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Sample records for additional operating costs

  1. Conceptual HALT (Hydrate Addition at Low Temperature) scaleup design: Capital and operating costs: Part 5. [Hydrate addition at low temperature for the removal of SO/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, M.; Kerivan, D.; Hendrick, C.; Kosek, B.; Tackett, D.; Golightley, M.

    1988-12-01

    Hydrate addition at low temperature (or the HALT process) is a retrofit option for moderate SO/sub 2/ removal efficiency in coal burning utility plants. This dry FGD process involves injecting calcium based dry hydrate particles into flue gas ducting downstream of the air preheater where the flue gas temperature is typically in the range of 280-325/degree/F. This report is comprised of the conceptual scaleup design of the HALT process to a 180 MW and a 500 MW coal fired utility station followed by detailed capital and operating cost estimates. A cost sensitivity analysis of major process variables for the 500 MW unit is also included. 1 fig.

  2. Estimating airline operating costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, D. V.

    1978-01-01

    A review was made of the factors affecting commercial aircraft operating and delay costs. From this work, an airline operating cost model was developed which includes a method for estimating the labor and material costs of individual airframe maintenance systems. The model, similar in some respects to the standard Air Transport Association of America (ATA) Direct Operating Cost Model, permits estimates of aircraft-related costs not now included in the standard ATA model (e.g., aircraft service, landing fees, flight attendants, and control fees). A study of the cost of aircraft delay was also made and a method for estimating the cost of certain types of airline delay is described.

  3. Estimating Airline Operating Costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, D. V.

    1978-01-01

    The factors affecting commercial aircraft operating and delay costs were used to develop an airline operating cost model which includes a method for estimating the labor and material costs of individual airframe maintenance systems. The model permits estimates of aircraft related costs, i.e., aircraft service, landing fees, flight attendants, and control fees. A method for estimating the costs of certain types of airline delay is also described.

  4. Operational cost drivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholz, Arthur L.; Dickinson, William J.

    1988-01-01

    To be economically viable, the operations cost of launch vehicles must be reduced by an order of magnitude as compared to the Space Transportation System (STS). A summary of propulsion-related operations cost drivers derived from a two-year study of Shuttle ground operations is presented. Examples are given of the inordinate time and cost of launch operations caused by propulsion systems designs that did not adequately consider impacts on prelaunching processing. Typical of these cost drivers are those caused by central hydraulic systems, storable propellants, gimballed engines, multiple propellants, He and N2 systems and purges, hard starts, high maintenance turbopumps, accessibility problems, and most significantly, the use of multiple, nonintegrated RCS, OMS, and main propulsion systems. Recovery and refurbishment of SRBs have resulted in expensive crash and salvage operations. Vehicle system designers are encouraged to be acutely aware of these cost drivers and to incorporate solutions (beginning with the design concepts) to avoid business as usual and costs as usual.

  5. Launch systems operations cost modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Mark K.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the launch systems operations modeling portion of a larger model development effort, NASA's Space Operations Cost Model (SOCM), led by NASA HQ. The SOCM study team, which includes cost and technical experts from each NASA Field Center and various contractors, has been tasked to model operations costs for all future NASA mission concepts including planetary and Earth orbiting science missions, space facilities, and launch systems. The launch systems operations modeling effort has near term significance for assessing affordability of our next generation launch vehicles and directing technology investments, although it provides only a part of the necessary inputs to assess life cycle costs for all elements that determine affordability for a launch system. Presented here is a methodology to estimate requirements associated with a launch facility infrastructure, or Spaceport, from start-up/initialization into steady-state operation. Included are descriptions of the reference data used, the unique estimating methodology that combines cost lookup tables, parametric relationships, and constructively-developed correlations of cost driver input values to collected reference data, and the output categories that can be used by economic and market models. Also, future plans to improve integration of launch vehicle development cost models, reliability and maintainability models, economic and market models, and this operations model to facilitate overall launch system life cycle performance simulations will be presented.

  6. The Launch Systems Operations Cost Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, Frank A.; Hamaker, Joseph W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    One of NASA's primary missions is to reduce the cost of access to space while simultaneously increasing safety. A key component, and one of the least understood, is the recurring operations and support cost for reusable launch systems. In order to predict these costs, NASA, under the leadership of the Independent Program Assessment Office (IPAO), has commissioned the development of a Launch Systems Operations Cost Model (LSOCM). LSOCM is a tool to predict the operations & support (O&S) cost of new and modified reusable (and partially reusable) launch systems. The requirements are to predict the non-recurring cost for the ground infrastructure and the recurring cost of maintaining that infrastructure, performing vehicle logistics, and performing the O&S actions to return the vehicle to flight. In addition, the model must estimate the time required to cycle the vehicle through all of the ground processing activities. The current version of LSOCM is an amalgamation of existing tools, leveraging our understanding of shuttle operations cost with a means of predicting how the maintenance burden will change as the vehicle becomes more aircraft like. The use of the Conceptual Operations Manpower Estimating Tool/Operations Cost Model (COMET/OCM) provides a solid point of departure based on shuttle and expendable launch vehicle (ELV) experience. The incorporation of the Reliability and Maintainability Analysis Tool (RMAT) as expressed by a set of response surface model equations gives a method for estimating how changing launch system characteristics affects cost and cycle time as compared to today's shuttle system. Plans are being made to improve the model. The development team will be spending the next few months devising a structured methodology that will enable verified and validated algorithms to give accurate cost estimates. To assist in this endeavor the LSOCM team is part of an Agency wide effort to combine resources with other cost and operations professionals to

  7. Total Cost Management: Analyzing Operational Support Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenny, Hans J.

    1996-01-01

    Total cost management, an innovation useful in higher education, is best implemented in the institution's support services. Total cost management is the practice of analyzing and improving an institution's financial and qualitative performance when producing a particular product or service, paying attention to the complete work process and all…

  8. Optimising costs in WLCG operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alandes Pradillo, María; Dimou, Maria; Flix, Josep; Forti, Alessandra; Sciabà, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    The Worldwide LHC Computing Grid project (WLCG) provides the computing and storage resources required by the LHC collaborations to store, process and analyse the 50 Petabytes of data annually generated by the LHC. The WLCG operations are coordinated by a distributed team of managers and experts and performed by people at all participating sites and from all the experiments. Several improvements in the WLCG infrastructure have been implemented during the first long LHC shutdown to prepare for the increasing needs of the experiments during Run2 and beyond. However, constraints in funding will affect not only the computing resources but also the available effort for operations. This paper presents the results of a detailed investigation on the allocation of the effort in the different areas of WLCG operations, identifies the most important sources of inefficiency and proposes viable strategies for optimising the operational cost, taking into account the current trends in the evolution of the computing infrastructure and the computing models of the experiments.

  9. Launch Vehicle Production and Operations Cost Metrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Neeley, James R.; Blackburn, Ruby F.

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, launch vehicle cost has been evaluated based on $/Kg to orbit. This metric is calculated based on assumptions not typically met by a specific mission. These assumptions include the specified orbit whether Low Earth Orbit (LEO), Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO), or both. The metric also assumes the payload utilizes the full lift mass of the launch vehicle, which is rarely true even with secondary payloads.1,2,3 Other approaches for cost metrics have been evaluated including unit cost of the launch vehicle and an approach to consider the full program production and operations costs.4 Unit cost considers the variable cost of the vehicle and the definition of variable costs are discussed. The full program production and operation costs include both the variable costs and the manufacturing base. This metric also distinguishes operations costs from production costs, including pre-flight operational testing. Operations costs also consider the costs of flight operations, including control center operation and maintenance. Each of these 3 cost metrics show different sensitivities to various aspects of launch vehicle cost drivers. The comparison of these metrics provides the strengths and weaknesses of each yielding an assessment useful for cost metric selection for launch vehicle programs.

  10. Treatment program operations and costs.

    PubMed

    Broome, Kirk M; Knight, Danica K; Joe, George W; Flynn, Patrick M

    2012-03-01

    This study investigates how average costs for an episode of care in outpatient drug-free (ODF) treatment relate to clinical intensity (length of stay and weekly counseling hours) and program structure (e.g., size, staffing), controlling for prices paid and selected clientele measures. Based on cost assessments from a naturalistic sample of 67 programs located across the United States (using the Treatment Cost Analysis Tool), robust regression techniques showed that programs having 10% longer treatment stays had episode costs 7% higher; those having 10% more weekly counseling hours per client had 4% higher episode costs. Other important factors included wages, amount of counselors' time conducting sessions, and serving more clients referred from the criminal justice system. The study provides valuable information on treatment program features that relate to costs. Most importantly, cost differences associated with longer stays or more intensive counseling protocols appear modest and may be justified by improved client outcomes. PMID:22154033

  11. A Study of Additional Costs of Second Language Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwen, Nelly

    A study was conducted whose primary aim was to identify and explain additional costs incurred by Alberta, Canada school jurisdictions providing second language instruction in 1980. Additional costs were defined as those which would not have been incurred had the second language program not been in existence. Three types of additional costs were…

  12. Additive Manufacturing of Low Cost Upper Stage Propulsion Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Protz, Christopher; Bowman, Randy; Cooper, Ken; Fikes, John; Taminger, Karen; Wright, Belinda

    2014-01-01

    NASA is currently developing Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies and design tools aimed at reducing the costs and manufacturing time of regeneratively cooled rocket engine components. These Low Cost Upper Stage Propulsion (LCUSP) tasks are funded through NASA's Game Changing Development Program in the Space Technology Mission Directorate. The LCUSP project will develop a copper alloy additive manufacturing design process and develop and optimize the Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication (EBF3) manufacturing process to direct deposit a nickel alloy structural jacket and manifolds onto an SLM manufactured GRCop chamber and Ni-alloy nozzle. In order to develop these processes, the project will characterize both the microstructural and mechanical properties of the SLMproduced GRCop-84, and will explore and document novel design techniques specific to AM combustion devices components. These manufacturing technologies will be used to build a 25K-class regenerative chamber and nozzle (to be used with tested DMLS injectors) that will be tested individually and as a system in hot fire tests to demonstrate the applicability of the technologies. These tasks are expected to bring costs and manufacturing time down as spacecraft propulsion systems typically comprise more than 70% of the total vehicle cost and account for a significant portion of the development schedule. Additionally, high pressure/high temperature combustion chambers and nozzles must be regeneratively cooled to survive their operating environment, causing their design to be time consuming and costly to build. LCUSP presents an opportunity to develop and demonstrate a process that can infuse these technologies into industry, build competition, and drive down costs of future engines.

  13. Operating cost model for local service airlines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. L.; Andrastek, D. A.

    1976-01-01

    Several mathematical models now exist which determine the operating economics for a United States trunk airline. These models are valuable in assessing the impact of new aircraft into an airline's fleet. The use of a trunk airline cost model for the local service airline does not result in representative operating costs. A new model is presented which is representative of the operating conditions and resultant costs for the local service airline. The calculated annual direct and indirect operating costs for two multiequipment airlines are compared with their actual operating experience.

  14. FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT OPERATING COSTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia State Dept. of Community Colleges, Richmond.

    CONCLUSIONS IN THREE AREAS WERE DERIVED FROM TABULAR PRESENTATIONS OF UNIT COST DATA FROM COLORADO, DELAWARE, GEORGIA, ILLINOIS, NORTH CAROLINA, OKLAHOMA, AND OREGON--(1) SMALL COLLEGES COST MORE TO OPERATE THAN LARGER COLLEGES. COSTS INCREASE AS MORE STUDENTS ENROLL IN A COLLEGE BUT NOT IN PROPORTION TO THE ENROLLMENT. (2) VOCATIONAL AND…

  15. Public Television Station Projected Operations and Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, James A.

    To provide information concerning projected operating characteristics of public television stations, this report summarizes and presents the conclusions of a much larger report based on questionnaires sent to public television licencees. It deals with scheduling, program needs, production costs, broadcast costs, funding mix, and other costs.…

  16. Operating Costs of Educational Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isler, Norman P.

    The references included were drawn from the documents received and processed to date by the ERIC Clearinghouse on Educational Facilities, and are organized into the following sections--(1) school business, (2) maintenance and operations, (3) insurance programs, (4) property accounting, (5) purchasing, and (6) food service. (FS)

  17. Unit costs of waste management operations

    SciTech Connect

    Kisieleski, W.E.; Folga, S.M.; Gillette, J.L.; Buehring, W.A.

    1994-04-01

    This report provides estimates of generic costs for the management, disposal, and surveillance of various waste types, from the time they are generated to the end of their institutional control. Costs include monitoring and surveillance costs required after waste disposal. Available data on costs for the treatment, storage, disposal, and transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive, low-level radioactive, transuranic radioactive, hazardous, mixed (low-level radioactive plus hazardous), and sanitary wastes are presented. The costs cover all major elements that contribute to the total system life-cycle (i.e., ``cradle to grave``) cost for each waste type. This total cost is the sum of fixed and variable cost components. Variable costs are affected by operating rates and throughput capacities and vary in direct proportion to changes in the level of activity. Fixed costs remain constant regardless of changes in the amount of waste, operating rates, or throughput capacities. Key factors that influence cost, such as the size and throughput capacity of facilities, are identified. In many cases, ranges of values for the key variables are presented. For some waste types, the planned or estimated costs for storage and disposal, projected to the year 2000, are presented as graphics.

  18. Modeling Operations Costs for Human Exploration Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shishko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Operations and support (O&S) costs for human spaceflight have not received the same attention in the cost estimating community as have development costs. This is unfortunate as O&S costs typically comprise a majority of life-cycle costs (LCC) in such programs as the International Space Station (ISS) and the now-cancelled Constellation Program. Recognizing this, the Constellation Program and NASA HQs supported the development of an O&S cost model specifically for human spaceflight. This model, known as the Exploration Architectures Operations Cost Model (ExAOCM), provided the operations cost estimates for a variety of alternative human missions to the moon, Mars, and Near-Earth Objects (NEOs) in architectural studies. ExAOCM is philosophically based on the DoD Architecture Framework (DoDAF) concepts of operational nodes, systems, operational functions, and milestones. This paper presents some of the historical background surrounding the development of the model, and discusses the underlying structure, its unusual user interface, and lastly, previous examples of its use in the aforementioned architectural studies.

  19. Toward lowering the cost of mission operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, S. D.; Ledbetter, K. W.

    1993-01-01

    The mission operations system is one of the more significant drivers of the cost of the mission operations and data analysis segment of missions. In large or long-lived projects, the MOS can also be a driver in total mission cost. Larger numbers of missions, together with an increasingly cost-conscious environment, dictate that future missions must more strictly control costs as they perform to their requirements. It is therefore prudent to examine the conduct of past missions for ways to conserve resources. In this paper we review inputs made to past projects' 'lessons-learned' activities, in which personnel from past projects (among other things) identified major cost drivers of MOS's and considered how economies were or might have been realized in both design and performance of their MOS. Common themes among four such reviews are summarized in an attempt to provide suggestions for cost reduction in future missions.

  20. Operation and maintenance cost-cutting

    SciTech Connect

    Hollingshead, T.W.

    1996-12-31

    This presentation by Timothy W. Hollingshead, Technical Services Manager, Pacific Gas and Electric, is about cutting costs in the Operation and Maintenance phase of geothermal energy production. The necessity of cost control, keeping workers well-trained and avoiding OSHA fines, taking advantages of new technologies, and establishing predictive maintenance programs are some of the issues discussed in this article.

  1. 14 CFR 93.129 - Additional operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES High Density Traffic Airports § 93... under IFR at a designated high density traffic airport without regard to the maximum number of operations allocated for that airport if the operation is not a scheduled operation to or from a high...

  2. 14 CFR 93.129 - Additional operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES High Density Traffic Airports § 93... under IFR at a designated high density traffic airport without regard to the maximum number of operations allocated for that airport if the operation is not a scheduled operation to or from a high...

  3. 14 CFR 93.129 - Additional operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES High Density Traffic Airports § 93... under IFR at a designated high density traffic airport without regard to the maximum number of operations allocated for that airport if the operation is not a scheduled operation to or from a high...

  4. 14 CFR 93.129 - Additional operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES High Density Traffic Airports § 93... under IFR at a designated high density traffic airport without regard to the maximum number of operations allocated for that airport if the operation is not a scheduled operation to or from a high...

  5. 14 CFR 93.129 - Additional operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES High Density Traffic Airports § 93... under IFR at a designated high density traffic airport without regard to the maximum number of operations allocated for that airport if the operation is not a scheduled operation to or from a high...

  6. Low Cost Mission Operations Workshop. [Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The presentations given at the Low Cost (Space) Mission Operations (LCMO) Workshop are outlined. The LCMO concepts are covered in four introductory sections: Definition of Mission Operations (OPS); Mission Operations (MOS) Elements; The Operations Concept; and Mission Operations for Two Classes of Missions (operationally simple and complex). Individual presentations cover the following topics: Science Data Processing and Analysis; Mis sion Design, Planning, and Sequencing; Data Transport and Delivery, and Mission Coordination and Engineering Analysis. A list of panelists who participated in the conference is included along with a listing of the contact persons for obtaining more information concerning LCMO at JPL. The presentation of this document is in outline and graphic form.

  7. Cost efficient operations for Discovery class missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, G. E.; Landshof, J. A.; Whitworth, G. W.

    1994-01-01

    The Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) program at The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory is scheduled to launch the first spacecraft in NASA's Discovery program. The Discovery program is to promote low cost spacecraft design, development, and mission operations for planetary space missions. The authors describe the NEAR mission and discuss the design and development of the NEAR Mission Operations System and the NEAR Ground System with an emphasis on those aspects of the design that are conducive to low-cost operations.

  8. Cost, capability, and risk for planetary operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaughlin, William I.; Deutsch, Marie J.; Miller, Lanny J.; Wolff, Donna M.; Zawacki, Steven J.

    1992-01-01

    The three key factors for flight projects - cost, capability, and risk - are examined with respect to their interplay, the uplink process, cost drivers, and risk factors. Scientific objectives are translated into a computer program during the uplink process, and examples are given relating to the Voyager Interstellar Mission, Galileo, and the Comet Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby. The development of a multimission sequence system based on these uplinks is described with reference to specific subsystems such as the pointer and the sequence generator. Operational cost drivers include mission, flight-system, and ground-system complexity, uplink traffic, and work force. Operational risks are listed in terms of the mission operations, the environment, and the mission facilities. The uplink process can be analyzed in terms of software development, and spacecraft operability is shown to be an important factor from the initial stages of spacecraft development.

  9. EOS Operations Systems: EDOS Implemented Changes to Reduce Operations Costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordier, Guy R.; Gomez-Rosa, Carlos; McLemore, Bruce D.

    2007-01-01

    The authors describe in this paper the progress achieved to-date with the reengineering of the Earth Observing System (EOS) Data and Operations System (EDOS), the experience gained in the process and the ensuing reduction of ground systems operations costs. The reengineering effort included a major methodology change, applying to an existing schedule driven system, a data-driven system approach.

  10. 24 CFR 578.55 - Operating costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Operating costs. 578.55 Section 578... more than 50 percent of the units or area is paid for with grant funds; (5) Electricity, gas, and water...) The maintenance and repair of housing; (2) Property taxes and insurance; (3) Scheduled payments to...

  11. US nuclear power plant operating cost and experience summaries

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, W.E.; Reid, R.L.; White, V.S.

    1998-02-01

    NUREG/CR-6577, U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries, has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Cost incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, representing fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operating summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from annual operating reports submitted by the licensees, plant histories contained in Nuclear Power Experience, trade press articles, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) web site (www.nrc.gov).

  12. Children's Construction of the Operation of Addition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grobecker, Betsey

    Six- to eight-year-old children (N=42) who were identified by their teachers as within the average range of ability in mathematics were individually tested on three different mathematics tasks. On the flashcard task and the nonverbal task where children replicated the number of buttons placed under a box, the same 14 addition problems with sums up…

  13. Vehicle design for low cost operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangsund, E.; Caluori, V.

    1986-10-01

    Based on considerations derived from a study examining transportation systems for drivers of operational costs, a near term expendable launch vehicle (ELV) is proposed. The largest single factor projected to decrease cost for the STS is an increase in the degree of reusability and a reduction in the maintenance and refurbishment of that reusable hardware. The proposed candidate ELV system has an assessed reliability value of 0.985, and it offers dual redundant avionics. The conservative design approach incorporates existing qualified Saturn V and Shuttle technology for Stages 1 and 2, and Leasat and multimission bus integral propulsion technology for the transfer vehicle, an all liquid engine using storable propellants.

  14. Cost Estimation of Laser Additive Manufacturing of Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piili, Heidi; Happonen, Ari; Väistö, Tapio; Venkataramanan, Vijaikrishnan; Partanen, Jouni; Salminen, Antti

    Laser additive manufacturing (LAM) is a layer wise fabrication method in which a laser beam melts metallic powder to form solid objects. Although 3D printing has been invented 30 years ago, the industrial use is quite limited whereas the introduction of cheap consumer 3D printers, in recent years, has familiarized the 3D printing. Interest is focused more and more in manufacturing of functional parts. Aim of this study is to define and discuss the current economic opportunities and restrictions of LAM process. Manufacturing costs were studied with different build scenarios each with estimated cost structure by calculated build time and calculating the costs of the machine, material and energy with optimized machine utilization. All manufacturing and time simulations in this study were carried out with a research machine equal to commercial EOS M series equipment. The study shows that the main expense in LAM is the investment cost of the LAM machine, compared to which the relative proportions of the energy and material costs are very low. The manufacturing time per part is the key factor to optimize costs of LAM.

  15. The cost of trauma operating theatre inefficiency.

    PubMed

    Ang, W W; Sabharwal, S; Johannsson, H; Bhattacharya, R; Gupte, C M

    2016-05-01

    The National Health Service (NHS) is currently facing a financial crisis with a projected deficit of £2billion by the end of financial year 2015/16. As operating rooms (OR) are one of the costliest components in secondary care, improving theatre efficiency should be at the forefront of efforts to improve health service efficiency. The objectives of this study were to characterize the causes of trauma OR delays and to estimate the cost of this inefficiency. A 1-month prospective single-centre study in St. Mary's Hospital. Turnaround time (TT) was used as the surrogate parameter to measure theatre efficiency. Factors including patient age, ASA score and presence of surgical and anaesthetic consultant were evaluated to identify positive or negative associations with theatre delays. Inefficiency cost was calculated by multiplying the time wasted with staff capacity costs and opportunity costs, found to be £24.77/minute. The commonest causes for increased TT were delays in sending for patients (50%) and problems with patient transport to the OR (31%). 461 min of delay was observed in 12 days, equivalent to loss of £951.58/theatre/day. Non-statistically significant trends were seen between length of delays and advancing patient age, ASA score and absence of either a senior clinician or an anaesthetic consultant. Interestingly, the trend was not as strong for absence of an anaesthetic consultant. This study found delays in operating TT to represent a sizable cost, with potential efficiency savings based on TT of £347,327/theatre/year. Further study of a larger sample is warranted to better evaluate the identified trends. PMID:27047660

  16. The cost of trauma operating theatre inefficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ang, W.W.; Sabharwal, S.; Johannsson, H.; Bhattacharya, R.; Gupte, C.M.

    2016-01-01

    The National Health Service (NHS) is currently facing a financial crisis with a projected deficit of £2billion by the end of financial year 2015/16. As operating rooms (OR) are one of the costliest components in secondary care, improving theatre efficiency should be at the forefront of efforts to improve health service efficiency. The objectives of this study were to characterize the causes of trauma OR delays and to estimate the cost of this inefficiency. A 1-month prospective single-centre study in St. Mary's Hospital. Turnaround time (TT) was used as the surrogate parameter to measure theatre efficiency. Factors including patient age, ASA score and presence of surgical and anaesthetic consultant were evaluated to identify positive or negative associations with theatre delays. Inefficiency cost was calculated by multiplying the time wasted with staff capacity costs and opportunity costs, found to be £24.77/minute. The commonest causes for increased TT were delays in sending for patients (50%) and problems with patient transport to the OR (31%). 461 min of delay was observed in 12 days, equivalent to loss of £951.58/theatre/day. Non-statistically significant trends were seen between length of delays and advancing patient age, ASA score and absence of either a senior clinician or an anaesthetic consultant. Interestingly, the trend was not as strong for absence of an anaesthetic consultant. This study found delays in operating TT to represent a sizable cost, with potential efficiency savings based on TT of £347,327/theatre/year. Further study of a larger sample is warranted to better evaluate the identified trends. PMID:27047660

  17. Test report - caustic addition system operability test procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Parazin, R.E.

    1995-10-13

    This Operability Test Report documents the test results of test procedure WHC-SD-WM-OTP-167 ``Caustic Addition System Operability Test Procedure``. The Objective of the test was to verify the operability of the 241-AN-107 Caustic Addition System. The objective of the test was met

  18. 24 CFR 891.150 - Operating cost standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Operating cost standards. 891.150... average annual operating cost of comparable housing for the elderly or for persons with disabilities in... housing costs such as the Consumer Price Index. The operating cost standards shall be developed based...

  19. 48 CFR 352.216-70 - Additional cost principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... indirect costs on the same basis as the allocation of indirect costs to sponsored research and development. (3) The cost of IR & D, including its proportionate share of indirect costs, is unallowable. (End of... are allowable as indirect costs. (3) B & P costs of past accounting periods are unallowable in...

  20. 48 CFR 3452.216-70 - Additional cost principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... costs of the current accounting period are allowable as indirect costs; bid and proposal costs of past... indirect costs on the same basis as the allocations of indirect costs of sponsored research and development. The costs of independent research and development, including its proportionate share of indirect...

  1. 48 CFR 3452.216-70 - Additional cost principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... costs of the current accounting period are allowable as indirect costs; bid and proposal costs of past... indirect costs on the same basis as the allocations of indirect costs of sponsored research and development. The costs of independent research and development, including its proportionate share of indirect...

  2. 48 CFR 3452.216-70 - Additional cost principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... costs of the current accounting period are allowable as indirect costs; bid and proposal costs of past... indirect costs on the same basis as the allocations of indirect costs of sponsored research and development. The costs of independent research and development, including its proportionate share of indirect...

  3. LIFE Cost of Electricity, Capital and Operating Costs

    SciTech Connect

    Anklam, T

    2011-04-14

    Successful commercialization of fusion energy requires economic viability as well as technical and scientific feasibility. To assess economic viability, we have conducted a pre-conceptual level evaluation of LIFE economics. Unit costs are estimated from a combination of bottom-up costs estimates, working with representative vendors, and scaled results from previous studies of fission and fusion plants. An integrated process model of a LIFE power plant was developed to integrate and optimize unit costs and calculate top level metrics such as cost of electricity and power plant capital cost. The scope of this activity was the entire power plant site. Separately, a development program to deliver the required specialized equipment has been assembled. Results show that LIFE power plant cost of electricity and plant capital cost compare favorably to estimates for new-build LWR's, coal and gas - particularly if indicative costs of carbon capture and sequestration are accounted for.

  4. Costs for hazardous waste incineration: Capital, operation and maintenance, retrofit

    SciTech Connect

    Mc Cormick, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    This book discusses relationships between capital, and O and M costs for hazardous waste incineration and the various waste-specific, design-specific, and operational factors affecting these costs. Selected titles and subtitles: Capital and O and M Maintenance Cost Requirements; Design Assumptions and Engineering Calculations; Capital Cost Estimation; Annual Cost Estimation; Unit Disposal Cost Calculation; Retrofit Cost Relationships Incinerator Systems Considered; and Ionizing Wet Scrubber Costs.

  5. Start-up and operating costs for artisan cheese companies.

    PubMed

    Bouma, Andrea; Durham, Catherine A; Meunier-Goddik, Lisbeth

    2014-01-01

    Lack of valid economic data for artisan cheese making is a serious impediment to developing a realistic business plan and obtaining financing. The objective of this study was to determine approximate start-up and operating costs for an artisan cheese company. In addition, values are provided for the required size of processing and aging facilities associated with specific production volumes. Following in-depth interviews with existing artisan cheese makers, an economic model was developed to predict costs based on input variables such as production volume, production frequency, cheese types, milk types and cost, labor expenses, and financing. Estimated values for start-up cost for processing and aging facility ranged from $267,248 to $623,874 for annual production volumes of 3,402 kg (7,500 lb) and 27,216 kg (60,000 lb), respectively. First-year production costs ranged from $65,245 to $620,094 for the above-mentioned production volumes. It is likely that high start-up and operating costs remain a significant entry barrier for artisan cheese entrepreneurs. PMID:24746129

  6. A life cycle cost economics model for projects with uniformly varying operating costs. [management planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, D. S.

    1977-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed for calculating the life cycle costs for a project where the operating costs increase or decrease in a linear manner with time. The life cycle cost is shown to be a function of the investment costs, initial operating costs, operating cost gradient, project life time, interest rate for capital and salvage value. The results show that the life cycle cost for a project can be grossly underestimated (or overestimated) if the operating costs increase (or decrease) uniformly over time rather than being constant as is often assumed in project economic evaluations. The following range of variables is examined: (1) project life from 2 to 30 years; (2) interest rate from 0 to 15 percent per year; and (3) operating cost gradient from 5 to 90 percent of the initial operating costs. A numerical example plus tables and graphs is given to help calculate project life cycle costs over a wide range of variables.

  7. Can Additional Homeopathic Treatment Save Costs? A Retrospective Cost-Analysis Based on 44500 Insured Persons

    PubMed Central

    Ostermann, Julia K.; Reinhold, Thomas; Witt, Claudia M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to compare the health care costs for patients using additional homeopathic treatment (homeopathy group) with the costs for those receiving usual care (control group). Methods Cost data provided by a large German statutory health insurance company were retrospectively analysed from the societal perspective (primary outcome) and from the statutory health insurance perspective. Patients in both groups were matched using a propensity score matching procedure based on socio-demographic variables as well as costs, number of hospital stays and sick leave days in the previous 12 months. Total cumulative costs over 18 months were compared between the groups with an analysis of covariance (adjusted for baseline costs) across diagnoses and for six specific diagnoses (depression, migraine, allergic rhinitis, asthma, atopic dermatitis, and headache). Results Data from 44,550 patients (67.3% females) were available for analysis. From the societal perspective, total costs after 18 months were higher in the homeopathy group (adj. mean: EUR 7,207.72 [95% CI 7,001.14–7,414.29]) than in the control group (EUR 5,857.56 [5,650.98–6,064.13]; p<0.0001) with the largest differences between groups for productivity loss (homeopathy EUR 3,698.00 [3,586.48–3,809.53] vs. control EUR 3,092.84 [2,981.31–3,204.37]) and outpatient care costs (homeopathy EUR 1,088.25 [1,073.90–1,102.59] vs. control EUR 867.87 [853.52–882.21]). Group differences decreased over time. For all diagnoses, costs were higher in the homeopathy group than in the control group, although this difference was not always statistically significant. Conclusion Compared with usual care, additional homeopathic treatment was associated with significantly higher costs. These analyses did not confirm previously observed cost savings resulting from the use of homeopathy in the health care system. PMID:26230412

  8. Preliminary estimates of operating costs for lighter than air transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. L.; Ardema, M. D.

    1975-01-01

    A preliminary set of operating cost relationships are presented for airship transports. The starting point for the development of the relationships is the direct operating cost formulae and the indirect operating cost categories commonly used for estimating costs of heavier than air commercial transports. Modifications are made to the relationships to account for the unique features of airships. To illustrate the cost estimating method, the operating costs of selected airship cargo transports are computed. Conventional fully buoyant and hybrid semi-buoyant systems are investigated for a variety of speeds, payloads, ranges, and altitudes. Comparisons are made with aircraft transports for a range of cargo densities.

  9. Preliminary estimates of operating costs for lighter than air transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. L.; Ardema, M. D.

    1975-01-01

    Presented is a preliminary set of operating cost relationships for airship transports. The starting point for the development of the relationships is the direct operating cost formulae and the indirect operating cost categories commonly used for estimating costs of heavier than air commercial transports. Modifications are made to the relationships to account for the unique features of airships. To illustrate the cost estimating method, the operating costs of selected airship cargo transports are computed. Conventional fully buoyant and hybrid semi-buoyant systems are investigated for a variety of speeds, payloads, ranges, and altitudes. Comparisons are made with aircraft transports for a range of cargo densities.

  10. Cost effectiveness of operator features in equipment design.

    PubMed

    Williams, J C

    1983-06-01

    In design negotiation, the attribution of credible values to the incorporation or deletion of operator features allows engineers the freedom to judge the overall effect of human factors recommendations in relation to the achievement of a design specification. Likewise in the development phase, product planners frequently need more precise statements about productivity, training needs and general operational performance than, "it will be greater/less, worse/better than...". The method described utilises measured and synthetic data, learning theory and Markov processes to calculate the likelihood of operator task failure. These failure rates are then treated via filter factors derived from the application of the Nominal Groups Technique to give a global statement of the likelihood of operator failure resulting in unscheduled calls for service. Using the relationship between the cost of service calls and the overall life cost of developing, manufacturing, marketing and supporting a leased product, it is then possible to place credible values on the design features in question. Thus during the design process it becomes feasible to calculate the likely effects of human factors recommendations and modifications in relation to manufacturing costs, and thereby facilitate rational assessment of their implementation on a sound economic basis. This technique has been used to considerable effect, and represents a useful additional tool for the human factors practitioner in the design negotiation process. Further developments and refinements are planned, and it is anticipated that a similar technique will shortly be available to enable assessment of the effectiveness of product training programmes and job aids. PMID:15676470

  11. Estimating the additional cost of disability: beyond budget standards.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson-Meyers, Laura; Brown, Paul; McNeill, Robert; Patston, Philip; Dylan, Sacha; Baker, Ronelle

    2010-11-01

    Disabled people have long advocated for sufficient resources to live a life with the same rights and responsibilities as non-disabled people. Identifying the unique resource needs of disabled people relative to the population as a whole and understanding the source of these needs is critical for determining adequate levels of income support and for prioritising service provision. Previous attempts to identify the resources and costs associated with disability have tended to rely on surveys of current resource use. These approaches have been criticised as being inadequate for identifying the resources that would be required to achieve a similar standard of living to non-disabled people and for not using methods that are acceptable to and appropriate for the disabled community. The challenge is therefore to develop a methodology that accurately identifies these unique resource needs, uses an approach that is acceptable to the disabled community, enables all disabled people to participate, and distinguishes 'needs' from 'wants.' This paper describes and presents the rationale for a mixed methodology for identifying and prioritising the resource needs of disabled people. The project is a partnership effort between disabled researchers, a disability support organisation and academic researchers in New Zealand. The method integrates a social model of disability framework and an economic cost model using a budget standards approach to identify additional support, equipment, travel and time required to live an 'ordinary life' in the community. A survey is then used to validate the findings and identify information gaps and resource priorities of the community. Both the theoretical basis of the approach and the practical challenges of designing and implementing a methodology that is acceptable to the disabled community, service providers and funding agencies are discussed. PMID:20933315

  12. 48 CFR 3452.216-70 - Additional cost principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... scientific, cost and other data needed to support the bids, proposals and applications. Bid and proposal... practice is to treat these costs by some other method, they may be accepted if they are found to...

  13. 48 CFR 352.216-70 - Additional cost principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-Federal contracts, grants, and agreements, including the development of scientific, cost, and other data... method, they may be accepted if they are found to be reasonable and equitable. (4) B & P costs do...

  14. 48 CFR 3452.216-70 - Additional cost principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... scientific, cost, and other data needed to support the bids, proposals, and applications. Bid and proposal... practice is to treat these costs by some other method, they may be accepted if they are found to...

  15. 48 CFR 352.216-70 - Additional cost principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... include independent research and development (IR & D) costs covered by the following paragraph, or pre-award costs covered by paragraph 36 of Attachment B to OMB Circular A-122. (b) IR & D costs. (1) IR & D...-Federal contracts, grants, or other agreements. (2) IR & D shall be allocated its proportionate share...

  16. 48 CFR 352.216-70 - Additional cost principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... include independent research and development (IR & D) costs covered by the following paragraph, or pre-award costs covered by paragraph 36 of Attachment B to OMB Circular A-122. (b) IR & D costs. (1) IR & D...-Federal contracts, grants, or other agreements. (2) IR & D shall be allocated its proportionate share...

  17. 48 CFR 352.216-70 - Additional cost principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... include independent research and development (IR & D) costs covered by the following paragraph, or pre-award costs covered by paragraph 36 of Attachment B to OMB Circular A-122. (b) IR & D costs. (1) IR & D...-Federal contracts, grants, or other agreements. (2) IR & D shall be allocated its proportionate share...

  18. Breckinridge Project, initial effort. Report IX. Operating cost estimate

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    Operating costs are normally broken into three major categories: variable costs including raw materials, annual catalyst and chemicals, and utilities; semi-variable costs including labor and labor related cost; and fixed or capital related charges. The raw materials and utilities costs are proportional to production; however, a small component of utilities cost is independent of production. The catalyst and chemicals costs are also normally proportional to production. Semi-variable costs include direct labor, maintenance labor, labor supervision, contract maintenance, maintenance materials, payroll overheads, operation supplies, and general overhead and administration. Fixed costs include local taxes, insurance and the time value of the capital investment. The latter charge often includes the investor's anticipated return on investment. In determining operating costs for financial analysis, return on investment (ROI) and depreciation are not treated as cash operating costs. These costs are developed in the financial analysis; the annual operating cost determined here omits ROI and depreciation. Project Annual Operating Costs are summarized in Table 1. Detailed supporting information for the cost elements listed below is included in the following sections: Electrical, catalyst and chemicals, and salaries and wages.

  19. Integrated operations/payloads/fleet analysis. Volume 3: System costs. Appendix A: Program direct costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Individualized program direct costs for each satellite program are presented. This breakdown provides the activity level dependent costs for each satellite program. The activity level dependent costs, or, more simply, program direct costs, are comprised of the total payload costs (as these costs are strictly program dependent) and the direct launch vehicle costs. Only those incremental launch vehicle costs associated directly with the satellite program are considered. For expendable launch vehicles the direct costs include the vehicle investment hardware costs and the launch operations costs. For the reusable STS vehicles the direct costs include only the launch operations, recovery operations, command and control, vehicle maintenance, and propellant support. The costs associated with amortization of reusable vehicle investment, RDT&E range support, etc., are not included.

  20. Electronics, the Cost Disease, and the Operation of Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumol, William J.; Blackman, Sue Anne Batey

    1983-01-01

    Examines trends in costs of conventional library operation and costs of electronic devices which may pervade libraries of future. Library costs in 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s, library automation, total library operating expenditures for university and college libraries, and rate of adoption of electronic techniques are covered. Sixty-three references…

  1. 49 CFR 218.107 - Additional operational requirements for hand-operated crossover switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional operational requirements for hand... hand-operated crossover switches. (a) Each railroad shall adopt and comply with an operating rule which... requirements of this section. (b) Hand-operated crossover switches, generally. Both hand-operated switches of...

  2. 49 CFR 218.107 - Additional operational requirements for hand-operated crossover switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional operational requirements for hand... hand-operated crossover switches. (a) Each railroad shall adopt and comply with an operating rule which... requirements of this section. (b) Hand-operated crossover switches, generally. Both hand-operated switches of...

  3. 49 CFR 218.107 - Additional operational requirements for hand-operated crossover switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional operational requirements for hand... hand-operated crossover switches. (a) Each railroad shall adopt and comply with an operating rule which... requirements of this section. (b) Hand-operated crossover switches, generally. Both hand-operated switches of...

  4. 49 CFR 218.107 - Additional operational requirements for hand-operated crossover switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional operational requirements for hand... hand-operated crossover switches. (a) Each railroad shall adopt and comply with an operating rule which... requirements of this section. (b) Hand-operated crossover switches, generally. Both hand-operated switches of...

  5. 49 CFR 218.107 - Additional operational requirements for hand-operated crossover switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional operational requirements for hand... hand-operated crossover switches. (a) Each railroad shall adopt and comply with an operating rule which... requirements of this section. (b) Hand-operated crossover switches, generally. Both hand-operated switches of...

  6. The cost of operating with failed fuel at Virginia power

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    Virginia Power has completed a study of the costs incurred due to fuel failures in its pressurized water reactors. This study was prompted by histories of high primary coolant activity and subsequent fuel inspections at the North Anna and Surry power stations. The study included an evaluation of the total costs of fuel failures as well as an evaluation of the economics of postirradiation fuel inspections. The major costs of fuel failures included personnel radiation exposure, permanently discharged failed fuel, radwaste generation, increased labor requirements, containment entry delays due to airborne radioactivity, and ramp rate restrictions. Although fuel failures affect a utility in several other areas, the items evaluated in the study were thought to be the most significant of the costs. The study indicated that performing a postirradiation failed fuel examination can be economically justified at tramp-corrected {sup 131}I levels of > 0.015 {mu}Ci/g. The savings to the utility can be on the order of several million dollars. Additionally, the cost penalty of performing a fuel inspection at lower iodine levels is generally in the range of $200,000. This economic penalty is expected to be outweighed by the intangible benefits of operating with a defect-free core.

  7. An analysis of short haul airline operating costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanafani, A.; Taghavi, S.

    1975-01-01

    The demand and supply characteristics of short haul air transportation systems are investigated in terms of airline operating costs. Direct, indirect, and ground handling costs are included. Supply models of short haul air transportation systems are constructed.

  8. Operational Impacts of Operating Reserve Demand Curves on Production Cost and Reliability: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Krad, Ibrahim; Ibanez, Eduardo; Ela, Erik; Gao, Wenzhong

    2015-10-27

    The electric power industry landscape is continually evolving. As emerging technologies such as wind, solar, electric vehicles, and energy storage systems become more cost-effective and present in the system, traditional power system operating strategies will need to be reevaluated. The presence of wind and solar generation (commonly referred to as variable generation) may result in an increase in the variability and uncertainty of the net load profile. One mechanism to mitigate this is to schedule and dispatch additional operating reserves. These operating reserves aim to ensure that there is enough capacity online in the system to account for the increased variability and uncertainty occurring at finer temporal resolutions. A new operating reserve strategy, referred to as flexibility reserve, has been introduced in some regions. A similar implementation is explored in this paper, and its implications on power system operations are analyzed.

  9. Improvement in aircraft performance reduces operating costs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-04-01

    The escalation of jet transport fuel prices has altered traditional economic formulas for commercial airplane operators. This economic change has provided the impetus to develop improvements for existing production run transports such as the Boeing 727, 737, and 747 airplanes. Improvements have been made in drag reduction, propulsion system, weight reduction, and operation.

  10. Operations and support cost modeling of conceptual space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebeling, Charles

    1994-01-01

    The University of Dayton is pleased to submit this annual report to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center which documents the development of an operations and support (O&S) cost model as part of a larger life cycle cost (LCC) structure. It is intended for use during the conceptual design of new launch vehicles and spacecraft. This research is being conducted under NASA Research Grant NAG-1-1327. This research effort changes the focus from that of the first two years in which a reliability and maintainability model was developed to the initial development of an operations and support life cycle cost model. Cost categories were initially patterned after NASA's three axis work breakdown structure consisting of a configuration axis (vehicle), a function axis, and a cost axis. A revised cost element structure (CES), which is currently under study by NASA, was used to established the basic cost elements used in the model. While the focus of the effort was on operations and maintenance costs and other recurring costs, the computerized model allowed for other cost categories such as RDT&E and production costs to be addressed. Secondary tasks performed concurrent with the development of the costing model included support and upgrades to the reliability and maintainability (R&M) model. The primary result of the current research has been a methodology and a computer implementation of the methodology to provide for timely operations and support cost analysis during the conceptual design activities.

  11. Computer Maintenance Operations Center (CMOC), additional computer support equipment ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Computer Maintenance Operations Center (CMOC), additional computer support equipment - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Techinical Equipment Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  12. Computerized operating cost model for industrial steam generation

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, T.D.

    1983-02-01

    Pending EPA regulations, establishing revised emission levels for industrial boilers are perceived to have an effect on the relative costs of steam production technologies. To aid in the comparison of competitive boiler technologies, the Steam Cost Code was developed which provides levelized steam costs reflecting the effects of a number of key steam cost parameters. The Steam Cost Code is a user interactive FORTRAN program designed to operate on a VAX computer system. The program requires the user to input a number of variables describing the design characteristics, capital costs, and operating conditions for a specific boiler system. Part of the input to the Steam Cost Code is the capital cost of the steam production system. The capital cost is obtained from a program called INDCEPT, developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory under Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center sponsorship.

  13. A Josephson systolic array processor for multiplication/addition operations

    SciTech Connect

    Morisue, M.; Li, F.Q.; Tobita, M.; Kaneko, S. )

    1991-03-01

    A novel Josephson systolic array processor to perform multiplication/addition operations is proposed. The systolic array processor proposed here consists of a set of three kinds of interconnected cells of which main circuits are made by using SQUID gates. A multiplication of 2 bits by 2 bits is performed in the single cell at a time and an addition of three data with two bits is simultaneously performed in an another type of cell. Furthermore, information in this system flows between cells in a pipeline fashion so that a high performance can be achieved. In this paper the principle of Josephson systolic array processor is described in detail and the simulation results are illustrated for the multiplication/addition of (4 bits {times} 4 bits + 8 bits). The results show that these operations can be executed in 330ps.

  14. Circulation Service Desk Operations: Costing and Management Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver-Meyers, Pat; And Others

    1985-01-01

    University of Oklahoma Libraries conducted a cost study of circulation service-desk operations. Using percentages of staff time occupied in particular tasks, pay rates, indirect costs, and overhead, total costs were computed on task-by-task basis. Information served as basis for reorganization of work assignments and revision of staff scheduling.…

  15. 42 CFR 417.930 - Initial costs of operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Initial costs of operation. 417.930 Section 417.930 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... costs of operation. Under section 1305 of the PHS, loans and loan guarantees were awarded for...

  16. 49 CFR 218.105 - Additional operational requirements for hand-operated main track switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional operational requirements for hand... hand-operated main track switches. (a) Each railroad shall adopt and comply with an operating rule... the requirements of this section. (b) Designating switch position. The normal position of a...

  17. 49 CFR 218.105 - Additional operational requirements for hand-operated main track switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional operational requirements for hand... hand-operated main track switches. (a) Each railroad shall adopt and comply with an operating rule... the requirements of this section. (b) Designating switch position. The normal position of a...

  18. 49 CFR 218.105 - Additional operational requirements for hand-operated main track switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional operational requirements for hand... hand-operated main track switches. (a) Each railroad shall adopt and comply with an operating rule... the requirements of this section. (b) Designating switch position. The normal position of a...

  19. 49 CFR 218.105 - Additional operational requirements for hand-operated main track switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional operational requirements for hand... hand-operated main track switches. (a) Each railroad shall adopt and comply with an operating rule... the requirements of this section. (b) Designating switch position. The normal position of a...

  20. 49 CFR 218.105 - Additional operational requirements for hand-operated main track switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional operational requirements for hand... hand-operated main track switches. (a) Each railroad shall adopt and comply with an operating rule... the requirements of this section. (b) Designating switch position. The normal position of a...

  1. Motions of alloying additions in the CAS steelmaking operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazumdar, D.; Guthrie, R. I. L.

    1993-08-01

    Water model studies in a pilot scale ladle ( D = 1.12 m and L = 0.93 m) were carried out to investigate the subsurface motion of both buoyant and sinking additions during the CAS (com-position adjustment by sealed argon bubbling systems) alloy addition procedure in steelmaking. This technique involves placing a refractory baffle around a rising gas/liquid plume within a stirred ladle of steel. Alloy additions are then made by projecting them into the slag-free region of steel within the baffled region. It was found that such particles while moving through the upwelling two-phase plume region can experience a significant reduction in drag forces, causing buoyant particles to penetrate more deeply than anticipated for a homogeneous fluid. Therefore, considering reduced drag on particles penetrating the upwelling gas liquid plume region, predictions were made for the trajectories of spherical-shaped particles using Newton’s law of motion. Predictions were in very reasonable agreement with those measured. Incorporating the velocity fields in industrial size vessels already reported by the present authors, trajectories of spherical-shaped additions (diameter ˜ 80 mm) in a 150-ton ladle during CAS operations were then predicted. The industrial implications of such trajectories, together with the alloy’s dissolution and dispersion behavior, were also analyzed. Finally, advantages of the CAS alloy addition procedure over conventional methods, in terms of the recovery rates of buoyant additions, are discussed.

  2. Entanglement Cost of Implementing Controlled-Unitary Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soeda, Akihito; Turner, Peter S.; Murao, Mio

    2011-10-01

    We investigate the minimum entanglement cost of the deterministic implementation of two-qubit controlled-unitary operations using local operations and classical communication (LOCC). We show that any such operation can be implemented by a three-turn LOCC protocol, which requires at least 1 ebit of entanglement when the resource is given by a bipartite entangled state with Schmidt number 2. Our result implies that there is a gap between the minimum entanglement cost and the entangling power of controlled-unitary operations. This gap arises due to the requirement of implementing the operations while oblivious to the identity of the inputs.

  3. Cost Analysis In A Multi-Mission Operations Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newhouse, M.; Felton, L.; Bornas, N.; Botts, D.; Roth, K.; Ijames, G.; Montgomery, P.

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft control centers have evolved from dedicated, single-mission or single missiontype support to multi-mission, service-oriented support for operating a variety of mission types. At the same time, available money for projects is shrinking and competition for new missions is increasing. These factors drive the need for an accurate and flexible model to support estimating service costs for new or extended missions; the cost model in turn drives the need for an accurate and efficient approach to service cost analysis. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) provides operations services to a variety of customers around the world. HOSC customers range from launch vehicle test flights; to International Space Station (ISS) payloads; to small, short duration missions; and has included long duration flagship missions. The HOSC recently completed a detailed analysis of service costs as part of the development of a complete service cost model. The cost analysis process required the team to address a number of issues. One of the primary issues involves the difficulty of reverse engineering individual mission costs in a highly efficient multimission environment, along with a related issue of the value of detailed metrics or data to the cost model versus the cost of obtaining accurate data. Another concern is the difficulty of balancing costs between missions of different types and size and extrapolating costs to different mission types. The cost analysis also had to address issues relating to providing shared, cloud-like services in a government environment, and then assigning an uncertainty or risk factor to cost estimates that are based on current technology, but will be executed using future technology. Finally the cost analysis needed to consider how to validate the resulting cost models taking into account the non-homogeneous nature of the available cost data and the

  4. Cost Analysis in a Multi-Mission Operations Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felton, Larry; Newhouse, Marilyn; Bornas, Nick; Botts, Dennis; Ijames, Gayleen; Montgomery, Patty; Roth, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft control centers have evolved from dedicated, single-mission or single mission-type support to multi-mission, service-oriented support for operating a variety of mission types. At the same time, available money for projects is shrinking and competition for new missions is increasing. These factors drive the need for an accurate and flexible model to support estimating service costs for new or extended missions; the cost model in turn drives the need for an accurate and efficient approach to service cost analysis. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) provides operations services to a variety of customers around the world. HOSC customers range from launch vehicle test flights; to International Space Station (ISS) payloads; to small, short duration missions; and has included long duration flagship missions. The HOSC recently completed a detailed analysis of service costs as part of the development of a complete service cost model. The cost analysis process required the team to address a number of issues. One of the primary issues involves the difficulty of reverse engineering individual mission costs in a highly efficient multi-mission environment, along with a related issue of the value of detailed metrics or data to the cost model versus the cost of obtaining accurate data. Another concern is the difficulty of balancing costs between missions of different types and size and extrapolating costs to different mission types. The cost analysis also had to address issues relating to providing shared, cloud-like services in a government environment, and then assigning an uncertainty or risk factor to cost estimates that are based on current technology, but will be executed using future technology. Finally the cost analysis needed to consider how to validate the resulting cost models taking into account the non-homogeneous nature of the available cost data and

  5. Contrast in low-cost operational concepts for orbiting satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walyus, Keith D.; Reis, James; Bradley, Arthur J.

    2002-12-01

    Older spacecraft missions, especially those in low Earth orbit with telemetry intensive requirements, required round-the-clock control center staffing. The state of technology relied on control center personnel to continually examine data, make decisions, resolve anomalies, and file reports. Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is a prime example of this description. Technological advancements in hardware and software over the last decade have yielded increases in productivity and operational efficiency, which result in lower cost. The re-engineering effort of HST, which has recently concluded, utilized emerging technology to reduce cost and increase productivity. New missions, of which NASA's Transition Region and Coronal Explorer Satellite (TRACE) is an example, have benefited from recent technological advancements and are more cost-effective than when HST was first launched. During its launch (1998) and early orbit phase, the TRACE Flight Operations Team (FOT) employed continually staffed operations. Yet once the mission entered its nominal phase, the FOT reduced their staffing to standard weekday business hours. Operations were still conducted at night and during the weekends, but these operations occurred autonomously without compromising their high standards for data collections. For the HST, which launched in 1990, reduced cost operations will employ a different operational concept, when the spacecraft enters its low-cost phase after its final servicing mission in 2004. Primarily due to the spacecraft"s design, the HST Project has determined that single-shift operations will introduce unacceptable risks for the amount of dollars saved. More importantly, significant cost-savings can still be achieved by changing the operational concept for the FOT, while still maintaining round-the-clock staffing. It"s important to note that the low-cost solutions obtained for one satellite may not be applicable for other satellites. This paper will contrast the differences between

  6. Operations and support cost modeling using Markov chains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unal, Resit

    1989-01-01

    Systems for future missions will be selected with life cycle costs (LCC) as a primary evaluation criterion. This reflects the current realization that only systems which are considered affordable will be built in the future due to the national budget constaints. Such an environment calls for innovative cost modeling techniques which address all of the phases a space system goes through during its life cycle, namely: design and development, fabrication, operations and support; and retirement. A significant portion of the LCC for reusable systems are generated during the operations and support phase (OS). Typically, OS costs can account for 60 to 80 percent of the total LCC. Clearly, OS costs are wholly determined or at least strongly influenced by decisions made during the design and development phases of the project. As a result OS costs need to be considered and estimated early in the conceptual phase. To be effective, an OS cost estimating model needs to account for actual instead of ideal processes by associating cost elements with probabilities. One approach that may be suitable for OS cost modeling is the use of the Markov Chain Process. Markov chains are an important method of probabilistic analysis for operations research analysts but they are rarely used for life cycle cost analysis. This research effort evaluates the use of Markov Chains in LCC analysis by developing OS cost model for a hypothetical reusable space transportation vehicle (HSTV) and suggests further uses of the Markov Chain process as a design-aid tool.

  7. The Application of Architecture Frameworks to Modelling Exploration Operations Costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shishko, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Developments in architectural frameworks and system-of-systems thinking have provided useful constructs for systems engineering. DoDAF concepts, language, and formalisms, in particular, provide a natural way of conceptualizing an operations cost model applicable to NASA's space exploration vision. Not all DoDAF products have meaning or apply to a DoDAF inspired operations cost model, but this paper describes how such DoDAF concepts as nodes, systems, and operational activities relate to the development of a model to estimate exploration operations costs. The paper discusses the specific implementation to the Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) operational functions/activities currently being developed and presents an overview of how this powerful representation can apply to robotic space missions as well.

  8. Investment and operating costs of binary cycle geothermal power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, B.; Brugman, J.

    1974-01-01

    Typical investment and operating costs for geothermal power plants employing binary cycle technology and utilizing the heat energy in liquid-dominated reservoirs are discussed. These costs are developed as a function of reservoir temperature. The factors involved in optimizing plant design are discussed. A relationship between the value of electrical energy and the value of the heat energy in the reservoir is suggested.

  9. Operations and Costs; A Study of Educational Public Television Stations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, James A.

    Good programing in public television requires adequate funding; adequate funding requires an understanding of the total public television station picture. This study provides information concerning projected operating characteristics and the resultant costs of these operations for public broadcasting stations. After a discussion of the procedures…

  10. 38th Annual Maintenance & Operations Cost Study for Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agron, Joe

    2009-01-01

    The nation's colleges are feeling the pinch of the economic downturn, and maintenance and operations (M&O) budgets especially are under pressure. This article presents data from the 38th annual Maintenance & Operations Cost Study for colleges that can help one in benchmarking expenditures at one's institution. Data provided only targets two-year…

  11. 36th Annual Maintenance & Operations Cost Study: Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agron, Joe

    2007-01-01

    Spending by school districts on maintenance and operations increased in 2006-2007, reversing years of historic low expenditures. According to "American School & University's" 36th annual Maintenance and Operations (M&O) Cost Study, the median school district spends 9.19% of total district expenditures (TDE) on M&O, up from 7.58% the year before.…

  12. 38th Annual Maintenance & Operations Cost Study for Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agron, Joe

    2009-01-01

    Despite the worst economic environment in generations, spending by K-12 institutions on maintenance and operations (M&O) held its own--defying historical trends that have shown M&O spending among the most affected in times of budget tightening. This article presents data from the 38th annual Maintenance & Operations Cost Study for schools that can…

  13. NECAP - NASA's Energy Cost Analysis Program. Operations manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    The use of the NASA'S ENERGY COST ANALYSIS PROGRAM (NECAP) is described. Supplementary information on new capabilities and program options is also provided. The Control Data Corporation (CDC) NETWORK OPERATING SYSTEM (NOS) is discussed. The basic CDC NOS instructions which are required to successfully operate NECAP are provided.

  14. 43 CFR 426.23 - Recovery of operation and maintenance (O&M) costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... provide the district with supplemental and additional benefits. (e) Amount of O&M a district pays under a... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Recovery of operation and maintenance (O&M... operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. (a) General. All new, amended, and renewed contracts shall...

  15. 43 CFR 426.23 - Recovery of operation and maintenance (O&M) costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... provide the district with supplemental and additional benefits. (e) Amount of O&M a district pays under a... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recovery of operation and maintenance (O&M... operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. (a) General. All new, amended, and renewed contracts shall...

  16. Cost optimization for series-parallel execution of a collection of intersecting operation sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgui, Alexandre; Levin, Genrikh; Rozin, Boris; Kasabutski, Igor

    2016-05-01

    A collection of intersecting sets of operations is considered. These sets of operations are performed successively. The operations of each set are activated simultaneously. Operation durations can be modified. The cost of each operation decreases with the increase in operation duration. In contrast, the additional expenses for each set of operations are proportional to its time. The problem of selecting the durations of all operations that minimize the total cost under constraint on completion time for the whole collection of operation sets is studied. The mathematical model and method to solve this problem are presented. The proposed method is based on a combination of Lagrangian relaxation and dynamic programming. The results of numerical experiments that illustrate the performance of the proposed method are presented. This approach was used for optimization multi-spindle machines and machining lines, but the problem is common in engineering optimization and thus the techniques developed could be useful for other applications.

  17. Space system operations and support cost analysis using Markov chains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unal, Resit; Dean, Edwin B.; Moore, Arlene A.; Fairbairn, Robert E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates the use of Markov chain process in probabilistic life cycle cost analysis and suggests further uses of the process as a design aid tool. A methodology is developed for estimating operations and support cost and expected life for reusable space transportation systems. Application of the methodology is demonstrated for the case of a hypothetical space transportation vehicle. A sensitivity analysis is carried out to explore the effects of uncertainty in key model inputs.

  18. Rapid Turnaround of Costing/Designing of Space Missions Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kudrle, Paul D.; Welz, Gregory A.; Basilio, Eleanor

    2008-01-01

    The Ground Segment Team (GST), at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, provides high-level mission operations concepts and cost estimates for projects that are in the formulation phase. GST has developed a tool to track costs, assumptions, and mission requirements, and to rapidly turnaround estimates for mission operations, ground data systems, and tracking for deep space and near Earth missions. Estimates that would often take several weeks to generate are now generated in minutes through the use of an integrated suite of cost models. The models were developed through interviews with domain experts in areas of Mission Operations, including but not limited to: systems engineering, payload operations, tracking resources, mission planning, navigation, telemetry and command, and ground network infrastructure. Data collected during interviews were converted into parametric cost models and integrated into one tool suite. The tool has been used on a wide range of missions from small Earth orbiters, to flagship missions like Cassini. The tool is an aid to project managers and mission planners as they consider different scenarios during the proposal and early development stages of their missions. The tool is also used for gathering cost related requirements and assumptions and for conducting integrated analysis of multiple missions.

  19. 47 CFR 25.111 - Additional information and ITU cost recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional information and ITU cost recovery. 25.111 Section 25.111 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER....111 Additional information and ITU cost recovery. (a) The Commission may request from any party at...

  20. Fundamental Drivers of the Cost and Price of Operating Reserves

    SciTech Connect

    Hummon, M. R.; Denholm, P.; Jorgenson, J.; Palchak, D.; Kirby, B.; Ma, O.

    2013-07-01

    Operating reserves impose a cost on the electric power system by forcing system operators to keep partially loaded spinning generators available for responding to system contingencies variable demand. In many regions of the United States, thermal power plants provide a large fraction of the operating reserve requirement. Alternative sources of operating reserves, such as demand response and energy storage, may provide more efficient sources of these reserves. However, to estimate the potential value of these services, the cost of reserve services under various grid conditions must first be established. This analysis used a commercial grid simulation tool to evaluate the cost and price of several operating reserve services, including spinning contingency reserves and upward regulation reserves. These reserve products were evaluated in a utility system in the western United States, considering different system flexibilities, renewable energy penetration, and other sensitivities. The analysis demonstrates that the price of operating reserves depend highly on many assumptions regarding the operational flexibility of the generation fleet, including ramp rates and the fraction of fleet available to provide reserves.

  1. 19 CFR 10.814 - Direct costs of processing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Direct costs of processing operations. 10.814 Section 10.814 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. United States-Bahrain Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin §...

  2. 19 CFR 10.774 - Direct costs of processing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Direct costs of processing operations. 10.774 Section 10.774 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. United...

  3. 19 CFR 10.774 - Direct costs of processing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Direct costs of processing operations. 10.774 Section 10.774 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. United...

  4. 19 CFR 10.774 - Direct costs of processing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Direct costs of processing operations. 10.774 Section 10.774 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. United...

  5. 19 CFR 10.774 - Direct costs of processing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Direct costs of processing operations. 10.774 Section 10.774 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. United...

  6. 19 CFR 10.774 - Direct costs of processing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Direct costs of processing operations. 10.774 Section 10.774 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. United...

  7. 42 CFR 417.930 - Initial costs of operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Initial costs of operation. 417.930 Section 417.930 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS, COMPETITIVE MEDICAL PLANS, AND HEALTH...

  8. 42 CFR 417.930 - Initial costs of operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... HEALTH CARE PREPAYMENT PLANS Administration of Outstanding Loans and Loan Guarantees § 417.930 Initial... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Initial costs of operation. 417.930 Section 417.930 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  9. 42 CFR 417.930 - Initial costs of operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... HEALTH CARE PREPAYMENT PLANS Administration of Outstanding Loans and Loan Guarantees § 417.930 Initial... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Initial costs of operation. 417.930 Section 417.930 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  10. 42 CFR 417.930 - Initial costs of operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Initial costs of operation. 417.930 Section 417.930 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS, COMPETITIVE MEDICAL PLANS, AND HEALTH...

  11. 36th Annual Maintenance & Operations Cost Study: Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agron, Joe

    2007-01-01

    Colleges are focusing increased effort--and money--to improve the physical condition of existing facilities and address a huge backlog of deferred maintenance. According to "American School & University's" 36th annual Maintenance and Operations (M&O) Cost Study, the median college spends 16.4% of total college budget on M&O, up from 11% the year…

  12. 19 CFR 10.877 - Direct costs of processing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Direct costs of processing operations. 10.877 Section 10.877 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. United States-Oman Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin §...

  13. 19 CFR 10.814 - Direct costs of processing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Direct costs of processing operations. 10.814 Section 10.814 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. United States-Bahrain Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin §...

  14. 24 CFR 583.125 - Grants for operating costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Grants for operating costs. 583.125 Section 583.125 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING...

  15. 24 CFR 242.24 - Initial operating costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Initial operating costs. 242.24 Section 242.24 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND...

  16. U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, RL

    2003-09-18

    The ''U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries'' (NUREG/CR-6577, Supp. 2) report has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants during 2000-2001. Costs incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, which represent fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications, which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operations summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from operating reports submitted by the licensees, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) database for enforcement actions, and outage reports.

  17. 14 CFR 119.36 - Additional certificate application requirements for commercial operators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... requirements for commercial operators. 119.36 Section 119.36 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS CERTIFICATION: AIR CARRIERS AND COMMERCIAL OPERATORS Certification, Operations... Chapter § 119.36 Additional certificate application requirements for commercial operators. (a)...

  18. 14 CFR 119.36 - Additional certificate application requirements for commercial operators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... requirements for commercial operators. 119.36 Section 119.36 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS CERTIFICATION: AIR CARRIERS AND COMMERCIAL OPERATORS Certification, Operations... Chapter § 119.36 Additional certificate application requirements for commercial operators. (a)...

  19. 14 CFR 119.36 - Additional certificate application requirements for commercial operators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... requirements for commercial operators. 119.36 Section 119.36 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS CERTIFICATION: AIR CARRIERS AND COMMERCIAL OPERATORS Certification, Operations... Chapter § 119.36 Additional certificate application requirements for commercial operators. (a)...

  20. 14 CFR 119.36 - Additional certificate application requirements for commercial operators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... requirements for commercial operators. 119.36 Section 119.36 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS CERTIFICATION: AIR CARRIERS AND COMMERCIAL OPERATORS Certification, Operations... Chapter § 119.36 Additional certificate application requirements for commercial operators. (a)...

  1. 3 CFR - Disposing of Unneeded Federal Real Estate-Increasing Sales Proceeds, Cutting Operating Costs, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Sales Proceeds, Cutting Operating Costs, and Improving Energy Efficiency Presidential Documents Other... Proceeds, Cutting Operating Costs, and Improving Energy Efficiency Memorandum for the Heads of Executive... and occupancy rates, annual operating cost, energy efficiency, and sustainability. To the...

  2. Centaur operations at the space station: Cost and transportation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A study was conducted to expand on the results of an initial study entitled Centaur Operations at the Space Station. The previous study developed technology demonstration missions (TDMs) that utilized the Centaur G-prime upper stage to advance OTV technologies required for accomodations and operations at the Space Station. An initial evaluation was performed of the cost to NASA for TDM implementation. Due to the potential for commercial communication satellite operation utilizing the TDM hardware, an evaluation of the Centaur's transportation potential was also performed.

  3. Concorde with the airlines. [operating costs and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leyman, C. S.

    1980-01-01

    The only supersonic aircraft in airline service, Concorde, offers the first actual test of supersonic cruise feasibility and the only real experience relative to passenger, airline, and community acceptance. The dominant characteristic of Concorde operations is low aircraft utilization, due partly to the restricted route network. Operating costs, the maintenance/reliability record and associated dispatch delays are discussed. Problems with overwater operations, and the secondary boom phenomena are examined. Monthly average load factors for various routes, major causes of technical delays, aircraft technical performance, and aircraft tracks are graphically depicted.

  4. Reducing Development and Operations Costs using NASA's "GMSEC" Systems Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Dan; Bristow, John; Crouse, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the role of Goddard Mission Services Evolution Center (GMSEC) in reducing development and operation costs in handling the massive data from NASA missions. The goals of GMSEC systems architecture development are to (1) Simplify integration and development, (2)Facilitate technology infusion over time, (3) Support evolving operational concepts, and (4) All for mix of heritage, COTS and new components. First 3 missions (i.e., Tropical Rainforest Measuring Mission (TRMM), Small Explorer (SMEX) missions - SWAS, TRACE, SAMPEX, and ST5 3-Satellite Constellation System) each selected a different telemetry and command system. These results show that GMSEC's message-bus component-based framework architecture is well proven and provides significant benefits over traditional flight and ground data system designs. The missions benefit through increased set of product options, enhanced automation, lower cost and new mission-enabling operations concept options .

  5. Application of trajectory optimization principles to minimize aircraft operating costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, J. A.; Morello, S. A.; Erzberger, H.

    1979-01-01

    This paper summarizes various applications of trajectory optimization principles that have been or are being devised by both government and industrial researchers to minimize aircraft direct operating costs (DOC). These costs (time and fuel) are computed for aircraft constrained to fly over a fixed range. Optimization theory is briefly outlined, and specific algorithms which have resulted from application of this theory are described. Typical results which demonstrate use of these algorithms and the potential savings which they can produce are given. Finally, need for further trajectory optimization research is presented.

  6. Disposable sensor system: low cost UGS for urban operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calcutt, Wade; Houser, Jeff; Winston, Mark; Brady, Steve; Jones, Barry

    2006-05-01

    McQ has developed a family of low cost unattended ground sensors using conventional technology and manufacturing techniques. Intended for small unit operations in an urban environment, these are tactically useful sensors that can be manufactured in large quantities (1M-10M units/year) for a projected production cost of less than $100 each. Secondary characteristics are small size (98 cm 3), light weight (85 gm), moderate lifetime (40 hrs), and moderate communications ranges (100m). An overview of the DSS system: its features, performance, and scenarios for use in urban warfare, is presented.

  7. Low Cost Missions Operations on NASA Deep Space Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, R. J.; Kusnierkiewicz, D. J.; Bowman, A.; Harvey, R.; Ossing, D.; Eichstedt, J.

    2014-12-01

    The ability to lower mission operations costs on any long duration mission depends on a number of factors; the opportunities for science, the flight trajectory, and the cruise phase environment, among others. Many deep space missions employ long cruises to their final destination with minimal science activities along the way; others may perform science observations on a near-continuous basis. This paper discusses approaches employed by two NASA missions implemented by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) to minimize mission operations costs without compromising mission success: the New Horizons mission to Pluto, and the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatories (STEREO). The New Horizons spacecraft launched in January 2006 for an encounter with the Pluto system.The spacecraft trajectory required no deterministic on-board delta-V, and so the mission ops team then settled in for the rest of its 9.5-year cruise. The spacecraft has spent much of its cruise phase in a "hibernation" mode, which has enabled the spacecraft to be maintained with a small operations team, and minimized the contact time required from the NASA Deep Space Network. The STEREO mission is comprised of two three-axis stabilized sun-staring spacecraft in heliocentric orbit at a distance of 1 AU from the sun. The spacecraft were launched in October 2006. The STEREO instruments operate in a "decoupled" mode from the spacecraft, and from each other. Since STEREO operations are largely routine, unattended ground station contact operations were implemented early in the mission. Commands flow from the MOC to be uplinked, and the data recorded on-board is downlinked and relayed back to the MOC. Tools run in the MOC to assess the health and performance of ground system components. Alerts are generated and personnel are notified of any problems. Spacecraft telemetry is similarly monitored and alarmed, thus ensuring safe, reliable, low cost operations.

  8. 7 CFR 1710.253 - Engineering and cost studies-addition of generation capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Engineering and cost studies-addition of generation... TO ELECTRIC LOANS AND GUARANTEES Construction Work Plans and Related Studies § 1710.253 Engineering... engineering and cost studies as specified by RUS. The studies shall cover a period from the beginning of...

  9. 7 CFR 1710.253 - Engineering and cost studies-addition of generation capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Engineering and cost studies-addition of generation... TO ELECTRIC LOANS AND GUARANTEES Construction Work Plans and Related Studies § 1710.253 Engineering... engineering and cost studies as specified by RUS. The studies shall cover a period from the beginning of...

  10. Prospects for cost reductions from relaxing additional cross-border measures related to livestock trade.

    PubMed

    Hop, G E; Mourits, M C M; Slager, R; Oude Lansink, A G J M; Saatkamp, H W

    2013-05-01

    Compared with the domestic trade in livestock, intra-communal trade across the European Union (EU) is subject to costly, additional veterinary measures. Short-distance transportation just across a border requires more measures than long-distance domestic transportation, while the need for such additional cross-border measures can be questioned. This study examined the prospects for cost reductions from relaxing additional cross-border measures related to trade within the cross-border region of the Netherlands (NL) and Germany (GER); that is, North Rhine Westphalia and Lower Saxony. The study constructed a deterministic spread-sheet cost model to calculate the costs of both routine veterinary measures (standard measures that apply to both domestic and cross-border transport) and additional cross-border measures (extra measures that only apply to cross-border transport) as applied in 2010. This model determined costs by stakeholder, region and livestock sector, and studied the prospects for cost reduction by calculating the costs after the relaxation of additional cross-border measures. The selection criteria for relaxing these measures were (1) a low expected added value on preventing contagious livestock diseases, (2) no expected additional veterinary risks in case of relaxation of measures and (3) reasonable cost-saving possibilities. The total cost of routine veterinary measures and additional cross-border measures for the cross-border region was €22.1 million, 58% (€12.7 million) of which came from additional cross-border measures. Two-thirds of this €12.7 million resulted from the trade in slaughter animals. The main cost items were veterinary checks on animals (twice in the case of slaughter animals), export certification and control of export documentation. Four additional cross-border measures met the selection criteria for relaxation. The relaxation of these measures could save €8.2 million (€5.0 million for NL and €3.2 million for GER) annually

  11. 14 CFR 25.1533 - Additional operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ....109 and 25.113, for weights, altitudes, temperatures, wind components, runway surface conditions (dry and wet), and runway gradients) for smooth, hard-surfaced runways. Additionally, at the option of...

  12. 14 CFR 25.1533 - Additional operating limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ....109 and 25.113, for weights, altitudes, temperatures, wind components, runway surface conditions (dry and wet), and runway gradients) for smooth, hard-surfaced runways. Additionally, at the option of...

  13. Improvements in floating point addition/subtraction operations

    DOEpatents

    Farmwald, P.M.

    1984-02-24

    Apparatus is described for decreasing the latency time associated with floating point addition and subtraction in a computer, using a novel bifurcated, pre-normalization/post-normalization approach that distinguishes between differences of floating point exponents.

  14. Additive Manufacturing for Cost Efficient Production of Compact Ceramic Heat Exchangers and Recuperators

    SciTech Connect

    Shulman, Holly; Ross, Nicole

    2015-10-30

    An additive manufacture technique known as laminated object manufacturing (LOM) was used to fabricate compact ceramic heat exchanger prototypes. LOM uses precision CO2 laser cutting of ceramic green tapes, which are then precision stacked to build a 3D object with fine internal features. Modeling was used to develop prototype designs and predict the thermal response, stress, and efficiency in the ceramic heat exchangers. Build testing and materials analyses were used to provide feedback for the design selection. During this development process, laminated object manufacturing protocols were established. This included laser optimization, strategies for fine feature integrity, lamination fluid control, green handling, and firing profile. Three full size prototypes were fabricated using two different designs. One prototype was selected for performance testing. During testing, cross talk leakage prevented the application of a high pressure differential, however, the prototype was successful at withstanding the high temperature operating conditions (1300 °F). In addition, analysis showed that the bulk of the part did not have cracks or leakage issues. This led to the development of a module method for next generation LOM heat exchangers. A scale-up cost analysis showed that given a purpose built LOM system, these ceramic heat exchangers would be affordable for the applications.

  15. 42 CFR 413.355 - Additional payment: QIO photocopy and mailing costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Prospective Payment for Skilled Nursing Facilities § 413.355 Additional payment: QIO photocopy and mailing costs. An additional payment is made to a skilled nursing facility in accordance with § 476.78 of...

  16. 42 CFR 413.355 - Additional payment: QIO photocopy and mailing costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Prospective Payment for Skilled Nursing Facilities § 413.355 Additional payment: QIO photocopy and mailing costs. An additional payment is made to a skilled nursing facility in accordance with § 476.78 of...

  17. 42 CFR 413.355 - Additional payment: QIO photocopy and mailing costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Prospective Payment for Skilled Nursing Facilities § 413.355 Additional payment: QIO photocopy and mailing costs. An additional payment is made to a skilled nursing facility in accordance with § 476.78 of...

  18. Research targets lower gas-processing operating costs

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, H.S.; Leppin, D.

    1997-12-29

    Increasing natural-gas demand and declining gas quality at the wellhead require the gas-processing industry to look to new technologies to stay competitive. The Gas Research Institute (GRI), Chicago, is managing a research, development, design, and deployment program that could save industry $230 million/year in operating and capital costs from NGL extraction and recovery, dehydration, acid-gas removal/sulfur recovery, and nitrogen rejection. Three technologies are addressed here. (1) Multivariable control (MVC) technology for predictive process control and optimization is installed or in design at 14 facilities, treating a combined total of more than 30 billion normal cu m/year (bcmy; 1.1 trillion standard cu ft/year, tcfy). Simple paybacks are typically less than 6 months. (2) A new acid-gas-removal process based on N-formyl morpholine (NFM) is being field tested that offers 40--50% savings in operating costs and 15--30% savings in capital costs relative to a commercially available physical solvent. (3) The GRI-MemCalc computer program for membrane separations and the GRI-Scavenger CalcBase computer program for scavenging technologies are screening tools that engineers can use to determine the best practice for treating their gas.

  19. The cost-effectiveness of HPV vaccination in addition to screening: a Dutch perspective.

    PubMed

    Setiawan, Didik; Luttjeboer, Jos; Westra, Tjalke Arend; Wilschut, Jan C; Suwantika, Auliya A; Daemen, Toos; Atthobari, Jarir; Wilffert, Bob; Postma, Maarten J

    2015-04-01

    Addition of the HPV vaccine to available cytological screening has been proposed to increase HPV-related cancer prevention. A comprehensive review on this combined strategy implemented in the Netherlands is lacking. For this review, we therefore analyzed all relevant studies on cost-effectiveness of HPV vaccines in combination with cervical screening in the Netherlands. Most of the studies agree that vaccination in pre-sexual-activity periods of life is cost-effective. Based on published sensitivity analyses, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was found to be mainly driven by vaccine cost and discount rates. Fewer vaccine doses, inclusion of additional benefits of these vaccines to prevent HPV-related non-cervical cancers and vaccination of males to further reduce the burden of HPV-induced cancers are three relevant options suggested to be investigated in upcoming economic evaluations. PMID:25482311

  20. Achieving cost reductions in EOSDIS operations through technology evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsome, Penny; Moe, Karen; Harberts, Robert

    1996-01-01

    The earth observing system (EOS) data information system (EOSDIS) mission includes the cost-effective management and distribution of large amounts of data to the earth science community. The effect of the introduction of new information system technologies on the evolution of EOSDIS is considered. One of the steps taken by NASA to enable the introduction of new information system technologies into the EOSDIS is the funding of technology development through prototyping. Recent and ongoing prototyping efforts and their potential impact on the performance and cost-effectiveness of the EOSDIS are discussed. The technology evolution process as it related to the effective operation of EOSDIS is described, and methods are identified for the support of the transfer of relevant technology to EOSDIS components.

  1. Costs and benefits of lunar oxygen: Engineering, operations, and economics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, Brent; Woodcock, Gordon R.

    1991-01-01

    Oxygen is the most commonly discussed lunar resource. It will certainly not be the easiest to retrieve, but oxygen's fundamental place in propulsion and life support guarantees it continued attention as a prime candidate for early in situ resource utilization (ISRU). The findings are reviewed of recent investigation, sponsored by NASA-Ames, into the kinds of technologies, equipment, and scenarios (the engineering and operations costs) that will be required even to initiate lunar oxygen production. The infrastructure necessary to surround and support a viable oxygen-processing operation is explained. Selected details are used to illustrate the depth of technology challenges, extent of operations burdens, and complexity of decision linkages. Basic assumptions, and resulting timelines and mass manifests, are listed. These findings are combined with state-of-the-art knowledge of lunar and Mars propulsion options in simple economic input/output and internal-rate-of-return models, to compare production costs with performance benefits. Implications for three realistic scales of exploration architecture - expeditionary, aggressive science, and industrialization/settlement - are discussed. Conclusions are reached regarding the contextual conditions within which production of lunar oxygen (LLOX) is a reasonable activity. LLOX appears less useful for Mars missions than previously hoped. Its economical use in low Earth orbit hinges on production of lunar hydrogen as well. LLOX shows promise for lunar ascent/descent use, but that depends strongly on the plant mass required.

  2. Nanoliter droplet viscometer with additive-free operation.

    PubMed

    Livak-Dahl, Eric; Lee, Jaesung; Burns, Mark A

    2013-01-21

    Measurement of a solution's viscosity is an important analytic technique for a variety of applications including medical diagnosis, pharmaceutical development, and industrial processing. The use of droplet-based (e.g., water-in-oil) microfluidics for viscosity measurements allows nanoliter-scale sample volumes to be used, much smaller than those either in standard macro-scale rheometers or in single-phase microfluidic viscometers. By observing the flow rate of a sample plug driven by a controlled pressure through an abrupt constriction, we achieve accurate and precise measurement of the plug viscosity without addition of labels or tracer particles. Sample plugs in our device geometry had a volume of ~30 nL, and measurements had an average error of 6.6% with an average relative standard deviation of 2.8%. We tested glycerol-based samples with viscosities as high as 101 mPa s, with the only limitation on samples being that their viscosity should be higher than that of the continuous oil phase. PMID:23192296

  3. The ATA-67 Formula for Direct Operating Cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faulkner, H. B.

    1972-01-01

    The ATA formulas for direct operating cost were developed for the purpose of comparing different aircraft, existing or not, on the same route or the same aircraft on different routes. Such characteristics of the airline as crew pay, maintenance procedures, and depreciation schedules are kept constant. In air transportation systems analysis the 1967 ATA formula is usually used with appropriate exceptions or modifications, such as: different maintenance labor rate, total maintenance multiplied by a factor, maintenance burden deleted, different depreciation schedule, or different spares percentages.

  4. Streamlining: Reducing costs and increasing STS operations effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersburg, R. K.

    1985-01-01

    The development of streamlining as a concept, its inclusion in the space transportation system engineering and operations support (STSEOS) contract, and how it serves as an incentive to management and technical support personnel is discussed. The mechanics of encouraging and processing streamlining suggestions, reviews, feedback to submitters, recognition, and how individual employee performance evaluations are used to motivation are discussed. Several items that were implemented are mentioned. Information reported and the methodology of determining estimated dollar savings are outlined. The overall effect of this activity on the ability of the McDonnell Douglas flight preparation and mission operations team to support a rapidly increasing flight rate without a proportional increase in cost is illustrated.

  5. Remotely operated guideposts reduce drilling time and costs

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, S.S.; Beato, C.L. ); Vetter, V.H. )

    1990-03-01

    This paper reports remotely operated guideposts used to establish, release, and re-establish guidelines for a template installation in 1,758 ft (536 m) of water in the Gulf of Mexico. The guideposts were used to reduce the drilling-template weight, to improve accessibility of the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) around the well slots, and to reposition the blowout preventer (BOP) stack on a new well without tripping the stack to the surface. Before field installation, procedures were developed and the guideposts and running tools were function tested. Wet tests verified the reliability of the ROV and guidepost interface. This testing contributed to the successful use of guideposts. Drilling-template costs dropped significantly. The approach helped save about 36 days of drilling time. The guideposts were also used to tie back the tendons and production risers for the tension-leg well platform (TLWP).

  6. Cost-effectiveness of additional catheter-directed thrombolysis for deep vein thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    ENDEN, T.; RESCH, S.; WHITE, C.; WIK, H. S.; KLØW, N. E.; SANDSET, P. M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Additional treatment with catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) has recently been shown to reduce post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS). Objectives To estimate the cost effectiveness of additional CDT compared with standard treatment alone. Methods Using a Markov decision model, we compared the two treatment strategies in patients with a high proximal deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and a low risk of bleeding. The model captured the development of PTS, recurrent venous thromboembolism and treatment-related adverse events within a lifetime horizon and the perspective of a third-party payer. Uncertainty was assessed with one-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyzes. Model inputs from the CaVenT study included PTS development, major bleeding from CDT and utilities for post DVT states including PTS. The remaining clinical inputs were obtained from the literature. Costs obtained from the CaVenT study, hospital accounts and the literature are expressed in US dollars ($); effects in quality adjusted life years (QALY). Results In base case analyzes, additional CDT accumulated 32.31 QALYs compared with 31.68 QALYs after standard treatment alone. Direct medical costs were $64 709 for additional CDT and $51 866 for standard treatment. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was $20 429/QALY gained. One-way sensitivity analysis showed model sensitivity to the clinical efficacy of both strategies, but the ICER remained < $55 000/QALY over the full range of all parameters. The probability that CDT is cost effective was 82% at a willingness to pay threshold of $50 000/QALY gained. Conclusions Additional CDT is likely to be a cost-effective alternative to the standard treatment for patients with a high proximal DVT and a low risk of bleeding. PMID:23452204

  7. Minimization of the energy costs for operating magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Ilyas A. H.; Gale, E.; Isakovic, A. F.

    2015-03-01

    Increasing prospects of utilizing the STT-MRAM calls for the re-assessment of the overall energy (power) cost of operating magnetic tunnel junctions and related elements. This motivates our design, nanofabrication and characterization of simple tri-layer magnetic tunnel junctions which show measurable decrease in the operating energy cost. The MTJs we report about rely on nanoengineering interfaces between the insulating and magnetic layers in such a way that the area of the hysteresis loops can be controlled in one or both magnetic layers. Our TMR coefficient ranges from 45% to 130%, depending on the MTJ layer materials, and can be anticipated to be further increased. We also report the study of the TMR dependence on the RA product, as an important interface parameter. Lastly, we present an analysis of MTJ parameters affected by our approach and a perspective on further improvements, focusing on the device design parameters relevant for the integration of this type of MTJs. This work is supported by the SRC-ATIC Grant 2012-VJ-2335. A part of this work is being performed at Cornell University CNF, a member of NNIN. We thank CNF staff for the support.

  8. Evaluation of Contrail Reduction Strategies Based on Environmental and Operational Costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Neil Y.; Sridhar, Banavar; Ng, Hok K.; Li, Jinhua

    2013-01-01

    This paper evaluates a set of contrail reduction strategies based on environmental and operational costs. A linear climate model was first used to convert climate effects of carbon dioxide emissions and aircraft contrails to changes in Absolute Global Temperature Potential, a metric that measures the mean surface temperature change due to aircraft emissions and persistent contrail formations. The concept of social cost of carbon and the carbon auction price from recent California's cap-and-trade system were then used to relate the carbon dioxide emissions and contrail formations to an environmental cost index. The strategy for contrail reduction is based on minimizing contrail formations by altering the aircraft's cruising altitude. The strategy uses a user-defined factor to trade off between contrail reduction and additional fuel burn and carbon dioxide emissions. A higher value of tradeoff factor results in more contrail reduction but also more fuel burn and carbon emissions. The strategy is considered favorable when the net environmental cost benefit exceeds the operational cost. The results show how the net environmental benefit varies with different decision-making time-horizon and different carbon cost. The cost models provide a guidance to select the trade-off factor that will result in the most net environmental benefit.

  9. Understanding cost growth during operations of planetary missions: An explanation of changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeill, J. F.; Chapman, E. L.; Sklar, M. E.

    In the development of project cost estimates for interplanetary missions, considerable focus is generally given to the development of cost estimates for the development of ground, flight, and launch systems, i.e., Phases B, C, and D. Depending on the project team, efforts expended to develop cost estimates for operations (Phase E) may be relatively less rigorous than that devoted to estimates for ground and flight systems development. Furthermore, the project team may be challenged to develop a solid estimate of operations cost in the early stages of mission development, e.g., Concept Study Report or Systems Requirement Review (CSR/SRR), Preliminary Design Review (PDR), as mission specific peculiarities that impact cost may not be well understood. In addition, a methodology generally used to develop Phase E cost is engineering build-up, also known as “ grass roots” . Phase E can include cost and schedule risks that are not anticipated at the time of the major milestone reviews prior to launch. If not incorporated into the engineering build-up cost method for Phase E, this may translate into an estimation of the complexity of operations and overall cost estimates that are not mature and at worse, insufficient. As a result, projects may find themselves with thin reserves during cruise and on-orbit operations or project overruns prior to the end of mission. This paper examines a set of interplanetary missions in an effort to better understand the reasons for cost and staffing growth in Phase E. The method used in the study is discussed as well as the major findings summarized as the Phase E Explanation of Change (EoC). Research for the study entailed the review of project materials, including Estimates at Completion (EAC) for Phase E and staffing profiles, major project milestone reviews, e.g., CSR, PDR, Critical Design Review (CDR), the interviewing of select project and mission management, and review of Phase E replan materials. From this work, a detai- ed

  10. 7 CFR 1710.253 - Engineering and cost studies-addition of generation capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Engineering and cost studies-addition of generation capacity. 1710.253 Section 1710.253 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... TO ELECTRIC LOANS AND GUARANTEES Construction Work Plans and Related Studies § 1710.253...

  11. 7 CFR 1710.253 - Engineering and cost studies-addition of generation capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Engineering and cost studies-addition of generation capacity. 1710.253 Section 1710.253 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL AND PRE-LOAN POLICIES AND PROCEDURES COMMON TO ELECTRIC LOANS AND...

  12. 7 CFR 1710.253 - Engineering and cost studies-addition of generation capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Engineering and cost studies-addition of generation capacity. 1710.253 Section 1710.253 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL AND PRE-LOAN POLICIES AND PROCEDURES COMMON TO ELECTRIC LOANS AND...

  13. ROBucket: A low cost operant chamber based on the Arduino microcontroller.

    PubMed

    Devarakonda, Kavya; Nguyen, Katrina P; Kravitz, Alexxai V

    2016-06-01

    The operant conditioning chamber is a cornerstone of animal behavioral research. Operant boxes are used to assess learning and motivational behavior in animals, particularly for food and drug reinforcers. However, commercial operant chambers cost several thousands of dollars. We have constructed the Rodent Operant Bucket (ROBucket), an inexpensive and easily assembled open-source operant chamber based on the Arduino microcontroller platform, which can be used to train mice to respond for sucrose solution or other liquid reinforcers. The apparatus contains two nose pokes, a drinking well, and a solenoid-controlled liquid delivery system. ROBucket can run fixed ratio and progressive ratio training schedules, and can be programmed to run more complicated behavioral paradigms. Additional features such as motion sensing and video tracking can be added to the operant chamber through the array of widely available Arduino-compatible sensors. The design files and programming code are open source and available online for others to use. PMID:26019006

  14. Viability Assessment of a Repository at Yucca Mountain. Volume 5: Costs to Construct and Operate the Repository

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This volume presents a management summary of the cost estimate to complete the design, and to license, construct, operate, monitor, close, and decommission a Monitored Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain in Nevada. This volume summarizes the scope, estimating methodologies, and assumptions used in development of the Monitored Geologic Repository-VA cost estimate. It identifies the key features necessary to understand the summary costs presented herein. This cost summary derives from a larger body of documented cost analysis. Volume 5 is organized to reflect this structured approach to cost estimation and contains the following sections: Section 1, Cost Elements. This section briefly defines the components of each major repository cost element. Section 2, Project Phases. This section presents the definition, as used in the estimate, of five project phases (Licensing, Pre-emplacement Construction, Emplacement Operations, Monitoring, and Closure and Decommissioning) and the schedule dates for each phase. It also contains major milestone dates and a bar chart schedule. Section 3, Major Assumptions. This section identifies key high-level assumptions for the cost estimate basis. Additional detailed assumptions are included in the appendices. Section 4, Integrated Cost Summary. This section presents a high-level roll-up of the VA costs resulting from the estimating work. The tables and figures contained in this section were compiled from the more detailed cost estimates in the appendices. Section 5, References. This section identifies the references that support this cost volume. Appendices. For each major repository cost element, Appendices B-F [B, C, D, E, F] presents additional information on the scope of cost elements, identifies methodologies used to develop the cost estimates, lists underlying cost assumptions, and tabulates summary results. Appendix A contains a glossary to assist the reader in understanding the terminology in Volume 5. Appendix G presents costs

  15. A low cost commercial approach to space systems development and operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonner, T. F.; Faget, M. A.; Allen, J. P.; Langstaff, D. H.

    In recent years a number of factors have led to increased attention to the lowering of costs for space flight systems and the operation of those systems. To that end Space Industries Inc. (SII), a small commercial space company based in Houston, Tex., is employing proven methods derived from over three decades of space flight development and space operations. These methods are based on a philosophy that is cost-sensitive focused with a primary objective to drive the cost of space systems and their operations down to the lowest level practical, consistent with the mission objectives, acceptable risk and safety considerations. This approach involves a process of: (1) addressing the basic requirements in the simplest and most cost effective manner, i.e. limit new development wherever possible, maximize use of proven and existing technology and eliminate non-essential requirements; (2) incorporation of proven industrial practices where possible, i.e. focus on performance envelopes (not on restrictive, specific and detailed specifications) and streamline program management, documentation, testing and other procedures; and (3) delivery of the "best" price, i.e. maximum customer utility at minimum cost with emphasis on customer service. The overriding factor, and indeed the most important aspect of the low cost commercial approach, is the willingness to accept greater risks to achieve all of the user's objectives. Our development approach is customer focused with emphasis on fully understanding the customer needs while striving constantly to limit new development requirements and, consequently, additional costs. This approach involves a process of designing for operations, i.e. low operation and life-cycle costs, while ensuring a reliability level consistent with customer budget constraints, mission objectives and safety consideration. In executing this low cost, customer-focused approach, we strive to maintain minimal overheads, simple interfaces, reduced documentation

  16. Control and operation cost optimization of the HISS cryogenic system

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, J.; Bieser, F.; Anderson, D.

    1983-08-01

    The Heavy Ion Spectrometer System (HISS) relies upon superconducting coils of cryostable design to provide a maximum particle bending field of 3 tesla. A previous paper describes the cryogenic facility including helium refrigeration and gas management. This paper discusses a control strategy which has allowed full time unattended operation, along with significant nitrogen and power cost reductions. Reduction of liquid nitrogen consumption has been accomplished by making use of the sensible heat available in the cold exhaust gas. Measured nitrogen throughput agrees with calculations for sensible heat utilization of zero to 70%. Calculated consumption saving over this range is 40 liters per hour for conductive losses to the supports only. The measured throughput differential for the total system is higher.

  17. Reducing The Operating Costs Of An Apartment Building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takács, Ján; Rácz, Lukáš

    2015-09-01

    Circulation pumps are mechanical devices, which are used to create the overpressure required for the transportation of a heat-transfer medium in heating technology as well as in other related technologies. In a circulation pump the mechanical energy generated by the drive machine - an electric motor is transformed to hydraulic energy, which consists of kinetic and static energy. In the pipeline of a heating system circulation pumps represent a source of hydraulic energy (positive differential pressure), which is consumed to transport the heat-transfer medium. During the flow, the heat-transfer medium puts up resistance to the so-called passive resistors, which consist of pressure losses from friction in the pipes and pressure losses due to local resistance. In this article the authors analyze the effect of a circulation pump on the operating costs in an apartment building. Different types of circulating pumps, ranging from the most unfavorable to the optimal, were selected.

  18. 77 FR 15976 - Additional Changes to the Schedule of Operations Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-19

    ... Rule on Changes to the Schedule of Operations Regulations (76 FR page 33979), if meat and poultry...). Executive Order 13563 emphasizes the importance of quantifying both costs and benefits, of reducing...

  19. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  20. Low Cost Injection Mold Creation via Hybrid Additive and Conventional Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Dehoff, Ryan R.; Watkins, Thomas R.; List, III, Frederick Alyious; Carver, Keith; England, Roger

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the proposed project between Cummins and ORNL is to significantly reduce the cost of the tooling (machining and materials) required to create injection molds to make plastic components. Presently, the high cost of this tooling forces the design decision to make cast aluminum parts because Cummins typical production volumes are too low to allow injection molded plastic parts to be cost effective with the amortized cost of the injection molding tooling. In addition to reducing the weight of components, polymer injection molding allows the opportunity for the alternative cooling methods, via nitrogen gas. Nitrogen gas cooling offers an environmentally and economically attractive cooling option, if the mold can be manufactured economically. In this project, a current injection molding design was optimized for cooling using nitrogen gas. The various components of the injection mold tooling were fabricated using the Renishaw powder bed laser additive manufacturing technology. Subsequent machining was performed on the as deposited components to form a working assembly. The injection mold is scheduled to be tested in a projection setting at a commercial vendor selected by Cummins.

  1. SideRack: A Cost-Effective Addition to Commercial Zebrafish Housing Systems

    PubMed Central

    Burg, Leonard; Gill, Ryan; Balciuniene, Jorune

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Commercially available aquatic housing systems provide excellent and relatively trouble-free hardware for rearing and housing juvenile as well as adult zebrafish. However, the cost of such systems is quite high and potentially prohibitive for smaller educational and research institutions. The need for tank space prompted us to experiment with various additions to our existing Aquaneering system. We also noted that high water exchange rates typical in commercial systems are suboptimal for quick growth of juvenile fish. We devised a housing system we call “SideRack,” which contains 20 large tanks with air supply and slow water circulation. It enables cost-effective expansion of existing fish facility, with a key additional benefit of increased growth and maturation rates of juvenile fish. PMID:24611601

  2. Cost Analysis of Operation Theatre Services at an Apex Tertiary Care Trauma Centre of India.

    PubMed

    Siddharth, Vijaydeep; Kumar, Subodh; Vij, Aarti; Gupta, Shakti Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Operating room services are one of the major cost and revenue-generating centres of a hospital. The cost associated with the provisioning of operating department services depends on the resources consumed and the unit costs of those resources. The objective of this study was to calculate the cost of operation theatre services at Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Centre, AIIMS, New Delhi. The study was carried out at the operation theatre department of Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Centre (JPNATC), AIIMS from April 2010 to March 2011 after obtaining approval from concerned authorities. This study was observational and descriptive in nature. Traditional (average or gross) costing methodology was used to arrive at the cost for the provisioning of operation theatre (OT) services. Cost was calculated under two heads; as capital and operating cost. Annualised cost of capital assets was calculated according to the methodology prescribed by the World Health Organization and operating costs were taken on actual basis; thereafter, per day cost of OT services was obtained. The average number of surgeries performed in the trauma centre per day is 13. The annual cost of providing operating room services at JPNATC, New Delhi was calculated to be 197,298,704 Indian rupees (INR) (US$ 3,653,679), while the per hour cost was calculated to be INR 22,626.92 (US$ 419). Majority of the expenditures were for human resource (33.63 %) followed by OT capital cost (31.90 %), consumables (29.97 %), engineering maintenance cost (2.55 %), support services operating cost (1.22 %) and support services capital cost (0.73 %). Of the total cost towards the provisioning of OT services, 32.63 % was capital cost while 67.37 % is operating cost. The results of this costing study will help in the future planning of resource allocation within the financial constraints (US$ 1 = INR 54). PMID:26730059

  3. IUS/TUG orbital operations and mission support study. Volume 5: Cost estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The costing approach, methodology, and rationale utilized for generating cost data for composite IUS and space tug orbital operations are discussed. Summary cost estimates are given along with cost data initially derived for the IUS program and space tug program individually, and cost estimates for each work breakdown structure element.

  4. Efficiency, Comprehensiveness and Cost-effectiveness when comparing Dictation and Electronic Templates for Operative Reports

    PubMed Central

    Laflamme, Mark R.; Dexter, Paul R.; Graham, Marilyn F.; Hui, Siu L.; McDonald, Clement J.

    2005-01-01

    Surgeons typically document operative events using dictation services. Dictated reports are frequently incomplete or delayed. Electronic note templates could potentially improve this process. Using a study design of alternating four week blocks, we compared the timeliness and comprehensiveness of operative notes created through the use of electronic templates (structured text documents for reuse) versus dictation services for five surgical procedures. Templates resulted in dramatically faster times to the presence of a verified operative report in the medical record compared to dictation services (mean 28 v. 22,440 minutes). Templates increased overall compliance with national standards for operative note documentation and avoided transcription costs. Documentation with templates took slightly more time than dictation (mean 6.77 v. 5.96 minutes; P=0.036), not including the additional time necessary to subsequently verify dictated reports. We conclude that electronic note templates can improve the timeliness and comprehensiveness of operative documentation, while decreasing transcription costs and requiring minimal additional effort on the part of surgeons. PMID:16779075

  5. 19 CFR 10.877 - Direct costs of processing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... manufacture of the specific good, including fringe benefits, on-the-job training, and the costs of engineering..., design, engineering, and blueprint costs, to the extent that they are allocable to the specific good;...

  6. 19 CFR 10.877 - Direct costs of processing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... manufacture of the specific good, including fringe benefits, on-the-job training, and the costs of engineering..., design, engineering, and blueprint costs, to the extent that they are allocable to the specific good;...

  7. 19 CFR 10.814 - Direct costs of processing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... manufacture of the specific good, including fringe benefits, on-the-job training, and the costs of engineering..., design, engineering, and blueprint costs, to the extent that they are allocable to the specific good;...

  8. 19 CFR 10.814 - Direct costs of processing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... manufacture of the specific good, including fringe benefits, on-the-job training, and the costs of engineering..., design, engineering, and blueprint costs, to the extent that they are allocable to the specific good;...

  9. 19 CFR 10.877 - Direct costs of processing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... manufacture of the specific good, including fringe benefits, on-the-job training, and the costs of engineering..., design, engineering, and blueprint costs, to the extent that they are allocable to the specific good;...

  10. 19 CFR 10.814 - Direct costs of processing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., design, engineering, and blueprint costs, to the extent that they are allocable to the specific good; (4... manufacture of the specific good, including fringe benefits, on-the-job training, and the costs of...

  11. Hospital Cost of Staphylococcal Infection after Cardiothoracic or Orthopedic Operations in France: A Retrospective Database Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bénard, Stève; Cyr, Sonya

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Staphylococcal infections (SI) after cardiothoracic (CT) or orthopedic (OP) surgery are associated with extended length of stay (LOS), a considerable mortality rate, and high cost. No data on these consequences have been published in France. Therefore, a study was conducted to describe the epidemiologic, clinical, and economic outcomes of SI following these operations in France based on a hospital discharge database. Methods: Patients who underwent the most common types of CT or OP operations in 2009 were identified and followed for one year. Staphylococcal infections occurring in the three following months were identified. Results: In 2009, 21,543 patients underwent one of the selected CT procedures (62% coronary artery bypass grafting; 38% cardiac valve replacement) and 175,518 patients underwent one of the selected OP procedures (64% hip arthroplasty; 36% knee arthroplasty). Among the patients, 4.4% (n=955) and 0.9% (n=1,515) developed SI after CT and OP surgery, respectively. Staphylococcal infection led to approximately 1.0 and 1.4 additional hospitalizations per patient, 22.1 and 24.1 additional hospital days, and an excess cost of €15,475 and €13,389 after an CT or OP procedure, respectively. The in-hospital mortality rate was 2.6 times and 6 times greater in infected patients than in non-infected patients for CT and OP. Hospital cost reached €505 million for these two CT procedures and €1.9 billion for the two OP procedures, of which €15 million and €20 million were related directly to patients having developed SI. Conclusions: Staphylococcal infections after common CT or OP operations were associated with greater mortality rates and hospital costs secondary to the additional procedures and greater LOS. PMID:26207403

  12. Optimizing breast cancer follow-up: diagnostic value and costs of additional routine breast ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Wojcinski, Sebastian; Farrokh, Andre; Hille, Ursula; Hirschauer, Elke; Schmidt, Werner; Hillemanns, Peter; Degenhardt, Friedrich

    2011-02-01

    A total of 2,546,325 breast cancer survivors are estimated to live in the United States. The organized breast cancer follow-up programs do not generally include breast ultrasound in asymptomatic women. The purpose of our prospective study was to investigate the efficacy of breast ultrasound in detecting previously occult recurrences. A total of 735 eligible patients with a history of breast cancer were recruited. We assessed the same patient population before (routine follow-up program) and after (study follow-up program) the introduction of an additional ultrasound examination. In the routine follow-up program 245 of 735 patients (33.3% [95% confidence-interval (CI): 29.9-36.7]) had an ultrasound due to abnormal local or mammographic findings. 490 of 735 patients (66.7% [95% CI: 63.3-70.1]) were initially considered asymptomatic and received an additional ultrasound exclusively within the study follow-up program. All positive examination results were followed by accelerated core needle biopsy. The routine follow-up program led to a biopsy in 66 of 735 patients (9.0%) revealing a recurrent cancer in 27 cases (3.7%). The study follow-up program with the additional ultrasound led to another 21 biopsies raising the total number of patients who had to undergo a biopsy from 9.0% (95% CI: 6.9-11.1) to 11.8% (95% CI: 9.5-14.2). Finally, we diagnosed a previously occult malignant lesion in an additional six patients following this protocol. Therefore, the rate of detected recurrences rose from 3.7% (95% CI: 2.3-5.0) in the routine follow-up program to 4.5% (95% CI: 3.0-6.0) in the study follow-up program (p = 0.041). Negative side effects were the additional costs (the costs per detected malignancy in the routine follow-up program were $2455.69; the costs for each additionally detected malignancy in the study follow-up program were $7580.30), the higher overall biopsy rate (9.0 vs. 11.8%) and the elevated benign biopsies rate (59.1% vs. 71.4%). Regarding these results, the

  13. Leveling the playing field: A new method for measuring operational cost efficiency in gas processing and field operations

    SciTech Connect

    Salahor, G.S.

    1998-12-31

    Per-unit operating cost is a measure which is extremely important from a commercial and competitive perspective in the gas processing industry nd is closely monitored by most operators. However, some operating cost measures are of only limited use in providing true insight into the extent of potential operational efficiency issues which may be actionable by operational management and staff. In fact, there are many cases where analysis and comparison of per-unit operating costs without proper contextual technical information can lead to misleading conclusions regarding the relative operational efficiency of various gas processing and gathering facilities. Because producing assets are all unique to some extent, interpretation and utilization of operating cost data for gas processing and gathering systems must reflect due consideration of the technical factors which influence the overall economic performance and costs. Ernst and Young has used actual industry operating data to develop a complexity and scale index for both gas processing and gathering assets incorporating such considerations, and has utilized this in their consulting work for industry for the past several years. This indexing methodology, when used as a basis for cost efficiency analysis, is very useful in assisting gas processing plants and gathering system operators to set appropriate and realistic cost performance targets which are commensurate with the structural and complexity issues particular to their facility.

  14. 42 CFR 412.71 - Determination of base-year inpatient operating costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Determination of base-year inpatient operating... Costs § 412.71 Determination of base-year inpatient operating costs. (a) Base-year costs. (1) For each... before September 30, 1983 is for less than 12 months, the base period will be the hospital's most...

  15. CAPITAL AND O AND M (OPERATION/MAINTENANCE) COST RELATIONSHIPS FOR HAZARDOUS WASTE INCINERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to develop relationships between capital and operation/maintenance (O&M) costs for hazardous waste incineration and the various waste-specific, design-specific, and operational factors that affect these costs. These cost relationships have been des...

  16. Reduce Operating Costs with an EnergySmart School Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Energy, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Energy costs are a school district's second highest expenditure after personnel. Public schools currently spend more than $8 billion per year for energy. School energy expenditures rose, on average, 20 percent per year between 2000 and 2002--and the costs continue to rise. Natural gas prices alone increased 14 percent annually between 2003 and…

  17. Enabling cost-effective high-current burst-mode operation in superconducting accelerators

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sheffield, Richard L.

    2015-06-01

    Superconducting (SC) accelerators are very efficient for CW or long-pulse operation, and normal conducting (NC) accelerators are cost effective for short-pulse operation. The addition of a short NC linac section to a SC linac can correct for the energy droop that occurs when pulsed high-current operation is required that exceeds the capability of the klystrons to replenish the cavity RF fields due to the long field fill-times of SC structures, or a requirement to support a broad range of beam currents results in variable beam loading. This paper describes the implementation of this technique to enable microseconds of high beam-current,more » 90 mA or more, in a 12 GeV SC long-pulse accelerator designed for the MaRIE 42-keV XFEL proposed for Los Alamos National Laboratory.« less

  18. Enabling cost-effective high-current burst-mode operation in superconducting accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, Richard L.

    2015-06-01

    Superconducting (SC) accelerators are very efficient for CW or long-pulse operation, and normal conducting (NC) accelerators are cost effective for short-pulse operation. The addition of a short NC linac section to a SC linac can correct for the energy droop that occurs when pulsed high-current operation is required that exceeds the capability of the klystrons to replenish the cavity RF fields due to the long field fill-times of SC structures, or a requirement to support a broad range of beam currents results in variable beam loading. This paper describes the implementation of this technique to enable microseconds of high beam-current, 90 mA or more, in a 12 GeV SC long-pulse accelerator designed for the MaRIE 42-keV XFEL proposed for Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  19. 25 CFR 170.602 - If a tribe incurs unforeseen construction costs, can it get additional funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Funding Process § 170.602 If a tribe incurs unforeseen construction costs, can it get additional funds... circumstances of the construction process (i.e., cost overruns). If the Secretary is unable to fund the... sufficient additional funds are awarded. (See 25 CFR 900.130(e).) Miscellaneous Provisions...

  20. 25 CFR 170.602 - If a tribe incurs unforeseen construction costs, can it get additional funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Funding Process § 170.602 If a tribe incurs unforeseen construction costs, can it get additional funds... circumstances of the construction process (i.e., cost overruns). If the Secretary is unable to fund the... sufficient additional funds are awarded. (See 25 CFR 900.130(e).) Miscellaneous Provisions...

  1. 25 CFR 170.602 - If a tribe incurs unforeseen construction costs, can it get additional funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... sufficient additional funds are awarded. (See 25 CFR 900.130(e).) Miscellaneous Provisions ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false If a tribe incurs unforeseen construction costs, can it... Funding Process § 170.602 If a tribe incurs unforeseen construction costs, can it get additional...

  2. 25 CFR 170.602 - If a tribe incurs unforeseen construction costs, can it get additional funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... sufficient additional funds are awarded. (See 25 CFR 900.130(e).) Miscellaneous Provisions ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false If a tribe incurs unforeseen construction costs, can it... Funding Process § 170.602 If a tribe incurs unforeseen construction costs, can it get additional...

  3. Wind turbine reliability : understanding and minimizing wind turbine operation and maintenance costs.

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-11-01

    Wind turbine system reliability is a critical factor in the success of a wind energy project. Poor reliability directly affects both the project's revenue stream through increased operation and maintenance (O&M) costs and reduced availability to generate power due to turbine downtime. Indirectly, the acceptance of wind-generated power by the financial and developer communities as a viable enterprise is influenced by the risk associated with the capital equipment reliability; increased risk, or at least the perception of increased risk, is generally accompanied by increased financing fees or interest rates. Cost of energy (COE) is a key project evaluation metric, both in commercial applications and in the U.S. federal wind energy program. To reflect this commercial reality, the wind energy research community has adopted COE as a decision-making and technology evaluation metric. The COE metric accounts for the effects of reliability through levelized replacement cost and unscheduled maintenance cost parameters. However, unlike the other cost contributors, such as initial capital investment and scheduled maintenance and operating expenses, costs associated with component failures are necessarily speculative. They are based on assumptions about the reliability of components that in many cases have not been operated for a complete life cycle. Due to the logistical and practical difficulty of replacing major components in a wind turbine, unanticipated failures (especially serial failures) can have a large impact on the economics of a project. The uncertainty associated with long-term component reliability has direct bearing on the confidence level associated with COE projections. In addition, wind turbine technology is evolving. New materials and designs are being incorporated in contemporary wind turbines with the ultimate goal of reducing weight, controlling loads, and improving energy capture. While the goal of these innovations is reduction in the COE, there is a

  4. Theoretical and experimental researches on the operating costs of a wastewater treatment plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panaitescu, M.; Panaitescu, F.-V.; Anton, I.-A.

    2015-11-01

    Purpose of the work: The total cost of a sewage plants is often determined by the present value method. All of the annual operating costs for each process are converted to the value of today's correspondence and added to the costs of investment for each process, which leads to getting the current net value. The operating costs of the sewage plants are subdivided, in general, in the premises of the investment and operating costs. The latter can be stable (normal operation and maintenance, the establishment of power) or variables (chemical and power sludge treatment and disposal, of effluent charges). For the purpose of evaluating the preliminary costs so that an installation can choose between different alternatives in an incipient phase of a project, can be used cost functions. In this paper will be calculated the operational cost to make several scenarios in order to optimize its. Total operational cost (fixed and variable) is dependent global parameters of wastewater treatment plant. Research and methodology: The wastewater treatment plant costs are subdivided in investment and operating costs. We can use different cost functions to estimate fixed and variable operating costs. In this study we have used the statistical formulas for cost functions. The method which was applied to study the impact of the influent characteristics on the costs is economic analysis. Optimization of plant design consist in firstly, to assess the ability of the smallest design to treat the maximum loading rates to a given effluent quality and, secondly, to compare the cost of the two alternatives for average and maximum loading rates. Results: In this paper we obtained the statistical values for the investment cost functions, operational fixed costs and operational variable costs for wastewater treatment plant and its graphical representations. All costs were compared to the net values. Finally we observe that it is more economical to build a larger plant, especially if maximum loading

  5. Cost-Effective Additive Manufacturing in Space: HELIOS Technology Challenge Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeVieneni, Alayna; Velez, Carlos Andres; Benjamin, David; Hollenbeck, Jay

    2012-01-01

    Welcome to the HELIOS Technology Challenge Guide. This document is intended to serve as a general road map for participants of the HELIOS Technology Challenge [HTC] Program and the associated inaugural challenge: HTC-01: Cost-Effective Additive Manufacturing in Space. Please note that this guide is not a rule book and is not meant to hinder the development of innovative ideas. Its primary goal is to highlight the objectives of the HTC-01 Challenge and to describe possible solution routes and pitfalls that such technology may encounter in space. Please also note that participants wishing to demonstrate any hardware developed under this program during any future HELIOS Technology Challenge showcase event(s) may be subject to event regulations to be published separately at a later date.

  6. 14 CFR 119.36 - Additional certificate application requirements for commercial operators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional certificate application requirements for commercial operators. 119.36 Section 119.36 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND OPERATORS FOR COMPENSATION OR...

  7. 29 CFR 1910.126 - Additional requirements for special dipping and coating operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Additional requirements for special dipping and coating... Dipping and Coating Operations § 1910.126 Additional requirements for special dipping and coating... requirements apply to flow coating? (1) You must use a direct low-pressure pumping system or a 10-gallon (38...

  8. 49 CFR 192.328 - Additional construction requirements for steel pipe using alternative maximum allowable operating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional construction requirements for steel pipe using alternative maximum allowable operating pressure. 192.328 Section 192.328 Transportation... Lines and Mains § 192.328 Additional construction requirements for steel pipe using alternative...

  9. 49 CFR 192.328 - Additional construction requirements for steel pipe using alternative maximum allowable operating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional construction requirements for steel pipe using alternative maximum allowable operating pressure. 192.328 Section 192.328 Transportation... Lines and Mains § 192.328 Additional construction requirements for steel pipe using alternative...

  10. 49 CFR 192.328 - Additional construction requirements for steel pipe using alternative maximum allowable operating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional construction requirements for steel pipe using alternative maximum allowable operating pressure. 192.328 Section 192.328 Transportation... Lines and Mains § 192.328 Additional construction requirements for steel pipe using alternative...

  11. 49 CFR 192.328 - Additional construction requirements for steel pipe using alternative maximum allowable operating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional construction requirements for steel pipe using alternative maximum allowable operating pressure. 192.328 Section 192.328 Transportation... Lines and Mains § 192.328 Additional construction requirements for steel pipe using alternative...

  12. 49 CFR 192.328 - Additional construction requirements for steel pipe using alternative maximum allowable operating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional construction requirements for steel pipe using alternative maximum allowable operating pressure. 192.328 Section 192.328 Transportation... Lines and Mains § 192.328 Additional construction requirements for steel pipe using alternative...

  13. 49 CFR 192.935 - What additional preventive and mitigative measures must an operator take?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... § 192.7), section 5, a risk analysis of its pipeline to identify additional measures to protect the high... and the root cause analysis to support identification of targeted additional preventative and..., unstable suspension bridge) is a threat to the integrity of a covered segment, the operator must...

  14. 49 CFR 192.935 - What additional preventive and mitigative measures must an operator take?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... § 192.7), section 5, a risk analysis of its pipeline to identify additional measures to protect the high... and the root cause analysis to support identification of targeted additional preventative and..., unstable suspension bridge) is a threat to the integrity of a covered segment, the operator must...

  15. Using Excel's Matrix Operations to Facilitate Reciprocal Cost Allocations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leese, Wallace R.; Kizirian, Tim

    2009-01-01

    The reciprocal method of service department cost allocation requires linear equations to be solved simultaneously. These computations are often so complex as to cause the abandonment of the reciprocal method in favor of the less sophisticated direct or step-down methods. Here is a short example demonstrating how Excel's sometimes unknown matrix…

  16. 25 CFR 171.555 - What additional costs will I incur if I am granted a Payment Plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... following costs: (a) An administrative fee to process your Payment Plan, as required by 31 CFR 901.9. (b... AND WATER IRRIGATION OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE Financial Matters: Assessments, Billing,...

  17. 25 CFR 171.555 - What additional costs will I incur if I am granted a Payment Plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... following costs: (a) An administrative fee to process your Payment Plan, as required by 31 CFR 901.9. (b... AND WATER IRRIGATION OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE Financial Matters: Assessments, Billing,...

  18. 25 CFR 171.555 - What additional costs will I incur if I am granted a Payment Plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... following costs: (a) An administrative fee to process your Payment Plan, as required by 31 CFR 901.9. (b... AND WATER IRRIGATION OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE Financial Matters: Assessments, Billing,...

  19. 25 CFR 171.555 - What additional costs will I incur if I am granted a Payment Plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... following costs: (a) An administrative fee to process your Payment Plan, as required by 31 CFR 901.9. (b... AND WATER IRRIGATION OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE Financial Matters: Assessments, Billing,...

  20. Operating costs and plant options analysis for the Shamokin fluidized bed boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Klett, M.G.; Dowdy, T.E.; Litman, R.

    1984-03-01

    This report presents the results of a study that examined the operating costs and options to improve the Shamokin Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustion Demonstration Plant located near Shamokin, Pennsylvania. The purpose of this study was to perform an operating cost analysis and compare the results with projected operating costs. An analysis was also made to identify possible cost savings options. Two base case scenarios were developed for this study: the first scenario assumed that the plant operated in a manner similar to operations during the extended test program; and the second scenario was concerned with two options. One option assumed upgrading the plant to achieve continuous full load operation, restarting, and used revised costs and revenues. The second assumed reconfiguring the plant for cogeneration.

  1. Report on audit of management and operating contractor overtime costs

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The Department of Energy (Department) uses contractors to operate its facilities. During Fiscal Year 1994, the Department`s management and operating contractors (contractors) had a total payroll of about $6.6 billion. Of this amount, about $251 million was compensation for overtime pay. The purpose of our audit was to evaluate contractor overtime payments for compliance with applicable regulations and contract provisions. Our objective was to determine whether the Department had controls in place to monitor and manage contractor overtime use.

  2. New cooling system chemistry provides 45% cost savings through high cycle operation

    SciTech Connect

    Tylec, M.; Janeczko, J.; Tari, K.

    1998-07-01

    Operating cost minimization is an everyday goal for the Power Generation Industry. The cost-effective treatment of open recirculating cooling systems for corrosion, mineral scale, fouling, and microbiological growth is critical to ensure optimal generation of power. Capitalizing on an advancement in alkaline cooling water technology enabled a northeastern cogeneration plant to reduce water consumption, discharge costs, and treatment costs. This paper discusses the conversion from a conventional phosphonate technology to Continuum{reg{underscore}sign} AEC, a revolutionary cooling water treatment program. It details the increased cycles of concentration, improved treatment performance, and reduced overall operating costs provided by the new treatment program.

  3. Operating cost guidelines for benchmarking DOE thermal treatment systems for low-level mixed waste

    SciTech Connect

    Salmon, R.; Loghry, S.L.; Hermes, W.H.

    1994-11-01

    This report presents guidelines for estimating operating costs for use in benchmarking US Department of Energy (DOE) low-level mixed waste thermal treatment systems. The guidelines are based on operating cost experience at the DOE Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) mixed waste incinerator at the K-25 Site at Oak Ridge. In presenting these guidelines, it should be made clear at the outset that it is not the intention of this report to present operating cost estimates for new technologies, but only guidelines for estimating such costs.

  4. 24 CFR 583.130 - Commitment of grant amounts for leasing, supportive services, and operating costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... leasing, supportive services, and operating costs. 583.130 Section 583.130 Housing and Urban Development... HOUSING PROGRAM Assistance Provided § 583.130 Commitment of grant amounts for leasing, supportive services, and operating costs. Upon execution of a grant agreement covering assistance for leasing,...

  5. 16 CFR 305.5 - Determinations of estimated annual energy consumption, estimated annual operating cost, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... consumption, estimated annual operating cost, and energy efficiency rating, and of water use rate. 305.5... energy efficiency rating, and of water use rate. (a) Procedures for determining the estimated annual energy consumption, the estimated annual operating costs, the energy efficiency ratings, and the...

  6. 75 FR 33987 - Disposing of Unneeded Federal Real Estate Increasing Sales Proceeds, Cutting Operating Costs, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ... Proceeds, Cutting Operating Costs, and Improving Energy Efficiency Memorandum for the Heads of Executive... and occupancy rates, annual operating cost, energy efficiency, and sustainability. To the extent... memorandum in the Federal Register. (Presidential Sig.) THE WHITE HOUSE, Washington, June 10, 2010 [FR...

  7. 16 CFR 305.5 - Determinations of estimated annual energy consumption, estimated annual operating cost, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... consumption, estimated annual operating cost, and energy efficiency rating, and of water use rate. 305.5... energy efficiency rating, and of water use rate. (a) Procedures for determining the estimated annual energy consumption, the estimated annual operating costs, the energy efficiency ratings, and the...

  8. 16 CFR 305.5 - Determinations of estimated annual energy consumption, estimated annual operating cost, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... consumption, estimated annual operating cost, and energy efficiency rating, and of water use rate. 305.5... energy efficiency rating, and of water use rate. Link to an amendment published at 75 FR 41713, July 19... operating costs, the energy efficiency ratings, and the efficacy factors of the following covered...

  9. 16 CFR 305.5 - Determinations of estimated annual energy consumption, estimated annual operating cost, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... consumption, estimated annual operating cost, and energy efficiency rating, and of water use rate. 305.5... energy efficiency rating, and of water use rate. (a) Procedures for determining the estimated annual energy consumption, the estimated annual operating costs, the energy efficiency ratings, and the...

  10. 42 CFR 412.62 - Federal rates for inpatient operating costs for fiscal year 1984.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... variations in case mix among hospitals; (2) Excluding an estimate of indirect medical education costs; (3... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Federal rates for inpatient operating costs for... SERVICES Basic Methodology for Determining Prospective Payment Federal Rates for Inpatient Operating...

  11. Advanced solar concentrator mass production, operation, and maintenance cost assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemeyer, W. A.; Bedard, R. J.; Bell, D. M.

    1981-01-01

    The object of this assessment was to estimate the costs of the preliminary design at: production rates of 100 to 1,000,000 concentrators per year; concentrators per aperture diameters of 5, 10, 11, and 15 meters; and various receiver/power conversion package weights. The design of the cellular glass substrate Advanced Solar Concentrator is presented. The concentrator is an 11 meter diameter, two axis tracking, parabolic dish solar concentrator. The reflective surface of this design consists of inner and outer groups of mirror glass/cellular glass gores.

  12. A life cycle cost economics model for automation projects with uniformly varying operating costs. [applied to Deep Space Network and Air Force Systems Command

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, D. S.

    1977-01-01

    The described mathematical model calculates life-cycle costs for projects with operating costs increasing or decreasing linearly with time. The cost factors involved in the life-cycle cost are considered, and the errors resulting from the assumption of constant rather than uniformly varying operating costs are examined. Parameters in the study range from 2 to 30 years, for project life; 0 to 15% per year, for interest rate; and 5 to 90% of the initial operating cost, for the operating cost gradient. A numerical example is presented.

  13. Initial Costs vs. Operational Costs. A Study of Building Improvement Projects in Fourteen Schools in the School District of Greenville County, South Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Tak Cheung

    To determine whether initial facility improvement costs were paid back by the reduced operational costs resulting from the improvement projects, this study examined the relationship between initial costs and operational costs of fourteen school buildings improved during the 1978-79 school year in Greenville County, South Carolina. With energy…

  14. Operation Compatibility: A Neglected Contribution to Dual-Task Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pannebakker, Merel M.; Band, Guido P. H.; Ridderinkhof, K. Richard

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, dual-task interference has been attributed to the consequences of task load exceeding capacity limitations. However, the current study demonstrates that in addition to task load, the mutual compatibility of the concurrent processes modulates whether 2 tasks can be performed in parallel. In 2 psychological refractory period…

  15. Reduction of operations and maintenance costs at geothermal power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Bruton, C.J.; Stevens, C.G.; Rard, J.A.; Kasameyer, P.W.

    1997-12-31

    To reduce chemical costs at geothermal power plants, we are investigating: (a) improved chemical processes associated with H{sub 2}S abatement techniques, and (b) the use of cross dispersive infrared spectrometry to monitor accurately, reliably, and continuously H{sub 2}S emissions from cooling towers. The latter is a new type of infrared optical technology developed by LLNL for non-proliferation verification. Initial work is focused at The Geysers in cooperation with Pacific Gas and Electric. Methods for deploying the spectrometer on-site at The Geysers are being developed. Chemical analysis of solutions involved in H{sub 2}S abatement technologies is continuing to isolate the chemical forms of sulfur produced.

  16. Cost-effectiveness analysis of arthroscopic surgery compared with non-operative management for osteoarthritis of the knee

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Jacquelyn D; Birmingham, Trevor B; Giffin, J Robert; Isaranuwatchai, Wanrudee; Hoch, Jeffrey S; Feagan, Brian G; Litchfield, Robert; Willits, Kevin; Fowler, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the cost-effectiveness of arthroscopic surgery in addition to non-operative treatments compared with non-operative treatments alone in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Design, setting and participants We conducted an economic evaluation alongside a single-centre, randomised trial among patients with symptomatic, radiographic knee OA (KL grade ≥2). Interventions Patients received arthroscopic debridement and partial resection of degenerative knee tissues in addition to optimised non-operative therapy, or optimised non-operative therapy only. Main outcome measures Direct and indirect costs were collected prospectively over the 2-year study period. The effectiveness outcomes were the Western Ontario McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Cost-effectiveness was estimated using the net benefit regression framework considering a range of willingness-to-pay values from the Canadian public payer and societal perspectives. We calculated incremental cost-effectiveness ratios and conducted sensitivity analyses using the extremes of the 95% CIs surrounding mean differences in effect between groups. Results 168 patients were included. Patients allocated to arthroscopy received partial resection and debridement of degenerative meniscal tears (81%) and/or articular cartilage (97%). There were no significant differences between groups in use of non-operative treatments. The incremental net benefit was negative for all willingness-to-pay values. Uncertainty estimates suggest that even if willing to pay $400 000 to achieve a clinically important improvement in WOMAC score, or ≥$50 000 for an additional QALY, there is <20% probability that the addition of arthroscopy is cost-effective compared with non-operative therapies only. Our sensitivity analysis suggests that even when assuming the largest treatment effect, the addition of arthroscopic surgery is not economically attractive compared with non-operative

  17. Is the system really the solution? Operating costs in hospital systems.

    PubMed

    Burns, Lawton Robert; McCullough, Jeffrey S; Wholey, Douglas R; Kruse, Gregory; Kralovec, Peter; Muller, Ralph

    2015-06-01

    Hospital system formation has recently accelerated. Executives emphasize scale economies that lower operating costs, a claim unsupported in academic research. Do systems achieve lower costs than freestanding facilities, and, if so, which system types? We test hypotheses about the relationship of cost with membership in systems, larger systems, and centralized and local hub-and-spoke systems. We also test whether these relationships have changed over time. Examining 4,000 U.S. hospitals during 1998 to 2010, we find no evidence that system members exhibit lower costs. However, members of smaller systems are lower cost than larger systems, and hospitals in centralized systems are lower cost than everyone else. There is no evidence that the system's spatial configuration is associated with cost, although national system hospitals exhibit higher costs. Finally, these results hold over time. We conclude that while systems in general may not be the solution to lower costs, some types of systems are. PMID:25904540

  18. The importance of operations, risk, and cost assessment to space transfer systems design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, J. M.; Komerska, R. J.; Rowell, L. F.

    1992-01-01

    This paper examines several methodologies which contribute to comprehensive subsystem cost estimation. The example of a space-based lunar space transfer vehicle (STV) design is used to illustrate how including both primary and secondary factors into cost affects the decision of whether to use aerobraking or propulsion for earth orbit capture upon lunar return. The expected dominant cost factor in this decision is earth-to-orbit launch cost driven by STV mass. However, to quantify other significant cost factors, this cost comparison included a risk analysis to identify development and testing costs, a Taguchi design of experiments to determine a minimum mass aerobrake design, and a detailed operations analysis. As a result, the predicted cost advantage of aerobraking, while still positive, was subsequently reduced by about 30 percent compared to the simpler mass-based cost estimates.

  19. Logistics: An integral part of cost efficient space operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Ann D.

    1996-01-01

    The logistics of space programs and its history within NASA are discussed, with emphasis on manned space flight and the Space Shuttle program. The lessons learned and the experience gained during these programs are reported on. Key elements of logistics are highlighted, and the problems and issues that can be expected to arise in relation to the support of long-term space operations and future space programs, are discussed. Such missions include the International Space Station program and the reusable launch vehicle. Possible solutions to the problems identified are outlined.

  20. Mars geoscience/climatology orbiter low cost mission operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, K. D.

    1984-01-01

    It will not be possible to support the multiple planetary missions of the magnitude and order of previous missions on the basis of foreseeable NASA funding. It is, therefore, necessary to seek innovative means for accomplishing the goals of planetary exploration with modestly allocated resources. In this connection, a Core Program set of planetary exploration missions has been recommended. Attention is given to a Mission Operations design overview which is based on the Mars Geoscience/Climatology Orbiter Phase-A study performed during spring of 1983.

  1. 78 FR 21159 - Additional Requirements for Special Dipping and Coating Operations (Dip Tanks); Extension of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-09

    ... Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 3506 et seq.) and Secretary of Labor's Order No. 1-2012 (77 FR... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Additional Requirements for Special Dipping and Coating... Coating Operations (Dip Tanks) (29 CFR 1910.126(g)(4)). DATES: Comments must be submitted...

  2. An Analysis of Word Problems in School Mathematics Texts: Operation of Addition and Subtraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Parmjit

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the types of word problems represented in Malaysia's primary one, primary two and primary three mathematics texts based on Van De Walle's model (1998) in the operations of addition and subtraction. A test was constructed to measure students' success based on this model. The data from this study indicates that the Malaysian…

  3. 49 CFR 192.935 - What additional preventive and mitigative measures must an operator take?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    .... (2) Outside force damage. If an operator determines that outside force (e.g., earth movement, floods... implementing additional inspection and maintenance programs. (b) Third party damage and outside force damage... measures to minimize the consequences to the covered segment from outside force damage. These...

  4. 49 CFR 192.935 - What additional preventive and mitigative measures must an operator take?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    .... (2) Outside force damage. If an operator determines that outside force (e.g., earth movement, floods... implementing additional inspection and maintenance programs. (b) Third party damage and outside force damage... measures to minimize the consequences to the covered segment from outside force damage. These...

  5. 33 CFR 157.460 - Additional operational requirements for tank barges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Additional operational requirements for tank barges. 157.460 Section 157.460 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION RULES FOR THE PROTECTION OF THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT RELATING TO TANK VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK...

  6. Operational Momentum in Large-Number Addition and Subtraction by 9-Month-Olds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrink, Koleen; Wynn, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies on nonsymbolic arithmetic have illustrated that under conditions that prevent exact calculation, adults display a systematic tendency to overestimate the answers to addition problems and underestimate the answers to subtraction problems. It has been suggested that this "operational momentum" results from exposure to a…

  7. 49 CFR 192.935 - What additional preventive and mitigative measures must an operator take?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... implementing additional inspection and maintenance programs. (b) Third party damage and outside force damage.... (2) Outside force damage. If an operator determines that outside force (e.g., earth movement, floods... measures to minimize the consequences to the covered segment from outside force damage. These......

  8. Development of low cost composite plates for humanitarian demining operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabet, L.; Scheppers, J.; Verpoest, I.; Pirlot, M.; Desmet, B.; Gilson, L.; Pirard, P.

    2006-08-01

    Composite plates using flax fabrics and maleic anhydride modified polypropylene were fabricated on laboratory scale. The aim of the current research was to develop a low cost composite plate or a hybrid structure based on those plates and steel sheet, for making humanitarian demining clothes protecting against secondary fragmentation caused by anti-personnel blast mines. Ballistic impact tests according to STANAG 2920 were carried out for determining the v{50}-limit. So called field tests were performed by means of simulated anti-personnel mines using M112 explosive; the repeatability and the spatial distribution of the projected fragments were checked before fixing the final experimental setup. The performance of the bare composite plate was compared with the hybrid structures in terms of v{50} and in terms of damage mechanisms. All tested configurations performed amazingly well during the field tests, which was not the case for the ballistic impact tests. This led to the conclusion that v{50} might not be the best criterion to characterize protective clothing. This conclusion is sustained by energetic considerations and by field tests on plates with half the thickness of the initial plates.

  9. Operating costs cut 60% with amine switch. [Methyldiethanolamine and diethanolamine

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-09

    At the Waveland, Miss., facility of United Gas Pipe Line Co., a methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) unit was supplemented by a smaller diethanolamine (DEA) unit. With the units running in parallel, product gas specifications could be met. Each unit was treating about one-half the 30 MMscfd flow of sour gas. Natural gas, purchased from nearby producers, comes into the plant containing 40-60 ppm H/sub 2/S and 4.8% CO/sub 2/. Although the absorber of the MDEA unit was adequate to handle the gas flow and remove the H/sub 2/S to specification, the reboiler capacity was not sufficient to meet a 2% CO/sub 2/ specification. MDEA concentration was limited to less than 40% by potential corrosion problems. The DEA unit was more expensive to operate, requiring sweet processed gas as boiler fuel, and consumed twice as much electricity as the MDEA unit. The combined outlet gas from the two units met volume requirements and specifications. But the system presented operational problems. Repeated foaming occurred with the MDEA unit. Daily losses of solvent were as much as 250 gal. By closely monitoring the system, United Gas was able to reduce foaming significantly by minimizing contamination with liquid hydrocarbons which had been entering with the feed gas during line surges. Extra labor was required. Several approaches were investigated involving equipment modifications and new materials. As a result of the study, United Gas concluded that the system could be optimized and all incoming gas treated in one unit by switching solvent. Conventional MDEA was replaced by a specially formulated MDEA based solvent with low foaming tendency (Union Carbide Corp.'s Ucarsol HS Solvent 101). It could be used at a 50% concentration in aqueous solution without apparent corrosion.

  10. Capital and operating costs of full-scale fecal sludge management and wastewater treatment systems in Dakar, Senegal.

    PubMed

    Dodane, Pierre-Henri; Mbéguéré, Mbaye; Sow, Ousmane; Strande, Linda

    2012-04-01

    A financial comparison of a parallel sewer based (SB) system with activated sludge, and a fecal sludge management (FSM) system with onsite septic tanks, collection and transport (C&T) trucks, and drying beds was conducted. The annualized capital for the SB ($42.66 capita(-1) year(-1)) was ten times higher than the FSM ($4.05 capita(-1) year(-1)), the annual operating cost for the SB ($11.98 capita(-1) year(-1)) was 1.5 times higher than the FSM ($7.58 capita(-1) year(-1)), and the combined capital and operating for the SB ($54.64 capita(-1) year(-1)) was five times higher than FSM ($11.63 capita(-1) year(-1)). In Dakar, costs for SB are almost entirely borne by the sanitation utility, with only 6% of the annualized cost borne by users of the system. In addition to costing less overall, FSM operates with a different business model, with costs spread among households, private companies, and the utility. Hence, SB was 40 times more expensive to implement for the utility than FSM. However, the majority of FSM costs are borne at the household level and are inequitable. The results of the study illustrate that in low-income countries, vast improvements in sanitation can be affordable when employing FSM, whereas SB systems are prohibitively expensive. PMID:22413875

  11. Capital and Operating Costs of Full-Scale Fecal Sludge Management and Wastewater Treatment Systems in Dakar, Senegal

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A financial comparison of a parallel sewer based (SB) system with activated sludge, and a fecal sludge management (FSM) system with onsite septic tanks, collection and transport (C&T) trucks, and drying beds was conducted. The annualized capital for the SB ($42.66 capita–1 year–1) was ten times higher than the FSM ($4.05 capita–1 year–1), the annual operating cost for the SB ($11.98 capita–1 year–1) was 1.5 times higher than the FSM ($7.58 capita–1 year–1), and the combined capital and operating for the SB ($54.64 capita–1 year–1) was five times higher than FSM ($11.63 capita–1 year–1). In Dakar, costs for SB are almost entirely borne by the sanitation utility, with only 6% of the annualized cost borne by users of the system. In addition to costing less overall, FSM operates with a different business model, with costs spread among households, private companies, and the utility. Hence, SB was 40 times more expensive to implement for the utility than FSM. However, the majority of FSM costs are borne at the household level and are inequitable. The results of the study illustrate that in low-income countries, vast improvements in sanitation can be affordable when employing FSM, whereas SB systems are prohibitively expensive. PMID:22413875

  12. Carnot's cycle for small systems: irreversibility and cost of operations

    PubMed

    Sekimoto; Takagi; Hondou

    2000-12-01

    In the thermodynamic limit, the existence of a maximal efficiency of energy conversion attainable by a Carnot cycle consisting of quasistatic isothermal and adiabatic processes precludes the existence of a perpetual machine of the second kind, whose cycles yield positive work in an isothermal environment. We employ the recently developed framework of the energetics of stochastic processes (called "stochastic energetics") to reanalyze the Carnot cycle in detail, taking account of fluctuations, without taking the thermodynamic limit. We find that in this nonmacroscopic situation both processes of connection to and disconnection from heat baths and adiabatic processes that cause distortion of the energy distribution are sources of inevitable irreversibility within the cycle. Also, the so-called null-recurrence property of the cumulative efficiency of energy conversion over many cycles and the irreversible property of isolated, purely mechanical processes under external "macroscopic" operations are discussed in relation to the impossibility of a perpetual machine, or Maxwell's demon. This analysis may serve as the basis for the design and analysis of mesoscopic energy converters in the near future. PMID:11138050

  13. Mission operations costs for scientific spacecraft: The revolution that is needed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledbetter, Kenneth W.

    1995-01-01

    An examination is made of the budget expenditure for Mission Operations in Office of Space Science missions since the resumption of flights after the 1986 Challenger accident, and projections shown for future costs if the same mission operations philosophy continues. It is shown that NASA cannot afford to continue with the same strategy, and must therefore find innovative approaches to accomplishing missions for less cost. A challenge is issued for a revolution in the way future missions are designed and operated. The mission operations concept needs to be generated early and applied to guide the design of both mission and spacecraft. Suggestions for revolutionary thinking are provided in areas of the mission, the spacecraft, the ground system, and the flight team designs. The bottom line is emphasized that to lower operations costs, we must remove labor-intensive tasks from operational processes.

  14. Evaluating student's academic achievement by a non-additive aggregation operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Siti Rohana Goh; Kasim, Maznah Mat; Ramli, Mohammad Fadzli; Sakib, Elyana

    2014-07-01

    In the context of multi-criteria decision making (MCDM), the average method used in Integrated Students Information System (ISIS) can be classified as an additive measure where the students' academic achievement are aggregated based on the assumption that there is no interaction among the evaluation criteria or the criteria are independent. This method is not suitable to be used if the schools look for equilibrium in their students' achievement. Thus, the non-additive aggregation operator is chosen to analyze students' academic achievements by further taking into accounts the interactions between the subjects. The measures of interaction were represented as λ-fuzzy measures. The effectiveness and success of this non-additive measures can be recognized by comparing the results of the new ranking which was obtained by nonadditive aggregation operator with the current approach of ranking that were based on the global scores using average score method. Throughout this study, it could be postulated that employing the non-additive aggregation operators to obtain an overall evaluation is more suitable because this method able to deal with interactions among subjects whereas the average method only assumes that there is no interaction between subjects or the subjects must be independent.

  15. Environmental projects, volume 11. Environmental assessment: Addition to operations building, Mars site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    An Environmental Assessment was performed of the proposed addition to building G-86 at the Mars Site, which will provide space for new electronic equipment to consolidate the Deep Space Network (DSN) support facilities from other Goldstone Deep Space Communication Complex (GDSCC) sites at the Mars Site, and will include a fifth telemetry and command group with its associated link monitor, control processor, and operator consoles. The addition of these facilities will increase the capability of the DSN to support future sophisticated NASA spacecraft missions such as the International Solar and Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Program. The planned construction of this building addition requires an Environmental Assessment (EA) document that records the existing environmental conditions at the Mars Site, that analyzes the environmental effects that possibly could be expected from the construction and use of the new building addition, and that recommends measures to be taken to mitigate any possible deleterious environmental effects.

  16. The Cluster Ground Segment and Operations - maintaining the high quality of services at lower cost -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpp, J.

    The Cluster ground segment mostly consists of that which was built in the early 1990s for the original Cluster mission which was destroyed in 1996 The four Cluster spacecraft were rebuilt and launched in Summer 2000 The Cluster mission has been in its routine operational phase since February 2001 After a data extension phase which added the upgraded Maspalomas terminal as a second Cluster dedicated ground station to the original VILSPA-1 station the mission is in its second extension phase and preparing to fly up to end 2009 The operational concept of Cluster is presented with emphasis on services to the user community such as response time monitoring of quality of operational service such as publishing the science data return ratio and anomalies in the space and ground segment With a considerable re-design and upgrade of the ground segment the annual mission costs for the additional 4 mission years could be reduced by 25 while maintaining the prime requirements of the mission The re-design and upgrade is subject of the paper presented It is shown how a combination of greatly differing measures can lead to this considerable reduction in cost Moving the ground station support from VILSPA-1 to Perth takes advantage of the orbit evolution and allows reducing significantly the staffing of Spacecraft controllers By making use of redundancies and margins in the space segment sharing of the Perth station with the XMM project is possible To share the station between two projects is facilitated by the migration from the old telemetry processors

  17. Balancing low cost with reliable operation in the rotordynamic design of the ALS Liquid Hydrogen Fuel Turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhill, L. M.

    1990-01-01

    The Air Force/NASA Advanced Launch System (ALS) Liquid Hydrogen Fuel Turbopump (FTP) has primary design goals of low cost and high reliability, with performance and weight having less importance. This approach is atypical compared with other rocket engine turbopump design efforts, such as on the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), which emphasized high performance and low weight. Similar to the SSME turbopumps, the ALS FTP operates supercritically, which implies that stability and bearing loads strongly influence the design. In addition, the use of low cost/high reliability features in the ALS FTP such as hydrostatic bearings, relaxed seal clearances, and unshrouded turbine blades also have a negative influence on rotordynamics. This paper discusses the analysis conducted to achieve a balance between low cost and acceptable rotordynamic behavior, to ensure that the ALS FTP will operate reliably without subsynchronous instabilities or excessive bearing loads.

  18. 75 FR 68616 - Notice of Certain Operating Cost Adjustment Factors for 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-08

    ...This notice establishes, for 2011, operating cost adjustment factors (OCAFs). OCAFs are annual factors used to adjust Section 8 rents renewed under section 524 of the Multifamily Assisted Housing Reform and Affordability Act of 1997...

  19. 43 CFR 404.55 - Who is responsible for the operation, maintenance, and replacement costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECLAMATION RURAL WATER SUPPLY PROGRAM... responsible for 100 percent of the operation, maintenance, and replacement costs for any rural water...

  20. Addition and subtraction operation of optical orbital angular momentum with dielectric metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Xunong; Li, Ying; Ling, Xiaohui; Liu, Yachao; Ke, Yougang; Fan, Dianyuan

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we propose a simple approach to realize addition and subtraction operation of optical orbital angular momentum (OAM) based on dielectric metasurfaces. The spin-orbit interaction of light in spatially inhomogeneous and anisotropic metasurfaces results in the spin-to-orbital angular momentum conversion. The subtraction system of OAM consists of two cascaded metasurfaces, while the addition system of OAM is constituted by inserting a half waveplate (HWP) between the two metasurfaces. Our experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical calculation. These results could be useful for OAM-carrying beams applied in optical communication, information processing, etc.

  1. 42 CFR 447.206 - Cost limit for providers operated by units of government.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Medicare cost reporting principles, and audited financial statements that will be used in conjunction with... are organized and operating in accordance with the provisions of 42 CFR 438; (3) Federally Qualified... 1905 of the Act, as well as 45 CFR 92.22 and Medicare cost principles when applicable....

  2. 42 CFR 413.124 - Reduction to hospital outpatient operating costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reduction to hospital outpatient operating costs. 413.124 Section 413.124 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PRINCIPLES OF REASONABLE COST REIMBURSEMENT; PAYMENT FOR END-STAGE RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL...

  3. Simple least-cost ration formulation for small beef cattle operations in China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Feed costs are a significant portion of total costs in production of beef cattle and affect profitability. Further, it is critical that nutrients in rations are adequate to meet the nutritional requirements of cattle in small beef operations without being in excess of requirements. There are sever...

  4. 77 FR 63324 - Notice of Certain Operating Cost Adjustment Factors for 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-16

    ... (76 FR 66319). Specifically, OCAFs are calculated as the sum of weighted average cost changes for... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Notice of Certain Operating Cost Adjustment Factors for 2013 AGENCY: Office of the... Administration, Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 7th Street SW., Washington, DC 20410;...

  5. Simple Automatic File Exchange (SAFE) to Support Low-Cost Spacecraft Operation via the Internet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Paul; Repaci, Max; Sames, David

    1998-01-01

    Various issues associated with Simple Automatic File Exchange (SAFE) are presented in viewgraph form. Specific topics include: 1) Packet telemetry, Internet IP networks and cost reduction; 2) Basic functions and technical features of SAFE; 3) Project goals, including low-cost satellite transmission to data centers to be distributed via an Internet; 4) Operations with a replicated file protocol; 5) File exchange operation; 6) Ground stations as gateways; 7) Lessons learned from demonstrations and tests with SAFE; and 8) Feedback and future initiatives.

  6. Operation and maintenance cost data for residential photovoltaic modules/panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oster, J. R., Jr.; Zaremski, D. R., Jr.; Albert, E. M.; Hawkins, S. L.

    1980-01-01

    Costs associated with the operation and maintenance of residential photovoltaic modules and arrays are studied. Six basic topics related to operation and maintenance to photovoltaic arrays are investigated: maintenance; cleaning; panel replacement; gasket repair/replacement; wiring repair/replacement; and termination repair/replacement. The effects of the mounting types (rack mount, stand off mount, direct mount and integral mount) and the installation/replacement type (sequential, partial interruption and independent) are identified and described. Methods of reducing maintenance costs are suggested.

  7. Cost-effectiveness of Crohn’s disease post-operative care

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Emily K; Kamm, Michael A; Dr Cruz, Peter; Hamilton, Amy L; Ritchie, Kathryn J; Bell, Sally J; Brown, Steven J; Connell, William R; Desmond, Paul V; Liew, Danny

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To define the cost-effectiveness of strategies, including endoscopy and immunosuppression, to prevent endoscopic recurrence of Crohn’s disease following intestinal resection. METHODS: In the “POCER” study patients undergoing intestinal resection were treated with post-operative drug therapy. Two thirds were randomized to active care (6 mo colonoscopy and drug intensification for endoscopic recurrence) and one third to drug therapy without early endoscopy. Colonoscopy at 18 mo and faecal calprotectin (FC) measurement were used to assess disease recurrence. Administrative data, chart review and patient questionnaires were collected prospectively over 18 mo. RESULTS: Sixty patients (active care n = 43, standard care n = 17) were included from one health service. Median total health care cost was $6440 per patient. Active care cost $4824 more than standard care over 18 mo. Medication accounted for 78% of total cost, of which 90% was for adalimumab. Median health care cost was higher for those with endoscopic recurrence compared to those in remission [$26347 (IQR 25045-27485) vs $2729 (IQR 1182-5215), P < 0.001]. FC to select patients for colonoscopy could reduce cost by $1010 per patient over 18 mo. Active care was associated with 18% decreased endoscopic recurrence, costing $861 for each recurrence prevented. CONCLUSION: Post-operative management strategies are associated with high cost, primarily medication related. Calprotectin use reduces costs. The long term cost-benefit of these strategies remains to be evaluated. PMID:27076772

  8. A decision tree for selecting the most cost-effective waste disposal strategy in foodservice operations.

    PubMed

    Wie, Seunghee; Shanklin, Carol W; Lee, Kyung-Eun

    2003-04-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine costs of disposal strategies for wastes generated in foodservice operations and to develop a decision tree to determine the most cost-effective disposal strategy for foodservice operations. Four cases, including the central food processing center (CFPC) in a school district, a continuing-care retirement center (CCRC), a university dining center (UDC), and a commercial chain restaurant (CCR), were studied to determine the most cost-effective disposal strategy. Annual costs for the current and projected strategies were determined for each case. Results of waste characterization studies and stopwatch studies, interviews with foodservice directors, and water flow and electrical requirements from manufacturers' specifications were used to determine cost incurred. The annual percentage increases for labor, fees, and services were used to reflect an inflated economic condition for the ensuing 10 years of the study period. The Net Present Worth method was used to compare costs of strategies, and the multiparameter sensitivity analysis was conducted to examine the tolerance of the chosen strategy. The most cost-effective strategy differed among foodservice operations because of the composition of food and packaging wastes, the quantity of recyclable materials, the waste-hauling charges, labor costs, start-up costs, and inflation rate. For example, the use of a garbage disposal for food waste and landfills and recycling for packaging waste were the most cost-effective strategies for the CCRC. A decision tree was developed to illustrate the decision-making process that occurs when conducting cost analysis and subsequent decisions. Dietetics practitioners can use the decision tree when evaluating the results of the cost analysis. PMID:12669011

  9. Government regulation and public opposition create high additional costs for field trials with GM crops in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Bernauer, Thomas; Tribaldos, Theresa; Luginbühl, Carolin; Winzeler, Michael

    2011-12-01

    Field trials with GM crops are not only plant science experiments. They are also social experiments concerning the implications of government imposed regulatory constraints and public opposition for scientific activity. We assess these implications by estimating additional costs due to government regulation and public opposition in a recent set of field trials in Switzerland. We find that for every Euro spent on research, an additional 78 cents were spent on security, an additional 31 cents on biosafety, and an additional 17 cents on government regulatory supervision. Hence the total additional spending due to government regulation and public opposition was around 1.26 Euros for every Euro spent on the research per se. These estimates are conservative; they do not include additional costs that are hard to monetize (e.g. stakeholder information and dialogue activities, involvement of various government agencies). We conclude that further field experiments with GM crops in Switzerland are unlikely unless protected sites are set up to reduce these additional costs. PMID:21279684

  10. 76 FR 53450 - Transmission Planning and Cost Allocation by Transmission Owning and Operating Public Utilities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-26

    ... Transmission Owning and Operating Public Utilities, Order No. 1000, 76 FR 49,842 (Aug. 11, 2011), 136 FERC ] 61... Energy Regulatory Commission Transmission Planning and Cost Allocation by Transmission Owning and Operating Public Utilities; Notice of Staff Informational Conferences Take notice that Commission staff...

  11. 78 FR 32224 - Availability of Version 3.1.2 of the Connect America Fund Phase II Cost Model; Additional...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ... as part of the Model Design PN, 77 FR 38804, June 29, 2012, of the possible significant economic...). See Electronic Filing of Documents in Rulemaking Proceedings, 63 FR 24121, May 1, 1998. Electronic...; Additional Discussion Topics in Connect America Cost Model Virtual Workshop AGENCY: Federal...

  12. Coking suppression in solid oxide fuel cells operating on ethanol by applying pyridine as fuel additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Feng; Ran, Ran; Park, Hee Jung; Jung, Doh Won; Kwak, Chan; Shao, Zongping

    2014-11-01

    In this study, pyridine was used to suppress the coke formation in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) operating on liquid fuels. Pyridine can selectively occupy acidic sites of the Ni/Al2O3 catalyst layer and solves the problem of dehydration of ethanol in principle, resulting in a significant reduction in the coke formation rate for operating on ethanol fuel. At 600 °C, by adding 12.5 vol.% pyridine into the ethanol fuel, the coke formation rate over the Ni/Al2O3 catalyst is reduced by 64% while a cell power output comparable to that operating on hydrogen is still achieved based on total potential hydrogen available from ethanol. The effective reduction of carbon deposition on the catalyst layer thus protects the anode layer from carbon deposition by strongly suppressing coke formation, especially near the anode-electrolyte interface. Pyridine is adsorbed onto the acidic sites of the Ni/Al2O3 catalyst and the adsorbed pyridine may reduce the amount of carbonium ions formed, thereby reducing coke formation. This study suggested that the addition of pyridine could suppress the coke formation in SOFCs with Ni/Al2O3 catalyst layer operated on ethanol or some other similar liquid fuels.

  13. Spacecraft Autonomy and Automation: A Comparative Analysis of Strategies for Cost Effective Mission Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Nathaniel, Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The evolution of satellite operations over the last 40 years has drastically changed. October 4, 1957 (during the cold war) the Soviet Union launched the world's first spacecraft into orbit. The Sputnik satellite orbited Earth for three months and catapulted the United States into a race for dominance in space. A year after Sputnik, President Dwight Eisenhower formed the National Space and Aeronautics Administration (NASA). With a team of scientists and engineers, NASA successfully launched Explorer 1, the first US satellite to orbit Earth. During these early years, massive amounts of ground support equipment and operators were required to successfully operate spacecraft vehicles. Today, budget reductions and technological advances have forced new approaches to spacecraft operations. These approaches require increasingly complex, on board spacecraft systems, that enable autonomous operations, resulting in more cost-effective mission operations. NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, considered world class in satellite development and operations, has developed and operated over 200 satellites during its 40 years of existence. NASA Goddard is adopting several new millennium initiatives that lower operational costs through the spacecraft autonomy and automation. This paper examines NASA's approach to spacecraft autonomy and ground system automation through a comparative analysis of satellite missions for Hubble Space Telescope-HST, Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous-NEAR, and Solar Heliospheric Observatory-SoHO, with emphasis on cost reduction methods, risk analysis and anomalies and strategies employed for mitigating risk.

  14. Operations Assessment of Launch Vehicle Architectures using Activity Based Cost Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruiz-Torres, Alex J.; McCleskey, Carey

    2000-01-01

    The growing emphasis on affordability for space transportation systems requires the assessment of new space vehicles for all life cycle activities, from design and development, through manufacturing and operations. This paper addresses the operational assessment of launch vehicles, focusing on modeling the ground support requirements of a vehicle architecture, and estimating the resulting costs and flight rate. This paper proposes the use of Activity Based Costing (ABC) modeling for this assessment. The model uses expert knowledge to determine the activities, the activity times and the activity costs based on vehicle design characteristics. The approach provides several advantages to current approaches to vehicle architecture assessment including easier validation and allowing vehicle designers to understand the cost and cycle time drivers.

  15. Municipal Rebate Programs for Environmental Retrofits: An Evaluation of Additionality and Cost-Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennear, Lori S.; Lee, Jonathan M.; Taylor, Laura O.

    2013-01-01

    When policies incentivize voluntary activities that also take place in the absence of the incentive, it is critical to identify the additionality of the policy--that is, the degree to which the policy results in actions that would not have occurred otherwise. Rebate programs have become a common conservation policy tool for local municipalities…

  16. 78 FR 12271 - Wireline Competition Bureau Seeks Additional Comment In Connect America Cost Model Virtual Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-22

    ... Design PN, 77 FR 38804, June 29, 2012, of the possible significant economic impact on a substantial... Documents in Rulemaking Proceedings, 63 FR 24121, May 1, 1998. Electronic Filers: Comments may be filed... document, the Wireline Competition Bureau seeks public input on additional questions relating to...

  17. Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113: Project cost estimate. Preliminary design report. Volume IV

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    This document contains Volume IV of the Preliminary Design Report for the Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113 which is the Project Cost Estimate and construction schedule. The estimate was developed based upon Title 1 material take-offs, budgetary equipment quotes and Raytheon historical in-house data. The W-113 project cost estimate and project construction schedule were integrated together to provide a resource loaded project network.

  18. Study of short-haul aircraft operating economics. Phase 2: An analysis of the impact of jet modernization on local service airline operating costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrastek, D. A.

    1976-01-01

    The objectives of this phase of the study were (1) to assess the 10 year operating cost trends of the local service airlines operating in the 1965 through 1974 period, (2) to glean from these trends the technological and operational parameters which were impacted most significantly by the transition to newer pure jet, short haul transports, and effected by changing fuel prices and cost of living indices, and (3) to develop, construct, and evaluate an operating cost forecasting model which would incorporate those factors which best predicted airline total operating cost behavior over that 10-year period.

  19. Operation and maintenance cost data for residential photovoltaic modules/panels

    SciTech Connect

    1980-07-01

    Burt Hill Kosar Rittelmann Associates has conducted a study to identify and estimate costs associated with the operation and maintenance of residential photovoltaic modules and arrays. Six basic topics related to operation and maintenance to photovoltaic arrays were investigated - General (Normal) Maintenance, Cleaning, Panel Replacement, Gasket Repair/Replacement, Wiring Repair/Replacement, and Termination Repair/Replacement. The effects of the mounting types - Rack Mount, Stand-Off Mount, Direct Mount, and Integral Mount - and the installation/replacement type - Sequential, Partial Interruption, and Independent - have been identified and described. Recommendation on methods of reducing maintenance costs are made.

  20. Advanced launch system (ALS) actuation and power systems impact operability and cost

    SciTech Connect

    Sundberg, G.R. . Lewis Research Center)

    1990-09-01

    To obtain the advanced launch system (ALS) primary goals of reduced costs ($300/lb earth to LEO) and improved operability, there must be significant reductions in the launch operability, there must be significant reductions in the launch operations and servicing requirements relative to current vehicle designs and practices. One of the primary methods for achieving these goals is by using electrical actuation integrated with a single vehicle electrical power system and controls for all actuation and avionics requirements. This paper reviews the ALS and its associated advanced development program to demonstrate maturation of those technologies that will help meet the overall operability and cost goals. The electric power and actuation systems are highlighted as a specific technology ready not only to meet the ALS goals (cryogenic fuel valves and thrust vector controls with peak power demands to 75 hp), but also those of other launch vehicles, military and civilian aircraft, lunar/Martian vehicles and a multitude of commercial applications.

  1. Feasibility of additional HTV operation requirement for sample returning capability from the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imada, Takane

    2006-07-01

    HTV (H-II transfer vehicle) is under development in JAXA as a service vehicle which delivers several items up to 6 ton to the ISS (International Space Station), however, it was not expected to have a recovery capability from the ISS. But after the NASA announcement about the Space Shuttle retirement after 2010, it is expected that the sample returning capability from the ISS will be drastically reduced after the retirement. It may also degrade the worth of the ISS as an experimental center on orbit. So, JAXA started the feasibility study about the additional function on HTV to equip a re-entry capsule in it to enable the recovery operation from the ISS. This study shows the preliminary feasibility assessment result of returning capsule in HTV carrier and the feasibility to equip small capsule and jettison system in carrier without major modification or safety impact to the ISS.

  2. The Effect of Infrastructure Sharing in Estimating Operations Cost of Future Space Transportation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaram, Meenakshi

    2005-01-01

    NASA and the aerospace industry are extremely serious about reducing the cost and improving the performance of launch vehicles both manned or unmanned. In the aerospace industry, sharing infrastructure for manufacturing more than one type spacecraft is becoming a trend to achieve economy of scale. An example is the Boeing Decatur facility where both Delta II and Delta IV launch vehicles are made. The author is not sure how Boeing estimates the costs of each spacecraft made in the same facility. Regardless of how a contractor estimates the cost, NASA in its popular cost estimating tool, NASA Air force Cost Modeling (NAFCOM) has to have a method built in to account for the effect of infrastructure sharing. Since there is no provision in the most recent version of NAFCOM2002 to take care of this, it has been found by the Engineering Cost Community at MSFC that the tool overestimates the manufacturing cost by as much as 30%. Therefore, the objective of this study is to develop a methodology to assess the impact of infrastructure sharing so that better operations cost estimates may be made.

  3. EOS MLS Lessons Learned: Design Ideas for Safer and Lower Cost Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Dominick

    2012-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) is a complex instrument with a front end computer and 32 subsystem computers. MLS is one of four instruments on NASA's EOS Aura spacecraft With almost 8 years in orbit, MLS has a few lessons learned which can be applied during the design phase of future instruments to effect better longevity, more robust operations and a significant cost benefit during operations phase.

  4. Report: landfill alternative daily cover: conserving air space and reducing landfill operating cost.

    PubMed

    Haughey, R D

    2001-02-01

    Title 40, Part 258 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Solid Waste Disposal Facility Criteria, commonly referred to as Subtitle D, became effective on October 9, 1993. It establishes minimum criteria for solid waste disposal facility siting, design, operations, groundwater monitoring and corrective action, and closure and postclosure maintenance, while providing EPA-approved state solid waste regulatory programs flexibility in implementing the criteria. Section 258.21(a) [40 CFR 258.21(a)] requires owners or operators of municipal solid waste landfill (MSWLF) units to cover disposed solid waste with 30cm of earthen material at the end of the operating day, or at more frequent intervals, if necessary, to control disease vectors, fires, odours, blowing litter, and scavenging. This requirement is consistent with already existing solid waste facility regulations in many states. For many MSWLFs, applying daily cover requires the importation of soil which increases landfill operating costs. Daily cover also uses valuable landfill air space, reducing potential operating revenue and the landfill's operating life. 40 CFR 258.21 (b) allows the director of an approved state to approve alternative materials of an alternative thickness if the owner or operator demonstrates that the alternative material and thickness will control disease vectors, fires, odours, blowing litter, and scavenging without presenting a threat to human health and the environment. Many different types of alternative daily cover (ADC) are currently being used, including geosynthetic tarps, foams, garden waste, and auto shredder fluff. These materials use less air space than soil and can reduce operating costs. This paper discusses the variety of ADCs currently being used around the country and their applicability to different climates and operating conditions, highlighting the more unusual types of ADC, the types of demonstrations necessary to obtain approval of ADC, and the impact on landfill air space

  5. 25 CFR 170.931 - Can tribes use IRR Program funds to pay tribal transportation department operating costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... transportation department operating costs? 170.931 Section 170.931 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT... Transportation Departments § 170.931 Can tribes use IRR Program funds to pay tribal transportation department operating costs? Yes. Tribes can use IRR Program funds to pay the cost of planning, administration,...

  6. Analysis of operating costs a Low-Level Mixed Waste Incineration Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Loghry, S.L.; Salmon, R.; Hermes, W.H.

    1995-12-31

    By definition, mixed wastes contain both chemically hazardous and radioactive components. These components make the treatment and disposal of mixed wastes expensive and highly complex issues because the different regulations which pertain to the two classes of contaminants frequently conflict. One method to dispose of low-level mixed wastes (LLMWs) is by incineration, which volatizes and destroys the organic (and other) hazardous contaminants and also greatly reduces the waste volume. The US Department of Energy currently incinerates liquid LLMW in its Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator, located at the K-25 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This incinerator has been fully permitted since 1991 and to date has treated approximately 7 {times} 10{sup 6} kg of liquid LLMW. This paper presents an analysis of the budgeted operating costs by category (e.g., maintenance, plant operations, sampling and analysis, and utilities) for fiscal year 1994 based on actual operating experience (i.e., a ``bottoms-up`` budget). These costs provide benchmarking guidelines which could be used in comparing incinerator operating costs with those of other technologies designed to dispose of liquid LLMW. A discussion of the current upgrade status and future activities are included in this paper. Capital costs are not addressed.

  7. 19 CFR 10.178 - Direct costs of processing operations performed in the beneficiary developing country.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Direct costs of processing operations performed in the beneficiary developing country. 10.178 Section 10.178 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. General...

  8. Capital and Operating Cost of Small Arsenic Removal System and their Most Frequent Maintenance Problems

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will first summarize the capital and operating cost of treatment systems by type and size of the systems. The treatment systems include adsorptive media (AM) systems, iron removal (IR), coagulation/filtration (CF), ion exchange (IX) systems, and point-of-use rev...

  9. Multiple-Shift Schooling: Design and Operation for Cost-Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, Mark

    Drawing on the experiences in a wide range of countries, this book highlights the advantages and problems of multiple-shift educational systems. Practical suggestions are offered for more effective operation of schools caught in the conflict between extending access and minimizing unit costs and maintaining educational quality. Following an…

  10. Space Operations Center system analysis study extension. Volume 2: Programmatics and cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A summary of Space Operations Center (SOC) orbital space station costs, program options and program recommendations is presented. Program structure, hardware commonality, schedules and program phasing are considered. Program options are analyzed with respect to mission needs, design and technology options, and anticipated funding constraints. Design and system options are discussed.

  11. 76 FR 77528 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; North Hollywood Operable Unit of the San...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ...In accordance with Section 122(i) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended (``CERCLA''), 42 U.S.C. 9622(i), notice is hereby given of a proposed administrative settlement for recovery of response costs concerning the North Hollywood Operable Unit of the San Fernando Valley Area 1 Superfund Site, located in the vicinity of Los Angeles, California,......

  12. 76 FR 79678 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; North Hollywood Operable Unit of the San...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-22

    ...In accordance with Section 122(i) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended (``CERCLA''), 42 U.S.C. 9622(i), notice is hereby given of a proposed administrative settlement for recovery of response costs concerning the North Hollywood Operable Unit of the San Fernando Valley Area 1 Superfund Site, located in the vicinity of Los Angeles, California,......

  13. Community College Finance: A Cost Analysis of Community College Expenditures Related to Maintenance and Operations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a costing model for maintenance and operations expenditures among 16 single-campus California community college districts and assess the impact of a variety of variables including size of student enrollment, physical plant age, acreage, gross square footage, and general obligation facility bonds on district…

  14. 19 CFR 10.178 - Direct costs of processing operations performed in the beneficiary developing country.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Direct costs of processing operations performed in the beneficiary developing country. 10.178 Section 10.178 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. General...

  15. A STANDARD PROCEDURE FOR COST ANALYSIS OF POLLUTION CONTROL OPERATIONS. VOLUME II. APPENDICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volume I is a user guide for a standard procedure for the engineering cost analysis of pollution abatement operations and processes. The procedure applies to projects in various economic sectors: private, regulated, and public. Volume II, the bulk of the document, contains 11 app...

  16. Activity-based costing in the operating room at Valley View Hospital.

    PubMed

    Baker, J J; Boyd, G F

    1997-01-01

    This article presents an example of how one hospital reports the results of activity-based costing (ABC). It examines the composition and supporting assumptions of an ABC report for a particular procedure in the operating room (OR). It describes management uses of the information generated. It comments upon how the continuous quality improvement (CQI) is synchronized with the ABC reporting. PMID:9327354

  17. 16 CFR 305.5 - Determinations of estimated annual energy consumption, estimated annual operating cost, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Determinations of estimated annual energy consumption, estimated annual operating cost, and energy efficiency rating, water use rate, and other required disclosure content. 305.5 Section 305.5 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS ENERGY...

  18. Estimation of the laser cutting operating cost by support vector regression methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jović, Srđan; Radović, Aleksandar; Šarkoćević, Živče; Petković, Dalibor; Alizamir, Meysam

    2016-09-01

    Laser cutting is a popular manufacturing process utilized to cut various types of materials economically. The operating cost is affected by laser power, cutting speed, assist gas pressure, nozzle diameter and focus point position as well as the workpiece material. In this article, the process factors investigated were: laser power, cutting speed, air pressure and focal point position. The aim of this work is to relate the operating cost to the process parameters mentioned above. CO2 laser cutting of stainless steel of medical grade AISI316L has been investigated. The main goal was to analyze the operating cost through the laser power, cutting speed, air pressure, focal point position and material thickness. Since the laser operating cost is a complex, non-linear task, soft computing optimization algorithms can be used. Intelligent soft computing scheme support vector regression (SVR) was implemented. The performance of the proposed estimator was confirmed with the simulation results. The SVR results are then compared with artificial neural network and genetic programing. According to the results, a greater improvement in estimation accuracy can be achieved through the SVR compared to other soft computing methodologies. The new optimization methods benefit from the soft computing capabilities of global optimization and multiobjective optimization rather than choosing a starting point by trial and error and combining multiple criteria into a single criterion.

  19. Investigation of the relationship between motor vehicle operating cost and levels of service using internal methods

    SciTech Connect

    Croft, F.M. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    This study was undertaken to accomplish three specific objectives pertaining to the measurement of traffic flow quality, namely: 1) to demonstrate that the internal energy of the traffic stream as determined by the parameter, acceleration noise, can be used as a quantitative measure of the quality of traffic flow on an urban freeway; 2) to demonstrate that vehicle operating costs are related to the parameter acceleration noise; and 3) to determine the effect that level of service has on operating costs by using the parameter acceleration noise. Traffic flow data were collected from sections of Interstate 65 in Louisville, Kentucky, using a floating car equipped with a Greenshields Traffic Analyzer. The traffic analyzer data were later reduced using an interactive computer program to yield values of acceleration noise. The traffic analyzer data, traffic volumn counts, and highway geometric data were used as inputs into the computer program RUNCOST to calculate vehicle operating costs. The relationship between acceleration noise and the traffic flow parameters of speed, volume, and density were analyzed using scatter diagrams and plots of the mean values of each parameter for each level of service. The relationship between operating cost and the traffic flow parameters of speed, volume, and density were also analyzed. It was concluded that acceleration noise due to traffic interaction is a quantitative measure of traffic flow quality.

  20. Feasibility and operating costs of an air cycle for CCHP in a fast food restaurant

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Perez-Blanco, Horacio; Vineyard, Edward

    2016-05-06

    This work considers the possibilities of an air-based Brayton cycle to provide the power, heating and cooling needs of fast-food restaurants. A model of the cycle based on conventional turbomachinery loss coefficients is formulated. The heating, cooling and power capabilities of the cycle are extracted from simulation results. Power and thermal loads for restaurants in Knoxville, TN and in International Falls, MN, are considered. It is found that the cycle can meet the loads by setting speed and mass flow-rate apportionment between the power and cooling functional sections. The associated energy costs appear elevated when compared to the cost ofmore » operating individual components or a more conventional, absorption-based CHP system. Lastly, a first-order estimate of capital investments is provided. Suggestions for future work whereby the operational costs could be reduced are given in the conclusions.« less

  1. Low-cost management aspects for developing, producing and operating future space transportation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goehlich, Robert A.; Rücker, Udo

    2005-01-01

    It is believed that a potential means for further significant reduction of the recurrent launch cost, which results also in a stimulation of launch rates of small satellites, is to make the launcher reusable, to increase its reliability and to make it suitable for new markets such as mass space tourism. Therefore, not only launching small satellites with expendable rockets on non-regular flights but also with reusable rockets on regular flights should be considered for the long term. However, developing, producing and operating reusable rockets require a fundamental change in the current "business as usual" philosophy. Under current conditions, it might not be possible to develop, to produce or to operate a reusable vehicle fleet economically. The favorite philosophy is based on "smart business" processes adapted by the authors using cost engineering techniques. In the following paper, major strategies for reducing costs are discussed, which are applied for a representative program proposal.

  2. RTS-ROV operated tie-in system for low cost subsea developments

    SciTech Connect

    Halle, P.O.

    1995-12-31

    A new type pull-in and connection system is developed for very deep waters. The system is called ROV-operated Tie-in System (RTS). Main objectives during the development phase was to make a tool system more or less independent of water depth, use of simple low cost installation vessels, minimum equipment left subsea, minimum support structure sizes, simple control system, various launching methods possible and use of field proven clamp hub and seal assemblies. The result has been a very cost effective tie-in system which is a key factor for reduction of total field development costs. The capacity for the tool is 10 inch 3,000 psi flexible flow lines or alternatively 9 inch 5,000 psi. The RTS replaces divers during tie-in operations and can be used down to at least 1500 m water depth.

  3. DCJ-indel and DCJ-substitution distances with distinct operation costs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Classical approaches to compute the genomic distance are usually limited to genomes with the same content and take into consideration only rearrangements that change the organization of the genome (i.e. positions and orientation of pieces of DNA, number and type of chromosomes, etc.), such as inversions, translocations, fusions and fissions. These operations are generically represented by the double-cut and join (DCJ) operation. The distance between two genomes, in terms of number of DCJ operations, can be computed in linear time. In order to handle genomes with distinct contents, also insertions and deletions of fragments of DNA – named indels – must be allowed. More powerful than an indel is a substitution of a fragment of DNA by another fragment of DNA. Indels and substitutions are called content-modifying operations. It has been shown that both the DCJ-indel and the DCJ-substitution distances can also be computed in linear time, assuming that the same cost is assigned to any DCJ or content-modifying operation. Results In the present study we extend the DCJ-indel and the DCJ-substitution models, considering that the content-modifying cost is distinct from and upper bounded by the DCJ cost, and show that the distance in both models can still be computed in linear time. Although the triangular inequality can be disrupted in both models, we also show how to efficiently fix this problem a posteriori. PMID:23879938

  4. U.S. Geological Survey Streamgage Operation and Maintenance Cost Evaluation...from the National Streamflow Information Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Norris, J. Michael

    2010-01-01

    To help meet the goal of providing earth-science information to the Nation, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) operates and maintains the largest streamgage network in the world, with over 7,600 active streamgages in 2010. This network is operated in cooperation with over 850 Federal, tribal, State, and local funding partners. The streamflow information provided by the USGS is used for the protection of life and property; for the assessment, allocation, and management of water resources; for the design of roads, bridges, dams, and water works; for the delineation of flood plains; for the assessment and evaluation of habitat; for understanding the effects of land-use, water-use, and climate changes; for evaluation of water quality; and for recreational safety and enjoyment. USGS streamgages are managed and operated to rigorous national standards, allowing analyses of data from streamgages in different areas and spanning long time periods, some with more than 100 years of data. About 90 percent of USGS streamgages provide streamflow information real-time on the web. Physical measurements of streamflow are made at streamgages multiple times a year, depending on flow conditions, to ensure the highest level of accuracy possible. In addition, multiple reviews and quality assurance checks are performed before the data is finalized. In 2006, the USGS reviewed all activities, operations, equipment, support, and costs associated with operating and maintaining a streamgage program (Norris and others, 2008). A summary of the percentages of costs associated with activities required to operate a streamgage on an annual basis are presented in figure 1. This information represents what it costs to fund a 'typical' USGS streamgage and how those funds are utilized. It should be noted that some USGS streamgages have higher percentages for some categories than do others depending on location and conditions. Forty-one percent of the funding for the typical USGS streamgage is for labor

  5. Advanced Launch System (ALS): Electrical actuation and power systems improve operability and cost picture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundberg, Gale R.

    1990-01-01

    To obtain the Advanced Launch System (ALS) primary goals of reduced costs and improved operability, there must be significant reductions in the launch operations and servicing requirements relative to current vehicle designs and practices. One of the primary methods for achieving these goals is by using vehicle electrical power system and controls for all actuation and avionics requirements. A brief status review of the ALS and its associated Advanced Development Program is presented to demonstrate maturation of those technologies that will help meet the overall operability and cost goals. The electric power and actuation systems are highlighted as a specific technology ready not only to meet the stringent ALS goals (cryogenic field valves and thrust vector controls with peak power demands to 75 hp), but also those of other launch vehicles, military and civilian aircraft, lunar/Martian vehicles, and a multitude of commercial applications.

  6. Advanced Launch System (ALS): Electrical actuation and power systems improve operability and cost picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundberg, Gale R.

    To obtain the Advanced Launch System (ALS) primary goals of reduced costs and improved operability, there must be significant reductions in the launch operations and servicing requirements relative to current vehicle designs and practices. One of the primary methods for achieving these goals is by using vehicle electrical power system and controls for all actuation and avionics requirements. A brief status review of the ALS and its associated Advanced Development Program is presented to demonstrate maturation of those technologies that will help meet the overall operability and cost goals. The electric power and actuation systems are highlighted as a specific technology ready not only to meet the stringent ALS goals (cryogenic field valves and thrust vector controls with peak power demands to 75 hp), but also those of other launch vehicles, military and civilian aircraft, lunar/Martian vehicles, and a multitude of commercial applications.

  7. Advanced launch system (ALS) - Electrical actuation and power systems improve operability and cost picture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundberg, Gale R.

    1990-01-01

    To obtain the Advanced Launch System (ALS) primary goals of reduced costs and improved operability, there must be significant reductions in the launch operations and servicing requirements relative to current vehicle designs and practices. One of the primary methods for achieving these goals is by using vehicle electrrical power system and controls for all aviation and avionics requirements. A brief status review of the ALS and its associated Advanced Development Program is presented to demonstrate maturation of those technologies that will help meet the overall operability and cost goals. The electric power and actuation systems are highlighted as a sdpecific technology ready not only to meet the stringent ALS goals (cryogenic field valves and thrust vector controls with peak power demands to 75 hp), but also those of other launch vehicles, military ans civilian aircraft, lunar/Martian vehicles, and a multitude of comercial applications.

  8. Advanced Launch System (ALS) actuation and power systems impact operability and cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundberg, Gale R.

    1990-01-01

    To obtain the Advanced Launch System (ALS) primary goals of reduced costs and improved operability, there must be significant reductions in the launch operations and servicing requirements relative to current vehicle designs and practices. One of the primary methods for achieving these goals is by using vehicle electrical power system and controls for all actuation and avionics requirements. A brief status review of the ALS and its associated Advanced Development Program is presented to demonstrate maturation of those technologies that will help meet the overall operability and cost goals. The electric power and actuation systems are highlighted as a specific technology ready not only to meet the stringent ALS goals (cryogenic field valves and thrust vector controls with peak power demands to 75 hp), but also those of other launch vehicles, military and civilian aircraft, lunar/Martian vehicles, and a multitude of commercial applications.

  9. Aircraft operator - Would you buy higher DOC to lower noise and fuel use. [Direct Operating Cost tradeoff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corning, G.; Hall, J. F.

    1977-01-01

    A method of optimization of the direct operating cost (DOC) and the effective perceived noise (in units of EPNdB) in aircraft is proposed. A computer program was used to generate a variety of aircraft designs meeting certain specifications, where wing loading, aspect ratio, cruise altitude, wing sweepback, and speed was varied, and DOC for each case was calculated. The higher aspect ratio, in combination with the appropriate wing loadings, cruise altitudes and wing sweep, is found to reduce the noise and the fuel used.

  10. Cost comparison of Transcatheter and Operative Pulmonary Valve Replacement (from the Pediatric Health Information Systems Database).

    PubMed

    O'Byrne, Michael L; Gillespie, Matthew J; Shinohara, Russell T; Dori, Yoav; Rome, Jonathan J; Glatz, Andrew C

    2016-01-01

    Outcomes for transcatheter pulmonary valve replacement (TC-PVR) and operative pulmonary valve replacement (S-PVR) are excellent. Thus, their respective cost is a relevant clinical outcome. We performed a retrospective cohort study of children and adults who underwent PVR at age ≥ 8 years from January 1, 2011, to December 31, 2013, at 35 centers contributing data to the Pediatric Health Information Systems database to address this question. A propensity score-adjusted multivariable analysis was performed to adjust for known confounders. Secondary analyses of department-level charges, risk of re-admission, and associated costs were performed. A total of 2,108 PVR procedures were performed in 2,096 subjects (14% transcatheter and 86% operative). The observed cost of S-PVR and TC-PVR was not significantly different (2013US $50,030 vs 2013US $51,297; p = 0.85). In multivariate analysis, total costs of S-PVR and TC-PVR were not significantly different (p = 0.52). Length of stay was shorter after TC-PVR (p <0.0001). Clinical and supply charges were greater for TC-PVR (p <0.0001), whereas laboratory, pharmacy, and other charges (all p <0.0001) were greater for S-PVR. Risks of both 7- and 30-day readmission were not significantly different. In conclusion, short-term costs of TC-PVR and S-PVR are not significantly different after adjustment. PMID:26552510

  11. Tug fleet and ground operations schedules and controls. Volume 3: Program cost estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Cost data for the tug DDT&E and operations phases are presented. Option 6 is the recommended option selected from seven options considered and was used as the basis for ground processing estimates. Option 6 provides for processing the tug in a factory clean environment in the low bay area of VAB with subsequent cleaning to visibly clean. The basis and results of the trade study to select Option 6 processing plan is included. Cost estimating methodology, a work breakdown structure, and a dictionary of WBS definitions is also provided.

  12. Installation, Operation, and Maintenance Strategies to Reduce the Cost of Offshore Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Maples, B.; Saur, G.; Hand, M.; van de Pieterman, R.; Obdam, T.

    2013-07-01

    Currently, installation, operation, and maintenance (IO&M) costs contribute approximately 30% to the LCOE of offshore wind plants. To reduce LCOE while ensuring safety, this paper identifies principal cost drivers associated with IO&M and quantifies their impacts on LCOE. The paper identifies technology improvement opportunities and provides a basis for evaluating innovative engineering and scientific concepts developed subsequently to the study. Through the completion of a case study, an optimum IO&M strategy for a hypothetical offshore wind project is identified.

  13. Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Operations and Maintenance Subtask Cost Savings Estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Waugh, Jody

    2013-02-01

    The Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance (LTSM) Operations and Maintenance (O&M) subtask in Task Order 501 focuses on using applied science and technology to cost-effectively improve the management of U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Legacy Management (LM) sites. Work under this subtask has generated numerous innovative solutions concerning how LM addresses site management issues. Many of these solutions have not only improved LTSM of the sites and our understanding of how to apply science and technology as the means to solve problems, but they also have resulted in considerable long-term cost savings. The purpose of this paper is to document the most significant cost savings that have occurred because of the work done under the LTSM O&M subtask. The LTSM O&M subtask is organized into the following four areas: (1) Surface Projects, (2) Laboratory O&M, (3) Subsurface Projects, and (4) System Operations and Analysis at Remote Sites (SOARS). Surface Projects focus on issues related to the monitoring, performance, sustainability, phytoremediation, and enhancement of disposal cells. The laboratory is used by Legacy Management Support project scientists to conduct bench-scale tests of promising technologies and concepts. Subsurface Projects address issues of groundwater plume persistence through contaminant residence and analysis of rate-limited processes. SOARS gathers data from many LM sites in real time to aid scientists and engineers in monitoring pilot studies, evaluating site conditions, and adjusting operational parameters (e.g., pump rates). This paper presents estimated projected cost savings that have occurred because of LTSM O&M activities. Estimates to conduct the activities and the estimated potential savings that will occur are provided in Section 2.0. However, some potential cost savings are intangible and cannot be estimated; Section 3.0 summarizes these savings. Finally, Section 4.0 presents a summary table of the savings identified in this report

  14. Low-cost day/night helmet-mounted displays (HMD) in airborne operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, Curtis J.

    1999-07-01

    Current doctrine dictates a requirement for conducting 24-hour operations on the modern battlefield either in a rural or urban environment. To date, Night Vision Goggles (NVGs) along with Infrared sensors provide the bulk of vision aids that allow crew members to engage in tactical operations at night and during periods of low and reduced visibility. Since operations employing these devices, as well as operational doctrine, require the crewmember to fly 'heads-out,' Heads-Up Displays (HUDs), enumerating flight parameters, engine and navigation information have come into existence, greatly reducing the workload on today's combat aviators. A fine example is the Marconi/Tracor ANVS-7. This device employs a symbol generator and CRT to project symbology of critical aircraft parameters into the Night Vision Goggle giving the aviator a HUD capability while engaged in NVG night operations. The system is limited to aided vision night operations employing NVGs. The same criteria that create a need for supplying critical flight information at night exist for day and night unaided vision operations. However, there is no system in production to answer this obvious need. There are several reasons for this: (1) Available technology that will offer a low-cost solution for days ops, (2) Ergonomic and Human factors Issues, (3) Competition with currently fielded systems (ANVS-7), (4) Cost. Highly sophisticated HMDs such as the Apache IHADSS and the Comanche HIDSS, which combine navigation, targeting as well as weapons and flight status for 24 hour, all-weather operations are far too expensive and, in many cases, inappropriate for the majority of Combat Support aircraft. Using internal R&D Kaiser Electronics has developed a low-cost HMD -- called Lite EyeTM HMD -- that is capable of being used in day and night operations that addresses the aforementioned issues. The solution, using recent advances in solid state display technology, maximizes the use of currently fielded equipment

  15. Digital standard cells and operational amplifiers for operation up to 250 degrees C using low-cost CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stemmer, Jens; Ackermann, Joerg; Uffmann, Dirk; Aderhold, Jochen

    1996-09-01

    There is an increasing demand from automotive, aircraft and space industry for reliable high temperature resistant electronics. Circuits with reliable functionality up to temperatures of 250 degree(s)C would be sufficient for most of these applications. Digital standard cells and operational amplifiers are the basic building blocks of these circuits. Commercially available digital standard cell libraries and operational amplifiers are normally specified for operation up to a maximum temperature of 125 degree(s)C. Hence, the purpose of this work was the design and characterization of digital standard cells and operational amplifiers for operation up to 250 degree(s)C using a low-cost 1.0 micrometers epi-CMOS process. Several design measures were applied to the cells in order to further improve latch-up resistivity and to limit leakage currents, respectively. The transfer curves of all digital cells for all input signal combinations have been recorded in the temperature range from 30 to 250 degree(s)C. Significant results are very low temperature shifts of the noise margins and of the switching point, respectively. Furthermore, the low (0 V) and high (5 V) levels are reached exactly over the entire temperature range. Outstanding characteristics of the operational amplifier comprise low open-loop gain temperature drift as well as low offset and offset temperature drift, respectively. The open-loop gain was greater than 83 dB at room temperature with a drift of less than 0.02 dB/ degree(s)C. The offset voltage amounted to -1 mV at room temperature and 1 mV at 250 degree(s)C, respectively. The long-term behavior of these cells is currently under investigation.

  16. Formation of gold nanostructures on copier paper surface for cost effective SERS active substrate - Effect of halide additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmonda, Christa; Kar, Sudeshna; Tai, Yian

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we report the simple fabrication of an active substrate assisted by gold nanostructures (AuNS) for application in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) using copier paper, which is a biodegradable and cost-effective material. As cellulose is the main component of paper, it can behave as a reducing agent and as a capping molecule for the synthesis of AuNS on the paper substrate. AuNS can be directly generated on the surface of the copier paper by addition of halides. The AuNS thus synthesized were characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, SEM, XRD, and XPS. In addition, the SERS effect of the AuNS-paper substrates synthesized by using various halides was investigated by using rhodamine 6G and melamine as probe molecules.

  17. Report on cost/pricing relationships for the space shuttle. [NASA/STS Operations Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The operations cost for the shuttle is the basis for developing the user charge policy for the system. The policy contains several elements that are significant to the user and to NASA. It will encourage the full use of the system to the benefits of the U.S. The charge policy will encourage early transition from the expendable launch vehicles to the shuttle and this will result in lower user costs for government as well as commercial users. The relationship between the charge policy and the utilization of the shuttle is critical to the economic efficiency of the system. NASA recognizes the challenging a relationship between pricing the cost of using a reusable space system, and the need to make sure it is re-used often.

  18. North Sea operators look at every way possible to cut costs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-06-29

    Offshore operators have embarked on a second revolution in North Sea technology. In the 1970s, concepts established in the Gulf of Mexico were adapted using massive injections of manpower and money to produce platforms and pipelines that could survive in the deeper water and harsher environment of the North Sea. Target for the late 1980s is a complete reappraisal of harsh environment technology so that small reservoirs can be exploited at a profit with crude prices at $15-18bbl. Even before the collapse in oil prices, companies were hoping to cut development costs by 15-20%. But goals are more ambitious now. Esso U.K. plc chairman Archie Forster said the Shell/Esso group was close to achieving a 50% reduction in costs and getting front end investment costs for North Sea projects down to $10/bbl.

  19. ISS Operations Cost Reductions Through Automation of Real-Time Planning Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Timothy A.; Clancey, William J.; McDonald, Aaron; Toschlog, Jason; Tucker, Tyson; Khan, Ahmed; Madrid, Steven (Eric)

    2011-01-01

    In 2007 the Johnson Space Center s Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) management team challenged their organizations to find ways to reduce the cost of operations for supporting the International Space Station (ISS) in the Mission Control Center (MCC). Each MOD organization was asked to define and execute projects that would help them attain cost reductions by 2012. The MOD Operations Division Flight Planning Branch responded to this challenge by launching several software automation projects that would allow them to greatly improve console operations and reduce ISS console staffing and intern reduce operating costs. These tasks ranged from improving the management and integration mission plan changes, to automating the uploading and downloading of information to and from the ISS and the associated ground complex tasks that required multiple decision points. The software solutions leveraged several different technologies including customized web applications and implementation of industry standard web services architecture; as well as engaging a previously TRL 4-5 technology developed by Ames Research Center (ARC) that utilized an intelligent agent-based system to manage and automate file traffic flow, archive data, and generate console logs. These projects to date have allowed the MOD Operations organization to remove one full time (7 x 24 x 365) ISS console position in 2010; with the goal of eliminating a second full time ISS console support position by 2012. The team will also reduce one long range planning console position by 2014. When complete, these Flight Planning Branch projects will account for the elimination of 3 console positions and a reduction in staffing of 11 engineering personnel (EP) for ISS.

  20. The determination of operational and support requirements and costs during the conceptual design of space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebeling, Charles; Beasley, Kenneth D.

    1992-01-01

    The first year of research to provide NASA support in predicting operational and support parameters and costs of proposed space systems is reported. Some of the specific research objectives were (1) to develop a methodology for deriving reliability and maintainability parameters and, based upon their estimates, determine the operational capability and support costs, and (2) to identify data sources and establish an initial data base to implement the methodology. Implementation of the methodology is accomplished through the development of a comprehensive computer model. While the model appears to work reasonably well when applied to aircraft systems, it was not accurate when used for space systems. The model is dynamic and should be updated as new data become available. It is particularly important to integrate the current aircraft data base with data obtained from the Space Shuttle and other space systems since subsystems unique to a space vehicle require data not available from aircraft. This research only addressed the major subsystems on the vehicle.

  1. Trade study: Liquid hydrogen transportation - Kennedy Space Center. [cost and operational effectivenss of shipping methods.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    Cryogenic transportation methods for providing liquid hydrogen requirements are examined in support of shuttle transportation system launch operations at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, during the time frames 1982-1991 in terms of cost and operational effectiveness. Transportation methods considered included sixteen different options employing mobile semi-trailer tankers, railcars, barges and combinations of each method. The study concludes that the most effective method of delivering liquid hydrogen from the vendor production facility in New Orleans to Kennedy Space Center includes maximum utilization of existing mobile tankers and railcars supplemented by maximum capacity mobile tankers procured incrementally in accordance with shuttle launch rates actually achieved.

  2. The cost of noise reduction for departure and arrival operations of commercial tilt rotor aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faulkner, H. B.; Swan, W. M.

    1976-01-01

    The relationship between direct operating cost (DOC) and noise annoyance due to a departure and an arrival operation was developed for commercial tilt rotor aircraft. This was accomplished by generating a series of tilt rotor aircraft designs to meet various noise goals at minimum DOC. These vehicles ranged across the spectrum of possible noise levels from completely unconstrained to the quietest vehicles that could be designed within the study ground rules. Optimization parameters were varied to find the minimum DOC. This basic variation was then extended to different aircraft sizes and technology time frames.

  3. Reducing metal alloy powder costs for use in powder bed fusion additive manufacturing: Improving the economics for production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Fransisco

    Titanium and its associated alloys have been used in industry for over 50 years and have become more popular in the recent decades. Titanium has been most successful in areas where the high strength to weight ratio provides an advantage over aluminum and steels. Other advantages of titanium include biocompatibility and corrosion resistance. Electron Beam Melting (EBM) is an additive manufacturing (AM) technology that has been successfully applied in the manufacturing of titanium components for the aerospace and medical industry with equivalent or better mechanical properties as parts fabricated via more traditional casting and machining methods. As the demand for titanium powder continues to increase, the price also increases. Titanium spheroidized powder from different vendors has a price range from 260/kg-450/kg, other spheroidized alloys such as Niobium can cost as high as $1,200/kg. Alternative titanium powders produced from methods such as the Titanium Hydride-Dehydride (HDH) process and the Armstrong Commercially Pure Titanium (CPTi) process can be fabricated at a fraction of the cost of powders fabricated via gas atomization. The alternative powders can be spheroidized and blended. Current sectors in additive manufacturing such as the medical industry are concerned that there will not be enough spherical powder for production and are seeking other powder options. It is believed the EBM technology can use a blend of spherical and angular powder to build fully dense parts with equal mechanical properties to those produced using traditional powders. Some of the challenges with angular and irregular powders are overcoming the poor flow characteristics and the attainment of the same or better packing densities as spherical powders. The goal of this research is to demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing alternative and lower cost powders in the EBM process. As a result, reducing the cost of the raw material to reduce the overall cost of the product produced with

  4. Entanglement cost and entangling power of bipartite unitary and permutation operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Yu, Li

    2016-04-01

    It is known that any bipartite unitary operator of Schmidt rank 3 is equivalent to a controlled unitary under local unitaries. We propose a standard form of such operators. Using the form we improve the upper bound for the entanglement cost to implement such operators under local operations and classical communications (LOCC), and provide a corresponding protocol. A part of our protocol is based on a recursive-control protocol which is helpful for implementing other unitary operators. We show that any bipartite permutation unitary of Schmidt rank 3 can be implemented using LOCC and two ebits. We give two protocols for implementing bipartite permutation unitaries of any Schmidt rank r and showed that one of the protocol uses O (r ) ebits of entanglement and O (r ) bits of classical communication, while these two types of costs for the other protocol scale as O (r logr ) but the actual values are smaller for all r <1100 . Based on this we obtain upper bounds of the number of nonlocal controlled-not gates needed to implement bipartite classical reversible maps using classical circuits under two different conditions. We also quantify the entangling power of bipartite permutation unitaries of Schmidt ranks 2 and 3. We show that they are respectively 1 ebit and some value between log29 -16 /9 and log23 ebits.

  5. Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113, Detail Design Report (Title II). Volume 4: Project cost estimate

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The Solid Waste Retrieval Facility--Phase 1 (Project W113) will provide the infrastructure and the facility required to retrieve from Trench 04, Burial ground 4C, contact handled (CH) drums and boxes at a rate that supports all retrieved TRU waste batching, treatment, storage, and disposal plans. This includes (1) operations related equipment and facilities, viz., a weather enclosure for the trench, retrieval equipment, weighing, venting, obtaining gas samples, overpacking, NDE, NDA, shipment of waste and (2) operations support related facilities, viz., a general office building, a retrieval staff change facility, and infrastructure upgrades such as supply and routing of water, sewer, electrical power, fire protection, roads, and telecommunication. Title I design for the operations related equipment and facilities was performed by Raytheon/BNFL, and that for the operations support related facilities including infrastructure upgrade was performed by KEH. These two scopes were combined into an integrated W113 Title II scope that was performed by Raytheon/BNFL. This volume represents the total estimated costs for the W113 facility. Operating Contractor Management costs have been incorporated as received from WHC. The W113 Facility TEC is $19.7 million. This includes an overall project contingency of 14.4% and escalation of 17.4%. A January 2001 construction contract procurement start date is assumed.

  6. Case studies of energy information systems and related technology: Operational practices, costs, and benefits

    SciTech Connect

    Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann; Kinney, Satkartar; Dewey, Jim

    2003-09-02

    Energy Information Systems (EIS), which can monitor and analyze building energy consumption and related data throughout the Internet, have been increasing in use over the last decade. Though EIS developers describe the capabilities, costs, and benefits of EIS, many of these descriptions are idealized and often insufficient for potential users to evaluate cost, benefit and operational usefulness. LBNL has conducted a series of case studies of existing EIS and related technology installations. This study explored the following questions: (1) How is the EIS used in day-to-day operation? (2) What are the costs and benefits of an EIS? (3) Where do the energy savings come from? This paper reviews the process of these technologies from installation through energy management practice. The study is based on interviews with operators and energy managers who use EIS. Analysis of energy data trended by EIS and utility bills was also conducted to measure the benefit. This paper explores common uses and findings to identify energy savings attributable to EIS, and discusses non-energy benefits as well. This paper also addresses technologies related to EIS that have been demonstrated and evaluated by LBNL.

  7. COST EFFECTIVE VOC EMISSION CONTROL STARTEGIES FOR MILITARY, AEROSPACE,AND INDUSTRIAL PAINT SPRAY BOOTH OPERATIONS: COMBINING IMPROVED VENTILATION SYSTEMS WITH INNOVATIVE, LOW COST EMISSION CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes a full-scale demonstration program in which several paint booths were modified for recirculation ventilation; the booth exhaust streams are vented to an innovative volatile organic compound (VOC) emission control system having extremely low operating costs. ...

  8. FGD system capital and operating cost reductions based on improved thiosorbic scrubber system design and latest process innovations

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.; Tseng, S.; Babu, M.

    1994-12-31

    Dravo Lime Company has operated the Miami Fort wet scrubber FGD pilot test unit since late 1989 and has continued in-house R&D to improve the economics of the magnesium-enhanced scrubbing process. Areas investigated include the scrubber configuration, flue gas velocity, spray nozzle type, droplet size, mist eliminator design, additives to inhibit oxidation, improved solids dewatering, etc. Also tested was the forced oxidation Thioclear process. The data gathered from the pilot plant and in-house programs were used to evaluate the capital and operating costs for the improved systems. These evaluations were made with eye towards the choices electric utilities will need to make in the near future to meet the Phase II emission limits mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act. Some of the process modifications investigated, for example, the dewatering improvements apply to potential beneficial retrofit of existing FGD systems today.

  9. The effect of using a heat recovery absorber on the performance and operating cost of the solar ammonia absorption cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Saghiruddin; Siddiqui, M.A.

    1997-02-01

    Economic analysis of ordinary and evacuated tubular type flat-plate collectors have been carried out for operating absorption cycles with and without heat recovery absorber. Water-ammonia, NaSCN-NH{sub 3} and LiNO{sub 3}-NH{sub 3} have been selected as the working fluids in the cycles. Use of a heat recovery absorber, in addition to the primary absorber in the conventional absorption cycles, lead to improvement in the system performances by about 20--30% in the H{sub 2}O-NH{sub 3} and 33--36% in the NaSCN-NH{sub 3} and LiNO{sub 3}-NH{sub 3} mixtures. Subsequently, there is a considerable amount of reduction in the cost of the solar collector required to operate them. For the set of operating conditions, in this theoretical study, the cost reduces to about 25% in the H{sub 2}O-NH{sub 3} and 30% in the NaSCN and LiNO{sub 3}-NH{sub 3} cycles.

  10. The Bibliographical Center for Research, Rocky Mountain Regions, Inc.: A Cost Study of the Center's Present Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maier, Joan M.; And Others

    This cost study analyzes the operating costs of the Bibliographical Center so that the Center can adopt the best possible combination of procedures with which to achieve its service objectives at the lowest possible cost to its members. This study provides data, upon which a fee schedule can be based, that is derived from the form of the input and…

  11. A prospective randomized outcome and cost comparison of totally extraperitoneal endoscopic hernioplasty versus Lichtenstein hernia operation among employed patients.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, T J; Haukipuro, K; Koivukangas, P; Hulkko, A

    1998-10-01

    Laparoscopic hernia operations have been criticized in regard to their high hospital costs. This study was designed to compare the costs and some outcome features of totally extraperitoneal endoscopic hernia operation (TEP) and Lichtenstein mesh repair (OPN) among 45 randomized employed patients. The medians of operative time in the TEP and OPN groups were 67.5 and 53 min, respectively. Return to normal life was 14 days in the TEP group and 20 days in the OPN group. The hospital costs per patient were $1,239 (all costs are in US dollars) in the TEP group and $782 in the OPN group. The median total costs were $3,912 and $4,661 in the TEP and OPN groups, respectively. The Lichtenstein operation is cheaper for the hospital. The total costs for working patients are lower with the endoscopic technique because fewer working days are lost. PMID:9799140

  12. 10 CFR 60.132 - Additional design criteria for surface facilities in the geologic repository operations area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional design criteria for surface facilities in the...) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Technical Criteria Design Criteria for the Geologic Repository Operations Area § 60.132 Additional design criteria for surface facilities...

  13. Re-Engineering of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to Reduce Operational Costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvis, Michael; Dougherty, Andrew; Whittier, Wallace

    1996-01-01

    Satellite telemetry processing onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is carried out using dedicated software and hardware. The current ground system is expensive to operate and maintain. The mandate to reduce satellite ground system operations and maintenance costs by the year 2000 led NASA to upgrade the command and control systems in order to improve the data processing capabilities, reduce operator experience levels and increase system standardization. As a result, a command and control system product development team was formed to redesign and develop the HST ground system. The command and control system ground system development consists of six elements. The results of the prototyping phase carried out for the following of these elements are presented: the front end processor; middleware, and the graphical user interface.

  14. 77 FR 19565 - Additional Changes to the Schedule of Operations Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-02

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Need for Correction On March 19, 2012 (77 FR 15976), the Food Safety and Inspection... rule to amend the meat and poultry products regulations pertaining to the schedule of operations....

  15. ISS Operations Cost Reductions Through Automation of Real-Time Planning Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Timothy A.

    2011-01-01

    In 2008 the Johnson Space Center s Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) management team challenged their organization to find ways to reduce the costs of International Space station (ISS) console operations in the Mission Control Center (MCC). Each MOD organization was asked to identify projects that would help them attain a goal of a 30% reduction in operating costs by 2012. The MOD Operations and Planning organization responded to this challenge by launching several software automation projects that would allow them to greatly improve ISS console operations and reduce staffing and operating costs. These projects to date have allowed the MOD Operations organization to remove one full time (7 x 24 x 365) ISS console position in 2010; with the plan of eliminating two full time ISS console support positions by 2012. This will account for an overall 10 EP reduction in staffing for the Operations and Planning organization. These automation projects focused on utilizing software to automate many administrative and often repetitive tasks involved with processing ISS planning and daily operations information. This information was exchanged between the ground flight control teams in Houston and around the globe, as well as with the ISS astronaut crew. These tasks ranged from managing mission plan changes from around the globe, to uploading and downloading information to and from the ISS crew, to even more complex tasks that required multiple decision points to process the data, track approvals and deliver it to the correct recipient across network and security boundaries. The software solutions leveraged several different technologies including customized web applications and implementation of industry standard web services architecture between several planning tools; as well as a engaging a previously research level technology (TRL 2-3) developed by Ames Research Center (ARC) that utilized an intelligent agent based system to manage and automate file traffic flow

  16. 49 CFR 192.112 - Additional design requirements for steel pipe using alternative maximum allowable operating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional design requirements for steel pipe...: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Pipe Design § 192.112 Additional design requirements for steel pipe using... for the steel pipe (1) The plate, skelp, or coil used for the pipe must be micro-alloyed, fine...

  17. 49 CFR 192.112 - Additional design requirements for steel pipe using alternative maximum allowable operating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional design requirements for steel pipe...: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Pipe Design § 192.112 Additional design requirements for steel pipe using... for the steel pipe (1) The plate, skelp, or coil used for the pipe must be micro-alloyed, fine...

  18. 49 CFR 192.112 - Additional design requirements for steel pipe using alternative maximum allowable operating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional design requirements for steel pipe...: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Pipe Design § 192.112 Additional design requirements for steel pipe using... for the steel pipe (1) The plate, skelp, or coil used for the pipe must be micro-alloyed, fine...

  19. 49 CFR 192.112 - Additional design requirements for steel pipe using alternative maximum allowable operating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional design requirements for steel pipe...: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Pipe Design § 192.112 Additional design requirements for steel pipe using... for the steel pipe (1) The plate, skelp, or coil used for the pipe must be micro-alloyed, fine...

  20. Development of underground-mine cost-estimating equations. [Dependence of initial capital cost, deferred capital cost and annual operating cost on region, annual mine output and seam depth

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-06

    Table 3.3 summarizes the initial capital, deferred capital, and operating costs (in millions of 1980 dollars) for the four regionally-based underground model mines. The initial capital is divided into two components, fixed and variable. The fixed component is just the investment cost for surface facilities, which is assumed to be independent of mine size. The rest of the initial capital cost is associated with production (primarily face-related) and is assumed to vary linearly with mine size (i.e., annual output). There exists a concern that deferred capital costs will change due to entry mode. However, the installations concerned primarily with this point are depreciated off over the mine life and are not targeted for replacement. Therefore, deferred capital costs will not change significantly with entry mode changes or seam depth. In conclusion, it is our feeling that, within the resources of this project, development of cost adjustment factors relating productivity to various supply regions and seam heights is not practical. Assuming that productivity and, therefore, cost is independent of seam height will introduce errors into the system; however, their extent should be minimized by the incorporation of multiple model mines into the RAMC. Lastly, the relationship presented in this memorandum for depth of cover should be used in the RAMC.

  1. Wind turbine reliability :understanding and minimizing wind turbine operation and maintenance costs.

    SciTech Connect

    Walford, Christopher A. (Global Energy Concepts. Kirkland, WA)

    2006-03-01

    Wind turbine system reliability is a critical factor in the success of a wind energy project. Poor reliability directly affects both the project's revenue stream through increased operation and maintenance (O&M) costs and reduced availability to generate power due to turbine downtime. Indirectly, the acceptance of wind-generated power by the financial and developer communities as a viable enterprise is influenced by the risk associated with the capital equipment reliability; increased risk, or at least the perception of increased risk, is generally accompanied by increased financing fees or interest rates. This paper outlines the issues relevant to wind turbine reliability for wind turbine power generation projects. The first sections describe the current state of the industry, identify the cost elements associated with wind farm O&M and availability and discuss the causes of uncertainty in estimating wind turbine component reliability. The latter sections discuss the means for reducing O&M costs and propose O&M related research and development efforts that could be pursued by the wind energy research community to reduce cost of energy.

  2. Analysis of operating costs for producing biodiesel from palm oil at pilot-scale in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Juan C; Hernández, Jorge A; Valdés, Carlos F; Khanal, Samir Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the operating costs of biodiesel production using palm oil in a pilot-scale plant with a capacity of 20,000 L/day (850 L/batch). The production plant uses crude palm oil as a feedstock, and methanol in a molar ratio of 1:10. The process incorporated acid esterification, basic transesterification, and dry washing with absorbent powder. Production costs considered in the analysis were feedstock, supplies, labor, electricity, quality and maintenance; amounting to $3.75/gal ($0.99/L) for 2013. Feedstocks required for biodiesel production were among the highest costs, namely 72.6% of total production cost. Process efficiency to convert fatty acids to biodiesel was over 99% and generated a profit of $1.08/gal (i.e., >22% of the total income). According to sensitivity analyses, it is more economically viable for biodiesel production processes to use crude palm oil as a feedstock and take advantage of the byproducts such as glycerine and fertilizers. PMID:25660089

  3. A cost-benefit evaluation of the LANDSAT flow-on operational system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Disciplines to benefit from the LANDSAT Follow-on System include agriculture, petroleum and mineral exploration, hydrologic land use, water resources management, forestry, land use planning and monitoring, and soil management. The annual quantified benefits are in the range of 420 to 970 million (FY 1976 dollars). The operational system sized to achieve the quantified benefits involves a single orbiting satellite with a backup satellite in launch readiness. The ground system includes a basic processing system which feeds information to three user systems - one for agriculture, one for hydrologic land use, and a third for all other users. The resulting present worth benefit cost ratio is at least equal to four with a reasonable likelihood of exceeding nine. This benefit cost ratio is evaluated for an infinite time horizon at the discount rate of 10 percent.

  4. Design and operation of a low cost, reliable millimeter-wave interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Porte, L.; Rettig, C.L.; Peebles, W.A.; Ngyuen, X.

    1999-01-01

    Knowledge of basic plasma parameters, such as line integrated density and turbulence spectra, is essential for physics understanding and plasma control. Integration of plasma diagnostic systems into a single port combined with diagnostic cost reduction is an important advance that can impact measurement availability on all fusion devices. This article presents preliminary data from a unique, low cost and reliable millimeter-wave interferometer that has been integrated to operate simultaneously with a collective Thomson scattering system. The interferometer uses only one commercially available frequency chirped source and only one detector. The DIII-D system design will be described together with preliminary design of a tangentially viewing system for the Pegasus spherical torus experiment. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Operational Issues in the Development of a Cost-Effective Reusable LOX/LH2 Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, Richard O.

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Space Launch Initiative (SLI) was initiated in early 2001 to conduct technology development and to reduce the business and technical risk associated with developing the next-generation reusable launch system. In the field of main propulsion, two LOXLH2 rocket engine systems, the Pratt & Whitney / Aerojet Joint Venture (JV) COBRA and the Rocketdyne RS-83, were funded to develop a safe, economical, and reusable propulsion system. Given that a large-thrust reusable rocket engine program had not been started in the U.S. since 1971, with the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), this provided an opportunity to build on the experience developed on the SSME system, while exploiting advances in technology that had occurred in the intervening 30 years. One facet of engine development that was identified as being especially vital in order to produce an optimal system was in the areas of operability and maintainability. In order to achieve the high levels of performance required by the Space Shuttle, the SSME system is highly complex with very tight tolerances and detailed requirements. Over the lifetime of the SSME program, the engine has required a high level of manpower to support the performance of inspections, maintenance (scheduled and unscheduled) and operations (prelaunch and post-flight). As a consequence, the labor- intensive needs of the SSME provide a significant impact to the overall cost efficiency of the Space Transportation System (STS). One of the strategic goals of the SLI is to reduce cost by requiring the engine(s) to be easier (Le. less expensive) to operate and maintain. The most effective means of accomplishing this goal is to infuse the operability and maintainability features into the engine design from the start. This paper discusses some of the operational issues relevant to a reusable LOx/LH2 main engine, and the means by which their impact is mitigated in the design phase.

  6. 29 CFR 1910.126 - Additional requirements for special dipping and coating operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (60 °C), you must prevent sparking of static electricity by: (1) Bonding and grounding all metallic... mixing with an acid if a dip tank fails. (f) What additional requirements apply to spray cleaning...

  7. Effect of weight loss on operational lung volumes and oxygen cost of breathing in obese women

    PubMed Central

    Bhammar, Dharini M.; Stickford, Jonathon L.; Bernhardt, Vipa; Babb, Tony G.

    2015-01-01

    Background The effect of moderate weight loss on operational lung volumes during exercise and the oxygen (O2) cost of breathing are unknown in obese women but could have important implications regarding exercise endurance. Methods In twenty-nine obese women (33 ± 8yr, 97 ± 14kg, BMI: 36 ± 4, body fat: 45.6 ± 4.5%; means ± SD), body composition, fat distribution (by MRI), pulmonary function, operational lung volumes during exercise, and the O2 cost of breathing during eucapnic voluntary hyperpnea ( V˙O2 vs. V˙E slope) were studied before and after a 12-week diet and resistance exercise weight loss program. Results Participants lost 7.5 ± 3.1kg or ≈8% of body weight (p < 0.001), but fat distribution remained unchanged. After weight loss, lung volume subdivisions at rest were increased (p < 0.05) and were moderately associated (p < 0.05) with changes in weight. End-expiratory lung volume (%Total Lung Capacity) increased at rest and during constant load exercise (p < 0.05). O2 cost of breathing was reduced by 16% (2.52 ± 1.02 to 2.11 ± 0.72ml/L; P=0.003). As a result, O2 uptake of the respiratory muscles (V˙O2Resp), estimated as the product of O2 cost of breathing and exercise V˙E during cycling at 60W, was significantly reduced by 27 ± 31ml (P<0.001), accounting for 46% of the reduction in total body V˙O2 during cycling at 60W. Conclusions Moderate weight loss yields important improvements in respiratory function at rest and during submaximal exercise in otherwise healthy obese women. These changes in breathing load could have positive effects on the exercise endurance and adherence to physical activity. PMID:26869243

  8. Low-cost USB interface for operant research using Arduino and Visual Basic.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Rogelio; Pérez-Herrera, Carlos A

    2015-03-01

    This note describes the design of a low-cost interface using Arduino microcontroller boards and Visual Basic programming for operant conditioning research. The board executes one program in Arduino programming language that polls the state of the inputs and generates outputs in an operant chamber. This program communicates through a USB port with another program written in Visual Basic 2010 Express Edition running on a laptop, desktop, netbook computer, or even a tablet equipped with Windows operating system. The Visual Basic program controls schedules of reinforcement and records real-time data. A single Arduino board can be used to control a total of 52 inputs/output lines, and multiple Arduino boards can be used to control multiple operant chambers. An external power supply and a series of micro relays are required to control 28-V DC devices commonly used in operant chambers. Instructions for downloading and using the programs to generate simple and concurrent schedules of reinforcement are provided. Testing suggests that the interface is reliable, accurate, and could serve as an inexpensive alternative to commercial equipment. PMID:25649099

  9. Comparison and Validation of Operational Cost in Smart Houses with the Introduction of a Heat Pump or a Gas Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimoji, Tsubasa; Tahara, Hayato; Matayoshi, Hidehito; Yona, Atsushi; Senjyu, Tomonobu

    2015-02-01

    Due to the concerns of global warming and the depletion of energy resources, renewable energies such as wind generation (WG) and photovoltaic generation (PV) are gaining attention in distribution systems. Efficient electric equipment such as heat pumps (HP) not only contribute low levels of carbon to society, but are also beneficial for consumers. In addition, gas instruments such as the gas engine (GE) and fuel cells (FC) are expected to reduce electricity cost by exhaust heat. Thus, it is important to clarify which systems (HP or GE) are more beneficial for consumers throughout the year. This paper compares the operational cost for the smart house between using the HP and the GE. Current electricity and gas prices are used to calculate the cost of the smart house. The system considered in this research comprises a PV, battery, solar collector (SC), uncontrolled load and either an HP or a GE. In order to verify the effectiveness of the proposed system, MATLAB is used for simulations.

  10. Optimal Design and Operation of In-Situ Chemical Oxidation Using Stochastic Cost Optimization Toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, U.; Parker, J.; Borden, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    In-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) has been applied at many dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contaminated sites. A stirred reactor-type model was developed that considers DNAPL dissolution using a field-scale mass transfer function, instantaneous reaction of oxidant with aqueous and adsorbed contaminant and with readily oxidizable natural oxygen demand ("fast NOD"), and second-order kinetic reactions with "slow NOD." DNAPL dissolution enhancement as a function of oxidant concentration and inhibition due to manganese dioxide precipitation during permanganate injection are included in the model. The DNAPL source area is divided into multiple treatment zones with different areas, depths, and contaminant masses based on site characterization data. The performance model is coupled with a cost module that involves a set of unit costs representing specific fixed and operating costs. Monitoring of groundwater and/or soil concentrations in each treatment zone is employed to assess ISCO performance and make real-time decisions on oxidant reinjection or ISCO termination. Key ISCO design variables include the oxidant concentration to be injected, time to begin performance monitoring, groundwater and/or soil contaminant concentrations to trigger reinjection or terminate ISCO, number of monitoring wells or geoprobe locations per treatment zone, number of samples per sampling event and location, and monitoring frequency. Design variables for each treatment zone may be optimized to minimize expected cost over a set of Monte Carlo simulations that consider uncertainty in site parameters. The model is incorporated in the Stochastic Cost Optimization Toolkit (SCOToolkit) program, which couples the ISCO model with a dissolved plume transport model and with modules for other remediation strategies. An example problem is presented that illustrates design tradeoffs required to deal with characterization and monitoring uncertainty. Monitoring soil concentration changes during ISCO

  11. 77 FR 59291 - Additional Changes to the Schedule of Operations Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-27

    ... administrative activities and preparing for inspection (including preparing an inspection station and picking up... FSIS inspection program personnel to put on required gear, pick up required forms and walk to a work... March 19, 2012, FSIS proposed to amend its regulations pertaining to the schedule of operations (77...

  12. 33 CFR 157.460 - Additional operational requirements for tank barges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Emergency steering capability. The owner or operator of each tank barge shall not permit the barge to be... requirements for tank barges. 157.460 Section 157.460 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... RELATING TO TANK VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Interim Measures for Certain Tank Vessels Without...

  13. 33 CFR 157.460 - Additional operational requirements for tank barges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) Emergency steering capability. The owner or operator of each tank barge shall not permit the barge to be... requirements for tank barges. 157.460 Section 157.460 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... RELATING TO TANK VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Interim Measures for Certain Tank Vessels Without...

  14. 33 CFR 157.460 - Additional operational requirements for tank barges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Emergency steering capability. The owner or operator of each tank barge shall not permit the barge to be... requirements for tank barges. 157.460 Section 157.460 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... RELATING TO TANK VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Interim Measures for Certain Tank Vessels Without...

  15. 33 CFR 157.460 - Additional operational requirements for tank barges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Emergency steering capability. The owner or operator of each tank barge shall not permit the barge to be... requirements for tank barges. 157.460 Section 157.460 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... RELATING TO TANK VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Interim Measures for Certain Tank Vessels Without...

  16. Associativity and Understanding of the Operation of Addition in Children with Learning Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grobecker, Betsey; Lawrence, Frank

    2000-01-01

    Twenty-seven children (ages 7-10) with learning disabilities and 42 controls were tested on three different mathematics tasks. Significantly more controls abstracted composite unit structures suggestive of operational logic on modified nonverbal and associativity of length tasks. On a flash card task, children with learning disabilities achieved…

  17. The determination of operational and support requirements and costs during the conceptual design of space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebeling, Charles

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective is to develop a methodology for predicting operational and support parameters and costs of proposed space systems. The first phase consists of: (1) the identification of data sources; (2) the development of a methodology for determining system reliability and maintainability parameters; (3) the implementation of the methodology through the use of prototypes; and (4) support in the development of an integrated computer model. The phase 1 results are documented and a direction is identified to proceed to accomplish the overall objective.

  18. ESTIMATING IRRIGATION COSTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Having accurate estimates of the cost of irrigation is important when making irrigation decisions. Estimates of fixed costs are critical for investment decisions. Operating cost estimates can assist in decisions regarding additional irrigations. This fact sheet examines the costs associated with ...

  19. Dynamic modeling used for the addition of robotic operation to the Advanced Servomanipulator teleoperator

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, G.K.; Bailey, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    A robotic mode has been added to the Advanced Servomanipulator (ASM), a 6 degree-of-freedom master/slave teleoperator. In order to understand the requirements for implementation of robotics on an arm designed for teleoperation, a dynamic simulation of the ASM slave arm was developed. The ASM model and modifications of the control system for robotic operation are presented. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Cost efficient operations: Challenge from NASA administrator and lessons learned from hunting sacred cows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornstein, Rhoda Shaller; Casasanta, Ralph; Hei, Donald J., Jr.; Hawkins, Frederick J.; Burke, Eugene S., Jr.; Todd, Jacqueline E.; Bell, Jerome A.; Miller, Raymond E.; Willoughby, John K.; Gardner, Jo Anne

    1996-01-01

    The conclusions and recommendations that resulted from NASA's Hunting Sacred Cows Workshop are summarized, where a sacred cow is a belief or assumption that is so well established that it appears to be unreasonably immune to criticism. A link was identified between increased complexity and increased costs, especially in relation to automation and autonomy. An identical link was identified for outsourcing and commercialization. The work of NASA's Cost Less team is reviewed. The following conclusions were stated by the Cost Less team and considered at the workshop: the way Nasa conducts business must change; NASA makes its best contributions to the public areas not addressed by other government organizations; the management tool used for the last 30 years is no longer suitable; the most important work on any program or project is carried out before the development or operations stages; automation should only be used to achieve autonomy if the reasons for automation are well understood, and NASA's most critical resources are its personnel.

  1. ORCED: A model to simulate the operations and costs of bulk-power markets

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, S.; Hirst, E.

    1998-06-01

    Dramatic changes in the structure and operation of US bulk-power markets require new analytical tools. The authors developed the Oak Ridge Competitive Electricity Dispatch (ORCED) model to analyze a variety of public-policy issues related to the many changes underway in the US electricity industry. Such issues include: policy and technology options to reduce carbon emissions from electricity production; the effects of electricity trading between high- and low-cost regions on consumers and producers in both regions; the ability of the owners of certain generating units to exercise market power as functions of the transmission link between two regions and the characteristics of the generating units and loads in each region; and the market penetration of new energy-production and energy-use technologies and the effects of their adoption on fuel use, electricity use and costs, and carbon emissions. ORCED treats two electrical systems connected by a single transmission link ORCED uses two load-duration curves to represent the time-varying electricity consumption in each region. The two curves represent peak and offpeak seasons. User specification of demand elasticities permits ORCED to estimate the effects of changes in electricity price, both overall and hour by hour, on overall electricity use and load shapes. ORCED represents the electricity supply in each region with 26 generating units. The two regions are connected by a single transmission link. This link is characterized by its capacity (MW), cost ({cents}/kWh), and losses (%). This report explains the inputs to, outputs from, and operation of ORCED. It also presents four examples showing applications of the model to various public-policy issues related to restructuring of the US electricity industry.

  2. Engineering and environmental properties of thermally treated mixtures containing MSWI fly ash and low-cost additives.

    PubMed

    Polettini, A; Pomi, R; Trinci, L; Muntoni, A; Lo Mastro, S

    2004-09-01

    An experimental work was carried out to investigate the feasibility of application of a sintering process to mixtures composed of Municipal Solid Waste Incinerator (MSWI) fly ash and low-cost additives (waste from feldspar production and cullet). The proportions of the three constituents were varied to adjust the mixture compositions to within the optimal range for sintering. The material was compacted in cylindrical specimens and treated at 1100 and 1150 degrees C for 30 and 60 min. Engineering and environmental characteristics including weight loss, dimensional changes, density, open porosity, mechanical strength, chemical stability and leaching behavior were determined for the treated material, allowing the relationship between the degree of sintering and both mixture composition and treatment conditions to be singled out. Mineralogical analyses detected the presence of neo-formation minerals from the pyroxene group. Estimation of the extent of metal loss from the samples indicated that the potential for volatilization of species of Pb, Cd and Zn is still a matter of major concern when dealing with thermal treatment of incinerator ash. PMID:15268956

  3. Additive for Low-Temperature Operation of Li-(CF)n Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, William; Whitacre, Jay

    2009-01-01

    Some progress has been reported in continuing research on the use of anion-receptor compounds as electrolyte additives to increase the sustainable rates of discharge and, hence, the discharge capacities, of lithium-poly(carbon monofluoride) [Li-(CF)n, where n >1] primary electrochemical power cells. Some results of this research at a prior stage were summarized in Increasing Discharge Capacities of Li(CF)n Cells (NPO-42346), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 32, No. 2 (February 2008), page 37. A major difference between the present and previously reported results is that now there is some additional focus on improving performance at temperatures from ambient down to as low as 40 C. To recapitulate from the cited prior article: During the discharge of a Li-(CF)n cell, one of the electrochemical reactions causes LiF to precipitate at the cathode. LiF is almost completely insoluble in most non-aqueous solvents, including those used in the electrolyte solutions of Li- (CF)n cells. LiF is electrochemically inactive and can block the desired transport of electrons at the cathode, and, hence, the precipitation of LiF can form an ever-thickening film on the cathode that limits the rate of discharge. An anion-receptor electrolyte additive helps to increase the discharge capacity in two ways: It renders LiF somewhat soluble in the non-aqueous electrolyte solution, thereby delaying precipitation until a high concentration of LiF in solution has been reached. When precipitation occurs, it promotes the formation of large LiF grains that do not conformally coat the cathode. The net effect is to reduce the blockage caused by precipitation of LiF, thereby maintaining a greater degree of access of electrolyte to the cathode and greater electronic conductivity.

  4. 29 CFR 1910.125 - Additional requirements for dipping and coating operations that use flammable liquids or liquids...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Additional requirements for dipping and coating operations that use flammable liquids or liquids with flashpoints greater than 199.4 °F (93 °C). 1910.125 Section 1910.125 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL...

  5. 29 CFR 1910.125 - Additional requirements for dipping and coating operations that use flammable liquids or liquids...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Additional requirements for dipping and coating operations that use flammable liquids or liquids with flashpoints greater than 199.4 °F (93 °C). 1910.125 Section 1910.125 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL...

  6. 40 CFR 267.1103 - What additional design and operating standards apply if liquids will be in my containment building?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... containment building and of sufficient strength and thickness to prevent collapse under the pressure exerted... standards apply if liquids will be in my containment building? 267.1103 Section 267.1103 Protection of....1103 What additional design and operating standards apply if liquids will be in my containment...

  7. 40 CFR 267.1103 - What additional design and operating standards apply if liquids will be in my containment building?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... containment building and of sufficient strength and thickness to prevent collapse under the pressure exerted... standards apply if liquids will be in my containment building? 267.1103 Section 267.1103 Protection of....1103 What additional design and operating standards apply if liquids will be in my containment...

  8. 40 CFR 267.1103 - What additional design and operating standards apply if liquids will be in my containment building?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... containment building and of sufficient strength and thickness to prevent collapse under the pressure exerted... standards apply if liquids will be in my containment building? 267.1103 Section 267.1103 Protection of....1103 What additional design and operating standards apply if liquids will be in my containment...

  9. 40 CFR 267.1103 - What additional design and operating standards apply if liquids will be in my containment building?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... containment building and of sufficient strength and thickness to prevent collapse under the pressure exerted... standards apply if liquids will be in my containment building? 267.1103 Section 267.1103 Protection of....1103 What additional design and operating standards apply if liquids will be in my containment...

  10. 29 CFR 1910.125 - Additional requirements for dipping and coating operations that use flammable liquids or liquids...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Additional requirements for dipping and coating operations that use flammable liquids or liquids with flashpoints greater than 199.4 °F (93 °C). 1910.125 Section 1910.125 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL...

  11. 40 CFR 62.15220 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... POLLUTANTS Federal Plan Requirements for Small Municipal Waste Combustion Units Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Continuous Emission Monitoring § 62.15220 What additional requirements must I meet for... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity...

  12. 40 CFR 62.15220 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... POLLUTANTS Federal Plan Requirements for Small Municipal Waste Combustion Units Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Continuous Emission Monitoring § 62.15220 What additional requirements must I meet for... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity...

  13. 40 CFR 62.15220 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... POLLUTANTS Federal Plan Requirements for Small Municipal Waste Combustion Units Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Continuous Emission Monitoring § 62.15220 What additional requirements must I meet for... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity...

  14. 40 CFR 62.15220 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... POLLUTANTS Federal Plan Requirements for Small Municipal Waste Combustion Units Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Continuous Emission Monitoring § 62.15220 What additional requirements must I meet for... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity...

  15. SQUID sensor with additional compensation module for operation in an AC applied field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Penna, S.; Cianflone, F.; Del Gratta, C.; Erné, S. N.; Granata, C.; Pasquarelli, A.; Pentiricci, A.; Pizzella, V.; Russo, M.; Romani, G. L.

    2006-06-01

    A possible implementation of an in-vivo SQUID susceptometer able to estimate the liver iron concentration of humans uses a low frequency applied field together with a lock-in detection. The room-temperature magnetising coils and the detection coils are designed to minimize their mutual coupling. Nevertheless, deviation from ideal behaviour causes a residual signal in the detection coil, with an amplitude significantly larger than the patient's. In addition low frequency noise is added by any relative displacement of the magnetising and sensing coils. Thus, we designed a SQUID sensor using a compact compensating module to be used in a multichannel SQUID susceptometer. The sensor consists of two second order axial gradiometers, wounded one inside the other on the same support. The sensing channel is larger than the compensation channel which is only sensitive to the residual signal. Each gradiometer is coupled to a dc SQUID with parallel washer configuration. The output of the compensation channel is A/D converted and is processed by an adaptive algorithm running on a real time unit. The compensation signal is coupled to the sensing channel by an additional feedback loop. The performances of a prototype module will be presented.

  16. Arsenic Remediation Enhancement Through Chemical Additions to Pump and Treat Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wovkulich, K.; Mailloux, B. J.; Stute, M.; Simpson, H. J.; Keimowitz, A. R.; Powell, A.; Lacko, A.; Chillrud, S. N.

    2008-12-01

    Arsenic is a contaminant found at more than 500 US Superfund sites. Since pump and treat technologies are widely used for remediation of contaminated groundwater, increasing the efficiency of contaminant removal at such sites should allow limited financial resources to clean up more sites. The Vineland Chemical Company Superfund site is extensively contaminated with arsenic after waste arsenic salts were stored and disposed of improperly for much of the company's 44 year manufacturing lifetime. Despite approximately eight years of pump and treat remediation, arsenic concentrations in the recovery wells can still be greater than 1000 ppb. The arsenic concentrations in the groundwater remain high because of slow desorption of arsenic from contaminated aquifer solids. Extrapolation of laboratory column experiments suggest that continuing the current groundwater remediation practice based on flushing ambient groundwater through the system may require on the order of hundreds of years to clean the site. However, chemical additions of phosphate or oxalic acid into the aquifer could decrease the remediation time scale substantially. Laboratory results from a soil column experiment using input of 10 mM oxalic acid suggest that site clean up of groundwater could be decreased to as little as four years. Pilot scale forced gradient field experiments will help establish whether chemical additions can be effective for increasing arsenic mobilization from aquifer solids and thus substantially decrease pump and treat clean up time.

  17. Development and application of a model for the analysis of trades between space launch system operations and acquisition costs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nix, Michael B.

    2005-12-01

    Early design decisions in the development of space launch systems determine the costs to acquire and operate launch systems. Some sources indicate that as much as 90% of life cycle costs are fixed by the end of the critical design review phase. System characteristics determined by these early decisions are major factors in the acquisition cost of flight hardware elements and facilities and influence operations costs through the amount of maintenance and support labor required to sustain system function. Operations costs are also dependent on post-development management decisions regarding how much labor will be deployed to meet requirements of market demand and ownership profit. The ability to perform early trade-offs between these costs is vital to the development of systems that have the necessary capacity to provide service and are profitable to operate. An Excel-based prototype model was developed for making early analyses of trade-offs between the costs to operate a space launch system and to acquire the necessary assets to meet a given set of operational requirements. The model, integrating input from existing models and adding missing capability, allows the user to make such trade-offs across a range of operations concepts (required flight rates, staffing levels, shifts per workday, workdays per week and per year, unreliability, wearout and depot maintenance) and the number, type and capability of assets (flight hardware elements, processing and supporting facilities and infrastructure). The costs and capabilities of hypothetical launch systems can be modeled as a function of interrelated turnaround times and labor resource levels, and asset loss and retirement. The number of flight components and facilities required can be calculated and the operations and acquisition costs compared for a specified scenario. Findings, based on the analysis of a hypothetical two stage to orbit, reusable, unmanned launch system, indicate that the model is suitable for the

  18. The Perceived Effect of Hidden Costs on the Operational Management of Information Technology Outsourcing: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swift, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Information technology (IT) outsourcing is a business trend aimed at reducing costs and enabling companies to concentrate on their core competencies. This qualitative multiple case design research study explored the effects of hidden costs on the operational management of IT outsourcing. The study involved analyzing IT outsourcing agreements as…

  19. A heat & mass integration approach to reduce capital and operating costs of a distillation configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Madenoor Ramapriya, Gautham; Jiang, Zheyu; Tawarmalani, Mohit; Agrawal, Rakesh

    2015-11-11

    We propose a general method to consolidate distillation columns of a distillation configuration using heat and mass integration. The proposed method encompasses all heat and mass integrations known till date, and includes many more. Each heat and mass integration eliminates a distillation column, a condenser, a reboiler and the heat duty associated with a reboiler. Thus, heat and mass integration can potentially offer significant capital and operating cost benefits. In this talk, we will study the various possible heat and mass integrations in detail, and demonstrate their benefits using case studies. This work will lay out a framework to synthesize an entire new class of useful configurations based on heat and mass integration of distillation columns.

  20. Expert system decision support for low-cost launch vehicle operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szatkowski, G. P.; Levin, Barry E.

    1991-01-01

    Progress in assessing the feasibility, benefits, and risks associated with AI expert systems applied to low cost expendable launch vehicle systems is described. Part one identified potential application areas in vehicle operations and on-board functions, assessed measures of cost benefit, and identified key technologies to aid in the implementation of decision support systems in this environment. Part two of the program began the development of prototypes to demonstrate real-time vehicle checkout with controller and diagnostic/analysis intelligent systems and to gather true measures of cost savings vs. conventional software, verification and validation requirements, and maintainability improvement. The main objective of the expert advanced development projects was to provide a robust intelligent system for control/analysis that must be performed within a specified real-time window in order to meet the demands of the given application. The efforts to develop the two prototypes are described. Prime emphasis was on a controller expert system to show real-time performance in a cryogenic propellant loading application and safety validation implementation of this system experimentally, using commercial-off-the-shelf software tools and object oriented programming techniques. This smart ground support equipment prototype is based in C with imbedded expert system rules written in the CLIPS protocol. The relational database, ORACLE, provides non-real-time data support. The second demonstration develops the vehicle/ground intelligent automation concept, from phase one, to show cooperation between multiple expert systems. This automated test conductor (ATC) prototype utilizes a knowledge-bus approach for intelligent information processing by use of virtual sensors and blackboards to solve complex problems. It incorporates distributed processing of real-time data and object-oriented techniques for command, configuration control, and auto-code generation.

  1. Artificial intelligent decision support for low-cost launch vehicle integrated mission operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szatkowski, Gerard P.; Schultz, Roger

    1988-01-01

    The feasibility, benefits, and risks associated with Artificial Intelligence (AI) Expert Systems applied to low cost space expendable launch vehicle systems are reviewed. This study is in support of the joint USAF/NASA effort to define the next generation of a heavy-lift Advanced Launch System (ALS) which will provide economical and routine access to space. The significant technical goals of the ALS program include: a 10 fold reduction in cost per pound to orbit, launch processing in under 3 weeks, and higher reliability and safety standards than current expendables. Knowledge-based system techniques are being explored for the purpose of automating decision support processes in onboard and ground systems for pre-launch checkout and in-flight operations. Issues such as: satisfying real-time requirements, providing safety validation, hardware and Data Base Management System (DBMS) interfacing, system synergistic effects, human interfaces, and ease of maintainability, have an effect on the viability of expert systems as a useful tool.

  2. Working memory updating latency reflects the cost of switching between maintenance and updating modes of operation.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Yoav; Oberauer, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    Updating and maintenance of information are 2 conflicting demands on working memory (WM). We examined the time required to update WM (updating latency) as a function of the sequence of updated and not-updated items within a list. Participants held a list of items in WM and updated a variable subset of them in each trial. Four experiments that vary the number of to-be-updated and to-be-maintained items, as well as their positions in the list, are reported. The pattern of latencies was best explained by a model assuming forward scanning of the list, updating modified items, and maintaining nonmodified items. Switching between updating and maintenance incurred a response time cost, which increased with overall set-size. The formation of new item-position associations accounted for an additional response time component. The finding of an update-switch cost provides novel behavioral support for a class of physiologically inspired computational models, in which updating and maintenance require 2 different states of WM. PMID:24446752

  3. Offline Interoperability, Cost Reduction and R eliability for Operational Procedures Using Meta-Modeling Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poupart, E.; Jolly, G.; Percebois, C.; Bazex, P.; Palanque, P.; Basnyat, S.; Rabault, P.; Sabatier, L.; Walrawens, A.

    2008-08-01

    In this paper, we present a CNES participation through a case study in a research project called DOMINO financed by the French National Research Agency (ANR) RNTL. This project has started in March 2007 and will end in March 2009, it regroups academics (ENSIETA, IRISA, and IRIT), industries and agencies, (AIRBUS, CEA, CNES and SODIFRANCE). This project has two main goals: to develop reliable Model Driven Engineering (MDE) components and to build bridges with Domain Specific Languages (DSL). CNES participates in this project through a case study on the reliable design of operational procedures and associated applications. There are two main objectives for this case study: the first to improve "offline" interoperability with the possibility to build import/export tools for any scripting procedure language by using meta-modeling technology. The second is to improve efficiency for the production, validation, and execution of scripting procedures using operational specifications. It is anticipated that this will result in a reduction of costs and reliability improvement.

  4. Weaving time into system architecture: satellite cost per operational day and optimal design lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Joseph H.; Hastings, Daniel E.; Newman, Dava J.

    2004-03-01

    An augmented perspective on system architecture is proposed (diachronic) that complements the traditional views on system architecture (synchronic). This paper proposes to view in a system architecture the flow of service (or utility) that the system will provide over its design lifetime. It suggests that the design lifetime is a fundamental component of system architecture although one cannot see it or touch it. Consequently, cost, utility, and value per unit time metrics are introduced. A framework is then developed that identifies optimal design lifetimes for complex systems in general, and space systems in particular, based on this augmented perspective of system architecture and on these metrics. It is found that an optimal design lifetime for a satellite exists, even in the case of constant expected revenues per day over the system's lifetime, and that it changes substantially with the expected Time to Obsolescence of the system and the volatility of the market the system is serving in the case of a commercial venture. The analysis thus proves that it is essential for a system architect to match the design lifetime with the dynamical characteristics of the environment the system is/will be operating in. It is also shown that as the uncertainty in the dynamical characteristics of the environment the system is operating in increases, the value of having the option to upgrade, modify, or extend the lifetime of a system at a later point in time increases depending on how events unfold.

  5. Enhanced methods for determining operational capabilities and support costs of proposed space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebeling, Charles

    1993-01-01

    This report documents the work accomplished during the first two years of research to provide support to NASA in predicting operational and support parameters and costs of proposed space systems. The first year's research developed a methodology for deriving reliability and maintainability (R & M) parameters based upon the use of regression analysis to establish empirical relationships between performance and design specifications and corresponding mean times of failure and repair. The second year focused on enhancements to the methodology, increased scope of the model, and software improvements. This follow-on effort expands the prediction of R & M parameters and their effect on the operations and support of space transportation vehicles to include other system components such as booster rockets and external fuel tanks. It also increases the scope of the methodology and the capabilities of the model as implemented by the software. The focus is on the failure and repair of major subsystems and their impact on vehicle reliability, turn times, maintenance manpower, and repairable spares requirements. The report documents the data utilized in this study, outlines the general methodology for estimating and relating R&M parameters, presents the analyses and results of application to the initial data base, and describes the implementation of the methodology through the use of a computer model. The report concludes with a discussion on validation and a summary of the research findings and results.

  6. The application of additive technologies in creation a medical simulator-trainer of the human head operating field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashapov, L. N.; Kashapov, N. F.; Kashapov, R. N.; Pashaev, B. Y.

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the work was to determine the possible application of additive manufacturing technology during the manufacturing process as close as possible to reality of medical simulator-trainers. In work were used some additive manufacturing technologies: selective laser sintering (SLS), fused deposition modeling (FDM), binder Jetting. As a result, a prototype of simulator-trainer of the human head operating field, which based on the CT real patient, was manufactured and conducted its tests. It was found that structure, which is obtained with the use of 3D-printers ProJet 160, most appropriate and closest to the real properties of the bone.

  7. First- and Second-Line Bevacizumab in Addition to Chemotherapy for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: A United States–Based Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Daniel A.; Chen, Qiushi; Ayer, Turgay; Howard, David H.; Lipscomb, Joseph; El-Rayes, Bassel F.; Flowers, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The addition of bevacizumab to fluorouracil-based chemotherapy is a standard of care for previously untreated metastatic colorectal cancer. Continuation of bevacizumab beyond progression is an accepted standard of care based on a 1.4-month increase in median overall survival observed in a randomized trial. No United States–based cost-effectiveness modeling analyses are currently available addressing the use of bevacizumab in metastatic colorectal cancer. Our objective was to determine the cost effectiveness of bevacizumab in the first-line setting and when continued beyond progression from the perspective of US payers. Methods We developed two Markov models to compare the cost and effectiveness of fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin with or without bevacizumab in the first-line treatment and subsequent fluorouracil, leucovorin, and irinotecan with or without bevacizumab in the second-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Model robustness was addressed by univariable and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Health outcomes were measured in life-years and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). Results Using bevacizumab in first-line therapy provided an additional 0.10 QALYs (0.14 life-years) at a cost of $59,361. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was $571,240 per QALY. Continuing bevacizumab beyond progression provided an additional 0.11 QALYs (0.16 life-years) at a cost of $39,209. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was $364,083 per QALY. In univariable sensitivity analyses, the variables with the greatest influence on the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio were bevacizumab cost, overall survival, and utility. Conclusion Bevacizumab provides minimal incremental benefit at high incremental cost per QALY in both the first- and second-line settings of metastatic colorectal cancer treatment. PMID:25691669

  8. 42 CFR 412.62 - Federal rates for inpatient operating costs for fiscal year 1984.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... services for each hospital in the data base for the most recent cost reporting period for which data are... of hospital costs industry-wide between the cost reporting period used under paragraph (b) of this...) Adjusting for area variations in hospital wage levels; and (4) Adjusting for the effects of a higher cost...

  9. Wind Power Impacts on Electric Power System Operating Costs: Summary and Perspective on Work to Date; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J. C.; DeMeo, E. A.; Parsons, B.; Milligan, M.

    2004-03-01

    Electric utility system planners and operators are concerned that variations in wind plant output may increase the operating costs of the system. This concern arises because the system must maintain an instantaneous balance between the aggregate demand for electric power and the total power generated by all power plants feeding the system. This is a highly sophisticated task that utility operators and automatic controls perform routinely, based on well-known operating characteristics for conventional power plants and a great deal of experience accumulated over many years. System operators are concerned that variations in wind plant output will force the conventional power plants to provide compensating variations to maintain system balance, thus causing the conventional power plants to deviate from operating points chosen to minimize the total cost of operating the system. The operators' concerns are compounded by the fact that conventional power plants are generally under their control and thus are dispatchable, whereas wind plants are controlled instead by nature. Although these are valid concerns, the key issue is not whether a system with a significant amount of wind capacity can be operated reliably, but rather to what extent the system operating costs are increased by the variability of the wind.

  10. Cost Quality Management Assessment for the Idaho Operations Office. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The Office of Engineering and Cost Management (EM-24) conducted a Cost Quality Management Assessment of EM-30 and EM-40 activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory on Feb. 3--19, 1992 (Round I). The CQMA team assessed the cost and cost-related management activities at INEL. The Round II CQMA, conducted at INEL Sept. 19--29, 1994, reviewed EM-30, EM-40, EM-50, and EM-60 cost and cost-related management practices against performance objectives and criteria. Round II did not address indirect cost analysis. INEL has made measurable progress since Round I.

  11. Municipal wastewater treatment by biofiltration: comparisons of various treatment layouts. Part 2: assessment of the operating costs in optimal conditions.

    PubMed

    Rocher, Vincent; Paffoni, Catherine; Gonçalves, Alexandre; Azimi, Sam; Pauss, André

    2012-01-01

    This work aims to compare the operation costs (energy, reagents, waste management) for the three layouts usually used in wastewater treatment plants incorporating biofilters, using technical and economical data acquired during 10 years of operation of a Parisian plant (Seine Centre, 240,000 m(3) d(-1) -800,000 equivalent inhabitants). The final objective is to establish general economical data and tendencies that can be translated from our study to any biofiltration plant. Our results evidenced the savings achieved through the treatment process combining upstream and downstream denitrification. To use this layout reduced the operating costs by some 10% as compared with conventional processing only comprising downstream denitrification. Operating costs were respectively estimated at 37 and 34 €/1,000 m(3) for downstream denitrification and combining upstream and downstream denitrification layouts. PMID:22508137

  12. Möbius operators and non-additive quantum probabilities in the Birkhoff-von Neumann lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vourdas, A.

    2016-03-01

    The properties of quantum probabilities are linked to the geometry of quantum mechanics, described by the Birkhoff-von Neumann lattice. Quantum probabilities violate the additivity property of Kolmogorov probabilities, and they are interpreted as Dempster-Shafer probabilities. Deviations from the additivity property are quantified with the Möbius (or non-additivity) operators which are defined through Möbius transforms, and which are shown to be intimately related to commutators. The lack of distributivity in the Birkhoff-von Neumann lattice Λd, causes deviations from the law of the total probability (which is central in Kolmogorov's probability theory). Projectors which quantify the lack of distributivity in Λd, and also deviations from the law of the total probability, are introduced. All these operators, are observables and they can be measured experimentally. Constraints for the Möbius operators, which are based on the properties of the Birkhoff-von Neumann lattice (which in the case of finite quantum systems is a modular lattice), are derived. Application of this formalism in the context of coherent states, generalizes coherence to multi-dimensional structures.

  13. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  14. Suggestions for the refurbishment of a Greek lignite-fired power plant -- Efficiency, costs, and operation aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Stamatelopoulos, G.N.; Kakaras, E.K.; Bergeles, G.; Georgoulis, L.

    1998-07-01

    The present paper outlines measures for the refurbishment of the Greek lignite-fired power plant Kardia and discusses their impact on the efficiency, the electricity generation costs and the operation of the plant. The power plants Kardia III and IV with an installed capacity of 300 NW{sub el} each were constructed in the late 70's in Northern Greece and still operate as base load units for the Public Power Corporation (PPC) of Greece. Several problems are detected during the operation of these two units concerning high flue gas outlet temperature--and consequently low boiler efficiency, poor electrostatic precipitator performance, high slagging tendency, fluctuating temperature field resulting unstable steam temperatures and a high percentage of leakage air. To improve the current situation PPC in collaboration with the National Technical University of Athens (NTUA) conducted a feasibility study to set the priorities and to select the most suitable measures for the refurbishment of these two units. Taking advantage of the international experience, the possible measures applicable in the case of brown coal fired units upgrade were collected, categorized and presented to PPC's management. The proposed measures were evaluated for the specific case of Kardia and then it was decided to further examine the following actions: Sealing of the boiler in order to minimize the amount of the leakage air, extension of the economizer followed by the replacement of one bled steam feed water preheater aiming at the decrease of the flue gas outlet temperature and optimization of the soot blowers operation. For these actions and using the process simulation program ENBIPRO, the expected benefits in terms of efficiency as well as the dimensions of the necessary additional heating surface and the influence of the rearrangement of the heating surfaces in the boiler on the water/steam cycle were calculated. The costs of the suggested actions were estimated together with the time frame

  15. Feasibility study of an Integrated Program for Aerospace-vehicle Design (IPAD) system. Volume 6: Implementation schedule, development costs, operational costs, benefit assessment, impact on company organization, spin-off assessment, phase 1, tasks 3 to 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrocq, C. A.; Hurley, M. J.; Dublin, M.

    1973-01-01

    A baseline implementation plan, including alternative implementation approaches for critical software elements and variants to the plan, was developed. The basic philosophy was aimed at: (1) a progressive release of capability for three major computing systems, (2) an end product that was a working tool, (3) giving participation to industry, government agencies, and universities, and (4) emphasizing the development of critical elements of the IPAD framework software. The results of these tasks indicate an IPAD first release capability 45 months after go-ahead, a five year total implementation schedule, and a total developmental cost of 2027 man-months and 1074 computer hours. Several areas of operational cost increases were identified mainly due to the impact of additional equipment needed and additional computer overhead. The benefits of an IPAD system were related mainly to potential savings in engineering man-hours, reduction of design-cycle calendar time, and indirect upgrading of product quality and performance.

  16. FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING, AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael D. Durham

    2005-03-17

    Brayton Point Unit 1 was successfully tested for applicability of activated carbon injection as a mercury control technology. Test results from this site have enabled a thorough evaluation of the impacts of future mercury regulations to Brayton Point Unit 1, including performance, estimated cost, and operation data. This unit has variable (29-75%) native mercury removal, thus it was important to understand the impacts of process variables and activated carbon on mercury capture. The team responsible for executing this program included: (1) Plant and PG&E National Energy Group corporate personnel; (2) Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); (3) United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL); (4) ADA-ES, Inc.; (5) NORIT Americas, Inc.; (6) Apogee Scientific, Inc.; (7) TRC Environmental Corporation; (8) URS Corporation; (9) Quinapoxet Solutions; (10) Energy and Environmental Strategies (EES); and (11) Reaction Engineering International (REI). The technical support of all of these entities came together to make this program achieve its goals. Overall, the objectives of this field test program were to determine the impact of activated carbon injection on mercury control and balance-of-plant processes on Brayton Point Unit 1. Brayton Point Unit 1 is a 250-MW unit that fires a low-sulfur eastern bituminous coal. Particulate control is achieved by two electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) in series. The full-scale tests were conducted on one-half of the flue gas stream (nominally 125 MW). Mercury control sorbents were injected in between the two ESPs. The residence time from the injection grid to the second ESP was approximately 0.5 seconds. In preparation for the full-scale tests, 12 different sorbents were evaluated in a slipstream of flue gas via a packed-bed field test apparatus for mercury adsorption. Results from these tests were used to determine the five carbon-based sorbents that were tested at full-scale. Conditions of interest

  17. Protecting child health and nutrition status with ready-to-use food in addition to food assistance in urban Chad: a cost-effectiveness analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite growing interest in use of lipid nutrient supplements for preventing child malnutrition and morbidity, there is inconclusive evidence on the effectiveness, and no evidence on the cost-effectiveness of this strategy. Methods A cost effectiveness analysis was conducted comparing costs and outcomes of two arms of a cluster randomized controlled trial implemented in eastern Chad during the 2010 hunger gap by Action contre la Faim France and Ghent University. This trial assessed the effect on child malnutrition and morbidity of a 5-month general distribution of staple rations, or staple rations plus a ready-to-use supplementary food (RUSF). RUSF was distributed to households with a child aged 6–36 months who was not acutely malnourished (weight-for-height > = 80% of the NCHS reference median, and absence of bilateral pitting edema), to prevent acute malnutrition in these children. While the addition of RUSF to a staple ration did not result in significant reduction in wasting rates, cost-effectiveness was assessed using successful secondary outcomes of cases of diarrhea and anemia (hemoglobin <110 g/L) averted among children receiving RUSF. Total costs of the program and incremental costs of RUSF and related management and logistics were estimated using accounting records and key informant interviews, and include costs to institutions and communities. An activity-based costing methodology was applied and incremental costs were calculated per episode of diarrhea and case of anemia averted. Results Adding RUSF to a general food distribution increased total costs by 23%, resulting in an additional cost per child of 374 EUR, and an incremental cost per episode of diarrhea averted of 1,083 EUR and per case of anemia averted of 3,627 EUR. Conclusions Adding RUSF to a staple ration was less cost-effective than other standard intervention options for averting diarrhea and anemia. This strategy holds potential to address a broad array of health and

  18. 42 CFR 412.71 - Determination of base-year inpatient operating costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ....130 of this chapter. (3) Kidney acquisition costs incurred by hospitals approved as renal transplantation centers as described in § 412.100. Kidney acquisition costs in the base year will be determined by multiplying the hospital's average kidney acquisition cost per kidney times the number of kidney...

  19. 42 CFR 412.71 - Determination of base-year inpatient operating costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ....130 of this chapter. (3) Kidney acquisition costs incurred by hospitals approved as renal transplantation centers as described in § 412.100. Kidney acquisition costs in the base year will be determined by multiplying the hospital's average kidney acquisition cost per kidney times the number of kidney...

  20. 42 CFR 412.71 - Determination of base-year inpatient operating costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ....130 of this chapter. (3) Kidney acquisition costs incurred by hospitals approved as renal transplantation centers as described in § 412.100. Kidney acquisition costs in the base year will be determined by multiplying the hospital's average kidney acquisition cost per kidney times the number of kidney...

  1. Optimization of PHEV Power Split Gear Ratio to Minimize Fuel Consumption and Operation Cost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanhe

    A Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) is a vehicle powered by a combination of an internal combustion engine and an electric motor with a battery pack. The battery pack can be charged by plugging the vehicle to the electric grid and from using excess engine power. The research activity performed in this thesis focused on the development of an innovative optimization approach of PHEV Power Split Device (PSD) gear ratio with the aim to minimize the vehicle operation costs. Three research activity lines have been followed: • Activity 1: The PHEV control strategy optimization by using the Dynamic Programming (DP) and the development of PHEV rule-based control strategy based on the DP results. • Activity 2: The PHEV rule-based control strategy parameter optimization by using the Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm (NSGA-II). • Activity 3: The comprehensive analysis of the single mode PHEV architecture to offer the innovative approach to optimize the PHEV PSD gear ratio.

  2. Portable, battery-operated, low-cost, bright field and fluorescence microscope.

    PubMed

    Miller, Andrew R; Davis, Gregory L; Oden, Z Maria; Razavi, Mohamad Reza; Fateh, Abolfazl; Ghazanfari, Morteza; Abdolrahimi, Farid; Poorazar, Shahin; Sakhaie, Fatemeh; Olsen, Randall J; Bahrmand, Ahmad Reza; Pierce, Mark C; Graviss, Edward A; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    This study describes the design and evaluation of a portable bright-field and fluorescence microscope that can be manufactured for $240 USD. The microscope uses a battery-operated LED-based flashlight as the light source and achieves a resolution of 0.8 microm at 1000x magnification in fluorescence mode. We tested the diagnostic capability of this new instrument to identify infections caused by the human pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Sixty-four direct, decontaminated, and serially diluted smears were prepared from sputa obtained from 19 patients suspected to have M. tuberculosis infection. Slides were stained with auramine orange and evaluated as being positive or negative for M. tuberculosis with both the new portable fluorescence microscope and a laboratory grade fluorescence microscope. Concordant results were obtained in 98.4% of cases. This highly portable, low cost, fluorescence microscope may be a useful diagnostic tool to expand the availability of M. tuberculosis testing at the point-of-care in low resource settings. PMID:20694194

  3. Data Collection for Current U.S. Wind Energy Projects: Component Costs, Financing, Operations, and Maintenance; January 2011 - September 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Martin-Tretton, M.; Reha, M.; Drunsic, M.; Keim, M.

    2012-01-01

    DNV Renewables (USA) Inc. (DNV) used an Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Cost Model to evaluate ten distinct cost scenarios encountered under variations in wind turbine component failure rates. The analysis considers: (1) a Reference Scenario using the default part failure rates within the O&M Cost Model, (2) High Failure Rate Scenarios that increase the failure rates of three major components (blades, gearboxes, and generators) individually, (3) 100% Replacement Scenarios that model full replacement of these components over a 20 year operating life, and (4) Serial Failure Scenarios that model full replacement of blades, gearboxes, and generators in years 4 to 6 of the wind project. DNV selected these scenarios to represent a broad range of possible operational experiences. Also in this report, DNV summarizes the predominant financing arrangements used to develop wind energy projects over the past several years and provides summary data on various financial metrics describing those arrangements.

  4. A series on optimizing satellite systems. I - Restoring interruptions of communications sattelite service: Logistical and cost comparisons of mature and newly operational systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, Marcellus S.

    1989-09-01

    A mathematical model is presented of costs and operational factors involved in provision for service interruptions of both a mature and typically large incumbent satellite system and of a smaller, more recently operational system. The equation expresses the required launch frequency for the new system as a function of the launch spacing of the mature system; the time disparity between the inauguration of the two systems; and the rate of capacity depreciation. In addition, a technique is presented to compare the relative extent to which the discounted costs of the new system exceed those of the mature system in furnishing the same effective capacity in orbit, and thus the same service liability, at a given point in time. It is determined that a mature incumbent communications satellite system, having more capacity in orbit, will on balance have a lower probability of service interruption than a newer, smaller system.

  5. A discounted-cost continuous-time flexible manufacturing and operator scheduling model solved by deconvexification over time

    SciTech Connect

    Eaves, B.C.; Rothblum, U.G.

    1990-08-01

    A discounted-cost, continuous-time, infinite-horizon version of a flexible manufacturing and operator scheduling model is solved. The solution procedure is to convexify the discrete operator-assignment constraints to obtain a linear program, and then to regain the discreteness and obtain an approximate manufacturing schedule by deconvexification of the solution of the linear program over time. The strong features of the model are the accommodation of linear inequality relations among the manufacturing activities and the discrete manufacturing scheduling, whereas the weak features are intra-period relaxation of inventory availability constraints, and the absence of inventory costs, setup times, and setup charges.

  6. Financial Quality Control of In-Patient Chemotherapy in Germany: Are Additional Payments Cost-Covering for Pharmaco-Oncological Expenses?

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Volker R.; Mallmann, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Cost-covering in-patient care is increasingly important for hospital providers in Germany, especially with regard to expensive oncological pharmaceuticals. Additional payments (Zusatzentgelte; ZE) on top of flat rate diagnose-related group (DRG) reimbursement can be claimed by hospitals for in-patient use of selected medications. To verify cost coverage of in-patient chemotherapies, the costs of medication were compared to their revenues. Method From January to June 2010, a retrospective cost-revenue study was performed at a German obstetrics/gynecology university clinic. The hospital's pharmacy list of inpatient oncological therapies for breast and gynecological cancer was checked for accuracy and compared with the documented ZEs and the costs and revenues for each oncological application. Results N = 45 in-patient oncological therapies were identified in n = 18 patients, as well as n = 7 bisphosphonate applications; n = 11 ZEs were documented. Costs for oncological medication were € 33,752. The corresponding ZE revenues amounted to only € 13,980, resulting in a loss of € 19,772. All in-patient oncological therapies performed were not cost-covering. Data discrepancy, incorrect documentation and cost attribution, and process aborts were identified. Conclusions Routine financial quality control at the medicine-pharmacy administration interface is implemented, with monthly comparison of costs and revenues, as well as admission status. Non-cost-covering therapies for in-patients should be converted to out-patient therapies. Necessary adjustments of clinic processes are made according to these results, to avoid future losses. PMID:21673822

  7. FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING, AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael D. Durham

    2003-05-01

    With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Mercury is known to have toxic effects on the nervous system of humans and wildlife. Although it exists only in trace amounts in coal, mercury is released when coal burns and can accumulate on land and in water. In water, bacteria transform the metal into methylmercury, the most hazardous form of the metal. Methylmercury can collect in fish and marine mammals in concentrations hundreds of thousands times higher than the levels in surrounding waters. One of the goals of DOE is to develop technologies by 2005 that will be capable of cutting mercury emissions 50 to 70 percent at well under one-half of today's costs. ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) is managing a project to test mercury control technologies at full scale at four different power plants from 2000--2003. The ADA-ES project is focused on those power plants that are not equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization systems. ADA-ES has developed a portable system that will be tested at four different utility power plants. Each of the plants is equipped with either electrostatic precipitators or fabric filters to remove solid particles from the plant's flue gas. ADA-ES's technology will inject a dry sorbent, such as activated carbon, which removes the mercury and makes it more susceptible to capture by the particulate control devices. A fine water mist may be sprayed into the flue gas to cool its temperature to the range where the dry sorbent is most effective. PG&E National Energy Group is providing two test sites that fire bituminous coals and both are equipped with electrostatic precipitators and carbon/ash separation systems. Wisconsin Electric Power Company is providing a third test site that burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and has an electrostatic

  8. System design study to reduce capital and operating costs and bench-scale testing of a circulating-bed AFB [atmospheric pressure fluidized bed] advanced concept: Phase 1, Design, cost estimate, and cost comparison for MWK circulating fluid bed combustor and oil-fired boilers: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sadhukhan, P.; Lin, Y.Y.; Hsiao, K.H.; Richards, S.R.; Wagner, C.; Settle, W.H.; Bryant, J.; Gorman, W.A.; Newlin, T.; Shires, P.J.; James, J.L.

    1986-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) issued an RFP for a "System Design Study to Reduce Capital and Operating Cost and Bench Scale Testing of a Circulating-Bed AFB Advanced Concept." The design and cost study of a 150,000 pounds per hour steam boiler comprised Phase-I of the RFP. The objective was to produce a design with improved performance and reduced capital and operating costs compared with conventional atmospheric pressure fluidized bed (AFB) boilers. The final result was a significant reduction of capital cost - 36% below the lowest AFB plant cost. The steam cost was 24% below the corresponding cost for the AFB process. In June 1985, DOE issued a Change Order (C001) to the Phase-I study in order for MWK to design and estimate the cost for a scaled-down coal-fired (Illinois No. 6, 3% S) CFBC plant producing low pressure and low temperature steam (75,000lbs/hr, 200 psig, 387{degree}F), and to compare the costs -capital and steam costs -with those for a packaged high sulfur (3%) fuel oil-fired boiler, which is of the same capacity and requires SO{sub 2} removal. An additional objective was to estimate the cost for a No. 2 fuel oil-fired boiler that does not need any SO{sub 2} scrubber. An evaluation of the sensitivity of the steam cost to the oil-fired boiler capital cost and to fuel prices was also to be undertaken. The cost of steam produced by the No. 6 fuel oil boiler is 52% higher than the cost for CFBC, and the corresponding cost for the No. 2 fuel oil plant is 43% higher. Again, a large advantage for the CFBC comes from the low price of coal relative to that of oil. The large cost advantage of steam calculated for the MWK CFBC using coal as a fuel over the oil-fired boilers would remain even in the worst case scenario of a declining oil price accompanied by a steady coal price. 7 refs., 25 figs., 34 tabs.

  9. Participatory operations model for cost-efficient monitoring and modeling of river basins--A systematic approach.

    PubMed

    Malve, Olli; Hjerppe, Turo; Tattari, Sirkka; Väisänen, Sari; Huttunen, Inese; Kotamäki, Niina; Kallio, Kari; Taskinen, Antti; Kauppila, Pirkko

    2016-01-01

    The worldwide economic downturn and the climate change in the beginning of 21st century have stressed the need for cost efficient and systematic operations model for the monitoring and management of surface waters. However, these processes are still all too fragmented and incapable to respond these challenges. For example in Finland, the estimation of the costs and benefits of planned management measures is insufficient. On this account, we present a new operations model to streamline these processes and to ensure the lucid decision making and the coherent implementation which facilitate the participation of public and all the involved stakeholders. The model was demonstrated in the real world management of a lake. The benefits, pitfalls and development needs were identified. After the demonstration, the operations model was put into operation and has been actively used in several other management projects throughout Finland. PMID:26184863

  10. EPA evaluation of the SYNERGY-1 fuel additive under Section 511 of the Motor Vehicle Information and Cost Savings Act. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Syria, S.L.

    1981-06-01

    This document announces the conclusions of the EPA evaluation of the 'SYNERGY-1' device under provisions of Section 511 of the Motor Vehicle Information and Cost Savings Act. This additive is intended to improve fuel economy and exhaust emission levels of two and four cycle gasoline fueled engines.

  11. Operating and life-cycle costs for uranium-contaminated soil treatment technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Douthat, D.M.; Armstrong, A.Q.; Stewart, R.N.

    1995-09-01

    The development of a nuclear industry in the US required mining, milling, and fabricating a large variety of uranium products. One of these products was purified uranium metal which was used in the Savannah River and Hanford Site reactors. Most of this feed material was produced at the US Department of Energy (DOE) facility formerly called the Feed Materials Production Center at Fernald, Ohio. During operation of this facility, soils became contaminated with uranium from a variety of sources. To avoid disposal of these soils in low-level radioactive waste burial sites, increasing emphasis has been placed on the remediating soils contaminated with uranium and other radionuclides. To address remediation and management of uranium-contaminated soils at sites owned by DOE, the DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD) evaluates and compares the versatility, efficiency, and economics of various technologies that may be combined into systems designed to characterize and remediate uranium-contaminated soils. Each technology must be able to (1) characterize the uranium in soil, (2) decontaminate or remove uranium from soil, (3) treat or dispose of resulting waste streams, (4) meet necessary state and federal regulations, and (5) meet performance assessment objectives. The role of the performance assessment objectives is to provide the information necessary to conduct evaluations of the technologies. These performance assessments provide the basis for selecting the optimum system for remediation of large areas contaminated with uranium. One of the performance assessment tasks is to address the economics of full-scale implementation of soil treatment technologies. The cost of treating contaminated soil is one of the criteria used in the decision-making process for selecting remedial alternatives.

  12. A Study of the Operating and Maintenance Costs in a Suburban School District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haugo, John; Mohrenweiser, Gary

    Two aspects of the operation and maintenance of the Suburban Park School District (SPSD) facilities are analyzed: (1) The allocation of funds to operation and maintenance, and (2) the individual custodial workloads. The maintenance and operation expenditures are divided into three categories (custodial salaries, operation expenditures above and…

  13. Coal unit trains: operations, maintenance, and technology. Volume 4. Costs and benefits of aluminum coal cars. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Boghani, A.B.

    1984-11-01

    This report examines the costs and benefits to a utility of acquiring aluminum coal cars. After discussing the history of aluminum car production, the report describes in detail the characteristics of several aluminum cars now in use, and the experience of railroads and utilities with them. The effects of acquiring aluminum cars instead of steel cars on the fuel cost, crew cost, maintenance-of-way cost, and car costs (capital and maintenance) are discussed. An illustrative example is given, in which the internal rate of return (IRR) and payback period of the extra investment made to acquire aluminum cars are calculated. A parametric analysis is performed to determine the sensitivity of IRR and payback period to the freight-rate discount for the aluminum car, the inflation rate, the purchase price of aluminum and steel cars, their maintenance costs, bad order ratios, car lives, salvage values, trip length, and car utilization. The study concludes that the aluminum cars can be an excellent investment, provided a reasonable freight-rate discount is obtained. The first cost of an aluminum car compared to that of a steel car, its estimated downtime, its estimated maintenance cost, and the anticipated degree of its utilization are also shown to significantly affect the attractiveness of the extra investment. In addition, the study reveals that some aluminum cars have proved more durable in service than others. Thus, the importance of a thorough evaluation of the design of the aluminum cars being offered is demonstrated. 11 references, 15 figures, 8 tables.

  14. Preliminary design and estimate of capital and operating costs for a production scale application of laser decontamination technology

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Ho-ming; Edelson, M.C.

    1994-08-06

    The application of laser ablation technology to the decontamination of radioactive metals, particularly the surfaces of equipment, is discussed. Included is information related to the design, capital and operating costs, and effectiveness of laser ablation technology, based on commercial excimer and Nd:YAG lasers, for the decontamination of production scale equipment.

  15. 42 CFR 412.79 - Determination of the hospital-specific rate for inpatient operating costs for Medicare-dependent...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Determination of the hospital-specific rate for inpatient operating costs for Medicare-dependent, small rural hospitals based on a Federal fiscal year 2002 base period. 412.79 Section 412.79 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  16. 24 CFR 401.412 - Adjustment of rents based on operating cost adjustment factor (OCAF) or budget.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adjustment of rents based on operating cost adjustment factor (OCAF) or budget. 401.412 Section 401.412 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF HOUSING AND OFFICE OF MULTIFAMILY HOUSING ASSISTANCE...

  17. 42 CFR 412.78 - Determination of the hospital-specific rate for inpatient operating costs for sole community...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Determination of the hospital-specific rate for inpatient operating costs for sole community hospitals based on a Federal fiscal year 2006 base period. 412.78 Section 412.78 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM...

  18. 42 CFR 412.79 - Determination of the hospital-specific rate for inpatient operating costs for Medicare-dependent...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Determination of the hospital-specific rate for inpatient operating costs for Medicare-dependent, small rural hospitals based on a Federal fiscal year 2002 base period. 412.79 Section 412.79 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  19. 42 CFR 412.78 - Determination of the hospital-specific rate for inpatient operating costs for sole community...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Determination of the hospital-specific rate for inpatient operating costs for sole community hospitals based on a Federal fiscal year 2006 base period. 412.78 Section 412.78 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM...

  20. 41 CFR 102-33.190 - What are the aircraft operations and ownership costs for which we must account?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What are the aircraft operations and ownership costs for which we must account? 102-33.190 Section 102-33.190 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT...

  1. 41 CFR 102-33.190 - What are the aircraft operations and ownership costs for which we must account?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What are the aircraft operations and ownership costs for which we must account? 102-33.190 Section 102-33.190 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 33-MANAGEMENT...

  2. 24 CFR 401.412 - Adjustment of rents based on operating cost adjustment factor (OCAF) or budget.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HOUSING ASSISTANCE RESTRUCTURING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MULTIFAMILY HOUSING MORTGAGE AND HOUSING ASSISTANCE RESTRUCTURING PROGRAM (MARK-TO-MARKET) Restructuring Plan § 401.412 Adjustment of rents based on operating cost adjustment factor (OCAF) or budget. (a) OCAF. (1) The...

  3. Contracted versus District-Operated Pupil Transportation Programs: An Analysis of Cost and Program Differences. Report 96-04.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Legislature, Boise. Office of Performance Evaluation.

    In June 1995, the Idaho Joint Legislative Oversight Committee directed the Office of Performance Evaluations to conduct an evaluation of school district pupil transportation. This report, the last in a series of four, examines the apparent cost difference between district-operated transportation programs and those that are contracted to…

  4. 42 CFR 412.64 - Federal rates for inpatient operating costs for Federal fiscal year 2005 and subsequent fiscal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Federal rates for inpatient operating costs for Federal fiscal year 2005 and subsequent fiscal years. 412.64 Section 412.64 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL...

  5. How School Facilities Managers and Business Officials Are Reducing Operating Costs and Saving Money. Energy-Smart Building Choices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC.

    This guide addresses contributions that school facility administrators and business officials can make in an effort to reduce operating costs and free up money for capital improvements. The guide explores opportunities available to utilize energy-saving strategies at any stage in a building's life, from its initial design phase through renovation.…

  6. 19 CFR 10.197 - Direct costs of processing operations performed in a beneficiary country or countries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Direct costs of processing operations performed in a beneficiary country or countries. 10.197 Section 10.197 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. Caribbean...

  7. Cost related sensitivity analysis for optimal operation of a grid-parallel PEM fuel cell power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sharkh, M. Y.; Tanrioven, M.; Rahman, A.; Alam, M. S.

    Fuel cell power plants (FCPP) as a combined source of heat, power and hydrogen (CHP&H) can be considered as a potential option to supply both thermal and electrical loads. Hydrogen produced from the FCPP can be stored for future use of the FCPP or can be sold for profit. In such a system, tariff rates for purchasing or selling electricity, the fuel cost for the FCPP/thermal load, and hydrogen selling price are the main factors that affect the operational strategy. This paper presents a hybrid evolutionary programming and Hill-Climbing based approach to evaluate the impact of change of the above mentioned cost parameters on the optimal operational strategy of the FCPP. The optimal operational strategy of the FCPP for different tariffs is achieved through the estimation of the following: hourly generated power, the amount of thermal power recovered, power trade with the local grid, and the quantity of hydrogen that can be produced. Results show the importance of optimizing system cost parameters in order to minimize overall operating cost.

  8. The Cost Efficiency Impact of the University Operation Fund on Public Universities in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuo, Jenn-Shyong; Ho, Yi-Cheng

    2008-01-01

    This study uses the stochastic frontier multiple-product cost function that is modeled after Battese and Coelli [Battese, G. E., & Coelli, T. J. (1995). "A model for technical inefficiency effects in a stochastic frontier production for panel data." "Empirical Economics" 20(2), 325-332.] in order to empirically measure the cost efficiency of the…

  9. 76 FR 66319 - Notice of Certain Operating Cost Adjustment Factors for 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ... (75 FR 68616). Specifically, OCAFs are calculated as the sum of weighted average cost changes for..., natural gas, and water/sewer/trash using publicly available indices. The weights used in the OCAF..., insurance, property taxes, and water/sewer/trash costs are only available at the national level. The...

  10. 78 FR 56911 - Notice of Certain Operating Cost Adjustment Factors for 2014

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-16

    ... (77 FR 63324). Specifically, OCAFs are calculated as the sum of weighted average cost changes for..., natural gas, and water/sewer/trash using publicly available indices. The weights used in the OCAF..., insurance, property taxes, and water/sewer/trash costs are only available at the national level. The...

  11. 19 CFR 10.178 - Direct costs of processing operations performed in the beneficiary developing country.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... assembly of the specific merchandise, including fringe benefits, on-the-job training, and the cost of engineering, supervisory, quality control, and similar personnel; (2) Dies, molds, tooling, and depreciation..., design, engineering, and blueprint costs insofar as they are allocable to the specific merchandise;...

  12. 19 CFR 10.178 - Direct costs of processing operations performed in the beneficiary developing country.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... assembly of the specific merchandise, including fringe benefits, on-the-job training, and the cost of engineering, supervisory, quality control, and similar personnel; (2) Dies, molds, tooling, and depreciation..., design, engineering, and blueprint costs insofar as they are allocable to the specific merchandise;...

  13. A decision model and cost analysis of intra-operative cell salvage during hepatic resection

    PubMed Central

    Lemke, Madeline; Eeson, Gareth; Lin, Yulia; Tarshis, Jordan; Hallet, Julie; Coburn, Natalie; Law, Calvin; Karanicolas, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Intraoperative cell salvage (ICS) can reduce allogeneic transfusions but with notable direct costs. This study assessed whether routine use of ICS is cost minimizing in hepatectomy and defines a subpopulation of patients where ICS is most cost minimizing based on patient transfusion risk. Methods A decision model from a health systems perspective was developed to examine adoption and non-adoption of ICS use for hepatectomy. A prospectively maintained database of hepatectomy patients provided data to populate the model. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis was used to determine the probability of ICS being cost-minimizing at specified transfusion risks. One-way sensitivity analysis was used to identify factors most relevant to institutions considering adoption of ICS for hepatectomies. Results In the base case analysis (transfusion risk of 28.8%) the probability that routine utilization of ICS is cost-minimizing is 64%. The probability that ICS is cost-minimizing exceeds 50% if the patient transfusion risk exceeds 25%. The model was most sensitive to patient transfusion risk, variation in costs of allogeneic blood, and number of appropriate cases the device could be used for. Conclusions ICS is cost-minimizing for routine use in liver resection, particularly when used for patients with a risk of transfusion of 25% or greater. PMID:27154806

  14. Energy-efficient evaporators can cut operating costs for wastewater treatment, reuse

    SciTech Connect

    Kersey, D.

    1996-05-01

    High-efficiency evaporators can substantially lower the costs of recycling water, separating and reducing waste, and reclaiming industrial byproducts. Although capital costs run higher than conventional, stream-driven systems, energy efficient designs can allow users to recoup those costs over time and provide significant, ongoing utility savings. This is especially true in applications in which evaporation requirements are more than 75,000 pounds per hour, and steam costs exceed $3 per 1,000 pounds. In conventional, multistage evaporators, vapor resulting from wastewater evaporation is reused as a heating agent to effect further evaporation, but fresh steam must be added continuously to the system to maintain adequate temperature and pressure--two factors critical to evaporation. In contrast, three energy-efficient designs maintain temperature and pressure by recycling otherwise wasted resources, thereby greatly reducing or eliminating steam costs and other utility expenses.

  15. Trends in workers compensation costs in a hotel-operating company over a six-year period.

    PubMed

    Kelley, C R; Mark, C R

    1995-03-01

    A large Honolulu-based hotel-operating company reviewed its workers compensation costs over the last 6 years. Data retrieved from the company's computerized data base is used to describe trends in injury incidence rate, average cost per claim, average medical cost per claim, and medical expenses as a percentage of total costs. Factors that might have influenced these parameters include company reorganization, employee training and safety programs, changes in the economy, company morale, aggressive case management, and the quality of the adjusting services hired. Cause-and-effect relationships, although suggested, cannot be proven. The data is presented, in this year of imminent workers compensation legislative reform, to increase the available factual data base on which rational and efficacious reform proposals can be developed. PMID:7737859

  16. The Costs of Operative Complications for Ankle Fractures: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Avilucea, Frank R.; Greenberg, Sarah E.; Grantham, W. Jeffrey; Sathiyakumar, Vasanth; Thakore, Rachel V.; Nwosu, Samuel K.; Archer, Kristin R.; Obremskey, William T.; Mir, Hassan R.; Sethi, Manish K.

    2014-01-01

    As our healthcare system moves towards bundling payments, it is vital to understand the potential financial implications associated with treatment of surgical complications. Considering that surgical treatment of ankle fractures is common, there remains minimal data relating costs to postsurgical intervention. We aimed to identify costs associated with ankle fracture complications through case-control analysis. Using retrospective analysis at a level I trauma center, 28 patients with isolated ankle fractures who developed complications (cases) were matched with 28 isolated ankle fracture patients without complications (controls) based on ASA score, age, surgery type, and fracture type. Patient charts were reviewed for demographics and complications leading to readmission/reoperation and costs were obtained from the financial department. Wilcoxon tests measured differences in the costs between the cases and controls. 28 out of 439 patients (6.4%) developed complications. Length of stay and median costs were significantly higher for cases than controls. Specifically, differences in total costs existed for infection and hardware-related pain. This is the first study to highlight the considerable costs associated with the treatment of complications due to isolated ankle fractures. Physicians must therefore emphasize methods to control surgical and nonsurgical factors that may impact postoperative complications, especially under a global payment system. PMID:25525521

  17. Additive manufacturing of liquid/gas diffusion layers for low-cost and high-efficiency hydrogen production

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mo, Jingke; Zhang, Feng -Yuan; Dehoff, Ryan R.; Peter, William H.; Toops, Todd J.; Green, Jr., Johney Boyd

    2016-01-14

    The electron beam melting (EBM) additive manufacturing technology was used to fabricate titanium liquid/gas diffusion media with high-corrosion resistances and well-controllable multifunctional parameters, including two-phase transport and excellent electric/thermal conductivities, has been first demonstrated. Their applications in proton exchange membrane eletrolyzer cells have been explored in-situ in a cell and characterized ex-situ with SEM and XRD. Compared with the conventional woven liquid/gas diffusion layers (LGDLs), much better performance with EBM fabricated LGDLs is obtained due to their significant reduction of ohmic loss. The EBM technology components exhibited several distinguished advantages in fabricating gas diffusion layer: well-controllable pore morphology and structure,more » rapid prototyping, fast manufacturing, highly customizing and economic. In addition, by taking advantage of additive manufacturing, it possible to fabricate complicated three-dimensional designs of virtually any shape from a digital model into one single solid object faster, cheaper and easier, especially for titanium. More importantly, this development will provide LGDLs with control of pore size, pore shape, pore distribution, and therefore porosity and permeability, which will be very valuable to develop modeling and to validate simulations of electrolyzers with optimal and repeatable performance. Further, it will lead to a manufacturing solution to greatly simplify the PEMEC/fuel cell components and to couple the LGDLs with other parts, since they can be easily integrated together with this advanced manufacturing process« less

  18. 19 CFR 10.178 - Direct costs of processing operations performed in the beneficiary developing country.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... assembly of the specific merchandise, including fringe benefits, on-the-job training, and the cost of... under consideration or are not “costs” of manufacturing the product. These include, but are not...

  19. FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING, AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael D. Durham

    2004-10-01

    PG&E NEG Salem Harbor Station Unit 1 was successfully tested for applicability of activated carbon injection as a mercury control technology. Test results from this site have enabled a thorough evaluation of mercury control at Salem Harbor Unit 1, including performance, estimated cost, and operation data. This unit has very high native mercury removal, thus it was important to understand the impacts of process variables on native mercury capture. The team responsible for executing this program included plant and PG&E headquarters personnel, EPRI and several of its member companies, DOE, ADA, Norit Americas, Inc., Hamon Research-Cottrell, Apogee Scientific, TRC Environmental Corporation, Reaction Engineering, as well as other laboratories. The technical support of all of these entities came together to make this program achieve its goals. Overall the objectives of this field test program were to determine the mercury control and balance-of-plant impacts resulting from activated carbon injection into a full-scale ESP on Salem Harbor Unit 1, a low sulfur bituminous-coal-fired 86 MW unit. It was also important to understand the impacts of process variables on native mercury removal (>85%). One half of the gas stream was used for these tests, or 43 MWe. Activated carbon, DARCO FGD supplied by NORIT Americas, was injected upstream of the cold side ESP, just downstream of the air preheater. This allowed for approximately 1.5 seconds residence time in the duct before entering the ESP. Conditions tested in this field evaluation included the impacts of the Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) system on mercury capture, of unburned carbon in the fly ash, of adjusting ESP inlet flue gas temperatures, and of boiler load on mercury control. The field evaluation conducted at Salem Harbor looked at several sorbent injection concentrations at several flue gas temperatures. It was noted that at the mid temperature range of 322-327 F, the LOI (unburned carbon) lost some of its

  20. Cost of Quality (CoQ) metrics for telescope operations and project management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radziwill, Nicole M.

    2006-06-01

    This study describes the goals, foundational work, and early returns associated with establishing a pilot quality cost program at the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). Quality costs provide a means to communicate the results of process improvement efforts in the universal language of project management: money. This scheme stratifies prevention, appraisal, internal failure and external failure costs, and seeks to quantify and compare the up-front investment in planning and risk management versus the cost of rework. An activity-based Cost of Quality (CoQ) model was blended with the Cost of Software Quality (CoSQ) model that has been successfully deployed at Raytheon Electronic Systems (RES) for this pilot program, analyzing the efforts of the GBT Software Development Division. Using this model, questions that can now be answered include: What is an appropriate length for our development cycle? Are some observing modes more reliable than others? Are we testing too much, or not enough? How good is our software quality, not in terms of defects reported and fixed, but in terms of its impact on the user? The ultimate goal is to provide a higher quality of service to customers of the telescope.

  1. 14 CFR 61.321 - How do I obtain privileges to operate an additional category or class of light-sport aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... additional category or class of light-sport aircraft? 61.321 Section 61.321 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Sport Pilots § 61.321 How do I obtain privileges to operate an additional category or class of light-sport aircraft? If you hold a sport pilot certificate and seek to operate...

  2. 14 CFR 61.321 - How do I obtain privileges to operate an additional category or class of light-sport aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... additional category or class of light-sport aircraft? 61.321 Section 61.321 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Sport Pilots § 61.321 How do I obtain privileges to operate an additional category or class of light-sport aircraft? If you hold a sport pilot certificate and seek to operate...

  3. 14 CFR 61.321 - How do I obtain privileges to operate an additional category or class of light-sport aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... additional category or class of light-sport aircraft? 61.321 Section 61.321 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Sport Pilots § 61.321 How do I obtain privileges to operate an additional category or class of light-sport aircraft? If you hold a sport pilot certificate and seek to operate...

  4. 14 CFR 61.321 - How do I obtain privileges to operate an additional category or class of light-sport aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... additional category or class of light-sport aircraft? 61.321 Section 61.321 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Sport Pilots § 61.321 How do I obtain privileges to operate an additional category or class of light-sport aircraft? If you hold a sport pilot certificate and seek to operate...

  5. 14 CFR 61.321 - How do I obtain privileges to operate an additional category or class of light-sport aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... additional category or class of light-sport aircraft? 61.321 Section 61.321 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Sport Pilots § 61.321 How do I obtain privileges to operate an additional category or class of light-sport aircraft? If you hold a sport pilot certificate and seek to operate...

  6. Neural Correlates of Task Cost for Stance Control with an Additional Motor Task: Phase-Locked Electroencephalogram Responses

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Ing-Shiou; Huang, Cheng-Ya

    2016-01-01

    With appropriate reallocation of central resources, the ability to maintain an erect posture is not necessarily degraded by a concurrent motor task. This study investigated the neural control of a particular postural-suprapostural procedure involving brain mechanisms to solve crosstalk between posture and motor subtasks. Participants completed a single posture task and a dual-task while concurrently conducting force-matching and maintaining a tilted stabilometer stance at a target angle. Stabilometer movements and event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded. The added force-matching task increased the irregularity of postural response rather than the size of postural response prior to force-matching. In addition, the added force-matching task during stabilometer stance led to marked topographic ERP modulation, with greater P2 positivity in the frontal and sensorimotor-parietal areas of the N1-P2 transitional phase and in the sensorimotor-parietal area of the late P2 phase. The time-frequency distribution of the ERP primary principal component revealed that the dual-task condition manifested more pronounced delta (1–4 Hz) and beta (13–35 Hz) synchronizations but suppressed theta activity (4–8 Hz) before force-matching. The dual-task condition also manifested coherent fronto-parietal delta activity in the P2 period. In addition to a decrease in postural regularity, this study reveals spatio-temporal and temporal-spectral reorganizations of ERPs in the fronto-sensorimotor-parietal network due to the added suprapostural motor task. For a particular set of postural-suprapostural task, the behavior and neural data suggest a facilitatory role of autonomous postural response and central resource expansion with increasing interregional interactions for task-shift and planning the motor-suprapostural task. PMID:27010634

  7. Neural Correlates of Task Cost for Stance Control with an Additional Motor Task: Phase-Locked Electroencephalogram Responses.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ing-Shiou; Huang, Cheng-Ya

    2016-01-01

    With appropriate reallocation of central resources, the ability to maintain an erect posture is not necessarily degraded by a concurrent motor task. This study investigated the neural control of a particular postural-suprapostural procedure involving brain mechanisms to solve crosstalk between posture and motor subtasks. Participants completed a single posture task and a dual-task while concurrently conducting force-matching and maintaining a tilted stabilometer stance at a target angle. Stabilometer movements and event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded. The added force-matching task increased the irregularity of postural response rather than the size of postural response prior to force-matching. In addition, the added force-matching task during stabilometer stance led to marked topographic ERP modulation, with greater P2 positivity in the frontal and sensorimotor-parietal areas of the N1-P2 transitional phase and in the sensorimotor-parietal area of the late P2 phase. The time-frequency distribution of the ERP primary principal component revealed that the dual-task condition manifested more pronounced delta (1-4 Hz) and beta (13-35 Hz) synchronizations but suppressed theta activity (4-8 Hz) before force-matching. The dual-task condition also manifested coherent fronto-parietal delta activity in the P2 period. In addition to a decrease in postural regularity, this study reveals spatio-temporal and temporal-spectral reorganizations of ERPs in the fronto-sensorimotor-parietal network due to the added suprapostural motor task. For a particular set of postural-suprapostural task, the behavior and neural data suggest a facilitatory role of autonomous postural response and central resource expansion with increasing interregional interactions for task-shift and planning the motor-suprapostural task. PMID:27010634

  8. A low-cost vector processor boosting compute-intensive image processing operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adorf, Hans-Martin

    1992-01-01

    Low-cost vector processing (VP) is within reach of everyone seriously engaged in scientific computing. The advent of affordable add-on VP-boards for standard workstations complemented by mathematical/statistical libraries is beginning to impact compute-intensive tasks such as image processing. A case in point in the restoration of distorted images from the Hubble Space Telescope. A low-cost implementation is presented of the standard Tarasko-Richardson-Lucy restoration algorithm on an Intel i860-based VP-board which is seamlessly interfaced to a commercial, interactive image processing system. First experience is reported (including some benchmarks for standalone FFT's) and some conclusions are drawn.

  9. Strategic supply system design - a holistic evaluation of operational and production cost for a biorefinery supply chain

    SciTech Connect

    Lamers, Patrick; Tan, Eric C.D.; Searcy, Erin M.; Scarlata, Christopher J.; Cafferty, Kara G.; Jacobson, Jacob J.

    2015-08-20

    Pioneer cellulosic biorefineries across the United States rely on a conventional feedstock supply system based on one-year contracts with local growers, who harvest, locally store, and deliver feed-stock in low-density format to the conversion facility. While the conventional system is designed for high biomass yield areas, pilot scale operations have experienced feedstock supply shortages and price volatilities due to reduced harvests and competition from other industries. Regional supply dependency and the inability to actively manage feedstock stability and quality, provide operational risks to the biorefinery, which translate into higher investment risk. The advanced feedstock supply system based on a network of depots can mitigate many of these risks and enable wider supply system benefits. This paper compares the two concepts from a system-level perspective beyond mere logistic costs. It shows that while processing operations at the depot increase feedstock supply costs initially, they enable wider system benefits including supply risk reduction (leading to lower interest rates on loans), industry scale-up, conversion yield improvements, and reduced handling equipment and storage costs at the biorefinery. When translating these benefits into cost reductions per liter of gasoline equivalent (LGE), we find that total cost reductions between -$0.46 to -$0.21 per LGE for biochemical and -$0.32 to -$0.12 per LGE for thermochemical conversion pathways are possible. Naturally, these system level benefits will differ between individual actors along the feedstock supply chain. Further research is required with respect to depot sizing, location, and ownership structures.

  10. Strategic supply system design - a holistic evaluation of operational and production cost for a biorefinery supply chain

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lamers, Patrick; Tan, Eric C.D.; Searcy, Erin M.; Scarlata, Christopher J.; Cafferty, Kara G.; Jacobson, Jacob J.

    2015-08-20

    Pioneer cellulosic biorefineries across the United States rely on a conventional feedstock supply system based on one-year contracts with local growers, who harvest, locally store, and deliver feed-stock in low-density format to the conversion facility. While the conventional system is designed for high biomass yield areas, pilot scale operations have experienced feedstock supply shortages and price volatilities due to reduced harvests and competition from other industries. Regional supply dependency and the inability to actively manage feedstock stability and quality, provide operational risks to the biorefinery, which translate into higher investment risk. The advanced feedstock supply system based on a networkmore » of depots can mitigate many of these risks and enable wider supply system benefits. This paper compares the two concepts from a system-level perspective beyond mere logistic costs. It shows that while processing operations at the depot increase feedstock supply costs initially, they enable wider system benefits including supply risk reduction (leading to lower interest rates on loans), industry scale-up, conversion yield improvements, and reduced handling equipment and storage costs at the biorefinery. When translating these benefits into cost reductions per liter of gasoline equivalent (LGE), we find that total cost reductions between -$0.46 to -$0.21 per LGE for biochemical and -$0.32 to -$0.12 per LGE for thermochemical conversion pathways are possible. Naturally, these system level benefits will differ between individual actors along the feedstock supply chain. Further research is required with respect to depot sizing, location, and ownership structures.« less

  11. Coal flow aids reduce coke plant operating costs and improve production rates

    SciTech Connect

    Bedard, R.A.; Bradacs, D.J.; Kluck, R.W.; Roe, D.C.; Ventresca, B.P.

    2005-06-01

    Chemical coal flow aids can provide many benefits to coke plants, including improved production rates, reduced maintenance and lower cleaning costs. This article discusses the mechanisms by which coal flow aids function and analyzes several successful case histories. 2 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  12. 77 FR 32183 - Transmission Planning and Cost Allocation by Transmission Owning and Operating Public Utilities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-31

    ...The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission affirms its basic determinations in Order No. 1000, amending the transmission planning and cost allocation requirements established in Order No. 890 to ensure that Commission-jurisdictional services are provided at just and reasonable rates and on a basis that is just and reasonable and not unduly discriminatory or preferential. This order affirms the......

  13. Capital and Operating Costs of Small Arsenic Removal Adsorptive Media Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducted 50 full-scale demonstration projects on treatment systems removing arsenic from drinking water in 26 states throughout the U.S. The projects were conducted to evaluate the performance, reliability, and cost of arsenic remo...

  14. 75 FR 62023 - Transmission Planning and Cost Allocation by Transmission Owning and Operating Public Utilities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-07

    ... Commission issued a Notice of proposed rulemaking (75 FR 37884) proposing to amend the transmission planning... proposed rule published June 30, 2010 (75 FR 37884) are due November 12, 2010. ADDRESSES: You may submit... Energy Regulatory Commission 18 CFR Part 35 Transmission Planning and Cost Allocation by...

  15. Evaluation of a "no-cost" Internet technology-based system for teleradiology and co-operative work.

    PubMed

    Bergh, B; Schlaefke, A; Pietsch, M; García, I; Vogl, T J

    2003-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the suitability of a no-cost system based on standard Internet technology components for teleradiology. The system was composed of free software (communication, DICOM viewer, compression) and standard off-the-shelf hardware components. For different image (CR, CT, MR) and network types (LAN and ISDN) the File Transfer, Audio and Video Conference, and Co-operative Work properties were examined and compared with the literature referring to standard complete packages and dedicated teleradiology systems. The main advantages of the no-cost system are: price; ease of use; independence from specific hardware; and potential connection to any possible partner. The performance of the File Transfer and the Audio and Video Conference was comparable to the other system groups with slight disadvantages in the usability. For Co-operative Work the employed "application sharing" technology does not meet the clinical requirements, which applies identically to the standard complete packages. Here the specialized systems prove superior, although they are proprietary. With minimal restraints the evaluated no-cost solution can be used for File Transfer and Conference scenarios. The usage for Co-operative Work with ISDN is not recommended, unless for the purpose of gaining experience or when dealing with small amounts of cases or images. PMID:12599011

  16. Cost-effectiveness of rituximab in addition to fludarabine and cyclophosphamide (R-FC) for the first-line treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Müller, Dirk; Fischer, Kirsten; Kaiser, Peter; Eichhorst, Barbara; Walshe, Ronald; Reiser, Marcel; Kellermann, Lenka; Borsi, Lisa; Civello, Daniele; Mensch, Alexander; Bahlo, Jasmin; Hallek, Michael; Stock, Stephanie; Fingerle-Rowson, Günter

    2016-05-01

    The cost-effectiveness of rituximab in combination with fludarabine/cyclophosphamide (R-FC) for the first line treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) was evaluated. Based on long-term clinical data (follow-up of 5.9 years) from the CLL8-trial, a Markov-model with three health states (Free from disease progression, Progressive disease, Death) was used to evaluate the cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) and cost per life years gained (LYG) of R-FC from the perspective of the German statutory health insurance (SHI). The addition of rituximab to FC chemotherapy results in a gain of 1.1 quality-adjusted life-years. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of R-FC compared with FC was €17 979 per QALY (€15 773 per LYG). Results were robust in deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. From the German SHI perspective, rituximab in combination with FC chemotherapy represents good value for first-line treatment of patients with CLL and compares favorably with chemotherapy alone. PMID:26584689

  17. Creature co-op: Achieving robust remote operations with a community of low-cost robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonasso, R. Peter

    1990-01-01

    The concept is advanced of carrying out space based remote missions using a cooperative of low cost robot specialists rather than monolithic, multipurpose systems. A simulation is described wherein a control architecture for such a system of specialists is being investigated. Early results show such co-ops to be robust in the face of unforeseen circumstances. Descriptions of the platforms and sensors modeled and the beacon and retriever creatures that make up the co-op are included.

  18. Sludge reduction by direct addition of chlorine dioxide into a sequencing batch reactor under operational mode of repeatedly alternating aeration/non-aeration.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hong; Liu, Weiyi; Li, Yuanmei; Xiao, Hong

    2015-01-01

    The effect of direct addition of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) into a repeatedly alternating aeration/non-aeration sequencing batch reactor (SBR) on its sludge reduction and process performance was investigated. The experimental results showed that the sludge reduction efficiency was 32.9% and the observed growth yield (Yobs) of SBR was 0.11 kg VSS (volatile suspended solids) /kg COD (chemical oxygen demand) for 80 days' operation at the optimum ClO2 dosage of 2.0 mg/g TSS (total suspended solids). It was speculated that cell lysis and cryptic growth, uncoupled metabolism and endogenous metabolism were jointly responsible for the sludge reduction in this study. COD, NH3-N, total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) in the effluent increased on average 29.47, 4.44, 1.97 and 0.05 mg/L, respectively. However, the effluent quality still satisfied the first-class B discharge standards for municipal wastewater treatment plants in China. In that case, the sludge maintained fine viability with the specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR) being 14.47 mg O2/(g VSS·h) and demonstrated good settleability with the sludge volume index (SVI) being 116 mL/g. The extra cost of sludge reduction at the optimum ClO2 dosage was estimated to be 2.24 CNY (or 0.36 dollar)/kg dry sludge. PMID:26524444

  19. A new algorithm for design, operation and cost assessment of struvite (MgNH4PO4) precipitation processes.

    PubMed

    Birnhack, Liat; Nir, Oded; Telzhenski, Marina; Lahav, Ori

    2015-01-01

    Deliberate struvite (MgNH4PO4) precipitation from wastewater streams has been the topic of extensive research in the last two decades and is expected to gather worldwide momentum in the near future as a P-reuse technique. A wide range of operational alternatives has been reported for struvite precipitation, including the application of various Mg(II) sources, two pH elevation techniques and several Mg:P ratios and pH values. The choice of each operational parameter within the struvite precipitation process affects process efficiency, the overall cost and also the choice of other operational parameters. Thus, a comprehensive simulation program that takes all these parameters into account is essential for process design. This paper introduces a systematic decision-supporting tool which accepts a wide range of possible operational parameters, including unconventional Mg(II) sources (i.e. seawater and seawater nanofiltration brines). The study is supplied with a free-of-charge computerized tool (http://tx.technion.ac.il/~agrengn/agr/Struvite_Program.zip) which links two computer platforms (Python and PHREEQC) for executing thermodynamic calculations according to predefined kinetic considerations. The model can be (inter alia) used for optimizing the struvite-fluidized bed reactor process operation with respect to P removal efficiency, struvite purity and economic feasibility of the chosen alternative. The paper describes the algorithm and its underlying assumptions, and shows results (i.e. effluent water quality, cost breakdown and P removal efficiency) of several case studies consisting of typical wastewaters treated at various operational conditions. PMID:25704607

  20. Quantum ring-polymer contraction method: Including nuclear quantum effects at no additional computational cost in comparison to ab initio molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Christopher; Spura, Thomas; Habershon, Scott; Kühne, Thomas D.

    2016-04-01

    We present a simple and accurate computational method which facilitates ab initio path-integral molecular dynamics simulations, where the quantum-mechanical nature of the nuclei is explicitly taken into account, at essentially no additional computational cost in comparison to the corresponding calculation using classical nuclei. The predictive power of the proposed quantum ring-polymer contraction method is demonstrated by computing various static and dynamic properties of liquid water at ambient conditions using density functional theory. This development will enable routine inclusion of nuclear quantum effects in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of condensed-phase systems.

  1. Artificial lift alternatives offer operators options for best production at low cost

    SciTech Connect

    Duey, R.

    1996-03-01

    An operator can produce wells cheaper and make equipment last longer with the right artificial lift combination for the task at hand. This paper describes beam pumps, long stroke pumping units, electric submersible pumps, a plunger lift, progressive cavity pumps, hydraulic pumps.

  2. 43 CFR 426.23 - Recovery of operation and maintenance (O&M) costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Recovery of operation and maintenance (O&M... RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ACREAGE LIMITATION RULES AND REGULATIONS § 426.23 Recovery of... received irrigation water to the total amount of land in the district that received irrigation water;...

  3. 43 CFR 426.23 - Recovery of operation and maintenance (O&M) costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Recovery of operation and maintenance (O&M... RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ACREAGE LIMITATION RULES AND REGULATIONS § 426.23 Recovery of... received irrigation water to the total amount of land in the district that received irrigation water;...

  4. 43 CFR 426.23 - Recovery of operation and maintenance (O&M) costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Recovery of operation and maintenance (O&M... RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ACREAGE LIMITATION RULES AND REGULATIONS § 426.23 Recovery of... received irrigation water to the total amount of land in the district that received irrigation water;...

  5. OPTIM: Computer program to generate a vertical profile which minimizes aircraft fuel burn or direct operating cost. User's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A profile of altitude, airspeed, and flight path angle as a function of range between a given set of origin and destination points for particular models of transport aircraft provided by NASA is generated. Inputs to the program include the vertical wind profile, the aircraft takeoff weight, the costs of time and fuel, certain constraint parameters and control flags. The profile can be near optimum in the sense of minimizing: (1) fuel, (2) time, or (3) a combination of fuel and time (direct operating cost (DOC)). The user can also, as an option, specify the length of time the flight is to span. The theory behind the technical details of this program is also presented.

  6. California Federal Facilities: Rate-Responsive Building Operation for Deeper Cost and Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect

    2012-05-01

    Dynamic pricing electricity tariffs, now the default for large customers in California (peak demand of 200 kW and higher for PG&E and SCE, and 20 kW and higher for SDG&E), are providing Federal facilities new opportunities to cut their electricity bills and help them meet their energy savings mandates. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) has created this fact sheet to help California federal facilities take advantage of these opportunities through “rate-responsive building operation.” Rate-responsive building operation involves designing your load management strategies around your facility’s variable electric rate, using measures that require little or no financial investment.

  7. 77 FR 60689 - Transmission Planning and Cost Allocation by Transmission Owning and Operating Public Utilities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-04

    .... SUMMARY: The Commission issued Order No. 1000, 76 FR 49842 (August 11, 2011) and Order No. 1000-A, 77 FR.... 1000-A, 77 FR 32,184 (May 31, 2012), 139 FERC ] 61,132 (2012). All compliance filings must be submitted... Filing Code: 80. In addition, to facilitate searching, filers are asked to title such filings...

  8. 75 FR 37883 - Transmission Planning and Cost Allocation by Transmission Owning and Operating Public Utilities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-30

    ... reformed the pro forma open access transmission tariff (OATT). Among other changes, Order No. 890 required... time to mature before additional changes are proposed. Many of these commenters state that if the...\\ and other commenters advocate changes such as establishing a regional or interconnection-wide...

  9. Improved operating scenarios of the DIII-D tokamak as a result of the addition of UNIX computer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Henline, P.A.

    1995-10-01

    The increased use of UNIX based computer systems for machine control, data handling and analysis has greatly enhanced the operating scenarios and operating efficiency of the DRI-D tokamak. This paper will describe some of these UNIX systems and their specific uses. These include the plasma control system, the electron cyclotron heating control system, the analysis of electron temperature and density measurements and the general data acquisition system (which is collecting over 130 Mbytes of data). The speed and total capability of these systems has dramatically affected the ability to operate DIII-D. The improved operating scenarios include better plasma shape control due to the more thorough MHD calculations done between shots and the new ability to see the time dependence of profile data as it relates across different spatial locations in the tokamak. Other analysis which engenders improved operating abilities will be described.

  10. Gas distribution industry survey: Costs of installation, maintenance and repair, and operations, version 1. Topical report, December 1993-March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Biederman, N.

    1996-05-01

    The U.S. natural gas distribution industry spends $40 - $45 billion each year to buy gas and deliver it to the customers and to expand and renew the distribution piping system. More than half of these expenditures are paid to suppliers and transporters of gas. The way in which the balance (nearly $18 billion) is spent is controlled by the local gas distribution companies. This research is aimed to provide a better understanding of how and why these costs are incurred. It is based on interviews with 24 gas distribution companies and the data collected on a wide variety of maintenance, installation, and operations activities.

  11. Fishery research in the Great Lakes using a low-cost remotely operated vehicle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennedy, Gregory W.; Brown, Charles L.; Argyle, Ray L.

    1988-01-01

    We used a MiniROVER MK II remotely operated vehicle (ROV) to collect ground-truth information on fish and their habitat in the Great Lakes that have traditionally been collected by divers, or with static cameras, or submersibles. The ROV, powered by 4 thrusters and controlled by the pilot at the surface, was portable and efficient to operate throughout the Great Lakes in 1987, and collected a total of 30 h of video data recorded for later analysis. We collected 50% more substrate information per unit of effort with the ROV than with static cameras. Fish behavior ranged from no avoidance reaction in ambient light, to erratic responses in the vehicle lights. The ROV's field of view depended on the time of day, light levels, and density of zooplankton. Quantification of the data collected with the ROV (either physical samples or video image data) will serve to enhance the use of the ROV as a research tool to conduct fishery research on the Great Lakes.

  12. Reconsideration of the costs of convenience: quality, operational, and fiscal strategies to minimize elective labor induction.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Kathleen Rice

    2010-01-01

    Elective induction of labor is at an all-time high in the United States despite known associated risks. It can lead to birth of an infant too early, a long labor, exposure to a high-alert medication with its potential side effects, unnecessary cesarean birth, and maternal and neonatal morbidity. There is a cascade of interventions related to elective induction such as an intravenous line, continuous electronic fetal monitoring, confinement to bed, amniotomy, pharmacologic labor stimulating agents, parental pain medications, and regional anesthesia, each with their own set of potential complications and risk of iatrogenic harm. These risks apply to all women having the procedure, however for nulliparous women before 41 weeks of gestation with an unfavorable cervix, the main risk is cesarean birth after unsuccessful labor induction with the potential for maternal and neonatal morbidity and increased healthcare costs. When cesarean occurs, subsequent births are likely to be via cesarean as well. Elective labor induction before 41 weeks is inconsistent with quality perinatal care, and performance of this unnecessary procedure should be minimized. Convenience as the reason for labor induction is contrary to a culture focused on patient safety. A review of current evidence, followed by changes in practice, is warranted to support the safest care possible during labor and birth. Various strategies to reduce the rate of elective induction in the United States are presented. PMID:20147829

  13. Integrated constructed wetland systems: design, operation, and performance of low-cost decentralized wastewater treatment systems.

    PubMed

    Behrends, L L; Bailey, E; Jansen, P; Houke, L; Smith, S

    2007-01-01

    Several different types of constructed wetland systems are being used as decentralized treatment systems including surface-flow, subsurface-flow, vertical-flow, and hybrid systems. Archetypical wetland systems have design strengths and weaknesses, and therefore it should be possible to design combined (integrated) systems to optimize a number of important treatment processes. This study provides comparative efficacy data for two integrated wetland treatment systems (IWTS) designed to enhance treatment of medium strength wastewater generated from a pilot-scale intensive fish farm. Results from the twenty eight months study included consistently high removal of COD (84% +) and ammonia nitrogen (93%) in both systems. Initially, phosphorus removal was also high (>90%) in both systems, but removal efficacy declined significantly over time. Nitrate removal was significantly better in the system that provided sequential aerobic and anoxic environments. Short hydraulic retention times coupled with sustained removal of COD and ammonia indicate that the ReCip components could be a least-cost wastewater treatment technology in the decentralized market sector. PMID:17506433

  14. Utilizing the EUVE Innovative Technology Testbed to Reduce Operations Cost for Present and Future Orbiting Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes work done under Cooperative Agreement (CA) on the following testbed projects: TERRIERS - The development of the ground systems to support the TERRIERS satellite mission at Boston University (BU). HSTS - The application of ARC's Heuristic Scheduling Testbed System (HSTS) to the EUVE satellite mission. SELMON - The application of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL) Selective Monitoring (SELMON) system to the EUVE satellite mission. EVE - The development of the EUVE Virtual Environment (EVE), a prototype three-dimensional (3-D) visualization environment for the EUVE satellite and its sensors, instruments, and communications antennae. FIDO - The development of the Fault-Induced Document Officer (FIDO) system, a prototype application to respond to anomalous conditions by automatically searching for, retrieving, and displaying relevant documentation for an operators use.

  15. The green operating room: simple changes to reduce cost and our carbon footprint.

    PubMed

    Wormer, Blair A; Augenstein, Vedra A; Carpenter, Christin L; Burton, Patrick V; Yokeley, William T; Prabhu, Ajita S; Harris, Beth; Norton, Sujatha; Klima, David A; Lincourt, Amy E; Heniford, B Todd

    2013-07-01

    Generating over four billion pounds of waste each year, the healthcare system in the United States is the second largest contributor of trash with one-third produced by operating rooms. Our objective is to assess improvement in waste reduction and recycling after implementation of a Green Operating Room Committee (GORC) at our institution. A surgeon and nurse-initiated GORC was formed with members from corporate leadership, nursing, anesthesia, and OR staff. Initiatives for recycling opportunities, reduction of energy and water use as well as solid waste were implemented and the results were recorded. Since formation of GORC in 2008, our OR has diverted 6.5 tons of medical waste. An effort to recycle all single-use devices was implemented with annual solid waste reduction of approximately 12,860 lbs. Disposable OR foam padding was replaced with reusable gel pads at greater than $50,000 per year savings. Over 500 lbs of previously discarded batteries were salvaged from the OR and donated to charity or redistributed in the hospital ($9,000 annual savings). A "Power Down" initiative to turn off all anesthesia and OR lights and equipment not in use resulted in saving $33,000 and 234.3 metric tons of CO2 emissions reduced per year. Converting from soap to alcohol-based waterless scrub demonstrated a potential saving of 2.7 million liters of water annually. Formation of an OR committee dedicated to ecological initiatives can provide a significant opportunity to improve health care's impact on the environment and save money. PMID:23815997

  16. Yeast hydrolysate as a low-cost additive to serum-free medium for the production of human thrombopoietin in suspension cultures of Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Sung, Y H; Lim, S W; Chung, J Y; Lee, G M

    2004-02-01

    To enhance the performance of a serum-free medium (SFM) for human thrombopoietin (hTPO) production in suspension cultures of recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (rCHO) cells, several low-cost hydrolysates such as yeast hydrolysate (YH), soy hydrolysate, wheat gluten hydrolysate and rice hydrolysate were tested as medium additives. Among various hydrolysates tested, the positive effect of YH on hTPO production was most significant. When 5 g l(-1) YH was added to SFM, the maximum hTPO concentration in batch culture was 40.41 microg ml(-1), which is 11.5 times higher than that in SFM without YH supplementation. This enhanced hTPO production in YH-supplemented SFM was obtained by the combined effect of enhanced q(hTPO) (the specific rate of hTPO production). The supplementation of YH in SFM increased q(hTPO) by 294% and extended culture longevity by >2 days if the culture was terminated at a cell viability of 50%. Furthermore, cell viability throughout the culture using YH-supplemented SFM was higher than that using any other hydrolysate-supplemented SFM tested, thereby minimizing degradation of hTPO susceptible to proteolytic degradation. In addition, YH supplementation did not affect in vivo biological activity of hTPO. Taken together, the results obtained demonstrate the potential of YH as a medium additive for hTPO production in serum-free suspension cultures of rCHO cells. PMID:12856163

  17. Effects of FeCl3 addition on the operation of a staged anaerobic fluidized membrane bioreactor (SAF-MBR).

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunseok; McCarty, Perry L; Kim, Jeonghwan; Bae, Jaeho

    2016-01-01

    The effects on sulfur removal and membrane fouling resulting from FeCl(3) addition to an anaerobic fluidized membrane bioreactor (AFMBR) in a staged AFMBR (SAF-MBR) was investigated. Total sulfur removal in the SAF-MBR was 42-59% without FeCl(3) addition, but increased to 87-95% with FeCl(3) addition. Sulfide removal in the AFMBR increased to 90% with addition of FeCl(3) at a molar Fe(3+)/S ratio of 0.54 and to 95% when the ratio was increased to 0.95. Effluent sulfide concentration then decreased to 0.3-0.6 mg/L. Phosphate removals were only 19 and 37% with the above added FeCl(3) ratios, indicating that iron removed sulfide more readily than phosphate. Neither chemical oxygen demand nor biochemical oxygen demand removal efficiencies were affected by the addition of FeCl(3). When the AFMBR permeate became exposed to air, light brown particles were formed from effluent Fe(2+) oxidation to Fe(3+). FeCl(3) addition, while beneficial for sulfide removal, did increase the membrane fouling rate due to the deposition of inorganic precipitates in the membrane pores. PMID:27386990

  18. The environmental costs of mountaintop mining valley fill operations for aquatic ecosystems of the Central Appalachians.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, Emily S; Palmer, Margaret A

    2011-03-01

    Southern Appalachian forests are recognized as a biodiversity hot spot of global significance, particularly for endemic aquatic salamanders and mussels. The dominant driver of land-cover and land-use change in this region is surface mining, with an ever-increasing proportion occurring as mountaintop mining with valley fill operations (MTVF). In MTVF, seams of coal are exposed using explosives, and the resulting noncoal overburden is pushed into adjacent valleys to facilitate coal extraction. To date, MTVF throughout the Appalachians have converted 1.1 million hectares of forest to surface mines and buried more than 2,000 km of stream channel beneath mining overburden. The impacts of these lost forests and buried streams are propagated throughout the river networks of the region as the resulting sediment and chemical pollutants are transmitted downstream. There is, to date, no evidence to suggest that the extensive chemical and hydrologic alterations of streams by MTVF can be offset or reversed by currently required reclamation and mitigation practices. PMID:21449964

  19. Effect of Operating Parameters and Chemical Additives on Crystal Habit and Specific Cake Resistance of Zinc Hydroxide Precipitates

    SciTech Connect

    Alwin, Jennifer Louise

    1999-08-01

    The effect of process parameters and chemical additives on the specific cake resistance of zinc hydroxide precipitates was investigated. The ability of a slurry to be filtered is dependent upon the particle habit of the solid and the particle habit is influenced by certain process variables. The process variables studied include neutralization temperature, agitation type, and alkalinity source used for neutralization. Several commercially available chemical additives advertised to aid in solid/liquid separation were also examined in conjunction with hydroxide precipitation. A statistical analysis revealed that the neutralization temperature and the source of alkalinity were statistically significant in influencing the specific cake resistance of zinc hydroxide precipitates in this study. The type of agitation did not significantly effect the specific cake resistance of zinc hydroxide precipitates. The use of chemical additives in conjunction with hydroxide precipitation had a favorable effect on the filterability. The morphology of the hydroxide precipitates was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy.

  20. An analysis of the impacts of economic incentive programs on commercial nuclear power plant operations and maintenance costs

    SciTech Connect

    Kavanaugh, D.C.; Monroe, W.H.; Wood, R.S.

    1996-02-01

    Operations and Maintenance (O and M) expenditures by nuclear power plant owner/operators possess a very logical and vital link in considerations relating to plant safety and reliability. Since the determinants of O and M outlays are considerable and varied, the potential linkages to plant safety, both directly and indirectly, can likewise be substantial. One significant issue before the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is the impact, if any, on O and M spending from state programs that attempt to improve plant operating performance, and how and to what extent these programs may affect plant safety and pose public health risks. The purpose of this study is to examine the role and degree of impacts from state promulgated economic incentive programs (EIPs) on plant O and M spending. A multivariate regression framework is specified, and the model is estimated on industry data over a five-year period, 1986--1990. Explanatory variables for the O and M spending model include plant characteristics, regulatory effects, financial strength factors, replacement power costs, and the performance incentive programs. EIPs are found to have statistically significant effects on plant O and M outlays, albeit small in relation to other factors. Moreover, the results indicate that the relatively financially weaker firms are more sensitive in their O and M spending to the presence of such programs. Formulations for linking spending behavior and EIPs with plant safety performance remains for future analysis.

  1. Regional Comparative Unit Cost Studies for Maintenance and Operation of Physical Plants in Universities and Colleges in Central States Region and Rocky Mountain Region.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Physical Plant Administrators, Corvallis, OR.

    Presented in this document are data pertaining to maintenance and operations costs at colleges and universities in the central states region and the Rocky Mountain region. The major accounts included in the cost analysis are: (1) physical plant administration, (2) building maintenance, (3) custodial services, (4) utilities, (5) landscape and…

  2. 19 CFR 10.197 - Direct costs of processing operations performed in a beneficiary country or countries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... specific merchandise, including fringe benefits, on-the-job training, and the cost of engineering..., engineering, and blueprint costs insofar as they are allocable to the specific merchandise and; (4) Costs...

  3. 19 CFR 10.197 - Direct costs of processing operations performed in a beneficiary country or countries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... specific merchandise, including fringe benefits, on-the-job training, and the cost of engineering..., engineering, and blueprint costs insofar as they are allocable to the specific merchandise and; (4) Costs...

  4. Free electron lasers for 13nm EUV lithography: RF design strategies to minimise investment and operational costs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keens, Simon; Rossa, Bernhard; Frei, Marcel

    2016-03-01

    As the semiconductor industry proceeds to develop ever better sources of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light for photolithography applications, two distinct technologies have come to prominence: Tin-plasma and free electron laser (FEL) sources. Tin plasma sources have been in development within the industry for many years, and have been widely reported. Meanwhile, FELs represent the most promising alternative to create high power EUV frequencies and, while tin-plasma source development has been ongoing, such lasers have been continuously developed by academic institutions for use in fundamental research programmes in conjunction with universities and national scientific institutions. This paper follows developments in the field of academic FELs, and presents information regarding novel technologies, specifically in the area of RF design strategy, that may be incorporated into future industrial FEL systems for EUV lithography in order to minimize the necessary investment and operational costs. It goes on to try to assess the cost-benefit of an alternate RF design strategy, based upon previous studies.

  5. Surgical biopsy with intra-operative frozen section. An accurate and cost-effective method for diagnosis of musculoskeletal sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Ashford, R U; McCarthy, S W; Scolyer, R A; Bonar, S F; Karim, R Z; Stalley, P D

    2006-09-01

    The most appropriate protocol for the biopsy of musculoskeletal tumours is controversial, with some authors advocating CT-guided core biopsy. At our hospital the initial biopsies of most musculoskeletal tumours has been by operative core biopsy with evaluation by frozen section which determines whether diagnostic tissue has been obtained and, if possible, gives the definitive diagnosis. In order to determine the accuracy and cost-effectiveness of this protocol we have undertaken a retrospective audit of biopsies of musculoskeletal tumours performed over a period of two years. A total of 104 patients had biopsies according to this regime. All gave the diagnosis apart from one minor error which did not alter the management of the patient. There was no requirement for re-biopsy. This protocol was more labour-intensive and 38% more costly than CT-guided core biopsy (AU$1804 vs AU$1308). However, the accuracy and avoidance of the anxiety associated with repeat biopsy outweighed these disadvantages. PMID:16943474

  6. An economic feasibility analysis of distributed electric power generation based upon the Natural Gas-Fired Fuel Cell: a model of the operations cost.

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-30

    This model description establishes the revenues, expenses incentives and avoided costs of Operation of a Natural Gas-Fired Fuel Cell-Based. Fuel is the major element of the cost of operation of a natural gas-fired fuel cell. Forecasts of the change in the price of this commodity a re an important consideration in the ownership of an energy conversion system. Differences between forecasts, the interests of the forecaster or geographical areas can all have significant effects on imputed fuel costs. There is less effect on judgments made on the feasibility of an energy conversion system since changes in fuel price can affect the cost of operation of the alternatives to the fuel cell in a similar fashion. The forecasts used in this model are only intended to provide the potential owner or operator with the means to examine alternate future scenarios. The operations model computes operating costs of a system suitable for a large condominium complex or a residential institution such as a hotel, boarding school or prison. The user may also select large office buildings that are characterized by 12 to 16 hours per day of operation or industrial users with a steady demand for thermal and electrical energy around the clock.

  7. Total Operational Costs Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, George

    Northern Valley Regional High School (New Jersey) has been involved in implementing a technology strategy for over a decade. This document outlines how the funding that the Board of Education has provided was spent and will be spent over the next 3 years. Included are several industry models that are geared towards business and public facilities.…

  8. Fees-for-services, cost recovery, and equity in a district of Burkina Faso operating the Bamako Initiative.

    PubMed Central

    Ridde, Valéry

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To gauge the effects of operating the Bamako Initiative in Kongoussi district, Burkina Faso. METHODS: Qualitative and quasi-experimental quantitative methodologies were used. FINDINGS: Following the introduction of fees-for-services in July 1997, the number of consultations for curative care fell over a period of three years by an average of 15.4% at "case" health centres but increased by 30.5% at "control" health centres. Moreover, although the operational results for essential drugs depots were not known, expenditure increased on average 2.7 times more than income and did not keep pace with the decline in the utilization of services. Persons in charge of the management committees had difficulties in releasing funds to ensure access to care for the poor. CONCLUSION: The introduction of fees-for-services had an adverse effect on service utilization. The study district is in a position to bear the financial cost of taking care of the poor and the community is able to identify such people. Incentives must be introduced by the state and be swiftly applied so that the communities agree to a more equitable system and thereby allow access to care for those excluded from services because they are unable to pay. PMID:12973646

  9. Cost-effectiveness of intensive multifactorial treatment compared with routine care for individuals with screen-detected Type 2 diabetes: analysis of the ADDITION-UK cluster-randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Tao, L; Wilson, E C F; Wareham, N J; Sandbæk, A; Rutten, G E H M; Lauritzen, T; Khunti, K; Davies, M J; Borch-Johnsen, K; Griffin, S J; Simmons, R K

    2015-01-01

    Aims To examine the short- and long-term cost-effectiveness of intensive multifactorial treatment compared with routine care among people with screen-detected Type 2 diabetes. Methods Cost–utility analysis in ADDITION-UK, a cluster-randomized controlled trial of early intensive treatment in people with screen-detected diabetes in 69 UK general practices. Unit treatment costs and utility decrement data were taken from published literature. Accumulated costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were calculated using ADDITION-UK data from 1 to 5 years (short-term analysis, n = 1024); trial data were extrapolated to 30 years using the UKPDS outcomes model (version 1.3) (long-term analysis; n = 999). All costs were transformed to the UK 2009/10 price level. Results Adjusted incremental costs to the NHS were £285, £935, £1190 and £1745 over a 1-, 5-, 10- and 30-year time horizon, respectively (discounted at 3.5%). Adjusted incremental QALYs were 0.0000, – 0.0040, 0.0140 and 0.0465 over the same time horizons. Point estimate incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) suggested that the intervention was not cost-effective although the ratio improved over time: the ICER over 10 years was £82 250, falling to £37 500 over 30 years. The ICER fell below £30 000 only when the intervention cost was below £631 per patient: we estimated the cost at £981. Conclusion Given conventional thresholds of cost-effectiveness, the intensive treatment delivered in ADDITION was not cost-effective compared with routine care for individuals with screen-detected diabetes in the UK. The intervention may be cost-effective if it can be delivered at reduced cost. PMID:25661661

  10. Comparison of operation efficiency for the insert task when using stereoscopic images with additional lines, stereoscopic images, and a manipulator with force feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, Katsuya; Shidoji, Kazunori; Matsubara, Kenjiro

    1999-05-01

    It has been reported that operation efficiency for the teleoperations using stereoscopic video images is lower than when using the naked eye in real environments. Here, the authors tried to improve the human-machine interface of this particular system to achieve higher operation efficiency for stereoscopic video imags by adding other information. An experiment was carried out under the four following conditions: when the insert task was performed by subjects using conventional stereoscopic video imags, when the centering lines of the cylindrical objects and holes were added to the conventional stereoscopic video images, when the force feedback was provided to the system manipulator as one object touched another object, and when both of the additional centering lines and force feedback were provided. The subject's task was to inset a cylindrical object into a round hole. The completion time was measured from the time of the starting signal to the time when the object was inserted into the hole. Completion time, when additional lines were given, was shorter than when the force feedback was provided, and when no additional information was provided. It was concluded that additional visual information contributed more to the recognition of the space rather than providing additional information about surface phenomena.

  11. Operations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkins, Jesse L. M.; Norton, Anderson; Boyce, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has documented schemes and operations that undergird students' understanding of fractions. This prior research was based, in large part, on small-group teaching experiments. However, written assessments are needed in order for teachers and researchers to assess students' ways of operating on a whole-class scale. In this…

  12. Balancing effluent quality, economic cost and greenhouse gas emissions during the evaluation of (plant-wide) control/operational strategies in WWTPs.

    PubMed

    Flores-Alsina, Xavier; Arnell, Magnus; Amerlinck, Youri; Corominas, Lluís; Gernaey, Krist V; Guo, Lisha; Lindblom, Erik; Nopens, Ingmar; Porro, Jose; Shaw, Andy; Snip, Laura; Vanrolleghem, Peter A; Jeppsson, Ulf

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to show the potential additional insight that result from adding greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to plant performance evaluation criteria, such as effluent quality (EQI) and operational cost (OCI) indices, when evaluating (plant-wide) control/operational strategies in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). The proposed GHG evaluation is based on a set of comprehensive dynamic models that estimate the most significant potential on-site and off-site sources of CO₂, CH₄ and N₂O. The study calculates and discusses the changes in EQI, OCI and the emission of GHGs as a consequence of varying the following four process variables: (i) the set point of aeration control in the activated sludge section; (ii) the removal efficiency of total suspended solids (TSS) in the primary clarifier; (iii) the temperature in the anaerobic digester; and (iv) the control of the flow of anaerobic digester supernatants coming from sludge treatment. Based upon the assumptions built into the model structures, simulation results highlight the potential undesirable effects of increased GHG production when carrying out local energy optimization of the aeration system in the activated sludge section and energy recovery from the AD. Although off-site CO₂ emissions may decrease, the effect is counterbalanced by increased N₂O emissions, especially since N₂O has a 300-fold stronger greenhouse effect than CO₂. The reported results emphasize the importance and usefulness of using multiple evaluation criteria to compare and evaluate (plant-wide) control strategies in a WWTP for more informed operational decision making. PMID:23959217

  13. In Search of the Economic Sustainability of Hadron Therapy: The Real Cost of Setting Up and Operating a Hadron Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderstraeten, Barbara; Verstraete, Jan; De Croock, Roger; De Neve, Wilfried; Lievens, Yolande

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the treatment cost and required reimbursement for a new hadron therapy facility, considering different technical solutions and financing methods. Methods and Materials: The 3 technical solutions analyzed are a carbon only (COC), proton only (POC), and combined (CC) center, each operating 2 treatment rooms and assumed to function at full capacity. A business model defines the required reimbursement and analyzes the financial implications of setting up a facility over time; activity-based costing (ABC) calculates the treatment costs per type of patient for a center in a steady state of operation. Both models compare a private, full-cost approach with public sponsoring, only taking into account operational costs. Results: Yearly operational costs range between €10.0M (M = million) for a publicly sponsored POC to €24.8M for a CC with private financing. Disregarding inflation, the average treatment cost calculated with ABC (COC: €29,450; POC: €46,342; CC: €46,443 for private financing; respectively €16,059, €28,296, and €23,956 for public sponsoring) is slightly lower than the required reimbursement based on the business model (between €51,200 in a privately funded POC and €18,400 in COC with public sponsoring). Reimbursement for privately financed centers is very sensitive to a delay in commissioning and to the interest rate. Higher throughput and hypofractionation have a positive impact on the treatment costs. Conclusions: Both calculation methods are valid and complementary. The financially most attractive option of a publicly sponsored COC should be balanced to the clinical necessities and the sociopolitical context.

  14. Production costs and operative margins in electric energy generation from biogas. Full-scale case studies in Italy.

    PubMed

    Riva, C; Schievano, A; D'Imporzano, G; Adani, F

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe the economic sustainability of three different biogas full scale plants, fed with different organic matrices: energy crops (EC), manure, agro-industrial (Plants B and C) and organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) (Plant A). The plants were observed for one year and total annual biomass feeding, biomass composition and biomass cost (€ Mg(-1)), initial investment cost and plant electric power production were registered. The unit costs of biogas and electric energy (€ Sm(-3)biogas, € kWh(-1)EE) were differently distributed, depending on the type of feed and plant. Plant A showed high management/maintenance cost for OFMSW treatment (0.155 € Sm(-3)biogas, 45% of total cost), Plant B suffered high cost for EC supply (0.130 € Sm(-3)biogas, 49% of total cost) and Plant C showed higher impact on the total costs because of the depreciation charge (0.146 € Sm(-3)biogas, 41% of total costs). The breakeven point for the tariff of electric energy, calculated for the different cases, resulted in the range 120-170 € MWh(-1)EE, depending on fed materials and plant scale. EC had great impact on biomass supply costs and should be reduced, in favor of organic waste and residues; plant scale still heavily influences the production costs. The EU States should drive incentives in dependence of these factors, to further develop this still promising sector. PMID:24841069

  15. Updating the evidence base on the operational costs of supplementary immunization activities for current and future accelerated disease control, elimination and eradication efforts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To achieve globally or regionally defined accelerated disease control, elimination and eradication (ADC/E/E) goals against vaccine-preventable diseases requires complementing national routine immunization programs with intensive, time-limited, and targeted Supplementary Immunization Activities (SIAs). Many global and country-level SIA costing efforts have historically relied on what are now outdated benchmark figures. Mobilizing adequate resources for successful implementation of SIAs requires updated estimates of non-vaccine costs per target population. Methods This assessment updates the evidence base on the SIA operational costs through a review of literature between 1992 and 2012, and an analysis of actual expenditures from 142 SIAs conducted between 2004 and 2011 and documented in country immunization plans. These are complemented with an analysis of budgets from 31 SIAs conducted between 2006 and 2011 in order to assess the proportion of total SIA costs per person associated with various cost components. All results are presented in 2010 US dollars. Results Existing evidence indicate that average SIA operational costs were usually less than US$0.50 per person in 2010 dollars. However, the evidence is sparse, non-standardized, and largely out of date. Average operational costs per person generated from our analysis of country immunization plans are consistently higher than published estimates, approaching US$1.00 for injectable vaccines. The results illustrate that the benchmarks often used to project needs underestimate the true costs of SIAs and the analysis suggests that SIA operational costs have been increasing over time in real terms. Our assessment also illustrates that operational costs vary across several dimensions. Variations in the actual costs of SIAs likely to reflect the extents to which economies of scale associated with campaign-based delivery can be attained, the underlying strength of the immunization program, sensitivities to the

  16. Tracking Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Paul W.

    2010-01-01

    Even though there's been a slight reprieve in energy costs, the reality is that the cost of non-renewable energy is increasing, and state education budgets are shrinking. One way to keep energy and operations costs from overshadowing education budgets is to develop a 10-year energy audit plan to eliminate waste. First, facility managers should…

  17. Oil Production Capacity Expansion Costs for the Persian Gulf

    EIA Publications

    1996-01-01

    Provides estimates of development and operating costs for various size fields in countries surrounding the Persian Gulf. In addition, a forecast of the required reserve development and associated costs to meet the expected demand through the year 2010 is presented.

  18. Influence of binder properties, method of addition, powder type and operating conditions on fluid-bed melt granulation and resulting tablet properties.

    PubMed

    Abberger, T

    2001-12-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate melt granulation in a laboratory scale fluid-bed granulator with respect to granule growth, granule properties and resulting tablet properties. The parameters investigated were method of addition of PEG (spray-on or addition as flakes), binder concentration, PEG type (3000, 4000 and 6000, sprayed-on), size (PEG 4000, added as three different sized flakes), powder type (two different sized lactose types and corn starch) and operating conditions (volume air flow and heating temperature). Addition of binder as flakes led to layering as a growth mechanism when the size of the flakes was high. Coalescence occurred when the size was low. Coalescence also occurred when spraying was the method of addition. Due to the greater viscosity of the PEG 6000 melt it produced bigger granules than 3000 or 4000. The influence of volume air flow was moderate and the influence of heating temperature in the range of 70-90 degrees C was very low with both methods of addition. The disintegration time of tablets from granules where PEG was added as flakes was shorter than from granules where PEG was sprayed-on. The latter method of binder addition led to tablets which did not disintegrate but eroded. This was apparently caused by formation of a binder matrix, which could not be destroyed by the disintegrant. PMID:11802658

  19. Economics of Automation in Space: Implications of Automated Versus Manned Operations on the High Cost of On-Orbit Assembly, Control and Servicing of Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, W. F.

    1994-01-01

    The continued high cost and risk of placing astronauts in space has placed considerable burden on NASA to cut costs and consider other means of achieving mission goals both effectively and safely. Additionally, future science missions which might place a tremendous burden on Shuttle availability, or require extended vehicle duty cycles on the Lunar surface and Mars surface, might preclude the presence of astronauts altogether.

  20. Life Cycle Costing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCraley, Thomas L.

    1985-01-01

    Life cycle costing establishes a realistic comparison of the cost of owning and operating products. The formula of initial cost plus maintenance plus operation divided by useful life identifies the best price over the lifetime of the product purchased. (MLF)

  1. Design and Implementation Status of a System Supporting Quasi On-line Hospital Operational Cost-monitoring and Performance-oriented Financing

    PubMed Central

    Spyropoulos, B.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the project is to propose a new design and a partial on-line implementation of a Patient Classification System (PCS) supporting quasi real-time vigilance for Hospital operational-cost monitoring and health-care service remuneration, within the Greek National Health System (GNHS).

  2. School Operations and Maintenance: Best Practices For Controlling Energy Costs. A Guidebook for K-12 School System Business Officers and Facilities Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Energy, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Operations and maintenance (O&M) offers not only strategies for maintaining facilities, but also opportunities for reducing energy costs and increasing energy efficiency at existing schools, regardless of age. This Guidebook provides detailed and practical guidance on how K-12 school districts can plan and implement enhancements to their current…

  3. 41 CFR 102-33.205 - When we use our aircraft to support other executive agencies, must we recover the operating costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false When we use our aircraft to support other executive agencies, must we recover the operating costs? 102-33.205 Section 102-33.205 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION...

  4. 41 CFR 102-33.205 - When we use our aircraft to support other executive agencies, must we recover the operating costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false When we use our aircraft to support other executive agencies, must we recover the operating costs? 102-33.205 Section 102-33.205 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION...

  5. 41 CFR 102-33.205 - When we use our aircraft to support other executive agencies, must we recover the operating costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false When we use our aircraft to support other executive agencies, must we recover the operating costs? 102-33.205 Section 102-33.205 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION...

  6. 42 CFR 412.63 - Federal rates for inpatient operating costs for Federal fiscal years 1984 through 2004.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Note: For Federal Register citations affecting § 412.63, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which...(f)(2)(ii) and therefore did not receive a lower Federal rate that would have applied for cost... hospitals in the MSA or NECMA in which it is located effective with the hospital's cost reporting...

  7. The cumulative cost of additional wakefulness: dose-response effects on neurobehavioral functions and sleep physiology from chronic sleep restriction and total sleep deprivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Dongen, Hans P A.; Maislin, Greg; Mullington, Janet M.; Dinges, David F.

    2003-01-01

    were near-linearly related to the cumulative duration of wakefulness in excess of 15.84 h (s.e. 0.73 h). CONCLUSIONS: Since chronic restriction of sleep to 6 h or less per night produced cognitive performance deficits equivalent to up to 2 nights of total sleep deprivation, it appears that even relatively moderate sleep restriction can seriously impair waking neurobehavioral functions in healthy adults. Sleepiness ratings suggest that subjects were largely unaware of these increasing cognitive deficits, which may explain why the impact of chronic sleep restriction on waking cognitive functions is often assumed to be benign. Physiological sleep responses to chronic restriction did not mirror waking neurobehavioral responses, but cumulative wakefulness in excess of a 15.84 h predicted performance lapses across all four experimental conditions. This suggests that sleep debt is perhaps best understood as resulting in additional wakefulness that has a neurobiological "cost" which accumulates over time.

  8. Cost reduction in space operations - Structuring a planetary program to minimize the annual funding requirement as opposed to minimizing the program runout cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, D. H.; Niehoff, J. C.; Spadoni, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    An approach is proposed for the structuring of a planetary mission set wherein the peak annual funding is minimized to meet the annual budget restraint. One aspect of the approach is to have a transportation capability that can launch a mission in any planetary opportunity; such capability can be provided by solar electric propulsion. Another cost reduction technique is to structure a mission test in a time sequenced fashion that could utilize essentially the same spacecraft for the implementation of several missions. A third technique would be to fulfill a scientific objective in several sequential missions rather than attempt to accomplish all of the objectives with one mission. The application of the approach is illustrated by an example involving the Solar Orbiter Dual Probe mission.

  9. Dynamic Analysis of Hybrid Energy Systems under Flexible Operation and Variable Renewable Generation -- Part I: Dynamic Performance Analysis and Part II: Dynamic Cost

    SciTech Connect

    Humberto E. Garcia; Amit Mohanty; Wen-Chiao Lin; Robert S. Cherry

    2013-04-01

    Dynamic analysis of hybrid energy systems (HES) under flexible operation and variable renewable generation is considered in order to better understand various challenges and opportunities associated with the high system variability arising from the integration of renewable energy into the power grid. Unique consequences are addressed by devising advanced HES solutions in which multiple forms of energy commodities, such as electricity and chemical products, may be exchanged. Dynamic models of various unit operations are developed and integrated within two different HES options. One HES option, termed traditional, produces electricity only and consists of a primary heat generator (PHG) (e.g., a small modular reactor), a steam turbine generator, a wind farm, and a battery storage. The other HES option, termed advanced, includes not only the components present in the traditional option but also a chemical plant complex to repurpose excess energy for non-electricity services, such as for the production of chemical goods (e.g., transportation fuel). In either case, a given HES is connected to the power grid at a point of common coupling and requested to deliver a certain electricity generation profile as dictated by a regional power grid operator based on a predicted demand curve. Dynamic analysis of these highly-coupled HES are performed to identify their key dynamical properties and limitations and to prescribe solutions for best managing and mitigating the high variability introduced from incorporating renewable energy into the energy mix. A comparative dynamic cost analysis is also conducted to determine best HES options. The cost function includes a set of metrics for computing fixed costs, such as fixed operations and maintenance (O&M) and overnight capital costs, and also variable operational costs, such as cost of variability, variable O&M cost, and cost of environmental impact, together with revenues. Assuming different options for implementing PHG (e

  10. An analysis of the benefits of photovoltaic-coated glazing on owning and operating costs of high rise commercial buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvester, Keith Everette

    Energy efficient glazing is necessary to reduce heat gains or losses that contribute to the high-energy use of buildings. However, high-rise commercial buildings that use energy efficient glazing are still consumptive. To reduce their energy use further, recent studies have integrated photovoltaic glazed window systems into the building shell. With limited light transmittance due to their required production of electricity, photovoltaic glazed windows can be developed with thermal properties similar to Low-E coatings. Consequently, these window systems can reduce operating costs of buildings without reducing the human satisfaction of the built environment. To understand the relationship between photovoltaic windows, energy use and human satisfaction, this study investigates the effects of photovoltaic glazed windows on energy use of large commercial buildings and includes an assessment of the overall human satisfaction of the workers within photovoltaic glazed office spaces. This study targets high-rise commercial buildings and their occupants in urban centers of the four census regions---North, Northeast, South, and Midwest. A prototypical building was used to develop the base case simulations for the DOE-2 energy simulation program and the PV F-Chart photovoltaic analysis program. By substituting the appropriate variable in the base case simulation for each site, building was simulated to evaluate the impact of the PV glazing on the building's heat loss/gaining as well as the amount of electricity that could be expected from the PV. To test for human satisfaction, a survey was performed to assess the overall preference of the subjects to the office spaces using the photovoltaic glazed windows. An analysis of the variance was also conducted to test for significantly different treatment means. Overall, the findings of this study show that photovoltaic windows significantly decrease the energy used by high-rise commercial buildings. Payback periods 11 to 20 years

  11. Use of Biostratigraphy to Increase Production, Reduce Operating Costs and Risks and Reduce Environmental Concerns in Oil Well Drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Edward Marks

    2005-09-09

    out at the top of the late Miocene, early Mohnian: Bolivina aff hughesi, Rotalia becki, Suggrunda californica, Virgulina grandis, Virgulina ticensis, Bulimina ecuadorana, Denticula lauta and Nonion medio-costatum. Please see Appendix B, Fig. 1, Neogene Zones, p. 91 and Appendix C, chart 5, p. 99 By the use of Stratigraphy, employing both Paleontology and Lithology, we can increase hydrocarbon production, reduce operating costs and risks by the identification of the productive sections, and reduce environmental concerns by drilling less dry holes needlessly.

  12. Reducing harmful emissions discharged into the atmosphere from operating boilers by applying a combination of low-cost technological measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roslyakov, P. V.; Ionkin, I. L.; Pleshanov, K. A.

    2010-12-01

    The operational methods for suppressing nitrogen oxide emissions widely used in gas-and-oil-fired boilers are described. Information is given on implementing integrated operational measures in BKZ-75-39GM and TGM-96B boilers.

  13. 19 CFR 10.197 - Direct costs of processing operations performed in a beneficiary country or countries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... specific merchandise, including fringe benefits, on-the-job training, and the cost of engineering... “costs” of manufacturing the product. These include, but are not limited to: (1) Profit; and (2)...

  14. 19 CFR 10.197 - Direct costs of processing operations performed in a beneficiary country or countries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... specific merchandise, including fringe benefits, on-the-job training, and the cost of engineering... “costs” of manufacturing the product. These include, but are not limited to: (1) Profit; and (2)...

  15. Optimization studies of carbon additives to negative active material for the purpose of extending the life of VRLA batteries in high-rate partial-state-of-charge operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boden, D. P.; Loosemore, D. V.; Spence, M. A.; Wojcinski, T. D.

    The negative plates of lead-acid batteries subjected to partial-state-of-charge (PSOC) operation fail because of the development of an electrically inert film of lead sulfate on their surfaces. It has been found that carbon additives to the negative active material can significantly increase their cycle life in this type of operation. In this paper we show that various types of carbon, including graphite, carbon black eliminate the surface development of lead sulfate and that, in their presence, the lead sulfate becomes homogeneously distributed throughout the active material. Examination of active material by energy dispersive spectroscopy after extensive cycling shows that lead formed during charge of lead sulfate preferentially deposits on the carbon particles that have been embedded in the active material. Electrochemical studies have been carried out on a number of types of carbon additives having a wide range of properties. These included flake, expanded and synthetic graphite, isotropically graphitized carbon, carbon black and activated carbon. We have investigated their effect on the resistivity and surface areas of the negative active material and also on such electrochemical properties as active material utilization and cycle life. Most of the carbon additives increase the utilization of the active material and impressive increases in cycle life have been obtained with over 6000 capacity turnovers having been achieved. However, at this time, we have not been able to correlate either the type or the properties of the carbon with capacity or cycle life. Further work is needed in this area. The increases that have been achieved in cycle life provide evidence that the lead-acid battery is a viable low cost option for hybrid-electric vehicle use.

  16. Profiling stainless steel welding processes to reduce fume emissions, hexavalent chromium emissions and operating costs in the workplace

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Michael; Siert, Arlen; Stone, Samuel; Chen, Bean T.

    2016-01-01

    Nine gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes for stainless steel were assessed for fume generation rates, fume generation rates per g of electrode consumed, and emission rates for hexavalent chromium (Cr6+). Elemental manganese, nickel, chromium, iron emissions per unit length of weld and labor plus consumables costs were similarly measured. Flux-cored arc welding and shielded metal arc (SMAW) processes were also studied. The objective was to identify the best welding processes for reducing workplace exposures, and estimate costs for all processes. Using a conical chamber, fumes were collected, weighed, recovered and analyzed by inductively-coupled atomic emission spectroscopy for metals, and by ion chromatography for Cr6+. GMAW processes used were Surface Tension Transfer™, Regulated Metal Deposition™, Cold Metal Transfer™, short-circuit, axial spray, and pulsed spray modes. Flux-cored welding used gas shielding; SMAW used E308 rods. Costs were estimated as dollars per m length of a ¼ in (6.3 mm) thick horizontal butt weld; equipment costs were estimated as ratios of new equipment costs to a 250 ampere capacity SMAW welding machine. Results indicate a broad range of fume emission factors for the processes studied. Fume emission rates per g of electrode were lowest for GMAW processes such as pulsed-spray mode (0.2 mg/g), and highest for SMAW (8 mg fume/g electrode). Emission rates of Cr6+ ranged from 50 to 7800 μg/min, and Cr6+ generation rates per g electrode ranged from 1 to 270μg/g. Elemental Cr generation rates spanned 13 to 330μg/g. Manganese emission rates ranged from 50 to 300μg/g. Nickel emission rates ranged from 4 to140 μg/g. Labor and consumables costs ranged from $3.15 (GMAW pulsed spray) to $7.40 (SMAW) per meter of finished weld, and were measured or estimated for all 11 processes tested. Equipment costs for some processes may be as much as 5 times the cost of a typical SMAW welding machine. The results show that all of the GMAW processes

  17. Profiling stainless steel welding processes to reduce fume emissions, hexavalent chromium emissions and operating costs in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Keane, Michael; Siert, Arlen; Stone, Samuel; Chen, Bean T

    2016-01-01

    Nine gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes for stainless steel were assessed for fume generation rates, fume generation rates per g of electrode consumed, and emission rates for hexavalent chromium (Cr(6+)). Elemental manganese, nickel, chromium, iron emissions per unit length of weld, and labor plus consumables costs were similarly measured. Flux-cored arc welding and shielded metal arc (SMAW) processes were also studied. The objective was to identify the best welding processes for reducing workplace exposures, and estimate costs for all processes. Using a conical chamber, fumes were collected, weighed, recovered, and analyzed by inductively coupled atomic emission spectroscopy for metals, and by ion chromatography for Cr(6+). GMAW processes used were Surface Tension Transfer, Regulated Metal Deposition, Cold Metal Transfer, short-circuit, axial spray, and pulsed spray modes. Flux-cored welding used gas shielding; SMAW used E308 rods. Costs were estimated as dollars per m length of a ¼ in (6.3 mm) thick horizontal butt weld; equipment costs were estimated as ratios of new equipment costs to a 250 ampere capacity SMAW welding machine. Results indicate a broad range of fume emission factors for the processes studied. Fume emission rates per g of electrode were lowest for GMAW processes such as pulsed-spray mode (0.2 mg/g), and highest for SMAW (8 mg fume/g electrode). Emission rates of Cr(6+) ranged from 50-7800 µg/min, and Cr(6+) generation rates per g electrode ranged from 1-270 µg/g. Elemental Cr generation rates spanned 13-330 µg/g. Manganese emission rates ranged from 50-300 µg/g. Nickel emission rates ranged from 4-140 µg/g. Labor and consumables costs ranged from $3.15 (GMAW pulsed spray) to $7.40 (SMAW) per meter of finished weld, and were measured or estimated for all 11 processes tested. Equipment costs for some processes may be as much as five times the cost of a typical SMAW welding machine. The results show that all of the GMAW processes in this

  18. Strapdown cost trend study and forecast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberlein, A. J.; Savage, P. G.

    1975-01-01

    The potential cost advantages offered by advanced strapdown inertial technology in future commercial short-haul aircraft are summarized. The initial procurement cost and six year cost-of-ownership, which includes spares and direct maintenance cost were calculated for kinematic and inertial navigation systems such that traditional and strapdown mechanization costs could be compared. Cost results for the inertial navigation systems showed that initial costs and the cost of ownership for traditional triple redundant gimbaled inertial navigators are three times the cost of the equivalent skewed redundant strapdown inertial navigator. The net cost advantage for the strapdown kinematic system is directly attributable to the reduction in sensor count for strapdown. The strapdown kinematic system has the added advantage of providing a fail-operational inertial navigation capability for no additional cost due to the use of inertial grade sensors and attitude reference computers.

  19. Grating array systems having a plurality of gratings operative in a coherently additive mode and methods for making such grating array systems

    DOEpatents

    Kessler, Terrance J.; Bunkenburg, Joachim; Huang, Hu

    2007-02-13

    A plurality of gratings (G1, G2) are arranged together with a wavefront sensor, actuators, and feedback system to align the gratings in such a manner, that they operate like a single, large, monolithic grating. Sub-wavelength-scale movements in the mechanical mounting, due to environmental influences, are monitored by an interferometer (28), and compensated by precision actuators (16, 18, 20) that maintain the coherently additive mode. The actuators define the grating plane, and are positioned in response to the wavefronts from the gratings and a reference flat, thus producing the interferogram that contains the alignment information. Movement of the actuators is also in response to a diffraction-limited spot on the CCD (36) to which light diffracted from the gratings is focused. The actuator geometry is implemented to take advantage of the compensating nature of the degrees of freedom between gratings, reducing the number of necessary control variables.

  20. Beyond cost-of-energy, the value-of-energy metric and value-centric approaches to design, operations, and maintenance of wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Kevin

    This thesis is oriented toward developers, owners, operators and investors of renewable energy projects. With increasing demand of renewables, our energy dependence comes down to reducing costs associated with this sector so as to compete with the existing sources. One way of valuing investment potential is to determine and then compare the overall value derived by investing in a particular project. Several engineering and financial levers, one of which is operation and maintenance, affect this value. This thesis provides a useful visual aid to owners and operators by which they can operate and maintain their wind farm so as to achieve maximum value throughout its lifetime. All the necessary components that go into developing a business model of a wind farm project will be discussed. Finally, this tool is valid within the assumptions that are explicitly stated. Real world data and trends are used to provide a practical approach to the optimization.