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Sample records for additional negative charge

  1. Beneficial effects of activated carbon additives on the performance of negative lead-acid battery electrode for high-rate partial-state-of-charge operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Jiayuan; Ding, Ping; Zhang, Hao; Wu, Xianzhang; Chen, Jian; Yang, Yusheng

    2013-11-01

    Experiments are made with negative electrode of 2 V cell and 12 V lead-acid battery doped with typical activated carbon additives. It turns out that the negative electrode containing tens-of-micron-sized carbon particles in NAM exhibits markedly increased HRPSoC cycle life than the one containing carbon particles with much smaller size of several microns or the one containing no activated carbon. The improved performance is mainly attributed to the optimized NAM microstructure and the enhanced electrode reaction kinetics by introducing appropriate activated carbon. The beneficial effects can be briefly summarized from three aspects. First, activated carbon acts as new porous-skeleton builder to increase the porosity and active surface of NAM, and thus facilitates the electrolyte diffusion from surface to inner and provides more sites for crystallization/dissolution of lead sulfate; second, activated carbon plays the role of electrolyte supplier to provide sufficient H2SO4 in the inner of plate when the diffusion of H2SO4 from plate surface cannot keep pace of the electrode reaction; Third, activated carbon acts as capacitive buffer to absorb excess charge current which would otherwise lead to insufficient NAM conversion and hydrogen evolution.

  2. Study of electrochemically active carbon, Ga2O3 and Bi2O3 as negative additives for valve-regulated lead-acid batteries working under high-rate, partial-state-of-charge conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Li; Chen, Baishuang; Wu, Jinzhu; Wang, Dianlong

    2014-02-01

    Electrochemically active carbon (EAC), Gallium (III) oxide (Ga2O3) and Bismuth (III) oxide (Bi2O3) are used as the negative additives of valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries to prolong the cycle life of VRLA batteries under high-rate partial-state-of-charge (HRPSoC) conditions, and their effects on the cycle life of VRLA batteries are investigated. It is found that the addition of EAC in negative active material can restrain the sulfation of the negative plates and prolong the cycle performance of VRLA batteries under HRPSoC conditions. It is also observed that the addition of Ga2O3 or Bi2O3 in EAC can effectively increase the overpotential of hydrogen evolution on EAC electrodes, and decrease the evolution rate of hydrogen. An appropriate addition amount of Ga2O3 or Bi2O3 in the negative plates of VRLA batteries can decrease the cut-off charging voltage, increase the cut-off discharging voltage, and prolong the cycle life of VRLA batteries under HRPSoC conditions. The battery added with 0.5% EAC and 0.01% Ga2O3 in negative active material shows a lowest cut-off charging voltage and a highest cut-off discharging voltage under HRPSoC conditions, and its' cycle life reaches about 8100 cycles which is at least three times longer than that without Ga2O3.

  3. 49 CFR 377.209 - Additional charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... CHARGES Extension of Credit to Shippers by Motor Common Carriers, Water Common Carriers, and Household Goods Freight Forwarders § 377.209 Additional charges. When a carrier— (a) Has collected the amount of tariff charges represented in a freight bill presented by it as the total amount of such charges, and...

  4. Interaction of linear polyamines with negatively charged phospholipids: the effect of polyamine charge distance.

    PubMed

    Finger, Sebastian; Schwieger, Christian; Arouri, Ahmad; Kerth, Andreas; Blume, Alfred

    2014-07-01

    The binding of cationic polyamines to negatively charged lipid membranes is driven by electrostatic interactions and additional hydrophobic contributions. We investigated the effect of polyamines with different number of charges and charge separation on the phase transition behavior of vesicles of phosphatidylglycerols (dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol and dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol) to differentiate between effects caused by the number of charges, the charge distance, and the hydrophobicity of the methylene spacer. Using differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy complemented with monolayer experiments, we found that the binding constant of polyamines to negatively charged lipid vesicles depends as expected on the number of charges. However, for diamines, the effect of binding on the main phase transition of phosphatidylglycerols (PGs) is also strongly influenced by the charge distance between the ammonium groups in the backbone. Oligoamines with charges separated by two or three methylene groups bind more strongly and have larger stabilizing effects on the lipid gel phase of PGs. With multivalent polyamines, the appearance of several transition peaks points to effects of molecular crowding on the surface, i.e., binding of only two or three charges to the surface in the case of spermine, and possible concomitant domain formation.

  5. Membrane Permeabilization Induced by Sphingosine: Effect of Negatively Charged Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Rojo, Noemi; Sot, Jesús; Viguera, Ana R.; Collado, M. Isabel; Torrecillas, Alejandro; Gómez-Fernández, J.C.; Goñi, Félix M.; Alonso, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine [(2S, 3R, 4E)-2-amino-4-octadecen-1, 3-diol] is the most common sphingoid long chain base in sphingolipids. It is the precursor of important cell signaling molecules, such as ceramides. In the last decade it has been shown to act itself as a potent metabolic signaling molecule, by activating a number of protein kinases. Moreover, sphingosine has been found to permeabilize phospholipid bilayers, giving rise to vesicle leakage. The present contribution intends to analyze the mechanism by which this bioactive lipid induces vesicle contents release, and the effect of negatively charged bilayers in the release process. Fluorescence lifetime measurements and confocal fluorescence microscopy have been applied to observe the mechanism of sphingosine efflux from large and giant unilamellar vesicles; a graded-release efflux has been detected. Additionally, stopped-flow measurements have shown that the rate of vesicle permeabilization increases with sphingosine concentration. Because at the physiological pH sphingosine has a net positive charge, its interaction with negatively charged phospholipids (e.g., bilayers containing phosphatidic acid together with sphingomyelins, phosphatidylethanolamine, and cholesterol) gives rise to a release of vesicular contents, faster than with electrically neutral bilayers. Furthermore, phosphorous 31-NMR and x-ray data show the capacity of sphingosine to facilitate the formation of nonbilayer (cubic phase) intermediates in negatively charged membranes. The data might explain the pathogenesis of Niemann-Pick type C1 disease. PMID:24940775

  6. Iodide uptake by negatively charged clay interlayers?

    PubMed

    Miller, Andrew; Kruichak, Jessica; Mills, Melissa; Wang, Yifeng

    2015-09-01

    Understanding iodide interactions with clay minerals is critical to quantifying risk associated with nuclear waste disposal. Current thought assumes that iodide does not interact directly with clay minerals due to electrical repulsion between the iodide and the negatively charged clay layers. However, a growing body of work indicates a weak interaction between iodide and clays. The goal of this contribution is to report a conceptual model for iodide interaction with clays by considering clay mineral structures and emergent behaviors of chemical species in confined spaces. To approach the problem, a suite of clay minerals was used with varying degrees of isomorphic substitution, chemical composition, and mineral structure. Iodide uptake experiments were completed with each of these minerals in a range of swamping electrolyte identities (NaCl, NaBr, KCl) and concentrations. Iodide uptake behaviors form distinct trends with cation exchange capacity and mineral structure. These trends change substantially with electrolyte composition and concentration, but do not appear to be affected by solution pH. The experimental results suggest that iodide may directly interact with clays by forming ion-pairs (e.g., NaI(aq)) which may concentrate within the interlayer space as well as the thin areas surrounding the clay particle where water behavior is more structured relative to bulk water. Ion pairing and iodide concentration in these zones is probably driven by the reduced dielectric constant of water in confined space and by the relatively high polarizability of the iodide species.

  7. Electron interactions with positively and negatively multiply charged biomolecular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feketeová, Linda

    2012-07-01

    Interactions of positively and negatively multiply charged biomolecular clusters with low-energy electrons, from ~ 0 up to 50 eV of electron energy, were investigated in a high resolution Fourier-Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance mass spectrometer equipped with an electrospray ionisation source. Electron-induced dissociation reactions of these clusters depend on the energy of the electrons, the size and the charge state of the cluster. The positively charged clusters [Mn+2H]2+ of zwitterionic betaines, M = (CH3)2XCH2CO2 (X = NCH3 and S), do capture an electron in the low electron energy region (< 10 eV). At higher electron energies neutral evaporation from the cluster becomes competitive with Coulomb explosion. In addition, a series of singly charged fragments arise from bond cleavage reactions, including decarboxylation and CH3 group transfer, due to the access of electronic excited states of the precursor ions. These fragmentation reactions depend on the type of betaine (X = NCH3 or S). For the negative dianionic clusters of tryptophan [Trp9-2H]2-, the important channel at low electron energies is loss of a neutral. Coulomb explosion competes from 19.8 eV and dominates at high electron energies. A small amount of [Trp2-H-NH3]- is observed at 21.8 eV.

  8. Experimental evidence on removing copper and light-induced degradation from silicon by negative charge

    SciTech Connect

    Boulfrad, Yacine Lindroos, Jeanette; Yli-Koski, Marko; Savin, Hele; Wagner, Matthias; Wolny, Franziska

    2014-11-03

    In addition to boron and oxygen, copper is also known to cause light-induced degradation (LID) in silicon. We have demonstrated previously that LID can be prevented by depositing negative corona charge onto the wafer surfaces. Positively charged interstitial copper ions are proposed to diffuse to the negatively charged surface and consequently empty the bulk of copper. In this study, copper out-diffusion was confirmed by chemical analysis of the near surface region of negatively/positively charged silicon wafer. Furthermore, LID was permanently removed by etching the copper-rich surface layer after negative charge deposition. These results demonstrate that (i) copper can be effectively removed from the bulk by negative charge, (ii) under illumination copper forms a recombination active defect in the bulk of the wafer causing severe light induced degradation.

  9. Experimental evidence on removing copper and light-induced degradation from silicon by negative charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulfrad, Yacine; Lindroos, Jeanette; Wagner, Matthias; Wolny, Franziska; Yli-Koski, Marko; Savin, Hele

    2014-11-01

    In addition to boron and oxygen, copper is also known to cause light-induced degradation (LID) in silicon. We have demonstrated previously that LID can be prevented by depositing negative corona charge onto the wafer surfaces. Positively charged interstitial copper ions are proposed to diffuse to the negatively charged surface and consequently empty the bulk of copper. In this study, copper out-diffusion was confirmed by chemical analysis of the near surface region of negatively/positively charged silicon wafer. Furthermore, LID was permanently removed by etching the copper-rich surface layer after negative charge deposition. These results demonstrate that (i) copper can be effectively removed from the bulk by negative charge, (ii) under illumination copper forms a recombination active defect in the bulk of the wafer causing severe light induced degradation.

  10. Non-additivity of pair interactions in charged colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlayson, Samuel D.; Bartlett, Paul

    2016-07-01

    It is general wisdom that the pair potential of charged colloids in a liquid may be closely approximated by a Yukawa interaction, as predicted by the classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. We experimentally determine the effective forces in a binary mixture of like-charged particles, of species 1 and 2, with blinking optical tweezers. The measured forces are consistent with a Yukawa pair potential but the (12) cross-interaction is not equal to the geometric mean of the (11) and (22) like-interactions, as expected from DLVO. The deviation is a function of the electrostatic screening length and the size ratio, with the cross-interaction measured being consistently weaker than DLVO predictions. The corresponding non-additivity parameter is negative and grows in magnitude with increased size asymmetry.

  11. Effect of positively and negatively charged liposomes on skin permeation of drugs.

    PubMed

    Ogiso, T; Yamaguchi, T; Iwaki, M; Tanino, T; Miyake, Y

    2001-01-01

    To clarify the effect of the surface charge of liposomes on percutaneous absorption, the permeation of liposomal drugs through rat skin was investigated in vitro and in vivo. Liposomes were prepared using egg yolk lecithin (EPC, phase transition temperature, -15 to -17 degrees C), cholesterol and dicetylphosphate (DP) or stearylamine (SA) (10:1:1, mol/mol). Also examined was the penetration behavior of positively and negatively charged liposomes, using a fluorescent probe (Nile Red). The in vitro penetration rate of melatonin (MT) entrapped in negatively charged liposomes was higher than that of positively charged ones (p<0.05). When the percutaneous absorption of ethosuximide (ES) encapsulated was estimated in vivo, the absorption of ES from negatively charged liposomes was slightly higher than that from positively charged liposomes. Additionally, the absorption of ES from both types of liposomes was superior to that from the lipid mixtures consisting of the same composition as the vesicles. The percutaneous absorption of betahistine (BH) from a gel formulation containing negatively charged liposomes of BH was much more than that from the formulation with positively charged ones, with 2-fold higher AUC (p<0.05). Histological studies revealed that the negatively charged liposomes diffused to the dermis and the lower portion of hair follicles through the stratum corneum and the follicles much faster than the positive vesicles at the initial time stage after application. Thus, the rapid penetration of negatively charged liposomes would contribute to the increased permeation of drugs through the skin.

  12. Is the negative glow plasma of a direct current glow discharge negatively charged?

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanov, E. A.; Saifutdinov, A. I.; Demidov, V. I.; Kudryavtsev, A. A.

    2015-02-15

    A classic problem in gas discharge physics is discussed: what is the sign of charge density in the negative glow region of a glow discharge? It is shown that traditional interpretations in text-books on gas discharge physics that states a negative charge of the negative glow plasma are based on analogies with a simple one-dimensional model of discharge. Because the real glow discharges with a positive column are always two-dimensional, the transversal (radial) term in divergence with the electric field can provide a non-monotonic axial profile of charge density in the plasma, while maintaining a positive sign. The numerical calculation of glow discharge is presented, showing a positive space charge in the negative glow under conditions, where a one-dimensional model of the discharge would predict a negative space charge.

  13. Maximizing Ion Current by Space Charge Neutralization using Negative Ions and Dust Particles

    SciTech Connect

    A. Smirnov; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2005-01-25

    Ion current extracted from an ion source (ion thruster) can be increased above the Child-Langmuir limit if the ion space charge is neutralized. Similarly, the limiting kinetic energy density of the plasma flow in a Hall thruster might be exceeded if additional mechanisms of space charge neutralization are introduced. Space charge neutralization with high-mass negative ions or negatively charged dust particles seems, in principle, promising for the development of a high current or high energy density source of positive light ions. Several space charge neutralization schemes that employ heavy negatively charged particles are considered. It is shown that the proposed neutralization schemes can lead, at best, only to a moderate but nonetheless possibly important increase of the ion current in the ion thruster and the thrust density in the Hall thruster.

  14. Electrostatic Power Generation from Negatively Charged, Simulated Lunar Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang H.; King, Glen C.; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Park, Yeonjoon

    2010-01-01

    Research was conducted to develop an electrostatic power generator for future lunar missions that facilitate the utilization of lunar resources. The lunar surface is known to be negatively charged from the constant bombardment of electrons and protons from the solar wind. The resulting negative electrostatic charge on the dust particles, in the lunar vacuum, causes them to repel each other minimizing the potential. The result is a layer of suspended dust about one meter above the lunar surface. This phenomenon was observed by both Clementine and Surveyor spacecrafts. During the Apollo 17 lunar landing, the charged dust was a major hindrance, as it was attracted to the astronauts' spacesuits, equipment, and the lunar buggies. The dust accumulated on the spacesuits caused reduced visibility for the astronauts, and was unavoidably transported inside the spacecraft where it caused breathing irritation [1]. In the lunar vacuum, the maximum charge on the particles can be extremely high. An article in the journal "Nature", titled "Moon too static for astronauts?" (Feb 2, 2007) estimates that the lunar surface is charged with up to several thousand volts [2]. The electrostatic power generator was devised to alleviate the hazardous effects of negatively charged lunar soil by neutralizing the charged particles through capacitive coupling and thereby simultaneously harnessing power through electric charging [3]. The amount of power generated or collected is dependent on the areal coverage of the device and hovering speed over the lunar soil surface. A thin-film array of capacitors can be continuously charged and sequentially discharged using a time-differentiated trigger discharge process to produce a pulse train of discharge for DC mode output. By controlling the pulse interval, the DC mode power can be modulated for powering devices and equipment. In conjunction with a power storage system, the electrostatic power generator can be a power source for a lunar rover or other

  15. Arabinogalactan proteins are incorporated in negatively charged coffee brew melanoidins.

    PubMed

    Bekedam, E Koen; De Laat, Marieke P F C; Schols, Henk A; Van Boekel, Martinus A J S; Smit, Gerrit

    2007-02-07

    The charge properties of melanoidins in high molecular weight (HMw) coffee brew fractions, isolated by diafiltration and membrane dialysis, were studied. Ion exchange chromatography experiments with the HMw fractions showed that coffee brew melanoidins were negatively charged whereas these molecules did not expose any positive charge at the pH of coffee brew. Fractions with different ionic charges were isolated and subsequently characterized by means of the specific extinction coefficient (K(mix 405nm)), sugar composition, phenolic group content, nitrogen content, and the arabinogalactan protein (AGP) specific Yariv gel-diffusion assay. The isolated fractions were different in composition and AGP was found to be present in one of the HMw fractions. The AGP accounted for 6% of the coffee brew dry matter and had a moderate negative charge, probably caused by the presence of uronic acids. As the fraction that precipitated with Yariv was brown (K(mix 405nm) = 1.2), compared to a white color in the green bean, it was concluded that these AGPs had undergone Maillard reaction resulting in an AGP-melanoidin complex. The presence of mannose (presumably from galactomannan) indicates the incorporation of galactomannans in the AGP-melanoidin complex. As the uronic acid content in the more negatively charged melanoidin-rich, AGP-poor HMw fractions decreased, it was hypothesized that acidic groups are formed or incorporated during melanoidin formation.

  16. The Distinction between Positive and Negative Reinforcement: Some Additional Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidman, Murray

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the distinction between positive and negative reinforcement and some additional considerations. He states that the concept of negative reinforcement has caused confusion, and he believes that the difficulty stems from conventions of ordinary speech, in which the term "negative" usually denotes the opposite of…

  17. Increased negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy centers in fluorinated diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Shanying; Hu, Evelyn L.

    2013-07-29

    We investigated the effect of fluorine-terminated diamond surface on the charged state of shallow nitrogen vacancy defect centers (NVs). Fluorination is achieved with CF{sub 4} plasma, and the surface chemistry is confirmed with x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. Photoluminescence of these ensemble NVs reveals that fluorine-treated surfaces lead to a higher and more stable negatively charged nitrogen vacancy (NV{sup −}) population than oxygen-terminated surfaces. NV{sup −} population is estimated by the ratio of negative to neutral charged NV zero-phonon lines. Surface chemistry control of NV{sup −} density is an important step towards improving the optical and spin properties of NVs for quantum information processing and magnetic sensing.

  18. Targeting Negative Surface Charges of Cancer Cells by Multifunctional Nanoprobes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bingdi; Le, Wenjun; Wang, Yilong; Li, Zhuoquan; Wang, Dong; Ren, Lei; Lin, Ling; Cui, Shaobin; Hu, Jennifer J.; Hu, Yihui; Yang, Pengyuan; Ewing, Rodney C.; Shi, Donglu; Cui, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    A set of electrostatically charged, fluorescent, and superparamagnetic nanoprobes was developed for targeting cancer cells without using any molecular biomarkers. The surface electrostatic properties of the established cancer cell lines and primary normal cells were characterized by using these nanoprobes with various electrostatic signs and amplitudes. All twenty two randomly selected cancer cell lines of different organs, but not normal control cells, bound specifically to the positively charged nanoprobes. The relative surface charges of cancer cells could be quantified by the percentage of cells captured magnetically. The activities of glucose metabolism had a profound impact on the surface charge level of cancer cells. The data indicate that an elevated glycolysis in the cancer cells led to a higher level secretion of lactate. The secreted lactate anions are known to remove the positive ions, leaving behind the negative changes on the cell surfaces. This unique metabolic behavior is responsible for generating negative cancer surface charges in a perpetuating fashion. The metabolically active cancer cells are shown to a unique surface electrostatic pattern that can be used for recovering cancer cells from the circulating blood and other solutions. PMID:27570558

  19. Targeting Negative Surface Charges of Cancer Cells by Multifunctional Nanoprobes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bingdi; Le, Wenjun; Wang, Yilong; Li, Zhuoquan; Wang, Dong; Ren, Lei; Lin, Ling; Cui, Shaobin; Hu, Jennifer J; Hu, Yihui; Yang, Pengyuan; Ewing, Rodney C; Shi, Donglu; Cui, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    A set of electrostatically charged, fluorescent, and superparamagnetic nanoprobes was developed for targeting cancer cells without using any molecular biomarkers. The surface electrostatic properties of the established cancer cell lines and primary normal cells were characterized by using these nanoprobes with various electrostatic signs and amplitudes. All twenty two randomly selected cancer cell lines of different organs, but not normal control cells, bound specifically to the positively charged nanoprobes. The relative surface charges of cancer cells could be quantified by the percentage of cells captured magnetically. The activities of glucose metabolism had a profound impact on the surface charge level of cancer cells. The data indicate that an elevated glycolysis in the cancer cells led to a higher level secretion of lactate. The secreted lactate anions are known to remove the positive ions, leaving behind the negative changes on the cell surfaces. This unique metabolic behavior is responsible for generating negative cancer surface charges in a perpetuating fashion. The metabolically active cancer cells are shown to a unique surface electrostatic pattern that can be used for recovering cancer cells from the circulating blood and other solutions.

  20. Study on space charge compensation in negative hydrogen ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, A. L.; Chen, J. E.; Peng, S. X. Ren, H. T.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, J. F.; Xu, Y.; Guo, Z. Y.

    2016-02-15

    Negative hydrogen ion beam can be compensated by the trapping of ions into the beam potential. When the beam propagates through a neutral gas, these ions arise due to gas ionization by the beam ions. However, the high neutral gas pressure may cause serious negative hydrogen ion beam loss, while low neutral gas pressure may lead to ion-ion instability and decompensation. To better understand the space charge compensation processes within a negative hydrogen beam, experimental study and numerical simulation were carried out at Peking University (PKU). The simulation code for negative hydrogen ion beam is improved from a 2D particle-in-cell-Monte Carlo collision code which has been successfully applied to H{sup +} beam compensated with Ar gas. Impacts among ions, electrons, and neutral gases in negative hydrogen beam compensation processes are carefully treated. The results of the beam simulations were compared with current and emittance measurements of an H{sup −} beam from a 2.45 GHz microwave driven H{sup −} ion source in PKU. Compensation gas was injected directly into the beam transport region to modify the space charge compensation degree. The experimental results were in good agreement with the simulation results.

  1. Clinical study on the treatment of chronic wound with negatively-charged aerosol

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xiaoxia; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Zhao-Qiang; Shi, Yan; Xie, Julin

    2013-01-01

    Background: Aerosols are defined as the mixture of liquid or solid particles/droplets that are stably suspending in air. When carrying a certain amount of negative charge, they will be defined as negatively-charged aerosol. This report investigates the effect of negatively-charged aerosol on the healing of chronic wound. Methods: 140 patients with chronic wound were assigned randomly into two groups. Normal, routine treatment was applied on chronic wounds of 73 patients depending on wounds situation (control group). While another 67 similar patients received negatively-charged aerosol therapy (2 hours per time, twice a day) and were used as experimental group. Wound healing assessment including the patients’ complication, detection of bacteria in wound secretions, and evaluation of wound healing. Results: The results of our study showed that after the application of negatively-charged aerosols, and condition and infection rate of wounds from experiment group were better and lower than that of control group. In comparison with control group, the relative size of wounds from experiment group was significantly smaller (P<0.05) at post-treatment day 0, 7, 14, 21 and 28. Also, the time required for wound healing in the experimental group was significantly shorter (P<0.05) than that in the control group. Conclusion: Negatively-charged aerosol therapy can accelerate wound healing speed and improve the healing of chronic wounds. Thus, we wound recommend the consideration of Negatively-charged aerosol therapies in addition to normal wound treatment in cases of chronic wound. PMID:24040472

  2. Construction principle for stable multiply-negative charged molecular systems. Part II. Triply-negative charged systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheller, M. K.; Cederbaum, L. S.

    1994-06-01

    Following a recently introduced construction principle, triply-negative charged compounds are designed and investigated. The specific series of systems discussed are M2X3-5 alkali and M2X3-7 earth alkali halides. For the highly ionic members in these series considerable evidence for their stability to fragmentation and to electron autodetachment is obtained at various levels of theory.

  3. Large negatively charged organic host molecules as inhibitors of endonuclease enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tauran, Yannick; Anjard, Christophe; Kim, Beomjoon; Rhimi, Moez; Coleman, Anthony W

    2014-10-07

    Three large negatively charged organic host molecules; β-cyclodextrin sulphate, para-sulphonato-calix[6]arene and para-sulphonato-calix[8]arene have been shown to be effective inhibitors of endonuclease in the low micromolar range, additionally para-sulphonato-calix[8]arene is a partial inhibitor of rhDNase I.

  4. Negative thermal expansion induced by intermetallic charge transfer.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Masaki; Oka, Kengo; Nabetani, Koichiro

    2015-06-01

    Suppression of thermal expansion is of great importance for industry. Negative thermal expansion (NTE) materials which shrink on heating and expand on cooling are therefore attracting keen attention. Here we provide a brief overview of NTE induced by intermetallic charge transfer in A-site ordered double perovskites SaCu3Fe4O12 and LaCu3Fe4-x Mn x O12, as well as in Bi or Ni substituted BiNiO3. The last compound shows a colossal dilatometric linear thermal expansion coefficient exceeding -70 × 10(-6) K(-1) near room temperature, in the temperature range which can be controlled by substitution.

  5. The sheath structure around a negatively charged rocket payload

    SciTech Connect

    Neubert, T.; Gilchrist, B.E.; Banks, P.M.; Williamson, P.R. ); Mandell, M.J.; Katz, I. ); Sasaki, S.; Oyama, K.I. ); Raitt, W.J.; Meyers, N.B. )

    1990-05-01

    The sheath structure around a rocket payload charged up to 460 V negative relative to the ambient ionospheric plasma is investigated experimentally and by computer simulations. In one of the experimental modes, the voltage between the payloads was increased linearly from 0 to 460 V in 2.5 s. In this case the tethered mother/daughter functioned as a double probe, the negative probe (mother) reaching large negative potentials, while the positive probe (daughter) stayed close to the ambient plasma potential. A floating probe array was mounted on the mother with probes located, 25, 50, 75, and 100 cm from the rocket surface. The internal impedance of the array was smaller than the probe/plasma impedance, which influenced the potential measurements. However, the measurements contain signatures, which the authors interpret as resulting from the outward expansion of the ion sheath with increasing negative mother potential. This conclusion is substantiated by NASCAP/LEO computer simulations of space charge limited flow. At high potentials, the observed ion current flowing to the mother increased more strongly with bias potential than found from the simulations. It is suggested that the enhancement of the current is generated by secondary electrons emitted by the ions bombarding the payload skin. The effects of the motion of the mother (540-580 m/s) and of the ambient magnetic field have been assessed by the code. It was estimated that the ion current to the mother was increased by 20% relative to a stationary payload, while the incorporation of a magnetic field had no practical influence on the simulation results.

  6. Negative space charge effects in photon-enhanced thermionic emission solar converters

    SciTech Connect

    Segev, G.; Weisman, D.; Rosenwaks, Y.; Kribus, A.

    2015-07-06

    In thermionic energy converters, electrons in the gap between electrodes form a negative space charge and inhibit the emission of additional electrons, causing a significant reduction in conversion efficiency. However, in Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission (PETE) solar energy converters, electrons that are reflected by the electric field in the gap return to the cathode with energy above the conduction band minimum. These electrons first occupy the conduction band from which they can be reemitted. This form of electron recycling makes PETE converters less susceptible to negative space charge loss. While the negative space charge effect was studied extensively in thermionic converters, modeling its effect in PETE converters does not account for important issues such as this form of electron recycling, nor the cathode thermal energy balance. Here, we investigate the space charge effect in PETE solar converters accounting for electron recycling, with full coupling of the cathode and gap models, and addressing conservation of both electric and thermal energy. The analysis shows that the negative space charge loss is lower than previously reported, allowing somewhat larger gaps compared to previous predictions. For a converter with a specific gap, there is an optimal solar flux concentration. The optimal solar flux concentration, the cathode temperature, and the efficiency all increase with smaller gaps. For example, for a gap of 3 μm the maximum efficiency is 38% and the optimal flux concentration is 628, while for a gap of 5 μm the maximum efficiency is 31% and optimal flux concentration is 163.

  7. Negatively-charged particle pickup in the Enceladus plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, G. H.; Arridge, C. S.; Coates, A. J.; Wellbrock, A.; Kriegel, H.; Meier, P.

    2013-09-01

    One of the key discoveries of the Cassini spacecraft's traverses of the Enceladus plume was that of negatively-charged nanograins and ions, as detected by CAPS- ELS. The trajectories of these charged particles are expected to be affected by the motional electric field in the vicinity of the moon, especially those of the low mass ions. During some Enceladus encounters, the particles have been observed arriving at the spacecraft in the local ram direction, i.e. close to being at rest with respect to Enceladus, presumably shortly after their formation and before the acceleration associated with the pickup process. During other encounters however, the ions have been observed to arrive at the spacecraft well away from the ram direction, in the gyroplane at ~90 degrees to the local magnetic field direction, indicating their pickup by the local plasma flow. We present an overview of observations of these negative pickup nanograins in the Enceladus plume, and our interpretation of these observations, and attempts to trace the origins of the grains using a hybrid simulation of the plume.

  8. Negative Ion CID Fragmentation of O-linked Oligosaccharide Aldoses—Charge Induced and Charge Remote Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doohan, Roisin A.; Hayes, Catherine A.; Harhen, Brendan; Karlsson, Niclas Göran

    2011-06-01

    Collision induced dissociation (CID) fragmentation was compared between reducing and reduced sulfated, sialylated, and neutral O-linked oligosaccharides. It was found that fragmentation of the [M - H]- ions of aldoses with acidic residues gave unique Z-fragmentation of the reducing end GalNAc containing the acidic C-6 branch, where the entire C-3 branch was lost. This fragmentation pathway, which is not seen in the alditols, showed that the process involved charge remote fragmentation catalyzed by a reducing end acidic anomeric proton. With structures containing sialic acid on both the C-3 and C-6 branch, the [M - H]- ions were dominated by the loss of sialic acid. This fragmentation pathway was also pronounced in the [M - 2H]2- ions revealing both the C-6 Z-fragment plus its complementary C-3 C-fragment in addition to glycosidic and cross ring fragmentation. This generation of the Z/C-fragment pairs from GalNAc showed that the charges were not participating in their generation. Fragmentation of neutral aldoses showed pronounced Z-fragmentation believed to be generated by proton migration from the C-6 branch to the negatively charged GalNAc residue followed by charge remote fragmentation similar to the acidic oligosaccharides. In addition, A-type fragments generated by charge induced fragmentation of neutral oligosaccharides were observed when the charge migrated from C-1 of the GalNAc to the GlcNAc residue followed by rearrangement to accommodate the 0,2A-fragmentation. LC-MS also showed that O-linked aldoses existed as interchangeable α/β pyranose anomers, in addition to a third isomer (25% of the total free aldose) believed to be the furanose form.

  9. Negative thermal expansion induced by intermetallic charge transfer

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Masaki; Oka, Kengo; Nabetani, Koichiro

    2015-01-01

    Suppression of thermal expansion is of great importance for industry. Negative thermal expansion (NTE) materials which shrink on heating and expand on cooling are therefore attracting keen attention. Here we provide a brief overview of NTE induced by intermetallic charge transfer in A-site ordered double perovskites SaCu3Fe4O12 and LaCu3Fe4−xMnxO12, as well as in Bi or Ni substituted BiNiO3. The last compound shows a colossal dilatometric linear thermal expansion coefficient exceeding −70 × 10−6 K−1 near room temperature, in the temperature range which can be controlled by substitution. PMID:27877801

  10. Laboratory infrared spectroscopy of gaseous negatively charged polyaromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Juehan; Berden, Giel; Oomens, Jos

    2014-06-01

    Based largely on infrared spectroscopic evidence, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules are now widely accepted to occur abundantly in the interstellar medium. Laboratory infrared spectra have been obtained for a large variety of neutral and cationic PAHs, but data for anionic PAHs are scarce. Nonetheless, in regions with relatively high electron densities and low UV photon fluxes, PAHs have been suggested to occur predominantly as negatively charged ions (anions), having substantial influence on cloud chemistry. While some matrix spectra have been reported for radical anion PAHs, no data is available for even-electron anions, which are more stable against electron detachment. Here we present the first laboratory infrared spectra of deprotonated PAHs ([PAH-H]{sup –}) in the wavelength ranges between 6 and 16 μm and around 3 μm. Wavelength-dependent infrared multiple-photon electron detachment is employed to obtain spectra for deprotonated naphthalene, anthracene, and pyrene in the gas phase. Spectra are compared with theoretical spectra computed at the density functional theory level. We show that the relative band intensities in different ranges of the IR spectrum deviate significantly from those of neutral and positively charged PAHs, and moreover from those of radical anion PAHs. These relative band intensities are, however, well reproduced by theory. An analysis of the frontier molecular orbitals of the even- and odd-electron anions reveals a high degree of charge localization in the deprotonated systems, qualitatively explaining the observed differences and suggesting unusually high electric dipole moments for this class of PAH molecules.

  11. Spin-triplet negatively charged excitons in GaAs quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, A. J.; Pepper, M.; Simmons, M. Y.; Ritchie, D. A.

    1995-09-01

    We observe magnetic-field-induced transitions in the interband optical spectra of GaAs quantum wells with a small excess electron density. Their strengthening with excess electron density, in addition to their light polarization dependence, demonstrate that these correspond to (excited) spin-triplet states of the negatively charged exciton. The second-electron binding energy of both singlet and triplet X- strengthens with field.

  12. Controllable transition from positive space charge to negative space charge in an inverted cylindrical magnetron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rane, R.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Ranjan, M.; Mukherjee, S.

    2016-01-01

    The combined effect of magnetic field (B), gas pressure (P), and the corresponding discharge voltage on the discharge properties of argon in inverted cylindrical magnetron has been investigated. In the experiment, anode is biased with continuous 10 ms sinusoidal half wave. It is observed that at a comparatively higher magnetic field (i.e., >200 gauss) and lower operating pressure (i.e., <1 × 10-3 mbar), the discharge extinguishes and demands a high voltage to reignite. Discharge current increases with increase in magnetic field and starts reducing at sufficiently higher magnetic field for a particular discharge voltage due to restricted electron diffusion towards the anode. It is observed that B/P ratio plays an important role in sustaining the discharge and is constant for a discharge voltage. The discharge is transformed to negative space charge regime from positive space charge regime at certain B/P ratio and this ratio varies linearly with the discharge voltage. The space charge reversal is indicated by the radial profile of the floating potential and plasma potential in between two electrodes for different magnetic fields. At a particular higher magnetic field (beyond 100 gauss), the floating potential increases gradually with the radial distance from cathode, whereas it remains almost constant at lower magnetic field.

  13. Controllable transition from positive space charge to negative space charge in an inverted cylindrical magnetron

    SciTech Connect

    Rane, R. Ranjan, M.; Mukherjee, S.; Bandyopadhyay, M.

    2016-01-15

    The combined effect of magnetic field (B), gas pressure (P), and the corresponding discharge voltage on the discharge properties of argon in inverted cylindrical magnetron has been investigated. In the experiment, anode is biased with continuous 10 ms sinusoidal half wave. It is observed that at a comparatively higher magnetic field (i.e., >200 gauss) and lower operating pressure (i.e., <1 × 10{sup −3} mbar), the discharge extinguishes and demands a high voltage to reignite. Discharge current increases with increase in magnetic field and starts reducing at sufficiently higher magnetic field for a particular discharge voltage due to restricted electron diffusion towards the anode. It is observed that B/P ratio plays an important role in sustaining the discharge and is constant for a discharge voltage. The discharge is transformed to negative space charge regime from positive space charge regime at certain B/P ratio and this ratio varies linearly with the discharge voltage. The space charge reversal is indicated by the radial profile of the floating potential and plasma potential in between two electrodes for different magnetic fields. At a particular higher magnetic field (beyond 100 gauss), the floating potential increases gradually with the radial distance from cathode, whereas it remains almost constant at lower magnetic field.

  14. Negative differential mobility for negative carriers as revealed by space charge measurements on crosslinked polyethylene insulated model cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teyssedre, G.; Vu, T. T. N.; Laurent, C.

    2015-12-01

    Among features observed in polyethylene materials under relatively high field, space charge packets, consisting in a pulse of net charge that remains in the form of a pulse as it crosses the insulation, are repeatedly observed but without complete theory explaining their formation and propagation. Positive charge packets are more often reported, and the models based on negative differential mobility(NDM) for the transport of holes could account for some charge packets phenomenology. Conversely, NDM for electrons transport has never been reported so far. The present contribution reports space charge measurements by pulsed electroacoustic method on miniature cables that are model of HVDC cables. The measurements were realized at room temperature or with a temperature gradient of 10 °C through the insulation under DC fields on the order 30-60 kV/mm. Space charge results reveal systematic occurrence of a negative front of charges generated at the inner electrode that moves toward the outer electrode at the beginning of the polarization step. It is observed that the transit time of the front of negative charge increases, and therefore the mobility decreases, with the applied voltage. Further, the estimated mobility, in the range 10-14-10-13 m2 V-1 s-1 for the present results, increases when the temperature increases for the same condition of applied voltage. The features substantiate the hypothesis of negative differential mobility used for modelling space charge packets.

  15. An analysis of five negative sprite-parent discharges and their associated thunderstorm charge structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boggs, Levi D.; Liu, Ningyu; Splitt, Michael; Lazarus, Steven; Glenn, Chad; Rassoul, Hamid; Cummer, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    In this study we analyze the discharge morphologies of five confirmed negative sprite-parent discharges and the associated charge structures of the thunderstorms that produced them. The negative sprite-parent lightning took place in two thunderstorms that were associated with a tropical disturbance in east central and south Florida. The first thunderstorm, which moved onshore in east central Florida, produced four of the five negative sprite-parent discharges within a period of 17 min, as it made landfall from the Atlantic Ocean. These negative sprite-parents were composed of bolt-from-the-blue (BFB), hybrid intracloud-negative cloud-to-ground (IC-NCG), and multicell IC-NCGs discharges. The second thunderstorm, which occurred inland over south Florida, produced a negative sprite-parent that was a probable hybrid IC-NCG discharge and two negative gigantic jets (GJs). Weakened upper positive charge with very large midlevel negative charge was inferred for both convective cells that initiated the negative-sprite-parent discharges. Our study suggests tall, intense convective systems with high wind shear at the middle to upper regions of the cloud accompanied by low cloud-to-ground (CG) flash rates promote these charge structures. The excess amount of midlevel negative charge results in these CG discharges transferring much more charge to ground than typical negative CG discharges. We find that BFB discharges prefer an asymmetrical charge structure that brings the negative leader exiting the upper positive charge region closer to the lateral positive screening charge layer. This may be the main factor in determining whether a negative leader exiting the upper positive region of the thundercloud forms a BFB or GJ.

  16. Photoionization in micelles: Addition of charged electron acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenland, Chris; Kevan, Larry

    The relative photoyield of the electron donor N, N, N', N'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB), solubilized in sodium and lithium dodecyl sulfate micelles with added charged electron acceptors was investigated. It was attempted to control the acceptor distance from a charged micellar interface by differently charged acceptors, cationic dimethyl viologen and anionic ferricyanide. However, back electron transfer from both cationic and anionic acceptors was found to be efficient. Thus simple electrostatic arguments for control of the photoyield do not seem applicable. Salt effects associated with the added ionic acceptors which partially neutralize the ionic micellar interface are suggested to be an important factor.

  17. High flux and antifouling properties of negatively charged membrane for dyeing wastewater treatment by membrane distillation.

    PubMed

    An, Alicia Kyoungjin; Guo, Jiaxin; Jeong, Sanghyun; Lee, Eui-Jong; Tabatabai, S Assiyeh Alizadeh; Leiknes, TorOve

    2016-10-15

    This study investigated the applicability of membrane distillation (MD) to treat dyeing wastewater discharged by the textile industry. Four different dyes containing methylene blue (MB), crystal violet (CV), acid red 18 (AR18), and acid yellow 36 (AY36) were tested. Two types of hydrophobic membranes made of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) were used. The membranes were characterized by testing against each dye (foulant-foulant) and the membrane-dye (membrane-foulant) interfacial interactions and their mechanisms were identified. The MD membranes possessed negative charges, which facilitated the treatment of acid and azo dyes of the same charge and showed higher fluxes. In addition, PTFE membrane reduced the wettability with higher hydrophobicity of the membrane surface. The PTFE membrane evidenced especially its resistant to dye absorption, as its strong negative charge and chemical structure caused a flake-like (loose) dye-dye structure to form on the membrane surface rather than in the membrane pores. This also enabled the recovery of flux and membrane properties by water flushing (WF), thereby direct-contact MD with PTFE membrane treating 100 mg/L of dye mixtures showed stable flux and superior color removal during five days operation. Thus, MD shows a potential for stable long-term operation in conjunction with a simple membrane cleaning process, and its suitability in dyeing wastewater treatment.

  18. Negative differential mobility for negative carriers as revealed by space charge measurements on crosslinked polyethylene insulated model cables

    SciTech Connect

    Teyssedre, G. Laurent, C.; Vu, T. T. N.

    2015-12-21

    Among features observed in polyethylene materials under relatively high field, space charge packets, consisting in a pulse of net charge that remains in the form of a pulse as it crosses the insulation, are repeatedly observed but without complete theory explaining their formation and propagation. Positive charge packets are more often reported, and the models based on negative differential mobility(NDM) for the transport of holes could account for some charge packets phenomenology. Conversely, NDM for electrons transport has never been reported so far. The present contribution reports space charge measurements by pulsed electroacoustic method on miniature cables that are model of HVDC cables. The measurements were realized at room temperature or with a temperature gradient of 10 °C through the insulation under DC fields on the order 30–60 kV/mm. Space charge results reveal systematic occurrence of a negative front of charges generated at the inner electrode that moves toward the outer electrode at the beginning of the polarization step. It is observed that the transit time of the front of negative charge increases, and therefore the mobility decreases, with the applied voltage. Further, the estimated mobility, in the range 10{sup −14}–10{sup −13} m{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} for the present results, increases when the temperature increases for the same condition of applied voltage. The features substantiate the hypothesis of negative differential mobility used for modelling space charge packets.

  19. Surface sliding friction of negatively charged polyelectrolyte gels.

    PubMed

    Kagata, Go; Gong, Jian Ping

    2007-04-15

    The friction between two polyelectrolyte gels carrying the same or opposite sign of charges has been investigated using a rheometer. It is found that the friction was strongly dependent on the interfacial interaction between two gel surfaces. In the repulsive interaction case, especially, the friction was extremely low. The friction behavior is attempted to be described in terms of the hydrodynamic lubrication of the solvent layer between two like-charged gel surfaces, which is formed due to the electrostatic repulsion of the two gel surfaces. From the theoretical analysis (hydrodynamic mechanism), the friction behaviors were explained qualitatively, all of the experimental results, nevertheless, could not be understood well. The viscoelastic feature of the gel and the non-Newtonian behavior of water at the friction interface are considered to be important to elucidate the gel friction.

  20. Charging-delay induced dust acoustic collisionless shock wave: Roles of negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Samiran; Bharuthram, R.; Khan, Manoranjan; Gupta, M. R.

    2006-11-15

    The effects of charging-delay and negative ions on nonlinear dust acoustic waves are investigated. It has been found that the charging-delay induced anomalous dissipation causes generation of dust acoustic collisionless shock waves in an electronegative dusty plasma. The small but finite amplitude wave is governed by a Korteweg-de Vries Burger equation in which the Burger term arises due to the charging-delay. Numerical investigations reveal that the charging-delay induced dissipation and shock strength decreases (increases) with the increase of negative ion concentration (temperature)

  1. Interactions of Cationic Peptides and Ions with Negatively Charged Lipid Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taheri-Araghi, Sattar

    In this thesis we study the interactions of ions and cationic peptides with a negatively charged lipid bilayer in an ionic solution where the electrostatic interactions are screened. We first examine the problem of charge renormalization and inversion of a highly charged bilayer with low dielectric constant. To be specific, we consider an asymmetrically charged lipid bilayer, in which only one layer is negatively charged. In particular, we study how dielectric discontinuities and charge correlations among lipid charges and condensed counterions influence the effective charge of the surface. When counterions are monovalent, e. g. , Na+, our mean-field approach implies that dielectric discontinuities can enhance counterion condensation. A simple scaling picture shows how the effects of dielectric discontinuities and surface-charge distributions are intertwined: Dielectric discontinuities diminish condensation if the backbone charge is uniformly smeared out while counterions are localized in space; they can, however, enhance condensation when the backbone charge is discrete. In the presence of asymmetric salts such as CaCl2, we find that the correlation effect, treated at the Gaussian level, is more pronounced when the surface has a lower dielectric constant, inverting the sign of the charge at a smaller value of Ca2+ concentration. In the last chapter we study binding of cationic peptides onto a lipid-bilayer membrane. The peptide not only interacts electrostatically with anionic lipids, rearranging their spatial distributions, but it can also insert hydrophobically into the membrane, expanding the area of its binding layer (i. e. , the outer layer). We examine how peptide charges and peptide insertion (thus area expansion) are intertwined. Our results show that, depending on the bilayer's surface charge density and peptide hydrophobicity, there is an optimal peptide charge yielding the maximum peptide penetration. Our results shed light on the physics behind the

  2. Interactions of PAMAM dendrimers with negatively charged model biomembranes.

    PubMed

    Yanez Arteta, Marianna; Ainalem, Marie-Louise; Porcar, Lionel; Martel, Anne; Coker, Helena; Lundberg, Dan; Chang, Debby P; Soltwedel, Olaf; Barker, Robert; Nylander, Tommy

    2014-11-13

    We have investigated the interactions between cationic poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers of generation 4 (G4), a potential gene transfection vector, with net-anionic model biomembranes composed of different ratios of zwitterionic phosphocholine (PC) and anionic phospho-L-serine (PS) phospholipids. Two types of model membranes were used: solid-supported bilayers, prepared with lipids carrying palmitoyl-oleoyl (PO) and diphytanoyl (DPh) acyl chains, and free-standing bilayers, formed at the interface between two aqueous droplets in oil (droplet interface bilayers, DIBs) using the DPh-based lipids. G4 dendrimers were found to translocate through POPC:POPS bilayers deposited on silica surfaces. The charge density of the bilayer affects translocation, which is reduced when the ionic strength increases. This shows that the dendrimer-bilayer interactions are largely controlled by their electrostatic attraction. The structure of the solid-supported bilayers remains intact upon translocation of the dendrimer. However, the amount of lipids in the bilayer decreases and dendrimer/lipid aggregates are formed in bulk solution, which can be deposited on the interfacial layers upon dilution of the system with dendrimer-free solvent. Electrophysiology measurements on DIBs confirm that G4 dendrimers cross the lipid membranes containing PS, which then become more permeable to ions. The obtained results have implications for PAMAM dendrimers as delivery vehicles to cells.

  3. Negatively charged liposomes show potent adjuvant activity when simply admixed with protein antigens

    PubMed Central

    Yanasarn, Nijaporn; Sloat, Brian R.; Cui, Zhengrong

    2011-01-01

    Liposomes have been investigated extensively as a vaccine delivery system. Herein the adjuvant activities of liposomes with different net surface charges (neutral, positive, or negative) were evaluated when admixed with protein antigens, ovalbumin (OVA, pI = 4.7), Bacillus anthracis protective antigen protein (PA, pI = 5.6), or cationized OVA (cOVA). Mice immunized subcutaneously with OVA admixed with different liposomes generated different antibody responses. Interestingly, OVA admixed with net negatively charged liposomes prepared with DOPA was as immunogenic as OVA admixed with positively charged liposomes prepared with DOTAP. Immunization of mice with the anthrax PA protein admixed with the net negatively charged DOPA liposomes also induced a strong and functional anti-PA antibody response. When the cationized OVA was used as a model antigen, liposomes with net neutral, negative, or positive charges showed comparable adjuvant activities. Immunization of mice with the OVA admixed with DOPA liposomes also induced OVA-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses and significantly delayed the growth of OVA-expressing B16-OVA tumors in mice. However, not all net negatively charged liposomes showed a strong adjuvant activity. The adjuvant activity of the negatively charged liposomes may be related to the liposome’s ability (i) to up-regulate the expression of molecules related to the activation and maturation of antigen-presenting cells and (ii) to slightly facilitate the uptake of the antigens by antigen-presenting cells. Simply admixing certain negatively charged liposomes with certain protein antigens of interest may represent a novel platform for vaccine development. PMID:21615153

  4. An in situ generated carbon as integrated conductive additive for hierarchical negative plate of lead-acid battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saravanan, M.; Ganesan, M.; Ambalavanan, S.

    2014-04-01

    In this work, we report an in situ generated carbon from sugar as additive in the Negative Active Mass (NAM) which enhances the charge-discharge characteristics of the lead-acid cells. In situ formed sugar derived carbon (SDC) with leady oxide (LO) provides a conductive network and excellent protection against NAM irreversible lead sulfation. The effect of SDC and carbon black (CB) added negative plates are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), galvanostatic charge-discharge, cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), respectively. The results show that subtle changes in the addition of carbon to NAM led to subsequent changes on the performance during partial-state-of-charge (PSoC) operations in lead-acid cells. Furthermore, SDC added cells exhibit remarkable improvement in the rate capability, active material utilization, cycle performance and charge acceptance compared to that of the conventional CB added cells. The impact of SDC with LO at various synthesis conditions on the electrochemical performance of the negative plate is studied systematically.

  5. Measurement of positively and negatively charged particles inside PMSE during MIDAS SOLSTICE 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smiley, B.; Robertson, S.; HoráNyi, M.; Blix, T.; Rapp, M.; Latteck, R.; Gumbel, J.

    2003-04-01

    A magnetically shielded, charge collecting rocket probe was used on two flights in the MIddle Atmosphere Dynamics and Structure (MIDAS) Studies of Layered STructures and ICE (SOLSTICE) 2001 rocket campaign over Andøya, Norway. The probe was a graphite collection surface with a permanent magnet underneath to deflect electrons. The first MIDAS was launched 17 June 2001 into a strong, multiply layered PMSE. The probe measured negative particles inside an electron biteout within the PMSE, having a peak charge number density of -1500 charges per cubic centimeter. The second MIDAS was launched 24 June 2001 into another strong, multiply layered PMSE. The probe saw a band of positive particles centered in the lowest radar echo maximum, and a negative particle layer accompanied by a positive ion excess. The charge number densities for the positive and negative PMSE particles were several thousand charges per cubic centimeter. Unexpectedly, 2 km beneath the PMSE, the probe also found a very pronounced negative layer, which was probably an NLC. Computer simulations of incoming, negatively charged ice grains were performed using a rarefied flow field representative of the MIDAS payload at zero angle of attack. Ice grains ≤1 nm in radius were diverted by the leading shock front, indicating the smallest detectable ice particle by this probe.

  6. Negatively charged silver nanoparticles with potent antibacterial activity and reduced toxicity for pharmaceutical preparations

    PubMed Central

    Salvioni, Lucia; Galbiati, Elisabetta; Collico, Veronica; Alessio, Giulia; Avvakumova, Svetlana; Corsi, Fabio; Tortora, Paolo; Prosperi, Davide; Colombo, Miriam

    2017-01-01

    Background The discovery of new solutions with antibacterial activity as efficient and safe alternatives to common preservatives (such as parabens) and to combat emerging infections and drug-resistant bacterial pathogens is highly expected in cosmetics and pharmaceutics. Colloidal silver nanoparticles (NPs) are attracting interest as novel effective antimicrobial agents for the prevention of several infectious diseases. Methods Water-soluble, negatively charged silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were synthesized by reduction with citric and tannic acid and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, zeta potential, differential centrifuge sedimentation, and ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy. AgNPs were tested with model Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria in comparison to two different kinds of commercially available AgNPs. Results In this work, AgNPs with higher antibacterial activity compared to the commercially available colloidal silver solutions were prepared and investigated. Bacteria were plated and the antibacterial activity was tested at the same concentration of silver ions in all samples. The AgNPs did not show any significant reduction in the antibacterial activity for an acceptable time period. In addition, AgNPs were transferred to organic phase and retained their antibacterial efficacy in both aqueous and nonaqueous media and exhibited no toxicity in eukaryotic cells. Conclusion We developed AgNPs with a 20 nm diameter and negative zeta potential with powerful antibacterial activity and low toxicity compared to currently available colloidal silver, suitable for cosmetic preservatives and pharmaceutical preparations administrable to humans and/or animals as needed.

  7. First-principles calculation of a negatively charged boron-vacancy center in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunisaki, Aiko; Muruganathan, Manoharan; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Kodera, Tetsuo

    2017-04-01

    As the boron doping in diamond has been well established, and a negatively charged boron-vacancy (BV) center has an active electron paramagnetic resonance, the BV center is an attractive candidate for spin information devices. Using the first-principles calculation, we report the electronic structure of the BV center in diamond for its various charge states. A geometrically optimized BV center in the diamond supercell exhibited C 3 v symmetry. The BV+1 charge state did not exhibit any spin splitting defect levels, while the BV0 and BV‑2 charge states showed a small energy separation between spin-polarized states. On the other hand, the negatively charged BV‑1 center possesses bound states with a larger separation inside the diamond bandgap. Moreover, it has the spin-triplet ground state and the spin-conserved triplet excited state. These characteristics indicate that the BV‑1 center in diamond is a good candidate for qubit operation.

  8. Stroke multiplicity and horizontal scale of negative charge regions in thunderclouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Earle R.; Mattos, Enrique V.; Machado, Luiz A. T.

    2016-05-01

    An X-band polarimetric radar and multiple lightning detection systems are used to document the initial cloud-to-ground lightning flash in a large number (46 cases) of incipient thunderstorms, as part of the CHUVA-Vale field campaign during the 2011/2012 spring-summer in southeast Brazil. The results show an exceptionally low stroke multiplicity (87% of flashes with single stroke) in the initial ground flashes, a finding consistent with the limited space available for the positive leader extension into new regions of negative space charge in compact cells. The results here are contrasted with the behavior of ground flashes in mesoscale thunderstorms in previous studies. Additionally, we found evidence for a minimum scale (radar echo >20 dBZ) for lightning initiation (>3 km in radius) and that the peak currents of initial cloud-to-ground flashes in these compact thunderstorms are only half as large as return stroke peak currents in general.

  9. Polymerization on the rocks: negatively-charged alpha-amino acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, A. R. Jr; Bohler, C.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Oligomers of the negatively-charged amino acids, glutamic acid, aspartic acid, and O-phospho-L-serine are adsorbed by hydroxylapatite and illite with affinities that increase with oligomer length. In the case of oligo-glutamic acids adsorbed on hydroxylapatite, addition of an extra residue results in an approximately four-fold increase in the strength of adsorption. Oligomers much longer than the 7-mer are retained tenaciously by the mineral. Repeated incubation of short oligo-glutamic acids adsorbed on hydroxylapatite or illite with activated monomer leads to the accumulation of oligomers at least 45 units long. The corresponding reactions of aspartic acid and O-phospho-L-serine on hydroxylapatite are less effective in generating long oligomers, while illite fails to accumulate substantial amounts of long oligomers of aspartic acid or of O-phospho-L-serine.

  10. Polymerization on the rocks: negatively-charged alpha-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Hill, A R; Böhler, C; Orgel, L E

    1998-06-01

    Oligomers of the negatively-charged amino acids, glutamic acid, aspartic acid, and O-phospho-L-serine are adsorbed by hydroxylapatite and illite with affinities that increase with oligomer length. In the case of oligo-glutamic acids adsorbed on hydroxylapatite, addition of an extra residue results in an approximately four-fold increase in the strength of adsorption. Oligomers much longer than the 7-mer are retained tenaciously by the mineral. Repeated incubation of short oligo-glutamic acids adsorbed on hydroxylapatite or illite with activated monomer leads to the accumulation of oligomers at least 45 units long. The corresponding reactions of aspartic acid and O-phospho-L-serine on hydroxylapatite are less effective in generating long oligomers, while illite fails to accumulate substantial amounts of long oligomers of aspartic acid or of O-phospho-L-serine.

  11. Effect of space charge on the negative oxygen flux during reactive sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moens, F.; Kalvas, T.; Van Steenberge, S.; Depla, D.

    2017-03-01

    Negative ions often play a distinctive role in the phase formation during reactive sputter deposition. The path of these high energetic ions is often assumed to be straight. In this paper, it is shown that in the context of reactive magnetron sputtering space charge effects are decisive for the energetic negative ion trajectories. To investigate the effect of space charge spreading, reactive magnetron sputter experiments were performed in compound mode with target materials that are expected to have a high secondary ion emission yield (MgO and CeO2). By the combination of energy flux measurements, and simulations, a quantitative value for the negative oxygen ion yield can be derived.

  12. Water freezes differently on positively and negatively charged surfaces of pyroelectric materials.

    PubMed

    Ehre, David; Lavert, Etay; Lahav, Meir; Lubomirsky, Igor

    2010-02-05

    Although ice melts and water freezes under equilibrium conditions at 0 degrees C, water can be supercooled under homogeneous conditions in a clean environment down to -40 degrees C without freezing. The influence of the electric field on the freezing temperature of supercooled water (electrofreezing) is of topical importance in the living and inanimate worlds. We report that positively charged surfaces of pyroelectric LiTaO3 crystals and SrTiO3 thin films promote ice nucleation, whereas the same surfaces when negatively charged reduce the freezing temperature. Accordingly, droplets of water cooled down on a negatively charged LiTaO3 surface and remaining liquid at -11 degrees C freeze immediately when this surface is heated to -8 degrees C, as a result of the replacement of the negative surface charge by a positive one. Furthermore, powder x-ray diffraction studies demonstrated that the freezing on the positively charged surface starts at the solid/water interface, whereas on a negatively charged surface, ice nucleation starts at the air/water interface.

  13. HBV maintains electrostatic homeostasis by modulating negative charges from phosphoserine and encapsidated nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Su, Pei-Yi; Yang, Ching-Jen; Chu, Tien-Hua; Chang, Chih-Hsu; Chiang, Chiayn; Tang, Fan-Mei; Lee, Chih-Yin; Shih, Chiaho

    2016-01-01

    Capsid assembly and stability of hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein (HBc) particles depend on balanced electrostatic interactions between encapsidated nucleic acids and an arginine-rich domain (ARD) of HBc in the capsid interior. Arginine-deficient ARD mutants preferentially encapsidated spliced viral RNA and shorter DNA, which can be fully or partially rescued by reducing the negative charges from acidic residues or serine phosphorylation of HBc, dose-dependently. Similarly, empty capsids without RNA encapsidation can be generated by ARD hyper-phosphorylation in insect, bacteria, and human hepatocytes. De-phosphorylation of empty capsids by phosphatase induced capsid disassembly. Empty capsids can convert into RNA-containing capsids by increasing HBc serine de-phosphorylation. In an HBV replicon system, we observed a reciprocal relationship between viral and non-viral RNA encapsidation, suggesting both non-viral RNA and serine-phosphorylation could serve as a charge balance buffer in maintaining electrostatic homeostasis. In addition, by comparing the biochemistry assay results between a replicon and a non-replicon system, we observed a correlation between HBc de-phosphorylation and viral replication. Balanced electrostatic interactions may be important to other icosahedral particles in nature. PMID:27958343

  14. Influence of bismuth on the charging ability of negative plates in lead-acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, L. T.; Ceylan, H.; Haigh, N. P.; Manders, J. E.

    To examine the influence of bismuth on the charging ability of negative plates in lead-acid batteries, plates are made from three types of oxides: (i) leady oxide of high quality which contains virtually no bismuth (termed 'control oxide'); (ii) control oxide in which bismuth oxide is blended at bismuth levels from 0.01 to 0.12 wt.%; (iii) leady oxide produced from Pasminco VRLA Refined™ lead (0.05-0.06 wt.%Bi). An experimental tool—the 'conversion indicator'—is developed to assess the charging ability of the test negative plates when cycling under either zero percent state-of-charge (SoC)/full-charge or partial state-of-charge (PSoC) duty. Although the conversion indicator is not the true charging efficiency, the two parameters have a close relationship, namely, the higher the conversion indicator, the greater the charging efficiency. Little difference is found in the charging ability, irrespective of bismuth content and discharge rate, when the plates are subjected to zero percent SoC/full-charge duty; the conversion indicator lies in the range 81-84%. By contrast, there is a marked difference when the negative plates are subjected to PSoC duty, i.e. consecutive cycling through 90-60, 70-40, 80-40 and 90-40% SoC windows. Up to 0.06 wt.%Bi improves the charging ability, especially with a low and narrow PSoC window (40-70% SoC) of the type that will be experienced in 42 V powernet automobile and hybrid electric duties. To maximize this beneficial effect, bismuth must be distributed uniformly in the plates. This is best achieved by using VRLA Refined™ lead for oxide production.

  15. Process for preparing negative plates for use in a dry charge battery

    SciTech Connect

    Wegner, P.C.

    1986-02-11

    This patent describes a process for the production of lead-containing negative plates for use in a dry charge battery. The process cnsists of drying wet negative plates while protecting them from oxidation. This improvement is accomplished by treating the wet negative plates prior to the drying operation with an aqueous soluton of an oxidation inhibiting agent selected from salicylic acid, and 2-naphtol. The plates are then protected against oxidation during drying; and dry negative plates are obtained which are resistant to the absorption of water from the atmosphere on storage but are wet immediately by battery acid in use.

  16. Numerical modelling of needle-grid electrodes for negative surface corona charging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Y.; Chen, G.; Rotaru, M.

    2011-08-01

    Surface potential decay measurement is a simple and low cost tool to examine electrical properties of insulation materials. During the corona charging stage, a needle-grid electrodes system is often used to achieve uniform charge distribution on the surface of the sample. In this paper, a model using COMSOL Multiphysics has been developed to simulate the gas discharge. A well-known hydrodynamic drift-diffusion model was used. The model consists of a set of continuity equations accounting for the movement, generation and loss of charge carriers (electrons, positive and negative ions) coupled with Poisson's equation to take into account the effect of space and surface charges on the electric field. Four models with the grid electrode in different positions and several mesh sizes are compared with a model that only has the needle electrode. The results for impulse current and surface charge density on the sample clearly show the effect of the extra grid electrode with various positions.

  17. Examining the association between rumination, negative affectivity, and negative affect induced by a paced auditory serial addition task.

    PubMed

    Feldner, Matthew T; Leen-Feldner, Ellen W; Zvolensky, Michael J; Lejuez, C W

    2006-09-01

    The present study examined the relations among a depressive ruminative response style, a general propensity to experience negative affectivity, and negative affect induced by a paced serial auditory addition task (PASAT). Ninety nonclinical individuals completed a computerized version of the PASAT, which elicits a generalized negative affect response [Lejuez, C. W., Kahler, C. W., & Brown, R. A. (2003). A modified computer version of the paced auditory serial addition task (PASAT) as a laboratory-based stressor: Implications for behavioral assessment. Behavior Therapist, 26, 290-292]. As hypothesized, there was a moderate correlation between depressive rumination and a propensity to experience negative affect, as indexed both by a significant association with a negative affect personality factor and the prediction of negative affect elicited during the provocation. Findings also suggested that dispositional negative affectivity moderated the effects of a depressive ruminative response style on the valence but not arousal dimensions of emotional responding to the challenge. These findings are discussed in terms of improving our understanding of rumination and its potential role in emotional vulnerability processes.

  18. Bactericidal action mechanism of negatively charged food grade clove oil nanoemulsions.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Hamid; Liu, Fei; Hategekimana, Joseph; Sharif, Hafiz Rizwan; Qi, Jing; Ali, Barkat; Bian, Yuan-Yuan; Ma, Jianguo; Yokoyama, Wallace; Zhong, Fang

    2016-04-15

    Clove oil (CO) anionic nanoemulsions were prepared with varying ratios of CO to canola oil (CA), emulsified and stabilized with purity gum ultra (PGU), a newly developed succinylated waxy maize starch. Interfacial tension measurements showed that CO acted as a co-surfactant and there was a gradual decrease in interfacial tension which favored the formation of small droplet sizes on homogenization until a critical limit (5:5% v/v CO:CA) was reached. Antimicrobial activity of the negatively charged CO nanoemulsion was determined against Gram positive GPB (Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram negative GNB (Escherichia coli) bacterial strains using minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and a time kill dynamic method. Negatively charged PGU emulsified CO nanoemulsion showed prolonged antibacterial activities against Gram positive bacterial strains. We concluded that negatively charged CO nanoemulsion droplets self-assemble with GPB cell membrane, and facilitated interaction with cellular components of bacteria. Moreover, no electrostatic interaction existed between negatively charged droplets and the GPB membrane.

  19. Loss of microvascular negative charges accompanied by interstitial edema in septic rats' heart.

    PubMed

    Gotloib, L; Shostak, A; Galdi, P; Jaichenko, J; Fudin, R

    1992-01-01

    We studied the effect of Gram-negative sepsis on negative charges of heart capillaries and myocardial cells. We used a rat model of multiorgan failure, with ruthenium red (RR) and polyethyleneimine (PEI) as cationic binding tracers. Twenty-four hours after induction of sepsis, negative charges had decreased in glycocalyx and basement membrane of myocardial capillary endothelial cells. There were substantial amounts of interstitial edema. Density of anionic charges in the sarcolemmal glycocalyx complex of cardiac cells was markedly reduced. Myocardial cells' mitochondria consistently showed morphologic changes, whose severity ranged between stages II and IV C of Trump. Thirteen days after induction of sepsis, capillary endothelial and myocardial cells had recovered almost completely and showed no intracellular edema. Gram-negative sepsis caused a significant reduction in negative charges normally present in the microvascular wall as well as on myocardial cells. Consequently, several membranes limiting the various compartments of heart tissue lost their structural integrity. This morphometric data could explain the development of protein-rich interstitial edema and defective cell volume regulation observed in cardiac muscle of endotoxin-shocked animals. This myocardial edema may be at the origin of the cardiac dysfunction observed in both experimental and human septic shock.

  20. Effect of argon addition on plasma parameters and dust charging in hydrogen plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kakati, B. Kausik, S. S.; Saikia, B. K.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Saxena, Y. C.

    2014-10-28

    Experimental results on effect of adding argon gas to hydrogen plasma in a multi-cusp dusty plasma device are reported. Addition of argon modifies plasma density, electron temperature, degree of hydrogen dissociation, dust current as well as dust charge. From the dust charging profile, it is observed that the dust current and dust charge decrease significantly up to 40% addition of argon flow rate in hydrogen plasma. But beyond 40% of argon flow rate, the changes in dust current and dust charge are insignificant. Results show that the addition of argon to hydrogen plasma in a dusty plasma device can be used as a tool to control the dust charging in a low pressure dusty plasma.

  1. Bright and dark triplet states of the negatively charged magnetoexcitons revealed in photoluminescence and time-resolved measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munteanu, F. M.; Rickel, D. G.; Perry, C. H.; Kim, Yongmin; Simmons, J. A.; Reno, J. L.

    2000-12-01

    Continuous and time-resolved magnetophotoluminescence measurements of three GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs heterostructures have been made in high magnetic fields. The spectra revealed the presence of a singlet and two triplet states (the so-called ``bright'' and ``dark'' states) of the negatively charged magnetoexciton, in addition to the neutral exciton. For an asymmetrically doped single quantum well sample, the singlet and the dark triplet states converge (and possibly cross) at a field of about 40 T. The two single heterojunction samples on the other hand show no such convergence, and the singlet remains the fundamental state at least in fields to 60 T. The lifetimes of the charged magnetoexcitons increased linearly with field, whereas the neutral exciton was essentially field independent. The results clarify earlier experimental studies, and provide a confirmation of a recent theory of the behavior of charged magnetoexcitons in magnetic fields by Wojs et al. [Phys Rev. B 62, 4630 (2000)].

  2. Ion-exchange molecularly imprinted polymer for the extraction of negatively charged acesulfame from wastewater samples.

    PubMed

    Zarejousheghani, Mashaalah; Schrader, Steffi; Möder, Monika; Lorenz, Pierre; Borsdorf, Helko

    2015-09-11

    Acesulfame is a known indicator that is used to identify the introduction of domestic wastewater into water systems. It is negatively charged and highly water-soluble at environmental pH values. In this study, a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) was synthesized for negatively charged acesulfame and successfully applied for the selective solid phase extraction (SPE) of acesulfame from influent and effluent wastewater samples. (Vinylbenzyl)trimethylammonium chloride (VBTA) was used as a novel phase transfer reagent, which enhanced the solubility of negatively charged acesulfame in the organic solvent (porogen) and served as a functional monomer in MIP synthesis. Different molecularly imprinted polymers were synthesized to optimize the extraction capability of acesulfame. The different materials were evaluated using equilibrium rebinding experiments, selectivity experiments and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The most efficient MIP was used in a molecularly imprinted-solid phase extraction (MISPE) protocol to extract acesulfame from wastewater samples. Using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS-MS) analysis, detection and quantification limits were achieved at 0.12μgL(-1) and 0.35μgL(-1), respectively. Certain cross selectivity for the chemical compounds containing negatively charged sulfonamide functional group was observed during selectivity experiments.

  3. Air Purification Effect of Positively and Negatively Charged Ions Generated by Discharge Plasma at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Kazuo; Nojima, Hideo

    2001-08-01

    In this paper, the air purification effect of positively and negatively charged ions generated by discharge plasma at atmospheric pressure is reported. We have developed a novel ion generation device which consists of a cylindrical glass tube and attached inner and outer mesh electrodes. With the application of AC voltage between the electrodes, positively charged ions and negatively charged ions have been generated at atmospheric pressure. The ion densities of 3.0× 104--7.0× 104 counts/cm3 have been obtained with the AC voltage of 1.8-2.3 kV (effective value). We have examined the air purification properties of this device. By the operation of this device, the initial oxygen nitride (NO) density of 10 ppm in 1 m3 (in cigarette smoke) was decreased to 1 ppm after 30 min. The number of suspended germs in air has been significantly reduced by the use of this type of ion generation device.

  4. Charged particle flows in the beam extraction region of a negative ion source for NBI

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, S.; Tsumori, K.; Nakano, H.; Osakabe, M.; Nagaoka, K.; Takeiri, Y.; Kaneko, O.; Kisaki, M.; Ikeda, K.; Shibuya, M.

    2016-02-15

    Experiments by a four-pin probe and photodetachment technique were carried out to investigate the charged particle flows in the beam extraction region of a negative hydrogen ion source for neutral beam injector. Electron and positive ion flows were obtained from the polar distribution of the probe saturation current. Negative hydrogen ion flow velocity and temperature were obtained by comparing the recovery times of the photodetachment signals at opposite probe tips. Electron and positive ions flows are dominated by crossed field drift and ambipolar diffusion. Negative hydrogen ion temperature is evaluated to be 0.12 eV.

  5. Dust charging processes with a Cairns-Tsallis distribution function with negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Abid, A. A.; Khan, M. Z.; Yap, S. L.; Terças, H.; Mahmood, S.

    2016-01-15

    Dust grain charging processes are presented in a non-Maxwellian dusty plasma following the Cairns-Tsallis (q, α)–distribution, whose constituents are the electrons, as well as the positive/negative ions and negatively charged dust grains. For this purpose, we have solved the current balance equation for a negatively charged dust grain to achieve an equilibrium state value (viz., q{sub d} = constant) in the presence of Cairns-Tsallis (q, α)–distribution. In fact, the current balance equation becomes modified due to the Boltzmannian/streaming distributed negative ions. It is numerically found that the relevant plasma parameters, such as the spectral indexes q and α, the positive ion-to-electron temperature ratio, and the negative ion streaming speed (U{sub 0}) significantly affect the dust grain surface potential. It is also shown that in the limit q → 1 the Cairns-Tsallis reduces to the Cairns distribution; for α = 0 the Cairns-Tsallis distribution reduces to pure Tsallis distribution and the latter reduces to Maxwellian distribution for q → 1 and α = 0.

  6. Photodissociation and charge transfer dynamics of negative ions studied with femtosecond photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zanni, Martin Thomas

    1999-12-01

    This dissertation presents studies aimed at understanding the potential energy surfaces and dynamics of isolated negative ions, and the effects of solvent on each. Although negative ions play important roles in atmospheric and solution phase chemistry, to a large extent the ground and excited state potential energy surfaces of gas phase negative ions are poorly characterized, and solvent effects even less well understood. In an effort to fill this gap, the author's coworkers and the author have developed a new technique, anion femtosecond photoelectron spectroscopy, and applied it to gas phase photodissociation and charge transfer processes. Studies are presented that (1) characterize the ground and excited states of isolated and clustered anions, (2) monitor the photodissociation dynamics of isolated and clustered anions, and (3) explore the charge-transfer-to-solvent states of atomic iodide clustered with polar and non-polar solvents.

  7. Ionization Efficiency of Doubly Charged Ions Formed from Polyprotic Acids in Electrospray Negative Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liigand, Piia; Kaupmees, Karl; Kruve, Anneli

    2016-07-01

    The ability of polyprotic acids to give doubly charged ions in negative mode electrospray was studied and related to physicochemical properties of the acids via linear discriminant analysis (LDA). It was discovered that the compound has to be strongly acidic (low p K a1 and p K a2) and to have high hydrophobicity (log P ow) to become multiply charged. Ability to give multiply charged ions in ESI/MS cannot be directly predicted from the solution phase acidities. Therefore, for the first time, a quantitative model to predict the charge state of the analyte in ESI/MS is proposed and validated for small anions. Also, a model to predict ionization efficiencies of these analytes was developed. Results indicate that acidity of the analyte, its octanol-water partition coefficient, and charge delocalization are important factors that influence ionization efficiencies as well as charge states of the analytes. The pH of the solvent was also found to be an important factor influencing the ionization efficiency of doubly charged ions.

  8. The dynamics of charged particles in the near wake of a very negatively charged body - Laboratory experiment and numerical simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, M. Alvin; Chan, Chung; Cooke, David L.; Tautz, Maurice F.

    1989-01-01

    A numerical simulation that is cylindrical in configuration space and three-dimensional in velocity space has been initiated to test a model for the near-wake dynamics of a very negatively charged body, with reference to the plasma environment around spacecraft. The simulation parameters were closely matched to those of a laboratory experiment so that the results can be compared directly. The laboratory study showed that the electrons and ions can display different temporal features in the filling-in of the wake; and that they can both be found within one body diameter of an object with a highly negative body potential. It was also found that the temperature of the electrons in the very near wake could be somewhat colder than the ambient value, suggesting the possibility of a filtering mechanism being operative there. The simulation results to date largely corroborate the density findings.

  9. Simulation of space charge compensation in a multibeamlet negative ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Sartori, E. Veltri, P.; Serianni, G.; Maceina, T. J.; Cavenago, M.

    2016-02-15

    Ion beam space charge compensation occurs by cumulating in the beam potential well charges having opposite polarity, usually generated by collisional processes. In this paper we investigate the case of a H{sup −} ion beam drift, in a bi-dimensional approximation of the NIO1 (Negative Ion Optimization phase 1) negative ion source. H{sup −} beam ion transport and plasma formation are studied via particle-in-cell simulations. Differential cross sections are sampled to determine the velocity distribution of secondary particles generated by ionization of the residual gas (electrons and slow H{sub 2}{sup +} ions) or by stripping of the beam ions (electrons, H, and H{sup +}). The simulations include three beamlets of a horizontal section, so that multibeamlet space charge and secondary particle diffusion between separate generation regions are considered, and include a repeller grid biased at various potentials. Results show that after the beam space charge is effectively screened by the secondary plasma in about 3 μs (in agreement with theoretical expectations), a plasma grows across the beamlets with a characteristic time three times longer, and a slight overcompensation of the electric potential is verified as expected in the case of negative ions.

  10. Glutamic acid 181 is negatively charged in the bathorhodopsin photointermediate of visual rhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, Megan N.; Amora, Tabitha L.; Ramos, Lavoisier S.; Chen, Min-Hsuan; Knox, Barry E.; Birge, Robert R.

    2011-01-01

    Assignment of the protonation state of the residue Glu-181 is important to our understanding of the primary event, activation processes and wavelength selection in rhodopsin. Despite extensive study, there is no general agreement on the protonation state of this residue in the literature. Electronic assignment is complicated by the location of Glu-181 near the nodal point in the electrostatic charge shift that accompanies excitation of the chromophore into the low-lying, strongly allowed ππ* state. Thus, the charge on this residue is effectively hidden from electronic spectroscopy. This situation is resolved in bathorhodopsin, because photoisomerization of the chromophore places Glu-181 well within the region of negative charge shift following excitation. We demonstrate that Glu-181 is negatively charged in bathorhodopsin based on the shift in the batho absorption maxima at 10K [λmax band (native)= 544±2 nm, λmax band (E181Q)= 556±3 nm] and the decrease in the λmax band oscillator strength (0.069±0.004) of E181Q relative to the native protein. Because the primary event in rhodopsin does not include a proton translocation or disruption of the hydrogen-bonding network within the binding pocket, we may conclude that the Glu-181 residue in rhodopsin is also charged. PMID:21319741

  11. Dust negative ion acoustic shock waves in a dusty multi-ion plasma with positive dust charging current

    SciTech Connect

    Duha, S. S.

    2009-11-15

    Recent analysis of Mamun et al.[ Phys. Lett. A 373, 2355 (2009)], who considered electrons, light positive ions, heavy negative ions, and extremely massive (few micron size) charge fluctuating dust, has been extended by positive dust charging current, i.e., considering the charging currents for positively charged dust grains. A dusty multi-ion plasma system consisting of electrons, light positive ions, negative ions, and extremely massive (few micron size) charge fluctuating stationary dust have been considered. The electrostatic shock waves associated with negative ion dynamics and dust charge fluctuation have been investigated by employing the reductive perturbation method. It has been shown that the dust charge fluctuation is a source of dissipation and is responsible for the formation of dust negative ion acoustic (DNIA) shock structures. The basic features of such DNIA shock structures have been identified. The findings of this investigation may be useful in understanding the laboratory phenomena and space dusty plasmas.

  12. Anomalous charge and negative-charge-transfer insulating state in cuprate chain compound KCuO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, D.; Rivero, P.; Meyers, D.; Liu, X.; Cao, Y.; Middey, S.; Whitaker, M. J.; Barraza-Lopez, S.; Freeland, J. W.; Greenblatt, M.; Chakhalian, J.

    2015-11-01

    Using a combination of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) experiments and first-principles calculations, we demonstrate that insulating KCuO2 contains Cu in an unusually high formal 3+ valence state, and the ligand-to-metal (O-to-Cu) charge-transfer energy is intriguingly negative (Δ ˜-1.5 eV) and has a dominant (˜60 % ) ligand-hole character in the ground state akin to the high Tc cuprate Zhang-Rice state. Unlike most other formal Cu3 + compounds, the Cu 2 p XAS spectra of KCuO2 exhibit pronounced 3 d8 (Cu3 +) multiplet structures, which account for ˜40 % of its ground state wave function. Ab initio calculations elucidate the origin of the band gap in KCuO2 as arising primarily from strong intracluster Cu 3 d -O 2 p hybridizations (tpd); the value of the band gap decreases with a reduced value of tpd. Further, unlike conventional negative-charge-transfer insulators, the band gap in KCuO2 persists even for vanishing values of Coulomb repulsion U , underscoring the importance of single-particle band-structure effects connected to the one-dimensional nature of the compound.

  13. Highly efficient bioinspired molecular Ru water oxidation catalysts with negatively charged backbone ligands.

    PubMed

    Duan, Lele; Wang, Lei; Li, Fusheng; Li, Fei; Sun, Licheng

    2015-07-21

    The oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of the natural photosynthesis system II (PSII) oxidizes water to produce oxygen and reducing equivalents (protons and electrons). The oxygen released from PSII provides the oxygen source of our atmosphere; the reducing equivalents are used to reduce carbon dioxide to organic products, which support almost all organisms on the Earth planet. The first photosynthetic organisms able to split water were proposed to be cyanobacteria-like ones appearing ca. 2.5 billion years ago. Since then, nature has chosen a sustainable way by using solar energy to develop itself. Inspired by nature, human beings started to mimic the functions of the natural photosynthesis system and proposed the concept of artificial photosynthesis (AP) with the view to creating energy-sustainable societies and reducing the impact on the Earth environments. Water oxidation is a highly energy demanding reaction and essential to produce reducing equivalents for fuel production, and thereby effective water oxidation catalysts (WOCs) are required to catalyze water oxidation and reduce the energy loss. X-ray crystallographic studies on PSII have revealed that the OEC consists of a Mn4CaO5 cluster surrounded by oxygen rich ligands, such as oxyl, oxo, and carboxylate ligands. These negatively charged, oxygen rich ligands strongly stabilize the high valent states of the Mn cluster and play vital roles in effective water oxidation catalysis with low overpotential. This Account describes our endeavors to design effective Ru WOCs with low overpotential, large turnover number, and high turnover frequency by introducing negatively charged ligands, such as carboxylate. Negatively charged ligands stabilized the high valent states of Ru catalysts, as evidenced by the low oxidation potentials. Meanwhile, the oxygen production rates of our Ru catalysts were improved dramatically as well. Thanks to the strong electron donation ability of carboxylate containing ligands, a seven

  14. Strategies of Pre-Service Primary School Teachers for Solving Addition Problems with Negative Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almeida, Rut; Bruno, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyses the strategies used by pre-service primary school teachers for solving simple addition problems involving negative numbers. The findings reveal six different strategies that depend on the difficulty of the problem and, in particular, on the unknown quantity. We note that students use negative numbers in those problems they find…

  15. Characteristics of EMI generated by negative metal-positive dielectric voltage stresses due to spacecraft charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaky, R. C.; Inouye, G. T.

    1985-01-01

    Charging of spacecraft surfaces by the environmental plasma can result in differential potentials between metallic structure and adjacent dielectric surfaces in which the relative polarity of the voltage stress is either negative dielectric/positive metal or negative metal/positive dielectric. Negative metal/positive dielectric is a stress condition that may arise if relatively large areas of spacecraft surface metals are shadowed from solar UV and/or if the UV intensity is reduced as in the situation in which the spacecraft is entering into or leaving eclipse. The results of experimental studies of negative metal/positive dielectric systems are given. Information is given on: enhanced electron emission I-V curves; e(3) corona noise vs e(3) steady-state current; the localized nature of e(3) and negative metal arc discharge currents; negative metal arc discharges at stress thresholds below 1 kilovolt; negative metal arc discharge characteristics; dependence of blowoff arc discharge current on spacecraft capacitance to space (linear dimension); and damage to second surface mirrors due to negative metal arcs.

  16. Space charge compensation in the Linac4 low energy beam transport line with negative hydrogen ions.

    PubMed

    Valerio-Lizarraga, Cristhian A; Lallement, Jean-Baptiste; Leon-Monzon, Ildefonso; Lettry, Jacques; Midttun, Øystein; Scrivens, Richard

    2014-02-01

    The space charge effect of low energy, unbunched ion beams can be compensated by the trapping of ions or electrons into the beam potential. This has been studied for the 45 keV negative hydrogen ion beam in the CERN Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport using the package IBSimu [T. Kalvas et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02B703 (2010)], which allows the space charge calculation of the particle trajectories. The results of the beam simulations will be compared to emittance measurements of an H(-) beam at the CERN Linac4 3 MeV test stand, where the injection of hydrogen gas directly into the beam transport region has been used to modify the space charge compensation degree.

  17. Modeling the selective partitioning of cations into negatively charged nanopores in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lu; Garde, Shekhar

    2007-02-01

    Partitioning and transport of water and small solutes into and through nanopores are important to a variety of chemical and biological processes and applications. Here we study water structure in negatively charged model cylindrical [carbon nanotube (CNT)-like] nanopores, as well as the partitioning of positive ions of increasing size (Na+, K+, and Cs+) into the pore interior using extensive molecular dynamics simulations. Despite the simplicity of the simulation system—containing a short CNT-like nanopore in water carrying a uniformly distributed charge of qpore=-ne surrounded by n (=0,…,8) cations, making the overall system charge neutral—the results provide new and useful insights on both the pore hydration and ion partitioning. For n =0, that is, for a neutral nanopore, water molecules partition into the pore and form single-file hydrogen-bonded wire spanning the pore length. With increasing n, water molecules enter the pore from both ends with preferred orientations, resulting in a mutual repulsion between oriented water molecules at the pore center and creating a cavity-like low density region at the center. For low negative charge densities on the pore, the driving force for partitioning of positive ions into the pore is weak, and no partitioning is observed. Increasing the pore charge gradually leads to partitioning of positive ions into the pore. Interestingly, over a range of intermediate negative charge densities, nanopores display both thermodynamic as well as kinetic selectivity toward partitioning of the larger K+ and Cs+ ions into their interior over the smaller Na+ ions. Specifically, the driving force is in the order K+>Cs+>Na+, and K+ and Cs+ ions enter the pore much more rapidly than Na+ ions. At higher charge densities, the driving force for partitioning increases for all cations—it is highest for K+ ions—and becomes similar for Na+ and Cs+ ions. The variation of thermodynamic driving force and the average partitioning time with the

  18. Optimizing charge neutralization for a magnetic sector SIMS instrument in negative mode

    SciTech Connect

    Pivovarov, Alexander L.; Guryanov, Georgiy M.

    2012-07-15

    Successful self-adjusted charge compensation was demonstrated for a CAMECA magnetic-sector secondary ion mass spectrometer applied in negative mode. Operation with the normal-incidence electron gun (NEG) potential positively biased relative to a sample potential enables substantial broadening of the Cs primary-ion-current density range available for analysis of insulators. The decrease of the negative NEG potential by 30 V allows the highest value of primary current density used for the analysis of a silica sample to increase by a factor of more than 6. By applying the improved charge neutralization technique, accurate Na depth profiles for SiO{sub 2} samples were obtained within detection limits of {approx}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} atoms/cm{sup 3}.

  19. Negative charge emission due to excimer laser bombardment of sodium trisilicate glass

    SciTech Connect

    Langford, S.C.; Jensen, L.C.; Dickinson, J.T. ); Pederson, L.R. )

    1990-10-15

    We describe measurements of negative charge emission accompanying irradiation of sodium trisilicate glass (Na{sub 2}O{center dot}3SiO{sub 2}) with 248-nm excimer laser light at fluences on the order of 2 J/cm{sup 2} per pulse, i.e., at the threshold for ablative etching of the glass surface. The negative charge emission consists of a very prompt photoelectron burst coincident with the laser pulse, followed by a much slower plume of electrons and negative ions traveling with a high density cloud of positive ions, previously identified as primarily Na{sup +}. Using combinations of {bold E} and {bold B} fields in conjunction with time-of-flight methods, the negative ions were successfully separated from the plume and tentatively identified as O{sup {minus}}, Si{sup {minus}}, NaO{sup {minus}}, and perhaps NaSi{sup {minus}}. These negative species are probably formed by gas phase collisions in the near-surface region which result in electron attachment.

  20. Electromagnetic Radiation in the Atmosphere Generated by Excess Negative Charge in a Nuclear-Electromagnetic Cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyshevsky, V. S.; Fomin, G. V.

    2017-01-01

    On the basis of the analytical model "PARMA" (PHITS-based Analytical Radiation Model in the Atmosphere), developed to model particle fluxes of secondary cosmic radiation in the Earth's atmosphere, we have calculated the characteristics of radio waves emitted by excess negative charge in an electromagnetic cascade. The results may be of use in an analysis of experimental data on radio emission of electron-photon showers in the atmosphere.

  1. Reversal of negative charges on the surface of Escherichia coli thioredoxin: pockets versus protrusions.

    PubMed

    Mancusso, Romina; Cruz, Eduardo; Cataldi, Marcela; Mendoza, Carla; Fuchs, James; Wang, Hsin; Yang, Xiaomin; Tasayco, María Luisa

    2004-04-06

    Recent studies of proteins with reversed charged residues have demonstrated that electrostatic interactions on the surface can contribute significantly to protein stability. We have used the approach of reversing negatively charged residues using Arg to evaluate the effect of the electrostatics context on the transition temperature (T(m)), the unfolding Gibbs free energy change (DeltaG), and the unfolding enthalpy change (DeltaH). We have reversed negatively charged residues at a pocket (Asp9) and protrusions (Asp10, Asp20, Glu85), all located in interconnecting segments between elements of secondary structure on the surface of Arg73Ala Escherichia coli thioredoxin. DSC measurements indicate that reversal of Asp in a pocket (Asp9Arg/Arg73Ala, DeltaT(m) = -7.3 degrees C) produces a larger effect in thermal stability than reversal at protrusions: Asp10Arg/Arg73Ala, DeltaT(m) = -3.1 degrees C, Asp20Arg/Arg73Ala, DeltaT(m) = 2.0 degrees C, Glu85Arg/Arg73Ala, DeltaT(m) = 3.9 degrees ). The 3D structure of thioredoxin indicates that Asp20 and Glu85 have no nearby charges within 8 A, while Asp9 does not only have Asp10 as sequential neighbor, but it also forms a 5-A long-range ion pair with the solvent-exposed Lys69. Further DSC measurements indicate that neutralization of the individual charges of the ion pair Asp9-Lys69 with nonpolar residues produces a significant decrease in stability in both cases: Asp9Ala/Arg73Ala, DeltaT(m) = -3.7 degrees C, Asp9Met/Arg73Ala, DeltaT(m) = -5.5 degrees C, Lys69Leu/Arg73Ala, DeltaT(m) = -5.1 degrees C. However, thermodynamic analysis shows that reversal or neutralization of Asp9 produces a 9-15% decrease in DeltaH, while both reversal of Asp at protrusions and neutralization of Lys69 produce negligible changes. These results correlate well with the NMR analysis, which demonstrates that only the substitution of Asp9 produces extensive conformational changes and these changes occur in the surroundings of Lys69. Our results led us to

  2. Adsorption of barium and calcium chloride onto negatively charged alpha-Fe(2)O(3) particles.

    PubMed

    Pochard, Isabelle; Denoyel, Renaud; Couchot, Pierre; Foissy, Alain

    2002-11-01

    Adsorption of cations (Na(+), Ca(2+), Ba(2+)) onto negatively charged (pH 10.4) hematite (alpha-Fe(2)O(3)) particles has been studied. The oxide material was carefully prepared in order to obtain monodisperse suspensions of well-crystallized, quasi-spherical particles (50 nm in diameter). The isoelectric point (IEP) is located at pH 8.5. Adsorption of barium ions onto oxide particles was carried out and the electrophoretic mobility was measured throughout the adsorption experiment. Comparison with calcium adsorption at full coverage reveals a higher uptake of Ba(2+). In both cases it shows also that chloride ions coadsorb with M(2) ions. Simultaneous uptake of the positive and negative ions explains why the electrophoretic mobility does not reverse to cationic migration. A theoretical study of the surface speciation has been carried out, using the MuSiC model. It reveals the presence of negative as well as positive sites on both sides of the point of zero charge (PZC) of the hematite particles, which may explain the coadsorption of Ba(2+) and Cl(-) at pH 10.4. The effective charge of the oxide particles, calculated from the electrophoretic mobility, is in very good agreement with the results found with the MuSiC modelization and the chloride/barium adsorption ratio. It also verifies the theory of ionic condensation. Calorimetric measurements gave a negative heat for the overall reaction occurring when Ba(2+)/Cl(-) ions adsorb onto hematite. Despite the fact that anions (Cl(-) and OH(-)) adsorption onto mineral oxides is an exothermic phenomenon, it is likely that barium and calcium adsorption is endothermic, denoting the formation of an inner-sphere complex as reported in the literature.

  3. New effects of a long-lived negatively charged massive particle on big bang nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusakabe, Motohiko; Kim, K. S.; Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Kajino, Toshitaka; Kino, Yasushi; Mathews, Grant J.

    2014-05-01

    Primordial 7Li abundance inferred from observations of metal-poor stars is a factor of about 3 lower than the theoretical value of standard big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) model. One of the solutions to the Li problem is 7Be destruction during the BBN epoch caused by a long-lived negatively charged massive particle, X-. The particle can bind to nuclei, and X-bound nuclei (X-nuclei) can experience new reactions. The radiative X- capture by 7Be nuclei followed by proton capture of the bound state of 7Be and X- (7Bex) is a possible 7Be destruction reaction. Since the primordial abundance of 7Li originates mainly from 7Li produced via the electron capture of 7Be after BBN, the 7Be destruction provides a solution to the 7Li problem. We suggest a new route of 7Bex formation, that is the 7Be charge exchange at the reaction of 7Be3+ ion and X-. The formation rate depends on the ionization fraction of 7Be3+ ion, the charge exchange cross section of 7Be3+, and the probability that excited states 7Bex* produced at the charge exchange are converted to the ground state. We find that this reaction can be equally important as or more important than ordinary radiative recombination of 7Be and X-. The effect of this new route is shown in a nuclear reaction network calculation.

  4. 13 CFR 107.1130 - Leverage fees and additional charges payable by Licensee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES SBA Financial Assistance for Licensees (Leverage) General Information About Obtaining Leverage § 107.1130 Leverage fees and additional charges payable by Licensee. (a... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leverage fees and...

  5. 13 CFR 107.1130 - Leverage fees and additional charges payable by Licensee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES SBA Financial Assistance for Licensees (Leverage) General Information About Obtaining Leverage § 107.1130 Leverage fees and additional charges payable by Licensee. (a... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Leverage fees and...

  6. 13 CFR 107.1130 - Leverage fees and additional charges payable by Licensee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES SBA Financial Assistance for Licensees (Leverage) General Information About Obtaining Leverage § 107.1130 Leverage fees and additional charges payable by Licensee. (a... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Leverage fees and...

  7. 13 CFR 107.1130 - Leverage fees and additional charges payable by Licensee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES SBA Financial Assistance for Licensees (Leverage) General Information About Obtaining Leverage § 107.1130 Leverage fees and additional charges payable by Licensee. (a... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Leverage fees and...

  8. 13 CFR 107.1130 - Leverage fees and additional charges payable by Licensee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES SBA Financial Assistance for Licensees (Leverage) General Information About Obtaining Leverage § 107.1130 Leverage fees and additional charges payable by Licensee. (a... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Leverage fees and...

  9. Negatively Charged Lipids as a Potential Target for New Amphiphilic Aminoglycoside Antibiotics: A BIOPHYSICAL STUDY.

    PubMed

    Sautrey, Guillaume; El Khoury, Micheline; Dos Santos, Andreia Giro; Zimmermann, Louis; Deleu, Magali; Lins, Laurence; Décout, Jean-Luc; Mingeot-Leclercq, Marie-Paule

    2016-06-24

    Bacterial membranes are highly organized, containing specific microdomains that facilitate distinct protein and lipid assemblies. Evidence suggests that cardiolipin molecules segregate into such microdomains, probably conferring a negative curvature to the inner plasma membrane during membrane fission upon cell division. 3',6-Dinonyl neamine is an amphiphilic aminoglycoside derivative active against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, including strains resistant to colistin. The mechanisms involved at the molecular level were identified using lipid models (large unilamellar vesicles, giant unilamelllar vesicles, and lipid monolayers) that mimic the inner membrane of P. aeruginosa The study demonstrated the interaction of 3',6-dinonyl neamine with cardiolipin and phosphatidylglycerol, two negatively charged lipids from inner bacterial membranes. This interaction induced membrane permeabilization and depolarization. Lateral segregation of cardiolipin and membrane hemifusion would be critical for explaining the effects induced on lipid membranes by amphiphilic aminoglycoside antibiotics. The findings contribute to an improved understanding of how amphiphilic aminoglycoside antibiotics that bind to negatively charged lipids like cardiolipin could be promising antibacterial compounds.

  10. Instability range of microsolvated multiply charged negative ions: prediction from detachment energy of stable hydrated clusters.

    PubMed

    Pathak, A K; Samanta, A K; Maity, D K; Mukherjee, T; Ghosh, S K

    2011-02-01

    We have presented a first-principle theory-based derivation of an exact expression for the solvent number-dependent electron-detachment energy of a solvated species in the thermodynamic limit. We also propose a generalized equation bridging the electron detachment energies for small and infinitely large clusters, thus providing a new route to calculate the ionization potential of a negatively charged ion from the electron-detachment energies of its stable hydrated clusters. Most importantly, it has the ability to predict the instability range of microhydrated anions. The calculated results for the ionization potential for a number of ions are found to be in good agreement with the available experimental results, and the predicted instability range for the doubly charged anions SO₄²⁻ and C₂O₄²⁻ is also consistent with experimental and ab initio results.

  11. Self-organization and oscillation of negatively charged dust particles in a 2-dimensional dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Y. L.; Huang, F.; Chen, Z. Y.; Liu, Y. H.; Yu, M. Y.

    2016-02-01

    Negatively charged dust particles immersed in 2-dimensional dusty plasma system are investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. The effects of the confinement potential and attraction interaction potential on dust particle self-organization are studied in detail and two typical dust particle distributions are obtained when the system reaches equilibrium. The average radial velocity (ARV), average radial force (ARF) and radial mean square displacement are employed to analyze the dust particles' dynamics. Both ARVs and ARFs exhibit oscillation behaviors when the simulation system reaches equilibrium state. The relationships between the oscillation and confinement potential and attraction potential are studied in this paper. The simulation results are qualitatively similar to experimental results.

  12. Tuning the affinity of anion binding sites in porin channels with negatively charged residues: molecular details for OprP.

    PubMed

    Modi, Niraj; Bárcena-Uribarri, Iván; Bains, Manjeet; Benz, Roland; Hancock, Robert E W; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich

    2015-02-20

    The cell envelope of the Gram negative opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is poorly permeable to many classes of hydrophilic molecules including antibiotics due to the presence of the narrow and selective porins. Here we focused on one of the narrow-channel porins, that is, OprP, which is responsible for the high-affinity uptake of phosphate ions. Its two central binding sites for phosphate contain a number of positively charged amino acids together with a single negatively charged residue (D94). The presence of this negatively charged residue in a binding site for negatively charged phosphate ions is highly surprising due to the potentially reduced binding affinity. The goal of this study was to better understand the role of D94 in phosphate binding, selectivity, and transport using a combination of mutagenesis, electrophysiology, and free-energy calculations. The presence of a negatively charged residue in the binding site is critical for this specific porin OprP as emphasized by the evolutionary conservation of such negatively charged residue in the binding site of several anion-selective porins. Mutations of D94 in OprP to any positively charged or neutral residue increased the binding affinity of phosphate for OprP. Detailed analysis indicated that this anionic residue in the phosphate binding site of OprP, despite its negative charge, maintained energetically favorable phosphate binding sites in the central region of the channel and at the same time decreased residence time thus preventing excessively strong binding of phosphate that would oppose phosphate flux through the channel. Intriguingly mutations of D94 to positively charged residues, lysine and arginine, resulted in very different binding affinities and free energy profiles, indicating the importance of side chain conformations of these positively charged residues in phosphate binding to OprP.

  13. A new method to study Li-ion cell safety: laser beam initiated reactions on both charged negative and positive electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérès, J. P.; Perton, F.; Audry, C.; Biensan, Ph; de Guibert, A.; Blanc, G.; Broussely, M.

    The improvement of Li-ion batteries safety in abuse use is one of the key issues for their establishment in future hybrid or electrical vehicles. Such a challenge requires a perfect understanding of phenomena which could occur in abuse situation. A new technique for a better understanding of Li-ion cell safety has been so investigated. Reactions between electrolyte and charged electrodes (positive and negative just recovered from dismantled charged 4/5A cells) have been initiated by a laser beam, having a monitored intensity and time pulse. From such a device, a strong and controlled heating can be generated, in a very short time scale, on a defined electrode surface area. This localized heating, which is supposed to be similar to that could occur from a cell internal short-circuit, is able to initiate "self-propagation reactions" on charged negative and positive electrodes. This new technique has allowed a ranking of charged electrodes in terms of "self-propagation ability". This range of new data has been compared to results obtained from classical thermal characterization methods (DSC, DTA) and results obtained from normalized abuse tests. Global charged negative and positive electrodes degradation mechanisms have been proposed in good agreement with the whole results. The safety of a done Li-ion cell seems mainly related to active negative and positive active materials, but also to other components of the electrodes, and especially additive carbons and aluminum collector of the positive side.

  14. A Hypersweet Protein: Removal of The Specific Negative Charge at Asp21 Enhances Thaumatin Sweetness.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Tetsuya; Ohta, Keisuke; Ojiro, Naoko; Murata, Kazuki; Mikami, Bunzo; Tani, Fumito; Temussi, Piero Andrea; Kitabatake, Naofumi

    2016-02-03

    Thaumatin is an intensely sweet-tasting protein that elicits sweet taste at a concentration of 50 nM, a value 100,000 times larger than that of sucrose on a molar basis. Here we attempted to produce a protein with enhanced sweetness by removing negative charges on the interacting side of thaumatin with the taste receptor. We obtained a D21N mutant which, with a threshold value 31 nM is much sweeter than wild type thaumatin and, together with the Y65R mutant of single chain monellin, one of the two sweetest proteins known so far. The complex model between the T1R2-T1R3 sweet receptor and thaumatin, derived from tethered docking in the framework of the wedge model, confirmed that each of the positively charged residues critical for sweetness is close to a receptor residue of opposite charge to yield optimal electrostatic interaction. Furthermore, the distance between D21 and its possible counterpart D433 (located on the T1R2 protomer of the receptor) is safely large to avoid electrostatic repulsion but, at the same time, amenable to a closer approach if D21 is mutated into the corresponding asparagine. These findings clearly confirm the importance of electrostatic potentials in the interaction of thaumatin with the sweet receptor.

  15. A Hypersweet Protein: Removal of The Specific Negative Charge at Asp21 Enhances Thaumatin Sweetness

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Tetsuya; Ohta, Keisuke; Ojiro, Naoko; Murata, Kazuki; Mikami, Bunzo; Tani, Fumito; Temussi, Piero Andrea; Kitabatake, Naofumi

    2016-01-01

    Thaumatin is an intensely sweet-tasting protein that elicits sweet taste at a concentration of 50 nM, a value 100,000 times larger than that of sucrose on a molar basis. Here we attempted to produce a protein with enhanced sweetness by removing negative charges on the interacting side of thaumatin with the taste receptor. We obtained a D21N mutant which, with a threshold value 31 nM is much sweeter than wild type thaumatin and, together with the Y65R mutant of single chain monellin, one of the two sweetest proteins known so far. The complex model between the T1R2-T1R3 sweet receptor and thaumatin, derived from tethered docking in the framework of the wedge model, confirmed that each of the positively charged residues critical for sweetness is close to a receptor residue of opposite charge to yield optimal electrostatic interaction. Furthermore, the distance between D21 and its possible counterpart D433 (located on the T1R2 protomer of the receptor) is safely large to avoid electrostatic repulsion but, at the same time, amenable to a closer approach if D21 is mutated into the corresponding asparagine. These findings clearly confirm the importance of electrostatic potentials in the interaction of thaumatin with the sweet receptor. PMID:26837600

  16. Activation energy of negative fixed charges in thermal ALD Al2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnhold-Pospischil, S.; Saint-Cast, P.; Richter, A.; Hofmann, M.

    2016-08-01

    A study of the thermally activated negative fixed charges Qtot and the interface trap densities Dit at the interface between Si and thermal atomic-layer-deposited amorphous Al2O3 layers is presented. The thermal activation of Qtot and Dit was conducted at annealing temperatures between 220 °C and 500 °C for durations between 3 s and 38 h. The temperature-induced differences in Qtot and Dit were measured using the characterization method called corona oxide characterization of semiconductors. Their time dependency were fitted using stretched exponential functions, yielding activation energies of EA = (2.2 ± 0.2) eV and EA = (2.3 ± 0.7) eV for Qtot and Dit, respectively. For annealing temperatures from 350 °C to 500 °C, the changes in Qtot and Dit were similar for both p- and n-type doped Si samples. In contrast, at 220 °C the charging process was enhanced for p-type samples. Based on the observations described in this contribution, a charging model leading to Qtot based on an electron hopping process between the silicon and Al2O3 through defects is proposed.

  17. Charge dynamics in alkanedithiols-additives in P3HT:PCBM bulk heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solanki, Ankur; Wu, Bo; Lam, Yeng Ming; Sum, Tze Chien

    2014-10-01

    Addition of a small fraction of high boiling point solvent into the host of donor/acceptor blend is one the best approach to control the morphology in order to enhance the power conversion efficiency of organic bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cell devices. Herein, we focus on the effect of two thiol-based additives (1,6-hexanedithiol (HDT) and 1,5-pentanedithiol (PDT)) on the charge dynamics of P3HT:PCBM blend system, studied by transient absorption spectroscopy (TAS) and correlated with the solar cell device performance. TAS reveals a more efficient charge generation and polaron formation in the systems with additives as compared to those without (NA systems), at the onset which persists up to few microseconds. The recombination dynamics also exhibits the reduced recombination losses on adding these additives in this system; however, there is marginal change of recombination dynamics in PDT added system with the control. These charge dynamics were validated using the analytical model proposed in our previous work and also correlated with improved device performance (ηNA = 0.9%, ηHDT = 2.7%, ηPDT = 1.6%).

  18. The negatively charged carboxy-terminal tail of β-tubulin promotes proper chromosome segregation

    PubMed Central

    Fees, Colby P.; Aiken, Jayne; O’Toole, Eileen T.; Giddings, Thomas H.; Moore, Jeffrey K.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the broadly conserved role of microtubules in chromosome segregation, we have a limited understanding of how molecular features of tubulin proteins contribute to the underlying mechanisms. Here we investigate the negatively charged carboxy-terminal tail domains (CTTs) of α- and β-tubulins, using a series of mutants that alter or ablate CTTs in budding yeast. We find that ablating β-CTT causes elevated rates of chromosome loss and cell cycle delay. Complementary live-cell imaging and electron tomography show that β-CTT is necessary to properly position kinetochores and organize microtubules within the assembling spindle. We identify a minimal region of negatively charged amino acids that is necessary and sufficient for proper chromosome segregation and provide evidence that this function may be conserved across species. Our results provide the first in vivo evidence of a specific role for tubulin CTTs in chromosome segregation. We propose that β-CTT promotes the ordered segregation of chromosomes by stabilizing the spindle and contributing to forces that move chromosomes toward the spindle poles. PMID:27053662

  19. Phagocytosis and transforming activity of crystalline metal sulfide particles are related to their negative surface charge

    SciTech Connect

    Abbracchio, M.P.; Heck, J.D.; Costa, M.

    1982-01-01

    Crystalline nickel sulfide (alpha NiS) and cobalt sulfide (CoS2) particles can cause greater cell transformation and cellular toxicity than the respective amorphous metal sulfide particles. Cultured mammalian cells phagocytose the crystalline metal sulfide particles more readily than the amorphous ones. In the case of the nickel sulfides, the crystalline metal sulfide particles had negatively charged surfaces (Zeta potential: -27.012 mV) in contrast to the amorphous particles, which were positively charge (Zeta potential: +9.174 mV). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of amorphous and crystalline NiS particles revealed that the outermost surface (1-4 nm) of the two particles had striking differences in Ni/S ratios and in their sulfur oxidation states. Rendering particles' surfaces more negative by reduction with lithium aluminum hydride enhanced their phagocytosis, and in the case of amorphous NiS chemical reduction resulted in an incidence of morphological transformation of Syrian hamster embryo cells comparable to that observed with untreated crystalline alpha NiS.

  20. Disappearance of the negative charge in giant DNA with a folding transition.

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, Y; Teramoto, Y; Yoshikawa, K

    2001-01-01

    In the present study we measure the electrophoretic mobility of giant T4 DNA (166 kbp) by electrophoretic light scattering for the elongated and folded compact states at different spermidine (trivalent cation) concentrations in 50 mM sodium maleate buffer (pH 6.0). It is found that the electrophoretic mobility of elongated DNA in the absence of the multivalent cation is seven times greater than that of fully folded compact DNA, where, with the increase of the concentration of spermidine, an abrupt transition is generated after a gradual decrease of the mobility. An analysis of the electrophoretic mobility suggests that the folded compact DNA chains almost completely lose their negative charges, by taking into account the difference of friction mechanism between an elongated and folded compact state. From the single chain observation by use of fluorescence microscopy, it is found that a phase-segregated structure is generated at intermediate concentrations of spermidine. The gradual decrease of the electrophoretic mobility in the transition region is, thus, attributed to the formation of the segregated state, exhibiting partial electroneutralization in the folded part. Disappearance of the negative charges in the completely folded compact DNAs is discussed in relation to the mechanism of transition, in terms of a first-order phase transition. PMID:11371456

  1. The free solution mobility of DNA and other analytes varies as the logarithm of the fractional negative charge.

    PubMed

    Stellwagen, Nancy C; Peters, Justin P; Dong, Qian; Maher, L James; Stellwagen, Earle

    2014-07-01

    The free solution mobilities of ssDNA and dsDNA molecules with variable charge densities have been measured by CE. DNA charge density was modified either by appending positively or negatively charged groups to the thymine residues in a 98 bp DNA molecule, or by replacing some of the negatively charged phosphate internucleoside linkers in small ssDNA or dsDNA oligomers with positively charged phosphoramidate linkers. Mobility ratios were calculated for each dataset by dividing the mobility of a charge variant by the mobility of its unmodified parent DNA. Mobility ratios essentially eliminate the effect of the BGE on the observed mobility, making it possible to compare analytes measured under different experimental conditions. Neutral moieties attached to the thymine residues in the 98-bp DNA molecule had little or no effect on the mobility ratios, indicating that bulky substituents in the DNA major groove do not affect the mobility significantly. The mobility ratios observed for the thymine-modified and linker-modified DNA charge variants increased approximately linearly with the logarithm of the fractional negative charge of the DNA. Mobility ratios calculated from previous studies of linker-modified DNA charge variants and small multicharged organic molecules also increased approximately linearly with the logarithm of the fractional negative charge of the analyte. The results do not agree with the Debye-Hückel-Onsager theory of electrophoresis, which predicts that the mobility of an analyte should depend linearly on analyte charge, not the logarithm of the charge, when the frictional coefficient is held constant.

  2. Excitation of Kelvin Helmholtz instability by an ion beam in a plasma with negatively charged dust grains

    SciTech Connect

    Rani, Kavita; Sharma, Suresh C.

    2015-02-15

    An ion beam propagating through a magnetized dusty plasma drives Kelvin Helmholtz Instability (KHI) via Cerenkov interaction. The frequency of the unstable wave increases with the relative density of negatively charged dust grains. It is observed that the beam has stabilizing effect on the growth rate of KHI for low shear parameter, but for high shear parameter, the instability is destabilized with relative density of negatively charged dust grains.

  3. Identification of singlet and triplet states of negatively charged excitons in CdTe-based quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astakhov, G. V.; Yakovlev, D. R.; Crooker, S. A.; Ossau, W.; Christianen, P. C. M.; Rudenkov, V. V.; Karczewski, G.; Wojtowicz, T.; Kossut, J.

    2004-02-01

    We present comprehensive study of negatively charged exciton in high magnetic fields for filling factors < 1. In magneto-optical spectra the fine structure was found to be contributed by neutral exciton and different a set of bound states of charged exciton. These states were identified due to their unique polarization properties charecteristics in emission and absorption spectra.

  4. The negatively charged regions of lactoferrin binding protein B, an adaptation against anti-microbial peptides.

    PubMed

    Morgenthau, Ari; Beddek, Amanda; Schryvers, Anthony B

    2014-01-01

    Lactoferrin binding protein B (LbpB) is a bi-lobed membrane bound lipoprotein that is part of the lactoferrin receptor complex in a variety of Gram-negative pathogens. Despite high sequence diversity among LbpBs from various strains and species, a cluster of negatively charged amino acids is invariably present in the protein's C-terminal lobe in all species except Moraxella bovis. The function of LbpB in iron acquisition has yet to be experimentally demonstrated, whereas in vitro studies have shown that LbpB confers protection against lactoferricin, a short cationic antimicrobial peptide released from the N- terminus of lactoferrin. In this study we demonstrate that the negatively charged regions can be removed from the Neisseria meningitidis LbpB without compromising stability, and this results in the inability of LbpB to protect against the bactericidal effects of lactoferricin. The release of LbpB from the cell surface by the autotransporter NalP reduces the protection against lactoferricin in the in vitro killing assay, attributed to removal of LbpB during washing steps, but is unlikely to have a similar impact in vivo. The protective effect of the negatively charged polysaccharide capsule in the killing assay was less than the protection conferred by LbpB, suggesting that LbpB plays a major role in protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides in vivo. The selective release of LbpB by NalP has been proposed to be a mechanism for evading the adaptive immune response, by reducing the antibody binding to the cell surface, but may also provide insights into the primary function of LbpB in vivo. Although TbpB and LbpB have been shown to be major targets of the human immune response, the selective release of LbpB suggests that unlike TbpB, LbpB may not be essential for iron acquisition, but important for protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides.

  5. The Negatively Charged Regions of Lactoferrin Binding Protein B, an Adaptation against Anti-Microbial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Morgenthau, Ari; Beddek, Amanda; Schryvers, Anthony B.

    2014-01-01

    Lactoferrin binding protein B (LbpB) is a bi-lobed membrane bound lipoprotein that is part of the lactoferrin receptor complex in a variety of Gram-negative pathogens. Despite high sequence diversity among LbpBs from various strains and species, a cluster of negatively charged amino acids is invariably present in the protein’s C-terminal lobe in all species except Moraxella bovis. The function of LbpB in iron acquisition has yet to be experimentally demonstrated, whereas in vitro studies have shown that LbpB confers protection against lactoferricin, a short cationic antimicrobial peptide released from the N- terminus of lactoferrin. In this study we demonstrate that the negatively charged regions can be removed from the Neisseria meningitidis LbpB without compromising stability, and this results in the inability of LbpB to protect against the bactericidal effects of lactoferricin. The release of LbpB from the cell surface by the autotransporter NalP reduces the protection against lactoferricin in the in vitro killing assay, attributed to removal of LbpB during washing steps, but is unlikely to have a similar impact in vivo. The protective effect of the negatively charged polysaccharide capsule in the killing assay was less than the protection conferred by LbpB, suggesting that LbpB plays a major role in protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides in vivo. The selective release of LbpB by NalP has been proposed to be a mechanism for evading the adaptive immune response, by reducing the antibody binding to the cell surface, but may also provide insights into the primary function of LbpB in vivo. Although TbpB and LbpB have been shown to be major targets of the human immune response, the selective release of LbpB suggests that unlike TbpB, LbpB may not be essential for iron acquisition, but important for protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides. PMID:24465982

  6. New effects of a long-lived negatively charged massive particle on big bang nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kusakabe, Motohiko; Kim, K. S.; Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Kajino, Toshitaka; Kino, Yasushi; Mathews, Grant J.

    2014-05-02

    Primordial {sup 7}Li abundance inferred from observations of metal-poor stars is a factor of about 3 lower than the theoretical value of standard big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) model. One of the solutions to the Li problem is {sup 7}Be destruction during the BBN epoch caused by a long-lived negatively charged massive particle, X{sup −}. The particle can bind to nuclei, and X-bound nuclei (X-nuclei) can experience new reactions. The radiative X{sup −} capture by {sup 7}Be nuclei followed by proton capture of the bound state of {sup 7}Be and X{sup −} ({sup 7}Be{sub x}) is a possible {sup 7}Be destruction reaction. Since the primordial abundance of {sup 7}Li originates mainly from {sup 7}Li produced via the electron capture of {sup 7}Be after BBN, the {sup 7}Be destruction provides a solution to the {sup 7}Li problem. We suggest a new route of {sup 7}Be{sub x} formation, that is the {sup 7}Be charge exchange at the reaction of {sup 7}Be{sup 3+} ion and X{sup −}. The formation rate depends on the ionization fraction of {sup 7}Be{sup 3+} ion, the charge exchange cross section of {sup 7}Be{sup 3+}, and the probability that excited states {sup 7}Be{sub x}* produced at the charge exchange are converted to the ground state. We find that this reaction can be equally important as or more important than ordinary radiative recombination of {sup 7}Be and X{sup −}. The effect of this new route is shown in a nuclear reaction network calculation.

  7. Negative Ion MALDI Mass Spectrometry of Polyoxometalates (POMs): Mechanism of Singly Charged Anion Formation and Chemical Properties Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulicault, Jean E.; Alves, Sandra; Cole, Richard B.

    2016-08-01

    MALDI-MS has been developed for the negative ion mode analysis of polyoxometalates (POMs). Matrix optimization was performed using a variety of matrix compounds. A first group of matrixes offers MALDI mass spectra containing abundant intact singly charged anionic adduct ions, as well as abundant in-source fragmentations at elevated laser powers. A relative ranking of the ability to induce POM fragmentation is found to be: DAN > CHCA > CNA > DIT> HABA > DCTB > IAA. Matrixes of a second group provide poorer quality MALDI mass spectra without observable fragments. Sample preparation, including the testing of salt additives, was performed to optimize signals for a model POM, POMc12, the core structure of which bears four negative charges. The matrix 9-cyanoanthracene (CNA) provided the best signals corresponding to singly charged intact POMc12 anions. Decompositions of these intact anionic species were examined in detail, and it was concluded that hydrogen radical-induced mechanisms were not prevalent, but rather that the observed prompt fragments originate from transferred energy derived from initial electronic excitation of the CNA matrix. Moreover, in obtained MALDI mass spectra, clear evidence of electron transfer to analyte POM species was found: a manifestation of the POMs ability to readily capture electrons. The affinity of polyanionic POMc12 toward a variety of cations was evaluated and the following affinity ranking was established: Fe3+ > Al3+ > Li+ > Ga3+ > Co2+ > Cr3+ > Cu2+ > [Mn2+, Mg2+] > [Na+, K+]. Thus, from the available cationic species, specific adducts are preferentially formed, and evidence is given that these higher affinity POM complexes are formed in the gas phase during the early stages of plume expansion.

  8. Electrolyte additive enabled fast charging and stable cycling lithium metal batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jianming; Engelhard, Mark H.; Mei, Donghai; Jiao, Shuhong; Polzin, Bryant J.; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Xu, Wu

    2017-03-01

    Batteries using lithium (Li) metal as anodes are considered promising energy storage systems because of their high energy densities. However, safety concerns associated with dendrite growth along with limited cycle life, especially at high charge current densities, hinder their practical uses. Here we report that an optimal amount (0.05 M) of LiPF6 as an additive in LiTFSI-LiBOB dual-salt/carbonate-solvent-based electrolytes significantly enhances the charging capability and cycling stability of Li metal batteries. In a Li metal battery using a 4-V Li-ion cathode at a moderately high loading of 1.75 mAh cm‑2, a cyclability of 97.1% capacity retention after 500 cycles along with very limited increase in electrode overpotential is accomplished at a charge/discharge current density up to 1.75 mA cm‑2. The fast charging and stable cycling performances are ascribed to the generation of a robust and conductive solid electrolyte interphase at the Li metal surface and stabilization of the Al cathode current collector.

  9. Comparison of positively and negatively charged achiral co-monomers added to cyclodextrin monolith: improved chiral separations in capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yang; Shamsi, Shahab A

    2014-10-01

    Cyclodextrins (CDs) and their derivatives have been one of the most popular and successful chiral additives used in electrokinetic chromatography because of the presence of multiple chiral centers, which leads to multiple chiral interactions. However, there has been relatively less published work on the use of CDs as monolithic media for capillary electrochromatography (CEC). The goal of this study was to show how the addition of achiral co-monomer to a polymerizable CD such as glycidyl methacrylate β-cyclodextrin (GMA/β-CD) can affect the enantioselective separations in monolithic CEC. To achieve this goal, polymeric monoliths columns were prepared by co-polymerizing GMA/β-CD with cationic or anionic achiral co-monomers [(2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid (AMPS) and vinyl benzyltrimethyl-ammonium (VBTA)] in the presence of conventional crosslinker (ethylene dimethacrylate) and ternary porogen system including butanediol, propanol and water. A total of 34 negatively charged compounds, 30 positively charged compounds and 33 neutral compounds were screened to compare the enantioresolution capability on the GMA/β-CD, GMA/β-CD-VBTA and GMA/β-CD-AMPS monolithic columns.

  10. Comparison of Positively and Negatively Charged Achiral Co-Monomers Added to Cyclodextrin Monolith: Improved Chiral Separations in Capillary Electrochromatography

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yang; Shamsi, Shahab A.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclodextrins (CDs) and their derivatives have been one of the most popular and successful chiral additives used in electrokinetic chromatography because of the presence of multiple chiral centers, which leads to multiple chiral interactions. However, there has been relatively less published work on the use of CDs as monolithic media for capillary electrochromatography (CEC). The goal of this study was to show how the addition of achiral co-monomer to a polymerizable CD such as glycidyl methacrylate β-cyclodextrin (GMA/β-CD) can affect the enantioselective separations in monolithic CEC. To achieve this goal, polymeric monoliths columns were prepared by co-polymerizing GMA/β-CD with cationic or anionic achiral co-monomers [(2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid (AMPS) and vinyl benzyltrimethyl-ammonium (VBTA)] in the presence of conventional crosslinker (ethylene dimethacrylate) and ternary porogen system including butanediol, propanol and water. A total of 34 negatively charged compounds, 30 positively charged compounds and 33 neutral compounds were screened to compare the enantioresolution capability on the GMA/β-CD, GMA/β-CD-VBTA and GMA/β-CD-AMPS monolithic columns. PMID:24108813

  11. Transient negative photoconductance in a charge transfer double quantum well under optical intersubband excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüfenacht, M.; Tsujino, S.; Sakaki, H.

    1998-06-01

    Recently, it was shown that an electron-hole radiative recombination is induced by a mid-infrared light exciting an intersubband transition in a charge transfer double quantum well (CTDQW). This recombination was attributed to an upstream transfer of electrons from an electron-rich well to a hole-rich well. In this study, we investigated the electrical response of a CTDQW under intersubband optical excitation, and found that a positive photocurrent, opposite in sign and proportional to the applied electric field, accompanies the intersubband-transition-induced luminescence (ITIL) signal. A negative photocurrent component was also observed and attributed to heating processes. This work brings a further evidence of the ITIL process and shows that an important proportion of the carriers are consumed by the transfer of electrons.

  12. Negatively charged hyperbranched polyglycerol grafted membranes for osmotic power generation from municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue; Cai, Tao; Chen, Chunyan; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2016-02-01

    Osmotic power holds great promise as a clean, sustainable and largely unexploited energy resource. Recent membrane development for pressure-retarded osmosis (PRO) is making the osmotic power generation more and more realistic. However, severe performance declines have been observed because the porous layer of PRO membranes is fouled by the feed stream. To overcome it, a negatively charged antifouling PRO hollow fiber membrane has been designed and studied in this work. An antifouling polymer, derived from hyperbranched polyglycerol and functionalized by α-lipoic acid and succinic anhydride, was synthesized and grafted onto the polydopamine (PDA) modified poly(ether sulfone) (PES) hollow fiber membranes. In comparison to unmodified membranes, the charged hyperbranched polyglycerol (CHPG) grafted membrane is much less affected by organic deposition, such as bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorption, and highly resistant to microbial growths, demonstrated by Escherichia coli adhesion and Staphylococcus aureus attachment. CHPG-g-TFC was also examined in PRO tests using a concentrated wastewater as the feed. Comparing to the plain PES-TFC and non-charged HPG-g-TFC, the newly developed membrane exhibits not only the smallest decline in water flux but also the highest recovery rate. When using 0.81 M NaCl and wastewater as the feed pair in PRO tests at 15 bar, the average power density remains at 5.6 W/m(2) in comparison to an average value of 3.6 W/m(2) for unmodified membranes after four PRO runs. In summary, osmotic power generation may be sustained by properly designing and anchoring the functional polymers to PRO membranes.

  13. Anion exchangers with negatively charged functionalities in hyperbranched ion-exchange layers for ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Uzhel, Anna S; Zatirakha, Alexandra V; Smirnov, Konstantin N; Smolenkov, Alexandr D; Shpigun, Oleg A

    2017-01-27

    Novel pellicular poly(styrene-divinylbenzene)-based (PS-DVB) anion exchangers with covalently-bonded hyperbranched functional ion-exchange layers containing negatively charged functionalities are obtained and examined. The hyperbranched coating is created on the surface of aminated PS-DVB substrate by repeating the modification cycles including alkylation with 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether (1,4-BDDGE), and amination of the terminal epoxide rings with methylamine (MA) or glycine (Gly). The influence of the position and the number of the layers with glycine, as well as of the total number of the layers of amine in the coating on the chromatographic properties of the obtained stationary phases is investigated. Chromatographic performance of the obtained stationary phases is evaluated using the model mixtures of inorganic and organic anions with hydroxide eluent. It is shown that the best selectivity toward weakly retained organic acids and oxyhalides is possessed by the anion exchanger obtained after 5 modification cycles, with glycine being used in the first one. Such anion exchanger packed in 25-cm long column is capable of separating 22 anions in 58min including 7 standard anions, mono-, di- and trivalent organic acids, oxyhalides, and some other double- and triple-charged anions.

  14. Negatively charged phospholipids suppress IFN-{gamma} production in T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yotsumoto, Satoshi; Kakiuchi, Terutaka; Aramaki, Yukihiko . E-mail: aramaki@ps.toyaku.ac.jp

    2005-12-30

    The effect of phospholipids on IFN-{gamma} production in mouse T cells was investigated. Phosphatidylserine (PS), which has a negatively charged head group, completely inhibited IFN-{gamma} production in splenic naive T cells and antigen-dependent IFN-{gamma} production in Th1 clone 42-6A cells, whereas other phospholipids, which have neutrally charged head group, had no effect. The structural requirements for IFN-{gamma} inhibitory effects by PS were investigated, and dimyristoyl-PS (C14: 0) and dipalmitoyl-PS (C16: 0) had no effect on IFN-{gamma} production, and interestingly, distearoyl-PS (18: 0) increased IFN-{gamma} production. Dioleoyl-PS (C18: 1), dilinoleoyl-PS (C18: 2), and oleoyl-lyso-PS (C18: 1) completely inhibited IFN-{gamma} production. To clarify this mechanism, we focused on the stability of IFN-{gamma} mRNA, and the treatment of splenic naive T cells with PS brought about 40% reductions in IFN-{gamma} mRNA expression in the presence of actinomycin D. Collectively, IFN-{gamma} inhibitory effects by PS are highly dependent on the molecular structure of PS and involve the decreasing of the stability of IFN-{gamma} mRNA.

  15. Negatively-charged NV-center in SiC: Electronic structure properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dev, Pratibha; Economou, Sophia

    Deep defects with high-spin states in semiconductors are promising candidates as solid-state systems for quantum computing applications. The charged NV-center in diamond is the best-known and most-studied defect center, and has proven to be a good proof-of-principle structure for demonstrating the use of such defects in quantum technologies. Increasingly, however, there is an interest in exploring deep defects in alternative semiconductors such as SiC. This is due to the challenges posed by diamond as host material for defects, as well as the attractive properties of SiC. In this density functional theory work, we study the spin-1 structure of the negatively charged NV-center in two polytypes: 3C-SiC and 4H-SiC. The calculated zero phonon line for the excited state of the defect is in telecom range (0.90eV), making it a very good candidate for quantum technologies. This work provides basic ingredients required to understand the physics of this color center at a quantitative and qualitative level. We also design quantum information applications, such as a spin-photon interface and multi-photon entanglement.

  16. Synthesis of positively and negatively charged silver nanoparticles and their deposition on the surface of titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharonova, A.; Loza, K.; Surmeneva, M.; Surmenev, R.; Prymak, O.; Epple, M.

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial infections related to dental implants are currently a significant complication. A good way to overcome this challenge is functionalization of implant surface with Ag nanoparticles (NPs) as antibacterial agent. This article aims at review the synthesis routes, size and electrical properties of AgNPs. Polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) and polyethyleneimine (PEI) were used as stabilizers. Dynamic Light Scattering, Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) have been used to characterize the prepared AgNPs. Two types of NPs were synthesized in aqueous solutions: PVP-stabilized NPs with a diameter of the metallic core of 70 ± 20 nm, and negative charge of -20 mV, PEI-stabilized NPs with the size of the metallic core of 50 ± 20 nm and positive charge of +55 mV. According to SEM results, all the NPs have a spherical shape. Functionalization of the titanium substrate surface with PVP and PEI-stabilized AgNPs was carried out by dropping method. XRD patterns revealed that the AgNPs are crystalline with the crystallite size of 14 nm.

  17. Interaction of cationic hydrophobic surfactants at negatively charged surfaces investigated by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    McNamee, Cathy E; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Higashitani, Ko; Vakarelski, Ivan U; Kappl, Michael

    2009-10-06

    Atomic force microscopy was used to study the adsorption of the surfactant octadecyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (C18TAC) at a low concentration (0.03 mM) to negatively charged surfaces in water. Atomic force microscopy tips were functionalized with dimethyloctadecyl(3-tripropyl)ammonium chloride (C18TAC-si) or N-trimethoxysilylpropyl-N,N,N-trimethylammomium chloride (hydrophilpos-si) to facilitate imaging of the adsorbed surfactant without artifacts. Tapping mode images and force measurements revealed C18TAC patches, identified as partial surfactant bilayers or hemimicelles. The forces controlling the adsorption process of the C18TAC to a negatively charged surface were investigated by measuring the forces between a C18TAC-si or a hydrophilpos-si tip and a silica surface in the presence of varying concentrations of either NaCl or NaNO3. Screening of forces with an increasing NaCl concentration was observed for the C18TAC-si and hydrophilpos-si tips, proving an electrostatic contribution. Screening was also observed for the hydrophilpos-si tip in NaNO3, whereas a long-range attraction was observed for the C18TAC-si tip for all NaNO3 concentrations. These results indicate that screening of the forces for the C18TAC-si tip depended on the type and/or size of the anion, possibly due to a different probability of the anions to enter the silane layers. The interaction of C18TAC patches with C18TAC-si tips in the presence of NaCl and the interaction of the patches with hydrophilpos-si tips in either NaCl or NaNO3 were repulsive and independent of the number of force curves measured, indicating a stable, positively charged C18TAC patch. However, the forces measured between the patches and a C18TAC-si tip in NaNO3 depended on the number of force curves measured, indicating a change in patch structure induced by the first interaction.

  18. Simultaneous Separation of Negatively and Positively Charged Species in Dynamic Field Gradient Focusing Using a Dual Polarity Electric Field

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Jeffrey M.; Huang, Zheng; Ivory, Cornelius F.

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic field gradient focusing (DFGF) utilizes an electric field gradient established by a computer-controlled electrode array to separate and concentrate charged analytes at unique axial positions. Traditionally, DFGF has been restricted to the analysis of negatively charged species due to limitations in the software of our voltage controller. This paper introduces a new voltage controller capable of operating under normal polarity (positive potentials applied to the electrode array) and reversed polarity (negative potentials applied to the electrode array) for the separation of negatively and positively charged analytes, respectively. The experiments conducted under normal polarity and reversed polarity illustrate the utility of the new controller to perform reproducible DFGF separations (elution times showing less than 1% run-to-run variation) over a wide pH range (3.08 to 8.5) regardless of the protein charge. A dual polarity experiment is then shown in which the separation channel has been divided into normal polarity and reversed polarity regions. This simultaneous separation of negatively charged R-phycoerythrin (R-PE) and positively charged cytochrome c (CYTC) within the same DFGF apparatus is shown. PMID:19722517

  19. Simultaneous separation of negatively and positively charged species in dynamic field gradient focusing using a dual polarity electric field.

    PubMed

    Burke, Jeffrey M; Huang, Zheng; Ivory, Cornelius F

    2009-10-01

    Dynamic field gradient focusing (DFGF) utilizes an electric field gradient established by a computer-controlled electrode array to separate and concentrate charged analytes at unique axial positions. Traditionally, DFGF has been restricted to the analysis of negatively charged species due to limitations in the software of our voltage controller. This paper introduces a new voltage controller capable of operating under normal polarity (positive potentials applied to the electrode array) and reversed polarity (negative potentials applied to the electrode array) for the separation of negatively and positively charged analytes, respectively. The experiments conducted under normal polarity and reversed polarity illustrate the utility of the new controller to perform reproducible DFGF separations (elution times showing less than 1% run-to-run variation) over a wide pH range (3.08 to 8.5) regardless of the protein charge. A dual polarity experiment is then shown in which the separation channel has been divided into normal polarity and reversed polarity regions. This simultaneous separation of negatively charged R-phycoerythrin (R-PE) and positively charged cytochrome c (CYTC) within the same DFGF apparatus is shown.

  20. Carbon Nanotube/Conductive Additive/Space Durable Polymer Nanocomposite Films for Electrostatic Charge Dissipation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Watson, Kent A.; Delozier, Donavon M.; Connell, John W.

    2003-01-01

    Thin film membranes of space environmentally stable polymeric materials possessing low color/solar absorptivity (alpha) are of interest for potential applications on Gossamer spacecraft. In addition to these properties, sufficient electrical conductivity is required in order to dissipate electrostatic charge (ESC) build-up brought about by the charged orbital environment. One approach to achieve sufficient electrical conductivity for ESC mitigation is the incorporation of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). However, when the SWNTs are dispersed throughout the polymer matrix, the nanocomposite films tend to be significantly darker than the pristine material resulting in a higher alpha. The incorporation of conductive additives in combination with a decreased loading level of SWNTs is one approach for improving alpha while retaining conductivity. Taken individually, the low loading level of conductive additives and SWNTs is insufficient in achieving the percolation level necessary for electrical conductivity. When added simultaneously to the film, conductivity is achieved through a synergistic effect. The chemistry, physical, and mechanical properties of the nanocomposite films will be presented.

  1. Isomer-selected photoelectron spectroscopy of isolated DNA oligonucleotides: phosphate and nucleobase deprotonation at high negative charge states.

    PubMed

    Vonderach, Matthias; Ehrler, Oli T; Matheis, Katerina; Weis, Patrick; Kappes, Manfred M

    2012-05-09

    Fractionation according to ion mobility and mass-to-charge ratio has been used to select individual isomers of deprotonated DNA oligonucleotide multianions for subsequent isomer-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) in the gas phase. Isomer-resolved PE spectra have been recorded for tetranucleotides, pentanucleotides, and hexanucleotides. These were studied primarily in their highest accessible negative charge states (3-, 4-, and 5-, respectively), as provided by electrospraying from room temperature solutions. In particular, the PE spectra obtained for pentanucleotide tetraanions show evidence for two coexisting classes of gas-phase isomeric structures. We suggest that these two classes comprise: (i) species with excess electrons localized exclusively at deprotonated phosphate backbone sites and (ii) species with at least one deprotonated base (in addition to several deprotonated phosphates). By permuting the sequence of bases in various [A(5-x)T(x)](4-) and [GT(4)](4-) pentanucleotides, we have established that the second type of isomer is most likely to occur if the deprotonated base is located at the first or last position in the sequence. We have used a combination of molecular mechanics and semiempirical calculations together with a simple electrostatic model to explore the photodetachment mechanism underlying our photoelectron spectra. Comparison of predicted to measured photoelectron spectra suggests that a significant fraction of the detected electrons originates from the DNA bases (both deprotonated and neutral).

  2. Investigations of the negative plate of lead/acid cells 1. Selection of additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saakes, Michel; J. Van Duin, Pieter; C. P. Ligtvoet, Alexander; Schmal, Dick

    A procedure is proposed for the selection of inhibitors and expanders used as additives for the negative plate of the lead/acid battery. Inhibitors were selected by performing d.c. and a.c. measurements at pure metals (Cu, Sb, Ag), which are assumed to act as local active sites for the hydrogen-evolution reaction at the negative plate. From this study anisaldehyde was found to show strong preferential adsorption at Cu and Sb. Expanders were selected using a.c. impedance measurements at a Pb electrode at a low anodic discharge current. Selected expanders were Indulin C and Na-1-naphtol-4-sulfonate. From the impedance measurements information was obtained not only on the expander action but also on the effect of the additive on the double layer and the diffusion properties of lead sulfate. From a study on the concentration dependence of the expander (Na-1-naphtol-4-sulfonate) an optimal effect was found at a concentration of about 600 ppm.

  3. Chondroitin sulfate addition to CD44H negatively regulates hyaluronan binding

    SciTech Connect

    Ruffell, Brian; Johnson, Pauline . E-mail: pauline@interchange.ubc.ca

    2005-08-26

    CD44 is a widely expressed cell adhesion molecule that binds hyaluronan, an extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycan, in a tightly regulated manner. This regulated interaction has been implicated in inflammation and tumor metastasis. CD44 exists in the standard form, CD44H, or as higher molecular mass isoforms due to alternative splicing. Here, we identify serine 180 in human CD44H as the site of chondroitin sulfate addition and show that lack of chondroitin sulfate addition at this site enhances hyaluronan binding by CD44. A CD44H-immunoglobulin fusion protein expressed in HEK293 cells, and CD44H expressed in murine L fibroblast cells were modified by chondroitin sulfate, as determined by reduced sulfate incorporation after chondroitinase ABC treatment. Mutation of serine 180 or glycine 181 in CD44H reduced chondroitin sulfate addition and increased hyaluronan binding, indicating that serine 180 is the site for chondroitin sulfate addition in CD44H and that this negatively regulates hyaluronan binding.

  4. Excitation of dust acoustic waves by an ion beam in a plasma cylinder with negatively charged dust grains

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Suresh C.; Kaur, Daljeet; Gahlot, Ajay; Sharma, Jyotsna

    2014-10-15

    An ion beam propagating through a plasma cylinder having negatively charged dust grains drives a low frequency electrostatic dust acoustic wave (DAW) to instability via Cerenkov interaction. The unstable wave frequencies and the growth rate increase with the relative density of negatively charged dust grains. The growth rate of the unstable mode scales to the one-third power of the beam density. The real part of the frequency of the unstable mode increases with the beam energy and scales to almost one-half power of the beam energy. The phase velocity, frequency, and wavelength results of the unstable mode are in compliance with the experimental observations.

  5. Statistical mechanics of dust charging in a multi-ion plasma with negative and positive ionic species

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, S. K.; Misra, Shikha

    2015-02-15

    On the basis of statistical mechanics and charging kinetics, the charge distribution over uniform size spherical dust particles in a multi-ion plasma comprising of multiple charged negative and positive ions is investigated. Two specific situations where the complex plasma is viz., (i) dark (no emission from dust) and (ii) irradiated by laser light (causing photoemission from dust) have been taken into account. The analytical formulation includes the population balance equation for the charged dust particles along with number and energy balance of the complex plasma constituents. The departure of the results for multi-ion plasma from that in case of usual singly charged positive ion plasma is graphically illustrated and discussed. In contrast to electron-ion plasma, significant number of particles is seen to acquire opposite charge in case of pure positive-negative ion plasma, even in the absence of electron emission from the dust grains. The effects of various plasma parameters viz., number density, particle size, and work function of dust on charge distribution have also been examined.

  6. Differential effects of DEAE negative mode chromatography and gel-filtration chromatography on the charge status of Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein.

    PubMed

    Hong, Zhi-Wei; Yang, Yu-Chi; Pan, Timothy; Tzeng, Huey-Fen; Fu, Hua-Wen

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP) is involved in H. pylori-associated gastric inflammation. HP-NAP is also a vaccine candidate, a possible drug target, and a potential diagnostic marker for H. pylori-associated diseases. Previously, we purified recombinant HP-NAP by one-step diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) negative mode chromatography by collecting the unbound fraction at pH 8.0 at 4°C. It remains unclear why HP-NAP does not bind to DEAE resins at the pH above its isoelectric point during the purification. To investigate how pH affects the surface net charge of HP-NAP and its binding to DEAE resins during the purification, recombinant HP-NAP expressed in Escherichia coli was subjected to DEAE negative mode chromatography at pH ranging from 7.0 to 9.0 at 25°C and the surface charge of purified HP-NAP was determined by capillary electrophoresis. A minimal amount of HP-NAP was detected in the elution fraction of DEAE Sepharose resin at pH 8.5, whereas recombinant HP-NAP was detected in the elution fraction of DEAE Sephadex resin only at pH 7.0 and 8.0. The purified recombinant HP-NAP obtained from the unbound fractions was not able to bind to DEAE resins at pH 7.0 to 9.0. In addition, the surface charge of the purified HP-NAP was neutral at pH 7.0 to 8.0 and was either neutral or slightly negative at pH 8.5 and 9.0. However, recombinant HP-NAP purified from gel-filtration chromatography was able to bind to DEAE Sepharose resin at pH 7.0 to 9.0 and DEAE Sephadex resin at pH 7.0. At pH 8.5 and 9.0, only the negatively charged species of HP-NAP were found. Thus, recombinant HP-NAP with different charge status can be differentially purified by DEAE negative mode chromatography and gel-filtration chromatography. Furthermore, the charge distribution on the surface of HP-NAP, the presence of impure proteins, and the overall net charge of the resins all affect the binding of HP-NAP to DEAE resins during the negative purification.

  7. Differential effects of DEAE negative mode chromatography and gel-filtration chromatography on the charge status of Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Timothy; Tzeng, Huey-Fen

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP) is involved in H. pylori-associated gastric inflammation. HP-NAP is also a vaccine candidate, a possible drug target, and a potential diagnostic marker for H. pylori-associated diseases. Previously, we purified recombinant HP-NAP by one-step diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) negative mode chromatography by collecting the unbound fraction at pH 8.0 at 4°C. It remains unclear why HP-NAP does not bind to DEAE resins at the pH above its isoelectric point during the purification. To investigate how pH affects the surface net charge of HP-NAP and its binding to DEAE resins during the purification, recombinant HP-NAP expressed in Escherichia coli was subjected to DEAE negative mode chromatography at pH ranging from 7.0 to 9.0 at 25°C and the surface charge of purified HP-NAP was determined by capillary electrophoresis. A minimal amount of HP-NAP was detected in the elution fraction of DEAE Sepharose resin at pH 8.5, whereas recombinant HP-NAP was detected in the elution fraction of DEAE Sephadex resin only at pH 7.0 and 8.0. The purified recombinant HP-NAP obtained from the unbound fractions was not able to bind to DEAE resins at pH 7.0 to 9.0. In addition, the surface charge of the purified HP-NAP was neutral at pH 7.0 to 8.0 and was either neutral or slightly negative at pH 8.5 and 9.0. However, recombinant HP-NAP purified from gel-filtration chromatography was able to bind to DEAE Sepharose resin at pH 7.0 to 9.0 and DEAE Sephadex resin at pH 7.0. At pH 8.5 and 9.0, only the negatively charged species of HP-NAP were found. Thus, recombinant HP-NAP with different charge status can be differentially purified by DEAE negative mode chromatography and gel-filtration chromatography. Furthermore, the charge distribution on the surface of HP-NAP, the presence of impure proteins, and the overall net charge of the resins all affect the binding of HP-NAP to DEAE resins during the negative purification. PMID:28328957

  8. Solute Transport of Negatively Charged Contrast Agents Across Articular Surface of Injured Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Kokkonen, H T; Chin, H C; Töyräs, J; Jurvelin, J S; Quinn, T M

    2017-04-01

    Solute transport through the extracellular matrix (ECM) is crucial to chondrocyte metabolism. Cartilage injury affects solute transport in cartilage due to alterations in ECM structure and solute-matrix interactions. Therefore, cartilage injury may be detected by using contrast agent-based clinical imaging. In the present study, effects of mechanical injury on transport of negatively charged contrast agents in cartilage were characterized. Using cartilage plugs injured by mechanical compression protocol, effective partition coefficients and diffusion fluxes of iodine- and gadolinium-based contrast agents were measured using high resolution microCT imaging. For all contrast agents studied, effective diffusion fluxes increased significantly, particularly at early times during the diffusion process (38 and 33% increase after 4 min, P < 0.05 for iodine and Gd-DTPA; and 76% increase after 10 min for diatrizoate, P < 0.05). Effective partition coefficients were unaffected in mechanically injured cartilage. Mechanical injury reduced PG content and collagen integrity in cartilage superficial zone. This study suggests that alterations in contrast agent diffusion flux, a non-equilibrium transport parameter, provides a more sensitive indicator for assessment of cartilage matrix integrity than partition coefficient and the equilibrium distribution of solute. These findings may help in developing clinical methods of contrast agent-based imaging to detect cartilage injury.

  9. Toward a Molecular Understanding of Protein Solubility: Increased Negative Surface Charge Correlates with Increased Solubility

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Ryan M.; Shende, Varad R.; Motl, Nicole; Pace, C. Nick; Scholtz, J. Martin

    2012-01-01

    Protein solubility is a problem for many protein chemists, including structural biologists and developers of protein pharmaceuticals. Knowledge about how intrinsic factors influence solubility is limited due to the difficulty of obtaining quantitative solubility measurements. Solubility measurements in buffer alone are difficult to reproduce, because gels or supersaturated solutions often form, making it impossible to determine solubility values for many proteins. Protein precipitants can be used to obtain comparative solubility measurements and, in some cases, estimations of solubility in buffer alone. Protein precipitants fall into three broad classes: salts, long-chain polymers, and organic solvents. Here, we compare the use of representatives from two classes of precipitants, ammonium sulfate and polyethylene glycol 8000, by measuring the solubility of seven proteins. We find that increased negative surface charge correlates strongly with increased protein solubility and may be due to strong binding of water by the acidic amino acids. We also find that the solubility results obtained for the two different precipitants agree closely with each other, suggesting that the two precipitants probe similar properties that are relevant to solubility in buffer alone. PMID:22768947

  10. Negatively charged donors in parabolic quantum-well wires under magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Li-Xue; Liu, Jian-Jun

    2007-09-01

    The ground state of a negatively charged donor (D-) in a parabolic GaAs quantum-well wire in the presence of a magnetic field is investigated using the finite difference method within the quasi-one-dimensional effective potential model. The magnetic effects on the binding energies of the ground state of a D- center are calculated for various parabolic potentials. The distance between the electrons and the donor ion and the distance between the two electrons are also calculated, respectively, as a function of the strength of the parabolic potential and the magnetic field. We find that the interplay of the spatial confinement and the magnetic confinement of electrons in quantum-well wires leads to complicated behavior of the binding energies of the D- center and that the increase of the electron-donor ion attraction dominates the increase of the electron-electron repulsion as the spatial and magnetic confinement increases for the ground state of a D- center in a parabolic quantum-well wire.

  11. Charged rotating black holes in Einstein-Maxwell-Chern-Simons theory with a negative cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blázquez-Salcedo, Jose Luis; Kunz, Jutta; Navarro-Lérida, Francisco; Radu, Eugen

    2017-03-01

    We consider rotating black hole solutions in five-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell-Chern-Simons theory with a negative cosmological constant and a generic value of the Chern-Simons coupling constant λ . Using both analytical and numerical techniques, we focus on cohomogeneity-1 configurations, with two equal-magnitude angular momenta, which approach at infinity a globally anti-de Sitter background. We find that the generic solutions share a number of basic properties with the known Cvetič, Lü, and Pope black holes which have λ =1 . New features occur as well; for example, when the Chern-Simons coupling constant exceeds a critical value, the solutions are no longer uniquely determined by their global charges. Moreover, the black holes possess radial excitations which can be labelled by the node number of the magnetic gauge potential function. Solutions with small values of λ possess other distinct features. For instance, the extremal black holes there form two disconnected branches, while not all near-horizon solutions are associated with global solutions.

  12. In vitro and in vivo performance of biocompatible negatively-charged salbutamol-loaded nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rytting, Erik; Bur, Michael; Cartier, Regis; Bouyssou, Thierry; Wang, Xiaoying; Krüger, Michael; Lehr, Claus-Michael; Kissel, Thomas

    2010-01-04

    The development and performance of a novel nanoparticle-based formulation for pulmonary delivery has been characterized chronologically through the particle preparation process, in vitro testing of drug release, biocompatibility, degradation, drug transport in cell culture, and in vivo bronchoprotection studies in anaesthetised guinea pigs. This study demonstrates excellent agreement of the in vitro and in vivo experiments undertaken to prove the feasibility of the design, thereby serving as an example highlighting the importance of in vitro test methods that predict in vivo performance. Nanoparticles were prepared from the newly designed negatively-charged polymer poly(vinyl sulfonate-co-vinyl alcohol)-g-poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) loaded with salbutamol free base. Average particle sizes of blank and drug-loaded nanoparticles prepared at the various stages of the investigations were between 91 and 204nm; average zeta potential values were between -50.1 and -25.6mV. Blank nanoparticles showed no significant toxicity, and no inflammatory activity was detected in Calu-3 cells. Sustained release of salbutamol from the nanoparticles was observed for 2.5h in vitro, and a prolonged effect was observed for 120min in vivo. These results demonstrate good agreement between in vitro and in vivo tests and also present a promising foundation for future advancement in nanomedicine strategies for pulmonary drug delivery.

  13. Energy losses of positive and negative charged particles in electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diachenko, M. M.; Kholodov, R. I.

    2017-02-01

    A heavy charged particle propagation through electron gas has been studied using combination of non-relativistic quantum mechanics and the Green’s functions method. The energy loss of a charged particle has been found in the case of large transferred momentum taking into account the interference term in the expression for the rate. The dependence of the energy loss of a charged particles in electron gas with nonzero temperature on the sign of the charge has been obtained.

  14. Radiation transport codes for potential applications related to radiobiology and radiotherapy using protons, neutrons, and negatively charged pions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.

    1972-01-01

    Several Monte Carlo radiation transport computer codes are used to predict quantities of interest in the fields of radiotherapy and radiobiology. The calculational methods are described and comparisions of calculated and experimental results are presented for dose distributions produced by protons, neutrons, and negatively charged pions. Comparisons of calculated and experimental cell survival probabilities are also presented.

  15. Enhanced density of negative fixed charges in Al2O3 layers on Si through a subsequent deposition of TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Thomas; Ziegler, Johannes; Kaufmann, Kai; Ilse, Klemens; Sprafke, Alexander; Wehrspohn, Ralf B.

    2016-04-01

    The passivation of silicon surfaces play an important role for achieving high-efficiency crystalline silicon solar cells. In this work, a stack system comprising of 20nm Al2O3 with a 22nm TiO2 topping layer was deposited on p-type Si using thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) and was investigated regarding its passivation quality. Quasi-steady-state photo conductance (QSSPC) measurements reveal that the minority carrier lifetime at an injection density of 1015cm-3 increased from 1.10ms to 1.96ms after the deposition of TiO2, which shows that the deposition of TiO2 onto Al2O3 is capable of enhancing its passivation quality. Capacity voltage (CV) measurements show that the amount of negative charges in the dielectric layer has increased from -2.4·1012cm-2 to -6.3·1012cm-2 due to the deposition of TiO2. The location of the additional charges was analyzed in this work by etching the dielectric layer stack in several steps. After each step CV measurements were performed. It is found that the additional negative charges are created within the Al2O3 layer. Additionally, ToF-SIMS measurements were performed to check for diffusion processes within the Al2O3 layer.

  16. Negatively Charged Lipid Membranes Promote a Disorder-Order Transition in the Yersinia YscU Protein

    PubMed Central

    Weise, Christoph F.; Login, Frédéric H.; Ho, Oanh; Gröbner, Gerhard; Wolf-Watz, Hans; Wolf-Watz, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    The inner membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is negatively charged, rendering positively charged cytoplasmic proteins in close proximity likely candidates for protein-membrane interactions. YscU is a Yersinia pseudotuberculosis type III secretion system protein crucial for bacterial pathogenesis. The protein contains a highly conserved positively charged linker sequence that separates membrane-spanning and cytoplasmic (YscUC) domains. Although disordered in solution, inspection of the primary sequence of the linker reveals that positively charged residues are separated with a typical helical periodicity. Here, we demonstrate that the linker sequence of YscU undergoes a largely electrostatically driven coil-to-helix transition upon binding to negatively charged membrane interfaces. Using membrane-mimicking sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles, an NMR derived structural model reveals the induction of three helical segments in the linker. The overall linker placement in sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles was identified by NMR experiments including paramagnetic relaxation enhancements. Partitioning of individual residues agrees with their hydrophobicity and supports an interfacial positioning of the helices. Replacement of positively charged linker residues with alanine resulted in YscUC variants displaying attenuated membrane-binding affinities, suggesting that the membrane interaction depends on positive charges within the linker. In vivo experiments with bacteria expressing these YscU replacements resulted in phenotypes displaying significantly reduced effector protein secretion levels. Taken together, our data identify a previously unknown membrane-interacting surface of YscUC that, when perturbed by mutations, disrupts the function of the pathogenic machinery in Yersinia. PMID:25418176

  17. O(2) adsorption and dissociation on neutral, positively and negatively charged Au(n) (n = 5-79) clusters.

    PubMed

    Roldán, Alberto; Ricart, Josep Manel; Illas, Francesc; Pacchioni, Gianfranco

    2010-09-28

    The adsorption and dissociation of an O(2) molecule on gas-phase gold clusters of size varying from 5 to 79 atoms have been investigated by means of first principles density functional theory calculations. The adsorption energies and dissociation barriers have been determined for neutral, positively and negatively charged gold clusters in order to analyze in a systematic way the role of the charge on the cluster reactivity. While there is beneficial effect on O(2) activation of an extra electron on the small gold clusters (Au(5) and Au(13)), the effect is absent for positively charged clusters. The effect of the charge vanishes rapidly by increasing the cluster size and is not visible for clusters containing about 40 atoms or more. Au(38) appears to be the most reactive among the clusters considered and strong oscillations in adsorption energies and dissociation barriers are found even for clusters containing several tens of atoms like Au(38), Au(55), and Au(79).

  18. Tantalum oxide/silicon nitride: A negatively charged surface passivation stack for silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Yimao Bullock, James; Cuevas, Andres

    2015-05-18

    This letter reports effective passivation of crystalline silicon (c-Si) surfaces by thermal atomic layer deposited tantalum oxide (Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}) underneath plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposited silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}). Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy imaging shows an approximately 2 nm thick interfacial layer between Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} and c-Si. Surface recombination velocities as low as 5.0 cm/s and 3.2 cm/s are attained on p-type 0.8 Ω·cm and n-type 1.0 Ω·cm c-Si wafers, respectively. Recombination current densities of 25 fA/cm{sup 2} and 68 fA/cm{sup 2} are measured on 150 Ω/sq boron-diffused p{sup +} and 120 Ω/sq phosphorus-diffused n{sup +} c-Si, respectively. Capacitance–voltage measurements reveal a negative fixed insulator charge density of −1.8 × 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −2} for the Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} film and −1.0 × 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −2} for the Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiN{sub x} stack. The Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiN{sub x} stack is demonstrated to be an excellent candidate for surface passivation of high efficiency silicon solar cells.

  19. Theoretical study of negatively charged Fe(-)-(H2O)(n ≤ 6) clusters.

    PubMed

    Castro, Miguel

    2012-06-14

    Interactions of a singly negatively charged iron atom with water molecules, Fe(-)-(H(2)O)(n≤6), in the gas phase were studied by means of density functional theory. All-electron calculations were performed using the B3LYP functional and the 6-311++G(2d,2p) basis set for the Fe, O, and H atoms. In the lowest total energy states of Fe(-)-(H(2)O)(n), the metal-hydrogen bonding is stronger than the metal-oxygen one, producing low-symmetry structures because the water molecules are directly attached to the metal by basically one of their hydrogen atoms, whereas the other ones are involved in a network of hydrogen bonds, which together with the Fe(δ-)-H(δ+) bonding accounts for the nascent hydration of the Fe(-) anion. For Fe(-)-(H(2)O)(3≤n), three-, four-, five-, and six-membered rings of water molecules are bonded to the metal, which is located at the surface of the cluster in such a way as to reduce the repulsion with the oxygen atoms. Nevertheless, internal isomers appear also, lying less than 3 or 5 kcal/mol for n = 2-3 or n = 4-6. These results are in contrast with those of classical TM(+)-(H(2)O)(n) complexes, where the direct TM(+)-O bonding usually produces high symmetry structures with the metal defining the center of the complex. They show also that the Fe(-) anions, as the TM(+) ions, have great capability for the adsorption of water molecules, forming Fe(-)-(H(2)O)(n) structures stabilized by Fe(δ-)-H(δ+) and H-bond interactions.

  20. Charge enhancement of single-stranded DNA in negative electrospray ionization using the supercharging reagent meta-nitrobenzyl alcohol.

    PubMed

    Brahim, Bessem; Alves, Sandra; Cole, Richard B; Tabet, Jean-Claude

    2013-12-01

    Charge enhancement of single-stranded oligonucleotide ions in negative ESI mode is investigated. The employed reagent, meta-nitrobenzyl alcohol (m-NBA), was found to improve total signal intensity (Itot), increase the highest observed charge states (zhigh), and raise the average charge states (zavg) of all tested oligonucleotides analyzed in negative ESI. To quantify these increases, signal enhancement ratios (SER1%) and charge enhancement coefficients (CEC1%) were introduced. The SER1%, (defined as the quotient of total oligonucleotide ion abundances with 1% m-NBA divided by total oligonucleotide abundance without m-NBA) was found to be greater than unity for every oligonucleotide tested. The CEC1% values (defined as the average charge state in the presence of 1% m-NBA minus the average charge state in the absence of m-NBA) were found to be uniformly positive. Upon close inspection, the degree of charge enhancement for longer oligonucleotides was found to be dependent upon thymine density (i.e., the number and the location of phospho-thymidine units). A correlation between the charge enhancement induced by the presence of m-NBA and the apparent gas-phase acidity (largely determined by the sequence of thymine units but also by the presence of protons on other nucleobases) of multiply deprotonated oligonucleotide species, was thus established. Ammonium cations appeared to be directly involved in the m-NBA supercharging mechanism, and their role seems to be consistent with previously postulated ESI mechanisms describing desorption/ionization of single-stranded DNA into the gas phase.

  1. Charge Enhancement of Single-Stranded DNA in Negative Electrospray Ionization Using the Supercharging Reagent Meta-nitrobenzyl Alcohol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahim, Bessem; Alves, Sandra; Cole, Richard B.; Tabet, Jean-Claude

    2013-12-01

    Charge enhancement of single-stranded oligonucleotide ions in negative ESI mode is investigated. The employed reagent, meta-nitrobenzyl alcohol (m-NBA), was found to improve total signal intensity (Itot), increase the highest observed charge states (zhigh), and raise the average charge states (zavg) of all tested oligonucleotides analyzed in negative ESI. To quantify these increases, signal enhancement ratios (SER1%) and charge enhancement coefficients (CEC1%) were introduced. The SER1%, (defined as the quotient of total oligonucleotide ion abundances with 1 % m-NBA divided by total oligonucleotide abundance without m-NBA) was found to be greater than unity for every oligonucleotide tested. The CEC1% values (defined as the average charge state in the presence of 1 % m-NBA minus the average charge state in the absence of m-NBA) were found to be uniformly positive. Upon close inspection, the degree of charge enhancement for longer oligonucleotides was found to be dependent upon thymine density (i.e., the number and the location of phospho-thymidine units). A correlation between the charge enhancement induced by the presence of m-NBA and the apparent gas-phase acidity (largely determined by the sequence of thymine units but also by the presence of protons on other nucleobases) of multiply deprotonated oligonucleotide species, was thus established. Ammonium cations appeared to be directly involved in the m-NBA supercharging mechanism, and their role seems to be consistent with previously postulated ESI mechanisms describing desorption/ionization of single-stranded DNA into the gas phase.

  2. Charge recombination mechanism to explain the negative capacitance in dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lie-Feng, Feng; Kun, Zhao; Hai-Tao, Dai; Shu-Guo, Wang; Xiao-Wei, Sun

    2016-03-01

    Negative capacitance (NC) in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) has been confirmed experimentally. In this work, the recombination behavior of carriers in DSC with semiconductor interface as a carrier’s transport layer is explored theoretically in detail. Analytical results indicate that the recombination behavior of carriers could contribute to the NC of DSCs under small signal perturbation. Using this recombination capacitance we propose a novel equivalent circuit to completely explain the negative terminal capacitance. Further analysis based on the recombination complex impedance show that the NC is inversely proportional to frequency. In addition, analytical recombination resistance is composed by the alternating current (AC) recombination resistance (Rrac) and the direct current (DC) recombination resistance (Rrdc), which are caused by small-signal perturbation and the DC bias voltage, respectively. Both of two parts will decrease with increasing bias voltage. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11204209 and 60876035) and the Natural Science Foundation of Tianjin City, China (Grant No. 13JCZDJC32800).

  3. Modeling probability of additional cases of natalizumab-associated JCV sero-negative progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Carruthers, Robert L; Chitnis, Tanuja; Healy, Brian C

    2014-05-01

    JCV serologic status is used to determine PML risk in natalizumab-treated patients. Given two cases of natalizumab-associated PML in JCV sero-negative patients and two publications that question the false negative rate of the JCV serologic test, clinicians may question whether our understanding of PML risk is adequate. Given that there is no gold standard for diagnosing previous JCV exposure, the test characteristics of the JCV serologic test are unknowable. We propose a model of PML risk in JCV sero-negative natalizumab patients. Using the numbers of JCV sero-positive and -negative patients from a study of PML risk by JCV serologic status (sero-positive: 13,950 and sero-negative: 11,414), we apply a range of sensitivities and specificities in order calculate the number of JCV-exposed but JCV sero-negative patients (false negatives). We then apply a range of rates of developing PML in sero-negative patients to calculate the expected number of PML cases. By using the binomial function, we calculate the probability of a given number of JCV sero-negative PML cases. With this model, one has a means to establish a threshold number of JCV sero-negative natalizumab-associated PML cases at which it is improbable that our understanding of PML risk in JCV sero-negative patients is adequate.

  4. Enhanced antidepressant-like effects of the macromolecule trefoil factor 3 by loading into negatively charged liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Jing; Yang, Xu; Mi, Jia; Wang, Jianxin; Hou, Jia; Shen, Teng; Li, Yongji; Wang, Bin; Li, Xuri; Zhu, Weili

    2014-01-01

    Immunocytes, mainly neutrophils and monocytes, exhibit an intrinsic homing property, enabling them to migrate to sites of injury and inflammation. They can thus act as Trojan horses carrying concealed drug cargoes while migrating across impermeable barriers to sites of disease, especially the blood–brain barrier (BBB). In this study, to target circulating phagocytic cells, we formulated negatively charged nanosize liposomes and loaded trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) into liposomes by the pH-gradient method. According to the optimized formulation (5:1.5 of lipid to cholesterol, 10:1 of lipid to drug, 10 mg/mL of lipid concentration, and 10 mmol/L of phosphate-buffered saline), 44.47% entrapment efficiency was obtained for TFF3 liposomes with 129.6 nm particle size and −36.6 mV zeta potential. Compared with neutrally charged liposomes, the negatively charged liposomes showed a strong binding capacity with monocytes and were effectively carried by monocytes to cross the BBB in vitro. Furthermore, enhanced antidepressant-like effects were found in the tail-suspension and forced-swim tests in mice, as measured by decreased immobility time, as well as increased swimming time and reduced immobility in rats. These results suggested that negatively charged liposomes could improve the behavioral responses of TFF3, and our study opens up a new way for the development of effective therapies for brain disease by increasing the permeability of the BBB. PMID:25419129

  5. Amino acid addition to Vibrio cholerae LPS establishes a link between surface remodeling in gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hankins, Jessica V; Madsen, James A; Giles, David K; Brodbelt, Jennifer S; Trent, M Stephen

    2012-05-29

    Historically, the O1 El Tor and classical biotypes of Vibrio cholerae have been differentiated by their resistance to the antimicrobial peptide polymyxin B. However, the molecular mechanisms associated with this phenotypic distinction have remained a mystery for 50 y. Both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria modify their cell wall components with amine-containing substituents to reduce the net negative charge of the bacterial surface, thereby promoting cationic antimicrobial peptide resistance. In the present study, we demonstrate that V. cholerae modify the lipid A anchor of LPS with glycine and diglycine residues. This previously uncharacterized lipid A modification confers polymyxin resistance in V. cholerae El Tor, requiring three V. cholerae proteins: Vc1577 (AlmG), Vc1578 (AlmF), and Vc1579 (AlmE). Interestingly, the protein machinery required for glycine addition is reminiscent of the gram-positive system responsible for D-alanylation of teichoic acids. Such machinery was not thought to be used by gram-negative organisms. V. cholerae O1 El Tor mutants lacking genes involved in transferring glycine to LPS showed a 100-fold increase in sensitivity to polymyxin B. This work reveals a unique lipid A modification and demonstrates a charge-based remodeling strategy shared between gram-positive and gram-negative organisms.

  6. Negligible "negative space-charge layer effects" at oxide-electrolyte/electrode interfaces of thin-film batteries.

    PubMed

    Haruta, Masakazu; Shiraki, Susumu; Suzuki, Tohru; Kumatani, Akichika; Ohsawa, Takeo; Takagi, Yoshitaka; Shimizu, Ryota; Hitosugi, Taro

    2015-03-11

    In this paper, we report the surprisingly low electrolyte/electrode interface resistance of 8.6 Ω cm(2) observed in thin-film batteries. This value is an order of magnitude smaller than that presented in previous reports on all-solid-state lithium batteries. The value is also smaller than that found in a liquid electrolyte-based batteries. The low interface resistance indicates that the negative space-charge layer effects at the Li3PO(4-x)N(x)/LiCoO2 interface are negligible and demonstrates that it is possible to fabricate all-solid state batteries with faster charging/discharging properties.

  7. Validity of Saha's equation of thermal ionization for negatively charged spherical particles in complex plasmas in thermal equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Sodha, M. S.; Mishra, S. K.

    2011-04-15

    The authors have discussed the validity of Saha's equation for the charging of negatively charged spherical particles in a complex plasma in thermal equilibrium, even when the tunneling of the electrons, through the potential energy barrier surrounding the particle is considered. It is seen that the validity requires the probability of tunneling of an electron through the potential energy barrier surrounding the particle to be independent of the direction (inside to outside and vice versa) or in other words the Born's approximation should be valid.

  8. Electrical discharge occurring between a negatively charged particle cloud and a grounded sphere electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashiyama, Y.; Migita, S.; Toki, K.; Sugimoto, T.

    2008-12-01

    Electrostatic discharge occurring between a space-charge cloud and a grounded object was investigated using a large-scale charged particle cloud formed by using three set of cloud generators consisting of a blower and corona charger. The ejecting velocity of the particles affects the formation of the charged cloud. At the lower velocity, the charged cloud spread due to electrostatic repulsion force, while at the higher velocity cloud forms an elongated conical shape. To cause electrostatic discharge between the cloud and a grounded object, a grounded sphere electrode with 100 mm in diameter was set at the inside or outside of the cloud. The brush-like discharge channels reached the maximum length of 0.55 m. The discharge current has a waveform with single or multi-peak, a current peak of several amperes, the maximum charge quantity of 2 μC, and the duration of several microseconds. The relationship between the charge quantity and the current peak or the duration in each discharge was examined. The discharge between the cloud and the electrode placed at the outside of the cloud has relatively longer channels and multi-peak current with the longer duration, while that at the inside of the cloud has the lower charge quantity with single peak.

  9. Diffusivity of the double negatively charged mono-vacancy in silicon.

    PubMed

    Bhoodoo, Chidanand; Vines, Lasse; Monakhov, Edouard; Gunnar Svensson, Bengt

    2017-03-27

    Lightly-doped silicon (Si) samples of n-type conductivity have been irradiated with 2.0 MeV [Formula: see text] ions at a temperature of 30 K and characterized in situ by deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements using an on-line setup. Migration of the Si mono-vacancy in its double negative charge state (V (2-)) starts to occur at temperatures above  ∼70 K and is monitored via trapping of V (2-) by interstitial oxygen impurity atoms ([Formula: see text]), leading to the growth of the prominent vacancy-oxygen ([Formula: see text]) center. The [Formula: see text] center gives rise to an acceptor level located at  ∼0.17 eV below the conduction band edge (E c ) and is readily detected by DLTS measurements. Post-irradiation isothermal anneals at temperatures in the range of 70 to 90 K reveal first-order kinetics for the reaction [Formula: see text] in both Czochralski-grown and Float-zone samples subjected to low fluences of [Formula: see text] ions, i.e. the irradiation-induced V concentration is dilute ([Formula: see text]10(13) cm(-3)). On the basis of these kinetics data and the content of [Formula: see text], the diffusivity of V (2-) can be determined quantitatively and is found to exhibit an activation energy for migration of  ∼0.18 eV with a pre-exponential factor of  ∼[Formula: see text] cm(2) s(-1). The latter value evidences a simple jump process without any entropy effects for the motion of V (2-). No deep level in the bandgap to be associated with V (2-) is observed but the results suggest that the level is situated deeper than  ∼0.19 eV below E c , corroborating results reported previously in the literature.

  10. Modification of electrostatic charge on inhaled carrier lactose particles by addition of fine particles.

    PubMed

    Bennett, F S; Carter, P A; Rowley, G; Dandiker, Y

    1999-01-01

    Triboelectrification affects particle adhesion and agglomeration and hence the formulation, manufacture, and use of dry powder inhaler (DPI) devices. Electrostatic charge measurement of two component mixes of spray-dried or crystalline lactose fine particles (< 10 microns) 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 30% w/w with spray-dried or crystalline lactose 63-90 microns, respectively, has been undertaken using a system incorporating pneumatic transport of the mixed powders to a stainless steel cyclone charging device. The magnitude of charge on the mixes was shown to decrease with increased fine particle content, and there was no significant difference in charge for each concentration between spray-dried and crystalline lactose. Both the variation of charge and powder adhesion to the cyclone surface increased with increase in fine particle content. The proportion of fine particles in carrier systems in DPIs may thus have an important role where triboelectrification is involved.

  11. Daylight-driven photocatalytic degradation of ionic dyes with negatively surface-charged In2S3 nanoflowers: dye charge-dependent roles of reactive species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Suxiang; Cai, Lejuan; Li, Dapeng; Fa, Wenjun; Zhang, Yange; Zheng, Zhi

    2015-12-01

    Even though dye degradation is a successful application of semiconductor photocatalysis, the roles of reactive species in dye degradation have not received adequate attention. In this study, we systematically investigated the degradation of two cationic dyes (rhodamine B and methylene blue) and two anionic dyes (methyl orange and orange G) over negatively surface-charged In2S3 nanoflowers synthesized at 80 °C under indoor daylight lamp irradiation. It is notable to find In2S3 nanoflowers were more stable in anionic dyes degradation compared to that in cationic dyes removal. The active species trapping experiments indicated photogenerated electrons were mainly responsible for cationic dyes degradation, but holes were more important in anionic dyes degradation. A surface-charge-dependent role of reactive species in ionic dye degradation was proposed for revealing such interesting phenomenon. This study would provide a new insight for preparing highly efficient daylight-driven photocatalyst for ionic dyes degradation.

  12. Electrical Detection of Negatively Charged Proteins Using n-Type Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistor Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Yasuki; Maehashi, Kenzo; Ohno, Yasuhide; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko

    2010-02-01

    We fabricated n-type carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNTFET) biosensors. To prevent the single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT)/metal contacts from adsorption of ambient molecules, SiNx passivation films were deposited on CNTFETs by catalytic chemical vapor deposition. CNTFETs with SiNx passivation films on SWNT/metal contacts, but SWNT channels are exposed to environment for sensing, exhibit n-type behavior both in air and solution. Negatively charged bovine serum albumin is successfully detected using the fabricated n-type CNTFET biosensors with SiNx passivation films. Electrical detections of both negatively and positively charged proteins are achieved using n- and p-type CNTFET biosensors, respectively.

  13. Mass spectrometry study of multiply negatively charged, gas-phase NaAOT micelles: how does charge state affect micellar structure and encapsulation?

    PubMed

    Fang, Yigang; Liu, Fangwei; Liu, Jianbo

    2013-01-01

    We report the formation and characterization of multiply negatively charged sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (NaAOT) aggregates in the gas phase, by electrospray ionization of methanol/water solution of NaAOT followed by detection using a guided-ion-beam tandem mass spectrometer. Singly and doubly charged aggregates dominate the mass spectra with the compositions of [Na(n-z)AOT(n)](z-) (n = 1-18 and z = 1-2). Solvation by water was detected only for small aggregates [Na(n-1)AOT(n)H(2)O](-) of n = 3-9. Incorporation of glycine and tryptophan into [Na(n-z)AOT(n)](z-) aggregates was achieved, aimed at identifying effects of guest molecule hydrophobicity on micellar solubilization. Only one glycine molecule could be incorporated into each [Na(n-z)AOT(n)](z-) of n ≥ 7, and at most two glycine molecules could be hosted in that of n ≥ 13. In contrast to glycine, up to four tryptophan molecules could be accommodated within single aggregates of n ≥ 6. However, deprotonation of tryptophan significantly decrease its affinity towards aggregates. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) was carried out for mass-selected aggregate ions, including measurements of product ion mass spectra for both empty and amino acid-containing aggregates. CID results provide a probe for aggregate structures, surfactant-solute interactions, and incorporation sites of amino acids. The present data was compared with mass spectrometry results of positively charged [Na(n+z)AOT(n)](z+) aggregates. Contrary to their positive analogues, which form reverse micelles, negatively charged aggregates may adopt a direct micelle-like structure with AOT polar heads exposed and amino acids being adsorbed near the micellar outer surface.

  14. Increasing dietary phosphorus intake from food additives: potential for negative impact on bone health.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Eiji; Yamamoto, Hironori; Yamanaka-Okumura, Hisami; Taketani, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    It is important to consider whether habitual high phosphorus intake adversely affects bone health, because phosphorus intake has been increasing, whereas calcium intake has been decreasing in dietary patterns. A higher total habitual dietary phosphorus intake has been associated with higher serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) and lower serum calcium concentrations in healthy individuals. Higher serum PTH concentrations have been shown in those who consume foods with phosphorus additives. These findings suggest that long-term dietary phosphorus loads and long-term hyperphosphatemia may have important negative effects on bone health. In contrast, PTH concentrations did not increase as a result of high dietary phosphorus intake when phosphorus was provided with adequate amounts of calcium. Intake of foods with a ratio of calcium to phosphorus close to that found in dairy products led to positive effects on bone health. Several randomized controlled trials have shown positive relations between dairy intake and bone mineral density. In our loading test with a low-calcium, high-phosphorus lunch provided to healthy young men, serum PTH concentrations showed peaks at 1 and 6 h, and serum fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) concentrations increased significantly at 8 h after the meal. In contrast, the high-calcium, high-phosphorus meal suppressed the second PTH and FGF23 elevations until 8 h after the meal. This implies that adequate dietary calcium intake is needed to overcome the interfering effects of high phosphorus intake on PTH and FGF23 secretion. FGF23 acts on the parathyroid gland to decrease PTH mRNA and PTH secretion in rats with normal kidney function. However, increased serum FGF23 is an early alteration of mineral metabolism in chronic kidney disease, causing secondary hyperthyroidism, and implying resistance of the parathyroid gland to the action of FGF23 in chronic kidney disease. These findings suggest that long-term high-phosphorus diets may impair bone health

  15. Ulva additions alter soil biogeochemistry and negatively impact Spartina alterniflora growth

    EPA Science Inventory

    Decaying mats of Ulva can be washed into salt marshes by the tides as large wrack deposits, especially in eutrophic estuaries, where they can negatively impact marsh vegetation. We report on a series of field and laboratory mesocosm experiments where we examined the effects of d...

  16. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  17. Steroidal Surfactants: Detection of Premicellar Aggregation, Secondary Aggregation Changes in Micelles, and Hosting of a Highly Charged Negative Substance.

    PubMed

    Barnadas-Rodríguez, Ramon; Cladera, Josep

    2015-08-25

    CHAPSO and CHAPS are zwitterionic surfactants derived from bile salts which are usually employed in protein purification and for the preparation of liposomes and bicelles. Despite their spread use, there are significant discrepancies on the critical concentrations that determine their aggregation behavior. In this work, we study the interaction between these surfactants with the negative fluorescent dye pyranine (HPTS) by absorbance, fluorescence, and infrared spectrometry to establish their concentration-dependent aggregation. For the studied surfactants, we detect three critical concentrations showing their concentration-dependent presence as a monomeric form, premicellar aggregates, micelles, and a second type of micelle in aqueous medium. The nature of the interaction of HPTS with the surfactants was studied using analogues of their tails and the negative bile salt taurocholate (TC) as reference for the sterol ring. The results indicate that the chemical groups involved are the hydroxyl groups of the polar face of the sterol ring and the sulfonate groups of the dye. This interaction causes not only the incorporation of the negative dye in CHAPSO and CHAPS micelles but also its association with their premicellar aggregates. Surprisingly, this hosting behavior for a negative charged molecule was also detected for the negative bile salt TC, bypassing, in this way, the electrostatic repulsion between the guest and the host.

  18. Enhancement of NK Cell Cytotoxicity Induced by Long-Term Living in Negatively Charged-Particle Dominant Indoor Air-Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Yasumitsu; Takahashi, Kazuaki; Mase, Akinori; Kotani, Muneo; Ami, Kazuhisa; Maeda, Megumi; Shirahama, Takashi; Lee, Suni; Matsuzaki, Hidenori; Kumagai-Takei, Naoko; Yoshitome, Kei; Otsuki, Takemi

    2015-01-01

    Investigation of house conditions that promote health revealed that negatively charged-particle dominant indoor air-conditions (NCPDIAC) induced immune stimulation. Negatively charged air-conditions were established using a fine charcoal powder on walls and ceilings and utilizing forced negatively charged particles (approximate diameter: 20 nm) dominant in indoor air-conditions created by applying an electric voltage (72 V) between the backside of the walls and the ground. We reported previously that these conditions induced a slight and significant increase of interleukin-2 during a 2.5-h stay and an increase of NK cell cytotoxicity when examining human subjects after a two-week night stay under these conditions. In the present study, seven healthy volunteers had a device installed to create NCPDIAC in the living or sleeping rooms of their own homes. Every three months the volunteers then turned the NCPDIAC device on or off. A total of 16 ON and 13 OFF trials were conducted and their biological effects were analyzed. NK activity increased during ON trials and decreased during OFF trials, although no other adverse effects were found. In addition, there were slight increases of epidermal growth factor (EGF) during ON trials. Furthermore, a comparison of the cytokine status between ON and OFF trials showed that basic immune status was stimulated slightly during ON trials under NCPIADC. Our overall findings indicate that the NCPDIAC device caused activation of NK activity and stimulated immune status, particularly only on NK activity, and therefore could be set in the home or office buildings. PMID:26173062

  19. Remarkable enhancement of charge carrier mobility of conjugated polymer field-effect transistors upon incorporating an ionic additive.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hewei; Yu, Chenmin; Liu, Zitong; Zhang, Guanxin; Geng, Hua; Yi, Yuanping; Broch, Katharina; Hu, Yuanyuan; Sadhanala, Aditya; Jiang, Lang; Qi, Penglin; Cai, Zhengxu; Sirringhaus, Henning; Zhang, Deqing

    2016-05-01

    Organic semiconductors with high charge carrier mobilities are crucial for flexible electronic applications. Apart from designing new conjugated frameworks, different strategies have been explored to increase charge carrier mobilities. We report a new and simple approach to enhancing the charge carrier mobility of DPP-thieno[3,2-b]thiophene-conjugated polymer by incorporating an ionic additive, tetramethylammonium iodide, without extra treatments into the polymer. The resulting thin films exhibit a very high hole mobility, which is higher by a factor of 24 than that of thin films without the ionic additive under the same conditions. On the basis of spectroscopic grazing incidence wide-angle x-ray scattering and atomic force microscopy studies as well as theoretical calculations, the remarkable enhancement of charge mobility upon addition of tetramethylammonium iodide is attributed primarily to an inhibition of the torsion of the alkyl side chains by the presence of the ionic species, facilitating a more ordered lamellar packing of the alkyl side chains and interchain π-π interactions.

  20. Remarkable enhancement of charge carrier mobility of conjugated polymer field-effect transistors upon incorporating an ionic additive

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hewei; Yu, Chenmin; Liu, Zitong; Zhang, Guanxin; Geng, Hua; Yi, Yuanping; Broch, Katharina; Hu, Yuanyuan; Sadhanala, Aditya; Jiang, Lang; Qi, Penglin; Cai, Zhengxu; Sirringhaus, Henning; Zhang, Deqing

    2016-01-01

    Organic semiconductors with high charge carrier mobilities are crucial for flexible electronic applications. Apart from designing new conjugated frameworks, different strategies have been explored to increase charge carrier mobilities. We report a new and simple approach to enhancing the charge carrier mobility of DPP-thieno[3,2-b]thiophene–conjugated polymer by incorporating an ionic additive, tetramethylammonium iodide, without extra treatments into the polymer. The resulting thin films exhibit a very high hole mobility, which is higher by a factor of 24 than that of thin films without the ionic additive under the same conditions. On the basis of spectroscopic grazing incidence wide-angle x-ray scattering and atomic force microscopy studies as well as theoretical calculations, the remarkable enhancement of charge mobility upon addition of tetramethylammonium iodide is attributed primarily to an inhibition of the torsion of the alkyl side chains by the presence of the ionic species, facilitating a more ordered lamellar packing of the alkyl side chains and interchain π-π interactions. PMID:27386541

  1. Biochar mitigates negative effects of salt additions on two herbaceous plant species.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sean C; Frye, Susan; Gale, Nigel; Garmon, Matthew; Launchbury, Rebecca; Machado, Natasha; Melamed, Sarah; Murray, Jessica; Petroff, Alexandre; Winsborough, Carolyn

    2013-11-15

    Addition of pyrolyzed biomass ("biochar") to soils has commonly been shown to increase crop yields and alleviate plant stresses associated with drought and exposure to toxic materials. Here we investigate the ability of biochar (at two dosages: 5 and 50 t ha(-1)) to mitigate salt-induced stress, simulating road salt additions in a factorial glasshouse experiment involving the broadleaved herbaceous plants Abutilon theophrasti and Prunella vulgaris. Salt additions of 30 g m(-2) NaCl to unamended soils resulted in high mortality rates for both species. Biochar (Fagus grandifolia sawdust pyrolyzed at 378 °C), when applied at 50 t ha(-1) as a top dressing, completely alleviated salt-induced mortality in A. theophrasti and prolonged survival of P. vulgaris. Surviving A. theophrasti plants that received both 50 t ha(-1) biochar and salt addition treatments showed growth rates and physiological performance similar to plants without salt addition. Biochar treatments alone also substantially increased biomass of P. vulgaris, with a ∼50% increase relative to untreated controls at both biochar dosages. Biochar did not significantly affect photosynthetic carbon gain (Amax), water use efficiency, or chlorophyll fluorescence (Fv/Fm) in either species. Our results indicate that biochar can ameliorate salt stress effects on plants through salt sorption, suggesting novel applications of biochar to mitigate effects of salinization in agricultural, urban, and contaminated soils.

  2. Hydrogen Bonding and Binding of Polybasic Residues with Negatively Charged Mixed Lipid Monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, C.; Feraudo, J.; Travesset, A.

    2008-01-23

    Phosphoinositides, phosphorylated products of phosphatidylinositol, are a family of phospholipids present in tiny amounts (1% or less) in the cytosolic surface of cell membranes, yet they play an astonishingly rich regulatory role, particularly in signaling processes. In this letter, we use molecular dynamics simulations on a model system of mixed lipid monolayers to investigate the interaction of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP{sub 2}), the most common of the phosphoinositides, with a polybasic peptide consisting of 13 lysines. Our results show that the polybasic peptide sequesters three PIP{sub 2} molecules, forming a complex stabilized by the formation of multiple hydrogen bonds between PIP{sub 2} and the Lys residues. We also show that the polybasic peptide does not sequester other charged phospholipids such as phosphatidylserine because of the inability to form long-lived stable hydrogen bonds.

  3. Negatively charged ions on Mg(0001) surfaces: appearance and origin of attractive adsorbate-adsorbate interactions.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Su-Ting; Todorova, Mira; Freysoldt, Christoph; Neugebauer, Jörg

    2014-09-26

    Adsorption of electronegative elements on a metal surface usually leads to an increase in the work function and decrease in the binding energy as the adsorbate coverage rises. Using density-functional theory calculations, we show that Cl adsorbed on a Mg(0001) surface complies with these expectations, but adsorption of {N,O,F} causes a decrease in the work function and an increase in the binding energy. Analyzing the electronic structure, we show that the presence of a highly polarizable electron spill-out in front of Mg(0001) causes this unusual adsorption behavior and is responsible for the appearance of a hitherto unknown net-attractive lateral electrostatic interaction between same charged adsorbates.

  4. A negative charge in transmembrane segment 1 of domain II of the cockroach sodium channel is critical for channel gating and action of pyrethroid insecticides

    SciTech Connect

    Du Yuzhe; Song Weizhong; Groome, James R.; Nomura, Yoshiko; Luo Ningguang; Dong Ke

    2010-08-15

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are the primary target of pyrethroids, an important class of synthetic insecticides. Pyrethroids bind to a distinct receptor site on sodium channels and prolong the open state by inhibiting channel deactivation and inactivation. Recent studies have begun to reveal sodium channel residues important for pyrethroid binding. However, how pyrethroid binding leads to inhibition of sodium channel deactivation and inactivation remains elusive. In this study, we show that a negatively charged aspartic acid residue at position 802 (D802) located in the extracellular end of transmembrane segment 1 of domain II (IIS1) is critical for both the action of pyrethroids and the voltage dependence of channel activation. Charge-reversing or -neutralizing substitutions (K, G, or A) of D802 shifted the voltage dependence of activation in the depolarizing direction and reduced channel sensitivity to deltamethrin, a pyrethroid insecticide. The charge-reversing mutation D802K also accelerated open-state deactivation, which may have counteracted the inhibition of sodium channel deactivation by deltamethrin. In contrast, the D802G substitution slowed open-state deactivation, suggesting an additional mechanism for neutralizing the action of deltamethrin. Importantly, Schild analysis showed that D802 is not involved in pyrethroid binding. Thus, we have identified a sodium channel residue that is critical for regulating the action of pyrethroids on the sodium channel without affecting the receptor site of pyrethroids.

  5. Optimization of tetravalent manganese feroxyhyte's negative charge density: A high-performing mercury adsorbent from drinking water.

    PubMed

    Kokkinos, E; Simeonidis, K; Pinakidou, F; Katsikini, M; Mitrakas, M

    2017-01-01

    This study demonstrates an optimization procedure for the development of an Hg-specified adsorbent able to comply with the regulation limit for drinking water of 1μg/L. On this purpose, the synthesis of Mn(IV)-feroxyhyte was modified to achieve high negative charge density by combining alkaline and extreme oxidizing conditions. In particular, precipitation of FeSO4 at pH9 and excess of KMnO4 follows a very fast nucleation step providing a product with very small nanocrystal size (1-2nm), high specific surface area (300m(2)/g) and maximum negative charge density (1.8mmol H(+)/g). The adsorbent was validated for Hg removal in batch experiments and column tests using natural-like water indicating an adsorption capacity as high as 2.5μg/mg at equilibrium concentration 1μg/L under reliable conditions of application. Importantly, the adsorption is an exothermic spontaneous process, resulting in the formation of inner sphere complexes by sharing both A-type and B-type oxygen atoms with the metal surface octahedral as revealed by the X-ray absorption fine structure results.

  6. Interaction of poly(L-lysines) with negatively charged membranes: an FT-IR and DSC study.

    PubMed

    Schwieger, Christian; Blume, Alfred

    2007-04-01

    The influence of the binding of poly(L-lysine) (PLL) to negatively charged membranes containing phosphatidylglycerols (PG) was studied by DSC and FT-IR spectroscopy. We found a general increase in the main transition temperature as well as increase in hydrophobic order of the membrane upon PLL binding. Furthermore we observed stronger binding of hydration water to the lipid head groups after PLL binding. The secondary structure of the PLL after binding was studied by FT-IR spectroscopy. We found that PLL binds in an alpha-helical conformation to negatively charged DPPG membranes or membranes with DPPG-rich domains. Moreover we proved that PLL binding induces domain formation in the gel state of mixed DPPC/DPPG or DMPC/DPPG membranes as well as lipid remixing in the liquid-crystalline state. We studied these effects as a function of PLL chain length and found a significant dependence of the secondary structure, phase transition temperature and domain formation capacity on PLL chain length and also a correlation between the peptide secondary structure and the phase transition temperature of the membrane. We present a system in which the membrane phase transition triggers a highly cooperative secondary structure transition of the membrane-bound peptide from alpha-helix to random coil.

  7. Evaluation of HA negatively charged membranes in the recovery of human adenoviruses and hepatitis A virus in different water matrices.

    PubMed

    Rigotto, C; Kolesnikovas, C K; Moresco, V; Simões, C M O; Barardi, C R M

    2009-11-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdV) and hepatitis A virus (HAV) are shed in the faeces and consequently may be present in environmental waters, resulting in an increase in pathogen concentration that can affect water quality and human health. The aim of this study was to evaluate an adsorption-elution method which utilizes negatively charged membrane HA to determine the efficient recovery of HAdV and HAV from different water matrices and to combine this procedure with a qualitative molecular method (nested RT-PCR and nested PCR). The best efficiency recovery was achieved in distilled water and treated wastewater effluent (100%) for both viruses and in recreational lagoon water for HAV (100%). The efficiency recovery was 10% for HAdV and HAV in seawater and 10% for HAdV in lagoon water. The viral detection limit by nested PCR for HAV in water samples ranged between 20-0.2 FFU/mL and 250 and 25 TCID50/mL for HAdV. In conclusion, these results suggest that the HA negatively charged membranes vary their efficiency for recovery of viral concentration depending upon the types of both enteric viruses and water matrices.

  8. Comparison of chiral separation of basic drugs in capillary electrophoresis and liquid chromatography using neutral and negatively charged cyclodextrins.

    PubMed

    Kwaterczak, Arkadiusz; Duszczyk, Kazimiera; Bielejewska, Anna

    2009-07-10

    Liquid chromatography (LC) and capillary electrophoresis (CE) are very widely used as chiral separation methods. In this publication we try to find if the results obtained in CE and LC with the chiral selector added to the electrolyte and the mobile phase, respectively, can be used as tools for studying weak stereoselective interactions, and how this information can be useful for optimizing chiral separation processes. The manuscript presents a systematic comparison of chiral discrimination of model compounds in HPLC and CE using neutral and negatively charged cyclodextrins. The enantiomeric separation of basic chiral pharmaceuticals such as pheniramine, brompheniramine, metoxyphenamine, cyclopentolate, doxylamine and ketamine was investigated in capillary electrophoresis (CE) and liquid chromatography (HPLC) using negatively charged sulfated-beta-cyclodextrin (S-beta-CD) and neutral cyclodextrins (CDs). The apparent stability constants between the model compounds and cyclodextrins were estimated in both techniques. We discuss the influence of the stability constant and K1/K2 ratio of the investigated complexes on chiral separation obtained in both techniques.

  9. The effects of nanoparticles and organic additives with controlled dispersion on dielectric properties of polymers: Charge trapping and impact excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yanhui; Wu, Ke; Bell, Michael; Oakes, Andrew; Ratcliff, Tyree; Lanzillo, Nicholas A.; Breneman, Curt; Benicewicz, Brian C.; Schadler, Linda S.

    2016-08-01

    This work presents a comprehensive investigation into the effects of nanoparticles and organic additives on the dielectric properties of insulating polymers using reinforced silicone rubber as a model system. TiO2 and ZrO2 nanoparticles (d = 5 nm) were well dispersed into the polymer via a bimodal surface modification approach. Organic molecules with the potential of voltage stabilization were further grafted to the nanoparticle to ensure their dispersion. These extrinsic species were found to provide deep traps for charge carriers and exhibited effective charge trapping properties at a rather small concentration (˜1017 cm-3). The charge trapping is found to have the most significant effect on breakdown strength when the electrical stressing time is long enough that most charges are trapped in the deep states. To establish a quantitative correlation between the trap depth and the molecular properties, the electron affinity and ionization energy of each species were calculated by an ab initio method and were compared with the experimentally measured values. The correlation however remains elusive and is possibly complicated by the field effect and the electronic interactions between different species that are not considered in this computation. At high field, a super-linear increase of current density was observed for TiO2 filled composites and is likely caused by impact excitation due to the low excitation energy of TiO2 compared to ZrO2. It is reasoned that the hot charge carriers with energies greater than the excitation energy of TiO2 may excite an electron-hole pair upon collision with the NP, which later will be dissociated and contribute to free charge carriers. This mechanism can enhance the energy dissipation and may account for the retarded electrical degradation and breakdown of TiO2 composites.

  10. Binding of cationic pentapeptides with modified side chain lengths to negatively charged lipid membranes: Complex interplay of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions.

    PubMed

    Hoernke, Maria; Schwieger, Christian; Kerth, Andreas; Blume, Alfred

    2012-07-01

    Basic amino acids play a key role in the binding of membrane associated proteins to negatively charged membranes. However, side chains of basic amino acids like lysine do not only provide a positive charge, but also a flexible hydrocarbon spacer that enables hydrophobic interactions. We studied the influence of hydrophobic contributions to the binding by varying the side chain length of pentapeptides with ammonium groups starting with lysine to lysine analogs with shorter side chains, namely omithine (Orn), alpha, gamma-diaminobutyric acid (Dab) and alpha, beta-diaminopropionic acid (Dap). The binding to negatively charged phosphatidylglycerol (PG) membranes was investigated by calorimetry, FT-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and monolayer techniques. The binding was influenced by counteracting and sometimes compensating contributions. The influence of the bound peptides on the lipid phase behavior depends on the length of the peptide side chains. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments showed exothermic and endothermic effects compensating to a different extent as a function of side chain length. The increase in lipid phase transition temperature was more significant for peptides with shorter side chains. FTIR-spectroscopy revealed changes in hydration of the lipid bilayer interface after peptide binding. Using monolayer techniques, the contributions of electrostatic and hydrophobic effects could clearly be observed. Peptides with short side chains induced a pronounced decrease in surface pressure of PG monolayers whereas peptides with additional hydrophobic interactions decreased the surface pressure much less or even lead to an increase, indicating insertion of the hydrophobic part of the side chain into the lipid monolayer.

  11. Solvent additive to achieve highly ordered nanostructural semicrystalline DPP copolymers: toward a high charge carrier mobility.

    PubMed

    An, Tae Kyu; Kang, Il; Yun, Hui-jun; Cha, Hyojung; Hwang, Jihun; Park, Seonuk; Kim, Jiye; Kim, Yu Jin; Chung, Dae Sung; Kwon, Soon-Ki; Kim, Yun-Hi; Park, Chan Eon

    2013-12-23

    A facile spin-coating method in which a small percentage of the solvent additive, 1-chloronaphthalene (CN), is found to increase the drying time during film deposition, is reported. The field-effect mobility of a PDPPDBTE film cast from a chloroform-CN mixed solution is 0.46 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). The addition of CN to the chloroform solution facilitates the formation of highly crystalline polymer structures.

  12. Interfacial charge transfer between CdTe quantum dots and Gram negative vs. Gram positive bacteria.

    SciTech Connect

    Dumas, E.; Gao, C.; Suffern, D.; Bradforth, S. E.; Dimitrejevic, N. M.; Nadeau, J. L.; McGill Univ.; Univ. of Southern California

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative toxicity of semiconductor and metal nanomaterials to cells has been well established. However, it may result from many different mechanisms, some requiring direct cell contact and others resulting from the diffusion of reactive species in solution. Published results are contradictory due to differences in particle preparation, bacterial strain, and experimental conditions. It has been recently found that C{sub 60} nanoparticles can cause direct oxidative damage to bacterial proteins and membranes, including causing a loss of cell membrane potential (depolarization). However, this did not correlate with toxicity. In this study we perform a similar analysis using fluorescent CdTe quantum dots, adapting our tools to make use of the particles fluorescence. We find that two Gram positive strains show direct electron transfer to CdTe, resulting in changes in CdTe fluorescence lifetimes. These two strains also show changes in membrane potential upon nanoparticle binding. Two Gram negative strains do not show these effects - nevertheless, they are over 10-fold more sensitive to CdTe than the Gram positives. We find subtoxic levels of Cd{sup 2+} release from the particles upon irradiation of the particles, but significant production of hydroxyl radicals, suggesting that the latter is a major source of toxicity. These results help establish mechanisms of toxicity and also provide caveats for use of certain reporter dyes with fluorescent nanoparticles which will be of use to anyone performing these assays. The findings also suggest future avenues of inquiry into electron transfer processes between nanomaterials and bacteria.

  13. Addition of Electrostatic Forces to EDEM with Applications to Triboelectrically Charged Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogue, Michael D.; Calle, Carlos; Curry, David

    2008-01-01

    Tribocharging of particles is common in many processes including fine powder handling and mixing, printer toner transport and dust extraction. In a lunar environment with its high vacuum and lack of water, electrostatic forces are an important factor to consider when designing and operating equipment. Dust mitigation and management is critical to safe and predictable performance of people and equipment. The extreme nature of lunar conditions makes it difficult and costly to carryout experiments on earth which are necessary to better understand how particles gather and transfer charge between each other and with equipment surfaces. DEM (Discrete Element Modeling) provides an excellent virtual laboratory for studying tribocharging of particles as well as for design of devices for dust mitigation and for other purposes related to handling and processing of lunar regolith. Theoretical and experimental work has been performed pursuant to incorporating screened Coulombic electrostatic forces into EDEM Tm, a commercial DEM software package. The DEM software is used to model the trajectories of large numbers of particles for industrial particulate handling and processing applications and can be coupled with other solvers and numerical models to calculate particle interaction with surrounding media and force fields. In this paper we will present overview of the theoretical calculations and experimental data and their comparison to the results of the DEM simulations. We will also discuss current plans to revise the DEM software with advanced electrodynamic and mechanical algorithms.

  14. Effect of secondary electron emission on nonlinear dust acoustic wave propagation in a complex plasma with negative equilibrium dust charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhakta, Subrata; Ghosh, Uttam; Sarkar, Susmita

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the effect of secondary electron emission on nonlinear propagation of dust acoustic waves in a complex plasma where equilibrium dust charge is negative. The primary electrons, secondary electrons, and ions are Boltzmann distributed, and only dust grains are inertial. Electron-neutral and ion-neutral collisions have been neglected with the assumption that electron and ion mean free paths are very large compared to the plasma Debye length. Both adiabatic and nonadiabatic dust charge variations have been separately taken into account. In the case of adiabatic dust charge variation, nonlinear propagation of dust acoustic waves is governed by the KdV (Korteweg-de Vries) equation, whereas for nonadiabatic dust charge variation, it is governed by the KdV-Burger equation. The solution of the KdV equation gives a dust acoustic soliton, whose amplitude and width depend on the secondary electron yield. Similarly, the KdV-Burger equation provides a dust acoustic shock wave. This dust acoustic shock wave may be monotonic or oscillatory in nature depending on the fact that whether it is dissipation dominated or dispersion dominated. Our analysis shows that secondary electron emission increases nonadiabaticity induced dissipation and consequently increases the monotonicity of the dust acoustic shock wave. Such a dust acoustic shock wave may accelerate charge particles and cause bremsstrahlung radiation in space plasmas whose physical process may be affected by secondary electron emission from dust grains. The effect of the secondary electron emission on the stability of the equilibrium points of the KdV-Burger equation has also been investigated. This equation has two equilibrium points. The trivial equilibrium point with zero potential is a saddle and hence unstable in nature. The nontrivial equilibrium point with constant nonzero potential is a stable node up to a critical value of the wave velocity and a stable focus above it. This critical

  15. Exchange-Induced Negative-U Charge Order in N-Doped WO3: A Spin-Peierls-Like System

    SciTech Connect

    Huda, M. N.; Yan, Y.; Wei, S.-H.; Al-Jassim, M. M.

    2009-01-01

    An unconventional spin-Peierls-type distortion was found in a nonmagnetic atom N doped pseudo-one-dimensional WO{sub 3} system. The periodicity of the initial ferromagnetic WO{sub 3}:N is doubled in one direction, and the band gap opens up due to this distortion. The magnetic moment at the N site is asymmetric in the distorted system, and the interaction between the localized spin is very weak. We show that the large exchange interaction of the nitrogen 2p atomic orbital and the pseudo-one-dimensional W-O-W chain in monoclinic WO{sub 3} structure is the origin of this spin-Peierls-like transition that leads to the stabilization of an unusual negative-U charge-ordered system.

  16. Bevacizumab Addition in Neoadjuvant Treatment Increases the Pathological Complete Response Rates in Patients with HER-2 Negative Breast Cancer Especially Triple Negative Breast Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Binglan; Shi, Changle; Liu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Background Neoadjuvant therapy is administered to breast cancer patients as an induction process before surgery or radiotherapy to reduce tumor size. Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) negative breast cancer lacks effective standard target therapy. Bevacizumab has a controversial role in the treatment of breast cancer and we conduct a meta-analysis to evaluate the value of adding bevacizumab in neoadjuvant regimen. Methods Potentially eligible studies were retrieved using PubMed, EMBASE and Medline. Clinical characteristics of patients and statistical data with pathological complete response (pCR) data were collected. Then a meta-analysis model was established to investigate the correlation between administration of bevacizumab in neoadjuvant therapy and pCR rates in HER-2 negative breast cancer. Results Seven eligible studies and 5408 patients were yielded. The pCR rates for “breast” or “breast plus lymph node” were similar. In subgroup analysis, we emphasized on patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). In the criterion of “lesions in breast” the pooled ORs was 1.55 [1.29, 1.86], P<0.00001 and regarding to the evaluation criterion of “lesions in breast and lymph nodes”, the pooled ORs was 1.48 [1.23, 1.78], P<0.0001, in favor of bevacizumab administration. Conclusion According to our pooled results, we finally find that bevacizumab addition as a neoadjuvant chemotherapy component, for induction use with limited cycle to improve the pCR rates and patients may avoid long-term adverse event and long-term invalid survival improvement. Especially in subgroup analysis, pCR rates could be improved significantly and physicians could consider bevacizumab with caution. As patients could avoid the adverse event caused by long-term using of bevacizumab, long-term quality of life improvement may be achieved, especially in TNBC. PMID:27579484

  17. Targeted delivery of chemically modified anti-miR-221 to hepatocellular carcinoma with negatively charged liposomes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wendian; Peng, Fangqi; Zhou, Taotao; Huang, Yifei; Zhang, Li; Ye, Peng; Lu, Miao; Yang, Guang; Gai, Yongkang; Yang, Tan; Ma, Xiang; Xiang, Guangya

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death. Gene therapy was established as a new strategy for treating HCC. To explore the potential delivery system to support the gene therapy of HCC, negatively charged liposomal delivery system was used to deliver miR-221 antisense oligonucleotide (anti-miR-221) to the transferrin (Tf) receptor over expressed HepG2 cells. The liposome exhibited a mean particle size of 122.5 nm, zeta potential of -15.74 mV, anti-miR-221 encapsulation efficiency of 70%, and excellent colloidal stability at 4°C. Anti-miR-221-encapsulated Tf-targeted liposome demonstrated a 15-fold higher delivery efficiency compared to nontargeted liposome in HepG2 cells in vitro. Anti-miR-221 Tf-targeted liposome effectively delivered anti-miR-221 to HepG2 cells, upregulated miR-221 target genes PTEN, P27(kip1), and TIMP3, and exhibited greater silencing efficiency over nontargeted anti-miR-221 liposome. After intravenous injection into HepG2 tumor-bearing xenografted mice with Cy3-labeled anti-miR-221 Tf-targeted liposome, Cy3-anti-miR-221 was successfully delivered to the tumor site and increased the expressions of PTEN, P27(kip1), and TIMP3. Our results demonstrate that the Tf-targeted negatively charged liposome could be a potential therapeutic modality in the gene therapy of human HCC.

  18. Integrating high electrical conductivity and photocatalytic activity in cotton fabric by cationizing for enriched coating of negatively charged graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Sahito, Iftikhar Ali; Sun, Kyung Chul; Arbab, Alvira Ayoub; Qadir, Muhammad Bilal; Jeong, Sung Hoon

    2015-10-05

    Electroconductive textiles have attended tremendous focus recently and researchers are making efforts to increase conductivity of e-textiles, in order to increase the use of such flexible and low cost textile materials. In this study, surface conductivity and photo catalytic activity of standard cotton fabric (SCF) was enhanced by modifying its surface charge, from negative to positive, using Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) as a cationic agent, to convert it into cationised cotton fabric (CCF). Then, both types of fabrics were dip coated with a simple dip and dry technique for the adsorption of negatively charged graphene oxide (GO) sheets onto its surface. This resulted in 67.74% higher loading amount of GO on the CCF making self-assembly. Finally, this coating was chemically converted by vapor reduction using hydrazine hydrate to reduced graphene oxide (rGO) for restoration of a high electrical conductivity at the fabric surface. Our results revealed that with such high loading of GO, the surface resistance of CCF was only 40Ω/sq as compared to 510Ω/sq of the SCF and a 66% higher photo catalytic activity was also achieved through cationization for improved GO coating. Graphene coated SCF and CCF were characterized using FE-SEM, FTIR, Raman, UV-vis, WAXD, EDX and XPS spectroscopy to ascertain successful reduction of GO to rGO. The effect of BSA treatment on adsorption of cotton fabric was studied using drop shape analyzer to measure contact angle and for thermal and mechanical resistance, the fabric was tested for TGA and tensile strength, respectively. rGO coated fabric also showed slightly improved thermal stability yet a minor loss of strength was observed. The high flexibility, photocatalytic activity and excellent conductivity of this fabric suggests that it can be used as an electrode material for various applications.

  19. Positive/negative surface charge of chitosan based nanogels and its potential influence on oral insulin delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Xu, Mengxue; Cheng, Xiaojie; Kong, Ming; Liu, Ya; Feng, Chao; Chen, Xiguang

    2016-01-20

    To develop insulin delivery system for the treatment of diabetes, two insulin-loaded nanogels with opposite zeta potential (-15.94 ± 0.449 mV for insulin:CMCS/CS-NGs(-) and +17.15 ± 0.492 mV for insulin:CMCS/CS-NGs(+)) were obtained. Ex vivo results showed that the nanogels with opposite surface charge exhibited different adhesion and permeation in specific intestinal segments. There was no significant differences in adhesion and permeation in rat duodenum, but in rat jejunum, insulin:CMCS/CS-NGs(-) exhibited enhanced adhesion and permeation, which were about 3 folds (adhesion) and 1.7 folds (permeation) higher than insulin:CMCS/CS-NGs(+). These results demonstrated that the surface charge property of nanogels determined the absorption sites of CMCS/CS-NGs in small intestine. In vivo study, the blood glucose level in insulin:CMCS/CS-NGs(-) group had 3 mmol/L lower than insulin:CMCS/CS-NGs(+) group during 1h to 11h after the oral administration, which demonstrated that negative insulin:CMCS/CS-NGs had a better management of blood glucose than positive ones.

  20. Negatively Charged Silver Nanoparticles Cause Retinal Vascular Permeability by Activating Plasma Contact System and Disrupting Adherens Junction

    PubMed Central

    Long, Yan-Min; Zhao, Xing-Chen; Clermont, Allen C.; Zhou, Qun-Fang; Liu, Qian; Feener, Edward P.; Yan, Bing; Jiang, Gui-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been extensively used as antibacterial component in numerous healthcare, biomedical, and consumer products. Therefore, their adverse effects to biological systems have become a major concern. AgNPs have been shown to be absorbed into circulation and redistributed into various organs. It is thus of great importance to understand how these nanoparticles affect vascular permeability and uncover the underlying molecular mechanisms. A negatively charged mecaptoundeonic acid capped silver nanoparticle (MUA@AgNP) was investigated in this work. Ex-vivo experiments in mouse plasma revealed that MUA@AgNPs caused plasma prekallikrein cleavage, while positively charged or neutral AgNPs, as well as Ag ions had no effect. In-vitro tests revealed that MUA@AgNPs activated the plasma kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) by triggering Hageman factor autoactivation. By using specific inhibitors aprotinin and HOE 140, we demonstrated that KKS activation caused the release of bradykinin, which activated B2 receptors and induced the shedding of adherens junction protein, VE-cadherin. These biological perturbations eventually resulted in endothelial paracellular permeability in mouse retina after intravitreal injection of MUA@AgNPs. The findings from this work provided key insights for toxicity modulation and biomedical applications of AgNPs. PMID:26399585

  1. Negatively charged silver nanoparticles cause retinal vascular permeability by activating plasma contact system and disrupting adherens junction.

    PubMed

    Long, Yan-Min; Zhao, Xing-Chen; Clermont, Allen C; Zhou, Qun-Fang; Liu, Qian; Feener, Edward P; Yan, Bing; Jiang, Gui-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been extensively used as antibacterial component in numerous healthcare, biomedical and consumer products. Therefore, their adverse effects to biological systems have become a major concern. AgNPs have been shown to be absorbed into circulation and redistributed into various organs. It is thus of great importance to understand how these nanoparticles affect vascular permeability and uncover the underlying molecular mechanisms. A negatively charged mecaptoundeonic acid-capped silver nanoparticle (MUA@AgNP) was investigated in this work. Ex vivo experiments in mouse plasma revealed that MUA@AgNPs caused plasma prekallikrein cleavage, while positively charged or neutral AgNPs, as well as Ag ions had no effect. In vitro tests revealed that MUA@AgNPs activated the plasma kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) by triggering Hageman factor autoactivation. By using specific inhibitors aprotinin and HOE 140, we demonstrated that KKS activation caused the release of bradykinin, which activated B2 receptors and induced the shedding of adherens junction protein, VE-cadherin. These biological perturbations eventually resulted in endothelial paracellular permeability in mouse retina after intravitreal injection of MUA@AgNPs. The findings from this work provided key insights for toxicity modulation and biomedical applications of AgNPs.

  2. Quantum effects in electron emission from and accretion on negatively charged spherical particles in a complex plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, S. K.; Sodha, M. S.; Misra, Shikha

    2012-07-15

    The authors have investigated the electron emissions (thermionic, electric field, photoelectric, and light induced field) from and electron accretion on a charged particle in a complex plasma, on the basis of a three region electrical potential model in and around a charged spherical particle in a complex plasma, characterized by Debye shielding. A continuous variation of the transmission coefficient across the surface of a particle (corresponding to emission and accretion) with the radial electron energy {epsilon}{sub r} has been obtained. It is seen that the numerical values of the emission and accretion transmission coefficients [D({epsilon}{sub r})] are almost the same. This is the necessary and sufficient condition for the validity of Saha's equation for thermal equilibrium of a system of dust and electrons. This is in contrast to the earlier condition, which limited the range of validity of Saha's equation to the range of the applicability of Born approximation. It is seen that D({epsilon}{sub r}) increases with increasing {epsilon}{sub r}, increasing negative electric potential on the surface, decreasing radius, and deceasing Debye length. The electron currents, corresponding to thermionic, electric field, photoelectric and light induced field emission increase with increasing surface potential; this fact may have significant repercussions in complex plasma kinetics. Since numerically D({epsilon}{sub r}) is significantly different from unity in the range of {epsilon}{sub r} of interest, it is necessary to take into account the D({epsilon}{sub r})-{epsilon}{sub r} dependence in complex plasma theory.

  3. V3 net charge: additional tool in HIV-1 tropism prediction.

    PubMed

    Montagna, Claudia; De Crignis, Elisa; Bon, Isabella; Re, Maria Carla; Mezzaroma, Ivano; Turriziani, Ombretta; Graziosi, Cecilia; Antonelli, Guido

    2014-12-01

    Genotype-based algorithms are valuable tools for the identification of patients eligible for CCR5 inhibitors administration in clinical practice. Among the available methods, geno2pheno[coreceptor] (G2P) is the most used online tool for tropism prediction. This study was conceived to assess if the combination of G2P prediction with V3 peptide net charge (NC) value could improve the accuracy of tropism prediction. A total of 172 V3 bulk sequences from 143 patients were analyzed by G2P and NC values. A phenotypic assay was performed by cloning the complete env gene and tropism determination was assessed on U87_CCR5(+)/CXCR4(+) cells. Sequences were stratified according to the agreement between NC values and G2P results. Of sequences predicted as X4 by G2P, 61% showed NC values higher than 5; similarly, 76% of sequences predicted as R5 by G2P had NC values below 4. Sequences with NC values between 4 and 5 were associated with different G2P predictions: 65% of samples were predicted as R5-tropic and 35% of sequences as X4-tropic. Sequences identified as X4 by NC value had at least one positive residue at positions known to be involved in tropism prediction and positive residues in position 32. These data supported the hypothesis that NC values between 4 and 5 could be associated with the presence of dual/mixed-tropic (DM) variants. The phenotypic assay performed on a subset of sequences confirmed the tropism prediction for concordant sequences and showed that NC values between 4 and 5 are associated with DM tropism. These results suggest that the combination of G2P and NC could increase the accuracy of tropism prediction. A more reliable identification of X4 variants would be useful for better selecting candidates for Maraviroc (MVC) administration, but also as a predictive marker in coreceptor switching, strongly associated with the phase of infection.

  4. Longitudinal Slit Procedure in Addition to Negative Pressure Wound Therapy for a Refractory Wound With Exposed Achilles Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Ohata, Erika; Mishima, Yoshito; Matsuo, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This case report reviews features of negative pressure wound therapy, particularly for the exposed Achilles tendon, and describes an additional effective procedure. Methods: An 87-year-old man presented with a soft-tissue defect measuring 3×5 cm with the exposed Achilles tendon as a sequela of deep burn. The condition of his affected leg was ischemic because of arteriosclerosis. We used negative pressure wound therapy and made 2 longitudinal slits penetrating the tendon to induce blood flow from the ventral side to the dorsal surface. Results: By this combination therapy, the surface of the exposed Achilles tendon was completely epithelialized and the tendon was spared without disuse syndrome. Conclusions: The authors conclude that this combination therapy is useful for covering the widely exposed tendon in aged patients. PMID:25848445

  5. Addition of ferrocene controls polymorphism and enhances charge mobilities in poly(3-hexylthiophene) thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Brandon; Clark, Michael; Grieco, Christopher; Larsen, Alec; Asbury, John; Gomez, Enrique

    2015-03-01

    Crystalline organic molecules often exhibit the ability to form multiple crystal structures depending on the processing conditions. Exploiting this polymorphism to optimize molecular orbital overlap between adjacent molecules within the unit lattice of conjugated polymers is an approach to enhance charge transport within the material. We have demonstrated the formation of tighter π- π stacking poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) polymorphs in films spin coated from ferrocene-containing solutions using grazing incident X-ray diffraction. As a result, we found that the addition of ferrocene to casting solutions yields thin-film transistors which exhibit significantly higher source-drain current and charge mobilities than neat polymer devices. Insights gleaned from ferrocene/poly(3-hexylthiophene) mixtures can serve as a template for selection and optimization of next generation small molecule/polymer systems possessing greater baseline charge mobilities. Ultimately, the development of such techniques to enhance the characteristics of organic transistors without imparting high costs or loss of advantageous properties will be a critical factor determining the future of organic components within the electronics market.

  6. Poly-l-lysines and poly-l-arginines induce leakage of negatively charged phospholipid vesicles and translocate through the lipid bilayer upon electrostatic binding to the membrane.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Marcel; Schwieger, Christian; Meister, Annette; Karlsson, Göran; Blume, Alfred

    2009-09-01

    Poly-l-lysines (PLL) and poly-l-arginines (PLA) of different polymer chain lengths interact strongly with negatively charged phospholipid vesicles mainly due to their different electrical charges. 1-Palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (POPG), 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (DPPG) and their mixtures (1/1 mol/mol) with the respective phosphatidylcholines of equivalent chain length were chosen as model membrane systems that form at room temperature either the fluid L(alpha) or the gel phase L(beta) lipid bilayer membranes, respectively. Leakage experiments revealed that the fluid POPG membranes are more perturbed compared to the gel phase DPPG membranes upon peptide binding. Furthermore, it was found that pure PG membranes are more prone to release the vesicle contents as a result of pore formation than the lipid mixtures POPG/POPC and DPPG/DPPC. For the longer polymers (>or=44 amino acids) maximal dye-release was observed when the molar ratio of the concentrations of amino acid residues to charged lipid molecules reached a value of R(P)=0.5, i.e. when the outer membrane layer was theoretically entirely covered by the polymer. At ratios lower or higher than 0.5 leakage dropped significantly. Furthermore, PLL and PLA insertions and/or translocations through lipid membranes were analyzed by using FITC-labeled polymers by monitoring their fluorescence intensity upon membrane binding. Short PLL molecules and PLA molecules of all lengths seemed to translocate through both fluid and gel phase lipid bilayers. Comparison of the PLL and PLA fluorescence assay results showed that PLA interacts stronger with phospholipid membranes compared to PLL. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) measurements were performed to give further insight into these mechanisms and to support the findings obtained by fluorescence assays. Cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) was used to visualize changes in the vesicles' morphology after addition of the

  7. Impact of negative affectively charged stimuli and response style on cognitive-control-related neural activation: an ERP study.

    PubMed

    Lamm, C; Pine, D S; Fox, N A

    2013-11-01

    The canonical AX-CPT task measures two forms of cognitive control: sustained goal-oriented control ("proactive" control) and transient changes in cognitive control following unexpected events ("reactive" control). We modified this task by adding negative and neutral International Affective Picture System (IAPS) pictures to assess the effects of negative emotion on these two forms of cognitive control. Proactive and reactive control styles were assessed based on measures of behavior and electrophysiology, including the N2 event-related potential component and source space activation (Low Resolution Tomography [LORETA]). We found slower reaction-times and greater DLPFC activation for negative relative to neutral stimuli. Additionally, we found that a proactive style of responding was related to less prefrontal activation (interpreted to reflect increased efficiency of processing) during actively maintained previously cued information and that a reactive style of responding was related to less prefrontal activation (interpreted to reflect increased efficiency of processing) during just-in-time environmentally triggered information. This pattern of results was evident in relatively neutral contexts, but in the face of negative emotion, these associations were not found, suggesting potential response style-by-emotion interaction effects on prefrontal neural activation.

  8. Negatively charged Ir(iii) cyclometalated complexes containing a chelating bis-tetrazolato ligand: synthesis, photophysics and the study of reactivity with electrophiles.

    PubMed

    Fiorini, Valentina; Zacchini, Stefano; Raiteri, Paolo; Mazzoni, Rita; Zanotti, Valerio; Massi, Massimiliano; Stagni, Stefano

    2016-08-09

    The bis-tetrazolate dianion [1,2 BTB](2-), which is the deprotonated form of 1,2 bis-(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)benzene [1,2-H2BTB], is for the first time exploited as an ancillary N^N ligand for negatively charged [Ir(C^N)2(N^N)](-)-type complexes, where C^N is represented by cyclometalated 2-phenylpyridine (ppy) or 2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)pyridine (F2ppy). The new Ir(iii) complexes [Ir(ppy)2(1,2 BTB)]- and [Ir(F2ppy)2(1,2 BTB)]- have been fully characterised and the analysis of the X-ray structure of [Ir(ppy)2(1,2 BTB)]- confirmed the coordination of the [1,2 BTB](2-) dianion in a bis chelated fashion through the N-atoms adjacent to each of the tetrazolic carbons. Both of the new anionic Ir(iii) complexes displayed phosphorescence in the visible region, with intense sky-blue (λmax = 460-490 nm) or aqua (λmax = 490-520 nm) emissions originating from [Ir(F2ppy)2(1,2 BTB)]- and [Ir(ppy)2(1,2 BTB)]-, respectively. In comparison with our very recent examples of anionic Ir(iii)tetrazolate cyclometalates, the new Ir(iii) tris chelate complexes [Ir(F2ppy)2(1,2 BTB)]- and [Ir(ppy)2(1,2 BTB)]-, display an improved robustness, allowing the study of their reactivity toward the addition of electrophiles such as H(+) and CH3(+). In all cases, the electrophilic attacks occurred at the coordinated tetrazolate rings, involving the reversible - by a protonation deprotonation mechanism - or permanent - upon addition of a methyl moiety - switching of their global net charge from negative to positive and, in particular, the concomitant variation of their photoluminescence output. The combination of the anionic complexes [Ir(F2ppy)2(1,2 BTB)]- or [Ir(ppy)2(1,2 BTB)]- with a deep red emitting (λmax = 686 nm) cationic Ir(iii) tetrazole complex such as [IrTPYZ-Me]+, where TPYZ-Me is 2-(2-methyl-2H-tetrazol-5-yl)pyrazine, gave rise to two fully Ir(iii)-based soft salts capable of displaying additive and O2-sensitive emission colours, with an almost pure white light obtained by the appropriate

  9. Orally Administered Nano-curcumin to Attenuate Morphine Tolerance: Comparison between Negatively Charged PLGA and Partially and Fully PEGylated Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hao; Hu, Xiaoyu; Szymusiak, Magdalena; Wang, Zaijie Jim; Liu, Ying

    2014-01-01

    We have formulated hydrophobic curcurmin [1,7-bis-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione] into stable nanoparticle suspensions (nano-curcumin) to overcome its relatively low bioavailability, high rate of metabolism and rapid elimination and clearance from the body. Employing the curcumin nanoformulations as the platform, we discovered that curcumin has the potential to alleviate morphine tolerance. The two types of stable polymeric nanoparticles - poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(lactic acid) (PEG-b-PLA) - and the hybrid of the two were generated using flash nanoprecipitation integrated with spray drying. The optimized formulations have high drug loading (>45%), small particles size with narrow distribution, and controlled surface properties. Mice behavioral studies (tail-flick and hot-plate tests) were conducted to verify the effects of nano-curcumin on attenuating morphine tolerance. Significant analgesia was observed in mice during both tail-flick and hot-plate tests using orally administrated nano-curcumin following subcutaneous injections of morphine. However, unformulated curcumin at the same dose showed no effect. Compared with PEGylated nano-curcumin, negatively charged PLGA nanoparticles showed better functionality. PMID:24195658

  10. Orally administered nanocurcumin to attenuate morphine tolerance: comparison between negatively charged PLGA and partially and fully PEGylated nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hao; Hu, Xiaoyu; Szymusiak, Magdalena; Wang, Zaijie Jim; Liu, Ying

    2013-12-02

    We have formulated hydrophobic curcurmin [1,7-bis-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione] into stable nanoparticle suspensions (nanocurcumin) to overcome its relatively low bioavailability, high rate of metabolism, and rapid elimination and clearance from the body. Employing the curcumin nanoformulations as the platform, we discovered that curcumin has the potential to alleviate morphine tolerance. The two types of stable polymeric nanoparticles, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(lactic acid) (PEG-b-PLA), and the hybrid of the two were generated using flash nanoprecipitation integrated with spray drying. The optimized formulations have high drug loading (>45%), small particles size with narrow distribution, and controlled surface properties. Mice behavioral studies (tail-flick and hot-plate tests) were conducted to verify the effects of nanocurcumin on attenuating morphine tolerance. Significant analgesia was observed in mice during both tail-flick and hot-plate tests using orally administered nanocurcumin following subcutaneous injections of morphine. However, unformulated curcumin at the same dose showed no effect. Compared with PEGylated nanocurcumin, negatively charged PLGA nanoparticles showed better functionality.

  11. [Air negative charge ion concentration and its relationships with meteorological factors in different ecological functional zones of Hefei City].

    PubMed

    Wei, Chaoling; Wang, Jingtao; Jiang, Yuelin; Zhang, Qingguo

    2006-11-01

    Air negative charge ion concentration (ANCIC) has a close relationship with air quality. The observations on the ANCIC, sunlight intensity, air temperature, and air relative humidity in different ecological functional zones of Hefei City from 2003 to 2004 showed that the diurnal change pattern of ANCIC was of single peak in sightseeing and habitation zones, dual peak in industrial zone, and complicated in commercial zone. Different ecological functional zones had different appearance time of their daily ANCIC extremum. The diurnal fluctuation of ANCIC was in the order of commercial zone > industrial zone > habitation zone and sightseeing zone. The annual change pattern of ANCIC in these zones was similar, being the highest in summer and lowest in winter, and the mean annual ANCIC was 819, 340, 149 and 126 ions x cm(-3), respectively. The most important meteorological factor affecting the ANCIC in Hefei City was air relative humidity, followed by sunlight intensity and air temperature. There was an exponential relationship between ANCIC and air relative humidity.

  12. The association of defensin HNP-2 with negatively charged membranes: A combined fluorescence and linear dichroism study.

    PubMed

    Pridmore, Catherine J; Rodger, Alison; Sanderson, John M

    2016-04-01

    The association of defensin HNP-2 with negatively charged membranes has been studied using a new approach that combines fluorescence and linear dichroism (LD) spectroscopies with simulated LD spectra in order to characterise the binding kinetics and bound configurations of the peptide. Binding to membranes composed of mixtures of diacylglycerophosphocholines (PC) with either diacylglycerophosphoglycerol (PG) or diacylglycerophosphoserine (PS) was conducted at lipid:peptide ratios that yielded binding, but not membrane fusion. HNP-2 association with membranes under these conditions was a 2 stage-process, with both stages exhibiting first order kinetics. The fast initial step, with a half-life of < 1 min, was followed by a slower step with a half-life of > 3 min. Conversion between the states was estimated to have an enthalpy of activation of approximately 10 kJ mol(-1) and an entropy of activation of -0.2 kJ K mol(-1). LD spectra corresponding to each of the membrane bound states were generated by non-linear regression using a standard kinetic model. These spectra are interpreted in comparison with spectra calculated using the program Dichrocalc and reveal that the peptide associates with membranes in a small number of stable configurations. All of these configurations have a significant proportion of β-sheet structure residing in the plane of the membrane. Two configurations support structures previously proposed for defensins in membranes.

  13. Negatively Charged Carbon Nanohorn Supported Cationic Liposome Nanoparticles: A Novel Delivery Vehicle for Anti-Nicotine Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hong; Hu, Yun; Huang, Wei; de Villiers, Sabina; Pentel, Paul; Zhang, Jianfei; Dorn, Harry; Ehrich, Marion; Zhang, Chenming

    2017-01-01

    Tobacco addiction is the second-leading cause of death in the world. Due to the nature of nicotine (a small molecule), finding ways to combat nicotine’s deleterious effects has been a constant challenge to the society and the medical field. In the present work, a novel anti-nicotine vaccine based on nanohorn supported liposome nanoparticles (NsL NPs) was developed. The nano-vaccine was constructed by using negatively charged carbon nanohorns as a scaffold for the assembly of cationic liposomes, which allow the conjugation of hapten conjugated carrier proteins. The assembled bio-nanoparticles are stable. Mice were immunized subcutaneously with the nano-vaccine, which induced high titer and high affinity of nicotine specific antibodies in mice. Furthermore, no evidence of clinical signs or systemic toxicity followed multiple administrations of NsL-based anti-nicotine vaccine. These results suggest that NsL-based anti-nicotine vaccine is a promising candidate in treating nicotine dependence and could have potential to significantly contribute to smoking cessation. PMID:26510313

  14. New insight into the spin-conserving excitation of the negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Bei; Zhang, R. Q.; Shi, X. Q.

    2014-01-01

    The negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (N-V−) color center in diamond is an important solid-state single photon source for applications to quantum communication and distributed quantum computation. Its full usefulness relies on sufficient radiative emission of the optical photons which requires realizable control to enhance emission into the zero-phonon line (ZPL) but until now is still a challenge. Detailed understanding of the associated excitation process would be of essential importance for such objective. Here we report a theoretical work that probes the spin-conserving optical excitation of the N-V− center. Using density-functional-theory (DFT) calculations, we find that the ZPL and the phonon-side band (PSB) depend sensitively on the axial strain of the system. Besides, we find a relatively small PSB appearing at about 100 GPa in the emission spectrum at low temperatures, which provides a means to enhance the coherent emission of the N-V− center in quantum optical networks. PMID:24888367

  15. Evaluation of negative fixed-charge density in tissue-engineered cartilage by quantitative MRI and relationship with biomechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Shogo; Homma, Kazuhiro; Numano, Tomokazu; Tateishi, Tetsuya; Ushida, Takashi

    2010-07-01

    Applying tissue-engineered cartilage in a clinical setting requires noninvasive evaluation to detect the maturity of the cartilage. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of articular cartilage has been widely accepted and applied clinically in recent years. In this study, we evaluated the negative fixed-charge density (nFCD) of tissue-engineered cartilage using gadolinium-enhanced MRI and determined the relationship between nFCD and biomechanical properties. To reconstruct cartilage tissue, articular chondrocytes from bovine humeral heads were embedded in agarose gel and cultured in vitro for up to 4 weeks. The nFCD of the cartilage was determined using the MRI gadolinium exclusion method. The equilibrium modulus was determined using a compressive stress relaxation test, and the dynamic modulus was determined by a dynamic compression test. The equilibrium compressive modulus and dynamic modulus of the tissue-engineered cartilage increased with an increase in culture time. The nFCD value--as determined with the [Gd-DTPA(2-)] measurement using the MRI technique--increased with culture time. In the regression analysis, nFCD showed significant correlations with equilibrium compressive modulus and dynamic modulus. From these results, gadolinium-enhanced MRI measurements can serve as a useful predictor of the biomechanical properties of tissue-engineered cartilage.

  16. Direct correlation of the crystal structure of proteins with the maximum positive and negative charge states of gaseous protein ions produced by electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Halan; Mazumdar, Shyamalava

    2005-09-01

    Electrospray mass spectrometric studies in native folded forms of several proteins in aqueous solution have been performed in the positive and negative ion modes. The mass spectra of the proteins show peaks corresponding to multiple charge states of the gaseous protein ions. The results have been analyzed using the known crystal structures of these proteins. Crystal structure analysis shows that among the surface exposed residues some are involved in hydrogen-bonding or salt-bridge interactions while some are free. The maximum positive charge state of the gaseous protein ions was directly related to the number of free surface exposed basic groups whereas the maximum negative charge state was related to the number of free surface exposed acidic groups of the proteins. The surface exposed basic groups, which are involved in hydrogen bonding, have lower propensity to contribute to the positive charge of the protein. Similarly, the surface exposed acidic groups involved in salt bridges have lower propensity to contribute to the negative charge of the protein. Analysis of the crystal structure to determine the maximum charge state of protein in the electrospray mass spectrum was also used to interpret the reported mass spectra of several proteins. The results show that both the positive and the negative ion mass spectra of the proteins could be interpreted by simple consideration of the crystal structure of the folded proteins. Moreover, unfolding of the protein was shown to increase the positive charge-state because of the availability of larger number of free basic groups at the surface of the unfolded protein.

  17. Exploration of Porphyrin-based Semiconductors for Negative Charge Transport Applications Using Synthetic, Spectroscopic, Potentiometric, Magnetic Resonance, and Computational Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawson, Jeffrey Scott

    Organic pi-conjugated materials are emerging as commercially relevant components in electronic applications that include transistors, light-emitting diodes, and solar cells. One requirement common to all of these functions is an aptitude for accepting and transmitting charges. It is generally agreed that the development of organic semiconductors that favor electrons as the majority carriers (n-type) lags behind the advances in hole transporting (p-type) materials. This shortcoming suggests that the design space for n-type materials is not yet well explored, presenting researchers with the opportunity to develop unconventional architectures. In this regard, it is worth noting that discrete molecular materials are demonstrating the potential to usurp the preeminent positions that pi-conjugated polymers have held in these areas of organic electronics research. This dissertation describes how an extraordinary class of molecules, meso-to-meso ethyne-bridged porphyrin arrays, has been bent to these new uses. Chapter one describes vis-NIR spectroscopic and magnetic resonance measurements revealing that these porphyrin arrays possess a remarkable aptitude for the delocalization of negative charge. In fact, the miniscule electron-lattice interactions exhibited in these rigid molecules allow them to host the most vast electron-polarons ever observed in a pi-conjugated material. Chapter two describes the development of an ethyne-bridged porphyrin-isoindigo hybrid chromophore that can take the place of fullerene derivatives in the conventional thin film solar cell architecture. Particularly noteworthy is the key role played by the 5,15-bis(heptafluoropropyl)porphyrin building block in the engineering of a chromophore that, gram for gram, is twice as absorptive as poly(3-hexyl)thiophene, exhibits a lower energy absorption onset than this polymer, and yet possesses a photoexcited singlet state sufficiently energetic to transfer a hole to this polymer. Chapter three describes

  18. Linear Free Energy Relationships for Metal-Ligand Complexation: Bidentate Binding to Negatively-Charged Oxygen Donor Atoms

    PubMed Central

    Carbonaro, Richard F.; Atalay, Yasemin B.; Di Toro, Dominic M.

    2011-01-01

    Stability constants for metal complexation to bidentate ligands containing negatively-charged oxygen donor atoms can be estimated from the following linear free energy relationship (LFER): log KML = χOO(αO log KHL,1 + αO log KHL,2) where KML is the metal-ligand stability constant for a 1:1 complex, KHL,1 and KHL,2 are the proton-ligand stability constants (the ligand pKa values), and αO is the Irving-Rossotti slope. The parameter χOO is metal specific and has slightly different values for 5 and 6 membered chelate rings. LFERs are presented for 21 different metal ions and are accurate to within approximately 0.30 log units in predictions of log KML values. Ligands selected for use in LFER development include dicarboxylic acids, carboxyphenols, and ortho-diphenols. For ortho-hydroxybenzaldehydes, α-hydroxycarboxylic acids, and α-ketocarboxylic acids, a modification of the LFER where log KHL,2 is set equal to zero is required. The chemical interpretation of χOO is that it accounts for the extra stability afforded to metal complexes by the chelate effect. Cu-NOM binding constants calculated from the bidentate LFERs are similar in magnitude to those used in WHAM 6. This LFER can be used to make log KML predictions for small organic molecules. Since natural organic matter (NOM) contains many of the same functional groups (i.e. carboxylic acids, phenols, alcohols), the LFER log KML predictions shed light on the range of appropriate values for use in modeling metal partitioning in natural systems. PMID:21833149

  19. Linear free energy relationships for metal-ligand complexation: Bidentate binding to negatively-charged oxygen donor atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbonaro, Richard F.; Atalay, Yasemin B.; Di Toro, Dominic M.

    2011-05-01

    Stability constants for metal complexation to bidentate ligands containing negatively-charged oxygen donor atoms can be estimated from the following linear free energy relationship (LFER): log KML = χOO( αO log KHL,1 + αO log KHL,2) where KML is the metal-ligand stability constant for a 1:1 complex, KHL,1 and KHL,2 are the proton-ligand stability constants (the ligand p Ka values), and αO is the Irving-Rossotti slope. The parameter χOO is metal specific and has slightly different values for five and six membered chelate rings. LFERs are presented for 21 different metal ions and are accurate to within approximately 0.30 log units in predictions of log KML values. Ligands selected for use in LFER development include dicarboxylic acids, carboxyphenols, and ortho-diphenols. For ortho-hydroxybenzaldehydes, α-hydroxycarboxylic acids, and α-ketocarboxylic acids, a modification of the LFER where log KHL,2 is set equal to zero is required. The chemical interpretation of χOO is that it accounts for the extra stability afforded to metal complexes by the chelate effect. Cu-NOM binding constants calculated from the bidentate LFERs are similar in magnitude to those used in WHAM 6. This LFER can be used to make log KML predictions for small organic molecules. Since natural organic matter (NOM) contains many of the same functional groups (i.e. carboxylic acids, phenols, alcohols), the LFER log KML predictions shed light on the range of appropriate values for use in modeling metal partitioning in natural systems.

  20. Rotational self-diffusion in suspensions of charged particles: simulations and revised Beenakker-Mazur and pairwise additivity methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makuch, Karol; Heinen, Marco; Abade, Gustavo Coelho; Nägele, Gerhard

    To the present day, the Beenakker-Mazur (BM) method is the most comprehensive statistical physics approach to the calculation of short-time transport properties of colloidal suspensions. A revised version of the BM method with an improved treatment of hydrodynamic interactions is presented and evaluated regarding the rotational short-time self-diffusion coefficient, $D^r$ , of suspensions of charged particles interacting by a hard-sphere plus screened Coulomb (Yukawa) pair potential. To assess the accuracy of the method, elaborate simulations of $D^r$ have been performed, covering a broad range of interaction parameters and particle concentrations. The revised BM method is compared in addition with results by a simplifying pairwise additivity (PA) method in which the hydrodynamic interactions are treated on a two-body level. The static pair correlation functions re- quired as input to both theoretical methods are calculated using the Rogers-Young integral equation scheme. While the revised BM method reproduces the general trends of the simulation results, it systematically and significantly underestimates the rotational diffusion coefficient. The PA method agrees well with the simulation data at lower volume fractions, but at higher concentrations $D^r$ is likewise underestimated. For a fixed value of the pair potential at mean particle distance comparable to the thermal energy, $D^r$ increases strongly with increasing Yukawa potential screening parameter.

  1. Absence of a guiding effect and charge transfer in the interaction of keV-energy negative ions with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocapillaries

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Lin; Guo Yanling; Jia Juanjuan; Zhang Hongqiang; Cui Ying; Shao Jianxiong; Yin Yongzhi; Qiu Xiyu; Lv Xueyang; Sun Guangzhi; Wang Jun; Chen Yifeng; Xi Fayuan; Chen Ximeng

    2011-09-15

    In this work, the efficient electron loss process was observed for the transmission of 10- to 18-keV Cu{sup -} and Cl{sup -} ions through Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocapillaries. The fractions of the scattered particles were simultaneously measured using a position-sensitive microchannel plate detector. The neutrals were guided through the capillary via multiple grazing scattering. In particular, the scattered Cl{sup -} ions were observed in the transmission, whereas no Cu{sup -} ion was formed. In contrast to highly charged ions, these results support strongly the fact that the scattering events dominate the transport of negative ions through the nanocapillaries and that there is no direct evidence for the formation of negative charge patches inside the capillaries which are able to repulse and guide negative ions efficiently.

  2. Immobilization of bilirubin oxidase on graphene oxide flakes with different negative charge density for oxygen reduction. The effect of GO charge density on enzyme coverage, electron transfer rate and current density.

    PubMed

    Filip, Jaroslav; Andicsová-Eckstein, Anita; Vikartovská, Alica; Tkac, Jan

    2017-03-15

    Previously we showed that an effective bilirubin oxidase (BOD)-based biocathode using graphene oxide (GO) could be prepared in 2 steps: 1. electrostatic adsorption of BOD on GO; 2. electrochemical reduction of the BOD-GO composite to form a BOD-ErGO (electrochemically reduced GO) film on the electrode. In order to identify an optimal charge density of GO for BOD-ErGO composite preparation, several GO fractions differing in an average flake size and ζ-potential were prepared using centrifugation and consequently employed for BOD-ErGO biocathode preparation. A simple way to express surface charge density of these particular GO nanosheets was developed. The values obtained were then correlated with biocatalytic and electrochemical parameters of the prepared biocathodes, i.e. electrocatalytically active BOD surface coverage (Γ), heterogeneous electron transfer rate (kS) and a maximum biocatalytic current density. The highest bioelectrocatalytic current density of (597±25)μAcm(-2) and the highest Γ of (23.6±0.9)pmolcm(-2) were obtained on BOD-GO composite having the same moderate negative charge density, but the highest kS of (79.4±4.6)s(-1) was observed on BOD-GO composite having different negative charge density. This study is a solid foundation for others to consider the influence of a charge density of GO on direct bioelectrochemistry/bioelectrocatalysis of other redox enzymes applicable for construction of biosensors, bioanodes, biocathodes or biofuel cells.

  3. Charge-discharge characteristics of all-solid-state thin-filmed lithium-ion batteries using amorphous Nb 2O 5 negative electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazawa, Hiromi; Sano, Kimihiro; Abe, Takashi; Baba, Mamoru; Kumagai, Naoaki

    All-solid-state thin-filmed lithium-ion rechargeable batteries composed of amorphous Nb 2O 5 negative electrode with the thickness of 50-300 nm and amorphous Li 2Mn 2O 4 positive electrode with a constant thickness of 200 nm, and amorphous Li 3PO 4- xN x electrolyte (100 nm thickness), have been fabricated on glass substrates with a 50 mm × 50 mm size by a sputtering method, and their electrochemical characteristics were investigated. The charge-discharge capacity based on the volume of positive electrode increased with increasing thickness of negative electrode, reaching about 600 mAh cm -3 for the battery with the negative electrode thickness of 200 nm. But the capacity based on the volume of both the positive and negative electrodes was the maximum value of about 310 mAh cm -3 for the battery with the negative electrode thickness of 100 nm. The shape of charge-discharge curve consisted of a two-step for the batteries with the negative electrode thickness more than 200 nm, but that with the thickness of 100 nm was a smooth S-shape curve during 500 cycles.

  4. Hypoxia and acidification have additive and synergistic negative effects on the growth, survival, and metamorphosis of early life stage bivalves.

    PubMed

    Gobler, Christopher J; DePasquale, Elizabeth L; Griffith, Andrew W; Baumann, Hannes

    2014-01-01

    Low oxygen zones in coastal and open ocean ecosystems have expanded in recent decades, a trend that will accelerate with climatic warming. There is growing recognition that low oxygen regions of the ocean are also acidified, a condition that will intensify with rising levels of atmospheric CO2. Presently, however, the concurrent effects of low oxygen and acidification on marine organisms are largely unknown, as most prior studies of marine hypoxia have not considered pH levels. We experimentally assessed the consequences of hypoxic and acidified water for early life stage bivalves (bay scallops, Argopecten irradians, and hard clams, Mercenaria mercenaria), marine organisms of significant economic and ecological value and sensitive to climate change. In larval scallops, experimental and naturally-occurring acidification (pH, total scale  = 7.4-7.6) reduced survivorship (by >50%), low oxygen (30-50 µM) inhibited growth and metamorphosis (by >50%), and the two stressors combined produced additively negative outcomes. In early life stage clams, however, hypoxic waters led to 30% higher mortality, while acidified waters significantly reduced growth (by 60%). Later stage clams were resistant to hypoxia or acidification separately but experienced significantly (40%) reduced growth rates when exposed to both conditions simultaneously. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that the consequences of low oxygen and acidification for early life stage bivalves, and likely other marine organisms, are more severe than would be predicted by either individual stressor and thus must be considered together when assessing how ocean animals respond to these conditions both today and under future climate change scenarios.

  5. Hypoxia and Acidification Have Additive and Synergistic Negative Effects on the Growth, Survival, and Metamorphosis of Early Life Stage Bivalves

    PubMed Central

    Gobler, Christopher J.; DePasquale, Elizabeth L.; Griffith, Andrew W.; Baumann, Hannes

    2014-01-01

    Low oxygen zones in coastal and open ocean ecosystems have expanded in recent decades, a trend that will accelerate with climatic warming. There is growing recognition that low oxygen regions of the ocean are also acidified, a condition that will intensify with rising levels of atmospheric CO2. Presently, however, the concurrent effects of low oxygen and acidification on marine organisms are largely unknown, as most prior studies of marine hypoxia have not considered pH levels. We experimentally assessed the consequences of hypoxic and acidified water for early life stage bivalves (bay scallops, Argopecten irradians, and hard clams, Mercenaria mercenaria), marine organisms of significant economic and ecological value and sensitive to climate change. In larval scallops, experimental and naturally-occurring acidification (pH, total scale  = 7.4–7.6) reduced survivorship (by >50%), low oxygen (30–50 µM) inhibited growth and metamorphosis (by >50%), and the two stressors combined produced additively negative outcomes. In early life stage clams, however, hypoxic waters led to 30% higher mortality, while acidified waters significantly reduced growth (by 60%). Later stage clams were resistant to hypoxia or acidification separately but experienced significantly (40%) reduced growth rates when exposed to both conditions simultaneously. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that the consequences of low oxygen and acidification for early life stage bivalves, and likely other marine organisms, are more severe than would be predicted by either individual stressor and thus must be considered together when assessing how ocean animals respond to these conditions both today and under future climate change scenarios. PMID:24416169

  6. Plantaricin A, a cationic peptide produced by Lactobacillus plantarum, permeabilizes eukaryotic cell membranes by a mechanism dependent on negative surface charge linked to glycosylated membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Sand, Sverre L; Nissen-Meyer, Jon; Sand, Olav; Haug, Trude M

    2013-02-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum C11 releases plantaricin A (PlnA), a cationic peptide pheromone that has a membrane-permeabilizing, antimicrobial effect. We have previously shown that PlnA may also permeabilize eukaryotic cells, with a potency that differs between cell types. It is generally assumed that cationic antimicrobial peptides exert their effects through electrostatic attraction to negatively charged phospholipids in the membrane. The aim of the present study was to investigate if removal of the negative charge linked to glycosylated proteins at the cell surface reduces the permeabilizing potency of PlnA. The effects of PlnA were tested on clonal rat anterior pituitary cells (GH(4) cells) using patch clamp and microfluorometric techniques. In physiological extracellular solution, GH(4) cells are highly sensitive to PlnA, but the sensitivity was dramatically reduced in solutions that partly neutralize the negative surface charge of the cells, in agreement with the notion that electrostatic interactions are probably important for the PlnA effects. Trypsination of cells prior to PlnA exposure also rendered the cells less sensitive to the peptide, suggesting that negative charges linked to membrane proteins are involved in the permeabilizing action. Finally, pre-exposure of cells to a mixture of enzymes that split carbohydrate residues from the backbone of glycosylated proteins also impeded the PlnA-induced membrane permeabilization. We conclude that electrostatic attraction between PlnA and glycosylated membrane proteins is probably an essential first step before PlnA can interact with membrane phospholipids. Deviating glycosylation patterns may contribute to the variation in PlnA sensitivity of different cell types, including cancerous cells and their normal counterparts.

  7. Negative Charge Neutralization in the Loops and Turns of Outer Membrane Phospholipase A Impacts Folding Hysteresis at Neutral pH.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Sarah K; Fleming, Karen G

    2016-11-08

    Hysteresis in equilibrium protein folding titrations is an experimental barrier that must be overcome to extract meaningful thermodynamic quantities. Traditional approaches to solving this problem involve testing a spectrum of solution conditions to find ones that achieve path independence. Through this procedure, a specific pH of 3.8 was required to achieve path independence for the water-to-bilayer equilibrium folding of outer membrane protein OmpLA. We hypothesized that the neutralization of negatively charged side chains (Asp and Glu) at pH 3.8 could be the physical basis for path-independent folding at this pH. To test this idea, we engineered variants of OmpLA with Asp → Asn and Glu → Gln mutations to neutralize the negative charges within various regions of the protein and tested for reversible folding at neutral pH. Although not fully resolved, our results show that these mutations in the periplasmic turns and extracellular loops are responsible for 60% of the hysteresis in wild-type folding. Overall, our study suggests that negative charges impact the folding hysteresis in outer membrane proteins and their neutralization may aid in protein engineering applications.

  8. Rotational self-diffusion in suspensions of charged particles: simulations and revised Beenakker-Mazur and pairwise additivity methods.

    PubMed

    Makuch, Karol; Heinen, Marco; Abade, Gustavo Coelho; Nägele, Gerhard

    2015-07-14

    We present a comprehensive joint theory-simulation study of rotational self-diffusion in suspensions of charged particles whose interactions are modeled by the generic hard-sphere plus repulsive Yukawa (HSY) pair potential. Elaborate, high-precision simulation results for the short-time rotational self-diffusion coefficient, D(r), are discussed covering a broad range of fluid-phase state points in the HSY model phase diagram. The salient trends in the behavior of D(r) as a function of reduced potential strength and range, and particle concentration, are systematically explored and physically explained. The simulation results are further used to assess the performance of two semi-analytic theoretical methods for calculating D(r). The first theoretical method is a revised version of the classical Beenakker-Mazur method (BM) adapted to rotational diffusion which includes a highly improved treatment of the salient many-particle hydrodynamic interactions. The second method is an easy-to-implement pairwise additivity (PA) method in which the hydrodynamic interactions are treated on a full two-body level with lubrication corrections included. The static pair correlation functions required as the only input to both theoretical methods are calculated using the accurate Rogers-Young integral equation scheme. While the revised BM method reproduces the general trends of the simulation results, it significantly underestimates D(r). In contrast, the PA method agrees well with the simulation results for D(r) even for intermediately concentrated systems. A simple improvement of the PA method is presented which is applicable for large concentrations.

  9. Influence of an Additive-Free Particle Spreading Method on Interactions between Charged Colloidal Particles at an Oil/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Yi, Zonglin; Xing, Xiaochen; Ngai, To; Jin, Fan

    2016-05-17

    The assembly and manipulation of charged colloidal particles at oil/water interfaces represent active areas of fundamental and applied research. Previously, we have shown that colloidal particles can spontaneously generate unstable residual charges at the particle/oil interface when spreading solvent is used to disperse them at an oil/water interface. These residual charges in turn affect the long-ranged electrostatic repulsive forces and packing of particles at the interface. To further uncover the influence arising from the spreading solvents on interfacial particle interactions, in the present study we utilize pure buoyancy to drive the particles onto an oil/water interface and compare the differences between such a spontaneously adsorbed particle monolayer to the spread monolayer based on solvent spreading techniques. Our results show that the solvent-free method could also lead particles to spread well at the interface, but it does not result in violent sliding of particles along the interface. More importantly, this additive-free spreading method can avoid the formation of unstable residual charges at the particle/oil interface. These findings agree well with our previous hypothesis; namely, those unstable residual charges are triboelectric charges that arise from the violently rubbing of particles on oil at the interface. Therefore, if the spreading solvents could be avoided, then we would be able to get rid of the formation of residual charges at interfaces. This finding will provide insight for precisely controlling the interactions among colloidal particles trapped at fluid/fluid interfaces.

  10. Negative electron binding energies observed in a triply charged anion: Photoelectron spectroscopy of 1-hydroxy-3,6,8-pyrene-trisulfonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Xing, Xiao-Peng; Wang, Xue-Bin; Wang, Lai-Sheng; Sergeeva, Alina P.; Boldyrev, Alexander I.

    2008-03-01

    We report the observation of negative electron binding energies (BEs) in a triply charged anion, 1-hydroxy-3,6,8-pyrene-trisulfonate (HPTS3-). Low-temperature photoelectron spectra were obtained for HPTS3- at several photon energies, revealing three detachment features below 0 electron BE. The HPTS3- trianion was measured to possess a negative BE of -0.66eV. Despite the relatively high excess energy stored in HPTS3-, it was observed to be a long-lived anion due to its high repulsive Coulomb barrier (RCB) (˜3.3eV), which prevents spontaneous electron emission. Theoretical calculations were carried out, which confirmed the negative electron BEs observed. The calculations further showed that the highest occupied molecular orbital in HPTS3- is an antibonding π orbital on the pyrene rings, followed by lone pair electrons in the peripheral -SO3- groups. Negative electron BE is a unique feature of multiply charged anions due to the presence of the RCB. Such metastable species may be good models to study electron-electron and vibronic interactions in complex molecules.

  11. Positively and Negatively Charged Ionic Modifications to Cellulose Assessed as Cotton-Based Protease-Lowering and Haemostatic Wound Agents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent developments in cellulose wound dressings targeted to different stages of wound healing have been based on structural and charge modifications that function to modulate events in the complex inflammatory and hemostatic phases of wound healing. Hemostasis and inflammation comprise two overlapp...

  12. Role of GCR positive and negative particles in charging the LISA-PF test masses in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimani, C.; Fabi, M.; Lobo, A. J.; Mateos, I.; Telloni, D.

    2015-05-01

    The LISA Pathfinder (LISA-PF) mission launch is scheduled during the second half of 2015. Galactic and solar ions with energies larger than 100 MeV/n and electrons above 10 MeV penetrate the spacecraft material and charge the gold-platinum test masses. This charging process generates spurious forces that, in some cases, may mimic the effects of genuine gravitational wave signals. A study of the test-mass charging due to galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) down to 1% in composition is reported here. The reliability of the results of this work is mainly limited by our capability to predict the energy spectra of GCRs in 2015. To this purpose, our model is applied to the expected PAMELA experiment proton data for the period January- March 2014 characterized by a positive polarity period and a level of solar modulation similar to those expected at the time of LISA-PF. The PAMELA observations will be available in the next few months. The comparison between our projections and measurements will provide valuable clues on the test-mass charging estimate uncertainty.

  13. Negatively charged residues of the segment linking the enzyme and cytolysin moieties restrict the membrane-permeabilizing capacity of adenylate cyclase toxin

    PubMed Central

    Masin, Jiri; Osickova, Adriana; Sukova, Anna; Fiser, Radovan; Halada, Petr; Bumba, Ladislav; Linhartova, Irena; Osicka, Radim; Sebo, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The whooping cough agent, Bordetella pertussis, secretes an adenylate cyclase toxin-hemolysin (CyaA) that plays a crucial role in host respiratory tract colonization. CyaA targets CR3-expressing cells and disrupts their bactericidal functions by delivering into their cytosol an adenylate cyclase enzyme that converts intracellular ATP to cAMP. In parallel, the hydrophobic domain of CyaA forms cation-selective pores that permeabilize cell membrane. The invasive AC and pore-forming domains of CyaA are linked by a segment that is unique in the RTX cytolysin family. We used mass spectrometry and circular dichroism to show that the linker segment forms α-helical structures that penetrate into lipid bilayer. Replacement of the positively charged arginine residues, proposed to be involved in target membrane destabilization by the linker segment, reduced the capacity of the toxin to translocate the AC domain across cell membrane. Substitutions of negatively charged residues then revealed that two clusters of negative charges within the linker segment control the size and the propensity of CyaA pore formation, thereby restricting the cell-permeabilizing capacity of CyaA. The ‘AC to Hly-linking segment’ thus appears to account for the smaller size and modest cell-permeabilizing capacity of CyaA pores, as compared to typical RTX hemolysins. PMID:27581058

  14. Operative Mechanism of Hole-Assisted Negative Charge Motion in Ground States of Radical-Anion Molecular Wires.

    PubMed

    Franco, Carlos; Burrezo, Paula Mayorga; Lloveras, Vega; Caballero, Rubén; Alcón, Isaac; Bromley, Stefan T; Mas-Torrent, Marta; Langa, Fernando; López Navarrete, Juan T; Rovira, Concepciò; Casado, Juan; Veciana, Jaume

    2017-01-18

    Charge transfer/transport in molecular wires over varying distances is a subject of great interest. The feasible transport mechanisms have been generally accounted for on the basis of tunneling or superexchange charge transfer operating over small distances which progressively gives way to hopping transport over larger distances. The underlying molecular sequential steps that likely take place during hopping and the operative mechanism occurring at intermediate distances have received much less attention given the difficulty in assessing detailed molecular-level information. We describe here the operating mechanisms for unimolecular electron transfer/transport in the ground state of radical-anion mixed-valence derivatives occurring between their terminal perchlorotriphenylmethyl/ide groups through thiophene-vinylene oligomers that act as conjugated wires of increasing length up to 53 Å. The unique finding here is that the net transport of the electron in the larger molecular wires is initiated by an electron-hole dissociation intermediated by hole delocalization (conformationally assisted and thermally dependent) forming transient mobile polaronic states in the bridge that terminate by an electron-hole recombination at the other wire extreme. On the contrary, for the shorter radical-anions our results suggest that a flickering resonance mechanism which is intermediate between hopping and superexchange is the operative one. We support these mechanistic interpretations by applying the pertinent biased kinetic models of the charge/spin exchange rates determined by electron paramagnetic resonance and by molecular structural level information obtained from UV-vis and Raman spectroscopies and by quantum chemical modeling.

  15. Charge/discharge characteristics of the coal-tar pitch carbon as negative electrode in Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung-Sik

    The charge/discharge characteristics were studied for the coal-tar pitch-based carbon (CTPC), which was pyrolyzed under the condition to form anisotropic mesophase pitch and then heat treated at temperatures ranging from 500 to 1300°C in N 2 atmosphere. As the heat treatment temperature increased, the reversible capacity for the CTPC increased progressively up to 1000°C, while the irreversible capacity decreased continuously. Carbons synthesized through the extraction of anisotropic mesophases showed higher reversible and lower irreversible capacities than the directly pyrolyzed ones.

  16. Charge effect on the photoinactivation of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria by cationic meso-substituted porphyrins

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background In recent times photodynamic antimicrobial therapy has been used to efficiently destroy Gram (+) and Gram (-) bacteria using cationic porphyrins as photosensitizers. There is an increasing interest in this approach, namely in the search of photosensitizers with adequate structural features for an efficient photoinactivation process. In this study we propose to compare the efficiency of seven cationic porphyrins differing in meso-substituent groups, charge number and charge distribution, on the photodynamic inactivation of a Gram (+) bacterium (Enterococcus faecalis) and of a Gram (-) bacterium (Escherichia coli). The present study complements our previous work on the search for photosensitizers that might be considered good candidates for the photoinactivation of a large spectrum of environmental microorganisms. Results Bacterial suspension (107 CFU mL-1) treated with different photosensitizers concentrations (0.5, 1.0 and 5.0 μM) were exposed to white light (40 W m-2) for a total light dose of 64.8 J cm-2. The most effective photosensitizers against both bacterial strains were the Tri-Py+-Me-PF and Tri-Py+-Me-CO2Me at 5.0 μM with a light fluence of 64.8 J cm-2, leading to > 7.0 log (> 99,999%) of photoinactivation. The tetracationic porphyrin also proved to be a good photosensitizer against both bacterial strains. Both di-cationic and the monocationic porphyrins were the least effective ones. Conclusion The number of positive charges, the charge distribution in the porphyrins' structure and the meso-substituent groups seem to have different effects on the photoinactivation of both bacteria. As the Tri-Py+-Me-PF porphyrin provides the highest log reduction using lower light doses, this photosensitizer can efficiently photoinactivate a large spectrum of environmental bacteria. The complete inactivation of both bacterial strains with low light fluence (40 W m-2) means that the photodynamic approach can be applied to wastewater treatment under natural

  17. Carboxyl and negative charge-functionalized superparamagnetic nanochains with amorphous carbon shell and magnetic core: synthesis and their application in removal of heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Chen, Qian-Wang; Chen, Jian; Yu, Bin-Xing; Hu, Xian-Yi

    2011-11-01

    This communication describes carboxyl-functionalized nanochains with amorphous carbon shell (18 nm) and magnetic core using ferrocene as a single reactant under the induction of an external magnetic field (0.40 T), which shows a superparamagnetic behavior and magnetization saturation of 38.6 emu g(-1). Because of mesoporous structure (3.8 nm) and surface negative charge (-35.18 mV), the nanochains can be used as adsorbent for removing the heavy metal ions (90%) from aqueous solution.

  18. The negative effect of Zr addition on the high temperature strength in alumina-forming austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Joonoh; Jang, Min-Ho; Kang, Jun-Yun; Lee, Tae-Ho

    2014-01-15

    The effect of a Zr addition on the precipitation behavior and mechanical properties in Nb-containing alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steels was investigated using tensile tests, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) analysis. The TEM observation showed that a Zr addition led to the formation of a (Nb,Zr)(C,N) complex particle, which coarsened the Nb-rich carbonitride. Tensile tests were performed at an elevated temperature (700 °C), and both the tensile and yield strengths decreased with a Zr addition. This unexpected result of a Zr addition was due to the reduction of the precipitation strengthening by particle coarsening. - Highlights: • The effect of Zr on high temperature strength in AFA steel containing Nb was studied. • Both the tensile and yield strengths of an AFA steel decreased with Zr-addition. • This is due to the reduction of precipitation strengthening by particle coarsening. • Nb(C,N) and (Nb,Zr)(C,N) particles were precipitated in an AFA and Zr-added AFA steel. • The size of (Nb,Zr)(C,N) particle is much bigger than that of Nb(C,N) particle.

  19. The temporal dynamics of ambivalence: changes in positive and negative affect in relation to consumption of an "emotionally charged" food.

    PubMed

    Hormes, Julia M; Rozin, Paul

    2011-08-01

    Ambivalence is thought to impact consumption of food, alcohol and drugs, possibly via influences on craving, with cravers often being simultaneously drawn toward and repelled from ingestion. So far, little is known about the temporal dynamics of ambivalence, especially as it varies in relationship to consumption. Participants (n=482, 56.8% female) completed the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule prior to, immediately and 30 min after the opportunity to eat a bar of chocolate. Affective ambivalence was calculated based on the relative strengths of and discrepancy between ratings of positive and negative affect. Ambivalence peaked prior to a decision about consumption and subsequently decreased, whether or not the decision was in favor of or against consuming. Decreasing ambivalence was driven by a drop in positive affect over time; positivity decreased more rapidly in those who consumed chocolate. Findings represent a first step in characterizing the dynamics of ambivalence in interactions with a target stimulus.

  20. Lactosylated PLGA nanoparticles containing ϵ-polylysine for the sustained release and liver-targeted delivery of the negatively charged proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ping; An, Tong; Zhao, Chuan; Li, Yuan; Li, Rongshan; Yang, Rui; Wang, Yinsong; Gao, Xiujun

    2015-01-30

    The acidic internal pH environment, initial burst release and lack of targeting property are main limitations of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles for carrying proteins. In this study, ϵ-polylysine (ϵ-PL) was used as an anti-acidic agent and a protein protectant to prepare PLGA nanoparticles for the protein delivery. To obtain the liver-targeting capability, lactosylated PLGA (Lac-PLGA) was synthesized by conjugation of lactose acid to PLGA at both ends, and then used to prepare nanoparticles containing ϵ-PL by the nanoprecipitation method. Bovine serumal bumin (BSA), a negatively charged protein, was efficiently loaded into Lac-PLGA/ϵ-PL nanoparticles and exhibited significant decreased burst release in vitro, sustained release in the blood and increased liver distribution in mice after intravenous injections. The enhanced stability of BSA was due to its electrical interaction with ϵ-PL and the neutralized internal environment of nanoparticles. In conclusion, Lac-PLGA/ϵ-PL nanoparticle system can be used as a promising carrier for the negatively charged proteins.

  1. Cationic hydrous thorium dioxide colloids – a useful tool for staining negatively charged surface matrices of bacteria for use in energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Kristen, Ingeborg; Barth, Elke

    2006-01-01

    Background Synthesis of cationic hydrous thorium dioxide colloids (ca. 1.0 to 1.7 nm) has been originally described by Müller [22] and Groot [11] and these have been used by Groot to stain acidic glucosaminoglycans for ultrastructure research of different tissues by conventional transmission electron microscopy. Results Synthesis of colloidal thorium dioxide has been modified and its use as a suitable stain of acidic mucopolysaccharides and other anionic biopolymers from bacteria, either as whole mount preparations or as preembedment labels, is described. The differences in stain behavior relative to commonly used rutheniumred-lysine and Alcian Blue™ electron dense acidic stains has been investigated and its use is exemplified for Pseudomonas aeruginosa adjacent cell wall biopolymers. For the first time thorificated biopolymers, i.e. bacterial outer cell wall layers, have been analysed at the ultrastructural level with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and electron spectroscopic imaging (ESI), leading to excellent contrast and signal strength for these extracellular biopolymers. Conclusion Application of cationic hydrous ThO2 colloids for tracing acidic groups of the bacterial surface and/or EPS has been shown to be rather effective by transmission electron microscopy. Because of its high electron density and its good diffusibility it stains and outlines electro-negative charges within these biopolymers. In combination with ESI, based on integrated energy-filtered electron microscopy (EFTEM) Th-densities and thus negative charge densities can be discriminated from other elemental densities, especially in environmental samples, such as biofilms. PMID:16803626

  2. The reduction rates of DEPC-modified mutant Thermus thermophilus Rieske proteins differ when there is a negative charge proximal to the cluster.

    PubMed

    Karagas, Nicholas E; Jones, Christie N; Osborn, Deborah J; Dzierlenga, Anika L; Oyala, Paul; Konkle, Mary E; Whitney, Emily M; David Britt, R; Hunsicker-Wang, Laura M

    2014-10-01

    Rieske and Rieske-type proteins are electron transport proteins involved in key biological processes such as respiration, photosynthesis, and detoxification. They have a [2Fe-2S] cluster ligated by two cysteines and two histidines. A series of mutations, L135E, L135R, L135A, and Y158F, of the Rieske protein from Thermus thermophilus has been produced which probe the effects of the neighboring residues, in the second sphere, on the dynamics of cluster reduction and the reactivity of the ligating histidines. These properties were probed using titrations and modifications with diethyl pyrocarbonate (DEPC) at various pH values monitored using UV-Visible and circular dichroism spectrophotometry. These results, along with results from EPR studies, provide information on ligating histidine modification and rate of reduction of each of the mutant proteins. L135R, L135A, and Y158F react with DEPC similarly to wild type, resulting in modified protein with a reduced [2Fe-2S] cluster in <90 min, whereas L135E requires >15 h under the same conditions. Thus, the negative charge slows down the rate of reduction and provides an explanation as to why negatively charged residues are rarely, if ever, found in the equivalent position of other Rieske and Rieske-type proteins.

  3. REVISED BIG BANG NUCLEOSYNTHESIS WITH LONG-LIVED, NEGATIVELY CHARGED MASSIVE PARTICLES: UPDATED RECOMBINATION RATES, PRIMORDIAL {sup 9}Be NUCLEOSYNTHESIS, AND IMPACT OF NEW {sup 6}Li LIMITS

    SciTech Connect

    Kusakabe, Motohiko; Kim, K. S.; Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Kajino, Toshitaka; Kino, Yasushi; Mathews, Grant J. E-mail: kyungsik@kau.ac.kr E-mail: kajino@nao.ac.jp E-mail: gmathews@nd.edu

    2014-09-01

    We extensively reanalyze the effects of a long-lived, negatively charged massive particle, X {sup –}, on big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). The BBN model with an X {sup –} particle was originally motivated by the discrepancy between the {sup 6,} {sup 7}Li abundances predicted in the standard BBN model and those inferred from observations of metal-poor stars. In this model, {sup 7}Be is destroyed via the recombination with an X {sup –} particle followed by radiative proton capture. We calculate precise rates for the radiative recombinations of {sup 7}Be, {sup 7}Li, {sup 9}Be, and {sup 4}He with X {sup –}. In nonresonant rates, we take into account respective partial waves of scattering states and respective bound states. The finite sizes of nuclear charge distributions cause deviations in wave functions from those of point-charge nuclei. For a heavy X {sup –} mass, m{sub X} ≳ 100 GeV, the d-wave → 2P transition is most important for {sup 7}Li and {sup 7,} {sup 9}Be, unlike recombination with electrons. Our new nonresonant rate of the {sup 7}Be recombination for m{sub X} = 1000 GeV is more than six times larger than the existing rate. Moreover, we suggest a new important reaction for {sup 9}Be production: the recombination of {sup 7}Li and X {sup –} followed by deuteron capture. We derive binding energies of X nuclei along with reaction rates and Q values. We then calculate BBN and find that the amount of {sup 7}Be destruction depends significantly on the charge distribution of {sup 7}Be. Finally, updated constraints on the initial abundance and the lifetime of the X {sup –} are derived in the context of revised upper limits to the primordial {sup 6}Li abundance. Parameter regions for the solution to the {sup 7}Li problem and the primordial {sup 9}Be abundances are revised.

  4. Revised Big Bang Nucleosynthesis with Long-lived, Negatively Charged Massive Particles: Updated Recombination Rates, Primordial 9Be Nucleosynthesis, and Impact of New 6Li Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusakabe, Motohiko; Kim, K. S.; Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Kajino, Toshitaka; Kino, Yasushi; Mathews, Grant. J.

    2014-09-01

    We extensively reanalyze the effects of a long-lived, negatively charged massive particle, X -, on big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). The BBN model with an X - particle was originally motivated by the discrepancy between the 6, 7Li abundances predicted in the standard BBN model and those inferred from observations of metal-poor stars. In this model, 7Be is destroyed via the recombination with an X - particle followed by radiative proton capture. We calculate precise rates for the radiative recombinations of 7Be, 7Li, 9Be, and 4He with X -. In nonresonant rates, we take into account respective partial waves of scattering states and respective bound states. The finite sizes of nuclear charge distributions cause deviations in wave functions from those of point-charge nuclei. For a heavy X - mass, mX >~ 100 GeV, the d-wave → 2P transition is most important for 7Li and 7, 9Be, unlike recombination with electrons. Our new nonresonant rate of the 7Be recombination for mX = 1000 GeV is more than six times larger than the existing rate. Moreover, we suggest a new important reaction for 9Be production: the recombination of 7Li and X - followed by deuteron capture. We derive binding energies of X nuclei along with reaction rates and Q values. We then calculate BBN and find that the amount of 7Be destruction depends significantly on the charge distribution of 7Be. Finally, updated constraints on the initial abundance and the lifetime of the X - are derived in the context of revised upper limits to the primordial 6Li abundance. Parameter regions for the solution to the 7Li problem and the primordial 9Be abundances are revised.

  5. Negatively Charged Metal Oxide Nanoparticles Interact with the 20S Proteasome and Differentially Modulate Its Biologic Functional Effects

    PubMed Central

    Falaschetti, Christine A.; Paunesku, Tatjana; Kurepa, Jasmina; Nanavati, Dhaval; Chou, Stanley S.; De, Mrinmoy; Song, MinHa; Jang, Jung-tak; Wu, Aiguo; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Cheon, Jinwoo; Smalle, Jan; Woloschak, Gayle E.

    2013-01-01

    The multicatalytic ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) carries out proteolysis in a highly orchestrated way and regulates a large number of cellular processes. Deregulation of the UPS in many disorders has been documented. In some cases, e.g. carcinogenesis, elevated proteasome activity has been implicated in disease development, while the etiology of other diseases, e.g. neurodegeneration, includes decreased UPS activity. Therefore, agents that alter proteasome activity could suppress as well as enhance a multitude of diseases. Metal oxide nanoparticles, often developed as diagnostic tools, have not previously been tested as modulators of proteasome activity. Here, several types of metal oxide nanoparticles were found to adsorb to the proteasome and show variable preferential binding for particular proteasome subunits with several peptide binding “hotspots” possible. These interactions depend on the size, charge, and concentration of the nanoparticles and affect proteasome activity in a time-dependent manner. Should metal oxide nanoparticles increase proteasome activity in cells, as they do in vitro, unintended effects related to changes in proteasome function can be expected. PMID:23930940

  6. The greater negative charge density of DNA in tris-borate buffers does not enhance DNA condensation by multivalent cations.

    PubMed

    Schwinefus, J J; Bloomfield, V A

    2000-12-01

    As indicated by recent measurements of the electrophoretic free solution mobility, DNA appears to have a greater helical charge density in Tris-borate-EDTA (TBE) buffers than in Tris-acetate-EDTA (TAE) buffers. Since electrostatic forces play a major role in DNA packaging processes, we have investigated the condensation of closed circular plasmid DNA using total intensity and dynamic light scattering in Tris-borate, Tris-acetate, and Tris-cacodylate buffers with cobaltic hexa-amine (III) [Co(NH(3))(3+)(6)]. We find that neither the critical concentration of Co(NH(3))(3+)(6) nor the hydrodynamic radii of the resulting condensates vary significantly in the buffer systems studied here despite the prediction that DNA condensation should occur at significantly lower Co(NH(3))(3+)(6) concentrations in Tris-borate buffers. Assuming a persistence length behavior similar to B-DNA in the presence of multivalent cations, a decrease in the attractive counterion correlation pressure decay length in Tris-borate buffers does not account for our observations. It is possible that the binding of multivalent cations to DNA may hinder borate association with the DNA double helix.

  7. Novel negatively charged hybrids. 3. Removal of Pb2+ from aqueous solution using zwitterionic hybrid polymers as adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junsheng; Ma, Yue; Zhang, Yaping; Shao, Guoquan

    2010-01-15

    Using zwitterionic hybrid polymers as adsorbent, the adsorption kinetics and isotherm, thermodynamic parameters of Delta G, Delta H and DeltaS for the removal of Pb(2+) from aqueous solution were investigated. It is indicated that the adsorption of Pb(2+) ions on these zwitterionic hybrid polymers followed the Lagergren second-order kinetic model and Freundlich isotherm model, demonstrating that the adsorption process might be Langmuir monolayer adsorption. The negative values of Delta G and the positive values of Delta H evidence that Pb(2+) adsorption on these zwitterionic hybrid polymers is spontaneous and endothermic process in nature. Moreover, the zwitterionic hybrid polymers produced reveal relatively higher desorption efficiency in 2 mol dm(-3) aqueous HNO(3) solution, indicating that they can be recycled in industrial processes. These findings suggest that these zwitterionic hybrid polymers are the promising adsorbents for Pb(2+) removal and can be potentially applied in the separation and recovery of Pb(2+) ions from the waste chemicals and contaminated water of lead-acid rechargeable battery.

  8. Bias tuning charge-releasing leading to negative differential resistance in amorphous gallium oxide/Nb:SrTiO3 heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P. C.; Li, P. G.; Zhi, Y. S.; Guo, D. Y.; Pan, A. Q.; Zhan, J. M.; Liu, H.; Shen, J. Q.; Tang, W. H.

    2015-12-01

    Negative differential resistance (NDR) and bipolar resistive switching (RS) phenomena were observed in Au/Ga2O3-x/Nb:SrTiO3/Au heterostructures fabricated by growing amorphous gallium oxide thin films on 0.7%Nb-doped SrTiO3 substrates using pulsed laser deposition technique. The RS behavior is reproducible and stable without the forming process. The NDR phenomenon happened during the course of RS from low resistance state to high resistance state and was dependent much on the applied forward bias. The bias dependent charge releasing from oxygen vacancies was considered to contribute to the NDR behavior. The results show that there is a very close relationship between NDR and RS.

  9. Reaction-space analysis of homogeneous charge compression ignition combustion with varying levels of fuel stratification under positive and negative valve overlap conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kodavasal, Janardhan; Lavoie, George A.; Assanis, Dennis N.; Martz, Jason B.

    2015-10-26

    Full-cycle computational fluid dynamics simulations with gasoline chemical kinetics were performed to determine the impact of breathing and fuel injection strategies on thermal and compositional stratification, combustion and emissions during homogeneous charge compression ignition combustion. The simulations examined positive valve overlap and negative valve overlap strategies, along with fueling by port fuel injection and direct injection. The resulting charge mass distributions were analyzed prior to ignition using ignition delay as a reactivity metric. The reactivity stratification arising from differences in the distributions of fuel–oxygen equivalence ratio (ΦFO), oxygen molar fraction (χO2) and temperature (T) was determined for three parametric studies. In the first study, the reactivity stratification and burn duration for positive valve overlap valve events with port fuel injection and early direct injection were nearly identical and were dominated by wall-driven thermal stratification. nitrogen oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions were negligible for both injection strategies. In the second study, which examined negative valve overlap valve events with direct injection and port fuel injection, reactivity stratification increased for direct injection as the ΦFO and T distributions associated with direct fuel injection into the hot residual gas were positively correlated; however, the latent heat absorbed from the hot residual gas by the evaporating direct injection fuel jet reduced the overall thermal and reactivity stratification. These stratification effects were offsetting, resulting in similar reactivity stratification and burn durations for the two injection strategies. The higher local burned gas temperatures with direct injection resulted in an order of magnitude increase in NO, while incomplete combustion of locally over-lean regions led to a sevenfold increase in CO emissions compared to port fuel

  10. Reaction-space analysis of homogeneous charge compression ignition combustion with varying levels of fuel stratification under positive and negative valve overlap conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Kodavasal, Janardhan; Lavoie, George A.; Assanis, Dennis N.; ...

    2015-10-26

    Full-cycle computational fluid dynamics simulations with gasoline chemical kinetics were performed to determine the impact of breathing and fuel injection strategies on thermal and compositional stratification, combustion and emissions during homogeneous charge compression ignition combustion. The simulations examined positive valve overlap and negative valve overlap strategies, along with fueling by port fuel injection and direct injection. The resulting charge mass distributions were analyzed prior to ignition using ignition delay as a reactivity metric. The reactivity stratification arising from differences in the distributions of fuel–oxygen equivalence ratio (ΦFO), oxygen molar fraction (χO2) and temperature (T) was determined for three parametric studies.more » In the first study, the reactivity stratification and burn duration for positive valve overlap valve events with port fuel injection and early direct injection were nearly identical and were dominated by wall-driven thermal stratification. nitrogen oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions were negligible for both injection strategies. In the second study, which examined negative valve overlap valve events with direct injection and port fuel injection, reactivity stratification increased for direct injection as the ΦFO and T distributions associated with direct fuel injection into the hot residual gas were positively correlated; however, the latent heat absorbed from the hot residual gas by the evaporating direct injection fuel jet reduced the overall thermal and reactivity stratification. These stratification effects were offsetting, resulting in similar reactivity stratification and burn durations for the two injection strategies. The higher local burned gas temperatures with direct injection resulted in an order of magnitude increase in NO, while incomplete combustion of locally over-lean regions led to a sevenfold increase in CO emissions compared to port fuel injection. The final study

  11. Ground-state oxygen holes and the metal-insulator transition in the negative charge-transfer rare-earth nickelates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisogni, Valentina; Catalano, Sara; Green, Robert J.; Gibert, Marta; Scherwitzl, Raoul; Huang, Yaobo; Strocov, Vladimir N.; Zubko, Pavlo; Balandeh, Shadi; Triscone, Jean-Marc; Sawatzky, George; Schmitt, Thorsten

    2016-10-01

    The metal-insulator transition and the intriguing physical properties of rare-earth perovskite nickelates have attracted considerable attention in recent years. Nonetheless, a complete understanding of these materials remains elusive. Here we combine X-ray absorption and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) spectroscopies to resolve important aspects of the complex electronic structure of rare-earth nickelates, taking NdNiO3 thin film as representative example. The unusual coexistence of bound and continuum excitations observed in the RIXS spectra provides strong evidence for abundant oxygen holes in the ground state of these materials. Using cluster calculations and Anderson impurity model interpretation, we show that distinct spectral signatures arise from a Ni 3d8 configuration along with holes in the oxygen 2p valence band, confirming suggestions that these materials do not obey a conventional positive charge-transfer picture, but instead exhibit a negative charge-transfer energy in line with recent models interpreting the metal-insulator transition in terms of bond disproportionation.

  12. Ground-state oxygen holes and the metal–insulator transition in the negative charge-transfer rare-earth nickelates

    SciTech Connect

    Bisogni, Valentina; Catalano, Sara; Green, Robert J.; Gibert, Marta; Scherwitzl, Raoul; Huang, Yaobo; Strocov, Vladimir N.; Zubko, Pavlo; Balandeh, Shadi; Triscone, Jean-Marc; Sawatzky, George; Schmitt, Thorsten

    2016-10-11

    The metal-insulator transitions and the intriguing physical properties of rare-earth perovskite nickelates have attracted considerable attention in recent years. However, a complete understanding of these materials remains elusive. Here, taking a NdNiO3 thin film as a representative example, we utilize a combination of x-ray absorption (XAS) and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) spectroscopies to resolve important aspects of the complex electronic structure of the rare-earth nickelates. The unusual coexistence of bound and continuum excitations observed in the RIXS spectra provides strong evidence for the abundance of oxygen 2p holes in the ground state of these materials. Using cluster calculations and Anderson impurity model interpretation, we show that these distinct spectral signatures arise from a Ni 3d8 configuration along with holes in the oxygen 2p valence band, confirming suggestions that these materials do not obey a “conventional” positive charge-transfer picture, but instead exhibit a negative charge-transfer energy, in line with recent models interpreting the metal to insulator transition in terms of bond disproportionation.

  13. Ground-state oxygen holes and the metal–insulator transition in the negative charge-transfer rare-earth nickelates

    PubMed Central

    Bisogni, Valentina; Catalano, Sara; Green, Robert J.; Gibert, Marta; Scherwitzl, Raoul; Huang, Yaobo; Strocov, Vladimir N.; Zubko, Pavlo; Balandeh, Shadi; Triscone, Jean-Marc; Sawatzky, George; Schmitt, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    The metal–insulator transition and the intriguing physical properties of rare-earth perovskite nickelates have attracted considerable attention in recent years. Nonetheless, a complete understanding of these materials remains elusive. Here we combine X-ray absorption and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) spectroscopies to resolve important aspects of the complex electronic structure of rare-earth nickelates, taking NdNiO3 thin film as representative example. The unusual coexistence of bound and continuum excitations observed in the RIXS spectra provides strong evidence for abundant oxygen holes in the ground state of these materials. Using cluster calculations and Anderson impurity model interpretation, we show that distinct spectral signatures arise from a Ni 3d8 configuration along with holes in the oxygen 2p valence band, confirming suggestions that these materials do not obey a conventional positive charge-transfer picture, but instead exhibit a negative charge-transfer energy in line with recent models interpreting the metal–insulator transition in terms of bond disproportionation. PMID:27725665

  14. Ground-state oxygen holes and the metal–insulator transition in the negative charge-transfer rare-earth nickelates

    DOE PAGES

    Bisogni, Valentina; Catalano, Sara; Green, Robert J.; ...

    2016-10-11

    The metal-insulator transitions and the intriguing physical properties of rare-earth perovskite nickelates have attracted considerable attention in recent years. However, a complete understanding of these materials remains elusive. Here, taking a NdNiO3 thin film as a representative example, we utilize a combination of x-ray absorption (XAS) and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) spectroscopies to resolve important aspects of the complex electronic structure of the rare-earth nickelates. The unusual coexistence of bound and continuum excitations observed in the RIXS spectra provides strong evidence for the abundance of oxygen 2p holes in the ground state of these materials. Using cluster calculations andmore » Anderson impurity model interpretation, we show that these distinct spectral signatures arise from a Ni 3d8 configuration along with holes in the oxygen 2p valence band, confirming suggestions that these materials do not obey a “conventional” positive charge-transfer picture, but instead exhibit a negative charge-transfer energy, in line with recent models interpreting the metal to insulator transition in terms of bond disproportionation.« less

  15. Ground-state oxygen holes and the metal-insulator transition in the negative charge-transfer rare-earth nickelates.

    PubMed

    Bisogni, Valentina; Catalano, Sara; Green, Robert J; Gibert, Marta; Scherwitzl, Raoul; Huang, Yaobo; Strocov, Vladimir N; Zubko, Pavlo; Balandeh, Shadi; Triscone, Jean-Marc; Sawatzky, George; Schmitt, Thorsten

    2016-10-11

    The metal-insulator transition and the intriguing physical properties of rare-earth perovskite nickelates have attracted considerable attention in recent years. Nonetheless, a complete understanding of these materials remains elusive. Here we combine X-ray absorption and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) spectroscopies to resolve important aspects of the complex electronic structure of rare-earth nickelates, taking NdNiO3 thin film as representative example. The unusual coexistence of bound and continuum excitations observed in the RIXS spectra provides strong evidence for abundant oxygen holes in the ground state of these materials. Using cluster calculations and Anderson impurity model interpretation, we show that distinct spectral signatures arise from a Ni 3d(8) configuration along with holes in the oxygen 2p valence band, confirming suggestions that these materials do not obey a conventional positive charge-transfer picture, but instead exhibit a negative charge-transfer energy in line with recent models interpreting the metal-insulator transition in terms of bond disproportionation.

  16. A photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio study of B21-: Negatively charged boron clusters continue to be planar at 21

    SciTech Connect

    Piazza, Zachary A.; Li, Wei-Li; Romanescu, Constantin; Sergeeva, Alina P.; Wang, Lai-Sheng; Boldyrev, Alexander I.

    2012-01-01

    The structures and chemical bonding of the B21- cluster have been investigated by a combined photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio study. The photoelectron spectrum at 193 nm revealed a very high adiabatic electron binding energy of 4.38 eV for B21- and a congested spectral pattern. Extensive global minimum searches were conducted using two different methods, followed by high-level calculations of the low-lying isomers. The global minimum of B21- was found to be a quasiplanar structure with the next low-lying planar isomer only 1.9 kcal/mol higher in energy at the CCSD(T)/6-311-G* level of theory. The calculated vertical detachment energies for the two isomers were found to be in good agreement with the experimental spectrum, suggesting that they were both present experimentally and contributed to the observed spectrum. Chemical bonding analyses showed that both isomers consist of a 14-atom periphery, which is bonded by classical two-center two-electron bonds, and seven interior atoms in the planar structures. A localized two-center two-electron bond is found in the interior of the two planar isomers, in addition to delocalized multi-center σ and π bonds. The structures and the delocalized bonding of the two lowest lying isomers of B21- were found to be similar to those in the two lowest energy isomers in B19-.

  17. A photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio study of B21-: negatively charged boron clusters continue to be planar at 21.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Zachary A; Li, Wei-Li; Romanescu, Constantin; Sergeeva, Alina P; Wang, Lai-Sheng; Boldyrev, Alexander I

    2012-03-14

    The structures and chemical bonding of the B(21)(-) cluster have been investigated by a combined photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio study. The photoelectron spectrum at 193 nm revealed a very high adiabatic electron binding energy of 4.38 eV for B(21)(-) and a congested spectral pattern. Extensive global minimum searches were conducted using two different methods, followed by high-level calculations of the low-lying isomers. The global minimum of B(21)(-) was found to be a quasiplanar structure with the next low-lying planar isomer only 1.9 kcal/mol higher in energy at the CCSD(T)/6-311-G* level of theory. The calculated vertical detachment energies for the two isomers were found to be in good agreement with the experimental spectrum, suggesting that they were both present experimentally and contributed to the observed spectrum. Chemical bonding analyses showed that both isomers consist of a 14-atom periphery, which is bonded by classical two-center two-electron bonds, and seven interior atoms in the planar structures. A localized two-center two-electron bond is found in the interior of the two planar isomers, in addition to delocalized multi-center σ and π bonds. The structures and the delocalized bonding of the two lowest lying isomers of B(21)(-) were found to be similar to those in the two lowest energy isomers in B(19)(-).

  18. Negatively charged excitions (X -) and D - triplet transitions in GaAs/Al 0.3Ga 0.7As multiple quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, S. R.; Yu, W.-Y.; Fu, L. P.; Jiang, Z. X.; Petrou, A.; McCombe, B. D.; Schaff, W.

    1996-07-01

    From a combination of low-temperature photoluminescence (PL) and far-infrared magnetospectroscopy on several GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well samples with different donor doping (well only, barrier only, both well and barrier), we have identified a recombination line due to negatively charged excitons (X -). We have also studied the effects of excess free electrons in the wells on the X - line. Magneto-Pl for low-density barrier-only doped samples shows both free exciton and X - recombination lines at all values of field studied. However, for more heavily doped samples the behavior is very different. As magnetic field is increased, three distinct features evolve from the broad free carrier recombination lines. At low fields all three features are Landau level recombination lines. At a field corresponding to filling factor v = 2 the lowest energy line undergoes a discontinuous change in slope, and above this field it evolves into the X - line. In related far-infrared magnetospectroscopy studies we have made a clear identification of one of the predicted negative donor ion (D -) triplet transitions.

  19. Charge-storage performance of Li/LiFePO4 cells with additive-incorporated ionic liquid electrolytes at various temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongittharom, Nithinai; Wang, Chueh-Han; Wang, Yi-Chen; Fey, George Ting-Kuo; Li, Hui-Ying; Wu, Tzi-Yi; Lee, Tai-Chou; Chang, Jeng-Kuei

    2014-08-01

    Butylmethylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (BMP-TFSI) ionic liquid (IL) with LiTFSI solute is used as a base electrolyte for Li/LiFePO4 cells. Three kinds of electrolyte additive, namely vinylene carbonate (VC), gamma-butyrolactone (γ-BL), and propylene carbonate (PC), with various concentrations are introduced. The thermal stability, flammability, and electrochemical properties of the electrolytes are investigated. At 25 °C, the additives (γ-BL is found to be the most effective) can significantly improve the capacity, high-rate performance, and cyclability of the cells. With an increase in temperature to 50 °C, the benefits of the additives gradually become insignificant. At 75 °C, the additives even have adverse effects. At such an elevated temperature, in the plain IL electrolyte (without additives), a LiFePO4 capacity of 152 mAh g-1 is found at 0.1 C. 77% of this capacity can be retained when the rate is increased to 3 C. These values are superior to those found for the additive-incorporated IL and conventional organic electrolytes. Moreover, negligible capacity loss is measured after 100 charge-discharge cycles at 75 °C in the plain IL electrolyte.

  20. Impact of Multiple Negative Charges on Blood Clearance and Biodistribution Characteristics of 99mTc-Labeled Dimeric Cyclic RGD Peptides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to evaluate the impact of multiple negative charges on blood clearance kinetics and biodistribution properties of 99mTc-labeled RGD peptide dimers. Bioconjugates HYNIC-P6G-RGD2 and HYNIC-P6D-RGD2 were prepared by reacting P6G-RGD2 and P6D-RGD2, respectively, with excess HYNIC-OSu in the presence of diisopropylethylamine. Their IC50 values were determined to be 31 ± 5 and 41 ± 6 nM, respectively, against 125I-echistatin bound to U87MG glioma cells in a whole-cell displacement assay. Complexes [99mTc(HYNIC-P6G-RGD2)(tricine)(TPPTS)] (99mTc-P6G-RGD2) and [99mTc(HYNIC-P6D-RGD2)(tricine)(TPPTS)] (99mTc-P6D-RGD2) were prepared in high radiochemical purity (RCP > 95%) and specific activity (37–110 GBq/μmol). They were evaluated in athymic nude mice bearing U87MG glioma xenografts for their biodistribution. The most significant difference between 99mTc-P6D-RGD2 and 99mTc-P6G-RGD2 was their blood radioactivity levels and tumor uptake. The initial blood radioactivity level for 99mTc-P6D-RGD2 (4.71 ± 1.00%ID/g) was ∼5× higher than that of 99mTc-P6G-RGD2 (0.88 ± 0.05%ID/g), but this difference disappeared at 60 min p.i. 99mTc-P6D-RGD2 had much lower tumor uptake (2.20–3.11%ID/g) than 99mTc-P6G-RGD2 (7.82–9.27%ID/g) over a 2 h period. Since HYNIC-P6D-RGD2 and HYNIC-P6G-RGD2 shared a similar integrin αvβ3 binding affinity (41 ± 6 nM versus 31 ± 5 nM), the difference in their blood activity and tumor uptake is most likely related to the nine negative charges and high protein binding of 99mTc-P6D-RGD2. Despite its low uptake in U87MG tumors, the tumor uptake of 99mTc-P6D-RGD2 was integrin αvβ3-specific. SPECT/CT studies were performed using 99mTc-P6G-RGD2 in athymic nude mice bearing U87MG glioma and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer xenografts. The SPECT/CT data demonstrated the tumor-targeting capability of 99mTc-P6G-RGD2, and its tumor uptake depends on the integrin αvβ3 expression levels on tumor cells and neovasculature. It was concluded that

  1. Conserved Negative Charges in the N-terminal Tetramerization Domain Mediate Efficient Assembly of Kv2.1 and Kv2.1/Kv6.4 Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Bocksteins, Elke; Labro, Alain J.; Mayeur, Evy; Bruyns, Tine; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre; Adriaensen, Dirk; Snyders, Dirk J.

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are transmembrane tetramers of individual α-subunits. Eight different Shaker-related Kv subfamilies have been identified in which the tetramerization domain T1, located on the intracellular N terminus, facilitates and controls the assembly of both homo- and heterotetrameric channels. Only the Kv2 α-subunits are able to form heterotetramers with members of the silent Kv subfamilies (Kv5, Kv6, Kv8, and Kv9). The T1 domain contains two subdomains, A and B box, which presumably determine subfamily specificity by preventing incompatible subunits to assemble. In contrast, little is known about the involvement of the A/B linker sequence. Both Kv2 and silent Kv subfamilies contain a fully conserved and negatively charged sequence (CDD) in this linker that is lacking in the other subfamilies. Neutralizing these aspartates in Kv2.1 by mutating them to alanines did not affect the gating properties, but reduced the current density moderately. However, charge reversal arginine substitutions strongly reduced the current density of these homotetrameric mutant Kv2.1 channels and immunocytochemistry confirmed the reduced expression at the plasma membrane. Förster resonance energy transfer measurements using confocal microscopy showed that the latter was not due to impaired trafficking, but to a failure to assemble the tetramer. This was further confirmed with co-immunoprecipitation experiments. The corresponding arginine substitution in Kv6.4 prevented its heterotetrameric interaction with Kv2.1. These results indicate that these aspartates (especially the first one) in the A/B box linker of the T1 domain are required for efficient assembly of both homotetrameric Kv2.1 and heterotetrameric Kv2.1/silent Kv6.4 channels. PMID:19717558

  2. Extraction of negative charges from an ion source: Transition from an electron repelling to an electron attracting plasma close to the extraction surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer, Christian; Fantz, Ursel

    2016-08-01

    Large-scale sources for negative hydrogen ions, capable of delivering an extracted ion current of several ten amperes, are a key component of the neutral beam injection system of the upcoming ITER fusion device. Since the created heat load of the inevitably co-extracted electrons after magnetic separation from the extracted beam limits their tolerable amount, special care must be taken for the reduction of co-extracted electrons—in particular, in deuterium operation, where the larger amount of co-extracted electrons often limits the source performance. By biasing the plasma grid (PG, first grid of the extraction system) positively with respect to the source body, the plasma sheath in front of the PG can be changed from an electron repelling towards an electron attracting sheath. In this way, the flux of charged particles onto the PG can be varied, thus changing the bias current and inverse to it the amount of co-extracted electrons. The PG bias affects also the flux of surface-produced H - towards the plasma volume as well as the plasma symmetry in front of the plasma grid, strongly influenced by an E → × B → drift. The influence of varying PG sheath potential profile on the plasma drift, the negative hydrogen ion density, and the source performance at the prototype H - source is presented, comparing hydrogen and deuterium operation. The transition in the PG sheath profile takes place in both isotopes, with a minimum of co-extracted electrons formed in case of the electron attracting PG sheath. The co-extracted electron density in deuterium operation is higher than in hydrogen operation, which is accompanied by an increased plasma density in deuterium.

  3. Basal electric and magnetic fields of celestial bodies come from positive-negative charge separation caused by gravitation of quasi-Casimir pressure in weak interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shao-Guang

    According to f =d(mv)/dt=m(dv/dt)+ v(dm/dt), a same gravitational formula had been de-duced from the variance in physical mass of QFT and from the variance in mass of inductive energy-transfer of GR respectively: f QF T = f GR = -G (mM/r2 )((r/r)+(v/c)) when their interaction-constants are all taken the experimental values (H05-0029-08, E15-0039-08). f QF T is the quasi-Casimir pressure. f GR is equivalent to Einstein's equation, then more easy to solve it. The hypothesis of the equivalent principle is not used in f QF T , but required by f GR . The predictions of f QF T and f GR are identical except that f QF T has quantum effects but f GR has not and f GR has Lense-Thirring effect but f QF T has not. The quantum effects of gravitation had been verified by Nesvizhevsky et al with the ultracold neutrons falling in the earth's gravitational field in 2002. Yet Lense-Thirring effect had not been measured by GP-B. It shows that f QF T is essential but f GR is phenomenological. The macro-f QF T is the statistic average pressure collided by net virtual neutrinos ν 0 flux (after self-offset in opposite directions) and in direct proportion to the mass. But micro-f QF T is in direct proportion to the scattering section. The electric mass (in inverse proportion to de Broglie wavelength λ) far less than nucleonic mass and the electric scattering section (in direct proportion to λ2 ) far large than that of nucleon, then the net ν 0 flux pressure exerted to electron far large than that to nucleon and the electric displacement far large than that of nucleon, it causes the gravitational polarization of positive-negative charge center separation. Because the gravity far less than the electromagnetic binding force, in atoms the gravitational polarization only produces a little separation. But the net ν 0 flux can press a part freedom electrons in plasma of ionosphere into the earth's surface, the static electric force of redundant positive ions prevents electrons from further

  4. Disinfection of Escherichia coli Gram negative bacteria using surface modified TiO2: optimization of Ag metallization and depiction of charge transfer mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gomathi Devi, LakshmipathiNaik; Nagaraj, Basavalingaiah

    2014-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of silver deposited TiO2 (Ag-TiO2 ) against Gram negative Escherichia coli bacteria was investigated by varying the Ag metal content from 0.10 to 0.50% on the surface of TiO2 . Ag depositions by the photoreduction method were found to be stable. Surface silver metallization was confirmed by EDAX and XPS studies. Photoluminescence studies show that the charge carrier recombination is less for 0.1% Ag-TiO2 and this catalyst shows superior bactericidal activity under solar light irradiation compared to Sol gel TiO2 (SG-TiO2 ) due to the surface plasmon effect. The energy levels of deposited Ag are dependent on the Ag content and it varies from -4.64 eV to -1.30 eV with respect to the vacuum energy level based on atomic silver to bulk silver deposits. The ability of electron transfer from Ag deposit to O2 depends on the position of the energy levels. The 0.25% and 0.50% Ag depositions showed detrimental effect on bactericidal activity due to the mismatch of energy levels. The effect of the EROS (External generation of the Reactive Oxygen Species by 0.1% Ag-TiO2 ) and IROS (Interior generation of Reactive Oxygen Species within the bacteria) on the bactericidal inactivation is discussed in detail.

  5. Measurement of negatively charged pion spectra in inelastic p+p interactions at 20, 31, 40, 80 and 158 GeV/c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abgrall, N.; Aduszkiewicz, A.; Ali, Y.; Anticic, T.; Antoniou, N.; Baatar, B.; Bay, F.; Blondel, A.; Blumer, J.; Bogomilov, M.; Bravar, A.; Brzychczyk, J.; Bunyatov, S. A.; Busygina, O.; Christakoglou, P.; Czopowicz, T.; Davis, N.; Debieux, S.; Dembinski, H.; Diakonos, F.; Luise, S. Di; Dominik, W.; Drozhzhova, T.; Dumarchez, J.; Dynowski, K.; Engel, R.; Ereditato, A.; Feofilov, G. A.; Fodor, Z.; Fulop, A.; Gaździcki, M.; Golubeva, M.; Grebieszkow, K.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Guber, F.; Haesler, A.; Hasegawa, T.; Hierholzer, M.; Idczak, R.; Igolkin, S.; Ivashkin, A.; Joković, D.; Kadija, K.; Kapoyannis, A.; Kaptur, E.; Kiełczewska, D.; Kirejczyk, M.; Kisiel, J.; Kiss, T.; Kleinfelder, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kolesnikov, V. I.; Kolev, D.; Kondratiev, V. P.; Korzenev, A.; Kovesarki, P.; Kowalski, S.; Krasnoperov, A.; Kurepin, A.; Larsen, D.; László, A.; Lyubushkin, V. V.; Maćkowiak-Pawłowska, M.; Majka, Z.; Maksiak, B.; Malakhov, A. I.; Manić, D.; Marcinek, A.; Marin, V.; Marton, K.; Mathes, H.-J.; Matulewicz, T.; Matveev, V.; Melkumov, G. L.; Mrówczyński, St.; Murphy, S.; Nakadaira, T.; Nirkko, M.; Nishikawa, K.; Palczewski, T.; Palla, G.; Panagiotou, A. D.; Paul, T.; Pistillo, C.; Peryt, W.; Petukhov, O.; Płaneta, R.; Pluta, J.; Popov, B. A.; Posiadała, M.; Puławski, S.; Puzović, J.; Rauch, W.; Ravonel, M.; Redij, A.; Renfordt, R.; Robert, A.; Röhrich, D.; Rondio, E.; Roth, M.; Rubbia, A.; Rustamov, A.; Rybczyński, M.; Sadovsky, A.; Sakashita, K.; Savić, M.; Schmidt, K.; Sekiguchi, T.; Seyboth, P.; Sgalaberna, D.; Shibata, M.; Sipos, R.; Skrzypczak, E.; Słodkowski, M.; Staszel, P.; Stefanek, G.; Stepaniak, J.; Ströbele, H.; Šuša, T.; Szuba, M.; Tada, M.; Tereshchenko, V.; Tolyhi, T.; Tsenov, R.; Turko, L.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Vassiliou, M.; Veberič, D.; Vechernin, V. V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vinogradov, L.; Wilczek, A.; Włodarczyk, Z.; Wojtaszek-Szwarc, A.; Wyszyński, O.; Zambelli, L.; Zipper, W.

    2014-03-01

    We present experimental results on inclusive spectra and mean multiplicities of negatively charged pions produced in inelastic p+p interactions at incident projectile momenta of 20, 31, 40, 80 and 158 GeV/ c ( 6.3, 7.7, 8.8, 12.3 and 17.3 GeV, respectively). The measurements were performed using the large acceptance NA61/SHINE hadron spectrometer at the CERN super proton synchrotron. Two-dimensional spectra are determined in terms of rapidity and transverse momentum. Their properties such as the width of rapidity distributions and the inverse slope parameter of transverse mass spectra are extracted and their collision energy dependences are presented. The results on inelastic p+p interactions are compared with the corresponding data on central Pb+Pb collisions measured by the NA49 experiment at the CERN SPS. The results presented in this paper are part of the NA61/SHINE ion program devoted to the study of the properties of the onset of deconfinement and search for the critical point of strongly interacting matter. They are required for interpretation of results on nucleus-nucleus and proton-nucleus collisions.

  6. Potentiation of photoinactivation of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria mediated by six phenothiazinium dyes by addition of azide ion.

    PubMed

    Kasimova, Kamola R; Sadasivam, Magesh; Landi, Giacomo; Sarna, Tadeusz; Hamblin, Michael R

    2014-11-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation (APDI) using phenothiazinium dyes is mediated by reactive oxygen species consisting of a combination of singlet oxygen (quenched by azide), hydroxyl radicals and other reactive oxygen species. We recently showed that addition of sodium azide paradoxically potentiated APDI of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria using methylene blue as the photosensitizer, and this was due to electron transfer to the dye triplet state from azide anion, producing azidyl radical. Here we compare this effect using six different homologous phenothiazinium dyes: methylene blue, toluidine blue O, new methylene blue, dimethylmethylene blue, azure A, and azure B. We found both significant potentiation (up to 2 logs) and also significant inhibition (>3 logs) of killing by adding 10 mM azide depending on Gram classification, washing the dye from the cells, and dye structure. Killing of E. coli was potentiated with all 6 dyes after a wash, while S. aureus killing was only potentiated by MB and TBO with a wash and DMMB with no wash. More lipophilic dyes (higher log P value, such as DMMB) were more likely to show potentiation. We conclude that the Type I photochemical mechanism (potentiation with azide) likely depends on the microenvironment, i.e. higher binding of dye to bacteria. Bacterial dye-binding is thought to be higher with Gram-negative compared to Gram-positive bacteria, when unbound dye has been washed away, and with more lipophilic dyes.

  7. Macroporous hydrogels based on 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate. Part 6: 3D hydrogels with positive and negative surface charges and polyelectrolyte complexes in spinal cord injury repair.

    PubMed

    Hejcl, A; Lesný, P; Prádný, M; Sedý, J; Zámecník, J; Jendelová, P; Michálek, J; Syková, E

    2009-07-01

    Macroporous hydrogels are artificial biomaterials commonly used in tissue engineering, including central nervous system (CNS) repair. Their physical properties may be modified to improve their adhesion properties and promote tissue regeneration. We implanted four types of hydrogels based on 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) with different surface charges inside a spinal cord hemisection cavity at the Th8 level in rats. The spinal cords were processed 1 and 6 months after implantation and histologically evaluated. Connective tissue deposition was most abundant in the hydrogels with positively-charged functional groups. Axonal regeneration was promoted in hydrogels carrying charged functional groups; hydrogels with positively charged functional groups showed increased axonal ingrowth into the central parts of the implant. Few astrocytes grew into the hydrogels. Our study shows that HEMA-based hydrogels carrying charged functional groups improve axonal ingrowth inside the implants compared to implants without any charge. Further, positively charged functional groups promote connective tissue infiltration and extended axonal regeneration inside a hydrogel bridge.

  8. Simulation of the transient indiffusion-segregation process of triply negatively charged Ga vacancies in GaAs and AlAs/GaAs superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Horng-Ming; Gösele, Ulrich M.; Tan, Teh Y.

    1993-08-01

    In GaAs and AlAs/GaAs superlattice crystals containing n-type regions, several sets of recent experimental results obtained from diffusion studies require the interpretation that the responsible point defect species, the triply negatively charged Ga vacancy (VGa3-), has attained its thermal equilibrium concentration (CVGa3-eq) at the onset of an experiment. This could be due to either the fact that under heavy n-doping conditions CVGa3-eq is fairly temperature independent, or the fact that the transient process of populating VGa3- from an undersaturated to the appropriate CVGa3-eq value via indiffusion from the surfaces to the interior of the crystals is extremely rapid. We have simulated the transient process of populating VGa3- to the crystal interior. The experiments use crystals consisting of adjacent intrinsic and n-type regions for which CVGa3-eq values are different, leading to the simultaneous occurrence of VGa3- diffusion and segregation phenomena. A diffusion-segregation equation has been derived and subsequently used in the simulation calculations. The simulation results showed that, as long as n-type regions are involved, such transient processes are ineffective and therefore cannot explain the experimental requirement that VGa3- is already present in the appropriate CVGa3-eq(n) value at the onset of an experiment. On the other hand, the transient process is sufficiently rapid for the purely intrinsic crystal cases. These simulation results support our recent finding that the CVGa3-eq(n) values are essentially temperature independent, obtained via a thermodynamic treatment.

  9. The influence of electron injection and charge recombination kinetics on the performance of porphyrin-sensitized solar cells: effects of the 4-tert-butylpyridine additive.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Cheng; Wu, Hui-Ping; Reddy, Nagannagari Masi; Lee, Hsuan-Wei; Lu, Hsueh-Pei; Yeh, Chen-Yu; Diau, Eric Wei-Guang

    2013-04-07

    The effects of the 4-tert-butylpyridine (TBP) additive in the electrolyte on photovoltaic performance of two push-pull porphyrin sensitizers (YD12 and YD12CN) were examined. Addition of TBP significantly increased the open-circuit voltage (VOC) for YD12 (from 550 to 729 mV) but it was to a lesser extent for YD12CN (from 544 to 636 mV); adding TBP also had the effect of reducing the short-circuit current density (JSC) slightly for YD12 (from 17.65 to 17.19 mA cm(-2)) but it led to a significant reduction for YD12CN (from 16.45 to 9.78 mA cm(-2)). The resulting power conversion efficiencies of the YD12 devices increase from 6.2% to 8.5% whereas those of the YD12CN devices decrease from 5.8% to 4.5%. Based on measurements of temporally resolved photoelectric transients of the devices and femtosecond fluorescence decays of thin-film samples, the poor performance of the YD12CN device in the presence of TBP can be understood as being due to the enhanced charge recombination, decreased electron injection, and a lesser extent of inhibition of the intermolecular energy transfer.

  10. Addition of positively charged tripeptide to N-terminus of the Fos basic region leucine zipper domain: implications on DNA bending, affinity, and specificity.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudi, T; Sarkar, B

    1999-09-01

    GKH-Fos(139-211)/Jun(248-334) (GKH: glycine-lysine-histidine) is a modified Fos/Jun heterodimer designed to contain a metal binding motif in the form of a GKH tripeptide at the amino terminus of Fos bZIP domain dimerized with the Jun basic region leucine zipper (bZIP) domain. We examined the effect of the addition of positively charged GKH motif to the N-terminus of Fos(139-211) on the DNA binding characteristics of the Fos(139-211)/Jun(248-334) heterodimer. Binding studies indicate that while the nonspecific DNA binding affinity of the GKH modified heterodimer increases 4-fold, it specifically binds the activating protein-1 (AP-1) site 6-fold less tightly than the control unmodified counterpart. Furthermore, helical phasing analysis indicates that GKH-Fos(139-211)/Jun(248-334) and control Fos(139-211)/Jun(248-334) both bend the DNA at the AP-1 site toward the minor groove. However, due to the presence of the positively charged GKH motif on Fos, the degree of the induced bend by GKH- Fos(139-211)/Jun(248-334) is greater than that induced by the unmodified Fos/Jun heterodimer. Our results suggest that the unfavorable energetic cost of the increased DNA bending by GKH-Fos(139-211)/Jun(248-334) results in a decrease in both specificity and affinity of binding of the heterodimer to the AP-1 site. These findings may have important implications in protein design as well in our understanding of DNA bending and factors responsible for the functional specificity of different members of the bZIP family of transcription factors.

  11. Towards a better understanding of the nucleation behavior of α and γ polymorphs of glycine from aqueous solution in the presence of selective additives by charge compensation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renuka Devi, K.; Srinivasan, K.

    2014-09-01

    The type of polymorphic nucleation of glycine observed at any instant of time mainly depends on the charge environment of the experimental solution and this is discussed based on the perspective of charge compensation mechanism among the molecular species. The nucleation of α takes place due to self-charge compensation by glycine molecules whereas, γ nucleation occurs by overcoming of self-charge compensation by induced charge compensation in smaller proportions through the charged ions of the externally added induced charge compensators sodium nitrate (ICCNaNO3) and sodium hydroxide (ICCNaOH). The overcoming of self-charge compensation occurs at the critical concentration of the induced charge compensators. Nucleation behaviour of the glycine polymorphs obtained in the present work has been compared with that obtained in our previous work with sodium acetate as ICC. Influence of these ICC charged ions on the solubility, pH, supersaturation, induction time, nucleation and growth of the nucleated polymorphs were studied. Structural conformation and probability nucleation ratio of the nucleated polymorphs were confirmed by powder x-ray diffraction.

  12. Crossing behavior of the singlet and triplet state of the negatively charged magnetoexciton in a GaAs/Al0.55Ga0.45As quantum well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munteanu, F. M.; Kim, Yongmin; Perry, C. H.; Rickel, D. G.; Simmons, J. A.; Reno, J. L.

    2000-02-01

    Polarized magnetophotoluminescence (MPL) measurements on a high-mobility δ-doped GaAs/Al0.55Ga0.45As single quantum well from 0 to 60 T at temperatures between 0.37 and 2.1 K are reported. In addition to the neutral heavy-hole magnetoexciton (X0), the singlet (X-s) and triplet (X-t) states of the negatively charged magnetoexciton are observed in both polarizations. The energy-dispersive and time-resolved MPL data suggest that their development is fundamentally related to the formation of the neutral magnetoexciton. At a magnetic field of 40 T the singlet and the triplet states cross as a result of the role played by the higher Landau levels and higher-energy subbands in their energetic evolution, confirming theoretical predictions. We also observed the formation of two higher-energy peaks. One of them is completely right circularly polarized and its appearance can be considered a result of the electron-hole exchange interaction enhancement with an associated electron g factor of 3.7 times the bulk value. The other peak completely dominates the MPL spectrum at fields around 30 T. Its behavior with magnetic field and temperature indicates that it may be related to previous anomalies observed in the integer and fractional quantum Hall regimes.

  13. Photoionization of chlorophyll a in rapidly frozen phospholipid vesicle solutions: Effects of phospholipid headgroup variation and addition of synthetic charged surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    Hiff, T.; Kevan, L. )

    1989-03-09

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) has been applied to measure the photoionization yield of chlorophyll a (Chla) after red-light irradiation with or without electron scavengers in frozen phospholipid vesicles differing in the nature of their headgroups. Along with the Chla monomeric cation, oligomeric cations have been detected. For anionic headgroups the photoionization yield is found to be half or less than that observed with the zwitterionic choline headgroup. A decrease of the yield is also observed when increasing amounts of anionic sodium dihexadecyl phosphate (DHP) are added to vary the surface charge of mixed vesicles. Electron spin echo (ESE) experiments in samples prepared with tetrabromo-P-benzoquinone (TBBQ) showed that the average location of the TBBQ radical anion is not sensitive to DHP addition. At low Chla concentration, the photoionization yield is increased more than 2-fold in dioctadecyldimethylammonium chloride (DODAC) cationic vesicles, prepared in pure water without electron scavengers, compared to the yield in similar dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), vesicles. An increase in yield is also seen in mixed DPPC/DODAC vesicles at low Chla concentration. The results are discussed in terms of electrostatic barriers influencing electron transfer.

  14. Analytical modeling and simulation of electrochemical charge/discharge behavior of Si thin film negative electrodes in Li-ion cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagannathan, M.; Chandran, K. S. Ravi

    2014-02-01

    Physically-based analytical models that provide insights into the diffusion and/or interface charge transfer effects in bulk (lithiating/delithiating) electrodes are needed to truly assess the performance/limitations of electrode materials for Li-ion batteries. In this context, an analytical modeling framework is constructed here to predict the electrochemical charge-discharge characteristics during lithiation and delithiation of solid amorphous Si (a-Si) thin film electrodes. The framework includes analytical expressions that satisfy Fick's second law for Li transport and the requisite flux boundary conditions of lithiation and delithiation steps. The expressions are derived here by the method of separation of variables. They enable the determination of transient Li concentration profiles in the thin film electrode as a function of state of charge/discharge. The time-dependent electrode surface concentrations (at the electrode-electrolyte interface) obtained from these profiles were used to determine the activation overpotentials and thus, the non-equilibrium cell potentials, as a function of state of charge/discharge using Butler-Volmer kinetics. The simulated charge/discharge characteristics agreed well with the experimental data of a-Si thin film electrodes obtained at different C-rates. The model offers insights into how the charge-discharge behavior is controlled by diffusion limitation within electrode and/or the activation overpotentials at the interface. The analytical framework is also shown to predict successfully the hysteretic behavior of lithiation/delithiation voltage curves.

  15. Electrical Charging of the Clouds of Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, William J.; Whitten, R. C.; Bakes, E. L. O.

    2003-01-01

    We have used recent data on graphitic cloud particles in the atmosphere or Titan to compute the electrical charging of the particles (radii ranging from 0.01 microns to 0.26 microns). The charging on the nightside was rather similar to that obtained earlier (Borucki et al, Icarus, 72, 604-622, 1987) except that charge distributions on the particles are now computed and recently obtained cloud particle sizes and density distributions were employed. The negative charge on particles of 0.26 microns peaked at 9 at 150 km altitude. The computations were repeated for the dayside with the addition of photoelectron emission by the particles as a result of the absorption of solar UV radiation. Particles (except the very smallest) now became positively charged with particles of radius 0.26 microns being charged up to +47. Next, very small particles (radii approximately 3 x 10^-4 microns) of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were introduced and treated as sources of negative ions since they could be either neutral or carry one negative charge. Moreover, they are mobile so that they had to be treated like molecular size negative ions although much more massive. They had the effect of substantially reducing the electron densities in the altitude range 190 to 310 km to values less than the negative PAH densities and increasing the peak electron charge on the larger particles. Particles of radius 0.26 microns bore peak charges of plus or minus 47 at altitudes of approximately 250 km. The simulated effect of PAHs on the nightside proved to be much less pronounced; at the peak negative PAH density, it was less than the electron density. The physics governing these results will be discussed.

  16. Analysis of the kinetics of P+ HA- recombination in membrane-embedded wild-type and mutant Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centers between 298 and 77 K indicates that the adjacent negatively charged QA ubiquinone modulates the free energy of P+ HA- and may influence the rate of the protein dielectric response.

    PubMed

    Gibasiewicz, Krzysztof; Pajzderska, Maria; Dobek, Andrzej; Brettel, Klaus; Jones, Michael R

    2013-09-26

    Time-resolved spectroscopic studies of recombination of the P(+)HA(-) radical pair in photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides give an opportunity to study protein dynamics triggered by light and occurring over the lifetime of P(+)HA(-). The state P(+)HA(-) is formed after the ultrafast light-induced electron transfer from the primary donor pair of bacteriochlorophylls (P) to the acceptor bacteriopheophytin (HA). In order to increase the lifetime of this state, and thus increase the temporal window for the examination of protein dynamics, it is possible to block forward electron transfer from HA(-) to the secondary electron acceptor QA. In this contribution, the dynamics of P(+)HA(-) recombination were compared at a range of temperatures from 77 K to room temperature, electron transfer from HA(-) to QA being blocked either by prereduction of QA or by genetic removal of QA. The observed P(+)HA(-) charge recombination was significantly slower in the QA-deficient RCs, and in both types of complexes, lowering the temperature from RT to 77 K led to a slowing of charge recombination. The effects are explained in the frame of a model in which charge recombination occurs via competing pathways, one of which is thermally activated and includes transient formation of a higher-energy state, P(+)BA(-). An internal electrostatic field supplied by the negative charge on QA increases the free energy levels of the state P(+)HA(-), thus decreasing its energetic distance to the state P(+)BA(-). In addition, the dielectric response of the protein environment to the appearance of the state P(+)HA(-) is accelerated from ∼50-100 ns in the QA-deficient mutant RCs to ∼1-16 ns in WT RCs with a negatively charged QA(-). In both cases, the temperature dependence of the protein dynamics is weak.

  17. Matrix assisted ionization: new aromatic and nonaromatic matrix compounds producing multiply charged lipid, peptide, and protein ions in the positive and negative mode observed directly from surfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Inutan, Ellen D; Wang, Beixi; Lietz, Christopher B; Green, Daniel R; Manly, Cory D; Richards, Alicia L; Marshall, Darrell D; Lingenfelter, Steven; Ren, Yue; Trimpin, Sarah

    2012-10-01

    Matrix assisted inlet ionization (MAII) is a method in which a matrix:analyte mixture produces mass spectra nearly identical to electrospray ionization without the application of a voltage or the use of a laser as is required in laserspray ionization (LSI), a subset of MAII. In MAII, the sample is introduced by, for example, tapping particles of dried matrix:analyte into the inlet of the mass spectrometer and, therefore, permits the study of conditions pertinent to the formation of multiply charged ions without the need of absorption at a laser wavelength. Crucial for the production of highly charged ions are desolvation conditions to remove matrix molecules from charged matrix:analyte clusters. Important factors affecting desolvation include heat, vacuum, collisions with gases and surfaces, and even radio frequency fields. Other parameters affecting multiply charged ion production is sample preparation, including pH and solvent composition. Here, findings from over 100 compounds found to produce multiply charged analyte ions using MAII with the inlet tube set at 450 °C are presented. Of the compounds tested, many have -OH or -NH(2) functionality, but several have neither (e.g., anthracene), nor aromaticity or conjugation. Binary matrices are shown to be applicable for LSI and solvent-free sample preparation can be applied to solubility restricted compounds, and matrix compounds too volatile to allow drying from common solvents. Our findings suggest that the physical properties of the matrix such as its morphology after evaporation of the solvent, its propensity to evaporate/sublime, and its acidity are more important than its structure and functional groups.

  18. 41 CFR 301-52.23 - Is the additional fee, which is equal to any late payment charge that the card contractor would...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES ARRANGING FOR TRAVEL SERVICES, PAYING TRAVEL EXPENSES, AND CLAIMING REIMBURSEMENT 52-CLAIMING REIMBURSEMENT § 301-52.23 Is the... charge had I not paid the bill, considered income? Yes, your agency will report this payment...

  19. 41 CFR 301-52.23 - Is the additional fee, which is equal to any late payment charge that the card contractor would...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES ARRANGING FOR TRAVEL SERVICES, PAYING TRAVEL EXPENSES, AND CLAIMING REIMBURSEMENT 52-CLAIMING REIMBURSEMENT § 301-52.23 Is the... charge had I not paid the bill, considered income? Yes, your agency will report this payment...

  20. Negative Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galbraith, Mary J.

    1974-01-01

    Examination of models for representing integers demonstrates that formal operational thought is required for establishing the operations on integers. Advocated is the use of many models for introducing negative numbers but, apart from addition, it is recommended that operations on integers be delayed until the formal operations stage. (JP)

  1. Effects of drying control chemical additive on properties of Li 4Ti 5O 12 negative powders prepared by spray pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Seo Hee; Kang, Yun Chan

    High-density Li 4Ti 5O 12 powders comprising spherical particles are prepared by spray pyrolysis from a solution containing dimethylacetamide (drying control chemical additive) and citric acid and ethylene glycol (organic additives). The prepared powders have high discharge capacities and good cycle properties. The optimum concentration of dimethylacetamide is 0.5 M. The addition of dimethylacetamide to the polymeric spray solutions containing citric acid and ethylene glycol helps in the effective control of the morphology of the Li 4Ti 5O 12 powders. At a constant current density of 0.17 mA g -1, the initial discharge capacities of the powders obtained from the spray solution with and without the organic additives are 171 and 167 mAh g -1, respectively.

  2. Space charge and charge trapping characteristics of cross-linked polyethylene subjected to ac electric stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Y. L.; Chen, G.; Miyake, H.; Matsui, K.; Tanaka, Y.; Takada, T.

    2006-04-01

    This paper reports on the result of space charge evolution in cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) planar samples approximately 220 µm thick. The space charge measurement technique used in this study is the pulsed electroacoustic method. There are two phases to this experiment. In the first phase, the samples were subjected to dc 30 kVdc mm-1 and ac (sinusoidal) electric stress levels of 30 kVpk mm-1 at frequencies of 1, 10 and 50 Hz ac. In addition, ac space charge under 30 kVrms mm-1 and 60 kVpk mm-1 electric stress at 50 Hz was also investigated. The volts-off results showed that the amount of charge trapped in XLPE sample under dc electric stress is significantly bigger than samples under ac stress even when the applied ac stresses are substantially higher. The second phase of the experiment involves studying the dc space charge evolution in samples that were tested under ac stress during the first phase of the experiment. Ac ageing causes positive charge to become more dominant over negative charge. It was also discovered that ac ageing creates deeper traps, particularly for negative charge. This paper also gives a brief overview of the data processing methods used to analyse space charge under ac electric stress.

  3. Effect of oxyfluorinated multi-walled carbon nanotube additives on positive temperature coefficient/negative temperature coefficient behavior in high-density polyethylene polymeric switches

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Byong Chol; Kang, Seok Chang; Im, Ji Sun; Lee, Se Hyun; Lee, Young-Seak

    2011-09-15

    Graphical abstract: The electrical properties of MWCNT-filled HDPE polymeric switches and their effect on oxyfluorination. Highlights: {yields} Oxyfluorinated MWCNTs were used to reduce the PTC/NTC phenomenon in MWCNT-filled HDPE polymeric switches. {yields} Electron mobility is difficult in MWCNT particles when the number of oxygen functional groups (C-O, C=O) increases by oxyfluorination. {yields} A mechanism of improved electrical properties of oxyfluorinated MWCNT-filled HDPE polymeric switches was suggested. -- Abstract: Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were embedded into high-density polyethylene (HDPE) to improve the electrical properties of HDPE polymeric switches. The MWCNT surfaces were modified by oxyfluorination to improve their positive temperature coefficient (PTC) and negative temperature coefficient (NTC) behaviors in HDPE polymeric switches. HDPE polymeric switches exhibit poor electron mobility between MWCNT particles when the number of oxygen functional groups is increased by oxyfluorination. Thus, the PTC intensity of HDPE polymeric switches was increased by the destruction of the electrical conductivity network. The oxyfluorination of MWCNTs also leads to weak NTC behavior in the MWCNT-filled HDPE polymeric switches. This result is attributed to the reduction of the mutual attraction between the MWCNT particles at the melting temperature of HDPE, which results from a decrease in the surface free energy of the C-F bond in MWCNT particles.

  4. Expression of Dominant-Negative Thyroid Hormone Receptor Alpha1 in Leydig and Sertoli Cells Demonstrates No Additional Defect Compared with Expression in Sertoli Cells Only

    PubMed Central

    Fumel, Betty; Froment, Pascal; Holzenberger, Martin; Livera, Gabriel; Monget, Philippe; Fouchécourt, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Background In the testis, thyroid hormone (T3) regulates the number of gametes produced through its action on Sertoli cell proliferation. However, the role of T3 in the regulation of steroidogenesis is still controversial. Methods The TRαAMI knock-in allele allows the generation of transgenic mice expressing a dominant-negative TRα1 (thyroid receptor α1) isoform restricted to specific target cells after Cre-loxP recombination. Here, we introduced this mutant allele in both Sertoli and Leydig cells using a novel aromatase-iCre (ARO-iCre) line that expresses Cre recombinase under control of the human Cyp19(IIa)/aromatase promoter. Findings We showed that loxP recombination induced by this ARO-iCre is restricted to male and female gonads, and is effective in Sertoli and Leydig cells, but not in germ cells. We compared this model with the previous introduction of TRαAMI specifically in Sertoli cells in order to investigate T3 regulation of steroidogenesis. We demonstrated that TRαAMI-ARO males exhibited increased testis weight, increased sperm reserve in adulthood correlated to an increased proliferative index at P3 in vivo, and a loss of T3-response in vitro. Nevertheless, TRαAMI-ARO males showed normal fertility. This phenotype is similar to TRαAMI-SC males. Importantly, plasma testosterone and luteinizing hormone levels, as well as mRNA levels of steroidogenesis enzymes StAR, Cyp11a1 and Cyp17a1 were not affected in TRαAMI-ARO. Conclusions/Significance We concluded that the presence of a mutant TRαAMI allele in both Leydig and Sertoli cells does not accentuate the phenotype in comparison with its presence in Sertoli cells only. This suggests that direct T3 regulation of steroidogenesis through TRα1 is moderate in Leydig cells, and that Sertoli cells are the main target of T3 action in the testis. PMID:25793522

  5. Multiplicity distribution and spectra of negatively charged hadrons in Au+Au collisions at square root of (sNN) = 130 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Allgower, C; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bichsel, H; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Bossingham, R; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Caines, H; Calderón De La Barca Sánchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, M L; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Conin, L; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; DeMello, M; Deng, W S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Grabski, J; Grachov, O; Greiner, D; Grigoriev, V; Guedon, M; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heffner, M; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Hümmler, H; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Y I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Konstantinov, A S; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R K; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamas-Valverde, J; Lamont, M A; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lebedev, A; LeCompte, T; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; Leszczynski, P; LeVine, M J; Li, Q; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; LoCurto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Lynn, D; Majka, R; Maliszewski, A; Margetis, S; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Y A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Y; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mitchell, J; Moiseenko, V A; Moltz, D; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Mutchler, G S; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Pinganaud, W; Platner, E; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Radomski, S; Rai, G; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, C; Russ, D; Rykov, V; Sakrejda, I; Sandweiss, J; Saulys, A C; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schweda, K; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schüttauf, A; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Shvetcov, V S; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Stroebele, H; Struck, C; Suaide, A A; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Symons, T J; Szanto De Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Turner, K; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vanyashin, A; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Voloshin, S A; Wang, F; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Wenaus, T; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yokosawa, A; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, W M; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

    2001-09-10

    The minimum-bias multiplicity distribution and the transverse momentum and pseudorapidity distributions for central collisions have been measured for negative hadrons ( h(-)) in Au+Au interactions at square root of ([s(NN)]) = 130 GeV. The multiplicity density at midrapidity for the 5% most central interactions is dN(h(-))/d(eta)/(eta = 0) = 280+/-1(stat)+/-20(syst), an increase per participant of 38% relative to pp collisions at the same energy. The mean transverse momentum is 0.508+/-0.012 GeV/c and is larger than in central Pb+Pb collisions at lower energies. The scaling of the h(-) yield per participant is a strong function of p( perpendicular). The pseudorapidity distribution is almost constant within /eta/<1.

  6. 41 CFR 301-71.213 - Is the additional fee, which is the equivalent to any late payment charge that the card...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 71-AGENCY TRAVEL ACCOUNTABILITY REQUIREMENTS Travel Claims for Reimbursement... must report this late payment fee as additional wages on Form W-2....

  7. 41 CFR 301-71.213 - Is the additional fee, which is the equivalent to any late payment charge that the card...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 71-AGENCY TRAVEL ACCOUNTABILITY REQUIREMENTS Travel Claims for Reimbursement... must report this late payment fee as additional wages on Form W-2....

  8. Nanoparticle coagulation in fractionally charged and charge fluctuating dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nunomura, Shota; Kondo, Michio; Shiratani, Masaharu; Koga, Kazunori; Watanabe, Yukio

    2008-08-15

    The kinetics of nanoparticle coagulation has been studied in fractionally charged and charge fluctuating dusty plasmas. The coagulation occurs when the mutual collision frequency among nanoparticles exceeds their charging and decharging/neutralization frequency. Interestingly, the coagulation is suppressed while a fraction (several percent) of nanoparticles are negatively charged in a plasma, in which stochastic charging plays an important role. A model is developed to predict a phase diagram of the coagulation and its suppression.

  9. Influence of negatively charged plume grains on the structure of Enceladus' Alfvén wings: Hybrid simulations versus Cassini Magnetometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriegel, Hendrik; Simon, Sven; Motschmann, Uwe; Saur, Joachim; Neubauer, Fritz M.; Persoon, Ann M.; Dougherty, Michele K.; Gurnett, Donald A.

    2011-10-01

    We apply the hybrid simulation code AIKEF (adaptive ion kinetic electron fluid) to the interaction between Enceladus' plume and Saturn's magnetospheric plasma. For the first time, the influence of the electron-absorbing dust grains in the plume on the plasma structures and magnetic field perturbation, the Alfvén wing, is taken into account within the framework of a global simulation. Our work continues the analytical calculations by Simon et al. (2011), who showed that electron absorption within the plume leads to a negative sign of the Hall conductivity. The resulting twist of the magnetic field, referred to as the Anti-Hall effect, has been observed during all targeted Enceladus flybys between 2005 and 2010. We show that (1) applying a plume model that considers both, the neutral gas and the dust allow us to quantitatively explain Cassini Magnetometer (MAG) data, (2) dust enhances the anti-Saturnward deflection of the ions, causing asymmetries which are evident in the MAG data, and (3) the ions in the plume are slowed down below 1 km s-1; and we compare our results to MAG data in order to systematically analyze variations in the plume activity and orientation for selected pairs of similar flybys: (E5, E6), (E7, E9) and (E8, E11).

  10. Immediate postoperative radiotherapy in residual nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma: Beneficial effect on local control without additional negative impact on pituitary function and life expectancy

    SciTech Connect

    Bergh, Alfons C.M. van den . E-mail: a.c.m.van.den.bergh@rt.umcg.nl; Berg, Gerrit van den; Schoorl, Michiel A.; Sluiter, Wim J.; Vliet, Anton M. van der; Hoving, Eelco W.; Szabo, Ben G.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R.; Dullaart, Robin P.F.

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the benefit of immediate postoperative radiotherapy in residual nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma (NFA) in perspective to the need for hormonal substitution and life expectancy. Methods and Materials: Retrospective cohort analysis of 122 patients, operated for NFA between 1979 and 1998. Recurrence was defined as regrowth on computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. The occurrence of hormonal deficiencies was defined as the starting date of hormonal substitution therapy. Results: Seventy-six patients had residual NFA after surgery and received immediate postoperative radiotherapy (Group 1); three patients developed a recurrence, resulting in a 95% local control rate at 10 years. Twenty-eight patients had residual NFA after surgery, but were followed by a wait-and-see policy (Group 2). Sixteen developed a recurrence, resulting in a local control rate of 49% at 5 years and 22% at 10 years (p < 0.001 compared with Group 1). There were no differences between Group 1 and 2 regarding the need for substitution with thyroid hormone, glucocorticoids, and sex hormones before first surgery, directly after surgery and at end of follow-up. There were no differences in hormone substitution free survival between Group 1 and Group 2 during the study period after first surgery. Life expectancy was similar in Group 1 and 2, and their median life expectancy did not differ from median life expectancy in the general population. Conclusions: Immediate postoperative radiotherapy provides a marked improvement of local control among patients with residual NFA compared with surgery alone, without an additional deleterious effect on pituitary function and life expectancy.

  11. Non-additive Empirical Force Fields for Short-Chain Linear Alcohols: Methanol to Butanol. Hydration Free Energetics and Kirkwood-Buff Analysis Using Charge Equilibration Models

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yang; Patel, Sandeep

    2010-01-01

    Building upon the nonadditive electrostatic force field for alcohols based on the CHARMM charge equilibration (CHEQ) formalism, we introduce atom-pair specific solute-solvent Lennard-Jones (LJ) parameters for alcohol-water interaction force fields targeting improved agreement with experimental hydration free energies of a series of small molecule linear alcohols as well as ab initio water-alcohol geometries and energetics. We consider short-chain, linear alcohols from methanol to butanol as they are canonical small-molecule organic model compounds to represent the hydroxyl chemical functionality for parameterizing biomolecular force fields for proteins. We discuss molecular dynamics simulations of dilute aqueous solutions of methanol and ethanol in TIP4P-FQ water, with particular discussion of solution densities, structure defined in radial distribution functions, electrostatic properties (dipole moment distributions), hydrogen bonding patterns of water, as well as a Kirkwood-Buff (KB) integral analysis. Calculation of the latter provides an assessment of how well classical force fields parameterized to at least semi-quantitatively match experimental hydration free energies capture the microscopic structures of dilute alcohol solutions; the latter translate into macroscopic thermodynamic properties through the application of KB analysis. We find that the CHEQ alcohol force fields of this work semi-quantitatively match experimental KB integrals for methanol and ethanol mole fractions of 0.1 and 0.2. The force field combination qualitatively captures the concentration dependence of the alcohol-alcohol and water-water KB integrals, but due to inadequacies in the representation of the microscopic structures in such systems (which cannot be parameterized in any systematic fashion), a priori quantitative description of alcohol-water KB integrals remains elusive. PMID:20687517

  12. PVP-coated, negatively charged silver nanoparticles: A multi-center study of their physicochemical characteristics, cell culture and in vivo experiments

    PubMed Central

    Ahlberg, Sebastian; Antonopulos, Alexandra; Diendorf, Jörg; Dringen, Ralf; Flöck, Rebekka; Goedecke, Wolfgang; Graf, Christina; Haberl, Nadine; Helmlinger, Jens; Herzog, Fabian; Heuer, Frederike; Hirn, Stephanie; Johannes, Christian; Kittler, Stefanie; Köller, Manfred; Korn, Katrin; Kreyling, Wolfgang G; Krombach, Fritz; Lademann, Jürgen; Loza, Kateryna; Luther, Eva M; Malissek, Marcelina; Meinke, Martina C; Nordmeyer, Daniel; Pailliart, Anne; Raabe, Jörg; Rancan, Fiorenza; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Rühl, Eckart; Schleh, Carsten; Seibel, Andreas; Sengstock, Christina; Treuel, Lennart; Vogt, Annika; Weber, Katrin; Zellner, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    Summary PVP-capped silver nanoparticles with a diameter of the metallic core of 70 nm, a hydrodynamic diameter of 120 nm and a zeta potential of −20 mV were prepared and investigated with regard to their biological activity. This review summarizes the physicochemical properties (dissolution, protein adsorption, dispersability) of these nanoparticles and the cellular consequences of the exposure of a broad range of biological test systems to this defined type of silver nanoparticles. Silver nanoparticles dissolve in water in the presence of oxygen. In addition, in biological media (i.e., in the presence of proteins) the surface of silver nanoparticles is rapidly coated by a protein corona that influences their physicochemical and biological properties including cellular uptake. Silver nanoparticles are taken up by cell-type specific endocytosis pathways as demonstrated for hMSC, primary T-cells, primary monocytes, and astrocytes. A visualization of particles inside cells is possible by X-ray microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, and combined FIB/SEM analysis. By staining organelles, their localization inside the cell can be additionally determined. While primary brain astrocytes are shown to be fairly tolerant toward silver nanoparticles, silver nanoparticles induce the formation of DNA double-strand-breaks (DSB) and lead to chromosomal aberrations and sister-chromatid exchanges in Chinese hamster fibroblast cell lines (CHO9, K1, V79B). An exposure of rats to silver nanoparticles in vivo induced a moderate pulmonary toxicity, however, only at rather high concentrations. The same was found in precision-cut lung slices of rats in which silver nanoparticles remained mainly at the tissue surface. In a human 3D triple-cell culture model consisting of three cell types (alveolar epithelial cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells), adverse effects were also only found at high silver concentrations. The silver ions that are released from silver nanoparticles may be harmful

  13. Crystallization of a complex between human CDK6 and a virus-encoded cyclin is critically dependent on the addition of small charged organic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Schulze-Gahmne, Ursula; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2001-07-06

    Human CDK6 plays an important role in controlling entry into the eucaryotic cell cycle. An activated complex of human CDK6 with a viral cyclin from herpesvirus saimiri was purified to homogeneity and crystallized using polyethylene glycol 3350 as precipitant. Crystallization was critically dependent on a narrow range of Ca Acetate concentration and the presence of Sulfo-betaine 201 as additive. Crystals belong to the hexagonal space group P6122 or P6522 with unit cell parameters a = b = 70.14 Angstrom, c = 448.77 Angstrom, g = 120 degrees and diffract X-rays to at least 3.1 Angstrom resolution.

  14. Electrical Charging of Aerosols and Conductivity of Titan's Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, W. J.; Whitten, R. C.; Tripathi, S. N.; Bakes, E. L. O.; Barth, E.

    2004-01-01

    We have used recent data on graphitic cloud particles in the atmosphere of Titan to compute the electrical charging of the particles (radii ranging from 0.01 microns to 0.26 microns). The charging on the nightside was rather similar to that obtained earlier except that charge distributions on the particles are now computed and recently obtained cloud particle sizes and density distributions were employed. The negative charge on particles of 0.26 microns peaked at 9 at 150 km altitude. The computations were repeated for the dayside with the addition of photoelectron emission by the particles as a result of the absorption of solar UV radiation. Particles (except the very smallest) now became positively charged with particles of radius 0.26 microns being charged up to +47. Next, very small particles (radii approx. 3 x 10 (sup -4) microns) of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were introduced and treated as sources of negative ions since they could be either neutral or carry one negative charge. Moreover, they are mobile so that they had to be treated like molecular size negative ions although much more massive. They had the effect of substantially reducing the electron densities in the altitude range 190 to 310 km to values less than the negative PAH densities and increasing the peak electron charge on the larger particles. Particles of radius 0.26 microns bore peak charges of approx. +47 at altitudes of approx. 250 km. The simulated effect of PAHs on the nightside proved to be much less pronounced; at the peak negative PAH density, it was less than the electron density. The physics governing these results will be discussed.

  15. Detection of heavy-metal ions using liquid crystal droplet patterns modulated by interaction between negatively charged carboxylate and heavy-metal cations.

    PubMed

    Han, Gyeo-Re; Jang, Chang-Hyun

    2014-10-01

    Herein, we demonstrated a simple, sensitive, and rapid label-free detection method for heavy-metal (HM) ions using liquid crystal (LC) droplet patterns on a solid surface. Stearic-acid-doped LC droplet patterns were spontaneously generated on an n-octyltrichlorosilane (OTS)-treated glass substrate by evaporating a solution of the nematic LC, 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl (5CB), dissolved in heptane. The optical appearance of the droplet patterns was a dark crossed texture when in contact with air, which represents the homeotropic orientation of the LC. This was caused by the steric interaction between the LC molecules and the alkyl chains of the OTS-treated surface. The dark crossed appearance of the acid-doped LC patterns was maintained after the addition of phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution (pH 8.1 at 25°C). The deprotonated stearic-acid molecules self-assembled through the LC/aqueous interface, thereby supporting the homeotropic anchoring of 5CB. However, the optical image of the acid-doped LC droplet patterns incubated with PBS containing HM ions appeared bright, indicating a planar orientation of 5CB at the aqueous/LC droplet interface. This dark to bright transition of the LC patterns was caused by HM ions attached to the deprotonated carboxylate moiety, followed by the sequential interruption of the self-assembly of the stearic acid at the LC/aqueous interface. The results showed that the acid-doped LC pattern system not only enabled the highly sensitive detection of HM ions at a sub-nanomolar concentration but it also facilitated rapid detection (<10 min) with simple procedures.

  16. Survey of International Space Station Charging Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craven, P. D.; Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.; Minow, Joseph I.; Coffey, Victoria N.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Ferguson, Dale C.; Parker, Linda N.

    2009-01-01

    With the negative grounding of the 160V Photovoltaic (PV) arrays, the International Space Station (ISS) can experience varied and interesting charging events. Since August 2006, there has been a multi-probe p ackage, called the Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU), availa ble to provide redundant measurements of the floating potential of th e ISS as well as the density and temperature of the local plasma environment. The FPMU has been operated during intermittent data campaigns since August 2006 and has collected over 160 days of information reg arding the charging of the ISS as it has progressed in configuration from one to three PV arrays and with various additional modules such as the European Space Agency?s Columbus laboratory and the Japan Aeros pace Exploration Agency's Kibo laboratory. This paper summarizes the charging of the ISS and the local environmental conditions that contr ibute to those charging events, both as measured by the FPMU.

  17. Like-charge attraction and opposite-charge decomplexation between polymers and DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyukdagli, Sahin

    2017-02-01

    We scrutinize the effect of polyvalent ions on polymer-DNA interactions. We extend a recently developed test-charge theory [S. Buyukdagli et al., Phys. Rev. E 94, 042502 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevE.94.042502] to the case of a stiff polymer interacting with a DNA molecule in an electrolyte mixture. The theory accounts for one-loop level electrostatic correlation effects such as the ionic cloud deformation around the strongly charged DNA molecule as well as image-charge forces induced by the low DNA permittivity. Our model can reproduce and explain various characteristics of the experimental phase diagrams for polymer solutions. First, the addition of polyvalent cations to the electrolyte solution results in the attraction of the negatively charged polymer by the DNA molecule. The glue of the like-charge attraction is the enhanced shielding of the polymer charges by the dense counterion layer at the DNA surface. Second, through the shielding of the DNA-induced electrostatic potential, mono- and polyvalent cations of large concentration both suppress the like-charge attraction. Within the same formalism, we also predict a new opposite-charge repulsion effect between the DNA molecule and a positively charged polymer. In the presence of polyvalent anions such as sulfate or phosphate, their repulsion by the DNA charges leads to the charge screening deficiency of the region around the DNA molecule. This translates into a repulsive force that results in the decomplexation of the polymer from DNA. This opposite-charge repulsion phenomenon can be verified by current experiments and the underlying mechanism can be beneficial to gene therapeutic applications where the control over polymer-DNA interactions is the key factor.

  18. Charge balancing in GaN-based 2-D electron gas devices employing an additional 2-D hole gas and its influence on dynamic behaviour of GaN-based heterostructure field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Herwig Reuters, Benjamin; Geipel, Sascha; Schauerte, Meike; Kalisch, Holger; Vescan, Andrei; Benkhelifa, Fouad; Ambacher, Oliver

    2015-03-14

    GaN-based heterostructure FETs (HFETs) featuring a 2-D electron gas (2DEG) can offer very attractive device performance for power-switching applications. This performance can be assessed by evaluation of the dynamic on-resistance R{sub on,dyn} vs. the breakdown voltage V{sub bd}. In literature, it has been shown that with a high V{sub bd}, R{sub on,dyn} is deteriorated. The impairment of R{sub on,dyn} is mainly driven by electron injection into surface, barrier, and buffer traps. Electron injection itself depends on the electric field which typically peaks at the gate edge towards the drain. A concept suitable to circumvent this issue is the charge-balancing concept which employs a 2-D hole gas (2DHG) on top of the 2DEG allowing for the electric field peak to be suppressed. Furthermore, the 2DEG concentration in the active channel cannot decrease by a change of the surface potential. Hence, beside an improvement in breakdown voltage, also an improvement in dynamic behaviour can be expected. Whereas the first aspect has already been demonstrated, the second one has not been under investigation so far. Hence, in this report, the effect of charge-balancing is discussed and its impact on the dynamic characteristics of HFETs is evaluated. It will be shown that with appropriate device design, the dynamic behaviour of HFETs can be improved by inserting an additional 2DHG.

  19. New insight in the structural features of haloadaptation in α-amylases from halophilic Archaea following homology modeling strategy: folded and stable conformation maintained through low hydrophobicity and highly negative charged surface.

    PubMed

    Zorgani, Mohamed Amine; Patron, Kevin; Desvaux, Mickaël

    2014-07-01

    Proteins from halophilic archaea, which live in extreme saline conditions, have evolved to remain folded, active and stable at very high ionic strengths. Understanding the mechanism of haloadaptation is the first step toward engineering of halostable biomolecules. Amylases are one of the main enzymes used in industry. Yet, no three-dimensional structure has been experimentally resolved for α-amylases from halophilic archaea. In this study, homology structure modeling of α-amylases from the halophilic archaea Haloarcula marismortui, Haloarcula hispanica, and Halalkalicoccus jeotgali were performed. The resulting models were subjected to energy minimization, evaluation, and structural analysis. Calculations of the amino acid composition, salt bridges and hydrophobic interactions were also performed and compared to a set of non-halophilic counterparts. It clearly appeared that haloarchaeal α-amylases exhibited lower propensities for helix formation and higher propensities for coil-forming regions. Furthermore, they could maintain a folded and stable conformation in high salt concentration through highly negative charged surface with over representation of acidic residues, especially Asp, and low hydrophobicity with increase of salt bridges and decrease in hydrophobic interactions on the protein surface. This study sheds some light on the stability of α-amylases from halophilic archaea and provides strong basis not only to understand haloadaptation mechanisms of proteins in microorganisms from hypersalines environments but also for biotechnological applications.

  20. New insight in the structural features of haloadaptation in α-amylases from halophilic Archaea following homology modeling strategy: folded and stable conformation maintained through low hydrophobicity and highly negative charged surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorgani, Mohamed Amine; Patron, Kevin; Desvaux, Mickaël

    2014-07-01

    Proteins from halophilic archaea, which live in extreme saline conditions, have evolved to remain folded, active and stable at very high ionic strengths. Understanding the mechanism of haloadaptation is the first step toward engineering of halostable biomolecules. Amylases are one of the main enzymes used in industry. Yet, no three-dimensional structure has been experimentally resolved for α-amylases from halophilic archaea. In this study, homology structure modeling of α-amylases from the halophilic archaea Haloarcula marismortui, Haloarcula hispanica, and Halalkalicoccus jeotgali were performed. The resulting models were subjected to energy minimization, evaluation, and structural analysis. Calculations of the amino acid composition, salt bridges and hydrophobic interactions were also performed and compared to a set of non-halophilic counterparts. It clearly appeared that haloarchaeal α-amylases exhibited lower propensities for helix formation and higher propensities for coil-forming regions. Furthermore, they could maintain a folded and stable conformation in high salt concentration through highly negative charged surface with over representation of acidic residues, especially Asp, and low hydrophobicity with increase of salt bridges and decrease in hydrophobic interactions on the protein surface. This study sheds some light on the stability of α-amylases from halophilic archaea and provides strong basis not only to understand haloadaptation mechanisms of proteins in microorganisms from hypersalines environments but also for biotechnological applications.

  1. A comparative study on the effect of Curcumin and Chlorin-p6 on the diffusion of two organic cations across a negatively charged lipid bilayer probed by second harmonic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, R. K.; Varshney, G. K.; Dube, A.; Gupta, P. K.; Das, K.

    2014-09-01

    The influence of Curcumin and Chlorin-p6 (Cp6) on the real time diffusion kinetics of two organic cations, LDS (LDS-698) and Malachite Green (MG) across a negatively charged phospholipid bilayer is investigated by Second Harmonic (SH) spectroscopy. The diffusion time constant of LDS at neutral pH in liposomes containing either Curcumin or Cp6 is significantly reduced, the effect being more pronounced with Curcumin. At acidic pH, the quantum of reduction in the diffusion time constant of MG by both the drugs was observed to be similar. The relative changes in the average diffusion time constants of the cations with increasing drug concentration at pH 5.0 and 7.4 shows a substantial pH effect for Curcumin induced membrane permeability, while a modest pH effect was observed for Cp6 induced membrane permeability. Based on available evidence this can be attributed to the increased interaction between the drug and the polar head groups of the lipid at pH 7.4 where the drug resides closer to the lipid-water interface.

  2. Negative tandem mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Poulsen, P.; Allen, S.L.; Casper, T.A.; Grubb, D.P.; Jong, R.A.; Nexsen, W.E.; Porter, G.D.; Simonen, T.C.

    1981-11-30

    A tandem mirror configuration can be created by combining hot electron end cell plasmas with neutral beam pumping. A region of large negative potential formed in each end cell confines electrons in the central cell. The requirement of charge neutrality causes the central cell potential to become negative with respect to ground in order to confine ions as well as electrons. We discuss the method of producing and calculating the desired axial potential profile, and show the calculated axial potential profile and plasma parameters for a negative configuration of TMX-Upgrade.

  3. Direct numerical simulations of exhaust gas recirculation effect on multistage autoignition in the negative temperature combustion regime for stratified HCCI flow conditions by using H2O2 addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Asrag, Hossam A.; Ju, Yiguang

    2013-04-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of a stratified flow in a homogeneous compression charge ignition (HCCI) engine are performed to investigate the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and temperature/mixture stratification effects on the autoignition of synthetic dimethyl ether (DME) in the negative temperature combustion region. Detailed chemistry for a DME/air mixture is employed and solved by a hybrid multi-time scale (HMTS) algorithm to reduce the computational cost. The effect of ? to mimic the EGR effect on autoignition are studied. The results show that adding ? enhances autoignition by rapid OH radical pool formation (34-46% reduction in ignition delay time) and changes the ignition heat release rates at different ignition stages. Sensitivity analysis is performed and the important reactions pathways affecting the autoignition are specified. The DNS results show that the scales introduced by thermal and mixture stratifications have a strong effect after the low temperature chemistry (LTC) ignition especially at the locations of high scalar dissipation rates. Compared to homogenous ignition, stratified ignitions show similar first autoignition delay times, but 18% reduction in the second and third ignition delay times. The results also show that molecular transport plays an important role in stratified low temperature ignition, and that the scalar mixing time scale is strongly affected by local ignition in the stratified flow. Two ignition-kernel propagation modes are observed: a wave-like, low-speed, deflagrative mode and a spontaneous, high-speed, ignition mode. Three criteria are introduced to distinguish these modes by different characteristic time scales and Damkhöler numbers using a progress variable conditioned by an ignition kernel indicator. The low scalar dissipation rate flame front is characterized by high displacement speeds and high mixing Damkhöler number. The proposed criteria are applied successfully at the different ignition stages and

  4. Configuration effects on satellite charging response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purvis, C. K.

    1980-01-01

    The response of various spacecraft configurations to a charging environment in sunlight was studied using the NASA Charging Analyzer Program code. The configuration features geometry, type of stabilization, and overall size. Results indicate that sunlight charging response is dominated by differential charging effects. Shaded insulation charges negatively result in the formation of potential barriers which suppress photoelectron emission from sunlit surfaces. Sunlight charging occurs relatively slowly: with 30 minutes of charging simulations, in none of the configurations modeled did the most negative surface cell reach half its equilibrium potential in eclipse.

  5. Negative magnetoresistivity in holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ya-Wen; Yang, Qing

    2016-09-01

    Negative magnetoresistivity is a special magnetotransport property associated with chiral anomaly in four dimensional chiral anomalous systems, which refers to the transport behavior that the DC longitudinal magnetoresistivity decreases with increasing magnetic field. We calculate the longitudinal magnetoconductivity in the presence of back-reactions of the magnetic field to gravity in holographic zero charge and axial charge density systems with and without axial charge dissipation. In the absence of axial charge dissipation, we find that the quantum critical conductivity grows with increasing magnetic field when the backreaction strength is larger than a critical value, in contrast to the monotonically decreasing behavior of quantum critical conductivity in the probe limit. With axial charge dissipation, we find the negative magnetoresistivity behavior. The DC longitudinal magnetoconductivity scales as B in the large magnetic field limit, which deviates from the exact B 2 scaling of the probe limit result. In both cases, the small frequency longitudinal magnetoconductivity still agrees with the formula obtained from the hydrodynamic linear response theory, even in the large magnetic field limit.

  6. Thai Negation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alam, Samsul

    A study analyzed the structure of negative sentences in the Thai language, based on data gathered from two native speakers. It is shown that the Thai negative marker generally occurs between the noun phrase (subject) and the verb phrase in simple active sentences and in passive sentences. Negation of noun phrases is also allowed in Thai, with a…

  7. Photoelectric Charging of Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sickafoose, A.; Colwell, J.; Horanyi, M.; Robertson, S.; Walch, B.

    1999-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have been performed on the photoelectric charging of dust particles which are either isolated or adjacent to a surface that is also a photoemitter. We find that zinc dust charges to a positive potential of a few volts when isolated in vacuum and that it charges to a negative potential of a few volts when passed by a photoemitting surface. The illumination is an arc lamp emitting wavelengths longer than 200 nm and the emitting surface is a zirconium foil.

  8. NEGATIVE SYMPTOMS AND NEGATIVE SCHIZOPHRENIA

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, S.K.; Gopinath, P.S.; Mathai, P. John; Michael, Albert

    1984-01-01

    SUMMARY This study determines the frequency distribution of prominent negative symptoms in a group of chronic, hospitalised schizophrenics. Thirty chronic Schizophrenic (D.S.M. III) patients were rated on the scale for Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS) and the prominent negative symptoms were correlated with age, sex and certain illness variables. Majority (80%) of patients had some or the other negative symptom, except thought blocking which was found in none. The subjective awareness of the symptoms was poor. Most negative symptoms were present to a severe degree in about 40% of cases. However, no significant correlation was found between severe negative symptoms and age or sex. Similarly, duration of illness, duration of hospitalisation or current medications did not influence negative symptoms to any appreciable degree. The implications are discussed. PMID:21965985

  9. Charge dynamic characteristics in corona-charged polytetrafluoroethylene film electrets.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang-Jin; Xiao, Hui-Ming; Zhu, Chun-Feng

    2004-08-01

    In this work, the charge dynamics characteristics of injection, transport and decay in porous and non-porous polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) film electrets were investigated by means of corona charging, isothermal and thermal stimulating surface-potential decay measurements. The results showed that the initial surface potential, whether positively or negatively charging, is much higher in non-porous PTFE than in porous PTFE. For porous film the value of initial surface potentials increases with increase of film thickness. Higher charging temperature can remarkably improve charge stability. The charge dynamics are correlated to materials microstructure according to their scanning electron micrographs. For non-porous PTFE films, polarizability change of C-F bonds is the main origin of electret charges; but for porous PTFE film a large number of bulk and interface type traps are expected because of the greater area of interface and higher crystallinity.

  10. Internal Charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.

    2014-01-01

    (1) High energy (>100keV) electrons penetrate spacecraft walls and accumulate in dielectrics or isolated conductors; (2) Threat environment is energetic electrons with sufficient flux to charge circuit boards, cable insulation, and ungrounded metal faster than charge can dissipate; (3) Accumulating charge density generates electric fields in excess of material breakdown strenght resulting in electrostatic discharge; and (4) System impact is material damage, discharge currents inside of spacecraft Faraday cage on or near critical circuitry, and RF noise.

  11. Variable Charge Soils: Mineralogy and Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Qafoku, Nik; Van Ranst, Eric; Noble, Andrew; Baert, Geert

    2003-11-01

    Soils rich in particles with amphoteric surface properties in the Oxisols, Ultisols, Alfisols, Spodosols and Andisols orders (1) are considered variable charge soils (2). The term “variable charge” is used to describe organic and inorganic soil constituents with reactive surface groups whose charge varies with pH, ionic concentration and composition of the soil solution. Such groups are the surface carboxyl, phenolic and amino functional groups of organic materials in soils, and surface hydroxyl groups of Fe and Al oxides, allophane and imogolite. The hydroxyl surface groups are also present on edges of some phyllosilicate minerals such as kaolinite, mica, and hydroxyl-interlayered vermiculite. The variable charge is developed on the surface groups as a result of adsorption or desorption of ions that are constituents of the solid phase, i.e., H+, and the adsorption or desorption of solid-unlike ions that are not constituents of the solid. Highly weathered soils usually undergo isoeletric weathering and reach a “zero net charge” stage during their development. They have a slightly acidic to acidic soil solution pH, which is close to either point of zero net charge (PZNC) (3) or point of zero salt effect (PZSE) (3). They are characterized by high abundances of minerals with a point of zero net proton charge (PZNPC) (3) at neutral and slightly basic pHs; the most important being Fe and Al oxides and allophane. Under acidic conditions, the surfaces of these minerals are net positively charged. In contrast, the surfaces of permanent charge phyllosilicates are negatively charged regardless of ambient conditions. Variable charge soils therefore, are heterogeneous charge systems. The coexistence and interactions of oppositely charged surfaces or particles confers a different pattern of physical and chemical behavior on the soil, relatively to a homogeneously charged system of temperate regions. In some variable charge soils (Oxisols and some Ultisols developed on

  12. Phase diagrams of charged colloidal rods: Can a uniaxial charge distribution break chiral symmetry?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drwenski, Tara; Dussi, Simone; Hermes, Michiel; Dijkstra, Marjolein; van Roij, René

    2016-03-01

    We construct phase diagrams for charged rodlike colloids within the second-virial approximation as a function of rod concentration, salt concentration, and colloidal charge. Besides the expected isotropic-nematic transition, we also find parameter regimes with a coexistence between a nematic and a second, more highly aligned nematic phase including an isotropic-nematic-nematic triple point and a nematic-nematic critical point, which can all be explained in terms of the twisting effect. We compute the Frank elastic constants to see if the twist elastic constant can become negative, which would indicate the possibility of a cholesteric phase spontaneously forming. Although the twisting effect reduces the twist elastic constant, we find that it always remains positive. In addition, we find that for finite aspect-ratio rods the twist elastic constant is also always positive, such that there is no evidence of chiral symmetry breaking due to a uniaxial charge distribution.

  13. Space charge formation and Bohm's criterion in the edge of thermal electronegative plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasserian, Kiomars; Aslaninejad, Morteza

    2016-09-01

    The collisional electronegative plasma space charge is investigated in the presence of the thermal positive ions. The Boltzmann distribution is assumed for electrons and negative ions and fluid equations are used to treat the accelerated positive ion through the sheath region. The influence of the positive ion temperature on the profile of the space charge is obtained for different negative ion concentration and negative ion temperature for collisionless and collisional cases. It is shown that the position of the space charge peak is independent of positive ion temperature while its amplitude depends on the positive ion temperature. The presence of the negative ion leads to damping of the space charge amplitude. In addition the thermal effect of the positive ion on the kinetic energy of the ion extracted from an ion source is studied in difference of collisionality and electronegativity. It is shown that, in the presence of thermal positive ion, the influence of the negative ion temperature on the sheath characteristics disappears. It is observed that in the presence of the hot positive ion, the twofold feature of the space charge starts at higher values of negative ion temperature which is more pronounced in collisional case. Finally, the influences of the positive and negative ion temperature, as well as the electronegativity and collisionality on the net electric current are studied.

  14. Electrically charged targets

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Ronald K.; Hunt, Angus L.

    1984-01-01

    Electrically chargeable laser targets and method for forming such charged targets in order to improve their guidance along a predetermined desired trajectory. This is accomplished by the incorporation of a small amount of an additive to the target material which will increase the electrical conductivity thereof, and thereby enhance the charge placed upon the target material for guidance thereof by electrostatic or magnetic steering mechanisms, without adversely affecting the target when illuminated by laser energy.

  15. Charging machine

    DOEpatents

    Medlin, John B.

    1976-05-25

    A charging machine for loading fuel slugs into the process tubes of a nuclear reactor includes a tubular housing connected to the process tube, a charging trough connected to the other end of the tubular housing, a device for loading the charging trough with a group of fuel slugs, means for equalizing the coolant pressure in the charging trough with the pressure in the process tubes, means for pushing the group of fuel slugs into the process tube and a latch and a seal engaging the last object in the group of fuel slugs to prevent the fuel slugs from being ejected from the process tube when the pusher is removed and to prevent pressure liquid from entering the charging machine.

  16. Protein charge ladders reveal that the net charge of ALS-linked superoxide dismutase can be different in sign and magnitude from predicted values.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yunhua; Abdolvahabi, Alireza; Shaw, Bryan F

    2014-10-01

    This article utilized "protein charge ladders"-chemical derivatives of proteins with similar structure, but systematically altered net charge-to quantify how missense mutations that cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) affect the net negative charge (Z) of superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1) as a function of subcellular pH and Zn(2+) stoichiometry. Capillary electrophoresis revealed that the net charge of ALS-variant SOD1 can be different in sign and in magnitude-by up to 7.4 units per dimer at lysosomal pH-than values predicted from standard pKa values of amino acids and formal oxidation states of metal ions. At pH 7.4, the G85R, D90A, and G93R substitutions diminished the net negative charge of dimeric SOD1 by up to +2.29 units more than predicted; E100K lowered net charge by less than predicted. The binding of a single Zn(2+) to mutant SOD1 lowered its net charge by an additional +2.33 ± 0.01 to +3.18 ± 0.02 units, however, each protein regulated net charge when binding a second, third, or fourth Zn(2+) (ΔZ < 0.44 ± 0.07 per additional Zn(2+) ). Both metalated and apo-SOD1 regulated net charge across subcellular pH, without inverting from negative to positive at the theoretical pI. Differential scanning calorimetry, hydrogen-deuterium exchange, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry confirmed that the structure, stability, and metal content of mutant proteins were not significantly affected by lysine acetylation. Measured values of net charge should be used when correlating the biophysical properties of a specific ALS-variant SOD1 protein with its observed aggregation propensity or clinical phenotype.

  17. 29 CFR 1601.12 - Contents of charge; amendment of charge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Contents of charge; amendment of charge. 1601.12 Section... charge; amendment of charge. (a) Each charge should contain the following: (1) The full name, address and... therein. Such amendments and amendments alleging additional acts which constitute unlawful...

  18. Temperature dependence of Vortex Charges in High Temperature Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, C. S.; Chen, Yan; Wang, Z. D.

    2003-03-01

    By considering of competition between antiferromagnetic (AF) and d-wave superconductivity orders, the temperature dependence of the vortex charge in high Tc superconductors is investigated by solving self-consistently the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations. The magnitude of induced antiferromagnetic order inside the vortex core is temperature dependent. The vortex charge is always negative when a sufficient strength of AF order presents at low temperature while the AF order may be suppressed at higher temperature and there the vortex charge becomes positive. A first order like transition from negative to the positive vortex charges occurs at certain temperature TN which is very close to the temperature for the disappearence of the local AF order. The vortex charges at various doping levels will also going to be examined. We show that the temperature dependence of the vortex core radius with induced AF order exhibits a weak Kramer-Pesch effect. The local density of states spectrum has a broad peak pattern at higher temperature while it exhibits two splitting peak at lower temperature. This temperature evolution may be detected by the future scanning-tunnel-microscope experiment. In addition, the effect of the vortex charge on the mixed state Hall effect will be discussed.

  19. Ion and water transport in charge-modified graphene nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Ying-Hua; Li, Kun; Chen, Wei-Yu; Si, Wei; Tan, Qi-Yan; Chen, Yun-Fei

    2015-10-01

    Porous graphene has a high mechanical strength and an atomic-layer thickness that makes it a promising material for material separation and biomolecule sensing. Electrostatic interactions between charges in aqueous solutions are a type of strong long-range interaction that may greatly influence fluid transport through nanopores. In this study, molecular dynamic simulations were conducted to investigate ion and water transport through 1.05-nm diameter monolayer graphene nanopores, with their edges charge-modified. Our results indicated that these nanopores are selective to counterions when they are charged. As the charge amount increases, the total ionic currents show an increase-decrease profile while the co-ion currents monotonically decrease. The co-ion rejection can reach 76.5% and 90.2% when the nanopores are negatively and positively charged, respectively. The Cl- ion current increases and reaches a plateau, and the Na+ current decreases as the charge amount increases in systems in which Na+ ions act as counterions. In addition, charge modification can enhance water transport through nanopores. This is mainly due to the ion selectivity of the nanopores. Notably, positive charges on the pore edges facilitate water transport much more strongly than negative charges. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2011CB707601 and 2011CB707605), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 50925519), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, Funding of Jiangsu Provincial Innovation Program for Graduate Education, China (Grant No. CXZZ13_0087), and the Scientific Research Foundation of Graduate School of Southeast University (Grant No. YBJJ 1322).

  20. Charge requirements of lipid II flippase activity in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Butler, Emily K; Tan, Wee Boon; Joseph, Hildy; Ruiz, Natividad

    2014-12-01

    Peptidoglycan (PG) is an extracytoplasmic glycopeptide matrix essential for the integrity of the envelope of most bacteria. The PG building block is a disaccharide-pentapeptide that is synthesized as a lipid-linked precursor called lipid II. The translocation of the amphipathic lipid II across the cytoplasmic membrane is required for subsequent incorporation of the disaccharide-pentapeptide into PG. In Escherichia coli, the essential inner membrane protein MurJ is the lipid II flippase. Previous studies showed that 8 charged residues in the central cavity region of MurJ are crucial for function. Here, we completed the functional analysis of all 57 charged residues in MurJ and demonstrated that the respective positive or negative charge of the 8 aforementioned residues is required for proper MurJ function. Loss of the negative charge in one of these residues, D39, causes a severe defect in MurJ biogenesis; by engineering an intragenic suppressor mutation that restores MurJ biogenesis, we found that this charge is also essential for MurJ function. Because of the low level of homology between MurJ and putative orthologs from Gram-positive bacteria, we explored the conservation of these 8 charged residues in YtgP, a homolog from Streptococcus pyogenes. We found that only 3 positive charges are similarly positioned and essential in YtgP; YtgP possesses additional charged residues within its predicted cavity that are essential for function and conserved among Gram-positive bacteria. From these data, we hypothesize that some charged residues in the cavity region of MurJ homologs are required for interaction with lipid II and/or energy coupling during transport.

  1. Zero-Net-Charge Air Ionizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, W. R., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Instrument monitors air supplied by air ionizer and regulates ionizer to ensure net charge neutral. High-impedance electrometer and nulling control amplifier regulate output of air ionizer. Primarily intended to furnish ionized air having no net charge, instrument adaptable to generating air with positive or negative net charge is so desired. Useful where integrated circuit chips are manufactured, inspected, tested or assembled.

  2. Sequential tentacle grafting and charge modification for enhancing charge density of mono-sized beads for facilitated protein refolding and purification from inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Ran; Yang, Chun-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2014-06-20

    We have previously found that addition of like-charged media in a refolding solution can greatly enhance the refolding of pure proteins by suppressing protein aggregation. Herein, negatively charged mono-sized microspheres with sulfonic groups were fabricated to explore the facilitating effect of like-charged media on the refolding of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expressed as inclusion bodies (IBs). A sequential polymer-tentacle grafting and sulfonate modification strategy was developed to increase the charge density of mono-sized poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (pGMA) beads (2.4μm). Namely, GMA was first grafted onto the beads by grafting polymerization to form poly(GMA) tentacles on the pGMA beads, and then the epoxy groups on the tentacles were converted into sulfonic groups by modification with sodium sulfite. By this fabrication strategy, the charge density of the beads reached 793μmol/g, about 2.8 times higher than that modified without prior grafting of the pGMA beads (285μmol/g). The negatively charged beads of different charge densities were used for facilitating the refolding of like-charged EGFP from IBs. The refolding yield as well as refolding rate increased with increasing charge density. The anti-aggregation effects of urea and like-charged microspheres were synergetic. In addition, partial purification of EGFP was achieved because the ion-exchange adsorption led to 52% removal of positively charged contaminant proteins in the refolded solution. Finally, reusability of the tentacle beads was demonstrated by repetitive EGFP refolding and recovery cycles.

  3. Stability of Charged Grains in Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Hamilton, D. P.

    2011-04-01

    Hypervelocity impacts of interplanetary micrometeoroids with orbiting ring particles generate dusty debris of all sizes. These ejecta particles become electrically charged by interactions with orbiting plasma and solar photons. Accordingly, they experience both gravity and Lorentz forces, whose combined effects cause interesting and complex dynamics. For simplicity, we model the magnetic fields of Jupiter and Saturn by centered and aligned dipoles and investigate the stability of motion for grains launched from circularly-orbiting parent bodies. We begin by determining the stability in both the radial and vertical directions as a function of charge-to-mass ratio and distance from the planet numerically. We find that positively-charged dust grains in the micron-size range are radially unstable, colliding with the planet if launched from within synchronous orbit and escaping entirely if launched outside this distance. Escaping grains have been observed as high-velocity dust streams from Jupiter and Saturn. In addition, positively and negatively-charged smaller grains are vertically unstable and spiral up magnetic field lines to sustain large latitudinal oscillations or be lost to the planet's atmosphere. We then undertake local and global stability analyses and derive stability criteria that match our numerical data extremely well. Our analysis builds upon work led by Burns, Hamilton, Horanyi, Howard, Mitchell, Northrop, Schaffer, and others. Some stability boundaries can be obtained analytically while others require more complicated semianalytic methods. Four of our five stability boundaries do not appear in the literature and the fifth matches the findings of Hamilton and Burns (1993). Finally, we expand our numerical runs to include the effects of tilted and offset magnetic field components. We find that regions of vertical instability expand significantly for the more complicated fields, and a large new region of radial instability appears outside synchronous

  4. Why Do Spacecraft Charge in Sunlight? Differential Charging and Surface Condition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    charge to high negative potentials in sunlight. Introduction Spacecraft charging in space plasmas is due to the imbalance of...in Sunlight In the Maxwellian space plasma model, the onset of spacecraft charging in eclipse occurs at a critical temperature T* [Lai, et al., 1982...S.T., Onset of spacecraft charging in single and double Maxwellian plasmas in space, Proceedings of the 8th Spacecraft Charging Technology

  5. Surface charge of gold nanoparticles mediates mechanism of toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeublin, Nicole M.; Braydich-Stolle, Laura K.; Schrand, Amanda M.; Miller, John M.; Hutchison, Jim; Schlager, John J.; Hussain, Saber M.

    2011-02-01

    Recently gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) have shown promising biological and military applications due to their unique electronic and optical properties. However, little is known about their biocompatibility in the event that they come into contact with a biological system. In the present study, we have investigated whether modulating the surface charge of 1.5 nm Au NPs induced changes in cellular morphology, mitochondrial function, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), intracellular calcium levels, DNA damage-related gene expression, and of p53 and caspase-3 expression levels after exposure in a human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT). The evaluation of three different Au NPs (positively charged, neutral, and negatively charged) showed that cell morphology was disrupted by all three NPs and that they demonstrated a dose-dependent toxicity; the charged Au NPs displayed toxicity as low as 10 µg ml-1 and the neutral at 25 µg ml-1. Furthermore, there was significant mitochondrial stress (decreases in MMP and intracellular Ca2+ levels) following exposure to the charged Au NPs, but not the neutral Au NPs. In addition to the differences observed in the MMP and Ca2+ levels, up or down regulation of DNA damage related gene expression suggested a differential cell death mechanism based on whether or not the Au NPs were charged or neutral. Additionally, increased nuclear localization of p53 and caspase-3 expression was observed in cells exposed to the charged Au NPs, while the neutral Au NPs caused an increase in both nuclear and cytoplasmic p53 expression. In conclusion, these results indicate that surface charge is a major determinant of how Au NPs impact cellular processes, with the charged NPs inducing cell death through apoptosis and neutral NPs leading to necrosis.Recently gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) have shown promising biological and military applications due to their unique electronic and optical properties. However, little is known about their biocompatibility in the

  6. Negative Certainty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ariso, José María

    2017-01-01

    The definitions of "negative knowledge" and the studies in this regard published to date have not considered the categorial distinction Wittgenstein established between knowledge and certainty. Hence, the important role that certainty, despite its omission, should have in these definitions and studies has not yet been shown. In this…

  7. Taming Highly Charged Radioisotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Usman; Eberhardt, Benjamin; Jang, Fuluni; Schultz, Brad; Simon, Vanessa; Delheij, Paul; Dilling, Jens; Gwinner, Gerald

    2012-10-01

    The precise and accurate mass of short-lived radioisotopes is a very important parameter in physics. Contribution to the improvement of nuclear models, metrological standard fixing and tests of the unitarity of the Caibbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix are a few examples where the mass value plays a major role. TRIUMF's ion trap for atomic and nuclear physics (TITAN) is a unique facility of three online ion traps that enables the mass measurement of short-lived isotopes with high precision (˜10-8). At present TITAN's electron beam ion trap (EBIT) increases the charge state to increase the precision, but there is no facility to significantly reduce the energy spread introduced by the charge breeding process. The precision of the measured mass of radioisotopes is linearly dependent on the charge state while the energy spread of the charged radioisotopes affects the precision adversely. To boost the precision level of mass measurement at TITAN without loosing too many ions, a cooler Penning trap (CPET) is being developed. CPET is designed to use either positively (proton) or negatively (electron) charged particles to reduce the energy spread via sympathetic cooling. Off-line setup of CPET is complete. Details of the working principles and updates are presented

  8. Synthesis and properties of differently charged chemiluminescent acridinium ester labels.

    PubMed

    Natrajan, Anand; Sharpe, David

    2013-02-14

    Chemiluminescent acridinium dimethylphenyl esters containing N-sulfopropyl groups in the acridinium ring are highly sensitive, hydrophilic labels that are used in automated immunoassays for clinical diagnostics. Light emission from these labels is triggered with alkaline peroxide in the presence of a cationic surfactant. At physiological pH, N-sulfopropyl acridinium esters exist as water adducts that are commonly referred to as pseudobases. Pseudobase formation, which results from addition of water to the zwitterionic N-sulfopropyl acridinium ring, neutralizes the positive charge on the acridinium nitrogen and imparts a net negative charge to the label due to the sulfonate moiety. As a consequence, N-sulfopropyl acridinium ester conjugates of small molecule haptens as well as large molecules such as proteins gain negative charges at neutral pH. In the current study, we describe the synthesis and properties of two new hydrophilic acridinium dimethylphenyl ester labels where the net charge in the labels was altered. In one label, the structure of the hydrophilic N-alkyl group attached to the acridinium ring was changed so that the pseudobase of the label contains no net charge. In the second acridinium ester, two additional negative charges in the form of sulfopropyl groups were added to the acridinium ring to make this label's pseudobase strongly anionic. Chemiluminescence measurements of these labels, as well as their conjugates of an antibody with a neutral pI, indicate that acridinium ester charge while having a modest effect on emission kinetics has little influence on light output. However, our results demonstrate that acridinium ester charge can affect protein pI, apparent chemiluminescence stability and non-specific binding of protein conjugates to microparticles. These results emphasize the need for careful consideration of acridinium ester charge in order to optimize reagent stability and performance in immunoassays. In the current study, we observed that

  9. Fluctuation of surface charge in membrane pores.

    PubMed Central

    Bashford, C Lindsay; Alder, Glenn M; Pasternak, Charles A

    2002-01-01

    Surface charge in track-etched polyethylene terephthalate (PET) membranes with narrow pores has been probed with a fluorescent cationic dye (3,3'-diethyloxacarbocyanine iodide (diO-C2-(3))) using confocal microscopy. Staining of negatively charged PET membranes with diO-C2-(3) is a useful measure of surface charge for the following reasons: 1) the dye inhibits K(+) currents through the pores and reduces their selectivity for cations; 2) it inhibits [3H]-choline+ transport and promotes 36Cl- transport across the membrane in a pH- and ionic-strength-dependent fashion; and 3) staining of pores by diO-C2-(3) is reduced by low pH and by the presence of divalent cations such as Ca2+ and Zn2+. Measurement of the time dependence of cyanine staining of pores shows fluctuations of fluorescence intensity that occur on the same time scale as do fluctuations of ionic current in such pores. These data support our earlier proposal that fluctuations in ionic current across pores in synthetic and biological membranes reflect fluctuations in the surface charge of the pore walls in addition to molecular changes in pore proteins. PMID:11916860

  10. Charge shielding in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shaojie; Stroth, Ulrich; Van Oost, Guido

    2010-11-15

    The shielding of a charge sheet in a magnetized plasma is investigated by taking account of the diamagnetic drift start-up current in addition to the polarization current. For a charge sheet with an infinitesimal width, the shielding is the same as the conventional Debye shielding if the charge sheet is perpendicular to the magnetic field; the shielding length is {radical}(2) times larger than the conventional one if the charge sheet is parallel to the magnetic field. When the scale length of the charge sheet is comparable or smaller than the ion Larmor radius, the electric field is significantly enhanced within the charge sheet, while far away from the charge sheet, the electric field is shielded to the usual 1/{epsilon}{sub r} level (where {epsilon}{sub r} is the diamagnetic coefficient of the magnetized plasma).

  11. Negative refraction and superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amariti, Antonio; Forcella, Davide; Mariotti, Alberto; Siani, Massimo

    2011-10-01

    We discuss exotic properties of charged hydrodynamical systems, in the broken superconducting phase, probed by electromagnetic waves. Motivated by general arguments from hydrodynamics, we observe that negative refraction, namely the propagation in opposite directions of the phase velocities and of the energy flux, is expected for low enough frequencies. We corroborate this general idea by analyzing a holographic superconductor in the AdS/CFT correspondence, where the response functions can be explicitly computed. We study the dual gravitational theory both in the probe and in the backreacted case. We find that, while in the first case the refractive index is positive at every frequency, in the second case there is negative refraction at low enough frequencies. This is in agreement with hydrodynamic considerations.

  12. Improving Charging-Breeding Simulations with Space-Charge Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilek, Ryan; Kwiatkowski, Ania; Steinbrügge, René

    2016-09-01

    Rare-isotope-beam facilities use Highly Charged Ions (HCI) for accelerators accelerating heavy ions and to improve measurement precision and resolving power of certain experiments. An Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) is able to create HCI through successive electron impact, charge breeding trapped ions into higher charge states. CBSIM was created to calculate successive charge breeding with an EBIT. It was augmented by transferring it into an object-oriented programming language, including additional elements, improving ion-ion collision factors, and exploring the overlap of the electron beam with the ions. The calculation is enhanced with the effects of residual background gas by computing the space charge due to charge breeding. The program assimilates background species, ionizes and charge breeds them alongside the element being studied, and allows them to interact with the desired species through charge exchange, giving fairer overview of realistic charge breeding. Calculations of charge breeding will be shown for realistic experimental conditions. We reexamined the implementation of ionization energies, cross sections, and ion-ion interactions when charge breeding.

  13. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  14. Charge Storage, Conductivity and Charge Profiles of Insulators as Related to Spacecraft Charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennison, J. R.; Swaminathan, Prasanna; Frederickson, A. R.

    2004-01-01

    Dissipation of charges built up near the surface of insulators due to space environment interaction is central to understanding spacecraft charging. Conductivity of insulating materials is key to determine how accumulated charge will distribute across the spacecraft and how rapidly charge imbalance will dissipate. To understand these processes requires knowledge of how charge is deposited within the insulator, the mechanisms for charge trapping and charge transport within the insulator, and how the profile of trapped charge affects the transport and emission of charges from insulators. One must consider generation of mobile electrons and holes, their trapping, thermal de-trapping, mobility and recombination. Conductivity is more appropriately measured for spacecraft charging applications as the "decay" of charge deposited on the surface of an insulator, rather than by flow of current across two electrodes around the sample. We have found that conductivity determined from charge storage decay methods is 102 to 104 smaller than values obtained from classical ASTM and IEC methods for a variety of thin film insulating samples. For typical spacecraft charging conditions, classical conductivity predicts decay times on the order of minutes to hours (less than typical orbit periods); however, the higher charge storage conductivities predict decay times on the order of weeks to months leading to accumulation of charge with subsequent orbits. We found experimental evidence that penetration profiles of radiation and light are exceedingly important, and that internal electric fields due to charge profiles and high-field conduction by trapped electrons must be considered for space applications. We have also studied whether the decay constants depend on incident voltage and flux or on internal charge distributions and electric fields; light-activated discharge of surface charge to distinguish among differing charge trapping centers; and radiation-induced conductivity. Our

  15. Controlling deposition of nanoparticles by tuning surface charge of SiO2 by surface modifications† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6ra22412a Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Eklöf, Johnas; Gschneidtner, Tina; Lara-Avila, Samuel; Nygård, Kim

    2016-01-01

    The self-assembly of nanoparticles on substrates is relevant for a variety of applications such as plasmonics, sensing devices and nanometer-sized electronics. We investigate the deposition of 60 nm spherical Au nanoparticles onto silicon dioxide (SiO2) substrates by changing the chemical treatment of the substrate and by that altering the surface charge. The deposition is characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) was used to characterize the surface workfunction. The underlying physics involved in the deposition of nanoparticles was described by a model based on Derjaguin–Landau–Verwey–Overbeek (DLVO) theory combined with random sequential adsorption (RSA). The spatial statistical method Ripley's K-function was used to verify the DLVO–RSA model (ERSA). The statistical results also showed that the adhered particles exhibit a short-range order at distances below ~300 nm. This method can be used in future research to predict the deposition densities of charged nanoparticles onto charged surfaces. PMID:28066544

  16. Discrete carbon nanotubes increase lead acid battery charge acceptance and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swogger, Steven W.; Everill, Paul; Dubey, D. P.; Sugumaran, Nanjan

    2014-09-01

    Performance demands placed upon lead acid batteries have outgrown the technology's ability to deliver. These demands, typically leading to Negative Active Material (NAM) failure, include: short, high-current surges; prolonged, minimal, overvoltage charging; repeated, Ah deficit charging; and frequent deep discharges. Research shows these failure mechanisms are attenuated by inclusion of carbon allotropes into the NAM. Addition of significant quantities of carbon, however, produces detrimental changes in paste rheology, leading to lowered industrial throughput. Additionally, capacity, cold-cranking performance, and other battery metrics are negatively affected at high carbon loads. Presented here is Molecular Rebar® Lead Negative, a new battery additive comprising discrete carbon nanotubes (dCNT) which uniformly disperse within battery pastes during mixing. NS40ZL batteries containing dCNT show enhanced charge acceptance, reserve capacity, and cold-cranking performance, decreased risk of polarization, and no detrimental changes to paste properties, when compared to dCNT-free controls. This work focuses on the dCNT as NAM additives only, but early-stage research is underway to test their functionality as a PAM additive. Batteries infused with Molecular Rebar® Lead Negative address the needs of modern lead acid battery applications, produce none of the detrimental side effects associated with carbon additives, and require no change to existing production lines.

  17. Charged conformal Killing spinors

    SciTech Connect

    Lischewski, Andree

    2015-01-15

    We study the twistor equation on pseudo-Riemannian Spin{sup c}-manifolds whose solutions we call charged conformal Killing spinors (CCKSs). We derive several integrability conditions for the existence of CCKS and study their relations to spinor bilinears. A construction principle for Lorentzian manifolds admitting CCKS with nontrivial charge starting from CR-geometry is presented. We obtain a partial classification result in the Lorentzian case under the additional assumption that the associated Dirac current is normal conformal and complete the classification of manifolds admitting CCKS in all dimensions and signatures ≤5 which has recently been initiated in the study of supersymmetric field theories on curved space.

  18. Holographic charge density waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donos, Aristomenis; Gauntlett, Jerome P.

    2013-06-01

    We show that strongly coupled holographic matter at finite charge density can exhibit charge density wave phases which spontaneously break translation invariance while preserving time-reversal and parity invariance. We show that such phases are possible within Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory in general spacetime dimensions. We also discuss related spatially modulated phases when there is an additional coupling to a second vector field, possibly with nonzero mass. We discuss how these constructions, and others, should be associated with novel spatially modulated ground states.

  19. Experimental studies of the charge limit phenomenon in NEA GaAs photocathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, H.; Alley, R.K.; Aoyagi, H.; Clendenin, J.E.; Frisch, J.C.; Mulhollan, G.A.; Saez, P.J.; Schultz, D.C.; Turner, J.L.

    1994-06-01

    Negative electron affinity GaAs photocathodes have been in continuous use at SLAC for generating polarized electron beams since early 1992. If the quantum efficiency of a GaAs cathode is below a critical value, the maximum photoemitted charge with photons of energies close to the band gap in a 2-ns pulse is found to be limited by the intrinsic properties of the cathode instead of by the space charge limit. We have studied this novel charge limit phenomenon in a variety of GaAs photocathodes of different structures and doping densities. We find that the charge limit is strongly dependent on the cathode`s quantum efficiency and the extraction electric field, and to a lesser degree on the excitation laser wavelength. In addition, we show that the temporal behavior of the charge limit depends critically on the doping density.

  20. Screening of an electrically charged particle in a two-dimensional two-component plasma at Γ = 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrero, Alejandro; Téllez, Gabriel

    2014-11-01

    We consider the thermodynamic effects of an electrically charged impurity immersed in a two-dimensional two-component plasma, composed of particles with charges ±e, at temperature T, at coupling Γ = e2/(kBT) = 2, confined in a large disk of radius R. In particular, we focus on the analysis of the charge density, the correlation functions and the grand potential. Our analytical results show how the charges are redistributed in the circular geometry considered here. When we consider a positively charged impurity, the negative ions accumulate close to the impurity leaving an excess of positive charge that accumulates at the boundary of the disk. Due to the symmetry under charge exchange, the opposite effect takes place when we place a negative impurity. Both cases in which the impurity charge is an integer multiple of the particle charges in the plasma, ±e, and where a fraction of them are considered, require a slightly different mathematical treatment, showing the effect of the quantization of plasma charges. The bulk and the tension effects in the plasma described by the grand potential are not modified by the introduction of the charged particle. Apart from the effects due to the collapse coming from the attraction between oppositely charged ions, an additional topological term appears in the grand potential, proportional to -n2 ln(mR), with n the dimensionless charge of the particle. This term modifies the central charge of the system, from c = 1 to c = 1 - 6n2, when considered in the context of conformal field theories.

  1. 29 CFR 1626.8 - Contents of charge; amendment of charge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Contents of charge; amendment of charge. 1626.8 Section... PROCEDURES-AGE DISCRIMINATION IN EMPLOYMENT ACT § 1626.8 Contents of charge; amendment of charge. (a) In... made therein. Such amendments and amendments alleging additional acts which constitute...

  2. Measurements of charged precipitation in a New Mexico thunderstorm: Lower positive charge centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Thomas C.; Winn, William P.

    1982-08-01

    We designed an instrument to measure the charge and vertical velocity of individual precipitation particles inside thunderclouds. A balloon carried the particle charge instrument, an electric field meter, and a standard meteorological radiosonde upward into thunderclouds over Langmuir Laboratory in central New Mexico. During one balloon flight the instruments encountered two regions of positive charge below the main negative charge center. We identify these positive regions with the lower positive charge centers that have been described in the literature for many years. We find the following points: (1) One region had an estimated total charge of 0.4 C. The other had 2 C. (2) The charge resided on precipitation particles. The particles' charges typically ranged between 10 and 200 pC, but a few particles had charges up to 400 pC. Their diameters lay between an estimated 1-3 mm. The charges were too large to be explained by the polarization induction mechanism. We favor the hypothesis that lightning provided the positive charge in the lower positive charge centers. (3) The motion of the lower positive charge centers enhanced the electrical energy of the storm, but their contribution to the overall electrical budget was small. (4) The field excursions (at the ground) associated with precipitation (FEAWPs) described by C. B. Moore and B. Vonnegut are probably caused by lower positive charge centers descending on precipitation. The larger (2 C) lower positive charge center caused a FEAWP. Negatively charged precipitation particles passed through our instrument near the top of its trajectory just before the balloon was struck by lightning. The charge density on precipitation particles was substantial, but we do not have enough information to comment on the role the particles may have had in generating the main region of negative charge.

  3. Evaluation of permanently charged electrofibrous filters

    SciTech Connect

    Biermann, A.H.; Lum, B.Y.; Bergman, W.

    1982-10-18

    These studies showed that loading the permanently charged filters with captured aerosols will lead to a neutralization of the filter charge. The transfer from the captured aerosol to the fiber surface and the subsequent neutralization of fiber charge. The increased efficiency is due to the additional mechanical capture by the particle deposits. The minimum efficiency obtained during the loading of solid aerosols is determined by the aerosol charge, with highly charged aerosols producing a lower minimum. Permanently charged filters lose their fiber charge when exposed to organic solvents or ionic water solutions. The fiber charge neutralization was minimized by coating the charged fibers with a polymer. Several different coating techniques were examined. Unfortunately, preventing the neutralization of fiber charge is not sufficient to prevent a deterioration of filter efficiency.

  4. Effect of net surface charge on physical properties of the cellulose nanoparticles and their efficacy for oral protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Song, Yongbo; Chen, Lingyun

    2015-05-05

    Both net positively and negatively charged cellulose-based nanoparticles were prepared from oppositely charged carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) and quaternized cellulose (QC). Effect of surface charge on efficacy of cellulose nanoparticles for delivering both positively and negatively charged proteins was investigated. Lysozyme (LYS) and bovine serum albumin (BSA), which possess positive and negative charge at physiological pH respectively, were used as models. The results revealed that high encapsulation efficiency (67.7% and 85.1%) could be achieved when negatively charged protein was encapsulated in positively charged nanoparticles, or positively charged protein was encapsulated in negatively charged nanoparticles. Proteins encapsulated in optimal cellulose nanoparticles could be sustainably released and no obvious protein denaturation was detected. Both net positively and negatively charged nanoparticles exhibited low cytotoxicity due to cellulose's good biocompatibility. Not only net positively charged nanoparticles demonstrated high cellular uptake efficiency, but also net negatively charged nanoparticles showed somewhat efficient cellular uptake.

  5. Food additives

    MedlinePlus

    ... or natural. Natural food additives include: Herbs or spices to add flavor to foods Vinegar for pickling ... Certain colors improve the appearance of foods. Many spices, as well as natural and man-made flavors, ...

  6. The impact of charge transfer and structural disorder on the thermoelectric properties of cobalt intercalated TiS2 † †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Powder X-ray diffraction data, thermal analysis data and additional magnetic and transport property data. See DOI: 10.1039/c5tc04217h Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Guélou, Gabin; Vaqueiro, Paz; Prado-Gonjal, Jesús; Barbier, Tristan; Hébert, Sylvie; Guilmeau, Emmanuel; Kockelmann, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    A family of phases, CoxTiS2 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.75) has been prepared and characterised by powder X-ray and neutron diffraction, electrical and thermal transport property measurements, thermal analysis and SQUID magnetometry. With increasing cobalt content, the structure evolves from a disordered arrangement of cobalt ions in octahedral sites located in the van der Waals' gap (x ≤ 0.2), through three different ordered vacancy phases, to a second disordered phase at x ≥ 0.67. Powder neutron diffraction reveals that both octahedral and tetrahedral inter-layer sites are occupied in Co0.67TiS2. Charge transfer from the cobalt guest to the TiS2 host affords a systematic tuning of the electrical and thermal transport properties. At low levels of cobalt intercalation (x < 0.1), the charge transfer increases the electrical conductivity sufficiently to offset the concomitant reduction in |S|. This, together with a reduction in the overall thermal conductivity leads to thermoelectric figures of merit that are 25% higher than that of TiS2, ZT reaching 0.30 at 573 K for CoxTiS2 with 0.04 ≤ x ≤ 0.08. Whilst the electrical conductivity is further increased at higher cobalt contents, the reduction in |S| is more marked due to the higher charge carrier concentration. Furthermore both the charge carrier and lattice contributions to the thermal conductivity are increased in the electrically conductive ordered-vacancy phases, with the result that the thermoelectric performance is significantly degraded. These results illustrate the competition between the effects of charge transfer from guest to host and the disorder generated when cobalt cations are incorporated in the inter-layer space. PMID:27774151

  7. Grain charging in protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilgner, M.

    2012-02-01

    Context. Recent work identified a growth barrier for dust coagulation that originates in the electric repulsion between colliding particles. Depending on its charge state, dust material may have the potential to control key processes towards planet formation such as magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and grain growth, which are coupled in a two-way process. Aims: We quantify the grain charging at different stages of disc evolution and differentiate between two very extreme cases: compact spherical grains and aggregates with fractal dimension Df = 2. Methods: Applying a simple chemical network that accounts for collisional charging of grains, we provide a semi-analytical solution. This allowed us to calculate the equilibrium population of grain charges and the ionisation fraction efficiently. The grain charging was evaluated for different dynamical environments ranging from static to non-stationary disc configurations. Results: The results show that the adsorption/desorption of neutral gas-phase heavy metals, such as magnesium, effects the charging state of grains. The greater the difference between the thermal velocities of the metal and the dominant molecular ion, the greater the change in the mean grain charge. Agglomerates have more negative excess charge on average than compact spherical particles of the same mass. The rise in the mean grain charge is proportional to N1/6 in the ion-dust limit. We find that grain charging in a non-stationary disc environment is expected to lead to similar results. Conclusions: The results indicate that the dust growth and settling in regions where the dust growth is limited by the so-called "electro-static barrier" do not prevent the dust material from remaining the dominant charge carrier.

  8. Negative Numbers and Antimatter Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsan, Ung Chan

    Dirac's equation states that an electron implies the existence of an antielectron with the same mass (more generally same arithmetic properties) and opposite charge (more generally opposite algebraic properties). Subsequent observation of antielectron validated this concept. This statement can be extended to all matter particles; observation of antiproton, antineutron, antideuton … is in complete agreement with this view. Recently antihypertriton was observed and 38 atoms of antihydrogen were trapped. This opens the path for use in precise testing of nature's fundamental symmetries. The symmetric properties of a matter particle and its mirror antimatter particle seem to be well established. Interactions operate on matter particles and antimatter particles as well. Conservation of matter parallels addition operating on positive and negative numbers. Without antimatter particles, interactions of the Standard Model (electromagnetism, strong interaction and weak interaction) cannot have the structure of group. Antimatter particles are characterized by negative baryonic number A or/and negative leptonic number L. Materialization and annihilation obey conservation of A and L (associated to all known interactions), explaining why from pure energy (A = 0, L = 0) one can only obtain a pair of matter particle antimatter particle — electron antielectron, proton and antiproton — via materialization where the mass of a pair of particle antiparticle gives back to pure energy with annihilation. These two mechanisms cannot change the difference in the number of matter particles and antimatter particles. Thus from pure energy only a perfectly symmetric (in number) universe could be generated as proposed by Dirac but observation showed that our universe is not symmetric, it is a matter universe which is nevertheless neutral. Fall of reflection symmetries shattered the prejudice that there is no way to define in an absolute way right and left or matter and antimatter

  9. Empirical in operando analysis of the charge carrier dynamics in hematite photoanodes by PEIS, IMPS and IMVS† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6cp04683e Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, David Shai; Dotan, Hen

    2016-01-01

    In this Perspective, we introduce intensity modulated photocurrent/voltage spectroscopy (IMPS and IMVS) as powerful tools for the analysis of charge carrier dynamics in photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells for solar water splitting, taking hematite (α-Fe2O3) photoanodes as a case study. We complete the picture by including photoelectrochemical impedance spectroscopy (PEIS) and linking the trio of PEIS, IMPS and IMVS, introduced here as photoelectrochemical immittance triplets (PIT), both mathematically and phenomenologically, demonstrating what conclusions can be extracted from these measurements. A novel way of analyzing the results by an empirical approach with minimal presumptions is introduced, using the distribution of relaxation times (DRT) function. The DRT approach is compared to conventional analysis approaches that are based on physical models and therefore come with model presumptions. This work uses a thin film hematite photoanode as a model system, but the approach can be applied to other PEC systems as well. PMID:27524381

  10. Coalescence and Breakup of Oppositely Charged Droplets

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junfeng; Wang, Bin; Qiu, Huihe

    2014-01-01

    The coalescence process of oppositely charged drops for different electrical conductivities of liquids is presented. When the electrical conductivity was relatively low, oppositely charged drops failed to coalesce under sufficiently high electrical fields and capillary ripples were formed on the surfaces of droplets after rebound. For a high electrically conductive liquid, it was found that a crown profile of drop fission always appeared on the top surface of negatively charged drops after the two charged drops contacted and bounced off. Furthermore, we report here, for the first time, the newly found phenomenon and argue that the break up might be caused by Rayleigh instability, a form of Coulomb fission. The different mobility of positive and negative ions is the underlying mechanism that explains why the break up always happened on the negative side of charged drops. PMID:25410022

  11. Structural, optical and charge generation properties of chalcostibite and tetrahedrite copper antimony sulfide thin films prepared from metal xanthates† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Chemical structures of the used metal xanthates, additional XRD, SEM-EDX and UV-vis data. See DOI: 10.1039/c5ta05777a Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    MacLachlan, Andrew J.; Brown, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report on a solution based approach for the preparation of thin films of copper antimony sulfide, an emerging absorber material for third generation solar cells. In this work, copper and antimony xanthates are used as precursor materials for the formation of two different copper antimony sulfide phases: chalcostibite (CuSbS2) and tetrahedrite (Cu12Sb4S13). Both phases were thoroughly investigated regarding their structural and optical properties. Moreover, thin films of chalcostibite and tetrahedrite were prepared on mesoporous TiO2 layers and photoinduced charge transfer in these metal sulfide/TiO2 heterojunctions was studied via transient absorption spectroscopy. Photoinduced charge transfer was detected in both the chalcostibite as well as the tetrahedrite sample, which is an essential property in view of applying these materials as light-harvesting agents in semiconductor sensitized solar cells. PMID:27019713

  12. Bacterial Spores Survive Electrospray Charging and Desolvation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, Sara N.; Austin, Daniel E.

    2014-05-01

    The survivability of Bacillus subtilis spores and vegetative Escherichia coli cells after electrospray from aqueous suspension was tested using mobility experiments at atmospheric pressure. E. coli did not survive electrospray charging and desolvation, but B. subtilis did. Experimental conditions ensured that any surviving bacteria were de-agglomerated, desolvated, and electrically charged. Based on mobility measurements, B. subtilis spores survived even with 2,000-20,000 positive charges. B. subtilis was also found to survive introduction into vacuum after either positive or negative electrospray. Attempts to measure the charge distribution of viable B. subtilis spores using electrostatic deflection in vacuum were inconclusive; however, viable spores with low charge states (less than 42 positive or less than 26 negative charges) were observed.

  13. Ion Accelerator With Negatively Biased Decelerator Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.

    1994-01-01

    Three-grid ion accelerator in which accelerator grid is biased at negative potential and decelerator grid downstream of accelerator grid biased at smaller negative potential. This grid and bias arrangement reduces frequency of impacts, upon accelerator grid, of charge-exchange ions produced downstream in collisions between accelerated ions and atoms and molecules of background gas. Sputter erosion of accelerator grid reduced.

  14. Ultrafast interfacial charge separation processes from the singlet and triplet MLCT states of Ru(bpy)2(dcbpy) adsorbed on nanocrystalline SnO2 under negative applied bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwai, Shinichiro; Hara, Kohjiro; Murata, Shigeo; Katoh, Ryuzi; Sugihara, Hideki; Arakawa, Hironori

    2000-08-01

    We have observed the stimulated emission from the 1MLCT state of Ru(bpy)2(dcbpy) adsorbed on SnO2 nanocrystal by femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy under applied bias (Vex) for the first time. The luminescence from the 3MLCT state has been also observed by picosecond time-resolved measurement. Observed lifetimes of the stimulated emission and the luminescence are 70 fs and 130 ps, respectively, at zero applied voltage. Both these lifetimes continuously increase with increasing negative bias and reach 320 fs (stimulated emission) and 6 ns (luminescence) at Vex=-0.7 V. The change in the lifetime of luminescence and of stimulated emission under negative applied bias is considered to be due to the change in the interfacial CS rate, although the possibility of the bias dependent desorption of the dye cannot be completely excluded. We analyzed the result by assuming that the changes in the lifetimes of the stimulated emission and the luminescence are due to the change in the interfacial CS rate constant. This analysis shows that interfacial CS occurs from both the 1MLCT and 3MLCT states. The competition between CS and intersystem crossing (ISC) from 1MLCT occurs in ˜100 fs time region. Assuming there is no nonradiative relaxation pathways from 1MLCT except for CS and for ISC, the rate constant of ISC was estimated to be 1/(320 fs). The ratio of the numbers of electrons injected from the 1MLCT and the 3MLCT states was 0.76:0.22. This means that unnegligible number of electrons are injected to SnO2 from the 1MLCT state.

  15. Considerations for a high-performance thermionic energy conversion device based on a negative electron affinity emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Joshua Ryan; Bilbro, Griff L.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2007-12-01

    A theory is developed to model the effect a negative electron affinity (NEA) emitter electrode has on the negative space charge effect of a vacuum thermionic energy conversion device (TEC). The theory is derived by treating the electrons in the interelectrode space as a collisionless gas and self-consistently solving the Boltzmann transport equation and Poisson equation. The theory determines the point on the voltage-current characteristic such that the maximum motive due to space charge is at the same level as the conduction band minimum. It is shown that emitter electrodes with an NEA significantly mitigate the negative space charge effect; therefore a TEC employing such an electrode will outperfrom a similar TEC with conventional electrodes in terms of output power. Additionally, it is shown that a TEC with an NEA emitter electrode can have a greater interelectrode spacing than a TEC with conventional electrodes operating under similar conditions where the outputs of both TEC’s are comparable.

  16. Charge Buildup in Magnetized Process Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namura, Takashi; Okada, Hiroyuki; Naitoh, Yasushi; Todokoro, Yoshihiro; Inoue, Morio

    1991-07-01

    The charge buildup in a magnetron etcher has been studied experimentally for two different magnet arrangements and theoretically on the basis of an equivalent circuit model. Wafer charging measured with a metal-Si3N4-SiO2-Si (MNOS) capacitor is negative along the centerline of the magnet poles and positive between the magnets in both cases. Wafer charging is explained either by curtent crowding at the center of the magnet poles or by the nonambipolar diffusion effect.

  17. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  18. Phosphazene additives

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  19. Negative results: negative perceptions limit their potential for increasing reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A

    2015-07-07

    Negative results are an important building block in the development of scientific thought, primarily because most likely the vast majority of data is negative, i.e., there is not a favorable outcome. Only very limited data is positive, and that is what tends to get published, albeit alongside a sub-set of negative results to emphasize the positive nature of the positive results. Yet, not all negative results get published. Part of the problem lies with a traditional mind-set and rigid publishing frame-work that tends to view negative results in a negative light, or that only tends to reward scientists primarily for presenting positive findings. This opinion piece indicates that in addition to a deficient mind-set, there are also severe limitations in the availability of publishing channels where negative results could get published.

  20. Particle size effects in particle-particle triboelectric charging studied with an integrated fluidized bed and electrostatic separator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilici, Mihai A.; Toth, Joseph R.; Sankaran, R. Mohan; Lacks, Daniel J.

    2014-10-01

    Fundamental studies of triboelectric charging of granular materials via particle-particle contact are challenging to control and interpret because of foreign material surfaces that are difficult to avoid during contacting and measurement. The measurement of particle charge itself can also induce charging, altering results. Here, we introduce a completely integrated fluidized bed and electrostatic separator system that charges particles solely by interparticle interactions and characterizes their charge on line. Particles are contacted in a free-surface fluidized bed (no reactor walls) with a well-controlled fountain-like flow to regulate particle-particle contact. The charged particles in the fountain are transferred by a pulsed jet of air to the top of a vertically-oriented electrostatic separator consisting of two electrodes at oppositely biased high voltage. The free-falling particles migrate towards the electrodes of opposite charge and are collected by an array of cups where their charge and size can be determined. We carried out experiments on a bidisperse size mixture of soda lime glass particles with systematically varying ratios of concentration. Results show that larger particles fall close to the negative electrode and smaller particles fall close to the positive electrode, consistent with theory and prior experiments that larger particles charge positively and smaller particles charge negatively. The segregation of particles by charge for one of the size components is strongest when its collisions are mostly with particles of the other size component; thus, small particles segregate most strongly to the negative sample when their concentration in the mixture is small (and analogous results occur for the large particles). Furthermore, we find additional size segregation due to granular flow, whereby the fountain becomes enriched in larger particles as the smaller particles are preferentially expelled from the fountain.

  1. Particle size effects in particle-particle triboelectric charging studied with an integrated fluidized bed and electrostatic separator system

    SciTech Connect

    Bilici, Mihai A.; Toth, Joseph R.; Sankaran, R. Mohan; Lacks, Daniel J.

    2014-10-15

    Fundamental studies of triboelectric charging of granular materials via particle-particle contact are challenging to control and interpret because of foreign material surfaces that are difficult to avoid during contacting and measurement. The measurement of particle charge itself can also induce charging, altering results. Here, we introduce a completely integrated fluidized bed and electrostatic separator system that charges particles solely by interparticle interactions and characterizes their charge on line. Particles are contacted in a free-surface fluidized bed (no reactor walls) with a well-controlled fountain-like flow to regulate particle-particle contact. The charged particles in the fountain are transferred by a pulsed jet of air to the top of a vertically-oriented electrostatic separator consisting of two electrodes at oppositely biased high voltage. The free-falling particles migrate towards the electrodes of opposite charge and are collected by an array of cups where their charge and size can be determined. We carried out experiments on a bidisperse size mixture of soda lime glass particles with systematically varying ratios of concentration. Results show that larger particles fall close to the negative electrode and smaller particles fall close to the positive electrode, consistent with theory and prior experiments that larger particles charge positively and smaller particles charge negatively. The segregation of particles by charge for one of the size components is strongest when its collisions are mostly with particles of the other size component; thus, small particles segregate most strongly to the negative sample when their concentration in the mixture is small (and analogous results occur for the large particles). Furthermore, we find additional size segregation due to granular flow, whereby the fountain becomes enriched in larger particles as the smaller particles are preferentially expelled from the fountain.

  2. CHARGE Association.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Semanti; Chakraborty, Jayanta

    2012-12-01

    We present here a case of 17-year-old boy from Kolkata presenting with obesity, bilateral gynecomastia, mental retardation, and hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. The patient weighed 70 kg and was of 153 cm height. Facial asymmetry (unilateral facial palsy), gynecomastia, decreased pubic and axillary hair, small penis, decreased right testicular volume, non-palpable left testis, and right-sided congenital inguinal hernia was present. The patient also had disc coloboma, convergent squint, microcornea, microphthalmia, pseudohypertelorism, low set ears, short neck, and choanalatresia. He had h/o VSD repaired with patch. Laboratory examination revealed haemoglobin 9.9 mg/dl, urea 24 mg/dl, creatinine 0.68 mg/dl. IGF1 77.80 ng/ml (decreased for age), GH <0.05 ng/ml, testosterone 0.25 ng/ml, FSH-0.95 μIU/ml, LH 0.60 ΅IU/ml. ACTH, 8:00 A.M cortisol, FT3, FT4, TSH, estradiol, DHEA-S, lipid profile, and LFT was within normal limits. Prolactin was elevated at 38.50 ng/ml. The patient's karyotype was 46XY. Echocardiography revealed ventricularseptal defect closed with patch, grade 1 aortic regurgitation, and ejection fraction 67%. Ultrasound testis showed small right testis within scrotal sac and undescended left testis within left inguinal canal. CT scan paranasal sinuses revealed choanalatresia and deviation of nasal septum to the right. Sonomammography revealed bilateral proliferation of fibroglandular elements predominantly in subareoalar region of breasts. MRI of brain and pituitary region revealed markedly atrophic pituitary gland parenchyma with preserved infundibulum and hypothalamus and widened suprasellar cistern. The CHARGE association is an increasingly recognized non-random pattern of congenital anomalies comprising of coloboma, heart defect, choanal atresia, retarded growth and development, genital hypoplasia, ear abnormalities, and/or deafness.[1] These anomalies have a higher probability of occurring together. In this report, we have described a boy with CHARGE

  3. Modular Battery Charge Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Button, Robert; Gonzalez, Marcelo

    2009-01-01

    A new approach to masterless, distributed, digital-charge control for batteries requiring charge control has been developed and implemented. This approach is required in battery chemistries that need cell-level charge control for safety and is characterized by the use of one controller per cell, resulting in redundant sensors for critical components, such as voltage, temperature, and current. The charge controllers in a given battery interact in a masterless fashion for the purpose of cell balancing, charge control, and state-of-charge estimation. This makes the battery system invariably fault-tolerant. The solution to the single-fault failure, due to the use of a single charge controller (CC), was solved by implementing one CC per cell and linking them via an isolated communication bus [e.g., controller area network (CAN)] in a masterless fashion so that the failure of one or more CCs will not impact the remaining functional CCs. Each micro-controller-based CC digitizes the cell voltage (V(sub cell)), two cell temperatures, and the voltage across the switch (V); the latter variable is used in conjunction with V(sub cell) to estimate the bypass current for a given bypass resistor. Furthermore, CC1 digitizes the battery current (I1) and battery voltage (V(sub batt) and CC5 digitizes a second battery current (I2). As a result, redundant readings are taken for temperature, battery current, and battery voltage through the summation of the individual cell voltages given that each CC knows the voltage of the other cells. For the purpose of cell balancing, each CC periodically and independently transmits its cell voltage and stores the received cell voltage of the other cells in an array. The position in the array depends on the identifier (ID) of the transmitting CC. After eight cell voltage receptions, the array is checked to see if one or more cells did not transmit. If one or more transmissions are missing, the missing cell(s) is (are) eliminated from cell

  4. Maintenance of coat protein N-terminal net charge and not primary sequence is essential for zucchini yellow mosaic virus systemic infectivity.

    PubMed

    Kimalov, Boaz; Gal-On, Amit; Stav, Ran; Belausov, Eduard; Arazi, Tzahi

    2004-11-01

    Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) surface exposed coat protein (CP) N-terminal domain (Nt) is 43 aa long and contains an equal number of positively and negatively charged amino acid residues (CP-Nt net charge = 0). A ZYMV-AGII truncation mutant lacking the first 20 aa of its CP-Nt (AGII-CP Delta 20; CP-Nt net charge = +2) was found to be systemically non-infectious even though AGII mutants harbouring larger CP-Nt deletions were previously demonstrated to be fully infectious. Nevertheless, AGII-CP Delta 20 infectivity was restored by fusion to its CP-Nt two Asp residues or a negatively charged Myc peptide, both predicted to neutralize CP-Nt net positive charge. To evaluate further the significance of CP-Nt net charge for AGII infectivity, a series of CP-Nt net charge mutants was generated and analysed for systemic infectivity of squash plants. AGII-CP(KKK) harbouring a CP-Nt amino fusion of three Lys residues (CP-Nt net charge = +3) was not systemically infectious. Addition of up to four Asp residues to CP-Nt did not abolish virus infectivity, although certain mutants were genetically unstable and had delayed infectivity. Addition of five negatively charged residues abolished infectivity (AGII-CP(DDDDD); CP-Nt net charge = -5) even though a recombinant CP(DDDDD) could assemble into potyviral-like particle in bacteria. Neutralization of CP-Nt net charge by fusing Asp or Lys residues recovered infectivity of AGII-CP(KKK) and AGII-CP(DDDDD). GFP-tagging of these mutants has demonstrated that both viruses have defective cell-to-cell movement. Together, these findings suggest that maintenance of CP-Nt net charge and not primary sequence is essential for ZYMV infectivity.

  5. A novel type of highly negatively charged lipooligosaccharide from Pseudomonas stutzeri OX1 possessing two 4,6-O-(1-carboxy)-ethylidene residues in the outer core region.

    PubMed

    Leone, Serena; Izzo, Viviana; Silipo, Alba; Sturiale, Luisa; Garozzo, Domenico; Lanzetta, Rosa; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Molinaro, Antonio; Di Donato, Alberto

    2004-07-01

    Pseudomonas stutzeri OXI is a Gram-negative microorganism able to grow in media containing aromatic hydrocarbons. A novel lipo-oligosaccharide from P. stutzeri OX1 was isolated and characterized. For the first time, the presence of two moieties of 4,6-O-(1-carboxy)-ethylidene residues (pyruvic acid) was identified in a core region; these two residues were found to possess different absolute configuration. The structure of the oligosaccharide backbone was determined using either alkaline or acid hydrolysis. Alkaline treatment, aimed at recovering the complete carbohydrate backbone, was carried out by mild hydrazinolysis (de-O-acylation) followed by de-N-acylation using hot KOH. The lipo-oligosaccharide was also analyzed after acid treatment, attained by mild hydrolysis with acetic acid, to obtain information on the nature of the phosphate and acyl groups. The two resulting oligosaccharides were isolated by gel permeation chromatography, and investigated by compositional and methylation analyses, by MALDI mass spectrometry, and by 1H-, 31P- and 13C-NMR spectroscopy. These experiments led to the identification of the major oligosaccharide structure representative of core region-lipid A. All sugars are D-pyranoses and alpha-linked, if not stated otherwise. Based on the structure found, the hypothesis can be advanced that pyruvate residues are used to block elongation of the oligosaccharide chain. This would lead to a less hydrophilic cellular surface, indicating an adaptive response of P. sutzeri OX1 to a hydrocarbon-containing environment.

  6. Layered Graphene-Hexagonal BN Nanocomposites: Experimentally Feasible Approach to Charge-Induced Switchable CO2 Capture.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xin; Kou, Liangzhi; Smith, Sean C

    2015-09-07

    Recently, inducing negative charge density on hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) has been predicted as an effective strategy for controllable, selective, and reversible CO2 capture. However, h-BN is a wide-gap semiconductor and it is not clear how to effectively induce the requisite negative charge density. In this paper, we employ first-principle calculations to propose hybrid h-BN-graphene (hybrid BN/G) nanosheets as an experimentally feasible strategy to induce charge on h-BN for charge-controlled CO2 capture. The results indicate that the charge density is effectively transferred from the graphene layer with high electronic mobility into the h-BN layer on the surface, regardless of the thickness of BN layers, such that CO2 capture/release can be simply controlled by switching on/off the charge states of hybrid BN/G system. In addition, these negatively charged hybrid BN/G are highly selective for separating CO2 from mixtures with CH4 , N2 , and/or H2 .

  7. Effect of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles on space charge distribution in propylene carbonate under impulse voltage

    SciTech Connect

    Sima, Wenxia Song, He; Yang, Qing; Guo, Hongda; Chen, Qiulin

    2015-12-15

    Addition of nanoparticles of the ferromagnetic material Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} can increase the positive impulse breakdown voltage of propylene carbonate by 11.65%. To further investigate the effect of ferromagnetic nanoparticles on the space charge distribution in the discharge process, the present work set up a Kerr electro-optic field mapping measurement system using an array photodetector to carry out time-continuous measurement of the electric field and space charge distribution in propylene carbonate before and after modification. Test results show that fast electrons can be captured by Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles and converted into relatively slow, negatively charged particles, inhibiting the generation and transportation of the space charge, especially the negative space charge.

  8. Instrumentation for Studies of Electron Emission and Charging From Insulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, C. D.; Zavyalov, V.; Dennison, J. R.

    2004-01-01

    Making measurements of electron emission properties of insulators is difficult since insulators can charge either negatively or positively under charge particle bombardment. In addition, high incident energies or high fluences can result in modification of a material s conductivity, bulk and surface charge profile, structural makeup through bond breaking and defect creation, and emission properties. We discuss here some of the charging difficulties associated with making insulator-yield measurements and review the methods used in previous studies of electron emission from insulators. We present work undertaken by our group to make consistent and accurate measurements of the electron/ion yield properties for numerous thin-film and thick insulator materials using innovative instrumentation and techniques. We also summarize some of the necessary instrumentation developed for this purpose including fast response, low-noise, high-sensitivity ammeters; signal isolation and interface to standard computer data acquisition apparatus using opto-isolation, sample-and-hold, and boxcar integration techniques; computer control, automation and timing using Labview software; a multiple sample carousel; a pulsed, compact, low-energy, charge neutralization electron flood gun; and pulsed visible and UV light neutralization sources. This work is supported through funding from the NASA Space Environments and Effects Program and the NASA Graduate Research Fellowship Program.

  9. Gelation of charged catanionic vesicles prepared by a semispontaneous process.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zheng-Lin; Hong, Jhen-Yi; Chang, Chien-Hsiang; Yang, Yu-Min

    2010-02-16

    Various stable charged catanionic vesicles with mean zeta-potential values from +59 mV to -96 mV were successfully prepared from an ion-pair amphiphile (dodecyltrimethylammonium-dodecylsulfate, DTMA-DS) and different amounts of the component ionic surfactants (dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide and sodium dodecyl sulfate) by using a simple semispontaneous process with the aid of cosolvent (1-propanol) addition in water. With the ensuring positively and negatively charged catanionic vesicles, gelation of them by four water-soluble polymers with various charge and hydrophobic characteristics was systematically studied by the tube inversion and rheological characteristic analyses. Four phase maps, which show regions of phase separation, viscous solution, and gel by varying the vesicle composition and polymer content, were thereby constructed. Furthermore, the experimental results of the relaxation time and the storage modulus at 1 Hz for the viscous solutions and gel samples revealed that the interactions at play between charged catanionic vesicles and the water-soluble polymers are of electrostatic and hydrophobic origin. The phase maps and the rheological properties obtained for mixtures of charged catanionic vesicles and polymers may provide useful information for the potential application of catanionic vesicles in mucosal or transdermal delivery of drugs.

  10. Influence of the direction of spontaneous orientation polarization on the charge injection properties of organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Yutaka; Lim, Hyunsoo; Isoshima, Takashi; Ito, Eisuke; Hara, Masahiko; Won Chin, Whee; Wook Han, Jin; Kinjo, Hiroumi; Ozawa, Yusuke; Nakayama, Yasuo; Ishii, Hisao

    2013-05-01

    A tris(7-propyl-8-hydroxyquinolinato) aluminum [Al(7-Prq)3] film shows negative giant surface potential (GSP) because of spontaneous orientation polarization. The polarity of this film is opposite to those of tris-(8-hydroxyquinolate) aluminum films. In Al(7-Prq)3-based organic light-emitting diodes, negative GSP leads to the positive interface charge and governs the electron injection and accumulation properties. In addition, a high resistance to the electron injection at the Al(7-Prq)3/Ca interface is suggested possibly because of the negative polarization charge at the interface. These results show the importance of orientation polarization in controlling the charge injection and accumulation properties and potential profile of the resultant devices.

  11. Analysis of Lunar Surface Charging for a Candidate Spacecraft Using NASCAP-2K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Linda; Minow, Joseph; Blackwell, William, Jr.

    2007-01-01

    The characterization of the electromagnetic interaction for a spacecraft in the lunar environment, and identification of viable charging mitigation strategies, is a critical lunar mission design task, as spacecraft charging has important implications both for science applications and for astronaut safety. To that end, we have performed surface charging calculations of a candidate lunar spacecraft for lunar orbiting and lunar landing missions. We construct a model of the spacecraft with candidate materials having appropriate electrical properties using Object Toolkit and perform the spacecraft charging analysis using Nascap-2k, the NASA/AFRL sponsored spacecraft charging analysis tool. We use nominal and atypical lunar environments appropriate for lunar orbiting and lunar landing missions to establish current collection of lunar ions and electrons. In addition, we include a geostationary orbit case to demonstrate a bounding example of extreme (negative) charging of a lunar spacecraft in the geostationary orbit environment. Results from the charging analysis demonstrate that minimal differential potentials (and resulting threat of electrostatic discharge) occur when the spacecraft is constructed entirely of conducting materials, as expected. We compare charging results to data taken during previous lunar orbiting or lunar flyby spacecraft missions.

  12. Hydration of highly charged ions.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Thomas S; Weiss, Alexander K H; Randolf, Bernhard R; Rode, Bernd M

    2011-08-01

    Based on a series of ab initio quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics (QMCF MD) simulations, the broad spectrum of structural and dynamical properties of hydrates of trivalent and tetravalent ions is presented, ranging from extreme inertness to immediate hydrolysis. Main group and transition metal ions representative for different parts of the periodic system are treated, as are 2 threefold negatively charged anions. The results show that simple predictions of the properties of the hydrates appear impossible and that an accurate quantum mechanical simulation in cooperation with sophisticated experimental investigations seems the only way to obtain conclusive results.

  13. Charge tuning in [111] grown GaAs droplet quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Bouet, L.; Vidal, M.; Marie, X.; Amand, T.; Wang, G.; Urbaszek, B.; Mano, T.; Ha, N.; Kuroda, T.; Sakoda, K.; Durnev, M. V.; Glazov, M. M.; Ivchenko, E. L.

    2014-08-25

    We demonstrate charge tuning in strain free GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dots (QDs) grown by droplet epitaxy on a GaAs(111)A substrate. Application of a bias voltage allows the controlled charging of the QDs from −3|e| to +2|e|. The resulting changes in QD emission energy and exciton fine-structure are recorded in micro-photoluminescence experiments at T = 4 K. We uncover the existence of excited valence and conduction states, in addition to the s-shell-like ground state. We record a second series of emission lines about 25 meV above the charged exciton emission coming from excited charged excitons. For these excited interband transitions, a negative diamagnetic shift of large amplitude is uncovered in longitudinal magnetic fields.

  14. A comparative study on the effect of Curcumin and Chlorin-p6 on the transport of the LDS cation across a negatively charged POPG bilayer: Effect of pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varshney, G. K.; Kintali, S. R.; Gupta, P. K.; Das, K.

    2017-02-01

    We report the use of interface selective Second Harmonic generation technique to investigate the transport of the LDS cation across POPG liposomes in the pH range of 4.0 to 8.0 in the presence and absence of two amphiphilic drugs, Curcumin and Chlorin-p6 (Cp6). Our results show that bilayer permeability of liposomes is significantly affected by the presence of the drugs and pH of the medium as evidenced by significant changes in the transport kinetics of the LDS. Studies carried out in the pH range 4.0-8.0 show that while Cp6 significantly enhanced the transport of LDS at pH 4.0, the transport of the cation was seen to increase with increasing pH, with maximum effect at pH 7.4 for Curcumin. The pH dependent bilayer localization of both the drugs was investigated by conducting steady state FRET studies using DPH labeled lipids as donors. The FRET results and the relative population of the various ionic/nonionic species of the drugs at different pH suggest that distance dependent interaction between the various ionic species of the drugs and polar head groups of the lipid is responsible for the observed pH dependence enhancement of the drug induced membrane permeability. Another interesting observation was that the stability of Curcumin in presence of POPG liposomes was observed to degrade significantly near physiological pH (7.4 and 8.0). Although this degradation did not affect the liposome integrity, interestingly this was observed to enhance the transport of the LDS cation across the bilayer. That the degradation products of Curcumin are equally effective as the drug itself in enhancing the membrane permeability lends additional support to the current opinion that the bioactive degradation products of the drug may have a significant contribution to its observed pharmacological effects.

  15. In Situ NMR Spectroscopy of Supercapacitors: Insight into the Charge Storage Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Electrochemical capacitors, commonly known as supercapacitors, are important energy storage devices with high power capabilities and long cycle lives. Here we report the development and application of in situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methodologies to study changes at the electrode–electrolyte interface in working devices as they charge and discharge. For a supercapacitor comprising activated carbon electrodes and an organic electrolyte, NMR experiments carried out at different charge states allow quantification of the number of charge storing species and show that there are at least two distinct charge storage regimes. At cell voltages below 0.75 V, electrolyte anions are increasingly desorbed from the carbon micropores at the negative electrode, while at the positive electrode there is little change in the number of anions that are adsorbed as the voltage is increased. However, above a cell voltage of 0.75 V, dramatic increases in the amount of adsorbed anions in the positive electrode are observed while anions continue to be desorbed at the negative electrode. NMR experiments with simultaneous cyclic voltammetry show that supercapacitor charging causes marked changes to the local environments of charge storing species, with periodic changes of their chemical shift observed. NMR calculations on a model carbon fragment show that the addition and removal of electrons from a delocalized system should lead to considerable increases in the nucleus-independent chemical shift of nearby species, in agreement with our experimental observations. PMID:24274637

  16. Negative hydrogen ion production mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Bacal, M.; Wada, M.

    2015-06-15

    Negative hydrogen/deuterium ions can be formed by processes occurring in the plasma volume and on surfaces facing the plasma. The principal mechanisms leading to the formation of these negative ions are dissociative electron attachment to ro-vibrationally excited hydrogen/deuterium molecules when the reaction takes place in the plasma volume, and the direct electron transfer from the low work function metal surface to the hydrogen/deuterium atoms when formation occurs on the surface. The existing theoretical models and reported experimental results on these two mechanisms are summarized. Performance of the negative hydrogen/deuterium ion sources that emerged from studies of these mechanisms is reviewed. Contemporary negative ion sources do not have negative ion production electrodes of original surface type sources but are operated with caesium with their structures nearly identical to volume production type sources. Reasons for enhanced negative ion current due to caesium addition to these sources are discussed.

  17. Negative hydrogen ion production mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacal, M.; Wada, M.

    2015-06-01

    Negative hydrogen/deuterium ions can be formed by processes occurring in the plasma volume and on surfaces facing the plasma. The principal mechanisms leading to the formation of these negative ions are dissociative electron attachment to ro-vibrationally excited hydrogen/deuterium molecules when the reaction takes place in the plasma volume, and the direct electron transfer from the low work function metal surface to the hydrogen/deuterium atoms when formation occurs on the surface. The existing theoretical models and reported experimental results on these two mechanisms are summarized. Performance of the negative hydrogen/deuterium ion sources that emerged from studies of these mechanisms is reviewed. Contemporary negative ion sources do not have negative ion production electrodes of original surface type sources but are operated with caesium with their structures nearly identical to volume production type sources. Reasons for enhanced negative ion current due to caesium addition to these sources are discussed.

  18. Negative numbers in simple arithmetic.

    PubMed

    Das, Runa; LeFevre, Jo-Anne; Penner-Wilger, Marcie

    2010-10-01

    Are negative numbers processed differently from positive numbers in arithmetic problems? In two experiments, adults (N = 66) solved standard addition and subtraction problems such as 3 + 4 and 7 - 4 and recasted versions that included explicit negative signs-that is, 3 - (-4), 7 + (-4), and (-4) + 7. Solution times on the recasted problems were slower than those on standard problems, but the effect was much larger for addition than subtraction. The negative sign may prime subtraction in both kinds of recasted problem. Problem size effects were the same or smaller in recasted than in standard problems, suggesting that the recasted formats did not interfere with mental calculation. These results suggest that the underlying conceptual structure of the problem (i.e., addition vs. subtraction) is more important for solution processes than the presence of negative numbers.

  19. Workplace Charging. Charging Up University Campuses

    SciTech Connect

    Giles, Carrie; Ryder, Carrie; Lommele, Stephen

    2016-03-01

    This case study features the experiences of university partners in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Workplace Charging Challenge with the installation and management of plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) charging stations.

  20. Charge-controlled switchable CO2 capture on boron nitride nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiao; Li, Zhen; Searles, Debra J; Chen, Ying; Lu, Gaoqing Max; Du, Aijun

    2013-06-05

    Increasing concerns about the atmospheric CO2 concentration and its impact on the environment are motivating researchers to discover new materials and technologies for efficient CO2 capture and conversion. Here, we report a study of the adsorption of CO2, CH4, and H2 on boron nitride (BN) nanosheets and nanotubes (NTs) with different charge states. The results show that the process of CO2 capture/release can be simply controlled by switching on/off the charges carried by BN nanomaterials. CO2 molecules form weak interactions with uncharged BN nanomaterials and are weakly adsorbed. When extra electrons are introduced to these nanomaterials (i.e., when they are negatively charged), CO2 molecules become tightly bound and strongly adsorbed. Once the electrons are removed, CO2 molecules spontaneously desorb from BN absorbents. In addition, these negatively charged BN nanosorbents show high selectivity for separating CO2 from its mixtures with CH4 and/or H2. Our study demonstrates that BN nanomaterials are excellent absorbents for controllable, highly selective, and reversible capture and release of CO2. In addition, the charge density applied in this study is of the order of 10(13) cm(-2) of BN nanomaterials and can be easily realized experimentally.

  1. Human fibrinogen adsorption on positively charged latex particles.

    PubMed

    Zeliszewska, Paulina; Bratek-Skicki, Anna; Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Cieśla, Michał

    2014-09-23

    Fibrinogen (Fb) adsorption on positively charged latex particles (average diameter of 800 nm) was studied using the microelectrophoretic and the concentration depletion methods based on AFM imaging. Monolayers on latex were adsorbed from diluted bulk solutions at pH 7.4 and an ionic strength in the range of 10(-3) to 0.15 M where fibrinogen molecules exhibited an average negative charge. The electrophoretic mobility of the latex after controlled fibrinogen adsorption was systematically measured. A monotonic decrease in the electrophoretic mobility of fibrinogen-covered latex was observed for all ionic strengths. The results of these experiments were interpreted according to the three-dimensional electrokinetic model. It was also determined using the concentration depletion method that fibrinogen adsorption was irreversible and the maximum coverage was equal to 0.6 mg m(-2) for ionic strength 10(-3) M and 1.3 mg m(-2) for ionic strength 0.15 M. The increase of the maximum coverage was confirmed by theoretical modeling based on the random sequential adsorption approach. Paradoxically, the maximum coverage of fibrinogen on positively charged latex particles was more than two times lower than the maximum coverage obtained for negative latex particles (3.2 mg m(-2)) at pH 7.4 and ionic strength of 0.15 M. This was interpreted as a result of the side-on adsorption of fibrinogen molecules with their negatively charged core attached to the positively charged latex surface. The stability and acid base properties of fibrinogen monolayers on latex were also determined in pH cycling experiments where it was observed that there were no irreversible conformational changes in the fibrinogen monolayers. Additionally, the zeta potential of monolayers was more positive than the zeta potential of fibrinogen in the bulk, which proves a heterogeneous charge distribution. These experimental data reveal a new, side-on adsorption mechanism of fibrinogen on positively charged surfaces and

  2. Negative Ions for Emerging Interdisciplinary Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guharay, Samar K.

    2011-09-01

    In many applications related to ion beam-materials interactions negative ions are particularly desirable due to its merit to yield a very low surface charge-up voltage, ˜ a few volts, for both electrically isolated surfaces and insulators. Some important applications pertaining to ion beam-material interactions include surface analysis by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), voltage-contrast microscopy for semiconductor device inspection, materials processing, and ion beam lithography. These applications primarily require vacuum environments. On the other hand, a distinct area of activities constitutes formation of ions and ion transport in ambient environmental conditions, i.e., at atmospheric pressures. In this context, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is an important analytical device that uses negative ions and operates at ambient conditions. IMS is widely used in both physical and biological sciences including monitoring environmental conditions, security screening and disease detection. This article highlights several critical issues related to the ionization sources and ion transport in IMS. Additionally, the critical issues related to ion sources, transport and focusing are discussed in the context of SIMS with sub-micrometer spatial resolution.

  3. Quick spacecraft charging primer

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, Brian Arthur

    2014-03-12

    This is a presentation in PDF format which is a quick spacecraft charging primer, meant to be used for program training. It goes into detail about charging physics, RBSP examples, and how to identify charging.

  4. Effect of surface charge of polyethyleneimine-modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes on the improvement of polymerase chain reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xueyan; Chen, Jingjing; Wen, Shihui; Peng, Chen; Shen, Mingwu; Shi, Xiangyang

    2011-04-01

    In molecular biology, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has played an important role but suffers a general problem with low efficiency and specificity. Development of suitable additives to improve the PCR specificity and efficiency and the understanding of the PCR enhancing mechanism still remain a great challenge. Here we report the use of polyethyleneimine (PEI)-modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with different surface charge polarities as a novel class of enhancers to improve the specificity and efficiency of PCR. The materials used included the positively charged PEI-modified MWCNTs (CNT/PEI), the neutral CNT/PEI modified with acetic anhydride (CNT/PEI.Ac), and the negatively charged CNT/PEI modified with succinic anhydride (CNT/PEI.SAH). We show that the specificity and efficiency of an error-prone two-round PCR are greatly impacted by the surface charge polarity of the PEI-modified MWCNTs. Positively charged CNT/PEI could significantly enhance the specificity and efficiency of PCR with an optimum concentration as low as 0.39 mg L-1, whereas neutral CNT/PEI.Ac had no such effect. Although negatively charged CNT/PEI.SAH could enhance the PCR, the optimum concentration required (630 mg L-1) was more than 3 orders of magnitude higher than that of positively charged CNT/PEI. The present study suggests that the PCR enhancing effect may be primarily based on the electrostatic interaction between the positively charged CNT/PEI and the negatively charged PCR components, rather than only on the thermal conductivity of MWCNTs.In molecular biology, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has played an important role but suffers a general problem with low efficiency and specificity. Development of suitable additives to improve the PCR specificity and efficiency and the understanding of the PCR enhancing mechanism still remain a great challenge. Here we report the use of polyethyleneimine (PEI)-modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with different surface charge

  5. On charging of snow particles in blizzard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shio, Hisashi

    1991-01-01

    The causes of the charge polarity on the blizzard, which consisted of fractured snow crystals and ice particles, were investigated. As a result, the charging phenomena showed that the characteristics of the blizzard are as follows: (1) In the case of the blizzard with snowfall, the fractured snow particles drifting near the surface of snow field (lower area: height 0.3 m) had positive charge, while those drifting at higher area (height 2 m) from the surface of snow field had negative charge. However, during the series of blizzards two kinds of particles positively and negatively charged were collected in equal amounts in a Faraday Cage. It may be considered that snow crystals with electrically neutral properties were separated into two kinds of snow flakes (charged positively and negatively) by destruction of the snow crystals. (2) In the case of the blizzard which consisted of irregularly formed ice drops (generated by peeling off the hardened snow field), the charge polarity of these ice drops salting over the snow field was particularly controlled by the crystallographic characteristics of the surface of the snow field hardened by the powerful wind pressure.

  6. Stability of Charged Grains in Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jontof-Hutter, D.; Hamilton, D. P.

    2012-12-01

    Hypervelocity impacts of interplanetary micrometeoroids with orbiting ring particles generate dusty debris of all sizes. These ejecta particles become electrically charged by interactions with orbiting plasma and solar photons. Accordingly, they experience both gravity and Lorentz forces, whose combined effects cause interesting and complex dynamics. For simplicity, we initially model the magnetic field of Saturn as a centered and aligned dipole and investigate the stability of motion for grains launched from circularly-orbiting parent bodies. In this approximation, the magnetic equator and the ring-plane coincide. We begin with numerical models, determining the stability of dust grain trajectories in both the radial and vertical directions as a function of launch distance from the planet, and over all charge-to-mass ratios from ions to rocks. We find that positively-charged sub-micron dust grains over a limited range in size are radially unstable, colliding with the planet if launched from within synchronous orbit and escaping entirely if launched from outside this distance. Escaping grains have been observed as high-velocity dust streams at Saturn and at Jupiter. In addition, positively and negatively-charged smaller grains are vertically unstable and spiral up magnetic field lines to sustain non-linear vertical oscillations or to collide with the planet at high latitude. We then undertake local and global stability analyses and derive stability criteria that match our numerical data extremely well. Our work builds upon studies led by Burns, Hamilton, Horanyi, Howard, Mendis, Mitchell, Northrop, Schaffer, and others. We confirm that for charged dust grains launched at the Kepler speed, planetary gravity cannot be ignored, even in the limit of electromagnetically-dominated grains. Some stability boundaries can be obtained analytically while others require more complicated semianalytic methods. Our solutions are general and can be applied wherever an aligned

  7. Interactions of Organic Additives with Ionic Crystal Hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füredi-Milhofer, H.; Sikirić, M.; Tunik, L.; Filipović-Vinceković, N.; Garti, N.

    The interactions of two groups of hydrated model crystals, calcium hydrogenphosphate dihydrate (DCPD) vs. octacalcium phosphate (OCP) and calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) vs. calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) with different organic additives are considered. DCPD precipitates as platelet-like crystals with the dominant faces shielded by hydrated layers and charged lateral faces. In the second system COM has charged surfaces, while all faces of COD are covered with layers containing water molecules. The organic molecules tested include negatively charged, flexible and rigid small and macromolecules (glutamic and aspartic acid, citrate, hexaammonium polyphosphate, phytate and polyaspartate) and anionic surfactants (sodium dodecyl sulphate, SDS, sodium diisooctyl sulfosuccinate, AOT, sodium cholate NaC and disodium oleoamido PEG-2 sulfosuccinate, PEG). Two types of effects have been demonstrated: (1) Effect on crystal growth morphology: Flexible organic molecules with high charge density and anionic surfactants affected the growth morphology of DCPD and COM by selectively interacting with the charged lateral faces while rigid molecules (phytate, polyaspartate) specifically recognized the dominant (010) face of DCPD due to structural and stereochemical compatibility. (2) Effect on phase composition: Anionic surfactants at concentrations above the cmc promoted growth of OCP and COD respectively by selectively adsorbing at, and inhibiting growth oif nuclei of DCPD and/or COM, which were dominant in the respective control systems. The effect was especially pronounced in the calcium oxalate precipitation system, where in some cases complete reversal of the phase composition occurred. The important role of the hydrated layer, as part of the structure of the investigated crystal hydrates, in the above crystal additive interactions is discussed.

  8. Improved negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Delmore, J.E.

    1984-05-01

    A method and apparatus for providing a negative ion source accelerates electrons away from a hot filament electron emitter into a region of crossed electric and magnetic fields arranged in a magnetron configuration. During a portion of the resulting cycloidal path, the electron velocity is reduced below its initial value. The electron accelerates as it leaves the surface at a rate of only slightly less than if there were no magnetic field, thereby preventing a charge buildup at the surface of the emitter. As the electron traverses the cycloid, it is decelerated during the second, third, and fourth quadrants, then reaccelerated as it approaches the end of the fourth quadrant to regain its original velocity. The minimum velocity occurs during the fourth quadrant, and corresponds to an electron temperature of 200 to 500/sup 0/C for the electric and magnetic fields commonly encountered in the ion sources of magnetic sector mass spectrometers. An ion source using the above-described thermalized electrons is also disclosed.

  9. Negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Delmore, James E.

    1987-01-01

    A method and apparatus for providing a negative ion source accelerates electrons away from a hot filament electron emitter into a region of crossed electric and magnetic fields arranged in a magnetron configuration. During a portion of the resulting cycloidal path, the electron velocity is reduced below its initial value. The electron accelerates as it leaves the surface at a rate of only slightly less than if there were no magnetic field, thereby preventing a charge buildup at the surface of the emitter. As the electron traverses the cycloid, it is decelerated during the second, third, and fourth quadrants, then reeccelerated as it approaches the end of the fourth quadrant to regain its original velocity. The minimum velocity occurs during the fourth quadrant, and corresponds to an electron temperature of 200.degree. to 500.degree. for the electric and magnetic fields commonly encountered in the ion sources of magnetic sector mass spectrometers. An ion source using the above-described thermalized electrons is also disclosed.

  10. Exotic negative molecules in AMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golser, Robin; Gnaser, Hubert; Kutschera, Walter; Priller, Alfred; Steier, Peter; Wallner, Anton

    2007-06-01

    "The techniques and equipment developed for AMS studies are well suited for identifying exotic negative ions". With this sentence begins a pioneering paper by Roy Middleton and Jeff Klein (M&K) on small doubly-charged negative carbon clusters [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 123 (1997) 532]. M&K were the first to utilize Accelerator Mass Spectrometry to prove the existence of these clusters and a number of other exotic molecules. We review M&K's efforts and show how their work is being continued at other laboratories. The latest developments are: (1) the discovery of long-lived molecular hydrogen anions H2-,D2-and (2) the unambiguous identification of the smallest doubly-charged negative molecule (LiF3)2-. In particular we show new experimental data for D3-, and for (LiF3)2-, and we try to answer the question why M&K's search for this di-anion was unsuccessful.

  11. Electrostatic Charge Carrier Injection into the Charge-Ordered Organic Material α-(BEDT-TTF)2I3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimata, Motoi; Ishihara, Takuma; Tajima, Hiroyuki

    2012-07-01

    We have fabricated a field effect transistor structure using the charge-ordered (CO) organic material α-(BEDT-TTF)2I3 to investigate the effects of electrostatic carrier injection. We have observed both n-type and bipolar behaviors in the CO state, whereas, previously, only n-type characteristics were reported. The present results indicate that the transfer characteristics for a negative gate voltage, i.e., hole transport characteristics, are highly dependent on the interface conditions between α-(BEDT-TTF)2I3 and the electrodes and/or gate insulator. In addition, the activation energy of the CO state is essentially independent of VSG. This result suggests the robustness of the CO state to electrostatic charge carrier injection.

  12. Integration Assessment of Visiting Vehicle Induced Electrical Charging of the International Space Station Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, Leonard; Kerslake, Thomas W.; Galofaro, Joel T.

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) undergoes electrical charging in low Earth orbit (LEO) due to positively biased, exposed conductors on solar arrays that collect electrical charges from the space plasma. Exposed solar array conductors predominately collect negatively charged electrons and thus drive the metal ISS structure electrical ground to a negative floating potential (FP) relative to plasma. This FP is variable in location and time as a result of local ionospheric conditions. ISS motion through Earth s magnetic field creates an addition inductive voltage up to 20 positive and negative volts across ISS structure depending on its attitude and location in orbit. ISS Visiting Vehicles (VVs), such as the planned Orion crew exploration vehicle, contribute to the ISS plasma charging processes. Upon physical contact with ISS, the current collection properties of VVs combine with ISS. This is an ISS integration concern as FP must be controlled to minimize arcing of ISS surfaces and ensure proper management of extra vehicular activity crewman shock hazards. This report is an assessment of ISS induced charging from docked Orion vehicles employing negatively grounded, 130 volt class, UltraFlex (ATK Space Systems) solar arrays. To assess plasma electron current collection characteristics, Orion solar cell test coupons were constructed and subjected to plasma chamber current collection measurements. During these tests, coupon solar cells were biased between 0 and 120 V while immersed in a simulated LEO plasma. Tests were performed using several different simulated LEO plasma densities and temperatures. These data and associated theoretical scaling of plasma properties, were combined in a numerical model which was integrated into the Boeing Plasma Interaction Model. It was found that the solar array design for Orion will not affect the ISS FP by more than about 2 V during worst case charging conditions. This assessment also motivated a trade study to determine

  13. Neurobiological background of negative symptoms.

    PubMed

    Galderisi, Silvana; Merlotti, Eleonora; Mucci, Armida

    2015-10-01

    Studies investigating neurobiological bases of negative symptoms of schizophrenia failed to provide consistent findings, possibly due to the heterogeneity of this psychopathological construct. We tried to review the findings published to date investigating neurobiological abnormalities after reducing the heterogeneity of the negative symptoms construct. The literature in electronic databases as well as citations and major articles are reviewed with respect to the phenomenology, pathology, genetics and neurobiology of schizophrenia. We searched PubMed with the keywords "negative symptoms," "deficit schizophrenia," "persistent negative symptoms," "neurotransmissions," "neuroimaging" and "genetic." Additional articles were identified by manually checking the reference lists of the relevant publications. Publications in English were considered, and unpublished studies, conference abstracts and poster presentations were not included. Structural and functional imaging studies addressed the issue of neurobiological background of negative symptoms from several perspectives (considering them as a unitary construct, focusing on primary and/or persistent negative symptoms and, more recently, clustering them into factors), but produced discrepant findings. The examined studies provided evidence suggesting that even primary and persistent negative symptoms include different psychopathological constructs, probably reflecting the dysfunction of different neurobiological substrates. Furthermore, they suggest that complex alterations in multiple neurotransmitter systems and genetic variants might influence the expression of negative symptoms in schizophrenia. On the whole, the reviewed findings, representing the distillation of a large body of disparate data, suggest that further deconstruction of negative symptomatology into more elementary components is needed to gain insight into underlying neurobiological mechanisms.

  14. Recent Results from a Laboratory Study of Charging Mechanisms in a Dusty Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venturini, Catherine C.; Spann, James F., Jr.; Comfort, Richard H.

    1998-01-01

    A laboratory investigation has been developed to experimentally study the interaction of micron sized particles with plasmas and electromagnetic radiation. The intent is to investigate under what conditions particles of various compositions and sizes become charged, or discharged, while exposed to an electron beam and UV radiation. This investigation uses a unique laboratory technique known as electrodynamic suspension of particles. Here, a single charged micron size particle is suspended in a quadrupole trap and then subjected to a controlled environment. In this paper, we will discuss recent results from this experiment in which different materials including polystyrene and aluminum oxide, and sizes ranging from 10 microns to 1 micron have been used to determine charge to mass ratios and then subjected to an electron beam and /or UV radiation. In each instance, the particle's charge as well as beam current flux and radiation intensity flux is measured. These results will be compared with initial results using salt crystals. It was found that a negatively charged salt crystal exposed for 30 minutes to a 500 eV electron beam with primary electron beam current of -3.06 x 10(exp -5) picoamps yielded a secondary electron current of 3.23 x 10(exp -5) picoamps. Additionally, the particle was observed to be steadily losing charge over this time interval. By studying the microphysics of one particle, a better understanding of theoretical models and other laboratory results associated with particle charging mechanisms can be achieved.

  15. Effect of electric charge on the adhesion of human blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Lowkis, B; Szymonowicz, M

    1993-01-01

    The paper presents the results of research into the effect of the size and depth of the implanted electric charge on the adhesion of human blood platelets. The experiments were carried out on polyethylene terephthalate PET foil of 36 microns thickness. The electret formation process was carried out in an electron-beam device. The electrization conditions were such that electrets with the excess electric charge accumulated at various depths were obtained. The selection of conditions was verified by investigating the space charge distribution with the use of the virtual electrode method. The microscopic observation of non-electrified foils and electrets as well as the quantitative examination of the adhesion of human blood platelets has explicitly confirmed the positive influence of the electret effect on the thrombogenesis of PET foil. This made it possible to define the optimum electrization conditions. The research has additionally indicated that the relationship between the amount of adherent blood platelets and the size of the electric charge is not a simple relation of the kind: the larger negative charge, the more thrombogenic material. The decisive and positive effect of the space charge has been confirmed by analysing the effectiveness of the surface and space charge.

  16. Oligomerization of Negatively-Charged Amino Acids by Carbonyldiimidazole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Aubrey R., Jr.; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1996-01-01

    The carbonyldiimidazole-induced oligomerizations of aspartic acid, glutamic acid and 0-phospho-serine are amongst the most efficient reported syntheses of biopolymers in aqueous solution. The dependence of the yields of products on the concentrations of reagents, the temperature and the enantiomeric composition of the substrate amino acids are reported. Catalysis by metal ions, particularly by Mg(2+), is described. These reactions do not generate significant amounts of material in the size-range of several tens of residues that are thought to be needed for a polymer to function as a genetic material.

  17. Enhanced performance of Zn(II)-doped lead-acid batteries with electrochemical active carbon in negative mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Jiayuan; Hu, Chen; Chen, Liying; Zhang, Dong; Ding, Ping; Chen, Dong; Liu, Hao; Chen, Jian; Wu, Xianzhang; Lai, Xiaokang

    2016-10-01

    The effect and mechanism of Zn(II) on improving the performances of lead-acid cell with electrochemical active carbon (EAC) in negative mass is investigated. The hydrogen evolution of the cell is significantly reduced due to the deposition of Zn on carbon surface and the increased porosity of negative mass. Zn(II) additives can also improve the low-temperature and high-rate capacities of the cell with EAC in negative mass, which ascribes to the formation of Zn on lead and carbon surface that constructs a conductive bridge among the active mass. Under the co-contribution of EAC and Zn(II), the partial-state-of-charge cycle life is greatly prolonged. EAC optimizes the NAM structure and porosity to enhance the charge acceptance and retard the lead sulfate accumulation. Zn(II) additive reduces the hydrogen evolution during charge process and improves the electric conductivity of the negative electrode. The cell with 0.6 wt% EAC and 0.006 wt% ZnO in negative mass exhibits 90% reversible capacity of the initial capacity after 2100 cycles. In contrast, the cell with 0.6 wt% EAC exhibits 84% reversible capacity after 2100 cycles and the control cell with no EAC and Zn(II) exhibits less than 80% reversible capacity after 1350 cycles.

  18. Negative Emissions Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Danny

    2006-04-01

    Although `negative emissions' of carbon dioxide need not, in principle, involve use of biological processes to draw carbon out of the atmosphere, such `agricultural' sequestration' is the only known way to remove carbon from the atmosphere on time scales comparable to the time scale for anthropogenic increases in carbon emissions. In order to maintain the `negative emissions' the biomass must be used in such a way that the resulting carbon dioxide is separated and permanently sequestered. Two options for sequestration are in the topsoil and via geologic carbon sequestration. The former has multiple benefits, but the latter also is needed. Thus, although geologic carbon sequestration is viewed skeptically by some environmentalists as simply a way to keep using fossil fuels---it may be a key part of reversing accelerating climate forcing if rapid climate change is beginning to occur. I will first review the general approach of agricultural sequestration combined with use of resulting biofuels in a way that permits carbon separation and then geologic sequestration as a negative emissions technology. Then I discuss the process that is the focus of my company---the EPRIDA cycle. If deployed at a sufficiently large scale, it could reverse the increase in CO2 concentrations. I also estimate of benefits --carbon and other---of large scale deployment of negative emissions technologies. For example, using the EPRIDA cycle by planting and soil sequestering carbon in an area abut In 3X the size of Texas would remove the amount of carbon that is being accumulated worldwide each year. In addition to the atmospheric carbon removal, the EPRIDA approach also counters the depletion of carbon in the soil---increasing topsoil and its fertility; reduces the excess nitrogen in the water by eliminating the need for ammonium nitrate fertilizer and reduces fossil fuel reliance by providing biofuel and avoiding natural gas based fertilizer production.

  19. The Origins of Positive and Negative in Electricity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, William B.

    2005-01-01

    Benjamin Franklin first introduced the terms positive and negative into electrical theory in the year 1747. The positive and negative terms originally had nothing to do with inherent electrical charge, but rather indicated which object had an excess of electrical fluid indicating positive, and which had a deficiency, indicating negative.

  20. An unusual charging event on ISEE 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, R. C.; Whipple, E. C.

    1988-06-01

    Electrostatic cleanliness requirements on ISEE 1 were expected to prevent negative charging in sunlight. This has largely been true, but on three occasions, ISEE 1 has been observed to charge to significant negative potentials in sunlight. Data from the two electric field experiments and from the plasma composition experiment on ISEE 1 show that the spacecraft charged to close to -70 V in sunlight at about 0700 UT on March 17, 1978. Data from the electron spectrometer experiments show that there was a potential barrier of some -10 to -20 V about the spacecraft during this event. The potential barrier was effective in turning back emitted photoelectrons to the spacecraft. Potential barriers can be formed by differential charging on the spacecraft or by the presence of excess space charge in the plasma. The shape of the barrier suggests that it is due to the former, even though electrostatic cleanliness specifications imposed on ISEE were intended to eliminate differential charging. Modeling of this event showed that the barrier could not be produced by the presence of space charge but that it was most likely produced by differential charging of the solar arrays.

  1. Lattice models of ionic systems with charge asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artyomov, Maxim N.; Kobelev, Vladimir; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2003-04-01

    The thermodynamics of a charge-asymmetric lattice gas of positive ions carrying charge q and negative ions with charge -zq is investigated using Debye-Hückel theory. Explicit analytic and numerical calculations, which take into account the formation of neutral and charged clusters and cluster solvation by the residual ions, are performed for z=2, 3, and 4. As charge asymmetry increases, the predicted critical point shifts to lower temperatures and higher densities. This trend agrees well with the results from recent Monte Carlo simulations for continuum charge-asymmetric hard-sphere ionic fluids and with the corresponding predictions from continuum Debye-Hückel theory.

  2. Migration of Carbon Adatoms on the Surface of Charged SWCNT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Longtao; Krstic, Predrag; Kaganovich, Igor

    2016-10-01

    In volume plasma, the growth of SWCNT from a transition metal catalyst could be enhanced by incoming carbon flux on SWCNT surface, which is generated by the adsorption and migration of carbon adatoms on SWCNT surface. In addition, the nanotube can be charged by the irradiation of plasma particles. How this charging effect will influence the adsorption and migration behavior of carbon atom has not been revealed. Using Density Functional Theory, Nudged Elastic Band and Kinetic Monte Carlo method, we found equilibrium sites, vibrational frequency, adsorption energy, most probable pathways for migration of adatoms, and the barrier sizes along these pathways. The metallic (5,5) SWCNT can support a fast migration of the carbon adatom along a straight path with low barriers, which is further enhanced by the presence of negative charge on SWCNT. The enhancement is contributed by the higher adsorption energy and thence longer lifetime of adatom on the charged SWCNT surface. The lifetime and migration distance of adatom increase by three and two orders of magnitude, respectively, as shown by Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation. These results support the surface migration mechanism of SWCNT growth in plasma environment. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Material Sciences and Engineering Division.

  3. Battery charge control: Which approach is best?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lurie, Charles

    1994-01-01

    The question of the best approach for battery charge control is addressed from two points of view: from the battery point-of-view; and from the spacecraft/mission point-of-view. In terms of performance, more aggressive charging can result in higher discharge voltage and capacity; however, aggressive charging usually implies more overcharge at higher rates and a concomitant higher end of charge temperature (higher stress, shorter life). In terms of life, benign charging can result in lower discharge voltage and capacity (poorer performance). Additionally, benign, or low stress charging, usually implies less overcharge at lower rates with lower end of charge temperature (lower stress, longer life). A discussion of these topics is presented in viewgraph form.

  4. Lead acid battery performance and cycle life increased through addition of discrete carbon nanotubes to both electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugumaran, Nanjan; Everill, Paul; Swogger, Steven W.; Dubey, D. P.

    2015-04-01

    Contemporary applications are changing the failure mechanisms of lead acid batteries. Sulfation at the negative electrode, acid stratification, and dendrite formation now precede positive electrode failures such as grid corrosion and active material shedding. To attenuate these failures, carbon has been explored as a negative electrode additive to increase charge acceptance, eliminate sulfation, and extend cycle life. Frequently, however, carbon incorporation decreases paste density and hinders manufacturability. Discrete carbon nanotubes (dCNT), also known as Molecular Rebar®, are lead acid battery additives which can be stably incorporated into either electrode to increase charge acceptance and cycle life with no change to paste density and without impeding the manufacturing process. Here, full-scale automotive batteries containing dCNT in the negative electrode or both negative and positive electrodes are compared to control batteries. dCNT batteries show little change to Reserve Capacity, improved Cold Cranking, increased charge acceptance, and enhanced overall system efficiency. Life cycle tests show >60% increases when dCNT are incorporated into the negative electrode (HRPSoC/SBA) and up to 500% when incorporated into both electrodes (SBA), with water loss per cycle reduced >20%. Failure modes of cycled batteries are discussed and a hypothesis of dCNT action is introduced: the dCNT/Had Overcharge Reaction Mechanism.

  5. Electrical charging of skis gliding on snow.

    PubMed

    Colbeck, S C

    1995-01-01

    Ski charging was measured using giant-slalom style skis as gliding capacitors. The voltage measured across the plates was proportional to the charge on the base. While resting on dry snow or suspended in the air, the voltage was slowly reduced by the data logger itself. On wet snow the decay was much faster. While stationary on powder snow the ski developed a slightly negative voltage, showed a small, transient positive peak when motion began, rapidly dropped to negative values, and then assumed a quasi-steady climb to positive voltages. A great deal of noise was superimposed on the general features of the signal when skiing on hard or bumpy surfaces. Thus, the accumulation of charge to high levels was only possible with long runs in deep powder. The rate of charging increased with speed but was not affected by use of one "antistatic" wax, and another such wax actually increased the measured voltage over that of an unwaxed base.

  6. Rational Design of α-Helical Antimicrobial Peptides to Target Gram-negative Pathogens, Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Utilization of Charge, ’Specificity Determinants,’ Total Hydrophobicity, Hydrophobe Type and Location as Design Parameters to Improve the Therapeutic Ratio

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ziqing; Vasil, Adriana I.; Gera, Lajos; Vasil, Michael L.; Hodges, Robert S.

    2011-01-01

    The rapidly growing problem of increased resistance to classical antibiotics makes the development of new classes of antimicrobial agents with lower rates of resistance urgent. Amphipathic cationic α-helical antimicrobial peptides have been proposed as a potential new class of antimicrobial agents. The goal of this study was to take a broad-spectrum, 26-residue, antimicrobial peptide in the all-D conformation, peptide D1 (K13) with excellent biologic properties and address the question of whether a rational design approach could be used to enhance the biologic properties if the focus was on Gram-negative pathogens only. To test this hypothesis, we used 11 and 6 diverse strains of Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudo-monas aeruginosa, respectively. We optimized the number and location of positively charged residues on the polar face, the number, location, and type of hydrophobe on the non-polar face and varied the number of ’specificity determinants’ in the center of the non-polar face from 1 to 2 to develop four new antimicrobial peptides. We demonstrated not only improvements in antimicrobial activity, but also dramatic reductions in hemolytic activity and unprecedented improvements in therapeutic indices. Compared to our original starting peptide D1 (V13), peptide D16 had a 746-fold improvement in hemolytic activity (i.e. decrease), maintained antimicrobial activity, and improved the therapeutic indices by 1305-fold and 895-fold against A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa, respectively. The resulting therapeutic indices for D16 were 3355 and 895 for A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa, respectively. D16 is an ideal candidate for commercialization as a clinical therapeutic to treat Gram-negative bacterial infections. PMID:21219588

  7. Bifunctional air electrodes containing elemental iron powder charging additive

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Chia-tsun; Demczyk, Brian G.; Gongaware, Paul R.

    1982-01-01

    A bifunctional air electrode for use in electrochemical energy cells is made, comprising a hydrophilic layer and a hydrophobic layer, where the hydrophilic layer essentially comprises a hydrophilic composite which includes: (i) carbon; (ii) elemental iron particles having a particle size of between about 25 microns and about 700 microns diameter; (iii) an oxygen evolution material; (iv) a nonwetting agent; and (v) a catalyst, where at least one current collector is formed into said composite.

  8. Battery and fuel cell electrodes containing stainless steel charging additive

    DOEpatents

    Zuckerbrod, David; Gibney, Ann

    1984-01-01

    An electrode for use in electrochemical energy cells is made, comprising a hydrophilic layer and a hydrophobic layer, where the hydrophilic layer comprises a hydrophilic composite which includes: (i) carbon particles; (ii) stainless steel particles; (iii) a nonwetting agent; and (iv) a catalyst, where at least one current collector contacts said composite.

  9. Aggregation of Heterogeneously Charged Colloids.

    PubMed

    Dempster, Joshua M; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2016-06-28

    Patchy colloids are attractive as programmable building blocks for metamaterials. Inverse patchy colloids, in which a charged surface is decorated with patches of the opposite charge, are additionally noteworthy as models for heterogeneously charged biological materials such as proteins. We study the phases and aggregation behavior of a single charged patch in an oppositely charged colloid with a single-site model. This single-patch inverse patchy colloid model shows a large number of phases when varying patch size. For large patch sizes we find ferroelectric crystals, while small patch sizes produce cross-linked gels. Intermediate values produce monodisperse clusters and unusual worm structures that preserve finite ratios of area to volume. The polarization observed at large patch sizes is robust under extreme disorder in patch size and shape. We examine phase-temperature dependence and coexistence curves and find that large patch sizes produce polarized liquids, in contrast to mean-field predictions. Finally, we introduce small numbers of unpatched charged colloids. These can either suppress or encourage aggregation depending on their concentration and the size of the patches on the patched colloids. These effects can be exploited to control aggregation and to measure effective patch size.

  10. On Multiplying Negative Numbers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, Mary L.; Dunn, Kenneth A.

    1985-01-01

    Comments on the history of negative numbers, some methods that can be used to introduce the multiplication of negative numbers to students, and an explanation of why the product of two negative numbers is a positive number are included. (MNS)

  11. Surface Charging Application Tests for Geosynchronous Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilmer, R. V.; Cooke, D. L.; Roth, C. J.; Davis, V. A.; Mandell, M. J.; Kuharski, R. A.

    2007-12-01

    The testing of a geosynchronous spacecraft surface charging application that combines the charged particle environment (~ 1 eV to 200 keV electron and proton fluxes) of the Magnetospheric Specification Model (MSM) with algorithms from the NASCAP-2K surface charging program is described. Spacecraft frame charging (chassis potential) is determined from low energy ion data collected by the Charge Control System (CCS) on a DSCS III B- 7 spacecraft at 307° E. Longitude. Several simple descriptions of satellite geometry and materials are employed, including one which approximates features of the DSCS satellite [i.e., Mandell and Cooke, AIAA-2004-986, 42nd AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, Reno, Nevada, Jan. 5-8, 2004]. Preliminary tests compared modeled and observed chassis potentials for three days when observed peak charging levels ranged from -200 to -600 volts [Hilmer et al. (2005), EOS Trans. AGU, 86(52), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract SM41A-1169]. While the electron and proton spectra generated by the MSM proved to be suitable for the charging calculation, the MSM does not produce all of the low energy electrons (< 20 eV) usually present in geosynchronous orbit to keep spacecraft from charging positive so only negative charging is assumed. Frame charging details vary greatly with MSM input parameter selection. The charging application works best with MSM spectra generated using the input parameter set that statistically produces the best electron fluxes in the midnight-dawn local time sector where surface charging is most often observed. Comparisons in the present study will concentrate on utilizing MSM particle fluxes generated using this "best set" of the input parameters. These tests will help us refine the MSM and NASCAP-2K algorithm configurations needed to best address spacecraft surface charging.

  12. Surface Charging Application Tests for Geosynchronous Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilmer, R. V.; Cooke, D. L.; Tautz, M.; Davis, V. A.; Mandell, M. J.; Kuharski, R. A.

    2006-12-01

    The testing of a geosynchronous spacecraft surface charging application that combines the charged particle environment (~ 1 eV to 200 keV electron and proton fluxes) of the Magnetospheric Specification Model (MSM) with algorithms from the NASCAP-2K surface charging program is described. Spacecraft frame charging (chassis potential) is determined from low energy ion data collected by the Charge Control System (CCS) on a DSCS III B-7 spacecraft at 307° E. Longitude. Several simple descriptions of satellite geometry and materials are employed, including one which approximates features of the DSCS satellite [i.e., Mandell and Cooke, AIAA-2004-986, 42nd AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, Reno, Nevada, Jan. 5-8, 2004]. Preliminary tests compared modeled and observed chassis potentials for three days when observed peak charging levels ranged from -200 to -600 volts [Hilmer et al. (2005), EOS Trans. AGU, 86(52), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract SM41A-1169]. While the electron and proton spectra generated by the MSM proved to be suitable for the charging calculation, the MSM does not produce all of the low energy electrons (< 20 eV) usually present in geosynchronous orbit to keep spacecraft from charging positive so only negative charging is assumed. Frame charging details vary greatly with MSM input parameter selection. The charging application works best with MSM spectra generated using the input parameter set that statistically produces the best electron fluxes in the midnight-dawn local time sector where surface charging is most often observed. Comparisons in the present study will concentrate on utilizing MSM particle fluxes generated using this "best set" of the input parameters and testing will cover an extended period of up to several months. These tests will help us refine the MSM and NASCAP-2K algorithm configurations needed to best address spacecraft surface charging.

  13. Electric charge limits on settled powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Vaquero, J.; Quintanilla, M. A. S.; Castellanos, A.

    2016-06-01

    In flows of dry particulate systems, electric charge is generated on particle surfaces by their collision with walls and with other particles. Charge build-up on single particles can yield local charge values high enough to surpass the limiting electric field for corona discharge into the surrounding gas. Then, local charge is decreased to a lower value that becomes stabilized when flows stop and particles deposit in a container. In this paper, we have used a Faraday pail system to measure the residual particle charge after using two different devices—tribochargers—for particle charging. One of the tribochargers allowed us to directly measure the total charge that was transferred from the walls to the particles, and this was compared to the final values in the bulk powder once it was collected in the Faraday pail. The results show that the electric charge of particles dispersed in gas is limited by corona discharge and depends mainly on the particle size. In addition, we present a simple model of the discharge of the collected powder based on electrostatic considerations. If the powder effective conductivity and the electric charge of the settling particles are known, the model predicts the temporal evolution of the total charge of the collected powder and the spatial distribution of the electric charge and electric field.

  14. On the anticritical temperature for spacecraft charging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Shu T.; Tautz, Maurice

    2008-11-01

    In recent years, evidence has been found for the existence of a critical temperature for the onset of spacecraft charging to high voltages. High-voltage charging affects scientific instruments on board and is related to spacecraft anomalies. However, less attention has been given to low-voltage charging which can also affect scientific experiments on board and is relevant to surface chemistry. There also can exist an anticritical temperature for low-voltage spacecraft surface charging. Ambient electrons at very low temperatures tend to cause negative surface charging, albeit at low voltages, and as the electron temperature increases, the charging ceases at a critical value depending on the surface material. We present the theory and numerical results of anticritical temperatures for typical surface materials in Maxwellian space plasmas. The change in anticritical temperature due to a low-incident-energy enhancement of the electron backscatter yield, consistent with recent measurements, is discussed. Approximate expressions for the anticritical temperature upper limits are given on the basis of Taylor expansions at low temperature of the charging onset equation. It is shown that that the existence of the anticritical temperature slightly modifies the possible triple-root configurations in the flux-voltage characteristic curve for a material. The surface charging effect of a Maxwellian plasma with flux components spanning the anticritical and critical temperatures is considered. A comparison with an empirical low-voltage charging curve is given.

  15. Effect of surface charge of immortalized mouse cerebral endothelial cell monolayer on transport of charged solutes.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wei; Li, Guanglei; Gil, Eun Seok; Lowe, Tao Lu; Fu, Bingmei M

    2010-04-01

    Charge carried by the surface glycocalyx layer (SGL) of the cerebral endothelium has been shown to significantly modulate the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to charged solutes in vivo. The cultured monolayer of bEnd3, an immortalized mouse cerebral endothelial cell line, is becoming a popular in vitro BBB model due to its easy growth and maintenance of many BBB characteristics over repeated passages. To test whether the SGL of bEnd3 monolayer carries similar charge as that in the intact BBB and quantify this charge, which can be characterized by the SGL thickness (L(f)) and charge density (C(mf)), we measured the solute permeability of bEnd3 monolayer to neutral solutes and to solutes with similar size but opposite charges: negatively charged alpha-lactalbumin (-11) and positively charged ribonuclease (+3). Combining the measured permeability data with a transport model across the cell monolayer, we predicted the L(f) and the C(mf) of bEnd3 monolayer, which is approximately 160 nm and approximately 25 mEq/L, respectively. We also investigated whether orosomucoid, a plasma glycoprotein modulating the charge of the intact BBB, alters the charge of bEnd3 monolayer. We found that 1 mg/mL orosomucoid would increase SGL charge density of bEnd3 monolayer to approximately 2-fold of its control value.

  16. Estimation of the diameter-charge distribution in polydisperse electrically charged sprays of electrically insulating liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigit, A. R. H.; Shrimpton, John S.

    2009-06-01

    The majority of scientific and industrial electrical spray applications make use of sprays that contain a range of drop diameters. Indirect evidence suggests the mean drop diameter and the mean drop charge level are usually correlated. In addition, within each drop diameter class there is every reason to suspect a distribution of charge levels exist for a particular drop diameter class. This paper presents an experimental method that uses the joint PDF of drop velocity and diameter, obtained from phase Doppler anemometry measurements, and directly obtained spatially resolved distributions of the mass and charge flux to obtain a drop diameter and charge frequency distribution. The method is demonstrated using several data-sets obtained from experimental measurements of steady poly-disperse sprays of an electrically insulating liquid produced with the charge injection technique. The space charge repulsion in the spray plume produces a hollow cone spray structure. In addition an approximate self-similarity is observed, with the maximum radial mass and charge flow occurring at r/ d ~ 200. The charge flux profile is slightly offset from the mass flux profile, and this gives direct evidence that the spray specific charge increases from approximately 20% of the bulk mean spray specific charge on the spray axis to approximately 200% of the bulk mean specific charge in the periphery of the spray. The results from the drop charge estimation model suggest a complex picture of the correlation between drop charge and drop diameter, with spray specific charge, injection velocity and orifice diameter all contributing to the shape of the drop diameter-charge distribution. Mean drop charge as a function of the Rayleigh limit is approximately 0.2, and is invariant with drop diameter and also across the spray cases tested.

  17. Threshold-Based Random Charging Scheme for Decentralized PEV Charging Operation in a Smart Grid

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ojin; Kim, Pilkee; Yoon, Yong-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Smart grids have been introduced to replace conventional power distribution systems without real time monitoring for accommodating the future market penetration of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs). When a large number of PEVs require simultaneous battery charging, charging coordination techniques have become one of the most critical factors to optimize the PEV charging performance and the conventional distribution system. In this case, considerable computational complexity of a central controller and exchange of real time information among PEVs may occur. To alleviate these problems, a novel threshold-based random charging (TBRC) operation for a decentralized charging system is proposed. Using PEV charging thresholds and random access rates, the PEVs themselves can participate in the charging requests. As PEVs with a high battery state do not transmit the charging requests to the central controller, the complexity of the central controller decreases due to the reduction of the charging requests. In addition, both the charging threshold and the random access rate are statistically calculated based on the average of supply power of the PEV charging system that do not require a real time update. By using the proposed TBRC with a tolerable PEV charging degradation, a 51% reduction of the PEV charging requests is achieved. PMID:28035963

  18. Threshold-Based Random Charging Scheme for Decentralized PEV Charging Operation in a Smart Grid.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ojin; Kim, Pilkee; Yoon, Yong-Jin

    2016-12-26

    Smart grids have been introduced to replace conventional power distribution systems without real time monitoring for accommodating the future market penetration of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs). When a large number of PEVs require simultaneous battery charging, charging coordination techniques have become one of the most critical factors to optimize the PEV charging performance and the conventional distribution system. In this case, considerable computational complexity of a central controller and exchange of real time information among PEVs may occur. To alleviate these problems, a novel threshold-based random charging (TBRC) operation for a decentralized charging system is proposed. Using PEV charging thresholds and random access rates, the PEVs themselves can participate in the charging requests. As PEVs with a high battery state do not transmit the charging requests to the central controller, the complexity of the central controller decreases due to the reduction of the charging requests. In addition, both the charging threshold and the random access rate are statistically calculated based on the average of supply power of the PEV charging system that do not require a real time update. By using the proposed TBRC with a tolerable PEV charging degradation, a 51% reduction of the PEV charging requests is achieved.

  19. Influence of carbons on the structure of the negative active material of lead-acid batteries and on battery performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, D.; Nikolov, P.; Rogachev, T.

    It has been established that addition of carbon additives to the lead negative active material (NAM) of lead-acid batteries increase battery charge acceptance in hybrid electric vehicle mode of operation. The present work studies three types of activated carbons and two types of carbon blacks with the aim to evaluate their efficiency in improving the charge acceptance of lead-acid batteries. It has been established that the size of carbon particles and their affinity to lead are essential. If carbon particles are of nanosizes, they are incorporated into the bulk of the skeleton branches of NAM and may thus increase the latter's ohmic resistance. Their content in NAM should not exceed 0.2-0.5 wt.%. At this loading level, carbon grains are adsorbed only on the surface of NAM contributing to the increase of its specific surface area and thus improving its charge acceptance. When carbon particles are of micron sizes and have high affinity to lead, they are integrated into the skeleton structure of NAM as a structural component and act as super-capacitors, i.e. electric charges are concentrated in them and then the current is distributed along the adjacent branches of the lead skeleton with the lowest ohmic resistance. This eventually improves the charge acceptance of the negative battery plates.

  20. Measurement and control of electrostatic charges on solids in a gaseous suspension. Technical progress report No. 5

    SciTech Connect

    Nieh, S.; Nguyen, T.

    1985-10-01

    Measurements of mean particle charges and charge distributions on Medium Volatile Bituminous (MVB) coals and Lignite A (LIGA) coals in a 51 mm ID grounded copper pipe loop have been made with the upgraded Faraday cage system. Both negative and positive charges were found for coals in all experiments. The dual polarities of charges are believed to be due to the nonuniform materials and chemical composition contained in coals. As expected, increasing velocity or decreasing air humidity has a significant effect to increase the mean particle charge and the standard deviation of distribution. Charge elimination by the addition of coal fines has been explored. Effective suppression of particle charges was achieved by adding 0.1% by mass of minus 1 ..mu..m coal dust into the pipe flow. A neutralization mechanism was proposed to interpret the measured results. The results of charge control obtained to date has been significant and encouraging. More work is needed to validate the proposed mechanism. 16 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Negative Ions in Space.

    PubMed

    Millar, Thomas J; Walsh, Catherine; Field, Thomas A

    2017-02-08

    Until a decade ago, the only anion observed to play a prominent role in astrophysics was H(-). The bound-free transitions in H(-) dominate the visible opacity in stars with photospheric temperatures less than 7000 K, including the Sun. The H(-) anion is also believed to have been critical to the formation of molecular hydrogen in the very early evolution of the Universe. Once H2 formed, about 500 000 years after the Big Bang, the expanding gas was able to lose internal gravitational energy and collapse to form stellar objects and "protogalaxies", allowing the creation of heavier elements such as C, N, and O through nucleosynthesis. Although astronomers had considered some processes through which anions might form in interstellar clouds and circumstellar envelopes, including the important role that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons might play in this, it was the detection in 2006 of rotational line emission from C6H(-) that galvanized a systematic study of the abundance, distribution, and chemistry of anions in the interstellar medium. In 2007, the Cassini mission reported the unexpected detection of anions with mass-to-charge ratios of up to ∼10 000 in the upper atmosphere of Titan; this observation likewise instigated the study of fundamental chemical processes involving negative ions among planetary scientists. In this article, we review the observations of anions in interstellar clouds, circumstellar envelopes, Titan, and cometary comae. We then discuss a number of processes by which anions can be created and destroyed in these environments. The derivation of accurate rate coefficients for these processes is an essential input for the chemical kinetic modeling that is necessary to fully extract physics from the observational data. We discuss such models, along with their successes and failings, and finish with an outlook on the future.

  2. Negative and positive cesium ion studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuehn, D. G.; Sutliff, D. E.; Chanin, L. M.

    1978-01-01

    Mass spectrometric analyses have been performed on the positive and negative species from discharges in Cs, He-Cs, and He-H2-Cs mixtures. Sampling was conducted through the electrodes of normal glow discharges and from close-spaced heated-cathode conditions, which approximate a cesium thermionic converter. No negative Cs ions were observed for Cs pressures less than .01 torr. Identified species included Cs(+), Cs2(+), Cs(-), and what appeared to be multiply charged ions. Low-mass negative and positive ions attributed to H2 were observed when an He-H2 mixture was also present in the discharge region.

  3. Solar Array and Auroral Charging Studies of DMSP Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matias, Kelwin

    2013-01-01

    The SSJ electrostatic analyzers and the SSIES plasma instruments on the DMSP spacecraft in low Earth polar orbit can be used to conduct case studies of auroral and solar array charging. We will use a program written in the Interactive Data Language (IDL) to evaluate questionable charging events in the SSJ records by comparing charging signatures in SSJ and SSIES data. In addition, we will assemble a number of case studies of solar array charging showing the signatures from the SSJ data and compare to the SSIES charging signatures. In addition we will use Satellite Tool Kit (STK) to propagate orbits, obtain solar intensity, and use to verify onset of charging with sunrise.

  4. Negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ehlers, Kenneth W.

    1984-01-01

    An ionization vessel is divided into an ionizing zone and an extraction zone by a magnetic filter. The magnetic filter prevents high-energy electrons from crossing from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. A small positive voltage impressed on a plasma grid, located adjacent an extraction grid, positively biases the plasma in the extraction zone to thereby prevent positive ions from migrating from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. Low-energy electrons, which would ordinarily be dragged by the positive ions into the extraction zone, are thereby prevented from being present in the extraction zone and being extracted along with negative ions by the extraction grid. Additional electrons are suppressed from the output flux using ExB drift provided by permanent magnets and the extractor grid electrical field.

  5. Negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.; Ehlers, K.W.

    1982-08-06

    An ionization vessel is divided into an ionizing zone and an extraction zone by a magnetic filter. The magnetic filter prevents high-energy electrons from crossing from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. A small positive voltage impressed on a plasma grid, located adjacent an extraction grid, positively biases the plasma in the extraction zone to thereby prevent positive ions from migrating from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. Low-energy electrons, which would ordinarily be dragged by the positive ions into the extraction zone, are thereby prevented from being present in the extraction zone and being extracted along with negative ions by the extraction grid. Additional electrons are suppressed from the output flux using ExB drift provided by permanent magnets and the extractor grid electrical field.

  6. Negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.; Ehlers, K.W.

    1984-12-04

    An ionization vessel is divided into an ionizing zone and an extraction zone by a magnetic filter. The magnetic filter prevents high-energy electrons from crossing from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. A small positive voltage impressed on a plasma grid, located adjacent an extraction grid, positively biases the plasma in the extraction zone to thereby prevent positive ions from migrating from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. Low-energy electrons, which would ordinarily be dragged by the positive ions into the extraction zone, are thereby prevented from being present in the extraction zone and being extracted along with negative ions by the extraction grid. Additional electrons are suppressed from the output flux using ExB drift provided by permanent magnets and the extractor grid electrical field. 14 figs.

  7. Facile Assembly of Large-Area 2D Microgel Colloidal Crystals Using Charge-Reversible Substrates.

    PubMed

    Weng, Junying; Li, Xiaoyun; Guan, Ying; Zhu, X X; Zhang, Yongjun

    2016-12-06

    2D colloidal crystals (CCs) have important applications; however, the fabrication of large-area, high-quality 2D CCs is still far from being trivial, and the fabrication of 2D microgel CCs is even harder. Here, we have demonstrated that they can be facilely fabricated using charge-reversible substrates. The charge-reversible substrates were prepared by modification with amino groups. The amino groups were then protected by amidation with 2,2-dimethylsuccinic anhydride. At acidic pH, the surface charge of the modified substrate will change from negative to positive as a result of the hydrolysis of the amide bonds and the regeneration of the amino groups. 2D microgel CCs can be simply fabricated by applying a concentrated microgel dispersion on the modified substrate. The negatively charged surface of the substrate allows the negatively charged microgel spheres, especially those close to the substrate, to self-assemble into 3D CCs. With the gradual hydrolysis of the amide bonds and the charge reversal of the substrate, the first 111 plane of the 3D assembly is fixed in situ on the substrate. The resulting 2D CC has a high degree of ordering because of the high quality of the parent 3D microgel CC. Because large-area 3D microgel CCs can be facilely fabricated, this method allows for the fabrication of 2D CCs of any size. Nonplanar substrates can also be used. In addition, the interparticle distance of the 2D array can be tuned by the concentration of the microgel dispersion. Besides rigid substrates (such as glass slides, quartz slides, and silicon wafers), flexible polymer films, including polyethylene terephthalate and poly(vinyl chloride) films, were also successfully used as substrates for the fabrication of 2D microgel CCs.

  8. What Protein Charging (and Supercharging) Reveal about the Mechanism of Electrospray Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogorzalek Loo, Rachel R.; Lakshmanan, Rajeswari; Loo, Joseph A.

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the charging mechanism of electrospray ionization is central to overcoming shortcomings such as ion suppression or limited dynamic range, and explaining phenomena such as supercharging. Towards that end, we explore what accumulated observations reveal about the mechanism of electrospray. We introduce the idea of an intermediate region for electrospray ionization (and other ionization methods) to account for the facts that solution charge state distributions (CSDs) do not correlate with those observed by ESI-MS (the latter bear more charge) and that gas phase reactions can reduce, but not increase, the extent of charging. This region incorporates properties (e.g., basicities) intermediate between solution and gas phase. Assuming that droplet species polarize within the high electric field leads to equations describing ion emission resembling those from the equilibrium partitioning model. The equations predict many trends successfully, including CSD shifts to higher m/z for concentrated analytes and shifts to lower m/z for sprays employing smaller emitter opening diameters. From this view, a single mechanism can be formulated to explain how reagents that promote analyte charging ("supercharging") such as m-NBA, sulfolane, and 3-nitrobenzonitrile increase analyte charge from "denaturing" and "native" solvent systems. It is suggested that additives' Brønsted basicities are inversely correlated to their ability to shift CSDs to lower m/z in positive ESI, as are Brønsted acidities for negative ESI. Because supercharging agents reduce an analyte's solution ionization, excess spray charge is bestowed on evaporating ions carrying fewer opposing charges. Brønsted basicity (or acidity) determines how much ESI charge is lost to the agent (unavailable to evaporating analyte).

  9. Three chamber negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ehlers, Kenneth W.; Hiskes, John R.

    1985-01-01

    A negative ion vessel is divided into an excitation chamber, a negative ionization chamber and an extraction chamber by two magnetic filters. Input means introduces neutral molecules into a first chamber where a first electron discharge means vibrationally excites the molecules which migrate to a second chamber. In the second chamber a second electron discharge means ionizes the molecules, producing negative ions which are extracted into or by a third chamber. A first magnetic filter prevents high energy electrons from entering the negative ionization chamber from the excitation chamber. A second magnetic filter prevents high energy electrons from entering the extraction chamber from the negative ionizing chamber. An extraction grid at the end of the negative ion vessel attracts negative ions into the third chamber and accelerates them. Another grid, located adjacent to the extraction grid, carries a small positive voltage in order to inhibit positive ions from migrating into the extraction chamber and contour the plasma potential. Additional electrons can be suppressed from the output flux using ExB forces provided by magnetic field means and the extractor grid electric potential.

  10. Sign-inverted surface stress-charge response in nanoporous gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hai-Jun; Parida, Smrutiranjan; Kramer, Dominik; Weissmüller, Jörg

    2008-12-01

    The surface stress-charge coefficient, ς, quantifies the response of the surface stress - a fundamental property of solid surfaces - to the addition or removal of superficial electric charge. So far, all experiments have found ς negative at clean metal surfaces. Here we report in situ dilatometry experiments on nanoporous gold samples prepared by dealloying. The results reveal a large reversible elastic contraction during the anodic part of cyclic potential scans. The behavior, which indicates an abnormal positive sign of ς, can be linked to a monolayer of strongly adsorbed oxygen formed during dealloying, and to the extraordinarily small (1-2 nm) structure scale of the material while the oxide is in place. After cathodic reduction, ς reverts to the conventional, negative sign of the clean metal surface. We discuss the sign of ς in relation to the electronic screening at metallic and oxide-covered surfaces.

  11. Charged particles in Titan's ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Sachchida

    2010-05-01

    Charged particles in Titan's ionosphere Marykutty Michael1, Sachchida Nand Tripathi1,2,3, Pratima Arya1 1Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur 2Oak Ridge Associated Universities 3NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Observations by two instruments onboard the Cassini spacecraft, Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) and CAssini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS), revealed the existence of heavy hydrocarbon and nitrile species with masses of several thousand atomic mass units at altitudes of 950 - 1400 km in the atmosphere of Titan (Waite et al., 2007; Crary et al., 2009). Though these particles were believed to be molecules, they are most likely aerosols formed by the clumping of smaller molecules (Waite et al., 2009). These particles were estimated to have a density of 10-3 kg m-3 and a size of up to 256 nm. The existence of very heavy ions has also been observed by the CAPS components with a mass by charge ratio of up to 10000 (Coates et al., 2007, 2009; Sittler et al., 2009). The goal of this paper is to find out whether the so called heavy ions (or charged particles) are generated by the charge transfer of ions and electrons to the particles. The charging of these particles has been studied by using the charge balance equations that include positive ions, negative ions, electrons, neutral and charged particles. Information on the most abundant ion clusters are obtained from Vuitton et al., (2009) and Wilson and Atreya, (2004). Mass by charge ratio thus calculated will be compared with those observed by Coates et al. (2007). References: Coates AJ, et al., Discovery of heavy negative ions in Titan's ionosphere, Geophys. Res. Lett., 34:L22103, 2007. Coates AJ, et al., Heavy negative ions in titan's ionosphere: altitude and latitude dependence. Planet. Space Sci., doi:10.1016/j.pss.2009.05.009, 2009. Crary F.J., et al., Heavy ions, temperatures and winds in titan's ionosphere: Combined cassini caps and inms observations. Planet. Space Sci., doi:10.1016/j.pss.2009.09.006, 2009

  12. The influence of size and charge of chitosan/polyglutamic acid hollow spheres on cellular internalization, viability and blood compatibility.

    PubMed

    Dash, Biraja C; Réthoré, Gildas; Monaghan, Michael; Fitzgerald, Kathleen; Gallagher, William; Pandit, Abhay

    2010-11-01

    Polymeric hollow spheres can be tailored as efficient carriers of various therapeutic molecules due to their tunable properties. However, the entry of these synthetic vehicles into cells, their cell viability and blood compatibility depend on their physical and chemical properties e.g. size, surface charge. Herein, we report the effect of size and surface charge on cell viability and cellular internalization behaviour and their effect on various blood components using chitosan/polyglutamic acid hollow spheres as a model system. Negatively charged chitosan/polyglutamic acid hollow spheres of various sizes 100, 300, 500 and 1000 nm were fabricated using a template based method and covalently surface modified using linear polyethylene glycol and methoxyethanol amine to create a gradient of surface charge from negative to neutrally charged spheres respectively. The results here suggest that both size and surface charge have a significant influence on the sphere's behaviour, most prominently on haemolysis, platelet activation, plasma recalcification time, cell viability and internalization over time. Additionally, cellular internalization behaviour and viability was found to vary with different cell types. These results are in agreement with those of inorganic spheres and liposomes, and can serve as guidelines for tailoring polymeric solid spheres for specific desired applications in biological and pharmaceutical fields, including the design of nanometer to submicron-sized delivery vehicles.

  13. Spacecraft Charging Sensitivity to Material Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Edwards, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Evaluating spacecraft charging behavior of a vehicle in the space environment requires knowledge of the material properties relevant to the charging process. Implementing surface and internal charging models requires a user to specify a number of material electrical properties including electrical resistivity parameters (dark and radiation induced), dielectric constant, secondary electron yields, photoemission yields, and breakdown strength in order to correctly evaluate the electric discharge threat posed by the increasing electric fields generated by the accumulating charge density. In addition, bulk material mass density and/or chemical composition must be known in order to analyze radiation shielding properties when evaluating internal charging. We will first describe the physics of spacecraft charging and show how uncertainties in material properties propagate through spacecraft charging algorithms to impact the results obtained from charging models. We then provide examples using spacecraft charging codes to demonstrate their sensitivity to material properties. The goal of this presentation is to emphasize the importance in having good information on relevant material properties in order to best characterize on orbit charging threats.

  14. Charge Exchange with Highly Charged Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glick, Jeremy; Ferri, Kevin; Schmitt, Jaclyn; Hanson, Joshua; Marler, Joan

    2016-05-01

    A detailed study of the physics of highly charged ions (HCIs) is critical for a deep understanding of observed phenomena resulting from interactions of HCIs with neutral atoms in astrophysical and fusion environments. Specifically the charge transfer rates and spectroscopy of the subsequent decay fluorescence are of great interest to these communities. Results from a laboratory based investigation of these rates will be presented. The experiment takes advantage of an energy and charge state selected beam of HCIs from the recently on-line Clemson University EBIT (CUEBIT). Progress towards an experimental apparatus for retrapping HCIs towards precision spectroscopy of HCIs will also be presented.

  15. Effect of the surface charge distribution on the fluid phase behavior of charged colloids and proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, Marco A.; Shen, Vincent K.

    2016-10-01

    A generic but simple model is presented to evaluate the effect of the heterogeneous surface charge distribution of proteins and zwitterionic nanoparticles on their thermodynamic phase behavior. By considering surface charges as continuous "patches," the rich set of surface patterns that is embedded in proteins and charged patchy particles can readily be described. This model is used to study the fluid phase separation of charged particles where the screening length is of the same order of magnitude as the particle size. In particular, two types of charged particles are studied: dipolar fluids and protein-like fluids. The former represents the simplest case of zwitterionic particles, whose charge distribution can be described by their dipole moment. The latter system corresponds to molecules/particles with complex surface charge arrangements such as those found in biomolecules. The results for both systems suggest a relation between the critical region, the strength of the interparticle interactions, and the arrangement of charged patches, where the critical temperature is strongly correlated to the magnitude of the dipole moment. Additionally, competition between attractive and repulsive charge-charge interactions seems to be related to the formation of fluctuating clusters in the dilute phase of dipolar fluids, as well as to the broadening of the binodal curve in protein-like fluids. Finally, a variety of self-assembled architectures are detected for dipolar fluids upon small changes to the charge distribution, providing the groundwork for studying the self-assembly of charged patchy particles.

  16. Spacecraft Charging Technology, 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The third Spacecraft Charging Technology Conference proceedings contain 66 papers on the geosynchronous plasma environment, spacecraft modeling, charged particle environment interactions with spacecraft, spacecraft materials characterization, and satellite design and testing. The proceedings is a compilation of the state of the art of spacecraft charging and environmental interaction phenomena.

  17. Particle charge spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuerstenau, Stephen D. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An airflow through a tube is used to guide a charged particle through the tube. A detector may be used to detect charge passing through the tube on the particle. The movement of the particle through the tube may be used to both detect its charge and size.

  18. Charge exchange system

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Oscar A.

    1978-01-01

    An improved charge exchange system for substantially reducing pumping requirements of excess gas in a controlled thermonuclear reactor high energy neutral beam injector. The charge exchange system utilizes a jet-type blanket which acts simultaneously as the charge exchange medium and as a shield for reflecting excess gas.

  19. Resistance of Escherichia coli to nourseothricin (streptothricin): reduced penetrability of the cell wall as an additional, possibly unspecific mechanism.

    PubMed

    Seltmann, G

    1989-01-01

    The resistance of E. coli strains to the antibiotic nourseothricin is known to be caused by an acetyltransferase acetylating the beta-lysine chain of the antibiotic. In addition, most of the resistant strains exhibit reduced penetrability of the outer membrane, presumably caused by a reduced amount of available negative charges. This was shown using crystal violet, Congo red, or the hydrophobic antibiotic novobiocin as indicators.

  20. Flywheel Charge/Discharge Control Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, Raymond.F.; Kenny, Barbara H.

    2001-01-01

    A control algorithm developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center will allow a flywheel energy storage system to interface with the electrical bus of a space power system. The controller allows the flywheel to operate in both charge and discharge modes. Charge mode is used to store additional energy generated by the solar arrays on the spacecraft during insolation. During charge mode, the flywheel spins up to store the additional electrical energy as rotational mechanical energy. Discharge mode is used during eclipse when the flywheel provides the power to the spacecraft. During discharge mode, the flywheel spins down to release the stored rotational energy.

  1. The growth of charged platelets.

    PubMed

    Labbez, C; Jönsson, Bo; Woodward, Cliff; Nonat, A; Delhorme, M

    2014-11-21

    Growth models of charged nanoplatelets are investigated with Monte Carlo simulations and simple theory. In a first model, 2-dimensional simulations in the canonical ensemble are used to demonstrate that the growth of a single weakly charged platelet could be limited by its own internal repulsion. The short range attractive interaction in the crystal is modeled with a square well potential while the electrostatic interactions are described with a screened Coulomb potential. The qualitative behavior of this case can also be described by simply balancing the attractive crystal energy with the screened Coulomb repulsion between the crystal sites. This repulsion is a free energy term dominated by counterion entropy and of course reduced by added salt. For a strongly coupled system, that is with high charge density and divalent counterions as in calcium silicate hydrate, the main product of cement hydration, the screened Coulomb approximation becomes inadequate and the growth behavior has to be described with the full primitive model. In this case, the energetic interactions become relatively more important and the entropy of the system plays a minor role. As a consequence, the electrostatic interactions gradually become less of a hindrance for aggregation and in extreme cases electrostatics actually promote the growth. This is manifested as an increased aggregation with, for example, increasing surface charge density. In the presence of divalent calcium ions and at the high negative surface charge density typical for calcium silicate hydrate, electrostatic interactions are not a hindrance for an infinite growth of the particles. By combining experimental and simulated data we can show that the limited sized platelets found in cement paste is due to a very fast nucleation rate compared to the growth rate.

  2. Investigation into the formation of charge packets in polyethylene: Experiment and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J.; Chen, G.; Lewin, P. L.

    2012-08-01

    The phenomenon of charge packet has been reported in polymeric insulation materials under the application of dc electric fields in recent decades. It is noted that such charge packets could lead to substantial modification of local electric stress, which increases the possibility of failure of insulating materials. The physics of charge packets has not yet been revealed clearly. In this paper, the dynamics of positive charge packets in polyethylene is observed using the pulsed electro-acoustic technique. Negative differential mobility of positive charge carrier is found, which is believed to be crucial to the formation of charge packets. This negative differential mobility is introduced into a bipolar charge transport model to simulate the packet-like space charge in polymers. Simulation results show that not only the negative differential mobility but also weaker trapping characteristic are required to generate a positive charge packet in polyethylene under dc stress.

  3. Electrochemical cell and negative electrode therefor

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1982-01-01

    A secondary electrochemical cell with the positive and negative electrodes separated by a molten salt electrolyte with the negative electrode comprising a particulate mixture of lithium-aluminum alloy and electrolyte and an additive selected from graphitized carbon, Raney iron or mixtures thereof. The lithium-aluminum alloy is present in the range of from about 45 to about 80 percent by volume of the negative electrode, and the electrolyte is present in an amount not less than about 10 percent by volume of the negative electrode. The additive of graphitized carbon is present in the range of from about 1 to about 10 percent by volume of the negative electrode, and the Raney iron additive is present in the range of from about 3 to about 10 percent by volume of the negative electrode.

  4. Culture-negative endocarditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... inflammation of the lining of one or more heart valves, but no endocarditis-causing germs can be found ... the heart, where they can settle on damaged heart valves. Alternative Names Endocarditis (culture-negative) Images Culture-negative ...

  5. Controlling the interface charge density in GaN-based metal-oxide-semiconductor heterostructures by plasma oxidation of metal layers

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Herwig Kalisch, Holger; Vescan, Andrei; Pécz, Béla; Kovács, András; Heuken, Michael

    2015-06-07

    In recent years, investigating and engineering the oxide-semiconductor interface in GaN-based devices has come into focus. This has been driven by a large effort to increase the gate robustness and to obtain enhancement mode transistors. Since it has been shown that deep interface states act as fixed interface charge in the typical transistor operating regime, it appears desirable to intentionally incorporate negative interface charge, and thus, to allow for a positive shift in threshold voltage of transistors to realise enhancement mode behaviour. A rather new approach to obtain such negative charge is the plasma-oxidation of thin metal layers. In this study, we present transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis as well as electrical data for Al-, Ti-, and Zr-based thin oxide films on a GaN-based heterostructure. It is shown that the plasma-oxidised layers have a polycrystalline morphology. An interfacial amorphous oxide layer is only detectable in the case of Zr. In addition, all films exhibit net negative charge with varying densities. The Zr layer is providing a negative interface charge density of more than 1 × 10{sup 13 }cm{sup –2} allowing to considerably shift the threshold voltage to more positive values.

  6. Negative ion generator

    DOEpatents

    Stinnett, Regan W.

    1984-01-01

    A negative ion generator is formed from a magnetically insulated transmission line having a coating of graphite on the cathode for producing negative ions and a plurality of apertures on the opposed anode for the release of negative ions. Magnetic insulation keeps electrons from flowing from the cathode to the anode. A transverse magnetic field removes electrons which do escape through the apertures from the trajectory of the negative ions.

  7. Negative ion generator

    DOEpatents

    Stinnett, R.W.

    1984-05-08

    A negative ion generator is formed from a magnetically insulated transmission line having a coating of graphite on the cathode for producing negative ions and a plurality of apertures on the opposed anode for the release of negative ions. Magnetic insulation keeps electrons from flowing from the cathode to the anode. A transverse magnetic field removes electrons which do escape through the apertures from the trajectory of the negative ions. 8 figs.

  8. Charge Structure and Charging Mechanisms in the Plume of Eyjafjallajökull

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnke, S. A.; Thomas, R. J.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Rison, W.; Edens, H. E.

    2012-12-01

    Three dimensional lightning mapping observations have been made of volcanic lightning during the magmatic phase of the 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in Iceland. From this data the charge structure in the plume has been inferred, providing insight into the charging mechanisms. During the magmatic phase (3-20 May) lightning was only observed from 11-20 May, except for a scant amount detected on the 6th of May. The observations from this period showed temporal variations in the charge structure, but at times a dipolar structure (negative over positive) was observed. Nearly all lightning discharges initiated low in altitude, between the positive charge layer and ground, and some may have initiated at the vent of the volcano itself. Of interest in volcanic lightning studies is the degree to which silica-based and water-based charging mechanisms influence electrification in volcanic plumes. In the case of the magmatic phase of the Eyjafjallajökull eruption the two charging mechanisms appear to have been complementary. During this part of the eruption charging on silicate particles due to the eruption process is not expected to have been as strong as it was in previous studies of Augustine and Redoubt volcanoes and water-based charging mechanisms like those involved in thunderstorms may have enhanced the electrification. Observations of the temporal variation of the atmospheric temperature structure around Eyjafjallajökull showed that colder temperatures in the latter part of May could have been a key to turning on the lightning activity. A simple charge structure model has been constructed that shows how water-based charging mechanisms could intensify the existing electrification from silicate particles and still allow for discharges to initiate below the lower charge layer. Overall the observations indicate that silica-based charging may not have been enough to initiate lightning during the magmatic phase and water-based charging mechanisms could have provided

  9. Sentential Negation in English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowarin, Macaulay

    2009-01-01

    This paper undertakes a detailed analysis of sentential negation in the English language with Chomsky's Government-Binding theory of Transformational Grammar as theoretical model. It distinguishes between constituent and sentential negation in English. The essay identifies the exact position of Negation phrase in an English clause structure. It…

  10. Physical methods to quantify small antibiotic molecules uptake into Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Winterhalter, Mathias; Ceccarelli, Matteo

    2015-09-01

    The development of antibiotics against Gram-negative bacteria is a challenge: any active compound must cross the outer cell envelope composed of a hydrophilic highly charged lipopolysaccharide layer followed by a tight hydrophobic layer containing water filled gates called porins to reach the hydrophilic periplasmic space and depending on the target with the further need to cross the hydrophobic inner membrane. In addition to a possible rapid enzymatic deactivation efflux pumps shuffle compounds back outside. The resulting low permeability of cell envelope requires high dose and leads therefore to toxicity problems. Despite its relevance the permeability barrier in Gram-negative bacteria is not well understood partially caused by the lack of appropriate direct assays. Here we give a brief introduction on current available techniques to quantify passive diffusion of small hydrophilic molecules into Gram-negative bacteria.

  11. Motion of charged particles in pulsar magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachariades, Haris Andrea

    The motion of charges in the magnetosphere of pulsars is studied from two complementary points of view: (1) for the case of aligned magnetic and rotational axes we solve a fluid version of the Lorentz-Dirac equation, in the Landau approximation, for a two-component plasma. We start from an approximately force-free initial condition and numerically integrate the equations of motion for a time equal to 1.6 percent of one stellar rotation period. We find that the system tends to a charge-separated state in which a negative charge region above the poles is separated by a vacuum gap from a positive charge region near the equator. We see the formation of force-free regions and a tendency of the vacuum gap to spread as the integrations proceed. The energies attained by the charges are only mildly relativistic and radiation reaction does not play an important role during the integrations. The negative charge above the polar region is electrostatically bound and there is a force-free region towards which negative charge tends to flow. Some positive charge is magnetically confined near the stellar equator and other positive charge crosses magnetic field lines moving outward to the region beyond the light cylinder. The outward motion of positive charge is due to the relative magnitudes of the electric and magnetic fields. (2) For the case of non-aligned axes we study the single particle dynamics for electrons moving in the region beyond the light cylinder, again using the Landau approximation to the Lorentz-Dirac equation. The effect of the inner magnetosphere is taken into account by adding a central attractive charge. We find that there exists a class of solutions corresponding to bounded orbits beyond the light cylinder. In an independent particle picture, particles started with different initial conditions within the basin of attraction of this class of orbits eventually form corotating patterns beyond the light cylinder. For a frequently occurring particle configuration

  12. Solar charged electric vehicle project analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Patten, J.A.; Bonnett, C.T.; Hartgen, D.T.; Barry, A.

    1996-11-01

    This paper addresses the cost of a solar charged electric vehicle and the energy and environmental savings derived from such a system. The analysis determines the energy and environmental savings attributed to the solar charging system in comparison to an EV charged from the utility grid. The solar charging provides an environmental benefit of $335--$694 per year in avoided pollution when compared to the costs for removing the pollution from the utility power plant. These pollutants include NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2} and PM{sub 10}. Pollution cost savings over the life of the vehicle and charging station (20 years) are nearly $14,000. In addition, solar charging provides an energy cost savings of about $312--$440/year which generates nearly $9,000 in additional cost savings over the life of the vehicle. The combined savings amounts to $23,000 over the life of the solar charged EV system. Therefore the initial investment of $20,000 for the solar charging system can be recaptured over the life of the system.

  13. Direct imaging charge distribution in reduced graphene oxide sheets induced by isolated charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yue; Wang, Ying; Zhou, Yuan; Shi, Anting; Hu, Jun; Zhang, Yi

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we directly visualized the charges distributed in one-atom-thick reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheet induced by adjacent charged rGO using a sample-charged mode scanning polarization force microscopy. We found that electron carriers could be attracted to one side of the rGO sheet and leave holes on the other side. The induced charges were distributed inhomogeneously; that is, contrary to earlier reports, the free carrier concentration was neither distributed on the ends, nor distributed uniformly on the whole rGO sheet. When the surrounding rGO sheets were injected with electrostatic charges, the motion of the charge carriers happened in the target-neutral rGO sheet simultaneously. The charges induced in the rGO sheet by isolated charges on adjacent rGO sheets decayed rapidly with the increasing of their separated distance. In addition, fine control of the distribution of the induced charges in a single rGO sheet could be realized through placing more isolated charges in the surrounding areas. These findings suggest a feasible and precise strategy for the modulation and design of local-charge-sensitive functional graphene-based systems.

  14. Transverse Mode Coupling Instability with Space Charge

    SciTech Connect

    Balbekov, V.

    2016-03-11

    Transverse mode coupling instability of a bunch with space charge and wake field is considered in frameworks of the boxcar model. Eigenfunctions of the bunch without wake are used as the basis for solution of the equations with the wake field included. Dispersion equation for the bunch eigentunes is obtained in the form of an infinite continued fraction. It is shown that influence of space charge on the instability essentially depends on the wake sign. In particular, threshold of the negative wake increases in absolute value until the space charge tune shift is rather small, and goes to zero at higher space charge. The explanation of this behavior is developed by analysis of the bunch spectrum. A comparison of the results with published articles is represented.

  15. The differential algebra based multiple level fast multipole algorithm for 3D space charge field calculation and photoemission simulation

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2015-09-28

    Coulomb interaction between charged particles inside a bunch is one of the most importance collective effects in beam dynamics, becoming even more significant as the energy of the particle beam is lowered to accommodate analytical and low-Z material imaging purposes such as in the time resolved Ultrafast Electron Microscope (UEM) development currently underway at Michigan State University. In addition, space charge effects are the key limiting factor in the development of ultrafast atomic resolution electron imaging and diffraction technologies and are also correlated with an irreversible growth in rms beam emittance due to fluctuating components of the nonlinear electron dynamics. In the short pulse regime used in the UEM, space charge effects also lead to virtual cathode formation in which the negative charge of the electrons emitted at earlier times, combined with the attractive surface field, hinders further emission of particles and causes a degradation of the pulse properties. Space charge and virtual cathode effects and their remediation are core issues for the development of the next generation of high-brightness UEMs. Since the analytical models are only applicable for special cases, numerical simulations, in addition to experiments, are usually necessary to accurately understand the space charge effect. In this paper we will introduce a grid-free differential algebra based multiple level fast multipole algorithm, which calculates the 3D space charge field for n charged particles in arbitrary distribution with an efficiency of O(n), and the implementation of the algorithm to a simulation code for space charge dominated photoemission processes.

  16. The differential algebra based multiple level fast multipole algorithm for 3D space charge field calculation and photoemission simulation

    DOE PAGES

    None, None

    2015-09-28

    Coulomb interaction between charged particles inside a bunch is one of the most importance collective effects in beam dynamics, becoming even more significant as the energy of the particle beam is lowered to accommodate analytical and low-Z material imaging purposes such as in the time resolved Ultrafast Electron Microscope (UEM) development currently underway at Michigan State University. In addition, space charge effects are the key limiting factor in the development of ultrafast atomic resolution electron imaging and diffraction technologies and are also correlated with an irreversible growth in rms beam emittance due to fluctuating components of the nonlinear electron dynamics.more » In the short pulse regime used in the UEM, space charge effects also lead to virtual cathode formation in which the negative charge of the electrons emitted at earlier times, combined with the attractive surface field, hinders further emission of particles and causes a degradation of the pulse properties. Space charge and virtual cathode effects and their remediation are core issues for the development of the next generation of high-brightness UEMs. Since the analytical models are only applicable for special cases, numerical simulations, in addition to experiments, are usually necessary to accurately understand the space charge effect. In this paper we will introduce a grid-free differential algebra based multiple level fast multipole algorithm, which calculates the 3D space charge field for n charged particles in arbitrary distribution with an efficiency of O(n), and the implementation of the algorithm to a simulation code for space charge dominated photoemission processes.« less

  17. Electrostatic Charging of Lunar Dust by UV Photoelectric Emissions and Solar Wind Electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, Mian M.; Tankosic, Dragana; Spann, James f.; LeClair, Andre C.; Dube, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    The ubiquitous presence of dust in the lunar environment with its high adhesive characteristics has been recognized to be a major safety issue that must be addressed in view of its hazardous effects on robotic and human exploration of the Moon. The reported observations of a horizon glow and streamers at the lunar terminator during the Apollo missions are attributed to the sunlight scattered by the levitated lunar dust. The lunar surface and the dust grains are predominantly charged positively by the incident UV solar radiation on the dayside and negatively by the solar wind electrons on the night-side. The charged dust grains are levitated and transported over long distances by the established electric fields. A quantitative understanding of the lunar dust phenomena requires development of global dust distribution models, based on an accurate knowledge of lunar dust charging properties. Currently available data of lunar dust charging is based on bulk materials, although it is well recognized that measurements on individual dust grains are expected to be substantially different from the bulk measurements. In this paper we present laboratory measurements of charging properties of Apollo 11 & 17 dust grains by UV photoelectric emissions and by electron impact. These measurements indicate substantial differences of both qualitative and quantitative nature between dust charging properties of individual micron/submicron sized dust grains and of bulk materials. In addition, there are no viable theoretical models available as yet for calculation of dust charging properties of individual dust grains for both photoelectric emissions and electron impact. It is thus of paramount importance to conduct comprehensive measurements for charging properties of individual dust grains in order to develop realistic models of dust processes in the lunar atmosphere, and address the hazardous issues of dust on lunar robotic and human missions.

  18. Effects of graphene coating and charge injection on water adsorption of solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yufeng; Guo, Wanlin

    2013-11-07

    The adhesion and cohesion of water molecules on graphene-coated and bare copper and mica substrates under charge injection have been extensively studied by first-principles calculations. Water adsorption on graphene-coated copper surface is weakened by injecting negative charges into the substrate, while enhanced by positive charges. Both negatively and positively charge injecting on graphene-coated mica strengthen the adsorption between water and the surface. While the adhesive and cohesive energies of water adsorption on charged bare copper and mica exhibit similar trends and much stronger response to charge injection. The charge sensitivity of water adsorbing on positively charged surfaces is significantly weakened by the graphene coating layer, mainly due to lower interfacial charge exchange. Our results suggest a viable way to modify water adsorption on a graphene-coated surface and unveil the role of graphene as a passivation layer for the wetting of a charged substrate.

  19. Negative symptoms: psychopathological models.

    PubMed Central

    Ananth, J; Djenderdjian, A; Shamasunder, P; Costa, J; Herrera, J; Sramek, J

    1991-01-01

    The psychopathological manifestations of schizophrenia have been broadly divided into positive and negative symptom groups. Even though there is no definitive consensus, psychomotor agitation, motor excitement, hallucinations, delusions and thought disorder constitute positive and psychomotor retardation, amotivation, apathy and decreased emotional expression are grouped into negative symptoms. The negative symptoms have been reported to appear late in the course of the illness and resistant to treatment with neuroleptics. While these claims have not been substantiated, the current interest on negative symptoms is related to the fact that many nonfunctioning institutionalized as well as ambulatory schizophrenics manifest negative symptoms. As chronic psychiatric beds have become scarce, many patients with negative symptoms who were harbored in the chronic mental hospitals have been released to the community care and some of these patients live on the streets. Thus their visibility has challenged psychiatry to focus its efforts on the etiology and treatment of negative symptoms. PMID:2049366

  20. VARIABLE CHARGE SOILS: MINERALOGY AND CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Van Ranst, Eric; Qafoku, Nikolla; Noble, Andrew; Xu, Ren-Kou

    2016-09-19

    Soils rich in particles with amphoteric surface properties in the Oxisols, Ultisols, Alfisols, Spodosols and Andisols orders (1) are considered to be variable charge soils (2) (Table 1). The term “variable charge” is used to describe organic and inorganic soil constituents with reactive surface groups whose charge varies with pH and ionic concentration and composition of the soil solution. Such groups are the surface carboxyl, phenolic and amino functional groups of organic materials in soils, and surface hydroxyl groups of Fe and Al oxides, allophane and imogolite. The hydroxyl surface groups are also present on edges of some phyllosilicate minerals such as kaolinite, mica, and hydroxyl-interlayered vermiculite. The variable charge is developed on the surface groups as a result of adsorption or desorption of ions that are constituents of the solid phase, i.e., H+, and the adsorption or desorption of solid-unlike ions that are not constituents of the solid phase. Highly weathered soils and subsoils (e.g., Oxisols and some Ultisols, Alfisols and Andisols) may undergo isoelectric weathering and reach a “zero net charge” stage during their development. They usually have a slightly acidic to acidic soil solution pH, which is close to either the point of zero net charge (PZNC) (3) or the point of zero salt effect (PZSE) (3). They are characterized by high abundances of minerals with a point of zero net proton charge (PZNPC) (3) at neutral and slightly basic pHs; the most important being Fe and Al oxides and allophane. Under acidic conditions, the surfaces of these minerals are net positively charged. In contrast, the surfaces of permanent charge phyllosilicates are negatively charged regardless of ambient conditions. Variable charge soils therefore, are heterogeneous charge systems.

  1. Charge-ordering transitions without charge differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Yundi; Pardo, Victor; Pickett, Warren

    2013-03-01

    The distorted perovskite nickelate system RNiO3 (R=rare earth except La) undergoes a metal-insulator transition (MIT) at a temperature that varies smoothly with the R ionic radius. This MIT is accompanied by structural transition which leads to two inequivalent Ni sites in the cell, and has been explained by charge ordering (CO): charge is transferred between the Ni1 and Ni2 sites in a long-range ordered fashion. Experimental data on core binding energies, ionic radii, and Mossbauer shifts are interpreted in terms of Ni cation charges of 3 +/- δ with, for example, δ ~ 0.3 for YNiO3. Making use of first principles DFT results and a new approach not invoking integration of the charge density, we find[2] that the Ni 3 d occupation is identical (to high accuracy) for the two Ni sites. We also present results for other compounds (La2VCuO6, YNiO3, CaFeO3, AgNiO2, V4O7), all of which have distinct ``charge states'' that have identical 3 d occupation. This quantitative procedure will be discussed and some implications will be outlined. DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-04ER46111 and Ramon y Cajal Program

  2. A Neutral Plasma Source for Active Spacecraft Charge Control.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-01

    potentials are generally negative since electrons have higher mobilities as compared to ions. Overall spacecraft frame charging enhances surface contamination...Cuchanski, M., Kremer, P. C., "Surface Micro-Discharges on Spacecraft Dielectrics", Paper 111-7, Proceedings of the Spacecraft Charging Techonology

  3. Charge-sensitive fluorescent nanosensors created from nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Petrakova, V; Rehor, I; Stursa, J; Ledvina, M; Nesladek, M; Cigler, P

    2015-08-07

    We show that fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) are among the few types of nanosensors that enable direct optical reading of noncovalent molecular events. The unique sensing mechanism is based on switching between the negatively charged and neutral states of NV centers which is induced by the interaction of the FND surface with charged molecules.

  4. Trajectories of Moving Charges in Static Electric Fields.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkup, L.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the implementation of a trajectory-plotting program for a microcomputer; shows how it may be used to demonstrate the focusing effect of a simple electrostatic lens. The computer program is listed and diagrams are included that show comparisons of trajectories of negative charges in the vicinity of positive charges. (TW)

  5. Coagulase-negative staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Becker, Karsten; Heilmann, Christine; Peters, Georg

    2014-10-01

    The definition of the heterogeneous group of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) is still based on diagnostic procedures that fulfill the clinical need to differentiate between Staphylococcus aureus and those staphylococci classified historically as being less or nonpathogenic. Due to patient- and procedure-related changes, CoNS now represent one of the major nosocomial pathogens, with S. epidermidis and S. haemolyticus being the most significant species. They account substantially for foreign body-related infections and infections in preterm newborns. While S. saprophyticus has been associated with acute urethritis, S. lugdunensis has a unique status, in some aspects resembling S. aureus in causing infectious endocarditis. In addition to CoNS found as food-associated saprophytes, many other CoNS species colonize the skin and mucous membranes of humans and animals and are less frequently involved in clinically manifested infections. This blurred gradation in terms of pathogenicity is reflected by species- and strain-specific virulence factors and the development of different host-defending strategies. Clearly, CoNS possess fewer virulence properties than S. aureus, with a respectively different disease spectrum. In this regard, host susceptibility is much more important. Therapeutically, CoNS are challenging due to the large proportion of methicillin-resistant strains and increasing numbers of isolates with less susceptibility to glycopeptides.

  6. Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci

    PubMed Central

    Heilmann, Christine; Peters, Georg

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The definition of the heterogeneous group of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) is still based on diagnostic procedures that fulfill the clinical need to differentiate between Staphylococcus aureus and those staphylococci classified historically as being less or nonpathogenic. Due to patient- and procedure-related changes, CoNS now represent one of the major nosocomial pathogens, with S. epidermidis and S. haemolyticus being the most significant species. They account substantially for foreign body-related infections and infections in preterm newborns. While S. saprophyticus has been associated with acute urethritis, S. lugdunensis has a unique status, in some aspects resembling S. aureus in causing infectious endocarditis. In addition to CoNS found as food-associated saprophytes, many other CoNS species colonize the skin and mucous membranes of humans and animals and are less frequently involved in clinically manifested infections. This blurred gradation in terms of pathogenicity is reflected by species- and strain-specific virulence factors and the development of different host-defending strategies. Clearly, CoNS possess fewer virulence properties than S. aureus, with a respectively different disease spectrum. In this regard, host susceptibility is much more important. Therapeutically, CoNS are challenging due to the large proportion of methicillin-resistant strains and increasing numbers of isolates with less susceptibility to glycopeptides. PMID:25278577

  7. Optical Study of Flow and Combustion in an HCCI Engine with Negative Valve Overlap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Trevor S.; Xu, Hongming; Richardson, Steve; Wyszynski, Miroslaw L.; Megaritis, Thanos

    2006-07-01

    One of the most widely used methods to enable Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) combustion is using negative valve overlapping to trap a sufficient quantity of hot residual gas. The characteristics of air motion with specially designed valve events having reduced valve lift and durations associated with HCCI engines and their effect on subsequent combustion are not yet fully understood. In addition, the ignition process and combustion development in such engines are very different from those in conventional spark-ignition or diesel compression ignition engines. Very little data has been reported concerning optical diagnostics of the flow and combustion in the engine using negative valve overlapping. This paper presents an experimental investigation into the in-cylinder flow characteristics and combustion development in an optical engine operating in HCCI combustion mode. PIV measurements have been taken under motored engine conditions to provide a quantitative flow characterisation of negative valve overlap in-cylinder flows. The ignition and combustion process was imaged using a high resolution charge coupled device (CCD) camera and the combustion imaging data was supplemented by simultaneously recorded in-cylinder pressure data which assisted the analysis of the images. It is found that the flow characteristics with negative valve overlapping are less stable and more valve event driven than typical spark ignition in-cylinder flows, while the combustion initiation locations are not uniformly distributed.

  8. Charge Islands Through Tunneling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Daryl C.

    2002-01-01

    It has been recently reported that the electrical charge in a semiconductive carbon nanotube is not evenly distributed, but rather it is divided into charge "islands." This paper links the aforementioned phenomenon to tunneling and provides further insight into the higher rate of tunneling processes, which makes tunneling devices attractive. This paper also provides a basis for calculating the charge profile over the length of the tube so that nanoscale devices' conductive properties may be fully exploited.

  9. Negative compressibility in graphene-terminated black phosphorus heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yingying; Chen, Xiaolong; Wu, Zefei; Xu, Shuigang; Han, Tianyi; Lin, Jiangxiazi; Skinner, Brian; Cai, Yuan; He, Yuheng; Cheng, Chun; Wang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Negative compressibility is a many-body effect wherein strong correlations give rise to an enhanced gate capacitance in two-dimensional (2D) electronic systems. We observe capacitance enhancement in a newly emerged 2D layered material, atomically thin black phosphorus (BP). The encapsulation of BP by hexagonal boron nitride sheets with few-layer graphene as a terminal ensures ultraclean heterostructure interfaces, allowing us to observe negative compressibility at low hole carrier concentrations. We explain the negative compressibility based on the Coulomb correlation among in-plane charges and their image charges in a gate electrode in the framework of Debye screening.

  10. Insight into acid-base nucleation experiments by comparison of the chemical composition of positive, negative, and neutral clusters.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Federico; Praplan, Arnaud P; Sarnela, Nina; Dommen, Josef; Kürten, Andreas; Ortega, Ismael K; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Junninen, Heikki; Simon, Mario; Tröstl, Jasmin; Jokinen, Tuija; Sipilä, Mikko; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Almeida, Joao; Breitenlechner, Martin; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Kangasluoma, Juha; Keskinen, Helmi; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Laaksonen, Ari; Lawler, Michael J; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Tomé, António; Virtanen, Annele; Viisanen, Yrjö; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Ye, Penglin; Curtius, Joachim; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R; Donahue, Neil M; Baltensperger, Urs

    2014-12-02

    We investigated the nucleation of sulfuric acid together with two bases (ammonia and dimethylamine), at the CLOUD chamber at CERN. The chemical composition of positive, negative, and neutral clusters was studied using three Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight (APi-TOF) mass spectrometers: two were operated in positive and negative mode to detect the chamber ions, while the third was equipped with a nitrate ion chemical ionization source allowing detection of neutral clusters. Taking into account the possible fragmentation that can happen during the charging of the ions or within the first stage of the mass spectrometer, the cluster formation proceeded via essentially one-to-one acid-base addition for all of the clusters, independent of the type of the base. For the positive clusters, the charge is carried by one excess protonated base, while for the negative clusters it is carried by a deprotonated acid; the same is true for the neutral clusters after these have been ionized. During the experiments involving sulfuric acid and dimethylamine, it was possible to study the appearance time for all the clusters (positive, negative, and neutral). It appeared that, after the formation of the clusters containing three molecules of sulfuric acid, the clusters grow at a similar speed, independent of their charge. The growth rate is then probably limited by the arrival rate of sulfuric acid or cluster-cluster collision.

  11. Particle Emission and Charging Effects Induced by Fracture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-15

    recombination with mobile charge carriers). These processes are initiated by bond breaking resulting in the creation of localized departures from...subsequendy decay to yield after-emission. Thermally stimulated relaxation involving mobile charge carriers releasing energy at appropriate recombination...region of contact. This flow of charge is slow because of the poor charge mobility in the rubber. In addition, any oxide layer on the metal also

  12. Spacecraft Charging in Geostationary Transfer Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, L. N.; Minow, J. I.

    2014-12-01

    The 700 km x 5.8 Re orbit of the two Van Allen Probes spacecraft provide a unique opportunity to investigate surface charging in geostationary transfer orbits. We use records from the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) plasma spectrometer to identify candidate surface charging events based on the "ion line" charging signature in the ion records. We summarize the energetic particle environment and the conditions necessary for charging to occur in this environment. We discuss the altitude, duration, and magnitude of events observed in the Van Allen Probes from the beginning of the mission to present time. In addition, we explore what information the dual satellites provide on the spatial and temporal variations in the charging environments.

  13. Charging of interplanetary grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baragiola, R. A.; Johnson, R. E.; Newcomb, John L.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this program is to quantify, by laboratory experiments, the charging of ices and other insulators subject to irradiation with electrons, ions and ultraviolet photons and to model special conditions based on the data. The system and conditions to be studied are those relevant for charging of dust in magnetospheric plasmas. The measurements are supplemented by computer simulations of charging or grains under a variety of conditions. Our work for this period involved experiments on water ice, improved models of charging of ice grains for Saturn's E-ring, and the construction of apparatus for electron impact studies and measurements of electron energy distributions.

  14. Electrical charging control apparatus and method, and solar to electrical energy conversion apparatus incorporating such charging control apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Staler, T.; Yerkes, J.W.

    1984-06-05

    Electrical charging control apparatus regulates the charging of a rechargeable battery by a solar panel. The control of the charging is through a relay which when closed directly connects the output and charging terminal of the solar panel to the output and charging terminal of the battery to permit the charging of the battery by the solar panel. Such coupling is in turn under the terminals are in a coupling prevention relationship chosen to prevent significant discharging of the battery through the solar panel; of breaker apparatus which breaks a coupling after a predetermined period of time; and of additional signal-tester apparatus which causes a termination of the coupling when the signal at the connected terminals reaches a chosen charging termination threshold. The breaking of the coupling, which can result in a periodic breaking, permits the testing for discharging prevention. A charging control method is in accordance with the above outlined method of operation of the charging control apparatus.

  15. Negative Ion Density Fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Igor Kaganovich

    2000-12-18

    Negative ions tend to stratify in electronegative plasmas with hot electrons (electron temperature Te much larger than ion temperature Ti, Te > Ti ). The boundary separating a plasma containing negative ions, and a plasma, without negative ions, is usually thin, so that the negative ion density falls rapidly to zero-forming a negative ion density front. We review theoretical, experimental and numerical results giving the spatio-temporal evolution of negative ion density fronts during plasma ignition, the steady state, and extinction (afterglow). During plasma ignition, negative ion fronts are the result of the break of smooth plasma density profiles during nonlinear convection. In a steady-state plasma, the fronts are boundary layers with steepening of ion density profiles due to nonlinear convection also. But during plasma extinction, the ion fronts are of a completely different nature. Negative ions diffuse freely in the plasma core (no convection), whereas the negative ion front propagates towards the chamber walls with a nearly constant velocity. The concept of fronts turns out to be very effective in analysis of plasma density profile evolution in strongly non-isothermal plasmas.

  16. The effects of fixed electrical charge on chondrocyte behavior.

    PubMed

    Dadsetan, Mahrokh; Pumberger, Matthias; Casper, Michelle E; Shogren, Kristin; Giuliani, Melissa; Ruesink, Terry; Hefferan, Theresa E; Currier, Bradford L; Yaszemski, Michael J

    2011-05-01

    In this study we have compared the effects of negative and positive fixed charges on chondrocyte behavior in vitro. Electrical charges have been incorporated into oligo(poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate) (OPF) using small charged monomers such as sodium methacrylate (SMA) and (2-(methacryloyloxy) ethyl)-trimethyl ammonium chloride (MAETAC) to produce negatively and positively charged hydrogels, respectively. The physical and electrical properties of the hydrogels were characterized by measuring and calculating the swelling ratio and zeta potential, respectively. Our results revealed that the properties of these OPF modified hydrogels varied according to the concentration of charged monomers. Zeta potential measurements demonstrated that the electrical properties of the OPF hydrogel surfaces changed on incorporation of SMA and MAETAC and that these changes in electrical properties were dose-dependent. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to determine the hydrogel surface composition. To assess the effects of surface properties on chondrocyte behavior primary chondrocytes isolated from rabbit ears were seeded as a monolayer on top of the hydrogels. We demonstrated that the cells remained viable over 7 days and began to proliferate while seeded on top of the hydrogels. Collagen type II staining was positive in all samples, however, the staining intensity was higher on negatively charged hydrogels. Similarly, glycosaminoglycan production was significantly higher on negatively charged hydrogels compared with a neutral hydrogel. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction showed up-regulation of collagen type II and down-regulation of collagen type I on the negatively charged hydrogels. These findings indicate that charge plays an important role in establishing an appropriate environment for chondrocytes and, hence, in the engineering of cartilage. Thus, further investigations into charged hydrogels for cartilage tissue

  17. Sensitive detection of miRNA by using hybridization chain reaction coupled with positively charged gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Xiangmin; Ning, Xue; Li, Zongbing; Cheng, Zhiyuan

    2016-01-01

    Positively charged gold nanoparticles (+)AuNPs can adsorb onto the negatively charged surface of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) or double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). Herein, long-range dsDNA polymers could form based on the hybridization chain reaction (HCR) of two hairpin probes (H1 and H2) by using miRNA-21 as an initiator. (+)AuNPs could adsorb onto the negatively charged surface of such long-range dsDNA polymers based on the electrostatic adsorption, which directly resulted in the precipitation of (+)AuNPs and the decrease of (+)AuNPs absorption spectra. Under optimal conditions, miRNA-21 detection could be realized in the range of 20 pM-10 nM with a detection limit of 6.8 pM. In addition, (+)AuNPs used here are much more stable than commonly used negatively charged gold nanoparticles ((−)AuNPs) in mixed solution that contained salt, protein or other metal ions. Importantly, the assay could realize the detection of miRNA in human serum samples. PMID:27576601

  18. Asymmetrical phase separation and gelation in binary mixtures of oppositely charged colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Yiwu; Yuan, Guangcui; Han, Charles C.

    2016-07-01

    Two types of colloidal particles, which are nearly the same in chemical composition but carry opposite surface charges, are mixed in water. Depending on the relative proportion of the oppositely charged particles, the process of aggregation leads to the formation of discrete clusters of various sizes in dilute dispersions, and to the development of particle gel networks in more concentrated systems. Due to the significant difference in the absolute values of surface charges (negative particle: -48 mV, positive particle: +24 mV), the phase separation and the gelation behaviors are asymmetric with respect to the mixing ratio. Mixtures with excess negative particles are more stable, while mixtures with excess positive particles are easily affected by phase separation. The hetero-aggregation triggered by the addition of microscopically large macro-ions is similar to what is often observed in a mono-component charged colloidal system, i.e., phase separation occurs through addition of small electrolyte ions. Within the concentration region investigated here, it is clear that the gel line is buried inside the phase separation region. Gelation occurs only when the number and size of the clusters are large and big enough to connect up into a space-spanning network. Our results indicate that, in this binary mixture of oppositely charged colloids, although the interaction between unlike species is attractive and that between like species is repulsive, the onset of gelation is in fact governed by the equilibrium phase separation, as in the case of purely attractive systems with short-range isotropic interaction.

  19. Asymmetrical phase separation and gelation in binary mixtures of oppositely charged colloids.

    PubMed

    Zong, Yiwu; Yuan, Guangcui; Han, Charles C

    2016-07-07

    Two types of colloidal particles, which are nearly the same in chemical composition but carry opposite surface charges, are mixed in water. Depending on the relative proportion of the oppositely charged particles, the process of aggregation leads to the formation of discrete clusters of various sizes in dilute dispersions, and to the development of particle gel networks in more concentrated systems. Due to the significant difference in the absolute values of surface charges (negative particle: -48 mV, positive particle: +24 mV), the phase separation and the gelation behaviors are asymmetric with respect to the mixing ratio. Mixtures with excess negative particles are more stable, while mixtures with excess positive particles are easily affected by phase separation. The hetero-aggregation triggered by the addition of microscopically large macro-ions is similar to what is often observed in a mono-component charged colloidal system, i.e., phase separation occurs through addition of small electrolyte ions. Within the concentration region investigated here, it is clear that the gel line is buried inside the phase separation region. Gelation occurs only when the number and size of the clusters are large and big enough to connect up into a space-spanning network. Our results indicate that, in this binary mixture of oppositely charged colloids, although the interaction between unlike species is attractive and that between like species is repulsive, the onset of gelation is in fact governed by the equilibrium phase separation, as in the case of purely attractive systems with short-range isotropic interaction.

  20. Impact of updraft on neutralized charge rate by lightning in thunderstorms: A simulation case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei; Zhang, Yijun; Zheng, Dong

    2015-12-01

    The rate of neutralized charge by lightning (RNCL) is an important parameter indicating the intensity of lightning activity. The total charging rate (CR), the CR of one kind of polarity (e.g., negative) charge (CROP), and the outflow rate of charge on precipitation (ORCP) are proposed as key factors impacting RNCL, based on the principle of conservation of one kind of polarity charge in a thunderstorm. In this paper, the impacts of updraft on CR and CROP are analyzed by using a 3D cloud resolution model for a strong storm that occurred in Beijing on 6 september 2008. The results show that updraft both promotes and inhibits RNCL at the same time. (1) Updraft always has a positive influence on CR. The correlation coefficient between the updraft volume and CR can reach 0.96. Strengthening of the updraft facilitates strengthening of RNCL through this positive influence. (2) Strengthening of the updraft also promotes reinforcement of CROP. The correlation coefficient between the updraft volume and CROP is high (about 0.9), but this promotion restrains the strengthening of RNCL because the strengthening of CROP will, most of the time, inhibit the increasing of RNCL. (3) Additionally, increasing of ORCP depresses the strengthening of RNCL. In terms of magnitude, the peak of ORCP is equal to the peak of CR. Because precipitation mainly appears after the lightning activity finishes, the depression effect of ORCP on RNCL can be ignored during the active lightning period.

  1. Tuning transport selectivity of ionic species by phosphoric acid gradient in positively charged nanochannel membranes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Meng; Yang, Xiaohai; Wang, Kemin; Wang, Qing; Fan, Xin; Liu, Wei; Liu, Xizhen; Liu, Jianbo; Huang, Jin

    2015-02-03

    The transport of ionic species through a nanochannel plays important roles in fundamental research and practical applications of the nanofluidic device. Here, we demonstrated that ionic transport selectivity of a positively charged nanochannel membrane can be tuned under a phosphoric acid gradient. When phosphoric acid solution and analyte solution were connected by the positively charged nanochannel membrane, the faster-moving analyte through the positively charged nanochannel membrane was the positively charged dye (methylviologen, MV(2+)) instead of the negatively charged dye (1,5-naphthalene disulfonate, NDS(2-)). In other words, a reversed ion selectivity of the nanochannel membranes can be found. It can be explained as a result of the combination of diffusion, induced electroosmosis, and induced electrophoresis. In addition, the influencing factors of transport selectivity, including concentration of phosphoric acid, penetration time, and volume of feed solution, were also investigated. The results showed that the transport selectivity can further be tuned by adjusting these factors. As a method of tuning ionic transport selectivity by establishing phosphoric acid gradient, it will be conducive to improving the separation of ionic species.

  2. Martian Atmospheric Pressure Static Charge Elimination Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansen, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    A Martian pressure static charge elimination tool is currently in development in the Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory (ESPL) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. In standard Earth atmosphere conditions, static charge can be neutralized from an insulating surface using air ionizers. These air ionizers generate ions through corona breakdown. The Martian atmosphere is 7 Torr of mostly carbon dioxide, which makes it inherently difficult to use similar methods as those used for standard atmosphere static elimination tools. An initial prototype has been developed to show feasibility of static charge elimination at low pressure, using corona discharge. A needle point and thin wire loop are used as the corona generating electrodes. A photo of the test apparatus is shown below. Positive and negative high voltage pulses are sent to the needle point. This creates positive and negative ions that can be used for static charge neutralization. In a preliminary test, a floating metal plate was charged to approximately 600 volts under Martian atmospheric conditions. The static elimination tool was enabled and the voltage on the metal plate dropped rapidly to -100 volts. This test data is displayed below. Optimization is necessary to improve the electrostatic balance of the static elimination tool.

  3. Colloids with continuously tunable surface charge.

    PubMed

    van Ravensteijn, Bas G P; Kegel, Willem K

    2014-09-09

    In this paper, we present a robust way to tune the surface potential of polystyrene colloids without changing the pH, ionic strength, etc. The colloids are composed of a cross-linked polystyrene core and a cross-linked vinylbenzyl chloride layer. Besides the chlorine groups, the particle surface contains sulfate/sulfonate groups (arising from the polymerization initiators) that provide a negative surface potential. Performing a Menschutkin reaction on the surface chlorine groups with tertiary amines allows us to introduce quaternary, positively charged amines. The overall charge on the particles is then determined by the ratio between the sulfate/sulfonate moieties and the quaternary amines. Using this process, we were able to invert the charge in a continuous manner without losing colloidal stability upon passing the isoelectric point. The straightforward reaction mechanism together with the fact that the reaction could be quenched rapidly resulted in a colloidal system in which the ζ potential can be tuned between -80 and 45 mV. As proof of principle, the positively charged particles were used in heterocoagulation experiments with nanometer- and micrometer-sized negatively charged silica particles to create geometrically well-defined colloidal (nano) clusters.

  4. Charge exchange and energy loss of slow highly charged ions in 1 nm thick carbon nanomembranes.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Richard A; Gruber, Elisabeth; Ritter, Robert; Heller, René; Facsko, Stefan; Aumayr, Friedrich

    2014-04-18

    Experimental charge exchange and energy loss data for the transmission of slow highly charged Xe ions through ultrathin polymeric carbon membranes are presented. Surprisingly, two distinct exit charge state distributions accompanied by charge exchange dependent energy losses are observed. The energy loss for ions exhibiting large charge loss shows a quadratic dependency on the incident charge state indicating that equilibrium stopping force values do not apply in this case. Additional angle resolved transmission measurements point on a significant contribution of elastic energy loss. The observations show that regimes of different impact parameters can be separated and thus a particle's energy deposition in an ultrathin solid target may not be described in terms of an averaged energy loss per unit length.

  5. Use of Doubly Charged Precursors to Validate Dissociation Mechanisms of Singly Charged Poly(Dimethylsiloxane) Oligomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouquet, Thierry; Toniazzo, Valérie; Ruch, David; Charles, Laurence

    2013-07-01

    Collision-induced dissociation of doubly charged poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) molecules was investigated to provide experimental evidence for fragmentation reactions proposed to occur upon activation of singly charged oligomers. This study focuses on two PDMS species holding trimethylsilyl or methoxy end-groups and cationized with ammonium. In both cases, introduction of the additional charge did not induce significant differences in dissociation behavior, and the use of doubly charged precursors enabled the occurrence of charge-separation reactions, allowing molecules always eliminated as neutrals upon activation of singly charged oligomers to be detected as cationized species. In the case of trimethylsilyl-terminated oligomers, random location of the adducted charge combined with rapid consecutive reactions proposed to occur from singly charged precursors could be validated based on MS/MS data of doubly charged oligomers. In the case of methoxy-terminated PDMS, favored interaction of the adducted ammonium with both end-groups, proposed to rationalize the dissociation behavior of singly charged molecules, was also supported by MS/MS data obtained for molecules adducted with two ammonium cations.

  6. Alamethicin channel conductance modified by lipid charge.

    PubMed

    Aguilella, V M; Bezrukov, S M

    2001-08-01

    The membrane surface charge modifies the conductance of ion channels by changing the electric potential and redistributing the ionic composition in their vicinity. We have studied the effects of lipid charge on the conductance of a multi-state channel formed in planar lipid bilayers by the peptide antibiotic alamethicin. The channel conductance was measured in two lipids: in a neutral dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) and a negatively charged dioleoylphosphatidylserine (DOPS). The charge state of DOPS was manipulated by the pH of the membrane-bathing solution. We find that at high salt concentrations (e.g., 2 M NaCl) the effect of the lipid charge is below the accuracy of our measurements. However, when the salt concentration in the membrane-bathing solution is decreased, the surface charge manifests itself as an increase in the conductance of the first two channel levels that correspond to the smallest conductive alamethicin aggregates. Our analysis shows that both the salt and pH dependence of the surface charge effect can be rationalized within the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann approach. Given channel conductance in neutral lipids, we use different procedures to account for the surface charge (e.g., introduce averaging over the channel aperture and take into account Na+ adsorption to DOPS heads), but only one adjustable parameter: an effective distance from the nearest lipid charge to the channel mouth center. We show that this distance varies by 0.3-0.4 nm upon channel transition from the minimal conducting aggregate (level L0) to the next larger one (level L1). This conclusion is in accord with a simple geometrical model of alamethicin aggregation.

  7. Serotonin, Inhibition, and Negative Mood

    PubMed Central

    Dayan, Peter; Huys, Quentin J. M

    2008-01-01

    Pavlovian predictions of future aversive outcomes lead to behavioral inhibition, suppression, and withdrawal. There is considerable evidence for the involvement of serotonin in both the learning of these predictions and the inhibitory consequences that ensue, although less for a causal relationship between the two. In the context of a highly simplified model of chains of affectively charged thoughts, we interpret the combined effects of serotonin in terms of pruning a tree of possible decisions, (i.e., eliminating those choices that have low or negative expected outcomes). We show how a drop in behavioral inhibition, putatively resulting from an experimentally or psychiatrically influenced drop in serotonin, could result in unexpectedly large negative prediction errors and a significant aversive shift in reinforcement statistics. We suggest an interpretation of this finding that helps dissolve the apparent contradiction between the fact that inhibition of serotonin reuptake is the first-line treatment of depression, although serotonin itself is most strongly linked with aversive rather than appetitive outcomes and predictions. PMID:18248087

  8. An Analysis of Two Thunderstorms Producing Five Negative Sprites on 12 September 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boggs, L.; Liu, N.; Splitt, M. E.; Lazarus, S. M.; Cummer, S. A.; Rassoul, H.

    2015-12-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the thunderstorms and the parent lightning discharge morphologies of five confirmed negative sprites taking place in two different thunderstorms. These two thunderstorms took place in east-central and south Florida on 12 September 2014. We utilized several lightning location networks, remote magnetic field measurements, dual polarization radar, and balloon borne soundings in our analysis. Each parent discharge was immediately preceded by intra-cloud (IC) discharges between the mid-level negative and upper positive charge regions. This either allowed a second upward negative leader to escape the upper positive charge region, or encouraged a downward negative leader to be initiated and connect with ground. The discharges found in this study support the findings of Lu et al., 2012 [JGR,117, D04212, 2012] that negative sprite-parent lightning consists primarily of hybrid intra-cloud negative cloud-to-ground (IC-NCG) and bolt-from-the-blue (BFB) lightning. Our work finds these unique discharges form in thunderstorms that have an excess of mid-level negative charge and weakened upper positive charge. Due to this charge structure, these unusual discharges transfer more charge to the ground than typical negative cloud-to-ground discharges. Our study suggests that the key difference separating bolt-from-the-blue and gigantic jet discharges is an asymmetric charge structure. This acts to bring the negative leader exiting the thundercloud closer to the lateral positive screening layer, encouraging the negative leader to turn towards ground. This investigation reveals IC discharges that involve multiple convective cells and come to ground as a negative CG discharge, a breed of hybrid IC-NCG discharges, also transfer more negative charge to ground than typical negative CG discharges and are able to initiate negative sprites. From this work, the charge structures mentioned above resulted from tall, intense convective cells with low CG flash

  9. Beware Capital Charge Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Stauffer, Hoff

    2006-04-15

    The capital charge rate has a material effect in cost comparisons. Care should be taken to calculate it correctly and use it properly. The most common mistake is to use a nominal, rather than real, capital charge rate. To make matters worse, the common short-cut formula does not work well. (author)

  10. Nondissipative optimum charge regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, R.; Vitebsky, J. N.

    1970-01-01

    Optimum charge regulator provides constant level charge/discharge control of storage batteries. Basic power transfer and control is performed by solar panel coupled to battery through power switching circuit. Optimum controller senses battery current and modifies duty cycle of switching circuit to maximize current available to battery.

  11. Impact of the Addition of Carboplatin and/or Bevacizumab to Neoadjuvant Once-per-Week Paclitaxel Followed by Dose-Dense Doxorubicin and Cyclophosphamide on Pathologic Complete Response Rates in Stage II to III Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: CALGB 40603 (Alliance)

    PubMed Central

    Sikov, William M.; Berry, Donald A.; Perou, Charles M.; Singh, Baljit; Cirrincione, Constance T.; Tolaney, Sara M.; Kuzma, Charles S.; Pluard, Timothy J.; Somlo, George; Port, Elisa R.; Golshan, Mehra; Bellon, Jennifer R.; Collyar, Deborah; Hahn, Olwen M.; Carey, Lisa A.; Hudis, Clifford A.; Winer, Eric P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose One third of patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) achieve pathologic complete response (pCR) with standard neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT). CALGB 40603 (Alliance), a 2 × 2 factorial, open-label, randomized phase II trial, evaluated the impact of adding carboplatin and/or bevacizumab. Patients and Methods Patients (N = 443) with stage II to III TNBC received paclitaxel 80 mg/m2 once per week (wP) for 12 weeks, followed by doxorubicin plus cyclophosphamide once every 2 weeks (ddAC) for four cycles, and were randomly assigned to concurrent carboplatin (area under curve 6) once every 3 weeks for four cycles and/or bevacizumab 10 mg/kg once every 2 weeks for nine cycles. Effects of adding these agents on pCR breast (ypT0/is), pCR breast/axilla (ypT0/isN0), treatment delivery, and toxicities were analyzed. Results Patients assigned to either carboplatin or bevacizumab were less likely to complete wP and ddAC without skipped doses, dose modification, or early discontinuation resulting from toxicity. Grade ≥ 3 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia were more common with carboplatin, as were hypertension, infection, thromboembolic events, bleeding, and postoperative complications with bevacizumab. Employing one-sided P values, addition of either carboplatin (60% v 44%; P = .0018) or bevacizumab (59% v 48%; P = .0089) significantly increased pCR breast, whereas only carboplatin (54% v 41%; P = .0029) significantly raised pCR breast/axilla. More-than-additive interactions between the two agents could not be demonstrated. Conclusion In stage II to III TNBC, addition of either carboplatin or bevacizumab to NACT increased pCR rates, but whether this will improve relapse-free or overall survival is unknown. Given results from recently reported adjuvant trials, further investigation of bevacizumab in this setting is unlikely, but the role of carboplatin could be evaluated in definitive studies, ideally limited to biologically defined patient subsets most likely

  12. Method for forming electrically charged laser targets

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Ronald K.; Hunt, Angus L.

    1979-01-01

    Electrically chargeable laser targets and method for forming such charged targets in order to improve their guidance along a predetermined desired trajectory. This is accomplished by the incorporation of a small amount of an additive to the target material which will increase the electrical conductivity thereof, and thereby enhance the charge placed upon the target material for guidance thereof by electrostatic or magnetic steering mechanisms, without adversely affecting the target when illuminated by laser energy.

  13. Rain Drop Charge Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S, Sreekanth T.

    begin{center} Large Large Rain Drop Charge Sensor Sreekanth T S*, Suby Symon*, G. Mohan Kumar (1) , S. Murali Das (2) *Atmospheric Sciences Division, Centre for Earth Science Studies, Thiruvananthapuram 695011 (1) D-330, Swathi Nagar, West Fort, Thiruvananthapuram 695023 (2) Kavyam, Manacaud, Thiruvananthapuram 695009 begin{center} ABSTRACT To study the inter-relations with precipitation electricity and precipitation microphysical parameters a rain drop charge sensor was designed and developed at CESS Electronics & Instrumentation Laboratory. Simultaneous measurement of electric charge and fall speed of rain drops could be done using this charge sensor. A cylindrical metal tube (sensor tube) of 30 cm length is placed inside another thick metal cover opened at top and bottom for electromagnetic shielding. Mouth of the sensor tube is exposed and bottom part is covered with metal net in the shielding cover. The instrument is designed in such a way that rain drops can pass only through unhindered inside the sensor tube. When electrically charged rain drops pass through the sensor tube, it is charged to the same magnitude of drop charge but with opposite polarity. The sensor tube is electrically connected the inverted input of a current to voltage converter operational amplifier using op-amp AD549. Since the sensor is electrically connected to the virtual ground of the op-amp, the charge flows to the ground and the generated current is converted to amplified voltage. This output voltage is recorded using a high frequency (1kHz) voltage recorder. From the recorded pulse, charge magnitude, polarity and fall speed of rain drop are calculated. From the fall speed drop diameter also can be calculated. The prototype is now under test running at CESS campus. As the magnitude of charge in rain drops is an indication of accumulated charge in clouds in lightning, this instrument has potential application in the field of risk and disaster management. By knowing the charge

  14. Negative Human Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brannan, John M.

    1972-01-01

    This study is an effort to examine man's most negative experiences as he perceives them. The results indicated that teachers were involved more often than any other person in the most negative experience reported. Improved human relations skills are clearly indicated for those in higher education as well as in public schools. (Author)

  15. Charged topological entanglement entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Shunji; Wen, Xueda; Hung, Ling-Yan; Ryu, Shinsei

    2016-05-01

    A charged entanglement entropy is a new measure which probes quantum entanglement between different charge sectors. We study symmetry-protected topological (SPT) phases in (2+1)-dimensional space-time by using this charged entanglement entropy. SPT phases are short-range entangled states without topological order and hence cannot be detected by the topological entanglement entropy. We demonstrate that the universal part of the charged entanglement entropy is nonzero for nontrivial SPT phases and therefore it is a useful measure to detect short-range entangled topological phases. We also discuss that the classification of SPT phases based on the charged topological entanglement entropy is related to that of the braiding statistics of quasiparticles.

  16. A floating water bridge produces water with excess charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Elmar C.; Sammer, Martina; Wexler, Adam D.; Kuntke, Philipp; Woisetschläger, Jakob

    2016-03-01

    Excess positive and negative Bjerrum-defect like charge (protonic and ‘aterprotonic’, from ancient Greek ἄ'τɛρ, ‘without’) in anolyte and catholyte of high voltage electrolysis of highly pure water was found during the so-called ‘floating water bridge’ experiment. The floating water bridge is a special case of an electrohydrodynamic liquid bridge and constitutes an intriguing phenomenon that occurs when a high potential difference (~kV cm-1) is applied between two beakers of water. To obtain such results impedance spectroscopy was used. This measurement technique allows the depiction and simulation of complex aqueous systems as simple electric circuits. In the present work we show that there is an additional small contribution from the difference in conductivity between anolyte and catholyte which cannot be measured with a conductivity meter, but is clearly visible in an impedance spectrum.

  17. Operating a redox flow battery with a negative electrolyte imbalance

    DOEpatents

    Pham, Quoc; Chang, On; Durairaj, Sumitha

    2015-03-31

    Loss of flow battery electrode catalyst layers during self-discharge or charge reversal may be prevented by establishing and maintaining a negative electrolyte imbalance during at least parts of a flow battery's operation. Negative imbalance may be established and/or maintained actively, passively or both. Actively establishing a negative imbalance may involve detecting an imbalance that is less negative than a desired threshold, and processing one or both electrolytes until the imbalance reaches a desired negative level. Negative imbalance may be effectively established and maintained passively within a cell by constructing a cell with a negative electrode chamber that is larger than the cell's positive electrode chamber, thereby providing a larger quantity of negative electrolyte for reaction with positive electrolyte.

  18. Collision integrals for charged-charged interaction in two-temperature non-equilibrium plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ghorui, S.; Das, A. K.

    2013-09-15

    Choice of an appropriate form of shielding distance in the estimation of collision integrals under screened coulomb potential for two-temperature non-equilibrium plasma is addressed. Simple expressions for collision integrals for charged-charged interactions are derived. It is shown that while some of the formalisms used earlier completely ignore the presence of ions, the others incorporating it may result in negative collision integrals for the interactions involving particles at higher charged states. The parametric regimes of concern and impact of different formalisms on the computed transport properties are investigated with specific reference to nitrogen plasma. A revised definition of the shielding distance is proposed, which incorporates both electrons and ions, avoids the problem of negative collision integrals in all practical regimes of interest and results in calculated property values in close agreement with experimentally observed results.

  19. Structural Pituitary Abnormalities Associated With CHARGE Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Louise C.; Gevers, Evelien F.; Baker, Joanne; Kasia, Tessa; Chong, Kling; Josifova, Dragana J.; Caimari, Maria; Bilan, Frederic; McCabe, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: CHARGE syndrome is a multisystem disorder that, in addition to Kallmann syndrome/isolated hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism, has been associated with anterior pituitary hypoplasia (APH). However, structural abnormalities such as an ectopic posterior pituitary (EPP) have not yet been described in such patients. Objective: The aims of the study were: 1) to describe the association between CHARGE syndrome and a structurally abnormal pituitary gland; and 2) to investigate whether CHD7 variants, which are identified in 65% of CHARGE patients, are common in septo-optic dysplasia /hypopituitarism. Methods: We describe 2 patients with features of CHARGE and EPP. CHD7 was sequenced in these and other patients with septo-optic dysplasia/hypopituitarism. Results: EPP, APH, and GH, TSH, and probable LH/FSH deficiency were present in 1 patient, and EPP and APH with GH, TSH, LH/FSH, and ACTH deficiency were present in another patient, both of whom had features of CHARGE syndrome. Both had variations in CHD7 that were novel and undetected in control cohorts or in the international database of CHARGE patients, but were also present in their unaffected mothers. No CHD7 variants were detected in the patients with septo-optic dysplasia/hypopituitarism without additional CHARGE features. Conclusion: We report a novel association between CHARGE syndrome and structural abnormalities of the pituitary gland in 2 patients with variations in CHD7 that are of unknown significance. However, CHD7 mutations are an uncommon cause of septo-optic dysplasia or hypopituitarism. Our data suggest the need for evaluation of pituitary function/anatomy in patients with CHARGE syndrome. PMID:23526466

  20. Materials with negative stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaglinski, Tim

    Negative stiffness, or a reversal in the usual assumed direction between causal forces and ensuing deformations, has been proposed as a pathway to materials which exceed theoretical performance bounds. Negative stiffness, as a concept, represents a relaxation of tacitly assumed material behavior, but it violates no natural laws. Negative stiffness, normally unstable without constraint, is permissible for stability under special conditions, for example a rigid boundary constraint so long as the material satisfies strong ellipticity in the parlance of elasticity. Hence, negative stiffness is not observed in materials or structures which are not constrained. If negative stiffness is allowed for inclusions of material, which are surrounded by a stabilizing positive stiffness matrix, composite theory predicts large increases in the mechanical damping and composite stiffness. The work herein explores several material systems which possess negative stiffness, and seeks to characterize the composite mechanical properties of these systems. Two metal matrix composite systems, namely Sn-VO2 and Sn-BaTIO3, were investigated. Here, negative stiffness arises from the ferroelastic phase transformations in the ceramic inclusions; stability is imparted by the tin matrix. Polycrystalline In-Tl and BaTIO 3 were also studied. Here, the entire material volume is phase transforming. Constraint is imparted on a small volume fraction of crystallites by the surrounding material. Various manifestations of negative stiffness were observed. Thermally broad damping peaks which depended upon thermal cycling were observed in the Sn-VO2 composites. Furthermore, mechanical instabilities were seen in composites intentionally designed to be unstable. Negative stiffness was indicated in the In-Tl alloy by magnification of damping peaks over those observed in single crystals, increases in damping peaks with increased cooling rates, occurrence of damping peaks before the appearance of martensite and

  1. Negative birefringent polyimide films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Frank W. (Inventor); Cheng, Stephen Z. D. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A negative birefringent film, useful in liquid crystal displays, and a method for controlling the negative birefringence of a polyimide film is disclosed which allows the matching of an application to a targeted amount of birefringence by controlling the degree of in-plane orientation of the polyimide by the selection of functional groups within both the diamine and dianhydride segments of the polyimide which affect the polyimide backbone chain rigidity, linearity, and symmetry. The higher the rigidity, linearity and symmetry of the polyimide backbone, the larger the value of the negative birefringence of the polyimide film.

  2. The effect of charging rate on the graphite electrode of commercial lithium-ion cells: A post-mortem study

    DOE PAGES

    Somerville, L.; Bareno, J.; Trask, S.; ...

    2016-10-22

    Increased charging rates negatively affect the lifetime of lithium-ion cells by increasing cell resistance and reducing capacity. This work is a post-mortem study of 18650 cells subjected to charge rates of 0.7-, 2-, 4-, and 6-C. For cells charged at 0.7-C to 4-C, this performance degradation is primarily related to surface film thickness with no observable change in surface film chemical composition. However, at charge rates of 6-C, the chemical composition of the surface film changes significantly, suggesting that this change is the reason for the sharper increase in cell resistance compared to the lower charge rates. In addition, wemore » found that surface film formation was not uniform across the electrode. Surface film was thicker and chemically different along the central band of the electrode “jelly roll”. This result is most likely attributable to an increase in temperature that results from non-uniform electrode wetting during manufacture. As a result, this non-uniform change further resulted in active material delamination from the current collector owing to chemical changes to the binder for the cell charged at 6-C.« less

  3. The effect of charging rate on the graphite electrode of commercial lithium-ion cells: A post-mortem study

    SciTech Connect

    Somerville, L.; Bareno, J.; Trask, S.; Jennings, P.; McGordon, A.; Lyness, C.; Bloom, Ira

    2016-10-22

    Increased charging rates negatively affect the lifetime of lithium-ion cells by increasing cell resistance and reducing capacity. This work is a post-mortem study of 18650 cells subjected to charge rates of 0.7-, 2-, 4-, and 6-C. For cells charged at 0.7-C to 4-C, this performance degradation is primarily related to surface film thickness with no observable change in surface film chemical composition. However, at charge rates of 6-C, the chemical composition of the surface film changes significantly, suggesting that this change is the reason for the sharper increase in cell resistance compared to the lower charge rates. In addition, we found that surface film formation was not uniform across the electrode. Surface film was thicker and chemically different along the central band of the electrode “jelly roll”. This result is most likely attributable to an increase in temperature that results from non-uniform electrode wetting during manufacture. As a result, this non-uniform change further resulted in active material delamination from the current collector owing to chemical changes to the binder for the cell charged at 6-C.

  4. The effect of charging rate on the graphite electrode of commercial lithium-ion cells: A post-mortem study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somerville, L.; Bareño, J.; Trask, S.; Jennings, P.; McGordon, A.; Lyness, C.; Bloom, I.

    2016-12-01

    Increased charging rates negatively affect the lifetime of lithium-ion cells by increasing cell resistance and reducing capacity. This work is a post-mortem study of 18650-type cells subjected to charge rates of 0.7-, 2-, 4-, and 6-C. For cells charged at 0.7-C to 4-C, this performance degradation is primarily related to surface film thickness with no observable change in surface film chemical composition. However, at charge rates of 6-C, the chemical composition of the surface film changes significantly, suggesting that this change is the reason for the sharper increase in cell resistance compared to the lower charge rates. In addition, we found that surface film formation was not uniform across the electrode. Surface film was thicker and chemically different along the central band of the electrode "jelly roll". This result is most likely attributable to an increase in temperature that results from non-uniform electrode wetting during manufacture. This non-uniform change further resulted in active material delamination from the current collector owing to chemical changes to the binder for the cell charged at 6-C.

  5. Charge-Transfer Versus Charge-Transfer-Like Excitations Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Barry; Sun, Haitao; Govind, Niranjan; Kowalski, Karol; Autschbach, Jochen

    2015-07-14

    Cr