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Sample records for additional ozone production

  1. Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) Ozone Climatology (2005-2009): Tropospheric and Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL) Profiles with Comparisons to Omi-based Ozone Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Anne M.; Miller, Sonya K.; Tilmes, Simone; Kollonige, Debra W.; Witte, Jacquelyn C.; Oltmans, Samuel J.; Johnson, Brian J.; Fujiwara, Masatomo; Schmidlin, F. J.; Coetzee, G. J. R.; Komala, Ninong; Maata, Matakite; bt Mohammad, Maznorizan; Nguyo, J.; Mutai, C.; Ogino, S-Y; Da Silva, F. Raimundo; Paes Leme, N. M.; Posny, Francoise; Scheele, Rinus; Selkirk, Henry B.; Shiotani, Masato; Stubi, Rene; Levrat, Gilbert; Calpini, Bertrand; Thouret, Valerie; Tsuruta, Haruo; Canossa, Jessica Valverde; Voemel, Holger; Yonemura, S.; Andres Diaz, Jorge; Tan Thanh, Nguyen T.; Thuy Ha, Hoang T.

    2012-01-01

    We present a regional and seasonal climatology of SHADOZ ozone profiles in the troposphere and tropical tropopause layer (TTL) based on measurements taken during the first five years of Aura, 2005-2009, when new stations joined the network at Hanoi, Vietnam; Hilo, Hawaii; Alajuela Heredia, Costa Rica; Cotonou, Benin. In all, 15 stations operated during that period. A west-to-east progression of decreasing convective influence and increasing pollution leads to distinct tropospheric ozone profiles in three regions: (1) western Pacific eastern Indian Ocean; (2) equatorial Americas (San Cristobal, Alajuela, Paramaribo); (3) Atlantic and Africa. Comparisons in total ozone column from soundings, the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI, on Aura, 2004-) satellite and ground-based instrumentation are presented. Most stations show better agreement with OMI than they did for EPTOMS comparisons (1998-2004; Earth-ProbeTotal Ozone Mapping Spectrometer), partly due to a revised above-burst ozone climatology. Possible station biases in the stratospheric segment of the ozone measurement noted in the first 7 years of SHADOZ ozone profiles are re-examined. High stratospheric bias observed during the TOMS period appears to persist at one station. Comparisons of SHADOZ tropospheric ozone and the daily Trajectory-enhanced Tropospheric Ozone Residual (TTOR) product (based on OMIMLS) show that the satellite-derived column amount averages 25 low. Correlations between TTOR and the SHADOZ sondes are quite good (typical r2 0.5-0.8), however, which may account for why some published residual-based OMI products capture tropospheric interannual variability fairly realistically. On the other hand, no clear explanations emerge for why TTOR-sonde discrepancies vary over a wide range at most SHADOZ sites.

  2. Biofiltration of high formaldehyde loads with ozone additions in long-term operation.

    PubMed

    Maldonado-Diaz, G; Arriaga, S

    2015-01-01

    Formaldehyde (FA) biofiltration was evaluated over 310 days with and without ozone addition. Without ozone, the biofilter was able to treat formaldehyde at inlet loads (ILs) lower than 40 g m(-3) h(-1), maintaining, under this condition, an average removal efficiency (RE) of 88 % for a few days before collapsing to zero. The continuous addition of ozone (90 ppbv) helped to recover the RE from zero to 98 ± 2 % and made it possible to operate at an IL of 40 g m(-3) h(-1) for long periods of operation (107 days). Furthermore, the ozone addition aided in operating the biofilter at a formaldehyde IL of up to 120 g m(-3) h(-1) values that have never before been reached. GC-mass spectrometry (MS) analysis showed that dimethoxymethane was the common compound in leachate during the performance decay. Also, the addition of ozone aided in maintaining an optimal pH in the biofilter with values between 7.5 and 8.2, due to the carbonate species formed during the ozone reactions with formaldehyde and its by-products. Thus, the pH control was confirmed and the alkalinity of the biofilter increased from 334.1 ± 100.3 to 1450 ± 127 mg CaCO3 L(-1) when ozone was added. Ozone addition diminished the exopolymeric substances (EPS) content of biofilm and biofilm thickness without affecting cell viability. Kinetic parameters suggested that the best conditions for carrying out FA biofiltration were reached under ozone addition. The addition of ozone during formaldehyde biofiltration could be a good strategy to maintain the pH and the steady state of the system under high ILs and for long periods of operation.

  3. Ozone’s Impact on Public Health: Contributions from Indoor Exposures to Ozone and Products of Ozone-Initiated Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Weschler, Charles J.

    2006-01-01

    Objective The associations between ozone concentrations measured outdoors and both morbidity and mortality may be partially due to indoor exposures to ozone and ozone-initiated oxidation products. In this article I examine the contributions of such indoor exposures to overall ozone-related health effects by extensive review of the literature as well as further analyses of published data. Findings Daily inhalation intakes of indoor ozone (micrograms per day) are estimated to be between 25 and 60% of total daily ozone intake. This is especially noteworthy in light of recent work indicating little, if any, threshold for ozone’s impact on mortality. Additionally, the present study estimates that average daily indoor intakes of ozone oxidation products are roughly one-third to twice the indoor inhalation intake of ozone alone. Some of these oxidation products are known or suspected to adversely affect human health (e.g., formaldehyde, acrolein, hydroperoxides, fine and ultrafine particles). Indirect evidence supports connections between morbidity/mortality and exposures to indoor ozone and its oxidation products. For example, cities with stronger associations between outdoor ozone and mortality tend to have residences that are older and less likely to have central air conditioning, which implies greater transport of ozone from outdoors to indoors. Conclusions Indoor exposures to ozone and its oxidation products can be reduced by filtering ozone from ventilation air and limiting the indoor use of products and materials whose emissions react with ozone. Such steps might be especially valuable in schools, hospitals, and childcare centers in regions that routinely experience elevated outdoor ozone concentrations. PMID:17035131

  4. Direct ozone production rate measurements and their use in assessing ozone source and receptor regions for Houston in 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baier, Bianca C.; Brune, William H.; Lefer, Barry L.; Miller, David O.; Martins, Douglas K.

    2015-08-01

    Mitigating ozone pollution involves reducing ozone production and relies on complex air-quality models to design reduction strategies and determine their effectiveness. However, modeled ozone does not always agree with observations. A complementary approach is to measure the ozone production rate directly, leading to the development of the Measurement of Ozone Production Sensor (MOPS). Two improved second-generation MOPSv2s were deployed for NASA's DISCOVER-AQ field campaign in September 2013 at the University of Houston, 5 km south of downtown, and Smith Point, at the mouth of the Houston Ship Channel. Median September P(O3) was low, consistent with the observed ambient ozone. The MOPSv2s provided statistically similar results when they were compared for 8 day sat the University of Houston. October measurements yielded a median ozone production rate of 27 ± 11 ppbv hr-1, falling within the range of calculated P(O3) from prior Houston field campaigns in 2006 and 2009. Additionally, diurnal patterns are similar to model-derived ozone production from these previous campaigns. An advection analysis for a high ozone event on 25 September 2013 indicates that the Houston site was in a local ozone source region, while Smith Point ozone was likely enhanced by transport from other areas.

  5. Electrochemical production of ozone and hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor); Hitchens, G. Duncan (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Methods of using ozone have been developed which sterilize instruments and medical wastes, oxidize organics found in wastewater, clean laundry, break down contaminants in soil into a form more readily digested by microbes, kill microorganisms present in food products, and destroy toxins present in food products. The preferred methods for killing microorganisms and destroying toxins use pressurized, humidified, and concentrated ozone produced by an electrochemical cell.

  6. Reaction products of ozone: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Glaze, W H

    1986-01-01

    The reaction products of ozone that form during the oxidation of compounds found in aqueous media are reviewed. Reaction products of ozone are well documented only for a limited number of substrates, and mechanistic information is quite rare. Decomposition of ozone during its reactions, sometimes induced by matrix impurities or by the by-products of the reactions, will generate highly reactive hydroxyl radicals. Thus, even reactions occurring at pH less than 7 may have radical character. More complete destruction of organic substrates may be enhanced by using catalysts, such as ultraviolet radiation or hydrogen peroxide, to accelerate radical formation. However, complete mineralization is generally not practical economically, so partially oxidized by-products can be expected under typical treatment conditions. Ozone by-products tend to be oxygenated compounds that are usually, but not always, more biodegradable and less toxic than xenobiotic precursors. Of particular interest are hydroperoxide by-products, which may have escaped detection because of their lability, and unsaturated aldehydes. Inorganic by-products tend to be in high oxidation states, which in some cases (e.g., some metallic elements) may lead to enhanced removal by flocculation and sedimentation. In other cases oxidation may lead to formation of reactive species such as hypobromous acid from bromide ion or permanganate from manganous ion. In general, more research is required before a valid assessment of the risks of ozone by-products can be made. PMID:3545802

  7. Thermochemical Kinetics for Multireference Systems: Addition Reactions of Ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yan; Tishchenko, Oksana; Gour, Jeffrey R.; Li, Wei; Lutz, Jesse; Piecuch, Piotr; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2009-05-14

    The 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions of ozone to ethyne and ethene provide extreme examples of multireference singlet-state chemistry, and they are examined here to test the applicability of several approaches to thermochemical kinetics of systems with large static correlation. Four different multireference diagnostics are applied to measure the multireference characters of the reactants, products, and transition states; all diagnostics indicate significant multireference character in the reactant portion of the potential energy surfaces. We make a more complete estimation of the effect of quadruple excitations than was previously available, and we use this with CCSDT/CBS estimation of Wheeler et al. (Wheeler, S. E.; Ess, D. H.; Houk, K. N. J. Phys. Chem. A 2008, 112, 1798.) to make new best estimates of the van der Waals association energy, the barrier height, and the reaction energy to form the cycloadduct for both reactions. Comparing with these best estimates, we present comprehensive mean unsigned errors for a variety of coupled cluster, multilevel, and density functional methods. Several computational aspects of multireference reactions are considered: (i) the applicability of multilevel theory, (ii) the convergence of coupled cluster theory for reaction barrier heights, (iii) the applicability of completely renormalized coupled cluster methods to multireference systems, (iv) the treatment by density functional theory, (v) the multireference perturbation theory for multireference reactions, and (vi) the relative accuracy of scaling-type multilevel methods as compared with additive ones. It is found that scaling-type multilevel methods do not perform better than the additive-type multilevel methods. Among the 48 tested density functionals, only M05 reproduces the best estimates within their uncertainty. Multireference perturbation theory based on the complete-active-space reference wave functions constructed using a small number of reaction-specific active orbitals

  8. 40 CFR 75.75 - Additional ozone season calculation procedures for special circumstances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Additional ozone season calculation... § 75.75 Additional ozone season calculation procedures for special circumstances. (a) The owner or operator of a unit that is required to calculate ozone season heat input for purposes of providing...

  9. 40 CFR 75.75 - Additional ozone season calculation procedures for special circumstances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Additional ozone season calculation... § 75.75 Additional ozone season calculation procedures for special circumstances. (a) The owner or operator of a unit that is required to calculate ozone season heat input for purposes of providing...

  10. 40 CFR 75.75 - Additional ozone season calculation procedures for special circumstances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Additional ozone season calculation... § 75.75 Additional ozone season calculation procedures for special circumstances. (a) The owner or operator of a unit that is required to calculate ozone season heat input for purposes of providing...

  11. 40 CFR 75.75 - Additional ozone season calculation procedures for special circumstances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Additional ozone season calculation... § 75.75 Additional ozone season calculation procedures for special circumstances. (a) The owner or operator of a unit that is required to calculate ozone season heat input for purposes of providing...

  12. 40 CFR 75.75 - Additional ozone season calculation procedures for special circumstances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Additional ozone season calculation... § 75.75 Additional ozone season calculation procedures for special circumstances. (a) The owner or operator of a unit that is required to calculate ozone season heat input for purposes of providing...

  13. Ozone Production and Control Strategies for Southern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiu, C.; Liu, S.; Chang, C.; Chen, J.; Chou, C. C.; Lin, C.

    2006-12-01

    An observation-based modeling (OBM) approach is used to estimate the ozone production efficiency and production rate of O3 (P(O3)) in southern Taiwan. The approach can also provide an indirect estimate of the concentration of OH. Measured concentrations of two aromatic hydrocarbons, i.e. ethylbenzene/m,p-xylene, are used to estimate the degree of photochemical processing and the amounts of photochemically consumed NOx and NMHCs. In addition, a one-dimensional (1d) photochemical model is used to compare with the OBM results. The average ozone production efficiency during the field campaign in Kaohsiung-Pingtung area in Fall 2003 is found to be about 5, comparable to previous works. The relationship of P(O3) with NOx is examined in detail and compared to previous studies. The derived OH concentrations from this approach are in fair agreement with values calculated from the 1d photochemical model. The relationship of total oxidants (e.g. O3+NO2) versus initial NOx and NMHCs suggests that reducing NMHCs are more effective in controlling total oxidants than reducing NOx. For O3 control, reducing NMHC is even more effective than NOx due to the NO titration effect. This observation-based approach provides a good alternative for understanding the production of ozone and formulating ozone control strategy in urban and suburban environment without measurements of peroxy radicals.

  14. A Status Report on the SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes) Project and Some Issues Affecting Ozone Climatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Anne M.; Witte, J. C.; McPeters, R. D.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    SHADOZ aims to support the study of local and global patterns in stratospheric and tropospheric ozone and to provide a data set for the validation for satellite products and model calculations of ozone. Southern hemispheric tropical ozone is of particular interest because this region appears to have complex interplay among photochemical ozone formation (from biomass burning and lightning), stratospheric dynamics, convection and possibly cross-hemispheric transport. Balloon-borne ozone instrumentation (ozonesondes), joined with standard radiosondes for measurement of pressure, temperature and relative humidity, is used to collect profiles throughout the troposphere and lower- to mid-stratosphere. A network of 10 southern hemisphere tropical and subtropical stations, called the Southern Hemisphere ADditional OZonesondes (SHADOZ) project, has been established from operational sites to assemble sonde data for 1998-2000. A status report on the archive, with station operating characteristics, will be given, along with some operational issues that may affect data analysis and interpretation.

  15. Tropospheric ozone production regions and the intercontinental origins of surface ozone over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derwent, Richard G.; Utembe, Steven R.; Jenkin, Michael E.; Shallcross, Dudley E.

    2015-07-01

    Ozone tagged labelling schemes have been implemented in a global Lagrangian chemistry-transport model to identify the intercontinental origins of surface ozone in Europe. Stratosphere-troposphere exchange gave rise to between 3 and 5 ppb across Europe, whereas the mid-latitudes of the Middle East, Asia and the Pacific Ocean region contributed 6-8 ppb. Surface ozone levels of 10-16 ppb were associated with the mid-latitudes of North America and the North Atlantic Ocean regions. Appreciable intercontinental ozone production occurred downwind of continental regions and above the surface layer. Intercontinental ozone formation and transport from tropical regions contributed about 4 ppb and was much less efficient compared with that from mid-latitudes. There were approaching 60 chemical processes driving intercontinental ozone formation, of which the HO2 + NO, CH3O2 + NO and CH3COO2 + NO reactions were the most important. Ozone production appeared to be driven by OH oxidation of secondary reaction products rather than the oxidation of primary emitted VOCs. The largest intercontinental ozone contributions amounted to about 20 ppb from North America to European baseline stations, 14 ppb from Asia to North American baseline stations and 10 ppb from Asia to European baseline stations. It is possible that changing intercontinental ozone production and transport could have led to seasonal ozone trends and shifts in seasonal cycles at northern hemisphere mid-latitude baseline ozone monitoring stations.

  16. Ozone interactions with human hair: Ozone uptake rates and product formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandrangi, Lakshmi S.; Morrison, Glenn C.

    In this study, the cumulative ozone uptake, the ozone reaction probability and product yields of volatile aldehydes and ketones were quantified for human scalp hair. Hair was chosen because ozone reacts readily with skin oils and the personal-care products that coat hair. Due to their proximity to the breathing zone, these reactions can influence personal exposure to ozone and its volatile reaction products. Hair samples were collected before and after washing and/or application of personal hair-care products. Samples were exposed to ozone for 24 h in a tubular Teflon reactor; ozone consumption rates and product emission rates were quantified. The mean values of integrated ozone uptake, initial and final follicle reaction probability values for eight washed and unwashed samples were, respectively, 5.1±4.4 μmol O 3 g -1, (13±8)×10 -5, and (1.0±1.3)×10 -5. Unwashed hair taken close to the scalp exhibited the highest integrated ozone uptake and reaction probability, indicating that scalp oils are responsible for much of the ozone reactivity. Otherwise there was no significant difference between washed and unwashed hair. Compounds (geranyl acetone, 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one, and decanal) associated with ozone reacting with sebum were observed as secondary products more frequently from unwashed hair than for washed hair and the summed yield of aldehydes ranged from 0.00 to 0.86. Based on reaction probabilities, cumulative ozone uptake and typical sebum generation rates, ozone flux to skin and hair is anticipated to be nearly transport limited, reducing personal exposure to ozone and increasing exposure to reaction products.

  17. User's guide for SBUV/TOMS ozone derivative products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleig, A. J.; Wellemeyer, C.; Oslik, N.; Lee, D.; Miller, J.; Magatani, R.

    1984-01-01

    A series of products are available derived from the total-ozone and ozone vertical profile results for the Solar Backscattered Ultraviolet/Total-Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (SBUV/TOMS) Nimbus-7 operation. Products available are (1) orbital height-latitude cross sections of the SBUV profile data, (2) daily global total ozone contours in polar coordinates, (3) daily averages of total ozone in global 5x5 degree latitude-longitude grid, (4) daily, monthly and quarterly averages of total ozone and profile data in 10 degree latitude zones, (5) tabular presentation of zonal means, (6) daily global total ozone and profile contours in polar coordinates. The ""Derivative Products User's Guide'' describes each of these products in detail, including their derivation and presentation format. Information is provided on how to order the tapes and microfilm from the National Space Science Data Center.

  18. Aromatic VOCs global influence in the ozone production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera-Perez, David; Pozzer, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Aromatic hydrocarbons are a subgroup of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) of special interest in the atmosphere of urban and semi-urban areas. Aromatics form a high fraction of VOCs, are highly reactive and upon oxidation they are an important source of ozone. These group of VOCs are released to the atmosphere by processes related to biomass burning and fossil fuel consumption, while they are removed from the atmosphere primarily by OH reaction and by dry deposition. In addition, a branch of aromatics (ortho-nitrophenols) produce HONO upon photolysis, which is responsible of certain amount of the OH recycling. Despite their importance in the atmosphere in anthropogenic polluted areas, the influence of aromatics in the ozone production remains largely unknown. This is of particular relevance, being ozone a pollutant with severe side effects on air quality, health and climate. In this work the atmospheric impacts at global scale of the most emitted aromatic VOCs in the gas phase (benzene, toluene, xylenes, ethylbenzene, styrene, phenol, benzaldehyde and trimethylbenzenes) are analysed and assessed. Specifically, the impact on ozone due to aromatic oxidation is estimated, as this is of great interest in large urban areas and can be helpful for developing air pollution control strategies. Further targets are the quantification of the NOx loss and the OH recycling due to aromatic oxidation. In order to investigate these processes, two simulations were performed with the numerical chemistry and climate simulation ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) model. The simulations compare two cases, one with ozone concentrations when aromatics are present or the second one when they are missing. Finally, model simulated ozone is compared against a global set of observations in order to better constrain the model accuracy.

  19. Study on the kinetics and transformation products of salicylic acid in water via ozonation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ruikang; Zhang, Lifeng; Hu, Jiangyong

    2016-06-01

    As salicylic acid is one of widely used pharmaceuticals, its residue has been found in various environmental water systems e.g. wastewater, surface water, treated water and drinking water. It has been reported that salicylic acid can be efficiently removed by advanced oxidation processes, but there are few studies on its transformation products and ozonation mechanisms during ozonation process. The objective of this study is to characterize the transformation products, investigate the degradation mechanisms at different pH, and propose the ozonation pathways of salicylic acid. The results showed that the rate of degradation was about 10 times higher at acidic condition than that at alkaline condition in the first 1 min when 1 mg L(-1) of ozone solution was added into 1 mg L(-1) of salicylic acid solution. It was proposed that ozone direct oxidation mechanism dominates at acidic condition, while indirect OH radical mechanism dominates at alkaline condition. A two stages pseudo-first order reaction was proposed at different pH conditions. Various hydroxylation products, carbonyl compounds and carboxylic acids, such as 2,5-dihydroxylbenzoic acid, 2,3-dihydroxylbenzoic acid, catechol, formaldehyde, glyoxal, acetaldehyde, maleic acid, acetic acid and oxalic acid etc. were identified as ozonation transformation products. In addition, acrylic acid was identified, for the first time, as ozonation transformation products through high resolution liquid chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometer. The information demonstrated in this study will help us to better understand the possible effects of ozonation products on the water quality. The degradation pathways of salicylic acid by ozonation in water sample were proposed. As both O3 and OH radical were important in the reactions, the degradation pathways of salicylic acid by ozonation in water sample were proposed at acidic and basic conditions. To our knowledge, there was no integrated study reported on the ozonation of

  20. Study on the kinetics and transformation products of salicylic acid in water via ozonation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ruikang; Zhang, Lifeng; Hu, Jiangyong

    2016-06-01

    As salicylic acid is one of widely used pharmaceuticals, its residue has been found in various environmental water systems e.g. wastewater, surface water, treated water and drinking water. It has been reported that salicylic acid can be efficiently removed by advanced oxidation processes, but there are few studies on its transformation products and ozonation mechanisms during ozonation process. The objective of this study is to characterize the transformation products, investigate the degradation mechanisms at different pH, and propose the ozonation pathways of salicylic acid. The results showed that the rate of degradation was about 10 times higher at acidic condition than that at alkaline condition in the first 1 min when 1 mg L(-1) of ozone solution was added into 1 mg L(-1) of salicylic acid solution. It was proposed that ozone direct oxidation mechanism dominates at acidic condition, while indirect OH radical mechanism dominates at alkaline condition. A two stages pseudo-first order reaction was proposed at different pH conditions. Various hydroxylation products, carbonyl compounds and carboxylic acids, such as 2,5-dihydroxylbenzoic acid, 2,3-dihydroxylbenzoic acid, catechol, formaldehyde, glyoxal, acetaldehyde, maleic acid, acetic acid and oxalic acid etc. were identified as ozonation transformation products. In addition, acrylic acid was identified, for the first time, as ozonation transformation products through high resolution liquid chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometer. The information demonstrated in this study will help us to better understand the possible effects of ozonation products on the water quality. The degradation pathways of salicylic acid by ozonation in water sample were proposed. As both O3 and OH radical were important in the reactions, the degradation pathways of salicylic acid by ozonation in water sample were proposed at acidic and basic conditions. To our knowledge, there was no integrated study reported on the ozonation of

  1. Ozone production by a dc corona discharge in air contaminated by n-heptane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekárek, S.

    2008-01-01

    Beneficial purposes of ozone such as elimination of odours, harmful bacteria and mildew can be used for transportation of food, fruits and vegetables with the aim to extend their storage life. To date the main technique used for this purpose in the transportation of these commodities, e.g. by trucks, was cooling. Here a combination of cooling together with the supply of ozone into containers with these commodities is considered. For these purposes we studied the effect of air contamination by n-heptane (part of automotive fuels) and humidity on ozone production by a dc hollow needle to mesh corona discharge. We found that, for both polarities of the needle electrode, addition of n-heptane to air (a) decreases ozone production; (b) causes discharge poisoning to occur at lower current than for air; (c) does not substantially influence the current for which the ozone production reaches the maximum. Finally the maximum ozone production for the discharge in air occurs for the same current as the maximum ozone production for the discharge contaminated by n-heptane. We also found that humidity decreases ozone production from air contaminated by n-heptane irrespective of the polarity of the coronating needle electrode. This dependence is stronger for the discharge with the needle biased positively.

  2. Ozone production in four major cities of China: sensitivity to ozone precursors and heterogeneous processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, L. K.; Wang, T.; Gao, J.; Ding, A. J.; Zhou, X. H.; Blake, D. R.; Wang, X. F.; Saunders, S. M.; Fan, S. J.; Zuo, H. C.; Zhang, Q. Z.; Wang, W. X.

    2013-10-01

    Despite a large volume of research over a number of years, our understandings of the key precursors that control tropospheric ozone production and the impacts of heterogeneous processes remain incomplete. In this study, we analyze measurements of ozone and its precursors made at rural/suburban sites downwind of four large Chinese cities - Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Lanzhou. At each site the same measurement techniques were utilized and a photochemical box model based on the Master Chemical Mechanism (v3.2) was applied, to minimize uncertainties in comparison of the results due to differences in methodology. All four cities suffered from severe ozone pollution. At the rural site of Beijing, export of the well-processed urban plumes contributed to the extremely high ozone levels (up to an hourly value of 286 ppbv), while the pollution observed at the suburban sites of Shanghai, Guangzhou and Lanzhou was characterized by intense in-situ ozone production. The major anthropogenic hydrocarbons were alkenes and aromatics in Beijing and Shanghai, aromatics in Guangzhou, and alkenes in Lanzhou. The ozone production was found to be in a VOCs-limited regime in both Shanghai and Guangzhou, and a mixed regime in Lanzhou. In Shanghai, the ozone formation was most sensitive to aromatics and alkenes, while in Guangzhou aromatics were the predominant ozone precursors. In Lanzhou, either controlling NOx or reducing emissions of olefins from the petrochemical industry would mitigate the local ozone production. The potential impacts of several heterogeneous processes on the ozone formation were assessed. The hydrolysis of dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5), uptake of the hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) on particles, and surface reactions of NO2 forming nitrous acid (HONO) present considerable sources of uncertainty in the current studies of ozone chemistry. Further efforts are urgently required to better understand these processes and refine atmospheric models.

  3. Effect of ozone pretreatment on hydrogen production from barley straw.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiangning; Ein-Mozaffari, Farhad; Upreti, Simant

    2013-09-01

    Application of ozone technology to lignocellulosic biohydrogen production was explored with a barley straw. Ozone pretreatment effectively degraded the straw lignin and increased reducing sugar yield. A simultaneous enzyme hydrolysis and dark fermentation experiment was conducted using a mixed anaerobic consortium together with saccharification enzymes. Both untreated and ozonated samples produced hydrogen. Compared to the untreated group, hydrogen produced by the groups ozonated for 15, 30, 45 and 90 min increased 99%, 133%, 166% and 94%, respectively. Some inhibitory effect on hydrogen production was observed with the samples ozonated for 90 min, and the inhibition was on the fermentative microorganisms, not the saccharification enzymes. These results demonstrate that production of biohydrogen from barley straw, a lignocellulosic biomass, can be significantly enhanced by ozone pretreatment.

  4. The cascade mechanism to explain ozone toxicity: the role of lipid ozonation products.

    PubMed

    Pryor, W A; Squadrito, G L; Friedman, M

    1995-12-01

    Ozone is so reactive that it can be predicted to be entirely consumed as it passes through the first layer of tissue it contacts at the lung/air interface. This layer includes the lung lining fluid (tracheobronchial surface fluid and alveolar and small airway lining fluid) and, where the lung lining fluid is thin or absent, the membranes of the epithelial cells that line the airways. Therefore, the biochemical changes that follow the inhalation of ozone must be relayed into deeper tissue strat by a cascade of ozonation products. Lipid ozonation products (LOP) are suggested to be the most likely species to act as signal transduction molecules. This is because unsaturated fatty acids are present in the lipids in both the lung lining fluid and in pulmonary cell bilayers, and ozone reacts with unsaturated fatty acids to produce ozone-specific products. Further, lipid ozonation products are finite in number, have structures that are predictable from the Criegee ozonation mechanism, and are small, diffusible, stable (or metastable) molecules. Preliminary data show that individual LOP cause the activation of specific lipases, which trigger the release of endogenous mediators of inflammation.

  5. Ozonation of piperidine, piperazine and morpholine: Kinetics, stoichiometry, product formation and mechanistic considerations.

    PubMed

    Tekle-Röttering, Agnes; Jewell, Kevin S; Reisz, Erika; Lutze, Holger V; Ternes, Thomas A; Schmidt, Winfried; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2016-01-01

    Piperidine, piperazine and morpholine as archetypes for secondary heterocyclic amines, a structural unit that is often present in pharmaceuticals (e.g., ritalin, cetirizine, timolol, ciprofloxacin) were investigated in their reaction with ozone. In principle the investigated compounds can be degraded with ozone in a reasonable time, based on their high reaction rate constants with respect to ozone (1.9 × 10(4)-2.4 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1)). However, transformation is insufficient (13-16%), most likely due to a chain reaction, which decomposes ozone. This conclusion is based on OH scavenging experiments, leading to increased compound transformation (18-27%). The investigated target compounds are similar in their kinetic and stoichiometric characteristics. However, the mechanistic considerations based on product formation indicate various reaction pathways. Piperidine reacts with ozone via a nonradical addition reaction to N-hydroxypiperidine (yield: 92% with and 94% without scavenging, with respect to compound transformation). However, piperazine degradation with ozone does not lead to N-hydroxypiperazine. In the morpholine/ozone reaction, N-hydroxymorpholine was identified. Additional oxidation pathways in all cases involved the formation of OH with high yields. One important pathway of piperazine and morpholine by ozonation could be the formation of C-centered radicals after ozone or OH radical attack. Subsequently, O2 addition forms unstable peroxyl radicals, which in one pathway loose superoxide radicals by generating a carbon-centered cation. Subsequent hydrolysis of the carbon-centered cation leads to formaldehyde, whereby ozonation of the N-hydroxy products can proceed in the same way and in addition give rise to hydroxylamine. A second pathway of the short-lived peroxyl radicals could be a dimerization to form short-lived tetraoxides, which cleave by forming hydrogen peroxide. All three products have been found. PMID:26624229

  6. Nimbus 7 solar backscatter ultraviolet (SBUV) ozone products user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleig, Albert J.; Mcpeters, R. D.; Bhartia, P. K.; Schlesinger, Barry M.; Cebula, Richard P.; Klenk, K. F.; Taylor, Steven L.; Heath, Donald F.

    1990-01-01

    Three ozone tape products from the Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV) experiment aboard Nimbus 7 were archived at the National Space Science Data Center. The experiment measures the fraction of incoming radiation backscattered by the Earth's atmosphere at 12 wavelengths. In-flight measurements were used to monitor changes in the instrument sensitivity. Total column ozone is derived by comparing the measurements with calculations of what would be measured for different total ozone amounts. The altitude distribution is retrieved using an optimum statistical technique for the inversion. The estimated initial error in the absolute scale for total ozone is 2 percent, with a 3 percent drift over 8 years. The profile error depends on latitude and height, smallest at 3 to 10 mbar; the drift increases with increasing altitude. Three tape products are described. The High Density SBUV (HDSBUV) tape contains the final derived products - the total ozone and the vertical ozone profile - as well as much detailed diagnostic information generated during the retrieval process. The Compressed Ozone (CPOZ) tape contains only that subset of HDSBUV information, including total ozone and ozone profiles, considered most useful for scientific studies. The Zonal Means Tape (ZMT) contains daily, weekly, monthly and quarterly averages of the derived quantities over 10 deg latitude zones.

  7. The influence of temperature on ozone production under varying NOx conditions - a modelling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coates, Jane; Mar, Kathleen A.; Ojha, Narendra; Butler, Tim M.

    2016-09-01

    emitted VOCs. The box model simulations approximating stagnant conditions and the maximal ozone production chemical regime reproduced the 2 ppbv increase in ozone per degree Celsius from the observational and regional model data over central Europe. The simulated ozone-temperature relationship was more sensitive to mixing than the choice of chemical mechanism. Our analysis suggests that reductions in NOx emissions would be required to offset the additional ozone production due to an increase in temperature in the future.

  8. New Insights on Tropical Ozone from SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes) Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Anne M.

    2004-01-01

    The SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes) ozone sounding network was initiated in 1998 to improve the coverage of tropical in-situ ozone measurements for satellite validation, algorithm development and related process studies. Over 2000 soundings have been archived at the website, , for 12 stations: Ascension Island; Nairobi and Malindi, Kenya; Irene, South Africa; Reunion Island, Watukosek, Java; Fiji; Tahiti; American Samoa; San Cristobal, Galapagos; Natal, Brazil; Paramaribo, Surinam. Key results from SHADOZ will be described from among the following: 1) By using ECC sondes with similar procedures, 5-10% accuracy and precision (1-sigma) of the sonde total ozone measurement was achieved; 2) Week-to-week variability in tropospheric ozone is so great that statistics are frequently not Gaussian; most stations vary up to a factor of 3 in tropospheric column over the course of a year; 3) Longitudinal variability in tropospheric ozone profiles is a consistent feature, with a 10-15 DU column-integrated difference between Atlantic and Pacific sites; this causes a "zonal wave-one" feature in total ozone. 4) The ozone record from Paramaribo, Surinam (6N, 55W) is a marked contrast to southern tropical ozone because Surinam is often north of the Intertropical Convergence Zone; 5) Indian Ocean region pollution may contribute up to half of the excess ozone observed in the south tropical Atlantic paradox in the December-January-February period of the year.

  9. Forests and ozone: productivity, carbon storage, and feedbacks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bin; Shugart, Herman H.; Shuman, Jacquelyn K.; Lerdau, Manuel T.

    2016-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone is a serious air-pollutant, with large impacts on plant function. This study demonstrates that tropospheric ozone, although it damages plant metabolism, does not necessarily reduce ecosystem processes such as productivity or carbon sequestration because of diversity change and compensatory processes at the community scale ameliorate negative impacts at the individual level. This study assesses the impact of ozone on forest composition and ecosystem dynamics with an individual-based gap model that includes basic physiology as well as species-specific metabolic properties. Elevated tropospheric ozone leads to no reduction of forest productivity and carbon stock and to increased isoprene emissions, which result from enhanced dominance by isoprene-emitting species (which tolerate ozone stress better than non-emitters). This study suggests that tropospheric ozone may not diminish forest carbon sequestration capacity. This study also suggests that, because of the often positive relationship between isoprene emission and ozone formation, there is a positive feedback loop between forest communities and ozone, which further aggravates ozone pollution. PMID:26899381

  10. Ozone production chemistry in the presence of urban plumes.

    PubMed

    Brune, W H; Baier, B C; Thomas, J; Ren, X; Cohen, R C; Pusede, S E; Browne, E C; Goldstein, A H; Gentner, D R; Keutsch, F N; Thornton, J A; Harrold, S; Lopez-Hilfiker, F D; Wennberg, P O

    2016-07-18

    Ozone pollution affects human health, especially in urban areas on hot sunny days. Its basic photochemistry has been known for decades and yet it is still not possible to correctly predict the high ozone levels that are the greatest threat. The CalNex_SJV study in Bakersfield CA in May/June 2010 provided an opportunity to examine ozone photochemistry in an urban area surrounded by agriculture. The measurement suite included hydroxyl (OH), hydroperoxyl (HO2), and OH reactivity, which are compared with the output of a photochemical box model. While the agreement is generally within combined uncertainties, measured HO2 far exceeds modeled HO2 in NOx-rich plumes. OH production and loss do not balance as they should in the morning, and the ozone production calculated with measured HO2 is a decade greater than that calculated with modeled HO2 when NO levels are high. Calculated ozone production using measured HO2 is twice that using modeled HO2, but this difference in calculated ozone production has minimal impact on the assessment of NOx-sensitivity or VOC-sensitivity for midday ozone production. Evidence from this study indicates that this important discrepancy is not due to the HO2 measurement or to the sampling of transported plumes but instead to either emissions of unknown organic species that accompany the NO emissions or unknown photochemistry involving nitrogen oxides and hydrogen oxides, possibly the hypothesized reaction OH + NO + O2 → HO2 + NO2. PMID:27101799

  11. ADEOS Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) Data Products User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, A.; Bhartia, P. K.; McPeters, R.; Herman, J.; Wellemeyer, C.; Jaross, G.; Seftor, C.; Torres, O.; Labow, G.; Byerly, W.; Moy, L.; Taylor, S.; Swissler, T.; Cebula, R.

    1998-01-01

    Two data products from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (ADEOS/TOMS) have been archived at the Distributed Active Archive Center, in the form of Hierarchical Data Format files. The ADEOS/ TOMS began taking measurements on September 11, 1996, and ended on June 29, 1997. The instrument measured backscattered Earth radiance and incoming solar irradiance; their ratio was used in ozone retrievals. Changes in the reflectivity of the solar diffuser used for the irradiance measurement were monitored using a carousel of three diffusers, each exposed to the degrading effects of solar irradiation at different rates. The algorithm to retrieve total column ozone compares measured Earth radiances at sets of three wavelengths with radiances calculated for different total ozone values, solar zenith angles, and optical paths. The initial error in the absolute scale for TOMS total ozone is 3 percent, the one standard deviation random error is 2 percent, and the drift is less than 0.5 percent over the 9-month data record. The Level 2 product contains the measured radiances, the derived total ozone amount, and reflectivity information for each scan position. The Level 3 product contains daily total ozone and reflectivity in a 1-degree latitude by 1.25 degrees longitude grid. The Level 3 files containing estimates of UVB at the Earth surface and tropospheric aerosol information will also be available. Detailed descriptions of both HDF data files and the CDROM product are provided.

  12. Products of ozone-initiated chemistry in a simulated aircraft environment.

    PubMed

    Wisthaler, Armin; Tamás, Gyöngyi; Wyon, David P; Strøm-Tejsen, Peter; Space, David; Beauchamp, Jonathan; Hansel, Armin; Märk, Tilmann D; Weschler, Charles J

    2005-07-01

    We used proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) to examine the products formed when ozone reacted with the materials in a simulated aircraft cabin, including a loaded high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter in the return air system. Four conditions were examined: cabin (baseline), cabin plus ozone, cabin plus soiled T-shirts (surrogates for human occupants), and cabin plus soiled T-shirts plus ozone. The addition of ozone to the cabin without T-shirts, at concentrations typically encountered during commercial air travel, increased the mixing ratio (v:v concentration) of detected pollutants from 35 ppb to 80 ppb. Most of this increase was due to the production of saturated and unsaturated aldehydes and tentatively identified low-molecular-weight carboxylic acids. The addition of soiled T-shirts, with no ozone present, increased the mixing ratio of pollutants in the cabin air only slightly, whereas the combination of soiled T-shirts and ozone increased the mixing ratio of detected pollutants to 110 ppb, with more than 20 ppb originating from squalene oxidation products (acetone, 4-oxopentanal, and 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one). For the two conditions with ozone present, the more-abundant oxidation products included acetone/propanal (8-20 ppb), formaldehyde (8-10 ppb), nonanal (approximately 6 ppb), 4-oxopentanal (3-7 ppb), acetic acid (approximately 7 ppb), formic acid (approximately 3 ppb), and 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one (0.5-2.5 ppb), as well as compounds tentatively identified as acrolein (0.6-1 ppb) and crotonaldehyde (0.6-0.8 ppb). The odor thresholds of certain products were exceeded. With an outdoor air exchange of 3 h(-1) and a recirculation rate of 20 h(-1), the measured ozone surface removal rate constant was 6.3 h(-1) when T-shirts were not present, compared to 11.4 h(-1) when T-shirts were present.

  13. Products of ozone-initiated chemistry in a simulated aircraft environment.

    PubMed

    Wisthaler, Armin; Tamás, Gyöngyi; Wyon, David P; Strøm-Tejsen, Peter; Space, David; Beauchamp, Jonathan; Hansel, Armin; Märk, Tilmann D; Weschler, Charles J

    2005-07-01

    We used proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) to examine the products formed when ozone reacted with the materials in a simulated aircraft cabin, including a loaded high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter in the return air system. Four conditions were examined: cabin (baseline), cabin plus ozone, cabin plus soiled T-shirts (surrogates for human occupants), and cabin plus soiled T-shirts plus ozone. The addition of ozone to the cabin without T-shirts, at concentrations typically encountered during commercial air travel, increased the mixing ratio (v:v concentration) of detected pollutants from 35 ppb to 80 ppb. Most of this increase was due to the production of saturated and unsaturated aldehydes and tentatively identified low-molecular-weight carboxylic acids. The addition of soiled T-shirts, with no ozone present, increased the mixing ratio of pollutants in the cabin air only slightly, whereas the combination of soiled T-shirts and ozone increased the mixing ratio of detected pollutants to 110 ppb, with more than 20 ppb originating from squalene oxidation products (acetone, 4-oxopentanal, and 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one). For the two conditions with ozone present, the more-abundant oxidation products included acetone/propanal (8-20 ppb), formaldehyde (8-10 ppb), nonanal (approximately 6 ppb), 4-oxopentanal (3-7 ppb), acetic acid (approximately 7 ppb), formic acid (approximately 3 ppb), and 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one (0.5-2.5 ppb), as well as compounds tentatively identified as acrolein (0.6-1 ppb) and crotonaldehyde (0.6-0.8 ppb). The odor thresholds of certain products were exceeded. With an outdoor air exchange of 3 h(-1) and a recirculation rate of 20 h(-1), the measured ozone surface removal rate constant was 6.3 h(-1) when T-shirts were not present, compared to 11.4 h(-1) when T-shirts were present. PMID:16053080

  14. Removal and transformation products of ibuprofen obtained during ozone- and ultrasound-based oxidative treatment.

    PubMed

    Yargeau, Viviane; Danylo, Félix

    2015-01-01

    The oxidation of ibuprofen (IBP) in water was evaluated using oxidative treatments: ozonation, sonication, hydrogen peroxide addition and combinations of these processes. After 20 minutes of treatment, ozone coupled with hydrogen peroxide at pH 7, 15 °C, an ozone dose of 16 mg/L and a hydrogen peroxide concentration of 7.1 mg/L was found to have the highest IBP (95%) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) (41%) removals. A synergistic effect was observed for the combined ozonation/sonication process, which might be explained by an improved mass transfer of ozone in the solution due to the presence of ultrasonic pressure waves. Transformation products were detected in the treated solutions. The nature of five of these products was confirmed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), including 4-isobutylacetophenone (4-IBAP), oxo-IBP, 4-acetylbenzoic acid, 4-ethybenzaldehyde and oxalic acid. In addition, COD analyses for each experiment showed that the ratio of %COD removal to %IBP removal was highest with sonication; suggesting that this oxidative process offers other mechanisms of removal which may lead to further degradation of products formed. This study presents the first data on removal of IBP by sonication coupled to ozonation and provides some insight into the potential of this combined treatment approach for the removal of contaminants of emerging concern. PMID:26204083

  15. Sensitivty of ozone production to organic nitrate formation in Sacramento and Los Angeles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browne, E. C.; Cohen, R. C.

    2010-12-01

    Total alkyl and multifunctional nitrates (ΣANs) are formed by a minor channel of the NO + RO2 reaction and thus represent a termination step of ozone production. ΣANs formation becomes most significant in the cross-over regime between NOx saturated (VOC limited) and NOx limited ozone production. In models that fail to account for changing rates of ΣANs formation, the NOx and VOC levels are considered independent parameters: to lower ozone production all that is needed is to decrease the limiting parameter. It has been recently shown that this view on ozone production may lead to counterproductive air quality control strategies (Farmer et al., 2010 submitted). Using both an analytical model and measurements from Mexico City, Farmer et al. demonstrated that ΣANs formation effectively couples VOCs and NOx. Analytical models show that VOC reduction strategies that result in a decrease in ΣANs yield will result in increased ozone production for NOx less than 3 ppb. We expand upon the work of Farmer et al. by investigating the sensitivity of ozone production to ΣANs formation using a regional three dimensional chemical transport model, WRF-CHEM. The standard chemistry treats all ΣANs species as a single model species with a given lifetime and NOx recycling efficiency. We implement a revised ΣANs representation that treats monofunctional, multifunctional saturated, multifunctional unsaturated, aromatic, isoprene, and monoterpene nitrates as unique model species with appropriate lifetimes and NOx recycling efficiencies. We investigate how this improved ΣANs representation affects ozone, and we compare these results to ground and airborne measurements in the Sacramento and Los Angeles areas. Additionally, we investigate the sensitivity of ozone formation to ΣANs formation rate, lifetime, and NOx recycling efficiency.

  16. Phospholipid Ozonation Products Activate the 5-Lipoxygenase Pathway in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zemski Berry, Karin A; Murphy, Robert C

    2016-08-15

    Ozone is a highly reactive environmental toxicant that can react with the double bonds of lipids in pulmonary surfactant. This study was undertaken to investigate the proinflammatory properties of the major lipid-ozone product in pulmonary surfactant, 1-palmitoyl-2-(9'-oxo-nonanoyl)-glycerophosphocholine (16:0/9al-PC), with respect to eicosanoid production. A dose-dependent increase in the formation of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) products was observed in murine resident peritoneal macrophages (RPM) and alveolar macrophages (AM) upon treatment with 16:0/9al-PC. In contrast, the production of cyclooxygenase (COX) derived eicosanoids did not change from basal levels in the presence of 16:0/9al-PC. When 16:0/9al-PC and the TLR2 ligand, zymosan, were added to RPM or AM, an enhancement of 5-LO product formation along with a concomitant decrease in COX product formation was observed. Neither intracellular calcium levels nor arachidonic acid release was influenced by the addition of 16:0/9al-PC to RPM. Results from mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor studies and direct measurement of phosphorylation of MAPKs revealed that 16:0/9al-PC activates the p38 MAPK pathway in RPM, which results in the activation of 5-LO. Our results indicate that 16:0/9al-PC has a profound effect on the eicosanoid pathway, which may have implications in inflammatory pulmonary disease states where eicosanoids have been shown to play a role. PMID:27448436

  17. Ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-06-01

    The author discusses the debate over whether concern about a hole in the ozone layer in Antarctic is real or science fiction. There is a growing consensus that efforts must be taken to protect the ozone layer. The issue now is not whether chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) should be controlled and regulated but how much and how soon. The United States has urged that the production of dangerous CFCs, and any other chemicals that affect the ozone layer, be restricted immediately to current levels and that their use be reduced 95 percent over the next decade. The American position was too strong for many European nations and the Japanese. Negotiations at an international conference on the matter broke down. The breakdown is due in part to a more acute concern for environmental matters in the United States than exists in many countries. Meanwhile CFCs are linked to another environmental problem that equally threatens the world - the Greenhouse Effect. The earth is in a natural warming period, but man could be causing it to become even warmer. The Greenhouse Effect could have a catastrophic impact on mankind, although nothing has been proven yet.

  18. Photochemical production of ozone and control strategy for Southern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiu, Chein-Jung; Liu, Shaw Chen; Chang, Chih-Chung; Chen, Jen-Ping; Chou, Charles C. K.; Lin, Chuan-Yao; Young, Chea-Yuan

    An observation-based method (OBM) is developed to evaluate the ozone (O 3) production efficiency (O 3 molecules produced per NO x molecule consumed) and O 3 production rate ( P(O 3)) during a field campaign in southern Taiwan. The method can also provide an estimate of the concentration of OH. A key step in the method is to use observed concentrations of two aromatic hydrocarbons, namely ethylbenzene and m, p-xylene, to estimate the degree of photochemical processing and amounts of photochemically consumed NO x and NMHCs by OH. In addition, total oxidant (O 3+NO 2) instead of O 3 itself turns out to be very useful for representing ozone production in the OBM approach. The average O 3 production efficiency during the field campaign in Fall (2003) is found to be about 10.2±3.9. The relationship of P(O 3) with NO x is examined and compared with a one-dimensional (1D) photochemical model. Values of P(O 3) derived from the OBM are slightly lower than those calculated in the 1D model. However, OH concentrations estimated by the OBM are about a factor of 2 lower than the 1D model. Fresh emissions, which affect the degree of photochemical processing appear to be a major cause of the underestimate. We have developed a three-dimensional (3D) OBM O 3 production diagram that resembles the EKMA ozone isopleth diagram to study the relationship of the total oxidant versus O 3 precursors. The 3D OBM O 3 production diagram suggests that reducing emissions of NMHCs are more effective in controlling O 3 than reducing NO x. However, significant uncertainties remain in the OBM, and considerable more work is required to minimize these uncertainties before a definitive control strategy can be reached. The observation-based approach provides a good alternative to measuring peroxy radicals for evaluating the production of O 3 and formulating O 3 control strategy in urban and suburban environments.

  19. New Directions: Ozone-initiated reaction products indoors may be more harmful than ozone itself

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weschler, Charles J.

    2004-10-01

    Epidemiological studies have found associations between ozone concentrations measured at outdoor monitoring stations and certain adverse health outcomes. As a recent example, Gent et al. (2003, Journal of the American Medical Association 290, 1859-1867) have observed an association between ozone levels and respiratory symptoms as well as the use of maintenance medication by 271 asthmatic children living in Connecticut and the Springfield area of Massachusetts. In another example, Gilliland et al. (2001, Epidemiology 12, 43-54) detected an association between short-term increases in ozone levels and increased absences among 4th grade students from 12 southern California communities during the period from January to June 1996. Although children may spend a significant amount of time outdoors, especially during periods when ozone levels are elevated, they spend a much larger fraction of their time indoors. I hypothesize that exposure to the products of ozone-initiated indoor chemistry is more directly responsible for the health effects observed in the cited epidemiological studies than is exposure to outdoor ozone itself.

  20. Radical Budget and Ozone Production in Houston, TX during SHARP 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, X.; van Duin, D.; Cazorla, M.; Chen, S.; Brune, W. H.; Flynn, J. H.; Lefer, B. L.; Dibb, J. E.; Wong, K.; Tsai, C.; Stutz, J.

    2010-12-01

    The chemistry of atmospheric radicals, especially the hydroxyl radical (OH) and hydroperoxyl radical (HO2), together called HOx, is deeply involved in the formation of the secondary pollutants ozone and fine particles. Radical precursors such as nitrous acid (HONO) and formaldehyde (HCHO) significantly affects HOx budget in urban environments like Houston. These chemical processes connect surface emissions, both human and natural, to local and regional pollution, and climate change. Using the data collected during the Study of Houston Atmospheric Radical Precursors (SHARP) in Houston, TX in spring 2009, we test our understanding of photochemistry through the analysis of the radical budget and ozone production. A numerical box model was used to simulate the oxidation processes and observed OH and HO2 during this study. Using the model results, we calculate the radical budget and analyze the sensitivity of ozone production to nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The radical budget shows that the photolysis of HONO and the photolysis of HCHO were significant HOx sources in this urban environment. We also compare the observed OH reactivity and ozone production rate to the model calculations. In general, ozone production rate was VOC limited in the morning and NOx limited in the afternoon. This relationship results from the ratio of VOCs to NOx in Houston. Results from this study provide additional support for regulatory actions to reduce reactive VOCs in Houston in order to reduce ozone and other secondary pollutants.

  1. Ozonation of anilines: Kinetics, stoichiometry, product identification and elucidation of pathways.

    PubMed

    Tekle-Röttering, Agnes; von Sonntag, Clemens; Reisz, Erika; Eyser, Claudia Vom; Lutze, Holger V; Türk, Jochen; Naumov, Sergej; Schmidt, Winfried; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2016-07-01

    Anilines as archetypes for aromatic amines, which play an important role in the production of, e.g., dyestuffs, plastics, pesticides or pharmaceuticals were investigated in their reaction with ozone. Due to their high reactivity towards ozone (1.2 × 10(5)-2.4 × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1)) the investigated aniline bearing different substituents are readily degraded in ozonation. However, around 4 to 5 molecules of ozone are needed to yield a successful transformation of aniline, most likely due to a chain reaction that decomposes ozone without compound degradation. This is inferred from OH radical scavenging experiments, in which compound transformation per ozone consumed is increased. Mechanistic considerations based on product formation indicate that addition to the aromatic ring is the preferential reaction in the case of aniline, p-chloroaniline and p-nitroaniline (high amounts of o-hydroxyaniline, p-hydroxyaniline, chloride, nitrite and nitrate, respectively were found). For aniline an addition to the nitrogen happens but to a small extent, since nitroso- and nitrobenzene were observed as well. In the case of N-methylaniline and N,N-dimethylaniline, an electron transfer reaction from nitrogen to ozone was proven due to the formation of formaldehyde. In contrast, for p-methylaniline and p-methoxyaniline the formation of formaldehyde may result from an electron transfer reaction at the aromatic ring. Additional oxidation pathways for all of the anilines under study are reactions of hydroxyl radicals formed in the electron transfer of ozone with the anilines (OH radical yields = 34-59%). These reactions may form aminyl radicals which in the case of aniline can terminate in bimolecular reactions with other compounds such as the determined o-hydroxyaniline by yielding the detected 2-amino-5-anilino-benzochinon-anil. PMID:27088249

  2. Ozonation of anilines: Kinetics, stoichiometry, product identification and elucidation of pathways.

    PubMed

    Tekle-Röttering, Agnes; von Sonntag, Clemens; Reisz, Erika; Eyser, Claudia Vom; Lutze, Holger V; Türk, Jochen; Naumov, Sergej; Schmidt, Winfried; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2016-07-01

    Anilines as archetypes for aromatic amines, which play an important role in the production of, e.g., dyestuffs, plastics, pesticides or pharmaceuticals were investigated in their reaction with ozone. Due to their high reactivity towards ozone (1.2 × 10(5)-2.4 × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1)) the investigated aniline bearing different substituents are readily degraded in ozonation. However, around 4 to 5 molecules of ozone are needed to yield a successful transformation of aniline, most likely due to a chain reaction that decomposes ozone without compound degradation. This is inferred from OH radical scavenging experiments, in which compound transformation per ozone consumed is increased. Mechanistic considerations based on product formation indicate that addition to the aromatic ring is the preferential reaction in the case of aniline, p-chloroaniline and p-nitroaniline (high amounts of o-hydroxyaniline, p-hydroxyaniline, chloride, nitrite and nitrate, respectively were found). For aniline an addition to the nitrogen happens but to a small extent, since nitroso- and nitrobenzene were observed as well. In the case of N-methylaniline and N,N-dimethylaniline, an electron transfer reaction from nitrogen to ozone was proven due to the formation of formaldehyde. In contrast, for p-methylaniline and p-methoxyaniline the formation of formaldehyde may result from an electron transfer reaction at the aromatic ring. Additional oxidation pathways for all of the anilines under study are reactions of hydroxyl radicals formed in the electron transfer of ozone with the anilines (OH radical yields = 34-59%). These reactions may form aminyl radicals which in the case of aniline can terminate in bimolecular reactions with other compounds such as the determined o-hydroxyaniline by yielding the detected 2-amino-5-anilino-benzochinon-anil.

  3. The Effect of Lightning NOx Production on Surface Ozone in the Continental United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaynak, B.; Hu, Y.; Martin, R. V.; Russell, A. G.; Choi, Y.; Wang, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Lightning NO(x) emissions calculated using the US National Lightning Detection Network data were found to account for 30% of the total NO(x) emissions for July August 2004, a period chosen both for having higher lightning NO(x) production and high ozone levels, thus maximizing the likelihood that such emissions could impact peak ozone levels. Including such emissions led to modest, but sometimes significant increases in simulated surface ozone when using the Community Multi-scale Air Quality Model (CMAQ). Three model simulations were performed, two with the addition of lightning NO(x) emissions, and one without. Domain-wide daily maximum 8-h ozone changes due to lightning NO(x) were less than 2 ppbv in 71 % of the cases with a maximum of 10 ppbv; whereas the difference in 1-h ozone was less than 2 ppbv in 77% of the cases with a maximum of 6 ppbv. Daily maximum 1-h and 8-h ozone for grids containing O3 monitoring stations changed slightly, with more than 43% of the cases differing less than 2 ppbv. The greatest differences were 42 ppbv for both 1-h and 8-h O3 , though these tended to be on days of lower ozone. Lightning impacts on the season-wide maximum 1-h and 8-h averaged ozone decreased starting from the 1 st to 4th highest values (an average of 4th highest, 8-h values is used for attainment demonstration in the US). Background ozone values from the y-intercept of O3 versus NO(z) curve were 42.2 and 43.9 ppbv for simulations without and with lightning emissions, respectively. Results from both simulations with lightning NO(x) suggest that while North American lightning production of NO(x) can lead to significant local impacts on a few occasions, they will have a relatively small impact on typical maximum levels and determination of Policy Relevant Background levels.

  4. Control of disinfection by-product formation using ozone-based advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuan-Chung; Wang, Yu-Hsiang

    2012-01-01

    The effects of ozone dosage, water temperature and catalyst addition in an ozonation-fluidized bed reactor (O3/FBR) on treated water quality and on the control of chlorinated and ozonated disinfection by-products (DBPs) were investigated. A biofiltration column was used to evaluate its removal efficiency on biodegradable organic matter and to reduce DBP formation. The Dong-Gang River, polluted by agricultural and domestic wastewater in Pingtung, Taiwan, was used as the water source. The treated water quality in terms of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), biodegradable DOC, ultraviolet absorbance at 254 nm (UV254) and specific UV absorbance (SUVA) improved with increasing ozone and catalyst dosages. Catalytic ozonation was more effective than ozonation alone at reducing the formation of DBPs at a given dosage. Experimental results show that water temperature had little effect on the treated water quality with the O3/FBR system used in this study (p > 0.05). The combination of O3/FBR and the biofiltration process effectively decreased the amount ofDBP precursors. The concentration of total trihalomethanes (TTHMs) was less than the maximum contaminant level (MCL) requirement, which is 80 microg/L, for all treated waters and the concentration of five haloacetic acids (HAA5) fell below 60 microg/L with an ozone dosage higher than 2.5 mg/L.

  5. Demonstration of AIRS Total Ozone Products to Operations to Enhance User Readiness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, Emily; Zavodsky, Bradley; Jedlovec, Gary

    2014-01-01

    cyclogenesis and hurricane force wind events. Currently, forecasters at WPC/OPC are evaluating the Air Mass RGB imagery in conjunction with the AIRS total column ozone to aid forecasting cyclogenesis and high wind forecasts. One of the limitations of the total ozone product is that it is difficult for forecasters to determine whether elevated ozone concentrations are related to stratospheric air or climatologically high values of ozone in certain regions. To address this limitation, SPoRT created an AIRS ozone anomaly product which calculates the percent of normal ozone based on a global stratospheric ozone mean climatology. With the knowledge that ozone values 125 percent of normal and greater typically represent stratospheric air; the anomaly product can be used with the total column ozone product to confirm regions of stratospheric air on the Air Mass RGB. This presentation describes the generation of these products along with forecaster feedback concerning the use of the AIRS ozone products in conjunction with the Air Mass RGB product for the unique forecast challenges WPC/OPC face. Additionally examples of CrIS ozone and anomaly products will be shown to further demonstrate the utility and capability of JPSS in forecasting unique events.

  6. Development and Application of Hyperspectral Infrared Ozone Retrieval Products for Operational Meteorology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, Emily; Zavodsky, Bradley; Jedlovec, Gary

    2015-01-01

    cyclogenesis and hurricane force wind events. Currently, forecasters at WPC/OPC are evaluating the Air Mass RGB imagery in conjunction with the AIRS total column ozone to aid forecasting cyclogenesis and high wind forecasts. One of the limitations of the total ozone product is that it is difficult for forecasters to determine whether elevated ozone concentrations are related to stratospheric air or climatologically high values of ozone in certain regions. To address this limitation, SPoRT created an AIRS ozone anomaly product which calculates the percent of normal ozone based on a global stratospheric ozone mean climatology. With the knowledge that ozone values 125 percent of normal and greater typically represent stratospheric air; the anomaly product can be used with the total column ozone product to confirm regions of stratospheric air on the Air Mass RGB. This presentation describes the generation of these products along with forecaster feedback concerning the use of the AIRS ozone products in conjunction with the Air Mass RGB product for the unique forecast challenges WPC/OPC face. Additionally examples of CrIS ozone and anomaly products will be shown to further demonstrate the utility and capability of JPSS in forecasting unique events.

  7. Ozone

    MedlinePlus

    ... reactive form of oxygen. In the upper atmosphere, ozone forms a protective layer that shields us from the sun’s ultraviolet rays. At ground level, ozone is a harmful air pollutant and a primary ...

  8. Ozone

    MedlinePlus

    Ozone is a gas. It can be good or bad, depending on where it is. "Good" ozone occurs naturally about 10 to 30 miles above ... the sun's ultraviolet rays. Part of the good ozone layer is gone. Man-made chemicals have destroyed ...

  9. In vitro ozone exposure inhibits mitogen-induced lymphocyte proliferation and IL-2 production

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, S.; Jordan, R.L.; Orlando, G.S.; Koren, H.S.

    1989-01-01

    Human blood mononuclear cells were exposed to ozone in vitro and thereafter analyzed for competence in mitogen-induced proliferation as well as IL-1 and IL-2 production. Proliferative responses induced by phytohemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin A (Con A), and pokeweed mitogen (PWM) were all depressed in lymphocytes exposed to an ozone concentration of 1 ppm for 4-6 h. The response to PWM was most sensitive to the ozone effect (38% suppression); responses to Con A and PHA were suppressed to a lesser extent, 23% and 18%, respectively, and were not significantly different from each other. PWM responses were affected at an ozone concentration as low as 0.1 ppm; however, no suppression of Con A-induced proliferation was seen below 0.18 ppm or of PHA-induced proliferation below 0.5 ppm. When lymphocytes and monocytes were exposed separately to ozone and then mixed back with control air-exposed monocytes or lymphocytes, both cell types appeared to be affected and the functional defects caused by the pollutant were additive. Monocyte IL-1 production induced by endotoxin was not affected by ozone exposure, while surface expression of HLA-DR on exposed monocytes was reduced by 40% 24 h after exposure. Moreover, lymphocytes exposed to ozone produced 46% less IL-2 while expressing similar surface density of IL-2 receptors. Taken together, these results show that exposure to ozone has distinct adverse effects on lymphocytes and monocytes, both of which are important in local immune defenses in the lung.

  10. The Influence of Atmospheric Conditions on the Production of Ozone during VOC Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coates, J.; Butler, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone is a short-lived climate forcing pollutant that is detrimental to human health and crop growth. Reactions involving volatile organic compounds (VOC) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) in the presence of sunlight produce ozone. Ozone production is a non-linear function of the concentrations of both NOx and VOC, with VOC acting as the "fuel" for ozone production and NOx as the "catalyst". Different VOC, due to their differing structure and carbon content, have different maximum potential to produce ozone. Due to different degrees of reactivity, VOC also differ in the time taken to reach this maximum ozone production potential under ideal conditions. Ozone production is also influenced by meteorological factors such as radiation, temperature, advection and mixing, which may alter the rate of ozone production, and the degree to which VOC are able to reach their maximum ozone production potential. Identifying the chemical and meteorological processes responsible for controlling the degree to which VOC are able to reach their maximum ozone production potential could inform decisions on emission control to efficiently tackle high levels of tropospheric ozone. In this study we use a boxmodel to determine the chemical processes affecting ozone production under different meteorological and chemical conditions. The chemistry scheme used by the boxmodel is "tagged" for each initial VOC enabling attribution of ozone production to its VOC source. We systematically vary a number of meteorological parameters along with the source of NOx within the box model to simulate a range of atmospheric conditions. These simulations are compared with a control simulation done under conditions of maximum ozone formation to determine which parameters affect the rate at which VOC produce ozone and the extent to which they reach their maximum potential to produce ozone. We perform multi-day simulations in order to examine whether these processes can influence ozone production over

  11. Removal of disinfection by-product precursors with ozone-UV advanced oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Chin, A; Bérubé, P R

    2005-05-01

    The efficacy of using ozone (O3), ultraviolet irradiation (UV) and the combined O3-UV advanced oxidation process (AOP) to remove 2 classes of disinfection by-product (DBP) precursors from raw surface water samples have been evaluated and compared. In particular, trihalomethane and haloacetic acids formation potentials were measured. Laboratory batch scale experiments were carried out as a function of ozone and UV dosage in order to study the removal kinetics. It is concluded that the combined O3-UV AOP is more effective than either the ozone or UV treatment alone. Ozone-UV AOP is capable of mineralizing up to 50% of the total organic carbon from the raw source water at an ozone dose of 0.62+/-0.019 mg O3/mL and a UV dose of 1.61 W s/cm2. In addition, O3-UV AOP can reduce trihalomethane formation potential by roughly 80% and haloacetic acids formation potential by roughly 70% at the same ozone and UV dosage.

  12. The Transition of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Total Ozone Products to Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, E. B.; Zavodsky, B. T.; Jedlovec, G. J.

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Short-term Prediction Research and Transition Center (NASA SPoRT) has transitioned a total column ozone product from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) retrievals to the Weather Prediction Center and Ocean Prediction Center. The total column ozone product is used to diagnose regions of warm, dry, ozone-rich, stratospheric air capable of descending to the surface to create high-impact non-convective winds. Over the past year, forecasters have analyzed the Red, Green, Blue (RGB) Air Mass imagery in conjunction with the AIRS total column ozone to aid high wind forecasts. One of the limitations of the total ozone product is that it is difficult for forecasters to determine whether elevated ozone concentrations are related to stratospheric air or climatologically high values of ozone in certain regions. During the summer of 2013, SPoRT created an AIRS ozone anomaly product which calculates the percent of normal ozone based on a global stratospheric ozone mean climatology. With the knowledge that ozone values 125 percent of normal and greater typically represent stratospheric air; the anomaly product can be used with the total column ozone product to confirm regions of stratospheric air. This paper describes the generation of these products along with forecaster feedback concerning the use of the AIRS ozone products in conjunction with the RGB Air Mass product to access the utility and transition of the products.

  13. Secondary Pollutants from Ozone Reaction with Ventilation Filters and Degradation of Filter Media Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Destaillats, Hugo; Chen, Wenhao; Apte, Michael; Li, Nuan; Spears, Michael; Almosni, Jérémie; Brunner, Gregory; Zhang, Jianshun; Fisk, William J.

    2011-05-01

    Prior research suggests that chemical processes taking place on the surface of particle filters employed in buildings may lead to the formation of harmful secondary byproducts. We investigated ozone reactions with fiberglass, polyester, cotton/polyester and polyolefin filter media, as well as hydrolysis of filter media additives. Studies were carried out on unused media, and on filters that were installed for 3 months in buildings at two different locations in the San Francisco Bay Area. Specimens from each filter media were exposed to {approx}150 ppbv ozone in a flow tube under a constant flow of dry or humidified air (50percent RH). Ozone breakthrough was recorded for each sample over periods of {approx}1000 min; the ozone uptake rate was calculated for an initial transient period and for steady-state conditions. While ozone uptake was observed in all cases, we did not observe significant differences in the uptake rate and capacity for the various types of filter media tested. Most experiments were performed at an airflow rate of 1.3 L/min (face velocity = 0.013 m/s), and a few tests were also run at higher rates (8 to 10 L/min). Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, two oxidation byproducts, were quantified downstream of each sample. Those aldehydes (m/z 31 and 45) and other volatile byproducts (m/z 57, 59, 61 and 101) were also detected in real-time using Proton-Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS). Low-ppbv byproduct emissions were consistently higher under humidified air than under dry conditions, and were higher when the filters were loaded with particles, as compared with unused filters. No significant differences were observed when ozone reacted over various types of filter media. Fiberglass filters heavily coated with impaction oil (tackifier) showed higher formaldehyde emissions than other samples. Those emissions were particularly high in the case of used filters, and were observed even in the absence of ozone, suggesting that hydrolysis of additives

  14. Ground-Level Ozone Following Astrophysical Ionizing Radiation Events: An Additional Biological Hazard?

    PubMed

    Thomas, Brian C; Goracke, Byron D

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysical ionizing radiation events such as supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, and solar proton events have been recognized as a potential threat to life on Earth, primarily through depletion of stratospheric ozone and subsequent increase in solar UV radiation at Earth's surface and in the upper levels of the ocean. Other work has also considered the potential impact of nitric acid rainout, concluding that no significant threat is likely. Not yet studied to date is the potential impact of ozone produced in the lower atmosphere following an ionizing radiation event. Ozone is a known irritant to organisms on land and in water and therefore may be a significant additional hazard. Using previously completed atmospheric chemistry modeling, we examined the amount of ozone produced in the lower atmosphere for the case of a gamma-ray burst and found that the values are too small to pose a significant additional threat to the biosphere. These results may be extended to other ionizing radiation events, including supernovae and extreme solar proton events.

  15. Ground-Level Ozone Following Astrophysical Ionizing Radiation Events: An Additional Biological Hazard?

    PubMed

    Thomas, Brian C; Goracke, Byron D

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysical ionizing radiation events such as supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, and solar proton events have been recognized as a potential threat to life on Earth, primarily through depletion of stratospheric ozone and subsequent increase in solar UV radiation at Earth's surface and in the upper levels of the ocean. Other work has also considered the potential impact of nitric acid rainout, concluding that no significant threat is likely. Not yet studied to date is the potential impact of ozone produced in the lower atmosphere following an ionizing radiation event. Ozone is a known irritant to organisms on land and in water and therefore may be a significant additional hazard. Using previously completed atmospheric chemistry modeling, we examined the amount of ozone produced in the lower atmosphere for the case of a gamma-ray burst and found that the values are too small to pose a significant additional threat to the biosphere. These results may be extended to other ionizing radiation events, including supernovae and extreme solar proton events. PMID:26745353

  16. Validation of SCIAMACHY Radiances and Ozone Products Using Ground and Space Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilsenrath, E.; Bhartia, P. K.; Bojkov, B. R.; Kowalewski, M.; Labow, G.; Ahmad, Z.

    2004-01-01

    Validation of SCIAMACHY data products are is key element for the detecting a stratospheric ozone recovery, which is a high priority for environmental research and environmental policy. Models predict an ozone recovery at a much lower rate than the measured depletion rate observed to date. Therefore improved precision of the satellite and ground ozone observing systems are required over the long term to verify its recovery. We show that validation of satellite radiances from space and from the ground can be an effective means for correcting long term drifts of backscatter type satellite measurements such as SCIAMACHY and can be used to cross calibrate all BUV instruments in orbit (TOMS, SBUV/2, GOME, OMI, GOME-2, OMPS). This method bypasses the retrieval algorithms used for both satellite and ground based measurements that are normally used to validate and correct the satellite data. This approach however requires well calibrated instruments and an accurate radiative transfer model that accounts for aerosols. In addition to comparing radiances, validation of SCIAMACHY ozone products will conducted by comparing total and profile ozone with TOMS and SBUV/2.

  17. Removal of disinfection by-products from contaminated water using a synthetic goethite catalyst via catalytic ozonation and a biofiltration system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Hsiang; Chen, Kuan-Chung

    2014-09-01

    The effects of synthetic goethite (α-FeOOH) used as the catalyst in catalytic ozonation for the degradation of disinfection by-product (DBP) precursors are investigated. A biofiltration column applied following the catalytic ozonation process is used to evaluate the efficiency of removing DBP precursors via biotreatment. Ozone can rapidly react with aromatic compounds and oxidize organic compounds, resulting in a decrease in the fluorescence intensity of dissolved organic matter (DOM). In addition, catalytic ozonation can break down large organic molecules, which causes a blue shift in the emission-excitation matrix spectra. Water treated with catalytic ozonation is composed of low-molecular structures, including soluble microbial products (SMPs) and other aromatic proteins (APs). The DOM in SMPs and APs is removed by subsequent biofiltration. Catalytic ozonation has a higher removal efficiency for dissolved organic carbon and higher ultraviolet absorbance at 254 nm compared to those of ozonation without a catalyst. The use of catalytic ozonation and subsequent biofiltration leads to a lower DBP formation potential during chlorination compared to that obtained using ozonation and catalytic ozonation alone. Regarding DBP species during chlorination, the bromine incorporation factor (BIF) of trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids increases with increasing catalyst dosage in catalytic ozonation. Moreover, the highest BIF is obtained for catalytic ozonation and subsequent biofiltration. PMID:25211774

  18. Removal of Disinfection By-Products from Contaminated Water Using a Synthetic Goethite Catalyst via Catalytic Ozonation and a Biofiltration System·

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Hsiang; Chen, Kuan-Chung

    2014-01-01

    The effects of synthetic goethite (α-FeOOH) used as the catalyst in catalytic ozonation for the degradation of disinfection by-product (DBP) precursors are investigated. A biofiltration column applied following the catalytic ozonation process is used to evaluate the efficiency of removing DBP precursors via biotreatment. Ozone can rapidly react with aromatic compounds and oxidize organic compounds, resulting in a decrease in the fluorescence intensity of dissolved organic matter (DOM). In addition, catalytic ozonation can break down large organic molecules, which causes a blue shift in the emission-excitation matrix spectra. Water treated with catalytic ozonation is composed of low-molecular structures, including soluble microbial products (SMPs) and other aromatic proteins (APs). The DOM in SMPs and APs is removed by subsequent biofiltration. Catalytic ozonation has a higher removal efficiency for dissolved organic carbon and higher ultraviolet absorbance at 254 nm compared to those of ozonation without a catalyst. The use of catalytic ozonation and subsequent biofiltration leads to a lower DBP formation potential during chlorination compared to that obtained using ozonation and catalytic ozonation alone. Regarding DBP species during chlorination, the bromine incorporation factor (BIF) of trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids increases with increasing catalyst dosage in catalytic ozonation. Moreover, the highest BIF is obtained for catalytic ozonation and subsequent biofiltration. PMID:25211774

  19. Influence of the heterogeneous reaction HCL + HOCl on an ozone hole model with hydrocarbon additions

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, S.; Cicerone, R.J.; Turco, R.P.

    1994-02-20

    Injection of ethane or propane has been suggested as a means for reducing ozone loss within the Antarctic vortex because alkanes can convert active chlorine radicals into hydrochloric acid. In kinetic models of vortex chemistry including as heterogeneous processes only the hydrolysis and HCl reactions of ClONO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O{sub 5}, parts per billion by volume levels of the light alkanes counteract ozone depletion by sequestering chlorine atoms. Introduction of the surface reaction of HCl with HOCl causes ethane to deepen baseline ozone holes and generally works to impede any mitigation by hydrocarbons. The increased depletion occurs because HCl + HOCl can be driven by HO{sub x} radicals released during organic oxidation. Following initial hydrogen abstraction by chlorine, alkane breakdown leads to a net hydrochloric acid activation as the remaining hydrogen atoms enter the photochemical system. Lowering the rate constant for reactions of organic peroxy radicals with ClO to 10{sup {minus}13} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} does not alter results, and the major conclusions are insensitive to the timing of the ethane additions. Ignoring the organic peroxy radical plus ClO reactions entirely restores remediation capabilities by allowing HO{sub x} removal independent of HCl. Remediation also returns if early evaporation of polar stratospheric clouds leaves hydrogen atoms trapped in aldehyde intermediates, but real ozone losses are small in such cases. 95 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. Kinetics and products of reactions of MTBE with ozone and ozone/hydrogen peroxide in water.

    PubMed

    Mitani, Marie M; Keller, Arturo A; Bunton, Clifford A; Rinker, Robert G; Sandall, Orville C

    2002-01-28

    Methyl-t-butyl-ether (MTBE) has become a prevalent groundwater pollutant due to its high volume use as a nationwide gasoline additive. Given its physicochemical properties, it requires new treatment approaches. Both aqueous O(3) and a combination of O(3)/H(2)O(2), which gives *OH, can remove MTBE from water, making use of O(3) a viable technology for remediation of groundwater from fuel contaminated sites. Rate constants and temperature dependencies for reactions of MTBE with O(3) or with *OH at pH 7.2, in a range of 21-45 degrees C (294-318K) were measured. The second-order rate constant for reaction of MTBE with O(3) is 1.4 x 10(18)exp(-95.4/RT) (M(-1)s(-1)), and for reaction of MTBE with *OH produced by the combination of O(3)/H(2)O(2) is 8.0 x 10(9)exp(-4.6/RT) (M(-1)s(-1)), with the activation energy (kJ mol(-1)) in both cases. At 25 degrees C, this corresponds to a rate constant of 27 M(-1)s(-1) for ozone alone, and 1.2 x 10(9) M(-1)s(-1) for O(3)/H(2)O(2). The concentration of *OH was determined using benzene trapping. Products of reactions of O(3) and O(3)/H(2)O(2) with MTBE, including t-butyl-formate (TBF), t-butyl alcohol (TBA), methyl acetate, and acetone, were determined after oxidant depletion. A reaction pathway for mineralization of MTBE was also explored. Under continuously stirred flow reactor (CSTR) conditions, addition of H(2)O(2) markedly increases the rate and degree of degradation of MTBE by O(3).

  1. Effects of temperature and chemical addition on the formation of bromoorganic DBPs during ozonation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangru; Echigo, Shinya; Lei, Hongxia; Smith, Michael E; Minear, Roger A; Talley, Jeffrey W

    2005-01-01

    The effects of temperature and addition of OH radical scavengers/enhancers or HOBr scavenger on the formation of bromoorganic disinfection byproducts (DBPs) from ozonation of six raw waters were studied in true batch reactors. The formation of bromoorganic DBPs during ozonation generally increased with the increase of temperature, but might also decrease for the waters with somewhat higher values of specific UV absorbance (SUVA). The addition of hydrogen peroxide, ethanol, or ammonium dramatically decreased the formation of bromoorganic DBPs; t-butanol addition significantly increased the formation of bromoorganic DBPs; bicarbonate addition might increase or decrease bromoorganic DBP formation depending on the water source. For all the waters treated with the chemical addition, the level of total organic bromine (TOBr) varied with the same pace as that of ozone exposure (CT), which suggests that TOBr formed during ozonation may be used to estimate the CT, a measure for the achieved degree of disinfection. The results demonstrate that for each water, the correlation between TOBr and CT was less affected by the change of chemical composition of the water than that between BrO(3)(-) and CT; for a given chemical composition and temperature of a water, there generally were well-defined relationships between TOBr and CT, and bromoform and CT just as that between BrO(3)(-) and CT. The possible mechanisms behind the linear functions of TOBr or BrO(3)(-) versus CT were given. Further study is needed to examine whether the trends found in this research can be applicable for the high SUVA waters.

  2. Tropical Tropospheric Ozone from SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere ADditional Ozonesondes) Network: A Project for Satellite Research, Process Studies, Education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Anne M.; Witte, Jacquelyn C.; Oltmans, Samuel J.; Schmidlin, Francis J.; Coetzee, G. J. R.; Hoegger, Bruno; Kirchhoff, V. W. J. H.; Ogawa, Toshihiro; Kawakami, Shuji; Posny, Francoise

    2002-01-01

    The first climatological overview of total, stratospheric and tropospheric ozone in the southern hemisphere tropical and subtropics is based on ozone sounding data from 10 sites comprising the Southern Hemisphere Additional OZonesondes (SHADOZ) network. The period covered is 1998-2000. Observations were made over: Ascension Island; Nairobi, Kenya; Irene, South Africa; Reunion Island; Watukosek, Java; Fiji; Tahiti; American Samoa; San Cristobal, Galapagos; Natal, Brazil. Campaign data were collected on a trans-Atlantic oceanographic cruise and during SAFARI-2000 in Zambia. The ozone data, with simultaneous temperature profiles to approx. 7 hPa and relative humidity to approx. 200 hPa, reside at: . SHADOZ ozone time-series and profiles give a perspective on tropical total, stratospheric and tropospheric ozone. Prominent features are highly variable tropospheric ozone and a zonal wave-one pattern in total (and tropospheric) column ozone. Total, stratospheric and tropospheric column ozone amounts peak between August and November and are lowest between March and May. Tropospheric ozone variability over the Indian and Pacific Ocean displays influences of the Indian Ocean Dipole and convective mixing. Pollution transport from Africa and South America is a seasonal feature. Tropospheric ozone seasonality over the Atlantic Basin shows effects of regional subsidence and recirculation as well as biomass burning. Dynamical and chemical influences appear to be of comparable magnitude though model studies are needed to quantify this.

  3. Insights into Tropical Tropospheric Ozone from the 1998-2000 SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes) Data Record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Anne M.; Witte, Jacquelyn C.; Oltmans, Samuel J.; Schmidlin, Francis J.; Volker, W.; Kirchhoff, J. H.; Posny, Franaoise; Gert, J.; Coetzee, R.; Hoegger, Bruno; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We describe the first overview of total, stratospheric and tropospheric ozone in the southern hemisphere tropics based on a three year, ten site record of ozone soundings from the Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) network. Observations covering 1998-2000 were made over Ascension Island; Nairobi, Kenya; Irene, South Africa; Reunion Island; Watukosek, Java; Fiji; Tahiti; American Samoa; San Cristobal, Galapagos; Natal, Brazil. The ozone data, with simultaneous temperature profiles to approximately 7 hPa and relative humidity to approximately 200 hPa, are at an archive: http://code9l6. gsfc.nasa.gov/Data_services/shadoz. Prominent features are highly variable tropospheric ozone, a zonal wave-one pattern in total (and tropospheric) column ozone, and signatures of the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) in stratospheric ozone. Total, stratospheric and tropospheric column ozone amounts usually peak between August and November and are lowest in the first half of the year. Tropospheric ozone variability over the Indian and Pacific Ocean displays influences of the waning 1997-1998 Indian Ocean Dipole and ENSO (El Nino / Southern Oscillation), seasonal convection and pollution transport from Africa. Tropospheric ozone over the Atlantic Basin reflects regional subsidence and recirculation as well as pollution ozone from biomass burning.

  4. Insights Into Tropical Tropospheric Ozone From The 1998-2000 Shadoz (southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes) Data Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, A. M.; Witte, J. C.; Oltmans, S. J.; Schmidlin, F. J.; Kirchhoff, V. W. J. H.; Posny, F.; Coetzee, G. J. R.; Hoegger, B.; Kawakami, S.; Ogawa, T.

    We describe the first overview of total, stratospheric and tropospheric ozone in the southern hemisphere tropics based on a 3-year, 10-site record of ozone soundings from the Southern Hemisphere ADditional OZonesondes (SHADOZ) network. Ob- servations covering 1998-2000 were made over Ascension Island; Nairobi, Kenya; Irene, South Africa; Réunion Island; Watukosek, Java; Fiji; Tahiti; American Samoa; San Cristóbal, Galapagos; Natal, Brazil. The ozone data, with simultaneous tem- perature profiles to 7 hPa and relative humidity to 200 hPa, are at an archive: . Prominent features are highly variable tropospheric ozone, a zonal wave-one pattern in total (and tropospheric) col- umn ozone, and signatures of the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) in stratospheric ozone. Total, stratospheric and tropospheric column ozone amounts usually peak be- tween August and November and are lowest in the first half of the year. Tropospheric ozone variability over the Indian and Pacific Ocean displays influences of the wan- ing 1997-1998 Indian Ocean Dipole and ENSO, seasonal convection and pollution transport from Africa. Tropospheric ozone over the Atlantic Basin reflects regional subsidence and recirculation as well as pollution ozone from biomass burning.

  5. Diagnosis of Photochemical Ozone Production Rates and Limiting Factors based on Observation-based Modeling Approach over East Asia: Impact of Radical Chemistry Mechanism and Ozone-Control Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanaya, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Growth of tropospheric ozone, causing health and climate impacts, is concerned over East Asia, because emissions of precursors have dramatically increased. Photochemical production rates of ozone and limiting factors, primarily studied for urban locations, have been poorly assessed within a perspective of regional-scale air pollution over East Asia. We performed comprehensive observations of ozone precursors at several locations with regional representativeness and made such assessment based on the observation-based modeling approach. Here, diagnosis at Fukue Island (32.75°N, 128.68°E) remotely located in western Japan (May 2009) is highlighted, where the highest 10% of hourly ozone concentrations reached 72‒118 ppb during May influenced by Asian continental outflow. The average in-situ ozone production rate was estimated to be 6.8 ppb per day, suggesting that in-travel production was still active, while larger buildup must have occurred beforehand. Information on the chemical status of the air mass arriving in Japan is important, because it affects how further ozone production occurs after precursor addition from Japanese domestic emissions. The main limiting factor of ozone production was usually NOx, suggesting that domestic NOx emission control is important in reducing further ozone production and the incidence of warning issuance (>120 ppb). VOCs also increased the ozone production rate, and occasionally (14% of time) became dominant. This analysis implies that the VOC reduction legislation recently enacted should be effective. The uncertainty in the radical chemistry mechanism governing ozone production had a non-negligible impact, but the main conclusion relevant to policy was not altered. When chain termination was augmented by HO2-H2O + NO/NO2 reactions and by heterogeneous loss of HO2 on aerosol particle surfaces, the daily ozone production rate decreased by <24%, and the fraction of hours when the VOC-limited condition occurred varied from 14% to 13

  6. Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) 1998-2000 tropical ozone climatology 1. Comparison with Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) and ground-based measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Anne M.; Witte, Jacquelyn C.; McPeters, Richard D.; Oltmans, Samuel J.; Schmidlin, Francis J.; Logan, Jennifer A.; Fujiwara, Masatomo; Kirchhoff, Volker W. J. H.; Posny, FrançOise; Coetzee, Gert J. R.; Hoegger, Bruno; Kawakami, Shuji; Ogawa, Toshihiro; Johnson, Bryan J.; VöMel, Holger; Labow, Gordon

    2003-01-01

    A network of 10 southern hemisphere tropical and subtropical stations, designated the Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) project and established from operational sites, provided over 1000 ozone profiles during the period 1998-2000. Balloon-borne electrochemical concentration cell (ECC) ozonesondes, combined with standard radiosondes for pressure, temperature, and relative humidity measurements, collected profiles in the troposphere and lower to midstratosphere at: Ascension Island; Nairobi, Kenya; Irene, South Africa; Réunion Island; Watukosek, Java; Fiji; Tahiti; American Samoa; San Cristóbal, Galapagos; and Natal, Brazil. The archived data are available at: . In this paper, uncertainties and accuracies within the SHADOZ ozone data set are evaluated by analyzing: (1) imprecisions in profiles and in methods of extrapolating ozone above balloon burst; (2) comparisons of column-integrated total ozone from sondes with total ozone from the Earth-Probe/Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) satellite and ground-based instruments; and (3) possible biases from station to station due to variations in ozonesonde characteristics. The key results are the following: (1) Ozonesonde precision is 5%. (2) Integrated total ozone column amounts from the sondes are usually to within 5% of independent measurements from ground-based instruments at five SHADOZ sites and overpass measurements from the TOMS satellite (version 7 data). (3) Systematic variations in TOMS-sonde offsets and in ground-based-sonde offsets from station to station reflect biases in sonde technique as well as in satellite retrieval. Discrepancies are present in both stratospheric and tropospheric ozone. (4) There is evidence for a zonal wave-one pattern in total and tropospheric ozone, but not in stratospheric ozone.

  7. Oxidation of aminodinitrotoluenes with ozone: Products and pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Spanggord, R.J.; Yao, C.D.; Mill, T.

    2000-02-01

    Aminodinitrotoluenes [2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene (2-ADNT) and 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene (4-ADNT)] are environmental pollutants that arise from the microbial biotransformation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). These chemicals are unique to soils, lagoons, and groundwaters near TNT production and handling facilities. In the remediation of such environments, consideration must be given to the behavior of these pollutants toward the remediation technology. An investigation of the products from the reaction of ozone with aminodinitrotoluenes (ADNTs) provides information about the oxidation pathway. Studies conducted at low conversions of 2- and 4-ADNT show 2:1 ozone/ADNT stoichiometries, prompt formation of glyoxylic and pyruvic acids, and NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}} and NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} (NO{sub x}) ions. Reaction schemes to account for these results involve a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of ozone to selected double bonds of the aromatic ring, leading to ring cleavage. {sup 15}N-Labeling experiments indicate that the amino function is not involved in the initial ozone oxidation and eventually is incorporated into pyruvamide (2-ADNT) and oxamic acid (4-ADNT) before being oxidized to nitrate.

  8. Quantifying VOC-Reaction Tracers, Ozone Production, and Continuing Aerosol Production Rates in Urban and Far-Downwind Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatfield, Robert; Ren, X.; Brune, W.; Fried, A.; Schwab, J.

    2008-01-01

    We have found a surprisingly informative decomposition of the complex question of smoggy ozone production (basically, [HO2] in a more locally determined field of [NO]) in the process of linked investigations of modestly smoggy Eastern North America (by NASA aircraft, July 2004) and rather polluted Flushing, NYC (Queens College, July, 2001). In both rural and very polluted situations, we find that a simple contour graph parameterization of the local principal ozone production rate can be estimated using only the variables [NO] and j(sub rads) [HCHO]: Po(O3) = c (j(sub rads) [HCHO])(sup a) [HCHO](sup b). Here j(sub rads) is the photolysis of HCHO to radicals, presumably capturing many harder-UV photolytic processes and the principle ozone production is that due to HO2; mechanisms suggest that ozone production due to RO2 is closely correlated, often suggesting a limited range of different proportionality factors. The method immediately suggests a local interpretation for concepts of VOC limitation and NOx limitation. We believe that the product j(sub rads) [HCHO] guages the oxidation rate of observed VOC mixtures in a way that also provides [HO2] useful for the principle ozone production rate k [HO2] [NO], and indeed, all ozone chemical production. The success of the method suggests that dominant urban primary-HCHO sources may transition to secondary plume-HCHO sources in a convenient way. Are there other, simple, near-terminal oxidized VOC's which help guage ozone production and aerosol particle formation? Regarding particles, we report on, to the extent NASA Research resources allow, on appealing relationships between far-downwind (Atlantic PBL) HCHO and very fine aerosol (including sulfate. Since j(sub rads) [HCHO] provides a time-scale, we may understand distant-plume particle production in a more quantitative manner. Additionally we report on a statistical search in the nearer field for relationships between glyoxals (important near-terminal aromatic and isoprene

  9. The impacts of surface ozone pollution on winter wheat productivity in China--An econometric approach.

    PubMed

    Yi, Fujin; Jiang, Fei; Zhong, Funing; Zhou, Xun; Ding, Aijun

    2016-01-01

    The impact of surface ozone pollution on winter wheat yield is empirically estimated by considering socio-economic and weather determinants. This research is the first to use an economic framework to estimate the ozone impact, and a unique county-level panel is employed to examine the impact of the increasing surface ozone concentration on the productivity of winter wheat in China. In general, the increment of surface ozone concentration during the ozone-sensitive period of winter wheat is determined to be harmful to its yield, and a conservative reduction of ozone pollution could significantly increase China's wheat supply.

  10. Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) 1998-2000 tropical ozone climatology 2. Tropospheric variability and the zonal wave-one

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Anne M.; Witte, Jacquelyn C.; Oltmans, Samuel J.; Schmidlin, Francis J.; Logan, Jennifer A.; Fujiwara, Masatomo; Kirchhoff, Volker W. J. H.; Posny, FrançOise; Coetzee, Gert J. R.; Hoegger, Bruno; Kawakami, Shuji; Ogawa, Toshihiro; Fortuin, J. P. F.; Kelder, H. M.

    2003-01-01

    The first view of stratospheric and tropospheric ozone variability in the Southern Hemisphere tropics is provided by a 3-year record of ozone soundings from the Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) network (http://croc.gsfc.nasa.gov/shadoz). Observations covering 1998-2000 were made over Ascension Island, Nairobi (Kenya), Irene (South Africa), Réunion Island, Watukosek (Java), Fiji, Tahiti, American Samoa, San Cristóbal (Galapagos), and Natal (Brazil). Total, stratospheric, and tropospheric column ozone amounts usually peak between August and November. Other features are a persistent zonal wave-one pattern in total column ozone and signatures of the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) in stratospheric ozone. The wave-one is due to a greater concentration of free tropospheric ozone over the tropical Atlantic than the Pacific and appears to be associated with tropical general circulation and seasonal pollution from biomass burning. Tropospheric ozone over the Indian and Pacific Oceans displays influences of the waning 1997-1998 El Niño, seasonal convection, and pollution transport from Africa. The most distinctive feature of SHADOZ tropospheric ozone is variability in the data, e.g., a factor of 3 in column amount at 8 of 10 stations. Seasonal and monthly means may not be robust quantities because statistics are frequently not Gaussian even at sites that are always in tropical air. Models and satellite retrievals should be evaluated on their capability for reproducing tropospheric variability and fine structure. A 1999-2000 ozone record from Paramaribo, Surinam (6°N, 55°W) (also in SHADOZ) shows a marked contrast to southern tropical ozone because Surinam is often north of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). A more representative tropospheric ozone climatology for models and satellite retrievals requires additional Northern Hemisphere tropical data.

  11. Rapid Removal of Tetrabromobisphenol A by Ozonation in Water: Oxidation Products, Reaction Pathways and Toxicity Assessment.

    PubMed

    Qu, Ruijuan; Feng, Mingbao; Wang, Xinghao; Huang, Qingguo; Lu, Junhe; Wang, Liansheng; Wang, Zunyao

    2015-01-01

    Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) is one of the most widely used brominated flame retardants and has attracted more and more attention. In this work, the parent TBBPA with an initial concentration of 100 mg/L was completely removed after 6 min of ozonation at pH 8.0, and alkaline conditions favored a more rapid removal than acidic and neutral conditions. The presence of typical anions and humic acid did not significantly affect the degradation of TBBPA. The quenching test using isopropanol indicated that direct ozone oxidation played a dominant role during this process. Seventeen reaction intermediates and products were identified using an electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Notably, the generation of 2,4,6-tribromophenol was first observed in the degradation process of TBBPA. The evolution of reaction products showed that ozonation is an efficient treatment for removal of both TBBPA and intermediates. Sequential transformation of organic bromine to bromide and bromate was confirmed by ion chromatography analysis. Two primary reaction pathways that involve cleavage of central carbon atom and benzene ring cleavage concomitant with debromination were thus proposed and further justified by calculations of frontier electron densities. Furthermore, the total organic carbon data suggested a low mineralization rate, even after the complete removal of TBBPA. Meanwhile, the acute aqueous toxicity of reaction solutions to Photobacterium Phosphoreum and Daphnia magna was rapidly decreased during ozonation. In addition, no obvious difference in the attenuation of TBBPA was found by ozone oxidation using different water matrices, and the effectiveness in natural waters further demonstrates that ozonation can be adopted as a promising technique to treat TBBPA-contaminated waters. PMID:26430733

  12. Rapid Removal of Tetrabromobisphenol A by Ozonation in Water: Oxidation Products, Reaction Pathways and Toxicity Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinghao; Huang, Qingguo; Lu, Junhe; Wang, Liansheng; Wang, Zunyao

    2015-01-01

    Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) is one of the most widely used brominated flame retardants and has attracted more and more attention. In this work, the parent TBBPA with an initial concentration of 100 mg/L was completely removed after 6 min of ozonation at pH 8.0, and alkaline conditions favored a more rapid removal than acidic and neutral conditions. The presence of typical anions and humic acid did not significantly affect the degradation of TBBPA. The quenching test using isopropanol indicated that direct ozone oxidation played a dominant role during this process. Seventeen reaction intermediates and products were identified using an electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Notably, the generation of 2,4,6-tribromophenol was first observed in the degradation process of TBBPA. The evolution of reaction products showed that ozonation is an efficient treatment for removal of both TBBPA and intermediates. Sequential transformation of organic bromine to bromide and bromate was confirmed by ion chromatography analysis. Two primary reaction pathways that involve cleavage of central carbon atom and benzene ring cleavage concomitant with debromination were thus proposed and further justified by calculations of frontier electron densities. Furthermore, the total organic carbon data suggested a low mineralization rate, even after the complete removal of TBBPA. Meanwhile, the acute aqueous toxicity of reaction solutions to Photobacterium Phosphoreum and Daphnia magna was rapidly decreased during ozonation. In addition, no obvious difference in the attenuation of TBBPA was found by ozone oxidation using different water matrices, and the effectiveness in natural waters further demonstrates that ozonation can be adopted as a promising technique to treat TBBPA-contaminated waters. PMID:26430733

  13. Products of the reaction of chlorine atoms and ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J. H., Jr.; Merideth, C. W.; Bhatia, S.; Guillory, W. A.; Gayles, J. N.

    1976-01-01

    Preliminary matrix-isolation infrared spectroscopic studies of the gas-phase reaction of chlorine atoms and ozone are reported. It was shown that the major product of the reaction is the symmetric OClO radical, while very little of the asymmetric ClOO radical is produced. It was also shown that the presence of O2 enhances the OClO production and the ClOO is the primary product in the reaction of Cl atoms and pure O2. The radical ClO was observed for the first time in a gas-phase reaction of Cl and O3. A mechanism for these observations is proposed.

  14. Observation of enhanced ozone in an electrically active storm over Socorro, NM: Implications for ozone production from corona discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minschwaner, K.; Kalnajs, L. E.; Dubey, M. K.; Avallone, L. M.; Sawaengphokai, P. C.; Edens, H. E.; Winn, W. P.

    2008-09-01

    Enhancements in ozone were observed between about 3 and 10 km altitude within an electrically active storm in central New Mexico. Measurements from satellite sensors and ground-based radar show cloud top pressures between 300 and 150 mb in the vicinity of an ozonesonde launched from Socorro, NM, and heavy precipitation with radar reflectivities exceeding 50 dBZ. Data from a lightning mapping array and a surface electric field mill show a large amount of electrical activity within this thunderstorm. The observed ozone enhancements are large (50% above the mean) and could have resulted from a number of possible processes, including the advection of polluted air from the urban environments of El Paso and Juarez, photochemical production by lightning-generated NOx from aged thunderstorm outflow, downward mixing of stratospheric air, or local production from within the thunderstorm. We find that a large fraction of the ozone enhancement is consistent with local production from corona discharges, either from cloud particles or by corona associated with lightning. The implied global source of ozone from thunderstorm corona discharge is estimated to be 110 Tg O3 a-1 with a range between 40 and 180 Tg O3 a-1. This value is about 21% as large as the estimated ozone production rate from lightning NOx, and about 3% as large as the total chemical production rate of tropospheric ozone. Thus while the estimated corona-induced production of ozone may be significant on local scales, it is unlikely to be as important to the global ozone budget as other sources.

  15. SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere ADditional Ozonesondes): A Look at the First Three Years' (1998-2000) Tropospheric Ozone Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Anne M.; Bhartia, Pawan K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The first climatological overview of total, stratospheric and tropospheric ozone in the southern hemisphere tropical and subtropics is based on ozone sounding data from 10 sites comprising the Southern Hemisphere ADditional OZonesondes (SHADOZ) network. The period covered is 1998-2000. Observations were made over: Ascension Island; Nairobi, Kenya; Irene, South Africa; RCunion Island; Watukosek, Java; Fiji; Tahiti; American Samoa; San Cristobal, Galapagos; Natai, Brazil. Campaign data were collected on a trans-Atlantic oceanographic cruise and during SAFARI-2000 in Zambia. The ozone data, with simultaneous temperature profiles to approx. 7 hPa and relative humidity to approx. 200 hPa, reside at an open archive: . SHADOZ ozone time-series and profiles give a perspective on tropical total, stratospheric and tropospheric ozone in 1998-2000. Prominent features are highly variable tropospheric ozone, a zonal wave-one pattern in total (and tropospheric) column ozone, and signatures of the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) in stratospheric ozone. Total, stratospheric and tropospheric column ozone amounts peak between August and November and are lowest between March and May. Tropospheric ozone variability over the Indian and Pacific Ocean displays influences of the Indian Ocean Dipole, ENSO, and Madden-Julian circulation on convective mixing. Pollution transport from Africa, South American and the Maritime Continent is a seasonal feature. Tropospheric ozone seasonality over the Atlantic Basin shows effects of regional subsidence and recirculation as well as biomass burning. Dynamical and chemical influences appear to be of comparable magnitude.

  16. The 1998-2000 SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere ADditional OZonesondes) Tropical Ozone Climatology. 2; Stratospheric and Tropospheric Ozone Variability and the Zonal Wave-One

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Anne M.; Witte, Jacquelyn C.; Oltmans, Samuel J.; Schmidlin, Francis J.; Logan, Jennifer A.; Fujiwara, Masatomo; Kirchhoff, Volker W. J. H.; Posny, Francoise; Coetzee, Gert J. R.; Hoegger, Bruno; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This is the second 'reference' or 'archival' paper for the SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes) network and is a follow-on to the recently accepted paper with similar first part of title. The latter paper compared SHADOZ total ozone with satellite and ground-based instruments and showed that the equatorial wave-one in total ozone is in the troposphere. The current paper presents details of the wave-one structure and the first overview of tropospheric ozone variability over the southern Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Ocean basins. The principal new result is that signals of climate effects, convection and offsets between biomass burning seasonality and tropospheric ozone maxima suggest that dynamical factors are perhaps more important than pollution in determining the tropical distribution of tropospheric ozone. The SHADOZ data at () are setting records in website visits and are the first time that the zonal view of tropical ozone structure has been recorded - thanks to the distribution of the 10 sites that make up this validation network.

  17. Discoveries about Tropical Tropospheric Ozone from Satellite and SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes) and a Future Perspective on NASA's Ozone Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Anne

    2003-01-01

    We have been producing near-real tropical tropospheric ozone ('TTO') data from TOMS since 1997 with Prof. Hudson and students at the University of Maryland. Maps for 1996-2000 for the operational Earth-Probe instrument reside at: . We also have archived 'TTO' data from the Nimbus 7/TOMS satellite (1979-1992). The tropics is a region strongly influenced by natural variability and anthropogenic activity and the satellite data have been used to track biomass burning pollution and to detect interannual variability and climate signals in ozone. We look forward to future ozone sensors from NASA; four will be launched in 2004 as part of the EOS AURA Mission. The satellite view of chemical-dynamical interactions in tropospheric ozone is not adequate to capture vertical variability. Thus, in 1998, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, NOAA's Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory (CMDL) and a team of international sponsors established the SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere ADditional OZonesondes) project to address the gap in tropical ozone soundings. SHADOZ augments launches at selected sites and provides a public archive of ozonesonde data from twelve tropical and subtropical stations at http://croc.nsfc.nasa.gov/shadoz. The stations are: Ascension Island; Nairobi, Kenya; Irene, South Africa; R,union Island; Watukosek, Java; Fiji; Tahiti; American Samoa; San Cristobal, Galapagos; Natal, Brazil, Malindi, Kenya; Paramaribo, Surinam. From the first 3-4 years of data (presently greater than 1700 sondes), the following features emerge: (a) highly variable tropospheric ozone; (b) a zonal wave-one pattern in tropospheric column ozone; (c) tropospheric ozone variability over the Indian and Pacific Ocean displays strong convective signatures.

  18. Ozone production in the Phoenix urban plume

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinman, L.I.

    2000-09-01

    In May and June of 1998, the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Chemistry Program conducted an aircraft and surface based field campaign in Phoenix, Arizona, with the overall goal of obtaining a mechanistic understanding of O{sub 3} formation in the metropolitan area. Participants in the study included scientists from the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality, Argonne National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. On most days, afternoon O{sub 3} levels in Phoenix air basin were within 20 ppb of morning levels, indicating a relatively inactive photochemistry, despite ample sunshine and high NO{sub x} levels. Maximum O{sub 3} levels were about 100 ppb, in contrast to the situation later in the summer when there are usually violations of the Federal 1 hour 120 ppb standard. In this article the authors present a preliminary analysis of the DOE G-1 aircraft observations pertinent to understanding the slow rate of O{sub 3} production in the Phoenix air basin. Comparisons will be made to other locations where higher levels of O{sub 3} and more rapid O{sub 3} production have been observed.

  19. OZONE PRODUCTION IN THE PHOENIX URBAN PLUME.

    SciTech Connect

    KLEINMAN,L.I.

    2000-09-01

    In May and June of 1998, the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Chemistry Program conducted an aircraft and surface based field campaign in Phoenix, Arizona, with the overall goal of obtaining a mechanistic understanding of O{sub 3} formation in the metropolitan area. Participants in the study included scientists from the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality, Argonne National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. On most days, afternoon O{sub 3} levels in the Phoenix air basin were within 20 ppb of morning levels, indicating a relatively inactive photochemistry, despite ample sunshine and high NO{sub x} levels. Maximum O{sub 3} levels were about 100 ppb, in contrast to the situation later in the summer when there are usually violations of the Federal 1 hour 120 ppb standard. In this article we present a preliminary analysis of the DOE G-1 aircraft observations pertinent to understanding the slow rate of O{sub 3} production in the Phoenix air basin. Comparisons will be made to other locations where higher levels of O{sub 3} and more rapid O{sub 3} production have been observed.

  20. Toward a Quantitative Assessment of the Influence of Regional Emission Sources on Ozone Production in the Colorado Front Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDuffie, E. E.; Dube, W. P.; Wolfe, D. E.; Tevlin, A.; Gilman, J.; Lerner, B. M.; De Gouw, J. A.; Murphy, J. G.; Fischer, E. V.; Brown, S. S.; Angevine, W. M.; Edwards, P.; Williams, E. J.

    2015-12-01

    Photochemical ozone production results from the oxidation and reaction of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO2 + NO). As with many US urban regions, ozone levels observed in the Northern Front Range Metropolitan Region of Colorado are influenced by urban emissions of NOx and VOCs. Despite nationwide decreases in these urban emissions, the Front Range of Colorado is one of the few US locations where ozone is currently increasing. It has also recently gone out of compliance with national ambient air quality standards for ozone during summer months. High ozone in Colorado may result from a number of factors, including long-range transport from Asia, increased influence of biomass burning, population increases, or increased emissions from oil and gas activities. The Front Range is home to the Denver-Julesburg (D-J) Basin, which has recently been experiencing a rise in oil and natural gas (O&NG) activity associated with the increase in non-conventional drilling techniques. The VOC and NOx emissions from O&NG activity in close proximity to the urban area may uniquely influence ozone in this region. This presentation will focus on using reactive nitrogen (NOx, NOy) and ozone measurements from a tall (300 m) tower to study the influence of local emissions on Front Range ozone. The tower is located between the D-J Basin and agricultural areas to the north and the Denver metro area to the south. In-situ reactive nitrogen and ozone measurements were collected using a custom Cavity Ring-Down instrument. Additional CH4, CO, and NH3 measurements from the tower serve as tracers for O&NG, urban, and agricultural emissions. Concurrently measured aircraft data is used to confirm the relationships between the tracer species. This presentation will discuss methods for determining the contributions of different emission sources to Front Range ozone, with a focus on differentiating the influence of urban and O&NG sources.

  1. Ozonesonde Climatology and Satellite Product Evaluation: Tropospheric Ozone in the Mid-Atlantic from 2005-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normile, C.; Thompson, A. M.; Schmidlin, F. J.; Schoeberl, M. R.

    2011-12-01

    Geostationary satellite missions are proposed to remotely assess regional air quality over large swaths, although the precise capability of the current set of satellite instruments to accurately resolve urban scale pollution remains unverified. We use the Trajectory Enhanced Tropospheric Ozone Residual product derived from Aura's Ozone Monitoring Instrument/Microwave Limb Sounder satellite data to examine the regional climatology of ozone pollution in the mid-Atlantic, focusing on the Washington, D.C. area and downwind Delmarva. We use the North American Regional Reanalysis to determine the synoptic scale flow patterns in the lower troposphere. In addition, a set of proxies (OMI NO2, surface ozone, cloud cover, and air mass classification) are employed to understand TTOR performance and interacting meteorological and chemical effects in the region. We find that the TTOR product accuracy varies substantially both temporally and spatially, improving during summer months (0.22% error in May compared to 11% error in October) for example, and over urban areas more than rural ones (12% error versus 16% error). TTOR product accuracy is influenced by air mass effects on advection and on planetary boundary layer ozone concentrations. Conditions conducive to ozone production yield a higher near-surface proportion of the tropospheric column as measured by Wallops Island ozonesondes. We identify synoptic-scale flow regimes that strengthen correlations between urban tropospheric ozone density and column density off the coast of the mid-Atlantic. These results indicate that remotely sensed measurements may indeed be able to discriminate urban influences on regional ozone and their effects in more remote areas and have implications for air quality assessment and model validation.

  2. The use of ozonation and catalytic ozonation combined with ultrafiltration for the control of natural organic matter (NOM) and disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnik, Bhavana Sushilkumar

    Commercially available titania membranes, with a molecular weight cut-off of 15, 5, 1 kD were used in a ozonation/membrane system that was fed with water from Lake Lansing. The effects of ozonation on permeate flux recovery and membrane fouling was investigated. In addition the effects of ozonation/membrane filtration hybrid process on the removal of the natural organic matter (NOM) and the formation of disinfection by-products (DBPS) were monitored. The commercial membrane (CeRAM Inside, Tami North America, St. Laurent, Quebec, Canada) was coated with iron oxide nanoparticles (4--6 nm in diameter) using a layer-by-layer technique and sintered in air for 30 minutes. Surface characterization was carried out using electron microscopy techniques and atomic force microscopy, to study the changes in structure and surface morphology of the membranes. The removal and survival of bacteria in the process was also evaluated using fluorescence microscopy and microbial assays. Finally the surface catalytic reaction was investigated to propose the mechanism responsible for the improved performance of the hybrid process. The permeate flux through a titania coated ceramic membrane was significantly affected by ozonation. A minimum threshold ozone concentration (2.5 g/m 3) could achieve complete recovery of permeate flux after fouling. Ozonation/filtration decreased the concentration of chlorinated disinfection by-products up to 80%. With catalyst coated membranes, the concentration of dissolved organic carbon was reduced by >85% and the concentrations of disinfection by-products decreased by up to 90%. Furthermore with the coated membrane, the concentrations of ozonation by-products in the permeate were reduced by >50% as compared to that obtained with the uncoated membranes, thus reducing the risk of potential regrowth of bacteria in the distribution system. Application of the hybrid process lead to greater than 7 log removal of bacteria. Surface characterization showed that

  3. Regeneration of Aqueous Periodate Solutions by Ozone Treatment: A Sustainable Approach for Dialdehyde Cellulose Production.

    PubMed

    Koprivica, Slavica; Siller, Martin; Hosoya, Takashi; Roggenstein, Walter; Rosenau, Thomas; Potthast, Antje

    2016-04-21

    A method for easy and fast regeneration of aqueous periodate solutions from dialdehyde cellulose (DAC) production by ozone treatment is presented, along with a direct and reliable simultaneous quantification of iodate and periodate by reversed-phase HPLC. The influence of iodate and ozone concentration, solution pH, and reaction time on the regeneration efficiency was studied, as well as the reaction kinetics. Regeneration of spent periodate solutions by ozone was successfully performed in alkaline medium, which favors the formation of free (.) OH radicals, as supported by the addition of radical scavengers and quantum mechanical calculations. At pH 13 and an ozone concentration of approximately 150 mg L(-1) , periodate was completely regenerated from a 100 mm solution of iodate within 1 h at room temperature. A cyclic process of cellulose oxidation and subsequent regeneration of spent periodate with 90 % efficiency has been developed. So far, commercial applications of DAC have been hampered by difficulties in reusing the costly periodate. This work overcomes this hurdle and presents a highly efficient, clean, and low-cost protocol for the preparation of DAC with integrated periodate recycling, with the possibility of scaling the process up.

  4. Ozonation of Canadian Athabasca asphaltene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Zhixiong

    . Two new solvent systems, a self-sustaining ozonation system and a cyclohexane/acetone/water or a cyclohexane/acetone/methanol system, were studied to overcome the drawback of using halogenated solvents. The self-sustaining ozonation process employed the final ozonation products as the reaction solvent. Compared to the self-sustaining ozonation, the cyclohexane solvent system showed higher ozone efficiency; however, it required dynamic adjustment of the solvent system during ozonation. An extensively ozonated asphaltene's weight would be doubled. Distillation of the products separated about 45% volatile products having biodiesel-style chemical structures. Compared to distillation, more than 90% of the ozonation products were extractable by acetone. The remaining acetone-insoluble part was further classified by dichloromethane and other solvents of different polarities. The separated ozonation products were good fuel additives or materials for other products.

  5. Effect of repetitive ozone treatment on bean plants—stress ethylene production and leaf necrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan, Hans-Jürgen; Schicker, Sieglinde

    Bean plants were repetitively treated with varying ozone (O 3) concentrations and exposure times on successive days. Our studies clearly demonstrate that a series of successive short episodes of ozone exposure is more damaging to the plants than continuous exposure of the same O 3 concentration for the same total exposure time. In contrast to single ozone exposure experiments repetitive ozone treatment causes stress ethylene production and the beginning of leaf necrosis at the same time. The "no effect levels" estimated for O 3 with single exposure experiments can not be applied to repetitive ozone exposure episodes because the plants are more sensitive under these conditions.

  6. Variability in Ozone in the Tropical Tropopause Region from the 1998-2000 SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere ADditional OZonesondes) Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Anne M.; Witte, J. C.; Oltmans, S. J.; Schmidlin, F. J.

    2002-01-01

    The first view of stratospheric and tropospheric ozone variability in the southern hemisphere tropics is provided by a 3-year, 10-site record of ozone soundings from the Southern Hemisphere ADditional OZonesondes (SHADOZ) network. Observations covering 1998-2000 were made over Ascension Island; Nairobi, Kenya; Irene, South Africa; Reunion Island; Watukosek, Java; Fiji; Tahiti; American Samoa; San Cristobal, Galapagos; Natal, Brazil. Taking the TTL (tropical tropopause layer) as the region between 12 and 17 km, we examine ozone variability in this region on a week-to-week and seasonal basis. The TTL layer is lower in September-October-November than in March-April-May, when ozone is a minimum at most SHADOZ stations. A zonal wave-one pattern is apparent in column-integrated TTL ozone because ozone mixing ratios are greater over the Atlantic and adjacent continents than over the Pacific and eastern Indian Ocean. The wave-one persists all year with varying magnitude and appears to be due to general circulation - with subsidence over the Atlantic and frequent deep convection over the Pacific and Indian Ocean. The variability of deep convection - most prominent at Java, Fiji, Samoa and Natal - is explored in time-vs-altitude ozone curtains. Stratospheric incursions into the troposphere are most prominent in soundings at Irene and Reunion Island.

  7. The Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) 1998-2002 Tropical Ozone Climatology. 3; Instrumentation and Station-to-Station Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Anne M.; Witte, Jacqueline C.; Smit, Herman G. J.; Oltmans, Samuel J.; Johnson, Bryan J.; Kirchhoff, Volker W. J. H.; Schmidlin, Francis J.

    2004-01-01

    Abstract: Since 1998 the Southern Hemisphere ADditional OZonesondes (SHADOZ) project has collected more than 2000 ozone profiles from a dozen tropical and subtropical sites using balloon-borne electrochemical concentration cell (ECC) ozonesondes. The data (with accompanying pressure-temperature-humidity soundings) are archived. Analysis of ozonesonde imprecision within the SHADOZ dataset revealed that variations in ozonesonde technique could lead to station-to-station biases in the measurements. In this paper imprecisions and accuracy in the SHADOZ dataset are examined in light of new data. When SHADOZ total ozone column amounts are compared to version 8 TOMS (2004 release), discrepancies between sonde and satellite datasets decline 1-2 percentage points on average, compared to version 7 TOMS. Variability among stations is evaluated using total ozone normalized to TOMS and results of laboratory tests on ozonesondes (JOSE-2O00, Julich Ozonesonde Intercomparison Experiment). Ozone deviations from a standard instrument in the JOSE flight simulation chamber resemble those of SHADOZ station data relative to a SHADOZ-defined climatological reference. Certain systematic variations in SHADOZ ozone profiles are accounted for by differences in solution composition, data processing and instrument (manufacturer). Instrument bias leads to a greater ozone measurement above 25 km over Nairobi and to lower total column ozone at three Pacific sites compared to other SHADOZ stations at 0-20 deg.S.

  8. Variability in Ozone in the Tropical Tropopause Region from the 1998-2000 SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere ADditional OZonesondes) Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, A. M.; Witte, J. C.; Oltmans, S. J.; Schmidlin, F. J.

    2002-05-01

    The first view of stratospheric and tropospheric ozone variability in the southern hemisphere tropics is provided by a 3-year, 10-site record of ozone soundings from the Southern Hemisphere ADditional OZonesondes (SHADOZ) network: (http://code916.gsfc.nasa.gov/Data_services/shadoz). Observations covering 1998-2000 were made over Ascension Island; Nairobi, Kenya; Irene, South Africa; Réunion Island; Watukosek, Java; Fiji; Tahiti; American Samoa; San Cristóbal, Galapagos; Natal, Brazil. Taking the TTL (tropical tropopause layer) as the region between 12 and 17 km, we examine ozone variability in this region on a week-to-week and seasonal basis. The TTL layer is lower in September-October-November than in March-April-May, when ozone is a minimum at most SHADOZ stations. A zonal wave-one pattern is apparent in column-integrated TTL ozone because ozone mixing ratios are greater over the Atlantic and adjacent continents than over the Pacific and eastern Indian Ocean. The wave-one persists all year with varying magnitude and appears to be due to general circulation - with subsidence over the Atlantic and frequent deep convection over the Pacific and Indian Ocean. The variability of deep convection - most prominent at Java, Fiji, Samoa and Natal - is explored in time-vs-altitude ozone curtains. Stratospheric incursions into the troposphere are most prominent in soundings at Irene and Réunion Island.

  9. Ozone decreases soybean productivity and water use efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betzelberger, A. M.; VanLoocke, A. D.; Ainsworth, E. A.; Bernacchi, C. J.

    2011-12-01

    The combination of population growth and climate change will increase pressure on agricultural and water resources throughout this century. An additional consequence of this growth is an increase in anthropogenic emissions that lead to the formation of tropospheric ozone (O3), which in concert with climate change, poses a significant threat to human health and nutrition. In addition to being an important greenhouse gas, O3 reduces plant productivity, an effect that has been particularly pronounced in soybean, which provides over half of the world's oilseed production. Plant productivity is linked to feedbacks in the climate system, indirectly through the carbon cycle, as well as directly through the partitioning of radiation into heat and moisture fluxes. Soybean, along with maize, comprises the largest ecosystem in the contiguous U.S. Therefore, changes in productivity and water use under increasing O3 could impact human nutrition as well as the regional climate. Soybean response to increasing O3 concentrations was tested under open-air agricultural conditions at the SoyFACE research site. During the 2009 growing season, eight 20 m diameter FACE plots were exposed to different O3 concentrations, ranging from 40 to 200 ppb. Canopy growth (leaf area index) and physiological measurements of leaf photosynthesis and stomatal conductance were taken regularly throughout the growing season. Canopy fluxes of heat and moisture were measured using the residual energy balance micrometeorological technique. Our results indicate that as O3 increased from 40 to 200 ppb, rates of photosynthesis and stomatal conductance decreased significantly. Further, the seed yield decreased by over 60%, while water use decreased by 30% and the water-use-efficiency (yield/water-use) declined by 50%. The growing season average canopy temperatures increased by 1°C and midday temperatures increased by 2°C compared to the control. Warmer and drier canopies may result in a positive feedback on O3

  10. Validation of Ozone Monitoring Instrument level 1b data products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobber, M.; Kleipool, Q.; Dirksen, R.; Levelt, P.; Jaross, G.; Taylor, S.; Kelly, T.; Flynn, L.; Leppelmeier, G.; Rozemeijer, N.

    2008-08-01

    The validation of the collection 2 level 1b radiance and irradiance data measured with the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) Aura satellite is investigated and described. A number of improvements from collection 2 data to collection 3 data are identified and presented. It is shown that with these improvements in the calibration and in the data processing the accuracy of the geophysically calibrated level 1b radiance and irradiance is improved in the collection 3 data. It is shown that the OMI level 1b irradiance product can be reproduced from a high-resolution solar reference spectrum convolved with the OMI spectral slit functions within 3% for the Fraunhofer structure and within 0.5% for the offset. The agreement of the OMI level 1b irradiance data product with other available literature irradiance spectra is within 4%. The viewing angle dependence of the irradiance and the irradiance goniometry are discussed, and improvements in the collection 3 data are described. The in-orbit radiometric degradation since launch is shown to be smaller than 0.5% above 310 nm and increases to about 1.2% at 270 nm. It is shown how the viewing angle dependence of the radiance is improved in the collection 3 data. The calculation of the surface albedo from OMI measurement data is discussed, and first results are presented. The OMI surface albedo values are compared to literature values from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) and the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME). Finally, improvements in the spectral and spatial stray light corrections from collection 2 data to collection 3 data are presented and discussed.

  11. Quantifying Ozone Production throughout the Boundary Layer from High Frequency Tethered Profile Measurements during a High Ozone Episode in the Uinta Basin, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, C. W.; Johnson, B.; Schnell, R. C.; Oltmans, S. J.; Cullis, P.; Hall, E. G.; Jordan, A. F.; Windell, J.; McClure-Begley, A.; Helmig, D.; Petron, G.

    2015-12-01

    During the Uinta Basin Winter Ozone Study (UBWOS) in Jan - Feb 2013, 735 tethered ozonesonde profiles were obtained at 3 sites including during high wintertime photochemical ozone production events that regularly exceeded 125 ppb. High resolution profiles of ozone and temperature with altitude, measured during daylight hours, showed the development of approximately week long high ozone episodes building from background levels of ~40 ppb to >150 ppb. The topography of the basin combined with a strong temperature inversion trapped oil and gas production effluents in the basin and the snow covered surface amplified the sun's radiation driving the photochemical ozone production at rates up to 13 ppb/hour in a cold layer capped at 1600-1700 meters above sea level. Beginning in mid-morning, ozone mixing ratios throughout the cold layer increased until late afternoon. Ozone mixing ratios were generally constant with height indicating that ozone production was nearly uniform throughout the depth of the cold pool. Although there was strong diurnal variation, ozone mixing ratios increased during the day more than decreased during the night, resulting in elevated levels the next morning; an indication that nighttime loss processes did not compensate for daytime production. Even though the 3 tethersonde sites were at elevations differing by as much as 140 m, the top of the high ozone layer was nearly uniform in altitude at the 3 locations. Mobile van surface ozone measurements across the basin confirmed this capped structure of the ozone layer; the vehicle drove out of high ozone mixing ratios at an elevation of ~1900 meters above sea level, above which free tropospheric ozone mixing ratios of ~50 ppb were measured. Exhaust plumes from a coal-fired power plant in the eastern portion of the basin were intercepted by the tethersondes. The structure of the profiles clearly showed that effluents in the plumes were not mixed downward and thus did not contribute precursor nitrogen

  12. Ozone Production from the 2004 North American Boreal Fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfister, G. G.; Emmons, L. K.; Hess, P. G.; Honrath, R.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Val Martin, M.; Owen, R. C.; Avery, M. A.; Browell, E. V.; Holloway, J. S.; Nedelec, P.; Purvis, R.; Ryerson, T. B.; Sachse, G. W.; Schlager, H.

    2006-01-01

    We examine the ozone production from boreal forest fires based on a case study of wildfires in Alaska and Canada in summer 2004. The model simulations were performed with the chemistry transport model, MOZART-4, and were evaluated by comparison with a comprehensive set of aircraft measurements. In the analysis we use measurements and model simulations of carbon monoxide (CO) and ozone (O3) at the PICO-NARE station located in the Azores within the pathway of North American outflow. The modeled mixing ratios were used to test the robustness of the enhancement ratio deltaO3/deltaCO (defined as the excess O3 mixing ratio normalized by the increase in CO) and the feasibility for using this ratio in estimating the O3 production from the wildfires. Modeled and observed enhancement ratios are about 0.25 ppbv/ppbv which is in the range of values found in the literature, and results in a global net O3 production of 12.9 2 Tg O3 during summer 2004. This matches the net O3 production calculated in the model for a region extending from Alaska to the East Atlantic (9-11 Tg O3) indicating that observations at PICO-NARE representing photochemically well-aged plumes provide a good measure of the O3 production of North American boreal fires. However, net chemical loss of fire related O3 dominates in regions far downwind from the fires (e.g. Europe and Asia) resulting in a global net O3 production of 6 Tg O3 during the same time period. On average, the fires increased the O3 burden (surface-300 mbar) over Alaska and Canada during summer 2004 by about 7-9%, and over Europe by about 2-3%.

  13. OMI Total Ozone Column Product Validated Against UVMFR Retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioannis, Raptis Panagiotis; Kazadziz, Stelios; Eleftherantos, Kostas; Kosmopoulos, Panagiotis; Amiridis, Vassilis

    2015-06-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) is a spectroradiometer on board NASA Aura, providing Total Ozone Column (TOC), almost globally, every day, with a spatial resolution of 13kmX24 km, since July 2004. In the next few months Sentinel-5P will be launched, and carry TROPOMI, a spaceborne nadir viewing spectrometer which will cover tha same spectral range, narrowing the spatial resolution to 7 km X 7 km and extending current data record. Studies have evaluated OMI’s product using Brewer spectroradiometer measurements and found average biases to be less than 3%. UVMFR (Ultraviolet Multifilter Radiometer) is an instrument designed to measure total and diffuse and calculate Direct solar Irradiance at 7 wavelengths in the UV spectrum, with high accuracy and very high frequency. Main advantages of this instrument is the portability, the automatic calibration procedure, simple operational use, unattended functionality and the relatively low cost. In that frame it could become a very effective solution to validate satellite products. A method was developed to retrieve TOC, from UVMFR measurements combined with radiative transfer model calculations. Lookup tables of ratios of direct solar irradiance at 305nm and 325nm in respect to TOC, Solar Zenith Angle and Aerosol Optical Depth have been constructed and compared with UVMFR irradiance measurements in order to retrieve TOC. We used UVMFR measurements in Athens, Greece during the period July 2009 to May 2014 to create a TOC time series with high temporal frequency (1 minute for cloudless conditions). The validation of the method have been assessed using a Brewer spectroradiometer operating in parallel for the whole period. In order to compare OMI-based and ground-based TOC measurements we have calculated UVMFR daily values of TOC averaging measurements in a 2 hour window around OMI overpass. This comparison revealed differences up to 7%, with mean differences at 4.2 DU and standard deviation of 8.7%. Same seasonal cycle

  14. Ozonation of ofloxacin in water: by-products, degradation pathway and ecotoxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Tay, Kheng Soo; Madehi, Norfazrina

    2015-07-01

    Application of ozonation in water treatment involves complex oxidation pathways that could lead to the formation of various by-products, some of which may be harmful to living organisms. In this work, ozonation by-products of ofloxacin (OFX), a frequently detected pharmaceutical pollutant in the environment, were identified and their ecotoxicity was estimated using the Ecological Structure Activity Relationships (ECOSAR) computer program. In order to examine the role of ozone (O3) and hydroxyl radicals (∙OH) in the degradation of ofloxacin, ozonation was performed at pH2, 7 and 12. In this study, 12 new structures have been proposed for the ozonation by-products detected during the ozonation of ofloxacin. According to the identified ozonation by-products, O3 and ∙OH were found to react with ofloxacin during ozonation. The reaction between ofloxacin and O3 proceeded via hydroxylation and breakdown of heterocyclic ring with unsaturated double-bond. The reaction between ofloxacin and ·OH generated various by-products derived from the breakdown of heterocyclic ring. Ecotoxicity assessment indicated that ozonation of OFX could yield by-products of greater toxicity compared with parent compounds.

  15. Ozone phytotoxicity evaluation and prediction of crops production in tropical regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Nurul Izma; Ramli, Nor Azam; Yahya, Ahmad Shukri

    2013-04-01

    Increasing ozone concentration in the atmosphere can threaten food security due to its effects on crop production. Since the 1980s, ozone has been believed to be the most damaging air pollutant to crops. In Malaysia, there is no index to indicate the reduction of crops due to the exposure of ozone. Therefore, this study aimed to identify the accumulated exposure over a threshold of X ppb (AOTX) indexes in assessing crop reduction in Malaysia. In European countries, crop response to ozone exposure is mostly expressed as AOT40. This study was designed to evaluate and predict crop reduction in tropical regions and in particular, the Malaysian climate, by adopting the AOT40 index method and modifying it based on Malaysian air quality and crop data. Nine AOTX indexes (AOT0, AOT5, AOT10, AOT15, AOT20, AOT25, AOT30, AOT40, and AOT50) were analyzed, crop responses tested and reduction in crops predicted. The results showed that the AOT50 resulted in the highest reduction in crops and the highest R2 value between the AOT50 and the crops reduction from the linear regression analysis. Hence, this study suggests that the AOT50 index is the most suitable index to estimate the potential ozone impact on crops in tropical regions. The result showed that the critical level for AOT50 index if the estimated crop reduction is 5% was 1336 ppb h. Additionally, the results indicated that the AOT40 index in Malaysia gave a minimum percentage of 6% crop reduction; as contrasted with the European guideline of 5% (due to differences in the climate e.g., average amount of sunshine).

  16. Consistent ozone-induced decreases in pasture forage quality across several grassland types and consequences for UK lamb production.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Felicity; Mills, Gina; Jones, Laurence; Abbott, John; Ashmore, Mike; Barnes, Jeremy; Neil Cape, J; Coyle, Mhairi; Peacock, Simon; Rintoul, Naomi; Toet, Sylvia; Wedlich, Kerstin; Wyness, Kirsten

    2016-02-01

    In this study we have demonstrated that rising background ozone has the potential to reduce grassland forage quality and explored the implications for livestock production. We analysed pasture samples from seven ozone exposure experiments comprising mesotrophic, calcareous, haymeadow and sanddune unimproved grasslands conducted in open-top chambers, solardomes and a field release system. Across all grassland types, there were significant increases in acid detergent fibre, crude fibre and lignin content with increasing ozone concentration, resulting in decreased pasture quality in terms of the metabolisable energy content of the vegetation. We derived a dose-response function for metabolisable energy of the grassland with ozone concentration, applicable to a range of grassland types, and used this to predict effects on pasture quality of UK vegetation at 1 km resolution using modelled ozone data for 2007 and for predicted higher average ozone concentrations in 2020. This showed a potential total reduction in lamb production in the UK of approximately 4% in 2020 compared to 2007. The largest impacts were in geographical areas of modest ozone increases between the two years, but where large numbers of lambs were present. For an individual farmer working to a very small cost margin this could represent a large reduction in profit, both in regions where the impacts per lamb and those where the impacts per km(2) of grazing land are largest. In the short term farmers could adapt their lamb management in response to changed forage quality by additional supplementary feed of high metabolisable energy content. Nationally this increase in annual additional feed in 2020 compared to 2007 would be 2,166 tonnes (an increase of 0.7%). Of added concern are the longer-term consequences of continual deterioration of pasture quality and the implications for changes in farming practices to compensate for potential reductions in livestock production capacity.

  17. Additive manufacturing in production: challenges and opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Bhrigu; Karg, Michael; Schmidt, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Additive manufacturing, characterized by its inherent layer by layer fabrication methodology has been coined by many as the latest revolution in the manufacturing industry. Due to its diversification of Materials, processes, system technology and applications, Additive Manufacturing has been synonymized with terminology such as Rapid prototyping, 3D printing, free-form fabrication, Additive Layer Manufacturing, etc. A huge media and public interest in the technology has led to an innovative attempt of exploring the technology for applications beyond the scope of the traditional engineering industry. Nevertheless, it is believed that a critical factor for the long-term success of Additive Manufacturing would be its ability to fulfill the requirements defined by the traditional manufacturing industry. A parallel development in market trends and product requirements has also lead to a wider scope of opportunities for Additive Manufacturing. The presented paper discusses some of the key challenges which are critical to ensure that Additive Manufacturing is truly accepted as a mainstream production technology in the industry. These challenges would highlight on various aspects of production such as product requirements, process management, data management, intellectual property, work flow management, quality assurance, resource planning, etc. In Addition, changing market trends such as product life cycle, mass customization, sustainability, environmental impact and localized production will form the foundation for the follow up discussion on the current limitations and the corresponding research opportunities. A discussion on ongoing research to address these challenges would include topics like process monitoring, design complexity, process standardization, multi-material and hybrid fabrication, new material development, etc.

  18. Effects of SO/sub 2/ and ozone on crop physiology and productivity. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Laeuchli, A.; Timm, H.

    1985-08-26

    Growth and productivity of several crop cultivars were related to physiological and biochemical parameters. In laboratory studies seed germination was not sensitive to SO/sub 2/ and ozone but root growth was sensitive. SO/sub 2/ inhibited pollen tube growth; ozone had no effect on pollen viability. Differential SO/sub 2/ sensitivity in corn cultivars was related to cellular uptake and detoxification. SO/sub 2/ induced ethylene production in a sensitive corn cultivar without visible injury. In bean cultivars sensitivity to ozone was correlated with stomatal uptake. Ozone decreased plant growth and pod yield, and lowered leaf water potential prior to bloom.

  19. Identification and structural elucidation of ozonation transformation products of estrone

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Quantitative methods for the analysis of contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) are abundant in the scientific literature. However, there are few reports on systematic methods of identification and structural identification of transformation products. For this reason, a new method based on high-resolution mass spectrometry and differential analysis was developed in order to facilitate and accelerate the process of identification and structural elucidation of transformation products CECs. This method was applied to the study of ozonation transformation products (OTPs) of the natural hormone estrone (E1). Results A control compare trend experiment consisting in the comparison of a control sample to several samples having been exposed to decreasing concentrations of O3(aq) indicated that 593 peaks could be associated with OTPs. After applying various filters to remove background noise, sample contaminants and signal spikes, this data set was reduced to 16 candidate peaks. By inspection of the shape of these peaks, only two compounds OTP-276 (m/z 275.12930) and OTP-318 (m/z 317.14008) were considered as good candidates for further study. Multi-stage tandem mass spectrometry (MSn) experiments of SPE extracts of the ozonated samples of E1 and of a deuterium-labeled analogue (E1-d4) showed that OTP-276 and OTP-318 had carboxylic acid and hydroxyl functional groups, as previously reported for OTPs of other hormones. Structures for these two compounds were proposed based on their MSn spectra. Conclusion These results indicate that the method proposed is a systematic and rapid approach to study transformation products of CECs. PMID:23618537

  20. Ozone production and losses in N2/O2 mixtures in an ozone generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankelevich, Yu. A.; Poroykov, A. Yu.; Rakhimova, T. V.; Voloshin, D. G.; Chukalovskii, A. A.; Zosimov, A. V.; Lunin, V. V.; Samoilovich, V. G.

    2016-09-01

    Nonunique ozone concentrations at the output of an ozone generator under identical external conditions of barrier discharge activation of N2/O2 mixtures but with different prehistories of operating practice and employed gas mixtures are investigated theoretically. An analytical approach is developed to determine the ozone yield with regard for its heterogeneous loss. Plasma-chemical and electron kinetics in the N2/O2-mixtures are calculated numerically. The results of numerical calculations are compared to experimental data obtained by the authors. It is noted that the heterogeneous loss of ozone is the probable reason for the observed variety of behavior of O3 concentrations, depending on prehistory of ozone generator operation, along with the N2 and O2 gas flow rates and the specific active power.

  1. Chlorofluorocarbon production scenarios: possible changes to stratospheric ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Wuebbles, D.J.; Tarp, R.L.; Nold, A.; Wood, W.P.

    1981-01-01

    As one aspect of the regulatory process, the Environmental Protection Agency has derived a series of scenarios for future atmospheric emission rates of the chlorofluorocarbons CFCl/sub 3/ (also referred to as F-11), CF/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ (F-12), CCl/sub 2/FCClF/sub 2/(F-113), CClF/sub 2/CClF/sub 2/(F-114), and CClF/sub 2/CF/sub 3/ (F-115). These scenarios are based on potential industrial production and commercial applications, and the eventual release of these chemicals into the atmosphere. In this study, the potential effect on stratospheric ozone resulting from future chlorofluorocarbon emissions as suggested by these scenarios is examined. Assessments are based upon model calculations using the one-dimensional coupled transport and chemical kinetics model of the troposphere and stratosphere developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The change in total ozone column calculated for the seven scenarios as a function of time is given. (JGB)

  2. Ozonation of trimethoprim in aqueous solution: identification of reaction products and their toxicity.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Jiangmeng; Huang, Jun; Wang, Bin; Cao, Qiming; Deng, Shubo; Yu, Gang

    2013-05-15

    This work aimed to better understand the ozonation process of a typical antibiotic pharmaceutical, trimethoprim in aqueous solution. The parent compound was almost completely degraded with ozone dose up to 3.5 mg/L with no mineralization. Twenty one degradation products were identified using an electrospray quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Several ozonation pathways were proposed including hydroxylation, demethylation, carbonylation, deamination and methylene group cleavage. Two species of luminescent bacteria Photobacterium phosphoreum and Vibrio qinghaiensis were selected to assess the toxicity of ozonation products. For P. phosphoreum, higher level of toxicity was observed compared to the parent compound, but a negligible toxicity change was observed for V. qinghaiensis, indicating different modes of action for the same water sample. This was further confirmed by quantitative structure-active relationship analysis. This work proves the dominant role of ozone rather than hydroxyl radicals in the reaction and the potential risk after ozonation.

  3. What Causes Aerosol Growth and Ozone Production in Smoke Plumes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, M. J.; Prinn, R. G.

    2006-12-01

    The growth of aerosol particles and production of ozone in smoke plumes is the result of a complex interaction between horizontal diffusion, gas-phase oxidation, coagulation, and mass transfer between phases. Models allow us to separate the effects of these processes and predict their impact on the global environment. We present the results of a new model of gas and aerosol chemistry applied to young biomass burning plumes. The model includes heterogeneous chemistry, kinetic mass transfer, coagulation and the formation of secondary organic and inorganic aerosol. Comparison with measurements from SAFARI 2000 (Hobbs et al., 2003, JGR, doi:10.1029/2002JD002352) suggests the baseline model underpredicts ozone formation and the growth of aerosol within the plume. We explore whether the model predictions can be improved by (1) including heterogeneous HONO production, and (2) adding in surrogates for the uncharacterized organic compounds emitted by the biomass burning. Including the heterogeneous reaction NO2 => HONO greatly improves the match for ozone, OH, and aerosol nitrate concentration, but only when the uptake coefficient approaches 10-3, which is over an order of magnitude higher than previously reported values (Stemmler et al., 2006, doi:10.1038/nature04603). Using the reaction NO2 => 0.5 HONO + 0.5 HNO3 with an uptake coefficient of 10-3 (the top of the range recommended by Jacob, 2000, Atm. Env.,34, 2131-2159) provides an even better match for aerosol nitrate, but produces less O3 and OH than the first reaction. Direct measurements of HONO and OH in young biomass plumes would help determine if this chemistry is taking place. We used two surrogates to model the uncharacterized compounds: long chain alkanes and monoterpenes, representing primary and secondary sources of condensable compounds respectively. Complete condensation of the long-chain alkanes can account for nearly all of the observed increase in organic carbon. However, the accommodation coefficient

  4. Ozonation of indigo enhanced by carboxylated carbon nanotubes: performance optimization, degradation products, reaction mechanism and toxicity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Qu, Ruijuan; Xu, Bingzhe; Meng, Lingjun; Wang, Liansheng; Wang, Zunyao

    2015-01-01

    As a promising disinfection technique to replace chlorination, ozonation has been demonstrated to be efficient in water treatment. This paper describes an effective way to enhance the ozonation of indigo by using carbon nanotubes functionalized with carboxyl groups (CNTs-COOH) as catalysts. The result of kinetic studies showed that the presence of CNTs-COOH dramatically increased the decolorization rate of indigo. Different types of catalysts were compared to further elucidate the internal mechanism of the catalytic reaction and the special nanostructure and the functional –COOH groups are considered to play an important role in the catalytic ozonation process. Four aromatic intermediate products were identified using an electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometer and further rationalized by the frontier electron density calculations. Ion chromatography analysis revealed that the nitrogen atom of indigo was released predominantly as ammonium and to a lesser extent as nitrate. The presence of the catalyst CNTs-COOH leads to a higher mineralization degree than single ozonation, as suggested by the total organic carbon (TOC) measurement. Three major carboxylic acids (i.e., oxalic, formic and acetic acids) were also identified as oxidation by-products, and they contributed significantly to the residual TOC after 2 h of ozonation. In addition, the toxicity evolution during the degradation was investigated through two aquatic model species to evaluate the potential ecological risks of the intermediate products.

  5. Increasing global agricultural production by reducing ozone damages via methane emission controls and ozone-resistant cultivar selection

    PubMed Central

    Avnery, Shiri; Mauzerall, Denise L; Fiore, Arlene M

    2013-01-01

    Meeting the projected 50% increase in global grain demand by 2030 without further environmental degradation poses a major challenge for agricultural production. Because surface ozone (O3) has a significant negative impact on crop yields, one way to increase future production is to reduce O3-induced agricultural losses. We present two strategies whereby O3 damage to crops may be reduced. We first examine the potential benefits of an O3 mitigation strategy motivated by climate change goals: gradual emission reductions of methane (CH4), an important greenhouse gas and tropospheric O3 precursor that has not yet been targeted for O3 pollution abatement. Our second strategy focuses on adapting crops to O3 exposure by selecting cultivars with demonstrated O3 resistance. We find that the CH4 reductions considered would increase global production of soybean, maize, and wheat by 23–102 Mt in 2030 – the equivalent of a ∼2–8% increase in year 2000 production worth $3.5–15 billion worldwide (USD2000), increasing the cost effectiveness of this CH4 mitigation policy. Choosing crop varieties with O3 resistance (relative to median-sensitivity cultivars) could improve global agricultural production in 2030 by over 140 Mt, the equivalent of a 12% increase in 2000 production worth ∼$22 billion. Benefits are dominated by improvements for wheat in South Asia, where O3-induced crop losses would otherwise be severe. Combining the two strategies generates benefits that are less than fully additive, given the nature of O3 effects on crops. Our results demonstrate the significant potential to sustainably improve global agricultural production by decreasing O3-induced reductions in crop yields. PMID:23504903

  6. Influence of Ar addition on ozone generation in a non-thermal plasma—a numerical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsin Liang; Lee, How Ming; Chen, Shiaw Huei; Wei, Ta Chin; Been Chang, Moo

    2010-10-01

    A numerical model based on a dielectric barrier discharge is developed in this study to investigate the influence of Ar addition on ozone generation. The simulation results show good agreement with the experimental data, confirming the validity of the numerical model. The mechanisms regarding how the Ar addition affects ozone generation are investigated with the assistance of a numerical simulation by probing into the following two questions, (1) why the ozone concentration just slightly decreases in the low specific input energy (SIE, the ratio of discharge power to gas flow rate) region even if the inlet O2 concentration is substantially decreased and (2) why the variation of the increased rate of ozone concentration with SIE (i.e. the variation in the slope of ozone concentration versus SIE) is more significant for an O2/Ar mixture plasma. As SIE is relatively low, ozone decomposition through electron-impact and radical attack reactions is less significant because of low ozone concentration and gas temperature. Therefore, the ozone concentration depends mainly on the amount of oxygen atoms generated. The simulation results indicate that the amount of oxygen atoms generated per electronvolt for Ar concentrations of 0%, 10%, 30%, 50% and 80% are 0.178, 0.174, 0.169, 0.165 and 0.166, respectively, explaining why the ozone concentration does not decrease linearly with the inlet O2 concentration in the low SIE region. On the other hand, the simulation results show that increasing Ar concentration would lead to a lower reduced field and a higher gas temperature. The former would lead to an increase in the rate constant of e + O3 → e + O + O2 while the latter would result in a decrease in the rate constant of O + O2 + M → O3 + M and an increase in that of O3 + O → 2O2. The changes in the rate constants of these reactions would have a negative effect on ozone generation, which is the rationale for the second question.

  7. Ifluence of outer electrode material on ozone production in coaxial negative corona discharge fed by oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orszagh, J.; Skalny, J. D.; Mason, N. J.

    2008-07-01

    The "electric odour", observed by Van Marum when oxygen was passing trough electric spark in 1785, has been later (1839), identified by Ch. F. Schonbeim as a new chemical compound named ozone (Stolarski 1999). Almost from those times ozone is widely used chemical compound. The effect of outer electrode material on the ozone production in negative corona discharge have been studied. Two electrodes with the same dimensions were used in the experiment. One was made of stainless steel other one of brass. First the outer electrode was mechanically cleaned to remove the layer of oxides. The reactor have been filled by pure oxygen and closed. Then the measurement (1 hour measurement of discharge current at the constant voltage and time dependence of ozone concentration in the reactor) was repeated 5 times without cleaning the surface to see the ageing effects. Especially the influence of electrode oxidation on ozone concentration was studied. The experiments have been carried out at atmospheric pressure and ambient temperature. The ozone concentration was measured by UV spectroscopy method directly in the discharge reactor. As one can expect the brass surface was oxidizing faster. After five measurements the electrode surface was covered by layer of greenish oxides. On the other hand the steel electrode surface had no visible oxides layer. The oxidation of the outer electrode had little systematic effect on the ozone concentration but in case of brass electrode the results were scattered in the range from 8000 ppm to 15000 ppm of ozone. It seems that the more oxides are created on the surface the less ozone is produced or the faster the ozone decomposition processes are (see Fig. 1). On the other hand in case of stainless steel electrode the ozone concentrations were comparable in all 5 measurements. Overall ozone concentration was higher in steel electrode. Figure 1: Time dependence of ozone concentration.

  8. Experimental monitoring of ozone production in a PET cyclotron facility.

    PubMed

    Zanibellato, L; Cicoria, G; Pancaldi, D; Boschi, S; Mostacci, D; Marengo, M

    2010-10-01

    Ozone produced from radiolytic processes was investigated as a possible health hazard in the working environment at the University Hospital "S.Orsola--Malpighi" PET facility. Intense radiation fields can generate ozone, known to be the most toxic gas produced by ionizing radiation around a particle accelerator. To evaluate ozone concentration in air, two different measurement campaigns were conducted with passive diffusion detectors. Comparison of the results with the concentration limits recommended by American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) demonstrated that ozone poses no health hazard to workers around a biomedical cyclotron.

  9. Dimethyl carbonate production for fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Y.; Kondo, T.; Asaoka, S.

    1996-12-31

    We have taken note of the transesterification reaction as a highly safe process of dimethyl carbonate (DMC) production for fuel additives. The reaction proceeds under the low corrosiveness and in the relatively mild condition. We have aimed to use an inorganic solid catalyst for this process. The inorganic solid catalyst is thermally stable and can be used in the large-scale fixed bed reactors without a catalyst separation unit. Through the transesterification of ethylene carbonate (EG) with methanol, DMC and ethylene glycol (EG) are co-generated as the products. EG is one of the bulk chemicals produced in the large scale plant comparable to one for the fuel additives. The market balance is important in the coproduction process. On the assumption that the amount of the co-production meets the market balance, the coproduction of DMC and EG is commercially viable. If we can control the amount of the EG coproduction in this process, it makes the process more flexible in the commercial production. Accordingly we have proposed a conceptual process scheme to control the amount of the EG coproduction. In this symposium, the inorganic solid catalyst system applying to the transesterification process and the conceptual process scheme how to control the amount of co-product will be discussed.

  10. DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT FORMATION AND CONTROL BY OZONATION AND BIOTREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is increasing interest in using ozone in water treatment because it is a strong disinfectant and is able to oxidize the precursors of some disinfection by-products (DBPs). However, ozonation itself produces DBPs, like aldehydes and ketones, and increases the concentration ...

  11. THE EFFECTS OF COMBINED OZONATION AND FILTRATION ON DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT FORMATION. (R830908)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of combined ozonation and membrane filtration on the removal of the natural organic matter (NOM) and the formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) were investigated. Ozonation/filtration resulted in a reduction of up to 50% in the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) ...

  12. Indoor secondary pollutants from cleaning product and air freshener use in the presence of ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Brett C.; Coleman, Beverly K.; Destaillats, Hugo; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Lunden, Melissa M.; Weschler, Charles J.; Nazaroff, William W.

    This study investigated the formation of secondary pollutants resulting from household product use in the presence of ozone. Experiments were conducted in a 50-m 3 chamber simulating a residential room. The chamber was operated at conditions relevant to US residences in polluted areas during warm-weather seasons: an air exchange rate of 1.0 h -1 and an inlet ozone concentration of approximately 120 ppb, when included. Three products were used in separate experiments. An orange oil-based degreaser and a pine oil-based general-purpose cleaner were used for surface cleaning applications. A plug-in scented-oil air freshener (AFR) was operated for several days. Cleaning products were applied realistically with quantities scaled to simulate residential use rates. Concentrations of organic gases and secondary organic aerosol from the terpene-containing consumer products were measured with and without ozone introduction. In the absence of reactive chemicals, the chamber ozone level was approximately 60 ppb. Ozone was substantially consumed following cleaning product use, mainly by homogeneous reaction. For the AFR, ozone consumption was weaker and heterogeneous reaction with sorbed AFR-constituent VOCs was of similar magnitude to homogeneous reaction with continuously emitted constituents. Formaldehyde generation resulted from product use with ozone present, increasing indoor levels by the order of 10 ppb. Cleaning product use in the presence of ozone generated substantial fine particle concentrations (more than 100 μg m -3) in some experiments. Ozone consumption and elevated hydroxyl radical concentrations persisted for 10-12 h following brief cleaning events, indicating that secondary pollutant production can persist for extended periods.

  13. Nimbus-7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) Data Products User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPeters, Richard D.; Bhartia, P. K.; Krueger, Arlin J.; Herman, Jay R.; Schlesinger, Barry M.; Wellemeyer, Charles G.; Seftor, Colin J.; Jaross, Glen; Taylor, Steven L.; Swissler, Tom; Torres, Omar; Labow, Gordon; Byerly, William; Cebula, Richard P.

    1996-01-01

    Two data products from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) onboard Nimbus-7 have been archived at the Distributed Active Archive Center, in the form of Hierarchical Data Format files. The instrument measures backscattered Earth radiance and incoming solar irradiance; their ratio is used in ozone retrievals. Changes in the instrument sensitivity are monitored by a spectral discrimination technique using measurements of the intrinsically stable wavelength dependence of derived surface reflectivity. The algorithm to retrieve total column ozone compares measured Earth radiances at sets of three wavelengths with radiances calculated for different total ozone values, solar zenith angles, and optical paths. The initial error in the absolute scale for TOMS total ozone is 3 percent, the one standard deviation random error is 2 percent, and drift is less than 1.0 percent per decade. The Level-2 product contains the measured radiances, the derived total ozone amount, and reflectivity information for each scan position. The Level-3 product contains daily total ozone amount and reflectivity in a I - degree latitude by 1.25 degrees longitude grid. The Level-3 product also is available on CD-ROM. Detailed descriptions of both HDF data files and the CD-ROM product are provided.

  14. Evidence for an unidentified ground-level source of formaldehyde in the Po Valley with potential implications for ozone production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, J.; Wolfe, G. M.; Bohn, B.; Broch, S.; Fuchs, H.; Ganzeveld, L. N.; Gomm, S.; Häseler, R.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Holland, F.; Jäger, J.; Li, X.; Lohse, I.; Lu, K.; Rohrer, F.; Wegener, R.; Mentel, T. F.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Wahner, A.; Keutsch, F. N.

    2014-10-01

    Ozone concentrations in the Po Valley of Northern Italy often exceed international regulations. As both a source of radicals and an intermediate in the oxidation of most volatile organic compounds (VOCs), formaldehyde (HCHO) is a useful tracer for the oxidative processing of hydrocarbons that leads to ozone production. We investigate the sources of HCHO in the Po Valley using vertical profile measurements acquired from the airship Zeppelin NT over an agricultural region during the PEGASOS 2012 campaign. Using a 1-D model, the total VOC oxidation rate is examined and discussed in the context of formaldehyde and ozone production in the early morning. While model and measurement discrepancies in OH reactivity are small (on average 3.4±11%), HCHO concentrations are underestimated by as much as 1.5 ppb (45%) in the convective mixed layer. A similar underestimate in HCHO was seen in the 2002-2003 FORMAT Po-Valley measurements, though the additional source of HCHO was not identified. Oxidation of unmeasured VOC precursors cannot explain the missing HCHO source, as measured OH reactivity is explained by measured VOCs and their calculated oxidation products. We conclude that local direct emissions from agricultural land are the most likely source of missing HCHO. Model calculations demonstrate that radicals from degradation of this non-photochemical HCHO source increase model ozone production rates by as much as 0.7 ppb h-1 (10%) before noon.

  15. Development of a portable instrument to measure ozone production rates in the troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sklaveniti, Sofia; Locoge, Nadine; Stevens, Philip; Kumar, Vinod; Sinha, Vinayak; Dusanter, Sébastien

    2015-04-01

    Ground-level ozone is a key species related to air pollution, causing respiratory problems, damaging crops and forests, and affecting the climate. Our current understanding of the tropospheric ozone-forming chemistry indicates that net ozone production occurs via reactions of peroxy radicals (HO2 + RO2) with NO producing NO2, whose photolysis leads to O3 formation. Production rates of tropospheric ozone, P(O3), depend on concentrations of oxides of nitrogen (NOx = NO + NO2) and Volatile Organic Compounds (V OCs), but also on production rates of ROx radicals (OH + HO2 + RO2). The formation of ozone follows a complex nonlinear chemistry that makes strategies for reducing ozone difficult to implement. In this context, atmospheric chemistry models are used to develop emission regulations, but there are still uncertainties associated with the chemical mechanisms used in these models. Testing the ozone formation chemistry in atmospheric models is needed, in order to ensure the development of effective strategies for ozone reduction. We will present the development of an instrument for direct measurements of ozone production rates (OPR) in ambient air. The OPR instrument is made of three components: (i) two quartz flow tubes to sample ambient air, one exposed to solar radiation and one covered by a UV filter, (ii) a NO2-to-O3 conversion unit, and (iii) an ozone analyzer. The total amount of ozone exiting each flow tube is conserved in the form of Ox = NO2 + O3. Ozone production rates P(O3) are derived from the difference in Ox concentration between the two flow tubes, divided by the exposure time of air inside the flow tubes. We will present studies that were carried out in the laboratory to characterize each part of the instrument and we will discuss the performances of the OPR instrument based on experiments carried out using synthetic air mixtures of known composition (NOx and V OCs). Chemical modeling will also be presented to assess the reliability of ozone

  16. Earth Probe Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) Data Product User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPeters, R.; Bhartia, P. K.; Krueger, A.; Herman, J.; Wellemeyer, C.; Seftor, C.; Jaross, G.; Torres, O.; Moy, L.; Labow, G.; Byerly, W.; Taylor, S.; Swissler, T.; Cebula, R.

    1998-01-01

    Two data products from the Earth Probe Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (EP/TOMS) have been archived at the Distributed Active Archive Center, in the form of Hierarchical Data Format files. The EP/ TOMS began taking measurements on July 15, 1996. The instrument measures backscattered Earth radiance and incoming solar irradiance; their ratio is used in ozone retrievals. Changes in the reflectivity of the solar diffuser used for the irradiance measurement are monitored using a carousel of three diffusers, each exposed to the degrading effects of solar irradiation at different rates. The algorithm to retrieve total column ozone compares measured Earth radiances at sets of three wavelengths with radiances calculated for different total ozone values. The initial error in the absolute scale for TOMS total ozone is 3 percent, the one standard deviation random error is 2 percent, and the drift is less than 0.5 percent over the first year of data. The Level-2 product contains the measured radiances, the derived total ozone amount, and reflectivity information for each scan position. The Level-3 product contains daily total ozone and reflectivity in a 1-degree latitude by 1.25 degrees longitude grid. Level-3 files containing estimates of LTVB at the Earth surface and tropospheric aerosol information are also available, Detailed descriptions of both HDF data-files and the CD-ROM product are provided.

  17. IDENTIFICATION OF NEW DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS FROM OZONE, CHLORINE DIOXIDE, CHLORAMINE, AND CHLORINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to concern over the potential adverse health effects of trihalomethanes (THMs) and other chlorinated by-products in chlorinated drinking water, alternative disinfection methods are being explored. Ozone, chlorine dioxide, and chloramine are currently popular alternatives to ...

  18. EXAMINING THE INFLAMMATORY RESPONSES OF HAPS: THE ROLE OF OZONE AND OTHER PHTOTCHEMICAL TRANSFORMATION PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chemistry and health effects of individual hazardous air pollutants (HAPS) have been studied for many years. Once released into the atmosphere, HAPS interact with hydroxyl radicals and ozone (created by photochemical processes), to produce many different products, whose toxic...

  19. Effects of ozone treatment on Botrytis cinerea and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum in relation to horticultural product quality.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Deana; Fan, Lihua; McRae, Ken; Walker, Brad; MacKay, Ron; Doucette, Craig

    2009-08-01

    Botrytis cinerea and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum are fungal pathogens that cause the decay of many fruits and vegetables. Ozone may be used as an antimicrobial agent to control the decay. The effect of gaseous ozone on spore viability of B. cinerea and mycelial growth of B. cinerea and S. sclerotiorum were investigated. Spore viability of B. cinerea was reduced by over 99.5% (P < 0.01) and height of the aerial mycelium was reduced from 4.7 mm in the control to less than 1 mm after exposure to 450 or 600 ppb ozone for 48 h at 20 degrees C. Sporulation of B. cinerea was also substantially inhibited by ozone treatments. However, ozone had no significant effect on mycelial growth of S. sclerotiorum in vitro. Decay and quality parameters including color, chlorophyll fluorescence (CF), and ozone injury were further assessed for various horticultural commodities (apple, grape, highbush blueberry, and carrot) treated with 450 ppb of ozone for 48 h at 20 degrees C over a period of 12 d. Lesion size and height of the aerial mycelium were significantly reduced by the ozone treatment on carrots inoculated with mycelial agar plugs of B. cinerea or S. sclerotiorum. Lesion size was also reduced on treated apples inoculated with 5 x 10(6) spores/mL of B. cinerea, and decay incidence of treated grapes was reduced. The 450 ppb ozone for 48 h treatment had no significant effect on color of carrots and apples or on CF of apples and grapes. Ozone, an environmentally sound antimicrobial agent, inactivates microorganisms through oxidization and residual ozone spontaneously decomposes to nontoxic products. It may be applied to fruits and vegetables to reduce decay and extend shelf life. PMID:19723209

  20. Ozone Production and Loss Rate Measurements in the Middle Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jucks, Kenneth W.; Johnson, David G.; Chance, K. V.; Traub, Wesley A.; Salawitch, R. J.; Stachnik, R. A.

    1996-01-01

    The first simultaneous measurements of HO(x), NO(x), and Cl(x) radicals in the middle stratosphere show that NO(x) catalytic cycles dominate loss of ozone (O3) for altitudes between 24 and 38 km; Cl(x) catalytic cycles are measured to be less effective than previously expected; and there is no 'ozone deficit' in the photochemically dominated altitude range from 31 and 38 km, contrary to some previous theoretical studies.

  1. Development and field deployment of an instrument to measure ozone production rates in the troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sklaveniti, S.; Locoge, N.; Dusanter, S.; Leonardis, T.; Lew, M.; Bottorff, B.; Sigler, P. S. R.; Stevens, P. S.; Wood, E. C. D.; Kundu, S.; Gentner, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    Ozone is a greenhouse gas and a primary constituent of urban smog, irritating the respiratory system and damaging the vegetation. The current understanding of ozone chemistry in the troposphere indicates that net ozone production P(O3) occurs when peroxy radicals (HO2+RO2) react with NO producing NO2, whose photolysis leads to O3 formation. P(O3) values can be calculated from peroxy radical concentrations, either from ambient measurements or box model outputs. These two estimation methods often disagree for NOx mixing ratios higher than a few ppb, questioning our ability to measure peroxy radicals under high NOx conditions or indicating that there are still unknowns in our understanding of the radical and ozone production chemistry. Direct measurements of ozone production rates will help to address this issue and improve air quality regulations. We will present the development of an instrument for direct measurements of ozone production rates (OPR). The OPR instrument consists of three parts: (i) two quartz flow tubes sampling ambient air ("Ambient" and "Reference" flow tube), (ii) an O3-to-NO2 conversion unit, and (iii) a Cavity Attenuated Phase Shift (CAPS) monitor to measure NO2. The air in the Ambient flow tube undergoes the same photochemistry as in ambient air, while the Reference flow tube is covered by a UV filter limiting the formation of ozone. Exiting the flow tubes, ozone is converted into NO2 and the sum O3+NO2 (Ox) is measured by the CAPS monitor. The difference in Ox between the two flow tubes divided by the residence time yields the Ox production rate, P(Ox). P(O3) is assumed to be equal to P(Ox) when NO2 is efficiently photolyzed during daytime. We will present preliminary results from the Indiana Radical, Reactivity and Ozone Production Intercomparison (IRRONIC) campaign in Bloomington, Indiana, during July 2015, where ozone production rates were measured by introducing various amounts of NO inside the flow tubes to investigate the ozone

  2. Ozonation of wastewater: removal and transformation products of drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Rodayan, Angela; Segura, Pedro Alejandro; Yargeau, Viviane

    2014-07-15

    In this study amphetamine, methamphetamine, methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), cocaine (COC), benzoylecgonine (BE), ketamine (KET) and oxycodone (OXY) in wastewater at concentrations of 100 μgL(-1) were subjected to ozone to determine their removals as a function of ozone dose and to identify significant oxidation transformation products (OTPs) produced as a result of ozonation. A method based on high resolution mass spectrometry and differential analysis was used to facilitate and accelerate the identification and structural elucidation of the transformation products. The drug removal ranged from 3 to 50% depending on the complexity of the matrix and whether a mixture or individual drugs were ozonated. Both transient and persistent oxidation transformation products were identified for MDMA, COC and OXY and their chemical formulae were determined. Three possible structures of the persistent transformation product of MDMA (OTP-213) with chemical formula C10H16O4N, were determined based on MS(n) mass spectra and the most plausible structure (OTP-213a) was determined based on the chemistry of ozone. These results indicate that ozone is capable of removing drugs of abuse from wastewater to varying extents and that persistent transformation products are produced as a result of treatment. PMID:24315025

  3. Sources of HOx and production of ozone in the upper troposphere over the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeglé, L.; Jacob, D. J.; Brune, W. H.; Tan, D.; Faloona, I. C.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Ridley, B. A.; Campos, T. L.; Sachse, G. W.

    The sources of HOx (OH+peroxy radicals) and the associated production of ozone at 8-12 km over the United States are examined by modeling observations of OH, HO2, NO, and other species during the SUCCESS aircraft campaign in April-May 1996. The HOx concentrations measured in SUCCESS are up to a factor of 3 higher than can be calculated from oxidation of water vapor and photolysis of acetone. The highest discrepancy was seen in the outflow of a convective storm. We show that convective injection of peroxides (CH3OOH and H2O2) and formaldehyde (CH2O) from the boundary layer to the upper troposphere could resolve this discrepancy. More generally, the data collected over the central United States during SUCCESS suggest that local convection was a major source of HOx and NOx to the upper troposphere. The OH and HO2 observations together with the observations of NO allow us to directly calculate the ozone production in the upper troposphere and its dependence on NOx. We find an average net ozone production of 2 ppbv day-1 between 8 and 12 km over the continental United States in the spring. Ozone production was NOx-limited under essentially all the conditions encountered in SUCCESS. The high levels of HOx present in the upper troposphere stimulate ozone production and increase the sensitivity of ozone to NOx emissions from aircraft and other sources.

  4. Formation potentials of bromate and brominated disinfection by-products in bromide-containing water by ozonation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tao; Wu, Shouke; Chen, Wei

    2014-12-01

    The ozonation involved in drinking water treatment raises issues of water quality security when the raw water contains bromide (Br(-)). Br(-) ions may be converted to bromate (BrO3 (-)) during ozonation and some brominated disinfection by-products (Br-DBPs) in the following chlorination. In this study, the effects of ozone (O3) dosage, contact time, pH, and Br(-) and ammonia (NH3-N) concentrations on the formation of BrO3 (-) and Br-DBPs have been investigated. The results show that decreasing the initial Br(-) concentration is an effective means of controlling the formation of BrO3 (-). When the concentration of Br(-) was lower than 100 μg/L, by keeping the ratio of O3 dosage to dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration at less than 1, BrO3 (-) production was effectively suppressed. The concentration of BrO3 (-) steadily increased with increasing O3 dosage at high Br(-) concentration (>900 μg/L). Additionally, a longer ozonation time increased the concentrations of BrO3 (-) and total organic bromine (TOBr), while it had less impact on the formation potentials of brominated trihalomethanes (Br-THMFP) and haloacetic acids (Br-HAAFP). Higher pH value and the presence of ammonia may lead to an increase in the formation potential of BrO3 (-) and Br-DBPs.

  5. Characterization of surface dielectric barrier discharge influenced by intermediate frequency for ozone production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelaziz, Ayman A.; Ishijima, Tatsuo; Seto, Takafumi; Osawa, Naoki; Wedaa, Hassan; Otani, Yoshio

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the intermediate frequency (1-10 kHz) of the sinusoidal driving voltage on the characteristics of a developed surface dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD)-based reactor having spikes on its discharge electrode. Moreover, its influence on the production of ozone and nitrogen oxide byproducts is evaluated. The results show that SDBD is operated in the filamentary mode at all the frequencies. Nevertheless, the pulses of the discharge current at high frequencies are much denser and have higher amplitudes than those at low frequencies. The analysis of the power consumed in the reactor shows that a small portion of the input power is dissipated in the dielectric material of SDBD source, whereas the major part of the power is consumed in the plasma discharge. The results of the ozone production show that higher frequencies have a slightly adverse effect on the ozone production at relatively high energy density values, where the ozone concentration is slightly decreased when the frequency is increased at the same energy density. The temperature of the discharge channels and gas is not a crucial factor for the decomposition of ozone in this reactor, while the results of the measurements of nitrogen oxides characteristics indicate that the formation of NO and NO2 has a significant adverse effect on the production efficiency of ozone due to their oxidation to another nitrogen oxides and their catalytic effect.

  6. Interactions of future climate, carbon dioxide, and ozone change crop and forest productivity and water use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardozzi, D.; Bonan, G. B.; Levis, S.

    2014-12-01

    The demand for agricultural and forest yield will continually increase as populations grow, though it is unclear how agricultural and forested ecosystem productivity and water use will respond to the interactions of changing climate, carbon dioxide and ozone. In ecosystems essential to resource production, it is critical to understand how productivity and water use will respond to these future changes. Previous research suggests that future climate and ozone can each decrease crop and timber yield and water use efficiency, while future carbon dioxide might increase yield and improve water use efficiency. However, the change in agricultural and forest water use and yield in response to the interactions among these variables has not yet been determined. We use the Community Land Model (CLM) to determine how changes in agricultural and timber water use and yield in response to the interactions of all three variables (climate, carbon dioxide, and ozone). Preliminary results suggest that future ozone and climate decrease forest and grain yield. However, carbon dioxide concentrations increase forest and grain yield, offsetting the decreases. Future climate increases evapotranspiration in all regions more than the decreases caused by carbon dioxide and ozone. The interactions of climate, carbon dioxide, and ozone decrease water use efficiency, with climate having the largest impact. These results demonstrate that, to maintain agricultural and forest productivity in the future, the demand for irrigation will increase.

  7. The degradation products of aniline in the solutions with ozone and kinetic investigations.

    PubMed

    Turhan, Kadir; Uzman, Suheyla

    2007-10-01

    Aromatic compounds are extensively used in several industries and can cause pollution in water sources. This work aims at examining the degradability of aniline in aqueous solutions by ozone-induced cleavage, and at determining the kinetics of the cited cleavage reactions. Aniline was prepared in four different concentrations and the flow rate of ozone supplied to each solution was selected. Aniline solutions were ozonated at low and high pH, so as to compare both molecular and hydroxyl free radical mechanisms, respectively. The main identified aromatic by-products were nitrobenzene and azobenzene when the experiment was carried out at acidic pH. Formation of nitrobenzene, azobenzene, azoxybenzene and 2-pyridine carboxylic acid (picolinic acid) was observed when the ozonization was carried out at basic pH. All the aromatic by-products found were less toxic than the raw materials. The pseudo-first-order constants in aniline concentrations were calculated.

  8. Vertical Distribution of Non-Methane Hydrocarbons During Winter Ozone Production Events in the Uintah Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, C. R.; Helmig, D.; Evans, J.; Hueber, J.; Park, J.; Boylan, P.

    2013-12-01

    Emissions of non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) are primarily linked to anthropogenic fossil fuel activities, such as oil and natural gas extraction and distribution, and are important tropospheric ozone precursors. The Uintah Basin, Utah, is a region of heavy oil and natural gas development where high winter-time ozone production events have been observed during strong inversions when there is snow cover present. In the winters of 2012 and 2013, we conducted measurements of methane and NMHC during the Uintah Basin Winter Ozone Study. NMHC were monitored along a vertical gradient up to 150 m using a flux tower and tethered balloon. In 2013, measurements of NMHC were also conducted from within the snowpack. In 2012, no high ozone events were observed. In contrast, during the 2013 study, several periods of high ozone occurred concurrently with strong increases in ambient NMHC. Here, we present vertical profile measurements of C2-C5 alkanes, benzene and toluene comparing 2012 and 2013. Data from 2013 show strong vertical gradients with build-up of NMHC and ozone near the surface during inversion events, with wash out of both ozone and ozone precursors during low pressure front passage from the west. The NOAA/INSTAAR global flask network provides a useful comparison for expected regional background values of NMHC, and we find up to a 570-fold enhancement in Uintah, providing evidence for the importance of local emissions sources. Investigation of NMHC ratios reveals distinctly different values in the ambient air and within the snowpack, suggesting active radical chemistry occurring in the snow. Analysis of butane and pentane isomer ratios points towards the presence of chlorine radicals, indicating that the snow may serve as a reactive chlorine reservoir that may enhance ozone production chemistry.

  9. Trend Analysis of Tropical Ozone From the Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morioka, H.; Fujiwara, M.; Shiotani, M.; Thompson, A. M.; Witte, J. C.; Oltmans, S. J.

    2007-12-01

    Linear trends of ozone for 1998-2007 are estimated for the troposphere through the lower stratosphere at ten tropical ozonesonde stations participating in the Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) project. Most stations cover the period from early 1998 to the end of 2006, but some stations have a shorter or longer record. Soundings are made once to four times per month, varying for station and year, but cover basically all seasons. The total sounding number ranges from 102 for Malindi to 429 for Ascension Island. Trends are calculated for vertically averaged values in each 1-km bin from 0-1 km to 30-31 km, and expressed as percent per year. Statistical test is also made. Around the tropopause, between 15 and 20 km, negative trends are seen for most stations. At San Cristobal (in the eastern Pacific) at 16-17 km, the trend is -4.3 ± 3.0 percent per year, and at Watukosek (in Indonesia) at 17-18 km, it is -4.8 ± 3.9 percent per year, both statistically significant. However, at Ascension (in the Atlantic) and at Natal (in South America), the tropopause trend is near zero and not statistically significant. At Natal at 12-13 km, the trend is +3.7 ± 3.0 percent per year, and at Malindi (in Africa) at 11-12 km, it is +5.0 ± 4.6 percent per year, both statistically significant. Generally in the free troposphere, positive trends are seen, but are statistically not significant for most regions. In the planetary boundary layer, statistically significant positive trends are seen at Kuala Lumpur (in Southeast Asia) and at Fiji (in the southwestern Pacific), and a statistically significant negative trend is seen at Paramaribo (in South America). The trend analysis is also made for four different seasons. Around the tropopause, seasonality in trend is small for all stations. In the upper troposphere, at Fiji and at Samoa, negative trends are seen in SON, but positive trends are seen in DJF.

  10. Ozone production by nanoporous dielectric barrier glow discharge in atmospheric pressure air

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, J. H.; Koo, I. G.; Choi, M. Y.; Lee, W. M.

    2008-03-10

    This study is aimed at demonstrating plasma-chemical ozone production based on low temperature atmospheric pressure glow discharge through nanoporous dielectric barriers. The 20 kHz ac driven discharge is formed in air or oxygen gas flowing in the axial direction of the cylindrical plasma reactor containing four parallel aluminum rods covered with nanoporous alumina films. The discharge utilizing nanoporous dielectric barrier is more uniform and more energy efficient in ozone generation than the discharge through smooth-surface dielectric barriers.

  11. Nimbus-7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) data products user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpeters, Richard D.; Krueger, Arlin J.; Bhartia, P. K.; Herman, Jay R.; Oaks, Arnold; Ahmad, Ziuddin; Cebula, Richard P.; Schlesinger, Barry M.; Swissler, Tom; Taylor, Steven L.

    1993-01-01

    Two tape products from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) aboard the Nimbus-7 have been archived at the National Space Science Data Center. The instrument measures backscattered Earth radiance and incoming solar irradiance; their ratio -- the albedo -- is used in ozone retrievals. In-flight measurements are used to monitor changes in the instrument sensitivity. The algorithm to retrieve total column ozone compares the observed ratios of albedos at pairs of wavelengths with pair ratios calculated for different ozone values, solar zenith angles, and optical paths. The initial error in the absolute scale for TOMS total ozone is 3 percent, the one standard-deviation random error is 2 percent, and the drift is +/- 1.5 percent over 14.5 years. The High Density TOMS (HDTOMS) tape contains the measured albedos, the derived total ozone amount, reflectivity, and cloud-height information for each scan position. It also contains an index of SO2 contamination for each position. The Gridded TOMS (GRIDTOMS) tape contains daily total ozone and reflectivity in roughly equal area grids (110 km in latitude by about 100-150 km in longitude). Detailed descriptions of the tape structure and record formats are provided.

  12. Photochemical production of ozone in the upper troposphere in association with cumulus convection over Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, K.; Kawakami, S.; Miyazaki, Y.; Higashi, Y.; Kondo, Y.; Nishi, N.; Koike, M.; Blake, D. R.; Machida, T.; Sano, T.; Hu, W.; Ko, M.; Ogawa, T.

    2003-02-01

    The Biomass Burning and Lightning Experiment phase A (BIBLE-A) aircraft observation campaign was conducted from 24 September to 10 October 1998, during a La Niña period. During this campaign, distributions of ozone and its precursors (NO, CO, and nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHCs)) were observed over the tropical Pacific Ocean, Indonesia, and northern Australia. Mixing ratios of ozone and its precursors were very low at altitudes between 0 and 13.5 km over the tropical Pacific Ocean. The mixing ratios of ozone precursors above 8 km over Indonesia were often significantly higher than those over the tropical Pacific Ocean, even though the prevailing easterlies carried the air from the tropical Pacific Ocean to over Indonesia within several days. For example, median NO and CO mixing ratios in the upper troposphere were 12 parts per trillion (pptv) and 72 parts per billion (ppbv) over the tropical Pacific Ocean and were 83 pptv and 85 ppbv over western Indonesia, respectively. Meteorological analyses and high ethene (C2H4) mixing ratios indicate that the increase of the ozone precursors was caused by active convection over Indonesia through upward transport of polluted air, mixing, and lightning all within the few days prior to observation. Sources of ozone precursors are discussed by comparing correlations of some NMHCs and CH3Cl concentrations with CO between the lower and upper troposphere. Biomass burning in Indonesia was nearly inactive during BIBLE-A and was not a dominant source of the ozone precursors, but urban pollution and lightning contributed importantly to their increases. The increase in ozone precursors raised net ozone production rates over western Indonesia in the upper troposphere, as shown by a photochemical model calculation. However, the ozone mixing ratio (~20 ppbv) did not increase significantly over Indonesia because photochemical production of ozone did not have sufficient time since the augmentation of ozone precursors. Backward trajectories

  13. Photochemical production of ozone in the upper troposphere in association with cumulus convection over Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, K.; Kawakami, S.; Miyazaki, Y.; Higashi, Y.; Kondo, Y.; Nishi, N.; Koike, M.; Blake, D. R.; Machida, T.; Sano, T.; Hu, W.; Ko, M.; Ogawa, T.

    2002-02-01

    The Biomass Burning and Lightning Experiment phase A (BIBLE-A) aircraft observation campaign was conducted from 24 September to 10 October 1998, during a La Niña period. During this campaign, distributions of ozone and its precursors (NO, CO, and nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHCs)) were observed over the tropical Pacific Ocean, Indonesia, and northern Australia. Mixing ratios of ozone and its precursors were very low at altitudes between 0 and 13.5 km over the tropical Pacific Ocean. The mixing ratios of ozone precursors above 8 km over Indonesia were often significantly higher than those over the tropical Pacific Ocean, even though the prevailing easterlies carried the air from the tropical Pacific Ocean to over Indonesia within several days. For example, median NO and CO mixing ratios in the upper troposphere were 12 parts per trillion (pptv) and 72 parts per billion (ppbv) over the tropical Pacific Ocean and were 83 pptv and 85 ppbv over western Indonesia, respectively. Meteorological analyses and high ethene (C2H4) mixing ratios indicate that the increase of the ozone precursors was caused by active convection over Indonesia through upward transport of polluted air, mixing, and lightning all within the few days prior to observation. Sources of ozone precursors are discussed by comparing correlations of some NMHCs and CH3Cl concentrations with CO between the lower and upper troposphere. Biomass burning in Indonesia was nearly inactive during BIBLE-A and was not a dominant source of the ozone precursors, but urban pollution and lightning contributed importantly to their increases. The increase in ozone precursors raised net ozone production rates over western Indonesia in the upper troposphere, as shown by a photochemical model calculation. However, the ozone mixing ratio (˜20 ppbv) did not increase significantly over Indonesia because photochemical production of ozone did not have sufficient time since the augmentation of ozone precursors. Backward trajectories

  14. Liquid-phase ozonation of vitrinites of coals of various metamorphic stages: Product composition

    SciTech Connect

    S.A. Semenova; Y.F. Patrakov; O.N. Fedyaeva; L.M. Pokrovskii

    2007-04-15

    The fractionated products of ozonation of vitrinites of Kuznetsk coals of different metamorphic stages in chloroform have been characterized by IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetry, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. High-molecular-mass compounds insoluble in water prevail in the products. Water-soluble products are ketones, oxyalkanols, lower aliphatic acids, and hydroxy- and dicarboxylic aromatic acids.

  15. Net ozone photochemical production over the eastern and central North Pacific as inferred from GTE/CITE 1 observations during fall 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chameides, W. L.; Davis, D. D.; Rodgers, M. O.; Bradshaw, J.; Sandholm, S.; Sachse, G.; Hill, G.; Gregory, G.

    1987-01-01

    The role of photochemistry in the budget of tropospheric ozone is studied. Measurements of O3, NO, CO, H2O vapor, and temperature obtained during the fall of 1983 during the GTE/CITE project over the eastern and central North Pacific Ocean are analyzed. The effect of altitude on the measurements is discussed. The analysis reveals a correlation between ozone and NO levels; both increase in concentration and variability with altitude. It is observed that an additional source of secondary importance associated wih CO-rich air parcels exists. A photochemical model is utilized to calculate the net rate of ozone production by photochemical reactions. A net photochemical source of ozone in the free troposphere and a net sink in the boundary layer are detected. The relation between the ozone source in the free troposphere and NO is examined. It is estimated that photochemistry provides a net ozone source to the free troposphere overlying the eastern and central North Pacific Ocean of about 5 x 10 to the 10th molecules/sq cm sec and a net sink of ozone to the boundary layer overlying this region of about 3 x 10 to the 10th molecules/sq cm sec.

  16. Ozone exposure of human tracheal epithelial cells inactivates cyclooxygenase and increases 15-HETE production.

    PubMed

    Alpert, S E; Walenga, R W

    1995-12-01

    We assessed the immediate and prolonged effects of ozone on arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism by primary cultured human tracheal epithelial (TE) cells. TE monolayers were exposed at a gas-fluid interface to air or 0.1, 0.25, or 0.5 ppm ozone (15 min air, then 45 min air/ozone), and serially collected effluents were analyzed by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and/or high-performance liquid chromatography. Release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and AA, but not 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE) or its metabolites, was detected from cultures prelabeled with [14C]AA. PGE2 production, measured by immunoassay, was nearly constant during air exposure. In contrast, PGE2 increased two- to threefold during the first 15-min exposure to all concentrations of ozone, but then progressively declined to 78 +/- 17, 57 +/- 12 (P < or = 0.05), and 45 +/- 15% (P < or = 0.05) of air controls after exposure to 0.1, 0.25, and 0.5 ppm ozone. Ozone did not induce a new spectrum of AA metabolites; only PGE2, lesser amounts of PGF2 alpha, and 15-HETE were present in media and cell extracts of air- or ozone-exposed cultures provided with 30 microM exogenous AA. However, cyclooxygenase (CO) activity (PGE2 produced from 30 microM AA) decreased to 82 +/- 9, 53 +/- 8 (P < or = 0.05), and 28 +/- 6% (P < or = 0.05) vs. controls after 0.1, 0.25, and 0.5 ppm ozone, whereas 15-HETE production was unimpaired. When cells exposed to 0.5 ppm ozone were maintained for up to 6 h in 5% CO2-air, spontaneous PGE2 production remained decreased and recovery of CO activity was extremely slow. TLC analysis of lipid extracts from [14C]AA-labeled cells revealed a nearly twofold increase in free intracellular 15-HETE, and hydrolysis of phospholipids demonstrated increased esterified 15-HETE. Exposure of human TE cells to ozone leads to a transient increase followed by prolonged decrease in PGE2 production and increased intracellular retention of 15-HETE. Loss of the bronchodilator and anti-inflammatory properties

  17. Reducing the formation of disinfection by-products by pre-ozonation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cheng-Nan; Ma, Ying-Shih; Zing, Fang-Fong

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study is to apply the pre-ozonation process to reduce the formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs). The raw water sample, collected from the Te-Chi Reservoir in central Taiwan, has been polluted by fertilizer. Three types of resins were used to isolate the natural organic matter into seven types of organic fractions. The pre-ozonation was used to oxidize each organic fraction to study the reduction of DBPs of each fraction. Experimental results indicated that the pre-ozonation could reduce the concentration of dissolved organic carbon resulting in the reduction of DBP formation. With the pre-ozonation, 9-54% of DOC and more than 40% of DBPs were reduced. With the analysis of UV adsorption and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), the reduction of A254 and unsaturated functional groups such as aromatic ring and C=C bond containing in the water sample is the major reaction mechanism.

  18. Inhalation of ozone produces a decrease in superoxide anion radical production in mouse alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Ryer-Powder, J.E.; Amoruso, M.A.; Czerniecki, B.; Witz, G.; Goldstein, B.D.

    1988-11-01

    The potentiation of fatal bacterial pneumonia in mice by prior inhalation of ozone occurs at levels of this oxidant pollutant that are frequently present in ambient air. A likely mechanism for this effect is an ozone-induced inhibition in the ability of pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM) to produce superoxide anion radical (O2-) demonstrated in the present study. A 25% decrease in PAM O2- production, as measured by nitroblue tetrazolium reduction, occurred after exposure of Swiss-Webster mice to 0.11 ppm ozone for 3 h (p less than 0.05). After 1 ppm there was almost complete inhibition of O2- release. In contrast, the rat, which is highly resistant to the potentiation of bacterial infections by ozone, was less sensitive to inhibition of PAM O2- production, as measured by cytochrome c reduction (mouse IC50, 0.41 ppm; rat IC50, 3.0 ppm ozone for 3 h). The observed decrement in mouse PAM O2- production was not associated with any change in phagocytic ability, as measured by both latex bead ingestion and 51Cr-labeled sheep red blood cell ingestion. This decrease in O2- production in the presence of normal phagocytic activity is analogous to certain of the findings in the neutrophils of children with chronic granulomatous disease. A decrease in rat PAM membrane cytochrome b558 levels was observed after ozone exposure of 3 ppm for 3 h, preliminarily suggesting that the mechanism by which ozone interferes with PAM O2- production may be through interaction with this heme-containing electron carrier.

  19. Assessing ozone-precursor relationships based on a smog production model and ambient data.

    PubMed

    Chang, T Y; Suzio, M J

    1995-01-01

    A semi-empirical model, Johnson's smog production model (SPM), which relates precursor emissions to ozone levels and estimates the relative effectiveness of volatile organic compounds (VOC) and NOx emission controls, has been evaluated and a modified version of SPM has been introduced. Both versions have been applied to routine data from 1989-1991 in five areas in the United States. In particular, extent parameters, which reveal the relative merit of VOC and NOx controls in reducing high ozone levels, have been calculated. Preliminary applications of SPM reveal interesting features with respect to VOC vs. NOx controls in reducing high ozone levels. For hourly data with ozone > or =0.08 ppm, distributions of extent parameters resulting from the modified SPM show the effectiveness of VOC controls at more monitoring sites than those from Johnson's SPM; however, relative features between the two versions are similar. On the other hand, for hourly data with ozone > or =0.12 ppm, the two SPM versions show very similar relative effectiveness of VOC and NOx controls with chosen values of model parameters. To improve the credibility of SPM, the range of validity of relationships between maximum smog produced or maximum ozone and NOx concentrations must be determined, and the parameters in these relationships must be better determined for typical VOC mixtures. Another essential parameter, which determines the fractional loss of NOy (NO and its oxidation products) from the gas phase must be better determined.

  20. Ozone impacts on the productivity of selected crops. [Corn, wheat, soybean and peanut crops

    SciTech Connect

    Heck, W.W.; Cure, W.W.; Shriner, D.S.; Olson, R.J.; Heagle, A.S.

    1982-01-01

    The regional impacts of ozone on corn, wheat, soybean, and peanut crops are estimated by using dose-response functions to relate ambient maximum 7 h/d seasonal ozone concentrations to crop productivity data. Linear dose-response functions were developed from open-top field chamber studies. It was assumed that the limited number of cultivars and growing conditions available for the analysis were representative of major agricultural regions. Hourly ozone data were selected to represent rural concentrations and used to calculate maximum 7-h/d average values. Seasonal ozone averages for counties were extrapolated from approximately 300 monitoring sites. Results must be interpreted with knowledge of these assumptions and sources of uncertainty. Impacts are calculated for county units for the conterminous United States with maps showing patterns and tables summarizing the potential magnitude of ozone effects on selected crop yields. The assessment estimates that approximately three billion dollars of productivity could be gained if current maximum 7 hour per day ozone levels were reduced from present levels to below 25 parts per billion. Dollar values are based on 1978 crop prices, without accounting for price effects, to provide an overall estimate of the impact. Of the estimated economic impact, soybean represents 64%, corn 17%, wheat 12%, and peanuts 7%.

  1. Model calculations of tropospheric ozone production potential following observed convective events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickering, Kenneth E.; Thompson, Anne M.; Dickerson, Russell R.; Luke, Winston T.; Mcnamara, Donna P.

    1990-01-01

    The profiles of CO, NO, O3, water vapor, and temperature, observed in 1985 during and after a series of convective events over rural areas of the south-central United States, were used to model the nonurban ozone production rates and to evaluate the effects of convective clouds on the tropospheric trace-gas chemistry. A comparison of trace-gas profiles measured in and around a large cumulonimbus during its dissipation showed that ozone production in the upper troposphere may be increased fourfold by convection relative to undisturbed air. The convective enhancement of O3 production for the entire tropospheric comlumn was found to be about 50 percent.

  2. Additives In Meat and Poultry Products

    MedlinePlus

    ... all cases, ingredients must be listed on the product label in the ingredients statement in order by weight, ... acid pyrophosphate, or orthophosphates, declared as "phosphates" on labels. PROPYL GALLATE - used as an antioxidant to prevent rancidity in products such as rendered fats or pork sausage. It ...

  3. Fate of three anti-influenza drugs during ozonation of wastewater effluents - degradation and formation of transformation products.

    PubMed

    Fedorova, Ganna; Grabic, Roman; Nyhlen, Jonas; Järhult, Josef D; Söderström, Hanna

    2016-05-01

    Anti-influenza drugs constitute a key component of pandemic preparedness plans against influenza. However, the occurrence of such drugs in water environments, the potential of resistance development in the natural hosts, and the risk for transmission of antiviral resistance to humans call for measures to increase removal in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). In this study, removal of three anti-influenza drugs; amantadine (AM), oseltamivir carboxylate (OC) and zanamivir (ZA), and formation/removal of their transformation products during ozonation of wastewater effluents from two Swedish WWTPs in Uppsala and Stockholm were studied. The removal profile of target antivirals and formation/removal of their transformation products were studied by liquid chromatography/high resolution mass spectrometry. 3.5 h of ozone exposure (total dose of ozone 5.95 g) led to complete removal of the three anti-influenza drugs with a degradation in the following order ZA > OC > AM. Two, five and one transformation products were identified and semi-quantified for AM, OC and ZA, respectively. Increasing and later decreasing transformation products concentration followed the decrease in concentration of target compounds. All transformation products detected, except one of AM in wastewater from Stockholm WWTP, were removed at the end of the experiment. The removal efficiency was higher for all studied compounds in wastewater from Uppsala WWTP, which had lower TOC and COD values, less phosphorus, and also higher pH in the water. Ozonation thus offers multiple benefits through its potential to degrade influenza antivirals, hence decrease the risk of environmental resistance development, in addition to degrading other pharmaceuticals and resistant microorganisms. PMID:26746418

  4. SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere ADditional Ozonesondes): What Have We Learned About Tropical Tropospheric Ozone from the First Three Years' (1998-2000) Data?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Anne M.; Bhartia, Pawan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The first climatological overview of total, stratospheric and tropospheric ozone in the southern hemisphere tropical and subtropics is based on ozone sounding data from 10 sites comprising the Southern Hemisphere Additional OZonesondes (SHADOZ) network. The period covered is 1998-2000. Observations were made over: Ascension Island; Nairobi, Kenya; Irene, South Africa; RCunion Island; Watukosek, Java; Fiji; Tahiti; American Samoa; San Cristobal, Galapagos; Natal, Brazil. Campaign data were collected on a trans-Atlantic oceanographic cruise and during SAFARI-2000 in Zambia. The ozone data, with simultaneous temperature profiles to approx. 7 hPa and relative humidity to approx. 200 hPa, reside at: . SHADOZ ozone time-series and profiles give a perspective on tropical total, stratospheric and tropospheric ozone in 1998-2000. Prominent features are highly variable tropospheric ozone, a zonal wave-one pattern in total (and tropospheric) column ozone, and signatures of the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) in stratospheric ozone. Total, stratospheric and tropospheric column ozone amounts peak between August and November and are lowest between March and May. Tropospheric ozone variability over the Indian and Pacific Ocean displays influences of the Indian Ocean Dipole, and convective mixing. Pollution transport from Africa, South American and the Maritime Continent is a seasonal feature. Tropospheric ozone seasonality over the Atlantic Basin shows effects of regional subsidence and recirculation as well as biomass burning. Dynamical and chemical influences appear to be of comparable magnitude though model studies are needed to quantify this.

  5. SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere ADditional Ozonesondes}: What Have We Learned About Tropical Tropospheric Ozone from the First Three Years (1998-2000) Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Anne M.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The first climatological overview of total, stratospheric and tropospheric ozone in the southern hemisphere tropical and subtropics is based on ozone sounding data from 10 sites comprising the Southern Hemisphere Additional OZonesondes (SHADOZ) network. The period covered is 1998-2000. Observations were made over: Ascension Island; Nairobi, Kenya; Irene, South Africa; Reunion Island; Watukosek, Java; Fiji; Tahiti; American Samoa; San Cristobal, Galapagos; Natal, Brazil. Campaign data were collected on an Trans-Atlantic oceanographic cruise and during SAFARI-2000 in Zambia. The ozone data, with simultaneous temperature profiles to approximately 7 hPa and relative humidity to approximately 200 hPa, reside at: . SHADOZ ozone time-series and profiles give a perspective on tropical total, stratospheric and tropospheric ozone in 1998-2000. Prominent features are highly variable tropospheric ozone, a zonal wave-one pattern in total (and tropospheric) column ozone, and signatures of the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) in stratospheric ozone. Total, stratospheric and tropospheric column ozone amounts peak between August and November and are lowest between March and May. Tropospheric ozone variability over the Indian and Pacific Ocean displays influences of the Indian Ocean Dipole, and convective mixing. Pollution transport from Africa, South American and the Maritime Continent is a seasonal feature. Tropospheric ozone seasonality over the Atlantic Basin shows effects of regional subsidence and recirculation as well as biomass burning. Dynamical and chemical influences appear to be of comparable magnitude though model studies are needed to quantify this.

  6. Direct measurement of ozone production rates in Houston in 2009 and comparison with two estimation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazorla, M.; Brune, W. H.; Ren, X.; Lefer, B.

    2011-10-01

    Ozone production rates, P(O3), were measured directly using the Penn State Measurement of Ozone Production Sensor (MOPS) during the Study of Houston Atmospheric Radical Precursors (SHARP 2009). Measured P(O3) peaked in the late morning, with values between 15 ppbv h-1 and 100 ppbv h-1, although values of 40-80 ppbv h-1 were typical for higher ozone days. These measurements were compared against ozone production rates calculated using measurements of hydroperoxyl (HO2), hydroxyl (OH), and nitric oxide (NO) radicals, called "calculated P(O3)". The same comparison was done using modeled radicals obtained from a box model with the RACM2 mechanism, called "modeled P(O3)". Measured and calculated P(O3) had similar peak values but the calculated P(O3) tended to peak earlier in the morning when NO values were higher. Measured and modeled P(O3) had a similar dependence on NO, but the modeled P(O3) was only half the measured P(O3). This difference indicates possible missing radical sources in the box model with the RACM2 mechanism and thus has implications for the ability of air quality models to accurately predict ozone production rates.

  7. Ozone production efficiencies of acetone and peroxides in the upper troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folkins, Ian; Chatfield, R.; Singh, H.; Chen, Y.; Heikes, B.

    HOx concentrations in the upper tropical troposphere can be enhanced by the presence of acetone and the convective injection of peroxides. These enhancements in HOx might be expected to increase ozone production by increasing the rate of the HO2+NO reaction. We show however that the convective enhancements of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and methyl hydroperoxide (CH3OOH) above steady state during the PEM West B campaign were largely restricted to air parcels of marine boundary layer origin in which the mean NO concentration was 8 pptv. The ozone production efficiencies of the two peroxides at such low NO concentrations are very small. Their impact on the ozone budget of the upper tropical troposphere during PEM West B was therefore probably modest. Unlike the peroxides, acetone in the upper tropical troposphere during PEM West B exhibited a positive correlation with NO. It also has a much larger ozone production efficiency than either H2O2 or CH3OOH. It therefore has a much greater potential for significantly increasing ozone production rates in the upper tropical troposphere.

  8. Exploring the roles of temperature and NOx on ozone production in the Sacramento urban plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafranchi, B. W.; Cohen, R. C.

    2009-12-01

    We investigate the role of temperature and NOx (NOx = NO+NO2) on ozone (O3) production in the Sacramento urban plume over a stretch of seven years (2001-2007) using data collected at UC Blodgett Forest Research Station (a forested site in the Sierra Nevadas about 80 km downwind of Sacramento, CA) and at a series of California Air Resources Board (CARB) sites along the Sacramento-Blodgett transect. The consistent daytime wind patterns between the Central Valley of California and the foothills of the Sierra Nevada mountains permits the assumption of plume transport from downtown Sacramento, over the CARB monitoring sites in the eastern suburbs, and past the Blodgett Forest research site. While NOx emissions are limited primarily to the urban and suburban regions of the transect, biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions are significant throughout the transect, thus there is a fast transition from VOC-limited to NOx-limited as the plume travels away from the urban center, and we have the opportunity to analyze the differences in ozone production across these two chemical regimes. For this analysis, the Sacramento-Blodgett transect is separated into three segments: urban, suburban, and rural, defined by the locations of selected monitoring sites. Ozone concentrations across each segment are controlled by chemical production (Pchem) and loss (Lchem), deposition to surfaces (Ldep), and mixing with background air (Lmix). At an assumed deposition rate, mixing rate, and background O3 concentration, the net chemical flux of ozone (Pchem - Lchem) can be inferred from differences in ozone concentrations between adjacent monitoring sites. We show that ozone production rates, in general, increase with temperature. We also show that decreases in NOx emissions over the period from 2001-2007 have been effective at reducing ozone production at all points along the transect, but only on days where temperatures are highest. At low temperatures, this decrease is less apparent

  9. Growth of Continental-Scale Metro-Agro-Plexes, Regional Ozone Pollution, and World Food Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chameides, W. L.; Kasibhatla, P. S.; Yienger, J.; Levy, H., II

    1994-04-01

    Three regions of the northern mid-latitudes, the continental-scale metro-agro-plexes, presently dominate global industrial and agricultural productivity. Although these regions cover only 23 percent of the Earth's continents, they account for most of the world's commercial energy consumption, fertilizer use, food-crop production, and food exports. They also account for more than half of the world's atmospheric nitrogen oxide (NO_x) emissions and, as a result, are prone to ground-level ozone (O_3) pollution during the summer months. On the basis of a global simulation of atmospheric reactive nitrogen compounds, it is estimated that about 10 to 35 percent of the world's grain production may occur in parts of these regions where ozone pollution may reduce crop yields. Exposure to yield-reducing ozone pollution may triple by 2025 if rising anthropogenic NO_x emissions are not abated.

  10. Turbulent transport and production/destruction of ozone in a boundary layer over complex terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhut, Gary K.; Jochum, Anne M.; Neininger, Bruno

    1994-01-01

    The first Intensive Observation Period (IOP) of the Swiss air pollution experiment POLLUMET took place in 1990 in the Aare River Valley between Bern and Zurich. During the IOP, fast response measurements of meteorological variables and ozone concentration were made within the boundary layer aboard a motorglider. In addition, mean values of meteorological variables and the concentrations of ozone and other trace species were measured using other aircraft, pilot balloons, tethersondes, and ground stations. Turbulent flux profiles of latent and sensible heat and ozone are calculated from the fast response data. Terms in the ozone mean concentration budget (time rate of change of mean concentration, horizontal advection, and flux divergence) are calculated for stationary time periods both before and after the passage of a cold front. The source/sink term is calculated as a residual in the budget, and its sign and magnitude are related to the measured concentrations of reactive trace species within the boundary layer. Relationships between concentration ratios of trace species and ozone concentration are determined in order to understand the influence of complex terrain on the processes that produce and destroy ozone.

  11. Direct measurement of ozone production rates in Houston in 2009 and comparison with two estimation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazorla, M.; Brune, W. H.; Ren, X.; Lefer, B.

    2012-01-01

    Net ozone production rates, P(O3), were measured directly using the Penn State Measurement of Ozone Production Sensor (MOPS) during the Study of Houston Atmospheric Radical Precursors (SHARP, 2009). Measured P(O3) peaked in the late morning, with values between 15 ppbv h-1 and 100 ppbv h-1, although values of 40-80 ppbv h-1 were typical for higher ozone days. These measurements were compared against ozone production rates calculated using measurements of hydroperoxyl (HO2), hydroxyl (OH), and nitric oxide (NO) radicals, called "calculated P(O3)". The same comparison was done using modeled radicals obtained from a box model with the RACM2 mechanism, called "modeled P(O3)". Measured and calculated P(O3) had similar peak values but the calculated P(O3) tended to peak earlier in the morning when NO values were higher. Measured and modeled P(O3) had a similar dependence on NO, but the modeled P(O3) was only half the measured P(O3). The modeled P(O3) is less than the calculated P(O3) because the modeled HO2 is less than the measured HO2. While statistical analyses are not conclusive regarding the comparison between MOPS measurements and the two estimation methods, the calculated P(O3) with measured HO2 produces peak values similar to the measured P(O3) when ozone is high. Although the MOPS is new and more testing is required to verify its observations, the measurements in the SHARP field campaign show the potential of this new technique for contributing to the understanding of ozone-producing chemistry and to the monitoring of ozone's response to future air quality regulatory actions.

  12. The 1998-2000 SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere ADditional Ozonesondes) Tropical Ozone Climatology: Comparison with TOMS and Ground-Based Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Anne M.; Witte, Jacquelyn; McPeters, Richard D.; Oltmans, Samuel J.; Schmidlin, Francis J.; Logan, Jennifer A.; Fujiwara, Masatormo; Kirchhoff, Volker W. J. H.; Posny, Francoise; Coetzee, Gerhard J. R.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A network of 10 southern hemisphere tropical and Subtropical stations, designated the Southern Hemisphere ADditional OZonesondes, (SHADOZ) project and established from operational sites, provided over 1000 ozone profiles during the period 1998-2000. Balloon-borne electrochemical concentration cell (ECC) ozonesondes, combined with standard radiosondes for pressure, temperature and relative humidity measurements, collected profiles in the troposphere and lower- to mid-stratosphere at: Ascension Island; Nairobi, Kenya; Irene, South Africa: Reunion Island, Watukosek Java; Fiji; Tahiti; American Samoa; San Cristobal, Galapagos; Natal, Brazil.

  13. The Influence of Pyrogenic, Biogenic and Anthropogenic Emissions on Ozone Production Downwind from Boreal Forest Fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finch, Douglas; Palmer, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Boreal forest fires emit pollutants that can have a strong influence on downwind surface ozone concentrations, with potential implications for exceeding air quality regulations. The influence of the mixing of pyrogenic, biogenic and anthropogenic emissions on ozone is not well understood. Using the nested 0.5° latitude x 0.667° longitude GEOS-Chem chemical transport model we track biomass burning plumes in North America. We identify the changes in key chemical reactions within these plumes as well as the sensitivity of ozone to the different emission sources. We illustrate the importance of this method using a case study of a multi-day forest fire during the BORTAS aircraft campaign over eastern Canada during summer 2011. We focus on emissions from the fire on the 17th of July and follow the plume for eight days. After the initial 24 hours of pyrogenic emissions the main source of VOCs is biogenic with increasing emissions from anthropogenic sources including outflow from Quebec City and Newfoundland. Using a Lagrangian framework, we show that the ozone production efficiency (OPE) of this plume decreases steadily as it moves away from the fire but increases rapidly as the plume reaches the east coast of Canada. Using a Eulerian framework we show that ozone mixing ratios of a east coast receptor region increase by approximately 15% even though the ozone tendency of the regional air mass is negative, which we find is due to the arrival of ozone precursors in the plume. We also consider the contribution of anthropogenic outflow over Nova Scotia that originates from the eastern seaboard of the United States to the local chemistry. Using these sensitivity model runs we generate a chemical reaction narrative for the plume trajectory that helps to understand the attribution of observed ozone variations.

  14. The Anatomy of Wintertime Photochemical Ozone Production Events in the Upper Green River, WY and Uintah, UT Natural Gas Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnell, R. C.; Oltmans, S. J.; Johnson, B. J.; Neely, R. R., III

    2012-12-01

    Rapid, cold temperature, wintertime photochemical ozone production events occur in rural Wyoming and Utah in regions of natural gas production. In December through March surface ozone concentrations of 10-30 ppb at sunrise may increase to 100-150 ppb soon after solar noon in below freezing (as low as -17oC) air temperatures. The key ingredients for this ozone production are gaseous effluents from local fossil fuel extraction activities, a strong temperature inversion, and snow cover. In the Upper Green River Basin, Wyoming (UGRB) events, elevated diurnal ozone events may occur for a few days to a week then cease when a new airmass sweeps into the basin. In the absence of extended snowcover such as in the winters of 2009 and 2010, no appreciable ozone production events were observed in the UGRB. But, in 2011 there was snow on the ground and record ozone concentrations (hourly averages up to 164 ppb) were measured in the UGRB. In the winter of 2009-2010 in the Uintah Basin (UB), elevated diurnal ozone events began when snow pack was established in mid-December, 2009 and persisted until the day the snow melted in mid-March, 2010. During this 3 month period, there were 521 hours with hourly ozone concentrations above 75 ppb. In the winter of 2011-2012, in the absence of snow cover, there was no excessive ozone production in the UB. Boundary layer zone measurements in the UGRB in 2011 showed that diurnal ozone production started at the surface and quickly spread vertically up to the top of the surface inversion capped at ~100 m above ground level. The elevated ozone decreased just as rapidly within a few hours after solar noon.hotochemical ozone production in the Uintah Basin, UT gas field in association with the presence of snow cover.

  15. Simulation of Halocarbon Production and Emissions and Effects on Ozone Depletion

    PubMed

    Holmes; Ellis

    1997-09-01

    / This paper describes an integrated model that simulates future halocarbon production/emissions and potential ozone depletion. Applications and historical production levels for various halocarbons are discussed first. A framework is then presented for modeling future halocarbon impacts incorporating differences in underlying demands, applications, regulatory mandates, and environmental characteristics. The model is used to simulate the potential impacts of several prominent issues relating to halocarbon production, regulation, and environmental interactions, notably: changes in agricultural methyl bromide use, increases in effectiveness of bromine for ozone depletion, modifications to the elimination schedule for HCFCs, short-term expansion of CFC demand in low use compliance countries, and delays in Russian Federation compliance. Individually, each issue does not unequivocally represent a significant likely increase in long-term atmospheric halogen loading and stratospheric ozone depletion. In combination, however, these impacts could increase peak halogen concentrations and long-term integral halogen loading, resulting in higher levels of stratospheric ozone depletion and longer exposure to increased levels of UV radiation.KEY WORDS: Halocarbons; Ozone depletion; Montreal Protocol; Integrated assessment

  16. Simulation of Halocarbon Production and Emissions and Effects on Ozone Depletion

    PubMed

    Holmes; Ellis

    1997-09-01

    / This paper describes an integrated model that simulates future halocarbon production/emissions and potential ozone depletion. Applications and historical production levels for various halocarbons are discussed first. A framework is then presented for modeling future halocarbon impacts incorporating differences in underlying demands, applications, regulatory mandates, and environmental characteristics. The model is used to simulate the potential impacts of several prominent issues relating to halocarbon production, regulation, and environmental interactions, notably: changes in agricultural methyl bromide use, increases in effectiveness of bromine for ozone depletion, modifications to the elimination schedule for HCFCs, short-term expansion of CFC demand in low use compliance countries, and delays in Russian Federation compliance. Individually, each issue does not unequivocally represent a significant likely increase in long-term atmospheric halogen loading and stratospheric ozone depletion. In combination, however, these impacts could increase peak halogen concentrations and long-term integral halogen loading, resulting in higher levels of stratospheric ozone depletion and longer exposure to increased levels of UV radiation.KEY WORDS: Halocarbons; Ozone depletion; Montreal Protocol; Integrated assessment PMID:9236283

  17. Insights into the Electronic Structure of Ozone and Sulfur Dioxide from Generalized Valence Bond Theory: Addition of Hydrogen Atoms.

    PubMed

    Lindquist, Beth A; Takeshita, Tyler Y; Dunning, Thom H

    2016-05-01

    Ozone (O3) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) are valence isoelectronic species, yet their properties and reactivities differ dramatically. In particular, O3 is highly reactive, whereas SO2 is chemically relatively stable. In this paper, we investigate serial addition of hydrogen atoms to both the terminal atoms of O3 and SO2 and to the central atom of these species. It is well-known that the terminal atoms of O3 are much more amenable to bond formation than those of SO2. We show that the differences in the electronic structure of the π systems in the parent triatomic species account for the differences in the addition of hydrogen atoms to the terminal atoms of O3 and SO2. Further, we find that the π system in SO2, which is a recoupled pair bond dyad, facilitates the addition of hydrogen atoms to the sulfur atom, resulting in stable HSO2 and H2SO2 species.

  18. Ozone production using dielectric barrier discharge in oxygen and carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontiga, Francisco; Abidat, Roukia; Moreno, Helena; Agustín, Fernández-Rueda; Rebiaï, Saida

    2015-09-01

    The generation of ozone in oxygen and carbon dioxide using a planar dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) has been experimentally investigated. The DBD reactor was operated at moderate voltages (4.2 to 5.6 kV) and frequencies (50 to 500 Hz) and the gas flow rate was varied in the range 50 to 200 cm3/min. The averaged consumed power (<1 W) was evaluated using a monitor capacitor of known capacitance (1 μF). The effluent gas from the DBD reactor was diverted to a gas cell situated inside the sample compartment of a UV spectrophotometer. Therefore, ozone concentration was determined from the measurement of absorbance using Beer-Lambert law. The results have shown that ozone concentration in oxygen grows very linearly with the input power. In contrast, the production of ozone in carbon dioxide is less regular, which may be due to the deposition of a thin layer over the stainless steel electrode during the application of the electrical discharge. Moreover, the rate of ozone production with the injected energy density was found to be 500 times weaker in carbon dioxide than in pure oxygen. This work was supported by the Spanish Government Agency ``Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación'' under Contract No. FIS2011-25161.

  19. From ozone depletion to agriculture: understanding the role of UV radiation in sustainable crop production.

    PubMed

    Wargent, Jason J; Jordan, Brian R

    2013-03-01

    Largely because of concerns regarding global climate change, there is a burgeoning interest in the application of fundamental scientific knowledge in order to better exploit environmental cues in the achievement of desirable endpoints in crop production. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is an energetic driver of a diverse range of plant responses and, despite historical concerns regarding the damaging consequences of UV-B radiation for global plant productivity as related to stratospheric ozone depletion, current developments representative of a range of organizational scales suggest that key plant responses to UV-B radiation may be exploitable in the context of a sustainable contribution towards the strengthening of global crop production, including alterations in secondary metabolism, enhanced photoprotection, up-regulation of the antioxidative response and modified resistance to pest and disease attack. Here, we discuss the prospect of this paradigm shift in photobiology, and consider the linkages between fundamental plant biology and crop-level outcomes that can be applied to the plant UV-B response, in addition to the consequences for related biota and many other facets of agro-ecosystem processes.

  20. A Lagrangian view of ozone production tendency in North American outflow in summers 2009 and 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Owen, R. Chris; Perlinger, Judith; Kumar, Aditya; Wu, Shiliang; Martin, Maria Val; Kramer, Louisa; Helmig, Detlev

    2013-04-01

    The Pico Mountain Observatory, located at 2,225 ma.s.l. in the Azores Islands, was established in 2001 to observe long-range transport from North America to the central North Atlantic. In previous research conducted at the Observatory, ozone enhancements (> 55 ppbv) were observed in North American outflows containing anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions, and efficient ozone production in these outflows was postulated. One of the major objectives of BORTAS is to better understand chemical composition and evolution during transport of biomass burning outflows. A key to the study of pollution plumes at a ground-based station is identification of emission type and source region(s). Transport pathways of individual plumes are also thought to be critical to plume aging. In this study, by analyzing observations of atmospheric tracer gases at Pico and FLEXPART simulation results, we were able to identify transport events induced by anthropogenic or biomass burning emissions during summers 2009 and 2010. In order to assess ozone production tendency during these long-range transport events, the convolved or "folded" retroplume technique developed by Owen and Honrath (2009) was applied to combine upwind FLEXPART transport pathways with GEOS-Chem chemical fields, providing a semi-lagrangian view of physical properties and production/loss of ozone in polluted North American outflows. Two anthropogenic events from North America were selected for detailed analysis because anthropogenic emissions were considered to be more predictable and consistent over time. Ozone enhancement was observed in both plumes, but due to differing transport mechanisms, ozone production tendency was found to be different between the two. In the first case, ozone production was found during the last two days of transport, when the pollution plume subsided from the free troposphere to the altitude of Pico station in the high pressure system centered over the Azores region at the time. Increase of

  1. Aircraft measurements of NO sub x over the eastern Pacific and continental United States and implications for ozone production

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, M.A.; Albritton, D.L. ); Hastie, D.R.; Schiff, H.I. ); Ridley, B.A.; Madronich, S. ); Rodgers, M.O.; Davis, D.D.; Bradshaw, J.D.; Sandholm, S.T. ); Torres, A.L. ); Karecki, D.R.; Harris, G.W.; Mackay, G.I. ); Gregory, G.L.; Beck, S.M.; Shipham, M.C.; Bachmeier, A.S. ); Condon, E.P.; Singh, H.B. ); Trainer, M.; Hubler, G. Univ. of Colorado, Boulder )

    1990-06-20

    Measurements of NO, NO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, and CO are presented from 13 aircraft flights made over the eastern Pacific Ocean and the continental United States in August and September 1986 during the NASA GTE/CITE 2 program. Measurements of NO by three different groups (two different techniques) and of NO{sub 2} by three different groups (three different techniques) are presented and examined along with calculated NO{sub x} (NO + NO{sub 2}) for correlations with O{sub 3}, CO, and dew-point temperature (DPT) primarily as a function of air mass category. Median values of NO and NO{sub 2} in the marine boundary layer were 4.0 and 10.4 pptv, respectively, and 12.4 and 18.0 pptv in the marine free troposphere. In the continental boundary layer, median values of NO and NO{sub 2} were 34.5 and 75.0 pptv, respectively, and 13.0 and 36.0 pptv at altitudes above 3 km in air masses having continental influence. In the maritime NO{sub x} data set a negative correlation is often observed between NO{sub x} and DPT, while positive correlations were typically observed between NO{sub x} and O{sub 3} and between NO{sub x} and CO. As expected, then, negative correlations were often observed between O{sub 3} and DPT and between CO and DPT, along with positive correlations between CO and O{sub 3}. In the continental data set, positive correlations were typically observed between NO{sub x} and DPT, O{sub 3}, and CO. Additionally, the various air masses were examined with respect to regions of net ozone production or net ozone destruction. In all but one case in the marine boundary layer, model calculations indicate that there is significant ozone destruction. In the continental boundary layer, however, calculations indicate significant ozone production. In the middle free troposphere at 5 {plus minus} 1 km, the in situ ozone formation was most often nearly in balance with ozone destruction.

  2. Atmospheric oxidation chemistry and ozone production: Results from SHARP 2009 in Houston, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xinrong; Duin, Diana; Cazorla, Maria; Chen, Shuang; Mao, Jingqiu; Zhang, Li; Brune, William H.; Flynn, James H.; Grossberg, Nicole; Lefer, Barry L.; Rappenglück, Bernhard; Wong, Kam W.; Tsai, Catalina; Stutz, Jochen; Dibb, Jack E.; Thomas Jobson, B.; Luke, Winston T.; Kelley, Paul

    2013-06-01

    Ozone (O3) and secondary fine particles come from the atmospheric oxidation chemistry that involves the hydroxyl radical (OH) and hydroperoxyl radical (HO2), which are together called HOx. Radical precursors such as nitrous acid (HONO) and formaldehyde (HCHO) significantly affect the HOx budget in urban environments. These chemical processes connect surface anthropogenic and natural emissions to local and regional air pollution. Using the data collected during the Study of Houston Atmospheric Radical Precursors (SHARP) in spring 2009, we examine atmospheric oxidation chemistry and O3 production in this polluted urban environment. A numerical box model with five different chemical mechanisms was used to simulate the oxidation processes and thus OH and HO2 in this study. In general, the model reproduced the measured OH and HO2 with all five chemical mechanisms producing similar levels of OH and HO2, although midday OH was overpredicted and nighttime OH and HO2 were underpredicted. The calculated HOx production was dominated by HONO photolysis in the early morning and by the photolysis of O3 and oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) in the midday. On average, the daily HOx production rate was 24.6 ppbv d-1, of which 30% was from O3 photolysis, 22% from HONO photolysis, 15% from the photolysis of OVOCs (other than HCHO), 14% from HCHO photolysis, and 13% from O3 reactions with alkenes. The O3 production was sensitive to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the early morning but was sensitive to NOx for most of afternoon. This is similar to the behavior observed in two previous summertime studies in Houston: the Texas Air Quality Study in 2000 (TexAQS 2000) and the TexAQS II Radical and Aerosol Measurement Project in 2006 (TRAMP 2006). Ozone production in SHARP exhibits a longer NOx-sensitive period than TexAQS 2000 and TRAMP 2006, indicating that NOx control may be an efficient approach for the O3 control in springtime for Houston. Results from this study

  3. [Effects of ozone stress on photosynthesis and dry matter production of rice II -you 084 under different Planting densities].

    PubMed

    Peng, Bin; Lai, Shang-kun; Li, Pan-lin; Wang, Yun-xia; Zhu, Jian-guo; Yang, Lian-xin; Wang, Yu-long

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the effects of ozone stress on photosynthesis, dry matter production, non-structural carbohydrate and yield formation of rice, a free air ozone concentration enrichment (FACE) experiment was conducted. A super hybrid rice cultivar II-you 084 with 3 spacing levels, low plant density (LD, 16 hills per m2), medium (MD, 24 hills per m2) and high plant density (HD, 32 hills per m2), was grown in the field at current and elevated ozone concentrations (current × 1.5). The results were as follows: Elevated ozone significantly reduced leaf SPAD value of UI-you 084 by 6%, 11% and 13%, at 63, 77, and 86 days after transplanting, respectively. The declines in leaf net photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance and transpiration rate at filling stage increased significantly on ozone stress over time. Ozone stress decreased dry matter production of rice by 46% from heading stage to plant maturity, thus reduced biomass yield by 25%. Elevated ozone decreased the concentration and accumulation of soluble carbohydrate and starch in stem of II-you 084 at jointing, heading and plant maturity, but significantly increased the dry matter transportation rate. No significant interaction was observed between ozone and planting density for photosynthesis, dry matter production and non-structural carbohydrate of rice. The above results indicated that elevated ozone reduced photosynthesis and growth of rice II-you 084 at late growth stage, which had no relationship with planting density.

  4. EVALUATION OF OZONATION BY-PRODUCTS FROM TWO CALIFORNIA SURFACE WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozonation by-products were analyzed for two surface water sources in Southern California-Los Angeles Aqueduct Water (LAWW) and State Project Water (SPW). Included are data obtained when LAAW was being treated at the Los Angeles Aqueduct Filtration Plant and similar data obtained...

  5. THE OZONE REACTION WITH BUTADIENE: FORMATION OF TOXIC PRODUCTS. (R826236)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    The formation yields of acrolein, 1,2-epoxy-3-butene and OH radicals have been measured from reaction of ozone with 1,3-butadiene at room temperature and atmosphere pressure. 1,3,5-Trimethyl benzene was added to scavenge OH radicals in measurements of product ...

  6. Toward Describing the Effects of Ozone Depletion on Marine Primary Productivity and Carbon Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullen, John J.

    1995-01-01

    This project was aimed at improved predictions of the effects of UVB and ozone depletion on marine primary productivity and carbon flux. A principal objective was to incorporate a new analytical description of photosynthesis as a function of UV and photosynthetically available radiation (Cullen et. al., Science 258:646) into a general oceanographic model. We made significant progress: new insights into the kinetics of photoinhibition were used in the analysis of experiments on Antarctic phytoplankton to generate a general model of UV-induced photoinhibition under the influence of ozone depletion and vertical mixing. The way has been paved for general models on a global scale.

  7. Emission characteristics of VOCs emitted from consumer and commercial products and their ozone formation potential.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Trieu-Vuong; Kim, Su-Yeon; Son, Youn-Suk; Choi, In-Young; Park, Seong-Ryong; Sunwoo, Young; Kim, Jo-Chun

    2015-06-01

    The characteristics of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from several consumer and commercial products (body wash, dishwashing detergent, air freshener, windshield washer fluid, lubricant, hair spray, and insecticide) were studied and compared. The spray products were found to emit the highest amount of VOCs (~96 wt%). In contrast, the body wash products showed the lowest VOC contents (~1.6 wt%). In the spray products, 21.6-96.4 % of the VOCs were propane, iso-butane, and n-butane, which are the components of liquefied petroleum gas. Monoterpene (C10H16) was the dominant component of the VOCs in the non-spray products (e.g., body wash, 53-88 %). In particular, methanol was present with the highest amount of VOCs in windshield washer fluid products. In terms of the number of carbon, the windshield washer fluids, lubricants, insecticides, and hair sprays comprised >95 % of the VOCs in the range C2-C5. The VOCs in the range C6-C10 were predominantly found in the body wash products. The dishwashing detergents and air fresheners contained diverse VOCs from C2 to C11. Besides comprising hazardous VOCs, VOCs from consumer products were also ozone precursors. The ozone formation potential of the consumer and commercial spray products was estimated to be higher than those of liquid and gel materials. In particular, the hair sprays showed the highest ozone formation potential.

  8. Emission characteristics of VOCs emitted from consumer and commercial products and their ozone formation potential.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Trieu-Vuong; Kim, Su-Yeon; Son, Youn-Suk; Choi, In-Young; Park, Seong-Ryong; Sunwoo, Young; Kim, Jo-Chun

    2015-06-01

    The characteristics of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from several consumer and commercial products (body wash, dishwashing detergent, air freshener, windshield washer fluid, lubricant, hair spray, and insecticide) were studied and compared. The spray products were found to emit the highest amount of VOCs (~96 wt%). In contrast, the body wash products showed the lowest VOC contents (~1.6 wt%). In the spray products, 21.6-96.4 % of the VOCs were propane, iso-butane, and n-butane, which are the components of liquefied petroleum gas. Monoterpene (C10H16) was the dominant component of the VOCs in the non-spray products (e.g., body wash, 53-88 %). In particular, methanol was present with the highest amount of VOCs in windshield washer fluid products. In terms of the number of carbon, the windshield washer fluids, lubricants, insecticides, and hair sprays comprised >95 % of the VOCs in the range C2-C5. The VOCs in the range C6-C10 were predominantly found in the body wash products. The dishwashing detergents and air fresheners contained diverse VOCs from C2 to C11. Besides comprising hazardous VOCs, VOCs from consumer products were also ozone precursors. The ozone formation potential of the consumer and commercial spray products was estimated to be higher than those of liquid and gel materials. In particular, the hair sprays showed the highest ozone formation potential. PMID:25601614

  9. Products and mechanisms of the reaction of gas phase ozone with organic colorants

    SciTech Connect

    Grosjean, D. ); Druzik, J.R. ); Sensharma, D.K. ); Whitmore, P.M.; DeMoor, C.P.; Cass, G.R. )

    1988-09-01

    Studies carried out in this laboratory have shown that many artists organic colorants fade substantially when exposed to ozone in the dark. These studies typically involved pigment exposure for 12 weeks to purified air containing 0.3-0.4 ppm of ozone at ambient temperature and humidity. These laboratory conditions are equivalent to about six years of exposure inside a typical air-conditioned building in Los Angeles, and the observed fading is therefore directly relevant to possible damage to works of arts in museum settings. Organic colorants that were most ozone-fugitive included natural colorants, such as curcumin and indigo, as well as modern synthetic colorants such as alizarin lakes and triphenylmethane dyes. Thus, these colorants were selected for further study with emphasis on the nature of the reaction products. Exposures were carried out on different substrates including watercolor paper, cellulose, silica gel, and Teflon. The experiments involved long-term exposure to low levels of ozone (e.g. {approximately} 0.3 ppm for 90 days) or shorter-term exposure to higher ozone concentrations (e.g. 10 ppm for 24 hours). Exposed and control samples, along with solvent and substrate blanks, were analyzed by mass spectrometry using a Kratos Scientific Instruments MS25 hexapole mass spectrometer operated in either methane chemical ionization (CI) or electron impact (EI) modes.

  10. Towards New Constraints on Ozone Production from Lightning NOx via Satellite Measurements of Peroxyacetyl Nitrate (PAN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, V.; Fischer, E. V.; Kulawik, S. S.; Zhu, L.; Worden, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Quantifying the strength and distribution of the source of nitrogen oxide radicals (NOx) from lightning, and the impact of this source on tropospheric ozone, is critical to understanding the contribution of anthropogenic vs natural sources of ozone as well as feedbacks between climate change and atmospheric chemistry. In the presence of biogenic volatile organic compounds, lightning NOx may be converted to peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN). PAN formation acts to sequester NOx and decrease ozone formation, thereby playing an important role in determining the oxidation capacity of the troposphere. However, comprehensive in situ measurements of reactive nitrogen species in the upper troposphere are insufficient for the purpose of validation of the representation of the relevant processes in chemical transport models. New satellite measurements of PAN from the Aura Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) provide an opportunity to place new constraints on the influence of lightning NOx on ozone production. Here we show that TES provides direct observations of enhanced PAN concentrations downwind of convective events over the US in summertime, evaluate the ability of the GEOS-Chem model to reproduce these enhancements and quantify the reduction in ozone formation that would result from the observed PAN. We will also discuss the prospects for PAN retrievals from other nadir-viewing satellite instruments.

  11. Oxidation of cetirizine, fexofenadine and hydrochlorothiazide during ozonation: Kinetics and formation of transformation products.

    PubMed

    Borowska, Ewa; Bourgin, Marc; Hollender, Juliane; Kienle, Cornelia; McArdell, Christa S; von Gunten, Urs

    2016-05-01

    The efficiency of wastewater ozonation for the abatement of three nitrogen-containing pharmaceuticals, two antihistamine drugs, cetirizine (CTR) and fexofenadine (FXF), and the diuretic drug, hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ), was investigated. Species-specific second-order rate constants for the reactions of the molecular, protonated (CTR, FXF) or deprotonated (HCTZ) forms of these compounds with ozone were determined. All three compounds are very reactive with ozone (apparent second order rate constants at pH 7: kO3,pH7 = 1.7·10(5) M(-1)s(-1), 8.5·10(4) M(-1)s(-1) and 9.0·10(3) M(-1)s(-1) for CTR, HCTZ and FXF, respectively). Transformation product (TP) structures were elucidated using liquid chromatography coupled with high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry, including isotope-labeled standards. For cetirizine and hydrochlorothiazide 8 TPs each and for fexofenadine 7 TPs were identified. The main TPs of cetirizine and fexofenadine are their respective N-oxides, whereas chlorothiazide forms to almost 100% from hydrochlorothiazide. In the bacteria bioluminescence assay the toxicity was slightly increased only during the ozonation of cetirizine at very high cetirizine concentrations. The main TPs detected in bench-scale experiments were also detected in full-scale ozonation of a municipal wastewater, for >90% elimination of the parent compounds. PMID:26971810

  12. 40 CFR Appendix H to Subpart A of... - Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 Phaseout Schedule for Production of Ozone-Depleting Substances

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Phaseout Schedule for Production of Ozone-Depleting Substances H Appendix H to Subpart A of Part 82... STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and Consumption Controls Pt. 82, Subpt. A, App. H Appendix H to Subpart A of Part 82—Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 Phaseout Schedule for Production of Ozone-Depleting...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix H to Subpart A of... - Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 Phaseout Schedule for Production of Ozone-Depleting Substances

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Phaseout Schedule for Production of Ozone-Depleting Substances H Appendix H to Subpart A of Part 82... STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and Consumption Controls Pt. 82, Subpt. A, App. H Appendix H to Subpart A of Part 82—Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 Phaseout Schedule for Production of Ozone-Depleting...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix H to Subpart A of... - Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 Phaseout Schedule for Production of Ozone-Depleting Substances

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Phaseout Schedule for Production of Ozone-Depleting Substances H Appendix H to Subpart A of Part 82... STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and Consumption Controls Pt. 82, Subpt. A, App. H Appendix H to Subpart A of Part 82—Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 Phaseout Schedule for Production of Ozone-Depleting...

  15. 40 CFR Appendix H to Subpart A of... - Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 Phaseout Schedule for Production of Ozone-Depleting Substances

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Phaseout Schedule for Production of Ozone-Depleting Substances H Appendix H to Subpart A of Part 82... STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and Consumption Controls Pt. 82, Subpt. A, App. H Appendix H to Subpart A of Part 82—Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 Phaseout Schedule for Production of Ozone-Depleting...

  16. Intercontinental Transport of Tropical Ozone from Biomass Burning: Views from Satellite and SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, A. M.; Witte, J. C.; Chatfield, R. B.; Guam, H.

    2003-01-01

    There has been interest in the connection between tropical fires and ozone since about 1980. Photochemically reactive gases released by fires (e.g. NO, CO, volatile organic carbon) interact as they do in an urban environment to form ozone. Interacting with chemical sources, tropical meteorology plays a part in tropospheric ozone distributions in the tropics, through large-scale circulation, deep convection, and regional phenomena like the West African and Asian monsoons. An overview of observations, taken from satellite and from ozone soundings, illustrates regional influences and intercontinental- range ozone transport in the tropics. One of the most striking findings is evidence for impacts of Indian Ocean pollution on the south Atlantic ozone maximum referred to as the "ozone paradox" [Thompson et al., GRL, 2000; JGR, 2003; Chatfield et al., GRL, 20031.

  17. Observational constraints on the contribution of isoprene oxidation to ozone production on the western slope of the Sierra Nevada, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyfus, Gabrielle B.; Schade, Gunnar W.; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2002-10-01

    Observations of isoprene and its oxidation products methacrolein (MACR) and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) are used to quantify the impact of isoprene oxidation on ozone production along the western slope of the Sierra Nevada mountains. Regular daytime up-slope wind flow patterns transport anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (VOC) and NOx emissions from the Central Valley toward the Sierra Nevada. A north-south band of oak forests stretching along the foothills and located approximately halfway between Sacramento and our measurement site (Blodgett Forest Research Station; elevation 1315 m) injects isoprene into this mixture. Subsequently, high ozone levels are encountered in these air masses. At Blodgett, daytime mixing ratios of isoprene's oxidation products and ozone were highly correlated. The observed daytime MVK/MACR ratio was used to estimate a mean [OH] of 9 (±4) × 106 molec. cm-3 between the measurement site and the Sierra foothills. The slope of the correlation between ozone and MVK was analyzed and compared to theoretical yield ratios for the photooxidation of isoprene to estimate the fraction of total ozone production due to isoprene oxidation. On average, over 40% of the observed midday ozone formation in this region was attributable to isoprene oxidation. On ozone episode days (maximum [O3] > 90 ppb), the mean isoprene contribution was over 70%. The calculated isoprene contribution to ozone production was variable from day to day but tended to increase exponentially with both isoprene input and air temperature. NOx conditions in the up-slope air masses were very important in determining the ozone formation potential of isoprene, and the general dominance of isoprene as an ozone precursor suggests that summertime ozone abatement strategies for the region must focus on anthropogenic NOx rather than VOC reductions.

  18. ESR evidence for radical production from the reaction of ozone with unsaturated lipids

    SciTech Connect

    Church, D.F.; McAdams, M.L..; Pryor, W.A. )

    1991-03-15

    The authors report electron spin resonance (ESR) spin trapping evidence for radical production by the reaction of ozone with unsaturated compounds. Soy and egg phosphatidylcholine liposomes, fatty acid emulsions, and homogeneous aqueous solutions of 3-hexenoic acid were treated with ozone in the presence of the spin trap {alpha}-phenyl-N-tert-butyl nitrone (PBN). Under these conditions, they observe spin adducts resulting from the trapping of both organic carbon- and oxygen-centered radicals. When the lipid-soluble antioxidant alpha-tocopherol is included in the liposomal systems, the formation of spin adducts is completely inhibited. The authors suggest that radicals giving rise to these spin adducts arise form the rapid decomposition of the 1,2,3-trioxolane intermediate that is initially formed when ozone reacts with the carbon-carbon double bonds of the substrates. These free radicals are not formed by the decomposition of the Criegee ozonide, since little of the ozonide is formed in the presence of water. Although hydrogen peroxide is the predominate peroxidic product of the ozone/alkene reaction, its decomposition is not responsible for the observed radical production since neither catalase nor iron chelators significantly affect the spin adduct yield. The radical yield is approximately 1%. Since a polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) such as linoleic acid produces much higher concentrations of spin trappable radicals than does the monounsaturated fatty oleic acid, the results also suggest that sites in the lung containing higher levels of PUFA may be an important target for radical formation.

  19. Simulation of halocarbon production and emissions and effects on ozone depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, K.J.; Ellis, H.

    1997-09-01

    This paper describes an integrated model that simulates future halocarbon production/emissions and potential ozone depletion. Applications and historical production levels for various halocarbons are discussed first. A framework is then presented for modeling future halocarbon impacts incorporating differences in underlying demands, applications, regulatory mandates, and environmental characteristics. The model is used to simulate the potential impacts of several prominent issues relating to halocarbon production, regulation, and environmental interactions, notably changes in agricultural methyl bromide use, increases in effectiveness of bromide for ozone depletion, modifications to the elimination schedule for HCFCs, short-term expansion of CFC demand in low use compliance countries, and delays in Russian Federation compliance. Individually, each issue does not unequivocally represent a significant likely increase in long-term atmospheric halogen loading and stratospheric ozone depletion. In combination, however, these impacts could increase peak halogen concentrations and long-term integral halogen loading, resulting in higher levels of stratospheric ozone depletion and longer exposure to increased levels of UV radiation.

  20. Release 2 data products from the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) Limb Profiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Q. Philippe; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Jaross, Glen R.; Deland, Matthew T.; Larsen, Jack C.; Fleig, Albert; Kahn, Daniel; Zhu, Tong; Chen, Zhong; Gorkavyi, Nick; Warner, Jeremy; Linda, Mike; Chen, Hong; Kowitt, Mark; Haken, Michael; Hall, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The OMPS Limb Profiler (LP) was launched on board the NASA Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite in October 2011. OMPS-LP is a limb-scattering hyperspectral sensor that provides ozone profiling capability at 1.5 km vertical resolution from cloud top to 60 km altitude. The use of three parallel slits allows global coverage in approximately four days. We have recently completed a full reprocessing of all LP data products, designated as Release 2, that improves the accuracy and quality of these products. Level 1 gridded radiance (L1G) changes include intra-orbit and seasonal correction of variations in wavelength registration, revised static and intra-orbit tangent height adjustments, and simplified pixel selection from multiple images. Ozone profile retrieval changes include removal of the explicit aerosol correction, exclusion of channels contaminated by stratospheric OH emission, a revised instrument noise characterization, improved synthetic solar spectrum, improved pressure and temperature ancillary data, and a revised ozone climatology. Release 2 data products also include aerosol extinction coefficient profiles derived with the prelaunch retrieval algorithm. Our evaluation of OMPS LP Release 2 data quality is good. Zonal average ozone profile comparisons with Aura MLS data typically show good agreement, within 5-10% over the altitude range 20-50 km between 60 deg S and 60 deg N. The aerosol profiles agree well with concurrent satellite measurements such as CALIPSO and OSIRIS, and clearly detect exceptional events such as volcanic eruptions and the Chelyabinsk bolide in February 2013.

  1. Indoor Secondary Pollutants from Household Product Emissions inthe Presence of Ozone: A Bench-Scale Chamber Study

    SciTech Connect

    Destaillats, Hugo; Lunden, Melissa M.; Singer, Brett C.; Coleman,Beverly K.; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Weschler, Charles J.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2005-10-01

    Ozone-driven chemistry is a major source of indoor secondary pollutants of health concern. This study investigates secondary air pollutants formed from reactions between constituents of household products and ozone. Gas-phase product emissions were introduced along with ozone at constant rates into a 198-L Teflon-lined reaction chamber. Gas-phase concentrations of reactive terpenoids and oxidation products were measured. Formaldehyde was a predominant oxidation byproduct for the three studied products, with yields under most conditions of 20-30% with respect to ozone consumed. Acetaldehyde, acetone, glycolaldehyde, formic acid and acetic acid were each also detected for two or three of the products. Immediately upon mixing of reactants, a scanning mobility particle sizer detected particle nucleation events that were followed by a significant degree of ultrafine particle growth. The production of secondary gaseous pollutants and particles depended primarily on the ozone level and was influenced by other parameters such as the air-exchange rate. Hydroxyl radical concentrations in the range 0.04-200 x 10{sup 5} molecules cm{sup -3} were measured. OH concentrations were observed to vary strongly with residual ozone level in the chamber, which was in the range 1-25 ppb, as is consistent with expectations from a simplified kinetic model. In a separate test, we exposed the dry residue of two products to ozone in the chamber and observed the formation of gas-phase and particle-phase secondary oxidation products.

  2. Effects of ozone on primary determinants of plant productivity. Final report, 15 May 1986-15 February 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Olszyk, D.M.; Heath, R.L.; Takemoto, B.K.

    1988-04-01

    This study evaluated the relationships among ozone exposure, gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, and whole-plant productivity for Spinacea oleracea. Lactuca sativa, Zea mays, Cucumis pepo, and Raphanus sativus in a greenhouse with plants grown hydroponically (spinach) or in loose media (other species) to allow recovery of root systems. Spinach showed decreases in stomatal conductance and transpiration, with variable exposure producing greater effects than constant exposure. Net photosynthesis was affected by ozone less than were the gas-exchange parameters. Radish was the only species showing consistent ozone effects with reductions in both shoot and root dry weight. Gas exchange was not consistently correlated with productivity. Chlorophyll fluorescence measurements were stable and reproducible, but changes in fluorescence induced by low ozone levels were not easily observed. The study clearly showed that even though changes in gas exchange and plant productivity occur with ozone exposure, the relationships among them are difficult to detect.

  3. Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) Level-3 Data Products User's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPeters, Richard D.; Bhartia, P. K.; Krueger, Arlin J.; Herman, Jay R.; Wellemeyer, Charles G.; Seftor, Colin J.; Byerly, William; Celarier, Edward A.

    2000-01-01

    Data from the TOMS series of instruments span the time period from November 1978, through the present with about a one and a-half year gap from January 1994 through July 1996. A set of four parameters derived from the TOMS measurements have been archived in the form of daily global maps or Level-3 data products. These products are total column ozone, effective surface reflectivity, aerosol index, and erythermal ultraviolet estimated at the Earth surface. A common fixed grid of I degree latitude by 1.25 degree longitude cells over the entire globe is provided daily for each parameter. These data are archived at the Goddard Space Flight Center Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAQ in Hierarchical Data Format (HDF). They are also available in a character format through the TOMS web site at http://toms.gsfc.nasa.gov. The derivations of the parameters, the mapping algorithm, and the data formats are described. The trend uncertainty for individual TOMS instruments is about 1% decade, but additional uncertainty exists in the combined data record due to uncertainty in the relative calibrations of the various TOMS.

  4. Interaction of ozone with wooden building products, treated wood samples and exotic wood species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schripp, Tobias; Langer, Sarka; Salthammer, Tunga

    2012-07-01

    Wooden building products indoors are known to be able to affect the perceived air quality depending on their emission strength. The indoor application of modern ecological lacquer systems (eco-lacquers or 'green' lacquers) may be a much stronger source than the substrates itself. Especially with regard to the formation of ultrafine particles by gas-to-particle conversion in the presence of ozone or other reactive species the impact of the applied building products on the indoor air quality has to be addressed. The present study reports a two concentration step ozonation of OSB panels, painted beech boards, and a number of solid 'exotic' wood types in a 1 m³ emission test chamber. The emission of volatile organic compounds (VOC) was recorded as well as the formation of ultrafine particles in the range 7-300 nm. The products are characterized on the basis of their ozone deposition velocity; the obtained values of 0.008-0.381 cm s-1 are comparable with previously published data. Within the samples of the present study one eco-lacquer was the strongest source of VOC (total VOC ˜ 60 mg m-3) while the wooden building products (OSB) were of intermediate emission strength. The lowest emission was found for the solid (exotic) wood samples. The VOC release of the samples corresponded roughly to the particle formation potential. However, the strongest UFP formation was measured for one solid wood sample ('Garapa') which showed a strong surface reaction in the presence of ozone and formed a large number of particles <40 nm. Overall, the experiments demonstrated the necessity of real-life samples for the estimation of UFP indoor air pollution from the ozone chemistry of terpenes.

  5. In-situ Measurements of Ozone Production Rates and Comparisons to Model-derived Production Rates During the Houston, TX and Denver, CO DISCOVER-AQ Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baier, B. C.; Brune, W. H.; Miller, D. O.; Lefer, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone (O3) is a secondary pollutant that has harmful effects on human and plant life. The climate and urban emissions in Houston, TX and Denver, CO can be conducive for significant ozone production and thus, high ozone events. Tighter government strategies for ozone mitigation have been proposed, which involve reducing the current EPA eight-hour ozone standard from 75 ppb to 65-70 ppb. These strategies rely on the reduction of ozone precursors in order to decrease the ozone production rate, P(O3). The changes in the ozone concentration at a certain location are dependent upon P(O3), so decreasing P(O3) can decrease ozone levels provided that it has not been transported from other areas. Air quality models test reduction strategies before they are implemented, locate ozone sources, and predict ozone episodes. Traditionally, P(O3) has been calculated by models. However, large uncertainties in model emissions inventories, chemical mechanisms, and meteorology can reduce confidence in this approach. A new instrument, the Measurement of Ozone Production Sensor (MOPS) directly measures P(O3) and can provide an alternate approach to determining P(O3). An updated version of the Penn State MOPS (MOPSv2.0) was deployed to Houston, TX and Denver, CO as a part of NASA's DISCOVER-AQ field campaign in the summers of 2013 and 2014, respectively. We present MOPS directly-measured P(O3) rates from these areas, as well as comparisons to zero-dimensional and three-dimensional modeled P(O3) using the RACM2 and MCMv2.2 mechanisms. These comparisons demonstrate the potential of the MOPS to test and evaluate model-derived P(O3), to advance the understanding of model chemical mechanisms, and to improve predictions of high ozone events.

  6. Slower ozone production in Houston, Texas following emission reductions: evidence from Texas Air Quality Studies in 2000 and 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, W.; Cohan, D. S.; Henderson, B. H.

    2014-03-01

    Airborne measurements from two Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS) field campaigns have been used to investigate changes of ozone production in Houston, Texas, from 2000 to 2006, a period of major emission reduction measures for petrochemical and other sources. Simultaneous declines in nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) and highly reactive volatile organic compounds (HRVOCs) were observed between the two periods. We simulate HOx (OH and HO2) and organic radicals with a box model, the Dynamically Simple Model of Atmospheric Chemical Complexity, constrained by available airborne observations. Parameters such as total radical production, total OH reactivity of VOCs and ozone production rate (OPR) are computed to characterize the change of ozone production between 2000 and 2006 in the Houston area. The reduction in HRVOCs led to a decline in total radical production by 20-50%. Ozone production rates in the Houston area declined by 40-50% from 2000 to 2006, to which the reduction in NOx and HRVOCs made large contributions. Despite the significant decline in OPR, ozone production efficiency held steady, and VOC-sensitive conditions dominated during times of most rapid ozone formation, while the slow ozone formation continued to be NOx-limited. Our results highlight the importance of a balanced approach of ongoing HRVOC controls with NOx controls to further reduce O3 levels in the Houston area.

  7. Ozone Production in Irradiated Laboratory Ices Relevant to Europa and Ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, P. D.; Moore, M. H.; Hudson, R. L.

    2005-08-01

    Observations suggest ozone (O3) is present on the icy surfaces of Ganymede (1), and Rhea and Dione (2). Molecular oxygen (O2) has also been observed on Europa (3) and Ganymede (4). The formation and trapping of such molecules in ice and their subsequent transportation to a sub-surface ocean may be potentially important for sustaining astrobiological life (5). It is assumed that ozone is produced in these icy surfaces by the addition of an oxygen atom to molecular oxygen, with the latter formed by prior irradiation of the water ice. The infrared absorption band of ozone in ice at 1037 cm-1 is strong and thus makes ozone a good tracer for the presence of molecular oxygen which is difficult to detect. We will present results of water/oxygen ices irradiated with 800 keV protons and show the band position and growth of ozone with increasing radiation dose. The thermal stability of this radiolytically-produced ozone has also been measured and comparisons made to the Jovian satellites. P. Cooper is grateful for the support from the National Academies Research Associateship Program. (1) Noll, K.S., Johnson, R.E., Lane, A.L., Domingue, D.L., Weaver, H.A., Science, 273, 341-343, (1996). (2) Noll, K.S., Roush, T.L., Cruikshank, D.P., Johnson, R.E., Pendleton, Y.J., Nature, 388, 45-47, (1997). (3) Spencer, J.R., Calvin, W.M., Astron. J., 124, 3400-3403, (2002). (4) Spencer, J.R., Calvin, W.M., Person, M. J., J. Geo. Res. 100 (E9), 19049-19056 (1995). (5) Chyba, C.F., Hand, K.P., Science, 292, 2026-2027, (2001).

  8. Evaluating and elucidating the formation of nitrogen-contained disinfection by-products during pre-ozonation and chlorination.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Pen-Chi; Chang, E-E; Chuang, Chao-Chin; Liang, Chung-Huei; Huang, Chin-Pao

    2010-06-01

    The effects of pre-ozonation on the formation of haloacetonitriles (HANs), trichloronitromethane (TCNM), and haloketones (HKs) during chlorination were evaluated. Ozone dose used in this study was 8.0, 10.0 and 25.0 mg O(3)/min. Results showed high UV(254) reduction (>80%) and relatively low dissolved organic carbon removal (40-70%) after ozonation, indicating that ozone might change significantly the chemical properties of natural organic matter presented in the raw water. Undesired ozonation by-products such as aldehydes and ketones were also formed during ozonation. At high ozone dose of 25.0 mg O(3)/min, the formation of dichloroacetonitrile and bromochloroacetonitrile were reduced significantly. Chlorination of the ozonated water formed high concentration of TCNM and HKs were 8-10 and 31-48 microg/L, respectively. It was also found that continuous hydrolysis at longer reaction time rapidly decreased the formation of HKs. Ozonation prior to chlorination practice exhibited a negative effect on TCNM and HKs reduction. A model based on the dissolved organic carbon and chlorine decay was developed not only for determining the reaction rate constants, e.g. formation and hydrolysis of HANs, HKs and TCNM, but also for interpreting the mechanisms of formation and hydrolysis for HANs, HKs and TCNM during the chlorination of natural organic matter.

  9. Ozonation of ranitidine: Effect of experimental parameters and identification of transformation products.

    PubMed

    Christophoridis, Christophoros; Nika, Maria-Christina; Aalizadeh, Reza; Thomaidis, Nikolaos S

    2016-07-01

    This study focuses on the effect of experimental parameters on the removal of ranitidine (RAN) during ozonation and the identification of the formed transformation products (TPs). The influence of pH value, the initial concentrations, the inorganic and the organic matter on RAN's removal were evaluated. Results indicated high reactivity of RAN with molecular aqueous ozone. Initial ozone concentration and pH were proven the major process parameters. Alkaline pH values promoted degradation and overall mineralization. Dissolved organic matter reacts competitively to RAN with the oxidants (ozone and/or radicals), influencing the target compound's removal. The presence of inorganic ions in the matrix did not seem to affect RAN ozonation. A total of eleven TPs were identified and structurally elucidated, with the complementary use of both Reversed Phase (RP) and Hydrophilic Interaction Liquid Chromatography (HILIC) quadrupole time of flight tandem mass spectrometry (Q-ToF-MS/MS). Most of the TPs (TP-304, TP-315b, TP-299b, TP-333, TP-283) were generated by the attack of ozone at the double bond or the adjacent secondary amine, with the abstraction of NO2 moiety, forming TPs with an aldehyde group and an imine bond. Oxidized derivatives with a carboxylic group (TP-315a, TP-331a, TP-331b, TP-299a) were also formed. RAN S-oxide was identified as an ozonation TP (TP-330) and its structure was confirmed through the analysis of a reference standard. TP-214 was also produced during ozonation, through the CN bond rupture adjacent to the NO2 moiety. HILIC was used complementary to RP, either for the separation and identification of TPs with isomeric structures that may have been co-eluted in RPLC or for the detection of new TPs that were not eluted in the RP chromatographic system. Retention time prediction was used as a supporting tool for the identification of TPs and results were in accordance with the experimental ones in both RP and HILIC. PMID:27133934

  10. 40 CFR 300.920 - Addition of products to Schedule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... additional information and/or a sample of the product in order to review and/or conduct validation sampling... not list the product. (3) Request for review of decision. (i) A manufacturer whose product was determined to be ineligible for listing on the NCP Product Schedule may request EPA's Administrator to...

  11. 40 CFR 300.920 - Addition of products to Schedule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... additional information and/or a sample of the product in order to review and/or conduct validation sampling... not list the product. (3) Request for review of decision. (i) A manufacturer whose product was determined to be ineligible for listing on the NCP Product Schedule may request EPA's Administrator to...

  12. Operational use of the AIRS Total Column Ozone Retrievals along with the RGB Airmass product as part of the GOES-R Proving Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folmer, M. J.; Zavodsky, B. T.; Molthan, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Red, Green, Blue (RGB) Air Mass product has been demonstrated in the GOES-R Proving Ground as a possible decision aid. Forecasters have been trained on the usefulness of identifying stratospheric intrusions and potential vorticity (PV) anomalies that can lead to explosive cyclogenesis, genesis of mesoscale convective systems (MCSs), or the transition of tropical cyclones to extratropical cyclones. It has also been demonstrated to distinguish different air mass types from warm, low ozone air masses to cool, high ozone air masses and the various interactions with the PV anomalies. To assist the forecasters in understanding the stratospheric contribution to high impact weather systems, the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Total Column Ozone Retrievals have been made available as an operational tool. These AIRS retrievals provide additional information on the amount of ozone that is associated with the red coloring seen in the RGB Air Mass product. This paper discusses how the AIRS retrievals can be used to quantify the red coloring in RGB Air Mass product. These retrievals can be used to diagnose the depth of the stratospheric intrusions associated with different types of weather systems and provide the forecasters with decision aid tools that can improve the quality of forecast products.

  13. Operational use of the AIRS Total Column Ozone Retrievals along with the RGB Airmass Product as Part of the GOES-R Proving Ground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folmer, M.; Zavodsky, Bradley; Molthan, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The Red, Green, Blue (RGB) Air Mass product has been demonstrated in the GOES ]R Proving Ground as a possible decision aid. Forecasters have been trained on the usefulness of identifying stratospheric intrusions and potential vorticity (PV) anomalies that can lead to explosive cyclogenesis, genesis of mesoscale convective systems (MCSs), or the transition of tropical cyclones to extratropical cyclones. It has also been demonstrated to distinguish different air mass types from warm, low ozone air masses to cool, high ozone air masses and the various interactions with the PV anomalies. To assist the forecasters in understanding the stratospheric contribution to high impact weather systems, the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) Total Column Ozone Retrievals have been made available as an operational tool. These AIRS retrievals provide additional information on the amount of ozone that is associated with the red coloring seen in the RGB Air Mass product. This paper discusses how the AIRS retrievals can be used to quantify the red coloring in RGB Air Mass product. These retrievals can be used to diagnose the depth of the stratospheric intrusions associated with different types of weather systems and provide the forecasters decision aid tools that can improve the quality of forecast products.

  14. Evidence for an unidentified non-photochemical ground-level source of formaldehyde in the Po Valley with potential implications for ozone production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, J.; Wolfe, G. M.; Bohn, B.; Broch, S.; Fuchs, H.; Ganzeveld, L. N.; Gomm, S.; Häseler, R.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Holland, F.; Jäger, J.; Li, X.; Lohse, I.; Lu, K.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Rohrer, F.; Wegener, R.; Wolf, R.; Mentel, T. F.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Wahner, A.; Keutsch, F. N.

    2015-02-01

    Ozone concentrations in the Po Valley of northern Italy often exceed international regulations. As both a source of radicals and an intermediate in the oxidation of most volatile organic compounds (VOCs), formaldehyde (HCHO) is a useful tracer for the oxidative processing of hydrocarbons that leads to ozone production. We investigate the sources of HCHO in the Po Valley using vertical profile measurements acquired from the airship Zeppelin NT over an agricultural region during the PEGASOS 2012 campaign. Using a 1-D model, the total VOC oxidation rate is examined and discussed in the context of formaldehyde and ozone production in the early morning. While model and measurement discrepancies in OH reactivity are small (on average 3.4 ± 13%), HCHO concentrations are underestimated by as much as 1.5 ppb (45%) in the convective mixed layer. A similar underestimate in HCHO was seen in the 2002-2003 FORMAT Po Valley measurements, though the additional source of HCHO was not identified. Oxidation of unmeasured VOC precursors cannot explain the missing HCHO source, as measured OH reactivity is explained by measured VOCs and their calculated oxidation products. We conclude that local direct emissions from agricultural land are the most likely source of missing HCHO. Model calculations demonstrate that radicals from degradation of this non-photochemical HCHO source increase model ozone production rates by as much as 0.6 ppb h-1 (12%) before noon.

  15. A comparison of biologically active filters for the removal of ozone by-products, turbidity, and particles

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, B.M.; Krasner, S.W.; Sclimenti, M.J.; Hacker, P.A.; Gramith, J.T.

    1996-11-01

    Biofiltration tests were performed at the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California`s 5.5-mgd (21,000 m{sup 3}d) demonstration plant using two 400 ft{sup 2} (37 m{sup 2}) anthracite/sand filters and a 6 ft{sup 2} (0.56 m{sup 2}) granular activated carbon (GAC)/sand filter operated in parallel. The empty-bed contact time (EBCT) within the GAC and anthracite ranged from 2.1-3.1 min. The filters were evaluated based on (1) conventional filtration performance (turbidity, particle removal, and headloss); (2) removal of biodegradable ozone by-products (assimilable organic carbon [AOC], aldehydes, and aldoketoacids) after startup; (3) removal of biodegradable ozone by-products at steady state; and (4) resistance to short-term process upsets such as intermittent chlorination or filter out-of-service time. Approximately 80 percent formaldehyde removal was achieved by the anthracite/sand filter operated at a 2.1-min EBCT (6 gpm/ft{sup 2} [15 m/h]) within 8 days of ozone operation. The GAC/sand filter operated at the same rate achieved 80 percent removal within 1 day, possibly as an additive effect of adsorption and biological removal. In-depth aldehyde monitoring at four depths (0.5-min EBCT intervals) provided additional insight into the removal kinetics. During periods of warmer water temperature, from 20 to 48 percent of the AOC was removed in the flocculation/sedimentation basins by 40-75 percent. This percentage removal typically resulted in AOC concentrations within 40 {mu}g C/L of the raw, unozonated water levels.

  16. Continuous ozonation treatment of ofloxacin: transformation products, water matrix effect and aquatic toxicity.

    PubMed

    Carbajo, Jose B; Petre, Alice L; Rosal, Roberto; Herrera, Sonia; Letón, Pedro; García-Calvo, Eloy; Fernández-Alba, Amadeo R; Perdigón-Melón, Jose A

    2015-07-15

    The continuous ozonation of the antibiotic ofloxacin (OFX) has been performed using a synthetic water matrix and in a sewage treatment plant (STP) effluent. The aim was to study the effect of the water matrix on the ozonation with particular emphasis on the aquatic toxicity of treated water. OFX was completely removed in both water matrices, although the amount of ozone consumed for its depletion was strongly matrix-dependent. The extent of mineralization was limited and a number of intermediate transformation products (TPs) appeared, twelve of which could be identified. OFX reaction pathway includes the degradation of piperazinyl and quinolone moieties. The further oxidation of TPs gave rise to the formation and accumulation of carboxylic acids, aldehydes, nitrogen-containing organic compounds and inorganic ions. Aquatic toxicity of treated mixtures was assessed using four standard species: the bacteria Vibrio fischeri and Pseudomonas putida as target organisms and the algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and the protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila as non-target organisms. OFX was toxic for the bacteria and the microalgae at the spiked concentration in untreated water. However, the continuous ozonation at the upper operational limit removed its toxic effects. T. thermophila was not affected by OFX, but was sensitive to STP effluent.

  17. Continuous ozonation treatment of ofloxacin: transformation products, water matrix effect and aquatic toxicity.

    PubMed

    Carbajo, Jose B; Petre, Alice L; Rosal, Roberto; Herrera, Sonia; Letón, Pedro; García-Calvo, Eloy; Fernández-Alba, Amadeo R; Perdigón-Melón, Jose A

    2015-07-15

    The continuous ozonation of the antibiotic ofloxacin (OFX) has been performed using a synthetic water matrix and in a sewage treatment plant (STP) effluent. The aim was to study the effect of the water matrix on the ozonation with particular emphasis on the aquatic toxicity of treated water. OFX was completely removed in both water matrices, although the amount of ozone consumed for its depletion was strongly matrix-dependent. The extent of mineralization was limited and a number of intermediate transformation products (TPs) appeared, twelve of which could be identified. OFX reaction pathway includes the degradation of piperazinyl and quinolone moieties. The further oxidation of TPs gave rise to the formation and accumulation of carboxylic acids, aldehydes, nitrogen-containing organic compounds and inorganic ions. Aquatic toxicity of treated mixtures was assessed using four standard species: the bacteria Vibrio fischeri and Pseudomonas putida as target organisms and the algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and the protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila as non-target organisms. OFX was toxic for the bacteria and the microalgae at the spiked concentration in untreated water. However, the continuous ozonation at the upper operational limit removed its toxic effects. T. thermophila was not affected by OFX, but was sensitive to STP effluent. PMID:25796038

  18. Study of Ozone-Initiated Limonene Reaction Products by Low Temperature Plasma Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nørgaard, Asger W.; Vibenholt, Anni; Benassi, Mario; Clausen, Per Axel; Wolkoff, Peder

    2013-07-01

    Limonene and its ozone-initiated reaction products were investigated in situ by low temperature plasma (LTP) ionization quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometry. Helium was used as discharge gas and the protruding plasma generated ~850 ppb ozone in front of the glass tube by reaction with the ambient oxygen. Limonene applied to filter paper was placed in front of the LTP afterglow and the MS inlet. Instantly, a wide range of reaction products appeared, ranging from m/ z 139 to ca. 1000 in the positive mode and m/ z 115 to ca. 600 in the negative mode. Key monomeric oxidation products including levulinic acid, 4-acetyl-1-methylcyclohexene, limonene oxide, 3-isopropenyl-6-oxo-heptanal, and the secondary ozonide of limonene could be identified by collision-induced dissociation. Oligomeric products ranged from the nonoxidized dimer of limonene (C20H30) and up to the hexamer with 10 oxygen atoms (C60H90O10). The use of LTP for in situ ozonolysis and ionization represents a new and versatile approach for the assessment of ozone-initiated terpene chemistry.

  19. Intercontinental Transport of Tropical Ozone from Biomass Burning: Views from Satellite and SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes) Soundings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Anne M.

    2003-01-01

    The atmospheric impacts of tropical fires came to attention in the 1970's and there has been interest in the connection between these fires and ozone since about 1980. Photochemically reactive gases released by fires (e.g. NO, CO, volatile organic carbon) interact as they do in an urban environment to form ozone. Tropical meteorology also plays a part in tropospheric ozone distributions in the tropics - through large-scale circulation, deep convection, regional phenomena (West African and Asian monsoon) - and variations associated with El-Nino and the Quasi- biennial Oscillation have been reported. This Poster is an overview of observations, taken from satellite and from ozone soundings, that illustrate regional influences and intercontinental-range ozone transport in the tropics.

  20. Ozone drinking water treatment handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    This book explains how ozone can be used to provide primary disinfection, while minimizing halogenated by-products. This is of use to those who design pilot plant studies in full scale ozone plants-and those who employ ozone and regulatory personnel. Detailed section on components of an ozonization system outlines feed gas preparation (air and oxygen), ozone generation, ozone contacting, ozone off gas destruction, monitoring and control of ozonation systems, engineering aspects of ozone, cost factors in ozone technology, case histories (European and U.S.).

  1. A review of selected chemical additives in cosmetic products.

    PubMed

    Juhász, Margit Lai Wun; Marmur, Ellen S

    2014-01-01

    The addition of chemical additives to consumer cosmetic products is a common practice to increase cosmetic effectiveness, maintain cosmetic efficacy, and produce a longer-lasting, more viable product. Recently, manufacturers have come under attack for the addition of chemicals including dioxane, formaldehyde, lead/lead acetate, parabens, and phthalate, as these additives may prove harmful to consumer health. Although reports show that these products may indeed adversely affect human health, these studies are conducted using levels of the aforementioned chemicals at much higher levels of exposure than those found in cosmetic products. When cosmeceuticals are used as per manufacturer's instructions, it is estimated that the levels of harmful additives found in these products are considerably lower than reported toxic concentrations.

  2. Development of a hybrid ozonation biofilm-membrane filatration process for the production of drinking water.

    PubMed

    Leiknes, T; Lazarova, M; Odegaard, H

    2005-01-01

    Drinking water sources in Norway are characterized by high concentrations of natural organic matter (NOM), low alkalinity and low turbidity. The removal of NOM is therefore a general requirement in producing potable water. Drinking water treatment plants are commonly designed with coagulation direct filtration or NF spiral wound membrane processes. This study has investigated the feasibility and potential of a hybrid process combining ozonation and biofiltration with a rotating disk membrane for treating drinking water with high NOM concentrations. Ozonation will oxidize the NOM content removing colour and form biodegradable organic compounds, which can be removed in biological filters. A constructed water was used in this study which is representative of ozonated NOM-containing water. A rotating membrane disk bioreactor downstream the ozonation process was used to carry out both the biodegradation as well as biomass separation in the same reactor. Maintenance of biodegradation of the organic matter while controlling biofouling of the membrane and acceptable water production rates was the focus in the study. Three operating modes were investigated. Removal of the biodegradable organics was consistent throughout the study indicating that sufficient biomass was maintained in the reactor for all operating conditions tested. Biofouling control was not achieved through shear-induced cleaning by periodically rotating the membrane disks at high speed. By adding a small amount of sponges in the membrane chamber the biofouling could be controlled by mechanical cleaning of the membrane surface during disk rotation. The overall results indicate that the system can favorably be used in an ozonation/biofiltration process by carrying out both biodegradation as well as biomass separation in the same reactor.

  3. The effects of hydrodynamic stretch on the flame propagation enhancement of ethylene by addition of ozone.

    PubMed

    Pinchak, Matthew; Ombrello, Timothy; Carter, Campbell; Gutmark, Ephraim; Katta, Viswanath

    2015-08-13

    The effect of O(3) on C(2)H(4)/synthetic-air flame propagation at sub-atmospheric pressure was investigated through detailed experiments and simulations. A Hencken burner provided an ideal platform to interrogate flame speed enhancement, producing a steady, laminar, nearly one-dimensional, minimally curved, weakly stretched, and nearly adiabatic flame that could be accurately compared with simulations. The experimental results showed enhancement of up to 7.5% in flame speed for 11 000 ppm of O(3) at stoichiometric conditions. Significantly, the axial stretch rate was also found to affect enhancement. Comparison of the flames for a given burner exit velocity resulted in the enhancement increasing almost 9% over the range of axial stretch rates that was investigated. Two-dimensional simulations agreed well with the experiments in terms of flame speed, as well as the trends of enhancement. Rate of production analysis showed that the primary pathway for O(3) consumption was through reaction with H, leading to early heat release and increased production of OH. Higher flame stretch rates resulted in increased flux through the H+O(3) reaction to provide increased enhancement, due to the thinning of the flame that accompanies higher stretch, and thus results in decreased distance for the H to diffuse before reacting with O(3).

  4. Secondary organic aerosol from ozone-initiated reactions with terpene-rich household products

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Beverly; Coleman, Beverly K.; Lunden, Melissa M.; Destaillats, Hugo; Nazaroff, William W.

    2008-01-01

    We analyzed secondary organic aerosol (SOA) data from a series of small-chamber experiments in which terpene-rich vapors from household products were combined with ozone under conditions analogous to product use indoors. Reagents were introduced into a continuously ventilated 198 L chamber at steady rates. Consistently, at the time of ozone introduction, nucleation occurred exhibiting behavior similar to atmospheric events. The initial nucleation burst and growth was followed by a period in which approximately stable particle levels were established reflecting a balance between new particle formation, condensational growth, and removal by ventilation. Airborne particles were measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS, 10 to 400 nm) in every experiment and with an optical particle counter (OPC, 0.1 to 2.0 ?m) in a subset. Parameters for a three-mode lognormal fit to the size distribution at steady state were determined for each experiment. Increasing the supply ozone level increased the steady-state mass concentration and yield of SOA from each product tested. Decreasing the air-exchange rate increased the yield. The steady-state fine-particle mass concentration (PM1.1) ranged from 10 to> 300 mu g m-3 and yields ranged from 5percent to 37percent. Steady-state nucleation rates and SOA mass formation rates were on the order of 10 cm-3 s-1 and 10 mu g m-3 min-1, respectively.

  5. Fate and transformation products of amine-terminated PAMAM dendrimers under ozonation and irradiation.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Morales, Javier; Rosal, Roberto; Hernando, María D; Ulaszewska, Maria M; García-Calvo, Eloy; Fernández-Alba, Amadeo R

    2014-02-15

    This article deals with the degradation of a third-generation (G3) poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer under ozonation and irradiation. The identification and quantification of G3 PAMAM dendrimer and its transformation products has been performed by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight-mass spectrometry. The dendrimer was completely depleted by ozone in less than 1 min. The effect of ultraviolet irradiation was attributed to hydroxyl-mediated oxidation. The transformation products were attributed to the oxidation of amines, which resulted in highly oxidized structures with abundance of carboxylic acids, which started from the formation of amine oxide and the scission of the CN bond of the amide group. We studied the toxicity of treated mixtures for six different organisms: the acute toxicity for the bacterium Vibrio fischeri and the microcrustacean Daphnia magna, the multigenerational growth inhibition of the alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, and the seed germination phytotoxicity of Licopersicon esculentum, Lactuca sativa and Lolium perenne. Ozonation and irradiation originated transformation products are more toxic than the parent dendrimer. The toxicity of the dendrimer for the green alga was linked to a strong increase of intracellular reactive oxygen species with intense lipid peroxidation. PMID:24384376

  6. Effect of sonically induced deflocculation on the efficiency of ozone mediated partial sludge disintegration for improved production of biogas.

    PubMed

    Packyam, G Sowmya; Kavitha, S; Kumar, S Adish; Kaliappan, S; Yeom, Ick Tae; Banu, J Rajesh

    2015-09-01

    In this study, ultrasonication was used for sludge deflocculation, followed by cell disintegration using ozone. The effect of this phase separated sono-ozone pretreatment is evaluated based on extra polymeric substances release, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in the medium, solubilization of intra cellular components and suspended solids (SS) reduction. Ultrasonically induced deflocculation was optimized at an energy dosage of 76.4(log 1.88)kJ/kg TS. During cell disintegration (ozone dosage 0.0011 mgO3/mgSS), chemical oxygen demand solubilization (COD) and SS reduction of sonic mediated ozone pretreated sludge were 25.4% and 17.8% comparatively higher than ozone pretreated sludge, respectively. Further, biogas production potential of control (raw), flocculated (ozone pretreated), and deflocculated (sonic mediated ozone pretreated) sludges were observed to be 0.202, 0.535 and 0.637 L/(gVS), respectively. Thus, the phase separated pretreatment at lower ultrasonic specific energy and low dose ozone proved to enhance the anaerobic biodegradability efficiently.

  7. Ozonation products of carbamazepine and their removal from secondary effluents by soil aquifer treatment--indications from column experiments.

    PubMed

    Hübner, U; Seiwert, B; Reemtsma, T; Jekel, M

    2014-02-01

    Ozonation is known as an efficient treatment to reduce the concentration of many trace organic compounds from WWTP effluents, but the formation of unknown and possibly persistent and toxic transformation products has to be considered. In this paper tertiary treatment of wastewater by the combination of ozone and soil aquifer treatment was investigated with respect to the removal of the antiepileptic drug carbamazepine (CBZ, 10 μg/L) and its transformation products. Batch tests and pilot experiments confirmed efficient removal of carbamazepine from secondary effluent by ozone. With typical ozone consumption of 0.7 mg O3/mg DOC0, approx. 50% of the transformed CBZ was detected as its primary product 1-(2-benzaldehyde)-4-hydro-(1H,3H)-quinazoline-2-one (BQM). Structure proposals and a formation pathway were elaborated for a total of 13 ozonation products of CBZ. In subsequent biological treatment BQM turned out to be more effectively biodegraded than CBZ. Its aldehyde group was quickly oxidized to a carboxylic acid (BaQM), which was removed in sand column experiments. Most of the minor ozonation products of CBZ persisted in sand column experiments with residence times of 5-6 days. Non-target screening of column effluent revealed no formation of persistent biotransformation products.

  8. Ozone-initiated terpene reaction products in five European offices: replacement of a floor cleaning agent.

    PubMed

    Nørgaard, A W; Kofoed-Sørensen, V; Mandin, C; Ventura, G; Mabilia, R; Perreca, E; Cattaneo, A; Spinazzè, A; Mihucz, V G; Szigeti, T; de Kluizenaar, Y; Cornelissen, H J M; Trantallidi, M; Carrer, P; Sakellaris, I; Bartzis, J; Wolkoff, P

    2014-11-18

    Cleaning agents often emit terpenes that react rapidly with ozone. These ozone-initiated reactions, which occur in the gas-phase and on surfaces, produce a host of gaseous and particulate oxygenated compounds with possible adverse health effects in the eyes and airways. Within the European Union (EU) project OFFICAIR, common ozone-initiated reaction products were measured before and after the replacement of the regular floor cleaning agent with a preselected low emitting floor cleaning agent in four offices located in four EU countries. One reference office in a fifth country did not use any floor cleaning agent. Limonene, α-pinene, 3-carene, dihydromyrcenol, geraniol, linalool, and α-terpineol were targeted for measurement together with the common terpene oxidation products formaldehyde, 4-acetyl-1-methylcyclohexene (4-AMCH), 3-isopropenyl-6-oxo-heptanal (IPOH), 6-methyl-5-heptene-2-one, (6-MHO), 4-oxopentanal (4-OPA), and dihydrocarvone (DHC). Two-hour air samples on Tenax TA and DNPH cartridges were taken in the morning, noon, and in the afternoon and analyzed by thermal desorption combined with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and HPLC/UV analysis, respectively. Ozone was measured in all sites. All the regular cleaning agents emitted terpenes, mainly limonene and linalool. After the replacement of the cleaning agent, substantially lower concentrations of limonene and formaldehyde were observed. Some of the oxidation product concentrations, in particular that of 4-OPA, were also reduced in line with limonene. Maximum 2 h averaged concentrations of formaldehyde, 4-AMCH, 6-MHO, and IPOH would not give rise to acute eye irritation-related symptoms in office workers; similarly, 6-AMCH, DHC and 4-OPA would not result in airflow limitation to the airways.

  9. Elimination of micropollutants and transformation products from a wastewater treatment plant effluent through pilot scale ozonation followed by various activated carbon and biological filters.

    PubMed

    Knopp, Gregor; Prasse, Carsten; Ternes, Thomas A; Cornel, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Conventional wastewater treatment plants are ineffective in removing a broad range of micropollutants, resulting in the release of these compounds into the aquatic environment, including natural drinking water resources. Ozonation is a suitable treatment process for micropollutant removal, although, currently, little is known about the formation, behavior, and removal of transformation products (TP) formed during ozonation. We investigated the elimination of 30 selected micropollutants (pharmaceuticals, X-ray contrast media, industrial chemicals, and TP) by biological treatment coupled with ozonation and, subsequently, in parallel with two biological filters (BF) or granular activated carbon (GAC) filters. The selected micropollutants were removed to very different extents during the conventional biological wastewater treatment process. Ozonation (specific ozone consumption: 0.87 ± 0.29 gO3 gDOC(-1), hydraulic retention time: 17 ± 3 min) eliminated a large number of the investigated micropollutants. Although 11 micropollutants could still be detected after ozonation, most of these were eliminated in subsequent GAC filtration at bed volumes (BV) of approximately 25,000 m(3) m(-3). In contrast, no additional removal of micropollutants was achieved in the BF. Ozonation of the analgesic tramadol led to the formation of tramadol-N-oxide that is effectively eliminated by GAC filters, but not by BF. For the antiviral drug acyclovir, the formation of carboxy-acyclovir was observed during activated sludge treatment, with an average concentration of 3.4 ± 1.4 μg L(-1) detected in effluent samples. Subsequent ozonation resulted in the complete elimination of carboxy-acyclovir and led to the formation of N-(4-carbamoyl-2-imino-5-oxo imidazolidin)-formamido-N-methoxyacetetic acid (COFA; average concentration: 2.6 ± 1.0 μg L(-1)). Neither the BF nor the GAC filters were able to remove COFA. These results highlight the importance of considering TP in the

  10. Elimination of micropollutants and transformation products from a wastewater treatment plant effluent through pilot scale ozonation followed by various activated carbon and biological filters.

    PubMed

    Knopp, Gregor; Prasse, Carsten; Ternes, Thomas A; Cornel, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Conventional wastewater treatment plants are ineffective in removing a broad range of micropollutants, resulting in the release of these compounds into the aquatic environment, including natural drinking water resources. Ozonation is a suitable treatment process for micropollutant removal, although, currently, little is known about the formation, behavior, and removal of transformation products (TP) formed during ozonation. We investigated the elimination of 30 selected micropollutants (pharmaceuticals, X-ray contrast media, industrial chemicals, and TP) by biological treatment coupled with ozonation and, subsequently, in parallel with two biological filters (BF) or granular activated carbon (GAC) filters. The selected micropollutants were removed to very different extents during the conventional biological wastewater treatment process. Ozonation (specific ozone consumption: 0.87 ± 0.29 gO3 gDOC(-1), hydraulic retention time: 17 ± 3 min) eliminated a large number of the investigated micropollutants. Although 11 micropollutants could still be detected after ozonation, most of these were eliminated in subsequent GAC filtration at bed volumes (BV) of approximately 25,000 m(3) m(-3). In contrast, no additional removal of micropollutants was achieved in the BF. Ozonation of the analgesic tramadol led to the formation of tramadol-N-oxide that is effectively eliminated by GAC filters, but not by BF. For the antiviral drug acyclovir, the formation of carboxy-acyclovir was observed during activated sludge treatment, with an average concentration of 3.4 ± 1.4 μg L(-1) detected in effluent samples. Subsequent ozonation resulted in the complete elimination of carboxy-acyclovir and led to the formation of N-(4-carbamoyl-2-imino-5-oxo imidazolidin)-formamido-N-methoxyacetetic acid (COFA; average concentration: 2.6 ± 1.0 μg L(-1)). Neither the BF nor the GAC filters were able to remove COFA. These results highlight the importance of considering TP in the

  11. Production of the Criegee ozonide during the ozonation of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes

    SciTech Connect

    Squadrito, G.L.; Uppu, R.M.; Cueto, R.; Pryor, W.A. )

    1992-12-01

    It is likely that Criegee ozonides are formed in small amounts in the lungs of animals breathing ozone-containing air. This makes these compounds potential candidates to act as secondary toxins which relay the toxic effects of ozone deeper into lung tissue than ozone itself could penetrate. Therefore, we have determined the yields of Criegee ozonides from unsaturated lipids in liposomal systems as a model of the types of yields of Criegee ozonides that might be expected both in the lung lining fluid layer and in biological membranes. Ozonation of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes produced both cis- and trans-Criegee ozonides. These ozonides have been isolated by solid phase extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography of the ozonized lipid, and the products have been identified by two-dimensional 1H nuclear magnetic resonance. The combined yield of the cis- and trans-Criegee ozonides is 10.7 +/- 2.8% (avg. +/- SD, n = 7) with small unilamellar liposomes and 10.6 +/- 2.7% (n = 3) with large multilamellar liposomes. We had previously reported that ozonation of methyl oleate in sodium dodecylsulfate micelles also produces an 11% yield of the Criegee ozonides. Thus, ozonation in a variety of models gives about 11% of the Criegee ozonide, suggesting that these products also would be formed in small but significant amounts in the lungs of animals breathing polluted air. Further research on the pharmacokinetics and possible toxicity of the Criegee ozonides of fatty acids is suggested.

  12. Occurrence and fate of ozonation by-products at a full-scale drinking water treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, A; Voutsa, D; Papadakis, N

    2014-05-15

    The occurrence and fate of carbonyl compounds as ozonation by-products at a full scale drinking water treatment plant (DWTP) were studied for one year. Raw water and samples after the main treatment processes (pre-ozonation, coagulation/flocculation, sand filtration, main ozonation, filtration through granular activated carbon and chlorination) were collected on a monthly basis. Pre-ozonation led to the formation of carbonyl compounds at concentrations of 67.3 ± 43.3 μg/l as sum of 14 carbonyl compounds whereas lower concentrations were determined after the main ozonation process, 32.8 ± 22.3 μg/l. The dominant compounds were formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, glyoxal and methyl glyoxal contributing to 65% of total carbonyl content. The DOC reactivity in formation of carbonyl compounds varied through the year exhibiting the higher values in spring. Coagulation/flocculation and sand filtration significantly removed (64-80%) the carbonyl compounds formed at the pre-ozonation step. The removal efficiency of filtration through granular activated carbon showed great variation ranging from 15 to 62%. Finally, the concentrations of carbonyl compounds in finished water were low, close to detection limits, revealing the efficiency of DWTP in the removal of this class of ozonation by-products.

  13. Elemental Bromine Production by TiO2 Photocatalysis and/or Ozonation.

    PubMed

    Parrino, Francesco; Camera Roda, Giovanni; Loddo, Vittorio; Palmisano, Leonardo

    2016-08-22

    Significant production of elemental bromine (Br2 ) was observed for the first time when treating bromide containing solutions at acidic pH, with TiO2 photocatalyst, ozone, or a combination thereof. Br2 selectivities up to approximately 85 % were obtained and the corresponding bromine mass balance values satisfied. The process is general and may be applied at a laboratory scale for green bromination reactions, or industrially as a cheap, safe, and environmentally sustainable alternative to the currently applied bromine production methods. PMID:27461437

  14. Elemental Bromine Production by TiO2 Photocatalysis and/or Ozonation.

    PubMed

    Parrino, Francesco; Camera Roda, Giovanni; Loddo, Vittorio; Palmisano, Leonardo

    2016-08-22

    Significant production of elemental bromine (Br2 ) was observed for the first time when treating bromide containing solutions at acidic pH, with TiO2 photocatalyst, ozone, or a combination thereof. Br2 selectivities up to approximately 85 % were obtained and the corresponding bromine mass balance values satisfied. The process is general and may be applied at a laboratory scale for green bromination reactions, or industrially as a cheap, safe, and environmentally sustainable alternative to the currently applied bromine production methods.

  15. Assessment and Applications of NASA Ozone Data Products Derived from Aura OMI-MLS Satellite Measurements in Context of the GMI Chemical Transport Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziemke, J. R.; Olsen, M. A.; Witte, J. C.; Douglass, A. R.; Strahan, S. E.; Wargan, K.; Liu, X.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Yang, K.; Kaplan, T. B.; Pawson, S.; Duncan, B. N.; Newman, P. A.; Bhartia, K.; Heney, M. K.

    2013-01-01

    Measurements from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), both onboard the Aura spacecraft, have been used to produce daily global maps of column and profile ozone since August 2004. Here we compare and evaluate three strategies to obtain daily maps of tropospheric and stratospheric ozone from OMI and MLS measurements: trajectory mapping, direct profile retrieval, and data assimilation. Evaluation is based upon an assessment that includes validation using ozonesondes and comparisons with the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) chemical transport model (CTM). We investigate applications of the three ozone data products from near-decadal and inter-annual timescales to day-to-day case studies. Zonally averaged inter-annual changes in tropospheric ozone from all of the products in any latitude range are of the order 1-2 Dobson Units while changes (increases) over the 8-year Aura record investigated http://eospso.gsfc.nasa.gov/atbd-category/49 vary approximately 2-4 Dobson Units. It is demonstrated that all of the ozone products can measure and monitor exceptional tropospheric ozone events including major forest fire and pollution transport events. Stratospheric ozone during the Aura record has several anomalous inter-annual events including stratospheric warming split events in the Northern Hemisphere extra-tropics that are well captured using the data assimilation ozone profile product. Data assimilation with continuous daily global coverage and vertical ozone profile information is the best of the three strategies at generating a global tropospheric and stratospheric ozone product for science applications.

  16. The Application of TOMS Ozone, Aerosol and UV-B Data to Madagascar Air Quality Determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, A.C.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) data products for the area of Madagascar are presented. In addition to total ozone, aerosols and UV-B tropospheric ozone results are shown from 1979 to the present. Tropospheric ozone over Africa and Madagascar is enhanced by 10 to 15 DU in October. This maximum coincides with the time of maximum biomass area burning in Africa and Madagascar. Ozone observations were made from 1979 to 1999 using the TOMS tropospheric ozone convective cloud differential method. As a result of easterly trade winds, ozone originating on Madagascar is transported to the west over the Mozambique Channel. In El Nino years higher level westerly winds descend to transport low level ozone easterly. This results in African continental ozone being transported east of Madagascar. Long range transport of African ozone is observed during El Nino periods. The potential of TOMS and other space data for use in public education and research on Madagascar air quality is demonstrated.

  17. Process analysis and economics of drinking water production from coastal aquifers containing chromophoric dissolved organic matter and bromide using nanofiltration and ozonation.

    PubMed

    Sobhani, R; McVicker, R; Spangenberg, C; Rosso, D

    2012-01-01

    In regions characterized by water scarcity, such as coastal Southern California, groundwater containing chromophoric dissolved organic matter is a viable source of water supply. In the coastal aquifer of Orange County in California, seawater intrusion driven by coastal groundwater pumping increased the concentration of bromide in extracted groundwater from 0.4 mg l⁻¹ in 2000 to over 0.8 mg l⁻¹ in 2004. Bromide, a precursor to bromate formation is regulated by USEPA and the California Department of Health as a potential carcinogen and therefore must be reduced to a level below 10 μg l⁻¹. This paper compares two processes for treatment of highly coloured groundwater: nanofiltration and ozone injection coupled with biologically activated carbon. The requirement for bromate removal decreased the water production in the ozonation process to compensate for increased maintenance requirements, and required the adoption of catalytic carbon with associated increase in capital and operating costs per unit volume. However, due to the absence of oxidant addition in nanofiltration processes, this process is not affected by bromide. We performed a process analysis and a comparative economic analysis of capital and operating costs for both technologies. Our results show that for the case studied in coastal Southern California, nanofiltration has higher throughput and lower specific capital and operating cost, when compared to ozone injection with biologically activate carbon. Ozone injection with biologically activated carbon, compared to nanofiltration, has 14% higher capital cost and 12% higher operating costs per unit water produced while operating at the initial throughput. Due to reduced ozone concentration required to accommodate for bromate reduction, the ozonation process throughput is reduced and the actual cost increase (per unit water produced) is 68% higher for capital cost and 30% higher for operations.

  18. Approach for detecting mutagenicity of biodegraded and ozonated pharmaceuticals, metabolites and transformation products from a drinking water perspective.

    PubMed

    Gartiser, Stefan; Hafner, Christoph; Kronenberger-Schäfer, Kerstin; Happel, Oliver; Trautwein, Christoph; Kümmerer, Klaus

    2012-09-01

    Many pharmaceuticals and related metabolites are not efficiently removed in sewage treatment plants and enter into surface water. There, they might be subject of drinking water abstraction and treatment by ozonation. In this study, a systematic approach for producing and effect-based testing of transformation products (TPs) during the drinking water ozonation process is proposed. For this, two pharmaceutical parent substances, three metabolites and one environmental degradation product were investigated with respect to their biodegradability and fate during drinking water ozonation. The Ames test (TA98, TA100) was used for the identification of mutagenic activity present in the solutions after testing inherent biodegradability and/or after ozonation of the samples. Suspicious results were complemented with the umu test. Due to the low substrate concentration required for ozonation, all ozonated samples were concentrated via solid phase extraction (SPE) before performing the Ames test. With the exception of piracetam, all substances were only incompletely biodegradable, suggesting the formation of stable TPs. Metformin, piracetam and guanylurea could not be removed completely by the ozonation process. We received some evidence that technical TPs are formed by ozonation of metformin and piracetam, whereas all tested metabolites were not detectable by analytical means after ozonation. In the case of guanylurea, one ozonation TP was identified by LC/MS. None of the experiments showed an increase of mutagenic effects in the Ames test. However, the SPE concentration procedure might lead to false-positive results due to the generation of mutagenic artefacts or might lead to false-negative results by missing adequate recovery efficiency. Thus, these investigations should always be accompanied by process blank controls that are carried out along the whole ozonation and SPE procedure. The study presented here is a first attempt to investigate the significance of

  19. Production of isotopically heavy ozone by ultraviolet light photolysis of O2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thiemens, Mark H.; Jackson, Teresa

    1987-01-01

    Ozone was produced by UV photolysis (157-200 nm) of molecular oxygen. The product ozone is enriched in O-17 and O-18 on a mass-independent basis, similar to the fractionations observed in an electrical discharge. The magnitude of O-18 and O-17 enrichment decreases with decreasing pressure, suggesting the presence of two fractionation mechanisms with differing delta-O-17/delta-O-18 ratios. One of the end members would be mass-independent with delta-O-18 equal to delta-O-17 equal to about 90 percent, which is dominant above about 20 torr. The second process which is significant below about 6 torr produces O3 with delta-O-18 equals about -55 percent, delta-O-17 equals about -27.5, possibly due to isotopic selectivity in diffusion to the reaction systems wall. The delta-O-17 = delta-O-18 isotopic fractionation resembles that observed in stratospheric ozone, though the magnitude of fractionation is a factor of four less.

  20. Chlorinated and nitrogenous disinfection by-product formation from ozonation and post-chlorination of natural organic matter surrogates.

    PubMed

    Bond, Tom; Templeton, Michael R; Rifai, Omar; Ali, Hussain; Graham, Nigel J D

    2014-09-01

    Ozonation before chlorination is associated with enhanced formation of chloropicrin, a halonitromethane disinfection by-product (DBP), during drinking water treatment. In order to elucidate reasons for this, five natural organic matter (NOM) surrogates were treated using both chlorination and ozonation-chlorination under controlled laboratory conditions. Selected surrogates comprised two phenolic compounds, two free amino acids and one dipeptide; these were resorcinol, 3-aminophenol, L-aspartic acid, β-alanine and ala-ala, respectively. Quantified DBPs included chloropicrin, chloroform, dichloroacetonitrile and trichloroacetonitrile. Relative to chlorination alone, increases in the formation of chloropicrin from ozonation-chlorination varied from 138% for 3-aminophenol to 3740% for ala-ala for the four amine surrogates. This indicates that ozone is more effective than chlorine in mediating a rate-limiting oxidation step in chloropicrin formation, most plausibly involving conversion of an amine group to a nitro group. While both hydrophilic and hydrophobic surrogates acted as chloropicrin precursors, ala-ala was the most reactive precursor following ozonation-chlorination. Since peptides are far commoner in drinking water sources than free amino acids, further research into chemical oxidation of these species by ozone and chlorine is recommended. In contrast, oxidation with ozone prior to chlorination reduced chloroform formation moderately for the two phenolic compounds.

  1. Relationship between VOC and NOx emissions and chemical production of tropospheric ozone in the Aburrá Valley (Colombia).

    PubMed

    Toro, María Victoria; Cremades, Lázaro V; Calbó, Josep

    2006-10-01

    Relationship between volatile organic compounds (VOC) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions and the chemical production of tropospheric ozone is studied through mathematical simulation. The study is applied to the Aburrá Valley, in the Colombian Andes, which is a practically unknown area from the point of view of ozone formation. The model used for this application is the European modelling of atmospheric constituents (EUMAC) zooming model (EZM) which consists of a mesoscale prognostic model (MEMO, mesoscale meteorological model) and a chemical reaction model (MUSE, multiscale for the atmospheric dispersion of reactive species), coupled to the chemical mechanism EMEP (European monitoring and evaluation program). The analysis is performed for a real episode that was characterized by high ozone production and that happened during the 23rd and 24th December, 1999 in Medellín (Colombia). From this real scenario, a sensitivity analysis has been carried out in order to assess the influence of VOC and NOx amounts on ozone production and to extract some conclusions for future ozone abatement policies in Andean regions. As far as ozone air quality is concerned, it is shown that in order to keep current levels the emphasis must be put to avoid increasing NOx emissions, or alternatively, to augment VOC emissions in order to have a high VOC/NOx ratio. PMID:16631888

  2. Handbook of ozone technology and applications. Vol. 2. Ozone for drinking water treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, R.G.; Netzer, A.

    1984-01-01

    This volume of the handbook series concerns the application of ozone for the treatment of drinking water. Great emphasis is given ozone's powerful disinfectant and oxidant properties with the added advantage of the non-production of undesirable by-products. European sources have been heavily drawn upon since that is where most of the experience has been. Over one-third of the volume is devoted to a bibliography of some 1600 citations (in addition to 260 as chapter references). Contents: Ozone disinfection of drinking water. Removal of color from drinking water with ozone. Removal of ammonia and other nitrogen derivatives from drinking water with ozone. Raw water preozonation. Recent developments in the treatment of drinking water. Ozone for drinking water treatment - a bibliography. Index.

  3. Ozone-biological activated carbon integrated treatment for removal of precursors of halogenated nitrogenous disinfection by-products.

    PubMed

    Chu, Wenhai; Gao, Naiyun; Yin, Daqiang; Deng, Yang; Templeton, Michael R

    2012-03-01

    Pilot-scale tests were performed to reduce the formation of several nitrogenous and carbonaceous disinfection by-products (DBPs) with an integrated ozone and biological activated carbon (O(3)-BAC) treatment process following conventional water treatment processes (coagulation-sedimentation-filtration). Relative to the conventional processes alone, O(3)-BAC significantly improved the removal of turbidity, dissolved organic carbon, UV(254), NH(4)(+) and dissolved organic nitrogen from 98-99%, 58-72%, 31-53%, 16-93% and 35-74%, respectively, and enhanced the removal efficiency of the precursors for the measured DBPs. The conventional process was almost ineffective in removing the precursors of trichloronitromethane (TCNM) and dichloroacetamide (DCAcAm). Ozonation could not substantially reduce the formation of DCAcAm, and actually increased the formation potential of TCNM; it chemically altered the molecular structures of the precursors and increased the biodegradability of N-containing organic compounds. Consequently, the subsequent BAC filtration substantially reduced the formation of the both TCNM and DCAcAm, thus highlighting a synergistic effect of O(3) and BAC. Additionally, O(3)-BAC was effective at controlling the formation of the total organic halogen, which can be considered as an indicator of the formation of unidentified DBPs.

  4. Transformation products and reaction kinetics of fragrances in advanced wastewater treatment with ozone.

    PubMed

    Janzen, Niklas; Dopp, Elke; Hesse, Julia; Richards, Jessica; Türk, Jochen; Bester, Kai

    2011-11-01

    The reaction of the fragrance compounds 4,6,6,7,8,8-hexamethyl-1,3,4,7-tetrahydrocyclopenta[g]isochromene (HHCB), 1-(3,5,5,6,8,8-hexamethyl-6,7-dihydronaphthalen-2-yl)ethanone (AHTN), 1-tert-butyl-3,5-dimethyl-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (musk xylene/MX), 1-(4-tert-butyl-2,6-dimethyl-3,5-dinitrophenyl)ethanone (musk ketone/MK), and 1-(2,3,8,8-tetramethyl-1,3,4,5,6,7-hexahydronaphthalen-2-yl)ethanone (OTNE) with ozone in tap water as well as waste water treatment plant (WWTP) effluents is described. Several transformation products are characterized by means of gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. One transformation product (HHCB-Lactone) was confirmed by means of a true standard. Musk xylene and musk ketone do not react with ozone under the conditions used in this study. AHTN and HHCB reacted slowly to a multitude of transformation products, while OTNE reacted quickly to several stable transformation products. The reaction constants and half lives are used to predict removal efficiencies for full scale reactors.

  5. Pomino: An Improved Satellite NO2 Product for the Ozone Monitoring Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.; Martin, R.; Boersma, K. F.; Sneep, M.; Stammes, P.; Spurr, R. J. D.; Wang, P.; Van Roozendael, M.; Clemer, K.; Irie, H.

    2014-12-01

    Tropospheric NO2 columns retrieved from satellite instruments are useful to infer NOx pollution, NOx emissions and atmospheric chemistry. Current satellite products are subject to limitations in assumptions of aerosol optical effects, surface reflectance anisotropy, vertical profiles of NO2, and/or cloud optical properties. Here we develop an improved Peking University Ozone Monitoring Instrument NO2 product (POMINO) for China, complementing the popular DONIMO v2 product. POMINO explicitly accounts for aerosol optical effects, angular dependence of surface reflectance, and dynamically varying atmospheric profiles of air pressure, air temperature and NO2 at a high horizontal resolution (50 km). Prior to the NO2 retrieval, we retrieve cloud top pressure and cloud fraction using consistent assumptions about the states of the atmosphere and surface. For our NO2 and cloud retrievals, we adopt from KNMI (via www.temis.nl) the SCDs of tropospheric NO2 (DOMINO v2) and O2-O2 dimer (OMCLDO2 v1.1.1.3), the TOA reflectance, and some other ancillary information. We develop the AMFv6 code for radiative transfer calculation, based on LIDORT v3.6. Radiative transfer is calculated explicitly for each satellite pixel with no need to use a look-up table. The calculation of AMFv6 is parallelized and is sufficiently fast so that one day of retrieval with global coverage would only take about three hours using 16 CPU cores. POMINO is consistent with MAX-DOAS NO2 data in China, with a R2of 0.96 as compared to the value at 0.72 for DOMINO v2. The improved consistency is related to explicit pixel-by-pixel radiative transfer calculation (instead of using a look-up table), consistent treatments of all parameters in retrieving clouds and NO2, explicit consideration of aerosol optical effects (rather than adjusting 'effective' clouds to implicitly account for aerosols), and consideration of surface reflectance anisotropy. Additional analyses are being conducted on the daily, seasonal and

  6. Variability in Ozone in the Tropical Upper Troposphere-Lower Stratosphere from the 1998-2000 SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes) Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, A. M.; Witte, J. C.; McPeters, R. D.; Schmidlin, F. J.; Oltmans, S. J.; Kirchhoff, V. W. J. H.; Coetzee, G. J. R.; Posny, F.; Kawakami, S.; Ogawa, T.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The first view of lower stratospheric and upper tropospheric structure from sondes is provided by a 3-year, 10-site record from the Southern Hemisphere ADditional OZonesondes (SHADOZ) network: . Observations covering 1998-2000 were made over Ascension Island; Nairobi, Kenya; Irene, South Africa; Reunion Island; Watukosek, Java; Fiji; Tahiti; American Samoa; San Cristobal, Galapagos; Natal, Brazil. Taking the UT/LS (upper troposphere- lower stratosphere) as the region between 12 and 17 km, we examine ozone variability in this region on a week-to-week and seasonal basis. The tropopause is lower in September-October-November than in March-April-May, when ozone is a minimum at most SHADOZ stations. A zonal wave-one pattern (referring to ozone mixing ratios greater over the Atlantic and adjacent continents than over the Pacific and eastern Indian Ocean), persists all year. The wave, predominantly in the troposphere and with variable magnitude, appears to be due to general circulation - with subsidence over the Atlantic and frequent deep convection over the Pacific and Indian Ocean. The variability of deep convection most prominent at Java, Fiji, Samoa and Natal - is explored in time-vs-altitude ozone curtains. Stratospheric incursions into the troposphere are most prominent in soundings at Irene and Reunion Island.

  7. Variability in Ozone in the Tropical Upper Troposphere-Lower Stratosphere from the 1998 - 200 SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere ADditional Ozonesondes) Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, A.; Witte, J.; Oltmans, S.; Coetzee, G.; Kawakami, S.; Ogawa, T.

    The first view of lower stratospheric and upper tropospheric structure from sondes is provided by a 3 year, 10-site record from the Southern Hemisphere ADditional- OZonesondes (SHADOZ) network: . Observations covering 1998-2000 were made over Ascension Island; Nairobi, Kenya; Irene, South Africa; Reunion Island; Watukosek, Java; Fiji; Tahiti; American Samoa; San Crist"bal, Galapagos; Natal, Brazil. Taking the UT/LS (upper troposphere-lower stratosphere) as the region between 12 and 17 km, we examine ozone variability in this region on a week- to- week and seasonal basis. The tropopause is lower in September-October-November than in March-April- May, when ozone is a minimum at most SHADOZ stations. A zonal wave-one pattern (referring to ozone mixing ratios greater over the Atlantic and adjacent continents than over the Pacific and eastern Indian Ocean), persists all year. The wave, predominantly in the troposphere and with variable magnitude, appears to be due to general circulation - with subsidence over the Atlantic and frequent deep convection over the Pacific and Indian Ocean. The variability of deep convection - most prominent at Java, Fiji, Samoa and Natal - is explored in time-vs-altitude ozone curtains. Stratospheric incursions into the troposphere are most prominent in soundings at Irene and Reunion Island.

  8. Ozone production in the upper troposphere over West Africa: sensitivity to non-methane hydrocarbons under convective conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechara, Joelle; Borbon, Agnès.; Aumont, Bernard; Jambert, Corinne; Perros, Pascal

    2010-05-01

    Tropical deep convection is an efficient pathway of transporting up to the upper troposphere (UT) trace gas species such as volatile organic compounds (VOC). However, the impact of convective transport on UT composition and chemistry is still poorly characterized. The chemical impact of convection on the tropical UT over West Africa was studied during the AMMA Special Observation Period in August 2006 (SOP 2a2). Experimental strategy consisted in sampling at altitudes between 0 and 12 km downwind of Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCS) and at cloud base on-board the two French aircrafts, the ATR-42 and the French Falcon-20. Previous work pointed out that tropical deep convection in West Africa is efficient and is responsible with fast transport of VOC into the UT even the most reactive (isoprene) in less than one hour (Bechara et al., 2009). Here, we have investigated the impact of VOC precursors on ozone production. For that purpose, box modelling was implemented with the Master Chemical Mechanism scheme to simulate ozone variability in the upper troposphere downwind convection. The model is initialized with observed trace gases concentrations (NMHC, NOx, NOy, CO...) collected during the AMMA SOP 2a2 airborne campaign. Results show a positive ozone production several days downwind convective clouds at an average rate of 4 ppb/day. They confirm that UT ozone production is sensitive to NOx. Surprisingly, the sensitivity of NMHC initial concentrations on ozone production is negative. Indeed, an increase in NMHC favours PAN (peroxyacetyl nitrate) formation and thus decreases ozone production. The implication on ozone budget in the upper troposphere is crucial.

  9. Numerical modelling of ozone production in a wire-cylinder corona discharge and comparison with a wire-plate corona discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pengxiang; Chen, Junhong

    2009-02-01

    The effect of electrode configuration on ozone production in the direct-current corona discharge of dry and humid air is studied by a numerical model that combines the electron distribution in the corona plasma, plasma chemistry and transport phenomena. Two electrode configurations are considered: wire-cylinder discharge with air flowing along the wire axis and wire-plate discharge with air flowing transverse to the wire. The ozone distributions in both types of discharges are compared. For both electrode configurations, the ozone production rate is higher in the negative corona than in the positive corona and it decreases with an increase in relative humidity. More importantly, the detailed ozone distribution in the neighbourhood of the discharge wire, together with the ozone kinetics, reveals the possible difference in the ozone production from the two discharges. With the same operating conditions and sufficiently short flow residence time, the ozone production rate is nearly the same for both electrode configurations. When the flow residence time is longer than the characteristic time for homogeneous ozone destruction, the net ozone production is higher in the wire-cylinder discharge than in the wire-plate discharge due to relatively less ozone destruction.

  10. Sensitivity of model assessments of high-speed civil transport effects on stratospheric ozone resulting from uncertainties in the NO x production from lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyshlyaev, Sergei P.; Geller, Marvin A.; Yudin, Valery A.

    1999-11-01

    Lightning NOx production is one of the most important and most uncertain sources of reactive nitrogen in the atmosphere. To examine the role of NOx lightning production uncertainties in supersonic aircraft assessment studies, we have done a number of numerical calculations with the State University of New York at Stony Brook-Russian State Hydrometeorological Institute of Saint-Petersburg two-dimensional model. The amount of nitrogen oxides produced by lightning discharges was varied within its quoted uncertainty from 2 to 12 Tg N/yr. Different latitudinal, altitudinal, and seasonal distributions of lightning NOx production were considered. Results of these model calculations show that the assessment of supersonic aircraft impacts on the ozone layer is very sensitive to the strength of NOx production from lightning. The high-speed civil transport produced NOx leads to positive column ozone changes for lightning NOx production less than 4 Tg N/yr, and to total ozone decrease for lightning NOx production more than 5 Tg N/yr for the same NOx emission scenario. For large lightning production the ozone response is mostly decreasing with increasing emission index, while for low lightning production the ozone response is mostly increasing with increasing emission index. Uncertainties in the global lightning NOx production strength may lead to uncertainties in column ozone up to 4%. The uncertainties due to neglecting the seasonal variations of the lightning NOx production and its simplified latitude distribution are about 2 times less (1.5-2%). The type of altitude distribution for the lightning NOx production does not significally impact the column ozone, but is very important for the assessment studies of aircraft perturbations of atmospheric ozone. Increased global lightning NOx production causes increased total ozone, but for assessment of the column ozone response to supersonic aircraft emissions, the increase of lightning NOx production leads to column ozone

  11. Pulmonary effects of inhaled limonene ozone reaction products in elderly rats

    SciTech Connect

    Sunil, Vasanthi R. . E-mail: sunilvr@eohsi.rutgers.edu; Laumbach, Robert J.; Patel, Kinal J.; Turpin, Barbara J.; Lim, Ho-Jin; Kipen, Howard M.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2007-07-15

    d-Limonene is an unsaturated volatile organic chemical found in cleaning products, air fresheners and soaps. It is oxidized by ozone to secondary organic aerosols consisting of aldehydes, acids, oxidants and fine and ultra fine particles. The lung irritant effects of these limonene ozone reaction products (LOP) were investigated. Female F344 rats (2- and 18-month-old) were exposed for 3 h to air or LOP formed by reacting 6 ppm d-limonene and 0.8 ppm ozone. BAL fluid, lung tissue and cells were analyzed 0 h and 20 h later. Inhalation of LOP increased TNF-{alpha}, cyclooxygenase-2, and superoxide dismutase in alveolar macrophages (AM) and Type II cells. Responses of older animals were attenuated when compared to younger animals. LOP also decreased p38 MAP kinase in AM from both younger and older animals. In contrast, while LOP increased p44/42 MAP kinase in AM from younger rats, expression decreased in AM and Type II cells from older animals. NF-{kappa}B and C/EBP activity also increased in AM from younger animals following LOP exposure but decreased or was unaffected in Type II cells. Whereas in younger animals LOP caused endothelial cell hypertrophy, perivascular and pleural edema and thickening of alveolar septal walls, in lungs from older animals, patchy accumulation of fluid within septal walls in alveolar sacs and subtle pleural edema were noted. LOP are pulmonary irritants inducing distinct inflammatory responses in younger and older animals. This may contribute to the differential sensitivity of these populations to pulmonary irritants.

  12. Biogas Production on Demand Regulated by Butyric Acid Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, K.; Schiffels, J.; Krafft, S.; Kuperjans, I.; Elbers, G.; Selmer, T.

    2016-03-01

    Investigating effects of volatile fatty acids on the biogas process it was observed that butyric acid can be used for transient stimulation of the methane production in biogas plants operating with low energy substrates like cattle manure. Upon addition of butyrate the methane output of the reactors doubled within 24 h and reached almost 3-times higher methane yields within 3-4 days. Butyrate was quantitatively eliminated and the reactors returned to the original productivity state within 3 days when application of butyrate was stopped. The opportunity to use butyrate feeding for increased biogas production on demand is discussed.

  13. The effects of tropospheric ozone on net primary productivity and implications for climate change.

    PubMed

    Ainsworth, Elizabeth A; Yendrek, Craig R; Sitch, Stephen; Collins, William J; Emberson, Lisa D

    2012-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone (O(3)) is a global air pollutant that causes billions of dollars in lost plant productivity annually. It is an important anthropogenic greenhouse gas, and as a secondary air pollutant, it is present at high concentrations in rural areas far from industrial sources. It also reduces plant productivity by entering leaves through the stomata, generating other reactive oxygen species and causing oxidative stress, which in turn decreases photosynthesis, plant growth, and biomass accumulation. The deposition of O(3) into vegetation through stomata is an important sink for tropospheric O(3), but this sink is modified by other aspects of environmental change, including rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations, rising temperature, altered precipitation, and nitrogen availability. We review the atmospheric chemistry governing tropospheric O(3) mass balance, the effects of O(3) on stomatal conductance and net primary productivity, and implications for agriculture, carbon sequestration, and climate change.

  14. Ozone Production in the Southern San Joaquin Valley: A NOx Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusede, S. E.; Wooldridge, P. J.; Browne, E. C.; Rollins, A. W.; Min, K.; Cohen, R. C.; Baier, B. C.; Beaver, M. R.; Boyle, E.; Brune, W. H.; Digangi, J. P.; Gentner, D. R.; Goldstein, A. H.; Keutsch, F.; Ren, X.; Sanders, J.; St Clair, J. M.; Thomas, J.; Weber, R.; Wennberg, P. O.; Zhang, L.

    2010-12-01

    We present measurements of NO2, total alkyl nitrates (ΣANs), and HNO3 by thermal dissociation-laser induced fluorescence (TD-LIF) and NO by chemiluminescence made as part of CalNex-2010 at the San Joaquin Valley supersite in Bakersfield, California (May 15-June 28). We discuss these nitrogen oxide observations in the context of co-located OH, HO2, HONO, H2CO, H2O2, VOC, and O3 measurements, examining the instantaneous ozone production rate (PO3) as a function of NO concentration and HOx production rate. Furthermore, using the slope of the Ox/ΣANs correlation, we report the lowest ever observed urban ΣANs branching ratio (1.5-2%). We test our understanding of this chemistry with a photochemical model, evaluating the implications of suppressed alkyl nitrate formation on O3 production.

  15. Ozone, Tropospheric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Jack

    1995-01-01

    In the early part of the 20th century, ground-based and balloon-borne measurements discovered that most of atmosphere's ozone is located in the stratosphere with highest concentrations located between 15 and 30 km (9,3 and 18.6 miles). For a long time, it was believed that tropospheric ozone originated from the stratosphere and that most of it was destroyed by contact with the earth's surface. Ozone, O3, was known to be produced by the photo-dissociation of molecular oxygen, O2, a process that can only occur at wavelengths shorter than 242 nm. Because such short-wave-length radiation is present only in the stratosphere, no tropospheric ozone production is possible by this mechanism. In the 1940s, however, it became obvious that production of ozone was also taking place in the troposphere. The overall reaction mechanism was eventually identified by Arie Haagen-Smit of the California Institute of Technology, in highly polluted southern California. The copious emissions from the numerous cars driven there as a result of the mass migration to Los Angeles after World War 2 created the new unpleasant phenomenon of photochemical smog, the primary component of which is ozone. These high levels of ozone were injuring vegetable crops, causing women's nylons to run, and generating increasing respiratory and eye-irritation problems for the populace. Our knowledge of tropospheric ozone increased dramatically in the early 1950s as monitoring stations and search centers were established throughout southern California to see what could be done to combat this threat to human health and the environment.

  16. 30 CFR 250.803 - Additional production system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... reference as specified in 30 CFR 250.198). (b) Design, installation, and operation of additional production... operating pressure ranges of pressure vessels at any time when there is a change in operating pressures that... any time when there is a significant change in operating pressures. The most recent...

  17. 30 CFR 250.803 - Additional production system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR 250.198). (b) Design, installation, and operation of additional production systems—(1) Pressure... ranges of pressure vessels at any time when there is a change in operating pressures that requires new... significant change in operating pressures. The most recent pressure-recorder charts used to...

  18. Effect of ozonolysis pretreatment parameters on the sugar release, ozone consumption and ethanol production from sugarcane bagasse.

    PubMed

    Travaini, Rodolfo; Barrado, Enrique; Bolado-Rodríguez, Silvia

    2016-08-01

    A L9(3)(4) orthogonal array (OA) experimental design was applied to study the four parameters considered most important in the ozonolysis pretreatment (moisture content, ozone concentration, ozone/oxygen flow and particle size) on ethanol production from sugarcane bagasse (SCB). Statistical analysis highlighted ozone concentration as the highest influence parameter on reaction time and sugars release after enzymatic hydrolysis. The increase on reaction time when decreasing the ozone/oxygen flow resulted in small differences of ozone consumptions. Design optimization for sugars release provided a parameters combination close to the best experimental run, where 77.55% and 56.95% of glucose and xylose yields were obtained, respectively. When optimizing the grams of sugar released by gram of ozone, the highest influence parameter was moisture content, with a maximum yield of 2.98gSUGARS/gO3. In experiments on hydrolysates fermentation, Saccharomyces cerevisiae provided ethanol yields around 80%, while Pichia stipitis was completely inhibited. PMID:27132222

  19. Effects of ozone on net primary production and carbon sequestration in the conterminous United States using a biogeochemistry model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felzer, B.; Kicklighter, D.; Melillo, J.; Wang, C.; Zhuang, Q.; Prinn, R.

    2004-07-01

    The effects of air pollution on vegetation may provide an important control on the carbon cycle that has not yet been widely considered. Prolonged exposure to high levels of ozone, in particular, has been observed to inhibit photosynthesis by direct cellular damage within the leaves and through possible changes in stomatal conductance. We have incorporated empirical equations derived for trees (hardwoods and pines) and crops into the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model to explore the effects of ozone on net primary production (NPP) and carbon sequestration across the conterminous United States. Our results show a 2.6 6.8% mean reduction for the United States in annual NPP in response to modelled historical ozone levels during the late 1980s-early 1990s. The largest decreases (over 13% in some locations) occur in the Midwest agricultural lands, during the mid-summer when ozone levels are highest. Carbon sequestration since the 1950s has been reduced by 18 38 Tg C yr-1 with the presence of ozone. Thus the effects of ozone on NPP and carbon sequestration should be factored into future calculations of the United States' carbon budget.

  20. GC/MS IDENTIFICATION OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS FROM MILWAUKEE'S NEW OZONATION PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Milwaukee Water Works recently added ozonation disinfection facilities to their municipal drinking water treatment. Coupling ozone treatment with biologically active filtration (BAF) was seen as a logical step to enhance multiple water quality objectives (an effective barrier...

  1. Laboratory Experiments on the Electrochemical Remediation of the Environment. Part 7: Microscale Production of Ozone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibanez, Jorge G.; Mayen-Mondragon, Rodrigo; Moran-Moran, M. T.; Alatorre-Ordaz, Alejandro; Mattson, Bruce; Eskestrand, Scot

    2005-01-01

    Ozone is a powerful oxidant and disinfectant, which can be used to clean environment as well as obtain pure drinking water. A series of experiments to produce and test ozone with simple equipment and material are presented.

  2. Production of mono- and di-carboxylated polyethylene glycols as a factor obstacle to the successful ozonation-assisted biodegradation of ethoxylated compounds.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Satoshi; Okuda, Tetsuji; Nishijima, Wataru; Okada, Mitsumasa

    2015-10-01

    Ozonation is believed to improve the biodegradability of organic compounds. In the present study, degradation of nonylphenol ethoxylates (NPEOs) was monitored in hybrid treatment systems consisting of ozonation and microbial degradation processes. We found that ozonation of NPEOs decreased, rather than increased, the biodegradability under certain conditions. The timing of ozonation was a definitive factor in determining whether ozonation increased or decreased the biodegradation rates of NPEOs. Initial ozonation of NPEOs prior to biodegradation reduced the rate of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal during the subsequent 14 d of biodegradation, whereas intermediate ozonation at the 9th day of biodegradation improved subsequent DOC removal during 14 d of NPEO biodegradation. Furthermore, reduction of DOC removal was also observed, when initial ozonation prior to biodegradation was subjected to cetyl alcohol ethoxylates. The production of less biodegradable intermediates, such as mono- and dicarboxylated polyethylene glycols (MCPEGs and DCPEGs), was responsible for the negative effect of ozonation on biodegradability of NPEOs. DCPEGs and MCPEGs were produced by biodegradation of polyethylene glycols (PEGs) that were ozonolysis products of the NPEOs, and the biodegradability of DCPEGs and MCPEGs was less than that of the precursor PEGs. The results indicate that, if the target chemicals contain ethoxy chains, production of PEGs may be one of the important factors when ozonation is considered.

  3. Numerical modeling of ozone production in a pulsed homogeneous discharge: A parameter study

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, J.O.; Eninger, J.E.

    1997-02-01

    The pulsed volume discharge is an alternative for the efficient generation of ozone in compact systems. This paper presents a parameter study of the reactions in this kind of homogeneous discharge by using a numerical model which solves plasma chemical kinetic rate and energy equations. Results are presented of ozone generation efficiency versus ozone concentration for different parameter combinations. Two parameter regimes are identified and analyzed. In the plasma phase ozone formation regime, where significant amounts of ozone are produced during the discharge pulse, it is found that higher ozone concentrations can be obtained than in the neutral phase ozone formation regime, where most of the ozone is formed after the discharge pulse. In the two-step ozone formation process, the rate of conversion of atomic oxygen plays a key role. In both regimes the ozone generation efficiency increases as n is increased or T{sub 0} decreased. The maximum concentration is 3% at 10 amagat and 100 K. The results on ozone accumulation in multiple pulse discharges are presented. In contrast to the single pulse case, higher efficiency is achieved at lower gas density. This scaling can be explained by losses due to ion currents. A tradeoff can be made between ozone generation efficiency and the number of pulses required to reach a certain concentration.

  4. Production of the Criegee ozonide during the ozonation of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes.

    PubMed

    Squadrito, G L; Uppu, R M; Cueto, R; Pryor, W A

    1992-12-01

    It is likely that Criegee ozonides are formed in small amounts in the lungs of animals breathing ozone-containing air. This makes these compounds potential candidates to act as secondary toxins which relay the toxic effects of ozone deeper into lung tissue than ozone itself could penetrate. Therefore, we have determined the yields of Criegee ozonides from unsaturated lipids in liposomal systems as a model of the types of yields of Criegee ozonides that might be expected both in the lung lining fluid layer and in biological membranes. Ozonation of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes produced both cis- and trans-Criegee ozonides. These ozonides have been isolated by solid phase extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography of the ozonized lipid, and the products have been identified by two-dimensional 1H nuclear magnetic resonance. The combined yield of the cis- and trans-Criegee ozonides is 10.7 +/- 2.8% (avg. +/- SD, n = 7) with small unilamellar liposomes and 10.6 +/- 2.7% (n = 3) with large multilamellar liposomes. We had previously reported (Chem. Res. Toxicol. 5, 505-511, 1992) that ozonation of methyl oleate in sodium dodecylsulfate micelles also produces an 11% yield of the Criegee ozonides. Thus, ozonation in a variety of models gives about 11% of the Criegee ozonide, suggesting that these products also would be formed in small but significant amounts in the lungs of animals breathing polluted air. Further research on the pharmacokinetics and possible toxicity of the Criegee ozonides of fatty acids is suggested.

  5. Surface recombination of oxygen atoms in O2 plasma at increased pressure: II. Vibrational temperature and surface production of ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopaev, D. V.; Malykhin, E. M.; Zyryanov, S. M.

    2011-01-01

    Ozone production in an oxygen glow discharge in a quartz tube was studied in the pressure range of 10-50 Torr. The O3 density distribution along the tube diameter was measured by UV absorption spectroscopy, and ozone vibrational temperature TV was found comparing the calculated ab initio absorption spectra with the experimental ones. It has been shown that the O3 production mainly occurs on a tube surface whereas ozone is lost in the tube centre where in contrast the electron and oxygen atom densities are maximal. Two models were used to analyse the obtained results. The first one is a kinetic 1D model for the processes occurring near the tube walls with the participation of the main particles: O(3P), O2, O2(1Δg) and O3 molecules in different vibrational states. The agreement of O3 and O(3P) density profiles and TV calculated in the model with observed ones was reached by varying the single model parameter—ozone production probability (\\gamma_{O_{3}}) on the quartz tube surface on the assumption that O3 production occurs mainly in the surface recombination of physisorbed O(3P) and O2. The phenomenological model of the surface processes with the participation of oxygen atoms and molecules including singlet oxygen molecules was also considered to analyse \\gamma_{O_{3}} data obtained in the kinetic model. A good agreement between the experimental data and the data of both models—the kinetic 1D model and the phenomenological surface model—was obtained in the full range of the studied conditions that allowed consideration of the ozone surface production mechanism in more detail. The important role of singlet oxygen in ozone surface production was shown. The O3 surface production rate directly depends on the density of physisorbed oxygen atoms and molecules and can be high with increasing pressure and energy inputted into plasma while simultaneously keeping the surface temperature low enough. Using the special discharge cell design, such an approach opens up the

  6. Ambient volatile organic compounds and their effect on ozone production in Wuhan, central China.

    PubMed

    Lyu, X P; Chen, N; Guo, H; Zhang, W H; Wang, N; Wang, Y; Liu, M

    2016-01-15

    Ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were continuously measured from February 2013 to October 2014 at an urban site in Wuhan. The characteristics and sources of VOCs and their effect on ozone (O3) formation were studied for the first time. The total VOC levels in Wuhan were relatively low, and of all VOCs, ethane (5.2 ± 0.2 ppbv) was the species with the highest levels. Six sources, i.e., vehicular exhausts, coal burning, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) usage, the petrochemical industry, solvent usage in dry cleaning/degreasing, and solvent usage in coating/paints were identified, and their contributions to the total VOCs were 27.8 ± 0.9%, 21.8 ± 0.8%, 19.8 ± 0.9%, 14.4 ± 0.9%, 8.5 ± 0.5%, and 7.7 ± 0.4%, respectively. Model simulation of a photochemical box model incorporating the Master Chemical Mechanism (PBM-MCM) indicated that the contribution to O3 formation of the above sources was 23.4 ± 1.3%, 22.2 ± 1.2%, 23.1 ± 1.7%, 11.8 ± 0.9%, 5.2 ± 0.4%, and 14.2 ± 1.1%, respectively. LPG and solvent usage in coating/paints were the sources that showed higher contributions to O3 formation, compared to their contributions to VOCs. The relative incremental reactivity (RIR) analysis revealed that the O3 formation in Wuhan was generally VOC-limited, and ethene and toluene were the primary species contributing to O3 production, accounting for 34.3% and 31.5% of the total RIR-weighted concentration, respectively. In addition, the contribution of CO to the O3 formation was remarkable. The C4 alkanes and alkenes from the LPG usage also significantly contributed to the O3 formation. The results can assist local governments in formulating and implementing control strategies for photochemical pollution.

  7. 40 CFR Appendix H to Subpart A of... - Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 Phaseout Schedule for Production of Ozone-Depleting Substances

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 Phaseout Schedule for Production of Ozone-Depleting Substances H Appendix H to Subpart A of Part 82... STRATOSPHERIC OZONE Production and Consumption Controls Pt. 82, Subpt. A, App. H Appendix H to Subpart A of...

  8. Effect of salts addition on hydrogen production by C. acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Alshiyab, H; Kalil, M S; Hamid, A A; Wan Yusoff, W M

    2008-09-15

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of salts addition to fermentation medium on hydrogen production, under anaerobic batch culture system. In this study, batch experiments were conducted to investigate the inhibitory effect of both NaCl and sodium acetate on hydrogen production. The optimum pH and temperature for hydrogen production were at initial pH of 7.0 and 30 degrees C. Enhanced production of hydrogen, using glucose as substrate was achieved. In the absence of Sodium Chloride and Sodium Acetate enhanced hydrogen yield (Y(P/S)) from 350 mL g(-1) glucose utilized to 391 mL g(-1) glucose utilized with maximum hydrogen productivity of 77.5 ml/L/h. Results also show that sodium chloride and sodium acetate in the medium adversely affect growth. Hydrogen yield per biomass (Y(P/X)) of 254 ml/L/g, biomass per substrate utilized (Y(X/S)) of 0.268 and (Y(H2/S) of 0.0349. The results suggested that Sodium at any concentration resulted to inhibit the bacterial productivity of hydrogen.

  9. 16 CFR 260.11 - Ozone-safe and ozone-friendly claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... friendly to, the ozone layer or the atmosphere. Example 1: A product is labeled “ozone-friendly.” The claim... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ozone-safe and ozone-friendly claims. 260.11... THE USE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MARKETING CLAIMS § 260.11 Ozone-safe and ozone-friendly claims. It...

  10. 16 CFR 260.11 - Ozone-safe and ozone-friendly claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... friendly to, the ozone layer or the atmosphere. Example 1: A product is labeled “ozone-friendly.” The claim... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ozone-safe and ozone-friendly claims. 260.11... THE USE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MARKETING CLAIMS § 260.11 Ozone-safe and ozone-friendly claims. It...

  11. Ozone Oxidation of Monoterpenes, Sesquiterpenes, and Oxygenated Terpenes: Product Yields and Relevance to Field Observations and Atmospheric Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, A.; Goldstein, A. H.; Keywood, M.; Varutbangkul, V.; Bahreini, R.; Gao, S.; Flagan, R.; Seinfeld, J.

    2003-12-01

    Measurements conducted in a ponderosa pine plantation in the Sierra Nevada, CA have shown that the reaction of ozone with gas-phase compounds dominates summertime ozone deposition to the ecosystem, with an exponential dependence on temperature that is similar to monoterpene emissions. Monoterpene fluxes measured above the forest canopy represent the monoterpenes that have effectively "escaped" the canopy, whereas measurements of ozone deposition due to chemistry provide an estimate of the compounds "missing" from the ecosystem scale flux due to within-canopy reactions with ozone. To be lost within the canopy, these "missing" compounds must have short lifetimes, on the order of a few minutes, compared to those that escape. Longer-lived, less reactive terpenes are widely measured, and are typically the compounds included in global inventories to assess impacts of biogenic emissions on tropospheric ozone production and secondary organic aerosol formation. The shorter-lived, highly reactive terpenes, however, are more difficult to observe and rarely measured, and thus the impacts of these compounds are likely inadequately represented. To better characterize the ozone-initiated oxidation of a range of terpenes, including those that escape the forest canopy and those oxidized within the canopy, we conducted laboratory measurements at the Caltech Indoor Chamber Facility to characterize the gas and particle phase yields from terpene + ozone reactions. These measurements were made to provide a guide to the oxidation products we expect to observe within a forest canopy, and to expand the knowledge of the impacts of these terpenes (both "missing" and "escaped") on atmospheric chemistry. The terpenes studied included several monoterpenes: α - and β -pinene, α -terpinene, terpinolene, myrcene, and 3-carene, two sesquiterpenes: β -caryophyllene and α -humulene, and two oxygenated terpenes: linalool and methyl chavicol, many of which have been observed at our field site. The

  12. Exploring the Production of NOx by Lightning and Its Impact on Tropospheric Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillani, Noor; Koshak, William; Biazar, Arastoo; Doty, Kevin; Mahon, Robert; Newchurch, Michael; Byun, Daewon; Emmons, Louisa

    2006-01-01

    Our quantitative understanding of free tropospheric (FT) chemistry is quite poor. State-of-the-art regional air quality models (e.g., US EPA's CMAQ) perform very poorly in simulating FT chemistry, with Uniform ozone around 70 ppb throughout the FT in summer, while ozonesonde data show much higher levels of ozone and much spatial-temporal structure. Such models completely neglect lightning-NOx (LNOx) emissions (the most significant source of NOx in the FT), and also contain large uncertainties in the specifications of intercontinental transport, stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE) and PBLFT exchange (PFTE). Global air chemistry models include LNOx, but in very crude fashion, with the frequency and distribution of lightning being based on modeled cloud parameters (hence large uncertainty), lightning energetics being assumed to be constant for all flashes (literature value, while in reality there is at least a two-orders of magnitude variability from flash-to-flash), and the production of NOx in the surrounding heated air, per Joule of heating, being assumed to be constant also (literature value, while in fact it is a non-linear function of the dissipated heat and local air density, p). This situation is commonly blamed on paucity of pertinent observational data, but for the USA, there is now a wealth of surface- and satellite-based data of lightning available to permit much improved observation-based estimation of LNOx emissions. In the FT, such NOx has a long residence time, and also the ozone production efficiency from NOx there is considerably higher than in the PBL. It is, therefore, of critical importance in FT chemistry. This paper will describe the approach and data products of an ongoing NSSTC project aimed at a much-improved quantification of not only LNOx production on the scale of continental USA based on local and regional lightning observations, but also of intercontinental transport, STE and PFTE, all in upgraded simulations of tropospheric

  13. AGA; U. S. gas reserve additions lag production

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-04

    The American Gas Association estimates 1991 U.S. natural gas reserve additions were only 65-79% of production, compared with a 96% average for 1981-90. AGA found that 75% of 1991 reserve additions occurred as discoveries and field extensions, and only 25% came from revisions of estimates. Total reserve additions may range from 11.1 tcf to 13.4 tcf. The 30 largest gas reserves holders sold more than 1.1 tcf of reserves to other firms. The top 30 companies had reserve additions of 5.754 tcf, down 3.541 tcf from a year earlier. Total gas reserves held by the top 30 dropped by 3.757 tcf. The 30 companies produced 8.417 tcf in 1991, compared with 8.352 tcf in 1989. This paper reports that AGA compiles the reserve addition estimates from data the 30 largest gas companies file with the Securities and exchange Commission, supplemented with data from gas pipelines holding large reserves.

  14. THE GAS PHASE REACTION OF OZONE WITH 1,3-BUTADIENE: FORMATION YIELDS OF SOME TOXIC PRODUCTS. (R826236)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The formation yields of acrolein, 1,2-epoxy-3-butene and OH radicals have been measured from reaction of ozone with 1,3-butadiene at room temperature and atmosphere pressure. 1,3,5-Trimethyl benzene was added to scavenge OH radicals in measurements of product yields. In separa...

  15. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  16. Reaction of α-cedrene with ozone: mechanism, gas and particulate products distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaoui, M.; Sexton, K. G.; Kamens, R. M.

    The gas-phase reaction of ozone with α-cedrene ( I) in the absence and presence of an OH radical scavenger (cyclohexane) has been studied in the outdoor 25 m 3 Teflon film chambers at the UNC smog chamber facility. Twenty-two compounds were identified for the first time in this study. Important products identified and semi-quantified were α-cedronaldehyde ( VI), α-cedronic acid ( VIII), α-cedrinic acid ( X), α-norcedronaldehyde ( VII), 8-hydroxy-9-α-cedranone ( III), and α-norcedronic acid ( IX). Acetone, formaldehyde, and acetaldehyde also were identified in this study. On average, measured gas and particle phase products accounted for ˜56% of the reacted α-cedrene. The total yield of products bearing hydroxy groups (e.g. 8-hydroxy-9-α-cedranone ( III)) and aldehydes (e.g. α-cedronaldehyde ( VI), α-norcedronaldehyde ( VII)) was found to be slightly dependent on the presence of an OH radical scavenger. Generally, the aldehyde yield was found to be higher when cyclohexane was present, and the hydroxy compounds yield was higher when cyclohexane was absent. All products identified in this study were found in the particle phase. α-Cedrinic acid ( X), α-cedronic acid ( VIII), and α-cedronaldehyde (VI) were observed in the early stage in the aerosol phase and may play an important role in the early formation of SOA. Detailed reaction schemes leading to most reaction products observed here are presented and discussed.

  17. O(D-1) production in ozone photolysis near 310 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C.; Demore, W. B.

    1973-01-01

    Relative quantum yields of O(D-1)production, phi, in ozone photolysis from 275 nm to 334 nm were determined in the gas phase at 233 K. The O(D-1) was monitored by means of its reaction with isobutane to form isobutyl alcohol. The light source was a high pressure mercury lamp combined with a monochromator, with a bandwidth of 1.6 nm. The results show a constant phi below 300 nm, which is taken as unity on the basis of previous work. There is a very sharp fall-off in phi which is centered at 308 nm. At 313 nm phi is not greater than 0.1.

  18. A quantum yield determination of O/1D/ production from ozone via laser flash photolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philen, D. L.; Davis, D. D.; Watson, R. T.

    1977-01-01

    The quantum yield of electronically excited atomic oxygen produced from ozone photolysis was measured at 298 K from wavelengths of 293.0 to 316.5 nm. The reaction of the atomic oxygen with N2O to form excited NO2 was used to monitor the O production; a frequency-doubled flashlamp-pumped dye laser which provided tunable ultraviolet in the desired spectral region with 0.1-nm linewidth served as the photolysis source. The atomic oxygen quantum yield was found to be constant below 300 nm, with a sharp decrease centered at 308 nm and a diminution to less than one tenth of the constant value by 313.5 nm.

  19. Indicators of photochemistry in DISCOVER-AQ observations: Implications for diagnosing ozone production and photochemical intensity from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, J. H.; Olson, J. R.; Chen, G.; Kleb, M. M.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Knapp, D. J.; Montzka, D.; Fried, A.; Walega, J.; Diskin, G. S.; Sachse, G. W.; Wisthaler, A.; Mikoviny, T.; Barrick, J. D.; Janz, S. J.; Kowalewski, M. G.; Yang, M. M.; Pickering, K. E.

    2013-12-01

    The DISCOVER-AQ series of field studies aims to collect observations that will improve the ability of satellites to diagnose surface air quality. A related goal is to evaluate and optimize future observing strategies combining ground-based and satellite observations. To date, detailed repetitive observations of atmospheric composition in the lower atmosphere have been collected over three locations: the Baltimore-Washington corridor, the southern San Joaquin Valley, and Houston. These observations include remotely-sensed column abundances as well as detailed in situ chemical soundings of ozone and its precursors in the lowest 3 km. Satellite observations are limited to a few key constituents controlling ozone production, e.g., ozone, NO2, and CH2O. If available, space-based observations of CO, CO2, and CH4 may also be useful for understanding the relative importance of anthropogenic and biogenic hydrocarbons. An analysis of cross-correlations between observations of ozone, NO2, and formaldehyde columns along with photochemical modeling of the more detailed DISCOVER-AQ observations is presented to determine what behaviors are likely to be detectable from space and how they might be used to diagnose how photochemical transformation and transport of emissions influence local air quality related to ozone.

  20. Use of ethylenediurea to detect effects of ambient ozone on biomass production by clover cultivars

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, W.; Johnson, M.; Frenkel, M.

    1995-12-31

    Ozone-tolerant (NCR) and ozone-sensitive (NCS) clonal plants of ladino white clover (Trifolium repens) were grown in 15-liter pots filled with a peat/perlite artificial growing medium during the 1994 and 1995 growing seasons. All plants were exposed to ambient concentrations of ozone. Beginning the first day plants were in the field, and continuing at 7-day intervals until final harvests, each plant was sprayed with 300 ppm ethylenediurea (EDU). Foliar biomass harvests were made at 28-day intervals and dry weights of leaves/stems determined. Biomass weights for NCR were unaffected by EDU. EDU ameliorated the effects of ambient ozone on NCR plants, allowing detection of the effects of ozone on an ozone-sensitive clone of white clover.

  1. Smog control fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Lundby, W.

    1993-06-29

    A method is described of controlling, reducing or eliminating, ozone and related smog resulting from photochemical reactions between ozone and automotive or industrial gases comprising the addition of iodine or compounds of iodine to hydrocarbon-base fuels prior to or during combustion in an amount of about 1 part iodine per 240 to 10,000,000 parts fuel, by weight, to be accomplished by: (a) the addition of these inhibitors during or after the refining or manufacturing process of liquid fuels; (b) the production of these inhibitors for addition into fuel tanks, such as automotive or industrial tanks; or (c) the addition of these inhibitors into combustion chambers of equipment utilizing solid fuels for the purpose of reducing ozone.

  2. Plant resistance mechanisms to air pollutants: rhythms in ascorbic acid production during growth under ozone stress

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.H. )

    1991-01-01

    Relationships between ozone (O3) tolerance and leaf ascorbic acid concentrations in O3-susceptible (O3-S) 'Hark' and O3-resistant (O3-R) 'Hood' soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merr., cultivars were examined with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Leaf samples were analyzed at 4 intervals during a 24 h period. Soybean cultivars grown in the greenhouse with charcoal filtered (CF) and nonfiltered (NF) air showed daily oscillations in ascorbic acid production. Highest ascorbic acid levels in leaves during light coincided with highest concentrations of photochemical oxidants in the atmosphere at 2:00 p.m. The resistant genotype produced more ascorbic acid in its trifoliate leaves than did the corresponding susceptible genotype. Under CF air (an O3-reduced environment) O3-S and O3-R cultivars showed rhythms in ascorbic acid production. In NF air (an O3 stress environment) the O3-R cultivar alone showed rhythms in ascorbic acid production. Results indicated that superior O3 tolerance in the Hood soybean cultivar (compared with Hark) was associated with a greater increase in endogenous levels of ascorbic acid. Ascorbic acid may scavenge free radicals and thereby protect cells from injury by O3 or other oxyradical products. Plants defend themselves against photochemical oxidant stress, such as O3, by several mechanisms. Experimental evidence indicates that antioxidant defense systems existing in plant tissues may function to protect cellular components from deleterious effects of photochemical oxidants through endogenous and exogenous controls.

  3. Production scheduling with discrete and renewable additional resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinowski, K.; Grabowik, C.; Paprocka, I.; Kempa, W.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper an approach to planning of additional resources when scheduling operations are discussed. The considered resources are assumed to be discrete and renewable. In most research in scheduling domain, the basic and often the only type of regarded resources is a workstation. It can be understood as a machine, a device or even as a separated space on the shop floor. In many cases, during the detailed scheduling of operations the need of using more than one resource, required for its implementation, can be indicated. Resource requirements for an operation may relate to different resources or resources of the same type. Additional resources are most often referred to these human resources, tools or equipment, for which the limited availability in the manufacturing system may have an influence on the execution dates of some operations. In the paper the concept of the division into basic and additional resources and their planning method was shown. A situation in which sets of basic and additional resources are not separable - the same additional resource may be a basic resource for another operation is also considered. Scheduling of operations, including greater amount of resources can cause many difficulties, depending on whether the resource is involved in the entire time of operation, only in the selected part(s) of operation (e.g. as auxiliary staff at setup time) or cyclic - e.g. when an operator supports more than one machine, or supervises the execution of several operations. For this reason the dates and work times of resources participation in the operation can be different. Presented issues are crucial when modelling of production scheduling environment and designing of structures for the purpose of scheduling software development.

  4. EFFECT OF RAPID SHALLOW BREATHING ON THE DISTRIBUTION OF 18-O-LABELED OZONE REACTION PRODUCT IN THE RESPIRATORY TRACT OF THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the effect of breathing pattern on ozone reaction product content within the respiratory tract. Thirty-four anesthetized, maleWistar rats were exposed to oxygen-18 (18O)-labeled ozone at 1.0 ppm for 2 h using a dual-chamber, negative-pressure ventilation system. Fre...

  5. OZONE PRODUCTION EFFICIENCY AND NOX DEPLETION IN AN URBAN PLUME: INTERPRETATION OF FIELD OBSERVATIONS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR EVALUATING O3-NOX-VOC SENSITIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone production efficiency (OPE) can be defined as the number of ozone (O3) molecules photochemically produced by a molecule of NOx (NO + NO2) before it is lost from the NOx - O3 cycle. Here, we consider observational and modeling techniques to evaluate various operational defi...

  6. Chemical composition of gas-phase organic carbon emissions from motor vehicles and implications for ozone production.

    PubMed

    Gentner, Drew R; Worton, David R; Isaacman, Gabriel; Davis, Laura C; Dallmann, Timothy R; Wood, Ezra C; Herndon, Scott C; Goldstein, Allen H; Harley, Robert A

    2013-10-15

    Motor vehicles are major sources of gas-phase organic carbon, which includes volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and other compounds with lower vapor pressures. These emissions react in the atmosphere, leading to the formation of ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA). With more chemical detail than previous studies, we report emission factors for over 230 compounds from gasoline and diesel vehicles via two methods. First we use speciated measurements of exhaust emissions from on-road vehicles in summer 2010. Second, we use a fuel composition-based approach to quantify uncombusted fuel components in exhaust using the emission factor for total uncombusted fuel in exhaust together with detailed chemical characterization of liquid fuel samples. There is good agreement between the two methods except for products of incomplete combustion, which are not present in uncombusted fuels and comprise 32 ± 2% of gasoline exhaust and 26 ± 1% of diesel exhaust by mass. We calculate and compare ozone production potentials of diesel exhaust, gasoline exhaust, and nontailpipe gasoline emissions. Per mass emitted, the gas-phase organic compounds in gasoline exhaust have the largest potential impact on ozone production with over half of the ozone formation due to products of incomplete combustion (e.g., alkenes and oxygenated VOCs). When combined with data on gasoline and diesel fuel sales in the U.S., these results indicate that gasoline sources are responsible for 69-96% of emissions and 79-97% of the ozone formation potential from gas-phase organic carbon emitted by motor vehicles.

  7. The unique OMI HCHO/NO 2 feature during the 2008 Beijing Olympics: Implications for ozone production sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witte, J. C.; Duncan, B. N.; Douglass, A. R.; Kurosu, T. P.; Chance, K.; Retscher, C.

    2011-06-01

    In preparation of the Beijing Summer Olympic and Paralympics Games, strict emission control measures (ECMs) were imposed between July and September 2008 on motor vehicle traffic and industrial emissions to improve air quality. We estimated changes in the chemical sensitivity of ozone production to these ECMs using Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) column measurements of formaldehyde (HCHO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO 2), where their ratio serves as a proxy for the sensitivity. During the ECMs, OMI NO 2 significantly decreased, subsequently increasing the HCHO/NO 2. For the first half of the ECM time period, the ratios maintained values greater than two indicating that ozone production became primarily NO x-limited. In contrast, ozone production was predominantly volatile organic compound (VOC)-limited or mixed VOC-NO x-limited during the same period in the preceding three years. After the ECMs were lifted, NO 2 and HCHO/NO 2 returned to their previous values. The 2005-2008 OMI record shows that this transition to a predominantly NO x-limited regime during the ECMs was unique. Meteorological factors likely explain the variability in HCHO/NO 2, particularly the transition to a mixed NO x-VOC-limitation in mid-August during the Olympics, where ozone production became sensitive to both NO x and VOCs until the end of the ECMs. The mixed VOC-NO x-limited regime observed during the Paralympics is also unique because previous years show that Beijing in September is predominantly VOC-limited. Beijing's large-scale tree-planting program was expected to increase levels of biogenic VOCs, but this is not supported by OMI HCHO data. However, MODIS vegetation indices show a small increase in vegetation cover from 2003 leading up to the Games in 2008. After the Games, however, there was a downturn in the indices (2009 and 2010) to levels similar to 2006.

  8. Surface ozone in the urban area of Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, R. A. F. D.; Costa, P. S.; Silva, C.; Godoi, R. M.; Martin, S. T.; Tota, J.; Barbosa, H. M.; Pauliquevis, T.; Ferreira De Brito, J.; Artaxo, P.; Manzi, A. O.; Wolf, S. A.; Cirino, G. G.

    2014-12-01

    When nitrogen oxides from vehicle and industrial emissions mix with volatile organic compounds from trees and plants with exposure to sunlight, a chemical reaction occurs contributing to ground-level ozone pollution. The preliminary results of the surface ozone study in urban area of Manaus, Amazonas State, Brazil, are presented for the first intensive operating period (IOP1) of the GoAmazon experiment (February/March 2014). Photochemical ozone production was found to be a regular process, with an afternoon maximum of the ozone mixing ratio of lower than 20 ppbv for cloudy days or clear sky weather. Typical ozone concentrations at mid-day were low (about 10 ppb). On the other hand, several high-value ozone episodes with surface ozone mixing ratios up to three times larger were registered during the dry season of 2013 (September/October). At the beginning of the wet season, the ozone concentration in Manaus decreased significantly, but diurnal variations can be found during the days with rainfall and other fast changes of meteorological conditions. Possible explanations of the nature of pulsations are discussed. Photochemical ozone production by local urban plumes of Manaus is named as a first possible source of the ozone concentration and biomass burning or power plant emissions are suggested as an alternative or an additional source.

  9. Enhancing ethanol production from thermophilic and mesophilic solid digestate using ozone combined with aqueous ammonia pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dianlong; Xi, Jiang; Ai, Ping; Yu, Liang; Zhai, Hong; Yan, Shuiping; Zhang, Yanlin

    2016-05-01

    Pretreatment with ozone combined with aqueous ammonia was used to recover residual organic carbon from recalcitrant solid digestate for ethanol production after anaerobic digestion (AD) of rice straw. Methane yield of AD at mesophilic and thermophilic conditions, and ethanol production of solid digestate were investigated. The results showed that the methane yield at thermophilic temperature was 72.2% higher than that at mesophilic temperature under the same conditions of 24days and 17% solid concentration. And also the ethanol production efficiency of solid digestate after thermophilic process was 24.3% higher than that of solid digestate after mesophilic process. In this study, the optimal conditions for integrated methane and ethanol processes were determined as 55°C, 17% solid concentration and 24days. 58.6% of glucose conversion, 142.8g/kg of methane yield and 65.2g/kg of ethanol yield were achieved, and the highest net energy balance was calculated as 6416kJ/kg.

  10. Gas-phase reaction of ( E)-β-farnesene with ozone: Rate coefficient and carbonyl products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourtchev, Ivan; Bejan, Iustinian; Sodeau, John R.; Wenger, John C.

    The gas-phase ozonolysis of ( E)-β-farnesene was investigated in a 3.91 m 3 atmospheric simulation chamber at 296 ± 2 K and relative humidity of around 0.1%. The relative rate method was used to determine the reaction rate coefficient of (4.01 ± 0.17) × 10 -16 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1, where the indicated errors are two least-squares standard deviations and do not include uncertainties in the rate coefficients for the reference compounds (γ-terpinene, cis-cyclooctene and 1,5-cyclooctadiene). Gas phase carbonyl products were collected using a denuder sampling technique and analyzed with GC/MS following derivatization with O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl) hydroxylamine (PFBHA). The reaction products detected were acetone, 4-oxopentanal, methylglyoxal, 4-methylenehex-5-enal, 6-methylhept-5-en-2-one, and ( E)-4-methyl-8-methylenedeca-4,9-dienal. A detailed mechanism for the gas-phase ozonolysis of ( E)-β-farnesene is proposed, which accounts for all of the products observed in this study. The results of this work indicate that the atmospheric reaction of ( E)-β-farnesene with ozone has a lifetime of around 1 h and is another possible source of the ubiquitous carbonyls, acetone, 4-oxopentanal and 6-methylhept-5-en-2-one in the atmosphere.

  11. Diagnostic Evaluation of Ozone Production and Horizontal Transport in a Regional Photochemical Air Quality Modeling System

    EPA Science Inventory

    A diagnostic model evaluation effort has been performed to focus on photochemical ozone formation and the horizontal transport process since they strongly impact the temporal evolution and spatial distribution of ozone (O3) within the lower troposphere. Results from th...

  12. Additive manufacturing. Continuous liquid interface production of 3D objects.

    PubMed

    Tumbleston, John R; Shirvanyants, David; Ermoshkin, Nikita; Janusziewicz, Rima; Johnson, Ashley R; Kelly, David; Chen, Kai; Pinschmidt, Robert; Rolland, Jason P; Ermoshkin, Alexander; Samulski, Edward T; DeSimone, Joseph M

    2015-03-20

    Additive manufacturing processes such as 3D printing use time-consuming, stepwise layer-by-layer approaches to object fabrication. We demonstrate the continuous generation of monolithic polymeric parts up to tens of centimeters in size with feature resolution below 100 micrometers. Continuous liquid interface production is achieved with an oxygen-permeable window below the ultraviolet image projection plane, which creates a "dead zone" (persistent liquid interface) where photopolymerization is inhibited between the window and the polymerizing part. We delineate critical control parameters and show that complex solid parts can be drawn out of the resin at rates of hundreds of millimeters per hour. These print speeds allow parts to be produced in minutes instead of hours.

  13. Oxidation of Microcystis aeruginosa and Anabaena flos-aquae by ozone: impacts on cell integrity and chlorination by-product formation.

    PubMed

    Coral, Lucila A; Zamyadi, Arash; Barbeau, Benoit; Bassetti, Fatima J; Lapolli, Flávio R; Prévost, Michèle

    2013-06-01

    Pre-ozonation of cyanobacterial (CB) cells in raw water and inter-ozonation of settled water can cause CB cell damage. However, there is limited information about the level of lysis or changes in cell properties after ozonation, release of intracellular compounds and their contribution to the formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs). This study aims to: (1) assess the extent of the pre-ozonation effects on CB cell properties; (2) determine the CT (ozone concentration × detention time) values required for complete loss of cell viability; and (3) study the DBPs formation associated with the pre-ozonation of cyanobacterial cells in laboratorial suspensions. To these ends, both Microcystis aeruginosa and Anabaena flos-aquae suspensions were prepared at concentrations of 250,000 cells mL(-1) and 1,500,000 cells mL(-1) and were subjected to ozone dosages of 0.5, 2.0 and 4.0 mg L(-1) at pH 6 and pH 8. A quick and complete loss of viability was achieved for both CB species after exposure (CT) to ozone of <0.2 mg min L(-1), although no significant decrease in total cell numbers was observed. Maximum dissolved organic carbon (DOC) releases of 0.96 mg L(-1) and 1.63 mg L(-1) were measured after ozonation of 250,000 cells mL(-1) of M. aeruginosa and A. flos-aquae, respectively. DOC release was found to be pH and ozone dose dependent. Ozonation of CB cells increased formation of trihalomethanes (THM) and haloacetic acids (HAA), mainly for suspensions of A. flos-aquae at pH 8 (by 174% and 65% for THM and HAA respectively). Utilities considering using ozone for oxidising CB cells should weigh out the benefit of CB control with the potential increased formation of chlorinated DBPs.

  14. Controls on urban ozone production rate as indicated by formaldehyde oxidation rate and nitric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatfield, Robert B.; Ren, Xinrong; Brune, William; Schwab, James; PMTACS Measurement Teams

    2010-12-01

    Several strong statistical relationships quantifying local ozone generation are found which use only easily measured variables: nitrogen oxides (NO x), formaldehyde (HCHO), its photolysis (i.e., UV), and temperature ( T). A parameterized regression developed for rural air was adapted to central Queens, New York City, i.e., considerable fresh emissions. Measurements of the radicals [HO 2] and [OH] were available. These provided explicit reference estimates of the predominant terms for chemical ozone production, Po(O 3) = k[HO 2][NO], of the predominant chemical loss of nitrogen oxides, L(NO 2) = k[OH][NO 2], and also their ratio. (This is termed a production efficiency for O 3.) Chemical modeling supports a robust extension from Po(O 3) to total chemical production, P(O 3). The two regression variables, [NO] and jHCHO⇒rads × [HCHO], which best explain Po(O 3), have low correlation, R ˜ 0.2 (variable, interacting urban plumelets?). In our analysis, R2 for Po(O 3) (and an estimate for its rate-determining [HO 2]) was in the range 0.48-0.81. Signally, the method suggests a quantitative and very local application of descriptions of "VOC limitation" or "NO x limitation" to P(O 3) and L(NO 2), expressed as dimensionless sensitivity variables. Unexpected sources, transport, or chemistry may be highlighted using only HCHO, NO x, and UV radiation. More complex relationships are needed in a focused analysis of intermediate polluted situations, where timescales or individual sources may give trouble. Here, we find that T is informative, and cooperates with j × [HCHO] in defining [HO 2]. Sensitivities for radicals and NO for Po(O 3) are similar ˜0.4, but sensitivities for radicals and NO 2 for L(NO 2) emphasize NO 2. Remaining variability in the statistical estimates of Po(O 3) and L(NO 2) is modulated by incompletely understood, slowly varying gain factors. Understanding of these gain factors promises a better empirical indicator for Po(O 3)/ L(NO 2). Complete 3-d

  15. Atmospheric OH reactivity in central London: observations, model predictions and estimates of in situ ozone production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalley, Lisa K.; Stone, Daniel; Bandy, Brian; Dunmore, Rachel; Hamilton, Jacqueline F.; Hopkins, James; Lee, James D.; Lewis, Alastair C.; Heard, Dwayne E.

    2016-02-01

    9) (particularly α-pinene and limonene) and model-generated intermediates increases the modelled OH concentrations by 41 %, and the magnitude of in situ ozone production calculated from the production of RO2 was significantly lower (60 %). This work highlights that any future ozone abatement strategies should consider the role that biogenic emissions play alongside anthropogenic emissions in influencing London's air quality.

  16. Atmospheric OH reactivity in central London: observations, model predictions and estimates of in situ ozone production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalley, L. K.; Stone, D.; Bandy, B.; Dunmore, R.; Hamilton, J. F.; Hopkins, J.; Lee, J. D.; Lewis, A. C.; Heard, D. E.

    2015-11-01

    -generated intermediates worsened the agreement between modelled and observed OH concentrations (by 41 %) and the magnitude of in situ ozone production calculated from the production of RO2 was significantly lower (60 %). This work highlights that any future ozone abatement strategies should consider the role that biogenic emissions play alongside anthropogenic emissions in influencing London's air quality.

  17. Additive manufacturing techniques for the production of tissue engineering constructs.

    PubMed

    Mota, Carlos; Puppi, Dario; Chiellini, Federica; Chiellini, Emo

    2015-03-01

    'Additive manufacturing' (AM) refers to a class of manufacturing processes based on the building of a solid object from three-dimensional (3D) model data by joining materials, usually layer upon layer. Among the vast array of techniques developed for the production of tissue-engineering (TE) scaffolds, AM techniques are gaining great interest for their suitability in achieving complex shapes and microstructures with a high degree of automation, good accuracy and reproducibility. In addition, the possibility of rapidly producing tissue-engineered constructs meeting patient's specific requirements, in terms of tissue defect size and geometry as well as autologous biological features, makes them a powerful way of enhancing clinical routine procedures. This paper gives an extensive overview of different AM techniques classes (i.e. stereolithography, selective laser sintering, 3D printing, melt-extrusion-based techniques, solution/slurry extrusion-based techniques, and tissue and organ printing) employed for the development of tissue-engineered constructs made of different materials (i.e. polymeric, ceramic and composite, alone or in combination with bioactive agents), by highlighting their principles and technological solutions.

  18. Development of Ozone Technology Rice Storage Systems (OTRISS) for Quality Improvement of Rice Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nur, M.; Kusdiyantini, E.; Wuryanti, W.; Winarni, T. A.; Widyanto, S. A.; Muharam, H.

    2015-06-01

    This research has been carried out by using ozone to address the rapidly declining quality of rice in storage. In the first year, research has focused on the rice storage with ozone technology for small capacity (e.g., household) and the medium capacity (e.g., dormitories, hospitals). Ozone was produced by an ozone generator with Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma (DBDP). Ozone technology rice storage system (OTRISS) is using ozone charateristic which is a strong oxidizer. Ozone have a short endurance of existence and then decompose, as a result produce oxygen and radicals of oxygen. These characteristics could kill microorganisms and pests, reduce air humidity and enrich oxygen. All components used in SPBTO assembled using raw materials available in the big cities in Indonesia. Provider of high voltage (High Voltage Power Supply, 40-70 kV, 23 KH, AC) is one of components that have been assembled and tested. Ozone generator is assembled with 7 reactors of Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma (DBDP). Rice container that have been prepared for OTRISS have adjusted so can be integrated with generator, power supply and blower to blow air. OTRISS with a capacity of 75 kg and 100 kg have been made and tested. The ability of ozone to eliminate bacteria and fungi have been tested and resulted in a decrease of microorganisms at 3 log CFU/g. Testing in food chemistry showed that ozone treatment of rice had not changed the chemical content that still meet the standard of chemical content and nutritional applicable to ISO standard milled rice. The results of this study are very likely to be used as an alternative to rice storage systems in warehouse. Test and scale-up is being carried out in a mini warehouse whose condition is mimicked to rice in National Rice Storage of Indonesia (Bulog) to ensure quality. Next adaptations would be installed in the rice storage system in the Bulog.

  19. A multi-sites analysis on the ozone effects on Gross Primary Production of European forests.

    PubMed

    Proietti, C; Anav, A; De Marco, A; Sicard, P; Vitale, M

    2016-06-15

    Ozone (O3) is both a greenhouse gas and a secondary air pollutant causing adverse impacts on forests ecosystems at different scales, from cellular to ecosystem level. Specifically, the phytotoxic nature of O3 can impair CO2 assimilation that, in turn affects forest productivity. This study aims to evaluate the effects of tropospheric O3 on Gross Primary Production (GPP) at 37 European forest sites during the time period 2000-2010. Due to the lack of carbon assimilation data at O3 monitoring stations (and vice-versa) this study makes a first attempt to combine high resolution MODIS Gross Primary Production (GPP) estimates and O3 measurement data. Partial Correlations, Anomalies Analysis and the Random Forests Analysis (RFA) were used to quantify the effects of tropospheric O3 concentration and its uptake on GPP and to evaluate the most important factors affecting inter-annual GPP changes. Our results showed, along a North-West/South-East European transect, a negative impact of O3 on GPP ranging from 0.4% to 30%, although a key role of meteorological parameters respect to pollutant variables in affecting GPP was found. In particular, meteorological parameters, namely air temperature (T), soil water content (SWC) and relative humidity (RH) are the most important predictors at 81% of test sites. Moreover, it is interesting to highlight a key role of SWC in the Mediterranean areas (Spanish, Italian and French test sites) confirming that, soil moisture and soil water availability affect vegetation growth and photosynthesis especially in arid or semi-arid ecosystems such as the Mediterranean climate regions. Considering the pivotal role of GPP in the global carbon balance and the O3 ability to reduce primary productivity of the forests, this study can help in assessing the O3 impacts on ecosystem services, including wood production and carbon sequestration. PMID:26971205

  20. Gas phase oxidation of monoethanolamine (MEA) with OH radical and ozone: kinetics, products, and particles.

    PubMed

    Borduas, Nadine; Abbatt, Jonathan P D; Murphy, Jennifer G

    2013-06-18

    Monoethanolamine (MEA) is currently the benchmark solvent in carbon capture and storage (CCS), a technology aimed at reducing CO2 emissions in large combustion industries. To accurately assess the environmental impact of CCS, a sound understanding of the fate of MEA in the atmosphere is necessary. Relative and absolute rate kinetic experiments were conducted in a smog chamber using online proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) to follow the decay of MEA. The room temperature (295 ± 3K) kinetics of oxidation with hydroxyl radicals from light and dark sources yield an average value of (7.02 ± 0.46) × 10(-11) cm(3) molec(-1) s(-1), in good agreement with previously published data. For the first time, the rate coefficient for MEA with ozone was measured: (1.09 ± 0.05) × 10(-18) cm(3) molec(-1) s(-1). An investigation into the oxidation products was also conducted using online chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CI-TOFMS) where formamide, isocyanic acid as well as higher order products including cyclic amines were detected. Significant particle numbers and mass loadings were observed during the MEA oxidation experiments and accounted for over 15% of the fate of MEA-derived nitrogen.

  1. Ozone and the stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimazaki, Tatsuo

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that the stratospheric ozone is effective in absorbing almost all radiation below 300 nm at heights below 300 km. The distribution of global ozone in the troposphere and the lower stratosphere, and the latitudinal variations of the total ozone column over four seasons are considered. The theory of the ozone layer production is discussed together with catalytic reactions for ozone loss and the mechanisms of ozone transport. Special attention is given to the anthropogenic perturbations, such as SST exhaust gases and freon gas from aerosol cans and refrigerators, that may cause an extensive destruction of the stratospheric ozone layer and thus have a profound impact on the world climate and on life.

  2. Products of ozonized arachidonic acid potentiate the formation of DNA single strand breaks in cultured human lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kozumbo, W.J.; Hanley, N.M.; Agarwal, S.

    1996-12-31

    In this study we examined the potential for environmental levels of ozone (O{sub 3}) to degrade arachidonic acid (AA), a polyunsaturated fatty acid abundantly present in the lung, into products that can produce DNA single strand breaks (ssb) in cultured human lung cells. Human lung fibroblasts were incubated with 60 {mu}M AA that had been previously exposed to an degraded by 0.4 ppm O{sub 3} (1 hr). Incubation of the cells with O{sub 3}-exposed AA (but not with vehicle alone) for 1 hr at 4{degrees}C and 37{degrees}C produced 555 and 245 rad-equivalents of DNA ssb, respectively, as determined by the DNA alkaline elution technique. These breaks were completely eliminated when the ozonized AA solution was incubated with catalase prior to cell treatment, indicating that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was solely responsible for damaging DNA. Superoxide dismutase, bovine serum albumin, or heat-inactivated catalase showed little, if any, inhibitory activity. The H{sub 2}O{sub 2} content for only about 40% of the observed breaks. Potentiation of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced DNA ssb persisted after removal of the carbonyl substances by chromatographic procedures, suggesting that the non-carbonyl component of ozonized AA was the responsible component for inducing augmentation of the observed increases in DNA ssb. Ozonized AA also induced DNA ssb in cultures of the human bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS-2B. Again, these breaks were shown to exceed levels that could be attributed to the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} alone. These results indicate that products of ozonized AA can interact to potentiate DNA ssb in human lung cells. 42 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Ozone-initiated chemistry in an occupied simulated aircraft cabin.

    PubMed

    Weschler, Charles J; Wisthaler, Armin; Cowlin, Shannon; Tamás, Gyöngyi; Strøm-Tejsen, Peter; Hodgson, Alfred T; Destaillats, Hugo; Herrington, Jason; Zhang, Junfeng; Nazaroff, William W

    2007-09-01

    We have used multiple analytical methods to characterize the gas-phase products formed when ozone was added to cabin air during simulated 4-hour flights that were conducted in a reconstructed section of a B-767 aircraft containing human occupants. Two separate groups of 16 females were each exposed to four conditions: low air exchange (4.4 (h-1)), <2 ppb ozone; low air exchange, 61-64 ppb ozone; high air exchange (8.8 h(-1)), <2 ppb ozone; and high air exchange, 73-77 ppb ozone. The addition of ozone to the cabin air increased the levels of identified byproducts from approximately 70 to 130 ppb at the lower air exchange rate and from approximately 30 to 70 ppb at the higher air exchange rate. Most of the increase was attributable to acetone, nonanal, decanal, 4-oxopentanal (4-OPA), 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one (6-MHO), formic acid, and acetic acid, with 0.25-0.30 mol of quantified product volatilized per mol of ozone consumed. Several of these compounds reached levels above their reported odor thresholds. Most byproducts were derived from surface reactions with occupants and their clothing, consistent with the inference that occupants were responsible for the removal of >55% of the ozone in the cabin. The observations made in this study have implications for other indoor settings. Whenever human beings and ozone are simultaneously present, one anticipates production of acetone, nonanal, decanal, 6-MHO, geranyl acetone, and 4-OPA.

  4. The Influence of Photolysis Rate Constants in Ozone Production for the Paso del Norte Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerra, Fernando; Fitzgerald, Rosa

    2012-03-01

    In this research work we are focusing on understanding the relationship between photolysis rates and the photochemical ozone changes observed in the Paso del Norte region. The city of El Paso, Texas together with Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, forms the largest contiguous bi-national metropolitan area. This region suffers year-round ozone pollution events, and a better understanding is needed to mitigate them. Previous studies have found that ambient ozone concentrations tend to be higher on weekends rather than on weekdays, this phenomenon being referred to, as the ``weekend effect.'' If the ozone standard is exceeded more frequently on weekends, then this phenomenon must be considered in the design of ozone control strategies. In this work we investigate some of the most representative weekend ozone episodes at El Paso, TX, during the years 2009, 2010 and 2011 using the ozone photolysis rates. In this research the TUV radiative-transfer model is used to calculate the local photolysis rates and a UV MFRSR instrument is used to obtain experimental parameters. Seasonal variations and the weekday-weekend effect is studied. The results of this research will help to understand the underlying behavior of the photolysis rate constants when different atmospheric conditions are present.

  5. Impacts of the production and consumption of biofuels on stratospheric ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revell, Laura E.; Bodeker, Greg E.; Huck, Petra E.; Williamson, Bryce E.

    2012-05-01

    Biofuels are becoming increasingly popular sources of renewable energy as economic pressures and environmental consequences encourage the use of alternatives to fossil fuels. However, growing crops destined for use as biofuels incurs large N2O emissions associated with the use of nitrogen-based fertilizers. Besides being a greenhouse gas, N2O is also the primary source of stratospheric NOx (NO + NO2) which leads to stratospheric ozone depletion. In this paper, the potential effects on the ozone layer of a large-scale shift away from fossil fuel use to biofuels consumption over the 21st century are examined. Under such a scenario, global-mean column ozone decreases by 2.6 DU between 2010 and 2100 in contrast to a 0.7 DU decrease under a control simulation (the IPCC SRES B1 scenario for greenhouse gases) and a 9.1 DU increase under the more commonly used SRES A1B scenario. Two factors cause the decrease in ozone in the biofuels simulation: 1) large N2O emissions lead to faster rates of the ozone-depleting NOx cycles and; 2) reduced CO2 emissions (due to less fossil fuel burning) lead to relatively less stratospheric cooling over the 21st century, which decreases ozone abundances. Reducing CO2 emissions while neglecting to reduce N2O emissions could therefore be damaging to the ozone layer.

  6. Effect of vibrationally excited oxygen on ozone production in the stratosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Patten, K.O. Jr.; Connell, P.S.; Kinnison, D.E.; Wuebbles, D.J.; Slanger, T.G.; Froidevaux, L.

    1994-01-20

    Photolysis of vibrationally excited oxygen produced by ultraviolet photolysis of ozone in the upper stratosphere is incorporated into the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory two-dimensional zonally averaged chemical-radiative-transport model of the troposphere and stratosphere. The importance of this potential contributor of odd oxygen to the concentration of ozone is evaluated based on recent information on vibrational distributions of excited oxygen and on preliminary studies of energy transfer from the excited oxygen. When energy transfer rate constants similar to those of Toumi et al. (1991) are assumed, increases in model ozone concentrations of up to 4.0% in the upper stratosphere are found, and the model ozone concentrations are found to agree slightly better with measurements, including recent data from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite. However, the ozone increase is only 0.3% when the larger energy transfer rate constants indicated by recent experimental work are applied to the model. An ozone increase of 1% at 50 km requires energy transfer rate constants one-twentieth those of the preliminary observations. As a result, vibrationally excited oxygen processes probably do not contribute enough ozone to be significant in models of the upper stratosphere. 41 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Effect of vibrationally excited oxygen on ozone production in the stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patten, K. O., Jr.; Connell, P. S.; Kinnison, D. E.; Wuebbles, D. J.; Slanger, T. G.; Froidevaux, L.

    1994-01-01

    Photolysis of vibrationally excited oxygen produced by ultraviolet photolysis of ozone in the upper stratosphere is incorporated into the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory two-dimensional zonally averaged chemical-radiative-transport model of the troposphere and stratosphere. The importance of this potential contributor of odd oxygen to the concentration of ozone is evaluated based on recent information on vibrational distributions of excited oxygen and on preliminary studies of energy transfer from the excited oxygen. When energy transfer rate constants similar to those of Toumi et al. (1991) are assumed, increases in model ozone concentrations of up to 4.0% in the upper stratosphere are found, and the model ozone concentrations are found to agree slightly better with measurements, including recent data from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite. However, the ozone increase is only 0.3% when the larger energy transfer rate constants indicated by recent experimental work are applied to the model. An ozone increase of 1% at 50 km requires energy transfer rate constants one-twentieth those of the preliminary observations. As a result, vibrationally excited oxygen processes probably do not contribute enough ozone to be significant in models of the upper stratosphere.

  8. Reactive Nitrogen, Ozone and Ozone Production in the Arctic Troposphere and the Impact of Stratosphere-Troposphere Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Q.; Rodriquez, J. M.; Douglass, A. R.; Crawford, J. H.; Apel, E.; Bian, H.; Blake, D. R.; Brune, W.; Chin, M.; Colarco, P. R.; daSilva, A.; Diskin, G. S.; Duncan, B. N.; Huey, L. C.; Knapp, D. J.; Montzka, D. D.; Nielsen, J. E.; Olson, J. R.; Pawson, S.; Weinheimer, A. J.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the aircraft observations obtained during the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellite (ARCTAS) mission together with the GEOS-5 CO simulation to examine O3 and NOy in the Arctic and sub-Arctic region and their source attribution. Using a number of marker tracers and their probability density distributions, we distinguish various air masses from the background troposphere and examine their contribution to NOx, O3, and O3 production in the Arctic troposphere. The background Arctic troposphere has mean O3 of approximately 60 ppbv and NOx of approximately 25 pptv throughout spring and summer with CO decreases from approximately 145 ppbv in spring to approximately 100 ppbv in summer. These observed CO, NOx and O3 mixing ratios are not notably different from the values measured during the 1988 ABLE-3A and the 2002 TOPSE field campaigns despite the significant changes in the past two decades in processes that could have changed the Arctic tropospheric composition. Air masses associated with stratosphere-troposphere exchange are present throughout the mid and upper troposphere during spring and summer. These air masses with mean O3 concentration of 140-160 ppbv are the most important direct sources of O3 in the Arctic troposphere. In addition, air of stratospheric origin is the only notable driver of net O3 formation in the Arctic due to its sustainable high NOx (75 pptv in spring and 110 pptv in summer) and NOy (approximately 800 pptv in spring and approximately 1100 pptv in summer) levels. The ARCTAS measurements present observational evidence suggesting significant conversion of nitrogen from HNO3 to NOx and then to PAN (a net formation of approximately 120 pptv PAN) in summer when air of stratospheric origin is mixed with tropospheric background during stratosphere-to-troposphere transport. These findings imply that an adequate representation of stratospheric O3 and NOy input are essential in accurately simulating O3

  9. Methods of cracking a crude product to produce additional crude products

    DOEpatents

    Mo, Weijian; Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria; Nair, Vijay

    2009-09-08

    A method for producing a crude product is disclosed. Formation fluid is produced from a subsurface in situ heat treatment process. The formation fluid is separated to produce a liquid stream and a first gas stream. The first gas stream includes olefins. The liquid stream is fractionated to produce one or more crude products. At least one of the crude products has a boiling range distribution from 38.degree. C. and 343.degree. C. as determined by ASTM Method D5307. The crude product having the boiling range distribution from 38.degree. C. and 343.degree. C. is catalytically cracked to produce one or more additional crude products. At least one of the additional crude products is a second gas stream. The second gas stream has a boiling point of at most 38.degree. C. at 0.101 MPa.

  10. Impact of Manaus City on the Amazon Green Ocean atmosphere: ozone production, precursor sensitivity and aerosol load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, U.; Ganzeveld, L.; Thielmann, A.; Dindorf, T.; Schebeske, G.; Welling, M.; Sciare, J.; Roberts, G.; Meixner, F. X.; Kesselmeier, J.; Lelieveld, J.; Kolle, O.; Ciccioli, P.; Lloyd, J.; Trentmann, J.; Artaxo, P.; Andreae, M. O.

    2010-05-01

    As a contribution to the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia - Cooperative LBA Airborne Regional Experiment (LBA-CLAIRE-2001) field campaign in the heart of the Amazon Basin, we analyzed the temporal and spatial dynamics of the urban plume of Manaus City during the wet-to-dry season transition period in July 2001. During the flights, we performed vertical stacks of crosswind transects in the urban outflow downwind of Manaus City, measuring a comprehensive set of trace constituents including O3, NO, NO2, CO, VOC, CO2, and H2O. Aerosol loads were characterized by total aerosol number concentration (CN) and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations, and light scattering properties. Measurements over pristine rainforest areas during the campaign showed low levels of pollution from biomass burning or industrial emissions, representative of wet season background conditions. The urban plume of Manaus City was found to be joined by plumes from power plants south of the city, all showing evidence of very strong photochemical ozone formation. One episode is discussed in detail, where a threefold increase in ozone mixing ratios in the atmospheric boundary layer occurred within a 100 km travel distance downwind of Manaus. Observation-based estimates of the ozone production rates in the plume reached 15 ppb h-1. Within the plume core, aerosol concentrations were strongly enhanced, with ΔCN/ΔCO ratios about one order of magnitude higher than observed in Amazon biomass burning plumes. ΔCN/ΔCO ratios tended to decrease with increasing transport time, indicative of a significant reduction in particle number by coagulation, and without substantial new particle nucleation occurring within the time/space observed. While in the background atmosphere a large fraction of the total particle number served as CCN (about 60-80% at 0.6% supersaturation), the CCN/CN ratios within the plume indicated that only a small fraction (16 ± 12%) of the plume particles were

  11. Impact of Manaus City on the Amazon Green Ocean atmosphere: ozone production, precursor sensitivity and aerosol load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, U.; Ganzeveld, L.; Thielmann, A.; Dindorf, T.; Schebeske, G.; Welling, M.; Sciare, J.; Roberts, G.; Meixner, F. X.; Kesselmeier, J.; Lelieveld, J.; Kolle, O.; Ciccioli, P.; Lloyd, J.; Trentmann, J.; Artaxo, P.; Andreae, M. O.

    2010-10-01

    As a contribution to the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia - Cooperative LBA Airborne Regional Experiment (LBA-CLAIRE-2001) field campaign in the heart of the Amazon Basin, we analyzed the temporal and spatial dynamics of the urban plume of Manaus City during the wet-to-dry season transition period in July 2001. During the flights, we performed vertical stacks of crosswind transects in the urban outflow downwind of Manaus City, measuring a comprehensive set of trace constituents including O3, NO, NO2, CO, VOC, CO2, and H2O. Aerosol loads were characterized by concentrations of total aerosol number (CN) and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), and by light scattering properties. Measurements over pristine rainforest areas during the campaign showed low levels of pollution from biomass burning or industrial emissions, representative of wet season background conditions. The urban plume of Manaus City was found to be joined by plumes from power plants south of the city, all showing evidence of very strong photochemical ozone formation. One episode is discussed in detail, where a threefold increase in ozone mixing ratios within the atmospheric boundary layer occurred within a 100 km travel distance downwind of Manaus. Observation-based estimates of the ozone production rates in the plume reached 15 ppb h-1. Within the plume core, aerosol concentrations were strongly enhanced, with ΔCN/ΔCO ratios about one order of magnitude higher than observed in Amazon biomass burning plumes. ΔCN/ΔCO ratios tended to decrease with increasing transport time, indicative of a significant reduction in particle number by coagulation, and without substantial new particle nucleation occurring within the time/space observed. While in the background atmosphere a large fraction of the total particle number served as CCN (about 60-80% at 0.6% supersaturation), the CCN/CN ratios within the plume indicated that only a small fraction (16±12%) of the plume particles were CCN

  12. Standardizing Interfaces for External Access to Data and Processing for the NASA Ozone Product Evaluation and Test Element (PEATE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilmes, Curt A.; Fleig, Albert J.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's traditional science data processing systems have focused on specific missions, and providing data access, processing and services to the funded science teams of those specific missions. Recently NASA has been modifying this stance, changing the focus from Missions to Measurements. Where a specific Mission has a discrete beginning and end, the Measurement considers long term data continuity across multiple missions. Total Column Ozone, a critical measurement of atmospheric composition, has been monitored for'decades on a series of Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instruments. Some important European missions also monitor ozone, including the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) and SCIAMACHY. With the U.S.IEuropean cooperative launch of the Dutch Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on NASA Aura satellite, and the GOME-2 instrumental on MetOp, the ozone monitoring record has been further extended. In conjunction with the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), NASA is now preparing to evaluate data and algorithms for the next generation Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) which will launch on the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Preparatory Project (NPP) in 2010. NASA is constructing the Science Data Segment (SDS) which is comprised of several elements to evaluate the various NPP data products and algorithms. The NPP SDS Ozone Product Evaluation and Test Element (PEATE) will build on the heritage of the TOMS and OM1 mission based processing systems. The overall measurement based system that will encompass these efforts is the Atmospheric Composition Processing System (ACPS). We have extended the system to include access to publically available data sets from other instruments where feasible, including non-NASA missions as appropriate. The heritage system was largely monolithic providing a very controlled processing flow from data.ingest of

  13. Hydrocarbon Observations and Ozone Production Rates in Western Houston During the Texas 2000 Air Quality Study

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, Carl M.; Spicer, Chet W.; Doskey, Paul V.

    2005-06-01

    Measurements of total non-methane hydrocarbon in whole air canisters collected from the top of a skyscraper on the western edge of Houston, Texas are summarized with an emphasis on samples collected during the passage of plumes of O{sub 3} and the associated rapid increase in the mixing ratio of this species. The back-trajectories associated with these events showed a pronounced deceleration of air parcels over central and western Houston and were not necessarily associated with direct passage over the petrochemical plants located in the heavily industrialized eastern part of Houston. As a result of the time these air parcels spent over the central and western parts of Houston, their VOC mix and associated chemical production rates were expected to differ from similar observations made over eastern Houston from aircraft sampling at low altitudes. Although periods of high O{sub 3} in the western part of the city were closely associated with light alkenes, these same observations show isoprene to make a significant contribution to the total VOC reactivity in the early afternoon (the start of peak photochemical activity) in contrast to observations made east of our sampling site that found the reactivity to be dominated by anthropogenic species. By initializing a 0-dimensional chemical kinetic model with observations made at the Williams Tower, we find that the ozone production efficiency scaled linearly to the ratio of total hydrocarbons and NO{sub x}, with an average OPE of 7.2, ranging from 2.3 to 16.9; these values are smaller than those reported in eastern Houston, suggesting a strong gradient in photochemical productivity across the city.

  14. Elevated carbon dioxide and ozone alter productivity and ecosystem carbon content in northern temperate forests.

    PubMed

    Talhelm, Alan F; Pregitzer, Kurt S; Kubiske, Mark E; Zak, Donald R; Campany, Courtney E; Burton, Andrew J; Dickson, Richard E; Hendrey, George R; Isebrands, J G; Lewin, Keith F; Nagy, John; Karnosky, David F

    2014-08-01

    Three young northern temperate forest communities in the north-central United States were exposed to factorial combinations of elevated carbon dioxide (CO2 ) and tropospheric ozone (O3 ) for 11 years. Here, we report results from an extensive sampling of plant biomass and soil conducted at the conclusion of the experiment that enabled us to estimate ecosystem carbon (C) content and cumulative net primary productivity (NPP). Elevated CO2 enhanced ecosystem C content by 11%, whereas elevated O3 decreased ecosystem C content by 9%. There was little variation in treatment effects on C content across communities and no meaningful interactions between CO2 and O3 . Treatment effects on ecosystem C content resulted primarily from changes in the near-surface mineral soil and tree C, particularly differences in woody tissues. Excluding the mineral soil, cumulative NPP was a strong predictor of ecosystem C content (r(2) = 0.96). Elevated CO2 enhanced cumulative NPP by 39%, a consequence of a 28% increase in canopy nitrogen (N) content (g N m(-2) ) and a 28% increase in N productivity (NPP/canopy N). In contrast, elevated O3 lowered NPP by 10% because of a 21% decrease in canopy N, but did not impact N productivity. Consequently, as the marginal impact of canopy N on NPP (∆NPP/∆N) decreased through time with further canopy development, the O3 effect on NPP dissipated. Within the mineral soil, there was less C in the top 0.1 m of soil under elevated O3 and less soil C from 0.1 to 0.2 m in depth under elevated CO2 . Overall, these results suggest that elevated CO2 may create a sustained increase in NPP, whereas the long-term effect of elevated O3 on NPP will be smaller than expected. However, changes in soil C are not well-understood and limit our ability to predict changes in ecosystem C content.

  15. Elevated carbon dioxide and ozone alter productivity and ecosystem carbon content in northern temperate forests.

    PubMed

    Talhelm, Alan F; Pregitzer, Kurt S; Kubiske, Mark E; Zak, Donald R; Campany, Courtney E; Burton, Andrew J; Dickson, Richard E; Hendrey, George R; Isebrands, J G; Lewin, Keith F; Nagy, John; Karnosky, David F

    2014-08-01

    Three young northern temperate forest communities in the north-central United States were exposed to factorial combinations of elevated carbon dioxide (CO2 ) and tropospheric ozone (O3 ) for 11 years. Here, we report results from an extensive sampling of plant biomass and soil conducted at the conclusion of the experiment that enabled us to estimate ecosystem carbon (C) content and cumulative net primary productivity (NPP). Elevated CO2 enhanced ecosystem C content by 11%, whereas elevated O3 decreased ecosystem C content by 9%. There was little variation in treatment effects on C content across communities and no meaningful interactions between CO2 and O3 . Treatment effects on ecosystem C content resulted primarily from changes in the near-surface mineral soil and tree C, particularly differences in woody tissues. Excluding the mineral soil, cumulative NPP was a strong predictor of ecosystem C content (r(2) = 0.96). Elevated CO2 enhanced cumulative NPP by 39%, a consequence of a 28% increase in canopy nitrogen (N) content (g N m(-2) ) and a 28% increase in N productivity (NPP/canopy N). In contrast, elevated O3 lowered NPP by 10% because of a 21% decrease in canopy N, but did not impact N productivity. Consequently, as the marginal impact of canopy N on NPP (∆NPP/∆N) decreased through time with further canopy development, the O3 effect on NPP dissipated. Within the mineral soil, there was less C in the top 0.1 m of soil under elevated O3 and less soil C from 0.1 to 0.2 m in depth under elevated CO2 . Overall, these results suggest that elevated CO2 may create a sustained increase in NPP, whereas the long-term effect of elevated O3 on NPP will be smaller than expected. However, changes in soil C are not well-understood and limit our ability to predict changes in ecosystem C content. PMID:24604779

  16. Ozone-Induced Dissociation of Conjugated Lipids Reveals Significant Reaction Rate Enhancements and Characteristic Odd-Electron Product Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Huong T.; Maccarone, Alan T.; Campbell, J. Larry; Mitchell, Todd W.; Blanksby, Stephen J.

    2013-02-01

    Ozone-induced dissociation (OzID) is an alternative ion activation method that relies on the gas phase ion-molecule reaction between a mass-selected target ion and ozone in an ion trap mass spectrometer. Herein, we evaluated the performance of OzID for both the structural elucidation and selective detection of conjugated carbon-carbon double bond motifs within lipids. The relative reactivity trends for [M + X]+ ions (where X = Li, Na, K) formed via electrospray ionization (ESI) of conjugated versus nonconjugated fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) were examined using two different OzID-enabled linear ion-trap mass spectrometers. Compared with nonconjugated analogues, FAMEs derived from conjugated linoleic acids were found to react up to 200 times faster and to yield characteristic radical cations. The significantly enhanced reactivity of conjugated isomers means that OzID product ions can be observed without invoking a reaction delay in the experimental sequence (i.e., trapping of ions in the presence of ozone is not required). This possibility has been exploited to undertake neutral-loss scans on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer targeting characteristic OzID transitions. Such analyses reveal the presence of conjugated double bonds in lipids extracted from selected foodstuffs. Finally, by benchmarking of the absolute ozone concentration inside the ion trap, second order rate constants for the gas phase reactions between unsaturated organic ions and ozone were obtained. These results demonstrate a significant influence of the adducting metal on reaction rate constants in the fashion Li > Na > K.

  17. Ozone-induced dissociation of conjugated lipids reveals significant reaction rate enhancements and characteristic odd-electron product ions.

    PubMed

    Pham, Huong T; Maccarone, Alan T; Campbell, J Larry; Mitchell, Todd W; Blanksby, Stephen J

    2013-02-01

    Ozone-induced dissociation (OzID) is an alternative ion activation method that relies on the gas phase ion-molecule reaction between a mass-selected target ion and ozone in an ion trap mass spectrometer. Herein, we evaluated the performance of OzID for both the structural elucidation and selective detection of conjugated carbon-carbon double bond motifs within lipids. The relative reactivity trends for [M + X](+) ions (where X = Li, Na, K) formed via electrospray ionization (ESI) of conjugated versus nonconjugated fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) were examined using two different OzID-enabled linear ion-trap mass spectrometers. Compared with nonconjugated analogues, FAMEs derived from conjugated linoleic acids were found to react up to 200 times faster and to yield characteristic radical cations. The significantly enhanced reactivity of conjugated isomers means that OzID product ions can be observed without invoking a reaction delay in the experimental sequence (i.e., trapping of ions in the presence of ozone is not required). This possibility has been exploited to undertake neutral-loss scans on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer targeting characteristic OzID transitions. Such analyses reveal the presence of conjugated double bonds in lipids extracted from selected foodstuffs. Finally, by benchmarking of the absolute ozone concentration inside the ion trap, second order rate constants for the gas phase reactions between unsaturated organic ions and ozone were obtained. These results demonstrate a significant influence of the adducting metal on reaction rate constants in the fashion Li > Na > K.

  18. Effect of ozonation and UV irradiation with direct filtration on disinfection and disinfection by-product precursors in drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Amirsardari, Y; Yu, Q; Willams, P

    2001-09-01

    Pilot plant studies were conducted to evaluate the effect of pre-ozonation and ultraviolet irradiation on disinfection, disinfection by-product precursors and water quality in a direct filtration water treatment system. Disinfection parameters including total coliforms, faecal coliforms and heterotrophic plate count were investigated. Total organic carbon (TOC), trihalomethanes (THMs), total organic halides (TOX), filtered water turbidity and colour were also evaluated. It was found that advanced pre-oxidation processes (ozonation and UV irradiation) significantly increase the level of disinfection of raw water. Removal of total trihalomethanes and total organic halides precursors improved with ozonation and UV irradiation, compared to no oxidation treatment in direct filtration and/or in conventional water treatment. All coliforms (total and faecal) were completely destroyed by ozonation alone, and also with ozonation in conjunction with UV irradiation. However, the heterotrophic plate count was not significantly reduced at an ozone residual concentration of 0.1 mg l(-1). This suggests that disinfection efficiency is strongly influenced by competition reactions of organic and inorganic compounds with ozone. Precursors of total trihalomethanes and total organic halides were reduced by 90% and 98%, respectively, with advanced pre-oxidation processes. Water quality parameters were improved by the pre-ozonation and UV irradiation treatment system.

  19. Ozonation by-products issued from the destruction of microorganisms present in wastewaters treated for reuse.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Valencia, M N; Orta-de-Velásquez, M T; Vaca-Mier, M; Franco, V

    2004-01-01

    This work demonstrates the reaction of ozone on the amino acids comprising the covering layer of resistant micro-organisms. A secondary aim was to check the byproducts generated when ozone was applied to synthetic samples (such as Vibrio cholerae NO 01 WFCC-449, Salmonella typhi ATTC-6539, faecal coliforms and Ascaris suum). The ozone was applied at a concentration of 18.4 mgO3/min at pH 3, for different lengths of time. In the case of bacteria, results showed that, at 8 minutes, the number was reduced to the level of the Official Mexican Standards set for treated water destined for irrigation purposes (1,000 MPN/100 mL). Excellent correlation coefficients (0.95 to 0.99) were obtained for microbial concentrations versus ozone contact time. Destruction times required for 100% removal of the initial bacteria population varied between 2 and 14 minutes, while Ascaris suum required 1 hour. When Gram-negative bacteria die due to the effects of ozone, cellular lysis and the liberation of endotoxins (biodegradable) were observed. The ozonation of amino acids in the shell of Ascaris suum eggs, leads to the formation of aldehydes, such as formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, in low concentrations (0.0003 and 0.0005 microg/mL respectively). These levels are not hazardous to human health.

  20. Oxidation of the antiviral drug acyclovir and its biodegradation product carboxy-acyclovir with ozone: kinetics and identification of oxidation products.

    PubMed

    Prasse, Carsten; Wagner, Manfred; Schulz, Ralf; Ternes, Thomas A

    2012-02-21

    The oxidation of the antiviral drug acyclovir (ACV) and its main biotransformation product carboxy-acyclovir (carboxy-ACV) by ozone was investigated. Both compounds have recently been detected in surface water, and carboxy-ACV has also been detected in drinking water. The experiments revealed a strong pH dependence of the oxidation of ACV and carboxy-ACV with reaction rate constants increasing by 4 orders of magnitude between the protonated, positively charged form (k(ox,PH(+)), ∼2.5 × 10(2) M(-1) s(-1)) and the deprotonated, negatively charged form (k(ox,P(-)), 3.4 × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1)). At pH 8 a single oxidation product was formed which was identified via LC-LTQ-Orbitrap MS and NMR as N-(4-carbamoyl-2-imino-5-oxoimidazolidin)formamido-N-methoxyacetic acid (COFA). Using Vibrio fischeri , an acute bacterial toxicity was found for COFA while carboxy-ACV revealed no toxic effects. Ozonation experiments with guanine and guanosine at pH 8 led to the formation of the respective 2-imino-5-oxoimidazolidines, confirming that guanine derivatives such as carboxy-ACV are undergoing the same reactions during ozonation. Furthermore, COFA was detected in finished drinking water of a German waterworks after ozonation and subsequent activated carbon treatment.

  1. Airborne and ground-based observations of a weekend effect in ozone, precursors, and oxidation products in the California South Coast Air Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollack, I. B.; Ryerson, T. B.; Trainer, M.; Parrish, D. D.; Andrews, A. E.; Atlas, E. L.; Blake, D. R.; Brown, S. S.; Commane, R.; Daube, B. C.; de Gouw, J. A.; Dubé, W. P.; Flynn, J.; Frost, G. J.; Gilman, J. B.; Grossberg, N.; Holloway, J. S.; Kofler, J.; Kort, E. A.; Kuster, W. C.; Lang, P. M.; Lefer, B.; Lueb, R. A.; Neuman, J. A.; Nowak, J. B.; Novelli, P. C.; Peischl, J.; Perring, A. E.; Roberts, J. M.; Santoni, G.; Schwarz, J. P.; Spackman, J. R.; Wagner, N. L.; Warneke, C.; Washenfelder, R. A.; Wofsy, S. C.; Xiang, B.

    2012-02-01

    Airborne and ground-based measurements during the CalNex (California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change) field study in May/June 2010 show a weekend effect in ozone in the South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) consistent with previous observations. The well-known and much-studied weekend ozone effect has been attributed to weekend reductions in nitrogen oxide (NOx = NO + NO2) emissions, which affect ozone levels via two processes: (1) reduced ozone loss by titration and (2) enhanced photochemical production of ozone due to an increased ratio of non-methane volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to NOx. In accord with previous assessments, the 2010 airborne and ground-based data show an average decrease in NOx of 46 ± 11% and 34 ± 4%, respectively, and an average increase in VOC/NOx ratio of 48 ± 8% and 43 ± 22%, respectively, on weekends. This work extends current understanding of the weekend ozone effect in the SoCAB by identifying its major causes and quantifying their relative importance from the available CalNex data. Increased weekend production of a VOC-NOx oxidation product, peroxyacetyl nitrate, compared to a radical termination product, nitric acid, indicates a significant contribution from increased photochemical production on weekends. Weekday-to-weekend differences in the products of NOx oxidation show 45 ± 13% and 42 ± 12% more extensive photochemical processing and, when compared with odd oxygen (Ox = O3 + NO2), 51 ± 14% and 22 ± 17% greater ozone production efficiency on weekends in the airborne and ground-based data, respectively, indicating that both contribute to higher weekend ozone levels in the SoCAB.

  2. Lidar-derived Correlations Between Lower-tropospheric Column and Surface Ozone: Implications for Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senff, C. J.; Langford, A. O.; Alvarez, R. J. _II, II; Kirgis, G.; Choukulkar, A.; Brewer, A.; Banta, R. M.; Weickmann, A. M.; Sandberg, S.; Olson, E.

    2015-12-01

    One of the data products that will be provided by the TEMPO satellite mission is 0-2 km ozone column concentration. To make inferences about surface air quality from this data product, the relationship between lower-tropospheric column and surface ozone concentrations and their diurnal, seasonal, and spatial variations have to be well understood. To characterize these relationships, we have used ozone profile observations obtained with NOAA's truck-based, scanning TOPAZ ozone lidar from several recent field campaigns including Discover-AQ Houston and Colorado, the Uintah Basin Wintertime Ozone Study (UBWOS), and the Las Vegas Ozone Study (LVOS). The TOPAZ lidar is ideally suited for this kind of study because it provides ozone profiles from about 15 m above ground level (AGL) up to 3 km AGL at high spatial and temporal resolution. We have used the lidar observations closest to the ground as a proxy for surface ozone and compared them to the 0-2 km AGL average column ozone concentrations measured with the lidar. Results from the Discover-AQ Colorado campaign show that in the afternoon, when the boundary layer (BL) was deep and well mixed, ozone column and surface concentrations agreed quite well. However, during the morning hours, ozone column concentrations were significantly higher than those at the surface, because ozone was depleted in a shallow surface layer due to titration and deposition, whereas ozone levels in the residual layer aloft remained moderately high. The analysis of column and surface ozone correlations using ozone lidar observations from the Discover-AQ Houston, UBWOS and LVOS campaigns is currently underway. The results from these studies will provide additional insights into the relationship between column and surface ozone, in particular their variation as a function of measurement location and season, and their dependence on BL processes such as mixed layer height evolution, land-sea breeze circulation, and terrain-induced flows.

  3. Ozone crisis

    SciTech Connect

    Roan, S.

    1989-01-01

    The author presents an account of the depletion of the atmosphere's ozone layer since the discovery of the phenomenon 15 years ago. The book recounts the flight to ban chlorofluorocarbons (CFC's) and describes the science, the people, and the politics involved, up to the March 1988 international treaty restricting CFC production. It surveys the media's coverage, describes the struggle for remedies, and offers a prognosis for the future.

  4. Changes in stratospheric ozone.

    PubMed

    Cicerone, R J

    1987-07-01

    The ozone layer in the upper atmosphere is a natural feature of the earth's environment. It performs several important functions, including shielding the earth from damaging solar ultraviolet radiation. Far from being static, ozone concentrations rise and fall under the forces of photochemical production, catalytic chemical destruction, and fluid dynamical transport. Human activities are projected to deplete substantially stratospheric ozone through anthropogenic increases in the global concentrations of key atmospheric chemicals. Human-induced perturbations may be occurring already.

  5. Ozone effect on respiratory syncytial virus infectivity and cytokine production by human alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Soukup, J.; Koren, H.S.; Becker, S.

    1993-01-01

    The study was performed to evaluate the effect of ozone (O3) exposure at 1 ppm for 2 hr on the susceptibility/resistance of adult human alveolar macrophages (AM) to infection with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in vitro and on RSV-induced cytokine production by the AM. AM were first exposed to O3 or to filtered air and then infected with RSV at multiplicities of infection (m.o.i.) of 0.1 1.0 and 10. The percentage RSV-infected AM and the amount of infectious virus released by the cells were determined at Days 2 and 4 after infection. Interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) levels in the supernatants were determined on Day 2. No difference in the percentage infected AM or in the amount of infectious RSV produced was found between control and O3-exposed cultures. However, O3-exposed AM infected with RSV at m.o.i. 1 produced less IL-1 in response to RSV infection than control AM:63.6 pg/ml compared with 98.5 pg/ml. No difference in IL-1 was seen with m.o.i. 10. IL-6 levels were also decreased, but only after infection with m.o.i. 0.1. At this level of infection 830 pg/ml was produced by control AM as compared to 468.2 pg/ml by O3-exposed AM. TNF production was unaffected by O3 at all multiplicities of infection. (Copyright (c) 1993 by Academic Press, Inc.)

  6. Characterizing the impacts of vertical transport and photochemical ozone production on an exceedance area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, Emma L.; Iraci, Laura T.; Austerberry, David; Pierce, R. Bradley; Roby, Matthew C.; Tadić, Jovan M.; Loewenstein, Max; Gore, Warren

    2015-05-01

    Offshore and inland vertical profiles of ozone (O3) were measured from an aircraft during 16 flights from January 2012 to January 2013 over the northern San Joaquin Valley (SJV) and over the Pacific Ocean. Analysis of in situ measurements presents an assessment of the seasonality and magnitude of net O3 production and transport within the lower troposphere above the SJV. During the high O3 season (May-October), the Dobson Unit sum of O3 in the 0-2 km above sea level (km.a.s.l.) layer above the SJV exceeds that above the offshore profile by up to 20.5%, implying net O3 production over the SJV or vertical transport from above. During extreme events (e.g. Stratosphere-to-troposphere transport) vertical features (areas of enhanced or depleted O3 or water vapor) are observed in the offshore and SJV profiles at different altitudes, demonstrating the scale of vertical mixing during transport. Correlation analysis between offshore O3 profiles and O3 surface sites in the SJV lends further support the hypothesis of vertical mixing. Correlation analysis indicates that O3 mixing ratios at surface sites in the northern and middle SJV show significant correlations to the 1.5-2 km.a.s.l. offshore altitude range. Southern SJV O3 surface sites show a shift towards maximum correlations at increased time-offsets, and O3 surface sites at elevated altitudes show significant correlations with higher offshore altitudes (2.5-4 km.a.s.l.).

  7. Impact of asthma, exposure period, and filters on human responses during exposures to ozone and its initiated chemistry products.

    PubMed

    Fadeyi, M O; Tham, K W; Wu, W Y

    2015-10-01

    The impact of asthma, exposure period, and filter condition downstream of the mixing box of air-conditioning system on building occupants' perceptual response, work performance, and salivary α-amylase secretion during exposures to ozone and its initiated chemistry products is studied. The experiments were conducted in a field environmental chamber (FEC) (240 m(3)) simulating an office environment. Experiments were conducted during periods when the air-handling system operated with new or used pleated panel filters at constant recirculation (7/h) and ventilation (1/h) rates. Average ozone and secondary organic aerosols (ozone-initiated chemistry products) measured during non-asthmatic and asthmatic subjects' 3-h exposures in the FEC were in the ranges approximately 20-37 ppb and approximately 1.6-3 μg/m(3), respectively. Asthmatic subjects' perceived odor intensity and sensory (eye, nose, and throat) irritation ratings were generally lower than those of non-asthmatic subjects, possibly explaining why asthmatic subjects accept perceived air quality more than non-asthmatic subjects. However, asthmatic subjects' perceived physiological-like symptom ratings (flu, chest tightness, and headache) and concentrations of secreted salivary α-amylase were generally higher than those of non-asthmatic subjects. Asthmatic subjects had significantly lower accuracy than non-asthmatic subjects in a task that required higher concentration although they had higher work speed. Filter condition did not make any significant difference for subjects' responses.

  8. 15 CFR 1180.6 - Production of additional copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... (Continued) TECHNOLOGY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE TRANSFER BY FEDERAL AGENCIES OF SCIENTIFIC, TECHNICAL AND ENGINEERING INFORMATION TO THE NATIONAL TECHNICAL INFORMATION SERVICE § 1180.6 Production...

  9. 15 CFR 1180.6 - Production of additional copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... (Continued) TECHNOLOGY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE TRANSFER BY FEDERAL AGENCIES OF SCIENTIFIC, TECHNICAL AND ENGINEERING INFORMATION TO THE NATIONAL TECHNICAL INFORMATION SERVICE § 1180.6 Production...

  10. 15 CFR 1180.6 - Production of additional copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... (Continued) TECHNOLOGY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE TRANSFER BY FEDERAL AGENCIES OF SCIENTIFIC, TECHNICAL AND ENGINEERING INFORMATION TO THE NATIONAL TECHNICAL INFORMATION SERVICE § 1180.6 Production...

  11. 15 CFR 1180.6 - Production of additional copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... (Continued) TECHNOLOGY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE TRANSFER BY FEDERAL AGENCIES OF SCIENTIFIC, TECHNICAL AND ENGINEERING INFORMATION TO THE NATIONAL TECHNICAL INFORMATION SERVICE § 1180.6 Production...

  12. Optimization of Ozonation Process for the Reduction of Excess Sludge Production from Activated Sludge Process of Sago Industry Wastewater Using Central Composite Design

    PubMed Central

    Subha, B.; Muthukumar, M.

    2012-01-01

    Sago industries effluent containing large amounts of organic content produced excess sludge which is a serious problem in wastewater treatment. In this study ozonation has been employed for the reduction of excess sludge production in activated sludge process. Central composite design is used to study the effect of ozone treatment for the reduction of excess sludge production in sago effluent and to optimise the variables such as pH, ozonation time, and retention time. ANOVA showed that the coefficient determination value (R2) of VSS and COD reduction were 0.9689 and 0.8838, respectively. VSS reduction (81%) was achieved at acidic pH 6.9, 12 minutes ozonation, and retention time of 10 days. COD reduction (87%) was achieved at acidic pH 6.7, 8 minutes of ozonation time, and retention time of 6 days. Low ozonation time and high retention time influence maximum sludge reduction, whereas low ozonation time with low retention time was effective for COD reduction. PMID:22593666

  13. Optimization of ozonation process for the reduction of excess sludge production from activated sludge process of sago industry wastewater using central composite design.

    PubMed

    Subha, B; Muthukumar, M

    2012-01-01

    Sago industries effluent containing large amounts of organic content produced excess sludge which is a serious problem in wastewater treatment. In this study ozonation has been employed for the reduction of excess sludge production in activated sludge process. Central composite design is used to study the effect of ozone treatment for the reduction of excess sludge production in sago effluent and to optimise the variables such as pH, ozonation time, and retention time. ANOVA showed that the coefficient determination value (R(2)) of VSS and COD reduction were 0.9689 and 0.8838, respectively. VSS reduction (81%) was achieved at acidic pH 6.9, 12 minutes ozonation, and retention time of 10 days. COD reduction (87%) was achieved at acidic pH 6.7, 8 minutes of ozonation time, and retention time of 6 days. Low ozonation time and high retention time influence maximum sludge reduction, whereas low ozonation time with low retention time was effective for COD reduction.

  14. Ozone effect on respiratory syncytial virus infectivity and cytokine production by human alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Soukup, J.; Koren, H.S.; Becker, S. )

    1993-02-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the effect of ozone (O3) exposure at 1 ppm for 2 hr on the susceptibility/resistance of adult human alveolar macrophages (AM) to infection with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in vitro and on RSV-induced cytokine production by the AM. AM were first exposed to O3 or to filtered air and then infected with RSV at multiplicities of infection (m.o.i.) of 0.1, 1.0, and 10. The percentage RSV-infected AM and the amount of infectious virus released by the cells were determined at Days 2 and 4 after infection. Interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) levels in the supernatants were determined on Day 2. No difference in the percentage infected AM or in the amount of infectious RSV produced was found between control and O3-exposed cultures. However, O3-exposed AM infected with RSV at m.o.i. 1 produced less IL-1 in response to RSV infection than control AM: 63.6 pg/ml compared with 98.5 pg/ml. No difference in IL-1 was seen with m.o.i. 10. IL-6 levels were also decreased, but only after infection with m.o.i. 0.1. At this level of infection 830 pg/ml was produced by control AM as compared to 468.2 pg/ml by O3-exposed AM. TNF production was unaffected by O3 at all multiplicities of infection. Statistical analysis of the O3 effect on AM cytokine production induced by the different multiplicities, however, revealed no significant effect of O3. Based on these observations it appears unlikely that O3 alters susceptibility of AM to infection with RSV, nor does O3 dramatically alter cytokine production in response to RSV since effects on IL-1 and IL-6 secretion were only found with the lowest levels of infection which induced cytokine release.

  15. GC-MS(n) and LC-MS/MS couplings for the identification of degradation products resulting from the ozonation treatment of Acetochlor.

    PubMed

    Bouchonnet, Stéphane; Bourcier, Sophie; Souissi, Yasmine; Genty, Christophe; Sablier, Michel; Roche, Pascal; Boireau, Véronique; Ingrand, Valérie

    2012-04-01

    The degradation of the chloracetamide herbicide acetochlor has been studied under simulated ozonation treatment plant conditions. The degradation of acetochlor included the formation of several degradation products that were identified using GC/ion-trap mass spectrometry with EI and CI and HPLC/electrospray-QqTOF mass spectrometry. Thirteen ozonation products of acetochlor have been identified. Ozonation of the deuterated herbicide combined to MS(n) and high-resolution mass measurement allowed effective characterization of the degradation products. At the exception of one of them, the product B (2-chloro-2', ethyl-6', methyl-acetanilide), none of the identified degradation products has been already reported in the literature. Post-ozonation kinetics studies revealed that the concentrations of most degradation products evolved noticeably with time, particularly during the first hours following the ozonation treatment. This raises concerns about the fate of degradation products in the effluents of treatment plants and suggests the need for a better control on these products if their toxicity was demonstrated. PMID:22689619

  16. [Ozone exposure and asthma].

    PubMed

    Kleis, S; Louis, R; Bartsch, P

    2003-03-01

    Ozone is a pollutant the production of which depends on weather conditions and car engine combustion. Numerous epidemiological studies have indicated that high ozone levels correlated with morbidity in asthma. Experimental studies have shown that exposure of healthy subjects and asthmatics to ozone levels comparable to those measured in ambient air during hot summer days can generate respiratory symptoms, neutrophilic airways inflammation and lung function impairment. Lung function changes following ozone exposure are more pronounced in asthmatics and are dependent on the duration and intensity of exposure, a previous exposure and the nutritional status of the subjects. The airway epithelial cell layer is likely to play a pivotal role in initiating the inflammatory process following ozone exposure. Control of ambient air ozone levels must be a target for public health authorities.

  17. Biological effects of ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, M. )

    1989-09-01

    Tropospheric ozone, a classic anthropogenic air pollutant, is going to remain a troublesome byproduct of contemporary civilization for many decades. We have known for some time that the hydrocarbons and nitrogen oxides from motor vehicles, together with actinic radiation, account for local and regional photochemistry leading to prolonged afternoon ozone peaks. We also now know that agricultural burning and intensive animal husbandry elevate regional and mesoscale concentrations of ozone and its precursors, and that remote background levels of ozone have been rising steadily throughout this century. The changes we will have to make in emission controls to appreciably reduce current tropospheric ozone levels will have profound effects on our transportation systems, consumer products, and lifestyles. As a society, we will have to make difficult choices about the levels of ozone-associated health, welfare, and natural system damage we will tolerate, or conversely, how much we are willing to pay for controls which can minimize the damage.

  18. Ozone production efficiency of a ship-plume: ITCT 2K2 case study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun S; Kim, Yong H; Han, Kyung M; Kim, Jhoon; Song, Chul H

    2016-01-01

    Ozone production efficiency (OPE) of ship plume was first evaluated in this study, based on ship-plume photochemical/dynamic model simulations and the ship-plume composition data measured during the ITCT 2K2 (Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation 2002) aircraft campaign. The averaged instantaneous OPEs (OPE(i)‾) estimated via the ship-plume photochemical/dynamic modeling for the ITCT 2K2 ship-plume ranged between 4.61 and 18.92, showing that the values vary with the extent of chemical evolution (or chemical stage) of the ship plume and the stability classes of the marine boundary layer (MBL). Together with OPE(i)‾, the equivalent OPEs (OPE(e)‾) for the entire ITCT 2K2 ship-plume were also estimated. The OPE(e)‾ values varied between 9.73 (for the stable MBL) and 12.73 (for the moderately stable MBL), which agreed well with the OPE(e)‾ of 12.85 estimated based on the ITCT 2K2 ship-plume observations. It was also found that both the model-simulated and observation-based OPE(e)‾ inside the ship-plume were 0.29-0.38 times smaller than the OPE(e)‾ calculated/measured outside the ITCT 2K2 ship-plume. Such low OPEs insides the ship plume were due to the high levels of NO and non-liner ship-plume photochemistry. Possible implications of this ship-plume OPE study in the global chemistry-transport modeling are also discussed. PMID:26009472

  19. Ozone production efficiency of a ship-plume: ITCT 2K2 case study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun S; Kim, Yong H; Han, Kyung M; Kim, Jhoon; Song, Chul H

    2016-01-01

    Ozone production efficiency (OPE) of ship plume was first evaluated in this study, based on ship-plume photochemical/dynamic model simulations and the ship-plume composition data measured during the ITCT 2K2 (Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation 2002) aircraft campaign. The averaged instantaneous OPEs (OPE(i)‾) estimated via the ship-plume photochemical/dynamic modeling for the ITCT 2K2 ship-plume ranged between 4.61 and 18.92, showing that the values vary with the extent of chemical evolution (or chemical stage) of the ship plume and the stability classes of the marine boundary layer (MBL). Together with OPE(i)‾, the equivalent OPEs (OPE(e)‾) for the entire ITCT 2K2 ship-plume were also estimated. The OPE(e)‾ values varied between 9.73 (for the stable MBL) and 12.73 (for the moderately stable MBL), which agreed well with the OPE(e)‾ of 12.85 estimated based on the ITCT 2K2 ship-plume observations. It was also found that both the model-simulated and observation-based OPE(e)‾ inside the ship-plume were 0.29-0.38 times smaller than the OPE(e)‾ calculated/measured outside the ITCT 2K2 ship-plume. Such low OPEs insides the ship plume were due to the high levels of NO and non-liner ship-plume photochemistry. Possible implications of this ship-plume OPE study in the global chemistry-transport modeling are also discussed.

  20. Ozonated olive oils and the troubles.

    PubMed

    Uysal, Bulent

    2014-01-01

    One of the commonly used methods for ozone therapy is ozonated oils. Most prominent type of used oils is extra virgin olive oil. But still, each type of unsaturated oils may be used for ozonation. There are a lot of wrong knowledge on the internet about ozonated oils and its use as well. Just like other ozone therapy studies, also the studies about ozone oils are inadequate to avoid incorrect knowledge. Current data about ozone oil and its benefits are produced by supplier who oversees financial interests and make misinformation. Despite the rapidly increasing ozone oil sales through the internet, its quality and efficacy is still controversial. Dozens of companies and web sites may be easily found to buy ozonated oil. But, very few of these products are reliable, and contain sufficiently ozonated oil. This article aimed to introduce the troubles about ozonated oils and so to inform ozonated oil users. PMID:26401346

  1. Photochemical production of ozone in Beijing during the 2008 Olympic Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, C. C.-K.; Tsai, C.-Y.; Chang, C.-C.; Lin, P.-H.; Liu, S. C.; Zhu, T.

    2011-09-01

    As a part of the CAREBeijing-2008 campaign, observations of O3, oxides of nitrogen (NOx and NOy), CO, and hydrocarbons (NMHCs) were carried out at the air quality observatory of the Peking University in Beijing, China during August 2008, including the period of the 29th Summer Olympic Games. The measurements were compared with those of the CAREBeijing-2006 campaign to evaluate the effectiveness of the air pollution control measures, which were conducted for improving the air quality in Beijing during the Olympics. The results indicate that significant reduction in the emissions of primary air pollutants had been achieved; the monthly averaged mixing ratios of NOx, NOy, CO, and NMHCs decreased by 42.2, 56.5, 27.8, and 49.7 %, respectively. In contrast to the primary pollutants, the averaged mixing ratio of O3 increased by 42.2 %. Nevertheless, it was revealed that the ambient levels of total oxidant (Ox = O3+NO2+1.5 NOz) and NOz were reduced by 21.3 and 77.4 %, respectively. The contradictions between O3 and Ox were further examined in two case studies. Ozone production rates of 30-70 ppbv h-1 and OPEx of ~8 mole mole-1 were observed on a clear-sky day in spite of the reduced levels of precursors. In that case, it was found that the mixing ratio of O3 increased with the increasing NO2/NO ratio, whereas the NOz mixing ratio leveled off when NO2/NO>8. Consequently, the ratio of O3 to NOz increased to above 10, indicating the shift from VOC-sensitive regime to NOx-sensitive regime. However, in the other case, it was found that the O3 production was inhibited significantly due to substantial reduction in the NMHCs. According to the observations, it was suggested that the O3 and/or Ox production rates in Beijing should have been reduced as a result of the reduction in the emissions of precursors during the Olympic period. However, the nighttime O3 levels increased due to a decline in the NO-O3 titration, and the midday O3 peak levels were elevated because of the shift in

  2. Photochemical production of ozone in Beijing during the 2008 Olympic Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, C. C.-K.; Tsai, C.-Y.; Chang, C.-C.; Lin, P.-H.; Liu, S. C.; Zhu, T.

    2011-06-01

    As a part of the CAREBeijing-2008 campaign, observations of O3, oxides of nitrogen (NOx and NOy), CO, and hydrocarbons (NMHCs) were carried out at the air quality observatory of the Peking University in Beijing, China during August 2008, including the period of the 29th Summer Olympic Games. The measurements were compared to those of the CAREBeijing-2006 campaign to evaluate the effectiveness of the air pollution control measures, which were conducted for improving the air quality in Beijing during the Olympics. The results indicate that significant reduction in the emissions of primary air pollutants had been achieved; the monthly averages of NOx, NOy, CO, and NMHCs reduced by 42.2, 56.5, 27.8, and 49.7 %, respectively. In contrast to the primary pollutants, the averaged mixing ratio of O3 increased by 42.2 %. Nevertheless, it was revealed that the ambient levels of total oxidants (Ox=O3+NO2+1.5NOz) and NOz reduced by 21.3 and 77.4 %, respectively. The contradictions between O3 and Ox were further examined in two case studies. Ozone production rates of 30-70 ppbv hr-1 and OPEx of ~8 mole mole-1 were observed on a clear-sky day in spite of the reduced levels of precursors. In that case, it was found that the concentrations of O3 increased with the increasing NO2/NO ratio, whereas the NOz concentrations leveled off when NO2/NO>8. Consequently, the ratio of O3 to NOz increased to above 10, indicating the shift from VOC-sensitive regime to NOx-sensitive regime. However, in the other case, it was found that the O3 production was inhibited significantly due to substantial reduction in the ambient levels of NMHCs. According to the observations, it was suggested that the O3/Ox production rates in Beijing should have been reduced for the reduction in the emissions of precursors during the Olympic period; however, the nighttime O3 levels were increased for decline in the NO-O3 titration, and the midday O3 peak levels were elevated for the shift in the photochemical regime

  3. Root and shoot gas exchange respond additively to moderate ozone and methyl jasmonate without induction of ethylene: ethylene is induced at higher O3 concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Grantz, D.A.; Vu, H.-B.

    2012-01-01

    The available literature is conflicting on the potential protection of plants against ozone (O3) injury by exogenous jasmonates, including methyl jasmonate (MeJA). Protective antagonistic interactions of O3 and MeJA have been observed in some systems and purely additive effects in others. Here it is shown that chronic exposure to low to moderate O3 concentrations (4–114 ppb; 12 h mean) and to MeJA induced additive reductions in carbon assimilation (A n) and root respiration (R r), and in calculated whole plant carbon balance. Neither this chronic O3 regime nor MeJA induced emission of ethylene (ET) from the youngest fully expanded leaves. ET emission was induced by acute 3 h pulse exposure to much higher O3 concentrations (685 ppb). ET emission was further enhanced in plants treated with MeJA. Responses of growth, allocation, photosynthesis, and respiration to moderate O3 concentrations and to MeJA appear to be independent and additive, and not associated with emission of ET. These results suggest that responses of Pima cotton to environmentally relevant O3 are not mediated by signalling pathways associated with ET and MeJA, though these pathways are inducible in this species and exhibit a synergistic O3×MeJA interaction at very high O3 concentrations. PMID:22563119

  4. Increasing Springtime Ozone Mixing Ratios in the Free Troposphere Over Western North America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, O. R.; Parrish, D. D.; Stohl, A.; Trainer, M.; Nedelec, P.; Thouret, V.; Cammas, J. P.; Oltmans, S. J.; Johnson, B. J.; Tarasick, D.; Leblanc, T.; McDermid, I. S.; Jaffe, D.; Gao, R.; Stith, J.; Ryerson, T.; Aikin, K.; Campos, T.; Weinheimer, A.; Avery, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    In the lowermost layer of the atmosphere - the troposphere - ozone is an important source of the hydroxyl radical, an oxidant that breaks down most pollutants and some greenhouse gases. High concentrations of tropospheric ozone are toxic, however, and have a detrimental effect on human health and ecosystem productivity1. Moreover, tropospheric ozone itself acts as an effective greenhouse gas. Much of the present tropospheric ozone burden is a consequence of anthropogenic emissions of ozone precursors resulting in widespread increases in ozone concentrations since the late 1800s. At present, east Asia has the fastest-growing ozone precursor emissions. Much of the springtime east Asian pollution is exported eastwards towards western North America. Despite evidence that the exported Asian pollution produces ozone, no previous study has found a significant increase in free tropospheric ozone concentrations above the western USA since measurements began in the late 1970s. Here we compile springtime ozone measurements from many different platforms across western North America. We show a strong increase in springtime ozone mixing ratios during 1995-2008 and we have some additional evidence that a similar rate of increase in ozone mixing ratio has occurred since 1984. We find that the rate of increase in ozone mixing ratio is greatest when measurements are more heavily influenced by direct transport from Asia. Our result agrees with previous modelling studies, which indicate that global ozone concentrations should be increasing during the early part of the twenty-first century as a result of increasing precursor emissions, especially at northern mid-latitudes, with western North America being particularly sensitive to rising Asian emissions. We suggest that the observed increase in springtime background ozone mixing ratio may hinder the USA s compliance with its ozone air quality standard.

  5. Increasing springtime ozone mixing ratios in the free troposphere over western North America.

    PubMed

    Cooper, O R; Parrish, D D; Stohl, A; Trainer, M; Nédélec, P; Thouret, V; Cammas, J P; Oltmans, S J; Johnson, B J; Tarasick, D; Leblanc, T; McDermid, I S; Jaffe, D; Gao, R; Stith, J; Ryerson, T; Aikin, K; Campos, T; Weinheimer, A; Avery, M A

    2010-01-21

    In the lowermost layer of the atmosphere-the troposphere-ozone is an important source of the hydroxyl radical, an oxidant that breaks down most pollutants and some greenhouse gases. High concentrations of tropospheric ozone are toxic, however, and have a detrimental effect on human health and ecosystem productivity. Moreover, tropospheric ozone itself acts as an effective greenhouse gas. Much of the present tropospheric ozone burden is a consequence of anthropogenic emissions of ozone precursors resulting in widespread increases in ozone concentrations since the late 1800s. At present, east Asia has the fastest-growing ozone precursor emissions. Much of the springtime east Asian pollution is exported eastwards towards western North America. Despite evidence that the exported Asian pollution produces ozone, no previous study has found a significant increase in free tropospheric ozone concentrations above the western USA since measurements began in the late 1970s. Here we compile springtime ozone measurements from many different platforms across western North America. We show a strong increase in springtime ozone mixing ratios during 1995-2008 and we have some additional evidence that a similar rate of increase in ozone mixing ratio has occurred since 1984. We find that the rate of increase in ozone mixing ratio is greatest when measurements are more heavily influenced by direct transport from Asia. Our result agrees with previous modelling studies, which indicate that global ozone concentrations should be increasing during the early part of the twenty-first century as a result of increasing precursor emissions, especially at northern mid-latitudes, with western North America being particularly sensitive to rising Asian emissions. We suggest that the observed increase in springtime background ozone mixing ratio may hinder the USA's compliance with its ozone air quality standard.

  6. Removal of precursors for disinfection by-products (Dbps)--differences between ozone- and OH-radical-induced oxidation.

    PubMed

    Kleiser, G; Frimmel, F H

    2000-06-22

    Pre-oxidation is often applied to reduce the formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs). The aim of pre-oxidation is to remove the centers of natural organic matter (NOM) which are responsible for the formation of DBPs. In this paper, the differences between ozone- and OH-radical-induced oxidation to remove DBP-precursors are compared. The experiments were done with water of the River Ruhr (Germany) with a concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) of 2 mg/l. Ozonation was able to remove DBP precursors selectively. After application of an absorbed ozone mass of 1.5 mg/mg DOC, a reduction in the formation potential for (THM-FP) and in the formation potential for organic halogen adsorbable on activated carbon (AOX-FP) down to 68 and 73% of the initial concentration was achieved, respectively. A removal of NOM was not achieved using absorbed ozone masses between 0.5 and 1.5 mg/mg DOC. In the hydrogen peroxide/UV process, in which OH-radicals are the reactive species, an increase in the THM concentration was measured after application of this process with short irradiation times. The maximum value of the THM-FP was 20% higher than the initial THM-FP. After an irradiation time of 1,050 min and a hydrogen peroxide consumption of 5.6 mg/l, the THM-FP and AOX-FP decreased to 75 and 71% of the initial formation potential, respectively. There was no selective removal of DBP precursors because the DOC concentration decreased also to 75% of the initial DOC-concentration after 1,050 min of irradiation.

  7. 40 CFR 300.920 - Addition of products to Schedule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS NATIONAL OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES POLLUTION... in § 300.915(a) to the Emergency Response Division (5202-G), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency..., the technical product data specified in § 300.915 must be submitted to the Emergency Response...

  8. 40 CFR 300.920 - Addition of products to Schedule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS NATIONAL OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES POLLUTION... in § 300.915(a) to the Emergency Response Division (5202-G), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency..., the technical product data specified in § 300.915 must be submitted to the Emergency Response...

  9. 40 CFR 300.920 - Addition of products to Schedule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS NATIONAL OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES POLLUTION... in § 300.915(a) to the Emergency Response Division (5202-G), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency..., the technical product data specified in § 300.915 must be submitted to the Emergency Response...

  10. Evaluation of the production and the destruction of ozone in the lower atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muramatsu, H.

    1994-01-01

    Observed surface ozone mixing ratio X(sub ob) is partitioned into two parts; X(sub tr), transported from the free troposphere and X(sub ch), chemically produced or destructed in the boundary layer. X(sub tr) is estimated from the ozone concentration in the free troposphere and the wind speed. The ozone in the free troposphere estimated from surface ozone observations is consistent with that of ozonesonde data. X(sub ch) is obtained from the difference between X(sub ob) and X(sub tr). X(sub tr) increases with wind speed, while X(sub ch) shows maximum at hourly wind speed of 1-2 m/s in the daytime. Contribution of X(sub tr) to X(sub ob) is larger than X(sub ch) except for a short period in summer. X(sub ch) is positive for April-October, but X(sub ch) can be negative in winter, showing the net chemical destruction in the boundary layer. X(sub ch) increases linearly with solar radiation, and is negative for daily global solar radiation below 8 MJ/sq m, which is about equal to the monthly mean in winter.

  11. The observed response of ozone production to the policy-driven decrease of NOx and CO emissions in the Baltimore/Washington area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, S. J.; Hosley, K.; Ren, X.; Wolfe, G.; Dickerson, R. R.; Salawitch, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    The nonlinearity of ozone production has important policy implications as cities continue to decrease NOx, CO, and other important ozone precursors. Observations in the Baltimore/Washington area from 1970 through 2014 demonstrate reductions in NOx and CO emissions due to policy implementation leading to dramatic improvement in air quality. We will analyze the response of the reactivity of ozone, NOx, and VOC to these emission reductions in the Baltimore/Washington area using the University of Washington Chemical Model (UWCMv2.2). This model allows us to evaluate this response using multiple gas-phase chemical mechanisms. With this model, we will also compare and contrast the response of modeled ozone to reduced NOx and CO concentrations across multiple chemical mechanisms.

  12. Additives initiate selective production of chemicals from biomass pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Leng, Shuai; Wang, Xinde; Wang, Lei; Qiu, Huizhe; Zhuang, Guilin; Zhong, Xing; Wang, Jianguo; Ma, Fengyun; Liu, Jingmei; Wang, Qiang

    2014-03-01

    To improve chemicals selectivity under low temperature, a new method that involves the injection of additives into biomass pyrolysis is introduced. This method allows biomass pyrolysis to achieve high selectivity to chemicals under low temperature (300°C), while nothing was obtained in typical pyrolysis under 300°C. However, by using the new method, the first liquid drop emerged at the interval between 140°C and 240°C. Adding methanol to mushroom scrap pyrolysis obtained high selectivity to acetic acid (98.33%), while adding ethyl acetate gained selectivity to methanol (65.77%) in bagasse pyrolysis and to acetone (72.51%) in corncob pyrolysis. Apart from basic chemicals, one high value-added chemical (2,3-dihydrobenzofuran) was also detected, which obtained the highest selectivity (10.33%) in corncob pyrolysis through the addition of ethyl acetate. Comparison of HZSM-5 and CaCO3 catalysis showed that benzene emerged in the liquid because of the larger degree of cracking and hydrodeoxygenation over HZSM-5. PMID:24508091

  13. Additives initiate selective production of chemicals from biomass pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Leng, Shuai; Wang, Xinde; Wang, Lei; Qiu, Huizhe; Zhuang, Guilin; Zhong, Xing; Wang, Jianguo; Ma, Fengyun; Liu, Jingmei; Wang, Qiang

    2014-03-01

    To improve chemicals selectivity under low temperature, a new method that involves the injection of additives into biomass pyrolysis is introduced. This method allows biomass pyrolysis to achieve high selectivity to chemicals under low temperature (300°C), while nothing was obtained in typical pyrolysis under 300°C. However, by using the new method, the first liquid drop emerged at the interval between 140°C and 240°C. Adding methanol to mushroom scrap pyrolysis obtained high selectivity to acetic acid (98.33%), while adding ethyl acetate gained selectivity to methanol (65.77%) in bagasse pyrolysis and to acetone (72.51%) in corncob pyrolysis. Apart from basic chemicals, one high value-added chemical (2,3-dihydrobenzofuran) was also detected, which obtained the highest selectivity (10.33%) in corncob pyrolysis through the addition of ethyl acetate. Comparison of HZSM-5 and CaCO3 catalysis showed that benzene emerged in the liquid because of the larger degree of cracking and hydrodeoxygenation over HZSM-5.

  14. Corona discharge influences ozone concentrations near rats.

    PubMed

    Goheen, Steven C; Gaither, Kari; Anantatmula, Shantha M; Mong, Gary M; Sasser, Lyle B; Lessor, Delbert

    2004-02-01

    Ozone can be produced by corona discharge either in dry air or when one electrode is submerged in water. Since ozone is toxic, we examined whether ozone production by corona near laboratory animals could reach levels of concern. Male rats were exposed to a corona discharge and the concentration of ozone produced was measured. The resulting concentration of ozone ranged from ambient levels to 250 ppb when animals were located 1 cm from a 10 kV source. Similar ozone concentrations were observed when a grounded water source was present. Possible explanations for, as well as concerns regarding, ozone production under these conditions are discussed. PMID:14735560

  15. Minireview: the health implications of water treatment with ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Carmichael, N.G.; Winder, C.; Borges, S.H.; Backhouse, B.L.; Lewis, P.D.

    1982-01-11

    Ozone is a highly efficient disinfectant which may have significant advantages in water treatment compared to chlorine. It has, however, been shown that mutagenic and possibly carcinogenic byproducts may be produced under certain conditions of ozonation. Light chlorination following ozonization may meet the highest standards of disinfection. In addition the destruction of much of the organic matter by prior ozone treatment may well result in less harmful chlorinated and brominated products in the finished water. In many cases ozone treatment alone may suffice. It would be desirable to test with long term in vivo experiments which of the alternatives produces the best combination of microbiologically clean and pleasant water with minimum mutagenic and carcinogenic effect.

  16. 15 CFR 713.4 - Advance declaration requirements for additionally planned production, processing, or consumption...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING SCHEDULE 2 CHEMICALS § 713.4 Advance declaration requirements for additionally planned production... additionally planned production, processing, or consumption of Schedule 2 chemicals. 713.4 Section...

  17. 15 CFR 713.4 - Advance declaration requirements for additionally planned production, processing, or consumption...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING SCHEDULE 2 CHEMICALS § 713.4 Advance declaration requirements for additionally planned production... additionally planned production, processing, or consumption of Schedule 2 chemicals. 713.4 Section...

  18. 15 CFR 713.4 - Advance declaration requirements for additionally planned production, processing, or consumption...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING SCHEDULE 2 CHEMICALS § 713.4 Advance declaration requirements for additionally planned production... additionally planned production, processing, or consumption of Schedule 2 chemicals. 713.4 Section...

  19. Additive Manufacturing in Production: A Study Case Applying Technical Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ituarte, Iñigo Flores; Coatanea, Eric; Salmi, Mika; Tuomi, Jukka; Partanen, Jouni

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is expanding the manufacturing capabilities. However, quality of AM produced parts is dependent on a number of machine, geometry and process parameters. The variability of these parameters affects the manufacturing drastically and therefore standardized processes and harmonized methodologies need to be developed to characterize the technology for end use applications and enable the technology for manufacturing. This research proposes a composite methodology integrating Taguchi Design of Experiments, multi-objective optimization and statistical process control, to optimize the manufacturing process and fulfil multiple requirements imposed to an arbitrary geometry. The proposed methodology aims to characterize AM technology depending upon manufacturing process variables as well as to perform a comparative assessment of three AM technologies (Selective Laser Sintering, Laser Stereolithography and Polyjet). Results indicate that only one machine, laser-based Stereolithography, was feasible to fulfil simultaneously macro and micro level geometrical requirements but mechanical properties were not at required level. Future research will study a single AM system at the time to characterize AM machine technical capabilities and stimulate pre-normative initiatives of the technology for end use applications.

  20. The Unique OMI HCHO/NO2 Feature During the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics: Implications for Ozone Production Sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, J. C.; Duncan, B. N.; Douglass, A. R.; Kurosu, T. P.; Chance, K.; Retscher, C.

    2010-01-01

    In preparation of the Beijing Summer Olympic and Paralympics Games, strict controls were imposed between July and September 2008 on motor vehicle traffic and industrial emissions to improve air quality for the competitors. We assessed chemical sensitivity of ozone production to these controls using Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) column measurements of formaldehyde (HCHO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2), where their ratio serves as a proxy for the sensitivity. During the emission controls, HCHO/NO2 increased and indicated a NOx-limited regime, in contrast to the same period in the preceding three years when the ratio indicates volatile organic carbon (VOC)-limited and mixed NOx-VOC-limited regimes. After the emission controls were lifted, observed NO2 and HCHO/NO2 returned to their previous values. The 2005-2008 OMI record shows that this transition in regimes was unique as ozone production in Beijing was rarely NOx-limited. OMI measured summertime increases in HCHO of around 13% in 2008 compared to prior years, the same time period during which MODIS vegetation indices increased. The OMI HCHO increase may be due to higher biogenic emissions of HCHO precursors, associated with Beijing's greening initiative for the Olympics. However, NO2 and HCHO were also found to be well-correlated during the summer months. This indicates an anthropogenic VOC contribution from vehicle emissions to OMI HCHO and is a plausible explanation for the relative HCHO minimum observed in August 2008, concurrent with a minimum in traffic emissions. We calculated positive trends in 2005-2008 OMI HCHO and NO2 of about +1 x 10(exp 14) Molec/ square M-2 and +3 x 10(exp 13) molec CM-2 per month, respectively. The positive trend in NO2 may be an indicator of increasing vehicular traffic since 2005, while the positive trend in HCHO may be due to a combined increase in anthropogenic and biogenic emissions since 2005.

  1. Analysis of 2010-2014 Ground-Level Ozone at Trinidad Head, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennartson, E.; McClure-Begley, A.; Petropavlovskikh, I. V.; Leonard, M.

    2015-12-01

    High concentrations of ground-level ozone in the troposphere have negative impacts on human health and other biological organisms. As the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is proposing to lower the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for ozone from 75 to 65-70 parts per billion (ppb), it is important to further study the relationship between both anthropogenic and natural pollutants that lead to production and accumulation of surface ozone. Ground-level ozone data from Trinidad Head, California (THD) was analyzed from 2010-2014 to investigate the factors contributing to high ground-level ozone events. For this research project, a high ozone event was defined as ground-level ozone readings greater than the 90th percentile of the seasonal ozone variability observed during the 2003-2014 period. The ozone exceedances were also required to last for three continuous hours or more. Meteorological parameters, such as wind speed and synoptic patterns, were taken into account. In addition, impacts related to stratospheric intrusions, Asian pollution transport, and the influence of local forest fires were considered. We show that high ground-level ozone events at THD occur during a dominant wind direction and are highly dependent on the origin of the air mass. This understanding of enhanced ground-level ozone drivers will provide a foundational knowledge of climate adaptation and mitigation with improved scientific understanding of the changing climate and its impacts.

  2. NOx Emissions from Large Point Sources: Variability in Ozone Production, Resulting Health Damages and Economic Costs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauzerall, D. L.; Sultan, B.; Kim, N.; Bradford, D.

    2004-12-01

    We present a proof-of-concept analysis of the measurement of the health damage of ozone (O3) produced from nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) emitted by individual large point sources in the eastern United States. We use a regional atmospheric model of the eastern United States, the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with Extensions (CAMx), to quantify the variable impact that a fixed quantity of NOx emitted from individual sources can have on the downwind concentration of surface O3, depending on temperature and local biogenic hydrocarbon emissions. We also examine the dependence of resulting ozone-related health damages on the size of the exposed population. The investigation is relevant to the increasingly widely used "cap and trade" approach to NOx regulation, which presumes that shifts of emissions over time and space, holding the total fixed over the course of the summer O3 season, will have minimal effect on the environmental outcome. By contrast, we show that a shift of a unit of NOx emissions from one place or time to another could result in large changes in the health effects due to ozone formation and exposure. We indicate how the type of modeling carried out here might be used to attach externality-correcting prices to emissions. Charging emitters fees that are commensurate with the damage caused by their NOx emissions would create an incentive for emitters to reduce emissions at times and in locations where they cause the largest damage.

  3. Estimating the Tropospheric Ozone Distribution by the Assimilation of Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashi, Hiroo; Stajner, Ivanka; Winslow, Nathan; Jones, Dylan B. A.; Pawson, Steven; Thompson, Anne M.

    2003-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone is important to the environment, because it acts as a strong oxidant to control the concentrations of many reduced gases (methane, carbon monoxide, ... ), its radiative forcing plays a significant role in the greenhouse effect, and direct contact with ozone is harmful to human health. Tropospheric ozone, whose main sources are intrusion from the stratosphere and chemical production from source gases associated with urban pollution or biomass burning, varies on a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Its transport and chemistry can be influenced by weather, seasonal, or multiannual variability. Despite the importance of tropospheric ozone, it contributes only about 10% of the total ozone loading in the atmosphere. Consequently, satellite instruments lose sensitivity below the stratospheric ozone peak, and provide little information about middle and lower tropospheric ozone. This talk will discuss recent modifications made to the satellite ozone data assimilation system at NASA's Data Assimilation Office (DAO) in order to provide better tropospheric ozone columns and profiles. We use a version of the system that assimilates only the data from the Solar Backscatter UltraViolet/2 (SBUV/2) instrument. The quality of the assimilated ozone in the tropical troposphere is evaluated by comparison with independent observations obtained from the Southern Hemispheric Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) network. It is shown that the quality of ozone fields is sensitive to the winds used in the transport model. Increasing the vertical resolution of the model also has a beneficial impact. The assimilated ozone in the lower troposphere was substantially improved by inclusion of tropospheric ozone production, loss, and dry deposition rates from the Harvard GEOS-CHEM model. The mechanisms behind these results will be examined and the implications for our understanding of tropospheric ozone will be discussed.

  4. Photochemical ozone production in tropical squall line convection during NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment/Amazon Boundary Layer Experiment 2A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickering, Kenneth E.; Thompson, Anne M.; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Simpson, Joanne; Scala, John R.

    1991-01-01

    The role of convection was examined in trace gas transport and ozone production in a tropical dry season squall line sampled on August 3, 1985, during NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment/Amazon Boundary Layer Experiment 2A (NASA GTE/ABLE 2A) in Amazonia, Brazil. Two types of analyses were performed. Transient effects within the cloud are examined with a combination of two-dimensional cloud and one-dimensional photochemical modeling. Tracer analyses using the cloud model wind fields yield a series of cross sections of NO(x), CO, and O3 distribution during the lifetime of the cloud; these fields are used in the photochemical model to compute the net rate of O3 production. At noon, when the cloud was mature, the instantaneous ozone production potential in the cloud is between 50 and 60 percent less than in no-cloud conditions due to reduced photolysis and cloud scavenging of radicals. Analysis of cloud inflows and outflows is used to differentiate between air that is undisturbed and air that has been modified by the storm. These profiles are used in the photochemical model to examine the aftereffects of convective redistribution in the 24-hour period following the storm. Total tropospheric column O3 production changed little due to convection because so little NO(x) was available in the lower troposphere. However, the integrated O3 production potential in the 5- to 13-km layer changed from net destruction to net production as a result of the convection. The conditions of the August 3, 1985, event may be typical of the early part of the dry season in Amazonia, when only minimal amounts of pollution from biomass burning have been transported into the region.

  5. Effect of ozone on photosynthesis, vegetative growth and productivity of prunus salicina' in the San Joaquin Valley of California. (Year 3). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, L.E.; DeJong, T.M.; Retzlaff, W.A.

    1992-10-01

    In 1988, an experimental orchard of Cassleman plum (Prunus salicina) was planted in open-top-fumigation chambers and exposed for 4 growing seasons to three ozone concentrations near Fresno, California. During the third year of the study, mean 12-h ozone levels (1991) were 0.034 ppm in the charcoal filtered chambers, 0.050 ppm in the ambient air chambers, 0.94 ppm in the ambient plus added ozone chambers and 0.058 ppm in the no-chamber field plots. Chronic ozone stress has a detrimental effect on photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, leaf appearance and retention, trunk growth, and yield. Yield was 19.8 kg per tree in the charcoal filtered chambers, 15.9 kg/tree in the ambient air chambers, 6.8 kg/tree in the ambient air plus ozone chambers and 15.8 kg/tree in the no-chamber plots. Premature leaf drop and a 35 percent yield loss occurred in 1990 at mean daily ozone concentrations greater than 0.09 ppm (the California Ambient Air Quality Standard). In 1991 the yield loss increased to 65%, indicating cumulative impact on long term productivity.

  6. Effect of ozone on photosynthesis, vegetative growth and productivity of prunus salicina in the San Joaquin Valley of California. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, L.E.; DeJong, T.M.; Retzlaff, W.A.

    1991-10-31

    In 1988, an experimental orchard of Cassleman plum (Prunus salicina) was planted in open top fumigation chambers and exposed for 4 growing seasons to three ozone concentrations near Fresno, California. During the two years from orchard establishment to the first fruit bearing stage, mean 12-h ozone levels (1989) were 0.044 ppm in the charcoal filtered chambers, 0.059 ppm in the ambient air chambers, 0.111 ppm in the ambient plus added ozone chambers and 0.064 ppm in the no-chamber field plots. The 1990 ozone levels were 0.038 ppm, 0.050 ppm, 0.090 ppm, and 0.050 ppm, respectively. Chronic ozone stress has a detrimental effect on leaf appearance and retention, trunk growth, and yield during the orchard establishment period. Fruit production was 28 percent lower in the ambient exposures and 38 percent lower in the twice ambient exposures, compared to trees grown in filtered air chambers. Photosynthesis was reduced 11 percent and 40 percent respectively. Premature leaf drop occurred at mean daily ozone concentrations greater than 0.09 ppm (the California Ambient Air Quality Standard) and had an adverse impact on trunk growth.

  7. Factors Influencing Agreement between OMI-based Ozone and NO2 Products and Ground-based Instrumentation during DISCOVER-AQ (July 2011, Maryland): Site Variability and Meteorology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, A. M.; Reed, A. J.; Martins, D. K.; Festa, J. M.; Szykman, J.; Joseph, E.; Herman, J. R.; Abuhassan, N.; Berkoff, T.

    2012-12-01

    The Pandora spectrophotometric column measurements of ozone and NO2 with OMI overpass comparisons are presented for 11 Maryland, USA, sites that operated in July 2011 in the DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) aircraft and ground campaign. In general, total ozone agreement between the Pandora and satellite is within 4%, with larger deviations present on very cloudy days. Both Pandora and OMI total ozone agree within a few percent of the integrated sonde total column ozones. In contrast, the TTOR tropospheric ozone column to 200 hPa, that is based on OMI and MLS differences, averages 20% offsets, usually too low, over Beltsville, 15 km from Washington, DC, and the Edgewood sampling site, 25 km northeast of Baltimore, where bay breeze is one factor enhancing lower tropospheric ozone. Site to site differences in NO2 column agreement are prominent, with the few rural sites displaying smaller offsets between OMI and Pandora. However, detailed examination of days with the largest discrepancies (greater than 30%) reveals that the ground NO2 measurement can be very sensitive to scattered clouds and low-lying aerosols. Implications for the use of satellite products by Air Quality decision-makers are discussed.

  8. Terminating pre-ozonation prior to biological activated carbon filtration results in increased formation of nitrogenous disinfection by-products upon subsequent chlorination.

    PubMed

    Chu, Wenhai; Li, Changjun; Gao, Naiyun; Templeton, Michael R; Zhang, Yanshen

    2015-02-01

    Previous research demonstrated that ozone dosed before biological activated carbon (BAC) filtration reduces the formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) upon subsequent chlorination. The current work aimed to evaluate the impact of terminating this pre-ozonation on the ability of the BAC to remove the precursors of N-DBPs. More N-DBP precursors passed into the post-BAC water when the pre-ozonation was terminated, resulting in greater formation of N-DBPs when the water was subsequently chlorinated, compared to a parallel BAC filter when the pre-ozonation was run continuously. Moreover, the N-DBP formation potential was significantly increased in the effluent of the BAC filter after terminating pre-ozonation, compared with the influent of the BAC filter (i.e. the effluent from the sand filter). Therefore, while selectively switching pre-ozonation on/off may have cost and other operational benefits for water suppliers, these should be weighed against the increased formation of N-DBPs and potential associated health risks.

  9. Mutagenic activity associated with by-products of drinking water disinfection by chlorine, chlorine dioxide, ozone and UV-irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zoeteman, B C; Hrubec, J; de Greef, E; Kool, H J

    1982-12-01

    A retrospective epidemiological study in The Netherlands showed a statistical association between chlorination by-products in drinking water and cancer of the esophagus and stomach for males. A pilot-plant study with alternative disinfectants was carried out with stored water of the Rivers Rhine and Meuse. It was demonstrated that the increase of direct acting mutagens after treatment with chlorine dioxide is similar to the effect of chlorination. Ozonation of Rhine water reduced the mutagenic activity for Salmonella typhimurium TA 98 both with and without metabolic activation. UV alone hardly affects the mutagenicity of the stored river water for S. typh. TA 98. In all studies, practically no mutagenic activity for S. typh. TA 100 was found. Although remarkable changes in the concentration of individual organic compounds are reported, the identity of the mutagens detected is yet unclear. Compounds of possible interest due to their removal by ozonation are 1,3,3-trimethyloxindole, dicyclopentadiene and several alkylquinolines. Compounds which might be responsible for the increased mutagenicity after chlorination are two brominated acetonitriles and tri(2-chlorethyl) phosphate. Furthermore, the concentration procedure with adsorption on XAD resin and the subsequent elution step may have affected the results. It is proposed to focus further research more on the less volatile by-products of disinfection than on the trihalomethanes.

  10. Economic valuation of environmental benefits of removing pharmaceutical and personal care products from WWTP effluents by ozonation.

    PubMed

    Molinos-Senante, M; Reif, R; Garrido-Baserba, M; Hernández-Sancho, F; Omil, F; Poch, M; Sala-Garrido, R

    2013-09-01

    Continuous release of pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) present in effluents from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is nowadays leading to the adoption of specific measures within the framework of the Directive 2000/60/EC (Water Framework Directive). The ozonation process, normally employed for drinking water production, has also proven its potential to eliminate PPCPs from secondary effluents in spite of their low concentrations. However, there is a significant drawback related with the costs associated with its implementation. This lack of studies is especially pronounced regarding the economic valuation of the environmental benefits associated to avoid the discharge of these pollutants into water bodies. For the first time the shadow prices of 5 PPCPs which are ethynilestradiol, sulfamethoxazole, diclofenac, tonalide and galaxolide from treated effluent using a pilot-scale ozonation reactor have been estimated. From non-sensitive areas their values are -73.73; -34.95; -42.20; -10.98; and -8.67 respectively and expressed in €/kg. They represent a proxy to the economic value of the environmental benefits arisen from undischarged pollutants. This paper contributes to value the environmental benefits of implementing post-treatment processes aimed to achieve the quality standards required by the Priority Substances Directive.

  11. 2D simulation of active species and ozone production in a multi-tip DC air corona discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meziane, M.; Eichwald, O.; Sarrette, J. P.; Ducasse, O.; Yousfi, M.

    2011-11-01

    The present paper shows for the first time in the literature a complete 2D simulation of the ozone production in a DC positive multi-tip to plane corona discharge reactor crossed by a dry air flow at atmospheric pressure. The simulation is undertaken until 1 ms and involves tens of successive discharge and post-discharge phases. The air flow is stressed by several monofilament corona discharges generated by a maximum of four anodic tips distributed along the reactor. The nonstationary hydrodynamics model for reactive gas mixture is solved using the commercial FLUENT software. During each discharge phase, thermal and vibrational energies as well as densities of radical and metastable excited species are locally injected as source terms in the gas medium surrounding each tip. The chosen chemical model involves 10 neutral species reacting following 24 reactions. The obtained results allow us to follow the cartography of the temperature and the ozone production inside the corona reactor as a function of the number of high voltage anodic tips.

  12. Effects of stratospheric ozone recovery on photochemistry and ozone air quality in the troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Wu, S.; Huang, Y.; Wang, Y.

    2014-04-01

    There has been significant stratospheric ozone depletion since the late 1970s due to ozone-depleting substances (ODSs). With the implementation of the Montreal Protocol and its amendments and adjustments, stratospheric ozone is expected to recover towards its pre-1980 level in the coming decades. In this study, we examine the implications of stratospheric ozone recovery for the tropospheric chemistry and ozone air quality with a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem). With a full recovery of the stratospheric ozone, the projected increases in ozone column range from 1% over the low latitudes to more than 10% over the polar regions. The sensitivity factor of troposphere ozone photolysis rate, defined as the percentage changes in surface ozone photolysis rate for 1% increase in stratospheric ozone column, shows significant seasonal variation but is always negative with absolute value larger than one. The expected stratospheric ozone recovery is found to affect the tropospheric ozone destruction rates much more than the ozone production rates. Significant decreases in surface ozone photolysis rates due to stratospheric ozone recovery are simulated. The global average tropospheric OH decreases by 1.7%, and the global average lifetime of tropospheric ozone increases by 1.5%. The perturbations to tropospheric ozone and surface ozone show large seasonal and spatial variations. General increases in surface ozone are calculated for each season, with increases by up to 0.8 ppbv in the remote areas. Increases in ozone lifetime by up to 13% are found in the troposphere. The increased lifetimes of tropospheric ozone in response to stratospheric ozone recovery enhance the intercontinental transport of ozone and global pollution, in particular for the summertime. The global background ozone attributable to Asian emissions is calculated to increase by up to 15% or 0.3 ppbv in the Northern Hemisphere in response to the projected stratospheric ozone recovery.

  13. Study on enhanced degradation of atrazine by ozonation in the presence of hydroxylamine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jingxin; Li, Ji; Dong, Wenyi; Ma, Jun; Cao, Jie; Li, Tingting; Li, Jiayin; Gu, Jia; Liu, Pingxin

    2016-10-01

    Degradation of atrazine (ATZ) by ozonation in the presence of hydroxylamine (HA) was experimentally investigated in this study. The results showed approximately 80% of ATZ was degraded by ozonation in the presence of HA, while only 20% was degraded by ozonation alone. The obvious inhibition of the ATZ degradation by tert-butanol suggested the enhanced ATZ degradation by ozone/HA was primarily attributed to OH. The OH yield was determined to be 25.8%. Additionally, the optimum HA dosage for the ATZ degradation was 4μM, when the ozone dosage was 20μM. The effects of pH, bicarbonate and temperature on ATZ degradation by ozone/HA were investigated in details. Most importantly, the enhanced ATZ degradation by ozonation in the presence of HA was still observed in real water especially at acidic pHs. Furthermore, the potential mechanism of OH formation during the reaction of ozone with HA was proposed herein. Nine products were identified by UPLC/Q-TOF-MS system. The ATZ degradation involved dealkylation, dechlorination-hydroxylation and olefination. The evolutions of the concentrations of three available transformation products including deethylatrazine, deisopropylatrazine and deethyldeisopropylatrazine in ozone/HA were evaluated and compared with that in ozonation alone.

  14. Study on enhanced degradation of atrazine by ozonation in the presence of hydroxylamine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jingxin; Li, Ji; Dong, Wenyi; Ma, Jun; Cao, Jie; Li, Tingting; Li, Jiayin; Gu, Jia; Liu, Pingxin

    2016-10-01

    Degradation of atrazine (ATZ) by ozonation in the presence of hydroxylamine (HA) was experimentally investigated in this study. The results showed approximately 80% of ATZ was degraded by ozonation in the presence of HA, while only 20% was degraded by ozonation alone. The obvious inhibition of the ATZ degradation by tert-butanol suggested the enhanced ATZ degradation by ozone/HA was primarily attributed to OH. The OH yield was determined to be 25.8%. Additionally, the optimum HA dosage for the ATZ degradation was 4μM, when the ozone dosage was 20μM. The effects of pH, bicarbonate and temperature on ATZ degradation by ozone/HA were investigated in details. Most importantly, the enhanced ATZ degradation by ozonation in the presence of HA was still observed in real water especially at acidic pHs. Furthermore, the potential mechanism of OH formation during the reaction of ozone with HA was proposed herein. Nine products were identified by UPLC/Q-TOF-MS system. The ATZ degradation involved dealkylation, dechlorination-hydroxylation and olefination. The evolutions of the concentrations of three available transformation products including deethylatrazine, deisopropylatrazine and deethyldeisopropylatrazine in ozone/HA were evaluated and compared with that in ozonation alone. PMID:27232722

  15. Tropospheric Ozone and Photochemical Smog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sillman, S.

    2003-12-01

    emitted species, in a process that is driven by sunlight and is accelerated by warm temperatures. This smog is largely the product of gasoline-powered engines (especially automobiles), although coal-fired industry can also generate photochemical smog. The process of photochemical smog formation was first identified by Haagen-Smit and Fox (1954) in association with Los Angeles, a city whose geography makes it particularly susceptible to this type of smog formation. Sulfate aerosols and organic particulates are often produced concurrently with ozone, giving rise to a characteristic milky-white haze associated with this type of air pollution.Today ozone and particulates are recognized as the air pollutants that are most likely to affect human health adversely. In the United States, most major metropolitan areas have periodic air pollution events with ozone in excess of government health standards. Violations of local health standards also occur in major cities in Canada and in much of Europe. Other cities around the world (especially Mexico City) also experience very high ozone levels. In addition to urban-scale events, elevated ozone occurs in region-wide events in the eastern USA and in Western Europe, with excess ozone extending over areas of 1,000 km2 or more. Ozone plumes of similar extent are found in the tropics (especially in Central Africa) at times of high biomass burning (e.g., Jenkins et al., 1997; Chatfield et al., 1998). In some cases ozone associated with biomass burning has been identified at distances up to 104 km from its sources (Schultz et al., 1999).Ozone also has a significant impact on the global troposphere, and ozone chemistry is a major component of global tropospheric chemistry. Global background ozone concentrations are much lower than urban or regional concentrations during pollution events, but there is evidence that the global background has increased as a result of human activities (e.g., Wang and Jacob, 1998; Volz and Kley, 1988). A rise in

  16. Identification of products formed during the heterogeneous nitration and ozonation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, Richard E.; Jeong, Haewoo; Haddadi, Shokouh; Fisseha Derseh, Rebeka; Gowan, Alexandra; Beránek, Josef; Kubátová, Alena

    2016-03-01

    The 3- and 4-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are the most abundant of PAHs in air particulate matter (PM). Thus we have investigated heterogeneous oxidation of 3- and 4-ring PAHs in a small-scale flow reactor using quartz filter as a support. Four representative PAHs, anthracene, phenanthrene, pyrene, and fluoranthene, were exposed to either NO2, O3 or NO2+O3 (NO3/N2O5) with a goal to identify and attempt quantification of major product distribution. A combination of gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with/without derivatization and liquid chromatography with high resolution MS (LC-HRMS) was used for identification. For the first time, a comprehensive characterization of a broad range of products enabled identifying ketone/diketone, aldehyde, hydroxyl, and carboxylic acid PAH derivatives. Exposure to NO3/N2O5 (formed by reacting NO2 with O3, a more powerful reactant than either O3 or NO2) produced additional compounds not observed with either oxidant alone. Multiple isomers of nitrofluoranthene and, for the first time, nitrophenanthrene were identified. In addition hydroxy-nitro-PAH derivatives were observed for the reaction of anthracene with NO3/N2O5. Monitoring of specific common ions such as those of 176 and 205 m/z attributed to carbonyl phenanthrene and deprotonated phenanthrene ions respectively was shown to be a useful tool for identification of multiple pyrene oxidation products.

  17. Ozone in the Atmosphere: II. The Lower Atmosphere.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Paul; Pickering, Pam

    1991-01-01

    Described are the problems caused by the increased concentration of ozone in the lower atmosphere. Photochemical pollution, mechanisms of ozone production, ozone levels in the troposphere, effects of ozone on human health and vegetation, ozone standards, and control measures are discussed. (KR)

  18. Ozonation of sunflower oils: impact of experimental conditions on the composition and the antibacterial activity of ozonized oils.

    PubMed

    Moureu, Sophie; Violleau, Frédéric; Ali Haimoud-Lekhal, Djamila; Calmon, Anne

    2015-02-01

    Ozone can react with vegetable oils to produce ozonized oils which have antimicrobial properties and can be used in dermatology. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of ozonation conditions and of the initial fatty acid composition on iodine index (II), peroxide index (IP), acidity value (AV) of ozonized sunflower oils. The antibacterial activity of these products against the three bacterial strains that are more often involved in mastitis (Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Streptococcus uberis) was also evaluated. In that purpose, two different sunflower oils have been studied: a "classical" oil (55% linoleic acid, 35% oleic acid) and a "high oleic" oil (90% oleic acid). Both were ozonized with or without water during different times (from 1 to 7 h). Results show that the addition of water has a direct impact on the increase in IP (up to 2600 meq of active oxygen/kg of oil with water and 430 without) and AV but does not influence the kinetic of the decrease in II. Minimal inhibitory concentrations were ranging from 1.25 to 40 mg/mL and the antibacterial activity of oils ozonized with water was better than the one of oils ozonized alone. These results are an open door to new applications of ozonized oils.

  19. Vertical and Horizontal Measurements of Ambient Ozone over a Gas and Oil Production Area using a UAV Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, A.; Gowing, I.; Martin, R. S.

    2013-12-01

    During the 2013 wintertime Uintah Basin Ozone Study (UBOS13), an autonomous unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) platform, coupled with an on-board UV ozone monitor, flew several spatial profiles near the location (Horse Pool) of other concentrated measurements by other co-investigators. The airframe, part of the Utah Water Research Laboratory's (UWRL) AggieAir UAV program, consisted of a custom-built, battery-operated plane with and 2.4 m (8 ft) wing span and a 12.7 cm x 12.7 cm x 30.5 cm payload bay with a carrying capacity of approximately 2.0 kg. With the current power system, the fully-loaded AggieAir UAV can fly for approximately 45 minutes at a nominal airspeed of 13.4 m/s (30 mph). The system can be operated either in manual control or be flown autonomously following preprogrammed waypoints via a built in GPS system. The AggieAir UAV systems were primarily designed for photographic and telemetry tracking projects. For the UBOS13 flights, a 2B Technologies Model 205 Ozone (O3) monitor was modified for minimal weight optimization, wrapped with lightweight insulation and secured into the UAV payload bay. Additionally, HOBO Model H08-001-02 shielded temperature/datalogger was secured to the exterior of the UAV from parallel thermal profile determination. During the study period, three demonstration flight profiles were obtained on February 17 and 18, 2013: two vertical 'curtain' profiles and a pair of 'stacked' horizontal profiles. As recorded by numerous ground-based monitoring sites, the ozone during the UAV test periods was characterized by initial trends of daytime O3 maximums over 130 ppb, followed by a meteorological front partially ventilating the Basin on the evening of Feb. 17th leading to decreased O3 minimums around 40 ppb. However, the ground level O3 rebuilt quickly to ground level maximums approaching 100 ppb. The vertical 'curtain' flown on the evening of Feb. 17th only reached a maximum elevation of about 2160 m ASL (600 m AGL) due to encountering

  20. Ozone production at a rural site in Georgia during the summer 1992 SOS campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinman, L.I.; Lee, Yin-Nan; Springston, S.R.

    1993-06-01

    As part of the Southern Oxidant Study (SOS) (UCAR, 1990), Brookhaven National Laboratory operated a ``SENIOR`` (South Eastern Network for Intensive Ozone Research) measurement site on a campaign basis during parts of the summers of 1991 and 1992. Measurements were made for the purpose of understanding the pervasive high levels of O{sub 3} observed in the southeastern US (Meagher et al, 1987 Aneja et al, 1990; NRC, 1991). In this article the authors focus on the 1992 observations of O{sub 3} and the predication of O{sub 3} formation rates based on a radical budget calculation and based on the photostationary state.

  1. Current ozone levels threaten gross primary production and yield of Mediterranean annual pastures and nitrogen modulates the response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvete-Sogo, Héctor; Elvira, Susana; Sanz, Javier; González-Fernández, Ignacio; García-Gómez, Héctor; Sánchez-Martín, Laura; Alonso, Rocío; Bermejo-Bermejo, Victoria

    2014-10-01

    Pastures are among the most important ecosystems in Europe considering their biodiversity and distribution area. However, their response to increasing tropospheric ozone (O3) and nitrogen (N) deposition, two of the main drivers of global change, is still uncertain. A new Open-Top Chamber (OTC) experiment was performed in central Spain, aiming to study annual pasture response to O3 and N in close to natural growing conditions. A mixture of six species of three representative families was sowed in the field. Plants were exposed for 40 days to four O3 treatments: filtered air, non-filtered air (NFA) reproducing ambient levels and NFA supplemented with 20 and 40 nl l-1 O3. Three N treatments were considered to reach the N integrated doses of “background”, +20 or +40 kg N ha-1. Ozone significantly reduced green and total aboveground biomass (maximum reduction 25%) and increased the senescent biomass (maximum increase 40%). Accordingly, O3 decreased community Gross Primary Production due to both a global reduction of ecosystem CO2 exchange and an increase of ecosystem respiration. Nitrogen could partially counterbalance O3 effects on aboveground biomass when the levels of O3 were moderate, but at the same time O3 exposure reduced the fertilization effect of higher N availability. Therefore, O3 must be considered as a stress factor for annual pastures in the Mediterranean areas.

  2. Activation of phospholipase A{sub 2} in 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes containing lipid ozonation products

    SciTech Connect

    Salgo, M.G.; Squadrito, G.L.; Pryor, W.A.

    1994-05-01

    The activation of phospholipase A{sub 2} (PLA{sub 2}) by lipid ozonation products is reported. The principal products from the ozonation of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) are 1-palmitoyl-2-[8-3(5-octyl-1,2,4-trioxolan-3-yl)octanoyl]--sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PC-Criegee ozonide) and 1-palmitoyl-2-(9-oxononanoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PC-aldehyde). Here we test the hypothesis that these two compounds are mediators of ozone toxicity. Using POPC vesicles, we find that PLA{sub 2} recognizes and hydrolyzes PC-Criegee ozonide at the same rate as that of arachidonic acid. Although the PC-aldehyde is not a substrate for PLA{sub 2}, the enzymatic rate of hydrolysis by PLA{sub 2} of unaltered fatty acids incorporated into POPC is enhanced when PC-aldehyde is present in the bilayer. Thus, both PC-Criegee ozonide and PC-aldehyde alter the activity of PLA{sub 2}, perhaps via an effect on membrane packing order. The capacity of PLA{sub 2} to recognize the PC-Criegee, and therefore ozone-induced damage, suggests a detoxification property of the enzyme and also a role in maintaining the structural properties of bilayer membranes that have been altered by exposure to ozone. 29 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Volatilization of low vapor pressure--volatile organic compounds (LVP-VOCs) during three cleaning products-associated activities: Potential contributions to ozone formation.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyeong-Moo; McKone, Thomas E; Bennett, Deborah H

    2016-06-01

    There have been many studies to reduce ozone formation mostly from volatile organic compound (VOC) sources. However, the role of low vapor pressure (LVP)-VOCs from consumer products remains mostly unexplored and unaddressed. This study explores the impact of high production volume LVP-VOCs on ozone formation from three cleaning products-associated activities (dishwashing, clothes washing, and surface cleaning). We develop a model framework to account for the portion available for ozone formation during the use phase and from the down-the-drain disposal. We apply experimental studies that measured emission rates or models that were developed for estimating emission rates of organic compounds during the use phase. Then, the fraction volatilized (fvolatilized) and the fraction disposed down the drain (fdown-the-drain) are multiplied by the portion available for ozone formation for releases to the outdoor air (fO3|volatilized) and down-the-drain (fO3|down-the-drain), respectively. Overall, for chemicals used in three specific cleaning-product uses, fvolatilized is less than 0.6% for all studied LVP-VOCs. Because greater than 99.4% of compounds are disposed of down the drain during the use phase, when combined with fO3|volatilized and fO3|down-the-drain, the portion available for ozone formation from the direct releases to outdoor air and the down-the-drain disposal is less than 0.4% and 0.2%, respectively. The results from this study indicate that the impact of the studied LVP-VOCs on ozone formation is very sensitive to what occurs during the use phase and suggest the need for future research on experimental work at the point of use.

  4. 15 CFR 713.4 - Advance declaration requirements for additionally planned production, processing, or consumption...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... additionally planned production, processing, or consumption of Schedule 2 chemicals. 713.4 Section 713.4..., processing, or consumption of Schedule 2 chemicals. (a) Declaration requirements for additionally planned activities. (1) You must declare additionally planned production, processing, or consumption of Schedule...

  5. 15 CFR 713.4 - Advance declaration requirements for additionally planned production, processing, or consumption...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... additionally planned production, processing, or consumption of Schedule 2 chemicals. 713.4 Section 713.4..., processing, or consumption of Schedule 2 chemicals. (a) Declaration requirements for additionally planned activities. (1) You must declare additionally planned production, processing, or consumption of Schedule...

  6. Use of AIRS, OMI, MLS, and TES Data in Assessing Forest Ecosystem Exposure to Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spruce, Joseph P.

    2007-01-01

    Ground-level ozone at high levels poses health threats to exposed flora and fauna, including negative impacts to human health. While concern is common regarding depletion of ozone in the stratosphere, portions of the urban and rural United States periodically have high ambient levels of tropospheric ozone on the ground. Ozone pollution can cause a variety of impacts to susceptible vegetation (e.g., Ponderosa and Jeffrey pine species in the southwestern United States), such as stunted growth, alteration of growth form, needle or leaf chlorosis, and impaired ability to withstand drought-induced water stress. In addition, Southern Californian forests with high ozone exposures have been recently subject to multiyear droughts that have led to extensive forest overstory mortality from insect outbreaks and increased incidence of wildfires. Residual forests in these impacted areas may be more vulnerable to high ozone exposures and to other forest threats than ever before. NASA sensors collect a wealth of atmospheric data that have been used recently for mapping and monitoring regional tropospheric ozone levels. AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder), OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument), MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder), and TES (Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer) data could be used to assess forest ecosystem exposure to ozone. Such NASA data hold promise for providing better or at least complementary synoptic information on ground-level ozone levels that Federal agency partners can use to assess forest health trends and to mitigate the threats as needed in compliance with Federal laws and mandates. NASA data products on ozone concentrations may be able to aid applications of DSTs (decision support tools) adopted by the USDA FS (U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service) and by the NPS (National Park Service), such as the Ozone Calculator, in which ground ozone estimates are employed to assess ozone impacts to forested vegetation.

  7. Ozone Production in the Boston Urban Area and Transport Downwind: Computation from Lidar Measurements and Comparison with Air Quality Forecast Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardesty, R. M.; Senff, C. J.; Alvarez, R. J.; Sandberg, S. P.; McKeen, S. A.; Wilczak, J. M.; Djalalova, I. V.; White, A. B.

    2005-12-01

    An important element in understanding and successfully forecasting local air quality events is accurate characterization of production of pollutants in urban regions and advection to areas downwind. During the 2004 New England Air Quality Study (NEAQS), which was conducted within the framework of the International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation (ICARTT) field experiment, NOAA deployed its airborne ozone and aerosol lidar to characterize the 3-dimensional structure of ozone and aerosol fields in the New England region. We have used the data set gathered with the lidar to compute ozone production in the Boston urban plume and to investigate transport and mixing processes for several days of the study. One of the few high ozone events in northern New England during the summer of 2004 occurred on July 30, when ozone levels exceeded 100 ppbv on Appledore Island just east of Portsmouth, NH. On this day, trajectories computed from wind profiler data showed that the New York plume was transported directly over Boston and then north-northeastwards along the New Hampshire and Maine coasts. By flying across the plume upstream and downwind of Boston and computing the horizontal ozone flux within the plume, we were able to estimate that the ozone flux downwind of Boston increased by 36 percent, concentrating the pollutants and likely playing a role in the high ozone observed. We also examined transport on August 3, when a shallow plume of high ozone was observed near Bar Harbor, ME. Trajectories indicated that this was a piece of the previous day's Boston plume, which was likely transported overnight across the Gulf of Maine in a very shallow layer. Later in the day, another plume was observed further south near Portland, ME. Trajectories showed that this was the Boston plume emitted on the morning of August 3, which followed a different transport path due to changes in the wind field over the period. On August 9, we mapped out the Boston

  8. Pilot experiments with electrodialysis and ozonation for the production of a fertiliser from urine.

    PubMed

    Pronk, W; Zuleeg, S; Lienert, J; Escher, B; Koller, M; Berner, A; Koch, G; Boller, M

    2007-01-01

    Pilot tests were performed with a process combination of electrodialysis and ozonation for the removal of micropollutants and the concentration of nutrients in urine. In continuous and batch experiments, maximum concentration factors up to 3.5 and 4.1 were obtained, respectively. The desalination capacity did not decrease significantly during continuous operation periods of several weeks. Membrane cleaning after 195 days resulted in approximately 35% increase in desalination rate. The Yeast Estrogen Screen (YES), a bioassay that selectively detects oestrogenic compounds, confirmed that about 90% of the oestrogenic activity was removed by electrodialysis. HPLC analysis showed that ibuprofen was removed to a high extent, while other micropollutants were below the detection limit. In view of the fact that ibuprofen is among the most rapidly transported micropollutants in electrodialysis processes, this result indicates that electrodialysis provides an effective barrier for micropollutants. Standardised plant growth tests were performed in the field with the salt solution resulting from the treatment by electrodialysis and subsequent ozonation. The results show that the plant height is comparable to synthetic fertilisers, but the crop yield is slightly lower. The latter is probably caused by volatilisation losses during field application, which can be prevented by improved application technologies.

  9. Summary of aircraft results for 1978 southeastern Virginia urban plume measurement study of ozone, nitrogen oxides, and methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, G. L.; Wornom, D. E.; Mathis, J. J., Jr.; Sebacher, D. I.

    1980-01-01

    Ozone production was determined from aircraft and surface in situ measurements, as well as from an airborne laser absorption spectrometer. Three aircraft and approximately 10 surface stations provided air-quality data. Extensive meteorological, mixing-layer-height, and ozone-precursor data were also measured. Approximately 50 hrs (9 flight days) of data from the aircraft equipped to monitor ozone, nitrogen oxides, dewpoint temperature, and temperature are presented. In addition, each experiment conducted is discussed.

  10. Ozone temporal variations at Whiteface Mountain and processes responsible for these variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xiujuan

    1998-12-01

    A 22-year-record of hourly ozone concentrations measured at Whiteface Mountain (WFM), New York, is analyzed and possible processes impacting ozone temporal variations as seasonal, interannual, and long term trends are discussed. As a rural mountain site, ozone is not produced locally but is transported from upwind areas. The seasonal variation accounts for 91% of the total variance, with broad peak from April and August. The peak time of ozone seasonal cycle for the air masses from clean areas occurs between March and May while the peak time of ozone seasonal cycle for the air masses from polluted areas occurs between May and August. Ozone concentrations for air masses from polluted areas in summer and fall are higher than those for air masses from clean area. The findings of this study and other suggest that upwind photochemical production and stratospheric intrusion are major processes for shaping this type of seasonal cycle at Whiteface Mountain. There are considerable interannual variations of ozone at Whiteface Mountain, characterized as two peaks and one minimum. Six dominant cycles, 132, 88, 66, 53, 44, and 29 months are identified in the interannual variations of ozone. The possible links between ozone and ENSO and solar cycle are weak and cannot be proven in this study. The long term trends of ozone at Whiteface Mountain change temporally, depending on time periods and season. The greatest increase rate occurs in 1970s and there is a decrease rate in 1990s (but not statistically significant). The facts that there is a similarity between ozone and NOx emission trends and synoptic systems have little influence on ozone changes may suggest that NOx emission is a major process for ozone changes over years. Most high ozone episodes with 1-hour ozone concentration exceeding 120 ppb or 80 ppb occur before 1980s when synoptic system are favorable to photochemical production. In additions, the air masses for these high ozone episodes are mostly advected from

  11. Excipients and additives: hidden hazards in drug products and in product substitution.

    PubMed Central

    Napke, E; Stevens, D G

    1984-01-01

    The excipients and additives in drug formulations have been described as inert because they do not have an active role in the prevention or treatment of particular ailments. This has led to the misconception among physicians, pharmacists, drug manufacturers and the public that excipients are harmless and unworthy of mention. In fact, pharmacists are allowed to substitute drug formulations, without regard to the excipients, as long as they ensure that the active ingredients in the substitute are the same as those in the formulation prescribed. The inappropriateness of the term inert is becoming increasingly apparent as evidence of adverse reactions--some fatal--to excipients mounts. The likelihood that some "active" constituents, particularly erythromycin, have been blamed for such reactions deserves to be investigated. The public deserves to be better protected. For example, the United States has legislation requiring complete labelling of all food, drugs and cosmetics that incorporate more than one ingredient, no matter how innocuous the constituents are believed to be. In Canada, drug manufacturers are not even required to share this information with physicians or pharmacists when they introduce a new drug or reformulate a product already being marketed, nor are pharmacists required to disclose the contents of formulations that they prepare in the absence of commercially available products. PMID:6498699

  12. Ozone-Initiated Chemistry in an Occupied Simulated AircraftCabin

    SciTech Connect

    Weschler, C.J.; Wisthaler, A.; Cowlind, S.; Tamas, G.; Strom-Tejsena, P.; Hodgson, A.T.; Destaillats, H.; Herrington, J.; Zhang,J.; Nazaroff, W.W.

    2007-07-01

    We have used multiple analytical methods to characterize the gas-phase products formed when ozone was added to cabin air during simulated 4-hour flights that were conducted in a reconstructed section of a B-767 aircraft containing human occupants. Two separate groups of 16 females were each exposed to four conditions: low air exchange (4.4 h-1), <2 ppb ozone; low air exchange, 61-64 ppb ozone; high air exchange (8.8 h-1), <2 ppb ozone; and high air exchange, 73-77 ppb ozone. The addition of ozone to the cabin air increased the levels of identified byproducts from {approx}70 to 130 ppb at the lower air exchange rate and from {approx}30 to 70 ppb at the higher air exchange rate. Most of the increase was attributable to acetone, nonanal, decanal, 4-oxopentanal (4-OPA), 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one (6-MHO), formic acid, and acetic acid, with 0.25-0.30 mol of quantified product volatilized per mol of ozone consumed. Several of these compounds reached levels above their reported odor thresholds. Most byproducts were derived from surface reactions with occupants and their clothing, consistent with the inference that occupants were responsible for the removal of >55% of the ozone in the cabin. The observations made in this study have implications for other indoor settings. Whenever human beings and ozone are simultaneously present, one anticipates production of acetone, nonanal, decanal, 6-MHO, geranyl acetone, and 4-OPA.

  13. Ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness changes carbon and water balance of temperate deciduous forests.

    PubMed

    Hoshika, Yasutomo; Katata, Genki; Deushi, Makoto; Watanabe, Makoto; Koike, Takayoshi; Paoletti, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone concentrations have increased by 60-100% in the Northern Hemisphere since the 19(th) century. The phytotoxic nature of ozone can impair forest productivity. In addition, ozone affects stomatal functions, by both favoring stomatal closure and impairing stomatal control. Ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness, i.e., a delay in stomatal responses to fluctuating stimuli, has the potential to change the carbon and water balance of forests. This effect has to be included in models for ozone risk assessment. Here we examine the effects of ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness on carbon assimilation and transpiration of temperate deciduous forests in the Northern Hemisphere in 2006-2009 by combining a detailed multi-layer land surface model and a global atmospheric chemistry model. An analysis of results by ozone FACE (Free-Air Controlled Exposure) experiments suggested that ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness can be incorporated into modelling based on a simple parameter (gmin, minimum stomatal conductance) which is used in the coupled photosynthesis-stomatal model. Our simulation showed that ozone can decrease water use efficiency, i.e., the ratio of net CO2 assimilation to transpiration, of temperate deciduous forests up to 20% when ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness is considered, and up to only 5% when the stomatal sluggishness is neglected. PMID:25943276

  14. The Safety and Anti-Tumor Effects of Ozonated Water in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Kohei; Azuma, Kazuo; Mori, Takuro; Kawamoto, Kinya; Murahata, Yusuke; Tsuka, Takeshi; Osaki, Tomohiro; Ito, Norihiko; Imagawa, Tomohiro; Itoh, Fumio; Okamoto, Yoshiharu

    2015-01-01

    Ozonated water is easier to handle than ozone gas. However, there have been no previous reports on the biological effects of ozonated water. We conducted a study on the safety of ozonated water and its anti-tumor effects using a tumor-bearing mouse model and normal controls. Local administration of ozonated water (208 mM) was not associated with any detrimental effects in normal tissues. On the other hand, local administration of ozonated water (20.8, 41.6, 104, or 208 mM) directly into the tumor tissue induced necrosis and inhibited proliferation of tumor cells. There was no significant difference in the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate-biotin nick-end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells following administration of ozonated water. The size of the necrotic areas was dependent on the concentration of ozonated water. These results indicate that ozonated water does not affect normal tissue and damages only the tumor tissue by selectively inducing necrosis. There is a possibility that it exerts through the production of reaction oxygen species (ROS). In addition, the induction of necrosis rather than apoptosis is very useful in tumor immunity. Based on these results, we believe that administration of ozonated water is a safe and potentially simple adjunct or alternative to existing antineoplastic treatments. PMID:26506343

  15. Ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness changes carbon and water balance of temperate deciduous forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshika, Yasutomo; Katata, Genki; Deushi, Makoto; Watanabe, Makoto; Koike, Takayoshi; Paoletti, Elena

    2015-05-01

    Tropospheric ozone concentrations have increased by 60-100% in the Northern Hemisphere since the 19th century. The phytotoxic nature of ozone can impair forest productivity. In addition, ozone affects stomatal functions, by both favoring stomatal closure and impairing stomatal control. Ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness, i.e., a delay in stomatal responses to fluctuating stimuli, has the potential to change the carbon and water balance of forests. This effect has to be included in models for ozone risk assessment. Here we examine the effects of ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness on carbon assimilation and transpiration of temperate deciduous forests in the Northern Hemisphere in 2006-2009 by combining a detailed multi-layer land surface model and a global atmospheric chemistry model. An analysis of results by ozone FACE (Free-Air Controlled Exposure) experiments suggested that ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness can be incorporated into modelling based on a simple parameter (gmin, minimum stomatal conductance) which is used in the coupled photosynthesis-stomatal model. Our simulation showed that ozone can decrease water use efficiency, i.e., the ratio of net CO2 assimilation to transpiration, of temperate deciduous forests up to 20% when ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness is considered, and up to only 5% when the stomatal sluggishness is neglected.

  16. Ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness changes carbon and water balance of temperate deciduous forests.

    PubMed

    Hoshika, Yasutomo; Katata, Genki; Deushi, Makoto; Watanabe, Makoto; Koike, Takayoshi; Paoletti, Elena

    2015-05-06

    Tropospheric ozone concentrations have increased by 60-100% in the Northern Hemisphere since the 19(th) century. The phytotoxic nature of ozone can impair forest productivity. In addition, ozone affects stomatal functions, by both favoring stomatal closure and impairing stomatal control. Ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness, i.e., a delay in stomatal responses to fluctuating stimuli, has the potential to change the carbon and water balance of forests. This effect has to be included in models for ozone risk assessment. Here we examine the effects of ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness on carbon assimilation and transpiration of temperate deciduous forests in the Northern Hemisphere in 2006-2009 by combining a detailed multi-layer land surface model and a global atmospheric chemistry model. An analysis of results by ozone FACE (Free-Air Controlled Exposure) experiments suggested that ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness can be incorporated into modelling based on a simple parameter (gmin, minimum stomatal conductance) which is used in the coupled photosynthesis-stomatal model. Our simulation showed that ozone can decrease water use efficiency, i.e., the ratio of net CO2 assimilation to transpiration, of temperate deciduous forests up to 20% when ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness is considered, and up to only 5% when the stomatal sluggishness is neglected.

  17. Enhanced Ozone Production at Low Temperatures due to Ethanol (E85)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginnebaugh, D. L.; Livingstone, P. L.; Jacobson, M. Z.

    2009-12-01

    The increased use of ethanol in transportation fuels warrants an investigation of its consequences. An important component of such an investigation is the temperature-dependence of ethanol and gasoline exhaust chemistry. We use the near-explicit Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM, version 3.1, LEEDS University) with the SMVGEAR II chemical ordinary differential solver to provide the speed necessary to simulate explicit chemistry to examine such effects. The MCM has over 13,500 organic reactions and 4,600 species. SMVGEAR II is a sparse-matrix Gear solver that reduces the computation time significantly while maintaining any specified accuracy. Although for this study we use a box model, we determined that the speed of the MCM with the SMVGEAR solver will allow the MCM to be modeled in 3-dimensions. We also verified the accuracy of the model with comparisons to smog chamber data. We use species-resolved tailpipe emissions data for E85 (15% gasoline, 85% ethanol fuel blend) and gasoline vehicles to compare the impact of each on ozone and carcinogenic organic gases as a function of ambient temperature and background concentrations, using Los Angeles in 2020 as a base case. We use two different emissions sets - one is a compilation of data taken at near 24 C and the other from data taken at -7 C - to determine how atmospheric chemistry and emissions are affected by temperature. We include diurnal effects by examining 2 day and 5 day scenarios. We find that for both emission data sets, the average ozone concentrations through the range of temperatures tested are higher with E85 than with gasoline by 8 parts per billion volume (ppbv) at higher temperatures to 55 ppbv at low temperatures and low sunlight (winter conditions) for an area with a high nitrogen oxides (NOx) to non-methane organic gases (NMOG) ratio. The results suggest that E85's effect on health through ozone formation becomes increasingly more significant relative to gasoline as temperatures decreased due to the

  18. Citronellal reactions with ozone and OH radical: Rate constants and gas-phase products detected using PFBHA derivatization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, J. C.; Ham, J. E.; Wells, J. R.

    The bimolecular rate constants, kOH+citronellal, (150±40)×10 -12 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 and, k+citronellal, (3.5±1.2)×10 -16 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1, were measured using the relative rate technique for the reactions of the hydroxyl radical (OH) and ozone (O 3) with 3,7-dimethyl-6-octen-1-al ((R)-(+)-citronellal) at (297±3) K and 1 atm total pressure. To more clearly define part of citronellal's indoor environment degradation mechanism, the products of the citronellal+OH and citronellal+O 3 reactions were also investigated. The positively identified citronellal/OH and citronellal/O 3 reaction products were: 3-methylhexanedial HC( dbnd O)CH 2CH 2CH(CH 3)CH 2C( dbnd O)H and 2-oxopropanal (methylglyoxal, CH 3C( dbnd O)C( dbnd O)H). The use of derivatizing agent O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine (PFBHA) was used to propose 3-methylhexanedial as a major citronellal/OH and citronellal/O 3 reaction product. The elucidation of this reaction product was facilitated by mass spectrometry of the derivatized reaction products coupled with plausible citronellal/OH and citronellal/O 3 reaction mechanisms based on previously published volatile organic compound/OH and volatile organic compound/O 3 gas-phase reaction mechanisms.

  19. Product analyses of ozone mediated nitration of benzimidazole derivatives with nitrogen dioxide: formation of 1-nitrobenzimidazoles and conversion to benzotriazoles.

    PubMed

    Kaiya, Toyo; Nakamura, Kei; Tanaka, Masaru; Miyata, Naoki; Kohda, Kohfuku

    2004-05-01

    Several benzimidazole derivatives having electron-withdrawing or -donating substituent(s) at the benzene moiety were used as models of the imidazole moiety of purine bases and their nitration with nitrogen dioxide and ozone (so-called Kyodai nitration) were examined. Products were extracted from the reaction mixture with AcOEt and their structures were analyzed. 1-Nitrobenzimidazole derivatives and unexpected 1-nitrobenzotriazole derivatives were identified. Although the yields of 1-nitrobenzimidazole derivatives were quite low, these were all new compounds that could be obtained only by Kyodai nitration. It was speculated that benzotriazoles were formed via 1-nitrobenzimidazoles and subsequent nitration toward benzotriazoles resulted in the formation of 1-nitrobenzotriazoles. PMID:15133210

  20. Comparison of formation of disinfection by-products by chlorination and ozonation of wastewater effluents and their toxicity to Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Park, Keun-Young; Choi, Su-Young; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Kweon, Ji-Hyang; Song, Ji-Hyeon

    2016-08-01

    This study compared the two most frequently used disinfectants (i.e., chlorine and ozone) to understand their efficiency in wastewater effluents and the ecotoxicity of disinfection by-products created during chlorination and ozonation. Four trihalomethanes (THMs) and nine haloacetic acids (HAAs) were measured from a chlorine-disinfected sample and two aldehydes (i.e., formaldehydes and acetaldehydes) were analyzed after ozonation. Chlorination was effective for total coliform removal with Ct value in the range of 30-60 mg-min/L. Over 1.6 mg/L of ozone dose and 0.5 min of the contact time presented sufficient disinfection efficiency. The concentration of THMs increased with longer contact time (24 h), but that of HAAs showed little change with contact time. The measured concentration of formaldehyde at the ozone dose of 1.6 mg/L and the contact time of 9 min showed the greatest value in this study, approximately 330 μg L(-1), from which the corresponding ecotoxicity was determined using an indicator species, Daphnia magna. The ecotoxicity results were consistent with the toxicological features judged by occurrence, genotoxicity, and carcinogenicity. Both the disinfection efficiency as well as the DBP formation potential should therefore be considered to avoid harmful impacts on aquatic environments when a disinfection method is used for wastewater effluents. PMID:27213572

  1. Corona Discharge Influences Ozone Concentrations Near Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Goheen, Steven C.; Gaither, Kari A.; Anantatmula, Shantha M.; Mong, Gary M.; Sasser, Lyle B.; Lessor, Delbert L.

    2004-02-26

    Ozone is produced by corona discharge in air. Its production is enhanced near grounded water. Whether grounded animals behave like grounded water, producing more ozone was investigated. Rats were exposed to corona discharge in a plastic cage. The concentration of ozone in the gas phase was monitored. The ozone concentration exceeded ambient levels only in the presence of corona discharge and either rats or water. When water or rats were exposed to corona discharge, ozone levels were more than 10 times higher than controls. Ozone levels increased rapidly with applied voltage. There was also a correlation between the distance of the corona needle to the rats and the amount of ozone produced. As the distance increased, ozone production decreased. These results are discussed in relation to the potential exposure of mammals to ozone in the vicinity of corona discharge and electric fields.

  2. Prophylaxis and therapeutic potential of ozone in buiatrics: Current knowledge.

    PubMed

    Đuričić, Dražen; Valpotić, Hrvoje; Samardžija, Marko

    2015-08-01

    Ozone therapy has been in use since 1896 in the USA. As a highly reactive molecule, ozone may inactivate bacteria, viruses, fungi, yeasts and protozoans, stimulate the oxygen metabolism of tissue, treat diseases, activate the immune system, and exhibit strong analgesic activity. More recently, ozone has been used in veterinary medicine, particularly in buiatrics, but still insufficiently. Medical ozone therapy has shown effectiveness as an alternative to the use of antibiotics, which are restricted to clinical use and have been withdrawn from non-clinical use as in-feed growth promoters in animal production. This review is an overview of current knowledge regarding the preventive and therapeutic effects of ozone in ruminants for the treatment of puerperal diseases and improvement in their fertility. In particular, ozone preparations have been tested in the treatment of reproductive tract lesions, urovagina and pneumomovagina, metritis, endometritis, fetal membrane retention and mastitis, as well as in the functional restoration of endometrium in dairy cows and goats. In addition, the preventive use of the intrauterine application of ozone has been assessed in order to evaluate its effectiveness in improving reproductive efficiency in dairy cows. No adverse effects were observed in cows and goats treated with ozone preparations. Moreover, there is a lot of evidence indicating the advantages of ozone preparation therapy in comparison to the application of antibiotics. However, there are certain limitations on ozone use in veterinary medicine and buiatrics, such as inactivity against intracellular microbes and selective activity against the same bacterial species, as well as the induction of tissue inflammation through inappropriate application of the preparation.

  3. A MCM modeling study of the effects of nitryl chloride on oxidant budgets, ozone production, VOC lifetimes, and halogen recycling in polluted regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, T. P.; Thornton, J. A.; Wolfe, G. M.; Gilman, J. B.; Kuster, W. C.; De Gouw, J. A.; Bon, D.; Vlasenko, A. L.; Li, S.; Williams, E. J.; Lerner, B. M.; Veres, P. R.; Roberts, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Nitryl chloride (ClNO2) is produced at night by reactions of dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) on chloride containing particles. Nitryl chloride is photolyzed during the day to liberate highly reactive chlorine atoms. This chemistry takes place primarily in urban environments where the concentrations of N2O5 precursors (NOx and ozone) are high, though it can likely occur in remote regions at lower intensity. Recent field measurements have illustrated the potential importance of ClNO2 as a chlorine atom source and a NOx reservoir. However, the fate of these chlorine atoms and the overall impact of ClNO2 remain unclear. To this end we have incorporated ClNO2 production, photolysis, and subsequent Cl-atom reactions into an existing Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM version 3.2) based model framework. Cl-atom reactions with alkenes and alcohols not presently part of the MCM have also been added. Using observational constraints from the CalNex 2010 field study, we assess the dominant reactive sinks and sources of chlorine atoms over the course of a model day. Relative to model runs excluding ClNO2 formation, the presence of ClNO2 produces marked changes on a variety of species important to tropospheric chemistry and air quality (e.g. O3, RO2, OH, HO2, ClOx). For example a 50% yield of ClNO2 (max ClNO2 of 1.5 ppb) from nighttime N2O5 reactions leads to a ~10% enhancement in integrated ozone production. VOC and NOx lifetimes are shorter due primarily to enhanced OH from propagation of RO2 produced by Cl-atom chemistry under high NOx. The impact of ClNO2 on daytime halogen atom recycling is substantial, with order of magnitude higher daytime Cl2 production predicted with ClNO2 chemistry than without. In fact, incorporation of ClNO2 could help explain daytime levels of Cl2 observed in polluted coastal regions. Additionally, we highlight a set of chlorinated VOC oxidation products that are predicted to form at small, but potentially detectable levels in regions with similar VOC

  4. Ozonation of pyridine and other N-heterocyclic aromatic compounds: Kinetics, stoichiometry, identification of products and elucidation of pathways.

    PubMed

    Tekle-Röttering, Agnes; Reisz, Erika; Jewell, Kevin S; Lutze, Holger V; Ternes, Thomas A; Schmidt, Winfried; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2016-10-01

    Pyridine, pyridazine, pyrimidine and pyrazine were investigated in their reaction with ozone. These compounds are archetypes for heterocyclic aromatic amines, a structural unit that is often present in pharmaceuticals, pesticides and dyestuffs (e.g., enoxacin, pyrazineamide or pyrimethamine). The investigated target compounds react with ozone with rate constants ranging from 0.37 to 57 M(-1) s(-1), hampering their degradation during ozonation. In OH radical scavenged systems the reaction of ozone with pyridine and pyridazine is characterized by high transformation (per ozone consumed) of 55 and 54%, respectively. In non scavenged system the transformation drops to 52 and 12%, respectively. However, in the reaction of pyrimidine and pyrazine with ozone this is reversed. Here, in an OH radical scavenged system the compound transformation is much lower (2.1 and 14%, respectively) than in non scavenged one (22 and 25%, respectively). This is confirmed by corresponding high N-oxide formation in the ozonation of pyridine and pyridazine, but probably low formation in the reaction of pyrimidine and pyrazine with ozone. With respect to reaction mechanisms, it is suggested that ozone adduct formation at nitrogen is the primary step in the ozonation of pyridine and pyridazine. On the contrary, ozone adduct formation to the aromatic ring seems to occur especially in the ozonation of pyrimidine as inferred from hydrogen peroxide yield. However, also OH radical reactions are supposed processes in the case of pyrimidine and in particular for pyrazine, albeit negligible OH radical yields are obtained. The low compound transformation in OH radical scavenged system can prove this. As a result of negligible OH radical yields in all cases (less than 6%) electron transfer as primary reaction pathway plays a subordinate role. PMID:27448509

  5. Ozonation of pyridine and other N-heterocyclic aromatic compounds: Kinetics, stoichiometry, identification of products and elucidation of pathways.

    PubMed

    Tekle-Röttering, Agnes; Reisz, Erika; Jewell, Kevin S; Lutze, Holger V; Ternes, Thomas A; Schmidt, Winfried; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2016-10-01

    Pyridine, pyridazine, pyrimidine and pyrazine were investigated in their reaction with ozone. These compounds are archetypes for heterocyclic aromatic amines, a structural unit that is often present in pharmaceuticals, pesticides and dyestuffs (e.g., enoxacin, pyrazineamide or pyrimethamine). The investigated target compounds react with ozone with rate constants ranging from 0.37 to 57 M(-1) s(-1), hampering their degradation during ozonation. In OH radical scavenged systems the reaction of ozone with pyridine and pyridazine is characterized by high transformation (per ozone consumed) of 55 and 54%, respectively. In non scavenged system the transformation drops to 52 and 12%, respectively. However, in the reaction of pyrimidine and pyrazine with ozone this is reversed. Here, in an OH radical scavenged system the compound transformation is much lower (2.1 and 14%, respectively) than in non scavenged one (22 and 25%, respectively). This is confirmed by corresponding high N-oxide formation in the ozonation of pyridine and pyridazine, but probably low formation in the reaction of pyrimidine and pyrazine with ozone. With respect to reaction mechanisms, it is suggested that ozone adduct formation at nitrogen is the primary step in the ozonation of pyridine and pyridazine. On the contrary, ozone adduct formation to the aromatic ring seems to occur especially in the ozonation of pyrimidine as inferred from hydrogen peroxide yield. However, also OH radical reactions are supposed processes in the case of pyrimidine and in particular for pyrazine, albeit negligible OH radical yields are obtained. The low compound transformation in OH radical scavenged system can prove this. As a result of negligible OH radical yields in all cases (less than 6%) electron transfer as primary reaction pathway plays a subordinate role.

  6. Quantification of Methane and VOC Emissions from Natural Gas Production in Two Basins with High Ozone Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edie, R.; Robertson, A.; Snare, D.; Soltis, J.; Field, R. A.; Murphy, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2005, the Uintah Basin of Utah and the Upper Green River Basin of Wyoming frequently exceeded the EPA 8-hour allowable ozone level of 75 ppb, spurring interest in volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted during oil and gas production. Debate continues over which stage of production (drilling, flowback, normal production, transmission, etc.) is the most prevalent VOC source. In this study, we quantify emissions from normal production on well pads by using the EPA-developed Other Test Method 33a. This methodology combines ground-based measurements of fugitive emissions with 3-D wind data to calculate the methane and VOC emission fluxes from a point source. VOC fluxes are traditionally estimated by gathering a canister of air during a methane flux measurement. The methane:VOC ratio of this canister is determined at a later time in the laboratory, and applied to the known methane flux. The University of Wyoming Mobile Laboratory platform is equipped with a Picarro methane analyzer and an Ionicon Proton Transfer Reaction-Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometer, which provide real-time methane and VOC data for each well pad. This independent measurement of methane and VOCs in situ reveals multiple emission sources on one well pad, with varying methane:VOC ratios. Well pad emission estimates of methane, benzene, toluene and xylene for the two basins will be presented. The different emission source VOC profiles and the limitations of real-time and traditional VOC measurement methods will also be discussed.

  7. Ozone photolysis of paracetamol in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Neamţu, Mariana; Bobu, Maria; Kettrup, Antonius; Siminiceanu, Ilie

    2013-01-01

    The degradation of a paracetamol (N-acetil-para-aminofenol) aqueous solution (C (0) P = 5 mmol L(-1)) is studied in a bench-scale setup by means of simple ozonation (O3) and ozonation catalyzed with UV light (O3/UV) in order to quantify the influence of UV light on the degradation process. The results have shown that under the adopted experimental conditions (25°C, applied ozone dose = 9.8 mg L(-1) and gas flow rate of 20 L h(-1)) both oxidative systems are capable of removing the substrate with mineralization degrees up to 51% for ozonation and 53% for O3/UV. HPICE chromatography allowed the detection of nitrate ions and maleic and oxalic acids as ultimate carboxylic acids. The experimental data have been interpreted through 5 indicators: the conversion of paracetamol (XP ), the conversion degree of TOC (XTOC ), the apparent rate constant (kap ), the Hatta number (Ha) and the enhancement factor (E). The main advantage of photo-ozonation compared to simple ozonation was a more advanced conversion (79% vs. 92% after 90 min). The paracetamol decay follows a pseudo-first-order reaction with a superior rate constant (higher by 54%) for the UV catalyzed system in comparison with direct ozonation. Mineralization is slightly accelerated (+4%) in the O3/UV system, due to the additional production of hydroxyl radicals induced by the UV light and a higher Hatta number (+24%). Nevertheless, the process was still in the slow reaction kinetic regime (Ha < 0.3), and the enhancement factor was not significantly increased. The results are useful for the design and scale-up of the gas-liquid processes.

  8. Stratospheric ozone depletion.

    PubMed

    Rowland, F Sherwood

    2006-05-29

    Solar ultraviolet radiation creates an ozone layer in the atmosphere which in turn completely absorbs the most energetic fraction of this radiation. This process both warms the air, creating the stratosphere between 15 and 50 km altitude, and protects the biological activities at the Earth's surface from this damaging radiation. In the last half-century, the chemical mechanisms operating within the ozone layer have been shown to include very efficient catalytic chain reactions involving the chemical species HO, HO2, NO, NO2, Cl and ClO. The NOX and ClOX chains involve the emission at Earth's surface of stable molecules in very low concentration (N2O, CCl2F2, CCl3F, etc.) which wander in the atmosphere for as long as a century before absorbing ultraviolet radiation and decomposing to create NO and Cl in the middle of the stratospheric ozone layer. The growing emissions of synthetic chlorofluorocarbon molecules cause a significant diminution in the ozone content of the stratosphere, with the result that more solar ultraviolet-B radiation (290-320 nm wavelength) reaches the surface. This ozone loss occurs in the temperate zone latitudes in all seasons, and especially drastically since the early 1980s in the south polar springtime-the 'Antarctic ozone hole'. The chemical reactions causing this ozone depletion are primarily based on atomic Cl and ClO, the product of its reaction with ozone. The further manufacture of chlorofluorocarbons has been banned by the 1992 revisions of the 1987 Montreal Protocol of the United Nations. Atmospheric measurements have confirmed that the Protocol has been very successful in reducing further emissions of these molecules. Recovery of the stratosphere to the ozone conditions of the 1950s will occur slowly over the rest of the twenty-first century because of the long lifetime of the precursor molecules.

  9. Stratospheric ozone depletion

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, F. Sherwood

    2006-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation creates an ozone layer in the atmosphere which in turn completely absorbs the most energetic fraction of this radiation. This process both warms the air, creating the stratosphere between 15 and 50 km altitude, and protects the biological activities at the Earth's surface from this damaging radiation. In the last half-century, the chemical mechanisms operating within the ozone layer have been shown to include very efficient catalytic chain reactions involving the chemical species HO, HO2, NO, NO2, Cl and ClO. The NOX and ClOX chains involve the emission at Earth's surface of stable molecules in very low concentration (N2O, CCl2F2, CCl3F, etc.) which wander in the atmosphere for as long as a century before absorbing ultraviolet radiation and decomposing to create NO and Cl in the middle of the stratospheric ozone layer. The growing emissions of synthetic chlorofluorocarbon molecules cause a significant diminution in the ozone content of the stratosphere, with the result that more solar ultraviolet-B radiation (290–320 nm wavelength) reaches the surface. This ozone loss occurs in the temperate zone latitudes in all seasons, and especially drastically since the early 1980s in the south polar springtime—the ‘Antarctic ozone hole’. The chemical reactions causing this ozone depletion are primarily based on atomic Cl and ClO, the product of its reaction with ozone. The further manufacture of chlorofluorocarbons has been banned by the 1992 revisions of the 1987 Montreal Protocol of the United Nations. Atmospheric measurements have confirmed that the Protocol has been very successful in reducing further emissions of these molecules. Recovery of the stratosphere to the ozone conditions of the 1950s will occur slowly over the rest of the twenty-first century because of the long lifetime of the precursor molecules. PMID:16627294

  10. Stratospheric ozone depletion.

    PubMed

    Rowland, F Sherwood

    2006-05-29

    Solar ultraviolet radiation creates an ozone layer in the atmosphere which in turn completely absorbs the most energetic fraction of this radiation. This process both warms the air, creating the stratosphere between 15 and 50 km altitude, and protects the biological activities at the Earth's surface from this damaging radiation. In the last half-century, the chemical mechanisms operating within the ozone layer have been shown to include very efficient catalytic chain reactions involving the chemical species HO, HO2, NO, NO2, Cl and ClO. The NOX and ClOX chains involve the emission at Earth's surface of stable molecules in very low concentration (N2O, CCl2F2, CCl3F, etc.) which wander in the atmosphere for as long as a century before absorbing ultraviolet radiation and decomposing to create NO and Cl in the middle of the stratospheric ozone layer. The growing emissions of synthetic chlorofluorocarbon molecules cause a significant diminution in the ozone content of the stratosphere, with the result that more solar ultraviolet-B radiation (290-320 nm wavelength) reaches the surface. This ozone loss occurs in the temperate zone latitudes in all seasons, and especially drastically since the early 1980s in the south polar springtime-the 'Antarctic ozone hole'. The chemical reactions causing this ozone depletion are primarily based on atomic Cl and ClO, the product of its reaction with ozone. The further manufacture of chlorofluorocarbons has been banned by the 1992 revisions of the 1987 Montreal Protocol of the United Nations. Atmospheric measurements have confirmed that the Protocol has been very successful in reducing further emissions of these molecules. Recovery of the stratosphere to the ozone conditions of the 1950s will occur slowly over the rest of the twenty-first century because of the long lifetime of the precursor molecules. PMID:16627294

  11. A general circulation model simulation of the springtime Antarctic ozone decrease and its impact on mid-latitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Cariolle, D.; Lasserre-Bigorry, A.; Royer, J.F. ); Geleyn, J.F. )

    1990-02-20

    Ozone is treated as an interactive variable calculated by means of a continuity equation which takes account of advection and photochemical production and loss. The ozone concentration is also used to compute the heating and cooling rates due to the absorption of solar ultraviolet radiation, and the infrared emission in the stratosphere. The daytime ozone decrease due to the perturbed chlorine chemistry found at high southern latitudes is introduced as an extra loss in the ozone continuity equation. Results of the perturbed simulation show a very good agreement with the ozone measurements made during spring 1987. The simulation also shows the development of a high-latitude anomalous circulation, with a warming of the upper stratosphere resulting mainly from dynamical heating. In addition, a substantial ozone decrease is found at mid-latitudes in a thin stratospheric layer located between the 390 and the 470 K {theta} surfaces. A significant residual ozone decrease is found at the end of the model integration, 7 months after the final warming and the vortex breakdown. If there is a significant residual ozone decrease in the atmosphere, the ozone trends predicted by photochemical models which do not take into account the high-latitude perturbed chemistry are clearly inadequate. Finally, it is concluded that further model simulations at higher horizontal resolution, possibly with a better representation of the heterogeneous chemistry, will be needed to evaluate with more confidence the magnitude of the mid-latitudinal ozone depletion induced by the ozone hole formation.

  12. Ozone: What Would It Be Like to Live in a World Where the Sun Was Dangerous?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clearing, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Defines ozone layer and the meaning, evidence, causes, and significance of ozone depletion. Summarizes solutions to the problem of ozone depletion and government action concerning the issue. Graphically depicts ozone depletion, global ozone loss, and how ozone is destroyed. Provides a lesson plan and listing for additional educational resources.…

  13. Differential chemical profiling to identify ozonation by-products of estrone-sulfate and first characterization of estrogenicity in generated drinking water.

    PubMed

    Bourgin, Marc; Gervais, Gaël; Bichon, Emmanuelle; Antignac, Jean-Philippe; Monteau, Fabrice; Leroy, Gaëla; Barritaud, Lauriane; Chachignon, Mathilde; Ingrand, Valérie; Roche, Pascal; Le Bizec, Bruno

    2013-07-01

    For a few years, the concern of water treatment companies is not only focused on the removal of target micropollutants but has been extended to the investigation of potential biologically active by-products generated during the treatment processes. Therefore, some methods dedicated to the detection and structural characterization of such by-products have emerged. However, most of these studies are usually carried out under simplified conditions (e.g. high concentration levels of micropollutants, drastic treatment conditions, use of deionized or ultrapure water) and somewhat unrealistic conditions compared to that implemented in water treatment plants. In the present study, a real field water sample was fortified at the part-per-billion level (50 μg L(-1)) with estrone-3-sulfate (E1-3S) before being ozonated (at 1 mg L(-1)) for 10 min. In a first step, targeted measurements evidenced a degradation of the parent compound (>80%) in 10 min. Secondly, a non-targeted chemical profiling approach derived from metabolomic profiling studies allowed to reveal 11 ozonation by-products, among which 4 were found predominant. The estrogenic activity of these water samples spiked with E1-3S before and after treatment was assessed by the ER-CALUX assay and was found to decrease significantly after 10 min of ozonation. Therefore, this innovative methodological strategy demonstrated its suitability and relevancy for revealing unknown compounds generated from water treatment, and permitted to generate new results regarding specifically the impact of ozonation on estrone-3-sulfate. These results confirm that ozonation is effective at removing E1-3S in drinking water and indicate that the by-products generated have significantly lower estrogenic activity.

  14. Differential chemical profiling to identify ozonation by-products of estrone-sulfate and first characterization of estrogenicity in generated drinking water.

    PubMed

    Bourgin, Marc; Gervais, Gaël; Bichon, Emmanuelle; Antignac, Jean-Philippe; Monteau, Fabrice; Leroy, Gaëla; Barritaud, Lauriane; Chachignon, Mathilde; Ingrand, Valérie; Roche, Pascal; Le Bizec, Bruno

    2013-07-01

    For a few years, the concern of water treatment companies is not only focused on the removal of target micropollutants but has been extended to the investigation of potential biologically active by-products generated during the treatment processes. Therefore, some methods dedicated to the detection and structural characterization of such by-products have emerged. However, most of these studies are usually carried out under simplified conditions (e.g. high concentration levels of micropollutants, drastic treatment conditions, use of deionized or ultrapure water) and somewhat unrealistic conditions compared to that implemented in water treatment plants. In the present study, a real field water sample was fortified at the part-per-billion level (50 μg L(-1)) with estrone-3-sulfate (E1-3S) before being ozonated (at 1 mg L(-1)) for 10 min. In a first step, targeted measurements evidenced a degradation of the parent compound (>80%) in 10 min. Secondly, a non-targeted chemical profiling approach derived from metabolomic profiling studies allowed to reveal 11 ozonation by-products, among which 4 were found predominant. The estrogenic activity of these water samples spiked with E1-3S before and after treatment was assessed by the ER-CALUX assay and was found to decrease significantly after 10 min of ozonation. Therefore, this innovative methodological strategy demonstrated its suitability and relevancy for revealing unknown compounds generated from water treatment, and permitted to generate new results regarding specifically the impact of ozonation on estrone-3-sulfate. These results confirm that ozonation is effective at removing E1-3S in drinking water and indicate that the by-products generated have significantly lower estrogenic activity. PMID:23726716

  15. Reaction products of amido-amine and epoxide useful as fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Efner, H.F.

    1988-04-12

    A method for reducing engine deposits in an internal combustion engine is described comprising the addition of a detergent fuel additive package to a hydrocarbon fuel for the engine. The fuel detergent is added in an amount effective to reduce deposits and the hydrocarbon fuel is used with detergent additive as fuel in an internal combustion engine. The detergent fuel additive package comprises: (1) a fuel detergent additive that is the reaction product prepared by reacting (a) vegetable oil or (b) higher carboxylic acid chosen from (i) aliphatic fatty acids having 10-25 carbon atoms and (ii) aralkyl acids having 12-42 carbon atoms with (c) multiamine to obtain a fist product mixture with the first product mixture reacted with alklylene oxide to produce a second product mixture and (2) a fuel detergent additive solvent compatible with the fuels.

  16. Effect of Periodic Water Addition on Citric Acid Production in Solid State Fermentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utpat, Shraddha S.; Kinnige, Pallavi T.; Dhamole, Pradip B.

    2013-09-01

    Water addition is one of the methods used to control the moisture loss in solid state fermentation (SSF). However, none of the studies report the timing of water addition and amount of water to be added in SSF. Therefore, this work was undertaken with an objective to evaluate the performance of periodic water addition on citric acid production in SSF. Experiments were conducted at different moistures (50-80 %) and temperatures (30-40 °C) to simulate the conditions in a fermenter. Citric acid production by Aspergillus niger (ATCC 9029) using sugarcane baggase was chosen as a model system. Based on the moisture profile, citric acid and sugar data, a strategy was designed for periodic addition of water. Water addition at 48, 96, 144 and 192 h enhanced the citric acid production by 62 % whereas water addition at 72, 120, and 168 h increased the citric acid production by just 17 %.

  17. Ozone Therapy in Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Domb, William C

    2014-01-01

    Summary The 21st century dental practice is quite dynamic. New treatment protocols and new materials are being developed at a rapid pace. Ozone dental therapy falls into the category of new treatment protocols in dentistry, yet ozone is not new at all. Ozone therapy is already a major treatment modality in Europe, South America and a number of other countries. What is provided here will not be an exhaustive scientific treatise so much as a brief general introduction into what dentists are now doing with ozone therapies and the numerous oral/systemic links that make this subject so important for physicians so that, ultimately, they may serve their patients more effectively and productively. PMID:25363268

  18. Upper tropospheric ozone production from lightning NOx-impacted convection: Smoke ingestion case study from the DC3 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apel, E. C.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Hills, A. J.; Blake, N. J.; Barth, M. C.; Weinheimer, A.; Cantrell, C.; Rutledge, S. A.; Basarab, B.; Crawford, J.; Diskin, G.; Homeyer, C. R.; Campos, T.; Flocke, F.; Fried, A.; Blake, D. R.; Brune, W.; Pollack, I.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T.; Wennberg, P. O.; Crounse, J. D.; Wisthaler, A.; Mikoviny, T.; Huey, G.; Heikes, B.; O'Sullivan, D.; Riemer, D. D.

    2015-03-01

    As part of the Deep Convective Cloud and Chemistry (DC3) experiment, the National Science Foundation/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Gulfstream-V (GV) and NASA DC-8 research aircraft probed the chemical composition of the inflow and outflow of two convective storms (north storm, NS, south storm, SS) originating in the Colorado region on 22 June 2012, a time when the High Park wildfire was active in the area. A wide range of trace species were measured on board both aircraft including biomass burning (BB) tracers hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and acetonitrile (ACN). Acrolein, a much shorter lived tracer for BB, was also quantified on the GV. The data demonstrated that the NS had ingested fresh smoke from the High Park fire and as a consequence had a higher VOC OH reactivity than the SS. The SS lofted aged fire tracers along with other boundary layer ozone precursors and was more impacted by lightning NOx (LNOx) than the NS. The NCAR master mechanism box model was initialized with measurements made in the outflow of the two storms. The NS and SS were predicted to produce 11 and 14 ppbv of O3, respectively, downwind of the storm over 2 days. Sensitivity tests revealed that the ozone production potential of the SS was highly dependent on LNOx. Normalized excess mixing ratios, ΔX/ΔCO, for HCN and ACN were determined in both the fire plume and the storm outflow and found to be 7.0 ± 0.5 and 2.3 ± 0.5 pptv ppbv-1, respectively, and 1.4 ± 0.3 pptv ppbv-1 for acrolein in the outflow only.

  19. Removal of the 2-Mercaptobenotiazole from Model Wastewater by Ozonation

    PubMed Central

    Kassai, Angelika

    2014-01-01

    The feasibility of ozonation process for 2-mercaptobenzothiazole (2-MBT) removal follows from results of ozonation of the model wastewater. Total removal of 2-MBT was observed after 20 minutes of ozonation. Very good reproducibility of repeated ozonation trials including sampling and analysis was observed. However, the majority of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) remained in the reaction mixture. Benzothiazole (BT) and 2-hydroxybenzothiazole (OBT) intermediates were identified during degradation of 2-MBT with ozone. In addition to the above benzothiazole derivatives, the creation of some other organic compounds follows from results of mass balance. The best fits of experimental data were obtained using the first kinetic model for 2-MBT and zero-order kinetic model for COD and DOC. The reaction time of 60 minutes can be considered as effective with regard to controlled oxidation in order to increase a portion of partially oxidized substances. Higher biodegradability and lower toxicity of ozonation products on respiration activity of activated sludge microorganisms was observed at higher ozonation time. PMID:24578619

  20. Gas-phase reaction products and yields of terpinolene with ozone and nitric oxide using a new derivatization agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, Jason E.; Jackson, Stephen R.; Harrison, Joel C.; Wells, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    The new derivatization agent, O-tert-butylhydroxylamine hydrochloride (TBOX) was used to investigate the carbonyl reaction products from terpinolene ozonolysis. With ozone (O3) as the limiting reagent, four carbonyl compounds were detected: methylglyoxal (MG), 4-methylcyclohex-3-en-1-one, (4MCH), 6-oxo-3-(propan-2-ylidene) heptanal (6OPH), and 3,6-dioxoheptanal (36DOH). The tricarbonyl 36DOH has not been previously observed. Using cyclohexane as a hydroxyl radical (OHrad) scavenger, the yields of 6OPH and 36DOH were reduced indicating the influence secondary OHrad radicals have on terpinolene ozonolysis products. However, the MG yield increased and the 4MCH yield was unchanged when OHrad radicals were scavenged suggesting they are only made by the terpinolene + O3 reaction. The detection of 36DOH using TBOX highlights the advantages of a smaller molecular weight derivatization agent for the detection of multi-carbonyl compounds. The product yields from terpinolene ozonolysis experiments conducted in the presence of 20 ppb nitric oxide (NO) remained unchanged except for MG which decreased. However, in experiments where O3 was kept constant at 50 ppb and NO was varied (20, 50, 100 ppb) MG, 6OPH, 36DOH decreased with increasing NO while 4MCH increased with increasing NO. The use of TBOX derivatization if combined with other derivatization agents may address a recurring need to simply and accurately detect multi-functional oxygenated species in air.

  1. Impact of downward-mixing ozone on surface ozone accumulation in southern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Ho

    2008-04-01

    The ozone that initially presents in the previous day's afternoon mixing layer can remain in the nighttime atmosphere and then be carried over to the next morning. Finally, this ozone can be brought to the ground by downward mixing as mixing depth increases during the daytime, thereby increasing surface ozone concentrations. Variation of ozone concentration during each of these periods is investigated in this work. First, ozone concentrations existing in the daily early morning atmosphere at the altitude range of the daily maximum mixing depth (residual ozone concentrations) were measured using tethered ozonesondes on 52 experimental days during 2004-2005 in southern Taiwan. Daily downward-mixing ozone concentrations were calculated by a box model coupling the measured daily residual ozone concentrations and daily mixing depth variations. The ozone concentrations upwind in the previous day's afternoon mixing layer were estimated by the combination of back air trajectory analysis and known previous day's surface ozone distributions. Additionally, the relationship between daily downward-mixing ozone concentration and daily photochemically produced ozone concentration was examined. The latter was calculated by removing the former from daily surface maximum ozone concentration. The measured daily residual ozone concentrations distributed at 12-74 parts per billion (ppb) with an average of 42 +/- 17 ppb are well correlated with the previous upwind ozone concentration (R2 = 0.54-0.65). Approximately 60% of the previous upwind ozone was estimated to be carried over to the next morning and became the observed residual ozone. The daily downward-mixing ozone contributes 48 +/- 18% of the daily surface maximum ozone concentration, indicating that the downward-mixing ozone is as important as daily photochemically produced ozone to daily surface maximum ozone accumulation. The daily downward-mixing ozone is poorly correlated with the daily photochemically produced ozone and

  2. Use of orbitrap-MS/MS and QSAR analyses to estimate mutagenic transformation products of iopamidol generated during ozonation and chlorination.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Taku; Hashizuka, Masahiro; Kuriyama, Taisuke; Matsui, Yoshihiko; Shirasaki, Nobutaka

    2016-04-01

    The effects of two water purification processes (ozonation, and chlorination after ozonation) on the mutagenicity of a solution containing iopamidol (X-ray contrast medium) were investigated by using the Ames assay. No mutagenicity was observed during ozonation. In contrast, mutagenicity was induced by the ozone-treated iopamidol-containing solution after subsequent chlorination, indicating that mutagenic transformation-products (TPs) were generated. Ten of 70 peaks detected on the LC/MS total ion chromatogram (TIC) of the ozone-treated iopamidol-containing solution after chlorination had a positive correlation (r(2) > 0.6) between their peak areas and the observed mutagenicity, suggesting that TPs detected as these peaks may induce mutagenicity. To narrow down the possible contributors to the observed mutagenicity, we compared the areas of the peaks on the TIC-charts with and without chlorination. Of the ten peaks, six were also detected in the ozone-treated iopamidol-containing solution without chlorination, which did not induce mutagenicity, indicating that these peaks were not related to the observed mutagenicity. Accurate m/z values and MS/MS analysis with an orbitrap MS of the remaining four peaks revealed that two of them represented the same TP in the negative and positive ion modes. The three remaining TPs were assessed in four quantitative structure-activity relationship models for predicting Ames mutagenicity. At least one model predicted that two of the three TPs were mutagenic, whereas none of the models predicted that the other TP was a mutagen, suggesting that the former TPs, estimated as N1-acetyl-5-amino-6-chloro-2-iodobenzene-1,3-dicarboxamide and 3-hydroxy-2-{3-[(2-hydroxyethoxy)carbonyl]-2,4,6-triiodo-5-nitrobenzoyl}amino)propanoic acid, could be the candidate compounds that contributed to the observed mutagenicity.

  3. Sensitivity of Ozone to Bromine in the Lower Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salawitch, R. J.; Weisenstein, D. K.; Kovalenko, L. J.; Sioris, C. E.; Wennberg, P. O.; Chance, K.; Ko, M. K. W.; McLinden, C. A.

    2005-01-01

    Measurements of BrO suggest that inorganic bromine (Br(sub y)) at and above the tropopause is 4 to 8 ppt greater than assumed in models used in past ozone trend assessment studies. This additional bromine is likely carried to the stratosphere by short-lived biogenic compounds and their decomposition products, including tropospheric BrO. Including this additional bromine in an ozone trend simulation increases the computed ozone depletion over the past approx.25 years, leading to better agreement between measured and modeled ozone trends. This additional Br(sub y) (assumed constant over time) causes more ozone depletion because associated BrO provides a reaction partner for ClO, which increases due to anthropogenic sources. Enhanced Br(sub y) causes photochemical loss of ozone below approx.14 km to change from being controlled by HO(sub x) catalytic cycles (primarily HO2+O3) to a situation where loss by the BrO+HO2 cycle is also important.

  4. Model ozone photochemistry on the basis of Solar Mesosphere Explorer mesospheric observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, R. T.; Rusch, D. W.; Thomas, R. J.; Allen, M.; Eckman, R. S.

    1987-01-01

    Morning and afternoon mesospheric ozone profiles (50-90 km) measured by the Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME) satellite are analyzed with one-dimensional photochemical models. The observed ozone abundances are 40 percent and 100 percent greater than the model ozone abundances at 50 and 80 km, respectively. Diurnal model calculations are compared with SME observations of ozone profiles at about 0400 and 1400 LT for high northern summer latitudes. Analysis of the ratios of these early morning and midafternoon ozone profiles provides the additional constraint that larger odd-oxygen production rates are required if lower odd-hydrogen activity is invoked to increase model O3 abundances. The increase in odd-oxygen production must be solar zenith angle independent in the mesosphere, ruling out significant changes in the Schumann-Runge band O2 opacities from Allen and Frederrick (1982).

  5. A New NASA Data Product: Tropospheric and Stratospheric Column Ozone in the Tropics Derived from TOMS Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziemke, J. R.; Chandra, S.; Bhartia, P. K.

    1999-01-01

    Tropospheric column ozone (TCO) and stratospheric column ozone (SCO) gridded data in the tropics for 1979-present are now available from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center via either direct ftp, world-NN,ide-NN,eb, or electronic mail. This note provides a brief overview of the method used to derive the data set including validation and adjustments.

  6. Effects of tropospheric ozone on methane and carbon dioxide fluxes from peatland mesocosms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toet, Sylvia; Oliver, Vikki; Helgason, Thorunn; Peacock, Simon; Barnes, Jeremy; Ineson, Phil; Ashmore, Mike

    2010-05-01

    gross photosynthesis has been enhanced by elevated ozone up till now. The latter may partly be explained by higher net biomass Sphagnum production observed at elevated ozone. Leaf biomass and stomatal conductance of Schoenus nigricans were not affected by ozone. Additional soil and plant data will be presented that may help unravel the mechanisms underling the observed changes in greenhouse gas fluxes. Hence, the results imply that increases in global background ozone concentrations that are predicted by models in the northern hemisphere over the 21st century may lead to a negative feedback on methane emissions from peatland ecosystems. This study will be continued with methane emission and high-frequency carbon dioxide flux measurements and more detailed process studies, including stable isotope tracer studies, providing key information for long-term predictions of ozone impacts on carbon dynamics in peatland ecosystems.

  7. SWIFT: Semi-empirical and numerically efficient stratospheric ozone chemistry for global climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreyling, Daniel; Wohltmann, Ingo; Lehmann, Ralph; Rex, Markus

    2015-04-01

    The SWIFT model is a fast yet accurate chemistry scheme for calculating the chemistry of stratospheric ozone. It is mainly intended for use in Global Climate Models (GCMs), Chemistry Climate Models (CCMs) and Earth System Models (ESMs). For computing time reasons these models often do not employ full stratospheric chemistry modules, but use prescribed ozone instead. This can lead to insufficient representation between stratosphere and troposphere. The SWIFT stratospheric ozone chemistry model, focuses on the major reaction mechanisms of ozone production and loss in order to reduce the computational costs. SWIFT consists of two sub-models. 1) Inside the polar vortex, the model calculates polar vortex averaged ozone loss by solving a set of coupled differential equations for the key species in polar ozone chemistry. 2) The extra-polar regime, which this poster is going to focus on. Outside the polar vortex, the complex system of differential equations of a full stratospheric chemistry model is replaced by an explicit algebraic polynomial, which can be solved in a fraction of the time needed by the full scale model. The approach, which is used to construct the polynomial, is also referred to as repro-modeling and has been successfully applied to chemical models (Turanyi (1993), Lowe & Tomlin (2000)). The procedure uses data from the Lagrangian stratospheric chemistry and transport model ATLAS and yields one high-order polynomial for global ozone loss and production rates over 24h per month. The stratospheric ozone change rates can be sufficiently described by 9 variables. Latitude, altitude, temperature, the overhead ozone abundance, 4 mixing ratios of ozone depleting chemical families (chlorine, bromine, nitrogen-oxides and hydrogen-oxides) and the ozone concentrations itself. The ozone change rates in the lower stratosphere as a function of these 9 variables yield a sufficiently compact 9-D hyper-surface, which we can approximate with a polynomial. In the upper

  8. Effect of urea addition on giant reed ensilage and subsequent methane production by anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shan; Ge, Xumeng; Liew, Lo Niee; Liu, Zhe; Li, Yebo

    2015-09-01

    The effect of urea addition on giant reed ensilage and sequential anaerobic digestion (AD) of the ensiled giant reed was evaluated. The dry matter loss during ensilage (up to 90 days) with or without urea addition was about 1%. Addition of 2% urea enhanced production of lactic acid by about 4 times, and reduced production of propionic acid by 2-8 times. Besides, urea addition reduced degradation of cellulose and hemicellulose, and increased degradation of lignin in giant reed during ensilage. Ensilage with or without urea addition had no significant effects on the enzymatic digestibility of giant reed, but ensilage with urea addition achieved a cumulative methane yield of 173 L/kg VS, which was 18% higher than that of fresh giant reed. The improved methane yield of giant reed could be attributed to the production of organic acids and ethanol during ensilage.

  9. Degradation of carbofuran by ozonation.

    PubMed

    Suneethi, S; Joseph, Kurian

    2009-04-01

    Degradation of commercial grade carbofuran (2, 3 dihydro-2, 2-dimethyl-7 benzo furanyl-N-methyl carbamate) in aqueous solution by ozone oxidation was investigated using bench scale experiments. The degradation rate was strongly influenced by the ozone dosage, pH, initial concentration of carbofuran and contact time of ozonation. Carbofuran solution of 200ppm concentration was degraded by 79% within 10 minutes consuming 87 mg of ozone at pH 4. The associated TOC reduction was observed to be 53%. Ammonium (20 mg/L) and nitrate (30 mg/L) ions were detected in the effluent as degradation products of ozonation. The results support the effectiveness of ozonation for degradation of organic pesticides such as carbofuran.

  10. Ozone studies in the Paso del Norte region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerra-Davila, Fernando

    obtained from this photolysis study demonstrate that the local ground level ozone formation is not only influenced by the strong solar radiation and changing aerosol makeup, but also by other heterogeneous factors and reactions. In addition, this research provided good evidence that the ground level ozone precursor regime in El Paso during the ozone episode of June 2006 was mostly VOC-limited. Much of this estimation was derived from measurements of local ambient VOC/NOx ratios. This finding shows that at least during June 2006, the non-linear surface ozone production increased during weekends compared to workdays in a habitually VOC-limited regime. The seasonal variations of columnar ozone as measured by a Multi-filter Rotating Shadowband instrument installed at the UTEP campus are analyzed for the first time for this region and results are presented. This investigation has addressed the problem of ground-level ozone formation in the Paso del Norte region. Urban ozone is a complex problem with many aspects that are not fully understood. In this investigation, a range of techniques has been used to address the study of local surface ozone episodes with the purpose of acquiring new insights and knowledge that will help understand and remediate the diverse atmospheric pollution events that affect this bi-national region recurrently. Innovative techniques were developed and used, ranging from the use of local ambient atmospheric pollution data to the utilization of complex modeling techniques to achieve the best possible computer results. Finally, the influence of ground level ozone concentrations in admissions to hospitals for this region due to respiratory diseases is analyzed. The comprehensive results obtained in this work will help to better understand ozone formation in the Paso del Norte Region for future policy regulation implementations.

  11. Atmospheric photochemical transformations enhance 1,3-butadiene-induced inflammatory responses in human epithelial cells: The role of ozone and other photochemical degradation products.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Melanie; Sexton, Kenneth G; Jeffries, Harvey; Jaspers, Ilona

    2007-03-20

    Chemistry of hazardous air pollutants has been studied for many years, yet little is known about how these chemicals, once reacted within urban atmospheres, affect healthy and susceptible individuals. Once released into the atmosphere, 1,3-butadiene (BD) reacts with hydroxyl radicals and ozone (created by photochemical processes), to produce many identified and unidentified products. Once this transformation has occurred, the toxic potential of atmospheric pollutants such as BD in the ambient environment is currently unclear. During this study, environmental irradiation chambers (also called smog chambers), utilizing natural sunlight, were used to create photochemical transformations of BD. The smog chamber/in vitro exposure system was designed to investigate the toxicity of chemicals before and after photochemical reactions and to investigate interactions with the urban atmosphere using representative in vitro samples. In this study, we determined the relative toxicity and inflammatory gene expression induced by coupling smog chamber atmospheres with an in vitro system to expose human respiratory epithelial cells to BD, BDs photochemical degradation products, or the equivalent ozone generated within the photochemical mixture. Exposure to the photochemically generated products of BD (primarily acrolein, acetaldehyde, formaldehyde, furan and ozone) induced significant increases in cytotoxicity, IL-8, and IL-6 gene expression compared to a synthetic mixture of primary products that was created by injecting the correct concentrations of the detected products from the irradiation experiments. Interestingly, exposure to the equivalent levels of ozone generated during the photochemical transformation of BD did not induce the same level of inflammatory cytokine release for either exposure protocol, suggesting that the effects from ozone alone do not account for the entire response in the irradiation experiments. These results indicate that BDs full photochemical product

  12. Atmospheric photochemical transformations enhance 1,3-butadiene-induced inflammatory responses in human epithelial cells: The role of ozone and other photochemical degradation products.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Melanie; Sexton, Kenneth G; Jeffries, Harvey; Jaspers, Ilona

    2007-03-20

    Chemistry of hazardous air pollutants has been studied for many years, yet little is known about how these chemicals, once reacted within urban atmospheres, affect healthy and susceptible individuals. Once released into the atmosphere, 1,3-butadiene (BD) reacts with hydroxyl radicals and ozone (created by photochemical processes), to produce many identified and unidentified products. Once this transformation has occurred, the toxic potential of atmospheric pollutants such as BD in the ambient environment is currently unclear. During this study, environmental irradiation chambers (also called smog chambers), utilizing natural sunlight, were used to create photochemical transformations of BD. The smog chamber/in vitro exposure system was designed to investigate the toxicity of chemicals before and after photochemical reactions and to investigate interactions with the urban atmosphere using representative in vitro samples. In this study, we determined the relative toxicity and inflammatory gene expression induced by coupling smog chamber atmospheres with an in vitro system to expose human respiratory epithelial cells to BD, BDs photochemical degradation products, or the equivalent ozone generated within the photochemical mixture. Exposure to the photochemically generated products of BD (primarily acrolein, acetaldehyde, formaldehyde, furan and ozone) induced significant increases in cytotoxicity, IL-8, and IL-6 gene expression compared to a synthetic mixture of primary products that was created by injecting the correct concentrations of the detected products from the irradiation experiments. Interestingly, exposure to the equivalent levels of ozone generated during the photochemical transformation of BD did not induce the same level of inflammatory cytokine release for either exposure protocol, suggesting that the effects from ozone alone do not account for the entire response in the irradiation experiments. These results indicate that BDs full photochemical product

  13. Relative production of ozone and nitrates in urban and rural power plant plumes: 1. Composite results based on data from 10 field measurement days

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillani, Noor V.; Meagher, James F.; Valente, Ralph J.; Imhoff, Robert E.; Tanner, Roger L.; Luria, Menachem

    1998-09-01

    A rather limited number of large power plants are responsible for about 2/3 and 1/3 of the U.S. anthropogenic emissions of SO2 and NOx, respectively. Considerable uncertainty continues to prevail about the local and regional impact of their potentially harmful secondary products (e.g., ozone, sulfates, nitrates), We have analyzed state-of-the-art data of the Southern Oxidant Study (SOS)-Nashville Field Study (1994, 1995) for 10 days of summer daytime field measurements by instrumented aircraft in the plumes of three large, tall-stack, base-load, Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) coal-fired power plants in northwestern Tennessee: Gallatin (G), located within the Nashville urban ozone nonattainment area, and Cumberland (C) and Johnsonville (JV) in rural isoprene-rich forested areas about 100 km to the west of Nashville. The average 1995 emissions of NOx from these three sources ranged over more than an order of magnitude. In this paper, we have explored plume chemical evolution and the magnitude, efficiency, and yield of ozone and NOz, (NOx oxidation products, mostly inorganic and organic nitrates) production in a broad variety of plume transport and chemistry scenarios within the convective boundary layer (CBL) in rural and urban settings. The results show that (1) plume chemical maturity and peak production capacities of ozone and NOz were realized quite close to the sources, within 30-40 km and 4 hours of daytime transport for Gallatin (smallest NOx emission rate, QNOx, and suburban environment) and typically within 100 km and 6 hours of CBL transport for Cumberland (highest QNOx and rural environment rich in isoprene); (2) the ozone impact of Gallatin on Nashville can exceed that of Cumberland, and under favorable transport and chemical conditions, both power plants can contribute as much as 50 ppb of excess ozone to the urban area, raising local peak levels well in excess of 100 ppb; (3) an estimated 3.1±0.7 molecules of ozone and more than 0.6 molecules of NOz

  14. Health Effects of a Mixture of Indoor Air Volatile Organics, Their Ozone Oxidation Products, and Stress

    PubMed Central

    Fiedler, Nancy; Laumbach, Robert; Kelly-McNeil, Kathie; Lioy, Paul; Fan, Zhi-Hua; Zhang, Junfeng; Ottenweller, John; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; Kipen, Howard

    2005-01-01

    In our present study we tested the health effects among women of controlled exposures to volatile organic compounds (VOCs), with and without ozone (O3), and psychological stress. Each subject was exposed to the following three conditions at 1-week intervals (within-subject factor): VOCs (26 mg/m3), VOCs + O3 (26 mg/m3 + 40 ppb), and ambient air with a 1-min spike of VOCs (2.5 mg/m3). As a between-subjects factor, half the subjects were randomly assigned to perform a stressor. Subjects were 130 healthy women (mean age, 27.2 years; mean education, 15.2 years). Health effects measured before, during, and after each 140-min exposure included symptoms, neurobehavioral performance, salivary cortisol, and lung function. Mixing VOCs with O3 was shown to produce irritating compounds including aldehydes, hydrogen peroxide, organic acids, secondary organic aerosols, and ultrafine particles (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter < 0.1 μm). Exposure to VOCs with and without O3 did not result in significant subjective or objective health effects. Psychological stress significantly increased salivary cortisol and symptoms of anxiety regardless of exposure condition. Neither lung function nor neurobehavioral performance was compromised by exposure to VOCs or VOCs + O3. Although numerous epidemiologic studies suggest that symptoms are significantly increased among workers in buildings with poor ventilation and mixtures of VOCs, our acute exposure study was not consistent with these epidemiologic findings. Stress appears to be a more significant factor than chemical exposures in affecting some of the health end points measured in our present study. PMID:16263509

  15. Determination of seven certified color additives in food products using liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Harp, Bhakti Petigara; Miranda-Bermudez, Enio; Barrows, Julie N

    2013-04-17

    This study describes a new method for determining FD&C Blue No. 1, FD&C Blue No. 2, FD&C Green No. 3, FD&C Red No. 3, FD&C Red No. 40, FD&C Yellow No. 5, and FD&C Yellow No. 6 in food products. These seven color additives are water-soluble dyes that are required to be batch certified by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) before they may be used in food and other FDA-regulated products. In the new method, the color additives are extracted from a product using one of two procedures developed for various product types, isolated from the noncolored components, and analyzed by liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection. The method was validated by determining linearity, range, precision, recovery from various matrices, limit of detection, limit of quantitation, and relative standard deviation for each color additive. A survey of 44 food products, including beverages, frozen treats, powder mixes, gelatin products, candies, icings, jellies, spices, dressings, sauces, baked goods, and dairy products, found total color additives ranging from 1.9 to 1221 mg/kg. FDA intends to use the new method for conducting a rigorous, comprehensive dietary exposure assessment of certified color additives in products likely to be consumed by children.

  16. Global Crop Yield Reductions due to Surface Ozone Exposure: Crop Production Losses and Economic Damage in 2000 and 2030 under Two Future Scenarios of O3 Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avnery, S.; Mauzerall, D. L.; Liu, J.; Horowitz, L. W.

    2011-12-01

    production in 2030 due to the need to feed a growing population, our calculations of crop production and economic losses are conservative. Our results suggest that O3 pollution poses a growing threat to global food security even under an optimistic scenario of future ozone precursor emissions. Further efforts to reduce surface O3 concentrations and adapt crops to elevated O3 thus provide an excellent opportunity to increase global grain yields without the environmental degradation associated with additional fertilizer application or land cultivation.

  17. Nonaqueous ozonation of vulcanized rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Serkiz, S.M.

    1999-12-07

    A process and resulting product are provided in which a solid particulate, such as vulcanized crumb rubber, has the surface functional groups oxidized by ozonation using a nonpolar solvent. The ozonation process renders the treated crumb rubber more suitable for use in new rubber formulations. As a result, larger loading levels of the treated crumb rubber can be used in new rubber mixtures.

  18. Nonaqueous ozonation of vulcanized rubber

    DOEpatents

    Serkiz, Steven M.

    1999-01-01

    A process and resulting product is provided in which a solid particulate, such as vulcanized crumb rubber, has the surface functional groups oxidized by ozonation using a nonpolar solvent. The ozonation process renders the treated crumb rubber more suitable for use in new rubber formulations. As a result, larger loading levels of the treated crumb rubber can be used in new rubber mixtures.

  19. Drivers of changes in stratospheric and tropospheric ozone between year 2000 and 2100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Antara; Maycock, Amanda C.; Archibald, Alexander T.; Abraham, N. Luke; Telford, Paul; Braesicke, Peter; Pyle, John A.

    2016-03-01

    A stratosphere-resolving configuration of the Met Office's Unified Model (UM) with the United Kingdom Chemistry and Aerosols (UKCA) scheme is used to investigate the atmospheric response to changes in (a) greenhouse gases and climate, (b) ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) and (c) non-methane ozone precursor emissions. A suite of time-slice experiments show the separate, as well as pairwise, impacts of these perturbations between the years 2000 and 2100. Sensitivity to uncertainties in future greenhouse gases and aerosols is explored through the use of the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 4.5 and 8.5 scenarios. The results highlight an important role for the stratosphere in determining the annual mean tropospheric ozone response, primarily through stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE) of ozone. Under both climate change and reductions in ODSs, increases in STE offset decreases in net chemical production and act to increase the tropospheric ozone burden. This opposes the effects of projected decreases in ozone precursors through measures to improve air quality, which act to reduce the ozone burden. The global tropospheric lifetime of ozone (τO3) does not change significantly under climate change at RCP4.5, but it decreases at RCP8.5. This opposes the increases in τO3 simulated under reductions in ODSs and ozone precursor emissions. The additivity of the changes in ozone is examined by comparing the sum of the responses in the single-forcing experiments to those from equivalent combined-forcing experiments. Whilst the ozone responses to most forcing combinations are found to be approximately additive, non-additive changes are found in both the stratosphere and troposphere when a large climate forcing (RCP8.5) is combined with the effects of ODSs.

  20. [Catalytic ozonation by ceramic honeycomb for the degradation of oxalic acid in aqueous solution].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Sun, Zhi-Zhong; Ma, Jun

    2007-11-01

    Comparative experiments for the degradation of oxalic acid in aqueous solution were carried out in the three processes of ozonation alone, ceramic honeycomb-catalyzed ozonation and ceramic honeycomb adsorption. The results show that the degradation rates of oxalic acid in the ceramic honeycomb-catalyzed ozonation, ozonation alone and ceramic honeycomb adsorption systems are 37.6%, 2.2% and 0.4%, and the presence of ceramic honeycomb catalyst significantly improves the degradation rate of oxalic acid compared to the results from non-catalytic ozonation and adsorption. With the addition of tert-butanol, the degradation rates of oxalic acid in catalytic ozonation system decrease by 24.1%, 29.0% and 30.1%, respectively, at the concentration of 5, 10 and 15 mg x L(-1). This phenomenon indicates that ceramic honeycomb-catalyzed ozonation for the degradation of oxalic acid in aqueous solution follows the mechanism of *OH oxidation, namely the heterogeneous surface of catalyst enhances the initiation of *OH. The results of TOC analysis demonstrate that the process of ceramic honeycomb-catalyzed ozonation can achieve the complete mineralization level without the formation of intermediary degradation products. The experimental results suggest that the reaction temperature has positive relationship with the degradation rate of oxalic acid. The degradation rates of oxalic acid in the ceramic honeycomb-catalyzed ozonation system are 16.4%, 37.6%, 61.3% and 68.2%, at the respective reaction temperature of 10, 20, 30 and 40 degrees C.

  1. Rocket ozone sounding network data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, D. U.; Krueger, A. J.; Foster, G. M.

    1979-01-01

    During the period March 1977 through May 1977, three regular monthly ozone profiles were measured at Wallops Flight Center and three regular monthly ozone profiles were measured at the Churchill Research Range. One additional flight was conducted at Wallops Flight Center in support of Nimbus 4 SBUV. Data results and flight profiles for the period covered are presented.

  2. IDENTIFICATION OF BROMOHYDRINS IN OZONATED WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because ozonation is becoming a popular alternative to chlorination for disinfection of drinking water and because little is known about the potential adverse effects of ozonation disinfection by-products (DBPs), we have sought to identify ozone DBPs, particularly brominated orga...

  3. A Case Study On the Relative Influence of Free Tropospheric Subsidence, Long Range Transport and Local Production in Modulating Ozone Concentrations over Qatar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayoub, Mohammed; Ackermann, Luis; Fountoukis, Christos; Gladich, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    The Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute (QEERI) operates a network of air quality monitoring stations (AQMS) around the Doha metropolitan area and an ozonesonde station with regular weekly launches and occasional higher frequency launch experiments (HFLE). Six ozonesondes were launched at 0700 LT/0400 UTC and 1300 LT/1000 UTC over a three day period between 10-12 September, 2013. We present the analysis of the ozonesonde data coupled with regional chemical transport modeling over the same time period using WRF-Chem validated against both the ozonesonde and surface AQMS measurements. The HFLE and modeling show evidence of both subsidence and transboundary transport of ozone during the study period, coupled with a strong sea breeze circulation on the 11th of September resulting in elevated ozone concentrations throughout the boundary layer. The development of the sea breeze during the course of the day and influence of the early morning residual layer versus daytime production is quantified. The almost complete titration of ozone in the morning hours of 11 September, 2013 is attributed to local vehicular emissions of NOx and stable atmospheric conditions prevailing over the Doha area. The relative contribution of long range transport of ozone along the Arabian Gulf coast and local urban emissions are discussed.

  4. Characterizing the fluorescent products of waste activated sludge in dissolved organic matter following ultrasound assisted ozone pretreatments.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shan-Shan; Guo, Wan-Qian; Meng, Zhao-Hui; Zhou, Xian-Jiao; Feng, Xiao-Chi; Zheng, He-Shan; Liu, Bo; Ren, Nan-Qi; Cui, Ya-Shan

    2013-03-01

    This study investigated the effects of ozone and ultrasound (US) pretreatments, both individually and combined, on waste activated sludge reduction. Batch tests were conducted first to optimize the individual ozone and US pretreatments. Maximum sludge reduction ratios of 10.89% and 23% were obtained at 0.15g O3/g total solids ozone dose and 1.5W/mL US energy density, respectively. The combined ozone and US pretreatments were studied using response surface methodology. A maximum sludge reduction ratio of 40.14% was achieved by the combined ozone/US pretreatment with an ozone dose of 0.154g O3/g total solids and an US energy density of 1.445W/mL. The analysis of the dissolved organic matter by three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy showed that the combined pretreatment was superior to the individual ozone and US pretreatments, and also demonstrated the synergetic effect of these two combined pretreatments.

  5. [Effects of nitrogen addition on grassland species diversity and productivity in Keerqin Sandy Land].

    PubMed

    Li, Lu-Jun; Zeng, De-Hui; Yu, Zhan-Yuan; Ai, Gui-Yan; Yang, Dan; Mao, Rong

    2009-08-01

    Species diversity and productivity are the important indices of the structure and functioning of ecosystems. With Keerqin sandy grassland as test object, this paper studied its species composition, species diversity, and productivity under effects of different level nitrogen (N) addition. Nitrogen addition altered the species composition and the dominant species in the community, increased the vegetation height and coverage, and decreased vegetation light penetration. With the increase of N addition, both the species richness and the diversity decreased. Nitrogen addition increased the aboveground biomass significantly (P<0.01). There was a significant positive relationship between species richness and vegetation light penetration (P<0.01), and a significant negative relationship between species richness and vegetation coverage (P<0.01). It was suggested that nitrogen deposition and artificial nitrogen addition would affect the species composition, species diversity, and productivity of sandy grassland ecosystem.

  6. An Inventory of Methods for the Assessment of Additive Increased Addictiveness of Tobacco Products

    PubMed Central

    van de Nobelen, Suzanne; Kienhuis, Anne S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cigarettes and other forms of tobacco contain the addictive drug nicotine. Other components, either naturally occurring in tobacco or additives that are intentionally added during the manufacturing process, may add to the addictiveness of tobacco products. As such, these components can make cigarette smokers more easily and heavily dependent. Efforts to regulate tobacco product dependence are emerging globally. Additives that increase tobacco dependence will be prohibited under the new European Tobacco Product Directive. Objective: This article provides guidelines and recommendations for developing a regulatory strategy for assessment of increase in tobacco dependence due to additives. Relevant scientific literature is summarized and criteria and experimental studies that can define increased dependence of tobacco products are described. Conclusions: Natural tobacco smoke is a very complex matrix of components, therefore analysis of the contribution of an additive or a combination of additives to the level of dependence on this product is challenging. We propose to combine different type of studies analyzing overall tobacco product dependence potential and the functioning of additives in relation to nicotine. By using a combination of techniques, changes associated with nicotine dependence such as behavioral, physiological, and neurochemical alterations can be examined to provide sufficient information. Research needs and knowledge gaps will be discussed and recommendations will be made to translate current knowledge into legislation. As such, this article aids in implementation of the Tobacco Product Directive, as well as help enable regulators and researchers worldwide to develop standards to reduce dependence on tobacco products. Implications: This article provides an overall view on how to assess tobacco product constituents for their potential contribution to use and dependence. It provides guidelines that help enable regulators worldwide to

  7. A test strategy for the assessment of additive attributed toxicity of tobacco products.

    PubMed

    Kienhuis, Anne S; Staal, Yvonne C M; Soeteman-Hernández, Lya G; van de Nobelen, Suzanne; Talhout, Reinskje

    2016-08-01

    The new EU Tobacco Product Directive (TPD) prohibits tobacco products containing additives that are toxic in unburnt form or that increase overall toxicity of the product. This paper proposes a strategy to assess additive attributed toxicity in the context of the TPD. Literature was searched on toxicity testing strategies for regulatory purposes from tobacco industry and governmental institutes. Although mainly traditional in vivo testing strategies have been applied to assess toxicity of unburnt additives and increases in overall toxicity of tobacco products due to additives, in vitro tests combined with toxicogenomics and validated using biomarkers of exposure and disease are most promising in this respect. As such, tests are needed that are sensitive enough to assess additive attributed toxicity above the overall toxicity of tobacco products, which can associate assay outcomes to human risk and exposure. In conclusion, new, sensitive in vitro assays are needed to conclude whether comparable testing allows for assessment of small changes in overall toxicity attributed to additives. A more pragmatic approach for implementation on a short-term is mandated lowering of toxic emission components. Combined with risk assessment, this approach allows assessment of effectiveness of harm reduction strategies, including banning or reducing of additives.

  8. 39 CFR 3055.6 - Addition of new market dominant products or changes to existing market dominant products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Addition of new market dominant products or changes to existing market dominant products. 3055.6 Section 3055.6 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL SERVICE PERFORMANCE AND CUSTOMER SATISFACTION REPORTING Annual Reporting of...

  9. Regenerated Uranium Separation in Matched Abundance Ratio Cascade with Additional Product Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslyukov, E. V.; Palkin, V. A.

    2016-09-01

    This paper addresses known methods used to purify regenerated uranium in single and double cascades. A new method for separating regenerated uranium has been developed that enables a significant reduction of the concentration of 232,234U in the additional product flow. Matched abundance ratio cascades (M*-cascades) with different key components and additional product flow are used in the new method. Main product flow of the M*-cascade contains low enriched regenerated uranium. It can be used for reactor fuel production. Purified product can be enriched in the ordinary cascade in compliance with the requirements of ASTM C 996-10 set for isotopes 232,234U in low enriched commercial uranium, which is usually produced from the natural one. Computer experiment based on the new method has been performed. The experiment shows that the best cascade with the maximum flow of the enriched purified product is M*-cascade with key components 232,236U.

  10. Size-mediated foliar response to ozone in black cherry trees.

    PubMed

    Fredericksen, T S; Skelly, J M; Steiner, K C; Kolb, T E; Kouterick, K B

    1996-01-01

    Local ozone concentration and visible foliar injury were measured over the 1994 growing season on open-grown black cherry (Prunus serotina Ehrh.) trees of varying size (age) within forest stands and adjacent openings at a site in north-central Pennsylvania. Relationships were determined between visible ozone injury and ozone exposure, as well as calculated between injury and ozone uptake expressed as the product of stomatal conductance and ozone concentration. In addition, simultaneous measurements of visible symptoms and leaf gas exchange were also conducted to determine the correlation between visible and physiological injury and ozone exposure. By September, the amount of leaf area affected by visible foliar ozone injury was greatest for seedlings (46%), followed by canopy trees (20%) and saplings (15%). A large amount of variability in foliar ozone symptom expression was observed among trees within a size class. Sum40 and Sum60 (ozone concentration > 40 and > 60 nl liter(-1)) cumulative exposure statistics were the most meaningful indices for interpretation of foliar injury response. Seedlings were apparently more sensitive to ozone injury than larger trees because their higher rates of stomatal conductance resulted in higher rates of ozone uptake. Seedlings also had higher rates of early leaf abscission than larger trees with an average of nearly 30% of the leaves on a shoot abscised by 1 September compared to approximately 5% for larger trees. However, per unit ozone uptake into the leaf, larger trees exhibited larger amounts of foliar injury. The amount of visible foliar injury was negatively correlated (r(2) = 0.82) with net photosynthetic rates, but was not related to stomatal conductance. Net photosynthesis and stomatal conductance thus became uncoupled at high levels of visible foliar injury. PMID:15091453

  11. 78 FR 77384 - DSM Nutritional Products; Filing of Food Additive Petition (Animal Use)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 573 DSM Nutritional Products; Filing of Food Additive Petition (Animal Use) AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of petition. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing that DSM Nutritional Products has filed...

  12. Protease addition to increase yield and fermentation rate in dry grind ethanol production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using a small scale laboratory procedure (100g shake flasks) for ethanol production from corn, the effects of acid protease addition during the fermentation step were evaluated. The batch fermentations were conducted in duplicate using standard conditions and with protease addition during fermentati...

  13. Source attribution of tropospheric ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone is a harmful pollutant with adverse effects on human health and ecosystems. As well as these effects, tropospheric ozone is also a powerful greenhouse gas, with an anthropogenic radiative forcing one quarter of that of CO2. Along with methane and atmospheric aerosol, tropospheric ozone belongs to the so-called Short Lived Climate forcing Pollutants, or SLCP. Recent work has shown that efforts to reduce concentrations of SLCP in the atmosphere have the potential to slow the rate of near-term climate change, while simultaneously improving public health and reducing crop losses. Unlike many other SLCP, tropospehric ozone is not directly emitted, but is instead influenced by two distinct sources: transport of air from the ozone-rich stratosphere; and photochemical production in the troposphere from the emitted precursors NOx (oxides of nitrogen), CO (Carbon Monoxide), and VOC (volatile organic compounds, including methane). Better understanding of the relationship between ozone production and the emissions of its precursors is essential for the development of targeted emission reduction strategies. Several modeling methods have been employed to relate the production of tropospheric ozone to emissions of its precursors; emissions perturbation, tagging, and adjoint sensitivity methods all deliver complementary information about modelled ozone production. Most studies using tagging methods have focused on attribution of tropospheric ozone production to emissions of NOx, even though perturbation methods have suggested that tropospheric ozone is also sensitive to VOC, particularly methane. In this study we describe the implementation into a global chemistry-climate model of a scheme for tagging emissions of NOx and VOC with an arbitrary number of labels, which are followed through the chemical reactions of tropospheric ozone production in order to perform attribution of tropospehric ozone to its emitted precursors. Attribution is performed to both

  14. Evaluation of sorghum flour functionality and quality characteristics of gluten-free bread and cake as influenced by ozone treatment.

    PubMed

    Marston, Kathryn; Khouryieh, Hanna; Aramouni, Fadi

    2015-12-01

    Commercially milled food-grade sorghum flour was subjected to ozone at the rate of 0.06 L/min for 15, 30, and 45 min. The pH of ozone-treated flour decreased as exposure time increased. The L* (lightness) values of sorghum flour significantly increased (p < 0.05), while the b* (yellowness) values significantly decreased as ozone exposure time increased. Peak viscosity significantly increased as time of ozonation increased from 0 to 45 min. Results showed that gluten-free cake volume significantly increased as ozonation time increased. Additionally, longer ozonation exposure times increased cells per slice area, lightness, and slice brightness values in gluten-free cakes while reducing crumb firmness. Despite improving lightness and slice brightness values, ozonation did not significantly increase the specific volume of gluten-free batter-based bread. While ozonation improved the volume and texture in cakes, it did not have the same positive effects on gluten-free bread. Bread made from ozonated sorghum flour had an open ragged structure with equivalent volume to the control flour. In both applications, the increased brightness and lightness values due to ozone exposure is recommended to increase the acceptability of sorghum products. PMID:25406134

  15. Evaluation of sorghum flour functionality and quality characteristics of gluten-free bread and cake as influenced by ozone treatment.

    PubMed

    Marston, Kathryn; Khouryieh, Hanna; Aramouni, Fadi

    2015-12-01

    Commercially milled food-grade sorghum flour was subjected to ozone at the rate of 0.06 L/min for 15, 30, and 45 min. The pH of ozone-treated flour decreased as exposure time increased. The L* (lightness) values of sorghum flour significantly increased (p < 0.05), while the b* (yellowness) values significantly decreased as ozone exposure time increased. Peak viscosity significantly increased as time of ozonation increased from 0 to 45 min. Results showed that gluten-free cake volume significantly increased as ozonation time increased. Additionally, longer ozonation exposure times increased cells per slice area, lightness, and slice brightness values in gluten-free cakes while reducing crumb firmness. Despite improving lightness and slice brightness values, ozonation did not significantly increase the specific volume of gluten-free batter-based bread. While ozonation improved the volume and texture in cakes, it did not have the same positive effects on gluten-free bread. Bread made from ozonated sorghum flour had an open ragged structure with equivalent volume to the control flour. In both applications, the increased brightness and lightness values due to ozone exposure is recommended to increase the acceptability of sorghum products.

  16. Population response to ozone application in wastewater: an on-site microcosm study with Gammarus fossarum (Crustacea: Amphipoda).

    PubMed

    Bundschuh, Mirco; Schulz, Ralf

    2011-03-01

    We assessed possible ecotoxicological implications of ozone application to secondary treated wastewater from a municipal wastewater treatment plant on Gammarus fossarum, an aquatic leaf shredding amphipod. Our 10-week study exposed G. fossarum populations to ozone-treated, non-ozone treated wastewater, or tap water in replicated outdoor flow-through stream microcosms. Feeding activity, an indicator for organic matter decomposition, of amphipod populations exposed to ozone treated wastewater was significantly higher compared to those exposed to non-ozone treated wastewater (repeated measure ANOVA, p = 0.0002, df = 44). Also the population size was at the end of the experiment with approximately 150% significantly (t-test, p = 0.0059, n = 4) increased in ozone treated wastewater compared to non-ozone treated wastewater. Additionally, chlorophyll-a concentration, an indicator for algal biomass, was significantly higher in ozone treated wastewater (repeated measure ANOVA, p = 0.0404, df = 65). Thus, from an ecotoxicological viewpoint, we conclude that ozonation may improve wastewater quality, which should translate into positive ecological outcomes in the receiving waters. However, because ozonation also can cause toxic transformation products, the process may best be considered on a case-by-case basis. PMID:21267649

  17. Distribution of total ozone and stratospheric ozone in the tropics - Implications for the distribution of tropospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Jack; Larsen, Jack C.

    1987-01-01

    Climatologies of total columnar ozone and integrated stratospheric ozone amounts at low latitudes (15 deg N to 15 deg S), derived from satellite observations, are presented. A significant longitudinal variability in total ozone is present, with highest values generally located between 60 deg W and 60 deg E. The integrated stratospheric component of total ozone, on the other hand, does not exhibit a longitudinal preference for high values. Therefore it is hypothesized that the climatological longitudinal distribution of total ozone reflects the variability of the abundance of tropospheric ozone at low latitudes. Furthermore, it is speculated that in situ photochemical production of ozone resulting from biomass burning may be responsible for the observed enhancement of total ozone at these longitudes.

  18. Ozone decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Batakliev, Todor; Georgiev, Vladimir; Anachkov, Metody; Rakovsky, Slavcho

    2014-01-01

    Catalytic ozone decomposition is of great significance because ozone is a toxic substance commonly found or generated in human environments (aircraft cabins, offices with photocopiers, laser printers, sterilizers). Considerable work has been done on ozone decomposition reported in the literature. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the literature, concentrating on analysis of the physico-chemical properties, synthesis and catalytic decomposition of ozone. This is supplemented by a review on kinetics and catalyst characterization which ties together the previously reported results. Noble metals and oxides of transition metals have been found to be the most active substances for ozone decomposition. The high price of precious metals stimulated the use of metal oxide catalysts and particularly the catalysts based on manganese oxide. It has been determined that the kinetics of ozone decomposition is of first order importance. A mechanism of the reaction of catalytic ozone decomposition is discussed, based on detailed spectroscopic investigations of the catalytic surface, showing the existence of peroxide and superoxide surface intermediates. PMID:26109880

  19. Ozone decomposition.

    PubMed

    Batakliev, Todor; Georgiev, Vladimir; Anachkov, Metody; Rakovsky, Slavcho; Zaikov, Gennadi E

    2014-06-01

    Catalytic ozone decomposition is of great significance because ozone is a toxic substance commonly found or generated in human environments (aircraft cabins, offices with photocopiers, laser printers, sterilizers). Considerable work has been done on ozone decomposition reported in the literature. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the literature, concentrating on analysis of the physico-chemical properties, synthesis and catalytic decomposition of ozone. This is supplemented by a review on kinetics and catalyst characterization which ties together the previously reported results. Noble metals and oxides of transition metals have been found to be the most active substances for ozone decomposition. The high price of precious metals stimulated the use of metal oxide catalysts and particularly the catalysts based on manganese oxide. It has been determined that the kinetics of ozone decomposition is of first order importance. A mechanism of the reaction of catalytic ozone decomposition is discussed, based on detailed spectroscopic investigations of the catalytic surface, showing the existence of peroxide and superoxide surface intermediates. PMID:26109880

  20. Polar ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, S.; Grose, W. L.; Jones, R. L.; Mccormick, M. P.; Molina, Mario J.; Oneill, A.; Poole, L. R.; Shine, K. P.; Plumb, R. A.; Pope, V.

    1990-01-01

    The observation and interpretation of a large, unexpected ozone depletion over Antarctica has changed the international scientific view of stratospheric chemistry. The observations which show the veracity, seasonal nature, and vertical structure of the Antarctic ozone hole are presented. Evidence for Arctic and midlatitude ozone loss is also discussed. The chemical theory for Antarctic ozone depletion centers around the occurrence of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in Antarctic winter and spring; the climatology and radiative properties of these clouds are presented. Lab studies of the physical properties of PSCs and the chemical processes that subsequently influence ozone depletion are discussed. Observations and interpretation of the chemical composition of the Antarctic stratosphere are described. It is shown that the observed, greatly enhanced abundances of chlorine monoxide in the lower stratosphere are sufficient to explain much if not all of the ozone decrease. The dynamic meteorology of both polar regions is given, interannual and interhemispheric variations in dynamical processes are outlined, and their likely roles in ozone loss are discussed.

  1. Ozone decomposition.

    PubMed

    Batakliev, Todor; Georgiev, Vladimir; Anachkov, Metody; Rakovsky, Slavcho; Zaikov, Gennadi E

    2014-06-01

    Catalytic ozone decomposition is of great significance because ozone is a toxic substance commonly found or generated in human environments (aircraft cabins, offices with photocopiers, laser printers, sterilizers). Considerable work has been done on ozone decomposition reported in the literature. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the literature, concentrating on analysis of the physico-chemical properties, synthesis and catalytic decomposition of ozone. This is supplemented by a review on kinetics and catalyst characterization which ties together the previously reported results. Noble metals and oxides of transition metals have been found to be the most active substances for ozone decomposition. The high price of precious metals stimulated the use of metal oxide catalysts and particularly the catalysts based on manganese oxide. It has been determined that the kinetics of ozone decomposition is of first order importance. A mechanism of the reaction of catalytic ozone decomposition is discussed, based on detailed spectroscopic investigations of the catalytic surface, showing the existence of peroxide and superoxide surface intermediates.

  2. Air Quality Modeling of Ozone Radical Precursors in Houston

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappenglueck, B.; Czader, B.; Li, X.

    2013-05-01

    The Houston-Galveston area has one of the highest ozone concentrations in the U.S., often exceeding the U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standard for ozone. Photochemical modeling of ozone formation in the Houston area generally underestimates the concentrations of free radical precursors contributing to ozone formation. Here we present modeling results using the Weather Research Forecast - Community Multiscale Air Quality (WRF-CMAQ) modeling system for the Houston-Galveston area. Meteorological parameters predicted by WRF are well simulated most of the time, including planetary boundary layer heights. Air quality simulations for the Houston-Galveston-Brazoria area using the combined WRF-SMOKE-CMAQ system showed overall good results for ozone and many other trace gases. HONO morning peaks are no longer underpredicted, on some occasions they are slightly overpredicted, which can be linked to NO2 overprediction. However, CMAQ mispredicts other trace gases like HO2, H2O2 and CH3OOH concentrations. The WRF-SMOKE-CMAQ system was also used to elucidate the relative importance of various photolysis processes as radical sources in the Houston atmosphere. Morning HOx formation is dominated by HONO while ozone contributes the most during midday. HONO contribution to HOx formation is more pronounced at the surface layer where most of it is formed. On the other hand, radical production from ozone is more important at elevated levels where higher concentrations of ozone are observed. Formaldehyde contributes up to 40% and also peaks during mid-day, but on days when high morning concentrations of formaldehyde are observed its contribution to HOx in the morning exceeds that of ozone. Photolysis of H2O2 is a minor contributor to radical levels. The process analysis tool available in CMAQ was utilized to analyze photochemical processes leading to ozone production and chemical transformations along trajectories linking a site at the Houston Ship Channel and the University of

  3. Response of lightning NOx emissions and ozone production to climate change: Insights from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finney, D. L.; Doherty, R. M.; Wild, O.; Young, P. J.; Butler, A.

    2016-05-01

    Results from an ensemble of models are used to investigate the response of lightning nitrogen oxide emissions to climate change and the consequent impacts on ozone production. Most models generate lightning using a parameterization based on cloud top height. With this approach and a present-day global emission of 5 TgN, we estimate a linear response with respect to changes in global surface temperature of +0.44 ± 0.05 TgN K-1. However, two models using alternative approaches give +0.14 and -0.55 TgN K-1 suggesting that the simulated response is highly dependent on lightning parameterization. Lightning NOx is found to have an ozone production efficiency of 6.5 ± 4.7 times that of surface NOx sources. This wide range of efficiencies across models is partly due to the assumed vertical distribution of the lightning source and partly to the treatment of nonmethane volatile organic compound (NMVOC) chemistry. Careful consideration of the vertical distribution of emissions is needed, given its large influence on ozone production.

  4. The meteorological environment of the tropospheric ozone maximum over the tropical South Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurti, T. N.; Fuelberg, H. E.; Sinha, M. C.; Oosterhof, D.; Bensman, E. L.; Kumar, V. B.

    1993-01-01

    Atmospheric flow patterns are examined over the South Atlantic Ocean where a maximum of tropospheric ozone has been observed just west of southern Africa. We investigate the flow climatology during October and perform a case study for six days during October 1989. Horizontal and vertical motions are examined and used to prepare 3D backward trajectories from the region of greatest ozone. An initially zonally symmetric distribution of ozone is treated as a passive tracer and advected by 3D flows forecast by the global model. Results from the passive tracer simulation indicate that 3D advection alone can produce a maximum of tropospheric ozone in the observed location. In addition, the trajectories suggest that by-products of biomass burning could be transported to the area of maximum ozone. Low-level flow from commonly observed regions of burning in Africa streams westward to the area of interest. Over Brazil, if the burning by-products are carried into the upper troposphere by convective process, they then could be transported eastward to the ozone feature in approximately five days. There is considerable subsidence over the tropical southern Atlantic, such that stratospheric influences also are a factor in producing the ozone maximum. Both planetary-scale and transient synoptic-scale circulation features play major roles in the various transport processes that influence the region. In summary, the observed tropospheric ozone maximum appears to be caused by a complex set of horizontal and vertical advections, transport from regions of biomass burning, and stratospheric influences.

  5. Kinetics of pulp mill effluent treatment by ozone-based processes.

    PubMed

    Ko, Chun-Han; Hsieh, Po-Hung; Chang, Meng-Wen; Chern, Jia-Ming; Chiang, Shih-Min; Tzeng, Chewn-Jeng

    2009-09-15

    The wastewaters generated from wood pulping and paper production processes are traditionally treated by biological and physicochemical processes. In order to reduce chemical oxygen demand (COD) and color to meet increasingly strict discharge standards, advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) are being adapted as polishing treatment units. Various ozone-based processes were used in this study to treat simulated wastewaters prepared from black liquor from a hardwood Kraft pulp mill in Taiwan. The experimental results showed that the COD and color were primarily removed by direct ozone oxidation and activated carbon adsorption. While the addition of activated carbon could enhance the COD and color removal during ozonation, the addition of hydrogen peroxide improved the color removal only. For the various ozone-based treatment processes, kinetic models were developed to satisfactorily predict the COD and color removal rates. According to the kinetic parameters obtained from the various ozone-based processes, the enhanced COD and color removal of ozonation in the presence of activated carbon was attributed to the regeneration of the activated carbon by ozonation. These kinetic models can be used for reactor design and process design to treat pulping wastewater using ozone-based processes.

  6. How do changes in the stratospheric circulation impact ozone?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garny, Hella; Dameris, Martin; Bodeker, Greg; Grewe, Volker; Stenke, Andrea

    2010-05-01

    The Brewer-Dobson circulation (BDC) and tropical upwelling in the lower stratosphere are predicted to increase with increasing greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations by most climate models and chemistry-climate models (CCMs). This change in the meridional circulation is likely to alter the transport of trace gases, and in particular ozone. In addition, ozone is affected by other processes such as changes in stratospheric temperatures that act to change the reaction rates of ozone-relevant chemistry. These climate-change related modifications of the ozone amount and distribution are superimposed on the depletion and recovery of the ozone layer due to stratospheric halogen loading. To assess the recovery of ozone correctly, it is important to understand the processes that affect ozone in a changing climate. In this study, multiple transient numerical simulations and complementary sensitivity studies with the E39CA CCM are used to disentangle the direct effect of changes in GHG concentrations, the indirect effect of GHG-induced sea surface temperature (SST) changes, and changes in CFC concentrations. It is shown that the increase in tropical upwelling is driven by the changes in SSTs rather than by the direct radiative effect of increased GHG concentrations. Therefore, the sensitivity simulations that separate the direct effect of increased amounts of GHGs and the indirect effect via increased SSTs can be used to separate the impact of the increase in tropical upwelling and the impact of stratospheric cooling on ozone. It is shown that the changes in the meridional circulation cause weak negative trends in the tropical lower stratosphere and associated positive trends in the extra-tropical lower stratosphere. Stratospheric cooling, on the other hand, causes a broad increase in ozone in the stratosphere. To study the processes that lead to changes in the ozone distribution in more detail, different diagnostics that can separate the changes in chemistry (production or

  7. Bioassaying for ozone with pollen systems.

    PubMed Central

    Feder, W A

    1981-01-01

    Sensitivity to ozone of pollen germinating in vitro is closely correlated with ozone sensitivity of the pollen parent. Ozone-sensitive and tolerant pollen populations have been identified in tobacco, petunia, and tomato cultivars. The rate of tube elongation can be reversibly slowed or stopped by exposure to low concentrations of ozone. Tube growth rates in the presence of a range of ozone dosages, of pollen populations exhibiting differing ozone sensitivity can be measured and different growth rates can be correlated with ozone dosages. The performance of selected pollen populations can then be used to bioassay ozone in ambient air by introducing the air sample into a growth chamber where ozone-sensitive pollen in growing. Petunia and tobacco pollen are especially useful because they store well at ordinary freezer temperatures and do not require special preparation prior to storage. Modified Brewbacker's growth medium is suitable for growth of both these pollen types. Four useful cultivars are Bel W-3, ozone-sensitive and Bel B, ozone-tolerant tobacco, and White Bountiful, ozone-sensitive and Blue Lagoon, ozone-tolerant petunia. Observations can be made directly by using a TV scanner, or by time lapse or interval photography. Year-round pollen production can be achieved in the greenhouse. Harvested pollen can be tested, packaged, and transported to user facilities without loss of vigor. Pollen populations are inexpensive to produce, respond reliably, and are simple to use as a bioassay for air quality. Images FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. PMID:7460876

  8. A Study on Generation Ice Containing Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Kenji; Koyama, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Hiromi

    Ozone has the capability of sterilization and deodorization due to high oxidation power. It is also effective for the conservation of perishable foods and purification of water. However, ozone has a disadvantage, that is, conservation of ozone is difficult because it changes back into oxygen. Recently, ice containing ozone is taken attention for the purpose of its conservation. The use of ice containing ozone seems to keep food fresher when we conserve and transport perishable foods due to effects of cooling and sterilization of ice containing ozone. In the present study, we investigated the influence of temperatures of water dissolving ozone on the timewise attenuations of ozone concentration in water. We also investigated the influence of cooling temperature, ice diameter, initial temperatures of water dissolving ozone and container internal pressure of the water dissolving ozone on ozone concentration in the ice. In addition, we investigated the influence of the ice diameter on the timewise attenuations of ozone concentration in the ice. It was confirmed that the solidification experimental data can be adjusted by a correlation between ozone concentration in the ice and solidification time.

  9. Enhanced photo-fermentative H2 production using Rhodobacter sphaeroides by ethanol addition and analysis of soluble microbial products

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Biological fermentation routes can provide an environmentally friendly way of producing H2 since they use renewable biomass as feedstock and proceed under ambient temperature and pressure. In particular, photo-fermentation has superior properties in terms of achieving high H2 yield through complete degradation of substrates. However, long-term H2 production data with stable performance is limited, and this data is essential for practical applications. In the present work, continuous photo-fermentative H2 production from lactate was attempted using the purple non-sulfur bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides KD131. As a gradual drop in H2 production was observed, we attempted to add ethanol (0.2% v/v) to the medium. Results As continuous operation went on, H2 production was not sustained and showed a negligible H2 yield (< 0.5 mol H2/mol lactateadded) within two weeks. Electron balance analysis showed that the reason for the gradual drop in H2 production was ascribed to the increase in production of soluble microbial products (SMPs). To see the possible effect of ethanol addition, a batch test was first conducted. The presence of ethanol significantly increased the H2 yield from 1.15 to 2.20 mol H2/mol lactateadded, by suppressing the production of SMPs. The analysis of SMPs by size exclusion chromatography showed that, in the later period of fermentation, more than half of the low molecular weight SMPs (< 1 kDa) were consumed and used for H2 production when ethanol had been added, while the concentration of SMPs continuously increased in the absence of ethanol. It was found that the addition of ethanol facilitated the utilization of reducing power, resulting in an increase in the cellular levels of NAD+ and NADP+. In continuous operation, ethanol addition was effective, such that stable H2 production was attained with an H2 yield of 2.5 mol H2/mol lactateadded. Less than 15% of substrate electrons were used for SMP production, whereas 35% were used in

  10. Ozone variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duetsch, H. U.

    1983-09-01

    The annual and long-term variations in the atmospheric ozone layer were examined on the basis of 55 yr of data taken at Aroya, Switzerland and 25 yr of data gathered by the global ozone network. Attention was given to annual and biennial variations, which showed that the midlatitude peak concentration was affected by a quasi-biennial variation of the tropical stratospheric circulation. Smaller scale circulation patterns were dominant in the lower stratosphere, although an observed negative trend of the total ozone was equally distributed between the troposphere and 24 km altitude. The global ozone increase detected in the 1960s was possible due to general circulation alterations, but may also have been influenced by injection of NO(x) into the atmosphere during atomic bomb testing.

  11. Contribution of low vapor pressure-volatile organic compounds (LVP-VOCs) from consumer products to ozone formation in urban atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Hyeong-Moo; McKone, Thomas E.; Bennett, Deborah H.

    2015-05-01

    Because recent laboratory testing indicates that some low vapor pressure-volatile organic compounds (LVP-VOC) solvents readily evaporate at ambient conditions, LVP-VOCs used in some consumer product formulations may contribute to ozone formation. The goal of this study is to determine the fraction of LVP-VOCs available for ozone formation from the use of consumer products for two hypothetical emissions. This study calculates and compares the fraction of consumed product available for ozone formation as a result of (a) volatilization to air during use and (b) down-the-drain disposal. The study also investigates the impact of different modes of releases on the overall fraction available in ambient air for ozone formation. For the portion of the LVP-VOCs volatilized to air during use, we applied a multi-compartment mass-balance model to track the fate of emitted LVP-VOCs in a multimedia urban environment. For the portion of the LVP-VOCs disposed down the drain, we used a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) fate model to predict the emission rates of LVP-VOCs to ambient air at WWTPs or at the discharge zone of the facilities and then used these results as emissions in the multimedia urban environment model. In a WWTP, the LVP-VOCs selected in this study are primarily either biodegraded or removed via sorption to sludge depending on the magnitude of the biodegradation half-life and the octanol-water partition coefficient. Less than 0.2% of the LVP-VOCs disposed down the drain are available for ozone formation. In contrast, when the LVP-VOC in a consumer product is volatilized from the surface to which it has been applied, greater than 90% is available for photochemical reactions either at the source location or in the downwind areas. Comparing results from these two modes of releases allows us to understand the importance of determining the fraction of LVP-VOCs volatilized versus disposed down the drain when the product is used by consumers. The results from this study

  12. [Effects of menthol as an additive in tobacco products and the need for regulation].

    PubMed

    Kahnert, S; Nair, U; Mons, U; Pötschke-Langer, M

    2012-03-01

    Menthol is the most widely used and the most prominent tobacco additive in tobacco products advertised and marketed by the tobacco industry. Besides its characteristic flavor, it possesses a variety of pharmacological properties facilitating tobacco smoke inhalation and potentiating dependence. These properties of menthol not only favor tobacco initiation and consumption but can also prevent smoking cessation. This article summarizes the effect of menthol as an additive in tobacco products and its effect on tobacco consumption that causes a number of chronic diseases and premature death and, therefore, counteracts tobacco control measures. Currently, there is no legislative regulation in Germany that considers the health hazard, addiction-enhancing and attractiveness-increasing properties of additives permitted in tobacco products. Effective regulation or even a ban could contribute to a reduction of tobacco consumption and, hence, save many people from a long-lasting tobacco dependence. PMID:22373857

  13. Tropospheric Ozone Over a Tropical Atlantic Station in the Northern Hemisphere: Paramaribo, Surinam (6 deg N, 55 deg W)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, W.; Krol, M. C.; Fortuin, J. P. F.; Kelder, H. M.; Thompson, A. M.; Becker, C. R.; Lelieveld, J.; Crutzen, P. J.

    2003-01-01

    We present an analysis of 2.5 years of weekly ozone soundings conducted at a new monitoring station in Paramaribo, Surinam (6 deg N,55 deg W). This is currently one of only three ozone sounding stations in the northern hemisphere (NH) tropics, and the only one in the equatorial Atlantic region. Paramaribo is part of the Southern Hemisphere ADditional Ozone Sounding program (SHADOZ). Due to its position close to the equator, the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) passes over Paramaribo twice per year, which results in a semi-annual seasonality of many parameters including relative humidity and ozone. The dataset from Paramaribo is used to: (1) evaluate ozone variability relative to precipitation, atmospheric circulation patterns and biomass burning; (2) contrast ozone at the NH equatorial Atlantic with that at nearby southern hemisphere (SH) stations Natal (6 deg S,35 deg W) and Ascension (8 deg S,14 deg W); (3) compare the seasonality of tropospheric ozone with a satellite-derived ozone product: Tropical Tropospheric Ozone Columns from the Modified Residual method (MR-TTOC). We find that Paramaribo is a distinctly Atlantic station. Despite its position north of the equator, it resembles nearby SH stations during most of the year. Transport patterns in the lower and middle troposphere during February and March differ from SH stations, which leads to a seasonality of ozone with two maxima. MR-TTOC over Paramaribo does not match the observed seasonality of ozone due to the use of a SH ozone sonde climatology in the MR method. The Paramaribo ozone record is used to suggest an improvement for northern hemisphere MR-TTOC retrievals. We conclude that station Paramaribo shows unique features in the region, and clearly adds new information to the existing SHADOZ record.

  14. FTIR spectra of the photolysis products of the phosphine-ozone complex in solid argon

    SciTech Connect

    Withnall, R.; Andrews, L.

    1987-02-12

    Red visible photolysis of the PH/sub 3/-O/sub 3/ complex, formed by reagent codeposition with excess argon at 12-18 K, gave seven major products, which are grouped by wavelength-dependent photochemical changes and identified by using /sup 16,18/O/sub 3/ and PH/sub x/D/sub 3-x/ (x = 0, 1, 2, 3) mixed isotopic precursors. The primary products are phosphine oxide (H/sub 3/PO) and phosphinous acid (H/sub 2/POH), structural isomers that were not interconverted by further irradiation, and phosphonic acid ((HO)/sub 2/HPO). The intermediate species HPO, also produced on red photolysis, gave way to HOOPO and HP(O/sub 2/)O on blue-green irradiation. Metaphosphoric acid (HOPO/sub 2/) absorptions increased throughout the irradiation sequence.

  15. Ozone and Cavitation Combination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreon, Ernestina; Traversoni, Leonardo

    2009-09-01

    From laboratory measurements it is well known that the addition of ozone and cavitation enhances the properties of both, understanding for that the ones related to disinfection and carbon removal from waste water. This paper shows modeling of such phenomena that gives some light to the understanding of it and also provides the opportunity to improve the effectiveness of the current procedures.

  16. Ultraviolet Radiation and Stratospheric Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, R.

    2003-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation from the sun produces ozone in the stratosphere and it participates in the destruction of ozone. Absorption of solar ultraviolet radiation by ozone is the primary heating mechanism leading to the maximum in temperature at the stratopause. Variations of solar ultraviolet radiation on both the 27-day solar rotation period and the 11-year solar cycle affect ozone by several mechanisms. The temperature and ozone in the upper stratosphere respond to solar uv variations as a coupled system. An increase in uv leads to an increase in the production of ozone through the photolysis of molecular oxygen. An increase in uv leads to an increase in temperature through the heating by ozone photolysis. The increase in temperature leads to a partially-offsetting decrease in ozone through temperature-dependent reaction rate coefficients. The ozone variation modulates the heating by ozone photolysis. The increase in ozone at solar maximum enhances the uv heating. The processes are understood and supported by long-term data sets. Variation in the upper stratospheric temperatures will lead to a change in the behavior of waves propagating upward from the troposphere. Changes in the pattern of wave dissipation will lead to acceleration or deceleration of the mean flow and changes in the residual or transport circulation. This mechanism could lead to the propagation of the solar cycle uv variation from the upper stratosphere downward to the lower stratosphere. This process is not well-understood and has been the subject of an increasing number of model studies. I will review the data analyses for solar cycle and their comparison to model results.

  17. DC corona ozone generation enhanced by TiO2 photocatalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekã¡Rek, S.

    2008-12-01

    Non-thermal electrical discharges, such as corona discharge are apart of the source of ozone, charged, and excited species and acoustic noise also the source of electromagnetic radiation of different wavelengths. The important component of this radiation from the standpoint of photocatalyst activation is the ultraviolet radiation. We studied the role of UV radiation on corona discharge ozone production by placing the titanium dioxide photocatalyst into the discharge region. We used hollow needle to mesh DC corona discharge at atmospheric pressure with TiO2 globules on the mesh. The discharge was enhanced by the flow of air through the needle. We found that for the needle biased negatively addition of TiO2 photocatalyst on the mesh electrode drastically increases discharge ozone production as well as the ozone production yield. These quantities are also influenced by the mass of the used photocatalyst and its distribution in the discharge chamber.

  18. Airway epithelial cell responses to ozone injury

    SciTech Connect

    Leikauf, G.D.; Simpson, L.G.; Zhao, Qiyu

    1995-03-01

    The airway epithelial cell is an important target in ozone injury. Once activated, the airway epithelium responds in three phases. The initial, or immediate phase, involves activation of constitutive cells, often through direct covalent interactions including the formation of secondary ozonolysis products-hydroxyhydroperoxides, aldehydes, and hydrogen peroxide. Recently, we found hydroxyhydroperoxides to be potent agonists; of bioactive eicosanoid formation by human airway epithelial cells in culture. Other probable immediate events include activation and inactivation of enzymes present on the epithelial surface (e.g., neutral endopeptidase). During the next 2 to 24 hr, or early phase, epithelial cells respond by synthesis and release of chemotactic factors, including chemokines-macrophage inflammatory protein-2, RANTES, and interleukin-8. Infiltrating leukocytes during this period also release elastase, an important agonist of epithelial cell mucus secretion and additional chemokine formation. The third (late) phase of ozone injury is characterized by eosinophil or monocyte infiltration. Cytokine expression leads to alteration of structural protein synthesis, with increases in fibronectin evident by in situ hybridization. Synthesis of epithelial antiproteases, e.g., secretary leukocyte protease inhibitor, may also increase locally 24 to 48 hr after elastase concentrations become excessive. Thus, the epithelium is not merely a passive barrier to ozone injury but has a dynamic role in directing the migration, activating, and then counteracting inflammatory cells. Through these complex interactions, epithelial cells can be viewed as the initiators (alpha) and the receptors (omega) of ozone-induced airway disease. 51 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Seasonal Characteristics of Tropical Ozone Profiles using the SHADOZ Ozonesonde Data Set: Comparisons with TOMS Tropical Ozone Climatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, J. C.; Thompson, A. M.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Advances in tropospheric ozone data products being developed for tropical and subtropical regions using TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) and other satellites are motivating efforts to renew and expand the collection of balloon-borne ozonesonde observations. The SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere ADditional OZonesondes) project is a web-based archive established since 1998. It's goals are to support validation of TOMS and SBUV (Solar Backscatter UV) satellite ozone measurements and to improve remote sensing techniques for estimating tropical and subtropical ozone. Profile data are taken from balloon-borne ozonesondes, currently at 11 stations coordinating weekly to bi-weekly launches. Station data are publically available at a central location via the internet: . Since the start of the project, the SHADOZ archive has accumulated over 1500 ozonesonde profiles. Data also includes measurements from various SHADOZ supported field campaigns, such as, the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX), Sounding of Ozone and Water in the Equatorial Region (SOWER) and Aerosols99 Atlantic Cruise. Using data from the archive, profile climatologies from selected stations will be shown to 1/characterize the variability of tropospheric tropical ozone among stations, 2/illustrate the seasonal offsets with respect to the tropical profile used in the TOMS v7 algorithm, and 3/estimate the potential error in TOMS retrieval estimates of the tropospheric portion of the atmosphere.

  20. Asymmetric ozone oxidation of silylalkenes using a C2-symmetrical dialkoxysilyl group as a chiral auxiliary.

    PubMed

    Igawa, Kazunobu; Kawasaki, Yuuya; Nishino, Kosuke; Mitsuda, Naoto; Tomooka, Katsuhiko

    2014-07-21

    Ozone oxidation of silyl-substituted alkenes, namely silylalkenes, proceeds in an addition-type manner to afford α-silylperoxy carbonyl compounds in good to excellent yields, without the formation of normal ozonolysis products. Herein the ozone oxidation of chiral alkenylsilanes prepared from alkynes and a newly designed chiral hydrosilane is reported. The reaction affords silylperoxides with high diastereoselectivity (up to 94 % d.r.). The silylperoxides are convertible into enantioenriched chiral acyloins in a stereospecific manner. PMID:24939819

  1. Efficient ozone generator for ozone layer enrichment from high altitude balloon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filiouguine, Igor V.; Kostiouchenko, Sergey V.; Koudriavtsev, Nikolay N.; Starikovskaya, Svetlana M.

    1994-01-01

    The possibilities of ozone production at low gas pressures by nanosecond high voltage discharge has been investigated. The measurements of ozone synthesis in N2-O2 mixtures have been performed. The explanation of experimental results is suggested. The possible ways of ozone yield growth are analyzed.

  2. Identification of ozonation by-products of 4- and 5-methyl-1H-benzotriazole during the treatment of surface water to drinking water.

    PubMed

    Müller, Alexander; Weiss, Stefan C; Beisswenger, Judith; Leukhardt, H Georg; Schulz, Wolfgang; Seitz, Wolfram; Ruck, Wolfgang K L; Weber, Walter H

    2012-03-01

    During the treatment of surface water to drinking water, ozonation is often used for disinfection and to remove organic trace substances, whereby oxidation by-products can be formed. Here we use the example of tolyltriazole to describe an approach for identifying relevant oxidation by-products in the laboratory and subsequently detecting them in an industrial-scale process. The identification process involves ozonation experiments with pure substances at laboratory level (concentration range mg L(-1)). The reaction solutions from different ozone contact times were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography - quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-QTOF-MS) in full scan mode. Various approaches were used to detect the oxidation by-products: (i) target searches of postulated oxidation by-pro