation of methane fluxes to night time CO2 fluxes was observed. At both sites methane production and emission is increasing at the beginning of the growing season.

  14. Technical Note: Methionine, a precursor of methane in living plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenhart, K.; Althoff, F.; Greule, M.; Keppler, F.

    2015-03-01

    When terrestrial plants were identified as producers of the greenhouse gas methane, much discussion and debate ensued not only about their contribution to the global methane budget but also with regard to the validity of the observation itself. Although the phenomenon has now become more accepted for both living and dead plants, the mechanism of methane formation in living plants remains to be elucidated and its precursor compounds to be identified. We made use of stable isotope techniques to verify the in vivo formation of methane, and, in order to identify the carbon precursor, 13C positionally labeled organic compounds were employed. Here we show that the amino acid L-methionine acts as a methane precursor in living plants. Employing 13C-labeled methionine clearly identified the sulfur-bound methyl group of methionine as a carbon precursor of methane released from lavender (Lavandula angustifolia). Furthermore, when lavender plants were stressed physically, methane release rates and the stable carbon isotope values of the emitted methane greatly increased. Our results provide additional support that plants possess a mechanism for methane production and suggest that methionine might play an important role in the formation of methane in living plants, particularly under stress conditions.

  15. Technical note: Methionine, a precursor of methane in living plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenhart, K.; Althoff, F.; Greule, M.; Keppler, F.

    2014-11-01

    When terrestrial plants were identified as producers of the greenhouse gas methane, much discussion and debate ensued, not only about their contribution to the global methane budget, but also with regard to the validity of the observation itself. Although the phenomenon has now become more accepted for both living and dead plants, the mechanism of methane formation in living plants remains to be elucidated and its precursor compounds identified. We made use of stable isotope techniques to verify in vivo formation of methane and, in order to identify the carbon precursor, 13C-positionally labelled organic compounds were employed. Here we show that the amino acid L-methionine acts as a methane precursor in living plants. Employing 13C-labelled methionine clearly identified the sulphur-bound methyl group of methionine as a carbon precursor of methane released from lavender (Lavandula angustifolia). Furthermore, when lavender plants were stressed physically, methane release rates and the stable carbon isotope values of the emitted methane greatly increased. Our results provide additional support that plants possess a mechanism for methane production and suggest that methionine might play an important role in the formation of methane in living plants, particularly under stress conditions.

  16. Mapping methane from marine and terrestrial hydrocarbon seepage using AVIRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, A. K.; Bradley, E. S.; Funk, C.; Roberts, D. A.; Leifer, I.; Dennison, P. E.; Margolis, J.

    2010-12-01

    Concentrations of atmospheric methane (CH4), a greenhouse gas at least 20 times more potent per molecule than carbon dioxide (CO2), have more than doubled in the last two centuries. Due to a lack of direct measurements of sources and sinks, the global methane budget is poorly constrained and emissions of this important greenhouse gas are often underestimated in climate models. The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) recently mapped methane emissions from the Coal Oil Point (COP) marine seep fields, a concentrated geologic methane source (0.015 Tg yr-1 from ~3 km2) located offshore from Santa Barbara, CA using a residual-based approach (Roberts et al. 2010) and short-wave infrared band ratios (Bradley et al. submitted). In this study, an additional cluster-tuned matched filter technique adapted from Funk et al. 2001 detected methane anomalies for COP that closely matched previous results and were in agreement with sonar-based seep surveys and flux buoy data. This technique was also applied to AVIRIS data acquired over the La Brea Tar Pits in Los Angeles, CA, a region known for natural oil and methane seepage. Significant anomalies were identified for known methane sources close to the tar pits where pipes have been established to prevent dangerous methane buildup. Therefore, imaging spectrometry using sensors like AVIRIS and planned satellite sensors like HyspIRI has the potential to greatly improve high spatial resolution mapping of methane emissions, thereby better constraining regional methane sources.

  17. The Search for Methane on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, C. R.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Atreya, S. K.; Flesch, G.; Farley, K. A.; Owen, T. C.; Leshin, L. A.; Stern, J. C.; Franz, H.; Eigenbrode, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    Abstract: Over the last several years, Earth-based telescopic and Mars orbit remote sensing instruments have reported significant abundances of methane on Mars ranging to tens of parts-per-billion by volume (ppbv). These observations have reported 'plumes' or localized patches of methane with variations on timescales much faster than model predictions, leading to speculation of sources from sub-surface methanogen bacteria, geological water-rock reactions, degassing of infalling comets, or UV degradation of micro-meteorites or interplanetary dust. More recently, these same groups report that the methane is no longer localized, and appears to have gone away, down to their detection limits of 7-8 ppbv. We will report in situ measurements made by the Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS) in the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite on Curiosity at much higher sensitivity, and over the first year of operation. Additionally, we will report methane abundances and 13CH4 measurements from methane detected in our evolved gas experiments using martian rock drill samples and compare the measurement methods to those used for determining H, C and O isotope ratios in carbon dioxide and water. The research described here was carried out in part at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

  18. 46 CFR 154.703 - Methane (LNG).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Cargo Pressure and Temperature Control § 154.703 Methane (LNG). Unless a cargo tank carrying methane (LNG)...

  19. Biogeochemistry: Rebalancing the global methane budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Grant

    2016-10-01

    A database of the carbon-isotope 'fingerprints' of methane has been used to constrain the contributions of different sources to the global methane budget. The surprising results have implications for climate prediction. See Letter p.88

  20. Hello, Water -- Good-bye, Methane

    NASA Video Gallery

    An animation shows carbon, hydrogen and oxygen atoms. Two hydrogen atoms join each oxygen atom to make water, or H2O. Four hydrogen atoms join a carbon atom to make methane, or CH4. The methane the...

  1. Method for the photocatalytic conversion of methane

    DOEpatents

    Noceti, Richard P.; Taylor, Charles E.; D'Este, Joseph R.

    1998-01-01

    A method for converting methane to methanol is provided comprising subjecting the methane to visible light in the presence of a catalyst and an electron transfer agent. Another embodiment of the invention provides for a method for reacting methane and water to produce methanol and hydrogen comprising preparing a fluid containing methane, an electron transfer agent and a photolysis catalyst, and subjecting said fluid to visible light for an effective period of time.

  2. Method for the photocatalytic conversion of methane

    DOEpatents

    Noceti, R.P.; Taylor, C.E.; D`Este, J.R.

    1998-02-24

    A method for converting methane to methanol is provided comprising subjecting the methane to visible light in the presence of a catalyst and an electron transfer agent. Another embodiment of the invention provides for a method for reacting methane and water to produce methanol and hydrogen comprising preparing a fluid containing methane, an electron transfer agent and a photolysis catalyst, and subjecting said fluid to visible light for an effective period of time. 3 figs.

  3. Methane production from marine microalgae Isochrysis galbana.

    PubMed

    Santos, Nathalia O; Oliveira, Suzana M; Alves, Larissa C; Cammarota, Magali C

    2014-04-01

    Methane production from marine microalgae Isochrysis galbana was assessed before and after mechanical and chemical pretreatments. Mechanical pretreatment resulted in a 61.7% increase in soluble Chemical Oxygen Demand. Different hydrolysis conditions were evaluated by varying temperature - T, sulfuric acid concentration - AC and biomass suspension concentration (measured as particulate COD - CODp) using an experimental design. The most significant interaction occurred between AC and T and the hydrolysis condition that showed the best result in the anaerobic digestion step was the condition at 40°C with addition of 0.2% (v/v) acid for 16h (9.27LCH4/kgVS). The low methane yields were attributed to inhibitory sodium concentrations for anaerobic digestion. Eliminating inhibitory sodium in the anaerobic digestion by biomass prewashing, there was a 71.5% increase in methane yield for biomass after acid hydrolysis, demonstrating the need for pretreatment and reduction in sodium concentration in the anaerobic digestion.

  4. Anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification is the dominant methane sink in a deep lake

    PubMed Central

    Deutzmann, Joerg S.; Stief, Peter; Brandes, Josephin; Schink, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification, also known as “nitrate/nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation” (n-damo), was discovered in 2006. Since then, only a few studies have identified this process and the associated microorganisms in natural environments. In aquatic sediments, the close proximity of oxygen- and nitrate-consumption zones can mask n-damo as aerobic methane oxidation. We therefore investigated the vertical distribution and the abundance of denitrifying methanotrophs related to Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera with cultivation-independent molecular techniques in the sediments of Lake Constance. Additionally, the vertical distribution of methane oxidation and nitrate consumption zones was inferred from high-resolution microsensor profiles in undisturbed sediment cores. M. oxyfera-like bacteria were virtually absent at shallow-water sites (littoral sediment) and were very abundant at deep-water sites (profundal sediment). In profundal sediment, the vertical distribution of M. oxyfera-like bacteria showed a distinct peak in anoxic layers that coincided with the zone of methane oxidation and nitrate consumption, a strong indication for n-damo carried out by M. oxyfera-like bacteria. Both potential n-damo rates calculated from cell densities (660–4,890 µmol CH4⋅m−2⋅d−1) and actual rates calculated from microsensor profiles (31–437 µmol CH4⋅m−2⋅d−1) were sufficiently high to prevent methane release from profundal sediment solely by this process. Additionally, when nitrate was added to sediment cores exposed to anoxic conditions, the n-damo zone reestablished well below the sediment surface, completely preventing methane release from the sediment. We conclude that the previously overlooked n-damo process can be the major methane sink in stable freshwater environments if nitrate is available in anoxic zones. PMID:25472842

  5. Potential methane reservoirs beneath Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Wadham, J L; Arndt, S; Tulaczyk, S; Stibal, M; Tranter, M; Telling, J; Lis, G P; Lawson, E; Ridgwell, A; Dubnick, A; Sharp, M J; Anesio, A M; Butler, C E H

    2012-08-30

    Once thought to be devoid of life, the ice-covered parts of Antarctica are now known to be a reservoir of metabolically active microbial cells and organic carbon. The potential for methanogenic archaea to support the degradation of organic carbon to methane beneath the ice, however, has not yet been evaluated. Large sedimentary basins containing marine sequences up to 14 kilometres thick and an estimated 21,000 petagrams (1 Pg equals 10(15) g) of organic carbon are buried beneath the Antarctic Ice Sheet. No data exist for rates of methanogenesis in sub-Antarctic marine sediments. Here we present experimental data from other subglacial environments that demonstrate the potential for overridden organic matter beneath glacial systems to produce methane. We also numerically simulate the accumulation of methane in Antarctic sedimentary basins using an established one-dimensional hydrate model and show that pressure/temperature conditions favour methane hydrate formation down to sediment depths of about 300 metres in West Antarctica and 700 metres in East Antarctica. Our results demonstrate the potential for methane hydrate accumulation in Antarctic sedimentary basins, where the total inventory depends on rates of organic carbon degradation and conditions at the ice-sheet bed. We calculate that the sub-Antarctic hydrate inventory could be of the same order of magnitude as that of recent estimates made for Arctic permafrost. Our findings suggest that the Antarctic Ice Sheet may be a neglected but important component of the global methane budget, with the potential to act as a positive feedback on climate warming during ice-sheet wastage.

  6. Potential methane reservoirs beneath Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Wadham, J L; Arndt, S; Tulaczyk, S; Stibal, M; Tranter, M; Telling, J; Lis, G P; Lawson, E; Ridgwell, A; Dubnick, A; Sharp, M J; Anesio, A M; Butler, C E H

    2012-08-30

    Once thought to be devoid of life, the ice-covered parts of Antarctica are now known to be a reservoir of metabolically active microbial cells and organic carbon. The potential for methanogenic archaea to support the degradation of organic carbon to methane beneath the ice, however, has not yet been evaluated. Large sedimentary basins containing marine sequences up to 14 kilometres thick and an estimated 21,000 petagrams (1 Pg equals 10(15) g) of organic carbon are buried beneath the Antarctic Ice Sheet. No data exist for rates of methanogenesis in sub-Antarctic marine sediments. Here we present experimental data from other subglacial environments that demonstrate the potential for overridden organic matter beneath glacial systems to produce methane. We also numerically simulate the accumulation of methane in Antarctic sedimentary basins using an established one-dimensional hydrate model and show that pressure/temperature conditions favour methane hydrate formation down to sediment depths of about 300 metres in West Antarctica and 700 metres in East Antarctica. Our results demonstrate the potential for methane hydrate accumulation in Antarctic sedimentary basins, where the total inventory depends on rates of organic carbon degradation and conditions at the ice-sheet bed. We calculate that the sub-Antarctic hydrate inventory could be of the same order of magnitude as that of recent estimates made for Arctic permafrost. Our findings suggest that the Antarctic Ice Sheet may be a neglected but important component of the global methane budget, with the potential to act as a positive feedback on climate warming during ice-sheet wastage. PMID:22932387

  7. Enhancement of Biogenic Coalbed Methane Production and Back Injection of Coalbed Methane Co-Produced Water

    SciTech Connect

    Song Jin

    2007-05-31

    Biogenic methane is a common constituent in deep subsurface environments such as coalbeds and oil shale beds. Coalbed methane (CBM) makes significant contributions to world natural gas industry and CBM production continues to increase. With increasing CBM production, the production of CBM co-produced water increases, which is an environmental concern. This study investigated the feasibility in re-using CBM co-produced water and other high sodic/saline water to enhance biogenic methane production from coal and other unconventional sources, such as oil shale. Microcosms were established with the selected carbon sources which included coal, oil shale, lignite, peat, and diesel-contaminated soil. Each microcosm contained either CBM coproduced water or groundwater with various enhancement and inhibitor combinations. Results indicated that the addition of nutrients and nutrients with additional carbon can enhance biogenic methane production from coal and oil shale. Methane production from oil shale was much greater than that from coal, which is possibly due to the greater amount of available Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) from oil shale. Inconclusive results were observed from the other sources since the incubation period was too low. WRI is continuing studies with biogenic methane production from oil shale.

  8. Martian Methane From a Cometary Source: A Hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fries, M.; Christou, A.; Archer, D.; Conrad, P.; Cooke, W.; Eigenbrode, J.; ten Kate, I. L.; Matney, M.; Niles, P.; Sykes, M.; Steele, A.; Treiman, A.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, methane in the martian atmosphere has been detected by Earth-based spectroscopy, the Planetary Fourier Spectrometer on the ESA Mars Express mission, and the NASA Mars Science Laboratory. The methane's origin remains a mystery, with proposed sources including volcanism, exogenous sources like impacts and interplanetary dust, aqueous alteration of olivine in the presence of carbonaceous material, release from ancient deposits of methane clathrates, and/or biological activity. An additional potential source exists: meteor showers from the emission of large comet dust particles could generate martian methane via UV pyrolysis of carbon-rich infall material. We find a correlation between the dates of Mars/cometary orbit encounters and detections of methane on Mars. We hypothesize that cometary debris falls onto Mars during these interactions, generating methane via UV photolysis.

  9. Methanator fueled engines for pollution control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cagliostro, D. E.; Winkler, E. L.

    1973-01-01

    A methanator fueled Otto-cycle engine is compared with other methods proposed to control pollution due to automobile exhaust emissions. The comparison is made with respect to state of development, emission factors, capital cost, operational and maintenance costs, performance, operational limitations, and impact on the automotive industries. The methanator fueled Otto-cycle engine is projected to meet 1975 emission standards and operate at a lower relative total cost compared to the catalytic muffler system and to have low impact. Additional study is required for system development.

  10. Effect of the addition of fatty by-products from the refining of vegetable oil on methane production in co-digestion.

    PubMed

    Torrijos, M; Sousbie, P; Badey, L; Bosque, F; Steyer, J P

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the effects of the addition of by-products from the refining of vegetable oil on the behavior of co-digestion reactors treating a mixture of grass, cow dung and fruit and vegetable waste. Three by-products were used: one soapstock, one used winterization earth and one skimming of aeroflotation of the effluents. Three 15 l reactors were run in parallel and fed five times a week. In a first phase of 4 weeks, the three reactors were fed with the co-digestion substrates alone (grass, cow dung and fruit and vegetable waste) at an organic loading rate (OLR) of 1.5 g VS/kg d (VS: volatile solids). Then, a different by-product from the refining of oil was added to the feed of each reactor at an OLR of 0.5 g VS/kg d, generating a 33% increase in the OLR. The results show that the addition of by-products from the refining of oil is an efficient way of increasing the methane production of co-digestion reactors thanks to high methane yield of such by-products (0.69-0.77 l CH(4)/g VS loaded). In fact, in this work, it was possible to raise the methane production of the reactors by about 60% through a 33% increase in the OLR thanks to the addition of the by-products from the refining of vegetable oil.

  11. Is there methane on Mars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahnle, Kevin; Freedman, Richard S.; Catling, David C.

    2011-04-01

    There have been several reports of methane on Mars at the 10-60 ppbv level. Most suggest that methane is both seasonally and latitudinally variable. Here we review why variable methane on Mars is physically and chemically implausible, and then we critically review the published reports. There is no known mechanism for destroying methane chemically on Mars. But if there is one, methane oxidation would deplete the O 2 in Mars's atmosphere in less than 10,000 years unless balanced by an equally large unknown source of oxidizing power. Physical sequestration does not raise these questions, but adsorption in the regolith or condensation in clathrates ignore competition for adsorption sites or are inconsistent with clathrate stability, respectively. Furthermore, any mechanism that relies on methane's van der Waals' attraction is inconsistent with the continued presence of Xe in the atmosphere at the 60 ppbv level. We then use the HITRAN database and transmission calculations to identify and characterize the absorption lines that would be present on Earth or Mars at the wavelengths of the published observations. These reveal strong competing telluric absorption that is most problematic at just those wavelengths where methane's signature seems most clearly seen from Earth. The competing telluric lines must be removed with models. The best case for martian methane was made for the 12CH 4ν3 R0 and R1 lines seen in blueshift when Mars was approaching Earth in early 2003 (Mumma, M.J., Villanueva, G.L., Novak, R.E., Hewagama, T., Bonev, B.P., DiSanti, M.A., Mandell, A.M., Smith, M.D. [2009]. Science 323, 1041-1045). For these the Doppler shift moves the two martian lines into near coincidence with telluric 13CH 4ν3 R1 and R2 lines that are 10-50× stronger than the inferred martian lines. By contrast, the 12CH 4ν3 R0 and R1 lines when observed in redshift do not contend with telluric 13CH 4. For these lines, Mumma et al.'s observations and analyses are consistent with an

  12. Terminating marine methane bubbles by superhydrophobic sponges.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao; Wu, Yuchen; Su, Bin; Wang, Jingming; Song, Yanlin; Jiang, Lei

    2012-11-14

    Marine methane bubbles are absorbed, steadily stored, and continuously transported based on the employment of superhydrophobic sponges. Antiwetting sponges are water-repellent in the atmosphere and absorb gas bubbles under water. Their capacity to store methane bubbles increases with enhanced submerged depth. Significantly, trapped methane bubbles can be continuously transported driven by differential pressure.

  13. APPROACH FOR ESTIMATING GLOBAL LANDFILL METHANE EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is an overview of available country-specific data and modeling approaches for estimating global landfill methane. Current estimates of global landfill methane indicate that landfills account for between 4 and 15% of the global methane budget. The report describes an ap...

  14. Are methane production and cattle performance related?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methane is a product of fermentation of feed in ruminant animals. Approximately 2 -12% of the gross energy consumed by cattle is released through enteric methane production. There are three primary components that contribute to the enteric methane footprint of an animal. Those components are dry ...

  15. 78 FR 37536 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Methane... meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee. The Federal... of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee is to provide advice on potential applications of...

  16. 40 CFR 721.4820 - Methane, bromodifluoro-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Methane, bromodifluoro-. 721.4820... Substances § 721.4820 Methane, bromodifluoro-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as methane, bromodifluoro- is subject to reporting...

  17. 30 CFR 75.342 - Methane monitors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Methane monitors. 75.342 Section 75.342 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.342 Methane monitors. (a)(1) MSHA approved methane monitors shall be installed on all face cutting machines, continuous miners, longwall...

  18. 30 CFR 75.342 - Methane monitors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Methane monitors. 75.342 Section 75.342 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.342 Methane monitors. (a)(1) MSHA approved methane monitors shall be installed on all face cutting machines, continuous miners, longwall...

  19. 40 CFR 721.4820 - Methane, bromodifluoro-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Methane, bromodifluoro-. 721.4820... Substances § 721.4820 Methane, bromodifluoro-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as methane, bromodifluoro- is subject to reporting...

  20. 30 CFR 75.342 - Methane monitors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Methane monitors. 75.342 Section 75.342 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.342 Methane monitors. (a)(1) MSHA approved methane monitors shall be installed on all face cutting machines, continuous miners, longwall...

  1. 76 FR 59667 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Methane... Meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee. Federal... of the Committee: The purpose of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee is to provide advice...

  2. 78 FR 26337 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Methane... Meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee. The Federal... of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee is to provide advice on potential applications of...

  3. 30 CFR 75.342 - Methane monitors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Methane monitors. 75.342 Section 75.342 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.342 Methane monitors. (a)(1) MSHA approved methane monitors shall be installed on all face cutting machines, continuous miners, longwall...

  4. Kinetic Study on the Effect of Chromium Addition to Ni-Based Catalysts for the Steam-CO2 Reforming of Methane.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoon-Hwa; Li, Peng; Moon, Dong-Ju; Park, Nam-Cook; Kim, Young-Chul

    2016-02-01

    In the present work, the kinetic effects of Ni-based catalysts containing various amounts of Cr on the steam-CO2 reforming (SCR) of methane were studied. Kinetic expressions for the SCR of methane over the Ni-based catalysts have been proposed using the power-law rate expression, based on the kinetic data obtained. In addition, the Arrhenius equation was used for calculating the activation energy. Analysis of the data revealed four simple results. Firstly, the partial pressure of CH4 exerts a major influence on the CH4 conversion rates. Secondly, the CH4 conversion rate is inversely proportional to the partial pressure of CO2. Thirdly, the partial pressure of steam has a very slight effect on the reaction rates. Finally, all the catalysts studied have similar apparent activation energies. PMID:27433614

  5. Kinetic Study on the Effect of Chromium Addition to Ni-Based Catalysts for the Steam-CO2 Reforming of Methane.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoon-Hwa; Li, Peng; Moon, Dong-Ju; Park, Nam-Cook; Kim, Young-Chul

    2016-02-01

    In the present work, the kinetic effects of Ni-based catalysts containing various amounts of Cr on the steam-CO2 reforming (SCR) of methane were studied. Kinetic expressions for the SCR of methane over the Ni-based catalysts have been proposed using the power-law rate expression, based on the kinetic data obtained. In addition, the Arrhenius equation was used for calculating the activation energy. Analysis of the data revealed four simple results. Firstly, the partial pressure of CH4 exerts a major influence on the CH4 conversion rates. Secondly, the CH4 conversion rate is inversely proportional to the partial pressure of CO2. Thirdly, the partial pressure of steam has a very slight effect on the reaction rates. Finally, all the catalysts studied have similar apparent activation energies.

  6. The effect of elevated methane pressure on methane hydrate dissociation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Circone, S.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2004-01-01

    Methane hydrate, equilibrated at P, T conditions within the hydrate stability field, was rapidly depressurized to 1.0 or 2.0 MPa and maintained at isobaric conditions outside its stability field, while the extent and rate of hydrate dissociation was measured at fixed, externally maintained temperatures between 250 and 288 K. The dissociation rate decreases with increasing pressure at a given temperature. Dissociation rates at 1.0 MPa parallel the complex, reproducible T-dependence previously observed between 250 and 272 K at 0.1 MPa. The lowest rates were observed near 268 K, such that >50% of the sample can persist for more than two weeks at 0.1 MPa to more than a month at 1 and 2 MPa. Varying the pressure stepwise in a single experiment increased or decreased the dissociation rate in proportion to the rates observed in the isobaric experiments, similar to the rate reversibility previously observed with stepwise changes in temperature at 0.1 MPa. At fixed P, T conditions, the rate of methane hydrate dissociation decreases monotonically with time, never achieving a steady rate. The relationship between time (t) and the extent of hydrate dissociation is empirically described by: Evolved gas (%) = A??tB where the pre-exponential term A ranges from 0 to 16% s-B and the exponent B is generally <1. Based on fits of the dissociation results to Equation 1 for the full range of temperatures (204 to 289 K) and pressures (0.1 to 2.0 MPa) investigated, the derived parameters can be used to predict the methane evolution curves for pure, porous methane hydrate to within ??5%. The effects of sample porosity and the presence of quartz sand and seawater on methane hydrate dissociation are also described using Equation 1.

  7. Methane flux from coastal salt marshes

    SciTech Connect

    Bartlett, K.B.; Harriss, R.C.; Sebacher, D.I.

    1985-06-20

    The seasonal flux of methane to the atmosphere from salt marsh soils was examined in three different vegetation zones within a single marsh near Yorktown, Virginia. A total of 100 measurements were made over a 2-year period, with maximum rates occurring during summer and fall. Spatial and temporal variability in fluxes was high; rates ranged from -2.4 to 21.3 x 10/sup -3/ g CH/sub 4//m/sup 2//d. Estimates of annual methane losses to the atmosphere were 0.43 g CH/sub 4//m/sup 2/ for a salt meadow zone, 1.3 g CH/sub 4//m/sup 2/ for short Spartina alterniflora, and 1.2 g CH/sub 4//m/sup 2/ for tall creek-bank S. alterniflora. A total of 63 flux measurements, made in a variety of other coastal salt marshes along the east coast of the US, suggest that the Virginia site may be fairly typical for this region. In addition to diffusional losses across the air-soil interface, methane can be lost from the marsh system to the atmosphere through the lateral movement of pore waters supersaturated with methane into tidal creeks, with subsequent degassing across the water-air interface. Estimates of the magnitude of methane input to the atmosphere by this mechanism indicate it may be as important as diffusional losses across the air-soil interface. These data suggest that salt marshes of this type make only a minor contribution to global atmospheric methane.

  8. Stimulation of methane oxidation potential and effects on vegetation growth by bottom ash addition in a landfill final evapotranspiration cover.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gil Won; Ho, Adrian; Kim, Pil Joo; Kim, Sang Yoon

    2016-09-01

    The landfilling of municipal solid waste is a significant source of atmospheric methane (CH4), contributing up to 20% of total anthropogenic CH4 emissions. The evapotranspiration (ET) cover system, an alternative final cover system in waste landfills, has been considered to be a promising way to mitigate CH4 emissions, as well as to prevent water infiltration using vegetation on landfill cover soils. In our previous studies, bottom ash from coal-fired power plants was selected among several industrial residues (blast furnace slag, bottom ash, construction waste, steel manufacture slag, stone powder sludge, and waste gypsum) as the best additive for ET cover systems, with the highest mechanical performance achieved for a 35% (wtwt(-1)) bottom ash content in soil. In this study, to evaluate the field applicability of bottom ash mixed soil as ET cover, four sets of lysimeters (height 1.2m×width 2m×length 6m) were constructed in 2007, and four different treatments were installed: (i) soil+bottom ash (35% wtwt(-1)) (SB); (ii) soil+compost (2% wtwt(-1), approximately corresponding to 40Mgha(-1) in arable field scale) (SC); (iii) soil+bottom ash+compost (SBC); and (iv) soil only as the control (S). The effects of bottom ash mixing in ET cover soil on CH4 oxidation potential and vegetation growth were evaluated in a pilot ET cover system in the 5th year after installation by pilot experiments using the treatments. Our results showed that soil properties were significantly improved by bottom ash mixing, resulting in higher plant growth. Bottom ash addition significantly increased the CH4 oxidation potential of the ET cover soil, mainly due to improved organic matter and available copper concentration, enhancing methanotrophic abundances in soil amended with bottom ash. Conclusively, bottom ash could be a good alternative as a soil additive in the ET cover system to improve vegetation growth and mitigate CH4 emission impact in the waste landfill system. PMID:27067424

  9. Methane sources and emissions in Italy

    SciTech Connect

    Guidotti, G.R.; Castagnola, A.M.

    1994-12-31

    Methane emissions in Italy were assessed in the framework of the measures taken to follow out the commitments undertaken at the 1992 U.N. Conference for Environment and Development. Methane emissions of anthropic origin were estimated to be in the range of 1.6 to 2.3 million ton of methane per year. Some of these methane sources (natural gas production, transmission and distribution; rice paddies; managed livestock enteric fermentation and waste; solid waste landfills) are given here particular care as they mainly contribute to the total methane emission budget.

  10. Methane Dynamics in Flooded Lands

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methane (CH4) is the second most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas with a heat trapping capacity 34 times greater than that of carbon dioxide on a100 year time scale. Known anthropogenic CH4 sources include livestock production, rice agriculture, landfills, and natural gas m...

  11. Bis(2-chloroethoxy)methane

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Bis ( 2 - chloroethoxy ) methane ; CASRN 111 - 91 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for

  12. Methane flux from Minnesota peatlands

    SciTech Connect

    Crill, P.M.; Bartlett, K.B.; Harriss, R.C.; Gorham, E.; Verry, E.S. )

    1988-12-01

    Northern (> 40 deg N) wetlands have been suggested as the largest natural source of methane (CH{sub 4}) to the troposphere. To refine the authors estimates of source strengths from this region and to investigate climatic controls on the process, fluxes were measured from a variety of Minnesota peatlands during May, June, and August 1986. Late spring and summer fluxes ranged from 11 to 866 mg CH{sub 4}/sq/m/day, averaging 207 mg CH{sub 4} sq/m/day overall. At Marcell Forest, forested bogs and fen sites had lower fluxes than open bogs. In the Red Lake peatland, circumneutral fens, with standing water above the peat surface, produced more methane than acid bog sites in which the water table was beneath the moss surface. Peat temperature was an important control. Methane flux increased in response to increasing soil temperature. It is estimated that the methane flux from all peatlands north of 40 deg may be on the order of 70 to 90 Tg/yr though estimates of this sort are plagued by uncertainties in the areal extent of peatlands, length of the CH{sub 4} producing season, and the spatial and temporal variability of the flux. 60 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Methane production by attached film

    DOEpatents

    Jewell, William J.

    1981-01-01

    A method for purifying wastewater of biodegradable organics by converting the organics to methane and carbon dioxide gases is disclosed, characterized by the use of an anaerobic attached film expanded bed reactor for the reaction process. Dilute organic waste material is initially seeded with a heterogeneous anaerobic bacteria population including a methane-producing bacteria. The seeded organic waste material is introduced into the bottom of the expanded bed reactor which includes a particulate support media coated with a polysaccharide film. A low-velocity upward flow of the organic waste material is established through the bed during which the attached bacterial film reacts with the organic material to produce methane and carbon dioxide gases, purified water, and a small amount of residual effluent material. The residual effluent material is filtered by the film as it flows upwardly through the reactor bed. In a preferred embodiment, partially treated effluent material is recycled from the top of the bed to the bottom of the bed for further treatment. The methane and carbon dioxide gases are then separated from the residual effluent material and purified water.

  14. Methane storage in molecular nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adisa, Olumide O.; Cox, Barry J.; Hill, James M.

    2012-05-01

    We survey various molecular structures which have been proposed as possible nanocontainers for methane storage. These are molecular structures that have been investigated through either experiments, molecular dynamics simulations or mathematical modelling. Computational simulation and mathematical modelling play an important role in predicting and verifying experimental outcomes, but both have their limitations. Even though recent advances have greatly improved computations, due to the large number of atoms and force field calculations involved, computational simulations can still be time consuming as compared to an instantaneous mathematical modelling approach. On the other hand, underlying an ideal mathematical model, there are many assumptions and approximations, but such modelling often reveals the key physical parameters and optimal configurations. Here, we review methane adsorption for three conventional nanostructures, namely graphite, single and multi-walled carbon nanotubes, and nanotube bundles (including interstitial and groove sites), and we survey methane adsorption in other molecular structures including metal organic frameworks. We also include an examination of minimum binding energies, equilibrium distances, gravimetric and volumetric uptakes, volume available for adsorption, as well as the effects of temperature and pressure on the adsorption of methane onto these molecular structures.

  15. Methane on the greenhouse agenda

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogan, Kathleen B.; Hoffman, John S.; Thompson, Anne M.

    1991-01-01

    Options for reducing methane emissions, which could have a significant effect on global warming, are addressed. Emissions from landfills, coal mining, oil and natural gas systems, ruminants, animal wastes and wastewater, rice cultivation, and biomass burning are considered. Methods for implementing these emission reductions are discussed.

  16. Ductile flow of methane hydrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    Compressional creep tests (i.e., constant applied stress) conducted on pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate over the temperature range 260-287 K and confining pressures of 50-100 MPa show this material to be extraordinarily strong compared to other icy compounds. The contrast with hexagonal water ice, sometimes used as a proxy for gas hydrate properties, is impressive: over the thermal range where both are solid, methane hydrate is as much as 40 times stronger than ice at a given strain rate. The specific mechanical response of naturally occurring methane hydrate in sediments to environmental changes is expected to be dependent on the distribution of the hydrate phase within the formation - whether arranged structurally between and (or) cementing sediments grains versus passively in pore space within a sediment framework. If hydrate is in the former mode, the very high strength of methane hydrate implies a significantly greater strain-energy release upon decomposition and subsequent failure of hydrate-cemented formations than previously expected.

  17. Methane generation from waste materials

    DOEpatents

    Samani, Zohrab A.; Hanson, Adrian T.; Macias-Corral, Maritza

    2010-03-23

    An organic solid waste digester for producing methane from solid waste, the digester comprising a reactor vessel for holding solid waste, a sprinkler system for distributing water, bacteria, and nutrients over and through the solid waste, and a drainage system for capturing leachate that is then recirculated through the sprinkler system.

  18. Insights into Methane Formation Temperatures, Biogenic Methanogenesis, and Natural Methane Emissions from Clumped Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, P. M.; Stolper, D. A.; Walter Anthony, K. M.; Dallimore, S.; Paull, C. K.; Wik, M.; Crill, P. M.; Winterdahl, M.; Smith, D. A.; Luhmann, A. J.; Ding, K.; Seyfried, W. E., Jr.; Eiler, J. M.; Ponton, C.; Sessions, A. L.

    2015-12-01

    Multiply substituted isotopologues of methane are a valuable new tool for characterizing and understanding the source of methane in different Earth environments. Here we present methane clumped isotope results from natural gas wells, hydrothermal vents, marine and lacustrine methane seeps, and culture experiments. We observe a wide range of formation temperatures for thermogenic methane. Methane samples from low-maturity reservoirs indicate formation temperatures between 102-144° C, high-maturity conventional and shale gasses indicate temperatures between 158-246 °C, and thermogenic coal gases indicate temperatures between 174-267 °C. Methane formation temperatures generally correlate positively with δ13C, and negatively with gas wetness indices. Methane samples from a set of marine hydrothermal vents indicate a formation temperature of 290-350 °C. Methane sampled from subsurface and marine biogenic sources typically indicate temperatures consistent with the formation environment (0-64° C). In contrast, freshwater biogenic methane samples, and cultures of hydrogenotrophic and methylotrophic methanogens, express low levels of isotopic clumping inconsistent with their formation temperature. These data and complementary models suggest that kinetic isotope effects, likely modulated by rates and pathways of methanogenesis, affect biogenic methane in cultures and freshwater environments. Alternatively, non-equilibrium signatures may result from mixing of methane with widely differing δD and δ13C values. Analyses of biogenic methane emissions from lakes indicate a correlation between methane flux and non-equilibrium clumped isotope fractionations in a given lake. Results from large methane seeps in Alaskan lakes confirm that some seeps emit thermogenic methane, but also indicate that other seeps emit subsurface biogenic methane or variable mixtures of biogenic and thermogenic methane. These results point to diverse sources for large Arctic methane seeps.

  19. Exhaled methane concentration profiles during exercise on an ergometer

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, A; Ruzsanyi, V; Unterkofler, K; Mohácsi, Á; Tuboly, E; Boros, M; Szabó, G; Hinterhuber, H; Amann, A

    2016-01-01

    Exhaled methane concentration measurements are extensively used in medical investigation of certain gastrointestinal conditions. However, the dynamics of endogenous methane release is largely unknown. Breath methane profiles during ergometer tests were measured by means of a photoacoustic spectroscopy based sensor. Five methane-producing volunteers (with exhaled methane level being at least 1 ppm higher than room air) were measured. The experimental protocol consisted of 5 min rest—15 min pedalling (at a workload of 75 W)—5 min rest. In addition, hemodynamic and respiratory parameters were determined and compared to the estimated alveolar methane concentration. The alveolar breath methane level decreased considerably, by a factor of 3–4 within 1.5 min, while the estimated ventilation-perfusion ratio increased by a factor of 2–3. Mean pre-exercise and exercise methane concentrations were 11.4 ppm (SD:7.3) and 2.8 ppm (SD:1.9), respectively. The changes can be described by the high sensitivity of exhaled methane to ventilationperfusion ratio and are in line with the Farhi equation. PMID:25749807

  20. Bioconversion of methane to lactate by an obligate methanotrophic bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Henard, Calvin A.; Smith, Holly; Dowe, Nancy; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G.; Pienkos, Philip T.; Guarnieri, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Methane is the second most abundant greenhouse gas (GHG), with nearly 60% of emissions derived from anthropogenic sources. Microbial conversion of methane to fuels and value-added chemicals offers a means to reduce GHG emissions, while also valorizing this otherwise squandered high-volume, high-energy gas. However, to date, advances in methane biocatalysis have been constrained by the low-productivity and limited genetic tractability of natural methane-consuming microbes. Here, leveraging recent identification of a novel, tractable methanotrophic bacterium, Methylomicrobium buryatense, we demonstrate microbial biocatalysis of methane to lactate, an industrial platform chemical. Heterologous overexpression of a Lactobacillus helveticus L-lactate dehydrogenase in M. buryatense resulted in an initial titer of 0.06 g lactate/L from methane. Cultivation in a 5 L continuously stirred tank bioreactor enabled production of 0.8 g lactate/L, representing a 13-fold improvement compared to the initial titer. The yields (0.05 g lactate/g methane) and productivity (0.008 g lactate/L/h) indicate the need and opportunity for future strain improvement. Additionally, real-time analysis of methane utilization implicated gas-to-liquid transfer and/or microbial methane consumption as process limitations. This work opens the door to develop an array of methanotrophic bacterial strain-engineering strategies currently employed for biocatalytic sugar upgrading to “green” chemicals and fuels. PMID:26902345

  1. Bioconversion of methane to lactate by an obligate methanotrophic bacterium

    DOE PAGES

    Henard, Calvin A.; Smith, Holly; Dowe, Nancy; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G.; Pienkos, Philip T.; Guarnieri, Michael T.

    2016-02-23

    Methane is the second most abundant greenhouse gas (GHG), with nearly 60% of emissions derived from anthropogenic sources. Microbial conversion of methane to fuels and value-added chemicals offers a means to reduce GHG emissions, while also valorizing this otherwise squandered high-volume, high-energy gas. However, to date, advances in methane biocatalysis have been constrained by the low-productivity and limited genetic tractability of natural methane-consuming microbes. Here, leveraging recent identification of a novel, tractable methanotrophic bacterium, Methylomicrobium buryatense, we demonstrate microbial biocatalysis of methane to lactate, an industrial platform chemical. Heterologous overexpression of a Lactobacillus helveticus L-lactate dehydrogenase in M. buryatense resultedmore » in an initial titer of 0.06 g lactate/L from methane. Cultivation in a 5 L continuously stirred tank bioreactor enabled production of 0.8 g lactate/L, representing a 13-fold improvement compared to the initial titer. The yields (0.05 g lactate/g methane) and productivity (0.008 g lactate/L/h) indicate the need and opportunity for future strain improvement. Additionally, real-time analysis of methane utilization implicated gas-to-liquid transfer and/or microbial methane consumption as process limitations. This work opens the door to develop an array of methanotrophic bacterial strain-engineering strategies currently employed for biocatalytic sugar upgrading to “green” chemicals and fuels.« less

  2. Improving methane production in cow dung and corn straw co-fermentation systems via enhanced degradation of cellulose by cabbage addition

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wenyang; Chen, Yong; Faisal, Shah; Khan, Aman; Chen, Zhengjun; Ling, Zhenmin; Liu, Pu; Li, Xiangkai

    2016-01-01

    The effects of cabbage waste (CW) addition on methane production in cow dung and corn straw co-fermentation systems were investigated. Four experimental groups, each containing 55 g of substrate, were set up as follows: 100% cow dung (C); 36% cabbage and 64% cow dung (CC); 36% straw and 64% cow dung (SC); and 18% cabbage, 18% straw, and 64% cow dung (CSC). After seven days of fermentation, the maximum methane yield was 134 mL in the CSC group, which was 2.81-fold, 1.78-fold, and 1340-fold higher than that obtained in the CC, SC, and C groups, respectively. CW treatment of the CSC group enhanced cellulase activity and enriched culturable cellulose-degrading bacterial strains. Miseq sequencing data revealed that the predominant phylum in the CSC group was Bacteroidetes, which contains most of the cellulose-degrading bacteria. Our results suggested that CW treatment elevated cellulose degradation and promoted methane production. PMID:27641709

  3. Improving methane production in cow dung and corn straw co-fermentation systems via enhanced degradation of cellulose by cabbage addition.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenyang; Chen, Yong; Faisal, Shah; Khan, Aman; Chen, Zhengjun; Ling, Zhenmin; Liu, Pu; Li, Xiangkai

    2016-01-01

    The effects of cabbage waste (CW) addition on methane production in cow dung and corn straw co-fermentation systems were investigated. Four experimental groups, each containing 55 g of substrate, were set up as follows: 100% cow dung (C); 36% cabbage and 64% cow dung (CC); 36% straw and 64% cow dung (SC); and 18% cabbage, 18% straw, and 64% cow dung (CSC). After seven days of fermentation, the maximum methane yield was 134 mL in the CSC group, which was 2.81-fold, 1.78-fold, and 1340-fold higher than that obtained in the CC, SC, and C groups, respectively. CW treatment of the CSC group enhanced cellulase activity and enriched culturable cellulose-degrading bacterial strains. Miseq sequencing data revealed that the predominant phylum in the CSC group was Bacteroidetes, which contains most of the cellulose-degrading bacteria. Our results suggested that CW treatment elevated cellulose degradation and promoted methane production. PMID:27641709

  4. The regulation of methane oxidation in soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mancinelli, R. L.

    1995-01-01

    The atmospheric concentration of methane, a greenhouse gas, has more than doubled during the past 200 years. Consequently, identifying the factors influencing the flux of methane into the atmosphere is becoming increasingly important. Methanotrophs, microaerophilic organisms widespread in aerobic soils and sediments, oxidize methane to derive energy and carbon for biomass. In so doing, they play an important role in mitigating the flux of methane into the atmosphere. Several physico-chemical factors influence rates of methane oxidation in soil, including soil diffusivity; water potential; and levels of oxygen, methane, ammonium, nitrate, nitrite, and copper. Most of these factors exert their influence through interactions with methane monooxygenase (MMO), the enzyme that catalyzes the reaction converting methane to methanol, the first step in methane oxidation. Although biological factors such as competition and predation undoubtedly play a role in regulating the methanotroph population in soils, and thereby limit the amount of methane consumed by methanotrophs, the significance of these factors is unknown. Obtaining a better understanding of the ecology of methanotrophs will help elucidate the mechanisms that regulate soil methane oxidation.

  5. Methane production from acid hydrolysates of Agave tequilana bagasse: evaluation of hydrolysis conditions and methane yield.

    PubMed

    Arreola-Vargas, Jorge; Ojeda-Castillo, Valeria; Snell-Castro, Raúl; Corona-González, Rosa Isela; Alatriste-Mondragón, Felipe; Méndez-Acosta, Hugo O

    2015-04-01

    Evaluation of diluted acid hydrolysis for sugar extraction from cooked and uncooked Agave tequilana bagasse and feasibility of using the hydrolysates as substrate for methane production, with and without nutrient addition, in anaerobic sequencing batch reactors (AnSBR) were studied. Results showed that the hydrolysis over the cooked bagasse was more effective for sugar extraction at the studied conditions. Total sugars concentration in the cooked and uncooked bagasse hydrolysates were 27.9 g/L and 18.7 g/L, respectively. However, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural was detected in the cooked bagasse hydrolysate, and therefore, the uncooked bagasse hydrolysate was selected as substrate for methane production. Interestingly, results showed that the AnSBR operated without nutrient addition obtained a constant methane production (0.26 L CH4/g COD), whereas the AnSBR operated with nutrient addition presented a gradual methane suppression. Molecular analyses suggested that methane suppression in the experiment with nutrient addition was due to a negative effect over the archaeal/bacterial ratio. PMID:25647030

  6. Methane production from acid hydrolysates of Agave tequilana bagasse: evaluation of hydrolysis conditions and methane yield.

    PubMed

    Arreola-Vargas, Jorge; Ojeda-Castillo, Valeria; Snell-Castro, Raúl; Corona-González, Rosa Isela; Alatriste-Mondragón, Felipe; Méndez-Acosta, Hugo O

    2015-04-01

    Evaluation of diluted acid hydrolysis for sugar extraction from cooked and uncooked Agave tequilana bagasse and feasibility of using the hydrolysates as substrate for methane production, with and without nutrient addition, in anaerobic sequencing batch reactors (AnSBR) were studied. Results showed that the hydrolysis over the cooked bagasse was more effective for sugar extraction at the studied conditions. Total sugars concentration in the cooked and uncooked bagasse hydrolysates were 27.9 g/L and 18.7 g/L, respectively. However, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural was detected in the cooked bagasse hydrolysate, and therefore, the uncooked bagasse hydrolysate was selected as substrate for methane production. Interestingly, results showed that the AnSBR operated without nutrient addition obtained a constant methane production (0.26 L CH4/g COD), whereas the AnSBR operated with nutrient addition presented a gradual methane suppression. Molecular analyses suggested that methane suppression in the experiment with nutrient addition was due to a negative effect over the archaeal/bacterial ratio.

  7. Estimation of methane emission flux at landfill surface using laser methane detector: Influence of gauge pressure.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Kyu; Kang, Jong-Yun; Lee, Nam-Hoon

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of measuring methane emission fluxes, using surface methane concentration and gauge pressure, by analyzing the influence of gauge pressure on the methane emission flux and the surface methane concentration, as well as the correlation between the methane emission flux and surface methane concentrations. The surface methane concentration was measured using a laser methane detector. Our results show a positive linear relationship between the surface methane concentration and the methane emission flux. Furthermore, the methane emission flux showed a positive linear relationship with the gauge pressure; this implies that when the surface methane concentration and the surface gauge pressure are measured simultaneously, the methane emission flux can be calculated using Darcy's law. A decrease in the vertical permeability was observed when the gauge pressure was increased, because reducing the vertical permeability may lead to a reduced landfill gas emission to the atmosphere, and landfill gas would be accumulated inside the landfill. Finally, this method is simple and can allow for a greater number of measurements during a relatively shorter period. Thus, it provides a better representation of the significant space and time variations in methane emission fluxes. PMID:27401161

  8. Estimation of methane emission flux at landfill surface using laser methane detector: Influence of gauge pressure.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Kyu; Kang, Jong-Yun; Lee, Nam-Hoon

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of measuring methane emission fluxes, using surface methane concentration and gauge pressure, by analyzing the influence of gauge pressure on the methane emission flux and the surface methane concentration, as well as the correlation between the methane emission flux and surface methane concentrations. The surface methane concentration was measured using a laser methane detector. Our results show a positive linear relationship between the surface methane concentration and the methane emission flux. Furthermore, the methane emission flux showed a positive linear relationship with the gauge pressure; this implies that when the surface methane concentration and the surface gauge pressure are measured simultaneously, the methane emission flux can be calculated using Darcy's law. A decrease in the vertical permeability was observed when the gauge pressure was increased, because reducing the vertical permeability may lead to a reduced landfill gas emission to the atmosphere, and landfill gas would be accumulated inside the landfill. Finally, this method is simple and can allow for a greater number of measurements during a relatively shorter period. Thus, it provides a better representation of the significant space and time variations in methane emission fluxes.

  9. Methane clathrates in the solar system.

    PubMed

    Mousis, Olivier; Chassefière, Eric; Holm, Nils G; Bouquet, Alexis; Waite, Jack Hunter; Geppert, Wolf Dietrich; Picaud, Sylvain; Aikawa, Yuri; Ali-Dib, Mohamad; Charlou, Jean-Luc; Rousselot, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    We review the reservoirs of methane clathrates that may exist in the different bodies of the Solar System. Methane was formed in the interstellar medium prior to having been embedded in the protosolar nebula gas phase. This molecule was subsequently trapped in clathrates that formed from crystalline water ice during the cooling of the disk and incorporated in this form into the building blocks of comets, icy bodies, and giant planets. Methane clathrates may play an important role in the evolution of planetary atmospheres. On Earth, the production of methane in clathrates is essentially biological, and these compounds are mostly found in permafrost regions or in the sediments of continental shelves. On Mars, methane would more likely derive from hydrothermal reactions with olivine-rich material. If they do exist, martian methane clathrates would be stable only at depth in the cryosphere and sporadically release some methane into the atmosphere via mechanisms that remain to be determined. In the case of Titan, most of its methane probably originates from the protosolar nebula, where it would have been trapped in the clathrates agglomerated by the satellite's building blocks. Methane clathrates are still believed to play an important role in the present state of Titan. Their presence is invoked in the satellite's subsurface as a means of replenishing its atmosphere with methane via outgassing episodes. The internal oceans of Enceladus and Europa also provide appropriate thermodynamic conditions that allow formation of methane clathrates. In turn, these clathrates might influence the composition of these liquid reservoirs. Finally, comets and Kuiper Belt Objects might have formed from the agglomeration of clathrates and pure ices in the nebula. The methane observed in comets would then result from the destabilization of clathrate layers in the nuclei concurrent with their approach to perihelion. Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations show that methane-rich clathrate

  10. Methane clathrates in the solar system.

    PubMed

    Mousis, Olivier; Chassefière, Eric; Holm, Nils G; Bouquet, Alexis; Waite, Jack Hunter; Geppert, Wolf Dietrich; Picaud, Sylvain; Aikawa, Yuri; Ali-Dib, Mohamad; Charlou, Jean-Luc; Rousselot, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    We review the reservoirs of methane clathrates that may exist in the different bodies of the Solar System. Methane was formed in the interstellar medium prior to having been embedded in the protosolar nebula gas phase. This molecule was subsequently trapped in clathrates that formed from crystalline water ice during the cooling of the disk and incorporated in this form into the building blocks of comets, icy bodies, and giant planets. Methane clathrates may play an important role in the evolution of planetary atmospheres. On Earth, the production of methane in clathrates is essentially biological, and these compounds are mostly found in permafrost regions or in the sediments of continental shelves. On Mars, methane would more likely derive from hydrothermal reactions with olivine-rich material. If they do exist, martian methane clathrates would be stable only at depth in the cryosphere and sporadically release some methane into the atmosphere via mechanisms that remain to be determined. In the case of Titan, most of its methane probably originates from the protosolar nebula, where it would have been trapped in the clathrates agglomerated by the satellite's building blocks. Methane clathrates are still believed to play an important role in the present state of Titan. Their presence is invoked in the satellite's subsurface as a means of replenishing its atmosphere with methane via outgassing episodes. The internal oceans of Enceladus and Europa also provide appropriate thermodynamic conditions that allow formation of methane clathrates. In turn, these clathrates might influence the composition of these liquid reservoirs. Finally, comets and Kuiper Belt Objects might have formed from the agglomeration of clathrates and pure ices in the nebula. The methane observed in comets would then result from the destabilization of clathrate layers in the nuclei concurrent with their approach to perihelion. Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations show that methane-rich clathrate

  11. Anaerobic oxidation of methane in the Concepción Methane Seep Area, Chilean continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steeb, P.; Linke, P.; Scholz, F.; Schmidt, M.; Liebetrau, V.; Treude, T.

    2012-04-01

    Within subduction zones of active continental margins, large amounts of methane can be mobilized by dewatering processes and transported to the seafloor along migration pathways. A recently discovered seep area located off Concepción (Chile) at water depth between 600 to 1100 mbsl is characterized by active methane vent sites as well as massive carbonates boulders and plates which probably are related to methane seepage in the past. During the SO210 research expedition "Chiflux" (Sept-Oct 2010), sediment from the Concepción Methane Seep Area (CSMA) at the fore arc of the Chilean margin was sampled to study microbial activity related to methane seepage. We sampled surface sediments (0-30cm) from sulfur bacteria mats, as well as clam, pogonophoran, and tubeworm fields with push cores and a TV-guided multicorer system. Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and sulfate reduction rates were determined using ex-situ radioisotope tracer techniques. Additionally, porewater chemistry of retrieved cores as well as isotopic composition and age record of surrounding authigenic carbonates were analyzed. The shallowest sulfate-methane-transition zone (SMTZ) was identified at 4 cm sediment depth hinting to locally strong fluid fluxes. However, a lack of Cl- anomalies in porewater profiles indicates a shallow source of these fluids, which is supported by the biogenic origin of the methane (δ13C -70‰ PDB). Sulfide and alkalinity was relatively high (up to 20 mM and 40 mEq, respectively). Rates of AOM and sulfate reduction within this area reached magnitudes typical for seeps with variation between different habitat types, indicating a diverse methane supply, which is affecting the depths of the SMTZ. Rates were highest at sulfur a bacteria mats (20 mmol m-2 d-1) followed by a large field of dead clams, a pogonophoran field, a black sediment spot, and a carbonate rich clam field. Lowest rates (0.2 mmol m-2 d-1) were measured in close vicinity to these hot spots. Abundant massive

  12. Factors affecting methane emission from rice fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neue, H. U.; Wassmann, R.; Lantin, R. S.; Alberto, Ma C. R.; Aduna, J. B.; Javellana, A. M.

    Emission of CH 4 from ricefields is the result of anoxic bacterial methane production. Global estimates of annual CH 4 emission from ricefields is 100 Tg. CH 4 emission data from limited sites are tentative. It is essential that uncertainty in individual sources is reduced in order to develop feasible and effective mitigation options which do not negate gains in rice production and productivity. Field studies at the International Rice Research Institute show that soil and added organic matter are the sources for initial methane production. Addition of rice straw enhances methane production. Roots and root exudates of wetland rice plants appear to be the major carbon sources at ripening stage. The production and transport of CH 4 to the atmosphere depend on properties of the rice plant. Under the same spacing and fertilization, the traditional variety Dular emitted more CH 4 per day than did the new plant type IR65597. Upon flooding for land preparation anaerobic conditions result in significant amount of methane being formed. Drying the field at midtillering significantly reduced total CH 4 emissions. Large amounts of entrapped CH 4 escape to the atmosphere when floodwater recedes upon drying at harvest. Cultural practices may account for 20% of the overall seasonal CH 4 emissions.

  13. The Methane to Markets Coal Mine Methane Subcommittee meeting

    SciTech Connect

    2008-07-01

    The presentations (overheads/viewgraphs) include: a report from the Administrative Support Group; strategy updates from Australia, India, Italy, Mexico, Nigeria, Poland and the USA; coal mine methane update and IEA's strategy and activities; the power of VAM - technology application update; the emissions trading market; the voluntary emissions reduction market - creating profitable CMM projects in the USA; an Italian perspective towards a zero emission strategies; and the wrap-up and summary.

  14. Methane production and isotopic fingerprinting in ethanol fuel contaminated sites.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Juliana G; Fletcher, Barbara; Aravena, Ramon; Barker, James F

    2010-01-01

    Biodegradation of organic compounds in groundwater can be a significant source of methane in contaminated sites. Methane might accumulate in indoor spaces posing a hazard. The increasing use of ethanol as a gasoline additive is a concern with respect to methane production since it is easily biodegraded and has a high oxygen demand, favoring the development of anaerobic conditions. This study evaluated the use of stable carbon isotopes to distinguish the methane origin between gasoline and ethanol biodegradation, and assessed the occurrence of methane in ethanol fuel contaminated sites. Two microcosm tests were performed under anaerobic conditions: one test using ethanol and the other using toluene as the sole carbon source. The isotopic tool was then applied to seven field sites known to be impacted by ethanol fuels. In the microcosm tests, it was verified that methane from ethanol (δ¹³C = -11.1‰) is more enriched in ¹³C, with δ¹³C values ranging from -20‰ to -30‰, while the methane from toluene (δ¹³C = -28.5‰) had a carbon isotopic signature of -55‰. The field samples had δ¹³C values varying over a wide range (-10‰ to -80‰), and the δ¹³C values allowed the methane source to be clearly identified in five of the seven ethanol/gasoline sites. In the other two sites, methane appears to have been produced from both sources. Both gasoline and ethanol were sources of methane in potentially hazardous concentrations and methane could be produced from organic acids originating from ethanol along the groundwater flow system even after all the ethanol has been completed biodegraded.

  15. Sustained reduction in methane production from long-term addition of 3-nitrooxypropanol to a beef cattle diet.

    PubMed

    Romero-Perez, A; Okine, E K; McGinn, S M; Guan, L L; Oba, M; Duval, S M; Kindermann, M; Beauchemin, K A

    2015-04-01

    The objective was to evaluate whether long-term addition of 3-nitrooxypropanol (NOP) to a beef cattle diet results in a sustained reduction in enteric CH4 emissions in beef cattle. Eight ruminally cannulated heifers (637 ± 16.2 kg BW) were used in a completely randomized design with 2 treatments: Control (0 g/d of NOP) and NOP (2 g/d of NOP). Treatments were mixed by hand into the total mixed ration (60% forage, DM basis) at feeding time. Feed offered was restricted to 65% of ad libitum DMI (slightly over maintenance energy intake) and provided once per day. The duration of the experiment was 146 d, including an initial 18-d covariate period without NOP use; a 112-d treatment period with NOP addition to the diet, divided into four 28-d time intervals (d 1 to 28, 29 to 56, 57 to 84, and 85 to 112); and a final 16-d recovery period without NOP use. During the covariate period and at the end of each interval and the end of the recovery period, CH4 was measured for 3 d using whole animal metabolic chambers. The concentration of VFA was measured in rumen fluid samples collected 0, 3, and 6 h after feeding, and the microbial population was evaluated using rumen samples collected 3 h after feeding on d 12 of the covariate period, d 22 of each interval within the treatment period, and d 8 of the recovery period. Average DMI for the experiment was 7.04 ± 0.27 kg. Methane emissions were reduced by 59.2% when NOP was used (9.16 vs. 22.46 g/kg DMI; P < 0.01). Total VFA concentrations were not affected (P = 0.12); however, molar proportion of acetate was reduced and that for propionate increased when NOP was added (P < 0.01), which reduced the acetate to propionate ratio (3.0 vs. 4.0; P < 0.01). The total copy number of the 16S rRNA gene of total bacteria was not affected (P = 0.50) by NOP, but the copy number of the 16S rRNA gene of methanogens was reduced (P < 0.01) and the copy number of the 18S rRNA gene of protozoa was increased (P = 0.03). The residual effect of NOP for

  16. Sustained reduction in methane production from long-term addition of 3-nitrooxypropanol to a beef cattle diet.

    PubMed

    Romero-Perez, A; Okine, E K; McGinn, S M; Guan, L L; Oba, M; Duval, S M; Kindermann, M; Beauchemin, K A

    2015-04-01

    The objective was to evaluate whether long-term addition of 3-nitrooxypropanol (NOP) to a beef cattle diet results in a sustained reduction in enteric CH4 emissions in beef cattle. Eight ruminally cannulated heifers (637 ± 16.2 kg BW) were used in a completely randomized design with 2 treatments: Control (0 g/d of NOP) and NOP (2 g/d of NOP). Treatments were mixed by hand into the total mixed ration (60% forage, DM basis) at feeding time. Feed offered was restricted to 65% of ad libitum DMI (slightly over maintenance energy intake) and provided once per day. The duration of the experiment was 146 d, including an initial 18-d covariate period without NOP use; a 112-d treatment period with NOP addition to the diet, divided into four 28-d time intervals (d 1 to 28, 29 to 56, 57 to 84, and 85 to 112); and a final 16-d recovery period without NOP use. During the covariate period and at the end of each interval and the end of the recovery period, CH4 was measured for 3 d using whole animal metabolic chambers. The concentration of VFA was measured in rumen fluid samples collected 0, 3, and 6 h after feeding, and the microbial population was evaluated using rumen samples collected 3 h after feeding on d 12 of the covariate period, d 22 of each interval within the treatment period, and d 8 of the recovery period. Average DMI for the experiment was 7.04 ± 0.27 kg. Methane emissions were reduced by 59.2% when NOP was used (9.16 vs. 22.46 g/kg DMI; P < 0.01). Total VFA concentrations were not affected (P = 0.12); however, molar proportion of acetate was reduced and that for propionate increased when NOP was added (P < 0.01), which reduced the acetate to propionate ratio (3.0 vs. 4.0; P < 0.01). The total copy number of the 16S rRNA gene of total bacteria was not affected (P = 0.50) by NOP, but the copy number of the 16S rRNA gene of methanogens was reduced (P < 0.01) and the copy number of the 18S rRNA gene of protozoa was increased (P = 0.03). The residual effect of NOP for

  17. [Copper in methane oxidation: a review].

    PubMed

    Su, Yao; Kong, Jiao-Yan; Zhang, Xuan; Xia, Fang-Fang; He, Ruo

    2014-04-01

    Methane bio-oxidation plays an important role in the global methane balance and warming mitigation, while copper has a crucial function in methane bio-oxidation. On one side, copper is known to be a key factor in regulating the expression of the genes encoding the two forms of methane monooxygenases (MMOs) and is the essential metal element of the particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO). On the other side, the content and fractionation of copper in the environment have great effects on the distribution of methanotrophs and their metabolic capability of methane and non-methane organic compounds, as well as on the copper-specific uptake systems in methanotrophs. Thus, it is meaningful to know the role of copper in methane bio-oxidation for comprehensive understanding of this process and is valuable for guiding the application of methanotrophs in greenhouse gas removal and pollution remediation. In this paper, the roles of copper in methane oxidation were reviewed, including the effect of copper on methanotrophic community structure and activity, the expression and activity of MMOs as well as the copper uptake systems in methanotrophs. The future studies of copper and methane oxidation were also discussed.

  18. Responses of methane effluxes and soil methane concentrations to compaction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plain, C.; Delogu, E.; Longdoz, B.; Epron, D.; Ranger, J.

    2015-12-01

    Forest soils host methanotrophic bacterial communities that make them a major methane sink worldwide. Soil compaction resulting from mechanization of forest operations is first affecting soil macroporosity, and thus gas and water transfer within the soil, leading to a reduced oxygenation of the soil. This reduction of soil aeration is expected to reduce the methanotrophic activity leading thus to less CH4 oxidation and more CH4 production, affecting the overall soil CH4budget. Compaction was applied in 2007 and had created linear ruts. We measured continuously since September 2014, in three different situations (compacted-mound, compacted hollow and control), soil CO2 and CH4 effluxes using closed chamber coupled to a cavity ring down spectrometer in an young oak plantation. Since December 2015, in addition to these measurements, we have implanted hydrophobic tubes to measure vertical soil profiles of CH4, O2 and CO2 concentrations in the 3 situations. The soil acts as CH4 sink, with no significant difference in net CH4uptake between control and both hollow and mound in the compacted treatment. However, the uptake of CH4 was significantly lower for the hollows than for the mounds resulting from both a lower diffusion of CH4 within soil and a higher production of CH4 in deeper layer when the soil is water saturated.

  19. Effectiveness of nitrate addition and increased oil content as methane mitigation strategies for beef cattle fed two contrasting basal diets.

    PubMed

    Troy, S M; Duthie, C-A; Hyslop, J J; Roehe, R; Ross, D W; Wallace, R J; Waterhouse, A; Rooke, J A

    2015-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of (1) the addition of nitrate and (2) an increase in dietary oil on methane (CH4) and hydrogen (H2) emissions from 2 breeds (cross-bred Charolais and purebred Luing) of finishing beef cattle receiving 2 contrasting basal diets consisting (grams per kilogram DM) of 500:500 (Mixed) and 80:920 (Concentrate) forage to concentrate ratios. Within each basal diet there were 3 treatments: (i) control treatments (mixed-CTL and concentrate-CTL) contained rapeseed meal as the protein source, which was replaced with either (ii) calcium nitrate (mixed-NIT and concentrate-NIT) supplying 21.5 g nitrate/kg DM, or (iii) rapeseed cake (mixed-RSC and concentrate-RSC) to increase dietary oil from 27 (CTL) to 53 g/kg DM (RSC). Following adaption to diets, CH4 and H2 emissions were measured on 1 occasion from each of the 76 steers over a 13-wk period. Dry matter intakes tended (P = 0.051) to be greater for the concentrate diet than the mixed diet; however, when expressed as grams DMI per kilogram BW, there was no difference between diets (P = 0.41). Dry matter intakes for NIT or RSC did not differ from CTL. Steers fed a concentrate diet produced less CH4 and H2 than those fed a mixed diet (P < 0.001). Molar proportions of acetate (P < 0.001) and butyrate (P < 0.01) were lower and propionate (P < 0.001) and valerate (P < 0.05) higher in the rumen fluid from steers fed the concentrate diet. For the mixed diet, CH4 yield (grams per kilogram DMI) was decreased by 17% when nitrate was added (P < 0.01), while H2 yield increased by 160% (P < 0.001). The addition of RSC to the mixed diet decreased CH4 yield by 7.5% (P = 0.18). However, for the concentrate diet neither addition of nitrate (P = 0.65) nor increasing dietary oil content (P = 0.46) decreased CH4 yield compared to concentrate-CTL. Molar proportions of acetate were higher (P < 0.001) and those of propionate lower (P < 0.01) in rumen fluid from NIT treatments compared to

  20. Pluto: evidence for methane frost.

    PubMed

    1976-11-19

    Infrared photometry (1.2 to 2.2 micrometers) of Pluto provides evidence for frozen methane on the surface of the planet. This appears to be the first observational indication of this ice in the solar system. Its presence on Pluto suggests that the planet's albedo (reflectance) may be >/= 0.4 and that its diameter may be less than that of the moon.

  1. Methane production from grape skins. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Yunghans, W.N.

    1981-10-09

    Methane production from grape pomace was measured for a 50-day digestion period. Gas production was calculated to be 2400 ft/sup 3//10 d/ton at 53% methane content. Microorganisms particularly a fungus which grows on grape pomace and lignin was isolated. Lignin content of pomace was measured at approximately 60%. Lignin is slowly digested and may represent a residue which requires long term digestion. Research is continuing on isolation of anaerobic methane bacteria and codigestion of pomace with enzymes as cellulase and pectinase. The sewage sludge functioned adequately as a mixed source of organisms capable of digesting grape pomace. A sediment from stored grape juice produced significant amounts of methane and represents a nutrient substrate for additional studies on continuous flow methane production. 3 figs.

  2. Enhanced Microbial Pathways for Methane Production from Oil Shale

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Fallgren

    2009-02-15

    Methane from oil shale can potentially provide a significant contribution to natural gas industry, and it may be possible to increase and continue methane production by artificially enhancing methanogenic activity through the addition of various substrate and nutrient treatments. Western Research Institute in conjunction with Pick & Shovel Inc. and the U.S. Department of Energy conducted microcosm and scaled-up reactor studies to investigate the feasibility and optimization of biogenic methane production from oil shale. The microcosm study involving crushed oil shale showed the highest yield of methane was produced from oil shale pretreated with a basic solution and treated with nutrients. Incubation at 30 C, which is the estimated temperature in the subsurface where the oil shale originated, caused and increase in methane production. The methane production eventually decreased when pH of the system was above 9.00. In the scaled-up reactor study, pretreatment of the oil shale with a basic solution, nutrient enhancements, incubation at 30 C, and maintaining pH at circumneutral levels yielded the highest rate of biogenic methane production. From this study, the annual biogenic methane production rate was determined to be as high as 6042 cu. ft/ton oil shale.

  3. Anthropogenic emissions of methane in the United States.

    PubMed

    Miller, Scot M; Wofsy, Steven C; Michalak, Anna M; Kort, Eric A; Andrews, Arlyn E; Biraud, Sebastien C; Dlugokencky, Edward J; Eluszkiewicz, Janusz; Fischer, Marc L; Janssens-Maenhout, Greet; Miller, Ben R; Miller, John B; Montzka, Stephen A; Nehrkorn, Thomas; Sweeney, Colm

    2013-12-10

    This study quantitatively estimates the spatial distribution of anthropogenic methane sources in the United States by combining comprehensive atmospheric methane observations, extensive spatial datasets, and a high-resolution atmospheric transport model. Results show that current inventories from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research underestimate methane emissions nationally by a factor of ∼1.5 and ∼1.7, respectively. Our study indicates that emissions due to ruminants and manure are up to twice the magnitude of existing inventories. In addition, the discrepancy in methane source estimates is particularly pronounced in the south-central United States, where we find total emissions are ∼2.7 times greater than in most inventories and account for 24 ± 3% of national emissions. The spatial patterns of our emission fluxes and observed methane-propane correlations indicate that fossil fuel extraction and refining are major contributors (45 ± 13%) in the south-central United States. This result suggests that regional methane emissions due to fossil fuel extraction and processing could be 4.9 ± 2.6 times larger than in EDGAR, the most comprehensive global methane inventory. These results cast doubt on the US EPA's recent decision to downscale its estimate of national natural gas emissions by 25-30%. Overall, we conclude that methane emissions associated with both the animal husbandry and fossil fuel industries have larger greenhouse gas impacts than indicated by existing inventories.

  4. Martian Atmospheric Methane Plumes from Meteor Shower Infall: A Hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fries, M.; Christou, A.; Archer, D.; Conrad, P.; Cooke, W.; Eigenbrode, J.; ten Kate, I. L.; Matney, M.; Niles, P.; Sykes, M.

    2016-01-01

    Methane plumes in the martian atmosphere have been detected using Earth-based spectroscopy, the Planetary Fourier Spectrometer on the ESA Mars Express mission, and the NASA Mars Science Laboratory. The methane's origin remains a mystery, with proposed sources including volcanism, exogenous sources like impacts and interplanetary dust, aqueous alteration of olivine in the presence of carbonaceous material, release from ancient deposits of methane clathrates, and/or biological activity. To date, none of these phenomena have been found to reliably correlate with the detection of methane plumes. An additional source exists, however: meteor showers could generate martian methane via UV pyrolysis of carbon-rich infall material. We find a correlation between the dates of Mars/cometary orbit encounters and detections of methane on Mars. We hypothesize that cometary debris falls onto Mars during these interactions, depositing freshly disaggregated meteor shower material in a regional concentration. The material generates methane via UV photolysis, resulting in a localized "plume" of short-lived methane.

  5. Molecular dynamics study of methane hydration and methane association in a polarizable water phase

    SciTech Connect

    Belle, D. van; Wodak, S.J. )

    1993-01-27

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the influence of adding an explicit polarization term to the water potential on the structural and dynamic properties of aqueous methane solutions and on methane-methane association in water. Calculations are performed using respectively two different water models: the three-center polarizable water model (PSPC), where the many-body effects are treated explicitly using the extended Lagrangian method, and the mean-field classical SPC model. Comparing the results obtained from the two sets of calculations the authors find that electronic polarization of the water molecules has a subtle though significant influence on the structure and dynamic of water molecules surrounding the hydrophobic solute. But its most remarkable influence by far is on the methane-methane potential of mean force: addition of the polarization term to the water potential effectively abolishes the much questioned solvent-separated minimum found in many previous studies with nonpolarizable water models. Polarizable water models thus appear to yield an improved physical picture of the system and should be well suited for investigating the process of hydrophobic association. 45 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Titan's Methane Cycle is Closed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofgartner, J. D.; Lunine, J. I.

    2013-12-01

    Doppler tracking of the Cassini spacecraft determined a polar moment of inertia for Titan of 0.34 (Iess et al., 2010, Science, 327, 1367). Assuming hydrostatic equilibrium, one interpretation is that Titan's silicate core is partially hydrated (Castillo-Rogez and Lunine, 2010, Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L20205). These authors point out that for the core to have avoided complete thermal dehydration to the present day, at least 30% of the potassium content of Titan must have leached into an overlying water ocean by the end of the core overturn. We calculate that for probable ammonia compositions of Titan's ocean (compositions with greater than 1% ammonia by weight), that this amount of potassium leaching is achievable via the substitution of ammonium for potassium during the hydration epoch. Formation of a hydrous core early in Titan's history by serpentinization results in the loss of one hydrogen molecule for every hydrating water molecule. We calculate that complete serpentinization of Titan's core corresponds to the release of more than enough hydrogen to reconstitute all of the methane atoms photolyzed throughout Titan's history. Insertion of molecular hydrogen by double occupancy into crustal clathrates provides a storage medium and an opportunity for ethane to be converted back to methane slowly over time--potentially completing a cycle that extends the lifetime of methane in Titan's surface atmosphere system by factors of several to an order of magnitude over the photochemically-calculated lifetime.

  7. Ceramic membranes for methane conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Balachandran, U.; Dusek, J.T.; Mieville, R.L.; Maiya, P.S.; Kleefisch, M.S.; Pei, S.; Kobylinski, T.P.; Udovich, C.A.

    1994-09-01

    In conventional conversion of methane to syngas, a significant cost of the partial oxidation process is that of the oxygen plant. In this report, the authors offer a technology that is based on dense ceramic membranes and that uses air as the oxidant for methane-conversion reactions, thus eliminating the need for the oxygen plant. Certain ceramic materials exhibit both electronic and ionic conductivities (of particular interest is oxygen-ion conductivity). These materials transport not only oxygen ions (functioning as selective oxygen separators) but also electrons back from the reactor side to the oxygen/reduction interface. No external electrodes are required and if the driving potential of transport is sufficient, the partial-oxidation reactions should be spontaneous. Such a system will operate without an externally applied potential. Oxygen is transported across the ceramic material in the form of oxygen anions, not oxygen molecules. Long tubes of Sr-Fe-Co-O (SFC) membrane were fabricated by plastic extrusion, and thermal stability of the tubes was studied as a function of oxygen partial pressure and high-temperature XRD. Mechanical properties were measured and found to be acceptable for a reactor material. Fracture of certain SFC tubes was the consequence of an oxygen gradient that introduced a volumetric lattice difference between the inner and outer walls. However, tubes made with a particular stoichiometry (SFC-2) provided methane conversion efficiencies of >99% in a reactor and some of these tubes have operated for up to {approx}1,000 h.

  8. Evidence for methane in Martian meteorites

    PubMed Central

    Blamey, Nigel J. F.; Parnell, John; McMahon, Sean; Mark, Darren F.; Tomkinson, Tim; Lee, Martin; Shivak, Jared; Izawa, Matthew R. M.; Banerjee, Neil R.; Flemming, Roberta L.

    2015-01-01

    The putative occurrence of methane in the Martian atmosphere has had a major influence on the exploration of Mars, especially by the implication of active biology. The occurrence has not been borne out by measurements of atmosphere by the MSL rover Curiosity but, as on Earth, methane on Mars is most likely in the subsurface of the crust. Serpentinization of olivine-bearing rocks, to yield hydrogen that may further react with carbon-bearing species, has been widely invoked as a source of methane on Mars, but this possibility has not hitherto been tested. Here we show that some Martian meteorites, representing basic igneous rocks, liberate a methane-rich volatile component on crushing. The occurrence of methane in Martian rock samples adds strong weight to models whereby any life on Mars is/was likely to be resident in a subsurface habitat, where methane could be a source of energy and carbon for microbial activity. PMID:26079798

  9. Evidence for methane in Martian meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blamey, Nigel J. F.; Parnell, John; McMahon, Sean; Mark, Darren F.; Tomkinson, Tim; Lee, Martin; Shivak, Jared; Izawa, Matthew R. M.; Banerjee, Neil R.; Flemming, Roberta L.

    2015-06-01

    The putative occurrence of methane in the Martian atmosphere has had a major influence on the exploration of Mars, especially by the implication of active biology. The occurrence has not been borne out by measurements of atmosphere by the MSL rover Curiosity but, as on Earth, methane on Mars is most likely in the subsurface of the crust. Serpentinization of olivine-bearing rocks, to yield hydrogen that may further react with carbon-bearing species, has been widely invoked as a source of methane on Mars, but this possibility has not hitherto been tested. Here we show that some Martian meteorites, representing basic igneous rocks, liberate a methane-rich volatile component on crushing. The occurrence of methane in Martian rock samples adds strong weight to models whereby any life on Mars is/was likely to be resident in a subsurface habitat, where methane could be a source of energy and carbon for microbial activity.

  10. Evidence for methane in Martian meteorites.

    PubMed

    Blamey, Nigel J F; Parnell, John; McMahon, Sean; Mark, Darren F; Tomkinson, Tim; Lee, Martin; Shivak, Jared; Izawa, Matthew R M; Banerjee, Neil R; Flemming, Roberta L

    2015-01-01

    The putative occurrence of methane in the Martian atmosphere has had a major influence on the exploration of Mars, especially by the implication of active biology. The occurrence has not been borne out by measurements of atmosphere by the MSL rover Curiosity but, as on Earth, methane on Mars is most likely in the subsurface of the crust. Serpentinization of olivine-bearing rocks, to yield hydrogen that may further react with carbon-bearing species, has been widely invoked as a source of methane on Mars, but this possibility has not hitherto been tested. Here we show that some Martian meteorites, representing basic igneous rocks, liberate a methane-rich volatile component on crushing. The occurrence of methane in Martian rock samples adds strong weight to models whereby any life on Mars is/was likely to be resident in a subsurface habitat, where methane could be a source of energy and carbon for microbial activity. PMID:26079798

  11. Emerging topics in marine methane biogeochemistry.

    PubMed

    Valentine, David L

    2011-01-01

    Our knowledge of physical, chemical, geological and biological processes affecting methane in the ocean and in underlying sediments is expanding at a rapid pace. On first inspection, marine methane biogeochemistry appears simple: Methane distribution in sediment is set by the deposition pattern of organic material, and the balance of sources and sinks keeps its concentration low in most waters. However, recent research reveals that methane is affected by complex biogeochemical processes whose interactions are understood only at a superficial level. Such processes span the deep-subsurface, near subsurface, and ocean waters, and relate primarily to the production, consumption, and transport of methane. The purpose of this synthesis is to examine select processes within the framework of methane biogeochemistry, to formulate hypotheses on how they might operate and interact with one another, and to consider their controls. PMID:21329202

  12. Methane-induced haemolysis of human erythrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Batliwala, H; Somasundaram, T; Uzgiris, E E; Makowski, L

    1995-01-01

    Human erythrocytes were exposed to high concentrations of methane and nitrogen through the application of elevated partial pressures of these gas molecules. Cell leakage (haemolysis) was measured for cells exposed to these gases under a wide range of experimental conditions. Application of methane produces haemolysis at pressures far below the hydrostatic pressures known to disrupt membrane or protein structure. The effects of changes in buffer, temperature, diffusion rate and detergents were studied. Methane acts co-operatively with detergents to produce haemolysis at much lower detergent concentration than is required in the absence of methane or in the presence of nitrogen. At sufficiently high concentrations of methane, all cells are haemolysed. Increased temperature enhances the effect. Methane produces 50% haemolysis at a concentration of about 0.33 M compared with about 7.5 M methanol required for the same degree of haemolysis. Images Figure 1 PMID:7733880

  13. Evidence for methane in Martian meteorites.

    PubMed

    Blamey, Nigel J F; Parnell, John; McMahon, Sean; Mark, Darren F; Tomkinson, Tim; Lee, Martin; Shivak, Jared; Izawa, Matthew R M; Banerjee, Neil R; Flemming, Roberta L

    2015-06-16

    The putative occurrence of methane in the Martian atmosphere has had a major influence on the exploration of Mars, especially by the implication of active biology. The occurrence has not been borne out by measurements of atmosphere by the MSL rover Curiosity but, as on Earth, methane on Mars is most likely in the subsurface of the crust. Serpentinization of olivine-bearing rocks, to yield hydrogen that may further react with carbon-bearing species, has been widely invoked as a source of methane on Mars, but this possibility has not hitherto been tested. Here we show that some Martian meteorites, representing basic igneous rocks, liberate a methane-rich volatile component on crushing. The occurrence of methane in Martian rock samples adds strong weight to models whereby any life on Mars is/was likely to be resident in a subsurface habitat, where methane could be a source of energy and carbon for microbial activity.

  14. Variability in wetland methane emissions simulated by CLM4Me¢ and its contribution to atmospheric methane concentration in CAM-chem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, L.; Paudel, R.; Hess, P. G. M.; Mahowald, N. M.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the temporal and spatial variation of wetland methane emissions is essential to the estimation of the global methane budget. Our goal for this study is three-fold: (i) to evaluate the wetland methane fluxes simulated in two versions of the Community Land Model, the Carbon-Nitrogen (CN, i.e. CLM4.0) and the Biogeochemistry (BGC, i.e. CLM4.5) versions using the methane emission model CLM4Me¢ so as to determine the sensitivity of the emissions to the underlying carbon model; (ii) to compare the simulated atmospheric methane concentrations to observations, including latitudinal gradients and interannual variability so as to determine the extent to which the atmospheric observations constrain the emissions; (iii) to understand the drivers of seasonal and interannual variability in atmospheric methane concentration. Simulations of the transport and removal of methane use the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM-chem) model in conjunction with CLM4Me¢ methane emissions from both CN and BGC simulations and other methane emission sources from literature. In each case we compare model simulated atmospheric methane concentration with observations. In addition, we simulate the atmospheric concentrations based on the TransCom wetland and rice paddy emissions derived from a different terrestrial ecosystem model VISIT. Our analysis indicates CN wetland methane emissions are higher in tropics and lower in high latitudes than emissions from BGC. CAM-chem model simulations with CLM4Me¢ methane emissions suggest that both prescribed anthropogenic and predicted wetlands methane emissions contribute substantially to seasonal and inter-annual variability in atmospheric methane concentration. Our results suggest that different spatial patterns of wetland emissions can have significant impacts on N-S atmospheric CH4 concentration gradients and growth rates. Our analysis also indicate the existence of large uncertainties in terms of spatial patterns and magnitude of global

  15. Coal-bed methane resources in Arkoma basin, southeastern Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, S.A. )

    1989-08-01

    A major federal tax incentive for unconventional gas production has interested entrepreneurs, geologists, and engineers in the occurrence and distribution of coal-bed methane resources in the Arkoma basin. Because the methane is trapped in coal beds, geology of the coal resources also has received renewed attention. The Arkoma basin contains most of the coal-bed methane resources in Oklahoma: 76% of the 7.9 billion short tons of the remaining, identified Middle Pennsylvanian coal resources of the state. This paper briefly reviews previous estimates of coal-bed methane resources in Oklahoma and presents an updated estimate for Haskell and LeFlore Counties and a new estimate for Latimer County. Rieke and Kirr indicated that 2.8 tcf of coal-bed methane is present in 10 coals in eight Oklahoma counties of the Arkoma basin, 500-3,000 ft deep. Iannacchione and Puglio estimated that a maximum of 1.5 tcf of coal-bed methane occurs in the Hartshorne coals in Haskell and LeFlore Counties from 500-3,000 ft deep. The present investigation shows that the Hartshorne and 11 other coals contain at least 1.8 tcf of coal-bed methane resources, based on identified coal resources 500-3,000 ft deep in Haskell, Latimer, and LeFlore Counties. An additional 1.2 tcf of coal-bed methane resources occur in the Hartshorne and four other coals from 3,000-7,000 ft deep, based on assumed stratigraphic and thickness continuity. Thus, a revised estimate indicates that Haskell, Latimer, and LeFlore Counties alone contain about 3 tcf of coal-bed methane resources in 12 coal beds from 500-7,000 ft deep. Undoubtedly additional coal-bed methane resources are present in the westernmost part of the Arkoma basin.

  16. Regulation of Methane Oxidation in a Freshwater Wetland by Water Table Changes and Anoxia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roslev, Peter; King, Gary M.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of water table fluctuations and anoxia on methane emission and methane oxidation were studied in a freshwater marsh. Seasonal aerobic methane oxidation rates varied between 15% and 76% of the potential diffusive methane flux (diffusive flux in the absence of aerobic oxidation). On an annual basis, approximately 43% of the methane diffusing into the oxic zone was oxidized before reaching the atmosphere. The highest methane oxidation was observed when the water table was below the peat surface. This was confirmed in laboratory experiments where short-term decreases in water table levels increased methane oxidation but also net methane emission. Although methane emission was generally not observed during the winter, stems of soft rush (Juncus effusus) emitted methane when the marsh was ice covered. Indigenous methanotrophic bacteria from the wetiand studied were relatively anoxia tolerant. Surface peat incubated under anoxic conditions maintained 30% of the initial methane oxidation capacity after 32 days of anoxia. Methanotrophs from anoxic peat initiated aerobic methane oxidation relatively quickly after oxygen addition (1-7 hours). These results were supported by culture experiments with the methanotroph Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. This organism maintained a greater capacity for aerobic methane oxidation when starved under anoxic compared to oxic conditions. Anoxic incubation of M. trichosporium OB3b in the presence of sulfide (2 mM) and a low redox potential (-110 mV) did not decrease the capacity for methane oxidation relative to anoxic cultures incubated without sulfide. The results suggest that aerobic methane oxidation was a major regulator of seasonal methane emission front the investigated wetland. The observed water table fluctuations affected net methane oxidation presumably due to associated changes in oxygen gradients. However, changes from oxic to anoxic conditions in situ had relatively little effect on survival of the methanotrophic

  17. Methane activation using Kr and Xe in a dielectric barrier discharge reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, Sungkwon; Lee, Dae Hoon Kim, Kwan-Tae; Kang, Woo Seok; Song, Young-Hoon

    2014-10-15

    Methane has interested many researchers as a possible new energy source, but the high stability of methane causes a bottleneck in methane activation, limiting its practical utilization. To determine how to effectively activate methane using non-thermal plasma, the conversion of methane is measured in a planar-type dielectric barrier discharge reactor using three different noble gases—Ar, Kr, and Xe—as additives. In addition to the methane conversion results at various applied voltages, the discharge characteristics such as electron temperature and electron density were calculated through zero-dimensional calculations. Moreover, the threshold energies of excitation and ionization were used to distinguish the dominant particle for activating methane between electrons, excited atoms, and ionized atoms. From the experiments and calculations, the selection of the additive noble gas is found to affect not only the conversion of methane but also the selectivity of product gases even under similar electron temperature and electron density conditions.

  18. Thermal properties of methane gas hydrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waite, William F.

    2007-01-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline solids in which molecules of a “guest” species occupy and stabilize cages formed by water molecules. Similar to ice in appearance (fig. 1), gas hydrates are stable at high pressures and temperatures above freezing (0°C). Methane is the most common naturally occurring hydrate guest species. Methane hydrates, also called simply “gas hydrates,” are extremely concentrated stores of methane and are found in shallow permafrost and continental margin sediments worldwide. Brought to sea-level conditions, methane hydrate breaks down and releases up to 160 times its own volume in methane gas. The methane stored in gas hydrates is of interest and concern to policy makers as a potential alternative energy resource and as a potent greenhouse gas that could be released from sediments to the atmosphere and ocean during global warming. In continental margin settings, methane release from gas hydrates also is a potential geohazard and could cause submarine landslides that endanger offshore infrastructure. Gas hydrate stability is sensitive to temperature changes. To understand methane release from gas hydrate, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a laboratory investigation of pure methane hydrate thermal properties at conditions relevant to accumulations of naturally occurring methane hydrate. Prior to this work, thermal properties for gas hydrates generally were measured on analog systems such as ice and non-methane hydrates or at temperatures below freezing; these conditions limit direct comparisons to methane hydrates in marine and permafrost sediment. Three thermal properties, defined succinctly by Briaud and Chaouch (1997), are estimated from the experiments described here: - Thermal conductivity, λ: if λ is high, heat travels easily through the material. - Thermal diffusivity, κ: if κ is high, it takes little time for the temperature to rise in the material. - Specific heat, cp: if cp is high, it takes a great deal of heat to

  19. Ebullitive methane emissions from oxygenated wetland streams.

    PubMed

    Crawford, John T; Stanley, Emily H; Spawn, Seth A; Finlay, Jacques C; Loken, Luke C; Striegl, Robert G

    2014-11-01

    Stream and river carbon dioxide emissions are an important component of the global carbon cycle. Methane emissions from streams could also contribute to regional or global greenhouse gas cycling, but there are relatively few data regarding stream and river methane emissions. Furthermore, the available data do not typically include the ebullitive (bubble-mediated) pathway, instead focusing on emission of dissolved methane by diffusion or convection. Here, we show the importance of ebullitive methane emissions from small streams in the regional greenhouse gas balance of a lake and wetland-dominated landscape in temperate North America and identify the origin of the methane emitted from these well-oxygenated streams. Stream methane flux densities from this landscape tended to exceed those of nearby wetland diffusive fluxes as well as average global wetland ebullitive fluxes. Total stream ebullitive methane flux at the regional scale (103 Mg C yr(-1) ; over 6400 km(2) ) was of the same magnitude as diffusive methane flux previously documented at the same scale. Organic-rich stream sediments had the highest rates of bubble release and higher enrichment of methane in bubbles, but glacial sand sediments also exhibited high bubble emissions relative to other studied environments. Our results from a database of groundwater chemistry support the hypothesis that methane in bubbles is produced in anoxic near-stream sediment porewaters, and not in deeper, oxygenated groundwaters. Methane interacts with other key elemental cycles such as nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur, which has implications for ecosystem changes such as drought and increased nutrient loading. Our results support the contention that streams, particularly those draining wetland landscapes of the northern hemisphere, are an important component of the global methane cycle.

  20. Zero valent iron significantly enhances methane production from waste activated sludge by improving biochemical methane potential rather than hydrolysis rate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiwen; Wang, Qilin; Zhang, Yaobin; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-02-05

    Anaerobic digestion has been widely applied for waste activated sludge (WAS) treatment. However, methane production from anaerobic digestion of WAS is usually limited by the slow hydrolysis rate and/or poor biochemical methane potential of WAS. This work systematically studied the effects of three different types of zero valent iron (i.e., iron powder, clean scrap and rusty scrap) on methane production from WAS in anaerobic digestion, by using both experimental and mathematical approaches. The results demonstrated that both the clean and the rusty iron scrap were more effective than the iron powder for improving methane production from WAS. Model-based analysis showed that ZVI addition significantly enhanced methane production from WAS through improving the biochemical methane potential of WAS rather than its hydrolysis rate. Economic analysis indicated that the ZVI-based technology for enhancing methane production from WAS is economically attractive, particularly considering that iron scrap can be freely acquired from industrial waste. Based on these results, the ZVI-based anaerobic digestion process of this work could be easily integrated with the conventional chemical phosphorus removal process in wastewater treatment plant to form a cost-effective and environment-friendly approach, enabling maximum resource recovery/reuse while achieving enhanced methane production in wastewater treatment system.

  1. Zero Valent Iron Significantly Enhances Methane Production from Waste Activated Sludge by Improving Biochemical Methane Potential Rather Than Hydrolysis Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yiwen; Wang, Qilin; Zhang, Yaobin; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-02-01

    Anaerobic digestion has been widely applied for waste activated sludge (WAS) treatment. However, methane production from anaerobic digestion of WAS is usually limited by the slow hydrolysis rate and/or poor biochemical methane potential of WAS. This work systematically studied the effects of three different types of zero valent iron (i.e., iron powder, clean scrap and rusty scrap) on methane production from WAS in anaerobic digestion, by using both experimental and mathematical approaches. The results demonstrated that both the clean and the rusty iron scrap were more effective than the iron powder for improving methane production from WAS. Model-based analysis showed that ZVI addition significantly enhanced methane production from WAS through improving the biochemical methane potential of WAS rather than its hydrolysis rate. Economic analysis indicated that the ZVI-based technology for enhancing methane production from WAS is economically attractive, particularly considering that iron scrap can be freely acquired from industrial waste. Based on these results, the ZVI-based anaerobic digestion process of this work could be easily integrated with the conventional chemical phosphorus removal process in wastewater treatment plant to form a cost-effective and environment-friendly approach, enabling maximum resource recovery/reuse while achieving enhanced methane production in wastewater treatment system.

  2. Inhibition Experiments on Anaerobic Methane Oxidation †

    PubMed Central

    Alperin, Marc J.; Reeburgh, William S.

    1985-01-01

    Anaerobic methane oxidation is a general process important in controlling fluxes of methane from anoxic marine sediments. The responsible organism has not been isolated, and little is known about the electron acceptors and substrates involved in the process. Laboratory evidence indicates that sulfate reducers and methanogens are able to oxidize small quantities of methane. Field evidence suggests anaerobic methane oxidation may be linked to sulfate reduction. Experiments with specific inhibitors for sulfate reduction (molybdate), methanogenesis (2-bromoethanesulfonic acid), and acetate utilization (fluoroacetate) were performed on marine sediments from the zone of methane oxidation to determine whether sulfate-reducing bacteria or methanogenic bacteria are responsible for methane oxidation. The inhibition experiment results suggest that methane oxidation in anoxic marine sediments is not directly mediated by sulfate-reducing bacteria or methanogenic bacteria. Our results are consistent with two possibilities: anaerobic methane oxidation may be mediated by an unknown organism or a consortium involving an unknown methane oxidizer and sulfate-reducing bacteria. PMID:16346921

  3. [Sources of Methane in the Boreal Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In determining the global methane budget the sources of methane must be balanced with the sinks and atmospheric inventory. The approximate contribution of the different methane sources to the budget has been establish showing the major terrestrial inputs as rice, wetlands, bogs, fens, and tundra. Measurements and modeling of production in these sources suggest that temperature, water table height and saturation along with substratum composition are important in controlling methane production and emission. The isotopic budget of 13 C and D/H in methane can be used as a tool to clarify the global budget. This approach has achieved success at constraining the inputs. Studies using the isotopic approach place constraints on global methane production from different sources. Also, the relation between the two biogenic production pathways, acetate fermentation and CO2 reduction, and the effect of substratum composition can be made using isotope measurements shows the relation between the different biogenic, thermogenic and anthropogenic sources of methane as a function of the carbon and hydrogen isotope values for each source and the atmosphere, tropospheric composition. Methane emissions from ponds and fens are a significant source in the methane budget of the boreal region. An initial study in 1993 and 1994 on the isotopic composition of this methane source and the isotopic composition in relation to oxidation of methane at the sediment surface of the ponds or fen was conducted as part of our BOREAS project. The isotopic composition of methane emitted by saturated anoxic sediment is dependent on the sediment composition and geochemistry, but will be influenced by in situ oxidation, in part, a function of rooted plant activity. The influence of oxidation mediated by rooted plant activities on the isotopic composition of methane is not well known and will depend on the plant type, sediment temperature, and numerous other variables. Information on this isotopic composition

  4. Methane flux time series for tundra environments

    SciTech Connect

    Whalen, S.C.; Reeburgh, W.E. )

    1988-12-01

    Seasonal measurements of net methane flux were made at permanent sites representing important components of arctic tundra. The sites include Eriophorum tussocks, intertussock depressions, moss-covered areas, and Carex stands. Methane fluxes showed high diel, seasonal, intra site, and between site variability. Eriophorum tussocks and Carex dominated methane release to the atmosphere, with mean annual net methane fluxes of 8.05 + or{minus}2.50 g CH{sub 4}/sq m and 4.88 + or{minus}0.73 g CH{sub 4}/sq m, respectively. Methane fluxes form the moss sites and intertussock depressions were much lower. Over 90% of the mean annual methane flux from the Eriophorum, intertussock depressions, and Carex sites occurred between thaw and freeze-up. Some 40% of the mean annual methane flux from the moss sites occurred during winter. Composite methane fluxes for tussock tundra and Carex-dominated wet meadow tundra environments were produced by weighting measured component fluxes according to areal coverage. Tussock and wet meadow tundra account for an estimated global methane emission of 19-33 Tg/yr. 39 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. GRI methane chemistry program review meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Dignon, J.; Grant, K.; Grossman, A.; Wuebles, D.; Brasseur, G.; Madronich, S.; Huang, T.; Chang, J.; Lott, B.

    1997-02-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas which affects the atmosphere directly by the absorption and re-emission of infrared radiation as well as indirectly, through chemical interactions. Emissions of several important greenhouse gases (GHGS) including methane are increasing, mainly due to human activity. Higher concentrations of these gases in the atmosphere are projected to cause a decrease in the amount of infrared radiation escaping to space, and a subsequent warming of global climate. It is therefore vital to understand not only the causes of increased production of methane and other GHGS, but the effect of higher GHG concentrations on climate, and the possibilities for reductions of these emissions. In GRI-UIUC methane project, the role of methane in climate change and greenhouse gas abatement strategies is being studied using several distinct approaches. First, a detailed treatment of the mechanisms controlling each important methane source and sink, and hence the atmospheric concentration of methane, is being developed for use with the UIUC Integrated Science Assessment Model. The focus of this study is to resolve the factors which determine methane emissions and removal, including human population, land use, energy demand, global temperature, and regional concentrations of the hydroxyl radical, carbon monoxide, nitrous oxides, non-methane hydrocarbons, water vapor, tropospheric and stratospheric ozone.

  6. Relationships between methane production and emission to lacunal methane concentrations in rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrd, G. T.; Fisher, F. M.; Sass, R. L.

    2000-03-01

    We measured lacunal methane concentrations in field-grown rice plants as a correlative to both methane production and emissions. Using a gas-tight syringe, 100-μL samples were withdrawn from plant lacunar spaces below the water level and diluted to provide enough volume for analysis by gas chromatography. Lacunal methane concentrations increased throughout the season and, for each sampling date, were usually significantly higher in the cultivars Mars and Cypress (high emitters) when compared with Lemont and Della (low emitters). The field site influenced lacunal methane concentrations, wherein greater lacunal methane concentrations corresponded with greater methane. Methane emission rates were positively correlated with plant lacunal methane concentrations for each cultivar, with an improvement in the relationship during the preheading season. With increases in methane production determined by emissions following field-induced anoxia, lacunal methane concentrations increased accordingly. Lacunal methane concentrations also clearly increased as plant biomass increased, but the relationship depended on field location, which also influenced emissions. Sampling lacunal methane concentrations of rice plants, although labor intensive, is quite flexible, using little field equipment, and may provide an effective alternative to large-scale flux measurements in areas not easily accessible.

  7. Aerobic methane production in surface waters of the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finke, N.; Crespo-Medina, M.; Schweers, J.; Joye, S. B.

    2011-12-01

    Near surface water of the global oceans often show elevated methane concentrations compared to the water column below with concentrations in supersaturation in regard to the atmosphere (Lamontagne et al. 1973), resulting in a source of this potent greenhouse gas to the atmosphere. The mechanisms leading to methane supersaturation in surface waters remains unclear. Incubations with Trichodesmium-containing Pacific surface water suggested methylphosphonate as potential methane precursor under phosphate limiting conditions (Karl et al. 2008), whereas in phosphate rich Arctic surface waters, DMSP addition stimulated methane production (Damm et al. 2010). Surface waters of the Gulf of Mexico typically exhibit a methane maximum that is conincident with the deep chlorophyll maximum, below the depths where Trichodesmium is abundant. Addition of methylphosphonate, dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) or methane thiol (MeSH), the proposed methane precursor in DMSP conversion to methane, to oxic sea water did not affect methane production within the chlorophyll maximum at most stations, whereas methyl phosphonate addition stimulated methane production in the surface water and proposed deep Trichodesmium horizon. Pre-filtration of the water through a 10 μm sieve, which eliminated Trichodesmium, or through a 1.2 μm filter, which eliminated additional cyanobacteria such as Synechococcus, did not reduce methane production. Under dark oxic and dark anoxic conditions, however, methane production was reduced 5 and 7-20 fold, respectively, indicating that anerobic methane production in anoxic microniches is not responsible for the methane production. The reduction of methane production under dark conditions suggests that methane production is, in some yet unrecognized way, linked to phototrophic metabolism. Cyanobacteria are likely not responsible for the observed aerobic methane production in the surface waters of the Gulf of Mexico and while methylphosphonate is a potential

  8. Pasture-scale measurement of methane emissions of grazing cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantifying methane emission of cattle grazing on southern Great Plains pastures using micrometeorology presents several challenges. Cattle are elevated, mobile point sources of methane, so that knowing their location in relation to atmospheric methane concentration measurements becomes critical. St...

  9. Ecosystem and physiological controls over methane production in northern wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, D.W.; Holland, E.A.; Schimel, D.S.

    1994-01-20

    Peat chemistry appears to exert primary control over methane production rates in the Canadian Northern Wetlands Study (NOWES) area. We determined laboratory methane production rate potentials in anaerobic slurries of samples collected from a transect of sites through the NOWES study area. We related methane production rates to indicators of resistance to microbial decay (peat C:N and lignin:N ratios) and experimentally manipulated substrate availability for methanogenesis using ethanol (EtOH) and plant litter. We also determined responses of methane production to pH and temperature. Methane production potentials declined along the gradient of sites from high rates in the coastal fens to low rates in the interior bogs and were generally highest in surface layers. Strong relationships between CH{sub 4} production potentials and peat chemistry suggested that methanogenesis was limited by fermentation rates. Methane production at ambient pH responded strongly to substrate additions in the circumneutral fens with narrow lignin:N and C:N ratios ({partial_derivative}CH{sub 4}/{partial_derivative}EtOH = 0.9-2.3 mg g{sup {minus}1}) and weakly in the acidic bogs with wide C:N and lignin:N ratios ({partial_derivative}CH{sub 4}/{partial_derivative}EtOH = -0.4-0.02 mg g{sup {minus}1}). Observed Q{sub 10} values ranged from 1.7 to 4.7 and generally increased with increasing substrate availability, suggesting that fermentation rates were limiting. Titration experiments generally demonstrated inhibition of methanogenesis by low pH. Our results suggest that the low rates of methane emission observed in interior bogs during NOWES likely resulted from pH and substrate quality limitation of the fermentation step in methane production and thus reflect intrinsically low methane production potentials. Low methane emission rates observed during NOWES will likely be observed in other northern wetland regions with similar vegetation chemistry. 57 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Ecosystem and physiological controls over methane production in northern wetlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentine, David W.; Holland, Elisabeth A.; Schimel, David S.

    1994-01-01

    Peat chemistry appears to exert primary control over methane production rates in the Canadian Northern Wetlands Study (NOWES) area. We determined laboratory methane production rate potentials in anaerobic slurries of samples collected from a transect of sites through the NOWES study area. We related methane production rates to indicators of resistance to microbial decay (peat C: N and lignin: N ratios) and experimentally manipulated substrate availability for methanogenesis using ethanol (EtOH) and plant litter. We also determined responses of methane production to pH and temperature. Methane production potentials declined along the gradient of sites from high rates in the coastal fens to low rates in the interior bogs and were generally highest in surface layers. Strong relationships between CH4 production potentials and peat chemistry suggested that methanogenesis was limited by fermentation rates. Methane production at ambient pH responded strongly to substrate additions in the circumneutral fens with narrow lignin: N and C: N ratios (delta CH4/delta EtOH = 0.9-2.3 mg/g) and weakly in the acidic bogs with wide C: N and lignin: N ratios (delta CH4/delta EtOH = -0.04-0.02 mg/g). Observed Q(sub 10) values ranged from 1.7 to 4.7 and generally increased with increasing substrate availability, suggesting that fermentation rates were limiting. Titration experiments generally demonstrated inhibition of methanogenesis by low pH. Our results suggest that the low rates of methane emission observed in interior bogs during NOWES likely resulted from pH and substrate quality limitation of the fermentation step in methane production and thus reflect intrinsically low methane production potentials. Low methane emission rates observed during NOWES will likely be observed in other northern wetland regions with similar vegetation chemistry.

  11. Removal of atmospheric methane in shallow subterranean environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Gallego, Miriam; Fernandez-Cortes, Angel; Cuezva, Soledad; García-Antón, Elena; Calaforra, Jose Maria; Cañaveras, Juan Carlos; Sanchez-Moral, Sergio

    2015-04-01

    Methane (CH4) is considered as the third most important greenhouse gas, after water and carbon dioxide, contributing substantially to radiative forcing. About 90% of the removal of CH4 from the atmosphere occurs through reaction with hydroxyl radicals. Moreover, secondary methane sink is related to soils by microbial oxidation in the aerobic zone of soils. Our monitoring results in subterranean environments have shown that there is an active remove of atmospheric methane without a significant intervention of methanotrophic bacteria. Several caves were monitored to identify the environmental factors controlling the gases exchange (CH4, CO2 and 222Rn) between subterranean environments, soils and atmosphere. Real-time and spots measurements of these greenhouse gases were measured using a cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) technique. Our results determine that concentrations of 222Rn and CO2 rise during the period of cave isolation (barely any exchange with the exterior atmosphere), contrary to the methane concentration decrease. The subterranean methane concentration was usually lower than the atmospheric and soil mean values. In addition, zero methane concentrations (ppm) were registered during several months in the most isolated caves. Our hypothesis is that an active process of methane oxidation is occurring in the underground atmosphere, akin to the photolysis effect that occurs in the troposphere-stratosphere region. Thus, negative and positive ions were measured inside the subterranean atmospheres to verify the correlation between the ionization by the 222Rn alpha particle decay and to the depletion of methane concentration. High negative correlations between negative ions and methane were obtained. Therefore, it is suggested that the oxidative gases (CO2, O2, H2Ov…), presented inside the subterranean environment, would be ionized by the energy released by 222Rn alpha particle decay, reacting and, consequently, oxidizing the atmospheric methane content.

  12. Methane and Nitrogen Abundances on Eris and Pluto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegler, Stephen C.; Cornelison, D. M.; Grundy, W. M.; Romanishin, W.; Abernathy, M.; Bovyn, M.; Burt, J.; Evans, D.; Maleszewski, C.; Thompson, Z.; Vilas, F.

    2010-10-01

    We present spectra of Eris from the MMT 6.5 meter telescope and Red Channel Spectrograph (5700 - 9800 angstroms; 5 angstroms per pixel) on Mt. Hopkins, AZ, and Pluto from the Steward Observatory 2.3 meter telescope and Boller and Chivens spectrograph (7100 - 9400 angstroms; 2 angstroms per pixel) on Kitt Peak, AZ. In addition, we present laboratory transmission spectra of methane-nitrogen and methane-argon ice mixtures. By anchoring our analysis with the methane-nitrogen phase diagram of Prokhvatilov and Yantsevich (1983), and comparing methane bands in our Eris spectrum and methane bands in our laboratory spectra, we are able to make a quantitative estimate of Eris' methane and nitrogen abundances. Our analysis suggests the surface ice consists of about 10% methane and about 90% nitrogen. By using the same analysis techniques on our Pluto spectrum, we find the anti-Charon facing hemisphere of Pluto has a methane abundance of about 3% and a nitrogen abundance of about 97%. Such abundances are consistent with values reported in the literature. It appears that the bulk volatile composition of Eris is similar to the bulk volatile composition of Pluto. Both objects appear to be dominated by nitrogen ice. Our analysis also suggests, unlike previous work reported in the literature, that the methane and nitrogen stoichiometry is constant with depth into the surface of Eris. Finally, we point out that our Eris spectrum is also consistent with an ice consisting of 40% methane and 60% argon. So, until someone detects an absorption attributable to nitrogen ice in the spectrum of Eris, it would be prudent to keep an open mind about the identity of ice components on Eris. We gratefully acknowledge support from NASA Planetary Astronomy and NASA Planetary Geology and Geophysics. We thank Steward Observatory for the consistent allocation of telescope time.

  13. Methane and Nitrogen Abundances on Pluto and Eris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegler, S. C.; Cornelison, D. M.; Grundy, W. M.; Romanishin, W.; Abernathy, M. R.; Bovyn, M. J.; Burt, J. A.; Evans, D. E.; Maleszewski, C. K.; Thompson, Z.; Vilas, F.

    2010-12-01

    We present spectra of Eris from the MMT 6.5 m Telescope and Red Channel Spectrograph (5700-9800 Å, 5 Å pixel-1) on Mt. Hopkins, AZ, and of Pluto from the Steward Observatory 2.3 m Telescope and Boller and Chivens Spectrograph (7100-9400 Å, 2 Å pixel-1) on Kitt Peak, AZ. In addition, we present laboratory transmission spectra of methane-nitrogen and methane-argon ice mixtures. By anchoring our analysis in methane and nitrogen solubilities in one another as expressed in the phase diagram of Prokhvatilov & Yantsevich, and comparing methane bands in our Eris and Pluto spectra and methane bands in our laboratory spectra of methane and nitrogen ice mixtures, we find Eris' bulk methane and nitrogen abundances are ~10% and ~90% and Pluto's bulk methane and nitrogen abundances are ~3% and ~97%. Such abundances for Pluto are consistent with values reported in the literature. It appears that the bulk volatile composition of Eris is similar to the bulk volatile composition of Pluto. Both objects appear to be dominated by nitrogen ice. Our analysis also suggests, unlike previous work reported in the literature, that the methane and nitrogen stoichiometry is constant with depth into the surface of Eris. Finally, we point out that our Eris spectrum is also consistent with a laboratory ice mixture consisting of 40% methane and 60% argon. Although we cannot rule out an argon-rich surface, it seems more likely that nitrogen is the dominant species on Eris because the nitrogen ice 2.15 μm band is seen in spectra of Pluto and Triton.

  14. METHANE AND NITROGEN ABUNDANCES ON PLUTO AND ERIS

    SciTech Connect

    Tegler, S. C.; Cornelison, D. M.; Abernathy, M. R.; Bovyn, M. J.; Burt, J. A.; Evans, D. E.; Maleszewski, C. K.; Thompson, Z.; Grundy, W. M.; Romanishin, W.; Vilas, F. E-mail: David.Cornelison@nau.ed E-mail: wjr@nhn.ou.ed

    2010-12-10

    We present spectra of Eris from the MMT 6.5 m Telescope and Red Channel Spectrograph (5700-9800 A, 5 A pixel{sup -1}) on Mt. Hopkins, AZ, and of Pluto from the Steward Observatory 2.3 m Telescope and Boller and Chivens Spectrograph (7100-9400 A, 2 A pixel{sup -1}) on Kitt Peak, AZ. In addition, we present laboratory transmission spectra of methane-nitrogen and methane-argon ice mixtures. By anchoring our analysis in methane and nitrogen solubilities in one another as expressed in the phase diagram of Prokhvatilov and Yantsevich, and comparing methane bands in our Eris and Pluto spectra and methane bands in our laboratory spectra of methane and nitrogen ice mixtures, we find Eris' bulk methane and nitrogen abundances are {approx}10% and {approx}90% and Pluto's bulk methane and nitrogen abundances are {approx}3% and {approx}97%. Such abundances for Pluto are consistent with values reported in the literature. It appears that the bulk volatile composition of Eris is similar to the bulk volatile composition of Pluto. Both objects appear to be dominated by nitrogen ice. Our analysis also suggests, unlike previous work reported in the literature, that the methane and nitrogen stoichiometry is constant with depth into the surface of Eris. Finally, we point out that our Eris spectrum is also consistent with a laboratory ice mixture consisting of 40% methane and 60% argon. Although we cannot rule out an argon-rich surface, it seems more likely that nitrogen is the dominant species on Eris because the nitrogen ice 2.15 {mu}m band is seen in spectra of Pluto and Triton.

  15. [The Trace Methane Sensor Based on TDLAS-WMS].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Wu, Jia-nan; Chen, Mei-mei; Yang, Xin-hua; Chen, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Methane is a colorless, odorless, flammable and explosive gas, which not only is the cause to induce significant security risk in coal mining operation, but also one of the important greenhouse gases, so the monitoring of methane is extremely critical. A trace methane gas sensor is designed and developed using the combination of tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) and wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) detection technology, which is based on the methane R(3) absorption branch in 2v3 second harmonic band. Through tuning parameters -0.591 cm(-1) x K(-1), using the method that change the working temperature of distributed feedback (DFB) laser to obtain the best absorption wavelength of methane at 1.654 μm. When the mid-wavelength of DFB laser is selected, the appropriate emitting intension can be obtained via adjusting the amplitude of inject current of DFB laser. Meanwhile, combining the frequency modulation technology to move the bandwidth of detection signal from low frequency to high frequency to reduce the 1/f noise. With aspect to the optical structure, utilizing herriott cell with 76 m effective optical path to guarantee the detection of trace methane is successful. Utilizing the proposed trace methane sensor to extract the second harmonic signal of detected methane in the range of 50 to 5 000 μmol x mol(-1), and adopting minimum mean square error criterion to fit the relationship between methane concentration and signal noise ratio, harmonic peak signal and methane concentration, respectively. In addition, the minimum detection limit is 1.4 μmol x mol(-1). The experiment results show the symmetry of harmonic waveform is good, no intensity modulation, and the factor of intensity-modulated impacts on harmonic detection is eliminated.

  16. Potential methane production and methane oxidation rates in peatland ecosystems of the Appalachian Mountains, United States

    SciTech Connect

    Yavitt, J.B.; Lang, G.E.; Downey, D.M. )

    1988-09-01

    Potential rates of methane production and carbon dioxide production were measured on 11 dates in 1986 in peat from six plant communities typical of moss-dominated peatlands in the Appalachian Mountains. Annual methane production ranged from 2.7 to 17.5 mol/sq m, and annual carbon dioxide production ranged from 30.6 to 79.0 mol/sq m. The wide range in methane production values among the communities found within a single peatland indicates that obtaining one production value for a peatland may not be appropriate. Low temperature constrained the potential for methane production in winter, while the chemical quality of the peat substrate appears to control methane production in the summer. Methane oxidation was measured throughout the peat profile to a depth of 30 cm. Values for methane oxidation ranged from 0.08 to 18.7 microM/hr among the six plant communities. Aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria probably mediated most of the activity. On a daily basis during the summer, between 11 and 100% of the methane produced is susceptible to oxidation within the peat column. Pools of dissolved methane and dissolved carbon dioxide in pore waters were less than 0.2 and less than 1.0 mol/sq m, respectively, indicating that methane does not accumulate in the pore waters. Peatlands have been considered as an important source of biologically produced methane. Despite the high rates of methane production, the high rates of methane oxidation dampen the potential emission of methane to the atmosphere. 41 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Sources of biogenic methane to form marine gas hydrates: In situ production or upward migration?

    SciTech Connect

    Paull, C.K.; Ussler, W. III; Borowski, W.S.

    1993-09-01

    Potential sources of biogenic methane in the Carolina Continental Rise -- Blake Ridge sediments have been examined. Two models were used to estimate the potential for biogenic methane production: (1) construction of sedimentary organic carbon budgets, and (2) depth extrapolation of modern microbial production rates. While closed-system estimates predict some gas hydrate formation, it is unlikely that >3% of the sediment volume could be filled by hydrate from methane produced in situ. Formation of greater amounts requires migration of methane from the underlying continental rise sediment prism. Methane may be recycled from below the base of the gas hydrate stability zone by gas hydrate decomposition, upward migration of the methane gas, and recrystallization of gas hydrate within the overlying stability zone. Methane bubbles may also form in the sediment column below the depth of gas hydrate stability because the methane saturation concentration of the pore fluids decreases with increasing depth. Upward migration of methane bubbles from these deeper sediments can add methane to the hydrate stability zone. From these models it appears that recycling and upward migration of methane is essential in forming significant gas hydrate concentrations. In addition, the depth distribution profiles of methane hydrate will differ if the majority of the methane has migrated upward rather than having been produced in situ.

  18. A methane-driven microbial food web in a wetland rice soil.

    PubMed

    Murase, Jun; Frenzel, Peter

    2007-12-01

    Methane oxidation is a key process controlling methane emission from anoxic habitats into the atmosphere. Methanotrophs, responsible for aerobic methane oxidation, do not only oxidize but also assimilate methane. Once assimilated, methane carbon may be utilized by other organisms. Here we report on a microbial food web in a rice field soil driven by methane. A thin layer of water-saturated rice field soil was incubated under opposing gradients of oxygen and (13)C-labelled methane. Bacterial and eukaryotic communities incorporating methane carbon were analysed by RNA-stable isotope probing (SIP). Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and cloning showed that methanotrophs were the most prominent group of bacteria incorporating methane carbon. In addition, a few Myxobacteria-related sequences were obtained from the 'heavy' rRNA fraction. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) targeting 18S rRNA detected various groups of protists in the 'heavy' rRNA fraction including naked amoeba (Lobosea and Heterolobosea), ciliates (Colpodea) and flagellates (Cercozoa). Incubation of soil under different methane concentrations in air resulted in the development of distinct protozoan communities. These results suggest that methane carbon is incorporated into non-methanotrophic pro- and microeukaryotes probably via grazing, and that methane oxidation is a shaping force of the microeukaryotic community depending on methane availability.

  19. A simple headspace equilibration method for measuring dissolved methane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Magen, C; Lapham, L.L.; Pohlman, John W.; Marshall, Kristin N.; Bosman, S.; Casso, Michael; Chanton, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    Dissolved methane concentrations in the ocean are close to equilibrium with the atmosphere. Because methane is only sparingly soluble in seawater, measuring it without contamination is challenging for samples collected and processed in the presence of air. Several methods for analyzing dissolved methane are described in the literature, yet none has conducted a thorough assessment of the method yield, contamination issues during collection, transport and storage, and the effect of temperature changes and preservative. Previous extraction methods transfer methane from water to gas by either a "sparge and trap" or a "headspace equilibration" technique. The gas is then analyzed for methane by gas chromatography. Here, we revisit the headspace equilibration technique and describe a simple, inexpensive, and reliable method to measure methane in fresh and seawater, regardless of concentration. Within the range of concentrations typically found in surface seawaters (2-1000 nmol L-1), the yield of the method nears 100% of what is expected from solubility calculation following the addition of known amount of methane. In addition to being sensitive (detection limit of 0.1 ppmv, or 0.74 nmol L-1), this method requires less than 10 min per sample, and does not use highly toxic chemicals. It can be conducted with minimum materials and does not require the use of a gas chromatograph at the collection site. It can therefore be used in various remote working environments and conditions.

  20. Impact Metamorphism of Subsurface Organic Matter on Mars: A Potential Source for Methane and Surface Alteration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oehler, D. Z.; Allen, C. C.; McKay, D. S.

    2005-01-01

    Reports of methane in the Martian atmosphere have spurred speculation about sources for that methane [1-3]. Discussion has centered on cometary/ meteoritic delivery, magmatic/mantle processes, UV-breakdown of organics, serpentinization of basalts, and generation of methane by living organisms. This paper describes an additional possibility: that buried organic remains from past life on Mars may have been generating methane throughout Martian history as a result of heating associated with impact metamorphism.

  1. Methane emissions from cattle differing in feed intake and feed efficiency fed a high concentrate diet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methane gas released by cattle is a product of fermentation of feed in the digestive tract and represents a loss of feed energy. In addition to being a dietary energy loss, methane is considered a greenhouse gas. Developing strategies to reduce methane emissions from cattle have the potential to i...

  2. Anaerobic Methane Oxidation in Soils - revealed using 13C-labelled methane tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riekie, G. J.; Baggs, E. M.; Killham, K. S.; Smith, J. U.

    2008-12-01

    In marine sediments, anaerobic methane oxidation is a significant biogeochemical process limiting methane flux from ocean to atmosphere. To date, evidence for anaerobic methane oxidation in terrestrial environments has proved elusive, and its significance is uncertain. In this study, an isotope dilution method specifically designed to detect the process of anaerobic methane oxidation in methanogenic wetland soils is applied. Methane emissions of soils from three contrasting permanently waterlogged sites in Scotland are investigated in strictly anoxic microcosms to which 13C- labelled methane is added, and changes in the concentration and 12C/13C isotope ratios of methane and carbon dioxide are subsequently measured and used to calculate separate the separate components of the methane flux. The method used takes into account the 13C-methane associated with methanogenesis, and the amount of methane dissolved in the soil. The calculations make no prior assumptions about the kinetics of methane production or oxidation. The results indicate that methane oxidation can take place in anoxic soil environments. The clearest evidence for anaerobic methane oxidation is provided by soils from a minerotrophic fen site (pH 6.0) in Bin Forest underlain by ultra-basic and serpentine till. In the fresh soil anoxic microcosms, net consumption methane was observed, and the amount of headspace 13C-CO2 increased at a greater rate than the 12+13C-CO2, further proof of methane oxidation. A net increase in methane was measured in microcosms of soil from Murder Moss, an alkaline site, pH 6.5, with a strong calcareous influence. However, the 13C-CH4 data provided evidence of methane oxidation, both in the disappearance of C- CH4 and appearance of smaller quantities of 13C-CO2. The least alkaline (pH 5.5) microcosms, of Gateside Farm soil - a granitic till - exhibited net methanogenesis and the changes in 13C-CH4 and 13C-CO2 here followed the pattern expected if no methane is consumed

  3. Plasma catalytic reforming of methane

    SciTech Connect

    Bromberg, L.; Cohn, D.R.; Rabinovich, A.; Alexeev, N.

    1998-08-01

    Thermal plasma technology can be efficiently used in the production of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich gases from methane and a variety of fuels. This paper describes progress in plasma reforming experiments and calculations of high temperature conversion of methane using heterogeneous processes. The thermal plasma is a highly energetic state of matter that is characterized by extremely high temperatures (several thousand degrees Celsius) and high degree of dissociation and substantial degree of ionization. The high temperatures accelerate the reactions involved in the reforming process. Hydrogen-rich gas (50% H{sub 2}, 17% CO and 33% N{sub 2}, for partial oxidation/water shifting) can be efficiently made in compact plasma reformers. Experiments have been carried out in a small device (2--3 kW) and without the use of efficient heat regeneration. For partial oxidation/water shifting, it was determined that the specific energy consumption in the plasma reforming processes is 16 MJ/kg H{sub 2} with high conversion efficiencies. Larger plasmatrons, better reactor thermal insulation, efficient heat regeneration and improved plasma catalysis could also play a major role in specific energy consumption reduction and increasing the methane conversion. A system has been demonstrated for hydrogen production with low CO content ({approximately} 1.5%) with power densities of {approximately} 30 kW (H{sub 2} HHV)/liter of reactor, or {approximately} 10 m{sup 3}/hr H{sub 2} per liter of reactor. Power density should further increase with increased power and improved design.

  4. Methane in Crystalline Bedrock: the Outokumpu Deep Drill Hole, Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kietäväinen, R.; Ahonen, L.; Niinikoski, P.; Itävaara, M.; Kukkonen, I. T.

    2014-12-01

    Carbon is a key element for life. One of the most interesting forms of carbon is methane, as it is both consumed and produced by microorganisms. Methane has also several possible ways of abiotic origin, some of which could provide understanding of the origin of life itself. The study of methane is thus important in order to understand deep subsurface ecosystems such as those found in the 2516 m deep Outokumpu Deep Drill Hole within the Precambrian Fennoscandian Shield in eastern Finland. There rock types differ from graphite-bearing mica schist and black schist to serpentinite and pegmatitic granodiorite and saline, gas-rich water, with up to 32 mmol l-1 of methane, and residence times of tens of millions of years occupies the fracture zones which host diverse microbial life, including methanogenic archaea. In order to understand methane systematics in crystalline bedrock, we analysed several forms of carbon, including dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), methane and ethane from the Outokumpu Deep Drill Hole for their isotopic composition. In addition, isotopic compositions of water and hydrogen were determined. The results show that hydrogen is in isotopic equilibrium in the system H2O-H2-CH4 at ambient temperatures, which could either indicate equilibration due to long residence time or relatively recent production of methane in situ. Therefore hydrogen is not a very useful indicator for the origin of methane in this case. Carbon isotope analysis shows that both methane and DIC becomes generally more enriched in 13C with depth, which could indicate higher amounts of microbial methane in the upper part of the bedrock. Based on carbon isotope composition, two types of ethane can be discerned. Taken all the evidence together, this leads us to suggest that at least two mechanisms are responsible for the methane production in Outokumpu: 1) Biotic which comprise most of methane and 2) abiotic which dominates in the deeper parts of the bedrock. The former type may include

  5. Sorption enhanced CO2 methanation.

    PubMed

    Borgschulte, Andreas; Gallandat, Noris; Probst, Benjamin; Suter, Riccardo; Callini, Elsa; Ferri, Davide; Arroyo, Yadira; Erni, Rolf; Geerlings, Hans; Züttel, Andreas

    2013-06-28

    The transformation from the fatuous consumption of fossil energy towards a sustainable energy circle is most easily marketable by not changing the underlying energy carrier but generating it from renewable energy. Hydrocarbons can be principally produced from renewable hydrogen and carbon dioxide collected by biomass. However, research is needed to increase the energetic and economic efficiency of the process. We demonstrate the enhancement of CO2 methanation by sorption enhanced catalysis. The preparation and catalytic activity of sorption catalysts based on Ni particles in zeolites is reported. The functioning of the sorption catalysis is discussed together with the determination of the reaction mechanism, providing implications for new ways in catalysis. PMID:23673365

  6. Comparison of Two Techniques to Calculate Methane Oxidation rates in Samples Obtained From the Hudson Canyon Seep Field in the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonte, M.; Kessler, J. D.; Chepigin, A.; Kellermann, M. Y.; Arrington, E.; Valentine, D. L.; Sylva, S.

    2014-12-01

    Aerobic methane oxidation, or methanotrophy, is the dominant process by which methane is removed from the water column in oceanic environments. Therefore, accurately quantifying methane oxidation rates is crucial when constructing methane budgets on a local or global scale. Here we present a comparison of two techniques used to determine methane oxidation rates based on samples obtained over the Hudson Canyon seep field in the North Atlantic. Traditional methane oxidation rate measurements require inoculation of water samples with isotopically labeled methane and tracking the changes to methane concentrations and isotopes as the samples are incubated. However, the addition of methane above background levels is thought to increase the potential for methane oxidation in the sample. A new technique to calculate methane oxidation rates is based on kinetic isotope models and incorporates direct measurements of methane concentrations, methane 13C isotopes, and water current velocity. Acoustic instrumentation (ADCP) aboard the R/V Endeavor was used to obtain water current velocity data while water samples were collected for methane concentration and isotopic ratio analysis. Methane δ13C measurements allow us to attribute changes in methane concentration to either water dispersion or bacterial methane oxidation. The data obtained from this cruise will tell us a comprehensive story of methane removal processes from this active seep field. The kinetic isotope models will allow us to estimate the total flux of methane from the seep site and calculate methane oxidation rates at different depths and locations away from seafloor plumes.

  7. Effects of chronic warming and nutrient additions on ecosystem respiration and methane fluxes along a tundra moisture gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Nadelhoffer, K.; Murray, G.; Giblin, A.; Shaver, G.; Laundre, J.; Johnson, L.; Stanley, A. ); Schimel, J. )

    1994-06-01

    We measured ecosystem respiration (ER: or CO[sub 2] flux), methane (CH[sub 4]) fluxes and net ecosystem production (NEP) near Toolik Lake, Alaska to compare effects of temperature, moisture and nutrients on tundra C balances. We measured fluxes using closed chambers in control, warmed and fertilized plots in wet, moist and dry tundra. ER rankings of tundra types differed between years. In 1992 ER was [approximately]70 g C m[sup [minus]2]y[sup [minus]1] in wet and moist tundra and was 50% lower in dry tundra. In 1993 ER was >150 g C m[sup [minus]2]y[sup [minus]1] in moist tundra and [approximately]55 g C m[sup [minus]2]y[sup [minus]1] in wet and dry tundra. CH[sub 4] emissions ranged from 3.5 to 7 g C m[sup [minus]2]y[sup [minus]1] in wet and from 0.6 to 2.8 g C m[sup [minus]2]y[sup [minus]1] in moist tundra. Dry tundra consumed about 0.1 g CH[sub 4]-C m[sup [minus]2]y[sup [minus]1]. In wet tundra ER increased slightly with warming but dramatically with fertilization. Wet tundra NEP increased with fertilization but not with warming. CH[sub 4] emissions from wet tundra increased with warming but decreased with fertilization. Warming and fertilization increased ER but neither treatment affected NEP in moist tundra. CH[sub 4] emissions from moist tundra responded similarly but less dramatically to treatments than did wet tundra CH[sub 4] fluxes. Warming did not affect ER or NEP in dry tundra, fertilization increased both process. Consumption of CH[sub 4] in dry tundra increased with warming but decreased with fertilization.

  8. High rates of anaerobic methane oxidation in freshwater wetlands reduce potential atmospheric methane emissions.

    PubMed

    Segarra, K E A; Schubotz, F; Samarkin, V; Yoshinaga, M Y; Hinrichs, K-U; Joye, S B

    2015-06-30

    The role of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in wetlands, the largest natural source of atmospheric methane, is poorly constrained. Here we report rates of microbially mediated AOM (average rate=20 nmol cm(-3) per day) in three freshwater wetlands that span multiple biogeographical provinces. The observed AOM rates rival those in marine environments. Most AOM activity may have been coupled to sulphate reduction, but other electron acceptors remain feasible. Lipid biomarkers typically associated with anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea were more enriched in (13)C than those characteristic of marine systems, potentially due to distinct microbial metabolic pathways or dilution with heterotrophic isotope signals. On the basis of this extensive data set, AOM in freshwater wetlands may consume 200 Tg methane per year, reducing their potential methane emissions by over 50%. These findings challenge precepts surrounding wetland carbon cycling and demonstrate the environmental relevance of an anaerobic methane sink in ecosystems traditionally considered strong methane sources.

  9. Regulation of methane genes and genome expression

    SciTech Connect

    John N. Reeve

    2009-09-09

    , designated TFE, that had sequences in common with the eukaryotic general transcription factor TFIIE, stimulated archaeal transcription initiation and that the archaeal TATA-box binding protein (TBP) remained attached to the promoter region whereas the transcription factor TFB dissociated from the template DNA following initiation. DNA sequences that directed the localized assembly of archaeal histones into archaeal nucleosomes were identified, and we established that transcription by an archaeal RNA polymerase was slowed but not blocked by archaeal nucleosomes. We developed a new protocol to purify archaeal RNA polymerases and with this enzyme and additional improvements to the in vitro transcription system, we established the template requirements for archaeal transcription termination, investigated the activities of proteins predicted to be methane gene regulators, and established how TrpY, a novel archaeal regulator of expression of the tryptophan biosynthetic operon functions in M. thermautotrophicus. This also resulted in the discovery that almost all M. thermautotrophicus mutants isolated as spontaneously resistant to 5-methyl tryptophan (5MTR) had mutations in trpY and were therefore 5MTR through de-repressed trp operon expression. This established a very simple, practical procedure to determine and quantify the DNA sequence changes that result from exposure of this Archaeon to any experimental mutagenesis protocol. Following the discovery that the Thermococcus kodakaraensis was amenable to genetic manipulation, we established this technology at OSU and subsequently added plasmid expression, a reporter system and additional genetic selections to the T. kodakaraensis genetic toolbox. We established that transcription and translation are coupled in this Archaeon, and by combining in vitro transcription and in vivo genetics, we documented that both TFB1 and TFB2 support transcription initiation in T. kodakaraensis. We quantified the roles of ribosome binding sequences

  10. Arctic permafrost: Microbial lid on subsea methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, Brett F.; Crill, Patrick

    2015-08-01

    Submarine permafrost thaw in the Arctic has been suggested as a trigger for the release of large quantities of methane to the water column, and subsequently the atmosphere -- with important implications for global warming. Now research shows that microbial oxidation of methane at the thaw front can effectively prevent its release.

  11. Dairy livestock methane remediation and global warming.

    PubMed

    Nusbaum, Neil J

    2010-10-01

    One of the major greenhouse gases is the methane released from ruminants. Greenhouse gas emissions in the agricultural portion of the economy may benefit from biologically based remediation strategies, including potential use of probiotics in animal husbandry. A broad range of disciplines (including climatologists, microbiologists, biochemists, physical chemists, agricultural economists) can assist in biological strategies to reduce agricultural methane emissions.

  12. Chemical transformations of methane in trifluoroacetic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnetskaya, M. V.; Svichkarev, O. M.; Budynina, E. M.; Mel'nikov, M. Ya.

    2013-12-01

    The reaction of methane conversion in anhydrous trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) is shown to take place at room temperature and atmospheric pressure and to result in the formation of a resinous product. Signals of ions with molecular weights of 684 and 700 are observed in MALDI-TOF spectra of the dry residue of methane conversion products.

  13. Thermophilic methane production and oxidation in compost.

    PubMed

    Jäckel, Udo; Thummes, Kathrin; Kämpfer, Peter

    2005-04-01

    Methane cycling within compost heaps has not yet been investigated in detail. We show that thermophilic methane oxidation occurred after a lag phase of up to one day in 4-week old, 8-week old and mature (>10-week old) compost material. The potential rate of methane oxidation was between 2.6 and 4.1 micromol CH4(gdw)(-1)h(-1). Profiles of methane concentrations within heaps of different ages indicated that 46-98% of the methane produced was oxidised by methanotrophic bacteria. The population size of thermophilic methanotrophs was estimated at 10(9) cells (gdw)(-1), based on methane oxidation rates. A methanotroph (strain KTM-1) was isolated from the highest positive step of a serial dilution series. This strain belonged to the genus Methylocaldum, which contains thermotolerant and thermophilic methanotrophs. The closest relative organism on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence identity was M. szegediense (>99%), a species originally isolated from hot springs. The temperature optimum (45-55 degrees C) for methane oxidation within the compost material was identical to that of strain KTM-1, suggesting that this strain was well adapted to the conditions in the compost material. The temperatures measured in the upper layer (0-40 cm) of the compost heaps were also in this range, so we assume that these organisms are capable of effectively reducing the potential methane emissions from compost.

  14. Abiotic production of methane in terrestrial planets.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Marmolejo, Andrés; Segura, Antígona; Escobar-Briones, Elva

    2013-06-01

    On Earth, methane is produced mainly by life, and it has been proposed that, under certain conditions, methane detected in an exoplanetary spectrum may be considered a biosignature. Here, we estimate how much methane may be produced in hydrothermal vent systems by serpentinization, its main geological source, using the kinetic properties of the main reactions involved in methane production by serpentinization. Hydrogen production by serpentinization was calculated as a function of the available FeO in the crust, given the current spreading rates. Carbon dioxide is the limiting reactant for methane formation because it is highly depleted in aqueous form in hydrothermal vent systems. We estimated maximum CH4 surface fluxes of 6.8×10(8) and 1.3×10(9) molecules cm(-2) s(-1) for rocky planets with 1 and 5 M⊕, respectively. Using a 1-D photochemical model, we simulated atmospheres with volume mixing ratios of 0.03 and 0.1 CO2 to calculate atmospheric methane concentrations for the maximum production of this compound by serpentinization. The resulting abundances were 2.5 and 2.1 ppmv for 1 M⊕ planets and 4.1 and 3.7 ppmv for 5 M⊕ planets. Therefore, low atmospheric concentrations of methane may be produced by serpentinization. For habitable planets around Sun-like stars with N2-CO2 atmospheres, methane concentrations larger than 10 ppmv may indicate the presence of life.

  15. Methane-Stimulated Benthic Marine Nitrogen Fixation at Deep-Sea Methane Seeps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekas, A. E.; Orphan, V.

    2011-12-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (the conversion of N2 to NH3) is a critical process in the oceans, counteracting the production of N2 gas by dissimilatory bacterial metabolisms and providing a source of bioavailable nitrogen to many nitrogen-limited ecosystems. Although current measurements of N2 production and consumption in the oceans indicate that the nitrogen cycle is not balanced, recent findings on the limits of nitrogen fixation suggest that the perceived imbalance is an artifact of an incomplete assessment of marine diazotrophy. One currently poorly studied and potentially underappreciated habitat for diazotrophic organisms is the sediments of the deep-sea. In the present study we investigate the distribution and magnitude of benthic marine diazotrophy at several active deep-sea methane seeps (Mound 12, Costa Rica; Eel River Basin, CA, USA; Hydrate Ridge, OR, USA; and Monterey Canyon, CA, USA). Using 15N2 and 15NH4 sediment incubation experiments followed by single-cell (FISH-NanoSIMS) and bulk isotopic analysis (EA-IRMS), we observed total protein synthesis (15N uptake from 15NH4) and nitrogen fixation (15N update from 15N2). The highest rates of nitrogen fixation observed in the methane seep sediment incubation experiments were over an order of magnitude greater than those previously published from non-seep deep-sea sediments (Hartwig and Stanley, Deep-Sea Research, 1978, 25:411-417). However, methane seep diazotrophy appears to be highly spatially variable, with sediments exhibiting no nitrogen fixation originating only centimeters away from sediments actively incorporating 15N from 15N2. The greatest spatial variability in diazotrophy was observed with depth in the sediment, and corresponded to steep gradients in sulfate and methane. The maximum rates of nitrogen fixation were observed within the methane-sulfate transition zone, where organisms mediating the anaerobic oxidation of methane are typically in high abundance. Additionally, incubation

  16. Carbon and hydrogen isotope composition and C-14 concentration in methane from sources and from the atmosphere: Implications for a global methane budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahlen, Martin

    1994-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: biogenic methane studies; forest soil methane uptake; rice field methane sources; atmospheric measurements; stratospheric samples; Antarctica; California; and Germany.

  17. Anthropogenic emissions of methane in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Scot M.; Wofsy, Steven C.; Michalak, Anna M.; Kort, Eric A.; Andrews, Arlyn E.; Biraud, Sebastien C.; Dlugokencky, Edward J.; Eluszkiewicz, Janusz; Fischer, Marc L.; Janssens-Maenhout, Greet; Miller, Ben R.; Miller, John B.; Montzka, Stephen A.; Nehrkorn, Thomas; Sweeney, Colm

    2013-01-01

    This study quantitatively estimates the spatial distribution of anthropogenic methane sources in the United States by combining comprehensive atmospheric methane observations, extensive spatial datasets, and a high-resolution atmospheric transport model. Results show that current inventories from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research underestimate methane emissions nationally by a factor of ∼1.5 and ∼1.7, respectively. Our study indicates that emissions due to ruminants and manure are up to twice the magnitude of existing inventories. In addition, the discrepancy in methane source estimates is particularly pronounced in the south-central United States, where we find total emissions are ∼2.7 times greater than in most inventories and account for 24 ± 3% of national emissions. The spatial patterns of our emission fluxes and observed methane–propane correlations indicate that fossil fuel extraction and refining are major contributors (45 ± 13%) in the south-central United States. This result suggests that regional methane emissions due to fossil fuel extraction and processing could be 4.9 ± 2.6 times larger than in EDGAR, the most comprehensive global methane inventory. These results cast doubt on the US EPA’s recent decision to downscale its estimate of national natural gas emissions by 25–30%. Overall, we conclude that methane emissions associated with both the animal husbandry and fossil fuel industries have larger greenhouse gas impacts than indicated by existing inventories. PMID:24277804

  18. Nonequilibrium clumped isotope signals in microbial methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, David T.; Gruen, Danielle S.; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Stewart, Lucy C.; Holden, James F.; Hristov, Alexander N.; Pohlman, John W.; Morrill, Penny L.; Könneke, Martin; Delwiche, Kyle B.; Reeves, Eoghan P.; Sutcliffe, Chelsea N.; Ritter, Daniel J.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.; Hemond, Harold F.; Kubo, Michael D.; Cardace, Dawn; Hoehler, Tori M.; Ono, Shuhei

    2015-04-01

    Methane is a key component in the global carbon cycle, with a wide range of anthropogenic and natural sources. Although isotopic compositions of methane have traditionally aided source identification, the abundance of its multiply substituted “clumped” isotopologues (for example, 13CH3D) has recently emerged as a proxy for determining methane-formation temperatures. However, the effect of biological processes on methane’s clumped isotopologue signature is poorly constrained. We show that methanogenesis proceeding at relatively high rates in cattle, surface environments, and laboratory cultures exerts kinetic control on 13CH3D abundances and results in anomalously elevated formation-temperature estimates. We demonstrate quantitatively that H2 availability accounts for this effect. Clumped methane thermometry can therefore provide constraints on the generation of methane in diverse settings, including continental serpentinization sites and ancient, deep groundwaters.

  19. Optical constants of liquid and solid methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martonchik, John V.; Orton, Glenn S.

    1994-01-01

    The optical constants n(sub r) + in(sub i) of liquid methane and phase 1 solid methane were determined over the entire spectral range by the use of various data sources published in the literature. Kramers-Kronig analyses were performed on the absorption spectra of liquid methane at the boiling point (111 K) and the melting point (90 K) and on the absorption spectra of phase 1 solid methane at the melting point and at 30 K. Measurements of the static dielectric constant at these temperatures and refractive indices determined over limited spectral ranges were used as constraints in the analyses. Applications of methane optical properties to studies of outer solar system bodies are described.

  20. High methane emission from Siberian river floodplains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, Yanjiao; van Huissteden, Ko; Dolman, Han

    2013-04-01

    Methane contributes significantly to global warming. Methane emission is essentially the net result of a balance between CH4 production by methanogenic bacteria in anaerobic soil zones, and CH4 oxidation by methanotrophic bacteria in aerated soil zones and plants. Arctic and sub-arctic permafrost holds a large amount of climate vulnerable carbon. In particular river floodplains are carbon-rich soils. River floodplains in this area are periodically or permanently submerged. The occurrence of flooding decreases soil oxygen availability, providing an ideal anaerobic environment for methane generation. Here we compare the chamber measurements of the methane flux from tundra and floodplain of the Kytalyk site in Northeast Siberia. Model experiments on this site have also been carried out in order to better explain spatial and temporal variations in methane emissions from northern permafrost. This serves as a basis for further model development including modeling of the flooding regime on the floodplain.

  1. Analysis of methane emissions from digested sludge.

    PubMed

    Schaum, C; Fundneider, T; Cornel, P

    2016-01-01

    The energetic use of sewage sludge is an important step in the generation of electricity and heat within a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). For a holistic approach, methane emissions derived from anaerobic treatment have to be considered. Measurements show that methane dissolved in digested sludge can be analyzed via the vacuum salting out degassing method. At different WWTPs, dissolved methane was measured, showing a concentration range of approximately 7-37 mg CH4/L. The average concentration of dissolved methane in mesophilic digested sludge was approximately 29 mg CH4/L, which corresponds to an estimated yearly specific load of approximately 14-21 g CH4 per population equivalent. Comparisons between continuous and discontinuous digester feeding show that a temporary rise in the volume load causes increased concentrations of dissolved methane. Investigations using an industrial-scale digestion plant, consisting of three digestion tank operated in series, show comparable results. PMID:27054731

  2. Analysis of methane emissions from digested sludge.

    PubMed

    Schaum, C; Fundneider, T; Cornel, P

    2016-01-01

    The energetic use of sewage sludge is an important step in the generation of electricity and heat within a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). For a holistic approach, methane emissions derived from anaerobic treatment have to be considered. Measurements show that methane dissolved in digested sludge can be analyzed via the vacuum salting out degassing method. At different WWTPs, dissolved methane was measured, showing a concentration range of approximately 7-37 mg CH4/L. The average concentration of dissolved methane in mesophilic digested sludge was approximately 29 mg CH4/L, which corresponds to an estimated yearly specific load of approximately 14-21 g CH4 per population equivalent. Comparisons between continuous and discontinuous digester feeding show that a temporary rise in the volume load causes increased concentrations of dissolved methane. Investigations using an industrial-scale digestion plant, consisting of three digestion tank operated in series, show comparable results.

  3. Nonequilibrium clumped isotope signals in microbial methane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, David T.; Gruen, Danielle S.; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Stewart, Lucy C.; Holden, James F.; Hristov, Alexander N.; Pohlman, John W.; Morrill, Penny L.; Könneke, Martin; Delwiche, Kyle B.; Reeves, Eoghan P.; Sutcliffe, Chelsea N.; Ritter, Daniel J.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.; Hemond, Harold F.; Kubo, Michael D.; Cardace, Dawn; Hoehler, Tori M.; Ono, Shuhei

    2015-01-01

    Methane is a key component in the global carbon cycle with a wide range of anthropogenic and natural sources. Although isotopic compositions of methane have traditionally aided source identification, the abundance of its multiply-substituted “clumped” isotopologues, e.g., 13CH3D, has recently emerged as a proxy for determining methane-formation temperatures; however, the impact of biological processes on methane’s clumped isotopologue signature is poorly constrained. We show that methanogenesis proceeding at relatively high rates in cattle, surface environments, and laboratory cultures exerts kinetic control on 13CH3D abundances and results in anomalously elevated formation temperature estimates. We demonstrate quantitatively that H2 availability accounts for this effect. Clumped methane thermometry can therefore provide constraints on the generation of methane in diverse settings, including continental serpentinization sites and ancient, deep groundwaters.

  4. Activated carbon monoliths for methane storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chada, Nagaraju; Romanos, Jimmy; Hilton, Ramsey; Suppes, Galen; Burress, Jacob; Pfeifer, Peter

    2012-02-01

    The use of adsorbent storage media for natural gas (methane) vehicles allows for the use of non-cylindrical tanks due to the decreased pressure at which the natural gas is stored. The use of carbon powder as a storage material allows for a high mass of methane stored for mass of sample, but at the cost of the tank volume. Densified carbon monoliths, however, allow for the mass of methane for volume of tank to be optimized. In this work, different activated carbon monoliths have been produced using a polymeric binder, with various synthesis parameters. The methane storage was studied using a home-built, dosing-type instrument. A monolith with optimal parameters has been fabricated. The gravimetric excess adsorption for the optimized monolith was found to be 161 g methane for kg carbon.

  5. Methane storage in advanced porous materials.

    PubMed

    Makal, Trevor A; Li, Jian-Rong; Lu, Weigang; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2012-12-01

    The need for alternative fuels is greater now than ever before. With considerable sources available and low pollution factor, methane is a natural choice as petroleum replacement in cars and other mobile applications. However, efficient storage methods are still lacking to implement the application of methane in the automotive industry. Advanced porous materials, metal-organic frameworks and porous organic polymers, have received considerable attention in sorptive storage applications owing to their exceptionally high surface areas and chemically-tunable structures. In this critical review we provide an overview of the current status of the application of these two types of advanced porous materials in the storage of methane. Examples of materials exhibiting high methane storage capacities are analyzed and methods for increasing the applicability of these advanced porous materials in methane storage technologies described.

  6. Temporal resilience and dynamics of anaerobic methane-oxidizing microbial communities to short-term changes in methane partial pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klasek, S.; Tiantian, Y.; Torres, M. E.; Colwell, F. S.; Wang, F.; Liang, L.

    2015-12-01

    Marine sediments produce tens to hundreds of teragrams of methane annually, which is released from the seabed at thousands of cold seeps distributed globally along continental margins. Around 80-90% of this methane is consumed in shallower sediment layers before reaching the hydrosphere, in a microbially-mediated process known as anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) However, cold seeps appear to exhibit temporal variation in gas flux intensity, and AOM filter efficiency at cold seeps generally decreases with fluid flow rate. To our knowledge, the degree to which temporal heterogeneity in subsurface methane flux stimulates AOM community growth and adaptation to increased methane concentrations has not been investigated. Static high-pressure bioreactors were used to incubate sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ) and methanogenic zone sediments underlying a Mediterranean mud volcano gas flare under in situ temperature and pressure at 8 MPa methane. Sulfide production rates of 0.4 μmol/cm3/day in both sediment regimes after 4 months of incubation suggested the resilience of the marine subsurface methane filter may extend well below the SMTZ (40 cm). Similar incubations of SMTZ samples from below a gas flare off Svalbard at saturating (3.8 MPa) and 0.2 MPa methane are being sampled after 1 week, 4 weeks, and 4 months; sulfide production rates of 8-18 nmol/cm3/day were first observed after 4 weeks of incubation. Sediment samples at all specified time points for both sets of incubations were collected for nucleic acid extraction and cell fixation. Anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are expected dominant taxa in enriched and non-enriched communities. 16S rDNA community analysis is expected to reveal additional microbial players involved in the short-term adaptation to higher methane partial pressures in the marine subsurface. Increased AOM community activity (RNA/DNA ratio) and copy numbers of methane cycling transcripts (mcr

  7. Studying methane migration mechanisms at Walker Ridge, Gulf of Mexico, via 3D methane hydrate reservoir modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Nole, Michael; Daigle, Hugh; Mohanty, Kishore; Cook, Ann; Hillman, Jess

    2015-12-15

    . Therefore, it is likely that additional mechanisms are at play, notably bound water activity reduction in clays. Three-dimensionality allows for inclusion of lithologic heterogeneities, which focus fluid flow and subsequently allow for heterogeneity in the methane migration mechanisms that dominate in marine sediments at a local scale. Incorporating recently acquired 3D seismic data from Walker Ridge to inform the lithologic structure of our modeled reservoir, we show that even with deep adjective sourcing of methane along highly permeable pathways, local hydrate accumulations can be sourced either by diffusive or advective methane flux; advectively-sourced hydrates accumulate evenly in highly permeable strata, while diffusively-sourced hydrates are characterized by thin strata-bound intervals with high clay-sand pore size contrasts.

  8. The direct aromatization of methane

    SciTech Connect

    Marcelin, G.; Oukaci, R.; Migone, R.A.; Kazi, A.M.

    1995-12-31

    The thermal decomposition of methane shows significant potential as a process for the production of higher unsaturated and aromatic hydrocarbons when the extent of the reaction is limited. Thermodynamic calculations have shown that when the reaction is limited to the formation of C{sub 2} to C{sub 10} products, yields of aromatics can exceed 40% at temperatures of 1200{degrees}C. Preliminary experiments have shown that when the reaction is limited to the formation of C{sub 2} to C{sub 10} products, yields of aromatics can exceed 40% at temperatures of 1200{degrees}C. Preliminary experiments have shown that cooling the product and reacting gases as the reaction proceeds can significantly reduce or eliminate the formation of solid carbon and heavier (C{sub 10+}) materials. Much work remains to be done in optimizing the quenching process and this is one of the goals of this program. Means to lower the temperature of the reaction are being studied as this result in a more feasible commercial process due to savings realized in energy and material of construction costs. The use of free-radical generators and catalysts will be investigated as a means of lowering the reaction temperature thus allowing faster quenching. It is highly likely that such studies will lead to a successful direct methane to higher hydrocarbon process.

  9. Methane emissions from Carex rostrata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yelverton, C. A.; Varner, R. K.; Roddy, S.; Noyce, G. L.

    2013-12-01

    Peatlands, especially in northern regions, are known for their contribution to the increase of methane (CH4) in the atmosphere. Methane emissions from peatlands are strongly correlated with water table, temperature, and species composition. Sedges, in particular, are a conduit for the release of CH4 directly to the atmosphere. This study examines the impact of clipping and sealing sedges (Carex rostrata) on CH4 emissions from a temperate peatland (Sallie's Fen, Barrington, NH, USA). Measurements of CH4 fluxes, dissolved CH4, and environmental conditions were made over a six-year period. Data from 2008 to 2013 show that the presence of Carex rostrata in this peatland increases CH4 emissions. Clipped plots have both lower seasonal and annual CH4 emissions, compared to control plots. By studying the type of environment associated with C. rostrata through measurements of water-table depth, pore water characteristics, and the peat, surface, and air temperature of each surrounding location, further studies will show how these factors affect the rate at which CH4 is emitted into the atmosphere.

  10. Microbial mats in the Black Sea that anaerobically oxidise methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nauhaus, K.; Knittel, K.; Krüger, M.; Boetius, A.; Michaelis, W.; Widdel, F.

    2003-04-01

    Reef-forming microbial mats were recovered from methane seeps in anoxic waters of the northwestern Black Sea (BS) shelf. The microbial mats consist mainly of archaea (ANME-1 cluster) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (Desulfosarcina/Desulfococcus group). Laboratory incubations with homogenized subsamples of the mats revealed their ability for the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). The phylogentic relationship of the sulfate reducing partner is the same as in the AOM consortia studied in sediment samples from a methane hydrate area (Hydrate Ridge (HR), Oregon, USA (1,2)). The archaeal partner however belongs to a different cluster than in the HR samples (ANME-2). Methane oxidation is coupled to sulfate reduction in a 1:1 stoichiometry. Elevated methane partial pressures (0.1 to 1.1 MPa) increased the sulfate reduction rates in the Black Sea samples only two-fold in contrast to 5-fold in HR samples. The optimal temperature for the BS samples is between 10 and 25^oC. In both samples AOM was not taking place if typical inhibitors for sulfate-reduction or methanogenesis were added, thus indicating a syntrophic relationship between the partner organisms. The intermediate that is exchanged between the methane oxidizing archaea and the sulfate-reducing bacterium is still unknown. Additions of the possible intermediates (Acetate, Formate, Hydrogen) did not result in higher sulfate reduction rates in the absence of methane. (1) Boetius, A. et al. (2000) A marine microbial consortium apparently mediating anaerobic oxidation of methane. Nature. 407: 623--626 (2) Nauhaus, K., Boetius, A., Krüger, M., Widdel, F. (2002) In vitro demonstration of anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled to sulphate reduction in sediment from a marine gas hydrate area. Environ. Microbiol. 4 (5): 296--305

  11. Topographic Variation and Methane Production in Siberian Arctic Tundra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eason, J.; Kuhn, M. A.; Dunn, S.; Spawn, S.; Schade, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the fate of soil carbon when permafrost soils begin to thaw is critical for predicting the impact of permafrost thaw on global climate change. Microbial metabolism of soil carbon can produce carbon dioxide or methane, depending on soil conditions, and which pathway dominates has great significance for the strength of climate feedbacks since methane is a much more powerful greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide. In Arctic ecosystems, methane production from upland environments is not well understood and generally assumed to be low because conditions there are generally not favorable for methanogenesis. Small changes in topography, however, can lead to great heterogeneity in soil conditions at small scales that may lead to higher methane flux than generally recognized. In this study, we investigated patterns in methane, carbon dioxide, and oxygen concentrations in in surface waters of 15 small ponds in the Kolyma River watershed in Northeast Siberia. The ponds were distributed across a topographic gradient from upland tundra high in the landscape to low-lying ponds in the floodplain of the Kolyma River. In addition, we used chambers to measured methane fluxes from a variety of topographic depressions that ranged from pools to moss-dominated saturated soils lacking surface water, to dry soils dominated by sedges. Dissolved carbon dioxide concentrations in ponds showed no trend down the topographic gradient while methane concentrations decreased downslope. The decrease in methane production may be the result of a switch from green moss to brown moss, which may act as a host for methanotrophic bacteria. Ponds with green moss had significantly higher concentrations of methane than the ponds with brown moss. In addition, we found significantly higher methane fluxes from pools and saturated soils then from drier soils, which showed very low fluxes. These results suggest that upland tundra may be a significant source of methane, and that methane fluxes are driven

  12. Environmental control on aerobic methane oxidation in coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinle, Lea; Maltby, Johanna; Engbersen, Nadine; Zopfi, Jakob; Bange, Hermann; Elvert, Marcus; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Kock, Annette; Lehmann, Moritz; Treude, Tina; Niemann, Helge

    2016-04-01

    Large quantities of methane are produced in anoxic sediments of continental margins and may be liberated to the overlying water column, where some of it is consumed by aerobic methane oxidizing bacteria (MOB). Aerobic methane oxidation (MOx) in the water column is consequently the final sink for methane before its release to the atmosphere, where it acts as a potent greenhouse gas. In the context of the ocean's contribution to atmospheric methane, coastal seas are particularly important accounting >75% of global methane emission from marine systems. Coastal oceans are highly dynamic, in particular with regard to the variability of methane and oxygen concentrations as well as temperature and salinity, all of which are potential key environmental factors controlling MOx. To determine important environmental controls on the activity of MOBs in coastal seas, we conducted a two-year time-series study with measurements of physicochemical water column parameters, MOx activity and the composition of the MOB community in a coastal inlet in the Baltic Sea (Boknis Eck Time Series Station, Eckernförde Bay - E-Bay). In addition, we investigated the influence of temperature and oxygen on MOx during controlled laboratory experiments. In E-Bay, hypoxia developed in bottom waters towards the end of the stratification period. Constant methane liberation from sediments resulted in bottom water methane accumulations and supersaturation (with respect to the atmospheric equilibrium) in surface waters. Here, we will discuss the factors impacting MOx the most, which were (i) perturbations of the water column (ii) temperature and (iii) oxygen concentration. (i) Perturbations of the water column caused by storm events or seasonal mixing led to a decrease in MOx, probably caused by replacement of stagnant water with a high standing stock of MOB by 'new' waters with a lower abundance of methanotrophs. b) An increase in temperature generally led to higher MOx rates. c) Even though methane was

  13. Mars methane detection and variability at Gale crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Christopher R.; Mahaffy, Paul R.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Flesch, Gregory J.; Mischna, Michael A.; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Farley, Kenneth A.; Conrad, Pamela G.; Christensen, Lance E.; Pavlov, Alexander A.; Martín-Torres, Javier; Zorzano, María-Paz; McConnochie, Timothy H.; Owen, Tobias; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Steele, Andrew; Malespin, Charles A.; Archer, P. Douglas; Sutter, Brad; Coll, Patrice; Freissinet, Caroline; McKay, Christopher P.; Moores, John E.; Schwenzer, Susanne P.; Bridges, John C.; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; Gellert, Ralf; Lemmon, Mark T.; MSL Science Team; Abbey, William; Achilles, Cherie; Agard, Christophe; Alexandre Alves Verdasca, José; Anderson, Dana; Anderson, Robert C.; Anderson, Ryan B.; Appel, Jan Kristoffer; Archer, Paul Douglas; Arevalo, Ricardo; Armiens-Aparicio, Carlos; Arvidson, Raymond; Atlaskin, Evgeny; Atreya, Andrew Sushil; Azeez, Aubrey Sherif; Baker, Burt; Baker, Michael; Balic-Zunic, Tonci; Baratoux, David; Baroukh, Julien; Barraclough, Bruce; Battalio, Michael; Beach, Michael; Bean, Keri; Beck, Pierre; Becker, Richard; Beegle, Luther; Behar, Alberto; Belgacem, Inès; Bell, James F., III; Bender, Steven; Benna, Mehdi; Bentz, Jennifer; Berger, Jeffrey; Berger, Thomas; Berlanga, Genesis; Berman, Daniel; Bish, David; Blacksberg, Jordana; Blake, David F.; José Blanco, Juan; Blaney, Ávalos Diana; Blank, Jennifer; Blau, Hannah; Bleacher, Lora; Boehm, Eckart; Bonnet, Jean-Yves; Botta, Oliver; Böttcher, Stephan; Boucher, Thomas; Bower, Hannah; Boyd, Nick; Boynton, William; Braswell, Shaneen; Breves, Elly; Bridges, John C.; Bridges, Nathan; Brinckerhoff, William; Brinza, David; Bristow, Thomas; Brunet, Claude; Brunner, Anna; Brunner, Will; Buch, Arnaud; Bullock, Mark; Burmeister, Sönke; Burton, John; Buz, Jennifer; Cabane, Michel; Calef, Fred; Cameron, James; Campbell, John L.; Cantor, Bruce; Caplinger, Michael; Clifton, Carey, Jr.; Caride Rodríguez, Javier; Carmosino, Marco; Carrasco Blázquez, Isaías; Cavanagh, Patrick; Charpentier, Antoine; Chipera, Steve; Choi, David; Christensen, Lance; Clark, Benton; Clegg, Sam; Cleghorn, Timothy; Cloutis, Ed; Cody, George; Coll, Patrice; Coman, Ecaterina I.; Conrad, Pamela; Coscia, David; Cousin, Agnès; Cremers, David; Crisp, Joy A.; Cropper, Kevin; Cros, Alain; Cucinotta, Francis; d'Uston, Claude; Davis, Scott; Day, Mackenzie; Daydou, Yves; DeFlores, Lauren; Dehouck, Erwin; Delapp, Dorothea; DeMarines, Julia; Dequaire, Tristan; Des Marais, David; Desrousseaux, Roch; Dietrich, William; Dingler, Robert; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn; Donny, Christophe; Downs, Robert; Drake, Darrell; Dromart, Gilles; Dupont, Audrey; Duston, Brian; Dworkin, Jason P.; Dyar, M. Darby; Edgar, Lauren; Edgett, Kenneth; Edwards, Christopher S.; Edwards, Laurence; Edwards, Peter; Ehlmann, Bethany; Ehresmann, Bent; Eigenbrode, Jennifer; Elliott, Beverley; Elliott, Harvey; Ewing, Ryan; Fabre, Cécile; Fairén, Alberto; Fairén, Alberto; Farley, Kenneth; Farmer, Jack; Fassett, Caleb; Favot, Laurent; Fay, Donald; Fedosov, Fedor; Feldman, Jason; Fendrich, Kim; Fischer, Erik; Fisk, Martin; Fitzgibbon, Mike; Flesch, Gregory; Floyd, Melissa; Flückiger, Lorenzo; Forni, Olivier; Fox, Valerie; Fraeman, Abigail; Francis, Raymond; François, Pascaline; Franz, Heather; Freissinet, Caroline; French, Katherine Louise; Frydenvang, Jens; Garvin, James; Gasnault, Olivier; Geffroy, Claude; Gellert, Ralf; Genzer, Maria; Getty, Stephanie; Glavin, Daniel; Godber, Austin; Goesmann, Fred; Goetz, Walter; Golovin, Dmitry; Gómez Gómez, Felipe; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Gondet, Brigitte; Gordon, Suzanne; Gorevan, Stephen; Graham, Heather; Grant, John; Grinspoon, David; Grotzinger, John; Guillemot, Philippe; Guo, Jingnan; Gupta, Sanjeev; Guzewich, Scott; Haberle, Robert; Halleaux, Douglas; Hallet, Bernard; Hamilton, Victoria; Hand, Kevin; Hardgrove, Craig; Hardy, Keian; Harker, David; Harpold, Daniel; Harri, Ari-Matti; Harshman, Karl; Hassler, Donald; Haukka, Harri; Hayes, Alexander; Herkenhoff, Kenneth; Herrera, Paul; Hettrich, Sebastian; Heydari, Ezat; Hipkin, Victoria; Hoehler, Tori; Hollingsworth, Jeff; Hudgins, Judy; Huntress, Wesley; Hurowitz, Joel; Hviid, Stubbe; Iagnemma, Karl; Indyk, Stephen; Israël, Guy; Jackson, Ryan Steele; Jacob, Samantha; Jakosky, Bruce; Jean-Rigaud, Laurent; Jensen, Elsa; Kløvgaard Jensen, Jaqueline; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Johnson, Micah; Johnstone, Stephen; Jones, Andrea; Jones, John H.; Joseph, Jonathan; Joulin, Mélissa; Jun, Insoo; Kah, Linda C.; Kahanpää, Henrik; Kahre, Melinda; Kaplan, Hannah; Karpushkina, Natalya; Kashyap, Srishti; Kauhanen, Janne; Keely, Leslie; Kelley, Simon; Kempe, Fabian; Kemppinen, Osku; Kennedy, Megan R.; Keymeulen, Didier; Kharytonov, Alexander; Kim, Myung-Hee; Kinch, Kjartan; King, Penelope; Kirk, Randolph; Kirkland, Laurel; Kloos, Jacob; Kocurek, Gary; Koefoed, Asmus; Köhler, Jan; Kortmann, Onno; Kotrc, Benjamin; Kozyrev, Alexander; Krau, Johannes; Krezoski, ß. Gillian; Kronyak, Rachel; Krysak, Daniel; Kuzmin, Ruslan; Lacour, Jean-Luc; Lafaille, Vivian; Langevin, Yves; Lanza, Nina; Lapôtre, Mathieu; Larif, Marie-France; Lasue, Jérémie; Le Deit, Laetitia; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Lee, Ella Mae; Lee, Qiu-Mei; Lee, Rebekka; Lees, David; Lefavor, Matthew; Lemmon, Mark; Lepinette, Alain; Lepore, Malvitte Kate; Leshin, Laurie; Léveillé, Richard; Lewin, Éric; Lewis, Kevin; Li, Shuai; Lichtenberg, Kimberly; Lipkaman, Leslie; Lisov, Denis; Little, Cynthia; Litvak, Maxim; Liu, Lu; Lohf, Henning; Lorigny, Eric; Lugmair, Günter; Lundberg, Angela; Lyness, Eric; Madsen, Morten Bo; Magee, Angela; Mahaffy, Paul; Maki, Justin; Mäkinen, Teemu; Malakhov, Alexey; Malespin, Charles; Malin, Michael; Mangold, Nicolas; Manhes, Gerard; Manning, Heidi; Marchand, Geneviève; Marín Jiménez, Mercedes; Martín García, César; Martin, David K.; Martin, Mildred; Martin, Peter; Martínez Martínez, Germán; Martínez-Frías, Jesús; Martín-Sauceda, Jaime; Martín-Soler, Martín Javier; Martín-Torres, F. Javier; Mason, Emily; Matthews, Tristan; Matthiä, Daniel; Mauchien, Patrick; Maurice, Sylvestre; McAdam, Amy; McBride, Marie; McCartney, Elaina; McConnochie, Timothy; McCullough, Emily; McEwan, Ian; McKay, Christopher; McLain, Hannah; McLennan, Scott; McNair, Sean; Melikechi, Noureddine; Mendaza de Cal, Teresa; Merikallio, Sini; Merritt, Sean; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Meyer, Michael; Mezzacappa, Alissa; Milkovich, Sarah; Millan, Maëva; Miller, Hayden; Miller, Kristen; Milliken, Ralph; Ming, Douglas; Minitti, Michelle; Mischna, Michael; Mitchell, Julie; Mitrofanov, Igor; Moersch, Jeffrey; Mokrousov, Maxim; Molina, Antonio; Moore, Jurado Casey; Moores, John E.; Mora-Sotomayor, Luis; Moreno, Gines; Morookian, John Michael; Morris, Richard V.; Morrison, Shaunna; Mousset, Valérie; Mrigakshi, Alankrita; Mueller-Mellin, Reinhold; Muller, Jan-Peter; Muñoz Caro, Guillermo; Nachon, Marion; Nastan, Abbey; Navarro López, Sara; Navarro González, Rafael; Nealson, Kenneth; Nefian, Ara; Nelson, Tony; Newcombe, Megan; Newman, Claire; Newsom, Horton; Nikiforov, Sergey; Nikitczuk, Matthew; Niles, Paul; Nixon, Brian; Noblet, Audrey; Noe, Eldar; Nolan, Dobrea Thomas; Oehler, Dorothy; Ollila, Ann; Olson, Timothy; Orthen, Tobias; Owen, Tobias; Ozanne, Marie; de Pablo Hernández, Miguel Ángel; Pagel, Hannah; Paillet, Alexis; Pallier, Etienne; Palucis, Marisa; Parker, Timothy; Parot, Yann; Parra, Alex; Patel, Kiran; Paton, Mark; Paulsen, Gale; Pavlov, Alexander; Pavri, Betina; Peinado-González, Verónica; Pepin, Robert; Peret, Laurent; Pérez, René; Perrett, Glynis; Peterson, Joseph; Pilorget, Cedric; Pinet, Patrick; Pinnick, Veronica; Pla-García, Jorge; Plante, Ianik; Poitrasson, Franck; Polkko, Jouni; Popa, Radu; Posiolova, Liliya; Posner, Arik; Pradler, Irina; Prats, Benito; Prokhorov, Vasily; Raaen, Eric; Radziemski, Leon; Rafkin, Scot; Ramos, Miguel; Rampe, Elizabeth; Rapin, William; Raulin, François; Ravine, Michael; Reitz, Günther; Ren, Jun; Rennó, Nilton; Rice, Melissa; Richardson, Mark; Ritter, Birgit; Rivera-Hernández, Frances; Robert, François; Robertson, Kevin; Rodriguez Manfredi, José Antonio; José Romeral-Planelló, Julio; Rowland, Scott; Rubin, David; Saccoccio, Muriel; Said, David; Salamon, Andrew; Sanin, Anton; Sans Fuentes, Sara Alejandra; Saper, Lee; Sarrazin, Philippe; Sautter, Violaine; Savijärvi, Hannu; Schieber, Juergen; Schmidt, Mariek; Schmidt, Walter; Scholes, Daniel; Schoppers, Marcel; Schröder, Susanne; Schwenzer, Susanne P.; Sciascia Borlina, Cauê; Scodary, Anthony; Sebastián Martínez, Eduardo; Sengstacken, Aaron; Shechet, Jennifer Griffes; Shterts, Ruslan; Siebach, Kirsten; Siili, Tero; Simmonds, John J.; Sirven, Jean-Baptiste; Slavney, Susan; Sletten, Ronald; Smith, Michael D.; Sobron Sanchez, Pablo; Spanovich, Nicole; Spray, John; Spring, Justin; Squyres, Steven; Stack, Katie; Stalport, Fabien; Starr, Richard; Stein, Andrew Steele Thomas; Stern, Jennifer; Stewart, Noel; Stewart, Wayne; Stipp, Svane Susan Louise; Stoiber, Kevin; Stolper, Edward; Sucharski, Robert; Sullivan, Robert; Summons, Roger; Sumner, Dawn Y.; Sun, Vivian; Supulver, Kimberley; Sutter, Brad; Szopa, Cyril; Tan, Florence; Tate, Christopher; Teinturier, Samuel; ten Kate, Inge Loes; Thomas, Alicia; Thomas, Peter; Thompson, Lucy; Thuillier, Franck; Thulliez, Emmanual; Tokar, Robert; Toplis, Michael; de la Torre Juárez, Manuel; Torres Redondo, Josefina; Trainer, Melissa; Treiman, Allan; Tretyakov, Vladislav; Ullán-Nieto, Aurora; Urqui-O'Callaghan, Roser; Valentín-Serrano, Patricia; Van Beek, Jason; Van Beek, Tessa; VanBommel, Scott; Vaniman, David; Varenikov, Alexey; Vasavada, Ashwin R.; Vasconcelos, Paulo; de Vicente-Retortillo Rubalcaba, Álvaro; Vicenzi, Edward; Vostrukhin, Andrey; Voytek, Mary; Wadhwa, Meenakshi; Ward, Jennifer; Watkins, Jessica; Webster, Christopher R.; Weigle, Gerald; Wellington, Danika; Westall, Frances; Wiens, Roger; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Williams, Amy; Williams, Joshua; Williams, Rebecca; Williams, Richard B.; Williford, Kenneth; Wilson, Michael A.; Wilson, Sharon A.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert; Wolff, Michael; Wong, Michael; Wray, James; Yana, Charles; Yen, Albert; Yingst, Aileen; Zeitlin, Cary; Zimdar, Robert; Zorzano Mier, María-Paz

    2015-01-01

    Reports of plumes or patches of methane in the martian atmosphere that vary over monthly time scales have defied explanation to date. From in situ measurements made over a 20-month period by the tunable laser spectrometer of the Sample Analysis at Mars instrument suite on Curiosity at Gale crater, we report detection of background levels of atmospheric methane of mean value 0.69 ± 0.25 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) at the 95% confidence interval (CI). This abundance is lower than model estimates of ultraviolet degradation of accreted interplanetary dust particles or carbonaceous chondrite material. Additionally, in four sequential measurements spanning a 60-sol period (where 1 sol is a martian day), we observed elevated levels of methane of 7.2 ± 2.1 ppbv (95% CI), implying that Mars is episodically producing methane from an additional unknown source.

  14. Mars atmosphere. Mars methane detection and variability at Gale crater.

    PubMed

    Webster, Christopher R; Mahaffy, Paul R; Atreya, Sushil K; Flesch, Gregory J; Mischna, Michael A; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Farley, Kenneth A; Conrad, Pamela G; Christensen, Lance E; Pavlov, Alexander A; Martín-Torres, Javier; Zorzano, María-Paz; McConnochie, Timothy H; Owen, Tobias; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L; Glavin, Daniel P; Steele, Andrew; Malespin, Charles A; Archer, P Douglas; Sutter, Brad; Coll, Patrice; Freissinet, Caroline; McKay, Christopher P; Moores, John E; Schwenzer, Susanne P; Bridges, John C; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; Gellert, Ralf; Lemmon, Mark T

    2015-01-23

    Reports of plumes or patches of methane in the martian atmosphere that vary over monthly time scales have defied explanation to date. From in situ measurements made over a 20-month period by the tunable laser spectrometer of the Sample Analysis at Mars instrument suite on Curiosity at Gale crater, we report detection of background levels of atmospheric methane of mean value 0.69 ± 0.25 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) at the 95% confidence interval (CI). This abundance is lower than model estimates of ultraviolet degradation of accreted interplanetary dust particles or carbonaceous chondrite material. Additionally, in four sequential measurements spanning a 60-sol period (where 1 sol is a martian day), we observed elevated levels of methane of 7.2 ± 2.1 ppbv (95% CI), implying that Mars is episodically producing methane from an additional unknown source.

  15. Mars atmosphere. Mars methane detection and variability at Gale crater.

    PubMed

    Webster, Christopher R; Mahaffy, Paul R; Atreya, Sushil K; Flesch, Gregory J; Mischna, Michael A; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Farley, Kenneth A; Conrad, Pamela G; Christensen, Lance E; Pavlov, Alexander A; Martín-Torres, Javier; Zorzano, María-Paz; McConnochie, Timothy H; Owen, Tobias; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L; Glavin, Daniel P; Steele, Andrew; Malespin, Charles A; Archer, P Douglas; Sutter, Brad; Coll, Patrice; Freissinet, Caroline; McKay, Christopher P; Moores, John E; Schwenzer, Susanne P; Bridges, John C; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; Gellert, Ralf; Lemmon, Mark T

    2015-01-23

    Reports of plumes or patches of methane in the martian atmosphere that vary over monthly time scales have defied explanation to date. From in situ measurements made over a 20-month period by the tunable laser spectrometer of the Sample Analysis at Mars instrument suite on Curiosity at Gale crater, we report detection of background levels of atmospheric methane of mean value 0.69 ± 0.25 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) at the 95% confidence interval (CI). This abundance is lower than model estimates of ultraviolet degradation of accreted interplanetary dust particles or carbonaceous chondrite material. Additionally, in four sequential measurements spanning a 60-sol period (where 1 sol is a martian day), we observed elevated levels of methane of 7.2 ± 2.1 ppbv (95% CI), implying that Mars is episodically producing methane from an additional unknown source. PMID:25515120

  16. Evaluation of Heat Induced Methane Release from Methane Hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leeman, J.; Elwood-Madden, M.; Phelps, T. J.; Rawn, C. J.

    2010-12-01

    Clathrates, or gas hydrates, structurally are guest gas molecules populating a cavity in a cage of water molecules. Gas hydrates naturally occur on Earth under low temperature and moderate pressure environments including continental shelf, deep ocean, and permafrost sediments. Large quantities of methane are trapped in hydrates, providing significant near-surface reserves of carbon and energy. Thermodynamics predicts that hydrate deposits may be destabilized by reducing the pressure in the system or raising the temperature. However, the rate of methane release due to varying environmental conditions remains relatively unconstrained and complicated by natural feedback effects of clathrate dissociation. In this study, hydrate dissociation in sediment due to localized increases in temperature was monitored and observed at the mesoscale (>20L) in a laboratory environment. Experiments were conducted in the Seafloor Process Simulator (SPS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to simulate heat induced dissociation. The SPS, containing a column of Ottawa sand saturated with water containing 25mg/L Sno-Max to aid nucleation, was pressurized and cooled well into the hydrate stability field. A fiber optic distributed sensing system (DSS) was embedded at four depths in the sediment column. This allowed the temperature strain value (a proxy for temperature) of the system to be measured with high spatial resolution to monitor the clathrate formation/dissociation processes. A heat exchanger embedded in the sediment was heated using hot recirculated ethylene glycol and the temperature drop across the exchanger was measured. These experiments indicate a significant and sustained amount of heat is required to release methane gas from hydrate-bearing sediments. Heat was consumed by hydrate dissociated in a growing sphere around the heat exchanger until steady state was reached. At steady state all heat energy entering the system was consumed in maintaining the temperature profile

  17. Identification of Methanogens and Controls on Methane Production in Incubations of Natural Methane Seep Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevorkian, R.; Lloyd, K. G.

    2014-12-01

    Methane, the most abundant hydrocarbon in Earth's atmosphere, is produced in large quantities in sediments underlying the world's oceans. Very little of this methane makes it to surface sediments as it is consumed by Anaerobic Methanotrophs (ANME's) in consortia with Sulfate Reducing Bacteria (SRB). Less is known about which organisms are responsible for methane production in marine sediments, and whether that production is under thermodynamic control based on hydrogen concentrations. Although ANMEs have been found to be active in methanogenic sediments and incubations, it is currently unknown whether they are able to grow in methanogenic conditions. We demonstrated with bottle incubations of methane seep sediment taken from Cape Lookout Bight, NC, that hydrogen controls methane production. While sulfate was present the hydrogen concentration was maintained at below 2 nM. Only after the depletion of sulfate allowed hydrogen concentrations to rise above 5 nM did we see production of methane. The same sediments when spiked with methane gas demonstrated its complete removal while sulfate reduction occurred. Quantitative PCR shows that ANME-2 and ANME-1 increase in 16S copy number as methane increases. Total direct cell counts demonstrate a decline in cells with the decrease of sulfate until a recovery corresponding with production of methane. Our results strongly suggest that hydrogen concentrations influence what metabolic processes can occur in marine sediments, and that ANME-1 and ANME-2 are able to grow on the energy provided from methane production.

  18. Stable methane hydrate above 2 GPa and the source of Titan's atmospheric methane.

    PubMed

    Loveday, J S; Nelmes, R J; Guthrie, M; Belmonte, S A; Allan, D R; Klug, D D; Tse, J S; Handa, Y P

    2001-04-01

    Methane hydrate is thought to have been the dominant methane-containing phase in the nebula from which Saturn, Uranus, Neptune and their major moons formed. It accordingly plays an important role in formation models of Titan, Saturn's largest moon. Current understanding assumes that methane hydrate dissociates into ice and free methane in the pressure range 1-2 GPa (10-20 kbar), consistent with some theoretical and experimental studies. But such pressure-induced dissociation would have led to the early loss of methane from Titan's interior to its atmosphere, where it would rapidly have been destroyed by photochemical processes. This is difficult to reconcile with the observed presence of significant amounts of methane in Titan's present atmosphere. Here we report neutron and synchrotron X-ray diffraction studies that determine the thermodynamic behaviour of methane hydrate at pressures up to 10 GPa. We find structural transitions at about 1 and 2 GPa to new hydrate phases which remain stable to at least 10 GPa. This implies that the methane in the primordial core of Titan remained in stable hydrate phases throughout differentiation, eventually forming a layer of methane clathrate approximately 100 km thick within the ice mantle. This layer is a plausible source for the continuing replenishment of Titan's atmospheric methane. PMID:11287946

  19. A Geochemical Model for the Origin of Methane on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glein, C. R.; Shock, E. L.

    2007-12-01

    The existence of methane in Titan's atmosphere has been a mystery for years [1]. The short photochemical lifetime of methane in the atmosphere suggests that methane is replenished from the interior. Observations by Cassini-Huygens have offered new insights into the origin of methane on Titan. These data have confirmed that Titan's methane is endogenic [2], consistent with geophysical models [3]. Today, an issue is the origin of methane on Titan in general. Why does Titan have methane in the first place? Here, we show that methane formation would have been unavoidable on early Titan. It is likely that Titan accreted materials similar to carbonaceous chondrites and comets, except for extreme volatiles in comets, such as carbon monoxide. Thus, we assume that Titan started with Fe-Ni metals and sulfides, silicates and oxides of the rock-forming elements, organic matter, carbon dioxide, methanol, and ammonia. After accretion, radiogenic heat would have melted ice, facilitating water-rock separation and interaction. Mineral dissolution and precipitation, along with acid-base reactions, would have been facile throughout differentiation, despite the low temperature. In contrast, most redox reactions, notably organic matter decomposition, would have been slow in cold aqueous solution. Eventually, the interior would have segregated into a muddy core, covered by a high-pressure ice layer, overlain by a salty ocean, capped by an ice shell [3]. The primordial muddy core would have been composed of phyllosilicates, organic matter, carbonates, sulfides, and presumably, metals. The early salty ocean would have been rich in sodium chloride and bicarbonate, in addition to methanol and ammonium salts. Methane would not have formed in hydrothermal systems at the ocean floor because the high-pressure ice layer would have inhibited hydrothermal circulation. Instead, we propose that methane is a byproduct of the thermal evolution of the core. Specifically, our core devolatilization

  20. Salting-Out of Methane in the Aqueous Solutions of Urea and Glycine-Betaine.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Mayank Kumar; Siddique, Asrar A; Tembe, B L

    2015-08-27

    We have studied the hydrophobic association and solvation of methane molecules in aqueous solutions of urea and glycine betaine (GB). We have calculated the potentials of mean force (PMFs) between methane molecules in water, aqueous GB, aqueous urea and aqueous urea-GB mixtures. The PMFs and equilibrium constants indicate that both urea and GB increase the hydrophobic association of methane. Calculation of thermodynamic parameters shows that the association of methane is stabilized by entropy whereas solvation is favored by enthalpy. In the case of the water-urea-GB mixture, both hydrophobic association and solvation are stabilized by entropy. From the investigation of radial distribution functions, running coordination numbers and excess coordination numbers, we infer that both urea and GB are preferentially excluded from methane surface in the mixtures of osmolytes and methane is preferentially solvated by water molecules in all the mixtures. The favorable exclusion of both urea and GB from the methane surface suggests that both urea and GB increase the interaction between methane molecules, i.e., salting-out of methane. We observe that addition of both urea and GB to water enhances local water structure. The calculated values of diffusion constants of water also suggest enhanced water-water interactions in the presence of urea and GB. The calculated free energies of methane in these mixtures show that methane is less soluble in the mixtures of urea and GB than in water. The data on solvation free energies support the observations obtained from the PMFs of methane molecules.

  1. Root-Associated Methane Oxidation and Methanogenesis: Key Determinants of Wetland Methane Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, G. M.

    1997-01-01

    During the award period, we have assessed the extent and controls of methane oxidation in north temperate wetlands. It is evident that wetlands have been a major global source of atmospheric methane in the past, and are so at present. It is also evident that microbial methane oxidation consumes a variable fraction of total wetland methane production, perhaps 10%-90%. Methane oxidation is thus a potentially important control of wetland methane emission. Our efforts have been designed to determine the extent of the process, its controls, and possible relationships to changes that might be expected in wetlands as a consequence of anthropogenic or climate-related disturbances. Current work, has emphasized controls of methane oxidation associated with rooted aquatic plants. As for the sediment-water interface, we have observed that oxygen availability is a primary limiting factor. Our conclusion is based on several different lines of evidence obtained from in vitro and in situ analyses. First, we have measured the kinetics of methane oxidation by intact plant roots harboring methane-oxidizing bacteria, as well as the kinetics of the methanotrophs themselves. Values for the half-saturation constant (apparent K(sub m)) are approximately 5 microns. These values are roughly equivalent to, or much less than porewater methane concentrations, indicating that uptake is likely saturated with respect to methane, and that some other parameter must limit activity. Methane concentrations in the lacunar spaces at the base of plant stems are also comparable to the half-saturation constants (when expressed as equivalent dissolved concentrations), providing further support for limitation of uptake by parameters other than methane.

  2. Environmental factors affecting methane distribution and bacterial methane oxidation in the German Bight (North Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osudar, Roman; Matoušů, Anna; Alawi, Mashal; Wagner, Dirk; Bussmann, Ingeborg

    2015-07-01

    River estuaries are responsible for high rates of methane emissions to the atmosphere. The complexity and diversity of estuaries require detailed investigation of methane sources and sinks, as well as of their spatial and seasonal variations. The Elbe river estuary and the adjacent North Sea were chosen as the study site for this survey, which was conducted from October 2010 to June 2012. Using gas chromatography and radiotracer techniques, we measured methane concentrations and methane oxidation (MOX) rates along a 60 km long transect from Cuxhaven to Helgoland. Methane distribution was influenced by input from the methane-rich mouth of the Elbe and gradual dilution by methane-depleted sea water. Methane concentrations near the coast were on average 30 ± 13 nmol L-1, while in the open sea, they were 14 ± 6 nmol L-1. Interestingly, the highest methane concentrations were repeatedly detected near Cuxhaven, not in the Elbe River freshwater end-member as previously reported. Though, we did not find clear seasonality we observed temporal methane variations, which depended on temperature and presumably on water discharge from the Elbe River. The highest MOX rates generally coincided with the highest methane concentrations, and varied from 2.6 ± 2.7 near the coast to 0.417 ± 0.529 nmol L-1 d-1 in the open sea. Turnover times varied from 3 to >1000 days. MOX rates were strongly affected by methane concentration, temperature and salinity. We ruled out the supposition that MOX is not an important methane sink in most of the Elbe estuary and adjacent German Bight.

  3. Methane and Trichloroethylene Degradation by Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b Expressing Particulate Methane Monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Lontoh, Sonny; Semrau, Jeremy D.

    1998-01-01

    Whole-cell assays of methane and trichloroethylene (TCE) consumption have been performed on Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b expressing particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO). From these assays it is apparent that varying the growth concentration of copper causes a change in the kinetics of methane and TCE degradation. For M. trichosporium OB3b, increasing the copper growth concentration from 2.5 to 20 μM caused the maximal degradation rate of methane (Vmax) to decrease from 300 to 82 nmol of methane/min/mg of protein. The methane concentration at half the maximal degradation rate (Ks) also decreased from 62 to 8.3 μM. The pseudo-first-order rate constant for methane, Vmax/Ks, doubled from 4.9 × 10−3 to 9.9 × 10−3 liters/min/mg of protein, however, as the growth concentration of copper increased from 2.5 to 20 μM. TCE degradation by M. trichosporium OB3b was also examined with varying copper and formate concentrations. M. trichosporium OB3b grown with 2.5 μM copper was unable to degrade TCE in both the absence and presence of an exogenous source of reducing equivalents in the form of formate. Cells grown with 20 μM copper, however, were able to degrade TCE regardless of whether formate was provided. Without formate the Vmax for TCE was 2.5 nmol/min/mg of protein, while providing formate increased the Vmax to 4.1 nmol/min/mg of protein. The affinity for TCE also increased with increasing copper, as seen by a change in Ks from 36 to 7.9 μM. Vmax/Ks for TCE degradation by pMMO also increased from 6.9 × 10−5 to 5.2 × 10−4 liters/min/mg of protein with the addition of formate. From these whole-cell studies it is apparent that the amount of copper available is critical in determining the oxidation of substrates in methanotrophs that are expressing only pMMO. PMID:16349516

  4. [Methanogens and manipulation of methane production in the rumen].

    PubMed

    Guo, Yan-qiu; Hu, Wei-lian; Liu, Jian-xin

    2005-02-01

    Methanogens belong to the kingdom of Euryarchaeota in the domain of Archaea. They are characterized by their ability to produce methane under anaerobic conditions. Methane production in the rumen represents a loss of energy for the host animal, and, in addition, methane eructated by ruminants may contribute to a greenhouse effect or global warming. Reduction or elimination of methanogenesis in the rumen has been touted as a way of improving animal production and may marginally benefit to control of anthropogenic release of methane. More and more scientists focus on ruminal methanogens and methanogenesis recently. Authors summarized the manipulation of methanogenesis in the rumen, including defaunation, feed formulation, adding electron acceptors and stimulation of acetogens. The characteristics of methanogenic Archaea and the recent knowledge of the methanogenesis in the rumen were also reviewed in this article.

  5. 30 CFR 75.1324 - Methane concentration and tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Methane concentration and tests. 75.1324... Methane concentration and tests. (a) No shot shall be fired in an area that contains 1.0 volume percent or more of methane. (b) Immediately before shots are fired, the methane concentration in a working...

  6. 30 CFR 75.1324 - Methane concentration and tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Methane concentration and tests. 75.1324... Methane concentration and tests. (a) No shot shall be fired in an area that contains 1.0 volume percent or more of methane. (b) Immediately before shots are fired, the methane concentration in a working...

  7. 30 CFR 75.1324 - Methane concentration and tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Methane concentration and tests. 75.1324... Methane concentration and tests. (a) No shot shall be fired in an area that contains 1.0 volume percent or more of methane. (b) Immediately before shots are fired, the methane concentration in a working...

  8. 30 CFR 75.1324 - Methane concentration and tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Methane concentration and tests. 75.1324... Methane concentration and tests. (a) No shot shall be fired in an area that contains 1.0 volume percent or more of methane. (b) Immediately before shots are fired, the methane concentration in a working...

  9. 30 CFR 75.1324 - Methane concentration and tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Methane concentration and tests. 75.1324... Methane concentration and tests. (a) No shot shall be fired in an area that contains 1.0 volume percent or more of methane. (b) Immediately before shots are fired, the methane concentration in a working...

  10. 30 CFR 75.323 - Actions for excessive methane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Actions for excessive methane. 75.323 Section... excessive methane. (a) Location of tests. Tests for methane concentrations under this section shall be made.... (1) When 1.0 percent or more methane is present in a working place or an intake air course,...

  11. 30 CFR 75.323 - Actions for excessive methane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Actions for excessive methane. 75.323 Section... excessive methane. (a) Location of tests. Tests for methane concentrations under this section shall be made.... (1) When 1.0 percent or more methane is present in a working place or an intake air course,...

  12. 30 CFR 27.21 - Methane-monitoring system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Methane-monitoring system. 27.21 Section 27.21... APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS METHANE-MONITORING SYSTEMS Construction and Design Requirements § 27.21 Methane-monitoring system. (a) A methane-monitoring system shall be so designed that any machine or equipment,...

  13. 30 CFR 75.323 - Actions for excessive methane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Actions for excessive methane. 75.323 Section... excessive methane. (a) Location of tests. Tests for methane concentrations under this section shall be made.... (1) When 1.0 percent or more methane is present in a working place or an intake air course,...

  14. 30 CFR 27.21 - Methane-monitoring system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Methane-monitoring system. 27.21 Section 27.21... APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS METHANE-MONITORING SYSTEMS Construction and Design Requirements § 27.21 Methane-monitoring system. (a) A methane-monitoring system shall be so designed that any machine or equipment,...

  15. 30 CFR 27.21 - Methane-monitoring system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Methane-monitoring system. 27.21 Section 27.21... APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS METHANE-MONITORING SYSTEMS Construction and Design Requirements § 27.21 Methane-monitoring system. (a) A methane-monitoring system shall be so designed that any machine or equipment,...

  16. Anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to nitrite reduction can be a potential methane sink in coastal environments.

    PubMed

    Shen, Li-Dong; Hu, Bao-Lan; Liu, Shuai; Chai, Xiao-Ping; He, Zhan-Fei; Ren, Hong-Xing; Liu, Yan; Geng, Sha; Wang, Wei; Tang, Jing-Liang; Wang, Yi-Ming; Lou, Li-Ping; Xu, Xiang-Yang; Zheng, Ping

    2016-08-01

    In the current study, we investigated nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (N-DAMO) as a potential methane sink in the Hangzhou Bay and the adjacent Zhoushan sea area. The potential activity of the N-DAMO process was primarily observed in Hangzhou Bay by means of (13)C-labeling experiments, whereas very low or no potential N-DAMO activity could be detected in the Zhoushan sea area. The measured potential N-DAMO rates ranged from 0.2 to 1.3 nmol (13)CO2 g(-1) (dry sediment) day(-1), and the N-DAMO potentially contributed 2.0-9.4 % to the total microbial methane oxidation in the examined sediments. This indicated that the N-DAMO process may be an alternative pathway in the coastal methane cycle. Phylogenetic analyses confirmed the presence of Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera-like bacteria in all the examined sediments, while the group A members (the dominant bacteria responsible for N-DAMO) were found mainly in Hangzhou Bay. Quantitative PCR showed that the 16S rRNA gene abundance of Candidatus M. oxyfera-like bacteria varied from 5.4 × 10(6) to 5.0 × 10(7) copies g(-1) (dry sediment), with a higher abundance observed in Hangzhou Bay. In addition, the overlying water NO3 (-) concentration and salinity were identified as the most important factors influencing the abundance and potential activity of Candidatus M. oxyfera-like bacteria in the examined sediments. This study showed the evidence of N-DAMO in coastal environments and indicated the importance of N-DAMO as a potential methane sink in coastal environments.

  17. Anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to nitrite reduction can be a potential methane sink in coastal environments.

    PubMed

    Shen, Li-Dong; Hu, Bao-Lan; Liu, Shuai; Chai, Xiao-Ping; He, Zhan-Fei; Ren, Hong-Xing; Liu, Yan; Geng, Sha; Wang, Wei; Tang, Jing-Liang; Wang, Yi-Ming; Lou, Li-Ping; Xu, Xiang-Yang; Zheng, Ping

    2016-08-01

    In the current study, we investigated nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (N-DAMO) as a potential methane sink in the Hangzhou Bay and the adjacent Zhoushan sea area. The potential activity of the N-DAMO process was primarily observed in Hangzhou Bay by means of (13)C-labeling experiments, whereas very low or no potential N-DAMO activity could be detected in the Zhoushan sea area. The measured potential N-DAMO rates ranged from 0.2 to 1.3 nmol (13)CO2 g(-1) (dry sediment) day(-1), and the N-DAMO potentially contributed 2.0-9.4 % to the total microbial methane oxidation in the examined sediments. This indicated that the N-DAMO process may be an alternative pathway in the coastal methane cycle. Phylogenetic analyses confirmed the presence of Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera-like bacteria in all the examined sediments, while the group A members (the dominant bacteria responsible for N-DAMO) were found mainly in Hangzhou Bay. Quantitative PCR showed that the 16S rRNA gene abundance of Candidatus M. oxyfera-like bacteria varied from 5.4 × 10(6) to 5.0 × 10(7) copies g(-1) (dry sediment), with a higher abundance observed in Hangzhou Bay. In addition, the overlying water NO3 (-) concentration and salinity were identified as the most important factors influencing the abundance and potential activity of Candidatus M. oxyfera-like bacteria in the examined sediments. This study showed the evidence of N-DAMO in coastal environments and indicated the importance of N-DAMO as a potential methane sink in coastal environments. PMID:27225473

  18. Methane cycling in a tidal freshwater swamp

    SciTech Connect

    Megonigal, J.P.; Schlesinger, W.H. )

    1993-06-01

    Previous studies of methanogenesis in a tidal freshwater swamp on the North Carolina coast have found that potential rates of methane production overestimate observed rates of methane flux, especially during summer months. This research investigates three possibilities for the unexplained losses: methane oxidation, lateral export of dissolved methane to the adjacent river, and ebullition. It is possible that each of these sinks increase during the summer. The potential for methane oxidation was demonstrated in intact soil cores incubated for 21 hours under a 0.5% CH[sub 3]F atmosphere. Methane flux increased from 10+/-27 (mean+/-sd) to 60+/-3 mg m[sup [minus]2] d[sup [minus]1] in treated cores; control core fluxes were 15+/-3 and 19+/-3 mg m[sup [minus]2] d[sup [minus]1] over the same periods. Incubations of slightly unsaturated soils with [sup 14]CH[sub 4] confirmed rapid potential rates of methane oxidation.

  19. Liquid Ethane and Methane on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Roger Nelson; Curchin, J.; Brown, R. H.; Barnes, J. W.; Jaumann, R.; Soderblom, L.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Lunine, J.; Stephan, K.; Hoefen, T. H.; Le Mouelic, S.; Sotin, C.; Baines, K.; Buratti, B.; Nicholson, P.

    2008-09-01

    Absorption coefficients for liquid methane and ethane were derived in a 1-bar nitrogen atmosphere at 90K. Ethane and methane were condensed in an aluminum sample cup, and a 2-way transmission spectrum was measured. Different path lengths up to 14 mm allowed a wide range of absorption coefficients to be measured, and covered the range needed to compare to spectra of Titan in the 1- to 5-micron atmospheric windows. The data were used to compute possible liquid absorption in spectra from the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) and were compared to global VIMS data for Titan. The laboratory data show that both liquid methane and ethane have a strong absorption band near 4.97 microns that is detectable by VIMS. A liquid lake thickness of 3 mm (6 mm path length) would result in an absorption band depth of about 65% for methane and 85% for ethane. Ethane has a 2.02-micron absorption with a strength similar to the 4.97-micron absorption, and methane has an absorption that is 10x weaker. Continuum absorption would result in the following surface reflectance levels (at VIMS wavelengths and resolution). Examining VIMS Titan data, we find that for most of the surface, we detect no liquid methane or ethane. In a few locations VIMS data indicate liquid methane or ethane, but at less than about 1-mm total path length.

  20. Methane on Mars: Measurements and Possible Origins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mumma, Michael J.; Villanueva, Geronimo L.; Novak, Robert E.; Radeva, Yana L.; Kaufl, H. Ulrich; Tokunaga, Alan; Encrenaz, Therese; Hartogh, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The presence of abundant methane in Earth's atmosphere (1.6 parts per million) requires sources other than atmospheric chemistry. Living systems produce more than 90% of Earth's atmospheric methane; the balance is of geochemical origin. On Mars, methane has been sought for nearly 40 years because of its potential biological significance, but it was detected only recently [1-5]. Its distribution on the planet is found to be patchy and to vary with time [1,2,4,5], suggesting that methane is released recently from the subsurface in localized areas, and is then rapidly destroyed [1,6]. Before 2000, searchers obtained sensitive upper limits for methane by averaging over much of Mars' dayside hemisphere, using data acquired by Marsorbiting spacecraft (Mariner 9) and Earth-based observatories (Kitt Peak National Observatory, Canada- France-Hawaii Telescope, Infrared Space Observatory). These negative findings suggested that methane should be searched at higher spatial resolution since the local abundance could be significantly larger at active sites. Since 2001, searches for methane have emphasized spatial mapping from terrestrial observatories and from Mars orbit (Mars Express).

  1. Microbial Methane Oxidation Rates in Guandu Wetland of northern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zih-Huei; Wang, Pei-Ling; Lin, Li-Hung

    2016-04-01

    lasted over a longer period of time for the samples collected in high tide period. It seems that aerobic methanotrophs needed a longer period of time to recovery and/or had low activities, since they had been suppressed by low oxygen concentration during high tide period. The rates of anaerobic methane oxidation ranged between 1.5 and 4.0 nmole/g/d for samples collected at high tide period, whereas lower rates ranging from 0.2 to 2.0 nmole/g/d were observed for samples at low tide period. The addition of basal salt solution apparently stimulated methane consumption significantly. Based on the field observation and laboratory incubations, our results indicated a dynamic shift of metabolic zonation in tidally influenced wetlands. Aerobic methanotrophy appears to outpace anaerobic methanotrophy by orders of magnitude regardless of tidal inundation. This together with methanogenesis regulated by the availability of sulfate and organic degradation plays a major role in controlling methane emission. While anaerobic methanotrophy is relatively minor in methane cycling, its linkage with the sulfate availability modulates the coupling of carbon and sulfur turnover under anoxic conditions.

  2. Methane venting to the atmosphere from sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakhova, Natalia; Semiletov, Igor; Salyuk, Anatoly; Joussupov, Vladimir; Kosmach, Denis; Gustafsson, Orjan; Leifer, Ira

    2010-05-01

    Sustained release of methane to the atmosphere from thawing Arctic permafrost likely is a strong positive feedback to climate warming. A climate impact of Arctic methane releases is implied by past climate shifts and may play a role in the renewed growth of contemporary atmospheric methane. Observed Arctic warming in early 21st century is stronger than predicted by several degrees, which may accelerate thaw-release of methane. The East Siberian Arctic Shelf (ESAS, encompassing the Laptev, East Siberian and Russian part of the Chuckchi Seas) occupies an area of 2.1×106 km2, three times as great as terrestrial Siberian wetlands. It is a shallow seaward extension of the Siberian tundra that was flooded during the Holocene transgression 7-15 kyr ago. The ESAS sub-sea permafrost, (frozen sediments inter-layered with the flooded peatland) contains not only comparable amounts of carbon as still land-fast permafrost in the Siberian tundra, but also sequesters permafrost-related seabed deposits of CH4. Remobilization to the atmosphere of only a small fraction of the methane trapped in ESAS sediments could trigger abrupt climate warming. Currently it is hypothesized that sub-sea permafrost acts as a lid retaining this shallow methane reservoir. However, estimates of ESAS methane emissions based on recent observations indicate the current atmospheric budget, which arises from gradual diffusion and ebullition, is on par with estimates of methane emissions from the entire World Ocean. Large transient emissions remain to be assessed; yet initial data suggest this component could increase significantly annual emissions. These study results show methane leakage from the shallow ESAS needs consideration in interactions between the biogeosphere and a warming Arctic climate.

  3. Anaerobic methane oxidation on the Amazon shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, N.E.; Aller, R.C.

    1995-09-01

    Anaerobic methane oxidation on the Amazon shelf is strongly controlled by dynamic physical sedimentation processes. Rapidly accumulating, physically reworked deltaic sediments characteristic of much of the shelf typically support what appear to be low rates of steady state anaerobic methane oxidation at depths of 5-8 m below the sediment-water interface. Methane oxidation in these cases is responsible for < {approximately}10% of the {Sigma}CO{sub 2} inventory in the oxidation zone and is limited largely by the steady-state diffusive flux of methane into the overlying sulfate reduction zone. In contrast, a large area of the shelf has been extensively eroded, reexposing once deeply buried (>10 m) methane-charged sediment directly to seawater. In this nonsteady-state situation, methane is a major source of recently produced {Sigma}CO{sub 2} and an important reductant for sulfate. These observations suggest that authigenic sedimentary carbonates derived from anaerobic methane oxidation may sometimes reflect physically enhanced nonsteady-state exposure of methane to sulfate in otherwise biogeochemically unreactive deposits. The concentration profiles of CH{sub 4}, SO{sub 4}{sup =}, and {Sigma}CO{sub 2} in the eroded deposit were reproduced by a coupled reaction-transport model. This area of the shelf was reexposed to seawater approximately 5-10 years ago based on the model results and the assumption that the erosion of the deposit occurred as a single event that has now ceased. The necessary second order rate constant for anaerobic methane oxidation was {le}0.1 mM{sup -1} d{sup -1}.

  4. Mars Methane highs unrelated to comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roos-Serote, Maarten; Atreya, Sushil K.; Webster, Chris; Mahaffy, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Until the Curiosity Rover arrived at Mars, all measurements of methane were done by remote sensing, either from Earth or from orbiting spacecraft, using a variety of different instruments and under different observing conditions. The Curiosity Rover's Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) / Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS) has carried out systematic measurements of martian methane from Gale crater for two consecutive martian years (31 - 33, starting in October 2012). Meteoric material interacts with the martian atmosphere when Mars passes through a meteoroid stream left behind by cometary bodies orbiting the Sun. Predictions show that 33 such events are likely to occur during the martian year. It has been suggested that the organics present in this material trigger the formation of methane in the atmosphere, and thus these events could possibly be an explanation for the observed variations in the methane abundance. In a recent paper, Fries et al. [2016] argued that all measurements of high methane concentrations are within 16 days of a predicted meteor shower event, and that as such there is a correlation. We present a new analysis including seven new data points that were not available previously. All these new measurements show low methane values. Some of the new measurements were deliberately taken at the same Ls when high values of methane were measured in the previous martian year, showing that the high methane measurements are likely not seasonal, as would be expected if they were connected to meteor shower events. In our analysis we take into account all the predicted meteor events and search for any correlation drawn between these events and the level of methane in the atmosphere. We conclude that whether we consider individual data points, apply statistical analysis, or consider different time spans between measurements and the occurrence of meteor events, or possible supply of organic material from comets, there is no evidence for such a correlation in the

  5. Measuring Methane Production from Ruminants.

    PubMed

    Hill, Julian; McSweeney, Chris; Wright, André-Denis G; Bishop-Hurley, Greg; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh

    2016-01-01

    Radiative forcing of methane (CH4) is significantly higher than carbon dioxide (CO2) and its enteric production by ruminant livestock is one of the major sources of greenhouse gas emissions. CH4 is also an important marker of farming productivity, because it is associated with the conversion of feed to product in livestock. Consequently, measurement of enteric CH4 is emerging as an important research topic. In this review, we briefly describe the conversion of carbohydrate to CH4 by the bacterial community within gut, and highlight some of the key host-microbiome interactions. We then provide a picture of current progress in techniques for measuring enteric CH4, the context in which these technologies are used, and the challenges faced. We also discuss solutions to existing problems and new approaches currently in development.

  6. Measuring Methane Production from Ruminants.

    PubMed

    Hill, Julian; McSweeney, Chris; Wright, André-Denis G; Bishop-Hurley, Greg; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh

    2016-01-01

    Radiative forcing of methane (CH4) is significantly higher than carbon dioxide (CO2) and its enteric production by ruminant livestock is one of the major sources of greenhouse gas emissions. CH4 is also an important marker of farming productivity, because it is associated with the conversion of feed to product in livestock. Consequently, measurement of enteric CH4 is emerging as an important research topic. In this review, we briefly describe the conversion of carbohydrate to CH4 by the bacterial community within gut, and highlight some of the key host-microbiome interactions. We then provide a picture of current progress in techniques for measuring enteric CH4, the context in which these technologies are used, and the challenges faced. We also discuss solutions to existing problems and new approaches currently in development. PMID:26603286

  7. Tapping methane hydrates for unconventional natural gas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppel, Carolyn

    2007-01-01

    Methane hydrate is an icelike form of concentrated methane and water found in the sediments of permafrost regions and marine continental margins at depths far shallower than conventional oil and gas. Despite their relative accessibility and widespread occurrence, methane hydrates have never been tapped to meet increasing global energy demands. With rising natural gas prices, production from these unconventional gas deposits is becoming economically viable, particularly in permafrost areas already being exploited for conventional oil and gas. This article provides an overview of gas hydrate occurrence, resource assessment, exploration, production technologies, renewability, and future challenges.

  8. METHOD FOR PRODUCING ISOTOPIC METHANES AND PARTIALLY HALOGENATED DERIVATIVES THEROF

    DOEpatents

    Frazer, J.W.

    1959-08-18

    A method is given for producing isotopic methanes and/ or partially halogenated derivatives. Lithium hydride, deuteride, or tritide is reacted with a halogenated methane or with a halogenated methane in combination with free halogen. The process is conveniently carried out by passing a halogenated methane preferably at low pressures or in an admixture with an inert gas through a fixed bed of finely divided lithium hydride heated initially to temperatures of 100 to 200 deg C depending upon the halogenated methane used.

  9. A model study of mechanisms of methane transfer from Arctic shelf to the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanenko, V. M.; Iakovlev, N. G.

    2012-04-01

    A possible positive feedback to rapid climate warming in Arctic - degradation of methane hydrates in the shelf bottom ground - has recently attracted attention of many research groups. This was primarily caused by new empirical evidence of very high concentrations of dissolved methane in Russian Arctic and methane fluxes to the atmosphere. A number of studies were conducted to access a possible effect of methane hydrates degradation in response to future warming of the ocean. Climate change scenarios were used to force the models of heat transfer in shelf ground. However, in majority of these works it was assumed that all methane released from shelf bottom reaches atmosphere. This precludes the possibility of taking into account methane bubbles dissolution, methane oxidation and subsequent ocean acidification effects. In this study we apply three modeling frameworks for quantifying these effects. First, one-dimensional (in vertical) model of water reservoir is used (Stepanenko et al. 2011), calculating vertical profiles of dissolved methane, bubbles' parameters and emission to the atmosphere. This model utilizes a bubble model by McGinnis et al. (2006), and diffusion-reaction equations for methane, oxygen and carbon dioxide concentrations in dissolved state. Thus, interaction between bubbles and dissolved gases and methane oxidation are described explicitly. Second, one-dimensional methane model is forced by temperature profile and eddy diffusion coefficients from 3D ocean dynamics model (Iakovlev 2009). And third, methane model is coupled to 3D ocean dynamics model allowing to reproduce advection of methane by oceanic currents in addition to above mentioned processes. This set of experiments allows to assess a significance of ocean dynamics for bottom-released methane transport and methane emission to the atmosphere. Since a number of parameters (e.g. initial bubble radius at the bottom, constants entering reaction rates formulae) are highly uncertain due to lack

  10. Arctic Methane Hydrates: A Potential Greenhouse Gas Hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Light, M. P. R.; Solana, C.

    Methane is one of the most important greenhouse gases present in the atmosphere, having 20 times more warming potential than CO2 over a 100 yr period and 56 times more over a 20 yr period. The submarine arctic ice contains abundant methane trapped as hydrates below the continental shelf and its edge. The reserves in this area are estimated at more than 140 times the volume of methane in the atmosphere and, if released relatively quickly, the effects could be catastrophic. Although some authors have established that submarine hydrates will remain stable for the next 1000 yr, this estimation could change if other phenomena are taken into account. Hydrates within the continental shelf in the Arctic are more unstable because of the increase in oceanic temperatures over the last 10,000 yr. A warm (2C maximum) intermediate depth (5- 500 m) current recently detected in the Arctic basin flowing along the shelf edge will further destabilize the methane hydrates exposed there. In addition, the presence of seismic activity along the Arctic mid-ocean ridge and in the northern Alaska region, with magnitudes greater than 3.5 Richter and epicentres less than 30 km deep, could trigger slope failures where the methane hydrate is unstable, releasing huge volumes of methane into the atmosphere. Therefore, identifying those areas that are potentially unstable under these new conditions and the possibilities of reducing the hazard are a priority in our research.

  11. Atomistic simulations of methane interactions with an atmospheric moisture.

    PubMed

    Galashev, Alexander Y

    2013-09-28

    Methane is an extremely effective absorber of radiation, i.e., it is a relatively potent greenhouse gas, and the increased concentration of methane in the atmosphere must influence earth's radiation balance. The adsorption of one to six methane molecules by water clusters is studied by the method of molecular dynamics under near-atmospheric conditions. The capture of methane molecules by water clusters produces an increase in the integrated intensity of IR absorbance and the reflection coefficient. The Raman spectrum of the system is considerably depleted due to the addition of methane molecules to the disperse water system. The observed emission power of a dispersed aqueous system with adsorbed methane molecules has appreciably increased relative to the analogous characteristics of the pure water cluster system. The Voronoi polyhedra and simplified ones constructed within the framework of molecular-dynamic model of clusters are used for the analysis of the structure changes occurring with increasing the number of adsorbed CH4 molecules. PMID:24089763

  12. Dynamics of methane production, sulfate reduction, and denitrification in a permanently waterlogged alder swamp

    SciTech Connect

    Westermann, P.; Ahring, B.K.

    1987-10-01

    The dynamics of sulfate reduction, methane production, and denitrification were investigated in a permanently waterlogged alder swamp. Molybdate, an inhibitor of sulfate reduction, stimulated methane production in soil slurries, thus suggesting competition for common substrates between sulfate-reducing and methane-producing bacteria. Acetate, hydrogen, and methanol were found to stimulate both sulfate reduction and methane production, while trimethylamine mainly stimulated methane production. Nitrate addition reduced both methane production and sulfate reduction, either as a consequence of competition of poisoning of the bacteria. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were only slightly limited by the availability of electron acceptors, while denitrifying bacteria were seriously limited by low nitrate concentrations. Arrhenius plots of the three processes revealed different responses to temperature changes in the slurries. Methane production was most sensitive to temperature changes, followed by denitrification and sulfate reduction. No significant differences between slope patterns were observed when comparing summer and winter measurements, indicating similar populations regarding temperature responses.

  13. Methane metabolism in a temperate swamp

    SciTech Connect

    Amaral, J.A.; Knowles, R.

    1994-11-01

    Methane production has received much attention due not only to its importance as a terminal step in anaerobic organic matter degradation but also to its potentially significant role in climatic change and atmospheric chemistry. Wetlands are an important source and potential reservoir of methane, but the factors controlling its production and emission are not fully understood. This study examined in situ availability of substrates and the distribution of electron acceptors in a temperate peat swamp to determine how the chemistry and microbiology of the site affects methane production. Measurements were obtained in summer, fall and spring at two sites. Laboratory incubations with slurried peat soil were carried out. From the results, the authors speculate that along with differences in hydrology and chemical characteristics, heterogeneity in microbial activity may also contribute to the spatial variability of methane production and emission in wetlands. 45 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Producing Hydrogen by Plasma Pyrolysis of Methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwater, James; Akse, James; Wheeler, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Plasma pyrolysis of methane has been investigated for utility as a process for producing hydrogen. This process was conceived as a means of recovering hydrogen from methane produced as a byproduct of operation of a life-support system aboard a spacecraft. On Earth, this process, when fully developed, could be a means of producing hydrogen (for use as a fuel) from methane in natural gas. The most closely related prior competing process - catalytic pyrolysis of methane - has several disadvantages: a) The reactor used in the process is highly susceptible to fouling and deactivation of the catalyst by carbon deposits, necessitating frequent regeneration or replacement of the catalyst. b) The reactor is highly susceptible to plugging by deposition of carbon within fixed beds, with consequent channeling of flow, high pressure drops, and severe limitations on mass transfer, all contributing to reductions in reactor efficiency. c) Reaction rates are intrinsically low. d) The energy demand of the process is high.

  15. Methane Detector With Plastic Fresnel Lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, W. B.

    1986-01-01

    Laser detector for natural gas leaks modified by substitution of molded plastic lens for spherical mirror. By measuring relative attenuation at two wavelengths, detector used to check for methane escaping from pipelines above or below ground and from landfill.

  16. Formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stolper, D.A.; Lawson, M.; Davis, C.L.; Ferreira, A.A.; Santos Neto, E. V.; Ellis, G.S.; Lewan, M.D.; Martini, A.M.; Tang, Y.; Schoell, M.; Sessions, A.L.; Eiler, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas and energy resource generated dominantly by methanogens at low temperatures and through the breakdown of organic molecules at high temperatures. However, methane-formation temperatures in nature are often poorly constrained. We measured formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane using a “clumped isotope” technique. Thermogenic gases yield formation temperatures between 157° and 221°C, within the nominal gas window, and biogenic gases yield formation temperatures consistent with their comparatively lower-temperature formational environments (<50°C). In systems where gases have migrated and other proxies for gas-generation temperature yield ambiguous results, methane clumped-isotope temperatures distinguish among and allow for independent tests of possible gas-formation models.

  17. Aerodyne Research mobile infrared methane monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmanus, J. B.; Kebabian, P. L.; Kolb, C. E.

    1991-01-01

    An improved real-time methane monitor based on infrared absorption of the 3.39 micron line of a HeNe laser is described. Real time in situ measurement of methane has important applications in stratospheric and tropospheric chemistry, especially when high accuracy measurements can be made rapidly, providing fine spatial-scale information. The methane instrument provides 5 ppb resolution in a 1 sec averaging time. A key feature in this instrument is the use of magnetic (Zeeman) broadening to achieve continuous tunability with constant output power over a range of 0.017/cm. The instruments optical absorption path length is 47 m through sampled air held at 50 torr in a multipass cell of the Herriott (off-axis resonator) type. A microprocessor controls laser frequency and amplitude and collects data with minimal operator attention. The instrument recently has been used to measure methane emissions from a variety of natural and artificial terrestrial sources.

  18. Abiotic Production of Methane in Terrestrial Planets

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán-Marmolejo, Andrés; Escobar-Briones, Elva

    2013-01-01

    Abstract On Earth, methane is produced mainly by life, and it has been proposed that, under certain conditions, methane detected in an exoplanetary spectrum may be considered a biosignature. Here, we estimate how much methane may be produced in hydrothermal vent systems by serpentinization, its main geological source, using the kinetic properties of the main reactions involved in methane production by serpentinization. Hydrogen production by serpentinization was calculated as a function of the available FeO in the crust, given the current spreading rates. Carbon dioxide is the limiting reactant for methane formation because it is highly depleted in aqueous form in hydrothermal vent systems. We estimated maximum CH4 surface fluxes of 6.8×108 and 1.3×109 molecules cm−2 s−1 for rocky planets with 1 and 5 M⊕, respectively. Using a 1-D photochemical model, we simulated atmospheres with volume mixing ratios of 0.03 and 0.1 CO2 to calculate atmospheric methane concentrations for the maximum production of this compound by serpentinization. The resulting abundances were 2.5 and 2.1 ppmv for 1 M⊕ planets and 4.1 and 3.7 ppmv for 5 M⊕ planets. Therefore, low atmospheric concentrations of methane may be produced by serpentinization. For habitable planets around Sun-like stars with N2-CO2 atmospheres, methane concentrations larger than 10 ppmv may indicate the presence of life. Key Words: Serpentinization—Exoplanets—Biosignatures—Planetary atmospheres. Astrobiology 13, 550–559. PMID:23742231

  19. The Clumped Isotope Composition of Biogenic Methane.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sessions, A. L.; Douglas, P. M.; Eiler, J. M.; Stolper, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    The excess or lack of 13CH3D, a doubly substituted ("clumped") isotopologue of methane, relative to that expected for a random distribution of isotopes across molecules, is a function of the processes that generated the methane. For high-temperature thermogenic methane, which typically achieves internal equilibrium, an excess of 13CH3D is expected and the amount of excess can serve as a thermometer. In contrast, biogenic methane often - though not always - has a smaller excess of clumped isotopologues, and sometimes even a deficit of clumped species ("anti-clumped"). The effect presumably arises from kinetic isotope effects accompanying enzymatic reactions in the methanogenic pathway, though the particular reaction(s) has not yet been positively identified. The decrease in clumping is also known to correlate with both the reversibility of the pathway and the methane flux. In this talk, we will present recent data bearing on the origin and utility of biologic fractionations of clumped isotopologues in methane. Preliminary data suggest that methane deriving from the fermentative pathway is enriched in D-bearing isotopologues, at the same level of clumping, relative to that derived from the CO2-reductive pathway. This property offers another potential means to distinguish biogenic methane sources in the environment. Recently, we have also begun to measure the 12CH2D2 isotopologue, for which equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects are predicted to be distinct from 13CH3D. Preliminary data suggest that the combination of both doubly-substituted isotopologues will be especially useful for disentangling mixtures containing biogenic gas.

  20. Methane Fingerprinting: Isotopic Methane and Ethane-to-Methane Ratio Analysis Using a Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Nabil; Fleck, Derek; Hoffnagle, John

    2016-04-01

    Emissions of Natural gas, and methane (CH4) specifically, have come under increased scrutiny by virtue of methane's 28-36x greenhouse warming potential compared to carbon dioxide (CO2) while accounting for 10% of the total greenhouse gas emissions in the US. Large uncontrolled leaks, such as the recent Aliso Canyon leak, originating from uncapped wells, coal mines and storage facilities have increased the total global contribution of methane missions even further. Determining the specific fingerprint of methane sources, by quantifying δ13C values and C2:C1 ratios, provides the means to understand methane producing processes and allows for sources of methane to be mapped and classified through these processes; i.e. biogenic vs. thermogenic, wet vs dry. In this study we present a fully developed Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer (CRDS) that precisely measures 12CH4 concentration and its 13CH4 isotope concentration, yielding δ13C measurements, C2H6 concentration, along with CO2 and H2O. This provides real-time continuous measurements without an upfront separation requirement or multiple analyses to derive the origin of the gas samples. The highly sensitive analyzer allows for measurements of scarce molecules down to sub-ppb 1-σ precision in 5 minutes of measurement: with CH4 <0.1ppb, δ13C <1‰ C2H6 <1ppb and CO2 <1ppm. To complement this work, we provide the analysis of different methane sources providing a 2-dimensional mapping of methane sources as functions of δ13C and C2:C1 ratios, which can be thought of as a modified Bernard Plot. This dual ratio mapping can be used to discriminate between naturally occurring biogenic methane sources, naturally occurring enriched thermogenic sources, and natural gas distribution sources. This also shows future promise in aiding gas and oil exploration, in distinguishing oil vs coal gases, as well as a valuable tool in the development of methane sequestration.

  1. Methane emission by adult ostriches (Struthio camelus).

    PubMed

    Frei, Samuel; Dittmann, Marie T; Reutlinger, Christoph; Ortmann, Sylvia; Hatt, Jean-Michel; Kreuzer, Michael; Clauss, Marcus

    2015-02-01

    Ostriches (Struthio camelus) are herbivorous birds with a digestive physiology that shares several similarities with that of herbivorous mammals. Previous reports, however, claimed a very low methane emission from ostriches, which would be clearly different from mammals. If this could be confirmed, ostrich meat would represent a very attractive alternative to ruminant-and generally mammalian-meat by representing a particularly low-emission agricultural form of production. We individually measured, by chamber respirometry, the amount of oxygen consumed as well as carbon dioxide and methane emitted from six adult ostriches (body mass 108.3±8.3 kg) during a 24-hour period when fed a pelleted lucerne diet. While oxygen consumption was in the range of values previously reported for ostriches, supporting the validity of our experimental setup, methane production was, at 17.5±3.2 L d(-1), much higher than previously reported for this species, and was of the magnitude expected for similar-sized, nonruminant mammalian herbivores. These results suggest that methane emission is similar between ostriches and nonruminant mammalian herbivores and that the environmental burden of these animals is comparable. The findings furthermore indicate that it appears justified to use currently available scaling equations for methane production of nonruminant mammals in paleo-reconstructions of methane production of herbivorous dinosaurs.

  2. Climate reconstruction from a methane influenced environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sztybor, K.; Rasmussen, T. L.; Mienert, J.; Bunz, S.; Consolaro, C.

    2013-12-01

    Sediment cores have been collected from Vestnesa Ridge, western Svalbard margin, from within and outside an active pockmark with methane gas flares. The lithological log, X-ray, magnetic susceptibility and numerous AMS dates were used to constrain the age model and for high-resolution inter-core correlation. Other proxies used in order to reconstruct the dynamics of changes of bottom water properties as well as North Atlantic hydrography were oxygen and carbon isotopes of benthic and planktonic foraminifera and assemblage counts. The main purpose of the study is to resolve the frequency of CH4 emissions from the seafloor through time in relation to past climate change. The magnetic susceptibility record from the pockmark core shows very low and constant values without the pattern typical for the western Svalbard. The seeping of methane clearly destroyed the signal. Benthic foraminifera within several intervals are depleted in δ13C, indicating increased methane flux from the seafloor. Carbon isotope values measured in planktonic foraminifera shells are also extremely low (<-10 ‰), which can be caused by coating of AOM (Anaerobic oxidation of methane)-derived carbonates (authigenic overgrowth). Moreover methane seepage affects the outcomes of AMS dating. Our results suggest that radiocarbon dates measured in bivalve shells are approximately 3000 cal years too old. In a methane influenced environment a multiproxy approach is necessary for more accurate paleoclimate reconstructions.

  3. Airborne Methane Measurements using Optical Parametric Amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riris, H.; Numata, K.; Li, S.; Wu, S.; Ramanathan, A.; Dawsey, M.; Abshire, J. B.; Kawa, S. R.; Mao, J.

    2012-12-01

    We report on airborne methane measurements with an active sensing instrument using widely tunable, seeded optical parametric generation (OPG). Methane is a strong greenhouse gas on Earth and it is also a potential biogenic marker on Mars and other planetary bodies. Methane in the Earth's atmosphere survives for a shorter time than CO2 but its impact on climate change can be larger than CO2. Carbon and methane emissions from land are expected to increase as permafrost melts exposing millennial-age carbon stocks to respiration (aerobic-CO2 and anaerobic-CH4) and fires. Methane emissions from clathrates in the Arctic Ocean and on land are also likely to respond to climate warming. However, there is considerable uncertainty in present Arctic flux levels, as well as how fluxes will change with the changing environment and more measurements are needed. In this paper we report on an airborne demonstration of atmospheric methane column optical depth measurements at 1.65 μm using widely tunable, seeded optical parametric amplifier (OPA) and a photon counting detector. Our results show good agreement between the experimentally derived optical depth measurements and theoretical calculations and follow the expected changes for aircraft altitudes from 3 to 11 km. The technique has also been used to measure carbon dioxide and monoxide, water vapor, and other trace gases in the near and mid-infrared spectral regions on the ground.

  4. Biogeochemistry of microbial coal-bed methane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strc, D.; Mastalerz, Maria; Dawson, K.; MacAlady, J.; Callaghan, A.V.; Wawrik, B.; Turich, C.; Ashby, M.

    2011-01-01

    Microbial methane accumulations have been discovered in multiple coal-bearing basins over the past two decades. Such discoveries were originally based on unique biogenic signatures in the stable isotopic composition of methane and carbon dioxide. Basins with microbial methane contain either low-maturity coals with predominantly microbial methane gas or uplifted coals containing older, thermogenic gas mixed with more recently produced microbial methane. Recent advances in genomics have allowed further evaluation of the source of microbial methane, through the use of high-throughput phylogenetic sequencing and fluorescent in situ hybridization, to describe the diversity and abundance of bacteria and methanogenic archaea in these subsurface formations. However, the anaerobic metabolism of the bacteria breaking coal down to methanogenic substrates, the likely rate-limiting step in biogenic gas production, is not fully understood. Coal molecules are more recalcitrant to biodegradation with increasing thermal maturity, and progress has been made in identifying some of the enzymes involved in the anaerobic degradation of these recalcitrant organic molecules using metagenomic studies and culture enrichments. In recent years, researchers have attempted lab and subsurface stimulation of the naturally slow process of methanogenic degradation of coal. Copyright ?? 2011 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.

  5. Biogeochemistry of Microbial Coal-Bed Methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strąpoć, Dariusz; Mastalerz, Maria; Dawson, Katherine; Macalady, Jennifer; Callaghan, Amy V.; Wawrik, Boris; Turich, Courtney; Ashby, Matthew

    2011-05-01

    Microbial methane accumulations have been discovered in multiple coal-bearing basins over the past two decades. Such discoveries were originally based on unique biogenic signatures in the stable isotopic composition of methane and carbon dioxide. Basins with microbial methane contain either low-maturity coals with predominantly microbial methane gas or uplifted coals containing older, thermogenic gas mixed with more recently produced microbial methane. Recent advances in genomics have allowed further evaluation of the source of microbial methane, through the use of high-throughput phylogenetic sequencing and fluorescent in situ hybridization, to describe the diversity and abundance of bacteria and methanogenic archaea in these subsurface formations. However, the anaerobic metabolism of the bacteria breaking coal down to methanogenic substrates, the likely rate-limiting step in biogenic gas production, is not fully understood. Coal molecules are more recalcitrant to biodegradation with increasing thermal maturity, and progress has been made in identifying some of the enzymes involved in the anaerobic degradation of these recalcitrant organic molecules using metagenomic studies and culture enrichments. In recent years, researchers have attempted lab and subsurface stimulation of the naturally slow process of methanogenic degradation of coal.

  6. Methane emission by adult ostriches (Struthio camelus).

    PubMed

    Frei, Samuel; Dittmann, Marie T; Reutlinger, Christoph; Ortmann, Sylvia; Hatt, Jean-Michel; Kreuzer, Michael; Clauss, Marcus

    2015-02-01

    Ostriches (Struthio camelus) are herbivorous birds with a digestive physiology that shares several similarities with that of herbivorous mammals. Previous reports, however, claimed a very low methane emission from ostriches, which would be clearly different from mammals. If this could be confirmed, ostrich meat would represent a very attractive alternative to ruminant-and generally mammalian-meat by representing a particularly low-emission agricultural form of production. We individually measured, by chamber respirometry, the amount of oxygen consumed as well as carbon dioxide and methane emitted from six adult ostriches (body mass 108.3±8.3 kg) during a 24-hour period when fed a pelleted lucerne diet. While oxygen consumption was in the range of values previously reported for ostriches, supporting the validity of our experimental setup, methane production was, at 17.5±3.2 L d(-1), much higher than previously reported for this species, and was of the magnitude expected for similar-sized, nonruminant mammalian herbivores. These results suggest that methane emission is similar between ostriches and nonruminant mammalian herbivores and that the environmental burden of these animals is comparable. The findings furthermore indicate that it appears justified to use currently available scaling equations for methane production of nonruminant mammals in paleo-reconstructions of methane production of herbivorous dinosaurs. PMID:25446146

  7. Soot formation in the methane oxygen and methane/oxygen/hydrogen flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dauerman, L.; Salser, G. E.

    1972-01-01

    The feasibility of using methane, recovered from carbon dioxide by the Sabatier-Senderens reaction, was investigated as a fuel in a reaction control engine. A problem to be avoided is the emission of soot particles. It is thought that such particles would remain in the environment of the spacecraft and, thereby, adversely affect optical sightings and possibly have an effect upon communications. The initial studies were of a practical nature. The first was the influence of the spatial arrangement of the fuel and oxygen injectors on soot formation. In the second study, inhibition of soot formation was considered. Considering the given situation, it was impractical to use an additive. However, since methanol combustion does not produce soot, and methanol can be produced from methane in situ, the possibility that methanol could act as an inhibitor was studied. In the third study, since these are restartable engines, the effect of shutdown on the rapidity of soot formation was studied.

  8. Inhibitory effects of sulfur compounds on methane oxidation by a methane-oxidizing consortium.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Hee; Moon, Kyung-Eun; Kim, Tae Gwan; Lee, Sang-Don; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2015-12-01

    Kinetic and enzymatic inhibition experiments were performed to investigate the effects of methanethiol (MT) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on methane oxidation by a methane-oxidizing consortium. In the coexistence of MT and H2S, the oxidation of methane was delayed until MT and H2S were completely degraded. MT and H2S could be degraded, both with and without methane. The kinetic analysis revealed that the methane-oxidizing consortium showed a maximum methane oxidation rate (Vmax) of 3.7 mmol g-dry cell weight (DCW)(-1) h(-1) and a saturation constant (Km) of 184.1 μM. MT and H2S show competitive inhibition on methane oxidation, with inhibition values (Ki) of 1504.8 and 359.8 μM, respectively. MT was primary removed by particulate methane monooxygenases (pMMO) of the consortium, while H2S was degraded by the other microorganisms or enzymes in the consortium. DNA and mRNA transcript levels of the pmoA gene expressions were decreased to ∼10(6) and 10(3)pmoA gene copy number g-DCW(-1) after MT and H2S degradation, respectively; however, both the amount of the DNA and mRNA transcript recovered their initial levels of ∼10(7) and 10(5)pmoA gene copy number g-DCW(-1) after methane oxidation, respectively. The gene expression results indicate that the pmoA gene could be rapidly reproducible after methane oxidation. This study provides comprehensive information of kinetic interactions between methane and sulfur compounds. PMID:26143035

  9. Isotopic composition of methane released from wetlands: Implications for the increase in atmospheric methane

    SciTech Connect

    Quay, P.D.; King, S.L.; Lansdown, J.M.; Wilbur, D.O. )

    1988-12-01

    Measurements of the delta-C{sup 13} of methane released from tropical, temperate, and arctic wetland sites are reported. The mean delta C{sup 13} values (relative to PDB carbonate standard) for peat bogs and Alaskan tundra are {minus}53 + or{minus}8, {minus}66 + or{minus}5 and {minus}64 + or{minus}5{per thousand}, respectively. These measurements combined with methane flux estimates yield a flux-weighted global average delta-C{sup 13} value of {minus}59 + or{minus}6{per thousand} for methane released from wetlands, a major natural methane source. The agreement between the measured delta-C{sup 13} for methane emitted from wetlands and the calculated steady state value of approximately {minus}6{per thousand} for the delta-C{sup 13} of preindustrial methane sources suggests that methane was predominantly produced biogenically in the preindustrial era. The industrial era time rate of change of the delta-C{sup 13} of the global methane flux is calculated from estimates of the growth rate of the major anthropogenically derived methane sources and the C{sup 13} composition of these sources, and compared to the measured change in the delta-C{sup 13} of methane during the last 300 years. Based on these results, it is estimated that 13 + or{minus}8% of the current global methane flux is derived abiogenically from natural gas and biomass burning, whereas the remainder is derived biogenically primarily from wetlands, rice paddies, and livestock. 40 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Transcriptomic evidence for net methane oxidation and net methane production in putative ANaerobic MEthanotrophic (ANME) archaea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, K. G.; Alperin, M. J.; Teske, A.

    2010-12-01

    Anaerobic methane oxidation regulates methane emissions in marine sediments and is thought to be mediated by uncultured methanogen-like archaea collectively labeled ANME (for ANaerobic MEthanotrophs). ANME archaea are often assumed to be obligate methanotrophs that are incapable of net methanogenesis, and are therefore used as proxies for anaerobic methane oxidation in many environments in spite of uncertainty regarding their metabolic capabilities. We tested this assumption by detecting and quantifying methanogenic gene transcription of ANME archaea across clearly differentiated zones of methane oxidation vs. methane production in sediments from the White Oak River estuary, NC. ANME-1 archaea (a group of putative obligate methanotrophs) consistently transcribe 16S rRNA and mRNA of methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) the key gene for methanogenesis, up to 45 cm into methanogenic sediments. CARD-FISH shows that ANME-1 archaea exist as single rod-shaped cells or pairs of cells, and in very low numbers. Integrating normalized depth-distributions of 16S rDNA and rRNA (measured with qPCR and RT-qPCR, respectively) shows that 26-77 % of the rDNA proxy for ANME-1 cell numbers, and 18-74 % of the rRNA proxy for ANME-1 activity occurs within methane-producing sediments. mRNA transcripts of dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsrAB) from sulfate reducing bacteria, the putative syntrophic partners of sulfate-dependent methane oxidation, were amplified consistently from methane-oxidizing sediments, and inconsistently from methane-producing sediments. These results change the perspective from ANME-1 archaea as obligate methane oxidizers to methanogens that are also capable of methane oxidation.

  11. Inhibitory effects of sulfur compounds on methane oxidation by a methane-oxidizing consortium.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Hee; Moon, Kyung-Eun; Kim, Tae Gwan; Lee, Sang-Don; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2015-12-01

    Kinetic and enzymatic inhibition experiments were performed to investigate the effects of methanethiol (MT) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on methane oxidation by a methane-oxidizing consortium. In the coexistence of MT and H2S, the oxidation of methane was delayed until MT and H2S were completely degraded. MT and H2S could be degraded, both with and without methane. The kinetic analysis revealed that the methane-oxidizing consortium showed a maximum methane oxidation rate (Vmax) of 3.7 mmol g-dry cell weight (DCW)(-1) h(-1) and a saturation constant (Km) of 184.1 μM. MT and H2S show competitive inhibition on methane oxidation, with inhibition values (Ki) of 1504.8 and 359.8 μM, respectively. MT was primary removed by particulate methane monooxygenases (pMMO) of the consortium, while H2S was degraded by the other microorganisms or enzymes in the consortium. DNA and mRNA transcript levels of the pmoA gene expressions were decreased to ∼10(6) and 10(3)pmoA gene copy number g-DCW(-1) after MT and H2S degradation, respectively; however, both the amount of the DNA and mRNA transcript recovered their initial levels of ∼10(7) and 10(5)pmoA gene copy number g-DCW(-1) after methane oxidation, respectively. The gene expression results indicate that the pmoA gene could be rapidly reproducible after methane oxidation. This study provides comprehensive information of kinetic interactions between methane and sulfur compounds.

  12. Methane Fluxes from Subtropical Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLucia, N.; Gomez-Casanovas, N.; Bernacchi, C.

    2013-12-01

    It is well documented that green house gas concentrations have risen at unequivocal rates since the industrial revolution but the disparity between anthropogenic sources and natural sources is uncertain. Wetlands are one example of a natural ecosystem that can be a substantial source or sink for methane (CH4) depending on climate conditions. Due to strict anaerobic conditions required for CH4-generating microorganisms, natural wetlands are one of the main sources for biogenic CH4. Although wetlands occupy less than 5% of total land surface area, they contribute approximately 20% of total CH4 emissions to the atmosphere. The processes regulating CH4 emissions are sensitive to land use and management practices of areas surrounding wetlands. Variation in adjacent vegetation or grazing intensity by livestock can, for example, alter CH4 fluxes from wetland soils by altering nutrient balance, carbon inputs and hydrology. Therefore, understanding how these changes will affect wetland source strength is essential to understand the impact of wetland management practices on the global climate system. In this study we quantify wetland methane fluxes from subtropical wetlands on a working cattle ranch in central Florida near Okeechobee Lake (27o10'52.04'N, 81o21'8.56'W). To determine differences in CH4 fluxes associated with land use and management, a replicated (n = 4) full factorial experiment was designed for wetlands where the surrounding vegetation was (1) grazed or un-grazed and (2) composed of native vegetation or improved pasture. Net exchange of CH4 and CO2 between the land surface and the atmosphere were sampled with a LICOR Li-7700 open path CH4 analyzer and Li-7500A open path CO2/H20 analyzer mounted in a 1-m3 static gas-exchange chamber. Our results showed and verified that CH4 emissions from subtropical wetlands were larger when high soil moisture was coupled with high temperatures. The presence of cattle only amplified these results. These results help quantify

  13. Methane in Sediments From Three Tropical, Coastal Lagoons on the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, B.; Paytan, A.; Miller, L.; Herrera-Silveira, J.

    2002-12-01

    coastal ecosystems. Laboratory experiments using sediment from the upper 20 cm in Celestun lagoon resulted in high rates of biogenic production of methane from the addition of trimethylamine, hydrogen, and, while additions of formate and acetate stimulated methane production to a lesser extent. This indicates that methane production in these sediments may be highly responsive to natural or anthropogenic changes in substrate availability. By synthesizing laboratory data and extensive field measurements from the lagoons, we hope to shed light on the factors controlling methane cycling in these sediments, and to better estimate methane flux to the atmosphere from these ecosystems.

  14. [Effect of temperature on methane production and oxidation in soils].

    PubMed

    Ding, Weixin; Cai, Zucong

    2003-04-01

    The influence of temperature and its mechanism on methane production and oxidation in soils were reviewed in this paper. Temperature can alter the soil ability to produce methane through changing types of dominant methanogens in archaeal community. Dominant methanogen is Methanosarcinaceae at higher temperature which can utilize both H2/CO2 and acetate as the precursor to produce methane, while Methanosaetaceae at lower temperature which only use acetate as the precursor and produce far less methane than do Methanosarcinaceae. Increasing soil temperature apparently raises soil ability to produce methane, which is called temperature effectiveness and expressed as Q10 with a range from 1.5 to 28 and an average of 4.1. There is an obviously positive correlation between temperature effectiveness (Q10) on methane production and substrate content. As compared to methane production, effect of temperature on methane oxidation is lower, which may be related to the strong affinity of methanotrophs for methane.

  15. Impact of high microwave power on hydrogen impurity trapping in nanocrystalline diamond films grown with simultaneous nitrogen and oxygen addition into methane/hydrogen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, C. J.; Fernandes, A. J. S.; Jiang, X. F.; Pinto, J. L.; Ye, H.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we study for the first time the influence of microwave power higher than 2.0 kW on bonded hydrogen impurity incorporation (form and content) in nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films grown in a 5 kW MPCVD reactor. The NCD samples of different thickness ranging from 25 to 205 μm were obtained through a small amount of simultaneous nitrogen and oxygen addition into conventional about 4% methane in hydrogen reactants by keeping the other operating parameters in the same range as that typically used for the growth of large-grained polycrystalline diamond films. Specific hydrogen point defect in the NCD films is analyzed by using Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. When the other operating parameters are kept constant (mainly the input gases), with increasing of microwave power from 2.0 to 3.2 kW (the pressure was increased slightly in order to stabilize the plasma ball of the same size), which simultaneously resulting in the rise of substrate temperature more than 100 °C, the growth rate of the NCD films increases one order of magnitude from 0.3 to 3.0 μm/h, while the content of hydrogen impurity trapped in the NCD films during the growth process decreases with power. It has also been found that a new H related infrared absorption peak appears at 2834 cm-1 in the NCD films grown with a small amount of nitrogen and oxygen addition at power higher than 2.0 kW and increases with power higher than 3.0 kW. According to these new experimental results, the role of high microwave power on diamond growth and hydrogen impurity incorporation is discussed based on the standard growth mechanism of CVD diamonds using CH4/H2 gas mixtures. Our current experimental findings shed light into the incorporation mechanism of hydrogen impurity in NCD films grown with a small amount of nitrogen and oxygen addition into methane/hydrogen plasma.

  16. Detection of Abiotic Methane in Terrestrial Continental Hydrothermal Systems: Implications for Methane on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Socki, Richard A.; Niles, Paul B.; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.; Romanek, Christopher S.; Zhang, Chuanlun L.; Bissada, Kadry K.

    2008-01-01

    The recent detection of methane in the Martian atmosphere and the possibility that its origin could be attributed to biological activity, have highlighted the importance of understanding the mechanisms of methane formation and its usefulness as a biomarker. Much debate has centered on the source of the methane in hydrothermal fluids, whether it is formed biologically by microorganisms, diagenetically through the decomposition of sedimentary organic matter, or inorganically via reduction of CO2 at high temperatures. Ongoing research has now shown that much of the methane present in sea-floor hydrothermal systems is probably formed through inorganic CO2 reduction processes at very high temperatures (greater than 400 C). Experimental results have indicated that methane might form inorganically at temperatures lower still, however these results remain controversial. Currently, methane in continental hydrothermal systems is thought to be formed mainly through the breakdown of sedimentary organic matter and carbon isotope equilibrium between CO2 and CH4 is thought to be rarely present if at all. Based on isotopic measurements of CO2 and CH4 in two continental hydrothermal systems, we suggest that carbon isotope equilibration exists at temperatures as low as 155 C. This would indicate that methane is forming through abiotic CO2 reduction at lower temperatures than previously thought and could bolster arguments for an abiotic origin of the methane detected in the martian atmosphere.

  17. Anaerobic methane oxidation in low-organic content methane seep sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pohlman, John W.; Riedel, Michael; Bauer, James E.; Canuel, Elizabeth A.; Paull, Charles K.; Lapham, Laura; Grabowski, Kenneth S.; Coffin, Richard B.; Spence, George D.

    2013-01-01

    Sulfate-dependent anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is the key sedimentary microbial process limiting methane emissions from marine sediments and methane seeps. In this study, we investigate how the presence of low-organic content sediment influences the capacity and efficiency of AOM at Bullseye vent, a gas hydrate-bearing cold seep offshore of Vancouver Island, Canada. The upper 8 m of sediment contains 14C. A fossil origin for the DIC precludes remineralization of non-fossil OM present within the sulfate zone as a significant contributor to pore water DIC, suggesting that nearly all sulfate is available for anaerobic oxidation of fossil seep methane. Methane flux from the SMT to the sediment water interface in a diffusion-dominated flux region of Bullseye vent was, on average, 96% less than at an OM-rich seep in the Gulf of Mexico with a similar methane flux regime. Evidence for enhanced methane oxidation capacity within OM-poor sediments has implications for assessing how climate-sensitive reservoirs of sedimentary methane (e.g., gas hydrate) will respond to ocean warming, particularly along glacially-influenced mid and high latitude continental margins.

  18. Methane, microbes and models: fundamental understanding of the soil methane cycle for future predictions.

    PubMed

    Nazaries, Loïc; Murrell, J Colin; Millard, Pete; Baggs, Liz; Singh, Brajesh K

    2013-09-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas and microbes in the environment play major roles in both global methane emissions and terrestrial sinks. However, a full mechanistic understanding of the response of the methane cycle to global change is lacking. Recent studies suggest that a number of biological and environmental processes can influence the net flux of methane from soils to the atmosphere but the magnitude and direction of their impact are still debated. Here, we synthesize recent knowledge on soil microbial and biogeochemical process and the impacts of climate change factors on the soil methane cycle. We focus on (i) identification of the source and magnitude of methane flux and the global factors that may change the flux rate and magnitude in the future, (ii) the microbial communities responsible for methane production and terrestrial sinks, and (iii) how they will respond to future climatic scenarios and the consequences for feedback responses at a global scale. We also identify the research gaps in each of the topics identified above, provide evidence which can be used to demonstrate microbial regulation of methane cycle and suggest that incorporation of microbial data from emerging -omic technologies could be harnessed to increase the predictive power of simulation models. PMID:23718889

  19. Atmospheric methane removal by methane-oxidizing bacteria immobilized on porous building materials.

    PubMed

    Ganendra, Giovanni; De Muynck, Willem; Ho, Adrian; Hoefman, Sven; De Vos, Paul; Boeckx, Pascal; Boon, Nico

    2014-04-01

    Biological treatment using methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) immobilized on six porous carrier materials have been used to mitigate methane emission. Experiments were performed with different MOB inoculated in building materials at high (~20 % (v/v)) and low (~100 ppmv) methane mixing ratios. Methylocystis parvus in autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC) exhibited the highest methane removal rate at high (28.5 ± 3.8 μg CH₄ g⁻¹ building material h⁻¹) and low (1.7 ± 0.4 μg CH₄ g⁻¹ building material h⁻¹) methane mixing ratio. Due to the higher volume of pores with diameter >5 μm compared to other materials tested, AAC was able to adsorb more bacteria which might explain for the higher methane removal observed. The total methane and carbon dioxide-carbon in the headspace was decreased for 65.2 ± 10.9 % when M. parvus in Ytong was incubated for 100 h. This study showed that immobilized MOB on building materials could be used to remove methane from the air and also act as carbon sink.

  20. High-pressure phase diagrams of methane + squalane and methane + hexatriacontane mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Marteau, P.; Tobaly, P.; Ruffier-Meray, V.; Hemptinne, J.C. de

    1998-05-01

    Thermodynamic properties of crude oils and natural gases are important for optimizing operating conditions. Equilibrium data on the methane + hexatriacontane mixture at (373, 398, 423, and 453) K and on the methane + squalane (2,6,10,15,19,23-hexamethyltetracosane) mixture at (323, 370, 420) K are reported. The apparatus and the near-infrared absorption method have been previously described.

  1. Conversion of methane to higher hydrocarbons (Biomimetic catalysis of the conversion of methane to methanol). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, B.E.; Taylor, R.T.; Satcher, J.H.

    1993-09-01

    In addition to inorganic catalysts that react with methane, it is well-known that a select group of aerobic soil/water bacteria called methanotrophs can efficiently and selectively utilize methane as the sole source of their energy and carbon for cellular growth. The first reaction in this metabolic pathway is catalyzed by the enzyme methane monooxygenase (MMO) forming methanol. Methanol is a technology important product from this partial oxidation of methane since it can be easily converted to liquid hydrocarbon transportation fuels (gasoline), used directly as a liquid fuel or fuel additive itself, or serve as a feedstock for chemicals production. This naturally occurring biocatalyst (MMO) is accomplishing a technologically important transformation (methane directly to methanol) for which there is currently no analogous chemical (non-biological) process. The authors approach has been to use the biocatalyst, MMO, as the initial focus in the development of discrete chemical catalysts (biomimetic complexes) for methane conversion. The advantage of this approach is that it exploits a biocatalytic system already performing a desired transformation of methane. In addition, this approach generated needed new experimental information on catalyst structure and function in order to develop new catalysts rationally and systematically. The first task is a comparative mechanistic, biochemical, and spectroscopic investigation of MMO enzyme systems. This work was directed at developing a description of the structure and function of the catalytically active sites in sufficient detail to generate a biomimetic material. The second task involves the synthesis, characterization, and chemical reactions of discrete complexes that mimic the enzymatic active site. These complexes were synthesized based on their best current understanding of the MMO active site structure.

  2. LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Don Augenstein; Ramin Yazdani; Rick Moore; Michelle Byars; Jeff Kieffer; Professor Morton Barlaz; Rinav Mehta

    2000-02-26

    Controlled landfilling is an approach to manage solid waste landfills, so as to rapidly complete methane generation, while maximizing gas capture and minimizing the usual emissions of methane to the atmosphere. With controlled landfilling, methane generation is accelerated to more rapid and earlier completion to full potential by improving conditions (principally moisture, but also temperature) to optimize biological processes occurring within the landfill. Gas is contained through use of surface membrane cover. Gas is captured via porous layers, under the cover, operated at slight vacuum. A field demonstration project has been ongoing under NETL sponsorship for the past several years near Davis, CA. Results have been extremely encouraging. Two major benefits of the technology are reduction of landfill methane emissions to minuscule levels, and the recovery of greater amounts of landfill methane energy in much shorter times, more predictably, than with conventional landfill practice. With the large amount of US landfill methane generated, and greenhouse potency of methane, better landfill methane control can play a substantial role both in reduction of US greenhouse gas emissions and in US renewable energy. The work described in this report, to demonstrate and advance this technology, has used two demonstration-scale cells of size (8000 metric tons [tonnes]), sufficient to replicate many heat and compaction characteristics of larger ''full-scale'' landfills. An enhanced demonstration cell has received moisture supplementation to field capacity. This is the maximum moisture waste can hold while still limiting liquid drainage rate to minimal and safely manageable levels. The enhanced landfill module was compared to a parallel control landfill module receiving no moisture additions. Gas recovery has continued for a period of over 4 years. It is quite encouraging that the enhanced cell methane recovery has been close to 10-fold that experienced with conventional

  3. Turbulent Methane-Air Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yaboah, Yaw D.; Njokwe, Anny; James, LaShanda

    1996-01-01

    This study is aimed at enhancing the understanding of turbulent premixed methane-air combustion. Such understanding is essential since: (1) many industries are now pursuing lighter hydrocarbon alternative fuels and the use of premixed flames to reduce pollutant emissions, and (2) the characteristic dimensions and flow rates of most industrial combustors are often large for flows to be turbulent. The specific objectives of the study are: (1) to establish the effects of process variables (e.g., flow rate, fuel/air ratio, chlorinated hydro-carbons, and pressure) on the emissions and flow structure (velocity distribution, streamlines, vorticity and flame shape), and (2) to develop a mechanistic model to explain the observed trends. This includes the acquisition of Dantec FlowMap Particle Image Velocimeter. The design and fabrication of the premixed burner has also been completed. The study is now at the stage of testing of equipment and analytical instruments. The presentation will give details on the tasks completed and on the current and future plans. The project is progressing well and all activities are on schedule. The outlook for the success of the project is bright.

  4. Gaia's breath - Global methane exhalations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.; Rogers, B.W.

    2005-01-01

    Methane (CH4) is the most abundant organic compound in the Earth's atmosphere, where it acts as a greenhouse gas and thus has implications for global climate change. The current atmospheric CH4 budget, however, does not take into account geologically-sourced CH4 seepage. Geological sources of CH4 include natural macro- and micro-seeps, mud volcanoes, and other miscellaneous sources such as gas hydrates, magmatic volcanoes, geothermal regions, and mid-ocean ridges. Macro-seeps contribute ???25 Tg (teragrams) CH4/yr to the atmosphere, whereas, micro-seepage contributes perhaps 7 Tg CH4/yr. Mud volcanoes emit ???5 Tg CH4/yr, and miscellaneous sources emit ???8 Tg CH4/yr to the atmosphere. Thus, the total contribution to the atmosphere from geological sources is estimated to be 45 Tg CH4/yr, which is significant to the atmospheric organic carbon cycle and should be included in any global inventory of atmospheric CH4. We argue that the atmospheric CH4 global inventory of the Interplanetary Panel on Climate Change must be adjusted in order to incorporate geologically-sourced CH4 from naturally occurring seepage.

  5. Investigations of Methane Production in Hypersaline Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bebout, Brad M.

    2015-01-01

    The recent reports of methane in the atmosphere of Mars, as well as the findings of hypersaline paleo-environments on that planet, have underscored the need to evaluate the importance of biological (as opposed to geological) trace gas production and consumption. Methane in the atmosphere of Mars may be an indication of life but might also be a consequence of geologic activity and/or the thermal alteration of ancient organic matter. Hypersaline environments have now been reported to be extremely likely in several locations in our solar system, including: Mars, Europa, and Enceladus. Modern hypersaline microbial mat communities, (thought to be analogous to those present on the early Earth at a period of time when Mars was experiencing very similar environmental conditions), have been shown to produce methane. However, very little is known about the physical and/or biological controls imposed upon the rates at which methane, and other important trace gases, are produced and consumed in these environments. We describe here the results of our investigations of methane production in hypersaline environments, including field sites in Chile, Baja California Mexico, California, USA and the United Arab Emirates. We have measured high concentrations of methane in bubbles of gas produced both in the sediments underlying microbial mats, as well as in areas not colonized by microbial mats in the Guerrero Negro hypersaline ecosystem, Baja California Mexico, in Chile, and in salt ponds on the San Francisco Bay. The carbon isotopic (d13C) composition of the methane in the bubbles exhibited an extremely wide range of values, (ca. -75 per mille ca. -25 per mille). The hydrogen isotopic composition of the methane (d2H) ranged from -60 to -30per mille and -450 to -350per mille. These isotopic values are outside of the range of values normally considered to be biogenic, however incubations of the sediments in contact with these gas bubbles reveals that the methane is indeed being

  6. Influence of headspace pressure on methane production in Biochemical Methane Potential (BMP) tests.

    PubMed

    Valero, David; Montes, Jesús A; Rico, José Luis; Rico, Carlos

    2016-02-01

    The biochemical methane potential test is the most commonly applied method to determine methane production from organic wastes. One of the parameters measured is the volume of biogas produced which can be determined manometrically by keeping the volume constant and measuring increases in pressure. In the present study, the effect of pressure accumulation in the headspace of the reactors has been studied. Triplicate batch trials employing cocoa shell, waste coffee grounds and dairy manure as substrates have been performed under two headspace pressure conditions. The results obtained in the study showed that headspace overpressures higher than 600mbar affected methane production for waste coffee grounds. On the contrary, headspace overpressures within a range of 600-1000mbar did not affect methane production for cocoa shell and dairy manure. With the analyses performed in the present work it has not been possible to determine the reasons for the lower methane yield value obtained for the waste coffee grounds under high headspace pressures.

  7. Forest cockchafer larvae as methane production hotspots in soils and their importance for net soil methane fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görres, Carolyn-Monika; Kammann, Claudia; Murphy, Paul; Müller, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    Certain groups of soil invertebrates, namely scarab beetles and millipedes, are capable of emitting considerable amounts of methane due to methanogens inhabiting their gut system. It was already pointed out in the early 1990's, that these groups of invertebrates may represent a globally important source of methane. However, apart from termites, the importance of invertebrates for the soil methane budget is still unknown. Here, we present preliminary results of a laboratory soil incubation experiment elucidating the influence of forest cockchafer larvae (Melolontha hippocastani FABRICIUS) on soil methane cycling. In January/February 2016, two soils from two different management systems - one from a pine forest (extensive use) and one from a vegetable field (intensive use) - were incubated for 56 days either with or without beetle larvae. Net soil methane fluxes and larvae methane emissions together with their stable carbon isotope signatures were quantified at regular intervals to estimate gross methane production and gross methane oxidation in the soils. The results of this experiment will contribute to testing the hypothesis of whether methane production hotspots can significantly enhance the methane oxidation capacity of soils. Forest cockchafer larvae are only found in well-aerated sandy soils where one would usually not suspect relevant gross methane production. Thus, besides quantifying their contribution to net soil methane fluxes, they are also ideal organisms to study the effect of methane production hotspots on overall soil methane cycling. Funding support: Reintegration grant of the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) (#57185798).

  8. Geologic emissions of methane to the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Etiope, Giuseppe; Klusman, Ronald W

    2002-12-01

    The atmospheric methane budget is commonly defined assuming that major sources derive from the biosphere (wetlands, rice paddies, animals, termites) and that fossil, radiocarbon-free CH4 emission is due to and mediated by anthropogenic activity (natural gas production and distribution, and coal mining). However, the amount of radiocarbon-free CH4 in the atmosphere, estimated at approximately 20% of atmospheric CH4, is higher than the estimates from statistical data of CH4 emission from fossil fuel related anthropogenic sources. This work documents that significant amounts of "old" methane, produced within the Earth crust, can be released naturally into the atmosphere through gas permeable faults and fractured rocks. Major geologic emissions of methane are related to hydrocarbon production in sedimentary basins (biogenic and thermogenic methane) and, subordinately, to inorganic reactions (Fischer-Tropsch type) in geothermal systems. Geologic CH4 emissions include diffuse fluxes over wide areas, or microseepage, on the order of 10(0)-10(2) mg m(-2) day(-1), and localised flows and gas vents, on the order of 10(2) t y(-1), both on land and on the seafloor. Mud volcanoes producing flows of up to 10(3) t y(-1) represent the largest visible expression of geologic methane emission. Several studies have indicated that methanotrophic consumption in soil may be insufficient to consume all leaking geologic CH4 and positive fluxes into the atmosphere can take place in dry or seasonally cold environments. Unsaturated soils have generally been considered a major sink for atmospheric methane, and never a continuous, intermittent, or localised source to the atmosphere. Although geologic CH4 sources need to be quantified more accurately, a preliminary global estimate indicates that there are likely more than enough sources to provide the amount of methane required to account for the suspected missing source of fossil CH4.

  9. X-ray Computed Tomography Observation of Methane Hydrate Dissociation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tomutsa, L.; Freifeld, B.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Stern, L.A.

    2002-01-01

    Deposits of naturally occurring methane hydrate have been identified in permafrost and deep oceanic environments with global reserves estimated to be twice the total amount of energy stored in fossil fuels. The fundamental behavior of methane hydrate in natural formations, while poorly understood, is of critical importance if the economic recovery of methane from hydrates is to be accomplished. In this study, computed X-ray tomography (CT) scanning is used to image an advancing dissociation front in a heterogeneous gas hydrate/sand sample at 0.1 MPa. The cylindrical methane hydrate and sand aggregate, 2.54 cm in diameter and 6.3 cm long, was contained in a PVC sample holder that was insulated on all but one end. At the uninsulated end, the dissociated gas was captured and the volume of gas monitored. The sample was initially imaged axially using X-ray CT scanning within the methane hydrate stability zone by keeping the sample temperature at 77??K. Subsequently, as the sample warmed through the methane hydrate dissociation point at 194??K and room pressure, gas was produced and the temperature at the bottom of the sample plug was monitored while CT images were acquired. The experiment showed that CT imaging can resolve the reduction in density (as seen by a reduction in beam attenuation) of the hydrate/sand aggregate due to the dissociation of methane hydrate. In addition, a comparison of CT images with gas flow and temperature measurements reveals that the CT scanner is able to resolve accurately and spatially the advancing dissociation front. Future experiments designed to better understand the thermodynamics of hydrate dissociation are planned to take advantage of the temporal and spatial resolution that the CT scanner provides.

  10. Operating atmospheric vent collection headers using methane gas enrichment

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, L.G.

    1996-12-31

    Tests at 60{degrees}C and 16psia using ethylene, hydrogen and methyl alcohol {open_quote}fuel vapors{open_quotes} showed that if an atmospheric vent collection header contains 25 vol% of methane and the only source of oxygen is the air, no possible mixture of fuel vapor, nitrogen and residual oxygen is flammable. Addition of these fuel vapors to a header containing 25% by volume of methane in all cases increases the 3.8 vol% oxygen safety factor that exists with zero fuel vapor in the gas stream. It is irrelevant that the fuel vapor has an upper flammable limit (VFL) greater than the methane enrichment gas. The minimum oxygen concentration to sustain a flame (MOC) increases with increased methane:nitrogen ratio in the gas stream, so that the {open_quote}listed{close_quotes} MOC has no relevance under methane enriched conditions. These findings have important ramifications when applying Coast Guard Regulations in 33CFR.154 for Marine Vapor Control Systems, which implies the need to operate at 170% of the combined gas stream UFL and requires operation at less than the MOC ({le} 8% oxygen) when tanks have been partly inerted with nitrogen. Large reductions of enrichment gas usage with attendant environmental benefits are technically possible using flow control of methane rather than gas analysis down-stream of the enrichment station. Operation above the UFL rather than below the MOC can cut enrichment gas usage by 50% or more while actually increasing the assumed 2 vol% oxygen safety factor. A negative flow control error of 7 vol% methane ({minus} 280% of target) is required to achieve flammability under worst case assumptions. 18 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Assessing Methane Migration Mechanisms at Walker Ridge, Gulf of Mexico, via 3D Methane Hydrate Reservoir Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nole, M.; Daigle, H.; Mohanty, K. K.; Hillman, J. I. T.; Cook, A.

    2015-12-01

    We employ a 3D methane hydrate reservoir simulator to model marine methane hydrate systems. Our simulator couples highly nonlinear heat and mass transport equations and includes heterogeneous sedimentation, in-situ organic methanogenesis, and the influences of both pore size contrast and salt exclusion from the hydrate phase on solubility gradients. Using environmental parameters of Walker Ridge, Gulf of Mexico, we first simulate hydrate formation in and around a thin, dipping, planar sand stratum surrounded by clay lithology as it is buried to 295mbsf. With sufficient methane supplied by methanogenesis in the clays, a 200x sand-clay pore size contrast allows for a strong enough concentration gradient to significantly drop the concentration of hydrate in clays immediately surrounding a thin sand, a phenomenon observed in corresponding well log data. Building upon previous work, our simulations account for a depth-wise increase in sand-clay solubility contrast from about 1.6% near the seafloor to 8.6% at depth, progressively strengthening the diffusive flux of methane with time. An exponentially decaying methanogenesis input to the clay lithology decreases the methane supplied to clays surrounding the sand layer with time, further enhancing the sand-clay hydrate saturation contrast. Significant diffusive methane transport occurs in a clay interval of about 11m above the sand and 4m below it, matching well log observations. Clay-sand pore size contrast alone is not enough to create hydrate-free zones seen in logs, because the corresponding diffusive methane flux is slower than the rate at which methanogenesis supplies methane. Therefore, it is likely that additional mechanisms are at play, notably bound water activity reduction in clays. Three-dimensionality allows for inclusion of lithologic heterogeneities, which focus flow and allow for heterogeneity in locally dominant methane migration mechanisms. Incorporating recent 3D seismic data to inform the model

  12. Circadian Variability in Methane Oxidation Activity in the Root Zone of Rice Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroth, M. H.; Cho, R.; Zeyer, J.

    2009-12-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas with a warming potential about 20 times stronger than that of carbon dioxide. A main source of biogenic methane are rice-paddy soils. Methane is produced in flooded rice fields under anaerobic conditions. Conversely, methanotrophic microorganisms oxidize methane to carbon dioxide in the root zone of rice plants in the presence of molecular oxygen supplied to the roots through the plants’ aerenchyma, thus reducing overall methane emissions to the atmosphere. To quantify methane oxidation we adapted push-pull tests (PPTs), a technique originally developed for aquifer testing, in combination with a suitable microbial inhibitor for application in the root zone of rice plants. During a PPT, 70 ml of a test solution containing dissolved substrates (methane, oxygen), nonreactive tracers (argon, chloride) and the methanogenesis inhibitor 2-Bromoethane sulfonate was injected into the plant’s root zone, and after a rest period of two hours extracted from the same location. Reaction rate constants were calculated from extraction-phase breakthrough curves of substrates and tracers. We conducted a set of three different laboratory PPTs to quantify methane oxidation at day time, directly after dawn, and at night in the root zone of four different potted rice plants each. High diurnal methane oxidation rate constants (up to 23 h-1) were obtained for all rice plants. Methane oxidation potential decreased soon after nightfall. At night, rate constants were usually below 1 h-1. Methane oxidation rates were apparently independent of additional oxygen supplied via the injected test solutions, but strongly dependent on photosynthetically produced oxygen transported to the roots through the plants’ aerenchyma. Additional PPTs utilizing 13C-labeled methane are currently being conducted to corroborate these findings. Ultimately, this novel tool shall support efforts to quantitatively understand the controlling mechanisms of methane turnover in

  13. Methane in permafrost - Preliminary results from coring at Fairbanks, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.; Lorenson, T.D.

    1993-01-01

    Permafrost has been suggested as a high-latitude source of methane (a greenhouse gas) during global warming. To begin to assess the magnitude of this source, we have examined the methane content of permafrost in samples from shallow cores (maximum depth, 9.5m) at three sites in Fairbanks, Alaska, where discontinuous permafrost is common. These cores sampled frozen loess, peat, and water (ice) below the active layer. Methane contents of permafrost range from <0.001 to 22.2mg/kg of sample. The highest methane content of 22.2mg/kg was found in association with peat at one site. Silty loess had high methane contents at each site of 6.56, 4.24, and 0.152mg/kg, respectively. Carbon isotopic compositions of the methane (??13C) ranged from -70.8 to -103.9 ???, and hydrogen isotopic compositions of the methane (??D) from -213 to -313 ???, indicating that the methane is microbial in origin. The methane concentrations were used in a one dimensional heat conduction model to predict the amount of methane that will be released from permafrost worldwide over the next 100 years, given two climate change scenarios. Our results indicate that at least 30 years will elapse before melting permafrost releases important amounts of methane; a maximum methane release rate will be about 25 to 30 Tg/yr, assuming that methane is generally distributed in shallow permafrost as observed in our samples.

  14. Estimating methane fluxes at a landscape scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockdale, James; MacBean, Natasha

    2010-05-01

    Terrestrial methane fluxes are an important component of peatland carbon budgets. Using a well-studied peatland site in Wales as a case study, we present a variety of approaches to quantifying annual methane fluxes at a landscape scale, with a focus on the comparison between a simple stratification method, an empirical regression-based method and a process-based method. The simplest approach relies on in situ methane flux measurements which, due to the indirect effects on methane flux from the vascular transport mechanism and co-variation with hydrological conditions, were stratified by vegetation type. Aside from this initial classification, an annual landscape flux was produced through a linear scaling model without attempting to consider any physical, chemical or biological processes known to control methane fluxes. The regression-based approach attempted to model fluxes using repeated measurements from across the study site over a 12 months period, together with environmental variables from associated locations. This method classifies the landscape by vegetation in a similar way to the first method and also takes into consideration variables commonly known to influence methane flux such as temperature and water table. However, no direct consideration of methane production or consumption is included in this empirical regression model. In contrast to both the preceding methods, estimates of methane flux using a process-based model were constructed for the same landscape. This method uses the Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach (CASA) model (Potter et al., 1993), which has been modified to include a representation of methane dynamics. The model is calibrated with ground-based measurements of net CH4 flux and water table depth using a Metropolis Hastings Markov Chain Monte Carlo approach. Comparison of these approaches shows that, while simple methods of stratification and scaling are computationally inexpensive and quick to perform, they are least successful when

  15. The dynamics behind Titan's methane clouds

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Jonathan L.; Pierrehumbert, Raymond T.; Frierson, Dargan M. W.; Caballero, Rodrigo

    2006-01-01

    We present results of an axisymmetric global circulation model of Titan with a simplified suite of atmospheric physics forced by seasonally varying insolation. The recent discovery of midlatitude tropospheric clouds on Titan has caused much excitement about the roles of surface sources of methane and the global circulation in forming clouds. Although localized surface sources, such as methane geysers or “cryovolcanoes,” have been invoked to explain these clouds, we find in this work that clouds appear in regions of convergence by the mean meridional circulation and over the poles during solstices, where the solar forcing reaches its seasonal maximum. Other regions are inhibited from forming clouds because of dynamical transports of methane and strong subsidence. We find that for a variety of moist regimes, i.e., with the effect of methane thermodynamics included, the observed cloud features can be explained by the large-scale dynamics of the atmosphere. Clouds at the solsticial pole are found to be a robust feature of Titan's dynamics, whereas isolated midlatitude clouds are present exclusively in a variety of moist dynamical regimes. In all cases, even without including methane thermodynamics, our model ceases to produce polar clouds ≈4–6 terrestrial years after solstices. PMID:17121992

  16. Molecular biology and regulation of methane monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Murrell, J C; Gilbert, B; McDonald, I R

    2000-01-01

    Methanotrophs are ubiquitous in the environment and play an important role in mitigating global warming due to methane. They are also potentially interesting for industrial applications such as production of bulk chemicals or bioremediation. The first step in the oxidation of methane is the conversion to methanol by methane monooxygenase, the key enzyme, which exists in two forms: the cytoplasmic, soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) and the membrane-bound, particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO). This paper reviews the biochemistry and molecular biology of both forms of MMO. In the past few years there have been many exciting new findings. sMMO components have been expressed in heterologous and homologous hosts. The pMMO has been purified and biochemically studied in some detail and the genes encoding the pMMO have been sequenced. Copper ions have been shown to play a key role in regulating the expression of both MMO enzyme complexes. We also present a model for copper regulation based on results from Northern analysis, primer-extensions and new sequence data, and raise a number of unanswered questions for future studies.

  17. The dynamics behind Titan's methane clouds.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Jonathan L; Pierrehumbert, Raymond T; Frierson, Dargan M W; Caballero, Rodrigo

    2006-12-01

    We present results of an axisymmetric global circulation model of Titan with a simplified suite of atmospheric physics forced by seasonally varying insolation. The recent discovery of midlatitude tropospheric clouds on Titan has caused much excitement about the roles of surface sources of methane and the global circulation in forming clouds. Although localized surface sources, such as methane geysers or "cryovolcanoes," have been invoked to explain these clouds, we find in this work that clouds appear in regions of convergence by the mean meridional circulation and over the poles during solstices, where the solar forcing reaches its seasonal maximum. Other regions are inhibited from forming clouds because of dynamical transports of methane and strong subsidence. We find that for a variety of moist regimes, i.e., with the effect of methane thermodynamics included, the observed cloud features can be explained by the large-scale dynamics of the atmosphere. Clouds at the solsticial pole are found to be a robust feature of Titan's dynamics, whereas isolated midlatitude clouds are present exclusively in a variety of moist dynamical regimes. In all cases, even without including methane thermodynamics, our model ceases to produce polar clouds approximately 4-6 terrestrial years after solstices.

  18. Methane flux in the Great Dismal Swamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harriss, R. C.; Sebacher, D. I.; Day, F. P., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The paper reports measurements made over a 17-month period of the methane flux in the Great Dismal Swamp of Virginia in light of the potential implications of variations in atmospheric methane concentrations. Gas flux measurements were made by a technique combining a gas filter correlation IR absorption analyzer with improved sampling chambers that enclose a soil area under conditions ranging from totally flooded soils to dry soils resulting from drought conditions. Methane emissions are found to range from 0.0013 g CH4/sq m per day to 0.019 g CH4/sq m per day, depending on temperature and season, when the soil is in a waterlogged state. During drought conditions, the peat soils in the swamp were a sink for atmospheric methane, with fluxes from less than 0.001 to 0.005 g CH4/sq m per day and decreasing with decreasing temperature. Results illustrate the potential complexity of the processes which regulate the net flux of methane between wetland soils and the atmosphere.

  19. Biotic systems to mitigate landfill methane emissions.

    PubMed

    Huber-Humer, Marion; Gebert, Julia; Hilger, Helene

    2008-02-01

    Landfill gases produced during biological degradation of buried organic wastes include methane, which when released to the atmosphere, can contribute to global climate change. Increasing use of gas collection systems has reduced the risk of escaping methane emissions entering the atmosphere, but gas capture is not 100% efficient, and further, there are still many instances when gas collection systems are not used. Biotic methane mitigation systems exploit the propensity of some naturally occurring bacteria to oxidize methane. By providing optimum conditions for microbial habitation and efficiently routing landfill gases to where they are cultivated, a number of bio-based systems, such as interim or long-term biocovers, passively or actively vented biofilters, biowindows and daily-used biotarps, have been developed that can alone, or with gas collection, mitigate landfill methane emissions. This paper reviews the science that guides bio-based designs; summarizes experiences with the diverse natural or engineered substrates used in such systems; describes some of the studies and field trials being used to evaluate them; and discusses how they can be used for better landfill operation, capping, and aftercare.

  20. Coal bed methane global market potential

    SciTech Connect

    Drazga, B.

    2007-01-16

    Worldwide increases in energy prices, as well as the increased potential for project financing derived from emissions credits, have renewed focus on coal bed methane (CBM) and coal mine methane (CMM) projects in coal-producing countries around the world. Globally, CBM utilization projects (in the operational, development, or planning stages) capture and utilize methane from gassy underground coal mines in at least 13 countries. The total methane emission reductions that could be achieved by these projects are approximately 135 billion cubic feet per year (equal to 14.8 million tons of carbon equivalent per year). This global activity level reflects a growing awareness of the technological practicality and the economic attractiveness of coal mine methane recovery and use. This report outlines the potential of the global CBM market. Contents: An overview of CBM; Challenges and issues; Technologies to generate power from CAM; Global CBM/CMM utilization; Country highlights; Ranking of countries with the largest CMM development potential (Australia, Canada, China, Germany, Mexico, Poland, Russia, Ukraine, United Kingdom, USA, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, France, India, Japan, Kazakhstan, South Africa); Planning CBM/CMM projects; Pre-feasibility and feasibility studies; Demonstration projects; Development plan and application process; Equity and debt; Carbon financing; Government sponsors; Private sponsors; Project risk reduction support; Examples of integrated project financing; Glossary.

  1. Nanocapsule for Safe and Effective Methane Storage

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    A nanocapsule for safe and effective methane storage is investigated by the method of molecular dynamics. The mass content of methane in the nanocapsule reaches the value of 14.5 mass%. The nanocapsule consists of two parts: a locking chamber and a storage area. The locking chamber is the nanotube (10.10), open at one end, with a K@C601+endohedral complex inside it. The storage area is a nanotube (20.20). The locking chamber and the storage area are joined with each other and form T-junction. The locking chamber is opened at the methane filling and the discharge stages, and it is closed at the storage stage. Thanks to the locking chamber, methane molecules are stored in the nanocapsules under normal external conditions. Opening and closing of the locking chamber are carried out by the K@C601+endohedral complex displacement, which is done by the electric field action. The specific structure of the nanocapsule allows two aims to be reached: a high methane mass content and significant level of safety. PMID:20628460

  2. Crystal structure of methane oxidation enzyme determined

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, R.

    1994-01-10

    A team of chemists has determined to 2.2-[angstrom] resolution the crystal structure of the hydroxylase protein of methane monooxygenase, the enzyme system responsible for the biological oxidation of methane. The hydroxylase, at a molecular weight of 251,000 daltons, if by far the largest component of methane monooxygenase. Although the crystal structure of the hydroxylase did not reveal any startling surprises about the enzyme-many features of the hydroxylase had been inferred previously from modeling and spectroscopic studies -- obtaining it is a significant achievement. For one thing, the crystal structure unambiguously confirms aspects of the enzyme structure that been at least somewhat speculative. The three-dimensional structure of the enzyme, the chemist say, also provides important insight into biological methane oxidation, including how methane, a relatively inert gas, might diffuse to and bind near the active site of the enzyme. The structure points to particular amino acid residues that are likely to participate in catalysis, and clarifies the structure of the dinuclear iron core of the enzyme.

  3. Transport of Methane in Trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutschera, E.; Khalil, A. K.; Shearer, M. J.; Rosenstiel, T.; Rice, A. L.

    2011-12-01

    Although overall methane (CH4) emissions for croplands, wetlands, and forests have been measured, the exact dynamics of CH4 transport through trees is not well understood. What roles transport mechanisms play in emission rates has been thoroughly investigated for rice, but is fairly unknown for trees. Better defined plant transport mechanisms yield more accurate determination of greenhouse gas flux and its variations, contributing to a comprehensive theory quantifying greenhouse gas emissions globally. CH4 emissions from the common wetland tree species black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa) native to the Pacific Northwest have been measured under hydroponic conditions in order to separate plant transport processes from the influence of soil processes. Canopy emissions of CH4 have been measured via canopy enclosure. Measurements of CH4 flux from each of 16 trees have indicated that emissions are normally constant over the half-hour sampling period. Samples for stable carbon isotope composition have been taken during these experiments and measured on a mass spectrometer. Compared to the isotopic composition of root water CH4, canopy CH4 is depleted in 13C; this indicates that CH4 moving through the tree is not following a bulk flow pathway (where no depletion would occur), but instead moves either diffusively or through other cell or tissue barriers. No correlation was found to exist between leaf area and CH4 emission; this is vital to upscaling tree-level emissions to the global scale since leaf area index (LAI) cannot be treated as an appropriate parameter to upscale flux. Correctly informing global-scale CH4 fluxes from plants requires an association between the role plant physiology plays in the production and transport of CH4 and magnitudes of flux. This research was supported by the Office of Science (BER), U. S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DE-FG02-08ER64515. Supported in part through NASA / Oregon Space Grant Consortium, grant NNG05GJ85H.

  4. Seasonal and inter-annual variation in ecosystem scale methane emission from a boreal fen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinne, Janne; Li, Xuefei; Raivonen, Maarit; Peltola, Olli; Sallantaus, Tapani; Haapanala, Sami; Smolander, Sampo; Alekseychik, Pavel; Aurela, Mika; Korrensalo, Aino; Mammarella, Ivan; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina; Vesala, Timo

    2016-04-01

    Northern wetlands are one of the major sources of atmospheric methane. We have measured ecosystem scale methane emissions from a boreal fen continuously since 2005. The site is an oligotrophic fen in boreal vegetation zone situated in Siikaneva wetland complex in Southern Finland. The mean annual temperature in the area is 3.3°C and total annual precipitation 710 mm. We have conducted the methane emission measurements by the eddy covariance method. Additionally we have measured fluxes of carbon dioxide, water vapor, and sensible heat together with a suite of other environmental parameters. We have analyzed this data alongside with a model run with University of Helsinki methane model. The measured fluxes show generally highest methane emission in late summers coinciding with the highest temperatures in saturated peat zone. During winters the fluxes show small but detectable emission despite the snow and ice cover on the fen. More than 90% of the annual methane emission occurs in snow-free period. The methane emission and peat temperature are connected in exponential manner in seasonal scales, but methane emission does not show the expected behavior with water table. The lack of water table position dependence also contrasts with the spatial variation across microtopography. There is no systematic variation in sub-diurnal time scale. The general seasonal cycle in methane emission is captured well with the methane model. We will show how well the model reproduces the temperature and water table position dependencies observed. The annual methane emission is typically around 10 gC m-2. This is a significant part of the total carbon exchange between the fen and the atmosphere and about twice the estimated carbon loss by leaching from the fen area. The inter-annual variability in the methane emission is modest. The June-September methane emissions from different years, comprising most of the annual emission, correlates positively with peat temperature, but not with

  5. Light-induced diurnal pattern of methane exchange in a boreal forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundqvist, Elin; Crill, Patrick; Mölder, Meelis; Vestin, Patrik; Lindroth, Anders

    2013-04-01

    Boreal forests represents one third of the Earth's forested land surface area and is a net sink of methane and an important component of the atmospheric methane budget. Methane is oxidized in well-aerated forest soils whereas ponds and bog soils are sources of methane. Besides the microbial processes in the soil also forest vegetation might contribute to methane exchange. Due to a recent finding of methane consumption by boreal plants that correlated with photosynthetic active radiation (PAR), we investigate the impact of PAR on soil methane exchange at vegetated plots on the forest floor. The study site, Norunda in central Sweden, is a 120 years old boreal forest stand, dominated by Scots pine and Norway spruce. We used continuous chamber measurements in combination with a high precision laser gas analyzer (Los Gatos Research), to measure the methane exchange at four different plots in July-November 2009, and April-June 2010. The ground vegetation consisted almost entirely of mosses and blueberry-shrubs. Two of the plots acted as stable sinks of methane whereas the other two plots shifted from sinks to sources during very wet periods. The preliminary results show a clear diurnal pattern of the methane exchange during the growing season, which cannot be explained by temperature. The highest consumption occurs at high PAR levels. The amplitude of the diurnal methane exchange during the growing season is in the order of 10 μmol m-2 h-1. This indicates that besides methane oxidation by methanotrophs in the soil there is an additional removal of methane at soil level by a process related to ground vegetation.

  6. Efficient 1.6 Micron Laser Source for Methane DIAL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuman, Timothy; Burnham, Ralph; Nehrir, Amin R.; Ismail, Syed; Hair, Johnathan W.

    2013-01-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas and on a per molecule basis has a warming influence 72 times that of carbon dioxide over a 20 year horizon. Therefore, it is important to look at near term radiative effects due to methane to develop mitigation strategies to counteract global warming trends via ground and airborne based measurements systems. These systems require the development of a time-resolved DIAL capability using a narrow-line laser source allowing observation of atmospheric methane on local, regional and global scales. In this work, a demonstrated and efficient nonlinear conversion scheme meeting the performance requirements of a deployable methane DIAL system is presented. By combining a single frequency 1064 nm pump source and a seeded KTP OPO more than 5 mJ of 1.6 µm pulse energy is generated with conversion efficiencies in excess of 20%. Even without active cavity control instrument limited linewidths (50 pm) were achieved with an estimated spectral purity of 95%. Tunable operation over 400 pm (limited by the tuning range of the seed laser) was also demonstrated. This source demonstrated the critical needs for a methane DIAL system motivating additional development of the technology.

  7. Methane and Nitrogen Abundances on the Icy Dwarf Planet Makemake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegler, Stephen C.; Grundy, William M.; Dillingham, Randy; Fish, Derek; Hendler, Nathan; Sufflebeam, Terry

    2014-11-01

    We present an optical spectrum of the icy dwarf planet Makemake from the MMT 6.5 meter telescope and Red Channel Spectrograph (6250 - 9800 angstroms; 3.5 angstroms per pixel; exposure time 7h 30m) on Mt. Hopkins, AZ. In addition, we present laboratory transmission spectra over similar wavelengths of methane-nitrogen ice mixtures from the Astrophysical Ice Laboratory in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Northern Arizona University. By anchoring our analysis with the methane-nitrogen phase diagram of Prokhvatilov and Yantsevich (1983, Sov. J. Low Temp. Phys., 9, 94), and comparing methane bands in our Makemake spectrum and methane bands in our laboratory spectra, we are able to make the first quantitative estimate of Makemake's methane and nitrogen abundances. We compare Makemake’s abundances with our previously derived abundances for Triton, Pluto, and Eris (see Tegler et al., 2012, ApJ, 751, 76). We gratefully acknowledge support from the NASA Solar Systems Observations and Solar System Workings programs. We thank Steward Observatory for the consistent allocation of telescope time.

  8. [Research progress in microbial methane oxidation coupled to denitrification].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing; Yuan, Meng-Dong; Liu, Jing-Jing; Huang, Xiao-Xiao; Wu, Wei-Xiang

    2013-12-01

    Methane oxidation coupled to denitrification is an essential bond to connect carbon- and nitrogen cycling. To deeply research this process will improve our understanding on the biochemical cycling of global carbon and nitrogen. As an exogenous gaseous carbon source of denitrification, methane can both regulate the balance of atmospheric methane to effectively mitigate the greenhouse effect caused by methane, and reduce the cost of exogenous carbon source input in traditional wastewater denitrification treatment process. As a result, great attention has being paid to the mechanical study of the process. This paper mainly discussed the two types of methane oxidation coupled to denitrification, i. e., aerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification (AME-D) and anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification (ANME-D), with the focus on the microbiological coupling mechanisms and related affecting factors. The existing problems in the engineering application of methane oxidation coupled to denitrification were pointed out, and the application prospects were approached. PMID:24697087

  9. Methane hydrate in the global organic carbon cycle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.

    2002-01-01

    The global occurrence of methane hydrate in outer continental margins and in polar regions, and the magnitude of the amount of methane sequestered in methane hydrate suggest that methane hydrate is an important component in the global organic carbon cycle. Various versions of this cycle have emphasized the importance of methane hydrate, and in the latest version the role of methane hydrate is considered to be analogous to the workings of an electrical circuit. In this circuit the methane hydrate is a condenser and the consequences of methane hydrate dissociation are depicted as a resistor and inductor, reflecting temperature change and changes in earth surface history. These consequences may have implications for global change including global climate change.

  10. [Research progress in microbial methane oxidation coupled to denitrification].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing; Yuan, Meng-Dong; Liu, Jing-Jing; Huang, Xiao-Xiao; Wu, Wei-Xiang

    2013-12-01

    Methane oxidation coupled to denitrification is an essential bond to connect carbon- and nitrogen cycling. To deeply research this process will improve our understanding on the biochemical cycling of global carbon and nitrogen. As an exogenous gaseous carbon source of denitrification, methane can both regulate the balance of atmospheric methane to effectively mitigate the greenhouse effect caused by methane, and reduce the cost of exogenous carbon source input in traditional wastewater denitrification treatment process. As a result, great attention has being paid to the mechanical study of the process. This paper mainly discussed the two types of methane oxidation coupled to denitrification, i. e., aerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification (AME-D) and anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification (ANME-D), with the focus on the microbiological coupling mechanisms and related affecting factors. The existing problems in the engineering application of methane oxidation coupled to denitrification were pointed out, and the application prospects were approached.

  11. Mars Methane Analogue Mission (M3): Analytical Techniques and Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloutis, E.; Vrionis, H.; Qadi, A.; Bell, J. F.; Berard, G.; Boivin, A.; Ellery, A.; Jamroz, W.; Kruzelecky, R.; Mann, P.; Samson, C.; Stromberg, J.; Strong, K.; Tremblay, A.; Whyte, L.; Wing, B.

    2011-03-01

    The Mars Methane Analogue Mission (M3) project is designed to simulate a rover-based search for, and analysis of, methane sources on Mars at a serpentinite open pit mine in Quebec, using a variety of instruments.

  12. A scalable model for methane consumption in arctic mineral soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Youmi; Stackhouse, Brandon; Lau, Maggie C. Y.; Xu, Xiangtao; Trugman, Anna T.; Moch, Jonathan; Onstott, Tullis C.; Jørgensen, Christian J.; D'Imperio, Ludovica; Elberling, Bo; Emmerton, Craig A.; St. Louis, Vincent L.; Medvigy, David

    2016-05-01

    Recent field studies have documented a surprisingly strong and consistent methane sink in arctic mineral soils, thought to be due to high-affinity methanotrophy. However, the distinctive physiology of these methanotrophs is poorly represented in mechanistic methane models. We developed a new model, constrained by microcosm experiments, to simulate the activity of high-affinity methanotrophs. The model was tested against soil core-thawing experiments and field-based measurements of methane fluxes and was compared to conventional mechanistic methane models. Our simulations show that high-affinity methanotrophy can be an important component of the net methane flux from arctic mineral soils. Simulations without this process overestimate methane emissions. Furthermore, simulations of methane flux seasonality are improved by dynamic simulation of active microbial biomass. Because a large fraction of the Arctic is characterized by mineral soils, high-affinity methanotrophy will likely have a strong effect on its net methane flux.

  13. Source Attribution of Methane Emissions in Northeastern Colorado Using Ammonia to Methane Emission Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilerman, S. J.; Neuman, J. A.; Peischl, J.; Aikin, K. C.; Ryerson, T. B.; Perring, A. E.; Robinson, E. S.; Holloway, M.; Trainer, M.

    2015-12-01

    Due to recent advances in extraction technology, oil and natural gas extraction and processing in the Denver-Julesburg basin has increased substantially in the past decade. Northeastern Colorado is also home to over 250 concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs), capable of hosting over 2 million head of ruminant livestock (cattle and sheep). Because of methane's high Global Warming Potential, quantification and attribution of methane emissions from oil and gas development and agricultural activity are important for guiding greenhouse gas emission policy. However, due to the co-location of these different sources, top-down measurements of methane are often unable to attribute emissions to a specific source or sector. In this work, we evaluate the ammonia:methane emission ratio directly downwind of CAFOs using a mobile laboratory. Several CAFOs were chosen for periodic study over a 12-month period to identify diurnal and seasonal variation in the emission ratio as well as differences due to livestock type. Using this knowledge of the agricultural ammonia:methane emission ratio, aircraft measurements of ammonia and methane over oil and gas basins in the western US during the Shale Oil and Natural Gas Nexus (SONGNEX) field campaign in March and April 2015 can be used for source attribution of methane emissions.

  14. Anaerobic bioassay of methane potential of microalgal biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Hong-Wei

    This study was undertaken to investigate the feasibility of using anaerobic digestion as a technique to recover solar energy embodied in excess algal biomass production harvested from Clemson University's high rate algal based Partitioned Aquaculture System (PAS) as an energy source to support PAS operations. In this study, four different organic substrates were loaded to anaerobic digesters in eight experimental trials, to ascertain the optimal combination of operational variables and effect of algal, or modified algal substrate upon methane production rate. The four substrates used in this study were: (1) a synthetic feedstock consisting of molasses and dog food, (2) a commercially obtained, readily degradable algal biomass (Spirulina ) in dry form, (3) PAS harvested and dewatered algal sludge, and (4) algal biomass blended with shredded waste paper or molasses as a carbon supplement for the adjustment of algal C/N ratio. Eight experimental trials using combinations of the four substrates were conducted in 15 liter digesters to investigate the effects of controlled digester parameters upon digester performance. Digesters operating at 20 days HRT, mesophilic digestion (35°C), and twice per day mixing at maximal loading rates produced maximal methane gas using PAS algal sludge. However, under these conditions overall methane production was less than 1000 ml CH4/l day. This low level of energy recovery from the fermentation of algal biomass (alone) is not energetically or economically favorable. Co-digestion of algal sludge and waste paper was investigated as a way to increase methane production. The data obtained from these trials suggest an optimum C/N ratio for co-digestion of algal sludge and waste paper in the range of 20--25/l. A balanced C/N ratio along with the stimulated increase in cellulase activity is suggested as likely reasons for increased methane production seen in co-digestion of algal sludge and waste paper. Yeast extract addition to anaerobic

  15. Methane hydrates in nature - Current knowledge and challenges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of methane hydrate research and the need for a coordinated effort, the United States Congress enacted the Methane Hydrate Research and Development Act of 2000. At the same time, the Ministry of International Trade and Industry in Japan launched a research program to develop plans for a methane hydrate exploratory drilling project in the Nankai Trough. India, China, the Republic of Korea, and other nations also have established large methane hydrate research and development programs. Government-funded scientific research drilling expeditions and production test studies have provided a wealth of information on the occurrence of methane hydrates in nature. Numerous studies have shown that the amount of gas stored as methane hydrates in the world may exceed the volume of known organic carbon sources. However, methane hydrates represent both a scientific and technical challenge, and much remains to be learned about their characteristics and occurrence in nature. Methane hydrate research in recent years has mostly focused on: (1) documenting the geologic parameters that control the occurrence and stability of methane hydrates in nature, (2) assessing the volume of natural gas stored within various methane hydrate accumulations, (3) analyzing the production response and characteristics of methane hydrates, (4) identifying and predicting natural and induced environmental and climate impacts of natural methane hydrates, (5) analyzing the methane hydrate role as a geohazard, (6) establishing the means to detect and characterize methane hydrate accumulations using geologic and geophysical data, and (7) establishing the thermodynamic phase equilibrium properties of methane hydrates as a function of temperature, pressure, and gas composition. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Consortium for Ocean Leadership (COL) combined their efforts in 2012 to assess the contributions that scientific drilling has made and could continue to make to advance

  16. Direct use of methane in coal liquefaction

    DOEpatents

    Sundaram, Muthu S.; Steinberg, Meyer

    1987-01-01

    This invention relates to a process for converting solid carbonaceous material, such as coal, to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons utilizing methane, generally at a residence time of about 20-120 minutes at a temperature of 250.degree.-750.degree. C., preferably 350.degree.-450.degree. C., pressurized up to 6000 psi, and preferably in the 1000-2500 psi range, preferably directly utilizing methane 50-100% by volume in a mix of methane and hydrogen. A hydrogen donor solvent or liquid vehicle such as tetralin, tetrahydroquinoline, piperidine, and pyrolidine may be used in a slurry mix where the solvent feed is 0-100% by weight of the coal or carbonaceous feed. Carbonaceous feed material can either be natural, such as coal, wood, oil shale, petroleum, tar sands, etc., or man-made residual oils, tars, and heavy hydrocarbon residues from other processing systems.

  17. Top consumer abundance influences lake methane efflux

    PubMed Central

    Devlin, Shawn P.; Saarenheimo, Jatta; Syväranta, Jari; Jones, Roger I.

    2015-01-01

    Lakes are important habitats for biogeochemical cycling of carbon. The organization and structure of aquatic communities influences the biogeochemical interactions between lakes and the atmosphere. Understanding how trophic structure regulates ecosystem functions and influences greenhouse gas efflux from lakes is critical to understanding global carbon cycling and climate change. With a whole-lake experiment in which a previously fishless lake was divided into two treatment basins where fish abundance was manipulated, we show how a trophic cascade from fish to microbes affects methane efflux to the atmosphere. Here, fish exert high grazing pressure and remove nearly all zooplankton. This reduction in zooplankton density increases the abundance of methanotrophic bacteria, which in turn reduce CH4 efflux rates by roughly 10 times. Given that globally there are millions of lakes emitting methane, an important greenhouse gas, our findings that aquatic trophic interactions significantly influence the biogeochemical cycle of methane has important implications. PMID:26531291

  18. Direct use of methane in coal liquefaction

    DOEpatents

    Sundaram, M.S.; Steinberg, M.

    1985-06-19

    This invention relates to a process for converting solid carbonaceous material, such as coal, to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons utilizing methane, generally at a residence time of about 20 to 120 minutes at a temperature of 250 to 750/sup 0/C, preferably 350 to 450/sup 0/C, pressurized up to 6000 psi, and preferably in the 1000 to 2500 psi range, preferably directly utilizing methane 50 to 100% by volume in a mix of methane and hydrogen. A hydrogen donor solvent or liquid vehicle such as tetralin, tetrahydroquinoline, piperidine, and pyrolidine may be used in a slurry mix where the solvent feed is 0 to 100% by weight of the coal or carbonaceous feed. Carbonaceous feed material can either be natural, such as coal, wood, oil shale, petroleum, tar sands, etc., or man-made residual oils, tars, and heavy hydrocarbon residues from other processing systems. 1 fig.

  19. Methane emissions from the West Siberian wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksyutov, S.; Glagolev, M.; Kleptsova, I.; Sabrekov, A.; Peregon, A.; Machida, T.

    2010-12-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas contributing as much as 20% of the anthropogenic radiative forcing in the contemporary atmosphere. Therefore estimation of the relative contribution of different methane sources to the atmosphere is a crucial task in addressing the problem of global warming. Mires are the main natural source of methane. West Siberia gains the especial importance in this respect as one of the most paludified region in the world with the mire area of 68.5 Mha or 27% of this region area. Since the previously published estimations of the regional flux varied widely from 2 to 22 MtCH4y-1, long-term and large-scale investigations of CH4 emission were organized in this study. More than 1500 methane flux measurements were made during the summer-autumn of 2007-2010. All variety of wetland types was reduced to 8 microlandscape types: palsas, ryams (dwarf pine-shrub-sphagnum communities), ridges, eutrophic, mesotrophic and oligotrophic hollows, peat mats and wetland ponds. Mire micro-landscapes of 30 key sites distributed in 7 zones (tundra, forest-tundra, north, middle and south taiga, sub-taiga and forest-steppe) of West Siberia were observed. Methane fluxes were measured by the static chamber method. Emission data were generalized into spatial emission model. The model is based upon a fractional area coverage map of mire micro-landscapes, methane emission periods for each zone and methane flux probability density distributions for each microlandscape type in these zones. The methane emission map with the resolution 0.5°×0.5° was created. It was confirmed that palsas, ryams and ridges had the lowest methane fluxes (1st/2nd/3rd quartiles are -0.04/0/0.04 mgCH4m-2h-1 for palsas, 0/0.04/0.28 mgCH4m-2h-1 for ryams, 0/0.09/0.37 mgCH4m-2h-1 for ridges) while the peat mats, poor fens and fens had the highest fluxes (2.74/4.65/6.11 mgCH4m-2h-1 for peat mats, 1.15/3.35/6.21 mgCH4m-2h-1 for fens combined with poor fens). Highest methane fluxes, reaching

  20. Symmetry-dependent broadening parameters for methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, K.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental results for the pressure-broadened linewidths gamma of methane are presented and compared with theoretical results. A solar Fourier transform spectrometer with spectral resolving power of about one million was used together with a 6-m base length multitraversal absorption cell. Pressures were determined to an accuracy of + or - 0.2 Torr by means of a capacitance manometer. The pressuring gases were N2, H2, and He. Results are presented for numerical averages of all linewidths corresponding to a given tetrahedral symmetry for J = 0-6. For all cases studied, gamma(E) is found to be substantially less than gamma(A), and gamma(A) is found to be near to, but significantly smaller than, gamma(F). Relative inelastic cross sections calculated for argon scattering from methane are compared with relative pressure-broadened linewidths measured in several experiments involving methane and other gases.

  1. SCREENING TESTS FOR IMPROVED METHANE CRACKING MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J; Jeffrey Holder, J

    2007-07-16

    Bench scale (1 to 6 gram) methane cracking tests have been performed on a variety of pure elements, some alloys, and SAES{reg_sign} commercial getters St 101, St 198, St 707, St 737, and St 909 to determine methane cracking performance (MCP) of 5% methane in a helium carrier at 700 C, 101.3 kPa (760 torr) with a 10 sccm feed. The MCP was almost absent from some materials tested while others showed varying degrees of MCP. Re, Cr, V, Gd, and Mo powders had good MCP, but limited capacities. Nickel supported on kieselguhr (Ni/k), a Zr-Ni alloy, and the SAES{reg_sign} getters had good MCP in a helium carrier. The MCP of these same materials was suppressed in a hydrogen carrier stream and the MCP of the Zr-based materials was reduced by nitride formation when tested with a nitrogen carrier gas.

  2. Top consumer abundance influences lake methane efflux.

    PubMed

    Devlin, Shawn P; Saarenheimo, Jatta; Syväranta, Jari; Jones, Roger I

    2015-01-01

    Lakes are important habitats for biogeochemical cycling of carbon. The organization and structure of aquatic communities influences the biogeochemical interactions between lakes and the atmosphere. Understanding how trophic structure regulates ecosystem functions and influences greenhouse gas efflux from lakes is critical to understanding global carbon cycling and climate change. With a whole-lake experiment in which a previously fishless lake was divided into two treatment basins where fish abundance was manipulated, we show how a trophic cascade from fish to microbes affects methane efflux to the atmosphere. Here, fish exert high grazing pressure and remove nearly all zooplankton. This reduction in zooplankton density increases the abundance of methanotrophic bacteria, which in turn reduce CH4 efflux rates by roughly 10 times. Given that globally there are millions of lakes emitting methane, an important greenhouse gas, our findings that aquatic trophic interactions significantly influence the biogeochemical cycle of methane has important implications. PMID:26531291

  3. Effects of dietary addition of cellulase and a Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product on nutrient digestibility, rumen fermentation and enteric methane emissions in growing goats.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qi; Wu, Jian; Wang, Min; Zhou, Chuanshe; Han, Xuefeng; Odongo, Edwin Nicholas; Tan, Zhiliang; Tang, Shaoxun

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the effectiveness of dietary cellulase (243 U/g, derived from Neocallimastix patriciarum) and a Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product (yeast product) on ruminal fermentation characteristics, enteric methane (CH4) emissions and methanogenic community in growing goats. The experiment was conducted in a 5 × 5 Latin square design using five Xiangdong black wether goats. The treatments included a Control and two levels of cellulase (0.8 g and 1.6 g/kg dry matter intake (DMI), i.e. 194 U/kg and 389 U/kg DMI, respectively) crossed over with two levels (6 g or 12 g/kg DMI) of the yeast product. There were no significant differences regarding feed intake, apparent digestibility of organic matter, neutral detergent fibre and acid detergent fibre among all the treatments. In comparison with the Control, the ruminal ammonia N concentration was decreased (p = 0.001) by cellulase and yeast product addition. The activities of carboxymethylcellulase and xylanase were decreased after cellulase addition. Moreover, dietary cellulase and yeast product addition led to a significant reduction (p < 0.05) of enteric CH4 emissions although the diversity and copy numbers of methanogens among treatments were not dissimilar. The present results indicate that the combination of cellulase and yeast fermentation product can reduce the production of CH4 energy and mitigate the enteric CH4 emissions to a certain degree.

  4. Effects of dietary addition of cellulase and a Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product on nutrient digestibility, rumen fermentation and enteric methane emissions in growing goats.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qi; Wu, Jian; Wang, Min; Zhou, Chuanshe; Han, Xuefeng; Odongo, Edwin Nicholas; Tan, Zhiliang; Tang, Shaoxun

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the effectiveness of dietary cellulase (243 U/g, derived from Neocallimastix patriciarum) and a Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product (yeast product) on ruminal fermentation characteristics, enteric methane (CH4) emissions and methanogenic community in growing goats. The experiment was conducted in a 5 × 5 Latin square design using five Xiangdong black wether goats. The treatments included a Control and two levels of cellulase (0.8 g and 1.6 g/kg dry matter intake (DMI), i.e. 194 U/kg and 389 U/kg DMI, respectively) crossed over with two levels (6 g or 12 g/kg DMI) of the yeast product. There were no significant differences regarding feed intake, apparent digestibility of organic matter, neutral detergent fibre and acid detergent fibre among all the treatments. In comparison with the Control, the ruminal ammonia N concentration was decreased (p = 0.001) by cellulase and yeast product addition. The activities of carboxymethylcellulase and xylanase were decreased after cellulase addition. Moreover, dietary cellulase and yeast product addition led to a significant reduction (p < 0.05) of enteric CH4 emissions although the diversity and copy numbers of methanogens among treatments were not dissimilar. The present results indicate that the combination of cellulase and yeast fermentation product can reduce the production of CH4 energy and mitigate the enteric CH4 emissions to a certain degree. PMID:27032031

  5. Ground and Airborne Methane Measurements with an Optical Parametric Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    We report on ground and airborne atmospheric methane measurements with a differential absorption lidar using an optical parametric amplifier (OPA). Methane is a strong greenhouse gas on Earth and its accurate global mapping is urgently needed to understand climate change. We are developing a nanosecond-pulsed OPA for remote measurements of methane from an Earth-orbiting satellite. We have successfully demonstrated the detection of methane on the ground and from an airplane at approximately 11-km altitude.

  6. CFD Modeling of Methane Production from Hydrate-Bearing Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Gamwo, I.K.; Myshakin, E.M.; Warzinski, R.P.

    2007-04-01

    Methane hydrate is being examined as a next-generation energy resource to replace oil and natural gas. The U.S. Geological Survey estimates that methane hydrate may contain more organic carbon the the world's coal, oil, and natural gas combined. To assist in developing this unfamiliar resource, the National Energy Technology Laboratory has undertaken intensive research in understanding the fate of methane hydrate in geological reservoirs. This presentation reports preliminary computational fluid dynamics predictions of methane production from a subsurface reservoir.

  7. Evaluation of Methane Sources in Groundwater in Northeastern Pennsylvania

    PubMed Central

    Molofsky, Lisa J; Connor, John A; Wylie, Albert S; Wagner, Tom; Farhat, Shahla K

    2013-01-01

    Testing of 1701 water wells in northeastern Pennsylvania shows that methane is ubiquitous in groundwater, with higher concentrations observed in valleys vs. upland areas and in association with calcium-sodium-bicarbonate, sodium-bicarbonate, and sodium-chloride rich waters—indicating that, on a regional scale, methane concentrations are best correlated to topographic and hydrogeologic features, rather than shale-gas extraction. In addition, our assessment of isotopic and molecular analyses of hydrocarbon gases in the Dimock Township suggest that gases present in local water wells are most consistent with Middle and Upper Devonian gases sampled in the annular spaces of local gas wells, as opposed to Marcellus Production gas. Combined, these findings suggest that the methane concentrations in Susquehanna County water wells can be explained without the migration of Marcellus shale gas through fractures, an observation that has important implications for understanding the nature of risks associated with shale-gas extraction. PMID:23560830

  8. Sulfide and methane production in sewer sediments.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiwen; Ni, Bing-Jie; Ganigué, Ramon; Werner, Ursula; Sharma, Keshab R; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated significant sulfide and methane production by sewer biofilms, particularly in rising mains. Sewer sediments in gravity sewers are also biologically active; however, their contribution to biological transformations in sewers is poorly understood at present. In this study, sediments collected from a gravity sewer were cultivated in a laboratory reactor fed with real wastewater for more than one year to obtain intact sediments. Batch test results show significant sulfide production with an average rate of 9.20 ± 0.39 g S/m(2)·d from the sediments, which is significantly higher than the areal rate of sewer biofilms. In contrast, the average methane production rate is 1.56 ± 0.14 g CH4/m(2)·d at 20 °C, which is comparable to the areal rate of sewer biofilms. These results clearly show that the contributions of sewer sediments to sulfide and methane production cannot be ignored when evaluating sewer emissions. Microsensor and pore water measurements of sulfide, sulfate and methane in the sediments, microbial profiling along the depth of the sediments and mathematical modelling reveal that sulfide production takes place near the sediment surface due to the limited penetration of sulfate. In comparison, methane production occurs in a much deeper zone below the surface likely due to the better penetration of soluble organic carbon. Modelling results illustrate the dependency of sulfide and methane productions on the bulk sulfate and soluble organic carbon concentrations can be well described with half-order kinetics.

  9. Methane activation using noble gases in a dielectric barrier discharge reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, Sungkwon; Hoon Lee, Dae; Seok Kang, Woo; Song, Young-Hoon

    2013-08-15

    The conversion of methane is measured in a planar-type dielectric barrier discharge reactor using three different noble gases—He, Ne, and Ar—as additives. The empirical results obtained clearly indicate that methane activation is considerably affected by thy type of noble gas used. Through 0-D calculations, the discharge parameters inside the reactor, i.e., electron temperature and electron density, are estimated using experiment results. A comparison of the discharge characteristics and experimental results shows that the electron temperature is an important factor in achieving high methane activation and the mixture with Ar gas shows the highest methane conversion. These results are constructed using the mechanisms of energy and charge transfer from excited and ionized noble gas atoms to methane molecules, considering the number density of active atoms of noble gases. Finally, electron temperatures obtained for gas mixtures having different reactant compositions and concentrations are analyzed to estimate methane activation.

  10. Methane metabolism in the archaeal phylum Bathyarchaeota revealed by genome-centric metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Evans, Paul N; Parks, Donovan H; Chadwick, Grayson L; Robbins, Steven J; Orphan, Victoria J; Golding, Suzanne D; Tyson, Gene W

    2015-10-23

    Methanogenic and methanotrophic archaea play important roles in the global flux of methane. Culture-independent approaches are providing deeper insight into the diversity and evolution of methane-metabolizing microorganisms, but, until now, no compelling evidence has existed for methane metabolism in archaea outside the phylum Euryarchaeota. We performed metagenomic sequencing of a deep aquifer, recovering two near-complete genomes belonging to the archaeal phylum Bathyarchaeota (formerly known as the Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotal Group). These genomes contain divergent homologs of the genes necessary for methane metabolism, including those that encode the methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR) complex. Additional non-euryarchaeotal MCR-encoding genes identified in a range of environments suggest that unrecognized archaeal lineages may also contribute to global methane cycling. These findings indicate that methane metabolism arose before the last common ancestor of the Euryarchaeota and Bathyarchaeota.

  11. Solubility of methane in water: the significance of the methane-water interaction potential.

    PubMed

    Konrad, Oliver; Lankau, Timm

    2005-12-15

    The influence of the methane-water interaction potential on the value of the Henry constant obtained from molecular dynamics simulations was investigated. The SPC, SPC/E, MSPC/E, and TIP3P potentials were used to describe water and the OPLS-UA and TraPPE potentials for methane. Nonbonding interactions between unlike atoms were calculated both with one of four mixing rules and with our new methane-water interaction potential. The Henry constants obtained from simulations using any of the mixing rules differed significantly from the experimental ones. Good agreement between simulation and experiment was achieved with the new potential over the whole temperature range. PMID:16375336

  12. Solubility of methane in water: the significance of the methane-water interaction potential.

    PubMed

    Konrad, Oliver; Lankau, Timm

    2005-12-15

    The influence of the methane-water interaction potential on the value of the Henry constant obtained from molecular dynamics simulations was investigated. The SPC, SPC/E, MSPC/E, and TIP3P potentials were used to describe water and the OPLS-UA and TraPPE potentials for methane. Nonbonding interactions between unlike atoms were calculated both with one of four mixing rules and with our new methane-water interaction potential. The Henry constants obtained from simulations using any of the mixing rules differed significantly from the experimental ones. Good agreement between simulation and experiment was achieved with the new potential over the whole temperature range.

  13. Investigation the flushing flow of liquid methane in Laval nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snigerev, B. A.; Tukmakov, A. L.; Tonkonog, V. G.

    2016-06-01

    Turbulent flushing flow of methane in Laval nozzles are investigated. To describe the motion of vapor-liquid mixture are used Favre averaged over the set of equations including the equations conservation of mass, momentum, and energy for a homogeneous mixture consisting from liquid and vapour phases. Numerical flow simulation based on cavitation approach using an additional transport equation for the volume fraction of the liquid phase. The study of the expiry of boiling methane at different degrees of underheating and the back pressures in the Laval nozzle are performed.

  14. Production of Methane and Water from Crew Plastic Waste

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Captain, Janine; Santiago, Eddie; Parrish, Clyde; Strayer, Richard F.; Garland, Jay L.

    2008-01-01

    Recycling is a technology that will be key to creating a self sustaining lunar outpost. The plastics used for food packaging provide a source of material that could be recycled to produce water and methane. The recycling of these plastics will require some additional resources that will affect the initial estimate of starting materials that will have to be transported from earth, mainly oxygen, energy and mass. These requirements will vary depending on the recycling conditions. The degredation products of these plastics will vary under different atmospheric conditions. An estimate of the the production rate of methane and water using typical ISRU processes along with the plastic recycling will be presented.

  15. Supersonic combustion of a silane/methane mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Northam, G. B.; Mclain, A. G.

    1985-01-01

    A test program was conducted to evaluate the ignition and combustion characteristics of a 20 volume percent silane/methane mixture using a model scramjet combustor with Mach 2 combustor entrance conditions. The test gas total temperature was varied from 1200 to 3900 R. The mixture autoignited at a total temperature of 1650 R. This autoignition temperature can be contrasted with 2330 R for hydrogen and 1350 R for a 20 percent silane/hydrogen mixture in similar hardware. Methane without the silane additive did not autoignite in this configuration at temperatures as high as 3900 R.

  16. Methane gas recovery underway in Rhode Island

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-04-01

    The Rhode Island Solid Waste Management Corp. (RISWMC) launched the first phase of its multi-million dollar methane gas recovery program at the Central Landfill in late January by lighting a flare. Eight gas recovery wells, drilled to an average depth of 45 feet, are connected to the flare, which will burn gas at the rate of 400 CFM to help control odor problems at the 154-acre landfill site, where 4,000 tons of trash from 31 Rhode Island communities are disposed of daily. RISWMC plans to convert the gas into enough electricity to serve the average needs of 18,000 homes in the state by February, 1989. An additional 33 wells are being drilled and will be connected to a second larger flare unit (2600 CFM), which will begin operating in July. Eventually, there will be a total of 71 recovery wells, and an electrical generation facility will be built.

  17. Method for removal of methane from coalbeds

    DOEpatents

    Pasini, III, Joseph; Overbey, Jr., William K.

    1976-01-01

    A method for removing methane gas from underground coalbeds prior to mining the coal which comprises drilling at least one borehole from the surface into the coalbed. The borehole is started at a slant rather than directly vertically, and as it descends, a gradual curve is followed until a horizontal position is reached where the desired portion of the coalbed is intersected. Approaching the coalbed in this manner and fracturing the coalbed in the major natural fraction direction cause release of large amounts of the trapped methane gas.

  18. Energy from anaerobic methane production. [Sweden

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-02-01

    Since 1970 Swedish researchers have been testing the ANAMET (anaerobic-aerobic-methane) process, which involves converting industrial wastewaters via an initial anaerobic microbiological step followed by an aerobic one. Recycling the biomass material in each step allows shorter hydraulic retention times without decreasing stability or solids reduction. Since the first ANAMET plants began operating at a Swedish sugar factory in 1972, 17 more plants have started up or are under construction. Moreover, the ANAMET process has engendered to offshoot BIOMET (biomass-methane) process, a thermophilic anaerobic scheme that can handle sugar-beet pulp as well as grass and other soft, fast-growing biomasses.

  19. Morphology of methane hydrate host sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, K.W.; Feng, H.; Tomov, S.; Winters, W.J.; Eaton, M.; Mahajan, D.

    2005-01-01

    The morphological features including porosity and grains of methane hydrate host sediments were investigated using synchrotron computed microtomography (CMT) technique. The sediment sample was obtained during Ocean Drilling Program Leg 164 on the Blake Ridge at water depth of 2278.5 m. The CMT experiment was performed at the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source facility. The analysis gave ample porosity, specific surface area, mean particle size, and tortuosity. The method was found to be highly effective for the study of methane hydrate host sediments.

  20. Methane production from global biomass burning

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Min Hao; Ward, D.E.

    1993-11-20

    Emissions of methane from various sources of biomass burning are determined quantitatively for tropical, temperate, and boreal regions. About 85% of the total CH{sub 4} is emitted in the tropical area, which is mainly the result of shifting cultivation, fuelwood use, and deforestation. Methane emissions from biomass burning may have increased by at least 9% during the last decade because of increases in tropical deforestation and the use of fuelwood. Changes in land use practices and population growth in the tropics are possible causes of the increase of atmospheric CH{sub 4} concentration. 31 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  1. Methane recovery from landfill in China

    SciTech Connect

    Gaolai, L.

    1996-12-31

    GEF has approved a special project for a demonstration project for Methane Recovery from the Urban Refuse Land Fill. This paper will introduce the possibility of GHG reduction from the landfill in China, describe the activities of the GEF project, and the priorities for international cooperation in this field. The Global Environment Facility (GEF) approved the project, China Promoting Methane Recovery and Unlization from Mixed Municipal Refuse, at its Council meeting in last April. This project is the first one supported by international organization in this field.

  2. Contribution of methane to aerosol carbon mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, F.; Barmet, P.; Stirnweis, L.; El Haddad, I.; Platt, S. M.; Saurer, M.; Lötscher, C.; Siegwolf, R.; Bigi, A.; Hoyle, C. R.; DeCarlo, P. F.; Slowik, J. G.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.; Dommen, J.

    2016-09-01

    Small volatile organic compounds (VOC) such as methane (CH4) have long been considered non-relevant to aerosol formation due to the high volatility of their oxidation products. However, even low aerosol yields from CH4, the most abundant VOC in the atmosphere, would contribute significantly to the total particulate carbon budget. In this study, organic aerosol (OA) mass yields from CH4 oxidation were evaluated at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) smog chamber in the presence of inorganic and organic seed aerosols. Using labeled 13C methane, we could detect its oxidation products in the aerosol phase, with yields up to 0.09

  3. Detection of Gaseous Methane on Pluto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Leslie; Tokunaga, Alan; Elliot, J.; deBergh, Catherine; Owen, Tobias; Witteborn, Fred C. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    We obtained Pluto's spectrum using the CSHELL echelle spectrograph at NASA's IRTF on Mauna Kea, on 25-26 May 1992, with a spectral resolution of 13,300. The spectral range (5998 - 6018 per centimeter, or 1661.8 - 1666.9 nm) includes the R(0) and the Q(1) - Q(9) lines of the 2v3 band of methane. The resulting spectrum shows the first detection of gaseous methane on Pluto, with a column height of 1.20 (sup +3.15) (sub -0.87) cm-A (3.22 (sup +8.46) (sub -2.34) x 10(exp 19) molecule per square centimeter)).

  4. Methane production by sheep and cattle in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minson, D. J.

    1993-02-01

    Using methane production rates from Australian feeds and local estimates of the quantity of feed eaten by different classes of animal, it was estimated that sheep and cattle in Australia produce 2.66 Tg methane in 1990. This value is 43% higher than previous estimates and indicates a need to reassess the methane production of ruminants in other countries.

  5. 46 CFR 154.1854 - Methane (LNG) as fuel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Methane (LNG) as fuel. 154.1854 Section 154.1854... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1854 Methane (LNG) as fuel. (a) If methane (LNG) vapors are used as fuel in the main propulsion system of a vessel,...

  6. 40 CFR 86.125-94 - Methane analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Methane analyzer calibration. 86.125... Complete Heavy-Duty Vehicles; Test Procedures § 86.125-94 Methane analyzer calibration. Prior to introduction into service and monthly thereafter, the methane analyzer shall be calibrated: (a) Follow...

  7. 30 CFR 57.22308 - Methane monitors (III mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., except power to monitoring equipment determined by MSHA to be intrinsically safe under 30 CFR part 18... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Methane monitors (III mines). 57.22308 Section... Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Equipment § 57.22308 Methane monitors (III mines)....

  8. 46 CFR 154.1854 - Methane (LNG) as fuel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Methane (LNG) as fuel. 154.1854 Section 154.1854... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1854 Methane (LNG) as fuel. (a) If methane (LNG) vapors are used as fuel in the main propulsion system of a vessel,...

  9. 30 CFR 57.22308 - Methane monitors (III mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., except power to monitoring equipment determined by MSHA to be intrinsically safe under 30 CFR part 18... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Methane monitors (III mines). 57.22308 Section... Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Equipment § 57.22308 Methane monitors (III mines)....

  10. 30 CFR 57.22308 - Methane monitors (III mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., except power to monitoring equipment determined by MSHA to be intrinsically safe under 30 CFR part 18... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Methane monitors (III mines). 57.22308 Section... Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Equipment § 57.22308 Methane monitors (III mines)....

  11. 40 CFR 86.125-94 - Methane analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Methane analyzer calibration. 86.125... Complete Heavy-Duty Vehicles; Test Procedures § 86.125-94 Methane analyzer calibration. Prior to introduction into service and monthly thereafter, the methane analyzer shall be calibrated: (a) Follow...

  12. 46 CFR 154.1854 - Methane (LNG) as fuel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Methane (LNG) as fuel. 154.1854 Section 154.1854... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1854 Methane (LNG) as fuel. (a) If methane (LNG) vapors are used as fuel in the main propulsion system of a vessel,...

  13. 30 CFR 57.22308 - Methane monitors (III mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., except power to monitoring equipment determined by MSHA to be intrinsically safe under 30 CFR part 18... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Methane monitors (III mines). 57.22308 Section... Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Equipment § 57.22308 Methane monitors (III mines)....

  14. Tables of critical-flow functions and thermodynamic properties for methane and computational procedures for both methane and natural gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    Procedures for calculating the mass flow rate of methane and natural gas through nozzles are given, along with the FORTRAN 4 subroutines used to make these calculations. Three sets of independent variables are permitted in these routines. In addition to the plenum pressure and temperature, the third independent variable is either nozzle exit pressure, Mach number, or temperature. A critical-flow factor that becomes a convenient means for determining the mass flow rate of methane through critical-flow nozzles is tabulated. Other tables are included for nozzle throat velocity and critical pressure, density, and temperature ratios, along with some thermodynamic properties of methane, including compressibility factor, enthalpy, entropy, specific heat, specific-heat ratio, and speed of sound. These tabulations cover a temperature range from 120 to 600 K and pressures to 3 million N/sq m.

  15. Perspectives On The Global Budget of Methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, M. K.; Butenhoff, C. L.; Shearer, M. J.

    2008-12-01

    Early budgets of methane focused on the emissions from individual sources but the estimates had large uncertainties. These uncertainties have been reduced considerably in recent years, but we need an understanding of the trends in the sources as well as their spatial distributions if we are to use methane to control global warming. A nearly 30 year long time series of global atmospheric methane concentrations has accumulated that can provide some of the answers. One of the most dramatic findings is that the increase of methane has nearly stopped in the last decade. But the record also shows that the trend was falling ever since systematic measurements were taken, and perhaps even before that. This finding has led to some puzzles. There is a belief that the anthropogenic sources of methane are increasing but to explain the falling trend we need decreasing sources (or increasing sinks). In fact, the atmospheric measurements show only that the most probable explanation for the decreasing trend and the present near constancy of concentrations is that the global source of methane has been more or less constant over the last 30 years with many short-term ups and downs. Moreover, there is good evidence that some of the major man-made sources of methane, such as cattle, biomass burning and possibly others, have stopped increasing some time back and other sources such as rice agriculture may have decreased over the last 30 years. This allows some smaller energy based sources to have increased, consistent with expectations, and balance out the decreasing sources to keep the total more or less constant. A credible quantitative case can be made for a stable global source based on available information on the trends of the various sources and sinks of methane, but uncertainties remain. We will argue that the stability of sources and sinks is the most likely explanation of the methane concentration trends. We will use this result to re-evaluate the future of man- made methane

  16. Tracking sinks of atmospheric methane using small world networks.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chih-Sheng; Su, Pei-Jen

    2014-12-01

    The present study uses small world network to highlight the key hubs for CH4 atmospheric pathways without considering rate constant of each reaction and concentrations of each species. The atmospheric methane sources and sinks were formulated into a well-organized network of 49 nodes and 302 links. In the network, reactions (including substrates and products) are considered as nodes and their pathways as links. Using a small world model, we analyzed the weighted and directed network of methane sources and sinks. By analyzing the characteristic path length, clustering coefficient, and degree distribution, we obtained insights into the methane network. The results indicate that only a few key nodes serve as hubs or limiting reactions, such as CH4 + OH → CH3 + H2O; HO2 + NO → NO2 + OH; CH3O2H → CH3O + OH; and CH4 + Cl → CH3 + HCl. The network is highly efficient; when key hub reactions experience interruptions, pathways to other nodes can be accessed to complete the methane degradation process. Additionally, our directed network keeps sources and sinks independent of each other such that changes in the number or type of methane sources does not affect the findings related to sinks. Tracking the structure of methane sources and sinks not only provides valuable, and perhaps universal, information about the network structure, but also can lead to a better understanding of the dynamic processes that generate the network. Finally, this is the first attempt of the network model in analyzing environmental issues and may represent a common blueprint for the interconnected reactions (sources and sinks) of other greenhouse gases.

  17. Ruminant Methane δ (13C/12C) - Values: Relation to Atmospheric Methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rust, Fleet

    1981-03-01

    The δ (13C/12C) - values of methane produced by fistulated steers, dairy cattle, and wethers, and dairy and beef cattle herds show a bimodal distribution that appears to be correlated with the plant type (C3 or C4, that is, producing either a three- or a four-carbon acid in the first step of photosynthesis) consumed by the animals. These results indicate that cattle and sheep, on a global basis, release methane with an average δ (13C/12C) value of -60 and -63 per mil, respectively. Together they are a source of atmospheric methane whose δ (13C/12C) is similar to published values for marsh gas and cannot explain the 20 per mil higher values for atmospheric methane.

  18. Biogenic Methane and the Rise of Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catling, David; McKay, Christopher

    2001-01-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis does not make the rise of oxygen inevitable. What is required is that reductant and oxygen be separated and permanently segregated. The usual picture for Earth is that oxygenic photosynthesis split CO2 into carbon and oxygen, with the carbon buried in sediments and the oxygen mostly taken up by oxides of iron and sulfur. The relatively small atmospheric reservoir of O2 is regulated by the carbon burial rate, reaction with volcanic and metamorphic gases, and oxidation of reduced carbon released as old sediments weather. Absent from this picture is a distinction between the Archean and modern times: on average, carbon burial fluxes would have been matched by oxygen losses then as now. Separation of reductant from oxidant is only provisional. No net oxidation of the continents occurs, and so no change of diagenetic, metamorphic, or volcanic gases is expected. Nor would any change in oxidative weathering be expected. Something more than carbon burial is required to make the Archean different. The escape of hydrogen to space permanently separates the reductant from the oxidant. Hydrogen escape is widely believed to have led to the present highly oxidized states of Mars and Venus. Hydrogen escape has usually been thought small for Archaean Earth, because water vapor is cold-trapped at the troposphere and thus held to levels of a few ppmv in the stratosphere. This cold trapping renders hydrogen escape negligible. However, methane is not cold trapped, and its expected abundance in the Archaean, given low oxygen levels and a biogenic source, would have been high, probably more than 100 times present. At such levels methane would have driven geologically significant levels of hydrogen escape. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  19. Resources assessment of methane hydrates offshore Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, T.

    2015-12-01

    JOGMEC, as a member of research group for resources assessment of Research Consortium for Methane Hydrate Resources in Japan (MH21), is conducting resources assessment of methane hydrates (MHs) offshore surrounding Japan. The interpretation of 3-D seismic data acquired by geophysical vessel 'Shigen', which is owned by Agency for Natural Resources and Energy, are carried out. And MH concentrated zones are being extracted. This study is an introduction for the case example of interpretation of 3-D seismic data in the area which have not been drilled. The characteristic of 3-D seismic data in this study area shows fold structure, which undulates severalfold. In addition, some faults are interpreted, which does not show the large displacement, are seen. Bottom Simulating Reflector (BSR) is very visible continuously. Clear velocity contrast in the boundary between above and below of BSR and the high velocity anomaly above BSR are confirmed in the high density velocity analysis profile. MHs are assumed to exist in sand heterogeneously because the velocity distribution in the extracted zones is inhomogeneous. In the results of geomorphological analysis, channel deposits and mid submarine fan deposits, which are located above BSR, are presumed the sediments which bear sand. Thus the extracted zones are estimated MH concentrated zones. As above, even the area has not been drilled, the extraction of MH concentrated zones can be estimated by the interpretation of the seismic data, the result of the high density velocity analysis, and the distribution of sand by geomorphological analysis. These results will be useful for the plan of the future drilling programme. This introduction is the example of 3-D seismic survey area. It will become a useful information for 3-D seismic survey plan by performing similar interpretation in 2-D seismic survey lines.

  20. Coalbed methane resource potential and current prospects in Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markowski, A.K.

    1998-01-01

    methane potential. Phase I of this study involved the entire Pennsylvanian coal-bearing interval of southwestern Pennsylvania. Phase II focused on a stratigraphic delineation and evaluation of Allegheny Group coal beds and associated sandstones. Several prospective coal beds and associated facies relationships with channel-fill sandstones were determined. Possible non-coal scenarios for coalbed methane include erosional contacts between coal beds and overlying channel-fill sandstones and areas of stacked channel-fill sandstones. Repetitive sequences of coal accumulation are stacked, commonly with shale interburden, and are also potential coalbed methane targets. Additional Pennsylvania Geological Survey drilling/coalbed methane sampling occurred in Armstrong, Beaver, Cambria, Greene, Lawrence, Somerset, and Washington Counties. Raw coalbed methane desorption data tables/graphical displays of gas contents versus depth, thickness, and time, and average composition and heating values from coal beds of the Allegheny Group to the Dunkard Group are available at the Pennsylvania Geological Survey. Further information on cross-sections, isopleth maps, isopach maps, raw drillhole data, and ownership issues can also be obtained from the same source.A mapping of the regional geology of the bituminous coal-bearing intervals in southwestern Pennsylvania reveal several prospective coal beds and associated facies relationships with channel-fill sandstones. Possible non-coal scenarios for coalbed methane include erosional contacts between coalbeds and overlying channel-fill sandstones and areas of stacked channel-fill sandstones. Repetitive sequences of coal accumulation are stacked, commonly with shale interburden. and are also potential coalbed methane targets.

  1. Microbial methane production in oxygenated water column of an oligotrophic lake.

    PubMed

    Grossart, Hans-Peter; Frindte, Katharina; Dziallas, Claudia; Eckert, Werner; Tang, Kam W

    2011-12-01

    The prevailing paradigm in aquatic science is that microbial methanogenesis happens primarily in anoxic environments. Here, we used multiple complementary approaches to show that microbial methane production could and did occur in the well-oxygenated water column of an oligotrophic lake (Lake Stechlin, Germany). Oversaturation of methane was repeatedly recorded in the well-oxygenated upper 10 m of the water column, and the methane maxima coincided with oxygen oversaturation at 6 m. Laboratory incubations of unamended epilimnetic lake water and inoculations of photoautotrophs with a lake-enrichment culture both led to methane production even in the presence of oxygen, and the production was not affected by the addition of inorganic phosphate or methylated compounds. Methane production was also detected by in-lake incubations of lake water, and the highest production rate was 1.8-2.4 nM⋅h(-1) at 6 m, which could explain 33-44% of the observed ambient methane accumulation in the same month. Temporal and spatial uncoupling between methanogenesis and methanotrophy was supported by field and laboratory measurements, which also helped explain the oversaturation of methane in the upper water column. Potentially methanogenic Archaea were detected in situ in the oxygenated, methane-rich epilimnion, and their attachment to photoautotrophs might allow for anaerobic growth and direct transfer of substrates for methane production. Specific PCR on mRNA of the methyl coenzyme M reductase A gene revealed active methanogenesis. Microbial methane production in oxygenated water represents a hitherto overlooked source of methane and can be important for carbon cycling in the aquatic environments and water to air methane flux.

  2. Unconventional gas resources. [Eastern Gas Shales, Western Gas Sands, Coalbed Methane, Methane from Geopressured Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Komar, C.A.

    1980-01-01

    This document describes the program goals, research activities, and the role of the Federal Government in a strategic plan to reduce the uncertainties surrounding the reserve potential of the unconventional gas resources, namely, the Eastern Gas Shales, the Western Gas Sands, Coalbed Methane, and methane from Geopressured Aquifers. The intent is to provide a concise overview of the program and to identify the technical activities that must be completed in the successful achievement of the objectives.

  3. Sources and sinks of methane in Lake Kivu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2011-10-01

    Africa's Lake Kivu, which borders Rwanda and the Republic of the Congo, contains huge amounts of methane (an estimated 60 cubic kilometers) and carbon dioxide (an estimated 300 cubic kilometers). Although the methane could provide a source of energy if it could be tapped, the high concentrations of gases pose a risk of dangerous gas eruptions, threatening the local population. Furthermore, it has been reported that concentrations of methane have risen by as much as 15% in the past 30 years. Scientists need to learn more about the sources and sinks of methane in Lake Kivu to better assess the risk of catastrophic outgassing and sustainability of methane harvesting.

  4. Diffusion of cyclooctane (1); methane (2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, J.

    This document is part of Subvolume A `Gases in Gases, Liquids and their Mixtures' of Volume 15 `Diffusion in Gases, Liquids and Electrolytes' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV `Physical Chemistry'. It is part of the chapter of the chapter `Diffusion in Pure Gases' and contains data on diffusion of (1) cyclooctane; (2) methane

  5. 40 CFR 721.4820 - Methane, bromodifluoro-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4820 Methane, bromodifluoro-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to... this section for the significant new uses described in paragraph (a)(2) of this section. (2)...

  6. 40 CFR 721.4820 - Methane, bromodifluoro-.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4820 Methane, bromodifluoro-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to... this section for the significant new uses described in paragraph (a)(2) of this section. (2)...

  7. 46 CFR 154.703 - Methane (LNG).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... maintained below the set pressure of the safety relief valve for at least 21 days by: (a) A refrigeration... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Methane (LNG). 154.703 Section 154.703 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS...

  8. 46 CFR 154.703 - Methane (LNG).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... maintained below the set pressure of the safety relief valve for at least 21 days by: (a) A refrigeration... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Methane (LNG). 154.703 Section 154.703 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS...

  9. Methane Gas Emissions - is Older Infrastructure Leakier?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendt, L. P.; Caulton, D.; Zondlo, M. A.; Lane, H.; Lu, J.; Golston, L.; Pan, D.

    2015-12-01

    Large gains in natural gas production from hydraulic fracturing is reinvigorating the US energy economy. It is a clean burning fuel with lower emissions than that of coal or oil. Studies show that methane (CH4) leaks from natural gas infrastructure vary widely. A broader question is whether leak rates of methane might offset the benefits of combustion of natural gas. Excess methane (CH4) is a major greenhouse gas with a radiative forcing constant of 25 times that of CO2 when projected over a 100-year period. An extensive field study of 250 wells in the Marcellus Shale conducted in July 2015 examined the emission rates of this region and identifed super-emitters. Spud production data will provide information as to whether older infrastructure is responsible for more of the emissions. Quantifying the emission rate was determined by extrapolating methane releases at a distance from private well pads using an inverse Gaussian plume model. Wells studied were selected by prevailing winds, distance from public roads, and topographical information using commercial (ARCGIS and Google Earth), non-profit (drillinginfo), and government (State of PA) databases. Data were collected from the mobile sensing lab (CH4, CO2 and H2O sensors), as well as from a stationary tower. Emission rates from well pads will be compared to their original production (spud dates) to evaluate whether infrastructure age and total production correlates with the observed leak rates. Very preliminary results show no statistical correlation between well pad production rates and observed leak rates.

  10. Methane: Signs of Progress along the Road

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent findings of Simpson et al. (Geophysical Research Letters, 33:L22808, doi:10.1029/2006GL027330, 2006) have indicated that the growth in the concentration of atmospheric methane has leveled off based on air sampling conducted throughout the Pacific basin (71 deg N to 47 deg S) over the last sev...

  11. Methane Dynamics in Large Amazonian Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawakuchi, H. O.; Bastviken, D.; Sawakuchi, A. O.; Borges, C. D.; Tsai, S. M.; Ward, N. D.; Richey, J. E.; Ballester, M. V.; Krusche, A. V.

    2014-12-01

    The emission of methane (CH4) from rivers is not always included in the greehouse gas budget for inland waters, mainly due to a lack of information available for these systems. Unraveling the dynamics that control fluvial CH4 sources and sinks is critical for understanding the contribution of CH4 to riverine and global carbon budgets. Here, we present estimates of CH4 sources and sinks in numerous large Amazonian rivers during periods of high and low discharge. Calculations based on CH4 flux measurements and isotopic data (δ13CH4) of dissolved CH4 and bubbles in riverbed sediments were performed to assess the sources and sinks of river water CH4. Molecular analysis (qPCR) in river water samples was used to determine methanotrophic bacterial density. Methane-oxidizing bacterial counts were compared to oxidation estimates in order to assess the relationship between methane sinks and in situ bacterial communities. In general, rivers that had an enriched δ13CH4 in the water also had a higher density of methanotrophic bacteria in the water column, illustrating an important control on CH4 availability and flux related to physicochemical factors that control the abundance and activity of methanotrophic bacteria. Further, we observed a distinct relationship between the type of river (e.g. clear, white, or black water) and the flux of methane from the water column.

  12. METHANE PHYTOREMEDIATION BY VEGETATIVE LANDFILL COVER SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Landfill gas, consisting of methane and other gases, is produced from organic compounds degrading in landfills, contributes to global climate change, is toxic to various types of vegetation, and may pose a combustion hazard at higher concentrations. New landfills are required to ...

  13. 77 FR 40032 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice... Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77032. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Lou Capitanio, U.S. Department of...

  14. Formation and retention of methane in coal

    SciTech Connect

    Hucka, V.J.; Bodily, D.M.; Huang, H.

    1992-05-15

    The formation and retention of methane in coalbeds was studied for ten Utah coal samples, one Colorado coal sample and eight coal samples from the Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank.Methane gas content of the Utah and Colorado coals varied from zero to 9 cm{sup 3}/g. The Utah coals were all high volatile bituminous coals. The Colorado coal was a gassy medium volatile bituminous coal. The Argonne coals cover a range or rank from lignite to low volatile bituminous coal and were used to determine the effect of rank in laboratory studies. The methane content of six selected Utah coal seams and the Colorado coal seam was measured in situ using a special sample collection device and a bubble desorbometer. Coal samples were collected at each measurement site for laboratory analysis. The cleat and joint system was evaluated for the coal and surrounding rocks and geological conditions were noted. Permeability measurements were performed on selected samples and all samples were analyzed for proximate and ultimate analysis, petrographic analysis, {sup 13}C NMR dipolar-dephasing spectroscopy, and density analysis. The observed methane adsorption behavior was correlated with the chemical structure and physical properties of the coals.

  15. Generating power with drained coal mine methane

    SciTech Connect

    2005-09-01

    The article describes the three technologies most commonly used for generating electricity from coal mine methane: internal combustion engines, gas turbines, and microturbines. The most critical characteristics and features of these technologies, such as efficiency, output and size are highlighted. 5 refs.

  16. Methane production in simulated hybrid bioreactor landfill.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiyong; Jin, Xiao; Ma, Zeyu; Tao, Huchun; Ko, Jae Hac

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this work was to study a hybrid bioreactor landfill technology for landfill methane production from municipal solid waste. Two laboratory-scale columns were operated for about ten months to simulate an anaerobic and a hybrid landfill bioreactor, respectively. Leachate was recirculated into each column but aeration was conducted in the hybrid bioreactor during the first stage. Results showed that leachate pH in the anaerobic bioreactor maintained below 6.5, while in the hybrid bioreactor quickly increased from 5.6 to 7.0 due to the aeration. The temporary aeration resulted in lowering COD and BOD5 in the leachate. The volume of methane collected from the hybrid bioreactor was 400 times greater than that of the anaerobic bioreactor. Also, the methane production rate of the hybrid bioreactor was improved within a short period of time. After about 10 months' operation, the total methane production in the hybrid bioreactor was 212 L (16 L/kgwaste).

  17. Sedimentary Rocks and Methane - Southwest Arabia Terra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton C.; Oehler, Dorothy Z.; Venechuk, Elizabeth M.

    2006-01-01

    We propose to land the Mars Science Laboratory in southwest Arabia Terra to study two key aspects of martian history the extensive record of sedimentary rocks and the continuing release of methane. The results of this exploration will directly address the MSL Scientific Objectives regarding biological potential, geology and geochemistry, and past habitability.

  18. Modeling of methane release from intact coal

    SciTech Connect

    Odintsev, V.N.

    2005-09-15

    Development of percolating clusters when loading samples of a geomaterial that is hierarchically and stochastically heterogeneous is modeled. The conditions are analyzed for propagation of crack under pressure of methane in the transition phase from a bound state into a free one on the faces of the growing crack in coal.

  19. Water Column Methanotrophy Fueled by Methane from the Hudson Canyon Seep Field, US Atlantic Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redmond, M. C.; Chan, E. W.; Kellermann, M. Y.; Arrington, E.; Valentine, D. L.; Kessler, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Several areas of methane seepage have recently been discovered along the US Atlantic margin, including parts of Hudson Canyon, offshore New York and New Jersey. However, little is known about the magnitude of seepage, the fate of this methane once it enters the water column, or the bacteria that may consume it. In July 2014, water column methane concentrations were measured throughout Hudson Canyon and methane oxidation tracked using a 13C-methane tracer. Samples for microbial community composition analysis were collected throughout the water column in areas with and without active seepage. 16S rRNA gene sequencing will be used to compare microbial communities from different depths, locations, and in samples with low and high methane concentrations and oxidation rates. DNA stable isotope probing experiments with 13C-labeled methane were also conducted and will be used to detect active water column methanotrophs from seep and non-seep sites. In addition, mesocosm experiments were used for high resolution measurements of methane oxidation, with samples for microbial community composition taken at several time points. 16S rRNA gene sequencing will be used to track changes in methanotrophic bacteria and the overall microbial community as methane was consumed.

  20. Extreme methane emissions from a Swiss hydropower reservoir: contribution from bubbling sediments.

    PubMed

    Delsontro, Tonya; McGinnis, Daniel F; Sobek, Sebastian; Ostrovsky, Ilia; Wehrli, Bernhard

    2010-04-01

    Methane emission pathways and their importance were quantified during a yearlong survey of a temperate hydropower reservoir. Measurements using gas traps indicated very high ebullition rates, but due to the stochastic nature of ebullition a mass balance approach was crucial to deduce system-wide methane sources and losses. Methane diffusion from the sediment was generally low and seasonally stable and did not account for the high concentration of dissolved methane measured in the reservoir discharge. A strong positive correlation between water temperature and the observed dissolved methane concentration enabled us to quantify the dissolved methane addition from bubble dissolution using a system-wide mass balance. Finally, knowing the contribution due to bubble dissolution, we used a bubble model to estimate bubble emission directly to the atmosphere. Our results indicated that the total methane emission from Lake Wohlen was on average >150 mg CH(4) m(-2) d(-1), which is the highest ever documented for a midlatitude reservoir. The substantial temperature-dependent methane emissions discovered in this 90-year-old reservoir indicate that temperate water bodies can be an important but overlooked methane source.

  1. Comparison of soil acetate concentrations and methane production, transport, and emission in two rice cultivars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigren, L. K.; Byrd, G. T.; Fisher, F. M.; Sass, R. L.

    1997-03-01

    The amount of methane emitted from irrigated rice paddies is dependent on the variety of rice grown. In this study we examined two varieties of rice with differing methane emission rates to determine if the primary mechanism for these differences was related to transport processes or the rate of methane production. The cultivars used were Mars and Lemont, with 1994 seasonal emissions of 34 and 18 g m-2, respectively. Seasonal methane emission and soil acetate concentration data were measured weekly over two seasons in both varieties. In addition, gas transport through the two rice varieties was investigated in both field and laboratory experiments in 1995. We found no significant differences in gas transport between the two varieties. However, significant differences between the two varieties were detected in the soil acetate concentrations during the vegetative growth stage. Mars exhibited higher seasonal methane emissions and higher soil acetate concentrations than Lemont. This suggests that the intervarietal differences in methane emissions are the result of different soil substrate levels and hence different rates of methane production. The turnover time of soil acetate was found to be small, about 1 hour in the last half of the season. Calculations of methane oxidation, using two methods, support previous findings that the fraction of methane oxidized in the soil prior to emission increases from 10 to 30% before heading to 30-70% after heading.

  2. Extreme methane emissions from a Swiss hydropower reservoir: contribution from bubbling sediments.

    PubMed

    Delsontro, Tonya; McGinnis, Daniel F; Sobek, Sebastian; Ostrovsky, Ilia; Wehrli, Bernhard

    2010-04-01

    Methane emission pathways and their importance were quantified during a yearlong survey of a temperate hydropower reservoir. Measurements using gas traps indicated very high ebullition rates, but due to the stochastic nature of ebullition a mass balance approach was crucial to deduce system-wide methane sources and losses. Methane diffusion from the sediment was generally low and seasonally stable and did not account for the high concentration of dissolved methane measured in the reservoir discharge. A strong positive correlation between water temperature and the observed dissolved methane concentration enabled us to quantify the dissolved methane addition from bubble dissolution using a system-wide mass balance. Finally, knowing the contribution due to bubble dissolution, we used a bubble model to estimate bubble emission directly to the atmosphere. Our results indicated that the total methane emission from Lake Wohlen was on average >150 mg CH(4) m(-2) d(-1), which is the highest ever documented for a midlatitude reservoir. The substantial temperature-dependent methane emissions discovered in this 90-year-old reservoir indicate that temperate water bodies can be an important but overlooked methane source. PMID:20218543

  3. Methane hydrate-bearing seeps as a source of aged dissolved organic carbon to the oceans

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pohlman, J.W.; Bauer, J.E.; Waite, W.F.; Osburn, C.L.; Chapman, N.R.

    2011-01-01

    Marine sediments contain about 500-10,000 Gt of methane carbon, primarily in gas hydrate. This reservoir is comparable in size to the amount of organic carbon in land biota, terrestrial soils, the atmosphere and sea water combined, but it releases relatively little methane to the ocean and atmosphere. Sedimentary microbes convert most of the dissolved methane to carbon dioxide. Here we show that a significant additional product associated with microbial methane consumption is methane-derived dissolved organic carbon. We use ??14 C and ??13 C measurements and isotopic mass-balance calculations to evaluate the contribution of methane-derived carbon to seawater dissolved organic carbon overlying gas hydrate-bearing seeps in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. We show that carbon derived from fossil methane accounts for up to 28% of the dissolved organic carbon. This methane-derived material is much older, and more depleted in 13 C, than background dissolved organic carbon. We suggest that fossil methane-derived carbon may contribute significantly to the estimated 4,000-6,000 year age of dissolved organic carbon in the deep ocean, and provide reduced organic matter and energy to deep-ocean microbial communities. ?? 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  4. SAES ST 909 PILOT SCALE METHANE CRACKING TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J; Henry Sessions, H

    2007-07-02

    Pilot scale (500 gram) SAES St 909 methane cracking tests were conducted to determine material performance for tritium process applications. Tests that ran up to 1400 hours have been performed at 700 C, 202.7 kPa (1520 torr) with a 30 sccm feed of methane, with various impurities, in a 20 vol% hydrogen, balance helium, stream. A 2.5 vol% methane feed was reduced below 30 ppm for 631 hours. A feed of 1.1 vol% methane plus 1.4 vol% carbon dioxide was reduced below 30 ppm for 513 hours. The amount of carbon dioxide gettered by St 909 can be equated to an equivalent amount of methane gettered to estimate a reduced bed life for methane cracking. The effect of 0.4 vol % and 2.1 vol% nitrogen in the feed reduced the time to exceed 30 ppm methane to 362 and 45 hours, respectively, but the nitrogen equivalence to reduced methane gettering capacity was found to be dependent on the nitrogen feed composition. Decreased hydrogen concentrations increased methane getter rates while a drop of 30 C in one bed zone increased methane emissions by over a factor of 30. The impact of gettered nitrogen can be somewhat minimized if the nitrogen feed to the bed has been stopped and sufficient time given to recover the methane cracking rate.

  5. Experimental Study of the PVTX Properties of Water-Methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, F.; Bodnar, R. J.

    2004-12-01

    Hydrothermal fluids containing small amounts of methane are common in many geological environments, including sedimentary basins, submarine hydrothermal systems and low grade metamorphic rocks. To better understand the behavior of these fluids, the phase equilibrium properties of water containing small amounts of methane (< 4 mol%) were determined using the synthetic fluid inclusion technique. Methane in the experiments was generated by the reaction of aluminum carbide with water to produce methane and aluminum hydroxide. Reaction products (methane and aluminum hydroxide) were verified by Raman spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction analyses, respectively. Concentrations of methane in the inclusions were calculated based on the reaction stoichiometry. A series of experiments demonstrated that using fresh aluminum carbide (from newly opened container) was critical to obtaining accurate compositions. This is because aluminum carbide decomposes slowly when exposed to humid air. Error analyses based on mass balance showed that with appropriate sample handling, the errors associated with the experimental technique were < 5% (relative) for methane concentrations < 4 mol%. Synthetic fluid inclusions containing < 4 mol% methane were trapped at 500-700° C, 1-3 kilobars. For a given formation temperature and pressure, the homogenization temperature decreases with increasing methane concentration. This behavior reflects both the changing slope of the fluid isochore as well as the increasing pressure on the solvus with increasing methane. Phase diagrams summarizing the PTX properties of the water-methane system will be presented.

  6. Methane emissions from tank bromeliads in neotropical forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinson, Guntars O.; Werner, Florian A.; Scherber, Christoph; Conrad, Ralf; Corre, Marife D.; Flessa, Heiner; Wolf, Katrin; Klose, Melanie; Gradstein, S. Robbert; Veldkamp, Edzo

    2010-11-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas. Methane concentrations above neotropical forests-the tropical forests found in Mexico, Central America, South America and the Caribbean-are high according to space-borne observations. However, the source of the methane is uncertain. Here, we measure methane fluxes from tank bromeliads-a common group of herbaceous plants in neotropical forests that collect water in tank-like structures-using vented static chambers. We sampled 167 bromeliads in the Ecuadorian Andes, and found that all of them emitted methane. We found a diverse community of methane-producing archaea within the water-containing tanks, suggesting that the tanks served as the source of the methane. Indeed, tank water was supersaturated with methane, and 13C-labelled methane added to tank water was emitted though the leaves. We suggest that the bromeliad tanks form a wetland environment conducive to methane production. In conjunction with other wetlands hidden beneath the copy surface, bromeliads may help to explain the inexplicably high methane levels observed over neotropical forests.

  7. Atmospheric Methane Contributions From Fractured Bedrock Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrin, D. L.

    2013-05-01

    Groundwater is not normally considered as an important contributor of atmospheric methane because the organic carbon content of aquifers is too low to sustain significant methanogenesis. Also, groundwater-generated methane partitions into the gas phase of the overlying soil, where it either dissolves in the pore water or is oxidized to carbon dioxide by methanotrophs. There are, however, localized conditions (related to human activities and hydrogeologic conditions) under which atmospheric contributions of groundwater-generated methane occur at the ground surface. Storing and transporting liquid petroleum products in the subsurface has resulted in the local introduction of high concentrations of degradable organic carbon and the creation of redox conditions that favor methanogenesis over more oxidative biodegradation pathways. Groundwater overlain by fractured bedrock, rather than by unconsolidated porous media, creates a situation where CH4 migrates through discrete fractures, thus limiting the soil volume and the surface area available for methanotrophic activity. The spatial distribution of methane in thin surface soils overlying bedrock suggests that CH4 migrates via fracture networks and that CH4 oxidation is a factor of about 50 less than that measured in typical unconsolidated soils. Atmospheric flux rates associated with contaminated bedrock aquifers were on the order of several grams of carbon (as CH4) per square meter, which is less than that reported for well documented sources (e.g., rice paddies) and probably represents a minor worldwide contribution. Nonetheless, these aquifers can represent an important localized source, can shift soils from a sink to a source of methane, and can permit petroleum products to load carbon (as biogenic CH4 and CO2) to the atmosphere without ever being combusted.

  8. SAES St 909 pilot scale methane cracking tests

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J. E.; Sessions, H. T.

    2008-07-15

    Pilot scale (0.5 kg) SAES St 909 methane cracking tests were conducted for potential tritium process applications. Up to 1400 hours tests were done at 700 deg.C, 202.7 kPa (1520 torr) with a 0.03 sLPM feed of methane plus impurities, in a 20 vol% hydrogen, balance helium, stream. Carbon dioxide gettered by St 909 can be equated to an equivalent amount of methane gettered, but equating nitrogen to an equivalent amount of methane was nitrogen feed composition dependent. A decreased hydrogen feed increased methane getter rates while a 30 deg.C drop in one furnace zone increased methane emissions by over a factor of 30. The impact of gettered nitrogen can be somewhat minimized if nitrogen feed to the bed has been stopped and sufficient time given to recover the methane cracking rate. (authors)

  9. Contribution of Fire Emissions to the Global Methane Budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worden, J.; Bloom, A. A.; Jiang, Z.; Bowman, K. W.; Worden, H. M.

    2015-12-01

    Fire emissions of methane potentially represent a significant but highly uncertain component of the global methane budget with estimates ranging from 14 to 88 Tg / yr. This range of estimates is driven in part by knowledge of dry matter burned, the fuel type, and variations in combustion efficiency. Here we use global estimates of CO emissions based on CO profiles from the NASA Terra MOPITT instrument and CH4/CO emission ratios from NASA Aura TES data to constrain estimates of the global contribution to atmospheric methane from fires. For the years 2001 to the present we find that fire emissions of methane are approximately 3% (or ~ 15 Tg / yr) of the global methane budget. Furthermore, fire emissions have likely been decreasing during this time period indicating that non-fire methane fluxes have primarily contributed to the recent increase in global atmospheric methane concentrations.

  10. Thermodynamic properties and diffusion of water + methane binary mixtures.

    PubMed

    Shvab, I; Sadus, Richard J

    2014-03-14

    Thermodynamic and diffusion properties of water + methane mixtures in a single liquid phase are studied using NVT molecular dynamics. An extensive comparison is reported for the thermal pressure coefficient, compressibilities, expansion coefficients, heat capacities, Joule-Thomson coefficient, zero frequency speed of sound, and diffusion coefficient at methane concentrations up to 15% in the temperature range of 298-650 K. The simulations reveal a complex concentration dependence of the thermodynamic properties of water + methane mixtures. The compressibilities, heat capacities, and diffusion coefficients decrease with increasing methane concentration, whereas values of the thermal expansion coefficients and speed of sound increase. Increasing methane concentration considerably retards the self-diffusion of both water and methane in the mixture. These effects are caused by changes in hydrogen bond network, solvation shell structure, and dynamics of water molecules induced by the solvation of methane at constant volume conditions. PMID:24628180

  11. Methane biofiltration using autoclaved aerated concrete as the carrier material.

    PubMed

    Ganendra, Giovanni; Mercado-Garcia, Daniel; Hernandez-Sanabria, Emma; Boeckx, Pascal; Ho, Adrian; Boon, Nico

    2015-09-01

    The methane removal capacity of mixed methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) culture in a biofilter setup using autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC) as a highly porous carrier material was tested. Batch experiment was performed to optimize MOB immobilization on AAC specimens where optimum methane removal was obtained when calcium chloride was not added during bacterial inoculation step and 10-mm-thick AAC specimens were used. The immobilized MOB could remove methane at low concentration (~1000 ppmv) in a biofilter setup for 127 days at average removal efficiency (RE) of 28.7 %. Unlike a plug flow reactor, increasing the total volume of the filter by adding a biofilter in series did not result in higher total RE. MOB also exhibited a higher abundance at the bottom of the filter, in proximity with the methane gas inlet where a high methane concentration was found. Overall, an efficient methane biofilter performance could be obtained using AAC as the carrier material.

  12. Methane biofiltration using autoclaved aerated concrete as the carrier material.

    PubMed

    Ganendra, Giovanni; Mercado-Garcia, Daniel; Hernandez-Sanabria, Emma; Boeckx, Pascal; Ho, Adrian; Boon, Nico

    2015-09-01

    The methane removal capacity of mixed methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) culture in a biofilter setup using autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC) as a highly porous carrier material was tested. Batch experiment was performed to optimize MOB immobilization on AAC specimens where optimum methane removal was obtained when calcium chloride was not added during bacterial inoculation step and 10-mm-thick AAC specimens were used. The immobilized MOB could remove methane at low concentration (~1000 ppmv) in a biofilter setup for 127 days at average removal efficiency (RE) of 28.7 %. Unlike a plug flow reactor, increasing the total volume of the filter by adding a biofilter in series did not result in higher total RE. MOB also exhibited a higher abundance at the bottom of the filter, in proximity with the methane gas inlet where a high methane concentration was found. Overall, an efficient methane biofilter performance could be obtained using AAC as the carrier material. PMID:25967655

  13. Conversion of methane to higher hydrocarbons in ac nonequilibrium plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Thanyachotpaiboon, K.; Chavadej; Caldwell, T.A.; Lobban, L.L.; Mallinson, R.G.

    1998-10-01

    The effects of plasma chemistry on the conversion of methane were studied using a dielectric barrier discharge reactor at ambient temperatures. A dielectric barrier discharge reactor generates a nonequilibrium plasma when a sufficiently high voltage is applied across the reactor`s electrodes. Methane molecules are activated at this temperature and coupled to form C{sub 2} hydrocarbons, higher hydrocarbons, and hydrogen. The study on the effect of voltage, residence time and third bodies on methane conversion and product selectivity shows that methane conversion initially increases with increasing voltage and residence time above the breakdown voltage, and product selectivities are essentially independent of the voltage. Production of hydrogen during the reaction limits olefin production. Methane conversion also increases when helium and ethane are in the feed stream. Helium and ethane both appear to be more easily activated than methane and enhance methane activation and conversion.

  14. Thermodynamic properties and diffusion of water + methane binary mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Shvab, I.; Sadus, Richard J.

    2014-03-14

    Thermodynamic and diffusion properties of water + methane mixtures in a single liquid phase are studied using NVT molecular dynamics. An extensive comparison is reported for the thermal pressure coefficient, compressibilities, expansion coefficients, heat capacities, Joule-Thomson coefficient, zero frequency speed of sound, and diffusion coefficient at methane concentrations up to 15% in the temperature range of 298–650 K. The simulations reveal a complex concentration dependence of the thermodynamic properties of water + methane mixtures. The compressibilities, heat capacities, and diffusion coefficients decrease with increasing methane concentration, whereas values of the thermal expansion coefficients and speed of sound increase. Increasing methane concentration considerably retards the self-diffusion of both water and methane in the mixture. These effects are caused by changes in hydrogen bond network, solvation shell structure, and dynamics of water molecules induced by the solvation of methane at constant volume conditions.

  15. A potential model for methane in water describing correctly the solubility of the gas and the properties of the methane hydrate.

    PubMed

    Docherty, H; Galindo, A; Vega, C; Sanz, E

    2006-08-21

    We have obtained the excess chemical potential of methane in water, over a broad range of temperatures, from computer simulation. The methane molecules are described as simple Lennard-Jones interaction sites, while water is modeled by the recently proposed TIP4P/2005 model. We have observed that the experimental values of the chemical potential are not reproduced when using the Lorentz-Berthelot combining rules. However, we also noticed that the deviation is systematic, suggesting that this may be corrected. In fact, by introducing positive deviations from the energetic Lorentz-Berthelot rule to account indirectly for the polarization methane-water energy, we are able to describe accurately the excess chemical potential of methane in water. Thus, by using a model capable of describing accurately the density of pure water in a wide range of temperatures and by deviating from the Lorentz-Berthelot combining rules, it is possible to reproduce the properties of methane in water at infinite dilution. In addition, we have applied this methane-water potential to the study of the solid methane hydrate structure, commonly denoted as sI, and find that the model describes the experimental value of the unit cell of the hydrate with an error of about 0.2%. Moreover, we have considered the effect of the amount of methane contained in the hydrate. In doing so, we determine that the presence of methane increases slightly the value of the unit cell and decreases slightly the compressibility of the structure. We also note that the presence of methane increases greatly the range of pressures where the sI hydrate is mechanically stable. PMID:16942354

  16. Quantifying the relative contribution of natural gas fugitive emissions to total methane emissions in Colorado, Utah, and Texas using mobile isotopic methane analysis based on Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rella, Chris; Winkler, Renato; Sweeney, Colm; Karion, Anna; Petron, Gabrielle; Crosson, Eric

    2014-05-01

    Fugitive emissions of methane into the atmosphere are a major concern facing the natural gas production industry. Because methane is more energy-rich than coal per kg of carbon dioxide emitted into the atmosphere, it represents an attractive alternative to coal for electricity generation, provided that the fugitive emissions of methane are kept under control. A key step in assessing these emissions in a given region is partitioning the observed methane emissions between natural gas fugitive emissions and other sources of methane, such as from landfills or agricultural activities. One effective method for assessing the contribution of these different sources is stable isotope analysis, using the isotopic carbon signature to distinguish between natural gas and landfills or ruminants. We present measurements of methane using a mobile spectroscopic stable isotope analyzer based on cavity ringdown spectroscopy, in three intense natural gas producing regions of the United States: the Denver-Julesburg basin in Colorado, the Uintah basin in Utah, and the Barnett Shale in Texas. Performance of the CRDS isotope analyzer is presented, including precision, calibration, stability, and the potential for measurement bias due to other atmospheric constituents. Mobile isotope measurements of individual sources and in the nocturnal boundary layer have been combined to establish the fraction of the observed methane emissions that can be attributed to natural gas activities. The fraction of total methane emissions in the Denver-Julesburg basin attributed to natural gas emissions is 78 +/- 13%. In the Uinta basin, which has no other significant sources of methane, the fraction is 96% +/- 15%. In addition, results from the Barnett shale are presented, which includes a major urban center (Dallas / Ft. Worth). Methane emissions in this region are spatially highly heterogeneous. Spatially-resolved isotope and concentration measurements are interpreted using a simple emissions model to

  17. A potential model for methane in water describing correctly the solubility of the gas and the properties of the methane hydrate.

    PubMed

    Docherty, H; Galindo, A; Vega, C; Sanz, E

    2006-08-21

    We have obtained the excess chemical potential of methane in water, over a broad range of temperatures, from computer simulation. The methane molecules are described as simple Lennard-Jones interaction sites, while water is modeled by the recently proposed TIP4P/2005 model. We have observed that the experimental values of the chemical potential are not reproduced when using the Lorentz-Berthelot combining rules. However, we also noticed that the deviation is systematic, suggesting that this may be corrected. In fact, by introducing positive deviations from the energetic Lorentz-Berthelot rule to account indirectly for the polarization methane-water energy, we are able to describe accurately the excess chemical potential of methane in water. Thus, by using a model capable of describing accurately the density of pure water in a wide range of temperatures and by deviating from the Lorentz-Berthelot combining rules, it is possible to reproduce the properties of methane in water at infinite dilution. In addition, we have applied this methane-water potential to the study of the solid methane hydrate structure, commonly denoted as sI, and find that the model describes the experimental value of the unit cell of the hydrate with an error of about 0.2%. Moreover, we have considered the effect of the amount of methane contained in the hydrate. In doing so, we determine that the presence of methane increases slightly the value of the unit cell and decreases slightly the compressibility of the structure. We also note that the presence of methane increases greatly the range of pressures where the sI hydrate is mechanically stable.

  18. Methane distribution in porewaters of the Eastern Siberian Shelf Sea - chemical, acoustic, and video observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruchert, V.; Sawicka, J. E.; Samarkin, V.; Noormets, R.; Stockmann, G. J.; Bröder, L.; Rattray, J.; Steinbach, J.

    2015-12-01

    We present porewater methane and sulfate concentrations, and the isotope composition of carbon dioxide from 18 sites in areas of reported high methane water column concentrations on the Siberian shelf. Echosounder imaging and video imagery of the benthic environment were used to detect potential bubble emission from the sea bottom and to locate high methane emission areas. In areas where bubble flares were identified by acoustic echsounder imaging, recovered sediment cores provided evidence for slightly elevated porewater methane concentrations 10 cm below the sediment surface relative to sites without flares. Throughout the recovered sediment depth intervals porewater concentrations of methane were more than a factor 300 below the gas saturation limit at sea surface pressure. In addition, surface sediment video recordings provided no evidence for bubble emissions in the investigated methane hotspot areas although at nearby sites bubbles were detected higher in the water column. The conflicting observations of acoustic indications of rising bubbles and the absence of bubbles and methane oversaturation in any of the sediment cores during the whole SWERUS cruise suggest that advective methane seepage is a spatially limited phenomenon that is difficult to capture with routine ship-based core sampling methods in this field area. Recovery of a sediment core from one high-activity site indicated steep gradients in dissolved sulfate and methane in the first 8 cm of sediment pointing to the presence of anaerobic methane oxidation at a site with a high upward flux of methane. Based on the decrease of methane towards the sediment surface and the rates of sulfate reduction-coupled methane oxidation, most of the upward-transported methane was oxidized within the sediment. This conclusion is further supported by the stable isotope composition of dissolved carbon dioxide in porewaters and the precipitation of calcium carbonate minerals only found in sediment at this site

  19. Using a Novel Optical Sensor to Characterize Methane Ebullition Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delwiche, K.; Hemond, H.; Senft-Grupp, S.

    2015-12-01

    We have built a novel bubble size sensor that is rugged, economical to build, and capable of accurately measuring methane bubble sizes in aquatic environments over long deployment periods. Accurate knowledge of methane bubble size is important to calculating atmospheric methane emissions from in-land waters. By routing bubbles past pairs of optical detectors, the sensor accurately measures bubbles sizes for bubbles between 0.01 mL and 1 mL, with slightly reduced accuracy for bubbles from 1 mL to 1.5 mL. The sensor can handle flow rates up to approximately 3 bubbles per second. Optional sensor attachments include a gas collection chamber for methane sampling and volume verification, and a detachable extension funnel to customize the quantity of intercepted bubbles. Additional features include a data-cable running from the deployed sensor to a custom surface buoy, allowing us to download data without disturbing on-going bubble measurements. We have successfully deployed numerous sensors in Upper Mystic Lake at depths down to 18 m, 1 m above the sediment. The resulting data gives us bubble size distributions and the precise timing of bubbling events over a period of several months. In addition to allowing us to characterize typical bubble size distributions, this data allows us to draw important conclusions about temporal variations in bubble sizes, as well as bubble dissolution rates within the water column.

  20. Polar methane production, hothouse climates, and climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fricke, H. C.; Williams, C.; Yavitt, J. B.

    2009-12-01

    Although the role of carbon dioxide in producing and maintaining hothouse climates has been considered extensively, the role of methane is more uncertain. Because methane is a very effective greenhouse gas, investigations of methane production and the potential impact of this gas on Cenozoic climate are critical. Methane produced from polar wetlands of hothouse climates is particularly important to understand, as production was likely much higher when wetlands rather than permafrost covered these areas. In this study we focus on Arctic methane production during the Eocene. Carbon isotope ratios of fossil tooth dentine and of authigenic carbonates associated with wetland sediment range from +5 to +10 per mil, which indicated that significant amount of methane production took place, and that this methane was able to reach the atmosphere. Support for this hypothesis is provided by experiments in which litter of plants related to those found in the Eocene high Arctic (e.g. conifers) were incubated at temperatures similar to those estimated for the region at this time. Methane production was measured for these incubations, and the resulting ‘Eocene’ production rates, when scaled to the landscape level, represent a polar source of methane that may several times that of the present day global methane flux. Therefore polar methane production during the Eocene likely represents a significant and presently unaccounted for input of this gas to the early Cenozoic atmosphere. High rates of polar methane production such as that estimated for the Eocene may have had a major impact on Cenozoic climate. They could have resulted in the production of polar stratospheric clouds that preferentially warmed the poles, thus providing a mechanism for preferentially warming high-latitude regions during hothouse climate states. Equally important incubation experiments indicate that methane production in Eocene wetlands is strongly influenced by temperature. Therefore a wetland

  1. Isotopic constraints on sources of methane in Los Angeles, California, USA (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend-Small, A.; Tyler, S. C.; Christensen, L.; Xu, X.; Pataki, D. E.

    2009-12-01

    Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas and an important contributor to global warming. Recent studies have suggested that methane emissions in large cities are underestimated with several models even indicating that substantial emissions attributed to cities are in part from regional and/or encroaching agricultural sources rather than from urban fossil fuel sources. We have found that stable isotopes (13-C and D) and radiocarbon (C-14) are excellent tracers of various sources of methane in Los Angeles, California. Measurements of the d13C and dD of methane from discrete sources show excellent separation between urban sources, such as vehicle emissions, power plants, oil refineries, landfills, and sewage treatment plants and agricultural sources like cows, biogas, and cattle feedlots. In addition, radiocarbon is an excellent tracer of modern versus fossil fuel contributions to methane emissions in the region. Preliminary measurements of background air in Los Angeles indicate that the major source of excess methane is vehicle emissions with most additional CH4 likely contributed from among other fossil fuel sources such as oil refining or power plants. We are currently confirming these results with broader field campaigns and additional measurements, including continuous measurements of atmospheric methane concentration using tunable laser spectroscopy. The combination of high-resolution tunable laser concentration measurements and precise isotope measurements using mass spectrometry is a very promising and powerful tool for methane source monitoring.

  2. Uninhibited methane biogeochemistry: A candid view of interactions among soil processes made possible by stable isotope and inert tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Fischer, J. C.

    2006-12-01

    Methane emission emerges as a highly variable property of ecosystems because the proximate controlling processes, methane production, consumption and transport, appear to vary considerably in both space and time. But the extent and importance of any co-correlation among these processes remains unclear. The idea of co-correlation is supported by a simplified model of methane fluxes that we have developed and by the frequently-observed relationship between net ecosystem productivity and methane emission. Yet the dominant approach toward problems in methane biogeochemistry remains focused on measuring or modeling each process individually and then assembling them into an understanding of the whole. This approach has arisen, in part, from our historic inability to measure methane production, consumption and transport simultaneously. Instead, one or more processes have been inhibited or excluded from consideration, leading to an incomplete picture of soil methane biogeochemistry. To overcome this limitation, we have used additions of 13C- labeled methane to simultaneously measure methane production and consumption in wetland soils. When coupled with additions of inert hydrologic and gas tracers (e.g., Br- and SF6), we have measured methane production, consumption and soil-atmosphere transport under field conditions with minimal disturbance. Our results reveal strong co-correlations among the processes that can be useful for building simpler, mechanistically-based models of ecosystem methane emissions.

  3. Investigating the chemical and isotopic kinetics of aerobic methane oxidation in the Northern US Atlantic Margin, Hudson Canyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, E. W.; Kessler, J. D.; Shiller, A. M.; Redmond, M. C.; Arrington, E. C.; Valentine, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    Recent discoveries of methane seepage along the US Atlantic margin have led to speculation on the fate of the released methane. Here we examine the kinetics of aerobic methane oxidation to gain a fundamental understanding of this methane sink. In order to look at this process in its entirety, a unique mesocosm incubation system was developed with a Dissolved Gas Analyzer System (DGAS) to monitor in real time the chemical and isotopic changes involved with aerobic methane oxidation. This system measures changes in methane, carbon dioxide, and oxygen concentrations as well as the stable carbon isotopes of methane and carbon dioxide with time. In addition samples are strategically removed to characterize trace metals, nutrients, cell counts, and microbial community genetics. This presentation will detail the results obtained from samples collected inside the Hudson Canyon at the edge of the methane clathrate stability zone and outside the Hudson Canyon, not influenced by the methane seepage. These results show that in both environments along the Atlantic margin, methane was consumed aggressively but the timing of consumption varied based on location. In addition, these results are leading to insights into the chemical requirements needed for aerobic methane oxidation and the resulting isotopic fractionation.

  4. Quantification of methane fluxes from industrial sites using a combination of a tracer release method and a Gaussian model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ars, S.; Broquet, G.; Yver-Kwok, C.; Wu, L.; Bousquet, P.; Roustan, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations keep on increasing in the atmosphere since industrial revolution. Methane (CH4) is the second most important anthropogenic GHG after carbon dioxide (CO2). Its sources and sinks are nowadays well identified however their relative contributions remain uncertain. The industries and the waste treatment emit an important part of the anthropogenic methane that is difficult to quantify because the sources are fugitive and discontinuous. A better estimation of methane emissions could help industries to adapt their mitigation's politic and encourage them to install methane recovery systems in order to reduce their emissions while saving money. Different methods exist to quantify methane emissions. Among them is the tracer release method consisting in releasing a tracer gas near the methane source at a well-known rate and measuring both their concentrations in the emission plume. The methane rate is calculated using the ratio of methane and tracer concentrations and the emission rate of the tracer. A good estimation of the methane emissions requires a good differentiation between the methane actually emitted by the site and the methane from the background concentration level, but also a good knowledge of the sources distribution over the site. For this purpose, a Gaussian plume model is used in addition to the tracer release method to assess the emission rates calculated. In a first step, the data obtained for the tracer during a field campaign are used to tune the model. Different model's parameterizations have been tested to find the best representation of the atmospheric dispersion conditions. Once these parameters are set, methane emissions are estimated thanks to the methane concentrations measured and a Bayesian inversion. This enables to adjust the position and the emission rate of the different methane sources of the site and remove the methane background concentration.

  5. Methane Geogas Storages Discharge under Permafrost Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraev, G. N.; Veremeeva, A.; Arzhanov, M. M.; Denisov, S. N.; Rivkina, E. M.

    2008-12-01

    High-latitude ecosystems are in the focus of global change studies. High-latitude ecosystems contribute up to 30% of all wetlands methane emissions according to AR4. High-latitude ecosystems are characterized with permafrost distribution. More than 107 km2 in the northern hemisphere is covered with permafrost. Permafrost soils were shown to contain layers enriched in methane and carbon dioxide as well as with pre- cursors needed for methane production and viable methanogenic microbial community. Thus the ancient methane itself, the substrate for its production and producers themselves are found in permafrost. They concentrated in various strata, geologic formations. For the North-Eastern Siberia a number of the strata were sampled for these components. More than 200 soil air samples from the cores of twenty 15-55 m boreholes were analyzed for methane and carbon dioxide concentration. The traces of acetate were also found in frozen soils. Labelled substrate experiments with soils in the laboratory gave the rates of methane production and lag phases of microbial communities for the various types of thawing permafrost soils. The volumes of the formations are calculated within the GIS based system according to state geological survey map of quaternary deposits of 1:1000000 scale. The land area was separated into three various morphologic levels dominating in the study area, as follows: Ice Complex covered watersheds, Alas Complex (Holocene Thaw Lake Depressions Deposits) and River Floodplains. The thickness and set of geologic formations for each morphologic level were specified. The study area was divided into 2.5 by 2.5 degrees Lat-Long grid to introduce to permafrost thawing model. Soil thermal characteristics were taken from the data available in literature or calculated on the basis of existing data on texture and iciness. The boundary conditions of ground surface temperature and water flow were controlled by the ensemble of GCMs models which ran under A1B and A2B

  6. In situ measurement of methane fluxes and analysis of transcribed particulate methane monooxygenase in desert soils.

    PubMed

    Angel, Roey; Conrad, Ralf

    2009-10-01

    Aerated soils are a biological sink for atmospheric methane. However, the activity of desert soils and the presence of methanotrophs in these soils have hardly been studied. We studied on-site atmospheric methane consumption rates as well as the diversity and expression of the pmoA gene, coding for a subunit of the particulate methane monooxygenase, in arid and hyperarid soils in the Negev Desert, Israel. Methane uptake was only detected in undisturbed soils in the arid region (approximately 90 mm year(-1)) and vertical methane profiles in soil showed the active layer to be at 0-20 cm depth. No methane uptake was detected in the hyperarid soils (approximately 20 mm year(-1)) as well as in disturbed soils in the arid region (i.e. agricultural field and a mini-catchment). Molecular analysis of the methanotrophic community using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and cloning/sequencing of the pmoA gene detected methanotrophs in the active soils, whereas the inactive ones were dominated by sequences of the homologous gene amoA, coding for a subunit of the ammonia monooxygenase. Even in the active soils, methanotrophs (as well as in situ activity) could not be detected in the soil crust, which is the biologically most important layer in desert soils. All pmoA sequences belonged to yet uncultured strains. Transcript analysis showed dominance of sequences clustering within the JR3, formerly identified in Californian grassland soils. Our results show that although active methanotrophs are prevalent in arid soils they seem to be absent or inactive in hyperarid and disturbed arid soils. Furthermore, we postulate that methanotrophs of the yet uncultured JR3 cluster are the dominant atmospheric methane oxidizers in this ecosystem.

  7. Thermodynamic properties of methane hydrate in quartz powder.

    PubMed

    Voronov, Vitaly P; Gorodetskii, Evgeny E; Safonov, Sergey S

    2007-10-01

    Using the experimental method of precision adiabatic calorimetry, the thermodynamic (equilibrium) properties of methane hydrate in quartz sand with a grain size of 90-100 microm have been studied in the temperature range of 260-290 K and at pressures up to 10 MPa. The equilibrium curves for the water-methane hydrate-gas and ice-methane hydrate-gas transitions, hydration number, latent heat of hydrate decomposition along the equilibrium three-phase curves, and the specific heat capacity of the hydrate have been obtained. It has been experimentally shown that the equilibrium three-phase curves of the methane hydrate in porous media are shifted to the lower temperature and high pressure with respect to the equilibrium curves of the bulk hydrate. In these experiments, we have found that the specific heat capacity of the hydrate, within the accuracy of our measurements, coincides with the heat capacity of ice. The latent heat of the hydrate dissociation for the ice-hydrate-gas transition is equal to 143 +/- 10 J/g, whereas, for the transition from hydrate to water and gas, the latent heat is 415 +/- 15 J/g. The hydration number has been evaluated in the different hydrate conditions and has been found to be equal to n = 6.16 +/- 0.06. In addition, the influence of the water saturation of the porous media and its distribution over the porous space on the measured parameters has been experimentally studied.

  8. Methane and carbon at equilibrium in source rocks

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Methane in source rocks may not exist exclusively as free gas. It could exist in equilibrium with carbon and higher hydrocarbons: CH4 + C < = > Hydrocarbon. Three lines of evidence support this possibility. 1) Shales ingest gas in amounts and selectivities consistent with gas-carbon equilibrium. There is a 50% increase in solid hydrocarbon mass when Fayetteville Shale is exposed to methane (450 psi) under moderate conditions (100°C): Rock-Eval S2 (mg g-1) 8.5 = > 12.5. All light hydrocarbons are ingested, but with high selectivity, consistent with competitive addition to receptor sites in a growing polymer. Mowry Shale ingests butane vigorously from argon, for example, but not from methane under the same conditions. 2) Production data for a well producing from Fayetteville Shale declines along the theoretical curve for withdrawing gas from higher hydrocarbons in equilibrium with carbon. 3) A new general gas-solid equilibrium model accounts for natural gas at thermodynamic equilibrium, and C6-C7 hydrocarbons constrained to invariant compositions. The results make a strong case for methane in equilibrium with carbon and higher hydrocarbons. If correct, the higher hydrocarbons in source rocks are gas reservoirs, raising the possibility of substantially more gas in shales than analytically apparent, and far more gas in shale deposits than currently recognized. PMID:24330266

  9. Tank bromeliad - a natural model ecosystem for methane cycling research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinson, Guntars; Brandt, Franziska; Conrad, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    Tank bromeliads are common epiphytes throughout neotropical forest ecosystems. They are relatively small discrete habitats for terrestrial and aquatic macro- and microorganisms and naturally replicated. Their tanks effectively collect leaf litter and water and harbor a diverse microbial community. Up to several thousands of these tank bromeliads per hectare of tropical forest create a unique wetland ecosystem responsible for significant methane emissions. In a field study in tropical montane forests of southern Ecuador we sampled tank bromeliads of different species, size and canopy height and found that tank water availability controlled community composition of methanogenic archaea, determined by molecular analysis of the archaeal 16S rRNA genes. We set up a greenhouse experiment to investigate drying and re-wetting effects on microbial community composition and methanogenesis. Additionally, we conducted 13-CH-4 and 13-CO-2 labeling studies to investigate potential interaction of plant and microbial metabolism during methane cycling in tank bromeliads. Drying resulted in rapid change of the microbial community composition. The relative abundance of acetoclastic methanogens increased and that of hydrogenotrophic methanogens decreased with decreasing tank water availability confirming our field observations. Labeling studies showed that carbon was released from the plant into the tank supporting methanogenesis and that tank-produced methane was ventilated through the bromeliad leaf structure into the atmosphere which is analogous to the rhizosphere environment of wetland ecosystems. The bromeliad ecosystem may therefore provide a natural model to study how environmental changes and plant-microbe interactions drive methane cycling in aquatic-terrestrial ecosystems.

  10. Geologic seepage of methane and light alkanes in Los Angeles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doezema, L. A.; Chang, K.; Baril, R.; Nwachuku, I.; Contreras, P.; Marquez, A.; Howard, D.

    2013-12-01

    Natural geologic seepage of methane from underground oil and natural gas reservoirs has been suggested to be an underreported part of the global methane budget. Other light alkanes are also given off in combination with the methane seepage, making it possible that geologic seepage is also a potentially significant global source of these light alkanes. This study reports C1-C5 findings from geologic seepage made in the Los Angeles region. Microseepage, invisible escape of gases, was measured primarily at Kenneth Hahn Regional Park, while macroseepage, the visible release of gases, was measured at the La Brea Tar Pits. Samples were collected using stainless steel canisters and flux chambers and were analyzed using gas chromatography with flame ionization detectors (GC-FID). Average microseepage flux rates of 0.95 μg m-2 h-1 for ethane and 0.51 μg m-2 h-1 were found for propane, while average macroseepage rates for methane, ethane, and propane were 664, 19.8, and 18.1 mg m-2 h-1 respectively. Relationships between microseepage flux rate and location of underground oil and natural deposit and earthquake fault lines are presented. Additionally, the relative importance of findings in context with global budgets and local air quality is discussed.

  11. Methane and carbon at equilibrium in source rocks.

    PubMed

    Mango, Frank D

    2013-01-01

    Methane in source rocks may not exist exclusively as free gas. It could exist in equilibrium with carbon and higher hydrocarbons: CH4 + C < = > Hydrocarbon. Three lines of evidence support this possibility. 1) Shales ingest gas in amounts and selectivities consistent with gas-carbon equilibrium. There is a 50% increase in solid hydrocarbon mass when Fayetteville Shale is exposed to methane (450 psi) under moderate conditions (100°C): Rock-Eval S2 (mg g-1) 8.5 = > 12.5. All light hydrocarbons are ingested, but with high selectivity, consistent with competitive addition to receptor sites in a growing polymer. Mowry Shale ingests butane vigorously from argon, for example, but not from methane under the same conditions. 2) Production data for a well producing from Fayetteville Shale declines along the theoretical curve for withdrawing gas from higher hydrocarbons in equilibrium with carbon. 3) A new general gas-solid equilibrium model accounts for natural gas at thermodynamic equilibrium, and C6-C7 hydrocarbons constrained to invariant compositions. The results make a strong case for methane in equilibrium with carbon and higher hydrocarbons. If correct, the higher hydrocarbons in source rocks are gas reservoirs, raising the possibility of substantially more gas in shales than analytically apparent, and far more gas in shale deposits than currently recognized. PMID:24330266

  12. Coalbed methane: from hazard to resource

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flores, R.M.

    1998-01-01

    Coalbed gas, which mainly consists of methane, has remained a major hazard affecting safety and productivity in underground coal mines for more than 100 yr. Coalbed gas emissions have resulted in outbursts and explosions where ignited by open lights, smoking or improper use of black blasting powder, and machinery operations. Investigations of coal gas outbursts and explosions during the past century were aimed at predicting and preventing this mine hazard. During this time, gas emissions were diluted with ventilation by airways (eg, tunnels, vertical and horizontal drillholes, shsfts) and by drainage boreholes. The 1970s 'energy crisis' led to studies of the feasibility of producing the gas for commercial use. Subsequent research on the origin, accumulation, distribution, availability, and recoverability has been pursued vigorously during the past two decades. Since the 1970s research investigations on the causes and effects of coal mine outbursts and gas emissions have led to major advances towards the recovery and development of coalbed methane for commercial use. Thus, coalbed methane as a mining hazard was harnessed as a conventional gas resource.Coalbed gas, which mainly consists of methane, has remained a major hazard affecting safety and productivity in underground coal mines for more than 100 years. Coalbed gas emissions have resulted in outbursts and explosions where ignited by open lights, smoking or improper use of black blasting powder, and machinery operations. Investigations of coal gas outbursts and explosions during the past century were aimed at predicting and preventing this mine hazard. During this time, gas emissions were diluted with ventilation by airways (e.g., tunnels, vertical and horizontal drillholes, shafts) and by drainage boreholes. The 1970's `energy crisis' led to studies of the feasibility of producing the gas for commercial use. Subsequent research on the origin, accumulation, distribution, availability, and recoverability has been

  13. Methane and sulfate dynamics in sediments from mangrove-dominated tropical coastal lagoons, Yucatán, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, P.-C.; Young, M. B.; Miller, L. G.; Herrera-Silveira, J. A.; Paytan, A.

    2015-11-01

    Methane, sulfate and chloride concentrations in sediment porewater from two coastal mangrove ecosystems (Celestún and Chelem Lagoons) on the Yucatán Peninsula, Mexico were measured. In these sediments methane exists in shallow sediments where sulfate is not depleted, and sulfate reduction is actively occurring. A transport-reaction model depicting the various production and consumption processes for methane and sulfate is used to elucidate processes responsible for this observation. The model illustrates that methane in the upper sediments is produced in-situ supported by high dissolved organic matter as well as by non-competitive substrates. In addition methane is contributed to porewater in the upper sediments, where sulfate reduction occurs, by transport from deeper zones within the sedimentary column through bubbles dissolution and diffusion. The shallow methane production and accumulation depths in these sediments promote high methane fluxes to the water column and atmosphere.

  14. Expression of barley SUSIBA2 transcription factor yields high-starch low-methane rice.

    PubMed

    Su, J; Hu, C; Yan, X; Jin, Y; Chen, Z; Guan, Q; Wang, Y; Zhong, D; Jansson, C; Wang, F; Schnürer, A; Sun, C

    2015-07-30

    Atmospheric methane is the second most important greenhouse gas after carbon dioxide, and is responsible for about 20% of the global warming effect since pre-industrial times. Rice paddies are the largest anthropogenic methane source and produce 7-17% of atmospheric methane. Warm waterlogged soil and exuded nutrients from rice roots provide ideal conditions for methanogenesis in paddies with annual methane emissions of 25-100-million tonnes. This scenario will be exacerbated by an expansion in rice cultivation needed to meet the escalating demand for food in the coming decades. There is an urgent need to establish sustainable technologies for increasing rice production while reducing methane fluxes from rice paddies. However, ongoing efforts for methane mitigation in rice paddies are mainly based on farming practices and measures that are difficult to implement. Despite proposed strategies to increase rice productivity and reduce methane emissions, no high-starch low-methane-emission rice has been developed. Here we show that the addition of a single transcription factor gene, barley SUSIBA2 (refs 7, 8), conferred a shift of carbon flux to SUSIBA2 rice, favouring the allocation of photosynthates to aboveground biomass over allocation to roots. The altered allocation resulted in an increased biomass and starch content in the seeds and stems, and suppressed methanogenesis, possibly through a reduction in root exudates. Three-year field trials in China demonstrated that the cultivation of SUSIBA2 rice was associated with a significant reduction in methane emissions and a decrease in rhizospheric methanogen levels. SUSIBA2 rice offers a sustainable means of providing increased starch content for food production while reducing greenhouse gas emissions from rice cultivation. Approaches to increase rice productivity and reduce methane emissions as seen in SUSIBA2 rice may be particularly beneficial in a future climate with rising temperatures resulting in increased

  15. Expression of barley SUSIBA2 transcription factor yields high-starch low-methane rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, J.; Hu, C.; Yan, X.; Jin, Y.; Chen, Z.; Guan, Q.; Wang, Y.; Zhong, D.; Jansson, C.; Wang, F.; Schnürer, A.; Sun, C.

    2015-07-01

    Atmospheric methane is the second most important greenhouse gas after carbon dioxide, and is responsible for about 20% of the global warming effect since pre-industrial times. Rice paddies are the largest anthropogenic methane source and produce 7-17% of atmospheric methane. Warm waterlogged soil and exuded nutrients from rice roots provide ideal conditions for methanogenesis in paddies with annual methane emissions of 25-100-million tonnes. This scenario will be exacerbated by an expansion in rice cultivation needed to meet the escalating demand for food in the coming decades. There is an urgent need to establish sustainable technologies for increasing rice production while reducing methane fluxes from rice paddies. However, ongoing efforts for methane mitigation in rice paddies are mainly based on farming practices and measures that are difficult to implement. Despite proposed strategies to increase rice productivity and reduce methane emissions, no high-starch low-methane-emission rice has been developed. Here we show that the addition of a single transcription factor gene, barley SUSIBA2 (refs 7, 8), conferred a shift of carbon flux to SUSIBA2 rice, favouring the allocation of photosynthates to aboveground biomass over allocation to roots. The altered allocation resulted in an increased biomass and starch content in the seeds and stems, and suppressed methanogenesis, possibly through a reduction in root exudates. Three-year field trials in China demonstrated that the cultivation of SUSIBA2 rice was associated with a significant reduction in methane emissions and a decrease in rhizospheric methanogen levels. SUSIBA2 rice offers a sustainable means of providing increased starch content for food production while reducing greenhouse gas emissions from rice cultivation. Approaches to increase rice productivity and reduce methane emissions as seen in SUSIBA2 rice may be particularly beneficial in a future climate with rising temperatures resulting in increased

  16. Expression of barley SUSIBA2 transcription factor yields high-starch low-methane rice

    SciTech Connect

    Su, J.; Hu, C.; Yan, X.; Jin, Y.; Chen, Z.; Guan, Q.; Wang, Y.; Zhong, D.; Jansson, Georg C.; Wang, F.; Schnrer, Anna; Sun, Chuanxin

    2015-07-22

    Atmospheric methane is the second most important greenhouse gas after carbon dioxide, and is responsible for about 20% of the global warming effect since pre-industrial times. Rice paddies are the largest anthropogenic methane source and produce 7–17% of atmospheric methane. Warm waterlogged soil and exuded nutrients from rice roots provide ideal conditions for methanogenesis in paddies with annual methane emissions of 25–100-million tonnes. This scenario will be exacerbated by an expansion in rice cultivation needed to meet the escalating demand for food in the coming decades4. There is an urgent need to establish sustainable technologies for increasing rice production while reducing methane fluxes from rice paddies. However, ongoing efforts for methane mitigation in rice paddies are mainly based on farming practices and measures that are difficult to implement5. Despite proposed strategies to increase rice productivity and reduce methane emissions4,6, no high-starch low-methane-emission rice has been developed. Here we show that the addition of a single transcription factor gene, barley SUSIBA2, conferred a shift of carbon flux to SUSIBA2 rice, favouring the allocation of photosynthates to aboveground biomass over allocation to roots. The altered allocation resulted in an increased biomass and starch content in the seeds and stems, and suppressed methanogenesis, possibly through a reduction in root exudates. Three-year field trials in China demonstrated that the cultivation of SUSIBA2 rice was associated with a significant reduction in methane emissions and a decrease in rhizospheric methanogen levels. SUSIBA2 rice offers a sustainable means of providing increased starch content for food production while reducing greenhouse gas emissions from rice cultivation. Approaches to increase rice productivity and reduce methane emissions as seen in SUSIBA2 rice may be particularly beneficial in a future climate with rising temperatures resulting in increased methane

  17. Expression of barley SUSIBA2 transcription factor yields high-starch low-methane rice.

    PubMed

    Su, J; Hu, C; Yan, X; Jin, Y; Chen, Z; Guan, Q; Wang, Y; Zhong, D; Jansson, C; Wang, F; Schnürer, A; Sun, C

    2015-07-30

    Atmospheric methane is the second most important greenhouse gas after carbon dioxide, and is responsible for about 20% of the global warming effect since pre-industrial times. Rice paddies are the largest anthropogenic methane source and produce 7-17% of atmospheric methane. Warm waterlogged soil and exuded nutrients from rice roots provide ideal conditions for methanogenesis in paddies with annual methane emissions of 25-100-million tonnes. This scenario will be exacerbated by an expansion in rice cultivation needed to meet the escalating demand for food in the coming decades. There is an urgent need to establish sustainable technologies for increasing rice production while reducing methane fluxes from rice paddies. However, ongoing efforts for methane mitigation in rice paddies are mainly based on farming practices and measures that are difficult to implement. Despite proposed strategies to increase rice productivity and reduce methane emissions, no high-starch low-methane-emission rice has been developed. Here we show that the addition of a single transcription factor gene, barley SUSIBA2 (refs 7, 8), conferred a shift of carbon flux to SUSIBA2 rice, favouring the allocation of photosynthates to aboveground biomass over allocation to roots. The altered allocation resulted in an increased biomass and starch content in the seeds and stems, and suppressed methanogenesis, possibly through a reduction in root exudates. Three-year field trials in China demonstrated that the cultivation of SUSIBA2 rice was associated with a significant reduction in methane emissions and a decrease in rhizospheric methanogen levels. SUSIBA2 rice offers a sustainable means of providing increased starch content for food production while reducing greenhouse gas emissions from rice cultivation. Approaches to increase rice productivity and reduce methane emissions as seen in SUSIBA2 rice may be particularly beneficial in a future climate with rising temperatures resulting in increased

  18. Distinguishing and understanding thermogenic and biogenic sources of methane using multiply substituted isotopologues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolper, D. A.; Martini, A. M.; Clog, M.; Douglas, P. M.; Shusta, S. S.; Valentine, D. L.; Sessions, A. L.; Eiler, J. M.

    2015-07-01

    Sources of methane to sedimentary environments are commonly identified and quantified using the stable isotopic compositions of methane. The methane "clumped-isotope geothermometer", based on the measurement of multiply substituted methane isotopologues (13CH3D and 12CH2D2), shows promise in adding new constraints to the sources and formational environments of both biogenic and thermogenic methane. However, questions remain about how this geothermometer behaves in systems with mixtures of biogenic and thermogenic gases and different biogenic environments. We have applied the methane clumped-isotope thermometer to a mixed biogenic-thermogenic system (Antrim Shale, USA) and to biogenic gas from gas seeps (Santa Barbara and Santa Monica Basin, USA), a pond on the Caltech campus, and methanogens grown in pure culture. We demonstrate that clumped-isotope based temperatures add new quantitative constraints to the relative amounts of biogenic vs. thermogenic gases in the Antrim Shale indicating a larger proportion (∼50%) of thermogenic gas in the system than previously thought. Additionally, we find that the clumped-isotope temperature of biogenic methane appears related to the environmental settings in which the gas forms. In systems where methane generation rates appear to be slow (e.g., the Antrim Shale and gas seeps), microbial methane forms in or near both internal isotopic equilibrium and hydrogen-isotope equilibrium with environmental waters. In systems where methane forms rapidly, microbial methane is neither in internal isotopic equilibrium nor hydrogen-isotope equilibrium with environmental waters. A quantitative model of microbial methanogenesis that incorporates isotopes is proposed to explain these results.

  19. Mitigation options for methane emissions from rice fields in the Philippines

    SciTech Connect

    Lantin, R.S.; Buendia, L.V.; Wassmann, R.

    1996-12-31

    The contribution of Philippine rice production to global methane emission and breakthroughs in methane emission studies conducted in the country are presented in this paper. A significant impact in the reduction of GHG emissions from agriculture can be achieved if methane emissions from ricefields can be abated. This study presents the contribution of Philippine rice cultivation to global methane emission and breakthroughs in methane emission studies in the country which address the issue of mitigation. Using the derived emission factors from local measurements, rice cultivation contributes 566.6 Gg of methane emission in the Philippines. This value is 62% of the total methane emitted from the agriculture sector. The emission factors employed which are 78% of the IPCC value for irrigated rice and 95% for rainfed rice were derived from measurements with an automatic system taken during the growth duration in the respective ecosystems. Plots drained for 2 weeks at midtillering and before harvest gave a significant reduction in methane emission as opposed to continuously flooded plots and plots drained before harvest. The cultivar Magat reduced methane emission by 50% as compared to the check variety IR72. The application of ammonium sulfate instead of urea reduced methane emission by 10% to 34%. Addition of 6 t ha{sup {minus}1} phosphogypsum in combination with urea reduced emission by 74% as opposed to plots applied with urea alone. It is also from the results of such measurements that abatement strategies are based as regards to modifying treatments such as water management, fertilization, and choice of rice variety. It is not easy to identify and recommend mitigation strategies that will fit a particular cropping system. However, the identified mitigation options provide focus for the abatement of methane emission from ricefields.

  20. Biogas and methane yield in response to co- and separate digestion of biomass wastes.

    PubMed

    Adelard, Laetitia; Poulsen, Tjalfe G; Rakotoniaina, Volana

    2015-01-01

    The impact of co-digestion as opposed to separate digestion, on biogas and methane yield (apparent synergetic effects) was investigated for three biomass materials (pig manure, cow manure and food waste) under mesophilic conditions over a 36 day period. In addition to the three biomass materials (digested separately), 13 biomass mixtures (co-digested) were used. Two approaches for modelling biogas and methane yield during co-digestion, based on volatile solids concentration and ultimate gas and methane potentials, were evaluated. The dependency of apparent synergetic effects on digestion time and biomass mixture composition was further assessed using measured cumulative biogas and methane yields and specific biogas and methane generation rates. Results indicated that it is possible, based on known volatile solids concentration and ultimate biogas or methane yields for a set of biomass materials digested separately, to accurately estimate gas yields for biomass mixtures made from these materials using calibrated models. For the biomass materials considered here, modelling indicated that the addition of pig manure is the main cause of synergetic effects. Co-digestion generally resulted in improved ultimate biogas and methane yields compared to separate digestion. Biogas and methane production was furthermore significantly higher early (0-7 days) and to some degree also late (above 20 days) in the digestion process during co-digestion.