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Sample records for additional microsatellite loci

  1. Characterization of microsatellite loci isolated in Mountain Plover (Charadrius montanus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    John, J. St; Kysela, R.F.; Oyler-McCance, S.J.

    2007-01-01

    Primers for 15 microsatellite loci were developed for Mountain Plover, a species whose distribution and abundance have been reduced drastically in the past 30 years. In a screen of 126 individuals collected from four breeding locales across the species' range, levels of polymorphism ranged from two to 13 alleles per locus. No two loci were found to be linked, although one locus revealed significant departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. These microsatellite loci can be used in population genetic studies, ultimately aiding in management efforts for Mountain Plover. Additionally, these markers can potentially be used in studies investigating the mating system of Mountain Plover. ?? 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Development of microsatellite loci in Artocarpus altilis (Moraceae) and cross-amplification in congeneric species1

    PubMed Central

    Witherup, Colby; Ragone, Diane; Wiesner-Hanks, Tyr; Irish, Brian; Scheffler, Brian; Simpson, Sheron; Zee, Francis; Zuberi, M. Iqbal; Zerega, Nyree J. C.

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized from enriched genomic libraries of Artocarpus altilis (breadfruit) and tested in four Artocarpus species and one hybrid. The microsatellite markers provide new tools for further studies in Artocarpus. • Methods and Results: A total of 25 microsatellite loci were evaluated across four Artocarpus species and one hybrid. Twenty-one microsatellite loci were evaluated on A. altilis (241), A. camansi (34), A. mariannensis (15), and A. altilis × mariannensis (64) samples. Nine of those loci plus four additional loci were evaluated on A. heterophyllus (jackfruit, 426) samples. All loci are polymorphic for at least one species. The average number of alleles ranges from two to nine within taxa. • Conclusions: These microsatellite primers will facilitate further studies on the genetic structure and evolutionary and domestication history of Artocarpus species. They will aid in cultivar identification and establishing germplasm conservation strategies for breadfruit and jackfruit. PMID:25202565

  3. Characterization of microsatellite loci isolated in trumpeter swan (Cygnus buccinator)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    John, J. St; Ransler, F.A.; Quinn, T.W.; Oyler-McCance, S.J.

    2006-01-01

    Primers for 16 microsatellite loci were developed for the trumpeter swan (Cygnus buccinator), a species recovering from a recent population bottleneck. In a screen of 158 individuals, the 16 loci were found to have levels of variability ranging from two to seven alleles. No loci were found to be linked, although two loci repeatedly revealed significant departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Amplification in the closely related tundra swan (Cygnus columbianus) was successful for all except one locus. These microsatellite loci will be applicable for population genetic analyses and ultimately aid in management efforts. ?? 2006 The Authors.

  4. CHARACTERIZATION OF MICROSATELLITE LOCI IN SCHOENOPLECTUS AMERICANUS (CYPERACEAE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Schoenoplectus americanus is a model organism for studying ecological and ecosystem responses of salt marsh plant communities to global climate change. Here we characterize 16 microsatellite loci in S. americanus to facilitate studies on the genetic basis of phenotypic responses...

  5. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci in Quercus fabri (Fagaceae).

    PubMed

    Xiao, Z Z; Chen, W W; Bao, W; Wang, R; Li, Y Y

    2016-06-21

    Quercus fabri is a pioneer species of secondary succession in evergreen broadleaved forests in China. In this study, we isolated and developed 12 polymorphic and 2 monomorphic microsatellite loci for Q. fabri using the biotin-streptavidin capture method. We characterized 12 polymorphic loci in 52 individuals from two populations. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 3 to 23. The observed and expected heterozygosities per locus were 0.033-0.773 and 0.138-0.924, respectively. These microsatellite loci will facilitate the studies on genetic variation, mating system, and gene flow of Q. fabri.

  6. Polymorphic microsatellite loci for Japanese Spanish mackerel (Scomberomorus niphonius).

    PubMed

    Lin, L; Zhu, L; Liu, S-F; Tang, Q-S; Su, Y-Q; Zhuang, Z-M

    2012-05-08

    We isolated and characterized 21 polymorphic microsatellite loci in Japanese Spanish mackerel (Scomberomorus niphonius) using a (GT)(13)-enriched genomic library. Forty individuals were collected from Qingdao, China. We found 3 to 24 alleles per locus, with a mean of 8.8. The observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.263 to 0.975 and from 0.385 to 0.946, with means of 0.655 and 0.685, respectively. Deviation from Hardy-Weinberg proportions was detected at three loci. Two loci showed evidence for null alleles. These microsatellite markers will be useful for population genetic analysis of Japanese Spanish mackerel.

  7. High polymorphism at microsatellite loci in the Chinese donkey.

    PubMed

    Zhang, R F; Xie, W M; Zhang, T; Lei, C Z

    2016-06-24

    To reveal the genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships between Chinese donkey breeds, 415 individuals representing ten breeds were investigated using ten microsatellite markers. The observed number of alleles, mean effective number of alleles (NE), mean expected heterozygosity (HE), and polymorphic information content (PIC) of each breed and polymorphic locus were analyzed. The results showed that seven (HTG7, HTG10, AHT4, HTG6, HMS6, HMS3, and HMS7) of ten microsatellite loci were polymorphic. The mean PIC, HE, and NE of seven polymorphic loci for the ten donkey breeds were 0.7679, 0.8072, and 6.0275, respectively. These results suggest that domestic Chinese donkey breeds possess higher levels of genetic diversity and heterozygosity than foreign donkeys. A neighbor-joining tree based on Nei's standard genetic distance showed that there was close genetic distance among Xinjiang, Qingyang, Xiji, and Guanzhong donkey breeds. In addition, Mongolia and Dezhou donkey breeds were placed in the same category. The phylogenetic tree revealed that the genetic relationships between Chinese donkey breeds are consistent with their geographic distribution and breeding history.

  8. Polymorphic microsatellite loci for the razor clam, Sinonovacula constricta.

    PubMed

    Ma, H-T; Jiang, H-B; Liu, X-Q; Wu, X-P; Wei, X-M

    2015-01-15

    The razor clam, Sinonovacula constricta, is an important commercial bivalve and a popular mollusca food in China. Twelve polymorphic microsatellite markers were isolated from the razor clam using a partial genomic library enriched for tandem repeat sequences of (CA)16, (GA)16. Polymorphisms of these loci were evaluated in a wild population of 30 individuals. The allele number of these polymorphic markers ranged from 5-15 per locus with an average of 9.333. Observed and expected heterozygosity values ranged from 0.192-1.000 and 0.219-0.906. Polymorphism information content ranged from 0.209-0.892 with an average of 0.704. Three loci significantly deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium after Bonferroni correction. No significant linkage disequilibrium was detected between these loci. This set of microsatellite loci are useful for genetic studies in S. constricta.

  9. Development of microsatellite loci in Artocarpus altilis (Moraceae) and cross-amplification in congeneric species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized from enriched genomic libraries of Artocarpus altilis (breadfruit) and tested in three other Artocarpus species and one hybrid. The microsatellite markers provide new tools for further studies in Artocarpus. Nineteen microsatellite primers were tes...

  10. Polymorphic microsatellite loci identified through development and cross-species amplification within shorebirds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, I.; Guzzetti, B.M.; Gust, Judy R.; Sage, G.K.; Gill, R.E.; Tibbitts, T.L.; Sonsthagen, S.A.; Talbot, S.L.

    2012-01-01

    We developed microsatellite loci for demographic assessments of shorebirds, a group with limited markers. First, we isolated five dinucleotide repeat microsatellite loci from the Black Oystercatcher (Haematopodidae: Haematopus bachmani), and three from the Bristle-thighed Curlew (Scolopacidae: Numenius tahitiensis); both species are of conservation concern. All eight loci were polymorphic in their respective target species. Hbaμ loci were characterized by two to three alleles with observed heterozygosity ranging from 0.07 to 0.33, and two to nine alleles were detected for Nut loci with observed heterozygosity ranging from 0.08 to 0.72. No linkage disequilibrium or departures from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium were observed. The eight loci were also tested for cross-species amplification in 12 other species within Charadriidae and Scolopacidae, and the results demonstrated transferability across several genera. We further tested all 14 species at 12 additional microsatellite markers developed for other shorebirds: Dunlin (Calidris alpina; four loci) and Ruff (Philomachus pugnax; eight loci). Two markers (Hbaμ4 and Ruff6) were polymorphic in 13 species, while two (Calp6 and Ruff9) were monomorphic. The remaining eight markers revealed polymorphism in one to nine species each. Our results provide further evidence that locus Ruff10 is sex-linked, contrary to the initial description. These markers can be used to enhance our understanding of shorebird biology by, for example, helping to determine migratory connectivity among breeding and wintering populations and detecting relatedness among individuals.

  11. Microsatellite loci for the invasive colonial hydrozoan Cordylophora caspia

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cordylophora caspia, a colonial hydrozoan native to the Ponto-Caspian region, has become a common invader of both fresh and brackish water ecosystems of North America and Europe. Here we describe 11 polymorphic microsatellite loci for this species. Preliminary analyses indicate ...

  12. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite Loci for Cornus sanguniea (Cornaceae) 1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite loci were developed for Cornus sanguinea and will permit genetic and conservation studies of the species. Methods and Results: A microsatellite-enriched library was used to develop 16 polymorphic microsatellite loci for C. sanguinea. The loci amplified 5-11 allel...

  13. Development of microsatellite loci for the endangered species Pityopsis ruthii (Asteraceae)1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite loci were developed for the endangered species Pityopsis ruthii and will permit genetic and conservation studies of the species. Methods and Results:A microsatellite enriched library was used to develop 12 polymorphic microsatellite loci for P. ruthii. The loci ...

  14. Development of eighteen microsatellite loci in walleye (Sander vitreus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coykendall, Dolly K.; Morrison, Cheryl L.; Stott, Wendylee; Springmann, Marcus J.

    2014-01-01

    A suite of tri- and tetra-nucleotide microsatellite loci were developed for walleye (Sander vitreus) from 454 pyrosequencing data. Eighteen of the 50 primer sets tested amplified consistently in 35 walleye from two lakes on Isle Royale, Lake Superior: Chickenbone Lake and Whittlesey Lake. The loci displayed moderate levels of allelic diversity (average 5.5 alleles/locus) and heterozygosity (average 35.8 %). Levels of genetic diversity were sufficient to produce unique multi-locus genotypes and detect phylogeographic structuring as individuals assigned back to their population of origin. Cross-species amplification within S. canadensis(sauger) was successful for 15 loci, and 11 loci were diagnostic to species. The loci characterized here will be useful for detecting fine-scale spatial structuring, resolving the taxonomic status of Sander species and sub-species, and detecting walleye/sauger hybrids.

  15. Characterization of 12 polymorphic microsatellite loci of Pityopsis graminifolia var. latifolia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pityopsis graminifolia (Michx.) Small var. latifolia (Fern.) Semple is an herbaceous perennial that grows in close proximity to the federally endangered species P. ruthii (Small) Small. Twelve polymorphic microsatellite loci were identified from 87 samples of P. graminifolia var. latifolia and addit...

  16. Does the evolutionary conservation of microsatellite loci imply function?

    SciTech Connect

    Shriver, M.D.; Deka, R.; Ferrell, R.E.

    1994-09-01

    Microsatellites are highly polymorphic tandem arrays of short (1-6 bp) sequence motifs which have been found widely distributed in the genomes of all eukaryotes. We have analyzed allele frequency data on 16 microsatellite loci typed in the great apes (human, chimp, orangutan, and gorilla). The majority of these loci (13) were isolated from human genomic libraries; three were cloned from chimpanzee genomic DNA. Most of these loci are not only present in all apes species, but are polymorphic with comparable levels of heterozygosity and have alleles which overlap in size. The extent of divergence of allele frequencies among these four species were studies using the stepwise-weighted genetic distance (Dsw), which was previously shown to conform to linearity with evolutionary time since divergence for loci where mutations exist in a stepwise fashion. The phylogenetic tree of the great apes constructed from this distance matrix was consistent with the expected topology, with a high bootstrap confidence (82%) for the human/chimp clade. However, the allele frequency distributions of these species are 10 times more similar to each other than expected when they were calibrated with a conservative estimate of the time since separation of humans and the apes. These results are in agreement with sequence-based surveys of microsatellites which have demonstrated that they are highly (90%) conserved over short periods of evolutionary time (< 10 million years) and moderately (30%) conserved over long periods of evolutionary time (> 60-80 million years). This evolutionary conservation has prompted some authors to speculate that there are functional constraints on microsatellite loci. In contrast, the presence of directional bias of mutations with constraints and/or selection against aberrant sized alleles can explain these results.

  17. Development and characterization of microsatellite loci in the mistletoe Psittacanthus schiedeanus (Loranthaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    González, Clementina; Harvey, Nick; Ornelas, Juan Francisco

    2015-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Microsatellite primers were developed for the parasitic Psittacanthus schiedeanus, a common mistletoe species on cloud forest–adapted tree hosts in Mesoamerica, to investigate intraspecific genetic patterns of diversity and genetic structure. • Methods and Results: Using an enriched library, 10 polymorphic microsatellite loci were developed in P. schiedeanus. All loci consisted of dinucleotide repeats. Average alleles per locus were 12 (4–17), and a total of 120 alleles were recorded across 39 individuals from four populations in Mexico. Primers were tested in 11 additional species, but only amplified successfully in P. calyculatus and P. angustifolius. • Conclusions: The polymorphic loci described will be useful in studies of genetic diversity and genetic population differentiation in natural populations of these parasitic plants, and will provide valuable information to understand the importance of host distribution. PMID:25606357

  18. [Genetic diversity of microsatellite loci in captive Amur tigers].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Gaung; Li, Di-Qiang; Xiao, Qi-Ming; Rao, Li-Qun; Zhang, Xue-Wen

    2004-09-01

    The tiger is one of the most threatened wildlife species since the abundance and distribution of tiger have decreased dramatically in the last century. The wild Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) only distributed in northeast China, the far east area of Russia and the north Korea and its size of wild population is about 450 in the world and 20 in China. Several hundred captive populations of Amur tigers are the main source to protect gene library of tiger and the source of recovering the wild populations. The Breeding Center for Felidae at Hengdaohezi and Haoerbin Tiger Park in Heilongjiang Province is the biggest captive breeding base in China. How to make clear the genetic pedigree and establish reasonable breeding system is the urgent issues. So we use the microsatellite DNA markers and non-invasive technology to research on the genetic diversity of captive Amur tiger in this study. Ten microsatellite loci (Fca005, Fca075, Fca094, Fca152, Fca161, Fca294, Pti002, Pti003, Pti007 and Pti010), highly variable nuclear markers, were studied their genetic diversity in 113 captive Amur tigers. The PCR amplified products of microsatellite loci were detected by non-denatured polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Allele numbers, allelic frequency, gene heterozygosity(H(e)), polymorphism information content(PIC) and effective number of allele(N(e)) were calculated. 41 alleles were found and their size were ranged from 110bp to 250bp in ten microsatellite loci, Fca152 had 6 alleles, Fca075, Fca094 and Fca294 had 5 alleles, Fca005 and Pti002 had 4 alleles and the others had 3 alleles in all tiger samples, respectively. The allelic frequencies were from 0.009 to 0.767; The He ranged from 0.385 to 0.707, and Fca294 and Pti010 locus had the highest and lowest value; the PIC were from 0.353 to 0.658, Fca294 and Pti010 locus had the highest and lowest value; and N(e) were from 1.626 to 3.409, Fca294 and Pti010 locus had the highest and lowest value, which showed the ten

  19. Nine microsatellite loci developed from the octocoral, Paragorgia arborea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coykendall, Dolly K.; Morrison, Cheryl L.

    2015-01-01

    Paragorgia arborea, or bubblegum coral, occurs in continental slope habitats worldwide, which are increasingly threatened by human activities such as energy development and fisheries practices. From 101 putative loci screened, nine microsatellite markers were developed from samples taken from Baltimore canyon in the western North Atlantic Ocean. The number of alleles ranged from two to thirteen per locus and each displayed equilibrium. These nuclear resources will help further research on population connectivity in threatened coral species where mitochondrial markers are known to lack fine-scale genetic diversity.

  20. An analysis of microsatellite loci in Arabidopsis thaliana: mutational dynamics and application.

    PubMed Central

    Symonds, V Vaughan; Lloyd, Alan M

    2003-01-01

    Microsatellite loci are among the most commonly used molecular markers. These loci typically exhibit variation for allele frequency distribution within a species. However, the factors contributing to this variation are not well understood. To expand on the current knowledge of microsatellite evolution, 20 microsatellite loci were examined for 126 accessions of the flowering plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. Substantial variability in mutation pattern among loci was found, most of which cannot be explained by the assumptions of the traditional stepwise mutation model or infinite alleles model. Here it is shown that the degree of locus diversity is strongly correlated with the number of contiguous repeats, more so than with the total number of repeats. These findings support a strong role for repeat disruptions in stabilizing microsatellite loci by reducing the substrate for polymerase slippage and recombination. Results of cluster analyses are also presented, demonstrating the potential of microsatellite loci for resolving relationships among accessions of A. thaliana. PMID:14668396

  1. Allele Frequencies at Microsatellite Loci: The Stepwise Mutation Model Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Valdes, A. M.; Slatkin, M.; Freimer, N. B.

    1993-01-01

    We summarize available data on the frequencies of alleles at microsatellite loci in human populations and compare observed distributions of allele frequencies to those generated by a simulation of the stepwise mutation model. We show that observed frequency distributions at 108 loci are consistent with the results of the model under the assumption that mutations cause an increase or decrease in repeat number by one and under the condition that the product Nu, where N is the effective population size and u is the mutation rate, is larger than one. We show that the variance of the distribution of allele sizes is a useful estimator of Nu and performs much better than previously suggested estimators for the stepwise mutation model. In the data, there is no correlation between the mean and variance in allele size at a locus or between the number of alleles and mean allele size, which suggests that the mutation rate at these loci is independent of allele size. PMID:8454213

  2. Estimating relatedness and relationships using microsatellite loci with null alleles.

    PubMed

    Wagner, A P; Creel, S; Kalinowski, S T

    2006-11-01

    Relatedness is often estimated from microsatellite genotypes that include null alleles. When null alleles are present, observed genotypes represent one of several possible true genotypes. If null alleles are detected, but analyses do not adjust for their presence (ie, observed genotypes are treated as true genotypes), then estimates of relatedness and relationship can be incorrect. The number of loci available in many wildlife studies is limited, and loci with null alleles are commonly a large proportion of data that cannot be discarded without substantial loss of power. To resolve this problem, we present a new approach for estimating relatedness and relationships from data sets that include null alleles. Once it is recognized that the probability of the observed genotypes is dependent on the probabilities of a limited number of possible true genotypes, the required adjustments are straightforward. The concept can be applied to any existing estimators of relatedness and relationships. We review established maximum likelihood estimators and apply the correction in that setting. In an application of the corrected method to data from striped hyenas, we demonstrate that correcting for the presence of null alleles affect results substantially. Finally, we use simulated data to confirm that this method works better than two common approaches, namely ignoring the presence of null alleles or discarding affected loci.

  3. Tetranucleotide microsatellite loci from the black bear (Ursus americanus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanderlin, J.S.; Faircloth, B.C.; Shamblin, B.; Conroy, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    We describe primers and polymerase chain reaction conditions to amplify 21 tetranucleotide microsatellite DNA loci in black bears (Ursus americanus). We tested primers using individuals from two populations, one each in Georgia and Florida. Among individuals from Georgia (n = 29), primer pairs yielded an average of 2.9 alleles (range, one to four) and an average observed heterozygosity (HO) of 0.50 (range, 0.00 to 0.79). Among individuals from Florida (n = 19), primer pairs yielded an average of 5.7 alleles (range, one to 14) and an HO of 0.55 (range, 0.00 to 1.00). A comparison of previously developed markers with individuals from Georgia suggests that bear populations in Georgia and Florida have reduced allelic diversity relative to other populations. ?? 2008 The Authors.

  4. Genetic diversity of microsatellite loci in hierarchically structured populations.

    PubMed

    Song, Seongho; Dey, Dipak K; Holsinger, Kent E

    2011-08-01

    Microsatellite loci are widely used for investigating patterns of genetic variation within and among populations. Those patterns are in turn determined by population sizes, migration rates, and mutation rates. We provide exact expressions for the first two moments of the allele frequency distribution in a stochastic model appropriate for studying microsatellite evolution with migration, mutation, and drift under the assumption that the range of allele sizes is bounded. Using these results, we study the behavior of several measures related to Wright's F(ST), including Slatkin's R(ST). Our analytical approximations for F(ST) and R(ST) show that familiar relationships between N(e)m and F(ST) or R(ST) hold when the migration and mutation rates are small. Using the exact expressions for F(ST) and R(ST), our numerical results show that, when the migration and mutation rates are large, these relationships no longer hold. Our numerical results also show that the diversity measures most closely related to F(ST) depend on mutation rates, mutational models (stepwise versus two-phase), migration rates, and population sizes. Surprisingly, R(ST) is relatively insensitive to the mutation rates and mutational models. The differing behaviors of R(ST) and F(ST) suggest that properties of the among-population distribution of allele frequencies may allow the roles of mutation and migration in producing patterns of diversity to be distinguished, a topic of continuing investigation.

  5. Optimizing selection of microsatellite loci from 454 pyrosequencing via post-sequencing bioinformatic analyses.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Silva, Iria; Toonen, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    The comparatively low cost of massive parallel sequencing technology, also known as next-generation sequencing (NGS), has transformed the isolation of microsatellite loci. The most common NGS approach consists of obtaining large amounts of sequence data from genomic DNA or enriched microsatellite libraries, which is then mined for the discovery of microsatellite repeats using bioinformatics analyses. Here, we describe a bioinformatics approach to isolate microsatellite loci, starting from the raw sequence data through a subset of microsatellite primer pairs. The primary difference to previously published approaches includes analyses to select the most accurate sequence data and to eliminate repetitive elements prior to the design of primers. These analyses aim to minimize the testing of primer pairs by identifying the most promising microsatellite loci.

  6. Isolation and characterization of 21 polymorphic microsatellite loci in the Japanese dace (Tribolodon hakonensis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koizumi, Noriyuki; Quinn, Thomas W.; Park, Myeongsoo; Fike, Jennifer A.; Nishida, Kazuya; Takemura, Takeshi; Watabe, Keiji; Mori, Atsushi

    2011-01-01

    Twenty one polymorphic microsatellite loci for the Japanese dace (Tribolodon hakonensis) were isolated and characterized. The number of observed alleles per locus in 32 individuals ranged from 3 to 30. The observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.125 to 0.969 and from 0.175 to 0.973, respectively. All loci conformed to Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium, no linkage disequilibrium was observed between pairs of loci and no loci showed evidence of null alleles. These microsatellite loci will be useful for investigating the intraspecific genetic variation and population structure of this species.

  7. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci from the soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura (Hemiptera: Aphididae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ten novel microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized from the soybean aphid, APHIS GLYCINES, a serious invasive pest of soybeans in North America. The isolated loci were polymorphic, with two to 19 alleles in 48 wild individuals collected from Korea, Japan, and the United States. All loci ...

  8. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci from the yellow-eyed penguin (Megadyptes antipodes).

    PubMed

    Boessenkool, S; King, T M; Seddon, P J; Waters, J M

    2008-09-01

    Twelve microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized in the endangered yellow-eyed penguin (Megadyptes antipodes) using enriched genomic libraries. Polymorphic loci revealed two to eight alleles per locus and observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.21 to 0.77. These loci will be suitable for assessing current and historical patterns of genetic variability in yellow-eyed penguins.

  9. Microsatellite loci from the endemic Southern Ocean octopus Adelieledone polymorpha (Robson, 1930).

    PubMed

    Strugnell, Jan M; Allcock, A Louise; Watts, Phillip C

    2009-05-01

    To determine the pattern of spatial genetic structure in the endemic Southern Ocean octopus Adelieledone polymorpha, microsatellite loci were isolated from partial genomic libraries enriched for repetitive DNA motifs. Seven dinucleotide and two trinucleotide microsatellite loci were isolated successfully and levels of polymorphism were quantified in 34 individuals sampled from the Southern Ocean near South Georgia. No pairs of microsatellite loci were linked significantly; however, one locus deviated (P < 0.05) from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Overall, the nine loci produced between five and 16 alleles, with observed and expected heterozygosities varying between 0.22 and 0.86 and between 0.21 and 0.94 respectively. This is the first description of microsatellite loci from an octopus endemic to the Southern Ocean, and these genetic markers are being used to quantify spatial structure within A. polymorpha.

  10. Development and characterization of microsatellite loci in the pantropical fern Hypolepis punctata (Dennstaedtiaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Hui; Wang, Ying; Yan, Yue-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite loci were isolated in Hypolepis punctata (Dennstaedtiaceae) to further study the reproductive ecology of this species. Methods and Results: We developed 16 microsatellite loci from one sample of H. punctata using an enriched genomic library. These loci were characterized in 28 individuals. The number of alleles per locus ranged from two to 10, and the expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.036 to 0.845. Conclusions: The results indicate that the microsatellite markers can facilitate further studies on inferring the phylogeography and population genetics of H. punctata and related species. PMID:26421252

  11. Haplogroup-specific deviation from the stepwise mutation model at the microsatellite loci DYS388 and DYS392.

    PubMed

    Nebel, A; Filon, D; Hohoff, C; Faerman, M; Brinkmann, B; Oppenheim, A

    2001-01-01

    Deviation from the stepwise mutation model (SMM) at specific human microsatellite loci has implications for population genetic and forensic investigations. In the present study, data on six Y chromosome-specific microsatellites were pooled for 455 paternally unrelated males from six Middle Eastern populations. All chromosomes were assigned to three haplogroups defined by six binary polymorphisms. Two of the microsatellite loci tested, DYS388 and DYS392, displayed marked haplogroup-specific differences in their allele variability. A bimodal distribution of short and long alleles was observed for DYS388 in haplogroup 1 and for DYS392 in haplogroups 1 and 2. Further investigation showed that the short/long alleles segregated almost completely between genealogically distinct haplogroups defined by additional binary markers. Thus, these two loci have a discriminatory power similar to a binary polymorphism. DYS388 was characterised by an extremely low mutation rate in haplogroups 2 and 3, as was DYS392 in haplogroup 3. Sequence analysis of the repeat regions at the two loci revealed no irregularities, indicating that the triplet expansion in these loci is not controlled by sequence variation at the repeat level. A high frequency of long DYS388 alleles has, so far, been found only in populations originating in the Middle East, suggesting that this microsatellite is useful as a region-specific marker.

  12. Investigation of population structure in Gulf of Mexico Seepiophila jonesi (Polychaeta, Siboglinidae) using cross-amplified microsatellite loci

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chunya; Schaeffer, Stephen W.; Fisher, Charles R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Vestimentiferan tubeworms are some of the most recognizable fauna found at deep-sea cold seeps, isolated environments where hydrocarbon rich fluids fuel biological communities. Several studies have investigated tubeworm population structure; however, much is still unknown about larval dispersal patterns at Gulf of Mexico (GoM) seeps. As such, researchers have applied microsatellite markers as a measure for documenting the transport of vestimentiferan individuals. In the present study, we investigate the utility of microsatellites to be cross-amplified within the escarpiid clade of seep vestimentiferans, by determining if loci originally developed for Escarpia spp. could be amplified in the GoM seep tubeworm, Seepiophila jonesi. Additionally, we determine if cross-amplified loci can reliably uncover the same signatures of high gene flow seen in a previous investigation of S. jonesi. Methods Seventy-seven S. jonesi individuals were collected from eight seep sites across the upper Louisiana slope (<1,000 m) in the GoM. Forty-eight microsatellite loci that were originally developed for Escarpia laminata (18 loci) and Escarpia southwardae (30 loci) were tested to determine if they were homologous and polymorphic in S. jonesi. Loci found to be both polymorphic and of high quality were used to test for significant population structuring in S. jonesi. Results Microsatellite pre-screening identified 13 (27%) of the Escarpia loci were homologous and polymorphic in S. jonesi, revealing that microsatellites can be amplified within the escarpiid clade of vestimentiferans. Our findings uncovered low levels of heterozygosity and a lack of genetic differentiation amongst S. jonesi from various sites and regions, in line with previous investigations that employed species-specific polymorphic loci on S. jonesi individuals retrieved from both the same and different seep sites. The lack of genetic structure identified from these populations supports the presence of

  13. PCR primers for microsatellite loci in the desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii, Testudinidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, T.; Goldberg, C.S.; Kaplan, M.E.; Schwalbe, C.R.; Swann, D.E.

    2003-01-01

    The desert tortoise, Gopherus agassizii, is a threatened species native to the North American desert southwest and is recognized as having distinct Mojave and Sonoran populations. We identified six polymorphic microsatellite loci in the desert tortoise. All six loci were polymorphic in Sonoran samples. Five of the loci were variable in Mojave samples with varying degrees of amplification success. Two of the loci exhibited low allelic variation (2-3 alleles) while four were highly variable (8-27 alleles).

  14. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci in Sisyrinchium (Iridaceae) and cross amplification in other genera.

    PubMed

    Miz, R B; Tacuatiá, L O; Cidade, F W; de Souza, A P; Bered, F; Eggers, L; de Souza-Chies, T T

    2016-09-16

    Recent phylogenetic studies on Sisyrinchium strongly suggest that species classified in section Hydastylus and section Viperella belong to a single group of plants in recent adaptive radiation (Clade IV). These species neither present clear morphological differentiation among them nor show clear identification using DNA barcode markers. Thus, the main goal of this study was to develop a set of polymorphic microsatellite markers compatible for representative species of both sections to ensure variability that could be revealed by SSR markers. Therefore, microsatellite primers were isolated and characterized for Sisyrinchium palmifolium and S. marchioides. In addition, transferability of the developed primers was tested in Iridoideae, primarily in closely related species of Sisyrinchium. Sixteen microsatellite loci were developed from enriched genomic libraries, of which ten were polymorphic. GST values indicated higher differentiation among subpopulations of S. palmifolium than those from S. marchioides. Major transferability was obtained using primers isolated from S. marchioides. All primers exhibited higher rates of cross-amplification for species belonging to Clade IV of Sisyrinchium, as well as to the genera Calydorea and Herbertia. These developed microsatellite markers can be used as an efficient tool for characterization of genetic variability in species belonging to Iridoideae, as well as for studies on population dynamics, genetic structure, and mating system in other Sisyrinchium species.

  15. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci from the Arctic cisco (Coregonus autumnalis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramey, A.; Graziano, S.L.; Nielsen, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    Eight polymorphic microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized for the Arctic cisco, Coregonus autumnalis. Loci were evaluated in 21 samples from the Colville River subsistence fishery. The number of alleles per locus ranged from two to 18. Observed heterozygosity of loci varied from 0.10 to 1.00, and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.09 to 0.92. All eight microsatellite markers were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The loci presented here will be useful in describing population structure and exploring populations of origin for Arctic cisco. ?? 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. PERMANENT GENETIC RESOURCES: Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci from the Arctic cisco (Coregonus autumnalis).

    PubMed

    Ramey, A; Graziano, S L; Nielsen, J L

    2008-03-01

    Eight polymorphic microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized for the Arctic cisco, Coregonus autumnalis. Loci were evaluated in 21 samples from the Colville River subsistence fishery. The number of alleles per locus ranged from two to 18. Observed heterozygosity of loci varied from 0.10 to 1.00, and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.09 to 0.92. All eight microsatellite markers were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The loci presented here will be useful in describing population structure and exploring populations of origin for Arctic cisco.

  17. Characterization of ten microsatellite loci in midget faded rattlesnake (Crotalus oreganus concolor)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Parker, Joshua M.

    2010-01-01

    Primers for 10 microsatellite loci were developed for midget faded rattlesnake (Crotalus oreganus concolor), a small bodied subspecies of the Western Rattlesnake, which is found in the Colorado Plateau of eastern Utah, western Colorado and southwestern Wyoming. In a screen of 23 individuals from the most northern portion of the subspecies range in southwestern Wyoming, the 10 loci were found to have levels of variability ranging from 4 to 11 alleles. No loci were found to be linked, although one locus revealed significant departures from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium. These microsatellite loci will be applicable for population genetic analyses, which will ultimately aid in management efforts for this rare subspecies of rattlesnake.

  18. CHARACTERIZATION OF MICROSATELLITE LOCI IN THE EUROPEAN GREEN CRAB (CARCINUS MAENAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carcinus maenas (Decapoda: Portunidae) has proven a highly successful invasive marine species whose potential economic and ecological impacts are of great concern worldwide. Here, we characterize fourteen polymorphic microsatellite loci in C. maenas and its sister species C. Ae...

  19. CHARACTERIZATION OF MICROSATELLITE LOCI IN THE WIDELY INTRODUCED ESTUARINE ANEMONE NEMATOSTELLA VECTENSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We characterized ten polymorphic microsatellite loci from Nematostella vectensis, a burrowing anemone recently introduced to estuaries along the Pacific coast of North America and the southeast coast of England. Preliminary results indicate high variability and significant depar...

  20. [The use of microsatellite loci for identification of sturgeon species (Acipenseridae) and hybrid forms].

    PubMed

    Barmintseva, A E; Mugue, N S

    2013-09-01

    The genetic polymorphism often sturgeon species that inhabit the territory of the Russian Federation (Russian sturgeon, Siberian sturgeon, Amur sturgeon, Sakhalin sturgeon, Persian sturgeon, ship sturgeon, starlet, stellate sturgeon, beluga, and kaluga) was examined at five microsatellite loci (Afug41, Afug51, An20, AoxD161, AoxD165) (in total, 3821 individuals). The examined loci were successfully amplified with the same primer set in all species tested and demonstrated a high level of variation. Alleles specific to different species have been identified, which allows them to be used to identify species of sturgeon and their food products. In addition, the possibility of identifying hybrid forms was demonstrated. The assignment test performed in the STRUCTURE software program showed a high probability of correctly assigning each individual to its species based on genotyping with five microsatellite loci examined (96-98%, on average). However, for Russian and Persian sturgeon, the rate of proper species assignment was considerably lower (75 and 84%, respectively).

  1. Microsatellite loci discovery from next-generation sequencing data and loci characterization in the epizoic barnacle Chelonibia testudinaria (Linnaeus, 1758)

    PubMed Central

    Zardus, John D.; Wares, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Microsatellite markers remain an important tool for ecological and evolutionary research, but are unavailable for many non-model organisms. One such organism with rare ecological and evolutionary features is the epizoic barnacle Chelonibia testudinaria (Linnaeus, 1758). Chelonibia testudinaria appears to be a host generalist, and has an unusual sexual system, androdioecy. Genetic studies on host specificity and mating behavior are impeded by the lack of fine-scale, highly variable markers, such as microsatellite markers. In the present study, we discovered thousands of new microsatellite loci from next-generation sequencing data, and characterized 12 loci thoroughly. We conclude that 11 of these loci will be useful markers in future ecological and evolutionary studies on C. testudinaria. PMID:27231653

  2. Isolation and characterization of eight novel microsatellite loci in the double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mercer, Dacey; Haig, Susan; Mullins, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We describe the isolation and characterization of eight microsatellite loci from the double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus). Genetic variability was assessed using 60 individuals from three populations. All loci were variable with the number of alleles ranging from two to 17 per locus, and observed heterozygosity varying from 0.05 to 0.89. No loci showed signs of linkage disequilibrium and all loci conformed to Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium frequencies. Further, all loci amplified and were polymorphic in two related Phalacrocorax species. These loci should prove useful for population genetic studies of the double-crested cormorant and other pelecaniform species.

  3. Characterisation of 12 microsatellite loci in the Vietnamese commercial clam Lutraria rhynchaena Jonas 1844 (Heterodonta: Bivalvia: Mactridae) through next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Thai, Binh Thanh; Tan, Mun Hua; Lee, Yin Peng; Gan, Han Ming; Tran, Trang Thi; Austin, Christopher M

    2016-05-01

    The marine clam Lutraria rhynchaena is gaining popularity as an aquaculture species in Asia. Lutraria populations are present in the wild throughout Vietnam and several stocks have been established and translocated for breeding and aquaculture grow-out purposes. In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of utilising Illumina next-generation sequencing technology to streamline the identification and genotyping of microsatellite loci from this clam species. Based on an initial partial genome scan, 48 microsatellite markers with similar melting temperatures were identified and characterised. The 12 most suitable polymorphic loci were then genotyped using 51 individuals from a population in Quang Ninh Province, North Vietnam. Genetic variation was low (mean number of alleles per locus = 2.6; mean expected heterozygosity = 0.41). Two loci showed significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) and the presence of null alleles, but there was no evidence of linkage disequilibrium among loci. Three additional populations were screened (n = 7-36) to test the geographic utility of the 12 loci, which revealed 100 % successful genotyping in two populations from central Vietnam (Nha Trang). However, a second population from north Vietnam (Co To) could not be successfully genotyped and morphological evidence and mitochondrial variation suggests that this population represents a cryptic species of Lutraria. Comparisons of the Qang Ninh and Nha Trang populations, excluding the 2 loci out of HWE, revealed statistically significant allelic variation at 4 loci. We reported the first microsatellite loci set for the marine clam Lutraria rhynchaena and demonstrated its potential in differentiating clam populations. Additionally, a cryptic species population of Lutraria rhynchaena was identified during initial loci development, underscoring the overlooked diversity of marine clam species in Vietnam and the need to genetically characterise population representatives prior

  4. Development and characterization of 24 polymorphic microsatellite loci for the freshwater fish Ichthyoelephas longirostris (Characiformes: Prochilodontidae).

    PubMed

    Landínez-García, Ricardo M; Márquez, Edna J

    2016-01-01

    The Neotropical freshwater fish Ichthyoelephas longirostris (Characiformes: prochilodontidae) is a short-distance migratory species endemic to Colombia. This study developed for the first time a set of 24 polymorphic microsatellite loci by using next-generation sequencing to explore the population genetics of this commercially exploited species. Nineteen of these loci were used to assess the genetic diversity and structure of 193 I. longirostris in three Colombian rivers of the Magdalena basin. Results showed that a single genetic stock circulates in the Cauca River, whereas other single different genetic stock is present in the rivers Samaná Norte and San Bartolomé-Magdalena. Additionally, I. longirostris was genetically different among and across rivers. This first insight about the population genetic structure of I. longirostris is crucial for monitoring the genetic diversity, the management and conservation of its populations, and complement the genetic studies in Prochilodontidae.

  5. Characterization of microsatellite loci in Castilleja sessiliflora and transferability to 24 Castilleja species (Orobanchaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Fant, Jeremie B.; Weinberg-Wolf, Hannah; Tank, David C.; Skogen, Krissa A.

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Microsatellite primers were developed in the hemiparasitic perennial forb Castilleja sessiliflora to investigate patterns of gene flow and genetic diversity within and among populations. • Methods and Results: Twelve polymorphic loci were identified in C. sessiliflora and tested on three populations (32 individuals each) sampled across the range of the species. The loci amplified di- and trinucleotide repeats with 3–14 alleles per locus. To assess cross-amplification, primer pairs were also tested on 24 additional Castilleja species that represent the morphological and geographic diversity of the genus. We provide reports of their effectiveness in all 25 taxa. • Conclusions: These results indicate the utility of these primers in C. sessiliflora for future studies of genetic structure and gene flow, as well as their widespread applicability in other members of the diverse and complex genus Castilleja. PMID:25202558

  6. Development and characterization of 24 polymorphic microsatellite loci for the freshwater fish Ichthyoelephas longirostris (Characiformes: Prochilodontidae)

    PubMed Central

    Landínez-García, Ricardo M.

    2016-01-01

    The Neotropical freshwater fish Ichthyoelephas longirostris (Characiformes: prochilodontidae) is a short-distance migratory species endemic to Colombia. This study developed for the first time a set of 24 polymorphic microsatellite loci by using next-generation sequencing to explore the population genetics of this commercially exploited species. Nineteen of these loci were used to assess the genetic diversity and structure of 193 I. longirostris in three Colombian rivers of the Magdalena basin. Results showed that a single genetic stock circulates in the Cauca River, whereas other single different genetic stock is present in the rivers Samaná Norte and San Bartolomé-Magdalena. Additionally, I. longirostris was genetically different among and across rivers. This first insight about the population genetic structure of I. longirostris is crucial for monitoring the genetic diversity, the management and conservation of its populations, and complement the genetic studies in Prochilodontidae. PMID:27635363

  7. Microsatellite flanking region similarities among different loci within insect species.

    PubMed

    Meglécz, E; Anderson, S J; Bourguet, D; Butcher, R; Caldas, A; Cassel-Lundhagen, A; d'Acier, A C; Dawson, D A; Faure, N; Fauvelot, C; Franck, P; Harper, G; Keyghobadi, N; Kluetsch, C; Muthulakshmi, M; Nagaraju, J; Patt, A; Péténian, F; Silvain, J-F; Wilcock, H R

    2007-04-01

    Although microsatellites are ubiquitous in eukaryota, the number of available markers varies strongly among taxa. This meta-analysis was conducted on 32 insect species. Sequences were obtained from two assembled whole genomes, whole genome shotgun (WGS) sequences from 10 species and screening partial genomic libraries for microsatellites from 23 species. We have demonstrated: (1) strong differences in the abundance of microsatellites among species; (2) that microsatellites within species are often grouped into families based on similarities in their flanking sequences; (3) that the proportion of microsatellites grouped into families varies strongly among taxa; and (4) that microsatellite families were significantly more often associated with transposable elements - or their remnants - than unique microsatellite sequences.

  8. Panel of polymorphic heterologous microsatellite loci to genotype critically endangered Bengal tiger: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sudhanshu; Singh, Sujeet Kumar; Munjal, Ashok Kumar; Aspi, Jouni; Goyal, Surendra Prakash

    2014-01-03

    In India, six landscapes and source populations that are important for long-term conservation of Bengal tigers (Panthera tigris tigris) have been identified. Except for a few studies, nothing is known regarding the genetic structure and extent of gene flow among most of the tiger populations across India as the majority of them are small, fragmented and isolated. Thus, individual-based relationships are required to understand the species ecology and biology for planning effective conservation and genetics-based individual identification has been widely used. But this needs screening and describing characteristics of microsatellite loci from DNA from good-quality sources so that the required number of loci can be selected and the genotyping error rate minimized. In the studies so far conducted on the Bengal tiger, a very small number of loci (n = 35) have been tested with high-quality source of DNA, and information on locus-specific characteristics is lacking. The use of such characteristics has been strongly recommended in the literature to minimize the error rate and by the International Society for Forensic Genetics (ISFG) for forensic purposes. Therefore, we describe for the first time locus-specific genetic and genotyping profile characteristics, crucial for population genetic studies, using high-quality source of DNA of the Bengal tiger. We screened 39 heterologous microsatellite loci (Sumatran tiger, domestic cat, Asiatic lion and snow leopard) in captive individuals (n = 8), of which 21 loci are being reported for the first time in the Bengal tiger, providing an additional choice for selection. The mean relatedness coefficient (R = -0.143) indicates that the selected tigers were unrelated. Thirty-four loci were polymorphic, with the number of alleles ranging from 2 to 7 per locus, and the remaining five loci were monomorphic. Based on the PIC values (> 0.500), and other characteristics, we suggest that 16 loci (3 to 7 alleles) be used for genetic

  9. Cross-Species Amplification and Polymorphism of Microsatellite Loci in the Soybean Aphid, Aphis glycines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We tested the utility of 18 previously characterized Aphis spp. microsatellite loci for polymorphism and differentiation among populations of the soybean aphid, Aphis glycines. Loci were chosen from a closely related species (Aphis gossypii) and a more distantly related species (Aphis fabae). We f...

  10. Interpretation of electrophoretograms of seven microsatellite loci to determine the genetic diversity of the Arabian Oryx.

    PubMed

    Arif, I A; Khan, H A; Shobrak, M; Al Homaidan, A A; Al Sadoon, M; Al Farhan, A H; Bahkali, A H

    2010-02-09

    Microsatellite markers are commonly used for examining population structure, especially inbreeding, outbreeding and gene flow. An array of microsatellite loci, preferably with multiallelic presentation, is preferable for ensuring accurate results. However, artifact peaks or stutters in the electrophoretograms significantly hamper the reliable interpretation of genotypes. We interpreted electrophoretograms of seven microsatellite loci to determine the genetic diversity of the Arabian Oryx. All the alleles of different loci exhibited good peak resolutions and hence were clearly identified. Moreover, none of the stutter peaks impaired the recognition or differentiation between homozygote and heterozygote. Our findings suggest that correct identification of alleles in the presence of co-amplified nonspecific fragments is important for reliable interpretation of microsatellite data.

  11. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci in the whale shark (Rhincodon typus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramirez-Macias, D.; Shaw, K.; Ward, R.; Galvan-Magana, F.; Vazquez-Juarez, R.

    2009-01-01

    In preparation for a study on population structure of the whale shark (Rhincodon typus), nine species-specific polymorphic microsatellite DNA markers were developed. An initial screening of 50 individuals from Holbox Island, Mexico found all nine loci to be polymorphic, with two to 17 alleles observed per locus. Observed and expected heterozygosity per locus ranged from 0.200 to 0.826 and from 0.213 to 0.857, respectively. Neither statistically significant deviations from Hardy–Weinberg expectations nor statistically significant linkage disequilibrium between loci were observed. These microsatellite loci appear suitable for examining population structure, kinship assessment and other applications.

  12. Development of 14 polymorphic microsatellite loci for Ficus tikoua (Moraceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lu-Shui; Tan, Lu; Hu, Dai-Mei; Chen, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed to facilitate studies on the fine-scale population genetic structure of Ficus tikoua (Moraceae), a prostrate shrub known to have highly restricted gene flow. Methods and Results: Microsatellite primers were developed using the biotin-streptavidin capture method and scanned for polymorphism within 76 individuals sampled from three natural F. tikoua populations. Fourteen loci were shown to be polymorphic, with allele numbers ranging from three to 16. The observed and expected heterozygosity in the three populations ranged from 0 to 1 and from 0 to 0.87, respectively. Substantial divergence was found among the populations at some loci. All loci can be successfully amplified in at least eight other Ficus species, indicating good transferability within the genus. Conclusions: The 14 microsatellite loci will be a helpful tool for assessing the fine-scale genetic structure of F. tikoua. PMID:27011895

  13. Thousands of microsatellite loci from the venomous coralsnake (Micrurus fulvius) and variability of select loci across populations and related species

    PubMed Central

    Castoe, Todd A.; Streicher, Jeffrey W.; Meik, Jesse M.; Ingrasci, Matthew J.; Poole, Alexander W.; de Koning, A.P. Jason; Campbell, Jonathan A.; Parkinson, Christopher L.; Smith, Eric N.; Pollock, David D.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of population genetics increasingly use next-generation DNA sequencing to identify microsatellite loci in non-model organisms. There are, however, relatively few studies that validate the feasibility of transitioning from marker development to experimental application across populations and species. North American coralsnakes of the Micrurus fulvius species complex occur in the United States and Mexico, and little is known about their population structure and phylogenetic relationships. This absence of information and population genetics markers is particularly concerning because they are highly venomous and have important implications on human health. To alleviate this problem in coralsnakes, we investigated the feasibility of using 454 shotgun sequences for microsatellite marker development. First, a genomic shotgun library from a single individual was sequenced (~7.74 megabases; 26,831 reads) to identify potentially amplifiable microsatellite loci (PALs). We then hierarchically sampled 76 individuals from throughout the geographic distribution of the species complex and examined whether PALs were amplifiable and polymorphic. Approximately half of the loci tested were readily amplifiable from all individuals, and 80% of the loci tested for variation were variable and thus informative as population genetic markers. To evaluate the repetitive landscape characteristics across multiple snakes, we also compared microsatellite content between the coralsnake and two other previously sampled snakes, the venomous copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix) and Burmese python (Python molurus). PMID:22938699

  14. Characterization of ten microsatellite loci in the Broad-tailed hummingbird (Selasphorus platycercus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Fike, Jennifer A.; Talley-Farnham, Tiffany; Engelman, Tena; Engelman, Fred

    2011-01-01

    The Broad-tailed Hummingbird (Selaphorus platycercus) breeds at higher elevations in the central and southern Rockies, eastern California, and Mexico and has been studied for 8 years in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado. Questions regarding the relatedness of Broad-tailed Hummingbirds banded together and then recaptured in close time proximity in later years led us to isolate and develop primers for 10 polymorphic microsatellite loci. In a screen of 25 individuals from a population in Rocky Mountain National Park, the 10 loci were found to have levels of variability ranging from two to 16 alleles. No loci were found to depart from linkage disequilibrium, although two loci revealed significant departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. These 10 microsatellite loci will be applicable for population genetic analyses, investigation of mating systems and relatedness, and may help gain insight into the migration timing and routes for this species.

  15. Isolation and characterization of 12 microsatellite loci in soapbark, Quillaja saponaria (Quillajaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Letelier, Luis; Harvey, Nick; Valderrama, Aly; Stoll, Alexandra; González-Rodríguez, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite primers were developed for the endemic Chilean tree Quillaja saponaria (Quillajaceae), a common member of the sclerophyllous Mediterranean forest, to investigate intraspecific patterns of genetic diversity and structure. Methods and Results: Using an enriched library, 12 polymorphic microsatellite loci were developed in Q. saponaria. All loci consisted of dinucleotide repeats. The average number of alleles per locus was 5.3 (2–13), with a total of 64 alleles recorded in 39 individuals from three populations. Conclusions: The microsatellite markers described here are the first characterized for Q. saponaria. The polymorphic loci will be useful in studies of genetic diversity and genetic population differentiation in natural populations of this species. PMID:25995980

  16. Polymorphic microsatellite loci for the sand pocket mouse Chaetodipus arenarius, an endemic from the Baja California Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munguia-Vega, A.; Rodriguez-Estrella, R.; Nachman, M.; Culver, M.

    2009-01-01

    Fifteen polymorphic microsatellite loci were isolated from an enriched genomic library of the sand pocket mouse Chaetodipus arenarius. The mean number of alleles per locus was 11.53 (range five to 19) and the average observed heterozygosity was 0.764 (range 0.121 to 1.0). The markers will be used for detecting the impact of human-induced habitat fragmentation on patterns of gene flow, genetic structure, and extinction risk. In addition, these markers will be useful across the genus because most of the loci cross-amplified and were polymorphic in three other species of Chaetodipus. ?? 2008 The Authors.

  17. Isolation and characterization of polymorphic microsatellite loci in muskrat, Ondatra zibethicus.

    PubMed

    Laurence, S; Bewick, A J; Coltman, D W; Davis, C S; Elsasser, S C; Kidd, A G; Lesbarrères, D; Schulte-Hostedde, A I

    2009-03-01

    We describe the isolation and characterization of 12 highly polymorphic microsatellite loci for the muskrat, Ondatra zibethicus. Microsatellite markers from three other rodent species were cross-amplified in muskrat and one of them was polymorphic. We observed moderate to high levels of genetic variability in these 13 polymorphic loci (five to 22 alleles per locus) with observed heterozygosity ranging from 0.48 to 0.96. These markers will be useful for further studies on population genetic structure in muskrat and potentially in other rodent species.

  18. Isolation and characterization of polymorphic microsatellite loci in the green leafhopper Empoasca vitis Goethe (Homoptera).

    PubMed

    Papura, D; Giresse, X; Chauvin, B; Caron, H; Delmotte, F; VAN Helden, M

    2009-05-01

    Eight dinucleotide microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized within the green leafhopper Empoasca vitis (Goethe) using an enrichment cloning procedure. Primers were tested on 171 individuals collected in the southwest of France from the vine plants. The identified loci were polymorphic, with allelic diversity ranging from two to 18 alleles per locus. Observed heterozygosities were from 0.021 to 0.760. These microsatellite markers should prove to be a useful tool for estimating the population genetic structure, host-plant specialization and migration capacity of this insect.

  19. Development of new microsatellite loci and multiplex reactions for muskellunge (Esox masquinongy)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sloss, Brian L.; Franckowiak, R.P.; Murphy, E.L.

    2008-01-01

    The muskellunge (Esox masquinongy) is a valued fisheries species throughout its native range. Numerous studies have documented performance and phenotypic differences among muskellunge populations, but genetic markers for assessment have been lacking. We characterized 14 microsatellite loci and developed five multiplex polymerase chain reactions. Successful amplification of northern pike (Esox lucius) was observed for seven loci. These microsatellites will be useful for analysing population structure, performance characteristics of propagated strains, and helping to develop and monitor hatchery management guidelines for muskellunge. ?? 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci from the tick Amblyomma aureolatum (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Ogrzewalska, M; Bajay, M M; Schwarcz, K; Bajay, S K; Telles, M P C; Pinheiro, J B; Zucchi, M I; Pinter, A; Labruna, M B

    2014-11-14

    Amblyomma aureolatum (Pallas) is the main vector of the bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii, the etiological agent of Brazilian spotted fever. This disease is the most lethal human spotted fever rickettsiosis in the world. Microsatellite loci were isolated from a dinucleotide-enriched library produced from A. aureolatum sampled in Southeastern Brazil. Eight polymorphic microsatellites were further characterized among 38 individuals sampled from São Paulo metropolitan region. The number of observed alleles ranged from 2 to 9, observed heterozygosity was 0.184-0.647, and expected heterozygosity was 0.251-0.747. Cross-species amplifications suggested that these loci will be useful for other Amblyomma species.

  1. Microsatellite loci for Orthophytum ophiuroides (Bromelioideae, Bromeliaceae) species adapted to neotropical rock outcrops1

    PubMed Central

    Aoki-Gonçalves, Felipe; Louzada, Rafael B.; De Souza, Lívia Moura; Palma-Silva, Clarisse

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Microsatellite primers were developed for Orthophytum ophiuroides, a rupicolous bromeliad species endemic to neotropical rocky fields. These microsatellite loci will be used to investigate population differentiation and species cohesion in such fragmented environments. The loci were tested for cross-amplification in related bromeliad species. • Methods and Results: Eleven polymorphic microsatellite markers were isolated and characterized from an enriched library of O. ophiuroides. The loci were tested on 42 individuals from two populations of this species. The number of alleles per locus ranged from three to nine and the expected and observed heterozygosities ranged from 0.167 to 0.870 and from 0.369 to 0.958, respectively. Seven loci successfully amplified in other related bromeliad species. • Conclusions: Our results suggest that the microsatellite loci developed here will be useful to assess genetic diversity and gene flow in O. ophiuroides for the investigation of population differentiation and species cohesion in neotropical mountainous habitats. PMID:25202607

  2. Eleven Novel Polymorphic Microsatellite Loci for Oval Squid Sepioteuthis Lessoniana (Shiro-Ika Type)

    PubMed Central

    Tomano, Satoshi; Ahmad-Syazni, Kamarudin; Ueta, Yukio; Ohara, Kenichi; Umino, Tetsuya

    2013-01-01

    The oval squid Sepioteuthis lessoniana is one of the most economically important squid species in Japan; however, its population structure is poorly understood due to the lack of hypervariable markers. Such information is critical for managing sustainable fisheries, as well as for ensuring the existence of wild S. lessoniana stocks. Eleven candidate microsatellite loci were isolated from a small insert genomic DNA library. Polymorphisms in these 11 loci were screened in 24 wild individuals. The number of alleles per locus was found to range from 5 to 19 alleles, and the observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.292 to 0.958. No evidence for linkage disequilibrium was detected among all the loci. The genotypic proportions conformed to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, except at one locus. In conclusion, these polymorphic microsatellite loci may be used to develop a genetic framework to manage S. lessoniana in the future. PMID:24108369

  3. Development and characterization of microsatellite loci for the haploid-diploid red seaweed Gracilaria vermiculophylla.

    PubMed

    Kollars, Nicole M; Krueger-Hadfield, Stacy A; Byers, James E; Greig, Thomas W; Strand, Allan E; Weinberger, Florian; Sotka, Erik E

    2015-01-01

    Microsatellite loci are popular molecular markers due to their resolution in distinguishing individual genotypes. However, they have rarely been used to explore the population dynamics in species with biphasic life cycles in which both haploid and diploid stages develop into independent, functional organisms. We developed microsatellite loci for the haploid-diploid red seaweed Gracilaria vermiculophylla, a widespread non-native species in coastal estuaries of the Northern hemisphere. Forty-two loci were screened for amplification and polymorphism. Nine of these loci were polymorphic across four populations of the extant range with two to eleven alleles observed. Mean observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.265 to 0.527 and 0.317 to 0.387, respectively. Overall, these markers will aid in the study of the invasive history of this seaweed and further studies on the population dynamics of this important haploid-diploid primary producer.

  4. Development and characterization of microsatellite loci for the haploid–diploid red seaweed Gracilaria vermiculophylla

    PubMed Central

    Byers, James E.; Greig, Thomas W.; Strand, Allan E.; Weinberger, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Microsatellite loci are popular molecular markers due to their resolution in distinguishing individual genotypes. However, they have rarely been used to explore the population dynamics in species with biphasic life cycles in which both haploid and diploid stages develop into independent, functional organisms. We developed microsatellite loci for the haploid–diploid red seaweed Gracilaria vermiculophylla, a widespread non-native species in coastal estuaries of the Northern hemisphere. Forty-two loci were screened for amplification and polymorphism. Nine of these loci were polymorphic across four populations of the extant range with two to eleven alleles observed. Mean observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.265 to 0.527 and 0.317 to 0.387, respectively. Overall, these markers will aid in the study of the invasive history of this seaweed and further studies on the population dynamics of this important haploid–diploid primary producer. PMID:26339541

  5. Development and characterization of thirteen microsatellite loci in Clark's nutcracker (Nucifraga columbiana)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Fike, Jennifer A.; Castoe, Todd A.; Tomback, Diana F.; Wunder, Michael B.; Schaming, Taza D.

    2013-01-01

    Clark’s nutcrackers are important seed dispersers for two widely-distributed western North American conifers, whitebark pine and limber pine, which are declining due to outbreaks of mountain pine beetle and white pine blister rust. Because nutcracker seed dispersal services are key to maintaining viable populations of these imperiled pines, knowledge of movement patterns of Clark’s nutcrackers helps managers understand local extinction risks for these trees. To investigate population structure within Clark’s nutcracker, we developed primers for and characterized 13 polymorphic microsatellite loci. In a screen of 22 individuals from one population, levels of variability ranged from 6 to 15 alleles. No loci were found to be linked, although 4 loci revealed significant departures from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium and evidence of null alleles. These microsatellite loci will enable population genetic analyses of Clark’s nutcrackers, which could provide insights into the spatial relationships between nutcrackers and the trees they help disperse.

  6. Variability with altitude of major histocompatibility complex-related microsatellite loci in goats from Southwest China.

    PubMed

    E, G X; Huang, Y F; Zhao, Y J; Na, R S

    2015-11-19

    We aimed to use microsatellite BM1258 loci of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) as an indicator of the influence of genetic diversity of immunity in goats (Dazu Black, Hechuan White, Meigu, and Tibetan goat). In total, 132 animals comprising 50 Dazu Black goats, 24 Hechuan White goats, 34 Meigu goats, and 24 Tibetan goats were examined. Collectively, 18 different alleles and 42 genotypes were found. The overall observed levels of heterozygosity showed large divergence from the expected levels in the four breeds, and an increase in the mean number of alleles of BM1258 accompanied decreasing altitude of the livestock's habitat. Our results indicate that low-altitude regions or plains were more conducive to genetic material exchange and gene flow between different populations. In addition, it seems that the breeds from low-altitude regions were less susceptible to problems introduced by commercial animals.

  7. Characterization of 11 new microsatellite loci in taro (Colocasia esculenta).

    PubMed

    Hu, Kan; Huang, Xing Fang; Ke, Wei Dong; Ding, Yi

    2009-03-01

    Eleven new microsatellite markers were isolated from taro, Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott, a root crop widely distributed all over the world. Forty-eight primer pairs were designed from a microsatellite-enriched genomic library, of which 11 primer pairs have polymorphisms in 30 individuals tested from a population in China, which revealed two to six alleles per locus with the observed and expected heterozygosity levels ranging from 0 to 0.733 and from 0.381 to 0.731, respectively. These new genetic markers will be useful for the study of taro germplasm management and population evolution in the future.

  8. Isolation and characterization of 11 tetranucleotide microsatellite loci in the Egyptian mongoose (Herpestes ichneumon).

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Mónica; Fernandes, Carlos A; Palomares, Francisco; Amorim, Isabel R; Bruford, Michael W; Santos-Reis, Margarida

    2009-07-01

    We report the isolation of 11 polymorphic tetranucleotide microsatellite loci in the Egyptian mongoose (Herpestes ichneumon). In a sample of 27 individuals, we observed between 4 and 7 alleles per locus and their observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.37 to 0.85 and from 0.44 to 0.79, respectively. All genotypic frequencies conformed to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium expectations and there were no instances of linkage disequilibrium detected between pairs of loci.

  9. Mendelian inheritance, linkage and genotypic disequilibrium in microsatellite loci isolated from Hymenaea courbaril (Leguminosae).

    PubMed

    Carneiro, F S; Lacerda, A E B; Lemes, M R; Gribel, R; Kanashiro, M; Sebbenn, A M

    2012-07-19

    The Neotropical tree Hymenaea courbaril, locally known as Jatobá, is a valuable source of lumber and also produces comestible and medicinal fruit. We characterized Mendelian inheritance, linkage and genotypic disequilibrium at nine microsatellite loci isolated from H. courbaril, in order to determine if they would provide accurate estimates of population genetic parameters of this important Amazon species. The study was made on 250 open-pollinated offspring originated from 14 seed trees. Only one of nine loci presented significant deviation from the expected Mendelian segregation (1:1). Genotypic disequilibrium between pairwise loci was investigated based on samples from 55 adult and 56 juvenile trees. No genetic linkage between any paired loci was observed. After Bonferroni's corrections for multiple tests, we found no evidence of genotypic disequilibrium between pairs of loci. We conclude that this set of loci can be used for genetic diversity/ structure, mating system, gene flow, and parentage analyses in H. courbaril populations.

  10. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci in the Chinese Cobra Naja atra (Elapidae).

    PubMed

    Lin, Long-Hui; Mao, Lu-Xi; Luo, Xia; Qu, Yan-Fu; Ji, Xiang

    2011-01-01

    We characterize thirteen polymorphic microsatellite loci isolated from Naja atra genomic libraries, which were enriched for AC-motif microsatellites. The thirteen loci were screened on a group of 48 individuals from two populations, one in Yong'an and the other in Ganzhou. These markers revealed a relatively high degree of genetic diversity (4-12 alleles per locus) and heterozygosity (Ho ranged from 0.213-0.854 and He ranged from 0.301-0.838). Tests for departure from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and for linkage disequilibrium were conducted for each of the two populations separately. After sequential Bonferroni correction, none of the 13 loci showed significant departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Hierarchical analysis of molecular variance indicated that a small but significant (P < 0.001) proportion (16.0%) of the total variation in the microsatellite DNA data were attributable to differences among populations, indicating geographical structuring and restricted gene flow. It could be attributable to the Wuyi mountains in the area having a sufficiently isolating effect to significantly reduce gene flow. Our microsatellite data also showed a low N(m) (1.31) value in the two populations from mainland China. Thus, the Yong'an and Ganzhou populations could be treated as distinct evolutionarily significant units (ESUs). The high level of polymorphism revealed by these microsatellite markers will be useful for the study of gene flow, population structure and evolutionary history of N. atra.

  11. CHARACTERIZATION OF SEVEN POLYMORPHIC MICROSATELLITE LOCI IN THE COMMON LOON (GAVIA IMMER)

    EPA Science Inventory

    We describe polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers and conditions to amplify seven microsatellite DNA loci isolated from the Common Loon (Gavia immer). The PCR primers were tested on 83 individuals from ten locations in North America, including breeding, migration stopover, and...

  12. Isolation and characterization of 108 novel microsatellite loci for Atlantic coastal killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus)

    EPA Science Inventory

    We characterized 108 polymorphic microsatellite loci for the mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus), an Atlantic coastal killifish. Allelic diversity among 26 individuals ranged between 2 and 15 alleles per locus, while expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.075 to 0.904. Significant ...

  13. Microsatellite loci for the fungus, Ascosphaera apis, cause of honey bee chalkbrood disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungus Ascosphaera apis (Ascomycota:Ascosphaeriaceae) is a worldwide fungal pathogen of honey bees. To provide tools for understanding the dispersal history of this pathogen, strain differences in virulence, and host-pathogen interactions, we developed and tested microsatellite loci for this sp...

  14. Fine spatial structure of Atlantic hake (Merluccius merluccius) stocks revealed by variation at microsatellite loci.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Ana G F; Martinez, Jose L; Garcia-Vazquez, Eva

    2004-01-01

    Genetic variation at 5 microsatellite loci was analyzed for European hake Merluccius merluccius sampled from 9 different regions in the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea. Significant genetic differentiation was found between samples, suggesting a fine subdivision of Atlantic and Mediterranean hake stocks. These results are discussed in the context of the decline of demersal fish species, probably due to overfishing.

  15. Eight microsatellite loci in Phaedranassa schizantha Baker (Amaryllidaceae) and cross-amplification in other Phaedranassa species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phaedranassa schizantha is a species endemic to Ecuador from which eight polymorphic microsatellite loci were isolated from an enriched genomic library. A total of 31 alleles with an average of four alleles per locus were detected across 29 individuals from a single natural population of P. schizan...

  16. Isolation and characterization of novel microsatellite loci for the endangered orchid Cypripedium japonicum (Orchidaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Yumi; Izuno, Ayako; Isagi, Yuji; Kurosawa, Takahide; Kaneko, Shingo

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Twenty-six microsatellite markers were developed for the endangered orchid Cypripedium japonicum (Orchidaceae) to estimate the clonal diversity and genetic structure of the remaining populations in Japan. Methods and Results: Microsatellite loci of C. japonicum were isolated using Ion Personal Genome Machine (PGM) sequencing. The primer sets were tested on 55 ramets sampled from two populations in Japan. Sixteen loci showed polymorphism in at least one population, with two to five alleles per locus. Observed and expected heterozygosities for the two populations ranged from 0.00 to 0.92 and 0.00 to 0.71, respectively. Conclusions: The microsatellite markers developed here provide a useful tool to analyze clonal structure and sexual regeneration status and will help to manage the remaining genetic variation within C. japonicum. PMID:26949576

  17. Development and characterization of 23 microsatellite loci for Rhododendron ovatum (Ericaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, De-Chen; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Si-Si; Liao, Meng-Yu; Fan, Xin-Yu; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Rong

    2017-01-01

    Premise of the study: To estimate the genetic variation of Rhododendron ovatum (Ericaceae), a monoecious evergreen shrub, 23 microsatellite markers were identified from its nuclear genome. Methods and Results: We developed 16 polymorphic and seven monomorphic microsatellite primers using the biotin-streptavidin capture method. The 16 polymorphic loci were investigated further using 89 individuals sampled from three populations in China. The number of alleles per locus ranged from four to 30, indicating a high level of polymorphism. The observed heterozygosity varied from 0.1034 to 0.9333, while the expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.1016 to 0.9542. Of these polymorphic primers, 12 were found to be functional in R. simsii, a congeneric species of R. ovatum. Conclusions: Moderate to high levels of genetic variation were found in these microsatellite loci, indicating that they can be applied in future studies of Rhododendron genetic structure, contributing to forest management and conservation. PMID:28090409

  18. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci in the intertidal sponge Halichondria panicea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knowlton, A.L.; Pierson, Barbara J.; Talbot, S.L.; Highsmith, R.C.

    2003-01-01

    GA- and CA-enriched genomic libraries were constructed for the intertidal sponge Halichondria panicea. Unique repeat motifs identified varied from the expected simple dinucleotide repeats to more complex repeat units. All sequences tended to be highly repetitive but did not necessarily contain the targeted motifs. Seven microsatellite loci were evaluated on sponges from the clone source population. All seven were polymorphic with 5.43??0.92 mean number of alleles. Six of the seven loci that could be resolved had mean heterozygosities of 0.14-0.68. The loci identified here will be useful for population studies.

  19. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci in the beaver (Castor canadensis).

    PubMed

    Crawford, J; Liu, Z; Nelson, T; Nielsen, C; Bloomquist, C

    2008-05-01

    We have isolated and characterized 10 microsatellite loci in the beaver (Castor canadensis). Sixty individuals from southern and central Illinois were screened at each locus. All loci exhibited moderate levels of polymorphism, ranging from five to 13 alleles per locus with average heterozygosity ranging from 0.317 to 0.867. Locus Cca5 deviated significantly from HWE (P < 0.001). The locus pair Cca4/Cca5 was shown to be in linkage disequilibrium in southern Illinois, but not in the central Illinois population. The remaining eight loci will be useful in investigations of mating and kinship patterns in beaver populations in Illinois.

  20. Development and characterization of eight polymorphic microsatellite loci from Pistacia lentiscus L. (Anacardiaceae).

    PubMed

    Albaladejo, Rafael G; Sebastiani, F; Aparicio, A; Buonamici, A; González-Martínez, S C; Vendramin, G G

    2008-07-01

    We have developed a set of eight polymorphic nuclear microsatellite markers for the Mediterranean shrub Pistacia lentiscus by means of an enriched library method. Characterization for the eight loci was carried out on 42 individuals from two populations sampled in southern Spain. The overall number of alleles detected was 59, ranging from three to 13 per locus. Expected heterozygosity per locus and population ranged from 0.139 to 0.895. Two loci albeit only in one population (Seville) departed significantly from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium expectations and no linkage disequilibrium between pairs of loci was detected. These markers will be used in studies of gene flow across a fragmented landscape.

  1. Isolation and characterization of 11 microsatellite loci in the mangrove crab, Ucides cordatus (Ocypodidae: Ucidinae).

    PubMed

    Varela, Eduardo Sousa; Gonçalves, Evonnildo D Costa; Santos, Melissa D Oliveira; Sampaio, Iracilda; Schneider, Horacio

    2009-09-01

    Eleven polymorphic microsatellite loci were described for the mangrove crab, Ucides cordatus, an important fishery resource on the Brazilian coast. The number of alleles observed at each locus varied between eight and 23. Observed and expected mean heterozygosities were 0.791 and 0.893 respectively. Amplification of all loci was highly successful, under the same polymerase chain reaction conditions. With the exception of P2D3, all loci adhered to the assumptions of the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and did not present deviations reflecting linkage disequilibrium. Given this, these markers will be extremely useful in future management programmes for U. cordatus stocks.

  2. MicNeSs: genotyping microsatellite loci from a collection of (NGS) reads.

    PubMed

    Suez, Marie; Behdenna, Abdelkader; Brouillet, Sophie; Graça, Paula; Higuet, Dominique; Achaz, Guillaume

    2016-03-01

    Microsatellites are widely used in population genetics to uncover recent evolutionary events. They are typically genotyped using capillary sequencer, which capacity is usually limited to 9, at most 12 loci for each run, and which analysis is a tedious task that is performed by hand. With the rise of next-generation sequencing (NGS), a much larger number of loci and individuals are available from sequencing: for example, on a single run of a GS Junior, 28 loci from 96 individuals are sequenced with a 30X cover. We have developed an algorithm to automatically and efficiently genotype microsatellites from a collection of reads sorted by individual (e.g. specific PCR amplifications of a locus or a collection of reads that encompass a locus of interest). As the sequencing and the PCR amplification introduce artefactual insertions or deletions, the set of reads from a single microsatellite allele shows several length variants. The algorithm infers, without alignment, the true unknown allele(s) of each individual from the observed distributions of microsatellites length of all individuals. MicNeSs, a python implementation of the algorithm, can be used to genotype any microsatellite locus from any organism and has been tested on 454 pyrosequencing data of several loci from fruit flies (a model species) and red deers (a nonmodel species). Without any parallelization, it automatically genotypes 22 loci from 441 individuals in 11 hours on a standard computer. The comparison of MicNeSs inferences to the standard method shows an excellent agreement, with some differences illustrating the pros and cons of both methods.

  3. Isolation and characterization of polymorphic microsatellite loci for Pachycrepoideus vindemmiae (Rondani) (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae).

    PubMed

    Chen, W; Fang, L; Liu, J L; He, Z; Hu, H Y

    2015-03-13

    The parasitoid wasp Pachycrepoideus vindemmiae (Rondani) is a common pupal parasitoid of many fly pests that is distributed worldwide. This organism can be used for biological control in orchards or livestock farms. Identifying polymorphic microsatellite loci would be useful for analyzing the population genetic structure of the parasitoid. In the current study, based on a modified biotin-capture method, 10 polymorphic microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized for the insect, 7 of which did not deviate from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The allelic number per locus varied from 3-7 (N = 30). The expected and observed heterozygosities of 10 loci ranged from 0.369-0.775 and from 0.300-0.867, respectively.

  4. Development and characterization of 32 microsatellite loci in Genipa americana (Rubiaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Manoel, Ricardo O.; Freitas, Miguel L. M.; Barreto, Mariana A.; Moraes, Mário L. T.; Souza, Anete P.; Sebbenn, Alexandre M.

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Microsatellite primers were developed for the tree species Genipa americana (Rubiaceae) for further population genetic studies. • Methods and Results: We identified 144 clones containing 65 repeat motifs from a genomic library enriched for (CT)8 and (GT)8 motifs. Primer pairs were developed for 32 microsatellite loci and validated in 40 individuals of two natural G. americana populations. Seventeen loci were polymorphic, revealing from three to seven alleles per locus. The observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.24 to 1.00 and from 0.22 to 0.78, respectively. • Conclusions: The 17 primers identified as polymorphic loci are suitable to study the genetic diversity and structure, mating system, and gene flow in G. americana. PMID:25202610

  5. Characterization of microsatellite loci for an Australian epiphytic orchid, Dendrobium calamiforme, using illumina sequencing

    DOE PAGES

    Trapnell, Dorset W.; Beasley, Rochelle R.; Lance, Stacey L.; ...

    2015-06-05

    Our premise describes how microsatellite loci were developed for the epiphytic pencil orchid Dendrobium calamiforme for population genetic and phylogeographic investigation of this Australian taxon. Nineteen microsatellite loci were identified from an Illumina paired-end shotgun library of D. calamiforme. Polymorphism and genetic diversity were assessed in 24 individuals from five populations separated by a maximum distance of ~80 km. All loci were polymorphic with two to 14 alleles per locus, expected heterozygosity ranging from 0.486 to 0.902, and probability of identity values ranging from 0.018 to 0.380. In conclusion, these novel markers will serve as valuable tools for investigation ofmore » levels of genetic diversity as well as patterns of gene flow, genetic structure, and phylogeographic history.« less

  6. Isolation of 91 polymorphic microsatellite loci in the western Mediterranean endemic Carex helodes (Cyperaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo, Juan M.; Escudero, Marcial; Jordano, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite primers were developed for Carex helodes (Cyperaceae), a western Mediterranean endemic that is locally distributed in southern Portugal and southwestern Spain and rare in northern Morocco. Methods and Results: One hundred nine nuclear microsatellite markers were developed using a shotgun pyrosequencing method, resulting in 91 polymorphic and 18 monomorphic loci when tested using 19 individuals sampled from five populations from Portugal, Spain, and Morocco. Loci averaged 3.23 alleles per locus (SD = 1.15). In a single population (Cortelha population, Portugal), the 34 most polymorphic loci showed a mean observed heterozygosity of 0.357 (SD = 0.292) and mean expected heterozygosity of 0.384 (SD = 0.255). Conclusions: Next-generation sequencing allowed us to develop a high number of genetic markers with levels of polymorphism adequate to study gene flow among populations. However, when genotyping the individuals within a population, we found low levels of variation. PMID:26819859

  7. Development and characterization of microsatellite loci for the endangered scrub Lupine, Lupinus aridorum (Fabaceae)

    DOE PAGES

    Ricono, Angela; Bupp, Glen; Peterson, Cheryl; ...

    2015-04-01

    Microsatellite primers were developed in scrub lupine (Lupinus aridorum, Fabaceae), an endemic species to Florida that is listed as endangered in the United States, to assess connectivity among populations, identify hybrids, and examine genetic diversity. We isolated and characterized 12 microsatellite loci polymorphic in scrub lupine or in closely related species (i.e., sky-blue lupine [L. diffusus] and Gulf Coast lupine [L. westianus]). Loci showed low to moderate polymorphism, ranging from two to 14 alleles per locus and 0.01 to 0.86 observed heterozygosity. In conclusion, these loci are the first developed for Florida species of lupine and will be used tomore » determine differentiation among species and to aid in conservation of the endangered scrub lupine.« less

  8. Development and characterization of polymorphic microsatellite loci for Saxifraga egregia (Saxifragaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Faqi; Li, Yinhu; Gao, Qingbo; Lei, Shuyun; Khan, Gulzar; Yang, Huiling; Chen, Shilong

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Saxifraga egregia (Saxifragaceae) is a perennial herb that is endemic to the Qinghai–Tibet Plateau. We developed 12 polymorphic microsatellite loci for S. egregia to investigate its population genetics. Methods and Results: Forty-eight pairs of microsatellite primers (including 36 monomorphic loci) were isolated and characterized by magnetic bead enrichment. Twelve of these markers showed polymorphism, and the number of alleles per locus ranged from four to 14 across 50 individuals from three populations of S. egregia. No linkage disequilibrium was detected in any pair of loci. Conclusions: These polymorphic markers are expected to be helpful in further studies on the systematics and phylogeography of S. egregia in the Qinghai–Tibet Plateau. PMID:26312195

  9. Cross-amplification and sequence variation of microsatellite loci in Eurasian hard pines.

    PubMed

    González-Martínez, S C; Robledo-Arnuncio, J J; Collada, C; Díaz, A; Williams, C G; Alía, R; Cervera, M T

    2004-06-01

    Microsatellite transfer across coniferous species is a valued methodology because de novo development for each species is costly and there are many species with only a limited commodity value. Cross-species amplification of orthologous microsatellite regions provides valuable information on mutational and evolutionary processes affecting these loci. We tested 19 nuclear microsatellite markers from Pinus taeda L. (subsection Australes) and three from P. sylvestris L. (subsection Pinus) on seven Eurasian hard pine species ( P. uncinata Ram., P. sylvestris L., P. nigra Arn., P. pinaster Ait., P. halepensis Mill., P. pinea L. and P. canariensis Sm.). Transfer rates to species in subsection Pinus (36-59%) were slightly higher than those to subsections Pineae and Pinaster (32-45%). Half of the trans-specific microsatellites were found to be polymorphic over evolutionary times of approximately 100 million years (ten million generations). Sequencing of three trans-specific microsatellites showed conserved repeat and flanking regions. Both a decrease in the number of perfect repeats in the non-focal species and a polarity for mutation, the latter defined as a higher substitution rate in the flanking sequence regions close to the repeat motifs, were observed in the trans-specific microsatellites. The transfer of microsatellites among hard pine species proved to be useful for obtaining highly polymorphic markers in a wide range of species, thereby providing new tools for population and quantitative genetic studies.

  10. Characterization of small microsatellite loci isolated in endangered Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis) for use in non-invasive sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Fike, Jennifer A.

    2011-01-01

    Primers for 10 microsatellite loci were developed specifically to amplify low quantity and quality DNA in the endangered Indiana Bat (Myotis sodalis). In a screen of 20 individuals from a population in Missouri, the 10 loci were found to have levels of variability ranging from seven to 18 alleles. No loci were found to be linked, although two loci revealed significant departures from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium. These microsatellite loci will be applicable for population genetic analyses and for use in mark-recapture studies that utilize DNA collected non-invasively from fecal pellets, which will ultimately aid in management efforts.

  11. Microsatellite mutation rates in the eastern tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum tigrinum) differ 10-fold across loci.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Zafer; McCormick, Cory R; Gopurenko, David; Williams, Rod N; Bos, David H; DeWoody, J Andrew

    2009-07-01

    Microsatellites are commonly used for mapping and population genetics because of their high heterozygosities and allelic variability (i.e., polymorphism). Microsatellite markers are generally more polymorphic than other types of molecular markers such as allozymes or SNPs because the insertions/deletions that give rise to microsatellite variability are relatively common compared to nucleotide substitutions. Nevertheless, direct evidence of microsatellite mutation rates (MMRs) is lacking in most vertebrate groups despite the importance of such estimates to key population parameters (e.g., genetic differentiation or theta = 4N (e)micro). Herein, we present empirical data on MMRs in eastern tiger salamanders (Ambystoma tigrinum tigrinum). We conducted captive breeding trials and genotyped over 1,000 offspring at a suite of microsatellite loci. These data on 7,906 allele transfers provide the first direct estimates of MMRs in amphibians, and they illustrate that MMRs can vary by more than an order of magnitude across loci within a given species (one locus had ten mutations whereas the others had none).

  12. Isolation of mini- and microsatellite loci from chromosome 19 library

    SciTech Connect

    Prosnyak, M.I.; Belajeva, O.V.; Polukarova, L.G.

    1994-09-01

    Mini- and microsatellite sequences are abundant in the human genome and are very useful as genetic markers. We report the isolation of a panel of clones containing marker sequences from chromosome 19. We screened 10,000 clones from the chromosome 19 cosmid library for the presence of di-(CA)n, tri-(TCC)n, (CAC)n microsatellites and M13-like minisatellite sequences. For this we have used synthetic oligonucleotides and polynucleotides, including micro- (CA, TCC, CAC) and minisatellite (M13 core) sequences. Preliminary results indicated that the chromosome 19 cosmid library contained both human and hamster clones. In order to identify human sequences from this library we have developed the technique of colony and blot hybridization with Alu-PCR, L1-PCR and B1-PCR probes. Dozens of clones have been selected, some of which were analyzed by conventional Southern blot analysis and non-radioactive in situ hybridization of chromosomes. Highly informative markers derived from these clones will be used for physical and genetic mapping of chromosome 19.

  13. Development and characterization of novel microsatellite loci for Lusitanian toadfish, Halobatrachus didactylus

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Paulo J.; Amorim, Maria Clara P.

    2015-01-01

    The Lusitanian toadfish Halobatrachus didactylus is an eastern Atlantic polygynous species showing male paternal care. In this paper we describe 5 novel microsatellite loci obtained by 454 GS-FLX Titanium pyrosequencing of a microsatellite-enriched library. The number of alleles per polymorphic locus varied between 2 and 4, and the observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.082 to 0.600. No significant deviation from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium was found and there was no evidence for linkage disequilibrium. These markers will be of great value for paternity studies and population genetics of this species. PMID:25653909

  14. DNA Slippage Occurs at Microsatellite Loci without Minimal Threshold Length in Humans: A Comparative Genomic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Leclercq, Sébastien; Rivals, Eric; Jarne, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    The dynamics of microsatellite, or short tandem repeats (STRs), is well documented for long, polymorphic loci, but much less is known for shorter ones. For example, the issue of a minimum threshold length for DNA slippage remains contentious. Model-fitting methods have generally concluded that slippage only occurs over a threshold length of about eight nucleotides, in contradiction with some direct observations of tandem duplications at shorter repeated sites. Using a comparative analysis of the human and chimpanzee genomes, we examined the mutation patterns at microsatellite loci with lengths as short as one period plus one nucleotide. We found that the rates of tandem insertions and deletions at microsatellite loci strongly deviated from background rates in other parts of the human genome and followed an exponential increase with STR size. More importantly, we detected no lower threshold length for slippage. The rate of tandem duplications at unrepeated sites was higher than expected from random insertions, providing evidence for genome-wide action of indel slippage (an alternative mechanism generating tandem repeats). The rate of point mutations adjacent to STRs did not differ from that estimated elsewhere in the genome, except around dinucleotide loci. Our results suggest that the emergence of STR depends on DNA slippage, indel slippage, and point mutations. We also found that the dynamics of tandem insertions and deletions differed in both rates and size at which these mutations take place. We discuss these results in both evolutionary and mechanistic terms. PMID:20624737

  15. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci for the isopod crustacean Armadillidium vulgare and transferability in terrestrial isopods.

    PubMed

    Giraud, Isabelle; Valette, Victorien; Bech, Nicolas; Grandjean, Frédéric; Cordaux, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Armadillidium vulgare is a terrestrial isopod (Crustacea, Oniscidea) which harbors Wolbachia bacterial endosymbionts. A. vulgare is the major model for the study of Wolbachia-mediated feminization of genetic males in crustaceans. As a consequence of their impact on host sex determination mechanisms, Wolbachia endosymbionts are thought to significantly influence A. vulgare evolution on various grounds, including population genetic structure, diversity and reproduction strategies. To provide molecular tools for examining these questions, we isolated microsatellite loci through 454 pyrosequencing of a repeat-enriched A. vulgare genomic library. We selected 14 markers and developed three polymorphic microsatellite multiplex kits. We tested the kits on two A. vulgare natural populations and found high genetic variation, thereby making it possible to investigate the impact of Wolbachia endosymbionts on A. vulgare nuclear variation at unprecedented resolution. In addition, we tested the transferability of these kits by cross-species amplification in five other terrestrial isopod species harboring Wolbachia endosymbionts. The microsatellite loci showed good transferability in particular in Armadillidium nasatum and Chaetophiloscia elongata, for which these markers represent promising tools for future genetic studies.

  16. Genetic Variation of Major Histocompatibility Complex and Microsatellite Loci: A Comparison in Bighorn Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, W. M.; Hedrick, P. W.; Muggli-Cockett, N. E.; Kalinowski, S.; Penedo, MCT.; Ramey-II, R. R.

    1997-01-01

    Examining and comparing genetic variation for major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and microsatellite (MS) loci in the same individuals provides an opportunity to understand the forces influencing genetic variation. We examined five MHC and three MS loci in 235 bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) from 14 populations and found that both types of loci were highly variable and were in Hardy-Weinberg proportions. Mean F(ST) values for both markers were very similar and MHC and MS genetic variability was predominantly distributed within rather than among populations. However, analyses of genetic distances and tree topologies revealed different spatial patterns of variation for the two types of loci. Collectively, these results indicated that neutral forces substantially influenced MS and MHC variation, and they provided limited evidence for selection acting on the MHC. PMID:9071595

  17. Genetic variation of major histocompatibility complex and microsatellite loci: a comparison in bighorn sheep.

    PubMed

    Boyce, W M; Hedrick, P W; Muggli-Cockett, N E; Kalinowski, S; Penedo, M C; Ramey, R R

    1997-02-01

    Examining and comparing genetic variation for major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and micro-satellite (MS) loci in the same individuals provides an opportunity to understand the forces influencing genetic variation. We examined five MHC and three MS loci in 235 bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) from 14 populations and found that both types of loci were highly variable and were in Hardy-Weinberg proportions. Mean FST values for both markers were very similar and MHC and MS genetic variability was predominantly distributed within rather than among populations. However, analyses of genetic distances and tree topologies revealed different spatial patterns of variation for the two types of loci. Collectively, these results indicated that neutral forces substantially influenced MS and MHC variation, and they provided limited evidence for selection acting on the MHC.

  18. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci in Alasmidonta heterodon (Bivalvia: Unionidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shaw, K.M.; King, T.L.; Lellis, W.A.; Eackles, M.S.

    2006-01-01

    We developed 13 species-specific microsatellite markers for the federally endangered Atlantic slope unionid Alasmidonta heterodon. Four to 18 alleles per locus were observed among 30 individuals. Observed heterozygosity throughout the loci ranged from 26.9 to 86.2% and averaged 63.6%. Estimates of individual pairwise genetic distances indicated that levels of genetic diversity among loci were sufficient to produce unique multilocus genotypes for all animals surveyed. Randomization tests showed that genotypes for this collection were consistent with Hardy-Weinberg expectations, and no significant linkage disequilibrium was observed between loci. These loci therefore appear suitable for population surveys, kinship assessment and other such applications. ?? 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Isolation and characterization of polymorphic microsatellite loci in Spondias radlkoferi (Anacardiaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar-Barajas, Esther; Sork, Victoria L.; González-Zamora, Arturo; Rocha-Ramírez, Víctor; Arroyo-Rodríguez, Víctor; Oyama, Ken

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were developed for Spondias radlkoferi to assess the impact of primate seed dispersal on the genetic diversity and structure of this important tree species of Anacardiaceae. • Methods and Results: Fourteen polymorphic loci were isolated from S. radlkoferi through 454 GS-FLX Titanium pyrosequencing of genomic DNA. The number of alleles ranged from three to 12. The observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.382 to 1.00 and from 0.353 to 0.733, respectively. The amplification was also successful in S. mombin and two genera of Anacardiaceae: Rhus aromatica and Toxicodendron radicans. • Conclusions: These microsatellite loci will be useful to assess the genetic diversity and population structure of S. radlkoferi and related species, and will allow us to investigate the effects of seed dispersal by spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) on the genetic structure and diversity of S. radlkoferi populations in a fragmented rainforest. PMID:25383270

  20. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci for Bixa orellana, an important source of natural dyes.

    PubMed

    Dequigiovanni, G; Ramos, S L F; Zucchi, M I; Bajay, M M; Pinheiro, J B; Fabri, E G; Bressan, E A; Veasey, E A

    2014-10-31

    Annatto (Bixa orellana) is a plant native from the American continental tropical zone. The seeds are used to produce a carotenoid-based yellow to orange food coloring. Microsatellite markers were developed for the Brazilian native species Bixa orellana to describe its genetic diversity and structure as well as to support conservation studies. Twenty-five microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized using an enriched genomic library. Ten loci were polymorphic in the 50 accessions sampled in this study, while 15 were considered monomorphic. The mean number of alleles per locus was 3.8, ranging from 2 to 6 alleles per locus. Mean values for the observed and expected heterozygosities were 0.541 (ranging from 0 to 0.658) and 0.639 (ranging from 0.422 to 0.787), respectively. All markers described in this study will be useful in further studies evaluating the genetic diversity, population dynamics, and conservation genetics of Bixa orellana.

  1. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci for Smilax sieboldii (Smilacaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Ru, Yalu; Cheng, Ruijing; Shang, Jing; Zhao, Yunpeng; Li, Pan; Fu, Chengxin

    2017-01-01

    Premise of the study: Polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed for Smilax sieboldii (Smilacaceae), a member of the S. hispida group with a biogeographic disjunction between eastern Asia and North America, to study the phylogeography and incipient speciation of this species and its close relatives. Methods and Results: Transcriptome sequencing produced 47,628 unigenes. Seventeen loci were developed from 122 randomly selected primer pairs. Polymorphism and genetic variation were evaluated for 68 accessions representing five populations of S. sieboldii. The number of alleles per locus ranged from four to 18; the expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.59 to 0.92. Twelve loci were successfully amplified in five related species: S. scobinicaulis, S. californica, S. hispida, S. moranensis, and S. jalapensis. Conclusions: These novel expressed sequence tag–derived microsatellite markers will facilitate further population genetic research of S. sieboldii and its close allies of the S. hispida group. PMID:28337395

  2. Isolation and Characterization of Sixteen Polymorphic Microsatellite Loci in the Golden Apple Snail Pomacea canaliculata

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lian; Xu, Haigen; Li, Hong; Wu, Jun; Ding, Hui; Liu, Yan

    2011-01-01

    We report the characterization of 16 polymorphic microsatellite markers in the golden apple snail, Pomacea canaliculata, a pest registered in the list of “100 of the world’s worst invasive alien species”. The fast isolation by AFLP (Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism) of sequences containing repeats (FIASCO) method was used to isolate microsatellite loci, and polymorphism was explored with 29 individuals collected in an invasive region from China. These primers showed a number of alleles per locus ranging from three to 13. The ranges of observed and expected heterozygosity were 0.310–0.966 and 0.523–0.898, respectively. These microsatellite markers described here will be useful for population genetic studies of P. canaliculata. PMID:22016640

  3. Isolation and characterization of sixteen polymorphic microsatellite loci in the golden apple snail Pomacea canaliculata.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lian; Xu, Haigen; Li, Hong; Wu, Jun; Ding, Hui; Liu, Yan

    2011-01-01

    We report the characterization of 16 polymorphic microsatellite markers in the golden apple snail, Pomacea canaliculata, a pest registered in the list of "100 of the world's worst invasive alien species". The fast isolation by AFLP (Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism) of sequences containing repeats (FIASCO) method was used to isolate microsatellite loci, and polymorphism was explored with 29 individuals collected in an invasive region from China. These primers showed a number of alleles per locus ranging from three to 13. The ranges of observed and expected heterozygosity were 0.310-0.966 and 0.523-0.898, respectively. These microsatellite markers described here will be useful for population genetic studies of P. canaliculata.

  4. Polymorphic microsatellite loci isolated from Cervus unicolor (Cervidae) show inbreeding in a domesticated population of Taiwan Sambar deer.

    PubMed

    Lin, D Y; Chiang, T Y; Huang, C C; Lin, H D; Tzeng, S J; Kang, S R; Sung, H M; Wu, M C

    2014-05-23

    Primers for eight microsatellites were developed; they successfully amplified DNA from 20 domesticated Formosan Sambar deer (Cervus unicolor swinhoei). All loci were polymorphic, with 10-19 alleles per locus. The average observed heterozygosity across loci and samples was 0.310, ranging from 0 to 0.750 at each locus. All loci but one, CU18, deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium due to excessive homozygosity in these domesticated broodstocks, reflecting inbreeding. These microsatellite loci will be useful, not only for assessment of population structure and genetic variability, but also for conservation of wild deer populations in Taiwan.

  5. Isolation and characterization of novel microsatellite loci in two species of burrowing shrimp Neotrypaea californiensis and Upogebia pugettensis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thalassinid shrimp are recognized as important ecosystem engineers due to their ability to influence the benthic communities they inhabit We describe the isolation and characterization of several microsatellite loci from two species, Neotrypaea californiensis Upogebia pugettensis which inhabit es...

  6. Development of 23 polymorphic microsatellite loci in invasive silver wattle, Acacia dealbata (Fabaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Guillemaud, Thomas; Broadhurst, Linda; Legoff, Isabelle; Henery, Martin; Blin, Aurélie; Ducatillion, Catherine; Ferrando, Nathalie; Malausa, Thibaut

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were developed for silver wattle, Acacia dealbata (Fabaceae), which is both an ornamental and an invasive weed species. It is native to southeastern Australia and invasive in Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Americas. Methods and Results: The pyrosequencing of a microsatellite-enriched genomic DNA library of A. dealbata produced 33,290 sequences and allowed the isolation of 201 loci with a minimum of seven repeats of microsatellite motifs. Amplification tests led to the setup of two multiplex PCR mixes allowing the amplification of 21 loci. The polymorphism of these markers was evaluated on a sample of 32 individuals collected in southeastern Australia. The number of alleles and the expected heterozygosity varied between two and 11, and between 0.11 and 0.88, respectively. Conclusions: The level of polymorphism of this set of 23 microsatellites is large enough to provide valuable information on the genetic structure and the invasion history of A. dealbata. PMID:25995979

  7. Genetic polymorphism of Hucul horse population based on 17 microsatellite loci.

    PubMed

    Fornal, Agnieszka; Radko, Anna; Piestrzyńska-Kajtoch, Agata

    2013-01-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) loci, i.e. microsatellites are a class of genetic markers commonly used for population studies and parentage control. This study determined the usefulness of microsatellite markers recommended by International Society for Animal Genetics (ISAG) for identification and pedigree analysis in horses based on the example of Polish Hucul horse population (Equus caballus). The set of seventeen microsatellites loci was tested (AHT4, AHT5, ASB2, HMS2, HMS3, HMS6, HMS7, HTG10, HTG4, HTG6, HTG7, VHL20, ASB17, ASB23, CA425, HMS1, LEX3) for 216 individuals. All samples were genotyped and mean number of alleles per locus was estimated (7.00). Means of observed (Ho) and expected (He) heterozygosity were calculated 0.7288 and 0.7027, respectively. The observed heterozygosity was similar to the results of research on Hucul horse population in another area of Carpathians Mountains. The average polymorphism information content (PIC) for analyses of seventeen microsatellite markers indicates the usefulness of this set of markers for Hucul horse parentage testing.

  8. PERMANENT GENETIC RESOURCES: Isolation and characterization of nine microsatellite loci from the chub mackerel, Scomber japonicus (Perciformes, Scombridae).

    PubMed

    Yagishita, N; Kobayashi, T

    2008-03-01

    The stock abundance of the chub mackerel Scomber japonicus - a very important species for fisheries, particularly in Japan - in the Pacific Ocean off Japan has remained at a low level. For studying the population genetics of the chub mackerel, we isolated nine polymorphic microsatellite loci (12-31 alleles/locus; expected heterozygosity, 0.762-0.983) from this species. Cross-species amplification indicated that eight of the nine microsatellite loci in the blue mackerel S. australasicus were polymorphic and functional.

  9. New microsatellite loci for Prosopis alba and P. chilensis (Fabaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Bessega, Cecilia F.; Pometti, Carolina L.; Miller, Joe T.; Watts, Richard; Saidman, Beatriz O.; Vilardi, Juan C.

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: As only six useful microsatellite loci that exhibit broad cross-amplification are so far available for Prosopis species, it is necessary to develop a larger number of codominant markers for population genetic studies. Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers obtained for Prosopis species from a 454 pyrosequencing run were optimized and characterized for studies in P. alba and P. chilensis. • Methods and Results: Twelve markers that were successfully amplified showed polymorphism in P. alba and P. chilensis. The number of alleles per locus ranged between two and seven and heterozygosity estimates ranged from 0.2 to 0.8. Most of these loci cross-amplify in P. ruscifolia, P. flexuosa, P. kuntzei, P. glandulosa, and P. pallida. • Conclusions: These loci will enable genetic diversity studies of P. alba and P. chilensis and contribute to fine-scale population structure, indirect estimation of relatedness among individuals, and marker-assisted selection. PMID:25202541

  10. Microsatellite loci in the tiger shark and cross-species amplification using pyrosequencing technology

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Natália J.; Cruz, Vanessa P.; Ashikaga, Fernando Y.; Camargo, Sâmia M.; Oliveira, Claudio; Piercy, Andrew N.; Burgess, George H.; Coelho, Rui; Santos, Miguel N.; Foresti, Fausto

    2016-01-01

    The tiger shark (Galeocerdo cuvier) has a global distribution in tropical and warm temperate seas, and it is caught in numerous fisheries worldwide, mainly as bycatch. It is currently assessed as near threatened by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List. In this study, we identified nine microsatellite loci through next generation sequencing (454 pyrosequencing) using 29 samples from the western Atlantic. The genetic diversity of these loci were assessed and revealed a total of 48 alleles ranging from 3 to 7 alleles per locus (average of 5.3 alleles). Cross-species amplification was successful at most loci for other species such as Carcharhinus longimanus, C. acronotus and Alopias superciliosus. Given the potential applicability of genetic markers for biological conservation, these data may contribute to the population assessment of this and other species of sharks worldwide. PMID:27635306

  11. Development of twelve microsatellite loci in the red tree corals Primnoa resedaeformis and Primnoa pacifica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrison, Cheryl; Springmann, Marcus J.; Shroades, Kelsey; Stone, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    A suite of tetra-, penta-, and hexa-nucleotide microsatellite loci were developed from Roche 454 pyrosequencing data for the cold-water octocorals Primnoa resedaeformis and P. pacifica. Twelve of 98 primer sets tested consistently amplified in 30 P. resedaeformis samples from Baltimore Canyon (western North Atlantic Ocean) and in 24 P. pacifica samples (Shutter Ridge, eastern Gulf of Alaska). The loci displayed moderate levels of allelic diversity (average 7.5 alleles/locus) and heterozygosity (average 47 %). Levels of genetic diversity were sufficient to produce unique multi-locus genotypes and to distinguish species. These common species are long-lived (hundreds of years) and provide essential fish habitat (P. pacifica), yet populations are provided little protection from human activities. These loci will be used to determine regional patterns of population connectivity to inform effective marine spatial planning and ecosystem-based fisheries management.

  12. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci for the endangered wetland plant Adenophora palustris (Campanulaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Otake, Kuniaki; Kondo, Toshiaki; Watanabe, Sonoko; Masumoto, Ikuko; Iwahori, Katsumi; Isagi, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Adenophora palustris (Campanulaceae) is an endangered wetland plant species in Japan. Although it is widely distributed in East Asia, only six extant populations are known in Japan, with fewer than 1000 individuals in total. We developed 15 microsatellite markers for this species and confirmed their utility for the closely related species A. triphylla var. japonica. Methods and Results: Ten polymorphic loci were characterized for genetic variation within three populations of A. palustris. The number of alleles per locus ranged from four to 15, with an average of 9.3; the expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.48 to 0.89, with an average of 0.74. Nine loci were successfully amplified in A. triphylla var. japonica, and three of these loci showed polymorphism. Conclusions: These markers are useful for investigating genetic diversity and gene flow within and among remnant populations of A. palustris in Japan, and the results will provide crucial information for conservation. PMID:27672523

  13. Isolation and characterization of macaroni penguin (Eudyptes chrysolophus) microsatellite loci and their utility in other penguin species (Spheniscidae, AVES).

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Sophia; Hart, Tom; Dawson, Deborah A; Horsburgh, Gavin J; Trathan, Philip N; Rogers, Alex D

    2009-11-01

    We report the characterization of 25 microsatellite loci isolated from the macaroni penguin (Eudyptes chrysolophus). Thirteen loci were arranged into four multiplex sets for future genetic studies of macaroni penguin populations. All 25 loci were tested separately in each of four other penguin species [Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae), chinstrap penguin (Pygoscelis antarctica), gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua) and king penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus)]. Between eight and 12 loci were polymorphic per species. These loci are expected to be useful for studies of population genetic structure in a range of penguin species.

  14. Development of 12 polymorphic microsatellite loci for the endangered Seychelles palm Lodoicea maldivica (Arecaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Emma J.; Määttänen, Kirsti; Kaiser-Bunbury, Christopher N.; Buser, Andres; Fleischer-Dogley, Frauke; Kettle, Chris J.

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: The evolutionarily and ecologically distinct coco de mer palm Lodoicea maldivica (Arecaceae) is endemic to two islands in the Seychelles. Before colonization of the islands by man, the endangered palm formed large monodominant stands, but its natural range is now restricted to four main populations and several patches of isolated individuals. Microsatellite markers were designed to investigate the genetic structure of the remaining natural populations of L. maldivica. Methods and Results: We developed 12 polymorphic and three monomorphic microsatellite markers for this species, with a mean number of alleles per locus of 13.2 (range 5–21) and expected heterozygosity values ranging from 0.31–0.91 for the polymorphic loci. Conclusions: These markers enable us to study the patterns of genetic diversity, contemporary seed dispersal, and the fine-scale spatial genetic structure of this important conservation flagship species. PMID:27144106

  15. Variable microsatellite loci for population genetic analysis of Old World monkey lice (Pedicinus sp.).

    PubMed

    Scholl, Katlyn; Allen, Julie M; Leendertz, Fabian H; Chapman, Colin A; Reed, David L

    2012-10-01

    Parasitic lice have been valuable informants of their host's evolutionary history because they complete their entire life cycle on the host and move between hosts primarily through direct host-to-host contact. Therefore, lice are confined to their hosts both in ecological and evolutionary time. Lice on great apes have been studied to examine details of their host's evolutionary history; however, species of Pedicinus, which parasitize the Old World monkeys, are less well known. We sampled lice from 2 groups of red colobus (Procolobus spp.) in Kibale National Park in Uganda and from red colobus and black and white colobus (Procolobus polycomos) in Taï National Park in Côte d'Ivoire. We used next-generation sequencing data analysis and the human body louse (Pediculus humanus humanus) genome to search for microsatellites for population genetic studies of Pedicinus lice. The 96 primer sets for microsatellite loci designed from the human body louse genome failed to amplify microsatellites in Pedicinus sp., perhaps due to the fast rate of evolution in parasitic lice. Of 63 microsatellites identified by next-generation sequencing data analysis of Pedicinus sp., 12 were variable among populations and 9 were variable within a single population. Our results suggest that these loci will be useful across the genus Pedicinus. We found that the lice in Uganda are not structured according to their hosts' social group; rather, 2 non-interbreeding populations of lice were found on both groups of red colobus. Because direct host-to-host contact is usually required for lice to move among hosts, these lice could be useful for identification and study of behavioral interactions between primate species.

  16. Characterization of microsatellite loci for the pitcher plant midge, Metriocnemus knabi Coq. (Diptera: Chironomidae).

    PubMed

    Rasic, Gordana; Maxwell, Sheri A; Keyghobadi, Nusha

    2009-09-01

    As a component of the inquiline community of the purple pitcher plant (Sarracenia purpurea), the pitcher plant midge Metriocneus knabi has been the subject of various ecological studies. However, very little is known about its characteristics beyond the larval stage, in particular the dispersal ability of adults. This study presents new molecular tools developed for testing of evolutionary and ecological questions in natural populations of this species. We describe a set of 12 microsatellite loci specific to M. knabi that are sufficiently polymorphic to provide insight into population genetic structure and dispersal patterns.

  17. Ten polymorphic microsatellite loci for Allobates femoralis, an Amazonian dendrobatoid frog.

    PubMed

    Jehle, R; Gasser, H; Pfunder, M; Amézquita, A; Lima, A P; Hödl, W

    2008-11-01

    Within the anuran amphibians, dendrobatoids (poison-arrow frogs) are renowned for their parental care, but the lack of highly variable DNA markers so far precluded precise and comprehensive measurements of their genetic mating system. Here we present 10 polymorphic microsatellites for Allobates femoralis, a widespread dendrobatoid from the Amazon basin. In 24 field-collected individuals, we found between seven and 15 alleles per locus, without deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium or linkage disequilibrium. The loci will be employed to quantify reproductive success in view of male territoriality and female mate choice, as well as to determine the fine-scale genetic structure of local populations.

  18. [Polymorphism of microsatellite loci in cultivars and species of pear (Pyrus L.)].

    PubMed

    Iakovin, N A; Fesenko, I A; Isachkin, A V; Karlov, G I

    2011-05-01

    Using five SSR markers, polymorphism ofmicrosatellite loci was examined in 46 cultivars and five species of pear (Pyrus ussuriensis, P. bretscgneideri, P. pyraster, and P. elaegnifolia). Most of the accessions examined demonstrated the presence of unique allele sets. The degree of relationship between Russian and Western European pear cultivar was established. It was demonstrated that P. ussuriensis and its first generation progeny were genetically distant from typical cultivars of P. communis, as well as from the P. communis x P. ussuriensis hybrids of later generations. SSR estimates of the cultivar relatedness were shown to correlate with the corresponding pedigree-based estimates. A number of SSR alleles specific to P. ussuriensis were identified. Based on the analysis of microsatellite loci, the allelic composition was determined for each cultivar examined. These data can serve as a molecular certificate of the cultivar.

  19. Novel polymorphic microsatellite loci for distinguishing rock bass (Ambloplites rupestris), Roanoke bass (Ambloplites cavifrons), and their hybrids.

    PubMed

    Eschenroeder, Jackman C; Roberts, James H

    2016-10-01

    The rock bass (Ambloplites rupestris) is a popular sport-fish native to the Mississippi and Great Lakes basins of North America. The species has been widely introduced outside its native range, including into Atlantic-slope streams of Virginia where it may hybridize with an imperiled, similar-looking congener, the Roanoke bass (Ambloplites cavifrons). In this study, we identified and evaluated novel molecular markers to facilitate identification of these species and study the extent of hybridization. Using molecular libraries developed from A. rupestris, we identified a suite of candidate nuclear microsatellite loci, synthesized primer sets, and tested these markers for amplification and polymorphism in populations of both species. We then calculated standard diversity statistics within and differentiation statistics between species, the latter providing an indication of marker power for distinguishing the species and their hybrids. Additionally, we evaluated our efficiency for identifying hybrids by classifying simulated genotypes of known ancestry. Eleven loci were polymorphic (2-22 alleles per locus) and reliably amplified in both species. Multilocus genetic differentiation between A. cavifrons and A. rupestris was quite high (F ST  = 0.66; D LR  = 19.3), indicating the high statistical power of this marker set for species and hybrid identification. Analyses of simulated data suggested these markers reliably distinguish between hybrids and non-hybrids, as well as between F1 hybrids and backcrossed individuals. This panel of 11 loci should prove useful for understanding patterns of hybridization between A. rupestris and A. cavifrons. As the first microsatellite markers developed for Ambloplites, these markers also should prove broadly useful for population genetic studies of this genus.

  20. Inheritance of microsatellite loci in the polyploid lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pyatskowit, J.D.; Krueger, C.C.; Kincaid, H.L.; May, B.

    2001-01-01

    Inheritance in the expression of amplicons for four microsatellite primer pairs was determined using 10 families created from gametes of wild lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens). Loci Afu34 and Afu68 expressed a maximum of two even-intensity bands per individual and had progeny genotype ratios that fit disomic inheritance (P > 0.05). Some variation exhibited at Afu34 and Afu68 was attributable to a null allele. Genotype expression at both loci also indicated that one female parent had transmitted unreduced gametes. Primer Afu39 amplified products that exhibited four gene doses, where genotype counts fit expected ratios for disomic inheritance (P > 0.05) indicating amplification of products from two disomic loci that share alleles. Meiotic drive was evident at the Afu39 loci based on a test for random segregation (P < 0.05). Only the expression of Afu19 gave evidence of tetrasomic inheritance based on a single progeny potentially produced by a double reduction gamete. No evidence for proposed octoploid inheritance was observed.

  1. Isolation and characterization of nine polymorphic microsatellite loci of the kelp greenling, Hexagrammos decagrammus, a temperate reef fish.

    PubMed

    Freiwald, Jan; Stewart, Nathan L; Yates, Devona C; Bernardi, Giacomo

    2009-03-01

    Nine polymorphic microsatellite loci were developed and characterized for the temperate reef fish species, Hexagrammos decagrammus (kelp greenling). The number of alleles varied from three to 22 in a sample of 22 individuals from one population. Expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.354 to 0.979. These microsatellites allow us to investigate reproductive success of individuals, alternative mating strategies as well as population structure and metapopulation dynamics of this species.

  2. Development and characterization of microsatellite loci for Lindera glauca (Lauraceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Biao; Dong, Shubin; Qi, Ji; Zhang, Limei; Ha, Denglong; Zhang, Zhixiang

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite primers were developed to investigate population genetic structure in Lindera glauca (Lauraceae). Methods and Results: Twenty-five microsatellite primers were developed and optimized for L. glauca using Illumina’s Solexa sequencing technology. These novel primers were found to be polymorphic in nine wild L. glauca populations with 81 total alleles confirmed and genotyped via capillary gel electrophoresis. The total number of alleles, observed heterozygosity, and expected heterozygosity for each population ranged from one to four, from 0.00 to 0.90, and from 0.00 to 0.79, respectively. In addition, the 25 primers were tested in 10 additional individuals of the related species L. communis, and all but four markers showed good amplification results. Conclusions: This set of microsatellite primers is the first specifically developed for L. glauca and will facilitate studies of genetic diversity and evolution among populations of this species. PMID:27843729

  3. Isolation of 18 microsatellite loci in the desert mistletoe Phoradendron californicum (Santalaceae) via 454 pyrosequencing1

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo, Juan M.; Munguia-Vega, Adrian; Rodríguez-Estrella, Ricardo; Bascompte, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Microsatellite primers were developed for the parasitic mistletoe Phoradendron californicum to investigate to what extent population genetic structure depends on host tree distribution within a highly fragmented landscape. • Methods and Results: Fourteen unlinked polymorphic and four monomorphic nuclear microsatellite markers were developed using a genomic shotgun pyrosequencing method. A total of 187 alleles plus four monomorphic loci alleles were found in 98 individuals sampled in three populations from the Sonoran Desert in the Baja California peninsula (Mexico). Loci averaged 13.3 alleles per locus (range 4–28), and observed and expected heterozygosities within populations varied from 0.167–0.879 and 0.364–0.932, respectively. • Conclusions: Levels of polymorphism of the reported markers are adequate for studies of diversity and fragmentation in natural populations of this parasitic plant. Cross-species amplifications in P. juniperinum and P. diguetianum only showed four markers that could be useful in P. diguetianum. PMID:25202503

  4. Cytogenetics and characterization of microsatellite loci for a South American pioneer tree species, Croton floribundus.

    PubMed

    Silvestrini, Milene; Pinto-Maglio, Cecília A F; Zucchi, Maria I; dos Santos, Flavio A M

    2013-12-01

    Despite the recent advances in plant population genetic studies, the lack of information regarding pedigree, ploidy level, or mode of inheritance for many polyploids can compromise the analysis of the molecular data produced. The aim of this study was to examine both microsatellite and cytogenetic characteristics of the pioneer tree Croton floribundus Spreng. (Euphorbiaceae) to test for the occurrence of polyploidy in the species and to evaluate its implications for the appropriate use of SSR markers. Seven microsatellite markers were developed and screened for 62 individuals from a semi-deciduous tropical forest in Brazil. Chromosome number, meiotic behavior, and pollen viability were evaluated from male flower buds. All SSR loci were highly polymorphic. The number of bivalents observed in meiosis n = 56 (2n = 8× = 112) and the maximum number of alleles per individual (Ni = 8) demonstrated the occurrence of polyploidy in C. floribundus. The normal meiotic pairing and the high pollen viability suggested that C. floribundus is a regular and stable polyploid, most likely an allopolyploid. The combined SSR and cytogenetic data provided new evidence on the origin and evolution of the species as well as assured the accurate use of SSR loci for population genetic studies of the polyploid pioneer species.

  5. Allele frequencies of microsatellite loci for genetic characterization of a Sicilian bovine population.

    PubMed

    Cosenza, M; Reale, S; Lupo, T; Vitale, F; Caracappa, S

    2015-01-30

    Short tandem repeats are used as an effective method to trace DNA markers in genotyping. Using a standardized kit, we tested 11 microsatellite markers recommended by the International Society for Animal Genetics (ISAG) in a sample of 495 Sicilian cattle. The aim of this study was to investigate the allele frequencies in the Sicilian cattle population to provide a reference database and at the same time to assess the use of the ISAG microsatellite panel for pedigree analysis. DNA samples were collected from blood and amplified in an 11-plex polymerase chain reaction (PCR); PCR products were injected in a 3130 Genetic Analyzer. All loci showed high mean polymorphism information content (0.768), and the observed mean heterozygosity was less than the expected value (0.732 vs 0.794, respectively). The exact test for Hardy-Weinberg proportions, allele number, and inbreeding coefficient were calculated. Our results indicated that equilibrium was not always maintained. The observed mean homozygote value exceeded the expected value (132.81 vs 102.14), but no evidence for allele dropout was found. These results could be explained by a non-random mating; further studies using a larger number of animals could confirm or invalidate this hypothesis. The probability of identity and exclusion of a locus were also estimated and proved to be useful in paternity testing. The ISAG microsatellite panel is useful to screen the Sicilian bovine kinship. Currently, an allele frequency database is being constructed.

  6. Characterization of microsatellite loci in Phormia regina towards expanding molecular applications in forensic entomology.

    PubMed

    Farncombe, K M; Beresford, D; Kyle, C J

    2014-07-01

    Forensic entomology involves the use of insects and arthropods to assist a spectrum of medico-criminal investigations that range from identifying cases of abuse, corpse movements, and most commonly, post mortem interval estimates. Many of these applications focus on the use of blowflies given their predicable life history characteristics in their larval stages. Molecular tools have become increasingly important in the unambiguous identification of larval blowfly species, however, these same tools have the potential to broaden the array of molecular applications in forensic entomology to include individual identifications and population assignments. Herein, we establish a microsatellite profiling system for the blowfly, Phormiaregina (Diptera: Calliphoridae). The goal being to create a system to identify the population genetic structure of this species and subsequently establish if these data are amenable to identifying corpse movements based on the geographic distribution of specific genetic clusters of blowflies. Using next generation sequencing technology, we screened a partial genomic DNA sequence library of P.regina, searching for di-, tetra-, and penta-nucleotide microsatellite loci. We identified and developed primers for 84 highly repetitive segments of DNA, of which 14 revealed consistent genotypes and reasonable levels of genetic variation (4-26 alleles/locus; heterozygosity ranged from 0.385 to 0.909). This study provides the first step in assessing the utility of microsatellite markers to track the movements and sources of corpses via blowflies.

  7. Microsatellite loci to recognize species for the cheese starter and contaminating strains associated with cheese manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Giraud, Frédéric; Giraud, Tatiana; Aguileta, Gabriela; Fournier, Elisabeth; Samson, Robert; Cruaud, Corine; Lacoste, Sandrine; Ropars, Jeanne; Tellier, Aurélien; Dupont, Joëlle

    2010-02-28

    We report the development of 17 microsatellite markers in the cheese fungi Penicillium camemberti and P. roqueforti, using an enrichment protocol. Polymorphism and cross-amplification were explored using 23 isolates of P. camemberti, 26 isolates of P. roqueforti, and 2 isolates of each of the P. chrysogenum and P. nalgiovense species, used to produce meat fermented products. The markers appeared useful for differentiating species, both using their amplification sizes and the sequences of their flanking regions. The microsatellite locus PC4 was particularly suitable for distinguishing contaminant species closely related to P. camemberti and for clarifying the phylogenetic relationship of this species with its supposed ancestral form, P. commune. We analyzed 22 isolates from different culture collections assigned to the morphospecies P. commune, most of them occurring as food spoilers, mainly from the cheese environment. None of them exhibited identical sequences with the ex-type isolate of the species P. commune. They were instead distributed into two other distinct lineages, corresponding to the old species P. fuscoglaucum and P. biforme, previously synonymized respectively with P. commune and P. camemberti. The ex-type isolate of P. commune was strictly identical to P. camemberti at all the loci examined. P. caseifulvum, a non toxinogenic species described as a new candidate for cheese fermentation, also exhibited sequences identical to P. camemberti. The microsatellite locus PC4 may therefore be considered as a useful candidate for the barcode of these economically important species.

  8. Differential structuring of human populations for homologous X and Y microsatellite loci.

    PubMed Central

    Scozzari, R; Cruciani, F; Malaspina, P; Santolamazza, P; Ciminelli, B M; Torroni, A; Modiano, D; Wallace, D C; Kidd, K K; Olckers, A; Moral, P; Terrenato, L; Akar, N; Qamar, R; Mansoor, A; Mehdi, S Q; Meloni, G; Vona, G; Cole, D E; Cai, W; Novelletto, A

    1997-01-01

    The global pattern of variation at the homologous microsatellite loci DYS413 (Yq11) and DXS8174 and DXS8175 (Xp22) was analyzed by examination of 30 world populations from four continents, accounting for more than 1,100 chromosomes per locus. The data showed discordant patterns of among- and within-population gene diversity for the Y-linked and the X-linked microsatellites. For the Y-linked polymorphism, all groups of populations displayed high FST values (the correlation between random haplotypes within subpopulations, relative to haplotypes of the total population) and showed a general trend for the haplotypes to cluster in a population-specific way. This was especially true for sub-Saharan African populations. The data also indicated that a large fraction of the variation among populations was due to the accumulation of new variants associated with the radiation process. Europeans exhibited the highest level of within-population haplotype diversity, whereas sub-Saharan Africans showed the lowest. In contrast, data for the two X-linked polymorphisms were concordant in showing lower FST values, as compared with those for DYS413, but higher within-population variances, for African versus non-African populations. Whereas the results for the X-linked loci agreed with a model of greater antiquity for the African populations, those for DYS413 showed a confounding pattern that is apparently at odds with such a model. Possible factors involved in this differential structuring for homologous X and Y microsatellite polymorphisms are discussed. Images Figure 1 PMID:9326337

  9. Development of microsatellite loci of pod mahogany, Afzelia quanzensis (Fabaceae), by Illumina shotgun sequencing, and cross-amplification in A. africana1

    PubMed Central

    Jinga, Percy; Palagi, Jason; Ashley, Mary V.

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite loci were developed for Afzelia quanzensis (Fabaceae) as a first step toward investigating genetic diversity and population structure of the species in its native range. Methods and Results: Illumina shotgun sequencing was used to generate raw sequence reads, which were searched for potential microsatellite loci. A total of 70 potential microsatellite loci were tested for amplification and polymorphism, and 39 successfully amplified. Of the 39 loci that amplified, 12 were polymorphic while 27 were monomorphic. The 12 polymorphic loci were cross-amplified in A. africana, and eight successfully amplified. Conclusions: The 12 polymorphic microsatellite loci can be used for genetic studies of A. quanzensis, which can help determine its conservation status. Eight loci can also be used for genotyping in A. africana. PMID:27347453

  10. Short Communication Microsatellite loci in the tetraploid spined loach, Cobitis biwae, and cross-species amplification in four related species.

    PubMed

    Jablonska, O; Marín, A; Kowalewska, K; Fujimoto, T; Arai, K

    2016-09-23

    Fifteen microsatellite loci were identified in the tetraploid spined loach, Cobitis biwae (Teleostei: Cobitidae). Among these, 14 were polymorphic (5-31 alleles) and showed moderate to high cross-species amplification transferability in four related species, Cobitis matsubarai, Cobitis taenia, Misgurnus anguillicaudatus, and Misgurnus fossilis. The loci, described herein, will be useful for population genetics, phylogeny, parentage analysis, and detection of hybridization among Cobitis species.

  11. Significant variance in genetic diversity among populations of Schistosoma haematobium detected using microsatellite DNA loci from a genome-wide database

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Urogenital schistosomiasis caused by Schistosoma haematobium is widely distributed across Africa and is increasingly being targeted for control. Genome sequences and population genetic parameters can give insight into the potential for population- or species-level drug resistance. Microsatellite DNA loci are genetic markers in wide use by Schistosoma researchers, but there are few primers available for S. haematobium. Methods We sequenced 1,058,114 random DNA fragments from clonal cercariae collected from a snail infected with a single Schistosoma haematobium miracidium. We assembled and aligned the S. haematobium sequences to the genomes of S. mansoni and S. japonicum, identifying microsatellite DNA loci across all three species and designing primers to amplify the loci in S. haematobium. To validate our primers, we screened 32 randomly selected primer pairs with population samples of S. haematobium. Results We designed >13,790 primer pairs to amplify unique microsatellite loci in S. haematobium, (available at http://www.cebio.org/projetos/schistosoma-haematobium-genome). The three Schistosoma genomes contained similar overall frequencies of microsatellites, but the frequency and length distributions of specific motifs differed among species. We identified 15 primer pairs that amplified consistently and were easily scored. We genotyped these 15 loci in S. haematobium individuals from six locations: Zanzibar had the highest levels of diversity; Malawi, Mauritius, Nigeria, and Senegal were nearly as diverse; but the sample from South Africa was much less diverse. Conclusions About half of the primers in the database of Schistosoma haematobium microsatellite DNA loci should yield amplifiable and easily scored polymorphic markers, thus providing thousands of potential markers. Sequence conservation among S. haematobium, S. japonicum, and S. mansoni is relatively high, thus it should now be possible to identify markers that are universal among Schistosoma

  12. Inheritance mode of microsatellite loci and their use for kinship analysis in the Pacific oyster ( Crassostrea gigas)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qi; Zheng, Xiaodong; Yu, Ruihai

    2008-08-01

    Five full-sib families of the Pacific oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) larvae were used to study the mode of inheritance at eight microsatellite loci, and the feasibility of these markers for kinship estimate was also examined. All eight microsatellite loci were compatible with Mendelian inheritance. Neither evidence of sex-linked barriers to transmission nor evidence of major barriers to fertilization between gametes from the parents was shown. Three of the eight loci showed the presence of null alleles in four families, demonstrating the need to conduct comprehensive species-specific inheritance studies for microsatellite loci used in population genetic studies. Although the null allele heterozygotes were considered as homozygotes in the calculation of genetic distance, offspring from five full-sib families were unambiguously discriminated in the neighbor-joining dendrogram. This result indicates that the microsatellite markers may be capable of discriminating between related and unrelated oyster larvae in the absence of pedigree information, and is applicable to the investigation of the effective number of parents contributing to the hatchery population of the Pacific oyster.

  13. Genetic comparison of lake sturgeon populations: Differentiation based on allelic frequencies at seven microsatellite loci

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McQuown, E.; Krueger, C.C.; Kincaid, H.L.; Gall, G.A.E.; May, B.

    2003-01-01

    The lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) has recently become a high priority for restoration management because of the near extinction of the species from many areas of North America. The identification of the level of population differentiation that naturally exists among lake sturgeon populations will be useful in the development of management plans to conserve and restore diversity, and in the choice of donor populations to use for re-introduction. Genetic variation among and within 210 lake sturgeon collected from seven locations (St. Lawrence River, Des Prairies River (tributary to the St. Lawrence River), Mattagami River (Hudson Bay drainage), Menominee River (Lake Michigan drainage), Wolf River (Lake Michigan drainage), Niagara River, and Lake Erie) was examined based on allelic variation at seven microsatellite loci (four disomic and three putative tetrasomic). High levels of variability were detected at these loci. Analyses revealed an average of 8.6 alleles per locus (range 5 to 12 alleles per locus) and heterozygosity values at the four disomic loci ranging from 0.46 to 0.66. Multivariate factor analysis of Nei's genetic distance values produced three distinct population groups that were organized by geography: 1) Mattagami (northern Quebec), 2) Menominee/ Wolf (Lake Michigan - Wisconsin), and 3) St. Lawrence/ Des Prairies/ Niagara/ Erie (lower Great Lakes). Differences based on G-tests summed over all loci occurred between all possible paired comparisons of the collections (P < 0.01). These analyses indicated that lake sturgeon populations are differentiated within the Great Lakes basin. Managers of this species will need to identify individual populations in their jurisdictions and provide separate consideration for their conservation and rehabilitation.

  14. Development and characterization of 16 polymorphic microsatellite loci for the Alaska blackfish (Esociformes: Dallia pectoralis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, Matthew A.; Sage, George K.; DeWilde, Rachel L.; López, J. Andres; Talbot, Sandra L.

    2014-01-01

    Blackfishes (Esociformes: Esocidae: Dallia), small fishes with relictual distributions, are unique in being the only primary freshwater fish genus endemic to Beringia. Although the number of species of Dallia is debated, disjunct populations and distinct mitochondrial divisions that predate the end of the last glacial maximum are apparent. We developed sixteen polymorphic microsatellites from the Alaska blackfish (Dallia pectoralis) to study genetic diversity in Dallia. Genotypes from two populations, Denali (n = 31) and Bethel (n = 35), demonstrated the usefulness of the loci for population-level investigation. Observed and expected heterozygosity averaged 18.6 and 19.8 % in Denali and 61.1 and 63.7 % in Bethel. Number of alleles at each locus averaged 3.50 in Denali and 9.63 in Bethel. The observed signature of variability and structuring between populations is consistent with mitochondrial data.

  15. Increased homozygosity at four microsatellite marker loci in Pima Indian DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sell, S.M.; Knowler, W.C.; Bogardus, C.

    1994-09-01

    Using 100 Marshfield-derived (MFD) microsatellite markers (screening set v.2) and DNA from 13 Pima Indians, none of whom were first degree relatives, we observed 4 marker loci on 3 different chromosomes which showed marked deviation from the reported heterozygosities for the Caucasian CEPH families. These 4 markers were also tested in 60 individuals from 8 different multigenerational pedigrees. For the marker MFD77, only a single allele was observed for all individuals tested. Our results indicate that a high degree of genetic homogeneity occurs in limited regions of the genome in the Pima Indian population. We are investigating the possibility that these regions of homogeneity might be associated with disease susceptibility in this population with a high prevalence of obesity, gallstones and diabetes mellitus.

  16. Isolation and characterization of 10 polymorphic microsatellite loci for the endangered Galapagos-endemic whitespotted sandbass (Paralabrax albomaculatus).

    PubMed

    Bertolotti, Alicia C; Griffiths, Sarah M; Truelove, Nathan K; Box, Stephen J; Preziosi, Richard F; Salinas de Leon, Pelayo

    2015-01-01

    The white-spotted sandbass (Paralabrax albomaculatus) is a commercially important species in the Galapagos Marine Reserve, but is classified as endangered in the IUCN Red List. For this study, 10 microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized using Illumina paired-end sequencing. These loci can be used for genetic studies of population structure and connectivity to aid in the management of the white-spotted sandbass and other closely-related species. The 10 characterized loci were polymorphic, with 11-49 alleles per locus, and observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.575 to 0.964. This set of markers is the first to be developed for this species.

  17. Genotyping the clonal structure of a gorgonian coral, Junceella juncea (Anthozoa: Octocorallia), using microsatellite loci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shang-Yin Vanson; Yu, Hon-Tsen; Fan, Tung-Yung; Dai, Chang-Feng

    2005-11-01

    The identification of different clones is fundamental to the study of population structure among organisms with mixed reproductive modes such as cnidarians. However, due to the low genetic variation of coral mtDNA and contamination by zooxanthellate DNA, very few molecular markers are available for studying the clonal structure of cnidarians. Herein we used four polymorphic loci of microsatellite DNA isolated from a zooxanthellae-free octocoral, Junceella juncea, to study its clonal structure in seven populations collected from three localities in Taiwan. In total, 40 multilocus genotypes were found among 152 colonies, and the number of genotypes (clones) identified in the seven populations ranged from 2 to 16. Each of the 40 multilocus genotypes was restricted to a single population, even where adjacent populations were only 100 m distant. The ratio of observed to expected genotypic diversity (Go:Ge) ranged from 0.217 to 0.650, and Go showed a significant departure from Ge ( p<0.05) at each site indicating that asexual fragmentation may play a major role in the maintenance of established populations. Mean relatedness ( R) values showed that genotypes within reefs were more closely related than those between regions. The results indicate that microsatellites are useful for discerning the clonal structures among and within populations at different spatial scales.

  18. Identification and characterization of the first microsatellite loci for the thick-shelled river mussel Unio crassus (Bivalvia: Unionidae).

    PubMed

    Sell, Jerzy; Mioduchowska, Monika; Kaczmarczyk, Agnieszka; Szymańczak, Robert

    2013-02-01

    The thick-shelled river mussel Unio crassus is critically endangered throughout its range as a result of increasing human activity and habitat loss. Next generation DNA sequencing was used to develop a set of microsatellite markers that can be used for future ecological and population genetics studies of U. crassus. A total of 11 polymorphic loci were identified and characterized using 57 individuals from two Polish populations. Numbers of alleles ranged from 2 to 15 and expected heterozygosity levels ranged from 0.069 to 0.899. Deficiency of heterozygous genotypes was observed in four loci. Marker independence was confirmed with tests for linkage disequilibrium, however, analyses indicated evidence of null alleles in four loci. The microsatellite markers developed specifically for U. crassus provide a valuable tool for future ecological, population genetic assessments, and conservation management of this species.

  19. Characterization of microsatellite loci for an Australian epiphytic orchid, Dendrobium calamiforme, using illumina sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Trapnell, Dorset W.; Beasley, Rochelle R.; Lance, Stacey L.; Field, Ashley R.; Jones, Kenneth L.

    2015-06-05

    Our premise describes how microsatellite loci were developed for the epiphytic pencil orchid Dendrobium calamiforme for population genetic and phylogeographic investigation of this Australian taxon. Nineteen microsatellite loci were identified from an Illumina paired-end shotgun library of D. calamiforme. Polymorphism and genetic diversity were assessed in 24 individuals from five populations separated by a maximum distance of ~80 km. All loci were polymorphic with two to 14 alleles per locus, expected heterozygosity ranging from 0.486 to 0.902, and probability of identity values ranging from 0.018 to 0.380. In conclusion, these novel markers will serve as valuable tools for investigation of levels of genetic diversity as well as patterns of gene flow, genetic structure, and phylogeographic history.

  20. Development and characterization of microsatellite loci for the endangered scrub Lupine, Lupinus aridorum (Fabaceae)

    SciTech Connect

    Ricono, Angela; Bupp, Glen; Peterson, Cheryl; Nunziata, Schyler O.; Lance, Stacey L.; Pruett, Christin L.

    2015-04-01

    Microsatellite primers were developed in scrub lupine (Lupinus aridorum, Fabaceae), an endemic species to Florida that is listed as endangered in the United States, to assess connectivity among populations, identify hybrids, and examine genetic diversity. We isolated and characterized 12 microsatellite loci polymorphic in scrub lupine or in closely related species (i.e., sky-blue lupine [L. diffusus] and Gulf Coast lupine [L. westianus]). Loci showed low to moderate polymorphism, ranging from two to 14 alleles per locus and 0.01 to 0.86 observed heterozygosity. In conclusion, these loci are the first developed for Florida species of lupine and will be used to determine differentiation among species and to aid in conservation of the endangered scrub lupine.

  1. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci for alligator gar (Atractosteus spatula) and their variability in two other species (Lepisosteus oculatus and L. osseus) of Lepisosteidae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moyer, G.R.; Sloss, Brian L.; Kreiser, B.R.; Feldheim, K.A.

    2009-01-01

    We report on the isolation of 17 polymorphic microsatellite loci from alligator gar (Atractosteus spatula), a large-bodied species that has experienced population declines across much of its range. These loci possessed 2-19 alleles and observed heterozygosities of 0-0.974. All loci conformed to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium expectations, and none exhibited linkage disequilibrium. Nine and eight of these loci were found to be polymorphic in the related species Lepisosteus oculatus and L. osseus, respectively. These microsatellite loci should prove useful in conservation efforts of A. spatula through the study of population structure and hatchery broodstock management. ?? 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Microsatellites loci reveal heterozygosis and population structure in vampire bats (Desmodus rotundus) (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae) of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Romero-Nava, Claudia; León-Paniagua, Livia; Ortega, Jorge

    2014-06-01

    A limited number of studies have focused on the population genetic structure of vampire bats (Desmous rotundus) in America. This medium-sized bat is distributed in tropical areas of the continent with high prevalence in forested livestock areas. The aim of this work was to characterize the vampire population structure and their genetic differentiation. For this, we followed standard methods by which live vampires (caught by mist-netting) and preserved material from scientific collections, were obtained for a total of 15 different locations, ranging from Chihuahua (North) to Quintana Roo (Southeast). Tissue samples were obtained from both live and collected animals, and the genetic differentiation, within and among localities, was assessed by the use of seven microsatellite loci. Our results showed that all loci were polymorphic and no private alleles were detected. High levels of heterozygosis were detected when the proportion of alleles in each locus were compared. Pairwise (ST) and R(ST) detected significant genetic differentiation among individuals from different localities. Our population structure results indicate the presence of eleven clusters, with a high percentage of assigned individuals to some specific collecting site.

  3. Characterization of 22 highly polymorphic microsatellite loci in the cosmopolitan fungal plant pathogen Verticillium dahliae. Permanent Genetic Resources added to Molecular Ecology Resources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twenty-two microsatellite loci were characterized in the soilborne plant pathogenic fungus Verticillium dahliae by analysis of the genome sequence. All loci were polymorphic in at least two of three populations of V. dahliae tested and collected from lettuce, spinach and tomato. These loci were us...

  4. Inheritance pattern of microsatellite loci and their use for kinship analysis in the Japanese scallop Patinopecten yessoensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kefeng; Li, Qi

    2009-06-01

    The inheritance mode of seven microsatellite markers was investigated in Patinopecten yessoensis larvae from four controlled crosses, and the feasibility of using these markers for kinship estimation was also examined. All the seven microsatellite loci were compatible with Mendelian inheritance. Neither sex-linked barriers to transmission nor major barriers to fertilization between gametes from the parents were evident. Two of the seven loci showed the presence of null alleles in two families, suggesting the need to conduct comprehensive species-specific inheritance studies for microsatellite loci used in population genetic studies. However, even if the null allele heterozygotes were considered as homozygotes in the calculation of genetic distance, offspring from four families were all unambiguously discriminated in the neighbor-joining dendrogram. This result indicates that the microsatellite markers used may be capable of discriminating between related and unrelated scallop larvae in the absence of pedigree information, and of investigating the effective number of parents contributing to the hatchery population of the Japanese scallop.

  5. Development and characterization of microsatellite loci for Ficus hirta (Moraceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Linna; Nason, John D.; Liang, Dan; Ge, Xuejun; Yu, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite primers were developed to investigate population genetic structure in Ficus hirta (Moraceae). Methods and Results: Sixteen microsatellite primers were developed and optimized for F. hirta using Illumina paired-end sequencing of pre-receptive and receptive developmental-phase female flowers. Out of 16 primers, nine were found to be polymorphic in four populations of F. hirta. Alleles per locus ranged from two to 15 across the 94 F. hirta individuals, while within-population observed and expected heterozygosity per locus ranged from 0.000 to 0.955 and from 0.000 to 0.882, respectively. In addition, the 16 primers were tested in 29 additional Ficus species, with all found to amplify in at least 11 of these species and with most amplifying in a majority of the species. Conclusions: This set of microsatellite primers is the first specifically developed for F. hirta and will facilitate studies of genetic diversity within and genetic differentiation among populations of Ficus species. PMID:26191467

  6. Isolation and characterization of 45 Polymorphie microsatellite loci of turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus) and cross-species amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Shiying; Ma, Aijun; Wang, Xin'an; Huang, Zhihui; Xue, Baogui; Yang, Zhi; Qu, Jiangbo

    2011-03-01

    Turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus) is a flatfish species commercially important for aquaculture. In this study, we generated a microsatellite-enriched genomic DNA library for Scophthalmus maximus, and then isolated and characterized 45 microsatellite loci by genotyping 30 individuals. The observed number of alleles ranged from 2 to 19 with an average of 6.24, while the effective number of alleles ranged from 1.30 to 11.11 with an average of 3.66. The expected heterozygosities varied from 0.235 to 0.925 4 and Polymorphie information content ranged from 0.2044 to 0.903 3, with an average of 0.622. Twelve loci deviated significantly from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, and no significant linkage disequilibrium was observed between any pair of loci after Bonferroni correction. In cross-species amplification, five flatfish species ( Paralichthys lethostigma, Verasper moseri, platichthys stellatus, Hippoglossoides dubius and Cynoglossus semilaevis) showed at least one Polymorphie locus. These Polymorphie microsatellite loci should prove useful for Population analysis of turbot and other related species.

  7. Cross-amplification and characterization of microsatellite loci in Acropora austera from the south-western Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Montoya-Maya, P H; Macdonald, A H H; Schleyer, M H

    2014-02-27

    Here, we report the successful cross-species amplification of previously published acroporid microsatellite markers in the coral Acropora austera from the south-western Indian Ocean. This fast-growing species is a major reef-building coral on South African reefs; however, it is the most damaged coral by scuba diving activity, and is known to be very susceptible to coral bleaching. Neither genetic information nor symbiont-free host tissue was available to develop novel microsatellite markers for this species. Cross-species amplification of previously published microsatellite markers was considered as an alternative to overcome these problems. Of the 21 microsatellite markers tested, 6 were reliably amplified, scored, and found to contain polymorphic loci (3-15 alleles). Although microsatellite sequences are believed to be scarce in the Acropora genome because of its small size, the results of this study and previous research indicate that the microsatellite sequences are well conserved across Acropora species. A detailed screening process identified and quantified the sources of error and bias in the application of these markers (e.g., allele scoring error, failure rates, frequency of null alleles), and may be accounted for in the study of the contemporary gene flow of A. austera in the south-western Indian Ocean.

  8. Genetic status of Asiatic black bear (Ursus thibetanus) reintroduced into South Korea based on mitochondrial DNA and microsatellite loci analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yung-Kun; Hong, Yoon-Jee; Min, Mi-Sook; Kim, Kyung Seok; Kim, Young-Jun; Voloshina, Inna; Myslenkov, Alexander; Smith, Gavin J D; Cuong, Nguyen Dinh; Tho, Huynh Huu; Han, Sang-Hoon; Yang, Doo-Ha; Kim, Chang-Bae; Lee, Hang

    2011-01-01

    The Asiatic black bear is one of the most endangered mammals in South Korea owing to population declines resulting from human exploitation and habitat fragmentation. To restore the black bear population in South Korea, 27 bear cubs from North Korea and Russian Far East (Primorsky Krai) were imported and released into Jirisan National Park, a reservoir of the largest wild population in South Korea, in 2004. To monitor the success of this reintroduction, the genetic diversity and population structure of the reintroduced black bears were measured using both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA markers. Mitochondrial D-loop region DNA sequences (615 bp) of 43 Japanese black bears from previous study and 14 Southeast Asian black bears in this study were employed to obtain phylogenetic inference of the reintroduced black bears. The mitochondrial phylogeny indicated Asiatic black bear populations from Russian Far East and North Korea form a single evolutionary unit distinct from populations from Japan and Southeast Asia. Mean expected heterozygosity (H(E)) across 16 microsatellite loci was 0.648 for Russian and 0.676 for North Korean populations. There was a moderate but significant level of microsatellite differentiation (F(ST) = 0.063) between black bears from the 2 source areas. In addition, genetic evidences revealed that 2 populations are represented as diverging groups, with lingering genetic admixture among individuals of 2 source populations. Relatedness analysis based on genetic markers indicated several discrepancies with the pedigree records. Implication of the phylogenetic and genetic evidences on long-term management of Asiatic black bears in South Korea is discussed.

  9. Genetic structure and gene flow among Komodo dragon populations inferred by microsatellite loci analysis.

    PubMed

    Ciofi, C; Bruford, M W

    1999-12-01

    A general concern for the conservation of endangered species is the maintenance of genetic variation within populations, particularly when they become isolated and reduced in size. Estimates of gene flow and effective population size are therefore important for any conservation initiative directed to the long-term persistence of a species in its natural habitat. In the present study, 10 microsatellite loci were used to assess the level of genetic variability among populations of the Komodo dragon Varanus komodoensis. Effective population size was calculated and gene flow estimates were compared with palaeogeographic data in order to assess the degree of vulnerability of four island populations. Rinca and Flores, currently separated by an isthmus of about 200 m, retained a high level of genetic diversity and showed a high degree of genetic similarity, with gene flow values close to one migrant per generation. The island of Komodo showed by far the highest levels of genetic divergence, and its allelic distinctiveness was considered of great importance in the maintenance of genetic variability within the species. A lack of distinct alleles and low levels of gene flow and genetic variability were found for the small population of Gili Motang island, which was identified as vulnerable to stochastic threats. Our results are potentially important for both the short- and long-term management of the Komodo dragon, and are critical in view of future re-introduction or augmentation in areas where the species is now extinct or depleted.

  10. Microsatellite Loci Analysis Reveals Post-bottleneck Recovery of Genetic Diversity in the Tibetan Antelope

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yurong; Zou, Xiaoyan; Xu, Yongtao; Guo, Xinyi; Li, Shuang; Zhang, Xuze; Su, Mengyu; Ma, Jianbin; Guo, Songchang

    2016-01-01

    The Tibetan antelope (chiru, Pantholops hodgsoni) is one of the most endangered mammals native to the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. The population size has rapidly declined over the last century due to illegal hunting and habitat damage. In the past 10 years, the population has reportedly been expanding due to conservation efforts. Several lines of evidence suggest that the Tibetan antelope has undergone a demographic bottleneck. However, the consequences of the bottleneck on genetic diversity and the post-bottleneck genetic recovery remain unknown. In this study, we investigate the genetic variation of 15 microsatellite loci from two Tibetan antelope populations sampled in 2003 (Pop2003) and 2013 (Pop2013). A higher level of genetic diversity (NA, 13.286; He, 0.840; PIC, 0.813; I, 2.114) was detected in Pop2013, compared to Pop2003 (NA, 12.929; He, 0.818; PIC, 0.789; I, 2.033). We observe that despite passing through the bottleneck, the Tibetan antelope retains high levels of genetic diversity. Furthermore, our results show significant or near significant increases in genetic diversity (He, PIC and I) in Pop2013 compared with Pop2003, which suggests that protection efforts did not arrive too late for the Tibetan antelope. PMID:27739522

  11. Development of nine new microsatellite loci for the American beaver, Castor canadensis (Rodentia: Castoridae), and cross-species amplification in the European beaver, Castor fiber.

    PubMed

    Pelz-Serrano, Karla; Munguia-Vega, Adrian; Piaggio, Antoinette J; Neubaum, Melissa; Munclinger, Pavel; Pártl, Adam; VAN Riper Iii, Charles; Culver, Melanie

    2009-03-01

    We developed nine new nuclear dinucleotide microsatellite loci for Castor canadensis. All loci were polymorphic, except for one. The number of alleles ranged from two to four and from five to 12 in populations from Arizona and Wisconsin, respectively. Average heterozygosity ranged from 0.13 to 0.86 per locus. Since cross-species amplification in Castor fiber was successful only in four loci, we tested also nine recently published C. canadensis loci in the Eurasian species. Eight of the published loci amplified; however, three were monomorphic. The number of alleles was lower in C. fiber than in C. canadensis at all loci tested.

  12. Development of nine new microsatellite loci for the American beaver, Castor canadensis (Rodentia: Castoridae), and cross-species amplification in the European beaver, Castor fiber

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pelz-Serrano, K.; Munguia-Vega, A.; Piaggio, A.J.; Neubaum, M.; Munclinger, P.; PArtl, A.; van Riper, Charles; Culver, M.

    2009-01-01

    We developed nine new nuclear dinucleotide microsatellite loci for Castor canadensis. All loci were polymorphic, except for one. The number of alleles ranged from two to four and from five to 12 in populations from Arizona and Wisconsin, respectively. Average heterozygosity ranged from 0.13 to 0.86 per locus. Since cross-species amplification in Castor fiber was successful only in four loci, we tested also nine recently published C. canadensis loci in the Eurasian species. Eight of the published loci amplified; however, three were monomorphic. The number of alleles was lower in C. fiber than in C. canadensis at all loci tested. ?? 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Polymorphic heterologous microsatellite loci for population genetics studies of the white-faced ibis Plegadis chihi (Vieillot, 1817) (Pelecaniformes, Threskiornithidae)

    PubMed Central

    de Castro e Souza, Andiara Silos Moraes; Miño, Carolina Isabel; Del Lama, Silvia Nassif

    2012-01-01

    We screened 44 heterologous microsatellites isolated in species of the families Threskiornithidae, Ciconiidae and Ardeidae for their use in a migratory waterbird, the white-faced ibis Plegadis chihi (Vieillot, 1817) (Threskiornithidae). Of the screened loci, 57% amplified successfully and 24% were polymorphic. In two breeding colonies from southern Brazil (N = 131) we detected 32 alleles (2–10 alleles/locus). Average He over all loci and colonies was 0.55, and the combined probability of excluding false parents, 98%. There was no departure from HWE in any loci or population. Eru6 and Eru4 loci were in non-random association in the Alvorada colony, and NnNF5 and Eru5 in both populations. AMOVA analysis indicated that most of the genetic diversity was contained within populations. Structure analysis suggested a single population, and FST value showed weak genetic structuring (FST = 0.009, p = 0.05). The two populations are apparently connected through gene-flow. The panel of six microsatellites optimized here was sufficiently informative for characterizing the genetic diversity and structure in these natural populations of the white-faced ibis. The information generated could be useful in future studies of genetic diversity, relatedness and the mating system in Plegadis chihi and related species. PMID:22481877

  14. Characterisation of microsatellite loci in two species of lice, Polyplax serrata (Phthiraptera: Anoplura: Polyplacidae) and Myrsidea nesomimi (Phthiraptera: Amblycera: Menoponidae).

    PubMed

    Martinu, Jana; Roubova, Veronika; Novakova, Milena; Smith, Vincent S; Hypsa, Vaclav; Stefka, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Polymorphic microsatellite loci were characterised for two louse species, the anopluran Polyplax serrata Burmeister, 1839, parasitising Eurasian field mice of the genus Apodemus Kaup, and the amblyceran Myrsidea nesomimi Palma et Price, 2010, found on mocking birds endemic to the Galápagos Islands. Evolutionary histories of the two parasites show complex patterns influenced both by their geographic distribution and through coevolution with their respective hosts, which renders them prospective evolutionary models. In P. serrata, 16 polymorphic loci were characterised and screened across 72 individuals from four European populations that belong to two sympatric mitochondrial lineages differing in their breadth of host-specificity. In M. nesomimi, 66 individuals from three island populations and two host species were genotyped for 15 polymorphic loci. The observed heterozygosity varied from 0.05 to 0.9 in P. serrata and from 0.0 to 0.96 in M. nesomimi. Deviations from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium were frequently observed in the populations of both parasites. Fst distances between tested populations correspond with previous phylogenetic data, suggesting the microsatellite loci are an informative resource for ecological and evolutionary studies of the two parasites.

  15. Development of ten microsatellite loci in the invasive giant African land snail, Achatina (=Lissachatina) fulica Bowdich, 1822

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrison, Cheryl L.; Springmann, Marcus J.; Iwanowicz, Deborah D.; Wade, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    A suite of tetra-nucleotide microsatellite loci were developed for the invasive giant African land snail, Achatina (=Lissachatina) fulica Bowdich, 1822, from Ion Torrent next-generation sequencing data. Ten of the 96 primer sets tested amplified consistently in 30 snails from Miami, Florida, plus 12 individuals representative of their native East Africa, Indian and Pacific Ocean regions. The loci displayed moderate levels of allelic diversity (average 5.6 alleles/locus) and heterozygosity (average 42 %). Levels of genetic diversity were sufficient to produce unique multi-locus genotypes and detect phylogeographic structuring among regional samples. The invasive A. fulica can cause extensive damage to important food crops and natural resources, including native flora and fauna. The loci characterized here will be useful for determining the origins and tracking the spread of invasions, detecting fine-scale spatial structuring and estimating demographic parameters.

  16. High Genetic Diversity and Fine-Scale Spatial Structure in the Marine Flagellate Oxyrrhis marina (Dinophyceae) Uncovered by Microsatellite Loci

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Chris D.; Montagnes, David J. S.; Martin, Laura E.; Watts, Phillip C.

    2010-01-01

    Free-living marine protists are often assumed to be broadly distributed and genetically homogeneous on large spatial scales. However, an increasing application of highly polymorphic genetic markers (e.g., microsatellites) has provided evidence for high genetic diversity and population structuring on small spatial scales in many free-living protists. Here we characterise a panel of new microsatellite markers for the common marine flagellate Oxyrrhis marina. Nine microsatellite loci were used to assess genotypic diversity at two spatial scales by genotyping 200 isolates of O. marina from 6 broad geographic regions around Great Britain and Ireland; in one region, a single 2 km shore line was sampled intensively to assess fine-scale genetic diversity. Microsatellite loci resolved between 1–6 and 7–23 distinct alleles per region in the least and most variable loci respectively, with corresponding variation in expected heterozygosities (He) of 0.00–0.30 and 0.81–0.93. Across the dataset, genotypic diversity was high with 183 genotypes detected from 200 isolates. Bayesian analysis of population structure supported two model populations. One population was distributed across all sampled regions; the other was confined to the intensively sampled shore, and thus two distinct populations co-occurred at this site. Whilst model-based analysis inferred a single UK-wide population, pairwise regional FST values indicated weak to moderate population sub-division (0.01–0.12), but no clear correlation between spatial and genetic distance was evident. Data presented in this study highlight extensive genetic diversity for O. marina; however, it remains a substantial challenge to uncover the mechanisms that drive genetic diversity in free-living microorganisms. PMID:21203414

  17. High genetic diversity and fine-scale spatial structure in the marine flagellate Oxyrrhis marina (Dinophyceae) uncovered by microsatellite loci.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Chris D; Montagnes, David J S; Martin, Laura E; Watts, Phillip C

    2010-12-23

    Free-living marine protists are often assumed to be broadly distributed and genetically homogeneous on large spatial scales. However, an increasing application of highly polymorphic genetic markers (e.g., microsatellites) has provided evidence for high genetic diversity and population structuring on small spatial scales in many free-living protists. Here we characterise a panel of new microsatellite markers for the common marine flagellate Oxyrrhis marina. Nine microsatellite loci were used to assess genotypic diversity at two spatial scales by genotyping 200 isolates of O. marina from 6 broad geographic regions around Great Britain and Ireland; in one region, a single 2 km shore line was sampled intensively to assess fine-scale genetic diversity. Microsatellite loci resolved between 1-6 and 7-23 distinct alleles per region in the least and most variable loci respectively, with corresponding variation in expected heterozygosities (H(e)) of 0.00-0.30 and 0.81-0.93. Across the dataset, genotypic diversity was high with 183 genotypes detected from 200 isolates. Bayesian analysis of population structure supported two model populations. One population was distributed across all sampled regions; the other was confined to the intensively sampled shore, and thus two distinct populations co-occurred at this site. Whilst model-based analysis inferred a single UK-wide population, pairwise regional F(ST) values indicated weak to moderate population sub-division (0.01-0.12), but no clear correlation between spatial and genetic distance was evident. Data presented in this study highlight extensive genetic diversity for O. marina; however, it remains a substantial challenge to uncover the mechanisms that drive genetic diversity in free-living microorganisms.

  18. Genetic structure of wild boar (Sus scrofa) populations from East Asia based on microsatellite loci analyses

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Wild boar, Sus scrofa, is an extant wild ancestor of the domestic pig as an agro-economically important mammal. Wild boar has a worldwide distribution with its geographic origin in Southeast Asia, but genetic diversity and genetic structure of wild boar in East Asia are poorly understood. To characterize the pattern and amount of genetic variation and population structure of wild boar in East Asia, we genotyped and analyzed microsatellite loci for a total of 238 wild boar specimens from ten locations across six countries in East and Southeast Asia. Results Our data indicated that wild boar populations in East Asia are genetically diverse and structured, showing a significant correlation of genetic distance with geographic distance and implying a low level of gene flow at a regional scale. Bayesian-based clustering analysis was indicative of seven inferred genetic clusters in which wild boars in East Asia are geographically structured. The level of genetic diversity was relatively high in wild boars from Southeast Asia, compared with those from Northeast Asia. This gradient pattern of genetic diversity is consistent with an assumed ancestral population of wild boar in Southeast Asia. Genetic evidences from a relationship tree and structure analysis suggest that wild boar in Jeju Island, South Korea have a distinct genetic background from those in mainland Korea. Conclusions Our results reveal a diverse pattern of genetic diversity and the existence of genetic differentiation among wild boar populations inhabiting East Asia. This study highlights the potential contribution of genetic variation of wild boar to the high genetic diversity of local domestic pigs during domestication in East Asia. PMID:25034725

  19. Microsatellite loci analysis for the genetic variability and the parentage test of five dog breeds in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Kang, Byeong-Teck; Kim, Kyung-Seok; Min, Mi-Sook; Chae, Young-Jin; Kang, Jung-Won; Yoon, Junghee; Choi, Jihye; Seong, Je-Kyung; Park, Han-Chan; An, Junghwa; Lee, Mun-Han; Park, Hee-Myung; Lee, Hang

    2009-06-01

    To investigate the population structure of five dog breeds in South Korea and to validate polymorphic microsatellite markers for the parentage test, microsatellite loci analyses were conducted for two Korean native dog breeds, Poongsan and Jindo, and three imported dog breeds, German Shepherd, Beagle and Greyhound. Overall genetic diversity was high across all dog breeds (expected heterozygosity range: 0.71 to 0.85), although breeds differed in deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE). Significant reduction of heterozygosity in the Poongsan and Greyhound breeds was caused by non-random mating and population substructure within these breeds (the Wahlund effects). The close relationship and high degree of genetic diversity for two Korean native dog breeds were substantial. The mean polymorphism information content value was highest in Jindos (0.82) and Poongsans (0.81), followed by Beagles (0.74), Greyhounds (0.72), and German Shepherds (0.66). Accumulated exclusion power values, as an indication of marker validity for parentage tests, were varied but very high across breeds, 0.9999 for Jindos, Poongsans, and Beagles, 0.9997 for Greyhounds, and 0.9995 for German Shepherds. Taken together, the microsatellite loci investigated in this study can serve as suitable markers for the parentage test and as individual identification to establish a reliable pedigree verification system of dog breeds in South Korea. This study also stresses that the population subdivision within breeds can become an important cause of deviation from HWE in dog breeds.

  20. Isolation of microsatellite loci and reliable genotyping using noninvasive samples of a critically endangered primate, Trachypithecus leucocephalus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiran; Qiao, Yu; Zheng, Yitao; Yao, Meng

    2016-07-01

    Genetic information can be critical in identifying conservation priorities and developing conservation strategies. There is an urgent need for noninvasive genetic tools to study the wild populations of Asian colobine monkeys. The majority of these species are threatened with habitat destruction, population reduction and even extinction, but generally lack information on their genetic diversity and population structure. Genetic sampling and tissue collection have been scarce in these species owing to strict regulations on manipulation of endangered species, and the difficulties and risks associated with capturing these arboreal and fast-moving monkeys in the challenging environments that they inhabit. These difficulties have hindered the development of molecular genetic markers, which are usually derived from tissues or blood. In this study, we present a method for de novo microsatellite isolation and genotyping using DNA from noninvasive origins of a critically endangered Asian colobine, the white-headed langur (Trachypithecus leucocephalus). Genomic DNA isolated from hair was shown to be sufficient for microsatellite enrichment and isolation, with similar isolation efficiencies as from tissue DNA. We identified and characterized 20 polymorphic microsatellite loci, and evaluated their amplification success and genotyping reliability with 86 field-collected fecal samples. These results show that this panel of loci can produce reliable genotypes from fecal samples, and represent a useful tool for noninvasive investigation of genetic structure, individual identification and kinship assessment in this highly endangered species. Our approach can be applied to conservation genetic studies of other wild species that lack sequence information and tissue samples.

  1. Genomic characterization of EmsB microsatellite loci in Echinococcus multilocularis.

    PubMed

    Valot, Benoît; Knapp, Jenny; Umhang, Gérald; Grenouillet, Frédéric; Millon, Laurence

    2015-06-01

    EmsB is a molecular marker applied to Echinococcus multilocularis genotyping studies. This marker has largely been used to investigate the epidemiology of the parasite in different endemic foci. The present study has lifted the veil on the genetic structure of this microsatellite. By in silico analysis on the E. multilocularis genome the microsatellite was described in about 40 copies on the chromosome 5 of the parasite. Similar structure was found in the relative parasite Echinococcus granulosus, where the microsatellite was firstly described. The present study completes the first investigations made on the EmsB microsatellite origins and confirms the reliability of this highly discriminant molecular marker.

  2. Allelic imbalance and instability of microsatellite loci on chromosome 1p in human non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Gasparian, A. V.; Laktionov, K. K.; Belialova, M. S.; Pirogova, N. A.; Tatosyan, A. G.; Zborovskaya, I. B.

    1998-01-01

    The mapping of allelic loss on the short arm of chromosome 1 has been performed in non-small-cell lung cancer. We used a set of 11 microsatellite loci spanning 1p to examine the frequency of allelic imbalance in a panel of 58 tumours. Fifty-one of 58 (87.9%) cases have shown somatic allelic loss at one or more loci tested. The two shortest regions of the overlap (SRO) of the deletions have been identified: SRO 1 at 1p13.1 and SRO 2 at 1p32-pter. Allelic losses at these regions have been compared among adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma and no difference has been found. In contrast to SRO 1, deletions at SRO 2 significantly correlated with advanced stage of the disease as well as post-operative metastasizing and relapse. These data may suggest that SRO 1 and SRO 2 can harbour tumour-supressor genes (TSGs) involved in different stages of NSCLC development. SRO 2 is still quite large and its refined mapping should help attempts to clone and identify the putative TSG(s). Microsatellite instability (replication errors) affecting only 6 (10.3%) of 58 tumour samples is an infrequent genetic alteration at the loci tested. Images Figure 2 PMID:9635835

  3. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci in the deep-sea marine fish, the roundnose grenadier (Coryphaenoides rupestris).

    PubMed

    Knutsen, Halvor; LE Goff-Vitry, Marie; Fiani, David; Hoelzel, A Rus

    2008-09-01

    We developed polymerase chain reaction primers for eight dinucleotide microsatellite loci in the marine deep sea fish, roundnose grenadier (Coryphaenoides rupestris). All markers were obtained from a partial genomic DNA library, and characterized in 90 unrelated individuals from one putative population sampled on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The number of alleles ranged from two to 61 with an average of 21 per locus. The observed heterozygosity levels ranged from 0.301 to 0.987 with an average of 0.672. Several of the markers amplified multiple alleles from either the Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) or the deep-sea fish roughhead grenadier (Macrourus berglax).

  4. PERMANENT GENETIC RESOURCES: Development of polymorphic microsatellite loci for the common vampire bat, Desmodus rotundus (Chiroptera: Phylostomidae).

    PubMed

    Piaggio, Antoinette J; Johnston, John J; Perkins, Susan L

    2008-03-01

    The common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus) is one of three haematophagous species of bats and the only species in this genus. These New World bats prey on mammals and create significant economic impacts through transmission of rabies in areas where livestock are prevalent. Furthermore, in some portions of their range, it is not uncommon for them to prey upon humans. It is critical to the management of this species and for understanding the spread of bat rabies that detailed studies of D. rotundus population structure be conducted. To further such studies, we have characterized 12 microsatellite loci for this species.

  5. Identification and Characterization of Microsatellite Loci in Maqui (Aristotelia chilensis [Molina] Stunz) Using Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS)

    PubMed Central

    Bastías, Adriana; Correa, Francisco; Rojas, Pamela; Almada, Rubén; Muñoz, Carlos; Sagredo, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Maqui (Aristotelia chilensis [Molina] Stunz) is a small dioecious tree native to South America with edible fruit characterized by very high antioxidant capacity and anthocyanin content. To preserve maqui as a genetic resource it is essential to study its genetic diversity. However, the complete genome is unknown and only a few gene sequences are available in databases. Simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers, which are neutral, co-dominant, reproducible and highly variable, are desirable to support genetic studies in maqui populations. By means of identification and characterization of microsatellite loci from a maqui genotype, using 454 sequencing technology, we develop a set of SSR for this species. Obtaining a total of 165,043 shotgun genome sequences, with an average read length of 387 bases, we covered 64 Mb of the maqui genome. Reads were assembled into 4,832 contigs, while 98,546 reads remained as singletons, generating a total of 103,378 consensus genomic sequences. A total of 24,494 SSR maqui markers were identified. Of them, 15,950 SSR maqui markers were classified as perfects. The most common SSR motifs were dinucleotide (31%), followed by tetranucleotide (26%) and trinucleotide motifs (24%). The motif AG/CT (28.4%) was the most abundant, while the motif AC (89 bp) was the largest. Eleven polymorphic SSRs were selected and used to analyze a population of 40 maqui genotypes. Polymorphism information content (PIC) ranged from 0.117 to 0.82, with an average of 0.58. Non-significant groups were observed in the maqui population, showing a panmictic genetic structure. In addition, we also predicted 11150 putative genes and 3 microRNAs (miRNAs) in maqui sequences. This results, including partial sequences of genes, some miRNAs and SSR markers from high throughput next generation sequencing (NGS) of maqui genomic DNA, constitute the first platform to undertake genetic and molecular studies of this important species. PMID:27459734

  6. Polymorphic microsatellite loci for Haumania danckelmaniana and transferability to H. liebrechtsiana (Marantaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Ley, Alexandra C.; Hardy, Olivier J.

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were developed for the species Haumania danckelmaniana (Marantaceae) from central tropical Africa. Methods and Results: Microsatellite isolation was performed simultaneously on three different species of Marantaceae through a procedure that combines multiplex microsatellite enrichment and next-generation sequencing. From 80 primers selected for initial screening, 20 markers positively amplified in H. danckelmaniana, of which 10 presented unambiguous amplification products within the expected size range and eight were polymorphic with four to nine alleles per locus. Positive transferability with the related species H. liebrechtsiana was observed for the same 10 markers. Conclusions: The polymorphic microsatellite markers are suitable for studies in genetic diversity and structure, mating system, and gene flow in H. danckelmaniana and the closely related species H. liebrechtsiana. PMID:27011899

  7. Isolation of 22 new Haliaeetus microsatellite loci and their characterization in the critically endangered Madagascar fish-eagle (Haliaeetus vociferoides) and three other Haliaeetus eagle species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tingay, R.E.; Dawson, D.A.; Pandhal, J.; Clarke, M.L.; David, V.A.; Hailer, F.; Culver, M.

    2007-01-01

    We isolated a total of 22 microsatellite loci from two Haliaeetus species: the Madagascar fish-eagle (Haliaeetus vociferoides) and the bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus). Five loci were monomorphic in both the Madagascar fish-eagle (n = 24-43) and the bald eagle (n = 2-8) but were found to be polymorphic in other Haliaeetus species. Haliaeetus loci have proved useful for investigating gene flow in Haliaeetus and Aquila eagles. Ten loci were polymorphic in the critically endangered Madagascar fish-eagle and will be used to investigate the genetic population structure and mating system in this species. ?? 2007 The Authors.

  8. First Insights into the Genetic Diversity of the Pinewood Nematode in Its Native Area Using New Polymorphic Microsatellite Loci

    PubMed Central

    Mallez, Sophie; Castagnone, Chantal; Espada, Margarida; Vieira, Paulo; Eisenback, Jonathan D.; Mota, Manuel; Guillemaud, Thomas; Castagnone-Sereno, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The pinewood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, native to North America, is the causative agent of pine wilt disease and among the most important invasive forest pests in the East-Asian countries, such as Japan and China. Since 1999, it has been found in Europe in the Iberian Peninsula, where it also causes significant damage. In a previous study, 94 pairs of microsatellite primers have been identified in silico in the pinewood nematode genome. In the present study, specific PCR amplifications and polymorphism tests to validate these loci were performed and 17 microsatellite loci that were suitable for routine analysis of B. xylophilus genetic diversity were selected. The polymorphism of these markers was evaluated on nematodes from four field origins and one laboratory collection strain, all originate from the native area. The number of alleles and the expected heterozygosity varied between 2 and 11 and between 0.039 and 0.777, respectively. First insights into the population genetic structure of B. xylophilus were obtained using clustering and multivariate methods on the genotypes obtained from the field samples. The results showed that the pinewood nematode genetic diversity is spatially structured at the scale of the pine tree and probably at larger scales. The role of dispersal by the insect vector versus human activities in shaping this structure is discussed. PMID:23554990

  9. Mixed mating in androdioecious Mercurialis annua inferred using progeny arrays and diploid-acting microsatellite loci in a hexaploid background

    PubMed Central

    Korbecka, Grażyna; Hamilton, Alastair; Pannell, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims The frequency at which males can be maintained with hermaphrodites in androdioecious populations is predicted to depend on the selfing rate, because self-fertilization by hermaphrodites reduces prospective siring opportunities for males. In particular, high selfing rates by hermaphrodites are expected to exclude males from a population. Here, the first estimates are provided of the mating system from two wild hexaploid populations of the androdioecious European wind-pollinated plant M. annua with contrasting male frequencies. Methods Four diploid microsatellite loci were used to genotype 19–20 progeny arrays from two populations of M. annua, one with males and one without. Mating-system parameters were estimated using the program MLTR. Key Results Both populations had similar, intermediate outcrossing rates (tm = 0·64 and 0·52 for the population with and without males, respectively). The population without males showed a lower level of correlated paternity and biparental inbreeding and higher allelic richness and gene diversity than the population with males. Conclusions The results demonstrate the utility of new diploid microsatellite loci for mating system analysis in a hexaploid plant. It would appear that androdioecious M. annua has a mixed-mating system in the wild, an uncommon finding for wind-pollinated species. This study sets a foundation for future research to assess the relative importance of the sexual system, plant-density variation and stochastic processes for the regulation of male frequencies in M. annua over space and time. PMID:21320876

  10. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite DNA loci in the threatened flat-spired three-toothed land snail Triodopsis platysayoides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Timothy L.; Eackles, Michael S.; Garner, B. A.; van Tuinen, M.; Arbogast, B. S.

    2015-01-01

    The hermaphroditic flat-spired three-tooth land snail (Triodopsis platysayoides) is endemic to a 21-km stretch of the Cheat River Gorge of northeastern West Virginia, USA. We document isolation and characterization of ten microsatellite DNA markers in this at-risk species. The markers displayed a moderate level of allelic diversity (averaging 7.1 alleles/locus) and heterozygosity (averaging 58.6 %). Allelic diversity at seven loci was sufficient to produce unique multilocus genotypes; no indication of selfing was detected in this cosexual species. Minimal deviations from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium and no linkage disequilibrium were observed within subpopulations. All loci deviated from Hardy–Weinberg expectations when individuals from subpopulations were pooled. Microsatellite markers developed for T. platysayoides yielded sufficient genetic diversity to (1) distinguish all individuals sampled and the level of selfing; (2) be appropriate for addressing fine-scale population structuring; (3) provide novel demographic insights for the species; and (4) cross-amplify and detect allelic diversity in the congeneric T. juxtidens.

  11. Selecting representative microsatellite loci for genetic monitoring and analyzing genetic structure of an outbred population of orange tabby cats in China.

    PubMed

    Du, X Y; Yi, S; Huo, X Y; Wang, C; Liu, D F; Ren, W Z; Chen, Z W

    2015-03-13

    We optimized a panel of microsatellite markers from cat and tiger genetic data for efficient genetic monitoring and used it to analyze the genetic structure of an outbred cat stock in China. We selected a set of rich polymorphic microsatellite loci from 131 cat microsatellite loci and 3 Sumatran tiger microsatellite loci using agarose gel electrophoresis. Next, the set of optimized genetic markers was used to analyze the genetic variation in an outbred population of orange tabby cats in China by simple-tandem repeat scanning. Thirty-one loci rich in polymorphisms were selected and the highest allele number in a single locus was 8. Analysis of the orange tabby cat population illustrated that the average observed number of alleles, mean effective allele number, mean Shannon's information index, mean expected heterozygosity, and observed heterozygosity were 3.8387, 2.4027, 0.9787, 0.5565, and 0.5528, respectively. The 31 microsatellite markers used were polymorphic and suitable for analyzing the genetic structure of cats. The population of orange tabby cats was confirmed to be a well-outbred stock.

  12. Cross-priming of microsatellite loci in subfamily cyprininae (family Cyprinidae): their utility in finding markers for population genetic analysis in three Indian major carps.

    PubMed

    Masih, Prachi; Luhariya, Rupesh K; Das, Rakhi; Gupta, Arti; Mohindra, Vindhya; Singh, Rajeev K; Srivastava, Rohit; Chauhan, U K; Jena, J K; Lal, Kuldeep K

    2014-08-01

    This study is aimed to identify polymorphic microsatellite markers and establish their potential for population genetics studies in three carp (family cyprinidae; subfamily cyprininae) species, Labeo rohita, Catla catla and Cirrhinus mrigala through use of cyprinid primers. These species have high commercial value and knowledge of genetic variation is important for management of farmed and wild populations. We tested 108 microsatellite primers from 11 species belonging to three different cyprinid subfamilies, Cyprininae, Barbinae and Leuciscinae out of which 63 primers (58.33%) successfully amplified orthologous loci in three focal species. Forty-two loci generated from 29 primers were polymorphic in these three carp species. Sequencing of amplified product confirmed the presence of SSRs in these 42 loci and orthologous nature of the loci. To validate potential of these 42 polymorphic loci in determining the genetic variation, we analyzed 486 samples of three focal species collected from Indus, Ganges and Brahmaputra river systems. Results indicated significant genetic variation, with mean number of alleles per locus ranging from 6.80 to 14.40 and observed heterozygosity ranging from 0.50 to 0.74 in the three focal species. Highly significant (P < 0.00001) allelic homogeneity values revealed that the identified loci can be efficiently used in population genetics analysis of these carp species. Further, thirty-two loci from 19 primers were useful for genotyping in more than one species. The data from the present study was compiled with cross-species amplification data from previous results on eight species of subfamily cyprininae to compare cross-transferability of microsatellite loci. It was revealed that out of 226 heterologous loci amplified, 152 loci that originated from 77 loci exhibited polymorphism and 45 primers were of multispecies utility, common for 2-7 species.

  13. Development of a multiplex PCR assay for fine-scale population genetic analysis of the Komodo monitor Varanus komodoensis based on 18 polymorphic microsatellite loci.

    PubMed

    Ciofi, Claudio; Tzika, Athanasia C; Natali, Chiara; Watts, Phillip C; Sulandari, Sri; Zein, Moch S A; Milinkovitch, Michel C

    2011-05-01

    Multiplex PCR assays for the coamplification of microsatellite loci allow rapid and cost-effective genetic analyses and the production of efficient screening protocols for international breeding programs. We constructed a partial genomic library enriched for di-nucleotide repeats and characterized 14 new microsatellite loci for the Komodo monitor (or Komodo dragon, Varanus komodoensis). Using these novel microsatellites and four previously described loci, we developed multiplex PCR assays that may be loaded on a genetic analyser in three separate panels. We tested the novel set of microsatellites for polymorphism using 69 individuals from three island populations and evaluated the resolving power of the entire panel of 18 loci by conducting (i) a preliminary assignment test to determine population(s) of origin and (ii) a parentage analysis for 43 captive Komodo monitors. This panel of polymorphic loci proved useful for both purposes and thus can be exploited for fine-scale population genetic analyses and as part of international captive breeding programs directed at maintaining genetically viable ex situ populations and reintroductions.

  14. Identification and validation of polymorphic microsatellite loci for the analysis of Phytophthora nicotianae populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A large number of SSR loci were screened in the genomic assemblies of 14 different isolates of Phytophthora nicotianae and primers were developed for amplification of 17 markers distributed among different contigs. These loci were highly polymorphic and amplified from genetically distant isolates of...

  15. Genetic variation at microsatellite loci in the tropical herb Aphelandra aurantiaca (Acanthaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Montes, Pilar; Tapia-López, Rosalinda; Núñez-Farfán, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: To assess the effect of forest fragmentation on genetic variation and population structure of Aphelandra aurantiaca (Acanthaceae), a tropical and ornamental herbaceous perennial plant, we developed the first microsatellite primers for the species. Methods and Results: Fourteen microsatellite markers were isolated and characterized from A. aurantiaca genomic libraries enriched for di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide repeat motifs. Polymorphism was evaluated in 107 individuals from four natural populations. Twelve out of 14 genetic markers were polymorphic. The number of alleles per locus ranged from two to 12, and the observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.22 to 0.96 and from 0.20 to 0.87, respectively. Fixation indices ranged from −0.41 to 0.44. Conclusions: These newly developed microsatellite markers for A. aurantiaca will be useful for future population genetic studies, specifically to detect the possible loss of genetic diversity due to habitat fragmentation. PMID:26649265

  16. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci for Florida largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides floridanus, and other micropterids.

    PubMed

    Lutz-Carrillo, Dijar J; Hagen, Cris; Dueck, Lucy A; Glenn, Travis C

    2008-01-01

    We isolated and characterized 52 novel microsatellite markers from Florida largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides floridanus, for use in conservation, management and population genetic studies. Markers were assessed in M. s. floridanus from peninsular Florida (n = 30) and averaged eight alleles per locus with observed heterozygosity of 0.57 (range 0-0.97). Cross-taxa amplification was successful among 88% of tested congeners. These polymorphic and potentially taxon-diagnostic markers contribute to the limited number of microsatellites currently available for micropterids and specifically M. s. floridanus.

  17. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci in Epidendrum puniceoluteum, an endemic orchid from the Atlantic Rainforest.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, F; Santos, M O; Palma-Silva, C; Barros, F; Meyer, D; Salatino, A; Souza, A P; Cozzolino, S

    2008-09-01

    Epidendrum puniceoluteum is an endemic orchid of Atlantic Rainforest, restricted to few populations only due to the destruction and fragmentation of its native habitat. Here, we report on the development of 10 microsatellite markers isolated from this orchid species. Genetic variability was characterized in two distant populations from Brazil coast. The number of alleles observed for each locus ranged from two to 12 and with an average of 6.4 alleles per locus. These microsatellites should be valuable tools for studying both fine-scale genetic structure of scattered E. puniceoluteum population and patterns will be useful genetic markers for other closely related taxa.

  18. New methods to identify conserved microsatellite loci and develop primer sets of high cross-species utility - as demonstrated for birds.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Deborah A; Horsburgh, Gavin J; Küpper, Clemens; Stewart, Ian R K; Ball, Alexander D; Durrant, Kate L; Hansson, Bengt; Bacon, Ida; Bird, Susannah; Klein, Akos; Krupa, Andrew P; Lee, Jin-Won; Martín-Gálvez, David; Simeoni, Michelle; Smith, Gemma; Spurgin, Lewis G; Burke, Terry

    2010-05-01

    We have developed a new approach to create microsatellite primer sets that have high utility across a wide range of species. The success of this method was demonstrated using birds. We selected 35 avian EST microsatellite loci that had a high degree of sequence homology between the zebra finch Taeniopygia guttata and the chicken Gallus gallus and designed primer sets in which the primer bind sites were identical in both species. For 33 conserved primer sets, on average, 100% of loci amplified in each of 17 passerine species and 99% of loci in five non-passerine species. The genotyping of four individuals per species revealed that 24-76% (mean 48%) of loci were polymorphic in the passerines and 18-26% (mean 21%) in the non-passerines. When at least 17 individuals were genotyped per species for four Fringillidae finch species, 71-85% of loci were polymorphic, observed heterozygosity was above 0.50 for most loci and no locus deviated significantly from Hardy-Weinberg proportions. This new set of microsatellite markers is of higher cross-species utility than any set previously designed. The loci described are suitable for a range of applications that require polymorphic avian markers, including paternity and population studies. They will facilitate comparisons of bird genome organization, including genome mapping and studies of recombination, and allow comparisons of genetic variability between species whilst avoiding ascertainment bias. The costs and time to develop new loci can now be avoided for many applications in numerous species. Furthermore, our method can be readily used to develop microsatellite markers of high utility across other taxa.

  19. Use of differential levels of mean observed heterozygosity in microsatellite loci of commercial varieties of sugarcane (Saccharum spp).

    PubMed

    Maranho, R C; Augusto, R; Mangolin, C A; Machado, M F P S

    2014-12-04

    In this study, we measured the genetic diversity within and among a set of 9 commercial sugarcane varieties used for alcohol and sugar production using 17 microsatellite DNA markers. The UGSM148 and UGSM59 primers were monomorphic for all 74 sugarcane samples. The estimated proportion of simple sequence repeated (SSR) polymorphic loci was 88.23%; 17 alleles were detected. The mean gene diversity of all SSR loci was 0.7279. The highest observed heterozygosity (HO) value was found in the RB72454 variety, whereas the lowest HO value was recorded in the SP813250 variety. The SP813250, RB845210, and RB835054 sugarcane varieties were the most genetically uniform varieties. An extremely high level of population differentiation was detected in the varieties exhibiting similar agronomic characteristics. Analysis of the genetic structure of the 9 sugarcane varieties using SSR markers was especially important to identify SSR loci with high levels of heterozygosity and to identify varieties showing the highest levels of heterozygosity. The monomorphic primers may be used to evaluate the genetic stability of sugarcane during cycles of vegetative multiplication, i.e., propagation via rhizomes.

  20. Development and characterization of 17 polymorphic microsatellite loci in the faucet snail, Bithynia tentaculata (Gastroposa: Caenogastropoda; Bithyniidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henningsen, Justin P.; Lance, Stacey L.; Jones, Kenneth L.; Hagen, Chris; Laurila, Joshua; Cole, Rebecca A.; Perez, Kathryn E.

    2010-01-01

    Bithynia tentaculata (Linnaeus, 1758), a snail native to Europe, was introduced into the US Great Lakes in the 1870's and has spread to rivers throughout the Northeastern US and Upper Mississippi River (UMR). Trematode parasites, for which B. tentaculata is a host, have also been introduced and are causing widespread waterfowl mortality in the UMR. Waterfowl mortality is caused by ingestion of trematode-infected B. tentaculata or insects infected with parasites released from the snails. We isolated and characterized 17 microsatellite loci from the invasive faucet snail, B. tentaculata (Gastropoda: Caenogastropoda: Bithyniidae). Loci were screened in 24 individuals of B. tentaculata. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 2 to 6, observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.050 to 0.783, and the probability of identity values ranged from 0.10 to 0.91. These new loci provide tools for examining the origin and spread of invasive populations in the US and management activities to prevent waterfowl mortality.

  1. Evolution of hypervariable microsatellites in apomictic polyploid lineages of Ranunculus carpaticola: directional bias at dinucleotide loci.

    PubMed

    Paun, Ovidiu; Hörandl, Elvira

    2006-09-01

    Microsatellites are widely used in genetic and evolutionary analyses, but their own evolution is far from simple. The mechanisms maintaining the mutational patterns of simple repeats and the typical stable allele-frequency distributions are still poorly understood. Asexual lineages may provide particularly informative models for the indirect study of microsatellite evolution, because their genomes act as complete linkage groups, with mutations being the only source of genetic variation. Here, we study the direction of accumulated dinucleotide microsatellite mutations in wild asexual lineages of hexaploid Ranunculus carpaticola. Whereas the overall number of contractions is not significantly different from that of expansions, the within-locus frequency of contractions, but not of expansions, significantly increases with allele length. Moreover, within-locus polymorphism is positively correlated with allele length, but this relationship is due solely to the influence of contraction mutations. Such asymmetries may explain length constraints generally observed with microsatellites and are consistent with stable, bell-shaped allele-frequency distributions. Although apomictic and allohexaploid, the R. carpaticola lineages show mutational patterns resembling the trends observed in a broad range of organisms, including sexuals and diploids, suggesting that, even if not of germline origin, the mutations in these apomicts may be the consequence of similar mechanisms.

  2. Characterization of thirteen microsatellite loci from the Ghanian antimalarial plant Cryptolepis sanguinolenta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cryptolepis sanguinolenta (Lindl.) Schlechter (Periplocaceae) is an herbaceous plant used in traditional medicine to treat malaria and populations of the species are diminishing due to overharvesting and lack of conservation. Co-dominant microsatellite markers that can be used to characterize geneti...

  3. DNA polymorphisms at bermudagrass microsatellite loci and their use in genotype fingerprinting

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The economically important, turf-type bermudagrasses include diploid Cynodon transvaalensis, tetraploid C. dactylon, and sterile triploid hybrids produced by crosses of these species. The objective of this study was to develop a set of microsatellite markers that could be used to distinguish among c...

  4. Characterization of 13 microsatellite loci for the deep-sea coral, Lophelia pertusa (Linnaeus 1758), from the western North Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrison, C.L.; Eackles, M.S.; Johnson, R.L.; King, T.L.

    2008-01-01

    A suite of 13 polymorphic tri- and tetranucleotide microsatellite loci were isolated from the ahermatypic deep-sea coral, Lophelia pertusa. Among 51 individuals collected from three disjunct oceanic regions, allelic diversity ranged from six to 38 alleles and averaged 9.1 alleles per locus. Observed heterozygosity ranged from 9.1 to 96.8% and averaged 62.3% in the Gulf of Mexico population. For some loci, amplification success varied among collections, suggesting regional variation in priming site sequences. Four loci showed departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in certain collections which may reflect nonrandom mating. ?? 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci in the invasive herb Solidago altissima (Asteraceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Sakata, Yuzu; Kaneko, Shingo; Hayano, Azusa; Inoue-Murayama, Miho; Ohgushi, Takayuki; Isagi, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were developed in the perennial herb Solidago altissima from populations within its introduced range in Japan to assess its population structure and to facilitate tracking of invasion expansion. • Methods and Results: Using 454 pyrosequencing, 16 microsatellite primer sets were developed for S. altissima. The primer sets were tested on 70 individuals sampled from three populations in Japan. The primers amplified di- and trinucleotide repeats with five to 25 alleles per locus, and the expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.46 to 0.92. • Conclusions: These results indicate the utility of primers in S. altissima for future research on a wide range of applications, including tracking of invasion dynamics and investigating population genetics of the species. PMID:25202531

  6. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci in tropical forage Stylosanthes capitata Vogel.

    PubMed

    Santos, M O; Sassaki, R P; Chiari, L; Resende, R M S; DE Souza, A P

    2009-01-01

    Stylosanthes capitata is an important tropical pasture legume. Knowledge of genetic diversity and structure of S. capitata populations is of great importance for the conservation and germplasm management of this species. Thus, eight microsatellite markers were developed from an S. capitata-enriched library. They were characterized in 20 accessions from the germplasm collection of the Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuária (Embrapa). The observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.16 to 0.85 and from 0.40 to 0.85, respectively. These microsatellites are the first set of molecular markers from this species and will contribute towards studies of genetic diversity, conservation and breeding of S. capitata.

  7. Clinal variation at microsatellite loci reveals historical secondary intergradation between glacial races of Coregonus artedi (Teleostei: Coregoninae).

    PubMed

    Turgeon, J; Bernatchez, L

    2001-11-11

    Classical models of the spatial structure of population genetics rely on the assumption of migration-drift equilibrium, which is seldom met in natural populations having only recently colonized their current range (e.g., postglacial). Population structure then depicts historical events, and counfounding effects due to recent secondary contact between recently differentiated lineages can further counfound analyses of association between geographic and genetic distances. Mitochondrial polymorphisms have revealed the existence of two closely related lineages of the lake cisco, Coregonus artedi, whose significantly different but overlaping geographical distributions provided a weak signal of past range fragmentation blurred by putative subsequent extensive secondary contacts. In this study, we analyzed geographical patterns of genetic variation at seven microsatellite loci among 22 populations of lake cisco located along the axis of an area covered by proglacial lakes 12,000-8,000 years ago in North America. The results clearly confirmed the existence of two genetically distinct races characterized by different sets of microsatellite alleles whose frequencies varied clinally across some 3000 km. Equilibrium and nonequilibrium analyses of isolation by distance revealed historical signal of gene flow resulting from the nearly complete admixture of these races following neutral secondary contacts in their historical habitat and indicated that the colonization process occurred by a stepwise expansion of an eastern (Atlantic) race into a previously established Mississippian race. This historical signal of equilibrium contrasted with the current migration-drift disequilibrium within major extant watersheds and was apparently maintained by high effective population sizes and low migration regimes.

  8. Genetic variability of wild cherry (Prunus avium L.) seed stands in Slovenia as revealed by nuclear microsatellite loci.

    PubMed

    Jarni, Kristjan; De Cuyper, Bart; Brus, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Microsatellite markers were used to describe the genetic variability of four seed stands of wild cherry (Prunus avium L.). One hundred and thirty one individuals were genotyped at ten nuclear microsatellite loci. Total genetic diversity was high (H(E) = 0.704), while differences between stands were small but significant (F(ST) = 0.053, G'(ST) = 0.234). There was a significant amount of clonal reproduction in one stand, with only 11 genotypes identified among 36 trees. One stand showed a significant excess (F(IS) = -0.044) of heterozygosity, and one showed a deficit (F(IS) = 0.044). Our results demonstrate the importance of taking into account the biological and genetic characteristics of species in forest management, especially when determining a new seed stand. The small genetic differences found between seed stands indicate that a large number of stands are not required. However, they should be carefully selected and should possess adequate genetic variability to ensure low relatedness between seed trees.

  9. Characterization of microsatellite loci in the lichen-forming fungus Cetraria aculeata (Parmeliaceae, Ascomycota)1

    PubMed Central

    Lutsak, Tetiana; Fernández-Mendoza, Fernando; Greshake, Bastian; Dal Grande, Francesco; Ebersberger, Ingo; Ott, Sieglinde; Printzen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed for the lichen species Cetraria aculeata (Parmeliaceae) to study fine-scale population diversity and phylogeographic structure. Methods and Results: Using Illumina HiSeq and MiSeq, 15 fungus-specific microsatellite markers were developed and tested on 81 specimens from four populations from Spain. The number of alleles ranged from four to 13 alleles per locus with a mean of 7.9, and average gene diversities varied from 0.40 to 0.73 over four populations. The amplification rates of 10 markers (CA01–CA10) in populations of C. aculeata exceeded 85%. The markers also amplified across a range of closely related species, except for locus CA05, which did not amplify in C. australiensis and C. “panamericana,” and locus CA10 which did not amplify in C. australiensis. Conclusions: The identified microsatellite markers will be used to study the genetic diversity and phylogeographic structure in populations of C. aculeata in western Eurasia. PMID:27672520

  10. Characterisation of a novel panel of polymorphic microsatellite loci for the liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica, using a next generation sequencing approach.

    PubMed

    Cwiklinski, Krystyna; Allen, Katherine; LaCourse, James; Williams, Diana J; Paterson, Steve; Hodgkinson, Jane E

    2015-06-01

    The liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica is an economically important pathogen of sheep and cattle and has been described by the WHO as a re-emerging zoonosis. Control is heavily reliant on the use of drugs, particularly triclabendazole and as a result resistance has now emerged. The population structure of F. hepatica is not well known, yet it can impact on host-parasite interactions and parasite control with drugs, particularly regarding the spread of triclabendazole resistance. We have identified 2448 potential microsatellites from 83 Mb of F. hepatica genome sequence using msatfinder. Thirty-five loci were developed and optimised for microsatellite PCR, resulting in a panel of 15 polymorphic loci, with a range of three to 15 alleles. This panel was validated on genomic DNA from 46 adult F. hepatica; 38 liver flukes sourced from a Northwest abattoir, UK and 8 liver flukes from an established isolate (Shrewsbury; Ridgeway Research). Evidence for null alleles was found at four loci (Fh_1, Fh_8, Fh_13 and Fh_14), which showed markedly higher levels of homozygosity than the remaining 11 loci. Of the 38 liver flukes isolated from cattle livers (n=10) at the abattoir, 37 genotypes were identified. Using a multiplex approach all 15 loci could be amplified from several life cycle stages that typically yield low amounts of DNA, including metacercariae, the infective life cycle stage present on pasture, highlighting the utility of this multiplex microsatellite panel. This study reports the largest panel of microsatellite markers available to date for population studies of F. hepatica and the first multiplex panel of microsatellite markers that can be used for several life cycle stages.

  11. Isolation of polymorphic microsatellite loci for the marine invader Microcosmus squamiger (Ascidiacea).

    PubMed

    Rius, Marc; Turon, Xavier; Pascual, Marta

    2008-11-01

    The ascidian Microcosmus squamiger is native to Australia and has recently spread worldwide. It has become a pest in some littoral communities within its introduced range. An enriched genomic library of M. squamiger resulted in a total of eight polymorphic loci that were genotyped in 20 individuals from a population within its introduced range, and 20 individuals more from a native population. The mean number of alleles per locus was 5.33 and mean observed heterozygosity was 0.432. No significant linkage disequilibrium was found among loci pairs. Significant genetic differentiation was observed between populations.

  12. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci in Sorbus porrigentiformis and cross-amplification in S. aria and S. rupicola (Rosaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Piñeiro, Rosalía; Karrman-Bailey, Freja; Cowan, Robyn S.; Fay, Michael F.

    2017-01-01

    Premise of the study: Southwestern Britain is an emblematic hotspot of polyploid diversity of whitebeams (Sorbus aria agg.; Rosaceae) with ca. 30 polyploid endemic species. The tetraploid S. porrigentiformis is postulated as one of the parents of most of these endemics, along with the sexual diploid S. aria s. str. and the tetraploid S. rupicola. Methods and Results: We isolated 16 nuclear microsatellite loci from S. porrigentiformis and characterized them on 45 trees representing the three putative parental species. Eleven loci were polymorphic, and eight of them exhibited species-specific alleles. Allele numbers ranged from one to 11, and observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.40 to 1.00. The intraspecific levels of variation were very low, in agreement with the facultative apomictic reproduction hypothesized for this species. Conclusions: The species-specific alleles will be useful for tracing the origin of the narrowly distributed Sorbus taxa. In addition, the assessment of diversity levels will help design a conservation strategy for the polyploid complex. PMID:28224061

  13. [Geographical structure of the sable (Martes zibellina L.) gene pool on the basis of microsatellite loci analysis].

    PubMed

    Kashtanov, S N; Svishcheva, G R; Pishchulina, S L; Lazebnyĭ, O E; Meshcherinskiĭ, I G; Simakin, L V; Rozhnov, V V

    2015-01-01

    The genetic structure of seven natural sable populations was investigated with the use of the original panel of 10 microsatellite loci. The populations were selected on the basis of the historical data on sable numbers fluctuations for the last 300 years, as well as on data on natural and artificial migrations affecting neighboring populations. We have demonstrated that the populations are in a state of genetic equilibrium for the majority of the loci. The genetic differences between three samplings from Central Siberia populations were insignificant, and the fixation index values were relatively low. At the same time, populations from the margins of the species habitation areal were characterized by the highest fixation index values. We have shown for the first time that populations from different regions of the sable habitation areal maintain their specific features despite the influence of natural and artificial migrations. The current study, performed with nuclear genetic markers, made it possible to get insight into the genetic structure of the analyzed species as a whole.

  14. Eight variable microsatellite loci for a Neotropical tree, Jacaranda copaia (Aubl.) D.Don (Bignoniaceae).

    PubMed

    Vinson, C C; Sampaio, I; Ciampi, A Y

    2008-11-01

    The Dendrogene Project (Genetic Conservation within Managed Forests in Amazonia) aims to understand the genetic and ecological processes that underpin tree species survival and in particular their response to forest management regimes. As part of the project, we developed eight microsatellite markers for Jacaranda copaia to be used for genetic structure, gene flow and reproductive biology studies. Polymorphism was evaluated using 96 adult trees from the Tapajos National Forest in the Eastern Brazilian Amazon. An average of 22 alleles per locus were detected, with expected heterozygosity ranging from 0.731 to 0.94.

  15. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci in Branchiostoma belcheri Gray (Amphioxus).

    PubMed

    Li, Z B; Huang, Y S; Shangguan, J B; Ning, Y F; Yi, Y; Dai, G

    2015-08-28

    Branchiostoma belcheri Gray is a second-class, nationally protected protochordate in China. We developed 10 novel polymorphic sites in B. belcheri, which were examined using a population of 30 wild individuals from Xiamen, China. The polymorphism information content ranged between 0.141 and 0.681, and the number of alleles varied from 2 to 5. The expected and observed heterozygosities varied between 0.1528 and 0.6920, and between 0.1429 and 0.5000, respectively. These novel microsatellite markers will facilitate the genetic analysis and protection of wild B. belcheri individuals, and the possible re-stocking of the species in the long-term.

  16. Microplate array diagonal gel electrophoresis for cohort studies of microsatellite loci.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-he; O'Dell, Sandra D; Day, Ian N M

    2002-05-01

    After PCR amplification, we have achieved precise sizing of trinucleotide and tetranucleotide microsatellite alleles on 96-well open-faced polyacrylamide microplate array diagonal gel electrophoresis (MADGE) gels: two tetranucleotide repeats, HUMTHOI (five alleles 248-263 bp) and DYS390 (eight alleles 200-228 bp), and DYS392, a trinucleotide repeat (eight alleles 210-231 bp). A gel matrix of Duracryl, a high mechanical strength polyacrylamide derivative, and appropriate ionic conditions provide the 1.3%-1.5% band resolution required. No end-labeling of primers is needed, as the sensitive Vistra Green intercalating dye is used for the visualization of bands. Co-run markers bracketing the PCR fragments ensure accurate sizing without inter-lane variability. Electrophoresis of multiple gels in a thermostatically controlled tank allows up to 1000 samples to be run in 90 min. Gel images were analyzed using a Fluorlmager 595 fluorescent scanning system, and alleles were identified using Phoretix software for band migration measurement and Microsoft Excel to compute fragment sizes. Estimated sizes were interpolated precisely to achieve accurate binning. Microsatellite-MADGE represents a utilitarian methodfor high-throughput genotyping in cohort studies, using standard laboratory equipment.

  17. Detection of molecular signatures of selection at microsatellite loci in the South African abalone (Haliotis midae) using a population genomic approach.

    PubMed

    Rhode, Clint; Vervalle, Jessica; Bester-van der Merwe, Aletta E; Roodt-Wilding, Rouvay

    2013-06-01

    Identifying genomic regions that may be under selection is important for elucidating the genetic architecture of complex phenotypes underlying adaptation to heterogeneous environments. A population genomic approach, using a classical neutrality test and various Fst-outlier detection methods was employed to evaluate genome-wide polymorphism data in order to identify loci that may be candidates for selection amongst six populations (three cultured and three wild) of the South African abalone, Haliotis midae. Approximately 9% of the genome-wide microsatellite markers were putatively subject to directional selection, whilst 6-18% of the genome is thought to be influenced by balancing selection. Genetic diversity estimates for candidate loci under directional selection was significantly reduced in comparison to candidate neutral loci, whilst candidate balancing selection loci demonstrated significantly higher levels of genetic diversity (Kruskal-Wallis test, P<0.05). Pairwise Fst estimates based on candidate directional selection loci also demonstrated increased levels of differentiation between study populations. Various candidate loci under selection showed significant inter-chromosomal linkage disequilibrium, suggesting possible gene-networks underling adaptive phenotypes. Furthermore, several loci had significant hits to known genes when performing BLAST searches to NCBI's non-redundant databases, whilst others are known to be derived from expressed sequences even though homology to a known gene could not be established. A number of loci also demonstrated relatively high similarity to transposable elements. The association of these loci to functional and genomically active sequences could in part explain the observed signatures of selection.

  18. Genetic diversity and differentiation in reef-building Millepora species, as revealed by cross-species amplification of fifteen novel microsatellite loci.

    PubMed

    Dubé, Caroline E; Planes, Serge; Zhou, Yuxiang; Berteaux-Lecellier, Véronique; Boissin, Emilie

    2017-01-01

    Quantifying the genetic diversity in natural populations is crucial to address ecological and evolutionary questions. Despite recent advances in whole-genome sequencing, microsatellite markers have remained one of the most powerful tools for a myriad of population genetic approaches. Here, we used the 454 sequencing technique to develop microsatellite loci in the fire coral Millepora platyphylla, an important reef-builder of Indo-Pacific reefs. We tested the cross-species amplification of these loci in five other species of the genus Millepora and analysed its success in correlation with the genetic distances between species using mitochondrial 16S sequences. We succeeded in discovering fifteen microsatellite loci in our target species M. platyphylla, among which twelve were polymorphic with 2-13 alleles and a mean observed heterozygosity of 0.411. Cross-species amplification in the five other Millepora species revealed a high probability of amplification success (71%) and polymorphism (59%) of the loci. Our results show no evidence of decreased heterozygosity with increasing genetic distance. However, only one locus enabled measures of genetic diversity in the Caribbean species M. complanata due to high proportions of null alleles for most of the microsatellites. This result indicates that our novel markers may only be useful for the Indo-Pacific species of Millepora. Measures of genetic diversity revealed significant linkage disequilibrium, moderate levels of observed heterozygosity (0.323-0.496) and heterozygote deficiencies for the Indo-Pacific species. The accessibility to new polymorphic microsatellite markers for hydrozoan Millepora species creates new opportunities for future research on processes driving the complexity of their colonisation success on many Indo-Pacific reefs.

  19. Genetic diversity and differentiation in reef-building Millepora species, as revealed by cross-species amplification of fifteen novel microsatellite loci

    PubMed Central

    Planes, Serge; Zhou, Yuxiang; Berteaux-Lecellier, Véronique; Boissin, Emilie

    2017-01-01

    Quantifying the genetic diversity in natural populations is crucial to address ecological and evolutionary questions. Despite recent advances in whole-genome sequencing, microsatellite markers have remained one of the most powerful tools for a myriad of population genetic approaches. Here, we used the 454 sequencing technique to develop microsatellite loci in the fire coral Millepora platyphylla, an important reef-builder of Indo-Pacific reefs. We tested the cross-species amplification of these loci in five other species of the genus Millepora and analysed its success in correlation with the genetic distances between species using mitochondrial 16S sequences. We succeeded in discovering fifteen microsatellite loci in our target species M. platyphylla, among which twelve were polymorphic with 2–13 alleles and a mean observed heterozygosity of 0.411. Cross-species amplification in the five other Millepora species revealed a high probability of amplification success (71%) and polymorphism (59%) of the loci. Our results show no evidence of decreased heterozygosity with increasing genetic distance. However, only one locus enabled measures of genetic diversity in the Caribbean species M. complanata due to high proportions of null alleles for most of the microsatellites. This result indicates that our novel markers may only be useful for the Indo-Pacific species of Millepora. Measures of genetic diversity revealed significant linkage disequilibrium, moderate levels of observed heterozygosity (0.323–0.496) and heterozygote deficiencies for the Indo-Pacific species. The accessibility to new polymorphic microsatellite markers for hydrozoan Millepora species creates new opportunities for future research on processes driving the complexity of their colonisation success on many Indo-Pacific reefs. PMID:28243525

  20. Deriving evolutionary relationships among populations using microsatellites and (deltamu)(2): all loci are equal, but some are more equal than others...

    PubMed Central

    Landry, Pierre-Alexandre; Koskinen, Mikko T; Primmer, Craig R

    2002-01-01

    Numerous studies have relied on microsatellite DNA data to assess the relationships among populations in a phylogenetic framework, converting microsatellite allelic composition of populations into evolutionary distances. Among other coefficients, (deltamu)(2) and R(st) are often employed because they make use of the differences in allele sizes on the basis of the stepwise mutation model. While it has been recognized that some microsatellites can yield disproportionate interpopulation distance estimates, no formal investigation has been conducted to evaluate to what extent such loci could affect the topology of the corresponding dendrograms. Here we show that single loci, displaying extremely large among-population variance, can greatly bias the topology of the phylogenetic tree, using data from European grayling (Thymallus thymallus, Salmonidae) populations. Importantly, we also demonstrate that the inclusion of a single disproportionate locus will lead to an overestimation of the stability of trees assessed using bootstrapping. To avoid this bias, we introduce a simple statistical test for detecting loci with significantly disproportionate variance prior to phylogenetic analyses and further show that exclusion of offending loci eliminates the false increase in phylogram stability. PMID:12136035

  1. [Analysis of microsatellite loci of the chloroplast genome in the genus Capsicum (Pepper)].

    PubMed

    Ryzhova, N N; Kochieva, E Z

    2004-08-01

    Six plastome microsatellites were examined in 43 accessions of the genus Capsicum. In total, 33 allelic variants were detected. A specific haplotype of chloroplast DNA was identified for each Capsicum species. Species-specific allelic variants were found for most wild Capsicum species. The highest intraspecific variation was observed for the C. baccatum plastome. Low cpDNA polymorphism was characteristic of C. annuum: the cpSSRs were either monomorphic or dimorphic. The vast majority of C. annuum accessions each had alleles of one type. Another allele type was rare and occurred only in wild accessions. The results testified again to genetic conservation of C. annuum and especially its cultivated forms. The phylogenetic relationships established for the Capsicum species on the basis of plastome analysis were similar to those inferred from the morphological traits, isozyme patterns, and molecular analysis of the nuclear genome.

  2. SNPs selected by information content outperform randomly selected microsatellite loci for delineating genetic identification and introgression in the endangered dark European honeybee (Apis mellifera mellifera).

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Irene; Henriques, Dora; Jara, Laura; Johnston, J Spencer; Chávez-Galarza, Julio; De La Rúa, Pilar; Pinto, M Alice

    2016-11-14

    The honeybee (Apis mellifera) has been threatened by multiple factors including pests and pathogens, pesticides and loss of locally adapted gene complexes due to replacement and introgression. In western Europe, the genetic integrity of the native A. m. mellifera (M-lineage) is endangered due to trading and intensive queen breeding with commercial subspecies of eastern European ancestry (C-lineage). Effective conservation actions require reliable molecular tools to identify pure-bred A. m. mellifera colonies. Microsatellites have been preferred for identification of A. m. mellifera stocks across conservation centres. However, owing to high throughput, easy transferability between laboratories and low genotyping error, SNPs promise to become popular. Here, we compared the resolving power of a widely utilized microsatellite set to detect structure and introgression with that of different sets that combine a variable number of SNPs selected for their information content and genomic proximity to the microsatellite loci. Contrary to every SNP data set, microsatellites did not discriminate between the two lineages in the PCA space. Mean introgression proportions were identical across the two marker types, although at the individual level, microsatellites' performance was relatively poor at the upper range of Q-values, a result reflected by their lower precision. Our results suggest that SNPs are more accurate and powerful than microsatellites for identification of A. m. mellifera colonies, especially when they are selected by information content.

  3. Simultaneous assessment of loss of heterozygosity at multiple microsatellite loci using semi-automated fluorescence-based detection: subregional mapping of chromosome 4 in cervical carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Hampton, G M; Larson, A A; Baergen, R N; Sommers, R L; Kern, S; Cavenee, W K

    1996-01-01

    Detection of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) by comparison of normal and tumor genotypes using PCR-based microsatellite loci provides considerable advantages over traditional Southern blotting-based approaches. However, current methodologies are limited by several factors, including the numbers of loci that can be evaluated for LOH in a single experiment, the discrimination of true alleles versus "stutter bands," and the use of radionucleotides in detecting PCR products. Here we describe methods for high throughput simultaneous assessment of LOH at multiple loci in human tumors; these methods rely on the detection of amplified microsatellite loci by fluorescence-based DNA sequencing technology. Data generated by this approach are processed by several computer software programs that enable the automated linear quantitation and calculation of allelic ratios, allowing rapid ascertainment of LOH. As a test of this approach, genotypes at a series of loci on chromosome 4 were determined for 58 carcinomas of the uterine cervix. The results underscore the efficacy, sensitivity, and remarkable reproducibility of this approach to LOH detection and provide subchromosomal localization of two regions of chromosome 4 commonly altered in cervical tumors. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8692882

  4. Characterization and transferability of microsatellite markers developed for Carpinus betulus (Betulaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Prinz, Kathleen; Finkeldey, Reiner

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Carpinus betulus (Betulaceae) is an octoploid, ecologically important, common tree species in European woodlands. We established 11 nuclear microsatellite loci allowing for detailed analyses of genetic diversity and structure. Methods and Results: A microsatellite-enriched library was used to develop primers for 11 microsatellite loci that revealed high allele numbers and genetic diversity in a preliminary study. Conclusions: All of the loci developed here are informative for C. betulus. In addition, the loci are transferable to several species within the genus, and almost all loci cross-amplified in species of different genera of the Betulaceae. PMID:26504678

  5. 'True' null allele detection in microsatellite loci: a comparison of methods, assessment of difficulties and survey of possible improvements.

    PubMed

    Dąbrowski, M J; Bornelöv, S; Kruczyk, M; Baltzer, N; Komorowski, J

    2015-05-01

    Null alleles are alleles that for various reasons fail to amplify in a PCR assay. The presence of null alleles in microsatellite data is known to bias the genetic parameter estimates. Thus, efficient detection of null alleles is crucial, but the methods available for indirect null allele detection return inconsistent results. Here, our aim was to compare different methods for null allele detection, to explain their respective performance and to provide improvements. We applied several approaches to identify the 'true' null alleles based on the predictions made by five different methods, used either individually or in combination. First, we introduced simulated 'true' null alleles into 240 population data sets and applied the methods to measure their success in detecting the simulated null alleles. The single best-performing method was ML-NullFreq_frequency. Furthermore, we applied different noise reduction approaches to improve the results. For instance, by combining the results of several methods, we obtained more reliable results than using a single one. Rule-based classification was applied to identify population properties linked to the false discovery rate. Rules obtained from the classifier described which population genetic estimates and loci characteristics were linked to the success of each method. We have shown that by simulating 'true' null alleles into a population data set, we may define a null allele frequency threshold, related to a desired true or false discovery rate. Moreover, using such simulated data sets, the expected null allele homozygote frequency may be estimated independently of the equilibrium state of the population.

  6. Genetic variability and heterogeneity of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus vector Ochlerotatus taeniorhynchus (Diptera: Culicidae) populations of the Colombian Atlantic coast, based on microsatellite loci.

    PubMed

    Bello, F; Becerra, V

    2009-09-29

    In Colombia, the mosquito Ochlerotatus taeniorhynchus has been identified as an efficient vector of the epidemic-epizootic Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. We evaluated the genetic variability and heterogeneity of this mosquito in Colombian populations using eight microsatellite DNA loci. Two hundred and ten mosquito specimens collected from seven populations of the Colombian Atlantic coast (San Bernardo del Viento, Coveñas, Cartagena, Barranquilla, Ciénaga, Dibulla, and Riohacha) were analyzed. We found five polymorphic microsatellite loci, with 19 alleles giving 62.5% polymorphism; the mean number of alleles per locus was 3.8. The mean expected heterogeneity ranged from 0.568 to 0.660. Most of the polymorphic microsatellite loci were in Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium, due to both deficit and excess of heterozygotes. The Fst statistic gave a total value of 0.0369, reflecting low genetic differentiation among the populations and, as a consequence, a low degree of structuring among them, while gene flow was high (Nm = 6.52); these findings point to genetic homogeneity among these populations. There was no significant linkage disequilibrium between genotype pairs of the various populations. We concluded that this mosquito is distributed in local populations along the Colombian Atlantic coast; these findings will be useful for developing strategies for controlling this vector.

  7. Location of Vibrio anguillarum resistance-associated trait loci in half-smooth tongue sole Cynoglossus semilaevis at its microsatellite linkage map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhihong; Guo, Li; Liu, Yang; Shao, Changwei; Chen, Songlin; Yang, Guanpin

    2016-11-01

    A cultured female half-smooth tongue sole ( Cynoglossus semilaevis) was crossed with a wild male, yielding the first filial generation of pseudo-testcrossing from which 200 fish were randomly selected to locate the Vibrio anguillarum resistance trait in half-smooth tongue sole at its microsatellite linkage map. In total, 129 microsatellites were arrayed into 18 linkage groups, ≥4 each. The map reconstructed was 852.85 cM in length with an average spacing of 7.68 cM, covering 72.07% of that expected (1 183.35 cM). The V. anguillarum resistance trait was a composite rather than a unit trait, which was tentatively partitioned into Survival time in Hours After V. anguillarum Infection (SHAVI) and Immunity of V. Anguillarum Infection (IVAI). Above a logarithm of the odds (LOD) threshold of 2.5, 18 loci relative to SHAVI and 3 relative to IVAI were identified. The 3 loci relative to IVAI explained 18.78%, 5.87% and 6.50% of the total phenotypic variation in immunity. The microsatellites bounding the 3 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) of IVAI may in future aid to the selection of V. anguillarum-immune half-smooth tongue sole varieties, and facilitate cloning the gene(s) controlling such immunity.

  8. Genetic structuring in a relictual population of screaming hairy armadillo (Chaetophractus vellerosus) in Argentina revealed by a set of novel microsatellite loci.

    PubMed

    Nardelli, Maximiliano; Ibáñez, Ezequiel Alejandro; Dobler, Dara; Justy, Fabienne; Delsuc, Frédéric; Abba, Agustín Manuel; Cassini, Marcelo Hernán; Túnez, Juan Ignacio

    2016-08-01

    The screaming hairy armadillo (Chaetophractus vellerosus) is a mammal species containing disjunct and isolated populations. In order to assess the effect of habitat fragmentation and geographic isolation, we developed seven new microsatellite loci isolated from low-coverage genome shotgun sequencing data for this species. Among these loci, six microsatellites were found to be polymorphic with 8-26 alleles per locus detected across 69 samples analyzed from a relictual population of the species located in the northeast of the Buenos Aires Province (Argentina). Mean allelic richness and polymorphic information content were 15 and 0.75, with observed and expected heterozygosities ranging from 0.40 to 0.67 and 0.58 to 0.90, respectively. All loci showed departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The analysis of population structure in this relictual population revealed three groups of individuals that are genetically differentiated. These newly developed microsatellites will constitute a very useful tool for the estimation of genetic diversity and structure, population dynamics, social structure, parentage and mating system in this little-studied armadillo species. Such genetic data will be particularly helpful for the development of conservation strategies for this isolated population and also for the endangered Bolivian populations previously recognized as a distinct species (Chaetophractus nationi).

  9. Characterization of 12 microsatellite loci for the Pacific lamprey, Entosphenus tridentatus (Petromyzontidae), and cross-amplification in five other lamprey species.

    PubMed

    Spice, E K; Whitesel, T A; McFarlane, C T; Docker, M F

    2011-12-22

    The Pacific lamprey (Entosphenus tridentatus) is an anadromous fish that is of conservation concern in North America and Asia. Data on Pacific lamprey population structure are scarce and conflicting, impeding conservation efforts. We optimized 12 polymorphic microsatellite loci for the Pacific lamprey. Three to 13 alleles per locus were observed in a sample of 51 fish collected from the West Fork Illinois River, Oregon. Observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.235 to 0.902 and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.214 to 0.750. Cross-species amplification produced 8 to 12 polymorphic loci in four other Entosphenus species and in the western brook lamprey (Lampetra richardsoni). Two loci appear to be diagnostic for distinguishing Entosphenus from Lampetra. These markers will be valuable for evaluating population structure and making conservation decisions for E. tridentatus and other lamprey species.

  10. Isolation and characterization of eight microsatellite loci from Galeocerdo cuvier (tiger shark) and cross-amplification in Carcharhinus leucas, Carcharhinus brevipinna, Carcharhinus plumbeus and Sphyrna lewini

    PubMed Central

    Jaquemet, Sébastien; Blaison, Antonin; Soria, Marc; Magalon, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    The tiger shark Galeocerdo cuvier (Carcharhinidae) is a large elasmobranch suspected to have, as other apex predators, a keystone function in marine ecosystems and is currently considered Near Threatened (Red list IUCN). Knowledge on its ecology, which is crucial to design proper conservation and management plans, is very scarce. Here we describe the isolation of eight polymorphic microsatellite loci using 454 GS-FLX Titanium pyrosequencing of enriched DNA libraries. Their characteristics were tested on a population of tiger shark (n = 101) from Reunion Island (South-Western Indian Ocean). All loci were polymorphic with a number of alleles ranging from two to eight. No null alleles were detected and no linkage disequilibrium was detected after Bonferroni correction. Observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.03 to 0.76 and from 0.03 to 0.77, respectively. No locus deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and the global FIS of the population was of 0.04NS. Some of the eight loci developed here successfully cross-amplified in the bull shark Carcharhinus leucas (one locus), the spinner shark Carcharhinus brevipinna (four loci), the sandbar shark Carcharhinus plumbeus (five loci) and the scalloped hammerhead shark Sphyrna lewini (two loci). We also designed primers to amplify and sequence a mitochondrial marker, the control region. We sequenced 862 bp and found a low genetic diversity, with four polymorphic sites, a haplotype diversity of 0.15 and a nucleotide diversity of 2 × 10−4. PMID:27231661

  11. Migration and Gene Flow Among Domestic Populations of the Chagas Insect Vector Triatoma dimidiata (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) Detected by Microsatellite Loci

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Lori; Monroy, M. Carlota; Rodas, Antonieta Guadalupe; Hicks, Robin M.; Lucero, David E.; Lyons, Leslie A.; Dorn, Patricia L.

    2015-01-01

    Triatoma dimidiata (Latreille, 1811) is the most abundant and significant insect vector of the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi in Central America, and particularly in Guatemala. Tr. cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas disease, and successful disease control requires understanding the geographic distribution and degree of migration of vectors such as T. dimidiata that frequently re-infest houses within months following insecticide application. The population genetic structure of T. dimidiata collected from six villages in southern Guatemala was studied to gain insight into the migration patterns of the insects in this region where populations are largely domestic. This study provided insight into the likelihood of eliminating T. dimidiata by pesticide application as has been observed in some areas for other domestic triatomines such as Triatoma infestans. Genotypes of microsatellite loci for 178 insects from six villages were found to represent five genetic clusters using a Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo method. Individual clusters were found in multiple villages, with multiple clusters in the same house. Although migration occurred, there was statistically significant genetic differentiation among villages (FRT = 0.05) and high genetic differentiation among houses within villages (FSR = 0.11). Relatedness of insects within houses varied from 0 to 0.25, i.e., from unrelated to half-sibs. The results suggest that T. dimidiata in southern Guatemala moves between houses and villages often enough that recolonization is likely, implying the use of insecticides alone is not sufficient for effective control of Chagas disease in this region and more sustainable solutions are required. PMID:26334816

  12. Isolation and Characterization of Microsatellite Loci for Hibiscus aridicola (Malvaceae), an Endangered Plant Endemic to the Dry-Hot Valleys of Jinsha River in Southwest China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Le; Sun, Weibang; Wang, Zhonglang; Guan, Kaiyun; Yang, Junbo

    2011-01-01

    Hibiscus aridicola (Malvaceae) is an endangered ornamental shrub endemic to the dry-hot valleys of Jinsha River in southwest China. Only four natural populations of H. aridicola exist in the wild according to our field investigation. It can be inferred that H. aridicola is facing a very high risk of extinction in the wild and an urgent conservation strategy is required. By using a modified biotin-streptavidin capture method, a total of 40 microsatellite markers were developed and characterized in H. aridicola for the first time. Polymorphisms were evaluated in 39 individuals from four natural populations. Fifteen of the markers showed polymorphisms with two to six alleles per locus; the observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.19 to 0.72. These microsatellite loci would be useful tools for population genetics studies on H. aridicola and other con-generic species which are important to the conservation and development of endangered species. PMID:22016620

  13. Isolation and characterization of 20 polymorphic microsatellite loci in the migratory freshwater fish Leporinus obtusidens (Characiformes: Anostomidae) using 454 shotgun pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Villanova, G V; Vera, M; Díaz, J; Martinez, P; Calcaterra, N B; Arranz, S E

    2015-03-01

    Twenty polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed for the Neotropical fish Leporinus obtusidens using a next generation sequencing approach and tested in two other characifomes species, Schizodon platae and Prochilodus lineatus. Microsatellite loci alleles in L. obtusidens ranged between 2 and 20 alleles per locus (mean = 5·7), with expected heterozygosity values ranging from 0·097 to 0·956 (mean = 0·578) and observed heterozygosity values ranging from 0·000 to 0·800 (mean = 0·400) in a sample of 20 specimens from the lower Paraná River (Argentina). Most of these markers will be a valuable tool for captive breeding and stocking programmes, as well as for analyses of population connectivity and genetic structure in this broadly distributed Neotropical migratory fish.

  14. Improving complex kinship analyses with additional STR loci.

    PubMed

    Carboni, Ilaria; Iozzi, Sara; Nutini, Anna Lucia; Torricelli, Francesca; Ricci, Ugo

    2014-11-01

    In a standard paternity testing, mother, child, and alleged father are analyzed with STR markers using commercially available kits. Since Italian civil legislation does not have thresholds to confirm a paternity, paternity is practically proven when likelihood ratio increases prior probability of paternity to posterior, accepted by court as sufficient. However, in some cases the number of markers included in a commercial kit may be insufficient to conclusively prove or disprove a relationship between individuals, especially when complex family scenarios are suspected or indirect analyses are required. Additional genetic information can increase the values of the likelihood ratio regarding the detection of true parental relationships in a pedigree, while reducing the chances of false attributions (e.g. false paternities). In these cases the introduction of a 26Plex amplification system allows to examine 23-26 additional markers depending on the commercial kit used, thus increasing the statistical power of the kinship analysis. The PCR conditions were optimized for a multiplex amplification system and a new generation CE instrument. In order to demonstrate the utility of additional STRs markers, four complex kinship cases are presented.

  15. Development and characterization of 26 novel microsatellite loci for the trochid gastropod Gibbula divaricata (Linnaeus, 1758), using Illumina MiSeq next generation sequencing technology

    PubMed Central

    García-Jiménez, Ricardo; Templado, José; Machordom, Annie

    2016-01-01

    In the present study we used the high-throughput sequencing technology Illumina MiSeq to develop 26 polymorphic microsatellite loci for the marine snail Gibbula divaricata. Four to 32 alleles were detected per locus across 30 samples analyzed. Observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.130 to 0.933 and from 0.294 to 0.956, respectively. No significant linkage disequilibrium existed. Seven loci deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium that could not totally be explained by the presence of null alleles. Sympatric distribution with other species of the genus Gibbula, as G. rarilineata and G. varia, lead us to test the cross utility of the developed markers in these two species, which could be useful to test common biogeographic patterns or potential hybridization phenomena, since morphological intermediate specimens were found. PMID:27042392

  16. A wheat intervarietal genetic linkage map based on microsatellite and target region amplified polymorphism markers and its utility for detecting quantitative trait loci.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z H; Anderson, J A; Hu, J; Friesen, T L; Rasmussen, J B; Faris, J D

    2005-08-01

    Efficient user-friendly methods for mapping plant genomes are highly desirable for the identification of quantitative trait loci (QTLs), genotypic profiling, genomic studies, and marker-assisted selection. SSR (microsatellite) markers are user-friendly and efficient in detecting polymorphism, but they detect few loci. Target region amplification polymorphism (TRAP) is a relatively new PCR-based technique that detects a large number of loci from a single reaction without extensive pre-PCR processing of samples. In the investigation reported here, we used both SSRs and TRAPs to generate over 700 markers for the construction of a genetic linkage map in a hard red spring wheat intervarietal recombinant inbred population. A framework map consisting of 352 markers accounted for 3,045 cM with an average density of one marker per 8.7 cM. On average, SSRs detected 1.9 polymorphic loci per reaction, while TRAPs detected 24. Both marker systems were suitable for assigning linkage groups to chromosomes using wheat aneuploid stocks. We demonstrated the utility of the maps by identifying major QTLs for days to heading and reduced plant height on chromosomes 5A and 4B, respectively. Our results indicate that TRAPs are highly efficient for genetic mapping in wheat. The maps developed will be useful for the identification of quality and disease resistance QTLs that segregate in this population.

  17. Linkage disequilibrium between alleles at highly polymorphic mini- and micro-satellite loci of Theileria parva isolated from cattle in three regions of Kenya.

    PubMed

    Odongo, D O; Oura, C A L; Spooner, P R; Kiara, H; Mburu, D; Hanotte, O H; Bishop, R P

    2006-07-01

    Theileria parva schizont-infected lymphocyte culture isolates from western, central and coastal Kenya were analysed for size polymorphism at 30 T. parva-specific variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) loci using a panel of mini- and micro-satellite markers. The mean number of alleles ranged from 3 to 11 at individual loci and 183 distinct alleles were observed in total, indicating high genetic diversity within the T. parva gene pool in Kenyan cattle. The frequency distribution of the length variation of specific alleles among isolates ranged from normal to markedly discontinuous. Genetic relationships between isolates were analysed using standard indices of genetic distance. Genetic distances and dendrograms derived from these using neighbour-joining algorithms did not indicate significant clustering on a geographical basis. Analysis of molecular variance demonstrated that the genetic variation between individual isolates was 72%, but only 2.3% when isolates from different regions were pooled. Both these observations suggest minimal genetic sub-structuring relative to geographical origin. Linkage disequilibrium was observed between pairs of loci within populations, as in certain Ugandan T. parva populations. A novel observation was that disequilibrium was also detected between alleles at three individual pairs of VNTR loci when isolates from the three regional meta-populations were pooled for analysis.

  18. Application of Microsatellite Loci for Molecular Identification of Elite Genotypes, Analysis of Clonality, and Genetic Diversity in Aspen Populus tremula L. (Salicaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Politov, Dmitry V.; Belokon, Maryana M.; Belokon, Yuri S.; Polyakova, Tatyana A.; Shatokhina, Anna V.; Mudrik, Elena A.; Azarova, Anna B.; Filippov, Mikhail V.; Shestibratov, Konstantin A.

    2015-01-01

    Testing systems for molecular identification of micropropagated elite aspen (Populus tremula L.) genotypes were developed on the base on microsatellite (SSR) loci. Out of 33 tested microsatellite loci, 14 were selected due to sustainable PCR amplification and substantial variability in elite clones of aspen aimed for establishment of fast-rotated forest plantations. All eight tested clones had different multilocus genotypes. Among 114 trees from three reference native stands located near the established plantations, 80 haplotypes were identified while some repeated genotypes were attributed to natural clones which appeared as a result of sprouting. The selected set of SSR markers showed reliable individual identification with low probability of appearance of identical aspen genotypes (a minimum of 4.8 · 10−10 and 1 × 10−4 for unrelated and related individuals, resp.). Case studies demonstrating practical applications of the test system are described including analysis of clonal structure and levels of genetic diversity in three natural aspen stands growing in the regions where plantations made of elite clones were established. PMID:26823661

  19. Microsatellites for Next-Generation Ecologists: A Post-Sequencing Bioinformatics Pipeline

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Silva, Iria; Whitney, Jonathan; Wainwright, Benjamin; Andrews, Kimberly R.; Ylitalo-Ward, Heather; Bowen, Brian W.; Toonen, Robert J.; Goetze, Erica; Karl, Stephen A.

    2013-01-01

    Microsatellites are the markers of choice for a variety of population genetic studies. The recent advent of next-generation pyrosequencing has drastically accelerated microsatellite locus discovery by providing a greater amount of DNA sequencing reads at lower costs compared to other techniques. However, laboratory testing of PCR primers targeting potential microsatellite markers remains time consuming and costly. Here we show how to reduce this workload by screening microsatellite loci via bioinformatic analyses prior to primer design. Our method emphasizes the importance of sequence quality, and we avoid loci associated with repetitive elements by screening with repetitive sequence databases available for a growing number of taxa. Testing with the Yellowstripe Goatfish Mulloidichthys flavolineatus and the marine planktonic copepod Pleuromamma xiphias we show higher success rate of primers selected by our pipeline in comparison to previous in silico microsatellite detection methodologies. Following the same pipeline, we discover and select microsatellite loci in nine additional species including fishes, sea stars, copepods and octopuses. PMID:23424642

  20. Microsatellites for next-generation ecologists: a post-sequencing bioinformatics pipeline.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Silva, Iria; Whitney, Jonathan; Wainwright, Benjamin; Andrews, Kimberly R; Ylitalo-Ward, Heather; Bowen, Brian W; Toonen, Robert J; Goetze, Erica; Karl, Stephen A

    2013-01-01

    Microsatellites are the markers of choice for a variety of population genetic studies. The recent advent of next-generation pyrosequencing has drastically accelerated microsatellite locus discovery by providing a greater amount of DNA sequencing reads at lower costs compared to other techniques. However, laboratory testing of PCR primers targeting potential microsatellite markers remains time consuming and costly. Here we show how to reduce this workload by screening microsatellite loci via bioinformatic analyses prior to primer design. Our method emphasizes the importance of sequence quality, and we avoid loci associated with repetitive elements by screening with repetitive sequence databases available for a growing number of taxa. Testing with the Yellowstripe Goatfish Mulloidichthys flavolineatus and the marine planktonic copepod Pleuromamma xiphias we show higher success rate of primers selected by our pipeline in comparison to previous in silico microsatellite detection methodologies. Following the same pipeline, we discover and select microsatellite loci in nine additional species including fishes, sea stars, copepods and octopuses.

  1. Cross-species amplification and polymorphism of microsatellite loci in Helicoverpa armigera and Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in Brazilian cropping systems.

    PubMed

    Leite, N A; Corrêa, A S; Alves-Pereira, A; Campos, J B; Zucchi, M I; Omoto, C

    2016-04-04

    The Old World bollworm Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) was recently discovered in Brazil. This species is closely related to the New World bollworm H. zea (Boddie), and mating between these species has already been reported under laboratory conditions. Here, we tested the cross-species amplification of 20 microsatellite (SSR) loci in field populations of H. armigera and H. zea collected from Brazilian cropping systems. Seven SSR loci were successfully amplified and polymorphic in both species except for the locus HaC14, which was monomorphic for H. zea. All SSR loci were in linkage equilibrium, and deviations from Hardy- Weinberg equilibrium were only observed for the locus HarSSR1 in the HaRS-2 population, where null alleles were present. A moderate level of polymorphism was detected in H. armigera and H. zea populations with a mean allele number of 4.14, and 2.24, respectively. Interestingly, most of the populations of the recent invader H. armigera showed higher genetic diversity and inbreeding coefficients than H. zea populations. The genetic identity of each species was recovered using a STRUCTURE analysis, where the populations formed two clusters (K = 2) according to their species. STRUCTURE also suggested the occurrence of potential hybrid offspring between H. armigera and H. zea individuals in natural conditions. These SSR loci will be valuable in characterizing population differentiation, invasion routes, adaptation, reproductive behavior, and intra- and interspecific gene flow in H. armigera and H. zea populations in Brazil, the USA, and other areas where these two pests occur.

  2. [Analysis of genetic structure and differentiation of the bog and dry land populations of Pinus sibirica du tour based on nuclear microsatellite loci].

    PubMed

    Oreshkova, N V; Sedel'nikova, T S; Pimenov, A V; Efremov, S P

    2014-09-01

    We evaluated the population structure of the bog and dry land populations of the Siberian pine Pinus sibirica (P. sibrica) in Western Siberia using nuclear genome markers. Six pairs of nuclear microsatellite loci were used for this analysis. We detected 30 allelic variants in 120 individuals of four populations of P. Sibirica. We established that the studied populations differ by genetic structure. The most essential differences were identified between the Siberian pine population from oligotrophic bog and the group of populations from dry land within eutrophic bogs and near settlements P. sibirica forest (F(ST) = 0.019; D(N) = 0.053). We estimated that diversification of the West Siberian populations of P. sibirica exceeded 2.4% (F(ST) = 0.024), based on an analysis of SSR markers.

  3. Isolation, characterization and cross-amplification of polymorphic microsatellite loci in the threatened endemic Mammillaria crucigera (Cactaceae).

    PubMed

    Solórzano, Sofia; Cortés-Palomec, Aurea C; Ibarra, Arturo; Dávila, Patricia; Oyama, Ken

    2009-01-01

    The cactus Mammillaria crucigera is a threatened species endemic to central Mexico. As a means of assessing population genetic status of these species, eight microsatellite markers were developed. These primers were tested in 40 individual from two wild populations. The results showed that these primers will be useful to describe population structure and aid to the conservation of species. The eight primers were tested in other Mammillaria species and most of them showed successful amplification.

  4. Genetic structure based on nuclear and chloroplast microsatellite loci of Solanum lycocarpum A. St. Hil. (Solanaceae) in Central Brazil.

    PubMed

    Martins, K; Chaves, L J; Vencovsky, R; Kageyama, P Y

    2011-04-19

    Solanum lycocarpum (Solanaceae) is a woody species found in the Brazilian Cerrado. The flowers are pollinated by Xylocopa spp bees, and seeds are dispersed by mammals with distinct home range sizes. As a consequence, relative contributions of pollen and seeds to overall gene flow can vary according to different spatial scales. We studied the genetic structure of four natural populations of S. lycocarpum separated by 19 to 128 km, including individuals located along dirt roads that interlink three of the populations. A total of 294 individuals were genotyped with five nuclear and six chloroplast microsatellite markers. Significant spatial genetic structure was found in the total set of individuals; the Sp statistic was 0.0086. Population differentiation based on the six chloroplast microsatellite markers (θ(pC) = 0.042) was small and similar to that based on the five nuclear microsatellite markers (θ(p) = 0.054). For this set of populations, pollen and seed flow did not differ significantly from one another (pollen-to-seed flow ratio = 1.22). Capability for long distance seed dispersion and colonization of anthropogenic sites contributes to the ability of S. lycocarpum to maintain genetic diversity. Seed dispersion along dirt roads may be critical in preserving S. lycocarpum genetic diversity in fragmented landscapes.

  5. Isolation, characterization and PCR multiplexing of microsatellite loci for two sub-species of terrestrial isopod Porcellio dilatatus (Crustacea, Oniscidea).

    PubMed

    Michaud, Caroline; Chupeau, Cassandre; Bech, Nicolas; Thierry, Magali; Sicard, Mathieu; Greve, Pierre; Beltran-Bech, Sophie

    2016-04-01

    Several microsatellite markers have already been developed for different terrestrial isopod species such as Armadillidium vulgare, A. nasatum and Porcellionides pruinosus. In all these species, the endosymbiont Wolbachia has a feminizing effect that generates a female bias in sex ratio and reduces the number of reproductive males. Thus this can potentially decrease the genetic diversity of host populations. However, in some other isopod species, Wolbachia induces cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI); the most commonly described effect of Wolbachia in arthropods. The CI by rendering some crossings incompatible can reduce the gene flow and strengthen genetic differentiation between isopod populations. To date, the influence of Wolbachia inducing CI on population structure of terrestrial isopods has never been investigated. In this study, we developed 10 polymorphic microsatellite markers shared by two sub-species of Porcellio dilatatus. Crossings between the two sub-species are partially incompatible due to two CI-inducing Wolbachia strains. These new microsatellite markers will allow us to investigate the effect of CI on host genetic differentiation in this species complex.

  6. Survey and Analysis of Microsatellites in the Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, M. Dharma; Muthulakshmi, M.; Madhu, M.; Archak, Sunil; Mita, K.; Nagaraju, J.

    2005-01-01

    We studied microsatellite frequency and distribution in 21.76-Mb random genomic sequences, 0.67-Mb BAC sequences from the Z chromosome, and 6.3-Mb EST sequences of Bombyx mori. We mined microsatellites of ≥15 bases of mononucleotide repeats and ≥5 repeat units of other classes of repeats. We estimated that microsatellites account for 0.31% of the genome of B. mori. Microsatellite tracts of A, AT, and ATT were the most abundant whereas their number drastically decreased as the length of the repeat motif increased. In general, tri- and hexanucleotide repeats were overrepresented in the transcribed sequences except TAA, GTA, and TGA, which were in excess in genomic sequences. The Z chromosome sequences contained shorter repeat types than the rest of the chromosomes in addition to a higher abundance of AT-rich repeats. Our results showed that base composition of the flanking sequence has an influence on the origin and evolution of microsatellites. Transitions/transversions were high in microsatellites of ESTs, whereas the genomic sequence had an equal number of substitutions and indels. The average heterozygosity value for 23 polymorphic microsatellite loci surveyed in 13 diverse silkmoth strains having 2–14 alleles was 0.54. Only 36 (18.2%) of 198 microsatellite loci were polymorphic between the two divergent silkworm populations and 10 (5%) loci revealed null alleles. The microsatellite map generated using these polymorphic markers resulted in 8 linkage groups. B. mori microsatellite loci were the most conserved in its immediate ancestor, B. mandarina, followed by the wild saturniid silkmoth, Antheraea assama. PMID:15371363

  7. What remains from a 454 run: estimation of success rates of microsatellite loci development in selected newt species (Calotriton asper, Lissotriton helveticus, and Triturus cristatus) and comparison with Illumina-based approaches

    PubMed Central

    Drechsler, Axel; Geller, Daniel; Freund, Katharina; Schmeller, Dirk S; Künzel, Sven; Rupp, Oliver; Loyau, Adeline; Denoël, Mathieu; Valbuena-Ureña, Emilio; Steinfartz, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    The development of microsatellite loci has become more efficient using next-generation sequencing (NGS) approaches, and many studies imply that the amount of applicable loci is large. However, few studies have sought to quantify the number of loci that are retained for use out of the thousands of sequence reads initially obtained. We analyzed the success rate of microsatellite loci development for three amphibian species using a 454 NGS approach on tetra-nucleotide motif-enriched species-specific libraries. The number of sequence reads obtained differed strongly between species and ranged from 19,562 for Triturus cristatus to 55,626 for Lissotriton helveticus, with 52,075 reads obtained for Calotriton asper. PHOBOS was used to identify sequences with tetra-nucleotide repeat motifs with a minimum repeat number of ten and high quality primer binding sites. Of 107 sequences for T. cristatus, 316 for C. asper and 319 for L. helveticus, we tested the amplification success, polymorphism, and degree of heterozygosity for 41 primer combinations each for C. asper and T. cristatus, and 22 for L. helveticus. We found 11 polymorphic loci for T. cristatus, 20 loci for C. asper, and 15 loci for L. helveticus. Extrapolated, the number of potentially amplifiable loci (PALs) resulted in estimated species-specific success rates of 0.15% (T. cristatus), 0.30% (C. asper), and 0.39% (L. helveticus). Compared with representative Illumina NGS approaches, our applied 454-sequencing approach on specifically enriched sublibraries proved to be quite competitive in terms of success rates and number of finally applicable loci. PMID:24198952

  8. Detected microsatellite polymorphisms in genetically altered inbred mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaoyan; Cui, Jing; Wang, Chao; Huo, Xueyun; Lu, Jing; Li, Yichen; Chen, Zhenwen

    2013-08-01

    Microsatellites are 50-200 repetitive DNA sequences composed of 1- to 6-base-pair-long reiterative motifs within the genome. They are vulnerable to DNA modifications, such as recombination and/or integration, and are recognized as "sentinel" DNA. Our previous report indicated that the genotypes of the microsatellite loci could change from mono- to poly-morphisms (CMP) in gene knockout (KO) mice, implying that genetic modification induces microsatellite mutation. However, it is still unclear whether the random insertion of DNA fragments into mice genomes produced via transgene (Tg) or N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) would also result in microsatellite mutations or microsatellite loci genotypes changes. This study was designed to find possible clues to answer this question. In brief, 198 microsatellite loci that were distributed among almost all of the chromosomes (except for the Y) were examined through polymerase chain reaction to screen possible CMPs in six Tg strains. First, for each strain, the microsatellite sequences of all loci were compared between Tg and the corresponding background strain to exclude genetic interference. Simultaneously, to exclude spontaneous mutation-related CMPs that might exist in the examined six strains, mice from five spontaneously mutated inbred strains were used as the negative controls. Additionally, the sequences of all loci in these spontaneous mutated mice were compared to corresponding genetic background controls. The results showed that 40 of the 198 (20.2%) loci were identified as having CMPs in the examined Tg mice strains. The CMP genotypes were either homozygous or heterozygous compared to the background controls. Next, we applied the 40 CMP positive loci in ENU-mutated mice and their corresponding background controls. After that, a general comparison of CMPs that exist among Tg, ENU-treated and KO mouse strains was performed. The results indicated that four (D11mit258, D13mit3, D14mit102 and DXmit172) of the 40 (10%) CMP

  9. Evaluation of microsatellite loci from libraries derived from the wild diploid 'Calcutta 4' and 'Ouro' banana cultivars.

    PubMed

    Silva, P R O; Jesus, O N J; Creste, S; Figueira, A; Amorim, E P; Ferreira, C F

    2015-09-25

    Microsatellite markers have been widely used in the quantification of genetic variability and for genetic breeding in Musa spp. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the discriminatory power of microsatellite markers derived from 'Calcutta 4' and 'Ouro' genomic libraries, and to analyze the genetic variability among 30 banana accessions. Thirty-eight markers were used: 15 from the 'Ouro' library and 23 from the 'Calcutta 4' library. Genetic diversity was evaluated by considering SSR markers as both dominant markers because of the presence of triploid accessions, and co-dominant markers. For the dominant analysis, polymorphism information content (PIC) values for 44 polymorphic markers ranged from 0.063 to 0.533, with a mean value of 0.24. A dendrogram analysis separated the BGB-Banana accessions into 4 groups: the 'Ouro' and 'Muísa Tia' accessions were the most dissimilar (93% dissimilarity), while the most similar accessions were 'Pacovan' and 'Walha'. The mean genetic distance between samples was 0.74. For the analysis considering SSR markers as co-dominants, using only diploid accessions, two groups were separated based on their genome contents (A and B). The PIC values for the markers from the 'Calcutta 4' library varied from 0.4836 to 0.7886, whereas those from the 'Ouro' library ranged from 0.3800 to 0.7521. Given the high PIC values, the markers from both the libraries showed high discriminatory power, and can therefore be widely applied for analysis of genetic diversity, population structures, and linkage mapping in Musa spp.

  10. Limited connectivity and a phylogeographic break characterize populations of the pink anemonefish, Amphiprion perideraion, in the Indo-Malay Archipelago: inferences from a mitochondrial and microsatellite loci

    PubMed Central

    Dohna, Tina A; Timm, Janne; Hamid, Lemia; Kochzius, Marc

    2015-01-01

    To enhance the understanding of larval dispersal in marine organisms, species with a sedentary adult stage and a pelagic larval phase of known duration constitute ideal candidates, because inferences can be made about the role of larval dispersal in population connectivity. Members of the immensely diverse marine fauna of the Indo-Malay Archipelago are of particular importance in this respect, as biodiversity conservation is becoming a large concern in this region. In this study, the genetic population structure of the pink anemonefish, Amphiprion perideraion, is analyzed by applying 10 microsatellite loci as well as sequences of the mitochondrial control region to also allow for a direct comparison of marker-derived results. Both marker systems detected a strong overall genetic structure (ΦST = 0.096, P < 0.0001; mean Dest = 0.17; FST = 0.015, P < 0.0001) and best supported regional groupings (ΦCT = 0.199 P < 0.0001; FCT = 0.018, P < 0.001) that suggested a differentiation of the Java Sea population from the rest of the archipelago. Differentiation of a New Guinea group was confirmed by both markers, but disagreed over the affinity of populations from west New Guinea. Mitochondrial data suggest higher connectivity among populations with fewer signals of regional substructure than microsatellite data. Considering the homogenizing effect of only a few migrants per generation on genetic differentiation between populations, marker-specific results have important implications for conservation efforts concerning this and similar species. PMID:25937914

  11. Development of Nuclear Microsatellite Loci and Mitochondrial Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms for the Natterjack Toad, Bufo (Epidalea) calamita (Bufonidae), Using Next Generation Sequencing and Competitive Allele Specific PCR (KASPar).

    PubMed

    Faucher, Leslie; Godé, Cécile; Arnaud, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Amphibians are undergoing a major decline worldwide and the steady increase in the number of threatened species in this particular taxa highlights the need for conservation genetics studies using high-quality molecular markers. The natterjack toad, Bufo (Epidalea) calamita, is a vulnerable pioneering species confined to specialized habitats in Western Europe. To provide efficient and cost-effective genetic resources for conservation biologists, we developed and characterized 22 new nuclear microsatellite markers using next-generation sequencing. We also used sequence data acquired from Sanger sequencing to develop the first mitochondrial markers for KASPar assay genotyping. Genetic polymorphism was then analyzed for 95 toads sampled from 5 populations in France. For polymorphic microsatellite loci, number of alleles and expected heterozygosity ranged from 2 to 14 and from 0.035 to 0.720, respectively. No significant departures from panmixia were observed (mean multilocus F IS = -0.015) and population differentiation was substantial (mean multilocus F ST = 0.222, P < 0.001). From a set of 18 mitochondrial SNPs located in the 16S and D-loop region, we further developed a fast and cost-effective SNP genotyping method based on competitive allele-specific PCR amplification (KASPar). The combination of allelic states for these mitochondrial DNA SNP markers yielded 10 different haplotypes, ranging from 2 to 5 within populations. Populations were highly differentiated (G ST = 0.407, P < 0.001). These new genetic resources will facilitate future parentage, population genetics and phylogeographical studies and will be useful for both evolutionary and conservation concerns, especially for the set-up of management strategies and the definition of distinct evolutionary significant units.

  12. Modular Skeletal Evolution in Sticklebacks Is Controlled by Additive and Clustered Quantitative Trait Loci

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Craig T.; Glazer, Andrew M.; Summers, Brian R.; Blackman, Benjamin K.; Norman, Andrew R.; Shapiro, Michael D.; Cole, Bonnie L.; Peichel, Catherine L.; Schluter, Dolph; Kingsley, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the genetic architecture of evolutionary change remains a long-standing goal in biology. In vertebrates, skeletal evolution has contributed greatly to adaptation in body form and function in response to changing ecological variables like diet and predation. Here we use genome-wide linkage mapping in threespine stickleback fish to investigate the genetic architecture of evolved changes in many armor and trophic traits. We identify >100 quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling the pattern of serially repeating skeletal elements, including gill rakers, teeth, branchial bones, jaws, median fin spines, and vertebrae. We use this large collection of QTL to address long-standing questions about the anatomical specificity, genetic dominance, and genomic clustering of loci controlling skeletal differences in evolving populations. We find that most QTL (76%) that influence serially repeating skeletal elements have anatomically regional effects. In addition, most QTL (71%) have at least partially additive effects, regardless of whether the QTL controls evolved loss or gain of skeletal elements. Finally, many QTL with high LOD scores cluster on chromosomes 4, 20, and 21. These results identify a modular system that can control highly specific aspects of skeletal form. Because of the general additivity and genomic clustering of major QTL, concerted changes in both protective armor and trophic traits may occur when sticklebacks inherit either marine or freshwater alleles at linked or possible “supergene” regions of the stickleback genome. Further study of these regions will help identify the molecular basis of both modular and coordinated changes in the vertebrate skeleton. PMID:24652999

  13. [Extension of a set of microsatellite markers for more precise identification of chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta Walbaum)].

    PubMed

    Afanas'ev, P K; Rubtsova, G A; Shitova, M V; Shaĭkhaev, E G; Zhivotovskiĭ, L A

    2011-11-01

    A set often microsatellite loci enabling fairly accurate identification of the chum salmon individuals from geographically distant groups was designed at the Laboratory of Genetic Identification, Vavilov Institute of General Genetics, Russian Academy of Sciences. However, identification of the individuals from closely located basins performed using these loci was not sufficiently precise. The present study was focused on the improvement of the resolution of the method through increasing the number microsatellite loci used. In this study, typing of additional microsatellite loci of chum salmon and evaluation of the change of the degree of identification with the increase of the number ofmicrosatellite loci used is described. It was shown that the identification accuracy permanently increased with the increase of the number of microsatellite markers used.

  14. Expression QTL analysis of top loci from GWAS meta-analysis highlights additional schizophrenia candidate genes.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Simone; van Eijk, Kristel R; Zeegers, Dave W L H; Strengman, Eric; Janson, Esther; Veldink, Jan H; van den Berg, Leonard H; Cahn, Wiepke; Kahn, René S; Boks, Marco P M; Ophoff, Roel A

    2012-09-01

    There is genetic evidence that schizophrenia is a polygenic disorder with a large number of loci of small effect on disease susceptibility. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of schizophrenia have had limited success, with the best finding at the MHC locus at chromosome 6p. A recent effort of the Psychiatric GWAS consortium (PGC) yielded five novel loci for schizophrenia. In this study, we aim to highlight additional schizophrenia susceptibility loci from the PGC study by combining the top association findings from the discovery stage (9394 schizophrenia cases and 12 462 controls) with expression QTLs (eQTLs) and differential gene expression in whole blood of schizophrenia patients and controls. We examined the 6192 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with significance threshold at P<0.001. eQTLs were calculated for these SNPs in a sample of healthy controls (n=437). The transcripts significantly regulated by the top SNPs from the GWAS meta-analysis were subsequently tested for differential expression in an independent set of schizophrenia cases and controls (n=202). After correction for multiple testing, the eQTL analysis yielded 40 significant cis-acting effects of the SNPs. Seven of these transcripts show differential expression between cases and controls. Of these, the effect of three genes (RNF5, TRIM26 and HLA-DRB3) coincided with the direction expected from meta-analysis findings and were all located within the MHC region. Our results identify new genes of interest and highlight again the involvement of the MHC region in schizophrenia susceptibility.

  15. Significant population genetic structure of the Cameroonian fresh water snail, Bulinus globosus, (Gastropoda: Planorbidae) revealed by nuclear microsatellite loci analysis.

    PubMed

    Djuikwo-Teukeng, F F; Da Silva, A; Njiokou, F; Kamgang, B; Ekobo, A Same; Dreyfuss, G

    2014-09-01

    In order to characterize the demographic traits and spatial structure of Cameroonians Bulinus globosus, intermediate host of Schistosoma haematobium, genetic structure of seven different populations, collected from the tropical zone, was studied using six polymorphic microsatellites. Intrapopulation genetic diversity ranged from 0.37 to 0.55. Interpopulation genetic diversity variation clearly illustrated their significant isolation due to distance with gene flow substantially limited to neighbouring populations. The effective population sizes (Ne) were relatively low (from 3.0 to 18.6), which supposes a high rate from which populations would lose their genetic diversity by drift. Analysis of genetic temporal variability indicated fluctuations of allelic frequencies (35 of 42 locus-population combinations, P<0.05) characteristic of stochastic demography, and this is reinforced by events of bottlenecks detected in all populations. These findings demonstrated that Cameroonian B. globosus were mixed-maters with some populations showing clear preference for outcrossing. These data also suggest that genetic drift and gene flow are the main factors shaping the genetic structure of studied populations.

  16. Analysis of new microsatellite markers developed from reported sequences of Japanese flounder Paralichthys olivaceus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haiyang; Jiang, Liming; Chen, Wei; Wang, Xubo; Wang, Zhigang; Zhang, Quanqi

    2010-12-01

    The expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of Japanese flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus, were selected from GenBank to identify simple sequence repeats (SSRs) or microsatellites. A bioinformatic analysis of 11111 ESTs identified 751 SSR-containing ESTs, including 440 dinucleotide, 254 trinucleotide, 53 tetranucleotide, 95 pentanucleotide and 40 hexanucleotide microsatellites respectively. The CA/TG and GA/TC repeats were the most abundant microsatellites. AT-rich types were predominant among trinucleotide and tetranucleotide microsatellites. PCR primers were designed to amplify 10 identified microsatellites loci. The PCR results from eight pairs of primers showed polymorphisms in wild populations. In 30 wild individuals, the mean observed and expected heterozygosities of these 8 polymorphic SSRs were 0.71 and 0.83 respectively and the average PIC value was 0.8. These microsatellite markers should prove to be a useful addition to the microsatellite markers that are now available for this species.

  17. Microsatellite genotyping reveals a signature in breast cancer exomes.

    PubMed

    McIver, L J; Fonville, N C; Karunasena, E; Garner, H R

    2014-06-01

    Genomic instability at microsatellite loci is a hallmark of many cancers, including breast cancer. However, much of the genomic variation and many of the hereditary components responsible for breast cancer remain undetected. We hypothesized that variation at microsatellites could provide additional genomic markers for breast cancer risk assessment. A total of 1,345 germline and tumor DNA samples from individuals diagnosed with breast cancer, exome sequenced as part of The Cancer Genome Atlas, were analyzed for microsatellite variation. The comparison group for our analysis, representing healthy individuals, consisted of 249 females which were exome sequenced as part of the 1,000 Genomes Project. We applied our microsatellite-based genotyping pipeline to identify 55 microsatellite loci that can distinguish between the germline of individuals diagnosed with breast cancer and healthy individuals with a sensitivity of 88.4 % and a specificity of 77.1 %. Further, we identified additional microsatellite loci that are potentially useful for distinguishing between breast cancer subtypes, revealing a possible fifth subtype. These findings are of clinical interest as possible risk diagnostics and reveal genes that may be of potential therapeutic value, including genes previously not associated with breast cancer.

  18. Estimation of genotyping error rate from repeat genotyping, unintentional recaptures and known parent-offspring comparisons in 16 microsatellite loci for brown rockfish (Sebastes auriculatus).

    PubMed

    Hess, Maureen A; Rhydderch, James G; LeClair, Larry L; Buckley, Raymond M; Kawase, Mitsuhiro; Hauser, Lorenz

    2012-11-01

    Genotyping errors are present in almost all genetic data and can affect biological conclusions of a study, particularly for studies based on individual identification and parentage. Many statistical approaches can incorporate genotyping errors, but usually need accurate estimates of error rates. Here, we used a new microsatellite data set developed for brown rockfish (Sebastes auriculatus) to estimate genotyping error using three approaches: (i) repeat genotyping 5% of samples, (ii) comparing unintentionally recaptured individuals and (iii) Mendelian inheritance error checking for known parent-offspring pairs. In each data set, we quantified genotyping error rate per allele due to allele drop-out and false alleles. Genotyping error rate per locus revealed an average overall genotyping error rate by direct count of 0.3%, 1.5% and 1.7% (0.002, 0.007 and 0.008 per allele error rate) from replicate genotypes, known parent-offspring pairs and unintentionally recaptured individuals, respectively. By direct-count error estimates, the recapture and known parent-offspring data sets revealed an error rate four times greater than estimated using repeat genotypes. There was no evidence of correlation between error rates and locus variability for all three data sets, and errors appeared to occur randomly over loci in the repeat genotypes, but not in recaptures and parent-offspring comparisons. Furthermore, there was no correlation in locus-specific error rates between any two of the three data sets. Our data suggest that repeat genotyping may underestimate true error rates and may not estimate locus-specific error rates accurately. We therefore suggest using methods for error estimation that correspond to the overall aim of the study (e.g. known parent-offspring comparisons in parentage studies).

  19. DNA microsatellite characterization of the jaguar (Panthera onca) in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Garcia, Manuel; Payán, Esteban; Murillo, Andrea; Alvarez, Diana

    2006-04-01

    The Colombian jaguar population is thought to contain two different subspecies, Panthera onca centralis and Panthera onca onca. The genetic structure of this population was evaluated using 12 microsatellite loci (n = 62 samples). In addition, 22 jaguar DNA samples from Guatemala, Paraguay, Perú, Bolivia, Venezuela and Brazil were analyzed for these microsatellite loci (n = 84 samples). The results of this study indicate six primary themes. First, the levels of gene diversity were very high. Second, the majority of the loci analyzed showed an absence of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, probably due to the Wahlund effect (= population subdivision). Third, several microsatellite loci showed significant heterogeneity between the two supposed subspecies in the country. Nevertheless, gene flow was present between them, and heterogeneity was relatively low, although the assignment analyses showed good classification of the jaguars studied into their respective subspecies. Fourth, the long-term historical effective population sizes were calculated through a maximum likelihood procedure for single and multi-step mutation models. Fifth, seven out of twelve DNA microsatellites studied significantly deviated from a single-step mutation model. However, the overall mean multi-step mutation percentage for these 12 DNA microsatellites was only 6%. Therefore, 94% of mutations were uni-step. Sixth, no bottleneck events were detected in the Colombian jaguar population overall.

  20. Dissecting the Finnish male uniformity: the value of additional Y-STR loci.

    PubMed

    Hedman, M; Neuvonen, A M; Sajantila, A; Palo, J U

    2011-06-01

    The forensic use of Y-chromosomal markers can be hampered by reduced diversity and geographical subdivision in some populations. In Finland both of these confounding factors are well documented, but it is also shown that increase of data could resolve or at least alleviate these problems. In order to increase the forensic usability of Y-chromosomal data in Finland, we have here evaluated the diversity at a number of additional Y-STRs. A seven Y-STR locus panel ("FY7": DYS449, DYS460, DYS505, DYS522, DYS576, DYS612 and DYS627) was found to reveal higher diversity levels among Finns than the substantially larger commercial multiplexes commonly in use. The Y-STR data augmented with the FY7 panel shows substantially higher discrimination capacity and lower levels of geographical structure among Finns. Amplifiable in one multiplex, this set of loci offers an informative and easy-to-use supplementary for the commercial Y-STR kits.

  1. Multiple Linkage Disequilibrium Mapping Methods to Validate Additive Quantitative Trait Loci in Korean Native Cattle (Hanwoo)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Kim, Jong-Joo

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency of genome-wide association analysis (GWAS) depends on power of detection for quantitative trait loci (QTL) and precision for QTL mapping. In this study, three different strategies for GWAS were applied to detect QTL for carcass quality traits in the Korean cattle, Hanwoo; a linkage disequilibrium single locus regression method (LDRM), a combined linkage and linkage disequilibrium analysis (LDLA) and a BayesCπ approach. The phenotypes of 486 steers were collected for weaning weight (WWT), yearling weight (YWT), carcass weight (CWT), backfat thickness (BFT), longissimus dorsi muscle area, and marbling score (Marb). Also the genotype data for the steers and their sires were scored with the Illumina bovine 50K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chips. For the two former GWAS methods, threshold values were set at false discovery rate <0.01 on a chromosome-wide level, while a cut-off threshold value was set in the latter model, such that the top five windows, each of which comprised 10 adjacent SNPs, were chosen with significant variation for the phenotype. Four major additive QTL from these three methods had high concordance found in 64.1 to 64.9Mb for Bos taurus autosome (BTA) 7 for WWT, 24.3 to 25.4Mb for BTA14 for CWT, 0.5 to 1.5Mb for BTA6 for BFT and 26.3 to 33.4Mb for BTA29 for BFT. Several candidate genes (i.e. glutamate receptor, ionotropic, ampa 1 [GRIA1], family with sequence similarity 110, member B [FAM110B], and thymocyte selection-associated high mobility group box [TOX]) may be identified close to these QTL. Our result suggests that the use of different linkage disequilibrium mapping approaches can provide more reliable chromosome regions to further pinpoint DNA makers or causative genes in these regions. PMID:26104396

  2. Multiple Linkage Disequilibrium Mapping Methods to Validate Additive Quantitative Trait Loci in Korean Native Cattle (Hanwoo).

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Kim, Jong-Joo

    2015-07-01

    The efficiency of genome-wide association analysis (GWAS) depends on power of detection for quantitative trait loci (QTL) and precision for QTL mapping. In this study, three different strategies for GWAS were applied to detect QTL for carcass quality traits in the Korean cattle, Hanwoo; a linkage disequilibrium single locus regression method (LDRM), a combined linkage and linkage disequilibrium analysis (LDLA) and a BayesCπ approach. The phenotypes of 486 steers were collected for weaning weight (WWT), yearling weight (YWT), carcass weight (CWT), backfat thickness (BFT), longissimus dorsi muscle area, and marbling score (Marb). Also the genotype data for the steers and their sires were scored with the Illumina bovine 50K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chips. For the two former GWAS methods, threshold values were set at false discovery rate <0.01 on a chromosome-wide level, while a cut-off threshold value was set in the latter model, such that the top five windows, each of which comprised 10 adjacent SNPs, were chosen with significant variation for the phenotype. Four major additive QTL from these three methods had high concordance found in 64.1 to 64.9Mb for Bos taurus autosome (BTA) 7 for WWT, 24.3 to 25.4Mb for BTA14 for CWT, 0.5 to 1.5Mb for BTA6 for BFT and 26.3 to 33.4Mb for BTA29 for BFT. Several candidate genes (i.e. glutamate receptor, ionotropic, ampa 1 [GRIA1], family with sequence similarity 110, member B [FAM110B], and thymocyte selection-associated high mobility group box [TOX]) may be identified close to these QTL. Our result suggests that the use of different linkage disequilibrium mapping approaches can provide more reliable chromosome regions to further pinpoint DNA makers or causative genes in these regions.

  3. Microsatellite and trinucleotide-repeat evolution: evidence for mutational bias and different rates of evolution in different lineages.

    PubMed Central

    Rubinsztein, D C; Amos, B; Cooper, G

    1999-01-01

    Microsatellites are stretches of repetitive DNA, where individual repeat units comprise one to six bases. These sequences are often highly polymorphic with respect to repeat number and include trinucleotide repeats, which are abnormally expanded in a number of diseases. It has been widely assumed that microsatellite loci are as likely to gain and lose repeats when they mutate. In this review, we present population genetic and empirical data arguing that microsatellites, including normal alleles at trinucleotide-repeat disease loci, are more likely to expand in length when they mutate. In addition, our experiments suggest that the rates of expansion of such sequences differ in related species. PMID:10434312

  4. PERMANENT GENETIC RESOURCES: Isolation of 60 polymorphic microsatellite loci in EST libraries of four sibling species of the phytopathogenic fungal complex Microbotryum.

    PubMed

    Giraud, T; Yockteng, R; Marthey, S; Chiapello, H; Jonot, O; Lopez-Villavicencio, M; DE Vienne, D M; Hood, M E; Refregier, G; Gendrault-Jacquemard, A; Wincker, P; Dossat, C

    2008-03-01

    We report the development of 60 microsatellite markers on four species of the fungal complex Microbotryum, causing anther smut of the Caryophyllaceae. Microsatellites were found in four expressed sequence tag (EST) libraries, built from isolates of M. lychnis-dioicae, M. violaceum sensus stricto, M. lagerheimii and M. dianthorum, collected, respectively, from the plants Silene latifolia, S. nutans, S. vulgaris and Dianthus carthusianorum. Intrapopulation polymorphism was investigated using 24 isolates, and cross-amplification was explored using 23 isolates belonging to at least 10 different Microbotryum species. This study provides numerous microsatellite markers for population genetics and mapping studies.

  5. Isolation of nuclear microsatellite markers for Cyperus fuscus (Cyperaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Böckelmann, Jörg; Wieser, David; Tremetsberger, Karin; Šumberová, Kateřina; Bernhardt, Karl-Georg

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were characterized in the extremely specialized ephemeral wetland plant species Cyperus fuscus (Cyperaceae). The markers will be used for studying population genetics in natural vs. anthropogenic habitats, on a European scale, and the role of the soil seed bank in the life cycle of this ephemeral species. Methods and Results: Twenty-one microsatellite loci were established and scored in two populations, with mean number of alleles of 2.6 and 2.9 and mean expected heterozygosity of 0.405 and 0.470, respectively. Forty-four additional loci with the number of alleles ranging from one to four (mean = 2.1) were successfully amplified in seven individuals. Conclusions: The novel microsatellite markers will be useful for studying the genetic structure of populations of this ephemeral plant as well as their seed bank. PMID:26649269

  6. Assessment of microsatellites in estimating inter- and intraspecific variation among Neotropical Crocodylus species.

    PubMed

    Bashyal, A; Gross, B A; Venegas-Anaya, M; Lowrance, F; Densmore Iii, L D

    2014-07-25

    We tested microsatellites that were developed for the saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) for cross-species amplification and to provide an estimate of inter- and intraspecific variation among four species of Neotropical crocodiles (C. rhombifer, C. intermedius, C. acutus, and C. moreletii). Our results indicated that with the exception of 2 loci in C. intermedius, all 10 microsatellite loci were successfully amplified in the 4 species, producing a set of variably sized alleles that ranged in number between 2 and 14 alleles per locus. Similarly, private alleles (i.e., unique alleles) also were reported in all 4 species for at least 3 loci. The mean observed and expected heterozygosities (averaged across species for all 10 loci combined) ranged from 0.39 to 0.77 and from 0.44 to 0.78, respectively. In addition to this, we evaluated these microsatellites in 2 populations of C. acutus and C. moreletii to assess their utility in estimating intraspecific levels of polymorphisms. These microsatellites also showed considerable allelic variation in population level analysis. The set of 10 microsatellite loci in our study had the potential to be used as a tool in population and conservation genetic studies of Neotropical crocodiles.

  7. Enhanced cross-species utility of conserved microsatellite markers in shorebirds

    PubMed Central

    Küpper, Clemens; Burke, Terry; Székely, Tamás; Dawson, Deborah A

    2008-01-01

    Background Microsatellite markers are popular genetic markers frequently used in forensic biology. Despite their popularity, the characterisation of polymorphic microsatellite loci and development of suitable markers takes considerable effort. Newly-available genomic databases make it feasible to identify conserved genetic markers. We examined the utility and characteristics of conserved microsatellite markers in Charadriiformes (plovers, sandpipers, gulls and auks). This order harbours many species with diverse breeding systems, life histories and extraordinary migration biology whose genetics warrant investigation. However, research has been largely restrained by the limited availability of genetic markers. To examine the utility of conserved microsatellite loci as genetic markers we collated a database of Charadriiformes microsatellites, searched for homologues in the chicken genome and tested conserved markers for amplification and polymorphism in a range of charadriiform species. Results Sixty-eight (42%) of 161 charadriiform microsatellite loci were assigned to a single location in the chicken genome based on their E-value. Fifty-five primers designed from conserved microsatellite loci with an E-value of E-10 or lower amplified across a wider range of charadriiform species than a control group of primers from ten anonymous microsatellite loci. Twenty-three of 24 examined conserved markers were polymorphic, each in on average 3 of 12 species tested. Conclusion Genomic sequence databases are useful tools to identify conserved genetic markers including those located in non-coding regions. By maximising primer sequence similarity between source species and database species, markers can be further improved and provide additional markers to study the molecular ecology of populations of non-model organisms. PMID:18950482

  8. Using Next Generation RAD Sequencing to Isolate Multispecies Microsatellites for Pilosocereus (Cactaceae).

    PubMed

    Bonatelli, Isabel A S; Carstens, Bryan C; Moraes, Evandro M

    2015-01-01

    Microsatellite markers (also known as SSRs, Simple Sequence Repeats) are widely used in plant science and are among the most informative molecular markers for population genetic investigations, but the development of such markers presents substantial challenges. In this report, we discuss how next generation sequencing can replace the cloning, Sanger sequencing, identification of polymorphic loci, and testing cross-amplification that were previously required to develop microsatellites. We report the development of a large set of microsatellite markers for five species of the Neotropical cactus genus Pilosocereus using a restriction-site-associated DNA sequencing (RAD-seq) on a Roche 454 platform. We identified an average of 165 microsatellites per individual, with the absolute numbers across individuals proportional to the sequence reads obtained per individual. Frequency distribution of the repeat units was similar in the five species, with shorter motifs such as di- and trinucleotide being the most abundant repeats. In addition, we provide 72 microsatellites that could be potentially amplified in the sampled species and 22 polymorphic microsatellites validated in two populations of the species Pilosocereus machrisii. Although low coverage sequencing among individuals was observed for most of the loci, which we suggest to be more related to the nature of the microsatellite markers and the possible bias inserted by the restriction enzymes than to the genome size, our work demonstrates that an NGS approach is an efficient method to isolate multispecies microsatellites even in non-model organisms.

  9. Infrequent microsatellite instability in oesophageal cancers.

    PubMed Central

    Muzeau, F.; Fléjou, J. F.; Belghiti, J.; Thomas, G.; Hamelin, R.

    1997-01-01

    Alterations of microsatellites have been found at relatively high frequency in hereditary and sporadic colorectal cancer and gastric and pancreatic cancers and at lower frequency in some other cancers. We determined the frequency of instability at 39 poly-CA microsatellite loci in 20 squamous cell carcinomas and 26 Barrett's adenocarcinomas of the oesophagus. None of the tumours presented instability for a high percentage of the tested loci. Four squamous cell carcinomas and six Barrett's adenocarcinomas showed microsatellite instability at one locus, and three Barrett's adenocarcinomas showed microsatellite instability at two loci. The presence of few loci showing microsatellite instability could be due to an instability background. We conclude that genetic defects in the DNA mismatch repair system do not play an important role in oesophageal cancers. Images Figure 1 PMID:9155055

  10. Cross-species amplification from crop soybean Glycine max provides informative microsatellite markers for the study of inbreeding wild relatives.

    PubMed

    Hempel, K; Peakall, R

    2003-06-01

    The development of microsatellite markers through transfer of primers from related species (cross-species amplification) remains a little-explored alternative to the de novo method in plants. In this study of 100 microsatellite loci from Glycine max, we examined two aspects of primer transfer. First, we tested if source locus properties can predict primer transfer and polymorphism in Glycine cyrtoloba and Glycine clandestina. We transferred 23 primers to G. cyrtoloba and 42 to G. clandestina, with 19 loci polymorphic within G. clandestina. However, we could not predict transfer or polymorphism from the source locus properties. Second, we evaluated the subset of 11 polymorphic loci for study in G. clandestina populations representing two local morphotypes. All loci were informative within populations (population mean He +/- SE = 0.58 +/- 0.04). We directly sequenced 28 alleles at 4 representative loci. The allelic patterns and sequencing results established that 8 of 11 loci were typical microsatellites, confirming the utility of primer transfer as an alternative to de novo development. Additionally, we found that morphotypic differentiation between populations was paralleled by changes in polymorphism level at six loci and size homoplasy at one locus. We interpret these patterns as being a product of selfing in G. clandestina. Our results demonstrate the value of allele sequence knowledge for the most effective use of microsatellites.

  11. Radiation hybrid mapping of 304 novel microsatellites in the domestic cat genome.

    PubMed

    Menotti-Raymond, M; David, V A; Agarwala, R; Schäffer, A A; Stephens, R; O'Brien, S J; Murphy, W J

    2003-01-01

    Effective utilization of the domestic cat as an animal model for hereditary and infectious disease requires the development and implementation of high quality gene maps incorporating microsatellites and conserved coding gene markers. Previous feline linkage and radiation hybrid maps have lacked sufficient microsatellite coverage on all chromosomes to make effective use of full genome scans. Here we report the isolation and genomic mapping of 304 novel polymorphic repeat loci in the feline genome. The new loci were mapped in the domestic cat radiation hybrid panel using an automated fluorescent TAQ-Man based assay. The addition of these 304 microsatellites brings the total number of microsatellites mapped in the feline genome to 580, and the total number of loci placed onto the RH map to 1,126. Microsatellites now span every autosome with an average spacing of roughly one polymorphic STR every five centimorgans, and full genome coverage of one marker every 2.7 megabases. These loci now provide a useful tool for undertaking full-genome scans to identify genes associated with phenotypes of interest, such as those relating to hereditary disease, coat color, patterning and morphology. These resources can also be extended to the remaining 36 species of the cat family for population genetic and evolutionary genomic analyses.

  12. Characterization of novel microsatellite markers for Hyphantria cunea and implications for other Lepidoptera.

    PubMed

    Cao, L J; Wen, J B; Wei, S J; Liu, J; Yang, F; Chen, M

    2015-06-01

    This is the first report of microsatellite markers (simple sequence repeats, SSR) for fall webworm, Hyphantria cunea (Drury) (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae), an important quarantine pest in some European and Asian countries. Here, we developed 48 microsatellite markers for H. cunea from SSR enrichment libraries. Sequences isolated from libraries were sorted into four categories and analyzed. Our results suggest that sequences classified as Grouped should not be used for microsatellite primer design. The genetic diversity of microsatellite loci was assessed in 72 individuals from three populations. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 2 to 5 with an average of 3. The observed and expected heterozygosities of loci ranged from 0 to 0.958 and 0 to 0.773, respectively. A total of 18 out of 153 locus/population combinations deviated significantly from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Moreover, significant linkage disequilibrium was detected in one pair of loci (1275 pairs in total). In the neutral test, two loci were grouped into the candidate category for positive selection and the remainder into the neutral category. In addition, a complex mutation pattern was observed for these loci, and F ST performed better than did R ST for the estimation of population differentiation in different mutation patterns. The results of the present study can be used for population genetic studies of H. cunea.

  13. Microsatellite analysis of malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Orjuela-Sánchez, Pamela; Brandi, Michelle C; Ferreira, Marcelo U

    2013-01-01

    Microsatellites have been increasingly used to investigate the population structure of malaria parasites, to map genetic loci contributing to phenotypes such as drug resistance and virulence in laboratory crosses and genome-wide association studies and to distinguish between treatment failures and new infections in clinical trials. Here, we provide optimized protocols for genotyping highly polymorphic microsatellites sampled from across the genomes of the human malaria parasites Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax that have been extensively used in research laboratories worldwide.

  14. Widespread non-additive and interaction effects within HLA loci modulate the risk of autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Tobias L.; Deutsch, Aaron J.; Han, Buhm; Hu, Xinli; Okada, Yukinori; Eyre, Stephen; Knapp, Michael; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Huizinga, Tom W.J.; Abecasis, Goncalo; Becker, Jessica; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.; Chen, Wei-Min; Franke, Andre; Gladman, Dafna D.; Gockel, Ines; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Martin, Javier; Nair, Rajan P.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Rahman, Proton; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Stuart, Philip E.; Tsoi, Lam C.; Van Heel, David A.; Worthington, Jane; Wouters, Mira M.; Klareskog, Lars; Elder, James T.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Schumacher, Johannes; Rich, Stephen S.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Sunyaev, Shamil R.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes confer strong risk for autoimmune diseases on a log-additive scale. Here we speculated that differences in autoantigen binding repertoires between a heterozygote’s two expressed HLA variants may result in additional non-additive risk effects. We tested non-additive disease contributions of classical HLA alleles in patients and matched controls for five common autoimmune diseases: rheumatoid arthritis (RA, Ncases=5,337), type 1 diabetes (T1D, Ncases=5,567), psoriasis vulgaris (Ncases=3,089), idiopathic achalasia (Ncases=727), and celiac disease (Ncases=11,115). In four out of five diseases, we observed highly significant non-additive dominance effects (RA: P=2.5×1012; T1D: P=2.4×10−10; psoriasis: P=5.9×10−6; celiac disease: P=1.2×10−87). In three of these diseases, the dominance effects were explained by interactions between specific classical HLA alleles (RA: P=1.8×10−3; T1D: P=8.6×1027; celiac disease: P=6.0×10−100). These interactions generally increased disease risk and explained moderate but significant fractions of phenotypic variance (RA: 1.4%, T1D: 4.0%, and celiac disease: 4.1%, beyond a simple additive model). PMID:26258845

  15. Fine-mapping identifies two additional breast cancer susceptibility loci at 9q31.2.

    PubMed

    Orr, Nick; Dudbridge, Frank; Dryden, Nicola; Maguire, Sarah; Novo, Daniela; Perrakis, Eleni; Johnson, Nichola; Ghoussaini, Maya; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Apicella, Carmel; Stone, Jennifer; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Van't Veer, Laura J; Hogervorst, Frans B; Fasching, Peter A; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Gibson, Lorna; Aitken, Zoe; Warren, Helen; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Chistof; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Sanchez, Marie; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Benitez, Javier; Zamora, Maria Pilar; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menéndez, Primitiva; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Hamann, Ute; Brauch, Hiltrud; Justenhoven, Christina; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Khan, Sofia; Bogdanova, Natalia; Dörk, Thilo; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Beesley, Jonathan; Lambrechts, Diether; Moisse, Matthieu; Floris, Guiseppe; Beuselinck, Benoit; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peissel, Bernard; Pensotti, Valeria; Couch, Fergus J; Olson, Janet E; Slettedahl, Seth; Vachon, Celine; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; McLean, Catriona; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Kristensen, Vessela; Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker; Nord, Silje; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robertus A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline M; Van Asperen, Christi J; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J; Lissowska, Jolanta; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Klevebring, Daniel; Hooning, Maartje J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; Kriege, Mieke; Hall, Per; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Pharoah, Paul D P; Dunning, Alison M; Shah, Mitul; Perkins, Barbara J; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Ashworth, Alan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Jones, Michael; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Olswold, Curtis; Slager, Susan; Toland, Amanda E; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidema; Iwata, Hiroji; Ishiguro, Junko; Wu, Anna H; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; Kang, Peter; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K; Noh, Dong-Young; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Lim, Wei Yen; Lee, Soo Chin; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; Mckay, James; Wu, Pei-Ei; Hou, Ming-Feng; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Shen, Chen-Yang; Blot, William; Cai, Qiuyin; Signorello, Lisa B; Luccarini, Craig; Bayes, Caroline; Ahmed, Shahana; Maranian, Mel; Healey, Catherine S; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Álvarez, Nuria; Herrero, Daniel; Tessier, Daniel C; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Hunter, David J; Lindstrom, Sara; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K; Easton, Douglas F; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Peto, Julian

    2015-05-15

    We recently identified a novel susceptibility variant, rs865686, for estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer at 9q31.2. Here, we report a fine-mapping analysis of the 9q31.2 susceptibility locus using 43 160 cases and 42 600 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 52 studies and a further 5795 cases and 6624 controls of Asian ancestry from nine studies. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs676256 was most strongly associated with risk in Europeans (odds ratios [OR] = 0.90 [0.88-0.92]; P-value = 1.58 × 10(-25)). This SNP is one of a cluster of highly correlated variants, including rs865686, that spans ∼14.5 kb. We identified two additional independent association signals demarcated by SNPs rs10816625 (OR = 1.12 [1.08-1.17]; P-value = 7.89 × 10(-09)) and rs13294895 (OR = 1.09 [1.06-1.12]; P-value = 2.97 × 10(-11)). SNP rs10816625, but not rs13294895, was also associated with risk of breast cancer in Asian individuals (OR = 1.12 [1.06-1.18]; P-value = 2.77 × 10(-05)). Functional genomic annotation using data derived from breast cancer cell-line models indicates that these SNPs localise to putative enhancer elements that bind known drivers of hormone-dependent breast cancer, including ER-α, FOXA1 and GATA-3. In vitro analyses indicate that rs10816625 and rs13294895 have allele-specific effects on enhancer activity and suggest chromatin interactions with the KLF4 gene locus. These results demonstrate the power of dense genotyping in large studies to identify independent susceptibility variants. Analysis of associations using subjects with different ancestry, combined with bioinformatic and genomic characterisation, can provide strong evidence for the likely causative alleles and their functional basis.

  16. Fine-mapping identifies two additional breast cancer susceptibility loci at 9q31.2

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Nick; Dudbridge, Frank; Dryden, Nicola; Maguire, Sarah; Novo, Daniela; Perrakis, Eleni; Johnson, Nichola; Ghoussaini, Maya; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Apicella, Carmel; Stone, Jennifer; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Van't Veer, Laura J.; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Fasching, Peter A.; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Gibson, Lorna; Aitken, Zoe; Warren, Helen; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Chistof; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Sanchez, Marie; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Benitez, Javier; Zamora, Maria Pilar; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menéndez, Primitiva; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Hamann, Ute; Brauch, Hiltrud; Justenhoven, Christina; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Khan, Sofia; Bogdanova, Natalia; Dörk, Thilo; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Beesley, Jonathan; Lambrechts, Diether; Moisse, Matthieu; Floris, Guiseppe; Beuselinck, Benoit; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peissel, Bernard; Pensotti, Valeria; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Slettedahl, Seth; Vachon, Celine; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; McLean, Catriona; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Kristensen, Vessela; Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker; Nord, Silje; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robertus A. E. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline M.; Van Asperen, Christi J.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Klevebring, Daniel; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; Kriege, Mieke; Hall, Per; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Perkins, Barbara J.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Ashworth, Alan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Jones, Michael; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Olswold, Curtis; Slager, Susan; Toland, Amanda E.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidema; Iwata, Hiroji; Ishiguro, Junko; Wu, Anna H.; Tseng, Chiu-chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O.; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; Kang, Peter; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K.; Noh, Dong-Young; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Lim, Wei Yen; Lee, Soo Chin; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; Mckay, James; Wu, Pei-Ei; Hou, Ming-Feng; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Shen, Chen-Yang; Blot, William; Cai, Qiuyin; Signorello, Lisa B.; Luccarini, Craig; Bayes, Caroline; Ahmed, Shahana; Maranian, Mel; Healey, Catherine S.; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M. Rosario; Álvarez, Nuria; Herrero, Daniel; Tessier, Daniel C.; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Hunter, David J.; Lindstrom, Sara; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Easton, Douglas F.; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Peto, Julian

    2015-01-01

    We recently identified a novel susceptibility variant, rs865686, for estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer at 9q31.2. Here, we report a fine-mapping analysis of the 9q31.2 susceptibility locus using 43 160 cases and 42 600 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 52 studies and a further 5795 cases and 6624 controls of Asian ancestry from nine studies. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs676256 was most strongly associated with risk in Europeans (odds ratios [OR] = 0.90 [0.88–0.92]; P-value = 1.58 × 10−25). This SNP is one of a cluster of highly correlated variants, including rs865686, that spans ∼14.5 kb. We identified two additional independent association signals demarcated by SNPs rs10816625 (OR = 1.12 [1.08–1.17]; P-value = 7.89 × 10−09) and rs13294895 (OR = 1.09 [1.06–1.12]; P-value = 2.97 × 10−11). SNP rs10816625, but not rs13294895, was also associated with risk of breast cancer in Asian individuals (OR = 1.12 [1.06–1.18]; P-value = 2.77 × 10−05). Functional genomic annotation using data derived from breast cancer cell-line models indicates that these SNPs localise to putative enhancer elements that bind known drivers of hormone-dependent breast cancer, including ER-α, FOXA1 and GATA-3. In vitro analyses indicate that rs10816625 and rs13294895 have allele-specific effects on enhancer activity and suggest chromatin interactions with the KLF4 gene locus. These results demonstrate the power of dense genotyping in large studies to identify independent susceptibility variants. Analysis of associations using subjects with different ancestry, combined with bioinformatic and genomic characterisation, can provide strong evidence for the likely causative alleles and their functional basis. PMID:25652398

  17. Microsatellite instability in patients with chronic B-cell lymphocytic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Niv, E; Bomstein, Y; Yuklea, M; Lishner, M

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the microsatellite instability (MSI) at selected loci with known involvement in the oncogenesis of chronic B-cell lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL). DNA from B cells (tumour cells) and from T cells (normal controls) of 27 samples of 26 patients with previously untreated B-CLL was extracted. Microsatellite instability in six microsatellite markers was tested using GeneScan Analysis Software. The rate of replication errors positive phenotype (RER+) was determined (MSI in more than 30% of examined loci). RER+ was found in four out of 27 paients (14.8%). A larger proportion of patients with stage C B-CLL exhibited RER+ than those with stage A or B (P<0.05). A higher prevalence of RER+ was demonstrated in a subgroup of patients with additional malignancies (three out of eight patients) in comparison with patients with B-CLL alone (1/19) (P=0.031). In conclusion, our study demonstrated that MSI might have a more prominent role in pathogenesis of B-CLL than reported todate. This may result from a selection of microsatellite markers adjacent to chromosomal loci, which are involved in B-cell malignancies, and using GeneScan Analysis Software, which is most modern and precise method of microsatellite analysis. PMID:15812543

  18. First results on the genetic diversity of the invasive signal crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus (Dana, 1852) in Europe using novel microsatellite loci.

    PubMed

    Froufe, E; Varandas, S; Teixeira, A; Sousa, R; Filipová, L; Petrusek, A; Edsman, L; Lopes-Lima, M

    2015-08-01

    The introduction of non-native crayfish in aquatic ecosystems is very common due to human activities (e.g. aquaculture, recreational and commercial fisheries). The signal crayfish, Pacifastacus leniusculus (Dana, 1852), is one of the most widespread invasive species in Europe. Although several important ecological and economic impacts of this species have been reported, its European population genetic characterisation has never been undertaken using nuclear markers. Thus, the aim of this study was to develop and characterise new microsatellite markers for signal crayfish that can be useful in future studies in its invaded range, since only five are available so far. In total, 93 individuals from four geographically distinct European populations (Portugal, Great Britain, Finland and Sweden) were scored for the new markers and for those previously described, with the Bayesian analysis revealing a clear distinction among populations. These markers are suitable for future studies of the population genetic structure of this important invasive species, by increasing information about the possible pathways of introduction and dispersal, and by giving insights about the most important vectors of introduction.

  19. Comparing geographical genetic differentiation between candidate and noncandidate loci for adaptation strengthens support for parallel ecological divergence in the marine snail Littorina saxatilis.

    PubMed

    Galindo, J; Morán, P; Rolán-Alvarez, E

    2009-03-01

    The Galician sympatric ecotypes of Littorina saxatilis have been proposed as a model system for studying parallel ecological speciation. Such a model system makes a clear prediction: candidate loci (for divergent adaptation) should present a higher level of geographical differentiation than noncandidate (neutral) loci. We used 2356 amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs) and four microsatellite loci to identify candidate loci for ecological adaptation using the F(ST) outlier method. Three per cent of the studied AFLP loci were identified as candidate loci associated with adaptation, after multitest adjustments, thus contributing to ecotype differentiation (candidate loci were not detected within ecotypes). Candidate and noncandidate loci were analysed separately at four different F(ST) partitions: differences between ecotypes (overall and local), differences between localities and micro-geographical differences within ecotypes. The magnitude of F(ST) differed between candidate and noncandidate loci for all partitions except in the case of micro-geographical differentiation within ecotypes, and the microsatellites (putatively neutral) showed an identical pattern to noncandidate loci. Thus, variation in candidate loci is determined partially independent by divergent natural selection (in addition to stochastic forces) at each locality, while noncandidate loci are exclusively driven by stochastic forces. These results support the evolutionary history described for these particular populations, considered to be a clear example of incomplete sympatric ecological speciation.

  20. Ultraconserved Elements Sequencing as a Low-Cost Source of Complete Mitochondrial Genomes and Microsatellite Markers in Non-Model Amniotes

    PubMed Central

    Raposo do Amaral, Fábio; Neves, Leandro G.; Resende, Márcio F. R.; Mobili, Flávia; Miyaki, Cristina Y.; Pellegrino, Katia C. M.; Biondo, Cibele

    2015-01-01

    Sequence capture of ultraconserved elements (UCEs) associated with massively parallel sequencing has become a common source of nuclear data for studies of animal systematics and phylogeography. However, mitochondrial and microsatellite variation are still commonly used in various kinds of molecular studies, and probably will complement genomic data in years to come. Here we show that besides providing abundant genomic data, UCE sequencing is an excellent source of both sequences for microsatellite loci design and complete mitochondrial genomes with high sequencing depth. Identification of dozens of microsatellite loci and assembly of complete mitogenomes is exemplified here using three species of Poospiza warbling finches from southern and southeastern Brazil. This strategy opens exciting opportunities to simultaneously analyze genome-wide nuclear datasets and traditionally used mtDNA and microsatellite markers in non-model amniotes at no additional cost. PMID:26379155

  1. Microsatellite instability confounds engraftment analysis of hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Li-Hui; Tang, Jih-Luh; Haley, Lisa; Beierl, Katie; Gocke, Christopher D; Eshleman, James R; Lin, Ming-Tseh

    2014-07-01

    Polymorphic short tandem-repeat, or microsatellite, loci have been widely used to analyze chimerism status after allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. In molecular diagnostic laboratories, it is recommended to calculate mixed chimerism for at least 2 informative loci and to avoid microsatellite loci on chromosomes with copy number changes. In this report, we show that microsatellite instability observed in 2 patients with acute leukemia may confound chimerism analysis. Interpretation errors may occur even if 2 to 3 loci are analyzed because of length variation in multiple microsatellite loci. Although microsatellite loci with length variation should not be selected for chimerism analysis, the presence of microsatellite instability, like copy number alteration because of aberrant chromosomes, provides evidence of recurrent or residual cancer cells after hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation.

  2. Microsatellite instability in early sporadic breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, J. A.; Walsh, T.; Chappell, S. A.; Carey, N.; Johnson, K.; Walker, R. A.

    1996-01-01

    We have studied the incidence of microsatellite instability at three trinucleotide repeats and seven dinucleotide repeats from five chromosomal regions, in a group of 30 mammographically detected 'early' invasive breast cancers and correlated its occurrence with clinicopathological parameters. The myotonic dystrophy (DM-1) trinucleotide repeat was analysed in 48 additional cases. In 4 out of 78 (5%) paired tumour-normal DNA samples we found evidence of somatic microsatellite instability at DM-1: a novel allele of a different size was seen in the tumour DNA which was not present in the normal DNA sample. All four tumours that showed evidence of instability were from the core group of 30 cases (13%) and were well or moderately differentiated, oestrogen receptor-positive, infiltrating ductal carcinomas. Two of these tumours were unstable at nine of ten loci studied, both trinucleotide and dinucleotide repeats. DNA prepared from different normal tissues showed no evidence of instability, for all four instability cases. These data indicate that microsatellite instability is specific to the tumour DNA and is an early event in the genesis of some sporadic breast cancers. Images Figure 1 PMID:8645585

  3. Microsatellite instability is rare in sporadic ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.S.; Han, H.; Schwartz, P.E.

    1994-09-01

    Microsatellite instability was first demonstrated to be a common underlying mechanism in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) and has recently been implicated in the development of several other human cancers. Although numerous genetic changes have been documented in ovarian cancer, their molecular bases are poorly understood. In investigating the molecular genetics of ovarian cancer, we analyzed twelve short tandem repeats that were amplified by PCR from DNA of 48 tumors and their corresponding lymphocyte samples. All of the 48 cases studied have no noticeable family history and, of them, 42 are epithelial (benign/borderline, 5; grade I, 4; GII, 4; GIII, 29) and 6 are nonepithelial. A microsatellite instability has been shown to be inversely correlated with the occurrence of allelic losses, half of those cases chosen have a fractional allele loss of {le}15 (median = .18 of 50 tumors tested for 86 loci from every chromosomal arm). The loci examined included eight dinucleotide repeats (D2S123, D9S104, D10S197, D11S904, D16S408, D16S421, D17S250, and D17S579), two trinucleotide repeats (DM and AR) and two tetranucleotide repeats (DXS981 and VWF). Despite the fact that HNPCC phenotype includes ovarian cancer and that microsatellite instability has been shown in one ovarian cancer from an HNPCC family, the allele sizes of 12 loci were found to be identical in all paired tumor and normal samples we studied except for one tumor at a single locus. The band shift displayed on polyacrylamide gel representing an additional allele of VWF was only observed in one grade III tumor. Our results are thus a strong indication that the alteration of microsatellite repeats may not play a major role in the development of sporadic ovarian cancer.

  4. Tools for assessing kinship, population structure, phylogeography, and interspecific hybridization in Asian carps invasive to the Mississippi River, USA: isolation and characterization of novel tetranucleotide microsatellite DNA loci in silver carp Hypophthalmichthys molitrix

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, T.L.; Eackles, M.S.; Chapman, D.C.

    2011-01-01

    We document the isolation and characterization of novel tetranucleotide microsatellite DNA markers for the invasive silver carp Hypophthalmichthys molitrix and provide the results of cross-species amplification for three additional invasive carp species: bighead (H. nobilis), grass (Ctenopharyngodon idella) and black (Mylopharyngodon piceus). In the target species these markers yielded levels of allelic diversity (average 4.4 alleles/locus) and heterozygosity (average 54.7%) sufficient to: (1) provide unique multilocus genotypes; (2) delineate kinship relationships; (3) differentiate populations/species; (4) estimate effective population sizes; and (5) provide unique demographic perspectives for control or eradication. Currently these markers are being utilized to determine the degree of introgressive hybridization between H. molitrix and H. nobilis, to quantify gene flow between different sub-basins established in the central United States, and to assess the demographic status of sub-basin groups. This information will be critically important in the management/control of these invasive species.

  5. Genome-wide meta-analysis of maize heterosis reveals the potential role of additive gene expression at pericentromeric loci

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    QTL, and also suggests a model for the potential role of additive expression in the formation and conservation of heterosis for GY via dominant, multigenic quantitative trait loci. Our findings contribute to a deeper understanding of the multifactorial phenomenon of heterosis, and thus to the breeding of new high yielding varieties. PMID:24693880

  6. Sequence determinants of human microsatellite variability

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Microsatellite loci are frequently used in genomic studies of DNA sequence repeats and in population studies of genetic variability. To investigate the effect of sequence properties of microsatellites on their level of variability we have analyzed genotypes at 627 microsatellite loci in 1,048 worldwide individuals from the HGDP-CEPH cell line panel together with the DNA sequences of these microsatellites in the human RefSeq database. Results Calibrating PCR fragment lengths in individual genotypes by using the RefSeq sequence enabled us to infer repeat number in the HGDP-CEPH dataset and to calculate the mean number of repeats (as opposed to the mean PCR fragment length), under the assumption that differences in PCR fragment length reflect differences in the numbers of repeats in the embedded repeat sequences. We find the mean and maximum numbers of repeats across individuals to be positively correlated with heterozygosity. The size and composition of the repeat unit of a microsatellite are also important factors in predicting heterozygosity, with tetra-nucleotide repeat units high in G/C content leading to higher heterozygosity. Finally, we find that microsatellites containing more separate sets of repeated motifs generally have higher heterozygosity. Conclusions These results suggest that sequence properties of microsatellites have a significant impact in determining the features of human microsatellite variability. PMID:20015383

  7. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association data and large-scale replication identifies additional susceptibility loci for type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zeggini, Eleftheria; Scott, Laura J.; Saxena, Richa; Voight, Benjamin F.; Marchini, Jonathan L; Hu, Tainle; de Bakker, Paul IW; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Almgren, Peter; Andersen, Gitte; Ardlie, Kristin; Boström, Kristina Bengtsson; Bergman, Richard N; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Borch-Johnsen, Knut; Burtt, Noël P; Chen, Hong; Chines, Peter S; Daly, Mark J; Deodhar, Parimal; Ding, Charles; Doney, Alex S F; Duren, William L; Elliott, Katherine S; Erdos, Michael R; Frayling, Timothy M; Freathy, Rachel M; Gianniny, Lauren; Grallert, Harald; Grarup, Niels; Groves, Christopher J; Guiducci, Candace; Hansen, Torben; Herder, Christian; Hitman, Graham A; Hughes, Thomas E; Isomaa, Bo; Jackson, Anne U; Jørgensen, Torben; Kong, Augustine; Kubalanza, Kari; Kuruvilla, Finny G; Kuusisto, Johanna; Langenberg, Claudia; Lango, Hana; Lauritzen, Torsten; Li, Yun; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Marvelle, Amanda F; Meisinger, Christa; Midthjell, Kristian; Mohlke, Karen L; Morken, Mario A; Morris, Andrew D; Narisu, Narisu; Nilsson, Peter; Owen, Katharine R; Palmer, Colin NA; Payne, Felicity; Perry, John RB; Pettersen, Elin; Platou, Carl; Prokopenko, Inga; Qi, Lu; Qin, Li; Rayner, Nigel W; Rees, Matthew; Roix, Jeffrey J; Sandbæk, Anelli; Shields, Beverley; Sjögren, Marketa; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stringham, Heather M; Swift, Amy J; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Walker, Mark; Watanabe, Richard M; Weedon, Michael N; Willer, Cristen J; Illig, Thomas; Hveem, Kristian; Hu, Frank B; Laakso, Markku; Stefansson, Kari; Pedersen, Oluf; Wareham, Nicholas J; Barroso, Inês; Hattersley, Andrew T; Collins, Francis S; Groop, Leif; McCarthy, Mark I; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David

    2009-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified multiple new genomic loci at which common variants modestly but reproducibly influence risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D)1-11. Established associations to common and rare variants explain only a small proportion of the heritability of T2D. As previously published analyses had limited power to discover loci at which common alleles have modest effects, we performed meta-analysis of three T2D GWA scans encompassing 10,128 individuals of European-descent and ~2.2 million SNPs (directly genotyped and imputed). Replication testing was performed in an independent sample with an effective sample size of up to 53,975. At least six new loci with robust evidence for association were detected, including the JAZF1 (p=5.0×10−14), CDC123/CAMK1D (p=1.2×10−10), TSPAN8/LGR5 (p=1.1×10−9), THADA (p=1.1×10−9), ADAMTS9 (p=1.2×10−8), and NOTCH2 (p=4.1×10−8) gene regions. The large number of loci with relatively small effects indicates the value of large discovery and follow-up samples in identifying additional clues about the inherited basis of T2D. PMID:18372903

  8. Inheritance of 15 microsatellites in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas: segregation and null allele identification for linkage analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Guo, Ximing; Zhang, Guofan

    2009-02-01

    Microsatellites were screened in a backcross family of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas. Fifteen microsatellite loci were distinguishable and polymorphic with 6 types of allele-combinations. Null alleles were detected in 46.7% of loci, accounting for 11.7% of the total alleles. Four loci did not segregate in Mendelian Ratios. Three linkage groups were identified among 7 of the 15 segregating loci. Fluorescence-based automated capillary electrophoresis (ABI 310 Genetic Analyzer) that used to detect the microsatellite loci, has been proved a fast, precise, and reliable method in microsatellite genotyping.

  9. Meta-analysis of gene-environment-wide association scans accounting for education level identifies additional loci for refractive error.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qiao; Verhoeven, Virginie J M; Wojciechowski, Robert; Barathi, Veluchamy A; Hysi, Pirro G; Guggenheim, Jeremy A; Höhn, René; Vitart, Veronique; Khawaja, Anthony P; Yamashiro, Kenji; Hosseini, S Mohsen; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lu, Yi; Haller, Toomas; Xie, Jing; Delcourt, Cécile; Pirastu, Mario; Wedenoja, Juho; Gharahkhani, Puya; Venturini, Cristina; Miyake, Masahiro; Hewitt, Alex W; Guo, Xiaobo; Mazur, Johanna; Huffman, Jenifer E; Williams, Katie M; Polasek, Ozren; Campbell, Harry; Rudan, Igor; Vatavuk, Zoran; Wilson, James F; Joshi, Peter K; McMahon, George; St Pourcain, Beate; Evans, David M; Simpson, Claire L; Schwantes-An, Tae-Hwi; Igo, Robert P; Mirshahi, Alireza; Cougnard-Gregoire, Audrey; Bellenguez, Céline; Blettner, Maria; Raitakari, Olli; Kähönen, Mika; Seppala, Ilkka; Zeller, Tanja; Meitinger, Thomas; Ried, Janina S; Gieger, Christian; Portas, Laura; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Amin, Najaf; Uitterlinden, André G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; Vingerling, Johannes R; Wang, Ya Xing; Wang, Xu; Tai-Hui Boh, Eileen; Ikram, M Kamran; Sabanayagam, Charumathi; Gupta, Preeti; Tan, Vincent; Zhou, Lei; Ho, Candice E H; Lim, Wan'e; Beuerman, Roger W; Siantar, Rosalynn; Tai, E-Shyong; Vithana, Eranga; Mihailov, Evelin; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Hayward, Caroline; Luben, Robert N; Foster, Paul J; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Wong, Hoi-Suen; Mitchell, Paul; Metspalu, Andres; Aung, Tin; Young, Terri L; He, Mingguang; Pärssinen, Olavi; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Jin Wang, Jie; Williams, Cathy; Jonas, Jost B; Teo, Yik-Ying; Mackey, David A; Oexle, Konrad; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Paterson, Andrew D; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Wong, Tien-Yin; Baird, Paul N; Stambolian, Dwight; Wilson, Joan E Bailey; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Hammond, Christopher J; Klaver, Caroline C W; Saw, Seang-Mei; Rahi, Jugnoo S; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Kemp, John P; Timpson, Nicholas J; Smith, George Davey; Craig, Jamie E; Burdon, Kathryn P; Fogarty, Rhys D; Iyengar, Sudha K; Chew, Emily; Janmahasatian, Sarayut; Martin, Nicholas G; MacGregor, Stuart; Xu, Liang; Schache, Maria; Nangia, Vinay; Panda-Jonas, Songhomitra; Wright, Alan F; Fondran, Jeremy R; Lass, Jonathan H; Feng, Sheng; Zhao, Jing Hua; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick J; Rantanen, Taina; Kaprio, Jaakko; Pang, Chi Pui; Chen, Li Jia; Tam, Pancy O; Jhanji, Vishal; Young, Alvin L; Döring, Angela; Raffel, Leslie J; Cotch, Mary-Frances; Li, Xiaohui; Yip, Shea Ping; Yap, Maurice K H; Biino, Ginevra; Vaccargiu, Simona; Fossarello, Maurizio; Fleck, Brian; Yazar, Seyhan; Tideman, Jan Willem L; Tedja, Milly; Deangelis, Margaret M; Morrison, Margaux; Farrer, Lindsay; Zhou, Xiangtian; Chen, Wei; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Meguro, Akira; Mäkelä, Kari Matti

    2016-03-29

    Myopia is the most common human eye disorder and it results from complex genetic and environmental causes. The rapidly increasing prevalence of myopia poses a major public health challenge. Here, the CREAM consortium performs a joint meta-analysis to test single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) main effects and SNP × education interaction effects on refractive error in 40,036 adults from 25 studies of European ancestry and 10,315 adults from 9 studies of Asian ancestry. In European ancestry individuals, we identify six novel loci (FAM150B-ACP1, LINC00340, FBN1, DIS3L-MAP2K1, ARID2-SNAT1 and SLC14A2) associated with refractive error. In Asian populations, three genome-wide significant loci AREG, GABRR1 and PDE10A also exhibit strong interactions with education (P<8.5 × 10(-5)), whereas the interactions are less evident in Europeans. The discovery of these loci represents an important advance in understanding how gene and environment interactions contribute to the heterogeneity of myopia.

  10. Meta-analysis of gene–environment-wide association scans accounting for education level identifies additional loci for refractive error

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Qiao; Verhoeven, Virginie J. M.; Wojciechowski, Robert; Barathi, Veluchamy A.; Hysi, Pirro G.; Guggenheim, Jeremy A.; Höhn, René; Vitart, Veronique; Khawaja, Anthony P.; Yamashiro, Kenji; Hosseini, S Mohsen; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lu, Yi; Haller, Toomas; Xie, Jing; Delcourt, Cécile; Pirastu, Mario; Wedenoja, Juho; Gharahkhani, Puya; Venturini, Cristina; Miyake, Masahiro; Hewitt, Alex W.; Guo, Xiaobo; Mazur, Johanna; Huffman, Jenifer E.; Williams, Katie M.; Polasek, Ozren; Campbell, Harry; Rudan, Igor; Vatavuk, Zoran; Wilson, James F.; Joshi, Peter K.; McMahon, George; St Pourcain, Beate; Evans, David M.; Simpson, Claire L.; Schwantes-An, Tae-Hwi; Igo, Robert P.; Mirshahi, Alireza; Cougnard-Gregoire, Audrey; Bellenguez, Céline; Blettner, Maria; Raitakari, Olli; Kähönen, Mika; Seppala, Ilkka; Zeller, Tanja; Meitinger, Thomas; Ried, Janina S.; Gieger, Christian; Portas, Laura; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M.; Amin, Najaf; Uitterlinden, André G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Wang, Ya Xing; Wang, Xu; Tai-Hui Boh, Eileen; Ikram, M. Kamran; Sabanayagam, Charumathi; Gupta, Preeti; Tan, Vincent; Zhou, Lei; Ho, Candice E. H.; Lim, Wan'e; Beuerman, Roger W.; Siantar, Rosalynn; Tai, E-Shyong; Vithana, Eranga; Mihailov, Evelin; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Hayward, Caroline; Luben, Robert N.; Foster, Paul J.; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Klein, Ronald; Wong, Hoi-Suen; Mitchell, Paul; Metspalu, Andres; Aung, Tin; Young, Terri L.; He, Mingguang; Pärssinen, Olavi; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Jin Wang, Jie; Williams, Cathy; Jonas, Jost B.; Teo, Yik-Ying; Mackey, David A.; Oexle, Konrad; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Paterson, Andrew D.; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Wong, Tien-Yin; Baird, Paul N.; Stambolian, Dwight; Wilson, Joan E. Bailey; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Hammond, Christopher J.; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; Saw, Seang-Mei; Rahi, Jugnoo S.; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Kemp, John P.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Smith, George Davey; Craig, Jamie E.; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Fogarty, Rhys D.; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Chew, Emily; Janmahasatian, Sarayut; Martin, Nicholas G.; MacGregor, Stuart; Xu, Liang; Schache, Maria; Nangia, Vinay; Panda-Jonas, Songhomitra; Wright, Alan F.; Fondran, Jeremy R.; Lass, Jonathan H.; Feng, Sheng; Zhao, Jing Hua; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick J.; Rantanen, Taina; Kaprio, Jaakko; Pang, Chi Pui; Chen, Li Jia; Tam, Pancy O.; Jhanji, Vishal; Young, Alvin L.; Döring, Angela; Raffel, Leslie J.; Cotch, Mary-Frances; Li, Xiaohui; Yip, Shea Ping; Yap, Maurice K.H.; Biino, Ginevra; Vaccargiu, Simona; Fossarello, Maurizio; Fleck, Brian; Yazar, Seyhan; Tideman, Jan Willem L.; Tedja, Milly; Deangelis, Margaret M.; Morrison, Margaux; Farrer, Lindsay; Zhou, Xiangtian; Chen, Wei; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Meguro, Akira; Mäkelä, Kari Matti

    2016-01-01

    Myopia is the most common human eye disorder and it results from complex genetic and environmental causes. The rapidly increasing prevalence of myopia poses a major public health challenge. Here, the CREAM consortium performs a joint meta-analysis to test single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) main effects and SNP × education interaction effects on refractive error in 40,036 adults from 25 studies of European ancestry and 10,315 adults from 9 studies of Asian ancestry. In European ancestry individuals, we identify six novel loci (FAM150B-ACP1, LINC00340, FBN1, DIS3L-MAP2K1, ARID2-SNAT1 and SLC14A2) associated with refractive error. In Asian populations, three genome-wide significant loci AREG, GABRR1 and PDE10A also exhibit strong interactions with education (P<8.5 × 10−5), whereas the interactions are less evident in Europeans. The discovery of these loci represents an important advance in understanding how gene and environment interactions contribute to the heterogeneity of myopia. PMID:27020472

  11. Characterization and development of chloroplast microsatellite markers for Gossypium hirsutum, and cross-species amplification in other Gossypium species.

    PubMed

    Cai, X Y; Liu, F; Zhou, Z L; Wang, X X; Wang, C Y; Wang, Y H; Wang, K B

    2015-10-05

    Cotton is an important economic crop worldwide; its fiber, commonly known as cotton lint, is the main natural source for the textile industry. Sixty chloroplast microsatellites were identified and characterized from the complete sequence of the Gossypium hirsutum chloroplast genome using a bioinformatic approach. Twenty chloroplast microsatellite loci were polymorphic in the 66 Gossypium germplasm accessions. A total of 85 alleles were detected, with allele numbers varying from 2-7 per locus. Polymorphism information content varied from 0.02-0.66, with a mean of 0.48. Additionally, transferability of the 20 polymorphic chloroplast microsatellite primers was evaluated in other 31 Gossypium species. Sixteen markers were successfully amplified across all species tested, while the remaining 4 markers cross-amplified in most species tested. These polymorphic chloroplast microsatellite markers may be useful tool for studies of individual identification, genetic diversity, evolution, conservation genetics, and molecular breeding in Gossypium.

  12. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite markers for Carolina hemlock (Tsuga caroliniana).

    PubMed

    Josserand, S A; Potter, K M; Echt, C S; Nelson, C D

    2008-11-01

    We describe the isolation and characterization of 31 polymorphic di- and trinucleotide microsatellite marker loci for Carolina hemlock (Tsuga caroliniana Englem.). In addition, primer pairs for 16 loci amplified scoreable alleles in six other Tsuga species. In eastern North America, both Carolina hemlock and eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis [L.] Carr.) populations are declining due to infestation by hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae. The markers described here should enhance population genetic studies of hemlocks, providing valuable information for conserving and restoring these important forest tree species.

  13. [A search for null alleles at the microsatellite locus of chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta Walbaum)].

    PubMed

    Kordicheva, S Iu; Rubtsova, G A; Shitova, M V; Shaĭkhaev, G O; Afanas'ev, K I; Zhivotovskiĭ, L A

    2010-08-01

    Population studies with the use of microsatellite markers face a problem of null alleles, i.e., the absence of a PCR product, caused by the mutations in the microsatellite flanking regions, which serve as the sites of primer hybridization. In this case, the microsatellite primer associated with such mutation is not amplified, leading to false homozygosity in heterozygous individuals. This, in turn, results in biased population genetic estimates, including the excess of homozygotes at microsatellite loci. Analysis of the population structure of a Pacific salmon species, chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta Walbaum), revealed the presence of null alleles at the Oke3 microsatellite locus in the population samples, in which an excess of homozygotes was observed. The analysis was performed using different combinations of modified primers chosen to match the Oke3 locus. The use of these primers enabled identification of true heterozygotes among those individuals, which were previously diagnosed as homozygotes with the use of standard primers. Removal of null alleles eliminated the excess homozygotes in the chum salmon samples described. In addition to the exclusion of false homozygosity, the use of modified primers makes it possible to introduce polymorphic primer variants associated with certain microsatellite alleles into population studies.

  14. Addition of four-hundred fifty-five microsatellite marker loci to the high density Gossypium hirsutum TM-1 x G. barbadense 3-79 genetic map

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A high density genetic linkage map plays important roles in understanding genome structure of tetraploid cotton, dissecting economically important traits, identifying molecular markers associated with a trait, and cloning a gene of interest through map-based cloning strategy. Four hundred fifty f...

  15. Developing Clade-Specific Microsatellite Markers: A Case Study in the Filamentous Fungal Genus Aspergillus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microsatellite markers are highly variable and very commonly used in population genetics studies. However, microsatellite loci are typically poorly conserved and cannot be used in distant related species. Thus, development of clade-specific microsatellite markers would increase efficiency and allow ...

  16. Microsatellites as targets of natural selection.

    PubMed

    Haasl, Ryan J; Payseur, Bret A

    2013-02-01

    The ability to survey polymorphism on a genomic scale has enabled genome-wide scans for the targets of natural selection. Theory that connects patterns of genetic variation to evidence of natural selection most often assumes a diallelic locus and no recurrent mutation. Although these assumptions are suitable to selection that targets single nucleotide variants, fundamentally different types of mutation generate abundant polymorphism in genomes. Moreover, recent empirical results suggest that mutationally complex, multiallelic loci including microsatellites and copy number variants are sometimes targeted by natural selection. Given their abundance, the lack of inference methods tailored to the mutational peculiarities of these types of loci represents a notable gap in our ability to interrogate genomes for signatures of natural selection. Previous theoretical investigations of mutation-selection balance at multiallelic loci include assumptions that limit their application to inference from empirical data. Focusing on microsatellites, we assess the dynamics and population-level consequences of selection targeting mutationally complex variants. We develop general models of a multiallelic fitness surface, a realistic model of microsatellite mutation, and an efficient simulation algorithm. Using these tools, we explore mutation-selection-drift equilibrium at microsatellites and investigate the mutational history and selective regime of the microsatellite that causes Friedreich's ataxia. We characterize microsatellite selective events by their duration and cost, note similarities to sweeps from standing point variation, and conclude that it is premature to label microsatellites as ubiquitous agents of efficient adaptive change. Together, our models and simulation algorithm provide a powerful framework for statistical inference, which can be used to test the neutrality of microsatellites and other multiallelic variants.

  17. An optimized microsatellite genotyping strategy for assessing genetic identity and kinship in Azara's owl monkeys (Aotus azarai).

    PubMed

    Babb, Paul L; McIntosh, Annick M; Fernandez-Duque, Eduardo; Di Fiore, Anthony; Schurr, Theodore G

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we characterize a panel of 20 microsatellite markers that reproducibly amplify in Azara's owl monkeys (Aotus azarai) for use in genetic profiling analyses. A total of 128 individuals from our study site in Formosa, Argentina, were genotyped for 20 markers, 13 of which were found to be polymorphic. The levels of allelic variation at these loci provided paternity exclusion probabilities of 0.852 when neither parent was known, and 0.981 when one parent was known. In addition, our analysis revealed that, although genotypes can be rapidly scored using fluorescence-based fragment analysis, the presence of complex or multiple short tandem repeat (STR) motifs at a microsatellite locus could generate similar fragment patterns from alleles that have different nucleotide sequences and perhaps different evolutionary origins. Even so, this collection of microsatellite loci is suitable for parentage analyses and will allow us to test various hypotheses about the relationship between social behavior and kinship in wild owl monkey populations. Furthermore, given the limited number of platyrrhine-specific microsatellite loci available in the literature, this STR panel represents a valuable tool for population studies of other cebines and callitrichines.

  18. Isolation and characterization of novel microsatellite markers from the sika deer (Cervus nippon) genome.

    PubMed

    Li, Y M; Bai, C Y; Niu, W P; Yu, H; Yang, R J; Yan, S Q; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, M J; Zhao, Z H

    2015-09-28

    Microsatellite markers are widely and evenly distributed, and are highly polymorphic. Rapid and convenient detection through automated analysis means that microsatellite markers are widely used in the construction of plant and animal genetic maps, in quantitative trait loci localization, marker-assisted selection, identification of genetic relationships, and genetic diversity and phylogenetic tree construction. However, few microsatellite markers remain to be isolated. We used streptavidin magnetic beads to affinity-capture and construct a (CA)n microsatellite DNA-enriched library from sika deer. We selected sequences containing more than six repeats to design primers. Clear bands were selected, which were amplified using non-specific primers following PCR amplification to screen polymorphisms in a group of 65 unrelated sika deer. The positive clone rate reached 82.9% by constructing the enriched library, and we then selected positive clones for sequencing. There were 395 sequences with CA repeats, and the CA repeat number was 4-105. We selected sequences containing more than six repeats to design primers, of which 297 pairs were designed. We next selected clear bands and used non-specific primers to amplify following PCR amplification. In total, 245 pairs of primers were screened. We then selected 50 pairs of primers to randomly screen for polymorphisms. We detected 47 polymorphic and 3 monomorphic loci in 65 unrelated sika deer. These newly isolated and characterized microsatellite loci can be used to construct genetic maps and for lineage testing in deer. In addition, they can be used for comparative genomics between Cervidae species.

  19. Successful genotyping of microsatellites in the woolly mammoth.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Yasuko; Roca, Alfred L; Fratpietro, Stephen; Greenwood, Alex D

    2012-01-01

    Genetic analyses using ancient DNA from Pleistocene and early Holocene fossils have largely relied on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences. Among woolly mammoths, Mammuthus primigenius, mtDNA analyses have identified 2 distinct clades (I and II) that diverged 1-2 Ma. Here, we establish that microsatellite markers can be effective on Pleistocene samples, successfully genotyping woolly mammoth specimens at 2 loci. Although significant differentiation at the 2 microsatellite loci was not detected between 16 clade I and 4 clade II woolly mammoths, our results demonstrate that the nuclear population structure of Pleistocene species can be examined using fast-evolving nuclear microsatellite markers.

  20. A suite of microsatellite markers for genetic management of captive cracids (Aves, Galliformes).

    PubMed

    Costa, M C; Camargo, C; Laganaro, N M; Oliveira, P R R; Davanço, P V; Azeredo, R M A; Simpson, J G P; Silveira, L F; Francisco, M R

    2014-11-27

    Cracids are medium to large frugivorous birds that are endemic to the Neotropics. Because of deforestation and overhunting, many species are threatened. The conservation of several species has relied on captive breeding and reintroduction in the wild, but captive populations may be inbred. Microsatellite tools can permit the construction of genetic pedigrees to reduce inbreeding, but only a few loci are available for this group of birds. Here, we present 10 novel polymorphic microsatellite loci and the cross-amplification of these and of 10 additional loci available in the literature in a panel of 5 cracid species, including 3 species with high conservation concern. We provide the first polymorphic loci for the jacutinga, Aburria jacutinga (N = 8), and red-billed curassow, Crax blumenbachii (N = 9), and additional loci for bare-faced curassow, C. fasciolata (N = 8), Alagoas curassow, Pauxi mitu (N = 5), and razor-billed curassow, P. tuberosa (N = 5). The average number of alleles was 2.9 for A. jacutinga, 2.7 for C. blumenbachii, 3.5 for C. fasciolata, 2.6 for P. mitu, and 5.7 for P. tuberosa. The mean expected heterozygosities were 0.42, 0.40, 0.48, 0.37, and 0.59, respectively. The average probabilities that the set of loci would not exclude a pair of parents of an arbitrary offspring were 2.9% in A. jacutinga, 1% in C. blumenbachii, 0.5% in C. fasciolata, 0.4% in P. mitu, and 0.002% in P. tuberosa suggesting that these loci may be adequate for parentage analysis and to implement ex situ genetic management plans.

  1. Somatic microsatellite variability as a predictive marker for colorectal cancer and liver cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Vaksman, Zalman; Garner, Harold R.

    2015-01-01

    Microsatellites (MSTs) are short tandem repeated genetic motifs that comprise ~3% of the genome. MST instability (MSI), defined as acquired/lost primary alleles at a small subset of microsatellite loci (e.g. Bethesda markers), is a clinically relevant marker for colorectal cancer. However, these markers are not applicable to other types of cancers, specifically, for liver cancer which has a high mortality rate. Here we show that somatic MST variability (SMV), defined as the presence of additional, non-primary (aka minor) alleles at MST loci, is a complementary measure of MSI, and a genetic marker for colorectal and liver cancer. Re-analysis of Illumina sequenced exomes from The Cancer Genome Atlas indicates that SMV may distinguish a subpopulation of African American patients with colorectal cancer, which represents ~33% of the population in this study. Further, for liver cancer, a higher rate of SMV may be indicative of an earlier age of onset. The work presented here suggests that classical MSI should be expanded to include SMV, going beyond alterations of the primary alleles at a small number of microsatellite loci. This measure of SMV may represent a potential new diagnostic for a variety of cancers and may provide new information for colorectal cancer patients. PMID:25691061

  2. Development of microsatellite markers for the Korean Mussel, Mytilus coruscus (Mytilidae) using next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    An, Hye Suck; Lee, Jang Wook

    2012-01-01

    Mytilus coruscus (family Mytilidae) is one of the most important marine shellfish species in Korea. During the past few decades, this species has become endangered due to the loss of habitats and overfishing. Despite this species' importance, information on its genetic background is scarce. In this study, we developed microsatellite markers for M. coruscus using next-generation sequencing. A total of 263,900 raw reads were obtained from a quarter-plate run on the 454 GS-FLX titanium platform, and 176,327 unique sequences were generated with an average length of 381 bp; 2569 (1.45%) sequences contained a minimum of five di- to tetra-nucleotide repeat motifs. Of the 51 loci screened, 46 were amplified successfully, and 22 were polymorphic among 30 individuals, with seven of trinucleotide repeats and three of tetranucleotide repeats. All loci exhibited high genetic variability, with an average of 17.32 alleles per locus, and the mean observed and expected heterozygosities were 0.67 and 0.90, respectively. In addition, cross-amplification was tested for all 22 loci in another congener species, M. galloprovincialis. None of the primer pairs resulted in effective amplification, which might be due to their high mutation rates. Our work demonstrated the utility of next-generation 454 sequencing as a method for the rapid and cost-effective identification of microsatellites. The high degree of polymorphism exhibited by the 22 newly developed microsatellites will be useful in future conservation genetic studies of this species.

  3. Novel Polymorphic Multilocus Microsatellite Markers to Distinguish Candida tropicalis Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sharon; Kong, Fanrong; Wang, He; Zhang, Li; Hou, Xin; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Candida tropicalis is an important pathogen. Here we developed and evaluated a polymorphic multilocus microsatellite scheme employing novel genetic markers for genotyping of C. tropicalis. Using 10 isolates from 10 unique (separate) patients to screen over 4000 tandem repeats from the C. tropicalis genome (strain MYA-3404), six new candidate microsatellite loci (ctm1, ctm3, ctm8, ctm18, ctm24 and ctm26) were selected according to amplification success, observed polymorphisms and stability of flanking regions by preliminary testing. Two known microsatellite loci CT14 and URA3 were also studied. The 6-locus scheme was then tested against a set of 82 different isolates from 32 patients. Microsatellite genotypes of isolates from the same patient (two to five isolates per patient) were identical. The six loci produced eight to 17 allele types and identified 11 to 24 genotypes amongst 32 patients’ isolates, achieving a discriminatory power (DP) of 0.76 to 0.97 (versus 0.78 for both CT14 and URA3 loci, respectively). Testing of a combination of only three loci, ctm1, ctm3 and ctm24, also achieved maximum typing efficiency (DP = 0.99, 29 genotypes). The microsatellite typing scheme had good correlation compared with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, although was slightly less discriminatory. The new six-locus microsatellite typing scheme is a potentially valuable tool for genotyping and investigating microevolution of C. tropicalis. PMID:27820850

  4. megasat: automated inference of microsatellite genotypes from sequence data.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Luyao; Paterson, Ian G; Fraser, Bonnie A; Watson, Beth; Bradbury, Ian R; Nadukkalam Ravindran, Praveen; Reznick, David; Beiko, Robert G; Bentzen, Paul

    2017-03-01

    megasat is software that enables genotyping of microsatellite loci using next-generation sequencing data. Microsatellites are amplified in large multiplexes, and then sequenced in pooled amplicons. megasat reads sequence files and automatically scores microsatellite genotypes. It uses fuzzy matches to allow for sequencing errors and applies decision rules to account for amplification artefacts, including nontarget amplification products, replication slippage during PCR (amplification stutter) and differential amplification of alleles. An important feature of megasat is the generation of histograms of the length-frequency distributions of amplification products for each locus and each individual. These histograms, analogous to electropherograms traditionally used to score microsatellite genotypes, enable rapid evaluation and editing of automatically scored genotypes. megasat is written in Perl, runs on Windows, Mac OS X and Linux systems, and includes a simple graphical user interface. We demonstrate megasat using data from guppy, Poecilia reticulata. We genotype 1024 guppies at 43 microsatellites per run on an Illumina MiSeq sequencer. We evaluated the accuracy of automatically called genotypes using two methods, based on pedigree and repeat genotyping data, and obtained estimates of mean genotyping error rates of 0.021 and 0.012. In both estimates, three loci accounted for a disproportionate fraction of genotyping errors; conversely, 26 loci were scored with 0-1 detected error (error rate ≤0.007). Our results show that with appropriate selection of loci, automated genotyping of microsatellite loci can be achieved with very high throughput, low genotyping error and very low genotyping costs.

  5. Heterozygosity increases microsatellite mutation rate

    PubMed Central

    Amos, William

    2016-01-01

    Whole genome sequencing of families of Arabidopsis has recently lent strong support to the heterozygote instability (HI) hypothesis that heterozygosity locally increases mutation rate. However, there is an important theoretical difference between the impact on base substitutions, where mutation rate increases in regions surrounding a heterozygous site, and the impact of HI on sequences such as microsatellites, where mutations are likely to occur at the heterozygous site itself. At microsatellite loci, HI should create a positive feedback loop, with heterozygosity and mutation rate mutually increasing each other. Direct support for HI acting on microsatellites is limited and contradictory. I therefore analysed AC microsatellites in 1163 genome sequences from the 1000 genomes project. I used the presence of rare alleles, which are likely to be very recent in origin, as a surrogate measure of mutation rate. I show that rare alleles are more likely to occur at locus-population combinations with higher heterozygosity even when all populations carry exactly the same number of alleles. PMID:26740567

  6. Characterization of microsatellites in wild and sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.)--markers for individual identification and reproductive processes.

    PubMed

    Schueler, Silvio; Tusch, Alexandra; Schuster, Mirko; Ziegenhagen, Birgit

    2003-02-01

    Nuclear microsatellites were characterized in Prunus avium and validated as markers for individual and cultivar identification, as well as for studies of pollen- and seed-mediated gene flow. We used 20 primer pairs from a simple sequence repeat (SSR) library of Prunus persica and identified 7 loci harboring polymorphic microsatellite sequences in P. avium. In a natural population of 75 wild cherry trees, the number of alleles per locus ranged from 4 to 9 and expected heterozygosity from 0.39 to 0.77. The variability of the SSR markers allowed an unambiguous identification of individual trees and potential root suckers. Additionally, we analyzed 13 sweet cherry cultivars and differentiated 12 of them. An exclusion probability of 0.984 was calculated, which indicates that the seven loci are suitable markers for paternity analysis. The woody endocarp was successfully used for resolution of all microsatellite loci and exhibited the same multilocus genotype as the mother tree, as shown in a single seed progeny. Hence, SSR fingerprinting of the purely maternal endocarp was also successful in this Prunus species, allowing the identification of the mother tree of the dispersed seeds. The linkage of microsatellite loci with PCR-amplified alleles of the self-incompatibility locus was tested in two full-sib families of sweet cherry cultivars. From low recombination frequencies, we inferred that two loci are linked with the S locus. The present study provides markers that will significantly facilitate studies of spatial genetic variation and gene flow in wild cherry, as well as breeding programs in sweet cherry.

  7. The report of my death was an exaggeration: A review for researchers using microsatellites in the 21st century1

    PubMed Central

    Hodel, Richard G. J.; Segovia-Salcedo, M. Claudia; Landis, Jacob B.; Crowl, Andrew A.; Sun, Miao; Liu, Xiaoxian; Gitzendanner, Matthew A.; Douglas, Norman A.; Germain-Aubrey, Charlotte C.; Chen, Shichao; Soltis, Douglas E.; Soltis, Pamela S.

    2016-01-01

    Microsatellites, or simple sequence repeats (SSRs), have long played a major role in genetic studies due to their typically high polymorphism. They have diverse applications, including genome mapping, forensics, ascertaining parentage, population and conservation genetics, identification of the parentage of polyploids, and phylogeography. We compare SSRs and newer methods, such as genotyping by sequencing (GBS) and restriction site associated DNA sequencing (RAD-Seq), and offer recommendations for researchers considering which genetic markers to use. We also review the variety of techniques currently used for identifying microsatellite loci and developing primers, with a particular focus on those that make use of next-generation sequencing (NGS). Additionally, we review software for microsatellite development and report on an experiment to assess the utility of currently available software for SSR development. Finally, we discuss the future of microsatellites and make recommendations for researchers preparing to use microsatellites. We argue that microsatellites still have an important place in the genomic age as they remain effective and cost-efficient markers. PMID:27347456

  8. Microsatellite DNA capture from enriched libraries.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Elena G; Zardoya, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Microsatellites are DNA sequences of tandem repeats of one to six nucleotides, which are highly polymorphic, and thus the molecular markers of choice in many kinship, population genetic, and conservation studies. There have been significant technical improvements since the early methods for microsatellite isolation were developed, and today the most common procedures take advantage of the hybrid capture methods of enriched-targeted microsatellite DNA. Furthermore, recent advents in sequencing technologies (i.e., next-generation sequencing, NGS) have fostered the mining of microsatellite markers in non-model organisms, affording a cost-effective way of obtaining a large amount of sequence data potentially useful for loci characterization. The rapid improvements of NGS platforms together with the increase in available microsatellite information open new avenues to the understanding of the evolutionary forces that shape genetic structuring in wild populations. Here, we provide detailed methodological procedures for microsatellite isolation based on the screening of GT microsatellite-enriched libraries, either by cloning and Sanger sequencing of positive clones or by direct NGS. Guides for designing new species-specific primers and basic genotyping are also given.

  9. Polymorphic microsatellite markers isolated from the neptune whelk Neptunea arthritica.

    PubMed

    Azuma, N; Miranda, R M; Goshima, S; Abe, S

    2009-01-01

    Eight polymorphic microsatellite DNA loci were isolated from the neptune whelk Neptunea arthritica, which is an important fishery resource in northern Japan. The number of alleles at the loci ranged from two to six, with observed and expected heterozygosities of 0.192-0.807 and 0.233-0.738, respectively. The observed variations suggest that these loci can be used as markers for population and kinship analyses in this species.

  10. Additional rabbit IgA allotypes, f69, f70, g76,g77: control by the C alphaf and C alphag loci.

    PubMed

    Lammert, J M; Dray, S; Knight, K L; Hanly, W C

    1977-04-01

    Genetic and immunochemical studies have led to the identification of four additional rabbit IgA allotypes controlled by the Calphaf and Calphag loci. The folowing linkage combinations of the VHa and the 'new' alleles were observed among the populations of rabbits studied: a1f70g76, a1f69g77, and a2f69g77. Cross-reactions among g74, g76, and g77 molecules with various anti-g anti-allotype antisera indicate that the IgA-g allotypic specificities are comprised of multiple antigenic determinants. These studies provide a basis for further understanding of the evolution and gnetic control of the immunoglobulin heavy chain chromosomal region.

  11. Development and characterization of novel microsatellite markers by Next Generation Sequencing for the blue and red shrimp Aristeus antennatus

    PubMed Central

    Heras, Sandra; Planella, Laia; Caldarazzo, Ilaria; Vera, Manuel; García-Marín, José-Luis

    2016-01-01

    The blue and red shrimp, Aristeus antennatus, is a commercially important crustacean, in the Mediterranean Sea, which has been listed as a priority species for fishery management. Hypervariable microsatellite markers could be a useful tool to identify genetic stocks among geographically close fishing grounds. Potential microsatellite markers (97) identified from next-generation sequencing of an individual shrimp using a 454 GS Junior Pyrosequencer were tested on a preliminary panel of 15 individuals representing the four worldwide genetic stocks of the species from which 35 polymorphic loci were identified and used to characterize an additional 20 individuals from the Western Mediterranean Sea. In the Western Mediterranean sample, 32 out of 35 were polymorphic loci and the number of alleles per locus ranged from 2 to 14 and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.050 to 0.968. No linkage disequilibrium was detected, indicating the independence of the loci. These novel microsatellites provide additional tools to address questions relating to genetic diversity, parentage studies and connectivity patterns of A. antennatus populations and help develop effective strategies to ensure long-term sustainability of this resource. PMID:27547526

  12. Genetic diversity of the honeybee in Africa: microsatellite and mitochondrial data.

    PubMed

    Franck, P; Garnery, L; Loiseau, A; Oldroyd, B P; Hepburn, H R; Solignac, M; Cornuet, J M

    2001-04-01

    A total of 738 colonies from 64 localities along the African continent have been analysed using the DraI RFLP of the COI-COII mitochondrial region. Mitochondrial DNA of African honeybees appears to be composed of three highly divergent lineages. The African lineage previously reported (named A) is present in almost all the localities except those from north-eastern Africa. In this area, two newly described lineages (called O and Y), putatively originating from the Near East, are observed in high proportion. This suggests an important differentiation of Ethiopian and Egyptian honeybees from those of other African areas. The A lineage is also present in high proportion in populations from the Iberian Peninsula and Sicily. Furthermore, eight populations from Morocco, Guinea, Malawi and South Africa have been assayed with six microsatellite loci and compared to a set of eight additional populations from Europe and the Middle East. The African populations display higher genetic variability than European populations at all microsatellite loci studied thus far. This suggests that African populations have larger effective sizes than European ones. According to their microsatellite allele frequencies, the eight African populations cluster together, but are divided in two subgroups. These are the populations from Morocco and those from the other African countries. The populations from southern Europe show very low levels of 'Africanization' at nuclear microsatellite loci. Because nuclear and mitochondrial DNA often display discordant patterns of differentiation in the honeybee, the use of both kinds of markers is preferable when assessing the phylogeography of Apis mellifera and to determine the taxonomic status of the subspecies.

  13. Microsatellite markers characterized in the barn owl (Tyto alba) and of high utility in other owls (Strigiformes: AVES).

    PubMed

    Klein, Akos; Horsburgh, Gavin J; Küpper, Clemens; Major, Agnes; Lee, Patricia L M; Hoffmann, Gyula; Mátics, Róbert; Dawson, Deborah A

    2009-11-01

    We have identified 15 polymorphic microsatellite loci for the barn owl (Tyto alba), five from testing published owl loci and 10 from testing non-owl loci, including loci known to be of high utility in passerines and shorebirds. All 15 loci were sequenced in barn owl, and new primer sets were designed for eight loci. The 15 polymorphic loci displayed two to 26 alleles in 56-58 barn owls. When tested in 10 other owl species (n = 1-6 individuals), between four and nine loci were polymorphic per species. These loci are suitable for studies of population structure and parentage in owls.

  14. Microsatellite instability in prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, A.L.; Wick, M.J.; Persons, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    Microsatellite instability (MIN) has been documented in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) as well as in sporadic forms of human cancers. Two of the genes which appear to be responsible for this particular tumor phenotype, hMSH2 and hMLH1, have now been identified. To determine the potential role of these mutator genes in prostate cancer, we have examined 95 prostate adenocarcinomas (40 paraffin embedded and 55 fresh frozen) for the presence of genetic instability at four microsatellite markers. The markers are localized to chromosome arms 5q(APC-CA1), 8p(Mfd 210Z), 15q(635/636), and 17q(p53-CA). Patients from whom paraffin embedded material was obtained were divided into short term (<3 years, n=18), and long term (>3 years, n=22) survivors. Of the 95 tumors examined, only four tumors (4%) demonstrated MIN: two tumors demonstrated MIN at 3 loci (p53-CA, APC-CA1, 635/636), one tumor demonstrated MIN at 2 loci (APC-CA1 and 635/636), and one tumor demonstrated instability at 635/636 only. All tumors exhibiting MIN had Gleason scores of {ge} 4+4. A correlation between MIN and survival was not observed. Information on family history was limited. However, of the two patients demonstrating MIN at three loci, one patient was diagnosed with a second malignancy (TCC of the ureter), but otherwise had a negative family history, while the second patient had one first degree relative with esophageal cancer. The patient demonstrating MIN at two loci had a negative family history, while the remaining patient had two first degree relatives with cancer (prostate and stomach). These results suggest that hMSH2 and hMLH1 (as reflected by the small percentage of tumors displaying MIN) do not play a prominent role in the process of prostate tumorigenesis.

  15. Loss of heterozygosity and microsatellite instability as predictive markers among Iranian esophageal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Forghanifard, Mohammad Mahdi; Vahid, Elham Emami; Dadkhah, Ezzat; Gholamin, Mehran; Noghabi, Samaneh Broumand; Ghahraman, Martha; Farzadnia, Mehdi; Abbaszadegan, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Variation in microsatellite sequences that are dispersed in the genome has been linked to a deficiency in cellular mismatch repair system and defects in several genes of this system are involved in carcinogenesis. Our aim in this study was to illustrate microsatellite DNA alteration in esophageal cancer. Materials and Methods: DNA was extracted from formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissues from surgical and matched margin-normal samples. Microsatellite instability (MSI) and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) were studied in 50 cases of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) by amplifying six microsatellite markers: D13S260 (13q12.3), D13S267 (13q12.3), D9S171 (9p21), D2S123 (2p), D5S2501 (5q21) and TP53 (17p13.1) analyzed on 6% denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results: Statistical analysis indicated a near significant reverse correlation between grade and LOH (P= 0.068, correlation coefficient= -0.272). Specifically, increased LOH in tumor DNA has a significant correlation with increased differentiation from poorly differentiated to well differentiated tumors (P= 0.002 and P= 0.016 respectively). In addition, higher number of chromosomal loci with LOH showed a reverse correlation with lymph node metastasis (P= 0.026, correlation coefficient= -0.485). Furthermore, there was a positive correlation between addiction and MSI (P= 0.026, correlation coefficient= 0.465). Conclusion: Microsatellite DNA alterations may be a prognostic tool for detection and the evolution of prognosis in patients with SCC of esophagus. It can be concluded that regional lymph node metastasis would be less likely with increased heterozygote loci and addiction with any of opium, cigarette, water pipe or alcohol can be a susceptibility factor(s) for MSI. PMID:27635196

  16. Characterization of microsatellite markers in Homarus (Crustacea, Decapoda).

    PubMed

    Tam, Y K; Kornfield, I

    1996-09-01

    Three variable microsatellite loci have been isolated from the American lobster, Homarus americanus. In a population sample from the Gulf of Maine, the effective numbers of alleles (Ne) for the two most variable loci were 16.33 and 13.19, respectively. Reduced variability at all three loci was seen in the European lobster, H. gammarus, for which the maximum Ne was 4.00. The reduction in variability in H. gammarus is consistent with a bottleneck event. Inheritance analysis using H. americanus demonstrated segregation of codominant alleles and the absence of linkage. Null alleles were observed at two loci in inheritance studies. This study demonstrates that microsatellite loci should be useful in studying the population structure of clawed lobsters.

  17. Whole-genome scan, in a complex disease, using 11,245 single-nucleotide polymorphisms: comparison with microsatellites.

    PubMed

    John, Sally; Shephard, Neil; Liu, Guoying; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Cao, Manqiu; Chen, Wenwei; Vasavda, Nisha; Mills, Tracy; Barton, Anne; Hinks, Anne; Eyre, Steve; Jones, Keith W; Ollier, William; Silman, Alan; Gibson, Neil; Worthington, Jane; Kennedy, Giulia C

    2004-07-01

    Despite the theoretical evidence of the utility of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for linkage analysis, no whole-genome scans of a complex disease have yet been published to directly compare SNPs with microsatellites. Here, we describe a whole-genome screen of 157 families with multiple cases of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), performed using 11,245 genomewide SNPs. The results were compared with those from a 10-cM microsatellite scan in the same cohort. The SNP analysis detected HLA*DRB1, the major RA susceptibility locus (P=.00004), with a linkage interval of 31 cM, compared with a 50-cM linkage interval detected by the microsatellite scan. In addition, four loci were detected at a nominal significance level (P<.05) in the SNP linkage analysis; these were not observed in the microsatellite scan. We demonstrate that variation in information content was the main factor contributing to observed differences in the two scans, with the SNPs providing significantly higher information content than the microsatellites. Reducing the number of SNPs in the marker set to 3,300 (1-cM spacing) caused several loci to drop below nominal significance levels, suggesting that decreases in information content can have significant effects on linkage results. In contrast, differences in maps employed in the analysis, the low detectable rate of genotyping error, and the presence of moderate linkage disequilibrium between markers did not significantly affect the results. We have demonstrated the utility of a dense SNP map for performing linkage analysis in a late-age-at-onset disease, where DNA from parents is not always available. The high SNP density allows loci to be defined more precisely and provides a partial scaffold for association studies, substantially reducing the resource requirement for gene-mapping studies.

  18. Characterization of microsatellite DNA markers for the alligator snapping turtle, Macrochelys temminckii: Primer note

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hackler, J.C.; Van Den Bussche, Ronald A.; Leslie, David M.

    2007-01-01

    Two trinucleotide and seven tetranucleotide microsatellite loci were isolated from an alligator snapping turtle Macrochelys temminckii. To assess the degree of variability in these nine microsatellite loci, we genotyped 174 individuals collected from eight river drainage basins in the southeastern USA. These markers revealed a moderate degree of allelic diversity (six to 16 alleles per locus) and observed heterozygosity (0.166-0.686). These polymorphic microsatellite loci provide powerful tools for population genetic studies for a species that is afforded some level of conservation protection in every state in which it occurs. ?? 2006 The Authors.

  19. Polymorphic microsatellite markers in the outbred CFW and ICR stocks for the generation of speed congenic mice on C57BL/6 background.

    PubMed

    Teppner, I; Aigner, B; Schreiner, E; Müller, M; Windisch, M

    2004-10-01

    Reliable definition of the phenotype of particular alleles is carried out in the genetic background of inbred strains. Appearance of mutations in outbred mice therefore requires the generation of congenic mice. The aim of this study was the establishment of a list of polymorphic microsatellite markers which can be used in a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based marker-assisted selection protocol (MASP) to allow the use of the two common outbred stocks, CFW and ICR, as donor animals for the fast generation of congenic C57BL/6 mice. The selection of informative microsatellite markers was carried out to provide a simple evaluation of the PCR products by conventional agarose gel electrophoresis. Outbred mice from three suppliers were examined. In total, 153 microsatellite loci were analysed. Here we present 76 and 70 microsatellite markers polymorphic for the outbred ICR and CFW stocks compared to C57BL/6. At least three microsatellite loci per chromosome were chosen as informative markers for the autosomal genome, giving rise to a maximum marker distance of 58 cM. Thus, additional individual markers have to be selected for the respective outbred mouse which is chosen as a donor animal.

  20. Rapid microsatellite marker development using next generation pyrosequencing to inform invasive Burmese python -- Python molurus bivittatus -- management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, Margaret E.; Hart, Kristen M.

    2013-01-01

    Invasive species represent an increasing threat to native ecosystems, harming indigenous taxa through predation, habitat modification, cross-species hybridization and alteration of ecosystem processes. Additionally, high economic costs are associated with environmental damage, restoration and control measures. The Burmese python, Python molurus bivittatus, is one of the most notable invasive species in the US, due to the threat it poses to imperiled species and the Greater Everglades ecosystem. To address population structure and relatedness, next generation sequencing was used to rapidly produce species-specific microsatellite loci. The Roche 454 GS-FLX Titanium platform provided 6616 di-, tri- and tetra-nucleotide repeats in 117,516 sequences. Using stringent criteria, 24 of 26 selected tri- and tetra-nucleotide loci were polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified and 18 were polymorphic. An additional six cross-species loci were amplified, and the resulting 24 loci were incorporated into eight PCR multiplexes. Multi-locus genotypes yielded an average of 61% (39%–77%) heterozygosity and 3.7 (2–6) alleles per locus. Population-level studies using the developed microsatellites will track the invasion front and monitor population-suppression dynamics. Additionally, cross-species amplification was detected in the invasive Ball, P. regius, and Northern African python, P. sebae. These markers can be used to address the hybridization potential of Burmese pythons and the larger, more aggressive P. sebae.

  1. Rapid Microsatellite Marker Development Using Next Generation Pyrosequencing to Inform Invasive Burmese Python—Python molurus bivittatus—Management

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Margaret E.; Hart, Kristen M.

    2013-01-01

    Invasive species represent an increasing threat to native ecosystems, harming indigenous taxa through predation, habitat modification, cross-species hybridization and alteration of ecosystem processes. Additionally, high economic costs are associated with environmental damage, restoration and control measures. The Burmese python, Python molurus bivittatus, is one of the most notable invasive species in the US, due to the threat it poses to imperiled species and the Greater Everglades ecosystem. To address population structure and relatedness, next generation sequencing was used to rapidly produce species-specific microsatellite loci. The Roche 454 GS-FLX Titanium platform provided 6616 di-, tri- and tetra-nucleotide repeats in 117,516 sequences. Using stringent criteria, 24 of 26 selected tri- and tetra-nucleotide loci were polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified and 18 were polymorphic. An additional six cross-species loci were amplified, and the resulting 24 loci were incorporated into eight PCR multiplexes. Multi-locus genotypes yielded an average of 61% (39%–77%) heterozygosity and 3.7 (2–6) alleles per locus. Population-level studies using the developed microsatellites will track the invasion front and monitor population-suppression dynamics. Additionally, cross-species amplification was detected in the invasive Ball, P. regius, and Northern African python, P. sebae. These markers can be used to address the hybridization potential of Burmese pythons and the larger, more aggressive P. sebae. PMID:23449030

  2. Rapid Microsatellite Marker Development Using Next Generation Pyrosequencing to Inform Invasive Burmese Python-Python molurus bivittatus-Management.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Margaret E; Hart, Kristen M

    2013-02-28

    Invasive species represent an increasing threat to native ecosystems, harming indigenous taxa through predation, habitat modification, cross-species hybridization and alteration of ecosystem processes. Additionally, high economic costs are associated with environmental damage, restoration and control measures. The Burmese python, Python molurus bivittatus, is one of the most notable invasive species in the US, due to the threat it poses to imperiled species and the Greater Everglades ecosystem. To address population structure and relatedness, next generation sequencing was used to rapidly produce species-specific microsatellite loci. The Roche 454 GS-FLX Titanium platform provided 6616 di-, tri- and tetra-nucleotide repeats in 117,516 sequences. Using stringent criteria, 24 of 26 selected tri- and tetra-nucleotide loci were polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified and 18 were polymorphic. An additional six cross-species loci were amplified, and the resulting 24 loci were incorporated into eight PCR multiplexes. Multi-locus genotypes yielded an average of 61% (39%-77%) heterozygosity and 3.7 (2-6) alleles per locus. Population-level studies using the developed microsatellites will track the invasion front and monitor population-suppression dynamics. Additionally, cross-species amplification was detected in the invasive Ball, P. regius, and Northern African python, P. sebae. These markers can be used to address the hybridization potential of Burmese pythons and the larger, more aggressive P. sebae.

  3. Development of microsatellite markers for Manilkara maxima T.D. Penn. (Sapotaceae) and their use in conservation genetics.

    PubMed

    Silva-Junior, José Audenor; de Souza França, Daniele; Moraes, Ramiris César Souza; Gaiotto, Fernanda Amato

    2016-06-01

    Manilkara maxima is an endemic tree species of the Atlantic Forest in southern Bahia, Brazil. It is considered important for forest conservation due to its mutualistic interactions with endemic and endangered animals. Our aim was to develop microsatellite markers to estimate genetic diversity in order to provide information for effectiveness of future conservation programs. We used next generation sequencing technology to develop the first specific microsatellite markers for M. maxima. Seventeen new microsatellite loci were applied in 72 individuals sampled in three natural populations. On average, the number of alleles per loci was 8.8. The expected heterozygosity varied between 0.72 and 0.77, indicating that the developed set of molecular markers is useful for genetic diversity studies. Additionally, the estimated value for the combined probability of exclusion (Q) was greater than 0.999, which indicates the powerful of these molecular tools for paternity and kinship analysis. Our results demonstrate that the set of microsatellites developed in this work is a powerful tool for population genetics, molecular ecology and conservation biology purposes.

  4. Gene amplification and microsatellite instability induced in tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial cells by alpha particles and heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piao, C. Q.; Hei, T. K.; Hall, E. J. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Gene amplification and microsatellite alteration are useful markers of genomic instability in tumor and transformed cell lines. It has been suggested that genomic instability contributes to the progression of tumorigenesis by accumulating genetic changes. In this study, amplification of the carbamyl-P-synthetase, aspartate transcarbamylase, dihydro-orotase (CAD) gene in transformed and tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial (BEP2D) cells induced by either alpha particles or (56)Fe ions was assessed by measuring resistance to N-(phosphonacetyl)-l-aspartate (PALA). In addition, alterations of microsatellite loci located on chromosomes 3p and 18q were analyzed in a series of primary and secondary tumor cell lines generated in nude mice. The frequency of PALA-resistant colonies was 1-3 x 10(-3) in tumor cell lines, 5-8 x 10(-5) in transformed cells prior to inoculation into nude mice, and less than 10(-7) in control BEP2D cells. Microsatellite alterations were detected in all 11 tumor cell lines examined at the following loci: D18S34, D18S363, D18S877, D3S1038 and D3S1607. No significant difference in either PALA resistance or microsatellite instability was found in tumor cell lines that were induced by alpha particles compared to those induced by (56)Fe ions.

  5. Designing of an artificial neural network model to evaluate the association of three combined Y-specific microsatellite loci on the actual and predicted postthaw motility in crossbred bull semen.

    PubMed

    Deb, Rajib; Singh, Umesh; Raja, Thirvvothur Venkatesan; Kumar, Sushil; Tyagi, Shrikant; Alyethodi, Rafeeque R; Alex, Rani; Sengar, Gyanendra; Sharma, Sheetal

    2015-06-01

    The freezing of bull semen significantly hamper the motility of sperm which reduces the conception rate in dairy cattle. The prediction of postthaw motility (PTM) before freezing will be useful to take the decision on discarding or freezing of the germplasm. The artificial neural network (ANN) methodology found to be useful in prediction and classification problems related to animal science, and hence, the present study was undertaken to compare the efficiency of ANN in prediction of PTM on the basis of the number of ejaculates, volume, and concentration of sperms. The combined effect of Y-specific microsatellite alleles on the actual and predicted PTM was also studied. The results revealed that the prediction accuracy of PTM based on the semen quality parameters was comparatively lower because of higher variability in the data set. The ANN gave better prediction accuracy (34.88%) than the multiple regression analysis models (32.04%). The root mean square error was lower for ANN (8.4353) than that in the multiple regression analysis (8.6168). The haplotype or combined effect of microsatellite alleles on actual and predicted PTM was found to be highly significant (P < 0.01). On the basis of results, it was concluded that the ANN methodology can be used for prediction of PTM in crossbred bulls.

  6. Characterization of microsatellite markers for Baccharis dracunculifolia (Asteraceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Belini, Camila M. B.; Marques, Marcia O. M.; Figueira, Glyn M.; Bajay, Miklos M.; Campos, Jaqueline B.; Viana, João P. G.; Pinheiro, José B.; Zucchi, Maria I.

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Baccharis dracunculifolia (Asteraceae) is a native plant of the Atlantic Forest that is used for the production of essential oil. Microsatellite markers were developed for this species to investigate the genetic diversity of three natural populations. Methods and Results: Seventeen out of 27 microsatellite loci identified in a genomic library used for the characterization of 315 individuals derived from three natural populations of B. dracunculifolia resulted in successful amplifications. Eleven polymorphic loci, ranging from two to seven alleles per locus, were obtained with expected and observed heterozygosity values ranging between 0.068 and 0.775 and 0.046 and 0.667, respectively. Conclusions: The microsatellite loci described in this study are tools that can be used for further studies of population genetics of B. dracunculifolia with a focus on deforested areas and conservation of natural populations. PMID:27011894

  7. Polymorphic microsatellites for forensic identification of agarwood (Aquilaria crassna).

    PubMed

    Eurlings, Marcel C M; van Beek, Henry Heuveling; Gravendeel, Barbara

    2010-04-15

    Tropical agarwood (Aquilaria) is in danger of extinction in the wild due to illegal logging. Its resin (Gaharu) is used for the production of highly valued incense throughout Asia. We have isolated and characterized microsatellite loci of Aquilaria crassna to detect the geographic origin of agarwood for forensic applications using a modified enrichment procedure based on the capture of repetitive sequences from restricted genomic DNA. We assessed the polymorphisms of five microsatellites amplified from fresh leaves of 22 trees from seven plantations in Vietnam and Thailand and dried leaves of a herbarium specimen of one wild tree. Cross specificity of these markers was confirmed on two related Aquilaria species occurring in China and Vietnam and one microsatellite locus was successfully amplified from wood and incense samples. Four of the loci were polymorphic and the number of alleles ranged from 3 to 15. The loci characterized here can provide a starting point for forensic identification of traded material and certification of sustainably produced agarwood.

  8. Microsatellite markers for Senna spectabilis var. excelsa (Caesalpinioideae, Fabaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    López-Roberts, M. Cristina; Barbosa, Ariane R.; Paganucci de Queiroz, Luciano; van den Berg, Cássio

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Senna spectabilis var. excelsa (Fabaceae) is a South and Central American tree of great ecological importance and one of the most common species in several sites of seasonally dry forests. Our goal was to develop microsatellite markers to assess the genetic diversity and structure of this species. Methods and Results: We designed and assessed 53 loci obtained from a microsatellite-enriched library and an intersimple sequence repeat library. Fourteen loci were polymorphic, and they presented a total of 39 alleles in a sample of 61 individuals from six populations. The mean values of observed and expected heterozygosities were 0.355 and 0.479, respectively. Polymorphism information content was 0.390 and the Shannon index was 0.778. Conclusions: Polymorphism information content and Shannon index indicate that at least nine of the 14 microsatellite loci developed are moderate to highly informative, and potentially useful for population genetic studies in this species. PMID:26819856

  9. Reduced microsatellite heterozygosity in island endemics supports the role of long-term effective population size in avian microsatellite diversity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Because of the high mutation rate of microsatellites, polymorphism at microsatellite loci might be predicted to reflect the effective population size over a time span of about 10,000 years and thus to be associated with biogeographic factors impacting species on that time frame. This prediction was tested by comparing heterozygosity at microsatellite loci from 294 bird species, including 58 species endemic to oceanic islands. Controlling statistically for phylogenetic effects, mean heterozygosity was significantly reduced in oceanic island endemics compared to other species. There was also an effect of current endangerment, statistically independent of the effect of island endemicity. These results support the hypothesis that long-term effective population size can be an important causative factor behind differences among species with respect to microsatellite heterozygosity. PMID:21104002

  10. Development of microsatellite markers for Hancornia speciosa Gomes (Apocynaceae).

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, A J L; Yamaguishi, A T; Chaves, L J; Coelho, A S G; Lima, J S; Telles, M P C

    2015-07-03

    Herein, we describe 34 microsatellite loci developed using an enrichment genomic library for the tree species Hancornia speciosa Gomes (Apocynaceae). Thirty-five individuals were genotyped using 34 primers to analyze the polymorphisms at each locus. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 4 to 20. The average number of alleles was 8.11, and the expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.62 to 0.94. These microsatellite primers will be useful in population genetics studies for this species.

  11. Additive effects of two quantitative trait loci that confer Rhopalosiphum maidis (corn leaf aphid) resistance in maize inbred line Mo17

    PubMed Central

    Betsiashvili, Mariam; Ahern, Kevin R.; Jander, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Plants show considerable within-species variation in their resistance to insect herbivores. In the case of Zea mays (cultivated maize), Rhopalosiphum maidis (corn leaf aphids) produce approximately twenty times more progeny on inbred line B73 than on inbred line Mo17. Genetic mapping of this difference in maize aphid resistance identified quantitative trait loci (QTL) on chromosomes 4 and 6, with the Mo17 allele reducing aphid reproduction in each case. The chromosome 4 QTL mapping interval includes several genes involved in the biosynthesis of DIMBOA (2,4-dihydroxy-7-methoxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one), a maize defensive metabolite that also is required for callose accumulation in response to aphid feeding. Consistent with the known association of callose with plant defence against aphids, R. maidis reproduction on B73×Mo17 recombinant inbred lines was negatively correlated with both DIMBOA content and callose formation. Further genetic mapping, as well as experiments with near-isogenic lines, confirmed that the Mo17 allele causes increased DIMBOA accumulation relative to the B73 allele. The chromosome 6 aphid resistance QTL functions independently of DIMBOA accumulation and has an effect that is additive to that of the chromosome 4 QTL. Thus, at least two separate defence mechanisms account for the higher level of R. maidis resistance in Mo17 compared with B73. PMID:25249072

  12. Analysis of microsatellite polymorphism in inbred knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Baofen; Du, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Jing; Yang, Huixin; Wang, Chao; Wu, Yanhua; Lu, Jing; Wang, Ying; Chen, Zhenwen

    2012-01-01

    Previously, we found that the genotype of 42 out of 198 mouse microsatellite loci, which are distributed among all chromosomes except the Y chromosome, changed from monomorphism to polymorphism (CMP) in a genetically modified inbred mouse strain. In this study, we further examined whether CMP also relates to the homologous recombination in gene knockout (KO) mouse strains. The same 42 microsatellite loci were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 29 KO inbred mouse strains via short tandem sequence repeat (STR) scanning and direct sequence cloning to justify microsatellite polymorphisms. The C57BL/6J and 129 mouse strains, from which these 29 KO mice were derived, were chosen as the background controls. The results indicated that 10 out of 42 (23.8%) loci showed CMP in some of these mouse strains. Except for the trinucleotide repeat locus of D3Mit22, which had microsatellite CMP in strain number 9, the core sequences of the remaining 41 loci were dinucleotide repeats, and 9 out of 41 (21.95%) showed CMPs among detected mouse strains. However, 11 out of 29 (37.9%) KO mice strains were recognized as having CMPs. The popular dinucleotide motifs in CMP were (TG)(n) (50%, 2/4), followed by (GT)(n) (27.27%, 3/11) and (CA)(n) (23.08%, 3/13). The microsatellite CMP in (CT)(n) and (AG)(n) repeats were 20% (1/5). According to cloning sequencing results, 6 KO mouse strains showed insertions of nucleotides whereas 1 showed a deletion. Furthermore, 2 loci (D13Mit3 and D14Mit102) revealed CMP in 2 strains, and mouse strain number 9 showed CMPs in two loci (D3Mit22 and D13Mit3) simultaneously. Collectively, these results indicated that microsatellite polymorphisms were present in the examined inbred KO mice.

  13. Analysis of Microsatellite Polymorphism in Inbred Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Yang, Huixin; Wang, Chao; Wu, Yanhua; Lu, Jing; Wang, Ying; Chen, Zhenwen

    2012-01-01

    Previously, we found that the genotype of 42 out of 198 mouse microsatellite loci, which are distributed among all chromosomes except the Y chromosome, changed from monomorphism to polymorphism (CMP) in a genetically modified inbred mouse strain. In this study, we further examined whether CMP also relates to the homologous recombination in gene knockout (KO) mouse strains. The same 42 microsatellite loci were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 29 KO inbred mouse strains via short tandem sequence repeat (STR) scanning and direct sequence cloning to justify microsatellite polymorphisms. The C57BL/6J and 129 mouse strains, from which these 29 KO mice were derived, were chosen as the background controls. The results indicated that 10 out of 42 (23.8%) loci showed CMP in some of these mouse strains. Except for the trinucleotide repeat locus of D3Mit22, which had microsatellite CMP in strain number 9, the core sequences of the remaining 41 loci were dinucleotide repeats, and 9 out of 41 (21.95%) showed CMPs among detected mouse strains. However, 11 out of 29 (37.9%) KO mice strains were recognized as having CMPs. The popular dinucleotide motifs in CMP were (TG)n (50%, 2/4), followed by (GT)n (27.27%, 3/11) and (CA)n (23.08%, 3/13). The microsatellite CMP in (CT)n and (AG)n repeats were 20% (1/5). According to cloning sequencing results, 6 KO mouse strains showed insertions of nucleotides whereas 1 showed a deletion. Furthermore, 2 loci (D13Mit3 and D14Mit102) revealed CMP in 2 strains, and mouse strain number 9 showed CMPs in two loci (D3Mit22 and D13Mit3) simultaneously. Collectively, these results indicated that microsatellite polymorphisms were present in the examined inbred KO mice. PMID:22509320

  14. Characterization of polymorphic microsatellite markers for Primula sikkimensis (Primulaceae) using a 454 sequencing approach1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chang-Han; Liu, Yun-Jiao; Zhang, Cai-Yun; Yan, Hai-Fei; Ge, Xue-Jun; Hao, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers from Primula sikkimensis (Primulaceae) were developed for testing deep lineage divergence and speciation events. Methods and Results: A total of 3112 microsatellites were identified from 61,755 unique reads though 454 pyrosequencing technology. Twenty-nine microsatellite loci were selected for PCR amplification and polymorphic analyses. Among the 29 tested markers, 17 microsatellite loci were further used for genotyping in three wild P. sikkimensis populations. The number of alleles varied from one to eight, and the observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.111 to 1.000. Ten simple sequence repeat loci could be successfully cross-amplified in two Primula species. The transferability values were 76.5% in P. florindae and 58.8% in P. alpicola, respectively. Conclusions: These microsatellite markers will be valuable for testing the hypothesis of lineage divergence, genetic introgression, and cryptic speciation events between P. sikkimensis and its closely related taxa. PMID:27437171

  15. Microsatellite polymorphism in the sexually transmitted human pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis indicates a genetically diverse parasite

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Melissa; Zubacova, Zuzana; Dunn, Linda A.; Upcroft, Jacqui; Sullivan, Steven A.; Tachezy, Jan; Carlton, Jane M.

    2010-01-01

    Given the growing appreciation of serious health sequelae from widespread Trichomonas vaginalis infection, new tools are needed to study the parasite's genetic diversity. To this end we have identified and characterized a panel of 21 microsatellites and six single-copy genes from the T. vaginalis genome, using seven laboratory strains of diverse origin. We have (1) adapted our microsatellite typing method to incorporate affordable fluorescent labeling, (2) determined that the microsatellite loci remain stable in parasites continuously cultured up to 17 months, and (3) evaluated microsatellite marker coverage of the six chromosomes that comprise the T. vaginalis genome using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). We have used the markers to show that T. vaginalis is a genetically diverse parasite in a population of commonly used laboratory strains. In addition, we have used phylogenetic methods to infer evolutionary relationships from our markers in order to validate their utility in future population analyses. Our panel is the first series of robust polymorphic genetic markers for T. vaginalis that can be used to classify and monitor lab strains, as well as provide a means to measure the genetic diversity and population structure of extant and future T. vaginalis isolates. PMID:20813140

  16. Microsatellite markers in the western prairie fringed orchid, Platanthera praeclara (Orchidaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Andrew A.; Aldrich-Wolfe, Laura; Lance, Stacey; Glenn, Travis; Travers, Steven E.

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Primers for 31 microsatellite-containing loci were developed for the threatened orchid Platanthera praeclara to enable characterization of the population genetics of this tallgrass prairie native. • Methods and Results: Sixteen polymorphic microsatellite loci were identified from four populations. Six of these loci were not in linkage disequilibrium. The average number of alleles per locus per population ranged from 6.4 to 8.9. • Conclusions: The results indicate that six of the polymorphic loci will be useful in future studies of population structure, gene flow, and genetic diversity. PMID:25202536

  17. Microsatellite marker isolation and development for the giant Pacific Octopus (Enteroctopus dofleini)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Toussaint, Rebecca K.; Sage, G. Kevin; Talbot, Sandra L.; Scheel, David

    2012-01-01

    We isolated and developed 18 novel microsatellite markers for the giant Pacific octopus (Enteroctopus dofleini) and examined them for 31 individuals from Prince William Sound (PWS), Alaska. These loci displayed moderate levels of allelic diversity (averaging 11 alleles per locus) and heterozygosity (averaging 65%). Seven loci deviated from Hardy–Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE) due to heterozygote deficiency for the PWS population, although deviations were not observed for all these loci in other populations, suggesting the PWS population is not in mutation-drift equilibrium. These novel microsatellite loci yielded sufficient genetic diversity for potential use in population genetics, individual identification, and parentage studies.

  18. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite markers for an endemic tree in East Asia, Quercus variabilis (Fagaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xian; Li, Jing; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers of Quercus variabilis (Fagaceae) were isolated for population genetic and landscape genetic studies. Methods and Results: Roche 454 pyrosequencing combined with the magnetic bead enrichment protocol were used to isolate microsatellite markers for Q. variabilis. A total of 2121 microsatellites were identified from 63,851 individual sequence reads. One hundred microsatellite loci were selected to test primer amplification efficiency among 24 individuals from two wild populations. Among the 100 tested markers, 34 primer pairs were successfully amplified. Of these, 14 yielded polymorphic amplification products, whereas the remaining 20 loci were monomorphic. The number of alleles for polymorphic loci ranged from two to six, and the observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.042 to 0.750. Conclusions: These microsatellite loci will provide useful tools for further population genetic and landscape genetic studies on Q. variabilis. PMID:26082882

  19. Genome-wide analysis of BMI in adolescents and young adults reveals additional insight into the effects of genetic loci over the life course.

    PubMed

    Graff, Mariaelisa; Ngwa, Julius S; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Homuth, Georg; Schipf, Sabine; Teumer, Alexander; Völzke, Henry; Wallaschofski, Henri; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Edward, Lakatta; Francesco, Cucca; Sanna, Serena; Scheet, Paul; Schlessinger, David; Sidore, Carlo; Xiao, Xiangjun; Wang, Zhaoming; Chanock, Stephen J; Jacobs, Kevin B; Hayes, Richard B; Hu, Frank; Van Dam, Rob M; Crout, Richard J; Marazita, Mary L; Shaffer, John R; Atwood, Larry D; Fox, Caroline S; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; White, Charles; Choh, Audrey C; Czerwinski, Stefan A; Demerath, Ellen W; Dyer, Thomas D; Towne, Bradford; Amin, Najaf; Oostra, Ben A; Van Duijn, Cornelia M; Zillikens, M Carola; Esko, Tõnu; Nelis, Mari; Nikopensius, Tit; Metspalu, Andres; Strachan, David P; Monda, Keri; Qi, Lu; North, Kari E; Cupples, L Adrienne; Gordon-Larsen, Penny; Berndt, Sonja I

    2013-09-01

    Genetic loci for body mass index (BMI) in adolescence and young adulthood, a period of high risk for weight gain, are understudied, yet may yield important insight into the etiology of obesity and early intervention. To identify novel genetic loci and examine the influence of known loci on BMI during this critical time period in late adolescence and early adulthood, we performed a two-stage meta-analysis using 14 genome-wide association studies in populations of European ancestry with data on BMI between ages 16 and 25 in up to 29 880 individuals. We identified seven independent loci (P < 5.0 × 10⁻⁸) near FTO (P = 3.72 × 10⁻²³), TMEM18 (P = 3.24 × 10⁻¹⁷), MC4R (P = 4.41 × 10⁻¹⁷), TNNI3K (P = 4.32 × 10⁻¹¹), SEC16B (P = 6.24 × 10⁻⁹), GNPDA2 (P = 1.11 × 10⁻⁸) and POMC (P = 4.94 × 10⁻⁸) as well as a potential secondary signal at the POMC locus (rs2118404, P = 2.4 × 10⁻⁵ after conditioning on the established single-nucleotide polymorphism at this locus) in adolescents and young adults. To evaluate the impact of the established genetic loci on BMI at these young ages, we examined differences between the effect sizes of 32 published BMI loci in European adult populations (aged 18-90) and those observed in our adolescent and young adult meta-analysis. Four loci (near PRKD1, TNNI3K, SEC16B and CADM2) had larger effects and one locus (near SH2B1) had a smaller effect on BMI during adolescence and young adulthood compared with older adults (P < 0.05). These results suggest that genetic loci for BMI can vary in their effects across the life course, underlying the importance of evaluating BMI at different ages.

  20. Genome-wide analysis of BMI in adolescents and young adults reveals additional insight into the effects of genetic loci over the life course

    PubMed Central

    Graff, Mariaelisa; Ngwa, Julius S.; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Homuth, Georg; Schipf, Sabine; Teumer, Alexander; Völzke, Henry; Wallaschofski, Henri; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Edward, Lakatta; Francesco, Cucca; Sanna, Serena; Scheet, Paul; Schlessinger, David; Sidore, Carlo; Xiao, Xiangjun; Wang, Zhaoming; Chanock, Stephen J.; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Hayes, Richard B.; Hu, Frank; Van Dam, Rob M.; Crout, Richard J.; Marazita, Mary L.; Shaffer, John R; Atwood, Larry D.; Fox, Caroline S.; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; White, Charles; Choh, Audrey C.; Czerwinski, Stefan A.; Demerath, Ellen W.; Dyer, Thomas D.; Towne, Bradford; Amin, Najaf; Oostra, Ben A.; Van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Zillikens, M. Carola; Esko, Tõnu; Nelis, Mari; Nikopensius, Tit; Metspalu, Andres; Strachan, David P.; Monda, Keri; Qi, Lu; North, Kari E.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Gordon-Larsen, Penny; Berndt, Sonja I.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic loci for body mass index (BMI) in adolescence and young adulthood, a period of high risk for weight gain, are understudied, yet may yield important insight into the etiology of obesity and early intervention. To identify novel genetic loci and examine the influence of known loci on BMI during this critical time period in late adolescence and early adulthood, we performed a two-stage meta-analysis using 14 genome-wide association studies in populations of European ancestry with data on BMI between ages 16 and 25 in up to 29 880 individuals. We identified seven independent loci (P < 5.0 × 10−8) near FTO (P = 3.72 × 10−23), TMEM18 (P = 3.24 × 10−17), MC4R (P = 4.41 × 10−17), TNNI3K (P = 4.32 × 10−11), SEC16B (P = 6.24 × 10−9), GNPDA2 (P = 1.11 × 10−8) and POMC (P = 4.94 × 10−8) as well as a potential secondary signal at the POMC locus (rs2118404, P = 2.4 × 10−5 after conditioning on the established single-nucleotide polymorphism at this locus) in adolescents and young adults. To evaluate the impact of the established genetic loci on BMI at these young ages, we examined differences between the effect sizes of 32 published BMI loci in European adult populations (aged 18–90) and those observed in our adolescent and young adult meta-analysis. Four loci (near PRKD1, TNNI3K, SEC16B and CADM2) had larger effects and one locus (near SH2B1) had a smaller effect on BMI during adolescence and young adulthood compared with older adults (P < 0.05). These results suggest that genetic loci for BMI can vary in their effects across the life course, underlying the importance of evaluating BMI at different ages. PMID:23669352

  1. Linkage analysis of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy and microsatellite loci spanning 61 cM of human chromosome 6p in 19 nuclear pedigrees provides no evidence for a susceptibility locus in this region

    SciTech Connect

    Elmslie, F.V.; Williamson, M.P.; Rees, M.

    1996-09-01

    Linkage analysis in separately ascertained families of probands with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) has previously provided evidence both for and against the existence of a locus (designated {open_quotes}EJM1{close_quotes}), on chromosome 6p, predisposing to a trait defined as either clinical JME, its associated electroencephalographic abnormality, or idiopathic generalized epilepsy. Linkage analysis was performed in 19 families in which a proband and at least one first- or two second-degree relatives have clinical JME. Family members were typed for seven highly polymorphic microsatellite markers on chromosome 6p: D6S260, D6S276, D6S291, D6S271, D6S465, D6S257, and D6S254. Pairwise and multipoint linkage analysis was carried out under the assumptions of autosomal dominant inheritance at 70% and 50% penetrance and autosomal recessive inheritance at 70% and 50% penetrance. No significant evidence in favor of linkage to the clinical trait of JME was obtained for any locus. The region formally excluded (LOD score <-2) by using multipoint analysis varies depending on the assumptions made concerning inheritance parameters and the proportion of linked families, {alpha} - that is, the degree of locus heterogeneity. Further analysis either classifying all unaffected individuals as unknown or excluding a subset of four families in which pyknoleptic absence seizures were present in one or more individuals did not alter these conclusions. 24 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Quantitative trait loci with additive effect on palatability and fatty acid composition of meat in a Wagyu-Limousin F*2 population.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A whole genome scan was conducted on 328 F2 progeny in a Wagyu x Limousin cross to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting palatability and fatty acid composition of beef. We have identified seven QTL on four chromosomes involved in lipid metabolism and tenderness. These genomic regions are...

  3. A microsatellite genetic linkage map of black rockfish ( Sebastes schlegeli)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Guannan; Jiang, Liming; He, Yan; Yu, Haiyang; Wang, Zhigang; Jiang, Haibin; Zhang, Quanqi

    2014-12-01

    Ovoviviparous black rockfish ( Sebastes schlegeli) is an important marine fish species for aquaculture and fisheries in China. Genetic information of this species is scarce because of the lack of microsatellite markers. In this study, a large number of microsatellite markers of black rockfish were isolated by constructing microsatellite-enriched libraries. Female- and male-specific genetic linkage maps were constructed using 435 microsatellite markers genotyped in a full-sib family of the fish species. The female linkage map contained 140 microsatellite markers, in which 23 linkage groups had a total genetic length of 1334.1 cM and average inter-marker space of 13.3 cM. The male linkage map contained 156 microsatellite markers, in which 25 linkage groups had a total genetic length of 1359.6 cM and average inter-marker distance of 12.4 cM. The genome coverage of the female and male linkage maps was 68.6% and 69.3%, respectively. The female-to-male ratio of the recombination rate was approximately 1.07:1 in adjacent microsatellite markers. This paper presents the first genetic linkage map of microsatellites in black rockfish. The collection of polymorphic markers and sex-specific linkage maps of black rockfish could be useful for further investigations on parental assignment, population genetics, quantitative trait loci mapping, and marker-assisted selection in related breeding programs.

  4. Asymmetric hybridization between non-native winter moth, Operophtera brumata (Lepidoptera: Geometridae), and native Bruce spanworm, Operophtera bruceata, in the Northeastern United States, assessed with novel microsatellites and SNPs.

    PubMed

    Havill, N P; Elkinton, J; Andersen, J C; Hagen, S B; Broadley, Hannah J; Boettner, G J; Caccone, A

    2017-04-01

    The European winter moth, Operophtera brumata, is a non-native pest in the Northeastern USA causing defoliation of forest trees and crops such as apples and blueberries. This species is known to hybridize with O. bruceata, the Bruce spanworm, a native species across North America, although it is not known if there are hybrid generations beyond F1. To study winter moth population genetics and hybridization with Bruce spanworm, we developed two sets of genetic markers, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and microsatellites, using genomic approaches. Both types of markers were validated using samples from the two species and their hybrids. We identified 1216 SNPs and 24 variable microsatellite loci. From them we developed a subset of 95 species-diagnostic SNPs and ten microsatellite loci that could be used for hybrid identification. We further validated the ten microsatellite loci by screening field collected samples of both species and putative hybrids. In addition to confirming the presence of F1 hybrids reported in previous studies, we found evidence for multi-generation asymmetric hybridization, as suggested by the occurrence of hybrid backcrosses with the winter month, but not with the Bruce spanworm. Laboratory crosses between winter moth females and Bruce spanworm males resulted in a higher proportion of viable eggs than the reciprocal cross, supporting this pattern. We discuss the possible roles of population demographics, sex chromosome genetic incompatibility, and bacterial symbionts as causes of this asymmetrical hybridization and the utility of the developed markers for future studies.

  5. Design and Implementation of Degenerate Microsatellite Primers for the Mammalian Clade

    PubMed Central

    Buschiazzo, Emmanuel; Beck, Josephine S.; Gemmell, Neil J.

    2011-01-01

    Microsatellites are popular genetic markers in molecular ecology, genetic mapping and forensics. Unfortunately, despite recent advances, the isolation of de novo polymorphic microsatellite loci often requires expensive and intensive groundwork. Primers developed for a focal species are commonly tested in a related, non-focal species of interest for the amplification of orthologous polymorphic loci; when successful, this approach significantly reduces cost and time of microsatellite development. However, transferability of polymorphic microsatellite loci decreases rapidly with increasing evolutionary distance, and this approach has shown its limits. Whole genome sequences represent an under-exploited resource to develop cross-species primers for microsatellites. Here we describe a three-step method that combines a novel in silico pipeline that we use to (1) identify conserved microsatellite loci from a multiple genome alignments, (2) design degenerate primer pairs, with (3) a simple PCR protocol used to implement these primers across species. Using this approach we developed a set of primers for the mammalian clade. We found 126,306 human microsatellites conserved in mammalian aligned sequences, and isolated 5,596 loci using criteria based on wide conservation. From a random subset of ∼1000 dinucleotide repeats, we designed degenerate primer pairs for 19 loci, of which five produced polymorphic fragments in up to 18 mammalian species, including the distinctly related marsupials and monotremes, groups that diverged from other mammals 120–160 million years ago. Using our method, many more cross-clade microsatellite loci can be harvested from the currently available genomic data, and this ability is set to improve exponentially as further genomes are sequenced. PMID:22216321

  6. Extensive polymorphism in Cryptosporidium parvum identified by multilocus microsatellite analysis.

    PubMed

    Feng, X; Rich, S M; Akiyoshi, D; Tumwine, J K; Kekitiinwa, A; Nabukeera, N; Tzipori, S; Widmer, G

    2000-08-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism and DNA sequence analysis discern two main types of Cryptosporidium parvum. We present a survey of length polymorphism at several microsatellite loci for type 1 and type 2 isolates. A total of 14 microsatellite loci were identified from C. parvum DNA sequences deposited in public databases. All repeats were mono-, di-, and trinucleotide repeats of A, AT, and AAT, reflecting the high AT content of the C. parvum genome. Several of these loci showed significant length polymorphism, with as many as seven alleles identified for a single locus. Differences between alleles ranged from 1 to 27 bp. Karyotype analysis using probes flanking three microsatellites localized each marker to an individual chromosomal band, suggesting that these markers are single copy. In a sample of 19 isolates for which at least three microsatellites were typed, a majority of isolates displayed a unique multilocus fingerprint. Microsatellite analysis of isolates passaged between different host species identified genotypic changes consistent with changes in parasite populations.

  7. FullSSR: Microsatellite Finder and Primer Designer

    PubMed Central

    Metz, Sebastián; Cabrera, Juan Manuel; Rueda, Eva; Giri, Federico; Amavet, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Microsatellites are genomic sequences comprised of tandem repeats of short nucleotide motifs widely used as molecular markers in population genetics. FullSSR is a new bioinformatic tool for microsatellite (SSR) loci detection and primer design using genomic data from NGS assay. The software was tested with 2000 sequences of Oryza sativa shotgun sequencing project from the National Center of Biotechnology Information Trace Archive and with partial genome sequencing with ROCHE 454® from Caiman latirostris, Salvator merianae, Aegla platensis, and Zilchiopsis collastinensis. FullSSR performance was compared against other similar SSR search programs. The results of the use of this kind of approach depend on the parameters set by the user. In addition, results can be affected by the analyzed sequences because of differences among the genomes. FullSSR simplifies the detection of SSRs and primer design on a big data set. The command line interface of FullSSR was intended to be used as part of genomic analysis tools pipeline; however, it can be used as a stand-alone program because the results are easily interpreted for a nonexpert user. PMID:27366148

  8. FullSSR: Microsatellite Finder and Primer Designer.

    PubMed

    Metz, Sebastián; Cabrera, Juan Manuel; Rueda, Eva; Giri, Federico; Amavet, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Microsatellites are genomic sequences comprised of tandem repeats of short nucleotide motifs widely used as molecular markers in population genetics. FullSSR is a new bioinformatic tool for microsatellite (SSR) loci detection and primer design using genomic data from NGS assay. The software was tested with 2000 sequences of Oryza sativa shotgun sequencing project from the National Center of Biotechnology Information Trace Archive and with partial genome sequencing with ROCHE 454® from Caiman latirostris, Salvator merianae, Aegla platensis, and Zilchiopsis collastinensis. FullSSR performance was compared against other similar SSR search programs. The results of the use of this kind of approach depend on the parameters set by the user. In addition, results can be affected by the analyzed sequences because of differences among the genomes. FullSSR simplifies the detection of SSRs and primer design on a big data set. The command line interface of FullSSR was intended to be used as part of genomic analysis tools pipeline; however, it can be used as a stand-alone program because the results are easily interpreted for a nonexpert user.

  9. Microsatellites identify depredated waterfowl remains from glaucous gull stomachs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scribner, K.T.; Bowman, Timothy D.

    1998-01-01

    Prey remains can provide valuable sources of information regarding causes of predation and the species composition of a predator's diet. Unfortunately, the highly degraded state of many prey samples from gastrointestinal tracts often precludes unambiguous identification. We describe a procedure by which PCR amplification of taxonomically informative microsatellite loci were used to identify species of waterfowl predated by glaucous gulls (Larus hyperboreus). We found that one microsatellite locus unambiguously distinguished between species of the subfamily Anserinae (whistling ducks, geese and swans) and those of the subfamily Anatidae (all other ducks). An additional locus distinguished the remains of all geese and swan species known to nest on the Yukon-Kuskokwim delta in western Alaska. The study focused on two waterfowl species which have experienced precipitous declines in population numbers: emperor geese (Chen canagica) and spectacled eiders (Somateria fischeri). No evidence of predation on spectacled eiders was observed. Twenty-six percent of all glaucous gull stomachs examined contained the remains of juvenile emperor geese.

  10. Validation of microsatellite multiplexes for parentage analysis and species discrimination in two hybridizing species of coral reef fish (Plectropomus spp., Serranidae)

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Hugo B; Feldheim, Kevin A; Jones, Geoffrey P; Ma, Kayan; Mansour, Hicham; Perumal, Sadhasivam; Williamson, David H; Berumen, Michael L

    2014-01-01

    Microsatellites are often considered ideal markers to investigate ecological processes in animal populations. They are regularly used as genetic barcodes to identify species, individuals, and infer familial relationships. However, such applications are highly sensitive the number and diversity of microsatellite markers, which are also prone to error. Here, we propose a novel framework to assess the suitability of microsatellite datasets for parentage analysis and species discrimination in two closely related species of coral reef fish, Plectropomus leopardus and P. maculatus (Serranidae). Coral trout are important fisheries species throughout the Indo-Pacific region and have been shown to hybridize in parts of the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. We first describe the development of 25 microsatellite loci and their integration to three multiplex PCRs that co-amplify in both species. Using simulations, we demonstrate that the complete suite of markers provides appropriate power to discriminate between species, detect hybrid individuals, and resolve parent–offspring relationships in natural populations, with over 99.6% accuracy in parent–offspring assignments. The markers were also tested on seven additional species within the Plectropomus genus with polymorphism in 28–96% of loci. The multiplex PCRs developed here provide a reliable and cost-effective strategy to investigate evolutionary and ecological dynamics and will be broadly applicable in studies of wild populations and aquaculture brood stocks for these closely related fish species. PMID:25360247

  11. Validation of microsatellite multiplexes for parentage analysis and species discrimination in two hybridizing species of coral reef fish (Plectropomus spp., Serranidae).

    PubMed

    Harrison, Hugo B; Feldheim, Kevin A; Jones, Geoffrey P; Ma, Kayan; Mansour, Hicham; Perumal, Sadhasivam; Williamson, David H; Berumen, Michael L

    2014-06-01

    Microsatellites are often considered ideal markers to investigate ecological processes in animal populations. They are regularly used as genetic barcodes to identify species, individuals, and infer familial relationships. However, such applications are highly sensitive the number and diversity of microsatellite markers, which are also prone to error. Here, we propose a novel framework to assess the suitability of microsatellite datasets for parentage analysis and species discrimination in two closely related species of coral reef fish, Plectropomus leopardus and P. maculatus (Serranidae). Coral trout are important fisheries species throughout the Indo-Pacific region and have been shown to hybridize in parts of the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. We first describe the development of 25 microsatellite loci and their integration to three multiplex PCRs that co-amplify in both species. Using simulations, we demonstrate that the complete suite of markers provides appropriate power to discriminate between species, detect hybrid individuals, and resolve parent-offspring relationships in natural populations, with over 99.6% accuracy in parent-offspring assignments. The markers were also tested on seven additional species within the Plectropomus genus with polymorphism in 28-96% of loci. The multiplex PCRs developed here provide a reliable and cost-effective strategy to investigate evolutionary and ecological dynamics and will be broadly applicable in studies of wild populations and aquaculture brood stocks for these closely related fish species.

  12. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  13. Chloroplast microsatellite markers for Artocarpus (Moraceae) developed from transcriptome sequences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Premise of the study: Chloroplast microsatellite loci were characterized from transcriptomes of Artocarpus (A.) altilis (breadfruit) and A. camansi (breadnut). They were tested in A. odoratissimus (terap) and A. altilis and evaluated in silico for two congeners. Methods and Results: 15 simple seque...

  14. Preliminary study on applicability of microsatellite DNA primers from parasite protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi in free-living protozoa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenjing; Yu, Yuhe; Shen, Yunfen; Miao, Wei; Feng, Weisong

    2004-04-01

    In this paper, we took the lead in studying on specificity of the microsatellite DNA loci and applicability of microsatellite DNA primers in protozoa. In order to study characters of microsatellites in free-living protozoa, eight microsatellite loci primers developed from Trypanosoma cruzi (MCLE01, SCLE10, MCLE08, SCLE11, MCLF10, MCLG10, MCL03, MCL05) were employed to amplify microsatellite in four free-living protozoa, including Bodo designis, Euglena gracilis FACHB848, Paramecium bruzise and Tetrahymena thermophila BF1. In the amplification systems of P. bruzise, four loci (SCLE10, SCLE11, MCLF10, MCL03) were amplified successfully, and four amplification fragments were in proper size. In genome of E. gracilis FACHB848, five of eight primers brought five clear amplification bands. In B. designis, three (No.4, 5 and 7) of eight loci produced clear and sharp products without stutter bands, whereas no bands appeared in T. thermophila BF1. Further, eight 300 500 bp amplification fragments were cloned and sequenced. Nevertheless, all sequenced products did not contain corresponding microsatellite sequence, although Bodo is in the same order and has the nearest phylogenetic relation with Trypanosoma among these four species. Thus, the microsatellite DNA primers can not be applied among order or more far taxa, and the specificity of microsatellite DNA is very high in protozoa. The results of this study will contribute to our understanding of microsatellite DNA in protozoa.

  15. Development of microsatellite markers for six Tetranychus species by transfer from Tetranychus urticae genome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia; Sun, Jing-Tao; Jin, Peng-Yu; Hong, Xiao-Yue

    2016-09-01

    Microsatellite markers are frequently used to explore the population genetic structure of organisms. Spider mites (genus Tetranychus) are important agricultural pests. Several markers have been developed for T. urticae, but for other spider mites, few such markers are available, hampering studies of their population genetics. In this study, we developed and characterized microsatellite markers for six non-model spider mite species (T. truncatus, T. kanzawai, T. ludeni, T. piercei, T. phaselus and T. pueraricola) by cross-species amplification of markers in the T. urticae genome, in order to better understand the population structure of Tetranychus species. Among 228 screened loci, many were polymorphic, including 13 loci in T. urticae, 11 loci in T. truncatus, 15 loci in T. pueraricola, 23 loci in T. kanzawai, 19 loci in T. piercei, 11 loci in T. phaselus and 9 loci in T. ludeni. Sequence analysis determined that the fragment length variations of the transferred microsatellites were mainly due to the variations of the numbers of repeats. These new microsatellite markers should be useful for studying the population genetics of the seven Tetranychus species.

  16. A microsatellite-based genetic linkage map for channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus.

    PubMed Central

    Waldbieser, G C; Bosworth, B G; Nonneman, D J; Wolters, W R

    2001-01-01

    Microsatellite loci were identified in channel catfish gene sequences or random clones from a small insert genomic DNA library. Outbred populations of channel catfish contained an average of eight alleles per locus and an average heterozygosity of 0.70. A genetic linkage map of the channel catfish genome (N = 29) was constructed from two reference families. A total of 293 microsatellite loci were polymorphic in one or both families, with an average of 171 informative meioses per locus. Nineteen type I loci, 243 type II loci, and one EST were placed in 32 multipoint linkage groups covering 1958 cM. Nine more type II loci were contained in three two-point linkage groups covering 24.5 cM. Twenty-two type II loci remained unlinked. Multipoint linkage groups ranged in size from 11.9 to 110.5 cM with an average intermarker distance of 8.7 cM. Seven microsatellite loci were closely linked with the sex-determining locus. The microsatellite loci and genetic linkage map will increase the efficiency of selective breeding programs for channel catfish. PMID:11404336

  17. Development and characterization of microsatellites for switchgrass rust fungus (Puccinia emaculata)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ten polymorphic microsatellite loci from the fungus Puccinia emaculata, responsible for rust disease of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) were developed. Loci were characterized using 20 single-pustule derived isolates of P. emaculata collected from switchgrass plants growing in the southeastern US. Th...

  18. Development of highly variable microsatellite markers for the tetraploid Silene stellata (Caryophyllaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Juannan; Dudash, Michele R.; Fenster, Charles B.; Zimmer, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: We designed and tested microsatellite markers for the North American native species Silene stellata (Caryophyllaceae) to investigate its population genetic structure and identify selection on floral design through male reproductive success. Methods and Results: A total of 153 candidate microsatellite loci were isolated based on next-generation sequencing. We identified 18 polymorphic microsatellite loci in three populations of S. stellata, with di- or trinucleotide repeats. Genotyping results showed the number of alleles per locus ranged from six to 45 and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.511 to 0.951. Five of these loci were successfully amplified in S. virginica and S. caroliniana and were also polymorphic. Conclusions: The microsatellite markers reported here provide a valuable tool for paternity analysis in S. stellata. They will also be useful for investigating the population genetic structures of S. stellata and related species. PMID:28101439

  19. Microsatellite markers for the New Zealand endemic Myosotis pygmaea species group (Boraginaceae) amplify across species1

    PubMed Central

    Prebble, Jessica M.; Tate, Jennifer A.; Meudt, Heidi M.; Symonds, V. Vaughan

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite loci were developed as polymorphic markers for the New Zealand endemic Myosotis pygmaea species group (Boraginaceae) for use in species delimitation and population and conservation genetic studies. Methods and Results: Illumina MiSeq sequencing was performed on genomic DNA from seedlings of M. drucei. From trimmed paired-end sequences >400 bp, 484 microsatellite loci were identified. Twelve of 48 microsatellite loci tested were found to be polymorphic and consistently scorable when screened on 53 individuals from four populations representing the geographic range of M. drucei. They also amplify in all other species in the M. pygmaea species group, i.e., M. antarctica, M. brevis, M. glauca, and M. pygmaea, as well as 18 other Myosotis species. Conclusions: These 12 polymorphic microsatellite markers establish an important resource for research and conservation of the M. pygmaea species group and potentially other Southern Hemisphere Myosotis. PMID:26082880

  20. Microsatellites for Oenothera gayleana and O. hartwegii subsp. filifolia (Onagraceae), and their utility in section Calylophus1

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Emily M.; Fant, Jeremie B.; Moore, Michael J.; Hastings, Amy P.; Larson, Erica L.; Agrawal, Anurag A.; Skogen, Krissa A.

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Eleven nuclear and four plastid microsatellite markers were screened for two gypsum endemic species, Oenothera gayleana and O. hartwegii subsp. filifolia, and tested for cross-amplification in the remaining 11 taxa within Oenothera sect. Calylophus (Onagraceae). Methods and Results: Microsatellite markers were tested in two to three populations spanning the ranges of both O. gayleana and O. hartwegii subsp. filifolia. The nuclear microsatellite loci consisted of both di- and trinucleotide repeats with one to 17 alleles per population. Several loci showed significant deviation from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium, which may be evidence of chromosomal rings. The plastid microsatellite markers identified one to seven haplotypes per population. The transferability of these markers was confirmed in all 11 taxa within Oenothera sect. Calylophus. Conclusions: The microsatellite loci characterized here are the first developed and tested in Oenothera sect. Calylophus. These markers will be used to assess whether pollinator foraging distance influences population genetic parameters in predictable ways. PMID:26949578

  1. [Intra- and interspecific polymorphism of (AAT)n in microsatellite locus du47D in parthenogenetic species of the genus Darevskia].

    PubMed

    Korchagin, V I; Vergun, A A; Godakova, S A; Tokarskaia, O N

    2013-03-01

    The molecular structure of the allelic variants of (AAT)n of the Du47D microsatellite locus was determined in parthenogenetic lizards Darevskia dahli, D. armeniaca, and D. rostombekovi. Comparative analysis of these alleles showed that they were characterized by perfect structure of microsatellite cluster, and were different in the number of (AAT) monomeric units, as well as in the combinations of species-specific substitutions and deletions in the microsatellite flanking regions. Molecular structure of microsatellite cluster, species-specific single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), and different representation of alleles Du47 in the samples of parthenogenetic species examined point to the origin of the alleles from different bisexual species, which is consistent with the hybrid nature of unisexual species of the genus Darevskia. In addition, these data reflect different combination patterns of interspecific hybridization events with the participation of the same bisexual species upon the formation of hybrid genomes of parthenogenetic species. Possible application of the allelic variants of microsatellite loci of parthenogenetic lizards as the genetic markers for the analysis of the genomes of parthenogenetic species in the light of evolution, ecology, and parthenogenetic type of reproduction in vertebrates is discussed.

  2. Development of a genome-wide anchored microsatellite map for common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Blair, M W; Pedraza, F; Buendia, H F; Gaitán-Solís, E; Beebe, S E; Gepts, P; Tohme, J

    2003-11-01

    A total of 150 microsatellite markers developed for common bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) were tested for parental polymorphism and used to determine the positions of 100 genetic loci on an integrated genetic map of the species. The value of these single-copy markers was evident in their ability to link two existing RFLP-based genetic maps with a base map developed for the Mesoamerican x Andean population, DOR364 x G19833. Two types of microsatellites were mapped, based respectively on gene-coding and anonymous genomic-sequences. Gene-based microsatellites proved to be less polymorphic (46.3%) than anonymous genomic microsatellites (64.3%) between the parents of two inter-genepool crosses. The majority of the microsatellites produced single bands and detected single loci, however four of the gene-based and three of the genomic microsatellites produced consistent double or multiple banding patterns and detected more than one locus. Microsatellite loci were found on each of the 11 chromosomes of common bean, the number per chromosome ranging from 5 to 17 with an average of ten microsatellites each. Total map length for the base map was 1,720 cM and the average chromosome length was 156.4 cM, with an average distance between microsatellite loci of 19.5 cM. The development of new microsatellites from sequences in the Genbank database and the implication of these results for genetic mapping, quantitative trait locus analysis and marker-assisted selection in common bean are described.

  3. A Novel Approach for Mining Polymorphic Microsatellite Markers In Silico

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Joseph I.; Nichols, Hazel J.

    2011-01-01

    An important emerging application of high-throughput 454 sequencing is the isolation of molecular markers such as microsatellites from genomic DNA. However, few studies have developed microsatellites from cDNA despite the added potential for targeting candidate genes. Moreover, to develop microsatellites usually requires the evaluation of numerous primer pairs for polymorphism in the focal species. This can be time-consuming and wasteful, particularly for taxa with low genetic diversity where the majority of primers often yield monomorphic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products. Transcriptome assemblies provide a convenient solution, functional annotation of transcripts allowing markers to be targeted towards candidate genes, while high sequence coverage in principle permits the assessment of variability in silico. Consequently, we evaluated fifty primer pairs designed to amplify microsatellites, primarily residing within transcripts related to immunity and growth, identified from an Antarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus gazella) transcriptome assembly. In silico visualization was used to classify each microsatellite as being either polymorphic or monomorphic and to quantify the number of distinct length variants, each taken to represent a different allele. The majority of loci (n = 36, 76.0%) yielded interpretable PCR products, 23 of which were polymorphic in a sample of 24 fur seal individuals. Loci that appeared variable in silico were significantly more likely to yield polymorphic PCR products, even after controlling for microsatellite length measured in silico. We also found a significant positive relationship between inferred and observed allele number. This study not only demonstrates the feasibility of generating modest panels of microsatellites targeted towards specific classes of gene, but also suggests that in silico microsatellite variability may provide a useful proxy for PCR product polymorphism. PMID:21853104

  4. Isolation and characterization of new polymorphic microsatellite markers from the cuttlefish Sepiella maindroni (Cephalopoda; Sepiidae).

    PubMed

    Guo, B-Y; Qi, P Z; Zhu, A Y; Lv, Z M; Wang, W C; Wu, C W

    2013-07-11

    Fifteen new polymorphic microsatellite loci were developed for the cuttlefish Sepiella maindroni. In 32 individuals from a wild population of coastal Ningde, Fujian Province, China, the number of alleles at these loci varied between 2 and 12, with an average of 5.86. The mean observed and expected heterozygosities were 0.6917 and 0.5993, respectively. Among these polymorphic microsatellite loci, 4 (SM2, SM19, SM40, and SM81) significantly deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium after sequential Bonferroni's correction. All of them were in linkage equilibrium. These microsatellite loci would be useful for evaluating the effect of releasing on extant S. maindroni populations as well as for investigating genetic diversity and population structure of this species.

  5. Microsatellite data analysis for population genetics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Seok; Sappington, Thomas W

    2013-01-01

    Theories and analytical tools of population genetics have been widely applied for addressing various questions in the fields of ecological genetics, conservation biology, and any context where the role of dispersal or gene flow is important. Underlying much of population genetics is the analysis of variation at selectively neutral marker loci, and microsatellites continue to be a popular choice of marker. In recent decades, software programs to estimate population genetics parameters have been developed at an increasing pace as computational science and theoretical knowledge advance. Numerous population genetics software programs are presently available to analyze microsatellite genotype data, but only a handful are commonly employed for calculating parameters such as genetic variation, genetic structure, patterns of spatial and temporal gene flow, population demography, individual population assignment, and genetic relationships within and between populations. In this chapter, we introduce statistical analyses and relevant population genetic software programs that are commonly employed in the field of population genetics and molecular ecology.

  6. Improving the population genetics toolbox for the study of the African malaria vector Anopheles nili: microsatellite mapping to chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Anopheles nili is a major vector of malaria in the humid savannas and forested areas of sub-Saharan Africa. Understanding the population genetic structure and evolutionary dynamics of this species is important for the development of an adequate and targeted malaria control strategy in Africa. Chromosomal inversions and microsatellite markers are commonly used for studying the population structure of malaria mosquitoes. Physical mapping of these markers onto the chromosomes further improves the toolbox, and allows inference on the demographic and evolutionary history of the target species. Results Availability of polytene chromosomes allowed us to develop a map of microsatellite markers and to study polymorphism of chromosomal inversions. Nine microsatellite markers were mapped to unique locations on all five chromosomal arms of An. nili using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Probes were obtained from 300-483 bp-long inserts of plasmid clones and from 506-559 bp-long fragments amplified with primers designed using the An. nili genome assembly generated on an Illumina platform. Two additional loci were assigned to specific chromosome arms of An. nili based on in silico sequence similarity and chromosome synteny with Anopheles gambiae. Three microsatellites were mapped inside or in the vicinity of the polymorphic chromosomal inversions 2Rb and 2Rc. A statistically significant departure from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, due to a deficit in heterozygotes at the 2Rb inversion, and highly significant linkage disequilibrium between the two inversions, were detected in natural An. nili populations collected from Burkina Faso. Conclusions Our study demonstrated that next-generation sequencing can be used to improve FISH for microsatellite mapping in species with no reference genome sequence. Physical mapping of microsatellite markers in An. nili showed that their cytological locations spanned the entire five-arm complement, allowing genome-wide inferences

  7. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association data and large-scale replication identifies additional susceptibility loci for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zeggini, Eleftheria; Scott, Laura J; Saxena, Richa; Voight, Benjamin F; Marchini, Jonathan L; Hu, Tianle; de Bakker, Paul I W; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Almgren, Peter; Andersen, Gitte; Ardlie, Kristin; Boström, Kristina Bengtsson; Bergman, Richard N; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Borch-Johnsen, Knut; Burtt, Noël P; Chen, Hong; Chines, Peter S; Daly, Mark J; Deodhar, Parimal; Ding, Chia-Jen; Doney, Alex S F; Duren, William L; Elliott, Katherine S; Erdos, Michael R; Frayling, Timothy M; Freathy, Rachel M; Gianniny, Lauren; Grallert, Harald; Grarup, Niels; Groves, Christopher J; Guiducci, Candace; Hansen, Torben; Herder, Christian; Hitman, Graham A; Hughes, Thomas E; Isomaa, Bo; Jackson, Anne U; Jørgensen, Torben; Kong, Augustine; Kubalanza, Kari; Kuruvilla, Finny G; Kuusisto, Johanna; Langenberg, Claudia; Lango, Hana; Lauritzen, Torsten; Li, Yun; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Marvelle, Amanda F; Meisinger, Christa; Midthjell, Kristian; Mohlke, Karen L; Morken, Mario A; Morris, Andrew D; Narisu, Narisu; Nilsson, Peter; Owen, Katharine R; Palmer, Colin N A; Payne, Felicity; Perry, John R B; Pettersen, Elin; Platou, Carl; Prokopenko, Inga; Qi, Lu; Qin, Li; Rayner, Nigel W; Rees, Matthew; Roix, Jeffrey J; Sandbaek, Anelli; Shields, Beverley; Sjögren, Marketa; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stringham, Heather M; Swift, Amy J; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Walker, Mark; Watanabe, Richard M; Weedon, Michael N; Willer, Cristen J; Illig, Thomas; Hveem, Kristian; Hu, Frank B; Laakso, Markku; Stefansson, Kari; Pedersen, Oluf; Wareham, Nicholas J; Barroso, Inês; Hattersley, Andrew T; Collins, Francis S; Groop, Leif; McCarthy, Mark I; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David

    2008-05-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified multiple loci at which common variants modestly but reproducibly influence risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Established associations to common and rare variants explain only a small proportion of the heritability of T2D. As previously published analyses had limited power to identify variants with modest effects, we carried out meta-analysis of three T2D GWA scans comprising 10,128 individuals of European descent and approximately 2.2 million SNPs (directly genotyped and imputed), followed by replication testing in an independent sample with an effective sample size of up to 53,975. We detected at least six previously unknown loci with robust evidence for association, including the JAZF1 (P = 5.0 x 10(-14)), CDC123-CAMK1D (P = 1.2 x 10(-10)), TSPAN8-LGR5 (P = 1.1 x 10(-9)), THADA (P = 1.1 x 10(-9)), ADAMTS9 (P = 1.2 x 10(-8)) and NOTCH2 (P = 4.1 x 10(-8)) gene regions. Our results illustrate the value of large discovery and follow-up samples for gaining further insights into the inherited basis of T2D.

  8. Distribution, function and evolution characterization of microsatellite in Sargassum thunbergii (Fucales, Phaeophyta) transcriptome and their application in marker development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fuli; Hu, Zimin; Liu, Wenhui; Li, Jingjing; Wang, Wenjun; Liang, Zhourui; Wang, Feijiu; Sun, Xiutao

    2016-01-06

    Using transcriptome data to mine microsatellite and develop markers has growingly become prevalent. However, characterizing the possible function of microsatellite is relatively rare. In this study, we explored microsatellites in the transcriptome of the brown alga Sargassum thunbergii and characterized the frequencies, distribution, function and evolution, and developed primers to validate these microsatellites. Our results showed that Tri-nucleotide is the most abundant, followed by di- and mono-nucleotide. The length of microsatellite was significantly affected by the repeat motif size. The density of microsatellite in the CDS region is significantly lower than that in the UTR region. The annotation of the transcripts containing microsatellite showed that 573 transcripts have GO terms and can be categorized into 42 groups. Pathways enrichment showed that microsatellites were significantly overrepresented in the genes involved in pathways such as Ubiquitin mediated proteolysis, RNA degradation, Spliceosome, etc. Primers flanking 961 microsatellite loci were designed, and among the 30 pairs of primer selected randomly for availability test, 23 were proved to be efficient. These findings provided new insight into the function and evolution of microsatellite in transcriptome, and the identified microsatellite loci within the annotated gene will be useful for developing functional markers in S. thunbergii.

  9. Distribution, function and evolution characterization of microsatellite in Sargassum thunbergii (Fucales, Phaeophyta) transcriptome and their application in marker development

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fuli; Hu, Zimin; Liu, Wenhui; Li, Jingjing; Wang, Wenjun; Liang, Zhourui; Wang, Feijiu; Sun, Xiutao

    2016-01-01

    Using transcriptome data to mine microsatellite and develop markers has growingly become prevalent. However, characterizing the possible function of microsatellite is relatively rare. In this study, we explored microsatellites in the transcriptome of the brown alga Sargassum thunbergii and characterized the frequencies, distribution, function and evolution, and developed primers to validate these microsatellites. Our results showed that Tri-nucleotide is the most abundant, followed by di- and mono-nucleotide. The length of microsatellite was significantly affected by the repeat motif size. The density of microsatellite in the CDS region is significantly lower than that in the UTR region. The annotation of the transcripts containing microsatellite showed that 573 transcripts have GO terms and can be categorized into 42 groups. Pathways enrichment showed that microsatellites were significantly overrepresented in the genes involved in pathways such as Ubiquitin mediated proteolysis, RNA degradation, Spliceosome, etc. Primers flanking 961 microsatellite loci were designed, and among the 30 pairs of primer selected randomly for availability test, 23 were proved to be efficient. These findings provided new insight into the function and evolution of microsatellite in transcriptome, and the identified microsatellite loci within the annotated gene will be useful for developing functional markers in S. thunbergii. PMID:26732855

  10. Outcrossing and paternity analysis of Pinus densiflora (Japanese red pine) by microsatellite polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Lian, C; Miwa, M; Hogetsu, T

    2001-07-01

    This study employed microsatellite loci to analyse outcrossing rate and pollen dispersal in Japanese red pine (Pinus densiflora) in an isolated stand. The average offspring outcrossing rate for 29 cones was 0.955. Significant differences in outcrossing rates between offspring groups on individual branches that extended in different directions at different heights were not detected. Male parents of 874 offspring collected from the maternal tree were assessed by exclusion using polymorphisms at three microsatellite loci. Paternity analysis indicated that at least 31% of the offspring were fertilized by pollen from trees outside the stand. The average distance of pollen migration within the study stand was 68 m, with a maximum value of 325 m. There was excess mating with nearby P. densiflora trees, of which only a few were predominant pollen donors. In addition, a weakly directional bias in P. densiflora pollination was also detected in the study stand, suggesting that female strobili on a branch of the maternal tree were more easily fertilized by pollen from trees in that direction.

  11. Power of exclusion of 19 microsatellite markers for parentage testing in river buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Kathiravan, P; Kataria, R S; Mishra, B P

    2012-08-01

    In the present study, 19 microsatellite markers were assessed for their power of exclusion to test parentage in river buffalo. Microsatellite genotypes of 216 unrelated buffaloes belonging to five different breeds were utilized for the study. The probabilities of exclusion were calculated for three hypothetical situations viz. paternity testing (PE1), one parental genotype unavailable (PE2) and exclusion of both parents i.e. substituted offspring (PE3). The mean probability of exclusion across 19 investigated markers in buffalo was 0.578 (PE1), 0.405 (PE2) and 0.764 (PE3) respectively. The probability of exclusion for paternity (PE1) ranged between 0.297 and 0.814 across different markers. The exclusion probability for the cases one parent unavailable (PE2) and substituted offspring (PE3) varied from 0.143 to 0.688 and 0.465 to 0.946 respectively. Polymorphism information content and expected heterozygosity were found to have significantly high correlation with probability of exclusion of microsatellite markers. The cumulative PE1 of nine marker loci was estimated to be 0.9999 while in case of absence of one of the parental genotypes, a minimum of 11 markers were required to achieve a cumulative PE2 of 0.999. In conclusion, the present study proposes two multiplex sets with four and five markers respectively for routine parentage testing in buffalo and an additional set of four markers for doubtful cases of paternity.

  12. Isolation and Characterization of Cross-Amplification Microsatellite Panels for Species of Procapra (Bovidae; Antilopinae)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Li, Chunlin; Yang, Ji; Luo, Zhenhua; Tang, Songhua; Li, Feng; Li, Chunwang; Liu, Bingwan; Jiang, Zhigang

    2012-01-01

    The three Procapra species, Tibetan gazelle (P. picticaudata), Mongolian gazelle (P. gutturosa) and Przewalski’s gazelle (P. przewalskii) are endemic to Asia. Several intraspecific genetic issues have been studied with species-specific microsatellite loci in these Asian gazelles. However, cross-species microsatellite panels are absent, which inhibits comparative conservation and evolutionary studies of the Procapra. In this study, we isolated 20 cross-species microsatellite loci for Procapra from both related species and the genomic library of P. przewalskii. Fifty-three samples of the three gazelles were used to characterize the markers. Allele numbers ranged from three to 20, with a mean of 7.93 per locus. Observed heterozygosity (HO) averaged 0.680 and expected heterozygosity (HE) 0.767. The mean polymorphic information content (PIC) was 0.757 for P. picticaudata, 0.803 for P. gutturosa and 0.590 for P. przewalskii. Nine loci were significantly deviated from Hardy-Weinberg (H-W) equilibrium in the three species. Significant linkage disequilibrium was detected in four pairs of loci in P. przewalskii, five pairs in P. gutturosa and 51 pairs in P. picticaudata. Considering the abundance of published loci and their high success rates of cross-amplification, testing and utilization of loci from related species is efficient for wild species of Bovidae. The cross-species microsatellite loci we developed will facilitate further interspecies genetic studies in Procapra. PMID:22942736

  13. Quantitative trait loci with additive effects on palatability and fatty acid composition of meat in a Wagyu-Limousin F2 population.

    PubMed

    Alexander, L J; Macneil, M D; Geary, T W; Snelling, W M; Rule, D C; Scanga, J A

    2007-10-01

    A whole-genome scan was conducted on 328 F(2) progeny in a Wagyu x Limousin cross to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting palatability and fatty acid composition of beef at an age-constant endpoint. We have identified seven QTL on five chromosomes involved in lipid metabolism and tenderness. None of the genes encoding major enzymes involved in fatty acid metabolism, such as fatty acid synthase (FASN), acetyl-CoA carboxylase alpha (ACACA), solute carrier family 2 (facilitated glucose transporter) member 4 (SLC2A4), stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) and genes encoding the subunits of fatty acid elongase, was located in these QTL regions. The present study may lead to a better-tasting and healthier product for consumers through improved selection for palatability and lipid content of beef.

  14. Genomic Microsatellites as Evolutionary Chronometers: A Test in Wild Cats

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, Carlos A.; Menotti-Raymond, Marilyn; Nelson, George; Goldstein, David; O'Brien, Stephen J.

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear microsatellite loci (2- to 5-bp tandem repeats) would seem to be ideal markers for population genetic monitoring because of their abundant polymorphism, wide dispersal in vertebrate genomes, near selective neutrality, and ease of assessment; however, questions about their mode of generation, mutation rates and ascertainment bias have limited interpretation considerably. We have assessed the patterns of genomic diversity for ninety feline microsatellite loci among previously characterized populations of cheetahs, lions and pumas in recapitulating demographic history. The results imply that the microsatellite diversity measures (heterozygosity, allele reconstitution and microsatellite allele variance) offer proportionate indicators, albeit with large variance, of historic population bottlenecks and founder effects. The observed rate of reconstruction of new alleles plus the growth in the breadth of microsatellite allele size (variance) was used here to develop genomic estimates of time intervals following historic founder events in cheetahs (12,000 yr ago), in North American pumas (10,000–17,000 yr ago), and in Asiatic lions of the Gir Forest (1000–4000 yr ago). [Supplemental material available online at http://rex.nci.nih.gov/lgd/front_page.htm and at http://www.genome.org.] PMID:11875029

  15. Genomic microsatellites as evolutionary chronometers: a test in wild cats.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Carlos A; Menotti-Raymond, Marilyn; Nelson, George; Goldstein, David; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2002-03-01

    Nuclear microsatellite loci (2- to 5-bp tandem repeats) would seem to be ideal markers for population genetic monitoring because of their abundant polymorphism, wide dispersal in vertebrate genomes, near selective neutrality, and ease of assessment; however, questions about their mode of generation, mutation rates and ascertainment bias have limited interpretation considerably. We have assessed the patterns of genomic diversity for ninety feline microsatellite loci among previously characterized populations of cheetahs, lions and pumas in recapitulating demographic history. The results imply that the microsatellite diversity measures (heterozygosity, allele reconstitution and microsatellite allele variance) offer proportionate indicators, albeit with large variance, of historic population bottlenecks and founder effects. The observed rate of reconstruction of new alleles plus the growth in the breadth of microsatellite allele size (variance) was used here to develop genomic estimates of time intervals following historic founder events in cheetahs (12,000 yr ago), in North American pumas (10,000-17,000 yr ago), and in Asiatic lions of the Gir Forest (1000-4000 yr ago).

  16. Transferability of microsatellites for studies on the social behavior of the tufted capuchin monkey (genus Sapajus).

    PubMed

    Tokuda, M; Martins, M M; Izar, P

    2014-11-27

    Because of relevant results that indicated that molecular techniques can provide increased knowledge of animal social systems, they usually complement observational field studies. Despite the great utility of microsatellites, they are not available for all species. Gathering genetic information using microsatellites that were originally designed for other species is a time-saving procedure. The aim of this study was to test the transferability of microsatellites and their usefulness in studies of social behavior of black capuchin monkeys (Sapajus nigritus). We noninvasively sampled adult and subadult black capuchins of three wild groups in southeastern Brazil. Seventeen microsatellites, which were previously designed for and successfully amplified in multiple Neotropical primate species, were tested. Nine of the 17 microsatellite loci tested produced an average of 6.22 alleles (range 2-12) per locus. The allelic richness and the expected heterozygosity for all loci was 5.93 and 0.70, respectively. The combined non-exclusion probability for one candidate parent across all loci was 0.01. The nine microsatellite loci optimized in this study have a great potential for application in studies of social structure and dispersal patterns in S. nigritus populations and in other Neotropical primate species.

  17. Genotyping of mature trees of Entandrophragma cylindricum with microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Garcia, F; Noyer, J-L; Risterucci, A-M; Chevallier, M-H

    2004-01-01

    We have characterized 10 microsatellite loci for the tropical tree Entandrophragma cylindricum (Sprague) Sprague (sapelli) in order to genotype individuals in forest stands for estimation of the genetic diversity of the species. We used the technique of building a (GA)n microsatellite-enriched library by capture with streptavidin-coated magnetic beads. We assessed the polymorphism of seven microsatellites in 186 mature trees in a selectively logged stand (Dimako) and an unlogged stand (Ndama), both in Cameroon. All the loci were polymorphic, and the number of alleles was high, ranging from eight to 36, with a mean of 22.1. Both stands showed the same high level of genetic diversity (mean H(E) = 0.85) and a low genetic differentiation (FST = 0.007), indicating that genetic diversity was within rather than among populations. Five and three out seven loci in Dimako and Ndama, respectively, showed a deficit of heterozygotes. The seven loci enabled more than 97% of the mature trees in each stand to be identified. It was concluded that these markers can be efficiently used for gene flow studies.

  18. Genome-wide microsatellite identification in the fungus Anisogramma anomala using Illumina sequencing and genome assembly.

    PubMed

    Cai, Guohong; Leadbetter, Clayton W; Muehlbauer, Megan F; Molnar, Thomas J; Hillman, Bradley I

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing has been dramatically accelerating the discovery of microsatellite markers (also known as Simple Sequence Repeats). Both 454 and Illumina reads have been used directly in microsatellite discovery and primer design (the "Seq-to-SSR" approach). However, constraints of this approach include: 1) many microsatellite-containing reads do not have sufficient flanking sequences to allow primer design, and 2) difficulties in removing microsatellite loci residing in longer, repetitive regions. In the current study, we applied the novel "Seq-Assembly-SSR" approach to overcome these constraints in Anisogramma anomala. In our approach, Illumina reads were first assembled into a draft genome, and the latter was then used in microsatellite discovery. A. anomala is an obligate biotrophic ascomycete that causes eastern filbert blight disease of commercial European hazelnut. Little is known about its population structure or diversity. Approximately 26 M 146 bp Illumina reads were generated from a paired-end library of a fungal strain from Oregon. The reads were assembled into a draft genome of 333 Mb (excluding gaps), with contig N50 of 10,384 bp and scaffold N50 of 32,987 bp. A bioinformatics pipeline identified 46,677 microsatellite motifs at 44,247 loci, including 2,430 compound loci. Primers were successfully designed for 42,923 loci (97%). After removing 2,886 loci close to assembly gaps and 676 loci in repetitive regions, a genome-wide microsatellite database of 39,361 loci was generated for the fungus. In experimental screening of 236 loci using four geographically representative strains, 228 (96.6%) were successfully amplified and 214 (90.7%) produced single PCR products. Twenty-three (9.7%) were found to be perfect polymorphic loci. A small-scale population study using 11 polymorphic loci revealed considerable gene diversity. Clustering analysis grouped isolates of this fungus into two clades in accordance with their geographic origins. Thus, the

  19. Development of microsatellite markers for the apomictic triploid fern Myriopteris lindheimeri (Pteridaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Grusz, Amanda L.; Pryer, Kathleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were developed for investigating the population dynamics of Myriopteris lindheimeri (Pteridaceae), an apomictic triploid fern endemic to deserts of the southwestern United States and Mexico. Methods and Results: Using 454 sequencing, 21 microsatellite markers were developed. Of these, 14 were polymorphic with up to five alleles per locus and eight markers amplified in one or more congeneric close relatives (M. covillei, M. fendleri, M. aurea, and M. rufa). To demonstrate marker utility, M. lindheimeri samples from three Arizona populations were genotyped at nine loci. For each population, diversity measures including percent polymorphic loci, frequency of heterozygotes across all loci, and genotypic diversity were calculated. Across the three populations, on average, 63% of loci were polymorphic, the average frequency of heterozygotes (across all loci) was 0.32, and average genotypic diversity was 0.34. Conclusions: These markers provide a foundation for future studies exploring polyploidy and apomixis in myriopterid ferns. PMID:26649266

  20. Characterization of polymorphic microsatellite markers and genetic diversity in wild bronze featherback, Notopterus notopterus (Pallas, 1769).

    PubMed

    Gupta, Arti; Lal, Kuldeep K; Punia, Peyush; Singh, Rajeev K; Mohindra, Vindhya; Sah, Rama S; Kumar, Rajesh; Luhariya, Rupesh K; Dwivedi, Arvind K; Masih, Prachi; Mishra, R M; Jena, J K

    2013-12-01

    Six polymorphic microsatellite DNA loci were identified in the primitive fish, bronze featherback, Notopterus notopterus for the first time and demonstrated significant population genetic structure. Out of the six primers, one primer (NN90) was specific to N. notopterus (microsatellite sequence within the RAG1 gene) and five primers were product of successful cross-species amplification. Sixty-four primers available from 3 fish species of order Osteoglossiformes and families Notopteridae and Osteoglossidae were tested to amplify homologous microsatellite loci in N. notopterus. Fifteen primer pairs exhibited successful cross-priming PCR product. However, polymorphism was detected only at five loci. To assess the significance of these six loci (including NN90) in population genetic study, 215 samples of N. notopterus from five rivers, viz Satluj, Gomti, Yamuna, Brahmaputra and Mahanadi were analyzed. The five sample sets displayed different diversity levels and observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.6036 to 0.7373. Significant genotype heterogeneity (P < 0.0001) and high FST (0.2205) over all loci indicated that the samples are not drawn from the same genepool. The identified microsatellite loci are promising for use in fine-scale population structure analysis of N. notopterus.

  1. Microsatellites in Pursuit of Microbial Genome Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Abdullah F.; Wang, Rongzhi; Wang, Shihua

    2016-01-01

    Microsatellites or short sequence repeats are widespread genetic markers which are hypermutable 1–6 bp long short nucleotide motifs. Significantly, their applications in genetics are extensive due to their ceaseless mutational degree, widespread length variations and hypermutability skills. These features make them useful in determining the driving forces of evolution by using powerful molecular techniques. Consequently, revealing important questions, for example, what is the significance of these abundant sequences in DNA, what are their roles in genomic evolution? The answers of these important questions are hidden in the ways these short motifs contributed in altering the microbial genomes since the origin of life. Even though their size ranges from 1 –to- 6 bases, these repeats are becoming one of the most popular genetic probes in determining their associations and phylogenetic relationships in closely related genomes. Currently, they have been widely used in molecular genetics, biotechnology and evolutionary biology. However, due to limited knowledge; there is a significant gap in research and lack of information concerning hypermutational mechanisms. These mechanisms play a key role in microsatellite loci point mutations and phase variations. This review will extend the understandings of impacts and contributions of microsatellite in genomic evolution and their universal applications in microbiology. PMID:26779133

  2. Development and characterization of microsatellite markers in the African deciduous tree Terminalia superba (Combretaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Demenou, Boris B.; Migliore, Jérémy; Tosso, Felicien; Kaymak, Esra; Hardy, Olivier J.

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellites were designed and characterized in the African timber forest tree Terminalia superba (Combretaceae). Due to their high variability, these markers are suitable to investigate gene flow patterns and the structure of genetic diversity. Methods and Results: From a genomic library obtained by next-generation sequencing, seven monomorphic and 14 polymorphic microsatellite loci were developed. The polymorphic microsatellites displayed two to 27 alleles (mean 11.4; expected heterozygosity range 0.283–0.940, mean 0.736) in one population from southeastern Cameroon. Genotypes were typical of an outbreeding diploid species, although null alleles explain a significant heterozygote deficit in three loci. Cross-amplification in three congeneric species (T. ivorensis, T. avicennioides, and T. mantaly) failed, suggesting that T. superba is rather divergent. Conclusions: This set of newly developed microsatellite markers will be useful for assessing the genetic diversity, population structure, and demographic history of T. superba in tropical African forests. PMID:26697276

  3. Microsatellite primers for the rare sedge Lepidosperma bungalbin (Cyperaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Nevill, Paul G.; Wardell-Johnson, Grant

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were developed for the rare sedge Lepidosperma bungalbin (Cyperaceae) to assess genetic variation and its spatial structuring. Methods and Results: We conducted shotgun sequencing on an Illumina MiSeq and produced 6,215,872 sequence reads. The QDD pipeline was used to design 60 primer pairs that were screened using PCR. We developed 17 loci, of which 12 loci were identified that were polymorphic, amplified reliably, and could be consistently scored. We then screened these loci for variation in individuals from three populations. The number of alleles observed for these 12 loci across the three populations ranged from nine to 19 and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.41 to 0.89. Conclusions: These markers will enable the quantification of the potential impact of mining on genetic variation within L. bungalbin and establish a baseline for future management of genetic variation of the rare sedge. PMID:27843727

  4. Microsatellite primers for the rare shrub Acacia adinophylla (Fabaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Nevill, Paul G.; Wardell-Johnson, Grant

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite primers were developed for the rare shrub Acacia adinophylla (Fabaceae) to assess genetic diversity and its spatial structuring. Methods and Results: Shotgun sequencing on an Illumina MiSeq produced 6,372,575 reads. Using the QDD pipeline, we designed 60 primer pairs, which were screened using PCR. Seventeen loci were developed, of which 12 loci were identified that were polymorphic, amplified reliably, and could be consistently scored. These loci were then screened for variation in individuals from three populations. The number of alleles observed for these 12 loci ranged from three to 18 and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.13 to 0.85. Conclusions: These markers will enable the quantification of genetic impact of proposed mining activities on the short-range endemic Acacia adinophylla. PMID:27843728

  5. Noninvasive individual and species identification of jaguars (Panthera onca), pumas (Puma concolor) and ocelots (Leopardus pardalis) in Belize, Central America using cross-species microsatellites and faecal DNA.

    PubMed

    Wultsch, Claudia; Waits, Lisette P; Kelly, Marcella J

    2014-11-01

    There is a great need to develop efficient, noninvasive genetic sampling methods to study wild populations of multiple, co-occurring, threatened felids. This is especially important for molecular scatology studies occurring in challenging tropical environments where DNA degrades quickly and the quality of faecal samples varies greatly. We optimized 14 polymorphic microsatellite loci for jaguars (Panthera onca), pumas (Puma concolor) and ocelots (Leopardus pardalis) and assessed their utility for cross-species amplification. Additionally, we tested their reliability for species and individual identification using DNA from faeces of wild felids detected by a scat detector dog across Belize in Central America. All microsatellite loci were successfully amplified in the three target species, were polymorphic with average expected heterozygosities of HE = 0.60 ± 0.18 (SD) for jaguars, HE = 0.65 ± 0.21 (SD) for pumas and HE = 0.70 ± 0.13 (SD) for ocelots and had an overall PCR amplification success of 61%. We used this nuclear DNA primer set to successfully identify species and individuals from 49% of 1053 field-collected scat samples. This set of optimized microsatellite multiplexes represents a powerful tool for future efforts to conduct noninvasive studies on multiple, wild Neotropical felids.

  6. Genetic Structure of Earthworm Populations at a Regional Scale: Inferences from Mitochondrial and Microsatellite Molecular Markers in Aporrectodea icterica (Savigny 1826)

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Leguizamon, Magally; Mathieu, Jérôme; Decaëns, Thibaud; Dupont, Lise

    2014-01-01

    Despite the fundamental role that soil invertebrates (e.g. earthworms) play in soil ecosystems, the magnitude of their spatial genetic variation is still largely unknown and only a few studies have investigated the population genetic structure of these organisms. Here, we investigated the genetic structure of seven populations of a common endogeic earthworm (Aporrectodea icterica) sampled in northern France to explore how historical species range changes, microevolutionary processes and human activities interact in shaping genetic variation at a regional scale. Because combining markers with distinct modes of inheritance can provide extra, complementary information on gene flow, we compared the patterns of genetic structure revealed using nuclear (7 microsatellite loci) and mitochondrial markers (COI). Both types of markers indicated low genetic polymorphism compared to other earthworm species, a result that can be attributed to ancient bottlenecks, for instance due to species isolation in southern refugia during the ice ages with subsequent expansion toward northern Europe. Historical events can also be responsible for the existence of two divergent, but randomly interbreeding mitochondrial lineages within all study populations. In addition, the comparison of observed heterozygosity among microsatellite loci and heterozygosity expected under mutation-drift equilibrium suggested a recent decrease in effective size in some populations that could be due to contemporary events such as habitat fragmentation. The absence of relationship between geographic and genetic distances estimated from microsatellite allele frequency data also suggested that dispersal is haphazard and that human activities favour passive dispersal among geographically distant populations. PMID:25003795

  7. Genetic structure of earthworm populations at a regional scale: inferences from mitochondrial and microsatellite molecular markers in Aporrectodea icterica (Savigny 1826).

    PubMed

    Torres-Leguizamon, Magally; Mathieu, Jérôme; Decaëns, Thibaud; Dupont, Lise

    2014-01-01

    Despite the fundamental role that soil invertebrates (e.g. earthworms) play in soil ecosystems, the magnitude of their spatial genetic variation is still largely unknown and only a few studies have investigated the population genetic structure of these organisms. Here, we investigated the genetic structure of seven populations of a common endogeic earthworm (Aporrectodea icterica) sampled in northern France to explore how historical species range changes, microevolutionary processes and human activities interact in shaping genetic variation at a regional scale. Because combining markers with distinct modes of inheritance can provide extra, complementary information on gene flow, we compared the patterns of genetic structure revealed using nuclear (7 microsatellite loci) and mitochondrial markers (COI). Both types of markers indicated low genetic polymorphism compared to other earthworm species, a result that can be attributed to ancient bottlenecks, for instance due to species isolation in southern refugia during the ice ages with subsequent expansion toward northern Europe. Historical events can also be responsible for the existence of two divergent, but randomly interbreeding mitochondrial lineages within all study populations. In addition, the comparison of observed heterozygosity among microsatellite loci and heterozygosity expected under mutation-drift equilibrium suggested a recent decrease in effective size in some populations that could be due to contemporary events such as habitat fragmentation. The absence of relationship between geographic and genetic distances estimated from microsatellite allele frequency data also suggested that dispersal is haphazard and that human activities favour passive dispersal among geographically distant populations.

  8. Development and characterization of microsatellite markers to study population genetic diversity of Przewalski's naked carp Gymnocypris przewalskii in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Jiang, P; Gang, H; Shi, J-Q; Sun, X

    2009-12-01

    Two populations of Przewalski's naked carp Gymnocypris przewalskii, 30 individuals per population, were screened for 10 microsatellite loci. Moderate allele variation was found in these loci with two to eight alleles per locus. The expected and observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.019 to 0.805 and from 0.160 to 0.575, respectively.

  9. Development of microsatellites from Fothergilla ×intermedia (Hamamelidaceae) and cross transfer to four other genera within Hamamelidaceae1

    PubMed Central

    Hatmaker, E. Anne; Wadl, Phillip A.; Mantooth, Kristie; Scheffler, Brian E.; Ownley, Bonnie H.; Trigiano, Robert N.

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: We developed microsatellites from Fothergilla ×intermedia to establish loci capable of distinguishing species and cultivars, and to assess genetic diversity for use by ornamental breeders and to transfer within Hamamelidaceae. Methods and Results: We sequenced a small insert genomic library enriched for microsatellites to develop 12 polymorphic microsatellite loci. The number of alleles detected ranged from four to 15 across five genera within Hamamelidaceae. Shannon’s information index ranged from 0.07 to 0.14. Conclusions: These microsatellite loci provide a set of markers to evaluate genetic diversity of natural and cultivated collections and assist ornamental plant breeders for genetic studies of five popular genera of woody ornamental plants. PMID:25909044

  10. [Correlation analysis of microsatellite DNA markers with wool traits in Liangshan semi-fine wool sheep].

    PubMed

    Wang, Gao-Fu; Wu, Deng-Jun

    2006-12-01

    Eighteen microsatellites on chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 9 were studied to detect their genotypes in 206 individuals in a Liangshan Semi-fine Wool Sheep nucleus breeding population. A GLM procedure was used to analyze the effects of these 18 microsatellites on wool traits. Results uncovered 7 loci that had a significant impact on wool traits. Genotypes of that favorably affect wool traits were determined.

  11. Cross-species amplification and optimization of microsatellite markers for use in six Neotropical parrots.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, Kara J; Waits, Lisette P

    2008-07-01

    Short amplicon primers were redesigned for 17 microsatellite loci developed in St. Vincent's Amazon and six loci developed in blue-and-yellow macaw and tested using six species of Neotropical parrot. Polymorphism was observed at 12 loci in blue-and-yellow macaw, 10 in red-and-green macaw, 11 in scarlet macaw, 10 in chestnut-fronted macaw, 11 in red-bellied macaw and 16 in mealy parrot. Number of alleles per locus ranged from two to 23 and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.05 to 0.95. The resulting multiplexed loci will be useful in evaluating genetic diversity, genetic structure and mating system in Neotropical parrots.

  12. Individual Identifiability Predicts Population Identifiability in Forensic Microsatellite Markers.

    PubMed

    Algee-Hewitt, Bridget F B; Edge, Michael D; Kim, Jaehee; Li, Jun Z; Rosenberg, Noah A

    2016-04-04

    Highly polymorphic genetic markers with significant potential for distinguishing individual identity are used as a standard tool in forensic testing [1, 2]. At the same time, population-genetic studies have suggested that genetically diverse markers with high individual identifiability also confer information about genetic ancestry [3-6]. The dual influence of polymorphism levels on ancestry inference and forensic desirability suggests that forensically useful marker sets with high levels of individual identifiability might also possess substantial ancestry information. We study a standard forensic marker set-the 13 CODIS loci used in the United States and elsewhere [2, 7-9]-together with 779 additional microsatellites [10], using direct population structure inference to test whether markers with substantial individual identifiability also produce considerable information about ancestry. Despite having been selected for individual identification and not for ancestry inference [11], the CODIS markers generate nontrivial model-based clustering patterns similar to those of other sets of 13 tetranucleotide microsatellites. Although the CODIS markers have relatively low values of the F(ST) divergence statistic, their high heterozygosities produce greater ancestry inference potential than is possessed by less heterozygous marker sets. More generally, we observe that marker sets with greater individual identifiability also tend toward greater population identifiability. We conclude that population identifiability regularly follows as a byproduct of the use of highly polymorphic forensic markers. Our findings have implications for the design of new forensic marker sets and for evaluations of the extent to which individual characteristics beyond identification might be predicted from current and future forensic data.

  13. Tissue identity testing of cancer by short tandem repeat polymorphism: pitfalls of interpretation in the presence of microsatellite instability.

    PubMed

    Much, Melissa; Buza, Natalia; Hui, Pei

    2014-03-01

    Tissue identity testing by short tandem repeat (STR) polymorphism offers discriminating power in resolving tissue mix-up or contamination. However, one caveat is the presence of microsatellite unstable tumors, in which genetic alterations may drastically change the STR wild-type polymorphism leading to unexpected allelic discordance. We examined how tissue identity testing results can be altered by the presence of microsatellite instability (MSI). Eleven cases of MSI-unstable (9 intestinal and 2 endometrial adenocarcinomas) and 10 cases of MSI-stable tumors (all colorectal adenocarcinomas) were included. All had been previously tested by polymerase chain reaction testing at 5 National Cancer Institute (NCI) recommended MSI loci and/or immunohistochemistry for DNA mismatch repair proteins (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2). Tissue identity testing targeting 15 STR loci was performed using AmpF/STR Identifiler Amplification. Ten of 11 MSI-unstable tumors demonstrated novel alleles at 5 to 12 STR loci per case and frequently with 3 or more allelic peaks. However, all affected loci showed identifiable germline allele(s) in MSI-high tumors. A wild-type allelic profile was seen in 7 of 10 MSI-stable tumors. In the remaining 3 cases, isolated novel alleles were present at a unique single locus in addition to germline alleles. Loss of heterozygosity was observed frequently in both MSI-stable (6/11 cases) and MSI-unstable tumors (8/10 cases). In conclusion, MSI may significantly alter the wild-type allelic polymorphism, leading to potential interpretation errors of STR genotyping. Careful examination of the STR allelic pattern, high index of suspicion, and follow-up MSI testing are crucial to avoid erroneous conclusions and subsequent clinical and legal consequences.

  14. Low abundance of microsatellite repeats in the genome of the Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Longmire, J.L.; Hahn, D.C.; Roach, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    A cosmid library made from brown-headed cowbird (Molothrus ater) DNA was examined for representation of 17 distinct microsatellite motifs including all possible mono-, di-, and trinucleotide microsatellites, and the tetranucleotide repeat (GATA)n. The overall density of microsatellites within cowbird DNA was found to be one repeat per 89 kb and the frequency of the most abundant motif, (AGC)n, was once every 382 kb. The abundance of microsatellites within the cowbird genome is estimated to be reduced approximately 15-fold compared to humans. The reduced frequency of microsatellites seen in this study is consistent with previous observations indicating reduced numbers of microsatellites and other interspersed repeats in avian DNA. In addition to providing new information concerning the abundance of microsatellites within an avian genome, these results provide useful insights for selecting cloning strategies that might be used in the development of locus-specific microsatellite markers for avian studies.

  15. Isolation and characterization of novel microsatellites for Abies koreana and A. nephrolepis (Pinaceae).

    PubMed

    Hong, J K; Lim, J; Lee, B Y; Kwak, M

    2016-04-28

    Abies koreana is an endemic and rare species from Korea and is classified as endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. Although the genetic diversity assessment for current population of A. koreana needs to be performed urgently, no microsatellite markers have been developed for this species. In the present study, we developed 22 novel polymorphic microsatellite loci and the characteristics of these loci were determined in A. koreana as well as in Abies nephrolepis, the most closely related species, and these loci were compared with previously reported microsatellite markers developed for the Abies genus. Genomic sequence (161 Mbp; 325,776 reads) was obtained from one individual of A. koreana using Roche 454 GS-FLX Titanium sequencing and 19,258 repeat motifs were identified from it. A total of 288 primer pairs with high copy numbers of di-repeat motifs were evaluated for amplification in A. koreana and A. nephrolepis. A total of 71 primer pairs successfully amplified fragments, of which 22 showed polymorphisms in A. koreana and A. nephrolepis. The average expected diversity was 0.767 and 0.717 in A. koreana and A. nephrolepis, respectively; these heterozygosity levels were moderate compared to the previously reported microsatellite loci from Abies species. This is the first set of microsatellite markers developed for A. koreana as well as A. nephrolepis and further population genetic studies of both species and genetic delimitation can be carried out for the species conservation and management.

  16. Bulk development and stringent selection of microsatellite markers in the western flower thrips Frankliniella occidentalis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Li-Jun; Li, Ze-Min; Wang, Ze-Hua; Zhu, Liang; Gong, Ya-Jun; Chen, Min; Wei, Shu-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Recent improvements in next-generation sequencing technologies have enabled investigation of microsatellites on a genome-wide scale. Faced with a huge amount of candidates, the use of appropriate marker selection criteria is crucial. Here, we used the western flower thrips Frankliniella occidentalis for an empirical microsatellite survey and validation; 132,251 candidate microsatellites were identified, 92,102 of which were perfect. Dinucleotides were the most abundant category, while (AG)n was the most abundant motif. Sixty primer pairs were designed and validated in two natural populations, of which 30 loci were polymorphic, stable, and repeatable, but not all in Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) and linkage equilibrium. Four marker panels were constructed to understand effect of marker selection on population genetic analyses: (i) only accept loci with single nucleotide insertions (SNI); (ii) only accept the most polymorphic loci (MP); (iii) only accept loci that did not deviate from HWE, did not show SNIs, and had unambiguous peaks (SS) and (iv) all developed markers (ALL). Although the MP panel resulted in microsatellites of highest genetic diversity followed by the SNI, the SS performed best in individual assignment. Our study proposes stringent criteria for selection of microsatellites from a large-scale number of genomic candidates for population genetic studies. PMID:27197749

  17. Development and characterization of microsatellite primers in the endangered Mediterranean shrub Ziziphus lotus (Rhamnaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    González-Robles, Ana; Manzaneda, Antonio J.; Bastida, Jesús M.; Harvey, Nick; Jaime, Rafael; Salido, Teresa; Martínez, Luisa M.; Fernández-Ocaña, Ana; Alcántara, Julio M.; Rey, Pedro J.

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite primers were developed to characterize and evaluate patterns of genetic diversity and structure in the endangered Mediterranean shrub Ziziphus lotus (Rhamnaceae). Methods and Results: Twenty microsatellite primers were developed for Z. lotus, of which 14 were polymorphic. We evaluated microsatellite polymorphism in 97 specimens from 18 Spanish and seven Moroccan populations. Between two and eight alleles were found per locus, and the average number of alleles was 5.54. Observed heterozygosity and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.08 to 0.90 and from 0.08 to 0.82, respectively. Nine of these primers also amplified microsatellite loci in Z. jujuba. Conclusions: The microsatellite markers described here will be useful in studies on genetic variation, population genetic structure, and gene flow in the fragmented habitat of this species. These markers are a valuable resource for designing appropriate conservation measures for the species in the Mediterranean range. PMID:28101436

  18. Characterization, development and multiplexing of microsatellite markers in three commercially exploited reef fish and their application for stock identification

    PubMed Central

    Dudgeon, Christine; Maher, Safia; Crook, David A.; Saunders, Thor M.; Barton, Diane P.; Taylor, Jonathan A.; Welch, David J.; Newman, Stephen J.; Travers, Michael J.; Saunders, Richard J.; Ovenden, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Thirty-four microsatellite loci were isolated from three reef fish species; golden snapper Lutjanus johnii, blackspotted croaker Protonibea diacanthus and grass emperor Lethrinus laticaudis using a next generation sequencing approach. Both IonTorrent single reads and Illumina MiSeq paired-end reads were used, with the latter demonstrating a higher quality of reads than the IonTorrent. From the 1–1.5 million raw reads per species, we successfully obtained 10–13 polymorphic loci for each species, which satisfied stringent design criteria. We developed multiplex panels for the amplification of the golden snapper and the blackspotted croaker loci, as well as post-amplification pooling panels for the grass emperor loci. The microsatellites characterized in this work were tested across three locations of northern Australia. The microsatellites we developed can detect population differentiation across northern Australia and may be used for genetic structure studies and stock identification. PMID:27635362

  19. Microsatellite markers for raspberry and blackberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    welve microsatellites were isolated from SSR-enriched genomic libraries of Rubus idaeus L.‘Meeker’ red raspberry (diploid) and R. loganobaccus L. H. Bailey ‘Marion’ blackberry-raspberry hybrid (hexaploid). These primer pairs, with the addition of one developed from a GenBank R. idaeus sequence, we...

  20. Microsatellite Markers for Raspberries and Blackberries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twelve microsatellites were isolated from SSR-enriched genomic libraries of Rubus idaeus L.‘Meeker’ red raspberry (diploid) and R. loganobaccus L. H. Bailey ‘Marion’ blackberry-raspberry hybrid (hexaploid). These primer pairs, with the addition of one developed from a GenBank R. idaeus sequence, w...

  1. Genetic diversity in Spanish donkey breeds using microsatellite DNA markers

    PubMed Central

    Aranguren-Méndez, José; Jordana, Jordi; Gomez, Mariano

    2001-01-01

    Genetic diversity at 13 equine microsatellite loci was compared in five endangered Spanish donkey breeds: Andaluza, Catalana, Mallorquina, Encartaciones and Zamorano-Leonesa. All of the equine microsatellites used in this study were amplified and were polymorphic in the domestic donkey breeds with the exception of HMS1, which was monomorphic, and ASB2, which failed to amplify. Allele number, frequency distributions and mean heterozygosities were very similar among the Spanish donkey breeds. The unbiased expected heterozygosity (HE) over all the populations varied between 0.637 and 0.684 in this study. The low GST value showed that only 3.6% of the diversity was between breeds (P < 0.01). Significant deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium were shown for a number of locus-population combinations, except HMS5 that showed agreement in all analysed populations. The cumulative exclusion probability (PE) was 0.999 in each breed, suggesting that the loci would be suitable for donkey parentage testing. The constructed dendrogram from the DA distance matrix showed little differentiation between Spanish breeds, but great differentiation between them and the Moroccan ass and also with the horse, used as an outgroup. These results confirm the potential use of equine microsatellite loci as a tool for genetic studies in domestic donkey populations, which could also be useful for conservation plans. PMID:11559485

  2. Analysis of microsatellites and parentage testing in saltwater crocodiles.

    PubMed

    Isberg, S R; Chen, Y; Barker, S G; Moran, C

    2004-01-01

    Fifteen microsatellite loci were evaluated in farmed saltwater crocodiles for use in parentage testing. One marker (C391) could not be amplied. For the remaining 14, the number of alleles per locus ranged from two to 16, and the observed heterozygosities ranged from 0.219 to 0.875. The cumulative exclusion probability for all 14 loci was .9988. the 11 loci that showed the greatest level of polymorphism were used for parentage testing, with an exclusion probability of .9980. With these 11 markers on 107 juveniles from 16 known breeding pairs, a 5.6% pedigree error rate was detected. This level of pedigree error, if consistent, could have an impact on the accuracy of gentic parameter and breeding value estimation. The usefulness of these markers was also evaluated for assigning parentage in situations where maternity, paternity, or both may not be known. In these situations, a 2% error in parentage assignment was predicted. It is therefore recommended that more micro-satellite markers be used in these situations. The use of these microsatellite markers will broaden the scope of a breeding program, allowing progeny to be tested from adults maintained in large breeding lagoons for selection as future breeding animals.

  3. Microsatellite instability in adenocarcinomas of the upper gastrointestinal tract. Relation to clinicopathological data and family history.

    PubMed Central

    Keller, G.; Rotter, M.; Vogelsang, H.; Bischoff, P.; Becker, K. F.; Mueller, J.; Brauch, H.; Siewert, J. R.; Höfler, H.

    1995-01-01

    We analyzed 66 adenocarcinomas arising in the upper gastrointestinal tract for microsatellite instability at eight microsatellite loci to investigate the role of these genetic alterations in the etiology of these tumors. We identified alterations in at least one locus in 11/46 adenocarcinomas of the stomach, in 2/15 adenocarcinomas arising in Barrett's esophagus, and in 1/5 adenocarcinomas of the duodenum and jejunum. Microsatellite instability in gastric tumors was found in 5/22 of intestinal, 1/3 of mixed, and 5/21 of diffuse type tumors. No relationship to the tumor stage (TNM), age, and survival time of the patients was observed. One patient had two synchronous gastric tumors both exhibiting microsatellite instability at multiple loci. His family history revealed four individuals in the maternal line afflicted with gastric carcinoma in three generations. Our data show that microsatellite instability is a genetic event in 11 to 24% of tumors of the upper gastrointestinal tract. The observation of microsatellite instability and a familial clustering of gastric tumors may suggest a genetic predisposition for a subset of gastric tumors, which may be identified by microsatellite analysis. Images Figure 1 PMID:7677173

  4. Detection of outlier loci and their utility for fisheries management.

    PubMed

    Russello, Michael A; Kirk, Stephanie L; Frazer, Karen K; Askey, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    Genetics-based approaches have informed fisheries management for decades, yet remain challenging to implement within systems involving recently diverged stocks or where gene flow persists. In such cases, genetic markers exhibiting locus-specific ('outlier') effects associated with divergent selection may provide promising alternatives to loci that reflect genome-wide ('neutral') effects for guiding fisheries management. Okanagan Lake kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka), a fishery of conservation concern, exhibits two sympatric ecotypes adapted to different reproductive environments; however, previous research demonstrated the limited utility of neutral microsatellites for assigning individuals. Here, we investigated the efficacy of an outlier-based approach to fisheries management by screening >11 000 expressed sequence tags for linked microsatellites and conducting genomic scans for kokanee sampled across seven spawning sites. We identified eight outliers among 52 polymorphic loci that detected ecotype-level divergence, whereas there was no evidence of divergence at neutral loci. Outlier loci exhibited the highest self-assignment accuracy to ecotype (92.1%), substantially outperforming 44 neutral loci (71.8%). Results were robust among-sampling years, with assignment and mixed composition estimates for individuals sampled in 2010 mirroring baseline results. Overall, outlier loci constitute promising alternatives for informing fisheries management involving recently diverged stocks, with potential applications for designating management units across a broad range of taxa.

  5. Genetic diversity and genetic structure of consecutive breeding generations of golden mandarin fish (Siniperca scherzeri Steindachner) using microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Luo, X N; Yang, M; Liang, X F; Jin, K; Lv, L Y; Tian, C X; Yuan, Y C; Sun, J

    2015-09-25

    In this study, 12 polymorphic microsatellites were inves-tigated to determine the genetic diversity and structure of 5 consecu-tive selected populations of golden mandarin fish (Siniperca scherzeri Steindachner). The total numbers of alleles, average heterozyosity, and average polymorphism information content showed that the genetic diversity of these breeding populations was decreasing. Additionally, pairwise fixation index FST values among populations and Da values in-creased from F1 generation to subsequent generations (FST values from 0.0221-0.1408; Da values from 0.0608-0.1951). Analysis of molecular variance indicated that most genetic variations arise from individuals within populations (about 92.05%), while variation among populations accounted for only 7.95%. The allele frequency of the loci SC75-220 and SC101-222 bp changed regularly in the 5 breeding generations. Their frequencies were gradually increased and showed an enrichment trend, indicating that there may be genetic correlations between these 2 loci and breeding traits. Our study indicated that microsatellite markers are effective for assessing the genetic variability in the golden mandarin fish breeding program.

  6. Rarity of microsatellite genomic instability in B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas in hepatitis C virus-infected patients.

    PubMed

    De Vita, S; Gasparotto, D; Pivetta, B; Vukosavljevic, T; Zagonel, V; Carbone, A; Boiocchi, M

    1997-05-01

    Several groups have emphasized the likely implication of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) in a fraction of B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Since only a minority of patients with HCV infection and monoclonal mixed cryoglobulinaemia develop overt lymphoma, the identification of predisposing factors has relevant clinical implications. The replication error phenotype (RER+), as revealed by widespread microsatellite instability, is caused by defects in DNA mismatch repair genes, and has been frequently disclosed in subsets of B-cell lymphomas with underlying infection and chronic inflammation. We therefore investigated the occurrence of the RER+ phenotype in a series of eight consecutive B-cell NHLs in patients with chronic infection by HCV. A polymerase chain reaction-based assay was used to analyse an extended panel of 15 microsatellite loci. Microsatellite instability was not observed in six tumour samples in any locus; the two remaining cases showed instability at only one locus. Therefore genetic instability by defects in DNA mismatch repair genes should not represent the general mechanism predisposing to overt lymphoma in HCV-infected patients. Although a clearer definition of HCV-related B-cell disorders should better address future studies on genetic instability in larger series, we recommend additional oncogenetic pathways as the target of further research.

  7. Conserved microsatellites in ants enable population genetic and colony pedigree studies across a wide range of species.

    PubMed

    Butler, Ian A; Siletti, Kimberly; Oxley, Peter R; Kronauer, Daniel J C

    2014-01-01

    Broadly applicable polymorphic genetic markers are essential tools for population genetics, and different types of markers have been developed for this purpose. Microsatellites have been employed as particularly polymorphic markers for over 20 years. However, PCR primers for microsatellite loci are often not useful outside the species for which they were designed. This implies that a new set of loci has to be identified and primers developed for every new study species. To overcome this constraint, we identified 45 conserved microsatellite loci based on the eight currently available ant genomes and designed primers for PCR amplification. Among these loci, we chose 24 for in-depth study in six species covering six different ant subfamilies. On average, 11.16 of these 24 loci were polymorphic and in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in any given species. The average number of alleles for these polymorphic loci within single populations of the different species was 4.59. This set of genetic markers will thus be useful for population genetic and colony pedigree studies across a wide range of ant species, supplementing the markers available for previously studied species and greatly facilitating the study of the many ant species lacking genetic markers. Our study shows that it is possible to develop microsatellite loci that are both conserved over a broad range of taxa, yet polymorphic within species. This should encourage researchers to develop similar tools for other large taxonomic groups.

  8. Conserved Microsatellites in Ants Enable Population Genetic and Colony Pedigree Studies across a Wide Range of Species

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Ian A.; Siletti, Kimberly; Oxley, Peter R.; Kronauer, Daniel J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Broadly applicable polymorphic genetic markers are essential tools for population genetics, and different types of markers have been developed for this purpose. Microsatellites have been employed as particularly polymorphic markers for over 20 years. However, PCR primers for microsatellite loci are often not useful outside the species for which they were designed. This implies that a new set of loci has to be identified and primers developed for every new study species. To overcome this constraint, we identified 45 conserved microsatellite loci based on the eight currently available ant genomes and designed primers for PCR amplification. Among these loci, we chose 24 for in-depth study in six species covering six different ant subfamilies. On average, 11.16 of these 24 loci were polymorphic and in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in any given species. The average number of alleles for these polymorphic loci within single populations of the different species was 4.59. This set of genetic markers will thus be useful for population genetic and colony pedigree studies across a wide range of ant species, supplementing the markers available for previously studied species and greatly facilitating the study of the many ant species lacking genetic markers. Our study shows that it is possible to develop microsatellite loci that are both conserved over a broad range of taxa, yet polymorphic within species. This should encourage researchers to develop similar tools for other large taxonomic groups. PMID:25244681

  9. Development and Characterization of Microsatellite Markers for the Cape Gooseberry Physalis peruviana

    PubMed Central

    Simbaqueba, Jaime; Sánchez, Pilar; Sanchez, Erika; Núñez Zarantes, Victor Manuel; Chacon, Maria Isabel; Barrero, Luz Stella; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo

    2011-01-01

    Physalis peruviana, commonly known as Cape gooseberry, is an Andean Solanaceae fruit with high nutritional value and interesting medicinal properties. In the present study we report the development and characterization of microsatellite loci from a P. peruviana commercial Colombian genotype. We identified 932 imperfect and 201 perfect Simple Sequence Repeats (SSR) loci in untranslated regions (UTRs) and 304 imperfect and 83 perfect SSR loci in coding regions from the assembled Physalis peruviana leaf transcriptome. The UTR SSR loci were used for the development of 162 primers for amplification. The efficiency of these primers was tested via PCR in a panel of seven P. peruviana accessions including Colombia, Kenya and Ecuador ecotypes and one closely related species Physalis floridana. We obtained an amplification rate of 83% and a polymorphic rate of 22%. Here we report the first P. peruviana specific microsatellite set, a valuable tool for a wide variety of applications, including functional diversity, conservation and improvement of the species. PMID:22039540

  10. A Novel Approach for Characterizing Microsatellite Instability in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuheng; Soong, T. David; Elemento, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) is characterized by the expansion or contraction of DNA repeat tracts as a consequence of DNA mismatch repair deficiency (MMRD). Accurate detection of MSI in cancer cells is important since MSI is associated with several cancer subtypes and can help inform therapeutic decisions. Although experimental assays have been developed to detect MSI, they typically depend on a small number of known microsatellite loci or mismatch repair genes and have limited reliability. Here, we report a novel genome-wide approach for MSI detection based on the global detection of insertions and deletions (indels) in microsatellites found in expressed genes. Our large-scale analyses of 20 cancer cell lines and 123 normal individuals revealed striking indel features associated with MSI: there is a significant increase of short microsatellite deletions in MSI samples compared to microsatellite stable (MSS) ones, suggesting a mechanistic bias of repair efficiency between insertions and deletions in normal human cells. By incorporating this observation into our MSI scoring metric, we show that our approach can correctly distinguish between MSI and MSS cancer cell lines. Moreover, when we applied this approach to primal tumor samples, our metric is also well consistent with diagnosed MSI status. Thus, our study offers new insight into DNA mismatch repair system, and also provides a novel MSI diagnosis method for clinical oncology with better reliability. PMID:23671654

  11. Microsatellite primers for Camissoniopsis cheiranthifolia (Onagraceae) and cross-amplification in related species1

    PubMed Central

    López-Villalobos, Adriana; Samis, Karen E.; Eckert, Christopher G.

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: We developed 24 nuclear microsatellite primers from an enriched genomic library for the Pacific coastal dune endemic Camissoniopsis cheiranthifolia to study the consequences of mating system differentiation, the genetics of species’ range limits, and hybridization with its closest sister taxon, C. bistorta. • Methods and Results: Twenty-four primer pairs were developed and characterized in four populations of C. cheiranthifolia and one population of C. bistorta. We also tested eight additional taxa for cross-amplification. The average number of alleles per locus per species was 4.3 and 6.0, respectively. The number of loci that amplified and were variable within the eight related taxa ranged from six to 17. • Conclusions: These markers will be useful in studying mating system evolution, the genetic structure of species’ ranges, hybridization, and the provenance of material used for habitat restoration in C. cheiranthifolia, C. bistorta, and related species. PMID:25309839

  12. Stronger transferability but lower variability in transcriptomic- than in anonymous microsatellites: evidence from Hylid frogs.

    PubMed

    Dufresnes, Christophe; Brelsford, Alan; Béziers, Paul; Perrin, Nicolas

    2014-07-01

    A simple way to quickly optimize microsatellites in nonmodel organisms is to reuse loci available in closely related taxa; however, this approach can be limited by the stochastic and low cross-amplification success experienced in some groups (e.g. amphibians). An efficient alternative is to develop loci from transcriptome sequences. Transcriptomic microsatellites have been found to vary in their levels of cross-species amplification and variability, but this has to date never been tested in amphibians. Here, we compare the patterns of cross-amplification and levels of polymorphism of 18 published anonymous microsatellites isolated from genomic DNA vs. 17 loci derived from a transcriptome, across nine species of tree frogs (Hyla arborea and Hyla cinerea group). We established a clear negative relationship between divergence time and amplification success, which was much steeper for anonymous than transcriptomic markers, with half-lives (time at which 50% of the markers still amplify) of 1.1 and 37 My, respectively. Transcriptomic markers are significantly less polymorphic than anonymous loci, but remain variable across diverged taxa. We conclude that the exploitation of amphibian transcriptomes for developing microsatellites seems an optimal approach for multispecies surveys (e.g. analyses of hybrid zones, comparative linkage mapping), whereas anonymous microsatellites may be more informative for fine-scale analyses of intraspecific variation. Moreover, our results confirm the pattern that microsatellite cross-amplification is greatly variable among amphibians and should be assessed independently within target lineages. Finally, we provide a bank of microsatellites for Palaearctic tree frogs (so far only available for H. arborea), which will be useful for conservation and evolutionary studies in this radiation.

  13. Polymorphic microsatellite markers for the striped skunk, Mephitis mephitis, and other mephitids.

    PubMed

    Dragoo, Jerry W; Coan, Kathryn E; Moore, Kristin A; Henke, Scott E; Fleischer, Robert C; Wisely, Samantha M

    2009-01-01

    We report 10 polymorphic microsatellite loci primers developed for striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis), a widespread mesocarnivore in North America. Numbers of alleles in these loci ranged from seven to 14 and the observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.76 to 1.0. These primers will be useful for studying population dynamics of skunks where rabies is endemic and will be useful to estimate genetic relatedness among females sharing winter dens. Most of these primers amplify across species within the Mephitidae.

  14. Coding Microsatellite Frameshift Mutations Accumulate in Atherosclerotic Carotid Artery Lesions: Evaluation of 26 Cases and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Carolin; Hakimi, Maani; Kloor, Matthias; Grond-Ginsbach, Caspar; Gross-Weissmann, Marie-Luise; Böckler, Dittmar; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Dihlmann, Susanne

    2015-06-09

    Somatic DNA alterations are known to occur in atherosclerotic carotid artery lesions; however, their significance is unknown. The accumulation of microsatellite mutations in coding DNA regions may reflect a deficiency of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system. Alternatively, accumulation of these coding microsatellite mutations may indicate that they contribute to the pathology. To discriminate between these two possibilities, we compared the mutation frequencies in coding microsatellites (likely functionally relevant) with those in noncoding microsatellites (likely neutral). Genomic DNA was isolated from carotid endarterectomy (CEA) specimens of 26 patients undergoing carotid surgery and from 15 nonatherosclerotic control arteries. Samples were analyzed by DNA fragment analysis for instability at three noncoding (BAT25, BAT26, CAT25) and five coding (AIM2, ACVR2, BAX, CASP5, TGFBR2) microsatellite loci, with proven validity for detection of microsatellite instability in neoplasms. We found an increased frequency of coding microsatellite mutations in CEA specimens compared with control specimens (34.6 versus 0%; p = 0.0013). Five CEA specimens exhibited more than one frameshift mutation, and ACVR2 and CASP5 were affected most frequently (5/26 and 6/26). Moreover, the rate of coding microsatellite alterations (15/130) differed significantly from that of noncoding alterations (0/78) in CEA specimens (p = 0.0013). In control arteries, no microsatellite alterations were observed, neither in coding nor in noncoding microsatellite loci. In conclusion, the specific accumulation of coding mutations suggests that these mutations play a role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic carotid lesions, since the absence of mutations in noncoding microsatellites argues against general microsatellite instability, reflecting MMR deficiency.

  15. Characterization and transferability of microsatellite markers of the cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea)

    PubMed Central

    Gimenes, Marcos A; Hoshino, Andrea A; Barbosa, Andrea VG; Palmieri, Dario A; Lopes, Catalina R

    2007-01-01

    Background The genus Arachis includes Arachis hypogaea (cultivated peanut) and wild species that are used in peanut breeding or as forage. Molecular markers have been employed in several studies of this genus, but microsatellite markers have only been used in few investigations. Microsatellites are very informative and are useful to assess genetic variability, analyze mating systems and in genetic mapping. The objectives of this study were to develop A. hypogaea microsatellite loci and to evaluate the transferability of these markers to other Arachis species. Results Thirteen loci were isolated and characterized using 16 accessions of A. hypogaea. The level of variation found in A. hypogaea using microsatellites was higher than with other markers. Cross-transferability of the markers was also high. Sequencing of the fragments amplified using the primer pair Ah11 from 17 wild Arachis species showed that almost all wild species had similar repeated sequence to the one observed in A. hypogaea. Sequence data suggested that there is no correlation between taxonomic relationship of a wild species to A. hypogaea and the number of repeats found in its microsatellite loci. Conclusion These results show that microsatellite primer pairs from A. hypogaea have multiple uses. A higher level of variation among A. hypogaea accessions can be detected using microsatellite markers in comparison to other markers, such as RFLP, RAPD and AFLP. The microsatellite primers of A. hypogaea showed a very high rate of transferability to other species of the genus. These primer pairs provide important tools to evaluate the genetic variability and to assess the mating system in Arachis species. PMID:17326826

  16. Identification and Evaluation of 21 Novel Microsatellite Markers from the Autumnal Moth (Epirrita autumnata) (Lepidoptera: Geometridae)

    PubMed Central

    Aarnes, Siv Grethe; Fløystad, Ida; Schregel, Julia; Vindstad, Ole Petter Laksforsmo; Jepsen, Jane Uhd; Eiken, Hans Geir; Ims, Rolf A.; Hagen, Snorre B.

    2015-01-01

    The autumnal moth (Epirrita autumnata) is a cyclically outbreaking forest Lepidoptera with circumpolar distribution and substantial impact on Northern ecosystems. We have isolated 21 microsatellites from the species to facilitate population genetic studies of population cycles, outbreaks, and crashes. First, PCR primers and PCR conditions were developed to amplify 19 trinucleotide loci and two tetranucleotide loci in six multiplex PCR approaches and then analyzed for species specificity, sensitivity and precision. Twelve of the loci showed simple tandem repeat array structures while nine loci showed imperfect repeat structures, and repeat numbers varied in our material between six and 15. The application in population genetics for all the 21 microsatellites were further validated in 48 autumnal moths sampled from Northern Norway, and allelic variation was detected in 19 loci. The detected numbers of alleles per locus ranged from two to 13, and the observed and expected heterozygosities varied from 0.04 to 0.69 and 0.04 to 0.79, respectively. Evidence for linkage disequilibrium was found for six loci as well as indication of one null allele. We find that these novel microsatellites and their multiplex-PCR assays are suitable for further research on fine- and large-scale population-genetic studies of Epirrita autumnata. PMID:26393576

  17. Identification and Evaluation of 21 Novel Microsatellite Markers from the Autumnal Moth (Epirrita autumnata) (Lepidoptera: Geometridae).

    PubMed

    Aarnes, Siv Grethe; Fløystad, Ida; Schregel, Julia; Vindstad, Ole Petter Laksforsmo; Jepsen, Jane Uhd; Eiken, Hans Geir; Ims, Rolf A; Hagen, Snorre B

    2015-09-17

    The autumnal moth (Epirrita autumnata) is a cyclically outbreaking forest Lepidoptera with circumpolar distribution and substantial impact on Northern ecosystems. We have isolated 21 microsatellites from the species to facilitate population genetic studies of population cycles, outbreaks, and crashes. First, PCR primers and PCR conditions were developed to amplify 19 trinucleotide loci and two tetranucleotide loci in six multiplex PCR approaches and then analyzed for species specificity, sensitivity and precision. Twelve of the loci showed simple tandem repeat array structures while nine loci showed imperfect repeat structures, and repeat numbers varied in our material between six and 15. The application in population genetics for all the 21 microsatellites were further validated in 48 autumnal moths sampled from Northern Norway, and allelic variation was detected in 19 loci. The detected numbers of alleles per locus ranged from two to 13, and the observed and expected heterozygosities varied from 0.04 to 0.69 and 0.04 to 0.79, respectively. Evidence for linkage disequilibrium was found for six loci as well as indication of one null allele. We find that these novel microsatellites and their multiplex-PCR assays are suitable for further research on fine- and large-scale population-genetic studies of Epirrita autumnata.

  18. Microsatellite markers for the yam bean Pachyrhizus (Fabaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Delêtre, Marc; Soengas, Beatriz; Utge, José; Lambourdière, Josie; Sørensen, Marten

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Microsatellite loci were developed for the understudied root crop yam bean (Pachyrhizus spp.) to investigate intraspecific diversity and interspecific relationships within the genus Pachyrhizus. • Methods and Results: Seventeen nuclear simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers with perfect di- and trinucleotide repeats were developed from 454 pyrosequencing of SSR-enriched genomic libraries. Loci were characterized in P. ahipa and wild and cultivated populations of four closely related species. All loci successfully cross-amplified and showed high levels of polymorphism, with number of alleles ranging from three to 12 and expected heterozygosity ranging from 0.095 to 0.831 across the genus. • Conclusions: By enabling rapid assessment of genetic diversity in three native neotropical crops, P. ahipa, P. erosus, and P. tuberosus, and two wild relatives, P. ferrugineus and P. panamensis, these markers will allow exploration of the genetic diversity and evolutionary history of the genus Pachyrhizus. PMID:25202568

  19. Differential patterns of spatial divergence in microsatellite and allozyme alleles: further evidence for locus-specific selection in the acorn barnacle, Semibalanus balanoides?

    PubMed

    Dufresne, F; Bourget, E; Bernatchez, L

    2002-01-01

    We compared patterns of genetic structure at potentially selected (two allozyme loci) and neutral molecular markers (six microsatellite loci) in the acorn barnacle, Semibalanus balanoides from the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Our results confirmed the presence of a geographical shift in alleles MPI and GPI near the Miramichi River. In contrast, no significant patterns of population differentiation among samples located north and south of the river mouth were detected for four of six microsatellite loci. However, analysis of molecular variance (amova) at individual loci revealed that a significant proportion of the total variance in allele frequencies was partitioned among samples located north and south of the river for both the allozyme and the other two microsatellite loci. The two most common alleles at these microsatellites showed frequencies that were highly correlated (r = 0.65-0.74, P < 0.05) with those of the MPI*2 allele, perhaps because of either physical linkage or epistasis. The two allozyme loci were significantly correlated in barnacles located north of the Miramichi River (r = 0.86, P < 0.05). Overall, our results supported the hypothesis that the broad scale pattern of allozyme allelic shifts is maintained by selection. They also indicated that microsatellites may not always behave in a neutral way and must be used cautiously, especially when evidence for genetic structuring relies on only a few assayed loci.

  20. The effects of read length, quality and quantity on microsatellite discovery and primer development: from Illumina to PacBio.

    PubMed

    Wei, Na; Bemmels, Jordan B; Dick, Christopher W

    2014-09-01

    The advent of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies has transformed the way microsatellites are isolated for ecological and evolutionary investigations. Recent attempts to employ NGS for microsatellite discovery have used the 454, Illumina, and Ion Torrent platforms, but other methods including single-molecule real-time DNA sequencing (Pacific Biosciences or PacBio) remain viable alternatives. We outline a workflow from sequence quality control to microsatellite marker validation in three plant species using PacBio circular consensus sequencing (CCS). We then evaluate the performance of PacBio CCS in comparison with other NGS platforms for microsatellite isolation, through simulations that focus on variations in read length, read quantity and sequencing error rate. Although quality control of CCS reads reduced microsatellite yield by around 50%, hundreds of microsatellite loci that are expected to have improved conversion efficiency to functional markers were retrieved for each species. The simulations quantitatively validate the advantages of long reads and emphasize the detrimental effects of sequencing errors on NGS-enabled microsatellite development. In view of the continuing improvement in read length on NGS platforms, sequence quality and the corresponding strategies of quality control will become the primary factors to consider for effective microsatellite isolation. Among current options, PacBio CCS may be optimal for rapid, small-scale microsatellite development due to its flexibility in scaling sequencing effort, while platforms such as Illumina MiSeq will provide cost-efficient solutions for multispecies microsatellite projects.

  1. Population structuring of the ubiquitous stingless bee Tetragonisca angustula in southern Brazil as revealed by microsatellite and mitochondrial markers.

    PubMed

    Francisco, Flávio O; Santiago, Leandro R; Mizusawa, Yuri M; Oldroyd, Benjamin P; Arias, Maria C

    2016-06-23

    Tetragonisca angustula is one of the most widespread stingless bees in the Neotropics. This species swarms frequently and is extremely successful in urban environments. In addition, it is one of the most popular stingless bee species for beekeeping in Latin America, so nest transportation and trading is common. Nest transportation can change the genetic structure of the host population, reducing inbreeding and increasing homogenization. Here, we evaluate the genetic structure of 17 geographic populations of T. angustula in southern Brazil to quantify the level of genetic differentiation between populations. Analyses were conducted on partially sequenced mitochondrial genes and 11 microsatellite loci of 1002 workers from 457 sites distributed on the mainland and on 3 islands. Our results show that T. angustula populations are highly differentiated as demonstrated by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and microsatellite markers. Of 73 haplotypes, 67 were population-specific. MtDNA diversity was low in 9 populations but microsatellite diversity was moderate to high in all populations. Microsatellite data suggest 10 genetic clusters and low level of gene flow throughout the studied area. However, physical barriers, such as rivers and mountain ranges, or the presence or absence of forest appear to be unrelated to population clusters. Factors such as low dispersal, different ecological conditions, and isolation by distance are most likely shaping the population structure of this species. Thus far, nest transportation has not influenced the general population structure in the studied area. However, due to the genetic structure we found, we recommend that nest transportation should only occur within and between populations that are genetically similar.

  2. A Microsatellite Genetic Linkage Map for Xiphophorus

    PubMed Central

    Walter, R. B.; Rains, J. D.; Russell, J. E.; Guerra, T. M.; Daniels, C.; Johnston, Dennis A.; Kumar, Jay; Wheeler, A.; Kelnar, K.; Khanolkar, V. A.; Williams, E. L.; Hornecker, J. L.; Hollek, L.; Mamerow, M. M.; Pedroza, A.; Kazianis, S.

    2004-01-01

    Interspecies hybrids between distinct species of the genus Xiphophorus are often used in varied research investigations to identify genomic regions associated with the inheritance of complex traits. There are 24 described Xiphophorus species and a greater number of pedigreed strains; thus, the number of potential interspecies hybrid cross combinations is quite large. Previously, select Xiphophorus experimental crosses have been shown to exhibit differing characteristics between parental species and among the hybrid fishes derived from crossing them, such as widely differing susceptibilities to chemical or physical agents. For instance, genomic regions harboring tumor suppressor and oncogenes have been identified via linkage association of these loci with a small set of established genetic markers. The power of this experimental strategy is related to the number of genetic markers available in the Xiphophorus interspecies cross of interest. Thus, we have undertaken the task of expanding the suite of easily scored markers by characterization of Xiphophorus microsatellite sequences. Using a cross between Xiphophorus maculatus and X. andersi, we report a linkage map predominantly composed of microsatellite markers. All 24 acrocentric chromosome sets of Xiphophorus are represented in the assembled linkage map with an average intergenomic distance of 7.5 cM. Since both male and female F1 hybrids were used to produce backcross progeny, these recombination rates were compared between “male” and “female” maps. Although several genomic regions exhibit differences in map length, male- and female-derived maps are similar. Thus Xiphophorus, in contrast to zebrafish, Danio rerio, and several other vertebrate species, does not show sex-specific differences in recombination. The microsatellite markers we report can be easily adapted to any Xiphophorus interspecies and some intraspecies crosses, and thus provide a means to directly compare results derived from independent

  3. Microsatellite variation in the Australian dingo.

    PubMed

    Wilton, A N; Steward, D J; Zafiris, K

    1999-01-01

    The dingo is thought to have arrived in Australia from Asia about 5,000 years ago. It is currently in danger because of interbreeding with domestic dogs. Several morphological, behavioral, and reproductive characteristics distinguish dingoes from domestic dog. Skull morphometrics are currently used to try to classify wild canids as pure dingo, dog, or hybrid. Molecular techniques based on diagnostic DNA differences between dogs and dingoes would make a much more reliable and practical test. A small number of markers (about 10) would allow detection of animals with domestic dog in their ancestry several generations back. We have typed 16 dingoes and 16 dogs of mixed breed for 14 microsatellites. The amount of variation in the Australian dingo is much less than in domestic dogs. The size distributions of microsatellites in the two groups usually overlap. The number of alleles in the dingo is much smaller in all cases. One dinucleotide repeat locus shows a size difference of 1 bp in allele classes between dog and dingo. This locus may be diagnostic for dog or dingo ancestry. The differences in distributions of alleles at other loci can also be used to classify animals using a likelihood method.

  4. Differentiation among Spanish sheep breeds using microsatellites

    PubMed Central

    Arranz, Juan-José; Bayón, Yolanda; Primitivo, Fermín San

    2001-01-01

    Genetic variability at 18 microsatellites was analysed on the basis of individual genotypes in five Spanish breeds of sheep – Churra, Latxa, Castellana, Rasa-Aragonesa and Merino -, with Awassi also being studied as a reference breed. The degree of population subdivision calculated between Spanish breeds from FST diversity indices was around 7% of total variability. A high degree of reliability was obtained for individual-breed assignment from the 18 loci by using different approaches among which the Bayesian method provided to be the most efficient, with an accuracy for nine microsatellites of over 99%. Analysis of the Bayesian assignment criterion illustrated the divergence between any one breed and the others, which was highest for Awassi sheep, while no great differences were evident among the Spanish breeds. Relationships between individuals were analysed from the proportion of shared alleles. The resulting dendrogram showed a remarkable breed structure, with the highest level of clustering among members of the Spanish breeds in Latxa and the lowest in Merino sheep, the latter breed exhibiting a peculiar pattern of clustering, with animals grouped into several closely set nodes. Analysis of individual genotypes provided valuable information for understanding intra- and inter-population genetic differences and allowed for a discussion with previously reported results using populations as taxonomic units. PMID:11712973

  5. Microsatellite primer resource for Populus developed from

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Tongming; Yang, Xiaohan; Gunter, Lee E; Tuskan, Gerald A; Wullschleger, Stan D; Huang, Prof. Minren; Li, Shuxian; Zhang, Xinye

    2008-01-01

    In this study, 148 428 simple sequence repeat (SSR) primer pairs were designed from the unambiguously mapped sequence scaffolds of the Nisqually-1 genome. The physical position of the priming sites were identified along each of the 19 Populus chromosomes, and it was specified whether the priming sequences belong to intronic, intergenic, exonic or UTR regions. A subset of 150 SSR loci were amplified and a high amplification success rate (72%) was obtained in P. tremuloides, which belongs to a divergent subgenus of Populus relative to Nisqually-1. PCR reactions showed that the amplification success rate of exonic primer pairs was much higher than that of the intronic/intergenic primer pairs. Applying ANOVA and regression analyses to the flanking sequences of microsatellites, the repeat lengths, the GC contents of the repeats, the repeat motif numbers, the repeat motif length and the base composition of the repeat motif, it was determined that only the base composition of the repeat motif and the repeat motif length significantly affect the microsatellite variability in P. tremuloides samples. The SSR primer resource developed in this study provides a database for selecting highly transferable SSR markers with known physical position in the Populus genome and provides a comprehensive genetic tool to extend the genome sequence of Nisqually-1 to genetic studies in different Populus species.

  6. Perils of gene mapping with microsatellite markers

    SciTech Connect

    Knowles, J.A.; Gilliam, T.C. ); Vieland, V.J. )

    1992-10-01

    The discovery of microsatellite polymorphisms has revitalized the genetic mapping of the human genome and promises to have a dramatic effect on human disease gene mapping. The high polymorphicity, relative abundance, and amenability of these markers to assay by PCR amplification gives them a significant advantage over previous markers, which explains their general acceptance and widespread use (Litt and Luty 1989; Weber and May 1989). Preliminary chromosome maps have been constructed using microsatellites exclusively (Weber et al. 1991; Hazen et al. 1992; Kwiatkowski et al. 1992), and disease loci have been mapped by linkage to these markers (Wijmenga et al. 1991). The markers provide new optimism for the mapping of disease genes, particularly for the mapping of complex genetic disorders. The authors present evidence that the very qualities that render these markers so efficient for chromosome mapping in large reference pedigrees can lead to dramatic lod score bias when applied to the typical pedigrees used to study genetic disorders, particularly when the disorder under study is complex. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Microsatellites in the endangered species Dyckia distachya (Bromeliaceae) and cross-amplification in other bromeliads.

    PubMed

    Zanella, Camila M; Janke, Aline; Paggi, Gecele M; Goetze, Márcia; Reis, Mauricio S; Bered, Fernanda

    2012-11-27

    Microsatellite markers were isolated in Dyckia distachya, an endangered bromeliad from southern Brazil, which will be useful to assess the population genetic structure and reproductive success in introduced and natural populations of this species. Twenty microsatellite loci were developed from an enriched genomic library, and nine of these were amplified. The loci were characterized in 43 individuals from introduced and wild D. distachya populations. All nine loci were polymorphic, with four to ten alleles per locus. In an introduced population the observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.136-0.667 and 0.543-0.877, respectively, while in a wild population it ranged from 0.000 to 0.895 and from 0.050 to 0.811, respectively. The development of these microsatellite markers will contribute to investigations of the reproductive potential and viability of introduced populations of D. distachya as well as the single known wild population. Cross-amplification in other Bromeliaceae species was successful, with high rates in four loci, demonstrating the applicability of these microsatellite markers in other taxa.

  8. Microsatellites in the Endangered Species Dyckia distachya (Bromeliaceae) and Cross-Amplification in Other Bromeliads

    PubMed Central

    Zanella, Camila M.; Janke, Aline; Paggi, Gecele M.; Goetze, Márcia; Reis, Mauricio S.; Bered, Fernanda

    2012-01-01

    Microsatellite markers were isolated in Dyckia distachya, an endangered bromeliad from southern Brazil, which will be useful to assess the population genetic structure and reproductive success in introduced and natural populations of this species. Twenty microsatellite loci were developed from an enriched genomic library, and nine of these were amplified. The loci were characterized in 43 individuals from introduced and wild D. distachya populations. All nine loci were polymorphic, with four to ten alleles per locus. In an introduced population the observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.136–0.667 and 0.543–0.877, respectively, while in a wild population it ranged from 0.000 to 0.895 and from 0.050 to 0.811, respectively. The development of these microsatellite markers will contribute to investigations of the reproductive potential and viability of introduced populations of D. distachya as well as the single known wild population. Cross-amplification in other Bromeliaceae species was successful, with high rates in four loci, demonstrating the applicability of these microsatellite markers in other taxa. PMID:23443098

  9. What phylogeny and gene genealogy analyses reveal about homoplasy in citrus microsatellite alleles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sixty-five microsatellite alleles from three Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) loci (cAGG9, CCT01 and GT03) of various Citrus, Fortunella or Poncirus accessions were cloned and sequenced to determine their mode of evolution. This data was used to assess sequence variation by calculating the average numb...

  10. Microsatellite markers for the human nematode parasite Ascaris lumbricoides: development and assessment of utility.

    PubMed

    Criscione, Charles D; Anderson, Joel D; Raby, Kyle; Sudimack, Dan; Subedi, Janardan; Rai, Dev R; Upadhayay, Ram P; Jha, Bharat; Williams-Blangero, Sarah; Anderson, Timothy J C

    2007-06-01

    We describe 35 microsatellite markers from the human parasitic nematode Ascaris lumbricoides. We found 7 sex-linked markers and demonstrate that 26 autosomal loci can be scored reliably. These markers have high genetic variability and provide the tools to address multiple questions concerning the epidemiology, fine-scale genetic structure, host specificity, and mating systems of this parasite.

  11. A standardized microsatellite marker panel for parentage and kinship analyses in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This research was designed to produce a standardized set of microsatellite loci for parentage and kinship analyses in channel catfish, the leading species in U.S. aquaculture. Three panels of 5 to 6 markers each were developed that contained a total of 2 dinucleotide, 8 trinucleotide, and 7 tetranuc...

  12. Diallelic nuclear microsatellites for diversity and population analyses of the allotraploid creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nine diallelic nuclear microsatellite loci were characterized in creeping bentgrass, Agrostis stolonifera L. (2n=4x=28, A2A2A3A3). Markers were developed for analyses of diversity and population biology of A. stolonifera. They may also help with identification of germplasm resour...

  13. Characterization of twelve microsatellite markers for the native redbud tree (Cercis canadensis)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eight microsatellite DNA markers were developed for studies of gene flow in the redbud tree (Cercis canadensis), which is native to North America. The loci were unlinked and polymorphic in a sample of 22 individuals collected from a single population in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Allele number ranged fr...

  14. Microsatellites: Evolutionary and methodological background and empirical applications at individual, population, and phylogenetic levels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scribner, Kim T.; Pearce, John M.; Baker, Allan J.

    2000-01-01

    The recent proliferation and greater accessibility of molecular genetic markers has led to a growing appreciation of the ecological and evolutionary inferences that can be drawn from molecular characterizations of individuals and populations (Burke et al. 1992, Avise 1994). Different techniques have the ability to target DNA sequences which have different patterns of inheritance, different modes and rates of evolution and, concomitantly, different levels of variation. In the quest for 'the right marker for the right job', microsatellites have been widely embraced as the marker of choice for many empirical genetic studies. The proliferation of microsatellite loci for various species and the voluminous literature compiled in very few years associated with their evolution and use in various research applications, exemplifies their growing importance as a research tool in the biological sciences.The ability to define allelic states based on variation at the nucleotide level has afforded unparalleled opportunities to document the actual mutational process and rates of evolution at individual microsatellite loci. The scrutiny to which these loci have been subjected has resulted in data that raise issues pertaining to assumptions formerly stated, but largely untestable for other marker classes. Indeed this is an active arena for theoretical and empirical work. Given the extensive and ever-increasing literature on various statistical methodologies and cautionary notes regarding the uses of microsatellites, some consideration should be given to the unique characteristics of these loci when determining how and under what conditions they can be employed.

  15. Development of microsatellites from Fothergilla xintermedia (Hamamelidaceae) and cross transfer to four other genera within Hamamelidaceae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Premise of the study: Develop microsatellites from Fothergilla ×intermedia to establish loci capable of distinguishing species and cultivars, and assess genetic diversity for use by ornamental breeders, and for transfer within Hamamelidaceae. Methods and Results: A small insert genomic library enric...

  16. Identification of 24 polymorphic microsatellite markers for the double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus).

    PubMed

    Fike, Jennifer A; Devault, Travis L; Rhodes, Olin E

    2009-07-01

    Twenty-four polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed for the double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus). The number of alleles ranged from two to 13 and observed heterozygosities ranged from 0.032 to 0.871. The use of these loci should enable researchers and biologists to learn more about the population structure and ecology of this species.

  17. Development of novel microsatellite markers for strain-specific identification of Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Jo, Beom-Ho; Lee, Chang Soo; Song, Hae-Ryong; Lee, Hyung-Gwan; Oh, Hee-Mock

    2014-09-01

    A strain-specific identification method is required to secure Chlorella strains with useful genetic traits, such as a fast growth rate or high lipid productivity, for application in biofuels, functional foods, and pharmaceuticals. Microsatellite markers based on simple sequence repeats can be a useful tool for this purpose. Therefore, this study developed five novel microsatellite markers (mChl-001, mChl-002, mChl-005, mChl-011, and mChl-012) using specific loci along the chloroplast genome of Chlorella vulgaris. The microsatellite markers were characterized based on their allelic diversities among nine strains of C. vulgaris with the same 18S rRNA sequence similarity. Each microsatellite marker exhibited 2~5 polymorphic allele types, and their combinations allowed discrimination between seven of the C. vulgaris strains. The two remaining strains were distinguished using one specific interspace region between the mChl-001 and mChl-005 loci, which was composed of about 27 single nucleotide polymorphisms, 13~15 specific sequence sites, and (T)n repeat sites. Thus, the polymorphic combination of the five microsatellite markers and one specific locus facilitated a clear distinction of C. vulgaris at the strain level, suggesting that the proposed microsatellite marker system can be useful for the accurate identification and classification of C. vulgaris.

  18. Fourteen polymorphic microsatellite markers for the threatened Arnica montana (Asteraceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Duwe, Virginia K.; Ismail, Sascha A.; Buser, Andres; Sossai, Esther; Borsch, Thomas; Muller, Ludo A. H.

    2015-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were developed to investigate population genetic structure in the threatened species Arnica montana. • Methods and Results: Fourteen microsatellite markers with di-, tetra-, and hexanucleotide repeat motifs were developed for A. montana using 454 pyrosequencing without and with library-enrichment methods, resulting in 56,545 sequence reads and 14,467 sequence reads, respectively. All loci showed a high level of polymorphism, with allele numbers ranging from four to 11 in five individuals from five populations (25 samples) and an expected heterozygosity ranging from 0.192 to 0.648 across the loci. • Conclusions: This set of microsatellite markers is the first one described for A. montana and will facilitate conservation genetic applications as well as the understanding of phylogeographic patterns in this species. PMID:25606354

  19. Evidence of multiple paternity in Morelet's Crocodile (Crocodylus moreletii) in Belize, CA, inferred from microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    McVay, John D; Rodriguez, David; Rainwater, Thomas R; Dever, Jennifer A; Platt, Steven G; McMurry, Scott T; Forstner, Michael R J; Densmore, Llewellyn D

    2008-12-01

    Microsatellite data were generated from hatchlings collected from ten nests of Morelet's Crocodile (Crocodylus moreletii) from New River Lagoon and Gold Button Lagoon in Belize to test for evidence of multiple paternity. Nine microsatellite loci were genotyped for 188 individuals from the 10 nests, alongside 42 nonhatchlings from Gold Button Lagoon. Then mitochondrial control region sequences were generated for the nonhatchlings and for one individual from each nest to test for presence of C. acutus-like haplotypes. Analyses of five of the nine microsatellite loci revealed evidence that progeny from five of the ten nests were sired by at least two males. These data suggest the presence of multiple paternity as a mating strategy in the true crocodiles. This information may be useful in the application of conservation and management techniques to the 12 species in this genus, most of which are threatened or endangered.

  20. Characterization of polymorphic microsatellite markers in Pinus armandii (Pinaceae), an endemic conifer species to China1

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wan-Lin; Wang, Ruo-Nan; Yan, Xiao-Hao; Niu, Chuan; Gong, Lin-Lin; Li, Zhong-Hu

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Pinus armandii (Pinaceae) is an important conifer tree species in central and southwestern China, and it plays a key role in the local forest ecosystems. To investigate its population genetics and design effective conservation strategies, we characterized 18 polymorphic microsatellite markers for this species. Methods and Results: Eighteen novel polymorphic and 16 monomorphic microsatellite loci of P. armandii were isolated using Illumina MiSeq technology. The number of alleles per locus ranged from two to five. The expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.061 to 0.609 with an average of 0.384, and the observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.063 to 0.947 with an average of 0.436. Seventeen loci could be successfully transferred to five related Pinus species (P. koraiensis, P. griffithii, P. sibirica, P. pumila, and P. bungeana). Conclusions: These novel microsatellites could potentially be used to investigate the population genetics of P. armandii and related species. PMID:27785387

  1. No Variation at 29 Microsatellites in the Genome of Jatropha curcas.

    PubMed

    Yue, Gen Hua; Lo, Loong Chueng; Sun, Fei; Cao, Su Ying; Yi, Cheng Xin; Hong, Yan; Sun, Wei Bang

    2014-01-01

    Genetic variation in the genome of a given species is the basis for natural selection and genetic improvement through selective breeding. We applied 29 microsatellites located on 11 linkage groups to study genetic variation in 276 accessions of J. curcas collected from nine locations in five countries in South America, Asia and Africa to initiate a breeding program. To our surprise, we did not detect any genetic diversity at all 29 microsatellites loci. All the 276 accessions were homozygous at all loci and shared the same genotype at each locus, suggesting no microsatellite variation in the genome of Jatropha curcas. This result is quite unusual, and may have a profound influence on the breeding strategies and genome study of this species.

  2. Development of microsatellite markers using Illumina MiSeq sequencing to characterize Ephedra gerardiana (Ephedraceae)1

    PubMed Central

    De, Ji; Zhu, Weidong; Liu, Tianmeng; Wang, Zhe; Zhong, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Premise of the study: Ephedra gerardiana (Ephedraceae), occurring in the Himalayan ranges, is an important plant species used in Tibetan medicine. Due to the lack of molecular markers to characterize genetic diversity, knowledge for conservation and uses of E. gerardiana resources is limited; we therefore developed microsatellite markers for use in this species. Methods and Results: Using Illumina MiSeq sequencing technology, we developed 29 polymorphic microsatellite loci suitable for E. gerardiana, of which 15 loci also showed polymorphisms in two related Ephedra species, E. saxatilis and E. monosperma. The average number of effective alleles per locus ranged from two to six. The observed and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.23 to 0.83 and 0.44 to 0.86, respectively, in E. gerardiana populations. Conclusions: The developed 29 microsatellite markers are effective for the study of genetic structure and genetic diversity of E. gerardiana, and 15 of these markers are suitable for related Ephedra species. PMID:28337389

  3. Characterization of 35 novel microsatellite DNA markers from the duck (Anas platyrhynchos) genome and cross-amplification in other birds

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yinhua; Tu, Jianfeng; Cheng, Xuebo; Tang, Bo; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Liu, Zhaoliang; Feng, Jidong; Lou, Yankun; Lin, Li; Xu, Ke; Zhao, Yulong; Li, Ning

    2005-01-01

    In order to study duck microsatellites, we constructed a library enriched for (CA)n, (CAG)n, (GCC)n and (TTTC)n. A total of 35 pairs of primers from these microsatellites were developed and used to detect polymorphisms in 31 unrelated Peking ducks. Twenty-eight loci were polymorphic and seven loci were monomorphic. A total of 117 alleles were observed from these polymorphic microsatellite markers, which ranged from 2 to 14 with an average of 4.18 per locus. The frequencies of the 117 alleles ranged from 0.02 to 0.98. The highest heterozygosity (0.97) was observed at the CAUD019 microsatellite locus and the lowest heterozygosity (0.04) at the CAUD008 locus, and 11 loci had heterozygosities greater than 0.50 (46.43%). The polymorphism information content (PIC) of 28 loci ranged from 0.04 to 0.88 with an average of 0.42. All the above markers were used to screen the polymorphism in other bird species. Two markers produced specific monomorphic products with the chicken DNA. Fourteen markers generated specific fragments with the goose DNA: 5 were polymorphic and 9 were monomorphic. But no specific product was detected with the peacock DNA. Based on sequence comparisons of the flanking sequence and repeat, we conclude that 2 chicken loci and 14 goose loci were true homologous loci of the duck loci. The microsatellite markers identified and characterized in the present study will contribute to the genetic map, quantitative traits mapping, and phylogenetic analysis in the duck and goose. PMID:15943922

  4. The use of microsatellite variation to infer population structure and demographic history in a natural model system.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, D B; Roemer, G W; Smith, D A; Reich, D E; Bergman, A; Wayne, R K

    1999-02-01

    To assess the reliability of genetic markers it is important to compare inferences that are based on them to a priori expectations. In this article we present an analysis of microsatellite variation within and among populations of island foxes (Urocyon littoralis) on California's Channel Islands. We first show that microsatellite variation at a moderate number of loci (19) can provide an essentially perfect description of the boundaries between populations and an accurate representation of their historical relationships. We also show that the pattern of variation across unlinked microsatellite loci can be used to test whether population size has been constant or increasing. Application of these approaches to the island fox system indicates that microsatellite variation may carry considerably more information about population history than is currently being used.

  5. Polymorphic microsatellite DNA markers for the Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pause, K.C.; Nourisson, C.; Clark, A.; Kellogg, M.E.; Bonde, R.K.; McGuire, P.M.

    2007-01-01

    Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) are marine mammals that inhabit the coastal waters and rivers of the southeastern USA, primarily Florida. Previous studies have shown that Florida manatees have low mitochondrial DNA variability, suggesting that nuclear DNA loci are necessary for discriminatory analyses. Here we report 10 polymorphic microsatellite loci with an average of 4.2 alleles per locus, and average heterozygosity of 50.1%. These loci have been developed for use in population studies, parentage assignment, and individual identification. ?? 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Isolation, characterization and PCR multiplexing of polymorphic microsatellite markers in the edible dormouse, Glis glis.

    PubMed

    Hürner, H; Martin, J F; Ribas, A; Arrizabalaga, A; Michaux, J R

    2009-05-01

    We isolated and characterized 10 dinucleotide microsatellite loci in the edible dormouse, Glis glis (Linnaeus). Four multiplex panels were developed. Loci were amplified in samples from two geographically distant populations (Torgny in Belgium and Montseny in Spain). All loci were polymorphic in Spain but four were monomorphic in Belgium. Individuals from Belgium and Spain exhibited an average allelic diversity of 1.9 and 3.3 and an observed heterozygosity ranging from 0.08 to 0.47 and from 0.04 to 0.72, respectively.

  7. Genetic Distances and Reconstruction of Phylogenetic Trees from Microsatellite DNA

    PubMed Central

    Takezaki, N.; Nei, M.

    1996-01-01

    Recently many investigators have used microsatellite DNA loci for studying the evolutionary relationships of closely related populations or species, and some authors proposed new genetic distance measures for this purpose. However, the efficiencies of these distance measures in obtaining the correct tree topology remains unclear. We therefore investigated the probability of obtaining the correct topology (P(C)) for these new distances as well as traditional distance measures by using computer simulation. We used both the infinite-allele model (IAM) and the stepwise mutation model (SMM), which seem to be appropriate for classical markers and microsatellite loci, respectively. The results show that in both the IAM and SMM CAVALLI-SFORZA and EDWARDS' chord distance (D(C)) and NEI et al.'s D(A) distance generally show higher P(C) values than other distance measures, whether the bottleneck effect exists or not. For estimating evolutionary times, however, NEI's standard distance and GOLDSTEIN et al.'s (δ μ)(2) are more appropriate than other distances. Microsatellite DNA seems to be very useful for clarifying the evolutionary relationships of closely related populations. PMID:8878702

  8. Applicability of Next Generation Sequencing Technology in Microsatellite Instability Testing

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Chun; Love, Clare; Beshay, Victoria; Macrae, Finlay; Fox, Stephen; Waring, Paul; Taylor, Graham

    2015-01-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) is a useful marker for risk assessment, prediction of chemotherapy responsiveness and prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer. Here, we describe a next generation sequencing approach for MSI testing using the MiSeq platform. Different from other MSI capturing strategies that are based on targeted gene capture, we utilize “deep resequencing”, where we focus the sequencing on only the microsatellite regions of interest. We sequenced a series of 44 colorectal tumours with normal controls for five MSI loci (BAT25, BAT26, BAT34c4, D18S55, D5S346) and a second series of six colorectal tumours (no control) with two mononucleotide loci (BAT25, BAT26). In the first series, we were able to determine 17 MSI-High, 1 MSI-Low and 26 microsatellite stable (MSS) tumours. In the second series, there were three MSI-High and three MSS tumours. Although there was some variation within individual markers, this NGS method produced the same overall MSI status for each tumour, as obtained with the traditional multiplex PCR-based method. PMID:25685876

  9. Student's Microsatellite Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelentsov, Victor; Kopik, Anatoliy; Karpenko, Stanislav; Mayorova, Victoria

    2002-01-01

    Nowadays BMSTU Youth space center carries on development of the microsatellite project. The project is based on principles of students direct involvement on all stages of development and maintenance of the satellite. The group of students was organized within the university with purpose of coordination of work at the program. Project current condition The work on creation of an experimental model of the micro satellite is performed. The aim is to define the structure and parameters of on-board devices (mass-overall dimensions characteristics, energy consumption and so on). developed. According to the simplified model an active stabilization system (three orthogonal electro-magnetic coils) and orientation characterization system (sunlight detector and magnitometer) are included in OCS structure. most suitable battery storage, power-supply controlling system. Student micro-satellite program goals 1.Scientific Information gaining in the field of Earth study- using perspective research methods. Studying of new devices behavior in space conditions. 2. Educative a. Students derive real experience of projecting, building of a spacecraft from the point of view of an experimenter, a constructor and a researcher. b. Organization of student's cooperation with key men of aerospace industry and other branches. c. Brainpower and material base preparation for micro-satellite systems' development. d. Attraction of youth interest to the topic, by: - Students' and pupils' groups attraction and involvement in experiments conduction and results processing. - Seminars and lections devoted to Earth study from the space organization - Specific scientific data distribution over World Wide Web. 3. International With purpose of program expansion, the developers' group looks to start of an international project. Within the project new experiments conduction and scientific information exchange are expected. 4. Status Bauman Moscow State Technical University's status improvement in the field

  10. Microsatellite spreading in the human genome: evolutionary mechanisms and structural implications.

    PubMed

    Nadir, E; Margalit, H; Gallily, T; Ben-Sasson, S A

    1996-06-25

    Microsatellites are tandem repeat sequences abundant in the genomes of higher eukaryotes and hitherto considered as "junk DNA." Analysis of a human genome representative data base (2.84 Mb) reveals a distinct juxtaposition of A-rich microsatellites and retroposons and suggests their coevolution. The analysis implies that most microsatellites were generated by a 3'-extension of retrotranscripts, similar to mRNA polyadenylylation, and that they serve in turn as "retroposition navigators," directing the retroposons via homology-driven integration into defined sites. Thus, they became instrumental in the preservation and extension of primordial genomic patterns. A role is assigned to these reiterating A-rich loci in the higher-order organization of the chromatin. The disease-associated triplet repeats are mostly found in coding regions and do not show an association with retroposons, constituting a unique set within the family of microsatellite sequences.

  11. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite markers in the Lepisorus clathratus complex (Polypodiaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Cun-Feng; Kwak, Myounghai; Xiang, Qiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellites were designed and characterized in the Sino-Himalayan fern Lepisorus clathratus complex (Polypodiaceae) to further study the phylogeography and reproductive ecology of this species. Methods and Results: From a genomic library obtained by next-generation sequencing, 10 polymorphic and six monomorphic microsatellite loci were developed. In one population of L. clathratus from Taibaishan in central China, the number of alleles observed for these microsatellites ranged from seven to 29, and observed and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.463 to 0.919 and from 0.797 to 0.947, respectively. Cross-amplification in other taxa within this complex was successful, but cross-amplification was poor for other congeneric species. Conclusions: This set of newly developed microsatellite markers will be useful for assessing genetic diversity, population structure, and mating system, and to infer polyploid origin in the L. clathratus complex. PMID:27785385

  12. Development of microsatellite markers for the clonal shrub Orixa japonica (Rutaceae) using 454 sequencing1

    PubMed Central

    Tamaki, Ichiro; Setsuko, Suzuki; Sugai, Kyoko; Yanagisawa, Nao

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were developed for a dioecious shrub, Orixa japonica (Rutaceae). Because O. japonica vigorously propagates by vegetative growth, microsatellite markers can be used to identify clonal relationships among its ramets. Methods and Results: Sixteen polymorphic microsatellite markers were identified by 454 next-generation sequencing. The number of alleles and expected heterozygosity for each locus among four populations ranged from two to 10 and from 0.140 to 0.875, respectively. Five of the 16 loci showed a low null allele frequency. Because Orixa is a monotypic genus, cross-amplification in a consubfamilial species, Skimmia japonica, was tested, and only one locus showed polymorphism. Conclusions: These microsatellite markers developed for O. japonica contribute to clone identification for studies examining the clonal structure and true sex ratio in the wild. Moreover, five markers that have a low null allele frequency can also be used for estimating mating systems or performing parentage analysis. PMID:27785383

  13. Novel microsatellite markers suggest the mechanism of parthenogenesis in Extatosoma tiaratum is automixis with terminal fusion.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Yasaman; van Rooyen, Anthony; Elgar, Mark Adrian; Jones, Therésa Melanie; Weeks, Andrew Raymond

    2016-06-27

    Parthenogenetic reproduction is taxonomically widespread and occurs through various cytological mechanisms, which have different impact on the genetic variation of the offspring. Extatosoma tiaratum is a facultatively parthenogenetic Australian insect (Phasmatodea), in which females oviposit continuously throughout their adult lifespan irrespective of mating. Fertilized eggs produce sons and daughters through sexual reproduction and unfertilized eggs produce female offspring via parthenogenesis. Here, we developed novel microsatellite markers for E. tiaratum and characterized them by genotyping individuals from a natural population. We then used the microsatellite markers to infer the cytological mechanism of parthenogenesis in this species. We found evidence suggesting parthenogenesis in E. tiaratum occurs through automixis with terminal fusion, resulting in substantial loss of microsatellite heterozygosity in the offspring. Loss of microsatellite heterozygosity may be associated with loss of heterozygosity in fitness related loci. The mechanism of parthenogenetic reproduction can therefore affect fitness outcomes and needs to be considered when comparing costs and benefits of sex versus parthenogenesis.

  14. Microsatellite and major histocompatibility complex variation in an endangered rattlesnake, the Eastern Massasauga (Sistrurus catenatus).

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Collin P; Duvall, Melvin R; Swanson, Bradley J; Phillips, Christopher A; Dreslik, Michael J; Baker, Sarah J; King, Richard B

    2016-06-01

    Genetic diversity is fundamental to maintaining the long-term viability of populations, yet reduced genetic variation is often associated with small, isolated populations. To examine the relationship between demography and genetic variation, variation at hypervariable loci (e.g., microsatellite DNA loci) is often measured. However, these loci are selectively neutral (or near neutral) and may not accurately reflect genomewide variation. Variation at functional trait loci, such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), can provide a better assessment of adaptive genetic variation in fragmented populations. We compared patterns of microsatellite and MHC variation across three Eastern Massasauga (Sistrurus catenatus) populations representing a gradient of demographic histories to assess the relative roles of natural selection and genetic drift. Using 454 deep amplicon sequencing, we identified 24 putatively functional MHC IIB exon 2 alleles belonging to a minimum of six loci. Analysis of synonymous and nonsynonymous substitution rates provided evidence of historical positive selection at the nucleotide level, and Tajima's D provided support for balancing selection in each population. As predicted, estimates of microsatellite allelic richness, observed, heterozygosity, and expected heterozygosity varied among populations in a pattern qualitatively consistent with demographic history and abundance. While MHC allelic richness at the population and individual levels revealed similar trends, MHC nucleotide diversity was unexpectedly high in the smallest population. Overall, these results suggest that genetic variation in the Eastern Massasauga populations in Illinois has been shaped by multiple evolutionary mechanisms. Thus, conservation efforts should consider both neutral and functional genetic variation when managing captive and wild Eastern Massasauga populations.

  15. 'Cut from the same cloth': Shared microsatellite variants among cancers link to ectodermal tissues-neural tube and crest cells.

    PubMed

    Karunasena, Enusha; Mciver, Lauren J; Bavarva, Jasmin H; Wu, Xiaowei; Zhu, Hongxiao; Garner, Harold R

    2015-09-08

    The pluripotent cells of the embryonic ectodermal tissues are known to be a precursor for multiple tumor types. The adaptability of these cells is a trait exploited by cancer. We previously described cancer-associated microsatellite loci (CAML) shared between glioblastoma (GBM) and lower-grade gliomas. Therefore, we hypothesized that these variants, identified from germline DNA, are shared by cancers from tissues originating from ectodermal tissues: neural tube cells (NTC) and crest cells (NCC). Using exome sequencing data from four cancers with origins to NTC and NCC, a 'signature' of loci significant to each cancer (p-value ≤ 0.01) was created and compared with previously identified CAML from breast cancer. The results of this analysis show that variant loci among the cancers with tissue origins from NTC/NCC were closely linked. Signaling pathways linked to genes with non-coding CAML genotypes revealed enriched connections to hereditary, neurological, and developmental disease or disorders. Thus, variants in genes from tissues initiating from NTC/NCC, if recurrently detected, may indicate a common etiology. Additionally, CAML genotypes from non-tumor DNA may predict cancer phenotypes and are common to shared embryonic tissues of origin.

  16. Isolation and characterisation of 11 polymorphic microsatellite markers in Papaver rhoeas L. (Corn Poppy), a major annual plant species from cultivated areas.

    PubMed

    Kati, Vaya; Corre, Valérie Le; Michel, Séverine; Jaffrelo, Lydia; Poncet, Charles; Délye, Christophe

    2012-12-24

    Papaver rhoeas, an annual plant species in the Papaveraceae family, is part of the biodiversity of agricultural ecosystems and also a noxious agronomic weed. We developed microsatellite markers to study the genetic diversity of P. rhoeas, using an enriched microsatellite library coupled with 454 next-generation sequencing. A total of 13,825 sequences were obtained that yielded 1795 microsatellite loci. After discarding loci with less than six repeats of the microsatellite motif, automated primer design was successful for 598 loci. We tested 74 of these loci for amplification with a total of 97 primer pairs. Thirty loci passed our tests and were subsequently tested for polymorphism using 384 P. rhoeas plants originating from 12 populations from France. Of the 30 loci, 11 showed reliable polymorphism not affected by the presence of null alleles. The number of alleles and the expected heterozygosity ranged from 3 to 7.4 and from 0.27 to 0.73, respectively. A low but significant genetic differentiation among populations was observed (F(ST) = 0.04; p < 0.001). The 11 validated polymorphic microsatellite markers developed in this work will be useful in studies of genetic diversity and population structure of P. rhoeas, assisting in designing management strategies for the control or the conservation of this species.

  17. Microsatellite-centromere mapping in Japanese scallop ( Patinopecten yessoensis) through half-tetrad analysis in gynogenetic diploid families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qi; Qi, Mingjun; Nie, Hongtao; Kong, Lingfeng; Yu, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Gene-centromere mapping is an essential prerequisite for understanding the composition and structure of genomes. Half-tetrad analysis is a powerful tool for mapping genes and understanding chromosomal behavior during meiosis. The Japanese scallop ( Patinopecten yessoensis), a cold-tolerant species inhabiting the northwestern Pacific coast, is a commercially important marine bivalve in Asian countries. In this study, inheritance of 32 informative microsatellite loci was examined in 70-h D-shaped larvae of three induced meiogynogenetic diploid families of P. yessoensis for centromere mapping using half-tetrad analysis. The ratio of gynogenetic diploids was proven to be 100%, 100% and 96% in the three families, respectively. Inheritance analysis in the control crosses showed that 51 of the 53 genotypic ratios observed were in accordance with Mendelian expectations at the 5% level after Bonferroni correction. Seven of the 32 microsatellite loci showed the existence of null alleles in control crosses. The second division segregation frequency ( y) of the microsatellite loci ranged from 0.07 to 0.85 with a mean of 0.38, suggesting the existence of positive interference after a single chiasma formation in some chromosomes in the scallop. Microsatellite-centromere distances ranged from 4 cM to 42 cM under the assumption of complete interference. Information on the positions of centromeres in relation to the microsatellite loci will represent a contribution towards the assembly of genetic maps in the commercially important scallop species.

  18. Development and characterization of 27 microsatellite markers for the mangrove fern, Acrostichum aureum (Pteridaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Takashi; Tsuda, Yoshiaki; Mori, Gustavo Maruyama; Cruz, Mariana Vargas; Shinmura, Yoshimi; Wee, Alison K. S.; Takayama, Koji; Asakawa, Takeshi; Yamakawa, Takeru; Suleiman, Monica; Núñez-Farfán, Juan; Webb, Edward L.; Watano, Yasuyuki; Kajita, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Twenty-seven nuclear microsatellite markers were developed for the mangrove fern, Acrostichum aureum (Pteridaceae), to investigate the genetic structure and demographic history of the only pantropical mangrove plant. Methods and Results: Fifty-six A. aureum individuals from three populations were sampled and genotyped to characterize the 27 loci. The number of alleles and expected heterozygosity ranged from one to 15 and 0.000 to 0.893, respectively. Across the 26 polymorphic loci, the Malaysian population showed much higher levels of polymorphism compared to the other two populations in Guam and Brazil. Cross-amplification tests in the other two species from the genus determined that seven and six loci were amplifiable in A. danaeifolium and A. speciosum, respectively. Conclusions: The 26 polymorphic microsatellite markers will be useful for future studies investigating the genetic structure and demographic history of of A. aureum, which has the widest distributional range of all mangrove plants. PMID:27672519

  19. Phylogenetic and microsatellite markers for Tulasnella (Tulasnellaceae) mycorrhizal fungi associated with Australian orchids1

    PubMed Central

    Ruibal, Monica P.; Peakall, Rod; Smith, Leon M.; Linde, Celeste C.

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Phylogenetic and microsatellite markers were developed for Tulasnella mycorrhizal fungi to investigate fungal species identity and diversity. These markers will be useful in future studies investigating the phylogenetic relationship of the fungal symbionts, specificity of orchid–mycorrhizal associations, and the role of mycorrhizae in orchid speciation within several orchid genera. • Methods and Results: We generated partial genome sequences of two Tulasnella symbionts originating from Chiloglottis and Drakaea orchid species with 454 genome sequencing. Cross-genus transferability across mycorrhizal symbionts associated with multiple genera of Australian orchids (Arthrochilus, Chiloglottis, Drakaea, and Paracaleana) was found for seven phylogenetic loci. Five loci showed cross-transferability to Tulasnella from other orchid genera, and two to Sebacina. Furthermore, 11 polymorphic microsatellite loci were developed for Tulasnella from Chiloglottis. • Conclusions: Highly informative markers were obtained, allowing investigation of mycorrhizal diversity of Tulasnellaceae associated with a wide variety of terrestrial orchids in Australia and potentially worldwide. PMID:25202528

  20. Genetic diversity analysis in the section Caulorrhizae (genus Arachis) using microsatellite markers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Diversity in 26 microsatellite loci from section Caulorrhizae germplasm was evaluated by using 33 accessions of A. pintoi Krapov. & W.C. Gregory and ten accessions of Arachis repens Handro. Twenty loci proved to be polymorphic and a total of 196 alleles were detected with an average of 9.8 alleles per locus. The variability found in those loci was greater than the variability found using morphological characters, seed storage proteins and RAPD markers previously used in this germplasm. The high potential of these markers to detect species-specific alleles and discriminate among accessions was demonstrated. The set of microsatellite primer pairs developed by our group for A. pintoi are useful molecular tools for evaluating Section Caulorrhizae germplasm, as well as that of species belonging to other Arachis sections. PMID:21637613

  1. Genetic diversity analysis in the section Caulorrhizae (genus Arachis) using microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, Darío A; Bechara, Marcelo D; Curi, Rogério A; Monteiro, Jomar P; Valente, Sérgio E S; Gimenes, Marcos A; Lopes, Catalina R

    2010-01-01

    Diversity in 26 microsatellite loci from section Caulorrhizae germplasm was evaluated by using 33 accessions of A. pintoi Krapov. & W.C. Gregory and ten accessions of Arachis repens Handro. Twenty loci proved to be polymorphic and a total of 196 alleles were detected with an average of 9.8 alleles per locus. The variability found in those loci was greater than the variability found using morphological characters, seed storage proteins and RAPD markers previously used in this germplasm. The high potential of these markers to detect species-specific alleles and discriminate among accessions was demonstrated. The set of microsatellite primer pairs developed by our group for A. pintoi are useful molecular tools for evaluating Section Caulorrhizae germplasm, as well as that of species belonging to other Arachis sections.

  2. Eleven microsatellites in an emerging invader, Phytolacca americana (Phytolaccaceae), from its native and introduced ranges1

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, Kerin E.; Berryman, Kaelyn R.; Hopper, McGee; Hoffberg, Sandra L.; Myhre, Karin E.; Iwao, Keisuke; Lee, Jared B.; Glenn, Travis C.; Mauricio, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: To facilitate population genetic analyses, microsatellite markers were developed for pokeweed (Phytolacca americana), a large, weedy, perennial herb native to eastern North America that is emerging as a significant invasive species in China. Methods and Results: We mined 1,100,538 Illumina MiSeq reads from genomic DNA for microsatellites and identified 58 primer pairs. We screened these primers for polymorphism in two native and two invasive populations. We identified 11 loci that amplified consistently. The number of alleles per locus ranged from two to six, and observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.00 to 1.00. All loci were largely monomorphic within populations but different among populations. The primers were of very limited use in the congener P. acinosa. Conclusions: These loci will provide a valuable resource to study the population genetics and invasion history of P. americana. PMID:25798346

  3. Development and characterization of microsatellite markers for the Chinese endangered medicinal plant Tetrastigma hemsleyanum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y H; Chen, N; Zhang, Y C; Fu, C X

    2014-10-31

    Tetrastigma hemsleyanum (Vitaceae) is an endangered medicinal plant endemic to China. Because of its widely known efficacy for treating many health problems, wild resources of this species are currently undergoing a rapid decline. Few studies have been conducted examining the population genetics or development of microsatellite loci for this plant. In this study, 14 microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized for T. hemsleyanum using a double-suppression PCR method. Polymorphisms were tested with a total of 50 individuals from 2 natural populations. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 3-9, with an average of 7 alleles per locus. The observed and expected heterozygosity per locus ranged from 0-1 and from 0.068-0.803, respectively. The polymorphism information content value varied from 0.215-0.760. These loci may facilitate further genetic studies of populations of T. hemsleyanum and provide guidance for their conservation.

  4. Microsatellite marker development for the coastal dune shrub Prunus maritima (Rosaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Badgley, Emily M.; Grubisha, Lisa C.; Roland, Anna K.; Connolly, Bryan A.; Klooster, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Microsatellite primers were developed in the beach plum, Prunus maritima, to investigate the genetic composition of remaining populations in need of conservation and, in future studies, to determine its relation to P. maritima var. gravesii. • Methods and Results: Fourteen primer pairs were identified and tested in four populations throughout the species’ geographic range. Of these 14 loci, 12 were shown to be polymorphic among a total of 60 P. maritima individuals sampled (15 individuals sampled from four populations). Among the polymorphic loci, the number of alleles ranged from two to 10 and observed heterozygosity of loci ranged from 0.07 to 0.93 among specimens tested. • Conclusions: These microsatellites will be useful in evaluating the population genetic composition of P. maritima and in developing approaches for further conservation and management of this species within the endangered coastal dune ecosystem of the northeastern United States. PMID:25699222

  5. Development and characterization of microsatellite markers for Piptadenia gonoacantha (Fabaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Grando, Carolina; Bajay, Miklos M.; Bajay, Stephanie K.; Schwarcz, Kaiser D.; Campos, Jaqueline B.; Brancalion, Pedro H. S.; Pinheiro, José B.; Rodrigues, Ricardo R.; Souza, Anete P.; Zucchi, Maria I.

    2015-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Microsatellite primers were designed for Piptadenia gonoacantha (Fabaceae) and characterized to estimate genetic diversity parameters. The species is a native tree from the Atlantic Forest biome commonly used in forest restoration; it has medicinal potential and the wood is economically useful. • Methods and Results: Twenty-eight microsatellite loci were identified from an enriched genomic library. Fifteen loci resulted in successful amplifications and were characterized in a natural population of 94 individuals. Twelve loci were polymorphic, with allele numbers ranging from three to 15 per locus, and expected and observed heterozygosities ranging from 0.2142 to 0.8325 and 0.190 to 0.769, respectively. • Conclusions: The developed markers will be used in further studies of population genetics of P. gonoacantha, aimed at conservation and management of the species in natural populations and in forest restoration projects. PMID:25699220

  6. Development of microsatellite markers for Viscum coloratum (Santalaceae) and their application to wild populations1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bo-Yun; Park, Han-Sol; Kim, Soonok; Kim, Young-Dong

    2017-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite primers were developed for Viscum coloratum (Santalaceae), a semiparasitic medicinal plant that is known for its anticancer properties. Due to excessive human harvesting and loss of suitable habitat of its populations, it has become a potentially threatened species requiring immediate conservation efforts. Methods and Results: Based on transcriptome data for V. coloratum, 124 primer pairs were randomly selected for initial validation, of which 19 yielded polymorphic microsatellite loci, with two to six alleles per locus. The usefulness of these markers was assessed for 60 individuals representing three populations of V. coloratum. Observed and expected heterozygosity values ranged from 0.033 to 0.833 and 0.032 to 0.672, respectively. Cross-species amplification for 19 loci in the related species V. album was conducted. Conclusions: The 19 newly developed loci are expected to be useful for studying the population genetics and ecological conservation of V. coloratum. PMID:28090408

  7. Microsatellite instability in thyroid tumours and tumour-like lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lazzereschi, D; Palmirotta, R; Ranieri, A; Ottini, L; Verì, M C; Cama, A; Cetta, F; Nardi, F; Colletta, G; Mariani-Costantini, R

    1999-01-01

    Fifty-one thyroid tumours and tumour-like lesions were analysed for instability at ten dinucleotide microsatellite loci and at two coding mononucleotide repeats within the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) type II receptor (TβRII) and insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) receptor (IGFIIR) genes respectively. Microsatellite instability (MI) was detected in 11 out of 51 cases (21.5%), including six (11.7%) with MI at one or two loci and five (9.8%) with Ml at three or more loci (RER+ phenotype). No mutations in the TβRII and IGFIIR repeats were observed. The overall frequency of MI did not significantly vary in relation to age, gender, benign versus malignant status and tumour size. However, widespread MI was significantly more frequent in follicular adenomas and carcinomas than in papillary and Hürthle cell tumours: three out of nine tumours of follicular type (33.3%) resulted in replication error positive (RER+), versus 1 out of 29 papillary carcinomas (3.4%, P = 0.01), and zero out of eight Hürthle cell neoplasms. Regional lymph node metastases were present in five MI-negative primary cancers and resulted in MI-positive in two cases. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:9888478

  8. Microsatellite isolation, linkage group identification and determination of recombination frequency in the peach-potato aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer) (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    PubMed

    Sloane, M A; Sunnucks, P; Wilson, A C; Hales, D F

    2001-06-01

    Fifteen polymorphic microsatellite markers were used to establish linkage groups and relative rates of recombination in male and female Myzus persicae (Sulzer) (Hemiptera: Aphididae) (peach-potato aphid). We cloned nine markers from M. persicae and for these we report primer sequences and levels of allelic diversity and heterozygosity in four Australian M. persicae populations. Of the remaining six loci, four loci, also cloned from M. persicae, were obtained from G. Malarky (Natural History Museum, London) and two loci from Sitobion miscanthi were used. Additionally, the primer sequences of locus M77, a locus monomorphic in M. persicae but polymorphic in the closely related Myzus antirrhinii, are presented. Eleven of the 15 polymorphic markers were autosomal and four were X-linked. A linkage analysis was performed on a European pedigree of aphids containing five families with between seven and 11 offspring each. There was no linkage between any loci in females. In males, several pairwise comparisons yielded no recombinant offspring. With the exception of locus M40, these observations were supported in a linkage analysis performed on larger families produced from Australian M. persicae crosses. Locus M40 showed segregation consistent with involvement in a translocation between autosomes 1 and 3 in European samples but not in the Australian samples. From the Australian crosses we report an absence of recombination in males but high recombination rates in females. One X chromosome and four autosomal linkage groups were identified and tentatively assigned to chromosomes. The relevance of achiasmate meiosis to the evolution of sex is discussed.

  9. Linkage analysis: Inadequate for detecting susceptibility loci in complex disorders?

    SciTech Connect

    Field, L.L.; Nagatomi, J.

    1994-09-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) may provide valuable clues about approaches to detecting susceptibility loci in other oligogenic disorders. Numerous studies have demonstrated significant association between IDDM and a VNTR in the 5{prime} flanking region of the insulin (INS) gene. Paradoxically, all attempts to demonstrate linkage of IDDM to this VNTR have failed. Lack of linkage has been attributed to insufficient marker locus information, genetic heterogeneity, or high frequency of the IDDM-predisposing allele in the general population. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) is located 2.7 kb from INS on the 5` side of the VNTR and shows linkage disequilibrium with INS region loci. We typed a highly polymorphic microsatellite within TH in 176 multiplex families, and performed parametric (lod score) linkage analysis using various intermediate reduced penetrance models for IDDM (including rare and common disease allele frequencies), as well as non-parametric (affected sib pair) linkage analysis. The scores significantly reject linkage for recombination values of .05 or less, excluding the entire 19 kb region containing TH, the 5{prime} VNTR, the INS gene, and IGF2 on the 3{prime} side of INS. Non-parametric linkage analysis also provided no significant evidence for linkage (mean TH allele sharing 52.5%, P=.12). These results have important implications for efforts to locate genes predisposing to complex disorders, strongly suggesting that regions which are significantly excluded by linkage methods may nevertheless contain predisposing genes readily detectable by association methods. We advocate that investigators routinely perform association analyses in addition to linkage analyses.

  10. Cross-Species, Amplifiable Microsatellite Markers for Neoverrucid Barnacles from Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vents Developed Using Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Yuichi; Shinzato, Chuya; Khalturina, Mariia; Watanabe, Hiromi; Inagaki, Fumio; Satoh, Nori; Mitarai, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Barnacles of the genus Neoverruca are abundant near deep-sea hydrothermal vents of the northwestern Pacific Ocean, and are useful for understanding processes of population formation and maintenance of deep-sea vent faunas. Using next-generation sequencing, we isolated 12 polymorphic microsatellite loci from Neoverruca sp., collected in the Okinawa Trough. These microsatellite loci revealed 2–19 alleles per locus. The expected and observed heterozygosities ranged from 0.286 to 1.000 and 0.349 to 0.935, respectively. Cross-species amplification showed that 9 of the 12 loci were successfully amplified for Neoverruca brachylepadoformis in the Mariana Trough. A pairwise FST value calculated using nine loci showed significant genetic differentiation between the two species. Consequently, the microsatellite markers we developed will be useful for further population genetic studies to elucidate genetic diversity, differentiation, classification, and evolutionary processes in the genus Neoverruca. PMID:25196437

  11. Cross-species, amplifiable microsatellite markers for neoverrucid barnacles from deep-sea hydrothermal vents developed using next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Yuichi; Shinzato, Chuya; Khalturina, Mariia; Watanabe, Hiromi; Inagaki, Fumio; Satoh, Nori; Mitarai, Satoshi

    2014-08-18

    Barnacles of the genus Neoverruca are abundant near deep-sea hydrothermal vents of the northwestern Pacific Ocean, and are useful for understanding processes of population formation and maintenance of deep-sea vent faunas. Using next-generation sequencing, we isolated 12 polymorphic microsatellite loci from Neoverruca sp., collected in the Okinawa Trough. These microsatellite loci revealed 2-19 alleles per locus. The expected and observed heterozygosities ranged from 0.286 to 1.000 and 0.349 to 0.935, respectively. Cross-species amplification showed that 9 of the 12 loci were successfully amplified for Neoverruca brachylepadoformis in the Mariana Trough. A pairwise FST value calculated using nine loci showed significant genetic differentiation between the two species. Consequently, the microsatellite markers we developed will be useful for further population genetic studies to elucidate genetic diversity, differentiation, classification, and evolutionary processes in the genus Neoverruca.

  12. Microsatellites Cross-Species Amplification across Some African Cichlids.

    PubMed

    Bezault, Etienne; Rognon, Xavier; Gharbi, Karim; Baroiller, Jean-Francois; Chevassus, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    The transfer of the genomic resources developed in the Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, to other Tilapiines sensu lato and African cichlid would provide new possibilities to study this amazing group from genetics, ecology, evolution, aquaculture, and conservation point of view. We tested the cross-species amplification of 32 O. niloticus microsatellite markers in a panel of 15 species from 5 different African cichlid tribes: Oreochromines (Oreochromis, Sarotherodon), Boreotilapiines (Tilapia), Chromidotilapines, Hemichromines, and Haplochromines. Amplification was successfully observed for 29 markers (91%), with a frequency of polymorphic (P(95)) loci per species around 70%. The mean number of alleles per locus and species was 3.2 but varied from 3.7 within Oreochromis species to 1.6 within the nontilapia species. The high level of cross-species amplification and polymorphism of the microsatellite markers tested in this study provides powerful tools for a wide range of molecular genetic studies within tilapia species as well as for other African cichlids.

  13. Nineteen polymorphic microsatellite markers developed for Trachinotus ovatus.

    PubMed

    Xie, Z Z; Huang, M W; Xu, W; Peng, C; He, J N; Meng, Z N; Zhang, Y; Li, S S; Lin, H R

    2014-12-12

    To evaluate the population genetic diversity of the ovate pompano, we isolated and characterized 19 microsatellite markers using a (CA)13-enriched genomic library. Polymorphism was assessed in 30 individuals from a single population collected from the Daya Bay Aquaculture Center, Guangdong, China. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 2 to 18 with an average of 7.8. The observed and expected heterozygosities varied from 0.2667 to 1.000 and from 0.3960 to 0.9435, respectively. Sixteen of 19 loci conformed to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, and no significant linkage disequilibrium was detected between any locus pairs. Our study supplies candidate microsatellite markers that can be useful for studying the population genetic structure of ovate pompano.

  14. Origin of Microsatellite Instability in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Halling, Kevin C.; Harper, Jeffrey; Moskaluk, Christopher A.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Petroni, Gina R.; Yustein, Aron S.; Tosi, Piero; Minacci, Chiara; Roviello, Franco; Piva, Paolo; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Jackson, Charles E.; Powell, Steven M.

    1999-01-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) is observed in 13–44% of gastric carcinoma. The etiology of MSI in gastric carcinoma has not been clearly defined. To assess the role of mismatch repair in the development of MSI in gastric cancer, expression of hMSH2 and hMLH1 was explored. We examined 117 gastric carcinomas for MSI and observed instability at one or more loci in 19 (16%) of these tumors. Of the 19 tumors with MSI, nine exhibited low-rate MSI (MSI-L) with instability at <17% of loci, whereas the remaining 10 exhibited high-rate MSI (MSI-H) with instability at >33% of loci examined. Immunohistochemical staining for hMLH1 and hMSH2 was performed on eight of the tumors with MSI-H, five with MSI-L, and 15 tumors without MSI. All eight tumors with MSI-H showed loss of staining for either hMLH1 (n = 5) or hMSH2 (n = 3). In contrast, tumors with MSI-L or without MSI all showed normal hMSH2 and hMLH1 protein expression patterns. Moreover, all eight of the tumors with MSI-H also showed instability at BAT-26, whereas none of the MSI-L tumors or tumors without instability showed instability at BAT-26. These findings suggest that the majority of high-level MSI in gastric cancer is associated with defects of the mismatch repair pathway. Although larger studies are needed, BAT-26 appears to be a sensitive and specific marker for the MSI-H phenotype in gastric carcinoma. PMID:10393852

  15. Microsatellite analyses of the trout of northwest Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nielsen, J.L.; Sage, G.K.

    2001-01-01

    The trout of northwest Mexico represent an undescribed group of fish considered part of the Oncorhynchus mykiss (Pacific trout) complex of species and subspecies. Recent genetic studies have shown these fish to have important genetic diversity and a unique evolutionary history when compared to coastal rainbow trout. Increased levels of allelic diversity have been found in this species at the southern extent of its range. In this study we describe the trout in the Sierra Madre Occidental from the rios Yaqui, Mayo, Casas Grandes and de Bavispe, and their relationship to the more southern distribution of Mexican golden trout (O. chrysogaster) using 11 microsatellite loci. Microsatellite allelic diversity in Mexican trout was high with a mean of 6.6 alleles/locus, average heterozygosity = 0.35, and a mean Fst = 0.43 for all loci combined. Microsatellite data were congruent with previously published mtDNA results showing unique panmictic population structure in the Rio Yaqui trout that differs from Pacific coastal trout and Mexican golden trout. These data also add support for the theory of headwaters transfer of trout across the Continental Divide from tributaries of the Rio de Bavispe into the Rio Casas Grandes. Rio Mayo trout share a close genetic relationship to trout in Rio Yaqui, but sample sizes from the Rio Mayo prevent significant comparisons in this study. Microsatellite analyses show significant allelic frequency differences between Rio Yaqui trout and O. chrysogaster in Sinaloa and Durango Mexico, adding further support for a unique evolutionary status for this group of northwestern Mexican trout.

  16. Microsatellite markers isolated from the flightless cormorant (Phalacrocorax harrisi).

    PubMed

    Duffie, Caroline; Glenn, Travis C; Hagen, Cris; Parker, Patricia

    2008-05-01

    Eight polymorphic microsatellite DNA loci were isolated from the flightless cormorant (Phalacrocorax harrisi) for future population genetic studies. Genetic variability was assessed using at least 38 individuals from two populations. Allele numbers ranged from three to nine per locus. Mean observed heterozygosity varied from 0.27 to 0.78. No locus deviated from Hardy-Weinberg (HW) or linkage equilibria in either population. The high levels of detected polymorphism indicate the utility of these markers for population genetic studies of this Galápagos species.

  17. Characterization of 16 microsatellite markers for the Oreinotinus clade of Viburnum (Adoxaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Barish, Syndi; Arakaki, Mónica; Edwards, Erika J.; Donoghue, Michael J.; Clement, Wendy L.

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite loci were isolated from four species of Viburnum (Adoxaceae) to study population structure and assess species boundaries among morphologically similar South American Viburnum species of the Oreinotinus clade. Methods and Results: Using a microsatellite-enriched library and mining next-generation sequence data, 16 microsatellites were developed. Each locus was tested on two populations of V. triphyllum and one population of V. pichinchense. For nuclear loci, one to 13 alleles were recovered, expected heterozygosity ranged from 0 to 0.8975, Simpson diversity index ranged from 0.0167 to 1.000, and Shannon diversity index ranged from 0 to 2.3670 in a given population. For the mitochondrial locus, three to six alleles were recovered and unbiased haploid diversity values ranged from 0.756 to 0.853 in a given population. Conclusions: The 16 microsatellite loci developed for the Oreinotinus clade (Viburnum, Adoxaceae) will inform investigations of population structure and species boundaries within this group. PMID:28101437

  18. Power of microsatellite markers for fingerprinting and parentage analysis in Eucalyptus grandis breeding populations.

    PubMed

    Kirst, M; Cordeiro, C M; Rezende, G D S P; Grattapaglia, D

    2005-01-01

    We report the genetic analysis of 192 unrelated individuals of an elite breeding population of Eucalyptus grandis (Hill ex Maiden) with a selected set of six highly polymorphic microsatellite markers developed for species of the genus Eucalyptus. A full characterization of this set of six loci was carried out generating allele frequency distributions that were used to estimate parameters of genetic information content of these loci, including expected heterozygosity, polymorphism information content (PIC), power of exclusion, and probability of identity. The number of detected alleles per locus ranged from 6 to 33, with an average of 19.8 +/- 9.2. The average expected heterozygosity was 0.86 +/- 0.11 and the average PIC was 0.83 +/- 0.16. Using only three loci, it was possible to discriminate all 192 individuals. The overall probability of identity considering all six EMBRA microsatellite markers combined was lower than 1 in 2 billion. An analysis of the sample size necessary to estimate expected heterozygosity with minimum variance indicated that at least 64 individuals have to be genotyped to characterize this parameter with adequate accuracy for most microsatellites in Eucalyptus. The high degree of multiallelism and the clear and simple codominant Mendelian inheritance of the set of microsatellites used provide an extremely powerful system for the unique identification of Eucalyptus individuals for fingerprinting purposes and parentage testing.

  19. Isolation, characterization, and multiplexing of novel microsatellite markers for the tropical scalloped spiny lobster (Panulirus homarus).

    PubMed

    Delghandi, M; Goddard, S; Jerry, D R; Dao, H T; Afzal, H; Al-Jardani, S S

    2015-12-29

    Of the various spiny lobster species in the tropical and subtropical Indo-West Pacific region, the tropical scalloped spiny lobster (Panulirus homarus) supports one of the most commercially valuable fishery resources in many coastal African and Asian countries. The last decade has witnessed a serious decline in the wild populations of this species. Knowledge of the genetic basis of spiny lobster population structure is a prerequisite to achieve a sustainable fisheries management for this species. Here, we describe 13 novel polymorphic microsatellite markers developed for P. homarus, using a cross-species primer design strategy based on P. ornatus Roche 454 shot-gun generated sequencing. Microsatellite polymorphisms were assessed in 96 unrelated P. homarus individuals of a natural population, with the number of alleles per locus varying from 2 to 14, the observed and expected heterozygosity from 0.00 to 0.78 and from 0.03 to 0.79, respectively, and with only four loci (Pho-G27, Pho-G32, Pho-G36, and Pho-G58) deviating from Hardy- Weinberg equilibrium. Genetic linkage disequilibrium analysis between all pairs of the loci showed significant departure from the null hypothesis between loci Pho-G22 - Pho-G30, and Pho-G30 - Pho-G35. The successful cross amplification of these microsatellites highlights the potential of the developed microsatellites for future population genetic research within the different Panulirus species.

  20. Morphological and microsatellite diversity associated with ecological factors in natural populations of Medicago laciniata Mill. (Fabaceae).

    PubMed

    Badri, Mounawer; Zitoun, Adel; Ilahi, Houcine; Huguet, Thierry; Aouani, Mohamed Elarbi

    2008-12-01

    Genetic variability in 10 natural Tunisian populations of Medicago laciniata were analysed using 19 quantitative traits and 12 polymorphic microsatellite loci. A large degree of genetic variability within-populations and among-populations was detected for both quantitative characters and molecular markers. High genetic differentiation among populations for quantitative traits was seen, with Q(ST) = 0.47, and F(ST) = 0.47 for microsatellite markers. Several quantitative traits displayed no statistical difference in the levels of Q(ST) and F(ST). Further, significant correlations between quantitative traits and eco-geographical factors suggest that divergence in the traits among populations may track environmental differences. There was no significant correlation between genetic variability at quantitative traits and microsatellite markers within populations. The site-of-origin of eco-geographical factors explain between 18.13% and 23.40% of genetic variance among populations at quantitative traits and microsatellite markers, respectively. The environmental factors that most influence variation in measured traits among populations are assimilated phosphorus (P(2)0(5)) and mean annual rainfall, followed by climate and soil texture, altitude and organic matter. Significant associations between eco-geographical factors and gene diversity, He, were established in five microsatellite loci suggesting that these simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are not necessarily biologically neutral.

  1. Development of microsatellite markers in Cratylia mollis and their transferability to C. argentea (Fabaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    López-Roberts, M. Cristina; de Queiroz, Luciano Paganucci; van den Berg, Cássio

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: This work aimed to develop microsatellite markers for Cratylia mollis as tools to assess its genetic diversity and structure and to evaluate their potential cross-amplification in related species. • Methods and Results: Microsatellite markers were developed using a microsatellite-enriched library and an intersimple sequence repeat library. From a set of 19 markers, 12 microsatellite loci were polymorphic and presented considerable variation in allele number (2–11), expected heterozygosity (0.226–0.883), and polymorphism information content per locus (0.212–0.870). Cross-amplification in C. argentea was successful in 16 loci, 12 of which were polymorphic (2–10 alleles). • Conclusions: The polymorphism of this set of microsatellite markers for C. mollis, as well as their successful cross-amplification in C. intermedia and C. bahiensis and their transferability to C. argentea, supports their use in future comparative studies to understand the mechanism involved in population divergence and speciation in the genus. PMID:25202484

  2. Comparison of microsatellite distribution in genomes of Centruroides exilicauda and Mesobuthus martensii.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Kubiak, Lukasz Jakub; Du, Lian-Ming; Li, Wu-Jiao; Jian, Zuo-Yi; Tang, Ce; Fan, Zhen-Xin; Zhang, Xiu-Yue; Yue, Bi-Song

    2016-12-05

    In this study, we characterized the distribution of microsatellites in the genomes and genes of Centruroides exilicauda and Mesobuthus martensii, carried out Gene Ontology (GO) analysis and GO enrichment analysis of coding sequences (CDSs) with microsatellite (SSR). In addition, over-represented GO functions related to environmental interactions, development process and methylation were identified to develop functional markers and facilitate further analysis of microsatellite function in the genes of scorpions. Location analysis indicated that microsatellites were predominantly concentrated at both ends of genes. Most genes containing microsatellite had the SSR present at only one locus, from which we infer that the number of SSRs per gene is limited even though intragenic tandem repeats can generate functional variability. Lastly, we identified 75 SSRs in 64 genes of 54 expanded gene families and 1 SSR in the toxin gene of Mesobuthus martensii, allowing future studies on the effect of microsatellites on gene function.

  3. Development, inheritance, and linkage-group assignment of 60 novel microsatellite markers for the gray, short-tailed opossum Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Gouin, Nicolas; Westenberger, Scott J; Mahaney, Susan M; Lindley, Peter; VandeBerg, John L; Samollow, Paul B

    2005-12-01

    Short-tandem-repeat (SSR) or microsatellite polymorphisms are some of the most extensively employed genetic markers in contemporary linkage mapping studies. To date, only a limited number of microsatellites have been isolated in the gray, short-tailed opossum Monodelphis domestica, a South American marsupial widely used for comparative biological and biomedical research. To increase the number of potentially useful mapping markers, we screened 2 microsatellite-enriched genomic libraries containing alternatively (CA)n or (GA)n repeats. A total of 184 clones were sequenced, from which 60 polymorphic microsatellite markers were successfully optimized. The efficiency of this enrichment protocol for M. domestica microsatellite isolation is discussed, and suggestions to improve the outcome are made. All 60 loci showed high allelic diversity, with allele numbers ranging from 2 to 10 in a subset of 33 unrelated animals. Normal Mendelian inheritance was confirmed for all loci by analyzing allelic segregation in 5 two-generation families. One microsatellite appeared to be X linked, and null alleles were found in 5 others. Two-point linkage analyses were implemented using the data on the 5 families, leading to the assignment of 59 of these loci to the existing linkage groups. The 60 novel microsatellites developed in this study will contribute significantly to the M. domestica linkage map, and further QTL mapping studies.

  4. Microsatellite markers for the Amazon peacock bass (Cichla piquiti).

    PubMed

    Carvalho, D C; Oliveira, D A A; Sampaio, I; Beheregaray, L B

    2009-01-01

    A set of primers to amplify 10 microsatellite DNA loci was developed for the Neotropical fish Cichla piquiti, one of the largest sized cichlids in the Amazon Basin. These loci were used to genotype individuals from two populations, one native population from the Tocantins River, the other an introduced population in southeast Brazil, Upper Paraná River. Cross-amplification was also successful for another species of peacock bass, C. kelberi. An average of 4.4 alleles per locus (2-9 alleles) was detected. These markers will be useful for the characterization of genetic structure of native populations, and also for invasive biology studies since Cichla species have been introduced in many river basins outside their native ranges.

  5. Microsatellite variation in red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus).

    PubMed

    Williams, C Lenney; Homan, H J; Johnston, J J; Linz, G M

    2004-02-01

    Territorial male red-winged blackbirds from five locations in the United States and Canada were genotyped using a suite of six microsatellite loci. Each population possessed unique alleles, but numbers of alleles per locus (range = 7.3-8.8) and expected multilocus heterozygosities (range = 0.76-0.80) were similar in all populations. Significant overall allele frequency differences were detected between some population pairs, and some pairwise Fst values were significant (but small). However, Fst among populations, although significant, was also small (0.009). Despite revealing low levels of population structure, the high multilocus polymorphism indicates these loci will be valuable in the genetic analysis of behavior and reproductive strategies in this species.

  6. Development of polymorphic microsatellite markers issued from pyrosequencing technology for the medicinal mushroom Agaricus subrufescens.

    PubMed

    Foulongne-Oriol, Marie; Spataro, Cathy; Moinard, Magalie; Cabannes, Delphine; Callac, Philippe; Savoie, Jean-Michel

    2012-09-01

    The recently described procedure of microsatellite-enriched library pyrosequencing was used to isolate microsatellite loci in the gourmet and medicinal mushroom Agaricus subrufescens. Three hundred and five candidate loci containing at least one simple sequence repeats (SSR) locus and for which primers design was successful, were obtained. From a subset of 95 loci, 35 operational and polymorphic SSR markers were developed and characterized on a sample of 14 A. subrufescens genotypes from diverse origins. These SubSSR markers each displayed from two to 10 alleles with an average of 4.66 alleles per locus. The observed heterozygosity ranged from 0 to 0.71. Several multiplex combinations can be set up, making it possible to genotype up to six markers easily and simultaneously. Cross-amplification in some closely congeneric species was successful for a subset of loci. The 35 microsatellite markers developed here provide a highly valuable molecular tool to study genetic diversity and reproductive biology of A. subrufescens.

  7. Evidence of microsatellite hitch-hiking selection in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.): implications for inferring population structure in nonmodel organisms.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Einar E; Hansen, Michael M; Meldrup, Dorte

    2006-10-01

    Microsatellites have gained wide application for elucidating population structure in nonmodel organisms. Since they are generally noncoding, neutrality is assumed but rarely tested. In Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.), microsatellite studies have revealed highly heterogeneous estimates of genetic differentiation among loci. In particular one locus, Gmo 132, has demonstrated elevated genetic differentiation. We investigated possible hitch-hiking selection at this and other microsatellite loci in Atlantic cod. We employed 11 loci for analysing samples from the Baltic Sea, North Sea, Barents Sea and Newfoundland covering a large part of the species' distributional range. The 'classical' Lewontin-Krakauer test for selection based on variance in estimates of F(ST) and (standardized genetic differentiation) revealed only one significant pairwise test (North Sea-Barents Sea), and the source of the elevated variance could not be ascribed exclusively to Gmo 132. In contrast, different variants of the recently developed ln Rtheta test for selective sweeps at microsatellite loci revealed a high number of significant outcomes of pair-wise tests for Gmo 132. Further, the presence of selection was indicated in at least one other locus. The results suggest that many previous estimates of genetic differentiation in cod based on microsatellites are inflated, and in some cases relationships among populations are obscured by one or more loci being the subject to hitch-hiking selection. Likewise, temporal estimates of effective population sizes in Atlantic cod may be flawed. We recommend, generally, to use a higher number of microsatellite loci to elucidate population structure in marine fishes and other nonmodel species to allow for identification of outlier loci that are subject to selection.

  8. Genome-wide survey and analysis of microsatellites in the Pacific oyster genome: abundance, distribution, and potential for marker development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiafeng; Qi, Haigang; Li, Li; Zhang, Guofan

    2014-01-01

    Microsatellites are a ubiquitous component of the eukaryote genome and constitute one of the most popular sources of molecular markers for genetic studies. However, no data are currently available regarding microsatellites across the entire genome in oysters, despite their importance to the aquaculture industry. We present the first genome-wide investigation of microsatellites in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas by analysis of the complete genome, resequencing, and expression data. The Pacific oyster genome is rich in microsatellites. A total of 604 653 repeats were identified, in average of one locus per 815 base pairs (bp). A total of 12 836 genes had coding repeats, and 7 332 were expressed normally, including genes with a wide range of molecular functions. Compared with 20 different species of animals, microsatellites in the oyster genome typically exhibited 1) an intermediate overall frequency; 2) relatively uniform contents of (A)n and (C)n repeats and abundant long (C)n repeats (≥24 bp); 3) large average length of (AG)n repeats; and 4) scarcity of trinucleotide repeats. The microsatellite-flanking regions exhibited a high degree of polymorphism with a heterozygosity rate of around 2.0%, but there was no correlation between heterozygosity and microsatellite abundance. A total of 19 462 polymorphic microsatellites were discovered, and dinucleotide repeats were the most active, with over 26% of loci found to harbor allelic variations. In all, 7 451 loci with high potential for marker development were identified. Better knowledge of the microsatellites in the oyster genome will provide information for the future design of a wide range of molecular markers and contribute to further advancements in the field of oyster genetics, particularly for molecular-based selection and breeding.

  9. Microsatellite size homoplasies and null alleles do not affect species diagnosis and population genetic analysis in a fungal species complex.

    PubMed

    Queloz, V; Duò, A; Sieber, T N; Grünig, C R

    2010-03-01

    The suitability of 13 microsatellite loci for species diagnosis and population genetics in 11 species of the Phialocephala fortinii s.l.-Acephala applanata species complex (PAC) was assessed. Two data sets were compared to test possible biases in species typing and clone detection resulting from null alleles and size homoplasies. The first data set was based on fragment lengths derived from a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay and the second data set was received from singleplex PCR at lower stringency and sequencing. Most null alleles observed in the multiplex PCR assay could be amplified during singleplex PCR under less stringent conditions. Size homoplasies resulting from mutations in flanking regions and differences in microsatellite structures were observed. For example, Phialocephala uotolensis possessed a (CT)(13) in addition to the (GT)(x) motif at locus mPF_0644. Despite the occurrence of null alleles and size homoplasies, species diagnosis and population genetic analysis studies were not affected. These markers will facilitate studies on population biology, ecology and biogeography of PAC species.

  10. Microsatellite in Aeschynomene falcata (Leguminosae): diversity, cross-amplification, and chromosome localization.

    PubMed

    Polido, C A; Mantello, C C; Moraes, A P; Souza, A P; Forni-Martins, E R

    2014-12-04

    Aeschynomene falcata is an important forage species; however, because of low seed production, it is underutilized as forage species. Aeschynomene is a polyphyletic genus with a challenging taxonomic position. Two subgenera have been proposed, and it is suggested that Aeschynomene can be split in 2 genera. Thus, new markers, such as microsatellite sequences, are desirable for improving breeding programs for A. falcata. Based on transferability and in situ localization, these microsatellite sequences can be applied as chromosome markers in the genus Aeschynomene and closely related genera. Here, we report the first microsatellite library developed for this genus; 11 microsatellites were characterized, with observed and expected heterozygosities ranging from 0.0000 to 0.7143 and from 0.1287 to 0.8360, respectively. Polymorphic information content varied from 0.1167 to 0.7786. The departure from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium may have resulted from frequent autogamy, which is characteristic of A. falcata. Of the 11 microsatellites, 9 loci were cross-amplified in A. brevipes and A. paniculata and 7 in Dalbergia nigra and Machaerium vestitum. Five of these 7 cross-amplified microsatellites were applied as probes during the in situ hybridization assay and 2 showed clear signals on A. falcata chromosomes, ensuring their viability as chromosome markers.

  11. Asymptotic unbounded root loci - Formulas and computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sastry, S. S.; Desoer, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    A new geometric way of computing the asymptotic behavior of unbounded root loci of a strictly proper linear time-invariant control system as loop gain goes to infinity is presented. Properties of certain restricted linear maps and nested restrictions of linear maps are developed, and formulas are obtained for the leading coefficient of the asymptotic values of the unbounded multivariable root loci are obtained in terms of eigenvalues of those maps. Published results and a certain simple null structure assumption are used to relate these asymptotic values to the structure at infinity of the Smith-McMillan form of the open loop transfer function. Explicit matrix formulas for the more abstract derived formulas are given and additional geometric insights are developed with orthogonal projections and singular value decomposition. Formulas for the pivots of the unbounded root loci are calculated and shown to have the same form as the coefficients of the unbounded asymptotic root loci.

  12. Novel microsatellite markers for the oriental fruit moth Grapholita molesta (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) and effects of null alleles on population genetics analyses.

    PubMed

    Song, W; Cao, L-J; Wang, Y-Z; Li, B-Y; Wei, S-J

    2016-11-07

    The oriental fruit moth (OFM) Grapholita molesta (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) is an important economic pest of stone and pome fruits worldwide. We sequenced the OFM genome using next-generation sequencing and characterized the microsatellite distribution. In total, 56,674 microsatellites were identified, with 11,584 loci suitable for primer design. Twenty-seven polymorphic microsatellites, including 24 loci with trinucleotide repeat and three with pentanucleotide repeat, were validated in 95 individuals from four natural populations. The allele numbers ranged from 4 to 40, with an average value of 13.7 per locus. A high frequency of null alleles was observed in most loci developed for the OFM. Three marker panels, all of the loci, nine loci with the lowest null allele frequencies, and nine loci with the highest null allele frequencies, were established for population genetics analyses. The null allele influenced estimations of genetic diversity parameters but not the OFM's genetic structure. Both a STRUCTURE analysis and a discriminant analysis of principal components, using the three marker panels, divided the four natural populations into three groups. However, more individuals were incorrectly assigned by the STRUCTURE analysis when the marker panel with the highest null allele frequency was used compared with the other two panels. Our study provides empirical research on the effects of null alleles on population genetics analyses. The microsatellites developed will be valuable markers for genetic studies of the OFM.

  13. Genetic diversity and relatedness between Canindé and British Alpine goat breeds in Northeastern Brazil accessed by microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Câmara, T S; Nunes, J F; Diniz, F M; Silva, G R; Araújo, A M

    2017-03-30

    The aim of this study was to access the genetic diversity and relatedness between Canindé and British Alpine goat breeds in the States of Piauí and Ceará using microsatellite markers. Genomic DNA was isolated from hair samples of 99 goats belonging to six different flocks. A panel of polymorphic heterologous microsatellite loci was used to genotype individuals. The microsatellite markers resulted in a total number of 145 alleles, with an average of 8.5 alleles per locus. The observed and expected heterozygosities were ≥0.687 and ≥0.627, respectively, for all loci. The polymorphic information content showed that all loci were highly informative with an overall mean of 0.757. Overall FST across all populations and loci was 18%, which was consistent with the coefficient of gene differentiation (GST = 0.104). AMOVA revealed that 12.8% of the variation was captured between breeds. The Bayesian STRUCTURE clustering detected the maximum likelihood for a model of two genetically distinct groups, in agreement with the number of predefined studied breeds and the two-dimensional plot from the PCoA analysis. The exotic British Alpine breed and the naturalized Brazilian Canindé breed were clearly differentiated by the microsatellite markers, indicating that these two breeds have distant genetic identities, despite the phenotypic similarity.

  14. Genetic Variation of 17 Wild Yellow Perch Populations from the Midwest and East Coast Analyzed Via Microsatellites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We used microsatellite loci, including seven newly developed by us, to analyze the population genetic structure of wild yellow perch Perca flavescens from 17 sampling areas in the Upper Midwest and East Coast of the United States. Our results revealed greater genetic differentiation and finer-scale ...

  15. Microsatellite marker development by multiplex ion torrent PGM sequencing: a case study of the endangered Odorrana narina complex of frogs.

    PubMed

    Igawa, Takeshi; Nozawa, Masafumi; Nagaoka, Mai; Komaki, Shohei; Oumi, Shohei; Fujii, Tamotsu; Sumida, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    The endangered Ryukyu tip-nosed frog Odorrana narina and its related species, Odorrana amamiensis, Odorrana supranarina, and Odorrana utsunomiyaorum, belong to the family Ranidae and are endemically distributed in Okinawa (O. narina), Amami and Tokunoshima (O. amamiensis), and Ishigaki and Iriomote (O. supranarina and O. utsunomiyaorum) Islands. Because of varying distribution patterns, this species complex is an intrinsic model for speciation and adaptation. For effective conservation and molecular ecological studies, further genetic information is needed. For rapid, cost-effective development of several microsatellite markers for these and 2 other species, we used next-generation sequencing technology of Ion Torrent PGM™. Distribution patterns of repeat motifs of microsatellite loci in these modern frog species (Neobatrachia) were similarly skewed. We isolated and characterized 20 new microsatellite loci of O. narina and validated cross-amplification in the three-related species. Seventeen, 16, and 13 loci were cross-amplified in O. amamiensis, O. supranarina, and O. utsunomiyaorum, respectively, reflecting close genetic relationships between them. Mean number of alleles and expected heterozygosity of newly isolated loci varied depending on the size of each inhabited island. Our findings suggested the suitability of Ion Torrent PGM™ for microsatellite marker development. The new markers developed for the O. narina complex will be applicable in conservation genetics and molecular ecological studies.

  16. A novel class of miniature inverted repeat transposable elements (MITEs) that contain hitchhiking (GTCY)n microsatellites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The insertion of transposable elements results in the modification of genome structure and gene expression, and also facilitates the propagation of derived internal sequences. We show that (GTCY)n microsatellite loci within genomes of Lepidoptera are mobile and multilocus due to hitchhiking within ...

  17. The genetic impact of demographic decline and reintroduction in the wild boar (Sus scrofa): a microsatellite analysis.

    PubMed

    Vernesi, C; Crestanello, B; Pecchioli, E; Tartari, D; Caramelli, D; Hauffe, H; Bertorelle, G

    2003-03-01

    The reintroduction of wild boar from central Europe after World War II has contributed substantially to the range expansion of this species in Italy, where indiscriminate hunting in earlier times resulted in extreme demographic reduction. However, the genetic impact of such processes is not well-understood. In this study, 105 individuals from Italian and Hungarian wild boar populations were characterized for nine autosomal microsatellite loci. The Hungarian samples, and two central Italian samples from protected areas (parks) where reintroduction is not documented, were assumed to be representative of the genetic composition of the source and the target populations in the reintroduction process, respectively. Animals hunted in the wild in the Florence area of Tuscany (Italy) were then studied to identify the effects of reintroduction. The results we obtained can be summarized as follows: (i) none of the populations analysed shows genetic evidence of demographic decline; (ii) the three parental populations from Italy and Hungary are genetically distinct; however, the low level of divergence appears in conflict with the naming of the Italian and the European subspecies (Sus scrofa majori and Sus scrofa scrofa, respectively); in addition, the Italian groups appear to be as divergent from each other as they are from the Hungarian population; (iii) most of the individuals hunted near Florence are genetically intermediate between the parental groups, suggesting that hybridization has occurred in this area, the average introgression of Hungarian genotypes is 13%, but approximately 45% of the genetic pool of these individuals can not be directly attributed to any of the parental populations we analysed; (iv) analysis of microsatellite loci, though in a limited number, is an important tool for estimating the genetic effect of reintroduction in the wild boar, and therefore for the development of conservation and management strategies for this species.

  18. Population Genetics of Overwintering Monarch Butterflies, Danaus plexippus (Linnaeus), from Central Mexico Inferred from Mitochondrial DNA and Microsatellite Markers.

    PubMed

    Pfeiler, Edward; Nazario-Yepiz, Nestor O; Pérez-Gálvez, Fernan; Chávez-Mora, Cristina Alejandra; Laclette, Mariana Ramírez Loustalot; Rendón-Salinas, Eduardo; Markow, Therese Ann

    2017-03-01

    Population genetic variation and demographic history in Danaus plexippus (L.), from Mexico were assessed based on analyses of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI; 658 bp) and subunit II (COII; 503 bp) gene segments and 7 microsatellite loci. The sample of 133 individuals included both migratory monarchs, mainly from 4 overwintering sites within the Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve (MBBR) in central Mexico (states of Michoacán and México), and a nonmigratory population from Irapuato, Guanajuato. Haplotype (h) and nucleotide (π) diversities were relatively low, averaging 0.466 and 0.00073, respectively, for COI, and 0.629 and 0.00245 for COII. Analysis of molecular variance of the COI data set, which included additional GenBank sequences from a nonmigratory Costa Rican population, showed significant population structure between Mexican migratory monarchs and nonmigratory monarchs from both Mexico and Costa Rica, suggesting limited gene flow between the 2 behaviorally distinct groups. Interestingly, while the COI haplotype frequencies of the nonmigratory populations differed from the migratory, they were similar to each other, despite the great physical distance between them. Microsatellite analyses, however, suggested a lack of structure between the 2 groups, possibly owing to the number of significant deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium resulting from heterzoygote deficiencies found for most of the loci. Estimates of demographic history of the combined migratory MBBR monarch population, based on the mismatch distribution and Bayesian skyline analyses of the concatenated COI and COII data set (n = 89) suggested a population expansion dating to the late Pleistocene (~35000-40000 years before present) followed by a stable effective female population size (Nef) of about 6 million over the last 10000 years.

  19. Analysis of microsatellite markers in the genome of the plant pathogen Ceratocystis fimbriata.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Melissa C; Wilken, P Markus; Coetzee, Martin P A; Wingfield, Michael J; Wingfield, Brenda D

    2013-01-01

    Ceratocystis fimbriata sensu lato represents a complex of cryptic and commonly plant pathogenic species that are morphologically similar. Species in this complex have been described using morphological characteristics, intersterility tests and phylogenetics. Microsatellite markers have been useful to study the population structure and origin of some species in the complex. In this study we sequenced the genome of C. fimbriata. This provided an opportunity to mine the genome for microsatellites, to develop new microsatellite markers, and map previously developed markers onto the genome. Over 6000 microsatellites were identified in the genome and their abundance and distribution was determined. Ceratocystis fimbriata has a medium level of microsatellite density and slightly smaller genome when compared with other fungi for which similar microsatellite analyses have been performed. This is the first report of a microsatellite analysis conducted on a genome sequence of a fungal species in the order Microascales. Forty-seven microsatellite markers have been published for population genetic studies, of which 35 could be mapped onto the C. fimbriata genome sequence. We developed an additional ten microsatellite markers within putative genes to differentiate between species in the C. fimbriata s.l. complex. These markers were used to distinguish between 12 species in the complex.

  20. Microsatellite markers for the Cabreúva tree, Myroxylon peruiferum (Fabaceae), an endangered medicinal species from the Brazilian Atlantic Forest.

    PubMed

    Schwarcz, K D; Bajay, M M; Macrini, C M T; Salazar, V L P; Souza, A P; Pinheiro, J B; Brancalion, P H S; Rodrigues, R R; Zucchi, M I

    2014-03-26

    The Cabreúva tree, Myroxylon peruiferum, is an endangered tropical species from Brazil used in forest restoration projects. It is known for its medicinal properties. Eleven microsatellite markers were developed for this species, from a microsatellite-enriched library. Nine of these markers, characterized in 30 individuals from a semideciduous forest remnant population in southeast Brazil, were polymorphic, with allele numbers ranging from 2 to 8 per locus; expected and observed heterozygosities ranged from 0.103 to 0.757 and 0.107 to 0.704, respectively. One locus (Mpe-C04) showed significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, probably due to null alleles. Two other loci (Mpe-E09 and Mpe-H07) were monomorphic in this population. These microsatellite loci should be useful for future population genetic studies of this species.

  1. DNA fingerprints of farm animals generated by microsatellite and minisatellite DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Haberfeld, A; Cahaner, A; Yoffe, O; Plotsky, Y; Hillel, J

    1991-01-01

    A multi-locus DNA probe, R18.1, derived from a bovine genomic library, detected DNA fingerprints of highly polymorphic loci in hybridization to genomic DNA from poultry and sheep, and of moderate polymorphic loci in cattle and human DNA. The average numbers of detected bands in chickens and sheep were 27.8 and 21.4, and the average band sharing levels were 0.25 and 0.33, respectively. In hybridization to cattle and human DNA, the results were less polymorphic; nevertheless, individual identification is feasible using probe R18.1. The results obtained by R18.1 were compared to results obtained by Jeffreys minisatellite probe 33.6 and two microsatellite oligonucleotides, (GT)12 and (GTG)5. The total number of detected loci using probes R18.1 and 33.6 were estimated in chickens through family analysis of broilers and the maximal number of detectable loci was calculated.

  2. A microsatellite genetic linkage map of human chromosome 18

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, R.E.; Speer, M.C.; Luo, Ying; Ott, J.; Gilliam, T.C. ); Rojas, K.; Overhauser, J. )

    1993-01-01

    We isolated nine new microsatellite markers from chromosome 18 and further characterized and mapped eight microsatellites developed in other laboratories. We have constructed a framework linkage map of chromosome 18 that includes 14 microsatellite markers (12 dinucleotide and 2 tetranucleotide) and 2 RFLP markers. Cytogenetic localization for the microsatellites was performed by PCR amplification of IS somatic cell hybrids containing different deletions of chromosome 18. Twelve of the microsatellites and one of the RFLPs have heterozygosities greater than 70%. The average heterozygosity of the markers included in the map is 72%. In addition, we have made provisional placements of 3 more microsatellite markers and 2 more RFLP markers. The map lengths (in Kosambi centimorgans) are as follows: sex-averaged, 109.3 cM; male, 72.4 cM; female, 161.2 cM. The average distance between markers in the sex-averaged map is 7.3 cM, and the largest gap between markers is 16.7 cM. Analysis of the data for differences in the female:male map distance ratio revealed significant evidence for a constant difference in the ratio (X[sup 2]=32.25; df = 1; P < 0.001; ratio = 2.5:1). Furthermore, there was significant evidence in favor of a variable female:male map distance ratio across the chromosome compared to a constant distance ratio (X[sup 2] = 27.78; df = 14; P = 0.015). To facilitate their use in genomic screening for disease genes, all of the microsatellite markers used here can be amplified under standard PCR conditions, and most can be used in duplex PCR reactions. 36 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Characterization of 13 microsatellites for Lahontan cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki henshawi) and cross-amplification in six other salmonids.

    PubMed

    Robinson, M L; Kirchoff, V S; Peacock, M M

    2009-01-01

    Thirteen newly developed tri- and tetranucleotide repeat microsatellite markers were developed for Lahontan cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki henshawi), a threatened subspecies endemic to the Lahontan hydrographic basin in the western USA. These loci are highly polymorphic with five to 30 alleles per locus and observed heterozygosities ranging from 0.4 to 0.7. Cross-species amplification of these markers was most successful in the closely related rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, with only three loci amplifying in brown trout, Salmo trutta. Nonoverlapping allelic distributions for many of these loci among the six salmonid species screened suggest these markers may be useful for hybrid determination.

  4. Microsatellite polymorphism and its association with body weight and selected morphometrics of farm red fox (Vulpes vulpes L.).

    PubMed

    Zatoń-Dobrowolska, Magdalena; Mucha, Anna; Wierzbicki, Heliodor; Morrice, David; Moska, Magdalena; Dobrowolski, Maciej; Przysiecki, Piotr

    2014-11-01

    Polymorphism of 30 canine-derived microsatellites was studied in a group of 200 red foxes kept on 2 Polish farms. 22 out of 30 microsatellites were selected to study association between marker genotypes and body weight (BW), body length (BL), body circumference (BC), tail length (TL), ear height (EH), length of the right front limb (FRLL), length of the right rear limb (RRLL), length of the right front foot (FRFL) and length of the right rear foot (RRFL). A total of 112 alleles and 243 genotypes were found at 22 autosomal microsatellite loci. Three monomorphic loci deemed as uninformative were excluded from the study. The association between marker genotypes and the studied traits was analysed using general linear model (GLM) procedure and least squares means (LSM). Linkage disequilibrium (LD) was estimated to assess non-random association between microsatellite loci. Out of 19 microsatellites studied four markers showed no association with the studied traits, three markers had a significant effect on one trait, and another three markers had significant effect on two traits. Among ten microsatellites with significant effect on four economically important traits (BW, BL, BC, TL) four were associated with two characters: marker FH2613 with BW and BC, marker FH2097withBL and BC, marker ZUBECA6 with BW and BC, whereas marker REN75M10 was associated with BL and TL. The strongest LD (r(2) ranged from 0.15 to 0.33) was estimated between nine loci with significant effect on economically important traits (BW, BL, BC, TL).

  5. The development of 10 novel polymorphic microsatellite markers through next generation sequencing and a preliminary population genetic analysis for the endangered Glenelg spiny crayfish, Euastacus bispinosus.

    PubMed

    Miller, Adam D; Van Rooyen, Anthony; Sweeney, Oisín F; Whiterod, Nick S; Weeks, Andrew R

    2013-07-01

    The Glenelg spiny crayfish, Euastacus bispinosus, is an iconic freshwater invertebrate of south eastern Australia and listed as 'endangered' under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999, and 'vulnerable' under the International Union for Conservation of Nature's Red List. The species has suffered major population declines as a result of over-fishing, low environmental flows, the introduction of invasive fish species and habitat degradation. In order to develop an effective conservation strategy, patterns of gene flow, genetic structure and genetic diversity across the species distribution need to be clearly understood. In this study we develop a suite of polymorphic microsatellite markers by next generation sequencing. A total of 15 polymorphic loci were identified and 10 characterized using 22 individuals from the lower Glenelg River. We observed low to moderate genetic variation across most loci (mean number of alleles per locus = 2.80; mean expected heterozygosity = 0.36) with no evidence of individual loci deviating significantly from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Marker independence was confirmed with tests for linkage disequilibrium, and analyses indicated no evidence of null alleles across loci. Individuals from two additional sites (Crawford River, Victoria; Ewens Ponds Conservation Park, South Australia) were genotyped at all 10 loci and a preliminary investigation of genetic diversity and population structure was undertaken. Analyses indicate high levels of genetic differentiation among sample locations (F ST = 0.49), while the Ewens Ponds population is genetically homogeneous, indicating a likely small founder group and ongoing inbreeding. Management actions will be needed to restore genetic diversity in this and possibly other at risk populations. These markers will provide a valuable resource for future population genetic assessments so that an effective framework can be developed for implementing conservation strategies for E

  6. Quantitative Trait Loci for Murine Growth

    PubMed Central

    Cheverud, J. M.; Routman, E. J.; Duarte, FAM.; van-Swinderen, B.; Cothran, K.; Perel, C.

    1996-01-01

    Body size is an archetypal quantitative trait with variation due to the segregation of many gene loci, each of relatively minor effect, and the environment. We examine the effects of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) on age-specific body weights and growth in the F(2) intercross of the LG/J and SM/J strains of inbred mice. Weekly weights (1-10 wk) and 75 microsatellite genotypes were obtained for 535 mice. Interval mapping was used to locate and measure the genotypic effects of QTLs on body weight and growth. QTL effects were detected on 16 of the 19 autosomes with several chromosomes carrying more than one QTL. The number of QTLs for age-specific weights varied from seven at 1 week to 17 at 10 wk. The QTLs were each of relatively minor, subequal effect. QTLs affecting early and l