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Sample records for additional neurological symptoms

  1. [Neurological symptoms following infusion of infliximab].

    PubMed

    Bebe, Anna C K M; Harboe, Kirstine Moll; Nøjgaard, Camilla

    2012-10-01

    Infliximab is indicated for treatment of plaque psoriasis when traditional systemic therapy is inadequate or inappropriate. The treatment is efficient but also carries a risk of serious adverse drug events. We describe a case of neurological symptoms following the first infusion of infliximab in a patient treated for plaque psoriasis. The patient fully recovered after sensation of the therapy. We believe the symptoms could be related to infliximab and stress the importance of thorough information of patients treated with tumour necrosis factor-α-inhibitors, also about the risk of serious adverse events.

  2. Network localization of neurological symptoms from focal brain lesions.

    PubMed

    Boes, Aaron D; Prasad, Sashank; Liu, Hesheng; Liu, Qi; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Caviness, Verne S; Fox, Michael D

    2015-10-01

    A traditional and widely used approach for linking neurological symptoms to specific brain regions involves identifying overlap in lesion location across patients with similar symptoms, termed lesion mapping. This approach is powerful and broadly applicable, but has limitations when symptoms do not localize to a single region or stem from dysfunction in regions connected to the lesion site rather than the site itself. A newer approach sensitive to such network effects involves functional neuroimaging of patients, but this requires specialized brain scans beyond routine clinical data, making it less versatile and difficult to apply when symptoms are rare or transient. In this article we show that the traditional approach to lesion mapping can be expanded to incorporate network effects into symptom localization without the need for specialized neuroimaging of patients. Our approach involves three steps: (i) transferring the three-dimensional volume of a brain lesion onto a reference brain; (ii) assessing the intrinsic functional connectivity of the lesion volume with the rest of the brain using normative connectome data; and (iii) overlapping lesion-associated networks to identify regions common to a clinical syndrome. We first tested our approach in peduncular hallucinosis, a syndrome of visual hallucinations following subcortical lesions long hypothesized to be due to network effects on extrastriate visual cortex. While the lesions themselves were heterogeneously distributed with little overlap in lesion location, 22 of 23 lesions were negatively correlated with extrastriate visual cortex. This network overlap was specific compared to other subcortical lesions (P < 10(-5)) and relative to other cortical regions (P < 0.01). Next, we tested for generalizability of our technique by applying it to three additional lesion syndromes: central post-stroke pain, auditory hallucinosis, and subcortical aphasia. In each syndrome, heterogeneous lesions that themselves had

  3. Neurological symptoms in individuals with fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva.

    PubMed

    Kitterman, Joseph A; Strober, Jonathan B; Kan, Lixin; Rocke, David M; Cali, Amanda; Peeper, Jeannie; Snow, Jennifer; Delai, Patricia L R; Morhart, Rolf; Pignolo, Robert J; Shore, Eileen M; Kaplan, Frederick S

    2012-12-01

    Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP), a rare, disabling condition caused by gain-of-function mutations of a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) type I receptor, leads to episodes of heterotopic ossification and resultant immobility. Neurological problems have not been associated with FOP, but neurological symptoms are commonly reported by FOP patients. To determine the prevalence of neurological symptoms and their characteristics in individuals with FOP, we conducted a survey of the 470 patient members of the International FOP Association (IFOPA) using a questionnaire about neurological symptoms. There were 168 responses (105 females, 63 males; age 1.5-68 years) from 30 countries representing 36 % of IFOPA members. Chronic neurological symptoms were reported by 86 (51 %). Prevalence of neuropathic pain (NP) was significantly increased (P < 0.001) compared to the general population, and tenfold more common in females (15 %) than males (1.6 %). Of those with NP, 94 % reported other sensory abnormalities. Prevalence of recurrent severe headaches (HA) (26 %) was similar to that in the general population, but prevalence in females with FOP (36 %) was almost fourfold greater than in males. Prevalence of NP, HA, and other sensory abnormalities was substantially higher in post-pubertal females; 33 % reported symptoms worsened during menstrual periods. Worsening of neurological symptoms during FOP flare-ups was reported by 23 %. Three patients with FOP (1.8 %) reported myoclonus, a prevalence much greater than reported in the general population (P < 0.001). Our worldwide survey indicates that neurological symptoms are common in FOP. We speculate that these symptoms are related to effects of dysregulated BMP signaling on the central and/or peripheral nervous systems.

  4. Neurological symptoms among dental assistants: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Moen, BE; Hollund, BE; Riise, T

    2008-01-01

    Background Dental assistants help the dentist in preparing material for filling teeth. Amalgam was the filling material mostly commonly used in Norway before 1980, and declined to about 5% of all fillings in 2005. Amalgam is usually an alloy of silver, copper, tin and mercury. Copper amalgam, giving particularly high exposure to mercury was used in Norway until 1994. Metallic mercury is neurotoxic. Few studies of the health of dental assistants exist, despite their exposure to mercury. There are questions about the existence of possible chronic neurological symptoms today within this working group, due to this exposure. The aim of this study was to compare the occurrence of neurological symptoms among dental assistants likely to be exposed to mercury from work with dental filling material, compared to similar health personnel with no such exposure. Methods All dental assistants still at work and born before 1970 registered in the archives of a trade union in Hordaland county of Norway were invited to participate (response rate 68%, n = 41), as well as a similar number of randomly selected assistant nurses (response rate 87%, n = 64) in the same age group. The participants completed a self-administered, mailed questionnaire, with questions about demographic variables, life-style factors, musculoskeletal, neurological and psychosomatic symptoms (Euroquest). Results The dental assistants reported significant higher occurrence of neurological symptoms; psychosomatic symptoms, problems with memory, concentration, fatigue and sleep disturbance, but not for mood. This was found by analyses of variance, adjusting for age, education, alcohol consumption, smoking and personality traits. For each specific neurological symptom, adjusted logistic regression analyses were performed, showing that these symptoms were mainly from arms, hands, legs and balance organs. Conclusion There is a possibility that the higher occurrence of neurological symptoms among the dental assistants

  5. [Symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder in neurological diseases].

    PubMed

    Kutlubaev, M A

    2016-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a common form of neurosis. Symptoms of OCD could develop as a sign of focal brain lesion, particularly in multiple sclerosis, extrapyramidal disorders, epilepsy, less frequently - in other diseases. Timely diagnosis and treatment of the symptoms of OCD is an important aspect in the management of mentioned neurological disorders. PMID:27240053

  6. A man with worsening gastrointestinal and neurologic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Irving, David

    2016-08-01

    A Coast Guardsman deployed to a remote island in the Bahamas contacted his primary care office about worsening gastrointestinal and neurologic complaints. This article describes the telemedicine consultation to determine the cause of his symptoms, whether he needed emergency evacuation, and how treatment was handled. PMID:27467293

  7. A man with worsening gastrointestinal and neurologic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Irving, David

    2016-08-01

    A Coast Guardsman deployed to a remote island in the Bahamas contacted his primary care office about worsening gastrointestinal and neurologic complaints. This article describes the telemedicine consultation to determine the cause of his symptoms, whether he needed emergency evacuation, and how treatment was handled.

  8. First Rank Symptoms and Neurological Soft Signs in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Hembram, Mahesh; Simlai, Jayati; Chaudhury, Suprakash; Biswas, Parthasarathi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the neurological soft signs (NSS) in schizophrenia patients with and without first rank symptoms (FRS), their first degree relatives (FDR), and normal controls. The study was conducted on 60 schizophrenia patients diagnosed according to ICD 10 DCR and categorized into groups with and without FRS using Schedules for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry, 30 FDRs of the study sample, and 30 normal controls matched for age, education, and handedness. All the subjects gave written informed consent. Scale for the Assessment of Positive Symptoms and Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms were applied to have a comprehensive assessment of the symptoms. NSS were assessed using Extended Standard Neurological Assessment Instrument. The correlations between NSS and clinical symptoms were relatively modest but significant. There was a weak relation between NSS and positive symptom severity. The FDR of schizophrenia patients had significantly lower NSS scores than schizophrenia patients, but only FDR of schizophrenia patients without FRS had significantly higher scores than normal controls. Our results indicate that NSS are more prominent in schizophrenia patients with negative symptoms and support the theory of NSS being a trait marker of schizophrenia particularly in those without FRS. PMID:24701561

  9. [The complex of neurological symptoms of substance abuse].

    PubMed

    Litvintsev, B S; Odinak, M M; Litvinenko, I V; Goncharenko, A Yu; Petrov, A D; Kovalenko, A P

    2015-08-01

    Standard neurological examination was performed in 85 patients of military service age (the average age was 32,6±5,3 years - from 19 to 44 years) with a confirmed diagnosis of substance abuse, caused by the use of narcotic drugs and psychotropic substances: cocaine and amphetamine in 12 patients, opioids - in 73 patienls. Some symptoms of nervous system damage had statistically characteristic peculiarities for different forms of substance abuse. Mydriasis, signs a bilateral pyramidal insufficiency, hyperkinetic disorder are often characteristic for cocaine and amphetamine abuse. Opioid abuse is characterised by more severe symptoms of nervous system damage, disseminated neurologic symptomatic and polyneurotic disorders. Symptoms of neurasthenia and vegetative-vascular dystonia, which are usually accompanied by the; symptoms of organic lesions of the central and peripheral nervous system, were observed in all patients with substance abuse. In order to detect the symptoms of nervous system damage in patients, which are supposed to be conscribe, it is necessary to take medical history. PMID:26829868

  10. [The complex of neurological symptoms of substance abuse].

    PubMed

    Litvintsev, B S; Odinak, M M; Litvinenko, I V; Goncharenko, A Yu; Petrov, A D; Kovalenko, A P

    2015-08-01

    Standard neurological examination was performed in 85 patients of military service age (the average age was 32,6±5,3 years - from 19 to 44 years) with a confirmed diagnosis of substance abuse, caused by the use of narcotic drugs and psychotropic substances: cocaine and amphetamine in 12 patients, opioids - in 73 patienls. Some symptoms of nervous system damage had statistically characteristic peculiarities for different forms of substance abuse. Mydriasis, signs a bilateral pyramidal insufficiency, hyperkinetic disorder are often characteristic for cocaine and amphetamine abuse. Opioid abuse is characterised by more severe symptoms of nervous system damage, disseminated neurologic symptomatic and polyneurotic disorders. Symptoms of neurasthenia and vegetative-vascular dystonia, which are usually accompanied by the; symptoms of organic lesions of the central and peripheral nervous system, were observed in all patients with substance abuse. In order to detect the symptoms of nervous system damage in patients, which are supposed to be conscribe, it is necessary to take medical history.

  11. Increase in ECHOvirus 6 infections associated with neurological symptoms in the Netherlands, June to August 2016

    PubMed Central

    Benschop, Kimberley SM; Geeraedts, Felix; Beuvink, Barbara; Spit, Silke A; Fanoy, Ewout B; Claas, Eric CJ; Pas, Suzan D; Schuurman, Rob; Verweij, Jaco J; Bruisten, Sylvia M; Wolthers, Katja C; Niesters, Hubert GM; Koopmans, Marion; Duizer, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    The Dutch virus-typing network VIRO-TypeNed reported an increase in ECHOvirus 6 (E-6) infections with neurological symptoms in the Netherlands between June and August 2016. Of the 31 cases detected from January through August 2016, 15 presented with neurological symptoms. Ten of 15 neurological cases were detected in the same province and the identified viruses were genetically related. This report is to alert medical and public health professionals of the circulation of E-6 associated with neurological symptoms. PMID:27719751

  12. A neuropsychological comparison of siblings with neurological versus hepatic symptoms of Wilson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Arguedas, Deborah; Stewart, Jeanette; Hodgkinson, Suzanne; Batchelor, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Wilson's Disease (WD) (also known as hepatolenticular degeneration) is a rare inherited autosomal recessive disorder of abnormal copper metabolism, with an estimated prevalence of approximately 1 in 30,000. The clinical features associated with WD are highly varied. However, subtypes generally reflect neurological, hepatic, and psychiatric symptoms. The present case study reports two brothers with a recent diagnosis of WD. Neurological symptoms and cognitive deficits were exhibited in one brother (BL) in the form of extrapyramidal features, while the other brother (AL) only exhibited hepatic symptoms. Extensive neuropsychological testing was conducted on both siblings to compare cognitive profiles. Results for BL indicated significantly impaired motor functioning and information processing speed, which impacted him significantly at school. Aspects of executive dysfunction were also apparent in addition to reduced visual and verbal memory, working memory, and attention. Results for AL revealed evidence of verbal memory difficulties and aspects of executive dysfunction. Comparison is made of the distinct and common cognitive characteristics of the cases presented in terms of implications for early intervention and management of cognitive difficulties.

  13. Possible neurologic effects of aspartame, a widely used food additive.

    PubMed

    Maher, T J; Wurtman, R J

    1987-11-01

    The artificial sweetener aspartame (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanyl-methyl ester), is consumed, primarily in beverages, by a very large number of Americans, causing significant elevations in plasma and, probably, brain phenylalanine levels. Anecdotal reports suggest that some people suffer neurologic or behavioral reactions in association with aspartame consumption. Since phenylalanine can be neurotoxic and can affect the synthesis of inhibitory monoamine neurotransmitters, the phenylalanine in aspartame could conceiveably mediate neurologic effects. If mice are given aspartame in doses that elevate plasma phenylalanine levels more than those of tyrosine (which probably occurs after any aspartame dose in humans), the frequency of seizures following the administration of an epileptogenic drug, pentylenetetrazole, is enhanced. This effect is simulated by equimolar phenylalanine and blocked by concurrent administration of valine, which blocks phenylalanine's entry into the brain. Aspartame also potentiates the induction of seizures by inhaled fluorothyl or by electroconvulsive shock. Perhaps regulations concerning the sale of food additives should be modified to require the reporting of adverse reactions and the continuing conduct of mandated safety research.

  14. Solving the conundrum of Job: a probable biblical description of chronic renal failure with neurological symptoms.

    PubMed

    Resende, Luiz Antonio de Lima; Kirchner, Daniel Rocco; Ruiz e Resende, Lucilene Silva

    2009-06-01

    The disease described in the Bible's Book of Job is controversial and had been of interest of theologists, psychiatrists, and dermatologists for many years. We describe several signs and symptoms compatible with chronic renal failure with neurological alterations.

  15. Early onset of neurological symptoms in fragile X premutation carriers exposed to neurotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Ripon; Pessah, Isaac N.; Gane, Louise; Ono, Michele; Hagerman, Paul J.; Brunberg, James A.; Tassone, Flora; Bourgeois, James A.; Adams, Patrick E.; Nguyen, Danh V.; Hagerman, Randi

    2014-01-01

    We present four cases of fragile X premutation carriers with early neurological symptoms, including symptoms consistent with multiple sclerosis (MS) and fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS). Each patient had significant exposure to one or more environmental neurotoxicants that have documented neurotoxicity (i.e. hexachlorocyclopentadiene or C56, Agent Orange, and 2,4- or 2,6-toluene diisocyanate and dichlormate). We hypothesize that premutation carriers are a vulnerable group to neurotoxins because elevated mRNA in the premutation can lead to early cell death and brain disease, leading to neuropsychiatric and neurological symptoms consistent with FXTAS. PMID:20466021

  16. Early onset of neurological symptoms in fragile X premutation carriers exposed to neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Paul, Ripon; Pessah, Isaac N; Gane, Louise; Ono, Michele; Hagerman, Paul J; Brunberg, James A; Tassone, Flora; Bourgeois, James A; Adams, Patrick E; Nguyen, Danh V; Hagerman, Randi

    2010-08-01

    We present four cases of fragile X premutation carriers with early neurological symptoms, including symptoms consistent with multiple sclerosis (MS) and fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS). Each patient had significant exposure to one or more environmental neurotoxicants that have documented neurotoxicity (i.e. hexachlorocyclopentadiene or C56, Agent Orange, and 2,4- or 2,6-toluene diisocyanate and dichlormate). We hypothesize that premutation carriers are a vulnerable group to neurotoxins because elevated mRNA in the premutation can lead to early cell death and brain disease, leading to neuropsychiatric and neurological symptoms consistent with FXTAS. PMID:20466021

  17. Smell or taste disturbances, neurological symptoms, and hydrocarbon exposure.

    PubMed

    Hotz, P; Tschopp, A; Söderström, D; Holtz, J; Boillat, M A; Gutzwiller, F

    1992-01-01

    A total of 264 workers participated in a cross-sectional study concerning the toxicity of hydrocarbons. The clinical examination shows an increased prevalence of smell and/or taste disturbances in the heavily exposed group. These symptoms appear to be generally transitory and reversible. They seem to be due to concentration peaks rather than to a long exposure duration. They are associated with acute depressor effects and not with symptoms which could belong to a hydrocarbon-induced chronic toxic encephalopathy. PMID:1587626

  18. [Neurological Signs and Symptoms of True Neurogenic Thoracic Outlet Syndrome].

    PubMed

    Higashihara, Mana; Konoeda, Fumie; Sonoo, Masahiro

    2016-05-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a well-known disorder, but many aspects of its pathology, including its definition, has been disputed. True neurogenic TOS (TN-TOS) is a rare but well-defined clinical condition. TN-TOS results from the compression of the C8/T1 roots (dominant for the T1 root) or the proximal lower trunk of the brachial plexus by a fibrous band. The band extends from the first rib to either the tip of an elongated C7 transverse process or a rudimentary cervical rib. The most common presenting symptoms of TN-TOS are insidious-onset atrophy and weakness of the intrinsic hand muscles, predominantly in the thenar eminence and radial digit flexors. Nerve conduction studies demonstrate pathognomonic findings: severely attenuated compound muscle action potential of the abductor pollicis brevis muscle, and usually, loss of the sensory nerve action potential of the medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve. Numbness and sensory loss are typically observed, mainly in the medial forearm, although they are usually mild, and may be absent in some patients. Severe pain or paresthesia proximal to the elbow is not observed. The classical concept of TOS underlie nonspecific neurogenic TOS. It has been primarily diagnosed using provocative maneuvers. However, there is controversy regarding its pathological conceptualization and existence, as objective evidence of the disease is still lacking. PMID:27156505

  19. Neurologic Symptoms Associated With Cattle Farming in the Agricultural Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Vegosen, Leora; Davis, Meghan F.; Silbergeld, Ellen; Breysse, Patrick N.; Agnew, Jacqueline; Gray, Gregory; Freeman, Laura Beane; Kamel, Freya

    2013-01-01

    Objective Infection with Campylobacter jejuni, a bacterium carried by poultry and livestock, is the most frequently identified antecedent to the autoimmune neurologic condition Guillain-Barré Syndrome. We used Agricultural Health Study data to assess whether cattle farming was associated with prevalence of neurologic symptoms. Methods Prevalence of self-reported symptoms in cattle farmers (n = 8878) was compared with farmers who did not work with animals (n = 7462), using multivariate regression. Results Prevalence of numbness and weakness were increased for beef and dairy farmers compared with the reference group (P < 0.0001). Of cattle farmers, 48% did not report raising other animal species, and prevalence of numbness and weakness were also increased in this subgroup compared with the reference group (P < 0.02). Conclusions Occupational exposure to cattle was associated with increased prevalence of self-reported symptoms associated with peripheral neuropathy. PMID:22975665

  20. Pseudomigraine with temporary neurological symptoms and lymphocytic pleocytosis. A report of 50 cases.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Aranda, F; Cañadillas, F; Martí-Massó, J F; Díez-Tejedor, E; Serrano, P J; Leira, R; Gracia, M; Pascual, J

    1997-07-01

    This is the first large series, comprising 50 patients who suffered a total of 164 episodes, of pseudomigraine with temporary neurological symptoms and lymphocytic pleocytosis (PMP syndrome). Onset of PMP was between the ages of 14 and 39 years and was most frequent in males (68%). Eight males (24%) and five females (31%) had a personal history of migraine. One-quarter had had a viral-like illness up to 3 weeks prior to the onset of the syndrome. The clinical picture consisted of one to 12 episodes of changing variable neurological deficits accompanied by moderate-to-severe headache and occasionally fever. The headaches were described as predominantly throbbing and bilateral with variable duration (mean, 19 h). The mean duration of the transient neurological deficits was 5 h. Sensory symptoms were most common (78% of episodes), followed by aphasic (66%) and motor (56%) symptoms. Visual symptoms appeared in only 12% of episodes. The most frequent combinations were motor aphasia plus sensory and motor right hemibody symptoms (19% of episodes), motor aphasia plus right sensory symptoms (10%) and isolated right (9%) or left (9%) sensory symptoms. All patients were asymptomatic between episodes and following the symptomatic period (maximum duration 49 days). Lymphocytic pleocytosis ranged from 10 to 760 lymphocytic cells/mm3 CSF (mean, 199). In CSF, protein was increased in 96% of patients, IgG was normal in 80% of cases and oligoclonal bands were not found. Adensoine deaminase values were slightly above normal in two out of 16 patients tested. Extensive microbiological determinations, including viral HIV and borrelia serologies, were negative. Brain CT and MRI were always within normal limits, while EEG frequently showed focal slowing. Conventional cranial angiography was performed on 12 patients. In only one were there abnormalities suggestive of localized vascular inflammation, coincident with the focal neurological symptoms. Two patients developed PMP symptoms

  1. Cognitive-analytical therapy for a patient with functional neurological symptom disorder-conversion disorder (psychogenic myopia): A case study.

    PubMed

    Nasiri, Hamid; Ebrahimi, Amrollah; Zahed, Arash; Arab, Mostafa; Samouei, Rahele

    2015-05-01

    Functional neurological symptom disorder commonly presents with symptoms and defects of sensory and motor functions. Therefore, it is often mistaken for a medical condition. It is well known that functional neurological symptom disorder more often caused by psychological factors. There are three main approaches namely analytical, cognitive and biological to manage conversion disorder. Any of such approaches can be applied through short-term treatment programs. In this case, study a 12-year-old boy with the diagnosed functional neurological symptom disorder (psychogenic myopia) was put under a cognitive-analytical treatment. The outcome of this treatment modality was proved successful.

  2. Cognitive-analytical therapy for a patient with functional neurological symptom disorder-conversion disorder (psychogenic myopia): A case study

    PubMed Central

    Nasiri, Hamid; Ebrahimi, Amrollah; Zahed, Arash; Arab, Mostafa; Samouei, Rahele

    2015-01-01

    Functional neurological symptom disorder commonly presents with symptoms and defects of sensory and motor functions. Therefore, it is often mistaken for a medical condition. It is well known that functional neurological symptom disorder more often caused by psychological factors. There are three main approaches namely analytical, cognitive and biological to manage conversion disorder. Any of such approaches can be applied through short-term treatment programs. In this case, study a 12-year-old boy with the diagnosed functional neurological symptom disorder (psychogenic myopia) was put under a cognitive-analytical treatment. The outcome of this treatment modality was proved successful. PMID:26487881

  3. Analysis of neurologic symptoms in deep diving: implications for selection of divers.

    PubMed

    Todnem, K; Nyland, H; Riise, T; Kambestad, B K; Vaernes, R; Hjelle, J O; Svihus, R; Aarli, J A

    1990-03-01

    Eighteen professional divers (age range 24-33 yr, mean 28.3) participated in one simulated dive to 360 meters of seawater (msw) in a helium-oxygen (heliox) atmosphere with equal compression and decompression profiles. All divers were given an extensive neurologic examination before diving. Clinical neurologic symptoms observed during the dives were equilibrium disorder, sleep disturbances, fatigue, nausea, loose stools, stomach pain, tremor, mental disturbances, reduced appetite, and headache. Symptoms were scored individually by each diver. The symptoms were analyzed statistically by factor analysis, which grouped them into four factors. These symptoms are presumably related to functional disturbances in the brain stem and the cerebellum. Factor 3 symptoms (tremor, mental disturbances, reduced appetite) correlated significantly to a history of predive decompression sickness (P = 0.006) and to cerebral concussion (P = 0.023). Three divers were periodically unable to work at bottom due to equilibrium disorder, diarrhea, or nausea. One diver with mild polyneuropathy and slight cerebral atrophy as seen by computerized tomography and another diver with abnormal electroencephalography were periodically unable to work due to equilibrium disorder and nausea, respectively. We advocate that divers with signs of central or peripheral nervous system dysfunction should not be selected for deep diving.

  4. Brain magnetic resonance imaging screening is not useful for HIV-1-infected patients without neurological symptoms.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Takeshi; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Teruya, Katsuji; Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Kikuchi, Yoshimi; Hasuo, Kanehiro; Oka, Shinichi

    2014-10-01

    We investigated the diagnostic usefulness of brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) screening in HIV-1-infected patients without neurological symptoms in detecting intracranial diseases at early stages. In this retrospective analysis, the study patients were HIV-1-infected patients who underwent brain MRI scan in clinical practice between 2001 and 2013. We excluded patients with MRI for (1) follow-up examination for prediagnosed intracranial diseases, (2) cancer staging, (3) screening mycobacterium/bacteria/fungi disease proliferation in the brain, and (4) evaluation for meningitis/encephalitis. The study patients (n=485) were classified into two groups: those who underwent brain MRI scan without any neurological symptoms/signs (asymptomatic patients, n=158) and those who underwent MRI due to such symptoms (symptomatic patients, n=327). Asymptomatic patients had lower CD4 counts than symptomatic patients (median 78 versus 241/μl). Intracranial diseases were detected in three (2%) of the asymptomatic patients [two toxoplasmosis and one progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML)] compared to 58 (19%) of the symptomatic patients (the χ(2) test, p<0.01). The latter included toxoplasmosis (n=10), PML (n=7), cytomegalovirus encephalitis (n=3), primary central nervous system lymphoma (n=3), cryptococcoma/meningitis (n=3), and HIV-associated dementia (n=17). Among symptomatic patients, intracranial diseases were common in those with slurred speech (3/6, 50%), seizure (4/10, 40%), eyesight/vision abnormality (5/16, 31%), altered mental status (8/31, 26%), and hemiplegia/numbness (13/50, 26%). For patients with CD4 count <200/μl, intracranial diseases were detected in only 3 (3%) of 144 asymptomatic patients, compared with 46 (32%) of 113 symptomatic patients (p<0.01). Brain MRI screening for HIV-1-infected patients without neurological symptoms is of little value.

  5. [A study of trientine therapy in Wilson's disease with neurological symptoms].

    PubMed

    Suda, M; Kubota, J; Yamaguchi, Y; Fujioka, Y; Saito, Y; Aoki, T

    1993-09-01

    D-penicillamine, an orally-administered chelating agent, is effective for Wilson's disease (WD). However 25% of WD patients showed serious adverse reactions to D-penicillamine cause this drug to be discontinued after months or years of treatment. For these cases, trientine-2HCl and trientine-4HCl, less toxic agents, are investigated. Three patients with WD, associated with neurological symptoms, were given either trientine-2HCl or trientine-4HCl. These patients had been on therapy with D-penicillamine. Severe adverse reactions had developed during the course of therapy, and D-penicillamine was discontinued, pancytopenia in case 1, nephrotic syndrome in case 2, and myasthenia gravis in case 3. Trientine-2HCl for case 1, and trientine-4HCl for cases 2 and 3 were instituted and continued. The neurological findings in all patients were extremely improved without side effects by trientine therapy. Though the chelating action on copper is weaker than that of D-penicillamine, it is efficient in improvement of the clinical neurological symptoms.

  6. Pesticide illness, farm practices, and neurological symptoms among farm residents in Colorado.

    PubMed

    Stallones, Lorann; Beseler, Cheryl

    2002-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the association between pesticides and neurological symptoms among a population exposed to organophosphate chemicals as a result of agricultural use. Chronic sequelae of acute pesticide poisoning from organophosphate compounds include a variety of neurological symptoms including restlessness, irritability, and trouble sleeping. Individuals who have had an acute pesticide poisoning have been reported to suffer a wide range of neurological symptoms that occur from weeks to months after the initial episode. Data for this study came from a cross-sectional survey of farmers and their spouses conducted in an eight-county area in north-eastern Colorado. Neurological characteristics were assessed to determine their relationship with previously reported pesticide-related illnesses. Symptoms that were significantly associated with a previous poisoning were difficulty concentrating [OR 2.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.22, 3.50]; relatives noticing person had trouble remembering things (OR 2.54, 95% CI 1.47, 4.39); making notes to remember things (OR 2.18, 95% CI 1.20, 3.97); finding it hard to understand the meaning of newspapers, magazines, and books (OR 1.90, 95% CI 1.01, 3.60); felt irritable (OR 1.84, 95% CI 1.08, 3.12); felt depressed (OR 2.82, 95% CI 1.65, 4.81); had heart palpitations without exertion (OR 2.83, 95% CI 1.22, 6.54); sleeping more than usual (OR 3.58, 95% CI 1.95, 6.58); difficulty moving fingers or grasping things (OR 2.08, 95% CI 1.06, 3.24); and headaches at least once a week (OR 1.85, 95% CI 1.06, 3.24). Stepwise regression was used to identify the best explanatory model of pesticide-related illness. Variables that were associated with increased odds of illness were being male, being depressed, sleeping too much, and using crop organophosphates.

  7. Functional Neurological Symptom Disorder: Mismanagement, Misdiagnosis, Chronic Cough Following Sexual Abuse: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    BIDAKI, Reza; ZAREPUR, Ehsan; AKRAMI, Maryam; Mohammad, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objective Conversion disorder (CD) is a mental disorder in which patient displays neurological symptoms such as blindness, mutism, paralysis and seizure. It starts when our mind converts our mental stress into a physical symptom. A 15-year-old single white female with chronic cough, which had begun 5 months ago, was brought to our clinic. She had no history of hospitalization. His daily cough was without sputum production or fever, rhinorrhea and stopped during sleep. There was no recent exposure to tobacco smoke or a person with a chronic productive cough. Laboratory tests were normal. She had engaged 4 months ago. Doing sex during engagement is prohibited in her culture but and had anal sex, because of her spouse’s trend. Psychotherapy was done and complete recovery was accomplished. PMID:27247590

  8. Functional Neurological Symptom Disorder: Mismanagement, Misdiagnosis, Chronic Cough Following Sexual Abuse: A Rare Case Report.

    PubMed

    Bidaki, Reza; Zarepur, Ehsan; Akrami, Maryam; Mohammad, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objective Conversion disorder (CD) is a mental disorder in which patient displays neurological symptoms such as blindness, mutism, paralysis and seizure. It starts when our mind converts our mental stress into a physical symptom. A 15-year-old single white female with chronic cough, which had begun 5 months ago, was brought to our clinic. She had no history of hospitalization. His daily cough was without sputum production or fever, rhinorrhea and stopped during sleep. There was no recent exposure to tobacco smoke or a person with a chronic productive cough. Laboratory tests were normal. She had engaged 4 months ago. Doing sex during engagement is prohibited in her culture but and had anal sex, because of her spouse's trend. Psychotherapy was done and complete recovery was accomplished. PMID:27247590

  9. Two Cases of Legionella pneumophila Pneumonia with Prolonged Neurologic Symptoms and Brain Hypoperfusion on Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Hiromitsu; Yamazaki, Susumu; Miura, You; Seto, Akira; Kanazawa, Minoru; Nagata, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral and cerebellar symptoms are frequently associated with Legionnaires' disease. However, corresponding brain lesions are difficult to demonstrate using either computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We report here two patients with Legionella pneumophila pneumonia accompanied by prolonged neurologic symptoms. In contrast to brain CT and MRI, which failed to detect any abnormalities, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) showed multiple sites of hypoperfusion within the brains of both patients. These cases suggest that vasculopathy, which is detectable by SPECT, might be one of the causes of neurologic symptoms in patients with Legionnaires' disease. PMID:27478660

  10. Two Cases of Legionella pneumophila Pneumonia with Prolonged Neurologic Symptoms and Brain Hypoperfusion on Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Miura, You; Seto, Akira; Kanazawa, Minoru; Nagata, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral and cerebellar symptoms are frequently associated with Legionnaires' disease. However, corresponding brain lesions are difficult to demonstrate using either computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We report here two patients with Legionella pneumophila pneumonia accompanied by prolonged neurologic symptoms. In contrast to brain CT and MRI, which failed to detect any abnormalities, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) showed multiple sites of hypoperfusion within the brains of both patients. These cases suggest that vasculopathy, which is detectable by SPECT, might be one of the causes of neurologic symptoms in patients with Legionnaires' disease. PMID:27478660

  11. Mast cell activation disease: An underappreciated cause of neurologic and psychiatric symptoms and diseases.

    PubMed

    Afrin, Lawrence B; Pöhlau, Dieter; Raithel, Martin; Haenisch, Britta; Dumoulin, Franz L; Homann, Juergen; Mauer, Uwe M; Harzer, Sabrina; Molderings, Gerhard J

    2015-11-01

    Neurologists and psychiatrists frequently encounter patients whose central and/or peripheral neurologic and/or psychiatric symptoms (NPS) are accompanied by other symptoms for which investigation finds no unifying cause and for which empiric therapy often provides little to no benefit. Systemic mast cell activation disease (MCAD) has rarely been considered in the differential diagnosis in such situations. Traditionally, MCAD has been considered as just one rare (neoplastic) disease, mastocytosis, generally focusing on the mast cell (MC) mediators tryptase and histamine and the suggestive, blatant symptoms of flushing and anaphylaxis. Recently another form of MCAD, MC activation syndrome (MC), has been recognized, featuring inappropriate MC activation with little to no neoplasia and likely much more heterogeneously clonal and far more prevalent than mastocytosis. There also has developed greater appreciation for the truly very large menagerie of MC mediators and their complex patterns of release, engendering complex, nebulous presentations of chronic and acute illness best characterized as multisystem polymorbidity of generally inflammatory ± allergic themes--including very wide arrays of central and peripheral NPS. Significantly helpful treatment--including for neuropsychiatric issues--usually can be identified once MCAD is accurately diagnosed. We describe MCAD's pathogenesis, presentation (focusing on NPS), and therapy, especially vis-à-vis neuropsychotropes. Since MCAD patients often present NPS, neurologists and psychiatrists have the opportunity, in recognizing the diagnostic possibility of MCAD, to short-circuit the often decades-long delay in establishing the correct diagnosis required to identify optimal therapy.

  12. Lumbar Puncture in HIV-Infected Patients with Syphilis and No Neurologic Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Khalil G.; Moore, Richard D.; Rompalo, Anne M.; Erbelding, Emily J.; Zenilman, Jonathan M.; Gebo, Kelly A.

    2009-01-01

    Background The decision to perform lumbar puncture in patients with asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and syphilis is controversial. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend certain criteria that warrant lumbar puncture. Here, we assess the performance of these criteria for detecting asymptomatic neurosyphilis (ANS). Methods Eligible subjects consisted of all patients with concurrent HIV infection and syphilis in a prospective clinical cohort who had no neurologic symptoms at the time of lumbar puncture. We retrospectively applied different stratification criteria to calculate the performance of lumbar puncture in detecting ANS: (1) lumbar puncture in patients with late latent syphilis or syphilis of an unknown duration, regardless of the CD4 cell count or rapid plasma reagin titer; (2) lumbar puncture if the CD4 cell count was ≤350 cells/mL and/or the rapid plasma reagin titer was ≥1:32, regardless of the syphilis stage; and (3) lumbar puncture in the context of serologic nonresponse to syphilis therapy. Results Two hundred two of 231 patients with syphilis did not have neurologic symptoms. Immediate lumbar puncture was performed for 46 patients, and 10 cases (22%) of ANS were detected. With use of the first criterion, 2 (14%) of 10 cases of ANS in patients with early-stage syphilis would have been missed (sensitivity, 80% [95% confidence interval {CI}, 44%–97%]; specificity, 76% [95% CI, 60%–89%]). Criterion 2 would not have missed any cases of ANS (sensitivity, 100% [95% CI, 70%–100%]; specificity, 87% [95% CI, 72%–96%]) but would have required that a lumbar puncture be performed for 88% of patients. Performance of lumbar puncture performed in 13 cases based on serologic nonresponse to syphilis therapy yielded 4 cases (31%) of ANS. Conclusions In patients with concurrent HIV infection and syphilis, the use of criteria based on rapid plasma reagin titer and CD4 cell count, instead of stage-based criteria

  13. Non-Focal Neurological Symptoms Associated with Classical Presentations of Transient Ischaemic Attack: Qualitative Analysis of Interviews with Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Susan; Locock, Louise; Giles, Matthew F.; Lasserson, Daniel S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Improving the recognition of transient ischaemic attack (TIA) at initial healthcare contact is essential as urgent specialist assessment and treatment reduces stroke risk. Accurate TIA detection could be achieved with clinical prediction rules but none have been validated in primary care. An alternative approach using qualitative analysis of patients' experiences of TIA may identify novel features of the TIA phenotype that are not detected routinely, as such techniques have revealed novel early features of other important conditions such as meningococcaemia. We sought to determine whether the patient's experience of TIA would reveal additional deficits that can be tested prospectively in cohort studies to determine their additional diagnostic and prognostic utility at the first healthcare contact. Methodology and Findings Qualitative semi-structured interviews with 25 patients who had experienced definite TIA as determined by a stroke specialist; framework analysis to map symptoms and key words or descriptive phrases used against each individual, with close attention to the detail of the language used. All interview transcripts were reviewed by a specialist clinician with experience in TIA/minor stroke. Patients described non-focal symptoms consistent with higher function deficits in spatial perception and awareness of deficit, as well as feelings of disconnection with their immediate surroundings. Of the classical features, weakness and speech disturbance were described in ways that did not meet the readily recognisable phenotype. Conclusion/Significance Analysis of patients' narrative accounts reveals a set of overlooked features of the experience of TIA which may provide additional diagnostic utility so that providers of first contact healthcare can recognise TIA more easily. Future research is required in a prospective cohort of patients presenting with transient neurological symptoms to determine how frequent these features are, what they add to

  14. Autistic Traits, ADHD Symptoms, Neurological Soft Signs and Regional Cerebral Blood Flow in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manouilenko, Irina; Pagani, Marco; Stone-Elander, Sharon; Odh, Richard; Brolin, Fredrik; Hatherly, Robert; Jacobsson, Hans; Larsson, Stig A.; Bejerot, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    The resting regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) patterns related to co-occurring symptoms such as inattention, hyperactivity, neurological soft signs and motor problems have not yet been disclosed in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). In this study thirteen adults with ASD and ten matched neurotypical controls underwent PET. The scores of rating…

  15. Small Cell Lung Cancer Patient with Profound Hyponatremia and Acute Neurological Symptoms: An Effective Treatment with Fludrocortisone

    PubMed Central

    Jaal, Jana; Jõgi, Tõnu; Altraja, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Hyponatremia is a frequent electrolyte abnormality in patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Being usually asymptomatic, hyponatremia may cause symptoms like nausea, fatigue, disorientation, headache, muscle cramps, or even seizures, particularly if severe and rapid decrease of serum sodium levels occurs. Here we report a case of SCLC patient with severe hyponatremia and acute neurological symptoms that developed 2 days after the first course of second-line chemotherapy, most probably due to the release of antidiuretic hormone (ADH, also known as arginine vasopressin) during lysis of the tumour cells. Initial treatment consisted of continuous administration of hypertonic saline that resulted in improvement of patient's neurological status. However, to obtain a persistent increase in serum sodium level, pharmacological intervention with oral fludrocortisone 0.1 mg twice daily was needed. We can therefore conclude that mineralocorticoids may be used to correct hyponatremia in SCLC patients when appropriate. PMID:26240768

  16. Facial pain. IV. A prospective study of 1052 patients with a view of: precipitating factors, associated symptoms, objective psychiatric and neurological symptoms.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, P

    1991-01-01

    In a prospective material of 1052 patients the precipitating factors, associated symptoms, psychological and neurological deficits have been examined. Mastication and talking are the most frequently occurring precipitating factors, 76% as regards Neuralgia, with typical starting difficulties. As regards Non-neuralgiform Pain 24%, with precipitation late in the masticatory process. There were trigger zones in 50% of the cases of Typical Trigeminal Neuralgia and in 9% of the patients with Non-neuralgiform Pain. In a series of cases the jaw joint is perceived as a trigger zone. Cold precipitates pain in 48%-39%. Other precipitating factors are much more rare--psychological stress in 15% of the patients with Non-neuralgiform Pain, however. "Vegetative" associated symptoms were relatively frequent, lacrimation occurred in 31% of the cases of Typical Trigeminal Neuralgia and in 20% of the cases of Non-neuralgiform Pain. Rhinorrhea and salivation were less frequent. In terms of figures migrainoid associated symptoms had no connection with vegetative associated symptoms or with pain in the eye. In 11% of the patients pain occurred most frequently during the night and in 20% the frequency of pain was the same day and night. About 1/3 of the patients with Neuralgia experienced seasonal variations. Tenderness of foramina is a symptom of no significance. Very few patients had primary sensory loss. No eye or ear symptoms have been found which may be referred to as the patho-anatomical basis of the pain. About 1/3 of the patients with Non-neuralgiform Pain had psychological symptoms whereas hardly any patients with Neuralgia had them. MMPI test performed on a small matched material showed no difference between Neuralgia and Non-neuralgiform Pain. In material B an examination has been made of the jaw joint arthrosis symptoms. A restriction of the diagnosis of arthrosis has had the effect that it must be recognized that patients with facial pain do not have the high frequency of

  17. XPC initiation codon mutation in xeroderma pigmentosum patients with and without neurological symptoms.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sikandar G; Oh, Kyu-Seon; Emmert, Steffen; Imoto, Kyoko; Tamura, Deborah; Digiovanna, John J; Shahlavi, Tala; Armstrong, Najealicka; Baker, Carl C; Neuburg, Marcy; Zalewski, Chris; Brewer, Carmen; Wiggs, Edythe; Schiffmann, Raphael; Kraemer, Kenneth H

    2009-01-01

    Two unrelated xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients, with and without neurological abnormalities, respectively, had identical defects in the XPC DNA nucleotide excision repair (NER) gene. Patient XP21BE, a 27-year-old woman, had developmental delay and early onset of sensorineural hearing loss. In contrast, patient XP329BE, a 13-year-old boy, had a normal neurological examination. Both patients had marked lentiginous hyperpigmentation and multiple skin cancers at an early age. Their cultured fibroblasts showed similar hypersensitivity to killing by UV and reduced repair of DNA photoproducts. Cells from both patients had a homozygous c.2T>G mutation in the XPC gene which changed the ATG initiation codon to arginine (AGG). Both had low levels of XPC message and no detectable XPC protein on Western blotting. There was no functional XPC activity in both as revealed by the failure of localization of XPC and other NER proteins at the sites of UV-induced DNA damage in a sensitive in vivo immunofluorescence assay. XPC cDNA containing the initiation codon mutation was functionally inactive in a post-UV host cell reactivation (HCR) assay. Microsatellite markers flanking the XPC gene showed only a small region of identity ( approximately 30kBP), indicating that the patients were not closely related. Thus, the initiation codon mutation resulted in DNA repair deficiency in cells from both patients and greatly increased cancer susceptibility. The neurological abnormalities in patient XP21BE may be related to close consanguinity and simultaneous inheritance of other recessive genes or other gene modifying effects rather than the influence of XPC gene itself. PMID:18955168

  18. Cobalamin deficiency manifested with seizures, mood oscillations, psychotic features and reversible dementia in the absence of typical neurologic and hematologic signs and symptoms: a case report.

    PubMed

    Vilibić, Maja; Jukić, Vlado; Vidović, Andelko; Brecić, Petrana

    2013-03-01

    Cobalamin deficiency is associated with a wide spectrum of hematologic, neurologic, gastroenterologic and psychiatric disorders or symptoms. We report a case of a 50-year-old man with complex partial seizures with secondary generalization, mood oscillations and psychotic symptoms alternating with confusion and reversible dementia secondary to cobalamin deficiency in the absence of typical neurologic and/or hematologic symptoms and signs. Exclusion of epilepsy, acute, atrophic or expansive lesion of central nervous system and usual etiology associated with reversible dementia (infectious diseases, an endocrine etiology and deficiency of vitamins other than cobalamin); finding of cobalamin deficiency only and complete neuropsychiatric recovery after substitution, confirmed etiology. Typical and atypical psychiatric manifestations due to cobalamin deficiency that precede neurologic and/or hematologic signs and symptoms can recover completely after adequate replacement therapy.

  19. Urgent carotid endarterectomy in patients with acute neurological ischemic events within six hours after symptoms onset.

    PubMed

    Gajin, P; Radak, Dj; Tanaskovic, S; Babic, S; Nenezic, D

    2014-06-01

    To analyze the outcome of urgent carotid endarterectomy (CEA) performed within less than six hours in patients with crescendo transient ischemic attack (TIA) and stroke in progression. From January 1998 to December 2008, 58 urgent CEAs were done for acute neurological ischemic events--46 patients with crescendo TIA and 12 patients with stroke in progression. Brain computed tomography (CT) was done prior and after the surgery. Disability level was assessed prior to and after urgent CEA using modified Rankin scale. Median follow-up was 42.1 ± 16.6 months. In the early postoperative period stroke rate was 0% for the patients in crescendo TIA group while in patients with stroke in progression group 3 patients (25%) had positive postoperative brain CT, yet neurological status significantly improved. Mid-term stroke rate was 2.2% in crescendo TIA group and 8.3% in stroke in progression group. In the early postoperative period there were no lethal outcomes, mid-term mortality was 8.3% in stroke in progression while in crescendo TIA group lethal outcomes were not observed. In conclusion, based on our results urgent CEA is a safe and effective treatment option for patients with crescendo TIA and stroke in progression with acceptable rate of postoperative complications.

  20. Findings at brain MRI in children with dengue fever and neurological symptoms.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Ruchi; Garg, Bhavya

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is a flavivirus of the genus arbovirus with four serotypes, from DEN 1 to DEN 4. There has been an increase in incidence of dengue infection in children in the tropics and subtropics. Dengue has a variable clinical presentation, with many patients being asymptomatic. Its clinical manifestations in children vary from fever and arthralgia to life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. We describe MRI findings in children with neurological involvement including dengue encephalopathy, acute hypoxic injury and dengue encephalitis. Dengue encephalopathy is usually secondary to multisystem derangement such as shock, hepatitis, coagulopathy and concurrent bacterial infection and is relatively common. Dengue encephalitis from direct neuronal invasion is rare. Nonspecific changes are seen on brain MRI in dengue infection. Clinical and laboratory findings as well as outcome do not necessarily correspond with brain MRI findings.

  1. Associations between diurnal cortisol patterns and lifestyle factors, psychotic symptoms, and neurological deficits: A longitudinal study on patients with chronic schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ho, Rainbow T H; Fong, Ted C T; Wan, Adrian H Y; Au-Yeung, Friendly S W; Chen, Eric Y H; Spiegel, David

    2016-10-01

    The present study examined the relationships between diurnal cortisol patterns and perceived stress, lifestyle factors, psychotic symptoms, neurological deficits, and daily functioning in patients with chronic schizophrenia. The participants were 149 Chinese patients with chronic schizophrenia, who provided salivary cortisol measures upon waking, before lunchtime, and before bedtime at baseline (Time 1). Self-report measures on perceived stress and lifestyle factors such as body-mass index and daily exercise span were recorded at Time 1. Diagnostic assessments on psychotic symptoms, neurological deficits, and daily functioning were made at Time 1 and Time 2 (3 months later). Latent growth modeling and path modeling analysis were performed to investigate the diurnal cortisol patterns and the relationships with the study variables, respectively. Greater perceived stress and body-mass index and less physical activity were significantly linked to reduced cortisol decline. Reduced cortisol decline at Time 1 significantly predicted greater psychotic (positive and negative) symptoms and more severe neurological deficits in motor coordination and sequencing of complex motor acts at Time 2. The present results contribute to a better understanding of the diurnal cortisol patterns among chronic schizophrenia patients and the associations with lifestyle factors, psychotic symptoms, and neurological deficits. The findings lend support to the neural diathesis-stress model and suggest that hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis may potentially mediate the effects of lifestyle factors on psychotic symptoms and neurological deficits. PMID:27359327

  2. Neurological Symptom Severity after a Recent Non-cardioembolic Stroke and Recurrent Vascular Risk

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Ho; Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Background There is a well-established relation of symptom severity with functional status and mortality after an index stroke. However, little is known about the impact of symptom severity of a recent index stroke on risk of recurrent vascular events. Methods We reviewed the dataset of a multicenter trial involving 3680 recent non-cardioembolic stroke patients aged ≥35 years and followed for 2 years. Independent associations of stroke severity (as measured by National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale [NIHSS] score) with recurrent stroke (primary outcome) and stroke/coronary heart disease (CHD)/vascular death (secondary outcome) were analyzed. NIHSS score was analyzed as a dichotomous (<4 vs. ≥4) and a continuous variable. Results Among study subjects, 550 (15%) had NIHSS scores ≥4 (overall scores ranged from 0 to 18, median score was 1 [25th to 75th percentile 0 to 2]). NIHSS was measured at a median 35 days after the index stroke. After adjusting for multiple covariates, NIHSS ≥4 was independently linked to higher risk of recurrent stroke (HR 1.37, 95% CI: 1.01–1.84) and risk of stroke/CHD/vascular death (HR 1.32, 95% CI: 1.07–1.64). Analysis of NIHSS score as a continuous variable also showed a higher risk of recurrent stroke (HR 1.06, 95% CI: 1.00–1.12) and stroke/CHD/vascular death (HR 1.05, 95% CI: 1.01–1.09) with increasing index stroke symptom severity. Conclusions Greater residual symptom severity after a recent stroke is associated with higher risk of recurrent vascular events. Future studies are needed to confirm this relationship and to clarify its underlying mechanisms. PMID:25817617

  3. Intra-Erythrocyte Infusion of Dexamethasone Reduces Neurological Symptoms in Ataxia Teleangiectasia Patients: Results of a Phase 2 Trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Ataxia Teleangiectasia [AT] is a rare neurodegenerative disease characterized by early onset ataxia, oculocutaneous teleangiectasias, immunodeficiency, recurrent infections, radiosensitivity and proneness to cancer. No therapies are available for this devastating disease. Recent observational studies in few patients showed beneficial effects of short term treatment with betamethasone. To avoid the characteristic side effects of long-term administration of steroids we developed a method for encapsulation of dexamethasone sodium phosphate (DSP) into autologous erythrocytes (EryDex) allowing slow release of dexamethasone for up to one month after dosing. Aims of the study were: the assessment of the effect of EryDex in improving neurological symptoms and adaptive behaviour of AT patients; the safety and tolerability of the therapy. Methods Twenty two patients (F:M = 1; mean age 11.2 ± 3.5) with a confirmed diagnosis of AT and a preserved or partially supported gait were enrolled for the study. The subjects underwent for six months a monthly infusion of EryDex. Ataxia was assessed by the International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale (ICARS) and the adaptive behavior by Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS). Clinical evaluations were performed at baseline and 1, 3, and 6 months. Results An improvement in ICARS (reduction of the score) was detected in the intention-to-treat (ITT) population (n = 22; p = 0.02) as well as in patients completing the study (per protocol PP) (n = 18; p = 0.01), with a mean reduction of 4 points (ITT) or 5.2 points (PP). When compared to baseline, a significant improvement were also found in VABS (increase of the score) (p < 0.0001, ITT, RMANOVA), with statistically significant increases at 3 and 6 months (p < 0.0001). A large inter-patient variability in the incorporation of DSP into erythrocytes was observed, with an evident positive effect of higher infusion dose on ICARS score decline

  4. HEALTH EFFECTS OF CHRONIC EXPOSURE TO ARSENIC VIA DRINKING WATER IN INNER MONGOLIA. III. NEUROLOGICAL SYMPTOMS AND PIN-PRICK MEASURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Health Effects of Chronic Exposure to Arsenic via Drinking Water in Inner Mongolia: III. Neurological Symptoms and Pin-prick Measures

    Yanhong Li, M.D.,Yajuan.Xia, M.D., Kegong Wu, M.D., Inner Mongolia Center For Endemic Disease Control and Research, Ling Ling He, B.S., Zhi...

  5. Relationship between Urinary N-Desmethyl-Acetamiprid and Typical Symptoms including Neurological Findings: A Prevalence Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Marfo, Jemima Tiwaa; Fujioka, Kazutoshi; Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Nakayama, Shouta M M; Mizukawa, Hazuki; Aoyama, Yoshiko; Ishizuka, Mayumi; Taira, Kumiko

    2015-01-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides are nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists used worldwide. Their environmental health effects including neurotoxicity are of concern. We previously determined a metabolite of acetamiprid, N-desmethyl-acetamiprid in the urine of a patient, who exhibited some typical symptoms including neurological findings. We sought to investigate the association between urinary N-desmethyl-acetamiprid and the symptoms by a prevalence case-control study. Spot urine samples were collected from 35 symptomatic patients of unknown origin and 50 non-symptomatic volunteers (non-symptomatic group, NSG, 4-87 year-old). Patients with recent memory loss, finger tremor, and more than five of six symptoms (headache, general fatigue, palpitation/chest pain, abdominal pain, muscle pain/weakness/spasm, and cough) were in the typical symptomatic group (TSG, n = 19, 5-69 year-old); the rest were in the atypical symptomatic group (ASG, n = 16, 5-78 year-old). N-desmethyl-acetamiprid and six neonicotinoids in the urine were quantified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The detection of N-desmethyl-acetamiprid was the most frequent and highest in TSG (47.4%, 6.0 ppb (frequency, maximum)), followed by in ASG (12.5%, 4.4 ppb) and in NSG (6.0%, 2.2 ppb), however acetamiprid was not detected. Thiamethoxam was detected in TSG (31.6%, 1.4 ppb), in ASG (6.3%, 1.9 ppb), but not in NSG. Nitenpyram was detected in TSG (10.5%, 1.2 ppb), in ASG (6.3%, not quantified) and in NSG (2.0%, not quantified). Clothianidin was only detected in ASG (6.3%, not quantified), and in NSG (2.0%, 1.6 ppb). Thiacloprid was detected in ASG (6.3%, 0.1 ppb). The cases in TSG with detection of N-desmethyl-acetamiprid and thiamethoxam were aged 5 to 62 years and 13 to 62 years, respectively. Detection of N-desmethyl-acetamiprid was associated with increased prevalence of the symptoms (odds ratio: 14, 95% confidence interval: 3.5-57). Urinary N-desmethyl-acetamiprid can be used as a

  6. Relationship between Urinary N-Desmethyl-Acetamiprid and Typical Symptoms including Neurological Findings: A Prevalence Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Nakayama, Shouta M. M.; Mizukawa, Hazuki; Aoyama, Yoshiko; Ishizuka, Mayumi; Taira, Kumiko

    2015-01-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides are nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists used worldwide. Their environmental health effects including neurotoxicity are of concern. We previously determined a metabolite of acetamiprid, N-desmethyl-acetamiprid in the urine of a patient, who exhibited some typical symptoms including neurological findings. We sought to investigate the association between urinary N-desmethyl-acetamiprid and the symptoms by a prevalence case-control study. Spot urine samples were collected from 35 symptomatic patients of unknown origin and 50 non-symptomatic volunteers (non-symptomatic group, NSG, 4–87 year-old). Patients with recent memory loss, finger tremor, and more than five of six symptoms (headache, general fatigue, palpitation/chest pain, abdominal pain, muscle pain/weakness/spasm, and cough) were in the typical symptomatic group (TSG, n = 19, 5–69 year-old); the rest were in the atypical symptomatic group (ASG, n = 16, 5–78 year-old). N-desmethyl-acetamiprid and six neonicotinoids in the urine were quantified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The detection of N-desmethyl-acetamiprid was the most frequent and highest in TSG (47.4%, 6.0 ppb (frequency, maximum)), followed by in ASG (12.5%, 4.4 ppb) and in NSG (6.0%, 2.2 ppb), however acetamiprid was not detected. Thiamethoxam was detected in TSG (31.6%, 1.4 ppb), in ASG (6.3%, 1.9 ppb), but not in NSG. Nitenpyram was detected in TSG (10.5%, 1.2 ppb), in ASG (6.3%, not quantified) and in NSG (2.0%, not quantified). Clothianidin was only detected in ASG (6.3%, not quantified), and in NSG (2.0%, 1.6 ppb). Thiacloprid was detected in ASG (6.3%, 0.1 ppb). The cases in TSG with detection of N-desmethyl-acetamiprid and thiamethoxam were aged 5 to 62 years and 13 to 62 years, respectively. Detection of N-desmethyl-acetamiprid was associated with increased prevalence of the symptoms (odds ratio: 14, 95% confidence interval: 3.5–57). Urinary N-desmethyl-acetamiprid can be used as a

  7. Are there more bowel symptoms in children with autism compared to normal children and children with other developmental and neurological disorders?: A case control study.

    PubMed

    Smith, R A; Farnworth, H; Wright, B; Allgar, V

    2009-07-01

    There is considerable controversy as to whether there is an association between bowel disorders and autism. Using a bowel symptom questionnaire we compared 51 children with autism spectrum disorder with control groups of 35 children from special school and 112 from mainstream school. There was a significant difference in the reporting of certain bowel symptoms (constipation, diarrhoea, flatulence) and food faddiness between the autism group and the mainstream school control group. There was no significant difference between the autism group and children in the special schools except for faddiness, which is an autism specific symptom and not a bowel symptom. This study confirms previously reported findings of an increase in bowel symptoms in children with autism. It would appear, however, that this is not specifically associated with autism as bowel symptoms were reported in similar frequency to a comparison group of children with other developmental and neurological disorders.

  8. Neurological findings of Lyme disease.

    PubMed Central

    Pachner, A. R.; Steere, A. C.

    1984-01-01

    Neurologic involvement of Lyme disease typically consists of meningitis, cranial neuropathy, and radiculoneuritis, alone or in combination, lasting for months. From 1976 to 1983, we studied 38 patients with Lyme meningitis. Headache and mild neck stiffness, which fluctuated in intensity, and lymphocytic pleocytosis were the common findings. Half of the patients also had facial palsies, which were unilateral in 12 and bilateral in seven. In addition, 12 patients had motor and/or sensory radiculoneuropathies; asymmetric weakness of extremities was the most common finding. Although incomplete presentations of neurologic involvement of Lyme disease may be confused with other entities, the typical constellation of neurologic symptoms represents a unique clinical picture. PMID:6516450

  9. Contribution of temperament to eating disorder symptoms in emerging adulthood: Additive and interactive effects.

    PubMed

    Burt, Nicole M; Boddy, Lauren E; Bridgett, David J

    2015-08-01

    Temperament characteristics, such as higher negative emotionality (NE) and lower effortful control (EC), are individual difference risk factors for developmental psychopathology. Research has also noted relations between temperament and more specific manifestations of psychopathology, such as eating disorders (EDs). Although work is emerging that indicates that NE and EC may additively contribute to risk for ED symptoms, no studies have considered the interactive effects of NE and EC in relation to ED symptoms. In the current investigation, we hypothesized that (1) low EC would be associated with increased ED symptoms, (2) high NE would be associated with increased ED symptoms, and (3) these temperament traits would interact, such that the relationship between NE and ED symptoms would be strongest in the presence of low EC. After controlling for gender and child trauma history, emerging adults' (N=160) lower EC (i.e., more difficulties with self-regulation) was associated with more ED symptoms. NE did not emerge as a direct predictor of ED symptoms. However, the anticipated interaction of these temperament characteristics on ED symptoms was found. The association between NE and ED symptoms was only significant in the context of low EC. These findings provide evidence that elevated NE may only be a risk factor for the development of eating disorders when individuals also have self-regulation difficulties. The implications of these findings for research and interventions are discussed.

  10. Vitamin E Dietary Supplementation Improves Neurological Symptoms and Decreases c-Abl/p73 Activation in Niemann-Pick C Mice

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Tamara; Contreras, Pablo; Castro, Juan Francisco; Chamorro, David; Balboa, Elisa; Bosch-Morató, Mònica; Muñoz, Francisco J.; Alvarez, Alejandra R.; Zanlungo, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    Niemann-Pick C (NPC) disease is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the accumulation of free cholesterol in lysosomes. We have previously reported that oxidative stress is the main upstream stimulus activating the proapoptotic c-Abl/p73 pathway in NPC neurons. We have also observed accumulation of vitamin E in NPC lysosomes, which could lead to a potential decrease of its bioavailability. Our aim was to determine if dietary vitamin E supplementation could improve NPC disease in mice. NPC mice received an alpha-tocopherol (α-TOH) supplemented diet and neurological symptoms, survival, Purkinje cell loss, α-TOH and nitrotyrosine levels, astrogliosis, and the c-Abl/p73 pathway functions were evaluated. In addition, the effect of α-TOH on the c-Abl/p73 pathway was evaluated in an in vitro NPC neuron model. The α-TOH rich diet delayed loss of weight, improved coordination and locomotor function and increased the survival of NPC mice. We found increased Purkinje neurons and α-TOH levels and reduced astrogliosis, nitrotyrosine and phosphorylated p73 in cerebellum. A decrease of c-Abl/p73 activation was also observed in the in vitro NPC neurons treated with α-TOH. In conclusion, our results show that vitamin E can delay neurodegeneration in NPC mice and suggest that its supplementation in the diet could be useful for the treatment of NPC patients. PMID:25079853

  11. Self-reported neurological symptoms in relation to CO emissions due to problem gas appliance installations in London: a cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Croxford, Ben; Leonardi, Giovanni S; Kreis, Irene

    2008-01-01

    Background Previous research by the authors found evidence that up to 10% of particular household categories may be exposed to elevated carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations from poor quality gas appliance installations. The literature suggests certain neurological symptoms are linked to exposure to low levels of CO. This paper addresses the hypothesis that certain self-reported neurological symptoms experienced by a householder are linked to an estimate of their CO exposure. Methods Between 27 April and 27 June 2006, 597 homes with a mains supply of natural gas were surveyed, mainly in old, urban areas of London. Qualified gas engineers tested all gas appliances (cooker, boiler, gas fire, and water heater) and reported, according to the Gas Industry Unsafe Situations Procedure, appliances considered At Risk (AR), Immediately Dangerous (ID) or Not to Current Standards (NCS). Five exposure risk categories were defined based on measurement of CO emitted by the appliance, its features and its use, with "high or very high" exposure category where occupants were considered likely to be exposed to levels greater than 26 ppm for one hour. The prevalence of symptoms at each level of exposure was compared with that at lowest level of exposure. Results Of the households, 6% were assessed as having a "high or very high" risk of exposure to CO. Of the individuals, 9% reported at least one neurological symptom. There was a statistically significant association between "high or very high" exposure risk to CO and self-reported symptoms compared to "no exposure" likelihood, for households not in receipt of benefit, controlling for "number of residents" and presence of pensioners, OR = 3.23 (95%CI: 1.28, 8.15). Risk ratios across all categories of exposure likelihood indicate a dose-response pattern. Those households in receipt of benefit showed no dose-response pattern. Conclusion This study found an association between risk of CO exposure at low concentration, and prevalence of

  12. Serum TRSUT Titer ≥1: 16 Is a Predictor for Neurosyphilis Among HIV-Infected Patients With Concurrent Syphilis and No Neurological Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jian-Jun; Wang, Zhen-Yan; Shen, Jia-Yin; Shen, Yin-Zhong; Liu, Li; Wang, Jiang-Rong; Zhang, Ren-Fang; Lu, Hong-Zhou

    2015-11-01

    Investigating the predictors for lumbar puncture to diagnose the asymptomatic neurosyphilis among HIV and syphilis co-infected patients in Shanghai, China. Respectively, screening the medical records from August 1, 2009 to June 30, 2015. Those HIV-infected patients with concurrent syphilis who had received lumbar puncture were selected and their clinical and demographic data were recorded. Participants comprised symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. The latter ones could be further divided into 3 groups: late syphilis, early syphilis with anti-syphilis treatment failure, and early syphilis with serum toludine red unheated serum test (TRUST) ≥1:32. Both syphilis stage and anti-syphilis treatment effect were defined by common criteria, and syphilis of unknown duration was considered as late syphilis. Asymptomatic neurosyphilis was defined as neurosyphilis without neurological symptoms such as headache, cognitive dysfunction, motor deficits, auditory or ophthalmic abnormalities, and stroke. Neurosyphilis was defined as reactive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) TRUST and/or CSF white blood cell >20 cells/μL without other reasons. Mann-Whitney test and Fisher's exact test were used for analyzing the difference between neurosyphilis and non-neurosyphilis group. Logistic regression test was performed to analyze the risk factors for neurosyphilis. In total, 170 participants were collected, and the rate of neurosyphilis was 32.35%. Among all the 105 participants without neurological symptoms, 80 patients were with late syphilis and 25 were with early syphilis. Among the early syphilis patients, 23 had a TRUST ≥1:32 and the other 2 experienced an anti-syphilis treatment failure. The differences of clinical and demographic variables between neurosyphilis and non-neurosyphilis group were not statistically significant except the serum TRUST titer (P < 0.01). From HIV/syphilis co-infected patients with or without neurological symptom, those who had neurological symptoms, CD

  13. Occupational neurology.

    PubMed

    Feldman, R G

    1987-01-01

    The nervous system is vulnerable to the effects of certain chemicals and physical conditions found in the work environment. The activities of an occupational neurologist focus on the evaluation of patients with neurological disorders caused by occupational or environmental conditions. When one is making a differential diagnosis in patients with neurological disorders, the possibility of toxic exposure or encounters with physical factors in the workplace must not be overlooked. Central to an accurate clinical diagnosis is the patient's history. A diagnosis of an occupational or environmental neurological problem requires a careful assessment of the clinical abnormalities and confirmation of these disabilities by objective tests such as nerve conduction velocity, evoked potentials, electroencephalogram, neuropsychological batteries, or nerve biopsy. On the basis of information about hazards in the workplace, safety standards and environmental and biological monitoring can be implemented in the workplace to reduce the risks of undue injury. Clinical manifestations of headache, memory disturbance, and peripheral neuropathy are commonly encountered presentations of the effects of occupational hazards. Physicians in everyday clinical practice must be aware of the signs and symptoms associated with exposure to possible neurotoxins and work methods. Occupational and environmental circumstances must be explored when evaluating patients with neurologic disorders.

  14. [Sleep and neurological diseases].

    PubMed

    Mayer, G

    2016-06-01

    Knowledge of the physiology of sleep-wake regulation can contribute to an understanding of the pathophysiology and symptoms of neurological diseases and is helpful for initiating specific therapies for sleep-wake cycle stabilization. Based on historically important observations on the close relationship between sleep and neurological diseases, new insights and developments in selected neurological entities are presented in this review article. PMID:27167889

  15. Comparative Genomic and Phylogenetic Analysis of the First Usutu Virus Isolate from a Human Patient Presenting with Neurological Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Gaibani, Paolo; Cavrini, Francesca; Gould, Ernest A.; Rossini, Giada; Pierro, Anna; Landini, Maria Paola; Sambri, Vittorio

    2013-01-01

    Usutu virus (USUV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus, belonging to the Japanese encephalitis antigenic complex, that circulates among mosquitoes and birds. We describe and analyze the complete genome sequence of the first USUV strain isolated from an immunocompromised patient with neuroinvasive disease. This USUV isolate showed an overall nucleotide identity of 99% and 96%, respectively, with the genomes of isolates from Europe and Africa. Comparison of the human USUV complete polyprotein sequence with bird-derived strains, showed two unique amino acid substitutions. In particular, one substitution (S595G) was situated in the DIII domain of the viral Envelope protein that is recognized by flavivirus neutralizing antibodies. An additional amino acid substitution (D3425E) was identified in the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) domain of the NS5 protein. This substitution is remarkable since E3425 is highly conserved among the other USUV isolates that were not associated with human infection. However, a similar substitution was observed in Japanese encephalitis and in West Nile viruses isolated from humans. Phylogenetic analysis of the human USUV strain revealed a close relationship with an Italian strain isolated in 2009. Analysis of synonymous nucleotide substitutions (SNSs) among the different USUV genomes showed a specific evolutionary divergence among different countries. In addition, 15 SNSs were identified as unique in the human isolate. We also identified four specific nucleotide substitutions in the 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs) in the human isolate that were not present in the other USUV sequences. Our analyses provide the basis for further experimental studies aimed at defining the effective role of these mutations in the USUV genome, their potential role in the development of viral variants pathogenic for humans and their evolution and dispersal out of Africa. PMID:23741387

  16. Psychometric Properties of a Generic, Patient-Centred Palliative Care Outcome Measure of Symptom Burden for People with Progressive Long Term Neurological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei; Crosby, Vincent; Wilcock, Andrew; Burman, Rachael; Silber, Eli; Hepgul, Nilay; Chaudhuri, K Ray; Higginson, Irene J.

    2016-01-01

    Background There is no standard palliative care outcome measure for people with progressive long term neurological conditions (LTNC). This study aims to determine the psychometric properties of a new 8-item palliative care outcome scale of symptom burden (IPOS Neuro-S8) in this population. Data and Methods Data were merged from a Phase II palliative care intervention study in multiple sclerosis (MS) and a longitudinal observational study in idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (IPD), multiple system atrophy (MSA) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). The IPOS Neuro-S8 was assessed for its data quality, score distribution, ceiling and floor effects, reliability, factor structure, convergent and discriminant validity, concurrent validity with generic (Palliative care Outcome Scale) and condition specific measures (Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale; Non-motor Symptoms Questionnaire; Parkinson’s Disease Questionnaire), responsiveness and minimally clinically important difference. Results Of the 134 participants, MS patients had a mean Extended Disability Status Scale score 7.8 (SD = 1.0), patients with an IPD, MSA or PSP were in Hoehn & Yahr stage 3–5. The IPOS Neuro-S8 had high data quality (2% missing), mean score 8 (SD = 5; range 0–32), no ceiling effects, borderline floor effects, good internal consistency (Cronbach’s α = 0.7) and moderate test-retest reliability (intraclass coefficient = 0.6). The results supported a moderately correlated two-factor structure (Pearson’s r = 0.5). It was moderately correlated with generic and condition specific measures (Pearson’s r: 0.5–0.6). There was some evidence for discriminant validity in IPD, MSA and PSP (p = 0.020), and for good responsiveness and longitudinal construct validity. Conclusions IPOS Neuro-S8 shows acceptable to promising psychometric properties in common forms of progressive LTNCs. Future work needs to confirm these findings with larger samples and its usefulness in wider disease groups. PMID

  17. Patients with depression display cytokine levels in serum and cerebrospinal fluid similar to patients with diffuse neurological symptoms without a defined diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Hestad, Knut A; Engedal, Knut; Whist, Jon Elling; Aukrust, Pål; Farup, Per G; Mollnes, Tom Eirik; Ueland, Thor

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Several reports indicate that inflammation may play a role in depression and demonstrate enhanced systemic levels of inflammatory mediators. We hypothesized that 44 patients with a diagnosis of depression would present with a specific and different serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytokine profile compared to 21 patients with diffuse neurological symptoms, of whom 15 had fatigue as a major symptom, but no change in emotional state. Methods The diagnoses of the patients with depression were according to the International Classification of Diseases, tenth edition (F32–34 spectra). Cytokine profiles in serum and CSF were determined by multiplex analysis, including 27 cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors. Results No differences could be found between the two groups studied regarding cytokine levels in serum or CSF except for serum interleukin (IL)-1 receptor antagonist that was lower in the depression group. There were only four high correlations (>0.4) between serum and CSF levels of the cytokines, reflecting independent synthesis and turnover in these two compartments. In the control group, fatigue was associated with increased IL-1 receptor antagonist, IL-10, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, and interferon-γ (all P<0.01). Conclusion Patients with depression had a similar cytokine profile as nondepressive patients, both systemically and in CSF. Fatigue was associated with higher levels of some inflammatory markers in the control group. It is possible that the presence of fatigue in a large proportion of patients and controls could contribute to the lack of difference in cytokine levels between these two groups. PMID:27110115

  18. Chapter 38: American neurology.

    PubMed

    Freemon, Frank R

    2010-01-01

    The great formative event in the history of North America, the Civil War of 1861 to 1865, was the stimulus for the development of clinical neurology and the neurosciences. The first neurological research center on the continent was the US Army hospital at Turner's Lane, Philadelphia, PA. Silas Weir Mitchell and his colleagues described causalgia (reflex sympathetic dystrophy), phantom limb sensation, and Horner's syndrome (before Horner). The medical leader of the Northern army was William Hammond. After the conclusion of hostilities, he began a huge clinical practice in New York City. In the United States, clinical neurology began in private practice, unlike Europe, where neurology began in institutions. Hammond's textbook, which first used the term athetosis, was used by a generation of physicians who encountered patients with neurological signs and symptoms. Early in the 20th century, neurological institutions were formed around universities; probably the most famous was the Montreal Neurological Institute founded by Wilder Penfield. The US federal government sponsored extensive research into the function and dysfunction of the nervous system through the Neurological Institute of Neurological Diseases and Blindness, later called the National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke. The government officially classified the final 10 years of the 20th century as the Decade of the Brain and provided an even greater level of research funding. PMID:19892141

  19. Duplication of the MECP2 region is a frequent cause of severe mental retardation and progressive neurological symptoms in males.

    PubMed

    Van Esch, Hilde; Bauters, Marijke; Ignatius, Jaakko; Jansen, Mieke; Raynaud, Martine; Hollanders, Karen; Lugtenberg, Dorien; Bienvenu, Thierry; Jensen, Lars Riff; Gecz, Jozef; Moraine, Claude; Marynen, Peter; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Froyen, Guy

    2005-09-01

    Loss-of-function mutations of the MECP2 gene at Xq28 are associated with Rett syndrome in females and with syndromic and nonsyndromic forms of mental retardation (MR) in males. By array comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH), we identified a small duplication at Xq28 in a large family with a severe form of MR associated with progressive spasticity. Screening by real-time quantitation of 17 additional patients with MR who have similar phenotypes revealed three more duplications. The duplications in the four patients vary in size from 0.4 to 0.8 Mb and harbor several genes, which, for each duplication, include the MR-related L1CAM and MECP2 genes. The proximal breakpoints are located within a 250-kb region centromeric of L1CAM, whereas the distal breakpoints are located in a 300-kb interval telomeric of MECP2. The precise size and location of each duplication is different in the four patients. The duplications segregate with the disease in the families, and asymptomatic carrier females show complete skewing of X inactivation. Comparison of the clinical features in these patients and in a previously reported patient enables refinement of the genotype-phenotype correlation and strongly suggests that increased dosage of MECP2 results in the MR phenotype. Our findings demonstrate that, in humans, not only impaired or abolished gene function but also increased MeCP2 dosage causes a distinct phenotype. Moreover, duplication of the MECP2 region occurs frequently in male patients with a severe form of MR, which justifies quantitative screening of MECP2 in this group of patients.

  20. Duplication of the MECP2 Region Is a Frequent Cause of Severe Mental Retardation and Progressive Neurological Symptoms in Males

    PubMed Central

    Van Esch, Hilde ; Bauters, Marijke ; Ignatius, Jaakko ; Jansen, Mieke ; Raynaud, Martine ; Hollanders, Karen ; Lugtenberg, Dorien ; Bienvenu, Thierry ; Jensen, Lars Riff ; Gécz, Jozef ; Moraine, Claude ; Marynen, Peter ; Fryns, Jean-Pierre ; Froyen, Guy 

    2005-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations of the MECP2 gene at Xq28 are associated with Rett syndrome in females and with syndromic and nonsyndromic forms of mental retardation (MR) in males. By array comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH), we identified a small duplication at Xq28 in a large family with a severe form of MR associated with progressive spasticity. Screening by real-time quantitation of 17 additional patients with MR who have similar phenotypes revealed three more duplications. The duplications in the four patients vary in size from 0.4 to 0.8 Mb and harbor several genes, which, for each duplication, include the MR-related L1CAM and MECP2 genes. The proximal breakpoints are located within a 250-kb region centromeric of L1CAM, whereas the distal breakpoints are located in a 300-kb interval telomeric of MECP2. The precise size and location of each duplication is different in the four patients. The duplications segregate with the disease in the families, and asymptomatic carrier females show complete skewing of X inactivation. Comparison of the clinical features in these patients and in a previously reported patient enables refinement of the genotype-phenotype correlation and strongly suggests that increased dosage of MECP2 results in the MR phenotype. Our findings demonstrate that, in humans, not only impaired or abolished gene function but also increased MeCP2 dosage causes a distinct phenotype. Moreover, duplication of the MECP2 region occurs frequently in male patients with a severe form of MR, which justifies quantitative screening of MECP2 in this group of patients. PMID:16080119

  1. Individual Cytokines Modulate the Neurological Symptoms of ATM Deficiency in a Region Specific Manner1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Chin Wai

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is a multisystemic neurodegenerative disease of childhood caused by the absence of functional ATM (A-T mutated) protein. The cerebellar cortex has the most obvious neuropathology, yet cells in other brain regions are also abnormal. A-T mouse models have been produced that replicate much, though not all, of the complex A-T phenotype. Nongenetic factors, including modulations of the immune status of the animal, have also recently been found to play a role in the disease phenotype. Here we report that these modulations show both cytokine and brain region specificity. The CNS changes induced by broad-spectrum immune challenges, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injections are a complex mixture of neuroprotective (TNFα) and neurodegenerative (IL1β) cytokine responses that change over time. For example, LPS first induces a protective response in A-T neurons through activation of tissue repair genes through infiltration of monocytes with M2 phenotype, followed over time by a set of more degenerative responses. Additional phenotypic complexity arises because the neuronal response to an immune challenge is regionally variable; cerebellum and cortex differ in important ways in their patterns of cellular and biochemical changes. Tracking these changes reveals an important though not exclusive role for the MAP kinase pathway. Our findings suggest brain responses to cytokine challenges are temporally and regionally specific and that both features are altered by the absence of ATM. This implies that management of the immune status of A-T patients might have significant clinical benefit. PMID:26465009

  2. Amisulpride augmentation for clozapine-refractory positive symptoms: additional benefit in reducing hypersialorrhea.

    PubMed

    Bogorni, Fabiani; Moreira, Frederico Fernandes; Pimentel, Eduardo Mylius; Grohs, Géder Evandro Motta; Diaz, Alexandre Paim

    2015-01-01

    One-third to half of patients taking clozapine suffer from refractory symptoms despite adequate treatment. Among other adverse effects, clozapine-induced hypersalivation (CIH) occurs in approximately half of all patients. This is a case of a 30-year-old male with refractory schizophrenia; in this patient, the remission of residual positive symptoms, as well as the reduction of CIH, was achieved by treatment with clozapine augmented with amisulpride.

  3. Neurology issues in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hüfner, Katharina; Frajo-Apor, Beatrice; Hofer, Alex

    2015-05-01

    Schizophrenia ranks among the leading causes of disability worldwide. The presence of neurological signs co-occurring with the psychiatric symptoms is indicative of an organic brain pathology. In the present article, we review the current literature on neurology issues in schizophrenia. Firstly, common neurological signs found in patients with schizophrenia (neurological soft signs and smell abnormalities) and their association with imaging findings are reviewed. Secondly, the significant association of schizophrenia with epilepsy and stroke is described as well as the absent association with other organic brain diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Thirdly, we discuss the potential role of NMDA receptor antibodies in schizophrenia. Fourthly, neurological side effects of antipsychotic drugs and their treatment are reviewed; and lastly, we discuss neurocognitive deficits in patients with schizophrenia and their treatment. The focus of the review remains on articles with relevance to the clinician. PMID:25773225

  4. Mother and Child Depressive Symptoms in Youth with Spina Bifida: Additive, Moderator, and Mediator Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schellinger, Kriston B.; Holmbeck, Grayson N.; Essner, Bonnie S.; Alvarez, Renae

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the extent to which parenting behaviors influence the relation between maternal and child depressive symptoms in youth with spina bifida and a comparison sample. Previous research has found that maternal depression not only negatively impacts the mother-child relationship, but also places the child at risk…

  5. Deficits in Agency in Schizophrenia, and Additional Deficits in Body Image, Body Schema, and Internal Timing, in Passivity Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Kyran T.; Martin-Iverson, Mathew T.; Holmes, Nicholas P.; Jablensky, Assen; Waters, Flavie

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia, particularly those with passivity symptoms, may not feel in control of their actions, believing them to be controlled by external agents. Cognitive operations that contribute to these symptoms may include abnormal processing in agency as well as body representations that deal with body schema and body image. However, these operations in schizophrenia are not fully understood, and the questions of general versus specific deficits in individuals with different symptom profiles remain unanswered. Using the projected-hand illusion (a digital video version of the rubber-hand illusion) with synchronous and asynchronous stroking (500 ms delay), and a hand laterality judgment task, we assessed sense of agency, body image, and body schema in 53 people with clinically stable schizophrenia (with a current, past, and no history of passivity symptoms) and 48 healthy controls. The results revealed a stable trait in schizophrenia with no difference between clinical subgroups (sense of agency) and some quantitative (specific) differences depending on the passivity symptom profile (body image and body schema). Specifically, a reduced sense of self-agency was a common feature of all clinical subgroups. However, subgroup comparisons showed that individuals with passivity symptoms (both current and past) had significantly greater deficits on tasks assessing body image and body schema, relative to the other groups. In addition, patients with current passivity symptoms failed to demonstrate the normal reduction in body illusion typically seen with a 500 ms delay in visual feedback (asynchronous condition), suggesting internal timing problems. Altogether, the results underscore self-abnormalities in schizophrenia, provide evidence for both trait abnormalities and state changes specific to passivity symptoms, and point to a role for internal timing deficits as a mechanistic explanation for external cues becoming a possible source of self-body input

  6. Current neurology

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, S.H. )

    1988-01-01

    The topics covered in this book include: Duchenne muscular dystrophy: DNA diagnosis in practice; Central nervous system magnetic resonance imaging; and Magnetic resonance spectroscopy of neurologic diseases.

  7. Neurological disorders and inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Casella, Giovanni; Tontini, Gian Eugenio; Bassotti, Gabrio; Pastorelli, Luca; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Spina, Luisa; Baldini, Vittorio; Vecchi, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Extraintestinal manifestations occur in about one-third of patients living with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and may precede the onset of gastrointestinal symptoms by many years. Neurologic disorders associated with IBD are not frequent, being reported in 3% of patients, but they often represent an important cause of morbidity and a relevant diagnostic issue. In addition, the increasing use of immunosuppressant and biological therapies for IBD may also play a pivotal role in the development of neurological disorders of different type and pathogenesis. Hence, we provide a complete and profound review of the main features of neurological complications associated with IBD, with particular reference to those related to drugs and with a specific focus on their clinical presentation and possible pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID:25083051

  8. Neurology and Don Quixote.

    PubMed

    Palma, Jose-Alberto; Palma, Fermin

    2012-01-01

    Don Quixote de la Mancha, which is considered one of the most important and influential works of Western modern prose, contains many references of interest for almost all of the medical specialties. In this regard, numerous references to neurology can be found in Cervantes' immortal work. In this study, we aimed to read Don Quixote from a neurologist's point of view, describing the neurological phenomena scattered throughout the novel, including tremors, sleep disturbances, neuropsychiatric symptoms, dementia, epilepsy, paralysis, stroke, syncope, traumatic head injury, and headache; we relate these symptoms with depictions of those conditions in the medical literature of the time. We also review Cervantes' sources of neurological information, including the works by renowned Spanish authors such as Juan Huarte de San Juan, Dionisio Daza Chacón and Juan Valverde de Amusco, and we hypothesize that Don Quixote's disorder was actually a neurological condition. Although Cervantes wrote it four centuries ago, Don Quixote contains plenty of references to neurology, and many of the ideas and concepts reflected in it are still of interest. PMID:23006630

  9. The impact of intimate partner violence and additional traumatic events on trauma symptoms and PTSD in preschool-aged children.

    PubMed

    Graham-Bermann, Sandra A; Castor, Lana E; Miller, Laura E; Howell, Kathryn H

    2012-08-01

    Children exposed to intimate partner violence (IPV) are at increased risk for developing traumatic stress symptoms and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Unfortunately, children who witness IPV are often exposed to additional traumatic events. Previous research has indicated that approximately one third of children experience 2 or more direct victimizations each year, and that exposure to one type of victimization places children at risk for exposure to additional types of victimization. Yet little is known about the impact of these additional traumas on children's functioning. For a sample of 120 preschool children (age 4-6 years) exposed to IPV in the past 2 years, 38% were exposed to additional traumatic events, including sexual assaults by family members, physical assaults, serious accidents, and/or life-threatening illnesses. Those exposed to both IPV and additional traumatic events had higher rates of PTSD diagnoses, traumatic stress symptoms (d = 0.96), and internalizing (d = 0.86) and externalizing behavior (d = 0.47) problems, than those exposed to IPV alone. We also compared DSM-IV diagnostic criteria to proposed criteria for evaluating traumatic stress in preschool-aged children. Results revealed the importance of conducting a complete assessment of traumatic events prior to treating children exposed to IPV.

  10. Neurological complications of transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pustavoitau, Aliaksei; Bhardwaj, Anish; Stevens, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Recipients of solid organ or hematopoietic cell transplants are at risk of life-threatening neurological disorders including encephalopathy, seizures, infections and tumors of the central nervous system, stroke, central pontine myelinolysis, and neuromuscular disorders-often requiring admission to, or occurring in, the intensive care unit (ICU). Many of these complications are linked directly or indirectly to immunosuppressive therapy. However, neurological disorders may also result from graft versus host disease, or be an expression of the underlying disease which prompted transplantation, as well as injury induced during radiation, chemotherapy, surgery, and ICU stay. In rare cases, neuroinfectious pathogens may be transmitted with the transplanted tissue or organ. Diagnosis may be a challenge because clinical symptoms and findings on neuroimaging lack specificity, and a biological specimen or tissue diagnosis is often needed for definitive diagnosis. Management is centered on preventing further neurological injury, etiology-targeted therapy, and balancing the benefits and toxicities of specific immunosuppressive agents. PMID:21764765

  11. Adult neurology training during child neurology residency.

    PubMed

    Schor, Nina F

    2012-08-21

    As it is currently configured, completion of child neurology residency requires performance of 12 months of training in adult neurology. Exploration of whether or not this duration of training in adult neurology is appropriate for what child neurology is today must take into account the initial reasons for this requirement and the goals of adult neurology training during child neurology residency.

  12. Neurological channelopathies

    PubMed Central

    Graves, T; Hanna, M

    2005-01-01

    Ion channels are membrane-bound proteins that perform key functions in virtually all human cells. Such channels are critically important for the normal function of the excitable tissues of the nervous system, such as muscle and brain. Until relatively recently it was considered that dysfunction of ion channels in the nervous system would be incompatible with life. However, an increasing number of human diseases associated with dysfunctional ion channels are now recognised. Such neurological channelopathies are frequently genetically determined but may also arise through autoimmune mechanisms. In this article clinical, genetic, immunological, and electrophysiological aspects of this expanding group of neurological disorders are reviewed. Clinical situations in which a neurological channelopathy should enter into the differential diagnosis are highlighted. Some practical guidance on how to investigate and treat this complex group of disorders is also included. PMID:15640425

  13. Anxiety disorders in headache patients in a specialised clinic: prevalence and symptoms in comparison to patients in a general neurological clinic.

    PubMed

    Mehlsteibl, D; Schankin, C; Hering, P; Sostak, P; Straube, A

    2011-06-01

    Data from several studies indicate an association of headache with anxiety disorders. In this study, we assessed and differentiated anxiety disorders in 100 headache patients by using the PSWQ (Penn State Worry Questionnaire) screening tool for generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) and the ACQ (Agoraphobic Cognitions Questionnaire) and BSQ (Body Sensation Questionnaire) for panic disorder (PD). Control groups were constructed: (1) on the basis of epidemiological studies on PD and GAD in the general population and (2) by including neurological patients. 37.0% of headache patients had a GAD. 27% of headache patients met the score for PD in the BSQ, 4.0% in the ACQ. Significant results were obtained in comparison to the general population (p < 0.001) and with regard to GAD in comparison with a sample of neurological patients (p < 0.005). The BSQ significantly correlated with the number of medication days (p < 0.005). The results confirm the increased prevalence of GAD in headache patients. PD seems to increase the risk of medication overuse.

  14. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  15. Are There More Bowel Symptoms in Children with Autism Compared to Normal Children and Children with Other Developmental and Neurological Disorders?: A Case Control Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, R. A.; Farnworth, H.; Wright, B.; Allgar, V.

    2009-01-01

    There is considerable controversy as to whether there is an association between bowel disorders and autism. Using a bowel symptom questionnaire we compared 51 children with autism spectrum disorder with control groups of 35 children from special school and 112 from mainstream school. There was a significant difference in the reporting of certain…

  16. [Neurological complications in cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Hundsberger, Thomas; Roth, Patrick; Roelcke, Ulrich

    2014-08-20

    Neurological symptoms in cancer patients have a great impact on quality of life and need an interdisciplinary approach. They lead to significant impairment in activities of daily living (gait disorders, dizziness), a loss of patients independency (vegetative disturbances, wheel-chair dependency) and interfere with social activities (ban of driving in case of epilepsy). In this article we describe three main and serious neurological problems in the context of oncological patients. These are chemotherapy-induced polyneuropathy, malignant spinal cord compression and epileptic seizures. Our aim is to increase the awareness of neurological complications in cancer patients to improve patients care.

  17. [Neurological rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Hömberg, V

    2010-10-01

    This article describes state of the art concepts of neurological rehabilitation in Germany. In parallel to enormous growth of knowledge in the neurosciences also neurological rehabilitation has made significant progress. The increasing use of concepts of evidence based medicine and an early translation of knowledge from the neurosciences into clinical rehabilitation practice contribute to therapeutic advances. It is now widely accepted, that rehabilitation should start early and should be organized in a multidisciplinary professional team. Therapeutic procedures selected should be evidence based and have to be modified to find custom tailored solutions for individual patients. General rules derived from neuroscientific knowledge have been shown to be useful to design new therapeutic techniques. Neuromodulatory stimulation and special pharmacological treatments provide further options for enhancing results of rehabilitation.

  18. Pregnancy-induced acute neurologic emergencies and neurologic conditions encountered in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Alvis, Jeffrey S; Hicks, Richard J

    2012-02-01

    Neurologic complications and conditions associated with pregnancy are rare. Frequently, presenting symptoms of neurologic conditions are nonspecific and can overlap with normal symptoms of pregnancy. As a result, clinical assessment can be insufficient to differentiate symptoms of a normal pregnancy from a neurologic disorder. It is imperative that the radiologist have a basic familiarity with the most common neurologic conditions encountered in pregnancy. The most commonly imaged acute and nonemergent disorders will be described, including eclampsia, cerebrovascular disease including cerebral venous thrombosis, postpartum cerebral angiopathy, multiple sclerosis, tumors, Bell palsy, Guillain-Barré syndrome, and pituitary disorders. PMID:22264902

  19. Unusual neurological presentations of vitamin B(12) deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ahn, T-B; Cho, J-W; Jeon, B S

    2004-05-01

    Vitamin B(12) deficiency (B(12)D) has a wide variety of neurological symptoms and signs. However, cerebellar dysfunction and cranial neuropathies other than optic neuropathy have been rarely reported. Herein, we describe two cases of unusual neurological manifestations of B(12)D. One patient showed prominent hoarseness with vocal cord paralysis, myelopathy, and peripheral neuropathy. The other had gait disturbance, lateral gaze limitation and cerebellar dysfunction in addition to the typical manifestations of subacute combined degeneration. Vitamin B(12) deficiency can rarely affect cerebellum and cranial nerves other than optic nerve.

  20. Key sleep neurologic disorders

    PubMed Central

    St. Louis, Erik K.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Sleep disorders are frequent comorbidities in neurologic patients. This review focuses on clinical aspects and prognosis of 3 neurologic sleep disorders: narcolepsy, restless legs syndrome/Willis-Ekbom disease (RLS/WED), and REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). Narcolepsy causes pervasive, enduring excessive daytime sleepiness, adversely affecting patients' daily functioning. RLS/WED is characterized by an uncomfortable urge to move the legs before sleep, often evolving toward augmentation and resulting in daylong bothersome symptoms. RBD causes potentially injurious dream enactment behaviors that often signify future evolution of overt synucleinopathy neurodegeneration in as many as 81% of patients. Timely recognition, referral for polysomnography, and longitudinal follow-up of narcolepsy, RLS/WED, and RBD patients are imperatives for neurologists in providing quality comprehensive patient care. PMID:24605270

  1. Fellowship programs in behavioral neurology.

    PubMed

    Green, R C; Benjamin, S; Cummings, J L

    1995-03-01

    We sent a behavioral neurology fellowship questionnaire to each of the training directors of 160 neurology residency programs throughout the world, seeking information about programs offering advanced training in behavioral neurology (or similar fellowships in cognitive neurology, neurobehavior, or cognitive neuroscience). Response rate was 100%. Thirty-four respondents reported active fellowship programs in behavioral neurology, and 28 additional respondents indicated that a behavioral neurology fellowship was planned. Nine of the 34 programs (26.5%) defined themselves as exclusively or predominantly concerned with dementia and age-related neurobehavioral disorders. Directors of the 34 active fellowship programs estimated that their combined programs had graduated 199 fellows and were currently training fifty. Most fellowships concentrated on outpatient clinical training, with teaching required by 78.1% and research required by 81.8%. Specialty certification for behavioral neurology was favored by over 75% of behavioral neurology fellowship training directors but by only 30% of training directors in residency programs without behavioral neurology fellowships. Behavioral neurology training programs have grown dramatically in response to an increased recognition of the academic interest in and the clinical needs for these services. PMID:7898686

  2. Neurologic effects of alcoholism.

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, I; Messing, R O

    1994-01-01

    Alcoholism, a worldwide disorder, is the cause of a variety of neurologic disorders. In this article we discuss the cellular pathophysiology of ethanol addition and abuse as well as evidence supporting and refuting the role of inheritance in alcoholism. A genetic marker for alcoholism has not been identified, but neurophysiologic studies may be promising. Some neurologic disorders related to longterm alcoholism are due predominantly to inadequate nutrition (the thiamine deficiency that causes Wernicke's encephalopathy), but others appear to involve the neurotoxicity of ethanol on brain (alcohol withdrawal syndrome and dementia) and peripheral nerves (alcoholic neuropathy and myopathy). Images PMID:7975567

  3. Neurological diseases and pain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Chronic pain is a frequent component of many neurological disorders, affecting 20–40% of patients for many primary neurological diseases. These diseases result from a wide range of pathophysiologies including traumatic injury to the central nervous system, neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation, and exploring the aetiology of pain in these disorders is an opportunity to achieve new insight into pain processing. Whether pain originates in the central or peripheral nervous system, it frequently becomes centralized through maladaptive responses within the central nervous system that can profoundly alter brain systems and thereby behaviour (e.g. depression). Chronic pain should thus be considered a brain disease in which alterations in neural networks affect multiple aspects of brain function, structure and chemistry. The study and treatment of this disease is greatly complicated by the lack of objective measures for either the symptoms or the underlying mechanisms of chronic pain. In pain associated with neurological disease, it is sometimes difficult to obtain even a subjective evaluation of pain, as is the case for patients in a vegetative state or end-stage Alzheimer's disease. It is critical that neurologists become more involved in chronic pain treatment and research (already significant in the fields of migraine and peripheral neuropathies). To achieve this goal, greater efforts are needed to enhance training for neurologists in pain treatment and promote greater interest in the field. This review describes examples of pain in different neurological diseases including primary neurological pain conditions, discusses the therapeutic potential of brain-targeted therapies and highlights the need for objective measures of pain. PMID:22067541

  4. Neurologic complications of cardiac tumors.

    PubMed

    Roeltgen, David; Kidwell, Chelsea S

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac tumors are an uncommon cause for neurologic disease, but if undiagnosed can be associated with devastating neurologic consequences. Primary cardiac tumors, both benign and neoplastic, and metastatic tumors occur. Primary cardiac tumors are more likely to be associated with neurologic embolic complications. Metastatic cardiac tumors are more likely to be associated with valvular distraction, arrhythmia, diminished cardiac output and indirect neurological dysfunction. Primary and metastatic cardiac tumors may result in cerebral metastatic disease. Atrial myxoma, a benign primary cardiac tumor, is the most common cardiac tumor associated with neurologic disease, and most commonly causes cerebral embolization and stroke. The use of thrombolytic therapy for these strokes is controversial. Additionally, delayed manifestations, including aneurysm formation and intracranial hemorrhage, are possible. Aneurysm formation has been described as occurring after removal of the primary tumor. The availability of noninvasive cardiac imaging has significantly helped decrease the neurologic morbidity of cardiac tumors and has led to frequent successful intervention. PMID:24365298

  5. Neurological Complications of Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Amy A.; Graus, Francesc; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is the preferred treatment for an expanding range of neoplastic and nonmalignant conditions. Increasing numbers of solid organ transplantations (SOTs) add an additional population of immunosuppressed patients with multiple potential neurological problems. While the spectrum of neurological complications varies with conditioning procedure and hematopoietic cell or solid organ source, major neurological complications occur with all transplantation procedures. This 2 part review emphasizes a practical consultative approach to central and peripheral nervous system problems related to HCT or SOT with clinical and neuroimaging examples from the authors’ institutional experience with the following conditions: the diversity of manifestations of common infections such as varicella zoster virus, Aspergillus, and progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), drug therapy-related complications, stroke mechanisms, the spectrum of graft versus host disease (GVHD), and neurologically important syndromes of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), and posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD). These complications preferentially occur at specific intervals after HCT and SOT, and neurological consultants must recognize an extensive spectrum of syndromes in order to effect timely diagnosis and expedite appropriate treatment. PMID:23983885

  6. Acute and subacute symptoms among workers in the printing industry.

    PubMed

    Baelum, J; Andersen, I; Mølhave, L

    1982-02-01

    The study population comprised 52 male printers and 52 controls. Each person was interviewed about job history, general health, and work-related symptoms. Symptoms from eyes and airways, neurological symptoms, and general symptoms were recorded. A lung function test and a measurement of the sense of smell were also carried out. The printers had significantly more eye, airway, and neurological symptoms than the controls; the main complaints being irritation of eyes, nose, throat, and a reduced sense of taste. The neurological symptoms were disorders of vision, vertigo, feeling of intoxication, and headache. Furthermore, abdominal pain and flatulence occurred more often among the printers. The symptoms showed no relation to age or job seniority, but neurological and general symptoms were related to shift work. No difference in lung function was found between the two groups. The printers had a slightly lower threshold of smell than the controls. Although the total load due to organic solvents and dust in the air was far below legal limits, the number of magnitude of symptoms experienced by the printers exceeded what is supposed when norms for workroom exposure are set. It is suggested that either the irritative effects of solvents are underestimated or the assumption of additive effects when great numbers of solvents are found does not hold true. A reduction of the number of solvents by eliminating the most toxic solvents or by using dyes without solvents is suggested. PMID:7066223

  7. Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... may begin with flu-like symptoms such as fever, chills, swollen lymph nodes, headaches, fatigue, muscle aches, and joint pain. Neurological complications most often occur in the second stage ... such as fever, stiff neck, and severe headache. Other problems, which ...

  8. Can we improve pollen season definitions by using the symptom load index in addition to pollen counts?

    PubMed

    Bastl, Katharina; Kmenta, Maximilian; Geller-Bernstein, Carmi; Berger, Uwe; Jäger, Siegfried

    2015-09-01

    Airborne pollen measurements are the foundation of aerobiological research and provide essential raw data for various disciplines. Pollen itself should be considered a relevant factor in air quality. Symptom data shed light on the relationship of pollen allergy and pollination. The aim of this study is to assess the spatial variation of local, regional and national symptom datasets. Ten pollen season definitions are used to calculate the symptom load index for the birch and grass pollen seasons (2013-2014) in Austria. (1) Local, (2) regional and (3) national symptom datasets are used to examine spatial variations and a consistent pattern was found. In conclusion, national datasets are suitable for first insights where no sufficient local or regional dataset is available and season definitions based on percentages provide a practical solution, as they can be applied in regions with different pollen loads and produce more constant results.

  9. Functional Disorders in Neurology: Case Studies.

    PubMed

    Stone, Jon; Hoeritzauer, Ingrid; Gelauff, Jeannette; Lehn, Alex; Gardiner, Paula; van Gils, Anne; Carson, Alan

    2016-08-01

    Functional, often called psychogenic, disorders are common in neurological practice. We illustrate clinical issues and highlight some recent research findings using six case studies of functional neurological disorders. We discuss dizziness as a functional disorder, describing the relatively new consensus term Persistent Posturo-Perceptual Dizziness (PPPD), axial jerking/myoclonus as a functional movement disorder, functional speech symptoms, post-concussion disorder with functional cognitive symptoms and finally advances in treatment of dissociative seizures and functional motor disorders. PMID:27445247

  10. Symptoms of Tickborne Illness

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease , southern tick-associated rash illness (STARI) , Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) , ehrlichiosis , and tularemia can result ... or neurologic symptoms. The rash seen with Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) varies greatly from person to ...

  11. Update on Paraneoplastic Neurologic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, Myrna R.

    2010-01-01

    When patients with cancer develop neurologic symptoms, common causes include metastasis, infections, coagulopathy, metabolic or nutritional disturbances, and neurotoxicity from treatments. A thorough clinical history, temporal association with cancer therapies, and results of ancillary tests usually reveal one of these mechanisms as the etiology. When no etiology is identified, the diagnosis considered is often that of a paraneoplastic neurologic disorder (PND). With the recognition that PNDs are more frequent than previously thought, the availability of diagnostic tests, and the fact that, for some PNDs, treatment helps, PNDs should no longer be considered diagnostic zebras, and when appropriate should be included in the differential diagnosis early in the evaluation. PMID:20479279

  12. Neurology goes global

    PubMed Central

    Mateen, Farrah J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary In recent years, the need for additional neurologists and neurologic expertise in many low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) has become more apparent. Many organizations are committed to this unmet need, but the scope of the problem remains mostly underappreciated. Neurologists may be skeptical about their value in resource-limited settings, yet we are critically needed and can have a marked effect. International experiences, however, must be carried out in ethical, informed, and sustainable ways in tandem with local health care providers when possible. We present a brief overview of critical issues in global neurology, the importance of focusing on benefits to the LMIC, and options for volunteer opportunities in clinical service, education, research, and disaster relief. Finally, we offer practical pointers and resources for planning these experiences. PMID:25110621

  13. Neurologic complications of scuba diving.

    PubMed

    Newton, H B

    2001-06-01

    Recreational scuba diving has become a popular sport in the United States, with almost 9 million certified divers. When severe diving injury occurs, the nervous system is frequently involved. In dive-related barotrauma, compressed or expanding gas within the ears, sinuses and lungs causes various forms of neurologic injury. Otic barotrauma often induces pain, vertigo and hearing loss. In pulmonary barotrauma of ascent, lung damage can precipitate arterial gas embolism, causing blockage of cerebral blood vessels and alterations of consciousness, seizures and focal neurologic deficits. In patients with decompression sickness, the vestibular system, spinal cord and brain are affected by the formation of nitrogen bubbles. Common signs and symptoms include vertigo, thoracic myelopathy with leg weakness, confusion, headache and hemiparesis. Other diving-related neurologic complications include headache and oxygen toxicity.

  14. Cognitive and affective empathy in children with conduct problems: additive and interactive effects of callous-unemotional traits and autism spectrum disorders symptoms.

    PubMed

    Pasalich, Dave S; Dadds, Mark R; Hawes, David J

    2014-11-30

    Callous-unemotional (CU) traits and autism spectrum disorders (ASD) symptoms are characterized by problems in empathy; however, these behavioral features are rarely examined together in children with conduct problems. This study investigated additive and interactive effects of CU traits and ASD symptoms in relation to cognitive and affective empathy in a non-ASD clinic-referred sample. Participants were 134 children aged 3 to 9 years (M=5.60; 79% boys) with oppositional defiant/conduct disorder, and their parents. Clinicians, teachers, and parents reported on dimensions of child behavior, and parental reports of family dysfunction and direct observations of parental warmth/responsiveness assessed quality of family relationships. Results from multiple regression analysis showed that, over and above the effects of child conduct problem severity and quality of family relationships, both ASD symptoms and CU traits were uniquely associated with deficits in cognitive empathy. Moreover, CU traits demonstrated an independent association with affective empathy, and this relationship was moderated by ASD symptoms. That is, there was a stronger negative association between CU traits and affective empathy at higher versus lower levels of ASD symptoms. These findings suggest including both CU traits and ASD-related social impairments in models delineating the atypical development of empathy in children with conduct problems. PMID:25015711

  15. Cognitive and affective empathy in children with conduct problems: additive and interactive effects of callous-unemotional traits and autism spectrum disorders symptoms.

    PubMed

    Pasalich, Dave S; Dadds, Mark R; Hawes, David J

    2014-11-30

    Callous-unemotional (CU) traits and autism spectrum disorders (ASD) symptoms are characterized by problems in empathy; however, these behavioral features are rarely examined together in children with conduct problems. This study investigated additive and interactive effects of CU traits and ASD symptoms in relation to cognitive and affective empathy in a non-ASD clinic-referred sample. Participants were 134 children aged 3 to 9 years (M=5.60; 79% boys) with oppositional defiant/conduct disorder, and their parents. Clinicians, teachers, and parents reported on dimensions of child behavior, and parental reports of family dysfunction and direct observations of parental warmth/responsiveness assessed quality of family relationships. Results from multiple regression analysis showed that, over and above the effects of child conduct problem severity and quality of family relationships, both ASD symptoms and CU traits were uniquely associated with deficits in cognitive empathy. Moreover, CU traits demonstrated an independent association with affective empathy, and this relationship was moderated by ASD symptoms. That is, there was a stronger negative association between CU traits and affective empathy at higher versus lower levels of ASD symptoms. These findings suggest including both CU traits and ASD-related social impairments in models delineating the atypical development of empathy in children with conduct problems.

  16. Neurologic injuries in baseball players.

    PubMed

    Treihaft, M M

    2000-01-01

    In baseball pitchers, injuries to the throwing arm are common due to the extreme stresses placed on the elbow and shoulder joints. These result in peripheral nerve syndromes including ulnar neuropathy at the elbow and suprascapular neuropathy at the shoulder. Recurrent trauma to the axillary artery causing aneurysm and thrombus formation may lead to distal ischemia and stroke. Careful evaluation is required to identify musculoskeletal, neurologic, and vascular causes of upper extremity symptoms in the throwing athlete.

  17. Neurology and neurologic practice in China.

    PubMed

    Shi, Fu-Dong; Jia, Jian-Ping

    2011-11-29

    In the wake of dramatic economic success during the past 2 decades, the specialized field of neurology has undergone a significant transformation in China. With an increase in life expectancy, the problems of aging and cognition have grown. Lifestyle alterations have been associated with an epidemiologic transition both in the incidence and etiology of stroke. These changes, together with an array of social issues and institution of health care reform, are creating challenges for practicing neurologists throughout China. Notable problems include overcrowded, decrepit facilities, overloaded physician schedules, deteriorating physician-patient relationships, and an insufficient infrastructure to accommodate patients who need specialized neurologic care. Conversely, with the creation of large and sophisticated neurology centers in many cities across the country, tremendous opportunities exist. Developments in neurologic subspecialties enable delivery of high-quality care. Clinical and translational research based on large patient populations as well as highly sophisticated technologies are emerging in many neurologic centers and pharmaceutical companies. Child neurology and neurorehabilitation will be fast-developing subdisciplines. Given China's extensive population, the growth and progress of its neurology complex, and its ever-improving quality control, it is reasonable to anticipate that Chinese neurologists will contribute notably to unraveling the pathogenic factors causing neurologic diseases and to providing new therapeutic solutions. PMID:22123780

  18. Neurology and neurologic practice in China.

    PubMed

    Shi, Fu-Dong; Jia, Jian-Ping

    2011-11-29

    In the wake of dramatic economic success during the past 2 decades, the specialized field of neurology has undergone a significant transformation in China. With an increase in life expectancy, the problems of aging and cognition have grown. Lifestyle alterations have been associated with an epidemiologic transition both in the incidence and etiology of stroke. These changes, together with an array of social issues and institution of health care reform, are creating challenges for practicing neurologists throughout China. Notable problems include overcrowded, decrepit facilities, overloaded physician schedules, deteriorating physician-patient relationships, and an insufficient infrastructure to accommodate patients who need specialized neurologic care. Conversely, with the creation of large and sophisticated neurology centers in many cities across the country, tremendous opportunities exist. Developments in neurologic subspecialties enable delivery of high-quality care. Clinical and translational research based on large patient populations as well as highly sophisticated technologies are emerging in many neurologic centers and pharmaceutical companies. Child neurology and neurorehabilitation will be fast-developing subdisciplines. Given China's extensive population, the growth and progress of its neurology complex, and its ever-improving quality control, it is reasonable to anticipate that Chinese neurologists will contribute notably to unraveling the pathogenic factors causing neurologic diseases and to providing new therapeutic solutions.

  19. Dengue: a new challenge for neurology

    PubMed Central

    Puccioni-Sohler, Marzia; Orsini, Marco; Soares, Cristiane N.

    2012-01-01

    Dengue infection is a leading cause of illness and death in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Forty percent of the world's population currently lives in these areas. The clinical picture resulting from dengue infection can range from relatively minor to catastrophic hemorrhagic fever. Recently, reports have increased of neurological manifestations. Neuropathogenesis seems to be related to direct nervous system viral invasion, autoimmune reaction, metabolic and hemorrhagic disturbance. Neurological manifestations include encephalitis, encephalopathy, meningitis, Guillain-Barré syndrome, myelitis, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, polyneuropathy, mononeuropathy, and cerebromeningeal hemorrhage. The development of neurological symptoms in patients with positive Immunoglobulin M (IgM) dengue serology suggests a means of diagnosing the neurological complications associated with dengue. Viral antigens, specific IgM antibodies, and the intrathecal synthesis of dengue antibodies have been successfully detected in cerebrospinal fluid. However, despite diagnostic advancements, the treatment of neurological dengue is problematic. The launch of a dengue vaccine is expected to be beneficial. PMID:23355928

  20. Liver cirrhosis in patients newly diagnosed with neurological phenotype of Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Przybyłkowski, Adam; Gromadzka, Grażyna; Chabik, Grzegorz; Wierzchowska, Agata; Litwin, Tomasz; Członkowska, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) can manifest itself in different clinical forms, the neurological and hepatic ones being the most common. It is suggested that neurological signs and psychiatric symptoms develop secondary to liver involvement. The aim of this study was to characterize the liver disease in patients newly diagnosed with the neurological form of WD. Treatment-naive patients diagnosed with WD were classified into three phenotypic groups: hepatic, neurological and pre-symptomatic. Liver involvement was ascertained through surrogate markers: abdominal ultrasound and laboratory parameters. In addition, study participants were screened for esophageal varices. Of 53 consecutively diagnosed WD patients, 23 individuals (43.4%) had a predominantly neurological presentation. In this group, cirrhosis was diagnosed in 11 (47.8%) subjects. Esophageal varices were present in all of them. In every patient with neurological WD, there was at least one sign of hepatic disease on ultrasound examination, indicating universal presence of liver involvement. The prevalence of surrogate signs of cirrhosis was similar in patients with the neurological and in those with the hepatic phenotype.

  1. [Neurology of hysteria (conversion disorder)].

    PubMed

    Sonoo, Masahiro

    2014-07-01

    Hysteria has served as an important driving force in the development of both neurology and psychiatry. Jean Martin Charcot's devotion to mesmerism for treating hysterical patients evoked the invention of psychoanalysis by Sigmund Freud. Meanwhile, Joseph Babinski took over the challenge to discriminate between organic and hysterical patients from Charcot and found Babinski's sign, the greatest milestone in modern neurological symptomatology. Nowadays, the usage of the term hysteria is avoided. However, new terms and new classifications are complicated and inconsistent between the two representative taxonomies, the DSM-IV and ICD-10. In the ICD-10, even the alternative term conversion disorder, which was becoming familiar to neurologists, has also disappeared as a group name. The diagnosis of hysteria remains important in clinical neurology. Extensive exclusive diagnoses and over investigation, including various imaging studies, should be avoided because they may prolong the disease course and fix their symptoms. Psychological reasons that seem to explain the conversion are not considered reliable. Positive neurological signs suggesting nonorganic etiologies are the most reliable measures for diagnosing hysteria, as Babinski first argued. Hysterical paresis has several characteristics, such as giving-way weakness or peculiar distributions of weakness. Signs to uncover nonorganic paresis utilizing synergy include Hoover's test and the Sonoo abductor test.

  2. Dysphagia associated with neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, D W

    1994-01-01

    Neurogenic dysphagia results from sensorimotor impairment of the oral and pharyngeal phases of swallowing due to a neurologic disorder. The symptoms of neurogenic dysphagia include drooling, difficulty initiating swallowing, nasal regurgitation, difficulty managing secretions, choke/cough episodes while feeding, and food sticking in the throat. If unrecognized and untreated, neurogenic dysphagia can lead to dehydration, malnutrition, and respiratory complications. The symptoms of neurogenic dysphagia may be relatively inapparent on account of both compensation for swallowing impairment and diminution of the laryngeal cough reflex due to a variety of factors. Patients with symptoms of oropharyngeal dysphagia should undergo videofluoroscopy of swallowing, which in the case of neurogenic dysphagia typically reveals impairment of oropharyngeal motor performance and/or laryngeal protection. The many causes of neurogenic dysphagia include stroke, head trauma, Parkinson's disease, motor neuron disease and myopathy. Evaluation of the cause of unexplained neurogenic dysphagia should include consultation by a neurologist, magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, blood tests (routine studies plus muscle enzymes, thyroid screening, vitamin B12 and anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies), electromyography/nerve conduction studies, and, in certain cases, muscle biopsy or cerebrospinal fluid examination. Treatment of neurogenic dysphagia involves treatment of the underlying neurologic disorder (if possible), swallowing therapy (if oral feeding is reasonably safe to attempt) and gastrostomy (if oral feeding is unsafe or inadequate).

  3. The Neurologic Manifestations of Mitochondrial Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parikh, Sumit

    2010-01-01

    The nervous system contains some of the body's most metabolically demanding cells that are highly dependent on ATP produced via mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Thus, the neurological system is consistently involved in patients with mitochondrial disease. Symptoms differ depending on the part of the nervous system affected. Although almost…

  4. Happiness and neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Barak, Yoram; Achiron, Anat

    2009-04-01

    addition, specific interventions to increase happiness developed by PoP clinicians have demonstrated efficacy and validity. Several measurement scales now exist that reliably measure happiness as a long-term state, rather than as a fluctuating condition resulting from prevailing mood. These enable the use of happiness as an end point in clinical trials. As happiness becomes increasingly accepted as an important consideration in neurological disease, it is likely to be monitored more extensively, with measures to raise happiness levels being taken as an effective means of improving patient outcomes.

  5. [Proposal of postgraduate training program in neurology].

    PubMed

    Kurihara, T

    2000-12-01

    In order to improve the postgraduate training in neurology in Japan, practical program is proposed. It consists of 5 years. The first 2 years include internal medicine for 16 months, pediatrics for 2 months, neurosurgery for 2 months, emergency medicine for 2 months, and anesthesiology for 2 months. The next 3 years include neurology training in the ward and out-patient clinic in the University Hospital for one year followed by another year of neurology ward training at the affiliated hospital where they are exposed to see more acute neurological cases. In addition to these clinical training, they will study basic neurological sciences in neuroanatomy, and neurophysiology in the evening in the form of small group seminars and they are assigned to read EEG every week and attend EEG reading sessions. EMG, muscle biopsy, and sural nerve biopsy will be done under supervision when they are in charge of such cases who require those examinations. The last year program includes neurological consultation from the other departments, out-patient clinic, setting up neurological conferences, and elective course for 3 months. It is recommended that Japanese Neurological Society informs us several institutes where they can offer pediatric neurology training, and neuropathology training in several districts in Japan, since they have difficulty in getting training in these two specialties in many Japanese hospitals.

  6. Marrow hypoplasia associated with congenital neurologic anomalies in two siblings.

    PubMed

    Drachtman, R; Weinblatt, M; Sitarz, A; Gold, A; Kochen, J

    1990-10-01

    Two siblings with congenital neurologic structural anomalies and delayed-onset selective bone marrow hypoplasia in a previously undescribed constellation of symptoms are presented. Differences between these cases and other well known syndromes are discussed. The importance of this association is the implication that children with congenital neurologic abnormalities may be at increased risk for the development of hypoplastic hematopoietic conditions. PMID:2264478

  7. Approach to Neurometabolic Diseases from a Pediatric Neurological Point of View

    PubMed Central

    KARIMZADEH, Parvaneh

    2015-01-01

    Objective Neurometabolic disorders are an important group of diseases that mostly are presented in newborns and infants. Neurological manifestations are the prominent signs and symptoms in this group of diseases. Seizures are a common sign and are often refractory to antiepileptic drugs in untreated neurometabolic patients. The onset of symptoms for neurometabolic disorders appears after an interval of normal or near normal growth and development.Additionally, affected children may fare well until a catabolic crisis occurs. Patients with neurometabolic disorders during metabolic decompensation have severe clinical presentation, which include poor feeding, vomiting, lethargy, seizures, and loss of consciousness. This symptom is often fatal but severe neurological insult and regression in neurodevelopmental milestones can result as a prominent sign in patients who survived. Acute symptoms should be immediately treated regardless of the cause. A number of patients with neurometabolic disorders respond favorably and, in some instances, dramatically respond to treatment. Early detection and early intervention is invaluable in some patients to prevent catabolism and normal or near normal neurodevelopmental milestones. This paper discusses neurometabolic disorders, approaches to this group of diseases (from the view of a pediatric neurologist), clinical and neurological manifestations, neuroimaging and electroencephalography findings, early detection, and early treatment. PMID:25767534

  8. The neurology in Shakespeare.

    PubMed

    Fogan, L

    1989-08-01

    William Shakespeare's 37 plays and poetry contain many references of interest for almost all of the medical specialties. To support that the Bard could be considered a Renaissance neurologist, the following important neurological phenomena have been selected from his repertoire for discussion: tremors, paralysis and stroke, sleep disturbances, epilepsy, dementia, encephalopathies, and the neurology of syphilis. PMID:2667505

  9. Neurologic presentations of AIDS.

    PubMed

    Singer, Elyse J; Valdes-Sueiras, Miguel; Commins, Deborah; Levine, Andrew

    2010-02-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the cause of AIDS, has infected an estimated 33 million individuals worldwide. HIV is associated with immunodeficiency, neoplasia, and neurologic disease. The continuing evolution of the HIV epidemic has spurred an intense interest in a hitherto neglected area of medicine, neuroinfectious diseases and their consequences. This work has broad applications for the study of central nervous system (CNS) tumors, dementias, neuropathies, and CNS disease in other immunosuppressed individuals. HIV is neuroinvasive (can enter the CNS), neurotrophic (can live in neural tissues), and neurovirulent (causes disease of the nervous system). This article reviews the HIV-associated neurologic syndromes, which can be classified as primary HIV neurologic disease (in which HIV is both necessary and sufficient to cause the illness), secondary or opportunistic neurologic disease (in which HIV interacts with other pathogens, resulting in opportunistic infections and tumors), and treatment-related neurologic disease (such as immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome). PMID:19932385

  10. Neurology and orthopaedics

    PubMed Central

    Houlden, Henry; Charlton, Paul; Singh, Dishan

    2007-01-01

    Neurology encompasses all aspects of medicine and surgery, but is closer to orthopaedic surgery than many other specialities. Both neurological deficits and bone disorders lead to locomotor system abnormalities, joint complications and limb problems. The main neurological conditions that require the attention of an orthopaedic surgeon are disorders that affect the lower motor neurones. The most common disorders in this group include neuromuscular disorders and traumatic peripheral nerve lesions. Upper motor neurone disorders such as cerebral palsy and stroke are also frequently seen and discussed, as are chronic conditions such as poliomyelitis. The management of these neurological problems is often coordinated in the neurology clinic, and this group, probably more than any other, requires a multidisciplinary team approach. PMID:17308288

  11. Neurological long term consequences of deep diving.

    PubMed

    Todnem, K; Nyland, H; Skeidsvoll, H; Svihus, R; Rinck, P; Kambestad, B K; Riise, T; Aarli, J A

    1991-04-01

    Forty commercial saturation divers, mean age 34.9 (range 24-49) years, were examined one to seven years after their last deep dive (190-500 metres of seawater). Four had by then lost their divers' licence because of neurological problems. Twenty seven (68%) had been selected by neurological examination and electroencephalography before the deep dives. The control group consisted of 100 men, mean age 34.0 (range 22-48) years. The divers reported significantly more symptoms from the nervous system. Concentration difficulties and paraesthesia in feet and hands were common. They had more abnormal neurological findings by neurological examination compatible with dysfunction in the lumbar spinal cord or roots. They also had a larger proportion of abnormal electroencephalograms than the controls. The neurological symptoms and findings were highly significantly correlated with exposure to deep diving (depth included), but even more significantly correlated to air and saturation diving and prevalence of decompression sickness. Visual evoked potentials, brainstem auditory evoked potentials, and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain did not show more abnormal findings in the divers. Four (10%) divers had had episodes of cerebral dysfunction during or after the dives; two had had seizures, one had had transitory cerebral ischaemia and one had had transitory global amnesia. It is concluded that deep diving may have a long term effect on the nervous system of the divers.

  12. State neurologic societies and the AAN

    PubMed Central

    Narayanaswami, Pushpa; Showers, Dave; Levi, Bruce; Showers, Melissa; Jones, Elaine C.; Busis, Neil A.; Comella, Cynthia L.; Pulst, Stefan M.; Hosey, Jonathan P.; Griggs, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary This report considers the recommendations of the State Society Task Force (SSTF), which evaluated how the relationship between the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) and neurologic societies of individual states can foster the care of patients with neurologic diseases. The task force also evaluated the role of state neurosociety and state medical society interactions in supporting the profession of neurology. The SSTF recommended that the AAN expand current support services to state neurosocieties and foster additional neurosociety development. Specific services to be considered by the AAN include online combined AAN/state neurosociety dues payment and enhanced Web support. The role of the AAN as a liaison between state neurosocieties and state medical societies is important to facilitate state level advocacy for neurology. PMID:25110622

  13. [Nationwide questionnaire study in "the Model Core Curriculum" and current status for the undergraduate education in neurology].

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Hidenao; Arimura, Kimiyoshi; Itoyama, Yasuto; Kwak, Shin; Kira, Jun-Ichi; Nakashima, Kenji; Amano, Takahiro; Inoue, Kiyoharu; Uozumi, Takenori; Kohara, Nobuo; Tsuji, Sadatoshi; Tamagawa, Akira; Toyoshima, Itaru; Mizutani, Tomohiko; Yoshii, Fumihito; Sobue, Gen; Shimizu, Teruo

    2008-08-01

    To investigate the current state of education for undergraduates, the subcommittee of the Japanese Society of Neurology for undergraduate education sent a questionnaire on the 2001-version of Model Core Curriculum to the department of neurology in 80 medical universities and their 7 associate medical institutes throughout Japan. Answers were obtained from 56 out of those 87 institutes (64.4%). According to the answers, the Core Curriculum was introduced to the program of undergraduate education in 93% of those 56 universities. For the revision of neurology part in the current Core Curriculum, there are number of requests for improving the description on the neurological examination, list of common symptoms and disorders, and addition of therapeutics. Despite application of the Model Core Curriculum in medical education, the present study disclosed that there were considerable difference in the number and content of the lectures, and the duration of clinical clerkship in neurology ward. These differences of the curriculum and training program depends on not only the number of staffs, but also whether they are working as staffs in a department of neurology or as a small group of neurologists within a department other than neurology.

  14. Cyclodextrins, blood-brain barrier, and treatment of neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Vecsernyés, Miklós; Fenyvesi, Ferenc; Bácskay, Ildikó; Deli, Mária A; Szente, Lajos; Fenyvesi, Éva

    2014-11-01

    Biological barriers are the main defense systems of the homeostasis of the organism and protected organs. The blood-brain barrier (BBB), formed by the endothelial cells of brain capillaries, not only provides nutrients and protection to the central nervous system but also restricts the entry of drugs, emphasizing its importance in the treatment of neurological diseases. Cyclodextrins are increasingly used in human pharmacotherapy. Due to their favorable profile to form hydrophilic inclusion complexes with poorly soluble active pharmaceutical ingredients, they are present as excipients in many marketed drugs. Application of cyclodextrins is widespread in formulations for oral, parenteral, nasal, pulmonary, and skin delivery of drugs. Experimental and clinical data suggest that cyclodextrins can be used not only as excipients for centrally acting marketed drugs like antiepileptics, but also as active pharmaceutical ingredients to treat neurological diseases. Hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin received orphan drug designation for the treatment of Niemann-Pick type C disease. In addition to this rare lysosomal storage disease with neurological symptoms, experimental research revealed the potential therapeutic use of cyclodextrins and cyclodextrin nanoparticles in neurodegenerative diseases, stroke, neuroinfections and brain tumors. In this context, the biological effects of cyclodextrins, their interaction with plasma membranes and extraction of different lipids are highly relevant at the level of the BBB.

  15. Neurologic complications of vaccinations.

    PubMed

    Miravalle, Augusto A; Schreiner, Teri

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews the most common neurologic disorders associated with common vaccines, evaluates the data linking the disorder with the vaccine, and discusses the potential mechanism of disease. A literature search was conducted in PubMed using a combination of the following terms: vaccines, vaccination, immunization, and neurologic complications. Data were also gathered from publications of the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Infectious Diseases, the World Health Organization, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System. Neurologic complications of vaccination are rare. Many associations have been asserted without objective data to support a causal relationship. Rarely, patients with a neurologic complication will have a poor outcome. However, most patients recover fully from the neurologic complication. Vaccinations have altered the landscape of infectious disease. However, perception of risk associated with vaccinations has limited the success of disease eradication measures. Neurologic complications can be severe, and can provoke fear in potential vaccines. Evaluating whether there is causal link between neurologic disorders and vaccinations, not just temporal association, is critical to addressing public misperception of risk of vaccination. Among the vaccines available today, the cost-benefit analysis of vaccinations and complications strongly argues in favor of vaccination.

  16. [Inborn errors of metabolism in adult neurology].

    PubMed

    Sedel, F

    2013-02-01

    Inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) are caused by mutations in genes coding for enzymes and other proteins involved in cell metabolism. Many IEM can be treated effectively. Although IEM have usually been considered pediatric diseases, they can present at any age, mostly with neurological and psychiatric symptoms, and therefore constitute an integral subspeciality of neurology. However, although they are increasingly being recognized, IEM remain rare, and the care for patients should be optimized in specialized reference centers. Since the number of different diseases is very large, the diagnostic approach needs to be rigorous, starting at the clinics and calling upon the additional help of neuroradiology, biochemistry and molecular biology. In practice, it is important for the neurologist to recognize: (1) when to start suspecting an IEM; and (2) how to correlate a given clinical presentation with one of the five major groups of diseases affecting the nervous system. These five groups may be classified as: (a) energy metabolism disorders such as respiratory chain disorders, pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency, GLUT1 deficiency, fatty-acid β-oxidation defects, and disorders involving key cofactors such as electron transfer flavoprotein, thiamine, biotin, riboflavin, vitamin E and coenzyme Q10; (b) intoxication syndromes such as porphyrias, urea-cycle defects, homocystinurias, organic acidurias and amino acidopathies; (c) lipid-storage disorders such as lysosomal storage disorders (Krabbe disease, metachromatic leukodystrophy, Niemann - Pick disease type C, Fabry disease and Gaucher's disease), peroxisomal disorders (adrenomyeloneuropathy, Refsum disease, disorders of pristanic acid metabolism, peroxisome biogenesis disorders), Tangier disease and cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis; (d) metal-storage diseases such as iron, copper and manganese metabolic disorders; and (e) neurotransmitter metabolism defects, including defects of serotonin, dopamine and glycine metabolism

  17. Neurology and international organizations.

    PubMed

    Mateen, Farrah J

    2013-07-23

    A growing number of international stakeholders are engaged with neurologic diseases. This article provides a brief overview of important international stakeholders in the practice of neurology, including global disease-specific programs, United Nations agencies, governmental agencies with international influence, nongovernmental organizations, international professional organizations, large private donors, private-public partnerships, commercial interests, armed forces, and universities and colleges. The continued engagement of neurologists is essential for the growing number of international organizations that can and should incorporate neurologic disease into their global agendas.

  18. William Shakespeare's neurology.

    PubMed

    Paciaroni, Maurizio; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2013-01-01

    Many of Shakespeare's plays contain characters who appear to be afflicted by neurological or psychiatric disorders. Shakespeare, in his descriptive analysis of his protagonists, was contributing to the understanding of these disorders. In fact, Charcot frequently used Shakespearean references in his neurological teaching sessions, stressing how acute objective insight is essential to achieving expert clinical diagnosis. Charcot found in Shakespeare the same rigorous observational techniques for which he himself became famous. This chapter describes many of Shakespearean characters suffering from varied neurological disorders, including Parkinsonism, epilepsy, sleeping disturbances, dementia, headache, prion disease, and paralyses. PMID:24290473

  19. [Neurological interpretation of dreams] .

    PubMed

    Pareja, J A; Gil-Nagel, A

    2000-10-01

    Cerebral cortical activity is constant throughout the entire human life, but substantially changes during the different phases of the sleep-wake cycle (wakefulness, non-REM sleep and REM sleep), as well as in relation to available information. In particular, perception of the environment is closely linked to the wake-state, while during sleep perception turns to the internal domain or endogenous cerebral activity. External and internal information are mutually exclusive. During wakefulness a neuronal mechanism allows attention to focus on the environment whereas endogenous cortical activity is ignored. The opposite process is provided during sleep. The function external attention-internal attention is coupled with the two modes of brain function during wakefulness and during sleep, providing two possible cortical status: thinking and dreaming. Several neurological processes may influence the declaration of the three states of being or may modify their orderly oscillation through the sleep-wake cycle. In addition, endogenous information and its perception (dreams) may be modified. Disturbances of dreaming may configurate in different general clinical scenarios: lack of dreaming, excess of dreaming (epic dreaming), paroxysmal dreaming (epileptic), nightmares, violent dreaming, daytime-dreaming (hallucinations), and lucid dreaming. Sensorial deprivation, as well as the emergence of internal perception may be the underlying mechanism of hallucinations. The probable isomorphism between hallucinations and dreaming is postulated, analyzed and discussed. PMID:11143502

  20. [Neurological interpretation of dreams] .

    PubMed

    Pareja, J A; Gil-Nagel, A

    2000-10-01

    Cerebral cortical activity is constant throughout the entire human life, but substantially changes during the different phases of the sleep-wake cycle (wakefulness, non-REM sleep and REM sleep), as well as in relation to available information. In particular, perception of the environment is closely linked to the wake-state, while during sleep perception turns to the internal domain or endogenous cerebral activity. External and internal information are mutually exclusive. During wakefulness a neuronal mechanism allows attention to focus on the environment whereas endogenous cortical activity is ignored. The opposite process is provided during sleep. The function external attention-internal attention is coupled with the two modes of brain function during wakefulness and during sleep, providing two possible cortical status: thinking and dreaming. Several neurological processes may influence the declaration of the three states of being or may modify their orderly oscillation through the sleep-wake cycle. In addition, endogenous information and its perception (dreams) may be modified. Disturbances of dreaming may configurate in different general clinical scenarios: lack of dreaming, excess of dreaming (epic dreaming), paroxysmal dreaming (epileptic), nightmares, violent dreaming, daytime-dreaming (hallucinations), and lucid dreaming. Sensorial deprivation, as well as the emergence of internal perception may be the underlying mechanism of hallucinations. The probable isomorphism between hallucinations and dreaming is postulated, analyzed and discussed.

  1. Neurological and endocrine phenotypes of fragile X carrier women.

    PubMed

    Hall, D; Todorova-Koteva, K; Pandya, S; Bernard, B; Ouyang, B; Walsh, M; Pounardjian, T; Deburghraeve, C; Zhou, L; Losh, M; Leehey, M; Berry-Kravis, E

    2016-01-01

    Women who carry fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1)gene premutation expansions frequently report neurological or endocrine symptoms and prior studies have predominantly focused on questionnaire report of medical issues. Premutation carrier (PMC) women (n = 33) and non-carrier controls (n = 13) were recruited and evaluated by a neurologist, neuropsychologist, and endocrinologist. Blood and skin biopsies were collected for molecular measures. Scales for movement disorders, neuropathy, cognitive function, psychiatric symptoms, sleep, and quality of life were completed. The average age of the women was 51 years (n = 46) and average CGG repeat size was 91 ± 24.9 in the FMR1 PMC women. Seventy percent of the PMC women had an abnormal neurological examination. PMC women had significantly higher scores on the Fragile X-Associated Tremor Ataxia Syndrome (FXTAS) rating scale, more neuropathy, and difficulty with tandem gait compared to controls. Central sensitivity syndromes, a neuroticism profile on the NEO Personality Profile, and sleep disorders were also prevalent. Discrepancies between subject report and examination findings were also seen. This pilot study suggests that women with the FMR1 premutation may have a phenotype that overlaps with that seen in FXTAS. Additional research with larger sample sizes is warranted to better delineate the clinical features. PMID:26212380

  2. Neurological and endocrine phenotypes of fragile X carrier women.

    PubMed

    Hall, D; Todorova-Koteva, K; Pandya, S; Bernard, B; Ouyang, B; Walsh, M; Pounardjian, T; Deburghraeve, C; Zhou, L; Losh, M; Leehey, M; Berry-Kravis, E

    2016-01-01

    Women who carry fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1)gene premutation expansions frequently report neurological or endocrine symptoms and prior studies have predominantly focused on questionnaire report of medical issues. Premutation carrier (PMC) women (n = 33) and non-carrier controls (n = 13) were recruited and evaluated by a neurologist, neuropsychologist, and endocrinologist. Blood and skin biopsies were collected for molecular measures. Scales for movement disorders, neuropathy, cognitive function, psychiatric symptoms, sleep, and quality of life were completed. The average age of the women was 51 years (n = 46) and average CGG repeat size was 91 ± 24.9 in the FMR1 PMC women. Seventy percent of the PMC women had an abnormal neurological examination. PMC women had significantly higher scores on the Fragile X-Associated Tremor Ataxia Syndrome (FXTAS) rating scale, more neuropathy, and difficulty with tandem gait compared to controls. Central sensitivity syndromes, a neuroticism profile on the NEO Personality Profile, and sleep disorders were also prevalent. Discrepancies between subject report and examination findings were also seen. This pilot study suggests that women with the FMR1 premutation may have a phenotype that overlaps with that seen in FXTAS. Additional research with larger sample sizes is warranted to better delineate the clinical features.

  3. [Child neurology and rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Kumagai, K

    2000-05-01

    The history of child neurology and the changing pattern of research methods in this field are reviewed with special reference to holoprosencephaly and recent technical advances in sleep research. This is followed by a discussion on the relationship between child neurology and rehabilitation. The majority of child neurologic disorders are developmental disabilities, but acquired child neurological diseases also show chronic progressive course in many cases. Therefore, child neurologist should understand the basis of rehabilitation approach and appreciate the three classes of disabilities; subsequently, a plan needs to be incorporating medical treatment and a program of rehabilitation for the disabled children. It is important that the role of the various rehabilitation specialists (rehabilitation doctor, physiotherapist, occupational therapist, and others) are understood in relation to the work of pediatric neurologist. Finally, a brief discussion is presented on the rehabilitation approach of patients with hypoxic encephalopathy and the information of welfare equipment.

  4. Haematology and neurology

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Steven; Cohen, Hannah; Losseff, Nick

    2007-01-01

    This review aims to update the reader on advances in the understanding of haematological conditions that may arise in neurological practice. Thrombophilia, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, sickle cell and clonal disorders associated with neuropathy are discussed. PMID:17369588

  5. Neurological Sequelae of Lupus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page Synonym(s): Lupus - Neurological Sequelae, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Table of Contents (click to jump to sections) What ... health problems and have a normal lifespan with periodic doctor visits and treatments with various drugs. What ...

  6. Apotemnophilia: a neurological disorder.

    PubMed

    Brang, David; McGeoch, Paul D; Ramachandran, Vilayanur S

    2008-08-27

    Apotemnophilia, a disorder that blurs the distinction between neurology and psychiatry, is characterized by the intense and longstanding desire for amputation of a specific limb. Here we present evidence from two individuals suggestive that this condition, long thought to be entirely psychological in origin, actually has a neurological basis. We found heightened skin conductance response to pinprick below the desired line of amputation. We propose apotemnophilia arises from congenital dysfunction of the right superior parietal lobule and its connection with the insula.

  7. Wikipedia and neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Brigo, Francesco; Igwe, Stanley C; Nardone, Raffaele; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Tezzon, Frediano; Otte, Willem M

    2015-07-01

    Our aim was to evaluate Wikipedia page visits in relation to the most common neurological disorders by determining which factors are related to peaks in Wikipedia searches for these conditions. Millions of people worldwide use the internet daily as a source of health information. Wikipedia is a popular free online encyclopedia used by patients and physicians to search for health-related information. The following Wikipedia articles were considered: Alzheimer's disease; Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; Dementia; Epilepsy; Epileptic seizure; Migraine; Multiple sclerosis; Parkinson's disease; Stroke; Traumatic brain injury. We analyzed information regarding the total article views for 90 days and the rank of these articles among all those available in Wikipedia. We determined the highest search volume peaks to identify possible relation with online news headlines. No relation between incidence or prevalence of neurological disorders and the search volume for the related articles was found. Seven out of 10 neurological conditions showed relations in search volume peaks and news headlines. Six out of these seven peaks were related to news about famous people suffering from neurological disorders, especially those from showbusiness. Identification of discrepancies between disease burden and health seeking behavior on Wikipedia is useful in the planning of public health campaigns. Celebrities who publicly announce their neurological diagnosis might effectively promote awareness programs, increase public knowledge and reduce stigma related to diagnoses of neurological disorders.

  8. Neurology in Asia.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chong-Tin

    2015-02-10

    Asia is important as it accounts for more than half of the world population. The majority of Asian countries fall into the middle income category. As for cultural traditions, Asia is highly varied, with many languages spoken. The pattern of neurologic diseases in Asia is largely similar to the West, with some disease features being specific to Asia. Whereas Asia constitutes 60% of the world's population, it contains only 20% of the world's neurologists. This disparity is particularly evident in South and South East Asia. As for neurologic care, it is highly variable depending on whether it is an urban or rural setting, the level of economic development, and the system of health care financing. To help remedy the shortage of neurologists, most counties with larger populations have established training programs in neurology. These programs are diverse, with many areas of concern. There are regional organizations serving as a vehicle for networking in neurology and various subspecialties, as well as an official journal (Neurology Asia). The Asian Epilepsy Academy, with its emphasis on workshops in various locations, EEG certification examination, and fellowships, may provide a template of effective regional networking for improving neurology care in the region.

  9. Astrocytes: The missing link in neurological disease?

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chia-Ching John; Deneen, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is comprised of numerous cell types that work in concert to facilitate proper function and homeostasis. Disruption of these carefully orchestrated networks results in neuronal dysfunction, manifesting itself in a variety of neurological disorders. While neuronal dysregulation is causative of symptoms manifest in the clinic, the etiology of these disorders is often more complex than simply a loss of neurons or intrinsic dysregulation of their function. In the adult brain, astrocytes comprise the most abundant cell type and play key roles in CNS physiology, therefore it stands to reason that dysregulation of normal astrocyte function contributes to the etiology and progression of varied neurological disorders. We review here some neurological disorders associated with an astrocyte factor and discuss how the related astrocyte dysfunction contributes to the etiology and/or progression of these disorders. PMID:24365571

  10. [The Bridge between Pediatric and Adult Neurology].

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Keizo

    2016-06-01

    Pediatric and adult departments are differentiated based on a cutoff age of approximately 15-17 years. In clinical neurology, there are certain disorders and related problems that overlap these age-determined boundaries. In this review, the following three themes are discussed. (1) Manual dexterity: Considering motor skills through the developmental stages of a child and manual impairment due to localized brain damage in adults, manual dexterity has been reviewed extensively from the perspective of cortical association areas. (2) Hepatolenticular degeneration: Wilson's disease (children) and Westphal-Strümpell pseudosclerosis (adults) are compared and assessed based on the age of onset to identify differences in clinical symptoms and pathological findings. (3) Hirayama disease: This disease has been identified as an adult neurological disorder. Since the onset of Hirayama disease occurs around puberty in children and adolescents, it provides a connecting link between pediatric and adult neurology. PMID:27279163

  11. [Post-ischemia neurologic recovery].

    PubMed

    Guiraud-Chaumeil, Bernard; Pariente, Jérémie; Albucher, Jean-François; Loubinoux, Isabelle; Chollet, François

    2002-01-01

    Stroke is one of the most common affliction of patients with neurological symptoms. Rehabilitation of stroke patients is a difficult task. Our knowledge on rehabilitation has recently improved with the emergence of data from new neuroimaging techniques. A prospective, double blind, cross over, placebo, controlled study on 8 patients with pure motor hemiparesia, is conducted to determine the influence of a single dose of fluoxetine on motor performance and cerebral activation of patients recovering from stroke. Each patient undergoes two functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) examinations, one under fluoxetine and one under placebo. A single dose of fluoxetine is enough to modulate cerebral sensori-motor activation and significantly improves motor skills of the affected side. Further studies are required to investigate the effect of chronic administration of fluoxetine on motor function. PMID:12587340

  12. Genomic medicine and neurological disease

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Philip M.; Wiszniewski, Wojciech; Lupski, James R.

    2011-01-01

    “Genomic medicine” refers to the diagnosis, optimized management, and treatment of disease—as well as screening, counseling, and disease gene identification—in the context of information provided by an individual patient’s personal genome. Genomic medicine, to some extent synonymous with “personalized medicine,” has been made possible by recent advances in genome technologies. Genomic medicine represents a new approach to health care and disease management that attempts to optimize the care of a patient based upon information gleaned from his or her personal genome sequence. In this review, we describe recent progress in genomic medicine as it relates to neurological disease. Many neurological disorders either segregate as Mendelian phenotypes or occur sporadically in association with a new mutation in a single gene. Heritability also contributes to other neurological conditions that appear to exhibit more complex genetics. In addition to discussing current knowledge in this field, we offer suggestions for maximizing the utility of genomic information in clinical practice as the field of genomic medicine unfolds. PMID:21594611

  13. Neurologic decompression sickness following cabin pressure fluctuations at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Auten, Jonathan D; Kuhne, Michael A; Walker, Harlan M; Porter, Henry O

    2010-04-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS) occurs in diving, altitude chamber exposures, and unpressurized or depressurized high-altitude flights. Because DCS takes many forms, in-flight cases may be misinterpreted as hypoxia, hyperventilation, or viral illness, with resulting failure to respond appropriately. In this case, a 28-yr-old male pilot of a single-seat, tactical aircraft experienced 12 rapid pressure fluctuations while flying at 43,000 ft above sea level. He had no symptoms and decided to complete the flight, which required an additional 2 h in the air. Approximately 1 h later he began to experience fatigue, lightheadedness, and confusion, which he interpreted as onset of a viral illness. However, symptoms progressed to visual, cognitive, motor, and sensory degradations and it was with some difficulty that he landed safely at his destination. Neurologic DCS was suspected on initial evaluation by flight line medical personnel because of the delayed onset and symptom progression. He was transferred to a local Emergency Department and noted to have altered mental status, asymmetric motor deficits, and non-dermatomal paresthesias of the upper and lower extremities. Approximately 3.5 h after the incident and 2.5 h after the onset of symptoms he began hyperbaric oxygen therapy. He received partial relief at 30 min of the Navy DiveTable 6 and full resolution at 90 min; there were no recurrent symptoms at a 1-yr follow-up. This case highlights the importance of early recognition of in-flight DCS symptoms and landing as soon as possible rather than as soon as practical in all likely scenarios. PMID:20377149

  14. Literary neurologic syndromes. Alice in Wonderland.

    PubMed

    Rolak, L A

    1991-06-01

    Many neurologic syndromes are named for literary characters. For example, the "Alice in Wonderland" syndrome of altered body perceptions, usually caused by migrainous ischemia, is so called because of the resemblance of its symptoms to the fluctuations in size and shape that plague the main character in Lewis Carroll's 1865 novel Alice in Wonderland. The medical symptoms of distorted body images match the literary description so precisely that illustrations from the original book depict them very accurately. Because Lewis Carroll suffered from classic migraine headaches, scholars have speculated that he may have experienced this syndrome himself. PMID:2039389

  15. [Neurological sleep disorders].

    PubMed

    Khatami, Ramin

    2014-11-01

    Neurological sleep disorders are common in the general population and may have a strong impact on quality of life. General practitioners play a key role in recognizing and managing sleep disorders in the general population. They should therefore be familiar with the most important neurological sleep disorders. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the most prevalent and important neurological sleep disorders, including Restless legs syndrome (with and without periodic limb movements in sleep), narcolepsy, NREM- and REM-sleep parasomnias and the complex relationship between sleep and epilepsies. Although narcolepsy is considered as a rare disease, recent discoveries in narcolepsy research provided insight in the function of brain circuitries involved in sleep wake regulation. REM sleep behavioral parasomnia (RBD) is increasingly recognized to represent an early manifestation of neurodegenerative disorders, in particular evolving synucleinopathies. Early diagnosis may thus open new perspectives for developing novel treatment options by targeting neuroprotective substances.

  16. Genomics in Neurological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Han, Guangchun; Sun, Jiya; Wang, Jiajia; Bai, Zhouxian; Song, Fuhai; Lei, Hongxing

    2014-01-01

    Neurological disorders comprise a variety of complex diseases in the central nervous system, which can be roughly classified as neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. The basic and translational research of neurological disorders has been hindered by the difficulty in accessing the pathological center (i.e., the brain) in live patients. The rapid advancement of sequencing and array technologies has made it possible to investigate the disease mechanism and biomarkers from a systems perspective. In this review, recent progresses in the discovery of novel risk genes, treatment targets and peripheral biomarkers employing genomic technologies will be discussed. Our major focus will be on two of the most heavily investigated neurological disorders, namely Alzheimer’s disease and autism spectrum disorder. PMID:25108264

  17. Genetic Analysis in Neurology

    PubMed Central

    Pittman, Alan; Hardy, John

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, neurogenetics research had made some remarkable advances owing to the advent of genotyping arrays and next-generation sequencing. These improvements to the technology have allowed us to determine the whole-genome structure and its variation and to examine its effect on phenotype in an unprecedented manner. The identification of rare disease-causing mutations has led to the identification of new biochemical pathways and has facilitated a greater understanding of the etiology of many neurological diseases. Furthermore, genome-wide association studies have provided information on how common genetic variability impacts on the risk for the development of various complex neurological diseases. Herein, we review how these technological advances have changed the approaches being used to study the genetic basis of neurological disease and how the research findings will be translated into clinical utility. PMID:23571731

  18. [Three patients with the same diagnosis but very different symptoms].

    PubMed

    Knechtle, Beat; Rüst, Christoph A; Rosemann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We present three cases of patients with a thoracic disc herniation with misinterpretation of the initial symptoms. In a first case, pulmonary symptoms were prominent; in a second case, the patient complained of cardiac symptoms; and in a third case, the patient reported neurological symptoms. Ineffective investigation of thoracic symptoms should raise the suspicion of a thoracic disc herniation. PMID:25552446

  19. Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Leypoldt, F; Wandinger, K-P

    2014-01-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes are immune-mediated erroneous attacks on the central or peripheral nervous systems, or both, directed originally against the tumour itself. They have been known for more than 40 years, but recently the discovery of new subgroups of paraneoplastic encephalitis syndromes with a remarkably good response to immune therapy has ignited new clinical and scientific interest. Knowledge of these subgroups and their associated autoantibodies is important in therapeutic decision-making. However, the abundance of new autoantibodies and syndromes can be confusing. This review paper summarizes current knowledge and new developments in the field of paraneoplastic neurological syndromes, their classification, pathophysiology and treatment. PMID:23937626

  20. Infant neurologic assessment.

    PubMed

    Hobdell, E

    2001-08-01

    Infant neurologic assessment reflects the ongoing maturation of the central nervous system. Traditional approaches to assessment cannot be used. Key factors are accurate observation and flexibility in obtaining the data. A case example using a 4-month-old infant illustrates specific approaches to assessment. PMID:11497071

  1. Ravel's neurological illness.

    PubMed

    Alonso, R J; Pascuzzi, R M

    1999-01-01

    In the last 10 years of his life, Maurice Ravel (1875-1937) experienced a gradually progressive decline in neurological function. Dr. Alajouanine examined Ravel, noting the presence of aphasia and apraxia with relative preservation of comprehension and memory. The exact diagnosis remains unclear, but the likelihood of a progressive degenerative disorder, such as frontotemporal dementia, is herein discussed. PMID:10718529

  2. Meta-Analysis of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder or Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms, Restriction Diet, and Synthetic Food Color Additives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nigg, Joel T.; Lewis, Kara; Edinger, Tracy; Falk, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The role of diet and of food colors in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or its symptoms warrants updated quantitative meta-analysis, in light of recent divergent policy in Europe and the United States. Method: Studies were identified through a literature search using the PubMed, Cochrane Library, and PsycNET databases…

  3. [Certification for specialists on neurology by Japanese Society of Neurology].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Norihiro

    2009-11-01

    In accordance with recent ever increasing numbers in elder population in Japan, number of patients of age-related neurological diseases such as stroke, dementia and neurodegenerative diseases, etc., also remarkably increasing. Naturally, social needs for medical intervention in neurological fields inevitably become indispensable. The role of the neurologists, especially specialists of neurology, must be substantially important in the near future. The Japanese Society of Neurology has already launched the system for quality-certified specialists for neurology in 1970's. The aim of the system to educate and certify specialists for neurology has been announced as follows; the specialist of neurology must widely experienced and practiced in clinical fields, and must properly diagnose and judge the neurological illness even they are so complicate and difficult to manage (Rinsho Shinkeigaku (Clinical Neurology) 38 (6): 593-619, 1998). However, in future, the specialists for neurology must cultivate and keep the minds of "Professionalism" of physicians as well as their skills for clinical neurology. The Professionalism consists of altruism, accountability, excellence, duty, honor and integrity, respect and a personal commitment to life-long learning (ABIM: American Board of Internal Medicine, Project Professionalism, 1990-). The specialists of neurology with recent privilege in clinical insurance system for their special ability and techniques for neurological examination, should not only share their clinical specialty but also provide their opinion based upon Professionalism to all over the world. PMID:20030199

  4. Therapeutic Effects of Bee Venom on Immunological and Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Deok-Sang; Kim, Sun Kwang; Bae, Hyunsu

    2015-01-01

    Bee Venom (BV) has long been used in Korea to relieve pain symptoms and to treat inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis. The underlying mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory and analgesic actions of BV have been proved to some extent. Additionally, recent clinical and experimental studies have demonstrated that BV and BV-derived active components are applicable to a wide range of immunological and neurodegenerative diseases, including autoimmune diseases and Parkinson’s disease. These effects of BV are known to be mediated by modulating immune cells in the periphery, and glial cells and neurons in the central nervous system. This review will introduce the scientific evidence of the therapeutic effects of BV and its components on several immunological and neurological diseases, and describe their detailed mechanisms involved in regulating various immune responses and pathological changes in glia and neurons. PMID:26131770

  5. Antroduodenal motility in neurologically handicapped children with feeding intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Werlin, Steven L

    2004-01-01

    Background Dysphagia and feeding intolerance are common in neurologically handicapped children. The aim is to determine the etiologies of feeding intolerance in neurologically handicapped children who are intolerant of tube feedings. Methods Eighteen neurologically handicapped children, followed in the Tube Feeding Clinic at the Children's Hospital of Wisconsin who were intolerant of gastrostomy feedings. The charts of these 18 patients were reviewed. Past medical history, diagnoses, history of fundoplication and results of various tests of gastrointestinal function including barium contrast radiography, endoscopy and antroduodenal manometry were documented. Results Five of 11 children had abnormal barium upper gastrointestinal series. Seven of 14 had abnormal liquid phase gastric emptying tests. Two of 16 had esophagitis on endoscopy. All 18 children had abnormal antroduodenal motility. Conclusions In neurologically handicapped children foregut dysmotility may be more common than is generally recognized and can explain many of the upper gastrointestinal symptoms in neurologically handicapped children. PMID:15341670

  6. [Biopterin and child neurologic disease].

    PubMed

    Shintaku, Haruo

    2009-01-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) deficiencies are disorders affecting phenylalanine metabolism in the liver and neurotransmitter biosynthesis in the brain. BH4 is the essential cofactor in the enzymatic hydroxylation of 3 aromatic amino acids (phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan). BH4 is synthesized from guanosine triphosphate (GTP), catalyzed by GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH), 6-pyruvoyl-tetrahydropterin synthase, and sepiapterin reductase (SR), and in aromatic amino acids, the hydoxylating system is regenerated by pterin-4a-carbinolamine dehydrolase and dihydropteridine reductase (DHPR). BH4 deficiency has been diagnosed in patients with hyperphenylalaninemia (HPA) by neonatal mass-screening based on BH4 oral-loading tests, analysis of urinary or serum pteridines, and measurement of DHPR activity in blood using a Guthrie card. BH4 deficiency without treatment causes combined symptoms of HPA and neurotransmitter (dopamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine, and serotonin) deficiency, such as red hair, psychomotor retardation, and progressive neurological deterioration. However, autosomal dominant GTPCH deficiency and autosomal recessive SR deficiency leads to BH4 and neurotransmitter deficiency without HPA and may not be detected by neonatal screening for phenylketonuria. The former is Segawa's disease, which is characterized by dopa-responsive dystonia with marked diurnal fluctuation and is caused by a defect of GTPCH, and the latter is SR deficiency, which is characterized by progressive psychomotor retardation, dystonia, and severe dopamine and serotonin deficiencies. Biochemical diagnosis is performed by the measurement of neopterin and biopterin levels, since both are low in Segawa disease, and the biopterin level is high in SR deficiency in cerebrospinal fluid. We must consider metabolic disorders of biopterin in child neurologic diseases with dystonia.

  7. Brain MRI Findings in Neurological Complications of Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Cabaj, Astra; Bekiesińska-Figatowska, Monika; Duczkowska, Agnieszka; Duczkowski, Marek

    2016-01-01

    The amount of people living with cancer is increasing; they live longer and have thus a higher risk of developing neurological complications. Magnetic resonance as a diagnostic procedure of choice in detecting the reasons of neurological/psychiatric symptoms in oncological patients is nowadays relatively easily accessible. Early diagnosis established by radiologists familiar with neurological entities that may follow cancer treatment allow clinicians to provide proper treatment, even if the diagnosis seems unbelievable. The review of MR images of acute and chronic neurological complications of cancer treatment from the authors' own archive is the focus of this report. Neurological complications of cancer can be metastatic and non-metastatic; the first cannot be considered as a treatment complication, the latter can be chemoor radiotherapy-induced, acute, chronic and delayed. In our material we dealt with complications with dramatic course (stroke, PRES, acute leukoencephalopathy, Wernicke's encephalopathy) and with cases with milder and/or longer course (neuro-infections, chronic leukoencephalopathy, telangiectasias and/or cavernous hemangiomas, second tumors: glioma and meningioma after irradiation). The central nervous system is very susceptible to complications of systemic cancer and its treatment. Even though the first thought of clinicians and radiologists after a patient's first neurological/psychiatric symptoms appears concerns the metastatic spread of the disease, they need to have an understanding that there are a number of other causes of such symptoms. The knowledge of entities which can be expected and diagnostic experience prevent clinicians from making wrong diagnosis. PMID:27629856

  8. Insomnia in neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Provini, Federica; Lombardi, Carolina; Lugaresi, Elio

    2005-03-01

    Insomnia is the most common sleep complaint. Insomnia is not a disease itself but mostly a clinical sign of an underlying disease. Degenerative and vascular diseases involving the central nervous system (CNS) may impair sleep either as a result of the brain lesion or because of illness-related discomfort (motor immobility, social and familial impairment, depression, drugs). Some neurological conditions characterized by movement disorders that start or persist during sleep hinder sleep onset and/or sleep continuity, causing a poor sleep complaint. CNS lesions and/or dysfunction in three specific neurological conditions (fatal familial insomnia, Morvan's chorea, and delirium tremens) impair the basic mechanisms of sleep generation inducing a syndrome in which the inability to sleep is consistently associated with motor and sympathergic overactivation. Agrypnia excitata is the term that aptly defines this generalized overactivation syndrome.

  9. [Vitamin D and neurology].

    PubMed

    Thouvenot, Éric; Camu, William

    2013-10-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is associated with a higher risk of multiple sclerosis and also with a higher relapse rate as well as a higher number of MRI lesions. Elders with vitamin D deficiency have worse cognitive performance. Vitamin D deficiency is a risk factor for developing Alzheimer's disease. Ischemic stroke are more frequent and more severe in patients with low vitamin D levels. Carotid atherosclerosis is more frequent and more severe in patients with vitamin D deficiency. Vitamin D deficiency is associated with a higher risk and worse prognosis of Parkinson's disease. In the different neurological disorders discussed herein, gene polymorphisms that could alter vitamin D metabolism are also associated with a higher incidence or a worse disease prognosis. Despite the links between vitamin D deficiency and the risks of developing neurological disorders, there is, to date, no proof that supplementation could alter the course of these diseases.

  10. Neurological Complications of Ebola Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Billioux, Bridgette Jeanne; Smith, Bryan; Nath, Avindra

    2016-07-01

    Ebola virus disease is one of the deadliest pathogens known to man, with a mortality rate between 25-90% depending on the species and outbreak of Ebola. Typically, it presents with fever, headache, voluminous vomiting and diarrhea, and can progress to a hemorrhagic illness; neurologic symptoms, including meningoencephalitis, seizures, and coma, can also occur. Recently, an outbreak occurred in West Africa, affecting > 28,000 people, and killing > 11,000. Owing to the magnitude of this outbreak, and the large number (>17,000) of Ebola survivors, the medical and scientific communities are learning much more about the acute manifestations and sequelae of Ebola. A number of neurologic complications can occur after Ebola, such as seizures, memory loss, headaches, cranial nerve abnormalities, and tremor. Ebola may also persist in some immunologically privileged sites, including the central nervous system, and can rarely lead to relapse in disease. Owing to these findings, it is important that survivors are evaluated and monitored for neurologic symptoms. Much is unknown about this disease, and treatment remains largely supportive; however, with ongoing clinical and basic science, the mechanisms of how Ebola affects the central nervous system and how it persists after acute disease will hopefully become more clear, and better treatments and clinical practices for Ebola patients will be developed. PMID:27412684

  11. Need for palliative care for neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Provinciali, Leandro; Carlini, Giulia; Tarquini, Daniela; Defanti, Carlo Alberto; Veronese, Simone; Pucci, Eugenio

    2016-10-01

    The new concept of palliative care supports the idea of palliation as an early approach to patients affected by disabling and life-limiting disease which focuses on the patient's quality of life along the entire course of disease. This model moves beyond the traditional concept of palliation as an approach restricted to the final stage of disease and widens the fields of intervention. There is a growing awareness of the importance of palliative care not only in oncological diseases but also in many other branches of medicine, and it appears particularly evident in the approach to many of the most frequent neurological diseases that are chronic, incurable and autonomy-impairing illnesses. The definition and implementation of palliative goals and procedures in neurology must take into account the specific features of these conditions in terms of the complexity and variability of symptoms, clinical course, disability and prognosis. The realization of an effective palliative approach to neurological diseases requires specific skills and expertise to adapt the concept of palliation to the peculiarities of these diseases; this approach should be realized through the cooperation of different services and the action of a multidisciplinary team in which the neurologist should play a central role to identify and face the patient's needs. In this view, it is paramount for the neurologist to be trained in these issues to promote the integration of palliative care in the care of neurological patients.

  12. Need for palliative care for neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Provinciali, Leandro; Carlini, Giulia; Tarquini, Daniela; Defanti, Carlo Alberto; Veronese, Simone; Pucci, Eugenio

    2016-10-01

    The new concept of palliative care supports the idea of palliation as an early approach to patients affected by disabling and life-limiting disease which focuses on the patient's quality of life along the entire course of disease. This model moves beyond the traditional concept of palliation as an approach restricted to the final stage of disease and widens the fields of intervention. There is a growing awareness of the importance of palliative care not only in oncological diseases but also in many other branches of medicine, and it appears particularly evident in the approach to many of the most frequent neurological diseases that are chronic, incurable and autonomy-impairing illnesses. The definition and implementation of palliative goals and procedures in neurology must take into account the specific features of these conditions in terms of the complexity and variability of symptoms, clinical course, disability and prognosis. The realization of an effective palliative approach to neurological diseases requires specific skills and expertise to adapt the concept of palliation to the peculiarities of these diseases; this approach should be realized through the cooperation of different services and the action of a multidisciplinary team in which the neurologist should play a central role to identify and face the patient's needs. In this view, it is paramount for the neurologist to be trained in these issues to promote the integration of palliative care in the care of neurological patients. PMID:27299428

  13. Simulation in neurology.

    PubMed

    Micieli, Giuseppe; Cavallini, Anna; Santalucia, Paola; Gensini, Gianfranco

    2015-10-01

    Simulation is a frontier for disseminating knowledge in almost all the fields of medicine and it is attracting growing interest because it offers a means of developing new teaching and training models, as well as of verifying what has been learned in a critical setting that simulates clinical practice. The role of simulation in neurology, until now limited by the obvious physical limitations of the dummies used to train students and learners, is now increasing since, today, it allows anamnestic data to be related to the instrumental evidence necessary for diagnosis and therapeutic decision-making, i.e., to the findings of neurophysiological investigations (EEG, carotid and vertebral echography and transcranial Doppler, for example) and neuroradiological investigations (CT, MRI imaging), as well as vital parameter monitoring (ECG, saturimetry, blood pressure, respiratory frequency, etc.). Simulation, by providing learners with opportunities to discuss, with experts, different profiles of biological parameters (both during the simulation itself and in the subsequent debriefing session), is becoming an increasingly important tool for training those involved in evaluation of critical neurological patients (stroke, Guillan Barrè syndrome, myasthenia, status epilepticus, headache, vertigo, confusional status, etc.) and complex cases. In this SIMMED (Italian Society for Simulation in Medicine) position paper, the applications (present and, possibly, future) of simulation in neurology are reported.

  14. [Neurological Disorders and Pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Berlit, P

    2016-02-01

    Neurological disorders caused by pregnancy and puerperium include the posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, the amniotic fluid embolism syndrome (AFES), the postpartum angiopathy due to reversible vasoconstriction syndrome, and the Sheehan syndrome. Hypertension and proteinuria are the hallmarks of preeclampsia, seizures define eclampsia. Hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelets constitute the HELLP syndrome. Vision disturbances including cortical blindness occur in the posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). The Sheehan syndrome presents with panhypopituitarism post partum due to apoplexia of the pituitary gland in severe peripartal blood loss leading to longstanding hypotension. Some neurological disorders occur during pregnancy and puerperium with an increased frequency. These include stroke, sinus thrombosis, the restless legs syndrome and peripheral nerve syndromes, especially the carpal tunnel syndrome. Chronic neurologic diseases need an interdisciplinary approach during pregnancy. Some anticonvulsants double the risk of birth defects. The highest risk exists for valproic acid, the lowest for lamotrigine and levetiracetam. For MS interval treatment, glatiramer acetate and interferones seem to be safe during pregnancy. All other drugs should be avoided. PMID:26953551

  15. Conversion disorder and mass psychogenic illness in child neurology.

    PubMed

    Mink, Jonathan W

    2013-11-01

    A common problem faced by neurologists is the existence of disorders that present with neurological symptoms but do not have identifiable neurological bases. Conversion disorder is the most common of these disorders. In some situations, members of a cohesive social group will develop the same or similar symptoms. This review discusses conversion disorder in children, with an emphasis on function movement disorders. It also reviews a recent occurrence of mass psychogenic illness in New York State with discussion of the key features of mass psychogenic illness.

  16. [Neurological soft signs in schizophrenia: correlations with age, sex, educational status and psychopathology].

    PubMed

    Panagiotidis, P; Kaprinis, G; Iacovides, A; Fountoulakis, K

    2013-01-01

    extrapyramidal symptomatology. Factors such as sex, age or family history of schizophrenia, are said to influence the performance of neurological examination, whereas relative few studies have provided longitudinal follow-up data on neurological soft signs in a sufficient number of patients, in order to address a possible deterioration of neurological functions. Finally, one additional difficulty when analyzing the NSS literature lies in the diversity of symptoms that are evaluated in the studies and/or non-standardized procedures or scoring. We will review some basic issues concerning recurrent difficulties in the measurement and definition of soft signs, as well as controversies on the significance of these signs with respect to clinical subtyping of schizophrenia, and social and demographic variables.

  17. [Neurological soft signs in schizophrenia: correlations with age, sex, educational status and psychopathology].

    PubMed

    Panagiotidis, P; Kaprinis, G; Iacovides, A; Fountoulakis, K

    2013-01-01

    extrapyramidal symptomatology. Factors such as sex, age or family history of schizophrenia, are said to influence the performance of neurological examination, whereas relative few studies have provided longitudinal follow-up data on neurological soft signs in a sufficient number of patients, in order to address a possible deterioration of neurological functions. Finally, one additional difficulty when analyzing the NSS literature lies in the diversity of symptoms that are evaluated in the studies and/or non-standardized procedures or scoring. We will review some basic issues concerning recurrent difficulties in the measurement and definition of soft signs, as well as controversies on the significance of these signs with respect to clinical subtyping of schizophrenia, and social and demographic variables. PMID:24486976

  18. Neurological complication of dengue infection.

    PubMed

    Murthy, J M K

    2010-01-01

    Dengue infection is endemic in more than 100 countries, mostly in the developing world. Recent observations indicate that the clinical profile of dengue is changing, and that neurological manifestations are being reported more frequently. The exact incidence of various neurological complications is uncertain. The pathogenesis of neurological manifestations is multiple and includes: neurotrophic effect of the dengue virus, related to the systemic effects of dengue infection, and immune mediated. In countries endemic to dengue, it will be prudent to investigate for dengue infection in patients with fever and acute neurological manifestations. There is need for understanding of the pathogenesis of various neurological manifestations.

  19. Welcome to Neurology: Genetics.

    PubMed

    Pulst, Stefan M

    2015-06-01

    The powers of human genetics and genetic technologies have transformed the complexities of neurology and neuroscience at the basic, translational, and now also the clinical level. We have left an era of black and white views of causative genetic variation and are entering a period of more than 50 shades of grey, fascinated with DNA variants that increase or decrease risk, epigenetic modification, and an unexpectedly large number of variants of unknown or potentially pathogenic significance. Loss-of-function alleles and even complete human gene knockouts for certain genes appear to be compatible with a normal phenotype. PMID:27066541

  20. Neurological theory of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Eggers, A E

    2003-06-01

    Review of the older literature on the relationship between migraine and hypertension, written in the era before either condition could be treated, discloses a high rate of co-morbidity. A neurological theory of essential hypertension is proposed in which the two diseases are brought together into one entity. It is hypothesized that abnormally functioning serotonergic pacemaker cells in the dorsal raphe nucleus, as part of a chronic stress response, inappropriately activate and inhibit parts of the central and autonomic nervous systems, so as to cause the two conditions. This theory builds on a previously published neural theory of migraine.

  1. Neurologic injury in snowmobiling

    PubMed Central

    Plog, Benjamin A.; Pierre, Clifford A.; Srinivasan, Vasisht; Srinivasan, Kaushik; Petraglia, Anthony L.; Huang, Jason H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Snowmobiles are increasingly popular recreational, all-terrain utility vehicles that require skill and physical strength to operate given their inherent maneuverability, acceleration, and top speed capabilities. These same characteristics increase the risk of injury with the operation of these vehicles, particularly neurological injury. We characterize our series of 107 patients involved in snowmobiling accidents. Methods: From January 2004 to January 2012, all snowmobiling-related injuries referred to our regional trauma center were reviewed. Information had been recorded in the hospital's trauma registry and medical records were retrospectively reviewed for data pertaining to the injuries, with particular emphasis on neurological injuries and any associated details. Results: A total of 107 patients were identified. Ninety percent of injured riders were male. The mean age was 34.4 years (range 10-70), with 7% younger than age 16. The mean Injury Severity Score was 12.0 ± 0.69 (range 1-34). Although not documented in all patients, alcohol use was found in 7.5% of the patients and drug use found in one patient. Documentation of helmet use was available for only 31 of the patients; of which 13% were not helmeted. Causes included being thrown, flipped, or roll-over (33%), striking a stationary object (27%), being struck by a snowmobile (9%), striking another snowmobile (5.5%) or a car, train, or truck (5.5%), being injured by the machine itself (9%), other (2%) or unspecified (18%). Head injuries occurred in 35% patients, including concussion, subarachnoid hemorrhage, subdural hematoma, contusion, and facial/skull fracture. Spinal fractures occurred in 21% of the patients. Fractures to the thoracic spine were the most common (50%), followed by the cervical (41%) and lumbar (36%) spine. There were also three brachial plexus injuries, one tibial nerve injury, and one internal carotid artery dissection. Average length of stay was 4.98 ± 0.56 days

  2. The neurology of sleep.

    PubMed

    Swick, Todd J

    2005-11-01

    Neurology, by virtue of its study of the brain, is the primary medical science for the elucidation of the anatomy, physiology, pathology and, ultimately, the function of sleep. There has been nothing short of a revolution in the science of sleep over the past 50 years. From the discovery of REM sleep to the identification of Hypocretin/Orexin the basic science and clinical field of sleep medicine has blossomed. This article will explore the anatomy, physiology, biochemistry and, to a limited extent, pathophysiology of the sleep/wake centers of the brain. The field of chronobiology will also be touched upon.

  3. Thermography in Neurologic Practice

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Eduardo Borba; Vilaça-Alves, José; Rosa, Claudio; Reis, Victor Machado

    2015-01-01

    One kind of medical images that has been developed in the last decades is thermal images. These images are assessed by infrared cameras and have shown an exponential development in recent years. In this sense, the aim of this study was to describe possibilities of thermography usage in the neurologic practice. It was performed a systematic review in Web of Knowledge (Thompson Reuters), set in all databases which used two combination of keywords as “topic”: “thermography” and “neurology”; and “thermography” and “neurologic”. The chronological period was defined from 2000 to 2014 (the least 15 years). Among the studies included in this review, only seven were with experimental design. It is few to bring thermography as a daily tool in clinical practice. However, these studies have suggested good results. The studies of review and an analyzed patent showed that the authors consider the thermography as a diagnostic tool and they recommend its usage. It can be concluded that thermography is already used as a diagnostic and monitoring tool of patients with neuropathies, particularly in complex regional pain syndrome, and stroke. And yet, this tool has great potential for future research about its application in diagnosis of other diseases of neurological origin. PMID:26191090

  4. Medical marijuana in neurology.

    PubMed

    Benbadis, Selim R; Sanchez-Ramos, Juan; Bozorg, Ali; Giarratano, Melissa; Kalidas, Kavita; Katzin, Lara; Robertson, Derrick; Vu, Tuan; Smith, Amanda; Zesiewicz, Theresa

    2014-12-01

    Constituents of the Cannabis plant, cannabinoids, may be of therapeutic value in neurologic diseases. The most abundant cannabinoids are Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, which possesses psychoactive properties, and cannabidiol, which has no intrinsic psychoactive effects, but exhibits neuroprotective properties in preclinical studies. A small number of high-quality clinical trials support the safety and efficacy of cannabinoids for treatment of spasticity of multiple sclerosis, pain refractory to opioids, glaucoma, nausea and vomiting. Lower level clinical evidence indicates that cannabinoids may be useful for dystonia, tics, tremors, epilepsy, migraine and weight loss. Data are also limited in regards to adverse events and safety. Common nonspecific adverse events are similar to those of other CNS 'depressants' and include weakness, mood changes and dizziness. Cannabinoids can have cardiovascular adverse events and, when smoked chronically, may affect pulmonary function. Fatalities are rare even with recreational use. There is a concern about psychological dependence, but physical dependence is less well documented. Cannabis preparations may presently offer an option for compassionate use in severe neurologic diseases, but at this point, only when standard-of-care therapy is ineffective. As more high-quality clinical data are gathered, the therapeutic application of cannabinoids will likely expand.

  5. Neurology and diving.

    PubMed

    Massey, E Wayne; Moon, Richard E

    2014-01-01

    Diving exposes a person to the combined effects of increased ambient pressure and immersion. The reduction in pressure when surfacing can precipitate decompression sickness (DCS), caused by bubble formation within tissues due to inert gas supersaturation. Arterial gas embolism (AGE) can also occur due to pulmonary barotrauma as a result of breath holding during ascent or gas trapping due to disease, causing lung hyperexpansion, rupture and direct entry of alveolar gas into the blood. Bubble disease due to either DCS or AGE is collectively known as decompression illness. Tissue and intravascular bubbles can induce a cascade of events resulting in CNS injury. Manifestations of decompression illness can vary in severity, from mild (paresthesias, joint pains, fatigue) to severe (vertigo, hearing loss, paraplegia, quadriplegia). Particularly as these conditions are uncommon, early recognition is essential to provide appropriate management, consisting of first aid oxygen, targeted fluid resuscitation and hyperbaric oxygen, which is the definitive treatment. Less common neurologic conditions that do not require hyperbaric oxygen include rupture of a labyrinthine window due to inadequate equalization of middle ear pressure during descent, which can precipitate vertigo and hearing loss. Sinus and middle ear overpressurization during ascent can compress the trigeminal and facial nerves respectively, causing temporary facial hypesthesia and lower motor neuron facial weakness. Some conditions preclude safe diving, such as seizure disorders, since a convulsion underwater is likely to be fatal. Preventive measures to reduce neurologic complications of diving include exclusion of individuals with specific medical conditions and safe diving procedures, particularly related to descent and ascent.

  6. Medical marijuana in neurology.

    PubMed

    Benbadis, Selim R; Sanchez-Ramos, Juan; Bozorg, Ali; Giarratano, Melissa; Kalidas, Kavita; Katzin, Lara; Robertson, Derrick; Vu, Tuan; Smith, Amanda; Zesiewicz, Theresa

    2014-12-01

    Constituents of the Cannabis plant, cannabinoids, may be of therapeutic value in neurologic diseases. The most abundant cannabinoids are Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, which possesses psychoactive properties, and cannabidiol, which has no intrinsic psychoactive effects, but exhibits neuroprotective properties in preclinical studies. A small number of high-quality clinical trials support the safety and efficacy of cannabinoids for treatment of spasticity of multiple sclerosis, pain refractory to opioids, glaucoma, nausea and vomiting. Lower level clinical evidence indicates that cannabinoids may be useful for dystonia, tics, tremors, epilepsy, migraine and weight loss. Data are also limited in regards to adverse events and safety. Common nonspecific adverse events are similar to those of other CNS 'depressants' and include weakness, mood changes and dizziness. Cannabinoids can have cardiovascular adverse events and, when smoked chronically, may affect pulmonary function. Fatalities are rare even with recreational use. There is a concern about psychological dependence, but physical dependence is less well documented. Cannabis preparations may presently offer an option for compassionate use in severe neurologic diseases, but at this point, only when standard-of-care therapy is ineffective. As more high-quality clinical data are gathered, the therapeutic application of cannabinoids will likely expand. PMID:25427150

  7. Porphyria and its neurologic manifestations.

    PubMed

    Tracy, Jennifer A; Dyck, P James B

    2014-01-01

    Porphyrias are rare disorders resulting from a defect in the heme biosynthetic pathway. They can produce significant disease of both the peripheral and central nervous systems, in addition to other organ systems, with acute intermittent porphyria, hereditary coproporphyria, and variegate porphyria as the subtypes associated with neurologic manifestations. The presence of a motor-predominant peripheral neuropathy (axonal predominant), accompanied by gastrointestinal distress and neuropsychiatric manifestations, should be a strong clue to the diagnosis of porphyria. Clinical confirmation can be made through evaluation of urine porphyrins during an exacerbation of disease. While hematin is helpful for acute treatment, long-term effective management requires avoidance of overstimulation of the cytochrome P450 pathway, as well as other risk factor control.

  8. Sports Neurology in Clinical Practice: Case Studies.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Tad

    2016-08-01

    With regard to persistent posttraumatic headache, there is legitimate concern that duration of symptoms may have an impact on the efficacy of future treatment attempts. Without neuropathologic confirmation, a clinical diagnosis of chronic traumatic encephalopathy cannot be made with a high degree of confidence. Sport-related headaches are challenging in a return-to-play context, because it is often unclear whether an athlete has an exacerbation of a primary headache disorder, has new-onset headache unrelated to trauma, or is in the recovery phase after concussion. Regular physical exercise may prove beneficial to multiple neurologic disease states. PMID:27445251

  9. Neurologic Parasitic Infections in Immigrants and Travelers

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Kiran; Zunt, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Infectious diseases are increasingly common in modern clinical practice and the contemporary neurologist must be aware of the clinical manifestations, potential complications, and management of common travel-related infections. The authors provide an approach to patients who present with neurologic symptoms, with a history of travel to or residence in tropical and developing countries. Although many other infections are important in this demographic, they focus on three parasitic infections that neurologists may encounter: cerebral malaria, neuroschistosomiasis, and neurocysticercosis. The epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, diagnostic evaluation, and treatment are discussed for each infection. PMID:21964842

  10. The neurologic manifestations of the acute porphyrias.

    PubMed

    Simon, Neil G; Herkes, Geoffrey K

    2011-09-01

    The porphyrias are diseases characterised by accumulation of porphyrins and porphyrin precursors owing to enzymatic deficiencies of the haem synthetic pathway. In the acute hepatic porphyrias accumulation of porphyrin precursors, in particular delta-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA), cause dysfunction of the central, peripheral and autonomic nervous systems. This leads to the characteristic clinical findings of abdominal pain, neuropsychiatric symptoms and neuropathy. The exact pathogenic mechanism is not clear but evidence to date suggests both direct toxic effects of ALA and intracellular metabolic derangement contribute to the neurologic disorders. This review explores the mechanisms of neural dysfunction in the acute porphyrias and the resultant clinical features of an acute attack.

  11. Different Neurologic Aspects of Nutritional B12 Deficiency in Infancy.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Sanem; Serdaroglu, Gul; Tekgul, Hasan; Gokben, Sarenur

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate neurologic problems caused by nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency in infancy. Twenty-four cases between 2 and 18 months of age with neurologic symptoms and/or signs and diagnosed as nutritional vitamin B12 deficiency were analyzed. The most common symptoms were developmental retardation, afebrile seizures, and involuntary movements. The mean vitamin B12 levels were lower in patients with both neurologic and extraneurologic involvement when compared to those with only neurologic symptoms. All of the cases were treated with vitamin B12. In patients with severe deficiencies, involuntary movements were observed during vitamin B12 treatment using cyanocobalamin form. At the 1-year follow-up, all but 3 patients were considered neurodevelopmentally normal. The 3 patients that did not fully recover, on admission, had the lowest vitamin B12 levels. It is of great importance to prevent, diagnose, and treat vitamin B12 deficiency promptly to prevent the long-term neurologic problems.

  12. History of neurologic examination books.

    PubMed

    Boes, Christopher J

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to create an annotated list of textbooks dedicated to teaching the neurologic examination. Monographs focused primarily on the complete neurologic examination published prior to 1960 were reviewed. This analysis was limited to books with the word "examination" in the title, with exceptions for the texts of Robert Wartenberg and Gordon Holmes. Ten manuals met the criteria. Works dedicated primarily to the neurologic examination without a major emphasis on disease description or treatment first appeared in the early 1900s. Georg Monrad-Krohn's "Blue Book of Neurology" ("Blue Bible") was the earliest success. These treatises served the important purpose of educating trainees on proper neurologic examination technique. They could make a reputation and be profitable for the author (Monrad-Krohn), highlight how neurology was practiced at individual institutions (McKendree, Denny-Brown, Holmes, DeJong, Mayo Clinic authors), and honor retiring mentors (Mayo Clinic authors).

  13. The Spectrum of Neurological Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Mir, Tanveer P.

    2012-01-01

    The equivalence of brain death with death is largely, although not universally accepted. Patients may have suffered insults such as cardiac arrest, vascular catastrophe, poisoning, or head trauma. Early identification of patients at greatest risk of poor neurologic outcome and management in the appropriate critical care setting is the key to maximizing neurological recovery. Recent technological advances and neuroimaging have made it possible to predict neurological reversibility with great accuracy. Significant improvements in therapy such as hypothermia, will improve outcomes in neurological catastrophies, particularly in anoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. The clinical spectrum and diagnostic criteria of minimally conscious and vegetative states is reviewed. The current understanding of the differences in prognosis and prediction of meaningful cognitive and functional recovery in each neurological state is described. Establishing an understanding of the ethical principles that guide medical decisions in clinical practice related to different neurological states is evolving into a new field called neuroethics. PMID:23610514

  14. History of neurologic examination books.

    PubMed

    Boes, Christopher J

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to create an annotated list of textbooks dedicated to teaching the neurologic examination. Monographs focused primarily on the complete neurologic examination published prior to 1960 were reviewed. This analysis was limited to books with the word "examination" in the title, with exceptions for the texts of Robert Wartenberg and Gordon Holmes. Ten manuals met the criteria. Works dedicated primarily to the neurologic examination without a major emphasis on disease description or treatment first appeared in the early 1900s. Georg Monrad-Krohn's "Blue Book of Neurology" ("Blue Bible") was the earliest success. These treatises served the important purpose of educating trainees on proper neurologic examination technique. They could make a reputation and be profitable for the author (Monrad-Krohn), highlight how neurology was practiced at individual institutions (McKendree, Denny-Brown, Holmes, DeJong, Mayo Clinic authors), and honor retiring mentors (Mayo Clinic authors). PMID:25829645

  15. Neuropathic urinary retention in the absence of neurological signs.

    PubMed

    Sylvester, P A; McLoughlin, J; Sibley, G N; Dorman, P J; Kabala, J; Ormerod, I E

    1995-12-01

    We present two cases of painless urinary retention secondary to central intervertebral disc prolapse. In neither case were there signs or symptoms suggesting an underlying neurological insult. Both patients voided spontaneously following neurosurgical intervention. The classical features of acute cauda equina compression may be absent in patients with central lumbar disc protrusion. Painless urinary retention may be the only physical sign.

  16. [Neurological manifestations of giant cell arteritis].

    PubMed

    Grachev, Yu V

    2016-01-01

    The article describes clinical, including neurological manifestations, of giant cell arteritis (GCA) - granulomatous vasculitis of large and medium-sized vessels, predominantly craniofacial, including precerebral and cerebral, arteries. Histopathological features of GCA are illustrated by the schemes of panarteritis and «postarteritis» (proliferative and fibrotic changes in the intima, underlying the development of cerebrovascular disorders). The main clinical manifestations of GCA are described as 3 groups of symptoms: general constitutional symptoms; manifestations of vasculitis of craniofacial, precerebral and cerebral arteries; polymyalgia rheumaticа. The authors present their own version of the taxonomy of visual disturbances in patients with GCA. Diagnostic steps in patients with suggestive signs of GCA are described. Therapeutic regimens of use of glucocorticoids for suggestion/diagnosis of GCA are presented.

  17. Neurology of Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Sweis, Rochelle; Ortiz, Jorge; Biller, José

    2016-03-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response syndrome occurring secondary to infection and labeled severe when end organ dysfunction or tissue hypoperfusion transpires. Sepsis-associated mortality remains high among critically ill patients, with chronic disease and immunosuppression being the most common risk factors. Studies demonstrate that early recognition and treatment are vital to decreasing mortality. Some of the least understood effects of sepsis are the associated neurologic complications. The peripheral nervous system (PNS) has gained most consideration and thought, largely due to dependence on mechanical ventilation. Central nervous system (CNS) complications related to sepsis have only more recently gained attention but continue to go unnoticed. Aside from the clinical examination, electroencephalography (EEG) is a sensitive tool for prognostication or uncovering non-convulsive seizures in encephalopathic patients. Further studies are needed to further define the urgency of a prevention and treatment plan for the deleterious effects of sepsis on the PNS and CNS. PMID:26820754

  18. Neurology of volition.

    PubMed

    Kranick, Sarah M; Hallett, Mark

    2013-09-01

    Neurological disorders of volition may be characterized by deficits in willing and/or agency. When we move our bodies through space, it is the sense that we intended to move (willing) and that our actions were a consequence of this intention (self-agency) that gives us the sense of voluntariness and a general feeling of being "in control." While it is possible to have movements that share executive machinery ordinarily used for voluntary movement but lack a sense of voluntariness, such as psychogenic movement disorders, it is also possible to claim volition for presumed involuntary movements (early chorea) or even when no movement is produced (anosognosia). The study of such patients should enlighten traditional models of how the percepts of volition are generated in the brain with regard to movement. We discuss volition and its components as multi-leveled processes with feedforward and feedback information flow, and dependence on prior expectations as well as external and internal cues.

  19. Hither neurology: research.

    PubMed Central

    Warlow, C P

    1992-01-01

    Neurological disability may be prevented, or it may be alleviated if prevention is impossible or ineffective. Research into prevention and alleviation can be "laboratory" or "clinical", the latter being no less scientific than the former. All proposed treatments must be properly evaluated to ensure that effective interventions are widely adopted and ineffective ones abandoned. Unless an intervention has a major effect on outcome (which most do not), the most efficient assessment is by random allocation of patients to the new intervention versus the old. Although there were, and still are, forces opposed to the proper evaluation of treatment, there are strong economic clinical arguments in its favour, which will lead to appropriate targeting of scarce health resources. PMID:1564502

  20. Immunotherapies for Neurological Manifestations in the Context of Systemic Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Kampylafka, Eleni I; Alexopoulos, Harry; Dalakas, Marinos C; Tzioufas, Athanasios G

    2016-01-01

    Neurological involvement is relatively common in the majority of systemic autoimmune diseases and may lead to severe morbidity and mortality, if not promptly treated. Treatment options vary greatly, depending on the underlying systemic pathophysiology and the associated neurological symptoms. Selecting the appropriate therapeutic scheme is further complicated by the lack of definite therapeutic guidelines, the necessity to differentiate primary neurological syndromes from those related to the underlying systemic disease, and to sort out adverse neurological manifestations caused by immunosuppressants or the biological agents used to treat the primary disease. Immunotherapy is a sine qua non for treating most, if not all, neurological conditions presenting in the context of systemic autoimmunity. Specific agents include classical immune modulators such as corticosteroids, cyclophosphamide, intravenous immunoglobulin, and plasma exchange, as well as numerous biological therapies, for example anti-tumor necrosis factor agents and monoclonal antibodies that target various immune pathways such as B cells, cytokines, and co-stimulatory molecules. However, experience regarding the use of these agents in neurological complications of systemic diseases is mainly empirical or based on small uncontrolled studies and case series. The aim of this review is to present the state-of-the-art therapies applied in various neurological manifestations encountered in the context of systemic autoimmune diseases; evaluate all treatment options on the basis of existing guidelines; and compliment these data with our personal experience derived from a large number of patients.

  1. Neurology and diving.

    PubMed

    Massey, E Wayne; Moon, Richard E

    2014-01-01

    Diving exposes a person to the combined effects of increased ambient pressure and immersion. The reduction in pressure when surfacing can precipitate decompression sickness (DCS), caused by bubble formation within tissues due to inert gas supersaturation. Arterial gas embolism (AGE) can also occur due to pulmonary barotrauma as a result of breath holding during ascent or gas trapping due to disease, causing lung hyperexpansion, rupture and direct entry of alveolar gas into the blood. Bubble disease due to either DCS or AGE is collectively known as decompression illness. Tissue and intravascular bubbles can induce a cascade of events resulting in CNS injury. Manifestations of decompression illness can vary in severity, from mild (paresthesias, joint pains, fatigue) to severe (vertigo, hearing loss, paraplegia, quadriplegia). Particularly as these conditions are uncommon, early recognition is essential to provide appropriate management, consisting of first aid oxygen, targeted fluid resuscitation and hyperbaric oxygen, which is the definitive treatment. Less common neurologic conditions that do not require hyperbaric oxygen include rupture of a labyrinthine window due to inadequate equalization of middle ear pressure during descent, which can precipitate vertigo and hearing loss. Sinus and middle ear overpressurization during ascent can compress the trigeminal and facial nerves respectively, causing temporary facial hypesthesia and lower motor neuron facial weakness. Some conditions preclude safe diving, such as seizure disorders, since a convulsion underwater is likely to be fatal. Preventive measures to reduce neurologic complications of diving include exclusion of individuals with specific medical conditions and safe diving procedures, particularly related to descent and ascent. PMID:24365363

  2. Symptoms: Lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Paskett, Electra D

    2015-01-01

    Lymphedema is one of the main late effects from breast cancer treatment affecting 3-60% of breast cancer survivors. Primarily occurring in the hand, arm, and/or affected breast, symptoms of lymphedema include swelling, pain, redness, restriction of arm/hand movement, tightness and feelings of fullness. These symptoms not only may limit physical functioning but also negatively affect quality of life, body image, social functioning, and financial status of breast cancer survivors with lymphedema. Unfortunately, there are no standardized methods for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of breast cancer-related lymphedema. Despite its prevalence and lack of clinical guidelines, lymphedema is one of the most poorly understood, relatively underestimated, and least researched complications of cancer treatment. This chapter reviews the current problem of breast cancer-related lymphedema by investigating prevention and risk reduction strategies, diagnosis, and treatment. In addition, this chapter identifies future research opportunities focusing on prevention and risk reduction strategies, quality of life and physical function, surveillance, patient education, cost, diagnosis, and treatment. Challenges and recommendations for future research in these areas, particularly among underserved populations, are discussed. PMID:26059932

  3. [Neurological appraisal of children and adolescents with psychotic symptoms].

    PubMed

    Tomás-Vila, Miguel

    2015-05-01

    Introduccion. Las manifestaciones psicoticas en la infancia no son infrecuentes; sin embargo, la bibliografia existente acerca de la valoracion neurologica de niños y adolescentes con cuadros psicoticos es muy escasa. Objetivo. Realizar una revision bibliografica no sistematica que permita responder a estas tres cuestiones: cuando debe llevarse a cabo una valoracion neurologica en un niño con rasgos psicoticos?, cuales son las condiciones medicas que pueden incluir un cuadro psicotico en su evolucion? y cual debe ser el procedimiento diagnostico? Desarrollo. Se revisan las enfermedades que pueden presentar sintomatologia psicotica al inicio o durante la evolucion, y se agrupan por patologias: errores congenitos del metabolismo, enfermedades geneticas, enfermedades autoinmunes e infecciosas, malformaciones del sistema nervioso central, epilepsia, patologia vascular, procesos reumatologicos, tumores cerebrales, y farmacos y sustancias psicoactivas. Se propone una pauta diagnostica en la que se valora la informacion obtenida a partir de la anamnesis y la exploracion y la aportacion de cada prueba diagnostica. Conclusiones. El numero de procesos que pueden manifestar sintomatologia psicotica a lo largo de su evolucion es muy elevado, y hay que considerar las claves que ofrecen la anamnesis y la exploracion. Esta revision puede ayudar a neuropediatras y otros especialistas a realizar una valoracion mas sistematizada de niños y adolescentes con cuadros psicoticos.

  4. Neurological and ocular fascioliasis in humans.

    PubMed

    Mas-Coma, Santiago; Agramunt, Verónica H; Valero, María Adela

    2014-01-01

    Fascioliasis is a food-borne parasitic disease caused by the trematode species Fasciola hepatica, distributed worldwide, and Fasciola gigantica, restricted to given regions of Africa and Asia. This disease in humans shows an increasing importance, which relies on its recent widespread emergence related to climate and global changes and also on its pathogenicity in the invasive, biliary, and advanced chronic phases in the human endemic areas, mainly of developing countries. In spite of the large neurological affection capacity of Fasciola, this important pathogenic aspect of the disease has been pronouncedly overlooked in the past decades and has not even appear within the numerous reviews on the parasitic diseases of the central nervous system. The aim of this wide retrospective review is an in-depth analysis of the characteristics of neurological and ocular fascioliasis caused by these two fasciolid species. The terms of neurofascioliasis and ophthalmofascioliasis are restricted to cases in which the direct affection of the central nervous system or the eye by a migrant ectopic fasciolid fluke is demonstrated by an aetiological diagnosis of recovered flukes after surgery or spontaneous moving-out of the fluke through the orbit. Cases in which the ectopic fluke is not recovered and the symptoms cannot be explained by an indirect affection at distance may also be included in these terms. Neurofascioliasis and ophthalmofascioliasis cases are reviewed and discussed. With regard to fascioliasis infection giving an indirect rise to neurological affection, the distribution and frequency of cases are analysed according to geography, sex, and age. Minor symptoms and major manifestations are discussed. Three main types of cases are distinguished depending on the characteristics of their manifestations: genuine neurological, meningeal, and psychiatric or neuropsychic. The impressive symptoms and signs appearing in each type of these cases are included. Brain examination

  5. Depressive symptoms in neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Baquero, Miquel; Martín, Nuria

    2015-01-01

    Depressive symptoms are very common in chronic conditions. This is true so for neurodegenerative diseases. A number of patients with cognitive decline and dementia due to Alzheimer’s disease and related conditions like Parkinson’s disease, Lewy body disease, vascular dementia, frontotemporal degeneration amongst other entities, experience depressive symptoms in greater or lesser grade at some point during the course of the illness. Depressive symptoms have a particular significance in neurological disorders, specially in neurodegenerative diseases, because brain, mind, behavior and mood relationship. A number of patients may develop depressive symptoms in early stages of the neurologic disease, occurring without clear presence of cognitive decline with only mild cognitive deterioration. Classically, depression constitutes a reliable diagnostic challenge in this setting. However, actually we can recognize and evaluate depressive, cognitive or motor symptoms of neurodegenerative disease in order to establish their clinical significance and to plan some therapeutic strategies. Depressive symptoms can appear also lately, when the neurodegenerative disease is fully developed. The presence of depression and other neuropsychiatric symptoms have a negative impact on the quality-of-life of patients and caregivers. Besides, patients with depressive symptoms also tend to further decrease function and reduce cognitive abilities and also uses to present more affected clinical status, compared with patients without depression. Depressive symptoms are treatable. Early detection of depressive symptoms is very important in patients with neurodegenerative disorders, in order to initiate the most adequate treatment. We review in this paper the main neurodegenerative diseases, focusing in depressive symptoms of each other entities and current recommendations of management and treatment. PMID:26301229

  6. Anthrax: Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... hands Inhalation anthrax symptoms can include: Fever and chills Chest Discomfort Shortness of breath Confusion or dizziness ... aches Gastrointestinal anthrax symptoms can include: Fever and chills Swelling of neck or neck glands Sore throat ...

  7. Functional Neuroanatomy and Neurophysiology of Functional Neurological Disorders (Conversion Disorder).

    PubMed

    Voon, Valerie; Cavanna, Andrea E; Coburn, Kerry; Sampson, Shirlene; Reeve, Alya; LaFrance, W Curt

    2016-01-01

    Much is known regarding the physical characteristics, comorbid symptoms, psychological makeup, and neuropsychological performance of patients with functional neurological disorders (FNDs)/conversion disorders. Gross neurostructural deficits do not account for the patients' deficits or symptoms. This review describes the literature focusing on potential neurobiological (i.e. functional neuroanatomic/neurophysiological) findings among individuals with FND, examining neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies of patients with the various forms of motor and sensory FND. In summary, neural networks and neurophysiologic mechanisms may mediate "functional" symptoms, reflecting neurobiological and intrapsychic processes.

  8. Functional Neuroanatomy and Neurophysiology of Functional Neurological Disorders (Conversion Disorder).

    PubMed

    Voon, Valerie; Cavanna, Andrea E; Coburn, Kerry; Sampson, Shirlene; Reeve, Alya; LaFrance, W Curt

    2016-01-01

    Much is known regarding the physical characteristics, comorbid symptoms, psychological makeup, and neuropsychological performance of patients with functional neurological disorders (FNDs)/conversion disorders. Gross neurostructural deficits do not account for the patients' deficits or symptoms. This review describes the literature focusing on potential neurobiological (i.e. functional neuroanatomic/neurophysiological) findings among individuals with FND, examining neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies of patients with the various forms of motor and sensory FND. In summary, neural networks and neurophysiologic mechanisms may mediate "functional" symptoms, reflecting neurobiological and intrapsychic processes. PMID:26900733

  9. History of neurologic examination books

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to create an annotated list of textbooks dedicated to teaching the neurologic examination. Monographs focused primarily on the complete neurologic examination published prior to 1960 were reviewed. This analysis was limited to books with the word “examination” in the title, with exceptions for the texts of Robert Wartenberg and Gordon Holmes. Ten manuals met the criteria. Works dedicated primarily to the neurologic examination without a major emphasis on disease description or treatment first appeared in the early 1900s. Georg Monrad-Krohn's “Blue Book of Neurology” (“Blue Bible”) was the earliest success. These treatises served the important purpose of educating trainees on proper neurologic examination technique. They could make a reputation and be profitable for the author (Monrad-Krohn), highlight how neurology was practiced at individual institutions (McKendree, Denny-Brown, Holmes, DeJong, Mayo Clinic authors), and honor retiring mentors (Mayo Clinic authors). PMID:25829645

  10. Neurologic Itch Management.

    PubMed

    Şavk, Ekin

    2016-01-01

    Neurologic itch is defined as pruritus resulting from any dysfunction of the nervous system. Itch arising due to a neuroanatomic pathology is seen to be neuropathic. Causes of neuropathic itch range from localized entrapment of a peripheral nerve to generalized degeneration of small nerve fibers. Antipruritic medications commonly used for other types of itch such as antihistamines and corticosteroids lack efficacy in neuropathic itch. Currently there are no therapeutic options that offer relief in all types of neuropathic pruritus, and treatment strategies vary according to etiology. It is best to decide on the appropriate tests and procedures in collaboration with a neurologist during the initial work-up. Treatment of neuropathic itch includes general antipruritic measures, local or systemic pharmacotherapy, various physical modalities, and surgery. Surgical intervention is the obvious choice of therapy in cases of spinal or cerebral mass, abscess, or hemorrhagic stroke, and may provide decompression in entrapment neuropathies. Symptomatic treatment is needed in the vast majority of patients. General antipruritic measures should be encouraged. Local treatment agents with at least some antipruritic effect include capsaicin, local anesthetics, doxepin, tacrolimus, and botulinum toxin A. Current systemic therapy relies on anticonvulsants such as gabapentin and pregabalin. Phototherapy, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and physical therapy have also been of value in selected cases. Among the avenues to be explored are transcranial magnetic stimulation of the brain, new topical cannabinoid receptor agonists, various modes of acupuncture, a holistic approach with healing touch, and cell transplantation to the spinal cord. PMID:27578080

  11. Neurological manifestations of malaria.

    PubMed

    Román, G C; Senanayake, N

    1992-03-01

    The involvement of the nervous system in malaria is reviewed in this paper. Cerebral malaria, the acute encephalopathy which complicates exclusively the infection by Plasmodium falciparum commonly affects children and adolescents in hyperendemic areas. Plugging of cerebral capillaries and venules by clumped, parasitized red cells causing sludging in the capillary circulation is one hypothesis to explain its pathogenesis. The other is a humoral hypothesis which proposes nonspecific, immune-mediated, inflammatory responses with release of vasoactive substances capable of producing endothelial damage and alterations of permeability. Cerebral malaria has a mortality rate up to 50%, and also a considerable longterm morbidity, particularly in children. Hypoglycemia, largely in patients treated with quinine, may complicate the cerebral symptomatology. Other central nervous manifestations of malaria include intracranial hemorrhage, cerebral arterial occlusion, and transient extrapyramidal and neuropsychiatric manifestations. A self-limiting, isolated cerebellar ataxia, presumably caused by immunological mechanisms, in patients recovering from falciparum malaria has been recognized in Sri Lanka. Malaria is a common cause of febrile seizures in the tropics, and it also contributes to the development of epilepsy in later life. Several reports of spinal cord and peripheral nerve involvement are also available. A transient muscle paralysis resembling periodic paralysis during febrile episodes of malaria has been described in some patients. The pathogenesis of these neurological manifestations remains unexplored, but offers excellent perspectives for research at a clinical as well as experimental level. PMID:1307475

  12. Neurology of Volition

    PubMed Central

    Kranick, Sarah M.; Hallett, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Neurological disorders of volition may be characterized by deficits in willing and/or agency. When we move our bodies through space, it is the sense that we intended to move (willing) and that our actions were a consequence of this intention (self-agency) that gives us the sense of voluntariness and a general feeling of being “in control.” While it is possible to have movements that share executive machinery ordinarily used for voluntary movement but lack a sense of voluntariness, such as psychogenic movement disorders, it is also possible to claim volition for presumed involuntary movements (early chorea) or even when no movement is produced (anosognosia). The study of such patients should enlighten traditional models of how the percepts of volition are generated in the brain with regards to movement. We discuss volition and its components as multi-leveled processes with feedforward and feedback information flow, and dependence on prior expectations as well as external and internal cues. PMID:23329204

  13. Neurology in ancient faces

    PubMed Central

    Appenzeller, O; Stevens, J; Kruszynski, R; Walker, S

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Clinical paleoneurology is almost non-existent, but recognition of neurological diseases in ancient people might be possible by scrutinising portraits apparently representing people as they appeared in life.
METHODS—About 200 mummy portraits painted in colour at the beginning of the first millennium were examined. Thirty two skulls excavated at Hawara in the Fayum (northern Egypt), where most of the portraits were found were measured, and nine caliper measures on each side of the skulls were taken. The right/left ratios were statistically analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA). One skull was subjected to 3D CT scanning and transilluminated.
RESULTS—Two patients were found with progressive facial hemiatrophy (Parry-Romberg syndrome), three with deviations of the visual axes (tropia) and one with oval pupils (corectopia).
CONCLUSIONS—Clinical paleoneurology is possible in the absence of a living nervous system. The patients probably had focal epilepsy, hemiplegic migraine, and autonomic nervous system dysfunction.

 PMID:11254781

  14. Neurological effects of pesticide use among farmers in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Yifan; Zhang, Chao; Yin, Yanhong; Cui, Fang; Cai, Jinyang; Chen, Zhaohui; Jin, Yanhong; Robson, Mark G; Li, Mao; Ren, Yuting; Huang, Xusheng; Hu, Ruifa

    2014-04-01

    The intensive use of pesticides has attracted great attention from the Chinese government. However, current regulations have had limited influence on their safe use. Although the acute neurologic effects of pesticides have been well documented, little is known about their cumulative effects. Knowledge of the impact of pesticides on health may convince farmers to minimize their use. We conducted a cross-sectional study in three provinces of China to evaluate the relationship between pesticide exposure and neurological dysfunction. Crop farmers were divided into two groups depending on their level of pesticide exposure. A total of 236 participants were assessed by questionnaire and neurological examination for symptoms and signs of neuropathy. Characteristics of neurologic dysfunction following cumulative low-level exposure were assessed with logistic regression analysis. Farmers exposed to high-level pesticide use had greater risk of developing sensations of numbness or prickling (odds ratio (OR) 2.62, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.08-6.36). After adjusting for recent exposure, the risk of numbness or prickling symptoms (OR 2.55, 95% CI: 1.04-6.25) remained statistically significant. Loss of muscle strength and decreased deep tendon reflexes had OR > 2, however, this did not reach statistical significance. These findings suggest that overuse of pesticides increased risk of neurologic dysfunction among farmers, with somatosensory small fibers most likely affected. Measures that are more efficient should be taken to curb excessive use of pesticides.

  15. Neurological Effects of Pesticide Use among Farmers in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yifan; Zhang, Chao; Yin, Yanhong; Cui, Fang; Cai, Jinyang; Chen, Zhaohui; Jin, Yanhong; Robson, Mark G.; Li, Mao; Ren, Yuting; Huang, Xusheng; Hu, Ruifa

    2014-01-01

    The intensive use of pesticides has attracted great attention from the Chinese government. However, current regulations have had limited influence on their safe use. Although the acute neurologic effects of pesticides have been well documented, little is known about their cumulative effects. Knowledge of the impact of pesticides on health may convince farmers to minimize their use. We conducted a cross-sectional study in three provinces of China to evaluate the relationship between pesticide exposure and neurological dysfunction. Crop farmers were divided into two groups depending on their level of pesticide exposure. A total of 236 participants were assessed by questionnaire and neurological examination for symptoms and signs of neuropathy. Characteristics of neurologic dysfunction following cumulative low-level exposure were assessed with logistic regression analysis. Farmers exposed to high-level pesticide use had greater risk of developing sensations of numbness or prickling (odds ratio (OR) 2.62, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.08–6.36). After adjusting for recent exposure, the risk of numbness or prickling symptoms (OR 2.55, 95% CI: 1.04–6.25) remained statistically significant. Loss of muscle strength and decreased deep tendon reflexes had OR > 2, however, this did not reach statistical significance. These findings suggest that overuse of pesticides increased risk of neurologic dysfunction among farmers, with somatosensory small fibers most likely affected. Measures that are more efficient should be taken to curb excessive use of pesticides. PMID:24736684

  16. Liver transplantation for hepatic and neurological Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Geissler, I; Heinemann, K; Rohm, S; Hauss, J; Lamesch, P

    2003-06-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) is an autosomal-recessive inherited disorder of copper metabolism characterized by excessive deposition of copper throughout the body. If medical treatment fails in cases of fulminant hepatic failure and progressive hepatic dysfunction due to advanced cirrhosis, liver transplantation (OLTx) has been demonstrated to be a valuable treatment option. Between December 1993 and December 2002, 225 OLTxs in 198 patients were performed in our institution. In this consecutive series six patients (three females and three males) were liver grafted for WD. The follow-up ranged from 3 to 7 years. All patients are alive with well-functioning grafts at present. The ceruloplasmin levels increased after transplantation and remained normal. The Kayser-Fleischer ring disappeared in all patients, and urinary copper excretion normalized. The neurological manifestations in the two patients with severe neurological symptoms showed after 2 to 5 years a downward tendency; in one the ataxic movements disappeared completely. The psychiatric disorder in one patient disappeared as well the mild neurological symptoms in the patient with CHILD A cirrhosis. These two patients are fully recovered and returned to work. OLTx should be considered as a treatment option in patients with severe progressive neurological deficits even in cases with stable liver function since liver grafting definitely cures the underlying biochemical defect. In such cases an early decision for liver transplantation is justified because neurological deficits may become irreversible.

  17. Neurologic Manifestations of Enterovirus 71 Infection in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Yeon; Lee, Myoung Sook; Kim, Dong Bin

    2016-04-01

    Enterovirus 71 frequently involves the central nervous system and may present with a variety of neurologic manifestations. Here, we aimed to describe the clinical features, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) profiles of patients presenting with neurologic complications of enterovirus 71 infection. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 31 pediatric patients hospitalized with acute neurologic manifestations accompanied by confirmed enterovirus 71 infection at Ulsan University Hospital between 2010 and 2014. The patients' mean age was 2.9 ± 5.5 years (range, 18 days to 12 years), and 80.6% of patients were less than 4 years old. Based on their clinical features, the patients were classified into 4 clinical groups: brainstem encephalitis (n = 21), meningitis (n = 7), encephalitis (n = 2), and acute flaccid paralysis (n = 1). The common neurologic symptoms included myoclonus (58.1%), lethargy (54.8%), irritability (54.8%), vomiting (48.4%), ataxia (38.7%), and tremor (35.5%). Twenty-five patients underwent an MRI scan; of these, 14 (56.0%) revealed the characteristic increased T2 signal intensity in the posterior region of the brainstem and bilateral cerebellar dentate nuclei. Twenty-six of 30 patients (86.7%) showed CSF pleocytosis. Thirty patients (96.8%) recovered completely without any neurologic deficits; one patient (3.2%) died due to pulmonary hemorrhage and shock. In the present study, brainstem encephalitis was the most common neurologic manifestation of enterovirus 71 infection. The characteristic clinical symptoms such as myoclonus, ataxia, and tremor in conjunction with CSF pleocytosis and brainstem lesions on MR images are pathognomonic for diagnosis of neurologic involvement by enterovirus 71 infection. PMID:27051240

  18. Neurologic Manifestations of Enterovirus 71 Infection in Korea

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 frequently involves the central nervous system and may present with a variety of neurologic manifestations. Here, we aimed to describe the clinical features, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) profiles of patients presenting with neurologic complications of enterovirus 71 infection. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 31 pediatric patients hospitalized with acute neurologic manifestations accompanied by confirmed enterovirus 71 infection at Ulsan University Hospital between 2010 and 2014. The patients’ mean age was 2.9 ± 5.5 years (range, 18 days to 12 years), and 80.6% of patients were less than 4 years old. Based on their clinical features, the patients were classified into 4 clinical groups: brainstem encephalitis (n = 21), meningitis (n = 7), encephalitis (n = 2), and acute flaccid paralysis (n = 1). The common neurologic symptoms included myoclonus (58.1%), lethargy (54.8%), irritability (54.8%), vomiting (48.4%), ataxia (38.7%), and tremor (35.5%). Twenty-five patients underwent an MRI scan; of these, 14 (56.0%) revealed the characteristic increased T2 signal intensity in the posterior region of the brainstem and bilateral cerebellar dentate nuclei. Twenty-six of 30 patients (86.7%) showed CSF pleocytosis. Thirty patients (96.8%) recovered completely without any neurologic deficits; one patient (3.2%) died due to pulmonary hemorrhage and shock. In the present study, brainstem encephalitis was the most common neurologic manifestation of enterovirus 71 infection. The characteristic clinical symptoms such as myoclonus, ataxia, and tremor in conjunction with CSF pleocytosis and brainstem lesions on MR images are pathognomonic for diagnosis of neurologic involvement by enterovirus 71 infection. PMID:27051240

  19. [Can music therapy for patients with neurological disorders?].

    PubMed

    Myskja, Audun

    2004-12-16

    Recent developments in brain research and in the field of music therapy have led to the development of music-based methods specifically aimed at relieving symptoms of Parkinson's disease and other neurologic disorders. Rhythmic auditory stimulation uses external rhythmic auditory cues from song, music or metronome to aid patients improving their walking functioning and has been shown to be effective both within sessions and as a result of training over time. Melodic intonation therapy and related vocal techniques can improve expressive dysphasia and aid rehabilitation of neurologic disorders, particularly Parkinson's disease, stroke and developmental disorders. PMID:15608775

  20. Adverse neurological outcomes in Nigerian children with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Lagunju, I A; Brown, B J

    2012-12-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is reported to be the most common genetic disorder affecting Nigerians. Children with SCD are at a high risk of neurological morbidity. The main objective of this study was to determine the pattern of adverse neurological outcomes among a cohort of Nigerian children with SCD. All children with SCD seen in the Department of Paediatrics, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria, over a period of 2 years were carefully evaluated for symptoms and signs of neurological complications, defined as clinical outcomes referable to the central nervous system. Of the 214 children evaluated, 187 were diagnosed with Hb SS disease and 27 with Hb SC disease. Neurological complications were identified in 78 (36.4 %) of the cases. The most common complications were headache (17.8 %), seizure (9.3 %) and stroke (8.4 %). Other less frequent complications included bacterial meningitis (2.8 %), spontaneous visual loss (1.4 %), paraplegia (0.9 %) and transient ischaemic attacks (0.9 %). Neurological complications occurred more frequently in children with sickle cell anaemia than in those with Hb SC disease (P = 0.002, 95 % CI 1.450-82.870). Adverse neurological events are common in Nigerian children with SCD, with a significantly higher risk in Hb SS than Hb SC disease. Stroke represents a major underlying cause of symptomatic epilepsy in SCD. Institution of primary preventive measures for stroke in SCD will significantly reduce the burden of stroke and epilepsy associated with SCD in Nigeria.

  1. Adverse neurological outcomes in Nigerian children with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Lagunju, I A; Brown, B J

    2012-12-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is reported to be the most common genetic disorder affecting Nigerians. Children with SCD are at a high risk of neurological morbidity. The main objective of this study was to determine the pattern of adverse neurological outcomes among a cohort of Nigerian children with SCD. All children with SCD seen in the Department of Paediatrics, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria, over a period of 2 years were carefully evaluated for symptoms and signs of neurological complications, defined as clinical outcomes referable to the central nervous system. Of the 214 children evaluated, 187 were diagnosed with Hb SS disease and 27 with Hb SC disease. Neurological complications were identified in 78 (36.4 %) of the cases. The most common complications were headache (17.8 %), seizure (9.3 %) and stroke (8.4 %). Other less frequent complications included bacterial meningitis (2.8 %), spontaneous visual loss (1.4 %), paraplegia (0.9 %) and transient ischaemic attacks (0.9 %). Neurological complications occurred more frequently in children with sickle cell anaemia than in those with Hb SC disease (P = 0.002, 95 % CI 1.450-82.870). Adverse neurological events are common in Nigerian children with SCD, with a significantly higher risk in Hb SS than Hb SC disease. Stroke represents a major underlying cause of symptomatic epilepsy in SCD. Institution of primary preventive measures for stroke in SCD will significantly reduce the burden of stroke and epilepsy associated with SCD in Nigeria. PMID:23129067

  2. Cytokine Therapies in Neurological Disease.

    PubMed

    Azodi, Shila; Jacobson, Steven

    2016-07-01

    Cytokines are a heterogeneous group of glycoproteins that coordinate physiological functions. Cytokine deregulation is observed in many neurological diseases. This article reviews current research focused on human clinical trials of cytokine and anticytokine therapies in the treatment of several neurological disease including stroke, neuromuscular diseases, neuroinfectious diseases, demyelinating diseases, and neurobehavioral diseases. This research suggests that cytokine therapy applications may play an important role in offering new strategies for disease modulation and treatment. Further, this research provides insights into the causal link between cytokine deregulation and neurological diseases. PMID:27388288

  3. Neurological effects of deep diving.

    PubMed

    Grønning, Marit; Aarli, Johan A

    2011-05-15

    Deep diving is defined as diving to depths more than 50 m of seawater (msw), and is mainly used for occupational and military purposes. A deep dive is characterized by the compression phase, the bottom time and the decompression phase. Neurological and neurophysiologic effects are demonstrated in divers during the compression phase and the bottom time. Immediate and transient neurological effects after deep dives have been shown in some divers. However, the results from the epidemiological studies regarding long term neurological effects from deep diving are conflicting and still not conclusive. Prospective clinical studies with sufficient power and sensitivity are needed to solve this very important issue.

  4. Neuromarketing and consumer neuroscience: contributions to neurology

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background ‘Neuromarketing’ is a term that has often been used in the media in recent years. These public discussions have generally centered around potential ethical aspects and the public fear of negative consequences for society in general, and consumers in particular. However, positive contributions to the scientific discourse from developing a biological model that tries to explain context-situated human behavior such as consumption have often been neglected. We argue for a differentiated terminology, naming commercial applications of neuroscientific methods ‘neuromarketing’ and scientific ones ‘consumer neuroscience’. While marketing scholars have eagerly integrated neuroscientific evidence into their theoretical framework, neurology has only recently started to draw its attention to the results of consumer neuroscience. Discussion In this paper we address key research topics of consumer neuroscience that we think are of interest for neurologists; namely the reward system, trust and ethical issues. We argue that there are overlapping research topics in neurology and consumer neuroscience where both sides can profit from collaboration. Further, neurologists joining the public discussion of ethical issues surrounding neuromarketing and consumer neuroscience could contribute standards and experience gained in clinical research. Summary We identify the following areas where consumer neuroscience could contribute to the field of neurology: First, studies using game paradigms could help to gain further insights into the underlying pathophysiology of pathological gambling in Parkinson’s disease, frontotemporal dementia, epilepsy, and Huntington’s disease. Second, we identify compulsive buying as a common interest in neurology and consumer neuroscience. Paradigms commonly used in consumer neuroscience could be applied to patients suffering from Parkinson’s disease and frontotemporal dementia to advance knowledge of this important behavioral symptom

  5. Neurological Manifestations of Acute Posterior Multifocal Placoid Pigment Epitheliopathy

    PubMed Central

    Alkhotani, Ashjan; Shirah, Bader

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Acute posterior multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy (APMPPE) is an immune-mediated chorioretinal disease that causes acute visual symptoms with characteristic ophthalmoscopic findings. Neurological complications are rarely reported in the literature. Here we report two new cases of APMPPE that presented with neurological manifestations, one of which was associated with peripheral neuropathy, which has not been described before. Methods A retrospective database review of all patients with a diagnosis of APMPPE was performed. Clinical, ophthalmological, and neurological data were analyzed, and only cases of APMPPE with neurological complications were included. A literature review of several databases was also performed, and previous case reports were reviewed and analyzed in detail. Results In total, 56 cases of APMPPE-associated neurological complications were included in the analyses: 54 from the literature and 2 from our own practice. The most common complication was cerebral vasculitis, which affected 28 patients (50%), followed by headaches in 15 patients (26.8%). The other complications include sixth-cranial-nerve palsy, transient hearing loss, meningoencephalitis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, and viral meningitis. Conclusions This report adds to the literature of a novel association of APMPPE with peripheral neuropathy, and comprehensively reviews the neurological manifestations of this disease. A high level of suspicion should be applied when dealing with a case of APMPPE. We recommend applying detailed clinical neurological examinations and magnetic resonance imaging to APMPPE patients, and then early steroid treatment if the examination is positive or even suspicious. Early treatment with steroids and long-term treatment with immunosuppressive azathioprine with interval neurological evaluations will contribute positively to the outcomes and avoid fatal complications, namely strokes.

  6. Neurological Complications of Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Jerry Clay

    2015-12-01

    Obesity has attained pandemic proportions, and bariatric surgery is increasingly being employed resulting in turn to more neurological complications which must be recognized and managed. Neurological complications may result from mechanical or inflammatory mechanisms but primarily result from micro-nutritional deficiencies. Vitamin B12, thiamine, and copper constitute the most frequent deficiencies. Neurological complications may occur at reasonably predictable times after bariatric surgery and are associated with the type of surgery used. During the early post-operative period, compressive or stretch peripheral nerve injury, rhabdomyolysis, Wernicke's encephalopathy, and inflammatory polyradiculoneuropathy may occur. Late complications ensue after months to years and include combined system degeneration (vitamin B12 deficiency) and hypocupric myelopathy. Bariatric surgery patients require careful nutritional follow-up with routine monitoring of micronutrients at 6 weeks and 3, 6, and 12 months post-operatively and then annually after surgery and multivitamin supplementation for life. Sustained vigilance for common and rare neurological complications is essential.

  7. [Consciousness disorders from neurological view].

    PubMed

    Lange, Rüdiger; Erbguth, Frank

    2016-09-01

    "Disturbances of consciousness of unknown origin" require an interdisciplinary approach due to the broad variety of possibly underlying causes. Primary neurological pathologies account for about half of the cases, which emphasizes the key role of the neurologist in the primary assessment and planning of the diagnostic and therapeutic strategy. The most important goal is to quickly identify patients with extremely time-critical conditions like ischemic stroke, bacterial meningitis or space occupying intracranial hemorrhage. The most important tool to generate a working hypothesis is the clinical neurological examination. However, even in apparently neurological presentations like e.g. first ever epileptic seizure, underlying even non-neurological pathologies have to be considered. PMID:27642737

  8. Neurologic disorder and criminal responsibility.

    PubMed

    Yaffe, Gideon

    2013-01-01

    Sufferers from neurologic and psychiatric disorders are not uncommonly defendants in criminal trials. This chapter surveys a variety of different ways in which neurologic disorder bears on criminal responsibility. It discusses the way in which a neurologic disorder might bear on the questions of whether or not the defendant acted voluntarily; whether or not he or she was in the mental state that is required for guilt for the crime; and whether or not he or she is deserving of an insanity defense. The discussion demonstrates that a just determination of whether a sufferer from a neurologic disorder is diminished in his or her criminal responsibility for harmful conduct requires equal appreciation of the nature of the relevant disorder and its impact on behavior, on the one hand, and of the legal import of facts about the psychologic mechanisms through which behavior is generated, on the other.

  9. Neurologic disorder and criminal responsibility.

    PubMed

    Yaffe, Gideon

    2013-01-01

    Sufferers from neurologic and psychiatric disorders are not uncommonly defendants in criminal trials. This chapter surveys a variety of different ways in which neurologic disorder bears on criminal responsibility. It discusses the way in which a neurologic disorder might bear on the questions of whether or not the defendant acted voluntarily; whether or not he or she was in the mental state that is required for guilt for the crime; and whether or not he or she is deserving of an insanity defense. The discussion demonstrates that a just determination of whether a sufferer from a neurologic disorder is diminished in his or her criminal responsibility for harmful conduct requires equal appreciation of the nature of the relevant disorder and its impact on behavior, on the one hand, and of the legal import of facts about the psychologic mechanisms through which behavior is generated, on the other. PMID:24182391

  10. [Continuing medical education (CME) in neurology. Concept of the German Society of Neurology (DGN) and the Neurology Section of the Professional League of German Neurologic Medicine (BVDN)].

    PubMed

    Reuther, P; Diener, H C; Franz, P; Hacke, W; Hofmann, W; Hopf, H C; Jungmann, F; Wiethölter, H

    1999-10-01

    Continuous medical education in Neurology (CME-Neurology) has been promoted in a concept organized by both the German society of neurology, German association for occupational interests of neurologists and psychiatrists). CME-Neurology has been started in January 1999 and is closely adapted to the CME guidelines of neurology section of UEMS and EFNS. The program shall serve to the maintenance and upgrading of knowledge skills and competence of postgraduate training in neurology.

  11. Historical perspective of Indian neurology

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Shrikant; Trikamji, Bhavesh; Singh, Sandeep; Singh, Parampreet; Nair, Rajasekharan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To chronicle the history of medicine and neurology in India with a focus on its establishment and evolution. Background: The history of neurology in India is divided into two periods: ancient and modern. The ancient period dates back to the mid-second millennium Before Christ (B.C.) during the creation of the Ayurvedic Indian system of Medicine, which detailed descriptions of neurological disorders called Vata Vyadhi. The early 20th century witnessed the birth of modern Indian medicine with the onset of formal physician training at the nation's first allopathic medical colleges located in Madras (1835), Calcutta (1835) and Mumbai (1848). Prior to India's independence from Britain in 1947, only 25 medical schools existed in the entire country. Today, there are over 355. In 1951, physicians across the field of neurology and neurosurgery united to create the Neurological Society of India (NSI). Four decades later in 1991, neurologists branched out to establish a separate organization called the Indian Academy of Neurology (IAN). Design/Methods: Information was gathered through literature review using PubMed, MD Consult, OVID, primary texts and research at various academic institutions in India. Results: Neurological disorders were first described in ancient India under Ayurveda. The transition to modern medicine occurred more recently through formal training at medical schools beginning in the 1930's. Early pioneers and founders of the NSI (1951) include Dr. Jacob Chandy, Dr. B Ramamurthi, Dr. S. T. Narasimhan and Dr. Baldev Singh. Later, Dr. J. S. Chopra, a prominent neurologist and visionary, recognized the need for primary centers of collaboration and subsequently established the IAN (1991). The future of Neurology in India is growing rapidly. Currently, there are 1100 practicing neurologists and more than 150 post-graduate trainees who join the ranks every year. As the number of neurologists rises across India, there is an increase in the amount of

  12. [Pain - a neglected neurological issue].

    PubMed

    Birklein, F; Baron, R; Gaul, C; Maihöfner, C; Rommel, O; Straube, A; Tölle, T; Wasner, G

    2016-06-01

    Chronic pain represents a great challenge; according to epidemiological data increasing numbers of patients should be expected. Based on recent advances, a better understanding of the pathophysiology of chronic pain has been achieved and neurologists have made a major contribution to this understanding. Chronic pain is accompanied by substantial maladaptive plastic alterations in both the peripheral and central nervous systems; therefore, neurological knowledge is of paramount importance for pain therapists but this contrasts with the current treatment situation of pain patients in Germany. There are basically too few departments and practices undertaking treatment, and neurologists are an exception in most pain centers. Furthermore, due to economic reasons neurological hospitals are currently experiencing a dearth of inpatients suffering from chronic pain. Diagnostic and/or treatment procedures for neurological pain entities (e.g. headaches or neuropathic pain) are insufficiently represented in the German diagnosis-related groups (DRG) reimbursement system and the obstacles for an efficient pain therapy in neurological practices are too high. Finally, there are too few academic positions for pain medicine in neurological hospitals; therefore, career opportunities for motivated young neurologists with an interest in pain are lacking. In order to address the unmet therapeutic needs of patients with chronic pain there is a high demand for (i) establishment of departments for neurological pain medicine, (ii) modification of the German DRG system and (iii) education of young neurologists with expertise in pain. Pain medicine in particular should be especially appealing to neurologists .

  13. Neurology in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Singhal, B S; Khadilkar, Satish V

    2014-01-01

    The social and economic impact of neurologic disorders is being increasingly recognized in the developing world. Demographic transition, especially in large Asian populations, has resulted in a significant increase in the elderly population, bringing to the fore neurologic illnesses such as strokes, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. CNS infections such as retroviral diseases, tuberculosis, and malaria still account for high mortality and morbidity. Traumatic brain injury due to traffic accidents takes a high toll of life. Epilepsy continues to be a major health concern with large segments of the developing world's population receiving no treatment. A significant mismatch between the provision of specialized neurologic services and the requirement for them exists, especially in rural areas. Also, health insurance is not available for the majority, with patients having bear the costs themselves, thus limiting the procurement of available healthcare facilities. Neurologic training centers are few and the availability of laboratory facilities and equipment is largely limited to the metropolitan areas. Cultural practices, superstitious beliefs, ignorance, and social stigma may also impede the delivery of neurologic care. Optimizing available human resources, integrating primary, secondary, and tertiary healthcare tiers and making medical treatment more affordable will improve the neurologic care in the developing world.

  14. Hippocrates: the forefather of neurology.

    PubMed

    Breitenfeld, T; Jurasic, M J; Breitenfeld, D

    2014-09-01

    Hippocrates is one of the most influential medical doctors of all times. He started observing and experimenting in times of mysticism and magic. He carried a holistic and humanitarian approach to the patient with examination as the principal approach-inspection, palpation and auscultation are still the most important tools in diagnosing algorithms of today. He had immense experience with the human body most likely due to numerous wound treatments he had performed; some even believe he performed autopsies despite the negative trend at the time. Hippocrates identified the brain as the analyst of the outside world, the interpreter of consciousness and the center of intelligence and willpower. Interestingly, Hippocrates was aware of many valid concepts in neurology; his treatise On the Sacred Disease was the most important for understanding neurology and epilepsy. His other ideas pioneered modern day neurology mentioning neurological diseases like apoplexy, spondylitis, hemiplegia, and paraplegia. Today, 10 % of neurological Pubmed and 7 % of neuroscience Scopus reviews mention Corpus Hippocraticum as one of the sources. Therefore, Hippocrates may be considered as the forefather of neurology. PMID:25027011

  15. [Pain - a neglected neurological issue].

    PubMed

    Birklein, F; Baron, R; Gaul, C; Maihöfner, C; Rommel, O; Straube, A; Tölle, T; Wasner, G

    2016-06-01

    Chronic pain represents a great challenge; according to epidemiological data increasing numbers of patients should be expected. Based on recent advances, a better understanding of the pathophysiology of chronic pain has been achieved and neurologists have made a major contribution to this understanding. Chronic pain is accompanied by substantial maladaptive plastic alterations in both the peripheral and central nervous systems; therefore, neurological knowledge is of paramount importance for pain therapists but this contrasts with the current treatment situation of pain patients in Germany. There are basically too few departments and practices undertaking treatment, and neurologists are an exception in most pain centers. Furthermore, due to economic reasons neurological hospitals are currently experiencing a dearth of inpatients suffering from chronic pain. Diagnostic and/or treatment procedures for neurological pain entities (e.g. headaches or neuropathic pain) are insufficiently represented in the German diagnosis-related groups (DRG) reimbursement system and the obstacles for an efficient pain therapy in neurological practices are too high. Finally, there are too few academic positions for pain medicine in neurological hospitals; therefore, career opportunities for motivated young neurologists with an interest in pain are lacking. In order to address the unmet therapeutic needs of patients with chronic pain there is a high demand for (i) establishment of departments for neurological pain medicine, (ii) modification of the German DRG system and (iii) education of young neurologists with expertise in pain. Pain medicine in particular should be especially appealing to neurologists . PMID:27167885

  16. Neurological emergencies: acute stroke

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, R.; Dennis, M.

    2000-01-01

    Stroke causes a vast amount of death and disability throughout the world, yet for many healthcare professionals it remains an area of therapeutic nihilism, and thus uninteresting. This negative perception is shared by the general public, who often have a poor understanding of the early symptoms and significance of a stroke. Yet within the past few years there have been many important developments in the approach to caring for stroke patients, for both the acute management and secondary prevention. After the completion of numerous clinical trials, there is now robust evidence to either support or discredit various interventions. Even more exciting is the prospect of yet more data becoming available in the near future, testing a whole array of treatments, as clinical interest in stroke expands exponentially. In this review an evidence based approach to the management of acute stroke within the first few days is presented, including ischaemic and haemorrhagic events, but not subarachnoid haemorrhage. It is explained why stroke is regarded as a medical emergency, and the importance of a rational, methodic approach to the initial assessment, which is the key to accurate diagnosis and subsequent management, is emphasised. The potential early problems associated with stroke are identified and specific interventions for different stroke types are discussed. The review ends with a brief discussion of the implications that the evolving treatments have for the organisation of modern stroke services.

 PMID:10675208

  17. Neurology of the pituitary.

    PubMed

    Samarasinghe, Shanika; Emanuele, Mary Ann; Mazhari, Alaleh

    2014-01-01

    The anterior pituitary hormones are essential for reproduction, growth, metabolic homeostasis, stress response, and adaptation to changes in the external environment. Each pituitary hormone is secreted in a distinctive pulsatile manner reflecting its regulation by the central nervous system through a complex interaction between hypothalamic neuroendocrine pathways, feedback effects from peripheral target gland hormones, and intrapituitary mechanisms. While the most common cause of a pituitary mass is an adenoma, the differential diagnosis is broad and includes pituitary hyperplasia, lymphocytic hypophysitis, craniopharyngioma among others. Patients with pituitary adenomas can be asymptomatic or present with symptoms due to mass effect, pituitary hormone dysfunction, or both. Prolactinomas represent 40% of pituitary adenomas, the majority of which are microadenomas. Hyperfunction of growth hormone and ACTH are far less common, while TSH-producing tumors are exceedingly rare. Hypopituitarism in patients with pituitary adenomas can be partial or complete. The clinical picture will depend on the type, degree, and rapidity of onset of pituitary hormone deficiency. An MRI specifically focused on the sellar region is the imaging modality of choice to detect pituitary pathology. Management of pituitary tumors ranges from observation of nonfunctioning microadenomas through medical, surgical, and radiotherapeutic approaches dependent on tumor type, function, size, and invasiveness.

  18. HIV Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit Home > HIV/AIDS > What is HIV/AIDS? HIV/AIDS This information in Spanish ( en español ) HIV symptoms Photo courtesy of AIDS.gov More information ... and brain Return to top More information on HIV symptoms Explore other publications and websites Basic Information ...

  19. Association of sickle cell disease, priapism, exchange transfusion and neurological events: ASPEN syndrome.

    PubMed

    Siegel, J F; Rich, M A; Brock, W A

    1993-11-01

    Priapism and acute neurological events are believed to be unrelated complications of sickle cell hemoglobinopathy. We describe a syndrome based on our experience and a review of the literature of significant neurological events after partial exchange transfusion to treat priapism in sicklemic patients. Severe headache is often the initiating symptom of this complex. The ensuing neurological events range from seizure activity to obtundation requiring ventilatory support. The proposed pathophysiology of these neurological events is related to cerebral ischemia after an acute increase in per cent total hemoglobin, concomitant decrease in per cent hemoglobin S and subsequent release of vasoactive substances during penile detumescence. We have termed this constellation of events the ASPEN syndrome, an eponym for association of sickle cell disease, priapism, exchange transfusion and neurological events. Early recognition and aggressive medical management resulted in complete reversal of neurological sequela. PMID:8411432

  20. Meige's Syndrome: Rare Neurological Disorder Presenting as Conversion Disorder.

    PubMed

    Debadatta, Mohapatra; Mishra, Ajay K

    2013-07-01

    Meige's syndrome is a rare neurological syndrome characterized by oromandibular dystonia and blepharospasm. Its pathophysiology is not clearly determined. A 35-year-old female presented to psychiatric department with blepharospasm and oromandibular dystonia with clinical provisional diagnosis of psychiatric disorder (Conversion Disorder). After thorough physical examination including detailed neurological exam and psychiatric evaluation no formal medical or psychiatric diagnosis could be made. The other differential diagnoses of extra pyramidal symptom, tardive dyskinesia, conversion disorder, anxiety disorder were ruled out by formal diagnostic criteria. Consequently with suspicion of Meige's syndrome she was referred to the department of Neurology and the diagnosis was confirmed. Hence, Meige's syndrome could be misdiagnosed as a psychiatric disorder such as conversion disorder or anxiety disorder because clinical features of Meige's syndrome are highly variable and affected by psychological factors and also can be inhibited voluntarily to some extent.

  1. Neurological counterparts of hyponatremia: pathological mechanisms and clinical manifestations.

    PubMed

    Podestà, Manuel Alfredo; Faravelli, Irene; Cucchiari, David; Reggiani, Francesco; Oldani, Silvia; Fedeli, Carlo; Graziani, Giorgio

    2015-04-01

    Hyponatremia, defined as a serum sodium concentration <135 mEq/L, represents the most frequent electrolyte disorder in older hospitalized patients. Early recognition of hyponatremia is mandatory, since it represents an independent risk factor that increases hospital mortality by 40 %. Delayed correction of hyponatremia may worsen brain edema, resulting in different degrees of neural damage. However, an overly rapid correction of serum sodium levels can lead to osmotic demyelination syndrome (ODS), a dreadful neurological picture. In recent years, hyponatremia and ODS have received growing attention both in terms of clinical management and pathophysiology, leading to the discovery of new drugs and treatment algorithms. In this review, we recapitulate the pathogenetic background, clinical manifestations, and treatment guidelines of hyponatremia, focusing on the neurological alterations. Neurological symptoms may be neglected when they manifest as early signs of mild hyponatremia, while brain damage can irremediably affect patients' conditions in the context of ODS.

  2. The early molecular processes underlying the neurological manifestations of an animal model of Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Beom Hee; Kim, Joo Hyun; Kim, Jae-Min; Heo, Sun Hee; Kang, Minji; Kim, Gu-Hwan; Choi, Jin-Ho; Yoo, Han-Wook

    2013-05-01

    The Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rat shows age-dependent hepatic manifestations that are similar to those of Wilson's disease (WD). The pathogenic process in the brain has, however, not been evaluated in detail due to the rarity of the neurological symptoms. However, copper accumulation is noted in LEC rat brain tissue from 24 weeks of age, which results in oxidative injuries. The current study investigated the gene expression profiles of LEC rat brains at 24 weeks of age in order to identify the important early molecular changes that underlie the development of neurological symptoms in WD. Biological ontology-based analysis revealed diverse altered expressions of the genes related to copper accumulation. Of particular interest, we found altered expression of genes connected to mitochondrial respiration (Sdhaf2 and Ndufb7), calcineurin-mediated cellular processes (Ppp3ca, Ppp3cb, and Camk2a), amyloid precursor protein (Anks1b and A2m) and alpha-synuclein (Snca). In addition to copper-related changes, compensatory upregulations of Cp and Hamp reflect iron-mediated neurotoxicity. Of note, reciprocal expression of Asmt and Bhmt is an important clue that altered S-adenosylhomocysteine metabolism underlies brain injury in WD, which is directly correlated to the decreased expression of S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase in hepatic tissue in LEC rats. In conclusion, our study indicates that diverse molecular changes, both variable and complex, underlie the development of neurological manifestations in WD. Copper-related injuries were found to be the principal pathogenic process, but Fe- or adenosylhomocysteine-related injuries were also implicated. Investigations using other animal models or accessible human samples will be required to confirm our observations.

  3. Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A in Neurology: Update

    PubMed Central

    Orsini, Marco; Leite, Marco Antonio Araujo; Chung, Tae Mo; Bocca, Wladimir; de Souza, Jano Alves; de Souza, Olivia Gameiro; Moreira, Rayele Priscila; Bastos, Victor Hugo; Teixeira, Silmar; Oliveira, Acary Bulle; Moraes, Bruno da Silva; Matta, André Palma; Jacinto, Luis Jorge

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews the current and most neurological (central nervous system, CNS) uses of the botulinum neurotoxin type A. The effect of these toxins at neuromuscular junction lends themselves to neurological diseases of muscle overactivity, particularly abnormalities of muscle control. There are seven serotypes of the toxin, each with a specific activity at the molecular level. Currently, serotypes A (in two preparations) and B are available for clinical purpose, and they have proved to be safe and effective for the treatment of dystonia, spasticity, headache, and other CNS disorders in which muscle hyperactivity gives rise to symptoms. Although initially thought to inhibit acetylcholine release only at the neuromuscular junction, botulinum toxins are now recognized to inhibit acetylcholine release at autonomic cholinergic nerve terminals, as well as peripheral release of neuro-transmitters involved in pain regulation. Its effects are transient and nondestructive, and largely limited to the area in which it is administered. These effects are also graded according to the dose, allowing individualized treatment of patients and disorders. It may also prove to be useful in the control of autonomic dysfunction and sialorrhea. In over 20 years of use in humans, botulinum toxin has accumulated a considerable safety record, and in many cases represents relief for thousands of patients unaided by other therapy. PMID:26487928

  4. Hepatitis C virus and neurological damage

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Shilu; Faheem, Muhammed; Ibrahim, Sara M; Iqbal, Waqas; Rauff, Bisma; Fatima, Kaneez; Qadri, Ishtiaq

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection exhibits a wide range of extrahepatic complications, affecting various organs in the human body. Numerous HCV patients suffer neurological manifestations, ranging from cognitive impairment to peripheral neuropathy. Overexpression of the host immune response leads to the production of immune complexes, cryoglobulins, as well as autoantibodies, which is a major pathogenic mechanism responsible for nervous system dysfunction. Alternatively circulating inflammatory cytokines and chemokines and HCV replication in neurons is another factor that severely affects the nervous system. Furthermore, HCV infection causes both sensory and motor peripheral neuropathy in the mixed cryoglobulinemia as well as known as an important risk aspect for stroke. These extrahepatic manifestations are the reason behind underlying hepatic encephalopathy and chronic liver disease. The brain is an apt location for HCV replication, where the HCV virus may directly wield neurotoxicity. Other mechanisms that takes place by chronic HCV infection due the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric disorders includes derangement of metabolic pathways of infected cells, autoimmune disorders, systemic or cerebral inflammation and alterations in neurotransmitter circuits. HCV and its pathogenic role is suggested by enhancement of psychiatric and neurological symptoms in patients attaining a sustained virologic response followed by treatment with interferon; however, further studies are required to fully assess the impact of HCV infection and its specific antiviral targets associated with neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:27134702

  5. Chelation treatment of neurological Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Walshe, J M; Yealland, M

    1993-03-01

    The results of chelation treatment of 137 patients presenting with neurological Wilson's disease are described, together with the more commonly observed toxic reactions to the various drugs employed. Fifty-seven patients made an excellent response to treatment and became symptom free. Thirty-six patients made a good recovery, but were left with some minor neurological deficit. Twenty-four patients had a poor response: although the disease process was arrested they were left more or less disabled. Twenty patients died: nine had little or no treatment, but 11 died despite apparently adequate chelation therapy. There was no obvious reason for this failure. The liver copper level was estimated in six of these patients: it was still significantly elevated in only one, but in all four in whom it was possible to make the determination, the concentration of copper in the basal ganglia was in excess of 45 micrograms/g wet weight. It was not apparent why adequate therapy failed to remove copper from the brains of these patients. There was no obvious clinical, histological or biochemical indicator of failure to respond to treatment. Initial deterioration before improvement was seen in 30 patients: the prognosis for a useful recovery was not necessarily worse than that in patients who did not show this phenomenon.

  6. Neurologic manifestations of lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Halperin, John J

    2011-08-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi infection, the tick-borne spirochetosis known as Lyme disease or Lyme borreliosis, involves the nervous system (neuroborreliosis) in 10% to 15% of patients. Common manifestations include lymphocytic meningitis, cranial neuritis, mononeuropathy multiplex, and painful radiculoneuritis. Rare patients develop inflammation in the brain or spinal cord. Regardless of the form of involvement, neuroborreliosis can be microbiologically cured in virtually all patients using standard 2- to 4-week antimicrobial regimens. Oral regimens appear to be as effective as parenteral ones in most instances. Although patients ill with Lyme disease may have concomitant cognitive or memory difficulty, these symptoms are not specific to neuroborreliosis and, when present in isolation, should not be viewed as suggestive of this diagnosis. When present as part of Lyme disease, they do not require additional or different treatment.

  7. Neurologic presentation of decompression sickness and air embolism in sport divers.

    PubMed

    Dick, A P; Massey, E W

    1985-05-01

    In a retrospective study of scuba divers with neurologic injuries, we found that mild symptoms were common. Seventy divers had decompression sickness, most often with paresthesias or numbness, rarely with paresis. Thirty-nine divers had air embolism that often caused unconsciousness or mild symptoms of cerebral injury. Many divers with neurologic decompression sickness gave histories of dives that were within conventional limits, and many with air embolism gave no history of breath-holding during ascent. Mild symptoms sometimes regressed spontaneously. Recompression delays were responsible for poor responses to therapy.

  8. Early mental and neurological sequelae after Japanese B encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Huy, B V; Tu, H C; Luan, T V; Lindqvist, R

    1994-09-01

    Japanese B encephalitis is a disease with high mortality and many of those surviving suffer from serious sequelae. During the 1992 epidemic in northern Vietnam 50 patients treated at the Institute for Protection of Children's Health in Hanoi were studied concerning the type of sequelae and the development of the symptoms during the first two months of the disease. The age span was 1 to 15 years. 29 of the patients (58%) did not recover fully during the observation period. Fifteen (30%) showed signs of both neurological and mental disturbances. Nine (18%) only had mental symptoms while 5 (20%) suffered from isolated neurological sequelae. EEG was pathological in 9 out of 30 tested cases (30%); 9 of 23 patients (39%) performed subnormal IQ tests. Deep coma, bronchopneumonia with cyanosis, apnea attacks, prolonged fever and coma were all correlated (without statistical significance) to a higher risk for subsequent sequelae.

  9. Anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody positive neurological syndromes.

    PubMed

    Tohid, Hassaan

    2016-07-01

    A rare kind of antibody, known as anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) autoantibody, is found in some patients. The antibody works against the GAD enzyme, which is essential in the formation of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), an inhibitory neurotransmitter found in the brain. Patients found with this antibody present with motor and cognitive problems due to low levels or lack of GABA, because in the absence or low levels of GABA patients exhibit motor and cognitive symptoms. The anti-GAD antibody is found in some neurological syndromes, including stiff-person syndrome, paraneoplastic stiff-person syndrome, Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS), limbic encephalopathy, cerebellar ataxia, eye movement disorders, and epilepsy. Previously, excluding MFS, these conditions were calledhyperexcitability disorders. However, collectively, these syndromes should be known as "anti-GAD positive neurological syndromes." An important limitation of this study is that the literature is lacking on the subject, and why patients with the above mentioned neurological problems present with different symptoms has not been studied in detail. Therefore, it is recommended that more research is conducted on this subject to obtain a better and deeper understanding of these anti-GAD antibody induced neurological syndromes. PMID:27356651

  10. Two additional cases of metformin-associated encephalopathy in patients with end-stage renal disease undergoing hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yeo-Jin; Bae, Eun Jin; Seo, Jong Woo; Jeon, Dae-Hong; Cho, Hyun Seop; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Chang, Se-Ho; Park, Dong Jun

    2013-01-01

    We report on two additional cases of metformin-associated encephalopathy in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) undergoing hemodialysis. Two patients were seen at our hospital with abnormal neurological signs and symptoms. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed the same pattern of high signal intensity in both basal ganglia in T2-weighted images in the two patients. The two patients had started taking metformin 5 and 6 weeks earlier at the same dose of 1000 mg per day. Metformin was immediately stopped, and regular hemodialysis was conducted. Their signs and symptoms resolved completely after these measures. The high signal intensity in both ganglia in T2-weighted MRI also disappeared. We should suspect metformin-induced encephalopathy and withdraw the drug when presented with diabetic patients with chronic kidney disease and neurological signs and symptoms of unknown cause.

  11. Occupational Neurological Disorders in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seong-Kyu

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to provide a literature review of occupational neurological disorders and related research in Korea, focusing on chemical hazards. We reviewed occupational neurological disorders investigated by the Occupational Safety and Health Research Institute of Korean Occupational Safety and Health Agency between 1992 and 2009, categorizing them as neurological disorders of the central nervous system (CNS), of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) or as neurodegenerative disorders. We also examined peer-reviewed journal articles related to neurotoxicology, published from 1984 to 2009. Outbreaks of occupational neurological disorder of the CNS due to inorganic mercury and carbon disulfide poisoning had helped prompt the development of the occupational safety and health system of Korea. Other major neurological disorders of the CNS included methyl bromide intoxication and chronic toxic encephalopathy. Most of the PNS disorders were n-hexane-induced peripheral neuritis, reported from the electronics industry. Reports of manganese-induced Parkinsonism resulted in the introduction of neuroimaging techniques to occupational medicine. Since the late 1990s, the direction of research has been moving toward degenerative disorder and early effect of neurotoxicity. To understand the early effects of neurotoxic chemicals in the preclinical stage, more follow-up studies of a longer duration are necessary. PMID:21258587

  12. Neuropathic urinary retention in the absence of neurological signs.

    PubMed Central

    Sylvester, P. A.; McLoughlin, J.; Sibley, G. N.; Dorman, P. J.; Kabala, J.; Ormerod, I. E.

    1995-01-01

    We present two cases of painless urinary retention secondary to central intervertebral disc prolapse. In neither case were there signs or symptoms suggesting an underlying neurological insult. Both patients voided spontaneously following neurosurgical intervention. The classical features of acute cauda equina compression may be absent in patients with central lumbar disc protrusion. Painless urinary retention may be the only physical sign. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8552542

  13. Plague Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Plague Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Plague Home Ecology & Transmission Symptoms Diagnosis & Treatment Maps & Statistics ...

  14. The role of cannabinoids and leptin in neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Agar, E

    2015-12-01

    Cannabinoids exert a neuroprotective influence on some neurological diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, multiple sclerosis and epilepsy. Synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists/antagonists or compounds can provide symptom relief or control the progression of neurological diseases. However, the molecular mechanism and the effectiveness of these agents in controlling the progression of most of these diseases remain unclear. Cannabinoids may exert effects via a number of mechanisms and interactions with neurotransmitters, neurotropic factors and neuropeptides. Leptin is a peptide hormone involved in the regulation of food intake and energy balance via its actions on specific hypothalamic nuclei. Leptin receptors are widely expressed throughout the brain, especially in the hippocampus, basal ganglia, cortex and cerebellum. Leptin has also shown neuroprotective properties in a number of neurological disorders, such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's. Therefore, cannabinoid and leptin hold therapeutic potential for neurological diseases. Further elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects on these agents may lead to the development of new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of neurological disorders. PMID:25880465

  15. The role of cannabinoids and leptin in neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Agar, E

    2015-12-01

    Cannabinoids exert a neuroprotective influence on some neurological diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, multiple sclerosis and epilepsy. Synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists/antagonists or compounds can provide symptom relief or control the progression of neurological diseases. However, the molecular mechanism and the effectiveness of these agents in controlling the progression of most of these diseases remain unclear. Cannabinoids may exert effects via a number of mechanisms and interactions with neurotransmitters, neurotropic factors and neuropeptides. Leptin is a peptide hormone involved in the regulation of food intake and energy balance via its actions on specific hypothalamic nuclei. Leptin receptors are widely expressed throughout the brain, especially in the hippocampus, basal ganglia, cortex and cerebellum. Leptin has also shown neuroprotective properties in a number of neurological disorders, such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's. Therefore, cannabinoid and leptin hold therapeutic potential for neurological diseases. Further elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects on these agents may lead to the development of new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of neurological disorders.

  16. Sub-typing CFS patients on the basis of 'minor' symptoms.

    PubMed

    Janal, Malvin N; Ciccone, Donald S; Natelson, Benjamin H

    2006-08-01

    The diagnosis of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), an illness characterized by medically unexplained fatigue, depends on a clinical case definition representing one or more pathophysiological mechanisms. To prepare for studies of these mechanisms, this study sought to identify subtypes of CFS. In 161 women meeting 1994 criteria for CFS, principal components analysis of the 10 'minor' symptoms of CFS produced three factors interpreted to indicate musculoskeletal, infectious and neurological subtypes. Extreme scores on one or more of these factors characterized about 2/3 of the sample. Those characterized by the neurological factor were at increased risk of reduced scores on cognitive tests requiring attention, working memory, long-term memory or rapid performance. In addition, the neurological subtype was associated with reduced levels of function. Those characterized by the musculoskeletal factor were at increased risk for the diagnosis of fibromyalgia (chronic widespread pain and mechanical allodynia) and reduced physical function. Those characterized by the infectious factor were less likely to evidence co-occurring fibromyalgia, and showed lesser risk of functional impairment. The prevalence of disability was increased in those with the highest scores on any of the subtypes, as well as in those with high scores on multiple factors. Depression and anxiety, while frequently present, were not more prevalent in any particular subtype, and did not increase with the severity of specific symptom reports. Results suggest that subtypes of CFS may be identified from reports of the minor diagnostic symptoms, and that these subtypes demonstrate construct validity. PMID:16473456

  17. Quantitative MR Markers and Psychiatric Symptoms in a Patient with Fahr Disease

    PubMed Central

    Buono, Viviana Lo; Corallo, Francesco; Costa, Antonio; Bramanti, Placido; Marino, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 43 Final Diagnosis: Fahr disease Symptoms: Movement disorder • chorea and tremors • cognitive deficit • behavioral aggressiveness and restlessness • visual hallucination Medication: Haloperidolo • levomepromazine • sodium valproate Clinical Procedure: Neurology examination • neuropsychological examination • MRI Specialty: Neurology Objective: Rare disease Background: Fahr’s disease (FD), or primitive idiopathic calcification of the basal ganglia, is a rare neurodegenerative syndrome characterized by the presence of idiopathic bilateral and symmetrical cerebral calcifications. Case Report: We describe the case of 43-year-old woman presenting with psychiatric symptoms, disorganized behavior, and migraine. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination showed basal ganglia calcifications. In addition, we analyzed the cortical brain volume and noted cortical atrophy. Extensive etiological clinico-biological assessment allowed us to exclude known causes of brain calcifications and to diagnose Fahr disease (FD). Neurological symptoms associated with psychiatric manifestations are not uncommon in FD. Conclusions: Purely psychiatric presentations are possible, as demonstrated by the present case, although there have been very few cases reported. To date, no studies related to the brain atrophy in FD have been reported. PMID:26094250

  18. The neurological basis of occupation.

    PubMed

    Gutman, Sharon A; Schindler, Victoria P

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper was to survey the literature about the neurological basis of human activity and its relationship to occupation and health. Activities related to neurological function were organized into three categories: those that activate the brain's reward system; those that promote the relaxation response; and those that preserve cognitive function into old age. The results from the literature review correlating neurological evidence and activities showed that purposeful and meaningful activities could counter the effects of stress-related diseases and reduce the risk for dementia. Specifically, it was found that music, drawing, meditation, reading, arts and crafts, and home repairs, for example, can stimulate the neurogical system and enhance health and well-being, Prospective research studies are needed to examine the effects of purposeful activities on reducing stress and slowing the rate of cognitive decline.

  19. Quality Metrics in Inpatient Neurology.

    PubMed

    Dhand, Amar

    2015-12-01

    Quality of care in the context of inpatient neurology is the standard of performance by neurologists and the hospital system as measured against ideal models of care. There are growing regulatory pressures to define health care value through concrete quantifiable metrics linked to reimbursement. Theoretical models of quality acknowledge its multimodal character with quantitative and qualitative dimensions. For example, the Donabedian model distils quality as a phenomenon of three interconnected domains, structure-process-outcome, with each domain mutually influential. The actual measurement of quality may be implicit, as in peer review in morbidity and mortality rounds, or explicit, in which criteria are prespecified and systemized before assessment. As a practical contribution, in this article a set of candidate quality indicators for inpatient neurology based on an updated review of treatment guidelines is proposed. These quality indicators may serve as an initial blueprint for explicit quality metrics long overdue for inpatient neurology.

  20. The neurological basis of occupation.

    PubMed

    Gutman, Sharon A; Schindler, Victoria P

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper was to survey the literature about the neurological basis of human activity and its relationship to occupation and health. Activities related to neurological function were organized into three categories: those that activate the brain's reward system; those that promote the relaxation response; and those that preserve cognitive function into old age. The results from the literature review correlating neurological evidence and activities showed that purposeful and meaningful activities could counter the effects of stress-related diseases and reduce the risk for dementia. Specifically, it was found that music, drawing, meditation, reading, arts and crafts, and home repairs, for example, can stimulate the neurogical system and enhance health and well-being, Prospective research studies are needed to examine the effects of purposeful activities on reducing stress and slowing the rate of cognitive decline. PMID:17623380

  1. Neurologic Emergencies in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Nentwich, Lauren M; Grimmnitz, Benjamin

    2016-08-01

    Neurologic diseases are a major cause of death and disability in elderly patients. Due to the physiologic changes and increased comorbidities that occur as people age, neurologic diseases are more common in geriatric patients and a major cause of death and disability in this population. This article discusses the elderly patient presenting to the emergency department with acute ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack, intracerebral hemorrhage, subarachnoid hemorrhage, chronic subdural hematoma, traumatic brain injury, seizures, and central nervous system infections. This article reviews the subtle presentations, difficult workups, and complicated treatment decisions as they pertain to our older patients." PMID:27475016

  2. The Tablet Device in Hospital Neurology and in Neurology Graduate Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Newey, Christopher R.; Bhimraj, Adarsh

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose: There is limited literature on tablet devices for neurohospitalists and in neurological graduate medical education. This study evaluated utilization, benefits, and limitations of customized tablets on inpatient neurology practice and resident education. The hypothesis was the perception of the tablet would be positive, given their portability, convenience to accessing point-of-care reference, and accessibility to the electronic medical record. Methods: Second-generation iPads with neurology-specific applications and literature were provided to our in-hospital general, stroke, and consult neurology teams. After 1 year, residents on these teams were surveyed on demographic data, familiarity, and utilization of the iPad and their perceptions of the device. Results: All 27 residents responded to the survey. Most participants (23 of 27) used a tablet while on inpatient service. Twelve regularly utilized the neurology-specific apps and/or accessed scientific articles. Technologically savvy residents felt significantly more comfortable using tablets and were more quickly acquainted with the features. Thirteen respondents wanted a formal orientation on the advanced features of the tablet independent of their familiarity with the device or level of technological comfort. Conclusion: Overall, the perception was that the tablet was beneficial for inpatient clinical care and as an educational reference. Participants became easily familiarized with the device features quickly, regardless of whether they owned one previously or not. Most physicians indicated interest in advanced features of tablets; however, a formal orientation may be beneficial for optimal utilization. A reliable network connection is essential to in-hospital use of tablet devices. Additional research pertaining to patient outcomes, objective educational benefit, and cost-effectiveness is necessary. PMID:25553224

  3. Edgar Allan Poe and neurology.

    PubMed

    Teive, Hélio Afonso Ghizoni; Paola, Luciano de; Munhoz, Renato Puppi

    2014-06-01

    Edgar Allan Poe was one of the most celebrated writers of all time. He published several masterpieces, some of which include references to neurological diseases. Poe suffered from recurrent depression, suggesting a bipolar disorder, as well as alcohol and drug abuse, which in fact led to his death from complications related to alcoholism. Various hypotheses were put forward, including Wernicke's encephalopathy.

  4. HEW and the neurologically handicapped

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, W. V.

    1974-01-01

    Some of the neurological disorders and therapeutic devices are considered with which the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW) is most concerned. The organization of the Department, because it is a rather complex one with many different agencies involved, is also described.

  5. Neurology Case Studies: Cerebrovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Muhammad U; Gorelick, Philip B

    2016-08-01

    This article discusses interesting vascular neurology cases including the management of intracranial stenosis, migraine headache and stroke risk, retinal artery occlusions associated with impaired hearing, intracranial occlusive disease, a heritable cause of stroke and vascular cognitive impairment, and an interesting clinico-neuroradiologic disorder associated with eclampsia. PMID:27445238

  6. Neurological Aspects of Reading Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Louis R.

    The author, a neurologist, looks at the nature of reading disabilities. He suggests that many reading disabilities are the result of normal constitutional differences and that the term "minimal brain dysfunction" is rarely appropriate and does not help the remediation process. Noted are various theories which relate neurology and reading ability.…

  7. Fly model causes neurological rethink

    PubMed Central

    Sadanandappa, Madhumala K

    2013-01-01

    A Drosophila model for a neurological disorder called type 2B Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease reveals that it has its origins in a partial loss of function, rather than a gain of function, which points to the need for a new therapeutic approach. PMID:24336781

  8. Neurologic issues and obstetric anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Chang, Laura Y; Carabuena, Jean Marie; Camann, William

    2011-09-01

    The rising popularity of regional anesthesia in the last several decades has greatly changed the experience of labor. Although the use of regional anesthesia has aided in decreasing maternal morbidity and mortality, a new dimension of neurologic issues, particularly headache and peripheral neuropathy, is apparent. Obstetric anesthesiologists frequently encounter patients with preexisting neurologic disease. Although very few of these disorders contraindicate the use of neuraxial technique, there are limited published data on specific neurologic and neuromuscular disorders in pregnancy. Neurologists are often consulted by anesthesiologists and obstetricians to evaluate pregnant patients for the feasibility of labor analgesia and when postpartum neurologic complications arise. Early consultation with an obstetric anesthesiologist, discussion with a neurologist, and communication with the obstetrician allows for the education and discussion of the risks and benefits of both the mode of delivery and anesthetic options. This multidisciplinary approach is crucial in forming reasonable expectations for the patient. The aim of this discussion is to provide an obstetric anesthesiologist's perspective on regional anesthesia and its implications in obstetrics, and to enhance communication between our specialties. PMID:22113509

  9. Gross cerebellar paraneoplastic neurological disorder in a patient with an occult breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Poudel, Chandra K; Achar, K N

    2013-01-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological disorders are relatively rare conditions posing both diagnostic as well as therapeutic challenges. A previously fit 66-year-old woman presented with subtle cerebellar symptoms which progressed rapidly over the course of days. Chest x-ray and routine blood tests were unremarkable. CT of the head with contrast showed no abnormality. Lumbar puncture showed no evidence of infection or oligoclonal bands. She was transferred to a neurological centre from a remote and rural setting. Subsequent MRI was reported to be normal as well. Tumour markers were negative but the paraneoplastic anti-Yo antibody was positive. A whole body CT scan revealed a spiculated left breast lesion which turned out to be malignant on fine needle aspiration. She underwent left mastectomy, had plasmapharesis and received high-dose intravenous Ig for her paraneoplastic neurological symptoms. She remained neurologically stable and underwent rehabilitation in her local hospital before getting discharged home. PMID:23595173

  10. Norovirus Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infection, National Institutes of Health NoroCORE Food Virology Symptoms Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Español: SÃntomas Prevent Dehydration Drink plenty of liquids to replace fluids that ...

  11. Rotavirus Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rotavirus Vaccine Program American Academy of Pediatrics Symptoms Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... PATH's Rotavirus Vaccine Program American Academy of Pediatrics Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How do I ...

  12. A new neurological focus in neonatal intensive care.

    PubMed

    Bonifacio, Sonia L; Glass, Hannah C; Peloquin, Susan; Ferriero, Donna M

    2011-09-01

    Advances in the care of high-risk newborn babies have contributed to reduced mortality rates for premature and term births, but the surviving neonates often have increased neurological morbidity. Therapies aimed at reducing the neurological sequelae of birth asphyxia at term have brought hypothermia treatment into the realm of standard care. However, this therapy does not provide complete protection from neurological complications and a need to develop adjunctive therapies for improved neurological outcomes remains. In addition, the care of neurologically impaired neonates, regardless of their gestational age, clearly requires a focused approach to avoid further injury to the brain and to optimize the neurodevelopmental status of the newborn baby at discharge from hospital. This focused approach includes, but is not limited to, monitoring of the patient's brain with amplitude-integrated and continuous video EEG, prevention of infection, developmentally appropriate care, and family support. Provision of dedicated neurocritical care to newborn babies requires a collaborative effort between neonatologists and neurologists, training in neonatal neurology for nurses and future generations of care providers, and the recognition that common neonatal medical problems and intensive care have an effect on the developing brain. PMID:21808297

  13. [Wilson's disease with severe neurological manifestations: response to trientine plus zinc therapy].

    PubMed

    Serra, B; Primo, J; García, M; Amorós, I; Aragó, M; Merino, C

    2004-05-01

    In patients with Wilson's disease and neurological manifestations, treatment with D-penicillamine can cause worsening of neurological symptoms, usually in the first few weeks of treatment. Because the neurological damage can be severe and irreversible, the use of D-penicillamine is controversial, and several authors believe that it should be avoided. Studies of the use of ammonium tetrathiomolybdate as an alternative chelating agent for the initial treatment of neurologic Wilson's disease are still in the experimental phase. Published experience on the simultaneous use of trientine, another chelating agent, and zinc, which blocks intestinal absorption of copper, is promising but limited. We present the case of a 17 year-old boy with severe neurologic Wilson's disease that had first presented six years previously. The patient showed a complete recovery after six months of treatment with a combination of trientine and zinc acetate.

  14. Multimodal Learning and Intelligent Prediction of Symptom Development in Individual Parkinson's Patients.

    PubMed

    Przybyszewski, Andrzej W; Kon, Mark; Szlufik, Stanislaw; Szymanski, Artur; Habela, Piotr; Koziorowski, Dariusz M

    2016-01-01

    We still do not know how the brain and its computations are affected by nerve cell deaths and their compensatory learning processes, as these develop in neurodegenerative diseases (ND). Compensatory learning processes are ND symptoms usually observed at a point when the disease has already affected large parts of the brain. We can register symptoms of ND such as motor and/or mental disorders (dementias) and even provide symptomatic relief, though the structural effects of these are in most cases not yet understood. It is very important to obtain early diagnosis, which can provide several years in which we can monitor and partly compensate for the disease's symptoms, with the help of various therapies. In the case of Parkinson's disease (PD), in addition to classical neurological tests, measurements of eye movements are diagnostic. We have performed measurements of latency, amplitude, and duration in reflexive saccades (RS) of PD patients. We have compared the results of our measurement-based diagnoses with standard neurological ones. The purpose of our work was to classify how condition attributes predict the neurologist's diagnosis. For n = 10 patients, the patient age and parameters based on RS gave a global accuracy in predictions of neurological symptoms in individual patients of about 80%. Further, by adding three attributes partly related to patient 'well-being' scores, our prediction accuracies increased to 90%. Our predictive algorithms use rough set theory, which we have compared with other classifiers such as Naïve Bayes, Decision Trees/Tables, and Random Forests (implemented in KNIME/WEKA). We have demonstrated that RS are powerful biomarkers for assessment of symptom progression in PD.

  15. Multimodal Learning and Intelligent Prediction of Symptom Development in Individual Parkinson’s Patients

    PubMed Central

    Przybyszewski, Andrzej W.; Kon, Mark; Szlufik, Stanislaw; Szymanski, Artur; Habela, Piotr; Koziorowski, Dariusz M.

    2016-01-01

    We still do not know how the brain and its computations are affected by nerve cell deaths and their compensatory learning processes, as these develop in neurodegenerative diseases (ND). Compensatory learning processes are ND symptoms usually observed at a point when the disease has already affected large parts of the brain. We can register symptoms of ND such as motor and/or mental disorders (dementias) and even provide symptomatic relief, though the structural effects of these are in most cases not yet understood. It is very important to obtain early diagnosis, which can provide several years in which we can monitor and partly compensate for the disease’s symptoms, with the help of various therapies. In the case of Parkinson’s disease (PD), in addition to classical neurological tests, measurements of eye movements are diagnostic. We have performed measurements of latency, amplitude, and duration in reflexive saccades (RS) of PD patients. We have compared the results of our measurement-based diagnoses with standard neurological ones. The purpose of our work was to classify how condition attributes predict the neurologist’s diagnosis. For n = 10 patients, the patient age and parameters based on RS gave a global accuracy in predictions of neurological symptoms in individual patients of about 80%. Further, by adding three attributes partly related to patient ‘well-being’ scores, our prediction accuracies increased to 90%. Our predictive algorithms use rough set theory, which we have compared with other classifiers such as Naïve Bayes, Decision Trees/Tables, and Random Forests (implemented in KNIME/WEKA). We have demonstrated that RS are powerful biomarkers for assessment of symptom progression in PD. PMID:27649187

  16. Multimodal Learning and Intelligent Prediction of Symptom Development in Individual Parkinson's Patients.

    PubMed

    Przybyszewski, Andrzej W; Kon, Mark; Szlufik, Stanislaw; Szymanski, Artur; Habela, Piotr; Koziorowski, Dariusz M

    2016-01-01

    We still do not know how the brain and its computations are affected by nerve cell deaths and their compensatory learning processes, as these develop in neurodegenerative diseases (ND). Compensatory learning processes are ND symptoms usually observed at a point when the disease has already affected large parts of the brain. We can register symptoms of ND such as motor and/or mental disorders (dementias) and even provide symptomatic relief, though the structural effects of these are in most cases not yet understood. It is very important to obtain early diagnosis, which can provide several years in which we can monitor and partly compensate for the disease's symptoms, with the help of various therapies. In the case of Parkinson's disease (PD), in addition to classical neurological tests, measurements of eye movements are diagnostic. We have performed measurements of latency, amplitude, and duration in reflexive saccades (RS) of PD patients. We have compared the results of our measurement-based diagnoses with standard neurological ones. The purpose of our work was to classify how condition attributes predict the neurologist's diagnosis. For n = 10 patients, the patient age and parameters based on RS gave a global accuracy in predictions of neurological symptoms in individual patients of about 80%. Further, by adding three attributes partly related to patient 'well-being' scores, our prediction accuracies increased to 90%. Our predictive algorithms use rough set theory, which we have compared with other classifiers such as Naïve Bayes, Decision Trees/Tables, and Random Forests (implemented in KNIME/WEKA). We have demonstrated that RS are powerful biomarkers for assessment of symptom progression in PD. PMID:27649187

  17. Epidemiology of neurological manifestations in Sjögren's syndrome: data from the French ASSESS Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal Alegria, Guillermo; Guellec, Dewi; Mariette, Xavier; Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Dernis, Emmanuelle; Dubost, Jean-Jacques; Trouvin, Anne-Priscille; Hachulla, Eric; Larroche, Claire; Le Guern, Veronique; Cornec, Divi; Devauchelle-Pensec, Valérie; Saraux, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Neurological manifestations seem common in primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) but their reported prevalences vary. We investigated the prevalence and epidemiology of neurological manifestations in a French nationwide multicentre prospective cohort of patients with pSS, the Assessment of Systemic Signs and Evolution in Sjögren's syndrome (ASSESS) cohort. Methods The ASSESS cohort, established in 2006, includes 395 patients fulfilling American–European Consensus Group criteria for pSS. Demographic and clinical data were compared between patient groups with and without neurological manifestations, and across patient groups with peripheral nervous system (PNS) manifestations, central nervous system (CNS) manifestations and no neurological manifestations. Results Data at inclusion were available for 392 patients, whose mean age was 58±12 years. Mean follow-up was 33.9 months. Neurological manifestations were present in 74/392 (18.9%) patients, including 63 (16%) with PNS manifestations and 14 (3.6%) with CNS manifestations. Prevalences were 9.2% for pure sensory neuropathy, 5.3% for sensorimotor neuropathy, 1.3% for cerebral vasculitis and 1.0% for myelitis. Neurological manifestations were associated with greater pSS activity as assessed using the ESSDAI (9.4±6.8 vs 4.3±4.8; p<0.001) and proportion of patients taking immunomodulatory/immunosuppressive drugs (32.4% (24/74) versus 13.8% (44/318), p=0003). New neurological symptoms were more common in patients with than without prior neurological manifestations (RR=3.918 (95% CI 1.91 to 8.05); p<0.001). Conclusions Prevalences of peripheral and central neurological manifestations in pSS are about 15% and 5%, respectively. Neurological manifestations are associated with greater pSS activity. New neurological manifestations are more common in patients with prior neurological involvement. PMID:27110384

  18. Paraneoplastic Neurological Syndrome in Fallopian Tube Cancer.

    PubMed

    Maas, E; Skoberne, T; Werner, A; Braun, S; Jackisch, C

    2014-10-01

    We report on a rare case of paraneoplastic syndrome (PS) that was discovered on completion of diagnostic work-up to be an undifferentiated fallopian tube carcinoma. A 49-year-old Caucasian woman was admitted to neurology with vertigo, gait ataxia and dysarthria, transient ischaemic attack (TIA) and stroke were quickly excluded. Indicative for the further diagnosis of a paraneoplastic syndrome was the identification of onconeuronal antibodies the detection of which can be associated with certain tumour entities. The strongly positive anti-Yo antibody that is formed above all by breast and lung cancers as well as ovarian cancer led to a corresponding staging. The tumour markers CEA, CA 125 and CA 15-3 were in the normal ranges. Mammography and thorax CT were also unremarkable; on transvaginal sonography the internal genitals were inconspicuous except for a follicular cyst on the left. On abdominal CT the only conspicuous finding was a 1.5 cm ovarian cyst. After consensual agreement a bilateral laparoscopic adenexectomy was performed but with unremarkable abdominal findings. The histological examination confirmed a right-sided undifferentiated tubal carcinoma with the provisional classification FIGO IIA. After a stage-related staging operation, the final classification was found to be the FIGO-IIIC stage on account of positive retroperitoneal lymph nodes. Thus adjuvant chemotherapy with 6 cycles of carboplatin and paclitaxel was performed. By means of a timely, guideline-conform therapy for tubal carcinoma, the neurological symptoms and, above all, the dysarthria could be improved after 10 months.

  19. Neurological complications in adult spinal deformity surgery.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Justin A; Reid, Patrick; Kim, Han Jo

    2016-09-01

    The number of surgeries performed for adult spinal deformity (ASD) has been increasing due to an aging population, longer life expectancy, and studies supporting an improvement in health-related quality of life scores after operative intervention. However, medical and surgical complication rates remain high, and neurological complications such as spinal cord injury and motor deficits can be especially debilitating to patients. Several independent factors potentially influence the likelihood of neurological complications including surgical approach (anterior, lateral, or posterior), use of osteotomies, thoracic hyperkyphosis, spinal region, patient characteristics, and revision surgery status. The majority of ASD surgeries are performed by a posterior approach to the thoracic and/or lumbar spine, but anterior and lateral approaches are commonly performed and are associated with unique neural complications such as femoral nerve palsy and lumbar plexus injuries. Spinal morphology, such as that of hyperkyphosis, has been reported to be a risk factor for complications in addition to three-column osteotomies, which are often utilized to correct large deformities. Additionally, revision surgeries are common in ASD and these patients are at an increased risk of procedure-related complications and nervous system injury. Patient selection, surgical technique, and use of intraoperative neuromonitoring may reduce the incidence of complications and optimize outcomes. PMID:27250041

  20. Importance of laboratory clinical investigation in the diagnosis of immune vasculitis with neurological manifestation.

    PubMed

    Hagenah, R; Senff, S H

    1984-01-01

    In this study 23 cases of immune vasculitis with predominance of neurological symptoms were analysed. Besides patient history and neurological examination, myelotomy is the most relevant means of diagnosis in immune vasculitis. For this reason myelotomy should be integrated in routine diagnostic methods if the diagnosis immune vasculitis is discussed. Other laboratory parameters have no great relevance in the diagnosis of immune vasculitis. A higher specificity of antibody tests, especially in the case of ANA, might be able to replace myelotomy in the diagnosis of immune vasculitis. The relevance of laboratory parameters in the diagnosis of immune vasculitis in neurological patients was examined.

  1. [Neurology].

    PubMed

    Sokolov, Arseny A; Rossetti, Andrea O; Michel, Patrik; Benninger, David; Nater, Bernard; Wider, Christian; Hirt, Lorenz; Kuntzer, Thierry; Démonet, Jean-François; Du Pasquier, Renaud A; Vingerhoets, François

    2016-01-13

    In 2015, cerebral stimulation becomes increasingly established in the treatment of pharmacoresistant epilepsy. Efficacy of endovascular treatment has been demonstrated for acute ischemic stroke. Deep brain stimulation at low frequency improves dysphagia and freezing of gait in Parkinson patients. Bimagrumab seems to increase muscular volume and force in patients with inclusion body myositis. In cluster-type headache, a transcutaneous vagal nerve stimulator is efficient in stopping acute attacks and also reducing their frequency. Initial steps have been undertaken towards modulating memory by stimulation of the proximal fornix. Teriflunomide is the first oral immunomodulatory drug for which efficacy has been shown in preventing conversion from clinical isolated syndrome to multiple sclerosis. PMID:26946707

  2. Social networks and neurological illness.

    PubMed

    Dhand, Amar; Luke, Douglas A; Lang, Catherine E; Lee, Jin-Moo

    2016-10-01

    Every patient is embedded in a social network of interpersonal connections that influence health outcomes. Neurologists routinely need to engage with a patient's family and friends due to the nature of the illness and its social sequelae. Social isolation is a potent determinant of poor health and neurobiological changes, and its effects can be comparable to those of traditional risk factors. It would seem reasonable, therefore, to map and follow the personal networks of neurology patients. This approach reveals influential people, their habits, and linkage patterns that could facilitate or limit health behaviours. Personal network information can be particularly valuable to enhance risk factor management, medication adherence, and functional recovery. Here, we propose an agenda for research and clinical practice that includes mapping the networks of patients with diverse neurological disorders, evaluating the impact of the networks on patient outcomes, and testing network interventions. PMID:27615420

  3. Botulinum Toxin in Pediatric Neurology

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Enas Abdallah Ali

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins are natural molecules produced by anaerobic spore-forming bacteria called Clostradium boltulinum. The toxin has a peculiar mechanism of action by preventing the release of acetylcholine from the presynaptic membrane. Consequently, it has been used in the treatment of various neurological conditions related to muscle hyperactivity and/or spasticity. Also, it has an impact on the autonomic nervous system by acting on smooth muscle, leading to its use in the management of pain syndromes. The use of botulinum toxin in children separate from adults has received very little attention in the literature. This review presents the current data on the use of botulinum neurotoxin to treat various neurological disorders in children. PMID:27335961

  4. Clinical neurology and executive dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Filley, C M

    2000-01-01

    Executive function is a uniquely human ability that permits an individual to plan, carry out, and monitor a sequence of actions that is intended to accomplish a goal. This crucial neurobehavioral capacity depends on the integrity of the frontal lobes, most importantly the dorsolateral prefrontal cortices and their connections. Executive dysfunction is associated with a wide range of neurologic disorders that affect these regions. In this paper, executive dysfunction is considered from the perspective of behavioral neurology, and the lesion method is employed to illustrate this impairment in a diverse group of disorders. Frontal system damage leading to disturbed executive function is common and clinically significant. Recognition of this syndrome is critical for ensuring the correct diagnosis, accurate prognosis, and appropriate treatment of affected patients. Executive dysfunction also represents an intriguing aspect of brain-behavior relationships and offers important insights into one of the highest cerebral functions. PMID:10879543

  5. Evaluating suspected work-related neurologic disorders (clinical diagnosis).

    PubMed

    Lotti, Marcello; Aminoff, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    The clinical diagnosis of work-related neurologic disorders is essentially one of exclusion because symptoms and signs are often nonspecific. The clinical reasoning requires a three-step approach: (1) establish the characteristics of the presenting disease; (2) ascertain that observed clinical features are consistent with those caused by the suspected agent(s); and (3) assess occupational exposures. A detailed history is of paramount importance in evaluating patients with suspected work-related neurologic disorders as it is in other clinical contexts, especially because in some circumstances it may represent the only criterion to establish causality. Thus, besides characterization of neurologic symptoms, including their location, quality, timecourse, and possible other associated symptoms, the work environment of the patient should be understood in full detail. In this respect, when a neurotoxin is suspected, then the history collection can be guided by the knowledge of the likely syndromes it produces. Similarly, physical examination should be directed to the target of toxicity/entrapment based on information from the work history. Although specific sites and elements of the nervous system may be affected depending on the offending agent, most neurotoxic disorders are characterized by generalized rather than focal neurologic abnormalities. Laboratory toxicologic tests have limited application for the etiologic diagnosis of neurotoxic disorders, except in cases of acute poisoning and in patients exposed to neurotoxic chemicals with prolonged half-life. In most cases examination takes place after the end of exposure, when the offending chemical is no longer detectable in body fluids. Electrophysiologic studies, in particular evoked potentials, electromyography, and conduction velocities, are important to confirm the organic basis of symptoms, particularly to detect subclinical or early neurologic involvement and to reduce the number of disorders to be considered in

  6. Neurologic syndrome in 25 workers from an aluminum smelting plant

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.M.; Longstreth, W.T. Jr.; Rosenstock, L.; Claypoole, K.H.; Brodkin, C.A.; Townes, B.D. )

    1992-07-01

    This article expands on an earlier series of three patients with a neurologic syndrome, who had all worked in an aluminum smelting plant. Twenty-five symptomatic workers from the same plant were referred for a standardized evaluation, including completion of a health questionnaire, neurologic examination, and neuropsychologic evaluation. An exposure index was calculated for each worker based on level and duration of exposure in the potroom, where exposures were the greatest. This index was correlated with symptoms, signs, and neuropsychologic test scores. Twenty-two (88%) of the patients reported frequent loss of balance, and 21 (84%) reported memory loss. Neurologic examination revealed signs of incoordination in 21 (84%) of the patients. Neuropsychologic test results showed preservation in certain spheres of functioning, such as verbal IQ, with substantial impairment in others, particularly memory functioning. On memory tests, 70% to 75% showed mild or greater impairment. The majority (17 of 19 tested, or 89%) showed depression on the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory. The exposure index was significantly correlated with signs and symptoms of incoordination. This study and others in humans and animals support the existence of a syndrome characterized by incoordination, poor memory, impairment in abstract reasoning, and depression. Aluminum exposure in the potroom seems the most likely cause.

  7. Comorbidities in Neurology: Is Adenosine the Common Link?

    PubMed Central

    Boison, Detlev; Aronica, Eleonora

    2015-01-01

    Comorbidities in Neurology represent a major conceptual and therapeutic challenge. For example, temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is a syndrome comprised of epileptic seizures and comorbid symptoms including memory and psychiatric impairment, depression, and sleep dysfunction. Similarly, Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) are accompanied by various degrees of memory dysfunction. Patients with AD have an increased likelihood for seizures, whereas all four conditions share certain aspects of psychosis, depression, and sleep dysfunction. This remarkable overlap suggests common pathophysiological mechanisms, which include synaptic dysfunction and synaptotoxicity, as well as glial activation and astrogliosis. Astrogliosis is linked to synapse function via the tripartite synapse, but astrocytes also control the availability of gliotransmitters and adenosine. Here we will specifically focus on the ‘adenosine hypothesis of comorbidities’ implying that astrocyte activation, via overexpression of adenosine kinase (ADK), induces a deficiency in the homeostatic tone of adenosine. We present evidence from patient-derived samples showing astrogliosis and overexpression of ADK as common pathological hallmark of epilepsy, AD, PD, and ALS. We discuss a transgenic ‘comorbidity model’, in which brain-wide overexpression of ADK and resulting adenosine deficiency produces a comorbid spectrum of seizures, altered dopaminergic function, attentional impairment, and deficits in cognitive domains and sleep regulation. We conclude that dysfunction of adenosine signaling is common in neurological conditions, that adenosine dysfunction can explain comorbid phenotypes, and that therapeutic adenosine augmentation might be effective for the treatment of comorbid symptoms in multiple neurological conditions. PMID:25979489

  8. Palliative care and neurology: time for a paradigm shift.

    PubMed

    Boersma, Isabel; Miyasaki, Janis; Kutner, Jean; Kluger, Benzi

    2014-08-01

    Palliative care is an approach to the care of patients and families facing progressive and chronic illnesses that focuses on the relief of suffering due to physical symptoms, psychosocial issues, and spiritual distress. As neurologists care for patients with chronic, progressive, life-limiting, and disabling conditions, it is important that they understand and learn to apply the principles of palliative medicine. In this article, we aim to provide a practical starting point in palliative medicine for neurologists by answering the following questions: (1) What is palliative care and what is hospice care? (2) What are the palliative care needs of neurology patients? (3) Do neurology patients have unique palliative care needs? and (4) How can palliative care be integrated into neurology practice? We cover several fundamental palliative care skills relevant to neurologists, including communication of bad news, symptom assessment and management, advance care planning, caregiver assessment, and appropriate referral to hospice and other palliative care services. We conclude by suggesting areas for future educational efforts and research.

  9. Rett syndrome: disruption of epigenetic control of postnatal neurological functions.

    PubMed

    Pohodich, Amy E; Zoghbi, Huda Y

    2015-10-15

    Loss-of-function mutations in the X-linked gene Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) cause a devastating pediatric neurological disorder called Rett syndrome. In males, these mutations typically result in severe neonatal encephalopathy and early lethality. On the other hand, owing to expression of the normal allele in ∼50% of cells, females do not suffer encephalopathy but instead develop Rett syndrome. Typically females with Rett syndrome exhibit a delayed onset of neurologic dysfunction that manifests around the child's first birthday and progresses over the next few years. Features of this disorder include loss of acquired language and motor skills, intellectual impairment and hand stereotypies. The developmental regression observed in patients with Rett syndrome arises from altered neuronal function and is not the result of neurodegeneration. Maintenance of an appropriate level of MeCP2 appears integral to the function of healthy neurons as patients with increased levels of MeCP2, owing to duplication of the Xq28 region encompassing the MECP2 locus, also present with intellectual disability and progressive neurologic symptoms. Despite major efforts over the past two decades to elucidate the molecular functions of MeCP2, the mechanisms underlying the delayed appearance of symptoms remain unclear. In this review, we will highlight recent findings that have expanded our knowledge of MeCP2's functions, and we will discuss how epigenetic regulation, chromatin organization and circuit dynamics may contribute to the postnatal onset of Rett syndrome.

  10. Human Neurological Development: Past, Present and Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelligra, R. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    Neurological development is considered as the major human potential. Vision, vestibular function, intelligence, and nutrition are discussed as well as the treatment of neurological disfunctions, coma, and convulsive seizures.

  11. Neurological prognostication after cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Sandroni, Claudio; Geocadin, Romergryko G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Prediction of neurological prognosis in patients who are comatose after successful resuscitation from cardiac arrest remains difficult. Previous guidelines recommended ocular reflexes, somatosensory evoked potentials and serum biomarkers for predicting poor outcome within 72h from cardiac arrest. However, these guidelines were based on patients not treated with targeted temperature management and did not appropriately address important biases in literature. Recent findings Recent evidence reviews detected important limitations in prognostication studies, such as low precision and, most importantly, lack of blinding, which may have caused a self-fulfilling prophecy and overestimated the specificity of index tests. Maintenance of targeted temperature using sedatives and muscle relaxants may interfere with clinical examination, making assessment of neurological status before 72 h or more after cardiac arrest unreliable. Summary No index predicts poor neurological outcome after cardiac arrest with absolute certainty. Prognostic evaluation should start not earlier than 72 h after ROSC and only after major confounders have been excluded so that reliable clinical examination can be made. Multimodality appears to be the most reasonable approach for prognostication after cardiac arrest. PMID:25922894

  12. Neurological manifestations of filarial infections.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Devender; Dumas, Michel; Preux, Pierre-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Filarial infections cause a huge public health burden wherever they are endemic. These filaria may locate anywhere in the human body. Their manifestations and pathogenic mechanisms, except the most common ones, are rarely investigated systematically. Their neurological manifestations, however, are being increasingly recognized particularly with onchocerciasis or Loa loa infections, Wuchereria bancrofti, or Mansonella perstans. The risk of developing these manifestations may also increase in cases that harbor multiple filariasis or coinfections, for instance as with Plasmodium. The microfilaria of Onchocerca and Loa loa are seen in cerebrospinal fluid. The pathogenesis of neurological manifestations of these infections is complex; however, pathogenic reactions may be caused by mechanical disruption, e.g., degeneration often followed by granulomas, causing fibrosis or mass effects on other tissues, vascular lesions, e.g., vascular block of cerebral vessels, or disordered inflammatory responses resulting in meningitis, encephalitis or localized inflammatory responses. The chances of having neurological manifestations may also depend upon the frequency and"heaviness"of infection over a lifetime. Hence, this type of infection should no longer be considered a disease of the commonly affected areas but one that may produce systemic effects or other manifestations, and these should be considered in populations where they are endemic. PMID:23829914

  13. Neurological abnormalities in chronic benzene poisoning. A study of six patients with aplastic anemia and two with preleukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Baslo, A.; Aksoy, M.

    1982-04-01

    Neurological, electromyographical and motor conduction velocity examinations were applied to 6 patients with aplastic anemia and two cases of preleukemia due to chronic exposure to benzene. In addition, sensory conduction velocities were measured in three patients. Neurological abnormalities were found in four out of six pancytopenic individuals. There was a certain relationship between the presence of neurological abnormalities and the period of cessation of the exposure. In the two patients with preleukemia similar neurologic abnormalities were found.

  14. Neuropsychiatric symptoms in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Aarsland, D.; Marsh, L.; Schrag, A.

    2009-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms are common in Parkinson's disease, even at the earliest stages, and have important consequences for quality of life and daily functioning, are associated with increased carer burden and increased risk for nursing home admission. In addition to cognitive impairment, a wide range of neuropsychiatric symptoms have been reported. In this paper, the epidemiology, clinical course, diagnosis, and management of some of the most common neuropsychiatric symptoms in PD are discussed: depression, anxiety, apathy, fatigue and psychotic symptoms. Although much is known regarding the prevalence and course of these symptoms, the empirical evidence for how to manage these symptoms is limited at best. There is thus an urgent need for systematic studies for the pharmacological and non-pharmacological management of these symptoms. PMID:19768724

  15. Premenstrual symptoms.

    PubMed

    1973-03-24

    Data is reviewed on premenstrual symptoms which have been related to high suicide and accident rates, employment absentee rates, poor academic performance and acute psychiatric problems. A recent study of healthy young women indicated that 39% had troublesome premenstrual symptoms, 54% passed clots in their menses, 70% had cyclical localized acneiform eruptions and only 17% failed to experience menstrual pain. Common menstrual disorders are classified as either dysmenorrhea or the premenstrual syndrome. Symptoms for the latter usually begin 2-12 days prior to menstruation and include nervous tension, irritability, anxiety, depression, bloated breasts and abdomen, swollen fingers and legs, headaches, dizziness, occasional hypersomia, excessive thirst and appetite. Some women may display an increased susceptibility to migraine, vasomotor rhinitis, asthma, urticaria and epilepsy. Symptoms are usually relieved with the onset of menses. While a definitive etiological theory remains to be substantiated, symptomatic relief has been reported with salt and water restriction and simple diuretics used 7 to 10 days premenstrually. Diazapam or chlordiazepoxide treatment is recommended before oral contraceptive therapy. The premenstrual syndrome may persist after menopause, is unaffected by parity, and sufferers score highly on neuroticism tests. Primary or spasmodic dysmenorrhea occurs in young women, tends to decline with age and parity and has no correlation with premenstrual symptoms or neuroticism. Spasmodic or colicky pain begins and is most severe on the first day of menstruation and may continue for 2-3 days. Treatment of dysmenorrhea with psychotropic drugs or narcotics is discouraged due to the risk of dependence and abuse. Temporary relief for disabling pain may be obtained with oral contraceptives containing synthetic estrogen and progestogen but the inherent risks should be acknowledged. Both disorders have been correlated to menstrual irregularity. Amenorrhea in

  16. Use of an enhanced surveillance system for encephalitis and aseptic meningitis for the detection of neurologic manifestations of dengue in Puerto Rico, 2003.

    PubMed

    García-Rivera, Enid J; Vorndam, Vance; Rigau-Pérez, José G

    2009-06-01

    Dengue infection has been implicated as a cause of neurologic manifestations since the beginning of the 20th century. An enhanced surveillance system for encephalitis and aseptic meningitis developed by the Puerto Rico Department of Health in collaboration with the Dengue Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, identified eleven laboratory positive dengue patients presenting with neurologic manifestations in 2003. Anti-dengue IgM antibody was detected in serum of eight patients and in cerebrospinal fluid of one patient. DENV-2 and DENV-3 were isolated from the serum of one patient each. All patients were negative for serologic markers of West Nile Virus and St. Louis encephalitis. Nine (82%) of the 11 patients had symptoms compatible with encephalitis. Their median age was 46 years (range: 9 months - 82 years) and five were males. Symptoms included severe headache, seizures, altered mental status, confusion, and coma. A motor disorder (upper extremities weakness and Guillain Barré Syndrome, respectively) occurred in two additional patients. Most patients recovered but there were two fatalities. Neurologic manifestations of dengue were rarely reported in Puerto Rico until the institution of enhanced surveillance, which resulted in the recognition of severe and fatal cases.

  17. NEUROLOGICAL RESEARCH RELEVANT TO READING--1967.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ISOM, JOHN B.

    ASPECTS OF NEUROLOGICAL RESEARCH ARE PRESENTED UNDER THE TOPICS OF NEUROLOGICAL GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT, CEREBRAL DOMINANCE, "SPLIT-BRAIN" SYNDROME, AND SEQUENCING. THE FIRST TWO AREAS INDICATE THAT ASSESSMENT OF A CHILD'S NEUROLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT MUST TAKE INTO ACCOUNT VARIATION OF RATE AND DEGREE OF DEVELOPMENT, AND THAT THE SIGNIFICANCE OF…

  18. Adult-onset presentation of a hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria patient without prior history of neurological complications.

    PubMed

    Tezcan, Kamer; Louie, Kristal T; Qu, Yong; Velasquez, Jorge; Zaldivar, Frank; Rioseco-Camacho, Natalia; Camacho, José Angel

    2012-01-01

    The Hyperornithinemia-Hyperammonemia-Homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome is a disorder of the urea cycle and ornithine degradation pathway caused by mutations in the mitochondrial ornithine transporter, ORNT1 (SLC25A15). In general, the majority of patients with HHH syndrome come to medical attention during infancy or early school years with symptoms such as learning disabilities, changes in cognitive development, spasticity, or liver dysfunction. In this report, we describe a 35-year-old male of Indian descent who was diagnosed with HHH syndrome after he presented to the emergency room with gastroenteritis, disorientation, and slurred speech. Molecular analysis revealed that this patient was heterozygous for two ORNT1 mutations, p.[Gly220Arg(+)Arg275X] (c.[658G>A(+)823C>T]) that had been previously reported in homozygous probands who presented during the first year of life. Cellular studies revealed that the ORNT1 p.Gly220Arg mutation was nonfunctional but targeted to the mitochondria. Given that this patient was a successful college graduate on a vegetarian diet without a prior history of learning or neurological impairment, additional factors such as gene redundancy, environmental, and epigenetic factors may have contributed to the delay in onset of presentation and lack of any previous symptoms. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an adult-onset HHH syndrome presentation without a prior history of neurological or cognitive deficiency.

  19. Adult-onset presentation of a hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria patient without prior history of neurological complications.

    PubMed

    Tezcan, Kamer; Louie, Kristal T; Qu, Yong; Velasquez, Jorge; Zaldivar, Frank; Rioseco-Camacho, Natalia; Camacho, José Angel

    2012-01-01

    The Hyperornithinemia-Hyperammonemia-Homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome is a disorder of the urea cycle and ornithine degradation pathway caused by mutations in the mitochondrial ornithine transporter, ORNT1 (SLC25A15). In general, the majority of patients with HHH syndrome come to medical attention during infancy or early school years with symptoms such as learning disabilities, changes in cognitive development, spasticity, or liver dysfunction. In this report, we describe a 35-year-old male of Indian descent who was diagnosed with HHH syndrome after he presented to the emergency room with gastroenteritis, disorientation, and slurred speech. Molecular analysis revealed that this patient was heterozygous for two ORNT1 mutations, p.[Gly220Arg(+)Arg275X] (c.[658G>A(+)823C>T]) that had been previously reported in homozygous probands who presented during the first year of life. Cellular studies revealed that the ORNT1 p.Gly220Arg mutation was nonfunctional but targeted to the mitochondria. Given that this patient was a successful college graduate on a vegetarian diet without a prior history of learning or neurological impairment, additional factors such as gene redundancy, environmental, and epigenetic factors may have contributed to the delay in onset of presentation and lack of any previous symptoms. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an adult-onset HHH syndrome presentation without a prior history of neurological or cognitive deficiency. PMID:23430880

  20. Neurologic complication after a roller coaster ride.

    PubMed

    Sa Leitao, Davi; Mendonca, Dercio; Iyer, Harish; Kao, Cheng-Kai

    2012-01-01

    Neurologic complications after roller coaster rides are uncommon but potentially catastrophic. Physicians should have a high index of suspicion and prompt appropriate investigation. A 22-year-old healthy African American man presented with a 2-day history of constant occipital headache associated with vertigo, nausea, vomiting, and ambulatory dysfunction. Physical examination showed gait ataxia, slight dysmetria, and vertical nystagmus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain showed early subacute ischemic infarct in the right cerebellum in the distribution of the right posterior inferior cerebellar artery. Magnetic resonance angiography of the neck showed focal dissection of the right vertebral artery at C1 through C2 level. On subsequent questioning, the patient recollected riding a roller coaster 2 weeks before the onset of symptoms. Anticoagulation with heparin was started, and the patient was bridged to oral warfarin. After a 5-day uneventful hospital course, symptoms improved and patient was discharged on oral anticoagulation. Cervicocephalic arterial dissections after roller coaster rides are rarely described in literature. The acceleration and abrupt changes of direction might lead to indirect trauma that is applied to mobile portions of the cervicocephalic arteries leading to intimal tears. Magnetic resonance angiography combined with axial T1-weighted cervical MRI is preferred because it is a high-sensitive, noninvasive test. The rationale for the use of anticoagulants or antiplatelets in patients with cervicocephalic arterial dissection is to prevent early recurrence and infarction. However, a meta-analysis failed to show significant difference in the rates of disability or death between both groups. Therefore, the decision for medical treatment should be made in a case-by-case basis. PMID:20980120

  1. Longitudinal course of physical and psychological symptoms after a natural disaster

    PubMed Central

    Wahlström, Lars; Michélsen, Hans; Schulman, Abbe; Backheden, Hans; Keskinen-Rosenqvist, Riitta

    2013-01-01

    Background After disaster, physical symptoms are common although seldom recognized due to lack of knowledge of the course of symptoms and relation to more studied psychological symptoms. Objective This study aimed to investigate the change in the reporting of different physical symptoms after a disaster, including possible factors for change, and whether psychological symptoms predict physical symptoms reporting at a later point in time. Method A longitudinal study of citizens of Stockholm who survived the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. A total of 1,101 participants completed questionnaires on somatic symptoms, general distress, posttraumatic stress, exposure, and demographic details 14 months and 3 years after the disaster. Physical symptoms occurring daily or weekly during the last year were investigated in four symptom indices: neurological, cardiorespiratory, gastrointestinal, and musculoskeletal. We used generalized estimating equations (GEE) analysis to determine odds ratios for a change in symptoms, and pathway analysis to predict the influence of psychological symptoms on physical symptoms. Results There was a general decrease of reporting in all physical symptom indices except the musculoskeletal symptom index. The change in the neurological symptom index showed the strongest association with exposure, and for women. General distress and posttraumatic stress at 14 months postdisaster predicted physical symptoms at 3 years. Conclusion Physical symptoms were predicted by psychological symptoms at an earlier time point, but in a considerable proportion of respondents, physical symptoms existed independently from psychological symptoms. Physicians should be observant on the possible connection of particular pseudoneurological symptoms with prior adversities. PMID:24379941

  2. Neurological decompression illness and hematocrit: analysis of a consecutive series of 200 recreational scuba divers.

    PubMed

    Newton, H B; Burkart, J; Pearl, D; Padilla, W

    2008-01-01

    Neurological complications are common in recreational divers diagnosed with decompression illness (DCI). Prior reports suggest that hemoconcentration, with hematocrit values of 48 or greater, increase the risk for more severe and persistent neurological deficits in divers with DCI. Herein we describe our experience with neurological DCI and hematocrit values in a large series of consecutively treated divers. We performed a retrospective chart review of 200 consecutive recreational divers that received treatment for DCI. Standard statistical analyses were performed to determine if there were any significant relationships between diving-related or demographic parameters, neurological manifestations, and hematocrit. In 177 of the 200 divers (88.5%), at least one manifestation of neurological DCI (mild, moderate, or severe) was present. The median hematocrit value was 43, for both male and female divers, with a range of 30 to 61. Hematocrit values did not correlate with diver age or level of diving experience. In male divers, the hematocrit did not correlate with neurological symptoms, including the sub-group with values of 48 or greater. In contrast, female divers with hematocrit values of 48 or greater were significantly more likely to develop motor weakness (p=0.002, Fisher's exact test) and an increased number of severe sensory symptoms (p=0.001, Kendall's tau statistic). Neurological complications are common in recreational divers treated for DCI. Hematocrit values of 48 or higher were correlated with the presence of motor weakness and severity of sensory symptoms in female divers. The hematocrit did not correlate with neurological DCI in male divers.

  3. [Present and future of neurology in Spain].

    PubMed

    Illa Sendra, I; García De Yébenes Prous, J; Ramo Tello, C; Polo Esteban, J M; Molinuevo Guix, J L; Robles Bayón, A; Mulas Delgado, F; Alvarez Sabín, J; Aguilar Barbera, M; Berciano Blanco JA, J A; Blesa González, R; Carnero Pardo, C; Castillo Sánchez, J; Del Ser Quijano, T; Ferrer Abizanda, I; García-Albea Ristol, E; Gómez Isla, T; Graus Ribas, F; Jiménez Hernández, M D; Liaño Martínez, H; Matías Guiu-Guia, J; Zarranz Imirizaldu, J J; Paradas López, C; Elena Martínez, G; Maltas Pérez, G; Ponce Rodríguez, M T

    2001-11-01

    This is a document prepared by the Spanish Society of Neurology (SEN), which was given to the President of Spain (Mr. José María Aznar) last September with the main aim of examining the current situation of Neurology in our country. It analyses the present and future of Neurology in clinical assistance, teaching and research. To prepare this document the criteria of patients' associations has been considered, including the Declaration of Madrid which has been subscribed by thirty of these associations. In spite of its relevant development in the previous decades, the current situation of Neurology in Spain is far from the ideal. To reach the recommendable menber of 3 or 4 neurologists per 100,000 inhabitants it is necessary to duplicate the present number of neurologists which has been estimated around 2/100,000; this situation is especially urgent in some Autonomous Communities. The most important problems in neurological assistance are: inadequate follow-up of the chronic outpatients, low numbers of neurological beds and of duties of Neurology, as well as of neurological case of patients with urgent neurological disorders. It is also necessary to increase the number of professors of Neurology to adequately cover pregraduate teaching; again there are important differences in teaching positions among Autonomous Communities. Neurology residence should be prolonged from 4 to 5 years. Finally, it is necessary to support the appearance of superespecialised units and to promote a coordinated research with other close specialities including basic neuroscience. PMID:11742621

  4. Neurology outside Paris following Charcot.

    PubMed

    Moulin, Thierry; Clarac, François; Petit, Henri; Broussolle, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    The Middle Ages saw the development of numerous universities in the different provinces that later became the kingdom of France. In 1794, Napoleon I established 3 medical schools in Paris, Montpellier and Strasbourg, which were transformed into medical faculties in 1808. France had always been a highly centralized country, but during the 19th century, this trend started to change with the creation of medical faculties in Nancy (1872), Lille (1877), Lyon (1878), Bordeaux (1879), Toulouse (1891), Algiers (1910) and Marseille (1930). Following the creation of the 12 foundation courses, specialized chairs were progressively established in Paris, but for a long time this remained restricted to the French capital. However, with the emergence of medicine as an academic discipline in several towns outside Paris, came the development of neurology. This was greatly influenced by former students of Jean-Martin Charcot, local personalities, and the interactions between the two. Leading figures included Albert Pitres in Bordeaux, Léon Ingelrans in Lille, Eugène Devic and Jules Froment in Lyon, Lucien Cornil in Marseille, Joseph Grasset in Montpellier, and Marcel Riser in Toulouse. The interaction between French and Germanic medical communities also developed at this turbulent time under the influence of several great physicians such as Wilhelm Waldeyer, Adolf Kussmaul, and later Jean Alexandre Barré in Strasbourg, and Hippolyte Bernheim in Nancy. There are a number of other university towns outside Paris in which the development of neurology was probably influenced by the same interactions with psychiatry. It would be worth carrying out a thorough analysis of these towns in order to present an exhaustive overview of the development of neurology in France.

  5. Liver transplantation in neurological Wilson's Disease: is there indication? A case report.

    PubMed

    Mocchegiani, F; Gemini, S; Vincenzi, P; Montalti, R; Vecchi, A; Nicolini, D; Federici, A; Coletta, M; Pansini, M; Lanari, J; Svegliati Baroni, G; Risaliti, A; Vivarelli, M

    2014-09-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by copper overload. In this disease, inadequate hepatic excretion leads to copper accumulation in the liver, brain, kidney, and cornea. Severe neurological symptoms can develop in patients with WD, often in the absence of relevant liver damage: it is unclear whether liver transplantation (LT) could reverse neurological symptoms, and at present LT is not recommended in this setting. We report a case of regression of neurological symptoms in a patient affected by WD with prevalent neurological involvement. A 19-year-old man with disabling neuropsychiatric symptoms from WD that included frontal ataxia, akinesia, dystonia, tremors, and behavioral disorders in the presence of preserved liver function (Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score=7; Child-Turcotte-Pugh score=A5) underwent LT in November 2009. At the time of LT, encephalic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) indicated diffuse neurodegenerative alterations involving subtentorial and supratentorial structures; bilateral Kayser-Fleischer ring was present. Four years after LT, laboratory tests show normalized copper metabolism and excellent liver function test results. Encephalic MRI shows a substantial improvement of already-known signal alterations at nuclei thalamus and putamen, mesencephalon, and pons. Kayser-Fleischer ring disappeared from the right eye, but a little remnant is still visible in the left eye. At neurological examination, all of the previous symptoms and signs are no longer present and behavioral disorders are no longer present; psychosocial functions are completely restored. The present case provides some evidence that LT may be a valid therapeutic option for WD patients with marked neurological impairment, particularly in those no longer responsive to chelation therapy.

  6. Neurologic injuries from scuba diving.

    PubMed

    Hawes, Jodi; Massey, E Wayne

    2009-02-01

    Interest in scuba (self-contained underwater breathing apparatus) diving increased in the 1970s, and undersea diving continues to be a popular sport early in the 21st century, with approximately 3 million certified divers in the United States. The Divers Alert Network (DAN), an institution created in 1981 by the Commerce Department, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, has collected diving injury data for US and Canadian divers since 1987 that can be studied to suggest the epidemiologic characteristics of diving. This article examines neurologic injuries resulting from scuba diving.

  7. Neurologic injuries from scuba diving.

    PubMed

    Hawes, Jodi; Massey, E Wayne

    2008-02-01

    Interest in scuba (self-contained underwater breathing apparatus) diving increased in the 1970s, and undersea diving continues to be a popular sport early in the 21st century, with approximately 3 million certified divers in the United States. The Divers Alert Network (DAN), an institution created in 1981 by the Commerce Department, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, has collected diving injury data for US and Canadian divers since 1987 that can be studied to suggest the epidemiologic characteristics of diving. This article examines neurologic injuries resulting from scuba diving.

  8. Emerging and Reemerging Neurologic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Carol A.

    2014-01-01

    The list of emerging and reemerging pathogens that cause neurologic disease is expanding. Various factors, including population growth and a rise in international travel, have contributed to the spread of pathogens to previously nonendemic regions. Recent advances in diagnostic methods have led to the identification of novel pathogens responsible for infections of the central nervous system. Furthermore, new issues have arisen surrounding established infections, particularly in an increasingly immunocompromised population due to advances in the treatment of rheumatologic disease and in transplant medicine. PMID:25360203

  9. Neurological soft signs in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: Their relationship to executive function and parental neurological soft signs.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jingbo; Xie, Jingtao; Chen, Gui; Zhang, Yajie; Wang, Suhong

    2015-07-30

    The correlations between neurological soft signs (NSS) in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and their executive function, symptoms of inattention, and hyperactivity-impulsivity and the NSS of their parents remain unclear. This study aimed to examine: (1) the prevalence of NSS in children with ADHD and their parents; (2) the correlation between the NSS of children with ADHD and the NSS of their parents; and (3) the correlation between the NSS of children with ADHD and their executive function and symptoms. NSS were assessed with the Cambridge Neurological Inventory (CNI) in 57 children with ADHD (and 80 parents) and 60 healthy children (and 75 parents). Executive function was measured with the Behavioral Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF). Children with ADHD and their parents had significantly higher NSS than normal children and their parents, respectively, and the NSS of children with ADHD were correlated more strongly with the NSS of their fathers than their mothers. No correlation was found between NSS and BRIEF executive function, but Disinhibition in children with ADHD was significantly correlated with hyperactivity-impulsivity symptoms. Paternal and maternal NSS provided different predictions for child NSS. It may be that NSS are more likely to be genetically transmitted by fathers.

  10. Neurology and psychiatry in Babylon.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Edward H; Wilson, James V Kinnier

    2014-09-01

    We here review Babylonian descriptions of neurological and psychiatric disorders, including epilepsy, stroke, psychoses, obsessive compulsive disorder, phobias, psychopathic behaviour, depression and anxiety. Most of these accounts date from the first Babylonian dynasty of the first half of the second millennium BC, within a millennium and a half of the origin of writing. The Babylonians were remarkably acute and objective observers of medical disorders and human behaviour. Their detailed descriptions are surprisingly similar to modern 19th and 20th century AD textbook accounts, with the exception of subjective thoughts and feelings which are more modern fields of enquiry. They had no knowledge of brain or psychological function. Some neuropsychiatric disorders, e.g. stroke or facial palsy, had a physical basis requiring the attention of a physician or asû, using a plant and mineral based pharmacology; some disorders such as epilepsy, psychoses, depression and anxiety were regarded as supernatural due to evil demons or spirits, or the anger of personal gods, and thus required the intervention of the priest or ašipu; other disorders such as obsessive compulsive disorder and psychopathic behaviour were regarded as a mystery. The Babylonians were the first to describe the clinical foundations of neurology and psychiatry. We discuss these accounts in relation to subsequent and more modern clinical descriptions.

  11. Neurological Complications of VZV Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the review Varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation results in zoster, which may be complicated by postherpetic neuralgia, myelitis, meningoencephalitis and VZV vasculopathy. This review highlights the clinical features, laboratory abnormalities, imaging changes and optimal treatment of each of those conditions. Because all of these neurological disorders produced by VZV reactivation can occur in the absence of rash, the virological tests proving that VZV caused disease are discussed. Recent findings After primary infection, VZV becomes latent in ganglionic neurons along the entire neuraxis. With a decline in VZV-specific cell-mediated immunity, VZV reactivates from ganglia and travels anterograde to the skin to cause zoster, which is often complicated by postherpetic neuralgia. VZV can also travel retrograde to produce meningoencephaltis, myelitis and stroke. When these complications occur without rash, VZV-induced disease can be diagnosed by detection of VZV DNA or anti-VZV antibody in CSF and treated with intravenous acyclovir. Summary Awareness of the expanding spectrum of neurological complications caused by VZV reactivation with and without rash will improve diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24792344

  12. Neurologic infections in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Jay, Cheryl A; Solbrig, Marylou V

    2014-01-01

    Even at a time when HIV/AIDS and immunosuppressive therapy have increased the number of individuals living with significant immunocompromise, diabetes mellitus (DM) remains a major comorbid disorder for several rare but potentially lethal infections, including rhino-orbital-cerebral mucormycosis and malignant external otitis. DM is also a commonly associated condition in patients with nontropical pyomyositis, pyogenic spinal infections, Listeria meningitis, and blastomycosis. As West Nile virus spread to and across North America over a decade ago, DM appeared in many series as a risk factor for death or neuroinvasive disease. More recently, in several large international population-based studies, DM was identified as a risk factor for herpes zoster. The relationships among infection, DM, and the nervous system are multidirectional. Viral infections have been implicated in the pathogenesis of type 1 and type 2 DM, while parasitic infections have been hypothesized to protect against autoimmune disorders, including type 1 DM. DM-related neurologic disease can predispose to systemic infection - polyneuropathy is the predominant risk factor for diabetic foot infection. Because prognosis for many neurologic infections depends on timely institution of antimicrobial and sometimes surgical therapy, neurologists caring for diabetic patients should be familiar with the clinical features of the neuroinfectious syndromes associated with DM. PMID:25410222

  13. Neurologic complications after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Živković, Saša A

    2013-01-01

    Neurologic complications are relatively common after solid organ transplantation and affect 15%-30% of liver transplant recipients. Etiology is often related to immunosuppressant neurotoxicity and opportunistic infections. Most common complications include seizures and encephalopathy, and occurrence of central pontine myelinolysis is relatively specific for liver transplant recipients. Delayed allograft function may precipitate hepatic encephalopathy and neurotoxicity of calcineurin inhibitors typically manifests with tremor, headaches and encephalopathy. Reduction of neurotoxic immunosuppressants or conversion to an alternative medication usually result in clinical improvement. Standard preventive and diagnostic protocols have helped to reduce the prevalence of opportunistic central nervous system (CNS) infections, but viral and fungal CNS infections still affect 1% of liver transplant recipients, and the morbidity and mortality in the affected patients remain fairly high. Critical illness myopathy may also affect up to 7% of liver transplant recipients. Liver insufficiency is also associated with various neurologic disorders which may improve or resolve after successful liver transplantation. Accurate diagnosis and timely intervention are essential to improve outcomes, while advances in clinical management and extended post-transplant survival are increasingly shifting the focus to chronic post-transplant complications which are often encountered in a community hospital and an outpatient setting. PMID:24023979

  14. Neurologic infections in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Jay, Cheryl A; Solbrig, Marylou V

    2014-01-01

    Even at a time when HIV/AIDS and immunosuppressive therapy have increased the number of individuals living with significant immunocompromise, diabetes mellitus (DM) remains a major comorbid disorder for several rare but potentially lethal infections, including rhino-orbital-cerebral mucormycosis and malignant external otitis. DM is also a commonly associated condition in patients with nontropical pyomyositis, pyogenic spinal infections, Listeria meningitis, and blastomycosis. As West Nile virus spread to and across North America over a decade ago, DM appeared in many series as a risk factor for death or neuroinvasive disease. More recently, in several large international population-based studies, DM was identified as a risk factor for herpes zoster. The relationships among infection, DM, and the nervous system are multidirectional. Viral infections have been implicated in the pathogenesis of type 1 and type 2 DM, while parasitic infections have been hypothesized to protect against autoimmune disorders, including type 1 DM. DM-related neurologic disease can predispose to systemic infection - polyneuropathy is the predominant risk factor for diabetic foot infection. Because prognosis for many neurologic infections depends on timely institution of antimicrobial and sometimes surgical therapy, neurologists caring for diabetic patients should be familiar with the clinical features of the neuroinfectious syndromes associated with DM.

  15. Neurology and psychiatry in Babylon.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Edward H; Wilson, James V Kinnier

    2014-09-01

    We here review Babylonian descriptions of neurological and psychiatric disorders, including epilepsy, stroke, psychoses, obsessive compulsive disorder, phobias, psychopathic behaviour, depression and anxiety. Most of these accounts date from the first Babylonian dynasty of the first half of the second millennium BC, within a millennium and a half of the origin of writing. The Babylonians were remarkably acute and objective observers of medical disorders and human behaviour. Their detailed descriptions are surprisingly similar to modern 19th and 20th century AD textbook accounts, with the exception of subjective thoughts and feelings which are more modern fields of enquiry. They had no knowledge of brain or psychological function. Some neuropsychiatric disorders, e.g. stroke or facial palsy, had a physical basis requiring the attention of a physician or asû, using a plant and mineral based pharmacology; some disorders such as epilepsy, psychoses, depression and anxiety were regarded as supernatural due to evil demons or spirits, or the anger of personal gods, and thus required the intervention of the priest or ašipu; other disorders such as obsessive compulsive disorder and psychopathic behaviour were regarded as a mystery. The Babylonians were the first to describe the clinical foundations of neurology and psychiatry. We discuss these accounts in relation to subsequent and more modern clinical descriptions. PMID:25037816

  16. Ictal kissing behavior: neurological and psychodynamic overview.

    PubMed

    Taşkıran, Emine; Özmen, Mine; Kılıc, Özge; Sentürk, Aslı; Özkara, Cigdem

    2013-11-01

    This study is based on the psychodynamic and neurological analysis of three Turkish patients who displayed ictal kissing automatism during their seizures. To unveil the probable underlying causes of their kissing behaviors, all patients underwent psychiatric interviews after being evaluated by ictal video-EEG recordings. The group consisted of two females (ages 35 and 29) and one male (age 26). In addition to prominent oral automatisms, each patient also displayed behaviors of kissing or blowing kisses to individuals at close proximity. Seizures were related to the right temporal lobe in two patients and the left temporal lobe in one patient. Magnetic resonance imaging showed mesial temporal sclerosis in two of the patients (one left, one right) and was normal in one. According to the DSM-IV-TR criteria, each of the three patients also suffered from major depression, while the psychodynamic interviews revealed traumatic childhood histories and intense unfulfilled affective needs. PMID:24029004

  17. Neurologic Aspects of Infections in International Travelers

    PubMed Central

    Han, May H.; Zunt, Joseph R.

    2009-01-01

    Background As international travel for business and pleasure becomes part of contemporary lifestyle, the clinician today is confronted with an increasing number of travelers returning ill with unfamiliar syndromes. The physician will encounter a myriad of patients with exotic infections, emerging infectious diseases, or resurgent Old-World infections. Review Summary This review article will discuss salient points of important infectious diseases associated with overseas travel, provide a syndromic approach to the traveler who returns with neurologic manifestations, and list resources for additional diagnostic, therapeutic, and preventive information. Conclusions As many of infections acquired in other countries can directly or indirectly affect the nervous system, the care of the ill traveler often falls into the hands of neurologists. The contemporary neurologist should therefore be knowledgeable of the clinical manifestations, potential complications, and appropriate management of region-specific infections. PMID:15631642

  18. [Neurological and psychiatric disorders following acute arsine poisoning (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Frank, G

    1976-07-15

    Follow-up study of 6 workers, who after survival of an acute arsine poisoning, developed psychopathologic and neurologic abnormalities. The symptoms appeared after a latency of 1 to 6 months indicating a toxic polyneuropathy and a mild psycho-organic syndrome. The severity of these reversible manifestations was directly related to the period of time of exposure to arsine. The clinical picture of arsine polyneuropathy was similar to that observed in arsenic poisoning, suggesting that arsine polyneuropathy is due to the action of arsenic. The psychopathologic syndrome corresponds to the so-called "Vergiftungsspätfolgesyndrom" and therefore does not appear to be a specific sequel of arsine poisoning.

  19. Neurologic complications of polycythemia and their impact on therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, L.K. )

    1990-03-01

    Polycythemia vera, a clonal stem cell disorder, produces neurologic problems in 50-80% of patients. Some symptoms, such as headache and dizziness, are related to hyperviscosity, and respond immediately to reduction of cell counts. Others seem to result from an associated coagulopathy. Patients with polycythemia tend to develop both arterial and venous thrombosis and are prone to hemorrhages. Treatments for polycythemia include phlebotomy, chlorambucil supplemented with phlebotomy, and {sup 32}P plus phlebotomy. Whatever treatment is chosen, the aim of therapy should be to reduce the hematocrit to approximately 40-45%.37 references.

  20. What micronutrient deficiencies should be considered in distinct neurological disorders?

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Pinckney J; Montgomery, Stephanie C; Cavallazzi, Rodrigo; Martindale, Robert G

    2013-07-01

    The expanding understanding of the biochemical and physiologic role of micronutrients, commonly referred to as vitamins and minerals, is driving the identification of their consequences in both deficiency and toxicity. Neural tissue is quite sensitive to physiologic changes, and as such, micronutrient deficiencies can have significant and profound effects on the functioning of both the central and peripheral nervous systems. Understanding which micronutrients can affect the nervous system can aid physician identification of these neurological symptoms and signs, leading to diagnostic testing and appropriate therapy.

  1. Factors affecting neurological deficits and intractable back pain in patients with insufficient bone union following osteoporotic vertebral fracture

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, Masatoshi; Terai, Hidetomi; Tsujio, Tadao; Nabeta, Masaharu; Namikawa, Takashi; Matsumura, Akira; Suzuki, Akinobu; Takayama, Kazushi; Takaoka, Kunio

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine factors affecting the severity of neurological deficits and intractable back pain in patients with insufficient bone union following osteoporotic vertebral fracture (OVF). Reports of insufficient union following OVF have recently increased. Patients with this lesion have various degrees of neurological deficits and back pain. However, the factors contributing to the severity of these are still unknown. A total of 45 patients with insufficient union following OVF were included in this study. Insufficient union was diagnosed based on the findings of vertebral cleft on plain radiography or CT, as well as fluid collection indicating high-intensity change on T2-weighted MRI. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the factors contributing to the severity of neurological deficits and back pain in the patients. Age, sex, level of fracture, duration after onset of symptoms, degree of local kyphosis, degree of angular instability, ratio of occupation by bony fragments, presence or absence of protrusion of flavum, and presence or absence of ossification of the anterior longitudinal ligament (OALL) in the adjacent level were used as explanatory variables, while severity of neurological deficits and back pain were response variables. On multivariate analysis, factors significantly affecting the severity of neurological deficits were angular instability of more than 15° [adjusted odds ratio (OR), 9.24 (95% confidence interval, CI 1.49–57.2); P < 0.05] and ratio of occupation by bony fragments in the spinal canal of more than 42% [adjusted OR 9.23 (95%CI 1.15–74.1); P < 0.05]. The factor significantly affecting the severity of back pain was angular instability of more than 15° [adjusted OR 14.9 (95%CI 2.11–105); P < 0.01]. On the other hand, presence of OALL in the adjacent level reduced degree of back pain [adjusted OR 0.14 (95%CI 0.03–0.76); P < 0.05]. In this study, pronounced angular

  2. Vestibular symptoms and history taking.

    PubMed

    Bisdorff, A

    2016-01-01

    History taking is an essential part in the diagnostic process of vestibular disorders. The approach to focus strongly on the quality of symptoms, like vertigo, dizziness, or unsteadiness, is not that useful as these symptoms often coexist and are all nonspecific, as each of them may arise from vestibular and nonvestibular diseases (like cardiovascular disease) and do not permit to distinguish potentially dangerous from benign causes. Instead, patients should be categorized if they have an acute, episodic, or chronic vestibular syndrome (AVS, EVS, or CVS) to narrow down the spectrum of differential diagnosis. Typical examples of disorders provoking an AVS would be vestibular neuritis or stroke of peripheral or central vestibular structures, of an EVS Menière's disease, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, or vestibular migraine and of a CVS long-standing uni- or bilateral vestibular failure or cerebellar degeneration. The presence of triggers should be established with a main distinction between positional (change of head orientation with respect to gravity), head motion-induced (time-locked to head motion regardless of direction) and orthostatic position change as the underlying disorders are quite different. Accompanying symptoms also help to orient to the underlying cause, like aural or neurologic symptoms, but also chest pain or dyspnea. PMID:27638064

  3. Neurological and neuropsychological characteristics of occipital, occipito-temporal and occipito-parietal infarction.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Antje; Grimsen, Cathleen; Kehrer, Stefanie; Bahnemann, Markus; Spang, Karoline; Prass, Maren; Irlbacher, Kerstin; Köhnlein, Martin; Lipfert, Anika; Brunner, Freimuth; Kastrup, Andreas; Fahle, Manfred; Brandt, Stephan A

    2014-07-01

    Neuropsychological deficits after occipital infarction are most often described in case studies and only a small sample of studies has attempted to exactly correlate the anatomical localization of lesions with associated neuropsychological symptoms. The present study investigated a large number of patients (N = 128) in order to provide an overview of neurological and neuropsychological deficits after occipital, occipito-temporal and occipito-parietal infarction. A particular approach of the study was to define exact anatomical correlates of neuropsychological dysfunction by using voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM) in 61 patients. In addition to a visual field defect and phosphenes, patients often reported anomia, difficulties in reading and memory deficits. Visual disorders, such as achromatopsia, akinetopsia or prosopagnosia, were rarely reported by the patients. Memory and visual disorders were diagnosed efficiently using simple clinical screening tests, such as the Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Test for immediate recall, the Demtect and the Lang Stereo Test. Visual field defects, reading disorders and the perception of phosphenes were associated primarily with lesions of the calcarine sulcus. Anomia and memory deficits were related to lesions of the occipital inferior gyrus, the lingual gyrus and hippocampus, as well as to lesions of principal white matter tracts.

  4. Neurologic complications of infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Gauhar; Lee, Jessica D

    2013-10-01

    Infective endocarditis is an infection of the inner surface or endocardium of the heart, in most instances involving the heart valves or the mural portion of the endocardium. As nonbacterial organisms such as rickettsia, fungi, and even viruses may also cause endocarditis, the term "infective endocarditis" is preferred over the older terminology of "bacterial endocarditis." Despite advancements in medical treatment and surgical therapies over the last few decades, infective endocarditis continues to be associated with a poor prognosis. There are many different factors affecting the clinical outcome in patient with infective endocarditis, including the type of organism and its virulence, patient characteristics, comorbid illness, time to diagnosis and treatment, indications for surgery, and time to surgery when indicated. In this article, we will review the epidemiology of endocarditis, the neurologic complications of infective endocarditis, and the current therapeutic strategies.

  5. Neurological complications of infantile osteopetrosis.

    PubMed

    Lehman, R A; Reeves, J D; Wilson, W B; Wesenberg, R L

    1977-11-01

    Seven cases of infantile osteopetrosis are presented. Five of these were available for detailed clinical examination and 2 for retrospective review, including autopsy slides. Neurological deficits in these patients are reviewed. Involvement of the central nervous system parenchyma was suggested by observations of delayed development, ocular abnormalities, and reflex changes as well as radiographic and autopsy findings. Cerebral atrophy was present in several of our patients as well as some reported in the literature and may account for the ventricular enlargement found in many of these patients. Though hydrocephalus may be present, it is unclear that this is frequent or that it can occur without antecedent intracranial hemorrhage. The large head size is not accounted for by calvarial thickening or by hydrocephalus. Despite our patients' small stature, pituitary function appeared to be normal. Surgical decompression may stabilize cranial nerve function, particularly when the optic nerves are involved. PMID:617576

  6. Neurological problems of jazz legends.

    PubMed

    Pearl, Phillip L

    2009-08-01

    A variety of neurological problems have affected the lives of giants in the jazz genre. Cole Porter courageously remained prolific after severe leg injuries secondary to an equestrian accident, until he succumbed to osteomyelitis, amputations, depression, and phantom limb pain. George Gershwin resisted explanations for uncinate seizures and personality change and herniated from a right temporal lobe brain tumor, which was a benign cystic glioma. Thelonious Monk had erratic moods, reflected in his pianism, and was ultimately mute and withdrawn, succumbing to cerebrovascular events. Charlie Parker dealt with mood lability and drug dependence, the latter emanating from analgesics following an accident, and ultimately lived as hard as he played his famous bebop saxophone lines and arpeggios. Charles Mingus hummed his last compositions into a tape recorder as he died with motor neuron disease. Bud Powell had severe posttraumatic headaches after being struck by a police stick defending Thelonious Monk during a Harlem club raid.

  7. The Neurological Examination in Family Practice

    PubMed Central

    Siemens, Peter

    1974-01-01

    The family practitioner has the first opportunity and responsibility of making a diagnosis. Since a large portion of his work is concerned with neurological problems, he should be able to do a complete neurological examination. This examination should include evaluation of the gait, mental function, cranial nerves, motor system and sensory system. With practice, a routine neurological examination can be done rapidly and accurately. PMID:20469138

  8. Neurologic Diseases in Special Care Patients.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Miriam R

    2016-07-01

    Neurologic diseases can have a major impact on functional capacity. Patients with neurologic disease require individualized management considerations depending on the extent of impairment and impact on functional capacity. This article reviews 4 of the more common and significant neurologic diseases (Alzheimer disease, cerebrovascular accident/stroke, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson disease) that are likely to present to a dental office and provides suggestions on the dental management of patients with these conditions.

  9. Neurology--the next 10 years.

    PubMed

    Baron, Ralf; Ferriero, Donna M; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Bettegowda, Chetan; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Kessler, John A; Vezzani, Annamaria; Waxman, Stephen G; Jarius, Sven; Wildemann, Brigitte; Weller, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Since the launch of our journal as Nature Clinical Practice Neurology in 2005, we have seen remarkable progress in many areas of neurology research, but what does the future hold? Will advances in basic research be translated into effective disease-modifying therapies, and will personalized medicine finally become a reality? For this special Viewpoint article, we invited a panel of Advisory Board members and other journal contributors to outline their research priorities and predictions in neurology for the next 10 years.

  10. Sir Charles Ballance: pioneer British neurological surgeon.

    PubMed

    Stone, J L

    1999-03-01

    Sir Charles A. Ballance (1856-1936) began his medical career at St. Thomas's Hospital the University College, London, England, in 1875, receiving honors in every subject and a gold medal in surgery. Victor Horsley (1857-1916) and Ballance were classmates at the University and in the later 1880s began work together at the Brown Institute and the National Hospital, Queen Square. In addition to important studies on vascular surgery, Ballance was involved in primate work on cerebral localization with lifelong friends Charles Beevor, Charles Sherrington, David Ferrier, and others. In June of 1887, Ballance assisted Horsley at Queen Square in the successful removal of an extramedullary spinal cord tumor. Horsley was about to abandon the operation, but his friend urged the removal of one lamina higher and the tumor was discovered. Ballance, a demonstrator in anatomy, realized the spinal cord segments lay higher in relation to the vertebral bodies than was generally appreciated. Ballance popularized the operation of radical mastoidectomy for advanced middle ear infection (1890), standardized an approach to drain or excise temporal brain abscesses, and was the first to clearly understand the neurological signs of cerebellar abscess (1894). Ballance also devised cranial base approaches to attack infectious thrombophlebitis of the lateral, petrosal, and cavernous sinuses. He was the first to completely remove an acoustic tumor (1894); 18 years later, the patient remained well. Ballance also drained a posterior fossa subdural hematoma (1906) and successfully sectioned the auditory nerve for Meniere's syndrome (1908). Ballance's operative experience with both supra- and infratentorial brain lesions included approximately 400 cases, which are detailed in his 1907 book, Some Points in the Surgery of the Brain and Its Membranes. His two-volume set, Essays on the Surgery of the Temporal Bone (1919), remains a brilliantly written and illustrated classic. Ballance was an expert on

  11. A retrospective evaluation of species-specific sensitivity for neurological signs in toxicological studies: Is the dog more sensitive than the non-human primate?

    PubMed

    Backes, Kathrin; Lorenz, Helga; Laplanche, Loic; Hudzik, Thomas J; Potschka, Heidrun; Hempel, Katja

    2016-01-22

    Selection of the appropriate non-rodent species in preclinical programs is crucial for good translatability and human safety. There is no data available in the literature which provides exact comparison of dog and non-human primate (NHP) sensitivity regarding neurological signs in toxicological studies. We performed a retrospective analysis of 174 toxicity studies with 15 neuroscience substances. Neurological signs in dogs and NHPs were evaluated in correlation to exposure data. Overall incidence of substance induced convulsions was similar in both species and no gender differences were observed. The reported liability of beagles to spontaneous convulsions was not confirmed in our studies. The symptom tremor showed the best inter-species translatability. The current toxicological study design does not include exposure assessment at the time-point of neurological signs, therefore, we propose to include additional toxicokinetic samples. Our analysis revealed factors including housing, handling, and behavior, which prevents direct species comparison. In addition only one non-rodent species is routinely tested in development programs, therefore data for both species is rare. We however, had sufficient data which enabled comparison for one compound. In the spirit of 3Rs further examples should be evaluated. PMID:26732424

  12. Brain biopsy in neurologic decline of unknown etiology.

    PubMed

    Magaki, Shino; Gardner, Tracie; Khanlou, Negar; Yong, William H; Salamon, Noriko; Vinters, Harry V

    2015-04-01

    Brain biopsies have an uncertain role in the diagnosis of patients with dementia or neurologic decline of unknown etiology. They are often performed only after an exhaustive panel of less invasive tests and procedures have failed to provide a definitive diagnosis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of brain biopsies in this patient group through the retrospective analysis of 53 brain biopsies performed for neurologic disease of unknown etiology at a single tertiary care institution between December 2001 and December 2011. Patients with known nonlymphomatous neoplasms thought to be associated with the neurologic symptoms or with immunodeficiency were excluded from the study. Furthermore, the clinical presentation, imaging and laboratory tests were compared between diagnostic groups to identify factors more likely to yield a diagnosis. Sixty percent of the biopsies were diagnostic (32 of 53), with the most common histologic diagnosis of central nervous system lymphoma in 14 of 53 patients (26% of total) followed by infarct in four subjects (7.5%). A few patients were found to have rare and unsuspected diseases such as lymphomatosis cerebri, neurosarcoidosis and neuroaxonal leukodystrophy. Complications from biopsy were uncommon and included hemorrhage and infection with abscess formation at the biopsy site. These results suggest that brain biopsies may be useful in difficult cases in which less invasive measures have been unable to yield a definitive diagnosis.

  13. Approaching neurological diseases to reduce mobility limitations in older persons.

    PubMed

    Lauretani, Fulvio; Ceda, Gian Paolo; Pelliccioni, Pio; Ruffini, Livia; Nardelli, Anna; Cherubini, Antonio; Maggio, Marcello

    2014-01-01

    The rapidly increasing elderly population poses a major challenge for future health-care systems. Neurological diseases in older persons are particularly common and coexist with other clinical conditions. This is not surprising given that, for example, even patients with Alzheimer Disease (AD) could have relevant extrapyramidal signs at the moment of the diagnosis with motor signs having more negative prognostic value. Longitudinal studies conducted on Parkinson Disease (PD) showed that, after 20 years, dementia is not only present in almost all survivors but is also the main factor influencing nursing home admission. Recently, it has been reported the importance of Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA: comprehensive evaluation of cognition, depressive symptoms, mobility and functional assessment) as a tool reducing morbidity in frail older patients admitted to any acute hospital unit. The CGA should be considered as a technological device, for physicians who take care of older persons affected by overlapping neurological diseases. CGA is an extraordinary and cost effective instrument even in patients with advanced neurological diseases where allows to collect valuable information for an effective plan of management.

  14. Transient neurologic syndrome after spinal anesthesia with epidural steroid treatment

    PubMed Central

    Cöcelli, L. Pirbudak; Erkutlu, Ibrahim; Karakurum, Gunhan; Avci, Neslihan; Gül, Rauf; Öner, Ünsal

    2009-01-01

    Background: Transient neurologic syndrome (TNS) is a rare complication of spinal and epidural anesthesia. It is defined as paradoxic postoperative back pain radiating to the lower extremities with no neurologic deficits. Because it is a self-limited disease, the treatment is usually symptomatic and consists of NSAIDs and injections of a neuromuscular-blocking drug at the trigger points. The syndrome may be resistant to this treatment regimen and may last for several months, resulting in a long convalescence. Case summary: A 63-year-old Turkish woman (height, 165 cm; weight, 71 kg) underwent hemorrhoidectomy in the jackknife position using spinal anesthesia. No adverse events occurred during puncture or surgery or in the immediate postoperative recovery period. Recovery from the sensory and motor block was normal. Twenty-four hours after surgery, lower limb and plantar pain developed with no sensory or motor deficit. Neurologic examination revealed normal motor and sensory function. Electroneuromyography showed partial denervation potential of muscles innervated by the left sciatic nerve. The symptoms were suggestive of TNS. Combination oral NSAID treatment with amitriptyline (25 mg/d) and gabapentin (1200 mg/d) was initiated. Because the pain still persisted 6 weeks after surgery, epidural steroid injection with triamcinolone acetate (80 mg) with isotonic saline was administered, resulting in definite pain relief (visual analog scale score = 0). Conclusions: Epidural steroid treatment was effective in this patient with TNS resistant to treatment with NSAIDs, amitriptyline, and gabapentin. Future studies are needed to evaluate this treatment. PMID:24683240

  15. Neurologic and Psychiatric Manifestations of Celiac Disease and Gluten Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Jessica R.; Eaton, William W.; Cascella, Nicola G.; Fasano, Alessio

    2013-01-01

    Celiac Disease (CD) is an immune-mediated disease dependent on gluten (a protein present in wheat, rye or barley) that occurs in about 1% of the population and is generally characterized by gastrointestinal complaints. More recently the understanding and knowledge of gluten sensitivity (GS), has emerged as an illness distinct from celiac disease with an estimated prevalence 6 times that of CD. Gluten sensitive people do not have villous atrophy or antibodies that are present in celiac disease, but rather they can test positive for antibodies to gliadin. Both CD and GS may present with a variety of neurologic and psychiatric co-morbidities, however, extraintestinal symptoms may be the prime presentation in those with GS. However, gluten sensitivity remains undertreated and underrecognized as a contributing factor to psychiatric and neurologic manifestiations. This review focuses on neurologic and psychiatric manifestations implicated with gluten sensitivity, reviews the emergence of gluten sensitivity distinct from celiac disease, and summarizes the potential mechanisms related to this immune reaction. PMID:21877216

  16. [Vertigo/dizziness and syncope from a neurological perspective].

    PubMed

    Machetanz, J

    2015-01-01

    Vertigo/dizziness and syncope are among the most frequent clinical entities encountered in neurology. In patients with presumed syncope, it is important to distinguish it from neurological and psychiatric diseases causing a transient loss of consciousness due to another etiology. Moreover, central nervous disorders of autonomic blood pressure regulation as well as affections of the peripheral autonomic nerves can be responsible for the onset of real syncope. This is particularly relevant in recurrent syncope. Vertigo occurs in the context of temporary disorders, relatively harmless diseases associated with chronic impairment, as well as in acute life-threatening states. Patient history and clinical examination play an important role in classifying these symptoms. It is of crucial importance in this context, e.g., to establish whether the patient is experiencing an initial manifestation or whether such episodes have been known to occur recurrently over a longer period of time, as well as how long the episodes last. Clinical investigations include a differential examination of the oculomotor system with particular regard to nystagmus. The present article outlines the main underlying neurological diseases associated with syncope and vertigo, their relevant differential diagnoses as well as practical approaches to their treatment.

  17. [German neurology and neurologists during the Third Reich: the aftermath].

    PubMed

    Martin, M; Fangerau, H; Karenberg, A

    2016-08-01

    The article discusses the consequences for neurology as a discipline which resulted from neurologists' participation in the crimes committed under National Socialism (NS). Chronologically, the current literature distinguishes mainly four overlapping stages: (1) a first phase was characterized by legal persecution and "denazification", which was also the time of the Nuremberg doctors' trial in which no neurologists were on trial. A detailed documentation of the trial for the German medical profession was published by Alexander Mitscherlich. (2) In the subsequent practice of wide amnestying and reintegration of former Nazi followers during the 1950s, neurologists were no exception as its elite continued in their positions. The year 1953 was the year of the Lisbon scandal, when chiefly Dutch representatives protested against the participation of Julius Hallervorden in the International Congress of Neurology. The newly founded societies, the German Society for Neurology (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Neurologie, DGN) and the German Society for Psychiatry and Neurology (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Psychiatrie und Neurologie, DGPN), unanimously supported their member. (3) The next period was characterized by a nascent criticism of the prevailing attitude of covering up the crimes committed by physicians during the Nazi period. The discovery of incriminating brain sections at various Max Planck Institutes brought neurology to the focus of the debate. (4) Since the 1980s and 1990s historians (of medicine) have been systematically examining medicine's Nazi past in a professional way, which resulted in a noticeable increase of knowledge. Additionally, a new generation of scholars provoked a change of mind insofar as they recognized medicine's responsibility for the crimes committed between 1933 and 1945. We expect that future historical research will further elucidate the history of neurology during the NS regime and have consequences for our current understanding of research

  18. [German neurology and neurologists during the Third Reich: the aftermath].

    PubMed

    Martin, M; Fangerau, H; Karenberg, A

    2016-08-01

    The article discusses the consequences for neurology as a discipline which resulted from neurologists' participation in the crimes committed under National Socialism (NS). Chronologically, the current literature distinguishes mainly four overlapping stages: (1) a first phase was characterized by legal persecution and "denazification", which was also the time of the Nuremberg doctors' trial in which no neurologists were on trial. A detailed documentation of the trial for the German medical profession was published by Alexander Mitscherlich. (2) In the subsequent practice of wide amnestying and reintegration of former Nazi followers during the 1950s, neurologists were no exception as its elite continued in their positions. The year 1953 was the year of the Lisbon scandal, when chiefly Dutch representatives protested against the participation of Julius Hallervorden in the International Congress of Neurology. The newly founded societies, the German Society for Neurology (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Neurologie, DGN) and the German Society for Psychiatry and Neurology (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Psychiatrie und Neurologie, DGPN), unanimously supported their member. (3) The next period was characterized by a nascent criticism of the prevailing attitude of covering up the crimes committed by physicians during the Nazi period. The discovery of incriminating brain sections at various Max Planck Institutes brought neurology to the focus of the debate. (4) Since the 1980s and 1990s historians (of medicine) have been systematically examining medicine's Nazi past in a professional way, which resulted in a noticeable increase of knowledge. Additionally, a new generation of scholars provoked a change of mind insofar as they recognized medicine's responsibility for the crimes committed between 1933 and 1945. We expect that future historical research will further elucidate the history of neurology during the NS regime and have consequences for our current understanding of research

  19. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibody-mediated neurological disease: results of a UK-based surveillance study in children

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Sukhvir; Hacohen, Yael; Jacobson, Leslie; Agrawal, Shakti; Gupta, Rajat; Philip, Sunny; Smith, Martin; Lim, Ming; Wassmer, Evangeline; Vincent, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Objective N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibody (NMDAR-Ab) encephalitis is a well-recognised clinico-immunological syndrome that presents with neuropsychiatric symptoms cognitive decline, movement disorder and seizures. This study reports the clinical features, management and neurological outcomes of paediatric NMDAR-Ab-mediated neurological disease in the UK. Design A prospective surveillance study. Children with NMDAR-Ab-mediated neurological diseases were voluntarily reported to the British Neurological Surveillance Unit (BPNSU) from November 2010 to December 2011. Initial and follow-up questionnaires were sent out to physicians. Results Thirty-one children fulfilled the criteria for the study. Eight presented during the study period giving an incidence of 0.85 per million children per year (95% CI 0.64 to 1.06); 23 cases were historical. Behavioural change and neuropsychiatric features were present in 90% of patients, and seizures and movement disorders both in 67%. Typical NMDAR-Ab encephalitis was reported in 24 children and partial phenotype without encephalopathy in seven, including predominantly psychiatric (four) and movement disorder (three). All patients received steroids, 22 (71%) received intravenous immunoglobulin, 9 (29%) received plasma exchange,and 10 (32%) received second-line immunotherapy. Of the 23 patients who were diagnosed early, 18 (78%) made a full recovery compared with only 1 of 8 (13%) of the late diagnosed patients (p=0.002, Fisher's exact test). Seven patients relapsed, with four needing additional second-line immunotherapy. Conclusions Paediatric NMDAR-Ab-mediated neurological disease appears to be similar to adult NMDAR-Ab encephalitis, but some presented with a partial phenotype. Early treatment was associated with a quick and often full recovery. PMID:25637141

  20. Dysfunctional HCN ion channels in neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    DiFrancesco, Jacopo C.; DiFrancesco, Dario

    2015-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels are expressed as four different isoforms (HCN1-4) in the heart and in the central and peripheral nervous systems. HCN channels are activated by membrane hyperpolarization at voltages close to resting membrane potentials and carry the hyperpolarization-activated current, dubbed If (funny current) in heart and Ih in neurons. HCN channels contribute in several ways to neuronal activity and are responsible for many important cellular functions, including cellular excitability, generation, and modulation of rhythmic activity, dendritic integration, transmission of synaptic potentials, and plasticity phenomena. Because of their role, defective HCN channels are natural candidates in the search for potential causes of neurological disorders in humans. Several data, including growing evidence that some forms of epilepsy are associated with HCN mutations, support the notion of an involvement of dysfunctional HCN channels in different experimental models of the disease. Additionally, some anti-epileptic drugs are known to modify the activity of the Ih current. HCN channels are widely expressed in the peripheral nervous system and recent evidence has highlighted the importance of the HCN2 isoform in the transmission of pain. HCN channels are also present in the midbrain system, where they finely regulate the activity of dopaminergic neurons, and a potential role of these channels in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease has recently emerged. The function of HCN channels is regulated by specific accessory proteins, which control the correct expression and modulation of the neuronal Ih current. Alteration of these proteins can severely interfere with the physiological channel function, potentially predisposing to pathological conditions. In this review we address the present knowledge of the association between HCN dysfunctions and neurological diseases, including clinical, genetic, and physiopathological

  1. Neurological Complications of Solid Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Amy A.; Graus, Francesc; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.

    2013-01-01

    Solid organ transplantation (SOT) is the preferred treatment for an expanding range of conditions whose successful therapy has produced a growing population of chronically immunosuppressed patients with potential neurological problems. While the spectrum of neurological complications varies with the type of organ transplanted, the indication for the procedure, and the intensity of long-term required immunosuppression, major neurological complications occur with all SOT types. The second part of this 2-part article on transplantation neurology reviews central and peripheral nervous system problems associated with SOT with clinical and neuroimaging examples from the authors’ institutional experience. Particular emphasis is given to conditions acquired from the donated organ or tissue, problems specific to types of organs transplanted and drug therapy-related complications likely to be encountered by hospitalists. Neurologically important syndromes such as immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), and posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) are readdressed in the context of SOT. PMID:24167649

  2. Addressing neurological disorders with neuromodulation.

    PubMed

    Oluigbo, Chima O; Rezai, Ali R

    2011-07-01

    Neurological disorders are becoming increasingly common in developed countries as a result of the aging population. In spite of medications, these disorders can result in progressive loss of function as well as chronic physical, cognitive, and emotional disability that ultimately places enormous emotional and economic on the patient, caretakers, and the society in general. Neuromodulation is emerging as a therapeutic option in these patients. Neuromodulation is a field, which involves implantable devices that allow for the reversible adjustable application of electrical, chemical, or biological agents to the central or peripheral nervous system with the objective of altering its functioning with the objective of achieving a therapeutic or clinically beneficial effect. It is a rapidly evolving field that brings together many different specialties in the fields of medicine, materials science, computer science and technology, biomedical, and neural engineering as well as the surgical or interventional specialties. It has multiple current and emerging indications, and an enormous potential for growth. The main challenges before it are in the need for effective collaboration between engineers, basic scientists, and clinicians to develop innovations that address specific problems resulting in new devices and clinical applications. PMID:21193369

  3. Neurology in the Vietnam War.

    PubMed

    Gunderson, Carl H; Daroff, Robert B

    2016-01-01

    Between December 1965 and December 1971, the United States maintained armed forces in Vietnam never less than 180,000 men and women in support of the war. At one time, this commitment exceeded half a million soldiers, sailors, and airmen from both the United States and its allies. Such forces required an extensive medical presence, including 19 neurologists. All but two of the neurologists had been drafted for a 2-year tour of duty after deferment for residency training. They were assigned to Vietnam for one of those 2 years in two Army Medical Units and one Air Force facility providing neurological care for American and allied forces, as well as many civilians. Their practice included exposure to unfamiliar disorders including cerebral malaria, Japanese B encephalitis, sleep deprivation seizures, and toxic encephalitis caused by injection or inhalation of C-4 explosive. They and neurologists at facilities in the United States published studies on all of these entities both during and after the war. These publications spawned the Defense and Veterans Head Injury Study, which was conceived during the Korean War and continues today as the Defense and Veterans Head Injury Center. It initially focused on post-traumatic epilepsy and later on all effects of brain injury. The Agent Orange controversy arose after the war; during the war, it was not perceived as a threat by medical personnel. Although soldiers in previous wars had developed serious psychological impairments, post-traumatic stress disorder was formally recognized in the servicemen returning from Vietnam.

  4. Addressing neurological disorders with neuromodulation.

    PubMed

    Oluigbo, Chima O; Rezai, Ali R

    2011-07-01

    Neurological disorders are becoming increasingly common in developed countries as a result of the aging population. In spite of medications, these disorders can result in progressive loss of function as well as chronic physical, cognitive, and emotional disability that ultimately places enormous emotional and economic on the patient, caretakers, and the society in general. Neuromodulation is emerging as a therapeutic option in these patients. Neuromodulation is a field, which involves implantable devices that allow for the reversible adjustable application of electrical, chemical, or biological agents to the central or peripheral nervous system with the objective of altering its functioning with the objective of achieving a therapeutic or clinically beneficial effect. It is a rapidly evolving field that brings together many different specialties in the fields of medicine, materials science, computer science and technology, biomedical, and neural engineering as well as the surgical or interventional specialties. It has multiple current and emerging indications, and an enormous potential for growth. The main challenges before it are in the need for effective collaboration between engineers, basic scientists, and clinicians to develop innovations that address specific problems resulting in new devices and clinical applications.

  5. Emotional disorders in neurological rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    House, Allan; Hosker, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Depression, anxiety, emotionalism, irritability, and apathy are common findings in the neurological rehabilitation setting and are associated with poorer outcomes. This chapter outlines the importance of detecting and attending to these disorders. The authors recommend the systematic use of self-report measures, tailored for those with cognitive or motor difficulties, in combination with interview-based assessments where suspicion of the presence of a disorder is aroused. A stepped care scheme for coordinating rehabilitation services is presented which highlights the importance of training all staff to be aware of the possibility of patients presenting with emotional disorders and the need to equip all staff with the skills to make emotional enquiries and to carry out brief interventions where indicated. Interventions should be based upon a combination of watchful waiting and optimization of clinical care followed by evidence-based brief therapies such as problem solving, motivational interviewing, and behavioral activation. Antidepressant prescribing should be reserved for the more severe cases and protocols should involve a system for reviewing and time-limiting prescriptions. This chapter aims to aid those designing services to produce simple and widely understood programs that meet the needs of this inherently heterogeneous client base.

  6. Neurology in the Vietnam War.

    PubMed

    Gunderson, Carl H; Daroff, Robert B

    2016-01-01

    Between December 1965 and December 1971, the United States maintained armed forces in Vietnam never less than 180,000 men and women in support of the war. At one time, this commitment exceeded half a million soldiers, sailors, and airmen from both the United States and its allies. Such forces required an extensive medical presence, including 19 neurologists. All but two of the neurologists had been drafted for a 2-year tour of duty after deferment for residency training. They were assigned to Vietnam for one of those 2 years in two Army Medical Units and one Air Force facility providing neurological care for American and allied forces, as well as many civilians. Their practice included exposure to unfamiliar disorders including cerebral malaria, Japanese B encephalitis, sleep deprivation seizures, and toxic encephalitis caused by injection or inhalation of C-4 explosive. They and neurologists at facilities in the United States published studies on all of these entities both during and after the war. These publications spawned the Defense and Veterans Head Injury Study, which was conceived during the Korean War and continues today as the Defense and Veterans Head Injury Center. It initially focused on post-traumatic epilepsy and later on all effects of brain injury. The Agent Orange controversy arose after the war; during the war, it was not perceived as a threat by medical personnel. Although soldiers in previous wars had developed serious psychological impairments, post-traumatic stress disorder was formally recognized in the servicemen returning from Vietnam. PMID:27035455

  7. Neurology of the H1N1 pandemic in Singapore: a nationwide case series of children and adults.

    PubMed

    Prerna, Asha; Lim, Jocelyn Y X; Tan, Natalie W H; Isa, Mas Suhaila; Oh, Helen May-Lin; Yassin, Norazieda; Low, Chian-Yong; Chan, Derrick W S; Chong, Chia-Yin; Leo, Yee-Sin; Chow, Angela Li-Ping; Tambyah, Paul Ananth; Tan, Kevin

    2015-10-01

    Neurologic complications have long been associated with influenza. A novel strain of influenza A (H1N1) first described in humans to have outbreak potential in 2009 in Mexico went on to become the first influenza pandemic of this century. We evaluated the neurologic complications of the novel influenza A (H1N1) 2009 in children and adults admitted to all public hospitals in Singapore during the influenza A (H1N1) 2009 pandemic between May 2009 and March 2010. All patients were positive for novel H1N1 infection and presented with neurologic symptoms prior to oseltamivir treatment. Ninety-eight patients (median age 6.6 years, range 0.4-62.6) were identified; 90 % were younger than 18 years; 32 % suffered from preexisting neurological, respiratory, or cardiac disease; and 66 % presented with seizures. Of those presenting with seizures, new onset seizures were the most common manifestation (n = 40, 61.5 %), followed by breakthrough seizures (n = 18, 27.7 %) and status epilepticus (n = 7, 10.8 %). Influenza-associated encephalopathy occurred in 20 %. The majority of children (n = 88) presented with seizures (n = 63, 71.6 %), encephalopathy (n = 19, 21.6 %), and syncope (n = 4, 4.5 %). Among adults, a wider range of neurological conditions were seen, with half of them presenting with an exacerbation of their underlying neurological disease. The neurological symptoms developed at a median of 2 days after the onset of systemic symptoms. The median length of hospital stay was 3 days, and 79 % were monitored in general wards. Neurologic complications associated with the novel influenza A (H1N1) 2009 strain were generally mild and had a good outcome. They occurred more frequently in patients with underlying neurological disorders. Seizures and encephalopathy were the most common manifestations, similar to other influenza virus strains.

  8. Application of next-generation sequencing technologies in Neurology

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Teng; Tan, Meng-Shan

    2014-01-01

    Genetic risk factors that underlie many rare and common neurological diseases remain poorly understood because of the multi-factorial and heterogeneous nature of these disorders. Although genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have successfully uncovered numerous susceptibility genes for these diseases, odds ratios associated with risk alleles are generally low and account for only a small proportion of estimated heritability. These results implicated that there are rare (present in <5% of the population) but not causative variants exist in the pathogenesis of these diseases, which usually have large effect size and cannot be captured by GWAS. With the decreasing cost of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, whole-genome sequencing (WGS) and whole-exome sequencing (WES) have enabled the rapid identification of rare variants with large effect size, which made huge progress in understanding the basis of many Mendelian neurological conditions as well as complex neurological diseases. In this article, recent NGS-based studies that aimed to investigate genetic causes for neurological diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, stroke, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinocerebellar ataxias, have been reviewed. In addition, we also discuss the future directions of NGS applications in this article. PMID:25568878

  9. Zika virus-associated neurological disorders: a review.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Abelardo Q C; Silva, Marcus Tulius T; Araujo, Alexandra P Q C

    2016-08-01

    Zika virus, an arbovirus transmitted by mosquitoes of the Aedes species, is now rapidly disseminating throughout the Americas and the ongoing Brazilian outbreak is the largest Zika virus epidemic so far described. In addition to being associated with a non-specific acute febrile illness, a number of neurological manifestations, mainly microcephaly and Guillain-Barré syndrome, have been associated with infection. These with other rarer neurological conditions suggest that Zika virus, similar to other flaviviruses, is neuropathogenic. The surge of Zika virus-related microcephaly cases in Brazil has received much attention and the role of the virus in this and in other neurological manifestations is growing. Zika virus has been shown to be transmitted perinatally and the virus can be detected in amniotic fluid, placenta and foetus brain tissue. A significant increase in Guillain-Barré syndrome incidence has also been reported during this, as well as in previous outbreaks. More recently, meningoencephalitis and myelitis have also been reported following Zika virus infection. In summary, while preliminary studies have suggested a clear relationship between Zika virus infection and certain neurological conditions, only longitudinal studies in this epidemic, as well as experimental studies either in animal models or in vitro, will help to better understand the role of the virus and the pathogenesis of these disorders.

  10. Zika virus-associated neurological disorders: a review.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Abelardo Q C; Silva, Marcus Tulius T; Araujo, Alexandra P Q C

    2016-08-01

    Zika virus, an arbovirus transmitted by mosquitoes of the Aedes species, is now rapidly disseminating throughout the Americas and the ongoing Brazilian outbreak is the largest Zika virus epidemic so far described. In addition to being associated with a non-specific acute febrile illness, a number of neurological manifestations, mainly microcephaly and Guillain-Barré syndrome, have been associated with infection. These with other rarer neurological conditions suggest that Zika virus, similar to other flaviviruses, is neuropathogenic. The surge of Zika virus-related microcephaly cases in Brazil has received much attention and the role of the virus in this and in other neurological manifestations is growing. Zika virus has been shown to be transmitted perinatally and the virus can be detected in amniotic fluid, placenta and foetus brain tissue. A significant increase in Guillain-Barré syndrome incidence has also been reported during this, as well as in previous outbreaks. More recently, meningoencephalitis and myelitis have also been reported following Zika virus infection. In summary, while preliminary studies have suggested a clear relationship between Zika virus infection and certain neurological conditions, only longitudinal studies in this epidemic, as well as experimental studies either in animal models or in vitro, will help to better understand the role of the virus and the pathogenesis of these disorders. PMID:27357348

  11. Depressive symptoms in adolescents: associations with white matter volume and marijuana use

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Krista Lisdahl; Nagel, Bonnie J.; Park, Ann; McQueeny, Tim; Tapert, Susan F.

    2008-01-01

    Background Depressed mood has been associated with decreased white matter and reduced hippocampal volumes. However, the relationship between brain structure and mood may be unique among adolescents who use marijuana heavily. The goal of this study was to examine the relationship between white matter and hippocampal volumes and depressive symptoms among adolescent marijuana users and controls. Methods Data were collected from marijuana users (n = 16) and demographically similar controls (n = 16) aged 16–18. Extensive exclusionary criteria included psychiatric and neurologic disorders, including major depression. Substance use, mood, and anatomical measures were collected after 28 days of monitored abstinence. Results Marijuana (MJ) users demonstrated more depressive symptoms than controls (p < .05). MJ use (β = .42, p < .005) and smaller white matter volume (β = −.34, p < .03) each predicted higher levels of depressive symptoms on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. MJ use interacted with white matter volume (β = −.55, p < .03) in predicting depression scores on the Beck Depression Inventory: among MJ users, but not controls, white matter volume was negatively associated with depressive symptoms. Conclusions Marijuana use and white matter volume were additive and interactive in predicting depressive symptoms among adolescents. Subtle neurodevelopmental white matter abnormalities may disrupt the connections between areas involved in mood regulation. PMID:17537075

  12. The global perspective on neurology training: the World Federation of Neurology survey.

    PubMed

    Steck, Andreas; Struhal, Walter; Sergay, Stephen M; Grisold, Wolfgang

    2013-11-15

    This World Federation of Neurology (WFN) study aimed to characterize the status quo of post-graduate neurology training throughout the world and enable a better orientation on global training in neurology. Basic data on training curricula and working conditions of neurology residents and neurologists in 39 countries worldwide were evaluated. Our data show considerable differences in manpower and training, but a continuous improvement within the last 10 years of observation. Worldwide a spread of interim evaluations and final examinations of different types are used. Online resources will undoubtedly profoundly change skill and knowledge acquisition and training practices in Neurology in the coming years.

  13. [Clinical symptoms of Alzheimer disease].

    PubMed

    Tariska, P; Urbanics, K; Knolmayer, J; Mészáros, A

    1995-04-23

    Data of patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease and checked out in the special unit named Memory Clinic functioning from 1992 in the National Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology are summarized. Age average of the 60 patients was 63 years, the first symptoms of the disease had appeared in 57 p.c. before the age of 65, so the classical presenile form of the ailment is represented too in the material. Predominance of multifocal cortical function disturbances in the symptomatology is characteristic, association of the depression is outstandingly frequent. The atypical features, or those characteristic in diseases of cerebrovascular origin are not infrequently seen (headache, dizziness, slight symptoms of pyramidal lesions). The absence of epileptic seizures It was interesting even in considering the data of the literature too. The main points of clinical diagnostics and differential diagnostics are demonstrated with the aid of case reports. The author's material is the first Hungarian publication in the topics of clinical symptoms of patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease that had been investigated with up-to-date methods. Occurrence of the disease of very great frequency could be supposed to occur at general practitioners, the importance of differential diagnostics and planning of the complex longlasting therapy is extremely great.

  14. Neurological events related to influenza A (H1N1) pdm09

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas, Graciela; Soto-Hernández, José Luis; Díaz-Alba, Alexandra; Ugalde, Yair; Mérida-Puga, Jorge; Rosetti, Marcos; Sciutto, Edda

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To review neurological complications after the influenza A (H1N1) pdm09, highlighting the clinical differences between patients with post-vaccine or viral infection. Design A search on Medline, Ovid, EMBASE, and PubMed databases using the keywords “neurological complications of Influenza AH1N1” or “post-vaccine Influenza AH1N1.” Setting Only papers written in English, Spanish, German, French, Portuguese, and Italian published from March 2009 to December 2012 were included. Sample We included 104 articles presenting a total of 1636 patient cases. In addition, two cases of influenza vaccine-related neurological events from our neurological care center, arising during the period of study, were also included. Main outcome measures Demographic data and clinical diagnosis of neurological complications and outcomes: death, neurological sequelae or recovery after influenza A (H1N1) pdm09 vaccine or infection. Results The retrieved cases were divided into two groups: the post-vaccination group, with 287 patients, and the viral infection group, with 1349 patients. Most patients in the first group were adults. The main neurological complications were Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) or polyneuropathy (125), and seizures (23). All patients survived. Pediatric patients were predominant in the viral infection group. In this group, 60 patients (4.7%) died and 52 (30.1%) developed permanent sequelae. A wide spectrum of neurological complications was observed. Conclusions Fatal cases and severe, permanent, neurological sequelae were observed in the infection group only. Clinical outcome was more favorable in the post-vaccination group. In this context, the relevance of an accurate neurological evaluation is demonstrated for all suspicious cases, as well as the need of an appropriate long-term clinical and imaging follow-up of infection and post-vaccination events related to influenza A (H1N1) pdm09, to clearly estimate the magnitude of neurological complications

  15. Neurologic disorders in Medicaid vs privately insured children and working-age adults.

    PubMed

    Mateen, Farrah J; Geer, Joseph P; Frick, Kevin; Carone, Marco

    2014-04-01

    This retrospective, observational study reports health utilization and access patterns of Medicaid recipients for neurologic diseases compared to privately insured individuals seen in 2 hospitals at a single institution in the same time period. We reviewed records of patients and compared demographic characteristics, visit types, neurologic diagnoses, and all-cause mortality, by age group, when seen with Medicaid vs private insurance. Adults insured by Medicaid were more likely to present as inpatients and with life-threatening neurologic disease compared to privately insured patients. Moreover, adult patients presenting with neurologic disease on Medicaid had a higher all-cause mortality rate than privately insured patients. Similar disparities in neurologic disease were not observed in children. The relationship of these findings to patient educational status, household income, comorbidities, and the reasons prompting Medicaid eligibility require additional study.

  16. Neurological Complications after Lateral Transpsoas Approach to Anterior Interbody Fusion with a Novel Flat-Blade Spine-Fixed Retractor

    PubMed Central

    Nunley, Pierce; Sandhu, Faheem; Frank, Kelly; Stone, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) surgical approach has potential advantages over other approaches but is associated with some unique neurologic risks due to the proximity of the lumbosacral plexus. The present study analyzed complications following LLIF surgical approach using a novel single flat-blade retractor system. Methods. A retrospective data collection of patients receiving LLIF using a novel single flat-blade retractor system at two institutions in the US. Inclusion criteria were all patients receiving an LLIF procedure with the RAVINE® Lateral Access System (K2M, Inc., Leesburg, VA, USA). There was no restriction on preoperative diagnosis or number of levels treated. Approach-related neurologic complications were collected and analyzed postoperatively through a minimum of one year. Results. Analysis included 253 patients with one to four treated lateral levels. Immediate postoperative neurologic complications were present in 11.1% (28/253) of patients. At one-year follow-up the approach-related neurologic complications resolved in all except 5 patients (2.0%). Conclusion. We observed an 11.1% neurologic complication rate in LLIF procedures. There was resolution of symptoms for most patients by 12-month follow-up, with only 2% of patients with residual symptoms. This supports the hypothesis that the vast majority of approach-related neurologic symptoms are transient. PMID:27294140

  17. Post-traumatic syndrome after minor head injury cannot be predicted by neurological investigations.

    PubMed

    Korinthenberg, Rudolf; Schreck, Jochen; Weser, Jürgen; Lehmkuhl, Gerhard

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate predictive factors of post-traumatic syndrome in children with minor head injury. Prospective neurological, electroencephalographic and psychological investigations were performed in 98 children aged 3-13 years within 24 h after the trauma and 4-6 weeks later. Inclusion criteria for mild head injury were unconsciousness <10 min or none at all, lack of overt neurological symptoms and other complications requiring intensive care. Twenty-six of the children had been unconscious for a short period. Ten had suffered a skull fracture. Within the first 24 h, nearly all children reported acute symptoms of concussion and 64 of 98 showed abnormal EEG findings. After 4-6 weeks, 23 of 98 still exhibited post-traumatic complaints with headache, fatigue, sleep disturbances, anxiety and affect instability. Such post-traumatic symptoms did not correlate with somatic, neurological or electroencephalographic findings observed immediately after the injury or at the follow-up investigation. As opposed to the situation in more severe head trauma, post-traumatic syndrome after minor head injury in children is apparently not due to central nervous injury detectable by neurological examination or electroencephalography. Irrespective of the necessity of neuroradiological investigations and repeated EEGs in more severe and complicated head trauma, we discourage the routine EEG examination in very slight head injury and instead rather recommend parent and patient counselling.

  18. Profile of neurological disorders in an adult neurology clinic in Kumasi, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Sarfo, Fred Stephen; Akassi, John; Badu, Elizabeth; Okorozo, Aham; Ovbiagele, Bruce; Akpalu, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the burden of neurological disorders is highest among populations in developing countries there is a dearth of data on the clinical spectrum of these disorders. Objective To profile the frequency of neurologic disorders and basic demographic data in an adult neurology out-patient service commissioned in 2011 in Kumasi, Ghana. Methods The study was conducted at the neurology clinic of the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital in Kumasi, Ghana. Over a three year period, all medical records of patients enrolled at the out-patient neurology clinic was reviewed by a neurologist and neurological diagnoses classified according to ICD-10. Results 1812 adults enrolled for care in the neurology out-patient service between 2011 and 2013. This comprised of 882 males and 930 females (male: female ratio of 1.0: 1.1) with an overall median age of 54 (IQR, 39–69) years. The commonest primary neurological disorders seen were strokes, epilepsy and seizure disorders, and movement disorders at frequencies of 57.1%, 19.8%, and 8.2% respectively. Conclusions Cerebrovascular diseases, epilepsy and movement disorders were among the commonest neurological disorders and the major contributors to neurologic morbidity among Ghanaians in an urban neurology clinic. PMID:27110596

  19. The neurological manifestations of trauma: lessons from World War I.

    PubMed

    Linden, Stefanie C; Hess, Volker; Jones, Edgar

    2012-04-01

    Changes in the clinical presentation of functional disorders and the influence of social and cultural factors can be investigated through the historical case notes from mental hospitals. World War I (WWI) was a potent trigger of functional disorders with neurological or psychiatric symptoms. We analysed 100 randomly selected case files of German servicemen admitted to the Department of Psychiatry of the Charité Medical School of Berlin University during WWI and classified them according to contemporaneous and retrospective modern diagnoses. We compared the clinical presentations with accounts in the German and British medical literature of the time. Most patients obtained the contemporaneous diagnosis of 'psychopathic constitution' or hysteria reflecting the general view of German psychiatrists that not the war but an individual predisposition was the basis for the development of symptoms. The clinical picture was dominated by pseudoneurological motor or sensory symptoms as well as pseudoseizures. Some soldiers relived combat experiences in dream-like dissociative states that partly resemble modern-day post-traumatic stress disorder. Most servicemen were classified as unfit for military service but very few of them were granted compensation. Severe functional disorders of a neurological character could develop even without traumatic exposure in combat, which is of interest for the current debate on triggers of stress disorders. The high incidence of pseudoseizures accords with the psychiatric literature of the time and contrasts with accounts of war-related disorders in Britain. The tendency of German psychiatrists not to send traumatised servicemen back to active duty also distinguished between German and British practice. Our data contribute to the debate on the changing patterns of human responses to traumatic experience and their historical and social context.

  20. The influence of BMX gene polymorphisms on clinical symptoms after mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Jia; Hsu, Yu-Wen; Chang, Che-Mai; Wu, Chung-Che; Ou, Ju-Chi; Tsai, Yan-Rou; Chiu, Wen-Ta; Chang, Wei-Chiao; Chiang, Yung-Hsiao; Chen, Kai-Yun

    2014-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is one of the most common neurological disorders. Most patients diagnosed with mTBI could fully recover, but 15% of patients suffer from persistent symptoms. In recent studies, genetic factors were found to be associated with recovery and clinical outcomes after TBI. In addition, results from our previous research have demonstrated that the bone marrow tyrosine kinase gene in chromosome X (BMX), a member of the Tec family of kinases, is highly expressed in rats with TBI. Therefore, our aim in this study was to identify the association between genetic polymorphisms of BMX and clinical symptoms following mTBI. Four tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (tSNPs) of BMX with minimum allele frequency (MAF) >1% were selected from the HapMap Han Chinese database. Among these polymorphisms, rs16979956 was found to be associated with the Beck anxiety inventory (BAI) and dizziness handicap inventory (DHI) scores within the first week after head injury. Additionally, another SNP, rs35697037, showed a significant correlation with dizziness symptoms. These findings suggested that polymorphisms of the BMX gene could be a potential predictor of clinical symptoms following mTBI. PMID:24860816

  1. [Charles Miller Fisher: a giant of neurology].

    PubMed

    Tapia, Jorge

    2013-08-01

    C. Miller Fisher MD, one of the great neurologists in the 20th century, died in April 2012. Born in Canada, he studied medicine at the University of Toronto. As a Canadian Navy medical doctor he participated in World War II and was a war prisoner from 1941 to 1944. He did a residency in neurology at the Montreal Neurological Institute between 1946 and 1948, and later on was a Fellow in Neurology and Neuropathology at the Boston City Hospital. In 1954 he entered the Massachusetts General Hospital as a neurologist and neuropathologist, where he remained until his retirement, in 2005. His academic career ended as Professor Emeritus at Harvard University. His area of special interest in neurology was cerebrovascular disease (CVD). In 1954 he created the first Vascular Neurology service in the world and trained many leading neurologists on this field. His scientific contributions are present in more than 250 publications, as journal articles and book chapters. Many of his articles, certainly not restricted to CVD, were seminal in neurology. Several concepts and terms that he coined are currently used in daily clinical practice. The chapters on CVD, in seven consecutive editions of Harrison's Internal Medicine textbook, are among his highlights. His death was deeply felt by the neurological community.

  2. [Neurologic manifestations in 93 patients with exogenous poisoning caused by non-therapeutic chemical substances].

    PubMed

    Agapejev, S; Vassiliev, I; Lima, M M

    1986-09-01

    Ninety-three patients with neurological manifestations and suspected exogenous intoxication were analysed. The detection of toxic substances was performed in the blood, urine and cerebrospinal fluid. There was clear predominance of the central nervous system impairment than the peripheric, and an apparent tropism of herbicides and organophosphates to the central nervous system compared with the peripheral nervous system, and considering the manifestations caused by carbamates and organochlorines. The authors analyse some probable action mechanism of these substances in the nervous system, and show the most frequently neurological signs and symptoms found.

  3. Adaptation of neurological practice and policy to a changing US health-care landscape.

    PubMed

    Gorelick, Philip B

    2016-04-01

    Health care in the USA is undergoing a drastic transformation under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is driving major health-care policy changes by connecting payment for traditional health-care services to value-based care initiatives and emphasising population health and innovative mechanisms to deliver care. Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, neurological practice will need to adapt and transform. Therefore, neurological policy should consider employing a new framework for neurological residency training, developing interdisciplinary team approaches to neurological subspecialty care, and strengthening the primary care-neurological specialty care interface to avoid redundancies and other medical waste. Additionally, neurological policy will need to support a more robust review of diagnostic and care pathway use to reduce avoidable expenditures, and test and implement bundled payments for key neurological diagnoses. In view of an anticipated 19% shortage of US neurologists in the next 10 years, development of new neurological policy under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is paramount.

  4. Subacute aseptic meningitis as neurological manifestation of primary Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Rosario; Valeria Saddi, Maria

    2006-10-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is an autoimmune disease characterized by inflammatory infiltration and secondary chronic dysfunction of exocrine glands. Systemic (extraglandular) manifestations of the disease occur in one-third of the patients, including a wide spectrum of peripheral and central neurological disorders. We report a case of subacute afebrile aseptic meningitis (AM) as neurological manifestation of primary SS. The neurological symptomatology presented gradual onset and progression, including diplopia, mild headache, pain and stiffness of the neck. The clinical examination pointed out xerostomia and xerophthalmia. Diagnosis of SS was confirmed by Schirmer's tear test and histopathology of the labial salivary glands. The neurological involvement was highlighted by gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the brain which displayed an increased diffuse leptomeningeal enhancement. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis showed moderate pleocytosis with prevalence of polymorphonuclear leukocytes and increased protein level but no evidence of Ig intrathecal synthesis. A cycle of intravenous steroid therapy led to a complete disappearance of the neurological symptomatology and to normalization of the CSF inflammatory pattern. Given the unusual presentation of this case of AM, which resembled the characteristics of a chronic meningitis rather than those of an acute form, in patients affected by SS we must stress the importance of cephalic symptoms such as headaches and cervical stiffness (even if mild and without fever) as possible signs of central neurological involvement of the disease.

  5. Overlap between Headache, Depression, and Anxiety in General Neurological Clinics: A Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Cui-Bai; Jia, Jian-Ping; Wang, Fen; Zhou, Ai-Hong; Zuo, Xiu-Mei; Chu, Chang-Biao

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many studies have reported that depression and anxiety have bidirectional relationship with headache. However, few researches investigated the roles of depression or anxiety in patients with headache. We surveyed the prevalence of depression and anxiety as a complication or cause of headache among outpatients with a chief complaint of headache at neurology clinics in general hospitals. Additional risk factors for depression and anxiety were also analyzed. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted at 11 general neurological clinics. All consecutive patients with a chief complaint of headache were enrolled. Diagnoses of depression and anxiety were made using the Chinese version of the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview, and those for headache were made according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd Edition. The headache impact test and an 11-point verbal rating scale were applied to assess headache severity and intensity. Logistic regression was used to analyze risk factors of patients with headache for depression or anxiety. Results: A total of 749 outpatients with headache were included. Among them, 148 (19.7%) were diagnosed with depression and 103 (13.7%) with anxiety. Further analysis showed that 114 (15.2%) patients complaining headache due to somatic symptoms of psychiatric disorders and 82 (10.9%) had a depression or anxiety comorbidity with headache. Most patients with depression or anxiety manifested mild to moderate headaches. Poor sleep and severe headache-related disabilities were predictors for either depression or anxiety. Conclusion: Clinicians must identify the etiology of headache and recognize the effects of depression or anxiety on headache to develop specific treatments. PMID:27270532

  6. Neurological examination: pioneering authors and their books.

    PubMed

    Maranhão-Filho, Péricles; Vincent, Maurice Borges; Silva, Marcos Martins da

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this article is to highlight some of the most important pioneering books specifically focused on the neurological examination and their authors. During the XIX Century, Alexander Hammond, William Gowers and Charles Mills pioneered the neurological literature, followed in the XX Century by Aloysio de Castro, Monrad-Krohn, Derek Denny-Brown, Robert Wartenberg, Gordon Holmes, and Russel DeJong. With determination and a marked sense of observation and research, they competently developed and spread the technique and art of the neurological exam.

  7. Neurologic manifestations of iron deficiency in childhood.

    PubMed

    Yager, Jerome Y; Hartfield, Dawn S

    2002-08-01

    Iron deficiency is a common disorder in pediatric patients. Although the most common manifestation is that of anemia, iron deficiency is frequently the source of a host of neurologic disorders presenting to general pediatric neurologic practices. These disorders include developmental delay, stroke, breath-holding episodes, pseudotumor cerebri, and cranial nerve palsies. Although frequent, the identification of iron deficiency as part of the differential diagnosis in these disorders is uncommon and frequently goes untreated. The purpose of the current review is to highlight what is understood regarding iron deficiency and it's underlying pathophysiology as it relates to the brain, and the association of iron deficiency with common neurologic pediatric disease.

  8. Complex Neurological and Oto-Neurological Remote Care: From Space Station to Clinic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchbanks, Robert J.; Good, Edward F.

    2013-02-01

    The main aim of this paper is to highlight the synergy between the remote care requirements for NASA and community/rural based medicine. It demonstrates the appropriateness of applying similar health-care models for space-based medicine, as for ‘2020 vision’ community-based medicine, and the common use of screening devices with telemedicine capabilities. There is a requirement to diagnose and manage complex cases remotely and the need to empower on-site medically trained personnel to undertake the physiological measurements and decision-making. For space exploration at greater distances, the telemedicine systems will require additional sophistication to support autonomous crew medical diagnosis and interventions.1 Non-invasive intracranial pressure measurement is a priority both for terrestrial and space medicine. Arguably it is the most important neurological physiological measurement yet to be mastered and to be routinely used.

  9. Eculizumab in Typical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS) With Neurological Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Pape, Lars; Hartmann, Hans; Bange, Franz Christoph; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Bueltmann, Eva; Ahlenstiel-Grunow, Thurid

    2015-01-01

    Eculizumab seems to show less benefit. We speculate that prophylactic Eculizumab therapy before development of neurological symptoms could be advantageous. PMID:26091445

  10. A brief exploration of neurological art history.

    PubMed

    Appenzeller, Otto; Amm, Marita; Jones, Howard

    2004-12-01

    The invention of realistic portraiture to reveal "inner life" is attributed by some art historians to Jan van Eyck who worked in Flanders from 1420 onwards. We show, using clinical neurological examination of the gold mask of Agamemnon dating from 1550-1500 BC and of the portraits of Henry III and his son Edward I -- important English royals -- painted between 1216 and 1307, that realistic portraits were made well before the 15th Century. Thus artists unwittingly used neurology as part of their realistic approach to the presentation of the face. Because neurological diagnosis is often visual, neurology, in turn, has a rich potential to unveil examples of realism in art. We consider the art pieces examined here also pertinent to art historians, as they assess the role of art in documenting history.

  11. Nurse-aid management of neurological emergencies.

    PubMed

    Platt, W D; Walton, J

    People with altered levels of consciousness cannot be responsible for themselves. This article highlights the steps a nurse aider must take at the scene of an accident and discusses the importance of the environment in the neurological emergency. PMID:8485364

  12. Clinical neurologic indices of toxicity in animals.

    PubMed Central

    O'Donoghue, J L

    1996-01-01

    The fundamental structures and functions of the nervous systems of animals and humans are conserved in many ways across species. These similarities provide a basis for developing common neurologic examinations for a number of species of animals and also provide a basis for developing risk assessments across species for neurologic end points. The neurologic examination requires no expensive equipment and can be conducted in the field or wherever impaired animals are identified. The proper conduct of neurologic examinations in animals assumes that the examiner has a fundamental understanding of the normal structure and function of the nervous system as well as knowledge about the spontaneous disease background of the species being studied. PMID:9182039

  13. 14 CFR 67.109 - Neurologic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... for a first-class airman medical certificate are: (a) No established medical history or clinical... neurologic condition that the Federal Air Surgeon, based on the case history and appropriate,...

  14. 14 CFR 67.309 - Neurologic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... for a third-class airman medical certificate are: (a) No established medical history or clinical... neurologic condition that the Federal Air Surgeon, based on the case history and appropriate,...

  15. 14 CFR 67.209 - Neurologic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... standards for a second-class airman medical certificate are: (a) No established medical history or clinical... neurologic condition that the Federal Air Surgeon, based on the case history and appropriate,...

  16. [Neurologic characteristics of diseases caused by Inkoo and Tahyna viruses].

    PubMed

    Demikhov, V G; Chaĭtsev, V G

    1995-01-01

    Two principal forms of diseases caused by Inkoo and Tahyna viruses were observed, fever (25 pts, 61%) and neuroinfection (13 pts, 31.7%). In 3 (7.3%) subjects the infection was inapparent. Ten patients presented with mixed forms of infection (virus-virus or virus-bacterial). Clinical manifestations were characterized by marked polymorphism and low specificity. The onset was acute with expressed symptoms of infection and weak catarrhal manifestations. Of the patients with the neuroinfectious form of the disease 3 presented with aseptic meningitis, 2 with meningoencephalitis, and 5 with encephalitis. Aseptic meningitis was characterized by a combination of general infectious and moderately expressed meningeal syndromes with weak inflammatory changes in the spinal fluid. Encephalitides were associated with numerous neurological symptoms which manifested on days 3-7 of the illness. These symptoms were asymmetry of nasolabial folds, hemiparesis, dysarthria, dysphagia, generalized tremor, tongue deviation. No significant differences in the clinical manifestations of Inkoo and Tahyna infections were observed. PMID:7740783

  17. Roles of Circular RNAs in Neurologic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yiye; Chen, Yinghui

    2016-01-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are a novel type of endogenous noncoding RNA receiving increasing attention. They have been shown to act as a natural microRNA sponges that repress the activity of corresponding miRNAs by binding with them, thus regulating target genes. Numerous studies have shown that miRNAs are involved in the pathogenesis of neurological diseases. Therefore, circRNAs may act as important regulatory factors in the occurrence and development processes of neurological disease. PMID:27147959

  18. Neurologic Complications of Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Rabinstein, Alejandro A

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The rate and outcomes of neurologic complications of patients receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to identify these parameters in ECMO patients. Methods All patients receiving ECMO were selected from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample between 2001-2011. The rate and outcomes of neurologic complications [acute ischemic stroke, intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), and seizures] among these patients was determined. Discharge status, mortality, length of stay, and hospitalization costs were compared between patients with and without neurologic complications using chi-squared tests for categorical variables and Student's t-test for continuous variables. Results In total, 23,951 patients were included in this study, of which 2,604 (10.9%) suffered neurologic complications of seizure (4.1%), stroke (4.1%), or ICH (3.6%). When compared to patients without neurologic complications, acute ischemic stroke patients had significantly higher rates of discharge to a long-term facility (12.2% vs. 6.8%, p<0.0001) and a significantly longer mean length of stay (41.6 days vs. 31.9 days, p<0.0001). ICH patients had significantly higher rates of discharge to a long-term facility (9.5% vs. 6.8%, p=0.007), significantly higher mortality rates (59.7% vs. 50.0%, p<0.0001), and a significantly longer mean length of stay (41.8 days vs. 31.9 days) compared to patients without neurologic complications. These outcomes did not differ significantly between seizure patients and patients without neurologic complications. Conclusions Given the increasing utilization of ECMO and the high costs and poor outcomes associated with neurologic complications, more research is needed to help determine the best way to prevent these sequelae in this patient population. PMID:26320848

  19. Sporadic hemiplegic migraine with permanent neurological deficits.

    PubMed

    Schwedt, Todd J; Zhou, Jiying; Dodick, David W

    2014-01-01

    By definition, the neurologic impairments of hemiplegic migraine are reversible. However, a few cases of permanent neurologic deficits associated with hemiplegic migraine have been reported. Herein, we present the case of a patient with permanent impairments because of hemiplegic migraine despite normalization of associated brain magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities. Cases like these suggest the need to consider aggressive prophylactic therapy for patients with recurrent hemiplegic migraine attacks.

  20. Hors d'oeuvres for neurology.

    PubMed

    Pascuzzi, R M

    1999-01-01

    From time to time, in the setting of lectures, rounds, or casual conversation, there is a need for hors d'oeuvres; small pieces, spices, and artifacts that generate a bit of thought and interest with a neurological twist. A potpourri of neurological trivia is herein presented for the purpose of stimulating the reader and serving as a brief reserve of questions and topics for use on rounds.

  1. Chapter 50: history of tropical neurology.

    PubMed

    Ogunniyi, Adesola

    2010-01-01

    Tropical neurology began less than two centuries ago. Consumption of dietary toxins predominated at the beginning and gave birth to the geographic entity. The story moved from lathyrism through Jamaican neuropathy to cassava-induced epidemic neuropathy, which was contrasted with Konzo, also associated with cassava. Other tropical diseases enumerated with chronological details include: Chaga's diseases, kwashiorkor, Madras type of motor neuron disease, atlanto-axial dislocation, Burkitt's lymphoma and Kuru, associated with cannibalism among the Fore linguistic group in New Guinea. More recent documentation includes the Cuban neuropathy in 1991 with an epidemic of visual loss and neuropathy, Anaphe venata entomophagy in Nigeria presenting as seasonal ataxia, and neurological aspects of the human immunodeficiency virus infection complete the picture. With time, professional associations were formed and the pioneers were given prominence. The World Federation of Neurology featured Geographic Neurology as a theme in 1977 and Tropical Neurology was given prominence at its 1989 meeting in New Delhi, India. The situation remains unchanged with regards to rare diseases like Meniere's, multiple sclerosis, hereditary disorders. However, with westernization and continued urbanization, changing disease patterns are being observed and tropical neurology may depart from dietary toxins to more western world-type disorders. PMID:19892153

  2. Comorbidity between neurological illness and psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Hesdorffer, Dale C

    2016-06-01

    Psychiatric disorders are common in many neurological disorders, including epilepsy, migraine, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, and stroke. These comorbidities increase disease burden and may complicate the treatment of the combined disorders. Initial studies of the comorbidity of psychiatric and neurological disorders were cross-sectional, and time order of the associations was impossible to elucidate. More recent work has clarified time associations between psychiatric disorders and neurological disorders, particularly in epilepsy and stroke where epidemiological evidence suggests that there is a bidirectional relationship. This article takes an epidemiological approach to understanding these relationships and focuses mostly on epilepsy. Although, these relationships are understood in many neurological disorders, routine screening for psychiatric disorders in neurological disorders is infrequent, mostly due to the lack of partnerships between psychiatrists and neurologists and the paucity of neuropsychiatrists. Much more needs to be done to improve the detection and treatment of patients affected by neurological and psychiatric disorders. Understanding the scope of this overlap may inspire collaborations to improve the lives of people affected by both disorders. PMID:26898322

  3. Telomere shortening in neurological disorders: an abundance of unanswered questions.

    PubMed

    Eitan, Erez; Hutchison, Emmette R; Mattson, Mark P

    2014-05-01

    Telomeres, ribonucleoprotein complexes that cap eukaryotic chromosomes, typically shorten in leukocytes with aging. Aging is a primary risk factor for neurodegenerative disease (ND), and a common assumption has arisen that leukocyte telomere length (LTL) can serve as a predictor of neurological disease. However, the evidence for shorter LTL in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's patients is inconsistent. The diverse causes of telomere shortening may explain variability in LTL between studies and individuals. Additional research is needed to determine whether neuronal and glial telomeres shorten during aging and in neurodegenerative disorders, if and how LTL is related to brain cell telomere shortening, and whether telomere shortening plays a causal role in or exacerbates neurological disorders. PMID:24698125

  4. Telomere Shortening in Neurological Disorders: An Abundance of Unanswered Questions

    PubMed Central

    Eitan, Erez; Hutchison, Emmette R.; Mattson, Mark P.

    2014-01-01

    Telomeres, ribonucleoprotein complexes that cap eukaryotic chromosomes, typically shorten in leukocytes with aging. Aging is a primary risk factor for neurodegenerative disease (ND), and a common assumption has arisen that leukocyte telomere length (LTL) can serve as a predictor of neurological disease. However, the evidence for shorter LTL in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s patients is inconsistent. The diverse causes of telomere shortening may explain variability in LTL between studies and individuals. Additional research is needed to determine whether neuronal and glial telomeres shorten during aging and in neurodegenerative disorders, if and how LTL is related to brain cell telomere shortening, and whether telomere shortening plays a causal role in or exacerbates neurological disorders. PMID:24698125

  5. Coalescence of psychiatry, neurology, and neuropsychology: from theory to practice.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Miles G; Goldstein, Martin; Katz, David; O'Neil, Sarah Quimby; Joseph, Anthony; Price, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    In a climate of renewed interest in the synergy between neurology and psychiatry, practitioners are increasingly recognizing the importance of exchange and collaboration between these two disciplines. However, there are few working models of interdisciplinary teams that freely share expertise in real time, while providing clinical and academic training to future physicians who specialize in the central nervous system. Over the past 11 years, the McLean Hospital Neuropsychiatry and Behavioral Neurology service has provided proof-of-principle for such collaboration, demonstrating that a team comprising psychiatrists, neurologists, and neuropsychologists can function effectively as a unit while maintaining the autonomy of these three disciplines and also synthesizing their combined knowledge. In addition to delivering enhanced patient care and promoting medical research, this clinical service has provided enriched cross-specialty training for fellows, residents, and medical students. The practical functioning of the team is described, and case vignettes are presented to illustrate the team's collaborative synergism in practice.

  6. [Causalgia in neurologic expert assessment].

    PubMed

    Suchenwirth, R M

    1990-08-01

    Rendering an expert opinion on causalgia, after having clear determined it as the disease, poses many problems to the examiner. One ought to make this diagnosis with its serious consequences only under the following conditions: --when it is a case of a mostly partial trauma of a nerve with considerable intermingling of sympathetic fibres; --when the pains have a burning and primarily superficial character; --when the pain appear soon (hours, mostly days or weeks, more rarely months afterward) after the trauma; --when the pains are accompanied by considerable vasovegetative symptoms (cold sweats, cyanosis, hyperhidrosis and others). Secondary algodystrophic changes (muscle, joints, bones, and skin) are to be considered. In quantitatively judging the effects, an over-evaluation, as well as an underevaluation, is to be avoided by all means. Therapeutic effects and spontaneous remission after six to twelve months are to be considered. An exemplary case, in which a deterioriation of the capacity to work from 20 to 100% (!) was assumed, showed the need for taking the personality structure of patient into consideration. PMID:2399634

  7. Mitochondrial Biology and Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Arun, Siddharth; Liu, Lei; Donmez, Gizem

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are extremely active organelles that perform a variety of roles in the cell including energy production, regulation of calcium homeostasis, apoptosis, and population maintenance through fission and fusion. Mitochondrial dysfunction in the form of oxidative stress and mutations can contribute to the pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s (PD), Alzheimer’s (AD), and Huntington’s diseases (HD). Abnormalities of Complex I function in the electron transport chain have been implicated in some neurodegenerative diseases, inhibiting ATP production and generating reactive oxygen species that can cause major damage to mitochondria Mutations in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA can contribute to neurodegenerative disease, although the pathogenesis of these conditions tends to focus on nuclear mutations. In PD, nuclear genome mutations in the PINK1 and parkin genes have been implicated in neurodegeneration [1], while mutations in APP, PSEN1 and PSEN2 have been implicated in a variety of clinical symptoms of AD [5]. Mutant htt protein is known to cause HD [2]. Much progress has been made to determine some causes of these neurodegenerative diseases, though permanent treatments have yet to be developed. In this review, we discuss the roles of mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of these diseases. PMID:26903445

  8. Neurological Sequelae in Adults After E coli O104: H4 Infection-Induced Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schuppner, Ramona; Maehlmann, Justus; Dirks, Meike; Worthmann, Hans; Tryc, Anita B; Sandorski, Kajetan; Bahlmann, Elisabeth; Kielstein, Jan T; Giesemann, Anja M; Lanfermann, Heinrich; Weissenborn, Karin

    2016-02-01

    In an outbreak of shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infections and associated hemolytic-uremic syndrome (STEC O104:H4) in Germany in the year 2011 neurological complications in adult patients occurred unexpectedly frequent, ranging between 48% and 100% in different patient groups. Few is known about the long-term effects of such complications and so we performed follow-up exams on 44 of the patients treated for STEC-HUS at Hannover Medical Scool in this observational study. Standardized follow-up exams including neurological and neuropsychological assessments, laboratory testing, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and EEG were carried out. Subgroups were examined 2 (n = 34), 7 (n = 22), and 19 (n = 23) months after disease onset. Additionally, at the 19-month follow-up, quality of life, sleep quality, and possible fatigue were assessed.Nineteen months after disease onset 31 patients were reassessed, 22 of whom still suffered from symptoms such as fatigue, headache, and attention deficits. In the neuropsychological assessments only 39% of the patients performed normal, whereas 61% scored borderline pathological or lower. Upon reviewal, the follow-up data most prominently showed a secondary decline of cognitive function in about one-quarter of the patients. Outcome was not related to treatment or laboratory data in the acute phase of the disease nor length of hospitalization. Prognosis of STEC-HUS associated brain dysfunction in adults with regard to severity of symptoms is mostly good; some patients however still have not made a full recovery. Patients' caretakers have to be aware of possible secondary decline of brain function as was observed in this study. PMID:26871766

  9. Movement disorder symptoms associated with Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) in two manganese (Mn)-exposed communities

    EPA Science Inventory

    Objectives: The UPDRS is a commonly used neurological measurement to assess the presence and severity of parkinsonian symptoms. It has also been used to assess symptoms associated with Mn exposure. Objectives: to determine 1) if movement disorder symptoms were associated with UP...

  10. Ion channel genes and human neurological disease: Recent progress, prospects, and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Edward C.; Jan, Lily Yeh

    1999-01-01

    What do epilepsy, migraine headache, deafness, episodic ataxia, periodic paralysis, malignant hyperthermia, and generalized myotonia have in common? These human neurological disorders can be caused by mutations in genes for ion channels. Many of the channel diseases are “paroxysmal disorders” whose principal symptoms occur intermittently in individuals who otherwise may be healthy and active. Some of the ion channels that cause human neurological disease are old acquaintances previously cloned and extensively studied by channel specialists. In other cases, however, disease-gene hunts have led the way to the identification of new channel genes. Progress in the study of ion channels has made it possible to analyze the effects of human neurological disease-causing channel mutations at the level of the single channel, the subcellular domain, the neuronal network, and the behaving organism. PMID:10220366

  11. Tyrosinemia type 1 and irreversible neurologic crisis after one month discontinuation of nitisone.

    PubMed

    Önenli Mungan, Neslihan; Yıldızdaş, Dinçer; Kör, Deniz; Horoz, Özden Özgür; İncecik, Faruk; Öktem, Murat; Sander, Johannes

    2016-10-01

    Tyrosinemia type I is an autosomal recessively inherited metabolic disease of tyrosine metabolism due to the deficiency of fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase. Clinical manifestations include hepatic failure, cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, renal fanconi syndrome, and neurologic crisis. With the introduction of 2-(2-nitro-4-trifluoro-methylbenzyol)-1,3 cyclohexanedione treatment the prognosis improved with reduced rate of complications. "Neurologic crisis" of tyrosinemia type I is a rare complication seen after discontinuation of treatment characterized with anorexia, vomiting, and hyponatremia in the initial phase continuing with paresthesia and paralysis of the extremities and the diaphragm. Here, we report a tyrosinemia type I patient who admitted to the hospital with nonspecific symptoms such as vomiting, anorexia, weakness, and restlessness only after one month discontinuation of nitisone and diagnosed as neurological crisis.

  12. Quantitative Evaluation System of Soft Neurological Signs for Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Miki; Yamashita, Yushiro; Iramina, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. Soft neurological signs (SNS) are minor neurological abnormalities in motor performance, and are used as one evaluation method for neurodevelopmental delays in children with ADHD. Our aim is to establish a quantitative evaluation system for children with ADHD. We focused on the arm movement called pronation and supination, which is one such soft neurological sign. Thirty three children with ADHD aged 7–11 years (27 males, six females) and twenty five adults participants aged 21–29 years old (19 males, six females) participated in our experiments. Our results suggested that the pronation and supination function in children with ADHD has a tendency to lag behind that of typically developing children by several years. From these results, our system has a possibility to objectively evaluate the neurodevelopmental delay of children with ADHD. PMID:26797613

  13. Quantitative Evaluation System of Soft Neurological Signs for Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Miki; Yamashita, Yushiro; Iramina, Keiji

    2016-01-18

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. Soft neurological signs (SNS) are minor neurological abnormalities in motor performance, and are used as one evaluation method for neurodevelopmental delays in children with ADHD. Our aim is to establish a quantitative evaluation system for children with ADHD. We focused on the arm movement called pronation and supination, which is one such soft neurological sign. Thirty three children with ADHD aged 7-11 years (27 males, six females) and twenty five adults participants aged 21-29 years old (19 males, six females) participated in our experiments. Our results suggested that the pronation and supination function in children with ADHD has a tendency to lag behind that of typically developing children by several years. From these results, our system has a possibility to objectively evaluate the neurodevelopmental delay of children with ADHD.

  14. Quantitative Evaluation System of Soft Neurological Signs for Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Miki; Yamashita, Yushiro; Iramina, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. Soft neurological signs (SNS) are minor neurological abnormalities in motor performance, and are used as one evaluation method for neurodevelopmental delays in children with ADHD. Our aim is to establish a quantitative evaluation system for children with ADHD. We focused on the arm movement called pronation and supination, which is one such soft neurological sign. Thirty three children with ADHD aged 7-11 years (27 males, six females) and twenty five adults participants aged 21-29 years old (19 males, six females) participated in our experiments. Our results suggested that the pronation and supination function in children with ADHD has a tendency to lag behind that of typically developing children by several years. From these results, our system has a possibility to objectively evaluate the neurodevelopmental delay of children with ADHD. PMID:26797613

  15. A Clinical Study of ADHD Symptoms with Relation to Symptoms of Learning Disorders in Schoolchildren in Bogota, Colombia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talero-Gutierrez, Claudia; Van Meerbeke, Alberto Velez; Reyes, Rodrigo Gonzalez

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate possible relationships between symptoms of ADHD and of learning disorder (LD) in a population geographically, culturally, and linguistically distinct from previous studies. Method: The authors evaluated a cross section of 834 Colombian schoolchildren for childhood neurological pathologies on the basis of a medical…

  16. Neurology in a globalizing world: World Congress of Neurology, Vienna, 2013.

    PubMed

    Hachinski, Vladimir

    2013-06-11

    The World Congress of Neurology (figure 1) theme "Neurology in a Globalizing World" acknowledges that science and increasingly medicine and neurology are becoming globalized. The best way to manage change is to shape it. It is becoming increasingly clear that brain diseases, particularly stroke and dementia, are projected to rise at a rate that could overwhelm our clinics and hospitals. Hence a new emphasis on prevention and the need to work across disciplines beyond our traditional roles. Neurologists are the guardians of the brain and need to take the lead role in advancing new approaches in stemming the tide of neurologic diseases.

  17. Neurologic complications of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09

    PubMed Central

    Khandaker, Gulam; Zurynski, Yvonne; Buttery, Jim; Marshall, Helen; Richmond, Peter C.; Dale, Russell C.; Royle, Jenny; Gold, Michael; Snelling, Tom; Whitehead, Bruce; Jones, Cheryl; Heron, Leon; McCaskill, Mary; Macartney, Kristine; Elliott, Elizabeth J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: We sought to determine the range and extent of neurologic complications due to pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 infection (pH1N1′09) in children hospitalized with influenza. Methods: Active hospital-based surveillance in 6 Australian tertiary pediatric referral centers between June 1 and September 30, 2009, for children aged <15 years with laboratory-confirmed pH1N1′09. Results: A total of 506 children with pH1N1′09 were hospitalized, of whom 49 (9.7%) had neurologic complications; median age 4.8 years (range 0.5–12.6 years) compared with 3.7 years (0.01–14.9 years) in those without complications. Approximately one-half (55.1%) of the children with neurologic complications had preexisting medical conditions, and 42.8% had preexisting neurologic conditions. On presentation, only 36.7% had the triad of cough, fever, and coryza/runny nose, whereas 38.7% had only 1 or no respiratory symptoms. Seizure was the most common neurologic complication (7.5%). Others included encephalitis/encephalopathy (1.4%), confusion/disorientation (1.0%), loss of consciousness (1.0%), and paralysis/Guillain-Barré syndrome (0.4%). A total of 30.6% needed intensive care unit (ICU) admission, 24.5% required mechanical ventilation, and 2 (4.1%) died. The mean length of stay in hospital was 6.5 days (median 3 days) and mean ICU stay was 4.4 days (median 1.5 days). Conclusions: Neurologic complications are relatively common among children admitted with influenza, and can be life-threatening. The lack of specific treatment for influenza-related neurologic complications underlines the importance of early diagnosis, use of antivirals, and universal influenza vaccination in children. Clinicians should consider influenza in children with neurologic symptoms even with a paucity of respiratory symptoms. PMID:22993280

  18. The role of electromagnetic fields in neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Terzi, Murat; Ozberk, Berra; Deniz, Omur Gulsum; Kaplan, Suleyman

    2016-09-01

    In the modern world, people are exposed to electromagnetic fields (EMFs) as part of their daily lives; the important question is "What is the effect of EMFs on human health?" Most previous studies are epidemiological, and we still do not have concrete evidence of EMF pathophysiology. Several factors may lead to chemical, morphological, and electrical alterations in the nervous system in a direct or indirect way. It is reported that non-ionizing EMFs have effects on animals and cells. The changes they bring about in organic systems may cause oxidative stress, which is essential for the neurophysiological process; it is associated with increased oxidization in species, or a reduction in antioxidant defense systems. Severe oxidative stress can cause imbalances in reactive oxygen species, which may trigger neurodegeneration. This review aims to detail these changes. Special attention is paid to the current data regarding EMFs' effects on neurological disease and associated symptoms, such as headache, sleep disturbances, and fatigue.

  19. A holistic approach on the neurological benefits of music.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Dabdoub, Lily; Catterall, Jenn

    2015-09-01

    A holistic perspective on human beings allows health carers to achieve an understanding of all the physiological, psychological and social disturbances of the patient as a whole. Through this article we wish to focus on how music has holistic neurological benefits. Music-therapy interventions can be more accessible and even "self-managed" by the patient's relatives. They can reinforce social cohesion, family ties and patients' self-esteem and thus produce a better quality of life. Overall, it is important to consider the benefits that an evolutionary understanding of musical behaviour and a holistic clinical perspective of the role of music may bring for rehabilitation of a wide range of symptoms and conditions.

  20. The role of electromagnetic fields in neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Terzi, Murat; Ozberk, Berra; Deniz, Omur Gulsum; Kaplan, Suleyman

    2016-09-01

    In the modern world, people are exposed to electromagnetic fields (EMFs) as part of their daily lives; the important question is "What is the effect of EMFs on human health?" Most previous studies are epidemiological, and we still do not have concrete evidence of EMF pathophysiology. Several factors may lead to chemical, morphological, and electrical alterations in the nervous system in a direct or indirect way. It is reported that non-ionizing EMFs have effects on animals and cells. The changes they bring about in organic systems may cause oxidative stress, which is essential for the neurophysiological process; it is associated with increased oxidization in species, or a reduction in antioxidant defense systems. Severe oxidative stress can cause imbalances in reactive oxygen species, which may trigger neurodegeneration. This review aims to detail these changes. Special attention is paid to the current data regarding EMFs' effects on neurological disease and associated symptoms, such as headache, sleep disturbances, and fatigue. PMID:27083321

  1. Neurologic complications of disorders of the adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Bertorini, Tulio E; Perez, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Disorders of the adrenal glands frequently have secondary neurological manifestations, while some diseases that involve the central nervous system are accompanied by adrenal gland dysfunction. Excessive corticosteroid secretions in primary or secondary Cushing's syndrome causes muscle weakness and behavioral disturbances, such as emotional lability and sometimes depression, while adrenal insufficiency may cause fatigue, weakness, and depression. Adrenoleukodystrophy and adrenoneuromyelopathy are X-linked recessive disorders of the metabolism of very long chain fatty acids that manifest with white matter abnormalities of the brain, myelopathy and/or neuropathy, as well as adrenal insufficiency. Other disorders of the adrenal glands include hyperaldosteroidism, which may cause weakness from hypokalemia. Dysfunction of the adrenal medulla causes excessive or deficient secretion of catecholamines, primarily causing cardiovascular symptoms. This chapter reviews the clinical manifestations and diagnostic aspects and treatment of the various disorders of the adrenal glands. Some of the congenital adrenal diseases are also discussed.

  2. A holistic approach on the neurological benefits of music.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Dabdoub, Lily; Catterall, Jenn

    2015-09-01

    A holistic perspective on human beings allows health carers to achieve an understanding of all the physiological, psychological and social disturbances of the patient as a whole. Through this article we wish to focus on how music has holistic neurological benefits. Music-therapy interventions can be more accessible and even "self-managed" by the patient's relatives. They can reinforce social cohesion, family ties and patients' self-esteem and thus produce a better quality of life. Overall, it is important to consider the benefits that an evolutionary understanding of musical behaviour and a holistic clinical perspective of the role of music may bring for rehabilitation of a wide range of symptoms and conditions. PMID:26417751

  3. A Case Study in the History of Neurology

    PubMed Central

    Day, Gregory S.; Tang-Wai, David F.

    2016-01-01

    We review the case of a young man who developed a constellation of symptoms and signs—bizarre behavior, seizures, abnormal movements, and autonomic instability—that evaded diagnosis at the time of presentation. We use this case to explore the way medical knowledge changes over time. Despite the dramatic advances in our understanding of neurological diseases in recent decades, physicians tend to approach diseases and diagnoses as if they were immutable. Our case reinforces how the diagnosis and treatment of disease are determined by an ever-changing historical context driven by the rapid expansion of medical knowledge. We discuss the implications of this realization and present strategies for navigating the boundaries of knowledge, both in practice and in principle. PMID:27695602

  4. Therapeutic Yoga: Symptom Management for Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Kim A; MacDonald, Megan

    2015-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, affecting over 2.3 million people worldwide. According to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, the age of disease onset is typically between 20 and 40 years, with a higher incidence in women. Individuals with MS experience a wide range of symptoms, including declining physical, emotional, and psychological symptoms (e.g., fatigue, imbalance, spasticity, chronic pain, cognitive impairment, bladder and bowel dysfunction, visual and speech impairments, depression, sensory disturbance, and mobility impairment). To date, both the cause of and cure for MS remain unknown. In recent years, more individuals with MS have been pursuing alternative methods of treatment to manage symptoms of the disease, including mind-body therapies such as yoga, meditation, breathing, and relaxation techniques. It has been suggested that the practice of yoga may be a safe and effective way of managing symptoms of MS. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to summarize the most relevant literature on exercise and mind-body modalities to treat MS symptoms and, more specifically, the benefits and potential role of yoga as an alternative treatment of symptom management for individuals with MS. The article also discusses future directions for research. PMID:26270955

  5. Application of Bioactive Compounds from Scutellaria in Neurologic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Farhan; Mittal, Sandeep; Joshee, Nirmal; Parajuli, Prahlad

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation of the brain is one of the most highly researched yet mysterious areas in modern day neurology. The process of inflammation is a normal mechanism of wound healing that can result from acute injuries such as traumas or can be caused by genetic/environmental factors. After the initial insult, the immune system defenses, specifically microglial cells, are activated in order to combat the infection or injury. However, prolonged or chronic inflammation is often deleterious due mainly to accumulation of free reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other pro-inflammatory cytokines in the brain FADDIN EN.CITE. Plant-derived natural compounds have the potential to ameliorate the causes and symptoms of neuroinflammation, due to their various anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, without completely muting the immune defenses. Scutellaria is a perennial plant in the mint family that has been used to treat diseases in Asia and Eastern Europe throughout history. This chapter reviews the active components of various Scutellaria species and their mechanisms of action to prevent chronic neurologic disorders involving neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. PMID:27651249

  6. Autoantibody-Associated Central Nervous System Neurologic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Linnoila, Jenny; Pittock, Sean J

    2016-08-01

    Autoimmune neurology is a rapidly evolving new subspecialty driven by the discovery of novel neural- (neuronal- or glial-) specific autoantibodies and their target antigens. The neurologic manifestations affecting the central nervous system include encephalitis, dementia, epilepsy, and movement and sleep disorders. Laboratory testing is now available for most of these neural-specific autoantibodies, which serve as diagnostic markers, in some instances directing the physician toward specific cancer types (e.g., N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor antibodies for teratoma, collapsin response mediator protein 5 for small-cell lung cancer) and assisting in therapeutic decision making. Antibodies targeting intracellular proteins serve as markers of cytotoxic effector T-cell-mediated injury, which is generally poorly responsive to immunotherapy. By contrast, antibodies targeting extracellular plasma membrane proteins may act as pathogenic effectors and often infer good responses to immunotherapy. Diagnosing these conditions and implementing treatment as early into the clinical course as possible ensures the best possible clinical outcomes. An adequate immunotherapy trial to assess maximum reversibility of symptoms, as assessed through objective functional measures, is crucial and can help to determine whether maintenance therapy is needed. PMID:27643908

  7. Immediate neurological recovery following perispinal etanercept years after brain injury.

    PubMed

    Tobinick, Edward; Rodriguez-Romanacce, Helen; Levine, Arthur; Ignatowski, Tracey A; Spengler, Robert N

    2014-05-01

    Positron emission tomographic brain imaging and pathological examination have revealed that a chronic, intracerebral neuroinflammatory response lasting for years after a single brain injury may occur in humans. Evidence suggests the immune signaling molecule, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), is centrally involved in this pathology through its modulation of microglial activation, role in synaptic dysfunction, and induction of depressive symptoms and neuropathic pain. Etanercept is a recombinant TNF receptor fusion protein and potent TNF inhibitor that has been found to reduce microglial activation and neuropathic pain in multiple experimental models. We report that a single dose of perispinal etanercept produced an immediate, profound, and sustained improvement in expressive aphasia, speech apraxia, and left hemiparesis in a patient with chronic, intractable, debilitating neurological dysfunction present for more than 3 years after acute brain injury. These results indicate that acute brain injury-induced pathologic levels of TNF may provide a therapeutic target that can be addressed years after injury. Perispinal administration of etanercept is capable of producing immediate relief from brain injury-mediated neurological dysfunction. PMID:24647830

  8. Neurotology symptoms at referral to vestibular evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dizziness-vertigo is common in adults, but clinical providers may rarely diagnose vestibular impairment and referral could be delayed. To assess neurotology symptoms (including triggers) reported by patients with peripheral vestibular disease, during the year just before their referral to vestibular evaluation. Methods 282 patients with peripheral vestibular disease and 282 control subjects accepted to participate. They had no middle ear, retinal, neurological, psychiatric, autoimmune or autonomic disorders. They reported their symptoms by a standardized questionnaire along with their anxiety/depression symptoms. Results Patients were referred after months or years from the onset of their symptoms, 24% of them reported frequent falls with a long clinical evolution; 10% of them reported no vertigo but instability related to specific triggers; 86% patients and 12% control subjects reported instability when moving the head rapidly and 79% patients and 6% control subjects reported instability when changing posture. Seven out of the 9 symptoms explored by the questionnaire allowed the correct classification of circa 95% of the participants (Discriminant function analysis, p < 0.001). High blood pressure, dyslipidemia and anxiety/depression symptoms showed a mild correlation with the total score of symptoms (multiple R2 =0.18, p < 0.001). Conclusions Late referral to vestibular evaluation may underlie a history of frequent falls; some patients may not report vertigo, but instability related to specific triggers, which could be useful to prompt vestibular evaluation. High blood pressure, dyslipidemia and anxiety/depression symptoms may have a mild influence on the report of symptoms of vestibular disease in both, patients and control subjects. PMID:24279682

  9. A systematic review of the influence of occupational organophosphate pesticides exposure on neurological impairment

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Noriko; Hashizume, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review of the published literature and to estimate whether or not there is a causal relationship between occupational exposure to organophosphate pesticides (OPs) and either neurological impairment or depressive symptoms. Data sources EMBASE, MEDLINE, Global Health and PsycINFO (1980 to April 2014). Setting Observational studies (cross-sectional, cohort and case–control studies) with exposed and unexposed groups. Participants People who occupationally use OPs for more than 1 month and their family. Primary outcome Results of neurological core test batteries or depressive symptoms such as headaches, anxiety and dizziness. Study appraisal and synthesis methods After an extensive search of various literature databases, one author screened titles and abstracts, searched the relevant publications manually and conducted data extraction. All extracted data from the selected articles were synthesised for analysis. Quality appraisal was conducted using the Newcastle Ottawa Scale. Results Of the 1024 articles retrieved by database search, 24 studies that met the inclusion and exclusion criteria were selected for analysis. Of the selected studies, 17 were cross-sectional and the remaining 7 were cohort and nested case–control studies. The geographical areas included in the studies were the USA (10 studies), the UK (4 studies), Africa (4 studies), Asia (3 studies), Europe (2 studies) and South America (1 study). Each of the included studies used different exposure and outcome assessments such as neurological scores and depressive symptoms, making it difficult to compare the results exactly. Most studies showed that exposed groups had poorer results than unexposed groups; however, owing to the inconsistent neurological test batteries, there was not enough pooling evidence to conduct a meta-analysis. Conclusions The findings of this literature review indicate that it is necessary to standardise the neurological or

  10. Associations between psychosomatic symptoms in adolescence and mental health symptoms in early adulthood.

    PubMed

    Kinnunen, Pirjo; Laukkanen, Eila; Kylmä, Jari

    2010-02-01

    This longitudinal study explored associations between psychosomatic symptoms in adolescence and mental health symptoms in early adulthood. The baseline data were collected in 1996 from 14-year-old pupils (n = 235; 116 girls, 119 boys) at schools using a structured questionnaire that included a 14-item scale of psychosomatic symptoms. The follow-up data were collected in 2006 from the same persons at the age of 24 using the Symptom Checklist-90. Follow-up questionnaires were returned by 149 (63.4%) young adults (88 women and 61 men). Young adults who had many psychosomatic symptoms in adolescence suffered more often than the others from somatization and anxiety symptoms in early adulthood. In addition, women had more symptoms of depression and paranoid ideation, and men had more interpersonal sensitivity and psychotic symptoms. Psychosomatic symptoms in adolescence might be important signals of mental health and this should be taken seriously in school health and in general primary care. PMID:20158547

  11. Status of neurology medical school education

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Imran I.; Isaacson, Richard S.; Safdieh, Joseph E.; Finney, Glen R.; Sowell, Michael K.; Sam, Maria C.; Anderson, Heather S.; Shin, Robert K.; Kraakevik, Jeff A.; Coleman, Mary; Drogan, Oksana

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To survey all US medical school clerkship directors (CDs) in neurology and to compare results from a similar survey in 2005. Methods: A survey was developed by a work group of the American Academy of Neurology Undergraduate Education Subcommittee, and sent to all neurology CDs listed in the American Academy of Neurology database. Comparisons were made to a similar 2005 survey. Results: Survey response rate was 73%. Neurology was required in 93% of responding schools. Duration of clerkships was 4 weeks in 74% and 3 weeks in 11%. Clerkships were taken in the third year in 56%, third or fourth year in 19%, and fourth year in 12%. Clerkship duration in 2012 was slightly shorter than in 2005 (fewer clerkships of ≥4 weeks, p = 0.125), but more clerkships have moved into the third year (fewer neurology clerkships during the fourth year, p = 0.051). Simulation training in lumbar punctures was available at 44% of schools, but only 2% of students attempted lumbar punctures on patients. CDs averaged 20% protected time, but reported that they needed at least 32%. Secretarial full-time equivalent was 0.50 or less in 71% of clerkships. Eighty-five percent of CDs were “very satisfied” or “somewhat satisfied,” but more than half experienced “burnout” and 35% had considered relinquishing their role. Conclusion: Trends in neurology undergraduate education since 2005 include shorter clerkships, migration into the third year, and increasing use of technology. CDs are generally satisfied, but report stressors, including inadequate protected time and departmental support. PMID:25305155

  12. Newer insights to the neurological diseases among biblical characters of old testament.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Stephen K; Pandian, Jeyaraj D

    2010-07-01

    Many people over the years have studied the Bible from a medical point of view offering diagnoses for the symptoms and signs that appear to have afflicted numerous individuals in the Bible. We review the biblical characters in the Old Testament and offer newer insights to their neurological diseases. We first look at the battle between Goliath and David. Interestingly, Goliath probably suffered from acromegaly. We propose autism as a diagnosis for Samson which would precede the first known case of autism by centuries. Isaac was a diabetic, and he probably had autonomic neuropathy. Few verses from the books of I Samuel, Psalms, and Ezekiel reveal symptoms suggestive of stroke. Jacob suffered from sciatica, and the child of the Shunnamite woman in II Kings had a subarachnoid hemorrhage. These instances among others found in the Old Testament of the Bible offer newer insights on the history of current neurological diseases.

  13. Newer insights to the neurological diseases among biblical characters of old testament

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Stephen K.; Pandian, Jeyaraj D.

    2010-01-01

    Many people over the years have studied the Bible from a medical point of view offering diagnoses for the symptoms and signs that appear to have afflicted numerous individuals in the Bible. We review the biblical characters in the Old Testament and offer newer insights to their neurological diseases. We first look at the battle between Goliath and David. Interestingly, Goliath probably suffered from acromegaly. We propose autism as a diagnosis for Samson which would precede the first known case of autism by centuries. Isaac was a diabetic, and he probably had autonomic neuropathy. Few verses from the books of I Samuel, Psalms, and Ezekiel reveal symptoms suggestive of stroke. Jacob suffered from sciatica, and the child of the Shunnamite woman in II Kings had a subarachnoid hemorrhage. These instances among others found in the Old Testament of the Bible offer newer insights on the history of current neurological diseases. PMID:21085524

  14. A survey of neurological decompression illness in commercial breath-hold divers (Ama) of Japan.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Hideki; Kohshi, Kiyotaka; Ishitake, Tatsuya; Wong, Robert M

    2010-01-01

    A survey was conducted in the northern district of Yamaguchi, Japan to determine the relationship between neurological diving accidents and risk factors among commercial breath-hold divers (Ama). A questionnaire was distributed to 381 Ama divers who are members of the Ama diving union. We sought information on their dive practices (depth of single dive, single dive time, surface interval, length of dive shifts, lunch break) and the presence or absence of medical problems, such as hypertension, cardiac arrhythmia, diabetic mellitus and other issues. Of the 381 Ama divers, 173 responded (45%): 29 were Funado (assisted-descent using weights) and 144 Cachido (unassisted) divers. Twelve had experienced strokelike symptoms during or after repetitive breath-hold diving; 11 were assisted and one unassisted (Funado vs. Cachido). Only two of 12 divers with neurological diving accidents had musculoskeletal symptoms. Neurological events were significantly correlated with dive depth, dive time, and surface interval; however, they were not related to medical history. Neurological diving accidents are more likely to happen among assisted Ama divers than unassisted ones. Repetitive breath-hold diving with a deep dive depth, long dive time, and short surface interval predisposes divers to decompression illness, which characteristically manifests as cerebral stroke.

  15. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in neurology.

    PubMed

    Auer, Tibor; Schwarcz, Attila; Horváth, Réka A; Barsi, Péter; Janszky, József

    2008-01-30

    The present contribution discusses the clinical use of functional MRI (fMRI) and its role in the most common neurological diseases. FMRI was found a reliable and reproducible examination tool resulting in a wide distribution of fMRI methods in presurgical evaluation of epilepsy in determining the relationship of eloquent areas and the epileptic focus. Preliminary data suggest that fMRI using memory paradigms can predict the postoperative memory decline in epilepsy surgery by determining whether a reorganization of memory functions took place. Speech-activated fMRI became the most used tool in determining hemispheric dominance. Visual and sensory-motor cortex can also be routinely investigated by fMRI which helps in decision on epilepsy surgery. FMRI combined with EEG is a new diagnostic tool in epilepsy and sleep disorders. FMRI can identify the penumbra after stroke and can provide an additional information on metabolic state of the threatened brain tissue. FMRI has a predictive role in post-stroke recovery. In relapsing-remitting MS an adaptive reorganization can be demonstrated by fMRI affecting the visual, motor, and memory systems, despite preserved functional performance. Much more extensive reorganization can be demonstrated in secondary progressive MS. These findings suggest that the different stages of MS are related to different stages of the reorganization and MS becomes progressive when there is no more reserve capacity in the brain for reorganization. FMRI offers the capability of detecting early functional hemodynamic alterations in Alzheimer's disease before morphological changes. FMRI can be a valuable tool to test and monitor treatment efficacy in AD. FMRI can also provide information about the mechanisms of different therapeutic approaches in Parkinson disorder including drug treatment and deep brain stimulation.

  16. Music therapy in neurological rehabilitation settings.

    PubMed

    Galińska, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    The neurologic music therapy is a new scope of music therapy. Its techniques deal with dysfunctions resulting from diseases of the human nervous system. Music can be used as an alternative modality to access functions unavailable through non-musical stimulus. Processes in the brain activated by the influence of music can be generalized and transferred to non-musical functions. Therefore, in clinical practice, the translation of non-musical therapeutic exercises into analogous, isomorphic musical exercises is performed. They make use of the executive peculiarity of musical instruments and musical structures to prime, cue and coordinate movements. Among musical components, a repetitive rhythm plays a significant role. It regulates physiologic and behavioural functions through the mechanism of entrainment (synchronization of biological rhythms with musical rhythm based on acoustic resonance). It is especially relevant for patients with a deficient internal timing system in the brain. Additionally, regular rhythmic patterns facilitate memory encoding and decoding of non-musical information hence music is an efficient mnemonic tool. The music as a hierarchical, compound language of time, with its unique ability to access affective/motivational systems in the brain, provides time structures enhancing perception processes, mainly in the range of cognition, language and motor learning. It allows for emotional expression and improvement of the motivation for rehabilitation activities. The new technologies of rhythmic sensory stimulation (i.e. Binaural Beat Stimulation) or rhythmic music in combination with rhythmic light therapy appear. This multimodal forms of stimulation are used in the treatment of stroke, brain injury, dementia and other cognitive deficits. Clinical outcome studies provide evidence of the significant superiority of rehabilitation with music over the one without music. PMID:26488358

  17. Music therapy in neurological rehabilitation settings.

    PubMed

    Galińska, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    The neurologic music therapy is a new scope of music therapy. Its techniques deal with dysfunctions resulting from diseases of the human nervous system. Music can be used as an alternative modality to access functions unavailable through non-musical stimulus. Processes in the brain activated by the influence of music can be generalized and transferred to non-musical functions. Therefore, in clinical practice, the translation of non-musical therapeutic exercises into analogous, isomorphic musical exercises is performed. They make use of the executive peculiarity of musical instruments and musical structures to prime, cue and coordinate movements. Among musical components, a repetitive rhythm plays a significant role. It regulates physiologic and behavioural functions through the mechanism of entrainment (synchronization of biological rhythms with musical rhythm based on acoustic resonance). It is especially relevant for patients with a deficient internal timing system in the brain. Additionally, regular rhythmic patterns facilitate memory encoding and decoding of non-musical information hence music is an efficient mnemonic tool. The music as a hierarchical, compound language of time, with its unique ability to access affective/motivational systems in the brain, provides time structures enhancing perception processes, mainly in the range of cognition, language and motor learning. It allows for emotional expression and improvement of the motivation for rehabilitation activities. The new technologies of rhythmic sensory stimulation (i.e. Binaural Beat Stimulation) or rhythmic music in combination with rhythmic light therapy appear. This multimodal forms of stimulation are used in the treatment of stroke, brain injury, dementia and other cognitive deficits. Clinical outcome studies provide evidence of the significant superiority of rehabilitation with music over the one without music.

  18. Wavelet-based characterization of gait signal for neurological abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Baratin, E; Sugavaneswaran, L; Umapathy, K; Ioana, C; Krishnan, S

    2015-02-01

    Studies conducted by the World Health Organization (WHO) indicate that over one billion suffer from neurological disorders worldwide, and lack of efficient diagnosis procedures affects their therapeutic interventions. Characterizing certain pathologies of motor control for facilitating their diagnosis can be useful in quantitatively monitoring disease progression and efficient treatment planning. As a suitable directive, we introduce a wavelet-based scheme for effective characterization of gait associated with certain neurological disorders. In addition, since the data were recorded from a dynamic process, this work also investigates the need for gait signal re-sampling prior to identification of signal markers in the presence of pathologies. To benefit automated discrimination of gait data, certain characteristic features are extracted from the wavelet-transformed signals. The performance of the proposed approach was evaluated using a database consisting of 15 Parkinson's disease (PD), 20 Huntington's disease (HD), 13 Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and 16 healthy control subjects, and an average classification accuracy of 85% is achieved using an unbiased cross-validation strategy. The obtained results demonstrate the potential of the proposed methodology for computer-aided diagnosis and automatic characterization of certain neurological disorders. PMID:25661004

  19. Leigh Syndrome in Childhood: Neurologic Progression and Functional Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Sook; Kim, Hunmin; Lim, Byung Chan; Hwang, Hee; Choi, Jieun; Kim, Ki Joong; Hwang, Yong Seung

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Few studies have analyzed the clinical course and functional outcome in Leigh syndrome (LS). The aim of this study was to determine the clinical, radiological, biochemical, and genetic features of patients with LS, and identify prognostic indicators of the disease progression and neurological outcome. Methods Thirty-nine patients who had been diagnosed with LS at the Seoul National University Children's Hospital were included. Their medical records, neuroimaging findings, and histological/biochemical findings of skeletal muscle specimens were reviewed. Targeted sequencing of mitochondrial DNA was performed based on mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) enzyme defects. Results Isolated complex I deficiency was the most frequently observed MRC defect (in 42% of 38 investigated patients). Mitochondrial DNA mutations were identified in 11 patients, of which 81.8% were MT-ND genes. The clinical outcome varied widely, from independent daily activity to severe disability. Poor functional outcomes and neurological deterioration were significantly associated with early onset (before an age of 1 year) and the presence of other lesions additional to basal ganglia involvement in the initial neuroimaging. Conclusions The neurological severity and outcome of LS may vary widely and be better than those predicted based on previous studies. We suggest that age at onset and initial neuroimaging findings are prognostic indicators in LS. PMID:27074294

  20. Rheumatologic and neurological events in an elderly patient with tricho-rhino-phalangeal syndrome type I.

    PubMed

    Rué, Marjory; Lüdecke, Hermann-Josef; Sibon, Igor; Richez, Christophe; Taine, Laurence; Foubert-Samier, Alexandra; Arveiler, Benoit; Schaeverbeke, Thierry; Lacombe, Didier; Tison, François; Goizet, Cyril

    2011-01-01

    Sparse scalp hair, a peculiar shape of the nose, and cone-shaped epiphyses of the phalanges are the hallmarks of the tricho-rhino-phalangeal syndromes (TRPS). Short stature, hip dysplasia, and malformations of inner organs including mitral valve prolpase have also often been described for these conditions. Here, we described a 64-year-old woman with molecularly proved TRPS I and several atypical late-onset rheumatologic and neurological symptoms.

  1. Looks can be deceiving: three cases of neurological diseases mimicking Guillain-Barrè syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sciacca, G; Nicoletti, A; Fermo, S Lo; Mostile, G; Giliberto, C; Zappia, Mario

    2016-04-01

    Guillain-Barrè syndrome (GBS) is an acute, paralyzing, inflammatory peripheral nerve disease, featured by monophasic disease course, symmetrical limb weakness and areflexia. Several pathologies can mimic the clinical presentation of GBS, making hard the differential diagnosis for patients complaining of acute flaccid paralysis. In this paper we describe three cases of different neurological diseases presenting with acute motor symptoms mimicking GBS, reviewing the relevant literature on misdiagnosis of GBS.

  2. Serological Studies of Neurologic Helminthic Infections in Rural Areas of Southwest Cameroon: Toxocariasis, Cysticercosis and Paragonimiasis

    PubMed Central

    Nkouawa, Agathe; Sako, Yasuhito; Itoh, Sonoyo; Kouojip-Mabou, Alida; Nganou, Christ Nadège; Saijo, Yasuaki; Knapp, Jenny; Yamasaki, Hiroshi; Nakao, Minoru; Nakaya, Kazuhiro; Moyou-Somo, Roger; Ito, Akira

    2010-01-01

    Background Both epilepsy and paragonimiasis had been known to be endemic in Southwest Cameroon. A total of 188 people (168 and 20 with and without symptoms confirmed by clinicians, respectively, 84.6% under 20 years old) were selected on a voluntary basis. Among 14 people (8.3%) with history of epilepsy, only one suffered from paragonimiasis. Therefore, we challenged to check antibody responses to highly specific diagnostic recombinant antigens for two other helminthic diseases, cysticercosis and toxocariasis, expected to be involved in neurological diseases. Soil-transmitted helminthic infections were also examined. Methodology/Principal Findings Fecal samples were collected exclusively from the 168 people. Eggs of Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura and hookworms were found from 56 (33.3%), 72 (42.8%), and 19 (11.3%) persons, respectively. Serology revealed that 61 (36.3%), 25 (14.9%) and 2 (1.2%) of 168 persons showed specific antibody responses to toxocariasis, paragonimiasis and cysticercosis, respectively. By contrast, 20 people without any symptoms as well as additional 20 people from Japan showed no antibody responses. Among the 14 persons with epilepsy, 5 persons were seropositive to the antigen specific to Toxocara, and one of them was simultaneously positive to the antigens of Paragonimus. The fact that 2 children with no history of epilepsy were serologically confirmed to have cysticercosis strongly suggests that serological survey for cysticercosis in children is expected to be useful for early detection of asymptomatic cysticercosis in endemic areas. Conclusions/Significance Among persons surveyed, toxocariasis was more common than paragonimiasis, but cysticercosis was very rare. However, the fact that 2 children were serologically confirmed to have cysticercosis was very important, since it strongly suggests that serology for cysticercosis is useful and feasible for detection of asymptomatic cysticercotic children in endemic areas for the early

  3. Neurological complications after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children, a single center experience.

    PubMed

    Azik, Fatih; Yazal Erdem, Arzu; Tavil, Betül; Bayram, Cengiz; Tunç, Bahattin; Uçkan, Duygu

    2014-06-01

    In this study, we retrospectively examined the data of children who underwent allo-HSCT from HLA-matched family donors. We analyzed the incidence, etiological factors, clinical characteristics, possible reasons, risk factors, and follow-up of neurologic complications. BU-based conditioning regimens were used in most of the cases (n = 62). The median duration of follow-up for the 89 patients was 20 months (range 1-41 months). Eleven percent of transplanted children developed one or more neurological symptoms after HSCT with a median observation time of two months (range -6 days to 18 months). The median age of the four girls and six boys with neurological complication was 13 yr (range 5.3-17.6 yr). Cylosporine A neurotoxicity was diagnosed in five children, four of them were PRES. The rest of complications were BU and lorazepam toxicity, an intracranial hemorrhage, a sinovenous thrombosis, and a transient ischemic attack during extracorpereal photopheresis. No difference was found between groups of neurological complication according to age, gender, diagnosis, hospitalization time, neutrophil and platelet engraftment time, stem cell source, and conditioning regimen, acute and chronic GVHD or VOD. Neurological complication was the cause of death in one patient (1.1%).

  4. [Neurological and psychiatric aspects of some gastrointestinal diseases].

    PubMed

    Aszalós, Zsuzsa

    2008-11-01

    each other and their severities significantly correlate. In the celiac disease the most common neurological manifestations are ataxia, peripheral neuropathy and myopathy. Up to 85% of patients with histologically proven coeliac disease have no gastrointestinal symptoms; consequently, measurement of antigliadin antibody titre is therefore vital in all cases of idiopathic ataxia. Complete resolution of neurological symptoms is the result of gluten-free diet. PMID:18952527

  5. Endogenous zinc in neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Koh, Jae-Yong

    2005-10-01

    The use of zinc in medicinal skin cream was mentioned in Egyptian papyri from 2000 BC (for example, the Smith Papyrus), and zinc has apparently been used fairly steadily throughout Roman and modern times (for example, as the American lotion named for its zinc ore, 'Calamine'). It is, therefore, somewhat ironic that zinc is a relatively late addition to the pantheon of signal ions in biology and medicine. However, the number of biological functions, health implications and pharmacological targets that are emerging for zinc indicate that it might turn out to be 'the calcium of the twenty-first century'. Here neurobiological roles of endogenous zinc is summarized.

  6. Endogenous Zinc in Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The use of zinc in medicinal skin cream was mentioned in Egyptian papyri from 2000 BC (for example, the Smith Papyrus), and zinc has apparently been used fairly steadily throughout Roman and modern times (for example, as the American lotion named for its zinc ore, 'Calamine'). It is, therefore, somewhat ironic that zinc is a relatively late addition to the pantheon of signal ions in biology and medicine. However, the number of biological functions, health implications and pharmacological targets that are emerging for zinc indicate that it might turn out to be 'the calcium of the twenty-first century'. Here neurobiological roles of endogenous zinc is summarized. PMID:20396459

  7. Ionotropic GABA and Glutamate Receptor Mutations and Human Neurologic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hongjie; Low, Chian-Ming; Moody, Olivia A; Jenkins, Andrew; Traynelis, Stephen F

    2015-07-01

    The advent of whole exome/genome sequencing and the technology-driven reduction in the cost of next-generation sequencing as well as the introduction of diagnostic-targeted sequencing chips have resulted in an unprecedented volume of data directly linking patient genomic variability to disorders of the brain. This information has the potential to transform our understanding of neurologic disorders by improving diagnoses, illuminating the molecular heterogeneity underlying diseases, and identifying new targets for therapeutic treatment. There is a strong history of mutations in GABA receptor genes being involved in neurologic diseases, particularly the epilepsies. In addition, a substantial number of variants and mutations have been found in GABA receptor genes in patients with autism, schizophrenia, and addiction, suggesting potential links between the GABA receptors and these conditions. A new and unexpected outcome from sequencing efforts has been the surprising number of mutations found in glutamate receptor subunits, with the GRIN2A gene encoding the GluN2A N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit being most often affected. These mutations are associated with multiple neurologic conditions, for which seizure disorders comprise the largest group. The GluN2A subunit appears to be a locus for epilepsy, which holds important therapeutic implications. Virtually all α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor mutations, most of which occur within GRIA3, are from patients with intellectual disabilities, suggesting a link to this condition. Similarly, the most common phenotype for kainate receptor variants is intellectual disability. Herein, we summarize the current understanding of disease-associated mutations in ionotropic GABA and glutamate receptor families, and discuss implications regarding the identification of human mutations and treatment of neurologic diseases. PMID:25904555

  8. Ionotropic GABA and Glutamate Receptor Mutations and Human Neurologic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hongjie; Low, Chian-Ming; Moody, Olivia A; Jenkins, Andrew; Traynelis, Stephen F

    2015-07-01

    The advent of whole exome/genome sequencing and the technology-driven reduction in the cost of next-generation sequencing as well as the introduction of diagnostic-targeted sequencing chips have resulted in an unprecedented volume of data directly linking patient genomic variability to disorders of the brain. This information has the potential to transform our understanding of neurologic disorders by improving diagnoses, illuminating the molecular heterogeneity underlying diseases, and identifying new targets for therapeutic treatment. There is a strong history of mutations in GABA receptor genes being involved in neurologic diseases, particularly the epilepsies. In addition, a substantial number of variants and mutations have been found in GABA receptor genes in patients with autism, schizophrenia, and addiction, suggesting potential links between the GABA receptors and these conditions. A new and unexpected outcome from sequencing efforts has been the surprising number of mutations found in glutamate receptor subunits, with the GRIN2A gene encoding the GluN2A N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit being most often affected. These mutations are associated with multiple neurologic conditions, for which seizure disorders comprise the largest group. The GluN2A subunit appears to be a locus for epilepsy, which holds important therapeutic implications. Virtually all α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor mutations, most of which occur within GRIA3, are from patients with intellectual disabilities, suggesting a link to this condition. Similarly, the most common phenotype for kainate receptor variants is intellectual disability. Herein, we summarize the current understanding of disease-associated mutations in ionotropic GABA and glutamate receptor families, and discuss implications regarding the identification of human mutations and treatment of neurologic diseases.

  9. Ionotropic GABA and Glutamate Receptor Mutations and Human Neurologic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hongjie; Low, Chian-Ming; Moody, Olivia A.; Jenkins, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The advent of whole exome/genome sequencing and the technology-driven reduction in the cost of next-generation sequencing as well as the introduction of diagnostic-targeted sequencing chips have resulted in an unprecedented volume of data directly linking patient genomic variability to disorders of the brain. This information has the potential to transform our understanding of neurologic disorders by improving diagnoses, illuminating the molecular heterogeneity underlying diseases, and identifying new targets for therapeutic treatment. There is a strong history of mutations in GABA receptor genes being involved in neurologic diseases, particularly the epilepsies. In addition, a substantial number of variants and mutations have been found in GABA receptor genes in patients with autism, schizophrenia, and addiction, suggesting potential links between the GABA receptors and these conditions. A new and unexpected outcome from sequencing efforts has been the surprising number of mutations found in glutamate receptor subunits, with the GRIN2A gene encoding the GluN2A N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit being most often affected. These mutations are associated with multiple neurologic conditions, for which seizure disorders comprise the largest group. The GluN2A subunit appears to be a locus for epilepsy, which holds important therapeutic implications. Virtually all α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor mutations, most of which occur within GRIA3, are from patients with intellectual disabilities, suggesting a link to this condition. Similarly, the most common phenotype for kainate receptor variants is intellectual disability. Herein, we summarize the current understanding of disease-associated mutations in ionotropic GABA and glutamate receptor families, and discuss implications regarding the identification of human mutations and treatment of neurologic diseases. PMID:25904555

  10. Evolution of the Dynamic Symptoms Model.

    PubMed

    Brant, Jeannine M; Dudley, William N; Beck, Susan; Miaskowski, Christine

    2016-09-01

    Theories and conceptual models can be thought of as broad nets that attempt to rationalize, explain, and master a phenomenon within clinical nursing and interdisciplinary care. They can be used to guide a review of the literature and to formulate and organize research variables and relationships. Gaps in the literature can be identified and opportunities for additional research revealed (Fawcett, 2005). A variety of symptom models or theories exist, including the Theory of Symptom Management (Dodd et al., 2001), Theory of Unpleasant Symptoms (Lenz, Pugh, Milligan, Gift, & Suppe, 1997), Symptoms Experience Model (Armstrong, 2003), and Symptom Experiences in Time Theory (Henly, Kallas, Klatt, & Swenson, 2003). Most recently, the National Institute of Nursing Research identified a new National Institutes of Health Symptom Science Model to guide symptom science research (Cashion & Grady, 2015).
. PMID:27541557

  11. [Sir William Richard Gowers: author of the "bible of neurology"].

    PubMed

    Hirose, Genjiro

    2014-11-01

    William Richard Gowers is one of the great pioneers in neurology and the author of the well-known neurology textbook, "A Manual of Diseases of the Nervous System." His concepts of neurology are based on meticulously and carefully accumulated knowledge of history, observations, and neurological examinations of patients with various neurological diseases. He is not only a great neurologist but also a great teacher who loves teaching students and physicians through well-prepared lectures. We can glean the essence of the field of neurology through his life story and numerous writings concerning neurological diseases. PMID:25407060

  12. Neurological Adverse Effects in Patients of Advanced Colorectal Carcinoma Treated with Different Schedules of FOLFOX

    PubMed Central

    Najam, Rahila; Mateen, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    The study is designed to assess the frequency and severity of few dose limiting neurological adverse effects of four different schedules of FOLFOX. Patients with histologically confirmed advanced colorectal carcinoma (CRC) were included in the study. Toxicity was graded according to CTC v 2.0. The frequency of grade 3 and 4 adverse effects was comparatively assessed in each treatment arm. The difference in the pattern of toxicity between the treatment schedule was evaluated. The most frequent adverse symptom of neurological adverse effect was grade 1 paresthesia in the patients treated with FOLFOX4 schedule. Grade 4 peripheral neuropathy was reported in few patients of FOLFOX7 treatment arm. Frequency and onset of neurological adverse effects like paresthesia, dizziness, and hypoesthesia were significantly different (P < 0.05), whereas frequency and onset of peripheral neuropathy were highly significant (P < 0.01) in each treatment arm of FOLFOX. Peripheral neuropathy was associated with electrolyte imbalance and diabetes in few patients. Frequency of symptoms, for example, paresthesia, is associated with increased number of recurrent exposure to oxaliplatin (increased number of cycles) even at low doses (85 mg/m2), whereas severity of symptoms, for example, peripheral neuropathy, is associated with higher dose (130 mg/m2) after few treatment cycles. PMID:24187619

  13. Neurological Adverse Effects in Patients of Advanced Colorectal Carcinoma Treated with Different Schedules of FOLFOX.

    PubMed

    Bano, Nusrat; Najam, Rahila; Mateen, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    The study is designed to assess the frequency and severity of few dose limiting neurological adverse effects of four different schedules of FOLFOX. Patients with histologically confirmed advanced colorectal carcinoma (CRC) were included in the study. Toxicity was graded according to CTC v 2.0. The frequency of grade 3 and 4 adverse effects was comparatively assessed in each treatment arm. The difference in the pattern of toxicity between the treatment schedule was evaluated. The most frequent adverse symptom of neurological adverse effect was grade 1 paresthesia in the patients treated with FOLFOX4 schedule. Grade 4 peripheral neuropathy was reported in few patients of FOLFOX7 treatment arm. Frequency and onset of neurological adverse effects like paresthesia, dizziness, and hypoesthesia were significantly different (P < 0.05), whereas frequency and onset of peripheral neuropathy were highly significant (P < 0.01) in each treatment arm of FOLFOX. Peripheral neuropathy was associated with electrolyte imbalance and diabetes in few patients. Frequency of symptoms, for example, paresthesia, is associated with increased number of recurrent exposure to oxaliplatin (increased number of cycles) even at low doses (85 mg/m(2)), whereas severity of symptoms, for example, peripheral neuropathy, is associated with higher dose (130 mg/m(2)) after few treatment cycles.

  14. Neurologic morbidity and quality of life in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a prospective cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Raja B.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Ledet, Davonna S.; Morris, E. Brannon; Pui, Ching-Hon; Howard, Scott C.; Krull, Kevin R.; Hinds, Pamela S.; Crom, Debbie; Browne, Emily; Zhu, Liang; Rai, Shesh; Srivastava, Deokumar; Ness, Kirsten K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is treated with potentially neurotoxic drugs and neurologic complications in long-term survivors are inadequately studied. This study investigated neurologic morbidity and its effect on quality of life in long-term survivors of childhood ALL. Methods Prospective, single institution, cross-sectional, institutional review board-approved study of long-term ALL survivors. Participants were recruited from institutional clinics. Participants answered an investigator-administered questionnaire followed by evaluation by a neurologist. Quality of life (QOL) was also assessed. Results Of the 162 participants recruited over a 3-year period, 83.3 % reported at least one neurologic symptom of interest, 16.7 % had single symptom, 11.1 % had two symptoms, and 55.6 % had three or more symptoms. Symptoms were mild and disability was low in the majority of participants with neurologic symptoms. Median age at ALL diagnosis was 3.9 years (0.4–18.6), median age at study enrollment was 15.7 years (6.9–28.9), and median time from completion of ALL therapy was 7.4 years (1.9–20.3). On multivariable analyses, female sex correlated with presence of dizziness, urinary incontinence, constipation, and neuropathy; use of≥10 doses of triple intrathecal chemotherapy correlated with uri-nary incontinence, back pain, and neuropathy; cranial radiation with ataxia; history of ALL relapse with fatigue; and CNS leukemia at diagnosis with seizures. Decline in mental QOL was associated with migraine and tension type headaches, while physical QOL was impaired by presence of dizziness and falls. Overall, good QOL and physical function was maintained by a majority of participants. Conclusions Neurologic symptoms were present in 83 % long-term ALL survivors. Symptoms related morbidity and QOL impairment is low in majority of survivors. Female sex, ≥10 doses of intrathecal chemotherapy, and history of ALL relapse predispose to impaired QOL

  15. An Overview of Multiple Sclerosis: Medical, Psychosocial, and Vocational Aspects of a Chronic and Unpredictable Neurological Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rumrill, Phillip D., Jr.; Roessler, Richard T.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an overview of multiple sclerosis (MS), one of the most common neurological disorders in the western hemisphere. Medical and psychosocial aspects of the disease such as causes and risk factors, diagnosis, incidence and prevalence, symptoms, courses, and treatment are described. Existing research regarding the employment…

  16. Nuclear Medicine Imaging in Pediatric Neurology

    PubMed Central

    Akdemir, Ümit Özgür; Atay Kapucu, Lütfiye Özlem

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear medicine imaging can provide important complementary information in the management of pediatric patients with neurological diseases. Pre-surgical localization of the epileptogenic focus in medically refractory epilepsy patients is the most common indication for nuclear medicine imaging in pediatric neurology. In patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, nuclear medicine imaging is particularly useful when magnetic resonance imaging findings are normal or its findings are discordant with electroencephalogram findings. In pediatric patients with brain tumors, nuclear medicine imaging can be clinically helpful in the diagnosis, directing biopsy, planning therapy, differentiating tumor recurrence from post-treatment sequelae, and assessment of response to therapy. Among other neurological diseases in which nuclear medicine has proved to be useful are patients with head trauma, inflammatory-infectious diseases and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. PMID:27299282

  17. A national neurological excellence centers network.

    PubMed

    Pazzi, S; Cristiani, P; Cavallini, A

    1998-02-01

    The most relevant problems related to the management of neurological disorders are (i) the frequent hospitalization in nonspecialist departments, with the need for neurological consultation, and (ii) the frequent requests of GPs for highly specialized investigations that are very expensive and of little value in arriving at a correct diagnosis. In 1996, the Consorzio di Bioingegneria e Informatica Medica in Italy realized the CISNet project (in collaboration with the Consorzio Istituti Scientifici Neuroscienze e Tecnologie Biomediche and funded by the Centro Studi of the National Public Health Council) for the implementation of a national neurological excellence centers network (CISNet). In the CISNet project, neurologists will be able to give on-line interactive consultation and off-line consulting services identifying correct diagnostic/therapeutic procedures, evaluating the need for both examination in specialist centers and admission to specialized centers, and identifying the most appropriate ones.

  18. Emergency Neurologic Life Support: Meningitis and Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Gaieski, David F; Nathan, Barnett R; O'Brien, Nicole F

    2015-12-01

    Bacterial meningitis and viral encephalitis, particularly herpes simplex encephalitis, are severe neurological infections that, if not treated promptly and effectively, lead to poor neurological outcome or death. Because treatment is more effective if given early, the topic of meningitis and encephalitis was chosen as an Emergency Neurological Life Support protocol. This protocol provides a practical approach to recognition and urgent treatment of bacterial meningitis and encephalitis. Appropriate imaging, spinal fluid analysis, and early empiric treatment is discussed. Though uncommon in its full form, the typical clinical triad of headache, fever, and neck stiffness should alert the clinical practitioner to the possibility of a central nervous system infection. Early attention to the airway and maintaining normotension is crucial in treatment of these patients, as is rapid treatment with anti-infectives and, in some cases, corticosteroids. PMID:26438456

  19. Mitochondria in Neuroplasticity and Neurological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mattson, Mark P.; Gleichmann, Marc; Cheng, Aiwu

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial electron transport generates the ATP that is essential for the excitability and survival of neurons, and the protein phosphorylation reactions that mediate synaptic signaling and related long-term changes in neuronal structure and function. Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles that divide, fuse and move purposefully within axons and dendrites. An Major functions of mitochondria in neurons include the regulation of Ca2+ and redox signaling, developmental and synaptic plasticity, and the arbitration of cell survival and death. The importance of mitochondria in neurons is evident in the neurological phenotypes in rare diseases caused by mutations in mitochondrial genes. Mitochondria-mediated oxidative stress, perturbed Ca2+ homeostasis and apoptosis may also contribute to the pathogenesis of prominent neurological diseases including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Huntington’s diseases, stroke, ALS and psychiatric disorders. Advances in understanding the molecular and cell biology of mitochondria are leading to novel approaches for the prevention and treatment of neurological disorders. PMID:19081372

  20. The History of Reimbursements in Neurology

    PubMed Central

    Lakhan, Shaheen E.; Ebied, Amr M.; Tepper, Deborah; Nguyen, Truc

    2013-01-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) addresses consumer protection, employer-provided insurance coverage, as well as the government’s role in providing health care access to the most vulnerable populations. Within the practice of neurology, the PPACA has the challenging goal of reconciling the needs of the growing elderly population with the financial barriers to costly yet available health care services. To bridge that gap, all health care professionals working in the field of neurology must reflect on the effect previous Medicare reimbursement policies have had on the current practice of neurology, and utilize lessons learned in recent years. The test of time will tell whether the PPACA will achieve the goal of decreasing in health care spending while ensuring quality universal healthcare services. PMID:24223566

  1. Nuclear Medicine Imaging in Pediatric Neurology.

    PubMed

    Akdemir, Ümit Özgür; Atay Kapucu, Lütfiye Özlem

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear medicine imaging can provide important complementary information in the management of pediatric patients with neurological diseases. Pre-surgical localization of the epileptogenic focus in medically refractory epilepsy patients is the most common indication for nuclear medicine imaging in pediatric neurology. In patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, nuclear medicine imaging is particularly useful when magnetic resonance imaging findings are normal or its findings are discordant with electroencephalogram findings. In pediatric patients with brain tumors, nuclear medicine imaging can be clinically helpful in the diagnosis, directing biopsy, planning therapy, differentiating tumor recurrence from post-treatment sequelae, and assessment of response to therapy. Among other neurological diseases in which nuclear medicine has proved to be useful are patients with head trauma, inflammatory-infectious diseases and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

  2. Emergency Neurologic Life Support: Meningitis and Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Gaieski, David F; Nathan, Barnett R; O'Brien, Nicole F

    2015-12-01

    Bacterial meningitis and viral encephalitis, particularly herpes simplex encephalitis, are severe neurological infections that, if not treated promptly and effectively, lead to poor neurological outcome or death. Because treatment is more effective if given early, the topic of meningitis and encephalitis was chosen as an Emergency Neurological Life Support protocol. This protocol provides a practical approach to recognition and urgent treatment of bacterial meningitis and encephalitis. Appropriate imaging, spinal fluid analysis, and early empiric treatment is discussed. Though uncommon in its full form, the typical clinical triad of headache, fever, and neck stiffness should alert the clinical practitioner to the possibility of a central nervous system infection. Early attention to the airway and maintaining normotension is crucial in treatment of these patients, as is rapid treatment with anti-infectives and, in some cases, corticosteroids.

  3. Nonlocal neurology: beyond localization to holonomy.

    PubMed

    Globus, G G; O'Carroll, C P

    2010-11-01

    The concept of local pathology has long served neurology admirably. Relevant models include self-organizing nonlinear brain dynamics, global workspace and dynamic core theories. However such models are inconsistent with certain clinical phenomena found in Charles Bonnet syndrome, disjunctive agnosia and schizophrenia, where there is disunity of content within the unity of consciousness. This is contrasted with the split-brain case where there is disunity of content and disunity of consciousnesses. The development of quantum brain theory with it nonlocal mechanisms under the law of the whole ("holonomy") offers new possibilities for explaining disintegration within unity. Dissipative quantum brain dynamics and its approach to the binding problem, memory and consciousness are presented. A nonlocal neurology armed with a holonomic understanding might see more deeply into what clinical neurology has always aspired to: the patient as a whole.

  4. Determinants of neurologic deterioration and stroke-free survival after spontaneous cervicocranial dissections: a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Ameer E; Jadhav, Vikram; Zacharatos, Haralabos; Chaudhry, Saqib A; Rodriguez, Gustavo J; Mohammad, Yousef M; Suri, M Fareed K; Tariq, Nauman; Vazquez, Gabriela; Tummala, Ramachandra P; Taylor, Robert A; Qureshi, Adnan I

    2013-05-01

    Patients with spontaneous cervicocranial dissection (SCCD) may experience new or recurrent ischemic events despite antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy. Treatment with stent placement is an available option; however, the literature on patient selection is limited. Thus, identifying patients at high risk for neurologic deterioration after SCCD is of critical importance. The present study examined the rate of neurologic deterioration in medically treated patients with SCCD and evaluated demographic, clinical, and radiologic factors affecting this deterioration. We retrospectively identified consecutive patients with SCCD over a 7-year period from 3 medical institutions, and evaluated the relationships between demographic data, clinical characteristics, and angiographical findings and subsequent neurologic outcomes. Neurologic deterioration was defined as transient ischemic attack (TIA), ischemic stroke, or death occurring during hospitalization or within 1 year of diagnosis. Kaplan-Meier curves were used to determine neurologic event-free survival up to 12 months. A total of 69 patients (mean age, 47.8 ± 14 years; 45 males) with SCCD were included in the study. Eleven patients (16%) experienced in-hospital neurologic deterioration (TIA in 9, ischemic stroke in 1) or death (1 patient). An additional 8 patients developed neurologic deterioration within 1 year after discharge (TIA in 5, ischemic stroke in 2, and death in 1). The overall 1-year event-free survival rate was 72%. Women (P = .046), patients with involvement of both vertebral arteries (P = .02), and those with intracranial arterial involvement (P = .018) had significantly higher rates of neurologic deterioration. Our findings indicate that neurologic deterioration is relatively common after SCCD despite medical treatment in women, patients with bilateral vertebral artery involvement, and those with intracranial vessel involvement.

  5. Medical Marijuana in Pediatric Neurological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Patel, Anup D

    2016-03-01

    Marijuana and marijuana-based products have been used to treat medical disease. Recently, derivatives of the plant have been separated or synthesized to treat various neurological disorders, many of them affecting children. Unfortunately, data are sparse in regard to treating children with neurologic illness. Therefore, formal conclusions about the potential efficacy, benefit, and adverse effects for these products cannot be made at this time. Further robust research using strong scientific methodology is desperately needed to formally evaluate the role of these products in children.

  6. Richard Bright and his neurological studies.

    PubMed

    Pearce, J M S

    2009-01-01

    Richard Bright was one of the famous triumvirate of Guy's Hospital physicians in the Victorian era. Remembered for his account of glomerulonephritis (Bright's disease) he also made many important and original contributions to medicine and neurology. These included his work on cortical epileptogenesis, descriptions of simple partial (Jacksonian) seizures, infantile convulsions, and a variety of nervous diseases. Most notable were his reports of neurological studies including papers on traumatic tetanus, syringomyelia, arteries of the brain, contractures of spinal origin, tumours of the base of the brain, and narcolepsy. His career and these contributions are outlined.

  7. DNA Repair Deficiency and Neurological Disease

    PubMed Central

    McKinnon, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Preface Responding to genotoxic stress is a prerequisite for development of the nervous system. Mutations in a variety of DNA repair factors can lead to human diseases that are characterized by pronounced neuropathology. In many of these syndromes the neurological component is amongst the most deleterious aspects of the disease. The nervous system poses a particular challenge in terms of clinical intervention, as the neuropathology often arises during nervous system development, and can be fully penetrant by childhood. Understanding how DNA repair deficiency impacts the nervous system will provide a rationale basis for therapies targeted at ameliorating the neurological problems in these syndromes. PMID:19145234

  8. Psychosis in Parkinson's disease without dementia: common and comorbid with other non-motor symptoms.

    PubMed

    Lee, Angela H; Weintraub, Daniel

    2012-06-01

    Psychosis in Parkinson's disease (PD) is common and associated with a range of negative outcomes. Dementia and psychosis are highly correlated in PD, but the frequency and correlates of psychosis in patients without cognitive impairment are not well understood. One hundred and ninety-one non-demented PD patients at two movement disorders centers participated in a study of neuropsychiatric complications in PD and completed a detailed neurological and neuropsychiatric assessment, including the rater-administered Parkinson Psychosis Rating Scale for hallucinations, delusions, and minor symptoms of psychosis (illusions and misidentification of persons). Psychotic symptoms were present in 21.5% of the sample. Visual hallucinations were most common (13.6%), followed by auditory hallucinations (6.8%), illusions or misidentification of people (7.3%), and paranoid ideation (4.7%). Visual hallucinations and illusions or misidentification of people were the most common comorbid symptoms (3.1%). Depression (P = 0.01) and rapid eye movement behavior disorder symptoms (P = 0.03) were associated with psychosis in a multivariable model. The odds of experiencing psychotic symptoms were approximately five times higher in patients with comorbid disorders of depression and sleep-wakefulness. Even in patients without global cognitive impairment, psychosis in PD is common and most highly correlated with other non-motor symptoms. Screening for psychosis should occur at all stages of PD as part of a broad non-motor assessment. In addition, these findings suggest a common neural substrate for disturbances of perception, mood, sleep-wakefulness, and incipient cognitive decline in PD. PMID:22674352

  9. Psychosis in Parkinson's disease without dementia: common and comorbid with other non-motor symptoms.

    PubMed

    Lee, Angela H; Weintraub, Daniel

    2012-06-01

    Psychosis in Parkinson's disease (PD) is common and associated with a range of negative outcomes. Dementia and psychosis are highly correlated in PD, but the frequency and correlates of psychosis in patients without cognitive impairment are not well understood. One hundred and ninety-one non-demented PD patients at two movement disorders centers participated in a study of neuropsychiatric complications in PD and completed a detailed neurological and neuropsychiatric assessment, including the rater-administered Parkinson Psychosis Rating Scale for hallucinations, delusions, and minor symptoms of psychosis (illusions and misidentification of persons). Psychotic symptoms were present in 21.5% of the sample. Visual hallucinations were most common (13.6%), followed by auditory hallucinations (6.8%), illusions or misidentification of people (7.3%), and paranoid ideation (4.7%). Visual hallucinations and illusions or misidentification of people were the most common comorbid symptoms (3.1%). Depression (P = 0.01) and rapid eye movement behavior disorder symptoms (P = 0.03) were associated with psychosis in a multivariable model. The odds of experiencing psychotic symptoms were approximately five times higher in patients with comorbid disorders of depression and sleep-wakefulness. Even in patients without global cognitive impairment, psychosis in PD is common and most highly correlated with other non-motor symptoms. Screening for psychosis should occur at all stages of PD as part of a broad non-motor assessment. In addition, these findings suggest a common neural substrate for disturbances of perception, mood, sleep-wakefulness, and incipient cognitive decline in PD.

  10. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  11. Symptoms of Aspergillosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov . Fungal Diseases Types of Fungal Diseases Aspergillosis Definition Symptoms People at Risk & Prevention Sources Diagnosis & Testing Treatment Healthcare Professionals Statistics More Resources Blastomycosis Definition Symptoms Risk & Prevention Sources Diagnosis & Testing Treatment & Outcomes ...

  12. Symptoms of Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Informed Cancer Home What Are the Symptoms of Ovarian Cancer? Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Gynecologic cancer symptoms diaries Ovarian cancer may cause one or more of these signs ...

  13. Signs and Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... print email share facebook twitter google plus linkedin Signs and Symptoms Partly because there are different types ... This section presents a general picture of CMT signs and symptoms. Contractures and bone deformities Many people ...

  14. Dermatomyositis: Signs and Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... print email share facebook twitter google plus linkedin Signs and Symptoms What happens to someone with dermatomyositis? ... be damaged as a result. About Dermatomyositis (DM) Signs and Symptoms Diagnosis Causes/Inheritance Medical Management Research ...

  15. Bell's Palsy Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Bell's Palsy Sections What Is Bell's Palsy? Bell's Palsy Symptoms ... Bell's Palsy? Bell's Palsy Diagnosis Bell's Palsy Treatment Bell's Palsy Symptoms Reviewed by: Philip R Rizzuto, MD FACS ...

  16. Neurological consequences of vitamin B12 deficiency and its treatment.

    PubMed

    Chalouhi, Christel; Faesch, Sabine; Anthoine-Milhomme, Marie-Constance; Fulla, Yvonne; Dulac, Olivier; Chéron, Gérard

    2008-08-01

    In developed countries, the vitamin B12 deficiency usually occurs in children exclusively breast-fed, whose mothers are vegetarians, causing low stores of vitamin B12. Symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency appear during the second trimester of life and include failure to thrive, lethargy, hypotonia, and arrest or regression of developmental skills. A megaloblastic anemia can be present. One half of the infants exhibit abnormal movements before the start of treatment with intramuscular cobalamin, which disappear 1 or 2 days after. More rarely, movement disorders appear a few days after treatment, whereas neurological symptoms are improving. These abnormal movements can last for 2 to 6 weeks. If not treated, vitamin B12 deficiency can cause lasting neurodisability. Therefore, efforts should be directed to preventing deficiency in pregnant and breast-feeding women on vegan diets and their infants by giving them vitamin B12 supplements. When preventive supplementation has failed, one should recognize and treat quickly an infant presenting with failure to thrive and delayed development.

  17. Neurological soft signs in schizophrenia and obsessive compulsive disorder spectrum.

    PubMed

    Tumkaya, S; Karadag, F; Oguzhanoglu, N K

    2012-04-01

    Obsessive compulsive symptoms are more frequent in patients with schizophrenia compared to normal population. Patients with obsessive compulsive disorder may also exhibit psychosis-like symptoms. Based on these findings, it has been suggested that there is a spectrum of disorders between OCD and schizophrenia. We compared two OCD groups (with good and poor insight) and two schizophrenia groups (with and without OCD) in this recommended spectrum especially in terms of neurological soft signs (NSSs) associated with sensory integration. The schizophrenia with OCD (schizo-obsessive) group exhibited worse performance than the schizophrenia group (p=0.002) in only graphesthesia tasks. Moreover, schizo-obsessive patients exhibited worse performance compared to OCD patients in terms of graphesthesia (p=0.001) and audiovisual integration (p=0.001). Interestingly, OCD patients with poor insight tended to exhibit graphesthesia deficit in a similar manner to schizo-obsessive patients rather than OCD patients. According to our results, graphesthesia disorder is strongly associated both with OCD and schizophrenia. This suggests that neurodevelopmental disorders that lead to graphesthesia disorder overlap in comorbid OCD and schizophrenia patients.

  18. [The carrier model of neurology in Hungary: a proposal for the solution until 2020].

    PubMed

    Bereczki, Dániel; Csiba, László; Komoly, Sámuel; Vécsei, László; Ajtay, András

    2011-11-30

    Based on our previous survey on the capacities of neurological services and on the predictable changes in the neurologist workforce in Hungary, we present a proposal for the organization of the structure of neurological services in the future. We discuss the diagnostic groups treated by neurologists, the neurological services and their progressive organization. Using the current capacities as baseline, we propose patient groups to be treated by neurologists in the future, and the levels of services. Based on the tendencies seen in the last years we suggest to consider to allocate acute stroke services exclusively to stroke units in neurological departments, and we identify a few other diagnostic groups where neurology should have a larger share in patient care. We define three levels for inpatient care: university departments, regional/county hospitals, city hospitals. Instead of minimum criteria we assign outpatient and inpatient standards that are functional from the economic point of view as well. University departments cover all areas of neurological services, have a function in graduate and postgraduate training, and on a regional basis they participate in professional quality assurance activities at the county and city hospital levels, and would have a more independent role in residency training. As far as patient care is concerned, the task of the regional/county hospitals would be similar to that of university departments - without the exclusively university functions. A general neurological service would be offered at the city hospital level - the representation of all subspecialties of neurology is not required. Neurorehabilitation would be organized at special units of neurological wards at the city hospital level, at independent neurorehabilitation wards in regional/county hospitals, and also as an outpatient service offered at the patients' home. The most significant organizational change would affect the outpatient neurological services. In addition

  19. Neurological Vision Rehabilitation: Description and Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingston, John; Katsaros, Jennifer; Vu, Yurika; Goodrich, Gregory L.

    2010-01-01

    The wars in Afghanistan and Iraq have been notable for the high rates of traumatic brain injury (TBI) that have been incurred by the troops. Visual impairments often occur following TBI and present new challenges for rehabilitation. We describe a neurological vision rehabilitation therapy that addresses the unique needs of patients with vision…

  20. Chapter 17: cognitive assessment in neurology.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Victor W

    2010-01-01

    Modern interests in cognitive assessment began with Franz Gall's early 19th century theory of mental organology and Paul Broca's reports in the 1860s on patients with focal brain injury and aphemia. These workers spurred interest in assessing delimited mental abilities in relation to discrete cerebral areas. With roots in experimental and educational psychology, the intelligence testing movement added assessment tools that could be applied to neurological patients. Early- to mid-20th-century landmarks were Alfred Binet and Theodore Simon's intelligence scale, Howard Knox's nonverbal performance tests, and the intelligence quotient conceived by Lewis Terman and refined by David Wechsler. Also developed during this era were Henry Head's Serial Tests for aphasic patients and Kurt Goldstein's tests for brain-injured patients with impairments in "abstract attitude" and concept formation. Other investigators have contributed procedures for the evaluation of language functions, memory, visuospatial and visuoconstructive skills, praxis, and executive functions. A further milestone was the development of short standardized cognitive instruments for dementia assessment. Within a neurological arena, the historical emphasis has been on a flexible, process-driven approach to the service of neurological diagnosis and syndrome identification. Advances in clinical psychology, neurology, and the cognate clinical neurosciences continue to enrich assessment options.

  1. 21 CFR 882.1480 - Neurological endoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Neurological endoscope. 882.1480 Section 882.1480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... ventricles of the brain. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  2. 21 CFR 882.1480 - Neurological endoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Neurological endoscope. 882.1480 Section 882.1480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... ventricles of the brain. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  3. 21 CFR 882.1480 - Neurological endoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Neurological endoscope. 882.1480 Section 882.1480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... ventricles of the brain. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  4. The Neurology Quality of Life Measurement Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Cella, David; Nowinski, Cindy; Peterman, Amy; Victorson, David; Miller, Deborah; Lai, Jin-Shei; Moy, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Objective The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) commissioned the Neurology Quality of Life (Neuro-QOL) project to develop a bilingual (English/Spanish), clinically relevant and psychometrically robust HRQL assessment tool. This paper describes the development and calibration of these banks and scales. Design Classical and modern test construction methodologies were used, including input from essential stakeholder groups. Setting An online patient panel testing service and eleven academic medical centers and clinics from across the United States and Puerto Rico that treat major neurological disorders. Participants Adult and pediatric patients representing different neurological disorders specified in this study, proxy respondents for select conditions (stroke and pediatric conditions), and English and Spanish speaking participants from the general population. Main Outcome Measures Multiple generic and condition specific measures used to provide construct validity evidence to new Neuro-QOL tool. Results Neuro-QOL has developed 14 generic item banks and 8 targeted scales to assess HRQL in five adult (stroke, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, epilepsy, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) and two pediatric conditions (epilepsy and muscular dystrophies). Conclusions The Neuro-QOL system will continue to evolve, with validation efforts in clinical populations, and new bank development in health domains not currently included. The potential for Neuro-QOL measures in rehabilitation research and clinical settings is discussed. PMID:21958920

  5. Neurological update: emerging issues in gait disorders.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Simon J G

    2015-06-01

    Gait disorders represent a common and diverse challenge in Neurological practice. The literature on this field is expanding and is seeking to address mainstream clinical issues as well as a greater understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms. This update will introduce a range of these concepts. PMID:25736555

  6. Prenatal Antecedents of Newborn Neurological Maturation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPietro, Janet A.; Kivlighan, Katie T.; Costigan, Kathleen A.; Rubin, Suzanne E.; Shiffler, Dorothy E.; Henderson, Janice L.; Pillion, Joseph P.

    2010-01-01

    Fetal neurobehavioral development was modeled longitudinally using data collected at weekly intervals from 24 to 38 weeks gestation in a sample of 112 healthy pregnancies. Predictive associations between 3 measures of fetal neurobehavioral functioning and their developmental trajectories to neurological maturation in the first weeks after birth…

  7. [Detection and management of the neurologic dysphagia].

    PubMed

    Leemann, Beatrice; Sergi, Sabrina; Sahinpasic, Leila; Schnider, Armin

    2016-03-01

    Neurologic dysphagia is frequent and has consequences which can be severe, such as, denutrition andpneumonia. In most cases, it can be detected with a clinical exam. The management includes some general measures, an adaptation of textures, specific rehabilitation, and nutritional assessment to judge whether complementary enteral nutrition is needed. PMID:27089605

  8. Anaerobic Infections in Children with Neurological Impairments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brook, Itzhak

    1995-01-01

    Children with neurological impairments are prone to develop serious infection with anaerobic bacteria. The most common anaerobic infections are decubitus ulcers; gastrostomy site wound infections; pulmonary infections (aspiration pneumonia, lung abscesses, and tracheitis); and chronic suppurative otitis media. The unique microbiology of each of…

  9. Therapeutic strategy of erythropoietin in neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang-Bao; Wang, Jiang-An; Yu, Shan Ping; Keogh, Christine L; Wei, Ling

    2008-06-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) was first identified as a hematopoietic cytokine that stimulates proliferation and differentiation of erythroid progenitor cells and was approved by the Food and Drug Administration as a treatment for chronic renal disease patients with anemia. In neural tissues, EPO is working via EPO receptors and induces non-hematopoietic effects. Recent studies have demonstrated that EPO exerts therapeutic potentials on neurological disorders such as ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, subarachnoid hemorrhage, traumatic brain injury, and Parkinson's disease. EPO treatment has been shown to reduce the ischemic infarct and hemorrhage volume, decrease neuronal death including apoptosis, and improve survival rates in animal models. The mechanism of EPO action in neurological disorders involves neuroprotection and promotion of neurogenesis and angiogenesis. Clinical trials of EPO treatments in neurological diseases have accumulated positive results. In stroke patients, EPO treatment may reduce infarct volume and improve functional outcomes. EPO administration has proven safe in animal studies and adult human patients, although safety and efficacy data in neonates and infants are incomplete and long-term multi-center patient evaluations are necessary. Available information suggests that EPO is a promising therapeutic drug for the treatment of neurological diseases.

  10. Cutaneous Adverse Effects of Neurologic Medications.

    PubMed

    Bahrani, Eman; Nunneley, Chloe E; Hsu, Sylvia; Kass, Joseph S

    2016-03-01

    Life-threatening and benign drug reactions occur frequently in the skin, affecting 8 % of the general population and 2-3 % of all hospitalized patients, emphasizing the need for physicians to effectively recognize and manage patients with drug-induced eruptions. Neurologic medications represent a vast array of drug classes with cutaneous side effects. Approximately 7 % of the United States (US) adult population is affected by adult-onset neurological disorders, reflecting a large number of patients on neurologic drug therapies. This review elucidates the cutaneous reactions associated with medications approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat the following neurologic pathologies: Alzheimer disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, epilepsy, Huntington disease, migraine, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson disease, and pseudobulbar affect. A search of the literature was performed using the specific FDA-approved drug or drug classes in combination with the terms 'dermatologic,' 'cutaneous,' 'skin,' or 'rash.' Both PubMed and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were utilized, with side effects ranging from those cited in randomized controlled trials to case reports. It behooves neurologists, dermatologists, and primary care physicians to be aware of the recorded cutaneous adverse reactions and their severity for proper management and potential need to withdraw the offending medication.

  11. The Transformation: Monarch Institute for Neurological Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reclaiming Children and Youth, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Those utilizing the Monarch Institute and its powerful website include educational and mental health professionals looking for training, or employers seeking qualified workers who happen to have neurological differences. Most are students and their parents who are worried and in pain because they have a problem. The young person is not progressing…

  12. 21 CFR 882.1480 - Neurological endoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Neurological endoscope. 882.1480 Section 882.1480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... ventricles of the brain. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  13. 21 CFR 882.1480 - Neurological endoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neurological endoscope. 882.1480 Section 882.1480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... ventricles of the brain. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  14. Negative symptoms in psychometrically defined schizotypy: The role of depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Campellone, Timothy R; Elis, Ori; Mote, Jasmine; Sanchez, Amy H; Kring, Ann M

    2016-06-30

    People high in schizotypy, a risk factor for schizophrenia-spectrum disorders, can have negative symptoms, including diminished experience of motivation/pleasure (MAP) and emotional expressivity (EXP). Additionally, people high in schizotypy often report elevated depressive symptoms, which are also associated with diminished MAP and EXP. In this study, we examined whether negative symptoms were related to schizotypy above and beyond the presence of depressive symptoms. Thirty-one people high in schizotypy and 24 people low in schizotypy were administered the Clinical Assessment Interview for Negative Symptoms (CAINS), an interview-based measure of MAP and EXP negative symptoms and completed a self-report measure of cognitive and somatic-affective depressive symptoms. People high in schizotypy had more MAP negative symptoms than people low in schizotypy, but we found no group differences in EXP negative symptoms. Importantly, the relationship between MAP negative symptoms and schizotypy was fully mediated by cognitive depressive symptoms. These findings suggest that depressive symptoms, specifically cognitive depressive symptoms, may be a pathway for motivation and pleasure impairment, in people at elevated risk for developing schizophrenia-spectrum disorders.

  15. Child neurology: Past, present, and future: part 1: history.

    PubMed

    Millichap, John J; Millichap, J Gordon

    2009-08-18

    The founding period of child neurology occurred in 3 phases: 1) early individual contributory phase, 2) organized training phase, and 3) expansion phase. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, individuals in pediatrics, neurology, and psychiatry established clinics and made important contributions to the literature on childhood epilepsy, cerebral palsy, and pediatric neurology. The latter half of the 20th century saw the organization of training programs in pediatric neurology, with fellowships supported by the NIH. This development was followed by a rapid expansion in the number of trainees certified in child neurology and their appointment to divisions of neurology in children's hospitals. In recent years, referrals of children with neurologic disorders have increased, and disorders previously managed by pediatricians are often seen in neurology clinics. The era of subspecialization is embraced by the practicing physician. The present day status of pediatric neurology and suggestions for the future development of the specialty are subjects for further discussion.

  16. An unusual cause of cerebellovestibular symptoms.

    PubMed

    Alzuabi, Muayad A; Saad, Anas M; Al-Husseini, Muneer J; Nada, Maha A

    2016-01-13

    Hashimoto encephalopathy (HE) is a controversial autoimmune disorder, probably underdiagnosed, that causes a wide variety of neurological manifestations. Symptoms differ among patients and may be very severe in some cases. However, it can be treated, with a very good prognosis. In our case, a teenaged girl with a family history of migraine, vitiligo and benign paroxysmal positional vertigo presented with severe ataxia, vomiting and hypotension. She had a history of similar, but milder, symptoms and was misdiagnosed several times. She had subclinical hypothyroidism, and high levels of antithyroid antibodies. There were abnormal MRI and visual evoked potential findings. After excluding other more common causes, we diagnosed her as having 'Hashimoto Encephalopathy', and started treatment with corticosteroids, on which she showed dramatic improvement. After about 2 years of presentation, the patient is able to continue her life independently.

  17. Epigenetic mechanisms in neurological and neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Landgrave-Gómez, Jorge; Mercado-Gómez, Octavio; Guevara-Guzmán, Rosalinda

    2015-01-01

    The role of epigenetic mechanisms in the function and homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS) and its regulation in diseases is one of the most interesting processes of contemporary neuroscience. In the last decade, a growing body of literature suggests that long-term changes in gene transcription associated with CNS’s regulation and neurological disorders are mediated via modulation of chromatin structure. “Epigenetics”, introduced for the first time by Waddington in the early 1940s, has been traditionally referred to a variety of mechanisms that allow heritable changes in gene expression even in the absence of DNA mutation. However, new definitions acknowledge that many of these mechanisms used to perpetuate epigenetic traits in dividing cells are used by neurons to control a variety of functions dependent on gene expression. Indeed, in the recent years these mechanisms have shown their importance in the maintenance of a healthy CNS. Moreover, environmental inputs that have shown effects in CNS diseases, such as nutrition, that can modulate the concentration of a variety of metabolites such as acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-coA), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) and beta hydroxybutyrate (β-HB), regulates some of these epigenetic modifications, linking in a precise way environment with gene expression. This manuscript will portray what is currently understood about the role of epigenetic mechanisms in the function and homeostasis of the CNS and their participation in a variety of neurological disorders. We will discuss how the machinery that controls these modifications plays an important role in processes involved in neurological disorders such as neurogenesis and cell growth. Moreover, we will discuss how environmental inputs modulate these modifications producing metabolic and physiological alterations that could exert beneficial effects on neurological diseases. Finally, we will highlight possible future directions in the field of epigenetics

  18. Gallstone symptoms. Myth and reality.

    PubMed

    Egbert, A M

    1991-10-01

    Gallstones are very common, but at least two thirds of detected stones are asymptomatic and a large number undoubtedly go undetected. The presence of symptoms or complications is the indication for surgery. It is important to accurately identify which symptoms are caused by gallstones, because removing the gallbladder will relieve only these symptoms. Making this determination is a challenge, however, because the classic picture of biliary colic may be inaccurate and the connection between gallstone disease and flatulent dyspepsia is questionable at best. Descriptions of both these conditions are based on anecdotal evidence or reports of uncontrolled surgical series. A review of recent controlled trials suggests that the pain of biliary colic is constant and infrequent, comes in episodes lasting 1 to 5 hours, is located in the epigastrium or right upper quadrant of the abdomen, and characteristically occurs at night. There are few additional symptoms other than nausea or vomiting, and colic is not induced by eating fatty meals. Flatulent dyspepsia--a symptom complex of vague pain in the right upper quadrant, fatty-food intolerance, and bloating--is probably not related to the presence of gallstones in the majority of patients.

  19. Delayed bedtimes and obsessive-compulsive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Coles, Meredith E; Schubert, Jessica R; Sharkey, Katherine M

    2012-10-01

    There is increasing recognition of an important interplay between psychiatric disorders and sleep. Clinical observations and several empirical studies have shown that later bedtimes are associated with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). This study examined the relation of delayed bedtimes (DBs) and symptoms of OCD. Two hundred and sixty-six undergraduates completed a battery of questionnaires assessing sleep patterns, mood, and obsessive-compulsive (OC) symptoms. Results showed that participants with DBs reported increased rates of OC symptoms, as compared with non-DB participants. Further, this relation remained significant when controlling for negative affect. Additional work examining the interplay between sleep and OC symptoms is warranted. PMID:22946735

  20. Contemporary Teaching of Neurology. Teaching Neurological Behavior to General Practitioners: A Fresh Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derouesne, C.; Salamon, R.

    1977-01-01

    Ways in which teaching neurology can be simplified for the nonspecialist practitioner are addressed in this assessment of the state-of-the-art in France. The hypothesis implies simplifying both the diagnoses and symptomatology. (LBH)

  1. Molecular Targets of Cannabidiol in Neurological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Ibeas Bih, Clementino; Chen, Tong; Nunn, Alistair V W; Bazelot, Michaël; Dallas, Mark; Whalley, Benjamin J

    2015-10-01

    Cannabis has a long history of anecdotal medicinal use and limited licensed medicinal use. Until recently, alleged clinical effects from anecdotal reports and the use of licensed cannabinoid medicines are most likely mediated by tetrahydrocannabinol by virtue of: 1) this cannabinoid being present in the most significant quantities in these preparations; and b) the proportion:potency relationship between tetrahydrocannabinol and other plant cannabinoids derived from cannabis. However, there has recently been considerable interest in the therapeutic potential for the plant cannabinoid, cannabidiol (CBD), in neurological disorders but the current evidence suggests that CBD does not directly interact with the endocannabinoid system except in vitro at supraphysiological concentrations. Thus, as further evidence for CBD's beneficial effects in neurological disease emerges, there remains an urgent need to establish the molecular targets through which it exerts its therapeutic effects. Here, we conducted a systematic search of the extant literature for original articles describing the molecular pharmacology of CBD. We critically appraised the results for the validity of the molecular targets proposed. Thereafter, we considered whether the molecular targets of CBD identified hold therapeutic potential in relevant neurological diseases. The molecular targets identified include numerous classical ion channels, receptors, transporters, and enzymes. Some CBD effects at these targets in in vitro assays only manifest at high concentrations, which may be difficult to achieve in vivo, particularly given CBD's relatively poor bioavailability. Moreover, several targets were asserted through experimental designs that demonstrate only correlation with a given target rather than a causal proof. When the molecular targets of CBD that were physiologically plausible were considered for their potential for exploitation in neurological therapeutics, the results were variable. In some cases

  2. Molecular Targets of Cannabidiol in Neurological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Ibeas Bih, Clementino; Chen, Tong; Nunn, Alistair V W; Bazelot, Michaël; Dallas, Mark; Whalley, Benjamin J

    2015-10-01

    Cannabis has a long history of anecdotal medicinal use and limited licensed medicinal use. Until recently, alleged clinical effects from anecdotal reports and the use of licensed cannabinoid medicines are most likely mediated by tetrahydrocannabinol by virtue of: 1) this cannabinoid being present in the most significant quantities in these preparations; and b) the proportion:potency relationship between tetrahydrocannabinol and other plant cannabinoids derived from cannabis. However, there has recently been considerable interest in the therapeutic potential for the plant cannabinoid, cannabidiol (CBD), in neurological disorders but the current evidence suggests that CBD does not directly interact with the endocannabinoid system except in vitro at supraphysiological concentrations. Thus, as further evidence for CBD's beneficial effects in neurological disease emerges, there remains an urgent need to establish the molecular targets through which it exerts its therapeutic effects. Here, we conducted a systematic search of the extant literature for original articles describing the molecular pharmacology of CBD. We critically appraised the results for the validity of the molecular targets proposed. Thereafter, we considered whether the molecular targets of CBD identified hold therapeutic potential in relevant neurological diseases. The molecular targets identified include numerous classical ion channels, receptors, transporters, and enzymes. Some CBD effects at these targets in in vitro assays only manifest at high concentrations, which may be difficult to achieve in vivo, particularly given CBD's relatively poor bioavailability. Moreover, several targets were asserted through experimental designs that demonstrate only correlation with a given target rather than a causal proof. When the molecular targets of CBD that were physiologically plausible were considered for their potential for exploitation in neurological therapeutics, the results were variable. In some cases

  3. Effects of music and music therapy on mood in neurological patients.

    PubMed

    Raglio, Alfredo; Attardo, Lapo; Gontero, Giulia; Rollino, Silvia; Groppo, Elisabetta; Granieri, Enrico

    2015-03-22

    Mood disorder and depressive syndromes represent a common comorbid condition in neurological disorders with a prevalence rate that ranges between 20% and 50% of patients with stroke, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson's disease. Notwithstanding, these conditions are often under-diagnosed and under-treated in the clinical practice and negatively affect the functional recovery, the adherence to treatment, the quality of life, and even the mortality risk. In addition, a bidirectional association between depression and neurological disorders may be possible being that depressive syndromes may be considered as a risk factor for certain neurological diseases. Despite the large amount of evidence regarding the effects of music therapy (MT) and other musical interventions on different aspects of neurological disorders, no updated article reviewing outcomes such as mood, emotions, depression, activity of daily living and so on is actually available; for this reason, little is known about the effectiveness of music and MT on these important outcomes in neurological patients. The aim of this article is to provide a narrative review of the current literature on musical interventions and their effects on mood and depression in patients with neurological disorders. Searching on PubMed and PsycInfo databases, 25 studies corresponding to the inclusion criteria have been selected; 11 of them assess the effects of music or MT in Dementia, 9 explore the efficacy on patients with Stroke, and 5 regard other neurological diseases like Multiple Sclerosis, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/motor neuron disease, Chronic quadriplegia, Parkinson's Disease, and Acquired Brain dysfunctions. Selected studies are based on relational and rehabilitative music therapy approaches or concern music listening interventions. Most of the studies support the efficacy of MT and other musical interventions on mood, depressive syndromes, and quality of life on neurological patients. PMID:25815256

  4. Effects of music and music therapy on mood in neurological patients

    PubMed Central

    Raglio, Alfredo; Attardo, Lapo; Gontero, Giulia; Rollino, Silvia; Groppo, Elisabetta; Granieri, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Mood disorder and depressive syndromes represent a common comorbid condition in neurological disorders with a prevalence rate that ranges between 20% and 50% of patients with stroke, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson’s disease. Notwithstanding, these conditions are often under-diagnosed and under-treated in the clinical practice and negatively affect the functional recovery, the adherence to treatment, the quality of life, and even the mortality risk. In addition, a bidirectional association between depression and neurological disorders may be possible being that depressive syndromes may be considered as a risk factor for certain neurological diseases. Despite the large amount of evidence regarding the effects of music therapy (MT) and other musical interventions on different aspects of neurological disorders, no updated article reviewing outcomes such as mood, emotions, depression, activity of daily living and so on is actually available; for this reason, little is known about the effectiveness of music and MT on these important outcomes in neurological patients. The aim of this article is to provide a narrative review of the current literature on musical interventions and their effects on mood and depression in patients with neurological disorders. Searching on PubMed and PsycInfo databases, 25 studies corresponding to the inclusion criteria have been selected; 11 of them assess the effects of music or MT in Dementia, 9 explore the efficacy on patients with Stroke, and 5 regard other neurological diseases like Multiple Sclerosis, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/motor neuron disease, Chronic quadriplegia, Parkinson’s Disease, and Acquired Brain dysfunctions. Selected studies are based on relational and rehabilitative music therapy approaches or concern music listening interventions. Most of the studies support the efficacy of MT and other musical interventions on mood, depressive syndromes, and quality of life on neurological patients. PMID:25815256

  5. Effects of music and music therapy on mood in neurological patients.

    PubMed

    Raglio, Alfredo; Attardo, Lapo; Gontero, Giulia; Rollino, Silvia; Groppo, Elisabetta; Granieri, Enrico

    2015-03-22

    Mood disorder and depressive syndromes represent a common comorbid condition in neurological disorders with a prevalence rate that ranges between 20% and 50% of patients with stroke, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson's disease. Notwithstanding, these conditions are often under-diagnosed and under-treated in the clinical practice and negatively affect the functional recovery, the adherence to treatment, the quality of life, and even the mortality risk. In addition, a bidirectional association between depression and neurological disorders may be possible being that depressive syndromes may be considered as a risk factor for certain neurological diseases. Despite the large amount of evidence regarding the effects of music therapy (MT) and other musical interventions on different aspects of neurological disorders, no updated article reviewing outcomes such as mood, emotions, depression, activity of daily living and so on is actually available; for this reason, little is known about the effectiveness of music and MT on these important outcomes in neurological patients. The aim of this article is to provide a narrative review of the current literature on musical interventions and their effects on mood and depression in patients with neurological disorders. Searching on PubMed and PsycInfo databases, 25 studies corresponding to the inclusion criteria have been selected; 11 of them assess the effects of music or MT in Dementia, 9 explore the efficacy on patients with Stroke, and 5 regard other neurological diseases like Multiple Sclerosis, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/motor neuron disease, Chronic quadriplegia, Parkinson's Disease, and Acquired Brain dysfunctions. Selected studies are based on relational and rehabilitative music therapy approaches or concern music listening interventions. Most of the studies support the efficacy of MT and other musical interventions on mood, depressive syndromes, and quality of life on neurological patients.

  6. [German neurology and neurologists during the Third Reich: Preconditions and general framework before and after 1933].

    PubMed

    Martin, M; Karenberg, A; Fangerau, H

    2016-08-01

    This article focuses on the institutional development of neurology in Germany up to the rise to power of the National Socialists and the radical sociopolitical changes after 1933. A wide range of scattered secondary literature was assessed and evaluated. Additionally, some original sources are literally quoted and interpreted according to the context. Since the end of the nineteenth century a complicated process of separation from internal medicine and psychiatry led to the formation of a self-conscious discipline of neurology. The first generation of German neurologists succeeded in founding the German Journal for Neurology ("Deutsche Zeitschrift für Nervenheilkunde") in 1890 and their own neurological association, the Society of German Neurologists ("Gesellschaft Deutscher Nervenärzte", GDN) in 1907. On an international scale, however, the institutional implementation of neurology with only a small number of chairs and few neurology departments remained more than modest. The ambitions for autonomy ended 2 years after the change of power in 1933. Regulatory interventions by the government and psychiatric interests led to the fusion of the GDN with the psychiatric specialist society, the new association being called the Society of German Neurologists and Psychiatrists ("Gesellschaft Deutscher Neurologen und Psychiater", GDNP) in 1935. In this group psychiatrists dominated the discourse. The expulsion, imprisonment and murder of physicians declared as non-Aryan or Jewish along with the forced consolidation ("Gleichschaltung") at the universities prompted profound changes in medical and academic life. It remains an ongoing challenge of neurological historical research to measure the impact of this upheaval on the few neurology departments in hospitals and private practices.

  7. [German neurology and neurologists during the Third Reich: Preconditions and general framework before and after 1933].

    PubMed

    Martin, M; Karenberg, A; Fangerau, H

    2016-08-01

    This article focuses on the institutional development of neurology in Germany up to the rise to power of the National Socialists and the radical sociopolitical changes after 1933. A wide range of scattered secondary literature was assessed and evaluated. Additionally, some original sources are literally quoted and interpreted according to the context. Since the end of the nineteenth century a complicated process of separation from internal medicine and psychiatry led to the formation of a self-conscious discipline of neurology. The first generation of German neurologists succeeded in founding the German Journal for Neurology ("Deutsche Zeitschrift für Nervenheilkunde") in 1890 and their own neurological association, the Society of German Neurologists ("Gesellschaft Deutscher Nervenärzte", GDN) in 1907. On an international scale, however, the institutional implementation of neurology with only a small number of chairs and few neurology departments remained more than modest. The ambitions for autonomy ended 2 years after the change of power in 1933. Regulatory interventions by the government and psychiatric interests led to the fusion of the GDN with the psychiatric specialist society, the new association being called the Society of German Neurologists and Psychiatrists ("Gesellschaft Deutscher Neurologen und Psychiater", GDNP) in 1935. In this group psychiatrists dominated the discourse. The expulsion, imprisonment and murder of physicians declared as non-Aryan or Jewish along with the forced consolidation ("Gleichschaltung") at the universities prompted profound changes in medical and academic life. It remains an ongoing challenge of neurological historical research to measure the impact of this upheaval on the few neurology departments in hospitals and private practices. PMID:27364622

  8. Neurological Manifestations of Brucellosis in an Indian Population.

    PubMed

    Tarfarosh, Shah Faisal Ahmad; Manzoor, Mushbiq

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease causing serious public health problems in countries of the Middle-East and developing countries like India. Neurobrucellosis is one of the devastating complications of this re-emerging zoonosis. The objective of this review was to identify the neurological manifestations of Brucellosis in an Indian population and bring into light the effective modalities used for treating neurobrucellosis. A systematic review of the scientific literature reported in accordance with the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analysis (PRISMA) guidelines was conducted. Three databases (PubMed, IndMed, and ScienceDirect) were used to analyze retrospectively case reports of sufficient quality for data extraction (from the last 15 years, 2002-2016), and relevant literature was reviewed. Most of the cases had a definite history of exposure to Brucella through occupational contact with cattle, drinking raw milk, or living near unhygienic abattoir or even trips to epidemic areas outside India. The common presentations include fever, meningitis, brisk deep-tendon reflexes, extensor plantars, sensory deficit usually below the twelfth thoracic vertebral level, weakness of lower limbs, ocular signs of papilledema, and retrobulbar neuritis. The usual systemic findings associated were hepatosplenomegaly and weight-loss. Neurobrucellosis needs to be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of fever of unknown origin involving neurological symptoms and systemic involvement. Prognosis is good if there is a combination of antibiotics, each with different mechanisms of action given in full dose. Suitable measures for its prevention are also suggested. PMID:27555982

  9. [Neurological soft signs as a candidate for endophenotype of schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Kałuzyńska, Olga; Rabe-Jabłońska, Jolanta

    2014-01-01

    A concept of an endophenotype, also termed as an internal endophenotype, is used in genetic studies on psychiatric disorders. Neurological soft signs are also considered candidates for endophenotypes of schizophrenia. Neurological soft signs are, objectively measured, non-localizing abnormalities, not related to impairment of a specific brain region, reflecting improper cortical-subcorical and intercortical connections. This paper presents the main domains of NSS, methods of measurement of NSS, their neuroanatomical substrate, association of NSS with schizophrenia symptoms the and analysis of the literature in order to check whether NSS meet the criteria of the phenotype. A marker can be considered a phenotype if it meets the following criteria: 1) association with a disease in a population, 2) heritability, 3) state-independence, 4) familial association (the endophenotype is more prevalent in the affected individuals, their affected and non-affected family members in comparison to the normal population), 5) co-segregation (the endophenotype is more prevalent among ill family members of ill probands compared with healthy relatives). Currently, there is an ample evidence that the NSS, especially these representing impaired motor coordination, meet certain criteria of an endophenotype. However, there are still several unresolved questions concerning NSS: studies on relatives of schizophrenic patients included small groups of subjects, many of the studies included individuals with schizophrenia, as well as schizophrenia spectrum disorders, the available date-base of twins (schizophrenia-concordant and schizophrenia non -concordant) is not sufficiently large, there are too few studies evaluating the relationship of NSS and individual genes, there are no objective and quantitative methods of measurement of NSS. Therefore, NSS still represent only candidates for an endophenotype of schizophrenia. Finding correlations of selected NSS with other endophenotypes and their

  10. Neurological Manifestations of Brucellosis in an Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Manzoor, Mushbiq

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease causing serious public health problems in countries of the Middle-East and developing countries like India. Neurobrucellosis is one of the devastating complications of this re-emerging zoonosis. The objective of this review was to identify the neurological manifestations of Brucellosis in an Indian population and bring into light the effective modalities used for treating neurobrucellosis. A systematic review of the scientific literature reported in accordance with the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analysis (PRISMA) guidelines was conducted. Three databases (PubMed, IndMed, and ScienceDirect) were used to analyze retrospectively case reports of sufficient quality for data extraction (from the last 15 years, 2002-2016), and relevant literature was reviewed. Most of the cases had a definite history of exposure to Brucella through occupational contact with cattle, drinking raw milk, or living near unhygienic abattoir or even trips to epidemic areas outside India. The common presentations include fever, meningitis, brisk deep-tendon reflexes, extensor plantars, sensory deficit usually below the twelfth thoracic vertebral level, weakness of lower limbs, ocular signs of papilledema, and retrobulbar neuritis. The usual systemic findings associated were hepatosplenomegaly and weight-loss. Neurobrucellosis needs to be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of fever of unknown origin involving neurological symptoms and systemic involvement. Prognosis is good if there is a combination of antibiotics, each with different mechanisms of action given in full dose. Suitable measures for its prevention are also suggested. PMID:27555982

  11. Parental quality of life in complex paediatric neurologic disorders of unknown aetiology.

    PubMed

    van Nimwegen, K J M; Kievit, W; van der Wilt, G J; Schieving, J H; Willemsen, M A A P; Donders, A R T; Verhaak, C M; Grutters, J P C

    2016-09-01

    Complex paediatric neurology (CPN) patients generally present with non-specific symptoms, such as developmental delay, impaired movement and epilepsy. The diagnostic trajectory in these disorders is usually complicated and long-lasting, and may be burdensome to the patients and their parents. Additionally, as caring for a chronically ill child can be stressful and demanding, parents of these patients may experience impaired health-related quality of life (HRQoL). This study aims to assess parental HRQoL and factors related to it in CPN. Physical and mental HRQoL of 120 parents was measured and compared to the general population using the SF-12 questionnaire. Parents also completed this questionnaire for the measurement of patient HRQoL. Additional questionnaires were used to measure parental uncertainty (Visual Analogue Scale) and worry phenomena (Penn State Worry Questionnaire), and to obtain socio-demographic data. A linear mixed model with random effect was used to investigate which of these variables were associated with parental HRQoL. As compared to the general population, HRQoL of these parents appeared diminished. Fathers showed both lowered physical (51.76, p < 0.05) and mental (49.41, p < 0.01) HRQoL, whereas mothers only showed diminished mental (46.46, p < 0.01) HRQoL. Patient HRQoL and parental worry phenomena were significantly correlated with overall and mental parental HRQoL. The reduction in parental mental HRQoL is alarming, also because children strongly rely on their parents and parental mental health is known to influence children's health. Awareness of these problems among clinicians, and supportive care if needed are important to prevent exacerbation of the problems. PMID:27321953

  12. Italian neurologists' perception on cognitive symptoms in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Neri, G; Serrati, C; Zolo, P; Cataldo, N; Ripellino, C

    2016-09-01

    The assessment of cognition is an important part of major depressive disorder (MDD) evaluation and a crucial issue is the physicians' perception of cognitive dysfunction in MDD that remains nowadays a little known matter. The present study aims at investigating the understanding of neurologists' perception about cognitive dysfunction in MDD. An on-line survey addressed to 85 Italian neurologists in the period between May and June 2015 was performed. The questionnaire comprised three sections: the first section collecting information on neurologists' socio-demographic profile, the second investigating cognitive symptoms relevance in relation with different aspects and the third one explicitly focusing on cognitive symptoms in MDD. Cognitive symptoms are considered most significant among DSM-5 symptoms to define the presence of a Major Depressive Episode in a MDD, to improve antidepressant therapy adherence, patients' functionality and concurrent neurological condition, once resolved. Furthermore, an incongruity came to light from this survey: the neurologists considered cognitive symptoms a not relevant aspect to choose the antidepressant treatment in comparison with the other DSM-5 symptoms on one side, but they declared the opposite in the third part of the questionnaire focused on cognitive symptoms. Cognitive symptoms appeared to be a relevant aspect in MDD and neurologists have a clear understanding of this issue. Nevertheless, the discrepancy between neurologists' perception on cognitive symptoms and the antidepressant treatment highlights the feeling of an unmet need that could be filled increasing the awareness of existing drugs with pro-cognitive effects.

  13. [The transition of deep brain stimulation from disease specific to symptom specific indications].

    PubMed

    Okun, Michael S

    2012-01-01

    The success of chronic deep brain stimulation (DBS) and electrical neuro-network modulation (ENM) to address neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders has led the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and also other worldwide regulatory agencies to grant approval for the use of DBS in specific disorders. In the United States, DBS is FDA approved for the treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease (PD), essential tremor (ET), obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), and for dystonia. OCD and dystonia have been approved under a mechanism referred to as a humanitarian device exemption (HDE). However, as the field of DBS and ENM evolve there has been a shift in practice patterns from targeting diseases to targeting specific and disabling symptoms. This shift has been driving interdisciplinary DBS boards to collect, and to address symptom profiles in all potential DBS candidates. Based on a specific symptom profile, a strategic and personalized medicine approach can be undertaken. The personalized approach will take into consideration the brain target, a unilateral versus a bilateral procedure, and the potential for use of more than one DBS lead per brain hemisphere. Additionally, a personalized approach to DBS will also facilitate improved pre-operative medication adjustments, as well as optimal post-operative medication, behavioral, and device management. PMID:23196455

  14. Toward precision medicine in neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lin; Jiang, Teng; Tan, Lan; Yu, Jin-Tai

    2016-03-01

    Technological development has paved the way for accelerated genomic discovery and is bringing precision medicine into view. The goal of precision medicine is to deliver optimally targeted and timed interventions tailored to an individual's molecular drivers of disease. Neurological diseases are promisingly suited models for precision medicine because of the rapidly expanding genetic knowledge base, phenotypic classification, the development of biomarkers and the potential modifying treatments. Moving forward, it is crucial that through these integrated research platforms to provide analysis both for accurate personal genome analysis and gene and drug discovery. Here we describe our vision of how precision medicine can bring greater clarity to the clinical and biological complexity of neurological diseases. PMID:27127757

  15. Astrogliopathology in neurological, neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Verkhratsky, Alexei; Parpura, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Astroglial cells represent a main element in the maintenance of homeostasis and providing defense to the brain. Consequently, their dysfunction underlies many, if not all, neurological, neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. General astrogliopathy is evident in diametrically opposing morpho-functional changes in astrocytes, i.e. their hypertrophy along with reactivity or atrophy with asthenia. Neurological disorders with astroglial participation can be genetic, of which Alexander disease is a primary sporadic astrogliopathy, environmentally caused, such as heavy metal encephalopathies, or neurodevelopmental in origin. Astroglia contribute to neurodegenerative processes seen in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's and Huntington's diseases. Furthermore, astroglia also play a role in major neuropsychiatric disorders, ranging from schizophrenia to depression, as well as in addictive disorders.

  16. Recognition and treatment of neurologic Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lorincz, Matthew T

    2012-11-01

    As Wilson's disease is both preventable and treatable, the diagnosis must not be missed. Despite this, it is usually misdiagnosed. Misdiagnosis and delay in treatment are clinically relevant because if left untreated, Wilson's disease progresses to hepatic failure or severe neurologic disability, and death. Those adequately treated have a normal life span. Wilson's disease is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the ATP7B gene. Mutations in ATP7B result in abnormal copper metabolism and subsequent toxic accumulation of copper. The clinical manifestations of neurologic Wilson's disease include variable combinations of dysarthria, dystonia, tremor, parkinsonism, ataxia, and choreoathetosis. Once the possibility of Wilson's disease is considered, diagnosis is straight forward. Currently available treatments, including zinc acetate and trientine, are generally well tolerated and effective.

  17. Hepatitis E virus and neurological injury.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Harry R; Kamar, Nassim; van Eijk, Jeroen J J; Mclean, Brendan N; Cintas, Pascal; Bendall, Richard P; Jacobs, Bart C

    2016-02-01

    Hepatitis E is hyperendemic in many developing countries in Asia and Africa, and is caused by hepatitis E virus (HEV) genotypes 1 and 2, which are spread via the faecal-oral route by contaminated water. Recent data show that HEV infection is also endemic in developed countries. In such geographical settings, hepatitis E is caused by HEV genotypes 3 and 4, and is mainly a porcine zoonosis. In a minority of cases, HEV causes acute and chronic hepatitis, but infection is commonly asymptomatic or unrecognized. HEV infection is associated with a number of extrahepatic manifestations, including a range of neurological injuries. To date, 91 cases of HEV-associated neurological injury--most commonly, Guillain-Barré syndrome, neuralgic amyotrophy, and encephalitis/myelitis--have been reported. Here, we review the reported cases, discuss possible pathogenic mechanisms, and present our perspectives on future directions and research questions.

  18. The neurology of aretaeus: radix pedis neurologia.

    PubMed

    Pearce, J M S

    2013-01-01

    Aretaeus (Aretaios) was a physician born in Cappadocia in about the 2nd century AD, a student of medicine and physician in Alexandria. His works are found in eight books which espoused the physiological and pathological views of the Hippocratic principles derived from the pneumatists and the eclectic schools. Though he has been called the forgotten physician, it has been said that: 'after Hippocrates no single Greek author has equalled Aretaios'. In order to give an indication of his neurological legacy, this paper offers a summary of and quotations from his principal neurological contributions: migraine, vertigo, tetanus, epilepsy, melancholia, strokes and paralysis. One of his most important discoveries was the notion that the pyramidal tract decussates. PMID:23969486

  19. Explanation and management of neurological disability.

    PubMed Central

    Critchley, E M; Mitchell, J D

    1987-01-01

    Patients are often told of the diagnosis of a neurological disability in less than ideal circumstances such that they may not fully comprehend it. Clinicians must be able to sense when the patient's understanding is imperfect even if superficially he or she appears to take in what has been said and its implications. A programme of further counselling is often required to follow this up. A critical look at current procedures will show how these problems arise. It is suggested that improvements in the care of neurologically disabled patients would follow from improved communication between the many agencies that the concerned in their care and from providing books and other material explaining disability and its treatment. A logical development would be for disabled living centres to be established adjacent to existing neuroscience units. PMID:2954610

  20. The neurology of aretaeus: radix pedis neurologia.

    PubMed

    Pearce, J M S

    2013-01-01

    Aretaeus (Aretaios) was a physician born in Cappadocia in about the 2nd century AD, a student of medicine and physician in Alexandria. His works are found in eight books which espoused the physiological and pathological views of the Hippocratic principles derived from the pneumatists and the eclectic schools. Though he has been called the forgotten physician, it has been said that: 'after Hippocrates no single Greek author has equalled Aretaios'. In order to give an indication of his neurological legacy, this paper offers a summary of and quotations from his principal neurological contributions: migraine, vertigo, tetanus, epilepsy, melancholia, strokes and paralysis. One of his most important discoveries was the notion that the pyramidal tract decussates.

  1. Protective effects of ginseng on neurological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Wei-Yi; Farooqui, Tahira; Koh, Hwee-Ling; Farooqui, Akhlaq A.; Ling, Eng-Ang

    2015-01-01

    Ginseng (Order: Apiales, Family: Araliaceae, Genus: Panax) has been used as a traditional herbal medicine for over 2000 years, and is recorded to have antianxiety, antidepressant and cognition enhancing properties. The protective effects of ginseng on neurological disorders are discussed in this review. Ginseng species and ginsenosides, and their intestinal metabolism and bioavailability are briefly introduced. This is followed by molecular mechanisms of effects of ginseng on the brain, including glutamatergic transmission, monoamine transmission, estrogen signaling, nitric oxide (NO) production, the Keap1/Nrf2 adaptive cellular stress pathway, neuronal survival, apoptosis, neural stem cells and neuroregeneration, microglia, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and cerebral microvessels. The molecular mechanisms of the neuroprotective effects of ginseng in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) including β-amyloid (Aβ) formation, tau hyperphosphorylation and oxidative stress, major depression, stroke, Parkinson’s disease and multiple sclerosis are presented. It is hoped that this discussion will stimulate more studies on the use of ginseng in neurological disorders. PMID:26236231

  2. Myalgic Encephalomyelitis: Symptoms and Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Jasona, Leonard A.; Zinn, Marcie L.; Zinn, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME) continues to cause significant morbidity worldwide with an estimated one million cases in the United States. Hurdles to establishing consensus to achieve accurate evaluation of patients with ME continue, fueled by poor agreement about case definitions, slow progress in development of standardized diagnostic approaches, and issues surrounding research priorities. Because there are other medical problems, such as early MS and Parkinson’s Disease, which have some similar clinical presentations, it is critical to accurately diagnose ME to make a differential diagnosis. In this article, we explore and summarize advances in the physiological and neurological approaches to understanding, diagnosing, and treating ME. We identify key areas and approaches to elucidate the core and secondary symptom clusters in ME so as to provide some practical suggestions in evaluation of ME for clinicians and researchers. This review, therefore, represents a synthesis of key discussions in the literature, and has important implications for a better understanding of ME, its biological markers, and diagnostic criteria. There is a clear need for more longitudinal studies in this area with larger data sets, which correct for multiple testing. PMID:26411464

  3. Organophosphate-induced brain damage: mechanisms, neuropsychiatric and neurological consequences, and potential therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun

    2012-06-01

    Organophosphate (OP)-induced brain damage is defined as progressive damage to the brain, resulting from the cholinergic neuronal excitotoxicity and dysfunction induced by OP-induced irreversible AChE inhibition. This delayed secondary neuronal damage that occurs mainly in the cholinergic regions of the brain that contain dense accumulations of cholinergic neurons and the majority of cholinergic projection, might be largely responsible for persistent profound neuropsychiatric and neurological impairments (memory, cognitive, mental, emotional, motor and sensory deficits) in the victims of OP poisoning. Neuroprotective strategies for attenuating OP-induced brain damage should target different development stages of OP-induced brain damage, and may include but not limited to: (1) Antidote therapies with atropine and related efficient anticholinergic drugs; (2) Anti-excitotoxic therapies targeting attenuation of cerebral edema and inflammatory reaction, blockage of calcium influx, inhibition of apoptosis program, and the control of seizures; (3) Neuroprotective strategies using cytokines, antioxidants and NMDAR antagonists (a single drug or a combination of drugs) to slow down the process of secondary neuronal damage; and (4) Therapies targeting individual symptoms or clusters of chronic neuropsychiatric and neurological symptoms. These neuroprotective strategies may help limit or prevent secondary neuronal damage at the early stage of OP poisoning and attenuate the subsequent neuropsychiatric and neurological impairments, thus reducing the long-term disability caused by exposure to OPs. PMID:22498093

  4. Neurologic uses of botulinum neurotoxin type A

    PubMed Central

    Ney, John P; Joseph, Kevin R

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews the current and most neurologic uses of botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT-A), beginning with relevant historical data, neurochemical mechanism at the neuromuscular junction. Current commercial preparations of BoNT-A are reviewed, as are immunologic issues relating to secondary failure of BoNT-A therapy. Clinical uses are summarized with an emphasis on controlled clinical trials (as appropriate), including facial movement disorders, focal neck and limb dystonias, spasticity, hypersecretory syndromes, and pain. PMID:19300614

  5. Neurological Sequelae Resulting from Encephalitic Alphavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ronca, Shannon E.; Dineley, Kelly T.; Paessler, Slobodan

    2016-01-01

    The recent surge in viral clinical cases and associated neurological deficits have reminded us that viral infections can lead to detrimental, long-term effects, termed sequelae, in survivors. Alphaviruses are enveloped, single-stranded positive-sense RNA viruses in the Togaviridae family. Transmission of alphaviruses between and within species occurs mainly via the bite of an infected mosquito bite, giving alphaviruses a place among arboviruses, or arthropod-borne viruses. Alphaviruses are found throughout the world and typically cause arthralgic or encephalitic disease in infected humans. Originally detected in the 1930s, today the major encephalitic viruses include Venezuelan, Western, and Eastern equine encephalitis viruses (VEEV, WEEV, and EEEV, respectively). VEEV, WEEV, and EEEV are endemic to the Americas and are important human pathogens, leading to thousands of human infections each year. Despite awareness of these viruses for nearly 100 years, we possess little mechanistic understanding regarding the complications (sequelae) that emerge after resolution of acute infection. Neurological sequelae are those complications involving damage to the central nervous system that results in cognitive, sensory, or motor deficits that may also manifest as emotional instability and seizures in the most severe cases. This article serves to provide an overview of clinical cases documented in the past century as well as a summary of the reported neurological sequelae due to VEEV, WEEV, and EEEV infection. We conclude with a treatise on the utility of, and practical considerations for animal models applied to the problem of neurological sequelae of viral encephalopathies in order to decipher mechanisms and interventional strategies. PMID:27379085

  6. [Craniospinal electromagnetic therapy in the neurological practice].

    PubMed

    Voropaev, A A; Troshin, V D; Mochalov, A D

    2007-01-01

    Effectiveness of a new method for treating neurological disorders based on the use of trans-cranial electro- and magnetic stimulation in patients with vascular, vertebral and traumatic pathology of the nervous system is presented. Different frequency parameters of transcranial electrical stimulation and superposition methods of the magnetic generator are proposed taking into account the specific features of neurodynamics and pathogenesis of diseases. The effect of craniospinal electromagnetic therapy on the autonomic nervous system is demonstrated. PMID:18427454

  7. Minor Neurological Dysfunction in Children with Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Punt, Marja; de Jong, Marianne; de Groot, Erik; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To improve understanding of brain function in children with severe dyslexia in terms of minor neurological dysfunctions (MNDs). Method: One hundred and four children (81 males, 23 females; age range 7-12y; mean age 9y 7mo, SD 1y 2mo;) with severe dyslexia (the presence of a Full-scale IQ score of greater than or equal to 85, retardation in…

  8. Severe neurologic manifestations in acute intermittent porphyria developed after spine surgery under general anesthesia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun Young; Kim, Yi Seul; Lim, Kyung-Jee; Lee, Hye Kyoung; Lee, Soo Kyung; Choi, Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Porphyrias are inherited metabolic disorders resulting from a specific enzyme defect in the heme biosynthetic pathway. Porphyrias are induced by various precipitants. Clinical features include abdominal pain, neurologic manifestations, autonomic neuropathy, and mental disturbance. Diagnosis may be delayed because of variable symptoms that mimic other diseases and because of the rarity of of porphyrias. Although most patients with known porphyria can complete anesthesia and surgery safely, undiagnosed porphyric patients are in danger of porphyric crisis due to inadvertent exposure to precipitating drugs and environment. We report a case of a patient who experienced delayed emergence with neurological disturbance after general anesthesia, ultimately diagnosed as acute intermittent porphyria. PMID:25302100

  9. The role of neurosciences intensive care in neurological conditions.

    PubMed

    Sadek, Ahmed-Ramadan; Damian, Maxwell; Eynon, C Andy

    2013-10-01

    The neurosciences intensive care unit provides specialized medical and nursing care to both the neurosurgical and neurological patient. This second of two articles describes the role it plays in the management of patients with neurological conditions.

  10. Neurological manifestations of gastrointestinal disorders, with particular reference to the differential diagnosis of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ghezzi, A; Zaffaroni, M

    2001-11-01

    Neurological manifestations of gastrointestinal disorders are described, with particular reference to those resembling multiple sclerosis (MS) on clinical or MRI grounds. Patients with celiac disease can present cerebellar ataxia, progressive myoclonic ataxia, myelopathy, or cerebral, brainstem and peripheral nerve involvement. Antigliadin antibodies can be found in subjects with neurological dysfunction of unknown cause, particularly in sporadic cerebellar ataxia ("gluten ataxia"). Patients with Whipple's disease can develop mental and psychiatric changes, supranuclear gaze palsy, upper motoneuron signs, hypothalamic dysfunction, cranial nerve abnormalities, seizures, ataxia, myorhythmia and sensory deficits. Neurological manifestations can complicate inflammatory bowel disease (e.g. ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease) due to vascular or vasculitic mechanisms. Cases with both Crohn's disease and MS or cerebral vasculitis are described. Epilepsy, chronic inflammatory polyneuropathy, muscle involvement and myasthenia gravis are also reported. The central nervous system can be affected in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection because of vasculitis associated with HCV-related cryoglobulinemia. Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy (MNGIE) is a disease caused by multiple deletions of mitochondrial DNA. It is characterized by peripheral neuropathy, ophthalmoplegia, deafness, leukoencephalopathy, and gastrointestinal symptoms due to visceral neuropathy. Neurological manifestations can be the consequence of vitamin B1, nicotinamide, vitamin B12, vitamin D, or vitamin E deficiency and from nutritional deficiency states following gastric surgery. PMID:11794474

  11. Lower urinary tract dysfunction in the neurological patient: clinical assessment and management.

    PubMed

    Panicker, Jalesh N; Fowler, Clare J; Kessler, Thomas M

    2015-07-01

    Lower urinary tract (LUT) dysfunction is a common sequela of neurological disease, resulting in symptoms that have a pronounced effect on quality of life. The site and nature of the neurological lesion affect the pattern of dysfunction. The risk of developing upper urinary tract damage and renal failure is much lower in patients with slowly progressive non-traumatic neurological disorders than in those with spinal cord injury or spina bifida; this difference in morbidity is taken into account in the development of appropriate management algorithms. Clinical assessment might include tests such as uroflowmetry, post-void residual volume measurement, renal ultrasound, (video-)urodynamics, neurophysiology, and urethrocystoscopy, depending on the indication. Incomplete bladder emptying is most often managed by intermittent catheterisation, and storage dysfunction by antimuscarinic drugs. Intradetrusor injections of onabotulinumtoxinA have transformed the management of neurogenic detrusor overactivity. Neuromodulation offers promise for managing both storage and voiding dysfunction. An individualised, patient-tailored approach is required for the management of LUT dysfunction associated with neurological disorders.

  12. More clinical observations on migraine associated with monocular visual symptoms in an Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Jogi, Vishal; Mehta, Sahil; Gupta, Amod; Singh, Paramjeet; Lal, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Context: Retinal migraine (RM) is considered as one of the rare causes of transient monocular visual loss (TMVL) and has not been studied in Indian population. Objectives: The study aims to analyze the clinical and investigational profile of patients with RM. Materials and Methods: This is an observational prospective analysis of 12 cases of TMVL fulfilling the International Classification of Headache Disorders-2nd edition (ICHD-II) criteria of RM examined in Neurology and Ophthalmology Outpatient Department (OPD) of Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh from July 2011 to October 2012. Results: Most patients presented in 3rd and 4th decade with equal sex distribution. Seventy-five percent had antecedent migraine without aura (MoA) and 25% had migraine with Aura (MA). Headache was ipsilateral to visual symptoms in 67% and bilateral in 33%. TMVL preceded headache onset in 58% and occurred during headache episode in 42%. Visual symptoms were predominantly negative except in one patient who had positive followed by negative symptoms. Duration of visual symptoms was variable ranging from 30 s to 45 min. None of the patient had permanent monocular vision loss. Three patients had episodes of TMVL without headache in addition to the symptom constellation defining RM. Most of the tests done to rule out alternative causes were normal. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain showed nonspecific white matter changes in one patient. Visual-evoked potential (VEP) showed prolonged P100 latencies in two cases. Patent foramen ovale was detected in one patient. Conclusions: RM is a definite subtype of migraine and should remain in the ICHD classification. It should be kept as one of the differential diagnosis of transient monocular vision loss. We propose existence of “acephalgic RM” which may respond to migraine prophylaxis. PMID:27011631

  13. Parent-child interaction, maternal depressive symptoms and preterm infant cognitive function.

    PubMed

    McManus, Beth M; Poehlmann, Julie

    2012-06-01

    Preterm infants are at risk for cognitive difficulties due to infant neurological immaturity and family social disadvantage, and this may be exacerbated by maternal depressive symptoms. This longitudinal study of infants born preterm (<35 weeks) or low birth weight (<2500 g) (n = 137) tests if maternal depressive symptoms at 4 months is associated with preterm children's cognitive function at 16 months. Additionally, we test if this association is mediated by the quality of parent-child interaction at 9 months, and if these associations differ by levels of maternal social support. Children's cognitive function was measured using the Bayley Scales of Infant Development, 2nd edition. Maternal depressive symptoms were measured using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Perceived social support was measured using the Maternal Support scale. The quality of parent-child interaction was measured using the Parent-Child Early Relational Assessment. Linear regression and structural equation modeling were used to test the research questions. Postnatal depression at 4 months is associated with lower cognitive function (mean difference = -5.22, 95% CI: [-10.19, -0.25]) at 16 months controlling for a host of socioeconomic characteristics. For mothers with fewer depressive symptoms, bolstering effects of maternal supports on children's cognitive function were evident. We find no evidence for effect mediation by quality of parent-child interaction. Early exposure to maternal depressive symptoms appears to have a negative influence on preterm children's later cognitive function. These findings suggest important policy and programmatic implications for early detection and intervention for families of preterm infants.

  14. Human endogenous retroviruses in neurologic disease.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Tove

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses are pathogenic - in other species than the human. Disease associations for Human Endogenous RetroViruses (HERVs) are emerging, but so far an unequivocal pathogenetic cause-effect relationship has not been established. A role for HERVs has been proposed in neurological and neuropsychiatric diseases as diverse as multiple sclerosis (MS) and schizophrenia (SCZ). Particularly for MS, many aspects of the activation and involvement of specific HERV families (HERV-H/F and HERV-W/MSRV) have been reported, both for cells in the circulation and in the central nervous system. Notably envelope genes and their gene products (Envs) appear strongly associated with the disease. For SCZ, for ALS, and for HIV-associated dementia (HAD), indications are accumulating for involvement of the HERV-K family, and also HERV-H/F and/or HERV-W. Activation is reasonably a prerequisite for causality as most HERV sequences remain quiescent in non-pathological conditions, so the importance of regulatory pathways and epigenetics involved in regulating HERV activation, derepression, and also involvement of retroviral restriction factors, is emerging. HERV-directed antiretrovirals have potential as novel therapeutic paradigms in neurologic disease, particularly in MS. The possible protective or ameliorative effects of antiretroviral therapy in MS are substantiated by reports that treatment of HIV infection may be associated with a significantly decreased risk of MS. Further studies of HERVs, their role in neurologic diseases, and their potential as therapeutic targets are essential. PMID:26818266

  15. Sparring and Neurological Function in Professional Boxers

    PubMed Central

    Stiller, John W.; Yu, Steven S.; Brenner, Lisa A.; Langenberg, Patricia; Scrofani, Phillip; Pannella, Patrick; Hsu, Edbert B.; Roberts, Darryl W.; Monsell, Ray M. T.; Binks, Sidney W.; Guzman, Alvaro; Postolache, Teodor T.

    2014-01-01

    Despite increased interest regarding the potentially long-term negative impact of chronic traumatic brain injury, limited research has been conducted regarding such injuries and neurological outcomes in real world settings. To increase understanding regarding the relationship between sparring (e.g., training under the tutelage of an experienced boxing coach for the purpose of improving skills and/or fitness) and neurological functioning, professional boxers (n = 237) who competed in Maryland between 2003 and 2008 completed measures regarding sparring exposure (Cumulative Sparring Index, CSI) and performance on tests of cognition (Symbol Digit Modalities Test, SDMT) and balance (Sharpened Romberg Test, SRT). Measures were completed prior to boxing matches. Higher scores on the CSI (increased sparring exposure) were associated with poorer performance on both tests of cognition (SDMT) and balance (SRT). A threshold effect was noted regarding performance on the SDMT, with those reporting CSI values greater than about 150 experiencing a decline in cognition. A history of frequent and/or intense sparring may pose a significant risk for developing boxing associated neurological sequelae. Implementing administration of clinically meaningful tests before bouts, such as the CSI, SDMT, and/or the SRT, as well as documentation of results into the boxer’s physicals or medical profiles may be an important step for improving boxing safety. PMID:25101253

  16. Chapter 19: visual images and neurological illustration.

    PubMed

    Ione, Amy

    2010-01-01

    This chapter examines the importance of visual materials for studying the brain in health and in disease. Surveying historical representations, this research confirms that images of the brain's form and function have long served as teaching tools and as historical reference points for neurological events. The research is divided into five sections: the first section, Early History to Printing Technology considers prehistoric and ancient imagery, pre-Renaissance thinking about the brain, and the impact of printing and printmaking on neurological research. The second section, Renaissance Illustration, focuses on Leonardo da Vinci, Andreas Vesalius, and other contributors who produced images of the brain as dissection restrictions eased. The third section, which turns to Early Modern and Modern Illustration, highlights the work of Thomas Willis, Charles Bell, and other scientists (throughout the 19th century) who demonstrated the value of a visual component within brain studies. The fourth section presents examples of Neurologically-Descriptive Illustrations, with the final section considering Historical Illustration and Contemporary Research. PMID:19892122

  17. The Neurological Sequelae of Electrical Injury

    PubMed Central

    Silversides, John

    1964-01-01

    Electricity is a potentially very dangerous commodity. Community safeguards, however, result in remarkably efficient control of this hazard. Mortality figures appear to be small and constant. No satisfactory morbidity figures are available with regard to general and neurological complications in non-fatal cases. Study of relevant features of such electrical phenomena as voltage level, resistance factors, current pathway, current diffusion and grounding reveals many difficulties in reconstruction of the sequence of events involved in these injuries. These features underline our frequent inability to understand the mechanisms of initiation of unconsciousness and even of differentiation between death by cardiac arrest and death by respiratory paralysis. Fourteen cases of electrical injury with a variety of neurological complications and sequelae are discussed, and the findings in these cases are compared with those of other observers. An attempt is made to present a comprehensive picture of immediate, secondary and late neurological effects, and to illustrate some of the pathological findings in electrocution material. ImagesFigs. 1 and 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Figs. 6 and 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11 PMID:14179536

  18. Temporal resolution in individuals with neurological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Rabelo, Camila Maia; Weihing, Jeffrey A; Schochat, Eliane

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Temporal processing refers to the ability of the central auditory nervous system to encode and detect subtle changes in acoustic signals. This study aims to investigate the temporal resolution ability of individuals with mesial temporal sclerosis and to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the gaps-in-noise test in identifying this type of lesion. METHOD: This prospective study investigated differences in temporal resolution between 30 individuals with normal hearing and without neurological lesions (G1) and 16 individuals with both normal hearing and mesial temporal sclerosis (G2). Test performances were compared, and the sensitivity and specificity were calculated. RESULTS: There was no difference in gap detection thresholds between the two groups, although G1 revealed better average thresholds than G2 did. The sensitivity and specificity of the gaps-in-noise test for neurological lesions were 68% and 98%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Temporal resolution ability is compromised in individuals with neurological lesions caused by mesial temporal sclerosis. The gaps-in-noise test was shown to be a sensitive and specific measure of central auditory dysfunction in these patients. PMID:26375561

  19. [Jean-Martin Charcot in German neurology].

    PubMed

    Lehmann, H C; Hartung, H-P; Kieseier, B C

    2004-02-01

    Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893), well known as the founder of modern neurology, was the most celebrated neurologist in the nineteenth century. His international success stemmed not only from mastery descriptions of various neurological disorders but also from his many contacts with scientists all over the world. The aim of this article is to review Charcot's ambivalent relationship to German neuropsychiatry of the time and to examine the German reception of his personality and work. Wilhelm Erb, Ludwig Hirt, Ernst von Leyden, Max Nonne, Adolph Strümpell, and other German physicians cultivated -to varying degrees - professional contacts with Charcot and, based on the fascination of his personality and significance of his work, were long and intensively influenced by the Salpêtrière school. The extent of their admiration became apparent in 1882 by the award of an honorary doctorate to Charcot by the University of Würzburg. Along with increasingly severe criticism of Charcot's research on hysteria and hypnosis, most German neuropsychiatrists became estranged, without neglecting his importance to the development of neurology in Germany.

  20. Radiopharmaceutical stem cell tracking for neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Rosado-de-Castro, Paulo Henrique; Pimentel-Coelho, Pedro Moreno; Gutfilen, Bianca; Lopes de Souza, Sergio Augusto; de Freitas, Gabriel Rodriguez; Mendez-Otero, Rosalia; Barbosa da Fonseca, Lea Mirian

    2014-01-01

    Although neurological ailments continue to be some of the main causes of disease burden in the world, current therapies such as pharmacological agents have limited potential in the restoration of neural functions. Cell therapies, firstly applied to treat different hematological diseases, are now being investigated in preclinical and clinical studies for neurological illnesses. However, the potential applications and mechanisms for such treatments are still poorly comprehended and are the focus of permanent research. In this setting, noninvasive in vivo imaging allows better understanding of several aspects of stem cell therapies. Amongst the various methods available, radioisotope cell labeling has become one of the most promising since it permits tracking of cells after injection by different routes to investigate their biodistribution. A significant increase in the number of studies utilizing this method has occurred in the last years. Here, we review the different radiopharmaceuticals, imaging techniques, and findings of the preclinical and clinical reports published up to now. Moreover, we discuss the limitations and future applications of radioisotope cell labeling in the field of cell transplantation for neurological diseases. PMID:24982880