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Sample records for additional operating costs

  1. Estimating airline operating costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, D. V.

    1978-01-01

    A review was made of the factors affecting commercial aircraft operating and delay costs. From this work, an airline operating cost model was developed which includes a method for estimating the labor and material costs of individual airframe maintenance systems. The model, similar in some respects to the standard Air Transport Association of America (ATA) Direct Operating Cost Model, permits estimates of aircraft-related costs not now included in the standard ATA model (e.g., aircraft service, landing fees, flight attendants, and control fees). A study of the cost of aircraft delay was also made and a method for estimating the cost of certain types of airline delay is described.

  2. Estimating Airline Operating Costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, D. V.

    1978-01-01

    The factors affecting commercial aircraft operating and delay costs were used to develop an airline operating cost model which includes a method for estimating the labor and material costs of individual airframe maintenance systems. The model permits estimates of aircraft related costs, i.e., aircraft service, landing fees, flight attendants, and control fees. A method for estimating the costs of certain types of airline delay is also described.

  3. Operational cost drivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholz, Arthur L.; Dickinson, William J.

    1988-01-01

    To be economically viable, the operations cost of launch vehicles must be reduced by an order of magnitude as compared to the Space Transportation System (STS). A summary of propulsion-related operations cost drivers derived from a two-year study of Shuttle ground operations is presented. Examples are given of the inordinate time and cost of launch operations caused by propulsion systems designs that did not adequately consider impacts on prelaunching processing. Typical of these cost drivers are those caused by central hydraulic systems, storable propellants, gimballed engines, multiple propellants, He and N2 systems and purges, hard starts, high maintenance turbopumps, accessibility problems, and most significantly, the use of multiple, nonintegrated RCS, OMS, and main propulsion systems. Recovery and refurbishment of SRBs have resulted in expensive crash and salvage operations. Vehicle system designers are encouraged to be acutely aware of these cost drivers and to incorporate solutions (beginning with the design concepts) to avoid business as usual and costs as usual.

  4. The Launch Systems Operations Cost Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, Frank A.; Hamaker, Joseph W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    One of NASA's primary missions is to reduce the cost of access to space while simultaneously increasing safety. A key component, and one of the least understood, is the recurring operations and support cost for reusable launch systems. In order to predict these costs, NASA, under the leadership of the Independent Program Assessment Office (IPAO), has commissioned the development of a Launch Systems Operations Cost Model (LSOCM). LSOCM is a tool to predict the operations & support (O&S) cost of new and modified reusable (and partially reusable) launch systems. The requirements are to predict the non-recurring cost for the ground infrastructure and the recurring cost of maintaining that infrastructure, performing vehicle logistics, and performing the O&S actions to return the vehicle to flight. In addition, the model must estimate the time required to cycle the vehicle through all of the ground processing activities. The current version of LSOCM is an amalgamation of existing tools, leveraging our understanding of shuttle operations cost with a means of predicting how the maintenance burden will change as the vehicle becomes more aircraft like. The use of the Conceptual Operations Manpower Estimating Tool/Operations Cost Model (COMET/OCM) provides a solid point of departure based on shuttle and expendable launch vehicle (ELV) experience. The incorporation of the Reliability and Maintainability Analysis Tool (RMAT) as expressed by a set of response surface model equations gives a method for estimating how changing launch system characteristics affects cost and cycle time as compared to today's shuttle system. Plans are being made to improve the model. The development team will be spending the next few months devising a structured methodology that will enable verified and validated algorithms to give accurate cost estimates. To assist in this endeavor the LSOCM team is part of an Agency wide effort to combine resources with other cost and operations professionals to

  5. Total Cost Management: Analyzing Operational Support Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenny, Hans J.

    1996-01-01

    Total cost management, an innovation useful in higher education, is best implemented in the institution's support services. Total cost management is the practice of analyzing and improving an institution's financial and qualitative performance when producing a particular product or service, paying attention to the complete work process and all…

  6. Optimising costs in WLCG operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alandes Pradillo, María; Dimou, Maria; Flix, Josep; Forti, Alessandra; Sciabà, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    The Worldwide LHC Computing Grid project (WLCG) provides the computing and storage resources required by the LHC collaborations to store, process and analyse the 50 Petabytes of data annually generated by the LHC. The WLCG operations are coordinated by a distributed team of managers and experts and performed by people at all participating sites and from all the experiments. Several improvements in the WLCG infrastructure have been implemented during the first long LHC shutdown to prepare for the increasing needs of the experiments during Run2 and beyond. However, constraints in funding will affect not only the computing resources but also the available effort for operations. This paper presents the results of a detailed investigation on the allocation of the effort in the different areas of WLCG operations, identifies the most important sources of inefficiency and proposes viable strategies for optimising the operational cost, taking into account the current trends in the evolution of the computing infrastructure and the computing models of the experiments.

  7. Launch Vehicle Production and Operations Cost Metrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Neeley, James R.; Blackburn, Ruby F.

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, launch vehicle cost has been evaluated based on $/Kg to orbit. This metric is calculated based on assumptions not typically met by a specific mission. These assumptions include the specified orbit whether Low Earth Orbit (LEO), Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO), or both. The metric also assumes the payload utilizes the full lift mass of the launch vehicle, which is rarely true even with secondary payloads.1,2,3 Other approaches for cost metrics have been evaluated including unit cost of the launch vehicle and an approach to consider the full program production and operations costs.4 Unit cost considers the variable cost of the vehicle and the definition of variable costs are discussed. The full program production and operation costs include both the variable costs and the manufacturing base. This metric also distinguishes operations costs from production costs, including pre-flight operational testing. Operations costs also consider the costs of flight operations, including control center operation and maintenance. Each of these 3 cost metrics show different sensitivities to various aspects of launch vehicle cost drivers. The comparison of these metrics provides the strengths and weaknesses of each yielding an assessment useful for cost metric selection for launch vehicle programs.

  8. 14 CFR 93.129 - Additional operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional operations. 93.129 Section 93.129 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES High Density Traffic Airports §...

  9. Additively Manufactured Low Cost Upper Stage Combustion Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Protz, Christopher; Cooper, Ken; Ellis, David; Fikes, John; Jones, Zachary; Kim, Tony; Medina, Cory; Taminger, Karen; Willingham, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Over the past two years NASA's Low Cost Upper Stage Propulsion (LCUSP) project has developed Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies and design tools aimed at reducing the costs and manufacturing time of regeneratively cooled rocket engine components. High pressure/high temperature combustion chambers and nozzles must be regeneratively cooled to survive their operating environment, causing their design fabrication to be costly and time consuming due to the number of individual steps and different processes required. Under LCUSP, AM technologies in Sintered Laser Melting (SLM) GRCop-84 and Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication (EBF3) Inconel 625 have been significantly advanced, allowing the team to successfully fabricate a 25k-class regenerative chamber. Estimates of the costs and schedule of future builds indicate cost reductions and significant schedule reductions will be enabled by this technology. Characterization of the microstructural and mechanical properties of the SLM-produced GRCop-84, EBF3 Inconel 625 and the interface layer between the two has been performed and indicates the properties will meet the design requirements. The LCUSP chamber is to be tested with a previously demonstrated SLM injector in order to advance the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) and demonstrate the capability of the application of these processes. NASA is advancing these technologies to reduce cost and schedule for future engine applications and commercial needs.

  10. 48 CFR 3452.216-70 - Additional cost principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... scientific, cost, and other data needed to support the bids, proposals, and applications. Bid and proposal... as prescribed in 3416.307(b): Additional Cost Principles (MAR 2011) (a) Bid and Proposal Costs. Bid and proposal costs are the immediate costs of preparing bids, proposals, and applications...

  11. 48 CFR 352.216-70 - Additional cost principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... clause: Additional Cost Principles (January 2006) (a) Bid and proposal (B & P) costs. (1) B & P costs are the immediate costs of preparing bids, proposals, and applications for potential Federal and non-Federal contracts, grants, and agreements, including the development of scientific, cost, and other...

  12. 48 CFR 3452.216-70 - Additional cost principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... scientific, cost, and other data needed to support the bids, proposals, and applications. Bid and proposal... as prescribed in 3416.307(b): Additional Cost Principles (MAR 2011) (a) Bid and Proposal Costs. Bid and proposal costs are the immediate costs of preparing bids, proposals, and applications...

  13. Additive Manufacturing of Low Cost Upper Stage Propulsion Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Protz, Christopher; Bowman, Randy; Cooper, Ken; Fikes, John; Taminger, Karen; Wright, Belinda

    2014-01-01

    NASA is currently developing Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies and design tools aimed at reducing the costs and manufacturing time of regeneratively cooled rocket engine components. These Low Cost Upper Stage Propulsion (LCUSP) tasks are funded through NASA's Game Changing Development Program in the Space Technology Mission Directorate. The LCUSP project will develop a copper alloy additive manufacturing design process and develop and optimize the Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication (EBF3) manufacturing process to direct deposit a nickel alloy structural jacket and manifolds onto an SLM manufactured GRCop chamber and Ni-alloy nozzle. In order to develop these processes, the project will characterize both the microstructural and mechanical properties of the SLMproduced GRCop-84, and will explore and document novel design techniques specific to AM combustion devices components. These manufacturing technologies will be used to build a 25K-class regenerative chamber and nozzle (to be used with tested DMLS injectors) that will be tested individually and as a system in hot fire tests to demonstrate the applicability of the technologies. These tasks are expected to bring costs and manufacturing time down as spacecraft propulsion systems typically comprise more than 70% of the total vehicle cost and account for a significant portion of the development schedule. Additionally, high pressure/high temperature combustion chambers and nozzles must be regeneratively cooled to survive their operating environment, causing their design to be time consuming and costly to build. LCUSP presents an opportunity to develop and demonstrate a process that can infuse these technologies into industry, build competition, and drive down costs of future engines.

  14. Naval Reserve Annual Operating Costs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-10-29

    Costs," by Goudreau, Kuzmack and Wiedemann , 15 May 1972. 46 Headquarters Level (Naval Reserve). The resources accounted for in this program element are...34 = $.w 1. . ." :) V, a CC CLA 6C % - - .9 V) 0 Gj L.3c V,, Ii]c ci I.. 4r. clu N14Il I) In c1I1k 0 tr4i , -C’. t- - W r- v 0 0 C ~JJ C’ a Q,~c 0 , C Z C CD

  15. OPERATOR BURDEN IN METAL ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Amy M; Love, Lonnie J

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is an emerging manufacturing process that creates usable machine parts via layer-by-layer joining of a stock material. With this layer-wise approach, high-performance geometries can be created which are impossible with traditional manufacturing methods. Metal AM technology has the potential to significantly reduce the manufacturing burden of developing custom hardware; however, a major consideration in choosing a metal AM system is the required amount of operator involvement (i.e., operator burden) in the manufacturing process. The operator burden not only determines the amount of operator training and specialization required but also the usability of the system in a facility. As operators of several metal AM processes, the Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) at Oak Ridge National Labs is uniquely poised to provide insight into requirements for operator involvement in each of the three major metal AM processes. The paper covers an overview of each of the three metal AM technologies, focusing on the burden on the operator to complete the build cycle, process the part for final use, and reset the AM equipment for future builds.

  16. Modeling Operations Costs for Human Exploration Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shishko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Operations and support (O&S) costs for human spaceflight have not received the same attention in the cost estimating community as have development costs. This is unfortunate as O&S costs typically comprise a majority of life-cycle costs (LCC) in such programs as the International Space Station (ISS) and the now-cancelled Constellation Program. Recognizing this, the Constellation Program and NASA HQs supported the development of an O&S cost model specifically for human spaceflight. This model, known as the Exploration Architectures Operations Cost Model (ExAOCM), provided the operations cost estimates for a variety of alternative human missions to the moon, Mars, and Near-Earth Objects (NEOs) in architectural studies. ExAOCM is philosophically based on the DoD Architecture Framework (DoDAF) concepts of operational nodes, systems, operational functions, and milestones. This paper presents some of the historical background surrounding the development of the model, and discusses the underlying structure, its unusual user interface, and lastly, previous examples of its use in the aforementioned architectural studies.

  17. Operation and maintenance cost-cutting

    SciTech Connect

    Hollingshead, T.W.

    1996-12-31

    This presentation by Timothy W. Hollingshead, Technical Services Manager, Pacific Gas and Electric, is about cutting costs in the Operation and Maintenance phase of geothermal energy production. The necessity of cost control, keeping workers well-trained and avoiding OSHA fines, taking advantages of new technologies, and establishing predictive maintenance programs are some of the issues discussed in this article.

  18. Low Cost Mission Operations Workshop. [Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The presentations given at the Low Cost (Space) Mission Operations (LCMO) Workshop are outlined. The LCMO concepts are covered in four introductory sections: Definition of Mission Operations (OPS); Mission Operations (MOS) Elements; The Operations Concept; and Mission Operations for Two Classes of Missions (operationally simple and complex). Individual presentations cover the following topics: Science Data Processing and Analysis; Mis sion Design, Planning, and Sequencing; Data Transport and Delivery, and Mission Coordination and Engineering Analysis. A list of panelists who participated in the conference is included along with a listing of the contact persons for obtaining more information concerning LCMO at JPL. The presentation of this document is in outline and graphic form.

  19. Cost efficient operations for Discovery class missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, G. E.; Landshof, J. A.; Whitworth, G. W.

    1994-01-01

    The Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) program at The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory is scheduled to launch the first spacecraft in NASA's Discovery program. The Discovery program is to promote low cost spacecraft design, development, and mission operations for planetary space missions. The authors describe the NEAR mission and discuss the design and development of the NEAR Mission Operations System and the NEAR Ground System with an emphasis on those aspects of the design that are conducive to low-cost operations.

  20. EOS Operations Systems: EDOS Implemented Changes to Reduce Operations Costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordier, Guy R.; Gomez-Rosa, Carlos; McLemore, Bruce D.

    2007-01-01

    The authors describe in this paper the progress achieved to-date with the reengineering of the Earth Observing System (EOS) Data and Operations System (EDOS), the experience gained in the process and the ensuing reduction of ground systems operations costs. The reengineering effort included a major methodology change, applying to an existing schedule driven system, a data-driven system approach.

  1. Uninterruptible Power Systems: Operational and Cost Considerations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-03-01

    earn a profit . It is therefore inappropriate to express costs of computer disruption in terms of business lost, spoilage of in-process materials, or...the direct cost-assignment approach is inappropriate since the Department of Defense is not in business to earn a profit . Disruptions of service and...York Stock Exchange, ins Wnce companies, petroleum chemical plants, rubber and plastics industries, whose operations (and profits ) depend upon *Dranetz

  2. 14 CFR 93.129 - Additional operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES High Density Traffic Airports § 93... under IFR at a designated high density traffic airport without regard to the maximum number of operations allocated for that airport if the operation is not a scheduled operation to or from a high...

  3. 14 CFR 93.129 - Additional operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES High Density Traffic Airports § 93... under IFR at a designated high density traffic airport without regard to the maximum number of operations allocated for that airport if the operation is not a scheduled operation to or from a high...

  4. 14 CFR 93.129 - Additional operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES High Density Traffic Airports § 93... under IFR at a designated high density traffic airport without regard to the maximum number of operations allocated for that airport if the operation is not a scheduled operation to or from a high...

  5. 14 CFR 93.129 - Additional operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES High Density Traffic Airports § 93... under IFR at a designated high density traffic airport without regard to the maximum number of operations allocated for that airport if the operation is not a scheduled operation to or from a high...

  6. US nuclear power plant operating cost and experience summaries

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, W.E.; Reid, R.L.; White, V.S.

    1998-02-01

    NUREG/CR-6577, U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries, has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Cost incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, representing fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operating summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from annual operating reports submitted by the licensees, plant histories contained in Nuclear Power Experience, trade press articles, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) web site (www.nrc.gov).

  7. Pension Costs on DOD Contracts: Additional Guidance Needed to Ensure Costs Are Consistent and Reasonable

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    support from a team of DOD actuaries . DOD audits projected and actual costs for contracts, including pension costs, to ensure they are allowable...qualified and credentialed actuaries ) and collected contractor data on incurred CAS pension costs from 2002 to 2011. To understand how pension costs... Actuary of the GAO for actuarial soundness. We also gathered contractor projections of CAS pension costs for 2012 to 2016. See appendix I for additional

  8. Costing Complex Products, Operations, and Support

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-30

    Airborne, Maritime and Fixed Station Joint Tactical Radio System = ==================^Åèìáëáíáçå=oÉëÉ~êÅÜW=`ob^qfkd=pvkbodv=clo=fkclojba=`e^kdb=====- ii...positions in Econometrics and Operations Research and in National Security Studies at Washington State University and Harvard University. He is active...research at the present time and to guide its future development. Background The costing of major defense projects is an area of perennial difficulty

  9. The cost of trauma operating theatre inefficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ang, W.W.; Sabharwal, S.; Johannsson, H.; Bhattacharya, R.; Gupte, C.M.

    2016-01-01

    The National Health Service (NHS) is currently facing a financial crisis with a projected deficit of £2billion by the end of financial year 2015/16. As operating rooms (OR) are one of the costliest components in secondary care, improving theatre efficiency should be at the forefront of efforts to improve health service efficiency. The objectives of this study were to characterize the causes of trauma OR delays and to estimate the cost of this inefficiency. A 1-month prospective single-centre study in St. Mary's Hospital. Turnaround time (TT) was used as the surrogate parameter to measure theatre efficiency. Factors including patient age, ASA score and presence of surgical and anaesthetic consultant were evaluated to identify positive or negative associations with theatre delays. Inefficiency cost was calculated by multiplying the time wasted with staff capacity costs and opportunity costs, found to be £24.77/minute. The commonest causes for increased TT were delays in sending for patients (50%) and problems with patient transport to the OR (31%). 461 min of delay was observed in 12 days, equivalent to loss of £951.58/theatre/day. Non-statistically significant trends were seen between length of delays and advancing patient age, ASA score and absence of either a senior clinician or an anaesthetic consultant. Interestingly, the trend was not as strong for absence of an anaesthetic consultant. This study found delays in operating TT to represent a sizable cost, with potential efficiency savings based on TT of £347,327/theatre/year. Further study of a larger sample is warranted to better evaluate the identified trends. PMID:27047660

  10. 48 CFR 246.470-1 - Assessment of additional costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Assessment of additional costs. 246.470-1 Section 246.470-1 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTRACT MANAGEMENT QUALITY ASSURANCE Government Contract...

  11. Children's Construction of the Operation of Addition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grobecker, Betsey

    Six- to eight-year-old children (N=42) who were identified by their teachers as within the average range of ability in mathematics were individually tested on three different mathematics tasks. On the flashcard task and the nonverbal task where children replicated the number of buttons placed under a box, the same 14 addition problems with sums up…

  12. Cost Estimation of Laser Additive Manufacturing of Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piili, Heidi; Happonen, Ari; Väistö, Tapio; Venkataramanan, Vijaikrishnan; Partanen, Jouni; Salminen, Antti

    Laser additive manufacturing (LAM) is a layer wise fabrication method in which a laser beam melts metallic powder to form solid objects. Although 3D printing has been invented 30 years ago, the industrial use is quite limited whereas the introduction of cheap consumer 3D printers, in recent years, has familiarized the 3D printing. Interest is focused more and more in manufacturing of functional parts. Aim of this study is to define and discuss the current economic opportunities and restrictions of LAM process. Manufacturing costs were studied with different build scenarios each with estimated cost structure by calculated build time and calculating the costs of the machine, material and energy with optimized machine utilization. All manufacturing and time simulations in this study were carried out with a research machine equal to commercial EOS M series equipment. The study shows that the main expense in LAM is the investment cost of the LAM machine, compared to which the relative proportions of the energy and material costs are very low. The manufacturing time per part is the key factor to optimize costs of LAM.

  13. Naval Aviation Costs: Targeting Operations and Support

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    17 Defense AT&L: November–December 2013 Naval Aviation Costs Targeting Operations and Support Capt. Robert Farmer n Capt. Keith Nixon n Capt...ONR Maj. Gen. Murray, TECOM Brig. Gen. Jansson, DLA Aviation SES Gilpin , DASN (Air) SES Stiller, DASN (Ships) SES Zangardi, DASN (C4I) *NAE Air... Robert Brown Training/Training Supt 6.7.6 – Lorie Nace Support Equipment 6.7.7 – Bruce Wilhelm Industrial Business Ops 6.8D – Roy Harris Tech Dir

  14. LIFE Cost of Electricity, Capital and Operating Costs

    SciTech Connect

    Anklam, T

    2011-04-14

    Successful commercialization of fusion energy requires economic viability as well as technical and scientific feasibility. To assess economic viability, we have conducted a pre-conceptual level evaluation of LIFE economics. Unit costs are estimated from a combination of bottom-up costs estimates, working with representative vendors, and scaled results from previous studies of fission and fusion plants. An integrated process model of a LIFE power plant was developed to integrate and optimize unit costs and calculate top level metrics such as cost of electricity and power plant capital cost. The scope of this activity was the entire power plant site. Separately, a development program to deliver the required specialized equipment has been assembled. Results show that LIFE power plant cost of electricity and plant capital cost compare favorably to estimates for new-build LWR's, coal and gas - particularly if indicative costs of carbon capture and sequestration are accounted for.

  15. Operative costs, reasons for operative waste, and vendor credit replacement in spinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.; Roberts, Rita; Collins, John

    2015-01-01

    Background: In 2012, Epstein et al. documented that educating spinal surgeons reduced the cost of operative waste (explanted devices: placed but removed prior to closure) occurring during anterior cervical diskectomy/fusion from 20% to 5.8%.[5] This prompted the development of a two-pronged spine surgeon-education program (2012-2014) aimed at decreasing operative costs for waste, and reducing the nine reasons for operative waste. Methods: The spine surgeon-education program involved posting the data for operative costs of waste and the nine reasons for operative waste over the neurosurgery/orthopedic scrub sinks every quarter. These data were compared for 2012 (latter 10 months), 2013 (12 months), and 2014 (first 9 months) (e.g. data were normalized). Savings from a 2013 Vendor Credit Replacement program were also calculated. Results: From 2012 to 2013 and 2014, spinal operative costs for waste were, respectively reduced by 64.7% and 61% for orthopedics, and 49.4% and 45.2% for neurosurgery. Although reduced by the program, the major reason for operative waste for all 3 years remained surgeon-related factors (e.g. 159.6, to 67, and 96, respectively). Alternatively, the eight other reasons for operative waste were reduced from 68.4 (2012) to 12 (2013) and finally to zero by 2014. Additionally, the Vendor Replacement program for 2013 netted $78,564. Conclusions: The spine surgeon-education program reduced the costs/reasons for operative waste for 2012 to lower levels by 2013 and 2014. Although the major cost/reasons for operative waste were attributed to surgeon-related factors, these declined while the other eight reasons for operative waste were reduced to zero by 2014. PMID:26005582

  16. Strategic missile (Minuteman) operating and support cost factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, M. W.

    1985-09-01

    The objective of this special study was to review the spectrum of available cost models and cost studies addressing strategic missiles, evaluate the elements of cost pertaining to operation and support, establish a comprehensive cost element structure to serve as both a standard or checklist in accomplishing cost estimates and the basis from which to develop Air Force cost factors. And finally, actually develop operations and support cost factors for Air Force strategic missiles and make them available to the cost community through publication in AFR 173-13. This paper was presented at the Annual DOD Cost Analysis Symposium.

  17. A life cycle cost economics model for projects with uniformly varying operating costs. [management planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, D. S.

    1977-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed for calculating the life cycle costs for a project where the operating costs increase or decrease in a linear manner with time. The life cycle cost is shown to be a function of the investment costs, initial operating costs, operating cost gradient, project life time, interest rate for capital and salvage value. The results show that the life cycle cost for a project can be grossly underestimated (or overestimated) if the operating costs increase (or decrease) uniformly over time rather than being constant as is often assumed in project economic evaluations. The following range of variables is examined: (1) project life from 2 to 30 years; (2) interest rate from 0 to 15 percent per year; and (3) operating cost gradient from 5 to 90 percent of the initial operating costs. A numerical example plus tables and graphs is given to help calculate project life cycle costs over a wide range of variables.

  18. Integrated operations/payloads/fleet analysis. Volume 3: System costs. Appendix A: Program direct costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Individualized program direct costs for each satellite program are presented. This breakdown provides the activity level dependent costs for each satellite program. The activity level dependent costs, or, more simply, program direct costs, are comprised of the total payload costs (as these costs are strictly program dependent) and the direct launch vehicle costs. Only those incremental launch vehicle costs associated directly with the satellite program are considered. For expendable launch vehicles the direct costs include the vehicle investment hardware costs and the launch operations costs. For the reusable STS vehicles the direct costs include only the launch operations, recovery operations, command and control, vehicle maintenance, and propellant support. The costs associated with amortization of reusable vehicle investment, RDT&E range support, etc., are not included.

  19. Cost effectiveness of operator features in equipment design.

    PubMed

    Williams, J C

    1983-06-01

    In design negotiation, the attribution of credible values to the incorporation or deletion of operator features allows engineers the freedom to judge the overall effect of human factors recommendations in relation to the achievement of a design specification. Likewise in the development phase, product planners frequently need more precise statements about productivity, training needs and general operational performance than, "it will be greater/less, worse/better than...". The method described utilises measured and synthetic data, learning theory and Markov processes to calculate the likelihood of operator task failure. These failure rates are then treated via filter factors derived from the application of the Nominal Groups Technique to give a global statement of the likelihood of operator failure resulting in unscheduled calls for service. Using the relationship between the cost of service calls and the overall life cost of developing, manufacturing, marketing and supporting a leased product, it is then possible to place credible values on the design features in question. Thus during the design process it becomes feasible to calculate the likely effects of human factors recommendations and modifications in relation to manufacturing costs, and thereby facilitate rational assessment of their implementation on a sound economic basis. This technique has been used to considerable effect, and represents a useful additional tool for the human factors practitioner in the design negotiation process. Further developments and refinements are planned, and it is anticipated that a similar technique will shortly be available to enable assessment of the effectiveness of product training programmes and job aids.

  20. Breckinridge Project, initial effort. Report IX. Operating cost estimate

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    Operating costs are normally broken into three major categories: variable costs including raw materials, annual catalyst and chemicals, and utilities; semi-variable costs including labor and labor related cost; and fixed or capital related charges. The raw materials and utilities costs are proportional to production; however, a small component of utilities cost is independent of production. The catalyst and chemicals costs are also normally proportional to production. Semi-variable costs include direct labor, maintenance labor, labor supervision, contract maintenance, maintenance materials, payroll overheads, operation supplies, and general overhead and administration. Fixed costs include local taxes, insurance and the time value of the capital investment. The latter charge often includes the investor's anticipated return on investment. In determining operating costs for financial analysis, return on investment (ROI) and depreciation are not treated as cash operating costs. These costs are developed in the financial analysis; the annual operating cost determined here omits ROI and depreciation. Project Annual Operating Costs are summarized in Table 1. Detailed supporting information for the cost elements listed below is included in the following sections: Electrical, catalyst and chemicals, and salaries and wages.

  1. 48 CFR 352.216-70 - Additional cost principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... needed to support the bids, proposals, and applications. (2) B & P costs of the current accounting period are allowable as indirect costs. (3) B & P costs of past accounting periods are unallowable in the current period. However, if the organization's established practice is to treat these costs by some...

  2. 48 CFR 3452.216-70 - Additional cost principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ACQUISITION REGULATION CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and... costs of the current accounting period are allowable as indirect costs; bid and proposal costs of past accounting periods are unallowable as costs of the current period. However, if the organization's...

  3. An analysis of short haul airline operating costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanafani, A.; Taghavi, S.

    1975-01-01

    The demand and supply characteristics of short haul air transportation systems are investigated in terms of airline operating costs. Direct, indirect, and ground handling costs are included. Supply models of short haul air transportation systems are constructed.

  4. 48 CFR 352.216-70 - Additional cost principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... include independent research and development (IR & D) costs covered by the following paragraph, or pre-award costs covered by paragraph 36 of Attachment B to OMB Circular A-122. (b) IR & D costs. (1) IR & D...-Federal contracts, grants, or other agreements. (2) IR & D shall be allocated its proportionate share...

  5. 48 CFR 352.216-70 - Additional cost principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... include independent research and development (IR & D) costs covered by the following paragraph, or pre-award costs covered by paragraph 36 of Attachment B to OMB Circular A-122. (b) IR & D costs. (1) IR & D...-Federal contracts, grants, or other agreements. (2) IR & D shall be allocated its proportionate share...

  6. 48 CFR 352.216-70 - Additional cost principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... include independent research and development (IR & D) costs covered by the following paragraph, or pre-award costs covered by paragraph 36 of Attachment B to OMB Circular A-122. (b) IR & D costs. (1) IR & D...-Federal contracts, grants, or other agreements. (2) IR & D shall be allocated its proportionate share...

  7. Operational Impacts of Operating Reserve Demand Curves on Production Cost and Reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Krad, Ibrahim; Ibanez, Eduardo; Ela, Erik; Gao, Wenzhong

    2015-11-02

    The electric power industry landscape is continually evolving. As emerging technologies such as wind, solar, electric vehicles, and energy storage systems become more cost-effective and present in the system, traditional power system operating strategies will need to be reevaluated. The presence of wind and solar generation (commonly referred to as variable generation) may result in an increase in the variability and uncertainty of the net load profile. One mechanism to mitigate this is to schedule and dispatch additional operating reserves. These operating reserves aim to ensure that there is enough capacity online in the system to account for the increased variability and uncertainty occurring at finer temporal resolutions. A new operating reserve strategy, referred to as flexibility reserve, has been introduced in some regions. A similar implementation is explored in this paper, and its implications on power system operations are analyzed.

  8. Operational Impacts of Operating Reserve Demand Curves on Production Cost and Reliability: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Krad, Ibrahim; Ibanez, Eduardo; Ela, Erik; Gao, Wenzhong

    2015-10-27

    The electric power industry landscape is continually evolving. As emerging technologies such as wind, solar, electric vehicles, and energy storage systems become more cost-effective and present in the system, traditional power system operating strategies will need to be reevaluated. The presence of wind and solar generation (commonly referred to as variable generation) may result in an increase in the variability and uncertainty of the net load profile. One mechanism to mitigate this is to schedule and dispatch additional operating reserves. These operating reserves aim to ensure that there is enough capacity online in the system to account for the increased variability and uncertainty occurring at finer temporal resolutions. A new operating reserve strategy, referred to as flexibility reserve, has been introduced in some regions. A similar implementation is explored in this paper, and its implications on power system operations are analyzed.

  9. Operations and support cost modeling of conceptual space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebeling, Charles

    1994-01-01

    The University of Dayton is pleased to submit this annual report to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center which documents the development of an operations and support (O&S) cost model as part of a larger life cycle cost (LCC) structure. It is intended for use during the conceptual design of new launch vehicles and spacecraft. This research is being conducted under NASA Research Grant NAG-1-1327. This research effort changes the focus from that of the first two years in which a reliability and maintainability model was developed to the initial development of an operations and support life cycle cost model. Cost categories were initially patterned after NASA's three axis work breakdown structure consisting of a configuration axis (vehicle), a function axis, and a cost axis. A revised cost element structure (CES), which is currently under study by NASA, was used to established the basic cost elements used in the model. While the focus of the effort was on operations and maintenance costs and other recurring costs, the computerized model allowed for other cost categories such as RDT&E and production costs to be addressed. Secondary tasks performed concurrent with the development of the costing model included support and upgrades to the reliability and maintainability (R&M) model. The primary result of the current research has been a methodology and a computer implementation of the methodology to provide for timely operations and support cost analysis during the conceptual design activities.

  10. Computerized operating cost model for industrial steam generation

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, T.D.

    1983-02-01

    Pending EPA regulations, establishing revised emission levels for industrial boilers are perceived to have an effect on the relative costs of steam production technologies. To aid in the comparison of competitive boiler technologies, the Steam Cost Code was developed which provides levelized steam costs reflecting the effects of a number of key steam cost parameters. The Steam Cost Code is a user interactive FORTRAN program designed to operate on a VAX computer system. The program requires the user to input a number of variables describing the design characteristics, capital costs, and operating conditions for a specific boiler system. Part of the input to the Steam Cost Code is the capital cost of the steam production system. The capital cost is obtained from a program called INDCEPT, developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory under Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center sponsorship.

  11. 49 CFR 218.107 - Additional operational requirements for hand-operated crossover switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional operational requirements for hand... hand-operated crossover switches. (a) Each railroad shall adopt and comply with an operating rule which... requirements of this section. (b) Hand-operated crossover switches, generally. Both hand-operated switches of...

  12. 49 CFR 218.107 - Additional operational requirements for hand-operated crossover switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional operational requirements for hand... hand-operated crossover switches. (a) Each railroad shall adopt and comply with an operating rule which... requirements of this section. (b) Hand-operated crossover switches, generally. Both hand-operated switches of...

  13. 49 CFR 218.107 - Additional operational requirements for hand-operated crossover switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional operational requirements for hand... hand-operated crossover switches. (a) Each railroad shall adopt and comply with an operating rule which... requirements of this section. (b) Hand-operated crossover switches, generally. Both hand-operated switches of...

  14. Cut operating costs by firing local fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Schwieger, B.

    1983-06-01

    Technology being applied in foreign countries, that may have merit here, is covered in a new annual publication, International Power Systems. Three excerpts are presented below. First, a boiler serving unit at Puente Nuevo in Cordoba is equipped to burn both low-grade anthracite and bituminous coal. Use of marginal quality coal reduces costs. Second, the Voelkingen boiler burns pulverized coal conventionally, but also coal-washes wastes in fluidized-bed combustors (which are detailed). Third, SO/sub 2/ control is accomplished with the Saarberg-Hoelter process, designed to remove SO/sub 2/ from boiler and process wastes with a low-cost line-scrubbing solution and to produce usable gypsum end product. The Voelkingen scrubber is installed inside the station's crossflow cooling tower. Other international systems for power plants will be featured in IPS.

  15. The EP-3E vs. the BAMS UAS: An Operating and Support Cost Comparison

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    thesis is to reexamine, compare and analyze the Operating and Support ( O &S) costs for both the EP-3E ISR aircraft with the Broad Area Maritime...capability. This comparison includes all costs from initial system deployment through the end of the platforms’ service life. This thesis uses the revised O &S...typical O &S comparison, this thesis modifies the existing BAMS O &S costs to account for the additional costs of bandwidth, ground station support

  16. The thermodynamic cost of quantum operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedingham, D. J.; Maroney, O. J. E.

    2016-11-01

    The amount of heat generated by computers is rapidly becoming one of the main problems for developing new generations of information technology. The thermodynamics of computation sets the ultimate physical bounds on heat generation. A lower bound is set by the Landauer limit, at which computation becomes thermodynamically reversible. For classical computation there is no physical principle which prevents this limit being reached, and approaches to it are already being experimentally tested. In this paper we show that for quantum computation with a set of signal states satisfying given conditions, there is an unavoidable excess heat generation that renders it inherently thermodynamically irreversible. The Landauer limit cannot, in general, be reached by quantum computers. We show the existence of a lower bound to the heat generated by quantum computing that exceeds that given by the Landauer limit, give the special conditions where this excess cost may be avoided, and provide a protocol for achieving the limiting heat cost when these conditions are met. We also show how classical computing falls within the special conditions.

  17. Budgeting Facilities Operation Costs Using the Facilities Operation Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    OF ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS BOS - Base Operating Support CNIC - Commander, Navy Installations Command COLS - Common Output Level Standard DECA ...of several different funding sources. Naval Support Activity Washington has five organizations (Navy Active, DECA , DODEA, DLA, and Other) forecasted

  18. 49 CFR 218.105 - Additional operational requirements for hand-operated main track switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-operated main track switches. 218.105 Section 218.105 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... PRACTICES Handling Equipment, Switches, and Fixed Derails § 218.105 Additional operational requirements for hand-operated main track switches. (a) Each railroad shall adopt and comply with an operating...

  19. 49 CFR 218.105 - Additional operational requirements for hand-operated main track switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-operated main track switches. 218.105 Section 218.105 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... PRACTICES Handling Equipment, Switches, and Fixed Derails § 218.105 Additional operational requirements for hand-operated main track switches. (a) Each railroad shall adopt and comply with an operating...

  20. 49 CFR 218.107 - Additional operational requirements for hand-operated crossover switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-operated crossover switches. 218.107 Section 218.107 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... PRACTICES Handling Equipment, Switches, and Fixed Derails § 218.107 Additional operational requirements for hand-operated crossover switches. (a) Each railroad shall adopt and comply with an operating rule...

  1. 49 CFR 218.107 - Additional operational requirements for hand-operated crossover switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-operated crossover switches. 218.107 Section 218.107 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... PRACTICES Handling Equipment, Switches, and Fixed Derails § 218.107 Additional operational requirements for hand-operated crossover switches. (a) Each railroad shall adopt and comply with an operating rule...

  2. Learning Costs: Operating Cost Analysis for New Designs for the Comprehensive High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickabaugh, James R.; And Others

    The cost factors involved in the New Designs for the Comprehensive High School project were compared with the traditional operating costs of a comprehensive high school in the United States. The high school cost analysis was based on expenditure profiles developed by the Educational Research Service (ERS). ERS data were manipulated to derive an…

  3. Cost Analysis In A Multi-Mission Operations Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newhouse, M.; Felton, L.; Bornas, N.; Botts, D.; Roth, K.; Ijames, G.; Montgomery, P.

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft control centers have evolved from dedicated, single-mission or single missiontype support to multi-mission, service-oriented support for operating a variety of mission types. At the same time, available money for projects is shrinking and competition for new missions is increasing. These factors drive the need for an accurate and flexible model to support estimating service costs for new or extended missions; the cost model in turn drives the need for an accurate and efficient approach to service cost analysis. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) provides operations services to a variety of customers around the world. HOSC customers range from launch vehicle test flights; to International Space Station (ISS) payloads; to small, short duration missions; and has included long duration flagship missions. The HOSC recently completed a detailed analysis of service costs as part of the development of a complete service cost model. The cost analysis process required the team to address a number of issues. One of the primary issues involves the difficulty of reverse engineering individual mission costs in a highly efficient multimission environment, along with a related issue of the value of detailed metrics or data to the cost model versus the cost of obtaining accurate data. Another concern is the difficulty of balancing costs between missions of different types and size and extrapolating costs to different mission types. The cost analysis also had to address issues relating to providing shared, cloud-like services in a government environment, and then assigning an uncertainty or risk factor to cost estimates that are based on current technology, but will be executed using future technology. Finally the cost analysis needed to consider how to validate the resulting cost models taking into account the non-homogeneous nature of the available cost data and the

  4. Cost Analysis in a Multi-Mission Operations Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felton, Larry; Newhouse, Marilyn; Bornas, Nick; Botts, Dennis; Ijames, Gayleen; Montgomery, Patty; Roth, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft control centers have evolved from dedicated, single-mission or single mission-type support to multi-mission, service-oriented support for operating a variety of mission types. At the same time, available money for projects is shrinking and competition for new missions is increasing. These factors drive the need for an accurate and flexible model to support estimating service costs for new or extended missions; the cost model in turn drives the need for an accurate and efficient approach to service cost analysis. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) provides operations services to a variety of customers around the world. HOSC customers range from launch vehicle test flights; to International Space Station (ISS) payloads; to small, short duration missions; and has included long duration flagship missions. The HOSC recently completed a detailed analysis of service costs as part of the development of a complete service cost model. The cost analysis process required the team to address a number of issues. One of the primary issues involves the difficulty of reverse engineering individual mission costs in a highly efficient multi-mission environment, along with a related issue of the value of detailed metrics or data to the cost model versus the cost of obtaining accurate data. Another concern is the difficulty of balancing costs between missions of different types and size and extrapolating costs to different mission types. The cost analysis also had to address issues relating to providing shared, cloud-like services in a government environment, and then assigning an uncertainty or risk factor to cost estimates that are based on current technology, but will be executed using future technology. Finally the cost analysis needed to consider how to validate the resulting cost models taking into account the non-homogeneous nature of the available cost data and

  5. Computer Maintenance Operations Center (CMOC), additional computer support equipment ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Computer Maintenance Operations Center (CMOC), additional computer support equipment - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Techinical Equipment Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  6. Operations and support cost modeling using Markov chains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unal, Resit

    1989-01-01

    Systems for future missions will be selected with life cycle costs (LCC) as a primary evaluation criterion. This reflects the current realization that only systems which are considered affordable will be built in the future due to the national budget constaints. Such an environment calls for innovative cost modeling techniques which address all of the phases a space system goes through during its life cycle, namely: design and development, fabrication, operations and support; and retirement. A significant portion of the LCC for reusable systems are generated during the operations and support phase (OS). Typically, OS costs can account for 60 to 80 percent of the total LCC. Clearly, OS costs are wholly determined or at least strongly influenced by decisions made during the design and development phases of the project. As a result OS costs need to be considered and estimated early in the conceptual phase. To be effective, an OS cost estimating model needs to account for actual instead of ideal processes by associating cost elements with probabilities. One approach that may be suitable for OS cost modeling is the use of the Markov Chain Process. Markov chains are an important method of probabilistic analysis for operations research analysts but they are rarely used for life cycle cost analysis. This research effort evaluates the use of Markov Chains in LCC analysis by developing OS cost model for a hypothetical reusable space transportation vehicle (HSTV) and suggests further uses of the Markov Chain process as a design-aid tool.

  7. The Application of Architecture Frameworks to Modelling Exploration Operations Costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shishko, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Developments in architectural frameworks and system-of-systems thinking have provided useful constructs for systems engineering. DoDAF concepts, language, and formalisms, in particular, provide a natural way of conceptualizing an operations cost model applicable to NASA's space exploration vision. Not all DoDAF products have meaning or apply to a DoDAF inspired operations cost model, but this paper describes how such DoDAF concepts as nodes, systems, and operational activities relate to the development of a model to estimate exploration operations costs. The paper discusses the specific implementation to the Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) operational functions/activities currently being developed and presents an overview of how this powerful representation can apply to robotic space missions as well.

  8. 19 CFR 10.877 - Direct costs of processing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.877 Direct costs of processing operations. (a) Items included... manufacture of the specific good, including fringe benefits, on-the-job training, and the costs of engineering... depreciation on machinery and equipment that are allocable to the specific good; (3) Research,...

  9. 19 CFR 10.814 - Direct costs of processing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.814 Direct costs of processing operations. (a) Items included... manufacture of the specific good, including fringe benefits, on-the-job training, and the costs of engineering... depreciation on machinery and equipment that are allocable to the specific good; (3) Research,...

  10. 19 CFR 10.774 - Direct costs of processing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.774 Direct costs of processing operations. (a) Items included... manufacture of the specific good, including fringe benefits, on-the-job training, and the costs of engineering... depreciation on machinery and equipment that are allocable to the specific good; (3) Research,...

  11. 19 CFR 10.877 - Direct costs of processing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.877 Direct costs of processing operations. (a) Items included... manufacture of the specific good, including fringe benefits, on-the-job training, and the costs of engineering... depreciation on machinery and equipment that are allocable to the specific good; (3) Research,...

  12. 19 CFR 10.774 - Direct costs of processing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.774 Direct costs of processing operations. (a) Items included... manufacture of the specific good, including fringe benefits, on-the-job training, and the costs of engineering... depreciation on machinery and equipment that are allocable to the specific good; (3) Research,...

  13. 19 CFR 10.814 - Direct costs of processing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.814 Direct costs of processing operations. (a) Items included... manufacture of the specific good, including fringe benefits, on-the-job training, and the costs of engineering... depreciation on machinery and equipment that are allocable to the specific good; (3) Research,...

  14. 19 CFR 10.814 - Direct costs of processing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.814 Direct costs of processing operations. (a) Items included... manufacture of the specific good, including fringe benefits, on-the-job training, and the costs of engineering... depreciation on machinery and equipment that are allocable to the specific good; (3) Research,...

  15. 19 CFR 10.814 - Direct costs of processing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.814 Direct costs of processing operations. (a) Items included... manufacture of the specific good, including fringe benefits, on-the-job training, and the costs of engineering... depreciation on machinery and equipment that are allocable to the specific good; (3) Research,...

  16. 19 CFR 10.877 - Direct costs of processing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.877 Direct costs of processing operations. (a) Items included... manufacture of the specific good, including fringe benefits, on-the-job training, and the costs of engineering... depreciation on machinery and equipment that are allocable to the specific good; (3) Research,...

  17. 19 CFR 10.774 - Direct costs of processing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.774 Direct costs of processing operations. (a) Items included... manufacture of the specific good, including fringe benefits, on-the-job training, and the costs of engineering... depreciation on machinery and equipment that are allocable to the specific good; (3) Research,...

  18. 19 CFR 10.774 - Direct costs of processing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.774 Direct costs of processing operations. (a) Items included... manufacture of the specific good, including fringe benefits, on-the-job training, and the costs of engineering... depreciation on machinery and equipment that are allocable to the specific good; (3) Research,...

  19. 19 CFR 10.877 - Direct costs of processing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.877 Direct costs of processing operations. (a) Items included... manufacture of the specific good, including fringe benefits, on-the-job training, and the costs of engineering... depreciation on machinery and equipment that are allocable to the specific good; (3) Research,...

  20. Investment and operating costs of binary cycle geothermal power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, B.; Brugman, J.

    1974-01-01

    Typical investment and operating costs for geothermal power plants employing binary cycle technology and utilizing the heat energy in liquid-dominated reservoirs are discussed. These costs are developed as a function of reservoir temperature. The factors involved in optimizing plant design are discussed. A relationship between the value of electrical energy and the value of the heat energy in the reservoir is suggested.

  1. Evaluation of electric vehicle production and operating costs

    SciTech Connect

    Cuenca, R. M.; Gaines, L. L.; Vyas, A. D.

    2000-05-23

    This report presents an analysis of the initial cost of electric vehicles (EVs). The manufacturing and retail cost structure of mature conventional vehicles produced at high volume is analyzed first, and the contributions by various cost categories to vehicle price are estimated. The costs are then allocated to such vehicle component groups as body, chassis, and powertrain. The similarities and differences among various component systems are reviewed. In electric vehicles, an electric drive replaces the conventional powertrain, and a battery pack replaces the fuel system. Three types of traction motors are reviewed, and their cost in high-volume production is analyzed. Various components of the motor and controller package are analyzed, and their representative costs are summarized. Four types of EV batteries are reviewed, and their costs are presented. Various alternatives for the low-, medium-, and high-volume production of EVs are evaluated, and some sample costs are presented. A methodology that estimates initial and operating costs on the basis of this analysis is presented. The methodology also estimates the average lifetime cost of owning and operating an electric vehicle.

  2. 49 CFR 218.105 - Additional operational requirements for hand-operated main track switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional operational requirements for hand... hand-operated main track switches. (a) Each railroad shall adopt and comply with an operating rule... the requirements of this section. (b) Designating switch position. The normal position of a...

  3. 49 CFR 218.105 - Additional operational requirements for hand-operated main track switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional operational requirements for hand... hand-operated main track switches. (a) Each railroad shall adopt and comply with an operating rule... the requirements of this section. (b) Designating switch position. The normal position of a...

  4. 49 CFR 218.105 - Additional operational requirements for hand-operated main track switches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional operational requirements for hand... hand-operated main track switches. (a) Each railroad shall adopt and comply with an operating rule... the requirements of this section. (b) Designating switch position. The normal position of a...

  5. 38th Annual Maintenance & Operations Cost Study for Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agron, Joe

    2009-01-01

    Despite the worst economic environment in generations, spending by K-12 institutions on maintenance and operations (M&O) held its own--defying historical trends that have shown M&O spending among the most affected in times of budget tightening. This article presents data from the 38th annual Maintenance & Operations Cost Study for…

  6. Operative Cost Comparison: Plating Versus Intramedullary Fixation for Clavicle Fractures.

    PubMed

    Hanselman, Andrew E; Murphy, Timothy R; Bal, George K; McDonough, E Barry

    2016-09-01

    Although clavicle fractures often heal well with nonoperative management, current literature has shown improved outcomes with operative intervention for specific fracture patterns in specific patient types. The 2 most common methods of midshaft clavicle fracture fixation are intramedullary and plate devices. Through retrospective analysis, this study performed a direct cost comparison of these 2 types of fixation at a single institution over a 5-year period. Outcome measures included operative costs for initial surgery and any hardware removal surgeries. This study reviewed 154 patients (157 fractures), and of these, 99 had intramedullary fixation and 58 had plate fixation. A total of 80% (79 of 99) of intramedullary devices and 3% (2 of 58) of plates were removed. Average cost for initial intramedullary placement was $2955 (US dollars) less than that for initial plate placement (P<.001); average cost for removal was $1874 less than that for plate removal surgery (P=.2). Average total cost for all intramedullary surgeries was $1392 less than the average cost for all plating surgeries (P<.001). Average cost for all intramedullary surgeries requiring plate placement and removal was $653 less than the average cost for all plating surgeries that involved only placement (P=.04). Intramedullary fixation of clavicle fractures resulted in a statistically significant cost reduction compared with plate fixation, despite the incidence of more frequent removal surgeries. [Orthopedics.2016; 39(5):e877-e882.].

  7. Cost of enlarged operating zone for an existing Francis runner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monette, Christine; Marmont, Hugues; Chamberland-Lauzon, Joël; Skagerstrand, Anders; Coutu, André; Carlevi, Jens

    2016-11-01

    Traditionally, hydro power plants have been operated close to best efficiency point, the more stable operating condition for which they have been designed. However, because of changes in the electricity market, many hydro power plants operators wish to operate their machines differently to fulfil those new market needs. New operating conditions can include whole range operation, many start/stops, extensive low load operation, synchronous condenser mode and power/frequency regulation. Many of these new operating conditions may impose more severe fatigue damage than the traditional base load operation close to best efficiency point. Under these conditions, the fatigue life of the runner may be significantly reduced and reparation or replacement cost might occur sooner than expected. In order to design reliable Francis runners for those new challenging operating scenarios, Andritz Hydro has developed various proprietary tools and design rules. These are used within Andritz Hydro to design mechanically robust Francis runners for the operating scenarios fulfilling customer's specifications. To estimate residual life under different operating scenarios of an existing runner designed years ago for best efficiency base load operation, Andritz Hydro's design rules and tools would necessarily lead to conservative results. While the geometry of a new runner can be modified to fulfil all conservative mechanical design rules, the predicted fatigue life of an existing runner under off-design operating conditions may appear rather short because of the conservative safety factor included in the calculations. The most precise and reliable way to calculate residual life of an existing runner under different operating scenarios is to perform a strain gauge measurement campaign on the runner. This paper presents the runner strain gage measurement campaign of a mid-head Francis turbine over all the operating conditions available during the test, the analysis of the measurement signals

  8. NASA operations: An agency wide approach to reduce cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squibb, Gael F.

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Space Operations Management Office (SOMO) is presented. The SOMO concept is based on continuing the distributed participation of the various NASA field centers and agencies, while employing consolidated management through a single lead center. The aim is to determine the duplicity and the overlap between the different agencies that independently developed their own operations management approaches in order to enable more cost effective mission operations by providing common services to the NASA programs. The space operations management will be performed in a distributed manner with a greater degree of contractor involvement than in the past. The changes, approaches and anticipated benefits of this approach to operations are discussed.

  9. Cost optimization for series-parallel execution of a collection of intersecting operation sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgui, Alexandre; Levin, Genrikh; Rozin, Boris; Kasabutski, Igor

    2016-05-01

    A collection of intersecting sets of operations is considered. These sets of operations are performed successively. The operations of each set are activated simultaneously. Operation durations can be modified. The cost of each operation decreases with the increase in operation duration. In contrast, the additional expenses for each set of operations are proportional to its time. The problem of selecting the durations of all operations that minimize the total cost under constraint on completion time for the whole collection of operation sets is studied. The mathematical model and method to solve this problem are presented. The proposed method is based on a combination of Lagrangian relaxation and dynamic programming. The results of numerical experiments that illustrate the performance of the proposed method are presented. This approach was used for optimization multi-spindle machines and machining lines, but the problem is common in engineering optimization and thus the techniques developed could be useful for other applications.

  10. Space system operations and support cost analysis using Markov chains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unal, Resit; Dean, Edwin B.; Moore, Arlene A.; Fairbairn, Robert E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates the use of Markov chain process in probabilistic life cycle cost analysis and suggests further uses of the process as a design aid tool. A methodology is developed for estimating operations and support cost and expected life for reusable space transportation systems. Application of the methodology is demonstrated for the case of a hypothetical space transportation vehicle. A sensitivity analysis is carried out to explore the effects of uncertainty in key model inputs.

  11. Surgical Cost Disclosure May Reduce Operating Room Expenditures.

    PubMed

    Austin, Luke S; Tjoumakaris, Fotios P; Ong, Alvin C; Lombardi, Nicholas J; Wowkanech, Charles D; Mehnert, Michael J

    2017-03-01

    Health care expenditures are rising in the United States. Recent policy changes are attempting to reduce spending through the development of value-based payment systems that rely heavily on cost transparency. This study was conducted to investigate whether cost disclosure influences surgeons to reduce operating room expenditures. Beginning in 2012, surgeon scorecards were distributed at a regional health care system. The scorecard reported the actual direct supply cost per case for a specific procedure and compared each surgeon's data with those of other surgeons in the same subspecialty. Rotator cuff repair was chosen for analysis. Actual direct supply cost per case was calculated quarterly and collected over a 2-year period. Surgeons were given a questionnaire to determine their interest in the scorecard. Actual direct supply cost per rotator cuff repair procedure decreased by $269 during the study period. A strong correlation (R(2)=0.77) between introduction of the scorecards and cost containment was observed. During the study period, a total of $39,831 was saved. Of the surgeons who were queried, 89% were interested in the scorecard and 56% altered their practice as a result. Disclosure of surgical costs may be an effective way to control operating room spending. The findings suggest that providing physicians with knowledge about their surgical charges can alter per-case expenditures. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(2):e269-e274.].

  12. Fundamental Drivers of the Cost and Price of Operating Reserves

    SciTech Connect

    Hummon, M. R.; Denholm, P.; Jorgenson, J.; Palchak, D.; Kirby, B.; Ma, O.

    2013-07-01

    Operating reserves impose a cost on the electric power system by forcing system operators to keep partially loaded spinning generators available for responding to system contingencies variable demand. In many regions of the United States, thermal power plants provide a large fraction of the operating reserve requirement. Alternative sources of operating reserves, such as demand response and energy storage, may provide more efficient sources of these reserves. However, to estimate the potential value of these services, the cost of reserve services under various grid conditions must first be established. This analysis used a commercial grid simulation tool to evaluate the cost and price of several operating reserve services, including spinning contingency reserves and upward regulation reserves. These reserve products were evaluated in a utility system in the western United States, considering different system flexibilities, renewable energy penetration, and other sensitivities. The analysis demonstrates that the price of operating reserves depend highly on many assumptions regarding the operational flexibility of the generation fleet, including ramp rates and the fraction of fleet available to provide reserves.

  13. 25 CFR 171.555 - What additional costs will I incur if I am granted a Payment Plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What additional costs will I incur if I am granted a Payment Plan? 171.555 Section 171.555 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER IRRIGATION OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE Financial Matters: Assessments, Billing,...

  14. 25 CFR 171.555 - What additional costs will I incur if I am granted a Payment Plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What additional costs will I incur if I am granted a Payment Plan? 171.555 Section 171.555 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER IRRIGATION OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE Financial Matters: Assessments, Billing,...

  15. Operating costs for the 110 MWe Nucla CFB

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, S.A.; Buck, J.W. ); Friedman, M.A. ); Rekos, N.F. )

    1993-01-01

    In January 1991, all testing as part of the Demonstration Test Program on the 110 MWe Nucla circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler was completed and all data analysis and reporting were finalized in April 1992. This effort was sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the US Department of Energy under its Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program . As part of the requirement for CCT funding, an economic evaluation of the plant's operating costs was completed over the 29 month testing period between September 1988 and January 1991. The objective of this effort was to provide a database of costs associated with the engineering, construction, start-up and operation of a utility-sized CFB boiler. Cost data associated with plant operations are presented based on the Rural Electrification Administration's (REA) uniform system of amounts. This system is consistent with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (FERC) methods of accounting for public utilities. This database serves as a reference for others considering and comparing this technology with other coal-fired options. This paper summarizes the method of repowering the original Nucla Station and provides a brief description of the current 420,000 kg/h (925,000 lb/hr) CFB boiler design. A breakdown of fuel nonfuel maintenance, and fixed expenses are presented for the period covered by the economic evaluation. Costs associated with limestone usage for SO[sub 2] control, start-up fuel consumption, and ash disposal costs are also presented.

  16. Operating costs for the 110 MWe Nucla CFB

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, S.A.; Buck, J.W.; Friedman, M.A.; Rekos, N.F.

    1993-03-01

    In January 1991, all testing as part of the Demonstration Test Program on the 110 MWe Nucla circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler was completed and all data analysis and reporting were finalized in April 1992. This effort was sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the US Department of Energy under its Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program . As part of the requirement for CCT funding, an economic evaluation of the plant`s operating costs was completed over the 29 month testing period between September 1988 and January 1991. The objective of this effort was to provide a database of costs associated with the engineering, construction, start-up and operation of a utility-sized CFB boiler. Cost data associated with plant operations are presented based on the Rural Electrification Administration`s (REA) uniform system of amounts. This system is consistent with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s (FERC) methods of accounting for public utilities. This database serves as a reference for others considering and comparing this technology with other coal-fired options. This paper summarizes the method of repowering the original Nucla Station and provides a brief description of the current 420,000 kg/h (925,000 lb/hr) CFB boiler design. A breakdown of fuel nonfuel maintenance, and fixed expenses are presented for the period covered by the economic evaluation. Costs associated with limestone usage for SO{sub 2} control, start-up fuel consumption, and ash disposal costs are also presented.

  17. U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, RL

    2003-09-18

    The ''U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries'' (NUREG/CR-6577, Supp. 2) report has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants during 2000-2001. Costs incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, which represent fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications, which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operations summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from operating reports submitted by the licensees, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) database for enforcement actions, and outage reports.

  18. 47 CFR 25.111 - Additional information and ITU cost recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional information and ITU cost recovery....111 Additional information and ITU cost recovery. (a) The Commission may request from any party at any... interference caused by radio stations authorized by other Administrations is guaranteed unless ITU...

  19. Centaur operations at the space station: Cost and transportation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A study was conducted to expand on the results of an initial study entitled Centaur Operations at the Space Station. The previous study developed technology demonstration missions (TDMs) that utilized the Centaur G-prime upper stage to advance OTV technologies required for accomodations and operations at the Space Station. An initial evaluation was performed of the cost to NASA for TDM implementation. Due to the potential for commercial communication satellite operation utilizing the TDM hardware, an evaluation of the Centaur's transportation potential was also performed.

  20. Concorde with the airlines. [operating costs and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leyman, C. S.

    1980-01-01

    The only supersonic aircraft in airline service, Concorde, offers the first actual test of supersonic cruise feasibility and the only real experience relative to passenger, airline, and community acceptance. The dominant characteristic of Concorde operations is low aircraft utilization, due partly to the restricted route network. Operating costs, the maintenance/reliability record and associated dispatch delays are discussed. Problems with overwater operations, and the secondary boom phenomena are examined. Monthly average load factors for various routes, major causes of technical delays, aircraft technical performance, and aircraft tracks are graphically depicted.

  1. Reducing Development and Operations Costs using NASA's "GMSEC" Systems Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Dan; Bristow, John; Crouse, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the role of Goddard Mission Services Evolution Center (GMSEC) in reducing development and operation costs in handling the massive data from NASA missions. The goals of GMSEC systems architecture development are to (1) Simplify integration and development, (2)Facilitate technology infusion over time, (3) Support evolving operational concepts, and (4) All for mix of heritage, COTS and new components. First 3 missions (i.e., Tropical Rainforest Measuring Mission (TRMM), Small Explorer (SMEX) missions - SWAS, TRACE, SAMPEX, and ST5 3-Satellite Constellation System) each selected a different telemetry and command system. These results show that GMSEC's message-bus component-based framework architecture is well proven and provides significant benefits over traditional flight and ground data system designs. The missions benefit through increased set of product options, enhanced automation, lower cost and new mission-enabling operations concept options .

  2. Application of trajectory optimization principles to minimize aircraft operating costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, J. A.; Morello, S. A.; Erzberger, H.

    1979-01-01

    This paper summarizes various applications of trajectory optimization principles that have been or are being devised by both government and industrial researchers to minimize aircraft direct operating costs (DOC). These costs (time and fuel) are computed for aircraft constrained to fly over a fixed range. Optimization theory is briefly outlined, and specific algorithms which have resulted from application of this theory are described. Typical results which demonstrate use of these algorithms and the potential savings which they can produce are given. Finally, need for further trajectory optimization research is presented.

  3. Low Cost Missions Operations on NASA Deep Space Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, R. J.; Kusnierkiewicz, D. J.; Bowman, A.; Harvey, R.; Ossing, D.; Eichstedt, J.

    2014-12-01

    The ability to lower mission operations costs on any long duration mission depends on a number of factors; the opportunities for science, the flight trajectory, and the cruise phase environment, among others. Many deep space missions employ long cruises to their final destination with minimal science activities along the way; others may perform science observations on a near-continuous basis. This paper discusses approaches employed by two NASA missions implemented by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) to minimize mission operations costs without compromising mission success: the New Horizons mission to Pluto, and the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatories (STEREO). The New Horizons spacecraft launched in January 2006 for an encounter with the Pluto system.The spacecraft trajectory required no deterministic on-board delta-V, and so the mission ops team then settled in for the rest of its 9.5-year cruise. The spacecraft has spent much of its cruise phase in a "hibernation" mode, which has enabled the spacecraft to be maintained with a small operations team, and minimized the contact time required from the NASA Deep Space Network. The STEREO mission is comprised of two three-axis stabilized sun-staring spacecraft in heliocentric orbit at a distance of 1 AU from the sun. The spacecraft were launched in October 2006. The STEREO instruments operate in a "decoupled" mode from the spacecraft, and from each other. Since STEREO operations are largely routine, unattended ground station contact operations were implemented early in the mission. Commands flow from the MOC to be uplinked, and the data recorded on-board is downlinked and relayed back to the MOC. Tools run in the MOC to assess the health and performance of ground system components. Alerts are generated and personnel are notified of any problems. Spacecraft telemetry is similarly monitored and alarmed, thus ensuring safe, reliable, low cost operations.

  4. 7 CFR 1710.253 - Engineering and cost studies-addition of generation capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Engineering and cost studies-addition of generation... TO ELECTRIC LOANS AND GUARANTEES Construction Work Plans and Related Studies § 1710.253 Engineering... engineering and cost studies as specified by RUS. The studies shall cover a period from the beginning of...

  5. 7 CFR 1710.253 - Engineering and cost studies-addition of generation capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Engineering and cost studies-addition of generation... TO ELECTRIC LOANS AND GUARANTEES Construction Work Plans and Related Studies § 1710.253 Engineering... engineering and cost studies as specified by RUS. The studies shall cover a period from the beginning of...

  6. 7 CFR 1710.253 - Engineering and cost studies-addition of generation capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Engineering and cost studies-addition of generation... TO ELECTRIC LOANS AND GUARANTEES Construction Work Plans and Related Studies § 1710.253 Engineering... engineering and cost studies as specified by RUS. The studies shall cover a period from the beginning of...

  7. 7 CFR 1710.253 - Engineering and cost studies-addition of generation capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Engineering and cost studies-addition of generation... TO ELECTRIC LOANS AND GUARANTEES Construction Work Plans and Related Studies § 1710.253 Engineering... engineering and cost studies as specified by RUS. The studies shall cover a period from the beginning of...

  8. 7 CFR 1710.253 - Engineering and cost studies-addition of generation capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Engineering and cost studies-addition of generation... TO ELECTRIC LOANS AND GUARANTEES Construction Work Plans and Related Studies § 1710.253 Engineering... engineering and cost studies as specified by RUS. The studies shall cover a period from the beginning of...

  9. Prospects for cost reductions from relaxing additional cross-border measures related to livestock trade.

    PubMed

    Hop, G E; Mourits, M C M; Slager, R; Oude Lansink, A G J M; Saatkamp, H W

    2013-05-01

    Compared with the domestic trade in livestock, intra-communal trade across the European Union (EU) is subject to costly, additional veterinary measures. Short-distance transportation just across a border requires more measures than long-distance domestic transportation, while the need for such additional cross-border measures can be questioned. This study examined the prospects for cost reductions from relaxing additional cross-border measures related to trade within the cross-border region of the Netherlands (NL) and Germany (GER); that is, North Rhine Westphalia and Lower Saxony. The study constructed a deterministic spread-sheet cost model to calculate the costs of both routine veterinary measures (standard measures that apply to both domestic and cross-border transport) and additional cross-border measures (extra measures that only apply to cross-border transport) as applied in 2010. This model determined costs by stakeholder, region and livestock sector, and studied the prospects for cost reduction by calculating the costs after the relaxation of additional cross-border measures. The selection criteria for relaxing these measures were (1) a low expected added value on preventing contagious livestock diseases, (2) no expected additional veterinary risks in case of relaxation of measures and (3) reasonable cost-saving possibilities. The total cost of routine veterinary measures and additional cross-border measures for the cross-border region was €22.1 million, 58% (€12.7 million) of which came from additional cross-border measures. Two-thirds of this €12.7 million resulted from the trade in slaughter animals. The main cost items were veterinary checks on animals (twice in the case of slaughter animals), export certification and control of export documentation. Four additional cross-border measures met the selection criteria for relaxation. The relaxation of these measures could save €8.2 million (€5.0 million for NL and €3.2 million for GER) annually

  10. Additive Manufacturing for Cost Efficient Production of Compact Ceramic Heat Exchangers and Recuperators

    SciTech Connect

    Shulman, Holly; Ross, Nicole

    2015-10-30

    An additive manufacture technique known as laminated object manufacturing (LOM) was used to fabricate compact ceramic heat exchanger prototypes. LOM uses precision CO2 laser cutting of ceramic green tapes, which are then precision stacked to build a 3D object with fine internal features. Modeling was used to develop prototype designs and predict the thermal response, stress, and efficiency in the ceramic heat exchangers. Build testing and materials analyses were used to provide feedback for the design selection. During this development process, laminated object manufacturing protocols were established. This included laser optimization, strategies for fine feature integrity, lamination fluid control, green handling, and firing profile. Three full size prototypes were fabricated using two different designs. One prototype was selected for performance testing. During testing, cross talk leakage prevented the application of a high pressure differential, however, the prototype was successful at withstanding the high temperature operating conditions (1300 °F). In addition, analysis showed that the bulk of the part did not have cracks or leakage issues. This led to the development of a module method for next generation LOM heat exchangers. A scale-up cost analysis showed that given a purpose built LOM system, these ceramic heat exchangers would be affordable for the applications.

  11. Costs and benefits of lunar oxygen: Engineering, operations, and economics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, Brent; Woodcock, Gordon R.

    1991-01-01

    Oxygen is the most commonly discussed lunar resource. It will certainly not be the easiest to retrieve, but oxygen's fundamental place in propulsion and life support guarantees it continued attention as a prime candidate for early in situ resource utilization (ISRU). The findings are reviewed of recent investigation, sponsored by NASA-Ames, into the kinds of technologies, equipment, and scenarios (the engineering and operations costs) that will be required even to initiate lunar oxygen production. The infrastructure necessary to surround and support a viable oxygen-processing operation is explained. Selected details are used to illustrate the depth of technology challenges, extent of operations burdens, and complexity of decision linkages. Basic assumptions, and resulting timelines and mass manifests, are listed. These findings are combined with state-of-the-art knowledge of lunar and Mars propulsion options in simple economic input/output and internal-rate-of-return models, to compare production costs with performance benefits. Implications for three realistic scales of exploration architecture - expeditionary, aggressive science, and industrialization/settlement - are discussed. Conclusions are reached regarding the contextual conditions within which production of lunar oxygen (LLOX) is a reasonable activity. LLOX appears less useful for Mars missions than previously hoped. Its economical use in low Earth orbit hinges on production of lunar hydrogen as well. LLOX shows promise for lunar ascent/descent use, but that depends strongly on the plant mass required.

  12. Achieving cost reductions in EOSDIS operations through technology evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsome, Penny; Moe, Karen; Harberts, Robert

    1996-01-01

    The earth observing system (EOS) data information system (EOSDIS) mission includes the cost-effective management and distribution of large amounts of data to the earth science community. The effect of the introduction of new information system technologies on the evolution of EOSDIS is considered. One of the steps taken by NASA to enable the introduction of new information system technologies into the EOSDIS is the funding of technology development through prototyping. Recent and ongoing prototyping efforts and their potential impact on the performance and cost-effectiveness of the EOSDIS are discussed. The technology evolution process as it related to the effective operation of EOSDIS is described, and methods are identified for the support of the transfer of relevant technology to EOSDIS components.

  13. Space Debris and the Cost of Space Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ailor, William; Womack, James; Peterson, Glenn; Murrell, Elisha

    2010-09-01

    The increased costs due to space debris of maintaining satellite constellations in sun-synchronous orbits at 850 km from 2010 to 2030 were examined for 1) a small constellation of government-owned satellites, 2) a medium-sized constellation of commercial satellites, and 3) large constellation of commercial satellites. Impacts of debris of 1mm diameter were assumed to degrade solar panel performance, 1cm objects damaged solar panels or terminated the satellite, and impact of a 10cm or larger object would terminate the satellite’s operation. Flux density projections were used to estimate the number of times a satellite would be impacted by objects of each size. The study determined the number of launches required to maintain each constellation for the 20-year period. The cost of maintaining the constellations increased by between 5%(government) and 26%(large commercial).

  14. 42 CFR 413.355 - Additional payment: QIO photocopy and mailing costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Prospective Payment for Skilled Nursing Facilities § 413.355 Additional payment: QIO photocopy and mailing costs. An additional payment is made to a skilled nursing facility in accordance with § 476.78 of...

  15. 42 CFR 413.355 - Additional payment: QIO photocopy and mailing costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Prospective Payment for Skilled Nursing Facilities § 413.355 Additional payment: QIO photocopy and mailing costs. An additional payment is made to a skilled nursing facility in accordance with § 476.78 of...

  16. 42 CFR 413.355 - Additional payment: QIO photocopy and mailing costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... RENAL DISEASE SERVICES; OPTIONAL PROSPECTIVELY DETERMINED PAYMENT RATES FOR SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Prospective Payment for Skilled Nursing Facilities § 413.355 Additional payment: QIO photocopy and mailing costs. An additional payment is made to a skilled nursing facility in accordance with § 476.78 of...

  17. NAS Automation Equipment Operating Cost Estimates, FY 1978-1984,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    AIRWAY FACILITIES cost $78,947,000 (70%), AIR TRAFFIC software support was $30,027,000 (27%) and other labor was $3,244,000 (3%). Support of the Enroute...andRepair . 4-9 4.7 Support Engineering................4-10 4.8 Automatic Data Interchange System, Service’B . .... 4-10 4.9 Field Software ...Maintenance .. .. .. ..... ...... 4-10 4.10 AT Training....................4-10 4.11 Operational Software S4pport........................4-11 ’ 4.12 NAFEC

  18. The ATA-67 Formula for Direct Operating Cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faulkner, H. B.

    1972-01-01

    The ATA formulas for direct operating cost were developed for the purpose of comparing different aircraft, existing or not, on the same route or the same aircraft on different routes. Such characteristics of the airline as crew pay, maintenance procedures, and depreciation schedules are kept constant. In air transportation systems analysis the 1967 ATA formula is usually used with appropriate exceptions or modifications, such as: different maintenance labor rate, total maintenance multiplied by a factor, maintenance burden deleted, different depreciation schedule, or different spares percentages.

  19. Make or Buy: Cost Impacts of Additive Manufacturing, 3D Laser Scanning Technology, and Collaborative Product Lifecycle Management on Ship Maintenance and Modernization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    1 Make or Buy: Cost Impacts of Additive Manufacturing , 3D Laser Scanning Technology, and Collaborative Product Lifecycle Management on Ship...DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Make or Buy: Cost Impacts of Additive Manufacturing , 3D Laser Scanning Technology...management during operations 4 Potential Technology 3: Additive Manufacturing (“3D Printing”) 5 • 3D design/image (e.g. from 3D LS) of final part

  20. Streamlining: Reducing costs and increasing STS operations effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersburg, R. K.

    1985-01-01

    The development of streamlining as a concept, its inclusion in the space transportation system engineering and operations support (STSEOS) contract, and how it serves as an incentive to management and technical support personnel is discussed. The mechanics of encouraging and processing streamlining suggestions, reviews, feedback to submitters, recognition, and how individual employee performance evaluations are used to motivation are discussed. Several items that were implemented are mentioned. Information reported and the methodology of determining estimated dollar savings are outlined. The overall effect of this activity on the ability of the McDonnell Douglas flight preparation and mission operations team to support a rapidly increasing flight rate without a proportional increase in cost is illustrated.

  1. Improvements in floating point addition/subtraction operations

    DOEpatents

    Farmwald, P.M.

    1984-02-24

    Apparatus is described for decreasing the latency time associated with floating point addition and subtraction in a computer, using a novel bifurcated, pre-normalization/post-normalization approach that distinguishes between differences of floating point exponents.

  2. Evaluation of Contrail Reduction Strategies Based on Environmental and Operational Costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Neil Y.; Sridhar, Banavar; Ng, Hok K.; Li, Jinhua

    2013-01-01

    This paper evaluates a set of contrail reduction strategies based on environmental and operational costs. A linear climate model was first used to convert climate effects of carbon dioxide emissions and aircraft contrails to changes in Absolute Global Temperature Potential, a metric that measures the mean surface temperature change due to aircraft emissions and persistent contrail formations. The concept of social cost of carbon and the carbon auction price from recent California's cap-and-trade system were then used to relate the carbon dioxide emissions and contrail formations to an environmental cost index. The strategy for contrail reduction is based on minimizing contrail formations by altering the aircraft's cruising altitude. The strategy uses a user-defined factor to trade off between contrail reduction and additional fuel burn and carbon dioxide emissions. A higher value of tradeoff factor results in more contrail reduction but also more fuel burn and carbon emissions. The strategy is considered favorable when the net environmental cost benefit exceeds the operational cost. The results show how the net environmental benefit varies with different decision-making time-horizon and different carbon cost. The cost models provide a guidance to select the trade-off factor that will result in the most net environmental benefit.

  3. ROBucket: A low cost operant chamber based on the Arduino microcontroller.

    PubMed

    Devarakonda, Kavya; Nguyen, Katrina P; Kravitz, Alexxai V

    2016-06-01

    The operant conditioning chamber is a cornerstone of animal behavioral research. Operant boxes are used to assess learning and motivational behavior in animals, particularly for food and drug reinforcers. However, commercial operant chambers cost several thousands of dollars. We have constructed the Rodent Operant Bucket (ROBucket), an inexpensive and easily assembled open-source operant chamber based on the Arduino microcontroller platform, which can be used to train mice to respond for sucrose solution or other liquid reinforcers. The apparatus contains two nose pokes, a drinking well, and a solenoid-controlled liquid delivery system. ROBucket can run fixed ratio and progressive ratio training schedules, and can be programmed to run more complicated behavioral paradigms. Additional features such as motion sensing and video tracking can be added to the operant chamber through the array of widely available Arduino-compatible sensors. The design files and programming code are open source and available online for others to use.

  4. Viability Assessment of a Repository at Yucca Mountain. Volume 5: Costs to Construct and Operate the Repository

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This volume presents a management summary of the cost estimate to complete the design, and to license, construct, operate, monitor, close, and decommission a Monitored Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain in Nevada. This volume summarizes the scope, estimating methodologies, and assumptions used in development of the Monitored Geologic Repository-VA cost estimate. It identifies the key features necessary to understand the summary costs presented herein. This cost summary derives from a larger body of documented cost analysis. Volume 5 is organized to reflect this structured approach to cost estimation and contains the following sections: Section 1, Cost Elements. This section briefly defines the components of each major repository cost element. Section 2, Project Phases. This section presents the definition, as used in the estimate, of five project phases (Licensing, Pre-emplacement Construction, Emplacement Operations, Monitoring, and Closure and Decommissioning) and the schedule dates for each phase. It also contains major milestone dates and a bar chart schedule. Section 3, Major Assumptions. This section identifies key high-level assumptions for the cost estimate basis. Additional detailed assumptions are included in the appendices. Section 4, Integrated Cost Summary. This section presents a high-level roll-up of the VA costs resulting from the estimating work. The tables and figures contained in this section were compiled from the more detailed cost estimates in the appendices. Section 5, References. This section identifies the references that support this cost volume. Appendices. For each major repository cost element, Appendices B-F [B, C, D, E, F] presents additional information on the scope of cost elements, identifies methodologies used to develop the cost estimates, lists underlying cost assumptions, and tabulates summary results. Appendix A contains a glossary to assist the reader in understanding the terminology in Volume 5. Appendix G presents costs

  5. A low cost commercial approach to space systems development and operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonner, T. F.; Faget, M. A.; Allen, J. P.; Langstaff, D. H.

    In recent years a number of factors have led to increased attention to the lowering of costs for space flight systems and the operation of those systems. To that end Space Industries Inc. (SII), a small commercial space company based in Houston, Tex., is employing proven methods derived from over three decades of space flight development and space operations. These methods are based on a philosophy that is cost-sensitive focused with a primary objective to drive the cost of space systems and their operations down to the lowest level practical, consistent with the mission objectives, acceptable risk and safety considerations. This approach involves a process of: (1) addressing the basic requirements in the simplest and most cost effective manner, i.e. limit new development wherever possible, maximize use of proven and existing technology and eliminate non-essential requirements; (2) incorporation of proven industrial practices where possible, i.e. focus on performance envelopes (not on restrictive, specific and detailed specifications) and streamline program management, documentation, testing and other procedures; and (3) delivery of the "best" price, i.e. maximum customer utility at minimum cost with emphasis on customer service. The overriding factor, and indeed the most important aspect of the low cost commercial approach, is the willingness to accept greater risks to achieve all of the user's objectives. Our development approach is customer focused with emphasis on fully understanding the customer needs while striving constantly to limit new development requirements and, consequently, additional costs. This approach involves a process of designing for operations, i.e. low operation and life-cycle costs, while ensuring a reliability level consistent with customer budget constraints, mission objectives and safety consideration. In executing this low cost, customer-focused approach, we strive to maintain minimal overheads, simple interfaces, reduced documentation

  6. Dissociating compatibility effects and distractor costs in the additional singleton paradigm.

    PubMed

    Folk, Charles L

    2013-01-01

    The interpretation of identity compatibility effects associated with irrelevant items outside the nominal focus of attention has fueled much of the debate over early versus late selection and perceptual load theory. However, compatibility effects have also played a role in the debate over the extent to which the involuntary allocation of spatial attention (i.e., attentional capture) is completely stimulus-driven or whether it is contingent on top-down control settings. For example, in the context of the additional singleton paradigm, irrelevant color singletons have been found to produce not only an overall cost in search performance but also significant compatibility effects. This combination of search costs and compatibility effects has been taken as evidence that spatial attention is indeed allocated in a bottom-up fashion to the salient but irrelevant singletons. However, it is possible that compatibility effects in the additional singleton paradigm reflect parallel processing of identity associated with low perceptual load rather than an involuntary shift of spatial attention. In the present experiments, manipulations of load were incorporated into the traditional additional singleton paradigm. Under low-load conditions, both search costs and compatibility effects were obtained, replicating previous studies. Under high-load conditions, search costs were still present, but compatibility effects were eliminated. This dissociation suggests that the costs associated with irrelevant singletons may reflect filtering processes rather than the allocation of spatial attention.

  7. Reducing The Operating Costs Of An Apartment Building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takács, Ján; Rácz, Lukáš

    2015-09-01

    Circulation pumps are mechanical devices, which are used to create the overpressure required for the transportation of a heat-transfer medium in heating technology as well as in other related technologies. In a circulation pump the mechanical energy generated by the drive machine - an electric motor is transformed to hydraulic energy, which consists of kinetic and static energy. In the pipeline of a heating system circulation pumps represent a source of hydraulic energy (positive differential pressure), which is consumed to transport the heat-transfer medium. During the flow, the heat-transfer medium puts up resistance to the so-called passive resistors, which consist of pressure losses from friction in the pipes and pressure losses due to local resistance. In this article the authors analyze the effect of a circulation pump on the operating costs in an apartment building. Different types of circulating pumps, ranging from the most unfavorable to the optimal, were selected.

  8. 25 CFR 39.201 - Does ISEF reflect the actual cost of school operations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Does ISEF reflect the actual cost of school operations... Does ISEF reflect the actual cost of school operations? ISEF does not attempt to assess the actual cost of school operations either at the local school level or in the aggregate nationally. ISEF is...

  9. 25 CFR 39.101 - Does ISEF assess the actual cost of school operations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Does ISEF assess the actual cost of school operations? 39... SCHOOL EQUALIZATION PROGRAM Indian School Equalization Formula § 39.101 Does ISEF assess the actual cost of school operations? No. ISEF does not attempt to assess the actual cost of school operations...

  10. IUS/TUG orbital operations and mission support study. Volume 5: Cost estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The costing approach, methodology, and rationale utilized for generating cost data for composite IUS and space tug orbital operations are discussed. Summary cost estimates are given along with cost data initially derived for the IUS program and space tug program individually, and cost estimates for each work breakdown structure element.

  11. Low Cost Injection Mold Creation via Hybrid Additive and Conventional Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Dehoff, Ryan R.; Watkins, Thomas R.; List, III, Frederick Alyious; Carver, Keith; England, Roger

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the proposed project between Cummins and ORNL is to significantly reduce the cost of the tooling (machining and materials) required to create injection molds to make plastic components. Presently, the high cost of this tooling forces the design decision to make cast aluminum parts because Cummins typical production volumes are too low to allow injection molded plastic parts to be cost effective with the amortized cost of the injection molding tooling. In addition to reducing the weight of components, polymer injection molding allows the opportunity for the alternative cooling methods, via nitrogen gas. Nitrogen gas cooling offers an environmentally and economically attractive cooling option, if the mold can be manufactured economically. In this project, a current injection molding design was optimized for cooling using nitrogen gas. The various components of the injection mold tooling were fabricated using the Renishaw powder bed laser additive manufacturing technology. Subsequent machining was performed on the as deposited components to form a working assembly. The injection mold is scheduled to be tested in a projection setting at a commercial vendor selected by Cummins.

  12. Allocation of Operations and Support Cost Targets Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-30

    Logistics Technology Dept P.O. Box 225907, Dallas TX 75265 Sa. NAME OF FUNDING/SPONSORING ORGANIZATION AF Business Research Mgt Center AFBRMC/RDCB Sb...REPORT (Yr., Mo.. Day) 84 Apr 5 15. PAGE COUNT 42 COSAT1 CODES FIELD 05 GROUP 01 SUB. GR. 18. SUBJECT TERMS (Continue on reverse if...necessary and identify by block number) Allocation of 0&S Cost Targets, Guarantees Life Cycle Cost, Costs, Cost Targets 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse

  13. The Fully Burdened Cost of Waste in Contingency Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    Markets • On-Site Reuse /Composting • On-Site Incineration (all types) and/or Containerized Burn (solid) • On-Site Landfills (with liners) • Off-Site Local...Blackwater:Yes Greywater : No Disposal: Local River 6 Cost Components Cost Component Cost Drivers Infrastructure Facility type (e.g., waste separation

  14. The Cost of an Additional Disability-Free Life Year for Older Americans: 1992–2005

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Liming

    2013-01-01

    Objective To estimate the cost of an additional disability-free life year for older Americans in 1992–2005. Data Source This study used 1992–2005 Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey, a longitudinal survey of Medicare beneficiaries with a rotating panel design. Study Design This analysis used multistate life table model to estimate probabilities of transition among a discrete set of health states (nondisabled, disabled, and dead) for two panels of older Americans in 1992 and 2002. Health spending incurred between annual health interviews was estimated by a generalized linear mixed model. Health status, including death, was simulated for each member of the panel using these transition probabilities; the associated health spending was cross-walked to the simulated health changes. Principal Findings Disability-free life expectancy (DFLE) increased significantly more than life expectancy during the study period. Assuming that 50 percent of the gains in DFLE between 1992 and 2005 were attributable to increases in spending, the average discounted cost per additional disability-free life year was $71,000. There were small differences between gender and racial/ethnic groups. Conclusions The cost of an additional disability-free life year was substantially below previous estimates based on mortality trends alone. PMID:22670874

  15. Hospital Cost of Staphylococcal Infection after Cardiothoracic or Orthopedic Operations in France: A Retrospective Database Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bénard, Stève; Cyr, Sonya

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Staphylococcal infections (SI) after cardiothoracic (CT) or orthopedic (OP) surgery are associated with extended length of stay (LOS), a considerable mortality rate, and high cost. No data on these consequences have been published in France. Therefore, a study was conducted to describe the epidemiologic, clinical, and economic outcomes of SI following these operations in France based on a hospital discharge database. Methods: Patients who underwent the most common types of CT or OP operations in 2009 were identified and followed for one year. Staphylococcal infections occurring in the three following months were identified. Results: In 2009, 21,543 patients underwent one of the selected CT procedures (62% coronary artery bypass grafting; 38% cardiac valve replacement) and 175,518 patients underwent one of the selected OP procedures (64% hip arthroplasty; 36% knee arthroplasty). Among the patients, 4.4% (n=955) and 0.9% (n=1,515) developed SI after CT and OP surgery, respectively. Staphylococcal infection led to approximately 1.0 and 1.4 additional hospitalizations per patient, 22.1 and 24.1 additional hospital days, and an excess cost of €15,475 and €13,389 after an CT or OP procedure, respectively. The in-hospital mortality rate was 2.6 times and 6 times greater in infected patients than in non-infected patients for CT and OP. Hospital cost reached €505 million for these two CT procedures and €1.9 billion for the two OP procedures, of which €15 million and €20 million were related directly to patients having developed SI. Conclusions: Staphylococcal infections after common CT or OP operations were associated with greater mortality rates and hospital costs secondary to the additional procedures and greater LOS. PMID:26207403

  16. 42 CFR 412.71 - Determination of base-year inpatient operating costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Determination of base-year inpatient operating... Costs § 412.71 Determination of base-year inpatient operating costs. (a) Base-year costs. (1) For each... before September 30, 1983 is for less than 12 months, the base period will be the hospital's most...

  17. 42 CFR 412.71 - Determination of base-year inpatient operating costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Determination of base-year inpatient operating... Costs § 412.71 Determination of base-year inpatient operating costs. (a) Base-year costs. (1) For each... before September 30, 1983 is for less than 12 months, the base period will be the hospital's most...

  18. 42 CFR 412.71 - Determination of base-year inpatient operating costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Determination of base-year inpatient operating... Costs § 412.71 Determination of base-year inpatient operating costs. (a) Base-year costs. (1) For each... before September 30, 1983 is for less than 12 months, the base period will be the hospital's most...

  19. A Robust Design Approach to Cost Estimation: Solar Energy for Marine Corps Expeditionary Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-14

    Resources Energy Technology Basics Electricity Grid Basics Costs Renewable Technologies Biomass Geothermal Solar Concentrators Solar Photovoltaics Wind...SPONSORED REPORT SERIES A Robust Design Approach to Cost Estimation: Solar Energy for Marine Corps Expeditionary Operations 14 July 2014...SUBTITLE A Robust Design Approach to Cost Estimation: Solar Energy for Marine Corps Expeditionary Operations 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  20. 43 CFR 426.23 - Recovery of operation and maintenance (O&M) costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recovery of operation and maintenance (O&M... operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. (a) General. All new, amended, and renewed contracts shall provide for payment of O&M costs as specified in this section. (b) Amount of O&M costs a district must pay...

  1. 43 CFR 426.23 - Recovery of operation and maintenance (O&M) costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Recovery of operation and maintenance (O&M... operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. (a) General. All new, amended, and renewed contracts shall provide for payment of O&M costs as specified in this section. (b) Amount of O&M costs a district must pay...

  2. Pre-operative laboratory testing: A prospective study on comparison and cost analysis

    PubMed Central

    Keshavan, Venkatesh H; Swamy, Chidananda MN

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Pre-operative investigations are performed before any surgical intervention under anaesthesia. Many are considered as routine. However, there are no clear guidelines regarding these in India. We aim to look at the relevance of the laboratory investigations ordered routinely and their cost implications compared with the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines. Methods: This prospective study was carried out at a tertiary care hospital. A total of 163 patients scheduled for elective surgical procedures were included in this study. Neither the surgeons nor anaesthesiologists involved in the case were aware of the study. The laboratory investigations of the patients who underwent surgery were noted. All values were categorised as normal or abnormal and they were assessed as indicated or unindicated based on NICE guidelines. Results: One hundred and sixty-three patients were subjected to a total of 984 tests. Forty three patients (26%) were subjected to tests as per NICE guidelines. Of the 984 tests, 515 tests were unindicated (52%). Out of the 515 unindicated tests, 7 (1.3%) were abnormal. None of these seven tests required any intervention or change of anaesthetic plan. The most common unindicated tests done were cardiac echocardiography and chest X-ray (92.5% and 93% respectively). The additional cost incurred towards unindicated tests was 63% of the total cost for the tests. Conclusion: Pre-operative laboratory investigations add to cost significantly. Patient premorbid conditions and surgical grade should guide the clinician to request for the relevant laboratory tests. PMID:27942058

  3. An analysis of nuclear power plant operating costs: A 1995 update

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-21

    Over the years real (inflation-adjusted) O&M cost have begun to level off. The objective of this report is to determine whether the industry and NRC initiatives to control costs have resulted in this moderation in the growth of O&M costs. Because the industry agrees that the control of O&M costs is crucial to the viability of the technology, an examination of the factors causing the moderation in costs is important. A related issue deals with projecting nuclear operating costs into the future. Because of the escalation in nuclear operating costs (and the fall in fossil fuel prices) many State and Federal regulatory commissions are examining the economics of the continued operation of nuclear power plants under their jurisdiction. The economics of the continued operation of a nuclear power plant is typically examined by comparing the cost of the plants continued operation with the cost of obtaining the power from other sources. This assessment requires plant-specific projections of nuclear operating costs. Analysts preparing these projections look at past industry-wide cost trends and consider whether these trends are likely to continue. To determine whether these changes in trends will continue into the future, information about the causal factors influencing costs and the future trends in these factors are needed. An analysis of the factors explaining the moderation in cost growth will also yield important insights into the question of whether these trends will continue.

  4. Reduce Operating Costs with an EnergySmart School Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Energy, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Energy costs are a school district's second highest expenditure after personnel. Public schools currently spend more than $8 billion per year for energy. School energy expenditures rose, on average, 20 percent per year between 2000 and 2002--and the costs continue to rise. Natural gas prices alone increased 14 percent annually between 2003 and…

  5. 19 CFR 10.814 - Direct costs of processing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., the growth, production, or manufacture of the good in the territory of one or both of the Parties... into a Party, the following: (1) All actual labor costs involved in the growth, production, or... attributable to the good or are not costs of growth, production, or manufacture of the good. These include,...

  6. 19 CFR 10.774 - Direct costs of processing operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., the growth, production, or manufacture of the good in the territory of one or both of the Parties... into a Party, the following: (1) All actual labor costs involved in the growth, production, or... attributable to the good or are not costs of growth, production, or manufacture of the good. These include,...

  7. Enabling cost-effective high-current burst-mode operation in superconducting accelerators

    DOE PAGES

    Sheffield, Richard L.

    2015-06-01

    Superconducting (SC) accelerators are very efficient for CW or long-pulse operation, and normal conducting (NC) accelerators are cost effective for short-pulse operation. The addition of a short NC linac section to a SC linac can correct for the energy droop that occurs when pulsed high-current operation is required that exceeds the capability of the klystrons to replenish the cavity RF fields due to the long field fill-times of SC structures, or a requirement to support a broad range of beam currents results in variable beam loading. This paper describes the implementation of this technique to enable microseconds of high beam-current,more » 90 mA or more, in a 12 GeV SC long-pulse accelerator designed for the MaRIE 42-keV XFEL proposed for Los Alamos National Laboratory.« less

  8. Enabling cost-effective high-current burst-mode operation in superconducting accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, Richard L.

    2015-06-01

    Superconducting (SC) accelerators are very efficient for CW or long-pulse operation, and normal conducting (NC) accelerators are cost effective for short-pulse operation. The addition of a short NC linac section to a SC linac can correct for the energy droop that occurs when pulsed high-current operation is required that exceeds the capability of the klystrons to replenish the cavity RF fields due to the long field fill-times of SC structures, or a requirement to support a broad range of beam currents results in variable beam loading. This paper describes the implementation of this technique to enable microseconds of high beam-current, 90 mA or more, in a 12 GeV SC long-pulse accelerator designed for the MaRIE 42-keV XFEL proposed for Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  9. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  10. Wind turbine reliability : understanding and minimizing wind turbine operation and maintenance costs.

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-11-01

    Wind turbine system reliability is a critical factor in the success of a wind energy project. Poor reliability directly affects both the project's revenue stream through increased operation and maintenance (O&M) costs and reduced availability to generate power due to turbine downtime. Indirectly, the acceptance of wind-generated power by the financial and developer communities as a viable enterprise is influenced by the risk associated with the capital equipment reliability; increased risk, or at least the perception of increased risk, is generally accompanied by increased financing fees or interest rates. Cost of energy (COE) is a key project evaluation metric, both in commercial applications and in the U.S. federal wind energy program. To reflect this commercial reality, the wind energy research community has adopted COE as a decision-making and technology evaluation metric. The COE metric accounts for the effects of reliability through levelized replacement cost and unscheduled maintenance cost parameters. However, unlike the other cost contributors, such as initial capital investment and scheduled maintenance and operating expenses, costs associated with component failures are necessarily speculative. They are based on assumptions about the reliability of components that in many cases have not been operated for a complete life cycle. Due to the logistical and practical difficulty of replacing major components in a wind turbine, unanticipated failures (especially serial failures) can have a large impact on the economics of a project. The uncertainty associated with long-term component reliability has direct bearing on the confidence level associated with COE projections. In addition, wind turbine technology is evolving. New materials and designs are being incorporated in contemporary wind turbines with the ultimate goal of reducing weight, controlling loads, and improving energy capture. While the goal of these innovations is reduction in the COE, there is a

  11. Theoretical and experimental researches on the operating costs of a wastewater treatment plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panaitescu, M.; Panaitescu, F.-V.; Anton, I.-A.

    2015-11-01

    Purpose of the work: The total cost of a sewage plants is often determined by the present value method. All of the annual operating costs for each process are converted to the value of today's correspondence and added to the costs of investment for each process, which leads to getting the current net value. The operating costs of the sewage plants are subdivided, in general, in the premises of the investment and operating costs. The latter can be stable (normal operation and maintenance, the establishment of power) or variables (chemical and power sludge treatment and disposal, of effluent charges). For the purpose of evaluating the preliminary costs so that an installation can choose between different alternatives in an incipient phase of a project, can be used cost functions. In this paper will be calculated the operational cost to make several scenarios in order to optimize its. Total operational cost (fixed and variable) is dependent global parameters of wastewater treatment plant. Research and methodology: The wastewater treatment plant costs are subdivided in investment and operating costs. We can use different cost functions to estimate fixed and variable operating costs. In this study we have used the statistical formulas for cost functions. The method which was applied to study the impact of the influent characteristics on the costs is economic analysis. Optimization of plant design consist in firstly, to assess the ability of the smallest design to treat the maximum loading rates to a given effluent quality and, secondly, to compare the cost of the two alternatives for average and maximum loading rates. Results: In this paper we obtained the statistical values for the investment cost functions, operational fixed costs and operational variable costs for wastewater treatment plant and its graphical representations. All costs were compared to the net values. Finally we observe that it is more economical to build a larger plant, especially if maximum loading

  12. 3 CFR - Disposing of Unneeded Federal Real Estate-Increasing Sales Proceeds, Cutting Operating Costs, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and occupancy rates, annual operating cost, energy efficiency, and sustainability. To the extent... Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance), and the Federal Data Center Consolidation Initiative,...

  13. [Surgical therapy of chronic anal fissure--do additional proctologic operations impair continence?].

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, J; Berger, A; Uranüs, S

    1994-07-01

    78 patients with chronic anal fissures have been mainly operated on by lateral internal sphincterotomy (LATS). Continence have been evaluated by questionnaire at least 9 months postoperatively. Patient without any additional proctological operation had minor disturbances of continence in 17%. Patient with additional operations had disturbances of continence in 30%. Especially the subgroup of patients with LATS and haemorrhoidectomy had bad results. In this group only 45% were fully continent.

  14. 25 CFR 170.602 - If a tribe incurs unforeseen construction costs, can it get additional funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false If a tribe incurs unforeseen construction costs, can it get additional funds? 170.602 Section 170.602 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Funding Process § 170.602 If a tribe incurs unforeseen construction costs, can it get additional...

  15. Low cost space operations - Empty promise or future reality. [cost effectiveness problems of NASA programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bader, M.

    1976-01-01

    Organizational obstacles to the achievement of a cost-effective Space Shuttle service are examined. Among the factors considered are the difficulties of fostering concern for cost-effectiveness among the NASA research and development team and elimination of unnecessary systems and personnel. The effect of foreign or commercial competition and the extent to which governmental funding and control should be implemented are considered.

  16. 24 CFR 583.130 - Commitment of grant amounts for leasing, supportive services, and operating costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... leasing, supportive services, and operating costs. 583.130 Section 583.130 Housing and Urban Development... HOUSING PROGRAM Assistance Provided § 583.130 Commitment of grant amounts for leasing, supportive services, and operating costs. Upon execution of a grant agreement covering assistance for leasing,...

  17. Operational cost minimization of heat pump for milk pasteurization in dairy.

    PubMed

    Söylemez, Mehmet Sait

    2005-11-01

    A thermo economic optimization analysis is presented yielding simple algebraic formula for estimating the optimum operating conditions of interconnected heat pump assisted milk pasteurizing systems. The overall operational cost method including the cost of auxiliary heater is used in the present study, together with the thermal analyses of all system components, for thermo economic analysis of the system.

  18. 16 CFR 305.5 - Determinations of estimated annual energy consumption, estimated annual operating cost, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... consumption, estimated annual operating cost, and energy efficiency rating, and of water use rate. 305.5... energy efficiency rating, and of water use rate. Link to an amendment published at 75 FR 41713, July 19... operating costs, the energy efficiency ratings, and the efficacy factors of the following covered...

  19. 16 CFR 305.5 - Determinations of estimated annual energy consumption, estimated annual operating cost, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... consumption, estimated annual operating cost, and energy efficiency rating, and of water use rate. 305.5... energy efficiency rating, and of water use rate. (a) Procedures for determining the estimated annual energy consumption, the estimated annual operating costs, the energy efficiency ratings, and the...

  20. 24 CFR 583.130 - Commitment of grant amounts for leasing, supportive services, and operating costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... leasing, supportive services, and operating costs. 583.130 Section 583.130 Housing and Urban Development... HOUSING PROGRAM Assistance Provided § 583.130 Commitment of grant amounts for leasing, supportive services, and operating costs. Upon execution of a grant agreement covering assistance for leasing,...

  1. Cost-Effective Additive Manufacturing in Space: HELIOS Technology Challenge Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeVieneni, Alayna; Velez, Carlos Andres; Benjamin, David; Hollenbeck, Jay

    2012-01-01

    Welcome to the HELIOS Technology Challenge Guide. This document is intended to serve as a general road map for participants of the HELIOS Technology Challenge [HTC] Program and the associated inaugural challenge: HTC-01: Cost-Effective Additive Manufacturing in Space. Please note that this guide is not a rule book and is not meant to hinder the development of innovative ideas. Its primary goal is to highlight the objectives of the HTC-01 Challenge and to describe possible solution routes and pitfalls that such technology may encounter in space. Please also note that participants wishing to demonstrate any hardware developed under this program during any future HELIOS Technology Challenge showcase event(s) may be subject to event regulations to be published separately at a later date.

  2. Report on audit of management and operating contractor overtime costs

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The Department of Energy (Department) uses contractors to operate its facilities. During Fiscal Year 1994, the Department`s management and operating contractors (contractors) had a total payroll of about $6.6 billion. Of this amount, about $251 million was compensation for overtime pay. The purpose of our audit was to evaluate contractor overtime payments for compliance with applicable regulations and contract provisions. Our objective was to determine whether the Department had controls in place to monitor and manage contractor overtime use.

  3. Initial Costs vs. Operational Costs. A Study of Building Improvement Projects in Fourteen Schools in the School District of Greenville County, South Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Tak Cheung

    To determine whether initial facility improvement costs were paid back by the reduced operational costs resulting from the improvement projects, this study examined the relationship between initial costs and operational costs of fourteen school buildings improved during the 1978-79 school year in Greenville County, South Carolina. With energy…

  4. Operating and Support Costs and Affordability of a 324 Ship Naval Battle Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    trend rates were to remain steady, negating the possibility of budget decreases, this thesis argues the Navy would still not be able to afford its...normalized results from the cost estimation models yielded a minimum cost growth of 17 percent in O&S costs. Even if budget growth trend rates were...tempo and operational costs to determine if a relationship actually existed. Analysis of burn rate data and expenditures among several ship classes was

  5. Bridging the gap between finance and clinical operations with activity-based cost management.

    PubMed

    Storfjell, J L; Jessup, S

    1996-12-01

    Activity-based cost management (ABCM) is an exciting management tool that links financial information with operations. By determining the costs of specific activities and processes, nurse managers accurately determine true costs of services more accurately than traditional cost accounting methods, and then can target processes for improvement and monitor them for change and improvement. The authors describe the ABCM process applied to nursing management situations.

  6. Advanced solar concentrator mass production, operation, and maintenance cost assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemeyer, W. A.; Bedard, R. J.; Bell, D. M.

    1981-01-01

    The object of this assessment was to estimate the costs of the preliminary design at: production rates of 100 to 1,000,000 concentrators per year; concentrators per aperture diameters of 5, 10, 11, and 15 meters; and various receiver/power conversion package weights. The design of the cellular glass substrate Advanced Solar Concentrator is presented. The concentrator is an 11 meter diameter, two axis tracking, parabolic dish solar concentrator. The reflective surface of this design consists of inner and outer groups of mirror glass/cellular glass gores.

  7. The importance of operations, risk, and cost assessment to space transfer systems design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, J. M.; Komerska, R. J.; Rowell, L. F.

    1992-01-01

    This paper examines several methodologies which contribute to comprehensive subsystem cost estimation. The example of a space-based lunar space transfer vehicle (STV) design is used to illustrate how including both primary and secondary factors into cost affects the decision of whether to use aerobraking or propulsion for earth orbit capture upon lunar return. The expected dominant cost factor in this decision is earth-to-orbit launch cost driven by STV mass. However, to quantify other significant cost factors, this cost comparison included a risk analysis to identify development and testing costs, a Taguchi design of experiments to determine a minimum mass aerobrake design, and a detailed operations analysis. As a result, the predicted cost advantage of aerobraking, while still positive, was subsequently reduced by about 30 percent compared to the simpler mass-based cost estimates.

  8. Is the system really the solution? Operating costs in hospital systems.

    PubMed

    Burns, Lawton Robert; McCullough, Jeffrey S; Wholey, Douglas R; Kruse, Gregory; Kralovec, Peter; Muller, Ralph

    2015-06-01

    Hospital system formation has recently accelerated. Executives emphasize scale economies that lower operating costs, a claim unsupported in academic research. Do systems achieve lower costs than freestanding facilities, and, if so, which system types? We test hypotheses about the relationship of cost with membership in systems, larger systems, and centralized and local hub-and-spoke systems. We also test whether these relationships have changed over time. Examining 4,000 U.S. hospitals during 1998 to 2010, we find no evidence that system members exhibit lower costs. However, members of smaller systems are lower cost than larger systems, and hospitals in centralized systems are lower cost than everyone else. There is no evidence that the system's spatial configuration is associated with cost, although national system hospitals exhibit higher costs. Finally, these results hold over time. We conclude that while systems in general may not be the solution to lower costs, some types of systems are.

  9. Cost-effectiveness analysis of arthroscopic surgery compared with non-operative management for osteoarthritis of the knee

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Jacquelyn D; Birmingham, Trevor B; Giffin, J Robert; Isaranuwatchai, Wanrudee; Hoch, Jeffrey S; Feagan, Brian G; Litchfield, Robert; Willits, Kevin; Fowler, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the cost-effectiveness of arthroscopic surgery in addition to non-operative treatments compared with non-operative treatments alone in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Design, setting and participants We conducted an economic evaluation alongside a single-centre, randomised trial among patients with symptomatic, radiographic knee OA (KL grade ≥2). Interventions Patients received arthroscopic debridement and partial resection of degenerative knee tissues in addition to optimised non-operative therapy, or optimised non-operative therapy only. Main outcome measures Direct and indirect costs were collected prospectively over the 2-year study period. The effectiveness outcomes were the Western Ontario McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Cost-effectiveness was estimated using the net benefit regression framework considering a range of willingness-to-pay values from the Canadian public payer and societal perspectives. We calculated incremental cost-effectiveness ratios and conducted sensitivity analyses using the extremes of the 95% CIs surrounding mean differences in effect between groups. Results 168 patients were included. Patients allocated to arthroscopy received partial resection and debridement of degenerative meniscal tears (81%) and/or articular cartilage (97%). There were no significant differences between groups in use of non-operative treatments. The incremental net benefit was negative for all willingness-to-pay values. Uncertainty estimates suggest that even if willing to pay $400 000 to achieve a clinically important improvement in WOMAC score, or ≥$50 000 for an additional QALY, there is <20% probability that the addition of arthroscopy is cost-effective compared with non-operative therapies only. Our sensitivity analysis suggests that even when assuming the largest treatment effect, the addition of arthroscopic surgery is not economically attractive compared with non-operative

  10. Conversion of packaged boiler to micronized coal cuts operating cost

    SciTech Connect

    Schwieger, B.

    1984-05-01

    The use of micronised coal can be an alternative to the purchase of new coal-fired boilers, since, in many cases, this fuel can be burned in existing oil- and gas-fired boilers with acceptable derating. The experience is quoted of Idaho Supreme, a potato processing company, where a packaged boiler designed to operate on oil and wood has been successfully run on micronised coal.

  11. Hybrid Airships: Intratheater Operations Cost-Benefit Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    and disaster relief operations (HA/DR) for Haiti began almost immediately. Aid from various nations, non -governmental organizations , and private...nations, non -governmental organizations , and private parties began moving toward the island nation. The US military joint port opening team and...need/capability gaps for hybrid airship employment,” determine required HA capabilities, identify partner organizations , and develop a timeline for

  12. Screw pumps cost effective for heavy crude operations

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, J.R. )

    1992-12-21

    This paper reports that in petroleum production, screw pumps fulfill the requirements for pumping crude oil with an API gravity of 20[degrees] or less (0.93 sp gr or greater). In many cases, these pumps provide more efficiency than centrifugal and reciprocating pumps. Heavy crude oils typically have viscosities at pumping temperatures in excess of 500 SSU (100 cSt). While screw pumps can handle viscosities ranging from fractional centistokes to millions of centistokes, the normal range for crude oil, from cost and efficiency viewpoints, is above 100 SSU (20 cSt). Bitumens can also be handled by screw pumps. Invented in 1922, rotary, positive-displacement multiple-screw pumps have been used for pumping fuel for burning, lubricating oil, fluid power, process feed, food, chemicals, synthetic-fiber slurries, general transfer, and many other applications.

  13. Reduction of operations and maintenance costs at geothermal power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Bruton, C.J.; Stevens, C.G.; Rard, J.A.; Kasameyer, P.W.

    1997-12-31

    To reduce chemical costs at geothermal power plants, we are investigating: (a) improved chemical processes associated with H{sub 2}S abatement techniques, and (b) the use of cross dispersive infrared spectrometry to monitor accurately, reliably, and continuously H{sub 2}S emissions from cooling towers. The latter is a new type of infrared optical technology developed by LLNL for non-proliferation verification. Initial work is focused at The Geysers in cooperation with Pacific Gas and Electric. Methods for deploying the spectrometer on-site at The Geysers are being developed. Chemical analysis of solutions involved in H{sub 2}S abatement technologies is continuing to isolate the chemical forms of sulfur produced.

  14. 49 CFR 192.328 - Additional construction requirements for steel pipe using alternative maximum allowable operating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional construction requirements for steel pipe using alternative maximum allowable operating pressure. 192.328 Section 192.328 Transportation... Lines and Mains § 192.328 Additional construction requirements for steel pipe using alternative...

  15. 49 CFR 192.328 - Additional construction requirements for steel pipe using alternative maximum allowable operating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional construction requirements for steel pipe using alternative maximum allowable operating pressure. 192.328 Section 192.328 Transportation... Lines and Mains § 192.328 Additional construction requirements for steel pipe using alternative...

  16. 49 CFR 192.328 - Additional construction requirements for steel pipe using alternative maximum allowable operating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional construction requirements for steel pipe using alternative maximum allowable operating pressure. 192.328 Section 192.328 Transportation... Lines and Mains § 192.328 Additional construction requirements for steel pipe using alternative...

  17. Operation Compatibility: A Neglected Contribution to Dual-Task Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pannebakker, Merel M.; Band, Guido P. H.; Ridderinkhof, K. Richard

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, dual-task interference has been attributed to the consequences of task load exceeding capacity limitations. However, the current study demonstrates that in addition to task load, the mutual compatibility of the concurrent processes modulates whether 2 tasks can be performed in parallel. In 2 psychological refractory period…

  18. 25 CFR 171.555 - What additional costs will I incur if I am granted a Payment Plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Payment Plan? 171.555 Section 171.555 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND... Collections § 171.555 What additional costs will I incur if I am granted a Payment Plan? You will incur the following costs: (a) An administrative fee to process your Payment Plan, as required by 31 CFR 901.9....

  19. 76 FR 79678 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; North Hollywood Operable Unit of the San...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-22

    ... AGENCY Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; North Hollywood Operable Unit of the San... Hollywood Operable Unit of the San Fernando Valley Area 1 Superfund Site, located in the vicinity of Los... to the North Hollywood Operable Unit Special Account within the Hazardous Substance Superfund....

  20. 76 FR 77528 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; North Hollywood Operable Unit of the San...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ... AGENCY Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; North Hollywood Operable Unit of the San... Hollywood Operable Unit of the San Fernando Valley Area 1 Superfund Site, located in the vicinity of Los... to the North Hollywood Operable Unit Special Account within the Hazardous Substance Superfund....

  1. The cost of cancer registry operations: Impact of volume on cost per case for core and enhanced registry activities

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Sujha; Tangka, Florence K.L.; Beebe, Maggie Cole; Trebino, Diana; Weir, Hannah K.; Babcock, Frances

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancer registration data is vital for creating evidence-based policies and interventions. Quantifying the resources needed for cancer registration activities and identifying potential efficiencies are critically important to ensure sustainability of cancer registry operations. Methods Using a previously validated web-based cost assessment tool, we collected activity-based cost data and report findings using 3 years of data from 40 National Program of Cancer Registry grantees. We stratified registries by volume: low-volume included fewer than 10,000 cases, medium-volume included 10,000–50,000 cases, and high-volume included >50,000 cases. Results Low-volume cancer registries incurred an average of $93.11 to report a case (without in-kind contributions) compared with $27.70 incurred by high-volume registries. Across all registries, the highest cost per case was incurred for data collection and abstraction ($8.33), management ($6.86), and administration ($4.99). Low- and medium-volume registries have higher costs than high-volume registries for all key activities. Conclusions Some cost differences by volume can be explained by the large fixed costs required for administering and performing registration activities, but other reasons may include the quality of the data initially submitted to the registries from reporting sources such as hospitals and pathology laboratories. Automation or efficiency improvements in data collection can potentially reduce overall costs. PMID:26702880

  2. Mars geoscience/climatology orbiter low cost mission operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, K. D.

    1984-01-01

    It will not be possible to support the multiple planetary missions of the magnitude and order of previous missions on the basis of foreseeable NASA funding. It is, therefore, necessary to seek innovative means for accomplishing the goals of planetary exploration with modestly allocated resources. In this connection, a Core Program set of planetary exploration missions has been recommended. Attention is given to a Mission Operations design overview which is based on the Mars Geoscience/Climatology Orbiter Phase-A study performed during spring of 1983.

  3. Reducing Operating Costs by Optimizing Space in Facilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    higher as potential candidates for modification. 2. Identify structural walls, wet walls, bathrooms , kitchens, plumbed areas, mechanical spaces, and...to share a workspace. Bathroom size, 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% Percentage of Companies that Utilize a Given Net Usable Square Feet Per Person Range Net...the application of the standards is that it may actually be too efficient at adding bodies and require additional bathrooms or electrical capacity to

  4. High Temperature Thermoplastic Additive Manufacturing Using Low-Cost, Open-Source Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, John M.; Stelter, Christopher J.; Yashin, Edward A.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (or 3D printing) via Fused Filament Fabrication (FFF), also known as Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM), is a process where material is placed in specific locations layer-by-layer to create a complete part. Printers designed for FFF build parts by extruding a thermoplastic filament from a nozzle in a predetermined path. Originally developed for commercial printers, 3D printing via FFF has become accessible to a much larger community of users since the introduction of Reprap printers. These low-cost, desktop machines are typically used to print prototype parts or novelty items. As the adoption of desktop sized 3D printers broadens, there is increased demand for these machines to produce functional parts that can withstand harsher conditions such as high temperature and mechanical loads. Materials meeting these requirements tend to possess better mechanical properties and higher glass transition temperatures (Tg), thus requiring printers with high temperature printing capability. This report outlines the problems and solutions, and includes a detailed description of the machine design, printing parameters, and processes specific to high temperature thermoplastic 3D printing.

  5. Capital and operating costs of full-scale fecal sludge management and wastewater treatment systems in Dakar, Senegal.

    PubMed

    Dodane, Pierre-Henri; Mbéguéré, Mbaye; Sow, Ousmane; Strande, Linda

    2012-04-03

    A financial comparison of a parallel sewer based (SB) system with activated sludge, and a fecal sludge management (FSM) system with onsite septic tanks, collection and transport (C&T) trucks, and drying beds was conducted. The annualized capital for the SB ($42.66 capita(-1) year(-1)) was ten times higher than the FSM ($4.05 capita(-1) year(-1)), the annual operating cost for the SB ($11.98 capita(-1) year(-1)) was 1.5 times higher than the FSM ($7.58 capita(-1) year(-1)), and the combined capital and operating for the SB ($54.64 capita(-1) year(-1)) was five times higher than FSM ($11.63 capita(-1) year(-1)). In Dakar, costs for SB are almost entirely borne by the sanitation utility, with only 6% of the annualized cost borne by users of the system. In addition to costing less overall, FSM operates with a different business model, with costs spread among households, private companies, and the utility. Hence, SB was 40 times more expensive to implement for the utility than FSM. However, the majority of FSM costs are borne at the household level and are inequitable. The results of the study illustrate that in low-income countries, vast improvements in sanitation can be affordable when employing FSM, whereas SB systems are prohibitively expensive.

  6. Capital and Operating Costs of Full-Scale Fecal Sludge Management and Wastewater Treatment Systems in Dakar, Senegal

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A financial comparison of a parallel sewer based (SB) system with activated sludge, and a fecal sludge management (FSM) system with onsite septic tanks, collection and transport (C&T) trucks, and drying beds was conducted. The annualized capital for the SB ($42.66 capita–1 year–1) was ten times higher than the FSM ($4.05 capita–1 year–1), the annual operating cost for the SB ($11.98 capita–1 year–1) was 1.5 times higher than the FSM ($7.58 capita–1 year–1), and the combined capital and operating for the SB ($54.64 capita–1 year–1) was five times higher than FSM ($11.63 capita–1 year–1). In Dakar, costs for SB are almost entirely borne by the sanitation utility, with only 6% of the annualized cost borne by users of the system. In addition to costing less overall, FSM operates with a different business model, with costs spread among households, private companies, and the utility. Hence, SB was 40 times more expensive to implement for the utility than FSM. However, the majority of FSM costs are borne at the household level and are inequitable. The results of the study illustrate that in low-income countries, vast improvements in sanitation can be affordable when employing FSM, whereas SB systems are prohibitively expensive. PMID:22413875

  7. An Analysis of Aviation Maintenance Operations and Supporting Costs, and Cost Capturing Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-04

    ABBREVIATIONS ACES Aviation Cost Evaluation System AESA Active Electronically Scanned Array AFAST Aviation Financial Analysis Support Tool AIMD Aircraft...the Secretary of Defense SAF/FM Secretary of the Air Force, Financial Management SUF Suffix TEC Type Equipment Code TD Technical Directive TOC... Array (AESA), was installed and its demand placed on the GCU in 2005 compared to the current utilization. The utilization change is illustrated by

  8. An Analysis of Aviation Maintenance Operations and Supporting Costs, and Cost Capturing Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    AND ABBREVIATIONS AESA Active Electronically Scanned Array ACES Aviation Cost Evaluation System AFAST Aviation Financial Analysis Support Tool...Tempo OSD Office of the Secretary of Defense SAF/FM Secretary of the Air Force, Financial Management SUF Suffix TEC Type Equipment Code TD...utilization. Figure 1 illustrates a time stamp when the new radar system, Active Electronically Scanned Array (AESA) was installed and its demand placed

  9. A Robust Design Approach to Cost Estimation: Solar Energy for Marine Corps Expeditionary Operations (Briefing Charts)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    days 75-134 for Salt Lake City, by year, 1961-2010 Cost projections: oil and solar 12 Oil cost projections (from USEIA, 2014) and PV array cost...A ROBUST DESIGN APPROACH TO COST ESTIMATION: SOLAR ENERGY FOR MARINE CORPS EXPEDITIONARY OPERATIONS S.M. Sanchez, M.M. Morse, S.C. Upton, M.L...DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Robust Design Approach to Cost Estimation: Solar Energy for Marine Corps

  10. Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations, 1992--1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    This report presents estimated costs and cost indices for domestic oil and natural gas field equipment and production operations for 1992, 1993, 1994, and 1995. The costs of all equipment and services are those in effect during June of each year. The sum (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measured do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of the total number of oil wells to the total number of gas wells. The detail provided in this report is unavailable elsewhere. The body of this report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables.

  11. Operator/service team cuts cost of completing marginal gas wells

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.N.; Watson, P. ); Buchanan, L.; Martin, C.D. )

    1995-01-16

    By combining optimized drilling and completion procedures with an operator/service company alliance, Union Pacific Resources Corp. (UPRC) decreased drilling/completion costs by 24%/well in its East Texas Cotton Valley gas production operations. Improved design of tubulars, cement, mud system, bits, fracturing gel, and zone isolation led to the steep decline in drilling and completion costs. In the past, gas reserves easily justified well costs of $1 million/well. However, for marginal areas this cost had to be substantially reduced. Many areas considered margin at $1 million are feasible at one-half that cost. The exploit marginal-acreage team (EMAT) of UPRC and Halliburton Energy Services (HES) personnel was formed in March 1993 to find ways to improve the economics of completing wells in marginal areas. The paper discusses drilling cost, completion styles, fracture stimulation, zone isolation, the alliance and its benefits.

  12. Carnot's cycle for small systems: Irreversibility and cost of operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekimoto, Ken; Takagi, Fumiko; Hondou, Tsuyoshi

    2000-12-01

    In the thermodynamic limit, the existence of a maximal efficiency of energy conversion attainable by a Carnot cycle consisting of quasistatic isothermal and adiabatic processes precludes the existence of a perpetual machine of the second kind, whose cycles yield positive work in an isothermal environment. We employ the recently developed framework of the energetics of stochastic processes (called ``stochastic energetics'') to reanalyze the Carnot cycle in detail, taking account of fluctuations, without taking the thermodynamic limit. We find that in this nonmacroscopic situation both processes of connection to and disconnection from heat baths and adiabatic processes that cause distortion of the energy distribution are sources of inevitable irreversibility within the cycle. Also, the so-called null-recurrence property of the cumulative efficiency of energy conversion over many cycles and the irreversible property of isolated, purely mechanical processes under external ``macroscopic'' operations are discussed in relation to the impossibility of a perpetual machine, or Maxwell's demon. This analysis may serve as the basis for the design and analysis of mesoscopic energy converters in the near future.

  13. Balancing low cost with reliable operation in the rotordynamic design of the ALS Liquid Hydrogen Fuel Turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhill, L. M.

    1990-01-01

    The Air Force/NASA Advanced Launch System (ALS) Liquid Hydrogen Fuel Turbopump (FTP) has primary design goals of low cost and high reliability, with performance and weight having less importance. This approach is atypical compared with other rocket engine turbopump design efforts, such as on the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), which emphasized high performance and low weight. Similar to the SSME turbopumps, the ALS FTP operates supercritically, which implies that stability and bearing loads strongly influence the design. In addition, the use of low cost/high reliability features in the ALS FTP such as hydrostatic bearings, relaxed seal clearances, and unshrouded turbine blades also have a negative influence on rotordynamics. This paper discusses the analysis conducted to achieve a balance between low cost and acceptable rotordynamic behavior, to ensure that the ALS FTP will operate reliably without subsynchronous instabilities or excessive bearing loads.

  14. Operation and maintenance cost data for residential photovoltaic modules/panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oster, J. R., Jr.; Zaremski, D. R., Jr.; Albert, E. M.; Hawkins, S. L.

    1980-01-01

    Costs associated with the operation and maintenance of residential photovoltaic modules and arrays are studied. Six basic topics related to operation and maintenance to photovoltaic arrays are investigated: maintenance; cleaning; panel replacement; gasket repair/replacement; wiring repair/replacement; and termination repair/replacement. The effects of the mounting types (rack mount, stand off mount, direct mount and integral mount) and the installation/replacement type (sequential, partial interruption and independent) are identified and described. Methods of reducing maintenance costs are suggested.

  15. Simple Automatic File Exchange (SAFE) to Support Low-Cost Spacecraft Operation via the Internet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Paul; Repaci, Max; Sames, David

    1998-01-01

    Various issues associated with Simple Automatic File Exchange (SAFE) are presented in viewgraph form. Specific topics include: 1) Packet telemetry, Internet IP networks and cost reduction; 2) Basic functions and technical features of SAFE; 3) Project goals, including low-cost satellite transmission to data centers to be distributed via an Internet; 4) Operations with a replicated file protocol; 5) File exchange operation; 6) Ground stations as gateways; 7) Lessons learned from demonstrations and tests with SAFE; and 8) Feedback and future initiatives.

  16. Operation and maintenance cost data for residential photovoltaic modules/panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oster, J. R., Jr.; Zaremski, D. R., Jr.; Albert, E. M.; Hawkins, S. L.

    1980-07-01

    Costs associated with the operation and maintenance of residential photovoltaic modules and arrays are studied. Six basic topics related to operation and maintenance to photovoltaic arrays are investigated: maintenance; cleaning; panel replacement; gasket repair/replacement; wiring repair/replacement; and termination repair/replacement. The effects of the mounting types (rack mount, stand off mount, direct mount and integral mount) and the installation/replacement type (sequential, partial interruption and independent) are identified and described. Methods of reducing maintenance costs are suggested.

  17. Warfighter Support: DOD Needs Additional Steps to Fully Integrate Operational Contract Support into Contingency Planning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    Planning Report to the Chairman, Subcommittee on Contracting Oversight, Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, U.S. Senate...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Warfighter Support: DOD Needs Additional Steps to Fully Integrate Operational Contract Support into Contingency Planning 5a...Support into Contingency Planning Why GAO Did This Study DOD has relied extensively on contractors for operations in Iraq and Afghanistan over the

  18. Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations 1994 through 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    This report presents estimated costs and cost indices for domestic oil and natural gas field equipment and production operations for 1994, 1995, 1996, and 1997. The costs of all equipment and services are those in effect during June of each year. The sums (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measures do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of the total number of oil wells to the total number of gas wells. The detail provided in this report is unavailable elsewhere. The body of this report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables. Price changes for oil and gas, changes in taxes on oil and gas revenues, and environmental factors (compliance costs and lease availability) have a significant impact on the number and cost of oil and gas wells drilled. These changes also impact the cost of oil and gas equipment and production operations.

  19. 78 FR 32224 - Availability of Version 3.1.2 of the Connect America Fund Phase II Cost Model; Additional...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ...; Additional Discussion Topics in Connect America Cost Model Virtual Workshop AGENCY: Federal Communications... issues in the ongoing virtual workshop. DATES: Comments are due on or before June 18, 2013. If you... comments. Virtual Workshop: In addition to the usual methods for filing electronic comments, the...

  20. Reducing operating costs for struvite formation with a carbon dioxide stripper.

    PubMed

    Fattah, K P; Sabrina, N; Mavinic, D S; Koch, F A

    2008-01-01

    One of the major operational costs of phosphorus recovery as struvite is the cost of caustic chemical that is added to maintain a desired level of operative pH. A study was conducted at the Lulu Island Wastewater Treatment Plant (LIWWTP), Richmond, BC, using a struvite crystallizer and a cascade stripper designed at the University of British Columbia (UBC). The stripper was tested under different operating conditions to determine the effectiveness of CO(2) stripping in increasing the pH of the water matrix and thereby reducing caustic chemical use. This reduction is expected to reduce the operational costs of struvite production. Throughout the project, a high percentage (90%) of phosphorus removal was achieved under each condition. The cascade stripper was very effective in saving caustic usage, ranging from 35% to 86%, depending on the operating conditions. However, the stripper showed relatively poor performance regarding ammonia stripping.

  1. Operational cost analysis of dental emergencies for deployed US Army personnel during operation Iraqi freedom.

    PubMed

    Colthirst, Paul M; Berg, Rosann G; Denicolo, Philip; Simecek, John W

    2013-04-01

    The documentation of dental emergency (DE) rates in past global conflicts has been well established; however, little is known about wartime DE costs on the battlefield. Using DEs as an example for decreased combat effectiveness, this article analyzes the cost of treating DEs in theater, both in terms of fixed and variable costs, and also highlighted the difficulties that military units experience when faced with degradation of combat manpower because of DEs. The study found that Dental-Disease and Non-Battle Injury cost the U.S. Army a total of $21.4M between July 1, 2009 and June 30, 2010, and $21.9M between July 1, 2010 and June 30, 2011. The results also revealed that approximately 32% of DE required follow-up treatment over the 2-year period, which increased the costs associated with a DE over time. Understanding the etiology and cost of DE cases, military dental practitioners will be better equipped to provide oral health instructions and preventive measures before worldwide deployments.

  2. A Delphi Study of Additive Manufacturing Applicability for United States Air Force Civil Engineer Contingency Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    This simple process is the basis for most consumer-grade desktop AM machines, commonly known as 3D printers (Pham & Gault, 1998:1270). Material...as a single purchase to decrease initial capital costs. Once the 3D printers are purchased and delivered, the selected bases can begin training...for several Questions if you would liKe to explain or elaborate on your answers. Additional information •out 3D printers and UTCs is provided as an

  3. Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations 1990 through 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-08

    This report presents estimated costs and indice for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations for 1990, 1991, 1992, and 1993. The costs of all equipment and serives were those in effect during June of each year. The sums (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measures do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of oil wells to gas wells. The body of the report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables. Price changes for oil and gas, changes in taxes on oil and gas revenues, and environmental factors (costs and lease availability) have significant impact on the number and cost of oil and gas wells drilled. These changes also impact the cost of oil and gas production equipment and operations.

  4. 77 FR 15976 - Additional Changes to the Schedule of Operations Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-19

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Food Safety and Inspection Service 9 CFR Parts 307 and 381 Additional Changes to the Schedule of Operations Regulations AGENCY: Food Safety and Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: The Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) is proposing to amend the meat...

  5. Operational Momentum in Large-Number Addition and Subtraction by 9-Month-Olds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrink, Koleen; Wynn, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies on nonsymbolic arithmetic have illustrated that under conditions that prevent exact calculation, adults display a systematic tendency to overestimate the answers to addition problems and underestimate the answers to subtraction problems. It has been suggested that this "operational momentum" results from exposure to a…

  6. 49 CFR 192.935 - What additional preventive and mitigative measures must an operator take?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... accordance with one of the risk assessment approaches in ASME/ANSI B31.8S (incorporated by reference, see § 192.7), section 5, a risk analysis of its pipeline to identify additional measures to protect the high.... (2) Outside force damage. If an operator determines that outside force (e.g., earth movement,...

  7. 49 CFR 192.935 - What additional preventive and mitigative measures must an operator take?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... accordance with one of the risk assessment approaches in ASME/ANSI B31.8S (incorporated by reference, see § 192.7), section 5, a risk analysis of its pipeline to identify additional measures to protect the high.... (2) Outside force damage. If an operator determines that outside force (e.g., earth movement,...

  8. 77 FR 19565 - Additional Changes to the Schedule of Operations Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-02

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Food Safety and Inspection Service 9 CFR Parts 307 and 381 RIN 0583-AD48 Additional Changes to the Schedule of Operations Regulations AGENCY: Food Safety and Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Correction. SUMMARY: On March 19, 2012, the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) published a...

  9. 42 CFR 412.77 - Determination of the hospital-specific rate for inpatient operating costs for sole community...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... inpatient operating costs for sole community hospitals based on a Federal fiscal year 1996 base period. 412... Costs § 412.77 Determination of the hospital-specific rate for inpatient operating costs for sole... payment formula set forth in § 412.92(d)(1). (2) This section applies only to cost reporting...

  10. 42 CFR 412.78 - Determination of the hospital-specific rate for inpatient operating costs for sole community...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... inpatient operating costs for sole community hospitals based on a Federal fiscal year 2006 base period. 412... Costs § 412.78 Determination of the hospital-specific rate for inpatient operating costs for sole... in § 412.92(d)(1). (2) This section applies only to cost reporting periods beginning on or...

  11. 42 CFR 447.206 - Cost limit for providers operated by units of government.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... section applies to payments made to health care providers that are operated by units of government as...) of the Act. (a) General rules. (1) All health care providers that are operated by units of government are limited to reimbursement not in excess of the individual health care provider's cost of...

  12. Costs and Utilization of Operating Rooms in a Public Hospital in Trinidad, West Indies

    PubMed Central

    Hariharan, Seetharaman; Chen, Deryk

    2015-01-01

    Context: A top-down evaluation of the costs of operating rooms (ORs) is not commonly done because it is relevant mostly in a publicly funded system. Objective: This study was conducted to determine the costs and utilization of ORs in a public hospital in Trinidad, West Indies, for two one-year periods using a top-down model. Design: Quantitative observational study. Main Outcome Measures: A “cost-block” model suggested for evaluation of intensive care unit costs was adapted to suit ORs. Data were obtained from personal interviews, records, and surveys from the appropriate hospital departments. Adjusted OR utilization times also were recorded for both years. Results: The total annual costs of 4 ORs for the years 2006 and 2009 were approximately US $2.2 and $3.2 million, respectively. Capital expenditure contributed to 70% of the costs, followed by consumables (15%) and medical staff salary (8%). The daily cost of running the ORs was US $6242 in 2006, which rose to $8873 in 2009. The cost of unutilized OR time was approximately US $298,342 in 2006 and was reduced to $198,315 during 2009. Conclusion: The adapted cost-block model was useful to evaluate the costs of ORs in a public hospital in Trinidad and can be used from the government’s expenditure perspective. Because the cost of running the ORs was high, efficiency must be improved to minimize waste. PMID:26828072

  13. Spacecraft Autonomy and Automation: A Comparative Analysis of Strategies for Cost Effective Mission Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Nathaniel, Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The evolution of satellite operations over the last 40 years has drastically changed. October 4, 1957 (during the cold war) the Soviet Union launched the world's first spacecraft into orbit. The Sputnik satellite orbited Earth for three months and catapulted the United States into a race for dominance in space. A year after Sputnik, President Dwight Eisenhower formed the National Space and Aeronautics Administration (NASA). With a team of scientists and engineers, NASA successfully launched Explorer 1, the first US satellite to orbit Earth. During these early years, massive amounts of ground support equipment and operators were required to successfully operate spacecraft vehicles. Today, budget reductions and technological advances have forced new approaches to spacecraft operations. These approaches require increasingly complex, on board spacecraft systems, that enable autonomous operations, resulting in more cost-effective mission operations. NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, considered world class in satellite development and operations, has developed and operated over 200 satellites during its 40 years of existence. NASA Goddard is adopting several new millennium initiatives that lower operational costs through the spacecraft autonomy and automation. This paper examines NASA's approach to spacecraft autonomy and ground system automation through a comparative analysis of satellite missions for Hubble Space Telescope-HST, Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous-NEAR, and Solar Heliospheric Observatory-SoHO, with emphasis on cost reduction methods, risk analysis and anomalies and strategies employed for mitigating risk.

  14. 78 FR 12271 - Wireline Competition Bureau Seeks Additional Comment In Connect America Cost Model Virtual Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-22

    ... Virtual Workshop AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: In this... Site: http://fjallfoss.fcc.gov/ecfs2/ . Follow the instructions for submitting comments. Virtual...://www.fcc.gov/blog/wcb-cost-model-virtual-workshop-2012 . People with Disabilities: Contact the FCC...

  15. Government regulation and public opposition create high additional costs for field trials with GM crops in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Bernauer, Thomas; Tribaldos, Theresa; Luginbühl, Carolin; Winzeler, Michael

    2011-12-01

    Field trials with GM crops are not only plant science experiments. They are also social experiments concerning the implications of government imposed regulatory constraints and public opposition for scientific activity. We assess these implications by estimating additional costs due to government regulation and public opposition in a recent set of field trials in Switzerland. We find that for every Euro spent on research, an additional 78 cents were spent on security, an additional 31 cents on biosafety, and an additional 17 cents on government regulatory supervision. Hence the total additional spending due to government regulation and public opposition was around 1.26 Euros for every Euro spent on the research per se. These estimates are conservative; they do not include additional costs that are hard to monetize (e.g. stakeholder information and dialogue activities, involvement of various government agencies). We conclude that further field experiments with GM crops in Switzerland are unlikely unless protected sites are set up to reduce these additional costs.

  16. Environmental projects, volume 11. Environmental assessment: Addition to operations building, Mars site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    An Environmental Assessment was performed of the proposed addition to building G-86 at the Mars Site, which will provide space for new electronic equipment to consolidate the Deep Space Network (DSN) support facilities from other Goldstone Deep Space Communication Complex (GDSCC) sites at the Mars Site, and will include a fifth telemetry and command group with its associated link monitor, control processor, and operator consoles. The addition of these facilities will increase the capability of the DSN to support future sophisticated NASA spacecraft missions such as the International Solar and Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Program. The planned construction of this building addition requires an Environmental Assessment (EA) document that records the existing environmental conditions at the Mars Site, that analyzes the environmental effects that possibly could be expected from the construction and use of the new building addition, and that recommends measures to be taken to mitigate any possible deleterious environmental effects.

  17. Operations Assessment of Launch Vehicle Architectures using Activity Based Cost Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruiz-Torres, Alex J.; McCleskey, Carey

    2000-01-01

    The growing emphasis on affordability for space transportation systems requires the assessment of new space vehicles for all life cycle activities, from design and development, through manufacturing and operations. This paper addresses the operational assessment of launch vehicles, focusing on modeling the ground support requirements of a vehicle architecture, and estimating the resulting costs and flight rate. This paper proposes the use of Activity Based Costing (ABC) modeling for this assessment. The model uses expert knowledge to determine the activities, the activity times and the activity costs based on vehicle design characteristics. The approach provides several advantages to current approaches to vehicle architecture assessment including easier validation and allowing vehicle designers to understand the cost and cycle time drivers.

  18. Validation of the Operating and Support Cost Model for Avionics Automatic Test Equipment (OSCATE).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    are essentially deter- mined during the initial design phases. This further em- phasises the need for consideration of the impact of design decisions...program manager can use in evaluation of the cost impact of available alternatives. The Operating and Support Cost Model for Automatic Test Equipment...ummmmm m m -"m - CHAPTER III METHODOLOGY The OSCATE model has been developed for use by pro- gram managers to evaluate the impact of ATE system para

  19. 25 CFR 170.602 - If a tribe incurs unforeseen construction costs, can it get additional funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false If a tribe incurs unforeseen construction costs, can it get additional funds? 170.602 Section 170.602 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Service Delivery for Indian Reservation...

  20. Study of short-haul aircraft operating economics. Phase 2: An analysis of the impact of jet modernization on local service airline operating costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrastek, D. A.

    1976-01-01

    The objectives of this phase of the study were (1) to assess the 10 year operating cost trends of the local service airlines operating in the 1965 through 1974 period, (2) to glean from these trends the technological and operational parameters which were impacted most significantly by the transition to newer pure jet, short haul transports, and effected by changing fuel prices and cost of living indices, and (3) to develop, construct, and evaluate an operating cost forecasting model which would incorporate those factors which best predicted airline total operating cost behavior over that 10-year period.

  1. Audit of health benefit costs at the Department`s Management and Operating Contractors

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-23

    The audit disclosed that the Department and certain of its contractors had initiated several positive actions to contain health benefit costs: improving data collection, increasing training, reviewing changes to health plans, improving the language in one contract, increasing the employees, share of health costs at one contractor, and initiating self-insurance at another contractor. Despite these actions, further improvements are needed in the administration of the contractor employee health benefit plans. It was found that the Department did not have the policies and procedures necessary to ensure that the health benefit costs met the tests for reasonableness. The audit of $95 million in health benefit costs incurred at six Management and Operating contractors showed that $15.4 million of these costs were excessive compared to national norms.

  2. Operation and maintenance cost data for residential photovoltaic modules/panels

    SciTech Connect

    1980-07-01

    Burt Hill Kosar Rittelmann Associates has conducted a study to identify and estimate costs associated with the operation and maintenance of residential photovoltaic modules and arrays. Six basic topics related to operation and maintenance to photovoltaic arrays were investigated - General (Normal) Maintenance, Cleaning, Panel Replacement, Gasket Repair/Replacement, Wiring Repair/Replacement, and Termination Repair/Replacement. The effects of the mounting types - Rack Mount, Stand-Off Mount, Direct Mount, and Integral Mount - and the installation/replacement type - Sequential, Partial Interruption, and Independent - have been identified and described. Recommendation on methods of reducing maintenance costs are made.

  3. Materials Testing and Cost Modeling for Composite Parts Through Additive Manufacturing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-30

    êÅÜ=mêçÖê~ãW= `êÉ~íáåÖ=póåÉêÖó=Ñçê=fåÑçêãÉÇ=`Ü~åÖÉ= - 246 - Panel 17. Reducing Life- Cycle Costs: Adopting Emerging Manufacturing Technologies...chain. Introduction Modern manufacturing processes tend to reflect globalization, a concentration on core activities, shorter product life- cycles ... cycle perspective, a number of organizations recognize that environmental benefits and performance improvements can be achieved (Horn & Harrysson, 2012

  4. Effect on the operation properties of DMBR with the addition of GAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jizhi; Zhang, Qian; Hong, Junming

    2017-01-01

    The membrane bioreactor and dynamic membrane bioreactor were used to examine the effect of granular activated carbon (GAC) on the treatment of synthetic wastewater. After the addition of different volume fractions GAC in the DMBR, the operation parameters, effluent COD, NH4 +-N, NO3 --N, TN concentrations and sludge viscosity of the bioreactor was investigated. The results showed that the addition of GAC could relieve the membrane fouling and improve the removal efficiencies of pollutants in the DMBR. The effluent concentrations of pollutants were linear correlation with the addition of volume fractions of GAC in the bioreactor. The value of R2 of each modulation was almost more than 0.9. The sludge viscosity was almost not affected by the volume fractions of GAC in the bioreactor. The best volume fractions of GAC were 20% in the DMBR.

  5. Afghanistan Drawdown Preparations: DOD Decision Makers Need Additional Analyses to Determine Costs and Benefits of Returning Excess Equipment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-19

    Major end items are equipment that is important to operational readiness such as aircraft; boats; motorized wheeled , tracked, and towed vehicles...Process (cont.) Loader , Scoop Type (July 2012 Playbook, p. 292) There are155 Marine Corps Scoop Type Loaders in Afghanistan, all of which are... loaders are determined to be excess when the disposition instructions are issued, the transportation cost for the return of these loaders could range

  6. EOS MLS Lessons Learned: Design Ideas for Safer and Lower Cost Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Dominick

    2012-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) is a complex instrument with a front end computer and 32 subsystem computers. MLS is one of four instruments on NASA's EOS Aura spacecraft With almost 8 years in orbit, MLS has a few lessons learned which can be applied during the design phase of future instruments to effect better longevity, more robust operations and a significant cost benefit during operations phase.

  7. The Effect of Infrastructure Sharing in Estimating Operations Cost of Future Space Transportation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaram, Meenakshi

    2005-01-01

    NASA and the aerospace industry are extremely serious about reducing the cost and improving the performance of launch vehicles both manned or unmanned. In the aerospace industry, sharing infrastructure for manufacturing more than one type spacecraft is becoming a trend to achieve economy of scale. An example is the Boeing Decatur facility where both Delta II and Delta IV launch vehicles are made. The author is not sure how Boeing estimates the costs of each spacecraft made in the same facility. Regardless of how a contractor estimates the cost, NASA in its popular cost estimating tool, NASA Air force Cost Modeling (NAFCOM) has to have a method built in to account for the effect of infrastructure sharing. Since there is no provision in the most recent version of NAFCOM2002 to take care of this, it has been found by the Engineering Cost Community at MSFC that the tool overestimates the manufacturing cost by as much as 30%. Therefore, the objective of this study is to develop a methodology to assess the impact of infrastructure sharing so that better operations cost estimates may be made.

  8. Report: landfill alternative daily cover: conserving air space and reducing landfill operating cost.

    PubMed

    Haughey, R D

    2001-02-01

    Title 40, Part 258 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Solid Waste Disposal Facility Criteria, commonly referred to as Subtitle D, became effective on October 9, 1993. It establishes minimum criteria for solid waste disposal facility siting, design, operations, groundwater monitoring and corrective action, and closure and postclosure maintenance, while providing EPA-approved state solid waste regulatory programs flexibility in implementing the criteria. Section 258.21(a) [40 CFR 258.21(a)] requires owners or operators of municipal solid waste landfill (MSWLF) units to cover disposed solid waste with 30cm of earthen material at the end of the operating day, or at more frequent intervals, if necessary, to control disease vectors, fires, odours, blowing litter, and scavenging. This requirement is consistent with already existing solid waste facility regulations in many states. For many MSWLFs, applying daily cover requires the importation of soil which increases landfill operating costs. Daily cover also uses valuable landfill air space, reducing potential operating revenue and the landfill's operating life. 40 CFR 258.21 (b) allows the director of an approved state to approve alternative materials of an alternative thickness if the owner or operator demonstrates that the alternative material and thickness will control disease vectors, fires, odours, blowing litter, and scavenging without presenting a threat to human health and the environment. Many different types of alternative daily cover (ADC) are currently being used, including geosynthetic tarps, foams, garden waste, and auto shredder fluff. These materials use less air space than soil and can reduce operating costs. This paper discusses the variety of ADCs currently being used around the country and their applicability to different climates and operating conditions, highlighting the more unusual types of ADC, the types of demonstrations necessary to obtain approval of ADC, and the impact on landfill air space

  9. Low-cost Electromagnetic Heating Technology for Polymer Extrusion-based Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, William G.; Rios, Orlando; Akers, Ronald R.; Morrison, William A.

    2016-01-07

    To improve the flow of materials used in in polymer additive manufacturing, ORNL and Ajax Tocco created an induction system for heating fused deposition modeling (FDM) nozzles used in polymer additive manufacturing. The system is capable of reaching a temperature of 230 C, a typical nozzle temperature for extruding ABS polymers, in 17 seconds. A prototype system was built at ORNL and sent to Ajax Tocco who analyzed the system and created a finalized power supply. The induction system was mounted to a PrintSpace Altair desktop printer and used to create several test parts similar in quality to those created using a resistive heated nozzle.

  10. Municipal Rebate Programs for Environmental Retrofits: An Evaluation of Additionality and Cost-Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennear, Lori S.; Lee, Jonathan M.; Taylor, Laura O.

    2013-01-01

    When policies incentivize voluntary activities that also take place in the absence of the incentive, it is critical to identify the additionality of the policy--that is, the degree to which the policy results in actions that would not have occurred otherwise. Rebate programs have become a common conservation policy tool for local municipalities…

  11. 42 CFR 413.139 - Depreciation: Optional allowance for depreciation based on a percentage of operating costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... is determined. (c) Application. If a provider has inadequate historical cost records for pre-1966... either has no historical cost records or has incomplete records, the determination of historical cost may... based on a percentage of operating costs. 413.139 Section 413.139 Public Health CENTERS FOR...

  12. 19 CFR 10.178 - Direct costs of processing operations performed in the beneficiary developing country.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... processing operations performed in the beneficiary developing country. (a) Items included in the direct costs... engineering, supervisory, quality control, and similar personnel; (2) Dies, molds, tooling, and depreciation on machinery and equipment which are allocable to the specific merchandise; (3) Research,...

  13. Space Operations Center system analysis study extension. Volume 2: Programmatics and cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A summary of Space Operations Center (SOC) orbital space station costs, program options and program recommendations is presented. Program structure, hardware commonality, schedules and program phasing are considered. Program options are analyzed with respect to mission needs, design and technology options, and anticipated funding constraints. Design and system options are discussed.

  14. Estimation of the laser cutting operating cost by support vector regression methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jović, Srđan; Radović, Aleksandar; Šarkoćević, Živče; Petković, Dalibor; Alizamir, Meysam

    2016-09-01

    Laser cutting is a popular manufacturing process utilized to cut various types of materials economically. The operating cost is affected by laser power, cutting speed, assist gas pressure, nozzle diameter and focus point position as well as the workpiece material. In this article, the process factors investigated were: laser power, cutting speed, air pressure and focal point position. The aim of this work is to relate the operating cost to the process parameters mentioned above. CO2 laser cutting of stainless steel of medical grade AISI316L has been investigated. The main goal was to analyze the operating cost through the laser power, cutting speed, air pressure, focal point position and material thickness. Since the laser operating cost is a complex, non-linear task, soft computing optimization algorithms can be used. Intelligent soft computing scheme support vector regression (SVR) was implemented. The performance of the proposed estimator was confirmed with the simulation results. The SVR results are then compared with artificial neural network and genetic programing. According to the results, a greater improvement in estimation accuracy can be achieved through the SVR compared to other soft computing methodologies. The new optimization methods benefit from the soft computing capabilities of global optimization and multiobjective optimization rather than choosing a starting point by trial and error and combining multiple criteria into a single criterion.

  15. 42 CFR 412.405 - Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. 412.405 Section 412.405 Public... Services of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities § 412.405 Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. The prospective payment...

  16. Capital and Operating Cost of Small Arsenic Removal System and their Most Frequent Maintenance Problems

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will first summarize the capital and operating cost of treatment systems by type and size of the systems. The treatment systems include adsorptive media (AM) systems, iron removal (IR), coagulation/filtration (CF), ion exchange (IX) systems, and point-of-use rev...

  17. 42 CFR 412.62 - Federal rates for inpatient operating costs for fiscal year 1984.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... are deemed to be parts of urban areas under section 601(g) of the Social Security Amendments of 1983..., plus any adjustments and special treatment of certain classes of hospitals for Federal fiscal year 1984... inpatient operating costs for those same hospitals for fiscal year 1984 under the Social Security Act as...

  18. V-22 Osprey Aircraft: Assessments Needed to Address Operational and Cost Concerns to Define Future Investments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-23

    GAO United States Government Accountability Office Testimony Before the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, House ...Investments Highlights of GAO-09-692T, a testimony before the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, House of Representatives T Since the 1980s...of Representatives V-22 OSPREY AIRCRAFT Assessments Needed to Address Operational and Cost Concerns to Define Future Investments Statement of

  19. Activity-based costing in the operating room at Valley View Hospital.

    PubMed

    Baker, J J; Boyd, G F

    1997-01-01

    This article presents an example of how one hospital reports the results of activity-based costing (ABC). It examines the composition and supporting assumptions of an ABC report for a particular procedure in the operating room (OR). It describes management uses of the information generated. It comments upon how the continuous quality improvement (CQI) is synchronized with the ABC reporting.

  20. 42 CFR 412.405 - Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. 412.405 Section 412.405 Public... Services of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities § 412.405 Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. The prospective payment...

  1. 42 CFR 412.405 - Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. 412.405 Section 412.405 Public... Services of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities § 412.405 Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. The prospective payment...

  2. 42 CFR 412.405 - Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. 412.405 Section 412.405 Public... Services of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities § 412.405 Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. The prospective payment...

  3. 42 CFR 412.405 - Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. 412.405 Section 412.405 Public... Services of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities § 412.405 Preadmission services as inpatient operating costs under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system. The prospective payment...

  4. Community College Finance: A Cost Analysis of Community College Expenditures Related to Maintenance and Operations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a costing model for maintenance and operations expenditures among 16 single-campus California community college districts and assess the impact of a variety of variables including size of student enrollment, physical plant age, acreage, gross square footage, and general obligation facility bonds on district…

  5. 42 CFR 412.62 - Federal rates for inpatient operating costs for fiscal year 1984.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... fiscal year 1984. 412.62 Section 412.62 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... § 412.62 Federal rates for inpatient operating costs for fiscal year 1984. (a) General rule. CMS... discharge in fiscal year 1984 involving inpatient hospital services of a hospital in the United...

  6. Feasibility and operating costs of an air cycle for CCHP in a fast food restaurant

    DOE PAGES

    Perez-Blanco, Horacio; Vineyard, Edward

    2016-05-06

    This work considers the possibilities of an air-based Brayton cycle to provide the power, heating and cooling needs of fast-food restaurants. A model of the cycle based on conventional turbomachinery loss coefficients is formulated. The heating, cooling and power capabilities of the cycle are extracted from simulation results. Power and thermal loads for restaurants in Knoxville, TN and in International Falls, MN, are considered. It is found that the cycle can meet the loads by setting speed and mass flow-rate apportionment between the power and cooling functional sections. The associated energy costs appear elevated when compared to the cost ofmore » operating individual components or a more conventional, absorption-based CHP system. Lastly, a first-order estimate of capital investments is provided. Suggestions for future work whereby the operational costs could be reduced are given in the conclusions.« less

  7. Feasibility and operating costs of an air cycle for CCHP in a fast food restaurant

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Blanco, Horacio; Vineyard, Edward

    2016-05-06

    This work considers the possibilities of an air-based Brayton cycle to provide the power, heating and cooling needs of fast-food restaurants. A model of the cycle based on conventional turbomachinery loss coefficients is formulated. The heating, cooling and power capabilities of the cycle are extracted from simulation results. Power and thermal loads for restaurants in Knoxville, TN and in International Falls, MN, are considered. It is found that the cycle can meet the loads by setting speed and mass flow-rate apportionment between the power and cooling functional sections. The associated energy costs appear elevated when compared to the cost of operating individual components or a more conventional, absorption-based CHP system. Lastly, a first-order estimate of capital investments is provided. Suggestions for future work whereby the operational costs could be reduced are given in the conclusions.

  8. Low-cost management aspects for developing, producing and operating future space transportation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goehlich, Robert A.; Rücker, Udo

    2005-01-01

    It is believed that a potential means for further significant reduction of the recurrent launch cost, which results also in a stimulation of launch rates of small satellites, is to make the launcher reusable, to increase its reliability and to make it suitable for new markets such as mass space tourism. Therefore, not only launching small satellites with expendable rockets on non-regular flights but also with reusable rockets on regular flights should be considered for the long term. However, developing, producing and operating reusable rockets require a fundamental change in the current "business as usual" philosophy. Under current conditions, it might not be possible to develop, to produce or to operate a reusable vehicle fleet economically. The favorite philosophy is based on "smart business" processes adapted by the authors using cost engineering techniques. In the following paper, major strategies for reducing costs are discussed, which are applied for a representative program proposal.

  9. Low-Cost Nanocellulose-Reinforced High-Temperature Polymer Composites for Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Ozcan, Soydan; Tekinalp, Halil L.; Love, Lonnie J.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Nelson, Kim

    2016-07-13

    ORNL worked with American Process Inc. to demonstrate the potential use of bio-based BioPlus® lignin-coated cellulose nanofibrils (L-CNF) as a reinforcing agent in the development of polymer feedstock suitable for additive manufacturing. L-CNF-reinforced polylactic acid (PLA) testing coupons were prepared and up to 69% increase in tensile strength and 133% increase in elastic modulus were demonstrated.

  10. U.S. Geological Survey Streamgage Operation and Maintenance Cost Evaluation...from the National Streamflow Information Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Norris, J. Michael

    2010-01-01

    To help meet the goal of providing earth-science information to the Nation, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) operates and maintains the largest streamgage network in the world, with over 7,600 active streamgages in 2010. This network is operated in cooperation with over 850 Federal, tribal, State, and local funding partners. The streamflow information provided by the USGS is used for the protection of life and property; for the assessment, allocation, and management of water resources; for the design of roads, bridges, dams, and water works; for the delineation of flood plains; for the assessment and evaluation of habitat; for understanding the effects of land-use, water-use, and climate changes; for evaluation of water quality; and for recreational safety and enjoyment. USGS streamgages are managed and operated to rigorous national standards, allowing analyses of data from streamgages in different areas and spanning long time periods, some with more than 100 years of data. About 90 percent of USGS streamgages provide streamflow information real-time on the web. Physical measurements of streamflow are made at streamgages multiple times a year, depending on flow conditions, to ensure the highest level of accuracy possible. In addition, multiple reviews and quality assurance checks are performed before the data is finalized. In 2006, the USGS reviewed all activities, operations, equipment, support, and costs associated with operating and maintaining a streamgage program (Norris and others, 2008). A summary of the percentages of costs associated with activities required to operate a streamgage on an annual basis are presented in figure 1. This information represents what it costs to fund a 'typical' USGS streamgage and how those funds are utilized. It should be noted that some USGS streamgages have higher percentages for some categories than do others depending on location and conditions. Forty-one percent of the funding for the typical USGS streamgage is for labor

  11. DCJ-indel and DCJ-substitution distances with distinct operation costs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Classical approaches to compute the genomic distance are usually limited to genomes with the same content and take into consideration only rearrangements that change the organization of the genome (i.e. positions and orientation of pieces of DNA, number and type of chromosomes, etc.), such as inversions, translocations, fusions and fissions. These operations are generically represented by the double-cut and join (DCJ) operation. The distance between two genomes, in terms of number of DCJ operations, can be computed in linear time. In order to handle genomes with distinct contents, also insertions and deletions of fragments of DNA – named indels – must be allowed. More powerful than an indel is a substitution of a fragment of DNA by another fragment of DNA. Indels and substitutions are called content-modifying operations. It has been shown that both the DCJ-indel and the DCJ-substitution distances can also be computed in linear time, assuming that the same cost is assigned to any DCJ or content-modifying operation. Results In the present study we extend the DCJ-indel and the DCJ-substitution models, considering that the content-modifying cost is distinct from and upper bounded by the DCJ cost, and show that the distance in both models can still be computed in linear time. Although the triangular inequality can be disrupted in both models, we also show how to efficiently fix this problem a posteriori. PMID:23879938

  12. Evaluation of low-cost commercial-off-the-shelf autopilot systems for SUAS operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Calvin Thomas

    With this increase in unmanned aircraft system (UAS) operations, there is a need for a structured process to evaluate different commercially available systems, particularly autopilots. The Remotely Operated Aircraft Management, Interpretation, and Navigation from Ground or ROAMING scale was developed to meet this need. This scale is a modification of the widely accepted Handling Qualities Rating scale developed by George Cooper and Robert Harper Jr. The Cooper-Harper scale allows pilots to rate a vehicle's performance in completing some task. Similarly, the ROAMING scale allows UAS operators to evaluate the management and observability of UAS in completing some task. The standardized evaluative process consists of cost, size, weight, and power (SWAP) analysis, ease of implementation through procedural description of setup, ROAMING scale rating, a slightly modified NASA TLX rating, and comparison of manual operation to autonomous operation of the task. This standard for evaluation of autopilots and their software will lead to better understanding of the workload placed on UAS operators and indicate where improvements to design and operational procedures can be made. An assortment of low-cost commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) autopilots were selected for use in the development of the evaluation and results of these tests demonstrate the commonalities and differences in these systems.

  13. Advanced Launch System (ALS): Electrical actuation and power systems improve operability and cost picture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundberg, Gale R.

    1990-01-01

    To obtain the Advanced Launch System (ALS) primary goals of reduced costs and improved operability, there must be significant reductions in the launch operations and servicing requirements relative to current vehicle designs and practices. One of the primary methods for achieving these goals is by using vehicle electrical power system and controls for all actuation and avionics requirements. A brief status review of the ALS and its associated Advanced Development Program is presented to demonstrate maturation of those technologies that will help meet the overall operability and cost goals. The electric power and actuation systems are highlighted as a specific technology ready not only to meet the stringent ALS goals (cryogenic field valves and thrust vector controls with peak power demands to 75 hp), but also those of other launch vehicles, military and civilian aircraft, lunar/Martian vehicles, and a multitude of commercial applications.

  14. Advanced Launch System (ALS) actuation and power systems impact operability and cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundberg, Gale R.

    1990-01-01

    To obtain the Advanced Launch System (ALS) primary goals of reduced costs and improved operability, there must be significant reductions in the launch operations and servicing requirements relative to current vehicle designs and practices. One of the primary methods for achieving these goals is by using vehicle electrical power system and controls for all actuation and avionics requirements. A brief status review of the ALS and its associated Advanced Development Program is presented to demonstrate maturation of those technologies that will help meet the overall operability and cost goals. The electric power and actuation systems are highlighted as a specific technology ready not only to meet the stringent ALS goals (cryogenic field valves and thrust vector controls with peak power demands to 75 hp), but also those of other launch vehicles, military and civilian aircraft, lunar/Martian vehicles, and a multitude of commercial applications.

  15. Advanced launch system (ALS) - Electrical actuation and power systems improve operability and cost picture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundberg, Gale R.

    1990-01-01

    To obtain the Advanced Launch System (ALS) primary goals of reduced costs and improved operability, there must be significant reductions in the launch operations and servicing requirements relative to current vehicle designs and practices. One of the primary methods for achieving these goals is by using vehicle electrrical power system and controls for all aviation and avionics requirements. A brief status review of the ALS and its associated Advanced Development Program is presented to demonstrate maturation of those technologies that will help meet the overall operability and cost goals. The electric power and actuation systems are highlighted as a sdpecific technology ready not only to meet the stringent ALS goals (cryogenic field valves and thrust vector controls with peak power demands to 75 hp), but also those of other launch vehicles, military ans civilian aircraft, lunar/Martian vehicles, and a multitude of comercial applications.

  16. Tug fleet and ground operations schedules and controls. Volume 3: Program cost estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Cost data for the tug DDT&E and operations phases are presented. Option 6 is the recommended option selected from seven options considered and was used as the basis for ground processing estimates. Option 6 provides for processing the tug in a factory clean environment in the low bay area of VAB with subsequent cleaning to visibly clean. The basis and results of the trade study to select Option 6 processing plan is included. Cost estimating methodology, a work breakdown structure, and a dictionary of WBS definitions is also provided.

  17. Installation, Operation, and Maintenance Strategies to Reduce the Cost of Offshore Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Maples, B.; Saur, G.; Hand, M.; van de Pieterman, R.; Obdam, T.

    2013-07-01

    Currently, installation, operation, and maintenance (IO&M) costs contribute approximately 30% to the LCOE of offshore wind plants. To reduce LCOE while ensuring safety, this paper identifies principal cost drivers associated with IO&M and quantifies their impacts on LCOE. The paper identifies technology improvement opportunities and provides a basis for evaluating innovative engineering and scientific concepts developed subsequently to the study. Through the completion of a case study, an optimum IO&M strategy for a hypothetical offshore wind project is identified.

  18. Naval Aircraft Operating and Support Cost-Estimating Model - FY77 Revision

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-02-01

    MPN on Claimant CINC MPN CINC MPN CINC 0W1N CINC MPN CINC O&MN CINC MPN O&MN OiMN 06.MN, MPN OiMN 06.MN 0S.MN O&MH O&HN O&MN O...Modifications 22. Replenishment Ground Support Equip. 23. Training Expendable Stores Appropriation O&MN, MPN O&MN, MPN APN-6 APN-5 APN-7- WPN Program...provide base support to the aircraft system the total cost (O&MN and MPN ) of base operating support services Cost Ele. Ref.

  19. Low-cost day/night helmet-mounted displays (HMD) in airborne operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, Curtis J.

    1999-07-01

    Current doctrine dictates a requirement for conducting 24-hour operations on the modern battlefield either in a rural or urban environment. To date, Night Vision Goggles (NVGs) along with Infrared sensors provide the bulk of vision aids that allow crew members to engage in tactical operations at night and during periods of low and reduced visibility. Since operations employing these devices, as well as operational doctrine, require the crewmember to fly 'heads-out,' Heads-Up Displays (HUDs), enumerating flight parameters, engine and navigation information have come into existence, greatly reducing the workload on today's combat aviators. A fine example is the Marconi/Tracor ANVS-7. This device employs a symbol generator and CRT to project symbology of critical aircraft parameters into the Night Vision Goggle giving the aviator a HUD capability while engaged in NVG night operations. The system is limited to aided vision night operations employing NVGs. The same criteria that create a need for supplying critical flight information at night exist for day and night unaided vision operations. However, there is no system in production to answer this obvious need. There are several reasons for this: (1) Available technology that will offer a low-cost solution for days ops, (2) Ergonomic and Human factors Issues, (3) Competition with currently fielded systems (ANVS-7), (4) Cost. Highly sophisticated HMDs such as the Apache IHADSS and the Comanche HIDSS, which combine navigation, targeting as well as weapons and flight status for 24 hour, all-weather operations are far too expensive and, in many cases, inappropriate for the majority of Combat Support aircraft. Using internal R&D Kaiser Electronics has developed a low-cost HMD -- called Lite EyeTM HMD -- that is capable of being used in day and night operations that addresses the aforementioned issues. The solution, using recent advances in solid state display technology, maximizes the use of currently fielded equipment

  20. Proposal of Economic Assessment of Hard Coal Mines Operation Conducted in Polish Conditions with the Use of Cost Benefit Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, Piotr; Majer, Marzena; Krzemień, Joanna

    2016-12-01

    The paper presents possibilities of an economic evaluation of hard coal mines, using Cost Benefit Analysis (CBA). Suggested methodology for CBA applied to the economic evaluation of a mine allows to conduct a complex evaluation of mine's functionality in connection to Polish conditions. Additionally to financial aspects, significant from the point of view of the mine's owner, the paper includes social and environmental effects as a result of mining activities. Proposed methodology has undergone tests which used averaged data obtained from two selected hard coal mines located in the Upper Silesian Coal Basin. Presented results confirm the validity of social costs and benefits, and environmental losses resulting from mining operation, which were included in analysis comprehensively evaluating the efficiency of hard coal mines.

  1. ISS Operations Cost Reductions Through Automation of Real-Time Planning Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Timothy A.; Clancey, William J.; McDonald, Aaron; Toschlog, Jason; Tucker, Tyson; Khan, Ahmed; Madrid, Steven (Eric)

    2011-01-01

    In 2007 the Johnson Space Center s Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) management team challenged their organizations to find ways to reduce the cost of operations for supporting the International Space Station (ISS) in the Mission Control Center (MCC). Each MOD organization was asked to define and execute projects that would help them attain cost reductions by 2012. The MOD Operations Division Flight Planning Branch responded to this challenge by launching several software automation projects that would allow them to greatly improve console operations and reduce ISS console staffing and intern reduce operating costs. These tasks ranged from improving the management and integration mission plan changes, to automating the uploading and downloading of information to and from the ISS and the associated ground complex tasks that required multiple decision points. The software solutions leveraged several different technologies including customized web applications and implementation of industry standard web services architecture; as well as engaging a previously TRL 4-5 technology developed by Ames Research Center (ARC) that utilized an intelligent agent-based system to manage and automate file traffic flow, archive data, and generate console logs. These projects to date have allowed the MOD Operations organization to remove one full time (7 x 24 x 365) ISS console position in 2010; with the goal of eliminating a second full time ISS console support position by 2012. The team will also reduce one long range planning console position by 2014. When complete, these Flight Planning Branch projects will account for the elimination of 3 console positions and a reduction in staffing of 11 engineering personnel (EP) for ISS.

  2. Soybean protein as a cost-effective lignin-blocking additive for the saccharification of sugarcane bagasse.

    PubMed

    Florencio, Camila; Badino, Alberto C; Farinas, Cristiane S

    2016-12-01

    Addition of surfactants, polymers, and non-catalytic proteins can improve the enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic materials by blocking the exposed lignin surfaces, but involves extra expense. Here, soybean protein, one of the cheapest proteins available, was evaluated as an alternative additive for the enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated sugarcane bagasse. The effect of the enzyme source was investigated using enzymatic cocktails from A. niger and T. reesei cultivated under solid-state, submerged, and sequential fermentation. The use of soybean protein led to approximately 2-fold increases in hydrolysis, relative to the control, for both A. niger and T. reesei enzymatic cocktails from solid-state fermentation. The effect was comparable to that of BSA. Moreover, the use of soybean protein and a 1:1 combination of A. niger and T. reesei enzymatic cocktails resulted in 54% higher glucose release, compared to the control. Soybean protein is a potential cost-effective additive for use in the biomass conversion process.

  3. North Sea operators look at every way possible to cut costs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-06-29

    Offshore operators have embarked on a second revolution in North Sea technology. In the 1970s, concepts established in the Gulf of Mexico were adapted using massive injections of manpower and money to produce platforms and pipelines that could survive in the deeper water and harsher environment of the North Sea. Target for the late 1980s is a complete reappraisal of harsh environment technology so that small reservoirs can be exploited at a profit with crude prices at $15-18bbl. Even before the collapse in oil prices, companies were hoping to cut development costs by 15-20%. But goals are more ambitious now. Esso U.K. plc chairman Archie Forster said the Shell/Esso group was close to achieving a 50% reduction in costs and getting front end investment costs for North Sea projects down to $10/bbl.

  4. The determination of operational and support requirements and costs during the conceptual design of space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebeling, Charles; Beasley, Kenneth D.

    1992-01-01

    The first year of research to provide NASA support in predicting operational and support parameters and costs of proposed space systems is reported. Some of the specific research objectives were (1) to develop a methodology for deriving reliability and maintainability parameters and, based upon their estimates, determine the operational capability and support costs, and (2) to identify data sources and establish an initial data base to implement the methodology. Implementation of the methodology is accomplished through the development of a comprehensive computer model. While the model appears to work reasonably well when applied to aircraft systems, it was not accurate when used for space systems. The model is dynamic and should be updated as new data become available. It is particularly important to integrate the current aircraft data base with data obtained from the Space Shuttle and other space systems since subsystems unique to a space vehicle require data not available from aircraft. This research only addressed the major subsystems on the vehicle.

  5. COST EFFECTIVE VOC EMISSION CONTROL STARTEGIES FOR MILITARY, AEROSPACE,AND INDUSTRIAL PAINT SPRAY BOOTH OPERATIONS: COMBINING IMPROVED VENTILATION SYSTEMS WITH INNOVATIVE, LOW COST EMISSION CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes a full-scale demonstration program in which several paint booths were modified for recirculation ventilation; the booth exhaust streams are vented to an innovative volatile organic compound (VOC) emission control system having extremely low operating costs. ...

  6. Trade study: Liquid hydrogen transportation - Kennedy Space Center. [cost and operational effectivenss of shipping methods.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    Cryogenic transportation methods for providing liquid hydrogen requirements are examined in support of shuttle transportation system launch operations at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, during the time frames 1982-1991 in terms of cost and operational effectiveness. Transportation methods considered included sixteen different options employing mobile semi-trailer tankers, railcars, barges and combinations of each method. The study concludes that the most effective method of delivering liquid hydrogen from the vendor production facility in New Orleans to Kennedy Space Center includes maximum utilization of existing mobile tankers and railcars supplemented by maximum capacity mobile tankers procured incrementally in accordance with shuttle launch rates actually achieved.

  7. Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113, Detail Design Report (Title II). Volume 4: Project cost estimate

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The Solid Waste Retrieval Facility--Phase 1 (Project W113) will provide the infrastructure and the facility required to retrieve from Trench 04, Burial ground 4C, contact handled (CH) drums and boxes at a rate that supports all retrieved TRU waste batching, treatment, storage, and disposal plans. This includes (1) operations related equipment and facilities, viz., a weather enclosure for the trench, retrieval equipment, weighing, venting, obtaining gas samples, overpacking, NDE, NDA, shipment of waste and (2) operations support related facilities, viz., a general office building, a retrieval staff change facility, and infrastructure upgrades such as supply and routing of water, sewer, electrical power, fire protection, roads, and telecommunication. Title I design for the operations related equipment and facilities was performed by Raytheon/BNFL, and that for the operations support related facilities including infrastructure upgrade was performed by KEH. These two scopes were combined into an integrated W113 Title II scope that was performed by Raytheon/BNFL. This volume represents the total estimated costs for the W113 facility. Operating Contractor Management costs have been incorporated as received from WHC. The W113 Facility TEC is $19.7 million. This includes an overall project contingency of 14.4% and escalation of 17.4%. A January 2001 construction contract procurement start date is assumed.

  8. A Further Examination of Operational Availability in Life Cycle Cost Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-01

    Training Ordnance INSTALLATION SUPPORT PERSI+t$44EL Base Operating Support DEPOl LEVEL HAINTTEW4CE Military Airframe Rework Civilian Engine Rework Real...34), parametrics, and engineering (a precisE•? approach that requires a deta;led data base). Models using parametrics are characterized by the ,,se of cost...delays (hangar space, engine run facilities, specialized fuel system repair bays, ect) and support / test equipment delays (work stands, fuel bowsers

  9. Estimating Operating and Support Cost Models for U.S. Naval Ships

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    200 words) With the end of the Cold War, the winds of military downsizing are blowing all over the world. Downsizing means fewer personnel, less...when facing downsizing budgetary decisions. This study analyzes the U.S. Navy main combatant vessels’ Operating and support (O&S) costs. It seeks to...the winds of military downsizing are blowing all over the world. Downsizing means fewer personnel, less facilities and smaller military budget

  10. 42 CFR 412.63 - Federal rates for inpatient operating costs for Federal fiscal years 1984 through 2004.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Federal fiscal years 1984 through 2004. 412.63 Section 412.63 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... Inpatient Operating Costs § 412.63 Federal rates for inpatient operating costs for Federal fiscal years 1984... reporting periods beginning before October 1, 1984, receives the lower Federal rate applicable to...

  11. Development of underground-mine cost-estimating equations. [Dependence of initial capital cost, deferred capital cost and annual operating cost on region, annual mine output and seam depth

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-06

    Table 3.3 summarizes the initial capital, deferred capital, and operating costs (in millions of 1980 dollars) for the four regionally-based underground model mines. The initial capital is divided into two components, fixed and variable. The fixed component is just the investment cost for surface facilities, which is assumed to be independent of mine size. The rest of the initial capital cost is associated with production (primarily face-related) and is assumed to vary linearly with mine size (i.e., annual output). There exists a concern that deferred capital costs will change due to entry mode. However, the installations concerned primarily with this point are depreciated off over the mine life and are not targeted for replacement. Therefore, deferred capital costs will not change significantly with entry mode changes or seam depth. In conclusion, it is our feeling that, within the resources of this project, development of cost adjustment factors relating productivity to various supply regions and seam heights is not practical. Assuming that productivity and, therefore, cost is independent of seam height will introduce errors into the system; however, their extent should be minimized by the incorporation of multiple model mines into the RAMC. Lastly, the relationship presented in this memorandum for depth of cover should be used in the RAMC.

  12. Re-Engineering of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to Reduce Operational Costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvis, Michael; Dougherty, Andrew; Whittier, Wallace

    1996-01-01

    Satellite telemetry processing onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is carried out using dedicated software and hardware. The current ground system is expensive to operate and maintain. The mandate to reduce satellite ground system operations and maintenance costs by the year 2000 led NASA to upgrade the command and control systems in order to improve the data processing capabilities, reduce operator experience levels and increase system standardization. As a result, a command and control system product development team was formed to redesign and develop the HST ground system. The command and control system ground system development consists of six elements. The results of the prototyping phase carried out for the following of these elements are presented: the front end processor; middleware, and the graphical user interface.

  13. Reducing metal alloy powder costs for use in powder bed fusion additive manufacturing: Improving the economics for production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Fransisco

    Titanium and its associated alloys have been used in industry for over 50 years and have become more popular in the recent decades. Titanium has been most successful in areas where the high strength to weight ratio provides an advantage over aluminum and steels. Other advantages of titanium include biocompatibility and corrosion resistance. Electron Beam Melting (EBM) is an additive manufacturing (AM) technology that has been successfully applied in the manufacturing of titanium components for the aerospace and medical industry with equivalent or better mechanical properties as parts fabricated via more traditional casting and machining methods. As the demand for titanium powder continues to increase, the price also increases. Titanium spheroidized powder from different vendors has a price range from 260/kg-450/kg, other spheroidized alloys such as Niobium can cost as high as $1,200/kg. Alternative titanium powders produced from methods such as the Titanium Hydride-Dehydride (HDH) process and the Armstrong Commercially Pure Titanium (CPTi) process can be fabricated at a fraction of the cost of powders fabricated via gas atomization. The alternative powders can be spheroidized and blended. Current sectors in additive manufacturing such as the medical industry are concerned that there will not be enough spherical powder for production and are seeking other powder options. It is believed the EBM technology can use a blend of spherical and angular powder to build fully dense parts with equal mechanical properties to those produced using traditional powders. Some of the challenges with angular and irregular powders are overcoming the poor flow characteristics and the attainment of the same or better packing densities as spherical powders. The goal of this research is to demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing alternative and lower cost powders in the EBM process. As a result, reducing the cost of the raw material to reduce the overall cost of the product produced with

  14. Lessons learned - MO&DA at JPL. [Mission Operations and Data Analysis cost reduction of planetary exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handley, Thomas H., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The issues of how to avoid future surprise growth in Mission Operations and Data Analysis (MO&DA) costs and how to minimize total MO&DA costs for planetary missions are discussed within the context of JPL mission operations support. It is argued that there is no simple, single solution: the entire Project life-cycle must be addressed. It is concluded that cost models that can predict both MO&DA cost as well as Ground System development costs are needed. The first year MO&DA budget plotted against the total of ground and flight systems developments is shown. In order to better recognize changes and control costs in general, a modified funding line item breakdown is recommended to distinguish between development costs (prelaunch and postlaunch) and MO&DA costs.

  15. ISS Operations Cost Reductions Through Automation of Real-Time Planning Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Timothy A.

    2011-01-01

    In 2008 the Johnson Space Center s Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) management team challenged their organization to find ways to reduce the costs of International Space station (ISS) console operations in the Mission Control Center (MCC). Each MOD organization was asked to identify projects that would help them attain a goal of a 30% reduction in operating costs by 2012. The MOD Operations and Planning organization responded to this challenge by launching several software automation projects that would allow them to greatly improve ISS console operations and reduce staffing and operating costs. These projects to date have allowed the MOD Operations organization to remove one full time (7 x 24 x 365) ISS console position in 2010; with the plan of eliminating two full time ISS console support positions by 2012. This will account for an overall 10 EP reduction in staffing for the Operations and Planning organization. These automation projects focused on utilizing software to automate many administrative and often repetitive tasks involved with processing ISS planning and daily operations information. This information was exchanged between the ground flight control teams in Houston and around the globe, as well as with the ISS astronaut crew. These tasks ranged from managing mission plan changes from around the globe, to uploading and downloading information to and from the ISS crew, to even more complex tasks that required multiple decision points to process the data, track approvals and deliver it to the correct recipient across network and security boundaries. The software solutions leveraged several different technologies including customized web applications and implementation of industry standard web services architecture between several planning tools; as well as a engaging a previously research level technology (TRL 2-3) developed by Ames Research Center (ARC) that utilized an intelligent agent based system to manage and automate file traffic flow

  16. The Database for Astronomical Spectroscopy - Updates, Additions and Plans for Splatalogue for Alma Full Science Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remijan, Anthony; Seifert, Nathan A.; McGuire, Brett A.

    2016-06-01

    For the past 10 years, Splatalogue has been constantly updated, modified and enhanced in order to make molecular spectroscopy data readily available to the astronomical community. Splatalogue is fully integrated into the ALMA Observing Tool, the ALMA data reduction and analysis package (CASA) and several enhanced tools being developed through the ALMA development program including the next generation CASA viewer (CARTA) and the ALMA Data Mining Toolkit (ADMIT). In anticipation for ALMA full science operations, a number of improvements have taken place over the past year to the Splatalogue database including, but not limited too, additions to Splatalogue from the JPL and CDMS line lists, improvements and reconciliation of the Lovas/NIST Catalog assigning NRAO recommended rest frequencies to every astronomically detected transition, including recent astronomical surveys to the list of transitions detected in space and finally, improved search and display features as requested by the astronomical community. Splatalogue is planning for the next 10 years of development and welcomes any and all contributions to improving the data integrity and availability to the scientific community.

  17. Analysis of operating costs for producing biodiesel from palm oil at pilot-scale in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Juan C; Hernández, Jorge A; Valdés, Carlos F; Khanal, Samir Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the operating costs of biodiesel production using palm oil in a pilot-scale plant with a capacity of 20,000 L/day (850 L/batch). The production plant uses crude palm oil as a feedstock, and methanol in a molar ratio of 1:10. The process incorporated acid esterification, basic transesterification, and dry washing with absorbent powder. Production costs considered in the analysis were feedstock, supplies, labor, electricity, quality and maintenance; amounting to $3.75/gal ($0.99/L) for 2013. Feedstocks required for biodiesel production were among the highest costs, namely 72.6% of total production cost. Process efficiency to convert fatty acids to biodiesel was over 99% and generated a profit of $1.08/gal (i.e., >22% of the total income). According to sensitivity analyses, it is more economically viable for biodiesel production processes to use crude palm oil as a feedstock and take advantage of the byproducts such as glycerine and fertilizers.

  18. Wind turbine reliability :understanding and minimizing wind turbine operation and maintenance costs.

    SciTech Connect

    Walford, Christopher A. (Global Energy Concepts. Kirkland, WA)

    2006-03-01

    Wind turbine system reliability is a critical factor in the success of a wind energy project. Poor reliability directly affects both the project's revenue stream through increased operation and maintenance (O&M) costs and reduced availability to generate power due to turbine downtime. Indirectly, the acceptance of wind-generated power by the financial and developer communities as a viable enterprise is influenced by the risk associated with the capital equipment reliability; increased risk, or at least the perception of increased risk, is generally accompanied by increased financing fees or interest rates. This paper outlines the issues relevant to wind turbine reliability for wind turbine power generation projects. The first sections describe the current state of the industry, identify the cost elements associated with wind farm O&M and availability and discuss the causes of uncertainty in estimating wind turbine component reliability. The latter sections discuss the means for reducing O&M costs and propose O&M related research and development efforts that could be pursued by the wind energy research community to reduce cost of energy.

  19. 78 FR 21159 - Additional Requirements for Special Dipping and Coating Operations (Dip Tanks); Extension of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-09

    ... Operations (Dip Tanks); Extension of the Office of Management and Budget's Approval of the Information... Coating Operations (Dip Tanks) (29 CFR 1910.126(g)(4)). DATES: Comments must be submitted (postmarked... on Dipping and Coating Operations (29 CFR 1910.126(g)(4)) requires employers to post a...

  20. F-16X MSIP (Multi-National Staged Improvement Program) Case Example: Operating and Support Cost Estimation Using VAMOSC (Visibility and Management of Operating and Support Costs).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    cats. 70M0 CrP -5763 Precision Location Major Now Avionics syatSM. Higher Strike System materiel and labor cost. Small (PLSS) radme may increase profile...MSIP maintenance material and labor costs are estimated using a bottoms-up cost factor estimation technique . A set of functional analogies for the MSIP

  1. A cost-benefit evaluation of the LANDSAT flow-on operational system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Disciplines to benefit from the LANDSAT Follow-on System include agriculture, petroleum and mineral exploration, hydrologic land use, water resources management, forestry, land use planning and monitoring, and soil management. The annual quantified benefits are in the range of 420 to 970 million (FY 1976 dollars). The operational system sized to achieve the quantified benefits involves a single orbiting satellite with a backup satellite in launch readiness. The ground system includes a basic processing system which feeds information to three user systems - one for agriculture, one for hydrologic land use, and a third for all other users. The resulting present worth benefit cost ratio is at least equal to four with a reasonable likelihood of exceeding nine. This benefit cost ratio is evaluated for an infinite time horizon at the discount rate of 10 percent.

  2. Design and operation of a low cost, reliable millimeter-wave interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Porte, L.; Rettig, C.L.; Peebles, W.A.; Ngyuen, X.

    1999-01-01

    Knowledge of basic plasma parameters, such as line integrated density and turbulence spectra, is essential for physics understanding and plasma control. Integration of plasma diagnostic systems into a single port combined with diagnostic cost reduction is an important advance that can impact measurement availability on all fusion devices. This article presents preliminary data from a unique, low cost and reliable millimeter-wave interferometer that has been integrated to operate simultaneously with a collective Thomson scattering system. The interferometer uses only one commercially available frequency chirped source and only one detector. The DIII-D system design will be described together with preliminary design of a tangentially viewing system for the Pegasus spherical torus experiment. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Operational Issues in the Development of a Cost-Effective Reusable LOX/LH2 Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, Richard O.

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Space Launch Initiative (SLI) was initiated in early 2001 to conduct technology development and to reduce the business and technical risk associated with developing the next-generation reusable launch system. In the field of main propulsion, two LOXLH2 rocket engine systems, the Pratt & Whitney / Aerojet Joint Venture (JV) COBRA and the Rocketdyne RS-83, were funded to develop a safe, economical, and reusable propulsion system. Given that a large-thrust reusable rocket engine program had not been started in the U.S. since 1971, with the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), this provided an opportunity to build on the experience developed on the SSME system, while exploiting advances in technology that had occurred in the intervening 30 years. One facet of engine development that was identified as being especially vital in order to produce an optimal system was in the areas of operability and maintainability. In order to achieve the high levels of performance required by the Space Shuttle, the SSME system is highly complex with very tight tolerances and detailed requirements. Over the lifetime of the SSME program, the engine has required a high level of manpower to support the performance of inspections, maintenance (scheduled and unscheduled) and operations (prelaunch and post-flight). As a consequence, the labor- intensive needs of the SSME provide a significant impact to the overall cost efficiency of the Space Transportation System (STS). One of the strategic goals of the SLI is to reduce cost by requiring the engine(s) to be easier (Le. less expensive) to operate and maintain. The most effective means of accomplishing this goal is to infuse the operability and maintainability features into the engine design from the start. This paper discusses some of the operational issues relevant to a reusable LOx/LH2 main engine, and the means by which their impact is mitigated in the design phase.

  4. Late Operating Room Start Times Impact Mortality and Cost for Nonemergent Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yount, Kenan W; Lau, Christine L; Yarboro, Leora T; Ghanta, Ravi K; Kron, Irving L; Kern, John A; Ailawadi, Gorav

    2015-01-01

    Background There is growing concern over the effect of starting non-emergent cardiac surgery later in the day on clinical outcomes and resource utilization. Our objective was to determine the differences in patient outcomes for starting non-emergent cardiac surgery after 3pm. Methods All non-emergent cardiac operations performed at a single institution from July 2008 to 2013 were reviewed. Cases were stratified based on “early start” or “late start,” defined by incision time before or after 3pm. Rates of observed and risk-adjusted mortality, major complications, and costs were compared on a univariate basis for all patients and via multivariable linear and logistic regression for patients with a valid Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) Predicted Risk of Mortality (PROM). Results A total of 3,395 non-emergent cardiac operations were reviewed, including 368 late start cases. Compared to cases starting earlier, mortality was significantly higher for patients undergoing late operations (5.2% vs. 3.5%, p=0.046) despite similar preoperative risk (STS PROM 3.8% vs. 3.3%) and major complication rates (18.2% vs. 18.3%). Costs were 8% higher with late start cases ($51,576 vs. $47,641, p<0.001). After controlling for case type, surgeon, year, and risk, late cases resulted in higher mortality (odds ratio 2.04, p=0.041) despite shorter operative duration (16 min, p<0.001). Conclusions Starting non-emergent cardiac cases later in the day is associated with 2× higher absolute and risk-adjusted mortality. These data should be carefully considered—not only by surgeons and patients but also in the context of the operating room system—when scheduling non-emergent cardiac cases. PMID:26209491

  5. Effect of weight loss on operational lung volumes and oxygen cost of breathing in obese women

    PubMed Central

    Bhammar, Dharini M.; Stickford, Jonathon L.; Bernhardt, Vipa; Babb, Tony G.

    2015-01-01

    Background The effect of moderate weight loss on operational lung volumes during exercise and the oxygen (O2) cost of breathing are unknown in obese women but could have important implications regarding exercise endurance. Methods In twenty-nine obese women (33 ± 8yr, 97 ± 14kg, BMI: 36 ± 4, body fat: 45.6 ± 4.5%; means ± SD), body composition, fat distribution (by MRI), pulmonary function, operational lung volumes during exercise, and the O2 cost of breathing during eucapnic voluntary hyperpnea ( V˙O2 vs. V˙E slope) were studied before and after a 12-week diet and resistance exercise weight loss program. Results Participants lost 7.5 ± 3.1kg or ≈8% of body weight (p < 0.001), but fat distribution remained unchanged. After weight loss, lung volume subdivisions at rest were increased (p < 0.05) and were moderately associated (p < 0.05) with changes in weight. End-expiratory lung volume (%Total Lung Capacity) increased at rest and during constant load exercise (p < 0.05). O2 cost of breathing was reduced by 16% (2.52 ± 1.02 to 2.11 ± 0.72ml/L; P=0.003). As a result, O2 uptake of the respiratory muscles (V˙O2Resp), estimated as the product of O2 cost of breathing and exercise V˙E during cycling at 60W, was significantly reduced by 27 ± 31ml (P<0.001), accounting for 46% of the reduction in total body V˙O2 during cycling at 60W. Conclusions Moderate weight loss yields important improvements in respiratory function at rest and during submaximal exercise in otherwise healthy obese women. These changes in breathing load could have positive effects on the exercise endurance and adherence to physical activity. PMID:26869243

  6. A Comparison of Two Fat Grafting Methods on Operating Room Efficiency and Costs

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, Allen; Maxwell, G. Patrick; Griffin, Leah; Champaneria, Manish C.; Parekh, Mousam; Macarios, David

    2017-01-01

    Background Centrifugation (Cf) is a common method of fat processing but may be time consuming, especially when processing large volumes. Objectives To determine the effects on fat grafting time, volume efficiency, reoperations, and complication rates of Cf vs an autologous fat processing system (Rv) that incorporates fat harvesting and processing in a single unit. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study of consecutive patients who underwent autologous fat grafting during reconstructive breast surgery with Rv or Cf. Endpoints measured were volume of fat harvested (lipoaspirate) and volume injected after processing, time to complete processing, reoperations, and complications. A budget impact model was used to estimate cost of Rv vs Cf. Results Ninety-eight patients underwent fat grafting with Rv, and 96 patients received Cf. Mean volumes of lipoaspirate (506.0 vs 126.1 mL) and fat injected (177.3 vs 79.2 mL) were significantly higher (P < .0001) in the Rv vs Cf group, respectively. Mean time to complete fat grafting was significantly shorter in the Rv vs Cf group (34.6 vs 90.1 minutes, respectively; P < .0001). Proportions of patients with nodule and cyst formation and/or who received reoperations were significantly less in the Rv vs Cf group. Based on these outcomes and an assumed per minute operating room cost, an average per patient cost savings of $2,870.08 was estimated with Rv vs Cf. Conclusions Compared to Cf, the Rv fat processing system allowed for a larger volume of fat to be processed for injection and decreased operative time in these patients, potentially translating to cost savings. Level of Evidence: 3 PMID:27733351

  7. Low-cost USB interface for operant research using Arduino and Visual Basic.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Rogelio; Pérez-Herrera, Carlos A

    2015-03-01

    This note describes the design of a low-cost interface using Arduino microcontroller boards and Visual Basic programming for operant conditioning research. The board executes one program in Arduino programming language that polls the state of the inputs and generates outputs in an operant chamber. This program communicates through a USB port with another program written in Visual Basic 2010 Express Edition running on a laptop, desktop, netbook computer, or even a tablet equipped with Windows operating system. The Visual Basic program controls schedules of reinforcement and records real-time data. A single Arduino board can be used to control a total of 52 inputs/output lines, and multiple Arduino boards can be used to control multiple operant chambers. An external power supply and a series of micro relays are required to control 28-V DC devices commonly used in operant chambers. Instructions for downloading and using the programs to generate simple and concurrent schedules of reinforcement are provided. Testing suggests that the interface is reliable, accurate, and could serve as an inexpensive alternative to commercial equipment.

  8. The determination of operational and support requirements and costs during the conceptual design of space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebeling, Charles

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective is to develop a methodology for predicting operational and support parameters and costs of proposed space systems. The first phase consists of: (1) the identification of data sources; (2) the development of a methodology for determining system reliability and maintainability parameters; (3) the implementation of the methodology through the use of prototypes; and (4) support in the development of an integrated computer model. The phase 1 results are documented and a direction is identified to proceed to accomplish the overall objective.

  9. Air Defense Options for Taiwan: An Assessment of Relative Costs and Operational Benefits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    C O R P O R A T I O N AIR DEFENSE OPTIONS FOR TAIWAN An Assessment of Relative Costs and Operational Benefits AIR D EFEN SE OPTION S FOR TAIW AN...confusion about its special and privileged relationship with the U.S. Department of Defense, RAND does not undertake work on behalf of, or act as a sub...materiel, or services to the Department of Defense. Similarly, any relationship of a RAND Associate with a defense contractor must be closely screened

  10. Comparison and Validation of Operational Cost in Smart Houses with the Introduction of a Heat Pump or a Gas Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimoji, Tsubasa; Tahara, Hayato; Matayoshi, Hidehito; Yona, Atsushi; Senjyu, Tomonobu

    2015-02-01

    Due to the concerns of global warming and the depletion of energy resources, renewable energies such as wind generation (WG) and photovoltaic generation (PV) are gaining attention in distribution systems. Efficient electric equipment such as heat pumps (HP) not only contribute low levels of carbon to society, but are also beneficial for consumers. In addition, gas instruments such as the gas engine (GE) and fuel cells (FC) are expected to reduce electricity cost by exhaust heat. Thus, it is important to clarify which systems (HP or GE) are more beneficial for consumers throughout the year. This paper compares the operational cost for the smart house between using the HP and the GE. Current electricity and gas prices are used to calculate the cost of the smart house. The system considered in this research comprises a PV, battery, solar collector (SC), uncontrolled load and either an HP or a GE. In order to verify the effectiveness of the proposed system, MATLAB is used for simulations.

  11. Treatment of a simulated textile wastewater in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) with addition of a low-cost adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Santos, Sílvia C R; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2015-06-30

    Color removal from textile wastewaters, at a low-cost and consistent technology, is even today a challenge. Simultaneous biological treatment and adsorption is a known alternative to the treatment of wastewaters containing biodegradable and non-biodegradable contaminants. The present work aims at evaluating the treatability of a simulated textile wastewater by simultaneously combining biological treatment and adsorption in a SBR (sequencing batch reactor), but using a low-cost adsorbent, instead of a commercial one. The selected adsorbent was a metal hydroxide sludge (WS) from an electroplating industry. Direct Blue 85 dye (DB) was used in the preparation of the synthetic wastewater. Firstly, adsorption kinetics and equilibrium were studied, in respect to many factors (temperature, pH, WS dosage and presence of salts and dyeing auxiliary chemicals in the aqueous media). At 25 °C and pH 4, 7 and 10, maximum DB adsorption capacities in aqueous solution were 600, 339 and 98.7 mg/g, respectively. These values are quite considerable, compared to other reported in literature, but proved to be significantly reduced by the presence of dyeing auxiliary chemicals in the wastewater. The simulated textile wastewater treatment in SBR led to BOD5 removals of 53-79%, but color removal was rather limited (10-18%). The performance was significantly enhanced by the addition of WS, with BOD5 removals above 91% and average color removals of 60-69%.

  12. 40 CFR 60.1275 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring... additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? Use the required span values and applicable performance...

  13. 40 CFR 60.1275 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring... additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? Use the required span values and applicable performance...

  14. 40 CFR 60.1275 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring... additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? Use the required span values and applicable performance...

  15. 40 CFR 60.1275 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring... additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? Use the required span values and applicable performance...

  16. 40 CFR 60.1275 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring... additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? Use the required span values and applicable performance...

  17. 75 FR 62023 - Transmission Planning and Cost Allocation by Transmission Owning and Operating Public Utilities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-07

    ... processes and cost allocation and would require cost allocation methods for intraregional and interregional... Energy Regulatory Commission 18 CFR Part 35 Transmission Planning and Cost Allocation by Transmission... and cost allocation requirements established in Order No. 890 to ensure that...

  18. 49 CFR 192.328 - Additional construction requirements for steel pipe using alternative maximum allowable operating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... meet this additional construction requirement: (a) Quality assurance (1) The construction of the... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional construction requirements for steel... Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS...

  19. 49 CFR 192.328 - Additional construction requirements for steel pipe using alternative maximum allowable operating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... meet this additional construction requirement: (a) Quality assurance (1) The construction of the... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional construction requirements for steel... Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS...

  20. Cost efficient operations: Challenge from NASA administrator and lessons learned from hunting sacred cows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornstein, Rhoda Shaller; Casasanta, Ralph; Hei, Donald J., Jr.; Hawkins, Frederick J.; Burke, Eugene S., Jr.; Todd, Jacqueline E.; Bell, Jerome A.; Miller, Raymond E.; Willoughby, John K.; Gardner, Jo Anne

    1996-01-01

    The conclusions and recommendations that resulted from NASA's Hunting Sacred Cows Workshop are summarized, where a sacred cow is a belief or assumption that is so well established that it appears to be unreasonably immune to criticism. A link was identified between increased complexity and increased costs, especially in relation to automation and autonomy. An identical link was identified for outsourcing and commercialization. The work of NASA's Cost Less team is reviewed. The following conclusions were stated by the Cost Less team and considered at the workshop: the way Nasa conducts business must change; NASA makes its best contributions to the public areas not addressed by other government organizations; the management tool used for the last 30 years is no longer suitable; the most important work on any program or project is carried out before the development or operations stages; automation should only be used to achieve autonomy if the reasons for automation are well understood, and NASA's most critical resources are its personnel.

  1. 77 FR 59291 - Additional Changes to the Schedule of Operations Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-27

    .... FSIS bears the cost of mandatory inspection provided during non-overtime and non-holiday hours of... time measurement that measures the amount of time it takes to don required gear, walk to a work station... measurement that measures the amount of time it takes inspection program personnel to don required gear,...

  2. SOLERAS - Solar-Powered Water Desalination Project at Yanbu: Forecasting models for operating and maintenance cost of the pilot plant

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Idrisi, M.; Hamad, G.

    1987-04-01

    This study was conducted in cooperation with the Department of Industrial Engineering of King Abdulaziz University. The main objective of this study is to meet some of the goals of the Solar Energy Water Desalination Plant (SEWDP) plan in the area of economic evaluation. The first part of this project focused on describing the existing trend in the operation and maintenance (OandM) cost for the SOLERAS Solar Energy Water Desalination Plant in Yanbu. The second part used the information obtained on existing trends to find suitable forecasting models. These models, which are found here, are sensitive to changes in costs trends. Nevertheless, the study presented here has established the foundation for (OandM) costs estimating in the plant. The methodologies used in this study should continue as more data on operation and maintenance costs become available, because, in the long run, the trend in costs will help determine where cost effectiveness might be improved. 7 refs., 24 figs., 15 tabs.

  3. Development and application of a model for the analysis of trades between space launch system operations and acquisition costs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nix, Michael B.

    2005-12-01

    Early design decisions in the development of space launch systems determine the costs to acquire and operate launch systems. Some sources indicate that as much as 90% of life cycle costs are fixed by the end of the critical design review phase. System characteristics determined by these early decisions are major factors in the acquisition cost of flight hardware elements and facilities and influence operations costs through the amount of maintenance and support labor required to sustain system function. Operations costs are also dependent on post-development management decisions regarding how much labor will be deployed to meet requirements of market demand and ownership profit. The ability to perform early trade-offs between these costs is vital to the development of systems that have the necessary capacity to provide service and are profitable to operate. An Excel-based prototype model was developed for making early analyses of trade-offs between the costs to operate a space launch system and to acquire the necessary assets to meet a given set of operational requirements. The model, integrating input from existing models and adding missing capability, allows the user to make such trade-offs across a range of operations concepts (required flight rates, staffing levels, shifts per workday, workdays per week and per year, unreliability, wearout and depot maintenance) and the number, type and capability of assets (flight hardware elements, processing and supporting facilities and infrastructure). The costs and capabilities of hypothetical launch systems can be modeled as a function of interrelated turnaround times and labor resource levels, and asset loss and retirement. The number of flight components and facilities required can be calculated and the operations and acquisition costs compared for a specified scenario. Findings, based on the analysis of a hypothetical two stage to orbit, reusable, unmanned launch system, indicate that the model is suitable for the

  4. Iron removal, energy consumption and operating cost of electrocoagulation of drinking water using a new flow column reactor.

    PubMed

    Hashim, Khalid S; Shaw, Andy; Al Khaddar, Rafid; Pedrola, Montserrat Ortoneda; Phipps, David

    2017-03-15

    The goal of this project was to remove iron from drinking water using a new electrocoagulation (EC) cell. In this research, a flow column has been employed in the designing of a new electrocoagulation reactor (FCER) to achieve the planned target. Where, the water being treated flows through the perforated disc electrodes, thereby effectively mixing and aerating the water being treated. As a result, the stirring and aerating devices that until now have been widely used in the electrocoagulation reactors are unnecessary. The obtained results indicated that FCER reduced the iron concentration from 20 to 0.3 mg/L within 20 min of electrolysis at initial pH of 6, inter-electrode distance (ID) of 5 mm, current density (CD) of 1.5 mA/cm(2), and minimum operating cost of 0.22 US $/m(3). Additionally, it was found that FCER produces H2 gas enough to generate energy of 10.14 kW/m(3). Statistically, it was found that the relationship between iron removal and operating parameters could be modelled with R(2) of 0.86, and the influence of operating parameters on iron removal followed the order: C0>t>CD>pH. Finally, the SEM (scanning electron microscopy) images showed a large number of irregularities on the surface of anode due to the generation of aluminium hydroxides.

  5. 25 CFR 170.931 - Can tribes use IRR Program funds to pay tribal transportation department operating costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can tribes use IRR Program funds to pay tribal... Transportation Departments § 170.931 Can tribes use IRR Program funds to pay tribal transportation department operating costs? Yes. Tribes can use IRR Program funds to pay the cost of planning, administration,...

  6. 25 CFR 170.931 - Can tribes use IRR Program funds to pay tribal transportation department operating costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Can tribes use IRR Program funds to pay tribal... Transportation Departments § 170.931 Can tribes use IRR Program funds to pay tribal transportation department operating costs? Yes. Tribes can use IRR Program funds to pay the cost of planning, administration,...

  7. Inspection of the cost reduction incentive program at the Department of Energy`s Idaho Operations Office

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-07

    The purpose of this inspection was to review the economy and efficiency of Idaho`s Fiscal Year 1992 Cost Reduction Incentive Program, as well as to provide information to Departmental officials regarding any difficulties in administering these types of programs. The report is of the findings and recommendations. According to Idaho officials, their Cost Reduction Incentive Program was designed to motivate and provide incentives to management and operating contractors which would result in cost savings to the Department while increasing the efficiency and effectiveness of the contractors` operations. Idaho officials reported that over $22.5 million in costs were saved as a result of the Fiscal Year 1992 Cost Reduction Incentive Program. It was found that: (1) Idaho officials acknowledged that they did not attempt a full accounting records validation of the contractor`s submitted cost savings; (2) cost reduction incentive programs may result in conflicts of interest--contractors may defer work in order to receive an incentive fee; (3) the Department lacks written Department-wide policies and procedures--senior Procurement officials stated that the 1985 memorandum from the then-Assistant Secretary for Management and Administration was not the current policy of the Department; and (4) the Department already has the management and operating contract award fee provisions and value engineering program that can be used to provide financial rewards for contractors that operate cost effectively and efficiently.

  8. The Perceived Effect of Hidden Costs on the Operational Management of Information Technology Outsourcing: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swift, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Information technology (IT) outsourcing is a business trend aimed at reducing costs and enabling companies to concentrate on their core competencies. This qualitative multiple case design research study explored the effects of hidden costs on the operational management of IT outsourcing. The study involved analyzing IT outsourcing agreements as…

  9. 49 CFR 192.935 - What additional preventive and mitigative measures must an operator take?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... STANDARDS Gas Transmission Pipeline Integrity Management § 192.935 What additional preventive and mitigative... detection systems, replacing pipe segments with pipe of heavier wall thickness, providing additional... supervision of known excavation work. (ii) Collecting in a central database information that is...

  10. 49 CFR 192.935 - What additional preventive and mitigative measures must an operator take?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What additional preventive and mitigative measures... STANDARDS Gas Transmission Pipeline Integrity Management § 192.935 What additional preventive and mitigative... those already required by Part 192 to prevent a pipeline failure and to mitigate the consequences of...

  11. Ancillary operation in coal preparation instrumentation: On-line low cost sulfur and ash analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Progress in reported on ancillary operations in coal preparation instrumentation, and on-line low cost sulfur and ash analysis of coal. This quarter's activities consisted of the following; the assembly of the sample preparation and delivery (SPAD) system was completed and laboratory pretesting performed; the entire system was assembled and debugged at C.Q. Inc.; field tests were executed according to the Field Test Plan with certain modifications necessitated by actual field conditions and C.Q. test schedule; coal slurry samples collected at C.Q. Inc. were either sent to the Homer City Coal Lab or brought back to B W for ICP analysis; and Homer City Coal Lab analysis of field collected slurry samples was completed and results reported to B W.

  12. A heat & mass integration approach to reduce capital and operating costs of a distillation configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Madenoor Ramapriya, Gautham; Jiang, Zheyu; Tawarmalani, Mohit; Agrawal, Rakesh

    2015-11-11

    We propose a general method to consolidate distillation columns of a distillation configuration using heat and mass integration. The proposed method encompasses all heat and mass integrations known till date, and includes many more. Each heat and mass integration eliminates a distillation column, a condenser, a reboiler and the heat duty associated with a reboiler. Thus, heat and mass integration can potentially offer significant capital and operating cost benefits. In this talk, we will study the various possible heat and mass integrations in detail, and demonstrate their benefits using case studies. This work will lay out a framework to synthesize an entire new class of useful configurations based on heat and mass integration of distillation columns.

  13. 49 CFR 192.935 - What additional preventive and mitigative measures must an operator take?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... detection systems, replacing pipe segments with pipe of heavier wall thickness, providing additional training to personnel on response procedures, conducting drills with local emergency responders and... must, at least, consider the following factors—swiftness of leak detection and pipe...

  14. Associativity and Understanding of the Operation of Addition in Children with Learning Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grobecker, Betsey; Lawrence, Frank

    2000-01-01

    Twenty-seven children (ages 7-10) with learning disabilities and 42 controls were tested on three different mathematics tasks. Significantly more controls abstracted composite unit structures suggestive of operational logic on modified nonverbal and associativity of length tasks. On a flash card task, children with learning disabilities achieved…

  15. Expert system decision support for low-cost launch vehicle operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szatkowski, G. P.; Levin, Barry E.

    1991-01-01

    Progress in assessing the feasibility, benefits, and risks associated with AI expert systems applied to low cost expendable launch vehicle systems is described. Part one identified potential application areas in vehicle operations and on-board functions, assessed measures of cost benefit, and identified key technologies to aid in the implementation of decision support systems in this environment. Part two of the program began the development of prototypes to demonstrate real-time vehicle checkout with controller and diagnostic/analysis intelligent systems and to gather true measures of cost savings vs. conventional software, verification and validation requirements, and maintainability improvement. The main objective of the expert advanced development projects was to provide a robust intelligent system for control/analysis that must be performed within a specified real-time window in order to meet the demands of the given application. The efforts to develop the two prototypes are described. Prime emphasis was on a controller expert system to show real-time performance in a cryogenic propellant loading application and safety validation implementation of this system experimentally, using commercial-off-the-shelf software tools and object oriented programming techniques. This smart ground support equipment prototype is based in C with imbedded expert system rules written in the CLIPS protocol. The relational database, ORACLE, provides non-real-time data support. The second demonstration develops the vehicle/ground intelligent automation concept, from phase one, to show cooperation between multiple expert systems. This automated test conductor (ATC) prototype utilizes a knowledge-bus approach for intelligent information processing by use of virtual sensors and blackboards to solve complex problems. It incorporates distributed processing of real-time data and object-oriented techniques for command, configuration control, and auto-code generation.

  16. Assessment of energy-saving strategies and operational costs in full-scale membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Gabarrón, S; Ferrero, G; Dalmau, M; Comas, J; Rodriguez-Roda, I

    2014-02-15

    The energy-saving strategies and operational costs of stand-alone, hybrid, and dual stream full-scale membrane bioreactors (MBRs) with capacities ranging from 1100 to 35,000 m(3) day(-1) have been assessed for seven municipal facilities located in Northeast Spain. Although hydraulic load was found to be the main determinant factor for the energy consumption rates, several optimisation strategies have shown to be effective in terms of energy reduction as well as fouling phenomenon minimization or preservation. Specifically, modifications of the biological process (installation of control systems for biological aeration) and of the filtration process (reduction of the flux or mixed liquor suspended solids concentration and installation of control systems for membrane air scouring) were applied in two stand-alone MBRs. After implementing these strategies, the yearly specific energy demand (SED) in flat-sheet (FS) and hollow-fibre (HF) stand-alone MBRs was reduced from 1.12 to 0.71 and from 1.54 to 1.12 kW h(-1) m(-3), respectively, regardless of their similar yearly averaged hydraulic loads. The strategies applied in the hybrid MBR, namely, buffering the influent flow and optimisation of both biological aeration and membrane air-scouring, reduced the SED values by 14%. These results illustrate that it is possible to apply energy-saving strategies to significantly reduce MBR operational costs, highlighting the need to optimise MBR facilities to reconsider them as an energy-competitive option.

  17. DOD Business Systems Modernization: Additional Enhancements Are Needed for Army Business System Schedule and Cost Estimates to Fully Meet Best Practices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    DOD BUSINESS SYSTEMS MODERNIZATION Additional Enhancements Are Needed for Army Business System Schedule and Cost...DATE SEP 2014 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE DOD Business Systems Modernization: Additional...Enhancements Are Needed for Army Business System Schedule and Cost Estimates to Fully Meet Best Practices 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  18. A cost-benefit analysis of blood donor vaccination as an alternative to additional DNA testing for reducing transfusion transmission of hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Fischinger, J M; Stephan, B; Wasserscheid, K; Eichler, H; Gärtner, B C

    2010-11-16

    A survey-based, cost-benefit analysis was performed comparing blood screening strategies with vaccination strategies for the reduction of transfusion transmission of HBV. 231 whole blood donors and 126 apheresis donors were eligible and completed a questionnaire detailing their donation habits. The cost-benefit analysis included current mandatory HBV testing (HbsAg+anti-Hbc, A1), A1 with additional nucleic acid testing (NAT) for minipool (A2) or individual donation testing (A3), as well as HBV vaccination strategies using time-dependant (B1) or titre dependent booster vaccination solely (B2), or B2 in addition to current mandatory testing procedures (B3). Different cost models were applied using a 5% rate of discount. Absolute costs for current mandatory testing procedures (A1) over 20 years in Germany were €1009 million. Additional NAT would lead to incremental costs of 43% (A2) or 339% (A3), respectively. Vaccination strategies B1 and B2 showed cost-reductions relative to A1 of 30% and 14%, respectively. The number of remaining HBV infections could be reduced from 360 (for A1) to 13, using vaccination, compared with 144 or 105 remaining infections for A2 or A3, respectively. Absolute cost per prevented infection is similar (€2.0 million) for A2 and B3. HBV vaccination offers the near-elimination of transfusion infections while representing a potential cost-reduction.

  19. Design, construction, operation and costs of a modern small-scale fuel-alcohol plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leeper, S. A.; Dawley, L. J.; Wolfram, J. H.; Berglund, G. R.; Richardson, J. G.; McAtee, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    The design used for the small-scale fuel alcohol plant (SSFAP) is discussed. By incorporating a microprocessor into the plant design, most plant operations were automated and labor requirements were reduced. Continuous processing made energy conservation possible, thus reducing energy requirements. A low-temperature, continuous plug-flow cooker design made high yields possible. Ethanol was consistently produced at the SSFAP from corn at a yield of 2.6 gallons (anhydrous) per bushel and an energy requirement of 30,000 to 35,000 Btu/gallon (190-proof). In addition, barley, grain dust, and potato waste were converted at the SSFAP. The capacity of the SSFAP is 180,000 gallons per year (300 days operation). Competitively priced ethanol is produced at this capacity.

  20. Enhanced methods for determining operational capabilities and support costs of proposed space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebeling, Charles

    1993-01-01

    This report documents the work accomplished during the first two years of research to provide support to NASA in predicting operational and support parameters and costs of proposed space systems. The first year's research developed a methodology for deriving reliability and maintainability (R & M) parameters based upon the use of regression analysis to establish empirical relationships between performance and design specifications and corresponding mean times of failure and repair. The second year focused on enhancements to the methodology, increased scope of the model, and software improvements. This follow-on effort expands the prediction of R & M parameters and their effect on the operations and support of space transportation vehicles to include other system components such as booster rockets and external fuel tanks. It also increases the scope of the methodology and the capabilities of the model as implemented by the software. The focus is on the failure and repair of major subsystems and their impact on vehicle reliability, turn times, maintenance manpower, and repairable spares requirements. The report documents the data utilized in this study, outlines the general methodology for estimating and relating R&M parameters, presents the analyses and results of application to the initial data base, and describes the implementation of the methodology through the use of a computer model. The report concludes with a discussion on validation and a summary of the research findings and results.

  1. [Image tracking system. A new technique for safe and cost-saving laparoscopic operation].

    PubMed

    Niebuhr, H; Born, O

    2000-05-01

    The potential for improvement of the results of laparoscopic operations as well as necessity of enhanced efficiency in the health-care systems are the main reasons for development and practical use of robotic systems in the field of laparoscopic surgery. While robotic systems imitate the human camera-holder the Image Tracking System (ImagTrac, Olympus, Tokio) is based on another principle: A voice-activated zoom function allows change between overview and detailed view. In the zoom-in position it is possible to select four different fields of view. The results of a clinical trial with control group show that the system: 1. Makes it possible to dispense with the human camera-holder without compromising patient safety, sometimes at greater convenience to the surgeon. 2. Makes it possible for routine laparoscopic operations such as laparoscopic cholecystectomy and laparoscopic hernia repair to be performed (as solo surgery) by a team of a surgeon and a nurse only. 3. Is more cost-effective than robotic systems with a similar range of features.

  2. Offline Interoperability, Cost Reduction and R eliability for Operational Procedures Using Meta-Modeling Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poupart, E.; Jolly, G.; Percebois, C.; Bazex, P.; Palanque, P.; Basnyat, S.; Rabault, P.; Sabatier, L.; Walrawens, A.

    2008-08-01

    In this paper, we present a CNES participation through a case study in a research project called DOMINO financed by the French National Research Agency (ANR) RNTL. This project has started in March 2007 and will end in March 2009, it regroups academics (ENSIETA, IRISA, and IRIT), industries and agencies, (AIRBUS, CEA, CNES and SODIFRANCE). This project has two main goals: to develop reliable Model Driven Engineering (MDE) components and to build bridges with Domain Specific Languages (DSL). CNES participates in this project through a case study on the reliable design of operational procedures and associated applications. There are two main objectives for this case study: the first to improve "offline" interoperability with the possibility to build import/export tools for any scripting procedure language by using meta-modeling technology. The second is to improve efficiency for the production, validation, and execution of scripting procedures using operational specifications. It is anticipated that this will result in a reduction of costs and reliability improvement.

  3. Weaving time into system architecture: satellite cost per operational day and optimal design lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Joseph H.; Hastings, Daniel E.; Newman, Dava J.

    2004-03-01

    An augmented perspective on system architecture is proposed (diachronic) that complements the traditional views on system architecture (synchronic). This paper proposes to view in a system architecture the flow of service (or utility) that the system will provide over its design lifetime. It suggests that the design lifetime is a fundamental component of system architecture although one cannot see it or touch it. Consequently, cost, utility, and value per unit time metrics are introduced. A framework is then developed that identifies optimal design lifetimes for complex systems in general, and space systems in particular, based on this augmented perspective of system architecture and on these metrics. It is found that an optimal design lifetime for a satellite exists, even in the case of constant expected revenues per day over the system's lifetime, and that it changes substantially with the expected Time to Obsolescence of the system and the volatility of the market the system is serving in the case of a commercial venture. The analysis thus proves that it is essential for a system architect to match the design lifetime with the dynamical characteristics of the environment the system is/will be operating in. It is also shown that as the uncertainty in the dynamical characteristics of the environment the system is operating in increases, the value of having the option to upgrade, modify, or extend the lifetime of a system at a later point in time increases depending on how events unfold.

  4. Operations and Maintenance Costs for New Major U.S. Coast Guard Platforms: Projected Versus Actual Costs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    expected OG-41 costs during two years out of the four years of data available. Even so, the budget predictions were sig - nificantly higher in the...the t-distribution table for a 0.05 sig - nificance level is used to identify the critical value, denoted as tdf . This test is called a two-tailed...the unusually high degree. Multiple regressions were conducted for the cutters and more sig - nificant results were obtained. 48 TABLE 8 CORRELATION

  5. 20 CFR 662.270 - How are the costs of providing services through the One-Stop delivery system and the operating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... through the One-Stop delivery system and the operating costs of the system to be funded? 662.270 Section... and the operating costs of the system to be funded? The MOU must describe the particular funding arrangements for services and operating costs of the One-Stop delivery system. Each partner must contribute...

  6. Cost Quality Management Assessment for the Idaho Operations Office. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The Office of Engineering and Cost Management (EM-24) conducted a Cost Quality Management Assessment of EM-30 and EM-40 activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory on Feb. 3--19, 1992 (Round I). The CQMA team assessed the cost and cost-related management activities at INEL. The Round II CQMA, conducted at INEL Sept. 19--29, 1994, reviewed EM-30, EM-40, EM-50, and EM-60 cost and cost-related management practices against performance objectives and criteria. Round II did not address indirect cost analysis. INEL has made measurable progress since Round I.

  7. Feasibility study of an Integrated Program for Aerospace-vehicle Design (IPAD) system. Volume 6: Implementation schedule, development costs, operational costs, benefit assessment, impact on company organization, spin-off assessment, phase 1, tasks 3 to 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrocq, C. A.; Hurley, M. J.; Dublin, M.

    1973-01-01

    A baseline implementation plan, including alternative implementation approaches for critical software elements and variants to the plan, was developed. The basic philosophy was aimed at: (1) a progressive release of capability for three major computing systems, (2) an end product that was a working tool, (3) giving participation to industry, government agencies, and universities, and (4) emphasizing the development of critical elements of the IPAD framework software. The results of these tasks indicate an IPAD first release capability 45 months after go-ahead, a five year total implementation schedule, and a total developmental cost of 2027 man-months and 1074 computer hours. Several areas of operational cost increases were identified mainly due to the impact of additional equipment needed and additional computer overhead. The benefits of an IPAD system were related mainly to potential savings in engineering man-hours, reduction of design-cycle calendar time, and indirect upgrading of product quality and performance.

  8. Additive for Low-Temperature Operation of Li-(CF)n Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, William; Whitacre, Jay

    2009-01-01

    Some progress has been reported in continuing research on the use of anion-receptor compounds as electrolyte additives to increase the sustainable rates of discharge and, hence, the discharge capacities, of lithium-poly(carbon monofluoride) [Li-(CF)n, where n >1] primary electrochemical power cells. Some results of this research at a prior stage were summarized in Increasing Discharge Capacities of Li(CF)n Cells (NPO-42346), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 32, No. 2 (February 2008), page 37. A major difference between the present and previously reported results is that now there is some additional focus on improving performance at temperatures from ambient down to as low as 40 C. To recapitulate from the cited prior article: During the discharge of a Li-(CF)n cell, one of the electrochemical reactions causes LiF to precipitate at the cathode. LiF is almost completely insoluble in most non-aqueous solvents, including those used in the electrolyte solutions of Li- (CF)n cells. LiF is electrochemically inactive and can block the desired transport of electrons at the cathode, and, hence, the precipitation of LiF can form an ever-thickening film on the cathode that limits the rate of discharge. An anion-receptor electrolyte additive helps to increase the discharge capacity in two ways: It renders LiF somewhat soluble in the non-aqueous electrolyte solution, thereby delaying precipitation until a high concentration of LiF in solution has been reached. When precipitation occurs, it promotes the formation of large LiF grains that do not conformally coat the cathode. The net effect is to reduce the blockage caused by precipitation of LiF, thereby maintaining a greater degree of access of electrolyte to the cathode and greater electronic conductivity.

  9. Projections of costs, financing, and additional resource requirements for low- and lower middle-income country immunization programs over the decade, 2011-2020.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Gian; Lydon, Patrick; Cornejo, Santiago; Brenzel, Logan; Wrobel, Sandra; Chang, Hugh

    2013-04-18

    The Decade of Vaccines Global Vaccine Action Plan has outlined a set of ambitious goals to broaden the impact and reach of immunization across the globe. A projections exercise has been undertaken to assess the costs, financing availability, and additional resource requirements to achieve these goals through the delivery of vaccines against 19 diseases across 94 low- and middle-income countries for the period 2011-2020. The exercise draws upon data from existing published and unpublished global forecasts, country immunization plans, and costing studies. A combination of an ingredients-based approach and use of approximations based on past spending has been used to generate vaccine and non-vaccine delivery costs for routine programs, as well as supplementary immunization activities (SIAs). Financing projections focused primarily on support from governments and the GAVI Alliance. Cost and financing projections are presented in constant 2010 US dollars (US$). Cumulative total costs for the decade are projected to be US$57.5 billion, with 85% for routine programs and the remaining 15% for SIAs. Delivery costs account for 54% of total cumulative costs, and vaccine costs make up the remainder. A conservative estimate of total financing for immunization programs is projected to be $34.3 billion over the decade, with country governments financing 65%. These projections imply a cumulative funding gap of $23.2 billion. About 57% of the total resources required to close the funding gap are needed just to maintain existing programs and scale up other currently available vaccines (i.e., before adding in the additional costs of vaccines still in development). Efforts to mobilize additional resources, manage program costs, and establish mutual accountability between countries and development partners will all be necessary to ensure the goals of the Decade of Vaccines are achieved. Establishing or building on existing mechanisms to more comprehensively track resources and

  10. Arsenic Remediation Enhancement Through Chemical Additions to Pump and Treat Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wovkulich, K.; Mailloux, B. J.; Stute, M.; Simpson, H. J.; Keimowitz, A. R.; Powell, A.; Lacko, A.; Chillrud, S. N.

    2008-12-01

    Arsenic is a contaminant found at more than 500 US Superfund sites. Since pump and treat technologies are widely used for remediation of contaminated groundwater, increasing the efficiency of contaminant removal at such sites should allow limited financial resources to clean up more sites. The Vineland Chemical Company Superfund site is extensively contaminated with arsenic after waste arsenic salts were stored and disposed of improperly for much of the company's 44 year manufacturing lifetime. Despite approximately eight years of pump and treat remediation, arsenic concentrations in the recovery wells can still be greater than 1000 ppb. The arsenic concentrations in the groundwater remain high because of slow desorption of arsenic from contaminated aquifer solids. Extrapolation of laboratory column experiments suggest that continuing the current groundwater remediation practice based on flushing ambient groundwater through the system may require on the order of hundreds of years to clean the site. However, chemical additions of phosphate or oxalic acid into the aquifer could decrease the remediation time scale substantially. Laboratory results from a soil column experiment using input of 10 mM oxalic acid suggest that site clean up of groundwater could be decreased to as little as four years. Pilot scale forced gradient field experiments will help establish whether chemical additions can be effective for increasing arsenic mobilization from aquifer solids and thus substantially decrease pump and treat clean up time.

  11. Photocatalytic treatment of an industrial effluent using artificial and solar UV radiation: an operational cost study on a pilot plant scale.

    PubMed

    Durán, A; Monteagudo, J M; San Martín, I

    2012-05-15

    The aim of this work was to study the operation costs of treating a real effluent from an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power station located in Spain. The study compares different homogeneous photocatalytic processes on a pilot plant scale using different types of radiation (artificial UV or solar UV with a compound parabolic collector). The efficiency of the processes was evaluated by an analysis of the total organic carbon (TOC) removed. The following processes were considered in the study: (i) a photo-Fenton process at an artificial UV pilot plant (with the initial addition of H(2)O(2)), (ii) a modified photo-Fenton process with continuous addition of H(2)O(2) and O(2) to the system and (iii) a ferrioxalate-assisted solar photo-Fenton process at a compound parabolic collector (CPC) pilot plant. The efficiency of these processes in degrading pollutants has been studied previously, and the results obtained in each of those studies have been published elsewhere. The operational costs due to the consumption of electrical energy, reagents and catalysts were calculated from the optimal conditions of each process. The results showed that the solar photo-Fenton system was economically feasible, being able to achieve up to 75% mineralization with a total cost of 6 €/m(3), which can be reduced to 3.6 €/m(3) by subtracting the electrical costs because the IGCC plant is self-sufficient in terms of energy.

  12. A Present Value-Unit Cost Methodology for Evaluating Wastewater Reclamation and Direct Reuse at a Military Base of Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-12-01

    KEY WORDS (Conllnut on rtvtrt^ tldt II ntctttmry mnd Idtntlly by block numbtr) Waslewater reciainalion Wat(;r renovation Water reuse Present...applied to a water supply problem typical for a military operation. A relevant unit cost figure, called the "present value-unit cost" (PVUC), is...determined and applied to alternative methods for meeting a projected need for water . The concepls of reclamation am! dual supply systems are

  13. A Model to Estimate the Operating and Maintenance (O&M) Costs of the Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    p. 2): We deliver survivable, fully capable, Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) Vehicles to our Warfighters and customers . We demand and...THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK 21 III. DATA SOURCES A. INTRODUCTION This chapter discusses the cost data of the Mine Resistant Ambush Protected...under the operating & maintenance (CES 5.0) funded elements for FY 2009 cost data from the Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) Joint Program

  14. Data Collection for Current U.S. Wind Energy Projects: Component Costs, Financing, Operations, and Maintenance; January 2011 - September 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Martin-Tretton, M.; Reha, M.; Drunsic, M.; Keim, M.

    2012-01-01

    DNV Renewables (USA) Inc. (DNV) used an Operations and Maintenance (O&M) Cost Model to evaluate ten distinct cost scenarios encountered under variations in wind turbine component failure rates. The analysis considers: (1) a Reference Scenario using the default part failure rates within the O&M Cost Model, (2) High Failure Rate Scenarios that increase the failure rates of three major components (blades, gearboxes, and generators) individually, (3) 100% Replacement Scenarios that model full replacement of these components over a 20 year operating life, and (4) Serial Failure Scenarios that model full replacement of blades, gearboxes, and generators in years 4 to 6 of the wind project. DNV selected these scenarios to represent a broad range of possible operational experiences. Also in this report, DNV summarizes the predominant financing arrangements used to develop wind energy projects over the past several years and provides summary data on various financial metrics describing those arrangements.

  15. FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING, AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael D. Durham

    2005-03-17

    Brayton Point Unit 1 was successfully tested for applicability of activated carbon injection as a mercury control technology. Test results from this site have enabled a thorough evaluation of the impacts of future mercury regulations to Brayton Point Unit 1, including performance, estimated cost, and operation data. This unit has variable (29-75%) native mercury removal, thus it was important to understand the impacts of process variables and activated carbon on mercury capture. The team responsible for executing this program included: (1) Plant and PG&E National Energy Group corporate personnel; (2) Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); (3) United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL); (4) ADA-ES, Inc.; (5) NORIT Americas, Inc.; (6) Apogee Scientific, Inc.; (7) TRC Environmental Corporation; (8) URS Corporation; (9) Quinapoxet Solutions; (10) Energy and Environmental Strategies (EES); and (11) Reaction Engineering International (REI). The technical support of all of these entities came together to make this program achieve its goals. Overall, the objectives of this field test program were to determine the impact of activated carbon injection on mercury control and balance-of-plant processes on Brayton Point Unit 1. Brayton Point Unit 1 is a 250-MW unit that fires a low-sulfur eastern bituminous coal. Particulate control is achieved by two electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) in series. The full-scale tests were conducted on one-half of the flue gas stream (nominally 125 MW). Mercury control sorbents were injected in between the two ESPs. The residence time from the injection grid to the second ESP was approximately 0.5 seconds. In preparation for the full-scale tests, 12 different sorbents were evaluated in a slipstream of flue gas via a packed-bed field test apparatus for mercury adsorption. Results from these tests were used to determine the five carbon-based sorbents that were tested at full-scale. Conditions of interest

  16. A series on optimizing satellite systems. I - Restoring interruptions of communications sattelite service: Logistical and cost comparisons of mature and newly operational systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, Marcellus S.

    1989-09-01

    A mathematical model is presented of costs and operational factors involved in provision for service interruptions of both a mature and typically large incumbent satellite system and of a smaller, more recently operational system. The equation expresses the required launch frequency for the new system as a function of the launch spacing of the mature system; the time disparity between the inauguration of the two systems; and the rate of capacity depreciation. In addition, a technique is presented to compare the relative extent to which the discounted costs of the new system exceed those of the mature system in furnishing the same effective capacity in orbit, and thus the same service liability, at a given point in time. It is determined that a mature incumbent communications satellite system, having more capacity in orbit, will on balance have a lower probability of service interruption than a newer, smaller system.

  17. Portable, battery-operated, low-cost, bright field and fluorescence microscope.

    PubMed

    Miller, Andrew R; Davis, Gregory L; Oden, Z Maria; Razavi, Mohamad Reza; Fateh, Abolfazl; Ghazanfari, Morteza; Abdolrahimi, Farid; Poorazar, Shahin; Sakhaie, Fatemeh; Olsen, Randall J; Bahrmand, Ahmad Reza; Pierce, Mark C; Graviss, Edward A; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2010-08-04

    This study describes the design and evaluation of a portable bright-field and fluorescence microscope that can be manufactured for $240 USD. The microscope uses a battery-operated LED-based flashlight as the light source and achieves a resolution of 0.8 microm at 1000x magnification in fluorescence mode. We tested the diagnostic capability of this new instrument to identify infections caused by the human pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Sixty-four direct, decontaminated, and serially diluted smears were prepared from sputa obtained from 19 patients suspected to have M. tuberculosis infection. Slides were stained with auramine orange and evaluated as being positive or negative for M. tuberculosis with both the new portable fluorescence microscope and a laboratory grade fluorescence microscope. Concordant results were obtained in 98.4% of cases. This highly portable, low cost, fluorescence microscope may be a useful diagnostic tool to expand the availability of M. tuberculosis testing at the point-of-care in low resource settings.

  18. 42 CFR 412.71 - Determination of base-year inpatient operating costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ....130 of this chapter. (3) Kidney acquisition costs incurred by hospitals approved as renal transplantation centers as described in § 412.100. Kidney acquisition costs in the base year will be determined by multiplying the hospital's average kidney acquisition cost per kidney times the number of kidney...

  19. 42 CFR 412.71 - Determination of base-year inpatient operating costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ....130 of this chapter. (3) Kidney acquisition costs incurred by hospitals approved as renal transplantation centers as described in § 412.100. Kidney acquisition costs in the base year will be determined by multiplying the hospital's average kidney acquisition cost per kidney times the number of kidney...

  20. Cost of Managing Waste in Contingency Operations: A Case Study from Bagram Air Force Base, Afghanistan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    Local Resale Markets • On-Site Reuse /Composting • On-Site Incineration (all types) and/or Containerized Burn (solid) • On-Site Landfills (with liners...Transport Treatment: Blackwater:Yes Greywater : No Disposal: Local River 6 Cost Components Cost Component Cost Drivers Infrastructure Facility type (e.g

  1. Proceedings of the NIST Conference on Reducing the Cost of Space Infrastructure and Operations: Part 1: Oral presentations and discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, William C.

    1993-08-01

    A conference was held from November 20-22, 1989 at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Gaithersburg, Maryland for the purpose of discussing methods for reducing the cost of space infrastructure and operations. This was a multidisciplinary group that included invited speakers from both within and outside of the traditional aerospace community. Specific comparison was made in the case of habitats and extravehicular activity with commercially successful undersea operations on earth which operate daily under more severe environmental conditions and with operating budgets on the order of 1/1000 that of orbital analogs.

  2. Cost of Unsuitability: Assessment of Trade-offs Between the Cost of Operational Unsuitability and Research, Development, Test and Evaluation (RDT&E) Costs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    under contract DASW01-04-C-0003, Task BD-7- 2768 , for the Office of the Director, Operational Test and Evaluation. The publication of this IDA document...from January 1993–August 1994, initial squadron operations ( ISO ) from A-3 September 1994–January 1995, and IOT&E from January–June 1995.1 Sharp...return on the 1 The developmental testing data come from McDonnell Douglas and program SARs; the ISO

  3. A discounted-cost continuous-time flexible manufacturing and operator scheduling model solved by deconvexification over time

    SciTech Connect

    Eaves, B.C.; Rothblum, U.G.

    1990-08-01

    A discounted-cost, continuous-time, infinite-horizon version of a flexible manufacturing and operator scheduling model is solved. The solution procedure is to convexify the discrete operator-assignment constraints to obtain a linear program, and then to regain the discreteness and obtain an approximate manufacturing schedule by deconvexification of the solution of the linear program over time. The strong features of the model are the accommodation of linear inequality relations among the manufacturing activities and the discrete manufacturing scheduling, whereas the weak features are intra-period relaxation of inventory availability constraints, and the absence of inventory costs, setup times, and setup charges.

  4. Naval Coastal Warfare Operations from 2000 to Operation Iraqi Freedom and the Deficiencies that Prompted their Addition to the Naval Expeditionary Combat Command

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-02

    the historical information will be drawn from personal recollection, personal journals and live interviews. In addition, written transcripts taken from...and troubleshoot problems in live operations during a short two week period of time. Two weeks per year is not much time, especially when one considers...51 Admiral W.C. Marsh.13 The living area we were initially assigned to was located at Camp Arifjan, a U.S. Army staging area several miles inland

  5. Naval Coastal Warfare Operations from 2000 to Operation Iraqi Freedom and the Deficiencies that Prompted their Addition to the Naval Expeditionary Combat Command

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-03

    and live interviews. In addition, written transcripts taken from interviews that were conducted during the first few months of OIF will also be...coordinate, cooperate and troubleshoot problems in live operations during a short two week period of time. Two weeks per year is not much time...as Commander Task Group 51.9 (CTG 51.9) who worked directly for Commander Task Force 51 Admiral W.C. Marsh.13 The living area we were initially

  6. Participatory operations model for cost-efficient monitoring and modeling of river basins--A systematic approach.

    PubMed

    Malve, Olli; Hjerppe, Turo; Tattari, Sirkka; Väisänen, Sari; Huttunen, Inese; Kotamäki, Niina; Kallio, Kari; Taskinen, Antti; Kauppila, Pirkko

    2016-01-01

    The worldwide economic downturn and the climate change in the beginning of 21st century have stressed the need for cost efficient and systematic operations model for the monitoring and management of surface waters. However, these processes are still all too fragmented and incapable to respond these challenges. For example in Finland, the estimation of the costs and benefits of planned management measures is insufficient. On this account, we present a new operations model to streamline these processes and to ensure the lucid decision making and the coherent implementation which facilitate the participation of public and all the involved stakeholders. The model was demonstrated in the real world management of a lake. The benefits, pitfalls and development needs were identified. After the demonstration, the operations model was put into operation and has been actively used in several other management projects throughout Finland.

  7. FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING, AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael D. Durham

    2003-05-01

    With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Mercury is known to have toxic effects on the nervous system of humans and wildlife. Although it exists only in trace amounts in coal, mercury is released when coal burns and can accumulate on land and in water. In water, bacteria transform the metal into methylmercury, the most hazardous form of the metal. Methylmercury can collect in fish and marine mammals in concentrations hundreds of thousands times higher than the levels in surrounding waters. One of the goals of DOE is to develop technologies by 2005 that will be capable of cutting mercury emissions 50 to 70 percent at well under one-half of today's costs. ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) is managing a project to test mercury control technologies at full scale at four different power plants from 2000--2003. The ADA-ES project is focused on those power plants that are not equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization systems. ADA-ES has developed a portable system that will be tested at four different utility power plants. Each of the plants is equipped with either electrostatic precipitators or fabric filters to remove solid particles from the plant's flue gas. ADA-ES's technology will inject a dry sorbent, such as activated carbon, which removes the mercury and makes it more susceptible to capture by the particulate control devices. A fine water mist may be sprayed into the flue gas to cool its temperature to the range where the dry sorbent is most effective. PG&E National Energy Group is providing two test sites that fire bituminous coals and both are equipped with electrostatic precipitators and carbon/ash separation systems. Wisconsin Electric Power Company is providing a third test site that burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and has an electrostatic

  8. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  9. Möbius operators and non-additive quantum probabilities in the Birkhoff-von Neumann lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vourdas, A.

    2016-03-01

    The properties of quantum probabilities are linked to the geometry of quantum mechanics, described by the Birkhoff-von Neumann lattice. Quantum probabilities violate the additivity property of Kolmogorov probabilities, and they are interpreted as Dempster-Shafer probabilities. Deviations from the additivity property are quantified with the Möbius (or non-additivity) operators which are defined through Möbius transforms, and which are shown to be intimately related to commutators. The lack of distributivity in the Birkhoff-von Neumann lattice Λd, causes deviations from the law of the total probability (which is central in Kolmogorov's probability theory). Projectors which quantify the lack of distributivity in Λd, and also deviations from the law of the total probability, are introduced. All these operators, are observables and they can be measured experimentally. Constraints for the Möbius operators, which are based on the properties of the Birkhoff-von Neumann lattice (which in the case of finite quantum systems is a modular lattice), are derived. Application of this formalism in the context of coherent states, generalizes coherence to multi-dimensional structures.

  10. Operating and life-cycle costs for uranium-contaminated soil treatment technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Douthat, D.M.; Armstrong, A.Q.; Stewart, R.N.

    1995-09-01

    The development of a nuclear industry in the US required mining, milling, and fabricating a large variety of uranium products. One of these products was purified uranium metal which was used in the Savannah River and Hanford Site reactors. Most of this feed material was produced at the US Department of Energy (DOE) facility formerly called the Feed Materials Production Center at Fernald, Ohio. During operation of this facility, soils became contaminated with uranium from a variety of sources. To avoid disposal of these soils in low-level radioactive waste burial sites, increasing emphasis has been placed on the remediating soils contaminated with uranium and other radionuclides. To address remediation and management of uranium-contaminated soils at sites owned by DOE, the DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD) evaluates and compares the versatility, efficiency, and economics of various technologies that may be combined into systems designed to characterize and remediate uranium-contaminated soils. Each technology must be able to (1) characterize the uranium in soil, (2) decontaminate or remove uranium from soil, (3) treat or dispose of resulting waste streams, (4) meet necessary state and federal regulations, and (5) meet performance assessment objectives. The role of the performance assessment objectives is to provide the information necessary to conduct evaluations of the technologies. These performance assessments provide the basis for selecting the optimum system for remediation of large areas contaminated with uranium. One of the performance assessment tasks is to address the economics of full-scale implementation of soil treatment technologies. The cost of treating contaminated soil is one of the criteria used in the decision-making process for selecting remedial alternatives.

  11. Cost related sensitivity analysis for optimal operation of a grid-parallel PEM fuel cell power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sharkh, M. Y.; Tanrioven, M.; Rahman, A.; Alam, M. S.

    Fuel cell power plants (FCPP) as a combined source of heat, power and hydrogen (CHP&H) can be considered as a potential option to supply both thermal and electrical loads. Hydrogen produced from the FCPP can be stored for future use of the FCPP or can be sold for profit. In such a system, tariff rates for purchasing or selling electricity, the fuel cost for the FCPP/thermal load, and hydrogen selling price are the main factors that affect the operational strategy. This paper presents a hybrid evolutionary programming and Hill-Climbing based approach to evaluate the impact of change of the above mentioned cost parameters on the optimal operational strategy of the FCPP. The optimal operational strategy of the FCPP for different tariffs is achieved through the estimation of the following: hourly generated power, the amount of thermal power recovered, power trade with the local grid, and the quantity of hydrogen that can be produced. Results show the importance of optimizing system cost parameters in order to minimize overall operating cost.

  12. 42 CFR 412.78 - Determination of the hospital-specific rate for inpatient operating costs for sole community...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... inpatient operating costs for sole community hospitals based on a Federal fiscal year 2006 base period. 412... HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES... community hospitals based on a Federal fiscal year 2006 base period. (a) Applicability. (1) This...

  13. 41 CFR 102-33.190 - What are the aircraft operations and ownership costs for which we must account?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What are the aircraft operations and ownership costs for which we must account? 102-33.190 Section 102-33.190 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL...

  14. How School Facilities Managers and Business Officials Are Reducing Operating Costs and Saving Money. Energy-Smart Building Choices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC.

    This guide addresses contributions that school facility administrators and business officials can make in an effort to reduce operating costs and free up money for capital improvements. The guide explores opportunities available to utilize energy-saving strategies at any stage in a building's life, from its initial design phase through renovation.…

  15. Contracted versus District-Operated Pupil Transportation Programs: An Analysis of Cost and Program Differences. Report 96-04.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Legislature, Boise. Office of Performance Evaluation.

    In June 1995, the Idaho Joint Legislative Oversight Committee directed the Office of Performance Evaluations to conduct an evaluation of school district pupil transportation. This report, the last in a series of four, examines the apparent cost difference between district-operated transportation programs and those that are contracted to…

  16. Defense Acquisitions. Assessments Needed to Address V-22 Aircraft Operational and Cost Concerns to Define Future Investments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    Honorable Edolphus Towns Chairman Committee on Oversight and Government Reform House of Representatives The Honorable Bart Stupak Chairman...Report to Congressional Requesters United States Government Accountability Office GAO May 2009 DEFENSE ACQUISITIONS...Assessments Needed to Address V-22 Aircraft Operational and Cost Concerns to Define Future Investments GAO-09-482 Report Documentation Page

  17. A Study of the Operating and Maintenance Costs in a Suburban School District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haugo, John; Mohrenweiser, Gary

    Two aspects of the operation and maintenance of the Suburban Park School District (SPSD) facilities are analyzed: (1) The allocation of funds to operation and maintenance, and (2) the individual custodial workloads. The maintenance and operation expenditures are divided into three categories (custodial salaries, operation expenditures above and…

  18. Coal unit trains: operations, maintenance, and technology. Volume 4. Costs and benefits of aluminum coal cars. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Boghani, A.B.

    1984-11-01

    This report examines the costs and benefits to a utility of acquiring aluminum coal cars. After discussing the history of aluminum car production, the report describes in detail the characteristics of several aluminum cars now in use, and the experience of railroads and utilities with them. The effects of acquiring aluminum cars instead of steel cars on the fuel cost, crew cost, maintenance-of-way cost, and car costs (capital and maintenance) are discussed. An illustrative example is given, in which the internal rate of return (IRR) and payback period of the extra investment made to acquire aluminum cars are calculated. A parametric analysis is performed to determine the sensitivity of IRR and payback period to the freight-rate discount for the aluminum car, the inflation rate, the purchase price of aluminum and steel cars, their maintenance costs, bad order ratios, car lives, salvage values, trip length, and car utilization. The study concludes that the aluminum cars can be an excellent investment, provided a reasonable freight-rate discount is obtained. The first cost of an aluminum car compared to that of a steel car, its estimated downtime, its estimated maintenance cost, and the anticipated degree of its utilization are also shown to significantly affect the attractiveness of the extra investment. In addition, the study reveals that some aluminum cars have proved more durable in service than others. Thus, the importance of a thorough evaluation of the design of the aluminum cars being offered is demonstrated. 11 references, 15 figures, 8 tables.

  19. 76 FR 49841 - Transmission Planning and Cost Allocation by Transmission Owning and Operating Public Utilities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-11

    ... section 206 of the Federal Power Act (FPA) to adopt reforms to its electric transmission planning and cost... efficient and cost-effective regional transmission planning. As discussed further below, the electric... anticompetitive practices existed in the electric industry and that, absent Commission action, such...

  20. 19 CFR 10.178 - Direct costs of processing operations performed in the beneficiary developing country.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...” means those costs either directly incurred in, or which can be reasonably allocated to, the growth... are not limited to: (1) All actual labor costs involved in the growth, production, manufacture, or... specific merchandise or are not related to the growth, production, manufacture, or assembly of...

  1. EPA evaluation of the SYNERGY-1 fuel additive under Section 511 of the Motor Vehicle Information and Cost Savings Act. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Syria, S.L.

    1981-06-01

    This document announces the conclusions of the EPA evaluation of the 'SYNERGY-1' device under provisions of Section 511 of the Motor Vehicle Information and Cost Savings Act. This additive is intended to improve fuel economy and exhaust emission levels of two and four cycle gasoline fueled engines.

  2. FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING, AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael D. Durham

    2004-10-01

    PG&E NEG Salem Harbor Station Unit 1 was successfully tested for applicability of activated carbon injection as a mercury control technology. Test results from this site have enabled a thorough evaluation of mercury control at Salem Harbor Unit 1, including performance, estimated cost, and operation data. This unit has very high native mercury removal, thus it was important to understand the impacts of process variables on native mercury capture. The team responsible for executing this program included plant and PG&E headquarters personnel, EPRI and several of its member companies, DOE, ADA, Norit Americas, Inc., Hamon Research-Cottrell, Apogee Scientific, TRC Environmental Corporation, Reaction Engineering, as well as other laboratories. The technical support of all of these entities came together to make this program achieve its goals. Overall the objectives of this field test program were to determine the mercury control and balance-of-plant impacts resulting from activated carbon injection into a full-scale ESP on Salem Harbor Unit 1, a low sulfur bituminous-coal-fired 86 MW unit. It was also important to understand the impacts of process variables on native mercury removal (>85%). One half of the gas stream was used for these tests, or 43 MWe. Activated carbon, DARCO FGD supplied by NORIT Americas, was injected upstream of the cold side ESP, just downstream of the air preheater. This allowed for approximately 1.5 seconds residence time in the duct before entering the ESP. Conditions tested in this field evaluation included the impacts of the Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) system on mercury capture, of unburned carbon in the fly ash, of adjusting ESP inlet flue gas temperatures, and of boiler load on mercury control. The field evaluation conducted at Salem Harbor looked at several sorbent injection concentrations at several flue gas temperatures. It was noted that at the mid temperature range of 322-327 F, the LOI (unburned carbon) lost some of its

  3. Cost Benefit Analysis of Installing a Recovery Exercise Module (REM) in a Cruise Missile for an Operational Test Launch.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    A±6 454 COST BENEFIT AINALYSIS OF INSTALLING A RECOVERY EXERCISE /In N9 ODULE (REM) IN R..(U) NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA H E GLASSNAN...BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF INSTALLING A RECOVERY EXERCISE MODULE (REM) IN A CRUISE MISSILE FOR AN OPERATIONAL TEST LAUNCH by Howard Elliott Glassman June 1987...iNI ELEMENT NO I NNO4 ACCESSION NO TITLE (InCludO Secu’fft C10uufCA1uon) COST BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF INSTALLING A RECOVERY EXERCISE MODULE (REM) IN A

  4. Cost of Quality (CoQ) metrics for telescope operations and project management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radziwill, Nicole M.

    2006-06-01

    This study describes the goals, foundational work, and early returns associated with establishing a pilot quality cost program at the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). Quality costs provide a means to communicate the results of process improvement efforts in the universal language of project management: money. This scheme stratifies prevention, appraisal, internal failure and external failure costs, and seeks to quantify and compare the up-front investment in planning and risk management versus the cost of rework. An activity-based Cost of Quality (CoQ) model was blended with the Cost of Software Quality (CoSQ) model that has been successfully deployed at Raytheon Electronic Systems (RES) for this pilot program, analyzing the efforts of the GBT Software Development Division. Using this model, questions that can now be answered include: What is an appropriate length for our development cycle? Are some observing modes more reliable than others? Are we testing too much, or not enough? How good is our software quality, not in terms of defects reported and fixed, but in terms of its impact on the user? The ultimate goal is to provide a higher quality of service to customers of the telescope.

  5. Operational Cost Analysis of Dental Emergencies for Deployed U.S. Army Personnel During Operation Iraqi Freedom

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    mitigated. Using the DOD Dental Fitness Classification ( DFC ) system, teeth with problems are assigned a classifi- cation of 2 or 3 based on their probability...of causing a DE over a 12-month period. For example, a tooth identified as a DFC 2 indicates the probability of a soldier developing a DE within...12 months is low. Although the DFC system has been validated, 13’ 14 dental providers should take additional steps to ensure their examinations and

  6. Addition of parenteral cefoxitin to regimen of oral antibiotics for elective colorectal operations. A randomized prospective study.

    PubMed Central

    Schoetz, D J; Roberts, P L; Murray, J J; Coller, J A; Veidenheimer, M C

    1990-01-01

    The efficacy of cefoxitin, a perioperative parenteral antibiotic, combined with mechanical bowel preparation and oral antibiotics to prevent wound infections and other septic complications in patients undergoing elective colorectal operations, was examined in a prospective randomized study. All 197 patients who completed the study received mechanical bowel preparation and oral neomycin/erythromycin base. In addition a perioperative parenteral antibiotic was given in three divided doses to 101 patients. The other 96 patients received no parenteral antibiotics. The overall incidence of intra-abdominal septic complications was 7.3% (7 of 96) in the control group (no cefoxitin) and 5% (5 of 101) in the treatment group (cefoxitin). This difference was not statistically significant. The incidence of abdominal wound infection was 14.6% in the control group and 5% in the treatment group, a statistically significant difference (p = 0.02). The addition of perioperative parenteral cefoxitin greatly reduced the incidence of wound infections in patients undergoing elective colorectal operations who had been prepared with mechanical bowel cleansing and oral antimicrobial agents. PMID:2100983

  7. [Receiver operating characteristic analysis and the cost--benefit analysis in determination of the optimal cut-off point].

    PubMed

    Vránová, J; Horák, J; Krátká, K; Hendrichová, M; Kovaírková, K

    2009-01-01

    An overview of the use of Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis within medicine is provided. A survey of the theory behind the analysis is offered together with a presentation on how to create a ROC curve and how to use Cost--Benefit analysis to determine the optimal cut-off point or threshold. The use of ROC analysis is exemplified in the "Cost--Benefit analysis" section of the paper. In these examples, it can be seen that the determination of the optimal cut-off point is mainly influenced by the prevalence and the severity of the disease, by the risks and adverse events of treatment or the diagnostic testing, by the overall costs of treating true and false positives (TP and FP), and by the risk of deficient or non-treatment of false negative (FN) cases.

  8. Cost-effectiveness of SQ® HDM SLIT-tablet in addition to pharmacotherapy for the treatment of house dust mite allergic rhinitis in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Green, William; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Klimek, Ludger; Hahn-Pedersen, Julie; Nørgaard Andreasen, Jakob; Taylor, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Background Allergic rhinitis is a global health problem that burdens society due to associated health care costs and its impact on health. Standardized quality (SQ®) house dust mite (HDM) sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT)-tablet is a sublingually administered allergy immunotherapy tablet for patients with persistent moderate to severe HDM allergic rhinitis despite use of allergy pharmacotherapy. Objective To assess the cost-effectiveness of SQ HDM SLIT-tablet in Germany for patients suffering from HDM allergic rhinitis. Methods A pharmacoeconomic analysis, based on data collected in a double-blinded, phase III randomized placebo-controlled trial (n=992), was undertaken to compare SQ HDM SLIT-tablet in addition to allergy pharmacotherapy to placebo plus allergy pharmacotherapy. Quality-adjusted life year (QALY) scores and health care resource use data recorded in the trial were applied to each treatment group and extrapolated over a nine-year time horizon. A series of scenarios were used to investigate the impact of changes on long-term patient health for both treatment groups, which was measured by annual changes in QALY scores. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were also performed. Results In the base case analysis, compared with allergy pharmacotherapy, SQ HDM SLIT-tablet led to a QALY gain of 0.31 at an incremental cost of €2,276 over the nine-year time horizon, equating to an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of €7,519. The treatment was cost-effective for all scenarios analyzed; however, results were sensitive to changes in individual parameter values during the deterministic sensitivity analysis. Conclusion SQ HDM SLIT-tablet in addition to pharmacotherapy is cost-effective compared with allergy pharmacotherapy plus placebo for the treatment of persistent moderate to severe HDM allergic rhinitis that is not well controlled by allergy pharmacotherapy. PMID:28243132

  9. Additive manufacturing of liquid/gas diffusion layers for low-cost and high-efficiency hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, Jingke; Zhang, Feng -Yuan; Dehoff, Ryan R.; Peter, William H.; Toops, Todd J.; Green, Jr., Johney Boyd

    2016-01-14

    The electron beam melting (EBM) additive manufacturing technology was used to fabricate titanium liquid/gas diffusion media with high-corrosion resistances and well-controllable multifunctional parameters, including two-phase transport and excellent electric/thermal conductivities, has been first demonstrated. Their applications in proton exchange membrane eletrolyzer cells have been explored in-situ in a cell and characterized ex-situ with SEM and XRD. Compared with the conventional woven liquid/gas diffusion layers (LGDLs), much better performance with EBM fabricated LGDLs is obtained due to their significant reduction of ohmic loss. The EBM technology components exhibited several distinguished advantages in fabricating gas diffusion layer: well-controllable pore morphology and structure, rapid prototyping, fast manufacturing, highly customizing and economic. In addition, by taking advantage of additive manufacturing, it possible to fabricate complicated three-dimensional designs of virtually any shape from a digital model into one single solid object faster, cheaper and easier, especially for titanium. More importantly, this development will provide LGDLs with control of pore size, pore shape, pore distribution, and therefore porosity and permeability, which will be very valuable to develop modeling and to validate simulations of electrolyzers with optimal and repeatable performance. Further, it will lead to a manufacturing solution to greatly simplify the PEMEC/fuel cell components and to couple the LGDLs with other parts, since they can be easily integrated together with this advanced manufacturing process

  10. Additive manufacturing of liquid/gas diffusion layers for low-cost and high-efficiency hydrogen production

    DOE PAGES

    Mo, Jingke; Zhang, Feng -Yuan; Dehoff, Ryan R.; ...

    2016-01-14

    The electron beam melting (EBM) additive manufacturing technology was used to fabricate titanium liquid/gas diffusion media with high-corrosion resistances and well-controllable multifunctional parameters, including two-phase transport and excellent electric/thermal conductivities, has been first demonstrated. Their applications in proton exchange membrane eletrolyzer cells have been explored in-situ in a cell and characterized ex-situ with SEM and XRD. Compared with the conventional woven liquid/gas diffusion layers (LGDLs), much better performance with EBM fabricated LGDLs is obtained due to their significant reduction of ohmic loss. The EBM technology components exhibited several distinguished advantages in fabricating gas diffusion layer: well-controllable pore morphology and structure,more » rapid prototyping, fast manufacturing, highly customizing and economic. In addition, by taking advantage of additive manufacturing, it possible to fabricate complicated three-dimensional designs of virtually any shape from a digital model into one single solid object faster, cheaper and easier, especially for titanium. More importantly, this development will provide LGDLs with control of pore size, pore shape, pore distribution, and therefore porosity and permeability, which will be very valuable to develop modeling and to validate simulations of electrolyzers with optimal and repeatable performance. Further, it will lead to a manufacturing solution to greatly simplify the PEMEC/fuel cell components and to couple the LGDLs with other parts, since they can be easily integrated together with this advanced manufacturing process« less

  11. Improvements Needed With Identifying Operating Costs Assessed to the Fleet Readiness Center Southwest

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-02

    Association), 2) bill of material ( BOM ), and 3) information systems support. These three categories of services account for $17.6M in services...FY 2010 FY 2011 Total Costs Not Supported Scheduling Repairs and Overhauls $1.5 $1.2 $1.3 $ 4.0 Bill of Material 2.8 2.0...by approximately $1.3 million per fiscal year. Contract Costs Incurred for Bill of Material Services From FY 2009 through FY 2011, DLA Aviation San

  12. A low-cost vector processor boosting compute-intensive image processing operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adorf, Hans-Martin

    1992-01-01

    Low-cost vector processing (VP) is within reach of everyone seriously engaged in scientific computing. The advent of affordable add-on VP-boards for standard workstations complemented by mathematical/statistical libraries is beginning to impact compute-intensive tasks such as image processing. A case in point in the restoration of distorted images from the Hubble Space Telescope. A low-cost implementation is presented of the standard Tarasko-Richardson-Lucy restoration algorithm on an Intel i860-based VP-board which is seamlessly interfaced to a commercial, interactive image processing system. First experience is reported (including some benchmarks for standalone FFT's) and some conclusions are drawn.

  13. 77 FR 60689 - Transmission Planning and Cost Allocation by Transmission Owning and Operating Public Utilities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-04

    ... Filing Code: 80. In addition, to facilitate searching, filers are asked to title such filings ``OATT... compliance filing, the filer must select the Type of Filing Code: 80. In addition, to facilitate...

  14. 77 FR 63324 - Notice of Certain Operating Cost Adjustment Factors for 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-16

    ... CUUR0000SEHD) at the national level. Fuel Oil: The Energy Information Agency Retail Price of No. 2 Fuel Oil to..., Natural Gas, Residential Energy Price, 2010-2011 annual prices in dollars per 1,000 cubic feet at the... these areas. The best current price data sources for the nine cost categories were used in...

  15. 78 FR 56911 - Notice of Certain Operating Cost Adjustment Factors for 2014

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-16

    ... Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) Consumer Price Index, All Items Less Food, Energy and Shelter (Series ID... . Natural Gas: Energy Information Agency, Natural Gas, Residential Energy Price, 2011-2012 annual prices in... these areas. The best current price data sources for the nine cost categories were used in...

  16. An Examination of the Relationship between Usage and Operating and Support Costs for Air Force Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    S Costs ....................................................................................................... 39 Econometric Methodology Overview...words, I use them both regularly in conversation. I must note that Claire and Yang showed great patience in explaining the nuances econometric theory...RECCE Reconnaissance Aircraft REMIS Reliability and Maintenance Information System SAF/FM Secretary of the Air Force financial Management TAI

  17. 77 FR 64890 - Transmission Planning and Cost Allocation by Transmission Owning and Operating Public Utilities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-24

    .... Consideration of Transmission Needs Driven by 28 Public Policy Requirements B. Nonincumbent Transmission... followed or if a cost allocation method was not followed or produced unjust and unreasonable results for a.... 1000 compliance filings process and make a decision based on the record before us. 3. Consideration...

  18. 77 FR 32183 - Transmission Planning and Cost Allocation by Transmission Owning and Operating Public Utilities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-31

    ...The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission affirms its basic determinations in Order No. 1000, amending the transmission planning and cost allocation requirements established in Order No. 890 to ensure that Commission-jurisdictional services are provided at just and reasonable rates and on a basis that is just and reasonable and not unduly discriminatory or preferential. This order affirms the......

  19. Capital and Operating Costs of Small Arsenic Removal Adsorptive Media Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducted 50 full-scale demonstration projects on treatment systems removing arsenic from drinking water in 26 states throughout the U.S. The projects were conducted to evaluate the performance, reliability, and cost of arsenic remo...

  20. The Cost of Iraq, Afghanistan, and Other Global War on Terror Operations Since 9/11

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-08

    President stated that the number of troops in Afghanistan would halve to about 4,900 and then by the beginning of 2017 , settle at an embassy presence...10 Changing Troop Levels in Afghanistan, 2001- 2017 ...several revisions, including sunsetting the authority on December 31, 2016, rather than September 30, 2017 . The bill endorses the Administration cost

  1. Coal flow aids reduce coke plant operating costs and improve production rates

    SciTech Connect

    Bedard, R.A.; Bradacs, D.J.; Kluck, R.W.; Roe, D.C.; Ventresca, B.P.

    2005-06-01

    Chemical coal flow aids can provide many benefits to coke plants, including improved production rates, reduced maintenance and lower cleaning costs. This article discusses the mechanisms by which coal flow aids function and analyzes several successful case histories. 2 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Energy sources for laparoscopic colectomy: a prospective randomized comparison of conventional electrosurgery, bipolar computer-controlled electrosurgery and ultrasonic dissection. Operative outcome and costs analysis.

    PubMed

    Targarona, Eduardo Ma; Balague, Carmen; Marin, Juan; Neto, Rene Berindoague; Martinez, Carmen; Garriga, Jordi; Trias, Manuel

    2005-12-01

    The development of operative laparoscopic surgery is linked to advances in ancillary surgical instrumentation. Ultrasonic energy devices avoid the use of electricity and provide effective control of small- to medium-sized vessels. Bipolar computer-controlled electrosurgical technology eliminates the disadvantages of electrical energy, and a mechanical blade adds a cutting action. This instrument can provide effective hemostasis of large vessels up to 7 mm. Such devices significantly increase the cost of laparoscopic procedures, however, and the amount of evidence-based information on this topic is surprisingly scarce. This study compared the effectiveness of three different energy sources on the laparoscopic performance of a left colectomy. The trial included 38 nonselected patients with a disease of the colon requiring an elective segmental left-sided colon resection. Patients were preoperatively randomized into three groups. Group I had electrosurgery; vascular dissection was performed entirely with an electrosurgery generator, and vessels were controlled with clips. Group II underwent computer-controlled bipolar electrosurgery; vascular and mesocolon section was completed by using the 10-mm Ligasure device alone. In group III, 5-mm ultrasonic shears (Harmonic Scalpel) were used for bowel dissection, vascular pedicle dissection, and mesocolon transection. The mesenteric vessel pedicle was controlled with an endostapler. Demographics (age, sex, body mass index, comorbidity, previous surgery and diagnoses requiring surgery) were recorded, as were surgical details (operative time, conversion, blood loss), additional disposable instruments (number of trocars, EndoGIA charges, and clip appliers), and clinical outcome. Intraoperative economic costs were also evaluated. End points of the trial were operative time and intraoperative blood loss, and an intention-to-treat principle was followed. The three groups were well matched for demographic and pathologic features

  3. Development of a practical and cost-effective medium for bioethanol production from the seaweed hydrolysate in surface-aerated fermentor by repeated-batch operation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Eun; Lee, Ji-Eun; Shin, Ga-Young; Choi, Woon Yong; Kang, Do Hyung; Lee, Hyeon-Yong; Jung, Kyung-Hwan

    2012-01-01

    To develop a practical and cost-effective medium for bioethanol production from the hydrolysate of seaweed Sargassum sagamianum, we investigated the feasibility and performance of bioethanol production in CSL (cornsteep liquor)-containing medium, where yeast Pichia stipitis was used and the repeated batch was carried out in a surface-aerated fermentor. The optimal medium replacement time during the repeated operation was determined to be 36 h, and the surface aeration rates were 30 and 100 ml/min. Under these conditions, the repeatedbatch operation was successfully carried out for 6 runs (216 h), in which the maximum bioethanol concentrations reached about 11-12 g/l at each batch operation. These results demonstrated that bioethanol production could be carried out repeatedly and steadily for 216 h. In these experiments, the total cumulative bioethanol production was 57.9 g and 58.0 g when the surface aeration rates were 30 ml/min and 100 ml/min, respectively. In addition, the bioethanol yields were 0.43 (about 84% of theoretical value) and 0.44 (about 86% of theoretical value) when the surface aeration rates were 30 ml/min and 100 ml/min, respectively. CSL was successfully used as a medium ingredient for the bioethanol production from the hydrolysate of seaweed Sargassum sagamianum, indicating that this medium may be practical and cost-effective for bioethanol production.

  4. Cost of owning and operating a 9-32-0/10-34-0 facility. [Ammonium polyphosphate base suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.J.

    1984-04-01

    This analysis specifies the relative economics of a 20-ton per hour combination 9-32-0/10-34-0 plant for a midwest location. The major points are: (A) Initial investment in on-site plant and equipment ranges from $192,000 to $242,000 (excluding storage costs) depending on use of fluid clay or dry clay respectively. Storage costs are a major cost outlay depending on scheduling of raw materials and final products. When storage and off-site costs such as truck scales, office building, and spare parts inventory were added, initial investment was from $356,000 (using fluid clay) to $406,000 (using dry clay). Since storage costs may be conservative, a total investment of $450,000 to $500,000 appears reasonable for planning purposes. (B) Annualized costs show raw materials as the predominant cost factor. For a 20-ton per hour plant, operated between 5000 tpy and 11,000 tpy, raw materials cost account for 81 to 89 percent of total annual costs. (C) Expected delivered phosphoric acid prices (1984) used in the analysis were $3.65 per unit (Ortho) and $4.56 per unit (Super). With a 60/40 annual production ratio in producing 10-34-0/9-32-0, the weighted break-even price ranged from $202 per ton for a 5000 tpy volume to $184 per ton for an 11,000 tpy volume. When revenues for the final product were set at $210 per ton for 10-34-0 and $183 per ton for 9-32-0, the breakeven volume was between 5000 and 6000 tons per year. As price estimates for the final products go down, this break-even volume will increase if everything else remains the same. (D) Although these estimates suggest economic feasibility for volumes above the breakeven point, this feasibility is highly sensitive to raw material cost and final product prices. Thus, quotes on prices and tonnages should not be divorced from assumptions on raw materials and revenues. 1 reference, 2 figures, 6 tables.

  5. Neural Correlates of Task Cost for Stance Control with an Additional Motor Task: Phase-Locked Electroencephalogram Responses

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Ing-Shiou; Huang, Cheng-Ya

    2016-01-01

    With appropriate reallocation of central resources, the ability to maintain an erect posture is not necessarily degraded by a concurrent motor task. This study investigated the neural control of a particular postural-suprapostural procedure involving brain mechanisms to solve crosstalk between posture and motor subtasks. Participants completed a single posture task and a dual-task while concurrently conducting force-matching and maintaining a tilted stabilometer stance at a target angle. Stabilometer movements and event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded. The added force-matching task increased the irregularity of postural response rather than the size of postural response prior to force-matching. In addition, the added force-matching task during stabilometer stance led to marked topographic ERP modulation, with greater P2 positivity in the frontal and sensorimotor-parietal areas of the N1-P2 transitional phase and in the sensorimotor-parietal area of the late P2 phase. The time-frequency distribution of the ERP primary principal component revealed that the dual-task condition manifested more pronounced delta (1–4 Hz) and beta (13–35 Hz) synchronizations but suppressed theta activity (4–8 Hz) before force-matching. The dual-task condition also manifested coherent fronto-parietal delta activity in the P2 period. In addition to a decrease in postural regularity, this study reveals spatio-temporal and temporal-spectral reorganizations of ERPs in the fronto-sensorimotor-parietal network due to the added suprapostural motor task. For a particular set of postural-suprapostural task, the behavior and neural data suggest a facilitatory role of autonomous postural response and central resource expansion with increasing interregional interactions for task-shift and planning the motor-suprapostural task. PMID:27010634

  6. Radiology operations: what you don't know could be costing you millions.

    PubMed

    Joffe, Sam; Drew, Donna; Bansal, Manju; Hase, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Rapid growth in advanced imaging procedures has left hospital radiology departments struggling to keep up with demand, resulting in loss of patients to facilities that can offer service more quickly. While the departments appear to be working at full capacity, an operational analysis of over 400 hospital radiology departments in the US by GE Healthcare has determined that, paradoxically, many departments are in fact underutilized and operating for below their potential capacity. While CT cycle time in hospitals that were studied averaged 35 minutes, top performing hospitals operated the same equipment at a cycle time of 15 minutes, yielding approximately double the throughput volume. Factors leading to suboptimal performance include accounting metrics that mask true performance, leadership focus on capital investment rather than operations, under staffing, under scheduling, poorly aligned incentives, a fragmented view of operations, lack of awareness of latent opportunities, and lack of sufficient skills and processes to implement improvements. The study showed how modest investments in radiology operations can dramatically improve access to services and profitability.

  7. Creature co-op: Achieving robust remote operations with a community of low-cost robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonasso, R. Peter

    1990-01-01

    The concept is advanced of carrying out space based remote missions using a cooperative of low cost robot specialists rather than monolithic, multipurpose systems. A simulation is described wherein a control architecture for such a system of specialists is being investigated. Early results show such co-ops to be robust in the face of unforeseen circumstances. Descriptions of the platforms and sensors modeled and the beacon and retriever creatures that make up the co-op are included.

  8. Comparison of Military and Commercial Design-to-Cost Aircraft Procurement and Operational Support Practices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-07-01

    of cont=ination if comercial syst-m were serviced with mil oil arni cost of flushing and of changing seals in all c ets). and acre ~han offset the...production line * Increased the risk of mixing seals and sub-system con- tamination when airline industry support capabi’lity is used e Added overhaul...Airplane Strength and Rigidity, Flight Loads. MIL-C-8073 Core Material, Plastic Honeycomb, Laminated Glass Fabric Base, for Aircraft Structural

  9. Energy and cost analysis of commercial building shell characteristics and operating schedules

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.S.; Pierce, F.E.

    1980-04-01

    Eight prototypical commercial buildings were considered, and estimates of the energy savings realized from various conservation measures are presented. For each of four building types (hospital, office, educational, and retail) two building designs representative of both pre- and post-embargo construction were analyzed. The ongoing program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory aims to develop an engineering-economic model to forecast annual energy use in the US commercial sector. This particular study was undertaken to define relationships among energy-conservation measures, energy savings, and capital costs. Buildings were modeled and analyzed using NECAP (NASA Energy-Cost Analysis Program) based on hourly weather data in Kansas City (selected as typical of the entire country). Energy-conservation measures considered include night and weekend thermostat setback, reduction in ventilation, reduction in lighting, window alterations (shading, dual panes, and size reduction), economizer cycle, reset of supply temperature based on zone demand, and improvements in equipment efficiencies. Results indicate energy savings as a function of the capital cost of each energy-conservation measure for each of the eight buildings considered.

  10. Community-Based Health Education Programs Designed to Improve Clinical Measures Are Unlikely to Reduce Short-Term Costs or Utilization Without Additional Features Targeting These Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Burton, Joe; Eggleston, Barry; Brenner, Jeffrey; Truchil, Aaron; Zulkiewicz, Brittany A; Lewis, Megan A

    2016-06-07

    Stakeholders often expect programs for persons with chronic conditions to "bend the cost curve." This study assessed whether a diabetes self-management education (DSME) program offered as part of a multicomponent initiative could affect emergency department (ED) visits, hospital stays, and the associated costs for an underserved population in addition to the clinical indicators that DSME programs attempt to improve. The program was implemented in Camden, New Jersey, by the Camden Coalition of Healthcare Providers to address disparities in diabetes care. Data used are from medical records and from patient-level information about hospital services from Camden's hospitals. Using multivariate regression models to control for individual characteristics, changes in utilization over time and changes relative to 2 comparison groups were assessed. No reductions in ED visits, inpatient stays, or costs for participants were found over time or relative to the comparison groups. High utilization rates and costs for diabetes are associated with longer term disease progression and its sequelae; thus, DSME or peer support may not affect these in the near term. Some clinical indicators improved among participants, and these might lead to fewer costly adverse health events in the future. DSME deployed at the community level, without explicit segmentation and targeting of high health care utilizers or without components designed to affect costs and utilization, should not be expected to reduce short-term medical needs for participating individuals or care-seeking behaviors such that utilization is reduced. Stakeholders must include financial outcomes in a program's design if those outcomes are to improve. (Population Health Management 20XX;XX:XXX-XXX).

  11. 14 CFR 61.321 - How do I obtain privileges to operate an additional category or class of light-sport aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... additional category or class of light-sport aircraft? 61.321 Section 61.321 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Sport Pilots § 61.321 How do I obtain privileges to operate an additional category or class of light-sport aircraft? If you hold a sport pilot certificate and seek to operate...

  12. 14 CFR 61.321 - How do I obtain privileges to operate an additional category or class of light-sport aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... additional category or class of light-sport aircraft? 61.321 Section 61.321 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Sport Pilots § 61.321 How do I obtain privileges to operate an additional category or class of light-sport aircraft? If you hold a sport pilot certificate and seek to operate...

  13. 14 CFR 61.321 - How do I obtain privileges to operate an additional category or class of light-sport aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... additional category or class of light-sport aircraft? 61.321 Section 61.321 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Sport Pilots § 61.321 How do I obtain privileges to operate an additional category or class of light-sport aircraft? If you hold a sport pilot certificate and seek to operate...

  14. 14 CFR 61.321 - How do I obtain privileges to operate an additional category or class of light-sport aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... additional category or class of light-sport aircraft? 61.321 Section 61.321 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Sport Pilots § 61.321 How do I obtain privileges to operate an additional category or class of light-sport aircraft? If you hold a sport pilot certificate and seek to operate...

  15. 14 CFR 61.321 - How do I obtain privileges to operate an additional category or class of light-sport aircraft?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... additional category or class of light-sport aircraft? 61.321 Section 61.321 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Sport Pilots § 61.321 How do I obtain privileges to operate an additional category or class of light-sport aircraft? If you hold a sport pilot certificate and seek to operate...

  16. A new algorithm for design, operation and cost assessment of struvite (MgNH4PO4) precipitation processes.

    PubMed

    Birnhack, Liat; Nir, Oded; Telzhenski, Marina; Lahav, Ori

    2015-01-01

    Deliberate struvite (MgNH4PO4) precipitation from wastewater streams has been the topic of extensive research in the last two decades and is expected to gather worldwide momentum in the near future as a P-reuse technique. A wide range of operational alternatives has been reported for struvite precipitation, including the application of various Mg(II) sources, two pH elevation techniques and several Mg:P ratios and pH values. The choice of each operational parameter within the struvite precipitation process affects process efficiency, the overall cost and also the choice of other operational parameters. Thus, a comprehensive simulation program that takes all these parameters into account is essential for process design. This paper introduces a systematic decision-supporting tool which accepts a wide range of possible operational parameters, including unconventional Mg(II) sources (i.e. seawater and seawater nanofiltration brines). The study is supplied with a free-of-charge computerized tool (http://tx.technion.ac.il/~agrengn/agr/Struvite_Program.zip) which links two computer platforms (Python and PHREEQC) for executing thermodynamic calculations according to predefined kinetic considerations. The model can be (inter alia) used for optimizing the struvite-fluidized bed reactor process operation with respect to P removal efficiency, struvite purity and economic feasibility of the chosen alternative. The paper describes the algorithm and its underlying assumptions, and shows results (i.e. effluent water quality, cost breakdown and P removal efficiency) of several case studies consisting of typical wastewaters treated at various operational conditions.

  17. Non-additive benefit or cost? Disentangling the indirect effects that occur when plants bearing extrafloral nectaries and honeydew-producing insects share exotic ant mutualists

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Amy M.; Rudgers, Jennifer A.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims In complex communities, organisms often form mutualisms with multiple different partners simultaneously. Non-additive effects may emerge among species linked by these positive interactions. Ants commonly participate in mutualisms with both honeydew-producing insects (HPI) and their extrafloral nectary (EFN)-bearing host plants. Consequently, HPI and EFN-bearing plants may experience non-additive benefits or costs when these groups co-occur. The outcomes of these interactions are likely to be influenced by variation in preferences among ants for honeydew vs. nectar. In this study, a test was made for non-additive effects on HPI and EFN-bearing plants resulting from sharing exotic ant guards. Preferences of the dominant exotic ant species for nectar vs. honeydew resources were also examined. Methods Ant access, HPI and nectar availability were manipulated on the EFN-bearing shrub, Morinda citrifolia, and ant and HPI abundances, herbivory and plant growth were assessed. Ant-tending behaviours toward HPI across an experimental gradient of nectar availability were also tracked in order to investigate mechanisms underlying ant responses. Key Results The dominant ant species, Anoplolepis gracilipes, differed from less invasive ants in response to multiple mutualists, with reductions in plot-wide abundances when nectar was reduced, but no response to HPI reduction. Conversely, at sites where A. gracilipes was absent or rare, abundances of less invasive ants increased when nectar was reduced, but declined when HPI were reduced. Non-additive benefits were found at sites dominated by A. gracilipes, but only for M. citrifolia plants. Responses of HPI at these sites supported predictions of the non-additive cost model. Interestingly, the opposite non-additive patterns emerged at sites dominated by other ants. Conclusions It was demonstrated that strong non-additive benefits and costs can both occur when a plant and herbivore share mutualist partners. These

  18. Design and Construction of Low Cost High Voltage dc Power Supply for Constant Power Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, N. S.; Jayasankar, V.

    2013-06-01

    Pulsed load applications like laser based systems need high voltage dc power supplies with better regulation characteristics. This paper presents the design, construction and testing of dc power supply with 1 kV output at 300 W power level. The designed converter has half bridge switched mode power supply (SMPS) configuration with 20 kHz switching. The paper covers the design of half bridge inverter, closed loop control, High frequency transformer and other related electronics. The designed power supply incorporates a low cost OPAMP based feedback controller which is designed using small signal modelling of the converter. The designed converter was constructed and found to work satisfactorily as per the specifications.

  19. A Survey of O&S (Operating and Support) Cost Models.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-16

    vaire Foe. ntapldityothe Navy’sAoe dsge toe do S theoac samepers for the offrhravy.gtin oevr h AVA oe Thiee a sestem ntic Supporth CotMdl(L sie...proprietary model currently marketed by the same authors. The HARDMAN models were consturcted to concentrate heavily on life cycle costs trade-off analysis...incorporated in a proprietary package currently being marketed for installation on a PC-XT computer. Figure 4 shows the coverage of the HARDMAN avionics model

  20. Paying for outpatient care in rural China: cost escalation under China's New Co-operative Medical Scheme.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Wu, Xun

    2015-03-01

    China's New Co-operative Medical Scheme (NCMS), a government-subsidized health insurance programme, was launched in 2003 in response to deterioration in access to health services in rural areas. Initially designed to cover inpatient care, it has begun to expand its benefit package to cover outpatient care since 2007. The impacts of this initiative on outpatient care costs have raised growing concern, in particular regarding whether it has in fact reduced out-of-pocket (OOP) payments for services among rural participants. This study investigates the impacts on outpatient costs by analysing data from an individual-level longitudinal survey, the China Health and Nutrition Survey, for 2004 and 2009, years shortly before and after NCMS began coverage of outpatient services in 2007. Various health econometrics strategies were employed in the analysis of these data, including the Two-Part Model, the Heckman Selection Model and Propensity Score Matching with the Differences-in-Differences model, to estimate the effects of the 2007 NCMS initiative on per episode outpatient costs. We find that NCMS outpatient coverage starting in 2007 had little impact on reducing its participants' OOP payments for outpatient services. The new coverage may also have contributed to an observed increase in total per episode outpatient costs billed to the insured patients. This increase was more pronounced among village clinics and township health centres-the backbone of the health system for rural residents-than at county and municipal hospitals.

  1. Operations cost Reduction for a Jovian Science Mission Using CubeSats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajguru, A.; Faler, A. C.

    2014-06-01

    This paper proposes the operation of a mission architecture for jovian satellite tour, that uses small orbiter 6U CubeSats, airless body landers of the same order of 6U size and a mothership carrier that will act as a communication hub to DSN.

  2. Development of Low-Cost Microcontroller-Based Interface for Data Acquisition and Control of Microbioreactor Operation.

    PubMed

    Husain, Abdul Rashid; Hadad, Yaser; Zainal Alam, Muhd Nazrul Hisham

    2016-10-01

    This article presents the development of a low-cost microcontroller-based interface for a microbioreactor operation. An Arduino MEGA 2560 board with 54 digital input/outputs, including 15 pulse-width-modulation outputs, has been chosen to perform the acquisition and control of the microbioreactor. The microbioreactor (volume = 800 µL) was made of poly(dimethylsiloxane) and poly(methylmethacrylate) polymers. The reactor was built to be equipped with sensors and actuators for the control of reactor temperature and the mixing speed. The article discusses the circuit of the microcontroller-based platform, describes the signal conditioning steps, and evaluates the capacity of the proposed low-cost microcontroller-based interface in terms of control accuracy and system responses. It is demonstrated that the proposed microcontroller-based platform is able to operate parallel microbioreactor operation with satisfactory performances. Control accuracy at a deviation less than 5% of the set-point values and responses in the range of few seconds have been recorded.

  3. OPTIM: Computer program to generate a vertical profile which minimizes aircraft fuel burn or direct operating cost. User's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A profile of altitude, airspeed, and flight path angle as a function of range between a given set of origin and destination points for particular models of transport aircraft provided by NASA is generated. Inputs to the program include the vertical wind profile, the aircraft takeoff weight, the costs of time and fuel, certain constraint parameters and control flags. The profile can be near optimum in the sense of minimizing: (1) fuel, (2) time, or (3) a combination of fuel and time (direct operating cost (DOC)). The user can also, as an option, specify the length of time the flight is to span. The theory behind the technical details of this program is also presented.

  4. California Federal Facilities: Rate-Responsive Building Operation for Deeper Cost and Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect

    2012-05-01

    Dynamic pricing electricity tariffs, now the default for large customers in California (peak demand of 200 kW and higher for PG&E and SCE, and 20 kW and higher for SDG&E), are providing Federal facilities new opportunities to cut their electricity bills and help them meet their energy savings mandates. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) has created this fact sheet to help California federal facilities take advantage of these opportunities through “rate-responsive building operation.” Rate-responsive building operation involves designing your load management strategies around your facility’s variable electric rate, using measures that require little or no financial investment.

  5. Defense Contractor Recovery of Cleanup Costs at Contractor Owned and Operated Facilitie

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-30

    COCO ) facilities’ or disposal sites for which the contractor is held responsible as a "Potentially Responsible Party".2 Its primary focus is on...ground water. A recent GAO study on COCO liability noted: "aggregate projections range from $0.9 billion to $1.1 billion...one contractor, spending $9...for transport".3 The focus of this chapter is whether a company owned and operated facility ( COCO ) which performed government contracts can shift

  6. Comparison of cost and operative outcomes of robotic hysterectomy compared to laparoscopic hysterectomy across different uterine weights.

    PubMed

    Moawad, Gaby N; Abi Khalil, Elias D; Tyan, Paul; Shu, Michael K; Samuel, David; Amdur, Richard; Scheib, Stacey A; Marfori, Cherie Q

    2017-01-31

    Operative cost and outcomes between robotic and laparoscopic hysterectomy across different uterine weights. Retrospective cohort study including patients undergoing robotic and laparoscopic hysterectomy for benign disease at an Academic university hospital. One hundred and ninety six hysterectomies were identified (101 robotic versus 95 laparoscopic). Demographic and surgical characteristics were statistically equivalent. Robotic group had a higher body mass index (±SD) (32.9 ± 6.5 versus 30.4 ± 7.1, p 0.012) and more frequent history of adnexal surgery (12.9 versus 4.2%, p 0.031). Laparoscopic group had a higher number of concurrent salpingectomy (81 versus 66.3%, p 0.02). Estimated blood loss did not differ between procedures. Compared to robotic hysterectomies, laparoscopic procedures added 47 min (CI: 31-63 min; p < 0.001) of operative time, costed $1648 more (CI: 500-2797; p = 0. 005) and had triple the odds of having an overnight admission (OR = 2.94 CI: 1.34-6.44; p = 0.007). After stratification of cases by uterine weight, the mean operative time difference between the two groups in uteri between 750 and 1000 g and in uteri >1000 g was 81.3 min (CI: 51.3-111.3, p < 0.0001) and 70 min (CI: 26-114, p < 0.005), respectively, in favor of the robotic group. Mean direct cost difference in uteri between 750 and 1000 g and uteri >1000 g was 1859$ (CI: 629-3090, p < 0.006) and 4509$ (CI: 377-8641, p < 0.004), respectively, also in favor of the robotic group. In expert hands, robotic hysterectomy for uteri weighing more than 750 g may be associated with shorter operative time and improved cost profile.

  7. Optimal Scheduling and Operating Target (OPTAR) Cost Model for Aircraft Carriers in the Fleet Response Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    depot maintenance. An additional carrier is always conducting a 3-year midlife Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH) and is not included in the FRTP...to anticipate; • The economic benefits of forward-deployed naval forces, as illustrated by the impact of naval crisis response on oil futures’ prices

  8. Quantum ring-polymer contraction method: Including nuclear quantum effects at no additional computational cost in comparison to ab initio molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Christopher; Spura, Thomas; Habershon, Scott; Kühne, Thomas D.

    2016-04-01

    We present a simple and accurate computational method which facilitates ab initio path-integral molecular dynamics simulations, where the quantum-mechanical nature of the nuclei is explicitly taken into account, at essentially no additional computational cost in comparison to the corresponding calculation using classical nuclei. The predictive power of the proposed quantum ring-polymer contraction method is demonstrated by computing various static and dynamic properties of liquid water at ambient conditions using density functional theory. This development will enable routine inclusion of nuclear quantum effects in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of condensed-phase systems.

  9. Sludge reduction by direct addition of chlorine dioxide into a sequencing batch reactor under operational mode of repeatedly alternating aeration/non-aeration.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hong; Liu, Weiyi; Li, Yuanmei; Xiao, Hong

    2015-01-01

    The effect of direct addition of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) into a repeatedly alternating aeration/non-aeration sequencing batch reactor (SBR) on its sludge reduction and process performance was investigated. The experimental results showed that the sludge reduction efficiency was 32.9% and the observed growth yield (Yobs) of SBR was 0.11 kg VSS (volatile suspended solids) /kg COD (chemical oxygen demand) for 80 days' operation at the optimum ClO2 dosage of 2.0 mg/g TSS (total suspended solids). It was speculated that cell lysis and cryptic growth, uncoupled metabolism and endogenous metabolism were jointly responsible for the sludge reduction in this study. COD, NH3-N, total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) in the effluent increased on average 29.47, 4.44, 1.97 and 0.05 mg/L, respectively. However, the effluent quality still satisfied the first-class B discharge standards for municipal wastewater treatment plants in China. In that case, the sludge maintained fine viability with the specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR) being 14.47 mg O2/(g VSS·h) and demonstrated good settleability with the sludge volume index (SVI) being 116 mL/g. The extra cost of sludge reduction at the optimum ClO2 dosage was estimated to be 2.24 CNY (or 0.36 dollar)/kg dry sludge.

  10. A professional and cost effective digital video editing and image storage system for the operating room.

    PubMed

    Scollato, A; Perrini, P; Benedetto, N; Di Lorenzo, N

    2007-06-01

    We propose an easy-to-construct digital video editing system ideal to produce video documentation and still images. A digital video editing system applicable to many video sources in the operating room is described in detail. The proposed system has proved easy to use and permits one to obtain videography quickly and easily. Mixing different streams of video input from all the devices in use in the operating room, the application of filters and effects produces a final, professional end-product. Recording on a DVD provides an inexpensive, portable and easy-to-use medium to store or re-edit or tape at a later time. From stored videography it is easy to extract high-quality, still images useful for teaching, presentations and publications. In conclusion digital videography and still photography can easily be recorded by the proposed system, producing high-quality video recording. The use of firewire ports provides good compatibility with next-generation hardware and software. The high standard of quality makes the proposed system one of the lowest priced products available today.

  11. Fishery research in the Great Lakes using a low-cost remotely operated vehicle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennedy, Gregory W.; Brown, Charles L.; Argyle, Ray L.

    1988-01-01

    We used a MiniROVER MK II remotely operated vehicle (ROV) to collect ground-truth information on fish and their habitat in the Great Lakes that have traditionally been collected by divers, or with static cameras, or submersibles. The ROV, powered by 4 thrusters and controlled by the pilot at the surface, was portable and efficient to operate throughout the Great Lakes in 1987, and collected a total of 30 h of video data recorded for later analysis. We collected 50% more substrate information per unit of effort with the ROV than with static cameras. Fish behavior ranged from no avoidance reaction in ambient light, to erratic responses in the vehicle lights. The ROV's field of view depended on the time of day, light levels, and density of zooplankton. Quantification of the data collected with the ROV (either physical samples or video image data) will serve to enhance the use of the ROV as a research tool to conduct fishery research on the Great Lakes.

  12. Effects of design flow and treatment level on construction and operation costs of municipal wastewater treatment plants and their implications on policy making.

    PubMed

    Friedler, Eran; Pisanty, Ehud

    2006-12-01

    Construction costs of 55 municipal wastewater treatment plants in Israel (secondary, advanced secondary, and advanced treatment) were analysed in order to derive cost functions expressing the effects of design flow and treatment level on construction costs. Three equations were derived (statistically significant, p<0.01), one for each treatment level. These indicate that economy of scale may become weaker as treatment level rises. Analysis of the distribution of construction costs revealed negative correlation (p<0.05) between the proportional cost of civil engineering and design flow, positive correlation (p<0.05) between the proportional cost of elecromechanical equipment and design flow, and no correlation between the proportional cost of electricity and control and design flow. Operation costs were found to be 20-70% more sensitive than construction costs to treatment level. The share of operation costs as part of the total annual costs was found to increase both with design flow and treatment level, whereas the share of construction costs concurrently decreased. The implication of the findings on policy, and consequently on treatment plants performance is discussed in the last part of the paper.

  13. Reconsideration of the costs of convenience: quality, operational, and fiscal strategies to minimize elective labor induction.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Kathleen Rice

    2010-01-01

    Elective induction of labor is at an all-time high in the United States despite known associated risks. It can lead to birth of an infant too early, a long labor, exposure to a high-alert medication with its potential side effects, unnecessary cesarean birth, and maternal and neonatal morbidity. There is a cascade of interventions related to elective induction such as an intravenous line, continuous electronic fetal monitoring, confinement to bed, amniotomy, pharmacologic labor stimulating agents, parental pain medications, and regional anesthesia, each with their own set of potential complications and risk of iatrogenic harm. These risks apply to all women having the procedure, however for nulliparous women before 41 weeks of gestation with an unfavorable cervix, the main risk is cesarean birth after unsuccessful labor induction with the potential for maternal and neonatal morbidity and increased healthcare costs. When cesarean occurs, subsequent births are likely to be via cesarean as well. Elective labor induction before 41 weeks is inconsistent with quality perinatal care, and performance of this unnecessary procedure should be minimized. Convenience as the reason for labor induction is contrary to a culture focused on patient safety. A review of current evidence, followed by changes in practice, is warranted to support the safest care possible during labor and birth. Various strategies to reduce the rate of elective induction in the United States are presented.

  14. Capacity optimization of battery-generator hybrid power system: Toward minimizing maintenance cost in expeditionary basecamp/operational energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onwuanumkpe, Jude C.

    Low and transient load condition are known to have deleterious impact on the efficiency and health of diesel generators (DGs). Extensive operation under such loads reduces fuel consumption and energy conversion efficiency, and contribute to diesel engine degradation, damage, or catastrophic failure. Non-ideal loads are prevalent in expeditionary base camps that support contingency operations in austere environments or remote locations where grid electricity is either non-existent or inaccessible. The impact of such loads on DGs exacerbates already overburdened basecamp energy logistics requirements. There is a need, therefore, to eliminate or prevent the occurrence of non-ideal loads. Although advances in diesel engine technologies have improved their performance, DGs remain vulnerable to the consequences of non-ideal loads and inherent inefficiencies of combustion. The mechanisms through which DGs respond to and mitigate non-ideal loads are also mechanically stressful and energy-intensive. Thus, this research investigated the idea of using batteries to prevent DGs from encountering non-ideal loads, as a way to reduce basecamp energy logistics requirements. Using a simple semi-empirical approach, the study modeled and simulated a battery-DG hybrid system under various load conditions. The simulation allowed for synthesis of design space in which specified battery and generator capacity can achieve optimal savings in fuel consumption and maintenance cost. Results show that a right-sized battery-diesel generator system allows for more than 50% cost savings relative to a standalone generator.

  15. Utilizing the EUVE Innovative Technology Testbed to Reduce Operations Cost for Present and Future Orbiting Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes work done under Cooperative Agreement (CA) on the following testbed projects: TERRIERS - The development of the ground systems to support the TERRIERS satellite mission at Boston University (BU). HSTS - The application of ARC's Heuristic Scheduling Testbed System (HSTS) to the EUVE satellite mission. SELMON - The application of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL) Selective Monitoring (SELMON) system to the EUVE satellite mission. EVE - The development of the EUVE Virtual Environment (EVE), a prototype three-dimensional (3-D) visualization environment for the EUVE satellite and its sensors, instruments, and communications antennae. FIDO - The development of the Fault-Induced Document Officer (FIDO) system, a prototype application to respond to anomalous conditions by automatically searching for, retrieving, and displaying relevant documentation for an operators use.

  16. The green operating room: simple changes to reduce cost and our carbon footprint.

    PubMed

    Wormer, Blair A; Augenstein, Vedra A; Carpenter, Christin L; Burton, Patrick V; Yokeley, William T; Prabhu, Ajita S; Harris, Beth; Norton, Sujatha; Klima, David A; Lincourt, Amy E; Heniford, B Todd

    2013-07-01

    Generating over four billion pounds of waste each year, the healthcare system in the United States is the second largest contributor of trash with one-third produced by operating rooms. Our objective is to assess improvement in waste reduction and recycling after implementation of a Green Operating Room Committee (GORC) at our institution. A surgeon and nurse-initiated GORC was formed with members from corporate leadership, nursing, anesthesia, and OR staff. Initiatives for recycling opportunities, reduction of energy and water use as well as solid waste were implemented and the results were recorded. Since formation of GORC in 2008, our OR has diverted 6.5 tons of medical waste. An effort to recycle all single-use devices was implemented with annual solid waste reduction of approximately 12,860 lbs. Disposable OR foam padding was replaced with reusable gel pads at greater than $50,000 per year savings. Over 500 lbs of previously discarded batteries were salvaged from the OR and donated to charity or redistributed in the hospital ($9,000 annual savings). A "Power Down" initiative to turn off all anesthesia and OR lights and equipment not in use resulted in saving $33,000 and 234.3 metric tons of CO2 emissions reduced per year. Converting from soap to alcohol-based waterless scrub demonstrated a potential saving of 2.7 million liters of water annually. Formation of an OR committee dedicated to ecological initiatives can provide a significant opportunity to improve health care's impact on the environment and save money.

  17. Landfill gas-fired power plant pays cost of operating landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, I.P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on recovery of energy from refuse that has become increasingly attractive in the past decade. The continuing urbanization of our society has created major challenges in the disposal of our waste products. Because of public concern over the potential presence of toxins, and for other environmental reasons, management and regulation of active and inactive landfills have become much more stringent and costly. Palos Verdes landfill, owned jointly by the Los Angeles County Sanitation Districts and Los Angeles County, is located about three miles from the Pacific Ocean in the city of Rolling Hills Estates, Calif. The landfill was closed in 1980. The garbage was covered with six to eight feet of soil, and the area was landscaped. Part of this area has already been developed as the South Coast Botanical Gardens and Ernie Howlett Park. The remainder is scheduled to become a golf course. As refuse decays within a landfill, the natural anaerobic biological reaction generates a low-Btu methane gas along with carbon dioxide, known as landfill gas (LFG). The gas also contains other less desirable trace components generated by the decomposing garbage. Uncontrolled, these gases migrate to the surface and escape into the atmosphere where they generate environmental problems, including objectionable odors. The Sanitation Districts have installed a matrix of gas wells and a gas collection system to enable incineration of the gas in flares. This approach reduced aesthetic, environmental and safety concerns. However, emissions from the flares were still a problem. The Sanitation Districts then looked at alternatives to flaring the gas, one of which was electrical generation. Since the Sanitation Districts have no on-site use for thermal energy, power generation for use in the utility grid was deemed the most feasible alternative.

  18. 10 CFR 60.132 - Additional design criteria for surface facilities in the geologic repository operations area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the geologic repository operations area. (a) Facilities for receipt and retrieval of waste. Surface... emplacement or as a result of retrieval from the underground facility. (b) Surface facility...

  19. 10 CFR 60.132 - Additional design criteria for surface facilities in the geologic repository operations area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the geologic repository operations area. (a) Facilities for receipt and retrieval of waste. Surface... emplacement or as a result of retrieval from the underground facility. (b) Surface facility...

  20. 40 CFR 62.15220 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? 62.15220 Section 62.15220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring...

  1. 40 CFR 62.15220 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? 62.15220 Section 62.15220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring...

  2. 40 CFR 62.15220 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? 62.15220 Section 62.15220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring...

  3. 40 CFR 62.15220 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? 62.15220 Section 62.15220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring...

  4. 40 CFR 62.15220 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? 62.15220 Section 62.15220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring...

  5. Costs and Operating Dynamics of Integrating Distributed Energy Resources in Commercial and Industrial Buildings with Electric Vehicle Charging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Robert Joseph

    Growing concerns over greenhouse gas and pollutant emissions have increased the pressure to shift energy conversion paradigms from current forms to more sustainable methods, such as through the use of distributed energy resources (DER) at industrial and commercial buildings. This dissertation is concerned with the optimal design and dispatch of a DER system installed at an industrial or commercial building. An optimization model that accurately captures typical utility costs and the physical constraints of a combined cooling, heating, and power (CCHP) system is designed to size and operate a DER system at a building. The optimization model is then used with cooperative game theory to evaluate the financial performance of a CCHP investment. The CCHP model is then modified to include energy storage, solar powered generators, alternative fuel sources, carbon emission limits, and building interactions with public and fleet PEVs. Then, a separate plugin electric vehicle (PEV) refueling model is developed to determine the cost to operate a public Level 3 fast charging station. The CCHP design and dispatch results show the size of the building load and consistency of the thermal loads are critical to positive financial performance. While using the CCHP system to produce cooling can provide savings, heat production drives positive financial performance. When designing the DER system to reduce carbon emissions, the use of renewable fuels can allow for a gas turbine system with heat recovery to reduce carbon emissions for a large university by 67%. Further reductions require large photovoltaic installations coupled with energy storage or the ability to export electricity back to the grid if costs are to remain relatively low. When considering Level 3 fast charging equipment, demand charges at low PEV travel levels are sufficiently high to discourage adoption. Integration of the equipment can reduce demand charge costs only if the building maximum demand does not coincide

  6. Removal of arsenic(III) and arsenic(V) on chemically modified low-cost adsorbent: batch and column operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Palas; Mondal, Naba Kumar; Bhattacharya, Shreya; Das, Biswajit; Das, Kousik

    2013-03-01

    Batch and column operations were performed utilizing thioglycolated sugarcane carbon (TSCC), a low-cost adsorbent, to remove As(III) and As(V) from aqueous systems. Under optimized batch conditions, the TSCC could remove up to 92.7 and 91.4 % for As(III) and As(V), respectively. An artificial neural network model showed the validity of TSCC as a preferable adsorbent for arsenic [As(III) and As(V)] removal in batch studies. In column operations, removal efficiency increases with increase in influent arsenic concentration and adsorbent dose and decreases with increase in flow rate. At an adsorbent dose of 6.0 g, flow rate 3.0 mL min-1, and initial arsenic concentration 1,500 μg L-1, the arsenic uptake capacity of TSCC for As(III) and As(V) was found to be 85.01 and 83.82 μg g-1, respectively. The Thomas model was used to analyze the column experimental data. Results from the column operations indicated that the adsorption behavior of arsenic [As(III) and As(V)] fits exceptionally well with the Thomas model with high correlation coefficient and very low standard error. Examinations of scanning electron microscopy and FTIR spectroscopy reveal that high arsenic adsorption favors surface complexation on the adsorbent surface.

  7. An analysis of the impacts of economic incentive programs on commercial nuclear power plant operations and maintenance costs

    SciTech Connect

    Kavanaugh, D.C.; Monroe, W.H.; Wood, R.S.

    1996-02-01

    Operations and Maintenance (O and M) expenditures by nuclear power plant owner/operators possess a very logical and vital link in considerations relating to plant safety and reliability. Since the determinants of O and M outlays are considerable and varied, the potential linkages to plant safety, both directly and indirectly, can likewise be substantial. One significant issue before the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is the impact, if any, on O and M spending from state programs that attempt to improve plant operating performance, and how and to what extent these programs may affect plant safety and pose public health risks. The purpose of this study is to examine the role and degree of impacts from state promulgated economic incentive programs (EIPs) on plant O and M spending. A multivariate regression framework is specified, and the model is estimated on industry data over a five-year period, 1986--1990. Explanatory variables for the O and M spending model include plant characteristics, regulatory effects, financial strength factors, replacement power costs, and the performance incentive programs. EIPs are found to have statistically significant effects on plant O and M outlays, albeit small in relation to other factors. Moreover, the results indicate that the relatively financially weaker firms are more sensitive in their O and M spending to the presence of such programs. Formulations for linking spending behavior and EIPs with plant safety performance remains for future analysis.

  8. An economic feasibility analysis of distributed electric power generation based upon the Natural Gas-Fired Fuel Cell: a model of the operations cost.

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-30

    This model description establishes the revenues, expenses incentives and avoided costs of Operation of a Natural Gas-Fired Fuel Cell-Based. Fuel is the major element of the cost of operation of a natural gas-fired fuel cell. Forecasts of the change in the price of this commodity a re an important consideration in the ownership of an energy conversion system. Differences between forecasts, the interests of the forecaster or geographical areas can all have significant effects on imputed fuel costs. There is less effect on judgments made on the feasibility of an energy conversion system since changes in fuel price can affect the cost of operation of the alternatives to the fuel cell in a similar fashion. The forecasts used in this model are only intended to provide the potential owner or operator with the means to examine alternate future scenarios. The operations model computes operating costs of a system suitable for a large condominium complex or a residential institution such as a hotel, boarding school or prison. The user may also select large office buildings that are characterized by 12 to 16 hours per day of operation or industrial users with a steady demand for thermal and electrical energy around the clock.

  9. Free electron lasers for 13nm EUV lithography: RF design strategies to minimise investment and operational costs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keens, Simon; Rossa, Bernhard; Frei, Marcel

    2016-03-01

    As the semiconductor industry proceeds to develop ever better sources of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light for photolithography applications, two distinct technologies have come to prominence: Tin-plasma and free electron laser (FEL) sources. Tin plasma sources have been in development within the industry for many years, and have been widely reported. Meanwhile, FELs represent the most promising alternative to create high power EUV frequencies and, while tin-plasma source development has been ongoing, such lasers have been continuously developed by academic institutions for use in fundamental research programmes in conjunction with universities and national scientific institutions. This paper follows developments in the field of academic FELs, and presents information regarding novel technologies, specifically in the area of RF design strategy, that may be incorporated into future industrial FEL systems for EUV lithography in order to minimize the necessary investment and operational costs. It goes on to try to assess the cost-benefit of an alternate RF design strategy, based upon previous studies.

  10. The Design and Operation of Suborbital Low Cost and Low Risk Vehicle to the Edge of Space (SOLVES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridzuan Zakaria, Norul; Nasrun, Nasri; Rashidy Zulkifi, Mohd; Izmir Yamin, Mohd; Othman, Jamaludin; Rafidi Zakaria, Norul

    2013-09-01

    Inclusive in the planning of Spaceport Malaysia are 2 local suborbital vehicles development. One of the vehicles is called SOLVES or Suborbital Low Cost and Low Risk Vehicle to the Edge of Space. The emphasis on the design and operation of SOLVES is green and robotic technology, where both green technology and robotic technology are used to protect the environment and enhance safety. As SOLVES climbs, its center of gravity stabilizes and remains at the bottom as its propellant being used until it depletes, due to the position of the vehicle's passenger cabin and its engines at its lower end. It will reach 80km from sea level generally known as "the edge of space" due to its momentum although its propellant will be depleted at a lower altitude. As the suborbital vehicle descends tail first, its wings automatically extend and rotate at horizontal axes perpendicular to the fuselage. These naturally and passively rotating wings ensure controlled low velocity and stable descend of the vehicle. The passenger cabin also rotates automatically at a steady low speed at the centerline of its fuselage as it descends, caused naturally by the lift force, enabling its passengers a surrounding 360 degrees view. SOLVES is steered automatically to its landing point by an electrical propulsion system with a vectoring nozzle. The electrical propulsion minimizes space and weight and is free of pollution and noise. Its electrical power comes from a battery aided by power generated by the naturally rotating wings. When the vehicle lands, it is in the safest mode as its propellant is depleted and its center of gravity remains at the bottom of its cabin. The cabin, being located at the bottom of the fuselage, enables very convenient, rapid and safe entry and exit of its passengers. SOLVES will be a robotic suborbital vehicle with green technology. The vehicle will carry 4 passengers and each passenger will be trained to land the vehicle manually if the fully automated landing system fails

  11. Managing U.S. Air Force Aircraft Operating and Support Costs: Insights from Recent RAND Analysis and Opportunities for the Future

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    Unit personnel costs might be reduced by consolidating many maintenance activities within a global network of maintenance facilities and by...discuss strategies for reducing O&S costs, and recommend additional actions for consideration. KC-135R/T AND C-130H O&S COST GROWTH FINDINGS The rate... global market, so Air Force efforts to reduce fuel expenditures must take the form of reductions in fuel consumption. The Air Force is examining a

  12. Fees-for-services, cost recovery, and equity in a district of Burkina Faso operating the Bamako Initiative.

    PubMed Central

    Ridde, Valéry

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To gauge the effects of operating the Bamako Initiative in Kongoussi district, Burkina Faso. METHODS: Qualitative and quasi-experimental quantitative methodologies were used. FINDINGS: Following the introduction of fees-for-services in July 1997, the number of consultations for curative care fell over a period of three years by an average of 15.4% at "case" health centres but increased by 30.5% at "control" health centres. Moreover, although the operational results for essential drugs depots were not known, expenditure increased on average 2.7 times more than income and did not keep pace with the decline in the utilization of services. Persons in charge of the management committees had difficulties in releasing funds to ensure access to care for the poor. CONCLUSION: The introduction of fees-for-services had an adverse effect on service utilization. The study district is in a position to bear the financial cost of taking care of the poor and the community is able to identify such people. Incentives must be introduced by the state and be swiftly applied so that the communities agree to a more equitable system and thereby allow access to care for those excluded from services because they are unable to pay. PMID:12973646

  13. Total Operational Costs Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, George

    Northern Valley Regional High School (New Jersey) has been involved in implementing a technology strategy for over a decade. This document outlines how the funding that the Board of Education has provided was spent and will be spent over the next 3 years. Included are several industry models that are geared towards business and public facilities.…

  14. 40 CFR 60.1765 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? 60.1765 Section 60.1765 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? Use the required span...

  15. 40 CFR 60.1765 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? 60.1765 Section 60.1765 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? Use the required span...

  16. 40 CFR 60.1765 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? 60.1765 Section 60.1765 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? Use the required span...

  17. 40 CFR 60.1765 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? 60.1765 Section 60.1765 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? Use the required span...

  18. 40 CFR 60.1765 - What additional requirements must I meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... meet for the operation of my continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? 60.1765 Section 60.1765 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... continuous emission monitoring systems and continuous opacity monitoring system? Use the required span...

  19. [Operational costs and control of performance in surgical clinics between marketing and planning economics. Risk or perhaps quadrature of the circle].

    PubMed

    Kraus, T W; Weber, W; Mieth, M; Funk, H; Klar, E; Herfarth, C

    2000-03-01

    Surgical hospitals can be seen as operational or even industrial production systems. Doctors have a major impact on both medical performance and costs. For active participation in the management process, knowledge of industrial controlling mechanisms is required. German hospitals currently receive no procedure-related financial revenues, such as prices or tariffs for defined medical treatment activities. Maximum clinical revenues are, furthermore, limited by principles of planned economy and can be increased only slightly by greater medical performance. Costs are the only target that can be autonomously influenced by the management. Operative controlling in hospitals aims at horizontal and vertical coordination of subunits and decentralization of process regulations. Hospital medical performance is not clearly defined, its quantitative measurement very problematic. Process-orientated clinical activities are not taken into account. A high percentage of hospital costs are fixed and can be influenced only by major structural interventions in the long term. Variable costs are primarily dependent on the quantity of clinical activities, but also heavily influenced by patient structure (comorbidity and risk profile). The various forms of industrial cost calculations, such as internal budgeting, internal markets or flexible plan-cost balancing, cannot be directly applied in hospital management. Based on these analyses, current operational concepts and strategic trends are listed to describe cost-management options in hospitals with focus on the German health reforms.

  20. Prevalence of type I allergy to natural rubber latex and type IV allergy to latex and rubber additives in operating room staff with glove-related symptoms.

    PubMed

    Miri, Sara; Pourpak, Zahra; Zarinara, Alireza; Zarinara, Alam; Heidarzade, Marzieh; Kazemnejad, Anoushirvan; Kardar, Gholamali; Firooz, Alireza; Moin, Athar

    2007-01-01

    There is lack of data on the prevalence of latex allergy in the health care setting in Iran. This study was performed to determine the prevalence of type I latex allergy and type IV allergy to latex and rubber additives among the operating room staff with glove-related symptoms in 13 general hospitals in Tehran. Skin-prick tests with commercial latex extract, patch tests with latex and 25 rubber additive series, and total and latex-specific IgE detection were performed on the operating room staff who reported latex glove-related symptoms. Five hundred twelve self-administered questionnaires (100%) were completed by all operating room staff and latex glove-related symptoms were reported by 59 (11.5%) employees. Among all symptomatic operating room staff tested, the prevalence of type I latex allergy was 30.5% and the prevalence rates of type IV allergy to latex and rubber additives were 16.7 and 14.6%, respectively. The most positive patch test result with rubber additives was related to tetramethylthiuram monosulfide (38.5%). The risk factors for type I latex allergy were female sex (p = 0.009) and positive patch test with rubber additives (p = 0.012). Subjects who had positive patch test with latex were significantly more likely to have positive patch test with rubber additives (p < 0.0001). Our results showed a high prevalence of type I latex allergy and type IV allergy to latex and rubber additives. Based on this study, we recommend eliminating powdered latex gloves from the operating rooms of the 13 studied general hospitals and support the substitution of powder-free latex gloves.

  1. Effect of Operating Parameters and Chemical Additives on Crystal Habit and Specific Cake Resistance of Zinc Hydroxide Precipitates

    SciTech Connect

    Alwin, Jennifer Louise

    1999-08-01

    The effect of process parameters and chemical additives on the specific cake resistance of zinc hydroxide precipitates was investigated. The ability of a slurry to be filtered is dependent upon the particle habit of the solid and the particle habit is influenced by certain process variables. The process variables studied include neutralization temperature, agitation type, and alkalinity source used for neutralization. Several commercially available chemical additives advertised to aid in solid/liquid separation were also examined in conjunction with hydroxide precipitation. A statistical analysis revealed that the neutralization temperature and the source of alkalinity were statistically significant in influencing the specific cake resistance of zinc hydroxide precipitates in this study. The type of agitation did not significantly effect the specific cake resistance of zinc hydroxide precipitates. The use of chemical additives in conjunction with hydroxide precipitation had a favorable effect on the filterability. The morphology of the hydroxide precipitates was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy.

  2. Tracking Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Paul W.

    2010-01-01

    Even though there's been a slight reprieve in energy costs, the reality is that the cost of non-renewable energy is increasing, and state education budgets are shrinking. One way to keep energy and operations costs from overshadowing education budgets is to develop a 10-year energy audit plan to eliminate waste. First, facility managers should…

  3. The effects of the addition of a pediatric surgery fellow on the operative experience of the general surgery resident.

    PubMed

    Raines, Alexander; Garwe, Tabitha; Adeseye, Ademola; Ruiz-Elizalde, Alejandro; Churchill, Warren; Tuggle, David; Mantor, Cameron; Lees, Jason

    2015-06-01

    Adding fellows to surgical departments with residency programs can affect resident education. Our specific aim was to evaluate the effect of adding a pediatric surgery (PS) fellow on the number of index PS cases logged by the general surgery (GS) residents. At a single institution with both PS and GS programs, we examined the number of logged cases for the fellows and residents over 10 years [5 years before (Time 1) and 5 years after (Time 2) the addition of a PS fellow]. Additionally, the procedure related relative value units (RVUs) recorded by the faculty were evaluated. The fellows averaged 752 and 703 cases during Times 1 and 2, respectively, decreasing by 49 (P = 0.2303). The residents averaged 172 and 161 cases annually during Time 1 and Time 2, respectively, decreasing by 11 (P = 0.7340). The total number of procedure related RVUs was 4627 and 6000 during Times 1 and 2, respectively. The number of cases logged by the PS fellows and GS residents decreased after the addition of a PS fellow; however, the decrease was not significant. Programs can reasonably add an additional PS fellow, but care should be taken especially in programs that are otherwise static in size.

  4. Oil Production Capacity Expansion Costs for the Persian Gulf

    EIA Publications

    1996-01-01

    Provides estimates of development and operating costs for various size fields in countries surrounding the Persian Gulf. In addition, a forecast of the required reserve development and associated costs to meet the expected demand through the year 2010 is presented.

  5. Effect of zinc addition and vacuum annealing time on the properties of spin-coated low-cost transparent conducting 1 at% Ga-ZnO thin films.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Amit Kumar; Kumar, Jitendra

    2013-12-01

    Pure and 1 at% gallium (Ga)-doped zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films have been prepared with a low-cost spin coating technique on quartz substrates and annealed at 500 °C in vacuum ∼10(-3) mbar to create anion vacancies and generate charge carriers for photovoltaic application. Also, 0.5-1.5 at% extra zinc species were added in the precursor sol to investigate changes in film growth, morphology, optical absorption, electrical properties and photoluminescence. It is shown that 1 at% Ga-ZnO thin films with 0.5 at% extra zinc content after vacuum annealing for 60 min correspond to wurtzite-type hexagonal structure with (0001) preferred orientation, electrical resistivity of ∼9 × 10(-3) Ω cm and optical transparency of ∼65-90% in the visible range. Evidence has been advanced for the presence of defect levels within bandgap such as zinc vacancy (VZn), zinc interstitial (Zni), oxygen vacancy (Vo) and oxygen interstitial (Oi). Further, variation in ZnO optical bandgap occurring with Ga doping and insertion of additional zinc species has been explained by invoking two competing phenomena, namely bandgap widening and renormalization, usually observed in semiconductors with increasing carrier concentration.

  6. A Low-Cost Environmental Monitoring System: How to Prevent Systematic Errors in the Design Phase through the Combined Use of Additive Manufacturing and Thermographic Techniques.

    PubMed

    Salamone, Francesco; Danza, Ludovico; Meroni, Italo; Pollastro, Maria Cristina

    2017-04-11

    nEMoS (nano Environmental Monitoring System) is a 3D-printed device built following the Do-It-Yourself (DIY) approach. It can be connected to the web and it can be used to assess indoor environmental quality (IEQ). It is built using some low-cost sensors connected to an Arduino microcontroller board. The device is assembled in a small-sized case and both thermohygrometric sensors used to measure the air temperature and relative humidity, and the globe thermometer used to measure the radiant temperature, can be subject to thermal effects due to overheating of some nearby components. A thermographic analysis was made to rule out this possibility. The paper shows how the pervasive technique of additive manufacturing can be combined with the more traditional thermographic techniques to redesign the case and to verify the accuracy of the optimized system in order to prevent instrumental systematic errors in terms of the difference between experimental and actual values of the above-mentioned environmental parameters.

  7. Effect of zinc addition and vacuum annealing time on the properties of spin-coated low-cost transparent conducting 1 at% Ga–ZnO thin films

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Amit Kumar; Kumar, Jitendra

    2013-01-01

    Pure and 1 at% gallium (Ga)-doped zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films have been prepared with a low-cost spin coating technique on quartz substrates and annealed at 500 °C in vacuum ∼10−3 mbar to create anion vacancies and generate charge carriers for photovoltaic application. Also, 0.5–1.5 at% extra zinc species were added in the precursor sol to investigate changes in film growth, morphology, optical absorption, electrical properties and photoluminescence. It is shown that 1 at% Ga–ZnO thin films with 0.5 at% extra zinc content after vacuum annealing for 60 min correspond to wurtzite-type hexagonal structure with (0001) preferred orientation, electrical resistivity of ∼9 × 10−3 Ω cm and optical transparency of ∼65–90% in the visible range. Evidence has been advanced for the presence of defect levels within bandgap such as zinc vacancy (VZn), zinc interstitial (Zni), oxygen vacancy (Vo) and oxygen interstitial (Oi). Further, variation in ZnO optical bandgap occurring with Ga doping and insertion of additional zinc species has been explained by invoking two competing phenomena, namely bandgap widening and renormalization, usually observed in semiconductors with increasing carrier concentration. PMID:27877622

  8. Effect of zinc addition and vacuum annealing time on the properties of spin-coated low-cost transparent conducting 1 at% Ga-ZnO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Amit Kumar; Kumar, Jitendra

    2013-12-01

    Pure and 1 at% gallium (Ga)-doped zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films have been prepared with a low-cost spin coating technique on quartz substrates and annealed at 500 °C in vacuum ˜10-3 mbar to create anion vacancies and generate charge carriers for photovoltaic application. Also, 0.5-1.5 at% extra zinc species were added in the precursor sol to investigate changes in film growth, morphology, optical absorption, electrical properties and photoluminescence. It is shown that 1 at% Ga-ZnO thin films with 0.5 at% extra zinc content after vacuum annealing for 60 min correspond to wurtzite-type hexagonal structure with (0001) preferred orientation, electrical resistivity of ˜9 × 10-3 Ω cm and optical transparency of ˜65-90% in the visible range. Evidence has been advanced for the presence of defect levels within bandgap such as zinc vacancy (VZn), zinc interstitial (Zni), oxygen vacancy (Vo) and oxygen interstitial (Oi). Further, variation in ZnO optical bandgap occurring with Ga doping and insertion of additional zinc species has been explained by invoking two competing phenomena, namely bandgap widening and renormalization, usually observed in semiconductors with increasing carrier concentration.

  9. Balancing effluent quality, economic cost and greenhouse gas emissions during the evaluation of (plant-wide) control/operational strategies in WWTPs.

    PubMed

    Flores-Alsina, Xavier; Arnell, Magnus; Amerlinck, Youri; Corominas, Lluís; Gernaey, Krist V; Guo, Lisha; Lindblom, Erik; Nopens, Ingmar; Porro, Jose; Shaw, Andy; Snip, Laura; Vanrolleghem, Peter A; Jeppsson, Ulf

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to show the potential additional insight that result from adding greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to plant performance evaluation criteria, such as effluent quality (EQI) and operational cost (OCI) indices, when evaluating (plant-wide) control/operational strategies in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). The proposed GHG evaluation is based on a set of comprehensive dynamic models that estimate the most significant potential on-site and off-site sources of CO₂, CH₄ and N₂O. The study calculates and discusses the changes in EQI, OCI and the emission of GHGs as a consequence of varying the following four process variables: (i) the set point of aeration control in the activated sludge section; (ii) the removal efficiency of total suspended solids (TSS) in the primary clarifier; (iii) the temperature in the anaerobic digester; and (iv) the control of the flow of anaerobic digester supernatants coming from sludge treatment. Based upon the assumptions built into the model structures, simulation results highlight the potential undesirable effects of increased GHG production when carrying out local energy optimization of the aeration system in the activated sludge section and energy recovery from the AD. Although off-site CO₂ emissions may decrease, the effect is counterbalanced by increased N₂O emissions, especially since N₂O has a 300-fold stronger greenhouse effect than CO₂. The reported results emphasize the importance and usefulness of using multiple evaluation criteria to compare and evaluate (plant-wide) control strategies in a WWTP for more informed operational decision making.

  10. Towards Cost-Effective Operational Monitoring Systems for Complex Waters: Analyzing Small-Scale Coastal Processes with Optical Transmissometry

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves-Araujo, Rafael; Wiegmann, Sonja; Torrecilla, Elena; Bardaji, Raul; Röttgers, Rüdiger; Bracher, Astrid; Piera, Jaume

    2017-01-01

    The detection and prediction of changes in coastal ecosystems require a better understanding of the complex physical, chemical and biological interactions, which involves that observations should be performed continuously. For this reason, there is an increasing demand for small, simple and cost-effective in situ sensors to analyze complex coastal waters at a broad range of scales. In this context, this study seeks to explore the potential of beam attenuation spectra, c(λ), measured in situ with an advanced-technology optical transmissometer, for assessing temporal and spatial patterns in the complex estuarine waters of Alfacs Bay (NW Mediterranean) as a test site. In particular, the information contained in the spectral beam attenuation coefficient was assessed and linked with different biogeochemical variables. The attenuation at λ = 710 nm was used as a proxy for particle concentration, TSM, whereas a novel parameter was adopted as an optical indicator for chlorophyll a (Chl-a) concentration, based on the local maximum of c(λ) observed at the long-wavelength side of the red band Chl-a absorption peak. In addition, since coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM) has an important influence on the beam attenuation spectral shape and complementary measurements of particle size distribution were available, the beam attenuation spectral slope was used to analyze the CDOM content. Results were successfully compared with optical and biogeochemical variables from laboratory analysis of collocated water samples, and statistically significant correlations were found between the attenuation proxies and the biogeochemical variables TSM, Chl-a and CDOM. This outcome depicted the potential of high-frequency beam attenuation measurements as a simple, continuous and cost-effective approach for rapid detection of changes and patterns in biogeochemical properties in complex coastal environments. PMID:28107539

  11. Updating the evidence base on the operational costs of supplementary immunization activities for current and future accelerated disease control, elimination and eradication efforts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To achieve globally or regionally defined accelerated disease control, elimination and eradication (ADC/E/E) goals against vaccine-preventable diseases requires complementing national routine immunization programs with intensive, time-limited, and targeted Supplementary Immunization Activities (SIAs). Many global and country-level SIA costing efforts have historically relied on what are now outdated benchmark figures. Mobilizing adequate resources for successful implementation of SIAs requires updated estimates of non-vaccine costs per target population. Methods This assessment updates the evidence base on the SIA operational costs through a review of literature between 1992 and 2012, and an analysis of actual expenditures from 142 SIAs conducted between 2004 and 2011 and documented in country immunization plans. These are complemented with an analysis of budgets from 31 SIAs conducted between 2006 and 2011 in order to assess the proportion of total SIA costs per person associated with various cost components. All results are presented in 2010 US dollars. Results Existing evidence indicate that average SIA operational costs were usually less than US$0.50 per person in 2010 dollars. However, the evidence is sparse, non-standardized, and largely out of date. Average operational costs per person generated from our analysis of country immunization plans are consistently higher than published estimates, approaching US$1.00 for injectable vaccines. The results illustrate that the benchmarks often used to project needs underestimate the true costs of SIAs and the analysis suggests that SIA operational costs have been increasing over time in real terms. Our assessment also illustrates that operational costs vary across several dimensions. Variations in the actual costs of SIAs likely to reflect the extents to which economies of scale associated with campaign-based delivery can be attained, the underlying strength of the immunization program, sensitivities to the

  12. M Times Photon Subtraction-Addition Coherent Superposition Operated Odd-Schrődinger-cat State: Nonclassicality and Decoherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Li; Guo, Qin; Jiang, Li-ying; Chen, Ge; Xu, Xue-xiang; Yuan, Wen

    2015-08-01

    We introduce a new non-Gaussian state (MCSO-OSCS), generated by m times coherent superposition operation acos θ + a †sin θ (MCSO) on odd-Schrődinger-cat state | α 0> - | - α 0>(OSCS), whose normalized constant is shown to be related to Hermite polynomials. We investigate the nonclassical properties of the MCSO-OSCS through Mandel's Q-parameter, quadrature squeezing, the photocount distribution and Wigner function (WF), which is turned out to be influenced by parameters m, θ and α 0. Especially the volume of negative region of WF could increase through controlling the parameters m, θ and α 0. We also investigate the decoherence of the MCSO-OSCS in terms of the fadeaway of the negativity of WF in a thermal environment.

  13. Comparing cost and process performance of activated sludge (AS) and biological aerated filters (BAF) over ten years of full sale operation.

    PubMed

    Hansen, R; Thogersen, T; Rogalla, F

    2007-01-01

    In the early 1990s, the Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) of Frederikshavn, Denmark, was extended to meet new requirements for nutrient removal (8 mg/L TN, 1.5 mg TP/L) as well as to increase its average daily flow to 16,500 m(3)/d (4.5 MGD). As the most economical upgrade of the existing activated sludge (AS) plant, a parallel biological aerated filter (BAF) was selected, and started up in 1995. Running two full scale processes in parallel for over ten years on the same wastewater and treatment objectives enabled a direct comparison in relation to operating performance, costs and experience. Common pretreatment consists of screening, an aerated grit and grease removal and three primary settlers with chemical addition. The effluent is then pumped to the two parallel biological treatment stages, AS with recirculation and an upflow BAF with floating media. The wastewater is a mixture of industrial and domestic wastewater, with a dominant discharge of fish processing effluent which can amount to 50% of the flow. The maximum hydraulic load on the pretreatment section as a whole is 1,530 m(3)/h. Approximately 60% of the sewer system is combined with a total of 32 overflow structures. To avoid the direct discharge of combined sewer overflows into the receiving waters, the total hydraulic wet weather capacity of the plant is increased to 4,330 m(3)/h, or 6 times average flow. During rain, some of the raw sewage can be directed through a stormwater bypass to the BAF, which can be modified in its operation to accommodate various treatment needs: either using simultaneous nitrification/denitrification in all filters with recirculation introducing bottom aeration with full nitrification in some filters for storm treatment and/or post-denitrification in one filter. After treatment, the wastewater is discharged to the Baltic Sea through a 500 m outfall. The BAF backwash sludge, approximately 1,900 m(3) per 24 h in dry weather, is redirected to the AS plant. Primary settler

  14. Production costs and operative margins in electric energy generation from biogas. Full-scale case studies in Italy.

    PubMed

    Riva, C; Schievano, A; D'Imporzano, G; Adani, F

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe the economic sustainability of three different biogas full scale plants, fed with different organic matrices: energy crops (EC), manure, agro-industrial (Plants B and C) and organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) (Plant A). The plants were observed for one year and total annual biomass feeding, biomass composition and biomass cost (€ Mg(-1)), initial investment cost and plant electric power production were registered. The unit costs of biogas and electric energy (€ Sm(-3)biogas, € kWh(-1)EE) were differently distributed, depending on the type of feed and plant. Plant A showed high management/maintenance cost for OFMSW treatment (0.155 € Sm(-3)biogas, 45% of total cost), Plant B suffered high cost for EC supply (0.130 € Sm(-3)biogas, 49% of total cost) and Plant C showed higher impact on the total costs because of the depreciation charge (0.146 € Sm(-3)biogas, 41% of total costs). The breakeven point for the tariff of electric energy, calculated for the different cases, resulted in the range 120-170 € MWh(-1)EE, depending on fed materials and plant scale. EC had great impact on biomass supply costs and should be reduced, in favor of organic waste and residues; plant scale still heavily influences the production costs. The EU States should drive incentives in dependence of these factors, to further develop this still promising sector.

  15. ACC Neuro-over-Connectivity Is Associated with Mathematically Modeled Additional Encoding Operations of Schizophrenia Stroop-Task Performance

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Reggie; Théberge, Jean; Williamson, Peter C.; Densmore, Maria; Neufeld, Richard W. J.

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging at 7.0 Tesla was undertaken among Schizophrenia participants (Sz), and clinical (major mood disorder; MDD) and healthy controls (HC), during performance of the Stoop task. Stroop conditions included congruent and incongruent word color items, color-only items, and word-only items. Previous modeling results extended to this most widely used selective-attention task. All groups executed item-encoding operations (subprocesses of the item encoding process) at the same rate (performance accuracy being similarly high throughout), thus displaying like processing capacity; Sz participants, however, employed more subprocesses for item completions than did the MDD participants, who in turn used more subprocesses than the HC group. The reduced efficiency in deploying cognitive-workload capacity among the Sz participants was paralleled by more diffuse neuroconnectivity (Blood-Oxygen-Level-Dependent co-activation) with the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) (Broadman Area 32), spreading away from this encoding-intensive region; and by less evidence of network dissociation across Stroop conditions. Estimates of cognitive work done to accomplish item completion were greater for the Sz participants, as were estimates of entropy in both the modeled trial-latency distribution, and its associated neuro-circuitry. Findings are held to be symptom and assessment significant, and to have potential implications for clinical intervention. PMID:27695425

  16. Operations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkins, Jesse L. M.; Norton, Anderson; Boyce, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has documented schemes and operations that undergird students' understanding of fractions. This prior research was based, in large part, on small-group teaching experiments. However, written assessments are needed in order for teachers and researchers to assess students' ways of operating on a whole-class scale. In this study,…

  17. Silica Scale Management: Lowering Operating Costs through Improved Scale Control, and Adding Value by Extracting Marketable By-Products

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, E A; Bourcier, W L; Wallce, A; Bruton, C J; Leif, R

    2003-06-18

    We are using laboratory and field experiments to design modeling tools and technology that will improve silica scale management practices in geothermal plants. Our work will help to lower operating costs through improved scale prediction and add new revenue streams from sale of mineral byproducts extracted from geothermal fluids. Improving the economics and effectiveness of scale control programs and/or extraction systems in geothermal operations requires a coupled kinetic-thermodynamic model of silica behavior. Silica scale precipitation is a multi-step process, involving a nucleation-related induction period, aqueous polymerization, condensation of polymers to form colloids, and deposition onto a solid surface. Many chemical and physical variables influence the rates of these steps and their impacts must be quantified and predictable in order to optimally control silica behavior. To date, in laboratory studies, we have quantified the effects on silica polymerization of the following set of chemical variables: Na at 500 and 2000 ppm, pH values from 5 to 9, temperatures of 25 and 50 C, and silica saturation values from 1.2 to 6 at initial dissolved silica concentrations of 600 ppm. Lowering pH both increases the induction time prior to polymerization and decreases the polymerization rate. We have successfully used a multiple regression model to predict polymerization rates from these variables. Geothermal fluids contain significant dissolved concentrations of potentially valuable mineral resources such as zinc, lithium, cesium and rubidium, but silica fouling interferes with traditional extraction methods. We are developing customized and new technologies to extract the silica as a commercial-grade commodity as well as the valuable metals. We are conducting field testing of some of these techniques at a Mammoth, CA geothermal plant using a reverse osmosis unit to concentrate the fluid, adding a commercial agglomerating agent to promote silica precipitation, and

  18. Economics of Automation in Space: Implications of Automated Versus Manned Operations on the High Cost of On-Orbit Assembly, Control and Servicing of Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, W. F.

    1994-01-01

    The continued high cost and risk of placing astronauts in space has placed considerable burden on NASA to cut costs and consider other means of achieving mission goals both effectively and safely. Additionally, future science missions which might place a tremendous burden on Shuttle availability, or require extended vehicle duty cycles on the Lunar surface and Mars surface, might preclude the presence of astronauts altogether.

  19. A Cost Benefit Analysis of Fire Scout Vertical Takeoff and Landing Tactical Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (VTUAV) Operator Alternatives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    48 Daniel Jurta et al. MQ-8B Fire Scout UAV Manning Cost Benefit Analysis. EMBA Project Report...December 8, 2012). 36 The exact cost of this training is difficult to ascertain, but a Naval Postgraduate School Executive MBA ( EMBA ) Capstone...57 Daniel Jurta et al. MQ-8B Fire Scout UAV Manning Cost Benefit Analysis. EMBA Project Report, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey: Naval

  20. 41 CFR 102-33.205 - When we use our aircraft to support other executive agencies, must we recover the operating costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false When we use our aircraft to support other executive agencies, must we recover the operating costs? 102-33.205 Section 102-33.205 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System...

  1. Medicare program; reissuance of the wage index in the 1981 schedule of limits on hospital per diem inpatient general routine operating costs--HCFA. Final notice.

    PubMed

    1984-11-26

    This notice affirms the use of the wage index that was used to calculate the 1981 schedule of limits on hospital per diem inpatient general routine operating costs, which was issued on June 30, 1981 [46 FR 33637], and September 30, 1981 [46 FR 48010]. The 1981 wage index was reissued for public comment on February 17, 1984 [49 FR 6175].

  2. The Project Manager’s Lieutenant for Logistics: A Study of the Chief Logistician’s Key Roles in Reducing Operations & Support Costs During Developmental Programs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-03-01

    failure of an item which would result in a system failure, and is not compensated for by redundancy or alternative operational procedures. • Design...CPT David A. Searle USAF, Dr. Caisse Vickery, “ The Impact of the Packard Commission’s Recommendations on Reducing Cost Overruns on Defense

  3. School Operations and Maintenance: Best Practices For Controlling Energy Costs. A Guidebook for K-12 School System Business Officers and Facilities Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Energy, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Operations and maintenance (O&M) offers not only strategies for maintaining facilities, but also opportunities for reducing energy costs and increasing energy efficiency at existing schools, regardless of age. This Guidebook provides detailed and practical guidance on how K-12 school districts can plan and implement enhancements to their current…

  4. Cost optimization in anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Bauer, M; Bach, A; Martin, E; Böttiger, B W

    2001-04-01

    As a result of the progress which has been made in medicine and technology and the increase in morbidity associated this demographic development, the need and thus the costs for medical care have increased as well. The financial resources which are available for medical care, however, are still limited and hence the funds which are available must be distributed more efficiently. Cost optimisation measures can help make better use of the profitability reserves in hospitals. The authors show how costs can be optimised in the anaesthesiology department of a clinic. Pharmacoeconomic evaluation of the new inhalation anaesthetics shows an example of how the cost structures in anaesthesia can be made more obvious and potential ways savings be implemented. To reduce material and personnel costs, a more rational means of internal process management is presented. According to cost-effectiveness analysis, medications are not divided into the categories inexpensive and expensive but rather cost-effective or non-cost-effective. By selecting a cost-effective drug it is possible to reduce cost at a hospital. For example, sevoflurane at a fresh gas flow of below 3 l/min has been shown to be a cost-effective inhalation anaesthetic which, in terms of the economics, is also superior to intravenous anaesthesia with propofol. In addition to these measures of reducing material costs, other examples are given of how personnel costs can be reduced by optimising work procedures: e.g. effective operating theatre co-ordination, short switchover times by overlapping anaesthesia induction and the use of multifunctional personnel. The gain in productivity which is a result of these measures can positively affect profits, and by optimising the organisation of procedures to shorten the times required to carry out a procedure, costs can be reduced.

  5. 19 CFR 10.197 - Direct costs of processing operations performed in a beneficiary country or countries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... performed in a beneficiary country or countries. (a) Items included in the direct costs of processing... specific merchandise, including fringe benefits, on-the-job training, and the cost of engineering... and equipment which are allocable to the specific merchandise; (3) Research, development,...

  6. 19 CFR 10.197 - Direct costs of processing operations performed in a beneficiary country or countries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... costs either directly incurred in, or which can be reasonably allocated to, the growth, production... merchandise: (1) All actual labor costs involved in the growth, production, manufacture or assembly of the... the growth, production, manufacture, or assembly of the merchandise, such as administrative...

  7. Cost reduction in space operations - Structuring a planetary program to minimize the annual funding requirement as opposed to minimizing the program runout cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, D. H.; Niehoff, J. C.; Spadoni, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    An approach is proposed for the structuring of a planetary mission set wherein the peak annual funding is minimized to meet the annual budget restraint. One aspect of the approach is to have a transportation capability that can launch a mission in any planetary opportunity; such capability can be provided by solar electric propulsion. Another cost reduction technique is to structure a mission test in a time sequenced fashion that could utilize essentially the same spacecraft for the implementation of several missions. A third technique would be to fulfill a scientific objective in several sequential missions rather than attempt to accomplish all of the objectives with one mission. The application of the approach is illustrated by an example involving the Solar Orbiter Dual Probe mission.

  8. [The costs of implementing and operating an oral health service from the perspective of the service and society].

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Christiane Alves; Loureiro, Carlos Alfredo

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the costs of setting up and maintaining dental care in the public sector. Costs were updated or depreciated according to the service's lifespan and were analyzed from the perspective of the service itself and society. According to the findings, for the service the total cost of setting up a dental care unit with seven rooms was BRL$860.643.67 in the first year, plus BRL$545,419.23 for maintenance, and clinical dental care was the most expensive specialty. For society, the total cost was BRL$990,065.06 (implementation) and BRL$668,369.55 (maintenance), and the most expensive specialty was prevention (US$1.00 = BRL$1.62). Capital costs represented a small percentage of total costs for a dental care unit, but they need to be considered, since they can modify the results. Due to the high costs, preventive and promotional interventions should not be performed in the clinical setting, but should be replaced by broader and less expansive population-based interventions, since considerable sums need to be spent by the low-income population to participate in free public programs.

  9. An analysis of the benefits of photovoltaic-coated glazing on owning and operating costs of high rise commercial buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvester, Keith Everette

    Energy efficient glazing is necessary to reduce heat gains or losses that contribute to the high-energy use of buildings. However, high-rise commercial buildings that use energy efficient glazing are still consumptive. To reduce their energy use further, recent studies have integrated photovoltaic glazed window systems into the building shell. With limited light transmittance due to their required production of electricity, photovoltaic glazed windows can be developed with thermal properties similar to Low-E coatings. Consequently, these window systems can reduce operating costs of buildings without reducing the human satisfaction of the built environment. To understand the relationship between photovoltaic windows, energy use and human satisfaction, this study investigates the effects of photovoltaic glazed windows on energy use of large commercial buildings and includes an assessment of the overall human satisfaction of the workers within photovoltaic glazed office spaces. This study targets high-rise commercial buildings and their occupants in urban centers of the four census regions---North, Northeast, South, and Midwest. A prototypical building was used to develop the base case simulations for the DOE-2 energy simulation program and the PV F-Chart photovoltaic analysis program. By substituting the appropriate variable in the base case simulation for each site, building was simulated to evaluate the impact of the PV glazing on the building's heat loss/gaining as well as the amount of electricity that could be expected from the PV. To test for human satisfaction, a survey was performed to assess the overall preference of the subjects to the office spaces using the photovoltaic glazed windows. An analysis of the variance was also conducted to test for significantly different treatment means. Overall, the findings of this study show that photovoltaic windows significantly decrease the energy used by high-rise commercial buildings. Payback periods 11 to 20 years

  10. Use of Biostratigraphy to Increase Production, Reduce Operating Costs and Risks and Reduce Environmental Concerns in Oil Well Drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Edward Marks

    2005-09-09

    out at the top of the late Miocene, early Mohnian: Bolivina aff hughesi, Rotalia becki, Suggrunda californica, Virgulina grandis, Virgulina ticensis, Bulimina ecuadorana, Denticula lauta and Nonion medio-costatum. Please see Appendix B, Fig. 1, Neogene Zones, p. 91 and Appendix C, chart 5, p. 99 By the use of Stratigraphy, employing both Paleontology and Lithology, we can increase hydrocarbon production, reduce operating costs and risks by the identification of the productive sections, and reduce environmental concerns by drilling less dry holes needlessly.

  11. Strapdown cost trend study and forecast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberlein, A. J.; Savage, P. G.

    1975-01-01

    The potential cost advantages offered by advanced strapdown inertial technology in future commercial short-haul aircraft are summarized. The initial procurement cost and six year cost-of-ownership, which includes spares and direct maintenance cost were calculated for kinematic and inertial navigation systems such that traditional and strapdown mechanization costs could be compared. Cost results for the inertial navigation systems showed that initial costs and the cost of ownership for traditional triple redundant gimbaled inertial navigators are three times the cost of the equivalent skewed redundant strapdown inertial navigator. The net cost advantage for the strapdown kinematic system is directly attributable to the reduction in sensor count for strapdown. The strapdown kinematic system has the added advantage of providing a fail-operational inertial navigation capability for no additional cost due to the use of inertial grade sensors and attitude reference computers.

  12. Discussion of and reply to ``Operational costs of breakdowns at the Commerce Refuse-to-Energy Facility``

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, M.; Smisko, J.; Norton, J.W.

    1995-11-01

    Matthew Eaton and Joe Smisko have presented a useful tool for comparing the cost of downtime with the cost of various options for maintenance during such downtime. By knowing the cost of downtime, the plant manager can consider the economic effect of using overtime and/or contract labor to shorten total system outage time. The author has several questions on the presentation concerning the values of power sold, natural gas purchased, and unprocessed refuse. The reader should also be provided with some statistics surrounding the issue of power sales pricing and gas purchase pricing. This article also contains the original authors` reply to the comments and questions.

  13. Influence of binder properties, method of addition, powder type and operating conditions on fluid-bed melt granulation and resulting tablet properties.

    PubMed

    Abberger, T

    2001-12-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate melt granulation in a laboratory scale fluid-bed granulator with respect to granule growth, granule properties and resulting tablet properties. The parameters investigated were method of addition of PEG (spray-on or addition as flakes), binder concentration, PEG type (3000, 4000 and 6000, sprayed-on), size (PEG 4000, added as three different sized flakes), powder type (two different sized lactose types and corn starch) and operating conditions (volume air flow and heating temperature). Addition of binder as flakes led to layering as a growth mechanism when the size of the flakes was high. Coalescence occurred when the size was low. Coalescence also occurred when spraying was the method of addition. Due to the greater viscosity of the PEG 6000 melt it produced bigger granules than 3000 or 4000. The influence of volume air flow was moderate and the influence of heating temperature in the range of 70-90 degrees C was very low with both methods of addition. The disintegration time of tablets from granules where PEG was added as flakes was shorter than from granules where PEG was sprayed-on. The latter method of binder addition led to tablets which did not disintegrate but eroded. This was apparently caused by formation of a binder matrix, which could not be destroyed by the disintegrant.

  14. Medicare program; reissuance of the wage index in the 1981 schedule of limits on hospital per diem inpatient general routine operating costs--HCFA. Proposed notice.

    PubMed

    1984-02-17

    We are reissuing for public comment the change in the types of data that were used to calculate the wage index that was contained in the schedules of limits on hospital per diem inpatient general routine operating costs reimbursable under Medicare that were applicable to cost reporting periods beginning on or after July 1, 1981 and for cost reporting periods ending after September 30, 1981. The cost limits for cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 1982 are governed by the notice published in the Federal Register on September 30, 1982 (47 FR 43296) and August 30, 1983 (48 FR 39426) and are not affected by this reissuance. The wage index was originally issued as part of the schedule of limits published on June 30, 1981 (46 FR 33637) and September 30, 1981 (46 FR 48010) and is being reissued as the result of the April 29, 1983 decision of the United States District Court for the District of Columbia in the case of District of Columbia Hospital Association, et al. v Heckler, et al. (No. 82-2520 DDC). The District Court held that the 1981 schedule of hospital cost limits was invalid for failure to comply with the Administrative Procedure Act insofar as the schedule incorporated or was formulated by using a wage index that was calculated by excluding Federal government hospital wage data.

  15. The cumulative cost of additional wakefulness: dose-response effects on neurobehavioral functions and sleep physiology from chronic sleep restriction and total sleep deprivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Dongen, Hans P A.; Maislin, Greg; Mullington, Janet M.; Dinges, David F.

    2003-01-01

    were near-linearly related to the cumulative duration of wakefulness in excess of 15.84 h (s.e. 0.73 h). CONCLUSIONS: Since chronic restriction of sleep to 6 h or less per night produced cognitive performance deficits equivalent to up to 2 nights of total sleep deprivation, it appears that even relatively moderate sleep restriction can seriously impair waking neurobehavioral functions in healthy adults. Sleepiness ratings suggest that subjects were largely unaware of these increasing cognitive deficits, which may explain why the impact of chronic sleep restriction on waking cognitive functions is often assumed to be benign. Physiological sleep responses to chronic restriction did not mirror waking neurobehavioral responses, but cumulative wakefulness in excess of a 15.84 h predicted performance lapses across all four experimental conditions. This suggests that sleep debt is perhaps best understood as resulting in additional wakefulness that has a neurobiological "cost" which accumulates over time.

  16. High operational and environmental stability of high-mobility conjugated polymer field-effect transistors through the use of molecular additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolka, Mark; Nasrallah, Iyad; Rose, Bradley; Ravva, Mahesh Kumar; Broch, Katharina; Sadhanala, Aditya; Harkin, David; Charmet, Jerome; Hurhangee, Michael; Brown, Adam; Illig, Steffen; Too, Patrick; Jongman, Jan; McCulloch, Iain; Bredas, Jean-Luc; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2016-12-01

    Due to their low-temperature processing properties and inherent mechanical flexibility, conjugated polymer field-effect transistors (FETs) are promising candidates for enabling flexible electronic circuits and displays. Much progress has been made on materials performance; however, there remain significant concerns about operational and environmental stability, particularly in the context of applications that require a very high level of threshold voltage stability, such as active-matrix addressing of organic light-emitting diode displays. Here, we investigate the physical mechanisms behind operational and environmental degradation of high-mobility, p-type polymer FETs and demonstrate an effective route to improve device stability. We show that water incorporated in nanometre-sized voids within the polymer microstructure is the key factor in charge trapping and device degradation. By inserting molecular additives that displace water from these voids, it is possible to increase the stability as well as uniformity to a high level sufficient for demanding industrial applications.

  17. High operational and environmental stability of high-mobility conjugated polymer field-effect transistors through the use of molecular additives.

    PubMed

    Nikolka, Mark; Nasrallah, Iyad; Rose, Bradley; Ravva, Mahesh Kumar; Broch, Katharina; Sadhanala, Aditya; Harkin, David; Charmet, Jerome; Hurhangee, Michael; Brown, Adam; Illig, Steffen; Too, Patrick; Jongman, Jan; McCulloch, Iain; Bredas, Jean-Luc; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2017-03-01

    Due to their low-temperature processing properties and inherent mechanical flexibility, conjugated polymer field-effect transistors (FETs) are promising candidates for enabling flexible electronic circuits and displays. Much progress has been made on materials performance; however, there remain significant concerns about operational and environmental stability, particularly in the context of applications that require a very high level of threshold voltage stability, such as active-matrix addressing of organic light-emitting diode displays. Here, we investigate the physical mechanisms behind operational and environmental degradation of high-mobility, p-type polymer FETs and demonstrate an effective route to improve device stability. We show that water incorporated in nanometre-sized voids within the polymer microstructure is the key factor in charge trapping and device degradation. By inserting molecular additives that displace water from these voids, it is possible to increase the stability as well as uniformity to a high level sufficient for demanding industrial applications.

  18. Profiling stainless steel welding processes to reduce fume emissions, hexavalent chromium emissions and operating costs in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Keane, Michael; Siert, Arlen; Stone, Samuel; Chen, Bean T

    2016-01-01

    Nine gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes for stainless steel were assessed for fume generation rates, fume generation rates per g of electrode consumed, and emission rates for hexavalent chromium (Cr(6+)). Elemental manganese, nickel, chromium, iron emissions per unit length of weld, and labor plus consumables costs were similarly measured. Flux-cored arc welding and shielded metal arc (SMAW) processes were also studied. The objective was to identify the best welding processes for reducing workplace exposures, and estimate costs for all processes. Using a conical chamber, fumes were collected, weighed, recovered, and analyzed by inductively coupled atomic emission spectroscopy for metals, and by ion chromatography for Cr(6+). GMAW processes used were Surface Tension Transfer, Regulated Metal Deposition, Cold Metal Transfer, short-circuit, axial spray, and pulsed spray modes. Flux-cored welding used gas shielding; SMAW used E308 rods. Costs were estimated as dollars per m length of a ¼ in (6.3 mm) thick horizontal butt weld; equipment costs were estimated as ratios of new equipment costs to a 250 ampere capacity SMAW welding machine. Results indicate a broad range of fume emission factors for the processes studied. Fume emission rates per g of electrode were lowest for GMAW processes such as pulsed-spray mode (0.2 mg/g), and highest for SMAW (8 mg fume/g electrode). Emission rates of Cr(6+) ranged from 50-7800 µg/min, and Cr(6+) generation rates per g electrode ranged from 1-270 µg/g. Elemental Cr generation rates spanned 13-330 µg/g. Manganese emission rates ranged from 50-300 µg/g. Nickel emission rates ranged from 4-140 µg/g. Labor and consumables costs ranged from $3.15 (GMAW pulsed spray) to $7.40 (SMAW) per meter of finished weld, and were measured or estimated for all 11 processes tested. Equipment costs for some processes may be as much as five times the cost of a typical SMAW welding machine. The results show that all of the GMAW processes in this

  19. Profiling stainless steel welding processes to reduce fume emissions, hexavalent chromium emissions and operating costs in the workplace

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Michael; Siert, Arlen; Stone, Samuel; Chen, Bean T.

    2016-01-01

    Nine gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes for stainless steel were assessed for fume generation rates, fume generation rates per g of electrode consumed, and emission rates for hexavalent chromium (Cr6+). Elemental manganese, nickel, chromium, iron emissions per unit length of weld and labor plus consumables costs were similarly measured. Flux-cored arc welding and shielded metal arc (SMAW) processes were also studied. The objective was to identify the best welding processes for reducing workplace exposures, and estimate costs for all processes. Using a conical chamber, fumes were collected, weighed, recovered and analyzed by inductively-coupled atomic emission spectroscopy for metals, and by ion chromatography for Cr6+. GMAW processes used were Surface Tension Transfer™, Regulated Metal Deposition™, Cold Metal Transfer™, short-circuit, axial spray, and pulsed spray modes. Flux-cored welding used gas shielding; SMAW used E308 rods. Costs were estimated as dollars per m length of a ¼ in (6.3 mm) thick horizontal butt weld; equipment costs were estimated as ratios of new equipment costs to a 250 ampere capacity SMAW welding machine. Results indicate a broad range of fume emission factors for the processes studied. Fume emission rates per g of electrode were lowest for GMAW processes such as pulsed-spray mode (0.2 mg/g), and highest for SMAW (8 mg fume/g electrode). Emission rates of Cr6+ ranged from 50 to 7800 μg/min, and Cr6+ generation rates per g electrode ranged from 1 to 270μg/g. Elemental Cr generation rates spanned 13 to 330μg/g. Manganese emission rates ranged from 50 to 300μg/g. Nickel emission rates ranged from 4 to140 μg/g. Labor and consumables costs ranged from $3.15 (GMAW pulsed spray) to $7.40 (SMAW) per meter of finished weld, and were measured or estimated for all 11 processes tested. Equipment costs for some processes may be as much as 5 times the cost of a typical SMAW welding machine. The results show that all of the GMAW processes

  20. Beyond cost-of-energy, the value-of-energy metric and value-centric approaches to design, operations, and maintenance of wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Kevin

    This thesis is oriented toward developers, owners, operators and investors of renewable energy projects. With increasing demand of renewables, our energy dependence comes down to reducing costs associated with this sector so as to compete with the existing sources. One way of valuing investment potential is to determine and then compare the overall value derived by investing in a particular project. Several engineering and financial levers, one of which is operation and maintenance, affect this value. This thesis provides a useful visual aid to owners and operators by which they can operate and maintain their wind farm so as to achieve maximum value throughout its lifetime. All the necessary components that go into developing a business model of a wind farm project will be discussed. Finally, this tool is valid within the assumptions that are explicitly stated. Real world data and trends are used to provide a practical approach to the optimization.

  1. Development of cost-effective media to increase the economic potential for larger-scale bioproduction of natural food additives by Lactobacillus rhamnosus , Debaryomyces hansenii , and Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Salgado, José Manuel; Rodríguez, Noelia; Cortés, Sandra; Domínguez, José Manuel

    2009-11-11

    Yeast extract (YE) is the most common nitrogen source in a variety of bioprocesses in spite of the high cost. Therefore, the use of YE in culture media is one of the major technical hurdles to be overcome for the development of low-cost fermentation routes, making the search for alternative-cheaper nitrogen sources particularly desired. The aim of the current study is to develop cost-effective media based on corn steep liquor (CSL) and locally available vinasses in order to increase the economic potential for larger-scale bioproduction. Three microorganisms were evaluated: Lactobacillus rhamnosus , Debaryomyces hansenii , and Aspergillus niger . The amino acid profile and protein concentration was relevant for the xylitol and citric acid production by D. hansenii and A. niger , respectively. Metals also played an important role for citric acid production, meanwhile, D. hansenii showed a strong dependence with the initial amount of Mg(2+). Under the best conditions, 28.8 g lactic acid/L (Q(LA) = 0.800 g/L.h, Y(LA/S) = 0.95 g/g), 35.3 g xylitol/L (Q(xylitol) = 0.380 g/L.h, Y(xylitol/S) = 0.69 g/g), and 13.9 g citric acid/L (Q(CA) = 0.146 g/L.h, Y(CA/S) = 0.63 g/g) were obtained. The economic efficiency (E(p/euro)) parameter identify vinasses as a lower cost and more effective nutrient source in comparison to CSL.

  2. Dredging Operations Technical Support Program. Planning-Level Cost Estimates of Dredged Material Containment Islands in New York Harbor.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    WES). Three sites are ... *considered: a. A--East Bank (off East Bank and Coney Island ). .. b. B--West Bank (Lower Bay west to Chapel Hill Channel). c...PROGRAM "P." US~~o ArCop MISCELLANEOUS PAPER D-88 3 PLANNING-LEVEL COST ESTIMATES OF AD-A194 812 DREDGED MATERIAL CONTAINMENT ISLANDS IN NEW YORK HARBOR...10278-0090 11. TITLE (include Security Classification) -’.. Planning-Level Cost Estimates of Dredged Material Containment Islands in New York Harbor

  3. Cost and Information Effectiveness Analysis (CIEA): A Methodology for Evaluating a Training Device Operational Readiness Assessment Capability (DORAC).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    define IW in exact terms. Carnap (1950) has referred to this process as expZication, or operational definition. Along with the operational definition...Bulletin, 1959, 56, 81-105. Carnap , R. Logical foundations of probability. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1950. Caro, P. Aircraft simulators

  4. PARAMETRIC ANALYSIS OF THE INSTALLATION AND OPERATING COSTS OF ACTIVE SOIL DEPRESSURIZATION SYSTEMS FOR RESIDENTIAL RADON MITIGATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a recent analysis showing that cost- effective indoor radon reduction technology is required for houses with initial radon concentrations < 4 pCi/L, because 78-86% of the national lung cancer risk due to radon is associated with those houses. ctive soi...

  5. Energy Management: Maintaining a Cost Effective, Quality Environment for Learning. A Case Study of Program Development and Operation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, James R.

    Analyzed is the energy management program implemented in 1984 at the Akron Public Schools of Ohio. The program was implemented to address the problems of rising utilities costs and uncontrollable energy use. Background information ranging from simple attendance statistics to the utilities budget are provided as well as the procedure for choosing…

  6. Human factors design for intuitive operation of a low-cost, image-guided, tele-robotic biopsy assistant.

    PubMed

    Hanumara, Nevan C; Walsh, Conor J; Slocum, Alexander H; Gupta, Rajiv; Shepard, Jo-Anne

    2007-01-01

    This paper details the design and interface development of Robopsy, an economical, tele-operated, patient mounted, disposable needle guidance and insertion system to assist radiologists in performing minimally invasive percutaneous biopsies remotely under CT guidance. Testing with a phantom in a realistic surgical setting was conducted to ensure that the interface was intuitive and facilitated smooth integration of the device into current procedure. Ease of learning and operation is critical in order to encourage rapid adoption of this new medical robotics model.

  7. Re-Engineering JPL's Mission Planning Ground System Architecture for Cost Efficient Operations in the 21st Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fordyce, Jess

    1996-01-01

    Work carried out to re-engineer the mission analysis segment of JPL's mission planning ground system architecture is reported on. The aim is to transform the existing software tools, originally developed for specific missions on different support environments, into an integrated, general purpose, multi-mission tool set. The issues considered are: the development of a partnership between software developers and users; the definition of key mission analysis functions; the development of a consensus based architecture; the move towards evolutionary change instead of revolutionary replacement; software reusability, and the minimization of future maintenance costs. The current status and aims of new developments are discussed and specific examples of cost savings and improved productivity are presented.

  8. Energy-Smart Building Choices: How School Facilities Managers and Business Officials Are Reducing Operating Costs and Saving Money

    SciTech Connect

    Energy Smart Schools Team

    2001-08-06

    Most K-12 schools could save 25% of their energy costs by being smart about energy. Nationwide, the savings potential is $6 billion. While improving energy use in buildings and busses, schools are likely to create better places for teaching and learning, with better lighting, temperature control, acoustics, and air quality. This brochure, targeted to school facilities managers and business officials, describes how schools can become more energy efficient.

  9. Cost Reduction through the Use of Additive Manufacturing (3D Printing) and Collaborative Product Lifecycle Management Technologies to Enhance the Navy’s Maintenance Programs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-30

    Intermediate Level Military and Civilian Medium Medium Depot Level Civilian High High D. ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING AM, more commonly known as 3D...eutectic metals, edible materials Granular Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) Most metal alloys Electron beam melting (EBM) Titanium alloys ...Selective laser melting (SLM) Titanium alloys , cobalt chrome alloys , stainless steel, aluminum Selective heat sintering (SHS) Thermoplastic powder

  10. Delivering Microwave Spectroscopy to the Masses: a Design of a Low-Cost Microwave Spectrometer Operating in the 18-26 GHZ Frequency Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steber, Amanda; Pate, Brooks

    2014-06-01

    Advances in chip-level microwave technology in the communications field have led to the possibilities of low cost alternatives for current Fourier transform microwave (FTMW) spectrometers. Many of the large, expensive microwave components in a traditional design can now be replaced by robust, mass market monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs). "Spectrometer on a board" designs are now feasible that offer dramatic cost reduction for microwave spectroscopy. These chip-level components can be paired with miniature computers to produce compact instruments that are operable through USB. A FTMW spectrometer design using the key MMIC components that drive cost reduction will be presented. Two dual channel synthesizers (Valon Technology Model 5008), a digital pattern generator (Byte Paradigm Wav Gen Xpress), and a high-speed digitizer/arbitrary waveform generator combination unit (Tie Pie HS-5 530 XM) form the key components of the spectrometer for operation in the 18-26.5 GHz range. The design performance is illustrated using a spectrometer that is being incorporated into a museum display for astrochemistry. For this instrument a user interface, developed in Python, has been developed and will be shown.

  11. Grating array systems having a plurality of gratings operative in a coherently additive mode and methods for making such grating array systems

    DOEpatents

    Kessler, Terrance J.; Bunkenburg, Joachim; Huang, Hu

    2007-02-13

    A plurality of gratings (G1, G2) are arranged together with a wavefront sensor, actuators, and feedback system to align the gratings in such a manner, that they operate like a single, large, monolithic grating. Sub-wavelength-scale movements in the mechanical mounting, due to environmental influences, are monitored by an interferometer (28), and compensated by precision actuators (16, 18, 20) that maintain the coherently additive mode. The actuators define the grating plane, and are positioned in response to the wavefronts from the gratings and a reference flat, thus producing the interferogram that contains the alignment information. Movement of the actuators is also in response to a diffraction-limited spot on the CCD (36) to which light diffracted from the gratings is focused. The actuator geometry is implemented to take advantage of the compensating nature of the degrees of freedom between gratings, reducing the number of necessary control variables.

  12. Effect of sucrose availability on wheel-running as an operant and as a reinforcing consequence on a multiple schedule: Additive effects of extrinsic and automatic reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Belke, Terry W; Pierce, W David

    2015-07-01

    As a follow up to Belke and Pierce's (2014) study, we assessed the effects of repeated presentation and removal of sucrose solution on the behavior of rats responding on a two-component multiple schedule. Rats completed 15 wheel turns (FR 15) for either 15% or 0% sucrose solution in the manipulated component and lever pressed 10 times on average (VR 10) for an opportunity to complete 15 wheel turns (FR 15) in the other component. In contrast to our earlier study, the components advanced based on time (every 8min) rather than completed responses. Results showed that in the manipulated component wheel-running rates were higher and the latency to initiate running longer when sucrose was present (15%) compared to absent (0% or water); the number of obtained outcomes (sucrose/water), however, did not differ with the presentation and withdrawal of sucrose. For the wheel-running as reinforcement component, rates of wheel turns, overall lever-pressing rates, and obtained wheel-running reinforcements were higher, and postreinforcement pauses shorter, when sucrose was present (15%) than absent (0%) in manipulated component. Overall, our findings suggest that wheel-running rate regardless of its function (operant or reinforcement) is maintained by automatically generated consequences (automatic reinforcement) and is increased as an operant by adding experimentally arranged sucrose reinforcement (extrinsic reinforcement). This additive effect on operant wheel-running generalizes through induction or arousal to the wheel-running as reinforcement component, increasing the rate of responding for opportunities to run and the rate of wheel-running per opportunity.

  13. Cost Reduction Through the Use of Additive Manufacturing (3d Printing) and Collaborative Product Life Cycle Management Technologies to Enhance the Navy’s Maintenance Programs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    Level Military and Civilian Medium Medium Depot Level Civilian High High D. ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING AM, more commonly known as 3D printing, is a...Thermoplastics (e.g., PLA, ABS), HDPE, eutectic metals, edible materials Granular Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) Most metal alloys ...Electron beam melting (EBM) Titanium alloys Selective laser melting (SLM) Titanium alloys , cobalt chrome alloys , stainless steel, aluminum Selective heat

  14. Cost effective stream-gaging strategies for the Lower Colorado River basin; the Blythe field office operations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moss, Marshall E.; Gilroy, Edward J.

    1980-01-01

    This report describes the theoretical developments and illustrates the applications of techniques that recently have been assembled to analyze the cost-effectiveness of federally funded stream-gaging activities in support of the Colorado River compact and subsequent adjudications. The cost effectiveness of 19 stream gages in terms of minimizing the sum of the variances of the errors of estimation of annual mean discharge is explored by means of a sequential-search optimization scheme. The search is conducted over a set of decision variables that describes the number of times that each gaging route is traveled in a year. A gage route is defined as the most expeditious circuit that is made from a field office to visit one or more stream gages and return to the office. The error variance is defined as a function of the frequency of visits to a gage by using optimal estimation theory. Currently a minimum of 12 visits per year is made to any gage. By changing to a six-visit minimum, the same total error variance can be attained for the 19 stations with a budget of 10% less than the current one. Other strategies are also explored. (USGS)

  15. Steam generation in line-focus solar collectors: a comparative assessment of thermal performance, operating stability, and cost issues

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, L.M.; May, E.K.

    1982-04-01

    The engineering and system benefits of using direct steam (in situ) generation in line-focus collectors are assessed. The major emphasis of the analysis is a detailed thermal performance comparison of in situ systems (which utilize unfired boilers). The analysis model developed for this study is discussed in detail. An analysis of potential flow stability problems is also provided along with a cursory cost analysis and an assessment of freeze protection, safety, and control issues. Results indicated a significant thermal performance advantage over the more conventional oil and flash systems and the flow stability does not appear to be a significant problem. In particular, at steam temperatures of 220/sup 0/C (430/sup 0/F) under the chosen set of assumptions, annual delivered energy predictions indicate that the in situ system can deliver 15% more energy than an oil system and 12% more energy than a flash system, with all of the systems using the same collector field. Further, the in situ system may result in a 10% capital cost reduction. Other advantages include improvement in simpler control when compared with flash systems, and fluid handling and safety enhancement when compared with oil systems.

  16. Use of federal assistance for private-operator capital cost in UMTA's (Urban Mass Transportation Administration's) Entrepreneurial Services Challenge Grant Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-03-01

    Dynamic changes in travel patterns stepped up the need for alternative transit service. The explosive growth of employment in the suburbs and the increasing number of city-to-suburb and inter-suburban trips have created 'new markets' that require more flexible and smaller-scale approaches than those provided by large centralized transit systems. UMTA has developed a program to respond to these 'new market' needs--The Entrepreneurial Services Challenge Grant Program (ESCGP). It features start-up capital costs support to entrepreneurs and supports the cost of a provider's own equipment purchase or lease (instead of UMTA buying vehicles and leasing or donating them to a provider). The idea behind the ESCGP is to help start new private transit services that can eventually operate without public subsidy. The program is directed toward two groups: equipment lessors and the entrepreneurial transit service providers. The report presents the ESCGP in detail and illustrates its application through case studies.

  17. A Rapid, Low-Cost Method to Determine Travel Times at Managed Aquifer Recharge Operations Using Noble Gas Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, J. E.; Visser, A.; Singleton, M. J.; Esser, B. K.; Halliwell, M.; Hillegonds, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    Managed aquifer recharge is a key component for the sustainable use of surface water and groundwater in the arid western U.S. When recycled water is a recharge water source, subsurface residence time, required for bacteria and virus deactivation, is best verified by application of an extrinsic tracer. Desirable tracer properties include: no real or perceived health risk, inexpensive even for a large volume of tagged water, large dynamic range, efficient introduction, convenient sampling methods, and rapid, low-cost analysis. We have developed and tested a dissolved noble gas tracer technique ideally suited for tracing large water volumes at managed aquifer recharge facilities. In an application of the method at a water district's facilities in the San Francisco Bay area, Xenon was introduced into a 106 m3 pond over a period of 7 days using a 300 m length of gas-permeable silicone tubing. Samples from the pond, near-field shallow monitoring wells, and production wells about 400 m from the recharge pond were analyzed for dissolved Xe by noble gas membrane inlet mass spectrometry (NGMIMS). The NGMIMS uses a syringe pump, gas-permeable membrane inlet, and quadrupole residual gas analyzer for measurement of noble gas concentrations. Samples are collected in VOA vials, and analysis can be carried out in real-time, with a measurement uncertainty of about 5% for Xe. Tracer first appeared in a production well 136 days after starting the tracer introduction at 0.7% (C/C0) of the peak pond xenon concentration. The cost of the tracer is about US650/106 m3 water, and the NGMIMS was assembled with parts totaling approximately US50,000, making application of the tracer method feasible for most managed aquifer recharge projects. This project is part of the California State Water Resources Control Board Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program.

  18. Can high fields save the tokamak? The challenge of steady-state operation for low cost compact reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freidberg, Jeffrey; Dogra, Akshunna; Redman, William; Cerfon, Antoine

    2016-10-01

    The development of high field, high temperature superconductors is thought to be a game changer for the development of fusion power based on the tokamak concept. We test the validity of this assertion for pilot plant scale reactors (Q 10) for two different but related missions: pulsed operation and steady-state operation. Specifically, we derive a set of analytic criteria that determines the basic design parameters of a given fusion reactor mission. As expected there are far more constraints than degrees of freedom in any given design application. However, by defining the mission of the reactor under consideration, we have been able to determine the subset of constraints that drive the design, and calculate the values for the key parameters characterizing the tokamak. Our conclusions are as follows: 1) for pulsed reactors, high field leads to more compact designs and thus cheaper reactors - high B is the way to go; 2) steady-state reactors with H-mode like transport are large, even with high fields. The steady-state constraint is hard to satisfy in compact designs - high B helps but is not enough; 3) I-mode like transport, when combined with high fields, yields relatively compact steady-state reactors - why is there not more research on this favorable transport regime?

  19. Applications systems verification and transfer project. Volume 7: Cost/benefit analysis for the ASVT on operational applications of satellite snow-cover observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castruccio, P.; Loats, H.; Lloyd, D.; Newman, P.

    1981-01-01

    The results of the OASSO ASVT's were used to estimate the benefits accruing from the added information available from satellite snowcover area measurement. Estimates of the improvement in runoff prediction due to addition of SATSCAM were made by the Colorado ASVT personnel. The improvement estimate is 6-10%. Data were applied to subregions covering the Western States snow area amended by information from the ASVT and other watershed experts to exclude areas which are not impacted by snowmelt runoff. Benefit models were developed for irrigation and hydroenergy uses. The benefit/cost ratio is 72:1. Since only two major benefit contributors were used and since the forecast improvement estimate does not take into account future satellite capabilities these estimates are considered to be conservative. The large magnitude of the benefit/cost ratio supports the utility and applicability of SATSCAM.

  20. OOTW COST TOOLS

    SciTech Connect

    HARTLEY, D.S.III; PACKARD, S.L.

    1998-09-01

    This document reports the results of a study of cost tools to support the analysis of Operations Other Than War (OOTW). It recommends the continued development of the Department of Defense (DoD) Contingency Operational Support Tool (COST) as the basic cost analysis tool for 00TWS. It also recommends modifications to be included in future versions of COST and the development of an 00TW mission planning tool to supply valid input for costing.