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Sample records for additional numerical experiments

  1. Numerical Optimization Using Computer Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trosset, Michael W.; Torczon, Virginia

    1997-01-01

    Engineering design optimization often gives rise to problems in which expensive objective functions are minimized by derivative-free methods. We propose a method for solving such problems that synthesizes ideas from the numerical optimization and computer experiment literatures. Our approach relies on kriging known function values to construct a sequence of surrogate models of the objective function that are used to guide a grid search for a minimizer. Results from numerical experiments on a standard test problem are presented.

  2. Numerical experiments in homogeneous turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogallo, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    The direct simulation methods developed by Orszag and Patternson (1972) for isotropic turbulence were extended to homogeneous turbulence in an incompressible fluid subjected to uniform deformation or rotation. The results of simulations for irrotational strain (plane and axisymmetric), shear, rotation, and relaxation toward isotropy following axisymmetric strain are compared with linear theory and experimental data. Emphasis is placed on the shear flow because of its importance and because of the availability of accurate and detailed experimental data. The computed results are used to assess the accuracy of two popular models used in the closure of the Reynolds-stress equations. Data from a variety of the computed fields and the details of the numerical methods used in the simulation are also presented.

  3. Numerical Experiments with Flows of Elongated Granules

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    NASA AVSCOM Technical Memorandum 105567 Technical Report 91- C- 006 𔃼e- 0ok, Numerical Experiments With Flows of Elongated Granules AD-A251 853 DTIC...EXPERIMENTS WITH FLOWS OF ELONGATED GRANULES H.G. Elrod 14 Cromwell Court Old Saybrook, Connecticut 06475 and D.E. Brewe Propulsion Directorate U.S. Army...granular flows (1) between two infinite, counter-moving, parallel, roughened walls, and (2) for an infinitely-wide slider. Each granule is simulated by a

  4. Some Numerical Experiments on Detonation Wave Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambier, Jean-Luc; Edwards, Thomas A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of a series of numerical experiments done on the propagation and initiation of a detonation wave. The calculations are performed in one-dimension, with considerable grid resolution. Of particular interest are the following questions: (1) the nature of periodic and chaotic instabilities generated by the wave; (2) the influence of the grid resolution on these instabilities; (3) the influence of the 'quality' of the numerical scheme; and (4) the influence of 'noise'. In the calculations, we use a second-order Total Variation Diminishing (TVD) scheme as the basic numerical method, with grid spacings as low as a fraction of a micron. Detonations waves are generated at the closed end of a tube, and allowed to propagate for approximately 20 cm. The required energy for successful initiation of the detonation will be measured for different cases of grid resolution and numerical schemes. A modified version of the TVD scheme has also been devised, which allows for much lower numerical diffusion of the radical species in the exponentially growing region behind the shock. The effect of this modification will be demonstrated. Oscillations in peak pressure and induction length are seen to develop in some cases: the oscillations can go through a sequence of modes, from a regular, high frequency mode to a low frequency mode with period doubling. A chaotic regime can also be obtained. General conclusions on the quality of algorithms will be presented. We will also discuss the performance of a version of the code developed on the IBM SP2 parallel computer.

  5. Numerical experiments on the clustering of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    Consistent and robust growth rates for disturbances which lead to galaxy clustering are obtainable with a precision of 1-2 percent, in numerical experiments that encompass such conditions as expansion, nonexpansion, and parameter variations. The experiments have given attention to the dominant physical processes of gravitational clustering in an expanding universe of conventional matter, and are based on n-body integrations for 100,000 particles responding self-consistently to forces of self-gravitation with periodic boundary conditions. Observed structures of the scale of galaxy clusters and superclusters are most easily described in terms of matter swept away from growing empty regions. The result of this process has a cellular appearance which resembles clustering of the scale of large voids and superclusters.

  6. Numerical Experiments on Ductile Fracture in Granites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regenauer-Lieb, K.; Weinberg, R. F.

    2006-12-01

    Ceramics and, by analogy rocks, are brittle at low temperatures, however, at high temperature and high pressure a second ductile mode of fracture based on dislocation and/or diffusion processes predominates. For ceramics 0.5-0.7 times the melting temperature suffice to create creep/ductile fracture which occurs typically after long time of deformation 104-1010 s (1). Ductile creep fractures make up for the low stress by profiting from accumulated strain and diffusion during slow creep deformation. Creep fractures typically nucleate on grain or phase boundaries, rigid or soft inclusions. Ultimately, the localized inhomogeneous damaged zone, begin to spread laterally and coalesce to create or follow a propagating shear band. The creep fracture sequence of crack nucleation, growth and coalescence relies on a mechanism of self-organization of fluids into a shear band during deformation and converts macroscopically to the crack like propagation of localized shear zones. Numerical experiments are used to test the ductile fracture hypothesis for the segregation and transfer of melts in granites. Ref: (1) C. Ghandi, M. F. Ashby, Acta Metallurgica 27, 1565 (1979).

  7. Seafloor weathering buffering climate: numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahat, N. X.; Archer, D. E.; Abbot, D. S.

    2013-12-01

    Continental silicate weathering is widely held to consume atmospheric CO2 at a rate controlled in part by temperature, resulting in a climate-weathering feedback [Walker et al., 1981]. It has been suggested that weathering of oceanic crust of warm mid-ocean ridge flanks also has a CO2 uptake rate that is controlled by climate [Sleep and Zahnle, 2001; Brady and Gislason, 1997]. Although this effect might not be significant on present-day Earth [Caldeira, 1995], seafloor weathering may be more pronounced during snowball states [Le Hir et al., 2008], during the Archean when seafloor spreading rates were faster [Sleep and Zahnle, 2001], and on waterworld planets [Abbot et al., 2012]. Previous studies of seafloor weathering have made significant contributions using qualitative, generally one-box, models, and the logical next step is to extend this work using a spatially resolved model. For example, experiments demonstrate that seafloor weathering reactions are temperature dependent, but it is not clear whether the deep ocean temperature affects the temperature at which the reactions occur, or if instead this temperature is set only by geothermal processes. Our goal is to develop a 2-D numerical model that can simulate hydrothermal circulation and resulting alteration of oceanic basalts, and can therefore address such questions. A model of diffusive and convective heat transfer in fluid-saturated porous media simulates hydrothermal circulation through porous oceanic basalt. Unsteady natural convection is solved for using a Darcy model of porous media flow that has been extensively benchmarked. Background hydrothermal circulation is coupled to mineral reaction kinetics of basaltic alteration and hydrothermal mineral precipitation. In order to quantify seafloor weathering as a climate-weathering feedback process, this model focuses on hydrothermal reactions that influence carbon uptake as well as ocean alkalinity: silicate rock dissolution, calcium and magnesium leaching

  8. Processing biobased polymers using plasticizers: Numerical simulations versus experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desplentere, Frederik; Cardon, Ludwig; Six, Wim; Erkoç, Mustafa

    2016-03-01

    In polymer processing, the use of biobased products shows lots of possibilities. Considering biobased materials, biodegradability is in most cases the most important issue. Next to this, bio based materials aimed at durable applications, are gaining interest. Within this research, the influence of plasticizers on the processing of the bio based material is investigated. This work is done for an extrusion grade of PLA, Natureworks PLA 2003D. Extrusion through a slit die equipped with pressure sensors is used to compare the experimental pressure values to numerical simulation results. Additional experimental data (temperature and pressure data along the extrusion screw and die are recorded) is generated on a dr. Collin Lab extruder producing a 25mm diameter tube. All these experimental data is used to indicate the appropriate functioning of the numerical simulation tool Virtual Extrusion Laboratory 6.7 for the simulation of both the industrial available extrusion grade PLA and the compound in which 15% of plasticizer is added. Adding the applied plasticizer, resulted in a 40% lower pressure drop over the extrusion die. The combination of different experiments allowed to fit the numerical simulation results closely to the experimental values. Based on this experience, it is shown that numerical simulations also can be used for modified bio based materials if appropriate material and process data are taken into account.

  9. Spray combustion experiments and numerical predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mularz, Edward J.; Bulzan, Daniel L.; Chen, Kuo-Huey

    1993-01-01

    The next generation of commercial aircraft will include turbofan engines with performance significantly better than those in the current fleet. Control of particulate and gaseous emissions will also be an integral part of the engine design criteria. These performance and emission requirements present a technical challenge for the combustor: control of the fuel and air mixing and control of the local stoichiometry will have to be maintained much more rigorously than with combustors in current production. A better understanding of the flow physics of liquid fuel spray combustion is necessary. This paper describes recent experiments on spray combustion where detailed measurements of the spray characteristics were made, including local drop-size distributions and velocities. Also, an advanced combustor CFD code has been under development and predictions from this code are compared with experimental results. Studies such as these will provide information to the advanced combustor designer on fuel spray quality and mixing effectiveness. Validation of new fast, robust, and efficient CFD codes will also enable the combustor designer to use them as additional design tools for optimization of combustor concepts for the next generation of aircraft engines.

  10. Breathing rogue wave observed in numerical experiment.

    PubMed

    Ruban, V P

    2006-09-01

    Numerical simulations of the recently derived fully nonlinear equations of motion for long-crested water waves [V. P. Ruban, Phys. Rev. E 71, 055303(R) (2005)] with quasirandom initial conditions are reported, which show the spontaneous formation of a single extreme wave on deep water. This rogue wave behaves in an oscillating manner and exists for a relatively long time (many wave periods) without significant change of its maximal amplitude.

  11. Numerical experiments on unstructured PIC stability.

    SciTech Connect

    Day, David Minot

    2011-04-01

    Particle-In-Cell (PIC) is a method for plasmas simulation. Particles are pushed with Verlet time integration. Fields are modeled using finite differences on a tensor product mesh (cells). The Unstructured PIC methods studied here use instead finite element discretizations on unstructured (simplicial) meshes. PIC is constrained by stability limits (upper bounds) on mesh and time step sizes. Numerical evidence (2D) and analysis will be presented showing that similar bounds constrain unstructured PIC.

  12. Numerical experiments with flows of elongated granules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, Harold G.; Brewe, David E.

    1992-01-01

    Theory and numerical results are given for a program simulating two dimensional granular flow (1) between two infinite, counter-moving, parallel, roughened walls, and (2) for an infinitely wide slider. Each granule is simulated by a central repulsive force field ratcheted with force restitution factor to introduce dissipation. Transmission of angular momentum between particles occurs via Coulomb friction. The effect of granular hardness is explored. Gaps from 7 to 28 particle diameters are investigated, with solid fractions ranging from 0.2 to 0.9. Among features observed are: slip flow at boundaries, coagulation at high densities, and gross fluctuation in surface stress. A videotape has been prepared to demonstrate the foregoing effects.

  13. Plume Electrification: Laboratory and Numerical Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, J. S.; Dufek, J.

    2012-12-01

    The spectacular lightning strokes observed during eruptions testify to the enormous potentials that can be generated within plumes. Related to the charging of individual ash particles, large electric fields and volcanic lightning have been observed at Eyjafjallajokull, Redoubt, and Chaiten, among other volcanoes. A number of mechanisms have been proposed for plume electrification, including triboelectric charging, charging from the brittle failure of rock, and charging due to phase change as material is carried aloft. While the overall electrification of the plume likely results from a combination of these processes, in the following work we focus on triboelectric charging—how a plume charges as particles collide with each other. To explore the role of triboelectric effects in plume charging we have conducted a number of small scale laboratory experiments similar to those designed by Forward et al (2009). Succinctly, the experiments consist of fluidizing an ash bed with nitrogen and monitoring the resulting currents induced by the moving particles. It is important to note that the reaction chamber only allows particle-particle interactions. The entire experimental setup is enclosed in a vacuum chamber, allowing us to carefully control the environment during experiments. Runs were carried out for different ash compositions, and driving pressures. We particularly focused on natural grain size distributions of ash and on quantifying not only the net charge but also the charging rate. Furthermore, we report on our progress to incorporate the collected data, namely charging rates, into a large eularian-eularian-lagrangian multiphase eruption dynamic model. Finally, to validate these results, we present our plans to deploy a large wireless sensor network of electrometers and magnetometers around active volcanoes to directly map the overhead E- and M-fields as an eruption occurs.

  14. Numerical study of a recent black-hole lasing experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tettamanti, M.; Cacciatori, S. L.; Parola, A.; Carusotto, I.

    2016-06-01

    We theoretically analyse a recent experiment reporting the observation of a self-amplifying Hawking radiation in a flowing atomic condensate (Steinhauer J., Nat. Phys., 10 (2014) 864). We are able to accurately reproduce the experimental observations using a theoretical model based on the numerical solution of a mean-field Gross-Pitaevskii equation that does not include quantum fluctuations of the matter field. In addition to confirming the black-hole lasing mechanism, our results show that the underlying dynamical instability has a classical hydrodynamic origin and is triggered by a seed of deterministic nature, linked to the non-stationary of the process, rather than by thermal or zero-point fluctuations.

  15. Numerical Experiments on Sediment Pulse Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, J. A.; Nelson, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    Local channel morphology is highly dependent on sediment supply from upstream reaches. Sediment pulses are introduced to channels during natural and anthropogenic disturbances such as landslides, dam removal, or gravel augmentation. Flume studies have shown that sediment pulses tend to evolve through some combination of translation and dispersion, but the relative importance of the sediment pulse size, the grain size of the pulse material, flow unsteadiness, and channel nonuniformity is poorly understood. Here we use a one-dimensional morphodynamic model to simulate the evolution of various sediment pulses in a straight, rectangular channel. The model is capable of determining transcritical flows, using the energy equation for subcritical nodes and a reduced momentum equation for supercritical nodes. Bed evolution and grain size sorting are handled with the mixed-grain-size Exner equation for sediment continuity. A stratigraphy submodel allows the vertical grain size distribution created during deposition to provide feedbacks on morphodynamic processes encountered during degradation. We explore how pulse characteristics such as total mass, feed timing, and grain size distribution affect pulse translation and dispersion. We also consider the influence of steady versus unsteady water discharge and the existence of background sediment feed. Finally, we examine the effect of variations in channel width by varying the amplitude and wavelength of downstream sinusoidal width undulations. Preliminary results suggest that smaller sediment pulses experience a greater degree of translation than larger pulses. Width variations, particularly those of larger amplitudes, were found to result in increased pulse dispersion. Our results suggest that morphodynamic models can facilitate understanding of what controls sediment pulse dynamics, and they may improve predictions and the potential effectiveness of river restoration techniques such as dam removal and gravel augmentation.

  16. Non-robust numerical simulations of analogue extension experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naliboff, John; Buiter, Susanne

    2016-04-01

    Numerical and analogue models of lithospheric deformation provide significant insight into the tectonic processes that lead to specific structural and geophysical observations. As these two types of models contain distinct assumptions and tradeoffs, investigations drawing conclusions from both can reveal robust links between first-order processes and observations. Recent studies have focused on detailed comparisons between numerical and analogue experiments in both compressional and extensional tectonics, sometimes involving multiple lithospheric deformation codes and analogue setups. While such comparisons often show good agreement on first-order deformation styles, results frequently diverge on second-order structures, such as shear zone dip angles or spacing, and in certain cases even on first-order structures. Here, we present finite-element experiments that are designed to directly reproduce analogue "sandbox" extension experiments at the cm-scale. We use material properties and boundary conditions that are directly taken from analogue experiments and use a Drucker-Prager failure model to simulate shear zone formation in sand. We find that our numerical experiments are highly sensitive to numerous numerical parameters. For example, changes to the numerical resolution, velocity convergence parameters and elemental viscosity averaging commonly produce significant changes in first- and second-order structures accommodating deformation. The sensitivity of the numerical simulations to small parameter changes likely reflects a number of factors, including, but not limited to, high angles of internal friction assigned to sand, complex, unknown interactions between the brittle sand (used as an upper crust equivalent) and viscous silicone (lower crust), highly non-linear strain weakening processes and poor constraints on the cohesion of sand. Our numerical-analogue comparison is hampered by (a) an incomplete knowledge of the fine details of sand failure and sand

  17. Polymer Photooxidation: An Experiment to Demonstrate the Effect of Additives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Norman S.; McKellar, John F.

    1979-01-01

    This undergraduate experiment shows that the inclusion of an appropriate additive can have a very marked effect on the physical properties of a polymer. The polymer used is polypropylene and the additives are 2-hydroxy-4-octyloxy-benzophenone and benzophenone. (BB)

  18. Numerical Simulation of High Drag Reduction in a Turbulent Channel Flow with Polymer Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubief, Yves

    2003-01-01

    The addition of small amounts of long chain polymer molecules to wall-bounded flows can lead to dramatic drag reduction. Although this phenomenon has been known for about fifty years, the action of the polymers and its effect on turbulent structures are still unclear. Detailed experiments have characterized two distinct regimes (Warholic et al. 1999), which are referred to as low drag reduction (LDR) and high drag reduction (HDR). The first regime exhibits similar statistical trends as Newtonian flow: the log-law region of the mean velocity profile remains parallel to that of the Newtonian ow but its lower bound moves away from the wall and the upward shift of the log-region is a function of drag reduction, DR. Although streamwise fluctuations are increased and transverse ones are reduced, the shape of the rms velocity profiles is not qualitatively modified. At higher drag reductions, of the order of 40-50%, the ow enters the HDR regime for which the slope of the log-law is dramatically augmented and the Reynolds shear stress is small (Warholic et al. 1999; Ptasinski et al. 2001). The drag reduction is eventually bounded by a maximum drag reduction (MDR) (Virk & Mickley 1970) which is a function of the Reynolds number. While several experiments report mean velocity profiles very close to the empirical profile of Virk & Mickley (1970) for MDR conditions, the observations regarding the structure of turbulence can differ significantly. For instance, Warholic et al. (1999) measured a near-zero Reynolds shear stress, whereas a recent experiment (Ptasinski et al. 2001) shows evidence of non-negligible Reynolds stress in their MDR flow. To the knowledge of the authors, only the LDR regime has been documented in numerical simulations (Sureshkumar et al. 1997; Dimitropoulos et al. 1998; Min et al. 2001; Dubief & Lele 2001; Sibilla & Baron 2002). This paper discusses the simulation of polymer drag reduced channel ow at HDR using the FENE-P (Finite Elastic non

  19. Numerical Simulation and Cold Modeling experiments on Centrifugal Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keerthiprasad, Kestur Sadashivaiah; Murali, Mysore Seetharam; Mukunda, Pudukottah Gopaliengar; Majumdar, Sekhar

    2011-02-01

    In a centrifugal casting process, the fluid flow eventually determines the quality and characteristics of the final product. It is difficult to study the fluid behavior here because of the opaque nature of melt and mold. In the current investigation, numerical simulations of the flow field and visualization experiments on cold models have been carried out for a centrifugal casting system using horizontal molds and fluids of different viscosities to study the effect of different process variables on the flow pattern. The effects of the thickness of the cylindrical fluid annulus formed inside the mold and the effects of fluid viscosity, diameter, and rotational speed of the mold on the hollow fluid cylinder formation process have been investigated. The numerical simulation results are compared with corresponding data obtained from the cold modeling experiments. The influence of rotational speed in a real-life centrifugal casting system has also been studied using an aluminum-silicon alloy. Cylinders of different thicknesses are cast at different rotational speeds, and the flow patterns observed visually in the actual castings are found to be similar to those recorded in the corresponding cold modeling experiments. Reasonable agreement is observed between the results of numerical simulation and the results of cold modeling experiments with different fluids. The visualization study on the hollow cylinders produced in an actual centrifugal casting process also confirm the conclusions arrived at from the cold modeling experiments and numerical simulation in a qualitative sense.

  20. Numerical Experiments In Strongly Coupled Complex (Dusty) Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, L. J.; Ivlev A.; Hubertus M. T.; Morfill, G. E.

    2010-07-01

    Complex (dusty) plasma is a suspension of micron-sized charged dust particles in a weakly ionized plasma with electrons, ions, and neutral atoms or molecules. Therein, dust particles acquire a few thousand electron charges by absorbing surrounding electrons and ions, and consequently interact with each other via a dynamically screened Coulomb potential while undergoing Brownian motion due primarily to frequent collisions with the neutral molecules. When the interaction potential energy between charged dust particles significantly exceeds their kinetic energy, they become strongly coupled and can form ordered structures comprising liquid and solid states. Since the motion of charged dust particles in complex (dusty) plasmas can be directly observed in real time by using a video camera, such systems have been generally regarded as a promising model system to study many phenomena occurring in solids, liquids and other strongly-coupled systems at the kinetic level, such as phase transitions, transport processes, and collective dynamics. Complex plasma physics has now grown into a mature research field with a very broad range of interdisciplinary facets. In addition to usual experimental and theoretical study, computer simulation in complex plasma plays an important role in bridging experimental observations and theories and in understanding many interesting phenomena observed in laboratory. The present talk will focus on a class of computer simulations that are usually non-equilibrium ones with external perturbation and that mimic the real complex plasma experiments (i. e., numerical experiment). The simulation method, i. e., the so-called Brownian Dynamics methods, will be firstly reviewed and then examples, such as simulations of heat transfer and shock wave propagation, will be present.

  1. A Comparison of Metamodeling Techniques via Numerical Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crespo, Luis G.; Kenny, Sean P.; Giesy, Daniel P.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a comparative analysis of a few metamodeling techniques using numerical experiments for the single input-single output case. These experiments enable comparing the models' predictions with the phenomenon they are aiming to describe as more data is made available. These techniques include (i) prediction intervals associated with a least squares parameter estimate, (ii) Bayesian credible intervals, (iii) Gaussian process models, and (iv) interval predictor models. Aspects being compared are computational complexity, accuracy (i.e., the degree to which the resulting prediction conforms to the actual Data Generating Mechanism), reliability (i.e., the probability that new observations will fall inside the predicted interval), sensitivity to outliers, extrapolation properties, ease of use, and asymptotic behavior. The numerical experiments describe typical application scenarios that challenge the underlying assumptions supporting most metamodeling techniques.

  2. Japanese children's numerical competencies: age- and schooling-related influences on the development of number concepts and addition skills.

    PubMed

    Naito, M; Miura, H

    2001-03-01

    Using a cutoff design (J. Bisanz, F. J. Morrison, & M. Dunn, 1995) to separate school-related influences from those that are age related, the study investigated the development of number concepts and addition skills in Japanese children. Three groups of kindergarten and 1st grade children who differed in age and/or school experiences completed tasks on their numerical competencies 1 and 6 months after school entrance. Children's use of addition strategies, rather than their solution accuracy, changed primarily as a function of schooling, not age. Children's Base 10 number concepts improved with the amount of schooling, as well as with other social and age-related factors. Results suggest that schooling is an important determinant in developing Japanese-speaking children's numerical competencies, which were not explained solely by their language characteristics or by age-related factors.

  3. Cryogenic Fracturing: Laboratory Visualization Experiments and Numerical Simulations Using Peridynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Short, R.; Edmiston, J. K.

    2015-12-01

    Typical hydraulic fracturing operations involve the use of a large quantity of water, which can be problematic for several reasons including possible formation (permeability) damage, disposal of waste water, and the use of precious local water resource. An alternate reservoir permeability enhancing technology not requiring water is cryogenic fracturing. This method induces controlled fracturing of rock formations by thermal shock and has potentially important applications in the geothermal and hydrocarbon industries. In this process, cryogenic fluid—such as liquid nitrogen—is injected into the subsurface, causing fracturing due to thermal gradients. These fractures may improve the formation permeability relative to that achievable by hydraulic fracturing alone. We conducted combined laboratory visualization and numerical simulations studies of thermal-shock-induced fracture initiation and propagation resulting from liquid nitrogen injection in rock and analog materials. The experiment used transparent soda-lime glass cubes to facilitate real-time visualization of fracture growth and the fracture network geometry. In this contribution, we report the effect of overall temperature difference between cryogenic fluid and solid material on the produced fracture network, by pre-heating the glass cubes to several temperatures and injecting liquid nitrogen. Temperatures are monitored at several points by thermocouple and the fracture evolution is captured visually by camera. The experiment was modeled using a customized, thermoelastic, fracture-capable numerical simulation code based on peridynamics. The performance of the numerical code was validated by the results of the laboratory experiments, and then the code was used to study the different factors affecting a cryogenic fracturing operation, including the evolution of residual stresses and constitutive relationships for material failure. In complex rock such as shale, understanding the process of cryogenic

  4. Numerical modeling of injection experiments at The Geysers

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, Karsten; Enedy, Steve

    1993-01-28

    Data from injection experiments in the southeast Geysers are presented that show strong interference (both negative and positive) with a neighboring production well. Conceptual and numerical models are developed that explain the negative interference (decline of production rate) in terms of heat transfer limitations and water-vapor relative permeability effects. Recovery and overrecovery following injection shut-in are attributed to boiling of injected fluid, with heat of vaporization provided by the reservoir rocks.

  5. Numerical modeling of injection experiments at The Geysers

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.; Enedy, S.

    1993-01-01

    Data from injection experiments in the southeast Geysers are presented that show strong interference (both negative and positive) with a neighboring production well. Conceptual and numerical models are developed that explain the negative interference (decline of production rate) in terms of heat transfer limitations and water-vapor relative permeability effects. Recovery and over-recovery following injection shut-in are attributed to boiling of injected fluid, with heat of vaporization provided by the reservoir rocks.

  6. Shock loading of graphite between water layers: Numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shurshalov, L. V.; Charakhch'yan, A. A.; Khishchenko, K. V.

    2016-11-01

    A series of numerical experiments on shock loading of graphite between water layers is realized. A simple model of the phase transition of graphite to diamond is formulated. The general scheme of the computational experiment is based on mechanical and thermal interactions of different substances (graphite, diamond, water) subjected to impact by a massive steel flyer in a cylindrical channel. The process of graphite-to-diamond transformation is traced out. The important problem of retaining the formed diamond sample and some favorable conditions to solve this question are discussed.

  7. Numerical support of laboratory experiments: Attenuation and velocity estimations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saenger, Erik; Madonna, Claudio; Frehner, Marcel; Almqvist, Bjarne

    2014-02-01

    We show that numerical support of laboratory experiments can significantly increase the understanding and simplify the interpretation of the obtained laboratory results. First we perform simulations of the Seismic Wave Attenuation Module to measure seismic attenuation of reservoir rocks. Our findings confirm the accuracy of this system. However, precision can be further improved by optimizing the sensor positions. Second, we model wave propagation for an ultrasonic pulse transmission experiment used to determine pressure- and temperature-dependent seismic velocities in the rock. Multiple waves are identified in our computer experiment, including bar waves. The metal jacket that houses the sample assembly needs to be taken into account for a proper estimation of the ultrasonic velocities. This influence is frequency-dependent.

  8. Effects of an additional dimension in the Young experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Barros, Allan Kardec

    2015-09-15

    The results of the Young experiment can be analyzed either by classical or Quantum Physics. The later one though leads to a more complete interpretation, based on two different patterns that appear when one works either with single or double slits. Here we show that the two patterns can be derived from a single principle, in the context of General Relativity, if one assumes an additional spatial dimension to the four known today. The found equations yield the same results as those in Quantum Mechanics.

  9. A numerical algorithm for endochronic plasticity and comparison with experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valanis, K. C.; Fan, J.

    1985-01-01

    A numerical algorithm based on the finite element method of analysis of the boundary value problem in a continuum is presented, in the case where the plastic response of the material is given in the context of endochronic plasticity. The relevant constitutive equation is expressed in incremental form and plastic effects are accounted for by the method of an induced pseudo-force in the matrix equations. The results of the analysis are compared with observed values in the case of a plate with two symmetric notches and loaded longitudinally in its own plane. The agreement between theory and experiment is excellent.

  10. FEM numerical model analysis of magnetic nanoparticle tumor heating experiments.

    PubMed

    Pearce, John A; Petyk, Alicia A; Hoopes, P Jack

    2014-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles are currently under investigation as heating agents for hyperthermic treatment of tumors. Major determinants of effective heating include the biodistribution of magnetic materials, the minimum iron oxide loading required to achieve adequate heating, and practically achievable magnetic field strengths. These are inter-related criteria that ultimately determine the practicability of this approach to tumor treatment. Currently, we lack fundamental engineering design criteria that can be used in treatment planning and assessment. Coupling numerical models to experimental studies illuminate the underlying physical processes and can separate physical processes to determine their relative importance. Further, adding thermal damage and cell death process to the models provides valuable perspective on the likelihood of successful treatment. FEM numerical models were applied to increase the understanding of a carefully calibrated series of experiments in mouse mammary carcinoma. The numerical models results indicate that tumor loadings equivalent to approximately 1 mg of Fe3O4 per gram of tumor tissue are required to achieve adequate heating in magnetic field strengths of 34 kA/m (rms) at 160 kHz. Further, the models indicate that direct intratumoral injection of the nanoparticles results in between 1 and 20% uptake in the tissues.

  11. Goodness-of-fit methods for additive-risk models in tumorigenicity experiments.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Debashis

    2003-09-01

    In tumorigenicity experiments, a complication is that the time to event is generally not observed, so that the time to tumor is subject to interval censoring. One of the goals in these studies is to properly model the effect of dose on risk. Thus, it is important to have goodness of fit procedures available for assessing the model fit. While several estimation procedures have been developed for current-status data, relatively little work has been done on model-checking techniques. In this article, we propose numerical and graphical methods for the analysis of current-status data using the additive-risk model, primarily focusing on the situation where the monitoring times are dependent. The finite-sample properties of the proposed methodology are examined through numerical studies. The methods are then illustrated with data from a tumorigenicity experiment.

  12. Numerical modeling of oxygen exclusion experiments of anaerobic bioventing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihopoulos, Philip G.; Suidan, Makram T.; Sayles, Gregory D.; Kaskassian, Sebastien

    2002-10-01

    A numerical and experimental study of transport phenomena underlying anaerobic bioventing (ABV) is presented. Understanding oxygen exclusion patterns in vadose zone environments is important in designing an ABV process for bioremediation of soil contaminated with chlorinated solvents. In particular, the establishment of an anaerobic zone of influence by nitrogen injection in the vadose zone is investigated. Oxygen exclusion experiments are performed in a pilot scale flow cell (2×1.1×0.1 m) using different venting flows and two different outflow boundary conditions (open and partially covered). Injection gas velocities are varied from 0.25×10 -3 to 1.0×10 -3 cm/s and are correlated with the ABV radius of influence. Numerical simulations are used to predict the collected experimental data. In general, reasonable agreement is found between observed and predicted oxygen concentrations. Use of impervious covers can significantly reduce the volume of forcing gas used, where an increase in oxygen exclusion efficiency is consistent with a decrease in the outflow area above the injection well.

  13. Numerical modeling of oxygen exclusion experiments of anaerobic bioventing.

    PubMed

    Mihopoulos, Philip G; Suidan, Makram T; Sayles, Gregory D; Kaskassian, Sebastien

    2002-10-01

    A numerical and experimental study of transport phenomena underlying anaerobic bioventing (ABV) is presented. Understanding oxygen exclusion patterns in vadose zone environments is important in designing an ABV process for bioremediation of soil contaminated with chlorinated solvents. In particular, the establishment of an anaerobic zone of influence by nitrogen injection in the vadose zone is investigated. Oxygen exclusion experiments are performed in a pilot scale flow cell (2 x 1.1 x 0.1 m) using different venting flows and two different outflow boundary conditions (open and partially covered). Injection gas velocities are varied from 0.25 x 10(-3) to 1.0 x 10(-3) cm/s and are correlated with the ABV radius of influence. Numerical simulations are used to predict the collected experimental data. In general, reasonable agreement is found between observed and predicted oxygen concentrations. Use of impervious covers can significantly reduce the volume of forcing gas used, where an increase in oxygen exclusion efficiency is consistent with a decrease in the outflow area above the injection well.

  14. Numerical experiments on the oscillations of a rotating, axisymmetric galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.; Vandervoort, Peter O.; Welty, Daniel E.; Smith, B. F.

    1989-01-01

    Modes of oscillation in six rotating, axisymmetric N-body systems are studied in a sequence of self-consistent, three-dimensional numerical experiments. The experimental systems are realizations of theoretical models of galaxies which are stellar-dynamical counterparts of uniformly rotating polytropes of index equal to 0.5. The ratio of the rotational kinetic energy to the gravitational potential energy ranges from 0.13 to 0.20. The systems oscillate axisymmetrically; the oscillations are interpreted as superpositions of a mode of radial pulsation and a Kelvin-like mode of oscillation. The experimental frequencies of these modes agree very well with theoretical predictions. When these modes are suppressed, the states of the experimental systems are very steady. The systems are dynamically unstable with respect to a toroidal mode when the ratio of the rotational kinetic energy to the gravitational potential energy exceeds a value lying between 0.16 and 0.17.

  15. Numerical Modelling of the Deep Impact Mission Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wuennemann, K.; Collins, G. S.; Melosh, H. J.

    2005-01-01

    NASA s Deep Impact Mission (launched January 2005) will provide, for the first time ever, insights into the interior of a comet (Tempel 1) by shooting a approx.370 kg projectile onto the surface of a comets nucleus. Although it is usually assumed that comets consist of a very porous mixture of water ice and rock, little is known about the internal structure and in particular the constitutive material properties of a comet. It is therefore difficult to predict the dimensions of the excavated crater. Estimates of the crater size are based on laboratory experiments of impacts into various target compositions of different densities and porosities using appropriate scaling laws; they range between 10 s of meters up to 250 m in diameter [1]. The size of the crater depends mainly on the physical process(es) that govern formation: Smaller sizes are expected if (1) strength, rather than gravity, limits crater growth; and, perhaps even more crucially, if (2) internal energy losses by pore-space collapse reduce the coupling efficiency (compaction craters). To investigate the effect of pore space collapse and strength of the target we conducted a suite of numerical experiments and implemented a novel approach for modeling porosity and the compaction of pores in hydrocode calculations.

  16. Cascade processes in stratified media: experiment and direct numerical simulation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibgatullin, Ilias; Brouzet, Christophe; Joubaud, Sylvain; Ermanyuk, Evgeny; Dauxois, Thierry

    2016-04-01

    Internal gravity waves may transfer substantial part of energy in oceans and astrophysical objects, influence the background stratification, and angular momentum. Internal waves can be generated by convection in astrophysical objects, by tidal motion and interaction with orography in oceans. Internal and inertial waves obey similar system of equations. Due to very particular type of dispersive relation and the way internal waves are reflected from surfaces, in confined domains the monochromatic internal waves after sequence of reflections may form closed paths, the "wave attractors" [1]. Presently, linear theory of wave attractors is quite elaborated and a principal interest of research is focused on nonlinear regimes and unstable configurations, overturning events and mixing. We have performed direct numerical simulation of wave attractors which closely reproduces experiments [2] being carried out in Ecole Normal Superior de Lyon (ENS de Lyon). Direct numerical simulation is realized with the help of spectral element approach and code nek5000. Triadic resonance is confirmed as the first instability which appears on the most energetic ray of the attractor at sufficiently large forcing. With further increase of the forcing amplitude the daughter waves also become unstable resulting in a sophisticated cascade process which was first observed experimentally. For very high forcing amplitude interaction of focused waves with the walls results in appearance of small-scale folded structures. Their interaction with principal flow is the subject of further research. 1. Maas, L. R. M. & Lam, F.-P. A., Geometric focusing of internal waves. J. Fluid Mech, 1995,. 300, 1-41 2. Scolan, H., Ermanyuk, E., Dauxois, T., 2013, Physical Review Letters, 110, 234501

  17. Scaling of material properties for Yucca Mountain: literature review and numerical experiments on saturated hydraulic conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    McKenna, S.A.; Rautman, C.A.

    1996-08-01

    A review of pertinent literature reveals techniques which may be practical for upscaling saturated hydraulic conductivity at Yucca Mountain: geometric mean, spatial averaging, inverse numerical modeling, renormalization, and a perturbation technique. Isotropic realizations of log hydraulic conductivity exhibiting various spatial correlation lengths are scaled from the point values to five discrete scales through these techniques. For the variances in log{sub 10} saturated hydraulic conductivity examined here, geometric mean, numerical inverse and renormalization adequately reproduce point scale fluxes across the modeled domains. Fastest particle velocities and dispersion measured on the point scale are not reproduced by the upscaled fields. Additional numerical experiments examine the utility of power law averaging on a geostatistical realization of a cross-section similar to the cross-sections that will be used in the 1995 groundwater travel time calculations. A literature review on scaling techniques for thermal and mechanical properties is included. 153 refs., 29 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. Numerical experiments with rubble piles: equilibrium shapes and spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Derek C.; Elankumaran, Pradeep; Sanderson, Robyn E.

    2005-02-01

    We present numerical experiments investigating the shape and spin limits of self-gravitating "perfect" rubble piles that consist of identical, smooth, rigid, spherical particles with configurable normal coefficient of restitution and no sliding friction. Such constructs are currently employed in a variety of investigations, ranging from the formation of asteroid satellites to the dynamical properties of Saturn's densest rings. We find that, owing to cannonball stacking behavior, rubble piles can maintain non-spherical shapes without bulk spin, unlike a fluid, and can spin faster than a perfect fluid before shedding mass, consistent with the theory for the more general continuum rubble pile model (Holsapple, 2004, Icarus 172, 272-303). Rubble piles that reassemble following a catastrophic disruption reconfigure themselves to lie within stability limits predicted by the continuum theory. We also find that coarse configurations consisting of a small number of particles are more resistant to tidal disruption than fine configurations with many particles. Overall this study shows that idealized rubble piles behave qualitatively in a manner similar to certain granular materials, at least in the limit where global shape readjustments and/or mass shedding begins. The limits obtained here may provide constraints on the possible internal structure of some small Solar System bodies that have extreme shapes or are under high stress. Amalthea is presented as a case study.

  19. Effects of numerical methods on comparisons between experiments and simulations of shock-accelerated mixing.

    SciTech Connect

    Rider, William; Kamm, J. R.; Tomkins, C. D.; Zoldi, C. A.; Prestridge, K. P.; Marr-Lyon, M.; Rightley, P. M.; Benjamin, R. F.

    2002-01-01

    We consider the detailed structures of mixing flows for Richtmyer-Meshkov experiments of Prestridge et al. [PRE 00] and Tomkins et al. [TOM 01] and examine the most recent measurements from the experimental apparatus. Numerical simulations of these experiments are performed with three different versions of high resolution finite volume Godunov methods. We compare experimental data with simulations for configurations of one and two diffuse cylinders of SF{sub 6} in air using integral measures as well as fractal analysis and continuous wavelet transforms. The details of the initial conditions have a significant effect on the computed results, especially in the case of the double cylinder. Additionally, these comparisons reveal sensitive dependence of the computed solution on the numerical method.

  20. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  1. Numerical Method for the Design of Healing Chamber in Additive-Manufactured Dental Implants.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hsiao-Chien; Tsai, Pei-I; Huang, Chih-Chieh; Chen, San-Yuan; Chao, Chuen-Guang; Tsou, Nien-Ti

    2017-01-01

    The inclusion of a healing chamber in dental implants has been shown to promote biological healing. In this paper, a novel numerical approach to the design of the healing chamber for additive-manufactured dental implants is proposed. This study developed an algorithm for the modeling of bone growth and employed finite element method in ANSYS to facilitate the design of healing chambers with a highly complex configuration. The model was then applied to the design of dental implants for insertion into the posterior maxillary bones. Two types of ITI® solid cylindrical screwed implant with extra rectangular-shaped healing chamber as an initial design are adopted, with which to evaluate the proposed system. This resulted in several configurations for the healing chamber, which were then evaluated based on the corresponding volume fraction of healthy surrounding bone. The best of these implants resulted in a healing chamber surrounded by around 9.2% more healthy bone than that obtained from the original design. The optimal design increased the contact area between the bone and implant by around 52.9%, which is expected to have a significant effect on osseointegration. The proposed approach is highly efficient which typically completes the optimization of each implant within 3-5 days on an ordinary personal computer. It is also sufficiently general to permit extension to various loading conditions.

  2. Numerical Method for the Design of Healing Chamber in Additive-Manufactured Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hsiao-Chien; Tsai, Pei-I; Huang, Chih-Chieh; Chen, San-Yuan; Chao, Chuen-Guang

    2017-01-01

    The inclusion of a healing chamber in dental implants has been shown to promote biological healing. In this paper, a novel numerical approach to the design of the healing chamber for additive-manufactured dental implants is proposed. This study developed an algorithm for the modeling of bone growth and employed finite element method in ANSYS to facilitate the design of healing chambers with a highly complex configuration. The model was then applied to the design of dental implants for insertion into the posterior maxillary bones. Two types of ITI® solid cylindrical screwed implant with extra rectangular-shaped healing chamber as an initial design are adopted, with which to evaluate the proposed system. This resulted in several configurations for the healing chamber, which were then evaluated based on the corresponding volume fraction of healthy surrounding bone. The best of these implants resulted in a healing chamber surrounded by around 9.2% more healthy bone than that obtained from the original design. The optimal design increased the contact area between the bone and implant by around 52.9%, which is expected to have a significant effect on osseointegration. The proposed approach is highly efficient which typically completes the optimization of each implant within 3–5 days on an ordinary personal computer. It is also sufficiently general to permit extension to various loading conditions. PMID:28293628

  3. A numerical experiment on light pollution from distant sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocifaj, M.

    2011-08-01

    To predict the light pollution of the night-time sky realistically over any location or measuring point on the ground presents quite a difficult calculation task. Light pollution of the local atmosphere is caused by stray light, light loss or reflection of artificially illuminated ground objects or surfaces such as streets, advertisement boards or building interiors. Thus it depends on the size, shape, spatial distribution, radiative pattern and spectral characteristics of many neighbouring light sources. The actual state of the atmospheric environment and the orography of the surrounding terrain are also relevant. All of these factors together influence the spectral sky radiance/luminance in a complex manner. Knowledge of the directional behaviour of light pollution is especially important for the correct interpretation of astronomical observations. From a mathematical point of view, the light noise or veil luminance of a specific sky element is given by a superposition of scattered light beams. Theoretical models that simulate light pollution typically take into account all ground-based light sources, thus imposing great requirements on CPU and MEM. As shown in this paper, a contribution of distant sources to the light pollution might be essential under specific conditions of low turbidity and/or Garstang-like radiative patterns. To evaluate the convergence of the theoretical model, numerical experiments are made for different light sources, spectral bands and atmospheric conditions. It is shown that in the worst case the integration limit is approximately 100 km, but it can be significantly shortened for light sources with cosine-like radiative patterns.

  4. Software reliability: Additional investigations into modeling with replicated experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagel, P. M.; Schotz, F. M.; Skirvan, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of programmer experience level, different program usage distributions, and programming languages are explored. All these factors affect performance, and some tentative relational hypotheses are presented. An analytic framework for replicated and non-replicated (traditional) software experiments is presented. A method of obtaining an upper bound on the error rate of the next error is proposed. The method was validated empirically by comparing forecasts with actual data. In all 14 cases the bound exceeded the observed parameter, albeit somewhat conservatively. Two other forecasting methods are proposed and compared to observed results. Although demonstrated relative to this framework that stages are neither independent nor exponentially distributed, empirical estimates show that the exponential assumption is nearly valid for all but the extreme tails of the distribution. Except for the dependence in the stage probabilities, Cox's model approximates to a degree what is being observed.

  5. Absence of visual experience modifies the neural basis of numerical thinking.

    PubMed

    Kanjlia, Shipra; Lane, Connor; Feigenson, Lisa; Bedny, Marina

    2016-10-04

    In humans, the ability to reason about mathematical quantities depends on a frontoparietal network that includes the intraparietal sulcus (IPS). How do nature and nurture give rise to the neurobiology of numerical cognition? We asked how visual experience shapes the neural basis of numerical thinking by studying numerical cognition in congenitally blind individuals. Blind (n = 17) and blindfolded sighted (n = 19) participants solved math equations that varied in difficulty (e.g., 27 - 12 = x vs. 7 - 2 = x), and performed a control sentence comprehension task while undergoing fMRI. Whole-cortex analyses revealed that in both blind and sighted participants, the IPS and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices were more active during the math task than the language task, and activity in the IPS increased parametrically with equation difficulty. Thus, the classic frontoparietal number network is preserved in the total absence of visual experience. However, surprisingly, blind but not sighted individuals additionally recruited a subset of early visual areas during symbolic math calculation. The functional profile of these "visual" regions was identical to that of the IPS in blind but not sighted individuals. Furthermore, in blindness, number-responsive visual cortices exhibited increased functional connectivity with prefrontal and IPS regions that process numbers. We conclude that the frontoparietal number network develops independently of visual experience. In blindness, this number network colonizes parts of deafferented visual cortex. These results suggest that human cortex is highly functionally flexible early in life, and point to frontoparietal input as a mechanism of cross-modal plasticity in blindness.

  6. Properties of numerical experiments in chaotic dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Guo-Cheng

    1999-10-01

    This dissertation contains four projects that I have worked on during my graduate study at University of Maryland at College Park. These projects are all related to numerical simulations of chaotic dynamical systems. In particular, the two conjectures in Chapter 1 are inspired by the numerical discoveries in Hunt and Ott [1, 2]. In Chapter 2, statistical properties of scalar transport in chaotic flows are investigated by using numerical simulations. In Chapters 3 and 4, I take a different angle and discuss the limitations of numerical simulations; i.e. for certain ``bad'' systems numerical simulations will yield incorrect or at least unreliable results no matter how many digits of precision are used. Chapter 1 discusses the properties of optimal orbits. Given a dynamical system and a function f from the state space to the real numbers, an optimal orbit for f is an orbit over which the average of f is maximal. In this chapter we discuss some basic mathematical aspects of optimal orbits: existence, sensitivity to perturbations of f, and approximability by periodic orbits with low period. For hyperbolic systems, we conjecture that (1)for (topologically) generic smooth functions, there exists an optimal periodic orbit, and (2)the optimal average can be approximated exponentially well by averages over certain periodic orbits with increasing period. In Chapter 2 we theoretically study the power spectrum of passive scalars transported in two dimensional chaotic fluid flows. Using a wave-packet method introduced by Antonsen et al. [3] [4], we numerically investigate several model flows, and confirm that the power spectrum has the k -l- scaling predicted by Batchelor [5]. In Chapter 3 we consider a class of nonhyperbolic systems, for which there are two fixed points in an attractor having a dense trajectory; the unstable manifold of one fixed point has dimension one and the other's is two dimensional. Under the condition that there exists a direction which is more expanding

  7. Floret Test, Numerical Simulations of the Dent, Comparison with Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lefrancois, A.; Cutting, J.; Gagliardi, F.; Tarver, C.; Tran, T.

    2006-02-14

    The Floret test has been developed as a screening test to study the performance of a small amount of HE. Numerical simulations have been performed recently using CTH. The objective of this study is to perform numerical simulations in order to better understand the shock waves interactions, involved in the dent formation. Different 3D wedge configurations have been tested using the Ignition and Growth reactive flow model for the HE receptor with Ls-Dyna.

  8. Numerical Experiments on the Formation and Maintenance of Cirriform Clouds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starr, David O'connell

    The role and relative importance of the dynamic and diabatic processes influencing the formation and maintenance of ice phase stratiform clouds are investigated at the cloud scale. The primary focus is on fair weather cirrus. A two-dimensional, time dependent, Eulerian numerical model is developed. The grid interval is 100 m and the domain is a vertical plane of (TURN) 3 km depth and (TURN) 6 km horizontal extent. The influence of larger scale processes are incorporated via a specified basic state vertical velocity and the initially specified thermodynamic structure. In addition to energy transformations between potential and kinetic forms and advection by the resolved wind field, other important physical processes, which are incorporated into the model in a parametric fashion, are transports due to subgrid scale processes, phase changes of water, infrared and short-wave radiative processes and the relative fall velocity of cloud particles. The parameterizations are based upon observations and theoretical consideration. This model is unique in its applicability to ice phase stratiform clouds. Comparable parameterizations for liquid phase stratiform clouds are given. The model is described in detail in all aspects. The approach is one of examining the sensitivity of simulations to the specification of various computational and parametric model constants and functions. The characteristics of the model are fully examined and the model is calibrated by means of comparison to observations and theory such that realistic simulations are obtained. The influence of the ice water relative fall speed on the physical properties of the cloud layer and the consequent modulation of the other cloud processes is found to be quite dramatic. Radiative processes are also found to have a significant impact. In particular, significant differences in the organization of convective elements between daytime and nighttime cases are found. Differences between ice phase and liquid phase

  9. Two-dimensional atmospheric transport and chemistry model - Numerical experiments with a new advection algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shia, Run-Lie; Ha, Yuk Lung; Wen, Jun-Shan; Yung, Yuk L.

    1990-01-01

    Extensive testing of the advective scheme proposed by Prather (1986) has been carried out in support of the California Institute of Technology-Jet Propulsion Laboratory two-dimensional model of the middle atmosphere. The original scheme is generalized to include higher-order moments. In addition, it is shown how well the scheme works in the presence of chemistry as well as eddy diffusion. Six types of numerical experiments including simple clock motion and pure advection in two dimensions have been investigated in detail. By comparison with analytic solutions, it is shown that the new algorithm can faithfully preserve concentration profiles, has essentially no numerical diffusion, and is superior to a typical fourth-order finite difference scheme.

  10. Experiences with an adaptive mesh refinement algorithm in numerical relativity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choptuik, M. W.

    An implementation of the Berger/Oliger mesh refinement algorithm for a model problem in numerical relativity is described. The principles of operation of the method are reviewed and its use in conjunction with leap-frog schemes is considered. The performance of the algorithm is illustrated with results from a study of the Einstein/massless scalar field equations in spherical symmetry.

  11. Numerical Simulation of the Perrin-Like Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazur, Zygmunt; Grech, Dariusz

    2008-01-01

    A simple model of the random Brownian walk of a spherical mesoscopic particle in viscous liquids is proposed. The model can be solved analytically and simulated numerically. The analytic solution gives the known Einstein-Smoluchowski diffusion law r[superscript 2] = 2Dt, where the diffusion constant D is expressed by the mass and geometry of a…

  12. Addition theorem of Slater type orbitals: a numerical evaluation of Barnett Coulson/Löwdin functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouferguene, Ahmed

    2005-04-01

    When using the one-centre two-range expansion method to evaluate multicentre integrals over Slater type orbitals (STOs), it may become necessary to compute numerical values of the corresponding Fourier coefficients, also known as Barnett-Coulson/Löwdin Functions (BCLFs) (Bouferguene and Jones 1998 J. Chem. Phys. 109 5718). To carry out this task, it is crucial to not only have a stable numerical procedure but also a fast algorithm. In previous work (Bouferguene and Rinaldi 1994 Int. J. Quantum Chem. 50 21), BCLFs were represented by a double integral which led to a numerically stable algorithm but this turned out to be disappointingly time consuming. The present work aims at exploring another path in which BCLFs are represented either by an infinite series involving modified Bessel functions {\\bf K}_{\

  13. Numerical experiments on galaxy clustering in open universes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    Numerical studies were performed on the dynamical effects on the evolution of clumps, filaments, voids, and galaxy clusters by various final Omega values. The final Omega values examined ranged from 0.03-1, and attention was given to defining observations of superclusters which would aid in determining an actual value for Omega. The numerical trials consisted of n-body integration programs governed by the total expansion and final Omega value and included comparisons between results for open and closed universes. All runs started from the same initial conditions. The dispersion trajectories of particles and the final galactic cluster forms were found to be equivalent, regardless of the final Omega value. The possibility of deriving a value for Omega from velocity data on galaxies which have not yet joined clusters is discussed.

  14. Mechanical characterisation of Dacron graft: Experiments and numerical simulation.

    PubMed

    Bustos, Claudio A; García-Herrera, Claudio M; Celentano, Diego J

    2016-01-04

    Experimental and numerical analyses focused on the mechanical characterisation of a woven Dacron vascular graft are presented. To that end, uniaxial tensile tests under different orientations have been performed to study the anisotropic behaviour of the material. These tests have been used to adjust the parameters of a hyperelastic anisotropic constitutive model which is applied to predict through numerical simulation the mechanical response of this material in the ring tensile test. The obtained results show that the model used is capable of representing adequately the nonlinear elastic region and, in particular, it captures the progressive increase of the rigidity and the anisotropy due to the stretching of the Dacron. The importance of this research lies in the possibility of predicting the graft׳s mechanical response under generalized loading such as those that occur under physiological conditions after surgical procedures.

  15. Macroscopic laws for immiscible two-phase flow in porous media: Results From numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothman, Daniel H.

    1990-06-01

    be approximately equal, which is the behavior predicted by Onsager's reciprocity theorem. However, persistent transient effects can render the reciprocity unobservable. The numerical study is performed with a discrete numerical model of the molecular dynamics of immiscible mixtures called the immiscible lattice gas. The immiscible lattice gas models both the Navier-Stokes equations and surface tension. Numerical tests presented here additionally provide quantitative validation of the method's ability to simulate wetting phenomena and the effects of capillary pressure. Whereas the numerical study of the linear phenomenological laws utilizes a highly simplified porous medium with one pore and two throats, numerical examples of wetting and nonwetting invasion experiments in a geometrically complex 2-D porous medium are also provided.

  16. Modeling turbulent flow over fractal trees using renormalized numerical simulation: Alternate formulations and numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Jason; Meneveau, Charles

    2012-12-01

    Simulating turbulent flows over objects characterized by hierarchies of length-scales poses special challenges associated with the cost of resolving small-scale elements. If these are treated as subgrid-scale elements, their effects on the resolved scales must be captured realistically. Most importantly, the associated drag forces must be parameterized. Prior work [S. Chester, C. Meneveau, and M. B. Parlange, "Modeling turbulent flow over fractal trees with renormalized numerical simulation," J. Comput. Phys. 225, 427-448 (2007), 10.1016/j.jcp.2006.12.009] proposed a technique called renormalized numerical simulation (RNS), which is applicable to objects that display scale-invariant geometric (fractal) properties. The idea of RNS is similar to that of the dynamic model used in large eddy simulation to determine model parameters for the subgrid-stress tensor model in the bulk of the flow. In RNS, drag forces from the resolved elements that are obtained during the simulation are re-scaled appropriately by determining drag coefficients that are then applied to specify the drag forces associated with the subgrid-scale elements. The technique has already been applied to model turbulent flow over a canopy of fractal trees [S. Chester, C. Meneveau, and M. B. Parlange, "Modeling turbulent flow over fractal trees with renormalized numerical simulation," J. Comput. Phys. 225, 427-448 (2007), 10.1016/j.jcp.2006.12.009], using a particular set of assumptions in evaluating the drag coefficient. In the current work we introduce a generalized framework for describing and implementing the RNS methodology. Furthermore, we describe various other possible practical implementations of RNS that differ on important, technical aspects related to (1) time averaging, (2) spatial localization, and (3) numerical representation of the drag forces. As part of this study, several RNS formulations are presented and compared. The various models are first implemented and compared in simulations of

  17. Numerical Experiments for Storm Surge Inundation in Korean Coastal Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, J.; Shim, J.; Jun, K.

    2012-12-01

    Sea-level rising due to climate change following the global warming and the increased intensity of typhoon are magnifying inundation hazards up to the unpredictable level, resulting from the typhoon surge in Korea and other coastal states around the world. Typhoon is the most serious natural disaster in Korean coastal area. Many people died by storm surge inundation every year. And typhoon caused a lot of damage to property. Climate changes due to global warming are producing a stronger natural disaster. Coastal zones have been damaged by typhoons and accompanying storm surge. Especially, the most serious loss of life and terrible property damage caused by typhoon Maemi in 2003. The typhoon Maemi invaded Korean Peninsula leaving property loss of $ 4 Billion and killing 131 people. After then, there has been an increased interest in these coastal zone problems. If storm surges coincide with high tides, the loss of life and property damage due to high waters arc even worse. Therefore it is desirable to accurately forecast the amount water level increase. In this study, using a numerical model FVCOM(finite volume coastal circulation model, Chen et al.,2004), storm surge was simulated to examine its fluctuation characteristics for the coastal area behind Masan, Yeosu and Busan city in Korea. In the numerical model, a moving boundary condition(wet-dry treatment) was incorporated to explain wave inundation. To simulate the inundation scenario, the model grids were extended up to the area inside the lowland in application of the digital elevation data(DEM) made by precisely combining the aero-LiDAR survey data and bathymetry data for the 3 demonstration regions of Busan, Masan and Yeosu. Minimum grid of 300 m unstructured triangular mesh applied to calculate the storm surge was adopted as a grid system. And the minimum grid size of 30 m was built near Busan, Masan and Yeosu area which are the fine coastal regions and where the inundation is simulated. Numerically

  18. Preliminary Results from Numerical Experiments on the Summer 1980 Heat Wave and Drought

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfson, N.; Atlas, R.; Sud, Y. C.

    1985-01-01

    During the summer of 1980, a prolonged heat wave and drought affected the United States. A preliminary set of experiments has been conducted to study the effect of varying boundary conditions on the GLA model simulation of the heat wave. Five 10-day numerical integrations with three different specifications of boundary conditions were carried out: a control experiment which utilized climatological boundary conditions, an SST experiment which utilized summer 1980 sea-surface temperatures in the North Pacific, but climatological values elsewhere, and a Soil Moisture experiment which utilized the values of Mintz-Serafini for the summer, 1980. The starting dates for the five forecasts were 11 June, 7 July, 21 July, 22 August, and 6 September of 1980. These dates were specifically chosen as days when a heat wave was already established in order to investigate the effect of soil moistures or North Pacific sea-surface temperatures on the model's ability to maintain the heat wave pattern. The experiments were evaluated in terms of the heat wave index for the South Plains, North Plains, Great Plains and the entire U.S. In addition a subjective comparison of map patterns has been performed.

  19. Three-Dimensional Numerical Modeling of Magnetohydrodynamic Augmented Propulsion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, M. W.; Hawk, C. W.; Litchford, R. J.

    2009-01-01

    Over the past several years, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has engaged in the design and development of an experimental research facility to investigate the use of diagonalized crossed-field magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) accelerators as a possible thrust augmentation device for thermal propulsion systems. In support of this effort, a three-dimensional numerical MHD model has been developed for the purpose of analyzing and optimizing accelerator performance and to aid in understanding critical underlying physical processes and nonideal effects. This Technical Memorandum fully summarizes model development efforts and presents the results of pretest performance optimization analyses. These results indicate that the MHD accelerator should utilize a 45deg diagonalization angle with the applied current evenly distributed over the first five inlet electrode pairs. When powered at 100 A, this configuration is expected to yield a 50% global efficiency with an 80% increase in axial velocity and a 50% increase in centerline total pressure.

  20. Numerical experiments in ringing of offshore systems under viscous loads

    SciTech Connect

    Gurley, K.R.; Kareem, A.

    1996-12-31

    A phenomenon which has recently received much attention in offshore engineering is the ringing response of structures. This high frequency transient type response has been observed in nature, particularly in tension leg platforms (TLPs). Given the implications of this behavior on the fatigue life of tendons, it is important that it be considered for response analysis. Significant progress has been made in recent years in identifying the nonlinear mechanisms that induce ringing in complex offshore structural systems. This introductory study-uses a simple model to numerically demonstrates several of the more salient features that are commonly cited in current literature, and shows that viscous loads may result in inducing ringing type response of members under certain conditions. Ringing response in pitch due to viscous loading is simulated on a column piercing the surface, and the significant contributing force mechanisms are identified. System characteristics are altered to ameliorate the performance of these systems.

  1. Tsunami intrusion in wide meandering channels: a Lagrangian numerical experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couston, L. A.; Alam, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    Among the many difficulties of tsunami forecast, wave runup on sloped beaches remains a major obstacle in numerical simulations. Traditional Eulerian models must adjust the fluid flow domain continuously due to the moving shorelines, which can significantly affect the computational cost and results accuracy. An efficient though uncommon alternative for accurate runup predictions still exists, consisting in using a Lagrangian model as recently shown by e.g. Couston et al. (2015) who studied the runup of landslide tsunamis in lakes with a non-dispersive Lagrangian model. Here we introduce a fully-nonlinear Boussinesq-type model derived in the Lagrangian framework to investigate various cases of long-wave runup on curved beaches and meandering channels. The governing equations are expressed in terms of curvilinear Lagrangian coordinates, making the model suitable for accurate runup computations at shorelines of arbitrary geometry while retaining the inherent simplicity of a physical model discretized on a fixed and structured grid. We implement an elliptic grid generation algorithm to map the physical space to the computational space, and a high-order finite-difference scheme for time integration. The numerical model has a linear complexity in the number of unknowns when neglecting dispersive effects. We show that the formation of edge waves due to the sloped banks of a wide channel has a significant influence on the capability of a meander or constriction in reflecting the intruding tsunami, and we investigate the effect of dispersion. Reference: Couston, L.-A., Mei, C. C., & Alam, M.-R. (2015). Landslide tsunamis in lakes. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 772, 784-804.

  2. Generation of large-scale structures and vortex systems in numerical experiments for rotating annular channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gledzer, A. E.

    2016-12-01

    Methods for solving shallow-water equations that describe flows in rotating annular channels are considered and the results of numerical calculations are analyzed for the possible generation of global large-scale flows, narrow jets, and numerous small-scale vortices in laboratory experiments. External effects in fluids are induced using a mass source-sink and the MHD-method of interaction of radial electric current with the magnetic field generated by the field of permanent magnets. A central-upwind scheme modified to suit the specific aspects of geophysical hydrodynamics. Initially, this method was used to solve shallow-water equations only in hydraulic problems, such as for flows in dam breaks, channels, rivers, and lakes. Geophysical hydrodynamics (in addition to free surface and topography) requires a rotation of the system as a whole, which is accompanied by the appearance of a complex system of vortices, jets, and turbulence (these should be taken into account in the formulation of the problem). Accordingly, the basic features of the central-upwind method should be changed. The modifications should ensure that the scheme is well-balanced and choose interpolation methods for desired variables. The main result of this modification is the control over numerical viscosity affecting the fluid motion variety. The active dynamics of a large number of vortices transformed into jets or generating large-scale streams is the general result of modifications suitable for geophysical hydrodynamics. Because there are technical difficulties in the creation of an appropriate laboratory setup for modeling of geophysical flows with the help of numerous source-sinks, it will be appropriate to use numerical experiments for studying the motions generated by this method. Unlike this method, the MHD-method can be rather easily used in laboratory conditions to generate a large variety of flows and vortex currents in the channel by a relatively small number of permanent magnets

  3. Numerical prediction experiments simulating the impact of mesoscale satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreitzberg, C. W.

    1979-01-01

    Recent developments in mesometeorology are summarized to place this research in perspective. Recent advances in computer analysis and forecast system development that provide the basis for the simulation tests are discussed. The impact of NIMBUS-6 humidity data on analyses off the West Coast are shown and incorporation of geopotential gradient data is discussed. Experiments to demonstrate the feasibility of incorporating satellite-derived wind fields in mesoscale severe storm models are mentioned briefly.

  4. An original traffic additional emission model and numerical simulation on a signalized road

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wen-Xing; Zhang, Jing-Yu

    2017-02-01

    Based on VSP (Vehicle Specific Power) model traffic real emissions were theoretically classified into two parts: basic emission and additional emission. An original additional emission model was presented to calculate the vehicle's emission due to the signal control effects. Car-following model was developed and used to describe the traffic behavior including cruising, accelerating, decelerating and idling at a signalized intersection. Simulations were conducted under two situations: single intersection and two adjacent intersections with their respective control policy. Results are in good agreement with the theoretical analysis. It is also proved that additional emission model may be used to design the signal control policy in our modern traffic system to solve the serious environmental problems.

  5. The Numerical Studies Program for the Atmospheric General Circulation Experiment (AGCE) for Spacelab Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowlis, W. W. (Editor); Davis, M. H. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    The atmospheric general circulation experiment (AGCE) numerical design for Spacelab flights was studied. A spherical baroclinic flow experiment which models the large scale circulations of the Earth's atmosphere was proposed. Gravity is simulated by a radial dielectric body force. The major objective of the AGCE is to study nonlinear baroclinic wave flows in spherical geometry. Numerical models must be developed which accurately predict the basic axisymmetric states and the stability of nonlinear baroclinic wave flows. A three dimensional, fully nonlinear, numerical model and the AGCE based on the complete set of equations is required. Progress in the AGCE numerical design studies program is reported.

  6. Study On Numerical Simulation And Experiment Of Fabrication Magnesium Semisolid Slurry By Damper Cooling Tube Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Shuisheng; Huang, Guojie; Zhang, Xiaoli; Yang, Haoqiang

    2007-05-01

    Damper Cooling Tube (DCT) Method to fabricate the semi-solid metal slurry has been studied in this paper. Firstly, numerical simulation is adopted to investigate the flow process in order to optimize the technical parameters. The temperature effects on the rheological properties of the slurries are also considered. The effects of technical parameters on the slurry properties are studied in detail. Then the experiment was carried out with AZ91 magnesium alloy in order to examine the numerical simulation results. The results of numerical simulation are consistent with the experimental results. According to the numerical and experiment results, the DCT device can fabricate fine semisolid slurry with primary globular phase.

  7. Analysis of Numerical Simulation Results of LIPS-200 Lifetime Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Juanjuan; Zhang, Tianping; Geng, Hai; Jia, Yanhui; Meng, Wei; Wu, Xianming; Sun, Anbang

    2016-06-01

    Accelerator grid structural and electron backstreaming failures are the most important factors affecting the ion thruster's lifetime. During the thruster's operation, Charge Exchange Xenon (CEX) ions are generated from collisions between plasma and neutral atoms. Those CEX ions grid's barrel and wall frequently, which cause the failures of the grid system. In order to validate whether the 20 cm Lanzhou Ion Propulsion System (LIPS-200) satisfies China's communication satellite platform's application requirement for North-South Station Keeping (NSSK), this study analyzed the measured depth of the pit/groove on the accelerator grid's wall and aperture diameter's variation and estimated the operating lifetime of the ion thruster. Different from the previous method, in this paper, the experimental results after the 5500 h of accumulated operation of the LIPS-200 ion thruster are presented firstly. Then, based on these results, theoretical analysis and numerical calculations were firstly performed to predict the on-orbit lifetime of LIPS-200. The results obtained were more accurate to calculate the reliability and analyze the failure modes of the ion thruster. The results indicated that the predicted lifetime of LIPS-200's was about 13218.1 h which could satisfy the required lifetime requirement of 11000 h very well.

  8. Numerical simulation of ultrasonic wave transmission experiments in rocks of shale gas reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qiao; Yao, Guanghua; Zhu, Honglin; Tan, Yanhu; Xu, Fenglin

    2017-01-01

    Shale gas reservoirs have risen in importance in China's new power source exploration and development program. The investigation of the propagation of ultrasonic waves in shale forms the basis for the full waveform application of acoustic logging data to the exploration of shale gas. Using acoustic wave theory, initial conditions, vibration source conditions, and stability conditions are developed in combination with experimental background of ultrasonic wave transmission. With improved boundary conditions, we performed numerical simulations of the ultrasound transmission experiments in shale using the high-order staggered-grid finite difference method (second-order in the time domain and fourth-order in the space domain). With programs developed within MatLab, the results obtained from numerical simulations agree well with experimental results based on physical models. In addition, using snapshots of the wave field that give a microscopic perspective, the propagation laws for ultrasonic waves can be analyzed. Using this method, human error is avoided, transmission experiments costs can be reduced and efficiency improved. This method extends the scope of experimental investigations regarding the transmission of ultrasonic waves in a shale gas reservoir with increasing stratification, and thus has great theoretical value and practical significance.

  9. Large fluctuations of the macroscopic current in diffusive systems: a numerical test of the additivity principle.

    PubMed

    Hurtado, Pablo I; Garrido, Pedro L

    2010-04-01

    Most systems, when pushed out of equilibrium, respond by building up currents of locally conserved observables. Understanding how microscopic dynamics determines the averages and fluctuations of these currents is one of the main open problems in nonequilibrium statistical physics. The additivity principle is a theoretical proposal that allows to compute the current distribution in many one-dimensional nonequilibrium systems. Using simulations, we validate this conjecture in a simple and general model of energy transport, both in the presence of a temperature gradient and in canonical equilibrium. In particular, we show that the current distribution displays a Gaussian regime for small current fluctuations, as prescribed by the central limit theorem, and non-Gaussian (exponential) tails for large current deviations, obeying in all cases the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorem. In order to facilitate a given current fluctuation, the system adopts a well-defined temperature profile different from that of the steady state and in accordance with the additivity hypothesis predictions. System statistics during a large current fluctuation is independent of the sign of the current, which implies that the optimal profile (as well as higher-order profiles and spatial correlations) are invariant upon current inversion. We also demonstrate that finite-time joint fluctuations of the current and the profile are well described by the additivity functional. These results suggest the additivity hypothesis as a general and powerful tool to compute current distributions in many nonequilibrium systems.

  10. Large fluctuations of the macroscopic current in diffusive systems: A numerical test of the additivity principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurtado, Pablo I.; Garrido, Pedro L.

    2010-04-01

    Most systems, when pushed out of equilibrium, respond by building up currents of locally conserved observables. Understanding how microscopic dynamics determines the averages and fluctuations of these currents is one of the main open problems in nonequilibrium statistical physics. The additivity principle is a theoretical proposal that allows to compute the current distribution in many one-dimensional nonequilibrium systems. Using simulations, we validate this conjecture in a simple and general model of energy transport, both in the presence of a temperature gradient and in canonical equilibrium. In particular, we show that the current distribution displays a Gaussian regime for small current fluctuations, as prescribed by the central limit theorem, and non-Gaussian (exponential) tails for large current deviations, obeying in all cases the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorem. In order to facilitate a given current fluctuation, the system adopts a well-defined temperature profile different from that of the steady state and in accordance with the additivity hypothesis predictions. System statistics during a large current fluctuation is independent of the sign of the current, which implies that the optimal profile (as well as higher-order profiles and spatial correlations) are invariant upon current inversion. We also demonstrate that finite-time joint fluctuations of the current and the profile are well described by the additivity functional. These results suggest the additivity hypothesis as a general and powerful tool to compute current distributions in many nonequilibrium systems.

  11. Experiments and numerical simulation of mixing under supercritical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, T.; Rodriguez, J.; Leyva, I. A.; Candel, S.

    2012-05-01

    Supercritical pressure conditions designate a situation where the working fluid pressure is above the critical point. Among these conditions, it is interesting to identify a transcritical range which corresponds to cases where the pressure is above the critical point, but the injection temperature is below the critical value. This situation is of special interest because it raises fundamental issues which have technological relevance in the analysis of flows in liquid rocket engines. This situation is here envisaged by analyzing the behavior of a nitrogen shear coaxial jet comprising an inner stream injected at temperatures close to the critical temperature and a coaxial flow at a higher temperature. Experiments are carried out both in the absence of external modulation and by imposing a large amplitude transverse acoustic field. Real gas large eddy simulations are performed for selected experiments. The combination of experiments and calculations is used to evaluate effects of injector geometry and operating parameters. Calculations retrieve what is observed experimentally when the momentum flux ratio of the outer to the inner stream J= (ρ _eu_e^2)/(ρ _iu_i^2) is varied. Results exhibit the change in flow structure and the development of a recirculation region when this parameter exceeds a critical value. The instantaneous flow patterns for different momentum flux ratios are used in a second stage to characterize the dynamical behavior of the flow in terms of power spectral density of velocity and density fluctuations. Results obtained under acoustic modulation provide insight into mixing enhancement of coaxial streams with a view of its possible consequences in high frequency combustion instabilities. It is shown in particular that the presence of strong acoustic modulations notably reduces the high density jet core length, indicating an increased mixing efficiency. This behavior is more pronounced when the jet is placed at the location of maximum transverse

  12. Numerical controlled polishing, continued force wear and part correction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hannah, P.R.; Day, R.D.; Hatch, D.J.; McClure, E.R.

    1994-09-01

    This abstract reports the near completion of the first phase of this program. It is the aim of this program to provide the operator of a N/C diamond turning machine or N/C grinding machine (jig grinder) with the wear characteristics necessary to achieve uniform material removal. The second phase of this program addresses a different problem, although solving this problem is highly dependent on the results of the first phase. Diamond turned, or any lathe turned surface, exhibits regular tool marks due to the tool passing over the surface being cut. Changes in depth of cut, feed rate and work rpm will change the character of these groves, but will not eliminate them. Optical surfaces produced by this process exhibit increased scattering as the light wavelength decreases limiting their use; at least for optical purposes, to IR and some visible applications. Utilizing wear information gathered in the first part of this program we will attempt to reduce these residual tool marks by polishing. The polishing of diamond turned surfaces is not new. Diamond turned metal surfaces, especially in electroless nickel and high phosphorus nickel electroplate have been polished to improve their scatter characteristics. What we believe is unique is the use of a spherical wheel, rotating on axis and being moved over the part in a prescribed manner by numerical control. Over the past year we have made some major changes in our polishing methods and procedures. We have listed below these changes, as a refresher for the reader as to our previous procedures. These changes will be addressed in the body of the text.

  13. Numerically Modeling Pulsed-Current, Kinked Wire Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filbey, Gordon; Kingman, Pat

    1999-06-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) has embarked on a program to provide far-term land fighting vehicles with electromagnetic armor protection. Part of this work seeks to establish robust simulations of magneto-solid-mechanics phenomena. Whether describing violent rupture of a fuse link resulting from a large current pulse or the complete disruption of a copper shaped-charge jet subjected to high current densities, the simulations must include effects of intense Lorentz body forces and rapid Ohmic heating. Material models are required that describe plasticity, flow and fracture, conductivity, and equation of state (EOS) parameters for media in solid, liquid, and vapor phases. An extended version of the Eulerian wave code CTH has been used to predict the apex motion of a V-shaped (``kinked'') copper wire 3mm in diameter during a 400 kilo-amp pulse. These predictions, utilizing available material, EOS, and conductivity data for copper and the known characteristics of an existing capacitor-bank pulsed power supply, were then used to configure an experiment. The experiments were in excellent agreement with the prior simulations. Both computational and experimental results (including electrical data and flash X-rays) will be presented.

  14. Numerical Simulation of Receptivity for a Transition Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collis, S. Scott; Joslin, R. D. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The cost of fuel to overcome turbulence induced viscous drag on a commercial airplane constitutes a significant fraction of the operating cost of an airline. Achieving laminar flow and maintaining it over a large portion of the wing can significantly reduce the viscous drag, and hence the cost. Design of such laminar-flow-control wings and their practical operation requires the ability to accurately and reliably predict the transition from laminar to turbulent flow. The transition process begins with the conversion of environmental and surface disturbances into the instability waves of the flow by a process called receptivity. The goal of the current research project has been to improve the prediction of transition through a better understanding of the physics of receptivity. The initial objective of this work was to investigate the specific stability and receptivity characteristics of a particular experimental investigation of boundary layer receptivity at NASA Langley. Some simulation results using direct solutions of the linearized Navier-Stokes equations which modeled this experiment where presented in the 1999 APS DFD meeting. However, based on these initial investigations, it became clear that to cover the vast receptivity parameter space required for a practical transition prediction tool, more efficient methods would be required. Thus, the focus of this research was shifted from modeling this particular experiment to formulating and developing new techniques that could efficiently yet accurately predict receptivity for a wide range of disturbance conditions.

  15. Numerical simulation of the fatigue behavior of additive manufactured titanium porous lattice structures.

    PubMed

    Zargarian, A; Esfahanian, M; Kadkhodapour, J; Ziaei-Rad, S

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the effects of cell geometry and relative density on the high-cycle fatigue behavior of Titanium scaffolds produced by selective laser melting and electron beam melting techniques were numerically investigated by finite element analysis. The regular titanium lattice samples with three different unit cell geometries, namely, diamond, rhombic dodecahedron and truncated cuboctahedron, and the relative density range of 0.1-0.3 were analyzed under uniaxial cyclic compressive loading. A failure event based algorithm was employed to simulate fatigue failure in the cellular material. Stress-life approach was used to model fatigue failure of both bulk (struts) and cellular material. The predicted fatigue life and the damage pattern of all three structures were found to be in good agreement with the experimental fatigue investigations published in the literature. The results also showed that the relationship between fatigue strength and cycles to failure obeyed the power law. The coefficient of power function was shown to depend on relative density, geometry and fatigue properties of the bulk material while the exponent was only dependent on the fatigue behavior of the bulk material. The results also indicated the failure surface at an angle of 45° to the loading direction.

  16. Numerical Geodynamic Experiments of Continental Collision: Past and Present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Robert

    -lithospheric mantle to upwell and come into contact with the thickened upper crust. When sedimentation is imposed subduction-like consumption of the subducting plate remains stable. Using numerical geodynamic models, I studied the influence of the pressure-dependence of viscosity on tectonic deformation during collision. At low activation volumes, high convergence rates, and low to moderate initial Moho temperatures the subduction style of mantle lithosphere deformation is dominant. At low activation volumes, high convergence rates, and high initial Moho temperatures distributed pure-shear style deformation occurs. At low activation volumes, low convergence rate, and moderate to high initial Moho temperatures the mantle lithosphere prefers a convective removal style of deformation. Increasing the activation volume of mantle material in either of these three cases changes the style of mantle lithosphere deformation because its viscosity increases non-linearly.

  17. Resistivity inversion in 2-D anisotropic media: numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiese, Timothy; Greenhalgh, Stewart; Zhou, Bing; Greenhalgh, Mark; Marescot, Laurent

    2015-04-01

    Many rocks and layered/fractured sequences have a clearly expressed electrical anisotropy although it is rare in practice to incorporate anisotropy into resistivity inversion. In this contribution, we present a series of 2.5-D synthetic inversion experiments for various electrode configurations and 2-D anisotropic models. We examine and compare the image reconstructions obtained using the correct anisotropic inversion code with those obtained using the false but widely used isotropic assumption. Superior reconstruction in terms of reduced data misfit, true anomaly shape and position, and anisotropic background parameters were obtained when the correct anisotropic assumption was employed for medium to high coefficients of anisotropy. However, for low coefficient values the isotropic assumption produced better-quality results. When an erroneous isotropic inversion is performed on medium to high level anisotropic data, the images are dominated by patterns of banded artefacts and high data misfits. Various pole-pole, pole-dipole and dipole-dipole data sets were investigated and evaluated for the accuracy of the inversion result. The eigenvalue spectra of the pseudo-Hessian matrix and the formal resolution matrix were also computed to determine the information content and goodness of the results. We also present a data selection strategy based on high sensitivity measurements which drastically reduces the number of data to be inverted but still produces comparable results to that of the comprehensive data set. Inversion was carried out using transversely isotropic model parameters described in two different co-ordinate frames for the conductivity tensor, namely Cartesian versus natural or eigenframe. The Cartesian frame provided a more stable inversion product. This can be simply explained from inspection of the eigenspectra of the pseudo-Hessian matrix for the two model descriptions.

  18. Numerical analysis of a deep drawing process with additional force transmission for an extension of the process limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, B.-A.; Bonk, C.; Grbic, N.; Vucetic, M.

    2017-02-01

    By sheet metal forming processes the forming limits and part characteristics are defined through the process specific loads. In deep drawing processes the maximum deep draw ratios as well as the springback behaviour of the metal parts are depending on the stress distribution in the part material during the forming process. While exceeding the load limits, a failure in the material occurs, which can be avoided by additional force transmission activated in the deep drawing process before the forming limit of material is achieved. This contribution deals with numerical investigation of process effect caused by additional force transmission regarding the extension of the process limits. Here, the steel material HCT 600X+Z (1.0941) in thickness s 0 = 1.0 mm is analyzed numerically using the anisotropic model Hill48. This model is validated by the means of cup test by Swift. Both, the FEA of conventional and forming process with additional force transmission are carried out. The numerical results are compared with reference geometry of rectangle cup.

  19. Numerical Experiments on Existence and Non-Uniqueness of Solutions of the Thermistor Problem with Helmholtz Term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröger, Tim

    2011-11-01

    A mathematical model of radiofrequency ablation (a form of therapy for tumors) consists essentially of the thermistor problem with an additional Helmholtz term. Thereby, the computational domain is neither convex nor has smooth boundary, and the electric conductivity σ(u) experiences a drastic drop for high temperatures u. The paper shows that these properties make the system very difficult to solve numerically. A literature survey shows that no efficient numerical solution for the problem has yet been published, whereas a number of theoretical existence results for solutions exist.

  20. Numerical Predictions of Wind Turbine Power and Aerodynamic Loads for the NREL Phase II and IV Combined Experiment Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duque, Earl P. N.; Johnson, Wayne; vanDam, C. P.; Chao, David D.; Cortes, Regina; Yee, Karen

    1999-01-01

    Accurate, reliable and robust numerical predictions of wind turbine rotor power remain a challenge to the wind energy industry. The literature reports various methods that compare predictions to experiments. The methods vary from Blade Element Momentum Theory (BEM), Vortex Lattice (VL), to variants of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RaNS). The BEM and VL methods consistently show discrepancies in predicting rotor power at higher wind speeds mainly due to inadequacies with inboard stall and stall delay models. The RaNS methodologies show promise in predicting blade stall. However, inaccurate rotor vortex wake convection, boundary layer turbulence modeling and grid resolution has limited their accuracy. In addition, the inherently unsteady stalled flow conditions become computationally expensive for even the best endowed research labs. Although numerical power predictions have been compared to experiment. The availability of good wind turbine data sufficient for code validation experimental data that has been extracted from the IEA Annex XIV download site for the NREL Combined Experiment phase II and phase IV rotor. In addition, the comparisons will show data that has been further reduced into steady wind and zero yaw conditions suitable for comparisons to "steady wind" rotor power predictions. In summary, the paper will present and discuss the capabilities and limitations of the three numerical methods and make available a database of experimental data suitable to help other numerical methods practitioners validate their own work.

  1. Flow of Thin Liquid Films with Surfactant: Analysis, Numerics, and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Ellen R.

    When surfactant is deposited on a thin layer of fluid the liquid is instantaneously set into motion. This striking effect is caused by a surface force, the Marangoni force, induced by a surface tension gradient produced by the local presence of surfactant. We investigate the motion of the fluid, and associated spreading of surfactant, in two scenarios: spreading on a horizontal solid substrate, where surface tension is the sole driving force, and on an inclined substrate, where gravity provides an additional force. The governing equations in both cases are derived from the Navier Stokes equations applying the lubrication approximation. The resulting fourth order system of nonlinear PDE consists of two equations: one for the height of the fluid free surface and the other for the distribution of surfactant. On a horizontal substrate, we introduce a droplet of insoluble surfactant on a film with initially uniform height. Neglecting the physical and smoothing effects of gravity, capillarity, and surface diffusion the development of a numerical method is complicated by the loss of smoothness at the leading edge of surfactant. We address this issue by transforming the spatial variable to a fixed domain and using the jump conditions of the simplified system as boundary conditions. These numerical results are then compared to a known similarity scaling and solution developed by Jensen and Grotberg [34, 35] for the region of the solution near the leading edge of the surfactant. We further this investigation by examining the solution near the center of the droplet. Using a phase plane analysis we determine that a similarity solution does exist for this region of the solution. However, this solution contradicts the behavior observed in the numerical simulations and we turn to an asymptotic analysis to determine the structure of the solution, which does not have self-similarity but agrees with numerical simulations. We compare the spreading behavior of the thin film and

  2. CO2 permeability of fractured cap rocks - experiments and numerical simulations (CO2Seals)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    (Draeger), Ines Rick; Clauser, Christoph

    2010-05-01

    In CO2 sequestration and underground gas storage the sealing capacity of a cap rock is of paramount importance. The main question is therefore how the leakage of CO2 through fissures and faults within the cap rock may affect the CO2 sealing efficiency of low-permeable seal lithotypes. In many cases, these structures provide the main pathways for leakage of CO2. Here, we provide an overview of one part of the joint research project CO2Seals, which deals with the effect of structural features - such as tectonic faults and fissures in the overburden - on the migration of CO2 in addition to mineralogical, petrophysical, and geochemical properties of different lithotypes. The primary contribution of the entire project consists of an improvement of the present quantitative understanding of CO2 transport and retention processes and associated interactions in cap rocks between rock and CO2 or brine. To this end, we are adapting different numerical tools for simulating the relevant petrophysical and geochemical processes of CO2 in cap rocks, in close operation with: (1) large-scale CO2-percolation experiments on fractured cap rock samples; (2) permeability, gas breakthrough, and diffusion experiments; (3) measurements of the mechanical stability of cap rocks and the geochemical alterations of fault zone rock. The observed resulting changes in petrophysical properties, such as porosity, relative rock permeability (CO2 and brine), and fault permeability provide basics for the following numerical simulations. For example, first permeability tests of a marl and clay cap rock out of Cretaceous and Jurassic formations revealed gas permeability of 10-18 m2 down to 10-22 m2. In addition, first percolation experiments indicated that the influence of fault zones on the measured CO2 permeability of clays is very low. Furthermore, numerical bench-scale models are performed to provide confidence for the subsequent transfer to reservoir systems. Large-scale numerical models were created

  3. Numerical Modeling of LLNL's Au-Sphere experiments on the OMEGA Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, K. H.; Raicher, E.; Frank, Y.; Fraenkel, M.; Johnsen, E.; Drake, R. P.; Shvarts, D.

    2016-10-01

    Experiments performed by LLNL on OMEGA studying X-ray conversion efficiencies for high-Z materials, aimed to confirm hohlraum modeling, resulted in a''liberal'' flux limiter value of 0.15 to match simulations with these measurements. This conclusion was re-examined and another model accounting for the effect of Ion Acoustic Turbulence on the thermal electron flux limitation was proposed. Our work continues to explore relevant physical parameters in modeling these experiments using the HYADES and FLORENCE codes. The sensitivity of laser absorption, X-ray emission and corona electron temperature to the electron flux limiter, inverse bremsstrahlung coefficient, resonant absorption in the critical layer, LTE and NLTE atomic physics and a numerical convergence study due to steep density and electron temperature profiles at the critical layer will be discussed. Additionally, alternative experimental designs, such as an ``onion'' configuration of plastic and gold as well as different laser illumination patterns, were studied. Supported by the LLNL under subcontract B614207 to DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  4. Gas Chromatographic Determination of Methyl Salicylate in Rubbing Alcohol: An Experiment Employing Standard Addition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Atta, Robert E.; Van Atta, R. Lewis

    1980-01-01

    Provides a gas chromatography experiment that exercises the quantitative technique of standard addition to the analysis for a minor component, methyl salicylate, in a commercial product, "wintergreen rubbing alcohol." (CS)

  5. Validation of a numerical FSI simulation of an aortic BMHV by in vitro PIV experiments.

    PubMed

    Annerel, S; Claessens, T; Degroote, J; Segers, P; Vierendeels, J

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, a validation of a recently developed fluid-structure interaction (FSI) coupling algorithm to simulate numerically the dynamics of an aortic bileaflet mechanical heart valve (BMHV) is performed. This validation is done by comparing the numerical simulation results with in vitro experiments. For the in vitro experiments, the leaflet kinematics and flow fields are obtained via the particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique. Subsequently, the same case is numerically simulated by the coupling algorithm and the resulting leaflet kinematics and flow fields are obtained. Finally, the results are compared, revealing great similarity in leaflet motion and flow fields between the numerical simulation and the experimental test. Therefore, it is concluded that the developed algorithm is able to capture very accurately all the major leaflet kinematics and dynamics and can be used to study and optimize the design of BMHVs.

  6. Free Radical Addition Polymerization Kinetics without Steady-State Approximations: A Numerical Analysis for the Polymer, Physical, or Advanced Organic Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iler, H. Darrell; Brown, Amber; Landis, Amanda; Schimke, Greg; Peters, George

    2014-01-01

    A numerical analysis of the free radical addition polymerization system is described that provides those teaching polymer, physical, or advanced organic chemistry courses the opportunity to introduce students to numerical methods in the context of a simple but mathematically stiff chemical kinetic system. Numerical analysis can lead students to an…

  7. Computational experiment on the numerical solution of some inverse problems of mathematical physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'ev, V. I.; Kardashevsky, A. M.; Sivtsev, PV

    2016-11-01

    In this article the computational experiment on the numerical solution of the most popular linear inverse problems for equations of mathematical physics are presented. The discretization of retrospective inverse problem for parabolic equation is performed using difference scheme with non-positive weight multiplier. Similar difference scheme is also used for the numerical solution of Cauchy problem for two-dimensional Laplace equation. The results of computational experiment, performed on model problems with exact solution, including ones with randomly perturbed input data are presented and discussed.

  8. Numerical simulation studies of the LBNL heavy-ion beam combiner experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, W.M.; Seidl, P.; Haber, I.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.

    1997-01-01

    Transverse beam combining is a cost-saving option employed in many designs for heavy-ion inertial fusion energy drivers. A major area of interest, both theoretically and experimentally, is the resultant transverse phase space dilution during the beam merging process. Currently, a prototype combining experiment is underway at LBNL and we have employed a variety of numerical descriptions to aid in both the initial design of the experiment data. These range from simple envelope codes to detailed 2- and 3-D PIC simulations. We compare the predictions of the different numerical models to each other and to experimental data at different longitudinal positions.

  9. Numerical experiments to investigate the accuracy of broad-band moment magnitude, Mwp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Tatsuhiko; Nishimura, Naoki

    2011-12-01

    We perform numerical experiments to investigate the accuracy of broad-band moment magnitude, Mwp. We conduct these experiments by measuring Mwp from synthetic seismograms and comparing the resulting values to the moment magnitudes used in the calculation of synthetic seismograms. In the numerical experiments using point sources, we have found that there is a significant dependence of Mwp on focal mechanisms, and that depths phases have a large impact on Mwp estimates, especially for large shallow earthquakes. Numerical experiments using line sources suggest that the effects of source finiteness and rupture propagation on Mwp estimates are on the order of 0.2 magnitude units for vertical fault planes with pure dip-slip mechanisms and 45° dipping fault planes with pure dip-slip (thrust) mechanisms, but that the dependence is small for strike-slip events on a vertical fault plane. Numerical experiments for huge thrust faulting earthquakes on a fault plane with a shallow dip angle suggest that the Mwp estimates do not saturate in the moment magnitude range between 8 and 9, although they are underestimates. Our results are consistent with previous studies that compared Mwp estimates to moment magnitudes calculated from seismic moment tensors obtained by analyses of observed data.

  10. Active dentate granule cells encode experience to promote the addition of adult-born hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Kirschen, Gregory W; Shen, Jia; Tian, Mu; Schroeder, Bryce; Wang, Jia; Man, Guoming; Wu, Song; Ge, Shaoyu

    2017-04-03

    The continuous addition of new dentate granule cells, exquisitely regulated by brain activity, renders the hippocampus plastic. However, how neural circuits encode experiences to impact the addition of adult-born neurons remains unknown. Here, we used endoscopic Ca(2+) imaging to track the real-time activity of individual dentate granule cells in freely-behaving mice. For the first time, we found that active dentate granule cells responded to a novel experience by preferentially increasing their Ca(2+) event frequency. This elevated activity, which we found to be associated with object exploration, returned to baseline by one hour in the same environment, but could be dishabituated via introduction to a novel environment. To seamlessly transition between environments, we next established a freely-controllable virtual reality system for unrestrained mice. We again observed increased firing of active neurons in a virtual enriched environment. Interestingly, multiple novel virtual experiences accumulatively increased the number of newborn neurons when compared to a single experience. Finally, optogenetic silencing of existing dentate granule cells during novel environmental exploration perturbed experience-induced neuronal addition. Together, our study shows that the adult brain conveys novel, enriched experiences to increase the addition of adult-born hippocampal neurons by increasing the firing of active dentate granule cells.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTAdult brains are constantly reshaping themselves from synapses to circuits as we encounter novel experiences from moment to moment. Importantly, this reshaping includes the addition of newborn hippocampal neurons. However, it remains largely unknown how our circuits encode experience-induced brain activity to govern the addition of new hippocampal neurons. By coupling in vivo Ca(2+) imaging of dentate granule neurons with a novel unrestrained virtual reality system for rodents, we discovered that a new experience rapidly

  11. Response of non-added solutes during nutrient addition experiments in streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Cardona, B.; Wymore, A.; Koenig, L.; Coble, A. A.; McDowell, W. H.

    2015-12-01

    Nutrient addition experiments, such as Tracer Additions for Spiraling Curve Characterization (TASCC), have become widely popular as a means to study nutrient uptake dynamics in stream ecosystems. However, the impact of these additions on ambient concentrations of non-added solutes is often overlooked. TASCC addition experiments are ideal for assessing interactions among solutes because it allows for the characterization of multiple solute concentrations across a broad range of added nutrient concentrations. TASCC additions also require the addition of a conservative tracer (NaCl) to track changes in conductivity during the experimental manipulation. Despite its use as a conservative tracer, chloride (Cl) and its associated sodium (Na) might change the concentrations of other ions and non-added nutrients through ion exchange or other processes. Similarly, additions of biologically active solutes might change the concentrations of other non-added solutes. These methodological issues in nutrient addition experiments have been poorly addressed in the literature. Here we examine the response of non-added solutes to pulse additions (i.e. TASCC) of NaCl plus nitrate (NO3-), ammonium, and phosphate across biomes including temperate and tropical forests, and arctic taiga. Preliminary results demonstrate that non-added solutes respond to changes in the concentration of these added nutrients. For example, concentrations of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) in suburban headwater streams of New Hampshire both increase and decrease in response to NO3- additions, apparently due to biotic processes. Similarly, cations such as potassium, magnesium, and calcium also increase during TASCC experiments, likely due to cation exchange processes associated with Na addition. The response of non-added solutes to short-term pulses of added nutrients and tracers needs to be carefully assessed to ensure that nutrient uptake metrics are accurate, and to detect biotic interactions that may

  12. Large and meso scale eddy structures forced by a river flow in the west Mediterranean under rotating conditions: Numerical and laboratory experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo, J.; Redondo, J.; Fraunie, P.; Durand, N.

    2003-04-01

    This work presents the results of two laboratory and numerical experiments. The characteristic induced structures by stationer typical conditions from spring, summer, fall and winter. Laboratory experiences were developed on a five meters turntable (SINTEF facilities) obeys the Froude-Rossby similarities. While, the meso-escale numerical model was developed in the LSEET laboratory. This work evidences complementary results from the vortex sort characteristic by radius from both experimental and model methods. Additionally numerical model has a better representation from the conditions in the first 15km and the laboratory model represent the resolution between the large and the meso scale boundary.

  13. Numerical solution of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations using density gradients as additional dependent variables. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwon, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    Numerical solution of two dimensional, time dependent, compressible viscous Navier-Stokes equations about arbitrary bodies was treated using density gradients as additional dependent variables. Thus, six dependent variables were computed with the SOR iteration method. Besides formulation for pressure gradient terms, a formulation for computing the body density was presented. To approximate the governing equations, an implicit finite difference method was employed. In computing the solution for the flow about a circular cylinder, a problem arose near the wall at both stagnation points. Thus, computations with various conditions were tried to examine the problem. Also, computations with and without formulations are compared. The flow variables were computed on 37 by 40 field first, then on an 81 by 40 field.

  14. Numerical Experiments in Complex Hæmodynamic Flows. Non-Newtonian Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basombrío, Fernando G.; Dari, Enzo A.; Buscaglia, Gustavo C.; Feijóo, Raúl A.

    Numerical experiments for non-trivial flows, close to realistic situations in hæmodynamics, are described and interpreted. Two geometries have been selected: an axisymmetric corrugated tube (with periodic boundary conditions) and a 3D bifurcation with an obstructed end (anastomosis). Results concern sensitivity of errors associated to the time-step size and mesh refinement, but essentially consist of the quantitative estimation of non-Newtonian effects based on Casson's rheological model, treated in retarded form. The time-step lag of such effects is the main reason for evaluating the sensitivity of errors. Due to the high computational cost characterizing the problems to be faced, we expect that the present results will be useful when real geometries should be modeled. The main conclusions are that non-Newtonian effects may be relevant (especially for secondary flows) and that, in most cases, for the same level of errors the use of Casson's law does not generate excessive additional computational costs. Thus, within this strategy, the user can accurately solve the problem using this rheological model without having to worry if the non-Newtonian effects are important or not.

  15. Numerical experiments for evolution of backarc basins and melting processes at the Mariana subduction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, S.; Chung, S.; Kuo, B.

    2009-12-01

    Backarc basin basalts can be characterized as fertile, MORB-like end-member mixed with water-rich, previously depleted, arc-like components in various proportions. In addition, an enriched component might also contribute to the magma generation. A number of melting processes have been proposed to account for the chemical systematics of the backarc basin basalts. Previous numerical model experiments for circulation and thermal evolution in the subduction zones generally consider a steady spreading center, corresponding to mature stages. In this study we attempt to better understand the roles of different melting mechanisms and magma sources using a series of thermomechemical models of evolution of backarc basins. In the models the effects of rifting-spreading transition, ridge migration and asymmetric spreading on the thermal field, fluid distribution and melting history are incorporated. We focused on the evolution of the Mariana subduction system because the Mariana subduction zone is one of the best sampled region and its tectonic environment and history are relatively simple. Furthermore, the variations along the strike of the Mariana trough represent the sequence of the evolution of a backarc basin from rifting to mature stages of spreading. The effects of modeling parameters including slab geometry, spreading rate, velocity of subducting slab, lithospheric rheology and crustal thickness have been investigated. How the melting regimes and magma sources may evolve with time in the Mariana arc-basin system will be presented.

  16. Numerical simulation and interpretation of the European in-pile core debris bed experiment--

    SciTech Connect

    Stubos, A.K.; Buchlin, J.-M. ); Joly, C. )

    1989-01-01

    The first European in-pile experiment is described. The experiment is designed to study, in the frame of the Post Accident Heat Removal program, the long-term coolability of a liquid-saturated core debris bed with internal heat dissipation. A physical model, along with its mathematical formulation and numerical implementation, is developed and used for the simulation and interpretation of the main stages of the experimental procedure.

  17. Coordinate Systems, Numerical Objects and Algorithmic Operations of Computational Experiment in Fluid Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degtyarev, Alexander; Khramushin, Vasily

    2016-02-01

    The paper deals with the computer implementation of direct computational experiments in fluid mechanics, constructed on the basis of the approach developed by the authors. The proposed approach allows the use of explicit numerical scheme, which is an important condition for increasing the effciency of the algorithms developed by numerical procedures with natural parallelism. The paper examines the main objects and operations that let you manage computational experiments and monitor the status of the computation process. Special attention is given to a) realization of tensor representations of numerical schemes for direct simulation; b) realization of representation of large particles of a continuous medium motion in two coordinate systems (global and mobile); c) computing operations in the projections of coordinate systems, direct and inverse transformation in these systems. Particular attention is paid to the use of hardware and software of modern computer systems.

  18. Influence of Ar addition on ozone generation in a non-thermal plasma—a numerical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsin Liang; Lee, How Ming; Chen, Shiaw Huei; Wei, Ta Chin; Been Chang, Moo

    2010-10-01

    A numerical model based on a dielectric barrier discharge is developed in this study to investigate the influence of Ar addition on ozone generation. The simulation results show good agreement with the experimental data, confirming the validity of the numerical model. The mechanisms regarding how the Ar addition affects ozone generation are investigated with the assistance of a numerical simulation by probing into the following two questions, (1) why the ozone concentration just slightly decreases in the low specific input energy (SIE, the ratio of discharge power to gas flow rate) region even if the inlet O2 concentration is substantially decreased and (2) why the variation of the increased rate of ozone concentration with SIE (i.e. the variation in the slope of ozone concentration versus SIE) is more significant for an O2/Ar mixture plasma. As SIE is relatively low, ozone decomposition through electron-impact and radical attack reactions is less significant because of low ozone concentration and gas temperature. Therefore, the ozone concentration depends mainly on the amount of oxygen atoms generated. The simulation results indicate that the amount of oxygen atoms generated per electronvolt for Ar concentrations of 0%, 10%, 30%, 50% and 80% are 0.178, 0.174, 0.169, 0.165 and 0.166, respectively, explaining why the ozone concentration does not decrease linearly with the inlet O2 concentration in the low SIE region. On the other hand, the simulation results show that increasing Ar concentration would lead to a lower reduced field and a higher gas temperature. The former would lead to an increase in the rate constant of e + O3 → e + O + O2 while the latter would result in a decrease in the rate constant of O + O2 + M → O3 + M and an increase in that of O3 + O → 2O2. The changes in the rate constants of these reactions would have a negative effect on ozone generation, which is the rationale for the second question.

  19. Numerical experiments on the accuracy of ENO and modified ENO schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, Chi-Wang

    1990-01-01

    Further numerical experiments are made assessing an accuracy degeneracy phenomena. A modified essentially non-oscillatory (ENO) scheme is proposed, which recovers the correct order of accuracy for all the test problems with smooth initial conditions and gives comparable results with the original ENO schemes for discontinuous problems.

  20. Numerical Model of Flame Spread Over Solids in Microgravity: A Supplementary Tool for Designing a Space Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Hsin-Yi; Tien, James S.; Ferkul, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The recently developed numerical model of concurrent-flow flame spread over thin solids has been used as a simulation tool to help the designs of a space experiment. The two-dimensional and three-dimensional, steady form of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations with chemical reactions are solved. With the coupled multi-dimensional solver of the radiative heat transfer, the model is capable of answering a number of questions regarding the experiment concept and the hardware designs. In this paper, the capabilities of the numerical model are demonstrated by providing the guidance for several experimental designing issues. The test matrix and operating conditions of the experiment are estimated through the modeling results. The three-dimensional calculations are made to simulate the flame-spreading experiment with realistic hardware configuration. The computed detailed flame structures provide the insight to the data collection. In addition, the heating load and the requirements of the product exhaust cleanup for the flow tunnel are estimated with the model. We anticipate that using this simulation tool will enable a more efficient and successful space experiment to be conducted.

  1. Physical barriers formed from gelling liquids: 1. numerical design of laboratory and field experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Finsterle, S.; Moridis, G.J.; Pruess, K.; Persoff, P.

    1994-01-01

    The emplacement of liquids under controlled viscosity conditions is investigated by means of numerical simulations. Design calculations are performed for a laboratory experiment on a decimeter scale, and a field experiment on a meter scale. The purpose of the laboratory experiment is to study the behavior of multiple gout plumes when injected in a porous medium. The calculations for the field trial aim at designing a grout injection test from a vertical well in order to create a grout plume of a significant extent in the subsurface.

  2. Strain localisation in two-phase materials: Insights from centimetre-scale numerical models and laboratory experiments with ice mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brune, S.; Czaplinska, D.; Piazolo, S.; Wilson, C. J. L.; Quinteros, J.

    2015-12-01

    Most numerical models of lithosphere deformation approximate the rheological behavior of polymineralic crust and mantle via single-phase flow laws assuming that the weakest or most abundant material controls the bulk rheology. However, previous work showed that in two phase aggregates the bulk viscosity of the dominant phase is significantly affected by second phase particles. Here we combine two unconventional approaches to quantify the relative impact of such particles on strain localisation and bulk response: (1) We run centimetre-scale numerical models of a matrix with inclusions using the elasto-visco-plastic FEM software Slim3D. Recrystallization-induced weakening processes in the matrix, i.e. grain boundary migration and nucleation, are approximated using strain-dependent viscous softening. (2) We conduct high T, constant strain rate deformation experiments with a matrix of deuterated ice (D2O) containing rigid or soft particles, i.e. calcite and graphite, respectively. Ice is a valuable rock analogue, as it replicates the microstructural and fabric changes as well as the non-Newtonian response of other anisotropic minerals, such as olivine and quartz. The laboratory experiments exhibit two types of rheological behaviour: stress partitioning between ice and particles and strain localization in rheologically softer material. To quantify the contribution of both response types, we calibrate numerical simulations with data derived from laboratory experiments. The strain rate, stress, and viscosity evolution of the numerical experiment provides insight to non-linear strain localization processes, particle motion and time-dependent stress concentrations during the deformation. We fit the parameters of the viscous softening function and thereby quantify the amount of additional weakening in the matrix of ice mixtures in comparison to pure ice, which allows to constrain softening parameters used in large-scale simulations of glacial flow and lithosphere deformation.

  3. Numerical simulations of the flow with the prescribed displacement of the airfoil and comparison with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Řidký, V.; Šidlof, P.; Vlček, V.

    2013-04-01

    The work is devoted to comparing measured data with the results of numerical simulations. As mathematical model was used mathematical model whitout turbulence for incompressible flow In the experiment was observed the behavior of designed NACA0015 airfoil in airflow. For the numerical solution was used OpenFOAM computational package, this is open-source software based on finite volume method. In the numerical solution is prescribed displacement of the airfoil, which corresponds to the experiment. The velocity at a point close to the airfoil surface is compared with the experimental data obtained from interferographic measurements of the velocity field. Numerical solution is computed on a 3D mesh composed of about 1 million ortogonal hexahedron elements. The time step is limited by the Courant number. Parallel computations are run on supercomputers of the CIV at Technical University in Prague (HAL and FOX) and on a computer cluster of the Faculty of Mechatronics of Liberec (HYDRA). Run time is fixed at five periods, the results from the fifth periods and average value for all periods are then be compared with experiment.

  4. Numerical simulations of a nonequilibrium argon plasma in a shock-tube experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambier, Jean-Luc

    1991-01-01

    A code developed for the numerical modeling of nonequilibrium radiative plasmas is applied to the simulation of the propagation of strong ionizing shock waves in argon gas. The simulations attempt to reproduce a series of shock-tube experiments which will be used to validate the numerical models and procedures. The ability to perform unsteady simulations makes it possible to observe some fluctuations in the shock propagation, coupled to the kinetic processes. A coupling mechanism by pressure waves, reminiscent of oscillation mechanisms observed in detonation waves, is described. The effect of upper atomic levels is also briefly discussed.

  5. Plume formation and lithosphere erosion - A comparison of laboratory and numerical experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Peter; Schubert, Gerald; Anderson, Charles; Goldman, Peggy

    1988-01-01

    The mechanics of thermal plume formation and intrusion into the lithosphere are investigated using a combination of laboratory and numerical simulations. The sequence of events leading to lithospheric thinning and uplift by thermal plumes is established, and some numerical estimates of the time scales for each stage in this process are derived that are applicable to the mantle. It is demonstrated that the two-dimensional finite element computations successfully reproduce the qualitative features seen in the experiments, with a quantitative discrepancy of typically 30 percent or less. The results of some calculations on plume formation and intrusion into model lithospheres with a variety of rheologies are presented.

  6. Numerical experiments on the influence of melt and serpentinization on passive margin structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetreault, Joya; Buiter, Susanne

    2014-05-01

    Passive margins are often classified as magma-rich or magma-poor, with distinctly different crustal architectures. For example, end-member magma-rich margins have thick sequences of seaward-dipping reflectors, short necking zones, and thick oceanic crusts, whereas many magma-poor margins have wide necking zones, hyper-extended crust, and exhumed serpentinized mantle. Melt and magmatic processes can strongly affect the mantle and crust during various stages of extension. At late stages of extension, serpentinization of upper mantle rocks will also affect crustal strength. We aim to study the influence of melt and serpentinization on structures developed during passive margin formation. Melt and serpentinization are two processes that can alter crust and mantle rheologic properties during different stages of extension. Introducing melt into a rift system will alter the thermal field, rheology, and density of crust and lithosphere. The presence of large amounts of melt (7-8%) in upper mantle rocks will significantly lower the viscosity. In addition, depleted mantle rocks can have significant loss of water that would result in raising the viscosity by about a factor of 100. Intrusion and underplating of magma to the lower crust can cause metamorphism and thus density and rheological changes of the surrounding crust. Furthermore, analogue experiments have shown that magmatic underplating will induce strain localization in the crust during extension. In regions such as the magma-poor margins of the North Atlantic, the serpentinization of mantle peridotites after sufficient thinning of continental crust can lead to strain localization that will subsequently affect the margin architecture. Upper mantle rocks become serpentinized at temperatures lower than 400 degrees when seawater infiltrates. The lower frictional properties that serpentinized peridotites have at these temperatures work to localize strain and allow detachment faults to form. We use 2D numerical experiments

  7. Statistical comparison between experiments and numerical simulations of shock-accelerated gas cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Rider, William; Kamm, J. R.; Zoldi, C. A.; Tomkins, C. D.

    2002-01-01

    We present detailed spatial analysis comparing experimental data and numerical simulation results for Richtmyer-Meshkov instability experiments of Prestridge et al. and Tomkins et al. These experiments consist, respectively, of one and two diffuse cylinders of sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) impulsively accelerated by a Mach 1.2 shockwave in air. The subsequent fluid evolution and mixing is driven by the deposition of baroclinic vorticity at the interface between the two fluids. Numerical simulations of these experiments are performed with three different versions of high resolution finite volume Godunov methods, including a new weighted adaptive Runge-Kutta (WARK) scheme. We quantify the nature of the mixing using using integral measures as well as fractal analysis and continuous wavelet transforms. Our investigation of the gas cylinder configurations follows the path of our earlier studies of the geometrically and dynamically more complex gas 'curtain' experiment. In those studies, we found significant discrepancies in the details of the experimentally measured mixing and the details of the numerical simulations. Here we evaluate the effects of these hydrodynamic integration techniques on the diffuse gas cylinder simulations, which we quantitatively compare with experimental data.

  8. Numerical simulations of biaxial experiments on damage and fracture in sheet metal forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerke, Steffen; Schmidt, Marco; Brünig, Michael

    2016-08-01

    The damage and failure process of ductile metals is characterized by different mechanisms acting on the micro-scale as well as on the macro-level. These deterioration processes essentially depend on the material type and on the loading conditions. To describe these phenomena in an appropriate way a phenomenological continuum damage and fracture model has been proposed. To detect the effects of stress-state-dependent damage mechanisms, numerical simulations of tests with new biaxial specimen geometries for sheet metals have been performed. The experimental results including digital image correlation (DIC) show good agreement with the corresponding numerical analysis. The presented approach based on both experiments and numerical simulation provides several new aspects in the simulation of sheet metal forming processes.

  9. Numerical experiments on breaking waves on contrasting beaches using a two-phase flow approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhtyar, R.; Barry, D. A.; Kees, C. E.

    2012-11-01

    A mechanistic understanding of beach environments needs to account for interactions of oceanic forcing and beach materials, in particular the role of waves on the evolution of the beach profile. A fully coupled two-phase flow model was used to simulate nearshore fluid-sediment turbulent flow in the cross-shore direction. It includes the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations and turbulent stress closures for each phase, and accounts for inter-granular stresses. The model has previously been validated using laboratory-scale data, so the results are likely more reliable for that scale. It was used to simulate wave breaking and the ensuing hydrodynamics and sediment transport processes in the surf/swash zones. Numerical experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of varying beach and wave characteristics (e.g., beach slope, sediment grain size, wave periods and heights) on the foreshore profile changes. Spilling and plunging breakers occur on dissipative and intermediate beaches, respectively. The impact of these wave/beach types on nearshore zone hydrodynamics and beach morphology was determined. The numerical results showed that turbulent kinetic energy, sediment concentrations and transport rate are greater on intermediate than on dissipative beaches. The results confirmed that wave energy, beach grain size and bed slope are main factors for sediment transport and beach morphodynamics. The location of the maximum sediment transport is near the breaking point for both beach types. Coarse- and fine-sand beaches differ significantly in their erosive characteristics (e.g., foreshore profile evolutions are erosive and accretionary on the fine and coarse sand beaches, respectively). In addition, a new parameter (based on main driving factors) is proposed that can characterize the sediment transport in the surf and swash zones. The results are consistent with existing physical observations, suggesting that the two-phase flow model is suitable for the

  10. Chemical and biological consequences of using carbon dioxide versus acid additions in ocean acidification experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, Kimberly K.; DuFore, Christopher M.; Robbins, Lisa L.

    2013-01-01

    Use of different approaches for manipulating seawater chemistry during ocean acidification experiments has confounded comparison of results from various experimental studies. Some of these discrepancies have been attributed to whether addition of acid (such as hydrochloric acid, HCl) or carbon dioxide (CO2) gas has been used to adjust carbonate system parameters. Experimental simulations of carbonate system parameter scenarios for the years 1766, 2007, and 2100 were performed using the carbonate speciation program CO2SYS to demonstrate the variation in seawater chemistry that can result from use of these approaches. Results showed that carbonate system parameters were 3 percent and 8 percent lower than target values in closed-system acid additions, and 1 percent and 5 percent higher in closed-system CO2 additions for the 2007 and 2100 simulations, respectively. Open-system simulations showed that carbonate system parameters can deviate by up to 52 percent to 70 percent from target values in both acid addition and CO2 addition experiments. Results from simulations for the year 2100 were applied to empirically derived equations that relate biogenic calcification to carbonate system parameters for calcifying marine organisms including coccolithophores, corals, and foraminifera. Calculated calcification rates for coccolithophores, corals, and foraminifera differed from rates at target conditions by 0.5 percent to 2.5 percent in closed-system CO2 gas additions, from 0.8 percent to 15 percent in the closed-system acid additions, from 4.8 percent to 94 percent in open-system acid additions, and from 7 percent to 142 percent in open-system CO2 additions.

  11. Laboratory and numerical decompression experiments: an insight into the nucleation and growth of bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spina, L.; Colucci, S.; De'Michieli Vitturi, M.; Scheu, B.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2014-12-01

    Numerical modeling, joined with experimental investigations, is fundamental for studying the dynamics of magmatic fluid into the conduit, where direct observations are unattainable. Furthermore, laboratory experiments can provide invaluable data to vunalidate complex multiphase codes. With the aim on unveil the essence of nucleation process, as well as the behavior of the multiphase magmatic fluid, we performed slow decompression experiments in a shock tube system. We choose silicon oil as analogue for the magmatic melt, and saturated it with Argon at 10 MPa for 72h. The slow decompression to atmospheric conditions was monitored through a high speed camera and pressure sensors, located into the experimental conduit. The experimental conditions of the decompression process have then been reproduced numerically with a compressible multiphase solver based on OpenFOAM. Numerical simulations have been performed by the OpenFOAM compressibleInterFoam solver for 2 compressible, non-isothermal immiscible fluids, using a VOF (volume of fluid) phase-fraction based interface capturing approach. The data extracted from 2D images obtained from laboratory analyses were compared to the outcome of numerical investigation, showing the capability of the model to capture the main processes studied.

  12. Numerical simulations of spark channels propagating along the ground surface: Comparison with high-current experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Bazelyan, E. M.; Sysoev, V. S.; Andreev, M. G.

    2009-08-15

    A numerical model of a spark discharge propagating along the ground surface from the point at which an {approx}100-kA current pulse is input into the ground has been developed based on experiments in which the velocity of a long leader was measured as a function of the leader current. The results of numerical simulations are in good agreement with the measured characteristics of creeping discharges excited in field experiments by using a high-power explosive magnetic generator. The reason why the length of a spark discharge depends weakly on the number of simultaneously developing channels is found. Analysis of the influence of the temporal characteristics of the current pulse on the parameters of the creeping spark discharge shows that actual lighting may exhibit similar behavior.

  13. Additive Routes to Action Learning: Layering Experience Shapes Engagement of the Action Observation Network

    PubMed Central

    Kirsch, Louise P.; Cross, Emily S.

    2015-01-01

    The way in which we perceive others in action is biased by one's prior experience with an observed action. For example, we can have auditory, visual, or motor experience with actions we observe others perform. How action experience via 1, 2, or all 3 of these modalities shapes action perception remains unclear. Here, we combine pre- and post-training functional magnetic resonance imaging measures with a dance training manipulation to address how building experience (from auditory to audiovisual to audiovisual plus motor) with a complex action shapes subsequent action perception. Results indicate that layering experience across these 3 modalities activates a number of sensorimotor cortical regions associated with the action observation network (AON) in such a way that the more modalities through which one experiences an action, the greater the response is within these AON regions during action perception. Moreover, a correlation between left premotor activity and participants' scores for reproducing an action suggests that the better an observer can perform an observed action, the stronger the neural response is. The findings suggest that the number of modalities through which an observer experiences an action impacts AON activity additively, and that premotor cortical activity might serve as an index of embodiment during action observation. PMID:26209850

  14. Additive Routes to Action Learning: Layering Experience Shapes Engagement of the Action Observation Network.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, Louise P; Cross, Emily S

    2015-12-01

    The way in which we perceive others in action is biased by one's prior experience with an observed action. For example, we can have auditory, visual, or motor experience with actions we observe others perform. How action experience via 1, 2, or all 3 of these modalities shapes action perception remains unclear. Here, we combine pre- and post-training functional magnetic resonance imaging measures with a dance training manipulation to address how building experience (from auditory to audiovisual to audiovisual plus motor) with a complex action shapes subsequent action perception. Results indicate that layering experience across these 3 modalities activates a number of sensorimotor cortical regions associated with the action observation network (AON) in such a way that the more modalities through which one experiences an action, the greater the response is within these AON regions during action perception. Moreover, a correlation between left premotor activity and participants' scores for reproducing an action suggests that the better an observer can perform an observed action, the stronger the neural response is. The findings suggest that the number of modalities through which an observer experiences an action impacts AON activity additively, and that premotor cortical activity might serve as an index of embodiment during action observation.

  15. Isentropic Compression for TATB Based HE Samples, Numerical Simulations and Comparison with Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lefrancois, A; Vandersall, K; L'Eplattenier, P; Burger, M

    2006-02-06

    Isentropic compression experiments and numerical simulations on TATB based HE were performed respectively at Z accelerator facility from Sandia National Laboratory and at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in order to study the isentrope and associated Hugoniot of this HE [1]. 3D configurations have been calculated here to test the new beta version of the electromagnetism package coupled with the dynamics in Ls-Dyna and compared with the ICE Z shot 1967.

  16. Series-field-coil ion beam diode experiment and numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, C.W. Jr.; Quintenz, J.P.; Zagar, D.M.; Johnson, P.R.; Anderson, R.J.; Widner, M.M.

    1984-08-01

    An experiment with a series-field-coil intense ion beam diode operating at the 1.6-MV, 0.8-TW level is described. The diode operates in the extraction mode with a 20-cm focal length. The diode design procedure is described together with some of the essential ion diode theory used in this design process. The experiment produced a well-focused ion beam while verifying some of the theoretical assumptions about ion diodes of this type. The experimental results are compared with numerical computer simulations and excellent agreement is obtained.

  17. Optimization of Capacitive Acoustic Resonant Sensor Using Numerical Simulation and Design of Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Rubaiyet Iftekharul; Loussert, Christophe; Sergent, Michelle; Benaben, Patrick; Boddaert, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Optimization of the acoustic resonant sensor requires a clear understanding of how the output responses of the sensor are affected by the variation of different factors. During this work, output responses of a capacitive acoustic transducer, such as membrane displacement, quality factor, and capacitance variation, are considered to evaluate the sensor design. The six device parameters taken into consideration are membrane radius, backplate radius, cavity height, air gap, membrane tension, and membrane thickness. The effects of factors on the output responses of the transducer are investigated using an integrated methodology that combines numerical simulation and design of experiments (DOE). A series of numerical experiments are conducted to obtain output responses for different combinations of device parameters using finite element methods (FEM). Response surface method is used to identify the significant factors and to develop the empirical models for the output responses. Finally, these results are utilized to calculate the optimum device parameters using multi-criteria optimization with desirability function. Thereafter, the validating experiments are designed and deployed using the numerical simulation to crosscheck the responses. PMID:25894937

  18. LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS, NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS, AND ASTRONOMICAL OBSERVATIONS OF DEFLECTED SUPERSONIC JETS: APPLICATION TO HH 110

    SciTech Connect

    Hartigan, P.; Carver, R.; Foster, J. M.; Rosen, P. A.; Williams, R. J. R.; Wilde, B. H.; Coker, R. F.; Hansen, J. F.; Blue, B. E.; Frank, A.

    2009-11-01

    Collimated supersonic flows in laboratory experiments behave in a similar manner to astrophysical jets provided that radiation, viscosity, and thermal conductivity are unimportant in the laboratory jets and that the experimental and astrophysical jets share similar dimensionless parameters such as the Mach number and the ratio of the density between the jet and the ambient medium. When these conditions apply, laboratory jets provide a means to study their astrophysical counterparts for a variety of initial conditions, arbitrary viewing angles, and different times, attributes especially helpful for interpreting astronomical images where the viewing angle and initial conditions are fixed and the time domain is limited. Experiments are also a powerful way to test numerical fluid codes in a parameter range in which the codes must perform well. In this paper, we combine images from a series of laboratory experiments of deflected supersonic jets with numerical simulations and new spectral observations of an astrophysical example, the young stellar jet HH 110. The experiments provide key insights into how deflected jets evolve in three dimensions, particularly within working surfaces where multiple subsonic shells and filaments form, and along the interface where shocked jet material penetrates into and destroys the obstacle along its path. The experiments also underscore the importance of the viewing angle in determining what an observer will see. The simulations match the experiments so well that we can use the simulated velocity maps to compare the dynamics in the experiment with those implied by the astronomical spectra. The experiments support a model where the observed shock structures in HH 110 form as a result of a pulsed driving source rather than from weak shocks that may arise in the supersonic shear layer between the Mach disk and bow shock of the jet's working surface.

  19. Numerical experiments with an implicit particle filter for the shallow water equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souopgui, I.; Chorin, A. J.; Hussaini, M.

    2012-12-01

    The estimation of initial conditions for the shallow water equations for a given set of later data is a well known test problem for data assimilation codes. A popular approach to this problem is the variational method (4D-Var), i.e. the computation of the mode of the posterior probability density function (pdf) via the adjoint technique. Here, we improve on 4D-Var by computing the conditional mean (the minimum least square error estimator) rather than the mode (a biased estimator) and we do so with implicit sampling, a Monte Carlo (MC) importance sampling method. The idea in implicit sampling is to first search for the high-probability region of the posterior pdf and then to find samples in this region. Because the samples are concentrated in the high-probability region, fewer samples are required than with competing MC schemes. The search for the high-probability region can be implemented by a minimization that is very similar to the minimization in 4D-Var, and we make use of a 4D-Var code in our implementation. The samples are obtained by solving algebraic equations with a random right-hand-side. These equations can be solved efficiently, so that the additional cost of our approach, compared to traditional 4D-Var, is small. The long-term goal is to assimilate experimental data, obtained with the CORIOLIS turntable in Grenoble (France), to study the drift of a vortex. We present results from numerical twin experiments as a first step towards our long-term goal. We discretize the shallow water equations on a square domain (2.5m× 2.5m) using finite differences on a staggered grid of size 28× 28 and a fourth order Runge-Kutta. We assume open boundary conditions and estimate the initial state (velocities and surface height) given noisy observations of the state. We solve the optimization problem using a 4D-Var code that relies on a L-BFGS method; the random algebraic equations are solved with random maps, i.e. we look for solutions in given, but random, directions

  20. Science Support for Space-Based Droplet Combustion: Drop Tower Experiments and Detailed Numerical Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchese, Anthony J.; Dryer, Frederick L.

    1997-01-01

    This program supports the engineering design, data analysis, and data interpretation requirements for the study of initially single component, spherically symmetric, isolated droplet combustion studies. Experimental emphasis is on the study of simple alcohols (methanol, ethanol) and alkanes (n-heptane, n-decane) as fuels with time dependent measurements of drop size, flame-stand-off, liquid-phase composition, and finally, extinction. Experiments have included bench-scale studies at Princeton, studies in the 2.2 and 5.18 drop towers at NASA-LeRC, and both the Fiber Supported Droplet Combustion (FSDC-1, FSDC-2) and the free Droplet Combustion Experiment (DCE) studies aboard the shuttle. Test matrix and data interpretation are performed through spherically-symmetric, time-dependent numerical computations which embody detailed sub-models for physical and chemical processes. The computed burning rate, flame stand-off, and extinction diameter are compared with the respective measurements for each individual experiment. In particular, the data from FSDC-1 and subsequent space-based experiments provide the opportunity to compare all three types of data simultaneously with the computed parameters. Recent numerical efforts are extending the computational tools to consider time dependent, axisymmetric 2-dimensional reactive flow situations.

  1. Shock experiments and numerical simulations on low energy portable electrically exploding foil accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, A. K.; Kaushik, T. C.; Gupta, Satish C.

    2010-03-15

    Two low energy (1.6 and 8 kJ) portable electrically exploding foil accelerators are developed for moderately high pressure shock studies at small laboratory scale. Projectile velocities up to 4.0 km/s have been measured on Kapton flyers of thickness 125 {mu}m and diameter 8 mm, using an in-house developed Fabry-Perot velocimeter. An asymmetric tilt of typically few milliradians has been measured in flyers using fiber optic technique. High pressure impact experiments have been carried out on tantalum, and aluminum targets up to pressures of 27 and 18 GPa, respectively. Peak particle velocities at the target-glass interface as measured by Fabry-Perot velocimeter have been found in good agreement with the reported equation of state data. A one-dimensional hydrodynamic code based on realistic models of equation of state and electrical resistivity has been developed to numerically simulate the flyer velocity profiles. The developed numerical scheme is validated against experimental and simulation data reported in literature on such systems. Numerically computed flyer velocity profiles and final flyer velocities have been found in close agreement with the previously reported experimental results with a significant improvement over reported magnetohydrodynamic simulations. Numerical modeling of low energy systems reported here predicts flyer velocity profiles higher than experimental values, indicating possibility of further improvement to achieve higher shock pressures.

  2. Observation and numerical experiments for drag coefficient under typhoon wind forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Huiqiu; Zhou, Liangming; Li, Shuiqing; Wang, Zhifeng

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a study on drag coefficients under typhoon wind forcing based on observations and numerical experiments. The friction velocity and wind speed are measured at a marine observation platform in the South China Sea. Three typhoons: SOULIK (2013), TRAMI (2013) and FITOW (2013) are observed at a buoy station in the northeast sea area of Pingtan Island. A new parameterization is formulated for the wind drag coefficient as a function of wind speed. It is found that the drag coefficient ( C d ) increases linearly with the slope of 0.083×10-3 for wind speed less than 24 m s-1. To investigate the drag coefficient under higher wind conditions, three numerical experiments are implemented for these three typhoons using SWAN wave model. The wind input data are objective reanalysis datasets, which are assimilated with many sources and provided every six hours with the resolution of 0.125°×0.125°. The numerical simulation results show a good agreement with wave observation data under typhoon wind forcing. The results indicate that the drag coefficient levels off with the linear slope of 0.012×10-3 for higher wind speeds (less than 34 m s-1) and the new parameterization improvese the simulation accuracy compared with the Wu (1982) default used in SWAN.

  3. Numerical experiments with a symmetric high-resolution shock-capturing scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.

    1986-01-01

    Characteristic-based explicit and implicit total variation diminishing (TVD) schemes for the two-dimensional compressible Euler equations have recently been developed. This is a generalization of recent work of Roe and Davis to a wider class of symmetric (non-upwind) TVD schemes other than Lax-Wendroff. The Roe and Davis schemes can be viewed as a subset of the class of explicit methods. The main properties of the present class of schemes are that they can be implicit, and, when steady-state calculations are sought, the numerical solution is independent of the time step. In a recent paper, a comparison of a linearized form of the present implicit symmetric TVD scheme with an implicit upwind TVD scheme originally developed by Harten and modified by Yee was given. Results favored the symmetric method. It was found that the latter is just as accurate as the upwind method while requiring less computational effort. Currently, more numerical experiments are being conducted on time-accurate calculations and on the effect of grid topology, numerical boundary condition procedures, and different flow conditions on the behavior of the method for steady-state applications. The purpose here is to report experiences with this type of scheme and give guidelines for its use.

  4. Numerical simulation experiments on water seepage patterns in heterogeneous, unsaturated rock fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.

    1996-05-01

    Water seepage has been numerically simulated in heterogeneous fractures, which were conceptualized as two-dimensional heterogeneous porous media. Flow was found to proceed in dendritic patterns along preferential paths, giving rise to such features as localized ponding and bypassing. Limited parameter variation studies have shown strong dependence of seepage patterns on fracture permeability and applied flow rate. The temporal evolution of seeps proceeds on a vast range of time scales. This casts doubt on the applicability of steady-state concepts for water migration in thick unsaturated zones of fractured rock where infiltration is episodic. An approximate invariance of seepage behavior was derived for simultaneous space-and-time scaling. Numerical simulation experiments have confirmed this invariance, as well as its limits of applicability.

  5. Numerical simulations of the Princeton magnetorotational instability experiment with conducting axial boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xing; Ji, Hantao; Goodman, Jeremy; Ebrahimi, Fatima; Gilson, Erik; Jenko, Frank; Lackner, Karl

    2016-12-01

    We investigate numerically the Princeton magnetorotational instability (MRI) experiment and the effect of conducting axial boundaries or endcaps. MRI is identified and found to reach a much higher saturation than for insulating endcaps. This is probably due to stronger driving of the base flow by the magnetically rather than viscously coupled boundaries. Although the computations are necessarily limited to lower Reynolds numbers (Re ) than their experimental counterparts, it appears that the saturation level becomes independent of Re when Re is sufficiently large, whereas it has been found previously to decrease roughly as Re-1 /4 with insulating endcaps. The much higher saturation levels will allow for the positive detection of MRI beyond its theoretical and numerical predictions.

  6. A Numerical Experiment to Test the Influence of the Uncertainty of Earth Model on Nutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C. L.; Zhang, M.

    2014-12-01

    From an infinite set of coupled ordinary differential equations that govern the infinitesimal elastic-gravitational oscillations of a rotating, slightly elliptical Earth, as well as a set of boundary conditions on displacement vector, stress tensor and gravity potential, the theoretical nutation model of non-rigid earth can be numerically obtained. In these differential equations and the boundary conditions, the distributions of density and elastic (Lame) parameters interior the Earth are key parameters and are usually input from 1D earth model like PREM. However, the influence of the uncertainty of a given earth model on nutation has never been checked. In this work, we made a numerical experiment to test it, and some primary results will be presented.

  7. Numerical prediction of the monsoon depression of 5-7 July 1979. [Monsoon Experiment (MONEX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shukla, J.; Atlas, R.; Baker, W. E.

    1981-01-01

    A well defined monsoon depression was used for two assimilation and forecast experiments: (1) using conventional surface and upper air data, (2) using these data plus Monex data. The data sets were assimilated and used with a general circulation model to make numerical predictions. The model, the analysis and assimilation procedure, the differences in the analyses due to different data inputs, and the differences in the numerical predictions are described. The MONEX data have a positive impact, although the differences after 24 hr are not significant. The MONEX assimilation does not agree with manual analysis location of depression center. The 2.5 x 3 deg horizontal resolution of the prediction model is too coarse. The assimilation of geopotential height data derived from satellite soundings generated gravity waves with amplitudes similar to the meteorologically significant features investigated.

  8. Role of damage mechanics in nanoindentation of lamellar bone at multiple sizes: experiments and numerical modeling.

    PubMed

    Lucchini, Riccardo; Carnelli, Davide; Ponzoni, Matteo; Bertarelli, Emanuele; Gastaldi, Dario; Vena, Pasquale

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to show that damage mechanisms can account for the response of lamellar bone to nanoindentation tests, with particular regards to the decrease of indentation stiffness with increasing penetration depth and to the loss of contact stiffness during the unloading phase of the test. For this purpose, indentation experiments on bovine cortical bone samples along axial and transverse directions have been carried out at five penetration depths from 50 to 450 nm; furthermore, a continuum damage model has been implemented into finite element analyses, which are able to simulate indentation experiments. Experiments along the axial direction have shown a decrease of about 20% of the indentation modulus with indentation depth; a similar trend was found along the transverse direction. All unloading branches of the force-displacement indentation curves exhibited relevant stiffness loss (curve concavity). The numerical model with damage was able to correctly predict the indentation stiffness and hardness at 300 nm penetration depth along both axial and transverse directions. Furthermore, stiffness loss during unloading was simulated with both qualitative and quantitative agreement with experiments. A final validation has been provided by simulating axial indentation experiments at the remaining penetration depths using the same set of constitutive parameters as those used to simulate the experiments at 300 nm depth. These results support the hypothesis that damage plays a relevant role in the mechanics of lamellar bone and should be taken into account when studying bone mechanical properties at multiple scales.

  9. Comparison of numerical simulations to experiments for atomization in a jet nebulizer.

    PubMed

    Lelong, Nicolas; Vecellio, Laurent; Sommer de Gélicourt, Yann; Tanguy, Christian; Diot, Patrice; Junqua-Moullet, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    The development of jet nebulizers for medical purposes is an important challenge of aerosol therapy. The performance of a nebulizer is characterized by its output rate of droplets with a diameter under 5 µm. However the optimization of this parameter through experiments has reached a plateau. The purpose of this study is to design a numerical model simulating the nebulization process and to compare it with experimental data. Such a model could provide a better understanding of the atomization process and the parameters influencing the nebulizer output. A model based on the Updraft nebulizer (Hudson) was designed with ANSYS Workbench. Boundary conditions were set with experimental data then transient 3D calculations were run on a 4 µm mesh with ANSYS Fluent. Two air flow rate (2 L/min and 8 L/min, limits of the operating range) were considered to account for different turbulence regimes. Numerical and experimental results were compared according to phenomenology and droplet size. The behavior of the liquid was compared to images acquired through shadowgraphy with a CCD Camera. Three experimental methods, laser diffractometry, phase Doppler anemometry (PDA) and shadowgraphy were used to characterize the droplet size distributions. Camera images showed similar patterns as numerical results. Droplet sizes obtained numerically are overestimated in relation to PDA and diffractometry, which only consider spherical droplets. However, at both flow rates, size distributions extracted from numerical image processing were similar to distributions obtained from shadowgraphy image processing. The simulation then provides a good understanding and prediction of the phenomena involved in the fragmentation of droplets over 10 µm. The laws of dynamics apply to droplets down to 1 µm, so we can assume the continuity of the distribution and extrapolate the results for droplets between 1 and 10 µm. So, this model could help predicting nebulizer output with defined geometrical and

  10. Comparison of Numerical Simulations to Experiments for Atomization in a Jet Nebulizer

    PubMed Central

    Lelong, Nicolas; Vecellio, Laurent; Sommer de Gélicourt, Yann; Tanguy, Christian; Diot, Patrice; Junqua-Moullet, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    The development of jet nebulizers for medical purposes is an important challenge of aerosol therapy. The performance of a nebulizer is characterized by its output rate of droplets with a diameter under 5 µm. However the optimization of this parameter through experiments has reached a plateau. The purpose of this study is to design a numerical model simulating the nebulization process and to compare it with experimental data. Such a model could provide a better understanding of the atomization process and the parameters influencing the nebulizer output. A model based on the Updraft nebulizer (Hudson) was designed with ANSYS Workbench. Boundary conditions were set with experimental data then transient 3D calculations were run on a 4 µm mesh with ANSYS Fluent. Two air flow rate (2 L/min and 8 L/min, limits of the operating range) were considered to account for different turbulence regimes. Numerical and experimental results were compared according to phenomenology and droplet size. The behavior of the liquid was compared to images acquired through shadowgraphy with a CCD Camera. Three experimental methods, laser diffractometry, phase Doppler anemometry (PDA) and shadowgraphy were used to characterize the droplet size distributions. Camera images showed similar patterns as numerical results. Droplet sizes obtained numerically are overestimated in relation to PDA and diffractometry, which only consider spherical droplets. However, at both flow rates, size distributions extracted from numerical image processing were similar to distributions obtained from shadowgraphy image processing. The simulation then provides a good understanding and prediction of the phenomena involved in the fragmentation of droplets over 10 µm. The laws of dynamics apply to droplets down to 1 µm, so we can assume the continuity of the distribution and extrapolate the results for droplets between 1 and 10 µm. So, this model could help predicting nebulizer output with defined geometrical and

  11. "Physically-based" numerical experiment to determine the dominant hillslope processes during floods?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaume, Eric; Esclaffer, Thomas; Dangla, Patrick; Payrastre, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    To study the dynamics of hillslope responses during flood event, a fully coupled "physically-based" model for the combined numerical simulation of surface runoff and underground flows has been developed. A particular attention has been given to the selection of appropriate numerical schemes for the modelling of both processes and of their coupling. Surprisingly, the most difficult question to solve, from a numerical point of view, was not related to the coupling of two processes with contrasted kinetics such as surface and underground flows, but to the high gradient infiltration fronts appearing in soils, source of numerical diffusion, instabilities and sometimes divergence. The model being elaborated, it has been successfully tested against results of high quality experiments conducted on a laboratory sandy slope in the early eighties, which is still considered as a reference hillslope experimental setting (Abdul & Guilham). The model appeared able to accurately simulate the pore pressure distributions observed in this 1.5 meter deep and wide laboratory hillslope, as well as its outflow hydrograph shapes and the measured respective contributions of direct runoff and groundwater to these outflow hydrographs. Based on this great success, the same model has been used to simulate the response of a theoretical 100-meter wide and 10% sloped hillslope, with a 2 meter deep pervious soil and impervious bedrock. Three rain events have been tested: a 100 millimeter rainfall event over 10 days, over 1 day or over one hour. The simulated responses are hydrologically not realistic and especially the fast component of the response, that is generally observed in the real-world and explains flood events, is almost absent of the simulated response. Thinking a little about the whole problem, the simulation results appears totally logical according to the proposed model. The simulated response, in fact a recession hydrograph, corresponds to a piston flow of a relatively uniformly

  12. A numerical experiment on the equilibrium and stability of a rotating galactic bar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.; Vandervoort, P. O.; Welty, D. E.; Smith, B. F.

    1982-01-01

    A self-consistent, three-dimensional numerical experiment is performed on an N-body system whose initial state is a realization of a certain theoretical model of a rotating triaxial galaxy. The model is a stellar-dynamical counterpart of a uniformly rotating polytrope of index equal to 0.5. The aim of the experiment is to study the equilibrium of the system and, in particular, to test its stability. The experimental system behaves in the mean like a realization of the theoretical model for at least seven crossing times. The principal departure of the system from equilibrium is an oscillation which is identified as a radial pulsation. There is no indication in its behavior that the system is unstable with respect to anu mode with an e-folding time shorter than or of the order of two crossing times. Certain changes that occur in the state of the system are interpreted, with the aid of the theoretical model, as secular changes which result from a slight failure of our numerical methods to conserve the mass, energy, and angular momentum of the system; these effects are small enough that they do not vitiate the experiment on a dynamical time scale.

  13. Idealized numerical experiments on the microphysical evolution of warm-type heavy rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hwan-Jin; Sohn, Byung-Ju; Hong, Song-You; Hashino, Tempei

    2017-02-01

    Recent satellite observations suggested that medium-depth heavy rain systems (i.e., warm-type heavy rainfall) were predominantly found in the Korean peninsula under moist-adiabatically near neutral conditions in contrast to the traditional view that deep convection induced by convective instability produced heavy rainfall (i.e., cold-type heavy rainfall). In order to examine whether a numerical model could explain the microphysical evolution of the warm-type as well as cold-type heavy rainfall, numerical experiments were implemented with idealized thermodynamic conditions. Under the prescribed humid and weakly unstable conditions, the warm-type experiments resulted in a lower storm height, earlier onset of precipitation, and heavier precipitation than was found for the cold-type experiments. The growth of ice particles and their melting process were important for developing cold-type heavy rainfall. In contrast, the collision and coalescence processes between liquid particles were shown to be the mechanism for increasing the radar reflectivity toward the surface in the storm core region for the warm-type heavy rainfall.

  14. Numerical experiments on the climatic sensitivity of an atmospheric hydrologic cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roads, J. O.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown for an intermediate numerical model that fractional cloudiness and relative humidity decrease with increasing temperature. The fractional cloudiness decreases at a rate about 1 per deg K. This occurs in spite of an increase in the evaporation, water transport, condensation, precipitation and cloud water content with increasing temperature. These results are quite similar to those found from models with more highly parameterized clouds, notably the NCAR model. The fractional cloudiness in this model is measured by the fractional coverage of total cloud water and the fractional coverage of positive condensation, in addition to the relative humidity. It is also shown that some of the characteristics of a temperate climate can be simulated in an intermediate numerical model with periodic, antisymmetric and symmetric boundary conditions on an f plane. Intermediate models of this sort may therefore be useful to investigate general questions about the earth's hydrologic cycle on climatic space and time scales

  15. Modeling upper mantle rheology with numerical experiments and mapping marine gravity with satellite altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yale, Mara M.

    This thesis consists of modeling upper mantle rheology with numerical experiments and mapping marine gravity anomalies with satellite altimetry data. Chapter 1 introduces my reasoning for undertaking projects in two distinct fields. Chapters 2 and 3 are numerical modeling projects. Chapters 4 and 5 and the appendix are satellite altimetry projects. Chapter 2 presents numerical modeling experiments of small-scale convection in the asthenosphere beneath California. Using the timing provided by the tectonic history and knowledge of the current thermal state from seismic tomography, our numerical experiments provide upper and lower bounds on the asthenosphere viscosity, and demonstrate the effects of rheologies that depend on temperature, pressure, and strain rate. Chapter 3 presents a numerical model to test the asthenosphere flow paradigm in which hotspots feed the low viscosity asthenosphere, and lithosphere consumes the asthenosphere. The model is applied to two distinct regions--the Iceland hotspot centered on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and the Kerguelen hotspot located near the Southeast Indian Ridge. The asthenosphere flow paradigm can explain major features of hotspot-ridge interactions for both on-axis and off-axis hotspots. Chapter 4 presents a resolution analysis of repeat satellite altimeter profiles to compare the along-track resolution capabilities of Geosat, ERS-1 and TOPEX data. On average globally, the along-track resolution (0.5 coherence) of eight-cycle stacks are approximately the same, 28, 29, and 30 km for TOPEX, Geosat, and ERS-1, respectively. TOPEX 31-cycle stacks (22 km) resolve slightly shorter wavelengths than Geosat 31-cycle stacks (24 km). Chapter 5 presents a method to improve global gravity profiles by iterating on the current grid. We use new repeat cycle data to improve stacks (averages) for ERS-1/2 (43 cycles) and Topex (142 cycles), and then implement the method for improving gravity profiles globally. We demonstrate the maximum

  16. Application of numerical modelling in the design of a full-scale heated Tunnel Sealing Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, R.; Chandler, N.; Martino, J.; Dixon, D.

    2005-10-01

    The Tunnel Sealing Experiment (TSX) was a full-scale in situ demonstration of technology for constructing nearly water tight-seals in excavations through crystalline rock deep below the surface of the earth. The experiment has been carried out at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL's) Underground Research Laboratory near Lac du Bonnet, Canada, in support of international programs for geologic disposal of radioactive waste. The TSX, with partners from Canada, Japan, France and the United States, was carried under conditions of high pressure (up to 4 MPa) and elevated temperature (up to 85°C). Comparing numerical model predictions with eight years of data collected from approximately 900 sensors was an important component of this experiment. Model of Transport In Fractured/porous Media (MOTIF), a finite element computer program developed by AECL for simulating fully coupled or uncoupled fluid flow, solute transport and heat transport, was used to model both the ambient temperature and heated phases of the TSX. The plan to heat the water in the TSX to 85°C was developed using model predictions and a comparison of simulated results with measurements during heating of the water in the TSX to about 50°C. The three-dimensional MOTIF simulations were conducted in parallel with axisymmetric modelling using Fast Lagrangian Analysis of Continua (FLAC), which computed the heat loss from pipes that carried the heated water through the rock to and from the experiment. The numerical model was initially used to develop a plan for operation of the experiment heaters, and then subsequently used to predict temperatures and hydraulic heads in the TSX bulkhead seals and surrounding rock. Copyright

  17. Spinel dissolution via addition of glass forming chemicals. Results of preliminary experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K. M.; Johnson, F. C.

    2015-11-01

    Increased loading of high level waste in glass can lead to crystallization within the glass. Some crystalline species, such as spinel, have no practical impact on the chemical durability of the glass, and therefore may be acceptable from both a processing and a product performance standpoint. In order to operate a melter with a controlled amount of crystallization, options must be developed for remediating an unacceptable accumulation of crystals. This report describes preliminary experiments designed to evaluate the ability to dissolve spinel crystals in simulated waste glass melts via the addition of glass forming chemicals (GFCs).

  18. Numerical modeling of laser-driven experiments aiming to demonstrate magnetic field amplification via turbulent dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzeferacos, P.; Rigby, A.; Bott, A.; Bell, A. R.; Bingham, R.; Casner, A.; Cattaneo, F.; Churazov, E. M.; Emig, J.; Flocke, N.; Fiuza, F.; Forest, C. B.; Foster, J.; Graziani, C.; Katz, J.; Koenig, M.; Li, C.-K.; Meinecke, J.; Petrasso, R.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B. A.; Ross, J. S.; Ryu, D.; Ryutov, D.; Weide, K.; White, T. G.; Reville, B.; Miniati, F.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Froula, D. H.; Gregori, G.; Lamb, D. Q.

    2017-04-01

    The universe is permeated by magnetic fields, with strengths ranging from a femtogauss in the voids between the filaments of galaxy clusters to several teragauss in black holes and neutron stars. The standard model behind cosmological magnetic fields is the nonlinear amplification of seed fields via turbulent dynamo to the values observed. We have conceived experiments that aim to demonstrate and study the turbulent dynamo mechanism in the laboratory. Here, we describe the design of these experiments through simulation campaigns using FLASH, a highly capable radiation magnetohydrodynamics code that we have developed, and large-scale three-dimensional simulations on the Mira supercomputer at the Argonne National Laboratory. The simulation results indicate that the experimental platform may be capable of reaching a turbulent plasma state and determining the dynamo amplification. We validate and compare our numerical results with a small subset of experimental data using synthetic diagnostics.

  19. Mixing of a point-source indoor pollutant: Numerical predictions and comparison with experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lobscheid, C.; Gadgil, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    In most practical estimates of indoor pollutant exposures, it is common to assume that the pollutant is uniformly and instantaneously mixed in the indoor space. It is also commonly known that this assumption is simplistic, particularly for point sources, and for short-term or localized indoor exposures. We report computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions of mixing time of a point-pulse release of a pollutant in an unventilated mechanically mixed isothermal room. We aimed to determine the adequacy of the standard RANS two-equation ({kappa}-{var_epsilon}) turbulence model to predict the mixing times under these conditions. The predictions were made for the twelve mixing time experiments performed by Drescher et al. (1995). We paid attention to adequate grid resolution, suppression of numerical diffusion, and careful simulation of the mechanical blowers used in the experiments. We found that the predictions are in good agreement with experimental measurements.

  20. Experiment and numerical simulation of cavitation performance on a pressure-regulating valve with different openings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, W. S.; Tan, L.; Cao, S. L.; Xu, Y.; Huang, J.; Xu, Q. H.

    2015-01-01

    As a kind of widely used device in pipe system for pressure and flow rate regulating, the valve would experience cavitation in the case when a sharp pressure drop occurs, which will induce the energy loss, noise and vibration of pipeline system, and even operational accidents. The experiment on flow resistance coefficient of a DN600 pressure-regulating valve under operation conditions from 0% to 100% openings is conducted. Based on the RNG k-e turbulence model and the Rayleigh-Plesset cavitation equation, a set of computational model is developed to simulate the turbulent flow in the valve under operational conditions from 0% to 100% openings. The computational results of flow resistance coefficient are compared to the experimental data. And the numerical simulation is employed to predict the cavitation performance of the valve at different inlet flow conditions. The transient cavitating flow is calculated to reveal the time evolution of cavitation in the valve.

  1. The sensitivity of the general circulation to Arctic Sea ice boundaries - A numerical experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, G. F.; Johnson, W. T.

    1978-01-01

    Results are presented for a set of numerical experiments conducted with the Goddard (formerly GISS) general circulation model. The experiments were designed to test the model atmospheric response to a single fixed and specified parameter, the total ice cover in the Davis Strait, Barents Sea, East Greenland Sea, Sea of Okhotsk and Bering Sea. Margin variations are considered that are substantially smaller than those involved in ice age or ice-free Arctic simulations. Anomaly is defined as the mean of two runs corresponding to climatological maximum sea ice conditions. Model results indicate that the ice margin anomalies are capable of altering local climates in certain regions of high and middle latitudes. Possible interactions between high latitudes and subtropical regions are suggested.

  2. Experiments and numerical modeling to estimate the coating variability in a pan coater.

    PubMed

    Sahni, Ekneet; Chaudhuri, Bodhisattwa

    2011-10-14

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the effect of the coating process parameters on coating performance and coating variability, and hence determine the optimal operating conditions. Coating of particles is done to mask the unpleasant taste or odor of the drug, to control the bioavailability of the API, and to increase shelf-life. The coating solution is sprayed in specific locations of the granular bed and coating uniformity is achieved by interparticle collisions and overall mixing behavior in the coater. Thus, good understanding of particle flow and granular mixing in a pan coater is vital to optimize the process parameters to reduce coating variability. Coating experiments are performed at previously determined optimal mixing conditions using Lactose nonpareils. The coating fluid (aqueous solution of Opadry II) is sprayed intermittently at different flow rates and concentration. Vernier Caliper is used to measure the change in diameter and the coating of the particles. Moreover, DEM based numerical modeling of spray coating is also performed for same operational parameter set and spray characteristic (center and the radius of the spray zone) used in the experiments. DEM simulation provides the residence time distribution of all the particles passing through the spray zone. The coating variability in the experiments is estimated at different pan and spray variables. The coating variability decreases with the increase inpan tilt, coating time and an optimum speed. The spray characteristics does not seem to have much effect on the variability although better coating is observed under better mixing conditions of high tilt and pan speed for the same spray parameters. The mass distribution of coated particles is quantified in the numerical model by the total number of particles passing through the spray zone and also by the frequency distribution of the residence time of the coated particles. It is observed that the simulations are in good agreement with the

  3. Microgravity experiments and numerical studies on ethanol/air spray flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thimothée, Romain; Chauveau, Christian; Halter, Fabien; Nicoli, Colette; Haldenwang, Pierre; Denet, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    same order of magnitude as that of the single-phase premixed flame. On the other hand, the numerical results exhibit the role played by the droplet radius in spray-flame propagation, and retrieve the experiments only when the droplets are small enough and when the Darrieus-Landau instability is triggered. A final discussion is developed to interpret the various patterns experimentally observed for the spray-flame front.

  4. Numerical experiments of internal wave generation by strong tidal flow across a finite amplitude bank edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Kevin G.

    1994-01-01

    Results of some idealized numerical experiments of strong tidal flow of a stratified fluid across a finite amplitude bank edge are presented. These experiments were motivated by a need to develop an understanding of some of the complex internal wave phenomena observed on Georges Bank (Loder et al., 1992) and at other locations where tidal forcing is strong. The numerical model solves the fully nonlinear, nonhydrostatic Boussinesq equations on an f plane. The model is two-dimensional, with spatial variation in the vertical and cross-bank directions only. Model forcings are based on the Georges Bank observations. A horizontally uniform stratification is used. The model successfully reproduces some observed features including the formation of a large depression and a hydraulic jump over the bank edge during off-bank flow and two on-bank propagating depressions every tidal period. An undular bore propagating away fron the bank is in agreement with other observations (La Violette et al., 1990). Rotational effects are shown to be responsible for the formation of the second of the on-bank propagating depressions. Sensitivity of the results to the topographic slope, tidal current strength, stratification, and model initialization is explored.

  5. Comparison of chemical and nuclear explosions: Numerical simulations of the Non-Proliferation Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kamm, J.R.; Bos, R.J.

    1995-06-01

    In this paper the authors discuss numerical simulations of the Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE), which was an underground explosion conducted in September 1993 in the volcanic tuff of the Nevada Test Site. The NPE source consisted of 1.29 {times} 10{sup 6} kg of ANFO-emulsion blasting agent, with the approximate energy of 1.1 kt, emplaced 389 m beneath the surface of Rainier Mesa. The authors compare detailed numerical simulations of the NPE with data collected from that experiment, and with calculations of an equally energetic nuclear explosion in identical geology. Calculated waveforms, at ranges out to approximately 1 km, agree moderately well in the time domain with free-field data, and are in qualitative agreement with free-surface records. Comparison of computed waveforms for equally energetic chemical and nuclear sources reveals relatively minor differences beyond the immediate near-source region, with the chemical source having an {approximately}25% greater seismic moment but otherwise indistinguishable (close-in) seismic source properties. 41 refs., 67 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. The Zombie Instability: Using Numerical Simulation to Design a Laboratory Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meng; Pei, Suyang; Jiang, Chung-Hsiang; Hassanzadeh, Pedram; Marcus, Philip

    2014-11-01

    A new type of finite amplitude-instability has been found in numerical simulations of stratified, rotating, shear flows. The instability occurs via baroclinic critical layers that create linearly unstable vortex layers, which roll-up into vortices. Under the right conditions, those vortices can form a new generation of vortices, resulting in ``vortex self-replication'' that fills the fluid with vortices. Creating this instability in a laboratory would provide further evidence for the existence of the instability, which we first found in numerical simulations of protoplanetary disks. To design a laboratory experiment we need to know how the flow parameters-- shear, rotation and stratification, etc. affect the instability. To build an experiment economically, we also need to know how the finite-amplitude trigger of the instability scales with viscosity and the size of the domain. In this talk, we summarize our findings. We present a map, in terms of the experimentally controllable parameters, that shows where the instability occurs and whether the instability creates a few isolated transient vortices, a few long-lived vortices, or long-lived, self-replicating vortices that fill the entire flow.

  7. Plume formation and lithosphere erosion: A comparison of laboratory and numerical experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, P.; Schubert, G.; Anderson, C.; Goldman, P.

    1988-12-10

    The mechanics of thermal plume formation and intrusion into the lithosphere are investigated using a combination of laboratory experiments and numerical simulations. In the experiments a deep layer of strongly temperature-dependent viscous sucrose solution is heated from below and cooled from above to produce high-viscosity surface and low-viscosity basal thermal boundary layers. Plumes develop from instabilities in the hot boundary layer, ascend, and partially intrude into the cold layer (lid). A set of two-dimensional finite element calculations are made using the experimental geometry, fluid properties, and boundary and initial conditions. Satisfactory agreement is obtained for the number and shape of plumes and the time variation of surface heat flux, basal temperature, and, to a lesser extent, lid thickness. The major discrepancy is the onset time for instability, which is typically 30% late in the calculations. Numerical simulations of mantle plume-lithosphere interaction with subsolidus creep rheology show that thermal plumes do not effectively intrude and erode the lithosphere if upper mantle viscosity is a function of temperature only, unless the activation energy is anomalously low, 50 kJ mol/sup -1/ or less. However, plumes can significantly erode the lithosphere on time scales of 10--20 m.y. if a low-viscosity asthenospheric channel, due to pressure dependence of viscosity, is present. copyright American Geophysical Union 1988

  8. Integrating Laboratory and Numerical Decompression Experiments to Investigate Fluid Dynamics into the Conduit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spina, Laura; Colucci, Simone; De'Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Scheu, Bettina; Dingwell, Donald Bruce

    2015-04-01

    The study of the fluid dynamics of magmatic melts into the conduit, where direct observations are unattainable, was proven to be strongly enhanced by multiparametric approaches. Among them, the coupling of numerical modeling with laboratory experiments represents a fundamental tool of investigation. Indeed, the experimental approach provide invaluable data to validate complex multiphase codes. We performed decompression experiments in a shock tube system, using pure silicon oil as a proxy for the basaltic melt. A range of viscosity comprised between 1 and 1000 Pa s was investigated. The samples were saturated with Argon for 72h at 10MPa, before being slowly decompressed to atmospheric pressure. The evolution of the analogue magmatic system was monitored through a high speed camera and pressure sensors, located into the analogue conduit. The experimental decompressions have then been reproduced numerically using a multiphase solver based on OpenFOAM framework. The original compressible multiphase Openfoam solver twoPhaseEulerFoam was extended to take into account the multicomponent nature of the fluid mixtures (liquid and gas) and the phase transition. According to the experimental conditions, the simulations were run with values of fluid viscosity ranging from 1 to 1000 Pa s. The sensitivity of the model has been tested for different values of the parameters t and D, representing respectively the relaxation time for gas exsolution and the average bubble diameter, required by the Gidaspow drag model. Valuable range of values for both parameters are provided from experimental observations, i.e. bubble nucleation time and bubble size distribution at a given pressure. The comparison of video images with the outcomes of the numerical models was performed by tracking the evolution of the gas volume fraction through time. Therefore, we were able to calibrate the parameter of the model by laboratory results, and to track the fluid dynamics of experimental decompression.

  9. Optimization of CFETR CSMC cabling based on numerical modeling and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jinggang; Dai, Chao; Liu, Bo; Wu, Yu; Liu, Fang; Liao, Guojun; Xue, Tianjun; Wei, Zhourong; Nijhuis, Arend; Zhou, Chao; Devred, Arnaud

    2015-12-01

    The China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) is a new tokamak device, whose magnet system includes toroidal field (TF), central solenoid (CS) and poloidal field (PF) coils. The main goal is to build a fusion engineering tokamak reactor with 50-200 MW fusion power and self-sufficiency by blanket, which means that the deuterium-tritium reaction in the plasma produces neutrons and alpha particles, and the neutrons react with the lithium-containing blanket surrounding the plasma, breeding the tritium by lithium-neutron reaction. To develop the manufacturing technique for the full-size CS coil, the Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) project for CFETR was launched first. A Nb3Sn conductor is to be used in the CFETR CSMC, whose design refers to the ITER CS conductor with the same short-twist-pitch cable pattern. Due to the short twist pitch and relatively low void fraction, a high compaction ratio is required during cabling and the risk of strand damage is increased significantly. Although it is impossible to avoid strand deformation for this design, it is crucial to find a way to reduce strand damage as much as possible. A numerical model was used to analyze the causes of strand damage, including variation in twist pitch length as well as different mechanical properties for copper and Nb3Sn strands. Several experiments have been performed to verify the numerical results, including cabling trials for different conditions and critical current (I c) tests on strands with/without deformation. The results show that the numerical analysis is consistent with the experiments and provides the optimal cabling conditions for the CFETR CSMC.

  10. Additional experiments relative to the shelf life of Li(Si)/FeS2 thermal batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searcy, J. Q.; Armijo, J. R.

    1985-02-01

    A continuing effort to develop a new thermal battery technology based on the Li(Si)/FeS2 electrochemical couple is reported. The results relate to the long shelf life requirement for thermal batteries designed by Sandia, and include topics relevant to leakage through the hermetic seal and accelerated aging experiments with materials new to the technology. Conclusions relevant to leakage through the hermetic seal are that the maximum leak rate must not exceed 1.8 x 10(-7) w, where w is the grams of Li(Si) contained by a battery, and that a bomb type leak test can be designed that is adequate for most Li(Si)/FeS2 batteries. Conclusions relevant to long term compatibility of new materials include the following: nickel is not compatible with the iron disulfide in the cathode; the CaSi2 additive used to suppress the initial voltage transient does not react or degrade during accelerated aging experiments, but the use of that material can lead to an increase in the variability of the activated lives, especially for long life batteries; Grafoil current collectors used with the cathode do not degrade in accelerated aging experiments.

  11. The quasi-harmonic ultrasonic polar scan for material characterization: experiment and numerical modeling.

    PubMed

    Kersemans, Mathias; Martens, Arvid; Van Den Abeele, Koen; Degrieck, Joris; Pyl, Lincy; Zastavnik, Filip; Sol, Hugo; Van Paepegem, Wim

    2015-04-01

    Conventionally, the ultrasonic polar scan (UPS) records the amplitude or time-of-flight in transmission using short ultrasonic pulses for a wide range of incidence angles, resulting in a fingerprint of the critical bulk wave angles of the material at the insonified spot. Here, we investigate the use of quasi-harmonic ultrasound (bursts) in a polar scan experiment, both experimentally and numerically. It is shown that the nature of the fingerprint drastically changes, and reveals the positions of the leaky Lamb angles. To compare with experiments, both plane wave and bounded beam simulations have been performed based on the recursive stiffness matrix method. Whereas the plane wave computations yield a pure Lamb wave angle fingerprint, this is no longer valid for the more realistic case of a bounded beam. The experimental recordings are fully supported by the bounded beam simulations. To complement the traditional amplitude measurement, experimental and numerical investigations have been performed to record, predict and analyze the phase of the transmitted ultrasonic beam. This results in the conceptual introduction of the 'phase polar scan', exposing even more intriguing and detailed patterns. In fact, the combination of the amplitude and the phase polar scan provides the complete knowledge about the complex transmission coefficient for every possible angle of incidence. This comprehensive information will be very valuable for inverse modeling of the local elasticity tensor based on a single UPS experiment. Finally, the UPS method has been applied for the detection of an artificial delamination. Compared to the pulsed UPS, the quasi-harmonic UPS (both the amplitude and phase recording) shows a superior sensitivity to the presence of a delamination.

  12. Dissolution-precipitation processes in tank experiments for testing numerical models for reactive transport calculations: Experiments and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poonoosamy, Jenna; Kosakowski, Georg; Van Loon, Luc R.; Mäder, Urs

    2015-06-01

    In the context of testing reactive transport codes and their underlying conceptual models, a simple 2D reactive transport experiment was developed. The aim was to use simple chemistry and design a reproducible and fast to conduct experiment, which is flexible enough to include several process couplings: advective-diffusive transport of solutes, effect of liquid phase density on advective transport, and kinetically controlled dissolution/precipitation reactions causing porosity changes. A small tank was filled with a reactive layer of strontium sulfate (SrSO4) of two different grain sizes, sandwiched between two layers of essentially non-reacting quartz sand (SiO2). A highly concentrated solution of barium chloride was injected to create an asymmetric flow field. Once the barium chloride reached the reactive layer, it forced the transformation of strontium sulfate into barium sulfate (BaSO4). Due to the higher molar volume of barium sulfate, its precipitation caused a decrease of porosity and lowered the permeability. Changes in the flow field were observed with help of dye tracer tests. The experiments were modelled using the reactive transport code OpenGeosys-GEM. Tests with non-reactive tracers performed prior to barium chloride injection, as well as the density-driven flow (due to the high concentration of barium chloride solution), could be well reproduced by the numerical model. To reproduce the mineral bulk transformation with time, two populations of strontium sulfate grains with different kinetic rates of dissolution were applied. However, a default porosity permeability relationship was unable to account for measured pressure changes. Post mortem analysis of the strontium sulfate reactive medium provided useful information on the chemical and structural changes occurring at the pore scale at the interface that were considered in our model to reproduce the pressure evolution with time.

  13. Dissolution-precipitation processes in tank experiments for testing numerical models for reactive transport calculations: Experiments and modelling.

    PubMed

    Poonoosamy, Jenna; Kosakowski, Georg; Van Loon, Luc R; Mäder, Urs

    2015-01-01

    In the context of testing reactive transport codes and their underlying conceptual models, a simple 2D reactive transport experiment was developed. The aim was to use simple chemistry and design a reproducible and fast to conduct experiment, which is flexible enough to include several process couplings: advective-diffusive transport of solutes, effect of liquid phase density on advective transport, and kinetically controlled dissolution/precipitation reactions causing porosity changes. A small tank was filled with a reactive layer of strontium sulfate (SrSO4) of two different grain sizes, sandwiched between two layers of essentially non-reacting quartz sand (SiO2). A highly concentrated solution of barium chloride was injected to create an asymmetric flow field. Once the barium chloride reached the reactive layer, it forced the transformation of strontium sulfate into barium sulfate (BaSO4). Due to the higher molar volume of barium sulfate, its precipitation caused a decrease of porosity and lowered the permeability. Changes in the flow field were observed with help of dye tracer tests. The experiments were modelled using the reactive transport code OpenGeosys-GEM. Tests with non-reactive tracers performed prior to barium chloride injection, as well as the density-driven flow (due to the high concentration of barium chloride solution), could be well reproduced by the numerical model. To reproduce the mineral bulk transformation with time, two populations of strontium sulfate grains with different kinetic rates of dissolution were applied. However, a default porosity permeability relationship was unable to account for measured pressure changes. Post mortem analysis of the strontium sulfate reactive medium provided useful information on the chemical and structural changes occurring at the pore scale at the interface that were considered in our model to reproduce the pressure evolution with time.

  14. Mantle exhumation and OCT architecture dependency on lithosphere deformation modes during continental breakup: Numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanniot, Ludovic; Kusznir, Nick; Manatschal, Gianreto; Cowie, Leanne

    2013-04-01

    The initiation of sea-floor spreading, during the continental breakup process, requires both the rupture of the continental crust and the initiation of decompression melting. This process results in mantle upwelling and at some point decompressional melting which creates new oceanic crust. Using numerical experiments, we investigate how the deformation mode of continental lithosphere thinning and stretching controls the rupture of continental crust and lithospheric mantle, the onset of decompression melting, their relative timing, and the circumstances under which mantle exhumation may occur. We assume that the topmost continental and ocean lithosphere, corresponding to the cooler brittle seismogenic layer, deforms by extensional faulting (pure-shear deformation) and magmatic intrusion, consistent with the observations of deformation processes occurring at slow spreading ocean ridges (Cannat, 1996). We assume that deformation beneath this topmost lithosphere layer (approximately 15-20 km thick) occurs in response to passive upwelling and thermal and melt buoyancy driven small-scale convection. We use a 2D finite element viscous flow model (FeMargin) to describe lithosphere and asthenosphere deformation. This flow field is used to advect lithosphere and asthenosphere temperature and material. The finite element model is kinematically driven by Vx for the topmost upper crust inducing passive upwelling beneath that layer. A vertical velocity Vz is defined for buoyancy enhanced upwelling as predicted by Braun et al. (2000). Melt generation is predicted by decompression melting using the parameterization and methodology of Katz et al. (2003). Numerical experiments have been used to investigate the dependency of continental crust and lithosphere rupture, decompression melt initiation, rifted margin ocean-continent transition architecture and subsidence history on the half-spreading rate Vx, buoyancy driven upwelling rate Vz, the relative contribution of these deformation

  15. Infragravity wave generation and dynamics over a mild slope beach : Experiments and numerical computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cienfuegos, R.; Duarte, L.; Hernandez, E.

    2008-12-01

    Charasteristic frequencies of gravity waves generated by wind and propagating towards the coast are usually comprised between 0.05Hz and 1Hz. Nevertheless, lower frequecy waves, in the range of 0.001Hz and 0.05Hz, have been observed in the nearshore zone. Those long waves, termed as infragravity waves, are generated by complex nonlinear mechanisms affecting the propagation of irregular waves up to the coast. The groupiness of an incident random wave field may be responsible for producing a slow modulation of the mean water surface thus generating bound long waves travelling at the group speed. Similarly, a quasi- periodic oscillation of the break-point location, will be accompained by a slow modulation of set-up/set-down in the surf zone and generation and release of long waves. If the primary structure of the carrying incident gravity waves is destroyed (e.g. by breaking), forced long waves can be freely released and even reflected at the coast. Infragravity waves can affect port operation through resonating conditions, or strongly affect sediment transport and beach morphodynamics. In the present study we investigate infragravity wave generation mechanisms both, from experiments and numerical computations. Measurements were conducted at the 70-meter long wave tank, located at the Instituto Nacional de Hidraulica (Chile), prepared with a beach of very mild slope of 1/80 in order to produce large surf zone extensions. A random JONSWAP type wave field (h0=0.52m, fp=0.25Hz, Hmo=0.17m) was generated by a piston wave-maker and measurements of the free surface displacements were performed all over its length at high spatial resolution (0.2m to 1m). Velocity profiles were also measured at four verticals inside the surf zone using an ADV. Correlation maps of wave group envelopes and infragravity waves are computed in order to identify long wave generation and dynamics in the experimental set-up. It appears that both mechanisms (groupiness and break-point oscillation) are

  16. Numerical and experimental study of suspensions containing carbon blacks used as conductive additives in composite electrodes for lithium batteries.

    PubMed

    Cerbelaud, Manuella; Lestriez, Bernard; Ferrando, Riccardo; Videcoq, Arnaud; Richard-Plouet, Mireille; Caldes, Maria Teresa; Guyomard, Dominique

    2014-03-18

    Suspensions of carbon blacks and spherical carbon particles are studied experimentally and numerically to understand the role of the particle shape on the tendency to percolation. Two commercial carbon blacks and one lab-synthesized spherical carbon are used. The percolation thresholds in suspensions are experimentally determined by two complementary methods: impedance spectroscopy and rheology. Brownian dynamics simulations are performed to explain the experimental results taking into account the fractal shape of the aggregates in the carbon blacks. The results of Brownian dynamics simulations are in good agreement with the experimental results and allow one to explain the experimental behavior of suspensions.

  17. Closed-flow column experiments: A numerical sensitivity analysis of reactive transport and parameter uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritschel, Thomas; Totsche, Kai Uwe

    2016-08-01

    The identification of transport parameters by inverse modeling often suffers from equifinality or parameter correlation when models are fitted to measurements of the solute breakthrough in column outflow experiments. This parameter uncertainty can be approached by performing multiple experiments with different sets of boundary conditions, each provoking observations that are uniquely attributable to the respective transport processes. A promising approach to further increase the information potential of the experimental outcome is the closed-flow column design. It is characterized by the recirculation of the column effluent into the solution supply vessel that feeds the inflow, which results in a damped sinusoidal oscillation in the breakthrough curve. In order to reveal the potential application of closed-flow experiments, we present a comprehensive sensitivity analysis using common models for adsorption and degradation. We show that the sensitivity of inverse parameter determination with respect to the apparent dispersion can be controlled by the experimenter. For optimal settings, a decrease in parameter uncertainty as compared to classical experiments by an order of magnitude is achieved. In addition, we show a reduced equifinality between rate-limited interactions and apparent dispersion. Furthermore, we illustrate the expected breakthrough curve for equilibrium and nonequilibrium adsorption, the latter showing strong similarities to the behavior found for completely mixed batch reactor experiments. Finally, breakthrough data from a reactive tracer experiment is evaluated using the proposed framework with excellent agreement of model and experimental results.

  18. Loophole-free Bell test using electron spins in diamond: second experiment and additional analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hensen, B.; Kalb, N.; Blok, M. S.; Dréau, A. E.; Reiserer, A.; Vermeulen, R. F. L.; Schouten, R. N.; Markham, M.; Twitchen, D. J.; Goodenough, K.; Elkouss, D.; Wehner, S.; Taminiau, T. H.; Hanson, R.

    2016-01-01

    The recently reported violation of a Bell inequality using entangled electronic spins in diamonds (Hensen et al., Nature 526, 682–686) provided the first loophole-free evidence against local-realist theories of nature. Here we report on data from a second Bell experiment using the same experimental setup with minor modifications. We find a violation of the CHSH-Bell inequality of 2.35 ± 0.18, in agreement with the first run, yielding an overall value of S = 2.38 ± 0.14. We calculate the resulting P-values of the second experiment and of the combined Bell tests. We provide an additional analysis of the distribution of settings choices recorded during the two tests, finding that the observed distributions are consistent with uniform settings for both tests. Finally, we analytically study the effect of particular models of random number generator (RNG) imperfection on our hypothesis test. We find that the winning probability per trial in the CHSH game can be bounded knowing only the mean of the RNG bias. This implies that our experimental result is robust for any model underlying the estimated average RNG bias, for random bits produced up to 690 ns too early by the random number generator. PMID:27509823

  19. Loophole-free Bell test using electron spins in diamond: second experiment and additional analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensen, B.; Kalb, N.; Blok, M. S.; Dréau, A. E.; Reiserer, A.; Vermeulen, R. F. L.; Schouten, R. N.; Markham, M.; Twitchen, D. J.; Goodenough, K.; Elkouss, D.; Wehner, S.; Taminiau, T. H.; Hanson, R.

    2016-08-01

    The recently reported violation of a Bell inequality using entangled electronic spins in diamonds (Hensen et al., Nature 526, 682–686) provided the first loophole-free evidence against local-realist theories of nature. Here we report on data from a second Bell experiment using the same experimental setup with minor modifications. We find a violation of the CHSH-Bell inequality of 2.35 ± 0.18, in agreement with the first run, yielding an overall value of S = 2.38 ± 0.14. We calculate the resulting P-values of the second experiment and of the combined Bell tests. We provide an additional analysis of the distribution of settings choices recorded during the two tests, finding that the observed distributions are consistent with uniform settings for both tests. Finally, we analytically study the effect of particular models of random number generator (RNG) imperfection on our hypothesis test. We find that the winning probability per trial in the CHSH game can be bounded knowing only the mean of the RNG bias. This implies that our experimental result is robust for any model underlying the estimated average RNG bias, for random bits produced up to 690 ns too early by the random number generator.

  20. Tsunami-induced boulder transport - combining physical experiments and numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oetjen, Jan; Engel, Max; May, Simon Matthias; Schüttrumpf, Holger; Brueckner, Helmut; Prasad Pudasaini, Shiva

    2016-04-01

    Coasts are crucial areas for living, economy, recreation, transportation, and various sectors of industry. Many of them are exposed to high-energy wave events. With regard to the ongoing population growth in low-elevation coastal areas, the urgent need for developing suitable management measures, especially for hazards like tsunamis, becomes obvious. These measures require supporting tools which allow an exact estimation of impact parameters like inundation height, inundation area, and wave energy. Focussing on tsunamis, geological archives can provide essential information on frequency and magnitude on a longer time scale in order to support coastal hazard management. While fine-grained deposits may quickly be altered after deposition, multi-ton coarse clasts (boulders) may represent an information source on past tsunami events with a much higher preservation potential. Applying numerical hydrodynamic coupled boulder transport models (BTM) is a commonly used approach to analyse characteristics (e.g. wave height, flow velocity) of the corresponding tsunami. Correct computations of tsunamis and the induced boulder transport can provide essential event-specific information, including wave heights, runup and direction. Although several valuable numerical models for tsunami-induced boulder transport exist (e. g. Goto et al., 2007; Imamura et al., 2008), some important basic aspects of both tsunami hydrodynamics and corresponding boulder transport have not yet been entirely understood. Therefore, our project aims at these questions in four crucial aspects of boulder transport by a tsunami: (i) influence of sediment load, (ii) influence of complex boulder shapes other than idealized rectangular shapes, (iii) momentum transfers between multiple boulders, and (iv) influence of non-uniform bathymetries and topographies both on tsunami and boulder. The investigation of these aspects in physical experiments and the correct implementation of an advanced model is an urgent need

  1. Determining the tube bundle streamlining critical parameters using the numerical experiment method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplunov, S. M.; Val'es, N. G.; Samolysov, A. V.; Marchevskaya, O. A.

    2015-08-01

    The article is devoted to development and application of mathematical models describing the most dangerous mechanisms through which vibrations are excited in tube bundles and blunt cylindrically shaped structures, and to development of reliable calculation methods for describing these models, which would make it possible to obtain prompt data for designing and subsequent operation of the considered structural elements. For solving such problems, a comprehensive approach is required, which should be based on a combined use of numerical experiments on computers and experimental investigations on full-scale equipment. The authors have developed a procedure for numerically investigating the hydrodynamic forces arising during stalled streamlining and the tube bundle vibrations caused by these forces. The procedure is based on using the developed mathematical model describing fluid-elastic excitation of vibrations in a bundle of elastic tubes placed in external cross flow. The problem of studying fluid-elastic excitation is brought to stability analysis, which is carried out with the assumption about a linear behavior of destabilizing forces for undisturbed state of elastic tubes. A theoretical investigation of the developed mathematical model was carried out, from which the necessary and sufficient condition of system stability has been obtained in terms of system dimensionless parameters (mass, damping, and velocity). An algorithm for numerically determining the matrices of linear hydrodynamic coupling coefficients for particular tube bundles is developed. The validity of the algorithm and the computer programs developed on its basis are checked by comparing the results of test calculations with the bank of known experimental data. A procedure is proposed for determining the matrices of linear hydrodynamic coupling coefficients in bundles having a regular layout of their cross section and a large number of tubes through calculating these matrices for a relatively small

  2. The additive effect on suicidality of family history of suicidal behavior and early traumatic experiences.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Castroman, J; Guillaume, S; Olié, E; Jaussent, I; Baca-García, E; Courtet, P

    2015-01-01

    Family history of suicidal behavior and personal history of childhood abuse are reported risk factors for suicide attempts and suicide completion. We aim to quantify the additive effect of family history of suicidal behavior and different subtypes of childhood abuse on suicidal behavior. We examined a sample of 496 suicide attempters, comparing individuals with family history of suicidal behavior and personal history of childhood (physical or sexual) abuse, individuals with family history of suicidal behavior only, individuals with history of early traumatic experiences only, and individuals with none of these two risk factors with regards to suicidal features. An additive effect was found for the age at the first attempt in suicide attempters with both family history of suicidal behavior and either physical or sexual abuse. No significant interactions were found between family history of suicidal behavior and childhood trauma in relation to any characteristics of suicidal behavior. Subjects presenting family history of suicidal behavior and childhood abuse attempt suicide earlier in life than subjects with just one or none of them, particularly if they were sexually abused. Other suicidality indexes were only partially or not associated with this combination of risk factors. A careful assessment of patients with both family history of suicidal behavior and childhood abuse could help to prevent future suicide attempts, particularly in young people.

  3. Channel evolution after dam removal in a poorly sorted sediment mixture: Experiments and numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer-Boix, Carles; Martín-Vide, Juan P.; Parker, Gary

    2014-11-01

    Dam removal is commonly used for river restoration. However, there are still some uncertainties associated with dam removal, mainly related to the sediment transport rates released downstream from the deposit that had previously filled the impoundment. This research studies the physical response to dam removal in the antecedent deposit by answering the following questions: (a) how does an initial channel excavated into the deposit evolve, and (b) what is the time distribution of the material released during the early stages of the process. These goals are achieved by an experimental campaign using a poorly sorted mixture of sediment in the antecedent deposit. The research shows that for the given conditions of our experiments, the rate at which the sediment is released depends on the height of the removed dam, the water discharge and the maximum potential volume of sediment to be eroded. This investigation provides new insights of the width evolution when the sediment is composed of a poorly sorted mixture. This evolution is linked to the bed degradation rates: channel narrows during a rapid incisional phase, and subsequently widens when bed degradation rates decrease. Channel width changes propagate upstream as a convection-like perturbation associated with a kinematic wave starting at the location of the antecedent dam. These features are modeled through a new numerical model accounting for mixtures. More specifically, a set of equations has been derived for the variation of bed elevation, channel bottom width, and bed grain-size distribution, which when solved numerically, describe the observed channel processes.

  4. Proof of concept of an artificial muscle: theoretical model, numerical model, and hardware experiment.

    PubMed

    Haeufle, D F B; Günther, M; Blickhan, R; Schmitt, S

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the hyperbolic Hill-type force-velocity relation was derived from basic physical components. It was shown that a contractile element CE consisting of a mechanical energy source (active element AE), a parallel damper element (PDE), and a serial element (SE) exhibits operating points with hyperbolic force-velocity dependency. In this paper, the contraction dynamics of this CE concept were analyzed in a numerical simulation of quick release experiments against different loads. A hyperbolic force-velocity relation was found. The results correspond to measurements of the contraction dynamics of a technical prototype. Deviations from the theoretical prediction could partly be explained by the low stiffness of the SE, which was modeled analog to the metal spring in the hardware prototype. The numerical model and hardware prototype together, are a proof of this CE concept and can be seen as a well-founded starting point for the development of Hill-type artificial muscles. This opens up new vistas for the technical realization of natural movements with rehabilitation devices.

  5. Fractal aggregates in reduced gravity experiments and numerical simulations to characterize cometary material properties.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasue, Jeremie; Levasseur-Regourd, Anny-Chantal; Hadamcik, Edith; Botet, Robert; Renard, Jean-Baptiste

    In situ missions have shown that cometary dust particles have low densities and are easily fragmenting aggregates [1]. The linear polarization of the solar light scattered by cometary dust corresponds to bell-shaped (with a small negative branch and a maximum below 30%) phase curves with a quasi-linear increase with the wavelength between 30° and 50° phase angle [2]. Such physical properties of the cometary material are reconciled by a fractal model of cometary dust and comet nuclei as formed by aggregation in reduced gravity as studied by laboratory experiments and numerical simulations. Reduced gravity light scattering experiments: The CODAG-LSU experiment (1999) gave the first indication of the light scattering properties transition between single particles and low dimensions fractal aggregates (D 1.3) [3, 4]. Such studies will be pursued on board the ISS with the ICAPS precursor experiment. The PROGRA2 experiment is designed to study the light scattering properties of particles levitated during dedicated microgravity flights or with ground-based configurations [5]. The material properties are chosen so as to be relevant in the context of cosmic dust from cometary and asteroidal origins. It is especially useful to disentangle the effects of varying albedos of constitutive materials [6], shape and size of constitutive grains [7]. Some of the results are interpreted in terms of fractal aggregates growth. Light scattering numerical simulations Based on numerical simulations and in coherence with the experimental results, a model of cometary coma by a mixture of fractal aggregates of up to 256 sub-micron sized spheroidal grains and compact spheroidal particles is shown to reproduce the polarimetric observations of comets such as 1P/Halley or C/1995 O1 Hale-Bopp [8]. Physical parameters of the size distribution of particles (minimum and maximum size, shape of the size distribution and quantity and location of absorbing and non-absorbing particles) can be retrieved

  6. Isentropic Compression up to 200 KBars for LX 04, Numerical Simulations and Comparison with Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lefrancois, A.; Hare, D.; L'Eplattenier, P.; Burger, M.

    2006-02-13

    Isentropic compression experiments and numerical simulations on LX-04 (HMX / Viton 85/15) were performed respectively at Z accelerator facility from Sandia National Laboratory and at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in order to study the isentrope and associated Hugoniot of this HE. 2D and 3D configurations have been calculated here to test the new beta version of the electromagnetism package coupled with the dynamics in Ls-Dyna and compared with the ICE Z shot 1067 on LX 04. The electromagnetism module is being developed in the general-purpose explicit and implicit finite element program LS-DYNA{reg_sign} in order to perform coupled mechanical/thermal/electromagnetism simulations. The Maxwell equations are solved using a Finite Element Method (FEM) for the solid conductors coupled with a Boundary Element Method (BEM) for the surrounding air (or vacuum). More details can be read in the references.

  7. Making soil containing numerous eggs of WCR for greenhouse and laboratory experiments.

    PubMed

    Németh, T; Marczali, Zs; Nádasy, M; Takács, J

    2009-01-01

    In the course of our work we often faced to the problem that WCR lays its eggs unevenly (Berger, 2008) so it is impossible to find soils under field circumstances which contains eggs in homogenous distribution and in large numbers. Owing to the inhomogeneous distribution and low number of eggs it is quite difficult to study the effectiveness of soil disinfectant and seed-dressing insecticides on larvae of WCR in pot experiments. Therefore, the aim of our studies was to gain soil samples with known quantity and distribution of eggs. According to our prevailing idea, numerous adults are placed into a relatively small place under ideal environmental conditions and a small quantity of soil is provided for them to lay eggs.

  8. Numerical modeling experiments of coastal upwelling at the field of Arctic fjords.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosecki, Szymon; Dzierzbicka-Głowacka, Lidia

    2016-04-01

    Coastal upwelling is a well described, known phenomenon in theory. Nowadays there is more and more both environmental and modeling studies about it. Upwelling especially in the Arctic fjords is a process that strongly affects hydrodynamics and even more ecosystems. It is so important, that it brings detailed question about effects and needed wind driven forcing parameters. My modeling experiment studies were strongly different than the studies that are typically carried out using numerical models. Instead of searching for this phenomenon in modeled analysis or environmental data, I did several case scenarios simulations. For those I used statistically selected wind data measured in-stiu. The hi-resolution coastal mapping, the flexible mesh discretization method and the sigma-layered three dimensional model MIKE 3 by DHI allowed me to explore this phenomenon with very good accuracy. This studies have been done in Institute of Oceanology PAS in Sopot, as a part of Centre for Polar Studies.

  9. Numerical analysis of experiments with gas injection into liquid metal coolant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usov, E. V.; Lobanov, P. D.; Pribaturin, N. A.; Mosunova, N. A.; Chuhno, V. I.; Kutlimetov, A. E.

    2016-10-01

    Presented paper contains results of a numerical analysis of experiments with gas injection in water and liquid metal which have been performed at the Institute of Thermophysics Russian Academy of Science (IT RAS). Obtained experimental data are very important to predict processes that take place in the BREST-type reactor during the hypothetical accident with damage of the steam generator tubes, and may be used as a benchmark to validate thermo-hydraulic codes. Detailed description of models to simulate transport of gas phase in a vertical liquid column is presented in a current paper. Two-fluid model with closing relation for wall friction and interface friction coefficients was used to simulate processes which take place in a liquid during injection of gaseous phase. It has being shown that proposed models allow obtaining a good agreement between experimental data and calculation results.

  10. A Numerical Simulation and Statistical Modeling of High Intensity Radiated Fields Experiment Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Laura J.

    2004-01-01

    Tests are conducted on a quad-redundant fault tolerant flight control computer to establish upset characteristics of an avionics system in an electromagnetic field. A numerical simulation and statistical model are described in this work to analyze the open loop experiment data collected in the reverberation chamber at NASA LaRC as a part of an effort to examine the effects of electromagnetic interference on fly-by-wire aircraft control systems. By comparing thousands of simulation and model outputs, the models that best describe the data are first identified and then a systematic statistical analysis is performed on the data. All of these efforts are combined which culminate in an extrapolation of values that are in turn used to support previous efforts used in evaluating the data.

  11. A numerical tool for reproducing driver behaviour: experiments and predictive simulations.

    PubMed

    Casucci, M; Marchitto, M; Cacciabue, P C

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents the simulation tool called SDDRIVE (Simple Simulation of Driver performance), which is the numerical computerised implementation of the theoretical architecture describing Driver-Vehicle-Environment (DVE) interactions, contained in Cacciabue and Carsten [Cacciabue, P.C., Carsten, O. A simple model of driver behaviour to sustain design and safety assessment of automated systems in automotive environments, 2010]. Following a brief description of the basic algorithms that simulate the performance of drivers, the paper presents and discusses a set of experiments carried out in a Virtual Reality full scale simulator for validating the simulation. Then the predictive potentiality of the tool is shown by discussing two case studies of DVE interactions, performed in the presence of different driver attitudes in similar traffic conditions.

  12. Numerical Analysis of a Pulse Detonation Cross Flow Heat Load Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.; Naples, Andrew .; Hoke, John L.; Schauer, Fred

    2011-01-01

    A comparison between experimentally measured and numerically simulated, time-averaged, point heat transfer rates in a pulse detonation (PDE) engine is presented. The comparison includes measurements and calculations for heat transfer to a cylinder in crossflow and to the tube wall itself using a novel spool design. Measurements are obtained at several locations and under several operating conditions. The measured and computed results are shown to be in substantial agreement, thereby validating the modeling approach. The model, which is based in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is then used to interpret the results. A preheating of the incoming fuel charge is predicted, which results in increased volumetric flow and subsequent overfilling. The effect is validated with additional measurements.

  13. Recirculation System for Geothermal Energy Recovery in Sedimentary Formations: Laboratory Experiments and Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkhoury, J. E.; Detwiler, R. L.; Serajian, V.; Bruno, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    Geothermal energy resources are more widespread than previously thought and have the potential for providing a significant amount of sustainable clean energy worldwide. In particular, hot permeable sedimentary formations provide many advantages over traditional geothermal recovery and enhanced geothermal systems in low permeability crystalline formations. These include: (1) eliminating the need for hydraulic fracturing, (2) significant reduction in risk for induced seismicity, (3) reducing the need for surface wastewater disposal, (4) contributing to decreases in greenhouse gases, and (5) potential use for CO2 sequestration. Advances in horizontal drilling, completion, and production technology from the oil and gas industry can now be applied to unlock these geothermal resources. Here, we present experimental results from a laboratory scale circulation system and numerical simulations aimed at quantifying the heat transfer capacity of sedimentary rocks. Our experiments consist of fluid flow through a saturated and pressurized sedimentary disc of 23-cm diameter and 3.8-cm thickness heated along its circumference at a constant temperature. Injection and production ports are 7.6-cm apart in the center of the disc. We used DI de-aired water and mineral oil as working fluids and explored temperatures from 20 to 150 oC and flow rates from 2 to 30 ml/min. We performed experiments on sandstone samples (Castlegate and Kirby) with different porosity, permeability and thermal conductivity to evaluate the effect of hydraulic and thermal properties on the heat transfer capacity of sediments. The producing fluid temperature followed an exponential form with time scale transients between 15 and 45 min. Steady state outflow temperatures varied between 60% and 95% of the set boundary temperature, higher percentages were observed for lower temperatures and flow rates. We used the flow and heat transport simulator TOUGH2 to develop a numerical model of our laboratory setting. Given

  14. Dependency of continental crustal rupture, decompression melt initiation and OCT architecture on lithosphere deformation modes during continental breakup: Numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanniot, L.; Kusznir, N. J.; Manatschal, G.

    2012-12-01

    During the continental breakup process, the initiation of sea-floor spreading requires both the rupture of the continental crust and the initiation of decompression melting. Using numerical experiments, we investigate how the deformation mode of continental lithosphere thinning and stretching controls the rupture of continental crust and lithospheric mantle, the onset of decompression melting and their relative timing. We use a two dimensional finite element viscous flow model to describe lithosphere and asthenosphere deformation. This flow field is used to advect lithosphere and asthenosphere material and temperature. Decompression melting is predicted using the parameterization scheme of Katz et al. (2003). Consistent with the observations of deformation processes occurring at slow spreading ocean ridges (Cannat, 1996), we assume that the topmost continental and oceanic lithosphere, corresponding to the cooler brittle seismogenic layer, deforms by extensional faulting (which we approximate to pure-shear deformation) and magmatic intrusion. Beneath this topmost lithosphere layer approximately 15-20 km thick, we assume that deformation occurs in response to passive upwelling and thermal and melt buoyancy driven small-scale convection. The relative contribution of these deformation components is parameterised by the ratio Vz/Vx, where Vx is the half spreading rate applied to the topmost lithosphere deformation and Vz is the upwelling velocity associated with the small scale convection. We use a series of numerical experiments to investigate the dependency of continental crust and lithosphere rupture, decompression melt initiation, rifted margin ocean-continent transition architecture and subsidence history on the half-spreading rate Vx, buoyancy driven upwelling rate Vz, the ratio Vz/Vx and upper lithosphere pure-shear width W. Based on the numerical experiment results we explore a polyphase evolution of deformation modes leading to continental breakup, sea

  15. Revisiting the steering principal of tropical cyclone motion in a numerical experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Liguang; Chen, Xiaoyu

    2016-12-01

    The steering principle of tropical cyclone motion has been applied to tropical cyclone forecasting and research for nearly 100 years. Two fundamental questions remain unanswered. One is why the steering flow plays a dominant role in tropical cyclone motion, and the other is when tropical cyclone motion deviates considerably from the steering. A high-resolution numerical experiment was conducted with the tropical cyclone in a typical large-scale monsoon trough over the western North Pacific. The simulated tropical cyclone experiences two eyewall replacement processes. Based on the potential vorticity tendency (PVT) diagnostics, this study demonstrates that the conventional steering, which is calculated over a certain radius from the tropical cyclone center in the horizontal and a deep pressure layer in the vertical, plays a dominant role in tropical cyclone motion since the contributions from other processes are largely cancelled out due to the coherent structure of tropical cyclone circulation. Resulting from the asymmetric dynamics of the tropical cyclone inner core, the trochoidal motion around the mean tropical cyclone track cannot be accounted for by the conventional steering. The instantaneous tropical cyclone motion can considerably deviate from the conventional steering that approximately accounts for the combined effect of the contribution of the advection of the symmetric potential vorticity component by the asymmetric flow and the contribution from the advection of the wave-number-one potential vorticity component by the symmetric flow.

  16. Numerical modeling of laser-driven experiments of colliding jets: Turbulent amplification of seed magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzeferacos, Petros; Fatenejad, Milad; Flocke, Norbert; Graziani, Carlo; Gregori, Gianluca; Lamb, Donald; Lee, Dongwook; Meinecke, Jena; Scopatz, Anthony; Weide, Klaus

    2014-10-01

    In this study we present high-resolution numerical simulations of laboratory experiments that study the turbulent amplification of magnetic fields generated by laser-driven colliding jets. The radiative magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulations discussed here were performed with the FLASH code and have assisted in the analysis of the experimental results obtained from the Vulcan laser facility. In these experiments, a pair of thin Carbon foils is placed in an Argon-filled chamber and is illuminated to create counter-propagating jets. The jets carry magnetic fields generated by the Biermann battery mechanism and collide to form a highly turbulent region. The interaction is probed using a wealth of diagnostics, including induction coils that are capable of providing the field strength and directionality at a specific point in space. The latter have revealed a significant increase in the field's strength due to turbulent amplification. Our FLASH simulations have allowed us to reproduce the experimental findings and to disentangle the complex processes and dynamics involved in the colliding flows. This work was supported in part at the University of Chicago by DOE NNSA ASC.

  17. Numerical Calculations of 3-D High-Lift Flows and Comparison with Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, William B, III

    2015-01-01

    Solutions were obtained with the Navier-Stokes CFD code TLNS3D to predict the flow about the NASA Trapezoidal Wing, a high-lift wing composed of three elements: the main-wing element, a deployed leading-edge slat, and a deployed trailing-edge flap. Turbulence was modeled by the Spalart-Allmaras one-equation turbulence model. One case with massive separation was repeated using Menter's two-equation SST (Menter's Shear Stress Transport) k-omega turbulence model in an attempt to improve the agreement with experiment. The investigation was conducted at a free stream Mach number of 0.2, and at angles of attack ranging from 10.004 degrees to 34.858 degrees. The Reynolds number based on the mean aerodynamic chord of the wing was 4.3 x 10 (sup 6). Compared to experiment, the numerical procedure predicted the surface pressures very well at angles of attack in the linear range of the lift. However, computed maximum lift was 5% low. Drag was mainly under predicted. The procedure correctly predicted several well-known trends and features of high-lift flows, such as off-body separation. The two turbulence models yielded significantly different solutions for the repeated case.

  18. Pore-scale controls on calcite dissolution rates from flow-through laboratory and numerical experiments.

    PubMed

    Molins, Sergi; Trebotich, David; Yang, Li; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B; Ligocki, Terry J; Shen, Chaopeng; Steefel, Carl I

    2014-07-01

    A combination of experimental, imaging, and modeling techniques were applied to investigate the pore-scale transport and surface reaction controls on calcite dissolution under elevated pCO2 conditions. The laboratory experiment consisted of the injection of a solution at 4 bar pCO2 into a capillary tube packed with crushed calcite. A high resolution pore-scale numerical model was used to simulate the experiment based on a computational domain consisting of reactive calcite, pore space, and the capillary wall constructed from volumetric X-ray microtomography images. Simulated pore-scale effluent concentrations were higher than those measured by a factor of 1.8, with the largest component of the discrepancy related to uncertainties in the reaction rate model and its parameters. However, part of the discrepancy was apparently due to mass transport limitations to reactive surfaces, which were most pronounced near the inlet where larger diffusive boundary layers formed around grains and in slow-flowing pore spaces that exchanged mass by diffusion with fast flow paths. Although minor, the difference between pore- and continuum-scale results due to transport controls was discernible with the highly accurate methods employed and is expected to be more significant where heterogeneity is greater, as in natural subsurface materials.

  19. Spatial correlations and probability density function of the phase difference in a developed speckle-field: numerical and natural experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mysina, N. Yu; Maksimova, L. A.; Gorbatenko, B. B.; Ryabukho, V. P.

    2015-10-01

    Investigated are statistical properties of the phase difference of oscillations in speckle-fields at two points in the far-field diffraction region, with different shapes of the scatterer aperture. Statistical and spatial nonuniformity of the probability density function of the field phase difference is established. Numerical experiments show that, for the speckle-fields with an oscillating alternating-sign transverse correlation function, a significant nonuniformity of the probability density function of the phase difference in the correlation region of the field complex amplitude, with the most probable values 0 and p, is observed. A natural statistical interference experiment using Young diagrams has confirmed the results of numerical experiments.

  20. Additions and Improvements to the FLASH Code for Simulating High Energy Density Physics Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, D. Q.; Daley, C.; Dubey, A.; Fatenejad, M.; Flocke, N.; Graziani, C.; Lee, D.; Tzeferacos, P.; Weide, K.

    2015-11-01

    FLASH is an open source, finite-volume Eulerian, spatially adaptive radiation hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics code that incorporates capabilities for a broad range of physical processes, performs well on a wide range of computer architectures, and has a broad user base. Extensive capabilities have been added to FLASH to make it an open toolset for the academic high energy density physics (HEDP) community. We summarize these capabilities, with particular emphasis on recent additions and improvements. These include advancements in the optical ray tracing laser package, with methods such as bi-cubic 2D and tri-cubic 3D interpolation of electron number density, adaptive stepping and 2nd-, 3rd-, and 4th-order Runge-Kutta integration methods. Moreover, we showcase the simulated magnetic field diagnostic capabilities of the code, including induction coils, Faraday rotation, and proton radiography. We also describe several collaborations with the National Laboratories and the academic community in which FLASH has been used to simulate HEDP experiments. This work was supported in part at the University of Chicago by the DOE NNSA ASC through the Argonne Institute for Computing in Science under field work proposal 57789; and the NSF under grant PHY-0903997.

  1. An experiment in software reliability: Additional analyses using data from automated replications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunham, Janet R.; Lauterbach, Linda A.

    1988-01-01

    A study undertaken to collect software error data of laboratory quality for use in the development of credible methods for predicting the reliability of software used in life-critical applications is summarized. The software error data reported were acquired through automated repetitive run testing of three independent implementations of a launch interceptor condition module of a radar tracking problem. The results are based on 100 test applications to accumulate a sufficient sample size for error rate estimation. The data collected is used to confirm the results of two Boeing studies reported in NASA-CR-165836 Software Reliability: Repetitive Run Experimentation and Modeling, and NASA-CR-172378 Software Reliability: Additional Investigations into Modeling With Replicated Experiments, respectively. That is, the results confirm the log-linear pattern of software error rates and reject the hypothesis of equal error rates per individual fault. This rejection casts doubt on the assumption that the program's failure rate is a constant multiple of the number of residual bugs; an assumption which underlies some of the current models of software reliability. data raises new questions concerning the phenomenon of interacting faults.

  2. Single Droplet Combustion of Decane in Microgravity: Experiments and Numerical Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, D. L.; Struk, P. M.; Ikegam, M.; Xu, G.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents experimental data on single droplet combustion of decane in microgravity and compares the results to a numerical model. The primary independent experiment variables are the ambient pressure and oxygen mole fraction, pressure, droplet size (over a relatively small range) and ignition energy. The droplet history (D(sup 2) history) is non-linear with the burning rate constant increasing throughout the test. The average burning rate constant, consistent with classical theory, increased with increasing ambient oxygen mole fraction and was nearly independent of pressure, initial droplet size and ignition energy. The flame typically increased in size initially, and then decreased in size, in response to the shrinking droplet. The flame standoff increased linearly for the majority of the droplet lifetime. The flame surrounding the droplet extinguished at a finite droplet size at lower ambient pressures and an oxygen mole fraction of 0.15. The extinction droplet size increased with decreasing pressure. The model is transient and assumes spherical symmetry, constant thermo-physical properties (specific heat, thermal conductivity and species Lewis number) and single step chemistry. The model includes gas-phase radiative loss and a spherically symmetric, transient liquid phase. The model accurately predicts the droplet and flame histories of the experiments. Good agreement requires that the ignition in the experiment be reasonably approximated in the model and that the model accurately predict the pre-ignition vaporization of the droplet. The model does not accurately predict the dependence of extinction droplet diameter on pressure, a result of the simplified chemistry in the model. The transient flame behavior suggests the potential importance of fuel vapor accumulation. The model results, however, show that the fractional mass consumption rate of fuel in the flame relative to fuel vaporized is close to 1.0 for all but the lowest ambient oxygen mole

  3. Characterization of stony soils' hydraulic conductivity using laboratory and numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckers, Eléonore; Pichault, Mathieu; Pansak, Wanwisa; Degré, Aurore; Garré, Sarah

    2016-08-01

    Determining soil hydraulic properties is of major concern in various fields of study. Although stony soils are widespread across the globe, most studies deal with gravel-free soils, so that the literature describing the impact of stones on the hydraulic conductivity of a soil is still rather scarce. Most frequently, models characterizing the saturated hydraulic conductivity of stony soils assume that the only effect of rock fragments is to reduce the volume available for water flow, and therefore they predict a decrease in hydraulic conductivity with an increasing stoniness. The objective of this study is to assess the effect of rock fragments on the saturated and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. This was done by means of laboratory experiments and numerical simulations involving different amounts and types of coarse fragments. We compared our results with values predicted by the aforementioned predictive models. Our study suggests that it might be ill-founded to consider that stones only reduce the volume available for water flow. We pointed out several factors of the saturated hydraulic conductivity of stony soils that are not considered by these models. On the one hand, the shape and the size of inclusions may substantially affect the hydraulic conductivity. On the other hand, laboratory experiments show that an increasing stone content can counteract and even overcome the effect of a reduced volume in some cases: we observed an increase in saturated hydraulic conductivity with volume of inclusions. These differences are mainly important near to saturation. However, comparison of results from predictive models and our experiments in unsaturated conditions shows that models and data agree on a decrease in hydraulic conductivity with stone content, even though the experimental conditions did not allow testing for stone contents higher than 20 %.

  4. Additive Manufacturing, Design, Testing, and Fabrication: A Full Engineering Experience at JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zusack, Steven

    2016-01-01

    I worked on several projects this term. While most projects involved additive manufacturing, I was also involved with two design projects, two testing projects, and a fabrication project. The primary mentor for these was Richard Hagen. Secondary mentors were Hai Nguyen, Khadijah Shariff, and fabrication training from James Brown. Overall, my experience at JSC has been successful and what I have learned will continue to help me in my engineering education and profession long after I leave. My 3D printing projects ranged from less than a 1 cubic centimeter to about 1 cubic foot and involved several printers using different printing technologies. It was exciting to become familiar with printing technologies such as industrial grade FDM (Fused Deposition Modeling), the relatively new SLA (Stereolithography), and PolyJet. My primary duty with the FDM printers was to model parts that came in from various sources to print effectively and efficiently. Using methods my mentor taught me and the Stratasys Insight software, I was able to minimize imperfections, hasten build time, improve strength for specific forces (tensile, shear, etc...), and reduce likelihood of a print-failure. Also using FDM, I learned how to repair a part after it was printed. This is done by using a special kind of glue that chemically melts the two faces of plastic parts together to form a fused interface. My first goal with SLA technology was to bring the printer back to operational readiness. In becoming familiar with the Pegasus SLA printer, I researched the leveling, laser settings, and different vats to hold liquid material. With this research, I was successfully able to bring the Pegasus back online and have successfully printed multiple sample parts as well as functional parts. My experience with PolyJet technology has been focused on an understanding of the abilities/limits, costs, and the maintenance for daily use. Still upcoming will be experience with using a composite printer that uses FDM

  5. Automated microbial metabolism laboratory. [design of advanced labeled release experiment based on single addition of soil and multiple sequential additions of media into test chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The design and rationale of an advanced labeled release experiment based on single addition of soil and multiple sequential additions of media into each of four test chambers are outlined. The feasibility for multiple addition tests was established and various details of the methodology were studied. The four chamber battery of tests include: (1) determination of the effect of various atmospheric gases and selection of that gas which produces an optimum response; (2) determination of the effect of incubation temperature and selection of the optimum temperature for performing Martian biochemical tests; (3) sterile soil is dosed with a battery of C-14 labeled substrates and subjected to experimental temperature range; and (4) determination of the possible inhibitory effects of water on Martian organisms is performed initially by dosing with 0.01 ml and 0.5 ml of medium, respectively. A series of specifically labeled substrates are then added to obtain patterns in metabolic 14CO2 (C-14)O2 evolution.

  6. Numerical Experiments on Oxygen Plasma Focus: Scaling Laws of Soft X-Ray Yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akel, M.

    2013-08-01

    Numerical experiments have been investigated on UNU/ICTP PFF low energy plasma focus device with oxygen filling gas. In these numerical experiments, the temperature window of 119-260 eV has been used as a suitable temperature range for generating oxygen soft X-rays. The Lee model was applied to characterize the UNU/ICTP PFF plasma focus. The optimum soft X-ray yield (Ysxr) was found to be 0.75 J, with the corresponding efficiency of about 0.03 % at pressure of 2.36 Torr and the end axial speed was va = 5 cm/μs. The practical optimum combination of p0, z0 and `a' for oxygen Ysxr was found to be 0.69 Torr, 4.8 cm and 2.366 cm respectively, with the outer radius b = 3.2 cm. This combination gives Ysxr ~ 5 J, with the corresponding efficiency of about 0.16 %. Thus we expect to increase the oxygen Ysxr of UNU/ICTP PFF, without changing the capacitor bank, merely by changing the electrode configuration and operating pressure. Scaling laws on oxygen soft X-ray yield, in terms of storage energies E0, peak discharge current Ipeak and focus pinch current Ipinch were found over the range from 1 kJ to 1 MJ. It was found that the oxygen soft X-ray yields scale well with and for the low inductance (L0 = 30 nH) (where yields are in J and currents in kA). While the soft X-ray yield scaling laws in terms of storage energies were found to be as (E0 in kJ and Ysxr in J) with the scaling showing gradual deterioration as E0 rises over the range. The oxygen soft X-ray yield emitted from plasma focus is found to be about 8.7 kJ for storage energy of 1 MJ. The optimum efficiency for soft X-ray yield (1.1 %) is with capacitor bank energy of 120 kJ. This indicates that oxygen plasma focus is a good soft X-ray source when properly designed.

  7. Police arrest and self-defence skills: performance under anxiety of officers with and without additional experience in martial arts.

    PubMed

    Renden, Peter G; Landman, Annemarie; Savelsbergh, Geert J P; Oudejans, Raôul R D

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether officers with additional martial arts training experience performed better in arrest and self-defence scenarios under low and high anxiety and were better able to maintain performance under high anxiety than officers who just rely on regular police training. We were especially interested to find out whether training once a week would already lead to better performance under high anxiety. Officers with additional experience in kickboxing or karate/jiu-jitsu (training several times per week), or krav maga (training once a week) and officers with no additional experience performed several arrest and self-defence skills under low and high anxiety. Results showed that officers with additional experience (also those who trained once a week) performed better under high anxiety than officers with no additional experience. Still, the additional experience did not prevent these participants from performing worse under high anxiety compared to low anxiety. Implications for training are discussed. Practitioner summary: Dutch police officers train their arrest and self-defence skills only four to six hours per year. Our results indicate that doing an additional martial arts training once a week may lead to better performance under anxiety, although it cannot prevent that performance decreases under high anxiety compared to low anxiety.

  8. Nitrate removal in stream ecosystems measured by 15N addition experiments: Total uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, Patrick J; Hall, Robert; Tank, Jennifer; Sobota, Daniel; O'Brien, Jon; Webster, Jackson; Valett, H. Maurice; Dodds, Walter; Poole, Geoff; Peterson, Chris G.; Meyer, Judy; McDowell, William; Johnson, Sherri; Hamilton, Stephen; Gregory, Stanley; Grimm, Nancy; Dahm, Cliff; Cooper, Lee W; Ashkenas, Linda; Thomas, Suzanne; Sheibley, Rich; Potter, Jody; Niederlehner, Bobbie; Johnson, Laura; Helton, Ashley; Crenshaw, Chelsea; Burgin, Amy; Bernot, Melody; Beaulieu, Jake; Arango, Clay

    2009-01-01

    We measured uptake length of {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup -} in 72 streams in eight regions across the United States and Puerto Rico to develop quantitative predictive models on controls of NO{sub 3}{sup -} uptake length. As part of the Lotic Intersite Nitrogen Experiment II project, we chose nine streams in each region corresponding to natural (reference), suburban-urban, and agricultural land uses. Study streams spanned a range of human land use to maximize variation in NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration, geomorphology, and metabolism. We tested a causal model predicting controls on NO{sub 3}{sup -} uptake length using structural equation modeling. The model included concomitant measurements of ecosystem metabolism, hydraulic parameters, and nitrogen concentration. We compared this structural equation model to multiple regression models which included additional biotic, catchment, and riparian variables. The structural equation model explained 79% of the variation in log uptake length (S{sub Wtot}). Uptake length increased with specific discharge (Q/w) and increasing NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentrations, showing a loss in removal efficiency in streams with high NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration. Uptake lengths shortened with increasing gross primary production, suggesting autotrophic assimilation dominated NO{sub 3}{sup -} removal. The fraction of catchment area as agriculture and suburban-urban land use weakly predicted NO{sub 3}{sup -} uptake in bivariate regression, and did improve prediction in a set of multiple regression models. Adding land use to the structural equation model showed that land use indirectly affected NO{sub 3}{sup -} uptake lengths via directly increasing both gross primary production and NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration. Gross primary production shortened S{sub Wtot}, while increasing NO{sub 3}{sup -} lengthened S{sub Wtot} resulting in no net effect of land use on NO{sub 3}{sup -} removal.

  9. Nitrate removal in stream ecosystems measured by 15N addition experiments: Total uptake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, R.O.; Tank, J.L.; Sobota, D.J.; Mulholland, P.J.; O'Brien, J. M.; Dodds, W.K.; Webster, J.R.; Valett, H.M.; Poole, G.C.; Peterson, B.J.; Meyer, J.L.; McDowell, W.H.; Johnson, S.L.; Hamilton, S.K.; Grimm, N. B.; Gregory, S.V.; Dahm, Clifford N.; Cooper, L.W.; Ashkenas, L.R.; Thomas, S.M.; Sheibley, R.W.; Potter, J.D.; Niederlehner, B.R.; Johnson, L.T.; Helton, A.M.; Crenshaw, C.M.; Burgin, A.J.; Bernot, M.J.; Beaulieu, J.J.; Arangob, C.P.

    2009-01-01

    We measured uptake length of 15NO-3 in 72 streams in eight regions across the United States and Puerto Rico to develop quantitative predictive models on controls of NO-3 uptake length. As part of the Lotic Intersite Nitrogen eXperiment II project, we chose nine streams in each region corresponding to natural (reference), suburban-urban, and agricultural land uses. Study streams spanned a range of human land use to maximize variation in NO-3 concentration, geomorphology, and metabolism. We tested a causal model predicting controls on NO-3 uptake length using structural equation modeling. The model included concomitant measurements of ecosystem metabolism, hydraulic parameters, and nitrogen concentration. We compared this structural equation model to multiple regression models which included additional biotic, catchment, and riparian variables. The structural equation model explained 79% of the variation in log uptake length (S Wtot). Uptake length increased with specific discharge (Q/w) and increasing NO-3 concentrations, showing a loss in removal efficiency in streams with high NO-3 concentration. Uptake lengths shortened with increasing gross primary production, suggesting autotrophic assimilation dominated NO-3 removal. The fraction of catchment area as agriculture and suburban-urban land use weakly predicted NO-3 uptake in bivariate regression, and did improve prediction in a set of multiple regression models. Adding land use to the structural equation model showed that land use indirectly affected NO-3 uptake lengths via directly increasing both gross primary production and NO-3 concentration. Gross primary production shortened SWtot, while increasing NO-3 lengthened SWtot resulting in no net effect of land use on NO- 3 removal. ?? 2009.

  10. Analysis of the Source Physics Experiment SPE4 Prime Using State-Of Parallel Numerical Tools.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobiev, O.; Ezzedine, S. M.; Antoun, T.; Glenn, L.

    2015-12-01

    This work describes a methodology used for large scale modeling of wave propagation from underground chemical explosions conducted at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) fractured granitic rock. We show that the discrete natures of rock masses as well as the spatial variability of the fabric of rock properties are very important to understand ground motions induced by underground explosions. In order to build a credible conceptual model of the subsurface we integrated the geological, geomechanical and geophysical characterizations conducted during recent test at the NNSS as well as historical data from the characterization during the underground nuclear test conducted at the NNSS. Because detailed site characterization is limited, expensive and, in some instances, impossible we have numerically investigated the effects of the characterization gaps on the overall response of the system. We performed several computational studies to identify the key important geologic features specific to fractured media mainly the joints characterized at the NNSS. We have also explored common key features to both geological environments such as saturation and topography and assess which characteristics affect the most the ground motion in the near-field and in the far-field. Stochastic representation of these features based on the field characterizations has been implemented into LLNL's Geodyn-L hydrocode. Simulations were used to guide site characterization efforts in order to provide the essential data to the modeling community. We validate our computational results by comparing the measured and computed ground motion at various ranges for the recently executed SPE4 prime experiment. We have also conducted a comparative study between SPE4 prime and previous experiments SPE1 and SPE3 to assess similarities and differences and draw conclusions on designing SPE5.

  11. NUMERICAL EXPERIMENTS ON THE TWO-STEP EMERGENCE OF TWISTED MAGNETIC FLUX TUBES IN THE SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Toriumi, S.; Yokoyama, T.

    2011-07-10

    We present the new results of the two-dimensional numerical experiments on the cross-sectional evolution of a twisted magnetic flux tube rising from the deeper solar convection zone (-20,000 km) to the corona through the surface. The initial depth is 10 times deeper than most of the previous calculations focusing on the flux emergence from the uppermost convection zone. We find that the evolution is illustrated by the following two-step process. The initial tube rises due to its buoyancy, subject to aerodynamic drag due to the external flow. Because of the azimuthal component of the magnetic field, the tube maintains its coherency and does not deform to become a vortex roll pair. When the flux tube approaches the photosphere and expands sufficiently, the plasma on the rising tube accumulates to suppress the tube's emergence. Therefore, the flux decelerates and extends horizontally beneath the surface. This new finding owes to our large-scale simulation, which simultaneously calculates the dynamics within the interior as well as above the surface. As the magnetic pressure gradient increases around the surface, magnetic buoyancy instability is triggered locally and, as a result, the flux rises further into the solar corona. We also find that the deceleration occurs at a higher altitude than assumed in our previous experiment using magnetic flux sheets. By conducting parametric studies, we investigate the conditions for the two-step emergence of the rising flux tube: field strength {approx}> 1.5 x 10{sup 4} G and the twist {approx}> 5.0 x 10{sup -4} km{sup -1} at -20,000 km depth.

  12. Flow and Transport in Highly Heterogeneous Porous Formations: Numerical Experiments Performed Using the Analytic Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankovic, I.

    2002-05-01

    Flow and transport in porous formations are analyzed using numerical simulations. Hydraulic conductivity is treated as a spatial random function characterized by a probability density function and a two-point covariance function. Simulations are performed for a multi-indicator conductivity structure developed by Gedeon Dagan (personal communication). This conductivity structure contains inhomogeneities (inclusions) of elliptical and ellipsoidal geometry that are embedded in a homogeneous background. By varying the distribution of sizes and conductivities of inclusions, any probability density function and two-point covariance may be reproduced. The multi-indicator structure is selected since it yields simple approximate transport solutions (Aldo Fiori, personal communication) and accurate numerical solutions (based on the Analytic Element Method). The dispersion is examined for two conceptual models. Both models are based on the multi-indicator conductivity structure. The first model is designed to examine dispersion in aquifers with continuously varying conductivity. The inclusions in this model cover as much area/volume of the porous formation as possible. The second model is designed for aquifers that contain clay/sand/gravel lenses embedded in otherwise homogeneous background. The dispersion in both aquifer types is simulated numerically. Simulation results are compared to those obtained using simple approximate solutions. In order to infer transport statistics that are representative of an infinite domain using the numerical experiments, the inclusions are placed in a domain that was shaped as a large ellipse (2D) and a large spheroid (3D) that were submerged in an unbounded homogeneous medium. On a large scale, the large body of inclusions behaves like a single large inhomogeneity. The analytic solution for a uniform flow past the single inhomogeneity of such geometry yields uniform velocity inside the domain. The velocity differs from that at infinity and

  13. Morphotectonic evolution of passive margins undergoing active surface processes: large-scale experiments using numerical models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beucher, Romain; Huismans, Ritske S.

    2016-04-01

    Extension of the continental lithosphere can lead to the formation of a wide range of rifted margins styles with contrasting tectonic and geomorphological characteristics. It is now understood that many of these characteristics depend on the manner extension is distributed depending on (among others factors) rheology, structural inheritance, thermal structure and surface processes. The relative importance and the possible interactions of these controlling factors is still largely unknown. Here we investigate the feedbacks between tectonics and the transfers of material at the surface resulting from erosion, transport, and sedimentation. We use large-scale (1200 x 600 km) and high-resolution (~1km) numerical experiments coupling a 2D upper-mantle-scale thermo-mechanical model with a plan-form 2D surface processes model (SPM). We test the sensitivity of the coupled models to varying crust-lithosphere rheology and erosional efficiency ranging from no-erosion to very efficient erosion. We discuss how fast, when and how the topography of the continents evolves and how it can be compared to actual passive margins escarpment morphologies. We show that although tectonics is the main factor controlling the rift geometry, transfers of masses at the surface affect the timing of faulting and the initiation of sea-floor spreading. We discuss how such models may help to understand the evolution of high-elevated passive margins around the world.

  14. Dynamics of soil water evaporation during soil drying: laboratory experiment and numerical analysis.

    PubMed

    Han, Jiangbo; Zhou, Zhifang

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory and numerical experiments were conducted to investigate the evolution of soil water evaporation during a continuous drying event. Simulated soil water contents and temperatures by the calibrated model well reproduced measured values at different depths. Results show that the evaporative drying process could be divided into three stages, beginning with a relatively high evaporation rate during stage 1, followed by a lower rate during transient stage and stage 2, and finally maintaining a very low and constant rate during stage 3. The condensation zone was located immediately below the evaporation zone in the profile. Both peaks of evaporation and condensation rate increased rapidly during stage 1 and transition stage, decreased during stage 2, and maintained constant during stage 3. The width of evaporation zone kept a continuous increase during stages 1 and 2 and maintained a nearly constant value of 0.68 cm during stage 3. When the evaporation zone totally moved into the subsurface, a dry surface layer (DSL) formed above the evaporation zone at the end of stage 2. The width of DSL also presented a continuous increase during stage 2 and kept a constant value of 0.71 cm during stage 3.

  15. Numerical Hindcast Experiments for Study Tropical Convections and MJO Events during Year of Tropical Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chern, J.; Tao, W.; Shen, B.

    2011-12-01

    The Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) is the dominant component of intraseasonal variability in the tropic. It interacts and influences a wide range of weather and climate phenomena across different temporal and spatial scales. Despite the important role the MJO plays in the weather and climate system, past multi-model MJO intercomparison studies have shown that current global general circulation models (GCMs) still have considerable shortcomings in representing and forecasting this phenomenon. To improve representation of MJO and tropical convective cloud systems in global model, an Multiscale Modeling Framework (MMF) in which a cloud-resolving model takes the place of the sing-column cumulus parameterization used in convectional GCMs has been successfully developed at NAAS Goddard (Tao et al. 2009). To evaluate and improve the ability of this modeling system in representation and prediction of the MJO, several numerical hindcast experiments of a few selected MJO events during YOTC have been carried out. The ability of the model to simulate the MJO events is examined using diagnostic and skill metrics developed by the CLIVAR MJO Working Group Project as well as comparisons with a high-resolution global mesoscale model simulations, satellite observations, and analysis dataset. Several key variables associated with the MJO are investigated, including precipitation, outgoing longwave radiation, large-scale circulation, surface latent heat flux, low-level moisture convergence, vertical structure of moisture and hydrometers, and vertical diabatic heating profiles to gain insight of cloud processes associated with the MJO events.

  16. Numerical and laboratory experiments on the dynamics of plume-ridge interaction. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Kincaid, C.; Gable, C.W.

    1995-09-01

    Mantle plumes and passive upwelling beneath ridges are the two dominant modes of mantle transport and thermal/chemical fluxing between the Earth`s deep interior and surface. While plumes and ridges independently contribute to crustal accretion, they also interact and the dispersion of plumes within the upper mantle is strongly modulated by mid-ocean ridges. The simplest mode of interaction, with the plume centered on the ridge, has been well documented and modeled. The remaining question is how plumes and ridges interact when the plume is located off-axis; it has been suggested that a pipeline-like flow from the off-axis plume to the ridge axis at the base of the rigid lithosphere may develop. Mid-ocean ridges migrating away from hot mantle plumes can be affected by plume discharges over long times and ridge migration distances. Salient feature of this model is that off-axis plumes communicate with the ridge through a channel resulting from the refraction and dispersion of an axi-symmetric plume conduit along the base of the sloping lithosphere. To test the dynamics of this model, a series of numerical and laboratory dynamic experiments on the problem of a fixed ridge and an off-axis buoyant upwelling were conducted. Results are discussed.

  17. Numerical simulations of recent proton acceleration experiments with sub-100 TW laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinigardi, Stefano

    2016-09-01

    Recent experiments carried out at the Italian National Research Center, National Optics Institute Department in Pisa, are showing interesting results regarding maximum proton energies achievable with sub-100 TW laser systems. While laser systems are being continuously upgraded in laboratories around the world, at the same time a new trend on stabilizing and making ion acceleration results reproducible is growing in importance. Almost all applications require a beam with fixed performance, so that the energy spectrum and the total charge exhibit moderate shot to shot variations. This result is surely far from being achieved, but many paths are being explored in order to reach it. Some of the reasons for this variability come from fluctuations in laser intensity and focusing, due to optics instability. Other variation sources come from small differences in the target structure. The target structure can vary substantially, when it is impacted by the main pulse, due to the prepulse duration and intensity, the shape of the main pulse and the total energy deposited. In order to qualitatively describe the prepulse effect, we will present a two dimensional parametric scan of its relevant parameters. A single case is also analyzed with a full three dimensional simulation, obtaining reasonable agreement between the numerical and the experimental energy spectrum.

  18. Numerical Simulation of Non-inductive Startup in the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Bryan, J. B.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2011-10-01

    Nonlinear numerical computation is used to investigate the relaxation of non-axisymmetric current channels from washer-gun plasma sources into ``tokamak-like'' plasmas in the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment. Resistive MHD simulations with the NIMROD code utilize fully 3D, anisotropic, temperature-dependent thermal conductivity corrected for regions of low-magnetization [Braginskii, 1965], temperature-dependent resistivity, and ohmic heating. Our modeling of injection has been improved by implementing a gaussian toroidal shape function for the current drive source, which has a more rapidly converging Fourier expansion than the original half-sine-wave shape, while retaining a similar current profile. The thermal boundary conditions have also been modified to allow a conducting path to form all the way to the electrodes. With sufficient localized vertical magnetic field reversal, the current channel oscillation frequency doubles. After this transition, parallel current profiles suggest the occurrence of magnetic reconnection when the current channel nearly makes contact with itself. Work Supported by the U.S. Dept. of Energy.

  19. Nonlinear ultrasonic waves in bubbly liquids with nonhomogeneous bubble distribution: Numerical experiments.

    PubMed

    Vanhille, Christian; Campos-Pozuelo, Cleofé

    2009-06-01

    This paper deals with the nonlinear propagation of ultrasonic waves in mixtures of air bubbles in water, but for which the bubble distribution is nonhomogeneous. The problem is modelled by means of a set of differential equations which describes the coupling of the acoustic field and bubbles vibration, and solved in the time domain via the use and adaptation of the SNOW-BL code. The attenuation and nonlinear effects are assumed to be due to the bubbles exclusively. The nonhomogeneity of the bubble distribution is introduced by the presence of bubble layers (or clouds) which can act as acoustic screens, and alters the behaviour of the ultrasonic waves. The effect of the spatial distribution of bubbles on the nonlinearity of the acoustic field is analyzed. Depending on the bubble density, dimension, shape, and position of the layers, its effects on the acoustic field change. Effects such as shielding and resonance of the bubbly layers are especially studied. The numerical experiments are carried out in two configurations: linear and nonlinear, i.e. for low and high excitation pressure amplitude, respectively, and the features of the phenomenon are compared. The parameters of the medium are chosen such as to reproduce air bubbly water involved in the stable cavitation process.

  20. On the generation of sound by turbulent convection. I - A numerical experiment. [in solar interior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdan, Thomas J.; Cattaneo, Fausto; Malagoli, Andrea

    1993-01-01

    Motivated by the problem of the origin of the solar p-modes, we study the generation of acoustic waves by turbulent convection. Our approach uses the results of high-resolution 3D simulations as the experimental basis for our investigation. The numerical experiment describes the evolution of a horizontally periodic layer of vigorously convecting fluid. The sound is measured by a procedure, based on a suitable linearization of the equations of compressible convection that allows the amplitude of the acoustic field to be determined. Through this procedure we identify unambiguously some 400 acoustic modes. The total energy of the acoustic field is found to be a fraction of a percent of the kinetic energy of the convection. The amplitudes of the observed modes depend weakly on (horizontal) wavenumber but strongly on frequency. The line widths of the observed modes typically exceed the natural linewidths of the modes as inferred from linear theory. This broadening appears to be related to the (stochastic) interaction between the modes and the underlying turbulence which causes abrupt, episodic events during which the phase coherence of the modes is lost.

  1. Magnetized jets and shocks in radial foil Z-pinches: experiments and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, S. V.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Pickworth, L. A.; Swadling, G. F.; Burdiak, G.; Skidmore, J.; Hall, G. N.; Bennett, M.; Bland, S. N.; Chittenden, J. P.; de Grouchy, P.; Derrick, J.; Hare, J.; Parker, T.; Sciortino, F.; Suttle, L.; Ciardi, A.; Rodriguez, R.; Gil, J. M.; Espinosa, G.; Hansen, E.; Frank, A.; Music, J.

    2014-10-01

    Different variations of the radial foil Z-pinch configuration have been investigated in the recent years on the MAGPIE generator (1.4 MA, 250 ns), particularly using over-massed aluminum foils with thicknesses of ~15 μm. This setup is characterized by a highly collimated, supersonic jet on the axis of the foil surrounded by low-density ablated plasma, both moving with the same axial velocity of ~60 km/s. Latest results show that the formation and collimation of the jet is directly related to toroidal magnetic field advected with the flow. We present new experimental results that include Thomson scattering measurements of plasma flow velocity and temperature, and a first study on the effect of foil material on jet formation. The effect of advected toroidal magnetic field in the plasma flow is clearly evidenced using a new experimental configuration that produces counter-streaming jets. The results are characterized by the formation of shocks in which the effect of magnetic field and radiative cooling are significant. The setup also allows controlling the polarity of the advected fields at the interaction point between the counter-streaming flows, and results from experiments and numerical simulations will be presented and discussed.

  2. Mass Movement-Induced Tsunami Hazard on Perialpine Lake Lucerne (Switzerland): Scenarios and Numerical Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilbe, Michael; Anselmetti, Flavio S.

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies of the sediments of Lake Lucerne have shown that massive subaqueous mass movements affecting unconsolidated sediments on lateral slopes are a common process in this lake, and, in view of historical reports describing damaging waves on the lake, it was suggested that tsunamis generated by mass movements represent a considerable natural hazard on the lakeshores. Newly performed numerical simulations combining two-dimensional, depth-averaged models for mass-movement propagation and for tsunami generation, propagation and inundation reproduce a number of reported tsunami effects. Four analysed mass-movement scenarios—three based on documented slope failures involving volumes of 5.5 to 20.8 × 106 m3—show peak wave heights of several metres and maximum runup of 6 to >10 m in the directly affected basins, while effects in neighbouring basins are less drastic. The tsunamis cause large-scale inundation over distances of several hundred metres on flat alluvial plains close to the mass-movement source areas. Basins at the ends of the lake experience regular water-level oscillations with characteristic periods of several minutes. The vulnerability of potentially affected areas has increased dramatically since the times of the damaging historical events, recommending a thorough evaluation of the hazard.

  3. Intercomparison of diffusion coefficient derived from the through-diffusion experiment using different numerical methods.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Lung; Wang, Tsing-Hai; Lee, Ching-Hor; Teng, Shi-Ping

    Diffusion is a dominant mechanism regulating the transport of released nuclides. The through-diffusion method is typically applied to determine the diffusion coefficients (D). Depending on the design of the experiment, the concentrations in the source term [i.e., inlet reservoir (IR)] or the end term [i.e., outlet reservoir (OR)] can be fixed or vary. The combinations involve four distinct models (i.e., the CC-CC model, CC-VC model, VC-CC model, and the VC-VC model). Studies discussing the VC-CC model are scant. An analytical method considering the decay effect is required to accurately interpret the radioactive nuclide diffusion experiment results. Therefore, we developed a CC-CC model and a CC-VC model with a decay effect and the simplified formulas of these two models to determine the diffusion coefficient (i.e., the CC-CC method and CC-VC method). We also proposed two simplified methods using the VC-VC model to determine the diffusion coefficient straightforwardly based upon the concentration variation in IR and OR. More importantly, the best advantage of proposed method over others is that one can derive three diffusion coefficients based on one run of experiment. In addition, applying our CC-VC method to those data reported from Radiochemica Acta 96:111-117, 2008; and J Contam Hydrol 35:55-65, 1998, derived comparable diffusion coefficient lying in the identical order of magnitude. Furthermore, we proposed a formula to determine the conceptual critical time (Tc), which is particularly beneficial for the selection of using CC-VC or VC-VC method. Based on our proposed method, it becomes possible to calculate diffusion coefficient from a through-diffusion experiment in a shorter period of time.

  4. Shear-driven particle size segregation: Models, analysis, numerical solutions, and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Lindsay Bard Hilbert

    , we find a layer of small particles below a layer of large particles. We also measure a velocity profile from the Couette cell experimental data, which provides parameters used to derive the solution of the initial boundary value problem. The initial condition for the partial differential equation corresponds to the one dimensional initial configuration of the experiment. We solve two initial boundary value problems, one with a piecewise linear shear rate and one with an exponential shear rate, where the parameters for both cases are derived from the experimental data. In each case, we use the method of characteristics to solve the initial boundary value problem. In both cases, almost all pieces of the solution can be explicitly calculated, and those that cannot are calculated numerically. In the piecewise linear case, there is a material interface across which the characteristic speed jumps; in the exponential case, the characteristics are curved. We compare the model with the exponential shear rate to the experimental data. The model solution is the volume fraction of small particles at time t and location z. We cannot measure the volume fraction locally in the experiment; instead, we map the volume fraction to a theoretical height which we compare to the experimental experimental height data. The height of the sample is an indirect measurement of the amount of mixing or segregation. We conclude that the model captures qualitative features of the experimental data, but there are features of the experiment that the current version of the model does not describe.

  5. Numerical Experiments on Advective Transport in Large Three-Dimensional Discrete Fracture Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makedonska, N.; Painter, S. L.; Karra, S.; Gable, C. W.

    2013-12-01

    Modeling of flow and solute transport in discrete fracture networks is an important approach for understanding the migration of contaminants in impermeable hard rocks such as granite, where fractures provide dominant flow and transport pathways. The discrete fracture network (DFN) model attempts to mimic discrete pathways for fluid flow through a fractured low-permeable rock mass, and may be combined with particle tracking simulations to address solute transport. However, experience has shown that it is challenging to obtain accurate transport results in three-dimensional DFNs because of the high computational burden and difficulty in constructing a high-quality unstructured computational mesh on simulated fractures. An integrated DFN meshing [1], flow, and particle tracking [2] simulation capability that enables accurate flow and particle tracking simulation on large DFNs has recently been developed. The new capability has been used in numerical experiments on advective transport in large DFNs with tens of thousands of fractures and millions of computational cells. The modeling procedure starts from the fracture network generation using a stochastic model derived from site data. A high-quality computational mesh is then generated [1]. Flow is then solved using the highly parallel PFLOTRAN [3] code. PFLOTRAN uses the finite volume approach, which is locally mass conserving and thus eliminates mass balance problems during particle tracking. The flow solver provides the scalar fluxes on each control volume face. From the obtained fluxes the Darcy velocity is reconstructed for each node in the network [4]. Velocities can then be continuously interpolated to any point in the domain of interest, thus enabling random walk particle tracking. In order to describe the flow field on fractures intersections, the control volume cells on intersections are split into four planar polygons, where each polygon corresponds to a piece of a fracture near the intersection line. Thus

  6. The initial stages of explosive volcanic eruptions: insights gained from comparisons between laboratory experiments and numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, A. B.; de'Michieli Vitturi, M.; Chojnicki, K. N.; Phillips, J. C.

    2011-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions begin with fragmentation, accompanied by formation of a leading pressure or shock wave and high acceleration of a gas-pyroclast mixture behind that wave. Characterizing and quantifying the details of the initial phases is critical in part because these processes control vent velocity and mass flux, which in turn partially control whether or not an eruption column buoyantly rises or collapses to form pyroclastic density currents. Parameters of particular interest are gas and particle acceleration rate, the degree of coupling between pyroclast and gas phases, particle concentration, shock wave characteristics (which can be measured in the field and interpreted to infer pre-eruption, sub-surface conditions), and characteristics of the rarefaction wave (because its propagation limits the propagation of the fragmentation front). To study these processes, we compared 1D shock tube experiments and equivalent 1D numerical model runs for a range of conditions: initial pressure ratios of 5 to 100, initial particle concentrations of about 40 vol% (air as ambient), and particle sizes of 4 μm to 150 μm. Key parameters of comparison are shock wave strength and velocity and particle flow-front velocity. Rarefaction wave speed and gas velocity behind the shock were calculated using the model, but are difficult to measure in the laboratory and therefore are not an integral part of our study at this time. In general, the experiments and calculations are in reasonable agreement in terms of shock wave characteristics. However, the model over predicts particle velocities by an order of magnitude relative to laboratory measurements. This discrepancy is significant because, as stated above, initial particle velocity is of critical interest to volcanologists when making predictions about plume behavior. We propose two explanations for the difference between calculated and measured particle velocities. 1) Overestimation of the drag coefficient which couples

  7. Characterization of stony soils' hydraulic conductivity using laboratory and numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichault, M.; Beckers, E.; Degré, A.; Garré, S.

    2015-10-01

    Determining soil hydraulic properties is of major concern in various fields of study. Though stony soils are widespread across the globe, most studies deal with gravel-free soils so that the literature describing the impact of stones on soil's hydraulic conductivity is still rather scarce. Most frequently, models characterizing the saturated hydraulic conductivity of stony soils assume that the only effect of rock fragments is to reduce the volume available for water flow and therefore they predict a decrease in hydraulic conductivity with an increasing stoniness. The objective of this study is to assess the effect of rock fragments on the saturated and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. This was done by means of laboratory and numerical experiments involving different amounts and types of coarse fragments. We compared our results with values predicted by the aforementioned models. Our study suggests that considering that stones only reduce the volume available for water flow might be ill-founded. We pointed out several drivers of the saturated hydraulic conductivity of stony soils, not considered by these models. On the one hand, the shape and the size of inclusions may substantially affect the hydraulic conductivity. On the other hand, the presence of rock fragments can counteract and even overcome the effect of a reduced volume in some cases. We attribute this to the creation of voids at the fine earth-stone interface. Nevertheless, these differences are mainly important near to saturation. However, we come up with a more nuanced view regarding the validity of the models under unsaturated conditions. Indeed, under unsaturated conditions, the models seem to represent the hydraulic behaviour of stones reasonably well.

  8. Continents, supercontinents, mantle thermal mixing, and mantle thermal isolation: Theory, numerical simulations, and laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenardic, A.; Moresi, L.; Jellinek, A. M.; O'Neill, C. J.; Cooper, C. M.; Lee, C. T.

    2011-10-01

    Super-continental insulation refers to an increase in mantle temperature below a supercontinent due to the heat transfer inefficiency of thick, stagnant continental lithosphere relative to thinner, subducting oceanic lithosphere. We use thermal network theory, numerical simulations, and laboratory experiments to provide tighter physical insight into this process. We isolate two end-member dynamic regimes. In the thermally well mixed regime the insulating effect of continental lithosphere can not cause a localized increase in mantle temperature due to the efficiency of lateral mixing in the mantle. In this regime the potential temperature of the entire mantle is higher than it would be without continents, the magnitude depending on the relative thickness of continental and oceanic lithosphere (i.e., the insulating effects of continental lithosphere are communicated to the entire mantle). Thermal mixing can be short circuited if subduction zones surround a supercontinent or if the convective flow pattern of the mantle becomes spatially fixed relative to a stationary supercontinent. This causes a transition to the thermal isolation regime: The potential temperature increases below a supercontinent whereas the potential temperature below oceanic domains drops such that the average temperature of the whole mantle remains constant. Transition into this regime would thus involve an increase in the suboceanic viscosity, due to local cooling, and consequently a decrease in the rate of oceanic lithosphere overturn. Transition out of this regime can involve the unleashing of flow driven by a large lateral temperature gradient, which will enhance global convective motions. Our analysis highlights that transitions between the two states, in either direction, will effect not only the mantle below a supercontinent but also the mantle below oceanic regions. This provides a larger set of predictions that can be compared to the geologic record to help determine if a hypothesized

  9. ELECTRODYNAMICS OF AXISYMMETRIC PULSAR MAGNETOSPHERE WITH ELECTRON-POSITRON DISCHARGE: A NUMERICAL EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Alexander Y.; Beloborodov, Andrei M.

    2014-11-01

    We present the first self-consistent global simulations of pulsar magnetospheres with operating e {sup ±} discharge. We focus on the simple configuration of an aligned or anti-aligned rotator. The star is spun up from a zero (vacuum) state to a high angular velocity, and we follow the coupled evolution of its external electromagnetic field and plasma particles using the ''particle-in-cell'' method. A plasma magnetosphere begins to form through the extraction of particles from the star; these particles are accelerated by the rotation-induced electric field, producing curvature radiation and igniting e {sup ±} discharge. We follow the system evolution for several revolution periods, longer than required to reach a quasi-steady state. Our numerical experiment puts to test previous ideas for the plasma flow and gaps in the pulsar magnetosphere. We first consider rotators capable of producing pairs out to the light cylinder through photon-photon collisions. We find that their magnetospheres are similar to the previously obtained force-free solutions with a Y-shaped current sheet. The magnetosphere continually ejects e {sup ±} pairs and ions. Pair creation is sustained by a strong electric field along the current sheet. We observe powerful curvature and synchrotron emission from the current sheet, consistent with Fermi observations of gamma-ray pulsars. We then study pulsars that can only create pairs in the strong-field region near the neutron star, well inside the light cylinder. We find that both aligned and anti-aligned rotators relax to the ''dead'' state with suppressed pair creation and electric currents, regardless of the discharge voltage.

  10. Numerical modeling of heat-transfer and the influence of process parameters on tailoring the grain morphology of IN718 in electron beam additive manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Raghavan, Narendran; Dehoff, Ryan; Pannala, Sreekanth; Simunovic, Srdjan; Kirka, Michael; Turner, John; Carlson, Neil; Babu, Sudarsanam S.

    2016-04-26

    The fabrication of 3-D parts from CAD models by additive manufacturing (AM) is a disruptive technology that is transforming the metal manufacturing industry. The correlation between solidification microstructure and mechanical properties has been well understood in the casting and welding processes over the years. This paper focuses on extending these principles to additive manufacturing to understand the transient phenomena of repeated melting and solidification during electron beam powder melting process to achieve site-specific microstructure control within a fabricated component. In this paper, we have developed a novel melt scan strategy for electron beam melting of nickel-base superalloy (Inconel 718) and also analyzed 3-D heat transfer conditions using a parallel numerical solidification code (Truchas) developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The spatial and temporal variations of temperature gradient (G) and growth velocity (R) at the liquid-solid interface of the melt pool were calculated as a function of electron beam parameters. By manipulating the relative number of voxels that lie in the columnar or equiaxed region, the crystallographic texture of the components can be controlled to an extent. The analysis of the parameters provided optimum processing conditions that will result in columnar to equiaxed transition (CET) during the solidification. Furthermore, the results from the numerical simulations were validated by experimental processing and characterization thereby proving the potential of additive manufacturing process to achieve site-specific crystallographic texture control within a fabricated component.

  11. Numerical modeling of heat-transfer and the influence of process parameters on tailoring the grain morphology of IN718 in electron beam additive manufacturing

    DOE PAGES

    Raghavan, Narendran; Dehoff, Ryan; Pannala, Sreekanth; ...

    2016-04-26

    The fabrication of 3-D parts from CAD models by additive manufacturing (AM) is a disruptive technology that is transforming the metal manufacturing industry. The correlation between solidification microstructure and mechanical properties has been well understood in the casting and welding processes over the years. This paper focuses on extending these principles to additive manufacturing to understand the transient phenomena of repeated melting and solidification during electron beam powder melting process to achieve site-specific microstructure control within a fabricated component. In this paper, we have developed a novel melt scan strategy for electron beam melting of nickel-base superalloy (Inconel 718) andmore » also analyzed 3-D heat transfer conditions using a parallel numerical solidification code (Truchas) developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The spatial and temporal variations of temperature gradient (G) and growth velocity (R) at the liquid-solid interface of the melt pool were calculated as a function of electron beam parameters. By manipulating the relative number of voxels that lie in the columnar or equiaxed region, the crystallographic texture of the components can be controlled to an extent. The analysis of the parameters provided optimum processing conditions that will result in columnar to equiaxed transition (CET) during the solidification. Furthermore, the results from the numerical simulations were validated by experimental processing and characterization thereby proving the potential of additive manufacturing process to achieve site-specific crystallographic texture control within a fabricated component.« less

  12. Evaluation of transverse dispersion effects in tank experiments by numerical modeling: parameter estimation, sensitivity analysis and revision of experimental design.

    PubMed

    Ballarini, E; Bauer, S; Eberhardt, C; Beyer, C

    2012-06-01

    Transverse dispersion represents an important mixing process for transport of contaminants in groundwater and constitutes an essential prerequisite for geochemical and biodegradation reactions. Within this context, this work describes the detailed numerical simulation of highly controlled laboratory experiments using uranine, bromide and oxygen depleted water as conservative tracers for the quantification of transverse mixing in porous media. Synthetic numerical experiments reproducing an existing laboratory experimental set-up of quasi two-dimensional flow through tank were performed to assess the applicability of an analytical solution of the 2D advection-dispersion equation for the estimation of transverse dispersivity as fitting parameter. The fitted dispersivities were compared to the "true" values introduced in the numerical simulations and the associated error could be precisely estimated. A sensitivity analysis was performed on the experimental set-up in order to evaluate the sensitivities of the measurements taken at the tank experiment on the individual hydraulic and transport parameters. From the results, an improved experimental set-up as well as a numerical evaluation procedure could be developed, which allow for a precise and reliable determination of dispersivities. The improved tank set-up was used for new laboratory experiments, performed at advective velocities of 4.9 m d(-1) and 10.5 m d(-1). Numerical evaluation of these experiments yielded a unique and reliable parameter set, which closely fits the measured tracer concentration data. For the porous medium with a grain size of 0.25-0.30 mm, the fitted longitudinal and transverse dispersivities were 3.49×10(-4) m and 1.48×10(-5) m, respectively. The procedures developed in this paper for the synthetic and rigorous design and evaluation of the experiments can be generalized and transferred to comparable applications.

  13. A numerical study on the effect of hydrogen/reformate gas addition on flame temperature and NO formation in strained methane/air diffusion flames

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Hongsheng; Neill, W. Stuart

    2009-02-15

    This paper investigates the effects of hydrogen/reformate gas addition on flame temperature and NO formation in strained methane/air diffusion flames by numerical simulation. The results reveal that flame temperature changes due to the combined effects of adiabatic temperature, fuel Lewis number and radiation heat loss, when hydrogen/reformate gas is added to the fuel of a methane/air diffusion flame. The effect of Lewis number causes the flame temperature to increase much faster than the corresponding adiabatic equilibrium temperature when hydrogen is added, and results in a qualitatively different variation from the adiabatic equilibrium temperature as reformate gas is added. At some conditions, the addition of hydrogen results in a super-adiabatic flame temperature. The addition of hydrogen/reformate gas causes NO formation to change because of the variations in flame temperature, structure and NO formation mechanism, and the effect becomes more significant with increasing strain rate. The addition of a small amount of hydrogen or reformate gas has little effect on NO formation at low strain rates, and results in an increase in NO formation at moderate or high strain rates. However, the addition of a large amount of hydrogen increases NO formation at all strain rates, except near pure hydrogen condition. Conversely, the addition of a large amount of reformate gas results in a reduction in NO formation. (author)

  14. AxBAxB… pulsed atomic layer deposition: Numerical growth model and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muneshwar, Triratna; Cadien, Ken

    2016-02-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is widely used for the fabrication of advanced semiconductor devices and related nanoscale structures. During ALD, large precursor doses (>1000 L per pulse) are often required to achieve surface saturation, of which only a small fraction is utilized in film growth while the rest is pumped from the system. Since the metal precursor constitutes a significant cost of ALD, strategies to enhance precursor utilization are essential for the scaling of ALD processes. In the precursor reaction step, precursor physisorption is restricted by steric hindrance (mA1) from ligands on the precursor molecules. On reaction, some of these ligands are removed as by-products resulting in chemisorbed species with reduced steric hindrance (mA1 → mA2, where mA2 < mA1) and some of the initially hindered surface reaction sites becoming accessible for further precursor physisorption. To utilize these additional reaction sites, we propose a generalized AxBAxB… pulsed deposition where the total precursor dose (ΦA) is introduced as multiple x (x > 1, x ∈ I) short-pulses rather than a single pulse. A numerical first-order surface reaction kinetics growth model is presented and applied to study the effect of AxBAxB… pulsed ALD on the growth per cycle (GPC). The model calculations predict higher GPC for AxBAxB… pulsing than with ABAB… deposition. In agreement with the model predictions, with AxBAxB… pulsed deposition, the GPC was found to increase by ˜46% for ZrN plasma enhanced ALD (PEALD), ˜49% for HfO2 PEALD, and ˜8% for thermal Al2O3 ALD with respect to conventional ABAB… pulsed growth.

  15. The effect of tailor-made additives on crystal growth of methyl paraben: Experiments and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Zhihui; Liu, Yong; Song, Yang; Guan, Guoqiang; Jiang, Yanbin

    2017-03-01

    In this study, methyl paraben (MP) was selected as the model component, and acetaminophen (APAP), p-methyl acetanilide (PMAA) and acetanilide (ACET), which share the similar molecular structure as MP, were selected as the three tailor-made additives to study the effect of tailor-made additives on the crystal growth of MP. HPLC results indicated that the MP crystals induced by the three additives contained MP only. Photographs of the single crystals prepared indicated that the morphology of the MP crystals was greatly changed by the additives, but PXRD and single crystal diffraction results illustrated that the MP crystals were the same polymorph only with different crystal habits, and no new crystal form was found compared with other references. To investigate the effect of the additives on the crystal growth, the interaction between additives and facets was discussed in detail using the DFT methods and MD simulations. The results showed that APAP, PMAA and ACET would be selectively adsorbed on the growth surfaces of the crystal facets, which induced the change in MP crystal habits.

  16. Numerical simulation of a natural gradient tracer experiment for the natural attenuation study: flow and physical transport.

    PubMed

    Julian, H E; Boggs, J M; Zheng, C; Feehley, C E

    2001-01-01

    attributed to aquifer heterogeneity at the decimeter (dm) and smaller scales. The calibrated transport parameters for the SSM (i.e., 1:7 for the ratio of mobile-to-total porosity; 2.5 x 10(-3) day-1 for the mass-transfer coefficient; 1 m for longitudinal dispersivity; and 0.1 m for transverse dispersivity) are consistent with separate numerical simulations of two earlier tracer experiments at the site. The multiscale modeling approach adopted in this study permits the incorporation of both large-scale geologic features important for flow simulation and small-scale heterogeneities critical for transport simulation. In addition, the dual-domain transport model provides a foundation for multispecies reactive transport modeling studies of natural attenuation of hydrocarbons during NATS.

  17. Numerical experiments on the role of buoyancy and rheology during the formation of extension-driven gneiss domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korchinski, Megan; Rey, Patrice; Teyssier, Christian; Whitney, Donna; Mondy, Luke

    2016-04-01

    Domal structures that are cored with crystallized partially melted crustal rocks are ubiquitous features in active and exhumed orogens. The exposure of these gneiss/migmatite domes at the Earth's surface represents an opportunity to study the mechanisms of flow within the deep crust, and the mode of emplacement of high-pressure rocks into the shallow crust. End-member gneiss dome types include (1) extension-driven domes that core metamorphic core complexes, and (2) buoyancy-driven domes that are exhumed by diapiric flow. Numerical models are ideally suited to test the relative roles of buoyancy and extension-driven mechanisms in dome dynamics, and therefore to explore the interaction of physical parameters involved in doming. To that end, this research utilizes a 2D visco-plastic thermomechanical modeling framework to undertake a parametric numerical experiment where the density (range of 2700-3100 kg.m3) and viscosity (range of 1E19-1E21 Pa.s) of the lower crust are systematically varied. The style and timing of "intrusion" of partially molten lower crust into non-molten lower crust is similar for densities of 2700-3100 kg.m3 across two lower crustal viscosities tested here (1E19 Pa.s, 1E21 Pa.s). However, dome development and upwards flow of lower crust material for a relatively high-density, middle-viscosity lower crust (2900-3100 kg.m^3; 1E20 Pa.s) involves a significant upward translation of the Moho, relative to the low-density, middle-viscosity model results. In addition, the high-density, middle-viscosity model shows a decrease in the volume of partial melt in the lower crust, and distributed brittle faulting in the upper crust. Thus, this experiment suite illustrates that variations in density and viscosity of the lower crust influence (1) faults distribution in the upper crust, (2) flow patterns within the lower crust, (3) upward translation of the solidus into the lower crust, and (4) upward displacement of the Moho. The style of extension within the

  18. Numerical modeling of a long-term in situ chemical osmosis experiment in the Pierre Shale, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garavito, A.M.; Kooi, H.; Neuzil, C.E.

    2006-01-01

    We have numerically modeled evolving fluid pressures and concentrations from a nine-year in situ osmosis experiment in the Pierre Shale, South Dakota. These data were obtained and recently interpreted by one of us (C.E.N.) as indicating a potentially significant role for chemical osmosis in media like the Pierre Shale. That analysis considered only the final pressure differentials among boreholes that were assumed to represent osmotic equilibrium. For this study, the system evolution was modeled using a recently developed transient model for membrane transport. The model simulates hydraulically and chemically driven fluid and solute transport. The results yield an estimate of the thickness of the water film between the clay platelets b of 40 A??, which corresponds to an osmotic efficiency ?? of 0.21 for the ambient pore water salinity of 3.5 g/l TDS. These values largely confirm the results of the earlier equilibrium analysis. However, the new model analysis provides additional constraints suggesting that intrinsic permeability k = 1.4 ?? 10-19 m2, specific storage Ss = 1.7 ?? 10-5 m-1, and diffusion coefficient D* = 6 ?? 10-11 m2/s. The k value is larger than certain independent estimates which range from 10-21 to 10-20; it may indicate opening of microcracks during the experiments. The fact that the complex transient pressure and concentration behavior for the individual wells could be reproduced quite accurately, and the inferred parameter values appear to be realistic for the Pierre Shale, suggests that the new model is a useful tool for modeling transient coupled flows in groundwater systems. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Production of hyperpolarized xenon in a static pump cell: Numerical simulations and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, A.; Baumer, D.; Brunner, E.

    2005-11-15

    Hyperpolarized {sup 129}Xe finds numerous applications in NMR spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging. The production of hyperpolarized {sup 129}Xe by spin-exchange optical pumping is therefore an important experimental issue. We model the three-dimensional transport processes within a so-called batch mode pump cell via numerical finite element method simulations and compare the results with experimental data. In particular, the influence of different experimental parameters, such as temperature, xenon and nitrogen partial pressure, laser power, and radius-to-length ratio of a cylindrical pump cell, is evaluated. The developed numerical method is capable of describing the spin-exchange optical pumping process in a realistic manner.

  20. Along-axis transition between narrow and wide rifts: Insights from 3D numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koptev, Alexander; Calais, Eric; Burov, Evgueni; Leroy, Sylvie; Gerya, Taras

    2016-04-01

    Based on performed high-resolution rheologically consistent three-dimensional thermo-mechanical numerical models, we show that there is a significant difference in the influence of the rheological profile on rifting style in the case of dominant active (plume-activated) rifting compared to dominant passive (far-field tectonic stresses) rifting. Narrow rifting, conventionally attributed to cold strong lithosphere in passive rifting mode, may develop in weak hot ultra-stretched lithosphere during active rifting, after plume impingement on a tectonically pre-stressed lithosphere. In that case, initially ultra-wide small-amplitude rift patterns focus, in a few Myr, in large-scale faults that form a narrow rift. Also, wide rifting may develop during ultra-slow spreading of strong lithosphere, and "switch" to the narrow rifting upon plume impingement. For further understanding the mechanisms behind the interactions between the mantle plume and far-field stresses in case of realistic horizontally heterogeneous lithosphere, we have tested our models on the case of the central East African Rift system (EARS). The EARS south of the Ethiopian Rift Valley bifurcates in two branches (eastern, magma-rich and western, magma-poor) surrounding the strong Tanzanian craton. Broad zones of low seismic velocity observed throughout the upper mantle beneath the central part of the EARS are consistent with the spreading of a deep mantle plume. The extensional features and topographic expression of the Eastern rift varies significantly north-southward: in northern Kenya the area of deformation is very wide (some 150-250 km in E-W direction), to the south the rift narrows to 60-70 km, yet further to the south this localized deformation widens again. Here we investigate this transition between localized and wide rifting using thermo-mechanical numerical modeling that couples, in a dynamic sense, the rise of the upper mantle material with the deformation of the African lithosphere below the

  1. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy as additional treatment in deep sternal wound infections – a single center's experience

    PubMed Central

    Bryndza, Magdalena; Chrapusta, Anna; Kobielska, Ewa; Kapelak, Bogusław; Grudzień, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Deep sternal wound infection (DSWI) is one of the most serious complications after cardiac surgery procedures, observed in 5% of patients. Current standard medical therapy for DSWI includes antibiotics, surgical debridement, resuturing or negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). Unfortunately, in some cases these methods are insufficient, and additional therapeutic options are needed. Aim To assess the effects and usefulness of additional hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO2) in patients with DSWI after cardiac surgery procedures. Material and methods A retrospective analysis of 10 patients after cardiac surgery who developed DSWI in the period 2010–2012 was performed. After 3 months of ineffective conventional therapy including targeted antibiotic, surgical sternal debridement and NPWT, patients were qualified for additional HBO2 therapy. A total of 20 sessions of HBO2 therapy were performed, each 92 minutes long. Results After 4 weeks of HBO2 treatment, 7 patients presented complete wound healing with fibrous scar formation. One patient was qualified for the another cycle of HBO2 therapy with 20 additional sessions, and complete wound healing was observed. In 2 cases, after 5 and 19 sessions, HBO2 was interrupted because of improper qualifications. Conclusions The HBO2 as an additional therapy in DSWI was successful in 80% of cases, and no complications were observed. However, due to the small number of published studies with a small number of patients, randomized, clinical trials are needed to assess the clinical results of HBO2 in DSWI after cardiac surgery procedures. PMID:27785131

  2. Exposure and Experience: Additional Criteria for Selecting Future Operational Theater Commanders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-23

    Kaufmann. From Plato to Derrida . Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Pearson Prentice Hall, 2008. 8 Experience Comparison of Former...Forrest E., and Walter Kaufmann. From Plato to Derrida . Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Pearson Prentice Hall, 2008. Bell, William Gardner. Center

  3. Blocking and Frontogenesis by Two-Dimensional Terrain in Baroclinic Flow. Part I: Numerical Experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, Stephen T.

    1999-06-01

    The shallow atmospheric fronts that develop in the early winter along the east coast of North America have been attributed, in various modeling and observational studies, to the land-sea contrasts in both surface heating and friction. However, typical synoptic conditions are such that these `coastal' fronts could also be a type of upstream influence by the Appalachian Mountain chain. Generalized models have suggested that relatively cold air can become trapped on the windward side of a mountain range during episodes of warm advection without a local contribution from differential surface fluxes. Such a process was proposed decades ago in a study of observations along the coast of Norway. Could coastal frontogenesis be primarily a consequence of a mountain circulation acting on the large-scale temperature gradient?A two-dimensional, terrain-following numerical model is used to find conditions under which orography may be sufficient to cause blocking and upstream frontogenesis in a baroclinic environment. The idealized basic flow is taken to have constant vertical shear parallel to a topographic ridge and a constant perpendicular wind that advects warm or cold temperatures toward the ridge. Land-sea contrasts are omitted. In the observed cases, the mountain is `narrow' in the sense that the Rossby number is large. This by itself increases the barrier effect, but the experiments show that large-scale warm advection is still crucial for blocking. For realistic choices of ambient static stability and baroclinicity, the flow can be blocked by a range like the northern Appalachians if the undisturbed incident wind speed is around 10 m s1. Cold advection weakens the barrier effect.The long-term behavior of the front in strongly blocked cases is described and compared to observations. Because of the background rotation and large-scale temperature advection, blocked solutions cannot become steady in the assumed environment. However, the interface between blocked and

  4. Tsunamis generated by 3D deformable landslides in various scenarios: laboratory experiments and numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFall, B. C.; Fritz, H. M.; Horrillo, J. J.; Mohammed, F.

    2014-12-01

    Landslide generated tsunamis such as Lituya Bay, Alaska 1958 account for some of highest recorded tsunami runup heights. Source and runup scenarios based on real world events are physically modeled using generalized Froude similarity in the three dimensional NEES tsunami wave basin at Oregon State University. A novel pneumatic landslide tsunami generator (LTG) was deployed to simulate landslides with varying geometry and kinematics. The bathymetric and topographic scenarios tested with the LTG are the basin-wide propagation and runup, fjord, curved headland fjord and a conical island setting representing a landslide off an island or a volcano flank collapse. The LTG consists of a sliding box filled with 1,350 kg of landslide material which is accelerated by pneumatic pistons down slope. Two different landslide materials are used to study the granulometry effects: naturally rounded river gravel and cobble mixtures. Water surface elevations are recorded by an array of resistance wave gauges. The landslide deformation is measured from above and underwater camera recordings. The landslide deposit is measured on the basin floor with a multiple transducer acoustic array (MTA). Landslide surface reconstruction and kinematics are determined with a stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV) system. Wave runup is recorded with resistance wave gauges along the slope and verified with video image processing. The measured landslide and wave parameters are compared between the planar hill slope used in various scenarios and the convex hill slope of the conical island. The energy conversion rates from the landslide motion to the wave train is quantified for the planar and convex hill slopes. The wave runup data on the opposing headland is analyzed and evaluated with wave theories. The measured landslide and tsunami data serve to validate and advance three-dimensional numerical landslide tsunami prediction models. Two 3D Navier-Stokes models were tested, the commercial code FLOW-3D

  5. Spatial correlations and probability density function of the phase difference in a developed speckle-field: numerical and natural experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Mysina, N Yu; Maksimova, L A; Ryabukho, V P; Gorbatenko, B B

    2015-10-31

    Investigated are statistical properties of the phase difference of oscillations in speckle-fields at two points in the far-field diffraction region, with different shapes of the scatterer aperture. Statistical and spatial nonuniformity of the probability density function of the field phase difference is established. Numerical experiments show that, for the speckle-fields with an oscillating alternating-sign transverse correlation function, a significant nonuniformity of the probability density function of the phase difference in the correlation region of the field complex amplitude, with the most probable values 0 and p, is observed. A natural statistical interference experiment using Young diagrams has confirmed the results of numerical experiments. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  6. English as an Additional Language (EAL) "viva voce": The EAL Doctoral Oral Examination Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Is the doctoral "viva voce" a reasonable method of examination? This exploratory paper proposes that the doctoral "viva voce" (oral examination) is a slightly different hurdle for doctoral candidates for whom English is an additional language (EAL, also termed ESL) than for those whose first language is English. It investigates…

  7. Designing Location-Based Learning Experiences for People with Intellectual Disabilities and Additional Sensory Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David J.; McHugh, David; Standen, Penny; Evett, Lindsay; Shopland, Nick; Battersby, Steven

    2011-01-01

    The research reported here is part of a larger project which seeks to combine serious games (or games-based learning) with location-based services to help people with intellectual disabilities and additional sensory impairments to develop work based skills. Specifically this paper reports on where these approaches are combined to scaffold the…

  8. Laser Additive Melting and Solidification of Inconel 718: Finite Element Simulation and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, John; Ladani, Leila; Sadowski, Magda

    2016-03-01

    The field of powdered metal additive manufacturing is experiencing a surge in public interest finding uses in aerospace, defense, and biomedical industries. The relative youth of the technology coupled with public interest makes the field a vibrant research topic. The authors have expanded upon previously published finite element models used to analyze the processing of novel engineering materials through the use of laser- and electron beam-based additive manufacturing. In this work, the authors present a model for simulating fabrication of Inconel 718 using laser melting processes. Thermal transport phenomena and melt pool geometries are discussed and validation against experimental findings is presented. After comparing experimental and simulation results, the authors present two correction correlations to transform the modeling results into meaningful predictions of actual laser melting melt pool geometries in Inconel 718.

  9. Additive Manufacture (3D Printing) of Plasma Diagnostic Components and Assemblies for Fusion Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinley, Morgan; Chun, Katherine; Melnik, Paul; Sieck, Paul; Smith, Trevor; Stuber, James; Woodruff, Simon; Romero-Talamas, Carlos; Rivera, William; Card, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    We are investigating the potential impact of additive manufacturing (3D printing) on the cost and complexity of plasma diagnostics. We present a survey of the current state-of-the-art in additive manufacture of metals, as well as the design of diagnostic components that have been optimized for and take advantage of these processes. Included among these is a set of retarding field analyzer probe heads that have been printed in tungsten with internal heat sinks and cooling channels. Finite element analysis of these probe heads shows the potential for a 750K reduction in peak temperature, allowing the probe to take data twice as often without melting. Results of the evaluation of these probe heads for mechanical strength and outgassing, as well as their use on Alcator C-Mod will be presented. Supported by DOE SBIR Grant DE-SC0011858.

  10. Additional results on space environmental effects on polymer matrix composites: Experiment A0180

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennyson, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    Additional experimental results on the atomic oxygen erosion of boron, Kevlar, and graphite fiber reinforced epoxy matrix composites are presented. Damage of composite laminates due to micrometeoroid/debris impacts is also examined with particular emphasis on the relationship between damage area and actual hole size due to particle penetration. Special attention is given to one micrometeoroid impact on an aluminum base plate which resulted in ejecta visible on an adjoining vertical flange structure.

  11. Experiments to Populate and Validate a Processing Model for Polyurethane Foam: Additional Data for Structural Foams

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Rekha R.; Celina, Mathias C.; Giron, Nicholas Henry; Long, Kevin Nicholas; Russick, Edward M.

    2015-01-01

    We are developing computational models to help understand manufacturing processes, final properties and aging of structural foam, polyurethane PMDI. Th e resulting model predictions of density and cure gradients from the manufacturing process will be used as input to foam heat transfer and mechanical models. BKC 44306 PMDI-10 and BKC 44307 PMDI-18 are the most prevalent foams used in structural parts. Experiments needed to parameterize models of the reaction kinetics and the equations of motion during the foam blowing stages were described for BKC 44306 PMDI-10 in the first of this report series (Mondy et al. 2014). BKC 44307 PMDI-18 is a new foam that will be used to make relatively dense structural supports via over packing. It uses a different catalyst than those in the BKC 44306 family of foams; hence, we expect that the reaction kineti cs models must be modified. Here we detail the experiments needed to characteriz e the reaction kinetics of BKC 44307 PMDI-18 and suggest parameters for the model based on these experiments. In additi on, the second part of this report describes data taken to provide input to the preliminary nonlinear visco elastic structural response model developed for BKC 44306 PMDI-10 foam. We show that the standard cu re schedule used by KCP does not fully cure the material, and, upon temperature elevation above 150°C, oxidation or decomposition reactions occur that alter the composition of the foam. These findings suggest that achieving a fully cured foam part with this formulation may be not be possible through therma l curing. As such, visco elastic characterization procedures developed for curing thermosets can provide only approximate material properties, since the state of the material continuously evolves during tests.

  12. Towards the field-scale experiments and numerical modeling of pesticides in tropical soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusek, J.; Ray, C.; Sanda, M.; Vogel, T.; Green, R.; Loo, B.

    2004-12-01

    Intensive use of pesticides in agriculture inevitably poses an increased threat to groundwater. Recent findings of pesticide residues in selected drinking water wells in Hawaii brings further attention to this problem since the primary source for potable water in Hawaii is groundwater from basal or dike-confined aquifers. A challenging research project was carried out at the University of Hawaii to elucidate potential impacts of selected pesticides on groundwater and to understand pesticide behavior in tropical soils. The major outcome of the project will be a recommendation to the Hawaii Department of Agriculture whether to restrict or approve these pesticide products entering Hawaii's agricultural market. Three sites on Oahu, one on Maui, and one on Kauai were selected for field evaluation of leaching. The soil types on Oahu are Wahiawa Oxisol (Poamoho), Molokai Oxisol (Kunia), and Waialua Vertisol (Waimanalo). The soil at Kula, Maui is an andisol (loam of Kula series) and that at Mana, Kauai is a Vertisol of Malama series. Three herbicides (S-metolachlor, imazaquin, sulfometuron methyl), one fungicide (trifloxystrobin), and one insecticide (imidacloprid) were used in our study. In addition, a commonly used herbicide (atrazine) and potassium bromide tracer were applied as reference chemicals. After spraying, the plots were covered with straw to decrease evaporation from bare soil surface and irrigated with aerial sprinklers for a period of 16 weeks. Disturbed soil samples from various depths were taken at regular intervals for pesticide analysis. Water flow dynamics was monitored with TDR probes and tensiometers installed at three depths. Weather data were acquired simultaneously. In-situ measurements of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity were done using a tension disc infiltrometer. Laboratory experiments of soil-water retention, as well as degradation, sorption, and column displacement experiments for the selected pesticides were conducted. Hence, comprehensive

  13. Electron transport and energy degradation in the ionosphere: Evaluation of the numerical solution, comparison with laboratory experiments and auroral observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lummerzheim, D.; Lilensten, J.

    1994-01-01

    Auroral electron transport calculations are a critical part of auroral models. We evaluate a numerical solution to the transport and energy degradation problem. The numerical solution is verified by reproducing simplified problems to which analytic solutions exist, internal self-consistency tests, comparison with laboratory experiments of electron beams penetrating a collision chamber, and by comparison with auroral observations, particularly the emission ratio of the N2 second positive to N2(+) first negative emissions. Our numerical solutions agree with range measurements in collision chambers. The calculated N(2)2P to N2(+)1N emission ratio is independent of the spectral characteristics of the incident electrons, and agrees with the value observed in aurora. Using different sets of energy loss cross sections and different functions to describe the energy distribution of secondary electrons that emerge from ionization collisions, we discuss the uncertainties of the solutions to the electron transport equation resulting from the uncertainties of these input parameters.

  14. Experiences of clinical tutors with English as an additional language (EAL) students.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongyan; Maithus, Caroline

    2012-11-01

    Clinical tutors, referred to in the international literature as clinical supervisors, facilitators, mentors or instructors, are responsible for providing and supervising workplace learning opportunities for groups of Bachelor of Nursing (BN) students. They also play a key role in assessing students. The role modeling and support provided by both clinical tutors and registered nurses (RN) or nurse preceptors helps students become familiar with the language in which nursing work is realised. As BN student cohorts in New Zealand have become more diverse in terms of cultures, ethnicities and language backgrounds, clinical tutors have to directly facilitate the development of context-specific and client-focused communication skills for students who speak English as an additional language. We undertook a study which looked at the perceptions of new nursing graduates with English as an additional language (EAL) on the development of spoken language skills for the clinical workplace. As well as interviewing graduates, we spoke to four clinical tutors in order to elicit their views on the language development of EAL students in previous cohorts. This article reports on the themes which emerged from the interviews with the tutors. These include goal setting for communication, integrating students into nursing work, making assessment less stressful, and endorsing independent learning strategies. Based on their observations and on other published research we make some suggestions about ways both clinical tutors and EAL students within their teaching groups could be supported in the development of communication skills for clinical practice.

  15. Additive manufacture (3d printing) of plasma diagnostic components and assemblies for fusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieck, Paul; Woodruff, Simon; Stuber, James; Romero-Talamas, Carlos; Rivera, William; You, Setthivoine; Card, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    Additive manufacturing (or 3D printing) is now becoming sufficiently accurate with a large range of materials for use in printing sensors needed universally in fusion energy research. Decreasing production cost and significantly lowering design time of energy subsystems would realize significant cost reduction for standard diagnostics commonly obtained through research grants. There is now a well-established set of plasma diagnostics, but these expensive since they are often highly complex and require customization, sometimes pace the project. Additive manufacturing (3D printing) is developing rapidly, including open source designs. Basic components can be printed for (in some cases) less than 1/100th costs of conventional manufacturing. We have examined the impact that AM can have on plasma diagnostic cost by taking 15 separate diagnostics through an engineering design using Conventional Manufacturing (CM) techniques to determine costs of components and labor costs associated with getting the diagnostic to work as intended. With that information in hand, we set about optimizing the design to exploit the benefits of AM. Work performed under DOE Contract DE-SC0011858.

  16. Linking Physical and Numerical Modelling in Hydrogeology Using Sand Tank Experiments and Comsol Multiphysics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singha, Kamini; Loheide, Steven P., II

    2011-01-01

    Visualising subsurface processes in hydrogeology and building intuition for how these processes are controlled by changes in forcing is hard for many undergraduate students. While numerical modelling is one way to help undergraduate students explore outcomes of multiple scenarios, many codes are not user-friendly with respect to defining domains,…

  17. Numerical experiment optimization to obtain the characteristics of the centrifugal pump steps package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldyrev, S. V.; Boldyrev, A. V.

    2014-12-01

    The numerical simulation method of turbulent flow in a running space of the working-stage in a centrifugal pump using the periodicity conditions has been formulated. The proposed method allows calculating the characteristic indices of one pump step at a lower computing resources cost. The comparison of the pump characteristics' calculation results with pilot data has been conducted.

  18. Numerical Estimation in Blind Subjects: Evidence of the Impact of Blindness and Its Following Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castronovo, Julie; Seron, Xavier

    2007-01-01

    Vision was for a long time considered to be essential in the elaboration of the semantic numerical representation. However, early visual deprivation does not seem to preclude the development of a spatial continuum oriented from left to right to represent numbers (J. Castronovo & X. Seron, 2007; D. Szucs & V. Csepe, 2005). The authors investigated…

  19. Mixing-to-eruption timescales: an integrated model combining numerical simulations and high-temperature experiments with natural melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagna, Chiara; Perugini, Diego; De Campos, Christina; Longo, Antonella; Dingwell, Donald Bruce; Papale, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    Arrival of magma from depth into shallow reservoirs and associated mixing processes have been documented as possible triggers of explosive eruptions. Quantifying the timing from beginning of mixing to eruption is of fundamental importance in volcanology in order to put constraints about the possible onset of a new eruption. Here we integrate numerical simulations and high-temperature experiment performed with natural melts with the aim to attempt identifying the mixing-to-eruption timescales. We performed two-dimensional numerical simulations of the arrival of gas-rich magmas into shallow reservoirs. We solve the fluid dynamics for the two interacting magmas evaluating the space-time evolution of the physical properties of the mixture. Convection and mingling develop quickly into the chamber and feeding conduit/dyke. Over time scales of hours, the magmas in the reservoir appear to have mingled throughout, and convective patterns become harder to identify. High-temperature magma mixing experiments have been performed using a centrifuge and using basaltic and phonolitic melts from Campi Flegrei (Italy) as initial end-members. Concentration Variance Decay (CVD), an inevitable consequence of magma mixing, is exponential with time. The rate of CVD is a powerful new geochronometer for the time from mixing to eruption/quenching. The mingling-to-eruption time of three explosive volcanic eruptions from Campi Flegrei (Italy) yield durations on the order of tens of minutes. These results are in perfect agreement with the numerical simulations that suggest a maximum mixing time of a few hours to obtain a hybrid mixture. We show that integration of numerical simulation and high-temperature experiments can provide unprecedented results about mixing processes in volcanic systems. The combined application of numerical simulations and CVD geochronometer to the eruptive products of active volcanoes could be decisive for the preparation of hazard mitigation during volcanic unrest.

  20. Numerical analysis of a neutron radiography-monitored infiltration experiment: Two-phase modeling using TOUGH2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Princ, Tomas; Sacha, Jan; Snehota, Michal

    2015-04-01

    It has been shown in ponded infiltration-outflow column experiments that true steady state flow is often not reached in certain soils exhibiting preferential flow. Experiments often show a temporal change of flow rate that can, in the case of experiments conducted on saturated samples at constant head gradients, be interpreted as variations of saturated hydraulic conductivity. It has also been shown that these variations can be caused by slow redistribution of entrapped air in the sample. The experiment presented in this study was conducted on a small fabricated sample with axially symmetrical inner geometry of material distribution. In preparing the sample, areas of fine sand were surrounded by continuous preferential pathways composed of coarse sand. Ponded infiltration was performed on the sample while monitoring using neutron imaging was conducted to obtain spatiotemporal information about the water content distribution in the sample. Results of the experiment revealed that during the quasi-steady state stage of the experiment the saturated hydraulic conductivity gradually decreased due to the transfer of air bubbles from fine sand to coarse sand. Flow through the coarse sand became partially blocked by air bubbles and the overall quasi-steady flow rate consequently decreased by 30% during six hours of infiltration. In an attempt to model this behavior, we simulated ponded infiltration in two dimensional (2D) domains using the EOS3 module of the numerical simulator TOUGH2 (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory). The main objective was to determine which types of preferential pathway patterns were prone to air entrapment and whether the air redistribution observed in the experiment could be numerically simulated. Modeling was conducted in three different 2D domains with increasing complexity of the preferential pathways' geometry. Analysis of the results confirmed that during ponded infiltration, water percolated fastest at the start of infiltration through the

  1. Assessment of quality of platelets preserved in plasma and platelet additive solution: A Malaysian experience

    PubMed Central

    Mokhtar, Munirah Binti; Hashim, Hasna Binti; Joshi, Sanmukh R

    2016-01-01

    Background: A use of platelet additives solution (PAS) improves storage conditions so as to give increased shelf life to platelets and to maintain hemostatic function. Objective: The present study was aimed to compare in vitro quality of platelet rich plasma (PRP)-derived platelet concentrate (PC) during extended period of storage in plasma and in additive solution (Composol PS and Fresenius). Study Design: Randomized 19 PCs each were used in the study for plasma and PAS as the storage medium. The measurement parameters, including pH, total white blood cell (WBC) count, total platelet count, and platelet activation rate, were studied on day 1, day 5, and day 8 of the storage period. The sterility test was carried out on the eighth day of storage. Results: pH of PC suspended in PAS was significantly lower as compared to that in plasma (P < 0.001) for all the three days of sampling. The WBC count, both in plasma and in PAS, showed an acceptable values of being <0.2 Χ 109 /unit during the storage period. Platelet count in PAS was higher as compared to that in plasma, though it was not statistically significant. While both the groups showed increased platelet activation rate during the storage, the PCs suspended in PAS showed significantly higher platelet activation rate (p0.001). Results from sterility test showed no bacterial growth in the PCs in both the groups. Conclusion: Most parameters studied on platelet storage in suspending medium of native plasma and PAS remained well within the acceptable limits. However, the pH values and platelet activation rate significantly differed in PAS as compared with plasma. PMID:27011678

  2. Direct Numerical Simulation of Fracture Behaviour for Random Short Wood Fibres Reinforced Composites, Comparison with Digital Image Correlation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, M.; Touchard, F.; Bezine, G.; Brillaud, J.

    2010-06-01

    The work is to predict fracture behaviour of bio-composites from the tensile properties of its components. In this work, we have realized a direct numerical simulation of fracture behaviour for random short spruce fibers reinforced composites. For calculations, wood fibers have been considered as linear elastic bodies, polypropylene matrix as an elastic-plastic material. Then, numerical results have been compared with experimental results that have been obtained by digital image correlation. This comparison indicates that random fiber FE model of random short spruce fibers reinforced composites can be able to fairly reflect the influence of random fibers microstructure in the composite on its fracture behavior. The calculation of both random fiber and homogeneous FE model and their comparison with experiments show that the average values of J-integral in a region in the front of the crack tip from both numerical FE models are in good agreement with the average J value of DIC experiment in the same region when the numerical and experimental CT specimens of the short spruce fiber reinforced composite are subjected to the same extension at their loading point.

  3. Numerical experiments with MPI-ESM coupled atmosphere-land-ocean model in conjunction with data assimilations in Arctic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, K.; Kuleshov, A.; Kirchner, I.; Tuchkova, N.

    2016-12-01

    Numerical experiments have been performed with state-of-the art modern MPI Earth System model (MPIESM) in conjunction with ocean altimetry data assimilation from archive AVISO. The original data assimilation method has been derived and applied. All computations have been realized on cluster system of German Climate Computing Center (DKRZ). The results of numerical experiments with and without assimilation were recorded and analyzed. A special attention has been focused on the Arctic zone. The model output in this region, in particular, ice concentration have been compared with independent data given by Arctic institute of Canada. It is shown that there is a good match of analyzed (after assimilation) model output and independent data.

  4. Summary and overview of the CYCLOPS P addition Lagrangian experiment in the Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krom, M. D.; Thingstad, T. F.; Brenner, S.; Carbo, P.; Drakopoulos, P.; Fileman, T. W.; Flaten, G. A. F.; Groom, S.; Herut, B.; Kitidis, V.; Kress, N.; Law, C. S.; Liddicoat, M. I.; Mantoura, R. F. C.; Pasternak, A.; Pitta, P.; Polychronaki, T.; Psarra, S.; Rassoulzadegan, F.; Skjoldal, E. F.; Spyres, G.; Tanaka, T.; Tselepides, A.; Wassmann, P.; Wexels Riser, C.; Woodward, E. M. S.; Zodiatis, G.; Zohary, T.

    2005-11-01

    CYCLOPS was a European Framework 5 program to further our understanding of phosphorus cycling in the Eastern Mediterranean. The core of CYCLOPS was a Lagrangian experiment in which buffered phosphoric acid was added to a <4×4 km patch of water together with SF 6 as the inert tracer. The patch was followed for nine days in total. Results obtained prior to the experiment showed that the system was typically ultra-oligotrophic and P-starved with DON:DOP, PON:POP and DIN:DIP all having ratios greatly in excess of 16:1 in surface waters. To our surprise, we found that although the added phosphate was rapidly taken up by the microbial biota, there was a small but significant decrease in chlorophyll a and no increase in primary production, together with an increase in heterotrophic bacterial activity, ciliate numbers and in the gut fullness and egg numbers in the zooplankton community. A microcosm experiment carried out using within-patch and out-of-patch water showed that the phytoplankton community were N and P co-limited while the bacteria and micrograzers were P-limited. Thus this system tends to N and P co-limitation of phytoplankton productivity in summer possibly caused by bioavailable DIN being converted into non-bioavailable forms of DON. On the basis of the data collected within the programme it was concluded that this behavior could be explained by three non-mutually exclusive processes described as (1) trophic by-pass in which the added phosphate gets directly to the grazing part of the predatory food chain from the heterotrophic bacteria bypassing the phytoplankton compartment phosphate, (2) trophic tunnelling in which phosphate is rapidly taken up by both phytoplankton and bacteria via rapid luxury consumption. This causes an immediate change in the phosphorus content but not the abundance of the prey organisms. The added P then "reappears" as responses at the predator level much more rapidly than expected, and (3) mixotrophic by-pass in which inorganic

  5. Rayleigh-Bénard percolation transition study of thermal convection in porous media: numerical simulation and NMR experiments.

    PubMed

    Weber, M; Klemm, A; Kimmich, R

    2001-05-07

    Thermal convection was studied as a function of the porosity in random-site percolation model objects in a Rayleigh-Bénard configuration. NMR velocity mapping experiments and numerical simulations using the finite-volume method are compared. Velocity histograms were evaluated and can be described by power laws in a wide range. The maximum velocity as a function of the porosity indicates a combined percolation/Rayleigh-Bénard transition.

  6. Numerical Experiments with a Continuous L{sub 2}-exponential Merit Function for Semi-Infinite Programming

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, Ana Isabel P. N.; Fernandes, Edite M. G. P.

    2008-11-06

    Here, we present some numerical experiments with a reduction method for solving nonlinear semi-infinite programming (SIP) problems. The method relies on a line search technique to ensure a sufficient decrease of a L{sub 2}-exponential merit function. The proposed merit function is continuous for SIP and improves the algorithm efficiency when compared with other previously tested merit functions. A comparison with other reduction methods is also included.

  7. Wettability effect on capillary trapping of supercritical CO2 at pore-scale: micromodel experiment and numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, R.; Wan, J.

    2015-12-01

    Wettability of reservoir minerals along pore surfaces plays a controlling role in capillary trapping of supercritical (sc) CO2 in geologic carbon sequestration. The mechanisms controlling scCO2 residual trapping are still not fully understood. We studied the effect of pore surface wettability on CO2 residual saturation at the pore-scale using engineered high pressure and high temperature micromodel (transparent pore networks) experiments and numerical modeling. Through chemical treatment of the micromodel pore surfaces, water-wet, intermediate-wet, and CO2-wet micromodels can be obtained. Both drainage and imbibition experiments were conducted at 8.5 MPa and 45 °C with controlled flow rate. Dynamic images of fluid-fluid displacement processes were recorded using a microscope with a CCD camera. Residual saturations were determined by analysis of late stage imbibition images of flow path structures. We performed direct numerical simulations of the full Navier-Stokes equations using a volume-of-fluid based finite-volume framework for the primary drainage and the followed imbibition for the micromodel experiments with different contact angles. The numerical simulations agreed well with our experimental observations. We found that more scCO2 can be trapped within the CO2-wet micromodel whereas lower residual scCO2 saturation occurred within the water-wet micromodels in both our experiments and the numerical simulations. These results provide direct and consistent evidence of the effect of wettability, and have important implications for scCO2 trapping in geologic carbon sequestration.

  8. [Requirements for drug approval and additional benefits assessment: Regulatory aspects and experiences].

    PubMed

    Broich, K; Löbker, W; Schulte, A; Beinlich, P; Müller, T

    2016-04-01

    The early assessment of benefits of newly approved drugs with novel active substances or new applications, which came into force on 1 January 2011 still represents a challenge to all parties involved. This article highlights the definitions, regulatory requirements and interaction between drug marketing approval and early assessment of benefits in Germany. The constellation of an extensively harmonized European and even international drug authorization process with a predominantly national regulation of drug reimbursement situation inevitably causes friction, which could be markedly reduced through early joint advisory discussions during the planning phase for pivotal clinical trials. During the year 2015 the Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices (BfArM) carried out 300 scientific advice procedures of which 34 were concerned with applications in the field of indications for the central nervous system (CNS). In comparison 98 advisory meetings were held by the Federal Joint Committee (G-BA) of which the BfArM provided advice in 12 instances and in 2 cases on CNS indications. Study design, endpoints and appropriate comparative therapies are the key issues in exchanges and discussions between the BfArM, the G‑BA and applicants. Under these aspects the BfArM and G‑BA promote an early and consistent involvement in early advice procedures regarding the prerequisites for drug approval and assessment of additional benefits.

  9. Effects of biochar addition to soil on nitrogen fluxes in a winter wheat lysimeter experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hüppi, Roman; Leifeld, Jens; Neftel, Albrecht; Conen, Franz; Six, Johan

    2014-05-01

    Biochar is a carbon-rich, porous residue from pyrolysis of biomass that potentially increases crop yields by reducing losses of nitrogen from soils and/or enhancing the uptake of applied fertiliser by the crops. Previous research is scarce about biochar's ability to increase wheat yields in temperate soils or how it changes nitrogen dynamics in the field. In a lysimeter system with two different soils (sandy/silt loam) nitrogen fluxes were traced by isotopic 15N enriched fertiliser to identify changes in nitrous oxide emissions, leaching and plant uptake after biochar addition. 20t/ha woodchip-waste biochar (pH=13) was applied to these soils in four lysimeters per soil type; the same number of lysimeters served as a control. The soils were cropped with winter wheat during the season 2012/2013. 170 kg-N/ha ammonium nitrate fertiliser with 10% 15N was applied in 3 events during the growing season and 15N concentrations where measured at different points in time in plant, soil, leachate and emitted nitrous oxide. After one year the lysimeter system showed no difference between biochar and control treatment in grain- and straw yield or nitrogen uptake. However biochar did reduce nitrous oxide emissions in the silt loam and losses of nitrate leaching in sandy loam. This study indicates potential reduction of nitrogen loss from cropland soil by biochar application but could not confirm increased yields in an intensive wheat production system.

  10. Impacts into quartz sand: Crater formation, shock metamorphism, and ejecta distribution in laboratory experiments and numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wünnemann, Kai; Zhu, Meng-Hua; Stöffler, Dieter

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the ejection mechanics by a complementary approach of cratering experiments, including the microscopic analysis of material sampled from these experiments, and 2-D numerical modeling of vertical impacts. The study is based on cratering experiments in quartz sand targets performed at the NASA Ames Vertical Gun Range. In these experiments, the preimpact location in the target and the final position of ejecta was determined by using color-coded sand and a catcher system for the ejecta. The results were compared with numerical simulations of the cratering and ejection process to validate the iSALE shock physics code. In turn the models provide further details on the ejection velocities and angles. We quantify the general assumption that ejecta thickness decreases with distance according to a power-law and that the relative proportion of shocked material in the ejecta increase with distance. We distinguish three types of shock metamorphic particles (1) melt particles, (2) shock lithified aggregates, and (3) shock-comminuted grains. The agreement between experiment and model was excellent, which provides confidence that the models can predict ejection angles, velocities, and the degree of shock loading of material expelled from a crater accurately if impact parameters such as impact velocity, impactor size, and gravity are varied beyond the experimental limitations. This study is relevant for a quantitative assessment of impact gardening on planetary surfaces and the evolution of regolith layers on atmosphereless bodies.

  11. Comprehensive analysis of neutrino events in the Super-Kamiokande type detector from the view point of the Computer Numerical Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konoshi, E.; Takahashi, N.; Galkin, V. I.; Misaki, A.

    2008-07-01

    Comparisons are made on the direction of the incident neutrino, zenith angle distribution of neutrino events produced both inside and outside the detector between the Super-Kamiokande Experiment and our Computer Numerical Experiment.

  12. WEC-SIM Phase 1 Validation Testing -- Numerical Modeling of Experiments: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Ruehl, Kelley; Michelen, Carlos; Bosma, Bret; Yu, Yi-Hsiang

    2016-08-01

    The Wave Energy Converter Simulator (WEC-Sim) is an open-source code jointly developed by Sandia National Laboratories and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. It is used to model wave energy converters subjected to operational and extreme waves. In order for the WEC-Sim code to be beneficial to the wave energy community, code verification and physical model validation is necessary. This paper describes numerical modeling of the wave tank testing for the 1:33-scale experimental testing of the floating oscillating surge wave energy converter. The comparison between WEC-Sim and the Phase 1 experimental data set serves as code validation. This paper is a follow-up to the WEC-Sim paper on experimental testing, and describes the WEC-Sim numerical simulations for the floating oscillating surge wave energy converter.

  13. WEC-Sim Phase 1 Validation Testing: Numerical Modeling of Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ruehl, Kelley; Michelen, Carlos; Bosma, Bret; Yu, Yi-Hsiang

    2016-06-24

    The Wave Energy Converter Simulator (WEC-Sim) is an open-source code jointly developed by Sandia National Laboratories and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. It is used to model wave energy converters subjected to operational and extreme waves. In order for the WEC-Sim code to be beneficial to the wave energy community, code verification and physical model validation is necessary. This paper describes numerical modeling of the wave tank testing for the 1:33-scale experimental testing of the floating oscillating surge wave energy converter. The comparison between WEC-Sim and the Phase 1 experimental data set serves as code validation. This paper is a follow-up to the WEC-Sim paper on experimental testing, and describes the WEC-Sim numerical simulations for the floating oscillating surge wave energy converter.

  14. Numerical experiments on transition control in wall-bounded shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biringen, S.; Caruso, M. J.

    1987-01-01

    Results are presented from a numerical simulation of transition control in plane channel and boundary layer flows. The analysis is based on a pseudo-spectral/finite difference semi-implicit solution procedure employed to numerically integrate the time-dependent, three-dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in a doubly periodic domain. In the channel flow, it was found that the active periodic suction/blowing method was effective in controlling strongly three-dimensional disturbances. In the boundary layer, the preliminary analysis indicated that in the early stages, passive control by suction is as effective as active control to suppress instabilities. The current work is focused on a detailed comparison of active and passive control by suction/blowing in the boundary layer.

  15. Nitrate removal in stream ecosystems measured by 15N addition experiments: 2. Denitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, Patrick J; Hall, Robert; Sobota, Daniel; Dodds, Walter; Findlay, Stuart; Grimm, Nancy; Hamilton, Stephen; McDowell, William; O'Brien, Jon; Tank, Jennifer; Ashkenas, Linda; Cooper, Lee W; Dahm, Cliff; Gregory, Stanley; Johnson, Sherri; Meyer, Judy; Peterson, Bruce; Poole, Geoff; Valett, H. Maurice; Webster, Jackson; Arango, Clay; Beaulieu, Jake; Bernot, Melody; Burgin, Amy; Crenshaw, Chelsea; Helton, Ashley; Johnson, Laura; Niederlehner, Bobbie; Potter, Jody; Sheibley, Rich; Thomas, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    We measured denitrification rates using a field {sup 15}N-NO{sub 3}{sup -} tracer-addition approach in a large, cross-site study of nitrate uptake in reference, agricultural, and suburban-urban streams. We measured denitrification rates in 49 of 72 streams studied. Uptake length due to denitrification (S{sub Wden}) ranged from 89 m to 184 km (median of 9050 m) and there were no significant differences among regions or land-use categories, likely because of the wide range of conditions within each region and land use. N{sub 2} production rates far exceeded N{sub 2}O production rates in all streams. The fraction of total NO{sub 3}{sup -} removal from water due to denitrification ranged from 0.5% to 100% among streams (median of 16%), and was related to NH{sub 4}{sup +} concentration and ecosystem respiration rate (ER). Multivariate approaches showed that the most important factors controlling S{sub Wden} were specific discharge (discharge/width) and NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration (positive effects), and ER and transient storage zones (negative effects). The relationship between areal denitrification rate (U{sub den}) and NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration indicated a partial saturation effect. A power function with an exponent of 0.5 described this relationship better than a Michaelis-Menten equation. Although U{sub den} increased with increasing NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration, the efficiency of NO{sub 3}{sup -} removal from water via denitrification declined, resulting in a smaller proportion of streamwater NO{sub 3}{sup -} load removed over a given length of stream. Regional differences in stream denitrification rates were small relative to the proximate factors of NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration and ecosystem respiration rate, and land use was an important but indirect control on denitrification in streams, primarily via its effect on NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration.

  16. Nitrate removal in stream ecosystems measured by 15N addition experiments: Denitrification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulholland, P.J.; Hall, R.O.; Sobota, D.J.; Dodds, W.K.; Findlay, S.E.G.; Grimm, N. B.; Hamilton, S.K.; McDowell, W.H.; O'Brien, J. M.; Tank, J.L.; Ashkenas, L.R.; Cooper, L.W.; Dahm, Clifford N.; Gregory, S.V.; Johnson, S.L.; Meyer, J.L.; Peterson, B.J.; Poole, G.C.; Valett, H.M.; Webster, J.R.; Arango, C.P.; Beaulieu, J.J.; Bernot, M.J.; Burgin, A.J.; Crenshaw, C.L.; Helton, A.M.; Johnson, L.T.; Niederlehner, B.R.; Potter, J.D.; Sheibley, R.W.; Thomasn, S.M.

    2009-01-01

    We measured denitrification rates using a field 15N-NO- 3 tracer-addition approach in a large, cross-site study of nitrate uptake in reference, agricultural, and suburban-urban streams. We measured denitrification rates in 49 of 72 streams studied. Uptake length due to denitrification (SWden) ranged from 89 m to 184 km (median of 9050 m) and there were no significant differences among regions or land-use categories, likely because of the wide range of conditions within each region and land use. N2 production rates far exceeded N2O production rates in all streams. The fraction of total NO-3 removal from water due to denitrification ranged from 0.5% to 100% among streams (median of 16%), and was related to NHz 4 concentration and ecosystem respiration rate (ER). Multivariate approaches showed that the most important factors controlling SWden were specific discharge (discharge / width) and NO-3 concentration (positive effects), and ER and transient storage zones (negative effects). The relationship between areal denitrification rate (Uden) and NO- 3 concentration indicated a partial saturation effect. A power function with an exponent of 0.5 described this relationship better than a Michaelis-Menten equation. Although Uden increased with increasing NO- 3 concentration, the efficiency of NO-3 removal from water via denitrification declined, resulting in a smaller proportion of streamwater NO-3 load removed over a given length of stream. Regional differences in stream denitrification rates were small relative to the proximate factors of NO-3 concentration and ecosystem respiration rate, and land use was an important but indirect control on denitrification in streams, primarily via its effect on NO-3 concentration. ?? 2009.

  17. Biospark: scalable analysis of large numerical datasets from biological simulations and experiments using Hadoop and Spark.

    PubMed

    Klein, Max; Sharma, Rati; Bohrer, Chris H; Avelis, Cameron M; Roberts, Elijah

    2017-01-15

    Data-parallel programming techniques can dramatically decrease the time needed to analyze large datasets. While these methods have provided significant improvements for sequencing-based analyses, other areas of biological informatics have not yet adopted them. Here, we introduce Biospark, a new framework for performing data-parallel analysis on large numerical datasets. Biospark builds upon the open source Hadoop and Spark projects, bringing domain-specific features for biology.

  18. Numerical Simulations of Hypervelocity Impact Experiments Involving Single Whipple Bumper Shields

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    laser photographs and high -speed X-ray photography. Computational results of both hydrocodes were compared to each other. * 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15...data to test the predictive capability of the hydrocodes and to compare the results of one code to the other. High -speed photographs of some of the...numerically sinmulating the impacts with high fidelity hydrocode calculations that incorporate the appropriate material equations of state and material models

  19. Numerical Experiments on the Detailed Energy Conversion and Spectrum Studies in a Corona Current Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Lei; Lin, Jun; Mei, Zhixing; Li, Yan

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we study the energy conversion and spectra in a corona current sheet (CS) by 2.5 dimensional MHD numerical simulations. Numerical results show that many Petschek-like fine structures with slow-mode shocks mediated by plasmoid instabilities develop during the magnetic reconnection process. The termination shocks can also be formed above the primary magnetic island and at the head of secondary islands. These shocks play important roles in generating thermal energy in a corona CS. For a numerical simulation with initial conditions close to the solar corona environment, the ratio of the generated thermal energy to the total dissipated magnetic energy is around 1/5 before secondary islands appear. After secondary islands appear, the generated thermal energy starts to increase sharply and this ratio can reach a value of about 3/5. In an environment with a relatively lower plasma density and plasma β, the plasma can be heated to a much higher temperature. After secondary islands appear, the one-dimensional energy spectra along the CS do not behave as a simple power law and the spectrum index increases with the wave number. The average spectrum index for the magnetic energy spectrum along the CS is about 1.8. The two-dimensional spectra intuitively show that part of the high energy is cascaded to large kx and ky space after secondary islands appear. The plasmoid distribution function calculated from numerical simulations behaves as a power law closer to f(\\psi )˜ {\\psi }-1 in the intermediate ψ regime. By using {η }{eff}={v}{inflow}\\cdot L, the effective magnetic diffusivity is estimated to be about 1011 ˜ 1012 m2 s-1.

  20. Effect of Additives on Green Sand Molding Properties using Design of Experiments and Taguchi's Quality Loss Function - An Experimental Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Bhagyashree; Mokashi, Pavani; Anand, R. L.; Burli, S. B.; Khandal, S. V.

    2016-09-01

    The experimental study aims to underseek the effect of various additives on the green sand molding properties as a particular combination of additives could yield desired sand properties. The input parameters (factors) selected were water and powder (Fly ash, Coconut shell and Tamarind) in three levels. Experiments were planned using design of experiments (DOE). On the basis of plans, experiments were conducted to understand the behavior of sand mould properties such as compression strength, shear strength, permeability number with various additives. From the experimental results it could be concluded that the factors have significant effect on the sand properties as P-value found to be less than 0.05 for all the cases studied. The optimization based on quality loss function was also performed. The study revealed that the quality loss associated with the tamarind powder was lesser compared to other additives selected for the study. The optimization based on quality loss function and the parametric analysis using ANOVA suggested that the tamarind powder of 8 gm per Kg of molding sand and moisture content of 7% yield better properties to obtain sound castings.

  1. Numerical Experiments with a Turbulent Single-Mode Rayleigh-Taylor Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L.D.

    2000-04-01

    Direct numerical simulation is a powerful tool for studying turbulent flows. Unfortunately, it is also computationally expensive and often beyond the reach of the largest, fastest computers. Consequently, a variety of turbulence models have been devised to allow tractable and affordable simulations of averaged flow fields. Unfortunately, these present a variety of practical difficulties, including the incorporation of varying degrees of empiricism and phenomenology, which leads to a lack of universality. This unsatisfactory state of affairs has led to the speculation that one can avoid the expense and bother of using a turbulence model by relying on the grid and numerical diffusion of the computational fluid dynamics algorithm to introduce a spectral cutoff on the flow field and to provide dissipation at the grid scale, thereby mimicking two main effects of a large eddy simulation model. This paper shows numerical examples of a single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability in which this procedure produces questionable results. We then show a dramatic improvement when two simple subgrid-scale models are employed. This study also illustrates the extreme sensitivity to initial conditions that is a common feature of turbulent flows.

  2. Hydrodynamics of long-duration urban floods: experiments and numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrault, Anaïs; Finaud-Guyot, Pascal; Archambeau, Pierre; Bruwier, Martin; Erpicum, Sébastien; Pirotton, Michel; Dewals, Benjamin

    2016-06-01

    Flood risk in urbanized areas raises increasing concerns as a result of demographic and climate changes. Hydraulic modelling is a key component of urban flood risk analysis; yet, detailed validation data are still lacking for comprehensively validating hydraulic modelling of inundation flow in urbanized floodplains. In this study, we present an experimental model of inundation flow in a typical European urban district and we compare the experimental observations with predictions by a 2-D shallow-water numerical model. The experimental set-up is 5 m × 5 m and involves seven streets in each direction, leading to 49 intersections. For a wide range of inflow discharges, the partition of the measured outflow discharges at the different street outlets was found to remain virtually constant. The observations also suggest that the street widths have a significant influence on the discharge partition between the different streets' outlets. The profiles of water depths along the streets are mainly influenced by the complex flow processes at the intersections, while bottom roughness plays a small part. The numerical model reproduces most of the observed flow features satisfactorily. Using a turbulence model was shown to modify the length of the recirculations in the streets, but not to alter significantly the discharge partition. The main limitation of the numerical model results from the Cartesian grid used, which can be overcome by using a porosity-based formulation of the shallow-water equations. The upscaling of the experimental observations to the field is also discussed.

  3. Temperature Fields in Soft Tissue during LPUS Treatment: Numerical Prediction and Experiment Results

    SciTech Connect

    Kujawska, Tamara; Wojcik, Janusz; Nowicki, Andrzej

    2010-03-09

    Recent research has shown that beneficial therapeutic effects in soft tissues can be induced by the low power ultrasound (LPUS). For example, increasing of cells immunity to stress (among others thermal stress) can be obtained through the enhanced heat shock proteins (Hsp) expression induced by the low intensity ultrasound. The possibility to control the Hsp expression enhancement in soft tissues in vivo stimulated by ultrasound can be the potential new therapeutic approach to the neurodegenerative diseases which utilizes the known feature of cells to increase their immunity to stresses through the Hsp expression enhancement. The controlling of the Hsp expression enhancement by adjusting of exposure level to ultrasound energy would allow to evaluate and optimize the ultrasound-mediated treatment efficiency. Ultrasonic regimes are controlled by adjusting the pulsed ultrasound waves intensity, frequency, duration, duty cycle and exposure time. Our objective was to develop the numerical model capable of predicting in space and time temperature fields induced by a circular focused transducer generating tone bursts in multilayer nonlinear attenuating media and to compare the numerically calculated results with the experimental data in vitro. The acoustic pressure field in multilayer biological media was calculated using our original numerical solver. For prediction of temperature fields the Pennes' bio-heat transfer equation was employed. Temperature field measurements in vitro were carried out in a fresh rat liver using the 15 mm diameter, 25 mm focal length and 2 MHz central frequency transducer generating tone bursts with the spatial peak temporal average acoustic intensity varied between 0.325 and 1.95 W/cm{sup 2}, duration varied from 20 to 500 cycles at the same 20% duty cycle and the exposure time varied up to 20 minutes. The measurement data were compared with numerical simulation results obtained under experimental boundary conditions. Good agreement between

  4. Temperature Fields in Soft Tissue during LPUS Treatment: Numerical Prediction and Experiment Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujawska, Tamara; Wójcik, Janusz; Nowicki, Andrzej

    2010-03-01

    Recent research has shown that beneficial therapeutic effects in soft tissues can be induced by the low power ultrasound (LPUS). For example, increasing of cells immunity to stress (among others thermal stress) can be obtained through the enhanced heat shock proteins (Hsp) expression induced by the low intensity ultrasound. The possibility to control the Hsp expression enhancement in soft tissues in vivo stimulated by ultrasound can be the potential new therapeutic approach to the neurodegenerative diseases which utilizes the known feature of cells to increase their immunity to stresses through the Hsp expression enhancement. The controlling of the Hsp expression enhancement by adjusting of exposure level to ultrasound energy would allow to evaluate and optimize the ultrasound-mediated treatment efficiency. Ultrasonic regimes are controlled by adjusting the pulsed ultrasound waves intensity, frequency, duration, duty cycle and exposure time. Our objective was to develop the numerical model capable of predicting in space and time temperature fields induced by a circular focused transducer generating tone bursts in multilayer nonlinear attenuating media and to compare the numerically calculated results with the experimental data in vitro. The acoustic pressure field in multilayer biological media was calculated using our original numerical solver. For prediction of temperature fields the Pennes' bio-heat transfer equation was employed. Temperature field measurements in vitro were carried out in a fresh rat liver using the 15 mm diameter, 25 mm focal length and 2 MHz central frequency transducer generating tone bursts with the spatial peak temporal average acoustic intensity varied between 0.325 and 1.95 W/cm2, duration varied from 20 to 500 cycles at the same 20% duty cycle and the exposure time varied up to 20 minutes. The measurement data were compared with numerical simulation results obtained under experimental boundary conditions. Good agreement between the

  5. Accessing numeric data via flags and tags: A final report on a real world experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kottenstette, J. P.; Freeman, J. E.; Staskin, E. R.; Hargrave, C. W.

    1978-01-01

    An experiment is reported which: extended the concepts of data flagging and tagging to the aerospace scientific and technical literature; generated experience with the assignment of data summaries and data terms by documentation specialists; and obtained real world assessments of data summaries and data terms in information products and services. Inclusion of data summaries and data terms improved users' understanding of referenced documents from a subject perspective as well as from a data perspective; furthermore, a radical shift in document ordering behavior occurred during the experiment toward proportionately more requests for data-summarized items.

  6. The Mechanics of Coulomb Wedges: Comparison Between a Numerical Model (Boundary Element Method) and a Sand-Box Experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Castello, M.; Cooke, M.

    2006-12-01

    Fold and thrust belts have been successfully modelled using either physical or numerical methods in recent years. The two methods have well-known advantages and drawbacks for investigating contractional processes. In this work we have applied the Boundary Element Method code in order to closely reproduce successive snapshots of deformation accumulated within a sand-box experiment. Our numerical models provide a quantitative mechanical analysis of the deformation observed in analogue models of non-cohesive Coulomb wedges during an underthrusting/accretion transition. Model results show that the total work done by the contracting wedge increases during the underthrusting stage up to a critical value when the propagation of a frontal thrust significantly reduces the work required for further deformation. This transition occurs when the energetic cost of developing a new forethrust is less than the benefit of growing this new fault. The elastic numerical model predicts the location of the maximum shear stress on the basal dècollement just prior to the propagation of the sole thrust as well as the energetically most viable position for the nucleation of new forethrust ramp. These positions do not coincide. Furthermore, the forethrust within the sandbox experiment develops at the energetically favoured position rather than the location of greatest shear stress suggesting that the new thrust ramps develop first ahead and then link down and backward to the propagating basal dècollement. As a result, the most efficient location for a new thrust ramp is where gravitational, frictional, internal and propagation work terms are optimally combined. The trade-off between the dominant frictional and internal work terms is fuelled by overburden weight, which reduces slip on thrust ramps until the internal work stored in the surrounding deforming material reaches a critical value. The correlation of our numerical results with analogue experiments validates use of the principle of

  7. Acoustic resonances in microfluidic chips: full-image micro-PIV experiments and numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Hagsäter, S M; Jensen, T Glasdam; Bruus, H; Kutter, J P

    2007-10-01

    We show that full-image micro-PIV analysis in combination with images of transient particle motion is a powerful tool for experimental studies of acoustic radiation forces and acoustic streaming in microfluidic chambers under piezo-actuation in the MHz range. The measured steady-state motion of both large 5 microm and small 1 microm particles can be understood in terms of the acoustic eigenmodes or standing ultra-sound waves in the given experimental microsystems. This interpretation is supported by numerical solutions of the corresponding acoustic wave equation.

  8. Impacts of Asian Dust and Haze Particles Addition on Phytoplankton in Incubation Experiments in the Yellow Sea of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, H.; Zhang, C.; Liu, Y.; Shi, J.; Yao, X.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition (AD) induced by dust events and air pollutants has been considered as an important source of bio-available nutrients such as N, P, Si and trace metals (e.g., Fe, Cu, Pb) to the oceans. The coastal seas of China are severely affected by AD from Asian dust events and haze episodes, especially in spring and winter. In this study, several on-board incubation experiments were performed in the Yellow Sea of China during 2011 - 2014, to explore the responses of micro-, nano- and pico-phytoplankton to various combinations of Asian dust, nutrients and haze particles by measuring the size-fractionated chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentration. In the experiments of Asian dust addition, the concentration of Chl a and the conversion efficiency index of N into Chl a increased by up to ~40 % and ~30 %, respectively, compared to the control, showing enhancement effects on the growth of phytoplankton. The addition of haze particles exhibited more obvious promotions of pico-phytoplankton growth, but more severe inhibitions of micro-phytoplankton growth than other treatments. The incubation experiments conducted in the Yellow Sea also indicated P limitation variations in spring and summer. It was inferred that both Asian dust and haze particles additions had significant impacts on the growth and structure of phytoplankton by modulating the limiting factors.

  9. Energy Budget of Liquid Drop Impact at Maximum Spreading: Numerical Simulations and Experiments.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Bong; Derome, Dominique; Dolatabadi, Ali; Carmeliet, Jan

    2016-02-09

    The maximum spreading of an impinging droplet on a rigid surface is studied for low to high impact velocity, until the droplet starts splashing. We investigate experimentally and numerically the role of liquid properties, such as surface tension and viscosity, on drop impact using three liquids. It is found that the use of the experimental dynamic contact angle at maximum spreading in the Kistler model, which is used as a boundary condition for the CFD-VOF calculation, gives good agreement between experimental and numerical results. Analytical models commonly used to predict the boundary layer thickness and time at maximum spreading are found to be less correct, meaning that energy balance models relying on these relations have to be considered with care. The time of maximum spreading is found to depend on both the impact velocity and surface tension, and neither dependency is predicted correctly in common analytical models. The relative proportion of the viscous dissipation in the total energy budget increases with impact velocity with respect to surface energy. At high impact velocity, the contribution of surface energy, even before splashing, is still substantial, meaning that both surface energy and viscous dissipation have to be taken into account, and scaling laws depending only on viscous dissipation do not apply. At low impact velocity, viscous dissipation seems to play an important role in low-surface-tension liquids such as ethanol.

  10. Numerical experiments on non-equilibrium wall-bounded flows over irregular roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Junlin

    2016-11-01

    To study the roughness geometrical effect on turbulent scales and response to departure from flow equilibrium, an irregular rough surface replicated from a hydraulic turbine blade is compared to a numerical sand-grain surface resembling widely studied, uniform roughness, in both developed and transient open-channel flows. Fully rough regime is reached for both surfaces in the developed open-channel flows. While the two cases produce essentially the same roughness function, the time-scale ratio between turbulence and the mean shear in the roughness sublayer of the irregular roughness is close to the smooth-wall value, twice as high as the value for sand grains. Therefore, it is possible that the topography plays a crucial role in determining the response of wall-bounded turbulence to flow distortion that is not captured by equilibrium sand-grain height. Transient, accelerating or decelerating open-channel flows with varying topographies are studied using direct numerical simulations to identify relevant physics and flow or topographical parameters that may be incorporated in turbulence models to reproduce the effects of irregular sub-grid roughness on flow responses to arbitrary departure from equilibrium.

  11. Mass transfer in thin films under counter-current gas: experiments and numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucquiaud, Mathieu; Lavalle, Gianluca; Schmidt, Patrick; Ausner, Ilja; Wehrli, Marc; O Naraigh, Lennon; Valluri, Prashant

    2016-11-01

    Mass transfer in liquid-gas stratified flows is strongly affected by the waviness of the interface. For reactive flows, the chemical reactions occurring at the liquid-gas interface also influence the mass transfer rate. This is encountered in several technological applications, such as absorption units for carbon capture. We investigate the absorption rate of carbon dioxide in a liquid solution. The experimental set-up consists of a vertical channel where a falling film is sheared by a counter-current gas flow. We measure the absorption occurring at different flow conditions, by changing the liquid solution, the liquid flow rate and the gas composition. With the aim to support the experimental results with numerical simulations, we implement in our level-set flow solver a novel module for mass transfer taking into account a variant of the ghost-fluid formalism. We firstly validate the pure mass transfer case with and without hydrodynamics by comparing the species concentration in the bulk flow to the analytical solution. In a final stage, we analyse the absorption rate in reactive flows, and try to reproduce the experimental results by means of numerical simulations to explore the active role of the waves at the interface.

  12. Electroosmotic flow measurements in a freely suspended liquid film: Experiments and numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Hussein Sheik, Abdulkadir; Bandulasena, H C Hemaka; Starov, Victor; Trybala, Anna

    2017-03-17

    Fluid flow profiles in free liquid films stabilised by anionic and cationic surfactants under an external electric field were investigated. Depthwise velocity fields were measured at the mid region of the free liquid film by confocal μ-PIV and corresponding numerical simulations were performed using Finite Element Method (FEM) to model the system. Depthwise change in velocity profiles was observed with electroosmotic flow dominating in the vicinity of the gas-liquid and solid-liquid interfaces while backpressure drives fluid in the opposite direction at the core of the film. It was also found that the direction of the flow at various sections of the films depends on the type of surfactant used, but flow features remained the same. Numerical simulations predicted the flow profiles with reasonable accuracy; however, asymmetry of the actual film geometry caused deviations at the top half of the computational domain. Overall, electroosmotic flow profiles within a free liquid film is similar to that of the closed-end solid microchannel. However, the flow direction and features of the velocity profiles can be changed by selecting various types of surfactants. The free liquid films thickness was selected to match dimensions of foam Plateau border. Hence these findings will be useful in developing a separation system based on foam electrokinetics. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Doubly-excited pulse-waves on flowing liquid films: experiments and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adebayo, Idris; Xie, Zhihua; Che, Zhizhao; Wray, Alex; Matar, Omar

    2016-11-01

    The interaction patterns between doubly-excited pulse waves on a flowing liquid film are studied both experimentally and numerically. The flowing film is constituted on an inclined glass substrate while pulse-waves are excited on the film surface by means of a solenoid valve connected to a relay which receives signals from customised Matlab routines. The effect of varying the system parameters i.e. film flow rate, inter-pulse interval and substrate inclination angle on the pulse interaction patterns are then studied. Results show that different interaction patterns exist for these binary pulses; which include a singular behaviour, complete merger, partial merger and total non-coalescence. A regime map of these patterns is then plotted for each inclination angles examined, based on the film Re and the inter-pulse interval. Finally, the individual effect of the system parameters on the merging distance of these binary pulses in the merger mode is then studied and the results validated using both numerical simulations and mathematical modelling. Funding from the Nigerian Government (for Idris Adebayo), and the EPSRC through a programme Grant MEMPHIS (EP/K003976/1) gratefully acknowledged.

  14. Numerical simulation of stratified flows from laboratory experiments to coastal ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraunie, Philippe

    2014-05-01

    Numeric modeling of a flow past vertical strip uniformly towing with permanent velocity in horizontal direction in a linearly stratified talk which was based on a finite differences solver adapted to the low Reynolds Navier-Stokes equation with transport equation for salinity (LES simulation [6]) has demonstrated reasonable agreement with data of schlieren visualization, density marker and probe measurements of internal wave fields. Another approach based on two different numerical methods for one specific case of stably stratified incompressible flow was developed, using the compact finite-difference discretizations. The numerical scheme itself follows the principle of semi-discretisation, with high order compact discretisation in space, while the time integration is carried out by the Strong Stability Preserving Runge-Kutta scheme. Results were compared against the reference solution obtained by the AUSM finite volume method [7]. The test case allowed demonstrating the ability of selected numerical methods to represent stably stratified flows over horizontal strip [4] and hill type 2D obstacles [1, 3] with generation of internal waves. From previous LES [4] and RANS [8] realistic simulations code, the ability of research codes to reproduce field observations is discussed. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This research work was supported by Region Provence Alpes Côte d'Azur - Modtercom project, the Research Plan MSM 6840770010 of the Ministry of education of Czech Republic and the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grant 12-01-00128). REFERENCES 1. Chashechkin Yu.D., Mitkin V.V. Experimental study of a fine structure of 2D wakes and mixing past an obstacle in a continuously stratified fluid // Dynamics of Atmosphere and Oceans. 2001. V. 34. P. 165-187. 2. Chashechkin, Yu. D. Hydrodynamics of a sphere in a stratified fluid // Fluid Dyn. 1989. V.24(1) P. 1-7. 3. Mitkin V. V., Chashechkin Yu. D. Transformation of hanging discontinuities into vortex systems in a stratified flow

  15. Validation experiment of a numerically processed millimeter-wave interferometer in a laboratorya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogi, Y.; Higashi, T.; Matsukawa, S.; Mase, A.; Kohagura, J.; Nagayama, Y.; Kawahata, K.; Kuwahara, D.; Yoshikawa, M.

    2014-11-01

    We propose a new interferometer system for density profile measurements. This system produces multiple measurement chords by a leaky-wave antenna driven by multiple frequency inputs. The proposed system was validated in laboratory evaluation experiments. We confirmed that the interferometer generates a clear image of a Teflon plate as well as the phase shift corresponding to the plate thickness. In another experiment, we confirmed that quasi-optical mirrors can produce multiple measurement chords; however, the finite spot size of the probe beam degrades the sharpness of the resulting image.

  16. Validation experiment of a numerically processed millimeter-wave interferometer in a laboratory.

    PubMed

    Kogi, Y; Higashi, T; Matsukawa, S; Mase, A; Kohagura, J; Nagayama, Y; Kawahata, K; Kuwahara, D; Yoshikawa, M

    2014-11-01

    We propose a new interferometer system for density profile measurements. This system produces multiple measurement chords by a leaky-wave antenna driven by multiple frequency inputs. The proposed system was validated in laboratory evaluation experiments. We confirmed that the interferometer generates a clear image of a Teflon plate as well as the phase shift corresponding to the plate thickness. In another experiment, we confirmed that quasi-optical mirrors can produce multiple measurement chords; however, the finite spot size of the probe beam degrades the sharpness of the resulting image.

  17. Validation experiment of a numerically processed millimeter-wave interferometer in a laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kogi, Y. Higashi, T.; Matsukawa, S.; Mase, A.; Kohagura, J.; Yoshikawa, M.; Nagayama, Y.; Kawahata, K.; Kuwahara, D.

    2014-11-15

    We propose a new interferometer system for density profile measurements. This system produces multiple measurement chords by a leaky-wave antenna driven by multiple frequency inputs. The proposed system was validated in laboratory evaluation experiments. We confirmed that the interferometer generates a clear image of a Teflon plate as well as the phase shift corresponding to the plate thickness. In another experiment, we confirmed that quasi-optical mirrors can produce multiple measurement chords; however, the finite spot size of the probe beam degrades the sharpness of the resulting image.

  18. Numerical study identifying the factors causing the significant underestimation of the specific discharge estimated using the modified integral pumping test method in a laboratory experiment.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kerang

    2015-09-01

    A three-dimensional finite element model is constructed to simulate the experimental conditions presented in a paper published in this journal [Goltz et al., 2009. Validation of two innovative methods to measure contaminant mass flux in groundwater. Journal of Contaminant Hydrology 106 (2009) 51-61] where the modified integral pumping test (MIPT) method was found to significantly underestimate the specific discharge in an artificial aquifer. The numerical model closely replicates the experimental configuration with explicit representation of the pumping well column and skin, allowing for the model to simulate the wellbore flow in the pumping well as an integral part of the porous media flow in the aquifer using the equivalent hydraulic conductivity approach. The equivalent hydraulic conductivity is used to account for head losses due to friction within the wellbore of the pumping well. Applying the MIPT method on the model simulated piezometric heads resulted in a specific discharge that underestimates the true specific discharge in the experimental aquifer by 18.8%, compared with the 57% underestimation of mass flux by the experiment reported by Goltz et al. (2009). Alternative simulation shows that the numerical model is capable of approximately replicating the experiment results when the equivalent hydraulic conductivity is reduced by an order of magnitude, suggesting that the accuracy of the MIPT estimation could be improved by expanding the physical meaning of the equivalent hydraulic conductivity to account for other factors such as orifice losses in addition to frictional losses within the wellbore. Numerical experiments also show that when applying the MIPT method to estimate hydraulic parameters, use of depth-integrated piezometric head instead of the head near the pump intake can reduce the estimation error resulting from well losses, but not the error associated with the well not being fully screened.

  19. Mie Light-Scattering Granulometer with an Adaptive Numerical Filtering Method. II. Experiments.

    PubMed

    Hespel, L; Delfour, A; Guillame, B

    2001-02-20

    A nephelometer is presented that theoretically requires no absolute calibration. This instrument is used for determining the particle-size distribution of various scattering media (aerosols, fogs, rocket exhausts, engine plumes, and the like) from angular static light-scattering measurements. An inverse procedure is used, which consists of a least-squares method and a regularization scheme based on numerical filtering. To retrieve the distribution function one matches the experimental data with theoretical patterns derived from Mie theory. The main principles of the inverse method are briefly presented, and the nephelometer is then described with the associated partial calibration procedure. Finally, the whole granulometer system (inverse method and nephelometer) is validated by comparison of measurements of scattering media with calibrated monodisperse or known size distribution functions.

  20. Is Cu involved in prion oligopeptide stability? Experiments and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minicozzi, V.; Morante, S.

    The high-sociological impact of neurodegenerative diseases (like Alzheimer disease, Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies, Parkinson disease, etc.) has renewed the interest of researchers in the study of misfolding processes and in particular of the rôle played by metals in plaque formation as their unbalanced concentration can be regarded as a possible concurrent cause of protein aggregation. Metals are essential players in many of the fundamental activities of cells. Storing, metabolism, and trafficking of metals through the cellular membrane and within the cytoplasm are mediated by many proteins via well-tuned mechanisms because of the toxicity of free ions. In this review article, we summarize the results of the most recent experimental and numerical investigations aimed at understanding the possible rôle of Cu in stabilizing the Prion protein structure and in the formation of protein polymers.

  1. Evidence from numerical experiments for a feedback dynamo generating Mercury's magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Heyner, Daniel; Wicht, Johannes; Gómez-Pérez, Natalia; Schmitt, Dieter; Auster, Hans-Ulrich; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz

    2011-12-23

    The observed weakness of Mercury's magnetic field poses a long-standing puzzle to dynamo theory. Using numerical dynamo simulations, we show that it could be explained by a negative feedback between the magnetospheric and the internal magnetic fields. Without feedback, a small internal field was amplified by the dynamo process up to Earth-like values. With feedback, the field strength saturated at a much lower level, compatible with the observations at Mercury. The classical saturation mechanism via the Lorentz force was replaced by the external field impact. The resulting surface field was dominated by uneven harmonic components. This will allow the feedback model to be distinguished from other models once a more accurate field model is constructed from MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) and BepiColombo data.

  2. Model of the accumulation process in the formation of planetary systems. I. Numerical experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Eneev, T.M.; Kozlov, N.N.

    1981-04-01

    This work considers the evolution of a plane protoplanetary nebula consisting of a large number of bodies (protoplanets), which interact gravitationally, combine on contact, and move in the field of a massive central body (the sun or a planet). It is assumed that the gravitational interaction between bodies occurs only during their binary close approach. It is also assumed that the bodies move in Keplerian orbits between close approaches and that the orbits of all the bodies are circular at the initial time of evolution of the cloud. The so-called limit model of the accumulation process, in which each close approach of bodies is terminated by their combining, is considered. It is shown that in the course of evolution of such a model there appear annular zones of material condensation whose subsequent development leads to the formation of planets with predominantly direct rotation about their axes. The principal numerical results are obtained by computer simulation of the planetary accumulation process.

  3. Surface flows and bulk mixing by coalescence of dissimilar drops: experiments and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Mark; Nowak, Emilia; Xie, Zhihua; Pain, Chris; Matar, Omar

    2016-11-01

    Merging of dissimilar drops, being of different size and/or composition is an essential part of multiple promising applications enabling release and mixing of various species in bespoken way. However, till now there is still a lack of understanding of the effect of the various factor involved on the kinetics of coalescence and the rate of mixing of the contents of the drops. This study is aimed at providing a thorough understanding of the merging process immediately after the rupture of the thin liquid film separating the drops initially. The effect of such parameters as the difference in size and surface tension of the merging drops, as well as the viscosity of the surrounding liquid phase, is investigated. Numerical simulations provide a deeper insight into the liquid redistribution during the merging. Their results are in good agreement with the experimental data and will be discussed during the talk. EPSRC UK Programme Grant MEMPHIS (EP/K003976/1).

  4. Imaging the shallow volcanic conduit from magma analogue decompression experiments: their implication for volcanic eruptions and applications to numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spina, Laura; Cimarelli, Corrado; Scheu, Bettina; Di Genova, Danilo; Colucci, Simone; De'Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-04-01

    Experimental volcanology is a powerful tool to reconstruct the dynamics of magmatic fluids within the conduit. More specifically analogue models, allow constraining the conduit dynamics by independently examine physical variables and their reciprocal relationships. Accurate scaling of the experiments to the natural systems is necessary to derive quantitative information on the studied processes. Here we present a suite of experiments investigating the decompressive response of magma analogues with different properties (i.e. fluid viscosity, suspended particle shape and/or content) and their scaling to the natural basaltic systems. In the experiments Ar-saturated silicone oils with different viscosities are used as proxies for volatile-bearing mafic magmas. Varying percentages of micrometric particles are added to the fluid to investigate the role of crystals content as well as crystal shape on the dynamics of the expanding flow. Through decompression, the degassing mixture is characterized by a regime of periodical oscillations of the bubbly front determined by phases of foam collapse and renewal. We find that time-scale of these oscillations has important implications for understanding the cyclical eruptive behaviour observed at basaltic volcanoes. Applicability of the experimental results to natural mafic systems has been verified in the scaling by using a set of a-dimensional numbers. The experimental dataset has been finally used to validate a numerical code implemented in the Openfoam framework. The original compressible multiphase solver twoPhaseEulerFoam was implemented to take into account the multicomponent nature of the fluid mixtures (liquid and gas) and their phase transition, as also reproduced in the experiments. Decompression experiments and their scaling to volcanic system provided fundamental information on the dynamics of volatiles within the shallow conduit. Furthermore, they are an invaluable tool to validate complex numerical codes for

  5. Numerical Simulations of Collisionless Shock Formation in Merging Plasma Jet Experiments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    the interaction. I. INTRODUCTION Collisionless shocks play an important role in energy transport and evolution of charged-particle distribution...functions in space and astrophysical environments. Although collisionless shocks in plasmas were first predicted in the 1950s [1] and discovered in...laboratory collisionless shock experiments stems from the fact that modern laboratory plasmas can satisfy key physics criteria for the shocks to

  6. Dual-Mode Scramjet Combustor: Numerical Sensitivity and Evaluation of Experiments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Experiments were performed at the Air Force Research Laboratory’s Propulsion Directorate (AFRL/RZ) in Research Cell 22 (RC22). Twelve cases from the...computations were performed on all twelve cases to establish a baseline computational approach. Computations were performed on one of the cases to test...5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Air Force Research Laboratory,Aerospace Propulsion

  7. Supercritical and Transcritical Shear Flows in Microgravity: Experiments and Direct Numerical Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    because of the complexities introduced by satisfying safety standards associated with performing drop tower experiments on pressure vessels with...generally valid. The study has been presented in detail in Refer- ence[15]. This shows the complexity of the small turbulent scales behavior that is dif...only. The computations were parallelized using three-dimensional domain decomposition and message passing, and an efficient parallel tridiagonal solver

  8. Aerosol and cloud chemistry of amines from CCS - reactivity experiments and numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, Christian; Tilgner, Andreas; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2013-04-01

    Capturing CO2 from the exhaust of power plants using amine scrubbing is a common technology. Therefore, amines can be released during the carbon capture process. To investigate the tropospheric chemical fate of amines from CO2 capturing processes and their oxidation products, the impact of aqueous aerosol particles and cloud droplets on the amine chemistry has been considered. Aqueous phase reactivity experiments of NO3 radicals and ozone with relevant amines and their corresponding nitrosamines were performed. Furthermore, nitrosamine formation and nitrosamine photolysis was investigated during laboratory experiments. These experiments implicated that aqueous phase photolysis can be an effective sink for nitrosamines and that ozone is unreactive towards amines and nitrosamines. Multiphase phase oxidation schemes of amines, nitrosamines and amides were developed, coupled to the existing multiphase chemistry mechanism CAPRAM and built into the Lagrangian parcel model SPACCIM using published and newly measured data. As a result, both deliquescent particles and cloud droplets are important compartments for the multiphase processing of amines and their products. Amines can be readily oxidised by OH radicals in the gas and cloud phase during daytime summer conditions. However, amine oxidation is restricted during winter conditions with low photochemical activity leading to long lifetimes of amines. The importance of the gas and aqueous phase depends strongly on the partitioning of the different amines. Furthermore, the simulations revealed that the aqueous formation of nitrosamines in aerosol particles and could droplets is not a relevant process under tropospheric conditions.

  9. Numerical Experiments of Counterflowiing Jet Effects on Supersonic Slender-Body Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatachari, Balaji Shankar; Mullane, Michael; Cheng, Gary C.; Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the use of counterflowing jets can greatly reduce the drag and heat loads on blunt-body geometries, especially when the long penetration mode jet condition can be established. Previously, the authors had done some preliminary numerical studies to determine the ability to establish long penetration mode jets on a typical Mach 1.6 slender configuration, and study its impact on the boom signature. The results indicated that a jet with a longer penetration length was required to achieve any impact on the boom signature of a typical Mach 1.6 slender configuration. This paper focuses on an in-depth parametric study, done using the space-time conservation element solution element Navier-Stokes flow solver, for investigating the effect of various counterflowing jet conditions/configurations on two supersonic slender-body models (cone-cylinder and quartic body of revolution). The study is aimed at gaining a better understanding of the relationship between the shock penetration length and reduction of drag and boom signature for these two supersonic slender-body configurations. Different jet flow rates, Mach numbers, nozzle jet exit diameters and jet-to-base diameter ratios were examined. The results show the characteristics of a short-to-long-to-short penetration-mode pattern with the increase of jet mass flow rates, observed across various counterflowing jet nozzle configurations. Though the optimal shock penetration length for potential boom-signature mitigation is tied to the long penetration mode, it often results in a very unsteady flow and leads to large oscillations of surface pressure and drag. Furthermore, depending on the geometry of the slender body, longer jet penetration did not always result in maximum drag reduction. For the quartic geometry, the maximum drag reduction corresponds well to the longest shock penetration length, while this was not the case for the cone-cylinder-as the geometry was already optimized for

  10. Surface photovoltage effect at the p-WSe2:Rb surface: Photoemission experiment and numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, J.; Iwicki, J.; Rossnagel, K.; Kipp, L.

    2011-02-01

    It is shown that a combined experimental and theoretical study of the surface photovoltage (SPV) effect can be utilized for the quantification of a number of material parameters in a semiconductor-adsorbate model system. At the Rb-adsorbed surface of the semiconducting layered transition metal dichalcogenide WSe2, a large SPV effect of ≈600 meV is observed already at a moderate photon flux. Using valence band PES and an auxiliary tunable light source, the surface potential and the SPV effect are traced as a function of the adsorbate density and absorbed light intensity. We find that a major part of the stationary band back bending as a function of photon flux is constrained to a highly sensitive region, that is, a large fraction (50%-80%) of the total SPV magnitude rises within less than 1 order of magnitude. The effect is reproduced by a numerical model involving semiclassical charge carrier dynamics in the surface space charge layer. Among the parameters determined from the simulation, we find an approximate bulk acceptor density between 0.9×1017 and 2×1017 cm-3, a broad distribution of adsorbate donor levels at ≈0.2 eV above the conduction band minimum, and electron and hole carrier mobilities μe=0.7 cm2/(V s), μh=1.5 cm2/(V s) in the crystallographic c direction.

  11. Numerical predictions and experiments for optimizing hidden corrosion detection in aircraft structures using Lamb modes.

    PubMed

    Terrien, N; Royer, D; Lepoutre, F; Déom, A

    2007-06-01

    To increase the sensitivity of Lamb waves to hidden corrosion in aircraft structures, a preliminary step is to understand the phenomena governing this interaction. A hybrid model combining a finite element approach and a modal decomposition method is used to investigate the interaction of Lamb modes with corrosion pits. The finite element mesh is used to describe the region surrounding the corrosion pits while the modal decomposition method permits to determine the waves reflected and transmitted by the damaged area. Simulations make easier the interpretation of some parts of the measured waveform corresponding to superposition of waves diffracted by the corroded area. Numerical results permit to extract significant information from the transmitted waveform and thus to optimize the signal processing for the detection of corrosion at an early stage. Now, we are able to detect corrosion pits down to 80-mum depth distributed randomly on a square centimeter of an aluminum plate. Moreover, thickness variations present on aircraft structures can be discriminated from a slightly corroded area. Finally, using this experimental setup, aircraft structures have been tested.

  12. The Effectiveness of Actuators Used in Active Flow Controls: Numerical Simulations, Analysis and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasel, Hermann; Wygnanksi, Israel J.; Gaster, Michael

    2002-05-01

    Acquiring the ability to effectively modify and control the behavior of fluid flow continues to be a pervasive and important aspiration in many areas of engineering. The present research continues to advance the technology of various schemes that employ the use of wall-mounted actuators for active flow control. Any design in which fluid-flow characteristics are important (aircraft, turbomachinery, ships, etc.) stands to benefit from this new technology of manipulating the flow behavior by time dependent forcing. Research completed to date promises reduced cost, complexity, and weight along with significant improvement in design performance. A summary of this research indicates however, that the details of the disturbance excitation process have still not been completely explored, and hence an understanding of the important parameters in actuator design is currently unavailable to the engineer. Only with this knowledge will it be possible to design devices for specific tasks that are efficient and effective in their performance. Our program of research examines boundary value periodic point source excitations of laminar boundary layers, and considers how some more complex actuators might be modeled numerically. The study is carried out in three parts: 1. linear theory, and 2. wind tunnel measurements, iii. full Navier-Stokes modeling.

  13. Numerical Simulation of Flow in a Whirling Annular Seal and Comparison with Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athavale, M. M.; Hendricks, R. C.; Steinetz, B. M.

    1995-01-01

    The turbulent flow field in a simulated annular seal with a large clearance/radius ratio (0.015) and a whirling rotor was simulated using an advanced 3D CFD code SCISEAL. A circular whirl orbit with synchronous whirl was imposed on the rotor center. The flow field was rendered quasi-steady by making a transformation to a totaling frame. Standard k-epsilon model with wall functions was used to treat the turbulence. Experimentally measured values of flow parameters were used to specify the seal inlet and exit boundary conditions. The computed flow-field in terms of the velocity and pressure is compared with the experimental measurements inside the seal. The agreement between the numerical results and experimental data with correction is fair to good. The capability of current advanced CFD methodology to analyze this complex flow field is demonstrated. The methodology can also be extended to other whirl frequencies. Half- (or sub-) synchronous (fluid film unstable motion) and synchronous (rotor centrifugal force unbalance) whirls are the most unstable whirl modes in turbomachinery seals, and the flow code capability of simulating the flows in steady as well as whirling seals will prove to be extremely useful in the design, analyses, and performance predictions of annular as well as other types of seals.

  14. Numerical experiment of thermal conductivity in two-dimensional Yukawa liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahzad, Aamir; He, Mao-Gang

    2015-12-01

    A newly improved homogenous nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (HNEMDS) method, proposed by the Evans, has been used to compute the thermal conductivity of two-dimensional (2D) strongly coupled complex (dusty) plasma liquids (SCCDPLs), for the first time. The effects of equilibrium external field strength along with different system sizes and plasma states (Γ, κ) on the thermal conductivity of SCCDPLs have been calculated using an enhanced HNEMDS method. A simple analytical temperature representation of Yukawa 2D thermal conductivity with appropriate normalized frequencies (plasma and Einstein) has also been calculated. The new HNEMDS algorithm shows that the present method provides more accurate results with fast convergence and small size effects over a wide range of plasma states. The presented thermal conductivity obtained from HNEMDS method is found to be in very good agreement with that obtained through the previously known numerical simulations and experimental results for 2D Yukawa liquids (SCCDPLs) and with the three-dimensional nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) and equilibrium MDS calculations. It is shown that the HNEMDS algorithm is a powerful tool, making the calculations very efficient and can be used to predict the thermal conductivity in 2D Yukawa liquid systems.

  15. Experiment and numerical simulation for laser ultrasonic measurement of residual stress.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yu; Liu, Changsheng; Kong, Xiangwei; Lin, Zhongya

    2017-01-01

    Laser ultrasonic is a most promising method for non-destructive evaluation of residual stress. The residual stress of thin steel plate is measured by laser ultrasonic technique. The pre-stress loading device is designed which can easily realize the condition of the specimen being laser ultrasonic tested at the same time in the known stress state. By the method of pre-stress loading, the acoustoelastic constants are obtained and the effect of different test directions on the results of surface wave velocity measurement is discussed. On the basis of known acoustoelastic constants, the longitudinal and transverse welding residual stresses are measured by the laser ultrasonic technique. The finite element method is used to simulate the process of surface wave detection of welding residual stress. The pulsed laser is equivalent to the surface load and the relationship between the physical parameters of the laser and the load is established by the correction coefficient. The welding residual stress of the specimen is realized by the ABAQUS function module of predefined field. The results of finite element analysis are in good agreement with the experimental method. The simple and effective numerical and experimental methods for laser ultrasonic measurement of residual stress are demonstrated.

  16. Experiment and numerical simulation of RF heating in the Tandem Mirror plasma propulsion device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T. F.; Peng, S.; Chang-Diaz, F. R.

    1991-01-01

    Recent results of experimental and theoretical studies of ICRF heating of the plasma in the Tendem Mirror rocket are presented. The radial and axial profile of the magnetic field of the wave have been measured, and the data agree with the results from numerical simulation. One very important new finding is that the wave damped when it approached the resonance plane. This is a strong indication of beach heating effect and that RF power is absorbed by the ions in the plasma as expected. This power absorption phenomenon was also further confirmed by the refined analytical study of the wave propagation in a slab model. The electron density in the central cell has been measured by a microwave interferometer. The existence of two types of discharge similar to those of H-alpha emission have also been observed from the density measurements. A preliminary design of a flight system for a 100-day Mars transit has been undertaken. The specific weight for a 10 MW rocket is only 0.04 kg/kW.

  17. 14N overtone NMR spectra under magic angle spinning: Experiments and numerically exact simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dell, Luke A.; Brinkmann, Andreas

    2013-02-01

    It was recently shown that high resolution 14N overtone NMR spectra can be obtained directly under magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions [L. A. O'Dell and C. I. Ratcliffe, Chem. Phys. Lett. 514, 168 (2011)], 10.1016/j.cplett.2011.08.030. Preliminary experimental results showed narrowed powder pattern widths, a frequency shift that is dependent on the MAS rate, and an apparent absence of spinning sidebands, observations which appeared to be inconsistent with previous theoretical treatments. Herein, we reproduce these effects using numerically exact simulations that take into account the full nuclear spin Hamiltonian. Under sample spinning, the 14N overtone signal is split into five (0, ±1, ±2) overtone sidebands separated by the spinning frequency. For a powder sample spinning at the magic angle, the +2ωr sideband is dominant while the others show significantly lower signal intensities. The resultant MAS powder patterns show characteristic quadrupolar lineshapes from which the 14N quadrupolar parameters and isotropic chemical shift can be determined. Spinning the sample at other angles is shown to alter both the shapes and relative intensities of the five overtone sidebands, with MAS providing the benefit of averaging dipolar couplings and shielding anisotropy. To demonstrate the advantages of this experimental approach, we present the 14N overtone MAS spectrum obtained from L-histidine, in which powder patterns from all three nitrogen sites are clearly resolved.

  18. Numerical experiment of thermal conductivity in two-dimensional Yukawa liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Shahzad, Aamir; He, Mao-Gang

    2015-12-15

    A newly improved homogenous nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (HNEMDS) method, proposed by the Evans, has been used to compute the thermal conductivity of two-dimensional (2D) strongly coupled complex (dusty) plasma liquids (SCCDPLs), for the first time. The effects of equilibrium external field strength along with different system sizes and plasma states (Γ, κ) on the thermal conductivity of SCCDPLs have been calculated using an enhanced HNEMDS method. A simple analytical temperature representation of Yukawa 2D thermal conductivity with appropriate normalized frequencies (plasma and Einstein) has also been calculated. The new HNEMDS algorithm shows that the present method provides more accurate results with fast convergence and small size effects over a wide range of plasma states. The presented thermal conductivity obtained from HNEMDS method is found to be in very good agreement with that obtained through the previously known numerical simulations and experimental results for 2D Yukawa liquids (SCCDPLs) and with the three-dimensional nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) and equilibrium MDS calculations. It is shown that the HNEMDS algorithm is a powerful tool, making the calculations very efficient and can be used to predict the thermal conductivity in 2D Yukawa liquid systems.

  19. Picosecond lasing in ytterbium fibre laser with nonlinear optical loop mirror: experiment and numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Borodkin, A A; Khudyakov, D V; Vartapetov, S K

    2015-02-28

    The operation regimes of a pulsed all-normal-dispersion polarisation-maintaining fibre laser with a nonlinear optical loop mirror are studied. The use of polarisation-maintaining fibres ensures polarisation and temperature stability of output radiation. The lasing and instability thresholds of the pulsed laser are determined experimentally. A spectral filter placed in the cavity makes it possible to change the centre wavelength of laser radiation within the range 1.02 – 1.05 μm with a spectral full width at half maximum of 2 nm. The average output power is 7 mW, which corresponds to a pulse energy of 0.8 nJ. The autocorrelation function width of the output pulse is 50 ps. The minimum pulse duration achieved after compression by an external pair of diffraction gratings is 1.8 ps. The dynamics of the temporal and spectral parameters of laser pulses is studied using mathematical simulation based on numerical solution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The simulation results coincide with experimental data with a high accuracy. (lasers)

  20. Numerical solution and experiment of a self-Q-switched 946 nm Cr,Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Q.; Feng, B.; Zhang, D.; Du, S.; Shi, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, S.

    2008-11-01

    A LD-pumped self-Q-switched 946 nm laser by using a co-doped Cr,Nd:YAG crystal as a gain medium as well as a saturable absorber is studied. The 946 nm self-Q-switched rate equations of co-doped crystal are solved numerically by Runge-Kutta method directly. The important parameters of lasers, such as average output power, threshold pump power, pulse width, pulses repetition rate, and optimal transmission of output coupler are obtained numerically. Experimentally, the maximum average output power up to 2.61 W, corresponding to a slope efficiency of 23.43%, was obtained in a simple and compact linear cavity. The optical-to-optical efficiency is 17.3% and the peak power is 7.57 kW with repetition rate of 23.78 kHz and pulse width of 14.5 ns. In the experiments, a high-quality fundamental transverse mode can be preserved in a large range of incident pump power. The numerical results of the 946 nm self-Q-switched Cr,Nd:YAG laser are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  1. Performing Hong-Ou-Mandel-type numerical experiments with repulsive condensates: The case of dark and dark-bright solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhi-Yuan; Kevrekidis, Panayotis G.; Krüger, Peter

    2016-12-01

    The Hong-Ou-Mandel experiment leads indistinguishable photons simultaneously reaching a 50:50 beam splitter to emerge on the same port through a two-photon interference. Motivated by this phenomenon, we consider numerical experiments of the same flavor for classical wave objects in the setting of repulsive condensates. We examine dark solitons interacting with a repulsive barrier, a case in which we find no significant asymmetries in the emerging waves after the collision, presumably due to their topological nature. We also consider case examples of two-component systems, where the dark solitons trap a bright structure in the second component (dark-bright solitary waves). For these, pronounced asymmetries upon collision are possible for the nontopological bright component. We also show an example of a similar phenomenology for ring dark-bright structures in two dimensions.

  2. PINTEX Data: Numeric results from the Polarized Internal Target Experiments (PINTEX) at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility

    DOE Data Explorer

    Meyer, H. O.

    The PINTEX group studied proton-proton and proton-deuteron scattering and reactions between 100 and 500 MeV at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF). More than a dozen experiments made use of electron-cooled polarized proton or deuteron beams, orbiting in the 'Indiana Cooler' storage ring, and of a polarized atomic-beam target of hydrogen or deuterium in the path of the stored beam. The collaboration involved researchers from several midwestern universities, as well as a number of European institutions. The PINTEX program ended when the Indiana Cooler was shut down in August 2002. The website contains links to some of the numerical results, descriptions of experiments, and a complete list of publications resulting from PINTEX.

  3. Precipitation forecasting by a mesoscale numerical weather prediction (NWP) model: eight years of experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, P.; Schubiger, F.; Binder, P.

    The Swiss Model, a hydrostatic numerical weather prediction model, has been used at MeteoSwiss for operational forecasting at the meso-beta scale (mesh-size 14 km) from 1994 until 2001. The quality of the quantitative precipitation forecasts is evaluated for the eight years of operation. The seasonal precipitation over Switzerland and its dependence on altitude is examined for both model forecasts and observations using the Swiss rain gauge network sampling daily precipitation at over 400 stations for verification. The mean diurnal cycle of precipitation is verified against the automatic surface observation network on the basis of hourly recordings. In winter, there is no diurnal forcing of precipitation and the modelled precipitation agrees with the observed values. In summer, the convection in the model starts too early, overestimates the amount of precipitation and is too short-lived. Skill scores calculated for six-hourly precipitation sums show a constant level of performance over the model life cycle. Dry and wet seasons influence the model performance more than the model changes during its operational period. The comprehensive verification of the model precipitation is complemented by the discussion of a number of heavy rain events investigated during the RAPHAEL project. The sensitivities to a number of model components are illustrated, namely the driving boundary fields, the internal partitioning of parameterised and grid-scale precipitation, the advection scheme and the vertical resolution. While a small impact of the advection scheme had to be expected, the increasing overprediction of rain with increasing vertical resolution in the RAPHAEL case studies was larger than previously thought. The frequent update of the boundary conditions enhances the positioning of the rain in the model.

  4. NUMERICAL EXPERIMENTS OF WAVE-LIKE PHENOMENA CAUSED BY THE DISRUPTION OF AN UNSTABLE MAGNETIC CONFIGURATION

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Hongjuan; Shen Chengcai; Lin Jun

    2009-08-01

    The origin of the Moreton wave observed in the chromosphere and the EIT wave observed in the corona during the eruption remains an active research subject. We investigate numerically in this work the evolutionary features of the magnetic configuration that includes a current-carrying flux rope, which is used to model the filament, after the loss of equilibrium in the system takes place in a catastrophic fashion. Rapid motions of the flux rope following the catastrophe invoke the velocity vortices behind the rope, and may also invoke slow- and fast-mode shocks in front of the rope. The velocity vortices at each side of the flux rope propagate roughly horizontally away from the area where they are produced, and both shocks expand toward the flank of the flux rope. The fast shock may eventually reach the bottom boundary and produce two echoes moving back into the corona, but the slow one and the vortices totally decay somewhere in the lower corona before arriving of the bottom boundary. The interaction of the fast shock with the boundary leads to disturbance that accounts for the Moreton wave observed in H{alpha}, and the disturbance in the corona caused by the slow shock and the velocity vortices should account for the EIT wave whose speed is about 40% that of the Moreton wave. The implication of these results to the observed correlation of the type II radio burst to the fast- and the slow-mode shocks and that of EIT waves to coronal mass ejections and flares has also been discussed.

  5. A numerical field experiment approach for determining probabilities of microburst intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.; Zweifel, Terry

    1992-01-01

    Several investigators had determined that some atmospheric parameters were related to the formation and severity of microbursts. For example, Caracena pointed out the relationship between a dry adiabatic lapse rate and microbursts in 'The crash of Delta Flight 191 at Dallas-Fort Worth international airport'. These early investigations led to the idea that numeric modeling of microbursts with varying atmospheric parameters might define 'signatures' that could lead to determining the probability of microburst intensity. The idea was that, by using already available sensors (such as static air temperature, pressure altitude, and radar reflectivity) onboard an aircraft, a reliable prediction of microburst existence and intensity could be formed. Such data could be used to create an 'expert meteorologist' using either artificial intelligence or other techniques that could be used in either reactive or look-ahead systems to vary sensitivity thresholds and coordinate the inputs from different detecting systems. To this end, Honeywell contracted to have the microburst simulations run. The questions to be addressed were the following: using the sensor set available to the aircraft (e.g. temperature, radar reflectivity, etc.), can we calculate the probability that (1) a microburst could be formed? and (2) that the resultant winds would be of sufficient magnitude to threaten the aircraft? Over a two year period, a data set of 1800 microburst simulations was accumulated. Verification of the microburst simulation was obtained using the results of other independent researchers and actual comparison to microburst events in Orlando and Denver. Some of the results from the simulation have already been incorporated into Honeywell's Windshear Detection and Guidance System with excellent results. Various aspects of this investigation are presented in viewgraph form.

  6. Numerical simulations of lab-scale brine-water mixing experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, Imane; Webb, Stephen Walter

    2006-10-01

    Laboratory-scale experiments simulating the injection of fresh water into brine in a Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) cavern were performed at Sandia National Laboratories for various conditions of injection rate and small and large injection tube diameters. The computational fluid dynamic (CFD) code FLUENT was used to simulate these experiments to evaluate the predictive capability of FLUENT for brine-water mixing in an SPR cavern. The data-model comparisons show that FLUENT simulations predict the mixing plume depth reasonably well. Predictions of the near-wall brine concentrations compare very well with the experimental data. The simulated time for the mixing plume to reach the vessel wall was underpredicted for the small injection tubes but reasonable for the large injection tubes. The difference in the time to reach the wall is probably due to the three-dimensional nature of the mixing plume as it spreads out at the air-brine or oil-brine interface. The depth of the mixing plume as it spreads out along the interface was within a factor of 2 of the experimental data. The FLUENT simulation results predict the plume mixing accurately, especially the water concentration when the mixing plume reaches the wall. This parameter value is the most significant feature of the mixing process because it will determine the amount of enhanced leaching at the oil-brine interface.

  7. Remedial Amendment Delivery near the Water Table Using Shear Thinning Fluids: Experiments and Numerical Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Oostrom, Martinus; Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Zhong, Lirong; Tartakovsky, Guzel D.; Wietsma, Thomas W.

    2014-08-19

    The use of shear thinning fluids (STFs) containing xanthan is a potential enhancement for emplacing a solute amendment near the water table and within the capillary fringe. Most research to date related to STF behavior has involved saturated and confined conditions. A series of flow cell experiments were conducted to investigate STF emplacement in variable saturated homogeneous and layered heterogeneous systems. Besides flow visualization using dyes, amendment concentrations and pressure data were obtained at several locations. The experiments showed that injection of STFs considerably improved the subsurface distribution near the water table by mitigating preferential flow through higher permeability zones compared to no-polymer injections. The phosphate amendment migrated with the xanthan SFT without retardation. Despite the high viscosity of the STF, no excessive mounding or preferential flow were observed in the unsaturated zone. The STOMP simulator was able to predict the experimentally observed fluid displacement and amendment concentrations reasonably well. Cross flow between layers could be interpreted as the main mechanism to transport STFs into lower permeability layers based on the observed pressure gradient and concentration data in layers of differing hydraulic conductivity.

  8. CO2-induced dissolution of low permeability carbonates. Part II: Numerical modeling of experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Yue; Smith, Megan; Sholokhova, Yelena; Carroll, Susan

    2013-12-01

    We used the 3D continuum-scale reactive transport models to simulate eight core flood experiments for two different carbonate rocks. In these experiments the core samples were reacted with brines equilibrated with pCO2 = 3, 2, 1, 0.5 MPa (Smith et al., 2013 [27]). The carbonate rocks were from specific Marly dolostone and Vuggy limestone flow units at the IEAGHG Weyburn-Midale CO2 Monitoring and Storage Project in south-eastern Saskatchewan, Canada. Initial model porosity, permeability, mineral, and surface area distributions were constructed from micro tomography and microscopy characterization data. We constrained model reaction kinetics and porosity-permeability equations with the experimental data. The experimental data included time-dependent solution chemistry and differential pressure measured across the core, and the initial and final pore space and mineral distribution. Calibration of the model with the experimental data allowed investigation of effects of carbonate reactivity, flow velocity, effective permeability, and time on the development and consequences of stable and unstable dissolution fronts. The continuum scale model captured the evolution of distinct dissolution fronts that developed as a consequence of carbonate mineral dissolution and pore scale transport properties. The results show that initial heterogeneity and porosity contrast control the development of the dissolution fronts in these highly reactive systems. This finding is consistent with linear stability analysis and the known positive feedback between mineral dissolution and fluid flow in carbonate formations. Differences in the carbonate kinetic drivers resulting from the range of pCO2 used in the experiments and the different proportions of more reactive calcite and less reactive dolomite contributed to the development of new pore space, but not to the type of dissolution fronts observed for the two different rock types. The development of the dissolution front was much more

  9. Numerically derived parametrisation of optimal RMP coil phase as a guide to experiments on ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, D. A.; Liu, Y. Q.; Li, L.; Kirk, A.; Dunne, M.; Dudson, B.; Piovesan, P.; Suttrop, W.; Willensdorfer, M.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2017-02-01

    Edge localised modes (ELMs) are a repetitive MHD instability, which may be mitigated or suppressed by the application of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs). In tokamaks which have an upper and lower set of RMP coils, the applied spectrum of the RMPs can be tuned for optimal ELM control, by introducing a toroidal phase difference {{Δ }}{{Φ }} between the upper and lower rows. The magnitude of the outermost resonant component of the RMP field | {b}{{res}}1| (other proposed criteria are discussed herein) has been shown experimentally to correlate with mitigated ELM frequency, and to be controllable by {{Δ }}{{Φ }} (Kirk et al 2013 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 53 043007). This suggests that ELM mitigation may be optimised by choosing {{Δ }}{{Φ }}={{Δ }}{{{Φ }}}{{opt}}, such that | {b}{{res}}1| is maximised. However it is currently impractical to compute {{Δ }}{{{Φ }}}{{opt}} in advance of experiments. This motivates this computational study of the dependence of the optimal coil phase difference {{Δ }}{{{Φ }}}{{opt}}, on global plasma parameters {β }N and q 95, in order to produce a simple parametrisation of {{Δ }}{{{Φ }}}{{opt}}. In this work, a set of tokamak equilibria spanning a wide range of ({β }N, q 95) is produced, based on a reference equilibrium from an ASDEX Upgrade experiment. The MARS-F code (Liu et al 2000 Phys. Plasmas 7 3681) is then used to compute {{Δ }}{{{Φ }}}{{opt}} across this equilibrium set for toroidal mode numbers n = 1-4, both for the vacuum field and including the plasma response. The computational scan finds that for fixed plasma boundary shape, rotation profiles and toroidal mode number n, {{Δ }}{{{Φ }}}{{opt}} is a smoothly varying function of ({β }N, q 95). A 2D quadratic function in ({β }N, q 95) is used to parametrise {{Δ }}{{{Φ }}}{{opt}}, such that for given ({β }N, q 95) and n, an estimate of {{Δ }}{{{Φ }}}{{opt}} may be made without requiring a plasma response computation. To quantify the uncertainty

  10. Numerical modelling of gravel unconstrained flow experiments with the DAN3D and RASH3D codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauthier, Claire; Pirulli, Marina; Pisani, Gabriele; Scavia, Claudio; Labiouse, Vincent

    2015-12-01

    Landslide continuum dynamic models have improved considerably in the last years, but a consensus on the best method of calibrating the input resistance parameter values for predictive analyses has not yet emerged. In the present paper, numerical simulations of a series of laboratory experiments performed at the Laboratory for Rock Mechanics of the EPF Lausanne were undertaken with the RASH3D and DAN3D numerical codes. They aimed at analysing the possibility to use calibrated ranges of parameters (1) in a code different from that they were obtained from and (2) to simulate potential-events made of a material with the same characteristics as back-analysed past-events, but involving a different volume and propagation path. For this purpose, one of the four benchmark laboratory tests was used as past-event to calibrate the dynamic basal friction angle assuming a Coulomb-type behaviour of the sliding mass, and this back-analysed value was then used to simulate the three other experiments, assumed as potential-events. The computational findings show good correspondence with experimental results in terms of characteristics of the final deposits (i.e., runout, length and width). Furthermore, the obtained best fit values of the dynamic basal friction angle for the two codes turn out to be close to each other and within the range of values measured with pseudo-dynamic tilting tests.

  11. Copper Tube Compression in Z-Current Geometry, Numerical Simulations and Comparison with Cyclope Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lefrancois, A.; L'Eplattenier, P.; Burger, M.

    2006-02-13

    Metallic tubes compressions in Z-current geometry were performed at the Cyclope facility from Gramat Research Center in order to study the behavior of metals under large strain at high strain rate. 3D configurations of cylinder compressions have been calculated here to benchmark the new beta version of the electromagnetism package coupled with the dynamics in Ls-Dyna and compared with the Cyclope experiments. The electromagnetism module is being developed in the general-purpose explicit and implicit finite element program LS-DYNA{reg_sign} in order to perform coupled mechanical/thermal/electromagnetism simulations. The Maxwell equations are solved using a Finite Element Method (FEM) for the solid conductors coupled with a Boundary Element Method (BEM) for the surrounding air (or vacuum). More details can be read in the references.

  12. On the hydrodynamics of planktonic microcrustacean locomotion: Numerical simulations and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borazjani, Iman; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Malkiel, Edwin; Katz, Joeph

    2007-11-01

    We develop a sharp-interface immersed boundary method for carrying out highly resolved simulations of the flow induced by a self-propelled copepod and integrate the simulations with high-resolution experiments to elucidate some aspects of the hydrodynamics of copepod swimming. A realistic copepod-like body is constructed, which includes most important parts of the animal's anatomy: the antennules, legs, and tail. The kinematics of the individual body appendages during an escape maneuver are prescribed based on data obtained using cinematic digital holography. The self-propelled motion of the copepod induced by the prescribed kinematics is simulated via a strongly-coupled fluid-structure interaction approach. The computed flowfields are compared with experimental results and analyzed to elucidate the structure and dynamics of the coherent wake vortices and quantify the specific contribution of each appendage on the production of propulsive thrust.

  13. Experiments and numerical modeling of fast flowing liquid metal thin films under spatially varying magnetic field conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narula, Manmeet Singh

    Innovative concepts using fast flowing thin films of liquid metals (like lithium) have been proposed for the protection of the divertor surface in magnetic fusion devices. However, concerns exist about the possibility of establishing the required flow of liquid metal thin films because of the presence of strong magnetic fields which can cause flow disrupting MHD effects. A plan is underway to design liquid lithium based divertor protection concepts for NSTX, a small spherical torus experiment at Princeton. Of these, a promising concept is the use of modularized fast flowing liquid lithium film zones, as the divertor (called the NSTX liquid surface module concept or NSTX LSM). The dynamic response of the liquid metal film flow in a spatially varying magnetic field configuration is still unknown and it is suspected that some unpredicted effects might be lurking. The primary goal of the research work being reported in this dissertation is to provide qualitative and quantitative information on the liquid metal film flow dynamics under spatially varying magnetic field conditions, typical of the divertor region of a magnetic fusion device. The liquid metal film flow dynamics have been studied through a synergic experimental and numerical modeling effort. The Magneto Thermofluid Omnibus Research (MTOR) facility at UCLA has been used to design several experiments to study the MHD interaction of liquid gallium films under a scaled NSTX outboard divertor magnetic field environment. A 3D multi-material, free surface MHD modeling capability is under development in collaboration with HyPerComp Inc., an SBIR vendor. This numerical code called HIMAG provides a unique capability to model the equations of incompressible MHD with a free surface. Some parts of this modeling capability have been developed in this research work, in the form of subroutines for HIMAG. Extensive code debugging and benchmarking exercise has also been carried out. Finally, HIMAG has been used to study the

  14. Changes in water, carbon, and nitrogen fluxes with the addition of biochar to soils: lessons learned from laboratory and greenhouse experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, R. T.; Gallagher, M. E.; Masiello, C. A.; Liu, Z.; Dugan, B.; Rudgers, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    The addition of biochar to agricultural soils has the potential to provide a number of ecosystem services, ranging from carbon (C) sequestration to increased soil fertility and crop production. It is estimated that 0.5 to 0.9 Pg of C yr-1 can be sequestered through the addition of biochar to soils, significantly increasing the charcoal flux to the biosphere over natural inputs from fire (0.05 to 0.20 Pg C yr-1). There remain large uncertainties about biochar mobility within the environment, making it a challenge to assess the ecosystem residence time of biochar. We conducted laboratory and greenhouse experiments to understand how soil amendment with laboratory-produced biochar changes water, C, and nitrogen (N) fluxes from soils. We used column experiments to assess how biochar amendment to three types of soils (sand, organic, clay-rich) affected hydraulic conductivity and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) fluxes. Results varied with soil type; biochar significantly decreased the hydraulic conductivity of the sand and organic soils by a factor of 10.6 and 2.7, respectively. While not statistically significant, biochar addition increased the hydraulic conductivity of the clay-rich soil by 50% on average. The addition of biochar significantly increased the DOC fluxes from the C-poor sand and clay soils while it significantly decreased the DOC flux from the organic-rich soil. In contrast, TDN fluxes decreased with biochar additions from all soil types, though the results were not statistically significant from the clay-rich soil. These laboratory experiments suggest that changes in the hydraulic conductivity of soil due to biochar amendments could play a significant role in understanding how biochar additions to agricultural fields will change watershed C and N dynamics. We additionally conducted a 28-day greenhouse experiment with sorghum plants using a three-way factorial treatment (water availability x biochar x mycorrhizae) to

  15. Numerical simulation of the geographical sources of water for Continental Scale Experiments (CSEs) Precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Sud, Yogesh; Schubert, Siegfried D.; Walker, Gregory K.

    2003-01-01

    There are several important research questions that the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) is actively pursuing, namely: What is the intensity of the water cycle and how does it change? And what is the sustainability of water resources? Much of the research to address these questions is directed at understanding the atmospheric water cycle. In this paper, we have used a new diagnostic tool, called Water Vapor Tracers (WVTs), to quantify the how much precipitation originated as continental or oceanic evaporation. This shows how long water can remain in the atmosphere and how far it can travel. The model-simulated data are analyzed over regions of interest to the GEWEX community, specifically, their Continental Scale Experiments (CSEs) that are in place in the United States, Europe, Asia, Brazil, Africa and Canada. The paper presents quantitative data on how much each continent and ocean on Earth supplies water for each CSE. Furthermore, the analysis also shows the seasonal variation of the water sources. For example, in the United States, summertime precipitation is dominated by continental (land surface) sources of water, while wintertime precipitation is dominated by the Pacific Ocean sources of water. We also analyze the residence time of water in the atmosphere. The new diagnostic shows a longer residence time for water (9.2 days) than more traditional estimates (7.5 days). We emphasize that the results are based on model simulations and they depend on the model s veracity. However, there are many potential uses for the new diagnostic tool in understanding weather processes and large and small scales.

  16. Pore-Water Extraction Intermediate-Scale Laboratory Experiments and Numerical Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Oostrom, Martinus; Freedman, Vicky L.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Truex, Michael J.

    2011-06-30

    A series of flow cell experiments was conducted to demonstrate the process of water removal through pore-water extraction in unsaturated systems. In this process, a vacuum (negative pressure) is applied at the extraction well establishing gas and water pressure gradients towards the well. The gradient may force water and dissolved contaminants, such as 99Tc, to move towards the well. The tested flow cell configurations consist of packings, with or without fine-grained well pack material, representing, in terms of particle size distribution, subsurface sediments at the SX tank farm. A pore water extraction process should not be considered to be equal to soil vapor extraction because during soil vapor extraction, the main goal may be to maximize gas removal. For pore water extraction systems, pressure gradients in both the gas and water phases need to be considered while for soil vapor extraction purposes, gas phase flow is the only concern. In general, based on the limited set (six) of flow experiments that were conducted, it can be concluded that pore water extraction rates and cumulative outflow are related to water content, the applied vacuum, and the dimensions of the sediment layer providing the extracted water. In particular, it was observed that application of a 100-cm vacuum (negative pressure) in a controlled manner leads to pore-water extraction until the water pressure gradients towards the well approach zero. Increased cumulative outflow was obtained with an increase in initial water content from 0.11 to 0.18, an increase in the applied vacuum to 200 cm, and when the water-supplying sediment was not limited. The experimental matrix was not sufficiently large to come to conclusions regarding maximizing cumulative outflow.

  17. Acoustic Characterization of Fluorinert FC-43 Liquid with Helium Gas Bubbles: Numerical Experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Vanhille, Christian; Pantea, Cristian; Sinha, Dipen N.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we define the acoustic characteristics of a biphasic fluid consisting of static helium gas bubbles in liquid Fluorinert FC-43 and study the propagation of ultrasound of finite amplitudes in this medium. Very low sound speed and high sound attenuation are found, in addition to a particularly high acoustic nonlinear parameter. This result suggests the possibility of using this medium as a nonlinear enhancer in various applications. In particular, parametric generation of low ultrasonic frequencies is studied in a resonator cavity as a function of driving pressure showing high conversion efficiency. This work suggests that this medium couldmore » be used for applications such as parametric arrays, nondestructive testing, diagnostic medicine, sonochemistry, underwater acoustics, and ultrasonic imaging and to boost the shock formation in fluids.« less

  18. COST Action MP0806 'Particles in Turbulence': International Conference on Fundamentals, Experiments, Numeric and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Markus; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Toschi, Federico

    2011-12-01

    Turbulent flows are ubiquitous in nature and technology. Turbulent flows govern the transport of particulate matter in nature. For example, in atmospheric flows turbulence impacts the dynamics of aerosols, droplets, spores and of the living world by either chemo-attractant transport or transport of the insects themselves. In marine flows examples include the bubble dynamics that governs the uptake of oxygen and carbon dioxide at the ocean air interface, or the impact of turbulence on the life of phyto- and zoo-plankton, or the spread of pollutants in the oceans and estuaries. Turbulence is equally important for technology from process engineering in chemical and pharmaceutical industries to energy transport and energy generation. The COST Action MP0806 'Particles in Turbulence' has as the primary objective the support of the fundamental research on the statistical properties of particle transport in turbulent flows. The Action provides excellent opportunities for the exchange of ideas by bringing together scientists from different areas of research and applications, or different views on the problem. The COST Action MP0806 organizes several events annually. The conference held at the University of Potsdam from 16 to 18 March 2011 was the main meeting of the Action in 2011. In total 87 researchers from 18 countries (of which 12 were European) met and presented their work, discussed new ideas on theoretical, numerical and experimental approaches, as well as on applications to various scientific domains. The conference attracted also a number of participants from outside the COST Action. The scientific presentations focused on inertial and finite-size particles, particle collisions, as well as advection and reaction in simple and complex flow geometries. Very interesting results were presented at the forefront of the field: the increasing computational power combined with novel numerical techniques now allows for the first time simulation of the dynamics of finites

  19. Calcium nitrate addition to control the internal load of phosphorus from sediments of a tropical eutrophic reservoir: microcosm experiments.

    PubMed

    Yamada, T M; Sueitt, A P E; Beraldo, D A S; Botta, C M R; Fadini, P S; Nascimento, M R L; Faria, B M; Mozeto, A A

    2012-12-01

    The main objective of this study was to perform laboratory experiments on calcium nitrate addition to sediments of a tropical eutrophic urban reservoir (Ibirité reservoir, SE Brazil) to immobilize the reactive soluble phosphorus (RSP) and to evaluate possible geochemical changes and toxic effects caused by this treatment. Reductions of 75 and 89% in the concentration of RSP were observed in the water column and interstitial water, respectively, after 145 days of nitrate addition. The nitrate application increased the rate of autotrophic denitrification, causing a consumption of 98% of the added nitrate and oxidation of 99% of the acid volatile sulfide. As a consequence, there were increases in the sulfate and iron (II) concentrations in the sediment interstitial water and water column, as well as changes in the copper speciation in the sediments. Toxicity tests initially indicated that the high concentrations of nitrate and nitrite in the sediment interstitial water (up to 2300 mg L(-1) and 260 mg L(-1), respectively) were the major cause of mortality of Ceriodaphnia silvestrii and Chironomus xanthus. However, at the end of the experiment, the sediment toxicity was completely removed and a reduction in the 48 h-EC50 of the water was also observed. Based on these results we can say that calcium nitrate treatment proved to be a valuable tool in remediation of eutrophic aquatic ecosystems leading to conditions that can support a great diversity of organisms after a restoration period.

  20. Diffusive Re-equilibration of Volatiles and Oxygen Fugacity in Olivine-Hosted Melt Inclusions: Experiments and Numerical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucholz, C. E.; Gaetani, G. A.; Behn, M. D.

    2011-12-01

    Determining the pre-eruptive volatile contents of magmas is of critical importance to understanding their generation and evolution. Mineral-hosted melt inclusions can provide information on the pre-eruptive H2O content of the magma as the host mineral shields the interior melt inclusion from decompression that the exterior magma undergoes as it ascends through the crust [1]. Consequently, melt inclusions have been widely used to provide pre-eruptive water contents (eg. [2]). Yet, there is strong evidence of rapid changes to H2O via proton diffusion through the olivine host crystal [3] that are not limited by redox reactions within the melt inclusion [4]. To quantify the extent to which H2O and other volatiles are faithfully recorded in olivine-hosted melt inclusions, we have combined experiments with numerical models to investigate the processes controlling diffusive re-equilibration of water and oxygen fugacity in an olivine-hosted melt inclusion. Dehydration experiments were performed on olivines from the 1999 Cerro Negro Volcano (Nicaragua) eruption. Melt inclusions with initially high water contents (~3.6 ± 0.6 wt. % H2O) were held at 1 atm and 1100°C at the Ni-NiO buffer for 4 to 72 hours. All run products were analyzed by SIMS on the Cameca 1280 ion microprobe at WHOI for H2O, CO2, SO2, F, and Cl. Using COMSOL Multiphysics finite-element modeling software we modeled the diffusive re-equilibration of water, oxygen fugacity, and other volatiles. To interpret our experimental results we used the geometry of the olivines and melt inclusions from the experiments in the numerical models. Our work confirms that the mechanism for loss or gain of H2O from an olivine-hosted melt inclusion is lattice diffusion of protons. Results from XANES analyses on previous dehydration experiments at 1250 °C indicate that H loss occurs through a process decoupled from fO2 re-equilibration. Re-equilibration of fO2 occurs independently via diffusion of point defects on timescales

  1. Numerical Simulation of Non-Inductive Startup of the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Bryan, John B.

    The dynamics and relaxation of magnetic flux ropes produced during non-inductive startup of the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment are simulated with nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic and two-fluid plasma models. A current filament is produced by a single injector and directed along multiple passes by toroidal and vertical vacuum magnetic field components. Adjacent passes of the current filament merge and reconnect, releasing an axisymmetric current ring from the driven channel. Squashing degree analysis indicates the presence of a quasi-separatrix layer (QSL) during ring formation, but the QSL does not solely correspond to magnetic reconnection. Chaotic scattering is also apparent from the distribution of magnetic field-line lengths. The merging of adjacent passes constitutes coherent dynamo action that affects the toroidally-averaged magnetic-field distribution. The MHD dynamo--primarily from the vertical displacement of the current channel--concentrates symmetric poloidal flux and transfers significant energy to the forming flux-rope ring. Accumulation of poloidal flux over many reconnection events contributes to the development of a poloidal magnetic field null near the central column that redirects the driven current filament, such that its path traces a toroidal surface. After cessation of the simulated current drive, temperature and current profiles broaden and closed flux surfaces form rapidly and encompass a large plasma volume. High toroidal-mode number harmonics of the magnetic energy decay preferentially, leaving a tokamak-like plasma suitable for transition to other forms of current drive. Computations with the two-fluid terms in Ohm's Law produce qualitatively similar plasma evolution to the MHD computations. However, for the computations with the two-fluid plasma model, the ion fluid significantly decouples from the electron fluid, weakening the dynamics during magnetic reconnection. This effect is quantified by comparing global and local plasma parameters in

  2. Numerical investigation of the seismo-acoustic responses of the Source Physics Experiment underground explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoun, T.; Ezzedine, S. M.; Vorobiev, O.; Glenn, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    We have performed three-dimensional high resolution simulations of underground explosions conducted recently in jointed rock outcrop as part of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) being conducted at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The main goal of the current study is to investigate the effects of the structural and geomechanical properties on the spall phenomena due to underground explosions and its subsequent effect on the seismo-acoustic signature at far distances. Two parametric studies have been undertaken to assess the impact of different 1) conceptual geological models including a single layer and two layers model, with and without joints and with and without varying geomechanical properties, and 2) depth of bursts of the explosions and explosion yields. Through these investigations we have explored not only the near-field response of the explosions but also the far-field responses of the seismic and the acoustic signatures. The near-field simulations were conducted using the Eulerian and Lagrangian codes, GEODYN and GEODYN -L, respectively, while the far-field seismic simulations were conducted using the elastic wave propagation code, WPP, and the acoustic response using the Kirchhoff-Helmholtz-Rayleigh time-dependent approximation code, KHR. Though a series of simulations, we have recorded the velocity field histories a) at the ground surface on an acoustic-source-patch for the acoustic simulations, and 2) on a seismic-source-box for the seismic simulations. We first analyzed the SPE3 and SPE4-prime experimental data and simulated results, and then simulated SPE5, SPE6/7 to anticipate their seismo-acoustic responses given conditions of uncertainties. SPE experiments were conducted in a granitic formation; we have extended the parametric study to include other geological settings such dolomite and alluvial formations. These parametric studies enabled us 1) investigating the geotechnical and geophysical key parameters that impact the seismo

  3. Numerical Simulations of a Co-Axial Supersonic-Combusting Free-Jet Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffney, Richard L.

    2008-01-01

    CFD calculations using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations coupled with species continuity equations have been made for a supersonic coaxial-jet CFD-validation experiment to determine the sensitivity of the external flowfield to the main-nozzle exit profile. Four different nozzle exit profiles were used in the study: a uniform profile, one computed using only the nozzle geometry, one computed using the nozzle geometry and part of the upstream facility combustor, and one using the nozzle and the full facility combustor. Two cases were examined using the four profiles: a non-reacting case without coflow and a reacting case with hydrogen coflow. Results show that the nozzle exit profile has a significant effect on the external flowfield. The uniform profile produced the longest jet while the profile created with the full combustor produced the shortest jet. The nozzle-only and part-combustor profiles fell between the other two profiles. The reacting flow was found to be more sensitive to the nozzle exit profile since it affects the downstream mixing and combustion. These calculations indicate the importance of properly setting the nozzle-exit profile for this type of calculation.

  4. Measurement and simulation of unmyelinated nerve electrostimulation: Lumbricus terrestris experiment and numerical model.

    PubMed

    Šarolić, A; Živković, Z; Reilly, J P

    2016-06-21

    The electrostimulation excitation threshold of a nerve depends on temporal and frequency parameters of the stimulus. These dependences were investigated in terms of: (1) strength-duration (SD) curve for a single monophasic rectangular pulse, and (2) frequency dependence of the excitation threshold for a continuous sinusoidal current. Experiments were performed on the single-axon measurement setup based on Lumbricus terrestris having unmyelinated nerve fibers. The simulations were performed using the well-established SENN model for a myelinated nerve. Although the unmyelinated experimental model differs from the myelinated simulation model, both refer to a single axon. Thus we hypothesized that the dependence on temporal and frequency parameters should be very similar. The comparison was made possible by normalizing each set of results to the SD time constant and the rheobase current of each model, yielding the curves that show the temporal and frequency dependencies regardless of the model differences. The results reasonably agree, suggesting that this experimental setup and method of comparison with SENN model can be used for further studies of waveform effect on nerve excitability, including unmyelinated neurons.

  5. Size-dependent vulnerability of marine fish larvae to predation: An individual-based numerical experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, J.H. Jr. . Dept. of Marine Sciences); Houde, E.D. . Chesapeake Biological Lab.); Rose, K.A. )

    1992-01-01

    An individual-based predation model permitted 20-d simulations to be initiated with populations of individual theoretical'' ctenophore-, medusae-, and planktivorous fish-like predators and larvae prey that varied in size, growth rate, and swimming speed similarly to populations in the field. Results of predation experiments in 3.2 M{sup 3} mesocosms were used to estimate parameters in a Gerritsen-Strickler type encounter model which is embedded into the individual-based framework. Larval susceptibility with size also was estimated for each predator. Model simulations indicate that the relationship between larval size and vulnerability to predation, and ultimately cohort survival rate, depends upon attributes both of individual predators and larval prey and that bigger or faster growing larvae within a cohort are not always most likely to survive. Despite the finding that cohort-specific mortality generally decreased as the mean size (length) of the members of the cohort increased, mean size or growth rate of individual surviving larvae each day was lower or not significantly different from those that died in most simulations until larvae reached a size threshold when susceptibility decreased more rapidly with larval size than encounter rate increased. After the size threshold was reached, a switch'' occurred whereby predation began to select for survivors of longer mean length. The time necessary to reach the threshold depends on growth rate of the larvae, size of the predators and the variance structure of these parameters.

  6. Size-dependent vulnerability of marine fish larvae to predation: An individual-based numerical experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, J.H. Jr.; Houde, E.D.; Rose, K.A.

    1992-11-01

    An individual-based predation model permitted 20-d simulations to be initiated with populations of individual ``theoretical`` ctenophore-, medusae-, and planktivorous fish-like predators and larvae prey that varied in size, growth rate, and swimming speed similarly to populations in the field. Results of predation experiments in 3.2 M{sup 3} mesocosms were used to estimate parameters in a Gerritsen-Strickler type encounter model which is embedded into the individual-based framework. Larval susceptibility with size also was estimated for each predator. Model simulations indicate that the relationship between larval size and vulnerability to predation, and ultimately cohort survival rate, depends upon attributes both of individual predators and larval prey and that bigger or faster growing larvae within a cohort are not always most likely to survive. Despite the finding that cohort-specific mortality generally decreased as the mean size (length) of the members of the cohort increased, mean size or growth rate of individual surviving larvae each day was lower or not significantly different from those that died in most simulations until larvae reached a size threshold when susceptibility decreased more rapidly with larval size than encounter rate increased. After the size threshold was reached, a ``switch`` occurred whereby predation began to select for survivors of longer mean length. The time necessary to reach the threshold depends on growth rate of the larvae, size of the predators and the variance structure of these parameters.

  7. Determination of forces in a magnetic bearing actuator - Numerical computation with comparison to experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, J. D.; Xia, Z.; Mccaul, E.; Hacker, H., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Calculations of the forces exerted on a journal by a magnetic bearing actuator are presented, along with comparisons to experimentally measured forces. The calculations are based on two-dimensional solutions for the flux distribution in the metal parts and free space, using finite but constant permeability in the metals. Above a relative permeability of 10,000 the effects of changes in permeability are negligible, but below 10,000 decreases in permeability cause significant decreases in the force. The calculated forces are shown to depend on the metal permeability more strongly when the journal is displaced from its centered position. The predicted forces in the principal attractive direction are in good agreement with experiment when a relatively low value of permeability is chosen. The forces measured normal to the axis of symmetry when the journal is displaced from that axis, however, are significantly higher than predicted by theory, even with a value of relative permeability larger than 5000. These results indicate a need for further work including nonlinear permeability distributions.

  8. Sulfate Transport and Release in Technogenic Soil Substrates: Experiments and Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schonsky, H.; Peters, A.; Lang, F.; Mekiffer, B.; Wessolek, G.

    2012-04-01

    In Berlin and many other cities technogenic soil substrates from World War II and building and construction debris in general play an important role for soil formation and solute transport in the vadose zone. The largest debris landfill in Berlin is the Teufelsberg. Sulfate release from the landfill poses threats for groundwater quality. The scope of this study is to determine the processes controlling sulfate release from soils containing rubble. Column leaching experiments were conducted to analyze sulfate mobilization from Teufelsberg topsoil material. Flow interruptions of one and seven days were introduced. Sulfate release was modeled using a geochemical simulation tool (HP1). The model considered water flux, solute transport and precipitation/dissolution with first order kinetics. Sulfate release increased after flow interruptions, although bromide breakthrough indicated physical equilibrium of transport processes. The model was applicable for qualitative description of our experimental results. The estimated equilibrium concentrations of sulfate were one to two orders of magnitude smaller than expected according to the equilibrium constant of gypsum. It is assumed that the mobilization of sulfate from calcite/gypsum co-precipitates determines the sulfate concentrations in the soil solution of the studied soils. If Sulfate release and transport from soils containing debris is modeled with literature values, sulfate concentrations will be overestimated by one to two orders of magnitude.

  9. Migration behavior of supercritical and liquid CO2 in a stratified system: Experiments and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Junho; Kim, Kue-Young; Han, Weon Shik; Park, Eungyu; Kim, Jeong-Chan

    2015-10-01

    Multiple scenarios of upward CO2 migration driven by both injection-induced pressure and buoyancy force were investigated in a horizontally and vertically stratified core utilizing a core-flooding system with a 2-D X-ray scanner. Two reservoir-type scenarios were considered: (1) the terrestrial reservoir scenario (10 MPa and 50°C), where CO2 exists in a supercritical state and (2) the deep-sea sediment reservoir scenario (28 MPa and 25°C), where CO2 is stored in the liquid phase. The core-flooding experiments showed a 36% increase in migration rate in the vertical core setting compared with the horizontal setting, indicating the significance of the buoyancy force under the terrestrial reservoir scenario. Under both reservoir conditions, the injected CO2 tended to find a preferential flow path (low capillary entry pressure and high-permeability (high-k) path) and bypass the unfavorable pathways, leaving low CO2 saturation in the low-permeability (low-k) layers. No distinctive fingering was observed as the CO2 moved upward, and the CO2 movement was primarily controlled by media heterogeneity. The CO2 saturation in the low-k layers exhibited a more sensitive response to injection rates, implying that the increase in CO2 injection rates could be more effective in terms of storage capacity in the low-k layers in a stratified reservoir. Under the deep-sea sediment condition, the storage potential of liquid CO2 was more than twice as high as that of supercritical CO2 under the terrestrial reservoir scenario. In the end, multiphase transport simulations were conducted to assess the effects of heterogeneity on the spatial variation of pressure buildup, CO2 saturation, and CO2 flux. Finally, we showed that a high gravity number (Ngr) tended to be more influenced by the heterogeneity of the porous media.

  10. Rosetta Consert Radio Sounding Experiment: A Numerical Method for the Inverse Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardiet, M.; Herique, A.; Rogez, Y.; Douté, S.; Kofman, W. W.

    2014-12-01

    Rosetta's module Philae will soon land on 67P CG nucleus, giving unprecedented insight about a comet nucleus, its composition and interior. The CONSERT instrument is one of the 20 scientific instruments of the mission. It's a bistatic two-modules radar, one on the orbiter, one on the lander. They generate EM waves that are transmitted through the nucleus. The signal is therefore delayed and attenuated by the nucleus materials and possible inhomogeneities. An accurate measurement and processing of these signals, repeated along the orbit, will allow us to perform a tomography, and for the first time, map the dielectric properties of a comet nucleus internal structures .Our approach for the resolution of this inverse problem is to use a custom built software called SIMSERT, which simulates the end-to-end experiment, using a ray-tracing algorithm. This tool is the key to prepare CONSERT operation and perform signal analysis. Given a comet shape and a landing site, we have conducted simulations to understand, quantify and get rid of the biases due to the discretization of the shape model.The first inversion using the comet shape model given by OSIRIS and NavCam teams , will assume a propagation in an homogeneous medium. The first goal is to identify and correct artefacts due to the surface interface. The second goal is to evaluate the coherency of the different permittivity estimations given by inverting the latter model on the signal measured at different positions along the orbit. Then it is likely that, based on the first investigations, more sophisticated models (rubble pile, strata) and inversions will be required. A comparative approach between the simulated data and the CONSERT data, will lead to permittivity maps of the nucleus, that are coherent with the observation, with a certain probability. These maps, the first of this type, will provide unprecedented information about the internal structure, the accretion history and the nucleus time evolution.

  11. Motor imagery of locomotion with an additional load: actual load experience does not affect differences between physical and mental durations.

    PubMed

    Munzert, Jörn; Blischke, Klaus; Krüger, Britta

    2015-03-01

    Motor imagery relies strongly on motor representations. Currently, it is widely accepted that both the imagery and execution of actions share the same neural representations (Jeannerod, Neuroimage 14:S103-S109, 2001). Comparing mental with actual movement durations opens a window through which to examine motor representations and how they relate to cognitive motor processes. The present experiment examined mental durations reported by participants standing upright who imagined walking either with or without an additional load while actually carrying or not carrying that same load. Results showed a robust effect of longer durations when imagining the additional load during mental walking, whereas physical walking with an additional load did not extend movement durations accordingly. However, experiencing an actual load during imagery did not influence mental durations substantially. This dissociation of load-related effects can be interpreted as being due to an interaction of motor processes and their cognitive representation along with a reduction in neural activity in vestibular and somatosensory areas during imagery of locomotion. It is argued that this effect might be specific to locomotion and not generalize to a broader range of movements.

  12. Thermal conductivity of the sideledge in aluminium electrolysis cells: Experiments and numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheribi, Aïmen E.; Poncsák, Sándor; Guérard, Sébastien; Bilodeau, Jean-François; Kiss, László; Chartrand, Patrice

    2017-03-01

    During aluminium electrolysis, a ledge of frozen electrolytes is generally formed, attached to the sides of the cells. This ledge acts as a protective layer, preventing erosion and chemical attacks of both the electrolyte melt and the liquid aluminium on the side wall materials. The control of the sideledge thickness is thus essential in ensuring a reasonable lifetime for the cells. The key property for modelling and predicting the sideledge thickness as a function of temperature and electrolyte composition is the thermal conductivity. Unfortunately, almost no data is available on the thermal conductivity of the sideledge. The aim of this work is to alleviate this lack of data. For seven different samples of sideledge microstructures, recovered from post-mortem industrial electrolysis cells, the thermal diffusivity, the density, and the phase compositions were measured in the temperature range of 423 K to 873 K. The thermal diffusivity was measured with a laser flash technique and the average phase compositions by X-ray diffraction analysis. The thermal conductivity of the sideledge is deduced from the present experimental thermal diffusivity and density, and the thermodynamically assessed heat capacity. In addition to the present experimental work, a theoretical model for the prediction of the effective thermal transport properties of the sideledge microstructure is also proposed. The proposed model considers an equivalent microstructure and depends on phase fractions, porosity, and temperature. The strength of the model lies in the fact that only a few key physical properties are required for its parametrization and they can be predicted with a good accuracy via first principles calculations. It is shown that the theoretical predictions are in a good agreement with the present experimental measurements.

  13. Numerical experiments in galactic disks: Gravitational instability, stochastic accretion, and galactic winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, John C.

    Using 0D, 1D, and 3D models of galaxies, I explore different problems in galaxy evolution most suited to each technique. In the simplest case, a galaxy is described by a few numbers integrated via coupled ordinary differential equations. By allowing the galaxies to respond to a stochastic accretion rate, I show a natural way of generating the finite scatter observed in several galaxy scaling relations: the correlation between a galaxy's stellar mass and its star formation rate or metallicity. By comparing this simple model to observations, we constrain the process by which gas accretes onto galaxies, which must occur, but is essentially impossible to observe directly. Adding an additional dimension to the models, we explore the structure of galactic disks as a function of radius. We find that turbulence driven by gravitational instability in the disks and the resulting migration of gas can explain a wide variety of phenomena, including the age-velocity dispersion correlation of stars in the solar neighborhood, the central quenching star formation in disk galaxies, rings of star formation, and the observed radial profile of gas column densities. Finally, we run a set of fully three-dimensional galaxy simulations to try to understand what physics is responsible for basic properties of galaxies, including the rate at which they form stars, and the rate at which they eject mass in large-scale winds. We find that supernovae are capable of driving moderate metal-enhanced winds, but surprisingly they have very little effect on the star formation rates of dwarf galaxies. Instead, ordinary photoelectric heating dominates the star formation law in low-mass galaxies.

  14. Relating a Jet-Surface Interaction Experiment to a Commercial Supersonic Transport Aircraft Using Numerical Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dippold, Vance F. III; Friedlander, David

    2017-01-01

    Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations were performed for a commercial supersonic transport aircraft concept and experimental hardware models designed to represent the installed propulsion system of the conceptual aircraft in an upcoming test campaign. The purpose of the experiment is to determine the effects of jet-surface interactions from supersonic aircraft on airport community noise. RANS simulations of the commercial supersonic transport aircraft concept were performed to relate the representative experimental hardware to the actual aircraft. RANS screening simulations were performed on the proposed test hardware to verify that it would be free from potential rig noise and to predict the aerodynamic forces on the model hardware to assist with structural design. The simulations showed a large region of separated flow formed in a junction region of one of the experimental configurations. This was dissimilar with simulations of the aircraft and could invalidate the noise measurements. This configuration was modified and a subsequent RANS simulation showed that the size of the flow separation was greatly reduced. The aerodynamic forces found on the experimental models were found to be relatively small when compared to the expected loads from the model’s own weight.Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations were completed for two configurations of a three-stream inverted velocity profile (IVP) nozzle and a baseline single-stream round nozzle (mixed-flow equivalent conditions). For the Sideline and Cutback flow conditions, while the IVP nozzles did not reduce the peak turbulent kinetic energy on the lower side of the jet plume, the IVP nozzles did significantly reduce the size of the region of peak turbulent kinetic energy when compared to the jet plume of the baseline nozzle cases. The IVP nozzle at Sideline conditions did suffer a region of separated flow from the inner stream nozzle splitter that did produce an intense, but small, region of

  15. The Role of Model and Initial Condition Error in Numerical Weather Forecasting Investigated with an Observing System Simulation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prive, Nikki C.; Errico, Ronald M.

    2013-01-01

    A series of experiments that explore the roles of model and initial condition error in numerical weather prediction are performed using an observing system simulation experiment (OSSE) framework developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (NASA/GMAO). The use of an OSSE allows the analysis and forecast errors to be explicitly calculated, and different hypothetical observing networks can be tested with ease. In these experiments, both a full global OSSE framework and an 'identical twin' OSSE setup are utilized to compare the behavior of the data assimilation system and evolution of forecast skill with and without model error. The initial condition error is manipulated by varying the distribution and quality of the observing network and the magnitude of observation errors. The results show that model error has a strong impact on both the quality of the analysis field and the evolution of forecast skill, including both systematic and unsystematic model error components. With a realistic observing network, the analysis state retains a significant quantity of error due to systematic model error. If errors of the analysis state are minimized, model error acts to rapidly degrade forecast skill during the first 24-48 hours of forward integration. In the presence of model error, the impact of observation errors on forecast skill is small, but in the absence of model error, observation errors cause a substantial degradation of the skill of medium range forecasts.

  16. Modeling Fold-And Belts Using Numerical Simulations and Physical Experiments: the Aconcagua and Mexican Fold-And Belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, L.; Hilley, G. E.; Fitz, E.; Hudleston, P. J.; Malinski, J.; Hernandez, M.; Take, A.

    2010-12-01

    In this contribution we first investigate the impact of erosion on the geometry and kinematics of the central Argentine Aconcagua Fold-and-Thrust Belt (AFTB) using an integrated analog (sandbox) and numerical (Gale) modeling approach in which mass removal from the topographic surface is limited by the rate of fluvial bedrock incision. This method unifies principles of frictional failure used in Critical Coulomb Wedge (CCW) theory with a quasi-mechanistic erosion rule, which allows us to explicitly relate temporal changes in erosional efficiency in this fold-and-thrust belt to its kinematics. We show that theoretical predictions of AFTB geometry, as well as the kinematics predicted by both physical and numerical experiments are both internally consistent and correctly predict the interpreted and measured field geometries. Specifically, the geometric evolution of the AFTB requires relatively high erosion efficiency values (K) during the initial stage of deformation, and relatively low K values during the latter stages, which is consistent with the progressive exposure of different rock types during the different stages of deformation. Model results indicate that the activity of the faults in the hinterland is high when erosion is most efficient during the initial stage of deformation; this activity is facilitated by increased out-of-sequence thrusting. In contrast, the models predict that forward-propagating thrusts dominate the latter stages of deformation when erosion is far less efficient. We next explore the role of the initial configuration of materials with differing constitutive properties using the Gale numerical code, and published and new structural data from the well-documented Mexican Fold-and-Thrust Belt (MFTB). This fold-and-thrust belt is located in central Mexico and its kinematics appear to be influenced by spatially varying material properties within the accreted foreland rocks. Preliminary results from the MFTB simulations show that rheological

  17. Water related triggering mechanisms of shallow landslides: Numerical modelling of hydraulic flows in slopes verified with field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broennimann, C.; Tacher, L.

    2009-04-01

    To assess hill slope stability and landslide triggering mechanisms, it is essential to understand the hydrogeological regime in slopes. In this work finite element models are elaborated and field experiments are carried out to study particularly shallow landslides with thickness of a few meters. The basis hypothesis of the presented research assumes that even for shallow landslides the hydrogeological role of the substratum, mostly bedrock, is determinant for the slopes behaviour, either it is draining or feeding the overlaying unstable mass. The investigated area of about 1 square kilometre is situated next to the villages Buchberg and Rüdlingen (canton Schaffhausen, Switzerland) at the border of the river Rhine. The lithology in this region is characterized mainly by horizontally layered sandstones intersected by marls from the upper seawater and the lower freshwater molasse, overlaid by soil and weathered bedrock of about 1 to 4 m thickness, both classified as silty sands. With a slope inclination of locally up to 40° the area is rather steep and characterized by continuous regressive erosion processes. During heavy rainfall events, such as the one from May 2002, shallow landslides occurred in the area affecting afforested soils as well as woodless areas. Geological field observations, infiltration and tracer tests show a fairly complicated hydrogeological character of the region. Along the slope, in the first few meters of depth, no groundwater table was found. However, seasonally controlled sources can be observed in-between outcropping bedrock. Within the sandstone, vertical faults in decametre scale oriented parallel to the Rhine that most likely opened during decompression due to the cutting of the river affect locally the hydrogeological regime by draining the slope. This implies a high grade of heterogeneity in the water flows in a local scale. Based on these conceptual hydrological and geological models, a numerical flow model was obtained using finite

  18. Interfacial instability in vertical counter-current gas-liquid film flow: theory, direct numerical simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Patrick; Ausner, Ilja; Ó Náraigh, Lennon; Lucquiaud, Mathieu; Valluri, Prashant

    2016-11-01

    The dynamics of vertical counter-current gas-liquid flows are largely determined by interfacial instability, which gives rise to a multitude of complex wave patterns and internal flows. To study the genesis and evolution of the instability in detail, we employ theoretical stability analysis, experiment and a newly developed level set method based in-house solver to carry out direct numerical simulations. Crucial results of these simulations, such as growth rate and phase velocity of interfacial waves, are rigorously compared against linear and weakly nonlinear theory; thereby showing remarkable agreement. The analysis also reveals the spatio-temporal character of the waves, depicting regimes of absolute and convective instability. Complementing the benchmark set by (non-)linear theory, we perform film thickness measurements of a real gas-liquid system (air-silicone oil) by means of a non-intrusive light-induced fluorescence technique to further validate the solver regarding its capability of capturing interfacial dynamics accurately. These measurements are in good agreement with the results of the nonlinear direct numerical simulations with respect to wavelength and wave shape of the most unstable mode.

  19. Numerical Simulation of Steady and Pulsatile Flow Through Vascular Stenoses and Comparisons with Experiments Using Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, Geoffrey; Agarwal, Ramesh; Moghaddam, Abbas N.; Choi, Eric T.; Amini, Amir A.

    2003-11-01

    A commercially available numerical flow solver "FLUENT" is employed in simulation of blood flow through vascular stenoses. Fluid properties are set to match those of the blood mimicking fluid used in flow phantom experiments at the Washington University School of Medicine. Computational results are compared for steady flow through axisymmetric and three-dimensional phantoms modeling mild to severe stenonses with the data collected using Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PC-MRI) technique by colleagues in the CVIA laboratory at Washington University School of Medicine. Computations are also performed for pulsatile flow through vascular stenoses. Comparisons of PC-MRI and FLUENT output data show qualitative agreement in streamline patterns and good quantitative agreement for pressure drop across the stenoses.

  20. On the dynamics of droughts in northeast Brazil - Observations, theory and numerical experiments with a general circulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moura, A. D.; Shukla, J.

    1981-01-01

    The establishment of a thermally direct local circulation which has its ascending branch at about 10 deg N and its descending branch over northeast Brazil and the adjoining oceanic region is proposed as a possible mechanism for the occurrence of severe droughts over this Brazilian region. The driving for this anomalous circulation is provided by enhanced moist convection due to the effect of warmer sea surface anomalies over the northern tropical Atlantic and cooling associated with colder sea surface temperature anomalies in the southern tropical Atlantic. A simple primitive equation model is used to calculate the frictionally-controlled and thermally-driven circulation due to a prescribed heating function in a resting atmosphere, and a series of numerical experiments are carried out to test the sensitivity of the Goddard Laboratory's model to prescribed sea surface temperature anomalies over the tropical Atlantic.

  1. The dynamics of charged particles in the near wake of a very negatively charged body - Laboratory experiment and numerical simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, M. Alvin; Chan, Chung; Cooke, David L.; Tautz, Maurice F.

    1989-01-01

    A numerical simulation that is cylindrical in configuration space and three-dimensional in velocity space has been initiated to test a model for the near-wake dynamics of a very negatively charged body, with reference to the plasma environment around spacecraft. The simulation parameters were closely matched to those of a laboratory experiment so that the results can be compared directly. The laboratory study showed that the electrons and ions can display different temporal features in the filling-in of the wake; and that they can both be found within one body diameter of an object with a highly negative body potential. It was also found that the temperature of the electrons in the very near wake could be somewhat colder than the ambient value, suggesting the possibility of a filtering mechanism being operative there. The simulation results to date largely corroborate the density findings.

  2. Numerical Modeling Experiments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-09-01

    presence of clouds is associated with the occurvence of condensation in the atmospheric models. Cloudiness 3t a particulat grid point is introduced -4...when saturation is predicted as a result of either large-scale moisture flux convergence or vertical convective adjustment. In most models such clouds ... cloud top, cloud thickness, and liquid-water content. In some general circulation models the local fractional convective cloud amountv tre taken

  3. Three-dimensional finite element numerical simulation and physical experiment for magnetism-stress detecting in oil casing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Fanshun; Zhang, Jie; Yang, Chaoqun; Yu, Weizhe; Chen, Yuxi

    2015-08-01

    The casing damage has been a big problem in oilfield production. The current detection methods mostly are used after casing damage, which is not very effective. With the rapid development of China's offshore oil industry, the number of offshore oil wells is becoming larger and larger. Because the cost of offshore oil well is very high, the casing damage will cause huge economic losses. What's more, it can also bring serious pollution to marine environment. So the effective methods of detecting casing damage are required badly. The accumulation of stress is the main reason for the casing damage. Magnetic anisotropy technique based on counter magnetostriction effect can detect the stress of casing in real time and help us to find out the hidden dangers in time. It is essential for us to prevent the casing damage from occurring. However, such technique is still in the development stage. Previous studies mostly got the relationship between stress and magnetic signals by physical experiment, and the study of physical mechanism in relative magnetic permeability connecting the stress and magnetic signals is rarely reported. The present paper uses the ANSYS to do the three-dimensional finite element numerical simulation to study how the relative magnetic permeability works for the oil casing model. We find that the quantitative relationship between the stress's variation and magnetic induction intensity's variation is: Δδ = K* Δ B, K = 8.04×109, which is proved correct by physical experiment.

  4. Evaluation of the role of heterogeneities on transverse mixing in bench-scale tank experiments by numerical modeling.

    PubMed

    Ballarini, E; Bauer, S; Eberhardt, C; Beyer, C

    2014-01-01

    In this work, numerical modeling is used to evaluate and interpret a series of detailed and well-controlled two-dimensional bench-scale conservative tracer tank experiments performed to investigate transverse mixing in porous media. The porous medium used consists of a fine matrix and a more permeable lens vertically aligned with the tracer source and the flow direction. A sensitivity analysis shows that the tracer distribution after passing the lens is only slightly sensitive to variations in transverse dispersivity, but strongly sensitive to the contrast of hydraulic conductivities. A unique parameter set could be calibrated to closely fit the experimental observations. On the basis of calibrated and validated model, synthetic experiments with different contrasts in hydraulic conductivity and more complex setups were performed and the efficiency of mixing evaluated. Flux-related dilution indices derived from these simulations show that the contrasts in hydraulic conductivity between matrix and high-permeable lenses as well as the spatial configuration of tracer plumes and lenses dominate mixing, rather than the actual pore scale dispersivities. These results indicate that local material distributions, the magnitude of permeability contrasts, and their spatial and scale relation to solute plumes are more important for macro-scale transverse dispersion than the micro-scale dispersivities of individual materials. Local material characterization by thorough site investigation hence is of utmost importance for the evaluation of mixing-influenced or -governed problems in groundwater, such as tracer test evaluation or an assessment of contaminant natural attenuation.

  5. Determination of Unknown Concentrations of Sodium Acetate Using the Method of Standard Addition and Proton NMR: An Experiment for the Undergraduate Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rajabzadeh, Massy

    2012-01-01

    In this experiment, students learn how to find the unknown concentration of sodium acetate using both the graphical treatment of standard addition and the standard addition equation. In the graphical treatment of standard addition, the peak area of the methyl peak in each of the sodium acetate standard solutions is found by integration using…

  6. Significant Change in Marine Plankton Structure and Carbon Production After the Addition of River Water in a Mesocosm Experiment.

    PubMed

    Fouilland, E; Trottet, A; Alves-de-Souza, C; Bonnet, D; Bouvier, T; Bouvy, M; Boyer, S; Guillou, L; Hatey, E; Jing, H; Leboulanger, C; Le Floc'h, E; Liu, H; Mas, S; Mostajir, B; Nouguier, J; Pecqueur, D; Rochelle-Newall, E; Roques, C; Salles, C; Tournoud, M-G; Vasseur, C; Vidussi, F

    2017-03-16

    Rivers are known to be major contributors to eutrophication in marine coastal waters, but little is known on the short-term impact of freshwater surges on the structure and functioning of the marine plankton community. The effect of adding river water, reducing the salinity by 15 and 30%, on an autumn plankton community in a Mediterranean coastal lagoon (Thau Lagoon, France) was determined during a 6-day mesocosm experiment. Adding river water brought not only nutrients but also chlorophyceans that did not survive in the brackish mesocosm waters. The addition of water led to initial increases (days 1-2) in bacterial production as well as increases in the abundances of bacterioplankton and picoeukaryotes. After day 3, the increases were more significant for diatoms and dinoflagellates that were already present in the Thau Lagoon water (mainly Pseudo-nitzschia spp. group delicatissima and Prorocentrum triestinum) and other larger organisms (tintinnids, rotifers). At the same time, the abundances of bacterioplankton, cyanobacteria, and picoeukaryote fell, some nutrients (NH4(+), SiO4(3-)) returned to pre-input levels, and the plankton structure moved from a trophic food web based on secondary production to the accumulation of primary producers in the mesocosms with added river water. Our results also show that, after freshwater inputs, there is rapid emergence of plankton species that are potentially harmful to living organisms. This suggests that flash flood events may lead to sanitary issues, other than pathogens, in exploited marine areas.

  7. Post-Gondwana geomorphic evolution of southwestern Africa: Implications for hte controls on landscape development from observations and numerical experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilchrist, Alan R.; Kooi, Henk; Beaumont, Christopher

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between morphology and surficial geology is used to quantify the denudation that has occurred across southwestern Africa sicne the fragmentation of Gondwana during the Early Mesozoic. Two main points emerge. Signficant denudation, of the order of kilometers, is widespread except in the Kalahari region of the continental interior. The denudation is systematically distributed so that the continental exterior catchment, draining directly to the Cape basin, is denuded to a greater depth than the interior catchment inland of the Great Escarpment. The analysis also implies tha the majority of the denudation occurred before the beginning of the Cenozoic for both teh exerior and interior catchments. Existing models of landscape development are reviewed, and implications of the denudation chronology are incorporated into a revised conceptual model. This revision implies tha thte primary effect of rifting on the subsequent landscape evolution is that it generates two distinct drainage regimes. A marginal upwarp, or rift flank uplift, separates rejuvenated rivers that drain into the subsiding rift from rivers in the continetal interior that are deflected but not rejuvenated. The two catchments evolve independently unless they are integrated by breaching of hte marginal upwarp. If this occurs, the exterior baselevel is communicated to the interior catchment that is denuded accordingly. Denudation rates generally decrease as the margin evolves, and this decrease is reinforced by the exposure of substrate that is resistant to denudation and/or a change to a more arid climate. The observations do not reveal a particular style of smaller-scale landscape evolution, sucha s escarpment retreat, that is responsible for the differential denudation across the region. It is proposed that numerical model experiments, which reflect the observational insights at the large scale, may identify the smaller-scale controls on escarpment development if the model and natural

  8. Soot Particle Optical Properties: a Comparison between Numerical Calculations and Experimental Data Collected during the Boston College Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, N.; Mazzoleni, C.; China, S.; Dubey, M. K.; Onasch, T. B.; Cross, E. S.; Davidovits, P.; Wrobel, W.; Ahern, A.; Schwarz, J. P.; Spackman, J. R.; Lack, D. A.; Massoli, P.; Freedman, A.; Olfert, J. S.; Freitag, S.; Sedlacek, A. J.; Cappa, C. D.; Subramanian, R.

    2010-12-01

    A black carbon instrument inter-comparison study was conducted in July 2008 at Boston College to measure the optical, physical and chemical properties of laboratory generated soot under controlled conditions [1]. The physical, chemical and optical properties were measured on size-selected particles for: 1. Nascent soot particles 2. Nascent- denuded soot particles 3. Soot particles coated with sulfuric acid or DOS (dioctyl sebacate) across a range of coating thicknesses 4. Coated and then denuded soot particles. Instruments involved in the inter-comparison study fell into two broad categories: a) mass-based instruments and b) optically-based instruments. During this experiment, 7 mass-based and 9 optically-based instruments were deployed. Absorption scattering and extinction measurements were carried out in combination with mass-based instruments in order to obtain absorption, scattering and extinction coefficients for coated and denuded soot particles as a function of their mass, size and coating thickness. Particle samples were also collected on nuclepore filters to perform Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis. The images obtained with the SEM elucidated the changes in particle morphology upon coating and denuding. The images were also used to determine morphological parameters for single soot aggregates (e.g. monomers number and diameter) used in the numerical estimation of aerosol optical properties. With the data collected during the experiment, we carry out a comparative study of the optical properties of soot particles obtained experimentally with those calculated using the two most commonly used numerical approximations (Rayleigh-Debye-Gans (RDG) theory and Mie theory). Thus we validate the degree of agreement between theoretical models and experimental results. The laboratory optical, mass, size and morphological data can be used to elucidate the impact of these parameters on radiative forcing by atmospheric soot [2, 3]. References: 1. Cross, E. S

  9. Investigation of the physical and numerical foundations of two-fluid representation of sodium boiling with applications to LMFBR experiments

    SciTech Connect

    No, H.C.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1983-03-01

    This work involves the development of physical models for the constitutive relations of a two-fluid, three-dimensional sodium boiling code, THERMIT-6S. The code is equipped with a fluid conduction model, a fuel pin model, and a subassembly wall model suitable for stimulating LMFBR transient events. Mathematically rigorous derivations of time-volume averaged conservation equations are used to establish the differential equations of THERMIT-6S. These equations are then discretized in a manner identical to the original THERMIT code. A virtual mass term is incorporated in THERMIT-6S to solve the ill-posed problem. Based on a simplified flow regime, namely cocurrent annular flow, constitutive relations for two-phase flow of sodium are derived. The wall heat transfer coefficient is based on momentum-heat transfer analogy and a logarithmic law for liquid film velocity distribution. A broad literature review is given for two-phase friction factors. It is concluded that entrainment can account for some of the discrepancies in the literature. Mass and energy exchanges are modelled by generalization of the turbulent flux concept. Interfacial drag coefficients are derived for annular flows with entrainment. Code assessment is performed by simulating three experiments for low flow-high power accidents and one experiment for low flow/low power accidents in the LMFBR. While the numerical results for pre-dryout are in good agreement with the data, those for post-dryout reveal the need for improvement of the physical models. The benefits of two-dimensional non-equilibrium representation of sodium boiling are studied.

  10. Numerical experiment to estimate the validity of negative ion diagnostic using photo-detachment combined with Langmuir probing

    SciTech Connect

    Oudini, N.; Sirse, N.; Ellingboe, A. R.; Benallal, R.; Taccogna, F.; Bendib, A.

    2015-07-15

    This paper presents a critical assessment of the theory of photo-detachment diagnostic method used to probe the negative ion density and electronegativity α = n{sub -}/n{sub e}. In this method, a laser pulse is used to photo-detach all negative ions located within the electropositive channel (laser spot region). The negative ion density is estimated based on the assumption that the increase of the current collected by an electrostatic probe biased positively to the plasma is a result of only the creation of photo-detached electrons. In parallel, the background electron density and temperature are considered as constants during this diagnostics. While the numerical experiments performed here show that the background electron density and temperature increase due to the formation of an electrostatic potential barrier around the electropositive channel. The time scale of potential barrier rise is about 2 ns, which is comparable to the time required to completely photo-detach the negative ions in the electropositive channel (∼3 ns). We find that neglecting the effect of the potential barrier on the background plasma leads to an erroneous determination of the negative ion density. Moreover, the background electron velocity distribution function within the electropositive channel is not Maxwellian. This is due to the acceleration of these electrons through the electrostatic potential barrier. In this work, the validity of the photo-detachment diagnostic assumptions is questioned and our results illustrate the weakness of these assumptions.

  11. 3D Numerical Experiments of Lithospheric Transtension Reveal Complex Crustal-Scale Flow and Strain Partitioning in Transdomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, P. F.; Mondy, L. S.; Duclaux, G.; Teyssier, C. P.; Whitney, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    We have used Underworld to perform a series of numerical experiments involving a 256 x 256 x 128 km domain, at a grid resolution of 1.33 km. The kinematic boundary conditions simulate a lithospheric-scale pull-apart setting. We compare the structural and thermal evolution of a model involving a crust of thickness 40 km (TMoho=540ºC) with a model with a crust of thickness 60 km (TMoho=830ºC). We show that in the thick, hot crust model the flow in the pull-apart region is strongly partitioned between the strong upper crust and the weak lower crust. The weak, deep crust flows toward the pull-apart region to isostatically compensate the stretching and thinning of the upper crust. In contrast, the velocity field in the upper crust remains parallel to the imposed direction of extension. In the pull-apart region a transdome, made of two parallel foliation folds (or sub-domes), forms. In the dome, fabrics evolve from strong vertical flattening in between the two sub-domes, to shallow dipping constriction roughly parallel to the direction of extension in the upper part of the transdome.

  12. Numerical experiments on the evolution in coronal magnetic configurations including a filament in response to the change in the photosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong-Juan; Liu, Si-Qing; Gong, Jian-Cun; Lin, Jun

    2015-03-01

    We investigate equilibrium height of a flux rope, and its internal equilibrium in a realistic plasma environment by carrying out numerical simulations of the evolution of systems including a current-carrying flux rope. We find that the equilibrium height of a flux rope is approximately described by a power-law function of the relative strength of the background field. Our simulations indicate that the flux rope can escape more easily from a weaker background field. This further confirms that a catastrophe in the magnetic configuration of interest can be triggered by a decrease in strength of the background field. Our results show that it takes some time to reach internal equilibrium depending on the initial state of the flux rope. The plasma flow inside the flux rope due to the adjustment for the internal equilibrium of the flux rope remains small and does not last very long when the initial state of the flux rope commences from the stable branch of the theoretical equilibrium curve. This work also confirms the influence of the initial radius of the flux rope in its evolution; the results indicate that a flux rope with a larger initial radius erupts more easily. In addition, by using a realistic plasma environment and a much higher resolution in our simulations, we notice some different characteristics compared to previous studies in Forbes. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China.

  13. An Analysis of the Muon-Like Events as the Fully Contained Events in the Super-Kamiokande through the Computer Numerical Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konishi, E.; Minorikawa, Y.; Galkin, V.I.; Ishiwata, M.; Nakamura, I.; Takahashi, N.; Kato, M.; Misaki, A.

    We analyze the muon-like Events(single ring image ) in the Super-Kamiokande (SK) by the Computer Numerical Experiment. Assuming the parameters of the neutrino oscillation obtained by the SK which characterize the type of the neutrino oscillation, we reproduce the zenith angle distribution of the muon-like events and compare it with the real distribution obtained by the SK . Also, we carry out the L/E analysis of the muon-like events by the Computer Numerical Experiment and compare it with that by the SK.

  14. Age and School Experience as Factors in Rule Utilization: Use of a Simple Addition Rule. Final Report, Part 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goulet, L. R.

    This study attempted to investigate the effects of school experience on performance on visual perception tests involving line figures and forms. The subjects were 120 first grade students selected from two public schools in the same community. The experiment involved an Experimental Treatments X Age X Time of Testing factorial design. All subjects…

  15. Investigation of capillary nanosecond discharges in air at moderate pressure: comparison of experiments and 2D numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klochko, Andrei V.; Starikovskaia, Svetlana M.; Xiong, Zhongmin; Kushner, Mark J.

    2014-09-01

    Nanosecond electrical discharges in the form of ionization waves are of interest for rapidly ionizing and exciting complex gas mixtures to initiate chemical reactions. Operating with a small discharge tube diameter can significantly increase the specific energy deposition and so enable optimization of the initiation process. Analysis of the uniformity of energy release in small diameter capillary tubes will aid in this optimization. In this paper, results for the experimentally derived characteristics of nanosecond capillary discharges in air at moderate pressure are presented and compared with results from a two-dimensional model. The quartz capillary tube, having inner and outer diameters of 1.5 and 3.4 mm, is about 80 mm long and filled with synthetic dry air at 27 mbar. The capillary tube with two electrodes at the ends is inserted into a break of the central wire of a long coaxial cable. A metal screen around the tube is connected to the cable ground shield. The discharge is driven by a 19 kV 35 ns voltage pulse applied to the powered electrode. The experimental measurements are conducted primarily by using a calibrated capacitive probe and back current shunts. The numerical modelling focuses on the fast ionization wave (FIW) and the plasma properties in the immediate afterglow after the conductive plasma channel has been established between the two electrodes. The FIW produces a highly focused region of electric field on the tube axis that sustains the ionization wave that eventually bridges the electrode gap. Results from the model predict FIW propagation speed and current rise time that agree with the experiment.

  16. Impact of dilution on microbial community structure and functional potential: comparison of numerical simulations and batch culture experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, R. B.; Garland, J. L.; Bolster, C. H.; Mills, A. L.

    2001-01-01

    A series of microcosm experiments was performed using serial dilutions of a sewage microbial community to inoculate a set of batch cultures in sterile sewage. After inoculation, the dilution-defined communities were allowed to regrow for several days and a number of community attributes were measured in the regrown assemblages. Based upon a set of numerical simulations, community structure was expected to differ along the dilution gradient; the greatest differences in structure were anticipated between the undiluted-low-dilution communities and the communities regrown from the very dilute (more than 10(-4)) inocula. Furthermore, some differences were expected among the lower-dilution treatments (e.g., between undiluted and 10(-1)) depending upon the evenness of the original community. In general, each of the procedures used to examine the experimental community structures separated the communities into at least two, often three, distinct groups. The groupings were consistent with the simulated dilution of a mixture of organisms with a very uneven distribution. Significant differences in community structure were detected with genetic (amplified fragment length polymorphism and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism), physiological (community level physiological profiling), and culture-based (colony morphology on R2A agar) measurements. Along with differences in community structure, differences in community size (acridine orange direct counting), composition (ratio of sewage medium counts to R2A counts, monitoring of each colony morphology across the treatments), and metabolic redundancy (i.e., generalist versus specialist) were also observed, suggesting that the differences in structure and diversity of communities maintained in the same environment can be manifested as differences in community organization and function.

  17. Modeling of Ionic Conductivity Enhancement of LiClO4-PVA-C System by TiO2 Addition Using Complex Numerical Model of PDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokrollahi, Mahvash; Semnani, Dariush; Morshed, Mohammad; Rezaei, Behzad; Mirsoofian, Mehdi

    2013-12-01

    PVA-TiO2 nanocomposite polymer electrolytes (PEs) were produced with different amounts of TiO2 (0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 wt.%) using the electrospinning process. Morphological studies of PVA-TiO2 nanofibers were accomplished with SEM. PVA-TiO2 membranes exhibited a high porosity of 79-91%. The impedance results showed that incorporation of TiO2 into the nanofiber membrane improved its ionic conductivity from 0.7 × 10-5 to 2.5 × 10-5 S/cm at room temperature. Nanofiber PEs showed very good reversibility and electrochemical stability up to 4.7 V. Diffusion coefficient of Li ion into PVA-TiO2 nanocomposite PEs was estimated by using a complex numerical model of partial differential equation for evaluation of ion transmission. Diffusion coefficient of PVA-TiO2 PEs containing different amounts of TiO2 (0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 wt.%) increased with increasing the nanoparticles content.

  18. A continuous microwave discharge maintained by two crossing millimeter-wave beams in hydrogen and argon: numerical simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, V. V.; Gorbachev, A. M.; Vikharev, A. L.; Radishev, D. B.; Kozlov, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    The results of numerical simulation of a continuous microwave discharge in two crossing wave beams of 30 GHz radiation in a mixture of hydrogen and argon are presented. The model describes the steady state of the gas discharge in Ar-H2-H through the self-consistent solution of the following equations: Maxwell’s equations, the electron balance equation, the transport of hydrogen atoms in the ternary mixture, the heat conduction equation and the equation of state of ideal gas. In Maxwell’s equations the effect of the plasma is taken into account through the conduction current. It is assumed that the generation of electrons occurs due to ionization processes and their loss occurs due to processes of electron-ion recombination and ambipolar diffusion. In the model the heat transfer is considered to be due to gas thermal conductivity and transfer of dissociation energy through the flow of hydrogen atoms. The gas pressure is assumed to be constant, and convection effects are neglected. The other approximations and reductions used in the model are discussed. The adequacy of the obtained model is confirmed by comparing the calculation results to experimental data. For comparison the distributions of gas temperature along the substrate in the center of the discharge and the atomic hydrogen flow to the substrate are used. The temperature is experimentally obtained through the analysis of the optical emission of the C2 Swan line. The atomic hydrogen flow to the substrate is measured from the etching of graphite samples imbedded into the substrate. The possibility of obtaining large-area uniform plasma layers in hydrogen with a small addition of methane is predicted. The applications of such gas discharge are discussed.

  19. Development of a Two-fluid Drag Law for Clustered Particles using Direct Numerical Simulation and Validation through Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gokaltun, Seckin; Munroe, Norman; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2014-12-31

    This study presents a new drag model, based on the cohesive inter-particle forces, implemented in the MFIX code. This new drag model combines an existing standard model in MFIX with a particle-based drag model based on a switching principle. Switches between the models in the computational domain occur where strong particle-to-particle cohesion potential is detected. Three versions of the new model were obtained by using one standard drag model in each version. Later, performance of each version was compared against available experimental data for a fluidized bed, published in the literature and used extensively by other researchers for validation purposes. In our analysis of the results, we first observed that standard models used in this research were incapable of producing closely matching results. Then, we showed for a simple case that a threshold is needed to be set on the solid volume fraction. This modification was applied to avoid non-physical results for the clustering predictions, when governing equation of the solid granular temperate was solved. Later, we used our hybrid technique and observed the capability of our approach in improving the numerical results significantly; however, improvement of the results depended on the threshold of the cohesive index, which was used in the switching procedure. Our results showed that small values of the threshold for the cohesive index could result in significant reduction of the computational error for all the versions of the proposed drag model. In addition, we redesigned an existing circulating fluidized bed (CFB) test facility in order to create validation cases for clustering regime of Geldart A type particles.

  20. Properties of Ductile Shear Zones Below Strike-Slip Faults: Insights From Numerical Experiments Incorporating Laboratory-Derived Rheologies (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fialko, Y. A.; Takeuchi, C. S.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the long-term evolution of stress and strain in a ductile substrate driven by far-field plate motion and slip on a vertical transform fault cutting through the brittle crust. Numerical models that incorporate laboratory-derived power-law rheologies with Arrhenius temperature dependence, viscous dissipation, and conductive heat transfer give rise to long-lived fault "roots" that localize deformation below the brittle-ductile transition. Strain localization in the viscoelastic medium in this case results from thermomechanical coupling and power law dependence of strain rate on stress. For conditions corresponding to the San Jacinto and San Andreas Faults in Southern California, the predicted width of the shear zone in the lower crust is a few kilometers; this shear zone accommodates more than 50% of the far-field plate motion. Coupled thermomechanical models predict a single-layer lithosphere in case of "dry" composition of the lower crust and upper mantle, and a "jelly sandwich" lithosphere in case of "wet" composition. Deviatoric stress in the lithosphere in our models is relatively insensitive to the water content, the far-field loading rate, and the fault strength, and is of the order of 102 MPa. Furthermore, stress in the lithosphere is found to inversely correlate with the velocity of relative plate motion. Somewhat surprisingly, we find that the thermally-activated shear zones have little effect on postseismic relaxation. In particular, the presence of such zones does not change the polarity of vertical displacements in cases of rheologies that are able to generate robust postseismic transients. We conclude that additional (to thermomechanical coupling) mechanisms of strain localization are required for a viscoelastic model to produce a vertical deformation pattern similar to that due to afterslip on a deep extension of a fault. Possible candidates include dynamic grain re-crystallization, and fabric development (mylonitization).

  1. New observations by visualizing age stratification and internal dynamics of freshwater lenses in heterogeneous media - laboratory experiments and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeckl, L.; Dose, E.; Houben, G.; Himmelsbach, T.

    2012-12-01

    We performed a series of multi-tracer laboratory scale experiments in a transparent sand-box model to visualize (a) processes during the genesis of freshwater lenses and (b) their internal dynamics. For physical modeling an acrylic glass box was used to simulate a cross section of an island, similar to Stoeckl & Houben (2012). Degassed salt water with a density of 1023 kg/m3 was injected from the bottom, saturating the sand inside the model. Fluorescent tracer dyes uranine, eosine and indigotine were used to mark the infiltrating fresh water from the top. All experiments were filmed and analyzed using fast motion mode. We performed two different types of experimental set-up according to Vacher (1988): (1) Layers of different hydraulic conductivity: By filling the sand-box model with sand of different grain sizes, layers of different hydraulic conductivity could be simulated. (2) Recharge distribution: By recharging the island heterogeneously we could observe shifts in the geometry of the freshwater lens. A novel approach of using different tracer colors and varying them spatially and over time within the recharge waters allowed us to visualize and measure internal flow processes. Age stratification and flow paths could therefore be investigated. Moreover, a combination of temporal and spatial tracer color variation in one single experiment enabled us to measure flow velocities of freshwater movement. Additionally, by injecting small amounts of tracer in the salt water environment, movements near the interface between fresh- and saltwater could be observed. Using the finite element model FEFLOW we could model the density driven dynamics of our small scale freshwater lens, including its formation and the degradation after turning off the recharge water. This is important to fill the gap between our physical sand-box model and ongoing field investigations. The main focus of this work is the effects of climate change as well as geological and morphological

  2. Numerical Experiments Using a Convective Flux Limiter on a Turbulent Single-Mode Rayleigh-Taylor Instability

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L.D.

    2000-07-10

    Direct numerical simulation and large eddy simulations are powerful tools for studying turbulent flows. Unfortunately, they are computationally demanding in terms of run times, storage, and accuracy of the numerical method used. In particular, high order methods promise high accuracy on a given grid, but they often fail to deliver the expected accuracy due to dispersive truncation errors that appear as unphysical oscillations in the numerical solutions. This report describes a nonlinear flux limiter that has been applied to the second-order tensor viscosity method and markedly reduces the dispersive truncation errors. A Rayleigh-Taylor instability is simulated to show how well the flux limiter works.

  3. Independent and additive contributions of postvictory testosterone and social experience to the development of the winner effect.

    PubMed

    Fuxjager, Matthew J; Oyegbile, Temitayo O; Marler, Catherine A

    2011-09-01

    The processes through which salient social experiences influence future behavior are not well understood. Winning fights, for example, can increase the odds of future victory, yet little is known about the internal mechanisms that underlie such winner effects. Here, we use the territorial California mouse (Peromyscus californicus) to investigate how the effects of postvictory testosterone (T) release and winning experience individually mediate positive changes in future winning ability and antagonistic behavior. Male mice were castrated and implanted with T capsules to maintain basal levels of this hormone. We found that males form a robust winner effect if they win three separate territorial disputes and experience a single T surge roughly 45 min after each encounter. Meanwhile, males exhibit only an intermediate winner effect if they either 1) acquire three previous wins but do not experience a change in postvictory T or 2) acquire no previous wins but experience three separate T pulses. The results indicate that the effect of postvictory T must be coupled with that of winning experience to trigger the maximum positive shift in winning ability, which highlights the importance of social context in the development of the winner effect. At the same time, however, postvictory T and winning experience are each capable of increasing future winning ability independently, and this finding suggests that these two factors drive plasticity in antagonistic behavior via distinct mechanistic channels. More broadly, our data offer insight into the possible ways in which various species might be able to adjust their behavioral repertoire in response to social interactions through mechanisms that are unlinked from the effects of gonadal steroid action.

  4. Current research activities: Applied and numerical mathematics, fluid mechanics, experiments in transition and turbulence and aerodynamics, and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, fluid mechanics including fluid dynamics, acoustics, and combustion, aerodynamics, and computer science during the period 1 Apr. 1992 - 30 Sep. 1992 is summarized.

  5. Super-thermal particles in hot plasmas—Kinetic models, numerical solution strategies, and comparison to tokamak experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauber, Philipp

    2013-12-01

    The excitation of collective instabilities by super-thermal particles in hot plasmas and the related transport processes attract increasing interest due to their fundamental challenges for theoretical models and their practical importance for burning fusion plasmas. In fact, the physics of a self-heated thermonuclear plasma due to fusion-born 3.5 MeV α-particles is one of the most important outstanding fundamental research topics on the way to a fusion power plant with magnetic confinement. Within the last 10 years significant advances on both the theoretical and the experimental sides have been made leading to a more detailed and quantitative understanding of fast-particle-driven instabilities. On the theoretical side, the crucial step was to move from fluid models for the plasma background with a hybrid kinetic expression for the energetic particles to a fully kinetic model for all the plasma species, i.e. background ions, background electrons, and fast ions. This improvement allows one to describe consistently the resonant interaction between global plasma waves such as shear Alfvén and Alfvén-acoustic waves, and the particles via Landau damping, i.e. the dynamics parallel to the magnetic background field. Also, mode conversion mechanisms require the inclusion of background ion scales in a kinetic, non-perturbative way. This accurate treatment of the plasma background leads not only to changes in the linear mode properties such as frequency, growth/damping rate, and mode structure but also influences the non-linear dynamics. Due to major advances, innovations and installation of diagnostics in present day experiments, this comparison can be carried out in a more detailed and comprehensive way than a few years ago. For example, the measurement of damping rates via active external antennas, the imaging of 2D mode structures via electron-cyclotron-emission spectroscopy, and the direct detection of escaping fast ions allow to diagnose various kinetic features of

  6. Reflections on Doctoral Supervision: Drawing from the Experiences of Students with Additional Learning Needs in Two Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Bethan

    2015-01-01

    Supervision is an essential part of doctoral study, consisting of relationship and process aspects, underpinned by a range of values. To date there has been limited research specifically about disabled doctoral students' experiences of supervision. This paper draws on qualitative, narrative interviews about doctoral supervision with disabled…

  7. Examining the Influence of Additional Field-Based Experiences on Pre-Service Teachers and Their Perceived Ability to Teach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Sarah K.

    2012-01-01

    In an attempt to analyse more closely the training experiences of pre-service teachers, the author conducted an exploratory quasi-experimental study at a university located in the Rocky Mountain region of the USA. All students who were enrolled in the same reading methods course (but enrolled in different sections) were invited to participate in…

  8. [Additional memory load causes changes in induced EEG beta-rhythm in experiments with a visual set formed to facial expression].

    PubMed

    Iakovenko, I A; Kozlov, M K; Cheremushkin, E A

    2012-01-01

    Subjects were divided into two equal groups 35 healthy subjects each. Formation of the visual set to facial emotion recognition was supplemented with two types of additional task: either visuospatial (to find a target stimulus among others) or verbal (to tell a word from a pseudoword). The results of the experiments were compared to those obtained in similar experiments without the memory load. Changes in the EEG beta rhythm during visual set forming and testing were studied. The EEG was analyzed by wavelet transformation. Changes in the mean level, maximum and latency of the maximum of wavelet coefficient were rated at different stages of the experiment. All these characteristics for the beta rhythm were higher in experiments with both types of additional memory load as compared to those without the memory load.

  9. East Asian International Student Experiences as Learners of English as an Additional Language: Implications for School Counsellors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popadiuk, Natalee E.; Marshall, Steve

    2011-01-01

    In the school counselling literature, little focus is placed on international students who are learners of English as an Additional Language (EAL) and on school counselling support related to their language acquisition. Using the Critical Incident Technique, we analyzed transcripts of 21 international EAL students from China, Japan, and Korea who…

  10. The effects of the addition of a pediatric surgery fellow on the operative experience of the general surgery resident.

    PubMed

    Raines, Alexander; Garwe, Tabitha; Adeseye, Ademola; Ruiz-Elizalde, Alejandro; Churchill, Warren; Tuggle, David; Mantor, Cameron; Lees, Jason

    2015-06-01

    Adding fellows to surgical departments with residency programs can affect resident education. Our specific aim was to evaluate the effect of adding a pediatric surgery (PS) fellow on the number of index PS cases logged by the general surgery (GS) residents. At a single institution with both PS and GS programs, we examined the number of logged cases for the fellows and residents over 10 years [5 years before (Time 1) and 5 years after (Time 2) the addition of a PS fellow]. Additionally, the procedure related relative value units (RVUs) recorded by the faculty were evaluated. The fellows averaged 752 and 703 cases during Times 1 and 2, respectively, decreasing by 49 (P = 0.2303). The residents averaged 172 and 161 cases annually during Time 1 and Time 2, respectively, decreasing by 11 (P = 0.7340). The total number of procedure related RVUs was 4627 and 6000 during Times 1 and 2, respectively. The number of cases logged by the PS fellows and GS residents decreased after the addition of a PS fellow; however, the decrease was not significant. Programs can reasonably add an additional PS fellow, but care should be taken especially in programs that are otherwise static in size.

  11. Effects of biochar addition on greenhouse gas emissions and microbial responses in a short-term laboratory experiment.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Gayoung; Kang, Hojeong

    2012-01-01

    Biochar application to soil has drawn much attention as a strategy to sequester atmospheric carbon in soil ecosystems. The applicability of this strategy as a climate change mitigation option is limited by our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the observed changes in greenhouse gas emissions from soils, microbial responses, and soil fertility changes. We conducted an 8-wk laboratory incubation using soils from PASTURE (silt loam) and RICE PADDY (silt loam) sites with and without two types of biochar (biochar from swine manure [CHAR-M] and from barley stover [CHAR-B]). Responses to addition of the different biochars varied with the soil source. Addition of CHAR-B did not change CO and CH evolution from the PASTURE or the RICE PADDY soils, but there was a decrease in NO emissions from the PASTURE soil. The effects of CHAR-M addition on greenhouse gas emissions were different for the soils. The most substantial change was an increase in NO emissions from the RICE PADDY soil. This result was attributed to a combination of abundant denitrifiers in this soil and increased net nitrogen mineralization. Soil phosphatase and N-acetylglucosaminidase activity in the CHAR-B-treated soils was enhanced compared with the controls for both soils. Fungal biomass was higher in the CHAR-B-treated RICE PADDY soil. From our results, we suggest CHAR-B to be an appropriate amendment for the PASTURE and RICE PADDY soils because it provides increased nitrogen availability and microbial activity with no net increase in greenhouse gas emissions. Application of CHAR-M to RICE PADDY soils could result in excess nitrogen availability, which may increase NO emissions and possible NO leaching problems. Thus, this study confirms that the ability of environmentally sound biochar additions to sequester carbon in soils depends on the characteristics of the receiving soil as well as the nature of the biochar.

  12. Comparison of 2D and 3D Numerical Models with Experiments of Tsunami Flow through a Built Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeVeque, R. J.; Motley, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    A series of tsunami wave basin experiments of flow through a scale model of Seaside, Oregon have been used as validation data for a 2015 benchmarking workshop hosted by the National Tsunami Mitigation Program, which focused on better understanding the ability of tsunami models to predict flow velocities and inundation depths following a coastal inundation event. As researchers begin to assess the safety of coastal infrastructures, proper assessment of tsunami-induced forces on coastal structures is critical. Hydrodynamic forces on these structures are fundamentally proportional to the local momentum flux of the fluid, and experimental data included momentum flux measurements at many instrumented gauge locations. The GeoClaw tsunami model, which solves the two-dimensional shallow water equations, was compared against other codes during the benchmarking workshop, and more recently a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics model using the open-source OpenFOAM software has been developed and results from this model are being compared with both the experimental data and the 2D GeoClaw results. In addition, the 3D model allows for computation of fluid forces on the faces of structures, permitting an investigation of the common use of momentum flux as a proxy for these forces. This work aims to assess the potential to apply these momentum flux predictions locally within the model to determine tsunami-induced forces on critical structures. Difficulties in working with these data sets and cross-model comparisons will be discussed. Ultimately, application of the more computationally efficient GeoClaw model, informed by the 3D OpenFOAM models, to predict forces on structures at the community scale can be expected to improve the safety and resilience of coastal communities.

  13. Evaluation of ground-penetrating radar to detect free-phase hydrocarbons in fractured rocks - Results of numerical modeling and physical experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lane, J.W.; Buursink, M.L.; Haeni, F.P.; Versteeg, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    The suitability of common-offset ground-penetrating radar (GPR) to detect free-phase hydrocarbons in bedrock fractures was evaluated using numerical modeling and physical experiments. The results of one- and two-dimensional numerical modeling at 100 megahertz indicate that GPR reflection amplitudes are relatively insensitive to fracture apertures ranging from 1 to 4 mm. The numerical modeling and physical experiments indicate that differences in the fluids that fill fractures significantly affect the amplitude and the polarity of electromagnetic waves reflected by subhorizontal fractures. Air-filled and hydrocarbon-filled fractures generate low-amplitude reflections that are in-phase with the transmitted pulse. Water-filled fractures create reflections with greater amplitude and opposite polarity than those reflections created by air-filled or hydrocarbon-filled fractures. The results from the numerical modeling and physical experiments demonstrate it is possible to distinguish water-filled fracture reflections from air- or hydrocarbon-filled fracture reflections, nevertheless subsurface heterogeneity, antenna coupling changes, and other sources of noise will likely make it difficult to observe these changes in GPR field data. This indicates that the routine application of common-offset GPR reflection methods for detection of hydrocarbon-filled fractures will be problematic. Ideal cases will require appropriately processed, high-quality GPR data, ground-truth information, and detailed knowledge of subsurface physical properties. Conversely, the sensitivity of GPR methods to changes in subsurface physical properties as demonstrated by the numerical and experimental results suggests the potential of using GPR methods as a monitoring tool. GPR methods may be suited for monitoring pumping and tracer tests, changes in site hydrologic conditions, and remediation activities.The suitability of common-offset ground-penetrating radar (GPR) to detect free-phase hydrocarbons

  14. An Experiment Comparing the Effectiveness of Low Cost Instructional Simulation Against High Cost Equipment Utilization in Teaching Numerical Control Principles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rummell, Winfield Raymond

    This study was designed to investigate the effectiveness of low cost instructional simulation, with numerical control (N/C) used as the subject vehicle. A unit of study was developed that included a detailed list of the behavioral changes which were desired for the students and the instructional materials and procedures deemed necessary for aiding…

  15. Project Fog Drops 5. Task 1: A numerical model of advection fog. Task 2: Recommendations for simplified individual zero-gravity cloud physics experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, C. W.; Eadie, W. J.; Katz, U.; Kocmond, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    A two-dimensional numerical model was used to investigate the formation of marine advection fog. The model predicts the evolution of potential temperature, horizontal wind, water vapor content, and liquid water content in a vertical cross section of the atmosphere as determined by vertical turbulent transfer and horizontal advection, as well as radiative cooling and drop sedimentation. The model is designed to simulate the formation, development, or dissipation of advection fog in response to transfer of heat and moisture between the atmosphere and the surface as driven by advection over horizontal discontinuities in the surface temperature. Results from numerical simulations of advection fog formation are discussed with reference to observations of marine fog. A survey of candidate fog or cloud microphysics experiments which might be performed in the low gravity environment of a shuttle-type spacecraft in presented. Recommendations are given for relatively simple experiments which are relevent to fog modification problems.

  16. Thermal and Mechanical Non-Equilibrium Effects on Turbulent Flows: Fundamental Studies of Energy Exchanges Through Direct Numerical Simulations, Molecular Simulations and Experiments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-26

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0104 Thermal and mechanical non-equilibrium effects on turbulent flows:fundamental studies of energy exchanges through direct ...flows: fundamental studies of energy exchanges through direct numerical simulations, molecular simulations and experiments 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...control of basic fluid dynamic processes is of direct relevance to AFOSR scientific objectives especially for turbulence flows. The very limited

  17. Importance of root HTO uptake in controlling land-surface tritium dynamics after an-acute HT deposition: a numerical experiment.

    PubMed

    Ota, Masakazu; Nagai, Haruyasu; Koarashi, Jun

    2012-07-01

    To investigate the role of belowground root uptake of tritiated water (HTO) in controlling land-surface tritium (T) dynamics, a sophisticated numerical model predicting tritium behavior in an atmosphere-vegetation-soil system was developed, and numerical experiments were conducted using the model. The developed model covered physical tritiated hydrogen (HT) transport in a multilayered atmosphere and soil, as well as microbial oxidation of HT to HTO in the soil, and it was incorporated into a well-established HTO-transfer organically bound tritium (OBT)-formation model. The model performance was tested through the simulation of an existing HT-release experiment. Numerical experiments involving a hypothetical acute HT exposure to a grassland field with a range of rooting depths showed that the HTO release from the leaves to the atmosphere, driven by the root uptake of the deposited HTO, can exceed the HTO evaporation from the ground surface to the atmosphere when root water absorption preferentially occurs beneath the ground surface. Such enhanced soil-leaf-atmosphere HTO transport, caused by the enhanced root HTO uptake, increased HTO concentrations in both the surface atmosphere and in the cellular water of the leaf. Consequently, leaf OBT assimilation calculated for shallow rooting depths increased by nearly an order of magnitude compared to that for large rooting depths.

  18. Microstructural Stability of Nanocrystalline Copper through the Addition of Antimony Dopants at Grain Boundaries: Experiments and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Rajgarhia, Rahul K.; Saxena, Ashok; Spearot, Douglas; Hartwig, Ted; More, Karren Leslie; Meyer III, Harry M; Kenik, Edward A

    2010-01-01

    Experiments and simulations show that the microstructural stability of nanocrystalline Cu can be improved by adding impurity atoms, such as Sb, which migrate to the grain boundaries. Cu100-xSbx alloys are cast in three compositions (Cu-0.0, 0.2 and 0.5 at.%Sb) and subsequently processed into nanocrystalline form by equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE). The presence of Sb atoms at the grain boundaries increases the recrystallization temperature to 400 C compared to 200 C for pure nanocrystalline Cu, which was verified by measurements of microhardness, ultimate tensile strength, grain size using TEM, and Auger electron spectroscopy. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed using a wider range of Sb compositions (0.0 to 1.0 at.%Sb) to study the underlying mechanisms associated with stability. MD simulations show that Sb atoms reduce excess grain boundary energy and that 0.2 and 0.5 at.%Sb is enough to stabilize the nanocrystalline Cu microstructure.

  19. The newer aspect of dexmedetomidine use in dentistry: As an additive to local anesthesia, initial experience, and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prashant; Thepra, Manju; Bhagol, Amrish; Priya, Kannu; Singh, Virendra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Despite the availability of a wide variety of pharmacological agents in the field of anesthesia, there has always been a continuous search for newer local anesthetic agents with improved efficacy, potency, and better handling properties. Dexmedetomidine, a selective alpha-2 adrenergic receptor agonist, is an emerging agent for provision of additive local anesthetic effect if used with conventional local anesthetics, which can be implicated in dentistry for performing many minor oral surgical procedures. The present paper reports a pilot study comparing clinical efficacy and potency of this newer emerging drug in combination with lignocaine. Materials and Methods: Ten patients undergoing orthodontic extraction for correction of malocclusion and other dentofacial deformities requiring orthodontic treatment were locally infiltrated with 2% lignocaine plus dexmedetomidine 1μ/ml and 2% lignocaine plus adrenaline in 1:200,000 dilution at two different appointments. The onset of action, duration of action, and pain threshold were assessed. Results: Onset of action was found to be faster with longer duration of action with the newer drug dexmedetomidine and lignocaine combination when compared with combination of lignocaine and adrenaline. Conclusion: The study demonstrated that the combination of dexmedetomidine with lignocaine enhances the local anesthetic potency of lignocaine without significant systemic effects when locally injected into oral mucosa. PMID:28163484

  20. Forestry Impacts on Mercury Mobility, Methylation, and Bioaccumulation - A Field Experiment with Enriched Stable Mercury Isotope Additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Carl; Haynes, Kristine; Mazur, Maxwell; Fidler, Nathan; Eckley, Chris; Kolka, Randy; Eggert, Susan; Sebestyen, Stephen

    2013-04-01

    Forest harvesting has clear impacts on terrestrial hydrology at least over the short term. Similar biogeochemical impacts, such as augmented mercury fluxes or downstream impacts on ecosystems are not as clear, and recent studies have not demonstrated consistent or predictable impacts across systems. To gain a better process understanding of mercury cycling in upland forest-lowland peatland ecosystems, we undertook a field-scale experiment at a study site in northern Minnesota (USA) where shallow subsurface hillslope runoff flows into an adjacent peatland ecosystem. Starting in 2009, three upland forest plots (< 1 hectare each) were delineated and hydrometric infrastructure such as runoff trenches, snow lysimeters, soil moisture probes, shallow piezometers, and throughfall gauges were installed in each plot. We added 14.2 to 16.7 μg/m2 of enriched mercury-200 and mercury-204 (as dilute mercuric nitrate) in the spring of 2011 and 2012, respectively, to distinguish between contemporary and legacy mercury and to provide some insight into the duration of contemporary mercury mobility in impacted terrestrial ecosystems. During the late winter of 2012, one of the study plots was clearcut and approximately 80% of slash was removed. We clearcut a second plot without slash removal, and left the third plot as a control. Throughout the study, we have monitored (including isotopes): mercury in runoff, soil-air gaseous Hg fluxes, methylation potentials in the adjacent peatland, and bioaccumulation into invertebrates inhabiting the adjacent peatland. Early results mostly indicate that slash removal actually lessens the impacts of clearcutting on mercury mobility (although forest harvesting in general does have a significant impact) and that forestry operations at this scale have little to no impact on methylation or bioaccumulation in downstream peatlands. Thus far, the greatest impact of slash removal in forest harvested systems is an increase in mercury evasion, likely as a

  1. Effect of pore size on bone ingrowth into porous titanium implants fabricated by additive manufacturing: An in vivo experiment.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Naoya; Fujibayashi, Shunsuke; Takemoto, Mitsuru; Sasaki, Kiyoyuki; Otsuki, Bungo; Nakamura, Takashi; Matsushita, Tomiharu; Kokubo, Tadashi; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2016-02-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) is an additive manufacturing technique with the ability to produce metallic scaffolds with accurately controlled pore size, porosity, and interconnectivity for orthopedic applications. However, the optimal pore structure of porous titanium manufactured by SLM remains unclear. In this study, we evaluated the effect of pore size with constant porosity on in vivo bone ingrowth in rabbits into porous titanium implants manufactured by SLM. Three porous titanium implants (with an intended porosity of 65% and pore sizes of 300, 600, and 900μm, designated the P300, P600, and P900 implants, respectively) were manufactured by SLM. A diamond lattice was adapted as the basic structure. Their porous structures were evaluated and verified using microfocus X-ray computed tomography. Their bone-implant fixation ability was evaluated by their implantation as porous-surfaced titanium plates into the cortical bone of the rabbit tibia. Bone ingrowth was evaluated by their implantation as cylindrical porous titanium implants into the cancellous bone of the rabbit femur for 2, 4, and 8weeks. The average pore sizes of the P300, P600, and P900 implants were 309, 632, and 956μm, respectively. The P600 implant demonstrated a significantly higher fixation ability at 2weeks than the other implants. After 4weeks, all models had sufficiently high fixation ability in a detaching test. Bone ingrowth into the P300 implant was lower than into the other implants at 4weeks. Because of its appropriate mechanical strength, high fixation ability, and rapid bone ingrowth, our results indicate that the pore structure of the P600 implant is a suitable porous structure for orthopedic implants manufactured by SLM.

  2. Numerical Modeling of Complex Targets for High-Energy- Density Experiments with Ion Beams and other Drivers

    DOE PAGES

    Koniges, Alice; Liu, Wangyi; Lidia, Steven; ...

    2016-04-01

    We explore the simulation challenges and requirements for experiments planned on facilities such as the NDCX-II ion accelerator at LBNL, currently undergoing commissioning. Hydrodynamic modeling of NDCX-II experiments include certain lower temperature effects, e.g., surface tension and target fragmentation, that are not generally present in extreme high-energy laser facility experiments, where targets are completely vaporized in an extremely short period of time. Target designs proposed for NDCX-II range from metal foils of order one micron thick (thin targets) to metallic foam targets several tens of microns thick (thick targets). These high-energy-density experiments allow for the study of fracture as wellmore » as the process of bubble and droplet formation. We incorporate these physics effects into a code called ALE-AMR that uses a combination of Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian hydrodynamics and Adaptive Mesh Refinement. Inclusion of certain effects becomes tricky as we must deal with non-orthogonal meshes of various levels of refinement in three dimensions. A surface tension model used for droplet dynamics is implemented in ALE-AMR using curvature calculated from volume fractions. Thick foam target experiments provide information on how ion beam induced shock waves couple into kinetic energy of fluid flow. Although NDCX-II is not fully commissioned, experiments are being conducted that explore material defect production and dynamics.« less

  3. Numerical Modeling of Complex Targets for High-Energy- Density Experiments with Ion Beams and other Drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Koniges, Alice; Liu, Wangyi; Lidia, Steven; Schenkel, Thomas; Barnard, John; Friedman, Alex; Eder, David; Fisher, Aaron; Masters, Nathan

    2016-04-01

    We explore the simulation challenges and requirements for experiments planned on facilities such as the NDCX-II ion accelerator at LBNL, currently undergoing commissioning. Hydrodynamic modeling of NDCX-II experiments include certain lower temperature effects, e.g., surface tension and target fragmentation, that are not generally present in extreme high-energy laser facility experiments, where targets are completely vaporized in an extremely short period of time. Target designs proposed for NDCX-II range from metal foils of order one micron thick (thin targets) to metallic foam targets several tens of microns thick (thick targets). These high-energy-density experiments allow for the study of fracture as well as the process of bubble and droplet formation. We incorporate these physics effects into a code called ALE-AMR that uses a combination of Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian hydrodynamics and Adaptive Mesh Refinement. Inclusion of certain effects becomes tricky as we must deal with non-orthogonal meshes of various levels of refinement in three dimensions. A surface tension model used for droplet dynamics is implemented in ALE-AMR using curvature calculated from volume fractions. Thick foam target experiments provide information on how ion beam induced shock waves couple into kinetic energy of fluid flow. Although NDCX-II is not fully commissioned, experiments are being conducted that explore material defect production and dynamics.

  4. Numerical Modeling of Complex Targets for High-Energy- Density Experiments with Ion Beams and other Drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koniges, Alice; Liu, Wangyi; Lidia, Steven; Schenkel, Thomas; Barnard, John; Friedman, Alex; Eder, David; Fisher, Aaron; Masters, Nathan

    2016-03-01

    We explore the simulation challenges and requirements for experiments planned on facilities such as the NDCX-II ion accelerator at LBNL, currently undergoing commissioning. Hydrodynamic modeling of NDCX-II experiments include certain lower temperature effects, e.g., surface tension and target fragmentation, that are not generally present in extreme high-energy laser facility experiments, where targets are completely vaporized in an extremely short period of time. Target designs proposed for NDCX-II range from metal foils of order one micron thick (thin targets) to metallic foam targets several tens of microns thick (thick targets). These high-energy-density experiments allow for the study of fracture as well as the process of bubble and droplet formation. We incorporate these physics effects into a code called ALE-AMR that uses a combination of Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian hydrodynamics and Adaptive Mesh Refinement. Inclusion of certain effects becomes tricky as we must deal with non-orthogonal meshes of various levels of refinement in three dimensions. A surface tension model used for droplet dynamics is implemented in ALE-AMR using curvature calculated from volume fractions. Thick foam target experiments provide information on how ion beam induced shock waves couple into kinetic energy of fluid flow. Although NDCX-II is not fully commissioned, experiments are being conducted that explore material defect production and dynamics.

  5. Atmospheric test models and numerical experiments for the simulation of the global distribution of weather data transponders

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, A; Molenkamp, C R

    1999-08-25

    A proposal has been made to establish a high density global network of atmospheric micro transponders to record time, temperature, and wind data with time resolution of {le} 1 minute, temperature accuracy of {+-} 1 K, spatial resolution no poorer than {approx}3km horizontally and {approx}0.1km vertically, and 2-D speed accuracy of {le} 1m/s. This data will be used in conjunction with advanced numerical weather prediction models to provide increases in the reliability of long range weather forecasts. Major advances in data collection technology will be required to provide the proposed high-resolution data collection network. Systems studies must be undertaken to determine insertion requirements, spacing, and evolution of the transponder ensemble, which will be used to collect the data. Numerical models which provide realistic global weather pattern simulations must be utilized in order to perform these studies. A global circulation model with a 3{sup o} horizontal resolution has been used for initial simulations of the generation and evolution of transponder distributions. These studies indicate that reasonable global coverage of transponders can be achieved by a launch scenario consisting of the sequential launch of transponders at specified heights from a globally distributed set of launch sites.

  6. Numerical Experiments on Land Surface Alterations with a Zonal Model Allowing for Interaction between the Geobotanic State and Climate.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutman, George

    1984-09-01

    A zonally-averaged steady-state hemispheric mean-annual climate model is used for conducting a series of experiments on land surface alterations: desertification, deforestation and irrigation. In each experiment a fixed perturbation of surface albedo and water availability is imposed in a single latitude belt (but a different perturbation is specified in each experiment). The desertification and deforestation experiments simulate modifications to the geobotanic state due to destruction of vegetation by overgrazing and excessive cultivation of the land in the semiarid and tropical zones, respectively. The irrigation experiment simulates the climatic impact of massive irrigation of the desert belt.Results indicate that the effect of changes in evapotranspiration rather than in surface albedo is predominant in regulating the surface temperature. It is shown that the impact of biofeedback is strongest in the area adjacent to the perturbation zone. It is also concluded that the prescribed perturbations of the geobotanic state are not sufficient to modify climate to an extent that these perturbations would persist.

  7. Experiments and numerical simulations of nonlinear vibration responses of an assembly with friction joints - Application on a test structure named "Harmony"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claeys, M.; Sinou, J.-J.; Lambelin, J.-P.; Todeschini, R.

    2016-03-01

    In presence of friction, the frequency response function of a metallic assembly is strongly dependent on the excitation level. The local stick-slip behavior at the friction interfaces induces energy dissipation and local stiffness softening. These phenomena are studied both experimentally and numerically on a test structure named "Harmony". Concerning the numerical part, a classical complete methodology from the finite element and friction modeling to the prediction of the nonlinear vibrational response is implemented. The well-known Harmonic Balance Method with a specific condensation process on the nonlinear frictional elements is achieved. Also, vibration experiments are performed to validate not only the finite element model of the test structure named "Harmony" at low excitation levels but also to investigate the nonlinear behavior of the system on several excitation levels. A scanning laser vibrometer is used to measure the nonlinear behavior and the local stick-slip movement near the contacts.

  8. Atmospheric Test Models and Numerical Experiments for the Simulation of the Global Distributions of Weather Data Transponders III. Horizontal Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Molenkamp, C.R.; Grossman, A.

    1999-12-20

    A network of small balloon-borne transponders which gather very high resolution wind and temperature data for use by modern numerical weather predication models has been proposed to improve the reliability of long-range weather forecasts. The global distribution of an array of such transponders is simulated using LLNL's atmospheric parcel transport model (GRANTOUR) with winds supplied by two different general circulation models. An initial study used winds from CCM3 with a horizontal resolution of about 3 degrees in latitude and longitude, and a second study used winds from NOGAPS with a 0.75 degree horizontal resolution. Results from both simulations show that reasonable global coverage can be attained by releasing balloons from an appropriate set of launch sites.

  9. Application of Microneedle Arrays for Enhancement of Transdermal Permeation of Insulin: In Vitro Experiments, Scaling Analyses and Numerical Simulations.

    PubMed

    Leeladurga, V; Teja, U Chandra; Sultana, S K Ashraf; Sudeep, K; Anusha, V Sai Sri; Han, Tao; Nalluri, Buchi N; Das, Diganta B

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this investigation is to study the effect of donor concentration and microneedle (MN) length on permeation of insulin and further evaluating the data using scaling analyses and numerical simulations. Histological evaluation of skin sections was carried to evaluate the skin disruption and depth of penetration by MNs. Scaling analyses were done using dimensionless parameters like concentration of drug (C t/C s), thickness (h/L) and surface area of the skin (S a/L (2)). Simulation studies were carried out using MATLAB and COMSOL software to simulate the insulin permeation using histological sections of MN-treated skin and experimental parameters like passive diffusion coefficient. A 1.6-fold increase in transdermal flux and 1.9-fold decrease in lag time values were observed with 1.5 mm MN when compared with passive studies. Good correlation (R (2) > 0.99) was observed between different parameters using scaling analyses. Also, the in vitro and simulated permeations profiles were found to be similar (f 2 ≥ 50). Insulin permeation significantly increased with increase in donor concentration and MN length (p < 0.05). The developed scaling correlations and numerical simulations were found to be accurate and would help researchers to predict the permeation of insulin with new dimensions of MN in optimizing insulin delivery. Overall, it can be inferred that the application of MNs can significantly enhance insulin permeation and may be an efficient alternative for injectable insulin therapy in humans.

  10. Laboratory-scale experiments and numerical modeling of cosolvent flushing of multi-component NAPLs in saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agaoglu, Berken; Scheytt, Traugott; Copty, Nadim K.

    2012-10-01

    This study examines the mechanistic processes governing multiphase flow of a water-cosolvent-NAPL system in saturated porous media. Laboratory batch and column flushing experiments were conducted to determine the equilibrium properties of pure NAPL and synthetically prepared NAPL mixtures as well as NAPL recovery mechanisms for different water-ethanol contents. The effect of contact time was investigated by considering different steady and intermittent flow velocities. A modified version of multiphase flow simulator (UTCHEM) was used to compare the multiphase model simulations with the column experiment results. The effect of employing different grid geometries (1D, 2D, 3D), heterogeneity and different initial NAPL saturation configurations was also examined in the model. It is shown that the change in velocity affects the mass transfer rate between phases as well as the ultimate NAPL recovery percentage. The experiments with low flow rate flushing of pure NAPL and the 3D UTCHEM simulations gave similar effluent concentrations and NAPL cumulative recoveries. Model simulations over-estimated NAPL recovery for high specific discharges and rate-limited mass transfer, suggesting a constant mass transfer coefficient for the entire flushing experiment may not be valid. When multi-component NAPLs are present, the dissolution rate of individual organic compounds (namely, toluene and benzene) into the ethanol-water flushing solution is found not to correlate with their equilibrium solubility values.

  11. Numerical Simulation and Experiments of Fatigue Crack Growth in Multi-Layer Structures of MEMS and Microelectronic Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    simulations of fatigue crack growth are conducted by use of cohesive zone models. Both, a damage mechanics based model as well as a model based on dislocation...conducted by use of cohesive zone models. Both, a damage mechanics based model as well as a model based on dislocation mechanics are employed. To...Paris-law type response obtained in experiments, and also predicts that for thinner films the tendency to crack. Damage tolerant design requires

  12. Preliminary numerical modeling for the G-Tunnel welded tuff mining experiment; Yucca Mountain site characterization project

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.L.; Bauer, S.J.

    1991-09-01

    Yucca Mountain, located in Southern Nevada, is to be considered as a potential site for a nuclear waste repository. Located in Rainier Mesa on the Nevada Test Site, G-Tunnel has been the site of a series of experiments, part of whose purpose is to evaluate measurement techniques for rock mechanics before testing in the Exploratory Shaft. Rainier Mesa is composed of welded and nonwelded tuffs that have thermal and mechanical properties and stress states similar to those of tuffs expected to be encountered at Yucca Mountain. A series of finite element calculations were performed to aid in designing instrumentation for the experiments in G-Tunnel and later to correlate with measured data. In this report are presented the results of the preliminary finite element calculations performed in conjunction with experimental measurements of drift convergence, or closure, and rock mass relaxation zones made before, during, and after completing the welded tuff mining experiment in G-Tunnel. Tape extensometer measurements of drift convergences and measurements determined by multiple point borehole extensometers are compared with corresponding calculated values using linear elastic and jointed rock material models. 9 refs., 25 figs., 7 tabs.

  13. UV-VIS backscattering measurements on atmospheric particles mixture using polarization lidar coupled with numerical simulations and laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miffre, Alain; Francis, Mirvatte; Anselmo, Christophe; Rairoux, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    As underlined by the latest IPCC report [1], tropospheric aerosols are nowadays recognized as one of the main uncertainties affecting the Earth's climate and human health. This issue is not straightforward due to the complexity of these nanoparticles, which present a wide range of sizes, shapes and chemical composition, which vary as a function of altitude, especially in the troposphere, where strong temperature variations are encountered under different water vapour content (from 10 to 100 % relative humidity). During this oral presentation, I will first present the scientific context of this research. Then, the UV-VIS polarimeter instrument and the subsequent calibration procedure [2] will be presented, allowing quantitative evaluation of particles backscattering coefficients in the atmosphere. In this way, up to three-component particles external mixtures can be partitioned into their spherical and non-spherical components, by coupling UV-VIS depolarization lidar measurements with numerical simulations of backscattering properties specific to non-spherical particles, such as desert dust or sea-salt particles [3], by applying the T-matrix numerical code [4]. This combined methodology is new, as opposed to the traditional approach using the lidar and T-matrix methodologies separately. In complement, recent laboratory findings [5] and field applications [6] will be presented, enhancing the sensitivity of the UV-VIS polarimeter. References [1] IPCC report, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, IPCC, (2013). [2] G. David, A. Miffre, B. Thomas, and P. Rairoux: "Sensitive and accurate dual-wavelength UV-VIS polarization detector for optical remote sensing of tropospheric aerosols," Appl. Phys. B 108, 197-216 (2012). [3] G. David, B. Thomas, T. Nousiainen, A. Miffre and P. Rairoux: "Retrieving simulated volcanic, desert dust, and sea-salt particle properties from two / three-component particle mixtures using UV-VIS polarization Lidar and T-matrix," Atmos. Chem Phys

  14. Effect of volcano ash additions on nutrient concentrations, bloom dynamics and community metabolism in a short-term experiment in the NW Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinbauer, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Volcano ash deposition is now considered as an important source of inorganic bioavailable iron which can relieve Fe-limitation in the ocean. As volcano ash also releases PO4, a experiment was performed in the NW Mediterranean Sea to test whether volcano ash deposition can affect nutrient dynamics and bloom development in a P-limited system. In a 54h experiment, it was shown that the development of a phytoplankton bloom was not enhanced or even repressed by ash additions of 2 and 20 mg l-1, whereas higher ash concentrations (200 mg l-1) induced a phytoplankton bloom as indicated by elevated Chlorophyll-a levels. Concurrently, net community production (NCP) and gross primary production (GPP) were enhanced at T24h at the highest ash additions. The metabolic balance was roughly neutral at low or no ash additions, but shifted towards phototrophy at the highest ash additions. The data on inorganic nutrient development and release estimates from ash material assays suggest relieving of P-limitation concomitant with NO3 and silicate use from ash. The concentration of TEP increased with increasing ash levels. The abundances of the heterotrophic compartment (bacteria, viruses and ciliates) also indicated dose-dependent responses. Our data suggest that heterotrophs won the competition for inorganic nutrients at ash levels of 2 and 20 mg l-1, whereas phytoplankton won at levels of 200 mg l-1. Overall, our experiments point to a strong potential of volcano ash deposition as forcing factor for nutrient dynamics and the activity of microbial plankton in a P-limited system.

  15. Study of the diffusion of an emulsion in the human skin by pulsed photoacoustic spectroscopy: experiment and numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benamar, N.; Lahjomri, F.; Chatri, E.; Leblanc, R. M.

    2004-12-01

    We previously used the Pulsed Photoacoustic Spectroscopy to quantify sunscreen chromophore diffusion into human skin, and suggested a methodology to evaluate the time and the depth diffusion profile into human skin. In the present study we present the results obtained for the diffusion of an emulsion in human skin, which is used in the sunscreen compositions. This study shows, for the first time, a particular behaviour due to a chemical reaction inside the skin during the diffusion process. This result brings a particularly interesting technique through the PPAS spectroscopy, to evaluate in situ, the eventual chemical reactions that can occur during drug diffusion into human skin. Numerical simulation allows us to understand the impact of thermal, optical and geometrical parameters on the photoacoustic signal and thus the physics of the diffusion phenomenon. The present simulation shows clearly that the tmax values corresponding to the maximum of the photoacoustic signal magnitude, Δ P max, decrease when the thickness, ell , of the sample decrease. Conclusions about possibilities and limitations of the considered model are discussed.

  16. Comparison of Sound Pressure Distribution Determined by Numerical Analysis and Scaled-Up Experiment for Small Ultrasonic Probe with Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Takenobu; Matsumoto, Sayuri; Naitou, Fumitaka; Takahashi, Mari; Endoh, Nobuyuki

    2009-07-01

    Ultrasonic medical equipment is used in not only diagnosis but also therapy such as that for treating hyperthermia. Many researchers are also studying high-frequency ultrasonic imaging systems with interluminal or catheter transducers. In both applications, an acoustic lens might improve the characteristics of ultrasonic medical probes. In this paper, a small acoustic lens for an ultrasonic catheter-type probe is described. The conventional three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (3D FDTD) with orthogonal coordinates requires a large memory and a long calculation time to estimate the characteristics of the lens. To overcome these disadvantages, a simple two-dimensional (2D) FDTD calculation based on symmetry is proposed in this paper. A virtual spherical sound source whose amplitude distribution is equal to that of the sound propagation field of an actual sound source is also used to simplify the calculation. A numerical model of the lens with a lens holder is constructed. The experimental results agree well with the calculated results with the lens holder.

  17. Numerical experiment about the arrangement determination of multiple bluff cylinders which obtain the most suitable new type stir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoi, Yoshifumi

    2016-03-01

    When developing the stirring rod for mixing two liquid with which the densities into which gas melted differ in little stirring operation, verification of the stirring effect was performed in the numerical simulation using a vortex method. Since it is calculation for specification examination of the preceding paragraph which creates a producing model, it becomes important to obtain a calculation result early and to feed back to the design. Two dimension calculation of the double file circular cylinder group which carried out staggered arrangement of the nine circular cylinders was performed. The aspects of the flow which strayed off from the design point or the design point were shown. The mixed degree was judged from the degree of the complexity of the flow pattern. In a design point, the complicated flow by a vortex is formed with oscillating 1 period, and interference stirring occurs. Adaptation ranges other than a design point are that the ranges of the value of P/L are 0.8-1.2.

  18. A field experiment and numerical modeling of a tracer at a gravel beach in Prince William Sound, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Qiaona; Li, Hailong; Boufadel, Michel C.; Liu, Jin

    2014-12-01

    Oil from the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill persists in many gravel beaches in Prince William Sound (Alaska, USA), despite great remedial efforts. A tracer study using lithium at a gravel beach on Knight Island, Prince William Sound, during the summer of 2008 is reported. The tracer injection and transport along a transect were simulated using the two-dimensional numerical model MARUN. Model results successfully reproduced the tracer concentrations observed at wells along the transect. A sensitivity analysis revealed that the estimated parameters are well determined. The simulated spatial distribution of tracer indicated that nutrients applied along the transect for bioremediation purposes would be washed to the sea very quickly (within a semi-diurnal tidal cycle) by virtue of the combination of the two-layered beach structure, the tidal fluctuation and the freshwater flow from inland. Thus, pore-water samples in the transect were found to be clean due to factors other than bioremediation. This may explain why the oil did not persist within the transect.

  19. Continuation of full-scale three-dimensional numerical experiments on high-intensity particle and laser beam-matter interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Warren, B.

    2012-12-01

    We present results from the grant entitled, Continuation of full-scale three-dimensional numerical experiments on high-intensity particle and laser beam-matter interactions. The research significantly advanced the understanding of basic high-energy density science (HEDS) on ultra intense laser and particle beam plasma interactions. This advancement in understanding was then used to to aid in the quest to make 1 GeV to 500 GeV plasma based accelerator stages. The work blended basic research with three-dimensions fully nonlinear and fully kinetic simulations including full-scale modeling of ongoing or planned experiments. The primary tool was three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The simulations provided a test bed for theoretical ideas and models as well as a method to guide experiments. The research also included careful benchmarking of codes against experiment. High-fidelity full-scale modeling provided a means to extrapolate parameters into regimes that were not accessible to current or near term experiments, thereby allowing concepts to be tested with confidence before tens to hundreds of millions of dollars were spent building facilities. The research allowed the development of a hierarchy of PIC codes and diagnostics that is one of the most advanced in the world.

  20. Surface dynamics of crude and weathered oil in the presence of dispersants: Laboratory experiment and numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, Alexander V.; Haus, Brian. K.; McGauley, Michael G.; Dean, Cayla W.; Ortiz-Suslow, David G.; Laxague, Nathan J. M.; Özgökmen, Tamay M.

    2016-05-01

    Marine oil spills can have dire consequences for the environment. Research on their dynamics is important for the well-being of coastal communities and their economies. Propagation of oil spills is a very complex physical-chemical process. As seen during the Deepwater Horizon event in the Gulf of Mexico during 2010, one of the critical problems remaining for prediction of oil transport and dispersion in the marine environment is the small-scale structure and dynamics of surface oil spills. The laboratory experiments conducted in this work were focused on understanding the differences between the dynamics of crude and weathered oil spills and the effect of dispersants. After deposition on the still water surface, a drop of crude oil quickly spread into a thin slick; while at the same time, a drop of machine (proxy for weathered) oil did not show significant evolution. Subsequent application of dispersant to the crude oil slick resulted in a quick contraction or fragmentation of the slick into narrow wedges and tiny drops. Notably, the slick of machine oil did not show significant change in size or topology after spraying dispersant. An advanced multi-phase, volume of fluid computational fluid dynamics model, incorporating capillary forces, was able to explain some of the features observed in the laboratory experiment. As a result of the laboratory and modeling experiments, the new interpretation of the effect of dispersant on the oil dispersion process including capillary effects has been proposed, which is expected to lead to improved oil spill models and response strategies.

  1. Numerical modeling of gun experiments with impact velocities less than SDT threshold: Thermal explosion initiated by friction heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barfield, W. D.

    1982-01-01

    One and two dimensional calculations were made to model thermal explosion ignited by friction heat, hypothesized as an initiation mechanism for the unknown XDT phenomenon that is responsible for detonations observed in gun experiments with impact velocities less than threshold for shock to detonation transition. Preliminary results suggest that friction induced thermal explosion would be quenched by cooling associated with side rarefactions after penetrating only a thin layer of the propellant. Other effects would be expected to increase the calculated heating rates or speed up the friction induced thermal explosion. For this reason, friction cannot be ruled out as an initiation mechanism on the basis of the results described.

  2. Comparison of SSM/I measurements to numerically-simulated cloud and precipitation during ERICA. [Experiment for Rapidly Intesifying Cyclones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkey, Donald J.; Robertson, Franklin R.; Lapenta, William M.; Cohen, Charles

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between the moisture fields and the cyclone event that occurred on January 4-5, 1989 over Atlantic was investigated using preliminary 140-km and 70-km simulations of this cyclone, generated by a 3D version of the Drexel LAMPS, along with digital imagery from the SSM/I sensor. As the source of data, a sounding data set was obtained from the Experiment for Rapidly Intensifying Cyclones over the Atlantic (ERICA) Data Center. It was found that the 70-km integration produces a realistic moisture and cloud field as judged against passive microwave and IR imagery.

  3. Numerical Boundary Condition Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Topics include numerical procedures for treating inflow and outflow boundaries, steady and unsteady discontinuous surfaces, far field boundaries, and multiblock grids. In addition, the effects of numerical boundary approximations on stability, accuracy, and convergence rate of the numerical solution are discussed.

  4. Numerical simulation of air- and water-flow experiments in a block of variably saturated, fractured tuff from Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Kwicklis, E.M.; Healy, R.W.; Thamir, F.; Hampson, D.

    1998-11-01

    Numerical models of water movement through variably saturated, fractured tuff have undergone little testing against experimental data collected from relatively well-controlled and characterized experiments. This report used the results of a multistage experiment on a block of variably saturated, fractured, welded tuff and associated core samples to investigate if those results could be explained using models and concepts currently used to simulate water movement in variably saturated, fractured tuff at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the potential location of a high-level nuclear-waste repository. Aspects of the experiment were modeled with varying degrees of success. Imbibition experiments performed on cores of various lengths and diameters were adequately described by models using independently measured permeabilities and moisture-characteristic curves, provided that permeability reductions resulting from the presence of entrapped air were considered. Entrapped gas limited maximum water saturations during imbibition to approximately 0.70 to 0,80 of the fillable porosity values determined by vacuum saturation. A numerical simulator developed for application to fluid flow problems in fracture networks was used to analyze the results of air-injection tests conducted within the tuff block through 1.25-cm-diameter boreholes. These analyses produced estimates of transmissivity for selected fractures within the block. Transmissivities of other fractures were assigned on the basis of visual similarity to one of the tested fractures. The calibrated model explained 53% of the observed pressure variance at the monitoring boreholes (with the results for six outliers omitted) and 97% of the overall pressure variance (including monitoring and injection boreholes) in the subset of air-injection tests examined.

  5. Complexities in barrier island response to sea level rise: Insights from numerical model experiments, North Carolina Outer Banks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Laura J.; List, Jeffrey H.; Williams, S. Jeffress; Stolper, David

    2010-09-01

    Using a morphological-behavior model to conduct sensitivity experiments, we investigate the sea level rise response of a complex coastal environment to changes in a variety of factors. Experiments reveal that substrate composition, followed in rank order by substrate slope, sea level rise rate, and sediment supply rate, are the most important factors in determining barrier island response to sea level rise. We find that geomorphic threshold crossing, defined as a change in state (e.g., from landward migrating to drowning) that is irreversible over decadal to millennial time scales, is most likely to occur in muddy coastal systems where the combination of substrate composition, depth-dependent limitations on shoreface response rates, and substrate erodibility may prevent sand from being liberated rapidly enough, or in sufficient quantity, to maintain a subaerial barrier. Analyses indicate that factors affecting sediment availability such as low substrate sand proportions and high sediment loss rates cause a barrier to migrate landward along a trajectory having a lower slope than average barrier island slope, thereby defining an "effective" barrier island slope. Other factors being equal, such barriers will tend to be smaller and associated with a more deeply incised shoreface, thereby requiring less migration per sea level rise increment to liberate sufficient sand to maintain subaerial exposure than larger, less incised barriers. As a result, the evolution of larger/less incised barriers is more likely to be limited by shoreface erosion rates or substrate erodibility making them more prone to disintegration related to increasing sea level rise rates than smaller/more incised barriers. Thus, the small/deeply incised North Carolina barriers are likely to persist in the near term (although their long-term fate is less certain because of the low substrate slopes that will soon be encountered). In aggregate, results point to the importance of system history (e

  6. An instrumental and numerical method to determine the hydrogenic ratio in isotopic experiments in the TJ-II stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Baciero, A. Zurro, B.; Martínez, M.

    2014-11-15

    The isotope effect is an important topic that is relevant for future D-T fusion reactors, where the use of deuterium, rather than hydrogen, may lean to improved plasma confinement. An evaluation of the ratio of hydrogen/deuterium is needed for isotope effect studies in current isotopic experiments. Here, the spectral range around H{sub α} and D{sub α} lines, obtained with an intensified multi-channel detector mounted to a 1-m focal length spectrometer, is analyzed using a fit function that includes several Gaussian components. The isotopic ratio evolution for a single operational day of the TJ-II stellarator is presented. The role of injected hydrogen by Neutral Beam Injection heating is also studied.

  7. The effects of boundary conditions on the steady-state response of three hypothetical ground-water systems; results and implications of numerical experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franke, O. Lehn; Reilly, Thomas E.

    1987-01-01

    The most critical and difficult aspect of defining a groundwater system or problem for conceptual analysis or numerical simulation is the selection of boundary conditions . This report demonstrates the effects of different boundary conditions on the steady-state response of otherwise similar ground-water systems to a pumping stress. Three series of numerical experiments illustrate the behavior of three hypothetical groundwater systems that are rectangular sand prisms with the same dimensions but with different combinations of constant-head, specified-head, no-flow, and constant-flux boundary conditions. In the first series of numerical experiments, the heads and flows in all three systems are identical, as are the hydraulic conductivity and system geometry . However, when the systems are subjected to an equal stress by a pumping well in the third series, each differs significantly in its response . The highest heads (smallest drawdowns) and flows occur in the systems most constrained by constant- or specified-head boundaries. These and other observations described herein are important in steady-state calibration, which is an integral part of simulating many ground-water systems. Because the effects of boundary conditions on model response often become evident only when the system is stressed, a close match between the potential distribution in the model and that in the unstressed natural system does not guarantee that the model boundary conditions correctly represent those in the natural system . In conclusion, the boundary conditions that are selected for simulation of a ground-water system are fundamentally important to groundwater systems analysis and warrant continual reevaluation and modification as investigation proceeds and new information and understanding are acquired.

  8. Forearc uplift in northern Chile: New paleoaltimetric methods, constraints, and numerical experiments on the role of subduction channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosentino, Nicolas Juan

    The lithosphere-scale geodynamic mechanisms that control forearc topography are still contentious. In northern Chile, this is in part due to a lack of paleoelevation constraints. In order to rectify this lack of data, this thesis carries out a series of studies. First, a new paleoaltimetry proxy for the hyperarid Atacama Desert was developed, based on the elevation-dependent relationship of the 87Sr/86Sr ratio of Holocene surface accumulations of salts. Here, an important source of calcium sulfate comes from stratocumulus clouds that generate fog on the continent, transferring water droplets to the ground surface which, upon evaporation, precipitate calcium sulfate. The seawater ratio of 87Sr/86Sr (0.70917) is distinctly higher than that of weathered mean Andean rock (<0.70750). Sites below 1075 m.a.s.l. and above 225 m.a.s.l. display Holocene calcium sulfate 87Sr/86Sr of mean value 0.70807 ± 0.00004, while the ratio outside this altitudinal domain is 0.70746 ± 0.00010. Based on these results for Holocene materials, Pliocene-Pleistocene paleoelevations of the forearc surface were inferred. We measured 87Sr/86Sr of dated ancient gypsic soils and applied appropriate corrections to the paleo-fog zone top and bottom. The results show that the magnitudes of paleo-elevation changes are small compared to the elevation of the study area: more than 45% of the 1000 m.a.s.l. average elevation of the Central Depression and more than 70% of the 900 m.a.s.l. average elevation of the westernmost Coastal Cordillera were achieved by pre-early Pliocene regional scale tectonic processes. Finally, the response of the forearc surface to 2D viscoelastic flow in a subduction channel was characterized numerically. 800-1100-m-thick subduction channels with viscosities of 5-10 x1018 Pa s best fit the elevations of the Central Depression after steady-state topography is reached in less than 6 myr. The onset of hyperaridity at 25 Ma starved the trench and subduction channel of sediments

  9. Kinetics of the addition of olefins to Si-centered radicals: the critical role of dispersion interactions revealed by theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Erin R; Clarkin, Owen J; Dale, Stephen G; DiLabio, Gino A

    2015-06-04

    Solution-phase rate constants for the addition of selected olefins to the triethylsilyl and tris(trimethylsilyl)silyl radicals are measured using laser-flash photolysis and competition kinetics. The results are compared with predictions from density functional theory (DFT) calculations, both with and without dispersion corrections obtained from the exchange-hole dipole moment (XDM) model. Without a dispersion correction, the rate constants are consistently underestimated; the errors increase with system size, up to 10(6) s(-1) for the largest system considered. Dispersion interactions preferentially stabilize the transition states relative to the separated reactants and bring the DFT-calculated rate constants into excellent agreement with experiment. Thus, dispersion interactions are found to play a key role in determining the kinetics for addition reactions, particularly those involving sterically bulky functional groups.

  10. Unification of dynamic density functional theory for colloidal fluids to include inertia and hydrodynamic interactions: derivation and numerical experiments.

    PubMed

    Goddard, B D; Nold, A; Savva, N; Yatsyshin, P; Kalliadasis, S

    2013-01-23

    Starting from the Kramers equation for the phase-space dynamics of the N-body probability distribution, we derive a dynamical density functional theory (DDFT) for colloidal fluids including the effects of inertia and hydrodynamic interactions (HI). We compare the resulting theory to extensive Langevin dynamics simulations for both hard rod systems and three-dimensional hard sphere systems with radially symmetric external potentials. As well as demonstrating the accuracy of the new DDFT, by comparing with previous DDFTs which neglect inertia, HI, or both, we also scrutinize the significance of including these effects. Close to local equilibrium we derive a continuum equation from the microscopic dynamics which is a generalized Navier-Stokes-like equation with additional non-local terms governing the effects of HI. For the overdamped limit we recover analogues of existing configuration-space DDFTs but with a novel diffusion tensor.

  11. Numerical investigation of solidification and CET of the transparent alloy NPG-37.5 wt.% DC in microgravity “TRACE” experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadein, M.; Wu, M.; Sturz, L.; Zimmermann, G.; Ludwig, A.

    2016-03-01

    A solidification experiment “TRACE” of the transparent alloy Neopentylglycol (NPG)-37.5wt.% D-Camphor (DC) was conducted on-board the sounding rocket TEXUS-47 in low-gravity environment to investigate the columnar growth and the columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET). To improve the fundamental understanding of solidification and CET in microgravity, the current laboratory scale experiment was tried to be numerically reproduced by a recently developed 5-phase volume averaging model. The temperature gradient in the solidification cell is applied to the simulation. In absence of melt flow, the calculated cooling curves, columnar tip position, tip undercooling and velocity, and number density of equiaxed crystals were compared to the results of in-situ real-time observations of the experiment. The CET could be predicted at position close to that of experiment. Simulation reveals the competitive growth between the columnar and equiaxed crystals before CET. Modelling parameters of equiaxed nucleation and columnar tip growth are the key to regulate this competition and to locate the CET. Experimental verification of modelling parameters considering melt flow is intended in the future work.

  12. Response of aboveground biomass and diversity to nitrogen addition – a five-year experiment in semi-arid grassland of Inner Mongolia, China

    PubMed Central

    He, Kejian; Qi, Yu; Huang, Yongmei; Chen, Huiying; Sheng, Zhilu; Xu, Xia; Duan, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the response of the plant community to increasing nitrogen (N) deposition is helpful for improving pasture management in semi-arid areas. We implemented a 5-year N addition experiment in a Stipa krylovii steppe of Inner Mongolia, northern China. The aboveground biomass (AGB) and species richness were measured annually. Along with the N addition levels, the species richness declined significantly, and the species composition changed noticeably. However, the total AGB did not exhibit a noticeable increase. We found that compensatory effects of the AGB occurred not only between the grasses and the forbs but also among Gramineae species. The plant responses to N addition, from the community to species level, lessened in dry years compared to wet or normal years. The N addition intensified the reduction of community productivity in dry years. Our study indicated that the compensatory effects of the AGB among the species sustained the stability of grassland productivity. However, biodiversity loss resulting from increasing N deposition might lead the semi-arid grassland ecosystem to be unsustainable, especially in dry years. PMID:27573360

  13. Response of aboveground biomass and diversity to nitrogen addition – a five-year experiment in semi-arid grassland of Inner Mongolia, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Kejian; Qi, Yu; Huang, Yongmei; Chen, Huiying; Sheng, Zhilu; Xu, Xia; Duan, Lei

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the response of the plant community to increasing nitrogen (N) deposition is helpful for improving pasture management in semi-arid areas. We implemented a 5-year N addition experiment in a Stipa krylovii steppe of Inner Mongolia, northern China. The aboveground biomass (AGB) and species richness were measured annually. Along with the N addition levels, the species richness declined significantly, and the species composition changed noticeably. However, the total AGB did not exhibit a noticeable increase. We found that compensatory effects of the AGB occurred not only between the grasses and the forbs but also among Gramineae species. The plant responses to N addition, from the community to species level, lessened in dry years compared to wet or normal years. The N addition intensified the reduction of community productivity in dry years. Our study indicated that the compensatory effects of the AGB among the species sustained the stability of grassland productivity. However, biodiversity loss resulting from increasing N deposition might lead the semi-arid grassland ecosystem to be unsustainable, especially in dry years.

  14. Influence of surface slope and roughness on the shape of river basins: a comparison between nature and numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamato, Philippe; Castelltort, Sébastien; Willett, Sean

    2010-05-01

    The last two decades have been marked by a large amount of studies on the relative influences of climate and tectonics on landscape evolution. Coevally, considerable advances have been achieved in numerical modelling of landscape evolution. These have been particularly useful in testing hypotheses and scenarios of the potential controls and feedbacks between climate, tectonics and landscape evolution. However, our current knowledge of the physical processes of erosion in nature remains incomplete. Indeed, although the predictions of landscape evolution models are often insightful, they are also sometimes overlooked due to their lack of physical basis. In parallel with current field and experimental investigations on erosion processes, one way to tackle this problem is to compare simulated and natural landscapes. Then, this allows us to know how can one assess whether a simulated landscape is realistic in a long-standing problem in geomorphology. The scaling between stream length and upstream drainage area, a relation known as Hack's law (Hack, 1957) provides a constrain on the geometry of natural landscapes. It is however notoriously difficult to use this law to assess the goodness of a landscape evolution model since it must be regarded over a logarithmic range of scales (stream orders), which is usually not possible in landscape evolution models because of their resolution. The convergence angle, a measure of a basin's elongation (Castelltort et al., 2009) is a similar metrics of drainage basin shape. It is controlled by the slope and roughness of the undissected surface on which a new basin develops. This relation arises from analytical predictions of water flow over simple topography and is supported by data on median to large-scale natural networks. In the present study we investigate the influence of slope and surface roughness on the shape of river basins using the CASCADE code (Braun and Sambridge, 1997). Results show that the rules used to route water in

  15. A numerical study of winter orographic seeding experiments in Korea using the Weather Research and Forecasting model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang Ki; Yum, Seong Soo; Park, Young-San

    2016-02-01

    Ice nucleation processes by silver iodide were parameterized and implemented into the Weather Research and Forecasting model to perform winter orographic cloud seeding experiment in an eastern mountainous region of the Korean Peninsula. Cloud seeding at a mountain site resulted in production of ice crystals, mostly by deposition and condensation freezing nucleation of seeding material and depletion of water drops by ice crystals themselves and by snow and graupel particles grown from these ice crystals but importantly precipitation increased over the target area to the west of the seeding site. Sensitivity test showed that increasing the release rate of seeding material led to enhanced precipitation. Interestingly, dominant ice crystal nucleation mode was different for different aerosol concentrations: deposition and condensation freezing nucleation were dominantly responsible for ice crystal formation for maritime aerosol type (i.e., low concentration) while the dominant mode was contact freezing nucleation for continental aerosol type (i.e., high concentration). When seeding material was released at a low-altitude site (i.e., upslope of mountain), it was not successfully transported upward to the target area but instead dispersed along the direction of the mountain ridges by the barrier jets.

  16. Revision and recalibration of existing shock classifications for quartzose rocks using low-shock pressure (2.5-20 GPa) recovery experiments and mesoscale numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowitz, Astrid; Güldemeister, Nicole; Schmitt, Ralf Thomas; Reimold, Wolf-Uwe; Wünnemann, Kai; Holzwarth, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    A combination of shock recovery experiments and numerical modeling of shock deformation in the low-shock pressure range from 2.5 to 20 GPa for two dry sandstone types of different porosity, a completely water-saturated sandstone, and a well-indurated quartzite provides new insights into strongly heterogeneous distribution of different shock features. (1) For nonporous quartzo-feldspathic rocks, the traditional classification scheme (Stöffler) is suitable with slight changes in pressure calibration. (2) For water-saturated quartzose rocks, a cataclastic texture (microbreccia) seems to be typical for the shock pressure range up to 20 GPa. This microbreccia does not show formation of PDFs but diaplectic quartz glass/SiO2 melt is formed at 20 GPa ( 1 vol%). (3) For porous quartzose rocks, the following sequence of shock features is observed with progressive increase in shock pressure (1) crushing of pores, (2) intense fracturing of quartz grains, and (3) increasing formation of diaplectic quartz glass/SiO2 melt replacing fracturing. The formation of diaplectic quartz glass/SiO2 melt, together with SiO2 high-pressure phases, is a continuous process that strongly depends on porosity. This experimental observation is confirmed by our concomitant numerical modeling. Recalibration of the shock classification scheme results in a porosity versus shock pressure diagram illustrating distinct boundaries for the different shock stages.

  17. Development of numerical model to investigate the laser driven shock waves from aluminum target into ambient air at atmospheric pressure and its comparison with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiva, S. Sai; Leela, Ch.; Chaturvedi, S.; Sijoy, C. D.; Kiran, P. Prem

    2017-01-01

    A one-dimensional, three-temperature (electron, ion and thermal radiation) numerical model was developed to study the laser induced shock wave (LISW) propagation from aluminum target in ambient air at atmospheric pressure. The hydrodynamic equations of mass, momentum and energy are solved by using an implicit scheme in Lagrangian form. The model considers the laser absorption to take place via inverse-bremsstrahlung due to electron-ion (e-i) process. The flux limited electron thermal energy transport due e-i and e-n thermal energy relaxation equations are solved implicitly. The experimental characterization of spatio-temporal evolution of the LISW in air generated by focusing a second harmonic (532 nm, 7ns) of Nd:YAG laser on to surface of Al is performed using shadowgraphy technique with a temporal resolution of 1.5 ns. The velocity of SW observed in the experiments over 0.2 µs-8 µs time scales was compared with the numerical results to understand the SW transition from planar to spherical evolution.

  18. Oxygenation to Bovine Blood in Artificial Heart and Lung Using Vibrating Flow Pump: Experiment and Numerical Analysis Based on Non-Newtonian Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shintaku, Hirofumi; Yonemura, Tsubasa; Tsuru, Kazuaki; Isoyama, Takashi; Yambe, Tomoyuki; Kawano, Satoyuki

    In this study, we construct an experimental apparatus for a prototype artificial heart and lung (AHL) by installing hollow fibers into the cylindrical tube of the vibrating flow pump (VFP). The oxygenation characteristics are investigated both by experiments using bovine blood and by numerical analyses based on the computational fluid dynamics. The analyses are carried out at the Reynolds numbers Re ranged from O(1) to O(103), which are determined based on the experimental conditions. The blood flow and the diffusion of oxygen gas are analyzed based on the Newtonian/non-Newtonian, unsteady, incompressible and axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations, and the advection-diffusion equation. The results show that the oxygenation rate increases in proportion to Re1/3, where the phenomenon corresponds to the decreasing thickness of the concentration boundary layer with Re. Although the effects of the vibrating flow and the rheology of the blood are clearly appeared on the velocity field, their effects on the gas exchange are relatively small at the ranges of prescribed Reynolds numbers. Furthermore, the numerical results in terms of the oxygenation rate are compared with the experimental ones. The basic design data of VFP were accumulated for the development of AHL in the clinical applications.

  19. Fracture toughness evaluation of 20MnMoNi55 pressure vessel steel in the ductile to brittle transition regime: Experiment & numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalan, Avinash; Samal, M. K.; Chakravartty, J. K.

    2015-10-01

    In this work, fracture behaviour of 20MnMoNi55 reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel in the ductile to brittle transition regime (DBTT) is characterised. Compact tension (CT) and single edged notched bend (SENB) specimens of two different sizes were tested in the DBTT regime. Reference temperature 'T0' was evaluated according to the ASTM E1921 standard. The effect of size and geometry on the T0 was studied and T0 was found to be lower for SENB geometry. In order to understand the fracture behaviour numerically, finite element (FE) simulations were performed using Beremin's model for cleavage and Rousselier's model for ductile failure mechanisms. The simulated fracture behaviour was found to be in good agreement with the experiment.

  20. Effects of initial iron corrosion rate on long-term performance of iron permeable reactive barriers: column experiments and numerical simulation.

    PubMed

    suk O, Jin; Jeen, Sung-Wook; Gillham, Robert W; Gui, Lai

    2009-01-26

    Column experiments and numerical simulation were conducted to test the hypothesis that iron material having a high corrosion rate is not beneficial for the long-term performance of iron permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) because of faster passivation of iron and greater porosity loss close to the influent face of the PRBs. Four iron materials (Connelly, Gotthart-Maier, Peerless, and ISPAT) were used for the column experiments, and the changes in reactivity toward cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) degradation in the presence of dissolved CaCO3 were evaluated. The experimental results showed that the difference in distribution of the accumulated precipitates, resulting from differences in iron corrosion rate, caused a difference in the migration rate of the cis-DCE profiles and a significant difference in the pattern of passivation, indicating a faster passivation in the region close to the influent end for the material having a higher corrosion rate. For the numerical simulation, the accumulation of secondary minerals and reactivity loss of iron were coupled using an empirically-derived relationship that was incorporated into a multi-component reactive transport model. The simulation results provided a reasonable representation of the evolution of iron reactivity toward cis-DCE treatment and the changes in geochemical conditions for each material, consistent with the observed data. The simulations for long-term performance were also conducted to further test the hypothesis and predict the differences in performance over a period of 40 years under typical groundwater conditions. The predictions showed that the cases of higher iron corrosion rates had earlier cis-DCE breakthrough and more reduction in porosity starting from near the influent face, due to more accumulation of carbonate minerals in that region. Therefore, both the experimental and simulation results appear to support the hypothesis and suggest that reactivity changes of iron materials resulting from

  1. Short range forecasting of sea breeze generated thunderstorms at the Kennedy Space Center: A real-time experiment using a primitive equation mesoscale numerical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, Walter A.; Schuh, Jerome A.; Moon, Dennis; Pielke, Roger A.; Cotton, William; Arritt, Raymond

    1987-01-01

    The operational efficiency of using guidance from a mesoscale numerical model to improve sea breeze thunderstorm forecasts at and around the Shuttle landing strip was assessed. The Prognostic Three-Dimensional Mesoscale (P3DM) model, developed as a sea breeze model, reveals a strong correlation between regions of mesoscale convergence and the triggering of sea breeze convection thunderstorms. The P3DM was modified to generate stability parameters familiar to the operational forecaster. In addition to the mesoscale fields of wind, vertical motion, moisture, temperature, a stability indicator, a combination of model-predicted K and Lifted Indices and the maximum grid cell vertical motion, were proposed and tested. Results of blind tests indicate that a forecaster, provided with guidance derived from model output, could improve local thunderstorm forecasts.

  2. Vineyard weeds control practices impact on surface water transfers: using numerical tracer experiment coupled to a distributed hydrological model to manage agricultural practices spatial arrangements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin, F.; Moussa, R.

    2009-04-01

    In rural basins, agricultural landscape management highly influences water and pollutants transfers. Landuse, agricultural practices and their spatial arrangements are at issue. Hydrological model are widely used to explore impacts of anthropogenic influences on experimental catchments. But planning all spatial arrangements leads to a possible cases count which cannot be considered. On the basis of the recent « numerical experiment » approach, we propose a « numerical tracer function » which had to be coupled to a distributed rainfall-runoff model. This function simulate the transfer of a virtual tracer successively spread on each distributed unit inside the catchment. It allows to rank hydrological spatial units according to their hydrological contribution to the surface flows, particularly at the catchment outlet. It was used with the distributed model MHYDAS in an agricultural context. The case study concerns the experimental Roujan vine-growing catchment (1km², south of France) studied since 1992. In this Mediterranean context, we focus on the soil hydraulic conductivity distributed parameter because it highly depends on weed control practices (chemical weeding induces a lot more runoff than mechanical weeding). We checked model sensitivity analysis to soil hydraulic conductivity spatial arrangement on runoff coefficient, peak discharge and catchment lag-time. Results show (i) the use of the tracer function is more efficient than a random approach to improve sensitivity to spatial arrangements from point of view of simulated discharge range, (ii) the first factor explaining hydrological simulations variability was practices area ratio, (iii) variability induced by practices spatial arrangements was significant on runoff coefficient and peak discharge for balanced practices area ratio and on lag-time for low area ratio of chemical weeding practices. From the actual situation on the experimental Roujan catchment (40% of tilled and 60% of non tilled vineyard

  3. Seismic reflection data imaging and interpretation from Braniewo2014 experiment using additional wide-angle refraction and reflection and well-logs data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trzeciak, Maciej; Majdański, Mariusz; Białas, Sebastian; Gaczyński, Edward; Maksym, Andrzej

    2015-04-01

    Braniewo2014 reflection and refraction experiment was realized in cooperation between Polish Oil and Gas Company (PGNiG) and the Institute of Geophysics (IGF), Polish Academy of Sciences, near the locality of Braniewo in northern Poland. PGNiG realized a 20-km-long reflection profile, using vibroseis and dynamite shooting; the aim of the reflection survey was to characterise Silurian shale gas reservoir. IGF deployed 59 seismic stations along this profile and registered additional full-spread wide-angle refraction and reflection data, with offsets up to 12 km; maximum offsets from the seismic reflection survey was 3 km. To improve the velocity information two velocity logs from near deep boreholes were used. The main goal of the joint reflection-refraction interpretation was to find relations between velocity field from reflection velocity analysis and refraction tomography, and to build a velocity model which would be consistent for both, reflection and refraction, datasets. In this paper we present imaging results and velocity models from Braniewo2014 experiment and the methodology we used.

  4. Effective discrepancy and numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varet, Suzanne; Lefebvre, Sidonie; Durand, Gérard; Roblin, Antoine; Cohen, Serge

    2012-12-01

    Many problems require the computation of a high dimensional integral, typically with a few tens of input factors, with a low number of integrand evaluations. To avoid the curse of dimensionality, we reduce the dimension before applying the Quasi-Monte Carlo method. We will show how to reduce the dimension by computing approximate Sobol indices of the variables with a two-levels fractional factorial design. Then, we will use the Sobol indices to define the effective discrepancy, which turns out to be correlated with the QMC error and thus enables one to choose a good sequence for the integral estimation.

  5. Co-addition of manure increases the dissipation rates of tylosin A and the numbers of resistance genes in laboratory incubation experiments.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Wang, Yan; Zou, Yong-De; Liao, Xin-Di; Liang, Juan-Boo; Xin, Wen; Wu, Yin-Bao

    2015-09-15

    The behavior of veterinary antibiotics in the soil is commonly studied using the following methods to add antibiotics to the soil: (A) adding manure collected from animals fed a diet that includes antibiotics; (B) adding antibiotic-free animal manure spiked with antibiotics; and (C) the direct addition of antibiotics. However, most studies have only used methods (B) and (C) in their research, and few studies have simultaneously compared the different antibiotic addition methods. This study used tylosin A (TYLA) as a model antibiotic to compare the effects of these three commonly used antibiotic addition methods on the dissipation rates of TYLA and the numbers of resistance genes in laboratory incubation experiments. The results showed that the three treatment methods produced similar TYLA degradation trends; however, there were significant differences (P<0.05) in the TYLA degradation half-life (t1/2) among the three methods. The half-life of TYLA degradation in treatments A, B and C was 2.44 ± 0.04, 1.21 ± 0.03 and 5.13 ± 0.11 days, respectively. The presence of manure resulted in a higher electrical conductivity (EC), higher relative abundance of Citrobacter amalonaticus, higher macrolide resistant gene (ermB, ermF and ermT) count and lower ecological toxicity in the soil, which could partially explain the higher TYLA degradation rate in the treatments containing manure. The higher degradation rate of TYLA in treatment B when compared to treatment A could be due to the lower concentrations of tylosin B (TYLB) and tylosin D (TYLD). The main route for veterinary antibiotics to enter the soil is via the manure of animals that have been administered antibiotics. Therefore, the more appropriate method to study the degradation and ecotoxicity of antibiotic residues in the soil is by using manure from animals fed/administered the particular antibiotic rather than by adding the antibiotic directly to the soil.

  6. Soil microbial biomass and community structure affected by repeated additions of sewage sludge in four Swedish long-term field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Börjesson, G.; Kätterer, T.; Kirchmann, H.

    2012-04-01

    Soil organic matter is a key attribute of soil fertility. The pool of soil organic C can be increased, either by mineral fertilisers or by adding organic amendments such as sewage sludge. Sewage sludge has positive effects on agricultural soils through the supply of organic matter and essential plant nutrients, but sludge may also contain unwanted heavy metals, xenobiotic substances and pathogens. One obvious effect of long-term sewage sludge addition is a decrease in soil pH, caused by N mineralisation followed by nitrification, sulphate formation and presence of organic acids with the organic matter added. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of sewage sludge on the microbial biomass and community structure. Materials and methods We analysed soil samples from four sites where sewage sludge has been repeatedly applied in long-term field experiments situated in different parts of Sweden; Ultuna (59°49'N, 17°39'E, started 1956), Lanna (58°21'N, 13°06'E, started 1997-98), Petersborg (55°32'N, 13°00'E, started 1981) and Igelösa (55°45'N, 13°18'E, started 1981). In these four experiments, at least one sewage sludge treatment is included in the experimental design. In the Ultuna experiment, all organic fertilisers, including sewage sludge, are applied every second year, corresponding to 4 ton C ha-1. The Lanna experiment has a similar design, with 8 ton dry matter ha-1 applied every second year. Lanna also has an additional treatment in which metal salts (Cd, Cu, Ni and Zn) are added together with sewage sludge. At Petersborg and Igelösa, two levels of sewage sludge (4 or 12 ton dry matter ha-1 every 4th year) are compared with three levels of NPK fertiliser (0 N, ½ normal N and normal N). Topsoil samples (0-20 cm depth) from the four sites were analysed for total C, total N, pH and PLFAs (phospholipid fatty acids). In addition, crop yields were recorded. Results At all four sites, sewage sludge has had a positive effect on crop yields

  7. Numerical accuracy assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerstoel, J. W.

    1988-12-01

    A framework is provided for numerical accuracy assessment. The purpose of numerical flow simulations is formulated. This formulation concerns the classes of aeronautical configurations (boundaries), the desired flow physics (flow equations and their properties), the classes of flow conditions on flow boundaries (boundary conditions), and the initial flow conditions. Next, accuracy and economical performance requirements are defined; the final numerical flow simulation results of interest should have a guaranteed accuracy, and be produced for an acceptable FLOP-price. Within this context, the validation of numerical processes with respect to the well known topics of consistency, stability, and convergence when the mesh is refined must be done by numerical experimentation because theory gives only partial answers. This requires careful design of text cases for numerical experimentation. Finally, the results of a few recent evaluation exercises of numerical experiments with a large number of codes on a few test cases are summarized.

  8. Numerical modeling of humic colloid borne americium (III) migration in column experiments using the transport/speciation code K1D and the KICAM model.

    PubMed

    Schüssler, W; Artinger, R; Kim, J I; Bryan, N D; Griffin, D

    2001-02-01

    The humic colloid borne Am(III) transport was investigated in column experiments for Gorleben groundwater/sand systems. It was found that the interaction of Am with humic colloids is kinetically controlled, which strongly influences the migration behavior of Am(III). These kinetic effects have to be taken into account for transport/speciation modeling. The kinetically controlled availability model (KICAM) was developed to describe actinide sorption and transport in laboratory batch and column experiments. Application of the KICAM requires a chemical transport/speciation code, which simultaneously models both kinetically controlled processes and equilibrium reactions. Therefore, the code K1D was developed as a flexible research code that allows the inclusion of kinetic data in addition to transport features and chemical equilibrium. This paper presents the verification of K1D and its application to model column experiments investigating unimpeded humic colloid borne Am migration. Parmeters for reactive transport simulations were determined for a Gorleben groundwater system of high humic colloid concentration (GoHy 2227). A single set of parameters was used to model a series of column experiments. Model results correspond well to experimental data for the unretarded humic borne Am breakthrough.

  9. Numerical modeling of humic colloid borne Americium (III) migration in column experiments using the transport/speciation code K1D and the KICAM model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüßler, W.; Artinger, R.; Kim, J. I.; Bryan, N. D.; Griffin, D.

    2001-02-01

    The humic colloid borne Am(III) transport was investigated in column experiments for Gorleben groundwater/sand systems. It was found that the interaction of Am with humic colloids is kinetically controlled, which strongly influences the migration behavior of Am(III). These kinetic effects have to be taken into account for transport/speciation modeling. The kinetically controlled availability model (KICAM) was developed to describe actinide sorption and transport in laboratory batch and column experiments. Application of the KICAM requires a chemical transport/speciation code, which simultaneously models both kinetically controlled processes and equilibrium reactions. Therefore, the code K1D was developed as a flexible research code that allows the inclusion of kinetic data in addition to transport features and chemical equilibrium. This paper presents the verification of K1D and its application to model column experiments investigating unimpeded humic colloid borne Am migration. Parameters for reactive transport simulations were determined for a Gorleben groundwater system of high humic colloid concentration (GoHy 2227). A single set of parameters was used to model a series of column experiments. Model results correspond well to experimental data for the unretarded humic borne Am breakthrough.

  10. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  11. Numerical adiabatic potentials of orthorhombic Jahn-Teller effects retrieved from ultrasound attenuation experiments. Application to the SrF2:Cr crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhevstovskikh, I. V.; Bersuker, I. B.; Gudkov, V. V.; Averkiev, N. S.; Sarychev, M. N.; Zherlitsyn, S.; Yasin, S.; Shakurov, G. S.; Ulanov, V. A.; Surikov, V. T.

    2016-06-01

    A methodology is worked out to retrieve the numerical values of all the main parameters of the six-dimensional adiabatic potential energy surface (APES) of a polyatomic system with a quadratic T-term Jahn-Teller effect (JTE) from the ultrasound experiments. The method is based on a verified assumption that ultrasound attenuation and speed encounter anomalies when the direction of propagation and polarization of its wave of strain coincides with the characteristic directions of symmetry breaking in the JTE. For the SrF2:Cr crystal, employed as a basic example, we observed anomaly peaks in the temperature dependence of attenuation of ultrasound at frequencies of 50-160 MHz in the temperature interval of 40-60 K for the wave propagating along the [110] direction, for both the longitudinal and the shear modes, the latter with two polarizations along the [001] and [1 1 ¯ 0 ] axes, respectively. We show that these anomalies are due to the ultrasound relaxation by the system of non-interacting Cr2+ JT centers with orthorhombic local distortions. The interpretation of the experimental findings is based on the T2 g⊗(eg+t2 g) JTE problem including the linear and the quadratic terms of vibronic interactions in the Hamiltonian and the same-symmetry modes reduced to one interaction mode. Combining the experimental results with a theoretical analysis, we show that on the complicated six-dimensional APES of this system with three tetragonal, four trigonal, and six orthorhombic extrema points, the latter are global minima, while the former are saddle points, and we estimate numerically all the main parameters of this surface, including the linear and quadratic vibronic coupling constants, the primary force constants, the coordinates of all the extrema points and their energies, the energy barrier between the orthorhombic minima, and the tunneling splitting of the ground vibrational states. To our knowledge, such a based-on-experimental-data numerical reconstruction of the APES

  12. The Role of Patients’ Age on Their Preferences for Choosing Additional Blood Pressure-Lowering Drugs: A Discrete Choice Experiment in Patients with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Sieta T.; de Vries, Folgerdiena M.; Dekker, Thijs; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M.; de Zeeuw, Dick; Ranchor, Adelita V.; Denig, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess whether patients’ willingness to add a blood pressure-lowering drug and the importance they attach to specific treatment characteristics differ among age groups in patients with type 2 diabetes. Materials and Methods Patients being prescribed at least an oral glucose-lowering and a blood pressure-lowering drug completed a questionnaire including a discrete choice experiment. This experiment contained choice sets with hypothetical blood pressure-lowering drugs and a no additional drug alternative, which differed in their characteristics (i.e. effects and intake moments). Differences in willingness to add a drug were compared between patients <75 years (non-aged) and ≥75 years (aged) using Pearson χ2-tests. Multinomial logit models were used to assess and compare the importance attached to the characteristics. Results Of the 161 patients who completed the questionnaire, 151 (72%) could be included in the analyses (mean age 68 years; 42% female). Aged patients were less willing to add a drug than non-aged patients (67% versus 84% respectively; P = 0.017). In both age groups, the effect on blood pressure was most important for choosing a drug, followed by the risk of adverse drug events and the risk of death. The effect on limitations due to stroke was only significant in the non-aged group. The effect on blood pressure was slightly more important in the non-aged than the aged group (P = 0.043). Conclusions Aged patients appear less willing to add a preventive drug than non-aged patients. The importance attached to various treatment characteristics does not seem to differ much among age groups. PMID:26445349

  13. What Is Numerical Control?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goold, Vernell C.

    1977-01-01

    Numerical control (a technique involving coded, numerical instructions for the automatic control and performance of a machine tool) does not replace fundamental machine tool training. It should be added to the training program to give the student an additional tool to accomplish production rates and accuracy that were not possible before. (HD)

  14. Topography and tectonics of the central New Madrid seismic zone: Results of numerical experiements using a three-dimensional boundary element program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomberg, Joan; Ellis, Michael

    1994-01-01

    We present results of a series of numerical experiments designed to test hypothetical mechanisms that derive deformation in the New Madrid seismic zone. Experiments are constrained by subtle topography and the distribution of seismicity in the region. We use a new boundary element algorithm that permits calcuation of the three-dimensional deformation field. Surface displacement fields are calculated for the New Madrid zone under both far-field (plate tectonics scale) and locally derived driving strains. Results demonstrate that surface displacement fields cannot distinguish between either a far-field simple or pure shear strain field or one that involves a deep shear zone beneath the upper crustal faults. Thus, neither geomorphic nor geodetic studies alone are expected to reveal the ultimate driving mechanism behind the present-day deformation. We have also tested hypotheses about strain accommodation within the New Madrid contractional step-over by including linking faults, two southwest dipping and one vertical, recently inferred from microearthquake data. Only those models with step-over faults are able to predict the observed topography. Surface displacement fields for long-term, relaxed deformation predict the distribution of uplift and subsidence in the contractional step-over remarkably well. Generation of these displacement fields appear to require slip on both the two northeast trending vertical faults and the two dipping faults in the step-over region, with very minor displacements occurring during the interseismic period when the northeast trending vertical faults are locked. These models suggest that the gently dippling central step-over fault is a reverse fault and that the steeper fault, extending to the southeast of the step-over, acts as a normal fault over the long term.

  15. Numerical experiments with applying approximate LU-factorizations as preconditioners for solving SLAEs with coefficient matrices from the "Sparse Matrix Market"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, K.; Zlatev, Z.

    2012-10-01

    The solution of systems of linear algebraic equations (SLAEs) is very often the most time-consuming part of the computational process during the treatment of the original problems, because these systems can be very large (containing up to many millions of equations). It is, therefore, important to select fast, robust and reliable methods for the solution of SLAEs when large applications are to be run, also in the case where fast modern computers are available. Since the coefficient matrices of the systems are normally sparse (i.e., most of their elements are zeros), the first requirement is to exploit efficiently the sparsity. However, this is normally not sufficient when the systems are very large. The computation of preconditioners based on approximate LU-factorizations and their use in the efforts to increase further the efficiency of the calculations will be discussed in this paper. Computational experiments based on comprehensive comparisons of many numerical results that are obtained by using ten well-known methods for solving SLAEs (the direct Gaussian elimination and nine iterative methods) when the coefficient matrices are chosen from the "Sparse Matrix Market" are reported in this paper. Most of the methods are preconditioned Krylov sub-space algorithms.

  16. Experiments and numerical modeling of CO2-brine-caprock interaction of the potential storage site within the Pohang basin in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seonok; Wang, Sookyun; Lee, Minhee

    2016-04-01

    Long term containment of stored CO2 in deep geological formation will be dependent on the performance of the caprock to prevent the buoyant CO2. The study aims to identify CO2-brine-caprock interactions and develop a framework, within which, geochemical reaction in caprock due CO2 injection can be evaluated. A series of autoclave experiments were conducted with caprock from drilling cores of Pohang basin where many researches have been focused as a candidate for geological CO2 sequestration at 50℃ with 100 bar of CO2 for 15day. XRD, XRF, ICP-OES and SEM-EDS studies were performed to characterize the reaction products. Also the numerical modeling with use of Geochemist's Workbench 10.0.6 (GWB) in two stages was performed. The first one was aimed at simulating the immediate changes in the aquifer and insulating caprocks impacted by the beginning of CO2 injection (100 days), the second enabling assessment of long-term effects of sequestration (10000 years). The simulations allowed to determine the suitability of the formation for carbon dioxide storage.

  17. Use of borehole radar reflection logging to monitor steam-enhanced remediation in fractured limestone-results of numerical modelling and a field experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gregoire, C.; Joesten, P.K.; Lane, J.W.

    2006-01-01

    Ground penetrating radar is an efficient geophysical method for the detection and location of fractures and fracture zones in electrically resistive rocks. In this study, the use of down-hole (borehole) radar reflection logs to monitor the injection of steam in fractured rocks was tested as part of a field-scale, steam-enhanced remediation pilot study conducted at a fractured limestone quarry contaminated with chlorinated hydrocarbons at the former Loring Air Force Base, Limestone, Maine, USA. In support of the pilot study, borehole radar reflection logs were collected three times (before, during, and near the end of steam injection) using broadband 100 MHz electric dipole antennas. Numerical modelling was performed to predict the effect of heating on radar-frequency electromagnetic (EM) wave velocity, attenuation, and fracture reflectivity. The modelling results indicate that EM wave velocity and attenuation change substantially if heating increases the electrical conductivity of the limestone matrix. Furthermore, the net effect of heat-induced variations in fracture-fluid dielectric properties on average medium velocity is insignificant because the expected total fracture porosity is low. In contrast, changes in fracture fluid electrical conductivity can have a significant effect on EM wave attenuation and fracture reflectivity. Total replacement of water by steam in a fracture decreases fracture reflectivity of a factor of 10 and induces a change in reflected wave polarity. Based on the numerical modelling results, a reflection amplitude analysis method was developed to delineate fractures where steam has displaced water. Radar reflection logs collected during the three acquisition periods were analysed in the frequency domain to determine if steam had replaced water in the fractures (after normalizing the logs to compensate for differences in antenna performance between logging runs). Analysis of the radar reflection logs from a borehole where the temperature

  18. Food additives

    MedlinePlus

    ... or natural. Natural food additives include: Herbs or spices to add flavor to foods Vinegar for pickling ... Certain colors improve the appearance of foods. Many spices, as well as natural and man-made flavors, ...

  19. Numerical Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegler, Robert S.; Braithwaite, David W.

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we attempt to integrate two crucial aspects of numerical development: learning the magnitudes of individual numbers and learning arithmetic. Numerical magnitude development involves gaining increasingly precise knowledge of increasing ranges and types of numbers: from non-symbolic to small symbolic numbers, from smaller to larger…

  20. Hindi Numerals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bright, William

    In most languages encountered by linguists, the numerals, considered as a paradigmatic set, constitute a morpho-syntactic problem of only moderate complexity. The Indo-Aryan language family of North India, however, presents a curious contrast. The relatively regular numeral system of Sanskrit, as it has developed historically into the modern…

  1. Stress heterogeneities in anisotropic materials - their effect on dislocation fields and post-deformational recrystallization: Insights from combined experiments and numerical simulations of polycrystalline ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazolo, S.; Montagnat, M.; Borthwick, V.; Evans, L.; Griera, A.; Grennerat, F.; Moulinec, H.; Wheeler, J.

    2014-12-01

    We present a coupled experimental and modeling approach to better understand the role of stress field heterogeneities on deformation and post-deformational behavior in material with a high viscoplastic anisotropy e.g. polycrystalline ice. We investigate: (1) Effect of stress heterogeneities on deformation behavior and microstructural development and, (2) effect of such microstructures on post-deformational recrystallization. (1) Full-field elasto-viscoplastic modelling (CraFT) is used to predict the local stress and strain field during transient creep in a polycrystalline ice sample. Modeling input includes the experimental starting microstructure and a validated slip system dependent flow law. EBSD measurements on selected areas are used to estimate the local dislocation field utilizing the Weighted Burgers Vector (WBV) analysis. Areas of local stress concentration correlate with triple junctions and grain boundaries, originating from strain incompatibilities between differently oriented grains. In these areas, the WBV analysis shows a non-negligible c-axis component that must be related to resolved shear stress in a prismatic plane, coherent with the predicted elevated stress levels. The resultant defect structure is necessary for the formation of the observed kink bands which have a well-defined crystallographic character, lattice distortions and subgrain development. (2) The microstructures arising from (1) significantly affect post-deformational behavior. Combined post-deformational annealing experiments and numerical simulations using the microdynamic modeling platform ELLE, allow prediction of the local microstructural evolution taking recovery within grains, grain boundary migration and nucleation into account. Results from this study, can explain several of the observed features in natural ice, and help to refine large scale models.

  2. Mitigation of Atmospheric Delay in SAR Absolute Ranging Using Global Numerical Weather Prediction Data: Corner Reflector Experiments at 3 Different Test Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Xiaoying; Balss, Ulrich; Eineder, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The atmospheric delay due to vertical stratification, the so-called stratified atmospheric delay, has a great impact on both interferometric and absolute range measurements. In our current researches [1][2][3], centimeter-range accuracy has been proven based on Corner Reflector (CR) based measurements by applying atmospheric delay correction using the Zenith Path Delay (ZPD) corrections derived from nearby Global Positioning System (GPS) stations. For a global usage, an effective method has been introduced to estimate the stratified delay based on global 4-dimensional Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) products: the direct integration method [4][5]. Two products, ERA-Interim and operational data, provided by European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) are used to integrate the stratified delay. In order to access the integration accuracy, a validation approach is investigated based on ZPD derived from six permanent GPS stations located in different meteorological conditions. Range accuracy at centimeter level is demonstrated using both ECMWF products. Further experiments have been carried out in order to determine the best interpolation method by analyzing the temporal and spatial correlation of atmospheric delay using both ECMWF and GPS ZPD. Finally, the integrated atmospheric delays in slant direction (Slant Path Delay, SPD) have been applied instead of the GPS ZPD for CR experiments at three different test sites with more than 200 TerraSAR-X High Resolution SpotLight (HRSL) images. The delay accuracy is around 1-3 cm depending on the location of test site due to the local water vapor variation and the acquisition time/date. [1] Eineder M., Minet C., Steigenberger P., et al. Imaging geodesy - Toward centimeter-level ranging accuracy with TerraSAR-X. Geoscience and Remote Sensing, IEEE Transactions on, 2011, 49(2): 661-671. [2] Balss U., Gisinger C., Cong X. Y., et al. Precise Measurements on the Absolute Localization Accuracy of TerraSAR-X on the

  3. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  4. Phosphazene additives

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  5. Numerical experiment of lake-effect snowstorm in C3VP campaign using the WRF model coupled with spectral bin microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iguchi, T.; Matsui, T.; Li, X.; Shi, J. J.; Tao, W.

    2010-12-01

    The next-generation Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission will offer a global view of precipitation systems including over middle and high latitudes and enable accurate measurement of frozen precipitation and light rainfall. The project of a synthetic GPM simulator was proposed to offer a vitual cloud libraty (VCL) to support development of the retrieval algorithm. The VCL is composed of ground validation (GV)-constrained 3D database of cloud resolving model (CRM) output and simulated GPM L1 product. The satellite retrieval algorithm can be cross-checked with a physical-based approach by using the VCL as a priori database. The first experiment for making VCL is planned for a snowfall event during the Canadian CloudSAT/CALIPSO Validation Project (C3VP) field campaign. This campaign was took place at the site located between the Lakes Huron and Ontario in south central Ontario, Canada. A cold wind passing over the lakes causes a snowstorm specific to areas over the lee side during winter season. Shi et al. [2010] showed a numerical simulation of the lake-effect snowstorm on Jan. 20, 2007 using the Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF) model with newly implemented the Goddard microphysics scheme (1-moment bulk for 2-water, 3-ice classes). The simulation reasonably represented the locally intensive frozen precipitation in agreement with King-city C-band radar observation. The structures of ice clouds were generally consistent with those in CloudSat and AMSU-B observations also. This study is aimed at a follow-up study of their research using the WRF in conjunction with the spectral bin microphysics for clouds (WRF-SBM), especially targeted to cloud microphysics of the snowfall event. This SBM (1-moment 33 bins for 1-water, 6-ice classes) is based on the Hebrew University Cloud Model (HUCM) [e.g., Khain et al., 2000; Iguchi et al., 2008, Appendix A]. We will offer a discussion of ice cloud microphysics on a lake-effect snowstorm with sensitivity tests to

  6. Free convective controls on sequestration of salts into low-permeability strata: Insights from sand tank laboratory experiments and numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, C. T.; Post, V.

    2008-12-01

    Vertical reflux of dense brines may occur in hydrogeologic situations including seawater intrusion, transgression-regression cycles, leachate migration from landfills and brine reflux beneath salt lakes. The critical control that geologic heterogeneity plays in the free convective process is still an area which requires significant exploration. To date, no studies have been published that focus on the effect that discrete low- permeability structures have on the free convection process at the scale of individual lenses. The precise local scale solute transport mechanisms that affect solute exchange between the layers of lower and higher permeability have not been reported. Using sand tank experiments and numerical models, we explore local scale solute transport processes associated with free convection in the region both surrounding and within discrete low-permeability strata. Different permeability geometries and contrasts between high- and low- permeability regions are explored. Results show that the free convective processes are inherently complex and not intuitively obvious. In the high-permeability region, salinization was rapid and occurred predominantly by free convective flow around the low-permeability blocks, a process we refer to as 'interlayer convection'. Fresh water originally present within the overall domain considered became trapped both below and within the low-permeability structures. A free convection flow field also became concurrently established within the low-permeability lenses, a process we refer to as 'intralayer convection'. This smaller sublayer scale process is driven by both larger scale interlayer convection and by the buoyancy of the fresh water within the low permeability lenses. It was found that upward vertical flow retards salinization of the lenses as these buoyant freshwater displacements oppose the downward penetration of dissolved salts by diffusion and free convection from above. Due to the presence of vertical upward flow

  7. Improving planning, design, reporting and scientific quality of animal experiments by using the Gold Standard Publication Checklist, in addition to the ARRIVE guidelines.

    PubMed

    Hooijmans, Carlijn R; de Vries, Rob; Leenaars, Marlies; Curfs, Jo; Ritskes-Hoitinga, Merel

    2011-03-01

    Several studies have demonstrated serious omissions in the way research that use animals is reported. In order to improve the quality of reporting of animal experiments, the Animals in research: reporting in vivo experiments (ARRIVE) Guidelines were published in the British Journal of Pharmacology in August 2010. However, not only the quality of reporting of completed animal studies needs to be improved, but also the design and execution of new experiments. With both these goals in mind, we published the Gold Standard Publication Checklist (GSPC) in May 2010, a few months before the ARRIVE guidelines appeared. In this letter, we compare the GSPC checklist with the ARRIVE Guidelines. The GSPC describes certain items in more detail, which makes it both easier to use when designing and conducting an experiment and particularly suitable for making systematic reviews of animal studies more feasible. In order to improve not only the reporting but also the planning, design, execution and thereby, the scientific quality of animal experiments, we strongly recommend to all scientists involved in animal experimentation and to editors of journals publishing animal studies to take a closer look at the contents of both the ARRIVE guidelines and GSPC, and select the set of guidelines which is most appropriate for their particular situation.

  8. Irradiation of Metallic Fuels with Rare Earth Additions for Actinide Transmutation in the ATR. Experiment Description for AFC-2A and AFC-2B

    SciTech Connect

    S. L. Hayes; D. J. Utterbeck; T. A. Hyde

    2007-03-01

    The U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), now within the broader context of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), seeks to develop and demonstrate the technologies needed to transmute the long-lived transuranic actinide isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel into shorter-lived fission products, thereby dramatically decreasing the volume of material requiring disposal and the long-term radio-toxicity and heat load of high-level waste sent to a geologic repository. One important component of the technology development is actinide-bearing metallic transmutation fuel forms containing plutonium, neptunium, americium (and possibly curium) isotopes. The proposed AFC-2A and AFC-2B irradiation experiments are a continuation of the metallic fuel test series in progress in the ATR. This report documents the experiment description and test matrix of the proposed experiments and the Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) and fabrication schedule.

  9. Irradiation of Metallic Fuels with Rare Earth Additions for Actinide Transmutation in the Advanced Test Reactor. Experiment Description for AFC-2A and AFC-2B

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, Steven L.

    2006-12-01

    The U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), now within the broader context of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), seeks to develop and demonstrate the technologies needed to transmute the long-lived transuranic actinide isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel into shorter-lived fission products, thereby dramatically decreasing the volume of material requiring disposal and the long-term radio-toxicity and heat load of high-level waste sent to a geologic repository. One important component of the technology development is actinide-bearing metallic transmutation fuel forms containing plutonium, neptunium, americium (and possibly curium) isotopes. The proposed AFC-2A and AFC-2B irradiation experiments are a continuation of the metallic fuel test series in progress in the ATR. This report documents the experiment description and test matrix of the proposed experiments and the Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) and fabrication schedule.

  10. Irradiation of Metallic Fuels with Rare Earth Additions for Actinide Transmutation in the ATR. Experiment Description for AFC-2A and AFC-2B

    SciTech Connect

    S. L. Hayes; D. J. Utterbeck; T. A. Hyde

    2006-11-01

    The U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), now within the broader context of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), seeks to develop and demonstrate the technologies needed to transmute the long-lived transuranic actinide isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel into shorter-lived fission products, thereby dramatically decreasing the volume of material requiring disposal and the long-term radio-toxicity and heat load of high-level waste sent to a geologic repository. One important component of the technology development is actinide-bearing metallic transmutation fuel forms containing plutonium, neptunium, americium (and possibly curium) isotopes. The proposed AFC-2A and AFC-2B irradiation experiments are a continuation of the metallic fuel test series in progress in the ATR. This report documents the experiment description and test matrix of the proposed experiments and the Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) and fabrication schedule.

  11. Qualitative impact of salinity, UV radiation and turbulence on leaching of organic plastic additives from four common plastics - A lab experiment.

    PubMed

    Suhrhoff, Tim Jesper; Scholz-Böttcher, Barbara M

    2016-01-15

    Four common consumer plastic samples (polyethylene, polystyrene, polyethylene terephthalate, polyvinylchloride) were studied to investigate the impact of physical parameters such as turbulence, salinity and UV irradiance on leaching behavior of selected plastic components. Polymers were exposed to two different salinities (i.e. 0 and 35 g/kg), UV radiation and turbulence. Additives (e.g. bisphenol A, phthalates, citrates, and Irgafos® 168 phosphate) and oligomers were detected in initial plastics and aqueous extracts. Identification and quantification was performed by GC-FID/MS. Bisphenol A and citrate based additives are leached easier compared to phthalates. The print highly contributed to the chemical burden of the analyzed polyethylene bag. The study underlines a positive relationship between turbulence and magnitude of leaching. Salinity had a minor impact that differs for each analyte. Global annual release of additives from assessed plastics into marine environments is estimated to be between 35 and 917 tons, of which most are derived from plasticized polyvinylchloride.

  12. Generation, Isolation, and Characterization of a Stable Enol from Grignard Addition to a Bis-Ester: A Microscale Experiment for the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicaise, Olivier J. C.; Ostrom, Kyle F.; Dalke, Brent J.

    2005-01-01

    An experiment is described that introduces students to the concept of temperature-dependent stability of the tetrahedral intermediate in an acyl-transfer reaction. The process involves the determination of the structure of an alpha-ketoester and its corresponding remarkably stable enol ester to suggest a mechanism for the formation of the products.

  13. Detection of Salicylic Acid in Willow Bark: An Addition to a Classic Series of Experiments in the Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clay, Matthew D.; McLeod, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    Salicylic acid and its derivative, acetylsalicylic acid, are often encountered in introductory organic chemistry experiments, and mention is often made that salicylic acid was originally isolated from the bark of the willow tree. This biological connection, however, is typically not further pursued, leaving students with an impression that biology…

  14. Two- and Three-Dimensional Numerical Experiments Representing Two Limiting Cases of an In-Line Pair of Finger Seal Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, M. J.; Steinetz, B. M.; Kudriavtsev, V. V.; Proctor, M. P.; Kiraly, L. James (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The work presented here concerns the numerical development and simulation of the flow, pressure patterns and motion of a pair of fingers arranged behind each other and axially aligned in-line. The fingers represent the basic elemental component of a Finger Seal (FS) and form a tight seal around the rotor. Yet their flexibility allows compliance with rotor motion and in a passive-adaptive mode complies also with the hydrodynamic forces induced by the flowing fluid. While the paper does not treat the actual staggered configuration of a finger seal, the inline arrangement represents a first step towards that final goal. The numerical 2-D (axial-radial) and 3-D results presented herein were obtained using a commercial package (CFD-ACE+). Both models use an integrated numerical approach, which couples the hydrodynamic fluid model (Navier-Stokes based) to the solid mechanics code that models the compliance of the fingers.

  15. Numerical Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sozio, Gerry

    2009-01-01

    Senior secondary students cover numerical integration techniques in their mathematics courses. In particular, students would be familiar with the "midpoint rule," the elementary "trapezoidal rule" and "Simpson's rule." This article derives these techniques by methods which secondary students may not be familiar with and an approach that…

  16. Numerical Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in numerical relativity have fueled an explosion of progress in understanding the predictions of Einstein's theory of gravity, General Relativity, for the strong field dynamics, the gravitational radiation wave forms, and consequently the state of the remnant produced from the merger of compact binary objects. I will review recent results from the field, focusing on mergers of two black holes.

  17. From mode I cracking to dilatancy, shear, and compaction banding: Constraints from axisymmetric and poly-axial experiments and numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemenda, A. I.; Jorand, C.; Petit, J.; Nguyen, S.

    2011-12-01

    -type tests thus show generally similar change of failure/localization structure with pressure, but under axisymmetric conditions some end-member structures are missing (the compaction bands in the extension tests and the dilatancy bands/mode I fractures in the compression tests). Deformation bifurcation is commonly used to explain the formation of shear bands. The initiation of compaction and dilatancy bands can also be viewed as resulting from a similar process. This requires assuming large absolute values of the dilatancy factor β. Finite-difference simulations suggest that |β| should rapidly reduce with inelastic deformation, which is confirmed by the experimental data. The numerical models suggest also that the failure structures observed in the experiments correspond to the unstable post-bifurcation evolution of the deformation bands that is largely defined by the evolution of β and other constitutive parameters with deformation.

  18. Micron-Size Zero-Valent Iron Emplacement in Porous Media Using Polymer Additives: Column and Flow Cell Ex-periments

    SciTech Connect

    Oostrom, Mart; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Covert, Matthew A.; Vermeul, Vince R.

    2006-03-20

    At the Hanford Site, an extensive In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) permeable reactive barrier was installed to prevent chromate from reaching the Columbia River. However, chromium has been detected in several wells, indicating a premature loss of the reductive capacity in the aquifer. Laboratory experiments have been conducted to investigate whether barrier reductive capacity can be enhanced by adding micron-scale zero-valent iron to the high-permeability zones within the aquifer using shear-thinning fluids containing polymers. Porous media were packed in a wedge-shaped flow cell to create either a heterogeneous layered system with a high-permeability zone between two low-permeability zones or a high-permeability channel sur-rounded by low-permeability materials. The injection flow rate, polymer type, polymer concentration, and injected pore volumes were determined based on preliminary short- and long-column experiments. The flow cell experiments indicated that iron concentration enhancements of at least 0.6% (w/w) could be obtained using moderate flow rates and injection of 30 pore volumes. The 0.6% amended Fe0 concentration would provide approximately 20 times the average reductive capacity that is provided by the dithionite-reduced iron in the ISRM barrier. Calculations show that a 1-m-long Fe0 amended zone with an average concentration of 0.6% w/w iron subject to a groundwater velocity of 1 m/day will have an estimated longevity of 7.2 years.

  19. Role of additional chromosomal changes in the prognostic value of t(4;14) and del(17p) in multiple myeloma: the IFM experience

    PubMed Central

    Hebraud, Benjamin; Magrangeas, Florence; Cleynen, Alice; Lauwers-Cances, Valerie; Chretien, Marie-Lorraine; Hulin, Cyrille; Leleu, Xavier; Yon, Edwige; Marit, Gerald; Karlin, Lionel; Roussel, Murielle; Stoppa, Anne-Marie; Belhadj, Karim; Voillat, Laurent; Garderet, Laurent; Macro, Margaret; Caillot, Denis; Mohty, Mohamad; Facon, Thierry; Moreau, Philippe; Attal, Michel; Munshi, Nikhil; Corre, Jill; Minvielle, Stephane

    2015-01-01

    In multiple myeloma, cytogenetic changes are important predictors of patient outcome. In this setting, the most important changes are deletion 17p, del(17p), and translocation of chromosomes 4 and 14, t(4;14), conferring a poor outcome. However, a certain degree of heterogeneity is observed in the survival of these high-risk patients. We hypothesized that other chromosomal changes may impact the outcome. We retrospectively analyzed a large series of 242 patients displaying either t(4;14) (157 patients) or del(17p) (110 patients), 25 patients presenting both abnormalities, using single nucleotide polymorphism array. In patients with t(4;14), del(1p32), del22q, and >30 chromosomal structural changes negatively impacted progression-free survival (PFS). For overall survival (OS), del(13q14), del(1p32), and the number of chromosomal structural changes worsened the prognosis of patients. For patients with del(17p), del6q worsened the prognosis of patients, whereas trisomy 15 and monosomy 14 were found to have a protective effect on PFS. For OS, del(1p32) worsened the prognosis of patients, whereas having >8 numerical changes was found to have a protective effect on survival. This study, which is the largest series of high-risk patients analyzed with the most modern genomic technique, identified 1 main factor negatively impacting survival: del(1p32). PMID:25636340

  20. Numerical Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    fisica matematica . ABSTRACT - We consider a new method for the numerical solution both of non- linear systems of equations and of cornplementauity... Matematica , Serie V11 Volume 9 , Roma (1989), 521-543 An Inexact Continuous Method for the Solution of Large Systems of Equations and Complementarity...34 - 00185 Roma - Italy APPENDIX 2 A Quadratically Convergent Method for Unear Programming’ Stefano Herzel Dipartimento di Matematica -G. Castelnuovo

  1. High energy physics program: Task A, Experiment and theory; Task B, Numerical simulation. Progress report, July 1, 1988--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    This report discusses research in High Energy Physics at Florida State University. Contained in this paper are: highlights of activities during the past few years; five year summary; fixed target experiments; collider experiments; SSC preparation, detector development and detector construction; computing, networking and VAX upgrade to ALPHA; and particle theory programs.

  2. A view of progress in the numerical modeling of physical characteristics of the World Ocean in the light of sixty-year experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkisyan, A. S.

    2015-05-01

    In view of the 60th anniversary of the pioneering oceanographic work on the numerical modeling of dynamical characteristics of the ocean [1], the author has decided to present his view of the principal milestones in the progress of the numerical modeling of climatic characteristics of the ocean. This progress is shown schematically and conventionally as a single a table consisting of two lines: (A) synthesis of measurement data models and (B) theory and calculation of sea currents. Line A consists of the following stages: reference surface method, diagnostic method, diagnostics-adaptation, and four-dimensional analysis. Line B is as follows: Ekman's school, numerical modeling of a barotropic and then baroclinic ocean, modeling of individual basins with high resolution, and modeling of the World Ocean with high resolution and allowance for ice cover. This paper briefly reviews and analyzes the results of each of the abovementioned stages. The author sympathizes with line A because he believes that the most realistic results for characteristics of scientific interest are obtained by a synthesis of models and measurement data, with an optimal choice of the model integration time. Unfortunately, studies in both directions have often used unreasonably long integration times (50-100 years). In this case, models even with a high resolution (0.1° of grid spacing) become inadequate and analyze strange characteristics, such as meridional overturning or kinetic energy averaged over the entire column of the world ocean, which actually have no scientific significance.

  3. Direct numerical simulations of exhaust gas recirculation effect on multistage autoignition in the negative temperature combustion regime for stratified HCCI flow conditions by using H2O2 addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Asrag, Hossam A.; Ju, Yiguang

    2013-04-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of a stratified flow in a homogeneous compression charge ignition (HCCI) engine are performed to investigate the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and temperature/mixture stratification effects on the autoignition of synthetic dimethyl ether (DME) in the negative temperature combustion region. Detailed chemistry for a DME/air mixture is employed and solved by a hybrid multi-time scale (HMTS) algorithm to reduce the computational cost. The effect of ? to mimic the EGR effect on autoignition are studied. The results show that adding ? enhances autoignition by rapid OH radical pool formation (34-46% reduction in ignition delay time) and changes the ignition heat release rates at different ignition stages. Sensitivity analysis is performed and the important reactions pathways affecting the autoignition are specified. The DNS results show that the scales introduced by thermal and mixture stratifications have a strong effect after the low temperature chemistry (LTC) ignition especially at the locations of high scalar dissipation rates. Compared to homogenous ignition, stratified ignitions show similar first autoignition delay times, but 18% reduction in the second and third ignition delay times. The results also show that molecular transport plays an important role in stratified low temperature ignition, and that the scalar mixing time scale is strongly affected by local ignition in the stratified flow. Two ignition-kernel propagation modes are observed: a wave-like, low-speed, deflagrative mode and a spontaneous, high-speed, ignition mode. Three criteria are introduced to distinguish these modes by different characteristic time scales and Damkhöler numbers using a progress variable conditioned by an ignition kernel indicator. The low scalar dissipation rate flame front is characterized by high displacement speeds and high mixing Damkhöler number. The proposed criteria are applied successfully at the different ignition stages and

  4. Spatio-Temporal Variation in Contrasting Effects of Resident Vegetation on Establishment, Growth and Reproduction of Dry Grassland Plants: Implications for Seed Addition Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Knappová, Jana; Knapp, Michal; Münzbergová, Zuzana

    2013-01-01

    Successful establishment of plants is limited by both biotic and abiotic conditions and their interactions. Seedling establishment is also used as a direct measure of habitat suitability, but transient changes in vegetation might provide windows of opportunity allowing plant species to colonize sites which otherwise appear unsuitable. We aimed to study spatio-temporal variability in the effects of resident vegetation on establishment, growth and reproduction of dry grassland species in abandoned arable fields representing potentially suitable habitats. Seeds were sown in disturbed (bare of vegetation and roots) and undisturbed plots in three fields abandoned in the last 20 years. To assess the effects of temporal variation on plant establishment, we initiated our experiments in two years (2007 and 2008). Seventeen out of the 35 sown species flowered within two years after sowing, while three species completely failed to become established. The vegetation in the undisturbed plots facilitated seedling establishment only in the year with low spring precipitation, and the effect did not hold for all species. In contrast, growth and flowering rate were consistently much greater in the disturbed plots, but the effect size differed between the fields and years of sowing. We show that colonization is more successful when site opening by disturbance coincide with other suitable conditions such as weather or soil characteristics. Seasonal variability involved in our study emphasizes the necessity of temporal replication of sowing experiments. Studies assessing habitat suitability by seed sowing should either involve both vegetation removal treatments and untreated plots or follow the gradient of vegetation cover. We strongly recommend following the numbers of established individuals, their sizes and reproductive success when assessing habitat suitability by seed sowing since one can gain completely different results in different phases of plant life cycle. PMID:23755288

  5. Comparison of two numerical modelling approaches to a field experiment of unsaturated radon transport in a covered uranium mill tailings soil (Lavaugrasse, France).

    PubMed

    Saâdi, Zakaria; Guillevic, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Uncertainties on the mathematical modelling of radon ((222)Rn) transport in an unsaturated covered uranium mill tailings (UMT) soil at field scale can have a great impact on the estimation of the average measured radon exhalation rate to the atmosphere at the landfill cover. These uncertainties are usually attributed to the numerical errors from numerical schemes dealing with soil layering, and to inadequate modelling of physical processes at the soil/plant/atmosphere interface and of the soil hydraulic and transport properties, as well as their parameterization. In this work, we demonstrate how to quantify these uncertainties by comparing simulation results from two different numerical models to experimental data of radon exhalation rate and activity concentration in the soil-gas measured in a covered UMT-soil near the landfill site Lavaugrasse (France). The first approach is based on the finite volume compositional (i.e., water, radon, air) transport model TOUGH2/EOS7Rn (Transport Of Unsaturated Groundwater and Heat version 2/Equation Of State 7 for Radon; Saâdi et al., 2014), while the second one is based on the finite difference one-component (i.e., radon) transport model TRACI (Transport de RAdon dans la Couche Insaturée; Ferry et al., 2001). Transient simulations during six months of variable rainfall and atmospheric air pressure showed that the model TRACI usually overestimates both measured radon exhalation rate and concentration. However, setting effective unsaturated pore diffusivities of water, radon and air components in soil-liquid and gas to their physical values in the model EOS7Rn, allowed us to enhance significantly the modelling of these experimental data. Since soil evaporation has been neglected, none of these two models was able to simulate the high radon peaks observed during the dry periods of summer. However, on average, the radon exhalation rate calculated by EOS7Rn was 34% less than that was calculated by TRACI, and much closer to the

  6. Playing Linear Numerical Board Games Promotes Low-Income Children's Numerical Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegler, Robert S.; Ramani, Geetha B.

    2008-01-01

    The numerical knowledge of children from low-income backgrounds trails behind that of peers from middle-income backgrounds even before the children enter school. This gap may reflect differing prior experience with informal numerical activities, such as numerical board games. Experiment 1 indicated that the numerical magnitude knowledge of…

  7. Seismic Absorption and Modulus Measurements in Porous Rocks in Lab and Field: Physical, Chemical, and Biological Effects of Fluids (Detecting a Biosurfactant Additive in a Field Irrigation Experiment)

    SciTech Connect

    Spetzler, Hartmut

    2006-05-01

    We have been exploring a new technology that is based on using low-frequency seismic attenuation data to monitor changes in fluid saturation conditions in two-fluid phase porous materials. The seismic attenuation mechanism is related to the loss of energy due to the hysteresis of resistance to meniscus movement (changes in surface tension, wettability) when a pore containing two fluids is stressed at very low frequencies (< 10 Hz). This technology has potential applications to monitoring changes in (1) leakage at buried waste sites, (2) contaminant remediation, and (3) flooding during enhanced petroleum recovery. We have concluded a three year field study at the Maricopa Agricultural Center site of the University of Arizona. Three sets of instruments were installed along an East-West line perpendicular to the 50m by 50m inigation site. Each set of instruments consisted of one three component seismometer and one tiltmeter. Microseisms and solid Earth-tides served as strain sources. The former have a power peak at a period of about 6 seconds and the tides have about two cycles per day. Installation of instruments commenced in late summer of 2002. The instruments operated nearly continuously until April 2005. During the fall of 2003 the site was irrigated with water and one year later with water containing 150 ppm of a biosurfactant additive. This biodegradable additive served to mimic a class of contaminants that change the surface tension of the inigation fluid. Tilt data clearly show tidal tilts superimposed on local tilts due to agricultural irrigation and field work. When the observed signals were correlated with site specific theoretical tilt signals we saw no anomalies for the water irrigation in 2003, but large anomalies on two stations for the surfactant irrigation in 2004. Occasional failures of seismometers as well as data acquisition systems contributed to less than continuous coverage. These data are noisier than the tilt data, but do also show possible

  8. Numerical and physical magnitudes are mapped into time.

    PubMed

    Ben-Meir, Shachar; Ganor-Stern, Dana; Tzelgov, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    In two experiments we investigated mapping of numerical and physical magnitudes with temporal order. Pairs of digits were presented sequentially for a size comparison task. An advantage for numbers presented in ascending order was found when participants were comparing the numbers' physical and numerical magnitudes. The effect was more robust for comparisons of physical size, as it was found using both select larger and select smaller instructions, while for numerical comparisons it was found only for select larger instructions. Varying both the digits' numerical and physical sizes resulted in a size congruity effect, indicating automatic processing of the irrelevant magnitude dimension. Temporal order and the congruency between numerical and physical magnitudes affected comparisons in an additive manner, thus suggesting that they affect different stages of the comparison process.

  9. Rice Yield and the Fate of Fertilizer Nitrogen as Affected by Addition of Earthworm Casts Collected from Oilseed Rape Fields: A Pot Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Min; Zhou, Xuefeng; Xie, Xiaobing; Zhao, Chunrong; Chen, Jiana; Cao, Fangbo; Zou, Yingbin

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism associated with improvement of soil nutritional status by oilseed rape crop, leading to better performance of rice crop, in rice-oilseed rape cropping systems is little known. The present study was aimed to test the hypothesis that earthworm casts produced during oilseed rape-growing season have positive effects on grain yield and fertilizer nitrogen (N) utilization in the subsequent flooded rice crop. A 15N-tracing pot experiment was conducted to determine the effects of earthworm casts collected from oilseed rape fields on yield attributes in rice and the fate of fertilizer N. Soil treated with earthworm casts (soil: earthworm casts = 4: 1, w/w) (EC1) produced 39% higher grain yield than soil only (EC0). EC1 had 18% more panicle number and 10% higher spikelet filling percentage than EC0. Aboveground biomass and harvest index were higher in EC1 than in EC0 by 20% and 15%, respectively. SPAD values in flag leaves were 10% and 22% higher under EC1 than EC0 at 15 and 20 days after heading, respectively. EC1 had 19% higher total N uptake and 18% higher physiological N-use efficiency than EC0. These positive effects of earthworm casts on yield attributes offset negative effects of decreasing N rate from 0.74 g pot–1 (equivalent to the recommended field rate of 150 kg ha–1) to 0.44 g pot–1 (equivalent to 60% of the recommended rate). Fertilizer N retention rate was 7% higher while fertilizer N loss rate was 6% lower in EC1 than in EC0. Our study suggests that earthworm casts produced during oilseed rape-growing season are expected to have the following benefits on the subsequent flooded rice system: (1) improving growth and physiological processes in rice plants and consequently increasing rice grain yield, and (2) increasing fertilizer N retention rate and hence decreasing fertilizer N loss rate and reducing environmental risk. PMID:27880837

  10. Control of nitrification/denitrification in an onsite two-chamber intermittently aerated membrane bioreactor with alkalinity and carbon addition: Model and experiment.

    PubMed

    Perera, Mahamalage Kusumitha; Englehardt, James D; Tchobanoglous, George; Shamskhorzani, Reza

    2017-02-20

    Denitrifying membrane bioreactors (MBRs) are being found useful in water reuse treatment systems, including net-zero water (nearly closed-loop), non-reverse osmosis-based, direct potable reuse (DPR) systems. In such systems nitrogen may need to be controlled in the MBR to meet the nitrate drinking water standard in the finished water. To achieve efficient nitrification and denitrification, the addition of alkalinity and external carbon may be required, and control of the carbon feed rate is then important. In this work, an onsite, two-chamber aerobic nitrifying/denitrifying MBR, representing one unit process of a net-zero water, non-reverse osmosis-based DPR system, was modeled as a basis for control of the MBR internal recycling rate, aeration rate, and external carbon feed rate. Specifically, a modification of the activated sludge model ASM2dSMP was modified further to represent the rate of recycling between separate aerobic and anoxic chambers, rates of carbon and alkalinity feed, and variable aeration schedule, and was demonstrated versus field data. The optimal aeration pattern for the modeled reactor configuration and influent matrix was found to be 30 min of aeration in a 2 h cycle (104 m(3) air/d per 1 m(3)/d average influent), to ultimately meet the nitrate drinking water standard. Optimal recycling ratios (inter-chamber flow to average daily flow) were found to be 1.5 and 3 during rest and mixing periods, respectively. The model can be used to optimize aeration pattern and recycling ratio in such MBRs, with slight modifications to reflect reactor configuration, influent matrix, and target nitrogen species concentrations, though some recalibration may be required.

  11. Numerical methods used in fusion science numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, M.

    2015-04-01

    The dynamics of burning plasma is very complicated physics, which is dominated by multi-scale and multi-physics phenomena. To understand such phenomena, numerical simulations are indispensable. Fundamentals of numerical methods used in fusion science numerical modeling are briefly discussed in this paper. In addition, the parallelization technique such as open multi processing (OpenMP) and message passing interface (MPI) parallel programing are introduced and the loop-level parallelization is shown as an example.

  12. Atmospheric Test Models and Numerical Experiments for the Simulation of the Global Distribution of Weather Data Transponders II. Vertical Transponder Motion Considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, A.; Errico, R.M.

    1999-11-29

    The vertical motion of constant density atmospheric balloons has been considered via an equation of motion for the vertical displacement of a balloon, due to vertical air motion, which can be numerically solved for balloon positions. Initial calculations are made for a constant density atmosphere. Various vertical wind models with relatively large amplitudes are applied to the model to determine how tightly the balloons are coupled to the reference level and the time scale for the balloons to change to the wind driven reference altitude. A surface launch of a balloon to a 6 km reference altitude is modeled using a detailed atmospheric pressure-density-temperature profile in the equation of motion. The results show the balloons to be relatively tightly coupled ({approx} 50-100 m) to the reference altitude.

  13. Frontiers in Numerical Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Charles R.; Finn, Lee S.; Hobill, David W.

    2011-06-01

    Preface; Participants; Introduction; 1. Supercomputing and numerical relativity: a look at the past, present and future David W. Hobill and Larry L. Smarr; 2. Computational relativity in two and three dimensions Stuart L. Shapiro and Saul A. Teukolsky; 3. Slowly moving maximally charged black holes Robert C. Ferrell and Douglas M. Eardley; 4. Kepler's third law in general relativity Steven Detweiler; 5. Black hole spacetimes: testing numerical relativity David H. Bernstein, David W. Hobill and Larry L. Smarr; 6. Three dimensional initial data of numerical relativity Ken-ichi Oohara and Takashi Nakamura; 7. Initial data for collisions of black holes and other gravitational miscellany James W. York, Jr.; 8. Analytic-numerical matching for gravitational waveform extraction Andrew M. Abrahams; 9. Supernovae, gravitational radiation and the quadrupole formula L. S. Finn; 10. Gravitational radiation from perturbations of stellar core collapse models Edward Seidel and Thomas Moore; 11. General relativistic implicit radiation hydrodynamics in polar sliced space-time Paul J. Schinder; 12. General relativistic radiation hydrodynamics in spherically symmetric spacetimes A. Mezzacappa and R. A. Matzner; 13. Constraint preserving transport for magnetohydrodynamics John F. Hawley and Charles R. Evans; 14. Enforcing the momentum constraints during axisymmetric spacelike simulations Charles R. Evans; 15. Experiences with an adaptive mesh refinement algorithm in numerical relativity Matthew W. Choptuik; 16. The multigrid technique Gregory B. Cook; 17. Finite element methods in numerical relativity P. J. Mann; 18. Pseudo-spectral methods applied to gravitational collapse Silvano Bonazzola and Jean-Alain Marck; 19. Methods in 3D numerical relativity Takashi Nakamura and Ken-ichi Oohara; 20. Nonaxisymmetric rotating gravitational collapse and gravitational radiation Richard F. Stark; 21. Nonaxisymmetric neutron star collisions: initial results using smooth particle hydrodynamics

  14. Spectral fitting inversion of low-frequency normal modes with self-coupling and cross-coupling of toroidal and spheroidal multiplets: numerical experiments to estimate the isotropic and anisotropic velocity structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Hitoshi

    2016-06-01

    The aspherical structure of the Earth is described in terms of lateral heterogeneity and anisotropy of the P- and S-wave velocities, density heterogeneity, ellipticity and rotation of the Earth and undulation of the discontinuity interfaces of the seismic wave velocities. Its structure significantly influences the normal mode spectra of the Earth's free oscillation in the form of cross-coupling between toroidal and spheroidal multiplets and self-coupling between the singlets forming them. Thus, the aspherical structure must be conversely estimated from the free oscillation spectra influenced by the cross-coupling and self-coupling. In the present study, we improve a spectral fitting inversion algorithm which was developed in a previous study to retrieve the global structures of the isotropic and anisotropic velocities of the P and S waves from the free oscillation spectra. The main improvement is that the geographical distribution of the intensity of the S-wave azimuthal anisotropy is represented by a nonlinear combination of structure coefficients for the anisotropic velocity structure, whereas in the previous study it was expanded into a generalized spherical harmonic series. Consequently, the improved inversion algorithm reduces the number of unknown parameters that must be determined compared to the previous inversion algorithm and employs a one-step inversion method by which the structure coefficients for the isotropic and anisotropic velocities are directly estimated from the fee oscillation spectra. The applicability of the improved inversion is examined by several numerical experiments using synthetic spectral data, which are produced by supposing a variety of isotropic and anisotropic velocity structures, earthquake source parameters and station-event pairs. Furthermore, the robustness of the inversion algorithm is investigated with respect to the back-ground noise contaminating the spectral data as well as truncating the series expansions by finite terms

  15. Dynamic analysis and numerical experiments for balancing of the continuous single-disc and single-span rotor-bearing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Aiming; Cheng, Xiaohan; Meng, Guoying; Xia, Yun; Wo, Lei; Wang, Ziyi

    2017-03-01

    Identification of rotor unbalance is critical for normal operation of rotating machinery. The single-disc and single-span rotor, as the most fundamental rotor-bearing system, has attracted research attention over a long time. In this paper, the continuous single-disc and single-span rotor is modeled as a homogeneous and elastic Euler-Bernoulli beam, and the forces applied by bearings and disc on the shaft are considered as point forces. A fourth-order non-homogeneous partial differential equation set with homogeneous boundary condition is solved for analytical solution, which expresses the unbalance response as a function of position, rotor unbalance and the stiffness and damping coefficients of bearings. Based on this analytical method, a novel Measurement Point Vector Method (MPVM) is proposed to identify rotor unbalance while operating. Only a measured unbalance response registered for four selected cross-sections of the rotor-shaft under steady-state operating conditions is needed when using the method. Numerical simulation shows that the detection error of the proposed method is very small when measurement error is negligible. The proposed method provides an efficient way for rotor balancing without test runs and external excitations.

  16. Verbal structure of numerals and digits handwriting: new evidence from kinematics.

    PubMed

    Lochy, Aliette; Pillon, Agnesa; Zesiger, Pascal; Seron, Xavier

    2002-01-01

    Two experiments used a digitizing tablet to analyse the temporal, spatial, and kinematic characteristics of handwritten production of arabic numbers. They addressed a specific issue of the numerical domain: Does the lexical and syntactic structure of verbal numerals influence the production of arabic numerals (Experiments 1 and 2), even after enforced semantic processing in a comparison task (Experiment 2)? Subjects had to write multi-digit arabic numerals (e.g., 1200) presented in two different verbal structures: a multiplicative one (e.g., teen-hundred, douze cents (twelve hundred)) or an additive one (e.g., thousand-unit-hundred, mille deux cents (one thousand two hundred)). Results show differences in the inter-digit jumps that reflect the influence of the structure of verbal numerals, even after the semantic task. This finding is discussed with regard to different models of number transcoding (McCloskey, Caramazza, & Basili, 1985; Power & Dal Martello, 1990, 1997).

  17. Geophysical monitoring of solute transport in dual-domain environments through laboratory experiments, field-scale solute tracer tests, and numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Ryan David

    The advection-dispersion equation (ADE) fails to describe non-Fickian solute transport breakthrough curves (BTCs) in saturated porous media in both laboratory and field experiments, necessitating the use of other models. The dual-domain mass transfer (DDMT) model partitions the total porosity into mobile and less-mobile domains with an exchange of mass between the two domains, and this model can reproduce better fits to BTCs in many systems than ADE-based models. However, direct experimental estimation of DDMT model parameters remains elusive and model parameters are often calculated a posteriori by an optimization procedure. Here, we investigate the use of geophysical tools (direct-current resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and complex conductivity) to estimate these model parameters directly. We use two different samples of the zeolite clinoptilolite, a material shown to demonstrate solute mass transfer due to a significant internal porosity, and provide the first evidence that direct-current electrical methods can track solute movement into and out of a less-mobile pore space in controlled laboratory experiments. We quantify the effects of assuming single-rate DDMT for multirate mass transfer systems. We analyze pore structures using material characterization methods (mercury porosimetry, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray computer tomography), and compare these observations to geophysical measurements. Nuclear magnetic resonance in conjunction with direct-current resistivity measurements can constrain mobile and less-mobile porosities, but complex conductivity may have little value in relation to mass transfer despite the hypothesis that mass transfer and complex conductivity lengths scales are related. Finally, we conduct a geoelectrical monitored tracer test at the Macrodispersion Experiment (MADE) site in Columbus, MS. We relate hydraulic and electrical conductivity measurements to generate a 3D hydraulic conductivity field, and compare to

  18. Experiment and numerical simulation on cross-die forming of SUS304 metastable austenitic stainless using a modified Johnson-Cook model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xifeng; Ding, Wei; Ye, Liyan; Chen, Jun

    2013-12-01

    True stress-strain curves of SUS304 metastable austenitic stainless steel at various strain rates were fitted by a modified Johnson-Cook material model. The effect of blank-holder force on Cross-die forming of SUS304 stainless steel was studied. The forming process was also simulated by the software Marc based on this model. Major strain distribution, thickness distribution and load-displacement were compared between experiment and simulation. The results indicated the modified Johnson-Cook model could well predict the deformation behavior of SUS304 stainless steel. The martensitie volume fraction at different positions of the formed part was in good agreement with what can be expected.

  19. Numerical Analysis of the SCHOLAR Supersonic Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Carlos G.; Cutler, Andrew D.

    2003-01-01

    The SCHOLAR scramjet experiment is the subject of an ongoing numerical investigation. The facility nozzle and combustor were solved separate and sequentially, with the exit conditions of the former used as inlet conditions for the latter. A baseline configuration for the numerical model was compared with the available experimental data. It was found that ignition-delay was underpredicted and fuel-plume penetration overpredicted, while the pressure rise was close to experimental values. In addition, grid-convergence by means of grid-sequencing could not be established. The effects of the different turbulence parameters were quantified. It was found that it was not possible to simultaneously predict the three main parameters of this flow: pressure-rise, ignition-delay, and fuel-plume penetration.

  20. Effect of 2004 tsunami on groundwater in a coastal aquifer of Sri Lanka: Tank experiments, field observations and numerical modelling (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vithanage, M. S.; Engesgaard, P. K.; Jensen, K. H.; Obeysekera, J.; Villholth, K. G.; Illangasekare, T. H.

    2009-12-01

    December 2004 tsunami provided a motivation to study the impact of the tsunami on shallow groundwater systems in the east coast of Sri Lanka. This particular natural hazard devastated the coastal aquifer systems of many countries in the region. Field investigations were carried out in a transect, located at the eastern coast Sri Lanka, perpendicular to the coastline on a 2.4 km wide sand stretch bounded by the sea and a lagoon and was partly destructed by the wave. Measurements of groundwater table and electrical conductivity of the groundwater were carried out from October, 2005 to September, 2006. Also, few physical experiments were undertaken in an intermediate scale tank (5 m long, 1.2 m tall and 0.05 m width) with three different subsurface configurations. Physical experimental setup, the field aquifer system and saltwater contamination was modeled using HST3D, a variable density flow and solute transport code, based on observations made in the field with the aim to understand the tsunami plume behavior and estimate the aquifer cleansing time. Physical experiments demonstrated that the tsunami saltwater plume entered into the aquifer is highly unstable and the flush-out times depend on the hydrostratigraphy of the media. Also fresh water recharge pushes the saltwater deeper into the aquifer slowing the total aquifer flush-out time. Electrical conductivity values in the field showed a reduction with the monsoonal rainfall following the tsunami while the rate of reduction was low during the dry season. With the freshwater recharge by the monsoon rainfall, the upper part of the aquifer (top 4.5 m) had returned to fresh groundwater conditions (EC<1000 μS/cm) around mid 2007. Although the top 6 m of the aquifer becomes fresh (<1000 μS/cm) in 5 years, it may take up to more than 15 years for the whole aquifer to fully clean. Also, the EC and some chemical parameters in the field showed that the post-tsunami well cleaning and pumping has likely led to retention of