Science.gov

Sample records for additional neighboring population

  1. THE BEHAVIOR OF ADMIXED POPULATIONS IN NEIGHBOR-JOINING INFERENCE OF POPULATION TREES

    PubMed Central

    KOPELMAN, NAAMA M.; STONE, LEWI; GASCUEL, OLIVIER; ROSENBERG, NOAH A.

    2013-01-01

    Neighbor-joining is one of the most widely used methods for constructing evolutionary trees. This approach from phylogenetics is often employed in population genetics, where distance matrices obtained from allele frequencies are used to produce a representation of population relationships in the form of a tree. In phylogenetics, the utility of neighbor-joining derives partly from a result that for a class of distance matrices including those that are additive or tree-like—generated by summing weights over the edges connecting pairs of taxa in a tree to obtain pairwise distances—application of neighbor-joining recovers exactly the underlying tree. For populations within a species, however, migration and admixture can produce distance matrices that reflect more complex processes than those obtained from the bifurcating trees typical in the multispecies context. Admixed populations—populations descended from recent mixture of groups that have long been separated—have been observed to be located centrally in inferred neighbor-joining trees, with short external branches incident to the path connecting their source populations. Here, using a simple model, we explore mathematically the behavior of an admixed population under neighbor-joining. We show that with an additive distance matrix, a population admixed among two source populations necessarily lies on the path between the sources. Relaxing the additivity requirement, we examine the smallest nontrivial case—four populations, one of which is admixed between two of the other three—showing that the two source populations never merge with each other before one of them merges with the admixed population. Furthermore, the distance on the constructed tree between the admixed population and either source population is always smaller than the distance between the source populations, and the external branch for the admixed population is always incident to the path connecting the sources. We define three properties

  2. Neighbors' problems, our problems: population growth in Central America.

    PubMed

    Fox, R W

    1990-06-01

    A largely ignored issue, Central America faces its most pressing problem in its soaring population growth, one that is wreaking havoc on its economic and social infrastructures. Rising by a factor of 7, Central America's population -- presently 28.9 million -- is expected to reach 7.7 million by the year 2000, and 62.8 million by 2025. Typical of most of the Third World, Central America's population explosion stems from the fact that while the latter half of the 20th century has seen reductions of mortality rates, brought on by improvements of general health conditions, birth rates have remained excessively high. Despite moderate declines in the birth rate, Central American women still average 3-6 children. These demographic factors pose catastrophic consequences for Central America's natural resources, urban development and labor force. And they also threaten to increase migration to the US. Economic pressures have put great demands on the region's rain forests, exploited both for its resources and cleared away to create farmland. Today, only 40% of the original forest remains, and almost 3% more is destroyed annually. The area's capital cities have seen their populations increase 3-6 fold between 1950 and 1980. This explosion places further demands on already overburdened urban infrastructures, and has led to a mushrooming of squatter settlements. It has also led to a massive increase in the urban labor force which cannot be accommodated by the region's economies, which are in disarray due to falling export commodity earnings, limited natural resources, and scant investment capital. The economic woes could further increase the flow of workers to the US (15-20% of El Salvador's total population has already filed to the US). Historically, the region had attempted to offset population growth through economic development, but such expectations were not met, especially with the economic decline that wiped out gains made during the 1960s and 70s. Only recently have the

  3. Re(de)fining the Orthographic Neighborhood: The Role of Addition and Deletion Neighbors in Lexical Decision and Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Colin J.; Perea, Manuel; Acha, Joana

    2009-01-01

    The influence of addition and deletion neighbors on visual word identification was investigated in four experiments. Experiments 1 and 2 used Spanish stimuli. In Experiment 1, lexical decision latencies were slower and less accurate for words and nonwords with higher-frequency deletion neighbors (e.g., "jugar" in "juzgar"), relative to control…

  4. Re(de)fining the orthographic neighborhood: the role of addition and deletion neighbors in lexical decision and reading.

    PubMed

    Davis, Colin J; Perea, Manuel; Acha, Joana

    2009-10-01

    The influence of addition and deletion neighbors on visual word identification was investigated in four experiments. Experiments 1 and 2 used Spanish stimuli. In Experiment 1, lexical decision latencies were slower and less accurate for words and nonwords with higher-frequency deletion neighbors (e.g., jugar in juzgar), relative to control stimuli. Experiment 2 showed a similar interference effect for words and nonwords with higher-frequency addition neighbors (e.g., conejo, which has the addition neighbor consejo), relative to control stimuli. Experiment 3 replicated this addition neighbor interference effect in a lexical decision experiment with English stimuli. Across all three experiments, interference effects were always evident for addition/deletion neighbors with word-outer overlap, usually present for those with word-initial overlap, but never present for those with word-final overlap. Experiment 4 replicated the addition/deletion neighbor inhibitory effects in a Spanish sentence reading task in which the participants' eye movements were monitored. These findings suggest that conventional orthographic neighborhood metrics should be redefined. In addition to its methodological implications, this conclusion has significant theoretical implications for input coding schemes and the mechanisms underlying word recognition. PMID:19803656

  5. Signaling among neighboring plants and the development of size inequalities in plant populations

    SciTech Connect

    Ballare, C.L. |; Scopel, A.L. |; Jordan, E.T.; Vierstra, R.D.

    1994-10-11

    Transgenic tobacco plants that express an oat phytochrome gene (phyA) under control of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter and display altered photophysiology were used to test the role of light as a vehicle of information in dominance relationships between neighboring plants. Compared with the isogenic wild type, phyA-overexpressing plants showed dramatically reduced morphological responsivity to changes in the red/far red ratio of the incident light and to the proximity of neighboring plants in spacing experiments. In transgenic canopies an increase in stand density caused the small plants of the population to be rapidly suppressed by their neighbors. In wild-type canopies, plants responded to increased density with large morphological changes, and there appeared to be an inverse relationship between the magnitude of this morphological response and the ranking of the individual plant in the population size hierarchy. In these wild-type populations, size inequality increased only moderately with density within the time frame of the experiments. The results suggest that, in crowded stands, the ability of individual plants to acquire information about their light environment via phytochrome plays a central role in driving architectural changes that, at the population level, delay the development of size differences between neighbors.

  6. Effects of precipitation change and neighboring plants on population dynamics of Bromus tectorum.

    PubMed

    Prevéy, Janet S; Seastedt, Timothy R

    2015-11-01

    Shifting precipitation patterns resulting from global climate change will influence the success of invasive plant species. In the Front Range of Colorado, Bromus tectorum (cheatgrass) and other non-native winter annuals have invaded grassland communities and are becoming more abundant. As the global climate warms, more precipitation may fall as rain rather than snow in winter, and an increase in winter rain could benefit early-growing winter annuals, such as B. tectorum, to the detriment of native species. In this study we measured the effects of simulated changes in seasonal precipitation and presence of other plant species on population growth of B. tectorum in a grassland ecosystem near Boulder, Colorado, USA. We also performed elasticity analyses to identify life transitions that were most sensitive to precipitation differences. In both study years, population growth rates were highest for B. tectorum growing in treatments receiving supplemental winter precipitation and lowest for those receiving the summer drought treatment. Survival of seedlings to flowering and seed production contributed most to population growth in all treatments. Biomass of neighboring native plants was positively correlated with reduced population growth rates of B. tectorum. However, exotic plant biomass had no effect on population growth rates. This study demonstrates how interacting effects of climate change and presence of native plants can influence the population growth of an invasive species. Overall, our results suggest that B. tectorum will become more invasive in grasslands if the seasonality of precipitation shifts towards wetter winters and allows B. tectorum to grow when competition from native species is low. PMID:26227366

  7. Effects of precipitation change and neighboring plants on population dynamics of Bromus tectorum.

    PubMed

    Prevéy, Janet S; Seastedt, Timothy R

    2015-11-01

    Shifting precipitation patterns resulting from global climate change will influence the success of invasive plant species. In the Front Range of Colorado, Bromus tectorum (cheatgrass) and other non-native winter annuals have invaded grassland communities and are becoming more abundant. As the global climate warms, more precipitation may fall as rain rather than snow in winter, and an increase in winter rain could benefit early-growing winter annuals, such as B. tectorum, to the detriment of native species. In this study we measured the effects of simulated changes in seasonal precipitation and presence of other plant species on population growth of B. tectorum in a grassland ecosystem near Boulder, Colorado, USA. We also performed elasticity analyses to identify life transitions that were most sensitive to precipitation differences. In both study years, population growth rates were highest for B. tectorum growing in treatments receiving supplemental winter precipitation and lowest for those receiving the summer drought treatment. Survival of seedlings to flowering and seed production contributed most to population growth in all treatments. Biomass of neighboring native plants was positively correlated with reduced population growth rates of B. tectorum. However, exotic plant biomass had no effect on population growth rates. This study demonstrates how interacting effects of climate change and presence of native plants can influence the population growth of an invasive species. Overall, our results suggest that B. tectorum will become more invasive in grasslands if the seasonality of precipitation shifts towards wetter winters and allows B. tectorum to grow when competition from native species is low.

  8. [Polymorphism of the apolipoprotein E gene (APOE) in the populations of Russia and neighboring countries].

    PubMed

    Borinskaia, S A; Kal'ina, N R; Sanina, E D; Kozhekbaeva, Zh M; Gupalo, E Iu; Garmash, I V; Ogurtsov, P P; Parshukova, O N; Boĭko, S G; Veselovskiĭ, E M; Vershubskaia, G G; Kozlov, A I; Rogaev, E I; Iankovskiĭ, N K

    2007-10-01

    Allele and genotype frequencies for the locus encoding apolipoprotein E, involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism (APOE), were evaluated in 16 populations representing 12 ethnic groups (a total of 1103 subjects) from Russia and neighboring countries. In the populations examined, the frequencies of allele epsilon4, which is the risk factor of Alzheimer's disease and coronary heart disease, varied from less than 5 to more than 20%, while the variation of the major epsilon3 allele in these populations ranged from less than 75 to 95%. The frequencies of alleles epsilon3 and epsilon4 were 0.714 and 0.205 in Saami, 0.734 and 0.149 in Maris, 0.841 and 0.122 in Evenks, 0.788 and 0.163 in Buryats, 0.764 and 0.202 in Chukchi, 0.875 and 0.075 in Iranians, 0.956 and 0.044 in mountain-dwellers of the Pamirs, 0.771 and 0.094 in Ukrainians, and 0.795 and 0.091 in Belarussians, respectively. In Russians from different regions of the country, the frequencies of these alleles were 0.728 and 0.139 (Kostroma), 0.795 and 0.105 (Moscow), 0.857 and 0.092 (Rostov-on-Don), and 0.824 and 0.083 (Krasnodar), respectively. The latitudinal distribution of the APOE epsilon3 and epsilon4 allele frequencies in the populations examined was comparable to the frequency distribution pattern of these alleles in other populations of Eurasia.

  9. From Local Adaptation to Ecological Speciation in Copepod Populations from Neighboring Lakes

    PubMed Central

    Barrera-Moreno, Omar Alfredo; Ciros-Pérez, Jorge; Ortega-Mayagoitia, Elizabeth; Alcántara-Rodríguez, José Arturo; Piedra-Ibarra, Elías

    2015-01-01

    Continental copepods have been derived from several independent invasive events from the sea, but the subsequent evolutionary processes that account for the current diversity in lacustrine environments are virtually unknown. Salinity is highly variable among lakes and constitutes a source of divergent selection driving potential reproductive isolation. We studied four populations of the calanoid copepod Leptodiaptomus cf. sicilis inhabiting four neighboring lakes with a common history (since the Late Pleistocene) located in the Oriental Basin, Mexico; one lake is shallow and varies in salinity periodically (1.4–10 g L-1), while three are deep and permanent, with constant salinity (0.5, 1.1 and 6.5 g L-1, respectively). We hypothesized that (1) these populations belong to a different species than L. sicilis sensu stricto and (2) are experiencing ecologically based divergence due to salinity differences. We assessed morphological and molecular (mtDNA) COI variation, as well as fitness differences and tests of reproductive isolation. Although relationships of the Mexican populations with L. sicilis s.s. could not be elucidated, we identified a clear pattern of divergent selection driven by salinity conditions. The four populations can still be considered a single biological species (sexual recognition and hybridization are still possible in laboratory conditions), but they have diverged into at least three different phenotypes: two locally adapted, specialized in the lakes of constant salinity (saline vs. freshwater), and an intermediate generalist phenotype inhabiting the temporary lake with fluctuating salinity. The specialized phenotypes are poorly suited as migrants, so prezygotic isolation due to immigrant inviability is highly probable. This implication was supported by molecular evidence that showed restricted gene flow, persistence of founder events, and a pattern of allopatric fragmentation. This study showed how ecologically based divergent selection may

  10. Septic tank additive impacts on microbial populations.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, S; Hoover, M T; Clark, G H; Gumpertz, M; Wollum, A G; Cobb, C; Strock, J

    2008-01-01

    Environmental health specialists, other onsite wastewater professionals, scientists, and homeowners have questioned the effectiveness of septic tank additives. This paper describes an independent, third-party, field scale, research study of the effects of three liquid bacterial septic tank additives and a control (no additive) on septic tank microbial populations. Microbial populations were measured quarterly in a field study for 12 months in 48 full-size, functioning septic tanks. Bacterial populations in the 48 septic tanks were statistically analyzed with a mixed linear model. Additive effects were assessed for three septic tank maintenance levels (low, intermediate, and high). Dunnett's t-test for tank bacteria (alpha = .05) indicated that none of the treatments were significantly different, overall, from the control at the statistical level tested. In addition, the additives had no significant effects on septic tank bacterial populations at any of the septic tank maintenance levels. Additional controlled, field-based research iswarranted, however, to address additional additives and experimental conditions.

  11. Population dependence in the interactions with neighbors for pollination: A field experiment with Taraxacum officinale.

    PubMed

    Lázaro, Amparo; Totland, Orjan

    2010-05-01

    PREMISE OF THE STUDY. The fitness of plants depends on their immediate biotic and abiotic environmental surroundings. The floral neighborhood of individual plants is part of this immediate environment and affects the frequency and behavior of their pollinators. However, the interactions among plants for pollination might differ among populations because populations differ in floral densities and pollinator assemblages. Despite that, manipulative experiments of the floral neighborhood in different populations with a specific focus on pollinator behavior are still rare. METHODS. We introduced mixtures of two species (Salvia farinacae and Tagetes bonanza) in two populations of Taraxacum officinale and examined their effect on pollinators' foraging behavior on Taraxacum. KEY RESULTS. The effects of the heterospecific neighborhood differed among pollinator groups and between the two populations. Only honeybees consistently preferred both the most diverse (containing three species) and completely pure patches of Taraxacum in both populations. We found a strong and positive effect of patch diversity on visitation to Taraxacum in one population, whereas in the other population either no effect or a negative effect of plant diversity occurred, which we attribute to differences between populations in the ratio of pollinators to inflorescences. Pollinator visitation consistently increased with local Taraxacum density in both populations. CONCLUSIONS. Our study shows that a similar local neighborhood can differentially affect the frequency and foraging behavior of pollinators, even in closely situated populations. Experimental studies conducted in several populations would contribute to determine which factors drive the variation in pollination interactions among populations.

  12. Paternity analysis reveals significant isolation and near neighbor pollen dispersal in small Cariniana legalis Mart. Kuntze populations in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest.

    PubMed

    Tambarussi, Evandro V; Boshier, David; Vencovsky, Roland; Freitas, Miguel L M; Sebbenn, Alexandre M

    2015-12-01

    Throughout the world, large trees are increasingly rare. Cariniana legalis is the tallest tree species of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest, reaching up to 60 m in height. Due to extensive deforestation of the Atlantic Forest, remnant C. legalis populations are small and spatially isolated, requiring the development of strategies for their conservation. For in situ and ex situ genetic conservation to be effective, it is important to understand the levels and patterns of spatial genetic structure (SGS), and gene flow. We investigated SGS and pollen flow in three small, physically isolated C. legalis stands using microsatellite loci. We measured, mapped, and sampled all C. legalis trees in the three stands: 65 trees from Ibicatu population, 22 trees from MGI, and 4 trees from MGII. We also collected and genotyped 600 seeds from Ibicatu, 250 seeds from MGI, and 200 seeds from MGII. Significant SGS was detected in Ibicatu up to 150 m, but substantial levels of external pollen flow were also detected in Ibicatu (8%), although not in MGI (0.4%) or MGII (0%). Selfing was highest in MGII (18%), the smallest group of trees, compared to MGI (6.4%) and Ibicatu (6%). In MGI and MGII, there was a strong pattern of mating among near-neighbors. Seed collection strategies for breeding, in situ and ex situ conservation and ecological restoration, must ensure collection from seed trees located at distances greater than 350 m and from several forest fragments. PMID:27069608

  13. Negative indirect effects of neighbors on imperiled scleractinian corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Lyza; Miller, M. W.

    2014-12-01

    Predation pressure on an individual may be influenced by spatial associations with other organisms. In the case of rare and imperiled species, such indirect interactions may affect the persistence and recovery of local populations. This study examined the effects of coral neighborhood composition on the foraging behavior and impact of the corallivorous gastropod, Coralliophila abbreviata. We conducted a manipulative field experiment in which focal colonies of the threatened scleractinian coral Acropora cervicornis had no neighbors, conspecific neighbors, alternative prey ( Orbicella faveolata) neighbors, or non-prey ( Porites asteroides) neighbors. Individually tagged C. abbreviata were then seeded into the study area and allowed to colonize the experimental plots. Initial colonization was significantly affected by the species of neighboring corals and snail abundance after colonization was negatively correlated with focal colony growth. Snails exhibited a strong prey preference for A. cervicornis over O. faveolata and responded numerically to neighborhood quality (i.e., relative preference for neighboring corals). Thus, conspecific neighbors had the greatest predator-mediated negative effect on focal colony performance followed by O. faveolata neighbors. The results suggest that C. abbreviata mediate apparent competition between O. faveolata and A. cervicornis as both species contributed to the local abundance of their shared predator. Additionally, home range estimates for tagged C. abbreviata were calculated, compared among sexes, and found to be significantly greater for males than for females. Overall, this study sheds light on the foraging behavior of an important coral predator and highlights the potential importance of consumer-mediated indirect interactions in the dynamics of severely reduced populations. The results also have direct implications for conservation and population enhancement efforts.

  14. 52 additional reference population samples for the 55 AISNP panel.

    PubMed

    Pakstis, Andrew J; Haigh, Eva; Cherni, Lotfi; ElGaaied, Amel Ben Ammar; Barton, Alison; Evsanaa, Baigalmaa; Togtokh, Ariunaa; Brissenden, Jane; Roscoe, Janet; Bulbul, Ozlem; Filoglu, Gonul; Gurkan, Cemal; Meiklejohn, Kelly A; Robertson, James M; Li, Cai-Xia; Wei, Yi-Liang; Li, Hui; Soundararajan, Usha; Rajeevan, Haseena; Kidd, Judith R; Kidd, Kenneth K

    2015-11-01

    Ancestry inference for a person using a panel of SNPs depends on the variation of frequencies of those SNPs around the world and the amount of reference data available for calculation/comparison. The Kidd Lab panel of 55 AISNPs has been incorporated in commercial kits by both Life Technologies and Illumina for massively parallel sequencing. Therefore, a larger set of reference populations will be useful for researchers using those kits. We have added reference population allele frequencies for 52 population samples to the 73 previously entered so that there are now allele frequencies publicly available in ALFRED and FROG-kb for a total of 125 population samples. PMID:26355664

  15. Good-Neighbor Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drozdowski, Mark J.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author draws on his experience as the director of the Fitchburg State College Foundation in Fitchburg, Massachusetts, to make a distinction between being a good neighbor to local non-profit organizations by sharing strategies and information, and creating conflicts of interest when both the college and its neighbor…

  16. Neighbors United for Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westhoff, Wayne W.; Corvin, Jaime; Virella, Irmarie

    2009-01-01

    Modeled upon the ecclesiastic community group concept of Latin America to unite and strengthen the bond between the Church and neighborhoods, a community-based organization created Vecinos Unidos por la Salud (Neighbors United for Health) to bring health messages into urban Latino neighborhoods. The model is based on five tenants, and incorporates…

  17. [The incidence of malignant mesothelioma (1977-1996) and asbestos exposure in the population of an area neighboring Lake Iseo, northern Italy].

    PubMed

    Barbieri, P G; Migliori, M; Merler, E

    1999-01-01

    The study was stimulated by the occurrence of malignant mesotheliomas among the workers of two adjacent factories located in Sarnico, near Lake Iseo (province of Brescia, northern Italy), one of which manufactured crocidolite and chrysotile ropes and gaskets until 1993. The aim of the study was: identification of malignant mesotheliomas occurring between 1977 and 1996 among the residents of 11 villages, which constituted the recruitment area of the work-force; estimation of the incidence of malignant pleural mesothelioma; collection of working histories of all cases to evaluate previous exposure to asbestos and radiation therapy. 21 cases of mesothelioma were detected (20 pleural, 1 peritoneal; 9 among males), and 20 were supported by histopathologic diagnosis. The incidence (x 100,000 person-years, standard: European population) was 2.5 (0.7-4.2) and 2.8 (1.2-4.3) among males and females, respectively, corresponding to a three-fold increase among males and a more than ten fold increase among women in comparison with the incidence reported by the Lombardy Cancer Registry. No cases had been exposed to radiation therapy, whereas all cases had been occupationally exposed to asbestos. Occupational exposure to asbestos had occurred in work on the production of crocidolite and chrysotile ropes and gaskets (6 males); in work in a textile factory producing cotton garments that was adjacent to and polluted by the former, where, in addition, chrysotile blankets were used for fireproofing in the weaving area and pipes were insulated using amosite-containing materials (10 cases, 6 among females); 5 cases occurred among women working in silk factories, where asbestos exposure was possible because of the presence of pipes insulated with asbestos and because women were handling temperature-controlled trays insulted with asbestos. In conclusion, the study demonstrated that the occurrence of mesothelioma was higher among females than males in the study area and that all cases of

  18. Public health concerns for neighbors of large-scale swine production operations.

    PubMed

    Thu, K M

    2002-05-01

    This article provides a review and critical synthesis of research related to public health concerns for neighbors exposed to emissions from large-scale swine production operations. The rapid industrialization of pork production in the 1990s produced a generation of confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs) of a size previously unseen in the U.S. Recent research and results from federally sponsored scientific symposia consistently indicate that neighbors of large-scale swine CAFOs can experience health problems at significantly higher rates than controlled comparison populations. Symptoms experienced by swine CAFO neighbors are generally oriented toward irritation of the respiratory tract and are consistent with the types of symptoms among interior confinement workers thathave been well documented in the occupational health literature. However, additional exposure assessment research is required to elucidate the relationship of reported symptoms among swine CAFO neighbors and CAFO emissions. PMID:12046804

  19. A new deep, hard X-ray survey of M31: Identifying Black Holes and Neutron Stars in the X-ray Binary Population of our Nearest Neighbor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wik, Daniel R.; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Yukita, Mihoko; Ptak, Andrew; Lehmer, Bret; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Antoniou, Vallia; Zezas, Andreas; Harrison, Fiona; Stern, Daniel; Venters, Tonia M.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Eracleous, Michael; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Pooley, David A.

    2016-04-01

    X-ray binaries (XRBs) trace old and new stellar populations in galaxies, and thus star formation history and star formation rate. X-ray emission from XRBs may be responsible for significant amounts of heating of the early Intergalactic Medium (IGM) at Cosmic Dawn and may also play a significant role in reionization. Until recently, the hard emission from these populations could only be studied for XRBs in our own galaxy, where it is often difficult to measure accurate distances and thus luminosities. The launch of NuSTAR, the first focusing hard X-ray observatory, has allowed us to resolve the brightest XRBs (down to LX ~ few times 10^38 erg/s) in galaxies like NGC 253, M83, and M82 up to 4 Mpc away. To reach much lower X-ray luminosities that are more typical of XRBs in the Milky Way (Lx <~ 10^37 erg/s), we have observed M31 in 4 NuSTAR fields for more than 1 Ms total exposure, covering younger stellar population in a swath of the disk (within the footprint of the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) Survey) and the older populations of the bulge. We detect 120 sources in the 4-25 keV band and over 40 hard band (12-25 keV) accreting black holes and neutron stars, distinguished by their spectral shape in this band. The luminosity function (LF) of the hard band detected sources are compared to Swift/BAT-derived LFs of the Milky Way population, which reveals an excess of luminous sources in M31 when correcting for star formation rate and stellar mass. We also discuss implications for this updated understanding of XRB populations on early-Universe measurements in, e.g., the 7 Ms Chandra Deep Field survey.

  20. Good neighbor monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Schukraft, D.F.

    1995-11-01

    Since 1896, when a Unocal 76 products oil refinery was sited overlooking San Pablo bay, urban sprawl has crept up and neighbors now include housing projects, shopping centers and schools. To ensure that the area is a safe and enjoyable place for all to live and work, Unocal is working with local community groups to monitor air quality. The refinery has recently installed a sophisticated air quality and meterological monitoring system designed to provide an early warning should sulfur compounds or hydrocarbons begin to reach unhealthful levels. Siting of the monitoring station was a joint effort by school administrators from the nearby Hillcrest Elementary School and the Bay Area Air Quality Management District. By strategically locating the station adjacent to the school, emission levels coming from the refinery or other local sources can be effectively monitored. A unique part of this program is how closely Unocal, Hillcrest School and BAAQMD work together. All three groups have access to the data.

  1. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  2. [Widows and neighbors, cornfields and magueys. The impact of population increase in the Toluca Valley: the case of Tenango del Valle during the eighteenth century].

    PubMed

    Kanter, D E

    1992-01-01

    The author examines the effect of rapid population growth due to migration on the parish of Tenango del Valle, Mexico, during the eighteenth century. She gives special consideration to the impact on quality of life in indigenous villages, especially for widows and female heads of households who were impoverished as a result of discriminatory land transactions. Data are mainly from the parish register for 1770.

  3. Demographic population model for American shad: will access to additional habitat upstream of dams increase population sizes?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, Julianne E.; Hightower, Joseph E.

    2012-01-01

    American shad Alosa sapidissima are in decline in their native range, and modeling possible management scenarios could help guide their restoration. We developed a density-dependent, deterministic, stage-based matrix model to predict the population-level results of transporting American shad to suitable spawning habitat upstream of dams on the Roanoke River, North Carolina and Virginia. We used data on sonic-tagged adult American shad and oxytetracycline-marked American shad fry both above and below dams on the Roanoke River with information from other systems to estimate a starting population size and vital rates. We modeled the adult female population over 30 years under plausible scenarios of adult transport, effective fecundity (egg production), and survival of adults (i.e., to return to spawn the next year) and juveniles (from spawned egg to age 1). We also evaluated the potential effects of increased survival for adults and juveniles. The adult female population size in the Roanoke River was estimated to be 5,224. With no transport, the model predicted a slow population increase over the next 30 years. Predicted population increases were highest when survival was improved during the first year of life. Transport was predicted to benefit the population only if high rates of effective fecundity and juvenile survival could be achieved. Currently, transported adults and young are less likely to successfully out-migrate than individuals below the dams, and the estimated adult population size is much smaller than either of two assumed values of carrying capacity for the lower river; therefore, transport is not predicted to help restore the stock under present conditions. Research on survival rates, density-dependent processes, and the impacts of structures to increase out-migration success would improve evaluation of the potential benefits of access to additional spawning habitat for American shad.

  4. Recovery of a wild fish population from whole-lake additions of a synthetic estrogen.

    PubMed

    Blanchfield, Paul J; Kidd, Karen A; Docker, Margaret F; Palace, Vince P; Park, Brad J; Postma, Lianne D

    2015-03-01

    Despite widespread recognition that municipal wastewaters contain natural and synthetic estrogens, which interfere with development and reproduction of fishes in freshwaters worldwide, there are limited data on the extent to which natural populations of fish can recover from exposure to these compounds. We conducted whole-lake additions of an active component of the birth control pill (17α-ethynylestradiol; EE2) that resulted in the collapse of the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) population. Here we quantify physiological, population, and genetic characteristics of this population over the 7 years after EE2 additions stopped to determine if complete recovery was possible. By 3 years post-treatment, whole-body vitellogenin concentrations in male fathead minnow had returned to baseline, and testicular abnormalities were absent. In the spring of the fourth year, adult size-frequency distribution and abundance had returned to pretreatment levels. Microsatellite analyses clearly showed that postrecovery fish were descendants of the original EE2-treated population. Results from this whole-lake experiment demonstrate that fish can recover from EE2 exposure at the biochemical through population levels, although the timelines to do so are long for multigenerational exposures. These results suggest that wastewater treatment facilities that reduce discharges of estrogens and their mimics can improve the health of resident fish populations in their receiving environments.

  5. Recovery of a wild fish population from whole-lake additions of a synthetic estrogen.

    PubMed

    Blanchfield, Paul J; Kidd, Karen A; Docker, Margaret F; Palace, Vince P; Park, Brad J; Postma, Lianne D

    2015-03-01

    Despite widespread recognition that municipal wastewaters contain natural and synthetic estrogens, which interfere with development and reproduction of fishes in freshwaters worldwide, there are limited data on the extent to which natural populations of fish can recover from exposure to these compounds. We conducted whole-lake additions of an active component of the birth control pill (17α-ethynylestradiol; EE2) that resulted in the collapse of the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) population. Here we quantify physiological, population, and genetic characteristics of this population over the 7 years after EE2 additions stopped to determine if complete recovery was possible. By 3 years post-treatment, whole-body vitellogenin concentrations in male fathead minnow had returned to baseline, and testicular abnormalities were absent. In the spring of the fourth year, adult size-frequency distribution and abundance had returned to pretreatment levels. Microsatellite analyses clearly showed that postrecovery fish were descendants of the original EE2-treated population. Results from this whole-lake experiment demonstrate that fish can recover from EE2 exposure at the biochemical through population levels, although the timelines to do so are long for multigenerational exposures. These results suggest that wastewater treatment facilities that reduce discharges of estrogens and their mimics can improve the health of resident fish populations in their receiving environments. PMID:25658019

  6. Exposure estimate for FD&C colour additives for the US population.

    PubMed

    Doell, Diana L; Folmer, Daniel E; Lee, Hyoung S; Butts, Kyla M; Carberry, Susan E

    2016-05-01

    Dietary exposures to the seven food, drug, and cosmetic (FD&C) colour additives that are approved for general use in food in the United States were estimated for the US population (aged 2 years and older), children (aged 2-5 years) and teenage boys (aged 13-18 years) based on analytical levels of the FD&C colour additives in foods. Approximately 600 foods were chosen for analysis, based on a survey of product labels, for the levels of FD&C colour additives. Dietary exposure was estimated using both 2-day food consumption data from the combined 2007-10 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and 10-14-day food consumption data from the 2007-10 NPD Group, Inc. National Eating Trends - Nutrient Intake Database (NPD NET-NID). Dietary exposure was estimated at the mean and 90th percentile using three different exposure scenarios: low exposure, average exposure and high exposure, to account for the range in the amount of each FD&C colour additive for a given food. For all populations and all exposure scenarios, the highest cumulative eaters-only exposures in food were determined for FD&C Red No. 40, FD&C Yellow No. 5 and FD&C Yellow No. 6. In addition, the eaters-only exposure was estimated for individual food categories in order to determine which food categories contributed the most to the exposure for each FD&C colour additive. Breakfast Cereal, Juice Drinks, Soft Drinks, and Frozen Dairy Desserts/Sherbet (also referred to as Ice Cream, Frozen Yogurt, Sherbet (including Bars, Sticks, Sandwiches)) were the major contributing food categories to exposure for multiple FD&C colour additives for all three populations. PMID:27092991

  7. Exposure estimate for FD&C colour additives for the US population.

    PubMed

    Doell, Diana L; Folmer, Daniel E; Lee, Hyoung S; Butts, Kyla M; Carberry, Susan E

    2016-05-01

    Dietary exposures to the seven food, drug, and cosmetic (FD&C) colour additives that are approved for general use in food in the United States were estimated for the US population (aged 2 years and older), children (aged 2-5 years) and teenage boys (aged 13-18 years) based on analytical levels of the FD&C colour additives in foods. Approximately 600 foods were chosen for analysis, based on a survey of product labels, for the levels of FD&C colour additives. Dietary exposure was estimated using both 2-day food consumption data from the combined 2007-10 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and 10-14-day food consumption data from the 2007-10 NPD Group, Inc. National Eating Trends - Nutrient Intake Database (NPD NET-NID). Dietary exposure was estimated at the mean and 90th percentile using three different exposure scenarios: low exposure, average exposure and high exposure, to account for the range in the amount of each FD&C colour additive for a given food. For all populations and all exposure scenarios, the highest cumulative eaters-only exposures in food were determined for FD&C Red No. 40, FD&C Yellow No. 5 and FD&C Yellow No. 6. In addition, the eaters-only exposure was estimated for individual food categories in order to determine which food categories contributed the most to the exposure for each FD&C colour additive. Breakfast Cereal, Juice Drinks, Soft Drinks, and Frozen Dairy Desserts/Sherbet (also referred to as Ice Cream, Frozen Yogurt, Sherbet (including Bars, Sticks, Sandwiches)) were the major contributing food categories to exposure for multiple FD&C colour additives for all three populations.

  8. A fast neighbor joining method.

    PubMed

    Li, J F

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of sequencing technologies, an increasing number of sequences are available for evolutionary tree reconstruction. Although neighbor joining is regarded as the most popular and fastest evolutionary tree reconstruction method [its time complexity is O(n(3)), where n is the number of sequences], it is not sufficiently fast to infer evolutionary trees containing more than a few hundred sequences. To increase the speed of neighbor joining, we herein propose FastNJ, a fast implementation of neighbor joining, which was motivated by RNJ and FastJoin, two improved versions of conventional neighbor joining. The main difference between FastNJ and conventional neighbor joining is that, in the former, many pairs of nodes selected by the rule used in RNJ are joined in each iteration. In theory, the time complexity of FastNJ can reach O(n(2)) in the best cases. Experimental results show that FastNJ yields a significant increase in speed compared to RNJ and conventional neighbor joining with a minimal loss of accuracy. PMID:26345805

  9. Our Chaotic Neighbor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Poster Version Large Magellanic Cloud

    This vibrant image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy to our own Milky Way galaxy.

    The infrared image, a mosaic of more than 100,000 individual tiles, offers astronomers a unique chance to study the lifecycle of stars and dust in a single galaxy. Nearly one million objects are revealed for the first time in this Spitzer view, which represents about a 1,000-fold improvement in sensitivity over previous space-based missions. Most of the new objects are dusty stars of various ages populating the Large Magellanic Cloud; the rest are thought to be background galaxies.

    The blue color in the picture, seen most prominently in the central bar, represents starlight from older stars. The chaotic, bright regions outside this bar are filled with hot, massive stars buried in thick blankets of dust. The red clouds contain cooler interstellar gas and molecular-sized dust grains illuminated by ambient starlight.

    The Large Magellanic Cloud, located 160,000 light-years from Earth, is one of a handful of dwarf galaxies that orbit our own Milky Way. It is approximately one-third as wide as the Milky Way, and, if it could be seen in its entirety, would cover the same amount of sky as a grid of about 480 full moons. About one-third of the whole galaxy can be seen in the Spitzer image.

    This picture is a composite of infrared light captured by Spitzer's infrared array camera. Light with wavelengths of 8 and 5.8 microns is red and orange: 4.5-micron light is green; and 3.6-micron light is blue.

  10. RECONS is Spying on Your Neighbors...

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, T. J.

    2003-12-01

    Spying on your neighbors can be an revealing experience. We review the 10-year RECONS (Research Consortium on Nearby Stars) effort to take an accurate census of all objects within 10 pc and outside of the Solar System. The result is an accurate cross-sectional study of your neighbors, who tend to be small and red, and lurk unseen in the night. Recent additions to the neighborhood include a few brown dwarfs and extrasolar planets. We will also introduce you to more than a dozen of your newest neighbors, discovered during a large southern sky parallax effort known as CTIOPI (CTIO Parallax Investigation). This work has been carried out on the CTIO 0.9m and 1.5m telescopes since 1999 under the auspices of the NOAO Surveys Program, and since February 2003 as a part of the SMARTS Consortium. Only by watching your neighbors for several years can you really be sure what they're up to, and we'll show you that some of them have hidden partners-in-crime. The first hints of these partners have been revealed via astrometric perturbations found during CTIOPI.

  11. Who's your neighbor? neighbor identification for agent-based modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Macal, C. M.; Howe, T. R.; Decision and Information Sciences; Univ. of Chicago

    2006-01-01

    Agent-based modeling and simulation, based on the cellular automata paradigm, is an approach to modeling complex systems comprised of interacting autonomous agents. Open questions in agent-based simulation focus on scale-up issues encountered in simulating large numbers of agents. Specifically, how many agents can be included in a workable agent-based simulation? One of the basic tenets of agent-based modeling and simulation is that agents only interact and exchange locally available information with other agents located in their immediate proximity or neighborhood of the space in which the agents are situated. Generally, an agent's set of neighbors changes rapidly as a simulation proceeds through time and as the agents move through space. Depending on the topology defined for agent interactions, proximity may be defined by spatial distance for continuous space, adjacency for grid cells (as in cellular automata), or by connectivity in social networks. Identifying an agent's neighbors is a particularly time-consuming computational task and can dominate the computational effort in a simulation. Two challenges in agent simulation are (1) efficiently representing an agent's neighborhood and the neighbors in it and (2) efficiently identifying an agent's neighbors at any time in the simulation. These problems are addressed differently for different agent interaction topologies. While efficient approaches have been identified for agent neighborhood representation and neighbor identification for agents on a lattice with general neighborhood configurations, other techniques must be used when agents are able to move freely in space. Techniques for the analysis and representation of spatial data are applicable to the agent neighbor identification problem. This paper extends agent neighborhood simulation techniques from the lattice topology to continuous space, specifically R2. Algorithms based on hierarchical (quad trees) or non-hierarchical data structures (grid cells) are

  12. Changes in Bacterial Population of Gastrointestinal Tract of Weaned Pigs Fed with Different Additives

    PubMed Central

    Roca, Mercè; Nofrarías, Miquel; Majó, Natàlia; Pérez de Rozas, Ana María; Castillo, Marisol; Martín-Orúe, Susana María; Espinal, Anna; Pujols, Joan; Badiola, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to provide novel insights into the gastrointestinal microbial diversity from different gastrointestinal locations in weaning piglets using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Additionally, the effect of different feed additives was analyzed. Thirty-two piglets were fed with four different diets: a control group and three enriched diets, with avilamycin, sodium butyrate, and a plant extract mixture. Digesta samples were collected from eight different gastrointestinal segments of each animal and the bacterial population was analysed by a PCR-RFLP technique that uses 16S rDNA gene sequences. Bacterial diversity was assessed by calculating the number of bands and the Shannon-Weaver index. Dendrograms were constructed to estimate the similarity of bacterial populations. A higher bacterial diversity was detected in large intestine compared to small intestine. Among diets, the most relevant microbial diversity differences were found between sodium butyrate and plant extract mixture. Proximal jejunum, ileum, and proximal colon were identified as those segments that could be representative of microbial diversity in pig gut. Results indicate that PCR-RFLP technique allowed detecting modifications on the gastrointestinal microbial ecology in pigs fed with different additives, such as increased biodiversity by sodium butyrate in feed. PMID:24575403

  13. Risk assessment of additives through soft drinks and nectars consumption on Portuguese population: a 2010 survey.

    PubMed

    Diogo, Janina S G; Silva, Liliana S O; Pena, Angelina; Lino, Celeste M

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated whether the Portuguese population is at risk of exceeding ADI levels for acesulfame-K, saccharin, aspartame, caffeine, benzoic and sorbic acid through an assessment of dietary intake of additives and specific consumption of four types of beverages, traditional soft drinks and soft drinks based on mineral waters, energetic drinks, and nectars. The highest mean levels of additives were found for caffeine in energetic drinks, 293.5mg/L, for saccharin in traditional soft drinks, 18.4 mg/L, for acesulfame-K and aspartame in nectars, with 88.2 and 97.8 mg/L, respectively, for benzoic acid in traditional soft drinks, 125.7 mg/L, and for sorbic acid in soft drinks based on mineral water, 166.5 mg/L. Traditional soft drinks presented the highest acceptable daily intake percentages (ADIs%) for acesulfame-K, aspartame, benzoic and sorbic acid and similar value for saccharin (0.5%) when compared with soft drinks based on mineral water, 0.7%, 0.08%, 7.3%, and 1.92% versus 0.2%, 0.053%, 0.6%, and 0.28%, respectively. However for saccharin the highest percentage of ADI was obtained for nectars, 0.9%, in comparison with both types of soft drinks, 0.5%. Therefore, it is concluded that the Portuguese population is not at risk of exceeding the established ADIs for the studied additives.

  14. Neighboring and Urbanism: Commonality versus Friendship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Carol J.

    1986-01-01

    Examines a dimension of neighboring that need not assume friendship as the role model. When the model assumes only a sense of connectedness as defining neighboring, then the residential correlation, shown in many studies between urbanism and neighboring, disappears. Theories of neighboring, study variables, methods, and analysis are discussed.…

  15. Randomized approximate nearest neighbors algorithm.

    PubMed

    Jones, Peter Wilcox; Osipov, Andrei; Rokhlin, Vladimir

    2011-09-20

    We present a randomized algorithm for the approximate nearest neighbor problem in d-dimensional Euclidean space. Given N points {x(j)} in R(d), the algorithm attempts to find k nearest neighbors for each of x(j), where k is a user-specified integer parameter. The algorithm is iterative, and its running time requirements are proportional to T·N·(d·(log d) + k·(d + log k)·(log N)) + N·k(2)·(d + log k), with T the number of iterations performed. The memory requirements of the procedure are of the order N·(d + k). A by-product of the scheme is a data structure, permitting a rapid search for the k nearest neighbors among {x(j)} for an arbitrary point x ∈ R(d). The cost of each such query is proportional to T·(d·(log d) + log(N/k)·k·(d + log k)), and the memory requirements for the requisite data structure are of the order N·(d + k) + T·(d + N). The algorithm utilizes random rotations and a basic divide-and-conquer scheme, followed by a local graph search. We analyze the scheme's behavior for certain types of distributions of {x(j)} and illustrate its performance via several numerical examples.

  16. Estimated daily intake of benzoic acid through food additives in adult population of South East Serbia.

    PubMed

    Lazarević, Konstansa; Stojanović, Dusica; Rancić, Natasa

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study is to estimate dietary intake of benzoic acid and its salts through food additives in adult population of South East Serbia. Information on dietary intake among 620 adults (aged 18-65) was collected using a food frequency questionnaire, and 748 food samples were analyzed. The mean estimated intake of benzoic acid -0.32 mg/kg of body weight (bw) per day was below acceptable daily intake (ADI). Dietary exposure to benzoic acid (0.36 mg/kg of bw/day; 7.2% ADI) (consumer only), also did not exceed ADI. The main contributors of benzoic acid to dietary intake were non alcoholic beverages (43.1%), ketchup and tomato products (36.1%), and domestic pickled vegetables (19.4%). The results of this study indicate that dietary exposure to benzoic acid and its salts through food preservatives does not represent a public health risk for the adult population of South East Serbia. PMID:22432399

  17. Increased Risk of Additional Cancers Among Patients with Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, James D.; Ma, Grace L.; Baumgartner, Joel M.; Madlensky, Lisa; Burgoyne, Adam M.; Tang, Chih-Min; Martinez, Maria Elena; Sicklick, Jason K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are considered non-hereditary or sporadic. However, single-institution studies suggest that GIST patients develop additional malignancies with increased frequencies. We hypothesized that we could gain greater insight into possible associations between GIST and other malignancies using a national cancer database inquiry. Methods Patients diagnosed with GIST (2001–2011) in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database were included. Standardized prevalence ratios (SPRs) and standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were used to quantify cancer risks incurred by GIST patients before and after GIST diagnoses, respectively, when compared with the general U.S. population. Results Of 6,112 GIST patients, 1,047 (17.1%) had additional cancers. There were significant increases in overall cancer rates: 44% (SPR=1.44) before diagnosis and 66% (SIR=1.66) after GIST diagnoses. Malignancies with significantly increased occurrence both before/after diagnoses included other sarcomas (SPR=5.24/SIR=4.02), neuroendocrine-carcinoid tumors (SPR=3.56/SIR=4.79), non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (SPR=1.69/SIR=1.76), and colorectal adenocarcinoma (SPR=1.51/SIR=2.16). Esophageal adenocarcinoma (SPR=12.0), bladder adenocarcinoma (SPR=7.51), melanoma (SPR=1.46), and prostate adenocarcinoma (SPR=1.20) were significantly more common only before GIST. Ovarian carcinoma (SIR=8.72), small intestine adenocarcinoma (SIR=5.89), papillary thyroid cancer (SIR=5.16), renal cell carcinoma (SIR=4.46), hepatobiliary adenocarcinomas (SIR=3.10), gastric adenocarcinoma (SIR=2.70), pancreatic adenocarcinoma (SIR=2.03), uterine adenocarcinoma (SIR=1.96), non-small cell lung cancer (SIR=1.74), and transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder (SIR=1.65) were significantly more common only after GIST. Conclusion This is the first population-based study to characterize the associations and temporal relationships between GIST and other cancers, both by site and

  18. Neighbor species differentially alter resistance phenotypes in Plantago.

    PubMed

    Barton, Kasey E; Bowers, M Deane

    2006-12-01

    In this study, we investigated how neighbors (i.e., competitors) altered resistance phenotypes, namely plant size and levels of secondary compounds (iridoid glycosides), of individual plants and specifically tested whether neighbor identity mattered. We conducted a greenhouse experiment with Plantago lanceolata and Plantago major (Plantaginaceae) in which each species served as focal plants as well as neighbors in a factorial design. In addition, we harvested plants six and nine weeks after transplantation to test whether effects changed as plants grew. In both species, competition reduced plant size, and this effect increased over time. Plantago lanceolata neighbors suppressed growth of both focal plant species more than P. major neighbors. Effects of competition on levels of secondary compounds were more complex. Concentrations of iridoid glycosides were increased by competition in both species at harvest one. By the second harvest, an effect of competition on iridoid glycosides was found only in P. major. Neighbor identity influenced levels of iridoid glycosides in P. lanceolata at harvest one; concentrations were higher in plants grown with P. lanceolata neighbors than in plants grown with P. major neighbors. We also tested whether there was a trade-off between growth (biomass) and defense (levels of iridoid glycosides). Biomass and iridoid glycoside content were significantly correlated only in plants grown with competition and harvested at nine weeks, and this relationship was positive in both species, indicating that there was no trade-off between growth and defense. This study suggests that neighbor identity could play an important role in interspecific interactions, including the interactions of plants with other trophic levels.

  19. Neighbor species differentially alter resistance phenotypes in Plantago.

    PubMed

    Barton, Kasey E; Bowers, M Deane

    2006-12-01

    In this study, we investigated how neighbors (i.e., competitors) altered resistance phenotypes, namely plant size and levels of secondary compounds (iridoid glycosides), of individual plants and specifically tested whether neighbor identity mattered. We conducted a greenhouse experiment with Plantago lanceolata and Plantago major (Plantaginaceae) in which each species served as focal plants as well as neighbors in a factorial design. In addition, we harvested plants six and nine weeks after transplantation to test whether effects changed as plants grew. In both species, competition reduced plant size, and this effect increased over time. Plantago lanceolata neighbors suppressed growth of both focal plant species more than P. major neighbors. Effects of competition on levels of secondary compounds were more complex. Concentrations of iridoid glycosides were increased by competition in both species at harvest one. By the second harvest, an effect of competition on iridoid glycosides was found only in P. major. Neighbor identity influenced levels of iridoid glycosides in P. lanceolata at harvest one; concentrations were higher in plants grown with P. lanceolata neighbors than in plants grown with P. major neighbors. We also tested whether there was a trade-off between growth (biomass) and defense (levels of iridoid glycosides). Biomass and iridoid glycoside content were significantly correlated only in plants grown with competition and harvested at nine weeks, and this relationship was positive in both species, indicating that there was no trade-off between growth and defense. This study suggests that neighbor identity could play an important role in interspecific interactions, including the interactions of plants with other trophic levels. PMID:16944243

  20. Whole lake addition of cadmium-109: radiotracer accumulation in the mussel population in the first season.

    PubMed

    Malley, D F; Chang, P S; Hesslein, R H

    1989-11-01

    Cadmium with the radiotracer 109Cd was added to the epilimnion of Precambrian Shield Lake 382 in the Experimental Lakes Area, northwestern Ontario to monitor pathways of Cd from water to abiotic and biotic components, to quantify Cd accumulation and distribution in biota and to evaluate adverse biological and ecological effects. This experiment will permit evaluation of the adequacy of the water quality guidelines of 0.2 microgram Cd l-1 in protecting aquatic life in softwater lakes. As part of the whole-lake experiment, we monitored the activities of 109Cd in various body parts of the floater mussel Anodonta grandis grandis to determine accumulation and distribution of Cd. Additions of Cd from 23 June to the end of October 1987 (a total of 900 g Cd and 89 mCi of 109Cd) increased the total [Cd] in the water from 1.6 to about 85 ng l-1. Cadmium-109 was accumulated in body parts of the mussels, in increasing concentration: mantle less than foot less than gill less than visceral mass less than kidney. After 4 months exposure to the increased water [Cd], the mussels had increased body burden of Cd by an estimated 5-9 times. At the latter increase, the population of 7330 +/- 2100 mussels in the lake contained an estimated 0.011-0.020% of the added 109Cd.

  1. Protein Neighbors and Proximity Proteomics*

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Johanna S.; Li, Xue-Wen; Perrett, Sarah; Lilley, Kathryn S.; Jackson, Antony P.

    2015-01-01

    Within cells, proteins can co-assemble into functionally integrated and spatially restricted multicomponent complexes. Often, the affinities between individual proteins are relatively weak, and proteins within such clusters may interact only indirectly with many of their other protein neighbors. This makes proteomic characterization difficult using methods such as immunoprecipitation or cross-linking. Recently, several groups have described the use of enzyme-catalyzed proximity labeling reagents that covalently tag the neighbors of a targeted protein with a small molecule such as fluorescein or biotin. The modified proteins can then be isolated by standard pulldown methods and identified by mass spectrometry. Here we will describe the techniques as well as their similarities and differences. We discuss their applications both to study protein assemblies and to provide a new way for characterizing organelle proteomes. We stress the importance of proteomic quantitation and independent target validation in such experiments. Furthermore, we suggest that there are biophysical and cell-biological principles that dictate the appropriateness of enzyme-catalyzed proximity labeling methods to address particular biological questions of interest. PMID:26355100

  2. OCR enhancement through neighbor embedding and fast approximate nearest neighbors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. C.

    2012-10-01

    Generic optical character recognition (OCR) engines often perform very poorly in transcribing scanned low resolution (LR) text documents. To improve OCR performance, we apply the Neighbor Embedding (NE) single-image super-resolution (SISR) technique to LR scanned text documents to obtain high resolution (HR) versions, which we subsequently process with OCR. For comparison, we repeat this procedure using bicubic interpolation (BI). We demonstrate that mean-square errors (MSE) in NE HR estimates do not increase substantially when NE is trained in one Latin font style and tested in another, provided both styles belong to the same font category (serif or sans serif). This is very important in practice, since for each font size, the number of training sets required for each category may be reduced from dozens to just one. We also incorporate randomized k-d trees into our NE implementation to perform approximate nearest neighbor search, and obtain a 1000x speed up of our original NE implementation, with negligible MSE degradation. This acceleration also made it practical to combine all of our size-specific NE Latin models into a single Universal Latin Model (ULM). The ULM eliminates the need to determine the unknown font category and size of an input LR text document and match it to an appropriate model, a very challenging task, since the dpi (pixels per inch) of the input LR image is generally unknown. Our experiments show that OCR character error rates (CER) were over 90% when we applied the Tesseract OCR engine to LR text documents (scanned at 75 dpi and 100 dpi) in the 6-10 pt range. By contrast, using k-d trees and the ULM, CER after NE preprocessing averaged less than 7% at 3x (100 dpi LR scanning) and 4x (75 dpi LR scanning) magnification, over an order of magnitude improvement. Moreover, CER after NE preprocessing was more that 6 times lower on average than after BI preprocessing.

  3. The genetic structure of a tribal population, the Yanomama Indians XI. Gene frequencies for 10 blood groups and the ABH-Le secretor traits in the Yanomama and their neighbors; the uniqueness of the tribe.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, R H; Gershowitz, H; Layrisse, M; Neel, J V

    1975-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of blood group typings for a total of 33 villages distributed among five South American Indian tribes--Yanomama (21 villages), Makiritare (eight villages), Macushi (two villages), Piaroa (one village), and Wapishana (one village). These new results for the Yanomama and Makiritare tribes have been combined with those previously reported to allow a better appreciation of the distribution of allelic frequencies in the tribes. The relationship of the Yanomama to other South American Indian tribes is investigated using data on six polymorphic loci (Rh, MNS, Fy, Jk, Di, Hp). By use of four genetic measures (two of genetic relationship and two of genetic diversity), we demonstrate that the Yanomama are genetically unique among a sample of 20 South American tribes. In addition, the Yanomama show somewhat less genetic diversity for the six loci analyzed than the average South American tribe. Taken together, these results indicate a rather long period of isolation for the population antecedent to the Yanomama--perhaps since the time of entry of man into the South American continent. The pattern of genetic relationships and genetic diversity for the 20 tribes is consistent with the hypothesis that evolution in South America proceeded by a process of fission-fusion leading to isolation of subpopulations with subsequent genetic differentiation as a consequence of population isolation. The uniqueness of the Yanomama appears to stem entirely from such a process, there being no evidence of any selective differential for the loci analyzed. PMID:50736

  4. Maize Leaves Turn Away from Neighbors1

    PubMed Central

    Maddonni, Gustavo Angel; Otegui, María Elena; Andrieu, Bruno; Chelle, Michael; Casal, Jorge J.

    2002-01-01

    In commercial crops, maize (Zea mays) plants are typically grown at a larger distance between rows (70 cm) than within the same row (16–23 cm). This rectangular arrangement creates a heterogeneous environment in which the plants receive higher red light (R) to far-red light (FR) ratios from the interrow spaces. In field crops, the hybrid Dekalb 696 (DK696) showed an increased proportion of leaves toward interrow spaces, whereas the experimental hybrid 980 (Exp980) retained random leaf orientation. Mirrors reflecting FR were placed close to isolated plants to simulate the presence of neighbors in the field. In addition, localized FR was applied to target leaves in a growth chamber. During their expansion, the leaves of DK696 turned away from the low R to FR ratio signals, whereas Exp980 leaves remained unaffected. On the contrary, tillering was reduced and plant height was increased by low R to FR ratios in Exp980 but not in DK696. Isolated plants preconditioned with low R/FR-simulating neighbors in a North-South row showed reduced mutual shading among leaves when the plants were actually grouped in North-South rows. These observations contradict the current view that phytochrome-mediated responses to low R/FR are a relic from wild conditions, detrimental for crop yield. PMID:12427985

  5. Dynamics of Litter Decomposition, Microbiota Populations, and Nutrient Movement Following Nitrogen and Phosphorus Additions to a Deciduous Forest Stand

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.M.

    2002-10-29

    The objective of this study was quantification of the dynamics of litter decomposition, microbiota populations, and nutrient movement in response to nitrogen and phosphorus additions to a deciduous forest stand. Nitrogen (urea) was applied at rates of 0, 550, and 1100 kg/ha in combination with phosphorus (concentrated superphosphate) at rates of 0, 275, and 550 kg/ha. Total loss of organic material from white oak, red maple, and black gum litter bags over a 16-month period was 34, 35, and 45%, respectively. Phosphorus treatment retarded weight loss from litter bags of all species. Weight loss for the 0-, 275-, and 55-kg/ha levels of phosphorus averaged 23, 20, and 19% for white oak; 26, 25, and 25% for red maple; 29, 27 and 26% for black gum. Weight losses were increased by a small amount (1 to 2%) or not at all by nitrogen treatment. The NP interfaction weight loss means were intermediate to the main treatment means. The increase in decomposition associated with nitrogen was offset by the decrease associated with phosphorus. Litter and soil bacterial populations were significantly increased by nitrogen additions, while litter and soil fungi did not respond to nitrogen. Soil fungal populations were increased by phosphorus addition, while litter bacterial populations were reduced. Litter fungi and soil bacteria did not respond to phosphorus. Combined additions of nitrogen and phosphorus increased bacterial populations, though not as much as nitrogen alone. There was a good correlation (r = 0.70) between bacterial population and litter weight loss.

  6. POPULATION DYNAMICS OF COTTON RATS ACROSS A LANDSCAPE MANIPULATED BY NITROGEN ADDITIONS AND ENCLOSURE FENCING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen additions in grasslands have produced qualitative and quantitative changes in vegetation resulting in an increase in biomass and decrease in plant species diversity. As with plants, we theorize that animal communities will decrease in species richness and become dominat...

  7. View of the south elevation of the bunkhouse and neighboring ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of the south elevation of the bunkhouse and neighboring buildings, looking to the east, In the background, from left to right in the photo, are the office, an agricultural shed, a small ranch hand's house (under the tree), and additional agricultural sheds. - Sespe Ranch, Bunkhouse, 2896 Telegraph Road, Fillmore, Ventura County, CA

  8. Effects of near and distant semantic neighbors on word production.

    PubMed

    Mirman, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    One way to examine the dynamics of word processing is to investigate how processing is affected by the co-activation of similar words ("neighbors"). A unique prediction of attractor dynamical models is that near neighbors should exert inhibitory effects and distant neighbors should exert facilitative effects. In study 1, data from 62 unselected chronic aphasia patients revealed a higher rate of semantic errors for words with many near semantic neighbors and fewer semantic errors for words with many distant semantic neighbors. In study 2, this basic result was replicated in controls using a speeded picture-naming paradigm. Together, these two studies provide strong new evidence consistent with the attractor dynamics view of neighborhood effects. In addition, analyses of correlations between effect sizes and lesion locations, and comparisons with the existing literature on semantic deficits in aphasia and the speeded picture-naming paradigm, all provide converging evidence that the semantic error patterns found in the present studies were due to disruptions of cognitive control mechanisms. PMID:21264640

  9. Drift wave stabilized by an additional streaming ion or plasma population.

    PubMed

    Bashir, M F; Vranjes, J

    2015-03-01

    It is shown that the universally unstable kinetic drift wave in an electron-ion plasma can very effectively be suppressed by adding an extra flowing ion (or plasma) population. The effect of the flow of the added ions is essential, their response is of the type (vph-vf0)exp[-(vph-vf0)2], where vf0 is the flow speed and vph is the phase speed parallel to the magnetic field vector. The damping is strong and it is mainly due to this ion exponential term, and this remains so for vf0

  10. Good Neighbors: Shared Challenges and Solutions Toward Increasing Value at Academic Medical Centers and Universities.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Gerard P

    2015-12-01

    Academic medical centers (AMCs) and universities are experiencing increasing pressure to enhance the value they offer at the same time that they are facing challenges related to outcomes, controlling costs, new competition, and government mandates. Yet, rarely do the leaders of these academic neighbors work cooperatively to enhance value. In this Perspective the author, a former university regional campus president with duties in an AMC as an academic physician, shares his insights into the shared challenges these academic neighbors face in improving the value of their services in complex environments. He describes the successes some AMCs have had in generating revenues from new clinical programs that reduce the overall cost of care for larger populations. He also describes how several universities have taken a comprehensive approach to reduce overhead and administrative costs. The author identifies six themes related to successful value improvement efforts and provides examples of successful strategies used by AMCs and their university neighbors to improve the overall value of their programs. He concludes by encouraging leaders of AMCs and universities to share information about their successes in value improvements with each other, to seek additional joint value enhancement efforts, and to market their value improvements to the public.

  11. Good Neighbors: Shared Challenges and Solutions Toward Increasing Value at Academic Medical Centers and Universities.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Gerard P

    2015-12-01

    Academic medical centers (AMCs) and universities are experiencing increasing pressure to enhance the value they offer at the same time that they are facing challenges related to outcomes, controlling costs, new competition, and government mandates. Yet, rarely do the leaders of these academic neighbors work cooperatively to enhance value. In this Perspective the author, a former university regional campus president with duties in an AMC as an academic physician, shares his insights into the shared challenges these academic neighbors face in improving the value of their services in complex environments. He describes the successes some AMCs have had in generating revenues from new clinical programs that reduce the overall cost of care for larger populations. He also describes how several universities have taken a comprehensive approach to reduce overhead and administrative costs. The author identifies six themes related to successful value improvement efforts and provides examples of successful strategies used by AMCs and their university neighbors to improve the overall value of their programs. He concludes by encouraging leaders of AMCs and universities to share information about their successes in value improvements with each other, to seek additional joint value enhancement efforts, and to market their value improvements to the public. PMID:26266460

  12. Microsatellite variation and genetic structure of brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) populations in Labrador and neighboring Atlantic Canada: evidence for ongoing gene flow and dual routes of post-Wisconsinan colonization

    PubMed Central

    Pilgrim, Brettney L; Perry, Robert C; Keefe, Donald G; Perry, Elizabeth A; Dawn Marshall, H

    2012-01-01

    In conservation genetics and management, it is important to understand the contribution of historical and contemporary processes to geographic patterns of genetic structure in order to characterize and preserve diversity. As part of a 10-year monitoring program by the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, we measured the population genetic structure of the world's most northern native populations of brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) in Labrador to gather baseline data to facilitate monitoring of future impacts of the recently opened Trans-Labrador Highway. Six-locus microsatellite profiles were obtained from 1130 fish representing 32 populations from six local regions. Genetic diversity in brook trout populations in Labrador (average HE= 0.620) is within the spectrum of variability found in other brook trout across their northeastern range, with limited ongoing gene flow occurring between populations (average pairwise FST= 0.139). Evidence for some contribution of historical processes shaping genetic structure was inferred from an isolation-by-distance analysis, while dual routes of post-Wisconsinan recolonization were indicated by STRUCTURE analysis: K= 2 was the most likely number of genetic groups, revealing a separation between northern and west-central Labrador from all remaining populations. Our results represent the first data from the nuclear genome of brook trout in Labrador and emphasize the usefulness of microsatellite data for revealing the extent to which genetic structure is shaped by both historical and contemporary processes. PMID:22837834

  13. Genome-Centric Analysis of Microbial Populations Enriched by Hydraulic Fracture Fluid Additives in a Coal Bed Methane Production Well.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Steven J; Evans, Paul N; Parks, Donovan H; Golding, Suzanne D; Tyson, Gene W

    2016-01-01

    Coal bed methane (CBM) is generated primarily through the microbial degradation of coal. Despite a limited understanding of the microorganisms responsible for this process, there is significant interest in developing methods to stimulate additional methane production from CBM wells. Physical techniques including hydraulic fracture stimulation are commonly applied to CBM wells, however the effects of specific additives contained in hydraulic fracture fluids on native CBM microbial communities are poorly understood. Here, metagenomic sequencing was applied to the formation waters of a hydraulically fractured and several non-fractured CBM production wells to determine the effect of this stimulation technique on the in-situ microbial community. The hydraulically fractured well was dominated by two microbial populations belonging to the class Phycisphaerae (within phylum Planctomycetes) and candidate phylum Aminicenantes. Populations from these phyla were absent or present at extremely low abundance in non-fractured CBM wells. Detailed metabolic reconstruction of near-complete genomes from these populations showed that their high relative abundance in the hydraulically fractured CBM well could be explained by the introduction of additional carbon sources, electron acceptors, and biocides contained in the hydraulic fracture fluid. PMID:27375557

  14. Genome-Centric Analysis of Microbial Populations Enriched by Hydraulic Fracture Fluid Additives in a Coal Bed Methane Production Well.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Steven J; Evans, Paul N; Parks, Donovan H; Golding, Suzanne D; Tyson, Gene W

    2016-01-01

    Coal bed methane (CBM) is generated primarily through the microbial degradation of coal. Despite a limited understanding of the microorganisms responsible for this process, there is significant interest in developing methods to stimulate additional methane production from CBM wells. Physical techniques including hydraulic fracture stimulation are commonly applied to CBM wells, however the effects of specific additives contained in hydraulic fracture fluids on native CBM microbial communities are poorly understood. Here, metagenomic sequencing was applied to the formation waters of a hydraulically fractured and several non-fractured CBM production wells to determine the effect of this stimulation technique on the in-situ microbial community. The hydraulically fractured well was dominated by two microbial populations belonging to the class Phycisphaerae (within phylum Planctomycetes) and candidate phylum Aminicenantes. Populations from these phyla were absent or present at extremely low abundance in non-fractured CBM wells. Detailed metabolic reconstruction of near-complete genomes from these populations showed that their high relative abundance in the hydraulically fractured CBM well could be explained by the introduction of additional carbon sources, electron acceptors, and biocides contained in the hydraulic fracture fluid.

  15. Genome-Centric Analysis of Microbial Populations Enriched by Hydraulic Fracture Fluid Additives in a Coal Bed Methane Production Well

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Steven J.; Evans, Paul N.; Parks, Donovan H.; Golding, Suzanne D.; Tyson, Gene W.

    2016-01-01

    Coal bed methane (CBM) is generated primarily through the microbial degradation of coal. Despite a limited understanding of the microorganisms responsible for this process, there is significant interest in developing methods to stimulate additional methane production from CBM wells. Physical techniques including hydraulic fracture stimulation are commonly applied to CBM wells, however the effects of specific additives contained in hydraulic fracture fluids on native CBM microbial communities are poorly understood. Here, metagenomic sequencing was applied to the formation waters of a hydraulically fractured and several non-fractured CBM production wells to determine the effect of this stimulation technique on the in-situ microbial community. The hydraulically fractured well was dominated by two microbial populations belonging to the class Phycisphaerae (within phylum Planctomycetes) and candidate phylum Aminicenantes. Populations from these phyla were absent or present at extremely low abundance in non-fractured CBM wells. Detailed metabolic reconstruction of near-complete genomes from these populations showed that their high relative abundance in the hydraulically fractured CBM well could be explained by the introduction of additional carbon sources, electron acceptors, and biocides contained in the hydraulic fracture fluid. PMID:27375557

  16. Approximate nearest neighbors via dictionary learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherian, Anoop; Morellas, Vassilios; Papanikolopoulos, Nikolaos

    2011-06-01

    Approximate Nearest Neighbors (ANN) in high dimensional vector spaces is a fundamental, yet challenging problem in many areas of computer science, including computer vision, data mining and robotics. In this work, we investigate this problem from the perspective of compressive sensing, especially the dictionary learning aspect. High dimensional feature vectors are seldom seen to be sparse in the feature domain; examples include, but not limited to Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) descriptors, Histogram Of Gradients, Shape Contexts, etc. Compressive sensing advocates that if a given vector has a dense support in a feature space, then there should exist an alternative high dimensional subspace where the features are sparse. This idea is leveraged by dictionary learning techniques through learning an overcomplete projection from the feature space so that the vectors are sparse in the new space. The learned dictionary aids in refining the search for the nearest neighbors to a query feature vector into the most likely subspace combination indexed by its non-zero active basis elements. Since the size of the dictionary is generally very large, distinct feature vectors are most likely to have distinct non-zero basis. Utilizing this observation, we propose a novel representation of the feature vectors as tuples of non-zero dictionary indices, which then reduces the ANN search problem into hashing the tuples to an index table; thereby dramatically improving the speed of the search. A drawback of this naive approach is that it is very sensitive to feature perturbations. This can be due to two possibilities: (i) the feature vectors are corrupted by noise, (ii) the true data vectors undergo perturbations themselves. Existing dictionary learning methods address the first possibility. In this work we investigate the second possibility and approach it from a robust optimization perspective. This boils down to the problem of learning a dictionary robust to feature

  17. Very low levels of direct additive genetic variance in fitness and fitness components in a red squirrel population.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, S Eryn; Gorrell, Jamieson C; Coltman, David W; Humphries, Murray M; Boutin, Stan; McAdam, Andrew G

    2014-05-01

    A trait must genetically correlate with fitness in order to evolve in response to natural selection, but theory suggests that strong directional selection should erode additive genetic variance in fitness and limit future evolutionary potential. Balancing selection has been proposed as a mechanism that could maintain genetic variance if fitness components trade off with one another and has been invoked to account for empirical observations of higher levels of additive genetic variance in fitness components than would be expected from mutation-selection balance. Here, we used a long-term study of an individually marked population of North American red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) to look for evidence of (1) additive genetic variance in lifetime reproductive success and (2) fitness trade-offs between fitness components, such as male and female fitness or fitness in high- and low-resource environments. "Animal model" analyses of a multigenerational pedigree revealed modest maternal effects on fitness, but very low levels of additive genetic variance in lifetime reproductive success overall as well as fitness measures within each sex and environment. It therefore appears that there are very low levels of direct genetic variance in fitness and fitness components in red squirrels to facilitate contemporary adaptation in this population.

  18. Very low levels of direct additive genetic variance in fitness and fitness components in a red squirrel population

    PubMed Central

    McFarlane, S Eryn; Gorrell, Jamieson C; Coltman, David W; Humphries, Murray M; Boutin, Stan; McAdam, Andrew G

    2014-01-01

    A trait must genetically correlate with fitness in order to evolve in response to natural selection, but theory suggests that strong directional selection should erode additive genetic variance in fitness and limit future evolutionary potential. Balancing selection has been proposed as a mechanism that could maintain genetic variance if fitness components trade off with one another and has been invoked to account for empirical observations of higher levels of additive genetic variance in fitness components than would be expected from mutation–selection balance. Here, we used a long-term study of an individually marked population of North American red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) to look for evidence of (1) additive genetic variance in lifetime reproductive success and (2) fitness trade-offs between fitness components, such as male and female fitness or fitness in high- and low-resource environments. “Animal model” analyses of a multigenerational pedigree revealed modest maternal effects on fitness, but very low levels of additive genetic variance in lifetime reproductive success overall as well as fitness measures within each sex and environment. It therefore appears that there are very low levels of direct genetic variance in fitness and fitness components in red squirrels to facilitate contemporary adaptation in this population. PMID:24963372

  19. A New Deep, Hard X-ray Survey of M31: Monitoring Black Hole and Neutron Star Accretion States in the X-ray Binary Population of Our Nearest Neighbor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wik, Daniel R.; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Yukita, Mihoko; Ptak, Andrew; Lehmer, Bret; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Antoniou, Vallia; Zezas, Andreas; Harrison, Fiona; Stern, Daniel; Venters, Tonia M.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Eracleous, Michael; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Pooley, David A.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray binaries (XRBs) trace old and new stellar populations in galaxies, and thus star formation history and star formation rate. X-ray emission from XRBs may be responsible for significant amounts of heating of the early Intergalactic Medium at Cosmic Dawn and may also play a significant role in reionization. Until recently, the hard emission from these populations could only be studied for XRBs in our own galaxy, where it is often difficult to measure accurate distances and thus luminosities. The launch of NuSTAR, the first focusing hard X-ray observatory, has allowed us to resolve the brightest XRBs (down to LX ~ few times 1038 erg/s) in galaxies like NGC 253, M83, and M82 up to 4 Mpc away. To reach much lower X-ray luminosities that are more typical of XRBs in the Milky Way (LX <~ 1037 erg/s), we have observed M31 in 3 NuSTAR fields, up to 5 visits apiece for more than 1 Ms total exposure, mostly within the footprint of the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) Survey. Our monitoring campaign reveals over 40 accreting black holes and neutron stars -- distinguished from each other by their spectral shape in the hard band -- some of which undergo state changes over the month-long timescales captured by our legacy survey to date. We also discuss implications for this updated understanding of XRB populations on early-Universe measurements in, e.g., the 7 Ms Chandra Deep Field survey.

  20. The clinic as a good corporate neighbor.

    PubMed

    Sass, Hans-Martin

    2013-02-01

    Clinics today specialize in health repair services similar to car repair shops; procedures and prices are standardized, regulated, and inflexibly uniform. Clinics of the future have to become Health Care Centers in order to be more respected and more effective corporate neighbors in offering outreach services in health education and preventive health care. The traditional concept of care for health is much broader than repair management and includes the promotion of lay health competence and responsibility in healthy social and natural environments. The corporate profile and ethics of the clinic as a good and competitive local neighbor will have to focus on [a] better personalized care, [b] education and services in preventive care, [c] direct or web-based information and advice for general, seasonal, or age related health risks, and on developing and improving trustworthy character traits of the clinic as a corporate person and a good neighbor. PMID:23444251

  1. The clinic as a good corporate neighbor.

    PubMed

    Sass, Hans-Martin

    2013-02-01

    Clinics today specialize in health repair services similar to car repair shops; procedures and prices are standardized, regulated, and inflexibly uniform. Clinics of the future have to become Health Care Centers in order to be more respected and more effective corporate neighbors in offering outreach services in health education and preventive health care. The traditional concept of care for health is much broader than repair management and includes the promotion of lay health competence and responsibility in healthy social and natural environments. The corporate profile and ethics of the clinic as a good and competitive local neighbor will have to focus on [a] better personalized care, [b] education and services in preventive care, [c] direct or web-based information and advice for general, seasonal, or age related health risks, and on developing and improving trustworthy character traits of the clinic as a corporate person and a good neighbor.

  2. Knowing Our Neighbors: Fundamental Properties of Nearby Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Jennifer L.; Ianna, P. A.; Henry, T. J.; Begam, M. C.; Jao, W.; Subasavage, J. P., Jr.; Nearby Stars, Research Consortium on

    2007-12-01

    Although the stars within 25 pc of the Sun constitute the one stellar sample that we can aspire to know thoroughly, we continue identifying objects closer than 10 pc. We know even less about local substellar populations, especially planets. The Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory Parallax Investigation (CTIOPI) is observing 31 late-type, red dwarfs selected for my thesis as part of a larger effort to complete the nearby star census. Preliminary parallaxes substantiate distances less than 25 pc for at least 28 stars. Of these, LP 991-84, LHS 6167, and LP 876-10 may lie within 10 pc. Preliminary proper motions for all but three stars exceed 0.2” yr-1. One recently established neighbor, LP 869-26, also appears to be a new binary. Associated VRI photometry and spectroscopy are in progress as well. Many of these stars are potential targets for astrometric planet searches, such as the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM). In addition to confirming solar neighborhood membership, astrometry can discover brown dwarfs and planets. Time-series analyses of residuals to the UVa Southern Parallax Program (SPP) observations are contributing to frequency and distribution data for nearby substellar objects. In particular, LHS 288 displays an intriguing signal, which might be caused by a very low-mass companion. Twelve other SPP stars demonstrate no significant perturbations. Finally, re-analyzing the Leander McCormick Observatory photographic plates of Barnard's Star failed to detect any planets orbiting it. This study of more than 900 exposures was sensitive to bodies of 2.2 Jupiter masses or more. NSF grants AST 98-20711 and 05-07711, GSU, NASA-SIM, Litton Marine Systems, UVa, Hampden-Sydney College, US Naval Observatory, and the Levinson Fund of the Peninsula Community Foundation supported this research. The ANU Research School of Astronomy & Astrophysics allocated observing time generously. CTIOPI was an NOAO Survey Program and continues as part of the SMARTS Consortium.

  3. Additive genetic variation for tolerance to estrogen pollution in natural populations of Alpine whitefish (Coregonus sp., Salmonidae)

    PubMed Central

    Brazzola, Gregory; Chèvre, Nathalie; Wedekind, Claus

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionary potential of natural populations to adapt to anthropogenic threats critically depends on whether there exists additive genetic variation for tolerance to the threat. A major problem for water-dwelling organisms is chemical pollution, and among the most common pollutants is 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), the synthetic estrogen that is used in oral contraceptives and that can affect fish at various developmental stages, including embryogenesis. We tested whether there is variation in the tolerance to EE2 within Alpine whitefish. We sampled spawners from two species of different lakes, bred them in vitro in a full-factorial design each, and studied growth and mortality of embryos. Exposure to EE2 turned out to be toxic in all concentrations we tested (≥1 ng/L). It reduced embryo viability and slowed down embryogenesis. We found significant additive genetic variation in EE2-induced mortality in both species, that is, genotypes differed in their tolerance to estrogen pollution. We also found maternal effects on embryo development to be influenced by EE2, that is, some maternal sib groups were more susceptible to EE2 than others. In conclusion, the toxic effects of EE2 were strong, but both species demonstrated the kind of additive genetic variation that is necessary for an evolutionary response to this type of pollution. PMID:25553069

  4. Additive genetic variation for tolerance to estrogen pollution in natural populations of Alpine whitefish (Coregonus sp., Salmonidae).

    PubMed

    Brazzola, Gregory; Chèvre, Nathalie; Wedekind, Claus

    2014-11-01

    The evolutionary potential of natural populations to adapt to anthropogenic threats critically depends on whether there exists additive genetic variation for tolerance to the threat. A major problem for water-dwelling organisms is chemical pollution, and among the most common pollutants is 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), the synthetic estrogen that is used in oral contraceptives and that can affect fish at various developmental stages, including embryogenesis. We tested whether there is variation in the tolerance to EE2 within Alpine whitefish. We sampled spawners from two species of different lakes, bred them in vitro in a full-factorial design each, and studied growth and mortality of embryos. Exposure to EE2 turned out to be toxic in all concentrations we tested (≥1 ng/L). It reduced embryo viability and slowed down embryogenesis. We found significant additive genetic variation in EE2-induced mortality in both species, that is, genotypes differed in their tolerance to estrogen pollution. We also found maternal effects on embryo development to be influenced by EE2, that is, some maternal sib groups were more susceptible to EE2 than others. In conclusion, the toxic effects of EE2 were strong, but both species demonstrated the kind of additive genetic variation that is necessary for an evolutionary response to this type of pollution. PMID:25553069

  5. An eight-neighbor filter for LARSYS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boston, S.; Giddings, L.

    1976-01-01

    An eight-neighbor filter was developed for the LARSYS program. It is used in cleaning zones and sharpening boundaries during the digitization of hand-painted zone maps, in making computer-based vegetation zones more homogeneous, and in classification of natural images, such as LANDSAT or other multispectral imagery.

  6. We're Neighbors, Let's Be Friends!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sing, Sandie F.

    1992-01-01

    Asserts that the Pacific Rim nations of Asia are neighbors to California and that teachers should use that concept as an instructional device. Presents six teaching activities that are linked to the California History-Social Science Framework. Includes step-by-step instructions for implementation. (CFR)

  7. Neighboring optimal guidance theory and computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, W. F.

    1974-01-01

    Developments of the linear quadratic optimal control problem are discussed. The theory is applicable to the development of neighboring optimal feedback guidance gains, and is useful as a tool for synthesizing feedback control laws. A computer program which requires only the pertinent matrices of the linear quadratic problem is described.

  8. 76 FR 76973 - Good Neighbor Environmental Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-09

    ... infrastructure issues and needs within the States contiguous to Mexico in order to improve the quality of life of... AGENCY Good Neighbor Environmental Board AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: Under the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92463, EPA gives notice of...

  9. 75 FR 8699 - Good Neighbor Environmental Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-25

    ... infrastructure issues and needs within the States contiguous to Mexico in order to improve the quality of life of... AGENCY Good Neighbor Environmental Board AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: Under the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, EPA gives notice of...

  10. 76 FR 52662 - Good Neighbor Environmental Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ... infrastructure issues and needs within the States contiguous to Mexico in order to improve the quality of life of... AGENCY Good Neighbor Environmental Board AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: Under the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92463, EPA gives notice of...

  11. 76 FR 31328 - Good Neighbor Environmental Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-31

    ... infrastructure issues and needs within the States contiguous to Mexico in order to improve the quality of life of... AGENCY Good Neighbor Environmental Board AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: Under the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92463, EPA gives notice of...

  12. 76 FR 73631 - Good Neighbor Environmental Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-29

    ... infrastructure issues and needs within the States contiguous to Mexico in order to improve the quality of life of... AGENCY Good Neighbor Environmental Board AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: Under the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92463, EPA gives notice of...

  13. 77 FR 32636 - Good Neighbor Environmental Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-01

    ... infrastructure issues and needs within the States contiguous to Mexico in order to improve the quality of life of... AGENCY Good Neighbor Environmental Board AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: Under the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92463, EPA gives notice of...

  14. 76 FR 12731 - Good Neighbor Environmental Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-08

    ... infrastructure issues and needs within the States contiguous to Mexico in order to improve the quality of life of... AGENCY Good Neighbor Environmental Board AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: Under the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92463, EPA gives notice of...

  15. Did the addition of concomitant chemotherapy to radiotherapy improve outcomes in hypopharyngeal cancer? A population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Hall, S.F.; Griffiths, R.

    2016-01-01

    Background For oncologists and for patients, no site-specific clinical trial evidence has emerged for the use of concurrent chemotherapy with radiotherapy (ccrt) over radiotherapy (rt) alone for cancer of the hypopharynx (hpc) or for other human papilloma virus–negative head-and-neck cancers. Methods This retrospective population-based cohort study using administrative data compared treatments over time (1990–2000 vs. 2000–2010), treatment outcomes, and outcomes over time in 1333 cases of hpc diagnosed in Ontario between January 1990 and December 2010. Results The incidence of hpc is declining; the use of ccrt that began in 2001 is increasing; and the 3-year overall survival for all patients remains poor at 34.6%. No difference in overall survival was observed in a comparison of patients treated in the decade before ccrt and of patients treated in the decade during the uptake of ccrt. Conclusions The addition of ccrt to the armamentarium of treatment options for oncologists treating head-and-neck patients did not improve outcomes for hpc at the population level. PMID:27536177

  16. Knowing our neighbors: Fundamental properties of nearby stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Jennifer Lynn

    The stars within 25 parsecs (pc) of our Sun constitute the one stellar sample that we aspire to know thoroughly, but we still have not even identified all of the stars within 10 pc. We have still less knowledge of the nearby substellar population, especially the planets. The four studies described herein expand our knowledge of the solar neighborhood. First, a re-analysis of the Leander McCormick Observatory photographic plates of Barnard's Star failed to detect any planets orbiting it, and this study would have detected planets with 2.2 Jupiter masses or greater. In addition, its parallax, proper motion, and secular acceleration were measured with results comparable with those from more modern equipment. Second, increased information about nearby planets was sought through time series analyses of astrometric residuals to stars observed by the University of Virginia Southern Parallax Program. Of these, LHS 288 displays an intriguing signal, which might be caused by a very low mass companion. Twelve other stars demonstrate no astrometric perturbations. While astrometry could reveal the presence of unseen companions, distances from trigonometric parallaxes define the solar neighborhood and identify its inhabitants. Preliminary parallaxes for 43 potential nearby stars being observed by the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory Parallax Investigation (CTIOPI) confirmed 28 stars as being within 25 pc, including three stars---LP 991-84, LHS 6167, and LP 876-10---that probably lie within 10 pc. Three more stars lie near the 25-pc boundary and their final parallaxes may qualify them as nearby. One recently established neighbor, LP 869-26, is a potential binary. For many stars in this third sample, preliminary photometry ( V, R, and I bands), spectroscopy, and proper motions are also available. Despite the continuing importance of ground-based parallax measurements, few active programs remain. The final project tested the recently installed infrared camera on the 31-inch

  17. Contrasting demographic histories of the neighboring bonobo and chimpanzee.

    PubMed

    Hvilsom, Christina; Carlsen, Frands; Heller, Rasmus; Jaffré, Nina; Siegismund, Hans R

    2014-01-01

    The Pleistocene epoch was a period of dramatic climate change that had profound impacts on the population sizes of many animal species. How these species were shaped by past events is often unclear, hindering our understanding of the population dynamics resulting in present day populations. We analyzed complete mitochondrial genomes representing all four recognized chimpanzee subspecies and the bonobo to infer the recent demographic history and used simulations to exclude a confounding effect of population structure. Our genus-wide Bayesian coalescent-based analysis revealed surprisingly dissimilar demographic histories of the chimpanzee subspecies and the bonobo, despite their overlapping habitat requirements. Whereas the central and eastern chimpanzee subspecies were inferred to have expanded tenfold between around 50,000 and 80,000 years ago and today, the population size of the neighboring bonobo remained constant. The changes in population size are likely linked to changes in habitat area due to climate oscillations during the late Pleistocene. Furthermore, the timing of population expansion for the rainforest-adapted chimpanzee is concurrent with the expansion of the savanna-adapted human, which could suggest a common response to changed climate conditions around 50,000-80,000 years ago.

  18. Nonparametric k-nearest-neighbor entropy estimator.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Damiano; Pant, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    A nonparametric k-nearest-neighbor-based entropy estimator is proposed. It improves on the classical Kozachenko-Leonenko estimator by considering nonuniform probability densities in the region of k-nearest neighbors around each sample point. It aims to improve the classical estimators in three situations: first, when the dimensionality of the random variable is large; second, when near-functional relationships leading to high correlation between components of the random variable are present; and third, when the marginal variances of random variable components vary significantly with respect to each other. Heuristics on the error of the proposed and classical estimators are presented. Finally, the proposed estimator is tested for a variety of distributions in successively increasing dimensions and in the presence of a near-functional relationship. Its performance is compared with a classical estimator, and a significant improvement is demonstrated. PMID:26871193

  19. A dissipative network model with neighboring activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Fei; Liu, Yun; Zhu, Jiang; Jiang Zhang, Zhen; Chao Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Ying

    2011-11-01

    We propose a network model with dissipative structure taking into consideration the effect of neighboring activation and individual dissipation. Nodes may feel tired of interactions with new nodes step by step, and drop out of the network evolution. However, these dormant nodes can become active again following neighbors. During the whole evolution only active nodes have opportunities to receive new links. We analyze user behavior of a real Internet forum, and the statistical characteristics of this forum are analogous to our model. Under the influence of motivation and dissipation, the degree distribution of our network model decays as a power law with a diversity of tunable power exponents. Furthermore, the network has high clustering, small average path length and positive assortativity coefficients.

  20. Nearest Neighbor Algorithms for Pattern Classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrios, J. O.

    1972-01-01

    A solution of the discrimination problem is considered by means of the minimum distance classifier, commonly referred to as the nearest neighbor (NN) rule. The NN rule is nonparametric, or distribution free, in the sense that it does not depend on any assumptions about the underlying statistics for its application. The k-NN rule is a procedure that assigns an observation vector z to a category F if most of the k nearby observations x sub i are elements of F. The condensed nearest neighbor (CNN) rule may be used to reduce the size of the training set required categorize The Bayes risk serves merely as a reference-the limit of excellence beyond which it is not possible to go. The NN rule is bounded below by the Bayes risk and above by twice the Bayes risk.

  1. Network geometry inference using common neighbors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, Fragkiskos; Aldecoa, Rodrigo; Krioukov, Dmitri

    2015-08-01

    We introduce and explore a method for inferring hidden geometric coordinates of nodes in complex networks based on the number of common neighbors between the nodes. We compare this approach to the HyperMap method, which is based only on the connections (and disconnections) between the nodes, i.e., on the links that the nodes have (or do not have). We find that for high degree nodes, the common-neighbors approach yields a more accurate inference than the link-based method, unless heuristic periodic adjustments (or "correction steps") are used in the latter. The common-neighbors approach is computationally intensive, requiring O (t4) running time to map a network of t nodes, versus O (t3) in the link-based method. But we also develop a hybrid method with O (t3) running time, which combines the common-neighbors and link-based approaches, and we explore a heuristic that reduces its running time further to O (t2) , without significant reduction in the mapping accuracy. We apply this method to the autonomous systems (ASs) Internet, and we reveal how soft communities of ASs evolve over time in the similarity space. We further demonstrate the method's predictive power by forecasting future links between ASs. Taken altogether, our results advance our understanding of how to efficiently and accurately map real networks to their latent geometric spaces, which is an important necessary step toward understanding the laws that govern the dynamics of nodes in these spaces, and the fine-grained dynamics of network connections.

  2. Network geometry inference using common neighbors.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Fragkiskos; Aldecoa, Rodrigo; Krioukov, Dmitri

    2015-08-01

    We introduce and explore a method for inferring hidden geometric coordinates of nodes in complex networks based on the number of common neighbors between the nodes. We compare this approach to the HyperMap method, which is based only on the connections (and disconnections) between the nodes, i.e., on the links that the nodes have (or do not have). We find that for high degree nodes, the common-neighbors approach yields a more accurate inference than the link-based method, unless heuristic periodic adjustments (or "correction steps") are used in the latter. The common-neighbors approach is computationally intensive, requiring O(t4) running time to map a network of t nodes, versus O(t3) in the link-based method. But we also develop a hybrid method with O(t3) running time, which combines the common-neighbors and link-based approaches, and we explore a heuristic that reduces its running time further to O(t2), without significant reduction in the mapping accuracy. We apply this method to the autonomous systems (ASs) Internet, and we reveal how soft communities of ASs evolve over time in the similarity space. We further demonstrate the method's predictive power by forecasting future links between ASs. Taken altogether, our results advance our understanding of how to efficiently and accurately map real networks to their latent geometric spaces, which is an important necessary step toward understanding the laws that govern the dynamics of nodes in these spaces, and the fine-grained dynamics of network connections. PMID:26382454

  3. Fast construction of k-nearest neighbor graphs for point clouds.

    PubMed

    Connor, Michael; Kumar, Piyush

    2010-01-01

    We present a parallel algorithm for k-nearest neighbor graph construction that uses Morton ordering. Experiments show that our approach has the following advantages over existing methods: 1) faster construction of k-nearest neighbor graphs in practice on multicore machines, 2) less space usage, 3) better cache efficiency, 4) ability to handle large data sets, and 5) ease of parallelization and implementation. If the point set has a bounded expansion constant, our algorithm requires one-comparison-based parallel sort of points, according to Morton order plus near-linear additional steps to output the k-nearest neighbor graph.

  4. Directed Abelian sandpile with multiple downward neighbors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhar, D.; Pruessner, G.; Expert, P.; Christensen, K.; Zachariou, N.

    2016-04-01

    We study the directed Abelian sandpile model on a square lattice, with K downward neighbors per site, K >2 . The K =3 case is solved exactly, which extends the earlier known solution for the K =2 case. For K >2 , the avalanche clusters can have holes and side branches and are thus qualitatively different from the K =2 case where avalanche clusters are compact. However, we find that the critical exponents for K >2 are identical with those for the K =2 case, and the large-scale structure of the avalanches for K >2 tends to the K =2 case.

  5. Directed Abelian sandpile with multiple downward neighbors.

    PubMed

    Dhar, D; Pruessner, G; Expert, P; Christensen, K; Zachariou, N

    2016-04-01

    We study the directed Abelian sandpile model on a square lattice, with K downward neighbors per site, K>2. The K=3 case is solved exactly, which extends the earlier known solution for the K=2 case. For K>2, the avalanche clusters can have holes and side branches and are thus qualitatively different from the K=2 case where avalanche clusters are compact. However, we find that the critical exponents for K>2 are identical with those for the K=2 case, and the large-scale structure of the avalanches for K>2 tends to the K=2 case. PMID:27176254

  6. Maximum expected accuracy structural neighbors of an RNA secondary structure

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Since RNA molecules regulate genes and control alternative splicing by allostery, it is important to develop algorithms to predict RNA conformational switches. Some tools, such as paRNAss, RNAshapes and RNAbor, can be used to predict potential conformational switches; nevertheless, no existent tool can detect general (i.e., not family specific) entire riboswitches (both aptamer and expression platform) with accuracy. Thus, the development of additional algorithms to detect conformational switches seems important, especially since the difference in free energy between the two metastable secondary structures may be as large as 15-20 kcal/mol. It has recently emerged that RNA secondary structure can be more accurately predicted by computing the maximum expected accuracy (MEA) structure, rather than the minimum free energy (MFE) structure. Results Given an arbitrary RNA secondary structure S0 for an RNA nucleotide sequence a = a1,..., an, we say that another secondary structure S of a is a k-neighbor of S0, if the base pair distance between S0 and S is k. In this paper, we prove that the Boltzmann probability of all k-neighbors of the minimum free energy structure S0 can be approximated with accuracy ε and confidence 1 - p, simultaneously for all 0 ≤ k < K, by a relative frequency count over N sampled structures, provided that N>N(ε,p,K)=Φ-1p2K24ε2, where Φ(z) is the cumulative distribution function (CDF) for the standard normal distribution. We go on to describe the algorithm RNAborMEA, which for an arbitrary initial structure S0 and for all values 0 ≤ k < K, computes the secondary structure MEA(k), having maximum expected accuracy over all k-neighbors of S0. Computation time is O(n3 · K2), and memory requirements are O(n2 · K). We analyze a sample TPP riboswitch, and apply our algorithm to the class of purine riboswitches. Conclusions The approximation of RNAbor by sampling, with rigorous bound on accuracy, together with the computation of

  7. [Population].

    PubMed

    1979-01-01

    Data on the population of Venezuela between 1975 and 1977 are presented in descriptive tables and graphs. Information is included on the employed population according to category, sex, and type of economic activity, and by sex, age, and area on the employment rate and the total, the economically active, and the unemployed population.

  8. The neurologist as a medical home neighbor.

    PubMed

    Hoch, Daniel B; Homonoff, Mark C; Moawad, Heidi; Cohen, Bruce H; Esper, Gregory J; Becker, Amanda; Busis, Neil A

    2013-04-01

    Recent health policy initiatives designed to improve care coordination have stimulated the resurgence of the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model. The details of how primary and specialty care are coordinated within the PCMH model are of interest to specialists. A good medical home "neighbor" must adhere to principles that complement the PCMH team-based approach and personal relationship to the patient. One issue for neurologists considering participation in this model is whether they will function as the principal physician for some patients, only in the role of a consultant, or take some new role. It is too early to suggest any one payment method as superior, or establish the appropriate capitation fees for practicing neurologists. Recommendations are provided for neurologists considering participation in a PCMH neighborhood. PMID:23914323

  9. Raman scattering mediated by neighboring molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Mathew D.; Bradshaw, David S.; Andrews, David L.

    2016-05-01

    Raman scattering is most commonly associated with a change in vibrational state within individual molecules, the corresponding frequency shift in the scattered light affording a key way of identifying material structures. In theories where both matter and light are treated quantum mechanically, the fundamental scattering process is represented as the concurrent annihilation of a photon from one radiation mode and creation of another in a different mode. Developing this quantum electrodynamical formulation, the focus of the present work is on the spectroscopic consequences of electrodynamic coupling between neighboring molecules or other kinds of optical center. To encompass these nanoscale interactions, through which the molecular states evolve under the dual influence of the input light and local fields, this work identifies and determines two major mechanisms for each of which different selection rules apply. The constituent optical centers are considered to be chemically different and held in a fixed orientation with respect to each other, either as two components of a larger molecule or a molecular assembly that can undergo free rotation in a fluid medium or as parts of a larger, solid material. The two centers are considered to be separated beyond wavefunction overlap but close enough together to fall within an optical near-field limit, which leads to high inverse power dependences on their local separation. In this investigation, individual centers undergo a Stokes transition, whilst each neighbor of a different species remains in its original electronic and vibrational state. Analogous principles are applicable for the anti-Stokes case. The analysis concludes by considering the experimental consequences of applying this spectroscopic interpretation to fluid media; explicitly, the selection rules and the impact of pressure on the radiant intensity of this process.

  10. Raman scattering mediated by neighboring molecules.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mathew D; Bradshaw, David S; Andrews, David L

    2016-05-01

    Raman scattering is most commonly associated with a change in vibrational state within individual molecules, the corresponding frequency shift in the scattered light affording a key way of identifying material structures. In theories where both matter and light are treated quantum mechanically, the fundamental scattering process is represented as the concurrent annihilation of a photon from one radiation mode and creation of another in a different mode. Developing this quantum electrodynamical formulation, the focus of the present work is on the spectroscopic consequences of electrodynamic coupling between neighboring molecules or other kinds of optical center. To encompass these nanoscale interactions, through which the molecular states evolve under the dual influence of the input light and local fields, this work identifies and determines two major mechanisms for each of which different selection rules apply. The constituent optical centers are considered to be chemically different and held in a fixed orientation with respect to each other, either as two components of a larger molecule or a molecular assembly that can undergo free rotation in a fluid medium or as parts of a larger, solid material. The two centers are considered to be separated beyond wavefunction overlap but close enough together to fall within an optical near-field limit, which leads to high inverse power dependences on their local separation. In this investigation, individual centers undergo a Stokes transition, whilst each neighbor of a different species remains in its original electronic and vibrational state. Analogous principles are applicable for the anti-Stokes case. The analysis concludes by considering the experimental consequences of applying this spectroscopic interpretation to fluid media; explicitly, the selection rules and the impact of pressure on the radiant intensity of this process.

  11. Raman scattering mediated by neighboring molecules.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mathew D; Bradshaw, David S; Andrews, David L

    2016-05-01

    Raman scattering is most commonly associated with a change in vibrational state within individual molecules, the corresponding frequency shift in the scattered light affording a key way of identifying material structures. In theories where both matter and light are treated quantum mechanically, the fundamental scattering process is represented as the concurrent annihilation of a photon from one radiation mode and creation of another in a different mode. Developing this quantum electrodynamical formulation, the focus of the present work is on the spectroscopic consequences of electrodynamic coupling between neighboring molecules or other kinds of optical center. To encompass these nanoscale interactions, through which the molecular states evolve under the dual influence of the input light and local fields, this work identifies and determines two major mechanisms for each of which different selection rules apply. The constituent optical centers are considered to be chemically different and held in a fixed orientation with respect to each other, either as two components of a larger molecule or a molecular assembly that can undergo free rotation in a fluid medium or as parts of a larger, solid material. The two centers are considered to be separated beyond wavefunction overlap but close enough together to fall within an optical near-field limit, which leads to high inverse power dependences on their local separation. In this investigation, individual centers undergo a Stokes transition, whilst each neighbor of a different species remains in its original electronic and vibrational state. Analogous principles are applicable for the anti-Stokes case. The analysis concludes by considering the experimental consequences of applying this spectroscopic interpretation to fluid media; explicitly, the selection rules and the impact of pressure on the radiant intensity of this process. PMID:27155637

  12. Demography and Population Projection of Aphis fabae (Hemiptera: Aphididae): with Additional Comments on Life Table Research Criteria.

    PubMed

    Akca, Izzet; Ayvaz, Tamer; Yazici, Eda; Smith, Cecil L; Chi, Hsin

    2015-08-01

    We collected developmental, survival, and reproduction data for Aphis fabae Scopoli (Hemiptera: Aphididae) reared on faba bean, Vicia faba L. 'Sevilla' at four constant temperatures (15, 20, 25, and 30°C), 70% relative humidity, and a photoperiod of 16:8 (L:D) h. The highest intrinsic rate of increase (r = 0.4347 d(-1)) and finite rate (λ = 1.5445 d(-1)) were observed at 25°C. The population projection based on the age-stage, two-sex life table quantitatively revealed the growth potential and stage structure of the aphid. We have included the following suggestions to aid researchers in life table studies: 1) The bootstrap method should be used to estimate the variance and SEs of developmental time, survival rate, fecundity, and population parameters. 2) The required number of bootstraps is dependent on the life table data--the higher the variation among individuals, the higher the number of bootstraps should be. In most cases, we suggest that 100,000 bootstraps should be used to obtain a stable estimate of variance and SEs. 3) Computer projection based on the age-stage, two-sex life table should be used to reveal the stage structure during population growth. 4) We used a simple equation based on the total fecundity, survival rate to adult stage, and first reproductive age to detect possible errors in life table parameters. 5) To assist readers in comprehending results, life table studies should include the cohort size, preadult survival rate, number of emerged female adults, mean fecundity, survival and fecundity curves, and population parameters.

  13. Demography and Population Projection of Aphis fabae (Hemiptera: Aphididae): with Additional Comments on Life Table Research Criteria.

    PubMed

    Akca, Izzet; Ayvaz, Tamer; Yazici, Eda; Smith, Cecil L; Chi, Hsin

    2015-08-01

    We collected developmental, survival, and reproduction data for Aphis fabae Scopoli (Hemiptera: Aphididae) reared on faba bean, Vicia faba L. 'Sevilla' at four constant temperatures (15, 20, 25, and 30°C), 70% relative humidity, and a photoperiod of 16:8 (L:D) h. The highest intrinsic rate of increase (r = 0.4347 d(-1)) and finite rate (λ = 1.5445 d(-1)) were observed at 25°C. The population projection based on the age-stage, two-sex life table quantitatively revealed the growth potential and stage structure of the aphid. We have included the following suggestions to aid researchers in life table studies: 1) The bootstrap method should be used to estimate the variance and SEs of developmental time, survival rate, fecundity, and population parameters. 2) The required number of bootstraps is dependent on the life table data--the higher the variation among individuals, the higher the number of bootstraps should be. In most cases, we suggest that 100,000 bootstraps should be used to obtain a stable estimate of variance and SEs. 3) Computer projection based on the age-stage, two-sex life table should be used to reveal the stage structure during population growth. 4) We used a simple equation based on the total fecundity, survival rate to adult stage, and first reproductive age to detect possible errors in life table parameters. 5) To assist readers in comprehending results, life table studies should include the cohort size, preadult survival rate, number of emerged female adults, mean fecundity, survival and fecundity curves, and population parameters. PMID:26470285

  14. Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

    In an effort to help meet the growing interest and concern about the problems created by the rapid growth of population, The International Planned Parenthood Federation has prepared this booklet with the aim of assisting the study of the history and future trends of population growth and its impact on individual and family welfare, national,…

  15. Additive influence of genetic predisposition and conventional risk factors in the incidence of coronary heart disease: a population-based study in Greece

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An additive genetic risk score (GRS) for coronary heart disease (CHD) has previously been associated with incident CHD in the population-based Greek European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition (EPIC) cohort. In this study, we explore GRS-‘environment’ joint actions on CHD for severa...

  16. The control of invasive species on private property with neighbor-to-neighbor spillovers

    PubMed Central

    Fenichel, Eli P.; Richards, Timothy J.; Shanafelt, David W.

    2013-01-01

    Invasive pests cross property boundaries. Property managers may have private incentives to control invasive species despite not having sufficient incentive to fully internalize the external costs of their role in spreading the invasion. Each property manager has a right to future use of his own property, but his property may abut others’ properties enabling spread of an invasive species. The incentives for a foresighted property manager to control invasive species have received little attention. We consider the efforts of a foresighted property manager who has rights to future use of a property and has the ability to engage in repeated, discrete control activities. We find that higher rates of dispersal, associated with proximity to neighboring properties, reduce the private incentives for control. Controlling species at one location provides incentives to control at a neighboring location. Control at neighboring locations are strategic complements and coupled with spatial heterogeneity lead to a weaker-link public good problem, in which each property owner is unable to fully appropriate the benefits of his own control activity. Future-use rights and private costs suggest that there is scope for a series of Coase-like exchanges to internalize much of the costs associated with species invasion. Pigouvian taxes on invasive species potentially have qualitatively perverse behavioral effects. A tax with a strong income effect (e.g, failure of effective revenue recycling) can reduce the value of property assets and diminish the incentive to manage insects on one’s own property. PMID:25346573

  17. The control of invasive species on private property with neighbor-to-neighbor spillovers.

    PubMed

    Fenichel, Eli P; Richards, Timothy J; Shanafelt, David W

    2014-10-01

    Invasive pests cross property boundaries. Property managers may have private incentives to control invasive species despite not having sufficient incentive to fully internalize the external costs of their role in spreading the invasion. Each property manager has a right to future use of his own property, but his property may abut others' properties enabling spread of an invasive species. The incentives for a foresighted property manager to control invasive species have received little attention. We consider the efforts of a foresighted property manager who has rights to future use of a property and has the ability to engage in repeated, discrete control activities. We find that higher rates of dispersal, associated with proximity to neighboring properties, reduce the private incentives for control. Controlling species at one location provides incentives to control at a neighboring location. Control at neighboring locations are strategic complements and coupled with spatial heterogeneity lead to a weaker-link public good problem, in which each property owner is unable to fully appropriate the benefits of his own control activity. Future-use rights and private costs suggest that there is scope for a series of Coase-like exchanges to internalize much of the costs associated with species invasion. Pigouvian taxes on invasive species potentially have qualitatively perverse behavioral effects. A tax with a strong income effect (e.g, failure of effective revenue recycling) can reduce the value of property assets and diminish the incentive to manage insects on one's own property. PMID:25346573

  18. The control of invasive species on private property with neighbor-to-neighbor spillovers.

    PubMed

    Fenichel, Eli P; Richards, Timothy J; Shanafelt, David W

    2014-10-01

    Invasive pests cross property boundaries. Property managers may have private incentives to control invasive species despite not having sufficient incentive to fully internalize the external costs of their role in spreading the invasion. Each property manager has a right to future use of his own property, but his property may abut others' properties enabling spread of an invasive species. The incentives for a foresighted property manager to control invasive species have received little attention. We consider the efforts of a foresighted property manager who has rights to future use of a property and has the ability to engage in repeated, discrete control activities. We find that higher rates of dispersal, associated with proximity to neighboring properties, reduce the private incentives for control. Controlling species at one location provides incentives to control at a neighboring location. Control at neighboring locations are strategic complements and coupled with spatial heterogeneity lead to a weaker-link public good problem, in which each property owner is unable to fully appropriate the benefits of his own control activity. Future-use rights and private costs suggest that there is scope for a series of Coase-like exchanges to internalize much of the costs associated with species invasion. Pigouvian taxes on invasive species potentially have qualitatively perverse behavioral effects. A tax with a strong income effect (e.g, failure of effective revenue recycling) can reduce the value of property assets and diminish the incentive to manage insects on one's own property.

  19. Competing neighbors: light perception and root function.

    PubMed

    Gundel, Pedro E; Pierik, Ronald; Mommer, Liesje; Ballaré, Carlos L

    2014-09-01

    Plant responses to competition have often been described as passive consequences of reduced resource availability. However, plants have mechanisms to forage for favorable conditions and anticipate competition scenarios. Despite the progresses made in understanding the role of light signaling in modulating plant-plant interactions, little is known about how plants use and integrate information gathered by their photoreceptors aboveground to regulate performance belowground. Given that the phytochrome family of photoreceptors plays a key role in the acquisition of information about the proximity of neighbors and canopy cover, it is tempting to speculate that changes in the red:far-red (R:FR) ratio perceived by aboveground plant parts have important implications shaping plant behavior belowground. Exploring data from published experiments, we assess the neglected role of light signaling in the control of root function. The available evidence indicates that plant exposure to low R:FR ratios affects root growth and morphology, root exudate profiles, and interactions with beneficial soil microorganisms. Although dependent on species identity, signals perceived aboveground are likely to affect root-to-root interactions. Root systems could also be guided to deploy new growth predominantly in open areas by light signals perceived by the shoots. Studying interactions between above- and belowground plant-plant signaling is expected to improve our understanding of the mechanisms of plant competition.

  20. Efficient nearest neighbors via robust sparse hashing.

    PubMed

    Cherian, Anoop; Sra, Suvrit; Morellas, Vassilios; Papanikolopoulos, Nikolaos

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents a new nearest neighbor (NN) retrieval framework: robust sparse hashing (RSH). Our approach is inspired by the success of dictionary learning for sparse coding. Our key idea is to sparse code the data using a learned dictionary, and then to generate hash codes out of these sparse codes for accurate and fast NN retrieval. But, direct application of sparse coding to NN retrieval poses a technical difficulty: when data are noisy or uncertain (which is the case with most real-world data sets), for a query point, an exact match of the hash code generated from the sparse code seldom happens, thereby breaking the NN retrieval. Borrowing ideas from robust optimization theory, we circumvent this difficulty via our novel robust dictionary learning and sparse coding framework called RSH, by learning dictionaries on the robustified counterparts of the perturbed data points. The algorithm is applied to NN retrieval on both simulated and real-world data. Our results demonstrate that RSH holds significant promise for efficient NN retrieval against the state of the art.

  1. Hierarchical neighbor effects on mycorrhizal community structure and function.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Holly V; Dickie, Ian A; Peltzer, Duane A; Fukami, Tadashi

    2016-08-01

    Theory predicts that neighboring communities can shape one another's composition and function, for example, through the exchange of member species. However, empirical tests of the directionality and strength of these effects are rare. We determined the effects of neighboring communities on one another through experimental manipulation of a plant-fungal model system. We first established distinct ectomycorrhizal fungal communities on Douglas-fir seedlings that were initially grown in three soil environments. We then transplanted seedlings and mycorrhizal communities in a fully factorial experiment designed to quantify the direction and strength of neighbor effects by focusing on changes in fungal community species composition and implications for seedling growth (a proxy for community function). We found that neighbor effects on the composition and function of adjacent communities follow a dominance hierarchy. Specifically, mycorrhizal communities established from soils collected in Douglas-fir plantations were both the least sensitive to neighbor effects, and exerted the strongest influence on their neighbors by driving convergence in neighbor community composition and increasing neighbor seedling vigor. These results demonstrate that asymmetric neighbor effects mediated by ecological history can determine both community composition and function. PMID:27551393

  2. Frequency and Correlation of Nearest Neighboring Nucleotides in Human Genome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Neng-zhi; Liu, Zi-xian; Qiu, Wen-yuan

    2009-02-01

    Zipf's approach in linguistics is utilized to analyze the statistical features of frequency and correlation of 16 nearest neighboring nucleotides (AA, AC, AG, ..., TT) in 12 human chromosomes (Y, 22, 21, 20, 19, 18, 17, 16, 15, 14, 13, and 12). It is found that these statistical features of nearest neighboring nucleotides in human genome: (i) the frequency distribution is a linear function, and (ii) the correlation distribution is an inverse function. The coefficients of the linear function and inverse function depend on the GC content. It proposes the correlation distribution of nearest neighboring nucleotides for the first time and extends the descriptor about nearest neighboring nucleotides.

  3. Selection on male longevity in a monogamous human population: late-life survival brings no additional grandchildren.

    PubMed

    Lahdenperä, M; Lummaa, V; Russell, A F

    2011-05-01

    Humans are exceptionally long-lived for mammals of their size. In men, lifespan is hypothesized to evolve from benefits of reproduction throughout adult life. We use multi-generational data from pre-industrial Finland, where remarriage was possible only after spousal death, to test selection pressures on male longevity in four monogamous populations. Men showed several behaviours consistent with attempting to accrue direct fitness throughout adult life and sired more children in their lifetimes if they lost their first wife and remarried. However, remarriage did not increase grandchild production because it compromised the success of motherless first-marriage offspring. Overall, grandchild production was not improved by living beyond 51 years and was reduced by living beyond 65. Our results highlight the importance of using grandchild production to understand selection on human life-history traits. We conclude that selection for (or enforcement of) lifetime monogamy will select for earlier reproductive investment and against increased lifespan in men.

  4. Screening for type 2 diabetes and population mortality over 10 years (ADDITION-Cambridge): a cluster-randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Rebecca K; Echouffo-Tcheugui, Justin B; Sharp, Stephen J; Sargeant, Lincoln A; Williams, Kate M; Prevost, A Toby; Kinmonth, Ann Louise; Wareham, Nicholas J; Griffin, Simon J

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background The increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes poses a major public health challenge. Population-based screening and early treatment for type 2 diabetes could reduce this growing burden. However, uncertainty persists around the benefits of screening for type 2 diabetes. We assessed the effect of a population-based stepwise screening programme on mortality. Methods In a pragmatic parallel group, cluster-randomised trial, 33 general practices in eastern England were randomly assigned by the method of minimisation in an unbalanced design to: screening followed by intensive multifactorial treatment for people diagnosed with diabetes (n=15); screening plus routine care of diabetes according to national guidelines (n=13); and a no-screening control group (n=5). The study population consisted of 20 184 individuals aged 40–69 years (mean 58 years), at high risk of prevalent undiagnosed diabetes, on the basis of a previously validated risk score. In screening practices, individuals were invited to a stepwise programme including random capillary blood glucose and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) tests, a fasting capillary blood glucose test, and a confirmatory oral glucose tolerance test. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality. All participants were flagged for mortality surveillance by the England and Wales Office of National Statistics. Analysis was by intention-to-screen and compared all-cause mortality rates between screening and control groups. This study is registered, number ISRCTN86769081. Findings Of 16 047 high-risk individuals in screening practices, 15 089 (94%) were invited for screening during 2001–06, 11 737 (73%) attended, and 466 (3%) were diagnosed with diabetes. 4137 control individuals were followed up. During 184 057 person-years of follow up (median duration 9·6 years [IQR 8·9–9·9]), there were 1532 deaths in the screening practices and 377 in control practices (mortality hazard ratio [HR] 1·06, 95% CI 0·90–1·25

  5. The effects of herbivory on neighbor interactions along a coastal marsh gradient

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, K.L.; Grace, J.B.; Marx, B.D.

    1997-01-01

    Many current theories of community function are based on the assumption that disturbances such as herbivory act to reduce the importance of neighbor interactions among plants. In this study, we examined the effects of herbivory (primarily by nutria, Myocastor coy-pus) on neighbor interactions between three dominant grasses in three coastal marsh communities, fresh, oligohaline, and mesohaline. The grasses studied were Panicum virgatum, Spartina patens, and Spartina alterniflora, which are dominant species in the fresh, oligohaline, and mesohaline marshes, respectively. Additive mixtures and monocultures of transplants were used in conjunction with exclosure fences to determine the impact of herbivory on neighbor interactions in the different marsh types. Herbivory had a strong effect on all three species and was important in all three marshes. In the absence of herbivores, the impact of neighbors was significant for two of the species (Panicum virgatum and Spartina patens) and varied considerably between environments, with competition intensifying for Panicum virgatum and decreasing for Spartina patens with increasing salinity. Indications of positive neighbor effects (mutualisms) were observed for both of these species, though in contrasting habitats and to differing degrees. In the presence of herbivores, however, competitive and positive effects were eliminated. Overall, then, it was observed that in this case, intense herbivory was able to override other biotic interactions such as competition and mutualism, which were not detectable in the presence of herbivores.

  6. Proxy-Based IPv6 Neighbor Discovery Scheme for Wireless LAN Based Mesh Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jihoon; Jeon, Seungwoo; Kim, Jaehoon

    Multi-hop Wireless LAN-based mesh network (WMN) provides high capacity and self-configuring capabilities. Due to data forwarding and path selection based on MAC address, WMN requires additional operations to achieve global connectivity using IPv6 address. The neighbor discovery operation over WLAN mesh networks requires repeated all-node broadcasting and this gives rise to a big burden in the entire mesh networks. In this letter, we propose the proxy neighbor discovery scheme for optimized IPv6 communication over WMN to reduce network overhead and communication latency. Using simulation experiments, we show that the control overhead and communication setup latency can be significantly reduced using the proxy-based neighbor discovery mechanism.

  7. Response of AM fungi spore population to elevated temperature and nitrogen addition and their influence on the plant community composition and productivity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao; Yang, Xue; Guo, Rui; Guo, Jixun

    2016-01-01

    To examine the influence of elevated temperature and nitrogen (N) addition on species composition and development of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and the effect of AMF on plant community structure and aboveground productivity, we conducted a 5-year field experiment in a temperate meadow in northeast China and a subsequent greenhouse experiment. In the field experiment, N addition reduced spore population diversity and richness of AMF and suppressed the spore density and the hyphal length density (HLD). Elevated temperature decreased spore density and diameter and increased the HLD, but did not affect AMF spore population composition. In the greenhouse experiment, AMF altered plant community composition and increased total aboveground biomass in both elevated temperature and N addition treatments; additionally, AMF also increased the relative abundance and aboveground biomass of the grasses Leymus chinensis (Poaceae) and Setaria viridis (Gramineae) and significantly reduced the relative abundance and aboveground biomass of the Suaeda corniculata (Chenopodiaceae). Although elevated temperature and N addition can affect species composition or suppress the development of AMF, AMF are likely to play a vital role in increasing plant diversity and productivity. Notably, AMF might reduce the threat of climate change induced degradation of temperate meadow ecosystems. PMID:27098761

  8. Response of AM fungi spore population to elevated temperature and nitrogen addition and their influence on the plant community composition and productivity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Yang, Xue; Guo, Rui; Guo, Jixun

    2016-01-01

    To examine the influence of elevated temperature and nitrogen (N) addition on species composition and development of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and the effect of AMF on plant community structure and aboveground productivity, we conducted a 5-year field experiment in a temperate meadow in northeast China and a subsequent greenhouse experiment. In the field experiment, N addition reduced spore population diversity and richness of AMF and suppressed the spore density and the hyphal length density (HLD). Elevated temperature decreased spore density and diameter and increased the HLD, but did not affect AMF spore population composition. In the greenhouse experiment, AMF altered plant community composition and increased total aboveground biomass in both elevated temperature and N addition treatments; additionally, AMF also increased the relative abundance and aboveground biomass of the grasses Leymus chinensis (Poaceae) and Setaria viridis (Gramineae) and significantly reduced the relative abundance and aboveground biomass of the Suaeda corniculata (Chenopodiaceae). Although elevated temperature and N addition can affect species composition or suppress the development of AMF, AMF are likely to play a vital role in increasing plant diversity and productivity. Notably, AMF might reduce the threat of climate change induced degradation of temperate meadow ecosystems. PMID:27098761

  9. Response of AM fungi spore population to elevated temperature and nitrogen addition and their influence on the plant community composition and productivity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Yang, Xue; Guo, Rui; Guo, Jixun

    2016-04-21

    To examine the influence of elevated temperature and nitrogen (N) addition on species composition and development of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and the effect of AMF on plant community structure and aboveground productivity, we conducted a 5-year field experiment in a temperate meadow in northeast China and a subsequent greenhouse experiment. In the field experiment, N addition reduced spore population diversity and richness of AMF and suppressed the spore density and the hyphal length density (HLD). Elevated temperature decreased spore density and diameter and increased the HLD, but did not affect AMF spore population composition. In the greenhouse experiment, AMF altered plant community composition and increased total aboveground biomass in both elevated temperature and N addition treatments; additionally, AMF also increased the relative abundance and aboveground biomass of the grasses Leymus chinensis (Poaceae) and Setaria viridis (Gramineae) and significantly reduced the relative abundance and aboveground biomass of the Suaeda corniculata (Chenopodiaceae). Although elevated temperature and N addition can affect species composition or suppress the development of AMF, AMF are likely to play a vital role in increasing plant diversity and productivity. Notably, AMF might reduce the threat of climate change induced degradation of temperate meadow ecosystems.

  10. A Good Neighbor Nonresident Tuition Plan: The Nevada Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Barry S.; Hansen, David A.

    The University of Nevada's "Good Neighbor" nonresident tuition plan for residents of 10 contiguous California counties is described. Data was gathered and interest cultivated over an 8-year period to bring the "Good Neighbor" proposal before the Board of Regents who subsequently approved it. Previous to the new policy, all out-of-state students…

  11. The Minnesota Family, Friend and Neighbor Grant Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Susman-Stillman, Amy; Stout, Karen; Cleveland, Jennifer; Hawley, Vicki

    2011-01-01

    In 1997, Minnesota became the first state in the nation to pass legislation establishing an education and support program for family, friend, and neighbor (FFN) care providers. This article describes the Minnesota Family, Friend and Neighbor Grant Program and findings from an evaluation of the programs and a curriculum scan of materials used in…

  12. What Do Foreign Neighbors Say about the Mental Lexicon?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitevitch, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    A corpus analysis of phonological word-forms shows that English words have few phonological neighbors that are Spanish words. Concomitantly, Spanish words have few phonological neighbors that are English words. These observations appear to undermine certain accounts of bilingual language processing, and have significant implications for the…

  13. Opinion dynamics in networks with common-neighbors-based connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huanjing; Shang, Lihui

    2015-03-01

    We investigate opinion dynamics of the model in which each agent can communicate with local neighbors whose opinions are inside the bound of confidence and meanwhile selecting long-range neighbors according to a common-neighbors rule. The common-neighbors rule means that two agents sharing more neighbors have larger probability to be connected. We find that increasing communication between agents who have common friends will prolong the time needed for the system to reach a consensus state. In contrast, the long-range connections between agents sharing no friends will promote the convergence of the system. The generality of this observation is tested against different system sizes. Simulation results also show that a large number of long-range connections help the system to reach a consensus fast.

  14. Bayesian spatiotemporal analysis of zero-inflated biological population density data by a delta-normal spatiotemporal additive model.

    PubMed

    Arcuti, Simona; Pollice, Alessio; Ribecco, Nunziata; D'Onghia, Gianfranco

    2016-03-01

    We evaluate the spatiotemporal changes in the density of a particular species of crustacean known as deep-water rose shrimp, Parapenaeus longirostris, based on biological sample data collected during trawl surveys carried out from 1995 to 2006 as part of the international project MEDITS (MEDiterranean International Trawl Surveys). As is the case for many biological variables, density data are continuous and characterized by unusually large amounts of zeros, accompanied by a skewed distribution of the remaining values. Here we analyze the normalized density data by a Bayesian delta-normal semiparametric additive model including the effects of covariates, using penalized regression with low-rank thin-plate splines for nonlinear spatial and temporal effects. Modeling the zero and nonzero values by two joint processes, as we propose in this work, allows to obtain great flexibility and easily handling of complex likelihood functions, avoiding inaccurate statistical inferences due to misclassification of the high proportion of exact zeros in the model. Bayesian model estimation is obtained by Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations, suitably specifying the complex likelihood function of the zero-inflated density data. The study highlights relevant nonlinear spatial and temporal effects and the influence of the annual Mediterranean oscillations index and of the sea surface temperature on the distribution of the deep-water rose shrimp density. PMID:26418888

  15. Addition of Bacillus sp. inoculums in bedding for swine on a pilot scale: effect on microbial population and bedding temperature.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, E K; Ulguim, R R; Corrêa, L B; Castilhos, D D; Bianchi, I; Gil-Turnes, C; Lucia, T

    2012-10-01

    Thermal and microbiological characteristics of beddings for swine were compared according to their depth and of addition of inoculums. Bedding was added to boxes at 0.25 (25D) and 0.50 m (50D), with three treatments: control (no inoculums); T1, with 250 g of Bacillus cereus var. toyoii at 8.4 × 10(7) CFU; and T2, with 250 g of a pool of B. subtilis, Bacillus licheniformis and Bacillus polymyxa at 8.4 × 10(7) CFU (250 g for 25D and 500 g for 50D). Mean temperatures were 28.5 ± 3.9 at the surface and 35.2 ± 8.9 inside the beddings. The most probable number (MPN) of thermophilic bacteria was higher for T1 and T2 than for the control (P<0.05). The MPN of thermophilic bacteria and fungi was greater for D50 than for D25 (P<0.05). The use of 25D without inoculums is recommended due to the reduction of thermophilic microbiota.

  16. Brazilian propolis extract used as an additive to decrease methane emissions from the rumen microbial population in vitro.

    PubMed

    Santos, Nadine Woruby; Zeoula, Lucia Maria; Yoshimura, Emerson Henri; Machado, Erica; Macheboeuf, Didier; Cornu, Agnès

    2016-06-01

    Propolis is a product that is rich in phenolic compounds and can be utilized in animal nutrition as a dietary additive. In this study, the effects of a Brazilian green propolis extract on rumen fermentation and gas production were determined. The fate of propolis phenolic compounds in the rumen medium was also investigated. Fermentation was done in 24-h batches over three periods. Inoculates were obtained from cows fed on grassland hay and concentrate. Propolis extract in a hydroalcoholic solution was applied at increasing doses to the substrate (1 to 56 g/kg). The fermentation substrate consisted on a mixture of alfalfa hay, soybean meal, and wheat grain mixture in dry matter. After 24 h of fermentation, seven new compounds were observed in the medium in amounts that correlated to the propolis dose. The dose of propolis extract linearly decreased the pH of the medium and linearly increased propionate production, which reduced the acetate-to-propionate ratio and influenced the total production of short-chain fatty acids. Propolis also linearly reduced methane production and increased the carbon dioxide-to-methane ratio. Ammonia nitrogen levels and in vitro digestibility of organic matter were similar among the treatments. The combination of increased propionate production and decreased methane production suggests better energy utilization from the feed. PMID:27105625

  17. Bayesian spatiotemporal analysis of zero-inflated biological population density data by a delta-normal spatiotemporal additive model.

    PubMed

    Arcuti, Simona; Pollice, Alessio; Ribecco, Nunziata; D'Onghia, Gianfranco

    2016-03-01

    We evaluate the spatiotemporal changes in the density of a particular species of crustacean known as deep-water rose shrimp, Parapenaeus longirostris, based on biological sample data collected during trawl surveys carried out from 1995 to 2006 as part of the international project MEDITS (MEDiterranean International Trawl Surveys). As is the case for many biological variables, density data are continuous and characterized by unusually large amounts of zeros, accompanied by a skewed distribution of the remaining values. Here we analyze the normalized density data by a Bayesian delta-normal semiparametric additive model including the effects of covariates, using penalized regression with low-rank thin-plate splines for nonlinear spatial and temporal effects. Modeling the zero and nonzero values by two joint processes, as we propose in this work, allows to obtain great flexibility and easily handling of complex likelihood functions, avoiding inaccurate statistical inferences due to misclassification of the high proportion of exact zeros in the model. Bayesian model estimation is obtained by Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations, suitably specifying the complex likelihood function of the zero-inflated density data. The study highlights relevant nonlinear spatial and temporal effects and the influence of the annual Mediterranean oscillations index and of the sea surface temperature on the distribution of the deep-water rose shrimp density.

  18. How neighbor canopy architecture affects target plant performance

    SciTech Connect

    Tremmel, D.C.; Bazzaz, F.A. )

    1993-10-01

    Plant competition occurs through the negative effects that individual plants have on resource availability to neighboring individuals. Therefore competition experiments need to examine how different species change resource availability to their neighbors, and how different species respond to these changes-allocationally, architecturally, and physiologically-through time. In a greenhouse study we used a model system of annuals to examine how canopies of species having differing morphologies differed in their architectures and light-interception abilities, and how different species performed when grown in these canopies. Abutilon theophrasti, Datura stramonium, and Polygonum pensylvanicum were grown as [open quotes]targets[close quotes]. Plants were grown in pots, with one target plant and four neighbor plants. Detailed measurements of neighbor canopy structure and target plant canopy architecture were made at five harvests. Species with different morphologies showed large differences in canopy structure, particularly when grass and forb species were compared. Setaria, a grass, had a more open canopy than the other species (all forbs), and was a consistently weak competitor. Overall, however, the relative effects of different neighbors on target biomass varied with target species. Target biomass was poorly correlated with neighbor biomass and leaf area, but was highly correlated with a measure of target light-interception ability that took into account both target leaf deployment and neighbor light interception. Despite clear differences among neighbor species in canopy structure and effect on light penetration, the results suggest no broad generalizations about the effects of different species as neighbors. Knowledge of morphological, physiological, and life history characteristics of both the target and neighbor species may be necessary to explain the results of their competition. 53 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Plant response to climate change varies with topography, interactions with neighbors, and ecotype.

    PubMed

    Liancourt, Pierre; Spence, Laura A; Song, Daniel S; Lkhagva, Ariuntsetseg; Sharkhuu, Anarmaa; Boldgiv, Bazartseren; Helliker, Brent R; Petraitis, Peter S; Casper, Brenda B

    2013-02-01

    Predicting the future of any given species represents an unprecedented challenge in light of the many environmental and biological factors that affect organismal performance and that also interact with drivers of global change. In a three-year experiment set in the Mongolian steppe, we examined the response of the common grass Festuca lenensis to manipulated temperature and water while controlling for topographic variation, plant-plant interactions, and ecotypic differentiation. Plant survival and growth responses to a warmer, drier climate varied within the landscape. Response to simulated increased precipitation occurred only in the absence of neighbors, demonstrating that plant-plant interactions can supersede the effects of climate change. F. lenensis also showed evidence of local adaptation in populations that were only 300 m apart. Individuals from the steep and dry upper slope showed a higher stress/drought tolerance, whereas those from the more productive lower slope showed a higher biomass production and a greater ability to cope with competition. Moreover, the response of this species to increased precipitation was ecotype specific, with water addition benefiting only the least stress-tolerant ecotype from the lower slope origin. This multifaceted approach illustrates the importance of placing climate change experiments within a realistic ecological and evolutionary framework. Existing sources of variation impacting plant performance may buffer or obscure climate change effects.

  20. Plant response to climate change varies with topography, interactions with neighbors, and ecotype.

    PubMed

    Liancourt, Pierre; Spence, Laura A; Song, Daniel S; Lkhagva, Ariuntsetseg; Sharkhuu, Anarmaa; Boldgiv, Bazartseren; Helliker, Brent R; Petraitis, Peter S; Casper, Brenda B

    2013-02-01

    Predicting the future of any given species represents an unprecedented challenge in light of the many environmental and biological factors that affect organismal performance and that also interact with drivers of global change. In a three-year experiment set in the Mongolian steppe, we examined the response of the common grass Festuca lenensis to manipulated temperature and water while controlling for topographic variation, plant-plant interactions, and ecotypic differentiation. Plant survival and growth responses to a warmer, drier climate varied within the landscape. Response to simulated increased precipitation occurred only in the absence of neighbors, demonstrating that plant-plant interactions can supersede the effects of climate change. F. lenensis also showed evidence of local adaptation in populations that were only 300 m apart. Individuals from the steep and dry upper slope showed a higher stress/drought tolerance, whereas those from the more productive lower slope showed a higher biomass production and a greater ability to cope with competition. Moreover, the response of this species to increased precipitation was ecotype specific, with water addition benefiting only the least stress-tolerant ecotype from the lower slope origin. This multifaceted approach illustrates the importance of placing climate change experiments within a realistic ecological and evolutionary framework. Existing sources of variation impacting plant performance may buffer or obscure climate change effects. PMID:23691663

  1. Fluctuating asymmetry and testing isolation of Montana grizzly bear populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Picton, Harold D.; Palmisciano, D.A.; Nelson, Gerald

    1990-01-01

    Fluctuating asymmetry of adult skulls was used to test he genetic isolation of the Yellowstone grizzly bear population from its nearest neighbor. An overall summary statistic was used in addition to 16 other parameters. Tests found the males of the Yellowstone populaion to be more vaiable than those of the North Conitinental Divide Exosystem. Evidence for precipitaiton effects is also included. This test tends to support the existing management haypothesis that the Yellowstone population is isolatied.

  2. Intrafield CD variation by stray light from neighboring field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Chang-Moon; Song, Jung-Ho; Woo, Sung-Soo; Kwon, Ki-Sung; Ahn, Chang-Nam; Shin, Ki-Soo

    2002-07-01

    The main object of this paper is to investigate the root cause of CD change by neighboring field observed in KrF scanner (max. 0.70NA) and to measure the amount of stray light from neighboring field precisely. Line widths of gate pattern are measured at the isolated and surrounded field and the amount of CD change by neighboring field is found to be proportional to the clear ratio of mask. By exposing with special configuration, it is found that the line width is linearly decreased as the dose of neighboring field increases. From this linear dependency on doses of neighboring field, it is clear that non-negligible amount of light is scattered out into the adjacent field. The amount of this stray light level coming from neighboring field is obtained quantitatively by synthetic analysis of above result and double exposure to mimic background DC light by flare. About 1.2% of stray light from outside of the field is observed at the slit position close to the boundary of neighboring field. Disappearing pad test is also performed to measure the flare from exposure of field itself. Finally, it is obtained the distribution of total stray light - nominal flare plus flare from adjacent field - and it is found to be existed around 0.7% deviation of stray light across the slit.

  3. 76 FR 7845 - Good Neighbor Environmental Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ... quality of life of persons residing on the United States side of the border. The statute calls for the... Agency (EPA) invites nominations from a diverse range of qualified candidates to be considered for.... Sources in addition to this Federal Register Notice may also be utilized in the solicitation of...

  4. Robust Neighboring Optimal Guidance for the Advanced Launch System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, David G.

    1993-01-01

    In recent years, optimization has become an engineering tool through the availability of numerous successful nonlinear programming codes. Optimal control problems are converted into parameter optimization (nonlinear programming) problems by assuming the control to be piecewise linear, making the unknowns the nodes or junction points of the linear control segments. Once the optimal piecewise linear control (suboptimal) control is known, a guidance law for operating near the suboptimal path is the neighboring optimal piecewise linear control (neighboring suboptimal control). Research conducted under this grant has been directed toward the investigation of neighboring suboptimal control as a guidance scheme for an advanced launch system.

  5. The response of Vibrio- and Rhodobacter-related populations of the NW Mediterranean Sea to additions of dissolved organic matter, phages, or dilution.

    PubMed

    Weinbauer, Markus G; Christen, Richard; Höfle, Manfred G

    2006-04-01

    We investigated the growth response of the heterotrophic prokaryotic community focusing on Vibrio- and Rhodobacter-related populations (SRF3) to variation in the availability of dissolved organic matter (DOM), population density-dependent effects, and prokaryotic virus (phage) infection in coastal and offshore waters of the NW Mediterranean Sea. We tested the response of the prokaryotic community to three different DOM fractions prepared by ultrafiltration. One of the DOM fractions contained phages (<0.2 m), a second was virus-free (<100 kDa), and a third contained only low molecular weight (<1 kDa). The proportion of Vibrio and SRF3 populations as determined by fluorescent in situ hybridization in the community ranged from <1 to 6.2% and from 3.2 to 6.3%, respectively. Based on changes in cell numbers, growth rates ranged from 2.1 to 3.1 day(-1) for Vibrio and from 0.8 to 1.2 day(-1) for SRF3. Growth rates of Vibrio were similar or higher than those of the total prokaryotic community, whereas the ability of Vibrio to use high molecular weight (HMW) DOM and the responses to additions of phage-rich material were lower. Growth rates of SRF3 were lower than that of the community. Susceptibility to infection of SRF3 was sometimes lower than in the community, whereas the growth stimulation of HMW DOM was similar or lower. Reducing the cell concentrations of the prokaryotic community by dilution stimulated the overall growth of the community, including that of its constituent Vibrio and SRF3 populations, but the effect was smaller on the SRF3 and greater on Vibrio populations than for the total community. Comparisons with the community also revealed that life strategy traits of bacterial populations differed between coastal and offshore waters. Overall, our data suggest that Vibrio is an r-strategist or opportunistic population in the NW Mediterranean Sea, whereas SRF3 is a K-strategist or equilibrium population. PMID:16598637

  6. Estimation of Carcinogenicity using Hierarchical Clustering and Nearest Neighbor Methodologies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previously a hierarchical clustering (HC) approach and a nearest neighbor (NN) approach were developed to model acute aquatic toxicity end points. These approaches were developed to correlate the toxicity for large, noncongeneric data sets. In this study these approaches applie...

  7. Additive influence of genetic predisposition and conventional risk factors in the incidence of coronary heart disease: a population-based study in Greece

    PubMed Central

    Yiannakouris, Nikos; Katsoulis, Michail; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Ordovas, Jose M; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios

    2014-01-01

    Objectives An additive genetic risk score (GRS) for coronary heart disease (CHD) has previously been associated with incident CHD in the population-based Greek European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition (EPIC) cohort. In this study, we explore GRS-‘environment’ joint actions on CHD for several conventional cardiovascular risk factors (ConvRFs), including smoking, hypertension, type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), body mass index (BMI), physical activity and adherence to the Mediterranean diet. Design A case–control study. Setting The general Greek population of the EPIC study. Participants and outcome measures 477 patients with medically confirmed incident CHD and 1271 controls participated in this study. We estimated the ORs for CHD by dividing participants at higher or lower GRS and, alternatively, at higher or lower ConvRF, and calculated the relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI) as a measure of deviation from additivity. Results The joint presence of higher GRS and higher risk ConvRF was in all instances associated with an increased risk of CHD, compared with the joint presence of lower GRS and lower risk ConvRF. The OR (95% CI) was 1.7 (1.2 to 2.4) for smoking, 2.7 (1.9 to 3.8) for hypertension, 4.1 (2.8 to 6.1) for T2DM, 1.9 (1.4 to 2.5) for lower physical activity, 2.0 (1.3 to 3.2) for high BMI and 1.5 (1.1 to 2.1) for poor adherence to the Mediterranean diet. In all instances, RERI values were fairly small and not statistically significant, suggesting that the GRS and the ConvRFs do not have effects beyond additivity. Conclusions Genetic predisposition to CHD, operationalised through a multilocus GRS, and ConvRFs have essentially additive effects on CHD risk. PMID:24500614

  8. Scalable Nearest Neighbor Algorithms for High Dimensional Data.

    PubMed

    Muja, Marius; Lowe, David G

    2014-11-01

    For many computer vision and machine learning problems, large training sets are key for good performance. However, the most computationally expensive part of many computer vision and machine learning algorithms consists of finding nearest neighbor matches to high dimensional vectors that represent the training data. We propose new algorithms for approximate nearest neighbor matching and evaluate and compare them with previous algorithms. For matching high dimensional features, we find two algorithms to be the most efficient: the randomized k-d forest and a new algorithm proposed in this paper, the priority search k-means tree. We also propose a new algorithm for matching binary features by searching multiple hierarchical clustering trees and show it outperforms methods typically used in the literature. We show that the optimal nearest neighbor algorithm and its parameters depend on the data set characteristics and describe an automated configuration procedure for finding the best algorithm to search a particular data set. In order to scale to very large data sets that would otherwise not fit in the memory of a single machine, we propose a distributed nearest neighbor matching framework that can be used with any of the algorithms described in the paper. All this research has been released as an open source library called fast library for approximate nearest neighbors (FLANN), which has been incorporated into OpenCV and is now one of the most popular libraries for nearest neighbor matching. PMID:26353063

  9. Scalable Nearest Neighbor Algorithms for High Dimensional Data.

    PubMed

    Muja, Marius; Lowe, David G

    2014-11-01

    For many computer vision and machine learning problems, large training sets are key for good performance. However, the most computationally expensive part of many computer vision and machine learning algorithms consists of finding nearest neighbor matches to high dimensional vectors that represent the training data. We propose new algorithms for approximate nearest neighbor matching and evaluate and compare them with previous algorithms. For matching high dimensional features, we find two algorithms to be the most efficient: the randomized k-d forest and a new algorithm proposed in this paper, the priority search k-means tree. We also propose a new algorithm for matching binary features by searching multiple hierarchical clustering trees and show it outperforms methods typically used in the literature. We show that the optimal nearest neighbor algorithm and its parameters depend on the data set characteristics and describe an automated configuration procedure for finding the best algorithm to search a particular data set. In order to scale to very large data sets that would otherwise not fit in the memory of a single machine, we propose a distributed nearest neighbor matching framework that can be used with any of the algorithms described in the paper. All this research has been released as an open source library called fast library for approximate nearest neighbors (FLANN), which has been incorporated into OpenCV and is now one of the most popular libraries for nearest neighbor matching.

  10. A novel P106L mutation in EPSPS and an unknown mechanism(s) act additively to confer resistance to glyphosate in a South African Lolium rigidum population.

    PubMed

    Kaundun, Shiv S; Dale, Richard P; Zelaya, Ian A; Dinelli, Giovanni; Marotti, Ilaria; McIndoe, Eddie; Cairns, Andrew

    2011-04-13

    Glyphosate resistance evolution in weeds is a growing problem in world agriculture. Here, we have investigated the mechanism(s) of glyphosate resistance in a Lolium rigidum population (DAG1) from South Africa. Nucleotide sequencing revealed the existence of at least three EPSPS homologues in the L. rigidum genome and identified a novel proline 106 to leucine substitution (P106L) in 52% DAG1 individuals. This mutation conferred a 1.7-fold resistance increase to glyphosate at the whole plant level. Additionally, a 3.1-fold resistance increase, not linked to metabolism or translocation, was estimated between wild-type P106-DAG1 and P106-STDS sensitive plants. Point accepted mutation analysis suggested that other amino acid substitutions at EPSPS position 106 are likely to be found in nature besides the P106/S/A/T/L point mutations reported to date. This study highlights the importance of minor mechanisms acting additively to confer significant levels of resistance to commercial field rates of glyphosate in weed populations subjected to high selection pressure.

  11. Additive effect of heavy metals on metabolic syndrome in the Korean population: the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Moon, Seong-Su

    2014-06-01

    There have been increasing concerns regarding health problems due to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). We investigated association of heavy metals, including lead, mercury, and cadmium, with metabolic syndrome (MS) and its individual components in the Korean population. Participants included 1,961 males and 1,989 females 20 years of age or older from the fourth and fifth Korea National Health and Nutritional Examination Surveys of the Korean population (2009 and 2010). We examined the relationship of blood lead, mercury, and cadmium levels with MS and the additive effect of three heavy metals on MS after adjustment for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), region, smoking, alcohol consumption, and regular exercise. Blood concentration of lead showed a significant but modest association with prevalence of MS (P = 0.04). Other heavy metals did not show such a relationship with MS. When the participants were classified according to the sum of category numbers of the three heavy metals, adjusted odds ratios were 1.0, 1.355, 1.638, and 1.556 (P < 0.01). Among components of MS, significant relationship of the sum of heavy metals with hypertension and elevated triglyceride was demonstrated. Blood concentration of lead was positively associated with the prevalence of MS. Of particular interest, cumulative effect of a mixture of lead, mercury, and cadmium on prevalence of MS was stronger than the sum of effect of each heavy metal. Accumulative effect of exposure to heavy metals could be more additive or synergistic than individual exposure in the general population.

  12. Three-state Potts model on triangular lattice with nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor antiferromagnetic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murtazaev, Akai K.; Babaev, Albert B.; Magomedov, Magomed A.; Kassan-Ogly, Felix A.; Proshkin, Alexey I.

    2016-11-01

    Using Monte Carlo simulations, we investigated phase transitions and frustrations in the three-state Potts model on a triangular lattice with allowance for antiferromagnetic exchange interactions between nearest-neighbors J1 and next-nearest-neighbors J2. The ratio of the next-nearest-neighbor and nearest-neighbor exchange constants r=J2/J1 is chosen within the range of 0≤r≤2. Based on the analysis of the entropy, specific heat, system state density function, and fourth order Binder cumulants, the phase transitions in the Potts model with interactions J1<0 and J2<0 are shown to be found in value ranges of 0≤r<0.2 and 1.25≤r≤2.0. In an intermediate range of 0.2≤r≤1.0 the phase transition fails and the frustrations are revealed.

  13. Additive Effects of the Risk Alleles of PNPLA3 and TM6SF2 on Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoliang; Liu, Zhipeng; Wang, Kai; Wang, Zhaowen; Sun, Xing; Zhong, Lin; Deng, Guilong; Song, Guohe; Sun, Baining; Peng, Zhihai; Liu, Wanqing

    2016-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have identified that variants in or near PNPLA3, NCAN, GCKR, LYPLAL1, and TM6SF2 are significantly associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in multiple ethnic groups. Studies on their impact on NAFLD in Han Chinese are still limited. In this study, we examined the relevance of these variants to NAFLD in a community-based Han Chinese population and further explored their potential joint effect on NAFLD. Six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (PNPLA3 rs738409, rs2294918, NCAN rs2228603, GCKR rs780094, LYPLAL1 rs12137855, and TM6SF2 rs58542926) previously identified in genome-wide analyses, to be associated with NAFLD were genotyped in 384 NAFLD patients and 384 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. We found two out of the six polymorphisms, PNPLA3 rs738409 (OR = 1.52, 95%CI: 1.19–1.96; P = 0.00087) and TM6SF2 rs58542926 (OR = 2.11, 95%CI: 1.34–3.39; P = 0.0016) are independently associated with NAFLD after adjustment for the effects of age, gender, and BMI. Our analysis further demonstrated the strong additive effects of the risk alleles of PNPLA3 and TM6SF2 with an overall significance between the number of risk alleles and NAFLD (OR = 1.64, 95%CI: 1.34–2.01; P = 1.4 × 10-6). The OR for NAFLD increased in an additive manner, with an average increase in OR of 1.52 per additional risk allele. Our results confirmed that the PNPLA3 and TM6SF2 variants were the most significant risk alleles for NAFLD in Chinese population. Therefore, genotyping these two genetic risk factors may help identify individuals with the highest risk of NAFLD. PMID:27532011

  14. Screening of household family members of brucellosis cases and neighboring community members in Azerbaijan.

    PubMed

    Ismayilova, Rita; Mody, Rupal; Abdullayev, Rakif; Amirova, Kamala; Jabbarova, Latafat; Ustun, Narmin; Jahanov, Musa; Nasirova, Emilya; Powers, Marilyn; Rivard, Robert; Hepburn, Matthew; Bautista, Christian T

    2013-05-01

    Brucellosis is an endemic zoonotic disease in Azerbaijan. The first human brucellosis case reported in 1922 was in Pardabil village of a region currently named Shabran. Household members of brucellosis index cases are a population at risk for brucellosis infection. The purpose of this study was to determine the rate of seropositivity of brucellosis among household and neighboring community members of brucellosis index cases in Azerbaijan. Twenty-one household members of 8 index brucellosis cases and 27 community neighbors were serologically tested for evidence of exposure by the serum agglutination test. Of these, the brucellosis seropositivity rate was 9.5% and 7.4%, respectively. Screening of household members of index cases and individuals who live in proximity to infected household members is a practical approach to increase the detection of brucellosis exposure.

  15. Fusion yield rate recovery by escaping hot-spot fast ions in the neighboring fuel layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xian-Zhu; McDevitt, C. J.; Guo, Zehua; Berk, H. L.

    2014-02-01

    Free-streaming loss by fast ions can deplete the tail population in the hot spot of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target. Escaping fast ions in the neighboring fuel layer of a cryogenic target can produce a surplus of fast ions locally. In contrast to the Knudsen layer effect that reduces hot-spot fusion reactivity due to tail ion depletion, the inverse Knudsen layer effect increases fusion reactivity in the neighboring fuel layer. In the case of a burning ICF target in the presence of significant hydrodynamic mix which aggravates the Knudsen layer effect, the yield recovery largely compensates for the yield reduction. For mix-dominated sub-ignition targets, the yield reduction is the dominant process.

  16. Additive-dominance genetic model analyses for late-maturity alpha-amylase activity in a bread wheat factorial crossing population.

    PubMed

    Rasul, Golam; Glover, Karl D; Krishnan, Padmanaban G; Wu, Jixiang; Berzonsky, William A; Ibrahim, Amir M H

    2015-12-01

    Elevated level of late maturity α-amylase activity (LMAA) can result in low falling number scores, reduced grain quality, and downgrade of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) class. A mating population was developed by crossing parents with different levels of LMAA. The F2 and F3 hybrids and their parents were evaluated for LMAA, and data were analyzed using the R software package 'qgtools' integrated with an additive-dominance genetic model and a mixed linear model approach. Simulated results showed high testing powers for additive and additive × environment variances, and comparatively low powers for dominance and dominance × environment variances. All variance components and their proportions to the phenotypic variance for the parents and hybrids were significant except for the dominance × environment variance. The estimated narrow-sense heritability and broad-sense heritability for LMAA were 14 and 54%, respectively. High significant negative additive effects for parents suggest that spring wheat cultivars 'Lancer' and 'Chester' can serve as good general combiners, and that 'Kinsman' and 'Seri-82' had negative specific combining ability in some hybrids despite of their own significant positive additive effects, suggesting they can be used as parents to reduce LMAA levels. Seri-82 showed very good general combining ability effect when used as a male parent, indicating the importance of reciprocal effects. High significant negative dominance effects and high-parent heterosis for hybrids demonstrated that the specific hybrid combinations; Chester × Kinsman, 'Lerma52' × Lancer, Lerma52 × 'LoSprout' and 'Janz' × Seri-82 could be generated to produce cultivars with significantly reduced LMAA level.

  17. Recovery of delay time from time series based on the nearest neighbor method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokhorov, M. D.; Ponomarenko, V. I.; Khorev, V. S.

    2013-12-01

    We propose a method for the recovery of delay time from time series of time-delay systems. The method is based on the nearest neighbor analysis. The method allows one to reconstruct delays in various classes of time-delay systems including systems of high order, systems with several coexisting delays, and nonscalar time-delay systems. It can be applied to time series heavily corrupted by additive and dynamical noise.

  18. Effectiveness of Phytogenic Feed Additive as Alternative to Bacitracin Methylene Disalicylate on Hematological Parameters, Intestinal Histomorphology and Microbial Population and Production Performance of Japanese Quails.

    PubMed

    Manafi, M; Hedayati, M; Khalaji, S

    2016-09-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of phytogenic additive and antibiotic growth promoter in laying Japanese quails. One hundred and sixty five quails were divided into three groups of 5 replicates and 11 quails (8 females and 3 males) in each replicate. Treatment 1 was fed control diet, treatment 2 was fed control diet supplemented with 0.05% bacitracin methylene disalicylate as antibiotic growth promoter and treatment 3 was fed control diet supplemented with 0.1% phytogenic feed additive (PFA) for two periods of 3 weeks each from 37 to 42 weeks of age. Results showed that egg production, eggshell strength, eggshell weight, villus height and villus height to crypt depth ratio were significantly (p≤0.05) increased and feed consumption, feed conversion ratio, albumen, Haugh unit, cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, alanine transaminase, gamma glutamyltransferase, alkaline phosphatase, high-density lipoprotein, triglyceride, number of goblet cell, crypt depth and intestinal bacterial population of Coliforms, Salmonella and E. coli were significantly (p≤0.05) decreased in PFA fed group. It is concluded that addition of PFA containing phytomolecules and organic acids as main ingredients could significantly improve the production parameters and the general health of laying quails as an alternative to antibiotic growth promoters. PMID:27189636

  19. Effectiveness of Phytogenic Feed Additive as Alternative to Bacitracin Methylene Disalicylate on Hematological Parameters, Intestinal Histomorphology and Microbial Population and Production Performance of Japanese Quails

    PubMed Central

    Manafi, M.; Hedayati, M.; Khalaji, S.

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of phytogenic additive and antibiotic growth promoter in laying Japanese quails. One hundred and sixty five quails were divided into three groups of 5 replicates and 11 quails (8 females and 3 males) in each replicate. Treatment 1 was fed control diet, treatment 2 was fed control diet supplemented with 0.05% bacitracin methylene disalicylate as antibiotic growth promoter and treatment 3 was fed control diet supplemented with 0.1% phytogenic feed additive (PFA) for two periods of 3 weeks each from 37 to 42 weeks of age. Results showed that egg production, eggshell strength, eggshell weight, villus height and villus height to crypt depth ratio were significantly (p≤0.05) increased and feed consumption, feed conversion ratio, albumen, Haugh unit, cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, alanine transaminase, gamma glutamyltransferase, alkaline phosphatase, high-density lipoprotein, triglyceride, number of goblet cell, crypt depth and intestinal bacterial population of Coliforms, Salmonella and E. coli were significantly (p≤0.05) decreased in PFA fed group. It is concluded that addition of PFA containing phytomolecules and organic acids as main ingredients could significantly improve the production parameters and the general health of laying quails as an alternative to antibiotic growth promoters. PMID:27189636

  20. A GIANT STAR FACTORY IN NEIGHBORING GALAXY NGC 6822

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Resembling curling flames from a campfire, this magnificent nebula in a neighboring galaxy is giving astronomers new insight into the fierce birth of stars as it may have more commonly happened in the early universe. The glowing gas cloud, called Hubble-V, has a diameter of about 200 light-years. A faint tail of nebulosity trailing off the top of the image sits opposite a dense cluster of bright stars at the bottom of the irregularly shaped nebula. NASA's Hubble Space Telescope's resolution and ultraviolet sensitivity reveals a dense knot of dozens of ultra-hot stars nestled in the nebula, each glowing 100,000 times brighter than our Sun. These youthful 4-million-year-old stars are too distant and crowded together to be resolved from ground-based telescopes. The small, irregular host galaxy, called NGC 6822, is one of the Milky Way's closest neighbors and is considered prototypical of the earliest fragmentary galaxies that inhabited the young universe. The galaxy is 1.6 million light-years away in the constellation Sagittarius. The Hubble-V image data was taken with Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) by two science teams: C. Robert O'Dell of Vanderbilt University and collaborators, and Luciana Bianchi of Johns Hopkins University and Osservatorio Astronomico, Torinese, Italy, and collaborators. This color image was produced by The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI). A Hubble image of Hubble-X, another intense star-forming region in NGC 6822, was released by The Heritage Team in January 2001. Credits: NASA, ESA and The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) Acknowledgment: C. R. O'Dell (Vanderbilt University) and L. Bianchi (Johns Hopkins University and Osservatorio Astronomico, Torinese, Italy) NOTE TO EDITORS: For additional information, please contact C. R. O'Dell, Vanderbilt University, Physics and Astronomy Dept., Box 1807 Station B, Nashville, TN 37235, (phone) 615-343-1779, (fax) 615-343-7263, (e-mail) cr.odell@vanderbilt.edu or Luciana Bianchi, Johns Hopkins

  1. Polymorphisms associated with the risk of lung cancer in a healthy Mexican Mestizo population: Application of the additive model for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Morales, Rebeca; Méndez-Ramírez, Ignacio; Castro-Hernández, Clementina; Martínez-Ramírez, Ollin C.; Gonsebatt, María Eugenia; Rubio, Julieta

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in Mexico and worldwide. In the past decade, there has been an increase in the number of lung cancer cases in young people, which suggests an important role for genetic background in the etiology of this disease. In this study, we genetically characterized 16 polymorphisms in 12 low penetrance genes (AhR, CYP1A1, CYP2E1, EPHX1, GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTPI, XRCC1, ERCC2, MGMT, CCND1 and TP53) in 382 healthy Mexican Mestizos as the first step in elucidating the genetic structure of this population and identifying high risk individuals. All of the genotypes analyzed were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, but different degrees of linkage were observed for polymorphisms in the CYP1A1 and EPHX1 genes. The genetic variability of this population was distributed in six clusters that were defined based on their genetic characteristics. The use of a polygenic model to assess the additive effect of low penetrance risk alleles identified combinations of risk genotypes that could be useful in predicting a predisposition to lung cancer. Estimation of the level of genetic susceptibility showed that the individual calculated risk value (iCRV) ranged from 1 to 16, with a higher iCRV indicating a greater genetic susceptibility to lung cancer. PMID:22215955

  2. Robust neighboring extremal guidance for the advanced launch system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bain, John; Speyer, Jason L.

    1993-01-01

    With the availability of modern flight computers, realtime neighboring extremal guidance seems feasible. To overcome sensitivity to unknown system parameters and environmental uncertainties, a robust neighboring extremal guidance scheme is proposed. About the optimal trajectory, the accessory problem in the calculus of variations is formed, generating a quadratic cost criterion in the perturbed states and controls. By formulating a disturbance attenuation problem based upon the second variation cost criterion, a differential game is formulated. The game theoretic cost criterion is minimized with respect to the perturbed control but maximized with respect to the unknown parameters in the linearized dynamics. The resulting differential game problem gives rise to a two-point boundary-value problem solved using the sweep method. The sweep method solution provides a linear robust neighboring extremal guidance scheme that is applied to the Advanced Launch System.

  3. Efficient nearest neighbor searches in N-ABLE.

    SciTech Connect

    Mackey, Greg Edward

    2010-07-01

    The nearest neighbor search is a significant problem in transportation modeling and simulation. This paper describes how the nearest neighbor search is implemented efficiently with respect to running time in the NISAC Agent-Based Laboratory for Economics. The paper shows two methods to optimize running time of the nearest neighbor search. The first optimization uses a different distance metric that is more computationally efficient. The concept of a magnitude-comparable distance is described, and the paper gives a specific magnitude-comparable distance that is more computationally efficient than the actual distance function. The paper also shows how the given magnitude-comparable distance can be used to speed up the actual distance calculation. The second optimization reduces the number of points the search examines by using a spatial data structure. The paper concludes with testing of the different techniques discussed and the results.

  4. A neighboring structure reconstructed matching algorithm based on LARK features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Taobei; Han, Jing; Zhang, Yi; Bai, Lianfa

    2015-11-01

    Aimed at the low contrast ratio and high noise of infrared images, and the randomness and ambient occlusion of its objects, this paper presents a neighboring structure reconstructed matching (NSRM) algorithm based on LARK features. The neighboring structure relationships of local window are considered based on a non-negative linear reconstruction method to build a neighboring structure relationship matrix. Then the LARK feature matrix and the NSRM matrix are processed separately to get two different similarity images. By fusing and analyzing the two similarity images, those infrared objects are detected and marked by the non-maximum suppression. The NSRM approach is extended to detect infrared objects with incompact structure. High performance is demonstrated on infrared body set, indicating a lower false detecting rate than conventional methods in complex natural scenes.

  5. Assessment of air quality at neighbor residences in the vicinity of swine production facilities.

    PubMed

    Donham, Kelley J; Lee, Joung Ae; Thu, Kendall; Reynolds, Stephen J

    2006-01-01

    Air sampling was completed on the front lawn of 35 homes neighboring swine farms in three different regions in the Upper Midwest of the United States. One region was dominated by large scale, swine confined animal feeding operations (CAFO's) noted as swine confinement area (SCA). The second area was dominated by smaller scale operations utilizing hoop structure facilities (HA). The third area was basically devoid of livestock, dominated by row-crop production, and served as the control area (CA). The time weighted average concentrations of hydrogen sulfide (8.42 ppb) was higher (p = 0.047) in SCA area than the control (3.48 ppb). However, carbon dioxide (449.6 ppm), ammonia (12.78 ppb) and PM10 (42.25 microg/m3) were higher in the hoop structure area than the other areas. Swine population density, distance between the homes and swine facilities, and wind direction had an interactive effect on the average levels of ammonia (p = 0.04). The contaminant levels at the homes were relatively low compared to typical concentrations inside animal buildings. However, exceedences of federal recommended limits for hydrogen sulfide in outdoor air were observed in the swine CAFO area. Concentration of hydrogen sulfide exceeded the recommended limits of the ATSDR (30 ppb) for chronic exposure at two of the 12 homes in the CAFO area (17%). Average hydrogen sulfide concentration exceeded the EPA recommended community standards (0.7 ppb) in all three areas assessed (SCA, HA, and CA). As chronic exposure to hydrogen sulfide may be present in areas of production agriculture, a potential health risk may be present. Further studies to provide additional information regarding exposures to hydrogen sulfide in rural environments are warranted. PMID:19274894

  6. Neighboring optimal guidance for aeroassisted orbital plane change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chern, Jeng-Shing; Hsu, Fu-Kuo

    1990-10-01

    The neighboring extremal method is used here to develop the neighboring optimal guidance laws for aeroassisted orbital plane change. The space vehicle is assumed to enter the earth's atmosphere from GEO. The nominal optimal trajectory for maximizing the orbital plane change is computed with specified initial and final conditions. Two cases are investigated, both having the same initial conditions but with different final exit speeds, one for a supercircular exit and the other for a circular exit. In both cases, the perturbed trajectories converge to their corresponding nominal optimal trajectories in a not too long time.

  7. Breast cancer classification using cluster k-nearest neighbor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samir, Brahim Belhaouari; Al-Absi, Hamada R. H.; Kassoul, Khelil

    2012-09-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of deaths among women. To reduce the number of deaths, early diagnosis and treatment have been pointed at as the most reliable approach. This paper introduces the application of cluster-knearest neighbor for breast cancer diagnosis. First, we apply wavelet transform to extract features. Feature selection is applied to select the most relevant features out of the huge number of coefficients that are extracted. After that, we apply the cluster-k-nearest neighbor classifier for classification.

  8. When good neighbors don't need fences: Temporal landscape partitioning among baboon social groups.

    PubMed

    Markham, A Catherine; Guttal, Vishwesha; Alberts, Susan C; Altmann, Jeanne

    2013-06-01

    Intraspecific competition is a key factor shaping space-use strategies and movement decisions in many species, yet how and when neighbors utilize shared areas while exhibiting active avoidance of one another is largely unknown. Here we investigated temporal landscape partitioning in a population of wild baboons (Papio cynocephalus). We used global positioning system (GPS) collars to synchronously record the hourly locations of 5 baboon social groups for ~900 days, and we used behavioral, demographic, and life history data to measure factors affecting use of overlap areas. Annual home ranges of neighboring groups overlapped substantially, as predicted (baboons are considered non-territorial), but home ranges overlapped less when space use was assessed over shorter time scales. Moreover, neighboring groups were in close spatial proximity to one another on fewer days than predicted by a null model, suggesting an avoidance-based spacing pattern. At all time scales examined (monthly, biweekly, and weekly), time spent in overlap areas was greater during time periods when groups fed on evenly dispersed, low-quality foods. The percent of fertile females in social groups was negatively correlated with time spent in overlap areas only during weekly time intervals. This suggests that broad temporal changes in ecological resources are a major predictor of how intensively overlap areas are used, and groups modify these ecologically driven spacing patterns at short time scales based on female reproductive status. Together these findings offer insight into the economics of territoriality by highlighting the dynamics of spacing patterns at differing time scales.

  9. When good neighbors don’t need fences: Temporal landscape partitioning among baboon social groups

    PubMed Central

    MARKHAM, A. CATHERINE; GUTTAL, VISHWESHA; ALBERTS, SUSAN C.; ALTMANN, JEANNE

    2013-01-01

    Intraspecific competition is a key factor shaping space-use strategies and movement decisions in many species, yet how and when neighbors utilize shared areas while exhibiting active avoidance of one another is largely unknown. Here we investigated temporal landscape partitioning in a population of wild baboons (Papio cynocephalus). We used global positioning system (GPS) collars to synchronously record the hourly locations of 5 baboon social groups for ~900 days, and we used behavioral, demographic, and life history data to measure factors affecting use of overlap areas. Annual home ranges of neighboring groups overlapped substantially, as predicted (baboons are considered non-territorial), but home ranges overlapped less when space use was assessed over shorter time scales. Moreover, neighboring groups were in close spatial proximity to one another on fewer days than predicted by a null model, suggesting an avoidance-based spacing pattern. At all time scales examined (monthly, biweekly, and weekly), time spent in overlap areas was greater during time periods when groups fed on evenly dispersed, low-quality foods. The percent of fertile females in social groups was negatively correlated with time spent in overlap areas only during weekly time intervals. This suggests that broad temporal changes in ecological resources are a major predictor of how intensively overlap areas are used, and groups modify these ecologically driven spacing patterns at short time scales based on female reproductive status. Together these findings offer insight into the economics of territoriality by highlighting the dynamics of spacing patterns at differing time scales. PMID:23914003

  10. Addition of fumaric acid and sodium benzoate as an alternative method to achieve a 5-log reduction of Escherichia coli O157:H7 populations in apple cider.

    PubMed

    Comes, Justin E; Beelman, Robert B

    2002-03-01

    A study was conducted to develop a preservative treatment capable of the Food and Drug Administration-mandated 5-log reduction of Escherichia coli O157:H7 populations in apple cider. Unpreserved apple cider was treated with generally recognized as safe acidulants and preservatives before inoculation with E. coli O157:H7 in test tubes and subjected to mild heat treatments (25, 35, and 45 degrees C) followed by refrigerated storage (4 degrees C). Fumaric acid had significant (P < 0.05) bactericidal effect when added to cider at 0.10% (wt/vol) and adjusted to pH 3.3, but citric and malic acid had no effect. Strong linear correlation (R2 = 0.96) between increasing undissociated fumaric acid concentrations and increasing log reductions of E. coli O157:H7 in apple cider indicated the undissociated acid to be the bactericidal form. The treatment that achieved the 5-log reduction in three commercial ciders was the addition of fumaric acid (0.15%, wt/vol) and sodium benzoate (0.05%, wt/vol) followed by holding at 25 degrees C for 6 h before 24 h of refrigeration at 4 degrees C. Subsequent experiments revealed that the same preservatives added to cider in flasks resulted in a more than 5-log reduction in less than 5 and 2 h when held at 25 and 35 degrees C, respectively. The treatment also significantly (P < 0.05) reduced total aerobic counts in commercial ciders to populations less than those of pasteurized and raw ciders from the same source (after 5 and 21 days of refrigerated storage at 4 degrees C, respectively). Sensory evaluation of the same ciders revealed that consumers found the preservative-treated cider to be acceptable. PMID:11899046

  11. [A need to implement new tools for diagnosing tobacco-addition syndrome and readiness/motivation to quit smoking in the working-age population in Poland].

    PubMed

    Broszkiewicz, Marzenna; Drygas, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    High rates of tobacco use is still observed in working-age population in Poland. The present level of the state tobacco control has been achieved through adopting legal regulations and population-based interventions. In Poland a sufficient contribution of health professionals to the diagnosis of the tobacco-addition syndrome (TAS) and the application of the 5A's (ask, advice, assess, assist, arrange follow-up) brief intervention, has not been confirmed by explicit research results. Systemic solutions of the health care system of the professional control, specialist health care, health professional trainings and reference centres have not as yet been elaborated. The tools for diagnosing tobacco dependence and motivation to quit smoking, developed over 30 years ago and recommended by experts to be used in clinical and research practice, have not met the current addiction criteria. In this paper other tools than those previously recommended - tests developed in the first decade of the 21st century (including Cigarette Dependence Scale and Nicotine Dependence Syndrome Scale), reflecting modern concepts of nicotine dependence are presented. In the literature on the readiness/motivation to change health behaviors, a new approach dominates. The motivational interviewing (MI) by Miller and Rollnick concentrates on a smoking person and his or her internal motivation. Motivational interviewing is recommended by the World Health Organization as a 5R's (relevance, risks, rewards, roadblocks, repetition) brief motivational advice, addressed to tobacco users who are unwilling to make a quit attempt. In Poland new research studies on the implementation of new diagnostic tools and updating of binding guidelines should be undertaken, to strengthen primary health care in treating tobacco dependence, and to incorporate MI and 5R's into trainings in TAS diagnosing and treating addressed to health professionals. PMID:27044722

  12. [A need to implement new tools for diagnosing tobacco-addition syndrome and readiness/motivation to quit smoking in the working-age population in Poland].

    PubMed

    Broszkiewicz, Marzenna; Drygas, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    High rates of tobacco use is still observed in working-age population in Poland. The present level of the state tobacco control has been achieved through adopting legal regulations and population-based interventions. In Poland a sufficient contribution of health professionals to the diagnosis of the tobacco-addition syndrome (TAS) and the application of the 5A's (ask, advice, assess, assist, arrange follow-up) brief intervention, has not been confirmed by explicit research results. Systemic solutions of the health care system of the professional control, specialist health care, health professional trainings and reference centres have not as yet been elaborated. The tools for diagnosing tobacco dependence and motivation to quit smoking, developed over 30 years ago and recommended by experts to be used in clinical and research practice, have not met the current addiction criteria. In this paper other tools than those previously recommended - tests developed in the first decade of the 21st century (including Cigarette Dependence Scale and Nicotine Dependence Syndrome Scale), reflecting modern concepts of nicotine dependence are presented. In the literature on the readiness/motivation to change health behaviors, a new approach dominates. The motivational interviewing (MI) by Miller and Rollnick concentrates on a smoking person and his or her internal motivation. Motivational interviewing is recommended by the World Health Organization as a 5R's (relevance, risks, rewards, roadblocks, repetition) brief motivational advice, addressed to tobacco users who are unwilling to make a quit attempt. In Poland new research studies on the implementation of new diagnostic tools and updating of binding guidelines should be undertaken, to strengthen primary health care in treating tobacco dependence, and to incorporate MI and 5R's into trainings in TAS diagnosing and treating addressed to health professionals.

  13. Neighboring Genes Show Correlated Evolution in Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbarian, Avazeh T.; Hurst, Laurence D.

    2015-01-01

    When considering the evolution of a gene’s expression profile, we commonly assume that this is unaffected by its genomic neighborhood. This is, however, in contrast to what we know about the lack of autonomy between neighboring genes in gene expression profiles in extant taxa. Indeed, in all eukaryotic genomes genes of similar expression-profile tend to cluster, reflecting chromatin level dynamics. Does it follow that if a gene increases expression in a particular lineage then the genomic neighbors will also increase in their expression or is gene expression evolution autonomous? To address this here we consider evolution of human gene expression since the human-chimp common ancestor, allowing for both variation in estimation of current expression level and error in Bayesian estimation of the ancestral state. We find that in all tissues and both sexes, the change in gene expression of a focal gene on average predicts the change in gene expression of neighbors. The effect is highly pronounced in the immediate vicinity (<100 kb) but extends much further. Sex-specific expression change is also genomically clustered. As genes increasing their expression in humans tend to avoid nuclear lamina domains and be enriched for the gene activator 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, we conclude that, most probably owing to chromatin level control of gene expression, a change in gene expression of one gene likely affects the expression evolution of neighbors, what we term expression piggybacking, an analog of hitchhiking. PMID:25743543

  14. Writing as a Neighborly Act: An Antidote for Academentia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savage, Mary C.

    1989-01-01

    Describes "academentia," the delusion that disciplines are intellectually powerful as a result of their specialization. Prescribes "neighborliness"--intellectual and practical work done from the perspective of critical consciousness--as the antidote to academentia. Suggests that writing projects have great potential as "neighborly" activities. (MM)

  15. Secure Nearest Neighbor Query on Crowd-Sensing Data.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ke; Wang, Liangmin; Zhong, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Nearest neighbor queries are fundamental in location-based services, and secure nearest neighbor queries mainly focus on how to securely and quickly retrieve the nearest neighbor in the outsourced cloud server. However, the previous big data system structure has changed because of the crowd-sensing data. On the one hand, sensing data terminals as the data owner are numerous and mistrustful, while, on the other hand, in most cases, the terminals find it difficult to finish many safety operation due to computation and storage capability constraints. In light of they Multi Owners and Multi Users (MOMU) situation in the crowd-sensing data cloud environment, this paper presents a secure nearest neighbor query scheme based on the proxy server architecture, which is constructed by protocols of secure two-party computation and secure Voronoi diagram algorithm. It not only preserves the data confidentiality and query privacy but also effectively resists the collusion between the cloud server and the data owners or users. Finally, extensive theoretical and experimental evaluations are presented to show that our proposed scheme achieves a superior balance between the security and query performance compared to other schemes. PMID:27669253

  16. Computerized Adaptive Testing Using the Nearest-Neighbors Criterion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Philip E.; Liou, Michelle

    2003-01-01

    Proposed and evaluated a modified version of the maximum Fisher information (MFI) criterion called the nearest-neighbors (NN) criterion. Simulation study results show that NN procedure improved to a moderate extent the undesirable item exposure rates associated with the MFI criterion and keeps sufficient precision in theta estimates. (SLD)

  17. VIEW OF ENTRANCE SIDE OF HOUSE, TAKEN FROM NEIGHBORING CARPORT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF ENTRANCE SIDE OF HOUSE, TAKEN FROM NEIGHBORING CARPORT AREA. WITH NEIGHBOR’S TRASH ENCLOSURE IN FOREGROUND. VIEW FACING WEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Three-Bedroom Single-Family Types 8 and 11, Birch Circle, Elm Drive, Elm Circle, and Date Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  18. Neighboring Genes Show Correlated Evolution in Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Ghanbarian, Avazeh T; Hurst, Laurence D

    2015-07-01

    When considering the evolution of a gene's expression profile, we commonly assume that this is unaffected by its genomic neighborhood. This is, however, in contrast to what we know about the lack of autonomy between neighboring genes in gene expression profiles in extant taxa. Indeed, in all eukaryotic genomes genes of similar expression-profile tend to cluster, reflecting chromatin level dynamics. Does it follow that if a gene increases expression in a particular lineage then the genomic neighbors will also increase in their expression or is gene expression evolution autonomous? To address this here we consider evolution of human gene expression since the human-chimp common ancestor, allowing for both variation in estimation of current expression level and error in Bayesian estimation of the ancestral state. We find that in all tissues and both sexes, the change in gene expression of a focal gene on average predicts the change in gene expression of neighbors. The effect is highly pronounced in the immediate vicinity (<100 kb) but extends much further. Sex-specific expression change is also genomically clustered. As genes increasing their expression in humans tend to avoid nuclear lamina domains and be enriched for the gene activator 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, we conclude that, most probably owing to chromatin level control of gene expression, a change in gene expression of one gene likely affects the expression evolution of neighbors, what we term expression piggybacking, an analog of hitchhiking.

  19. The Effectiveness of Document Neighboring in Search Enhancement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilbur, W. John; Coffee, Leona

    1994-01-01

    Compares two methods of information retrieval--one that rates documents according to a query and another that uses relevant documents to find further relevant documents (i.e., neighboring documents). Highlights include experiments at the National Library of Medicine; feedback; vector cosine retrieval; and a measure of retrieval effectiveness…

  20. The C allele of JAK2 rs4495487 is an additional candidate locus that contributes to myeloproliferative neoplasm predisposition in the Japanese population

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Polycythemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythemia (ET), and primary myelofibrosis (PMF) are myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) characterized in most cases by a unique somatic mutation, JAK2 V617F. Recent studies revealed that JAK2 V617F occurs more frequently in a specific JAK2 haplotype, named JAK2 46/1 or GGCC haplotype, which is tagged by rs10974944 (C/G) and/or rs12343867 (T/C). This study examined the impact of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the JAK2 locus on MPNs in a Japanese population. Methods We sequenced 24 JAK2 SNPs in Japanese patients with PV. We then genotyped 138 MPN patients (33 PV, 96 ET, and 9 PMF) with known JAK2 mutational status and 107 controls for a novel SNP, in addition to two SNPs known to be part of the 46/1 haplotype (rs10974944 and rs12343867). Associations with risk of MPN were estimated by odds ratios and their 95% confidence intervals using logistic regression. Results A novel locus, rs4495487 (T/C), with a mutated T allele was significantly associated with PV. Similar to rs10974944 and rs12343867, rs4495487 in the JAK2 locus is significantly associated with JAK2-positive MPN. Based on the results of SNP analysis of the three JAK2 locus, we defined the "GCC genotype" as having at least one minor allele in each SNP (G allele in rs10974944, C allele in rs4495487, and C allele in rs12343867). The GCC genotype was associated with increased risk of both JAK2 V617F-positive and JAK2 V617F-negative MPN. In ET patients, leukocyte count and hemoglobin were significantly associated with JAK2 V617F, rather than the GCC genotype. In contrast, none of the JAK2 V617F-negative ET patients without the GCC genotype had thrombosis, and splenomegaly was frequently seen in this subset of ET patients. PV patients without the GCC genotype were significantly associated with high platelet count. Conclusions Our results indicate that the C allele of JAK2 rs4495487, in addition to the 46/1 haplotype, contributes significantly to the

  1. Lipid-Coated Cisplatin Nanoparticles Induce Neighboring Effect and Exhibit Enhanced Anticancer Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shutao; Wang, Yuhua; Miao, Lei; Xu, Zhenghong; Lin, C. Michael; Zhang, Yuan; Huang, Leaf

    2014-01-01

    Encapsulation of cisplatin (CDDP) into nanoparticles (NPs) with high drug loading and encapsulation efficiency has been difficult due to the poor solubility of CDDP. However, this barrier has been overcome with a reverse microemulsion method appropriating CDDP’s poor solubility to our advantage promoting the synthesis of a pure cisplatin nanoparticle with a high drug loading capacity (approximately 80.8wt%). Actively targeted CDDP NPs exhibited significant accumulation in human A375M melanoma tumor cells in vivo. In addition, CDDP NPs achieved potent anti-tumor efficacy through the neighboring effect at a dose of 1 mg/kg when injected weekly via IV without inducing nephrotoxicity. The neighboring effect regards an observation made in vivo when the tumor cells that took up CDDP NPs released active drug following apoptosis. Via diffusion, surrounding cells that were previously unaffected showed intake of the released drug and their apoptosis soon followed. This observation was also made in vitro when A375M melanoma tumor cells incubated with CDDP NPs exhibited release of active drug and induced apoptosis on untreated neighboring cells. However, the neighboring effect was unique to rapidly proliferating tumor cells. Liver functional parameters and H&E staining of liver tissue in vivo failed to detect any difference between CDDP NP treated and control groups in terms of tissue health. By simultaneously promoting an increase in cytotoxicity and a lesser degree of side effects over free CDDP, CDDP NPs show great therapeutic potential with lower doses of drug while enhancing anti-cancer effectiveness. PMID:24083505

  2. Knee Pain and Low Back Pain Additively Disturb Sleep in the General Population: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of the Nagahama Study

    PubMed Central

    Murase, Kimihiko; Tabara, Yasuharu; Ito, Hiromu; Kobayashi, Masahiko; Takahashi, Yoshimitsu; Setoh, Kazuya; Kawaguchi, Takahisa; Muro, Shigeo; Kadotani, Hiroshi; Kosugi, Shinji; Sekine, Akihiro; Yamada, Ryo; Nakayama, Takeo; Mishima, Michiaki; Matsuda, Shuichi; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Chin, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    low back pain: OR = 1.61, p<0.01; both knee and low back pain: OR = 2.17, p<0.01). Conclusion Knee and low back pains were independently associated with short sleep duration and poor sleep quality. Further, they additively increased the correlation with these sleep problems in the general population. PMID:26444713

  3. Differences in first neighbor orientation behind the anomalies in the low and high density trans-1,2-dichloroethene liquid.

    PubMed

    Rovira-Esteva, M; Murugan, N Arul; Pardo, L C; Busch, S; Tamarit, J Ll; Cuello, G J; Bermejo, F J

    2012-03-28

    Trans-1,2-dichloroethene (HClC=CClH) has several structural and dynamic anomalies between its low- and high-density liquid, previously found through neutron scattering experiments. To explain the microscopic origin of the differences found in those experiments, a series of molecular dynamics simulations were performed. The analysis of molecular short-range order shows that the number of molecules in the first neighbor shell is 12 for the high-density liquid and 11 for the low-density one. It also shows that the angular position of the center of mass of the first neighbor is roughly the same although the molecular orientation is not. In both liquids the first neighbor and its reference molecule arrange mainly in two configurations, each being the most probable in one of the liquids. First neighbors in the configuration that predominates in the high-density liquid tend to locate themselves closer to the reference molecule, an evidence that they are more strongly bonded. This arrangement facilitates a better packing of the rest of molecules in the first neighbor shell so that on average an additional molecule can be included, and is proposed to be the key in the explanation of all the observed anomalies in the characteristics of both liquids.

  4. A New Adaptive Image Denoising Method Based on Neighboring Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Mantosh; Om, Hari

    2016-03-01

    Many good techniques have been discussed for image denoising that include NeighShrink, improved adaptive wavelet denoising method based on neighboring coefficients (IAWDMBNC), improved wavelet shrinkage technique for image denoising (IWST), local adaptive wiener filter (LAWF), wavelet packet thresholding using median and wiener filters (WPTMWF), adaptive image denoising method based on thresholding (AIDMT). These techniques are based on local statistical description of the neighboring coefficients in a window. These methods however do not give good quality of the images since they cannot modify and remove too many small wavelet coefficients simultaneously due to the threshold. In this paper, a new image denoising method is proposed that shrinks the noisy coefficients using an adaptive threshold. Our method overcomes these drawbacks and it has better performance than the NeighShrink, IAWDMBNC, IWST, LAWF, WPTMWF, and AIDMT denoising methods.

  5. Social dilemma alleviated by sharing the gains with immediate neighbors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhi-Xi; Yang, Han-Xin

    2014-01-01

    We study the evolution of cooperation in the evolutionary spatial prisoner's dilemma game (PDG) and snowdrift game (SG), within which a fraction α of the payoffs of each player gained from direct game interactions is shared equally by the immediate neighbors. The magnitude of the parameter α therefore characterizes the degree of the relatedness among the neighboring players. By means of extensive Monte Carlo simulations as well as an extended mean-field approximation method, we trace the frequency of cooperation in the stationary state. We find that plugging into relatedness can significantly promote the evolution of cooperation in the context of both studied games. Unexpectedly, cooperation can be more readily established in the spatial PDG than that in the spatial SG, given that the degree of relatedness and the cost-to-benefit ratio of mutual cooperation are properly formulated. The relevance of our model with the stakeholder theory is also briefly discussed. PMID:24580174

  6. Social dilemma alleviated by sharing the gains with immediate neighbors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhi-Xi; Yang, Han-Xin

    2014-01-01

    We study the evolution of cooperation in the evolutionary spatial prisoner's dilemma game (PDG) and snowdrift game (SG), within which a fraction α of the payoffs of each player gained from direct game interactions is shared equally by the immediate neighbors. The magnitude of the parameter α therefore characterizes the degree of the relatedness among the neighboring players. By means of extensive Monte Carlo simulations as well as an extended mean-field approximation method, we trace the frequency of cooperation in the stationary state. We find that plugging into relatedness can significantly promote the evolution of cooperation in the context of both studied games. Unexpectedly, cooperation can be more readily established in the spatial PDG than that in the spatial SG, given that the degree of relatedness and the cost-to-benefit ratio of mutual cooperation are properly formulated. The relevance of our model with the stakeholder theory is also briefly discussed.

  7. Detection and removal of PCR duplicates in population genomic ddRAD studies by addition of a degenerate base region (DBR) in sequencing adapters.

    PubMed

    Schweyen, Hannah; Rozenberg, Andrey; Leese, Florian

    2014-10-01

    Restriction-site associated DNA sequencing (RAD) has emerged as a powerful marker system for studying genome-wide DNA polymorphisms using next-generation sequencing. A recent technical facilitation of RAD is double-digest RAD (ddRAD), which utilizes two restriction enzymes for library preparation. The more flexible and balanced ddRAD allows analysis of genomic loci in hundreds of individuals. However, in contrast to paired-end sequencing of traditional RAD libraries, PCR duplicates cannot be detected with ddRAD. This is a concern because duplicates can contribute substantially to read coverage data and erroneously inflate the proportion of homozygous loci (allele dropout). Allele dropout can bias population genetic parameter inference and complicate the detection of outlier loci under selection. Here we outline a simple and straightforward approach to detecting PCR duplicates from ddRAD libraries. Our approach introduces a degenerate base region (DBR, 12,288 unique combinations) in the sequencing adapter. We demonstrate the high efficiency and low rate of false positives in simulations. In addition, a pilot study was performed to test this approach on six aquatic invertebrates, sequenced on a HiSeq 2500 sequencer. The reads of the ddRAD libraries consisted of 33.48% PCR duplicates distributed on 19.40% of the loci. A disproportionate number of PCR duplicates were detected in only 4.66% of the loci. While this should not be a concern for general parameter inference, outlier loci detection in particular would be improved by the DBR technique. Given the easy and straightforward application of the technique in other RAD protocols as well, we suggest that DBR regions should generally be included in PCR-based RAD studies.

  8. Single cell transcriptomics of neighboring hyphae of Aspergillus niger

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Single cell profiling was performed to assess differences in RNA accumulation in neighboring hyphae of the fungus Aspergillus niger. A protocol was developed to isolate and amplify RNA from single hyphae or parts thereof. Microarray analysis resulted in a present call for 4 to 7% of the A. niger genes, of which 12% showed heterogeneous RNA levels. These genes belonged to a wide range of gene categories. PMID:21816052

  9. [Galaxy/quasar classification based on nearest neighbor method].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang-Ru; Lu, Yu; Zhou, Jian-Ming; Wang, Yong-Jun

    2011-09-01

    With the wide application of high-quality CCD in celestial spectrum imagery and the implementation of many large sky survey programs (e. g., Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), Two-degree-Field Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dF), Spectroscopic Survey Telescope (SST), Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) program and Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) program, etc.), celestial observational data are coming into the world like torrential rain. Therefore, to utilize them effectively and fully, research on automated processing methods for celestial data is imperative. In the present work, we investigated how to recognizing galaxies and quasars from spectra based on nearest neighbor method. Galaxies and quasars are extragalactic objects, they are far away from earth, and their spectra are usually contaminated by various noise. Therefore, it is a typical problem to recognize these two types of spectra in automatic spectra classification. Furthermore, the utilized method, nearest neighbor, is one of the most typical, classic, mature algorithms in pattern recognition and data mining, and often is used as a benchmark in developing novel algorithm. For applicability in practice, it is shown that the recognition ratio of nearest neighbor method (NN) is comparable to the best results reported in the literature based on more complicated methods, and the superiority of NN is that this method does not need to be trained, which is useful in incremental learning and parallel computation in mass spectral data processing. In conclusion, the results in this work are helpful for studying galaxies and quasars spectra classification.

  10. Nearest neighbor spacing of fair weather cumulus clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, Joachim H.; Cahalan, Robert F.

    1990-01-01

    Histograms of nearest neighbor spacings of fair weather cumulus at 15 locations over the world's oceans are presented based on the analysis of high resolution Landsat 3 Multispectral Scanner images for amounts of cloud cover ranging from 0.6 to 37.6 percent. These histograms are found to be essentially the same at all locations analyzed, similarly to previous findings on the size distributions and the fractal dimensions of the perimeters for this cloud type. The nearest neighbor spacings are linearly dependent on the effective cloud radii, with a proportionality factor ranging from five to twenty. The histograms peak at about 0.5 km. Nearest-neighbor spacings smaller than about a kilometer, associated with cumulus clouds with an effective radius less than a few hundred meters, have a distribution of cloud centers that is almost indepedent in the horizontal plane and show a tendency for the formation of clumps. Larger spacings of up to thirty kilometers occur and are associated with the larger clouds. These latter spacings are not independent.

  11. Fast and accurate hashing via iterative nearest neighbors expansion.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhongming; Zhang, Debing; Hu, Yao; Lin, Shiding; Cai, Deng; He, Xiaofei

    2014-11-01

    Recently, the hashing techniques have been widely applied to approximate the nearest neighbor search problem in many real applications. The basic idea of these approaches is to generate binary codes for data points which can preserve the similarity between any two of them. Given a query, instead of performing a linear scan of the entire data base, the hashing method can perform a linear scan of the points whose hamming distance to the query is not greater than rh , where rh is a constant. However, in order to find the true nearest neighbors, both the locating time and the linear scan time are proportional to O(∑i=0(rh)(c || i)) ( c is the code length), which increase exponentially as rh increases. To address this limitation, we propose a novel algorithm named iterative expanding hashing in this paper, which builds an auxiliary index based on an offline constructed nearest neighbor table to avoid large rh . This auxiliary index can be easily combined with all the traditional hashing methods. Extensive experimental results over various real large-scale datasets demonstrate the superiority of the proposed approach.

  12. Query-Adaptive Reciprocal Hash Tables for Nearest Neighbor Search.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xianglong; Deng, Cheng; Lang, Bo; Tao, Dacheng; Li, Xuelong

    2016-02-01

    Recent years have witnessed the success of binary hashing techniques in approximate nearest neighbor search. In practice, multiple hash tables are usually built using hashing to cover more desired results in the hit buckets of each table. However, rare work studies the unified approach to constructing multiple informative hash tables using any type of hashing algorithms. Meanwhile, for multiple table search, it also lacks of a generic query-adaptive and fine-grained ranking scheme that can alleviate the binary quantization loss suffered in the standard hashing techniques. To solve the above problems, in this paper, we first regard the table construction as a selection problem over a set of candidate hash functions. With the graph representation of the function set, we propose an efficient solution that sequentially applies normalized dominant set to finding the most informative and independent hash functions for each table. To further reduce the redundancy between tables, we explore the reciprocal hash tables in a boosting manner, where the hash function graph is updated with high weights emphasized on the misclassified neighbor pairs of previous hash tables. To refine the ranking of the retrieved buckets within a certain Hamming radius from the query, we propose a query-adaptive bitwise weighting scheme to enable fine-grained bucket ranking in each hash table, exploiting the discriminative power of its hash functions and their complement for nearest neighbor search. Moreover, we integrate such scheme into the multiple table search using a fast, yet reciprocal table lookup algorithm within the adaptive weighted Hamming radius. In this paper, both the construction method and the query-adaptive search method are general and compatible with different types of hashing algorithms using different feature spaces and/or parameter settings. Our extensive experiments on several large-scale benchmarks demonstrate that the proposed techniques can significantly outperform both

  13. Neighboring extremal guidance for systems with a piecewise linear control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, David G.; Helfrich, Clifford E.

    1991-01-01

    The neighboring extremal feedback control law is developed for systems with a piecewise linear control for the case where the optimal control is obtained by nonlinear programming techniques. To develop the control perturbation for a given deviation from the nominal path, the second variation is minimized subject to the constraint that the final conditions be satisfied. This process leads to a feedback relationship between the control perturbation and the measured deviation from the nominal state. A simple example, the lunar launch problem, is used to demonstrate the validity of the guidance law. For model errors on the order of 5 percent, the results indicate that 5 percent errors occur in the final conditions.

  14. Community structure detection based on the neighbor node degree information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Li-Ying; Li, Sheng-Nan; Lin, Jian-Hong; Guo, Qiang; Liu, Jian-Guo

    2016-11-01

    Community structure detection is of great significance for better understanding the network topology property. By taking into account the neighbor degree information of the topological network as the link weight, we present an improved Nonnegative Matrix Factorization (NMF) method for detecting community structure. The results for empirical networks show that the largest improved ratio of the Normalized Mutual Information value could reach 63.21%. Meanwhile, for synthetic networks, the highest Normalized Mutual Information value could closely reach 1, which suggests that the improved method with the optimal λ can detect the community structure more accurately. This work is helpful for understanding the interplay between the link weight and the community structure detection.

  15. Neighboring extremal optimal control design including model mismatch errors

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, T.J.; Hull, D.G.

    1994-11-01

    The mismatch control technique that is used to simplify model equations of motion in order to determine analytic optimal control laws is extended using neighboring extremal theory. The first variation optimal control equations are linearized about the extremal path to account for perturbations in the initial state and the final constraint manifold. A numerical example demonstrates that the tuning procedure inherent in the mismatch control method increases the performance of the controls to the level of a numerically-determined piecewise-linear controller.

  16. The nearest neighbor and the bayes error rates.

    PubMed

    Loizou, G; Maybank, S J

    1987-02-01

    The (k, l) nearest neighbor method of pattern classification is compared to the Bayes method. If the two acceptance rates are equal then the asymptotic error rates satisfy the inequalities Ek,l + 1 ¿ E*(¿) ¿ Ek,l dE*(¿), where d is a function of k, l, and the number of pattern classes, and ¿ is the reject threshold for the Bayes method. An explicit expression for d is given which is optimal in the sense that for some probability distributions Ek,l and dE* (¿) are equal. PMID:21869395

  17. Neighborly interactions of metabolically-activated astrocytes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Dienel, Gerald A; Cruz, Nancy F

    2003-01-01

    Metabolic responses of brain cells to a stimulus are governed, in part, by their enzymatic specialization and interrelationships with neighboring cells, and local shifts in functional metabolism during brain activation are likely to be influenced by the neurotransmitter system, subcellular compartmentation, and anatomical structure. Selected examples of functional activation illustrate the complexity of metabolic interactions in working brain and of interpretation of changes in brain lactate levels. The major focus of this article is the disproportionately higher metabolism of glucose compared to oxygen in normoxic brain, a phenomenon that occurs during activation in humans and animals. The glucose utilized in excess of oxygen is not fully explained by accumulation of glucose, lactate, or glycogen in brain or by lactate efflux from brain to blood. Thus, any lactate derived from the excess glucose could not have been stoichiometrically exported to and metabolized by neighboring neurons because oxygen consumption would have otherwise increased and matched that of glucose. Metabolic labeling of tricarboxylic acid cycle-derived amino acids increased during brief sensory stimulation, reflecting a rise in oxidative metabolism. Brain glycogen is mainly in astrocytes, and its level falls throughout the stimulus and early post-activation interval. Glycogenolysis cannot be accounted for by lactate accumulation or oxidation; there must be rapid product clearance. Glycogen restoration is slow and diversion of glucose from oxidative pathways for its re-synthesis could reduce the global O(2)/glucose uptake ratio; astrocytes could downshift this ratio for up to an hour after 5 min stimulus. Morphological studies of astrocytes reveal a paucity of cytoplasm and organelles in the fine processes that surround synapses and form gap junction connections with neighboring astrocytes. Specialized regions of astrocytes, e.g. their endfeet and thin peripheral lamellae, are likely to have

  18. Sources of secondary metabolite variation in Dysidea avara (Porifera: Demospongiae): the importance of having good neighbors.

    PubMed

    De Caralt, Sonia; Bry, Delphine; Bontemps, Nataly; Turon, Xavier; Uriz, Maria-Jesus; Banaigs, Bernard

    2013-02-18

    Several studies report temporal, geographical, and intra-individual variation in sponge metabolite yields. However, the internal and/or external factors that regulate the metabolite production remain poorly understood. Dysidea avara is a demosponge that produces sesquiterpenoids (avarol and derivatives) with interesting medical properties, which has prompted addressed studies to obtain enough amounts of these metabolites for research on drug discovery. Within this framework, specimens of Dysidea avara from a population of the Northwest Mediterranean were sampled and their secondary metabolites quantified to assess their variability and the possible relationship with external (seasonality, interactions with neighbors) and internal (reproductive stages) factors. The results show a variation of the amount of both avarol and its monoacetate derivative with time, with no clear relationship with seawater temperature. A trade-off with sponge reproduction was not found either. However, our results showed for the first time that sponges are able to increase production or accumulation of secondary metabolites in their peripheral zone depending on the nature of their neighbors. This finding could explain part of the high variability in the amount of secondary metabolites usually found in chemical ecology studies on sponges and opens new biotechnological approaches to enhance the metabolite yield in sponge cultures.

  19. 78 FR 60280 - Good Neighbor Environmental Board; Cancellation Notice of Public Advisory Committee teleconference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Good Neighbor Environmental Board; Cancellation Notice of Public Advisory Committee teleconference AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Cancellation of the Good Neighbor...

  20. Legumes Can Increase Cadmium Contamination in Neighboring Crops

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jianjun; Xu, Ligen; Yang, Xiantian; Yong, Jean W. H.; Chen, Xin

    2012-01-01

    Legumes are widely used in many cropping systems because they share their nitrogen fixation products and phosphorus mobilization activities with their neighbors. In the current study, however, we showed that co-cultivation with legumes increased cadmium (Cd) contamination in the adjacent crops. Both field and mesocosm experiments indicated that legumes increased Cd levels in edible parts and shoots of four neighboring crops and five maize varieties tested, regardless of the Cd levels in the soil. This enhanced Cd accumulation in crops was attributed to root interactions that alter the rhizosphere environment. Co-cultivation with legumes reduced soil pH, which somewhat increased the exchangeable forms of Cd. Our results have demonstrated the inevitable increases in Cd levels of crops as a direct result of co-cultivation with legumes even under situations when these levels are below the permissible threshold. With this new revelation, we need to consider carefully the current cropping systems involving legumes and perhaps to re-design the current and future cropping systems in view of avoiding food contamination by Cd. PMID:22905189

  1. Love Thy Neighbor? Ethnoracial Diversity and Trust Reexamined.

    PubMed

    Abascal, Maria; Baldassarri, Delia

    2015-11-01

    According to recent research, ethnoracial diversity negatively affects trust and social capital. This article challenges the current conception and measurement of "diversity" and invites scholars to rethink "so-cial capital" in complex societies. It reproduces the analysis of Putnam and shows that the association between diversity and self-reported trust is a compositional artifact attributable to residential sorting: non-whites report lower trust and are overrepresented in heterogeneous communities. The association between diversity and trust is better explained by differences between communities and their residents in terms of race/ethnicity, residential stability, and economic conditions; these classic indicators of inequality, not diversity, strongly and consistently predict self-reported trust. Diversity indexes also obscure the distinction between in-group and out-group contact. For whites, heterogeneity means more out-group neighbors; for nonwhites, heterogeneity means more in-group neighbors. Therefore, separate analyses were conducted by ethnoracial groups. Only for whites does living among out-group members--not in diverse communities per se--negatively predict trust.

  2. DNA sequence evolution with neighbor-dependent mutation.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Peter F; Burge, Christopher B; Hwa, Terence

    2003-01-01

    We introduce a model of DNA sequence evolution which can account for biases in mutation rates that depend on the identity of the neighboring bases. An analytic solution for this class of models is developed by adopting well-known methods of nonlinear dynamics. Results are presented for the CpG-methylation-deamination process, which dominates point substitutions in vertebrates. The dinucleotide frequencies generated by the model (using empirically obtained mutation rates) match the overall pattern observed in noncoding DNA. A web-based tool has been constructed to compute single- and dinucleotide frequencies for arbitrary neighbor-dependent mutation rates. Also provided is the backward procedure to infer the mutation rates using maximum likelihood analysis given the observed single- and dinucleotide frequencies. Reasonable estimates of the mutation rates can be obtained very efficiently, using generic noncoding DNA sequences as input, after masking out long homonucleotide subsequences. Our method is much more convenient and versatile to use than the traditional method of deducing mutation rates by counting mutation events in carefully chosen sequences. More generally, our approach provides a more realistic but still tractable description of noncoding genomic DNA and may be used as a null model for various sequence analysis applications.

  3. Attractor Dynamics and Semantic Neighborhood Density: Processing Is Slowed by Near Neighbors and Speeded by Distant Neighbors

    PubMed Central

    Mirman, Daniel; Magnuson, James S.

    2008-01-01

    The authors investigated semantic neighborhood density effects on visual word processing to examine the dynamics of activation and competition among semantic representations. Experiment 1 validated feature-based semantic representations as a basis for computing semantic neighborhood density and suggested that near and distant neighbors have opposite effects on word processing. Experiment 2 confirmed these results: Word processing was slower for dense near neighborhoods and faster for dense distant neighborhoods. Analysis of a computational model showed that attractor dynamics can produce this pattern of neighborhood effects. The authors argue for reconsideration of traditional models of neighborhood effects in terms of attractor dynamics, which allow both inhibitory and facilitative effects to emerge. PMID:18194055

  4. Preserving spatial linear correlations between neighboring stations in simulating daily precipitation using extended Markov models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ababaei, Behnam; Sohrabi, Teymour; Mirzaei, Farhad

    2014-10-01

    Most stochastic weather generators have their focus on precipitation because it is the most important variable affecting environmental processes. One of the methods to reproduce the precipitation occurrence time series is to use a Markov process. But, in addition to the simulation of short-term autocorrelations in one station, it is sometimes important to preserve the spatial linear correlations (SLC) between neighboring stations as well. In this research, an extension of one-site Markov models was proposed to preserve the SLC between neighboring stations. Qazvin station was utilized as the reference station and Takestan (TK), Magsal, Nirougah, and Taleghan stations were used as the target stations. The performances of different models were assessed in relation to the simulation of dry and wet spells and short-term dependencies in precipitation time series. The results revealed that in TK station, a Markov model with a first-order spatial model could be selected as the best model, while in the other stations, a model with the order of two or three could be selected. The selected (i.e., best) models were assessed in relation to preserving the SLC between neighboring stations. The results depicted that these models were very capable in preserving the SLC between the reference station and any of the target stations. But, their performances were weaker when the SLC between the other stations were compared. In order to resolve this issue, spatially correlated random numbers were utilized instead of independent random numbers while generating synthetic time series using the Markov models. Although this method slightly reduced the model performances in relation to dry and wet spells and short-term dependencies, the improvements related to the simulation of the SLC between the other stations were substantial.

  5. Flight-deck display of neighboring aircraft wake vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holforty, Wendy L.

    Over the coming decades, aviation operations are predicted to rise steadily, increasing the burden on already congested and constrained airspace. A major factor governing the safe minimum separation distance between aircraft is the hazard generated by the wake of neighboring aircraft. Unaware of their proximity to other traffic, aircraft have encountered the wake turbulence of neighboring aircraft tens of miles ahead of them with serious or fatal consequences. The wake display described herein is a perspective view, synthetic vision, flight deck display that enables flight crews to "see" neighboring aircraft, as well as their wakes via a predictive algorithm. Capable of enhancing the situational awareness with respect to the wake-vortex encounter hazard by enabling the flight crew to see the relative position of their aircraft with respect to the wake hazard, the display may allow for a decrease in the standard aircraft spacing to those now used in VFR conditions and an increase in airport and airspace capacity. At present, there is no mechanism in place in the National Airspace System that warns pilots of potential wake vortex encounters. The concept of a wake vortex display addresses the need for a real-time wake vortex avoidance scheme available directly to the pilot. The wake display has been evaluated under both simulated and actual flight conditions. Thirteen pilots with flight experience ranging from a student pilot to commercial airline and military pilots served as pilot test subjects evaluating the display under simulated conditions. The pilot test subjects completed a survey concerning their knowledge and understanding of wake vortices prior to the simulation data trials and, after the trials, they completed a pilot evaluation and postflight survey rating their experience and providing feedback for the display design. One test pilot and four guest pilots flew the display during the in-flight evaluations incorporating three wake encounter scenarios. They

  6. Effects of environmental cadmium and lead exposure on adults neighboring a discharge: Evidences of adverse health effects.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Mathilde; Toure, Aminata; Garçon, Guillaume; Diop, Cheikh; Bouhsina, Saâd; Dewaele, Dorothée; Cazier, Fabrice; Courcot, Dominique; Tall-Dia, Anta; Shirali, Pirouz; Diouf, Amadou; Fall, Mamadou; Verdin, Anthony

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine Pb and Cd concentrations in humans and to assess the effect of co-exposure to these metals on biomarkers of oxidative stress and nephrotoxicity. Blood and urine levels of Pb and Cd, oxidative stress and urinary renal biomarkers were measured in 77 subjects neighboring a discharge and 52 in the control site. Exposed subjects showed significantly higher levels of lead and cadmium in blood and urine than the controls. Excessive production of reactive oxygen species induced by these metals in exposed subjects conducted to a decrease in antioxidant defense system (GPx, Selenium, GSH) and an increase in lipid peroxidation (MDA). Moreover, changes in markers of nephrotoxicity (high urinary concentrations of total protein, RBP and CC16, as well as GSTα and LDH increased activities) suggested the occurrence of discrete and early signs of impaired renal function for the discharge neighboring population. PMID:26196314

  7. Effects of environmental cadmium and lead exposure on adults neighboring a discharge: Evidences of adverse health effects.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Mathilde; Toure, Aminata; Garçon, Guillaume; Diop, Cheikh; Bouhsina, Saâd; Dewaele, Dorothée; Cazier, Fabrice; Courcot, Dominique; Tall-Dia, Anta; Shirali, Pirouz; Diouf, Amadou; Fall, Mamadou; Verdin, Anthony

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine Pb and Cd concentrations in humans and to assess the effect of co-exposure to these metals on biomarkers of oxidative stress and nephrotoxicity. Blood and urine levels of Pb and Cd, oxidative stress and urinary renal biomarkers were measured in 77 subjects neighboring a discharge and 52 in the control site. Exposed subjects showed significantly higher levels of lead and cadmium in blood and urine than the controls. Excessive production of reactive oxygen species induced by these metals in exposed subjects conducted to a decrease in antioxidant defense system (GPx, Selenium, GSH) and an increase in lipid peroxidation (MDA). Moreover, changes in markers of nephrotoxicity (high urinary concentrations of total protein, RBP and CC16, as well as GSTα and LDH increased activities) suggested the occurrence of discrete and early signs of impaired renal function for the discharge neighboring population.

  8. Neighboring Optimal Aircraft Guidance in a General Wind Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jardin, Matthew R. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Method and system for determining an optimal route for an aircraft moving between first and second waypoints in a general wind environment. A selected first wind environment is analyzed for which a nominal solution can be determined. A second wind environment is then incorporated; and a neighboring optimal control (NOC) analysis is performed to estimate an optimal route for the second wind environment. In particular examples with flight distances of 2500 and 6000 nautical miles in the presence of constant or piecewise linearly varying winds, the difference in flight time between a nominal solution and an optimal solution is 3.4 to 5 percent. Constant or variable winds and aircraft speeds can be used. Updated second wind environment information can be provided and used to obtain an updated optimal route.

  9. Reduction of Conflicts in Mining Development Using "Good Neighbor Agreements"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masaitis, A.

    2013-05-01

    New environmental and social challenges for the mining industry in both developed and developing countries show the obvious need to implement "responsible" mining practices that include improved community involvement. Good Neighbor Agreements (GNA's) are a relatively new mechanism for improving communication and trust between a mining company and the community. The focus of a GNA will be to provide a written and enforceable agreement, negotiated between the concerned public and the respective mining company to respond to concerns from the public, and also provide a mechanism for conflict resolution, when there is mutual benefit to maintain a working relationship. Development of GNA's, a recently evolving process that promotes environmentally sound relationships between mines and the surrounding communities. Modify and apply the resulting GNA formulas to the developing countries and countries with transitional economies. This is particularly important for countries that have poorly functioning regulatory systems that cannot guarantee a healthy and safe environment for the communities. The fundamental questions addressed by this research. 1. This is a three-year research project started in August 2012 at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) to develop a Good Neighbor Agreements standards as well as to investigate the details of mine development. 2. Identify spheres of possible cooperation between mining companies, government organizations, and the Non-Governmental Organizations (NGO's). Use this cooperation to develop international standards for the GNA, to promote exchange of environmental information, and exchange of successful environmental, health, and safety practices between mining operations from different countries. Discussion: The Good Neighbor Agreement currently evolving will address the following: 1. Provide an economically viable mechanism for developing a partnership between mining operations and the local communities that will increase mining industry

  10. Time and neighbor interaction in resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallen, Hans D.; Niu, Shupeng; Li, Ling

    2014-09-01

    We study systems in which the resonance Raman process is fast due to the requirement for phonon involvement in the absorption. The resonance enhancement is found to track the isolated molecule, or vapor phase, absorption since the molecule does not have time to exchange energy with its neighbors. This corroborates with studies of pre-resonance, where Heisenberg's uncertainty principle enforces a rapid process, but differs from resonance on electronically allowed transitions, where the resonance allows a relatively prolonged interaction. High resolution excitation spectroscopy reveals large gains and narrow features usually associated with the isolated molecule. Vibration energies shift as the resonance is approached and the excited state vibration levels are probed. Several multiplets and overtone modes are enhanced along with the strongly coupled ring-breathing mode in aromatic molecules.

  11. Young fire ant workers feign death and survive aggressive neighbors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassill, Deby L.; Vo, Kim; Becker, Brandie

    2008-07-01

    Feigning death is a method of self-defense employed among a wide range of prey species when threatened by predator species. This paper reports on death-feigning behavior by the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, during intraspecific aggression among neighboring fire ant workers. Days-old workers responded to aggression by death feigning, weeks-old workers responded by fleeing and months-old workers responded by fighting back. By feigning death, days-old workers were four times more likely to survive aggression than older workers. From a proximate perspective, retaliation by young workers against aggressive older workers is certain to fail. With their relatively soft exoskeleton, young workers would be prone to injury and death and unable to execute an effective attack of biting or stinging older workers with harder exoskeletons. From an ultimate perspective, death feigning allows young workers to survive and contribute to brood care and colony growth, both of which are essential to queen survival and fitness.

  12. Approximate Nearest Neighbor Search for a Dataset of Normalized Vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terasawa, Kengo; Tanaka, Yuzuru

    This paper describes a novel algorithm for approximate nearest neighbor searching. For solving this problem especially in high dimensional spaces, one of the best-known algorithm is Locality-Sensitive Hashing (LSH). This paper presents a variant of the LSH algorithm that outperforms previously proposed methods when the dataset consists of vectors normalized to unit length, which is often the case in pattern recognition. The LSH scheme is based on a family of hash functions that preserves the locality of points. This paper points out that for our special case problem we can design efficient hash functions that map a point on the hypersphere into the closest vertex of the randomly rotated regular polytope. The computational analysis confirmed that the proposed method could improve the exponent ρ, the main indicator of the performance of the LSH algorithm. The practical experiments also supported the efficiency of our algorithm both in time and in space.

  13. Anatomical landmark detection using nearest neighbor matching and submodular optimization.

    PubMed

    Liu, David; Zhou, S Kevin

    2012-01-01

    We present a two-stage method for effective and efficient detection of one or multiple anatomical landmarks in an arbitrary 3D volume. The first stage of nearest neighbor matching is to roughly estimate the landmark locations. It searches out of 100,000 volumes for the closest to an input volume and then transfers landmark annotations to the input. The second stage of submodular optimization is to refine the landmark locations by running discriminative landmark detectors within the search ranges constrained by the first stage results. Further it coordinates multiple detectors with a search strategy optimized on the fly to reduce the overall computation cost arising in a submodular formulation. We validate the accuracy, speed and robustness of our approach by detecting body regions and landmarks in a dataset of 2500 CT scans. PMID:23286155

  14. Knowing Our Neighbors: Fundamental Properties of Nearby Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Jennifer Lynn

    2007-07-01

    The stars within 25 pc constitute the sample that we aspire to know thoroughly. A well-understood, volume-limited sample of nearby stars is an essential input for the stellar luminosity function, the mass-luminosity relationship, the stellar velocity distribution, and the stellar multiplicity fraction, including substellar companions. Such samples help define stellar populations and estimate the amount mass contributed by local stars. In addition, the stars in this volume provide insight into stellar evolution and the history of star formation in the disk. These physical relationships and subsamples describe the makeup of our Galaxy and, by extension, more distant galaxies. However, models are being developed from an incomplete catalog with limited parameters. Although trigonometric parallaxes establish both sample membership and the cosmic distance scale, many objects within reach of ground-based telescopes remain unmeasured. To advance the solar neighborhood census, observations of 56 nearby stars are presented, including astrometric companion search results, along with a possible a new infrared parallax program.

  15. Physiological regulation and functional significance of shade avoidance responses to neighbors.

    PubMed

    Keuskamp, Diederik H; Sasidharan, Rashmi; Pierik, Ronald

    2010-06-01

    Plants growing in dense vegetations compete with their neighbors for resources such as water, nutrients and light. The competition for light has been particularly well studied, both for its fitness consequences as well as the adaptive behaviors that plants display to win the battle for light interception. Aboveground, plants detect their competitors through photosensory cues, notably the red:far-red light ratio (R:FR). The R:FR is a very reliable indicator of future competition as it decreases in a plant-specific manner though red light absorption for photosynthesis and is sensed with the phytochrome photoreceptors. In addition, also blue light depletion is perceived for neighbor detection. As a response to these light signals plants display a suite of phenotypic traits defined as the shade avoidance syndrome (SAS). The SAS helps to position the photosynthesizing leaves in the higher zones of a canopy where light conditions are more favorable. In this review we will discuss the physiological control mechanisms through which the photosensory signals are transduced into the adaptive phenotypic responses that make up the SAS. Using this mechanistic knowledge as a starting point, we will discuss how the SAS functions in the context of the complex multi-facetted environments that plants usually grow in.

  16. Spectral neighbor analysis method for automated generation of quantum-accurate interatomic potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, A.P.; Swiler, L.P.; Trott, C.R.; Foiles, S.M.; Tucker, G.J.

    2015-03-15

    We present a new interatomic potential for solids and liquids called Spectral Neighbor Analysis Potential (SNAP). The SNAP potential has a very general form and uses machine-learning techniques to reproduce the energies, forces, and stress tensors of a large set of small configurations of atoms, which are obtained using high-accuracy quantum electronic structure (QM) calculations. The local environment of each atom is characterized by a set of bispectrum components of the local neighbor density projected onto a basis of hyperspherical harmonics in four dimensions. The bispectrum components are the same bond-orientational order parameters employed by the GAP potential [1]. The SNAP potential, unlike GAP, assumes a linear relationship between atom energy and bispectrum components. The linear SNAP coefficients are determined using weighted least-squares linear regression against the full QM training set. This allows the SNAP potential to be fit in a robust, automated manner to large QM data sets using many bispectrum components. The calculation of the bispectrum components and the SNAP potential are implemented in the LAMMPS parallel molecular dynamics code. We demonstrate that a previously unnoticed symmetry property can be exploited to reduce the computational cost of the force calculations by more than one order of magnitude. We present results for a SNAP potential for tantalum, showing that it accurately reproduces a range of commonly calculated properties of both the crystalline solid and the liquid phases. In addition, unlike simpler existing potentials, SNAP correctly predicts the energy barrier for screw dislocation migration in BCC tantalum.

  17. Influence of neighboring levels in three-pulse photon-echo processes

    SciTech Connect

    Villaeys, A. A.; Dappe, Y. J.; Liang, K. K.; Lin, S. H.

    2009-05-15

    It is the purpose of the present paper to study the dynamics underlying a three-pulse photon-echo process performed on a vibronic system coupled to non-Markovian baths, when a neighboring level enters into the global dynamical evolution because of broadband excitation required in these experiments. Particular emphasis is on the energy gap between the vibronic levels, but also on the fluctuation amplitudes and correlation times of their corresponding thermal baths. The photon-echo signal appears to be very sensitive to the additional interfering contributions introduced by the neighboring vibronic level. It is shown that these contributions associated to the pathways involving different vibronic states are modulated by their corresponding energy gap. As a consequence, these contributions to the integrated photon-echo signal strongly decrease for large energy gaps. Also, an oscillating behavior is observed on the time dependence of the photon-echo signal resulting from the summation of the contributions provided by the individual vibronic levels. Moreover, the influence of the non-Markovian character of the baths, accountable for inhomogeneous broadening, affects the amplitude and the time dependence of the photon-echo signal, as well as its dependence with the delay time of the laser pulses. Of course, for longer times a Markovian dynamical evolution is recovered.

  18. Genetic predisposition to coronary heart disease and stroke using an additive genetic risk score: a population-based study in Greece

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: To determine the extent to which the risk for incident coronary heart disease (CHD) increases in relation to a genetic risk score (GRS) that additively integrates the influence of high-risk alleles in nine documented single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for CHD, and to examine whether t...

  19. Effect of non-starch-polysaccharide-degrading enzymes as feed additive on the rumen bacterial population in non-lactating cows quantified by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Zeitz, J O; Guertler, P; Pfaffl, M W; Eisenreich, R; Wiedemann, S; Schwarz, F J

    2013-12-01

    The effects of non-starch-polysaccharide-degrading enzymes, added to a maize silage- and grass silage-based total mixed ration (TMR) at least 14 h before feeding, on the rumen bacterial population were investigated. Six non-lactating Holstein Friesian cows were allocated to three treatment groups using a duplicate 3 × 3 Latin square design with three 31-day periods (29 days of adaptation and 2 days of sampling). Treatments were control TMR [69% forage and 31% concentrates on a dry matter (DM) basis] or TMR with 13.8 or 27.7 ml/kg of feed DM of Roxazyme G2 liquid with activities (U/ml enzyme preparation) of xylanase 260 000, β-glucanase 180 000 and cellulase 8000 (DSM Nutritional Products, Basel, Switzerland). The concentrations of 16S rDNA of Anaerovibrio lipolytica, Fibrobacter succinogenes, Prevotella ruminicola, Ruminococcus flavefaciens, Selenomonas ruminantium and Treponema bryantii, and their relative percentage of total bacteria in rumen samples obtained before feeding and 3 and 7 h after feeding and from two rumen fractions were determined using real-time PCR. Sampling time had only little influence, but bacterial numbers and the composition of the population differed between the transition layer between rumen fluid and the fibre mat (fraction A) and the rumen fluid (fraction B) highlighting the importance to standardize sampling. The 16S rDNA copies of total bacteria and the six bacterial species as well as the population composition were mainly unaffected by the high levels of exogenous enzymes supplemented at all sampling times and in both rumen fractions. Occasionally, the percentages of the non-fibrolytic species P. ruminicola and A. lipolytica changed in response to enzyme supplementation. Some increases in the potential degradability of the diet and decreases in lag time which occurred collaterally indicate that other factors than changes in numbers of non-particle-associated bacteria are mainly responsible for the effects of

  20. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  1. Effects of nationwide addition of selenium to fertilizers on foods, and animal and human health in Finland: From deficiency to optimal selenium status of the population.

    PubMed

    Alfthan, Georg; Eurola, Merja; Ekholm, Päivi; Venäläinen, Eija-Riitta; Root, Tarja; Korkalainen, Katja; Hartikainen, Helinä; Salminen, Pirjo; Hietaniemi, Veli; Aspila, Pentti; Aro, Antti

    2015-01-01

    Despite different geological features the Nordic countries are generally selenium-poor areas. In each country various factors such as food importation and life-style determine the selenium (Se) intake. Due to an extremely low Se intake in the 1970s in Finland, 0.025 mg/day, an official decision was made in 1984 to supplement multinutrient fertilizers with Se in the chemical form of sodium selenate. Almost all fertilizers used in Finland since 1985 have contained Se. Currently all crop fertilizers contain 15 mg Se/kg. Finland is still the only country to take this country-wide measure. In a national monitoring programme, sampling of cereals, basic foodstuffs, feeds, fertilizers, soils, and human tissues has been carried out annually since 1985 by four governmental research organizations. Sampling of foods has been done four times per year and human blood has been obtained annually from the same (n=60) adults. The accuracy of analyses has been verified by annual interlaboratory quality control. During this programme the selenium concentration of spring cereals has increased on average 15-fold compared with the level before the Se fertilization. The mean increase in the Se concentration in beef, pork and milk was 6-, 2- and 3-fold. In terms of Se, organically grown foods of plant origin are generally comparable to products produced before the Se supplementation of fertilizers. Milk from organically fed cows is 50% lower in Se than the usual milk. The average dietary human intake increased from 0.04 mg Se/day/10 MJ in 1985 to a present plateau of 0.08 mg Se/day/10 MJ, which is well above the current nutrition recommendations. Foods of animal origin contribute over 70% of the total daily Se intake. The mean human plasma Se concentration increased from 0.89 μmol/L to a general level of 1.40 μmol/L that can be considered to be an optimal status. The absence of Se deficiency diseases and a reference population have made conclusions on the impact on human health difficult

  2. Effects of soaking with natural additives in combinations with vacuum or modified atmosphere packaging on microbial populations and shelf life of fresh truffles (Chinese Tuber indicum).

    PubMed

    Miao, Yuzhi; Chen, Cuiping; Ma, Qinqin; Wang, Yiding; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Guo, Fanglan; Li, Wei; Yong, Bin

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the relative effects and interactions of combined soaking treatment using citric acid (CTA) and apple polyphenol (APP) at mild heating temperatures for the inactivation of the external and internal microflora (mesophilic aerobic bacteria, mesophilic anaerobic bacteria, and fungi) in Chinese Tuber indicum, as well as to analyze the microbiological and sensory changes under modified atmosphere packaging (MAP)- and vacuum atmosphere packaging (VAC)-packed Chinese T. indicum stored at 4 °C for up to 55 d. Chinese T. indicum was soaked with CTA and APP alone or in combination for 10, 20, and 30 min at 35, 45, and 55 °C. A disinfection method using CTA and APP (3% CTA + 3% APP for 20 min at 45 °C) was obtained. Under this set of combination, the experimental values of microbial counts of mesophilic aerobic bacteria, mesophilic anaerobic bacteria, and fungi were 2.31 ± 0.4 log CFU/g, <1.0 log CFU/g, and <1.0 log CFU/g, respectively. Through the analysis of sensory qualities and microbial populations for MAP- or VAC-packed Chinese T. indicum, the shelf life of soaked truffles was prolonged to 45 or 40 d, respectively. The synergistic effect of CTA and APP may provide valuable insight into the reduction of microorganisms on fresh truffles.

  3. Epistatic Gene-Based Interaction Analyses for Glaucoma in eMERGE and NEIGHBOR Consortium.

    PubMed

    Verma, Shefali Setia; Cooke Bailey, Jessica N; Lucas, Anastasia; Bradford, Yuki; Linneman, James G; Hauser, Michael A; Pasquale, Louis R; Peissig, Peggy L; Brilliant, Murray H; McCarty, Catherine A; Haines, Jonathan L; Wiggs, Janey L; Vrabec, Tamara R; Tromp, Gerard; Ritchie, Marylyn D

    2016-09-01

    Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) is a complex disease and is one of the major leading causes of blindness worldwide. Genome-wide association studies have successfully identified several common variants associated with glaucoma; however, most of these variants only explain a small proportion of the genetic risk. Apart from the standard approach to identify main effects of variants across the genome, it is believed that gene-gene interactions can help elucidate part of the missing heritability by allowing for the test of interactions between genetic variants to mimic the complex nature of biology. To explain the etiology of glaucoma, we first performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) on glaucoma case-control samples obtained from electronic medical records (EMR) to establish the utility of EMR data in detecting non-spurious and relevant associations; this analysis was aimed at confirming already known associations with glaucoma and validating the EMR derived glaucoma phenotype. Our findings from GWAS suggest consistent evidence of several known associations in POAG. We then performed an interaction analysis for variants found to be marginally associated with glaucoma (SNPs with main effect p-value <0.01) and observed interesting findings in the electronic MEdical Records and GEnomics Network (eMERGE) network dataset. Genes from the top epistatic interactions from eMERGE data (Likelihood Ratio Test i.e. LRT p-value <1e-05) were then tested for replication in the NEIGHBOR consortium dataset. To replicate our findings, we performed a gene-based SNP-SNP interaction analysis in NEIGHBOR and observed significant gene-gene interactions (p-value <0.001) among the top 17 gene-gene models identified in the discovery phase. Variants from gene-gene interaction analysis that we found to be associated with POAG explain 3.5% of additional genetic variance in eMERGE dataset above what is explained by the SNPs in genes that are replicated from previous GWAS studies (which

  4. Epistatic Gene-Based Interaction Analyses for Glaucoma in eMERGE and NEIGHBOR Consortium.

    PubMed

    Verma, Shefali Setia; Cooke Bailey, Jessica N; Lucas, Anastasia; Bradford, Yuki; Linneman, James G; Hauser, Michael A; Pasquale, Louis R; Peissig, Peggy L; Brilliant, Murray H; McCarty, Catherine A; Haines, Jonathan L; Wiggs, Janey L; Vrabec, Tamara R; Tromp, Gerard; Ritchie, Marylyn D

    2016-09-01

    Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) is a complex disease and is one of the major leading causes of blindness worldwide. Genome-wide association studies have successfully identified several common variants associated with glaucoma; however, most of these variants only explain a small proportion of the genetic risk. Apart from the standard approach to identify main effects of variants across the genome, it is believed that gene-gene interactions can help elucidate part of the missing heritability by allowing for the test of interactions between genetic variants to mimic the complex nature of biology. To explain the etiology of glaucoma, we first performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) on glaucoma case-control samples obtained from electronic medical records (EMR) to establish the utility of EMR data in detecting non-spurious and relevant associations; this analysis was aimed at confirming already known associations with glaucoma and validating the EMR derived glaucoma phenotype. Our findings from GWAS suggest consistent evidence of several known associations in POAG. We then performed an interaction analysis for variants found to be marginally associated with glaucoma (SNPs with main effect p-value <0.01) and observed interesting findings in the electronic MEdical Records and GEnomics Network (eMERGE) network dataset. Genes from the top epistatic interactions from eMERGE data (Likelihood Ratio Test i.e. LRT p-value <1e-05) were then tested for replication in the NEIGHBOR consortium dataset. To replicate our findings, we performed a gene-based SNP-SNP interaction analysis in NEIGHBOR and observed significant gene-gene interactions (p-value <0.001) among the top 17 gene-gene models identified in the discovery phase. Variants from gene-gene interaction analysis that we found to be associated with POAG explain 3.5% of additional genetic variance in eMERGE dataset above what is explained by the SNPs in genes that are replicated from previous GWAS studies (which

  5. Epistatic Gene-Based Interaction Analyses for Glaucoma in eMERGE and NEIGHBOR Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Shefali Setia; Lucas, Anastasia; Bradford, Yuki; Linneman, James G.; Hauser, Michael A.; Pasquale, Louis R.; Peissig, Peggy L.; Brilliant, Murray H.; McCarty, Catherine A.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Wiggs, Janey L.; Vrabec, Tamara R.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.

    2016-01-01

    Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) is a complex disease and is one of the major leading causes of blindness worldwide. Genome-wide association studies have successfully identified several common variants associated with glaucoma; however, most of these variants only explain a small proportion of the genetic risk. Apart from the standard approach to identify main effects of variants across the genome, it is believed that gene-gene interactions can help elucidate part of the missing heritability by allowing for the test of interactions between genetic variants to mimic the complex nature of biology. To explain the etiology of glaucoma, we first performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) on glaucoma case-control samples obtained from electronic medical records (EMR) to establish the utility of EMR data in detecting non-spurious and relevant associations; this analysis was aimed at confirming already known associations with glaucoma and validating the EMR derived glaucoma phenotype. Our findings from GWAS suggest consistent evidence of several known associations in POAG. We then performed an interaction analysis for variants found to be marginally associated with glaucoma (SNPs with main effect p-value <0.01) and observed interesting findings in the electronic MEdical Records and GEnomics Network (eMERGE) network dataset. Genes from the top epistatic interactions from eMERGE data (Likelihood Ratio Test i.e. LRT p-value <1e-05) were then tested for replication in the NEIGHBOR consortium dataset. To replicate our findings, we performed a gene-based SNP-SNP interaction analysis in NEIGHBOR and observed significant gene-gene interactions (p-value <0.001) among the top 17 gene-gene models identified in the discovery phase. Variants from gene-gene interaction analysis that we found to be associated with POAG explain 3.5% of additional genetic variance in eMERGE dataset above what is explained by the SNPs in genes that are replicated from previous GWAS studies (which

  6. Polymorphic L1 retrotransposons are frequently in strong linkage disequilibrium with neighboring SNPs.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Saneyuki; Ohno, Tomoyuki; Ishiguro, Koichi; Aizawa, Yasunori

    2014-05-10

    L1 retrotransposons have been the major driver of structural variation of the human genome. L1 insertion polymorphism (LIP)-mediated genomic variation can alter the transcriptome and contribute to the divergence of human phenotypes. To assess this possibility, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) including LIPs is required. Toward this ultimate goal, the present study examined linkage disequilibrium between six LIPs and their neighboring single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Genomic PCR and sequencing of L1-plus and -minus alleles from different donors revealed that all six LIPs were in strong linkage disequilibrium with at least one SNP. In addition, comparison of syntenic regions containing the identified SNP nucleotides was performed among modern humans (L1-plus and -minus alleles), archaic humans and non-human primates, revealing two different evolutionary schemes that might have resulted in the observed strong SNP-LIP linkage disequilibria. This study provides an experimental framework and guidance for a future SNP-LIP integrative GWAS.

  7. Calculation of nucleation free energy for duplex oligomers in the context of nearest neighbor models.

    PubMed

    Guerra, João Carlos de Oliveira

    2013-08-01

    Additive physical properties of DNA double strand polymers have been expanded in terms of 8 irreducible parameters. This provided consistency relations among the corresponding 10 duplex dimer contributions. To allow for oligomer analysis, end parameters were often added, and this would add extra degrees of freedom to the fore mentioned parameters. Statistical mechanics approaches were then connected to the nearest neighbor (NN) approach in the framework of the two-states model. Ad hoc end effects were thus (wrongly) correlated to nucleation phenomena and this lead to a critique for its role in NN modeling. With this motivation, a new NN model is proposed that accommodates the nucleation free energies. The model relates the nucleation free energy to the mean composition of the chain and permits to obtain a good estimate for the free energy associated only to the Watson-Crick base pairings.

  8. Neighboring Gene Regulation by Antisense Long Non-Coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, Victoria E.; Zaphiropoulos, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Antisense transcription, considered until recently as transcriptional noise, is a very common phenomenon in human and eukaryotic transcriptomes, operating in two ways based on whether the antisense RNA acts in cis or in trans. This process can generate long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), one of the most diverse classes of cellular transcripts, which have demonstrated multifunctional roles in fundamental biological processes, including embryonic pluripotency, differentiation and development. Antisense lncRNAs have been shown to control nearly every level of gene regulation—pretranscriptional, transcriptional and posttranscriptional—through DNA–RNA, RNA–RNA or protein–RNA interactions. This review is centered on functional studies of antisense lncRNA-mediated regulation of neighboring gene expression. Specifically, it addresses how these transcripts interact with other biological molecules, nucleic acids and proteins, to regulate gene expression through chromatin remodeling at the pretranscriptional level and modulation of transcriptional and post-transcriptional processes by altering the sense mRNA structure or the cellular compartmental distribution, either in the nucleus or the cytoplasm. PMID:25654223

  9. Gentle Nearest Neighbors Boosting over Proper Scoring Rules.

    PubMed

    Nock, Richard; Ali, Wafa Bel Haj; D'Ambrosio, Roberto; Nielsen, Frank; Barlaud, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Tailoring nearest neighbors algorithms to boosting is an important problem. Recent papers study an approach, UNN, which provably minimizes particular convex surrogates under weak assumptions. However, numerical issues make it necessary to experimentally tweak parts of the UNN algorithm, at the possible expense of the algorithm's convergence and performance. In this paper, we propose a lightweight Newton-Raphson alternative optimizing proper scoring rules from a very broad set, and establish formal convergence rates under the boosting framework that compete with those known for UNN. To the best of our knowledge, no such boosting-compliant convergence rates were previously known in the popular Gentle Adaboost's lineage. We provide experiments on a dozen domains, including Caltech and SUN computer vision databases, comparing our approach to major families including support vector machines, (Ada)boosting and stochastic gradient descent. They support three major conclusions: (i) GNNB significantly outperforms UNN, in terms of convergence rate and quality of the outputs, (ii) GNNB performs on par with or better than computationally intensive large margin approaches, (iii) on large domains that rule out those latter approaches for computational reasons, GNNB provides a simple and competitive contender to stochastic gradient descent. Experiments include a divide-and-conquer improvement of GNNB exploiting the link with proper scoring rules optimization. PMID:26353210

  10. Maximal Neighbor Similarity Reveals Real Communities in Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žalik, Krista Rizman

    2015-12-01

    An important problem in the analysis of network data is the detection of groups of densely interconnected nodes also called modules or communities. Community structure reveals functions and organizations of networks. Currently used algorithms for community detection in large-scale real-world networks are computationally expensive or require a priori information such as the number or sizes of communities or are not able to give the same resulting partition in multiple runs. In this paper we investigate a simple and fast algorithm that uses the network structure alone and requires neither optimization of pre-defined objective function nor information about number of communities. We propose a bottom up community detection algorithm in which starting from communities consisting of adjacent pairs of nodes and their maximal similar neighbors we find real communities. We show that the overall advantage of the proposed algorithm compared to the other community detection algorithms is its simple nature, low computational cost and its very high accuracy in detection communities of different sizes also in networks with blurred modularity structure consisting of poorly separated communities. All communities identified by the proposed method for facebook network and E-Coli transcriptional regulatory network have strong structural and functional coherence.

  11. Hyperspectral image visualization using t-distributed stochastic neighbor embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Biyin; Yu, Xin

    2015-12-01

    Hyperspectral image visualization reduces high-dimensional spectral bands to three color channels, which are sought in order to explain well the nonlinear data characteristics that are hidden in the high-dimensional spectral bands. Despite the surge in the linear visualization techniques, the development of nonlinear visualization has been limited. The paper presents a new technique for visualization of hyperspectral image using t-distributed stochastic neighbor embedding, called VHI-tSNE, which learns a nonlinear mapping between the high-dimensional spectral space and the three-dimensional color space. VHI-tSNE transforms hyperspectral data into bilateral probability similarities, and employs a heavy-tailed distribution in three-dimensional color space to alleviate the crowding problem and optimization problem in SNE technique. We evaluate the performance of VHI-tSNE in experiments on several hyperspectral imageries, in which we compare it to the performance of other state-of-art techniques. The results of experiments demonstrated the strength of the proposed technique.

  12. Maximal Neighbor Similarity Reveals Real Communities in Networks

    PubMed Central

    Žalik, Krista Rizman

    2015-01-01

    An important problem in the analysis of network data is the detection of groups of densely interconnected nodes also called modules or communities. Community structure reveals functions and organizations of networks. Currently used algorithms for community detection in large-scale real-world networks are computationally expensive or require a priori information such as the number or sizes of communities or are not able to give the same resulting partition in multiple runs. In this paper we investigate a simple and fast algorithm that uses the network structure alone and requires neither optimization of pre-defined objective function nor information about number of communities. We propose a bottom up community detection algorithm in which starting from communities consisting of adjacent pairs of nodes and their maximal similar neighbors we find real communities. We show that the overall advantage of the proposed algorithm compared to the other community detection algorithms is its simple nature, low computational cost and its very high accuracy in detection communities of different sizes also in networks with blurred modularity structure consisting of poorly separated communities. All communities identified by the proposed method for facebook network and E-Coli transcriptional regulatory network have strong structural and functional coherence. PMID:26680448

  13. Tularemia, a re-emerging infectious disease in Iran and neighboring countrie

    PubMed Central

    Zargar, Afsaneh; Maurin, Max; Mostafavi, Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Tularemia is a zoonotic disease transmitted by direct contact with infected animals and through arthropod bites, inhalation of contaminated aerosols, ingestion of contaminated meat or water, and skin contact with any infected material. It is widespread throughout the northern hemisphere, including Iran and its neighbors to the north, northeast, and northwest. METHODS: In this paper, the epidemiology of tularemia as a re-emerging infectious disease in the world with a focus on Iran and the neighboring countries is reviewed. RESULTS: In Iran, positive serological tests were first reported in 1973, in wildlife and domestic livestock in the northwestern and southeastern parts of the country. The first human case was reported in 1980 in the southwest of Iran, and recent studies conducted among at-risk populations in the western, southeastern, and southwestern parts of Iran revealed seroprevalences of 14.4, 6.52, and 6%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Several factors may explain the absence of reported tularemia cases in Iran since 1980. Tularemia may be underdiagnosed in Iran because Francisella tularensis subspecies holarctica is likely to be the major etiological agent and usually causes mild to moderately severe disease. Furthermore, tularemia is not a disease extensively studied in the medical educational system in Iran, and empirical therapy may be effective in many cases. Finally, it should be noted that laboratories capable of diagnosing tularemia have only been established in the last few years. Since both recent and older studies have consistently found tularemia antibodies in humans and animals, the surveillance of this disease should receive more attention. In particular, it would be worthwhile for clinical researchers to confirm tularemia cases more often by isolating F. tularensis from infected humans and animals. PMID:25773439

  14. Additional perspectives on chronic kidney disease of unknown aetiology (CKDu) in Sri Lanka – lessons learned from the WHO CKDu population prevalence study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The recent emergence of an apparently new form of chronic kidney disease of unknown aetiology (CKDu) has become a serious public health crisis in Sri Lanka. CKDu is slowly progressive, irreversible, and asymptomatic until late stages, and is not attributable to hypertension, diabetes, or other known aetiologies. In response to the scope and severity of the emerging CKDu health crisis, the Sri Lanka Ministry of Health and the World Health Organization initiated a collaborative research project from 2009 through 2012 to investigate CKDu prevalence and aetiology. The objective of this paper is to discuss the recently published findings of this investigation and present additional considerations and recommendations that may enhance subsequent investigations designed to identify and understand CKDu risk factors in Sri Lanka or other countries. PMID:25069485

  15. Fluorous protic ionic liquids exhibit discrete segregated nano-scale solvent domains and form new populations of nano-scale objects upon primary alcohol addition.

    PubMed

    Greaves, Tamar L; Kennedy, Danielle F; Shen, Yan; Hawley, Adrian; Song, Gonghua; Drummond, Calum J

    2013-05-28

    Fluorous protic ionic liquids (FPILS) containing a perfluorinated anion and hydrocarbon cation have been observed to segregate into nano-scale fluorocarbon, hydrocarbon and polar domains. The solubility and interactions of ethanol and butanol in a series of FPILs has been investigated by synchrotron source small and wide angle X-ray scattering. Nano-scale objects were found to be present within the binary solutions from low concentrations of FPILs in alcohols to around 40 to 80 wt% FPIL. The FPILs retain their fluorocarbon, hydrocarbon and polar domains in binary mixtures with alcohols in addition to the formation of nano-scale alcohol associated objects. For comparison, the influence of alcohols on the nano-scale segregation of analogous protic ionic liquids (PILs) which contained hydrocarbon anions in place of the perfluorinated anions was also investigated. The ethanol and butanol were miscible with the PILs across the full concentration range, with no evidence for the formation of analogous nano-scale objects. The FPILs are prospective solvents which may enable simultaneous solubility of fluorocarbon, hydrocarbon and polar species.

  16. CD90-positive cells, an additional cell population, produce laminin {alpha}2 upon transplantation to dy{sup 3k}/dy{sup 3k} mice

    SciTech Connect

    Fukada, So-ichiro Yamamoto, Yukiko; Segawa, Masashi; Sakamoto, Kenta; Nakajima, Mari; Sato, Masaki; Morikawa, Daisuke; Uezumi, Akiyoshi; Miyagoe-Suzuki, Yuko; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Tsujikawa, Kazutake; Yamamoto, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    Laminin {alpha}2 is a component of skeletal and cardiac muscle basal lamina. A defect of the laminin {alpha}2 chain leads to severe congenital muscular dystrophy (MDC1A) in humans and dy/dy mice. Myogenic cells including myoblasts, myotubes, and myofibers in skeletal muscle are a possible source of the laminin {alpha}2 chain, and myogenic cells are thus proposed as a cell source for congenital muscular dystrophy therapy. However, we observed production of laminin {alpha}2 in non-myogenic cells of normal mice, and we could enrich these laminin {alpha}2-producing cells in CD90{sup +} cell fractions. Intriguingly, the number of CD90{sup +} cells increased dramatically during skeletal muscle regeneration in mice. This fraction did not include myogenic cells but exhibited a fibroblast-like phenotype. Moreover, these cells were resident in skeletal muscle, not derived from bone marrow. Finally, the production of laminin {alpha}2 in CD90{sup +} cells was not dependent on fusion with myogenic cells. Thus, CD90{sup +} cells are a newly identified additional cell fraction that increased during skeletal muscle regeneration in vivo and could be another cell source for therapy for lama2-deficient muscular dystrophy.

  17. Zooplankton Successions in Neighboring Lakes with Contrasting Impacts of Amphibian and Fish Predators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schabetsberger, Robert; Grill, Susanne; Hauser, Gabriele; Wukits, Petra

    2006-06-01

    Two pairs of neighboring subalpine lakes located in the Northern Calcareous Alps of Austria were investigated. Each pair comprised a deeper lake containing European minnows (Phoxinus phoxinus ), and a corresponding shallower lake harboring Alpine newts (Triturus alpestris ) as top predators. Plankton successions within fish and amphibian lakes differed markedly from each other. Throughout the year rotifers numerically dominated within the minnow lakes, while pigmented copepods (Genera Heterocope, Acanthodiaptomus , Arctodiaptomus , Mixodiaptomus ) and Daphnia were prominent in the amphibian lakes, at least early during the ice-free period. We argue that size-selective predation by minnows was the ultimate reason for this predominance of smaller zooplankton. While one of the minnow lakes was characterized by a succession of spatially and temporally segregated rotifer species, the other minnow lake permitted the development of populations of small-sized Bosmina and Ceriodaphnia during summer, probably due to the existence of a strong oxycline allowing zooplankton crustaceans to avoid predation from shore-based shoals of minnows. Once trout were introduced into this lake, minnows were visibly reduced in abundance. Bosmina and Ceriodaphnia disappeared and Daphnia together with a predacious copepod (Heterocope ) emerged either from egg banks or arrived from nearby source populations. We argue that the crustacean communities within the fishless lakes were adapted to the comparatively weak predation rates of Alpine newts.

  18. Adult and Child Semantic Neighbors of the Kroll and Potter (1984) Nonobjects

    PubMed Central

    Storkel, Holly L.; Adlof, Suzanne M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The purpose was to determine the number of semantic neighbors, namely semantic set size, for 88 nonobjects (Kroll & Potter, 1984) and determine how semantic set size related to other measures and age. Method Data were collected from 82 adults and 92 preschool children in a discrete association task. The nonobjects were presented via computer, and participants reported the first word that came to mind that was meaningfully related to the nonobject. Words reported by two or more participants were considered semantic neighbors. The strength of each neighbor was computed as the proportion of participants who reported the neighbor. Results Results showed that semantic set size was not significantly correlated with objectlikeness ratings or object decision reaction times from Kroll and Potter (1984). However, semantic set size was significantly negatively correlated with the strength of the strongest neighbor(s). In terms of age effects, adult and child semantic set sizes were significantly positively correlated and the majority of numeric differences were on the order of 0–3 neighbors. Comparison of actual neighbors showed greater discrepancies; however, this varied by neighbor strength. Conclusions Semantic set size can be determined for nonobjects. Specific guidelines are suggested for using these nonobjects in future research. PMID:19252127

  19. K-nearest neighbors based methods for identification of different gear crack levels under different motor speeds and loads: Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong

    2016-03-01

    features, some other popular statistical models including linear discriminant analysis, quadratic discriminant analysis, classification and regression tree and naive Bayes classifier, are compared with the developed method. The results show that the developed method has the highest prediction accuracies among these statistical models. Additionally, selection of the number of new significant features and parameter selection of K-nearest neighbors are thoroughly investigated.

  20. Forecasting Space Weather Events for a Neighboring World

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Yihua; Mason, Tom; Wood, Erin L.

    2015-01-01

    Shortly after NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN mission (MAVEN) spacecraft entered Mars' orbit on 21 September 2014, scientists glimpsed the Martian atmosphere's response to a front of solar energetic particles (SEPs) and an associated coronal mass ejection (CME). In response to some solar flares and CMEs, streams of SEPs burst from the solar atmosphere and are further accelerated in the interplanetary medium between the Sun and the planets. These particles deposit their energy and momentum into anything in their path, including the Martian atmosphere and MAVEN particle detectors. MAVEN scientists had been alerted to the likely CME-Mars encounter by a space weather prediction system that had its origins in space weather forecasting for Earth but now forecasts space weather for Earth's neighboring planets. The two Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory spacecraft and Solar Heliospheric Observatory observed a CME on 26 September, with a trajectory that suggested a Mars intercept. A computer model developed for solar wind prediction, the Wang-Sheeley-Arge-Enlil cone model [e.g., Zheng et al., 2013; Parsons et al., 2011], running in real time at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) located at NASA Goddard since 2006, showed the CME propagating in the direction of Mars (Figure 1). According to MAVEN particle detectors, the disturbance and accompanying SEP enhancement at the leading edge of the CME reached Mars at approximately 17 hours Universal Time on 29 September 2014. Such SEPs may have a profound effect on atmospheric escape - they are believed to be a possible means for driving atmospheric loss. SEPs can cause loss of Mars' upper atmosphere through several loss mechanisms including sputtering of the atmosphere. Sputtering occurs when atoms are ejected from the atmosphere due to impacts with energetic particles.

  1. Blind tests of RNA nearest-neighbor energy prediction.

    PubMed

    Chou, Fang-Chieh; Kladwang, Wipapat; Kappel, Kalli; Das, Rhiju

    2016-07-26

    The predictive modeling and design of biologically active RNA molecules requires understanding the energetic balance among their basic components. Rapid developments in computer simulation promise increasingly accurate recovery of RNA's nearest-neighbor (NN) free-energy parameters, but these methods have not been tested in predictive trials or on nonstandard nucleotides. Here, we present, to our knowledge, the first such tests through a RECCES-Rosetta (reweighting of energy-function collection with conformational ensemble sampling in Rosetta) framework that rigorously models conformational entropy, predicts previously unmeasured NN parameters, and estimates these values' systematic uncertainties. RECCES-Rosetta recovers the 10 NN parameters for Watson-Crick stacked base pairs and 32 single-nucleotide dangling-end parameters with unprecedented accuracies: rmsd of 0.28 kcal/mol and 0.41 kcal/mol, respectively. For set-aside test sets, RECCES-Rosetta gives rmsd values of 0.32 kcal/mol on eight stacked pairs involving G-U wobble pairs and 0.99 kcal/mol on seven stacked pairs involving nonstandard isocytidine-isoguanosine pairs. To more rigorously assess RECCES-Rosetta, we carried out four blind predictions for stacked pairs involving 2,6-diaminopurine-U pairs, which achieved 0.64 kcal/mol rmsd accuracy when tested by subsequent experiments. Overall, these results establish that computational methods can now blindly predict energetics of basic RNA motifs, including chemically modified variants, with consistently better than 1 kcal/mol accuracy. Systematic tests indicate that resolving the remaining discrepancies will require energy function improvements beyond simply reweighting component terms, and we propose further blind trials to test such efforts. PMID:27402765

  2. Blind tests of RNA nearest-neighbor energy prediction.

    PubMed

    Chou, Fang-Chieh; Kladwang, Wipapat; Kappel, Kalli; Das, Rhiju

    2016-07-26

    The predictive modeling and design of biologically active RNA molecules requires understanding the energetic balance among their basic components. Rapid developments in computer simulation promise increasingly accurate recovery of RNA's nearest-neighbor (NN) free-energy parameters, but these methods have not been tested in predictive trials or on nonstandard nucleotides. Here, we present, to our knowledge, the first such tests through a RECCES-Rosetta (reweighting of energy-function collection with conformational ensemble sampling in Rosetta) framework that rigorously models conformational entropy, predicts previously unmeasured NN parameters, and estimates these values' systematic uncertainties. RECCES-Rosetta recovers the 10 NN parameters for Watson-Crick stacked base pairs and 32 single-nucleotide dangling-end parameters with unprecedented accuracies: rmsd of 0.28 kcal/mol and 0.41 kcal/mol, respectively. For set-aside test sets, RECCES-Rosetta gives rmsd values of 0.32 kcal/mol on eight stacked pairs involving G-U wobble pairs and 0.99 kcal/mol on seven stacked pairs involving nonstandard isocytidine-isoguanosine pairs. To more rigorously assess RECCES-Rosetta, we carried out four blind predictions for stacked pairs involving 2,6-diaminopurine-U pairs, which achieved 0.64 kcal/mol rmsd accuracy when tested by subsequent experiments. Overall, these results establish that computational methods can now blindly predict energetics of basic RNA motifs, including chemically modified variants, with consistently better than 1 kcal/mol accuracy. Systematic tests indicate that resolving the remaining discrepancies will require energy function improvements beyond simply reweighting component terms, and we propose further blind trials to test such efforts.

  3. Communicating worst-case scenarios: neighbors' views of industrial accident management.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Branden B; Chess, Caron

    2003-08-01

    The prospect of industrial accidents motivated the U.S. Congress to require in the Clean Air Act of 1990 that manufacturing facilities develop Risk Management Plans (RMP) to submit to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) by July 1999. Industry worried that the requirement to communicate to the public a "worst-case scenario" would arouse unnecessary and counterproductive fears among industry neighbors. We report here the results of focus groups and surveys with such neighbors, focusing particularly upon their reactions to messages about a hypothetical worst-case scenario and management of these risks by industry, government, and other parties. Our findings confirmed our hypotheses that citizens would be skeptical of the competence and trustworthiness of these managers and that this stance would color their views of industrial-facility accident risks. People with job ties to industry or who saw industrial benefits to the community as exceeding its risks had more positive views of industrial risks, but still expressed great concern about the risk and doubt about accident management. Notwithstanding these reactions, overall respondents welcomed this and other related information, which they wanted their local industries to supply. Respondents were not more reassured by additional text describing management of accidents by government and industry. However, respondents did react very positively to the concept of community oversight to review plant safety. Claims about the firm's moral obligation or financial self-interest in preventing accidents were also received positively. Further research on innovative communication and management of accident risks is warranted by these results, even before recent terrorist attacks made this topic more salient. PMID:12926575

  4. Analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Genotypic Lineage Distribution in Chile and Neighboring Countries.

    PubMed

    Lagos, Jaime; Couvin, David; Arata, Loredana; Tognarelli, Javier; Aguayo, Carolina; Leiva, Tamara; Arias, Fabiola; Hormazabal, Juan Carlos; Rastogi, Nalin; Fernández, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), caused by the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), remains a disease of high importance to global public health. Studies into the population structure of MTB have become vital to monitoring possible outbreaks and also to develop strategies regarding disease control. Although Chile has a low incidence of MTB, the current rates of migration have the potential to change this scenario. We collected and analyzed a total of 458 M. tuberculosis isolates (1 isolate per patient) originating from all 15 regions of Chile. The isolates were genotyped using the spoligotyping method and the data obtained were analyzed and compared with the SITVIT2 database. A total of 169 different patterns were identified, of which, 119 patterns (408 strains) corresponded to Spoligotype International Types (SITs) and 50 patterns corresponded to orphan strains. The most abundantly represented SITs/lineages were: SIT53/T1 (11.57%), SIT33/LAM3 (9.6%), SIT42/LAM9 (9.39%), SIT50/H3 (5.9%), SIT37/T3 (5%); analysis of the spoligotyping minimum spanning tree as well as spoligoforest were suggestive of a recent expansion of SIT42, SIT50 and SIT37; all of which potentially evolved from SIT53. The most abundantly represented lineages were LAM (40.6%), T (34.1%) and Haarlem (13.5%). LAM was more prevalent in the Santiago (43.6%) and Concepción (44.1%) isolates, rather than the Iquique (29.4%) strains. The proportion of X lineage was appreciably higher in Iquique and Concepción (11.7% in both) as compared to Santiago (1.6%). Global analysis of MTB lineage distribution in Chile versus neighboring countries showed that evolutionary recent lineages (LAM, T and Haarlem) accounted together for 88.2% of isolates in Chile, a pattern which mirrored MTB lineage distribution in neighboring countries (n = 7378 isolates recorded in SITVIT2 database for Peru, Brazil, Paraguay, and Argentina; and published studies), highlighting epidemiological advantage of Euro-American lineages in this region

  5. Analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Genotypic Lineage Distribution in Chile and Neighboring Countries

    PubMed Central

    Lagos, Jaime; Couvin, David; Arata, Loredana; Tognarelli, Javier; Aguayo, Carolina; Leiva, Tamara; Arias, Fabiola; Hormazabal, Juan Carlos; Rastogi, Nalin; Fernández, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), caused by the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), remains a disease of high importance to global public health. Studies into the population structure of MTB have become vital to monitoring possible outbreaks and also to develop strategies regarding disease control. Although Chile has a low incidence of MTB, the current rates of migration have the potential to change this scenario. We collected and analyzed a total of 458 M. tuberculosis isolates (1 isolate per patient) originating from all 15 regions of Chile. The isolates were genotyped using the spoligotyping method and the data obtained were analyzed and compared with the SITVIT2 database. A total of 169 different patterns were identified, of which, 119 patterns (408 strains) corresponded to Spoligotype International Types (SITs) and 50 patterns corresponded to orphan strains. The most abundantly represented SITs/lineages were: SIT53/T1 (11.57%), SIT33/LAM3 (9.6%), SIT42/LAM9 (9.39%), SIT50/H3 (5.9%), SIT37/T3 (5%); analysis of the spoligotyping minimum spanning tree as well as spoligoforest were suggestive of a recent expansion of SIT42, SIT50 and SIT37; all of which potentially evolved from SIT53. The most abundantly represented lineages were LAM (40.6%), T (34.1%) and Haarlem (13.5%). LAM was more prevalent in the Santiago (43.6%) and Concepción (44.1%) isolates, rather than the Iquique (29.4%) strains. The proportion of X lineage was appreciably higher in Iquique and Concepción (11.7% in both) as compared to Santiago (1.6%). Global analysis of MTB lineage distribution in Chile versus neighboring countries showed that evolutionary recent lineages (LAM, T and Haarlem) accounted together for 88.2% of isolates in Chile, a pattern which mirrored MTB lineage distribution in neighboring countries (n = 7378 isolates recorded in SITVIT2 database for Peru, Brazil, Paraguay, and Argentina; and published studies), highlighting epidemiological advantage of Euro-American lineages in this region

  6. [Autoimmune processes after long-term low-level exposure to electromagnetic fields (the results of an experiment). Part 1. Mobile communications and changes in electromagnetic conditions for the population. Needs for additional substantiation of the existing hygienic standards].

    PubMed

    Grigor'ev, Iu G; Grigor'ev, O A; Ivanov, A A; Liaginskaia, A M; Merkulov, A V; Stepanov, V S; Shagina, N B

    2010-01-01

    Mobile communications provides a new source of electromagnetic exposure for almost the whole population of the Russian Federation. For the first time in the history of civilization the brain of mobile phone users was exposed to localized radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMF). Population exposure from the base stations is also considered to be specific. However, existing standards for limiting the exposure do not account for this special EMF source and may not ensure the absence of health effects. There was a need for reliable information that would extend databases used for development of new standards. As recommended by the World Health Organization an additional experiment was performed under the supervision of foreign experts, which showed changes in autoimmune status in rats after long-term low-level RF EMF exposure with an incident power density of 500 microW/cm2.

  7. Assessing the Quality of Family, Friend, and Neighbor Care: The State of Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Douglas R.

    2008-01-01

    The author explores the extent to which infants and toddlers are regularly in the care of nonparental relatives, friends, and neighbors and notes the limited research on the quality of care provided by family, friends, and neighbors. (Note: This article is an excerpt from "Who's Watching the Babies?: Improving the Quality of Family, Friend, and…

  8. Working with Family, Friend, and Neighbor Caregivers: Lessons from Four Diverse Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Douglas R.

    2011-01-01

    This article is excerpted from "Who's Watching the Babies? Improving the Quality of Family, Friend, and Neighbor Care" by Douglas R. Powell ("ZERO TO THREE," 2008). The article explores questions about program development and implementation strategies for supporting Family, Friend, and Neighbor (FFN) caregivers: How do programs and their host…

  9. Our Neighbor Republics: A Selected List of Readable Books for Young People. Bulletin, 1942, No. 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beust, Nora E.

    1942-01-01

    The Library Service Division of the U. S. Office of Education has prepared a series of bibliographies designed for use in furthering a better understanding of our neighbor republics. The first bibliography appeared in multigraphed form in February 1942 under the title "Our Neighbor Republics; a selected list of readable books for young people."…

  10. Phosphazene additives

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  11. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  12. A common neighbor analysis of crystallization kinetics and excess entropy of charged spherical colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia Bañuelos, Efraín; Contreras Aburto, Claudio; Maldonado Arce, Amir

    2016-03-01

    The topological analysis tool known as the common neighbor analysis (CNA) is used for the first time in this work to analyze crystallization kinetics and excess entropy of charge-stabilized colloidal suspensions. For this purpose, Brownian dynamics computer simulations are implemented to investigate the crystallization kinetics of homogeneously melted colloidal crystals that are composed of hard-core-screened-Coulomb interacting particles. The results are in agreement with recent static structure factor measurements that could indicate the presence of icosahedral units in the metastable melt, and with the fact that weakly screened charged colloids crystallize into body-centered-cubic (bcc) ordering. A two-step crystallization pathway is found, in which the population of bcc-subunit CNA-pairs satisfactorily obeys a Verhulst model. Moreover, the CNA helped to unveil that the excess entropy obeys a quasi-universal functional form, relating the behavior of colloidal, molecular, and metallic liquid systems. The work contributes to the scientific understanding of the crystallization pathway of charged colloids, and to the development of new ways to assess the degree of crystalline order, starting from the excess entropy.

  13. Birth rates decline as neighbors learn from one another how to control fertility.

    PubMed

    1997-01-01

    This article refers to a recent article (by Population Council demographer John Bongaarts and University of Pennsylvania sociology professor Susan Cotts Watkins) on strategies for promoting future global fertility decline. The article emphasizes the importance of the process of social interaction as a powerful force that accelerates the pace of demographic transition. The force of social interaction is frequently overlooked. Social interaction operates through personal networks that connect individuals; national channels of interaction connecting social and territorial communities within a country; and global channels connecting countries. Empirical evidence finds that the most important interaction for fertility change occurs in exchanges between personal networks of small communities. When innovative fertility behavior is adopted by a group within a community, then changes are communicated in an ever widening band. It is expected that countries with multiple channels of linked transportation and communication networks and extensive media facilities would experience more rapid fertility decline. Bongaarts and Watkins argue that the extent of a country's links with a global society help determine the timing of its transition to lower fertility. All countries are connected to some extent by ideas, information, or social influence and are at some level of development. When some countries in a region begin their fertility transition, neighboring countries soon follow. Fertility transition occurs even at low levels of development. Fertility decline can occur rapidly, even if socioeconomic development is modest, once the onset of the transition has occurred. PMID:12292644

  14. With the help of one's neighbors: externalities in the production of nutrition in Peru.

    PubMed

    Alderman, Harold; Hentschel, Jesko; Sabates, Ricardo

    2003-05-01

    Both public and private resources contribute to the nutritional status of children. In addition, the investments made by one household may contribute to the health of other households in the neighborhood through improvements in the sanitation environment and through increases in shared knowledge. This paper measures the externalities of investments in nutrition by indicating the impact of the education of women in Peruvian neighborhoods on the nutrition of children in other households, after controlling for the education and income of those households. We find that in rural areas this shared knowledge has a significant impact on nutrition, with the coefficient of an increase in the average education of women in the neighborhood being appreciable larger than the coefficient of education in isolation. In addition, we indicate the impact of the water and sanitation environment in the neighborhood, again controlling for the household's own access to sanitation and water. In both urban and rural areas, we observe externalities from investments in such household level infrastructure with the evidence particularly strong for sanitation made by neighboring households. PMID:12697194

  15. China's Tibetan population and population in Tibet.

    PubMed

    Guo, D

    1996-04-01

    This article addresses the Tibetan population distribution in Tibet and neighboring provinces of China. Tibet is one of China's autonomous regions that is ethnic-inhabited. In 1994 there were 2.36 million people living in Tibet, most of whom were of Tibetan nationality. The total Tibetan population living in China numbered 4,593,072 people, who lived mostly in Tibet, Sichuan, Qinghai, Gansu, and Yunnan, in descending order of population size. The Tibetan population in 1953 numbered 2,775,622. The total increase during 1975-90 was 65.48% and the annual growth rate was 13.71%. The annual growth rate among Tibetans during 1982-90 was 21.79% in Tibet, 20.88% in Sichuan, 24.10% in Qinghai, 23.58% in Gansu, and 18.79% in Yunnan. The regional distribution of Tibetans and the ratio of Tibetan population to Han population was highest in Tibet Autonomous Region (a ratio of 25.94:1), followed by Yushu Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture in Qinghai (30.52:1). Other Tibet concentrations of population were in Guoluo Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture in Qinghai (8.71:1), Hunagnan Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture in Qinghai (5.78:1), and Ganzi Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture in Sichuan (3.53:1). The population size of Tibetans living in Tibetan prefectures of neighboring provinces was higher than in Tibet in 1990. The rapid growth of the Tibetan population is attributed to the end to the serf system and the improvement in living conditions.

  16. Reduction in Predator Defense in the Presence of Neighbors in a Colonial Fish

    PubMed Central

    Schädelin, Franziska C.; Fischer, Stefan; Wagner, Richard H.

    2012-01-01

    Predation pressure has long been considered a leading explanation of colonies, where close neighbors may reduce predation via dilution, alarming or group predator attacks. Attacking predators may be costly in terms of energy and survival, leading to the question of how neighbors contribute to predator deterrence in relationship to each other. Two hypotheses explaining the relative efforts made by neighbors are byproduct-mutualism, which occurs when breeders inadvertently attack predators by defending their nests, and reciprocity, which occurs when breeders deliberately exchange predator defense efforts with neighbors. Most studies investigating group nest defense have been performed with birds. However, colonial fish may constitute a more practical model system for an experimental approach because of the greater ability of researchers to manipulate their environment. We investigated in the colonial fish, Neolamprologus caudopunctatus, whether prospecting pairs preferred to breed near conspecifics or solitarily, and how breeders invested in anti-predator defense in relation to neighbors. In a simple choice test, prospecting pairs selected breeding sites close to neighbors versus a solitary site. Predators were then sequentially presented to the newly established test pairs, the previously established stimulus pairs or in between the two pairs. Test pairs attacked the predator eight times more frequently when they were presented on their non-neighbor side compared to between the two breeding sites, where stimulus pairs maintained high attack rates. Thus, by joining an established pair, test pairs were able to reduce their anti-predator efforts near neighbors, at no apparent cost to the stimulus pairs. These findings are unlikely to be explained by reciprocity or byproduct-mutualism. Our results instead suggest a commensal relationship in which new pairs exploit the high anti-predator efforts of established pairs, which invest similarly with or without neighbors

  17. Polymorphic Alu insertions in six Brazilian African-derived populations.

    PubMed

    Cotrim, Nelson Henderson; Auricchio, Maria Teresa B M; Vicente, João Pedro; Otto, Paulo A; Mingroni-Netto, Regina Célia

    2004-01-01

    At least 25 African-derived populations (quilombo remnants) are believed to exist in the Ribeira River Valley, located in the southern part of São Paulo State, Brazil. We studied four Alu polymorphic loci (APO, ACE, TPA25, and FXIIIB) in individuals belonging to six quilombo remnants in addition to individuals sampled from the city of São Paulo. The allelic frequencies observed in the quilombo remnants were similar to those previously observed in African-derived populations from Central and North America. Genetic variability indexes (Fst and Gst values) in our quilombos were higher than the reported values for the majority of other populations analyzed for the same kind of markers, but lower than the variability usually observed in Amerindian groups. The observed high degree of genetic differentiation may be due to genetic drift, especially the founder effect. Our results suggest that these populations behave genetically as semi-isolates. The degree of genetic variability within populations was larger than among them, a finding described in other studies. In the neighbor-joining tree, some of the Brazilian quilombos clustered with the African and African-derived populations (São Pedro and Galvão), others with the Europeans (Pilões, Maria Rosa, and Abobral). Pedro Cubas was placed in an isolated branch. Principal component analysis was also performed and confirmed the trends observed in the neighbor-joining tree. Overall, the quilombos showed a higher degree of gene flow than average when compared to other worldwide populations, but similar to other African-derived populations.

  18. Bone and Skeletal Muscle: Neighbors With Close Ties

    PubMed Central

    DiGirolamo, Douglas J; Kiel, Douglas P; Esser, Karyn A

    2016-01-01

    The musculoskeletal system evolved in mammals to perform diverse functions that include locomotion, facilitating breathing, protecting internal organs, and coordinating global energy expenditure. Bone and skeletal muscles involved with locomotion are both derived from somitic mesoderm and accumulate peak tissue mass synchronously, according to genetic information and environmental stimuli. Aging results in the progressive and parallel loss of bone (osteopenia) and skeletal muscle (sarcopenia) with profound consequences for quality of life. Age-associated sarcopenia results in reduced endurance, poor balance, and reduced mobility that predispose elderly individuals to falls, which more frequently result in fracture because of concomitant osteoporosis. Thus, a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the parallel development and involution of these tissues is critical to developing new and more effective means to combat osteoporosis and sarcopenia in our increasingly aged population. This perspective highlights recent advances in our understanding of mechanisms coupling bone and skeletal muscle mass, and identify critical areas where further work is needed. PMID:23630111

  19. Mixed random walks with a trap in scale-free networks including nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor jumps.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongzhi; Dong, Yuze; Sheng, Yibin

    2015-10-01

    Random walks including non-nearest-neighbor jumps appear in many real situations such as the diffusion of adatoms and have found numerous applications including PageRank search algorithm; however, related theoretical results are much less for this dynamical process. In this paper, we present a study of mixed random walks in a family of fractal scale-free networks, where both nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor jumps are included. We focus on trapping problem in the network family, which is a particular case of random walks with a perfect trap fixed at the central high-degree node. We derive analytical expressions for the average trapping time (ATT), a quantitative indicator measuring the efficiency of the trapping process, by using two different methods, the results of which are consistent with each other. Furthermore, we analytically determine all the eigenvalues and their multiplicities for the fundamental matrix characterizing the dynamical process. Our results show that although next-nearest-neighbor jumps have no effect on the leading scaling of the trapping efficiency, they can strongly affect the prefactor of ATT, providing insight into better understanding of random-walk process in complex systems. PMID:26450286

  20. Building a Co-Created Citizen Science Program with Community Members Neighboring a Hazardous Waste Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-Andreotta, M.; Brusseau, M. L. L.; Artiola, J. F.; Maier, R. M.; Gandolfi, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    A research project that is only expert-driven may ignore the role of local knowledge in research, often gives low priority to the development of a comprehensive strategy to engage the community, and may not deliver the results of the study to the community in an effective way. To date, only a limited number of co-created citizen science projects, where community members are involved in most or all steps of the scientific process, have been initiated at contaminated sites and even less in conjunction with risk communication. Gardenroots: The Dewey-Humboldt AZ Garden Project was a place-based, co-created citizen science project where community members and researchers together: defined the question for study, developed hypotheses, collected environmental samples, disseminated results broadly, translated the results into action, and posed new research questions. This co-created environmental research project produced new data and addressed an additional exposure route (consumption of vegetables grown in soils with elevated arsenic levels) that was not being evaluated in the current site assessment. Furthermore, co-producing science led to both individual learning and social-ecological outcomes. This approach illustrates the benefits of a co-created citizen-science program in addressing the complex problems that arise in communities neighboring a hazardous waste sites. Such a project increased the community's involvement in regional environmental assessment and decision-making, which has the potential to help mitigate environmental exposures and thereby reduce associated risks.

  1. Bond-cluster approximation to the axial next-nearest-neighbor Ising model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, James H.; Desjardins, J. S.

    1984-11-01

    The three-dimensional simple-cubic spin- 1/2 axial next-nearest-neighbor Ising model is studied by means of Kikuchi's cluster-variation method employing a new technique described previously [J. S. Desjardins and O. Steinsvoll,

    [Phys. Scr. 28, 565 (1983)]
    for the solution of the general equations of equilibrium. The particular solution employed in this paper is equivalent to Bethe's first approximation and yields a surprisingly rich phase diagram with modulated structures appearing up to a repeat distance of 15 planes (the highest studied). The phase diagram obtained by our technique resembles closely the mean-field, spin- 1/2 phase diagram of von Boehm and Bak with some significant differences: The second-order boundary of the paramagnetic region is at a significantly lower temperature with a minimum at | κ |˜0.4, where κ is the ratio of the antiferromagnetic to the ferromagnetic coupling constant. In addition, we are able to follow the temperature dependence of the shape of the modulated solutions from the squared-off, low-temperature behavior of Selke and Fisher to the sinusoidal behavior of the high-temperature, mean-field results. The position of our Lifshitz point is in good agreement with previous results, as is the conclusion that transitions between phases are of first order. By contrast, in two dimensions the same approximation completely fails to reproduce reported features of the phase diagram.

  2. Rigidity percolation by next-nearest-neighbor bonds on generic and regular isostatic lattices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Leyou; Rocklin, D Zeb; Chen, Bryan Gin-ge; Mao, Xiaoming

    2015-03-01

    We study rigidity percolation transitions in two-dimensional central-force isostatic lattices, including the square and the kagome lattices, as next-nearest-neighbor bonds ("braces") are randomly added to the system. In particular, we focus on the differences between regular lattices, which are perfectly periodic, and generic lattices with the same topology of bonds but whose sites are at random positions in space. We find that the regular square and kagome lattices exhibit a rigidity percolation transition when the number of braces is ∼LlnL, where L is the linear size of the lattice. This transition exhibits features of both first-order and second-order transitions: The whole lattice becomes rigid at the transition, and a diverging length scale also exists. In contrast, we find that the rigidity percolation transition in the generic lattices occur when the number of braces is very close to the number obtained from Maxwell's law for floppy modes, which is ∼L. The transition in generic lattices is a very sharp first-order-like transition, at which the addition of one brace connects all small rigid regions in the bulk of the lattice, leaving only floppy modes on the edge. We characterize these transitions using numerical simulations and develop analytic theories capturing each transition. Our results relate to other interesting problems, including jamming and bootstrap percolation. PMID:25871071

  3. QRS detection using K-Nearest Neighbor algorithm (KNN) and evaluation on standard ECG databases.

    PubMed

    Saini, Indu; Singh, Dilbag; Khosla, Arun

    2013-07-01

    The performance of computer aided ECG analysis depends on the precise and accurate delineation of QRS-complexes. This paper presents an application of K-Nearest Neighbor (KNN) algorithm as a classifier for detection of QRS-complex in ECG. The proposed algorithm is evaluated on two manually annotated standard databases such as CSE and MIT-BIH Arrhythmia database. In this work, a digital band-pass filter is used to reduce false detection caused by interference present in ECG signal and further gradient of the signal is used as a feature for QRS-detection. In addition the accuracy of KNN based classifier is largely dependent on the value of K and type of distance metric. The value of K = 3 and Euclidean distance metric has been proposed for the KNN classifier, using fivefold cross-validation. The detection rates of 99.89% and 99.81% are achieved for CSE and MIT-BIH databases respectively. The QRS detector obtained a sensitivity Se = 99.86% and specificity Sp = 99.86% for CSE database, and Se = 99.81% and Sp = 99.86% for MIT-BIH Arrhythmia database. A comparison is also made between proposed algorithm and other published work using CSE and MIT-BIH Arrhythmia databases. These results clearly establishes KNN algorithm for reliable and accurate QRS-detection.

  4. Multiple burn fuel-optimal orbit transfers: Numerical trajectory computation and neighboring optimal feedback guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, C.-H.; Goodson, Troy D.; Ledsinger, Laura A.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes current work in the numerical computation of multiple burn, fuel-optimal orbit transfers and presents an analysis of the second variation for extremal multiple burn orbital transfers as well as a discussion of a guidance scheme which may be implemented for such transfers. The discussion of numerical computation focuses on the use of multivariate interpolation to aid the computation in the numerical optimization. The second variation analysis includes the development of the conditions for the examination of both fixed and free final time transfers. Evaluations for fixed final time are presented for extremal one, two, and three burn solutions of the first variation. The free final time problem is considered for an extremal two burn solution. In addition, corresponding changes of the second variation formulation over thrust arcs and coast arcs are included. The guidance scheme discussed is an implicit scheme which implements a neighboring optimal feedback guidance strategy to calculate both thrust direction and thrust on-off times.

  5. Nearest neighbor, bilinear interpolation and bicubic interpolation geographic correction effects on LANDSAT imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jayroe, R. R., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Geographical correction effects on LANDSAT image data are identified, using the nearest neighbor, bilinear interpolation and bicubic interpolation techniques. Potential impacts of registration on image compression and classification are explored.

  6. Heterogeneity and nearest-neighbor coupling can explain small-worldness and wave properties in pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Cappon, Giacomo; Pedersen, Morten Gram

    2016-05-01

    Many multicellular systems consist of coupled cells that work as a syncytium. The pancreatic islet of Langerhans is a well-studied example of such a microorgan. The islets are responsible for secretion of glucose-regulating hormones, mainly glucagon and insulin, which are released in distinct pulses. In order to observe pulsatile insulin secretion from the β-cells within the islets, the cellular responses must be synchronized. It is now well established that gap junctions provide the electrical nearest-neighbor coupling that allows excitation waves to spread across islets to synchronize the β-cell population. Surprisingly, functional coupling analysis of calcium responses in β-cells shows small-world properties, i.e., a high degree of local coupling with a few long-range "short-cut" connections that reduce the average path-length greatly. Here, we investigate how such long-range functional coupling can appear as a result of heterogeneity, nearest-neighbor coupling, and wave propagation. Heterogeneity is also able to explain a set of experimentally observed synchronization and wave properties without introducing all-or-none cell coupling and percolation theory. Our theoretical results highlight how local biological coupling can give rise to functional small-world properties via heterogeneity and wave propagation. PMID:27249943

  7. Heterogeneity and nearest-neighbor coupling can explain small-worldness and wave properties in pancreatic islets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappon, Giacomo; Pedersen, Morten Gram

    2016-05-01

    Many multicellular systems consist of coupled cells that work as a syncytium. The pancreatic islet of Langerhans is a well-studied example of such a microorgan. The islets are responsible for secretion of glucose-regulating hormones, mainly glucagon and insulin, which are released in distinct pulses. In order to observe pulsatile insulin secretion from the β-cells within the islets, the cellular responses must be synchronized. It is now well established that gap junctions provide the electrical nearest-neighbor coupling that allows excitation waves to spread across islets to synchronize the β-cell population. Surprisingly, functional coupling analysis of calcium responses in β-cells shows small-world properties, i.e., a high degree of local coupling with a few long-range "short-cut" connections that reduce the average path-length greatly. Here, we investigate how such long-range functional coupling can appear as a result of heterogeneity, nearest-neighbor coupling, and wave propagation. Heterogeneity is also able to explain a set of experimentally observed synchronization and wave properties without introducing all-or-none cell coupling and percolation theory. Our theoretical results highlight how local biological coupling can give rise to functional small-world properties via heterogeneity and wave propagation.

  8. LEDs/ALAN-Working To Be Good Neighbors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Robert

    2015-08-01

    ALAN (Artificial Light At Night) and LEDs have recently become major discussion topics in the areas of astronomy, light pollution, endangered species and human health to mention but a few. In years past, MH, LPS and HPS dominated night lighting with LPS and its associated narrow spectrum as the preferred source around observatories and shorelines. LEDs offer the ability to modify the spectrum, realize substantial energy savings and other associated benefits while meeting the requirements of the astronomy community.The primary concern of the different groups relates to blue light content of the LED. For astronomers, the molecular (Raleigh) scattering related to the blue light interferes with certain portions of the spectrum used for deep space studies. The ecologists studying various endangered species find blue and green light can be related to declining leatherback turtle population in certain areas of the world. Other animals ranging from bats to moths and other insects are now being studied to determine the effect of the blue light spectrum on their behavior. The impact of blue light on the human circadian rhythm and vision, especially in the older population, is being extensively studied today.This presentation will discuss the spectral power distribution (SPD) of various light sources, the performance of new LED solutions and how the SPD of these new LED’s can be adapted to address some of the issues raised by various constituencies. A discussion describing why some of the metrics used to describe standard lighting are not adequate for specifying the new LED solutions with the modified spectra will be included.Today, lighting plans and implementation are all too often based on opinions and limited data. The ensuing problems and repercussions make it imperative to collect accurate and thorough information. Data collection is now ongoing using a variety of techniques analyzing the “before” and “after” lighting results from the C of HI LED streetlight

  9. SibRank: Signed bipartite network analysis for neighbor-based collaborative ranking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shams, Bita; Haratizadeh, Saman

    2016-09-01

    Collaborative ranking is an emerging field of recommender systems that utilizes users' preference data rather than rating values. Unfortunately, neighbor-based collaborative ranking has gained little attention despite its more flexibility and justifiability. This paper proposes a novel framework, called SibRank that seeks to improve the state of the art neighbor-based collaborative ranking methods. SibRank represents users' preferences as a signed bipartite network, and finds similar users, through a novel personalized ranking algorithm in signed networks.

  10. Efficient neighbor channel reservation for contention resolution in optical burst-switched networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jan, Alam; Aziz, Khurram; Khan, Samee U.

    2013-08-01

    We propose a different reflection-based technique, named efficient neighbor channel reservation, where a contending burst is reflected from a suitable neighbor node and then resumes its original path. Our proposed scheme does not use any extra hardware and addresses several limitations of other schemes including: (a) eliminating the use of bulky fiber delay lines, (b) avoiding complexity required with burst segmentation, (c) preventing resource wastage that occurs with prereservation schemes, and (d) preventing loop formation inherent in most deflection routing schemes.

  11. Finger vein identification using fuzzy-based k-nearest centroid neighbor classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosdi, Bakhtiar Affendi; Jaafar, Haryati; Ramli, Dzati Athiar

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, a new approach for personal identification using finger vein image is presented. Finger vein is an emerging type of biometrics that attracts attention of researchers in biometrics area. As compared to other biometric traits such as face, fingerprint and iris, finger vein is more secured and hard to counterfeit since the features are inside the human body. So far, most of the researchers focus on how to extract robust features from the captured vein images. Not much research was conducted on the classification of the extracted features. In this paper, a new classifier called fuzzy-based k-nearest centroid neighbor (FkNCN) is applied to classify the finger vein image. The proposed FkNCN employs a surrounding rule to obtain the k-nearest centroid neighbors based on the spatial distributions of the training images and their distance to the test image. Then, the fuzzy membership function is utilized to assign the test image to the class which is frequently represented by the k-nearest centroid neighbors. Experimental evaluation using our own database which was collected from 492 fingers shows that the proposed FkNCN has better performance than the k-nearest neighbor, k-nearest-centroid neighbor and fuzzy-based-k-nearest neighbor classifiers. This shows that the proposed classifier is able to identify the finger vein image effectively.

  12. Retrieving backbone string neighbors provides insights into structural modeling of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiang-Ming; Li, Tong-Hua; Cong, Pei-Sheng; Tang, Sheng-Nan; Xiong, Wen-Wei

    2012-07-01

    Identification of protein structural neighbors to a query is fundamental in structure and function prediction. Here we present BS-align, a systematic method to retrieve backbone string neighbors from primary sequences as templates for protein modeling. The backbone conformation of a protein is represented by the backbone string, as defined in Ramachandran space. The backbone string of a query can be accurately predicted by two innovative technologies: a knowledge-driven sequence alignment and encoding of a backbone string element profile. Then, the predicted backbone string is employed to align against a backbone string database and retrieve a set of backbone string neighbors. The backbone string neighbors were shown to be close to native structures of query proteins. BS-align was successfully employed to predict models of 10 membrane proteins with lengths ranging between 229 and 595 residues, and whose high-resolution structural determinations were difficult to elucidate both by experiment and prediction. The obtained TM-scores and root mean square deviations of the models confirmed that the models based on the backbone string neighbors retrieved by the BS-align were very close to the native membrane structures although the query and the neighbor shared a very low sequence identity. The backbone string system represents a new road for the prediction of protein structure from sequence, and suggests that the similarity of the backbone string would be more informative than describing a protein as belonging to a fold.

  13. Multiple 3D RNA Structure Superposition Using Neighbor Joining.

    PubMed

    Hoksza, David; Svozil, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in RNA research and the steady growth of available RNA structures call for bioinformatics methods for handling and analyzing RNA structural data. Recently, we introduced SETTER-a fast and accurate method for RNA pairwise structure alignment. In this paper, we describe MultiSETTER, SETTER extension for multiple RNA structure alignment. MultiSETTER combines SETTER's decomposition of RNA structures into non-overlapping structural subunits with the multiple sequence alignment algorithm ClustalW adapted for the structure alignment. The accuracy of MultiSETTER was assessed by the automatic classification of RNA structures and its comparison to SCOR annotations. In addition, MultiSETTER classification was also compared to multiple sequence alignment-based and secondary structure alignment-based classifications provided by LocARNA and RNADistance tools, respectively. MultiSETTER precompiled Windows libraries, as well as the C++ source code, are freely available from http://siret.cz/multisetter.

  14. Microsatellite diversity delineates genetic relationships of Shia and Sunni Muslim populations of Uttar Pradesh, India.

    PubMed

    Eaaswarkhanth, Muthukrishnan; Dubey, Bhawna; Ramakodi Meganathan, Poorlin; Noor, Sabahat; Haque, Ikramul

    2009-08-01

    In this study we characterize the genetic diversity and relationships between the Shia and Sunni Muslim populations of North India and geographically targeted neighboring and global populations. We examined a number of parameters of population genetic and forensic interest based on the allele frequencies from 15 autosomal STR loci (D8S1179, D21S11, D7S820, CSF1PO, D19S433, VWA, TPOX, D18S51, D3S1358, THO1, D13S317, D16S539, D2S1338, D5S818, and FGA). All the studied loci were consistent with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, except loci D18S51 and FGA for both Muslim populations, even after applying the Bonferroni correction. The combined power of exclusion and combined power of discrimination values for all 15 STR loci were 0.9999 and >0.99999, respectively, in both Muslim populations. Gene diversity values ranged from 0.6784 (TPOX) to 0.9027 (FGA) for Shia Muslims and from 0.7152 (CSF1PO) to 0.9120 (D18S51) for Sunni Muslims. The observed heterozygosity (H(o)) ranged from 0.5833 (D18S51) to 0.8595 (VWA) in Shia Muslims and from 0.6818 (CSF1PO) to 0.8333 (D21S11) in Sunni Muslims and was lower than the expected heterozygosity (H(e)) for 11 out of the 15 STRs typed. We analyzed the genetic affinities of the Shia and Sunni Muslim populations with their geographically closest neighboring North Indian, Middle Eastern, East Asian, and European populations using distance-based methods, including neighbor-joining trees and multidimensional scaling. In addition, we estimated the genetic contribution of the putative parental populations included in the analysis to the Shia and Sunni Muslim gene pool using admixture analysis. Although we observed a certain degree of genetic contribution from Iran to both Muslim populations, the results of the phylogenetic analyses based on autosomal STRs suggest genetic relatedness with some of the geographically closest neighboring Hindu religious populations.

  15. Seasonal stomatal behavior of a common desert shrub and the influence of plant neighbors.

    PubMed

    Kropp, Heather; Ogle, Kiona

    2015-02-01

    Stomata simultaneously regulate plant carbon gain and water loss, and patterns of stomatal conductance (g(s)) provide insight into water use strategies. In arid systems, g(s) varies seasonally based on factors such as water availability and temperature. Moreover, the presence and species identity of neighboring plants likely affects g(s) of the focal plant by altering available soil water and microclimate conditions. We investigated stomatal behavior in Larrea tridentata, a drought-tolerant, evergreen shrub occurring throughout the arid southwestern United States. We measured g(s) in Larrea over multiple seasons in the presence of neighbors representing different woody species. The data were analyzed in the context of a commonly used phenomenological model that relates g(s) to vapor pressure deficit (D) to understand spatial and temporal differences in stomatal behavior. We found that g(s) in Larrea was affected by neighborhood association, and these effects varied seasonally. The greatest effect of neighborhood association on g(s) occurred during the winter period, where Larrea growing alone (without neighbors) had higher g(s) compared to Larrea growing with neighbors. Larrea's stomatal sensitivity to D and reference conductance (i.e., g(s) at D = 1 kPa) also differed significantly among different neighbor associations. Random effects indicated reference g(s) varied over short time scales (daily), while stomatal sensitivity showed little daily or seasonal variation, but was notably affected by neighbor associations such that neighboring species, especially trees, reduced Larrea's sensitivity to D. Overall, seasonal dynamics and neighborhood conditions appear critical to understanding temporal and spatial variation in Larrea's physiological behavior. PMID:25526845

  16. Knowing Our Neighbors: Two In and One Out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Jennifer L.; Lurie, John C.; Ianna, Philip A.; Riedel, Adric R.; Winters, Jennifer G.; Finch, Charlie T.; Jao, Wei-Chun; Subasavage, John P.; Henry, Todd J.

    2016-01-01

    Obtaining a well-understood, volume-limited (and ultimately volume-complete) sample of nearby stars is necessary for determining a host of interesting astrophysical quantities, including the stellar luminosity and mass functions, the distribution of stellar velocities, and the stellar multiplicity fraction. Furthermore, such a sample provides insight into the local star formation history. Towards that end, the Research Consortium on Nearby Stars (RECONS) team measures trigonometric parallaxes to establish which systems truly lie within the Solar Neighborhood, emphasizing those within 25 pc. Less accurate photometric and spectroscopic estimates previously suggested LP 991-84, LHS 6167AB, and LHS 2880 as possible members of the 10-pc sample, which made them desirable candidates.Recent measurements with the CTIO/SMARTS 0.9-m telescope place LP 991-84 and LHS 6167AB at 8.6 ± 0.1 and 9.68 ± 0.09 pc, respectively, which is consistent with earlier estimates of their distances. However, the final parallax for LHS 2880 places it beyond 25 pc, at a distance of 31 ± 1 pc, despite its previous identification as a member of the 10-pc sample. The proper motions of these systems are 0.2589 ± 0.0004, 0.4394 ± 0.0003, and 0.7113 ± 0.0009 arcsec yr-1, respectively.To characterize these systems more fully, the RECONS team obtained VRI photometry for each; they range from 13.8-14.5 mag. in V. LHS 6167AB also shows signs of long-term variability in V, including a possible flare. In addition, CTIO 1.5-m spectroscopy identifies LP 991-84 and LHS 6167AB as M4.5 V systems.Even as we aspire to identify all the stars within 25 pc, we find that the 10-pc volume still holds some surprises.NSF grants AST 05-07711 and AST 09-08402, NASA-SIM, Georgia State University, the University of Virginia, Hampden-Sydney College, and the Levinson Fund of the Peninsula Community Foundation supported this research. CTIOPI was an NOAO Survey Program and continues as part of the SMARTS Consortium. We

  17. Dear enemies and nasty neighbors in crayfish: effects of social status and sex on responses to familiar and unfamiliar conspecifics.

    PubMed

    Tierney, A J; Andrews, K; Happer, K R; White, M K M

    2013-10-01

    Our experiment examined the ability of crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) to discriminate between familiar and unfamiliar conspecifics of equivalent social status, and investigated whether this species displays dear enemy or nasty neighbor effects. Pairs of size and sex matched crayfish fought to establish social status and the resulting dominant and subordinate crayfish then participated in a choice phase in which they interacted with two conspecifics tethered in an arena. Both choice conspecifics had the same social status and sex, but one was familiar (the focal animal's previous opponent) and the other was novel. We found that subordinate focal animals of both sexes spent significantly more time in proximity to the unfamiliar choice animal, behavior inconsistent with the dear enemy and nasty neighbor hypotheses. In contrast, male and female dominant focals differed significantly: females spent more time close to and fighting with the familiar choice animal while male dominants responded equivalently to the two choice animals. Thus the response of crayfish toward familiar and unfamiliar conspecifics was complex and not explained by a single hypothesis. We suggest that, in addition to familiarity and unfamiliarity, the perceived threat-level of opponents influences the behavior of crayfish toward conspecifics.

  18. Error Analysis for RADAR Neighbor Matching Localization in Linear Logarithmic Strength Varying Wi-Fi Environment

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Zengshan; Xu, Kunjie; Yu, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    This paper studies the statistical errors for the fingerprint-based RADAR neighbor matching localization with the linearly calibrated reference points (RPs) in logarithmic received signal strength (RSS) varying Wi-Fi environment. To the best of our knowledge, little comprehensive analysis work has appeared on the error performance of neighbor matching localization with respect to the deployment of RPs. However, in order to achieve the efficient and reliable location-based services (LBSs) as well as the ubiquitous context-awareness in Wi-Fi environment, much attention has to be paid to the highly accurate and cost-efficient localization systems. To this end, the statistical errors by the widely used neighbor matching localization are significantly discussed in this paper to examine the inherent mathematical relations between the localization errors and the locations of RPs by using a basic linear logarithmic strength varying model. Furthermore, based on the mathematical demonstrations and some testing results, the closed-form solutions to the statistical errors by RADAR neighbor matching localization can be an effective tool to explore alternative deployment of fingerprint-based neighbor matching localization systems in the future. PMID:24683349

  19. Plant Clonal Integration Mediates the Horizontal Redistribution of Soil Resources, Benefiting Neighboring Plants.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xue-Hua; Zhang, Ya-Lin; Liu, Zhi-Lan; Gao, Shu-Qin; Song, Yao-Bin; Liu, Feng-Hong; Dong, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Resources such as water taken up by plants can be released into soils through hydraulic redistribution and can also be translocated by clonal integration within a plant clonal network. We hypothesized that the resources from one (donor) microsite could be translocated within a clonal network, released into different (recipient) microsites and subsequently used by neighbor plants in the recipient microsite. To test these hypotheses, we conducted two experiments in which connected and disconnected ramet pairs of Potentilla anserina were grown under both homogeneous and heterogeneous water regimes, with seedlings of Artemisia ordosica as neighbors. The isotopes [(15)N] and deuterium were used to trace the translocation of nitrogen and water, respectively, within the clonal network. The water and nitrogen taken up by P. anserina ramets in the donor microsite were translocated into the connected ramets in the recipient microsites. Most notably, portions of the translocated water and nitrogen were released into the recipient microsite and were used by the neighboring A. ordosica, which increased growth of the neighboring A. ordosica significantly. Therefore, our hypotheses were supported, and plant clonal integration mediated the horizontal hydraulic redistribution of resources, thus benefiting neighboring plants. Such a plant clonal integration-mediated resource redistribution in horizontal space may have substantial effects on the interspecific relations and composition of the community and consequently on ecosystem processes.

  20. Handling Neighbor Discovery and Rendezvous Consistency with Weighted Quorum-Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    Own, Chung-Ming; Meng, Zhaopeng; Liu, Kehan

    2015-01-01

    Neighbor discovery and the power of sensors play an important role in the formation of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) and mobile networks. Many asynchronous protocols based on wake-up time scheduling have been proposed to enable neighbor discovery among neighboring nodes for the energy saving, especially in the difficulty of clock synchronization. However, existing researches are divided two parts with the neighbor-discovery methods, one is the quorum-based protocols and the other is co-primality based protocols. Their distinction is on the arrangements of time slots, the former uses the quorums in the matrix, the latter adopts the numerical analysis. In our study, we propose the weighted heuristic quorum system (WQS), which is based on the quorum algorithm to eliminate redundant paths of active slots. We demonstrate the specification of our system: fewer active slots are required, the referring rate is balanced, and remaining power is considered particularly when a device maintains rendezvous with discovered neighbors. The evaluation results showed that our proposed method can effectively reschedule the active slots and save the computing time of the network system. PMID:26404297

  1. Image Geo-Localization Based on Multiple Nearest Neighbor Feature Matching Using Generalized Graphs.

    PubMed

    Zamir, Amir Roshan; Shah, Mubarak

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we present a new framework for geo-locating an image utilizing a novel multiple nearest neighbor feature matching method using Generalized Minimum Clique Graphs (GMCP). First, we extract local features (e.g., SIFT) from the query image and retrieve a number of nearest neighbors for each query feature from the reference data set. Next, we apply our GMCP-based feature matching to select a single nearest neighbor for each query feature such that all matches are globally consistent. Our approach to feature matching is based on the proposition that the first nearest neighbors are not necessarily the best choices for finding correspondences in image matching. Therefore, the proposed method considers multiple reference nearest neighbors as potential matches and selects the correct ones by enforcing consistency among their global features (e.g., GIST) using GMCP. In this context, we argue that using a robust distance function for finding the similarity between the global features is essential for the cases where the query matches multiple reference images with dissimilar global features. Towards this end, we propose a robust distance function based on the Gaussian Radial Basis Function (G-RBF). We evaluated the proposed framework on a new data set of 102k street view images; the experiments show it outperforms the state of the art by 10 percent.

  2. Plant Clonal Integration Mediates the Horizontal Redistribution of Soil Resources, Benefiting Neighboring Plants

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xue-Hua; Zhang, Ya-Lin; Liu, Zhi-Lan; Gao, Shu-Qin; Song, Yao-Bin; Liu, Feng-Hong; Dong, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Resources such as water taken up by plants can be released into soils through hydraulic redistribution and can also be translocated by clonal integration within a plant clonal network. We hypothesized that the resources from one (donor) microsite could be translocated within a clonal network, released into different (recipient) microsites and subsequently used by neighbor plants in the recipient microsite. To test these hypotheses, we conducted two experiments in which connected and disconnected ramet pairs of Potentilla anserina were grown under both homogeneous and heterogeneous water regimes, with seedlings of Artemisia ordosica as neighbors. The isotopes [15N] and deuterium were used to trace the translocation of nitrogen and water, respectively, within the clonal network. The water and nitrogen taken up by P. anserina ramets in the donor microsite were translocated into the connected ramets in the recipient microsites. Most notably, portions of the translocated water and nitrogen were released into the recipient microsite and were used by the neighboring A. ordosica, which increased growth of the neighboring A. ordosica significantly. Therefore, our hypotheses were supported, and plant clonal integration mediated the horizontal hydraulic redistribution of resources, thus benefiting neighboring plants. Such a plant clonal integration-mediated resource redistribution in horizontal space may have substantial effects on the interspecific relations and composition of the community and consequently on ecosystem processes. PMID:26904051

  3. Error analysis for RADAR neighbor matching localization in linear logarithmic strength varying Wi-Fi environment.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mu; Tian, Zengshan; Xu, Kunjie; Yu, Xiang; Wu, Haibo

    2014-01-01

    This paper studies the statistical errors for the fingerprint-based RADAR neighbor matching localization with the linearly calibrated reference points (RPs) in logarithmic received signal strength (RSS) varying Wi-Fi environment. To the best of our knowledge, little comprehensive analysis work has appeared on the error performance of neighbor matching localization with respect to the deployment of RPs. However, in order to achieve the efficient and reliable location-based services (LBSs) as well as the ubiquitous context-awareness in Wi-Fi environment, much attention has to be paid to the highly accurate and cost-efficient localization systems. To this end, the statistical errors by the widely used neighbor matching localization are significantly discussed in this paper to examine the inherent mathematical relations between the localization errors and the locations of RPs by using a basic linear logarithmic strength varying model. Furthermore, based on the mathematical demonstrations and some testing results, the closed-form solutions to the statistical errors by RADAR neighbor matching localization can be an effective tool to explore alternative deployment of fingerprint-based neighbor matching localization systems in the future.

  4. Improved locality-sensitive hashing method for the approximate nearest neighbor problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ying-Hua; Ma, Ting-Huai; Zhong, Shui-Ming; Cao, Jie; Wang, Xin; Abdullah, Al-Dhelaan

    2014-08-01

    In recent years, the nearest neighbor search (NNS) problem has been widely used in various interesting applications. Locality-sensitive hashing (LSH), a popular algorithm for the approximate nearest neighbor problem, is proved to be an efficient method to solve the NNS problem in the high-dimensional and large-scale databases. Based on the scheme of p-stable LSH, this paper introduces a novel improvement algorithm called randomness-based locality-sensitive hashing (RLSH) based on p-stable LSH. Our proposed algorithm modifies the query strategy that it randomly selects a certain hash table to project the query point instead of mapping the query point into all hash tables in the period of the nearest neighbor query and reconstructs the candidate points for finding the nearest neighbors. This improvement strategy ensures that RLSH spends less time searching for the nearest neighbors than the p-stable LSH algorithm to keep a high recall. Besides, this strategy is proved to promote the diversity of the candidate points even with fewer hash tables. Experiments are executed on the synthetic dataset and open dataset. The results show that our method can cost less time consumption and less space requirements than the p-stable LSH while balancing the same recall.

  5. Assessing the Impacts of Reduced Noise Operations of Wind Turbines on Neighbor Annoyance: A Preliminary Analysis in Vinalhaven, Maine

    SciTech Connect

    Hoen, Ben; Wiser, Ryan; Eckholdt, Haftan

    2010-06-23

    differences in turbine sound outputs that did exist might have been masked by higher (non-turbine) wind sound levels that were coincident with NRO periods. Because this preliminary test only included a small portion of the population surrounding the turbines, the sample of self-reported ratings was itself very small. In addition, the conditions varied greatly over the study period, as described in the report that follows. Consequently, the results presented here should be considered preliminary, and further data collection and analysis are warranted. The main findings of this preliminary study are: (1) As planned, periods in which the NRO was engaged were found to have noticeably lower turbine rotational speeds (rpm), based on turbine operational data. (2) 11% of responses overall indicated that the turbines were perceived as either 'very' or 'extremely' loud at the time they were logged, and roughly two thirds of those (7% overall) indicated the sounds to be 'very' or 'extremely' annoying. (3) Self-reported turbine loudness and annoyance ratings were higher during the night and when the wind was from the North (participants in the study were located to the east and south of the turbines). (4) Self-reported turbine loudness and annoyance ratings were generally found to be lower during the NRO periods, but these observed differences are relatively small in magnitude, and are not statistically significant. (5) There is some limited evidence that high-speed surface winds mask self-reported turbine loudness and annoyance ratings. Therefore, because NRO settings are only engaged during periods of high winds, the true effects of the NRO adjustments might be diluted to some degree. (6) The results of this preliminary assessment should not be applied to the full population of homeowners near the turbines in Vinalhaven, Maine because the potentially most-sensitive individuals (those most vocal of their dislike of the turbine sounds) opted not to participate in the study, and because

  6. A comparison of the spatial linear model to Nearest Neighbor (k-NN) methods for forestry applications.

    PubMed

    Ver Hoef, Jay M; Temesgen, Hailemariam

    2013-01-01

    Forest surveys provide critical information for many diverse interests. Data are often collected from samples, and from these samples, maps of resources and estimates of aerial totals or averages are required. In this paper, two approaches for mapping and estimating totals; the spatial linear model (SLM) and k-NN (k-Nearest Neighbor) are compared, theoretically, through simulations, and as applied to real forestry data. While both methods have desirable properties, a review shows that the SLM has prediction optimality properties, and can be quite robust. Simulations of artificial populations and resamplings of real forestry data show that the SLM has smaller empirical root-mean-squared prediction errors (RMSPE) for a wide variety of data types, with generally less bias and better interval coverage than k-NN. These patterns held for both point predictions and for population totals or averages, with the SLM reducing RMSPE from 9% to 67% over some popular k-NN methods, with SLM also more robust to spatially imbalanced sampling. Estimating prediction standard errors remains a problem for k-NN predictors, despite recent attempts using model-based methods. Our conclusions are that the SLM should generally be used rather than k-NN if the goal is accurate mapping or estimation of population totals or averages.

  7. Polymers with nearest- and next nearest-neighbor interactions on the Husimi lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Tiago J.

    2016-04-01

    The exact grand-canonical solution of a generalized interacting self-avoid walk (ISAW) model, placed on a Husimi lattice built with squares, is presented. In this model, beyond the traditional interaction {ω }1={{{e}}}{ɛ 1/{k}BT} between (nonconsecutive) monomers on nearest-neighbor (NN) sites, an additional energy {ɛ }2 is associated to next-NN (NNN) monomers. Three definitions of NNN sites/interactions are considered, where each monomer can have, effectively, at most two, four, or six NNN monomers on the Husimi lattice. The phase diagrams found in all cases have (qualitatively) the same thermodynamic properties: a non-polymerized (NP) and a polymerized (P) phase separated by a critical and a coexistence surface that meet at a tricritical (θ-) line. This θ-line is found even when one of the interactions is repulsive, existing for {ω }1 in the range [0,∞ ), i.e., for {ɛ }1/{k}BT in the range [-∞ ,∞ ). Thus, counterintuitively, a θ-point exists even for an infinite repulsion between NN monomers ({ω }1=0), being associated to a coil-‘soft globule’ transition. In the limit of an infinite repulsive force between NNN monomers, however, the coil-globule transition disappears, and only NP-P continuous transition is observed. This particular case, with {ω }2=0, is also solved exactly on the square lattice, using a transfer matrix calculation where a discontinuous NP-P transition is found. For attractive and repulsive forces between NN and NNN monomers, respectively, the model becomes quite similar to the semiflexible-ISAW one, whose crystalline phase is not observed here, as a consequence of the frustration due to competing NN and NNN forces. The mapping of the phase diagrams in canonical ones is discussed and compared with recent results from Monte Carlo simulations on the square lattice.

  8. What Will the Neighbors Think? Building Large-Scale Science Projects Around the World

    ScienceCinema

    Jones, Craig; Mrotzek, Christian; Toge, Nobu; Sarno, Doug

    2016-07-12

    Public participation is an essential ingredient for turning the International Linear Collider into a reality. Wherever the proposed particle accelerator is sited in the world, its neighbors -- in any country -- will have something to say about hosting a 35-kilometer-long collider in their backyards. When it comes to building large-scale physics projects, almost every laboratory has a story to tell. Three case studies from Japan, Germany and the US will be presented to examine how community relations are handled in different parts of the world. How do particle physics laboratories interact with their local communities? How do neighbors react to building large-scale projects in each region? How can the lessons learned from past experiences help in building the next big project? These and other questions will be discussed to engage the audience in an active dialogue about how a large-scale project like the ILC can be a good neighbor.

  9. The role of neighboring infected cattle in bovine leukemia virus transmission risk.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Sota; Tsutsui, Toshiyuki; Yamamoto, Takehisa; Hayama, Yoko; Muroga, Norihiko; Konishi, Misako; Kameyama, Ken-Ichiro; Murakami, Kenji

    2015-07-01

    A cohort study was conducted to evaluate the risk of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) transmission to uninfected cattle by adjacent infected cattle in 6 dairy farms. Animals were initially tested in 2010-2011 using a commercial ELISA kit. Uninfected cattle were repeatedly tested every 4 to 6 months until fall of 2012. The Cox proportional hazard model with frailty showed that uninfected cattle neighboring to infected cattle (n=53) had a significant higher risk of seroconversion than those without any infected neighbors (n=81) (hazard ratio: 12.4, P=0.001), implying that neighboring infected cattle were a significant risk factor for BLV transmission. This finding provides scientific support for animal health authorities and farmers to segregate infected cattle on farms to prevent spread of BLV.

  10. The role of neighboring infected cattle in bovine leukemia virus transmission risk

    PubMed Central

    KOBAYASHI, Sota; TSUTSUI, Toshiyuki; YAMAMOTO, Takehisa; HAYAMA, Yoko; MUROGA, Norihiko; KONISHI, Misako; KAMEYAMA, Ken-ichiro; MURAKAMI, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    A cohort study was conducted to evaluate the risk of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) transmission to uninfected cattle by adjacent infected cattle in 6 dairy farms. Animals were initially tested in 2010–2011 using a commercial ELISA kit. Uninfected cattle were repeatedly tested every 4 to 6 months until fall of 2012. The Cox proportional hazard model with frailty showed that uninfected cattle neighboring to infected cattle (n=53) had a significant higher risk of seroconversion than those without any infected neighbors (n=81) (hazard ratio: 12.4, P=0.001), implying that neighboring infected cattle were a significant risk factor for BLV transmission. This finding provides scientific support for animal health authorities and farmers to segregate infected cattle on farms to prevent spread of BLV. PMID:25754652

  11. Learn good from bad: Effects of good and bad neighbors in spatial prisoners' dilemma games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Peng

    2015-10-01

    Cooperation is vital for the human society and this study focuses on how to promote cooperation. In our stratification model, there exist three classes: two minorities are elites who are prone to cooperate and scoundrels who are born to defect; one majority is the class of common people. Agents of these three classes interact with each other on a square lattice. Commons' cooperation and its factors are investigated. Contradicting our common sense, it indicates that elites play a negative role while scoundrels play a positive one in promoting commons' cooperation. Besides, effects of good and bad neighbors vary with temptation. When the temptation is smaller the positive effect is able to overcome the negative effect, but the later prevails when the temptation is larger. It concludes that common people are more prone to cooperate in harsh environment with bad neighbors, and a better environment with good neighbors merely leads to laziness and free riding of commons.

  12. A fast approximate nearest neighbor search algorithm in the Hamming space.

    PubMed

    Esmaeili, Mani Malek; Ward, Rabab Kreidieh; Fatourechi, Mehrdad

    2012-12-01

    A fast approximate nearest neighbor search algorithm for the (binary) Hamming space is proposed. The proposed Error Weighted Hashing (EWH) algorithm is up to 20 times faster than the popular locality sensitive hashing (LSH) algorithm and works well even for large nearest neighbor distances where LSH fails. EWH significantly reduces the number of candidate nearest neighbors by weighing them based on the difference between their hash vectors. EWH can be used for multimedia retrieval and copy detection systems that are based on binary fingerprinting. On a fingerprint database with more than 1,000 videos, for a specific detection accuracy, we demonstrate that EWH is more than 10 times faster than LSH. For the same retrieval time, we show that EWH has a significantly better detection accuracy with a 15 times lower error rate.

  13. Neighbor-Dependent Ramachandran Probability Distributions of Amino Acids Developed from a Hierarchical Dirichlet Process Model

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Rajib; Jordan, Michael I.; Dunbrack, Roland L.

    2010-01-01

    Distributions of the backbone dihedral angles of proteins have been studied for over 40 years. While many statistical analyses have been presented, only a handful of probability densities are publicly available for use in structure validation and structure prediction methods. The available distributions differ in a number of important ways, which determine their usefulness for various purposes. These include: 1) input data size and criteria for structure inclusion (resolution, R-factor, etc.); 2) filtering of suspect conformations and outliers using B-factors or other features; 3) secondary structure of input data (e.g., whether helix and sheet are included; whether beta turns are included); 4) the method used for determining probability densities ranging from simple histograms to modern nonparametric density estimation; and 5) whether they include nearest neighbor effects on the distribution of conformations in different regions of the Ramachandran map. In this work, Ramachandran probability distributions are presented for residues in protein loops from a high-resolution data set with filtering based on calculated electron densities. Distributions for all 20 amino acids (with cis and trans proline treated separately) have been determined, as well as 420 left-neighbor and 420 right-neighbor dependent distributions. The neighbor-independent and neighbor-dependent probability densities have been accurately estimated using Bayesian nonparametric statistical analysis based on the Dirichlet process. In particular, we used hierarchical Dirichlet process priors, which allow sharing of information between densities for a particular residue type and different neighbor residue types. The resulting distributions are tested in a loop modeling benchmark with the program Rosetta, and are shown to improve protein loop conformation prediction significantly. The distributions are available at http://dunbrack.fccc.edu/hdp. PMID:20442867

  14. Do masked orthographic neighbor primes facilitate or inhibit the processing of Kanji compound words?

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Mariko; Sears, Christopher R; Hino, Yasushi; Lupker, Stephen J

    2014-04-01

    In the masked priming paradigm, when a word target is primed by a higher frequency neighbor (e.g., blue-BLUR), lexical decision latencies are slower than when the same word is primed by an unrelated word of equivalent frequency (e.g., care-BLUR). This inhibitory neighbor priming effect (e.g., Davis & Lupker, 2006; Segui & Grainger, 1990) is taken as evidence for the lexical competition process that is an important component of localist activation-based models of visual word recognition (Davis, 2003; Grainger & Jacobs, 1996; McClelland & Rumelhart, 1981). The present research looked for evidence of an inhibitory neighbor priming effect using words written in Japanese Kanji, a logographic, nonalphabetic script. In 4 experiments (Experiments 1A, 1B, 3A, and 3B), inhibitory neighbor priming effects were observed for low-frequency targets primed by higher frequency Kanji word neighbors ([symbol in text]). In contrast, there was a significant facilitation effect when targets were primed by Kanji nonword neighbors ([symbols in text]; Experiments 2 and 3). Significant facilitation was also observed when targets were primed by single constituent Kanji characters ([symbols in text]; Experiment 4). Taken together, these results suggest that lexical competition plays a role in the recognition of Kanji words, just as it does for words in alphabetic languages. However, in Kanji, and likely in other logographic languages, the effect of lexical competition appears to be counteracted by facilitory morphological priming due to the repetition of a morphological unit in the prime and target (i.e., in Kanji, each character represents a morpheme). PMID:24364705

  15. Phase Correlations at Neighboring Intensity Critical Points in Gaussian Random Wave Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Isaac

    1998-11-01

    Phase correlations are studied for neighboring critical points of the intensity in an isotropic Gaussian random wave field. Significant correlations and anticorrelations are found that extend out to at least the fifth nearest neighbors. A theoretical interpretation of the empirical data is attempted within the framework of the phase autocorrelation and the probability-density functions of extended two-dimensional random phase fields. It is found, however, that adaptations of these theoretical models are unable to account satisfactorily, or even qualitatively, for the extensive phase correlations that are present in these fields.

  16. Distribution of glutamine and asparagine residues and their near neighbors in peptides and proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, A B; Robinson, L R

    1991-01-01

    In a statistical study of neighboring residues in 1465 peptides and proteins comprising 450,431 residues, it was found that the preferences for residues neighboring to glutamine and asparagine residues are consistent with the hypothesis that the rates of deamidation of these residues are of biological significance. Some dipeptide and tripeptide structures have special usefulness and some are especially undesirable. More such structures exist for amide residues than for other residues, and their specific types are those most relevant to the deamidation of amide residues under biological conditions. PMID:1924347

  17. Long-term effect of September 11 on the political behavior of victims’ families and neighbors

    PubMed Central

    Hersh, Eitan D.

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates the long-term effect of September 11, 2001 on the political behaviors of victims’ families and neighbors. Relative to comparable individuals, family members and residential neighbors of victims have become—and have stayed—significantly more active in politics in the last 12 years, and they have become more Republican on account of the terrorist attacks. The method used to demonstrate these findings leverages the random nature of the terrorist attack to estimate a causal effect and exploits new techniques to link multiple, individual-level, governmental databases to measure behavioral change without relying on surveys or aggregate analysis. PMID:24324145

  18. Efficient neighbor list calculation for molecular simulation of colloidal systems using graphics processing units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Michael P.; Anderson, Joshua A.; Nikoubashman, Arash; Glotzer, Sharon C.; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.

    2016-06-01

    We present an algorithm based on linear bounding volume hierarchies (LBVHs) for computing neighbor (Verlet) lists using graphics processing units (GPUs) for colloidal systems characterized by large size disparities. We compare this to a GPU implementation of the current state-of-the-art CPU algorithm based on stenciled cell lists. We report benchmarks for both neighbor list algorithms in a Lennard-Jones binary mixture with synthetic interaction range disparity and a realistic colloid solution. LBVHs outperformed the stenciled cell lists for systems with moderate or large size disparity and dilute or semidilute fractions of large particles, conditions typical of colloidal systems.

  19. Long-term effect of September 11 on the political behavior of victims' families and neighbors.

    PubMed

    Hersh, Eitan D

    2013-12-24

    This article investigates the long-term effect of September 11, 2001 on the political behaviors of victims' families and neighbors. Relative to comparable individuals, family members and residential neighbors of victims have become--and have stayed--significantly more active in politics in the last 12 years, and they have become more Republican on account of the terrorist attacks. The method used to demonstrate these findings leverages the random nature of the terrorist attack to estimate a causal effect and exploits new techniques to link multiple, individual-level, governmental databases to measure behavioral change without relying on surveys or aggregate analysis.

  20. Sibling, peer, neighbor, and schoolmate correlations as indicators of the importance of context for adolescent development.

    PubMed

    Duncan, G J; Boisjoly, J; Harris, K M

    2001-08-01

    We use nationally representative data to calculate correlations in achievement and delinquency between genetically differentiated siblings within a family, between peers as defined by adolescents' "best friend" nominations, between schoolmates living in the same neighborhood, and between grademates within a school. We find the largest correlations between siblings, especially identical twins. Grademate and neighbor correlations are small. Peer-based correlations are considerably larger than grademate and neighbor correlations but not larger than most sibling correlations. The data suggest that family-based factors are several times more powerful than neighborhood and school contexts in affecting adolescents' achievement and behavior. PMID:11523270

  1. Effect of further-neighbor interactions on the magnetization behaviors of the Ising model on a triangular lattice.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Zhuo, W Z; Qin, M H; Dong, S; Zeng, M; Lu, X B; Gao, X S; Liu, J-M

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we study the magnetization behaviors of the classical Ising model on the triangular lattice using Monte Carlo simulations, and pay particular attention to the effect of further-neighbor interactions. Several fascinating spin states are identified to be stabilized in certain magnetic field regions, respectively, resulting in the magnetization plateaus at 2/3, 5/7, 7/9 and 5/6 of the saturation magnetization M S, in addition to the well-known plateaus at 0, 1/3 and 1/2 of M S. The stabilization of these interesting orders can be understood as the consequence of the competition between Zeeman energy and exchange energy. PMID:27356040

  2. Effect of further-neighbor interactions on the magnetization behaviors of the Ising model on a triangular lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Zhuo, W. Z.; Qin, M. H.; Dong, S.; Zeng, M.; Lu, X. B.; Gao, X. S.; Liu, J.-M.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we study the magnetization behaviors of the classical Ising model on the triangular lattice using Monte Carlo simulations, and pay particular attention to the effect of further-neighbor interactions. Several fascinating spin states are identified to be stabilized in certain magnetic field regions, respectively, resulting in the magnetization plateaus at 2/3, 5/7, 7/9 and 5/6 of the saturation magnetization M S, in addition to the well-known plateaus at 0, 1/3 and 1/2 of M S. The stabilization of these interesting orders can be understood as the consequence of the competition between Zeeman energy and exchange energy.

  3. A novel hybrid classification model of genetic algorithms, modified k-Nearest Neighbor and developed backpropagation neural network.

    PubMed

    Salari, Nader; Shohaimi, Shamarina; Najafi, Farid; Nallappan, Meenakshii; Karishnarajah, Isthrinayagy

    2014-01-01

    Among numerous artificial intelligence approaches, k-Nearest Neighbor algorithms, genetic algorithms, and artificial neural networks are considered as the most common and effective methods in classification problems in numerous studies. In the present study, the results of the implementation of a novel hybrid feature selection-classification model using the above mentioned methods are presented. The purpose is benefitting from the synergies obtained from combining these technologies for the development of classification models. Such a combination creates an opportunity to invest in the strength of each algorithm, and is an approach to make up for their deficiencies. To develop proposed model, with the aim of obtaining the best array of features, first, feature ranking techniques such as the Fisher's discriminant ratio and class separability criteria were used to prioritize features. Second, the obtained results that included arrays of the top-ranked features were used as the initial population of a genetic algorithm to produce optimum arrays of features. Third, using a modified k-Nearest Neighbor method as well as an improved method of backpropagation neural networks, the classification process was advanced based on optimum arrays of the features selected by genetic algorithms. The performance of the proposed model was compared with thirteen well-known classification models based on seven datasets. Furthermore, the statistical analysis was performed using the Friedman test followed by post-hoc tests. The experimental findings indicated that the novel proposed hybrid model resulted in significantly better classification performance compared with all 13 classification methods. Finally, the performance results of the proposed model was benchmarked against the best ones reported as the state-of-the-art classifiers in terms of classification accuracy for the same data sets. The substantial findings of the comprehensive comparative study revealed that performance of the

  4. A novel hybrid classification model of genetic algorithms, modified k-Nearest Neighbor and developed backpropagation neural network.

    PubMed

    Salari, Nader; Shohaimi, Shamarina; Najafi, Farid; Nallappan, Meenakshii; Karishnarajah, Isthrinayagy

    2014-01-01

    Among numerous artificial intelligence approaches, k-Nearest Neighbor algorithms, genetic algorithms, and artificial neural networks are considered as the most common and effective methods in classification problems in numerous studies. In the present study, the results of the implementation of a novel hybrid feature selection-classification model using the above mentioned methods are presented. The purpose is benefitting from the synergies obtained from combining these technologies for the development of classification models. Such a combination creates an opportunity to invest in the strength of each algorithm, and is an approach to make up for their deficiencies. To develop proposed model, with the aim of obtaining the best array of features, first, feature ranking techniques such as the Fisher's discriminant ratio and class separability criteria were used to prioritize features. Second, the obtained results that included arrays of the top-ranked features were used as the initial population of a genetic algorithm to produce optimum arrays of features. Third, using a modified k-Nearest Neighbor method as well as an improved method of backpropagation neural networks, the classification process was advanced based on optimum arrays of the features selected by genetic algorithms. The performance of the proposed model was compared with thirteen well-known classification models based on seven datasets. Furthermore, the statistical analysis was performed using the Friedman test followed by post-hoc tests. The experimental findings indicated that the novel proposed hybrid model resulted in significantly better classification performance compared with all 13 classification methods. Finally, the performance results of the proposed model was benchmarked against the best ones reported as the state-of-the-art classifiers in terms of classification accuracy for the same data sets. The substantial findings of the comprehensive comparative study revealed that performance of the

  5. A Novel Hybrid Classification Model of Genetic Algorithms, Modified k-Nearest Neighbor and Developed Backpropagation Neural Network

    PubMed Central

    Salari, Nader; Shohaimi, Shamarina; Najafi, Farid; Nallappan, Meenakshii; Karishnarajah, Isthrinayagy

    2014-01-01

    Among numerous artificial intelligence approaches, k-Nearest Neighbor algorithms, genetic algorithms, and artificial neural networks are considered as the most common and effective methods in classification problems in numerous studies. In the present study, the results of the implementation of a novel hybrid feature selection-classification model using the above mentioned methods are presented. The purpose is benefitting from the synergies obtained from combining these technologies for the development of classification models. Such a combination creates an opportunity to invest in the strength of each algorithm, and is an approach to make up for their deficiencies. To develop proposed model, with the aim of obtaining the best array of features, first, feature ranking techniques such as the Fisher's discriminant ratio and class separability criteria were used to prioritize features. Second, the obtained results that included arrays of the top-ranked features were used as the initial population of a genetic algorithm to produce optimum arrays of features. Third, using a modified k-Nearest Neighbor method as well as an improved method of backpropagation neural networks, the classification process was advanced based on optimum arrays of the features selected by genetic algorithms. The performance of the proposed model was compared with thirteen well-known classification models based on seven datasets. Furthermore, the statistical analysis was performed using the Friedman test followed by post-hoc tests. The experimental findings indicated that the novel proposed hybrid model resulted in significantly better classification performance compared with all 13 classification methods. Finally, the performance results of the proposed model was benchmarked against the best ones reported as the state-of-the-art classifiers in terms of classification accuracy for the same data sets. The substantial findings of the comprehensive comparative study revealed that performance of the

  6. GPR measurements and estimation for road subgrade damage caused by neighboring train vibration load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yonghui; Lu, Gang; Ge, Shuangcheng

    2015-04-01

    Generally, road can be simplified as a three-layer structure, including subgrade, subbase and pavement. Subgrade is the native material underneath a constructed road. It is commonly compacted before the road construction, and sometimes stabilized by the addition of asphalt, lime or other modifiers. As the mainly supporting structure, subgrade damage would lead in pavement settlement, displacement and crack. Assessment and monitoring of the subgrade condition currently involves trial pitting and subgrade sampling. However there is a practical limit on spatial density at which trail pits and cores can be taken. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) has been widely used to characterize highway pavement profiling, concrete structure inspection and railroad track ballast estimation. GPR can improve the economics of road maintenance. Long-term train vibration load might seriously influence the stability of the subgrade of neighboring road. Pavement settlement and obvious cracks have been found at a municipal road cross-under a railway with culvert box method. GPR test was conducted to estimate the subgrade and soil within 2.0 m depth for the further road maintenance. Two survey lines were designed in each lane, and total 12 GPR sections have been implemented. Considering both the penetrating range and the resolution, a antenna with a 500 MHz central frequency was chosen for on-site GPR data collection. For data acquisition, we used the default operating environment and scanning parameters for the RAMAC system: 60kHz transmission rate, 50 ns time window, 1024 samples per scan and 0.1 m step-size. Continuous operation was used; the antenna was placed on the road surface and slowly moved along the road. The strong surrounding disturbance related to railroad and attachments, might decrease the reliability of interpretation results. Some routine process methods (including the background removing, filtering) have been applied to suppress the background noise. Additionally, attribute

  7. Response of Ivyleaf Morningglory [(Ipomoea hederacea (L.) Jacq.] to Neighboring Plants and Objects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field observations of morningglory (Ipomoea spp.) noted that many plants grew out of places of comparable competitive advantage (alleys in field experiments with little or no vegetation) onto neighboring plants or structures that allowed a climbing habitat. A total of 223 morningglory plants growin...

  8. Text Categorization Based on K-Nearest Neighbor Approach for Web Site Classification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwon, Oh-Woog; Lee, Jong-Hyeok

    2003-01-01

    Discusses text categorization and Web site classification and proposes a three-step classification system that includes the use of Web pages linked with the home page. Highlights include the k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) approach; improving performance with a feature selection method and a term weighting scheme using HTML tags; and similarity…

  9. Nearest Neighbor Searching in Binary Search Trees: Simulation of a Multiprocessor System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Mark; Willett, Peter

    1987-01-01

    Describes the simulation of a nearest neighbor searching algorithm for document retrieval using a pool of microprocessors. Three techniques are described which allow parallel searching of a binary search tree as well as a PASCAL-based system, PASSIM, which can simulate these techniques. Fifty-six references are provided. (Author/LRW)

  10. Lexical Precision in Skilled Readers: Individual Differences in Masked Neighbor Priming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Sally; Hersch, Jolyn

    2010-01-01

    Two experiments investigated the relationship between masked form priming and individual differences in reading and spelling proficiency among university students. Experiment 1 assessed neighbor priming for 4-letter word targets from high- and low-density neighborhoods in 97 university students. The overall results replicated previous evidence of…

  11. Testing for Lexical Competition during Reading: Fast Priming with Orthographic Neighbors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakayama, Mariko; Sears, Christopher R.; Lupker, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have found that masked word primes that are orthographic neighbors of the target inhibit lexical decision latencies (Davis & Lupker, 2006; Nakayama, Sears, & Lupker, 2008), consistent with the predictions of lexical competition models of visual word identification (e.g., Grainger & Jacobs, 1996). In contrast, using the fast priming…

  12. Living alongside more affluent neighbors predicts greater involvement in antisocial behavior among low-income boys

    PubMed Central

    Odgers, Candice L.; Donley, Sachiko; Caspi, Avshalom; Bates, Christopher J.; Moffitt, Terrie E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The creation of economically mixed communities has been proposed as one way to improve the life outcomes of children growing up in poverty. However, whether low-income children benefit from living alongside more affluent neighbors is unknown. Method Prospectively gathered data on over 1,600 children from the Environmental Risk (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin Study living in urban environments is used to test whether living alongside more affluent neighbors (measured via high-resolution geo-spatial indices) predicts low-income children’s antisocial behavior (reported by mothers and teachers at the ages of 5, 7, 10, and 12). Results Results indicated that low-income boys (but not girls) surrounded by more affluent neighbors had higher levels of antisocial behavior than their peers embedded in concentrated poverty. The negative effect of growing up alongside more affluent neighbors on low-income boys’ antisocial behavior held across childhood and after controlling for key neighborhood and family-level factors. Conclusions Findings suggest that efforts to create more economically mixed communities for children, if not properly supported, may have iatrogenic effects on boys’ antisocial behavior. PMID:25611118

  13. Loving All Your Neighbors: Why Community Colleges Need the Academic Study of Religion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maley, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    This chapter explains how the study of world religions prepares the community college student to become a better citizen, worker, and neighbor. The effective middle between the pitfalls of religious relativism and religious dominance in a world religions classroom is central to this discussion of teaching critical thinking, empathy, and…

  14. Word Misperception, the Neighbor Frequency Effect, and the Role of Sentence Context: Evidence from Eye Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slattery, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    An eye movement experiment was conducted to investigate whether the processing of a word can be affected by its higher frequency neighbor (HFN). Target words with an HFN (birch) or without one (spruce) were embedded into 2 types of sentence frames: 1 in which the HFN (birth) could fit given the prior sentence context, and 1 in which it could not.…

  15. Mi Vecina es una Mujer Colpeada (My Neighbor Is a Battered Woman).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Melissa

    This book, the Spanish version of "My Neighbor is a Battered Woman," is intended as a general introduction to the problems of battered women. The format for part 1 consists of the presentation of facts about wife beating, i.e., who are victims, characteristics of batterers, the environment in which family violence exists, and services for battered…

  16. Adult and Child Semantic Neighbors of the Kroll and Potter (1984) Nonobjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storkel, Holly L.; Adlof, Suzanne M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose was to determine the number of semantic neighbors, namely, "semantic set size," for 88 nonobjects (J. F. Kroll & M. C. Potter, 1984) and determine how semantic set size related to other measures and age. Method: Data were collected from 82 adults and 92 preschool children in a discrete association task. The nonobjects were…

  17. Stuttering Attitudes among Turkish Family Generations and Neighbors from Representative Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozdemir, R. Sertan; St. Louis, Kenneth O.; Topbas, Seyhun

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Attitudes toward stuttering, measured by the "Public Opinion Survey of Human Attributes-Stuttering" ("POSHA-S"), are compared among (a) two different representative samples; (b) family generations (children, parents, and either grandparents or uncles and aunts) and neighbors; (c) children, parents, grandparents/adult relatives, and…

  18. Predicting Change for Individual Psychotherapy Clients on the Basis of their Nearest Neighbors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutz, Wolfgang; Leach, Chris; Barkham, Michael; Lucock, Mike; Stiles, William B.; Evans, Chris; Noble, Rachael; Iveson, Steve

    2005-01-01

    This study extended client-focused research by using the nearest neighbor (NN) approach, a client-specific sampling and prediction strategy derived from research on alpine avalanches. Psychotherapy clients (N = 203) seen in routine practice settings in the United Kingdom completed a battery of intake measures and then completed symptom intensity…

  19. Neighboring States See Economic Value in Early Childhood Education. Research Brief. Volume 97, Number 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Policy Forum, 2009

    2009-01-01

    As the push for economic stimulus has states contemplating economic development in new and different ways, Wisconsin may find it helpful to note the unconventional efforts of its neighbors. who have positioned themselves to reap potential long-term economic benefits from high quality early childhood care and education. Business leaders in…

  20. Integration and Analysis of Neighbor Discovery and Link Quality Estimation in Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Radi, Marjan; Dezfouli, Behnam; Abu Bakar, Kamalrulnizam; Abd Razak, Shukor

    2014-01-01

    Network connectivity and link quality information are the fundamental requirements of wireless sensor network protocols to perform their desired functionality. Most of the existing discovery protocols have only focused on the neighbor discovery problem, while a few number of them provide an integrated neighbor search and link estimation. As these protocols require a careful parameter adjustment before network deployment, they cannot provide scalable and accurate network initialization in large-scale dense wireless sensor networks with random topology. Furthermore, performance of these protocols has not entirely been evaluated yet. In this paper, we perform a comprehensive simulation study on the efficiency of employing adaptive protocols compared to the existing nonadaptive protocols for initializing sensor networks with random topology. In this regard, we propose adaptive network initialization protocols which integrate the initial neighbor discovery with link quality estimation process to initialize large-scale dense wireless sensor networks without requiring any parameter adjustment before network deployment. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first attempt to provide a detailed simulation study on the performance of integrated neighbor discovery and link quality estimation protocols for initializing sensor networks. This study can help system designers to determine the most appropriate approach for different applications. PMID:24678277

  1. Perspectives on Family, Friend and Neighbor Child Care: Research, Programs and Policy. Occasional Paper Series 15

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Rena, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    Family, friend and neighbor care has frequently been characterized in the media, and even in the early care and education field, as "substandard, unregulated care," a "fall-back" position when parents can not find or afford a regulated setting. However, up until quite recently, there was virtually no research to support any claims about this type…

  2. Salt tolerance and stress level affect plant biomass-density relationships and neighbor effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhenxing; Chen, Wenwen; Zhang, Qian; Yang, Haishui; Tang, Jianjun; Weiner, Jacob; Chen, Xin

    2014-07-01

    It has been shown that plant biomass-density relationships are altered under extreme or stressed conditions. We do not know whether variation in biomass-density relationships is a direct result of stress tolerance or occurs via changes in plant-plant interactions. Here, we evaluated biomass-density relationships and neighbor effects in six plant species that differ in salt tolerance in a salt marsh, and conducted a literature review of biomass-density relationship under higher and lower stress levels. Our field study showed that both neighbor effects and the exponent of the biomass-density relationship (α) varied among plant species with different degrees of salt tolerance. There was a positive relationship between neighbor effects (measured as relative interaction index) and α-value among the tested species. The literature review showed that α and its variation increased under higher stress. Our results indicate that plant species with different salinity tolerance differ in the direction and strength of neighbor effects, resulting in variation in biomass-density relationships. Our results support the hypothesis that differences in biomass-density relationships among species are not due to differences in stress tolerance alone, they are mediated by changes in plant-plant interactions.

  3. Latching chains in K-nearest-neighbor and modular small-world networks.

    PubMed

    Song, Sanming; Yao, Hongxun; Simonov, Alexander Yurievich

    2015-01-01

    Latching dynamics retrieve pattern sequences successively by neural adaption and pattern correlation. We have previously proposed a modular latching chain model in Song et al. (2014) to better accommodate the structured transitions in the brain. Different cortical areas have different network structures. To explore how structural parameters like rewiring probability, threshold, noise and feedback connections affect the latching dynamics, two different connection schemes, K-nearest-neighbor network and modular network both having modular structure are considered. Latching chains are measured using two proposed measures characterizing length of intra-modular latching chains and sequential inter-modular association transitions. Our main findings include: (1) With decreasing threshold coefficient and rewiring probability, both the K-nearest-neighbor network and the modular network experience quantitatively similar phase change processes. (2) The modular network exhibits selectively enhanced latching in the small-world range of connectivity. (3) The K-nearest-neighbor network is more robust to changes in rewiring probability, while the modular network is more robust to the presence of noise pattern pairs and to changes in the strength of feedback connections. According to our findings, the relationships between latching chains in K-nearest-neighbor and modular networks and different forms of cognition and information processing emerging in the brain are discussed.

  4. Nearest Neighbor Interactions Affect the Conformational Distribution in the Unfolded State of Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toal, Siobhan; Schweitzer-Stenner, Reinhard; Rybka, Karin; Schwalbe, Hardol

    2013-03-01

    In order to enable structural predictions of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) the intrinsic conformational propensities of amino acids must be complimented by information on nearest-neighbor interactions. To explore the influence of nearest-neighbors on conformational distributions, we preformed a joint vibrational (Infrared, Vibrational Circular Dichroism (VCD), polarized Raman) and 2D-NMR study of selected GxyG host-guest peptides: GDyG, GSyG, GxLG, GxVG, where x/y ={A,K,LV}. D and S (L and V) were chosen at the x (y) position due to their observance to drastically change the distribution of alanine in xAy tripeptide sequences in truncated coil libraries. The conformationally sensitive amide' profiles of the respective spectra were analyzed in terms of a statistical ensemble described as a superposition of 2D-Gaussian functions in Ramachandran space representing sub-ensembles of pPII-, β-strand-, helical-, and turn-like conformations. Our analysis and simulation of the amide I' band profiles exploits excitonic coupling between the local amide I' vibrational modes in the tetra-peptides. The resulting distributions reveal that D and S, which themselves have high propensities for turn-structures, strongly affect the conformational distribution of their downstream neighbor. Taken together, our results indicate that Dx and Sx motifs might act as conformational randomizers in proteins, attenuating intrinsic propensities of neighboring residues. Overall, our results show that nearest neighbor interactions contribute significantly to the Gibbs energy landscape of disordered peptides and proteins.

  5. Disentangling above- and belowground neighbor effects on the growth, chemistry, and arthropod community on a focal plant.

    PubMed

    Kos, Martine; Bukovinszky, Tibor; Mulder, Patrick P J; Bezemeri, T Martijn

    2015-01-01

    Neighboring plants can influence arthropods on a focal plant, and this can result in associational resistance or associational susceptibility. These effects can be mediated by above- and belowground interactions between the neighbor and focal plant, but determining the relative contribution of the above- and belowground effects remains an open challenge. We performed a common garden experiment with a design that enabled us to disentangle the above- and belowground effects of five different plant species on the growth and chemistry of the focal plant ragwort (Jacobaea vulgaris), and the arthropod community associated with this plant. Aboveground effects of different neighboring plant species were more important for the growth and quality of J. vulgaris and for the arthropod abundance on this plant than belowground effects of neighbors. This remained true when only indirect neighbor effects (via affecting the biomass or quality of the focal plant) were considered. The aboveground neighbor effects on arthropod abundance on the focal plant were strongly negative. However, the magnitude of the effect depended on the identity of the neighboring species, and herbivore abundance on the focal plant was higher when surrounded by conspecific than when surrounded by heterospecific plants. We also observed interactions between above- and belowground neighbor effects, indicating that these effects may be nonadditive. We conclude that above- and belowground associational effects are not equally strong, and that neighbor effects on plant-arthropod interactions occur predominantly aboveground.

  6. Nitrate dual isotopic composition in the northern South China Sea and neighboring West Philippine Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Xu, M.; Wu, Y.; Dai, M.; Kao, S.

    2013-12-01

    Nitrate nitrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions (δ15NNO3 and δ18ONO3) were used to diagnose nitrate dynamics and the origins of water masses in the northern South China Sea (SCS) and West Philippine Sea (WPS) where water exchanges via the Luzon Strait at different depths. In the SCS, 1-3‰ greater upward increase in δ18ONO3 relative to corresponding δ15NNO3 was just observed in the lower euphotic zone (EZ), indicating a rapid internal cycle of nitrate assimilation and remineralization. Much lower nitrate concentration in the EZ of WPS does not allow us to measure its dual isotopes. From 500 m deep to the base of EZ in the WPS, non-proportional decreases in δ15NNO3 (from 6.4‰ to 2.1-2.6‰) and δ18ONO3 (from 3.0‰ to 1.1‰) accompanying with elevated N:P ratio anomalies (N* from -1.2 μM up to 2 μM), suggest the accumulation of atmospheric-derived N (e.g. N2 fixation and/or N deposition). This allochthonous N signal cumulated in the subsurface of WPS may regulate the δ15NNO3 in the SCS subsurface due to seasonal Kuroshio intrusion, which could supply isotopically light nitrate as newly fixed N source to the SCS. The higher (~0.5‰) δ15NNO3 and δ18ONO3 values, associated with lower N* were detected in the WPS intermediate water (WPS-IW, σθ = 26.5~27.1 kg m-3) around depth of 600-800 m (especially at a southern site) when compared to those of the conventional water source coming from North Pacific Intermediate Water (NPIW). By combining nitrate concentration, N* and δ15NNO3 as constraints, we propose that an additional southerly source other than NPIW may feed into the WPS-IW. On the other hand, the SCS intermediate water (SCS-IW, ~400-700 m), which supposedly sourced from WPS-IW along similar isopycnal levels, showed ~1‰ lower δ15NNO3 and δ18ONO3 values. This reduction in nitrate duel isotopes indicates intense diapycnal mixing primarily due to basin-wide upwelling in the SCS interior. This is the first hand data in the SCS for deep profiles

  7. K-nearest-neighbor conditional entropy approach for the assessment of the short-term complexity of cardiovascular control.

    PubMed

    Porta, A; Castiglioni, P; Bari, V; Bassani, T; Marchi, A; Cividjian, A; Quintin, L; Di Rienzo, M

    2013-01-01

    Complexity analysis of short-term cardiovascular control is traditionally performed using entropy-based approaches including corrective terms or strategies to cope with the loss of reliability of conditional distributions with pattern length. This study proposes a new approach aiming at the estimation of conditional entropy (CE) from short data segments (about 250 samples) based on the k-nearest-neighbor technique. The main advantages are: (i) the control of the loss of reliability of the conditional distributions with the pattern length without introducing a priori information; (ii) the assessment of complexity indexes without fixing the pattern length to an arbitrary low value. The approach, referred to as k-nearest-neighbor conditional entropy (KNNCE), was contrasted with corrected approximate entropy (CApEn), sample entropy (SampEn) and corrected CE (CCE), being the most frequently exploited approaches for entropy-based complexity analysis of short cardiovascular series. Complexity indexes were evaluated during the selective pharmacological blockade of the vagal and/or sympathetic branches of the autonomic nervous system. We found that KNNCE was more powerful than CCE in detecting the decrease of complexity of heart period variability imposed by double autonomic blockade. In addition, KNNCE provides indexes indistinguishable from those derived from CApEn and SampEn. Since this result was obtained without using strategies to correct the CE estimate and without fixing the embedding dimension to an arbitrary low value, KNNCE is potentially more valuable than CCE, CApEn and SampEn when the number of past samples most useful to reduce the uncertainty of future behaviors is high and/or variable among conditions and/or groups.

  8. On the consistency between nearest-neighbor peridynamic discretizations and discretized classical elasticity models

    DOE PAGES

    Seleson, Pablo; Du, Qiang; Parks, Michael L.

    2016-08-16

    The peridynamic theory of solid mechanics is a nonlocal reformulation of the classical continuum mechanics theory. At the continuum level, it has been demonstrated that classical (local) elasticity is a special case of peridynamics. Such a connection between these theories has not been extensively explored at the discrete level. This paper investigates the consistency between nearest-neighbor discretizations of linear elastic peridynamic models and finite difference discretizations of the Navier–Cauchy equation of classical elasticity. While nearest-neighbor discretizations in peridynamics have been numerically observed to present grid-dependent crack paths or spurious microcracks, this paper focuses on a different, analytical aspect of suchmore » discretizations. We demonstrate that, even in the absence of cracks, such discretizations may be problematic unless a proper selection of weights is used. Specifically, we demonstrate that using the standard meshfree approach in peridynamics, nearest-neighbor discretizations do not reduce, in general, to discretizations of corresponding classical models. We study nodal-based quadratures for the discretization of peridynamic models, and we derive quadrature weights that result in consistency between nearest-neighbor discretizations of peridynamic models and discretized classical models. The quadrature weights that lead to such consistency are, however, model-/discretization-dependent. We motivate the choice of those quadrature weights through a quadratic approximation of displacement fields. The stability of nearest-neighbor peridynamic schemes is demonstrated through a Fourier mode analysis. Finally, an approach based on a normalization of peridynamic constitutive constants at the discrete level is explored. This approach results in the desired consistency for one-dimensional models, but does not work in higher dimensions. The results of the work presented in this paper suggest that even though nearest-neighbor

  9. 78 FR 70957 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: HUD-Owned Real Estate Good Neighbor Next Door...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: HUD-Owned Real Estate Good Neighbor... Information Collection: HUD Real Estate Owned Good Neighbor Next Door. OMB Approval Number: 2502-0570. Type...

  10. Collective coherence in nearest neighbor coupled metamaterials: A metasurface ruler equation

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ningning; Zhang, Weili; Singh, Ranjan

    2015-10-28

    The collective coherent interactions in a meta-atom lattice are the key to myriad applications and functionalities offered by metasurfaces. We demonstrate a collective coherent response of the nearest neighbor coupled split-ring resonators whose resonance shift decays exponentially in the strong near-field coupled regime. This occurs due to the dominant magnetic coupling between the nearest neighbors which leads to the decay of the electromagnetic near fields. Based on the size scaling behavior of the different periodicity metasurfaces, we identified a collective coherent metasurface ruler equation. From the coherent behavior, we also show that the near-field coupling in a metasurface lattice exists even when the periodicity exceeds the resonator size. The identification of a universal coherence in metasurfaces and their scaling behavior would enable the design of novel metadevices whose spectral tuning response based on near-field effects could be calibrated across microwave, terahertz, infrared, and the optical parts of the electromagnetic spectrum.

  11. Neighboring optimal guidance for aeroassisted orbital plane change with G-value constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chern, Jeng-Shing; Hsu, Fu-Kuo; Lin, Ching-Chyuan

    In the last decade, the optimal aeroassisted trajectories, either for reentry or orbital transfer, have been investigated extensively. At the same time, the guidance and control problems for these missions are attracting scientists gradually. The purpose of this paper is to develop a neighboring optimal guidance for aeroassisted orbital plane change with G-value constraint. The normal optimal trajectory for maximizing the orbital plane change with G-value constraint is computed with specified initial and final conditions. We then assume that there are small variations in initial values of the state variables, and try to guide the vehicle back to the nominal optimal trajectory under G-value constraint of 2.5 by using the neighboring optimal guidance law developed in this paper. The displacements of the switching points are calculated and discussed.

  12. spFRET reveals changes in nucleosome breathing by neighboring nucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Buning, Ruth; Kropff, Wietske; Martens, Kirsten; van Noort, John

    2015-02-18

    Chromatin, the structure in which DNA is compacted in eukaryotic cells, plays a key role in regulating DNA accessibility. FRET experiments on single nucleosomes, the basic units in chromatin, have revealed a dynamic nucleosome where spontaneous DNA unwrapping from the ends provides access to the nucleosomal DNA. Here we investigated how this DNA breathing is affected by extension of the linker DNA and by the presence of a neighboring nucleosome. We found that both electrostatic interactions between the entering and exiting linker DNA and nucleosome-nucleosome interactions increase unwrapping. Interactions between neighboring nucleosomes are more likely in dinucleosomes spaced by 55 bp of linker DNA than in dinucleosomes spaced by 50 bp of linker DNA. Such increased unwrapping may not only increase the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA in chromatin fibers, it may also be key to folding of nucleosomes into higher order structures.

  13. Acid Rain and Friendly Neighbors. The policy dispute between Canada and the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Schmandt, J.; Roderick, H.

    1986-01-01

    Acid Rain and Friendly Neighbors is a source book that summarizes the results of the various studies of acid rain and traces the issues historically. Contents: Part One: The Search for a Bilateral Agreement. Acid rain is different; The nature and effects of acid rain: a comparison of assessments; U.S.-Canadian negotiations on acid rain; Part Two: Domestic Policy Development. Canada's acid rain policy: federal and provincial roles; The U.S. policy response to acid rain; Environmental and economic interests in Canada and the United States; Part Three: Supportive Structures. The international joint commission: the role it might play; Lessons from the Great Lakes water quality agreements; Supporting structures for resolving environmental disputes among friendly neighbors.

  14. An alternative near-neighbor definition of hydrogen bonding in water.

    PubMed

    Hammerich, A D; Buch, V

    2008-03-21

    A definition of hydrogen bonding in water is proposed in which an H...O pair forms a hydrogen bond if (a) an oxygen atom is the nearest nonchemically bonded neighbor of a hydrogen atom; and (b) the hydrogen is the first or the second intermolecular near-neighbor of the oxygen. Unlike the commonly employed hydrogen-bond definitions, this definition does not depend on the choice of geometric or energetic cutoffs applied to continuous distributions of properties. With the present definition, the distribution of O...H bond lengths decays smoothly to zero in a physically reasonable range. After correction for the presence of intermittent hydrogen bonds, this definition appears to provide a more stable description of hydrogen bonds and coordination shells than the more conventional cutoff-based definition. "Partial" H bonds satisfying only one of the two bonding requirements serve as transition states in the H-bond network evolution.

  15. The influence of lagoon on neighboring rivers by water and sediment quality.

    PubMed

    Lai, W L; Chen, J J; Chung, C Y; Lee, C G; Liao, S W

    2010-01-01

    Canonical discriminant analysis (CDA) was applied in order to distinguish the water-quality and the sediment-quality parameters from neighboring rivers, and to recognize similarities of water and sediment properties between a lagoon and neighboring rivers. Two set of constructed discriminant functions showed a marked contribution to most of the discriminant variables. In water, the significant parameters - the total nitrogen, algae, dissolved oxygen and total phosphate - were combined as the nutrient effect factor. The recognition capacities of the two discriminant functions were 95.6 and 4.4%, respectively; the Kaoping River showed the most similarities with the water quality in Dapeng Bay; in sediment, the significant parameters porosity, Cd, Cr, Al, and Pb were combined as the heavy metal effect factor. The recognition capacities were 82.6 and 17.4%, respectively, but the sediment properties in these three rivers had no significant similarity with the Dapeng Bay. PMID:20453320

  16. Inferring Host Dark Matter Halo Masses of Individual Galaxies from Neighboring Galaxy Counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguri, Masamune; Lin, Yen-Ting

    2015-03-01

    How well can we infer host dark matter halo masses of individual galaxies? Based on the halo occupation distribution framework, we analytically compute the number of neighboring galaxies within a cylinder of some redshift interval and radius in transverse comoving distance. The result is used to derive the conditional probability distribution function (PDF) of the host halo mass of a galaxy, given the neighboring galaxy counts. We compare our analytic results with those obtained using a realistic mock galaxy catalog, finding reasonable agreements. We find the optimal cylinder radius to be ∼ 0.5-1 {{h}-1} Mpc for the inference of halo masses. The PDF is generally broad, and sometimes has two peaks at low- and high-mass regimes because of the effect of chance projection along the line of sight. Potential applications and extensions of the new theoretical framework developed herein are also discussed.

  17. Terahertz metasurfaces with a high refractive index enhanced by the strong nearest neighbor coupling.

    PubMed

    Tan, Siyu; Yan, Fengping; Singh, Leena; Cao, Wei; Xu, Ningning; Hu, Xiang; Singh, Ranjan; Wang, Mingwei; Zhang, Weili

    2015-11-01

    The realization of high refractive index is of significant interest in optical imaging with enhanced resolution. Strongly coupled subwavelength resonators were proposed and demonstrated at both optical and terahertz frequencies to enhance the refractive index due to large induced dipole moment in meta-atoms. Here, we report an alternative design for flexible free-standing terahertz metasurface in the strong coupling regime where we experimentally achieve a peak refractive index value of 14.36. We also investigate the impact of the nearest neighbor coupling in the form of frequency tuning and enhancement of the peak refractive index. We provide an analytical circuit model to explain the impact of geometrical parameters and coupling on the effective refractive index of the metasurface. The proposed meta-atom structure enables tailoring of the peak refractive index based on nearest neighbor coupling and this property offers tremendous design flexibility for transformation optics and other index-gradient devices at terahertz frequencies.

  18. A dynamic evolutionary clustering perspective: Community detection in signed networks by reconstructing neighbor sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianrui; Wang, Hua; Wang, Lina; Liu, Weiwei

    2016-04-01

    Community detection in social networks has been intensively studied in recent years. In this paper, a novel similarity measurement is defined according to social balance theory for signed networks. Inter-community positive links are found and deleted due to their low similarity. The positive neighbor sets are reconstructed by this method. Then, differential equations are proposed to imitate the constantly changing states of nodes. Each node will update its state based on the difference between its state and average state of its positive neighbors. Nodes in the same community will evolve together with time and nodes in the different communities will evolve far away. Communities are detected ultimately when states of nodes are stable. Experiments on real world and synthetic networks are implemented to verify detection performance. The thorough comparisons demonstrate the presented method is more efficient than two acknowledged better algorithms.

  19. Domain adaptation of image classification based on collective target nearest-neighbor representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Song; Ye, Mao; Liu, Qihe; Li, Fan

    2016-05-01

    In many practical applications, we frequently face the awkward problem in which an image classifier trained in a scenario is difficult to use in a new scenario. Traditionally, the probability inference-based methods are used to solve this problem. From the point of image representation, we propose an approach for domain adaption of image classification. First, all source samples are supposed to form the dictionary. Then, we encode the target sample by combining this dictionary and the local geometric information. Based on this new representation, called target nearest-neighbor representation, image classification can obtain good performance in the target domain. Our core contribution is that the nearest-neighbor information of the target sample is technically exploited to form more robust representation. Experimental results confirm the effectiveness of our method.

  20. Neighborhood disorder, fear, and mistrust: the buffering role of social ties with neighbors.

    PubMed

    Ross, C E; Jang, S J

    2000-08-01

    This paper proposes that individuals who report that they live in neighborhoods characterized by disorder--by crime, vandalism, graffiti, danger, noise, dirt, and drugs--have high levels of fear and mistrust. It further proposes that an individual's alliances and connections with neighbors can buffer the negative effects of living in a neighborhood characterized by disorder on fear and mistrust. Results from a representative sample of 2482 Illinois residents collected by telephone in 1995 support the propositions. Living in a neighborhood with a lot of perceived disorder significantly affects mistrust and the fear of victimization, adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics. Perceived neighborhood disorder and social ties significantly interact: informal social ties with neighbors reduce the fear- and mistrust-producing effects of disorder. However, formal participation in neighborhood organizations shows little buffering effect.

  1. spFRET reveals changes in nucleosome breathing by neighboring nucleosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buning, Ruth; Kropff, Wietske; Martens, Kirsten; van Noort, John

    2015-02-01

    Chromatin, the structure in which DNA is compacted in eukaryotic cells, plays a key role in regulating DNA accessibility. FRET experiments on single nucleosomes, the basic units in chromatin, have revealed a dynamic nucleosome where spontaneous DNA unwrapping from the ends provides access to the nucleosomal DNA. Here we investigated how this DNA breathing is affected by extension of the linker DNA and by the presence of a neighboring nucleosome. We found that both electrostatic interactions between the entering and exiting linker DNA and nucleosome-nucleosome interactions increase unwrapping. Interactions between neighboring nucleosomes are more likely in dinucleosomes spaced by 55 bp of linker DNA than in dinucleosomes spaced by 50 bp of linker DNA. Such increased unwrapping may not only increase the accessibility of nucleosomal DNA in chromatin fibers, it may also be key to folding of nucleosomes into higher order structures.

  2. An inhibitory influence of transposed-letter neighbors on eye movements during reading.

    PubMed

    Pagán, Ascensión; Paterson, Kevin B; Blythe, Hazel I; Liversedge, Simon P

    2016-02-01

    Previous research has shown that prior exposure to a word's substitution neighbor earlier in the same sentence can disrupt processing of that word, indicating that interword lexical priming occurs naturally during reading, due to the competition between lexical candidates during word identification. Through the present research, we extended these findings by investigating the effects of prior exposure to a word's transposed-letter neighbor (TLN) earlier in a sentence. TLNs are constituted from the same letters, but in different orders. The findings revealed an inhibitory TLN effect, with longer total reading times for target words, and increased regressions to prime and target words, when the target followed a TLN rather than a control word. These findings indicate that prior exposure to a TLN can disrupt word identification during reading. We suggest that this is caused by a failure of word identification, due to the initial misidentification of the target word (potentially as its TLN) triggering postlexical checking. PMID:26032225

  3. "Sand bar" of actinoid and neighboring elements in a chart of nuclides.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, K; Sekine, T

    1982-03-01

    Inspection of a chart of nuclides reveals a "sand bar" of actinoid and neighboring elements when a suitable half-life level is chosen. A bay of alpha-instability lying between the nuclides of neutron magic number 126 and the beta-stability line in the actinoid group is a characteristic feature in this area. Calculation shows that fairly good agreement is obtained between the measured half-lives and those derived theoretically.

  4. Epidemic phase and the site percolation with distant-neighbor interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, C. B.; Barbin, D.; Caliri, A.

    1998-01-01

    A generalized site percolation model is used to construct an analogy with the epidemic problem, involving spatial coordinates. Epidemic phase and concepts like herd immunity are analyzed in terms of connectivity in a 2D square lattice. The epidemic model used in this work considers a specific interaction topology that includes up to the fifth-nearest neighbors. The results, obtained by Monte Carlo simulation, emphasize the meaning of the spatial coordinates and are illustrated by an epidemic/non-epidemic phase diagram.

  5. Essays on applied auction problems in electric generation and in neighboring jurisdictions

    SciTech Connect

    Eastman-Perl, K.A.

    1993-01-01

    This work consists of three essays. The first essay, [open quotes]Contract Selection and Performance in Competitive Bidding for Electric Generation,[close quotes], studies the new practice of competitive bidding among third parties to supply utilities with electric generating capacity. The other two essays, entitled [open quotes]First Price Auctions in Neighboring Jurisdictions,[close quotes] and [open quotes]Second Price Auctions in Neighboring Jurisdictions,[close quotes] study the general problem of auctions when there are several auctioneers that can observe each other and can use information from these observations strategically. The first essay notes that competitive bidding programs for electric generation are really auctions of long-term contracts between utility and third parties. Bids and contracts from Maine were studied. Since Maine has a wealth of alternative fuels, such as wood and hydroelectric, the applicability of this study is limited to states with significant alternative fuel resources. The second and third essays consider auctions in neighboring jurisdictions. One concerns first-price auctions (low bid, wins, and is paid its bid), and the other concerns second-price auctions (low bid wins, and is paid the second lowest bid). One town initially holds an auction, the results of which are public information. Another town can use this public information to negotiate with the winner of the initial auction. Firms always bid higher in an initial first-price auction than they would if a neighboring town were not present. In equilibrium, firms are no worse off than they would be if both towns acted independently, and the negotiating town benefits at the expense of the town initially auctioning. In second-price auctions, the incentive compatibility property is preserved if relatively lower cost firms bid in the initial auction. The town initially conducting the auction is unaffected, and the negotiating town benefits at the firm's expense.

  6. Airborne signals from a wounded leaf facilitate viral spreading and induce antibacterial resistance in neighboring plants.

    PubMed

    Dorokhov, Yuri L; Komarova, Tatiana V; Petrunia, Igor V; Frolova, Olga Y; Pozdyshev, Denis V; Gleba, Yuri Y

    2012-01-01

    Many plants release airborne volatile compounds in response to wounding due to pathogenic assault. These compounds serve as plant defenses and are involved in plant signaling. Here, we study the effects of pectin methylesterase (PME)-generated methanol release from wounded plants ("emitters") on the defensive reactions of neighboring "receiver" plants. Plant leaf wounding resulted in the synthesis of PME and a spike in methanol released into the air. Gaseous methanol or vapors from wounded PME-transgenic plants induced resistance to the bacterial pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum in the leaves of non-wounded neighboring "receiver" plants. In experiments with different volatile organic compounds, gaseous methanol was the only airborne factor that could induce antibacterial resistance in neighboring plants. In an effort to understand the mechanisms by which methanol stimulates the antibacterial resistance of "receiver" plants, we constructed forward and reverse suppression subtractive hybridization cDNA libraries from Nicotiana benthamiana plants exposed to methanol. We identified multiple methanol-inducible genes (MIGs), most of which are involved in defense or cell-to-cell trafficking. We then isolated the most affected genes for further analysis: β-1,3-glucanase (BG), a previously unidentified gene (MIG-21), and non-cell-autonomous pathway protein (NCAPP). Experiments with Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and a vector encoding two tandem copies of green fluorescent protein as a tracer of cell-to-cell movement showed the increased gating capacity of plasmodesmata in the presence of BG, MIG-21, and NCAPP. The increased gating capacity is accompanied by enhanced TMV reproduction in the "receivers". Overall, our data indicate that methanol emitted by a wounded plant acts as a signal that enhances antibacterial resistance and facilitates viral spread in neighboring plants.

  7. A Scheduling Strategy Based on Neighbor Search for Heterogeneous Sensor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosugi, Kazuya; Namerikawa, Toru

    This paper deals with a sensor scheduling problem which considers state dependent noise and processing delay. A networked sensor system usually consists of a large number of sensors, which can be constructed with some different types of sensors. We propose a sensor scheduling algorithm based on the neighbor search algorithm nearby nodes for discrete time heterogeneous systems by minimization problem of assessment function. Finally experimental results show effectiveness of the proposed method.

  8. Frustrated quantum antiferromagnet with third neighbor interactions and single ion anisotropy on the honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, A. S. T.

    2016-08-01

    I study the spin-1 Heisenberg antiferromagnet on the two dimensional honeycomb lattice at zero temperature, with first J1, second J2 and third J3 neighbors exchange interactions and single ion easy plane anisotropy, using the SU(3) Schwinger boson formalism. The phase diagram is shown. The results show the existence of a region in the intermediate frustrated regime where the system does not have quantum magnetic order.

  9. Increased root oxygen uptake in pea plants responding to non-self neighbors.

    PubMed

    Meier, Ina Christin; Angert, Alon; Falik, Omer; Shelef, Oren; Rachmilevitch, Shimon

    2013-09-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that plants alter root growth and decrease competition with roots of the same individual (self); however, the physiological traits accompanying this response are still widely unknown. In this study, we investigated the effect of root identity on gas exchange in the model species pea (Pisum sativum L.). Split-root plants were planted so that each pot contained either two roots of the same plant (self) or of two different plants (non-self), and the responses of biomass, photosynthesis, and respiration were measured. The photosynthetic rate was not affected by the identity of the root neighbor. We found a reduction of leaf dark respiration by half, accompanied by an increase in nocturnal root respiration by 29 % in plants neighboring with non-self. The activity of the alternative oxidase (AOX) pathway increased when plants responded to non-self neighbors. The increased activity of AOX in plants responding to non-self indicates carbon imbalances in roots, possibly as a consequence of increased root exudation and communication between individuals. If such an effect occurs more widely, it may change the assumptions made for the quantity of respiration as used in carbon budget models.

  10. A set of nearest neighbor parameters for predicting the enthalpy change of RNA secondary structure formation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhi John; Turner, Douglas H.; Mathews, David H.

    2006-01-01

    A complete set of nearest neighbor parameters to predict the enthalpy change of RNA secondary structure formation was derived. These parameters can be used with available free energy nearest neighbor parameters to extend the secondary structure prediction of RNA sequences to temperatures other than 37°C. The parameters were tested by predicting the secondary structures of sequences with known secondary structure that are from organisms with known optimal growth temperatures. Compared with the previous set of enthalpy nearest neighbor parameters, the sensitivity of base pair prediction improved from 65.2 to 68.9% at optimal growth temperatures ranging from 10 to 60°C. Base pair probabilities were predicted with a partition function and the positive predictive value of structure prediction is 90.4% when considering the base pairs in the lowest free energy structure with pairing probability of 0.99 or above. Moreover, a strong correlation is found between the predicted melting temperatures of RNA sequences and the optimal growth temperatures of the host organism. This indicates that organisms that live at higher temperatures have evolved RNA sequences with higher melting temperatures. PMID:16982646

  11. Influence of the number of topologically interacting neighbors on swarm dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Yilun; Bouffanais, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Recent empirical and theoretical works on collective behaviors based on a topological interaction are beginning to offer some explanations as for the physical reasons behind the selection of a particular number of nearest neighbors locally affecting each individual's dynamics. Recently, flocking starlings have been shown to topologically interact with a very specific number of neighbors, between six to eight, while metric-free interactions were found to govern human crowd dynamics. Here, we use network- and graph-theoretic approaches combined with a dynamical model of locally interacting self-propelled particles to study how the consensus reaching process and its dynamics are influenced by the number k of topological neighbors. Specifically, we prove exactly that, in the absence of noise, consensus is always attained with a speed to consensus strictly increasing with k. The analysis of both speed and time to consensus reveals that, irrespective of the swarm size, a value of k ~ 10 speeds up the rate of convergence to consensus to levels close to the one of the optimal all-to-all interaction signaling. Furthermore, this effect is found to be more pronounced in the presence of environmental noise. PMID:24567077

  12. Protein function prediction using neighbor relativity in protein-protein interaction network.

    PubMed

    Moosavi, Sobhan; Rahgozar, Masoud; Rahimi, Amir

    2013-04-01

    There is a large gap between the number of discovered proteins and the number of functionally annotated ones. Due to the high cost of determining protein function by wet-lab research, function prediction has become a major task for computational biology and bioinformatics. Some researches utilize the proteins interaction information to predict function for un-annotated proteins. In this paper, we propose a novel approach called "Neighbor Relativity Coefficient" (NRC) based on interaction network topology which estimates the functional similarity between two proteins. NRC is calculated for each pair of proteins based on their graph-based features including distance, common neighbors and the number of paths between them. In order to ascribe function to an un-annotated protein, NRC estimates a weight for each neighbor to transfer its annotation to the unknown protein. Finally, the unknown protein will be annotated by the top score transferred functions. We also investigate the effect of using different coefficients for various types of functions. The proposed method has been evaluated on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Homo sapiens interaction networks. The performance analysis demonstrates that NRC yields better results in comparison with previous protein function prediction approaches that utilize interaction network.

  13. Equivalent charge source model based iterative maximum neighbor weight for sparse EEG source localization.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peng; Tian, Yin; Lei, Xu; Hu, Xiao; Yao, Dezhong

    2008-12-01

    How to localize the neural electric activities within brain effectively and precisely from the scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings is a critical issue for current study in clinical neurology and cognitive neuroscience. In this paper, based on the charge source model and the iterative re-weighted strategy, proposed is a new maximum neighbor weight based iterative sparse source imaging method, termed as CMOSS (Charge source model based Maximum neighbOr weight Sparse Solution). Different from the weight used in focal underdetermined system solver (FOCUSS) where the weight for each point in the discrete solution space is independently updated in iterations, the new designed weight for each point in each iteration is determined by the source solution of the last iteration at both the point and its neighbors. Using such a new weight, the next iteration may have a bigger chance to rectify the local source location bias existed in the previous iteration solution. The simulation studies with comparison to FOCUSS and LORETA for various source configurations were conducted on a realistic 3-shell head model, and the results confirmed the validation of CMOSS for sparse EEG source localization. Finally, CMOSS was applied to localize sources elicited in a visual stimuli experiment, and the result was consistent with those source areas involved in visual processing reported in previous studies.

  14. Local and neighboring patch conditions alter sex-specific movement in banana weevils.

    PubMed

    Carval, Dominique; Perrin, Benjamin; Duyck, Pierre-François; Tixier, Philippe

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms underlying the movements and spread of a species over time and space is a major concern of ecology. Here, we assessed the effects of an individual's sex and the density and sex ratio of conspecifics in the local and neighboring environment on the movement probability of the banana weevil, Cosmopolites sordidus. In a "two patches" experiment, we used radiofrequency identification tags to study the C. sordidus movement response to patch conditions. We showed that local and neighboring densities of conspecifics affect the movement rates of individuals but that the density-dependent effect can be either positive or negative depending on the relative densities of conspecifics in local and neighboring patches. We demonstrated that sex ratio also influences the movement of C. sordidus, that is, the weevil exhibits nonfixed sex-biased movement strategies. Sex-biased movement may be the consequence of intrasexual competition for resources (i.e., oviposition sites) in females and for mates in males. We also detected a high individual variability in the propensity to move. Finally, we discuss the role of demographic stochasticity, sex-biased movement, and individual heterogeneity in movement on the colonization process. PMID:27069621

  15. Study of Near-Neighbor Structure of Point Defects in α-FE by Displacement Cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei-Lu; Liu, Wei; Wu, Xuebang; Fang, Q. F.; Liu, C. S.; Huang, Qun-Ying; Wu, Y. C.

    2012-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to study the primary damage formation in α-Fe by collision cascades in the recoil energy range 0.5-20 keV. Two near-neighbor analysis methods including the near-neighbor defect density (NPDD) analysis and cluster analysis were introduced to characterize the spatial aggregation of point defects and the morphologies of clusters, respectively. It is found that the NPDD of self-interstitial atom (SIA) and the number of Frenkel pairs show a similar variation trend, while the NPDD of vacancy exhibits a peak at shorter time than that of SIA. Furthermore, we find that the clusters of point defects exist mostly in the form of chainlike structure in the course and the end of cascades, but the proportion of chainlike clusters decreases with increasing the number of point defects included in one cluster. Therefore, the present methods are found to be effective to characterize the aggregation and the near-neighbor structure of point defects by displacement cascades at any time.

  16. [Radioecological investigation of the soil cover of eastern Urals State radioactive reserve and neighboring areas].

    PubMed

    Mikhaĭlovskaia, L N; Molchanova, I V; Karavaeva, E N; Pozolotina, V N; Tarasov, O V

    2011-01-01

    The contamination levels and spatial distribution of 90Sr and 137Cs in the soil cover of the Eastern Ural State Radioactive Reserve and neighboring areas have been studied. Situated in the Chelyabinsk region, the Reserve embraces the frontal part of the Eastern Urals Radioactive Trace. This Trace emerged in 1957 as a result of the nuclear accident at the Production Association "Mayak". In the studied areas, the content of radionuclides in soils decreases exponentially as the distance from the source of contamination increases. 90Sr received by the soil cover as a result of the accident in 1957 has remained the main contaminant of the Reserve central part (97% of the total contamination). Its contribution throughout western neighboring areas reduces up to 67%, which decreases the effect of 90Sr on the environment. Within eastern neighboring areas, soil is mainly contaminated by 137Cs received as a result of the wind disseminated dried sediments from the shores of Lake Karachay (1967) that was used for dumping high-level radioactive waste. Also observed was enrichment of forest litters with this radionuclide due to current atmospheric fallout.

  17. Efficient generation and optimization of stochastic template banks by a neighboring cell algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehrmann, Henning; Pletsch, Holger J.

    2014-12-01

    Placing signal templates (grid points) as efficiently as possible to cover a multidimensional parameter space is crucial in computing-intensive matched-filtering searches for gravitational waves, but also in similar searches in other fields of astronomy. To generate efficient coverings of arbitrary parameter spaces, stochastic template banks have been advocated, where templates are placed at random while rejecting those too close to others. However, in this simple scheme, for each new random point its distance to every template in the existing bank is computed. This rapidly increasing number of distance computations can render the acceptance of new templates computationally prohibitive, particularly for wide parameter spaces or in large dimensions. This paper presents a neighboring cell algorithm that can dramatically improve the efficiency of constructing a stochastic template bank. By dividing the parameter space into subvolumes (cells), for an arbitrary point an efficient hashing technique is exploited to obtain the index of its enclosing cell along with the parameters of its neighboring templates. Hence only distances to these neighboring templates in the bank are computed, massively lowering the overall computing cost, as demonstrated in simple examples. Furthermore, we propose a novel method based on this technique to increase the fraction of covered parameter space solely by directed template shifts, without adding any templates. As is demonstrated in examples, this method can be highly effective.

  18. Effect of neighboring cells on cell stiffness measured by optical tweezers indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousafzai, Muhammad S.; Coceano, Giovanna; Mariutti, Alberto; Ndoye, Fatou; Amin, Ladan; Niemela, Joseph; Bonin, Serena; Scoles, Giacinto; Cojoc, Dan

    2016-05-01

    We report on the modification of mechanical properties of breast cancer cells when they get in contact with other neighboring cells of the same type. Optical tweezers vertical indentation was employed to investigate cell mechanics in isolated and contact conditions, by setting up stiffness as a marker. Two human breast cancer cell lines with different aggressiveness [MCF-7 (luminal breast cancer) and MDA-MB-231 (basal-like breast cancer)] and one normal immortalized breast cell line HBL-100 (normal and myoepithelial) were selected. We found that neighboring cells significantly alter cell stiffness: MDA-MB-231 becomes stiffer when in contact, while HBL-100 and MCF-7 exhibit softer character. Cell stiffness was probed at three cellular subregions: central (above nucleus), intermediate (cytoplasm), and near the leading edge. In an isolated condition, all cells showed a significant regional variation in stiffness: higher at the center and fading toward the leading edge. However, the regional variation becomes statistically insignificant when the cells were in contact with other neighboring cells. The proposed approach will contribute to understand the intriguing temporal sequential alterations in cancer cells during interaction with their surrounding microenvironment.

  19. Population attribute compression

    DOEpatents

    White, James M.; Faber, Vance; Saltzman, Jeffrey S.

    1995-01-01

    An image population having a large number of attributes is processed to form a display population with a predetermined smaller number of attributes that represent the larger number of attributes. In a particular application, the color values in an image are compressed for storage in a discrete look-up table (LUT). Color space containing the LUT color values is successively subdivided into smaller volumes until a plurality of volumes are formed, each having no more than a preselected maximum number of color values. Image pixel color values can then be rapidly placed in a volume with only a relatively few LUT values from which a nearest neighbor is selected. Image color values are assigned 8 bit pointers to their closest LUT value whereby data processing requires only the 8 bit pointer value to provide 24 bit color values from the LUT.

  20. Female gene pools of Berber and Arab neighboring communities in central Tunisia: microstructure of mtDNA variation in North Africa.

    PubMed

    Cherni, Lotfi; Loueslati, Besma Yaacoubi; Pereira, Luísa; Ennafaâ, Hajer; Amorim, António; El Gaaied, Amel Ben Ammar

    2005-02-01

    North African populations are considered genetically closer to Eurasians than to sub-Saharans. However, they display a considerably high mtDNA heterogeneity among them, namely in the frequencies of the U6, East African, and sub-Saharan haplogroups. In this study, we describe and compare the female gene pools of two neighboring Tunisian populations, Kesra (Berber) and Zriba (non-Berber), which have contrasting historical backgrounds. Both populations presented lower diversity values than those observed for other North African populations, and they were the only populations not showing significant negative Fu's F(S) values. Kesra displayed a much higher proportion of typical sub-Saharan haplotypes (49%, including 4.2% of M1 haplogroup) than Zriba (8%). With respect to U6 sequences, frequencies were low (2% in Kesra and 8% in Zriba), and all belonged to the subhaplogroup U6a. An analysis of these data in the context of North Africa reveals that the emerging picture is complex, because Zriba would match the profile of a Berber Moroccan population, whereas Kesra, which shows twice the frequency of sub-Saharan lineages normally observed in northern coastal populations, would match a western Saharan population except for the low U6 frequency. The North African patchy mtDNA landscape has no parallel in other regions of the world and increasing the number of sampled populations has not been accompanied by any substantial increase in our understanding of its phylogeography. Available data up to now rely on sampling small, scattered populations, although they are carefully characterized in terms of their ethnic, linguistic, and historical backgrounds. It is therefore doubtful that this picture truly represents the complex historical demography of the region rather than being just the result of the type of samplings performed so far.

  1. Herbivores mediate different competitive and facilitative responses of native and invader populations of Brassica nigra.

    PubMed

    Oduor, Ayub M O; Strauss, Sharon Y; García, Yedra; Cascales, Modesto Berbel; Gómez, José M

    2013-10-01

    Differences in plant and herbivore community assemblages between exotic and native ranges may select for different levels of plant traits in invasive and native populations of plant species. Little is currently known of how herbivores may mediate competitive and facilitative interactions between invasive and native populations of plant species and their plant neighbors. Here, we conducted a common-garden field experiment to test whether invasive and native populations of Brassica nigra differ in phenotypic expressions of growth (biomass and plant height) and reproductive (seed yield) traits under different plant neighbor treatments and ambient vs. reduced level of insect herbivore damage on the B. nigra plants. We found significant interactive effects of plant neighbor treatments, level of insect herbivore damage on B. nigra plants, and invasive status of B. nigra on the phenotypic trait expressions. Plant neighbor treatments had minimal effects on phenotypic trait expressions by invasive populations of B. nigra under either level of insect herbivore damage. In contrast, for native populations of B. nigra, ambient level of insect herbivore damage resulted in plant neighbors facilitating expression of the traits above, while reduced damage resulted in plant neighbors competitively suppressing trait expression. Our results suggest that insect herbivores and plant neighbors interactively shape expression of plant traits in native and exotic ranges of invasive plants. Such interactions could potentially lead to different selection pressures on traits that determine antiherbivore defenses and plant-plant interactions. PMID:24358714

  2. The statistical investigation of the First and Second Byurakan survey galaxies and their neighbors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazaryan, Tigran A.

    2014-05-01

    In the thesis we study close pairs of galaxies with the aim of understanding the influence of gravitational interaction on nuclear activity and star formation of paired galaxies. For this purpose we investigate dependences of integral parameters of galaxies, their star formation and properties of nuclei on kinematic parameters of systems and their large-scale environment. The thesis has an introduction, three main chapters, a summary, lists of abbreviations and references, and three appendices. In the first chapter, the methods of selection of sample of pairs of galaxies and measurements of physical parameters of the First Byurakan Survey (Markarian) galaxies and their neighbors are presented, and the databases in appendices A and B are described, which contain parameters of neighbors of Markarian galaxies measured by us, and the parameters of pairs having Markarian galaxies, based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data. The selection effects of sample of pairs are discussed, and the statistical comparison of Markarian galaxies and their neighbors is done. The results of statistical study of star formation and activity of nuclei in pairs having Markarian galaxies are presented, as well as the correlations between properties of galaxies in pairs and the physical mechanisms behind them. In the second chapter, the results of statistical study of the Second Byurakan Survey (SBS) galaxies and their neighbors, and star formation and activity of nuclei in those pairs are presented and discussed. In the third chapter, possibilities of using supernovae as indicators of star formation are discussed, the sample of supernovae in pairs of galaxies is presented, and study of star formation in pairs of interacting galaxies by means of that sample of supernovae is done. Also а conclusion about the nature of progenitors of different types of supernovae is made. The short summary of main results of the study concludes the thesis. The thesis has 158 pages. The main results

  3. Combining high-dispersion spectroscopy with high contrast imaging: Probing rocky planets around our nearest neighbors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snellen, I.; de Kok, R.; Birkby, J. L.; Brandl, B.; Brogi, M.; Keller, C.; Kenworthy, M.; Schwarz, H.; Stuik, R.

    2015-04-01

    Context. Ground-based high-dispersion (R ~ 100 000) spectroscopy (HDS) is proving to be a powerful technique with which to characterize extrasolar planets. The planet signal is distilled from the bright starlight, combining ral and time-differential filtering techniques. In parallel, high-contrast imaging (HCI) is developing rapidly, aimed at spatially separating the planet from the star. While HDS is limited by the overwhelming noise from the host star, HCI is limited by residual quasi-static speckles. Both techniques currently reach planet-star contrast limits down to ~10-5, albeit for very different types of planetary systems. Aims: In this work, we discuss a way to combine HDS and HCI (HDS+HCI). For a planet located at a resolvable angular distance from its host star, the starlight can be reduced up to several orders of magnitude using adaptive optics and/or coronography. In addition, the remaining starlight can be filtered out using high-dispersion spectroscopy, utilizing the significantly different (or Doppler shifted) high-dispersion spectra of the planet and star. In this way, HDS+HCI can in principle reach contrast limits of ~10-5 × 10-5, although in practice this will be limited by photon noise and/or sky-background. In contrast to current direct imaging techniques, such as Angular Differential Imaging and Spectral Differential Imaging, it will work well at small working angles and is much less sensitive to speckle noise. For the discovery of previously unknown planets HDS+HCI requires a high-contrast adaptive optics system combined with a high-dispersion R ~ 100 000 integral field spectrograph (IFS). This combination currently does not exist, but is planned for the European Extremely Large Telescope. Methods: We present simulations of HDS+HCI observations with the E-ELT, both probing thermal emission from a planet at infrared wavelengths, and starlight reflected off a planet atmosphere at optical wavelengths. For the infrared simulations we use the

  4. Genetic characterization of Clupisoma garua (Hamilton 1822) from six Indian populations using mtDNA cytochrome b gene.

    PubMed

    Saraswat, Darpan; Lakra, W S; Nautiyal, Prakash; Goswami, Mukunda; Shyamakant, Komal; Malakar, Abhishekh

    2014-02-01

    Clupisoma garua (Hamilton, 1822) is a commercially important freshwater fish and a potential candidate species for aquaculture. This study investigates the genetic diversity and population structure of six Indian populations of C. garua using cytochrome b (cyt b) sequences of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We sequenced cyt b gene of 64 individuals collected from five distant rivers: Ganga, Gomti, Betwa, Gandak and Brahmaputra. Sequencing of 1054 bp cyt b mtDNA fragment revealed the presence of 19 haplotypes with a haplotype diversity value of 1.000 and a nucleotide diversity value of 0.0258 ± 0.00164. The Gandak river fish population showed highest nucleotide diversity. The fixation index analysis indicated significant genetic divergence among populations from different geographical areas. Both the neighbor-joining tree and median-joining network analysis of the haplotype data showed distinct patterns of phylo-geographic structure. The hierarchical analysis of molecular variance revealed that intra-group variation among populations was highly significant. The results of this study suggest that C. garua populations, especially geographically isolated groups, have developed significant genetic structures within the population. In addition, tests of neutrality suggest that C. garua may have experienced a population expansion. The study results establish cyt b as polymorphic and a potential marker to determine the population structure of C. garua. Information of genetic variation and population structure generated from this study would be useful for planning effective strategies for the conservation and rehabilitation of Schilibid cat fishes.

  5. Genetic characterization of Clupisoma garua (Hamilton 1822) from six Indian populations using mtDNA cytochrome b gene.

    PubMed

    Saraswat, Darpan; Lakra, W S; Nautiyal, Prakash; Goswami, Mukunda; Shyamakant, Komal; Malakar, Abhishekh

    2014-02-01

    Clupisoma garua (Hamilton, 1822) is a commercially important freshwater fish and a potential candidate species for aquaculture. This study investigates the genetic diversity and population structure of six Indian populations of C. garua using cytochrome b (cyt b) sequences of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We sequenced cyt b gene of 64 individuals collected from five distant rivers: Ganga, Gomti, Betwa, Gandak and Brahmaputra. Sequencing of 1054 bp cyt b mtDNA fragment revealed the presence of 19 haplotypes with a haplotype diversity value of 1.000 and a nucleotide diversity value of 0.0258 ± 0.00164. The Gandak river fish population showed highest nucleotide diversity. The fixation index analysis indicated significant genetic divergence among populations from different geographical areas. Both the neighbor-joining tree and median-joining network analysis of the haplotype data showed distinct patterns of phylo-geographic structure. The hierarchical analysis of molecular variance revealed that intra-group variation among populations was highly significant. The results of this study suggest that C. garua populations, especially geographically isolated groups, have developed significant genetic structures within the population. In addition, tests of neutrality suggest that C. garua may have experienced a population expansion. The study results establish cyt b as polymorphic and a potential marker to determine the population structure of C. garua. Information of genetic variation and population structure generated from this study would be useful for planning effective strategies for the conservation and rehabilitation of Schilibid cat fishes. PMID:23676141

  6. Influence of neighboring particles on the drag of a particle suspended in laminar flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roig, Adam Vincent

    Understanding particle-fluid flows is very important for the areas of sedimentation in river beds, fluidized bed reactors, and other fields of multiphase flow. The effect of one particle on another in a fluid flow is not very well understood nor does a correlation exist to describe the behavior of the drag coefficient between particles. The use of Proteus was validated by comparison to previous studies to the result obtained through simulations in Proteus, including analysis of the wake structure of a single sphere. Two particles were then analyzed for various Reynolds numbers less than 250 but greater than 5 and for the dimensionless gap of L/D ≥ 2, where L is the distance between the two particle centers and D is the diameter of the particles. Two arrangements were used for simulation, with the particles spaced horizontally or vertically within the fluid flow. Both orientations were evaluated for the effects of the dimensionless gap on the drag coefficient. The wake structure at higher Reynolds numbers were also evaluated for effects due to neighboring particles. A correlation was developed for the case of the horizontal particles at a dimensionless gap, L/D ≥ 2 for the range of Reynolds numbers described. The orientation effect is then studied at a fixed distance for offsets of thirty, forty-five and sixty degrees from the horizontal. Results are also presented to evaluate the effect of the diameter of a neighboring particle. The current results are restricted to the case described in the work. Future studies may build on the current work to extend the work to other effects of neighboring particles and multiple particle influence.

  7. Adaptive behavior of neighboring neurons during adaptation-induced plasticity of orientation tuning in V1

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Sensory neurons display transient changes of their response properties following prolonged exposure to an appropriate stimulus (adaptation). In adult cat primary visual cortex, orientation-selective neurons shift their preferred orientation after being adapted to a non-preferred orientation. The direction of those shifts, towards (attractive) or away (repulsive) from the adapter depends mostly on adaptation duration. How the adaptive behavior of a neuron is related to that of its neighbors remains unclear. Results Here we show that in most cases (75%), cells shift their preferred orientation in the same direction as their neighbors. We also found that cells shifting preferred orientation differently from their neighbors (25%) display three interesting properties: (i) larger variance of absolute shift amplitude, (ii) wider tuning bandwidth and (iii) larger range of preferred orientations among the cluster of cells. Several response properties of V1 neurons depend on their location within the cortical orientation map. Our results suggest that recording sites with both attractive and repulsive shifts following adaptation may be located in close proximity to iso-orientation domain boundaries or pinwheel centers. Indeed, those regions have a more diverse orientation distribution of local inputs that could account for the three properties above. On the other hand, sites with all cells shifting their preferred orientation in the same direction could be located within iso-orientation domains. Conclusions Our results suggest that the direction and amplitude of orientation preference shifts in V1 depend on location within the orientation map. This anisotropy of adaptation-induced plasticity, comparable to that of the visual cortex itself, could have important implications for our understanding of visual adaptation at the psychophysical level. PMID:20003453

  8. Thermodynamic contribution and nearest-neighbor parameters of pseudouridine-adenosine base pairs in oligoribonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Graham A.; Bloomingdale, Richard J.; Znosko, Brent M.

    2013-01-01

    Pseudouridine (Ψ) is the most common noncanonical nucleotide present in naturally occurring RNA and serves a variety of roles in the cell, typically appearing where structural stability is crucial to function. Ψ residues are isomerized from native uridine residues by a class of highly conserved enzymes known as pseudouridine synthases. In order to quantify the thermodynamic impact of pseudouridylation on U-A base pairs, 24 oligoribonucleotides, 16 internal and eight terminal Ψ-A oligoribonucleotides, were thermodynamically characterized via optical melting experiments. The thermodynamic parameters derived from two-state fits were used to generate linearly independent parameters for use in secondary structure prediction algorithms using the nearest-neighbor model. On average, internally pseudouridylated duplexes were 1.7 kcal/mol more stable than their U-A counterparts, and terminally pseudouridylated duplexes were 1.0 kcal/mol more stable than their U-A equivalents. Due to the fact that Ψ-A pairs maintain the same Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding capabilities as the parent U-A pair in A-form RNA, the difference in stability due to pseudouridylation was attributed to two possible sources: the novel hydrogen bonding capabilities of the newly relocated imino group as well as the novel stacking interactions afforded by the electronic configuration of the Ψ residue. The newly derived nearest-neighbor parameters for Ψ-A base pairs may be used in conjunction with other nearest-neighbor parameters for accurately predicting the most likely secondary structure of A-form RNA containing Ψ-A base pairs. PMID:24062573

  9. Thermodynamic contribution and nearest-neighbor parameters of pseudouridine-adenosine base pairs in oligoribonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Graham A; Bloomingdale, Richard J; Znosko, Brent M

    2013-11-01

    Pseudouridine (Ψ) is the most common noncanonical nucleotide present in naturally occurring RNA and serves a variety of roles in the cell, typically appearing where structural stability is crucial to function. Ψ residues are isomerized from native uridine residues by a class of highly conserved enzymes known as pseudouridine synthases. In order to quantify the thermodynamic impact of pseudouridylation on U-A base pairs, 24 oligoribonucleotides, 16 internal and eight terminal Ψ-A oligoribonucleotides, were thermodynamically characterized via optical melting experiments. The thermodynamic parameters derived from two-state fits were used to generate linearly independent parameters for use in secondary structure prediction algorithms using the nearest-neighbor model. On average, internally pseudouridylated duplexes were 1.7 kcal/mol more stable than their U-A counterparts, and terminally pseudouridylated duplexes were 1.0 kcal/mol more stable than their U-A equivalents. Due to the fact that Ψ-A pairs maintain the same Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding capabilities as the parent U-A pair in A-form RNA, the difference in stability due to pseudouridylation was attributed to two possible sources: the novel hydrogen bonding capabilities of the newly relocated imino group as well as the novel stacking interactions afforded by the electronic configuration of the Ψ residue. The newly derived nearest-neighbor parameters for Ψ-A base pairs may be used in conjunction with other nearest-neighbor parameters for accurately predicting the most likely secondary structure of A-form RNA containing Ψ-A base pairs.

  10. Highly flexible nearest-neighbor-search associative memory with integrated k nearest neighbor classifier, configurable parallelism and dual-storage space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Fengwei; Mihara, Keisuke; Yamasaki, Shogo; Chen, Lei; Jürgen Mattausch, Hans

    2016-04-01

    VLSI-implementations are often applied to solve the high computational cost of pattern matching but have usually low flexibility for satisfying different target applications. In this paper, a digital word-parallel associative memory architecture for k nearest neighbor (KNN) search, which is one of the most basic algorithms in pattern recognition, is reported applying the squared Euclidean distance measure. The reported architecture features reconfigurable parallelism, dual-storage space to achieve a flexible number of reference vectors, and a dedicated majority vote circuit. Programmable switching circuits, located between vector components, enable scalability of the searching parallelism by configuring the reference feature-vector dimensionality. A pipelined storage with dual static-random-access-memory (SRAM) cells for each unit and an intermediate winner control circuit are designed to extend the applicability by improving the flexibility of the reference storage. A test chip in 180 nm CMOS technology, which has 32 rows, 4 elements in each row and 2-parallel 8-bit dual-components in each element, consumes altogether 61.4 mW and in particular only 11.9 mW during the reconfigurable KNN classification (at 45.58 MHz and 1.8 V).

  11. Neighbor-directed histidine N (τ)-alkylation: A route to imidazolium-containing phosphopeptide macrocycles.

    PubMed

    Qian, Wen-Jian; Park, Jung-Eun; Grant, Robert; Lai, Christopher C; Kelley, James A; Yaffe, Michael B; Lee, Kyung S; Burke, Terrence R

    2015-11-01

    Our recently discovered, selective, on-resin route to N(τ)-alkylated imidazolium-containing histidine residues affords new strategies for peptide mimetic design. In this, we demonstrate the use of this chemistry to prepare a series of macrocyclic phosphopeptides, in which imidazolium groups serve as ring-forming junctions. Interestingly, these cationic moieties subsequently serve to charge-mask the phosphoamino acid group that directed their formation. Neighbor-directed histidine N(τ)-alkylation opens the door to new families of phosphopeptidomimetics for use in a range of chemical biology contexts.

  12. Recent studies at NASA-Langley of vortical flows interacting with neighboring surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, J. E.; Campbell, J. F.

    1983-01-01

    The importance of leading edge vortical flows, which occur near and interact with neighboring surfaces, is stressed. Research in this area conducted or sponsored by the NASA Langley Research Center since 1978 is surveyed. Particular attention is given to the cumulative results of a number of theoretical and experimental studies. It is noted that these studies have been carried out in order to understand and use this kind of flow. Much of the work has been devoted to improving the lift-to-drag ratio and pitch characteristics for wings in this flow, although work has also been done on examining the unsteady and lateral characteristics.

  13. Nearest-neighbor doublets in protein-coding regions of MS2 RNA. [coliphage virus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jukes, T. H.

    1977-01-01

    'Nearest neighbor' base pairs ('doublets') in the protein-coding regions of MS2 RNA have been tabulated with respect to their positions in the first two bases of amino acid codons, in the second two bases, or paired by contact between adjoining codons. Considerable variation is evident between numbers of doublets in each of these three possible positions, but the totals of each of the 16 doublets in the coding regions of the MS2 RNA molecule show much less variation. Compilations of doublets in nucleic acid strands have no predictive value for the amino acid composition of proteins coded by such strands.

  14. Regioselective Hydrolysis and Transesterification of Dimethyl 3-Benzamidophthalates Assisted by a Neighboring Amide Group.

    PubMed

    Krivec, Marko; Perdih, Franc; Košmrlj, Janez; Kočevar, Marijan

    2016-07-01

    An efficient, highly regioselective hydrolysis and transesterification of dimethyl 3-benzamidophthalates into the corresponding carboxylic acid monoesters and mixed esters (including tert-butyl esters) under basic conditions is presented. The selectivity is governed by the neighboring 3-benzamido moiety's participation and by the nature of the solvent. In alcohols the reaction occurred exclusively at the ortho-position to the benzamido functionality, in pyridine or acetonitrile at both ester groups. An insight into the mechanistic pathway was obtained from a (1)H NMR study in perdeuteromethanol. PMID:27281457

  15. Word misperception, the neighbor frequency effect, and the role of sentence context: evidence from eye movements.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Timothy J

    2009-12-01

    An eye movement experiment was conducted to investigate whether the processing of a word can be affected by its higher frequency neighbor (HFN). Target words with an HFN (birch) or without one (spruce) were embedded into 2 types of sentence frames: 1 in which the HFN (birth) could fit given the prior sentence context, and 1 in which it could not. The results suggest that words can be misperceived as their HFN, and that top-down information from sentence context strongly modulates this effect. Implications for models of word recognition and eye movements during reading are discussed.

  16. Neighbor-directed histidine N(τ) alkylation. A route to imidazolium-containing phosphopeptide macrocycles

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Wen-Jian; Park, Jung-Eun; Grant, Robert; Lai, Christopher C.; Kelley, James A.; Yaffe, Michael B.; Lee, Kyung S.; Burke, Terrence R.

    2015-07-07

    Our recently discovered, selective, on-resin route to N(τ)-alkylated imidazolium-containing histidine residues affords new strategies for peptide mimetic design. In this, we demonstrate the use of this chemistry to prepare a series of macrocyclic phosphopeptides, in which imidazolium groups serve as ring-forming junctions. These cationic moieties subsequently serve to charge-mask the phosphoamino acid group that directed their formation. Furthermore, neighbor-directed histidine N(τ)-alkylation opens the door to new families of phosphopeptidomimetics for use in a range of chemical biology contexts.

  17. The OpenGeoSys coupling concept for THMC processes in subsurface and the neighboring hydro-compartments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalbacher, T.; Delfs, J. O.; Shao, H.; Boettcher, N.; Walther, M.; Kolditz, O.

    2012-12-01

    State-of-the-art computational models used for integrated water resources management are rapidly developing instruments. Advances in computational mathematics have revolutionized the variety and the nature of the problems that can be addressed by environmental scientists and engineers. For each hydro-compartment, from precipitation and surface run-off to catchment water balance and groundwater interactions, there exist many excellent simulation codes. However, their development has been isolated within different disciplines. The OpenGeoSys (OGS) project is a scientific open source initiative for numerical simulation of thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in porous and fractured media. The basic concept is to provide a flexible numerical framework (using primarily the Finite Element Method (FEM)) for solving multi-field problems in porous and fractured media for applications in geoscience and hydrology. To this purpose, OGS is based on an object-oriented FEM concept including a broad spectrum of interfaces for pre- and post-processing. The idea includes a web-based platform for community access, outfitted with professional software engineering tools such as platform-independent compiling and fully automated benchmarking. The second strategy is to utilize an additional coupling concept that enables OGS simulations to interact sequentially with other individual modeling software in order to address coupled processes in neighboring hydrologic compartments, which includes methods of coupling different physical processes and different geometric model complexities under consideration of the spatial and temporal scale change and the required computational resources. The IWAS ToolBox concept.

  18. Effects on pulmonary health of neighboring residents of concentrated animal feeding operations: exposure assessed using optimized estimation technique.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Anja; Römmelt, Horst; Ehrenstein, Vera; van Strien, Rob; Praml, Georg; Küchenhoff, Helmut; Nowak, Dennis; Radon, Katja

    2011-01-01

    Potential adverse health effects of concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs), which were also shown in the authors' Lower Saxony Lung Study, are of public concern. The authors aimed to investigate pulmonary health effect of neighboring residents assessed using optimized estimation technique. Annual ammonia emission was measured to assess the emission from CAFO and from surrounding fields. Location of sampling points was optimized using cluster analysis. Individual exposure of 457 nonfarm subjects was interpolated by weighting method. Mean estimated annual ammonia levels varied between 16 and 24 μg/m³. Higher exposed participants were more likely to be sensitized against ubiquitous allergens as compared to lower exposed subjects (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 4.2; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-13.2). In addition, they showed a significantly lower forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV₁) (adjusted mean difference in % of predicted -8%; 95% CI -13% to -3%). The authors' previous findings that CAFOs may contribute to burden of respiratory diseases were confirmed by this study. PMID:21864103

  19. Comparison of Neural Networks and Tabular Nearest Neighbor Encoding for Hyperspectral Signature Classification in Unresolved Object Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalz, M.; Ritter, G.; Key, R.

    detections (Rfa). As proof of principle, we analyze classification of multiple closely spaced signatures from a NASA database of space material signatures. Additional analysis pertains to computational complexity and noise sensitivity, which are superior to Bayesian techniques based on classical neural networks. [1] Winter, M.E. "Fast autonomous spectral end-member determination in hyperspectral data," in Proceedings of the 13th International Conference On Applied Geologic Remote Sensing, Vancouver, B.C., Canada, pp. 337-44 (1999). [2] N. Keshava, "A survey of spectral unmixing algorithms," Lincoln Laboratory Journal 14:55-78 (2003). [3] Key, G., M.S. SCHMALZ, F.M. Caimi, and G.X. Ritter. "Performance analysis of tabular nearest neighbor encoding algorithm for joint compression and ATR", in Proceedings SPIE 3814:115-126 (1999). [4] Schmalz, M.S. and G. Key. "Algorithms for hyperspectral signature classification in unresolved object detection using tabular nearest neighbor encoding" in Proceedings of the 2007 AMOS Conference, Maui HI (2007). [5] Ritter, G.X., G. Urcid, and M.S. Schmalz. "Autonomous single-pass endmember approximation using lattice auto-associative memories", Neurocomputing (Elsevier), accepted (June 2008).

  20. Hydrogen abstraction from deoxyribose by a neighboring 3'-uracil peroxyl radical.

    PubMed

    Schyman, Patric; Eriksson, Leif A; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2009-05-01

    Theoretical examination of the reactivity of the uracil-5-peroxyl radical when abstracting a hydrogen atom from a neighboring 5'-deoxyribose in 5'-ApU-5-peroxyl-3' has been performed using density functional theory with the MPWB1K functional. Halogenated uracils are often used as radiosensitizers in DNA since the reactive uracil-5-yl radical is formed upon radiation and is known to create strand break and alkali-labile sites. Under aerobic conditions, such as in the cell, it has been proposed that the uracil-5-peroxyl radical is formed and would be the damaging agent. Our results show low reactivity for the uracil-5-peroxyl radical, determined by calculating the activation and reaction energies for the plausible hydrogen abstraction sites C1', C2', and C3' of the neighboring 5'-deoxyribose. These findings support the hypothesis that hydrogen abstraction primarily occurs by the uracil-5-yl radical, also under aerobic conditions, prior to formation of the peroxyl radical. PMID:19402732

  1. [Spectra Classification Based on Local Mean-Based K-Nearest Centroid Neighbor Method].

    PubMed

    Tu, Liang-ping; Wei, Hui-ming; Wang, Zhi-heng; Wei, Peng; Luo, A-li; Zhao, Yong-heng

    2015-04-01

    In the present paper, a local mean-based K-nearest centroid neighbor (LMKNCN) technique is used for the classification of stars, galaxies and quasars (QSOS). The main idea of LMKNCN is that it depends on the principle of the nearest centroid neighborhood(NCN), and selects K centroid neighbors of each class as training samples and then classifies a query pattern into the class with the distance of the local centroid mean vector to the samples . In this paper, KNN, KNCN and LMKNCN were experimentally compared with these three different kinds of spectra data which are from the United States SDSS-DR8. Among these three methods, the rate of correct classification of the LMKNCN algorithm is higher than the other two algorithms or comparable and the average rate of correct classification is higher than the other two algorithms, especially for the identification of quasars. Experiment shows that the results in this work have important significance for studying galaxies, stars and quasars spectra classification.

  2. Promoting pollution prevention through community-industry dialogues: the good neighbor model in Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Murdock, Barbara Scott; Sexton, Ken

    2002-05-15

    This article examines five attempts by communities to promote pollution prevention through direct negotiations with local manufacturing plants. These projects were Good Neighbor Dialogues spearheaded by Citizens for a Better Environment-Minnesota, an environmental advocacy organization. Three community-company partnerships (a container plant, a foundry, and a cabinet manufacturer) were successful and two (a munitions plant and a petroleum refinery) were not. Successful dialogues all shared certain characteristics: the company was open to negotiating with the community; there was an effective "champion" within the company; a skilled, independent facilitator served as moderator; community participants received independent technical assistance; and both the company and community understood the value of cooperative environmental decision making. Results suggest that Good Neighbor Dialogues can, under the right settings and circumstances, be an effective mechanism for building social capital by fostering greater understanding and trust between companies and communities. They offer the prospect of community-company partnerships that promote pollution prevention and other environmental improvements, while at the same time reinforcing and amplifying traditional pollution control strategies. PMID:12038821

  3. Disentangling neighbors and extended range density oscillations in monatomic amorphous semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Roorda, S; Martin, C; Droui, M; Chicoine, M; Kazimirov, A; Kycia, S

    2012-06-22

    High energy x-ray diffraction measurements of pure amorphous Ge were made and its radial distribution function (RDF) was determined at high resolution, revealing new information on the atomic structure of amorphous semiconductors. Fine structure in the second peak in the RDF provides evidence that a fraction of third neighbors are closer than some second neighbors; taking this into account leads to a narrow distribution of tetrahedral bond angles, (8.5 ± 0.1)°. A small peak which appears near 5 Å upon thermal annealing shows that some ordering in the dihedral bond-angle distribution takes place during structural relaxation. Extended range order is detected (in both a-Ge and a-Si) which persists to beyond 20 Å, and both the periodicity and its decay length increase upon thermal annealing. Previously, the effect of structural relaxation was only detected at intermediate range, involving reduced tetrahedral bond-angle distortions. These results enhance our understanding of the atomic order in continuous random networks and place significantly more stringent requirements on computer models intending to describe these networks, or their alternatives which attempt to describe the structure in terms of an arrangement of paracrystals.

  4. Hydrogen abstraction from deoxyribose by a neighboring 3'-uracil peroxyl radical.

    PubMed

    Schyman, Patric; Eriksson, Leif A; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2009-05-01

    Theoretical examination of the reactivity of the uracil-5-peroxyl radical when abstracting a hydrogen atom from a neighboring 5'-deoxyribose in 5'-ApU-5-peroxyl-3' has been performed using density functional theory with the MPWB1K functional. Halogenated uracils are often used as radiosensitizers in DNA since the reactive uracil-5-yl radical is formed upon radiation and is known to create strand break and alkali-labile sites. Under aerobic conditions, such as in the cell, it has been proposed that the uracil-5-peroxyl radical is formed and would be the damaging agent. Our results show low reactivity for the uracil-5-peroxyl radical, determined by calculating the activation and reaction energies for the plausible hydrogen abstraction sites C1', C2', and C3' of the neighboring 5'-deoxyribose. These findings support the hypothesis that hydrogen abstraction primarily occurs by the uracil-5-yl radical, also under aerobic conditions, prior to formation of the peroxyl radical.

  5. Adaptive broadcasting method using neighbor type information in wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyocheol; Kim, Jeonghyun; Yoo, Younghwan

    2011-01-01

    Flooding is the simplest and most effective way to disseminate a packet to all nodes in a wireless sensor network (WSN). However, basic flooding makes all nodes transmit the packet at least once, resulting in the broadcast storm problem in a worst case, and in turn, network resources are severely wasted. Particularly, power is the most valuable resource of WSNs as nodes are powered by batteries, then the waste of energy by the basic flooding lessens the lifetime of WSNs. In order to solve the broadcast storm problem, this paper proposes a dynamic probabilistic flooding that utilizes the neighbor information like the numbers of child and sibling nodes. In general, the more sibling nodes there are, the higher is the probability that a broadcast packet may be sent by one of the sibling nodes. The packet is not retransmitted by itself, though. Meanwhile, if a node has many child nodes its retransmission probability should be high to achieve the high packet delivery ratio. Therefore, these two terms-the numbers of child and sibling nodes-are adopted in the proposed method in order to attain more reliable flooding. The proposed method also adopts the back-off delay scheme to avoid collisions between close neighbors. Simulation results prove that the proposed method outperforms previous flooding methods in respect of the number of duplicate packets and packet delivery ratio.

  6. Mapping DNA methylation by transverse current sequencing: Reduction of noise from neighboring nucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Jose; Massey, Steven; Kalitsov, Alan; Velev, Julian

    Nanopore sequencing via transverse current has emerged as a competitive candidate for mapping DNA methylation without needed bisulfite-treatment, fluorescent tag, or PCR amplification. By eliminating the error producing amplification step, long read lengths become feasible, which greatly simplifies the assembly process and reduces the time and the cost inherent in current technologies. However, due to the large error rates of nanopore sequencing, single base resolution has not been reached. A very important source of noise is the intrinsic structural noise in the electric signature of the nucleotide arising from the influence of neighboring nucleotides. In this work we perform calculations of the tunneling current through DNA molecules in nanopores using the non-equilibrium electron transport method within an effective multi-orbital tight-binding model derived from first-principles calculations. We develop a base-calling algorithm accounting for the correlations of the current through neighboring bases, which in principle can reduce the error rate below any desired precision. Using this method we show that we can clearly distinguish DNA methylation and other base modifications based on the reading of the tunneling current.

  7. Data Delivery Method Based on Neighbor Nodes' Information in a Mobile Ad Hoc Network

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Takuma; Taenaka, Yuzo; Okuda, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Suguru

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a data delivery method based on neighbor nodes' information to achieve reliable communication in a mobile ad hoc network (MANET). In a MANET, it is difficult to deliver data reliably due to instabilities in network topology and wireless network condition which result from node movement. To overcome such unstable communication, opportunistic routing and network coding schemes have lately attracted considerable attention. Although an existing method that employs such schemes, MAC-independent opportunistic routing and encoding (MORE), Chachulski et al. (2007), improves the efficiency of data delivery in an unstable wireless mesh network, it does not address node movement. To efficiently deliver data in a MANET, the method proposed in this paper thus first employs the same opportunistic routing and network coding used in MORE and also uses the location information and transmission probabilities of neighbor nodes to adapt to changeable network topology and wireless network condition. The simulation experiments showed that the proposed method can achieve efficient data delivery with low network load when the movement speed is relatively slow. PMID:24672371

  8. Data delivery method based on neighbor nodes' information in a mobile ad hoc network.

    PubMed

    Kashihara, Shigeru; Hayashi, Takuma; Taenaka, Yuzo; Okuda, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Suguru

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a data delivery method based on neighbor nodes' information to achieve reliable communication in a mobile ad hoc network (MANET). In a MANET, it is difficult to deliver data reliably due to instabilities in network topology and wireless network condition which result from node movement. To overcome such unstable communication, opportunistic routing and network coding schemes have lately attracted considerable attention. Although an existing method that employs such schemes, MAC-independent opportunistic routing and encoding (MORE), Chachulski et al. (2007), improves the efficiency of data delivery in an unstable wireless mesh network, it does not address node movement. To efficiently deliver data in a MANET, the method proposed in this paper thus first employs the same opportunistic routing and network coding used in MORE and also uses the location information and transmission probabilities of neighbor nodes to adapt to changeable network topology and wireless network condition. The simulation experiments showed that the proposed method can achieve efficient data delivery with low network load when the movement speed is relatively slow.

  9. [Spectra Classification Based on Local Mean-Based K-Nearest Centroid Neighbor Method].

    PubMed

    Tu, Liang-ping; Wei, Hui-ming; Wang, Zhi-heng; Wei, Peng; Luo, A-li; Zhao, Yong-heng

    2015-04-01

    In the present paper, a local mean-based K-nearest centroid neighbor (LMKNCN) technique is used for the classification of stars, galaxies and quasars (QSOS). The main idea of LMKNCN is that it depends on the principle of the nearest centroid neighborhood(NCN), and selects K centroid neighbors of each class as training samples and then classifies a query pattern into the class with the distance of the local centroid mean vector to the samples . In this paper, KNN, KNCN and LMKNCN were experimentally compared with these three different kinds of spectra data which are from the United States SDSS-DR8. Among these three methods, the rate of correct classification of the LMKNCN algorithm is higher than the other two algorithms or comparable and the average rate of correct classification is higher than the other two algorithms, especially for the identification of quasars. Experiment shows that the results in this work have important significance for studying galaxies, stars and quasars spectra classification. PMID:26197610

  10. Sources of Secondary Metabolite Variation in Dysidea avara (Porifera: Demospongiae): The Importance of Having Good Neighbors

    PubMed Central

    De Caralt, Sonia; Bry, Delphine; Bontemps, Nataly; Turon, Xavier; Uriz, Maria-Jesus; Banaigs, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Several studies report temporal, geographical, and intra-individual variation in sponge metabolite yields. However, the internal and/or external factors that regulate the metabolite production remain poorly understood. Dysidea avara is a demosponge that produces sesquiterpenoids (avarol and derivatives) with interesting medical properties, which has prompted addressed studies to obtain enough amounts of these metabolites for research on drug discovery. Within this framework, specimens of Dysidea avara from apopulation of the Northwest Mediterranean were sampled and their secondary metabolites quantified to assess their variability and the possible relationship with external (seasonality, interactions with neighbors) and internal (reproductive stages) factors. The results show a variation of the amount of both avarol and its monoacetate derivative with time, with no clear relationship with seawater temperature. A trade-off with sponge reproduction was not found either. However, our results showed for the first time that sponges are able to increase production or accumulation of secondary metabolites in their peripheral zone depending on the nature of their neighbors. This finding could explain part of the high variability in the amount of secondary metabolites usually found in chemical ecology studies on sponges and opens new biotechnological approaches to enhance the metabolite yield in sponge cultures. PMID:23429282

  11. Detect thy neighbor: identity recognition at the root level in plants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin J W; During, Heinjo J; Anten, Niels P R

    2012-10-01

    Some plant species increase root allocation at the expense of reproduction in the presence of non-self and non-kin neighbors, indicating the capacity of neighbor-identity recognition at the root level. Yet in spite of the potential consequences of root identity recognition for the relationship between plant interactions and community structure and functioning, this phenomenon still remains poorly understood. We first critically assess the evidence for the existence of self/non-self and kin recognition at the root level in plants. While root identity recognition most likely exists to some degree, there remain valid points of criticism regarding experiments that have documented this, particularly concerning the effects of pot volume in self/non-self recognition experiments and the roles of size inequality and asymmetric competition in kin recognition studies. Subsequently we review and propose some plausible physiological mechanisms that may underlie these responses. Finally we briefly discuss the relation between under- and aboveground interactions and the potential consequences of root identity recognition for agriculture, and conclude with raising several questions for future studies.

  12. Mapping asthma-associated variants in admixed populations

    PubMed Central

    Mersha, Tesfaye B.

    2015-01-01

    Admixed populations arise when two or more previously isolated populations interbreed. Mapping asthma susceptibility loci in an admixed population using admixture mapping (AM) involves screening the genome of individuals of mixed ancestry for chromosomal regions that have a higher frequency of alleles from a parental population with higher asthma risk as compared with parental population with lower asthma risk. AM takes advantage of the admixture created in populations of mixed ancestry to identify genomic regions where an association exists between genetic ancestry and asthma (in contrast to between the genotype of the marker and asthma). The theory behind AM is that chromosomal segments of affected individuals contain a significantly higher-than-average proportion of alleles from the high-risk parental population and thus are more likely to harbor disease–associated loci. Criteria to evaluate the applicability of AM as a gene mapping approach include: (1) the prevalence of the disease differences in ancestral populations from which the admixed population was formed; (2) a measurable difference in disease-causing alleles between the parental populations; (3) reduced linkage disequilibrium (LD) between unlinked loci across chromosomes and strong LD between neighboring loci; (4) a set of markers with noticeable allele-frequency differences between parental populations that contributes to the admixed population (single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the markers of choice because they are abundant, stable, relatively cheap to genotype, and informative with regard to the LD structure of chromosomal segments); and (5) there is an understanding of the extent of segmental chromosomal admixtures and their interactions with environmental factors. Although genome-wide association studies have contributed greatly to our understanding of the genetic components of asthma, the large and increasing degree of admixture in populations across the world create many challenges

  13. Radiation dose rates now and in the future for residents neighboring restricted areas of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant.

    PubMed

    Harada, Kouji H; Niisoe, Tamon; Imanaka, Mie; Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Amako, Katsumi; Fujii, Yukiko; Kanameishi, Masatoshi; Ohse, Kenji; Nakai, Yasumichi; Nishikawa, Tamami; Saito, Yuuichi; Sakamoto, Hiroko; Ueyama, Keiko; Hisaki, Kumiko; Ohara, Eiji; Inoue, Tokiko; Yamamoto, Kanako; Matsuoka, Yukiyo; Ohata, Hitomi; Toshima, Kazue; Okada, Ayumi; Sato, Hitomi; Kuwamori, Toyomi; Tani, Hiroko; Suzuki, Reiko; Kashikura, Mai; Nezu, Michiko; Miyachi, Yoko; Arai, Fusako; Kuwamori, Masanori; Harada, Sumiko; Ohmori, Akira; Ishikawa, Hirohiko; Koizumi, Akio

    2014-03-11

    Radiation dose rates were evaluated in three areas neighboring a restricted area within a 20- to 50-km radius of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in August-September 2012 and projected to 2022 and 2062. Study participants wore personal dosimeters measuring external dose equivalents, almost entirely from deposited radionuclides (groundshine). External dose rate equivalents owing to the accident averaged 1.03, 2.75, and 1.66 mSv/y in the village of Kawauchi, the Tamano area of Soma, and the Haramachi area of Minamisoma, respectively. Internal dose rates estimated from dietary intake of radiocesium averaged 0.0058, 0.019, and 0.0088 mSv/y in Kawauchi, Tamano, and Haramachi, respectively. Dose rates from inhalation of resuspended radiocesium were lower than 0.001 mSv/y. In 2012, the average annual doses from radiocesium were close to the average background radiation exposure (2 mSv/y) in Japan. Accounting only for the physical decay of radiocesium, mean annual dose rates in 2022 were estimated as 0.31, 0.87, and 0.53 mSv/y in Kawauchi, Tamano, and Haramachi, respectively. The simple and conservative estimates are comparable with variations in the background dose, and unlikely to exceed the ordinary permissible dose rate (1 mSv/y) for the majority of the Fukushima population. Health risk assessment indicates that post-2012 doses will increase lifetime solid cancer, leukemia, and breast cancer incidences by 1.06%, 0.03% and 0.28% respectively, in Tamano. This assessment was derived from short-term observation with uncertainties and did not evaluate the first-year dose and radioiodine exposure. Nevertheless, this estimate provides perspective on the long-term radiation exposure levels in the three regions.

  14. Radiation dose rates now and in the future for residents neighboring restricted areas of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Kouji H.; Niisoe, Tamon; Imanaka, Mie; Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Amako, Katsumi; Fujii, Yukiko; Kanameishi, Masatoshi; Ohse, Kenji; Nakai, Yasumichi; Nishikawa, Tamami; Saito, Yuuichi; Sakamoto, Hiroko; Ueyama, Keiko; Hisaki, Kumiko; Ohara, Eiji; Inoue, Tokiko; Yamamoto, Kanako; Matsuoka, Yukiyo; Ohata, Hitomi; Toshima, Kazue; Okada, Ayumi; Sato, Hitomi; Kuwamori, Toyomi; Tani, Hiroko; Suzuki, Reiko; Kashikura, Mai; Nezu, Michiko; Miyachi, Yoko; Arai, Fusako; Kuwamori, Masanori; Harada, Sumiko; Ohmori, Akira; Ishikawa, Hirohiko; Koizumi, Akio

    2014-01-01

    Radiation dose rates were evaluated in three areas neighboring a restricted area within a 20- to 50-km radius of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in August–September 2012 and projected to 2022 and 2062. Study participants wore personal dosimeters measuring external dose equivalents, almost entirely from deposited radionuclides (groundshine). External dose rate equivalents owing to the accident averaged 1.03, 2.75, and 1.66 mSv/y in the village of Kawauchi, the Tamano area of Soma, and the Haramachi area of Minamisoma, respectively. Internal dose rates estimated from dietary intake of radiocesium averaged 0.0058, 0.019, and 0.0088 mSv/y in Kawauchi, Tamano, and Haramachi, respectively. Dose rates from inhalation of resuspended radiocesium were lower than 0.001 mSv/y. In 2012, the average annual doses from radiocesium were close to the average background radiation exposure (2 mSv/y) in Japan. Accounting only for the physical decay of radiocesium, mean annual dose rates in 2022 were estimated as 0.31, 0.87, and 0.53 mSv/y in Kawauchi, Tamano, and Haramachi, respectively. The simple and conservative estimates are comparable with variations in the background dose, and unlikely to exceed the ordinary permissible dose rate (1 mSv/y) for the majority of the Fukushima population. Health risk assessment indicates that post-2012 doses will increase lifetime solid cancer, leukemia, and breast cancer incidences by 1.06%, 0.03% and 0.28% respectively, in Tamano. This assessment was derived from short-term observation with uncertainties and did not evaluate the first-year dose and radioiodine exposure. Nevertheless, this estimate provides perspective on the long-term radiation exposure levels in the three regions. PMID:24567380

  15. Radiation dose rates now and in the future for residents neighboring restricted areas of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant.

    PubMed

    Harada, Kouji H; Niisoe, Tamon; Imanaka, Mie; Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Amako, Katsumi; Fujii, Yukiko; Kanameishi, Masatoshi; Ohse, Kenji; Nakai, Yasumichi; Nishikawa, Tamami; Saito, Yuuichi; Sakamoto, Hiroko; Ueyama, Keiko; Hisaki, Kumiko; Ohara, Eiji; Inoue, Tokiko; Yamamoto, Kanako; Matsuoka, Yukiyo; Ohata, Hitomi; Toshima, Kazue; Okada, Ayumi; Sato, Hitomi; Kuwamori, Toyomi; Tani, Hiroko; Suzuki, Reiko; Kashikura, Mai; Nezu, Michiko; Miyachi, Yoko; Arai, Fusako; Kuwamori, Masanori; Harada, Sumiko; Ohmori, Akira; Ishikawa, Hirohiko; Koizumi, Akio

    2014-03-11

    Radiation dose rates were evaluated in three areas neighboring a restricted area within a 20- to 50-km radius of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in August-September 2012 and projected to 2022 and 2062. Study participants wore personal dosimeters measuring external dose equivalents, almost entirely from deposited radionuclides (groundshine). External dose rate equivalents owing to the accident averaged 1.03, 2.75, and 1.66 mSv/y in the village of Kawauchi, the Tamano area of Soma, and the Haramachi area of Minamisoma, respectively. Internal dose rates estimated from dietary intake of radiocesium averaged 0.0058, 0.019, and 0.0088 mSv/y in Kawauchi, Tamano, and Haramachi, respectively. Dose rates from inhalation of resuspended radiocesium were lower than 0.001 mSv/y. In 2012, the average annual doses from radiocesium were close to the average background radiation exposure (2 mSv/y) in Japan. Accounting only for the physical decay of radiocesium, mean annual dose rates in 2022 were estimated as 0.31, 0.87, and 0.53 mSv/y in Kawauchi, Tamano, and Haramachi, respectively. The simple and conservative estimates are comparable with variations in the background dose, and unlikely to exceed the ordinary permissible dose rate (1 mSv/y) for the majority of the Fukushima population. Health risk assessment indicates that post-2012 doses will increase lifetime solid cancer, leukemia, and breast cancer incidences by 1.06%, 0.03% and 0.28% respectively, in Tamano. This assessment was derived from short-term observation with uncertainties and did not evaluate the first-year dose and radioiodine exposure. Nevertheless, this estimate provides perspective on the long-term radiation exposure levels in the three regions. PMID:24567380

  16. Seismic clusters analysis in North-Eastern Italy by the nearest-neighbor approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peresan, Antonella; Gentili, Stefania

    2016-04-01

    The main features of earthquake clusters in the Friuli Venezia Giulia Region (North Eastern Italy) are explored, with the aim to get some new insights on local scale patterns of seismicity in the area. The study is based on a systematic analysis of robustly and uniformly detected seismic clusters of small-to-medium magnitude events, as opposed to selected clusters analyzed in earlier studies. To characterize the features of seismicity for FVG, we take advantage of updated information from local OGS bulletins, compiled at the National Institute of Oceanography and Experimental Geophysics, Centre of Seismological Research, since 1977. A preliminary reappraisal of the earthquake bulletins is carried out, in order to identify possible missing events and to remove spurious records (e.g. duplicates and explosions). The area of sufficient completeness is outlined; for this purpose, different techniques are applied, including a comparative analysis with global ISC data, which are available in the region for large and moderate size earthquakes. Various techniques are considered to estimate the average parameters that characterize the earthquake occurrence in the region, including the b-value and the fractal dimension of epicenters distribution. Specifically, besides the classical Gutenberg-Richter Law, the Unified Scaling Law for Earthquakes, USLE, is applied. Using the updated and revised OGS data, a new formal method for detection of earthquake clusters, based on nearest-neighbor distances of events in space-time-energy domain, is applied. The bimodality of the distribution, which characterizes the earthquake nearest-neighbor distances, is used to decompose the seismic catalog into sequences of individual clusters and background seismicity. Accordingly, the method allows for a data-driven identification of main shocks (first event with the largest magnitude in the cluster), foreshocks and aftershocks. Average robust estimates of the USLE parameters (particularly, b

  17. False-nearest-neighbors algorithm and noise-corrupted time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Carl; Morari, Manfred

    1997-05-01

    The false-nearest-neighbors (FNN) algorithm was originally developed to determine the embedding dimension for autonomous time series. For noise-free computer-generated time series, the algorithm does a good job in predicting the embedding dimension. However, the problem of predicting the embedding dimension when the time-series data are corrupted by noise was not fully examined in the original studies of the FNN algorithm. Here it is shown that with large data sets, even small amounts of noise can lead to incorrect prediction of the embedding dimension. Surprisingly, as the length of the time series analyzed by FNN grows larger, the cause of incorrect prediction becomes more pronounced. An analysis of the effect of noise on the FNN algorithm and a solution for dealing with the effects of noise are given here. Some results on the theoretically correct choice of the FNN threshold are also presented.

  18. Gated cardiac scanning using limited-angle image reconstruction technique and information in the neighboring phases

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, K.C.; MacDonald, B.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1984-02-01

    It is known that there are gaps in scan angle in gated cardiac scanning due to lack of synchronization between heart beat and CT machine rotation. The missing projections in these gaps result in artifacts in the reconstructed images. In a previous paper an iterative limited-angle reconstruction technique was employed to fill in the missing projections to remove the artifacts. It was found there that the root-mean-square errors of the limited-angle images were reduced to a level comparable to those of reconstructions using complete-angle information. In the present paper the results are further improved by using the scans of a neighboring portion of the cardiac cycle as a first estimate of the missing scans in the phase of interest when initializing the iterations. Such a modification provides a better starting point for the iterations.

  19. Transitions in histone acetylation reveal boundaries of three separately regulated neighboring loci

    PubMed Central

    Litt, Michael D.; Simpson, Melanie; Recillas-Targa, Félix; Prioleau, Marie-Noëlle; Felsenfeld, Gary

    2001-01-01

    We have studied developmentally regulated patterns of histone acetylation at high resolution across ∼54 kb of DNA containing three independently regulated but neighboring genetic loci. These include a folate receptor gene, a 16 kb condensed chromatin region, the chicken β-globin domain and an adjacent olfactory receptor gene. Within these regions the relative levels of acetylation appear to fall into three classes. The condensed chromatin region maintains the lowest acetylation at every developmental stage. Genes that are inactive show similarly low levels, but activation results in a dramatic increase in acetylation. The highest levels of acetylation are seen at regulatory sites upstream of the genes. These patterns imply the action of more than one class of acetylation. Notably, there is a very strong constitutive focus of hyperacetylation at the 5′ insulator element separating the globin locus from the folate receptor region, which suggests that this insulator element may harbor a high concentration of histone acetylases. PMID:11331588

  20. Magic nucleus 132Sn and its one-neutron-hole neighbor 131Sn.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, P; Daly, P J; Zhang, C T; Grabowski, Z W; Saha, S K; Broda, R; Fornal, B; Ahmad, I; Seweryniak, D; Wiedenhöver, I; Carpenter, M P; Janssens, R V; Khoo, T L; Lauritsen, T; Lister, C J; Reiter, P; Blomqvist, J

    2001-08-01

    Prompt and delayed gamma-ray cascades in doubly magic 132Sn and its neighbor 131Sn have been studied at Gammasphere using a 248Cm fission source. Isotopic assignments of unknown gamma rays were based on coincidences with known transitions in A = 112-116 Pd fission partners. The yrast level spectra of both tin nuclei are interpreted using empirical nucleon-nucleon interactions from the 132Sn and 208Pb regions. Results include identification of the (nuf(7/2)h(-1)(11/2))9(+) aligned state in 132Sn and of extensive (nuf(7/2)h(-2)(11/2)), (nuf(7/2)d(-1)(3/2)h(-1)(11/2)) and (nuh(-1)(11/2)x3(-)) multiplets in 131Sn. The previously reported beta(-) decay of an unusual 131In high-spin isomer to levels in 131Sn is also elucidated. PMID:11497825

  1. Density functional theory for nearest-neighbor exclusion lattice gases in two and three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafuente, Luis; Cuesta, José A.

    2003-12-01

    To speak about fundamental measure theory obliges us to mention dimensional crossover. This feature, inherent to the systems themselves, was incorporated in the theory almost from the beginning. Although at first it was thought to be a consistency check for the theory, it rapidly became its fundamental pillar, thus becoming the only density functional theory which possesses such a property. It is straightforward that dimensional crossover connects, for instance, the parallel hard cube system (three dimensional) with that of squares (two dimensional) and rods (one dimensional). We show here that there are many more connections which can be established in this way. Through them we deduce from the functional for parallel hard (hyper)cubes in the simple (hyper)cubic lattice the corresponding functionals for the nearest-neighbor exclusion lattice gases in the square, triangular, simple cubic, face-centered-cubic, and body-centered-cubic lattices. As an application, the bulk phase diagram for all these systems is obtained.

  2. Using the joint transform correlator as the feature extractor for the nearest neighbor classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soon, Boon Y.; Karim, Mohammad A.; Alam, Mohammad S.

    1999-01-01

    Financial transactions using credit cards have gained popularity but the growing number of counterfeits and frauds may defeat the purpose of the cards. The search for a superior method to curb the criminal acts has become urgent especially in the brilliant information age. Currently, neural-network-based pattern recognition techniques are employed for security verification. However, it has been a time consuming experience, as some techniques require a long period of training time. Here, a faster and more efficient method is proposed to perform security verification that verifies the fingerprint images using the joint transform correlator as a feature extractor for nearest neighbor classifier. The uniqueness comparison scheme is proposed to improve the accuracy of the system verification. The performance of the system under noise corruption, variable contrast, and rotation of the input image is verified with a computer simulation.

  3. Nearest neighbor correlations in perpendicular artificial spin ice arrays in the presence of an applied field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempinger, Susan; Fraleigh, Robert; Lammert, Paul; Crespi, Vincent; Samarth, Nitin; Schiffer, Peter

    By studying the field dependent magnetization switching process in perpendicular artificial spin ice arrays arrays, we hope to gain insight in to the dynamical properties of interacting spin systems. To this end, we have used diffraction-limited Kerr imaging to study lithographically patterned arrays of single domain, nanoscale islands of Co/Pt multilayers. We can tune the interaction strength and introduce geometric frustration in to the patterned systems by changing the lattice spacing and geometry of the arrays. Using MOKE microscopy we are able to optically resolve, spatially isolate, and extract the switching field of each island in an array in the presence of an external field. These switching fields allow us to calculate the magnetization and nearest neighbor spin-spin correlation throughout a hysteresis loop. These quantities help us determine the effect of increased interactions and geometric frustration on the switching process of dipole coupled arrays. Funded by DOE.

  4. Self-Organized Criticality in Glassy Spin Systems Requires a Diverging Number of Neighbors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andresen, Juan Carlos; Zhu, Zheng; Andrist, Ruben S.; Katzgraber, Helmut G.; Dobrosavljević, V.; Zimanyi, Gergely T.

    2013-08-01

    We investigate the conditions required for general spin systems with frustration and disorder to display self-organized criticality, a property which so far has been established only for the fully connected infinite-range Sherrington-Kirkpatrick Ising spin-glass model [Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 1034 (1999)]. Here, we study both avalanche and magnetization jump distributions triggered by an external magnetic field, as well as internal field distributions in the short-range Edwards-Anderson Ising spin glass for various space dimensions between 2 and 8, as well as the fixed-connectivity mean-field Viana-Bray model. Our numerical results, obtained on systems of unprecedented size, demonstrate that self-organized criticality is recovered only in the strict limit of a diverging number of neighbors and is not a generic property of spin-glass models in finite space dimensions.

  5. Comparing distance metrics for rotation using the k-nearest neighbors algorithm for entropy estimation.

    PubMed

    Huggins, David J

    2014-02-15

    Distance metrics facilitate a number of methods for statistical analysis. For statistical mechanical applications, it is useful to be able to compute the distance between two different orientations of a molecule. However, a number of distance metrics for rotation have been employed, and in this study, we consider different distance metrics and their utility in entropy estimation using the k-nearest neighbors (KNN) algorithm. This approach shows a number of advantages over entropy estimation using a histogram method, and the different approaches are assessed using uniform randomly generated data, biased randomly generated data, and data from a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of bulk water. The results identify quaternion metrics as superior to a metric based on the Euler angles. However, it is demonstrated that samples from MD simulation must be independent for effective use of the KNN algorithm and this finding impacts any application to time series data. PMID:24311273

  6. Proteomic characterization of host response to Yersinia pestis and near neighbors.

    PubMed

    Chromy, Brett A; Perkins, Julie; Heidbrink, Jenny L; Gonzales, Arlene D; Murphy, Gloria A; Fitch, J Patrick; McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L

    2004-07-23

    Host-pathogen interactions result in protein expression changes within both the host and the pathogen. Here, results from proteomic characterization of host response following exposure to Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, and to two near neighbors, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia enterocolitica, are reported. Human monocyte-like cells were chosen as a model for macrophage immune response to pathogen exposure. Two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry was used to identify host proteins with differential expression following exposure to these three closely related Yersinia species. This comparative proteomic characterization of host response clearly shows that host protein expression patterns are distinct for the different pathogen exposures, and contributes to further understanding of Y. pestis virulence and host defense mechanisms. This work also lays the foundation for future studies aimed at defining biomarkers for presymptomatic detection of plague.

  7. Modeling of free electronic state density in hydrogenic plasmas based on nearest neighbor approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Nishikawa, Takeshi

    2014-07-15

    Most conventional atomic models in a plasma do not treat the effect of the plasma on the free-electron state density. Using a nearest neighbor approximation, the state densities in hydrogenic plasmas for both bound and free electrons were evaluated and the effect of the plasma on the atomic model (especially for the state density of the free electron) was studied. The model evaluates the electron-state densities using the potential distribution formed by the superposition of the Coulomb potentials of two ions. The potential from one ion perturbs the electronic state density on the other. Using this new model, one can evaluate the free-state density without making any ad-hoc assumptions. The resulting contours of the average ionization degree, given as a function of the plasma temperature and density, are shifted slightly to lower temperatures because of the effect of the increasing free-state density.

  8. Quantum simulation of Heisenberg spin chains with next-nearest-neighbor interactions in coupled cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zhixin; Zhou Zhengwei; Zhou Xingxiang; Zhou Xiangga; Guo Guangcan

    2010-02-15

    We propose a scheme to simulate one-dimensional XXZ-type Heisenberg spin models with competing interactions between nearest neighbors (NNs) and next NNs in photon-coupled microcavities. Our scheme exploits the rich resources and flexible controls available in such a system to realize arbitrarily adjustable ratios between the effective NN and next-NN coupling strengths. Such a powerful capability allows us to simulate frustration phenomena and disorder behaviors in one-dimensional systems arising from next-NN interactions, a large class of problems of great importance in condensed-matter physics. Our scheme is robust due to the lack of atomic excitations, which suppresses spontaneous emission and cavity decay strongly.

  9. Quantum simulation of pairing Hamiltonians with nearest-neighbor-interacting qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhixin; Gu, Xiu; Wu, Lian-Ao; Liu, Yu-xi

    2016-06-01

    Although a universal quantum computer is still far from reach, the tremendous advances in controllable quantum devices, in particular with solid-state systems, make it possible to physically implement "quantum simulators." Quantum simulators are physical setups able to simulate other quantum systems efficiently that are intractable on classical computers. Based on solid-state qubit systems with various types of nearest-neighbor interactions, we propose a complete set of algorithms for simulating pairing Hamiltonians. The fidelity of the target states corresponding to each algorithm is numerically studied. We also compare algorithms designed for different types of experimentally available Hamiltonians and analyze their complexity. Furthermore, we design a measurement scheme to extract energy spectra from the simulators. Our simulation algorithms might be feasible with state-of-the-art technology in solid-state quantum devices.

  10. Rerouting of subglacial water flow between neighboring glaciers in West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Winnie; Creyts, Timothy T.; Bell, Robin E.

    2016-05-01

    Investigations of the Greenland ice sheet's subglacial hydrological system show that the connectivity of different regions of the system influences how the glacier velocity responds to variations in surface melting. Here we examine whether subglacial water flow paths can be rerouted beneath three outlet glaciers in the ablation zone of western Greenland. We use Lamont-Doherty and Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets of University of Kansas (CReSIS) ice-penetrating radar data to create a new ice thickness map. We then use a simple subglacial water flow model to examine whether flow paths can be rerouted and identify the topographic conditions that are sensitive to subglacial rerouting. By varying water pressures within an observationally constrained range, we show that moderate changes in pressure can cause flow paths to reroute and exchange water from one subglacial catchment to another. Flow across subglacial overdeepenings is particularly sensitive to rerouting. These areas have low hydraulic gradients driving flow, so subtle water pressure variations have a strong influence on water flow direction. Based on correlations between water flow paths and ice velocity changes, we infer that water piracy between neighboring catchments can result in a different spatial pattern of hydrologically induced ice velocity speedup depending on the amount and timing of surface melt. The potential for subglacial water to reroute across different catchments suggests that multiple hydrographs from neighboring glaciers are likely necessary to accurately ascertain melt budgets from proglacial point measurements. The relationship between surface runoff, ice dynamics, and proglacial discharge can be altered by rerouting of subglacial water flow within and across outlet glaciers.

  11. Beyond the nearest-neighbor Zimm-Bragg model for helix-coil transition in peptides.

    PubMed

    Murza, Adrian; Kubelka, Jan

    2009-02-01

    The nearest-neighbor (micro = 1) variant of the Zimm and Bragg (ZB) model has been extensively used to describe the helix-coil transition in biopolymers. In this work, we investigate the helix-coil transition for a 21-residue alanine peptide (AP) with the ZB model up to fourth nearest neighbor (micro = 1, 2, 3, and 4). We use a matrix approach that takes into account combinations of any number of helical stretches of any length and therefore gives the exact statistical weight of the chain within the assumptions of the ZB model. The parameters of the model are determined by fitting the temperature-dependent circular dichroism and Fourier transform infrared experimental spectra of the AP. All variants of the model fit the experimental data, thus giving similar results in terms of the macroscopic observables, such as temperature-dependent fractional helicity. However, the resulting microscopic parameters, such as distributions of the individual residue helical probabilities and free energy surfaces, vary significantly depending on the variant of the model. Overall, the mean residue enthalpy and entropy (in the absolute value) both increase with micro, but combined yield essentially the same "effective" value of the ZB propagation parameters for all micro. Greater helical probabilities for individual residues are predicted for larger micro, in particular, near the center of the sequence. The ZB nucleation parameters increase with increasing micro, which results in a lower free energy barrier to helix nucleation and lower apparent "cooperativity" of the transition. The significance of the long-range interactions for the predictions of ZB model for helix-coil transition, the calculated model parameters and the limitations of the model are discussed.

  12. Non-nearest-neighbor dependence of stability for group III RNA single nucleotide bulge loops.

    PubMed

    Kent, Jessica L; McCann, Michael D; Phillips, Daniel; Panaro, Brandon L; Lim, Geoffrey F S; Serra, Martin J

    2014-06-01

    Thirty-five RNA duplexes containing single nucleotide bulge loops were optically melted and the thermodynamic parameters for each duplex determined. The bulge loops were of the group III variety, where the bulged nucleotide is either a AG/U or CU/G, leading to ambiguity to the exact position and identity of the bulge. All possible group III bulge loops with Watson-Crick nearest-neighbors were examined. The data were used to develop a model to predict the free energy of an RNA duplex containing a group III single nucleotide bulge loop. The destabilization of the duplex by the group III bulge could be modeled so that the bulge nucleotide leads to the formation of the Watson-Crick base pair rather than the wobble base pair. The destabilization of an RNA duplex caused by the insertion of a group III bulge is primarily dependent upon non-nearest-neighbor interactions and was shown to be dependent upon the stability of second least stable stem of the duplex. In-line structure probing of group III bulge loops embedded in a hairpin indicated that the bulged nucleotide is the one positioned further from the hairpin loop irrespective of whether the resulting stem formed a Watson-Crick or wobble base pair. Fourteen RNA hairpins containing group III bulge loops, either 3' or 5' of the hairpin loop, were optically melted and the thermodynamic parameters determined. The model developed to predict the influence of group III bulge loops on the stability of duplex formation was extended to predict the influence of bulge loops on hairpin stability.

  13. Distance-Constraint k-Nearest Neighbor Searching in Mobile Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yongkoo; Park, Kisung; Hong, Jihye; Ulamin, Noor; Lee, Young-Koo

    2015-01-01

    The k-Nearest Neighbors (kNN) query is an important spatial query in mobile sensor networks. In this work we extend kNN to include a distance constraint, calling it a l-distant k-nearest-neighbors (l-kNN) query, which finds the k sensor nodes nearest to a query point that are also at l or greater distance from each other. The query results indicate the objects nearest to the area of interest that are scattered from each other by at least distance l. The l- kNN query can be used in most kNN applications for the case of well distributed query results. To process an l-kNN query, we must discover all sets of kNN sensor nodes and then find all pairs of sensor nodes in each set that are separated by at least a distance l. Given the limited battery and computing power of sensor nodes, this l-kNN query processing is problematically expensive in terms of energy consumption. In this paper, we propose a greedy approach for l- kNN query processing in mobile sensor networks. The key idea of the proposed approach is to divide the search space into subspaces whose all sides are l. By selecting k sensor nodes from the other subspaces near the query point, we guarantee accurate query results for l- kNN. In our experiments, we show that the proposed method exhibits superior performance compared with a post-processing based method using the kNN query in terms of energy efficiency, query latency, and accuracy. PMID:26225969

  14. Distance-Constraint k-Nearest Neighbor Searching in Mobile Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Han, Yongkoo; Park, Kisung; Hong, Jihye; Ulamin, Noor; Lee, Young-Koo

    2015-07-27

    The κ-Nearest Neighbors ( κNN) query is an important spatial query in mobile sensor networks. In this work we extend κNN to include a distance constraint, calling it a l-distant κ-nearest-neighbors (l-κNN) query, which finds the κ sensor nodes nearest to a query point that are also at or greater distance from each other. The query results indicate the objects nearest to the area of interest that are scattered from each other by at least distance l. The l-κNN query can be used in most κNN applications for the case of well distributed query results. To process an l-κNN query, we must discover all sets of κNN sensor nodes and then find all pairs of sensor nodes in each set that are separated by at least a distance l. Given the limited battery and computing power of sensor nodes, this l-κNN query processing is problematically expensive in terms of energy consumption. In this paper, we propose a greedy approach for l-κNN query processing in mobile sensor networks. The key idea of the proposed approach is to divide the search space into subspaces whose all sides are l. By selecting κ sensor nodes from the other subspaces near the query point, we guarantee accurate query results for l-κNN. In our experiments, we show that the proposed method exhibits superior performance compared with a post-processing based method using the κNN query in terms of energy efficiency, query latency, and accuracy.

  15. Building a co-created citizen science program with gardeners neighboring a superfund site: The Gardenroots case study

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Andreotta, Monica D; Brusseau, Mark L; Artiola, Janick; Maier, Raina M; Gandolfi, A Jay

    2014-01-01

    A research project that is only expert-driven may ignore the role of local knowledge in research, give low priority to the development of a comprehensive communication strategy to engage the community, and may not deliver the results of the study to the community in an effective way. Objective To demonstrate how a research program can respond to a community research need, establish a community-academic partnership, and build a co-created citizen science program. Methods A place-based, community-driven project was designed where academics and community members maintained a reciprocal dialogue, and together, we: 1) defined the question for study, 2) gathered information, 3) developed hypotheses, 3) designed data collection methodologies, 4) collected environmental samples (soil, irrigation water, and vegetables), 5) interpreted data, 6) disseminated results and translated results into action, and 7) discussed results and asked new questions. Results The co-created environmental research project produced new data and addressed an additional exposure route (consumption of vegetables grown in soils with elevated arsenic levels). Public participation in scientific research improved environmental health assessment, information transfer, and risk communication efforts. Furthermore, incorporating the community in the scientific process produced both individual learning outcomes and community-level outcomes. Conclusions This approach illustrates the benefits of a community-academic co-created citizen-science program in addressing the complex problems that arise in communities neighboring a contaminated site. Such a project can increase the community's involvement in risk communication and decision-making, which ultimately has the potential to help mitigate exposure and thereby reduce associated risk. PMID:25954473

  16. Absorbing phase transition in a conserved lattice gas model with next-nearest-neighbor hopping in one dimension.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Bub

    2015-12-01

    The absorbing phase transition of the modified conserved lattice gas (m-CLG) model was investigated in one dimension. The m-CLG model was modified from the conserved lattice gas (CLG) model in such a way that each active particle hops to one of the nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor empty sites. The order parameter exponent, the dynamic exponent, and the correlation length exponent were estimated from the power-law behavior and finite-size scaling of the active particle densities. The exponents were found to differ considerably from those of the ordinary CLG model and were also distinct from those of the Manna model, suggesting that next-nearest-neighbor hopping is a relevant factor that alters the critical behavior in the one-dimensional CLG model. PMID:26764627

  17. A DFT Study on the Dissociation Property of Sulfonic Acids with Different Neighboring Pendants in Polymer Electrolyte Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuan-yuan; Tsuchida, Eiji; Choe, Yoong-Kee; Ikeshoji, Tamio; Ohira, Akihiro

    The proton dissociation property of four model compounds of polymer electrolyte membranes, M1-M4, has been studied based on density functional theory. These four model compounds have the same proton donor group, sulfonic acid, while differ by types of neighboring pendants, non-fluorinated and fluorinated. We find that the protons in the fluorinated model compounds can be dissociated when hydrated by 3 water molecules, comparable to Nafion, while for those non-fluorinated compounds, the protons can be dissociated only hydrated by 4 water molecules. The results indicate that the neighboring pendants have a significant effect on the proton dissociation property of the model compounds. The electron-withdrawing group involved in the neighboring pendants can improve the proton dissociation property of the compounds, which would be meaningful for finding a novel polymer electrolyte membrane with good conductivity.

  18. Magnetic properties of an Ising ferromagnetic model on a square lattice with next-nearest-neighbor and crystal field interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Espriella, N.; Arenas, Abraham J.; Páez Meza, M. S.

    2016-11-01

    We studied an Ising ferromagnet on a bipartite square lattice with nearest-neighbor ferromagnetic exchange couplings between spin values SiA = 2 and σjB = 5 / 2, next-nearest-neighbor exchange couplings between spins, SiA = 2 and an average term of single-ion anisotropy for each lattice site. We carried out Monte Carlo simulations on the planes (D‧ ,kB T‧) and (J2‧ ,kB T‧) to investigate the influence of exchange parameters J2‧ and anisotropy of D‧ lattice on the critical temperature of the system. The thermal behaviors of the sublattice magnetizations, total magnetization and specific heat were investigated. We found that the critical behavior system depends linearly on the next-nearest-neighbor interaction J2‧ and for antiferromagnetic exchange interactions the system undergoes reentrant phenomena.

  19. Quantum signature of discrete breathers in a nonlinear Klein-Gordon lattice with nearest and next-nearest neighbor interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Bing; Li, De-Jun

    2016-05-01

    A theoretical work on quantum breathers in a nonlinear Klein-Gordon lattice model with nearest and next-nearest neighbor interactions is presented. The semiclassical and the full quantum cases are respectively considered. For the semiclassical case, we obtain the analytical solution of discrete breather, and find that the wave number corresponding to the appearance of discrete breather changes when the ratio of the next-nearest- to -nearest - neighbor harmonic force constants is greater than 1/4. For the full quantum case, by calculating the energy spectrum of the system containing two quanta, we prove numerically the existence of quantum breathers (two-quanta bound states) and find the shape of energy spectrum changes dramatically as the value of next -nearest neighbor harmonic force constant increasing.

  20. Development and implementation of the Good Neighbor Agreement (GNA) practice in the USA sustainable mining development.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masaitis, Alexandra

    2014-05-01

    New economic, environmental and social challenges for the mining industry in the USA show the need to implement "responsible" mining practices that include improved community involvement. Conflicts which occur in the US territory and with US mining companies around the world are now common between the mining proponents, NGO's and communities. These conflicts can sometimes be alleviated by early development of modes of communication, and a formal discussion format that allows airing of concerns and potential resolution of problems. One of the methods that can formalize this process is to establish a Good Neighbor Agreement (GNA), which deals specifically with challenges in relationships between mining operations and the local communities. It is a new practice related to mining operations that are oriented toward social needs and concerns of local communities that arise during the normal life of a mine, which can achieve sustainable mining practices. The GNA project being currently developed at the University of Nevada, USA in cooperation with the Newmont Mining Corporation has a goal of creating an open company/community dialog that will help identify and address sociological and environmental concerns associated with mining. Discussion: The Good Neighbor Agreement currently evolving will address the following: 1. Identify spheres of possible cooperation between mining companies, government organizations, and NGO's. 2. Provide an economically viable mechanism for developing a partnership between mining operations and the local communities that will increase mining industry's accountability and provide higher levels of confidence for the community that a mine is operated in a safe and sustainable manner. Implementation of the GNA can help identify and evaluate conflict criteria in mining/community relationships; determine the status of concerns; determine the role and responsibilities of stakeholders; analyze problem resolution feasibility; maintain the community

  1. Queries of nature neighbor objects on UnitsDelaunay structure in spatial database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiatian; Zhao, Renliang; Chen, Jun

    2006-10-01

    In recent years, the research on models of spatial relation computation can be divided into two types: the spatial relation among intersected entities and the spatial relation among the non-intersected entities. Currently, the latter is often used distance, direction and coordinate systems and other methods to study. But these quantitative methods are difficult to sympathize with human natural language understanding and space cognitive habits. Nature neighbor relationship is a vital space relationship. It can answer such questions as "Which hospital are adjacent to the moving object?" "Which schools are adjacent to the McDonald's shop?" In this paper, we analyzed two methods to compute the nature neighbor relationships: Voronoi diagram method and Delaunay triangulation method. We found the main problems for applying these methods to spatial selection are the overall and repetitive calculation. In some basic theory: (i) Define function f in order to distinct different types of triangle. According to the different sources of the nodes, the f is individually equal to 0, 1 and 2. And then the 3×3 matrix C is built on the f. According to the different values of |C|, we can divide the triangles as three types: α, β, γ. (ii) Taking into account that the triangles of type α is not entirely internal concave polygon, we divide the type α into type α and δ on the condition whether the polygon includes the focus of the triangle or not. Then the D(P) composed by Q includes four types of triangles: α, β, γ and δ. (iii) Demonstrate that the space scope of Q in R2 is equal to the space scope of triangle set T of type α in D(P) , reasoned out the complement of Q in R2 is equivalence with the set {Tβ union Tγ union Tδ} and the nature neighbor relationship can only exist in the set {Tβ union Tγ union Tδ}. (iv) For β and γ-type triangle we posed a subset of their sources and demonstrated the certainty in the context of natural subset of the space adjacent to the

  2. Food additives and preschool children.

    PubMed

    Martyn, Danika M; McNulty, Breige A; Nugent, Anne P; Gibney, Michael J

    2013-02-01

    Food additives have been used throughout history to perform specific functions in foods. A comprehensive framework of legislation is in place within Europe to control the use of additives in the food supply and ensure they pose no risk to human health. Further to this, exposure assessments are regularly carried out to monitor population intakes and verify that intakes are not above acceptable levels (acceptable daily intakes). Young children may have a higher dietary exposure to chemicals than adults due to a combination of rapid growth rates and distinct food intake patterns. For this reason, exposure assessments are particularly important in this age group. The paper will review the use of additives and exposure assessment methods and examine factors that affect dietary exposure by young children. One of the most widely investigated unfavourable health effects associated with food additive intake in preschool-aged children are suggested adverse behavioural effects. Research that has examined this relationship has reported a variety of responses, with many noting an increase in hyperactivity as reported by parents but not when assessed using objective examiners. This review has examined the experimental approaches used in such studies and suggests that efforts are needed to standardise objective methods of measuring behaviour in preschool children. Further to this, a more holistic approach to examining food additive intakes by preschool children is advisable, where overall exposure is considered rather than focusing solely on behavioural effects and possibly examining intakes of food additives other than food colours.

  3. A statistical mechanical calculation of the thermodynamic properties of interstitial solid solutions involving second nearest neighbor interactions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alex, K.; Mclellan, R. B.

    1971-01-01

    A previous calculation of the thermodynamic properties of interstitial solid solutions based on the technique of Kirkwood expansions has been extended to include the effects of second nearest neighbor solute atom mutual interactions. The error inherent in the first order (or quasi-chemical) counting of the degeneracy of the solution crystal is avoided. It is shown that, at high temperatures, even strong second nearest neighbor solute mutual interactions have a negligible effect on the entropy of the solution and a small, temperature-dependent effect on the solute partial enthalpy.

  4. Genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms reveal population history and adaptive divergence in wild guppies.

    PubMed

    Willing, Eva-Maria; Bentzen, Paul; van Oosterhout, Cock; Hoffmann, Margarete; Cable, Joanne; Breden, Felix; Weigel, Detlef; Dreyer, Christine

    2010-03-01

    Adaptation of guppies (Poecilia reticulata) to contrasting upland and lowland habitats has been extensively studied with respect to behaviour, morphology and life history traits. Yet population history has not been studied at the whole-genome level. Although single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most abundant form of variation in many genomes and consequently very informative for a genome-wide picture of standing natural variation in populations, genome-wide SNP data are rarely available for wild vertebrates. Here we use genetically mapped SNP markers to comprehensively survey genetic variation within and among naturally occurring guppy populations from a wide geographic range in Trinidad and Venezuela. Results from three different clustering methods, Neighbor-net, principal component analysis (PCA) and Bayesian analysis show that the population substructure agrees with geographic separation and largely with previously hypothesized patterns of historical colonization. Within major drainages (Caroni, Oropouche and Northern), populations are genetically similar, but those in different geographic regions are highly divergent from one another, with some indications of ancient shared polymorphisms. Clear genomic signatures of a previous introduction experiment were seen, and we detected additional potential admixture events. Headwater populations were significantly less heterozygous than downstream populations. Pairwise F(ST) values revealed marked differences in allele frequencies among populations from different regions, and also among populations within the same region. F(ST) outlier methods indicated some regions of the genome as being under directional selection. Overall, this study demonstrates the power of a genome-wide SNP data set to inform for studies on natural variation, adaptation and evolution of wild populations.

  5. [Food additives and healthiness].

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Additives are used for improving food structure or preventing its spoilage, for example. Many substances used as additives are also naturally present in food. The safety of additives is evaluated according to commonly agreed principles. If high concentrations of an additive cause adverse health effects for humans, a limit of acceptable daily intake (ADI) is set for it. An additive is a risk only when ADI is exceeded. The healthiness of food is measured on the basis of nutrient density and scientifically proven effects.

  6. Population genetic study among the Orange Asli (Semai Senoi) of Malaysia: Malayan aborigines.

    PubMed

    Saha, N; Mak, J W; Tay, J S; Liu, Y; Tan, J A; Low, P S; Singh, M

    1995-02-01

    A population genetic study was undertaken to provide gene frequency data on the additional blood genetic markers in the Semai and to estimate the genetic relations between the Semai and their neighboring and linguistically related populations by genetic distance and principal components analyses. Altogether 10 polymorphic and 7 monomorphic blood genetic markers (plasma proteins and red cell enzymes) were studied in a group of 349 Senoi Semai from 11 aboriginal settlements (villages) in the Pahang State of western Malaysia. Both the red cell glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (PGD) loci reveal the presence of polymorphic frequencies of a nondeficient slow allele at the G6PD locus and a fast allele at the PGD locus. The Semai are characterized by high prevalences of ahaptoglobinemia and G6PD deficiency, high frequencies of HP*1, HB*E, RH*R1, ACP*C, GLO1*1, PGM1*2+, and GC*1F and corresponding low frequencies of ABO*A, HbCoSp, HB*B0, TF*D, CHI, and GC*2. Genetic distance analyses by both cluster and principal components models were performed between the Semai and 14 other populations (Malay; Javanese; Khmer; Veddah; Tamils of Malaysia, Sri Lanka, and India; Sinhalese; Oraon; Toda and Irula of India; Chinese; Japanese; Koreans) on the basis of 30 alleles at 7 polymorphic loci. A more detailed analysis using 53 alleles at 13 polymorphic loci with 10 populations was carried out. Both analyses give genetic evidence of a close relationship between the Semai and the Khmer of Cambodia. Furthermore, the Semai are more closely related to the Javanese than to their close neighbors--the Malay, Chinese, and Tamil Indians. There is no evidence for close genetic relationship between the Semai and the Veddah or other Indian tribes. The evidence fits well with the linguistic relationship of the Semai with the Mon-Khmer branch of the Austro-Asiatic language family.

  7. Elastic Strain Energy Storage and Neighboring Organ Assistance for Fluid Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arun, C. P.

    2003-11-01

    Storage of elastic strain energy by non-muscular structures such as tendons and ligaments, is a common scheme employed by jumping animals. Also, since skeletal muscle is attached to bone, mechanical advantage is obtained, allowing a burst of power that is unobtainable by muscle contraction alone. This is important at launch since force may be applied for only the brief period when the legs are in contact with the ground. Liquid propelling structures such as the urinary bladder and the heart face the similar problem of being able to impart force to the content only as long as the wall is in a stretched state. Using data from videocystometry and cardiac catheterisation we show that the means employed to achieve liquid propulsion appears to involve a combination of isometric contraction (contraction against a closed sphincter or valve) with hyperelastic stretch of the wall, elastic strain energy storage by the wall, overshoot past the undistended state and neighboring organ assistance (NOA). Thus, the heart, a partially collapsible thick muscular shell without the benefit of NOA manages an ejection fraction of about 70%. Using all of the above means, the collapsible urinary bladder is able to nearly always empty. Elastic strain energy storage and NOA appear to be important strategies for liquid propulsion employed by hollow viscera.

  8. A graph-based N-body approximation with application to stochastic neighbor embedding.

    PubMed

    Parviainen, Eli

    2016-03-01

    We propose a novel approximation technique, bubble approximation (BA), for repulsion forces in an N-body problem, where attraction has a limited range and repulsion acts between all points. These kinds of systems occur frequently in dimension reduction and graph drawing. Like tree codes, the established N-body approximation method, BA replaces several point-to-point computations by one area-to-point computation. Novelty of BA is to consider not only the magnitudes but also the directions of forces from the area. Therefore, its area-to-point approximations are applicable anywhere in the space. The joint effect of forces from inside the area is calculated analytically, assuming a homogeneous mass of points inside the area. These two features free BA from hierarchical data structures and complicated bookkeeping of interactions, which plague tree codes. Instead, BA uses a simple graph to control the computations. The graph provides a sparse matrix, which, suitably weighted, replaces the full matrix of pairwise comparisons in the N-body problem. As a concrete example, we implement a sparse-matrix version of stochastic neighbor embedding (a dimension reduction method), and demonstrate its good performance by comparisons to full-matrix method, and to three different approximate versions of the same method. PMID:26690681

  9. A graph-based N-body approximation with application to stochastic neighbor embedding.

    PubMed

    Parviainen, Eli

    2016-03-01

    We propose a novel approximation technique, bubble approximation (BA), for repulsion forces in an N-body problem, where attraction has a limited range and repulsion acts between all points. These kinds of systems occur frequently in dimension reduction and graph drawing. Like tree codes, the established N-body approximation method, BA replaces several point-to-point computations by one area-to-point computation. Novelty of BA is to consider not only the magnitudes but also the directions of forces from the area. Therefore, its area-to-point approximations are applicable anywhere in the space. The joint effect of forces from inside the area is calculated analytically, assuming a homogeneous mass of points inside the area. These two features free BA from hierarchical data structures and complicated bookkeeping of interactions, which plague tree codes. Instead, BA uses a simple graph to control the computations. The graph provides a sparse matrix, which, suitably weighted, replaces the full matrix of pairwise comparisons in the N-body problem. As a concrete example, we implement a sparse-matrix version of stochastic neighbor embedding (a dimension reduction method), and demonstrate its good performance by comparisons to full-matrix method, and to three different approximate versions of the same method.

  10. Particle Communication and Domain Neighbor Coupling: Scalable Domain Decomposed Algorithms for Monte Carlo Particle Transport

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, M. J.; Brantley, P. S.

    2015-01-20

    In order to run Monte Carlo particle transport calculations on new supercomputers with hundreds of thousands or millions of processors, care must be taken to implement scalable algorithms. This means that the algorithms must continue to perform well as the processor count increases. In this paper, we examine the scalability of:(1) globally resolving the particle locations on the correct processor, (2) deciding that particle streaming communication has finished, and (3) efficiently coupling neighbor domains together with different replication levels. We have run domain decomposed Monte Carlo particle transport on up to 221 = 2,097,152 MPI processes on the IBM BG/Q Sequoia supercomputer and observed scalable results that agree with our theoretical predictions. These calculations were carefully constructed to have the same amount of work on every processor, i.e. the calculation is already load balanced. We also examine load imbalanced calculations where each domain’s replication level is proportional to its particle workload. In this case we show how to efficiently couple together adjacent domains to maintain within workgroup load balance and minimize memory usage.

  11. Discrimination of two neighboring intra- and intermodal empty time intervals marked by three successive stimuli.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Tsuyoshi; Hasuo, Emi; Labonté, Katherine; Laflamme, Vincent; Grondin, Simon

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the discrimination of two neighboring intra- or inter-modal empty time intervals marked by three successive stimuli. Each of the three markers was a flash (visual-V) or a sound (auditory-A). The first and last markers were of the same modality, while the second one was either A or V, resulting in four conditions: VVV, VAV, AVA and AAA. Participants judged whether the second interval, whose duration was systematically varied, was shorter or longer than the 500-ms first interval. Compared with VVV and AAA, discrimination was impaired with VAV, but not so much with AVA (in Experiment 1). Whereas VAV and AVA consisted of the same set of single intermodal intervals (VA and AV), discrimination was impaired in the VAV compared to the AVA condition. This difference between VAV and AVA could not be attributed to the participants' strategy to perform the discrimination task, e.g., ignoring the standard interval or replacing the visual stimuli with sounds in their mind (in Experiment 2). These results are discussed in terms of sequential grouping according to sensory similarity.

  12. Ising model of cardiac thin filament activation with nearest-neighbor cooperative interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, John Jeremy; Stolovitzky, Gustavo; Tu, Yuhai; de Tombe, Pieter P.; Bers, D. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a model of cardiac thin filament activation using an Ising model approach from equilibrium statistical physics. This model explicitly represents nearest-neighbor interactions between 26 troponin/tropomyosin units along a one-dimensional array that represents the cardiac thin filament. With transition rates chosen to match experimental data, the results show that the resulting force-pCa (F-pCa) relations are similar to Hill functions with asymmetries, as seen in experimental data. Specifically, Hill plots showing (log(F/(1-F)) vs. log [Ca]) reveal a steeper slope below the half activation point (Ca(50)) compared with above. Parameter variation studies show interplay of parameters that affect the apparent cooperativity and asymmetry in the F-pCa relations. The model also predicts that Ca binding is uncooperative for low [Ca], becomes steeper near Ca(50), and becomes uncooperative again at higher [Ca]. The steepness near Ca(50) mirrors the steep F-pCa as a result of thermodynamic considerations. The model also predicts that the correlation between troponin/tropomyosin units along the one-dimensional array quickly decays at high and low [Ca], but near Ca(50), high correlation occurs across the whole array. This work provides a simple model that can account for the steepness and shape of F-pCa relations that other models fail to reproduce.

  13. Resilience of d-wave superconductivity to nearest-neighbor repulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, A. G. R.; Senechal, D.; Bouliane, V.; Tremblay, A.-M. S.

    2014-03-01

    Many theoretical approaches find d-wave superconductivity in the one-band Hubbard model for high-temperature superconductors. At strong-coupling (U >= W , where U is the on-site repulsion and W = 8 t the bandwidth) pairing is controlled by the exchange energy J = 4t2 / U . One may then surmise, ignoring retardation effects, that near-neighbor Coulomb repulsion V will destroy superconductivity when it becomes larger than J, a condition that is easily satisfied in cuprates for example. Using Cellular Dynamical Mean-Field theory with an exact diagonalization solver for the extended Hubbard model, we show that pairing at strong coupling is preserved, even when V >> J , as long as V < U / 2 . While at weak coupling V always reduces the spin fluctuations and hence d-wave pairing, at strong coupling, in the underdoped regime, the increase of J = 4t2 /(U - V) caused by V increases binding at low frequency while the pair-breaking effect of V is pushed to high frequency. These two effects compensate in the underdoped regime, in the presence of a pseudogap. While the pseudogap competes with superconductivity, the proximity to the Mott transition that leads to the pseudogap, and retardation effects, protect d-wave superconductivity from V. PRB 87, 075123 (2013) Supported by NSERC (Canada), CFI (Canada), CIFAR, and the Tier I Canada Research chair Program (A.-M.S.T.). Computational facilities were provided by Compute Canada and Calcul Quebec.

  14. Evidence of codon usage in the nearest neighbor spacing distribution of bases in bacterial genomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higareda, M. F.; Geiger, O.; Mendoza, L.; Méndez-Sánchez, R. A.

    2012-02-01

    Statistical analysis of whole genomic sequences usually assumes a homogeneous nucleotide density throughout the genome, an assumption that has been proved incorrect for several organisms since the nucleotide density is only locally homogeneous. To avoid giving a single numerical value to this variable property, we propose the use of spectral statistics, which characterizes the density of nucleotides as a function of its position in the genome. We show that the cumulative density of bases in bacterial genomes can be separated into an average (or secular) plus a fluctuating part. Bacterial genomes can be divided into two groups according to the qualitative description of their secular part: linear and piecewise linear. These two groups of genomes show different properties when their nucleotide spacing distribution is studied. In order to analyze genomes having a variable nucleotide density, statistically, the use of unfolding is necessary, i.e., to get a separation between the secular part and the fluctuations. The unfolding allows an adequate comparison with the statistical properties of other genomes. With this methodology, four genomes were analyzed Burkholderia, Bacillus, Clostridium and Corynebacterium. Interestingly, the nearest neighbor spacing distributions or detrended distance distributions are very similar for species within the same genus but they are very different for species from different genera. This difference can be attributed to the difference in the codon usage.

  15. Collective Intelligence: Aggregation of Information from Neighbors in a Guessing Game

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Toni; Zamora, Jordi; Eguíluz, Víctor M.

    2016-01-01

    Complex systems show the capacity to aggregate information and to display coordinated activity. In the case of social systems the interaction of different individuals leads to the emergence of norms, trends in political positions, opinions, cultural traits, and even scientific progress. Examples of collective behavior can be observed in activities like the Wikipedia and Linux, where individuals aggregate their knowledge for the benefit of the community, and citizen science, where the potential of collectives to solve complex problems is exploited. Here, we conducted an online experiment to investigate the performance of a collective when solving a guessing problem in which each actor is endowed with partial information and placed as the nodes of an interaction network. We measure the performance of the collective in terms of the temporal evolution of the accuracy, finding no statistical difference in the performance for two classes of networks, regular lattices and random networks. We also determine that a Bayesian description captures the behavior pattern the individuals follow in aggregating information from neighbors to make decisions. In comparison with other simple decision models, the strategy followed by the players reveals a suboptimal performance of the collective. Our contribution provides the basis for the micro-macro connection between individual based descriptions and collective phenomena. PMID:27093274

  16. Testing spatial symmetry using contingency tables based on nearest neighbor relations.

    PubMed

    Ceyhan, Elvan

    2014-01-01

    We consider two types of spatial symmetry, namely, symmetry in the mixed or shared nearest neighbor (NN) structures. We use Pielou's and Dixon's symmetry tests which are defined using contingency tables based on the NN relationships between the data points. We generalize these tests to multiple classes and demonstrate that both the asymptotic and exact versions of Pielou's first type of symmetry test are extremely conservative in rejecting symmetry in the mixed NN structure and hence should be avoided or only the Monte Carlo randomized version should be used. Under RL, we derive the asymptotic distribution for Dixon's symmetry test and also observe that the usual independence test seems to be appropriate for Pielou's second type of test. Moreover, we apply variants of Fisher's exact test on the shared NN contingency table for Pielou's second test and determine the most appropriate version for our setting. We also consider pairwise and one-versus-rest type tests in post hoc analysis after a significant overall symmetry test. We investigate the asymptotic properties of the tests, prove their consistency under appropriate null hypotheses, and investigate finite sample performance of them by extensive Monte Carlo simulations. The methods are illustrated on a real-life ecological data set.

  17. The exon junction complex is required for definition and excision of neighboring introns in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Rippei; Handler, Dominik; Ish-Horowicz, David; Brennecke, Julius

    2014-08-15

    Splicing of pre-mRNAs results in the deposition of the exon junction complex (EJC) upstream of exon-exon boundaries. The EJC plays crucial post-splicing roles in export, translation, localization, and nonsense-mediated decay of mRNAs. It also aids faithful splicing of pre-mRNAs containing large introns, albeit via an unknown mechanism. Here, we show that the core EJC plus the accessory factors RnpS1 and Acinus aid in definition and efficient splicing of neighboring introns. This requires prior deposition of the EJC in close proximity to either an upstream or downstream splicing event. If present in isolation, EJC-dependent introns are splicing-defective also in wild-type cells. Interestingly, the most affected intron belongs to the piwi locus, which explains the reported transposon desilencing in EJC-depleted Drosophila ovaries. Based on a transcriptome-wide analysis, we propose that the dependency of splicing on the EJC is exploited as a means to control the temporal order of splicing events. PMID:25081352

  18. Collective Intelligence: Aggregation of Information from Neighbors in a Guessing Game.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Toni; Zamora, Jordi; Eguíluz, Víctor M

    2016-01-01

    Complex systems show the capacity to aggregate information and to display coordinated activity. In the case of social systems the interaction of different individuals leads to the emergence of norms, trends in political positions, opinions, cultural traits, and even scientific progress. Examples of collective behavior can be observed in activities like the Wikipedia and Linux, where individuals aggregate their knowledge for the benefit of the community, and citizen science, where the potential of collectives to solve complex problems is exploited. Here, we conducted an online experiment to investigate the performance of a collective when solving a guessing problem in which each actor is endowed with partial information and placed as the nodes of an interaction network. We measure the performance of the collective in terms of the temporal evolution of the accuracy, finding no statistical difference in the performance for two classes of networks, regular lattices and random networks. We also determine that a Bayesian description captures the behavior pattern the individuals follow in aggregating information from neighbors to make decisions. In comparison with other simple decision models, the strategy followed by the players reveals a suboptimal performance of the collective. Our contribution provides the basis for the micro-macro connection between individual based descriptions and collective phenomena. PMID:27093274

  19. The exon junction complex is required for definition and excision of neighboring introns in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Rippei; Handler, Dominik; Ish-Horowicz, David

    2014-01-01

    Splicing of pre-mRNAs results in the deposition of the exon junction complex (EJC) upstream of exon–exon boundaries. The EJC plays crucial post-splicing roles in export, translation, localization, and nonsense-mediated decay of mRNAs. It also aids faithful splicing of pre-mRNAs containing large introns, albeit via an unknown mechanism. Here, we show that the core EJC plus the accessory factors RnpS1 and Acinus aid in definition and efficient splicing of neighboring introns. This requires prior deposition of the EJC in close proximity to either an upstream or downstream splicing event. If present in isolation, EJC-dependent introns are splicing-defective also in wild-type cells. Interestingly, the most affected intron belongs to the piwi locus, which explains the reported transposon desilencing in EJC-depleted Drosophila ovaries. Based on a transcriptome-wide analysis, we propose that the dependency of splicing on the EJC is exploited as a means to control the temporal order of splicing events. PMID:25081352

  20. Number of Sialic Acid Residues in Ganglioside Headgroup Affects Interactions with Neighboring Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Shelli L.; Lee, Ka Yee C.

    2013-01-01

    Monolayers of binary mixtures of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and asialo-(GA1), disialo-(GD1b) and trisialo-(GT1b) gangliosides were used to determine the effect of ganglioside headgroup charge and geometry on its interactions with the neighboring zwitterionic lipid. Surface pressure versus molecular area isotherm measurements along with concurrent fluorescence microscopy of the monolayers at the air-water interface were complemented with atomic force microscopy imaging of monolayers deposited on solid substrates. Results were used to further develop a proposed geometric packing model that the complementary geometry of DPPC and monosialoganglioside GM1 headgroups affects their close molecular packing, inducing condensation of the layer at small mol % of ganglioside. For GA1, GD1b, and GT1b, a similar condensing effect, followed by a fluidizing effect is seen that varies with glycosphingolipid concentration, but results do not directly follow from geometric arguments because less DPPC is needed to condense ganglioside molecules with larger cross-sectional areas. The variations in critical packing mole ratios can be explained by global effects of headgroup charge and resultant dipole moments within the monolayer. Atomic force microscopy micrographs further support the model of ganglioside-induced DPPC condensation with condensed domains composed of a striped phase of condensed DPPC and DPPC/ganglioside geometrically packed complexes at low concentrations. PMID:24047994

  1. Number of sialic acid residues in ganglioside headgroup affects interactions with neighboring lipids.

    PubMed

    Frey, Shelli L; Lee, Ka Yee C

    2013-09-17

    Monolayers of binary mixtures of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and asialo-(GA1), disialo-(GD1b) and trisialo-(GT1b) gangliosides were used to determine the effect of ganglioside headgroup charge and geometry on its interactions with the neighboring zwitterionic lipid. Surface pressure versus molecular area isotherm measurements along with concurrent fluorescence microscopy of the monolayers at the air-water interface were complemented with atomic force microscopy imaging of monolayers deposited on solid substrates. Results were used to further develop a proposed geometric packing model that the complementary geometry of DPPC and monosialoganglioside GM1 headgroups affects their close molecular packing, inducing condensation of the layer at small mol % of ganglioside. For GA1, GD1b, and GT1b, a similar condensing effect, followed by a fluidizing effect is seen that varies with glycosphingolipid concentration, but results do not directly follow from geometric arguments because less DPPC is needed to condense ganglioside molecules with larger cross-sectional areas. The variations in critical packing mole ratios can be explained by global effects of headgroup charge and resultant dipole moments within the monolayer. Atomic force microscopy micrographs further support the model of ganglioside-induced DPPC condensation with condensed domains composed of a striped phase of condensed DPPC and DPPC/ganglioside geometrically packed complexes at low concentrations. PMID:24047994

  2. Magnetization reversal in magnetic dot arrays: Nearest-neighbor interactions and global configurational anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van de Wiele, Ben; Fin, Samuele; Pancaldi, Matteo; Vavassori, Paolo; Sarella, Anandakumar; Bisero, Diego

    2016-05-01

    Various proposals for future magnetic memories, data processing devices, and sensors rely on a precise control of the magnetization ground state and magnetization reversal process in periodically patterned media. In finite dot arrays, such control is hampered by the magnetostatic interactions between the nanomagnets, leading to the non-uniform magnetization state distributions throughout the sample while reversing. In this paper, we evidence how during reversal typical geometric arrangements of dots in an identical magnetization state appear that originate in the dominance of either Global Configurational Anisotropy or Nearest-Neighbor Magnetostatic interactions, which depends on the fields at which the magnetization reversal sets in. Based on our findings, we propose design rules to obtain the uniform magnetization state distributions throughout the array, and also suggest future research directions to achieve non-uniform state distributions of interest, e.g., when aiming at guiding spin wave edge-modes through dot arrays. Our insights are based on the Magneto-Optical Kerr Effect and Magnetic Force Microscopy measurements as well as the extensive micromagnetic simulations.

  3. K-D Decision Tree: An Accelerated and Memory Efficient Nearest Neighbor Classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Tomoyuki; Wada, Toshikazu

    This paper presents a novel algorithm for Nearest Neighbor (NN) classifier. NN classification is a well-known method of pattern classification having the following properties: * it performs maximum-margin classification and achieves less than twice the ideal Bayesian error, * it does not require knowledge of pattern distributions, kernel functions or base classifiers, and * it can naturally be applied to multiclass classification problems. Among the drawbacks are A) inefficient memory use and B) ineffective pattern classification speed. This paper deals with the problems A and B. In most cases, NN search algorithms, such as k-d tree, are employed as a pattern search engine of the NN classifier. However, NN classification does not always require the NN search. Based on this idea, we propose a novel algorithm named k-d decision tree (KDDT). Since KDDT uses Voronoi-condensed prototypes, it consumes less memory than naive NN classifiers. We have confirmed that KDDT is much faster than NN search-based classifier through a comparative experiment (from 9 to 369 times faster than NN search based classifier). Furthermore, in order to extend applicability of the KDDT algorithm to high-dimensional NN classification, we modified it by incorporating Gabriel editing or RNG editing instead of Voronoi condensing. Through experiments using simulated and real data, we have confirmed the modified KDDT algorithms are superior to the original one.

  4. Microbead-based biomimetic synthetic neighbors enhance survival and function of rat pancreatic β-cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Lee, Samuel; Ma, Minglin; Kim, Soo Min; Guye, Patrick; Pancoast, James R.; Anderson, Daniel G.; Weiss, Ron; Lee, Richard T.; Hammond, Paula T.

    2013-10-01

    Diabetes is caused by the loss or dysfunction of insulin-secreting β-cells in the pancreas. β-cells reduce their mass and lose insulin-producing ability in vitro, likely due to insufficient cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions as β-cells lose their native microenvironment. Herein, we built an ex-vivo cell microenvironment by culturing primary β-cells in direct contact with `synthetic neighbors', cell-sized soft polymer microbeads that were modified with cell-cell signaling factors as well as components from pancreatic-tissue-specific ECMs. This biomimetic 3D microenvironment was able to promote native cell-cell and cell-ECM interactions. We obtained sustained maintenance of β-cell function in vitro enhanced cell viability from the few days usually observed in 2D culture to periods exceeding three weeks, with enhanced β-cell stability and insulin production. Our approach can be extended to create a general 3D culture platform for other cell types.

  5. Know Thy Neighbor: Costly Information Can Hurt Cooperation in Dynamic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Antonioni, Alberto; Cacault, Maria Paula; Lalive, Rafael; Tomassini, Marco

    2014-01-01

    People need to rely on cooperation with other individuals in many aspects of everyday life, such as teamwork and economic exchange in anonymous markets. We study whether and how the ability to make or break links in social networks fosters cooperate, paying particular attention to whether information on an individual's actions is freely available to potential partners. Studying the role of information is relevant as information on other people's actions is often not available for free: a recruiting firm may need to call a job candidate's references, a bank may need to find out about the credit history of a new client, etc. We find that people cooperate almost fully when information on their actions is freely available to their potential partners. Cooperation is less likely, however, if people have to pay about half of what they gain from cooperating with a cooperator. Cooperation declines even further if people have to pay a cost that is almost equivalent to the gain from cooperating with a cooperator. Thus, costly information on potential neighbors' actions can undermine the incentive to cooperate in fluid networks. PMID:25356905

  6. Polypeptide motions are dominated by peptide group oscillations resulting from dihedral angle correlations between nearest neighbors.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, James E; Jha, Abhishek K; Sosnick, Tobin R; Freed, Karl F

    2007-01-23

    To identify basic local backbone motions in unfolded chains, simulations are performed for a variety of peptide systems using three popular force fields and for implicit and explicit solvent models. A dominant "crankshaft-like" motion is found that involves only a localized oscillation of the plane of the peptide group. This motion results in a strong anticorrelated motion of the phi angle of the ith residue (phi(i)) and the psi angle of the residue i - 1 (psi(i-1)) on the 0.1 ps time scale. Only a slight correlation is found between the motions of the two backbone dihedral angles of the same residue. Aside from the special cases of glycine and proline, no correlations are found between backbone dihedral angles that are separated by more than one torsion angle. These short time, correlated motions are found both in equilibrium fluctuations and during the transit process between Ramachandran basins, e.g., from the beta to the alpha region. A residue's complete transit from one Ramachandran basin to another, however, occurs in a manner independent of its neighbors' conformational transitions. These properties appear to be intrinsic because they are robust across different force fields, solvent models, nonbonded interaction routines, and most amino acids. PMID:17223689

  7. Seismic hazard of American Samoa and neighboring South Pacific Islands--methods, data, parameters, and results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, Mark D.; Harmsen, Stephen C.; Rukstales, Kenneth S.; Mueller, Charles S.; McNamara, Daniel E.; Luco, Nicolas; Walling, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    American Samoa and the neighboring islands of the South Pacific lie near active tectonic-plate boundaries that host many large earthquakes which can result in strong earthquake shaking and tsunamis. To mitigate earthquake risks from future ground shaking, the Federal Emergency Management Agency requested that the U.S. Geological Survey prepare seismic hazard maps that can be applied in building-design criteria. This Open-File Report describes the data, methods, and parameters used to calculate the seismic shaking hazard as well as the output hazard maps, curves, and deaggregation (disaggregation) information needed for building design. Spectral acceleration hazard for 1 Hertz having a 2-percent probability of exceedance on a firm rock site condition (Vs30=760 meters per second) is 0.12 acceleration of gravity (1 second, 1 Hertz) and 0.32 acceleration of gravity (0.2 seconds, 5 Hertz) on American Samoa, 0.72 acceleration of gravity (1 Hertz) and 2.54 acceleration of gravity (5 Hertz) on Tonga, 0.15 acceleration of gravity (1 Hertz) and 0.55 acceleration of gravity (5 Hertz) on Fiji, and 0.89 acceleration of gravity (1 Hertz) and 2.77 acceleration of gravity (5 Hertz) on the Vanuatu Islands.

  8. Conflict in Neighboring Countries, a Great Risk for Malaria Elimination in Southwestern Iran: Narrative Review Article.

    PubMed

    Molaee Zadeh, Maryam; Shahandeh, Khandan; Bigdeli, Shahla; Basseri, Hamid Reza

    2014-12-01

    The intensity of the conflict such as war is one of the determinants of the flow of migrants and refuges with consequence of introducing infectious disease to other countries. This paper investigates the relationship between malaria incidence and forced immigration due to war from neighboring countries in Dezful district, southwestern Iran. All available data and accessible archived documentary records on malaria cases in the period 1988-2011 in Dezful Health Centers were reviewed. Retrospective analysis of routine surveillance data from the Health authority of Dezful district was conducted to assess the trend of malaria incidence and prevalence in the last two decades. Malaria transmission dynamics was described using surveillance indicators viz, Annual Parasite Incidence (API), Slide Positivity Rate (SPR), Annual Blood Examination Rate (ABER) and based on personal information of patients. Two peaks of malaria incidence occurred during past two decades. The first one arisen by Iran-Iraq war due to residential instability in Dezful while the API reached to 8 per 1000. The second peak happened after to civil war of Afghanistan began which caused large immigrates moved into the study area. During the second peak, API reached 1.7 per 1000 at maximum and the majority of patients were immigrants. This study describes the linkage between incidence and prevalence of malaria and immigration due to civil conflict. Therefore, malaria screening of immigrants and early warning programme are effective to prevent outbreak of disease in a potential risk area such Dezful. PMID:26171354

  9. Effects of neighboring vascular plants on the abundance of bryophytes in different vegetation types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jägerbrand, Annika K.; Kudo, Gaku; Alatalo, Juha M.; Molau, Ulf

    2012-07-01

    Due to the climate change, vegetation of tundra ecosystems is predicted to shift toward shrub and tree dominance, and this change may influence bryophytes. To estimate how changes in growing environment and the dominance of vascular plants influence bryophyte abundance, we compared the relationship of occurrence of bryophytes among other plant types in a five-year experiment of warming (T), fertilization (F) and T + F in two vegetation types, heath and meadow, in a subarctic-alpine ecosystem. We compared individual leaf area among shrub species to confirm that deciduous shrubs might cause severe shading effect. Effects of neighboring functional types on the performance of Hylocomium splendens was also analyzed. Results show that F and T + F treatments significantly influenced bryophyte abundance negatively. Under natural conditions, bryophytes in the heath site were negatively related to the abundance of shrubs and lichens and the relationship between lichens and bryophytes strengthened after the experimental period. After five years of experimental treatments in the meadow, a positive abundance relationship emerged between bryophytes and deciduous shrubs, evergreen shrubs and forbs. This relationship was not found in the heath site. Our study therefore shows that the abundance relationships between bryophytes and plants in two vegetation types within the same area can be different. Deciduous shrubs had larger leaf area than evergreen shrubs but did not show any shading effect on H. splendens.

  10. Enhancing the effectiveness of virtual screening by fusing nearest neighbor lists: a comparison of similarity coefficients.

    PubMed

    Whittle, Martin; Gillet, Valerie J; Willett, Peter; Alex, Alexander; Loesel, Jens

    2004-01-01

    This paper evaluates the effectiveness of various similarity coefficients for 2D similarity searching when multiple bioactive target structures are available. Similarity searches using several different activity classes within the MDL Drug Data Report and the Dictionary of Natural Products databases are performed using BCI 2D fingerprints. Using data fusion techniques to combine the resulting nearest neighbor lists we obtain group recall results which, in many cases, are a considerable improvement on standard average recall values obtained for individual structures. It is shown that the degree of improvement can be related to the structural diversity of the activity class that is searched for, the best results being found for the most diverse groups. The group recall of active compounds using subsets of the class is also investigated: for highly self-similar activity classes, the group recall improvement saturates well before the full activity class size is reached. A rough correlation is found between the relative improvement using the group recall and the square of the number of unique compounds available in all of the merged lists. The Tanimoto coefficient is found unambiguously to be the best coefficient to use for the recovery of active compounds using multiple targets. Furthermore, when using the Tanimoto coefficient, the "MAX" fusion rule is found to be more effective than the "SUM" rule for the combination of similarity searches from multiple targets. The use of group recall can lead to improved enrichment in database searches and virtual screening.

  11. Super-Enhancers at the Nanog Locus Differentially Regulate Neighboring Pluripotency-Associated Genes.

    PubMed

    Blinka, Steven; Reimer, Michael H; Pulakanti, Kirthi; Rao, Sridhar

    2016-09-27

    Super-enhancers are tissue-specific cis-regulatory elements that drive expression of genes associated with cell identity and malignancy. A cardinal feature of super-enhancers is that they are transcribed to produce enhancer-derived RNAs (eRNAs). It remains unclear whether super-enhancers robustly activate genes in situ and whether their functions are attributable to eRNAs or the DNA element. CRISPR/Cas9 was used to systematically delete three discrete super-enhancers at the Nanog locus in embryonic stem cells, revealing functional differences in Nanog transcriptional regulation. One distal super-enhancer 45 kb upstream of Nanog (-45 enhancer) regulates both nearest neighbor genes, Nanog and Dppa3. Interestingly, eRNAs produced at the -45 enhancer specifically regulate Dppa3 expression by stabilizing looping of the -45 enhancer and Dppa3. Our work illustrates that genomic editing is required to determine enhancer function and points to a method to selectively target a subset of super-enhancer-regulated genes by depleting eRNAs. PMID:27681417

  12. Nearest-neighbor nonparametric method for estimating the configurational entropy of complex molecules.

    PubMed

    Hnizdo, Vladimir; Darian, Eva; Fedorowicz, Adam; Demchuk, Eugene; Li, Shengqiao; Singh, Harshinder

    2007-02-01

    A method for estimating the configurational (i.e., non-kinetic) part of the entropy of internal motion in complex molecules is introduced that does not assume any particular parametric form for the underlying probability density function. It is based on the nearest-neighbor (NN) distances of the points of a sample of internal molecular coordinates obtained by a computer simulation of a given molecule. As the method does not make any assumptions about the underlying potential energy function, it accounts fully for any anharmonicity of internal molecular motion. It provides an asymptotically unbiased and consistent estimate of the configurational part of the entropy of the internal degrees of freedom of the molecule. The NN method is illustrated by estimating the configurational entropy of internal rotation of capsaicin and two stereoisomers of tartaric acid, and by providing a much closer upper bound on the configurational entropy of internal rotation of a pentapeptide molecule than that obtained by the standard quasi-harmonic method. As a measure of dependence between any two internal molecular coordinates, a general coefficient of association based on the information-theoretic quantity of mutual information is proposed. Using NN estimates of this measure, statistical clustering procedures can be employed to group the coordinates into clusters of manageable dimensions and characterized by minimal dependence between coordinates belonging to different clusters.

  13. C-GRAAL: common-neighbors-based global GRAph ALignment of biological networks.

    PubMed

    Memišević, Vesna; Pržulj, Nataša

    2012-07-01

    Networks are an invaluable framework for modeling biological systems. Analyzing protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks can provide insight into underlying cellular processes. It is expected that comparison and alignment of biological networks will have a similar impact on our understanding of evolution, biological function, and disease as did sequence comparison and alignment. Here, we introduce a novel pairwise global alignment algorithm called Common-neighbors based GRAph ALigner (C-GRAAL) that uses heuristics for maximizing the number of aligned edges between two networks and is based solely on network topology. As such, it can be applied to any type of network, such as social, transportation, or electrical networks. We apply C-GRAAL to align PPI networks of eukaryotic and prokaryotic species, as well as inter-species PPI networks, and we demonstrate that the resulting alignments expose large connected and functionally topologically aligned regions. We use the resulting alignments to transfer biological knowledge across species, successfully validating many of the predictions. Moreover, we show that C-GRAAL can be used to align human-pathogen inter-species PPI networks and that it can identify patterns of pathogen interactions with host proteins solely from network topology.

  14. The cost of defeat: Capuchin groups travel further, faster and later after losing conflicts with neighbors.

    PubMed

    Crofoot, Margaret C

    2013-09-01

    Although competition between social groups is central to hypotheses about the evolution of human social organization, competitive interactions among group-mates are thought to play a more dominant role in shaping the behavior and ecology of other primate species. However, few studies have directly tested the impact of intergroup conflicts in non-human primates. What is the cost of defeat? To address this question, the movements of six neighboring white-faced capuchin (Cebus capucinus) social groups living on Barro Colorado Island, Panama were tracked simultaneously using an Automated Radio Telemetry System (ARTS), for a period of six months. Groups moved 13% (441 m) further on days they lost interactions compared with days they won interactions. To cover these larger distances, they traveled faster, stopped less frequently, and remained active later in the evening. Defeat also caused groups to alter their patterns of space use. Losing groups had straighter travel paths than winning groups, larger net displacements and were more likely to change their sleeping site. These results demonstrate that losing groups pay increased travel costs and suggest that they forage in low-quality areas. They provide some of the first direct evidence that intergroup conflicts have important energetic consequences for members of competitively unsuccessful primate social groups. A better understanding of how intergroup competition impacts patterns of individual fitness is thus needed to clarify the role that this group-level process plays in shaping the evolution of human- and non-human primate behavior.

  15. Collective Intelligence: Aggregation of Information from Neighbors in a Guessing Game.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Toni; Zamora, Jordi; Eguíluz, Víctor M

    2016-01-01

    Complex systems show the capacity to aggregate information and to display coordinated activity. In the case of social systems the interaction of different individuals leads to the emergence of norms, trends in political positions, opinions, cultural traits, and even scientific progress. Examples of collective behavior can be observed in activities like the Wikipedia and Linux, where individuals aggregate their knowledge for the benefit of the community, and citizen science, where the potential of collectives to solve complex problems is exploited. Here, we conducted an online experiment to investigate the performance of a collective when solving a guessing problem in which each actor is endowed with partial information and placed as the nodes of an interaction network. We measure the performance of the collective in terms of the temporal evolution of the accuracy, finding no statistical difference in the performance for two classes of networks, regular lattices and random networks. We also determine that a Bayesian description captures the behavior pattern the individuals follow in aggregating information from neighbors to make decisions. In comparison with other simple decision models, the strategy followed by the players reveals a suboptimal performance of the collective. Our contribution provides the basis for the micro-macro connection between individual based descriptions and collective phenomena.

  16. The exon junction complex is required for definition and excision of neighboring introns in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Rippei; Handler, Dominik; Ish-Horowicz, David; Brennecke, Julius

    2014-08-15

    Splicing of pre-mRNAs results in the deposition of the exon junction complex (EJC) upstream of exon-exon boundaries. The EJC plays crucial post-splicing roles in export, translation, localization, and nonsense-mediated decay of mRNAs. It also aids faithful splicing of pre-mRNAs containing large introns, albeit via an unknown mechanism. Here, we show that the core EJC plus the accessory factors RnpS1 and Acinus aid in definition and efficient splicing of neighboring introns. This requires prior deposition of the EJC in close proximity to either an upstream or downstream splicing event. If present in isolation, EJC-dependent introns are splicing-defective also in wild-type cells. Interestingly, the most affected intron belongs to the piwi locus, which explains the reported transposon desilencing in EJC-depleted Drosophila ovaries. Based on a transcriptome-wide analysis, we propose that the dependency of splicing on the EJC is exploited as a means to control the temporal order of splicing events.

  17. Export of microRNAs: A Bridge between Breast Carcinoma and Their Neighboring Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jahagirdar, Devashree; Purohit, Shruti; Jain, Aayushi; Sharma, Nilesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a leading type of cancer among women in India as well as worldwide. According to the WHO 2015 report, it has been anticipated that there would be a twofold rise in the death due to breast cancer among women. The heterogeneous property of breast carcinoma has been suggested to be linked with dedicated set of communication and signaling pathway with their surroundings, which culminate into progression and development of the cancer. Among the plethora of communication tools in the hand of breast carcinoma cells is the recently appreciated exocytosis of the tightly packed short non-coding RNA molecules, predominantly the microRNAs (miRNAs). Recent studies suggest that miRNAs may work as courier messengers to participate in endocrine and paracrine signaling to facilitate information transfer between breast carcinoma and their neighboring cells. Evidence suggests that breast tumor cells communicate via packaged miRNAs in the tumor-released microvesicles, which enrich the tumor microenvironment. There is a strong view that dissecting out the mechanistic and regulatory aspects of miRNA export and role may uncover many prospects for overcoming the signaling defects and thereby controlling aberrant cell division. The detection of circulating miRNAs associated with breast carcinoma can also be used as biomarkers for early diagnosis. This review article is an attempt to provide updated knowledge on implications of short RNAs and their transport in the breast cancer pathophysiology. PMID:27379209

  18. RESPONSE PROPERTIES OF LOCAL FIELD POTENTIALS AND NEIGHBORING SINGLE NEURONS IN AWAKE PRIMARY VISUAL CORTEX

    PubMed Central

    Lashgari, Reza; Li, Xiaobing; Chen, Yao; Kremkow, Jens; Bereshpolova, Yulia; Swadlow, Harvey A.; Alonso, Jose M.

    2012-01-01

    Recordings from local field potentials (LFPs) are becoming increasingly common in research and clinical applications, however, we still have a poor understanding of how LFP stimulus selectivity originates from the combined activity of single neurons. Here, we systematically compared the stimulus selectivity of LFP and neighboring single unit activity (SUA) recorded in area V1 of awake primates. We demonstrate that LFP and SUA have similar stimulus preferences for orientation, direction of motion, contrast, size, temporal frequency and even spatial phase. However, the average SUA had 50 times better signal to noise, 20% higher contrast sensitivity, 45% higher direction selectivity and 15% more tuning depth than the average LFP. Low LFP frequencies (< 30 Hz) were most strongly correlated with the spiking frequencies of neurons with non-linear spatial summation and poor orientation/direction selectivity that were located near cortical current sinks (negative LFPs). In contrast, LFP gamma frequencies (> 30 Hz) were correlated with a more diverse group of neurons located near cortical sources (positive LFPs). In summary, our results indicate that low- and high-frequency LFP pools signals from V1 neurons with similar stimulus preferences but different response properties and cortical depths. PMID:22895722

  19. Nearest neighbor density ratio estimation for large-scale applications in astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremer, J.; Gieseke, F.; Steenstrup Pedersen, K.; Igel, C.

    2015-09-01

    In astronomical applications of machine learning, the distribution of objects used for building a model is often different from the distribution of the objects the model is later applied to. This is known as sample selection bias, which is a major challenge for statistical inference as one can no longer assume that the labeled training data are representative. To address this issue, one can re-weight the labeled training patterns to match the distribution of unlabeled data that are available already in the training phase. There are many examples in practice where this strategy yielded good results, but estimating the weights reliably from a finite sample is challenging. We consider an efficient nearest neighbor density ratio estimator that can exploit large samples to increase the accuracy of the weight estimates. To solve the problem of choosing the right neighborhood size, we propose to use cross-validation on a model selection criterion that is unbiased under covariate shift. The resulting algorithm is our method of choice for density ratio estimation when the feature space dimensionality is small and sample sizes are large. The approach is simple and, because of the model selection, robust. We empirically find that it is on a par with established kernel-based methods on relatively small regression benchmark datasets. However, when applied to large-scale photometric redshift estimation, our approach outperforms the state-of-the-art.

  20. Nearest-neighbor-interactions from a minimal discrete flavor symmetry within SU(5) grand unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmanuel-Costa, D.; Simões, C.

    2012-01-01

    A flavor symmetry based on Z4 is analyzed in the context of SU(5) Grand Unification with the standard fermionic content plus three right-handed neutrinos. The role of Z4 is to forbid some Yukawa couplings of up- and down-quarks to Higgs scalars such that the quark mass matrices Mu, Md have Nearest-Neighbor-Interaction (NNI) structure, once they are generated through the electroweak symmetry breaking. It turns out in this framework that Z4 is indeed the minimal discrete symmetry and its implementation requires the introduction of at least two Higgs quintets, which leads to a two Higgs doublet model at low energy scale. Because of the SU(5) unification, it is shown that the charged lepton mass matrix develops also NNI form. However, the effective neutrino mass matrix exhibits a nonparallel pattern, in the framework of the type-I seesaw mechanism. Analyzing all possible zero textures allowed by gauge-horizontal symmetry SU(5)×Z4, it is seen that only two patterns are in agreement with the leptonic experimental data and they could be further distinguished by the light neutrino mass spectrum hierarchy. It is also demonstrated that Z4 freezes out the possibility of proton decay through exchange of color Higgs triplets at tree-level.

  1. A Context-Aware Mobile User Behavior-Based Neighbor Finding Approach for Preference Profile Construction.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qian; Fu, Deqian; Dong, Xiangjun

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a new approach is adopted to update the user preference profile by seeking users with similar interests based on the context obtainable for a mobile network instead of from desktop networks. The trust degree between mobile users is calculated by analyzing their behavior based on the context, and then the approximate neighbors are chosen by combining the similarity of the mobile user preference and the trust degree. The approach first considers the communication behaviors between mobile users, the mobile network services they use as well as the corresponding context information. Then a similarity degree of the preference between users is calculated with the evaluation score of a certain mobile web service provided by a mobile user. Finally, based on the time attenuation function, the users with similar preference are found, through which we can dynamically update the target user's preference profile. Experiments are then conducted to test the effect of the context on the credibility among mobile users, the effect of time decay factors and trust degree thresholds. Simulation shows that the proposed approach outperforms two other methods in terms of Recall Ratio, Precision Ratio and Mean Absolute Error, because neither of them consider the context mobile information. PMID:26805852

  2. Population and environment: an Australian challenge.

    PubMed

    Short, R V

    1992-07-01

    The latest UN population projections are cause both for hope and for despair. If effective family planning programs could be implemented without delay in those areas of the world where contraceptives are used by only a minority of the population, then the global population might increase by a mere 2.4 billion people by 2050, and thereafter would decline to 6.4 billion by the end of the next century. A more realistic projection is that numbers will increase to 11.2 billion by the year 2100. But if the issue is ignored, then there will be a global population of 17.6 billion by the century's end. The recent immigration debate and the Government Report on Population Issues and Australia's Future published in early 1992 could be taken as a starting point, even though there is no suggestion in the report that Australia should ever aim to stabilize its own population. The committee was strongly of the view that immigration was an ineffective and inappropriate tool to reduce mass population pressures in other parts of the world. Clearly Australia cannot act as a safety valve for the population excesses in the rest of the world. Even without immigration the present population of 17 million will grow by about another 2 million over the next 40 years as a result of natural increase. If the current level of about 111,000 migrants a year is maintained, Australia's population will grow to 25 million by 2031. The solution is to transfer some of the defense budget to the Australian International Development Assistance Bureau and provide Asian neighbors, whose family planning programs are starved of support, with the weapons they need to fight the population battle. The Population Issues Committee itself recognized that there was a clear need for Australia to develop an enhanced foreign aid program to support family planning services. By doing so Australia would earn the lasting gratitude of Asian neighbors.

  3. A dynamic population of stromal cells contributes to the follicle stem cell niche in the Drosophila ovary

    PubMed Central

    Sahai-Hernandez, Pankaj; Nystul, Todd G.

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial stem cells are maintained within niches that promote self-renewal by providing signals that specify the stem cell fate. In the Drosophila ovary, epithelial follicle stem cells (FSCs) reside in niches at the anterior tip of the tissue and support continuous growth of the ovarian follicle epithelium. Here, we demonstrate that a neighboring dynamic population of stromal cells, called escort cells, are FSC niche cells. We show that escort cells produce both Wingless and Hedgehog ligands for the FSC lineage, and that Wingless signaling is specific for the FSC niche whereas Hedgehog signaling is active in both FSCs and daughter cells. In addition, we show that multiple escort cells simultaneously encapsulate germ cell cysts and contact FSCs. Thus, FSCs are maintained in a dynamic niche by a non-dedicated population of niche cells. PMID:24131631

  4. A range of complex probabilistic models for RNA secondary structure prediction that includes the nearest-neighbor model and more.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Elena; Lang, Raymond; Eddy, Sean R

    2012-02-01

    The standard approach for single-sequence RNA secondary structure prediction uses a nearest-neighbor thermodynamic model with several thousand experimentally determined energy parameters. An attractive alternative is to use statistical approaches with parameters estimated from growing databases of structural RNAs. Good results have been reported for discriminative statistical methods using complex nearest-neighbor models, including CONTRAfold, Simfold, and ContextFold. Little work has been reported on generative probabilistic models (stochastic context-free grammars [SCFGs]) of comparable complexity, although probabilistic models are generally easier to train and to use. To explore a range of probabilistic models of increasing complexity, and to directly compare probabilistic, thermodynamic, and discriminative approaches, we created TORNADO, a computational tool that can parse a wide spectrum of RNA grammar architectures (including the standard nearest-neighbor model and more) using a generalized super-grammar that can be parameterized with probabilities, energies, or arbitrary scores. By using TORNADO, we find that probabilistic nearest-neighbor models perform comparably to (but not significantly better than) discriminative methods. We find that complex statistical models are prone to overfitting RNA structure and that evaluations should use structurally nonhomologous training and test data sets. Overfitting has affected at least one published method (ContextFold). The most important barrier to improving statistical approaches for RNA secondary structure prediction is the lack of diversity of well-curated single-sequence RNA secondary structures in current RNA databases. PMID:22194308

  5. So Close, and yet so Far: Cross-Racial Interactions among Undergraduate Students in Two Neighboring Borderland Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Monica F.; Prentice, Mary; Valentine, Kathryn; Arellano, Eduardo C.; Dankovich, Robin L.

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses two studies on the extent and nature of cross-racial interactions (CRIs) among undergraduate students from two neighboring US-Mexico borderland communities. Of the four participating higher education institutions, two were adjacent to the US-Mexico borderline, while the other two were 45 miles away from the borderline. One…

  6. The role of on-site and nearest-neighbor interactions in the correlated two-particles quantum walk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peixoto, A. S.; Dias, W. S.

    2016-09-01

    We study the influence of the on-site and nearest-neighbor interactions on the eigenstates and dynamics of two-particles restricted to move in a one-dimensional optical lattice. An effective tight-binding approach with non-local interactions is employed in order to consider the non-perfect screening of the coulomb interaction between two-particles. Numerical and analytical results unveil the emergence of a new sub-band of bound states due to the nearest-neighbor interaction, besides a broadening of the usual sub-band associated with the hubbard-like on-site coupling. Furthermore, we solve the time-dependent schrodinger equation to follow the time evolution of an initially localized two-particles state. While the on-site interaction is responsible for a correlated dynamics in which particles occupy predominantly the same site, nearest-neighbor interactions is shown to be able to induce a quantum walk on which the particles remain predominantly in neighboring sites.

  7. Competition and cooperation among similar representations: toward a unified account of facilitative and inhibitory effects of lexical neighbors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qi; Mirman, Daniel

    2012-04-01

    One of the core principles of how the mind works is the graded, parallel activation of multiple related or similar representations. Parallel activation of multiple representations has been particularly important in the development of theories and models of language processing, where coactivated representations (neighbors) have been shown to exhibit both facilitative and inhibitory effects on word recognition and production. Researchers generally ascribe these effects to interactive activation and competition, but there is no unified explanation for why the effects are facilitative in some cases and inhibitory in others. We present a series of simulations of a simple domain-general interactive activation and competition model that is broadly consistent with more specialized domain-specific models of lexical processing. The results showed that interactive activation and competition can indeed account for the complex pattern of reversals. Critically, the simulations revealed a core computational principle that determines whether neighbor effects are facilitative or inhibitory: strongly active neighbors exert a net inhibitory effect, and weakly active neighbors exert a net facilitative effect.

  8. Income Replacement and Reemployment Programs in Michigan and Neighboring States. W.E. Upjohn Institute Staff Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodbury, Stephen A.

    Income replacement and reemployment programs in Michigan and its neighboring states were examined in the context of recent changes in federal policy regarding compensation and services for individuals who have lost their jobs or sustained job-related injuries. The analysis focused primarily on the following programs: (1) Unemployment Insurance…

  9. How a PINT Can Hurt You Now but Help You Later: The Time Course of Priming for Word Body Neighbors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pexman, Penny M.; Trew, Jennifer L.; Holyk, Gregory G.

    2005-01-01

    The process of naming an exception word prime (e.g., PINT) delays subsequent naming of a nonrhyming regular-inconsistent word body neighbor target (e.g., TINT). Both an activation account (Taraban & McClelland, 1987) and a learning account (Burt & Humphreys, 1993) have been offered to explain this interference effect. We investigated how long…

  10. The Day Care Neighbor Service: A Handbook for the Organization and Operation of a New Approach to Family Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Alice H.; Watson, Eunice L.

    The Day Care Neighbor Service makes it possible to provide social service at the neighborhood level where working mothers, without benefit of any social agency, make private and informal day care arrangements with neighborhood sitters. It makes use of a social work consultant to find the key individual in each neighborhood who is already…

  11. A range of complex probabilistic models for RNA secondary structure prediction that includes the nearest-neighbor model and more.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Elena; Lang, Raymond; Eddy, Sean R

    2012-02-01

    The standard approach for single-sequence RNA secondary structure prediction uses a nearest-neighbor thermodynamic model with several thousand experimentally determined energy parameters. An attractive alternative is to use statistical approaches with parameters estimated from growing databases of structural RNAs. Good results have been reported for discriminative statistical methods using complex nearest-neighbor models, including CONTRAfold, Simfold, and ContextFold. Little work has been reported on generative probabilistic models (stochastic context-free grammars [SCFGs]) of comparable complexity, although probabilistic models are generally easier to train and to use. To explore a range of probabilistic models of increasing complexity, and to directly compare probabilistic, thermodynamic, and discriminative approaches, we created TORNADO, a computational tool that can parse a wide spectrum of RNA grammar architectures (including the standard nearest-neighbor model and more) using a generalized super-grammar that can be parameterized with probabilities, energies, or arbitrary scores. By using TORNADO, we find that probabilistic nearest-neighbor models perform comparably to (but not significantly better than) discriminative methods. We find that complex statistical models are prone to overfitting RNA structure and that evaluations should use structurally nonhomologous training and test data sets. Overfitting has affected at least one published method (ContextFold). The most important barrier to improving statistical approaches for RNA secondary structure prediction is the lack of diversity of well-curated single-sequence RNA secondary structures in current RNA databases.

  12. 75 FR 62412 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Comment Request; HUD-Owned Real Estate-Good Neighbor...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Comment Request; HUD- Owned Real Estate... Notice also lists the following information: Title of Proposal: HUD-Owned Real Estate-Good Neighbor...

  13. Repulsive interactions induced by specific adsorption: Anomalous step diffusivity and inadequacy of nearest-neighbor Ising model. (part I experimental)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Shakran, Mohammad; Kibler, Ludwig A.; Jacob, Timo; Ibach, Harald; Beltramo, Guillermo L.; Giesen, Margret

    2016-09-01

    This is Part I of two closely related papers, where we show that the specific adsorption of anions leads to a failure of the nearest-neighbor Ising model to describe island perimeter curvatures on Au(100) electrodes in dilute KBr, HCl and H2SO4 electrolytes and the therewith derived step diffusivity vs. step orientation. This result has major consequences for theoretical studies aiming at the understanding of growth, diffusion and degradation phenomena. Part I focuses on the experimental data. As shown theoretically in detail in Part II (doi:10.1016/j.susc.2016.03.022), a set of nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor interaction energies (ɛNN, ɛNNN) can uniquely be derived from the diffusivity of steps along <100> and <110>. We find strong repulsive next-nearest neighbor (NNN) interaction in KBr and HCl, whereas NNN interaction is negligibly for H2SO4. The NNN repulsive interaction energy ɛNNN therefore correlates positively with the Gibbs adsorption energy of the anions. We find furthermore that ɛNNN increases with increasing Br- and Cl- coverage. The results for ɛNN and ɛNNN are quantitatively consistent with the coverage dependence of the step line tension. We thereby establish a sound experimental base for theoretical studies on the energetics of steps in the presence of specific adsorption.

  14. Beyond basins: φ,ψ preferences of a residue depend heavily on the φ,ψ values of its neighbors.

    PubMed

    Hollingsworth, Scott A; Lewis, Matthew C; Karplus, P Andrew

    2016-09-01

    The Ramachandran plot distributions of nonglycine residues from experimentally determined structures are routinely described as grouping into one of six major basins: β, PII , α, αL , ξ and γ'. Recent work describing the most common conformations adopted by pairs of residues in folded proteins [i.e., (φ,ψ)2 -motifs] showed that commonly described major basins are not true single thermodynamic basins, but are composed of distinct subregions that are associated with various conformations of either the preceding or following neighbor residue. Here, as documentation of the extent to which the conformational preferences of a central residue are influenced by the conformations of its two neighbors, we present a set of φ,ψ-plots that are delimited simultaneously by the φ,ψ-angles of its neighboring residues on both sides. The level of influence seen here is typically greater than the influence associated with considering the identities of neighboring residues, implying that the use of this heretofore untapped information can improve the accuracy of structure prediction algorithms and low resolution protein structure refinement.

  15. Having quality population.

    PubMed

    Ramos, F V

    1993-06-01

    This speech was delivered during Population and Development Week in the Philippines. Attention was drawn to population statistics: an annual growth rate of 2.3%, density of 202 persons/sq km, and an expected population of 75 million by the year 2000. Coupled with rapid population growth is the uneven distribution of wealth: the top 20% have over 50% of the total income and the lowest 20% have only 5% of the income. In such a social situation, it is women and children who are the most vulnerable. In cities, unemployment is high due to population growth and the migration of the rural poor. The rural poor living in areas of declining resources also move onto marginal uplands, which adds pressure to the already fragile ecology. Everyone must accept that the nation's problems are due to overpopulation. The government's development plans aim for sustainable growth, poverty alleviation, reduction in equality, generation of job opportunities, and achievement of social justice. People in government are determined to lead the Philippines toward a higher standard comparable with other dynamic Asian neighbors. The strategy is empowerment of the people. THe value is in the welfare of individuals and their families and the welfare of the nation. Couples have the right to manage their family size voluntarily and responsibly. The government's role is to provide adequate information on family planning in accordance with individual's religious convictions. Policies will also be directed to improved access to quality education, child survival, and maternal health, employment opportunities, and access and control over resources for people. There must be fuller participation of women in development. Support for the government's population program is sought from government officials, the private sector, and nongovernmental organizations. All provincial governors, city and municipal mayors, and all local executives will be directed to formulate population plans and to provide family

  16. HLA class I and II polymorphisms in the Gujjar population from Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Raza, Ali; Firasat, Sadaf; Khaliq, Shagufta; Abid, Aiysha; Shah, Syed Shoaib; Mehdi, Syed Qasim; Mohyuddin, Aisha

    2013-01-01

    HLA polymorphisms at the HLA -A, -B, -C, -DRB and -DQB1 loci were investigated in the Gujjar population from the Punjab province of Pakistan. The Gujjars (n = 97) were genotyped using sequence specific primers for polymerase chain reaction. The allele and haplotype frequencies were calculated and a neighbor-joining (NJ) tree comparing the Gujjar with other populations was constructed. The class I allelic groups with a frequency greater than 10% include A*01, A*02, A*11, A*26 and A*31 at the HLA-A locus, B*08 and B*51 at the HLA-B locus and C*07 and C*14 at the HLA-C locus. Among the 12 allelic groups detected at the DRB1* locus, *03, *13, and *15 were present at frequencies higher than 10% whereas at the DQB1 locus, the allelic groups*06 and *02 accounted for over half of the Gujjar population. HLA-A*31-B*51-DRB1*13 was the most common (8.8%) haplotype in this population. A NJ tree revealed that the Pakistani Gujjar are closely related to the Golla tribe from Andhra Pradesh in India. The two populations are dedicated to the same profession, cattle breeding. HLA analyses of additional Punjab castes would provide valuable information for anthropological, organ transplantation and genetic disease studies.

  17. Intrinsic acid-base properties of a hexa-2'-deoxynucleoside pentaphosphate, d(ApGpGpCpCpT): neighboring effects and isomeric equilibria.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Martín, Alicia; Johannsen, Silke; Sigel, Astrid; Operschall, Bert P; Song, Bin; Sigel, Helmut; Okruszek, Andrzej; González-Pérez, Josefa María; Niclós-Gutiérrez, Juan; Sigel, Roland K O

    2013-06-17

    The intrinsic acid-base properties of the hexa-2'-deoxynucleoside pentaphosphate, d(ApGpGpCpCpT) [=(A1∙G2∙G3∙C4∙C5∙T6)=(HNPP)⁵⁻] have been determined by ¹H NMR shift experiments. The pKa values of the individual sites of the adenosine (A), guanosine (G), cytidine (C), and thymidine (T) residues were measured in water under single-strand conditions (i.e., 10% D₂O, 47 °C, I=0.1 M, NaClO₄). These results quantify the release of H⁺ from the two (N7)H⁺ (G∙G), the two (N3)H⁺ (C∙C), and the (N1)H⁺ (A) units, as well as from the two (N1)H (G∙G) and the (N3)H (T) sites. Based on measurements with 2'-deoxynucleosides at 25 °C and 47 °C, they were transferred to pKa values valid in water at 25 °C and I=0.1 M. Intramolecular stacks between the nucleobases A1 and G2 as well as most likely also between G2 and G3 are formed. For HNPP three pKa clusters occur, that is those encompassing the pKa values of 2.44, 2.97, and 3.71 of G2(N7)H⁺, G3(N7)H⁺, and A1(N1)H⁺, respectively, with overlapping buffer regions. The tautomer populations were estimated, giving for the release of a single proton from five-fold protonated H₅(HNPP)(±) , the tautomers (G2)N7, (G3)N7, and (A1)N1 with formation degrees of about 74, 22, and 4%, respectively. Tautomer distributions reveal pathways for proton-donating as well as for proton-accepting reactions both being expected to be fast and to occur practically at no "cost". The eight pKa values for H₅(HNPP)(±) are compared with data for nucleosides and nucleotides, revealing that the nucleoside residues are in part affected very differently by their neighbors. In addition, the intrinsic acidity constants for the RNA derivative r(A1∙G2∙G3∙C4∙C5∙U6), where U=uridine, were calculated. Finally, the effect of metal ions on the pKa values of nucleobase sites is briefly discussed because in this way deprotonation reactions can easily be shifted to the physiological pH range.

  18. Cell categories and K-nearest neighbor algorithm based decoding of primary motor cortical activity during reach-to-grasp task.

    PubMed

    Yangyang Guo; Wei Li; Jiping He

    2014-01-01

    Neural decoding is a procedure to acquire intended movement information from neural activity and generate movement commands to control external devices such as intelligent prostheses. In this study, monkey Astra was trained to accomplish a 3-D reach-to-grasp task, and we recorded neural signals from its primary motor cortex (M1) during the task. The task-related cells were divided into four classes based on their correlation with two movement parameters: movement direction and orientation. We adopted the simple k-nearest neighbor (KNN) algorithm as the classifier, and chose cells from appropriate cell classes for movement parameter decoding. Cell classification was shown improving decoding accuracy with relatively less cells, even during movement planning stage (CRT). High decoding accuracy before movement actually performed is of great significance for intelligent prostheses control, and provides evidence that M1 is more than accepting ready-made movement commands but also participating in movement planning. We also found that population of task-related cells in M1 had a preference for specific direction and orientation, and this preference was more significant when it came to population of direction-related cells and orientation-related cells. PMID:25570453

  19. Rock glacier outflows may adversely affect lakes: lessons from the past and present of two neighboring water bodies in a crystalline-rock watershed.

    PubMed

    Ilyashuk, Boris P; Ilyashuk, Elena A; Psenner, Roland; Tessadri, Richard; Koinig, Karin A

    2014-06-01

    Despite the fact that rock glaciers are one of the most common geomorphological expressions of mountain permafrost, the impacts of their solute fluxes on lakes still remain largely obscure. We examined water and sediment chemistry, and biota of two neighboring water bodies with and without a rock glacier in their catchments in the European Alps. Paleolimnological techniques were applied to track long-term temporal trends in the ecotoxicological state of the water bodies and to establish their baseline conditions. We show that the active rock glacier in the mineralized catchment of Lake Rasass (RAS) represents a potent source of acid rock drainage that results in enormous concentrations of metals in water, sediment, and biota of RAS. The incidence of morphological abnormalities in the RAS population of Pseudodiamesa nivosa, a chironomid midge, is as high as that recorded in chironomid populations inhabiting sites heavily contaminated by trace metals of anthropogenic origin. The incidence of morphological deformities in P. nivosa of ∼70% persisted in RAS during the last 2.5 millennia and was ∼40% in the early Holocene. The formation of RAS at the toe of the rock glacier most probably began at the onset of acidic drainage in the freshly deglaciated area. The present adverse conditions are not unprecedented in the lake's history and cannot be associated exclusively with enhanced thawing of the rock glacier in recent years.

  20. Rock Glacier Outflows May Adversely Affect Lakes: Lessons from the Past and Present of Two Neighboring Water Bodies in a Crystalline-Rock Watershed

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Despite the fact that rock glaciers are one of the most common geomorphological expressions of mountain permafrost, the impacts of their solute fluxes on lakes still remain largely obscure. We examined water and sediment chemistry, and biota of two neighboring water bodies with and without a rock glacier in their catchments in the European Alps. Paleolimnological techniques were applied to track long-term temporal trends in the ecotoxicological state of the water bodies and to establish their baseline conditions. We show that the active rock glacier in the mineralized catchment of Lake Rasass (RAS) represents a potent source of acid rock drainage that results in enormous concentrations of metals in water, sediment, and biota of RAS. The incidence of morphological abnormalities in the RAS population of Pseudodiamesa nivosa, a chironomid midge, is as high as that recorded in chironomid populations inhabiting sites heavily contaminated by trace metals of anthropogenic origin. The incidence of morphological deformities in P. nivosa of ∼70% persisted in RAS during the last 2.5 millennia and was ∼40% in the early Holocene. The formation of RAS at the toe of the rock glacier most probably began at the onset of acidic drainage in the freshly deglaciated area. The present adverse conditions are not unprecedented in the lake’s history and cannot be associated exclusively with enhanced thawing of the rock glacier in recent years. PMID:24804777

  1. Plant defense phenotypes determine the consequences of volatile emission for individuals and neighbors.

    PubMed

    Schuman, Meredith C; Allmann, Silke; Baldwin, Ian T

    2015-01-01

    Plants are at the trophic base of terrestrial ecosystems, and the diversity of plant species in an ecosystem is a principle determinant of community structure. This may arise from diverse functional traits among species. In fact, genetic diversity within species can have similarly large effects. However, studies of intraspecific genetic diversity have used genotypes varying in several complex traits, obscuring the specific phenotypic variation responsible for community-level effects. Using lines of the wild tobacco Nicotiana attenuata genetically altered in specific well-characterized defense traits and planted into experimental populations in their native habitat, we investigated community-level effects of trait diversity in populations of otherwise isogenic plants. We conclude that the frequency of defense traits in a population can determine the outcomes of these traits for individuals. Furthermore, our results suggest that some ecosystem-level services afforded by genetically diverse plant populations could be recaptured in intensive monocultures engineered to be functionally diverse. PMID:25873033

  2. Bond additivity corrections for quantum chemistry methods

    SciTech Connect

    C. F. Melius; M. D. Allendorf

    1999-04-01

    In the 1980's, the authors developed a bond-additivity correction procedure for quantum chemical calculations called BAC-MP4, which has proven reliable in calculating the thermochemical properties of molecular species, including radicals as well as stable closed-shell species. New Bond Additivity Correction (BAC) methods have been developed for the G2 method, BAC-G2, as well as for a hybrid DFT/MP2 method, BAC-Hybrid. These BAC methods use a new form of BAC corrections, involving atomic, molecular, and bond-wise additive terms. These terms enable one to treat positive and negative ions as well as neutrals. The BAC-G2 method reduces errors in the G2 method due to nearest-neighbor bonds. The parameters within the BAC-G2 method only depend on atom types. Thus the BAC-G2 method can be used to determine the parameters needed by BAC methods involving lower levels of theory, such as BAC-Hybrid and BAC-MP4. The BAC-Hybrid method should scale well for large molecules. The BAC-Hybrid method uses the differences between the DFT and MP2 as an indicator of the method's accuracy, while the BAC-G2 method uses its internal methods (G1 and G2MP2) to provide an indicator of its accuracy. Indications of the average error as well as worst cases are provided for each of the BAC methods.

  3. Dissimilar Teen Crash Rates in Two Neighboring Southeastern Virginia Cities with Different High School Start Times

    PubMed Central

    Vorona, Robert Daniel; Szklo-Coxe, Mariana; Wu, Andrew; Dubik, Michael; Zhao, Yueqin; Ware, J. Catesby

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: Early high school start times may contribute to insufficient sleep leading to increased teen crash rate. Virginia Beach (VB) and Chesapeake are adjacent, demographically similar cities. VB high schools start 75-80 minutes earlier than Chesapeake's. We hypothesized that VB teens would manifest a higher crash rate than Chesapeake teens. Methods: The Virginia Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) provided de-identified, aggregate 2008 and 2007 data for weekday crashes and crash times in VB and Chesapeake for drivers aged 16-18 years (“teens”), and provided 2008 and 2007 crash data for all drivers. Data allowed comparisons of VB versus Chesapeake crash rates for teens (overall and hour-by-hour), and teens versus all other ages. We compared AM and PM traffic congestion (peak hours) in the two cities. Results: In 2008, there were 12,916 and 8,459 Virginia Beach and Chesapeake 16- to 18-year-old drivers, respectively. For VB and Chesapeake, teen drivers' crash rates in 2008 were 65.8/1000 and 46.6/1000 (p < 0.001), respectively, and in 2007 were 71.2/1000 and 55.6/1000. Teen drivers' crash peaks in the morning occurred one hour earlier in VB than Chesapeake, consistent with school commute time. Congestion data for VB and Chesapeake did not explain the different crash rates. Conclusions: A significantly increased teen crash rate for both 2008 and 2007 occurred in VB, the city with earlier high school start times. Future studies using individual level data may clarify if sleep restriction, circadian dyssynchrony, and sleep inertia might contribute to this increased crash rate. Citation: Vorona RD; Szklo-Coxe M; Wu A; Dubik M; Zhao Y; Ware JC. Dissimilar teen crash rates in two neighboring southeastern Virginia cities with different high school start times. J Clin Sleep Med 2011;7(2):145-151. PMID:21509328

  4. Using K-Nearest Neighbor Classification to Diagnose Abnormal Lung Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chin-Hsing; Huang, Wen-Tzeng; Tan, Tan-Hsu; Chang, Cheng-Chun; Chang, Yuan-Jen

    2015-01-01

    A reported 30% of people worldwide have abnormal lung sounds, including crackles, rhonchi, and wheezes. To date, the traditional stethoscope remains the most popular tool used by physicians to diagnose such abnormal lung sounds, however, many problems arise with the use of a stethoscope, including the effects of environmental noise, the inability to record and store lung sounds for follow-up or tracking, and the physician’s subjective diagnostic experience. This study has developed a digital stethoscope to help physicians overcome these problems when diagnosing abnormal lung sounds. In this digital system, mel-frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCCs) were used to extract the features of lung sounds, and then the K-means algorithm was used for feature clustering, to reduce the amount of data for computation. Finally, the K-nearest neighbor method was used to classify the lung sounds. The proposed system can also be used for home care: if the percentage of abnormal lung sound frames is > 30% of the whole test signal, the system can automatically warn the user to visit a physician for diagnosis. We also used bend sensors together with an amplification circuit, Bluetooth, and a microcontroller to implement a respiration detector. The respiratory signal extracted by the bend sensors can be transmitted to the computer via Bluetooth to calculate the respiratory cycle, for real-time assessment. If an abnormal status is detected, the device will warn the user automatically. Experimental results indicated that the error in respiratory cycles between measured and actual values was only 6.8%, illustrating the potential of our detector for home care applications. PMID:26053756

  5. Predicting the Maximum Earthquake Magnitude from Seismic Data in Israel and Its Neighboring Countries

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores several data mining and time series analysis methods for predicting the magnitude of the largest seismic event in the next year based on the previously recorded seismic events in the same region. The methods are evaluated on a catalog of 9,042 earthquake events, which took place between 01/01/1983 and 31/12/2010 in the area of Israel and its neighboring countries. The data was obtained from the Geophysical Institute of Israel. Each earthquake record in the catalog is associated with one of 33 seismic regions. The data was cleaned by removing foreshocks and aftershocks. In our study, we have focused on ten most active regions, which account for more than 80% of the total number of earthquakes in the area. The goal is to predict whether the maximum earthquake magnitude in the following year will exceed the median of maximum yearly magnitudes in the same region. Since the analyzed catalog includes only 28 years of complete data, the last five annual records of each region (referring to the years 2006–2010) are kept for testing while using the previous annual records for training. The predictive features are based on the Gutenberg-Richter Ratio as well as on some new seismic indicators based on the moving averages of the number of earthquakes in each area. The new predictive features prove to be much more useful than the indicators traditionally used in the earthquake prediction literature. The most accurate result (AUC = 0.698) is reached by the Multi-Objective Info-Fuzzy Network (M-IFN) algorithm, which takes into account the association between two target variables: the number of earthquakes and the maximum earthquake magnitude during the same year. PMID:26812351

  6. Peripheral nerve injury activates convergent nociceptive input to dorsal horn neurons from neighboring intact nerve.

    PubMed

    Terayama, Ryuji; Yamamoto, Yuya; Kishimoto, Noriko; Maruhama, Kotaro; Mizutani, Masahide; Iida, Seiji; Sugimoto, Tomosada

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that peripheral nerve injury induced excessive nociceptive response of spinal cord dorsal horn neurons and such change has been proposed to reflect the development of neuropathic pain state. The aim of this study was to examine the spinal dorsal horn for convergence of nociceptive input to second-order neurons deafferented by peripheral nerve injury. Double immunofluorescence labeling for c-Fos and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) was performed to detect convergent synaptic input to spinal dorsal horn neurons after the saphenous nerve injury. c-Fos expression and the phosphorylation of ERK were induced by noxious heat stimulation of the hindpaw and by electrical stimulation of the injured or uninjured saphenous nerve, respectively. Within the central terminal field of the saphenous nerve, the number of c-Fos protein-like immunoreactive (c-Fos-IR) cell profiles was significantly decreased at 3 days and returned to the control level by 14 days after the injury. p-ERK immunoreactive (p-ERK-IR) cell profiles were distributed in the central terminal field of the saphenous nerve, and the topographic distribution pattern and number of such p-ERK-IR cell profiles remained unchanged after the nerve injury. The time course of changes in the number of double-labeled cell profiles was similar to that of c-Fos-IR cell profiles after the injury. These results indicate that convergent primary nociceptive input through neighboring intact nerves contributes to increased responsiveness of spinal dorsal horn nociceptive neurons.

  7. Air Pollution from Industrial Swine Operations and Blood Pressure of Neighboring Residents

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Rachel Avery; Rose, Kathryn M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Industrial swine operations emit odorant chemicals including ammonia, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), and volatile organic compounds. Malodor and pollutant concentrations have been associated with self-reported stress and altered mood in prior studies. Objectives: We conducted a repeated-measures study of air pollution, stress, and blood pressure in neighbors of swine operations. Methods: For approximately 2 weeks, 101 nonsmoking adult volunteers living near industrial swine operations in 16 neighborhoods in eastern North Carolina sat outdoors for 10 min twice daily at preselected times. Afterward, they reported levels of hog odor on a 9-point scale and measured their blood pressure twice using an automated oscillometric device. During the same 2- to 3-week period, we measured ambient levels of H2S and PM10 at a central location in each neighborhood. Associations between systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP, respectively) and pollutant measures were estimated using fixed-effects (conditional) linear regression with adjustment for time of day. Results: PM10 showed little association with blood pressure. DBP [β (SE)] increased 0.23 (0.08) mmHg per unit of reported hog odor during the 10 min outdoors and 0.12 (0.08) mmHg per 1-ppb increase of H2S concentration in the same hour. SBP increased 0.10 (0.12) mmHg per odor unit and 0.29 (0.12) mmHg per 1-ppb increase of H2S in the same hour. Reported stress was strongly associated with BP; adjustment for stress reduced the odor–DBP association, but the H2S–SBP association changed little. Conclusions: Like noise and other repetitive environmental stressors, malodors may be associated with acute blood pressure increases that could contribute to development of chronic hypertension. PMID:23111006

  8. Exploration of Neighboring Planetary Systems: Roadmap to a New Discipline in Space Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, D. C.

    1995-12-01

    A little more than two decades ago a pair of workshops chaired by Jesse Greenstein marked the beginning of a new era in modern astronomy and planetary science, leading perhaps to the formation of a new discipline in space science. More significantly, this is also an era that will bring to closure the much grander revolution in human thought due to Copernicus some five hundred years ago. This is the time when powerful new telescopes in space will permit humans to search for and characterize other planetary systems and to study in detail the nature of other Earth-like planets should they exist, with the possibility of inferring the presence of life on at least some of these planets from their atmospheric spectra. The NASA Administrator, Mr. Goldin, challenged the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to create a roadmap to explore neighboring planetary systems and to characterize and image individual planets in those systems. JPL conducted a study involving 135 researchers from 53 universities and companies, most of which were selected through a competitive process, and recently (October 5 and 6) reported on their findings to a Blue Ribbon Panel chaired by Professor C. Townes. The findings of the ExNPS study resonate strongly with those of the ``HST and Beyond'' Committee chaired by Alan Dressler, that a search for and characterization of Earth-like planets revolving around nearby stars and the search for evidence of life on them should be one of the major objectives of space astronomy in the coming decade. I will review the major aspects of the proposed roadmap with emphasis on the scientific objectives and the combined ground and space-based hardware that is being considered to accomplish the task.

  9. Predicting the Maximum Earthquake Magnitude from Seismic Data in Israel and Its Neighboring Countries.

    PubMed

    Last, Mark; Rabinowitz, Nitzan; Leonard, Gideon

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores several data mining and time series analysis methods for predicting the magnitude of the largest seismic event in the next year based on the previously recorded seismic events in the same region. The methods are evaluated on a catalog of 9,042 earthquake events, which took place between 01/01/1983 and 31/12/2010 in the area of Israel and its neighboring countries. The data was obtained from the Geophysical Institute of Israel. Each earthquake record in the catalog is associated with one of 33 seismic regions. The data was cleaned by removing foreshocks and aftershocks. In our study, we have focused on ten most active regions, which account for more than 80% of the total number of earthquakes in the area. The goal is to predict whether the maximum earthquake magnitude in the following year will exceed the median of maximum yearly magnitudes in the same region. Since the analyzed catalog includes only 28 years of complete data, the last five annual records of each region (referring to the years 2006-2010) are kept for testing while using the previous annual records for training. The predictive features are based on the Gutenberg-Richter Ratio as well as on some new seismic indicators based on the moving averages of the number of earthquakes in each area. The new predictive features prove to be much more useful than the indicators traditionally used in the earthquake prediction literature. The most accurate result (AUC = 0.698) is reached by the Multi-Objective Info-Fuzzy Network (M-IFN) algorithm, which takes into account the association between two target variables: the number of earthquakes and the maximum earthquake magnitude during the same year.

  10. Using K-Nearest Neighbor Classification to Diagnose Abnormal Lung Sounds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chin-Hsing; Huang, Wen-Tzeng; Tan, Tan-Hsu; Chang, Cheng-Chun; Chang, Yuan-Jen

    2015-01-01

    A reported 30% of people worldwide have abnormal lung sounds, including crackles, rhonchi, and wheezes. To date, the traditional stethoscope remains the most popular tool used by physicians to diagnose such abnormal lung sounds, however, many problems arise with the use of a stethoscope, including the effects of environmental noise, the inability to record and store lung sounds for follow-up or tracking, and the physician's subjective diagnostic experience. This study has developed a digital stethoscope to help physicians overcome these problems when diagnosing abnormal lung sounds. In this digital system, mel-frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCCs) were used to extract the features of lung sounds, and then the K-means algorithm was used for feature clustering, to reduce the amount of data for computation. Finally, the K-nearest neighbor method was used to classify the lung sounds. The proposed system can also be used for home care: if the percentage of abnormal lung sound frames is > 30% of the whole test signal, the system can automatically warn the user to visit a physician for diagnosis. We also used bend sensors together with an amplification circuit, Bluetooth, and a microcontroller to implement a respiration detector. The respiratory signal extracted by the bend sensors can be transmitted to the computer via Bluetooth to calculate the respiratory cycle, for real-time assessment. If an abnormal status is detected, the device will warn the user automatically. Experimental results indicated that the error in respiratory cycles between measured and actual values was only 6.8%, illustrating the potential of our detector for home care applications. PMID:26053756

  11. M33: A Close Neighbor Reveals its True Size and Splendor (3-color composite)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    One of our closest galactic neighbors shows its awesome beauty in this new image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. M33, also known as the Triangulum Galaxy, is a member of what's known as our Local Group of galaxies. Along with our own Milky Way, this group travels together in the universe, as they are gravitationally bound. In fact, M33 is one of the few galaxies that is moving toward the Milky Way despite the fact that space itself is expanding, causing most galaxies in the universe to grow farther and farther apart.

    When viewed with Spitzer's infrared eyes, this elegant spiral galaxy sparkles with color and detail. Stars appear as glistening blue gems (several of which are actually foreground stars in our own galaxy), while dust rich in organic molecules glows green. The diffuse orange-red glowing areas indicate star-forming regions, while small red flecks outside the spiral disk of M33 are most likely distant background galaxies. But not only is this new image beautiful, it also shows M33 to be surprising large bigger than its visible-light appearance would suggest. With its ability to detect cold, dark dust, Spitzer can see emission from cooler material well beyond the visible range of M33's disk. Exactly how this cold material moved outward from the galaxy is still a mystery, but winds from giant stars or supernovas may be responsible.

    M33 is located about 2.9 million light-years away in the constellation Triangulum. This is a three-color composite image showing infrared observations from two of Spitzer instruments. Blue represents combined 3.6- and 4.5-micron light and green shows light of 8 microns, both captured by Spitzer's infrared array camera. Red is 24-micron light detected by Spitzer's multiband imaging photometer.

  12. M33: A Close Neighbor Reveals its True Size and Splendor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    One of our closest galactic neighbors shows its awesome beauty in this new image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. M33, also known as the Triangulum Galaxy, is a member of what's known as our Local Group of galaxies. Along with our own Milky Way, this group travels together in the universe, as they are gravitationally bound. In fact, M33 is one of the few galaxies that is moving toward the Milky Way despite the fact that space itself is expanding, causing most galaxies in the universe to grow farther and farther apart.

    When viewed with Spitzer's infrared eyes, this elegant spiral galaxy sparkles with color and detail. Stars appear as glistening blue gems (many of which are actually foreground stars in our own galaxy), while dust in the spiral disk of the galaxy glows pink and red. But not only is this new image beautiful, it also shows M33 to be surprising large bigger than its visible-light appearance would suggest. With its ability to detect cold, dark dust, Spitzer can see emission from cooler material well beyond the visible range of M33's disk. Exactly how this cold material moved outward from the galaxy is still a mystery, but winds from giant stars or supernovas may be responsible.

    M33 is located about 2.9 million light-years away in the constellation Triangulum. This composite image was taken by Spitzer's infrared array camera. The color blue indicates infrared light of 3.6 microns, green shows 4.5-micron light, and red 8.0 microns.

  13. Physical Interactions Between the Thermosphere and Ionosphere, and Coupling to the Neighboring Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller-Rowell, T. J.

    2011-12-01

    Coupled thermosphere ionosphere physics-based models have about a 25 year heritage. This paper reviews the physical processes pertaining to the interaction between the neutral and plasma domains, and what we have learnt from the coupling physics embedded in the models. The interactions range from the chemical to the dynamic, from the linear to the non-linear, and from the intuitive to the non-intuitive. For example, coupled thermosphere-ionosphere models have been able to unravel some of the complexities of the storm-time response, in particular the observed seasonal/local-time characteristics of the ionospheric negative phase and its connection to the transport of thermospheric major species. Another example is the unexpected asymmetry in the neutral wind response to magnetospheric forcing, which is a good example of a non-linear response. Both these cases illustrate how, physical modeling, firstly, can be used as a tool to simulate the phenomena, and secondly, can be used to elucidate the underlying physical processes at work. This second step, is the most difficult and time-consuming, and is often neglected. Still many outstanding issues remain, which will likely be address by coupling to the neighboring domains. For instance, the challenge of the semi-annual variation in several neutral and plasma parameters has yet to be modeled successfully. The hope is that coupling with the lower atmosphere will shed light on the physical processes. Another example is the huge increases in plasma density at mid-latitudes, which likely requires careful coupling of thermosphere-ionosphere with both inner and outer magnetosphere codes. Both these directions, coupling with the lower atmosphere and with the magnetosphere, are active and fruitful lines of research that will provide the momentum for future advances in understanding of the coupled geospace physical system.

  14. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, James C. (Inventor); Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  15. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of the additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  16. Specific aspects of consanguinity: some examples from the Tunisian population.

    PubMed

    Romdhane, Lilia; Ben Halim, Nizar; Rejeb, Insaf; Kefi, Rym; Bouyacoub, Yosra; Ben Rekaya, Mariem; Messai, Habib; Messaoud, Olfa; Riahi, Zied; Bonnet, Crystel; Ben Rhouma, Faten; Nagara, Majdi; Petit, Christine; McElreavey, Ken; Romeo, Giovanni; Abdelhak, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Located at the cross-road between Europe and Africa, Tunisia is a North African country of 11 million inhabitants. Throughout its history, it has been invaded by different ethnic groups. These historical events, and consanguinity, have impacted on the spectrum and frequency of genetic diseases in Tunisia. Investigations of Tunisian families have significantly contributed to elucidation of the genetic bases of rare disorders, providing an invaluable resource of cases due to particular familial structures (large family size, consanguinity and share of common ancestors). In the present study, we report on and review different aspects of consanguinity in the Tunisian population as a case study, representing several features common to neighboring or historically related countries in North Africa and the Middle East. Despite the educational, demographic and behavioral changes that have taken place during the last four decades, familial and geographical endogamy still exist at high frequencies, especially in rural areas. The health implications of consanguinity in Tunisian families include an increased risk of the expression of autosomal recessive diseases and particular phenotypic expressions. With new sequencing technologies, the investigation of consanguineous populations provides a unique opportunity to better evaluate the impact of consanguinity on the genome dynamic and on health, in addition to a better understanding of the genetic bases of diseases. PMID:25060280

  17. Polymorphisms at 17 Y-STR loci in Botswana populations.

    PubMed

    Tau, Tiroyamodimo; Davison, Sean; D'Amato, María Eugenia

    2015-07-01

    Seventeen Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats (YSTRs)-DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS385a/b, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635, and Y-GATA-H4-were analyzed in 252 unrelated male individuals from Botswana. A total of 238 unique haplotypes were identified. The discrimination capacity (DC) was 0.9444 whereas the haplotype diversity (HD) was 0.9990. A database search of the 238 unique haplotypes in the Y chromosome haplogroup database (YHRD) yielded three African American, six Sub-Saharan African, and two admixed South American matches. Five additional African-American matches were detected in the Applied Biosystems Y-STR database. RST, multi-dimensional scaling (MDS) and AMOVA were used to investigate population differentiation in Sub-Saharan Africa and in Botswana. The populations in Sub-Saharan Africa were found to be heterogeneous, with Botswana showing significant differences from its neighbors. No geographic regional or ethnic differentiation was observed within Botswana. Regional and ethnic variation can be useful in forensic working hypotheses. PMID:25817844

  18. Additional Types of Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... A A Listen En Español Additional Types of Neuropathy Charcot's Joint Charcot's Joint, also called neuropathic arthropathy, ... can stop bone destruction and aid healing. Cranial Neuropathy Cranial neuropathy affects the 12 pairs of nerves ...

  19. Food Additives and Hyperkinesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wender, Ester H.

    1977-01-01

    The hypothesis that food additives are causally associated with hyperkinesis and learning disabilities in children is reviewed, and available data are summarized. Available from: American Medical Association 535 North Dearborn Street Chicago, Illinois 60610. (JG)

  20. Smog control fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Lundby, W.

    1993-06-29

    A method is described of controlling, reducing or eliminating, ozone and related smog resulting from photochemical reactions between ozone and automotive or industrial gases comprising the addition of iodine or compounds of iodine to hydrocarbon-base fuels prior to or during combustion in an amount of about 1 part iodine per 240 to 10,000,000 parts fuel, by weight, to be accomplished by: (a) the addition of these inhibitors during or after the refining or manufacturing process of liquid fuels; (b) the production of these inhibitors for addition into fuel tanks, such as automotive or industrial tanks; or (c) the addition of these inhibitors into combustion chambers of equipment utilizing solid fuels for the purpose of reducing ozone.

  1. Effect of pH, urea, peptide length, and neighboring amino acids on alanine alpha-proton random coil chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Carlisle, Elizabeth A; Holder, Jessica L; Maranda, Abby M; de Alwis, Adamberage R; Selkie, Ellen L; McKay, Sonya L

    2007-01-01

    Accurate random coil alpha-proton chemical shift values are essential for precise protein structure analysis using chemical shift index (CSI) calculations. The current study determines the chemical shift effects of pH, urea, peptide length and neighboring amino acids on the alpha-proton of Ala using model peptides of the general sequence GnXaaAYaaGn, where Xaa and Yaa are Leu, Val, Phe, Tyr, His, Trp or Pro, and n = 1-3. Changes in pH (2-6), urea (0-1M), and peptide length (n = 1-3) had no effect on Ala alpha-proton chemical shifts. Denaturing concentrations of urea (8M) caused significant downfield shifts (0.10 +/- 0.01 ppm) relative to an external DSS reference. Neighboring aliphatic residues (Leu, Val) had no effect, whereas aromatic amino acids (Phe, Tyr, His and Trp) and Pro caused significant shifts in the alanine alpha-proton, with the extent of the shifts dependent on the nature and position of the amino acid. Smaller aromatic residues (Phe, Tyr, His) caused larger shift effects when present in the C-terminal position (approximately 0.10 vs. 0.05 ppm N-terminal), and the larger aromatic tryptophan caused greater effects in the N-terminal position (0.15 ppm vs. 0.10 C-terminal). Proline affected both significant upfield (0.06 ppm, N-terminal) and downfield (0.25 ppm, C-terminal) chemical shifts. These new Ala correction factors detail the magnitude and range of variation in environmental chemical shift effects, in addition to providing insight into the molecular level interactions that govern protein folding.

  2. Some Observations about the Nearest-Neighbor Model of the Error Threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Gerrish, Philip J.

    2009-09-09

    I explore some aspects of the 'error threshold' - a critical mutation rate above which a population is nonviable. The phase transition that occurs as mutation rate crosses this threshold has been shown to be mathematically equivalent to the loss of ferromagnetism that occurs as temperature exceeds the Curie point. I will describe some refinements and new results based on the simplest of these mutation models, will discuss the commonly unperceived robustness of this simple model, and I will show some preliminary results comparing qualitative predictions with simulations of finite populations adapting at high mutation rates. I will talk about how these qualitative predictions are relevant to biomedical science and will discuss how my colleagues and I are looking for phase-transition signatures in real populations of Escherichia coli that go extinct as a result of excessive mutation.

  3. INS-1 Cells Undergoing Caspase-Dependent Apoptosis Enhance the Regenerative Capacity of Neighboring Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Caroline; Bacon, Siobhán; Concannon, Caoimhín G.; Rizvi, Syed R.; Baquié, Mathurin; Farrelly, Angela M.; Kilbride, Seán M.; Dussmann, Heiko; Ward, Manus W.; Boulanger, Chantal M.; Wollheim, Claes B.; Graf, Rolf; Byrne, Maria M.; Prehn, Jochen H.M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE In diabetes, β-cell mass is not static but in a constant process of cell death and renewal. Inactivating mutations in transcription factor 1 (tcf-1)/hepatocyte nuclear factor1a (hnf1a) result in decreased β-cell mass and HNF1A–maturity onset diabetes of the young (HNF1A-MODY). Here, we investigated the effect of a dominant-negative HNF1A mutant (DN-HNF1A) induced apoptosis on the regenerative capacity of INS-1 cells. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS DN-HNF1A was expressed in INS-1 cells using a reverse tetracycline-dependent transactivator system. Gene(s)/protein(s) involved in β-cell regeneration were investigated by real-time quantitative RT-PCR, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry. Pancreatic stone protein/regenerating protein (PSP/reg) serum levels in human subjects were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS We detected a prominent induction of PSP/reg at the gene and protein level during DN-HNF1A–induced apoptosis. Elevated PSP/reg levels were also detected in islets of transgenic HNF1A-MODY mice and in the serum of HNF1A-MODY patients. The induction of PSP/reg was glucose dependent and mediated by caspase activation during apoptosis. Interestingly, the supernatant from DN-HNF1A–expressing cells, but not DN-HNF1A–expressing cells treated with zVAD.fmk, was sufficient to induce PSP/reg gene expression and increase cell proliferation in naïve, untreated INS-1 cells. Further experiments demonstrated that annexin-V–positive microparticles originating from apoptosing INS-1 cells mediated the induction of PSP/reg. Treatment with recombinant PSP/reg reversed the phenotype of DN-HNF1A–induced cells by stimulating cell proliferation and increasing insulin gene expression. CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest that apoptosing INS-1 cells shed microparticles that may stimulate PSP/reg induction in neighboring cells, a mechanism that may facilitate the recovery of β-cell mass in HNF1A-MODY. PMID:20682686

  4. Counting Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    Scientists use sampling to get an estimate of things they cannot easily count. A population is made up of all the organisms of one species living together in one place at the same time. All of the people living together in one town are considered a population. All of the grasshoppers living in a field are a population. Scientists keep track of the…

  5. Population Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Child Health and Human Development (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    The scope of population research as carried on by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) is set forth in this booklet. Population problems of the world, United States, and the individual are considered along with international population policies based on voluntary family planning programs. NICHD goals for biological…

  6. Understanding Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mothner, Ira

    Activities and concerns of Ford Foundation supported population research and training centers are described in this report. The centers are concerned with population growth, consequences of growth for human welfare, forces that determine family planning, interrelations among population variables, economics of contraceptive distribution, and…

  7. Additive Manufacturing Infrared Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, Darrell

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is a rapid prototyping technology that allows parts to be built in a series of thin layers from plastic, ceramics, and metallics. Metallic additive manufacturing is an emerging form of rapid prototyping that allows complex structures to be built using various metallic powders. Significant time and cost savings have also been observed using the metallic additive manufacturing compared with traditional techniques. Development of the metallic additive manufacturing technology has advanced significantly over the last decade, although many of the techniques to inspect parts made from these processes have not advanced significantly or have limitations. Several external geometry inspection techniques exist such as Coordinate Measurement Machines (CMM), Laser Scanners, Structured Light Scanning Systems, or even traditional calipers and gages. All of the aforementioned techniques are limited to external geometry and contours or must use a contact probe to inspect limited internal dimensions. This presentation will document the development of a process for real-time dimensional inspection technique and digital quality record of the additive manufacturing process using Infrared camera imaging and processing techniques.

  8. Population growth and foreign policy.

    PubMed

    Flood, P J

    1978-04-01

    Australian foreign policy is examined in light of the population issue and its relationships to its developing Asian neighbors. Rapid population growth has been a 20th-century phenomenon. In the ESCAP region, almost all governments are anxious to reduce growth rates and welcome international assistance for population programs. The motivation of these governments seems to be both political and economic. Asian countries do not share the view expressed at Bucharest by Latin American and African representatives that high population growth rates are not a problem. Results of national family planning programs in 16 developing Asian countries are assessed. Major fertility decline has only occurred so far in the most prosperous of these countries. Future fertility trends are hard to predict. Present inadequate knowledge of the determinants of human fertility and limited knowledge regarding fertility limitation techniques hamper progress in population reduction. Australia has aided these countries in demographic training and data collection. For both economic and humanitarian reasons, this aid should be extended to program implementation.

  9. Plant defense phenotypes determine the consequences of volatile emission for individuals and neighbors

    PubMed Central

    Schuman, Meredith C; Allmann, Silke; Baldwin, Ian T

    2015-01-01

    Plants are at the trophic base of terrestrial ecosystems, and the diversity of plant species in an ecosystem is a principle determinant of community structure. This may arise from diverse functional traits among species. In fact, genetic diversity within species can have similarly large effects. However, studies of intraspecific genetic diversity have used genotypes varying in several complex traits, obscuring the specific phenotypic variation responsible for community-level effects. Using lines of the wild tobacco Nicotiana attenuata genetically altered in specific well-characterized defense traits and planted into experimental populations in their native habitat, we investigated community-level effects of trait diversity in populations of otherwise isogenic plants. We conclude that the frequency of defense traits in a population can determine the outcomes of these traits for individuals. Furthermore, our results suggest that some ecosystem-level services afforded by genetically diverse plant populations could be recaptured in intensive monocultures engineered to be functionally diverse. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04490.001 PMID:25873033

  10. Females make tough neighbors: sex-specific competitive effects in seedlings of a dioecious grass.

    PubMed

    Eppley, Sarah M

    2006-01-01

    If males and females of a species differ in their effect on intraspecific competition then this can have significant ecological and evolutionary consequences because it can lead to size and mortality disparities between the sexes, and thus cause biased population sex ratios. If the degree of sexual dimorphism of competitive effect varies across environments then this variation can generate sex ratio variation within and between populations. In a California population of Distichlis spicata, a dioecious grass species exhibiting extreme within-population sex ratio variation (spatial segregation of the sexes), I evaluated the intraspecific competitive effects of male and female D. spicata seedlings in three soil types. The sex of seedlings was determined using a RAPD-PCR marker co-segregating with female phenotype. Distichlis spicata seedlings, regardless of sex, were six times larger when grown with male versus female conspecific seedlings in soil from microsites where the majority of D. spicata plants are female, and this sexual dimorphism of competitive effect was weaker or did not occur in other soil types. This study suggests that it is not just the higher costs of female versus male reproduction itself that cause spatial segregation of the sexes in D. spicata, but that differences in competitive abilities between the sexes--which occur as early as the seedling stage--can generate sex ratio variation.

  11. The New Neighbors: A User's Guide to Data on Immigrants in U.S. Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capps, Randy; Passel, Jeffrey S.; Perez-Lopez, Daniel; Fix, Michael

    This guidebook is designed to help local policy makers, program implementers, and advocates use U.S. Census and other data sources to identify immigrant populations in their local communities (their characteristics, contributions, and needs). It lists relevant data sources, the information contained in each, where they can be located, and software…

  12. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamine, containing phenylethvnvl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynviphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pvrrolidinone to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  13. Exactly solvable spin-1 Ising-Heisenberg diamond chain with the second-neighbor interaction between nodal spins.

    PubMed

    Hovhannisyan, V V; Strečka, J; Ananikian, N S

    2016-03-01

    The spin-1 Ising-Heisenberg diamond chain with the second-neighbor interaction between nodal spins is rigorously solved using the transfer-matrix method. In particular, exact results for the ground state, magnetization process and specific heat are presented and discussed. It is shown that further-neighbor interaction between nodal spins gives rise to three novel ground states with a translationally broken symmetry, but at the same time, does not increases the total number of intermediate plateaus in a zero-temperature magnetization curve compared with the simplified model without this interaction term. The zero-field specific heat displays interesting thermal dependencies with a single- or double-peak structure. PMID:26836749

  14. Exactly solvable spin-1 Ising-Heisenberg diamond chain with the second-neighbor interaction between nodal spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovhannisyan, V. V.; Strečka, J.; Ananikian, N. S.

    2016-03-01

    The spin-1 Ising-Heisenberg diamond chain with the second-neighbor interaction between nodal spins is rigorously solved using the transfer-matrix method. In particular, exact results for the ground state, magnetization process and specific heat are presented and discussed. It is shown that further-neighbor interaction between nodal spins gives rise to three novel ground states with a translationally broken symmetry, but at the same time, does not increases the total number of intermediate plateaus in a zero-temperature magnetization curve compared with the simplified model without this interaction term. The zero-field specific heat displays interesting thermal dependencies with a single- or double-peak structure.

  15. Population redistribution in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Adebayo, A

    1984-07-01

    One of the major consequences of the reorganization of Nigeria from 4 states into 12 states in 1967 and then into 19 states in the late 1970s was the redistribution of the Nigerian population. Prior to 1967 Nigeria's rural population migrated primarily to the 4 state capitals of Kaduna, Ibadan, Enugu, Benin City and to the federal capital of Lagos. The creation of additional states, each with their own capital, provided new urban environments where migrants from rural areas were afforded opportunities for employment and social mobility. Between 1960-1980, World Bank estimates indicate that 1) population in Nigerian cityes of over 500,000 population increased from 22-57%; 2) the number of cities with a population of 500,000 or more increased from 2 to 9 and 3) the urban population increased from 13-20%. Given Nigeria's estimated population growth rate of 3.6%/year, it is imperative that the goverment continue its decentralization efforts. Tables show 1) population by region based on the 1963 census; 2) estimated population of the 19 state capitals for 1963 and 1975; and 3) estimated population of the areas included in each of the 19 states for 196o, 1977, 1979, and 19819

  16. Peru: population and policy.

    PubMed

    Sobrevilla, L A

    1987-06-01

    Peru's 1985 Population Policy Law states as its second objective that individuals and couples should be well informed and provided with the education and health services that will assist them in making responsible decisions about the number and spacing of their children. Thus, the law establishes a firm basis for IEC programs. With regard to population education, the purpose of the law is to create awareness through all educational channels of the reciprocal influence of population dynamics and socioeconomic development and to promote positive attitudes toward small family size. The law promotes the use of the communications media to educate and inform about population issues. The National Population Council, which coordinates and supervises the IEC activities of public sector agencies, has issued publications and audiovisual materials, conducted meetings with government officials and opinion leaders, and promoted awareness of population policy as a key part of development planning. In 1984, the Council organized the First National Seminar on Communication and Population to review activities, set the basis for intersectoral coordination, unify criteria, and review population policy concepts and language. The Ministry of Health carries out IEC activities as part of its family planning services program. In addition, the Ministry of Education has organized a national population education program that aims to revise school curricula to include a greater emphasis on population dynamics and family life education. The activities of a number of private institutions complement the IEC work public sector organizations. PMID:12341769

  17. Peru: population and policy.

    PubMed

    Sobrevilla, L A

    1987-06-01

    Peru's 1985 Population Policy Law states as its second objective that individuals and couples should be well informed and provided with the education and health services that will assist them in making responsible decisions about the number and spacing of their children. Thus, the law establishes a firm basis for IEC programs. With regard to population education, the purpose of the law is to create awareness through all educational channels of the reciprocal influence of population dynamics and socioeconomic development and to promote positive attitudes toward small family size. The law promotes the use of the communications media to educate and inform about population issues. The National Population Council, which coordinates and supervises the IEC activities of public sector agencies, has issued publications and audiovisual materials, conducted meetings with government officials and opinion leaders, and promoted awareness of population policy as a key part of development planning. In 1984, the Council organized the First National Seminar on Communication and Population to review activities, set the basis for intersectoral coordination, unify criteria, and review population policy concepts and language. The Ministry of Health carries out IEC activities as part of its family planning services program. In addition, the Ministry of Education has organized a national population education program that aims to revise school curricula to include a greater emphasis on population dynamics and family life education. The activities of a number of private institutions complement the IEC work public sector organizations.

  18. Localization in one-dimensional lattices with non-nearest-neighbor hopping: Generalized Anderson and Aubry-André models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biddle, J.; Priour, D. J., Jr.; Wang, B.; Das Sarma, S.

    2011-02-01

    We study the quantum localization phenomena of noninteracting particles in one-dimensional lattices based on tight-binding models with various forms of hopping terms beyond the nearest neighbor, which are generalizations of the famous Aubry-André and noninteracting Anderson models. For the case with deterministic disordered potential induced by a secondary incommensurate lattice (i.e., the Aubry-André model), we identify a class of self-dual models, for which the boundary between localized and extended eigenstates are determined analytically by employing a generalized Aubry-André transformation. We also numerically investigate the localization properties of nondual models with next-nearest-neighbor hopping, Gaussian, and power-law decay hopping terms. We find that even for these nondual models, the numerically obtained mobility edges can be well approximated by the analytically obtained condition for localization transition in the self-dual models, as long as the decay of the hopping rate with respect to distance is sufficiently fast. For the disordered potential with genuinely random character, we examine scenarios with next-nearest-neighbor hopping, exponential, Gaussian, and power-law decay hopping terms numerically. We find that the higher-order hopping terms can remove the symmetry in the localization length about the energy band center compared to the Anderson model. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that for the power-law decay case, there exists a critical exponent below which mobility edges can be found. Our theoretical results could, in principle, be directly tested in shallow atomic optical lattice systems enabling non-nearest-neighbor hopping.

  19. Multifunctional fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Baillargeon, D.J.; Cardis, A.B.; Heck, D.B.

    1991-03-26

    This paper discusses a composition comprising a major amount of a liquid hydrocarbyl fuel and a minor low-temperature flow properties improving amount of an additive product of the reaction of a suitable diol and product of a benzophenone tetracarboxylic dianhydride and a long-chain hydrocarbyl aminoalcohol.

  20. Biobased lubricant additives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fully biobased lubricants are those formulated using all biobased ingredients, i.e. biobased base oils and biobased additives. Such formulations provide the maximum environmental, safety, and economic benefits expected from a biobased product. Currently, there are a number of biobased base oils that...