Science.gov

Sample records for additional papers include

  1. Photoactive devices including porphyrinoids with coordinating additives

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R; Zimmerman, Jeramy; Yu, Eric K; Thompson, Mark E; Trinh, Cong; Whited, Matthew; Diev, Vlacheslav

    2015-05-12

    Coordinating additives are included in porphyrinoid-based materials to promote intermolecular organization and improve one or more photoelectric characteristics of the materials. The coordinating additives are selected from fullerene compounds and organic compounds having free electron pairs. Combinations of different coordinating additives can be used to tailor the characteristic properties of such porphyrinoid-based materials, including porphyrin oligomers. Bidentate ligands are one type of coordinating additive that can form coordination bonds with a central metal ion of two different porphyrinoid compounds to promote porphyrinoid alignment and/or pi-stacking. The coordinating additives can shift the absorption spectrum of a photoactive material toward higher wavelengths, increase the external quantum efficiency of the material, or both.

  2. 21. Southeast corner of switch house addition, including exterior transformers ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Southeast corner of switch house addition, including exterior transformers and start of power transmission line. Employee House No. 1 is in the background. - Rock Creek Hydroelectric Project, Rock Creek, Baker County, OR

  3. Constant-Pressure Combustion Charts Including Effects of Diluent Addition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, L Richard; Bogart, Donald

    1949-01-01

    Charts are presented for the calculation of (a) the final temperatures and the temperature changes involved in constant-pressure combustion processes of air and in products of combustion of air and hydrocarbon fuels, and (b) the quantity of hydrocarbon fuels required in order to attain a specified combustion temperature when water, alcohol, water-alcohol mixtures, liquid ammonia, liquid carbon dioxide, liquid nitrogen, liquid oxygen, or their mixtures are added to air as diluents or refrigerants. The ideal combustion process and combustion with incomplete heat release from the primary fuel and from combustible diluents are considered. The effect of preheating the mixture of air and diluents and the effect of an initial water-vapor content in the combustion air on the required fuel quantity are also included. The charts are applicable only to processes in which the final mixture is leaner than stoichiometric and at temperatures where dissociation is unimportant. A chart is also included to permit the calculation of the stoichiometric ratio of hydrocarbon fuel to air with diluent addition. The use of the charts is illustrated by numerical examples.

  4. 75 FR 26794 - International Paper Company Franklin Pulp & Paper Mill Including On-Site Leased Workers From...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-12

    ... February 16, 2010 (75 FR 7034). At the request of the Company, the Department reviewed the certification... Employment and Training Administration International Paper Company Franklin Pulp & Paper Mill Including On... Worker Adjustment Assistance on December 17th, 2009, applicable to workers of International Paper...

  5. 76 FR 2145 - International Paper Company, Franklin Pulp & Paper Mill, Including On-Site Leased Workers From...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-12

    ... Federal Register on February 16, 2010 (75 FR 7034). The workers are engaged in the production of uncoated... Federal Register on May 12, 2010 (75 FR 26794). Following a careful a review of new and previously... Employment and Training Administration International Paper Company, Franklin Pulp & Paper Mill, Including...

  6. 78 FR 21151 - Boise White Paper, LLC, A Subsidiary of Boise Paper Holdings, LLC, Including On-Site Leased...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-09

    ... determination was published in the Federal Register on February 6, 2013 (78 FR 8590). Workers are engaged in... Employment and Training Administration Boise White Paper, LLC, A Subsidiary of Boise Paper Holdings, LLC... Electric, Mitech, and Anne Elisabeth Elsey, St. Helens, OR; Boise White Paper, LLC, A Subsidiary of...

  7. 76 FR 27366 - Blue Heron Paper Company, Including Workers Whose Unemployment Insurance (UI) Wages Are Paid...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-11

    ... 16, 2010 (75 FR 34174). At the request of the State agency, the Department reviewed the certification... Employment and Training Administration Blue Heron Paper Company, Including Workers Whose Unemployment... reported under a separated unemployment insurance (UI) tax account under the name Barrett Business...

  8. 78 FR 48467 - Wausau Paper, Brainerd Converting Operation, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Employment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... February 22, 2013 (Volume 78 FR Pages 12361-12363). At the request of the State Workforce Office, the... Workers From Employment Resource Center, Securitas and Marsden, Brainerd, Minnesota; Amended Certification... Paper, Brainerd Converting Operation, including on-site leased workers from Employment Resource...

  9. Mathematical Modeling and Simulation of the Pressing Section of a Paper Machine Including Dynamic Capillary Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Printsypar, G.; Iliev, O.; Rief, S.

    2011-12-01

    Paper production is a challenging problem which attracts attention of many scientists. The process which is of our interest takes place in the pressing section of a paper machine. The paper layer is dried by means of the pressing it against fabrics, i.e. press felts. The paper-felt sandwich is transported through the press nips at high speed (for more details see [3]). Since the natural drainage of water in the felts is much longer than the drying in the pressing section we include in the consideration the dynamic capillary effect. The dynamic capillary pressure-saturation relation proposed by Hassanizadeh and Gray (see [2]) is adopted for the pressing process. One of the other issues which is taken into account while modeling the pressing section is the appearance of fully saturated regions. We include in consideration two flow regimes: the one-phase water flow and the two-phase air-water flow. It leads to a free boundary problem. We also account for the complexity of the paper-felt sandwich porous structure. Apart from the two flow regimes the computational domain is divided by layers into nonoverlapping subdomains. Then, the system of equations describing transport processes in the pressing section is stated taking into account all these features. The presented model is discretized by the finite volume method. We carry out some numerical experiments for different configurations of the pressing section (roll press, shoe press) and for parameters which are typical for paper-felt sandwich during the paper production process. The experiments show that the dynamic capillary effect has a significant influence on the distribution of pressure even for small values of the material coefficient (see Fig. 1). The obtained results are in agreement with laboratory experiment performed in [1], which states that the distribution of the pressure is not symmetric with the maximum value occurring in front of the center of the pressing nip and the minimum value less than entry

  10. 25 CFR 1000.83 - Can additional provisions be included in an AFA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ANNUAL FUNDING AGREEMENTS UNDER THE TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNMENT ACT AMENDMENTS TO THE INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Annual Funding Agreements for Bureau of Indian Affairs Programs Contents and Scope of Annual Funding Agreements § 1000.83 Can additional provisions be included in an AFA? Yes,...

  11. Maize chromosome and chromosome segment additions to oat including new B73 and Mo17 addition lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oat-maize addition (OMA) lines with one, or occasionally more, chromosomes of maize (Zea mays L., 2n=2x=20) added to oat (Avena sativa L., 2n=6x=42) can be developed from oat x maize crosses. Self-fertile disomic addition lines for maize chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, short arm of 10, and a mon...

  12. 75 FR 71464 - Shorewood Packaging, a Subsidiary of International Paper Company, Including On-Site Leased...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-23

    ..., 2010 (75 FR 54187). The workers produce cigarette cartons. The initial investigation resulted in a... Employment and Training Administration Shorewood Packaging, a Subsidiary of International Paper Company... Packaging, a subsidiary of International Paper Company, Danville, Virginia, meet the worker...

  13. EVAPORATION: a new vapour pressure estimation methodfor organic molecules including non-additivity and intramolecular interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compernolle, S.; Ceulemans, K.; Müller, J.-F.

    2011-09-01

    We present EVAPORATION (Estimation of VApour Pressure of ORganics, Accounting for Temperature, Intramolecular, and Non-additivity effects), a method to predict (subcooled) liquid pure compound vapour pressure p0 of organic molecules that requires only molecular structure as input. The method is applicable to zero-, mono- and polyfunctional molecules. A simple formula to describe log10p0(T) is employed, that takes into account both a wide temperature dependence and the non-additivity of functional groups. In order to match the recent data on functionalised diacids an empirical modification to the method was introduced. Contributions due to carbon skeleton, functional groups, and intramolecular interaction between groups are included. Molecules typically originating from oxidation of biogenic molecules are within the scope of this method: aldehydes, ketones, alcohols, ethers, esters, nitrates, acids, peroxides, hydroperoxides, peroxy acyl nitrates and peracids. Therefore the method is especially suited to describe compounds forming secondary organic aerosol (SOA).

  14. Concentrations and composition profiles of parabens in currency bills and paper products including sanitary wipes.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chunyang; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2014-03-15

    Parabens (alkyl esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid) are widely used as antimicrobial preservatives in personal care products, pharmaceuticals, and foodstuffs. Although parabens have been reported to be used as antimicrobials in certain types of papers (e.g., wet sanitary or hygiene wipes), little is known about the occurrence of these compounds in paper products. In this study, we determined the concentrations of six paraben analogs, methyl (MeP), ethyl (EtP), propyl (PrP), butyl (BuP), benzyl (BzP), and heptyl parabens (HepP), in 253 paper products divided into 18 categories, using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). At least one of the six parabens was detected in almost all (detection rate: 98%) paper samples, and the total concentrations (∑PBs; sum of six parabens) ranged from 1.85 to 3,220,000 ng/g (geometric mean (GM): 103; median: 55.1 ng/g). Sanitary wipes contained very high concentrations of ∑PBs (GM: 8300 ng/g). Paper currencies, tickets, business cards, food cartons, flyers, and newspapers contained notable concentrations of ∑PBs, and the GM concentrations in these paper categories were on the order of a few tens to thousands of nanograms per gram. One source of parabens in paper products is the use of these chemicals as antifungal agents. MeP and PrP were the predominant analogs, accounting for approximately 62% and 16% of the total concentrations of parabens, respectively. On the basis of measured concentrations and frequency of handling of paper products, we estimated the daily intake (EDI) of parabens through dermal absorption. The GM and 95th percentile EDI values were 6.31 and 2050 ng/day, respectively, for the general population. Among the paper categories analyzed, sanitary wipes contributed to the majority (>90%) of the exposures. PMID:24419282

  15. Combinatorial Synthesis of Linearly Condensed Polycyclic Compounds, Including Anthracyclinones, Through Tandem Diels-Alder Additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Pierre

    Double exocyclic 1,3-dienes such as 2,3,5,6-tetramethylidene-7-oxabicyclo[2.2.1]heptane and its 1-substituted derivatives undergo two successive Diels-Alder additions with large reactivity difference between the addition of the first equivalent (k 1) and the second equivalent (k 2) of dienophile. This allows one to prepare, through parallel synthesis, a large number of linearly condensed polycyclic systems containing three annulated six-membered rings, including naphthacenyl systems and anthracyclinones. The large k 1/k 2 rate constant ratio is a consequence of the Dimroth principle, the first cycloaddition being significantly more exothermic then the second one. Control of regio- and stereoselectivity of the two successive cycloadditions is possible by 1-substitution of the 2,3,5,6-tetramethylidene-7-oxabicyclo[2.2.1]heptane, for instance by a 1-(dimethoxymethyl) group, or by stereoselective disubstitution of the double diene by arenesulfenyl substituents. Enantiomerically pure anthracyclinones and analogues are obtained using enantiomerically pure dienophiles such as 3-oxo-but-2-en-2-yl esters. The chemistry so-developed has allowed the preparation of enantiomerically pure 6-((aminoalkoxy)oxy)methyl-6,7-dideoxyidarubicinones that are DNA intercalators and inhibitors of topoisomerase II-induced DNA strained religation.

  16. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  17. Forming microbial anodes with acetate addition decreases their capability to treat raw paper mill effluent.

    PubMed

    Ketep, Stéphanie F; Bergel, Alain; Bertrand, Marie; Barakat, Mohamed; Achouak, Wafa; Fourest, Eric

    2014-07-01

    Microbial anodes were formed under polarization at -0.3 V/SCE on graphite plates in effluents from a pulp and paper mill. The bioanodes formed with the addition of acetate led to the highest current densities (up to 6A/m(2)) but were then unable to oxidize the raw effluent efficiently (0.5A/m(2)). In contrast, the bioanodes formed without acetate addition were fully able to oxidize the organic matter contained in the effluent, giving up to 4.5A/m(2) in continuous mode. Bacterial communities showed less bacterial diversity for the acetate-fed bioanodes compared to those formed in raw effluents. Deltaproteobacteria were the most abundant taxonomic group, with a high diversity for bioanodes formed without acetate addition but with almost 100% Desulfuromonas for the acetate-fed bioanodes. The addition of acetate to form the microbial anodes induced microbial selection, which was detrimental to the treatment of the raw effluent. PMID:24862005

  18. Effect of Copper and Other Trace Metal Addition to Pulp and Paper Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Jason; Richardson, Desmond; Stack, Karen; Lewis, Trevor

    2015-12-01

    Porous pots were used to mimic, on a laboratory scale, an industrial activated sludge plant from a thermomechanical pulp and news print paper mill. Trace metal additions of Ca, Co, Cu, Fe(III), and Mg were found to improve chemical oxygen demand removal from 82% to 86 to 87%. Copper (0.1 to 1.0 mg/L) was also found to be beneficial in significantly inhibiting the growth of filamentous bacteria, contributing to a reduction of 20 to 45% in sludge volume index (SVI) with improved settle ability and decreased bulking. However, at levels of 1.0 mg/L and higher, the concentration of Cu in the porous pot effluent would potentially exceed guidelines for receiving waters. The fate and impact of Cu was affected by the presence of other trace metals, in particular Mg and Ca. The addition of Mg or Ca along with 0.5 mg/L Cu increased the amount of Cu in the aqueous phase to levels that would potentially exceed government environmental guidelines. Calcium addition was also found to inhibit the effect of Cu in reducing filamentous bacteria and SVI. PMID:26652119

  19. Genomic prediction of growth in pigs based on a model including additive and dominance effects.

    PubMed

    Lopes, M S; Bastiaansen, J W M; Janss, L; Knol, E F; Bovenhuis, H

    2016-06-01

    Independent of whether prediction is based on pedigree or genomic information, the focus of animal breeders has been on additive genetic effects or 'breeding values'. However, when predicting phenotypes rather than breeding values of an animal, models that account for both additive and dominance effects might be more accurate. Our aim with this study was to compare the accuracy of predicting phenotypes using a model that accounts for only additive effects (MA) and a model that accounts for both additive and dominance effects simultaneously (MAD). Lifetime daily gain (DG) was evaluated in three pig populations (1424 Pietrain, 2023 Landrace, and 2157 Large White). Animals were genotyped using the Illumina SNP60K Beadchip and assigned to either a training data set to estimate the genetic parameters and SNP effects, or to a validation data set to assess the prediction accuracy. Models MA and MAD applied random regression on SNP genotypes and were implemented in the program Bayz. The additive heritability of DG across the three populations and the two models was very similar at approximately 0.26. The proportion of phenotypic variance explained by dominance effects ranged from 0.04 (Large White) to 0.11 (Pietrain), indicating that importance of dominance might be breed-specific. Prediction accuracies were higher when predicting phenotypes using total genetic values (sum of breeding values and dominance deviations) from the MAD model compared to using breeding values from both MA and MAD models. The highest increase in accuracy (from 0.195 to 0.222) was observed in the Pietrain, and the lowest in Large White (from 0.354 to 0.359). Predicting phenotypes using total genetic values instead of breeding values in purebred data improved prediction accuracy and reduced the bias of genomic predictions. Additional benefit of the method is expected when applied to predict crossbred phenotypes, where dominance levels are expected to be higher. PMID:26676611

  20. Additional records of metazoan parasites from Caribbean marine mammals, including genetically identified anisakid nematodes.

    PubMed

    Colón-Llavina, Marlene M; Mignucci-Giannoni, Antonio A; Mattiucci, Simonetta; Paoletti, Michela; Nascetti, Giuseppe; Williams, Ernest H

    2009-10-01

    Studies of marine mammal parasites in the Caribbean are scarce. An assessment for marine mammal endo- and ectoparasites from Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, but extending to other areas of the Caribbean, was conducted between 1989 and 1994. The present study complements the latter and enhances identification of anisakid nematodes using molecular markers. Parasites were collected from 59 carcasses of stranded cetaceans and manatees from 1994 to 2006, including Globicephala macrorhynchus, Kogia breviceps, Kogia sima, Lagenodelphis hosei, Mesoplodon densirostris, Peponocephala electra, Stenella longirostris, Steno bredanensis, Trichechus manatus. Tursiops truncatus, and Ziphius cavirostris. Sixteen species of endoparasitic helminthes were morphologically identified, including two species of acanthocephalans (Bolbosoma capitatum, Bolbosoma vasculosum), nine species of nematodes (Anisakis sp., Anisakis brevispiculata, Anisakis paggiae, Anisakis simplex, Anisakis typica, Anisakis ziphidarium, Crassicauda anthonyi, Heterocheilus tunicatus, Pseudoterranova ceticola), two species of cestodes (Monorygma grimaldi, Phyllobothrium delphini), and three species of trematodes (Chiorchis groschafti, Pulmonicola cochleotrema, Monoligerum blairi). The nematodes belonging to the genus Anisakis recovered in some stranded animals were genetically identified to species level based on their sequence analysis of mitochondrial DNA (629 bp of mtDNA cox 2). A total of five new host records and six new geographic records are presented. PMID:19582477

  1. Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamata, Masahiro; Yajima, Seiko

    2013-01-01

    An educational experiment illustrates the electrolysis of water and copper chloride to middle school science students. The electrolysis cell is composed of filter paper soaked with Na[subscript 2]SO[subscript 4] or CuCl[subscript 2] aqueous solution sandwiched, along with a sheet of platinum foil, between two coin-type lithium batteries. When the…

  2. 36 CFR 1290.4 - Types of materials included in scope of assassination record and additional records and information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... scope of assassination record and additional records and information. 1290.4 Section 1290.4 Parks... COLLECTION ACT OF 1992 (JFK ACT) § 1290.4 Types of materials included in scope of assassination record and additional records and information. The term record in assassination record and additional records...

  3. 36 CFR 1290.4 - Types of materials included in scope of assassination record and additional records and information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... in scope of assassination record and additional records and information. 1290.4 Section 1290.4 Parks... COLLECTION ACT OF 1992 (JFK ACT) § 1290.4 Types of materials included in scope of assassination record and additional records and information. The term record in assassination record and additional records...

  4. 36 CFR 1290.4 - Types of materials included in scope of assassination record and additional records and information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... in scope of assassination record and additional records and information. 1290.4 Section 1290.4 Parks... COLLECTION ACT OF 1992 (JFK ACT) § 1290.4 Types of materials included in scope of assassination record and additional records and information. The term record in assassination record and additional records...

  5. Using Py-GC/MS to fingerprint additives associated with paper mill effluent toxicity episodes.

    PubMed

    Sithole, B Bruce; Pimentel, Jorge; Gibbons, Sharon; Watanabe, Chu

    2012-10-26

    Understanding the cause of effluent toxicity is an important requirement for its prevention, remediation and return to compliance. One component of the strategy entails identification and fingerprinting of additives or components in additives that may be the cause of the toxicity episodes. A number of additives used in pulp and papermaking are polymeric compounds that are suspect in effluent toxicity. Their analysis and detection is difficult as they are not amenable to analysis by normal techniques applicable to mill effluents such as gas chromatography. Py-GC/MS is a powerful analytical technique that can be used to fingerprint these additives. The presence of the additives is confirmed by fingerprint pyrograms of the additives (or components in the formulations of the additives) in conjunction with mass spectrometry. The technique has been used to fingerprint and quantify polymeric additives associated with mill effluent toxicity episodes. PMID:22930350

  6. Analysis of Scientific Papers Included in the Sciences Citation Index Expanded Written by South Korean Plastic Surgeons: 2001-2010

    PubMed Central

    Go, Ju Young; Mun, Goo-Hyun; Jeon, Byung-Joon; Lim, So-Young; Pyon, Jai-Kyong; Bang, Sa-Ik; Oh, Kap Sung

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of our study was to analyze scientific papers published by South Korean plastic surgeons in journals included in the Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE), and to evaluate the publication and research activities of Korean plastic surgeon. Methods We conducted a survey of SCIE papers in the field of plastic surgery published by South Korean authors between 2001 and 2010 using Web of Science software. We further analyzed these results according to the number of publications per year, journals, institution, and type of papers. We also compared the total number of citations to published scientific papers. We analyzed the rank of South Korea among other countries in representative journals. Results Overall, 667 papers were published by South Korean authors between 2001 and 2010. The number of publications increased dramatically from 2003 (n=31) to 2010 (n=139). Subsequently, the ten most productive Korean medical colleges were identified. All published papers received 2,311 citations and the citation to paper ratio was 3.49. The rank of Korea among other countries in terms of the number of published papers remained in the top 10 during the recent 10 years. Conclusions Publication output of Korean plastic surgeon over the last 10 years showed a remarkable growth in terms of quantity and quality. Currently, Korea is among the top six countries in representative plastic surgery journals. Korean plastic surgeons have played a central role in this progress, and it is anticipated that they will continue to do so in the future. PMID:22783491

  7. 36 CFR 1290.4 - Types of materials included in scope of assassination record and additional records and information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION JFK ASSASSINATION RECORDS... COLLECTION ACT OF 1992 (JFK ACT) § 1290.4 Types of materials included in scope of assassination record and... information includes, for purposes of interpreting and implementing the JFK Act: (a) Papers, maps, and...

  8. Internet and paper self-help materials for problem drinking: is there an additive effect?

    PubMed

    Cunningham, John A; Humphreys, Keith; Koski-Jännes, Anja; Cordingley, Joanne

    2005-09-01

    The objective of this study was to conduct a preliminary evaluation of an Internet-based intervention for problem drinkers, comparing changes in drinking between respondents who only received the intervention to those who also received a self-help book. After receiving a personalized feedback summary on the Internet, 83 respondents provided complete baseline information and volunteered to participate in a 3-month follow-up survey. Half of the respondents were randomized to receive an additional self-help book. The follow-up was returned by 48 respondents (69% female). Repeated measures ANOVAs were conducted to compare drinking levels at baseline and 3-month follow-up among respondents who only received the Internet-based intervention. There was minimal support for an impact of the Internet intervention alone. In addition, hierarchical regression analyses were conducted to compare respondents in the two intervention conditions on their drinking at follow-up, controlling for baseline consumption. Respondents who received the additional self-help book reported drinking less and experiencing fewer consequences at follow-up as compared to respondents who received only the Internet-based intervention. While the results are promising, they cannot be taken as evidence of the efficacy of Internet-based personalized feedback as a stand-alone intervention because of the absence of a control group that did not receive the intervention. Further research on this topic should be a priority because of the potential for Internet-based interventions to reach problem drinkers underserved by traditional treatment. PMID:15893433

  9. 40 CFR 260.23 - Petitions to amend 40 CFR part 273 to include additional hazardous wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM: GENERAL Rulemaking Petitions § 260.23 Petitions to amend 40 CFR part 273 to include additional hazardous wastes. (a) Any person... the Administrator that regulation under the universal waste regulations of 40 CFR part 273:...

  10. 40 CFR 260.23 - Petitions to amend 40 CFR part 273 to include additional hazardous wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM: GENERAL Rulemaking Petitions § 260.23 Petitions to amend 40 CFR part 273 to include additional hazardous wastes. (a) Any person... the Administrator that regulation under the universal waste regulations of 40 CFR part 273:...

  11. 40 CFR 260.23 - Petitions to amend 40 CFR part 273 to include additional hazardous wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM: GENERAL Rulemaking Petitions § 260.23 Petitions to amend 40 CFR part 273 to include additional hazardous wastes. (a) Any person... the Administrator that regulation under the universal waste regulations of 40 CFR part 273:...

  12. 40 CFR 260.23 - Petitions to amend 40 CFR part 273 to include additional hazardous wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM: GENERAL Rulemaking Petitions § 260.23 Petitions to amend 40 CFR part 273 to include additional hazardous wastes. (a) Any person... the Administrator that regulation under the universal waste regulations of 40 CFR part 273:...

  13. 40 CFR 260.23 - Petitions to amend 40 CFR part 273 to include additional hazardous wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM: GENERAL Rulemaking Petitions § 260.23 Petitions to amend 40 CFR part 273 to include additional hazardous wastes. (a) Any person... the Administrator that regulation under the universal waste regulations of 40 CFR part 273:...

  14. 14 CFR 11.77 - Is there any additional information I must include in my petition for designating airspace?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Is there any additional information I must include in my petition for designating airspace? 11.77 Section 11.77 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... of the agency, office, facility, or person who would have authority to permit the use of the...

  15. 78 FR 67369 - National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program: Addition to the Vaccine Injury Table to Include All...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-12

    ... the category for new vaccines on the Table. See 70 FR 19092. Subsequently, the Secretary engaged in...). See 76 FR 36367. Since that time, quadrivalent influenza vaccines (meaning that they contain four...: Addition to the Vaccine Injury Table to Include All Vaccines Against Seasonal Influenza AGENCY:...

  16. Formation of gold nanostructures on copier paper surface for cost effective SERS active substrate - Effect of halide additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmonda, Christa; Kar, Sudeshna; Tai, Yian

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we report the simple fabrication of an active substrate assisted by gold nanostructures (AuNS) for application in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) using copier paper, which is a biodegradable and cost-effective material. As cellulose is the main component of paper, it can behave as a reducing agent and as a capping molecule for the synthesis of AuNS on the paper substrate. AuNS can be directly generated on the surface of the copier paper by addition of halides. The AuNS thus synthesized were characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, SEM, XRD, and XPS. In addition, the SERS effect of the AuNS-paper substrates synthesized by using various halides was investigated by using rhodamine 6G and melamine as probe molecules.

  17. Effects of additives on the co-pyrolysis of municipal solid waste and paper sludge by using thermogravimetric analysis.

    PubMed

    Fang, Shiwen; Yu, Zhaosheng; Lin, Yan; Lin, Yousheng; Fan, Yunlong; Liao, Yanfen; Ma, Xiaoqian

    2016-06-01

    By using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), the effects of different additives (MgO, Al2O3 and ZnO) on the pyrolysis characteristics and activation energy of municipal solid waste (MSW), paper sludge (PS) and their blends in N2 atmosphere had been investigated in this study. The experiments resulted that these additives were effective in reducing the initial temperature and activation energy. However, not all the additives were beneficial to reduce the residue mass and enhance the index D. For the different ratios of MSW and PS, the same additive even had the different influences. The catalytic effects of additives were not obvious and the pyrolysis became difficult with the increase of the proportion of PS. Based on all the contrast of the pyrolysis characteristics, MgO was the best additive and 70M30P was the best ratio, respectively. PMID:26985626

  18. EVAPORATION: a new vapor pressure estimation method for organic molecules including non-additivity and intramolecular interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compernolle, S.; Ceulemans, K.; Müller, J.-F.

    2011-04-01

    We present EVAPORATION (Estimation of VApour Pressure of ORganics, Accounting for Temperature, Intramolecular, and Non-additivity effects), a method to predict vapour pressure p0 of organic molecules needing only molecular structure as input. The method is applicable to zero-, mono- and polyfunctional molecules. A simple formula to describe log10p0(T) is employed, that takes into account both a wide temperature dependence and the non-additivity of functional groups. In order to match the recent data on functionalised diacids an empirical modification to the method was introduced. Contributions due to carbon skeleton, functional groups, and intramolecular interaction between groups are included. Molecules typically originating from oxidation of biogenic molecules are within the scope of this method: carbonyls, alcohols, ethers, esters, nitrates, acids, peroxides, hydroperoxides, peroxy acyl nitrates and peracids. Therefore the method is especially suited to describe compounds forming secondary organic aerosol (SOA).

  19. Major histocompatibility complex harbors widespread genotypic variability of non-additive risk of rheumatoid arthritis including epistasis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wen-Hua; Bowes, John; Plant, Darren; Viatte, Sebastien; Yarwood, Annie; Massey, Jonathan; Worthington, Jane; Eyre, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Genotypic variability based genome-wide association studies (vGWASs) can identify potentially interacting loci without prior knowledge of the interacting factors. We report a two-stage approach to make vGWAS applicable to diseases: firstly using a mixed model approach to partition dichotomous phenotypes into additive risk and non-additive environmental residuals on the liability scale and secondly using the Levene's (Brown-Forsythe) test to assess equality of the residual variances across genotype groups per marker. We found widespread significant (P < 2.5e-05) vGWAS signals within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) across all three study cohorts of rheumatoid arthritis. We further identified 10 epistatic interactions between the vGWAS signals independent of the MHC additive effects, each with a weak effect but jointly explained 1.9% of phenotypic variance. PTPN22 was also identified in the discovery cohort but replicated in only one independent cohort. Combining the three cohorts boosted power of vGWAS and additionally identified TYK2 and ANKRD55. Both PTPN22 and TYK2 had evidence of interactions reported elsewhere. We conclude that vGWAS can help discover interacting loci for complex diseases but require large samples to find additional signals. PMID:27109064

  20. Major histocompatibility complex harbors widespread genotypic variability of non-additive risk of rheumatoid arthritis including epistasis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wen-Hua; Bowes, John; Plant, Darren; Viatte, Sebastien; Yarwood, Annie; Massey, Jonathan; Worthington, Jane; Eyre, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Genotypic variability based genome-wide association studies (vGWASs) can identify potentially interacting loci without prior knowledge of the interacting factors. We report a two-stage approach to make vGWAS applicable to diseases: firstly using a mixed model approach to partition dichotomous phenotypes into additive risk and non-additive environmental residuals on the liability scale and secondly using the Levene’s (Brown-Forsythe) test to assess equality of the residual variances across genotype groups per marker. We found widespread significant (P < 2.5e-05) vGWAS signals within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) across all three study cohorts of rheumatoid arthritis. We further identified 10 epistatic interactions between the vGWAS signals independent of the MHC additive effects, each with a weak effect but jointly explained 1.9% of phenotypic variance. PTPN22 was also identified in the discovery cohort but replicated in only one independent cohort. Combining the three cohorts boosted power of vGWAS and additionally identified TYK2 and ANKRD55. Both PTPN22 and TYK2 had evidence of interactions reported elsewhere. We conclude that vGWAS can help discover interacting loci for complex diseases but require large samples to find additional signals. PMID:27109064

  1. Highly enantioselective and efficient synthesis of flavanones including pinostrobin through the rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric 1,4-addition.

    PubMed

    Korenaga, Toshinobu; Hayashi, Keigo; Akaki, Yusuke; Maenishi, Ryota; Sakai, Takashi

    2011-04-15

    An efficient synthesis of bioactive chiral flavanones (1) was achieved through the Rh-catalyzed asymmetric 1,4-addition of arylboronic acid to chromone. The reaction in toluene proceeded smoothly at room temperature in the presence of 0.5% Rh catalyst with electron-poor chiral diphosphine MeO-F(12)-BIPHEP. In this reaction, the 1,2-addition to (S)-1 frequently occurred to yield (2S,4R)-2,4-diaryl-4-chromanol as a byproduct, which could be reduced by changing the reaction solvent to CH(2)Cl(2) to deactivate the Rh catalyst (3% required). PMID:21413690

  2. Addition of Al and Fe salts during treatment of paper mill effluents to improve activated sludge settlement characteristics.

    PubMed

    Agridiotis, V; Forster, C F; Carliell-Marquet, C

    2007-11-01

    Metal salts, ferrous sulphate and aluminium chloride, were added to laboratory-scale activated sludge plant treating paper mill effluents to investigate the effect on settlement characteristics. Before treatment the sludge was filamentous, had stirred sludge volume index (SSVI) values in excess of 300 and was moderately hydrophobic. The use of FeSO4.7H2O took three weeks to reduce the SSVI to 90. Microscopic examination showed that Fe had converted the filamentous flocs into a compact structure. When the iron dosing was stopped, the sludge returned to its bulking state within four weeks. In a subsequent trial, the addition of AlCl3 initially resulted in an improvement of the settlement index but then caused deterioration of the sludge properties. It is possible that aluminium was overdosed and caused charge reversal, increasing the SSVI. PMID:17113285

  3. 7 CFR 984.437 - Methods for proposing names of additional candidates to be included on walnut growers' nomination...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... to be included on walnut growers' nomination ballots. 984.437 Section 984.437 Agriculture Regulations... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WALNUTS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Administrative... walnut growers' nomination ballots. (a) With regard to Board grower member positions specified in §...

  4. 7 CFR 984.437 - Methods for proposing names of additional candidates to be included on walnut growers' nomination...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... to be included on walnut growers' nomination ballots. 984.437 Section 984.437 Agriculture Regulations... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WALNUTS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Administrative... walnut growers' nomination ballots. (a) With regard to Board grower member positions specified in §...

  5. 7 CFR 984.437 - Methods for proposing names of additional candidates to be included on walnut growers' nomination...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... to be included on walnut growers' nomination ballots. 984.437 Section 984.437 Agriculture Regulations... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WALNUTS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Administrative... walnut growers' nomination ballots. (a) With regard to Board grower member positions specified in §...

  6. 7 CFR 984.437 - Methods for proposing names of additional candidates to be included on walnut growers' nomination...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... to be included on walnut growers' nomination ballots. 984.437 Section 984.437 Agriculture Regulations... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WALNUTS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Administrative... walnut growers' nomination ballots. (a) With regard to Board grower member positions specified in §...

  7. 7 CFR 984.437 - Methods for proposing names of additional candidates to be included on walnut growers' nomination...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... to be included on walnut growers' nomination ballots. 984.437 Section 984.437 Agriculture Regulations... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WALNUTS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Administrative... walnut growers' nomination ballots. (a) With regard to Board grower member positions specified in §...

  8. 17 CFR 230.432 - Additional information required to be included in prospectuses relating to tender offers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... required to be included in prospectuses relating to tender offers. 230.432 Section 230.432 Commodity and... prospectuses relating to tender offers. Notwithstanding the provisions of any form for the registration of securities under the Act, any prospectus relating to securities to be offered in connection with a...

  9. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Newcastle NTMS quadrangle, Wyoming, including concentrations of forty-two additional elements

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, S.J.; Sandoval, W.F.; Gallimore, D.L.; Talcott, C.L.; Martinez, R.G.; Minor, M.E.; Mills, C.F.

    1980-06-01

    During the summer and fall of 1977, 533 water and 1226 sediment samples were collected from 1740 locations within the 18,000 km/sup 2/ area of the Newcastle quadrangle, Wyoming. Water samples were collected from wells and springs; sediment samples were collected from stream channels and from springs. Each water sample was analyzed for uranium, and each sediment sample was analyzed for 43 elements, including uranium and thorium. Uranium concentrations in water samples range from below the detection limit of 0.02 ppB to 702.26 ppB and have a median of 1.73 ppB and a mean of 11.76 ppB. Water samples containing high uranium concentrations (>20 ppB) generally are associated with known uranium mining activity or units known to be uranium bearing. About one-third of the water samples containing high uranium concentrations were collected from locations within the Pumpkin Buttes and Turnercrest-Ross Districts. Nearly half of the water samples containing high uranium concentrations were collected from locations just west of the Monument Hill and Highland Flats-Box Creek Districts. Similar anomalous uranium concentrations in this region have been reported updip from Exxon's Highland uranium deposits. High uranium concentrations were also found associated with the Lance Creek-Old Woman Anticline District.

  10. Performance of portland limestone cements: Cements designed to be more sustainable that include up to 15% limestone addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Timothy J.

    In 2009, ASTM and AASHTO permitted the use of up to 5% interground limestone in ordinary portland cement (OPC) as a part of a change to ASTM C150/AASHTO M85. When this work was initiated a new proposal was being discussed that would enable up to 15% interground limestone cement to be considered in ASTM C595/AASHTO M234. This work served to provide rapid feedback to the state department of transportation and concrete industry for use in discussions regarding these specifications. Since the time this work was initiated, ASTM C595/AASHTO M234 was passed (2012c) and PLCs are now able to be specified, however they are still not widely used. The proposal for increasing the volume of limestone that would be permitted to be interground in cement is designed to enable more sustainable construction, which may significantly reduce the CO2 that is embodied in the built infrastructure while also extending the life of cement quarries. Research regarding the performance of cements with interground limestone has been conducted by the cement industry since these cements became widely used in Europe over three decades ago, however this work focuses on North American Portland Limestone Cements (PLCs) which are specifically designed to achieve similar performance as the OPCs they replace.This thesis presents a two-phase study in which the potential for application of cements containing limestone was assessed. The first phase of this study utilized a fundamental approach to determine whether cement with up to 15% of interground or blended limestone can be used as a direct substitute to ordinary portland cement. The second phase of the study assessed the concern of early age shrinkage and cracking potential when using PLCs, as these cements are typically ground finer than their OPC counterparts. For the first phase of the study, three commercially produced PLCs were obtained and compared to three commercially produced OPCs made from the same clinker. An additional cement was tested

  11. Performance of portland limestone cements: Cements designed to be more sustainable that include up to 15% limestone addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Timothy J.

    In 2009, ASTM and AASHTO permitted the use of up to 5% interground limestone in ordinary portland cement (OPC) as a part of a change to ASTM C150/AASHTO M85. When this work was initiated a new proposal was being discussed that would enable up to 15% interground limestone cement to be considered in ASTM C595/AASHTO M234. This work served to provide rapid feedback to the state department of transportation and concrete industry for use in discussions regarding these specifications. Since the time this work was initiated, ASTM C595/AASHTO M234 was passed (2012c) and PLCs are now able to be specified, however they are still not widely used. The proposal for increasing the volume of limestone that would be permitted to be interground in cement is designed to enable more sustainable construction, which may significantly reduce the CO2 that is embodied in the built infrastructure while also extending the life of cement quarries. Research regarding the performance of cements with interground limestone has been conducted by the cement industry since these cements became widely used in Europe over three decades ago, however this work focuses on North American Portland Limestone Cements (PLCs) which are specifically designed to achieve similar performance as the OPCs they replace.This thesis presents a two-phase study in which the potential for application of cements containing limestone was assessed. The first phase of this study utilized a fundamental approach to determine whether cement with up to 15% of interground or blended limestone can be used as a direct substitute to ordinary portland cement. The second phase of the study assessed the concern of early age shrinkage and cracking potential when using PLCs, as these cements are typically ground finer than their OPC counterparts. For the first phase of the study, three commercially produced PLCs were obtained and compared to three commercially produced OPCs made from the same clinker. An additional cement was tested

  12. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Newcastle NTMS Quadrangle, Wyoming, including concentrations of forty-two additional elements

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, S.J.; Sandoval, W.F.; Gallimore, D.L.; Talcott, C.L.; Martinez, R.G.; Minor, M.E.; Mills, C.F.

    1980-06-01

    Water and sediment samples were collected and each water sample was analyzed for U, and each sediment sample was analyzed for 43 elements, including U and Th. Uranium concentrations in water samples range from below the detection limit of 0.02 ppB to 702.26 ppB and have a median of 1.73 ppB and a mean of 11.76 ppB. Water samples containing high uranium concentrations generally are associated with known uranium mining activity or units known to be uranium bearing. About one-third of the water samples containing high uranium concentrations were collected from locations within the Pumpkin Buttes and Turnercrest-Ross Districts. Nearly half of the water samples containing high uranium concentrations were collected from locations just west of the Monument Hill and Highland Flats-Box Creek Districts. Similar anomalous uranium concentrations in this region have been reported updip from Exxon's Highland uranium deposits. High uranium concentrations were also found associated with the Lance Creek-Old Woman Anticline District. Uranium concentrations in sediment samples range from 1.14 to 220.70 ppM and have a median of 3.37 ppM and a mean of 4.03 ppM. Throughout the major uranium mining districts of the Powder River Basin, sediment samples with high uranium concentrations were collected from dry streams located near wells producing water samples with high uranium concentrations. High uranium concentrations were also found associated with the Lance Creek oil field where uranium mineralization is known in the White River formation. High uranium concentrations were also found in sediment samples in areas where uranium mineralization is not known. These samples are from dry streams in areas underlain by the White River formation, the Niobrara formation, and the Pierre, Carlisle, Belle Fourche, and Mowry shales.

  13. Co-digestion of manure with grass silage and pulp and paper mill sludge using nutrient additions.

    PubMed

    Hagelqvist, Alina; Granström, Karin

    2016-08-01

    There is an increasing worldwide demand for biogas. Anaerobic co-digestion involves the treatment of different substrates with the aim of improving the production of biogas and the stability of the process. This study evaluates how methane production is affected by the co-digestion of pig and dairy manure with grass silage and pulp and paper mill sludge and assesses whether methane production is affected by factors other than nutrient deficiency, low buffering capacity, inadequate dilution, and an insufficient activity and amount of microorganism culture. Anaerobic digestion was performed in batch reactors under mesophilic conditions for 20 days. The season of grass silage and manure collection proved to be an important factor affecting methane production. Spring grass silage produced a maximum of 250 mL/VSadded and spring manure 150 mL/VSadded, whereas autumn grass silage produced at most 140 ml/VSadded and autumn manure 45 mL/VSadded. The pulp mill sludge used is comprised of both primary and secondary sludge and produced at most 50 mL/VSadded regardless of season; this substrate benefitted most from co-digestion. PMID:26776302

  14. Ionic liquid as a mobile phase additive in high-performance liquid chromatography for the simultaneous determination of eleven fluorescent whitening agents in paper materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Chen, Xianbo; Qiu, Bin; Zhou, Liang; Zhang, Hui; Xie, Juan; Luo, Yan; Wang, Bin

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, 11 4,4'-diaminostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid based fluorescent whitening agents with different numbers of sulfonic acid groups were separated by using an ionic liquid as a mobile phase additive in high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. The effects of ionic liquid concentration, pH of mobile phase B, and composition of mobile phase A on the separation of fluorescent whitening agents were systematically investigated. The ionic liquid tetrabutylammonium tetrafluoroborate is superior to tetrabutylammomnium bromide for the separation of the fluorescent whitening agents. The optimal separation conditions were an ionic liquid concentration at 8 mM and the pH of mobile phase B at 8.5 with methanol as mobile phase A. The established method exhibited low limits of detection (0.04-0.07 ng/mL) and wide linearity ranges (0.30-20 ng/mL) with high linear correlation coefficients from 0.9994 to 0.9998. The optimized procedure was applied to analyze target analytes in paper samples with satisfactory results. Eleven target analytes were quantified, and the recoveries of spiked paper samples were in the range of 85-105% with the relative standard deviations from 2.1 to 5.1%. The obtained results indicated that the method was efficient for detection of 11 fluorescent whitening agents. PMID:26843408

  15. Including xpc® feed additive in the diet of inoculated broilers during grow-out helps control salmonella associated with their carcasses after processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to test XPC® feed additive for control of Salmonella in poultry meat products. Day of hatch broiler chicks were gavaged with 106 cells of a nalidixic acid resistant marker strain of Salmonella Typhimurium and placed on clean pine shavings in 9 separate floor pens (25 ...

  16. Exploring Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    Exploratorium Magazine communicates ideas that exhibits cannot easily demonstrate, extending the museum beyond its physical walls. This issue takes an in-depth look at the science and history of paper. Topics include: (1) Fascinating Facts about Paper; (2) A Closer Look at the Paper in This Magazine; (3) Handmade Paper; (4) Paper Airplanes; (5)…

  17. Presenting a scientific paper, including the pitfalls.

    PubMed Central

    Lashford, L S

    1995-01-01

    The tone of the presentation is set with the writing of the abstract. Wanting a trip to Vienna is not a good enough reason for framing an abstract unless the data are really interesting. If you don't find them so, you can bet your life that nobody else will. Have you presented the work before? Increasingly, the forms inviting abstracts stipulate that they should contain novel data. This protects the audience from boredom and your reputation from the aspersion that you never have anything new to say. It has been my practice to communicate similar data at a second meeting provided it contains some new results and that it is targeted at a totally unrelated specialist group. Hopefully, no one will have heard the information before. However, it is not acceptable to simply rehash the same abstract but should reflect the special interests of the second group. If one genuinely wants the abstract accepted for oral presentation it must contain a clear hypothesis, a brief description of methods, an exposition of results, and a conclusion. That well worn phrase 'results will be presented' simply raises the suspicion that the author is hoping that the data will be ready by the time that the conference begins. Sometimes, in the rush to meet deadlines for abstract submission, the needs of coauthors are overlooked. This is a sensitive area and can easily temporarily wreck what appeared to be a harmonious collaboration. Do make sure that all coauthors have seen the abstract before submission and are happy with the content--it is good research practice and important to the smooth running of the research group. PMID:7574867

  18. Presenting a scientific paper, including the pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Lashford, L S

    1995-08-01

    The tone of the presentation is set with the writing of the abstract. Wanting a trip to Vienna is not a good enough reason for framing an abstract unless the data are really interesting. If you don't find them so, you can bet your life that nobody else will. Have you presented the work before? Increasingly, the forms inviting abstracts stipulate that they should contain novel data. This protects the audience from boredom and your reputation from the aspersion that you never have anything new to say. It has been my practice to communicate similar data at a second meeting provided it contains some new results and that it is targeted at a totally unrelated specialist group. Hopefully, no one will have heard the information before. However, it is not acceptable to simply rehash the same abstract but should reflect the special interests of the second group. If one genuinely wants the abstract accepted for oral presentation it must contain a clear hypothesis, a brief description of methods, an exposition of results, and a conclusion. That well worn phrase 'results will be presented' simply raises the suspicion that the author is hoping that the data will be ready by the time that the conference begins. Sometimes, in the rush to meet deadlines for abstract submission, the needs of coauthors are overlooked. This is a sensitive area and can easily temporarily wreck what appeared to be a harmonious collaboration. Do make sure that all coauthors have seen the abstract before submission and are happy with the content--it is good research practice and important to the smooth running of the research group. PMID:7574867

  19. Quantum ring-polymer contraction method: Including nuclear quantum effects at no additional computational cost in comparison to ab initio molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Christopher; Spura, Thomas; Habershon, Scott; Kühne, Thomas D.

    2016-04-01

    We present a simple and accurate computational method which facilitates ab initio path-integral molecular dynamics simulations, where the quantum-mechanical nature of the nuclei is explicitly taken into account, at essentially no additional computational cost in comparison to the corresponding calculation using classical nuclei. The predictive power of the proposed quantum ring-polymer contraction method is demonstrated by computing various static and dynamic properties of liquid water at ambient conditions using density functional theory. This development will enable routine inclusion of nuclear quantum effects in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of condensed-phase systems.

  20. Study Modules for Calculus-Based General Physics. [Includes Modules 1 and 2: Dimensions and Vector Addition; Rectilinear Motion; plus a Trigonometry and Calculus Review].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Robert G., Ed.; And Others

    This is part of a series of 42 Calculus Based Physics (CBP) modules totaling about 1,000 pages. The modules include study guides, practice tests, and mastery tests for a full-year individualized course in calculus-based physics based on the Personalized System of Instruction (PSI). The units are not intended to be used without outside materials;…

  1. Localization of eight additional genes in the human major histocompatibility complex, including the gene encoding the casein kinase II {beta} subunit (CSNK2B)

    SciTech Connect

    Albertella, M.R.; Jones, H.; Thomson, W.

    1996-09-01

    A wide range of autoimmune and other diseases are known to be associated with the major histocompatibility complex. Many of these diseases are linked to the genes encoding the polymorphic histocompatibility complex. Many of these diseases are linked to the genes encoding the polymorphic histocompatibility antigens in the class I and class II regions, but some appear to be more strongly associated with genes in the central 1100-kb class III region, making it important to characterize this region fully for the presence of novel genes. An {approximately}220-kb segment of DNA in the class III region separating the Hsp70 (HSPA1L) and BAT1 (D6S8IE) genes, which was previously known to contain 14 genes. Genomic DNA fragments spanning the gaps between the known genes were used as probes to isolate cDNAs corresponding to five new genes within this region. Evidence from Northern blot analysis and exon trapping experiments that suggested the presence of at least two more new genes was also obtained. Partial cDNA and complete exonic genomic sequencing of one of the new genes has identified it as the casein kinase II{beta} subunit (CSNK2B). Two of the other novel genes lie within a region syntenic to that implicated in susceptibility to experimental allergic orchitis in the mouse, an autoimmune disease of the testis, and represent additional candidates for the Orch-1 locus associated with this disease. In addition, characterization of the 13-kb intergenic gap separating the RD (D6545) and G11 (D6S60E) genes has revealed the presence of a gene encoding a 1246-amino-acid polypeptide that shows significant sequence similarity to the yeast anti-viral Ski2p gene product. 49 refs., 8 figs.

  2. Petrographic and Geochemical Characterization of Ore-Bearing Intrusions of the Noril'sk type, Siberia; With Discussion of Their Origin, Including Additional Datasets and Core Logs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czamanske, Gerald K., (compiler)

    2002-01-01

    The Noril'sk I, Talnakh, and Kharaelakh intrusions of the Noril'sk district host one of the outstanding metal concentrations in the world; contained Cu-Ni resources are comparable to the deposits at Sudbury, Ontario and the platinum group element (PGE) resource is second only to that of the Bushveld Complex. Our opportunity to cooperatively sample and study this district in Siberian Russia arose in 1990 through a memorandum of understanding between the U.S. Geological Survey and the former Ministry of Geology of the U.S.S.R. The world-class significance of these deposits and the possibility that understanding their geologic context, including construction of a credible 'ore-deposit model,' will lead to discovery of similar deposits elsewhere, inspired extensive studies of the ores, the mafic-intrusions which host them, and associated flood basalts.

  3. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Dalhart NTMS quadrangle, New Mexico/Texas/Oklahoma, including concentrations of forty-two additional elements

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, T.L.

    1980-08-01

    Totals of 1583 water samples and 503 sediment samples were collected from 2028 locations within the 20 000-km/sup 2/ area of the quadrangle at an average density of one location per 9.86 km/sup 2/. Water samples were collected from wells, springs, and streams and were analyzed for uranium. Sediment samples were collected from streams and springs and were analyzed for uranium, thorium, and 41 additional elements. All field and analytical data are listed in the appendixes of this report. Discussion is limited to anomalous samples, which are considered to be those containing over 20 ppB uranium for waters and over 5 ppM uranium for sediments. Uranium concentrations in water samples range from below the detection limit of 0.2 ppB to 1457.65 ppB and average 7.41 ppB. Most of the seventy anomalous water samples (4.4% of all water samples) are grouped spatially into five clusters or areas of interest. Samples in three of the clusters were collected along the north edge of the quadrangle where Mesozoic strata are exposed. The other two clusters are from the central and southern portions where the Quaternary Ogallala formation is exposed. Sediment samples from the quadrangle have uranium concentrations that range from 0.90 ppM to 27.20 ppM and average 3.27 ppM. Fourteen samples (2.8% of all sediment samples) contain over 5 ppM uranium and are considered anomalous. The five samples with the highest concentrations occur where downcutting streams expose Cretaceous units beneath the Quaternary surficial deposits. The remaining anomalous sediment samples were collected from scattered locations and do not indicate any single formation or unit as a potential source for the anomalous concentrations.

  4. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance data release for the Elk City NTMS Quadrangle, Idaho/Montana, including concentrations of forty-five additional elements

    SciTech Connect

    Broxton, D.E.; Beyth, M.

    1980-07-01

    Totals of 1580 water and 1720 sediment samples were collected from 1754 locations in the quadrangle. Elemental concentration, field measurement, weather, geologic, and geographic data for each sample location are listed for waters in Appendix I-A and for sediments in Appendix I-B. Uranium/thorium ratios for sediment samples are also included in Appendix I-B. All elemental analyses were performed at the LASL. Water samples were initially analyzed for uranium by fluorometry. All water samples containing more than 40 parts per billion (ppB) uranium were reanalyzed by delayed-neutron counting (DNC). A supplemental report containing the multielement analyses of water samples will be open filed in the near future. Sediments were analyzed for uranium and thorium as well as aluminum, antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, bismuth, cadmium, calcium, cerium, cesium, chlorine, chromium, cobalt, copper, dysprosium, europium, gold, hafnium, iron, lanthanum, lead, lithium, lutetium, magnesium, manganese, nickel, niobium, potassium, rubidium, samarium, selenium, scandium, silver, sodium, strontium, tantalum, terbium, tin, titanium, tungsten, vanadium, ytterbium, zinc, and zirconium. Basic statistics for 40 of these elements are presented. All sediments were analyzed for uranium by delayed-neutron counting. Other elemental concentrations in sediments were determined by neutron-activation analysis for 30 elements, by x-ray fluorescence for 12 elements, and by arc-source emission spectrography for 2 elements. Analytical results for sediments are reported as parts per million.

  5. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance data release for the Ashton NTMS quadrangle, Idaho/Montana/Wyoming, including concentrations of forty-two additional elements

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, S.S. Jr; Sandoval, W.F.; Gallimore, D.L.; Hansel, J.M.; Hensley, W.K.; Pirtle, J.; Macdonell, C.J.

    1980-08-01

    This report contains data collected during a geochemical survey for uranium in the Ashton National Topographic Map Series quadrangle of eastern Idaho, southwestern Montana, and northwestern Wyoming by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) as part of the nationwide Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR). The LASL is responsible for conducting the HSSR primarily in the Rocky Mountain states of New Mexico, Colorado, Wyoming, and Montana and in Alaska. Totals of 1141 water and 1500 sediment samples were collected from 1539 locations in the quadrangle by a commercial contractor. Water samples were collected at streams, springs, wells, ponds, and marshes; sediment samples were obtained from streams, springs, and ponds. Histograms and statistical data for uranium concentrations in water and sediment samples and thorium concentrations in sediment samples are given. Uranium/thorium ratios for sediment samples are also included. All elemental analyses were performed at the LASL. Water samples were initially analyzed for uranium by fluorometry. All water samples containing more than 40 ppB uranium were reanalyzed by delayed-neutron counting (DNC). Sediments were analyzed for uranium and thorium as well as aluminum, antimony, barium, beryllium, bismuth, cadmium, calcium, cerium, cesium, chlorine, chromium, cobalt, copper, dysprosium, europium, gold, hafnium, iron, lanthanum, lead, lithium, lutetium, magnesium, manganese, nickel, niobium, potassium, rubidium, samarium, scandium, silver, sodium, strontium, tantalum, terbium, tin, titanium, tungsten, vanadium, ytterbium, and zinc. All sediments were analyzed for uranium by DNC. Other elemental concentrations in sediments were determined by neutron activation analysis for 31 elements, by x-ray fluorescence for 9 elements, and by arc-source emission spectrography for 2 elements. Analytical results for sediments are reported as parts per million.

  6. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance data release for the Lewistown NTMS Quadrangle, Montana, including concentrations of forty-two additional elements

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, S.S. Jr.

    1980-08-01

    Totals of 758 water and 1170 sediment samples were collected from 1649 locations in the Levistown quadrangle. Water samples were collected at streams, springs, wells, ponds, and marshes; sediment samples were obtained from streams, springs, and ponds. Histograms and statistical data for uranium concentrations in water and sediment samples and thorium concentrations in sediment samples are given. All samples were collected at the nominal reconnaissance density of one sample location per 10 km/sup 2/. Elemental concentration, field measurement, weather, geologic, and geographic data for each sample location are listed for waters and for sediments. Uranium to thorium (U/Th) ratios for sediment samples are included. Water samples were initially analyzed for uranium by fluorometry. All water samples containing more than 40 ppB U were reanalyzed by delayed-neutron counting. Sediments were analyzed for U and Th as well as Al, Sb, Ba, Be, Bi, Cd, Ca, Ce, Cs, Cl, Cr, Co, Cu, Dy, Eu, Au, Hf, Fe, La, Pb, Li, Lu, Mg, Mn, Ni, Nb, K, Rb, Sa, Sc, Ag, Na, Sr, Ta, Tb, Sn, Ti, W, V, Yb, and Zn. All sediments were analyzed for U by delayed neutron counting. Other elemental concentrations in sediments were determined by neutron activation analysis for 31 elements, by x-ray fluorescence for 9 elements, and by arc-source emission spectrography for 2 elements. Analytical results are reported as parts per million. Descriptions of procedures used for analysis of water and sediments samples as well as analytical precisions and detection limits are given.

  7. Research Papers Sponsored by the Commission on Private Philanthropy and Public Needs. Volume II: Philanthropic Fields of Interest, Part II-Additional Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Treasury, Washington, DC.

    Twelve papers discuss future changes and trends in philanthropic giving and activities. The report is Volume II, Part II of a five volume series examining the relationship between nonprofit institutions and their donors. The opening paper reviews the needs for better definition of the government's role in contracting and grant making, and for…

  8. Studies in Public Welfare. Additional Material for Paper Number 6: How Public Welfare Benefits are Distributed in Low-Income Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Alair A., Comp.; And Others

    This supplement was designed to be used in conjunction with Paper No. Six, which contains a detailed description of the methodology employed. In conjunction with General Accounting Office, the Subcommittee on Fiscal Policy chose as study sites six areas of the Nation from among the 59 census areas which have been designated by the Census Bureau as…

  9. The effects of fuel composition and ammonium sulfate addition on PCDD, PCDF, PCN and PCB concentrations during the combustion of biomass and paper production residuals.

    PubMed

    Lundin, Lisa; Jansson, Stina

    2014-01-01

    The use of waste wood as an energy carrier has increased during the last decade. However, the higher levels of alkali metals and chlorine in waste wood compared to virgin biomass can promote the formation of deposits and organic pollutants. Here, the effect of fuel composition and the inhibitory effects of ammonium sulfate, (NH4)2SO4, on the concentrations of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the flue gas of a lab-scale combustor was investigated. Ammonium sulfate is often used as a corrosion-preventing additive and may also inhibit formation of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs). In addition to PCDDs and PCDFs, polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCN) and biphenyls (PCB) were also analyzed. It was found that the flue gas composition changed dramatically when (NH4)2SO4 was added: CO, SO2, and NH3 levels increased, while those of HCl decreased to almost zero. However, the additive's effects on POP formation were less pronounced. When (NH4)2SO4 was added to give an S:Cl ratio of 3, only the PCDF concentration was reduced, indicating that this ratio was not sufficient to achieve a general reduction in POP emissions. Conversely, at an S:Cl ratio of 6, significant reductions in the WHO-TEQ value and the PCDD and PCDF contents of the flue gas were observed. The effect on the PCDF concentration was especially pronounced. PCN formation seemed to be promoted by the elevated CO concentrations caused by adding (NH4)2SO4. PMID:24053941

  10. International Conference on Recent Research and Development in Vocational Education (Adelaide, South Australia, Australia, March 12-19, 1989). Additional Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TAFE National Centre for Research and Development, Payneham (Australia).

    The conference recorded in this document covered a wide variety of themes and consisted of keynote addresses, research presentations, and workshops. The following keynote addresses are include: "Some Recent TAFE National Centre Research and Development in Australian Vocational Education" (Hall); "Vocational Teacher Education: Principles,…

  11. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  12. Including Ideology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allan, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Ellen Brantlinger's paper, "Using ideology: cases of non-recognition of the politics of research and practice in special education" (Brantlinger, E. 1997. "Using ideology: Cases of nonrecognition of the politics of research and practice in special education." "Review of Educational Research" 67, no. 4: 425-59),…

  13. Pulp and paper mills

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-14

    The various hazards present in the many steps used in the production of products from pulp and paper mills were reviewed and discussed. The biological effects of 43 chemical, physical and dust hazards were detailed in the report. Dust hazards included exposures to wood dust, mold and bagasse dusts and fibrogenic dusts. Physical hazards included high heat and humidity, and noise. Raw materials and chemical intermediates discussed included calcium-oxide (1305788), magnesium-oxide (1309484), pulping liquors, sodium-hydroxide (1310732), sulfate, sulfites, sulfides, sulfur (7704349) and sulfuric-acid (7664939). Pulp bleaching agents were discussed along with papermaking additives, contaminants and/or byproducts, and pulping or combustion effluents. Sampling and analytical techniques for physical and chemical hazards were discussed. Engineering controls for hazards in pulp and paper mills were reviewed. OSHA regulations governing pulp and paper mills were evaluated.

  14. Paper electronics.

    PubMed

    Tobjörk, Daniel; Österbacka, Ronald

    2011-05-01

    Paper is ubiquitous in everyday life and a truly low-cost substrate. The use of paper substrates could be extended even further, if electronic applications would be applied next to or below the printed graphics. However, applying electronics on paper is challenging. The paper surface is not only very rough compared to plastics, but is also porous. While this is detrimental for most electronic devices manufactured directly onto paper substrates, there are also approaches that are compatible with the rough and absorptive paper surface. In this review, recent advances and possibilities of these approaches are evaluated and the limitations of paper electronics are discussed. PMID:21433116

  15. Measurement of toverline{t} production with additional jet activity, including b quark jets, in the dilepton decay channel using pp collisions at √{s} = 8 {TeV}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; de Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Yonamine, R.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Tytgat, M.; van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Júnior, W. L. Aldá; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; de Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; El Sawy, M.; El-Khateeb, E.; Elkafrawy, T.; Mohamed, A.; Salama, E.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.

    2016-07-01

    Jet multiplicity distributions in top quark pair ({t}{overline{t}}) events are measured in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 {fb}^ {-1}. The measurement is performed in the dilepton decay channels (e^+e^-, μ^+ μ^-, and e^{±} μ^{∓}). The absolute and normalized differential cross sections for {t}overline{t} production are measured as a function of the jet multiplicity in the event for different jet transverse momentum thresholds and the kinematic properties of the leading additional jets. The differential {t overline{t} b} and {t overline{t} b overline{b}} cross sections are presented for the first time as a function of the kinematic properties of the leading additional b jets. Furthermore, the fraction of events without additional jets above a threshold is measured as a function of the transverse momenta of the leading additional jets and the scalar sum of the transverse momenta of all additional jets. The data are compared and found to be consistent with predictions from several perturbative quantum chromodynamics event generators and a next-to-leading order calculation.

  16. Measurement of $\\mathrm{ t \\bar{t} } $ production with additional jet activity, including b quark jets, in the dilepton decay channel using pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s} =$ 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-10-13

    Jet multiplicity distributions in top quark pair (tt) events are measured in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. The measurement is performed in the dilepton decay channels (e+e-+μ- and e±μ). Furthermore, the absolute and normalized differential cross sections for tt production are measured as a function of the jet multiplicity in the event for different jet transverse momentum thresholds and the kinematic properties of the leading additional jets. The differential tt-b and tt-bb- cross sections are presented for the first time as a function of the kinematic properties of the leading additional b jets. Furthermore, the fraction of events without additional jets above a threshold is measured as a function of the transverse momenta of the leading additional jets and the scalar sum of the transverse momenta of all additional jets. Finally, the data are compared and found to be consistent with predictions from several perturbative quantum chromodynamics event generators and a next-to-leading ordercalculation.

  17. Measurement of $$\\mathrm{ t \\bar{t} } $$ production with additional jet activity, including b quark jets, in the dilepton decay channel using pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} =$$ 8 TeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-07-07

    Jet multiplicity distributions in top quark pair (tt) events are measured in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. The measurement is performed in the dilepton decay channels (e+e-,μ+μ- and e±μ∓). Furthermore, the absolute and normalized differential cross sections for tt production are measured as a function of the jet multiplicity in the event for different jet transverse momentum thresholds and the kinematic properties of the leading additional jets. The differential tt-b and tt-bb- cross sections are presented formore » the first time as a function of the kinematic properties of the leading additional b jets. Furthermore, the fraction of events without additional jets above a threshold is measured as a function of the transverse momenta of the leading additional jets and the scalar sum of the transverse momenta of all additional jets. Finally, the data are compared and found to be consistent with predictions from several perturbative quantum chromodynamics event generators and a next-to-leading ordercalculation.« less

  18. Torn Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Louis J.

    1975-01-01

    Colored construction paper was used to develop an interesting, creative experience for elementary and high school students, who learned to appreciate and to understand the torn paper innovation in art. Examples of this tearing technique are found in works by Picasso, Motherwell, Vincenti, and Matisse. (Author/RK)

  19. Paper Trail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagnon, Denis

    2007-01-01

    Invented in 1948, electric hand dryers now are widely available in public restrooms. Given the expense of making paper, the labor involved in keeping restrooms stocked, and the waste generated from disposing paper, the use of hand dryers is an alternative for school and university facility owners and managers. However, standing in the way of…

  20. Evaluation of the butter flavoring chemical diacetyl and a fluorochemical paper additive for mutagenicity and toxicity using the mammalian cell gene mutation assay in L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Paul; Clarke, Jane J; San, Richard H C; Begley, Timothy H; Dunkel, Virginia C

    2008-08-01

    Diacetyl (2,3-butanedione) is a yellowish liquid that is usually mixed with other ingredients to produce butter flavor or other flavors in a variety of food products. Inhalation of butter flavoring vapors was first associated with clinical bronchiolitis obliterans among workers in microwave popcorn production. Recent findings have shown irreversible obstructive lung disease among workers not only in the microwave popcorn industry, but also in flavoring manufacture, and in chemical synthesis of diacetyl, a predominant chemical for butter flavoring. It has been reported that perfluorochemicals utilized in food packaging are migrating into foods and may be sources of oral exposure. Relatively small quantities of perfluorochemicals are used in the manufacturing of paper or paperboard that is in direct contact with food to repel oil or grease and water. Because of recent concerns about perfluorochemicals such as those found on microwave popcorn bags (e.g. Lodyne P208E) and diacetyl in foods, we evaluated both compounds for mutagenicity using the mammalian cell gene mutation assay in L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells. Lodyne P208E was less toxic than diacetyl and did not induce a mutagenic response. Diacetyl induced a highly mutagenic response in the L5178Y mouse lymphoma mutation assay in the presence of human liver S9 for activation. The increase in the frequency of small colonies in the assay with diacetyl indicates that diacetyl causes damage to multiple loci on chromosome 11 in addition to functional loss of the thymidine kinase locus. PMID:18585428

  1. Gasoline additives, emissions, and performance

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The papers included in this publication deal with the influence of fuel, additive, and hardware changes on a variety of vehicle performance characteristics. Advanced techniques for measuring these performance parameters are also described. Contents include: Fleet test evaluation of gasoline additives for intake valve and combustion chamber deposit clean up; A technique for evaluating octane requirement additives in modern engines on dynamometer test stands; A fleet test of two additive technologies comparing their effects on tailpipe emissions; Investigation into the vehicle exhaust emissions of high percentage ethanol blends; Variability in hydrocarbon speciation measurements at low emission (ULEV) levels; and more.

  2. Contributed Papers, 1967.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Special Libraries Association, New York, NY. Documentation Div.

    Included are six papers from the Special Libraries Association Documentation Division's Contributed Papers Session at the National Conference in New York, May 28 - June 1, 1967, which were not included in the November, 1967 issue of Special Libraries. The papers are: (1) "The Bibliographical Control of Aerospace Industry Conference Literature…

  3. Alkaline "Permanent" Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacey, Antony

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of paper manufacturing processes and their effects on library materials focuses on the promotion of alkaline "permanent" paper, with less acid, by Canadian library preservation specialists. Standards for paper acidity are explained; advantages of alkaline paper are described, including decreased manufacturing costs; and recyclability is…

  4. The Migrant Papers. Behavorial Science Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Ira E.

    Four papers pertaining to health services for East Coast migrant workers are included in this publication. These papers are: (1) "The Crew Leader as a Broker with Implications for Health Service Delivery," (2) "Migrant Health Project with Implications for Health Service Delivery," (3) "Planned Change in a Migrant Health Project," and (4) "Life…

  5. New Paper from Newspaper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Describes a paper recycling experiment in which students recycle a piece of newsprint to make a new sheet of paper. Involves collection of information from the internet for the activity. Includes both instructor information and a student worksheet. (YDS)

  6. {sup 13}C chemical shift anisotropies for carbonate ions in cement minerals and the use of {sup 13}C, {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR in studies of Portland cement including limestone additions

    SciTech Connect

    Sevelsted, Tine F.; Herfort, Duncan

    2013-10-15

    {sup 13}C isotropic chemical shifts and chemical shift anisotropy parameters have been determined for a number of inorganic carbonates relevant in cement chemistry from slow-speed {sup 13}C MAS or {sup 13}C({sup 1}H) CP/MAS NMR spectra (9.4 T or 14.1 T) for {sup 13}C in natural abundance. The variation in the {sup 13}C chemical shift parameters is relatively small, raising some doubts that different carbonate species in Portland cement-based materials may not be sufficiently resolved in {sup 13}C MAS NMR spectra. However, it is shown that by combining {sup 13}C MAS and {sup 13}C({sup 1}H) CP/MAS NMR carbonate anions in anhydrous and hydrated phases can be distinguished, thereby providing valuable information about the reactivity of limestone in cement blends. This is illustrated for three cement pastes prepared from an ordinary Portland cement, including 0, 16, and 25 wt.% limestone, and following the hydration for up to one year. For these blends {sup 29}Si MAS NMR reveals that the limestone filler accelerates the hydration for alite and also results in a smaller fraction of tetrahedrally coordinated Al incorporated in the C-S-H phase. The latter result is more clearly observed in {sup 27}Al MAS NMR spectra of the cement–limestone blends and suggests that dissolved aluminate species in the cement–limestone blends readily react with carbonate ions from the limestone filler, forming calcium monocarboaluminate hydrate. -- Highlights: •{sup 13}C chemical shift anisotropies for inorganic carbonates from {sup 13}C MAS NMR. •Narrow {sup 13}C NMR chemical shift range (163–171 ppm) for inorganic carbonates. •Anhydrous and hydrated carbonate species by {sup 13}C MAS and {sup 13}C({sup 1}H) CP/MAS NMR. •Limestone accelerates the hydration for alite in Portland – limestone cements. •Limestone reduces the amount of aluminium incorporated in the C-S-H phase.

  7. Fun with Paper Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Dava; Hounshell, Paul B.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses paper chromatographic techniques and provides examples of typical classroom activities. Includes description of retardation values obtained during chromatography exercises and suggests using them for math lessons. (JN)

  8. Food additives

    MedlinePlus

    Food additives are substances that become part of a food product when they are added during the processing or making of that food. "Direct" food additives are often added during processing to: Add nutrients ...

  9. Welfare's Children. Discussion Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiseman, Michael

    States with family cap public assistance policies deny or reduce additional welfare benefits to mothers who conceive and give birth to additional children while they are receiving aid. By 1999, 22 states had family cap policies in place. This paper reports estimates of the number and cost implications of infants conceived by mothers receiving…

  10. Housing: Topic Paper F.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on the Handicapped, Washington, DC.

    This paper, one of a series of topic papers assessing federal laws and programs affecting persons with disabilities, addresses the issue of housing. Major federal responsibilities are to develop additional housing opportunities for persons with disabilities and to assure that currently available housing is equally open to individuals with…

  11. Handmade Paper Landscapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guhin, Paula

    2012-01-01

    Making paper can be good for the planet, as well as an adventure for one's students. The costs of the activity of making the pulp from recycled paper are low and it is very eco-friendly. To begin, the author showed her middle-school students several examples of handmade paper in which outdoor scenes had been developed using an additive technique.…

  12. Food additives.

    PubMed

    Berglund, F

    1978-01-01

    The use of additives to food fulfils many purposes, as shown by the index issued by the Codex Committee on Food Additives: Acids, bases and salts; Preservatives, Antioxidants and antioxidant synergists; Anticaking agents; Colours; Emulfifiers; Thickening agents; Flour-treatment agents; Extraction solvents; Carrier solvents; Flavours (synthetic); Flavour enhancers; Non-nutritive sweeteners; Processing aids; Enzyme preparations. Many additives occur naturally in foods, but this does not exclude toxicity at higher levels. Some food additives are nutrients, or even essential nutritents, e.g. NaCl. Examples are known of food additives causing toxicity in man even when used according to regulations, e.g. cobalt in beer. In other instances, poisoning has been due to carry-over, e.g. by nitrate in cheese whey - when used for artificial feed for infants. Poisonings also occur as the result of the permitted substance being added at too high levels, by accident or carelessness, e.g. nitrite in fish. Finally, there are examples of hypersensitivity to food additives, e.g. to tartrazine and other food colours. The toxicological evaluation, based on animal feeding studies, may be complicated by impurities, e.g. orthotoluene-sulfonamide in saccharin; by transformation or disappearance of the additive in food processing in storage, e.g. bisulfite in raisins; by reaction products with food constituents, e.g. formation of ethylurethane from diethyl pyrocarbonate; by metabolic transformation products, e.g. formation in the gut of cyclohexylamine from cyclamate. Metabolic end products may differ in experimental animals and in man: guanylic acid and inosinic acid are metabolized to allantoin in the rat but to uric acid in man. The magnitude of the safety margin in man of the Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) is not identical to the "safety factor" used when calculating the ADI. The symptoms of Chinese Restaurant Syndrome, although not hazardous, furthermore illustrate that the whole ADI

  13. Selected Papers on Values.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackmon, C. Robert, Ed.

    This document contains papers and reports read at the August 1968, meeting of the Continuing Interest Group on Values, a subgroup of the National Conference of Professors of Educational Administration, held at the State University of New York at Albany. Included are three papers by C. Robert Blackmon; the first considers values as education's most…

  14. CATV Technical Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Cable Television Association, Inc., Washington, DC.

    Complete technical papers of the 1977 National Cable Television Association Convention are included in this report. Twenty-two of 32 papers and two abstracts cover the topics of advanced cable television techniques, human reactions to television picture impairment, special displays and services, protection from theft of service, everyday…

  15. Corrosion/96 conference papers

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    Topics covered by this conference include: cathodic protection in natural waters; cleaning and repassivation of building HVAC systems; worldwide opportunities in flue gas desulfurization; advancements in materials technology for use in oil and gas service; fossil fuel combustion and conversion; technology of corrosion inhibitors; computers in corrosion control--modeling and information processing; recent experiences and advances of austenitic alloys; managing corrosion with plastics; corrosion measurement technology; corrosion inhibitors for concrete; refining industry; advances in corrosion control for rail and tank trailer equipment; CO{sub 2} corrosion--mechanisms and control; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion in nuclear systems; role of corrosion in boiler failures; effects of water reuse on monitoring and control technology in cooling water applications; methods and mechanisms of scale and deposit control; corrosion detection in petroleum production lines; underground corrosion control; environmental cracking--relating laboratory results and field behavior; corrosion control in reinforced concrete structures; corrosion and its control in aerospace and military hardware; injection and process addition facilities; progress reports on the results of reinspection of deaerators inspected or repaired per RP0590 criteria; near 100% volume solids coating technology and application methods; materials performance in high temperature environments containing halides; impact of toxicity studies on use of corrosion/scale inhibitors; mineral scale deposit control in oilfield related operations; corrosion in gas treating; marine corrosion; cold climate corrosion; corrosion in the pulp and paper industry; gaseous chlorine alternatives in cooling water systems; practical applications of ozone in recirculating cooling water systems; and water reuse in industry. Over 400 papers from this conference have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  16. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  17. Phosphazene additives

    SciTech Connect

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  18. Reply to comment by Ben-Zvi, A., D. Rosenfeld and A. Givati on the paper: Levin, Z., N. Halfon and P. Alpert, “Reassessment of rain experiments and operations in Israel including synoptic considerations,” Atmos. Res. 97, 513-525. DOI: 10.1016/j.atmosres.2010.06.011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Zev; Halfon, Noam; Alpert, Pinhas

    2011-03-01

    Levin et al. (2010; hereafter LHA) (Levin, Z., Halfon, N., Alpert, P., 2010. Reassessment of rain experiments and operations in Israel including synoptic considerations. Atmos. Res. 97, 513-525. DOI:10.1016/j.atmosres.2010.06.011.), reanalyzed the results of the operational seeding in northern Israel between 1975 and 2007 and the preceding Israel 2 cloud seeding experiment (1969-1975) and concluded that there is no net increase in precipitation over the target areas. Our analysis revealed that a synoptic bias during Israel 2 is one of the reasons for the apparent positive effect of seeding in the northern target area and the negative effect in the southern area both of which disappeared in the following experiment in the south (Israel 3; 1975-1995) and the operational seeding in the north. Ben-Zvi et al. (2010;hereafter BRG) criticized our paper primarily on the ground that we did not consider the positive results of Israel 1 experiment (1960-1967). It should be noted that in Israel 1 different seeding lines were used from those in both Israel 2 and the operational period. In addition, its raw data is not accessible anymore for reanalysis. Furthermore, Israel 2 had been designed as a confirmatory cross-over experiment to Israel 1 and failed to reproduce its promising results with double ratio (DR) of ~ 1.00, namely, zero rainfall enhancements. The same DR values were also found in Israel 3 and in the operational seeding. Therefore, because of the differences in the two experiments, the lack of access to the raw data and the disappointing results of the confirmatory experiment, we decided to concentrate our analysis on the more recent seeding activities. The attempt by BRG to explain the reduction of the DR to ~ 1.00 in the operational seeding period by the suppression due to pollution have been disproved by Alpert et al. (2008, 2009) and also fail to explain the sharp decline of the target/control ratio right at the beginning of the operational seeding period when

  19. 34 CFR 303.15 - Include; including.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Include; including. 303.15 Section 303.15 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EARLY INTERVENTION PROGRAM FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS...

  20. Characterization of Paper Heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Considine, John M.

    Paper and paperboard are the most widely-used green materials in the world because they are renewable, recyclable, reusable, and compostable. Continued and expanded use of these materials and their potential use in new products requires a comprehensive understanding of the variability of their mechanical properties. This work develops new methods to characterize the mechanical properties of heterogeneous materials through a combination of techniques in experimental mechanics, materials science and numerical analysis. Current methods to analyze heterogeneous materials focus on crystalline materials or polymer-crystalline composites, where material boundaries are usually distinct. This work creates a methodology to analyze small, continuously-varying stiffness gradients in 100% polymer systems and is especially relevant to paper materials where factors influencing heterogeneity include local mass, fiber orientation, individual pulp fiber properties, local density, and drying restraint. A unique approach was used to understand the effect of heterogeneity on paper tensile strength. Additional variation was intentionally introduced, in the form of different size holes, and their effect on strength was measured. By modifying two strength criteria, an estimate of strength in the absence of heterogeneity was determined. In order to characterize stiffness heterogeneity, a novel load fixture was developed to excite full-field normal and shear strains for anisotropic stiffness determination. Surface strains were measured with digital image correlation and were analyzed with the VFM (Virtual Fields Method). This approach led to VFM-identified stiffnesses that were similar to values determined by conventional tests. The load fixture and VFM analyses were used to measure local stiffness and local stiffness variation on heterogeneous anisotropic materials. The approach was validated on simulated heterogeneous materials and was applied experimentally to three different paperboards

  1. Higher Education Amendments of 1998. Report of the Committee on Education and the Workforce. House of Representatives on H.R. 6, Together with Additional and Dissenting Views (Including Cost Estimate of the Congressional Budget Office). House of Representatives, 105th Congress, 2d Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and the Workforce.

    This volume presents the report of the Committee on Education and the Workforce regarding the Higher Education Amendments of 1998, including additional and dissenting views. The report, which features both the text of the amendments and the Committee's review of them, covers the following sections of the proposed legislation (H.R. 6), set to go…

  2. Electronic Paper Turns the Page.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Charles C.

    2001-01-01

    Documents the development of electronic paper focusing on significant events and inventors. Includes a graphic of the process of making electronic paper. Illustrates the multidisciplinary nature of the development of electronic paper. (DDR)

  3. A Review of Paper Quality and Paper Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, John C.

    1981-01-01

    Studies involving condition of paper in libraries are reviewed, noting the folding endurance test, paper quality, and the work of William Barrow in field of conservation and production of long-lasting paper. The theory of paper-making, types of degradation, and treatments for acid paper are included. Sixty references are cited. (EJS)

  4. Ultrathin metallized PBI paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chenevey, E. C.

    1978-01-01

    A study to determine the feasibility of preparing ultrathin papers with a target weight of 3.5 g/m squared from polybenzimidazole (PBI) fibrids was undertaken. Small hand sheets of target weight were fabricated. They were light brown, low density materials with sufficient strength to be readily handleable. Characterization of these sheets included strength, fold endurance, thermal gravimetric analysis in air and nitrogen and photomicrographs. Two different batches of PBI fibrids were studied and differences in fabrication performance were noted. In neither case could target weight papers be prepared using conventional paper making techniques.

  5. Nanotechnology in paper electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna; Österbacka, Professor Ronald; Han, Jin-Woo, Dr

    2014-03-01

    The ability to put cutting edge technology on paper—not in words but in a working physical form—has been attracting an increasing number of researchers over the past decade. Paper has many advantages that make it attractive for flexible electronics: it is relatively environmentally benign; it is renewable; it can be recycled; it is light weight; production processes for paper are well advanced; and it is inexpensive. This special issue, with guest editors Ronald Österbacka from Åbo Akademi University in Finland and Jin-Woo Han from the NASA AMES Research Center, features some of the latest in paper electronics research, including developments towards applications in displays, sensing and alternative energy sources, as well as fundamental studies to further our understanding of how paper can be most effectively used in electronics. As Andrew Steckl and colleagues in the US point out, 'Cellulose-based paper substrates were implemented as an electronic substrate as early as 1969, with most advancement occurring in the past decade largely due to technology improvements in thin film deposition and organic materials' [1, 2]. They report a detailed comparison between paper, standard liquid crystal display rigid glass and flexible glass for hosting pentacene organic thin film transistors, and obtain promising results for future paper-based devices. As most meaningful electronic devices rely on transistors to function, transistors feature quite prominently in this special issue. Rodrigo Martins and colleagues in France and Portugal study the effect of fibre type, structure and dimension on paper-based transistors and reveal further insights into how paper properties affect device performance [3]. Qing Wan and colleagues in China bring the state of the art in transistor technology to paper substrates [4], fabricating indium-zinc-oxide (IZO)-based protonic/electronic hybrid thin film transistors on paper and showing that they can be used as artificial synapses. Like the

  6. Library Services. Miscellaneous Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on library journal cooperation, interlibrary lending, library services to minorities, and school library media centers, which were presented at the 1983 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference, include: (1) "The Co-operation between Editors of Library Journals in Socialist Countries," in which Wolfgang Korluss…

  7. CLE Working Papers 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southampton Univ. (England). Centre for Language Education.

    The purpose of these working papers is to reflect the current activities of members of the Centre for Language in Education at the University of Southampton, England. They include: (1) "Inaugural Lecture: Is Language Education or Is Education Language?" (Christopher Brumfit); (2) "Teachers' Views of Language Knowledge" (Rosamond Mitchell and Janet…

  8. Regional Activities Division. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on library network activities in Canada, the Third World, Japan, Malaysia, Brazil, and Sweden which were presented at the 1982 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) "Canada: A Voluntary and Flexible Network," a review by Guy Sylvestre of the political, social, and economic structures affecting…

  9. Retooling for an aging America: building the healthcare workforce. A white paper regarding implementation of recommendation 4.2 of this Institute of Medicine Report of April 14, 2008, that "All licensure, certification and maintenance of certification for healthcare professionals should include demonstration of competence in care of older adults as a criterion.".

    PubMed

    2011-08-01

    In Chicago, Illinois, on May 7, 2009, a group of 53 medical educators representing many U.S. certification boards, residency review committees, and medical societies met to review and approve a white paper intended to promote Recommendation 4.2 of the Institute of Medicine report of April 14, 2008, "Retooling for an Aging America: Building the Healthcare Workforce." This recommendation is one of 14 and states: "All licensure, certification and maintenance of certification for healthcare professionals should include demonstration of competence in care of older adults as a criterion." Background information given included the growing numbers of older adults, review of a 15-year initiative by a section of the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) to include geriatric education in all surgical and some related medical specialties, a recent announcement of 26 elder care competencies to be expected of graduating medical students from association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) affiliated schools, and the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) approach to 'Reinforcing Geriatric Competencies through Licensure and Certification Examinations." Nine points involved in the implementation of this recommendation received discussion, and approaches to realization were presented. In conclusion, this white paper, which those listed as being in attendance approved, proposes hat all ABMS member boards whose diplomates participate in the care of older adults select the floor competencies enumerated by the AAMC that apply to their specialty and add or subtract those completed during their trainees' initial (intern) year and then define those needed in subsequent years of residency and ultimate practice. This would fulfill the requirements of Recommendation 4.2 above. PMID:21797833

  10. The Rayleigh Papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Thomas; Bederson, Benjamin

    2005-04-01

    The Third Lord Rayleigh (1842-1919), aka John William Strutt, was among the most stellar physicists of the Nineteenth Century, in both theory and experiment. He spent most of his mature years in his own laboratory, self-funded, on his family estate. One of the consequences was the fact that all of his papers remained at the estate upon his death. After his son's (Robert John Strutt, 1875-1947) death both their scientific papers ended up on the auction block. (Robert John was himself an atmospheric physicist.) Part of the Strutt collection went to the Burndy Library of the Dibner Institute at MIT, but most landed in the library at the US Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratory (now the Air Force Research Laboratory at Hansom AFB), purchased from the auctioneer out of library funds, for 9,000. The individual most responsible for preserving these papers was John N. Howard, the laboratory Chief Scientist, who was a founding editor of the journal Applied Optics. Recently the authors examined first hand the Rayleigh papers. Included in these are a complete set of his handwritten scientific notes, taken over the period 1862-1919, from the time he was a student at Trinity College, Cambridge until just months before his death. We will show a number of interesting examples from these notes, including his first identification of argon, as well as some other fascinating items from the collection.

  11. Mechanical performance improvement of electroactive papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaehwan; Seo, Yung B.; Jung, Eunmi

    2001-07-01

    Electro-Active Paper (EAPap) is a paper that produces large displacement with small force under electrical excitation. EAPap is made with a chemically treated paper by bonding thin aluminum foils on both sides of the paper to comprise electrodes. When electric voltage is applied on the electrodes the EAPap produces bending displacement. However, the displacement output has been unstable and degraded with time scale. To improve the bending performance of EAPap, different paper fibers-broad-leaf, needle-leaf, bacteria cellulose and Korean traditional paper, and additive chemicals are tested. It was observed that needle-leaf paper exhibits better results then others. By eliminating the effect of adhesive layer and selecting a proper paper fiber, the displacement output has been stable with long time scale. The operational principle of EAPap is, we believe, based on the electrostriction effect associated with intermolecular interaction of the constituents of the paper. To confirm this result, more investigation of the paper quality should be followed in the beginning of paper manufacturing process. Since EAPaps are quite simple to fabricate and lightweight, various applications including flexible speakers, active sound absorbing materials and smart shape control devices can be possible.

  12. [Discussion paper participation research].

    PubMed

    Farin, Erik

    2012-12-01

    This contribution introduces the "Diskussionspapier Teilhabeforschung" (discussion paper participation research) of the German Association for Rehabilitation (DVfR) and German Society for Rehabilitation Science (DGRW). The aim of this paper is to more clearly define current scientific research activity on the subject of participation and the significance of interdisciplinary participation research. The authors emphasise the desirability of a stronger scientific basis for instruments designed to improve the participation of disabled individuals. The paper is meant to be understood as an initial basis for the discussion about participation research development, and the authors are open to suggestions and elaboration.Participation research is understood in this discussion paper as an interdisciplinary research field with 7 goals and characteristics: 1. focussing on participation and self-determination; 2. contextual approach (taking environmental and personal factors into consideration that affect participation); 3. the participation of disabled persons in participation research; 4. interdisciplinary cooperation; 5. involving organisations and institutions whose approaches to participation research overlap; 6. referring to social and healthcare policies; 7. national and international orientations.The authors discuss the rationale behind increasing the support for participation research and theoretical models thereof. Fundamental concepts with high relevance to participation research include the biopsychosocial model of the International Classification of Functionality, Disability and Health (ICF), the inclusion concept, empowerment concept, and capabilities concept. The authors conclude their paper with recommendations for strengthening the research funding for participation research, and specify concrete steps toward greater participation research. PMID:23235948

  13. Multifunctional fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Baillargeon, D.J.; Cardis, A.B.; Heck, D.B.

    1991-03-26

    This paper discusses a composition comprising a major amount of a liquid hydrocarbyl fuel and a minor low-temperature flow properties improving amount of an additive product of the reaction of a suitable diol and product of a benzophenone tetracarboxylic dianhydride and a long-chain hydrocarbyl aminoalcohol.

  14. Nanotechnology in paper electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna; Österbacka, Professor Ronald; Han, Jin-Woo, Dr

    2014-03-01

    The ability to put cutting edge technology on paper—not in words but in a working physical form—has been attracting an increasing number of researchers over the past decade. Paper has many advantages that make it attractive for flexible electronics: it is relatively environmentally benign; it is renewable; it can be recycled; it is light weight; production processes for paper are well advanced; and it is inexpensive. This special issue, with guest editors Ronald Österbacka from Åbo Akademi University in Finland and Jin-Woo Han from the NASA AMES Research Center, features some of the latest in paper electronics research, including developments towards applications in displays, sensing and alternative energy sources, as well as fundamental studies to further our understanding of how paper can be most effectively used in electronics. As Andrew Steckl and colleagues in the US point out, 'Cellulose-based paper substrates were implemented as an electronic substrate as early as 1969, with most advancement occurring in the past decade largely due to technology improvements in thin film deposition and organic materials' [1, 2]. They report a detailed comparison between paper, standard liquid crystal display rigid glass and flexible glass for hosting pentacene organic thin film transistors, and obtain promising results for future paper-based devices. As most meaningful electronic devices rely on transistors to function, transistors feature quite prominently in this special issue. Rodrigo Martins and colleagues in France and Portugal study the effect of fibre type, structure and dimension on paper-based transistors and reveal further insights into how paper properties affect device performance [3]. Qing Wan and colleagues in China bring the state of the art in transistor technology to paper substrates [4], fabricating indium-zinc-oxide (IZO)-based protonic/electronic hybrid thin film transistors on paper and showing that they can be used as artificial synapses. Like the

  15. Additive usage levels.

    PubMed

    Langlais, R

    1996-01-01

    With the adoption of the European Parliament and Council Directives on sweeteners, colours and miscellaneous additives the Commission is now embarking on the project of coordinating the activities of the European Union Member States in the collection of the data that are to make up the report on food additive intake requested by the European Parliament. This presentation looks at the inventory of available sources on additive use levels and concludes that for the time being national legislation is still the best source of information considering that the directives have yet to be transposed into national legislation. Furthermore, this presentation covers the correlation of the food categories as found in the additives directives with those used by national consumption surveys and finds that in a number of instances this correlation still leaves a lot to be desired. The intake of additives via food ingestion and the intake of substances which are chemically identical to additives but which occur naturally in fruits and vegetables is found in a number of cases to be higher than the intake of additives added during the manufacture of foodstuffs. While the difficulties are recognized in contributing to the compilation of food additive intake data, industry as a whole, i.e. the food manufacturing and food additive manufacturing industries, are confident that in a concerted effort, use data on food additives by industry can be made available. Lastly, the paper points out that with the transportation of the additives directives into national legislation and the time by which the food industry will be able to make use of the new food legislative environment several years will still go by; food additives use data by the food industry will thus have to be reviewed at the beginning of the next century. PMID:8792135

  16. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    DOEpatents

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  17. Surfactants on cleanup detail in paper mills

    SciTech Connect

    Longhini, D.

    1996-06-01

    From pulp production to paper coating, surfactants are involved in almost every facet of pulp and paper manufacturing. Within the industry, the role of surface-active agents is growing every larger with the demand for recycled paper. In the US, for example, The American Forest and Paper Assn. has established an ambitious goal of recovering 50% of the paper used in the US by 2000. By then, paper producers in North America are expected to have invested more than $10 billion in recycling equipment, and be spending more than $300 million/yr on drinking chemicals, including surfactants. Surfactants will also serve the industry indirectly, as additives in the production and formulation of products sold to the paper industry, including biocides, retention aids and water-treatment polymers. Providing higher-quality paper while reducing dependence on virgin pulp, requires manufacturing technologies and process chemicals that can restore wastepaper to its original state. Achieving those goals will depend on the development of novel surfactants through close collaboration with mill customers, and pioneering research in surface science, polymer engineering and organic chemistry.

  18. Optical modulator including grapene

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  19. Possibilities of Laser Processing of Paper Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, Alexander; Saukkonen, Esa; Piili, Heidi

    Nowadays, lasers are applied in many industrial processes: the most developed technologies include such processes as laser welding, hybrid welding, laser cutting of steel, etc. In addition to laser processing of metallic materials, there are also many industrial applications of laser processing of non-metallic materials, like laser welding of polymers, laser marking of glass and laser cutting of wood-based materials. It is commonly known that laser beam is suitable for cutting of paper materials as well as all natural wood-fiber based materials. This study reveals the potential and gives overview of laser application in processing of paper materials. In 1990's laser technology increased its volume in papermaking industry; lasers at paper industry gained acceptance for different perforating and scoring applications. Nowadays, with reduction in the cost of equipment and development of laser technology (especially development of CO2 technology), laser processing of paper material has started to become more widely used and more efficient. However, there exists quite little published research results and reviews about laser processing of paper materials. In addition, forest industry products with pulp and paper products in particular are among major contributors for the Finnish economy with 20% share of total exports in the year 2013. This has been the standpoint of view and motivation for writing this literature review article: when there exists more published research work, knowledge of laser technology can be increased to apply it for processing of paper materials.

  20. INTRODUCTION Summary of Papers Summary of Papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Serge; Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2010-12-01

    review various aspects of Turbulent Mixing that were discussed at the Second International Conference and Advanced School 'Turbulent Mixing and Beyond', TMB-2009, held in summer 2009 at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, Italy. The papers are arranged by TMB themes and within each theme they are ordered alphabetically by the last name of the first author, with tutorials following research contributions. Canonical turbulence and turbulent mixing. The theme of canonical turbulence and turbulent mixing is considered by several authors. Casciola et al investigate the dynamics of inertial particles dispersed in a turbulent jet and compare their numerical modeling results with the classical similarity theory of the jet far-field. Remarkable agreement is found between the theory and the direct numerical simulations (DNS), including decay of Stokes numbers with the distance from the origin, self-similarity of the mean axial particle velocity profile, etc. Nagata considers complex turbulent flows, which are known to exhibit no linear critical point for the laminar states, and which are linearly stable at finite Reynolds numbers. Square duct flow and sliding Couette flow in an annulus are considered and nonlinear traveling-wave states are found for the flows with the use of the homotopy approach developed by the author. These states may constitute a skeleton around which a time-dependent trajectory in the phase space is organized. Teitelbaum and Mininni study a decaying 3D incompressible turbulence, which mimicks turbulent mixing in geophysical flows, with rotation rendering the flow anisotropic at large scales. The authors analyze three DNS results (without and with rotation, and with helicity), observe a decoupling of the modes normal to the rotation axis, and show that the helicity decreases the decay rate of turbulence. Wang and Peters investigate the structure of turbulence by studying strain rates of various scalars, including a

  1. FY 1978 scientific and technical reports, articles, papers, and presentations. [bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, O. L. (Compiler)

    1978-01-01

    Abstracts of 73 technical papers published or presented by MSFC personnel in FY-78 are presented. In addition, over 400 papers by contractors to that facility are listed along with the STAR document number for each report. Titles of 208 additional papers already cleared for publication are included.

  2. Recent Advances in Paper-Based Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Liana, Devi D.; Raguse, Burkhard; Gooding, J. Justin; Chow, Edith

    2012-01-01

    Paper-based sensors are a new alternative technology for fabricating simple, low-cost, portable and disposable analytical devices for many application areas including clinical diagnosis, food quality control and environmental monitoring. The unique properties of paper which allow passive liquid transport and compatibility with chemicals/biochemicals are the main advantages of using paper as a sensing platform. Depending on the main goal to be achieved in paper-based sensors, the fabrication methods and the analysis techniques can be tuned to fulfill the needs of the end-user. Current paper-based sensors are focused on microfluidic delivery of solution to the detection site whereas more advanced designs involve complex 3-D geometries based on the same microfluidic principles. Although paper-based sensors are very promising, they still suffer from certain limitations such as accuracy and sensitivity. However, it is anticipated that in the future, with advances in fabrication and analytical techniques, that there will be more new and innovative developments in paper-based sensors. These sensors could better meet the current objectives of a viable low-cost and portable device in addition to offering high sensitivity and selectivity, and multiple analyte discrimination. This paper is a review of recent advances in paper-based sensors and covers the following topics: existing fabrication techniques, analytical methods and application areas. Finally, the present challenges and future outlooks are discussed. PMID:23112667

  3. Profiles in garbage: Office paper

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.

    1998-04-01

    The primary markets for recycled office paper are tissue mills, printing and writing paper, and paperboard packaging. Other uses include exports and newsprint. As recently as 1990, more than half of recovered office paper was exported, primarily to paper mills in Pacific Rim countries. This decade has seen an increase in the number of mills using deinked market pulp made from office paper. North American capacity to produce deinked market pulp skyrocketed in the first half of this decade. However, oversupply in the end markets for office paper led to financial problems and shutdown for several of these new mills.

  4. Paper fiber studies for electroactive papers acuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaehwan; Youn, Sung-Yul; Seo, Yung B.

    2003-07-01

    Electro-Active Paper (EAPap) has been interested due to its possibility for developing a new EAP material that has merits in terms of lightweight, dry condition, large displacement output, low actuation voltage and low power consumption. The possibility of EAPap can be proved by investigating the operational principle more thoroughly and by demonstrating a niche application. So far the working principle is believed to be a migration effect of moistures and some chemical contents in the paper. However this is not completely understood yet. Therefore, this paper will present basic studies of paper fibers for EAPap in terms of fibrous nature, their crystallinity, and mechanical, physical and electrochemical characteristics. These results will be able to summarize the migration effect and the direction for improving the performance of EAPap will be shown. Since the power requirement of EAPap is so small that it can be activated by remote microwave power, which is promising for making flying objects.

  5. Electro-active paper actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaehwan; Seo, Yung B.

    2002-06-01

    In this paper, the actuation mechanism of electro-active paper (EAPap) actuators is addressed and the potential of the actuators is demonstrated. EAPap is a paper that produces large displacement with small force under an electrical excitation. EAPap is made with a chemically treated paper by constructing thin electrodes on both sides of the paper. When electrical voltage is applied on the electrodes the EAPap produces bending displacement. However, the displacement output has been unstable and degraded with timescale. To improve the bending performance of EAPap, different paper fibers - softwood, hardwood, bacteria cellulose, cellophane, carbon mixture paper, electrolyte containing paper and Korean traditional paper, in conjunction with additive chemicals, were tested. Two attempts were made to construct the electrodes: the direct use of aluminum foil and the gold sputtering technique. It was found that a cellophane paper exhibits a remarkable bending performance. When 2 MV m-1 excitation voltage was applied to the paper actuator, more than 3 mm tip displacement was observed from the 30 mm long paper beam. This is quite a low excitation voltage compared with that of other EAPs. Details of the experiments and results are addressed.

  6. Fuel and Additive Characterization for HCCI Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S M; Flowers, D; Martinez-Frias, J; Espinosa-Loza, F; Pitz, W J; Dibble, R

    2003-02-12

    This paper shows a numerical evaluation of fuels and additives for HCCl combustion. First, a long list of candidate HCCl fuels is selected. For all the fuels in the list, operating conditions (compression ratio, equivalence ratio and intake temperature) are determined that result in optimum performance under typical operation for a heavy-duty engine. Fuels are also characterized by presenting Log(p)-Log(T) maps for multiple fuels under HCCl conditions. Log(p)-Log(T) maps illustrate important processes during HCCl engine operation, including compression, low temperature heat release and ignition. Log(p)-Log(T) diagrams can be used for visualizing these processes and can be used as a tool for detailed analysis of HCCl combustion. The paper also includes a ranking of many potential additives. Experiments and analyses have indicated that small amounts (a few parts per million) of secondary fuels (additives) may considerably affect HCCl combustion and may play a significant role in controlling HCCl combustion. Additives are ranked according to their capability to advance HCCl ignition. The best additives are listed and an explanation of their effect on HCCl combustion is included.

  7. York Papers in Linguistics 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlow, S. J., Ed.; Warner, A. R., Ed.

    Papers on a variety of linguistic topics include six papers from a Festschrift and nine others, as follows: "Attitudes Towards English as a Possible Lingua Franca in Switzerland" (Urs Durmuller); "Functional Stability and Structural Levelling of Dialects: The Case of Maastricht" (Anton M. Hagen, Henk Munstermann); "On the Limits of Auditory…

  8. Working Papers on Contract Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Robert; And Others

    Included in this package are: a copy of a learning contract between two students; an abstract fulfilling part of the contract objectives; and six papers on the topic of contract education. The goal of the learning contract was to edit and prepare for publication "Working Papers on Contract Education". The credential awarded for satisfactory…

  9. Teaching and Research in International Law in Asia and the Pacific. Report of a Regional Consultation Meeting Including Nine Country Status Surveys (Seoul, Republic of Korea, October 10-13, 1984). Social and Human Sciences in Asia and the Pacific. RUSHSAP Series on Occasional Monographs and Papers, 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and the Pacific.

    Information on teaching and research in international law for countries of the Asia-Pacific region is presented in proceedings of a 1984 conference sponsored by the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization. In addition to a regional overview, suggestions are offered for promoting regional cooperation in international law.…

  10. Thousand Papers and Counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-04-01

    The ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) has just passed an impressive milestone with the publication of the 1,000th peer-reviewed scientific article based on data from the world's largest and most advanced optical and near-infrared telescope. "This remarkable landmark, reached in only six years of operations is another clear demonstration of the unique capabilities of this telescope, a true flagship in European research that is continuously opening new horizons in astrophysics", says Catherine Cesarsky, ESO Director General. The number of scientific papers quantifies the success of an observatory. The passing of this milestone demonstrates the excellent acceptance of the VLT and its instrumentation by the astronomers. For Alvio Renzini, VLT Programme Scientist: "It is exhilarating to see how well the astronomical community has made use of the capabilities offered by the VLT and VLTI. The astronomers are fully exploiting the unique flexibility of the VLT, which with four telescopes and ten instruments permanently mounted offers at any time a set of observational opportunities that has no parallel at any other observatory worldwide. This explains the still increasing demand of observing time, and only one out of four or five submitted research proposals can be given observing time." In 2004 alone, 338 refereed papers using VLT data appeared. This corresponds to almost one new scientific paper being published per day, an increase of more than 25% compared to the previous year. The Very Large Telescope comprises four 8.2-m reflecting Unit Telescopes (UTs) and will in due time also include four moving 1.8-m Auxiliary Telescopes (ATs), two of which have successfully passed their first tests in January 2004 and February 2005 (see ESO PR 01/04 and ESO PR 06/05). In routine operation since April 1, 1999 when the first Unit Telescope became operational, the VLT has grown to include all four Unit Telescopes. The instrument suite covers most wavelengths accessible from the ground

  11. Outstanding student paper awards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Hydrology Section presented five outstanding student paper awards at the 1999 Spring Meeting in Boston, Massachusetts, last June.Maneesha Joshi presented a poster titled “Estimation of the Extent and Duration of Melt on the Greenland Ice Sheet using an Edge Detection Technique on Passive Microwave Data.” She received her B.Tech. in civil engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay in 1991, and a M.S. in environmental engineering from State University of New York, Buffalo in 1994. Maneesha expects to complete her Ph.D. in civil engineering (remote sensing) in September 1999, under the supervision of Carolyn Merry (Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering & Geodetic Science), Ken Jezek, and John Bolzan (Byrd Polar Research Center) at the Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Her thesis focuses on estimating the extent of melt, melt season, and duration, and absorbed radiation on the Greenland ice sheet from passive microwave and SAR data. Maneesha's other interests include image processing, issues related to global climate change, and photogrammetry.

  12. Writing a Research Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikk, Jaan

    2006-01-01

    The value of research and the career of a university lecturer depend heavily on the success in publishing scientific papers. This article reviews the guidelines for writing and submitting research papers. The three most important success criteria in publishing are as follows: the paper describes a good research, it is written according to the…

  13. The physics of paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alava, Mikko; Niskanen, Kaarlo

    2006-03-01

    Paper is a material known to everybody. It has a network structure consisting of wood fibres that can be mimicked by cooking a portion of spaghetti and pouring it on a plate, to form a planar assembly of fibres that lie roughly horizontal. Real paper also contains other constituents added for technical purposes. This review has two main lines of thought. First, in the introductory part, we consider the physics that one encounters when 'using' paper, an everyday material that exhibits the presence of disorder. Questions arise, for instance, as to why some papers are opaque and others translucent, some are sturdy and others sloppy, some readily absorb drops of liquid while others resist the penetration of water. The mechanical and rheological properties of paper and paperboard are also interesting. They are inherently dependent on moisture content. In humid conditions paper is ductile and soft, in dry conditions brittle and hard. In the second part we explain in more detail research problems concerned with paper. We start with paper structure. Paper is made by dewatering a suspension of fibres starting from very low content of solids. The processes of aggregation, sedimentation and clustering are familiar from statistical mechanics. Statistical growth models or packing models can simulate paper formation well and teach a lot about its structure. The second research area that we consider is the elastic and viscoelastic properties and fracture of paper and paperboard. This has traditionally been the strongest area of paper physics. There are many similarities to, but also important differences from, composite materials. Paper has proved to be convenient test material for new theories in statistical fracture mechanics. Polymer physics and memory effects are encountered when studying creep and stress relaxation in paper. Water is a 'softener' of paper. In humid conditions, the creep rate of paper is much higher than in dry conditions. The third among our topics is the

  14. Paper Sizes and Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Mestre, Neville

    2007-01-01

    Reams of paper come in a standardised system of related sheet sizes. Most people are familiar with the international paper sizes A4, A3 and B4, but there are others. The ratio of the sides of any sheet in the series is such that if the paper is cut or folded in half on itself then the ratio of the sides remains unchanged. Due to this property of…

  15. Perspectives on Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourell, David L.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has skyrocketed in visibility commercially and in the public sector. This article describes the development of this field from early layered manufacturing approaches of photosculpture, topography, and material deposition. Certain precursors to modern AM processes are also briefly described. The growth of the field over the last 30 years is presented. Included is the standard delineation of AM technologies into seven broad categories. The economics of AM part generation is considered, and the impacts of the economics on application sectors are described. On the basis of current trends, the future outlook will include a convergence of AM fabricators, mass-produced AM fabricators, enabling of topology optimization designs, and specialization in the AM legal arena. Long-term developments with huge impact are organ printing and volume-based printing.

  16. Protein crystallization with paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Miki; Kakinouchi, Keisuke; Adachi, Hiroaki; Maruyama, Mihoko; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Sano, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y.; Takahashi, Yoshinori; Yoshimura, Masashi; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Murakami, Satoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Takano, Kazufumi

    2016-05-01

    We developed a new protein crystallization method that incorporates paper. A small piece of paper, such as facial tissue or KimWipes, was added to a drop of protein solution in the traditional sitting drop vapor diffusion technique, and protein crystals grew by incorporating paper. By this method, we achieved the growth of protein crystals with reducing osmotic shock. Because the technique is very simple and the materials are easy to obtain, this method will come into wide use for protein crystallization. In the future, it could be applied to nanoliter-scale crystallization screening on a paper sheet such as in inkjet printing.

  17. Paper microzone plates.

    PubMed

    Carrilho, Emanuel; Phillips, Scott T; Vella, Sarah J; Martinez, Andres W; Whitesides, George M

    2009-08-01

    This paper describes 96- and 384-microzone plates fabricated in paper as alternatives to conventional multiwell plates fabricated in molded polymers. Paper-based plates are functionally related to plastic well plates, but they offer new capabilities. For example, paper-microzone plates are thin (approximately 180 microm), require small volumes of sample (5 microL per zone), and can be manufactured from inexpensive materials ($0.05 per plate). The paper-based plates are fabricated by patterning sheets of paper, using photolithography, into hydrophilic zones surrounded by hydrophobic polymeric barriers. This photolithography used an inexpensive formulation photoresist that allows rapid (approximately 15 min) prototyping of paper-based plates. These plates are compatible with conventional microplate readers for quantitative absorbance and fluorescence measurements. The limit of detection per zone loaded for fluorescence was 125 fmol for fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled bovine serum albumin, and this level corresponds to 0.02 the quantity of analyte per well used to achieve comparable signal-to-noise in a 96-well plastic plate (using a solution of 25 nM labeled protein). The limits of detection for absorbance on paper was approximately 50 pmol per zone for both Coomassie Brilliant Blue and Amaranth dyes; these values were 0.4 that required for the plastic plate. Demonstration of quantitative colorimetric correlations using a scanner or camera to image the zones and to measure the intensity of color, makes it possible to conduct assays without a microplate reader. PMID:19572563

  18. Crepe Paper Colorimetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pringle, David L.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Uses crepe paper for the introduction of spectrophotometric concepts. Dyes used in the manufacturing of the crepe paper dissolve rapidly in water to produce solutions of colors. The variety of colors provides spectra in the visible spectrum that allow students to grasp concepts of absorption and transmission. (AIM)

  19. The Mock Research Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Carlton

    2008-01-01

    The mock research paper combines creative writing with academic writing and, in the process, breaks down that binary. This article describes a writing assignment that offers an introduction to the college research paper genre. This assignment helps students focus on crafting an argument and learning genre conventions while postponing until the…

  20. Updating the Research Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liepolt, Werner

    2005-01-01

    For more than 30 years, Staples High School (Westport, Connecticut) juniors have undertaken a major research paper. Their English teachers supervise this project-based unit and get feedback about the preparation students feel they have gotten in research and in writing. Students used to be taught to use notebooks, paper, pencil, and index cards…

  1. Paper Highlight — Site

    Cancer.gov

    In a recent paper published in Cancer Cell, ICBP investigators at the University of Texas Health Science Center, want to provide the potential mechanistic explanation how the known 20q13 and 17q23 amplicons transcriptionally control gene expression through long-range chromatin proximity. This paper describes how different large sets of data can be integrated for finding new biological mechanisms.

  2. A Paper Pistol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Martin

    2002-10-01

    In his diary, Lewis Carroll speaks of making what he called paper pistols for his child friends. The pistol is best folded from a single sheet of newspaper as shown in the illustration. When held at one corner and swung rapidly through the air, a portion of the paper pops out with a loud bang.

  3. TRICHLOROETHYLENE (TCE) ISSUE PAPERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    These issue papers are a part of EPA's effort to develop a trichloroethylene (TCE) human health risk assessment. These issue papers were developed by EPA to provide scientific and technical information to the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) for use in developing their advice ...

  4. "Are You Paper?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimbrough, Walter M.

    2004-01-01

    "Paper" was the term created in the late 1980s and early 1990s when Black fraternities and sororities first began to shorten their pledge periods, subsequently abolishing pledging in 1990. Paper signified a person who completed the membership intake process without pledging. Essentially, they followed the rules of the national organization as…

  5. EDITORIAL: MST Best Paper Award for 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Patrick

    2005-12-01

    pressure and flow measurements on aircraft structures in wind tunnels. The luminescence from the molecular sensor can be quenched by oxygen, giving a luminescence intensity inversely proportional to quencher concentration and hence air pressure. Quenching occurs on the 10 µs timescale, allowing use in unsteady pressure measurement situations. The paper is well organized and clearly written, with a good introduction to the principle of the sensor technique and its application, together with a clear description of the techniques needed to produce good sensitivity by means of luminophore adsorption to enhanced surface area offered by porous anodized aluminium. The paper considers theoretical aspects of the sensor time response, both in respect of luminescence lifetime and also gas permeation in a micropore. The experimental responses for two types of pressure fluctuation are presented. These include a pressure-jump apparatus by means of a fast opening valve on the millisecond timescale, and a shock tube system capable of microsecond resolution using a CCD array. In addition, coating intensity versus pressure and temperature relations, together with photodegradation, have been studied. Thus the paper reports a good combination of multidisciplinary activities necessary to develop and test a simple sensor capable of widespread application. The paper cites up-to-date references to prior art, has a good quality rating from the referees and significant downloads. We therefore recommend this paper for the MST 2004 Best Paper Award. The paper that came a close second was 'Micromachined strain gauges for the determination of liquid flow friction coefficients in microchannels' by R Baviere and F Ayela, 15 377-383 (2004)

  6. Paper surfaces for metal nanoparticle inkjet printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öhlund, Thomas; Örtegren, Jonas; Forsberg, Sven; Nilsson, Hans-Erik

    2012-10-01

    The widespread usage of paper and board offer largely unexploited possibilities for printed electronics applications. Reliability and performance of printed devices on comparatively rough and inhomogenous surfaces of paper does however pose challenges. Silver nanoparticle ink has been deposited on ten various paper substrates by inkjet printing. The papers are commercially available, and selected over a range of different types and construction. A smooth nonporous polyimide film was included as a nonporous reference substrate. The substrates have been characterized in terms of porosity, absorption rate, apparent surface energy, surface roughness and material content. The electrical conductivity of the resulting printed films have been measured after drying at 60 °C and again after additional curing at 110 °C. A qualitative analysis of the conductivity differences on the different substrates based on surface characterization and SEM examination is presented. Measurable parameters of importance to the final conductivity are pointed out, some of which are crucial to achieve conductivity. When certain criteria of the surfaces are met, paper media can be used as low cost, but comparably high performance substrates for metal nanoparticle inks in printed electronics applications.

  7. IAF 15 Draft Paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menkin, Evgeny; Juillerat, Robert

    2015-01-01

    With the International Space Station Program transition from assembly to utilization, focus has been placed on the optimization of essential resources. This includes resources both resupplied from the ground and also resources produced by the ISS. In an effort to improve the use of two of these, the ISS Engineering teams, led by the ISS Program Systems Engineering and Integration Office, undertook an effort to modify the techniques use to perform several key on-orbit events. The primary purposes of this endeavor was to make the ISS more efficient in the use of the Russian-supplied fuel for the propulsive attitude control system and also to minimize the impacts to available ISS power due to the positioning of the ISS solar arrays. Because the ISS solar arrays are sensitive to several factors that are present when propulsive attitude control is used, they must be operated in a manner to protect them from damage. This results in periods of time where the arrays must be positioned, rather than autonomously tracking the sun, resulting in negative impacts to power generated by the solar arrays and consumed by both the ISS core systems and payload customers. A reduction in the number and extent of the events each year that require the ISS to use propulsive attitude control simultaneously accomplishes both these goals. Each instance where the ISS solar arrays normal sun tracking mode must be interrupted represent a need for some level of powerdown of equipment. As the magnitude of payload power requirements increases, and the efficiency of the ISS solar arrays decreases, these powerdowns caused by array positioning, will likely become more significant and could begin to negatively impact the payload operations. Through efforts such as this, the total number of events each year that require positioning of the arrays to unfavorable positions for power generation, in order to protect them against other constraints, are reduced. Optimization of propulsive events and

  8. Papers in Syntax. Working Papers in Linguistics No. 42.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kathol, Andreas, Ed.; Pollard, Carl, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This collection of working papers in syntax includes: "Null Objects in Mandarin Chinese" (Christie Block); "Toward a Linearization-Based Approach to Word Order Variation in Japanese" (Mike Calcagno); "A Lexical Approach to Inalienable Possession Constructions in Korean" (Chung, Chan); "Chinese NP Structure" (Gao, Qian); "Linearization and…

  9. Papers in Semantics. Working Papers in Linguistics No. 49.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoon, Jae-Hak, Ed.; Kathol, Andreas, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    Papers on semantic theory and research include: "Presupposition, Congruence, and Adverbs of Quantification" (Mike Calcagno); "A Unified Account of '(Ta)myen'-Conditionals in Korean" (Chan Chung); "Spanish 'imperfecto' and 'preterito': Truth Conditions and Aktionsart Effects in a Situation Semantics" (Alicia Cipria, Craige Roberts); "Remarks on…

  10. Families classification including multiopposition asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milani, Andrea; Spoto, Federica; Knežević, Zoran; Novaković, Bojan; Tsirvoulis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of our new classification of asteroid families, upgraded by using catalog with > 500,000 asteroids. We discuss the outcome of the most recent update of the family list and of their membership. We found enough evidence to perform 9 mergers of the previously independent families. By introducing an improved method of estimation of the expected family growth in the less populous regions (e.g. at high inclination) we were able to reliably decide on rejection of one tiny group as a probable statistical fluke. Thus we reduced our current list to 115 families. We also present newly determined ages for 6 families, including complex 135 and 221, improving also our understanding of the dynamical vs. collisional families relationship. We conclude with some recommendations for the future work and for the family name problem.

  11. CALL FOR PAPERS: Optical solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, P. D.; Haelterman, Marc; Vilaseca, R.

    2003-06-01

    A topical issue of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics will be devoted to recent advances in optical solitons. The topics to be covered will include, but are not limited to: bulletProperties, control and dynamics of temporal solitons bulletProperties, control and dynamics of spatial solitons bulletCavity solitons in passive and active resonators bulletThree-dimensional spatial solitons bulletDark, bright, grey solitons; interface dynamics bulletCompound or vector solitons; incoherent solitons bulletLight and matter solitons in BEC bulletNonlinear localized structures in microstructured and nanostructured materials (photonic crystals, etc) bulletAngular momentum effects associated with localized light structures; vortex solitons bulletQuantum effects associated with localized light structures bulletInteraction of solitons with atoms and other media bulletApplications of optical solitons The DEADLINE for submission of contributions is 31 July 2003 to allow the topical issue to appear in about February 2004. All papers will be peer-reviewed in accordance with the normal refereeing procedures and standards of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics. Advice on publishing your work in the journal may be found at www.iop.org/journals/authors/jopb. Submissions should ideally be in either standard LaTeX form or Microsoft Word. There are no page charges for publication. In addition to the usual 50 free reprints, the corresponding author of each paper published will receive a complimentary copy of the topical issue. Contributions to the topical issue should if possible be submitted electronically at www.iop.org/journals/jopb. or by e-mail to jopb@iop.org. Authors unable to submit online or by e-mail may send hard copy contributions (enclosing the electronic code) to: Dr Claire Bedrock (Publisher), Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics, Institute of Physics Publishing, Dirac House, Temple Back, Bristol BS1 6BE, UK. All

  12. Call for Papers: Cavity QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, W.; Gerard, J.-M.

    2003-06-01

    Cavity QED interactions of light and matter have been investigated in a wide range of systems covering the spectrum from microwaves to optical frequencies, using media as diverse as single atoms and semiconductors. Impressive progress has been achieved technologically as well as conceptually. This topical issue of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics is intended to provide a comprehensive account of the current state of the art of cavity QED by uniting contributions from researchers active across this field. As Guest Editors of this topical issue, we invite manuscripts on current theoretical and experimental work on any aspects of cavity QED. The topics to be covered will include, but are not limited to: bulletCavity QED in optical microcavities bulletSemiconductor cavity QED bulletQuantum dot cavity QED bulletRydberg atoms in microwave cavities bulletPhotonic crystal cavity QED bulletMicrosphere resonators bulletMicrolasers and micromasers bulletMicrodroplets bulletDielectric cavity QED bulletCavity QED-based quantum information processing bulletQuantum state engineering in cavities The DEADLINE for submission of contributions is 31 July 2003 to allow the topical issue to appear in about February 2004. All papers will be peer-reviewed in accordance with the normal refereeing procedures and standards of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics. Advice on publishing your work in the journal may be found at www.iop.org/journals/authors/jopb. Submissions should ideally be in either standard LaTeX form or Microsoft Word. There are no page charges for publication. In addition to the usual 50 free reprints, the corresponding author of each paper published will receive a complimentary copy of the topical issue. Contributions to the topical issue should if possible be submitted electronically at www.iop.org/journals/jopb. or by e-mail to jopb@iop.org. Authors unable to submit online or by e-mail may send hard copy contributions (enclosing the

  13. Comment on the Papers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morawski, Stefan

    1975-01-01

    Author presented his opinion of the positions of San Juan (AA 521 871) and Rudich (AA 521 870) while answering Dickie's comments (AA 521 873) and defending his previous paper (AA 521 872) in this journal. (RK)

  14. Abstracts of contributed papers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This volume contains 571 abstracts of contributed papers to be presented during the Twelfth US National Congress of Applied Mechanics. Abstracts are arranged in the order in which they fall in the program -- the main sessions are listed chronologically in the Table of Contents. The Author Index is in alphabetical order and lists each paper number (matching the schedule in the Final Program) with its corresponding page number in the book.

  15. NASA's Great Observatories: Paper Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This educational brief discusses observatory stations built by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for looking at the universe. This activity for grades 5-12 has students build paper models of the observatories and study their history, features, and functions. Templates for the observatories are included. (MVL)

  16. Response to Prof. Bormuth's Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Rexford

    Responding to John Bormuth's econometric argument for a more balanced program of support for reading and writing instruction, this paper considers some of the reasons that literacy policy has not been formulated in the economically most rational manner. These reasons include the fact that reading instruction has become politicized, the…

  17. Mental Retardation, Selected Conference Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheerenberger, R.C., Ed.

    A compilation of selected papers includes the following: comprehensive diagnostic services; pediatric aspects of diagnosis; psychological evaluation of the severely retarded; use of social competency devices; diagnosis of the adult retarded; programing for the severely retarded; nursery school experiences for the trainable; a practical approach to…

  18. All-printed paper memory.

    PubMed

    Lien, Der-Hsien; Kao, Zhen-Kai; Huang, Teng-Han; Liao, Ying-Chih; Lee, Si-Chen; He, Jr-Hau

    2014-08-26

    We report the memory device on paper by means of an all-printing approach. Using a sequence of inkjet and screen-printing techniques, a simple metal–insulator–metal device structure is fabricated on paper as a resistive random access memory with a potential to reach gigabyte capacities on an A4 paper. The printed-paper-based memory devices (PPMDs) exhibit reproducible switching endurance, reliable retention, tunable memory window, and the capability to operate under extreme bending conditions. In addition, the PBMD can be labeled on electronics or living objects for multifunctional, wearable, on-skin, and biocompatible applications. The disposability and the high-security data storage of the paper-based memory are also demonstrated to show the ease of data handling, which are not achievable for regular silicon-based electronic devices. We envision that the PPMDs manufactured by this cost-effective and time-efficient all-printing approach would be a key electronic component to fully activate a paper-based circuit and can be directly implemented in medical biosensors, multifunctional devices, and self-powered systems. PMID:25019420

  19. Another Paper Landscape?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radlak, Ted

    2001-01-01

    Describes the University of Toronto's extensive central campus revitalization plan to create lush landscapes that add to the school's image and attractiveness. Drawings and photographs are included. (GR)

  20. Synopses of Selected Papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtright, Thomas L.; Fairlie, David B.; Zachos, Cosmas K.

    2014-11-01

    The decisive contributors to the development of the formulation are Hermann Weyl (1885-1955), Eugene Wigner (1902-1995), Hilbrand Groenewold (1910-1996), and Jose Moyal (1910-1998). The bulk of the theory is implicit in Groenewold's and Moyal's seminal papers. But confidence in the autonomy of the formulation accreted slowly and fitfully. As a result, an appraisal of critical milestones cannot avoid subjectivity. Nevertheless, here we provide summaries of a few papers that we believe remedied confusion about the logical structure of the formulation ...

  1. Reviewing Student Papers Electronically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunford, Spencer

    2011-01-01

    In order to consistently give quality feedback to students, the author introduces the revision and automation tools in Microsoft Word 2007. These features, Comments, Tracking, and Changes, are part of the Review group in MS Word 2007. Additionally, the AutoCorrect feature can be used to enhance and support editing endeavors. This article offers a…

  2. Employment, Training, and Literacy Enhancement Act of 1997. Report of the Committee on Education and the Workforce, House of Representatives, on H.R. 1385 Together with Additional and Dissenting Views [Including Cost Estimate of the Congressional Budget Office], 105th Congress, 1st Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and the Workforce.

    This document contains the text of the Employment, Training, and Literacy Enhancement Act of 1997, as amended by committee, including the titles that cover the following: general provisions; employment and training programs for disadvantaged youth; federally administered programs; adult education programs; miscellaneous provisions; the State Human…

  3. Extending Paper Chromatography Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finson, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    One of the "good old" standard activities middle school students seem to enjoy is paper chromatography. The procedures and materials needed are relatively simple and the results can be colorful. All too often, the activity ends just after these colorful results are obtained, cutting short the potential it holds for some further inquiry. With some…

  4. Torn Paper Birds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Carolyn Lang

    1998-01-01

    Describes a lesson for third-grade students that begins with an examination of bird prints done by John James Audubon and moves into the students creating their own torn paper birds. Introduces the students to the beauty of birds and focuses on the environmental issues that face birds and their habitats. (CMK)

  5. Viking survey paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soffen, G.

    1976-01-01

    The paper reviews Viking injection into Mars orbit, the landing, and the Orbiter. The following Viking investigations are discussed: the search for life (photosynthetic analysis, metabolic analysis, and respiration), molecular analysis, inorganic chemistry, water detection, thermal mapping, radio science, and physical and seismic characteristics. Also considered are the imaging system, the lander camera, entry science, and Mars weather.

  6. [Collected Papers on Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connell, Michael L., Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on issues related to mathematics in technology and teacher education: "A Case for Strong Conceptualization in Technology Enhanced Mathematics Instruction" (Michael L. Connell and Delwyn L. Harnisch); "Faculty/Student Collaboration in Education and Math--Using the Web To Improve Student Learning and…

  7. PROPHE Background Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Daniel C.

    This paper describes the Program for Research on Private Higher Education (PROPHE), a program that seeks to build knowledge about private higher education around the world. The program focuses on discovery, analysis, and dissemination of information, as well as creation of an international base of trained researchers. The main mission of the…

  8. [Church Archives; Selected Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abraham, Terry; And Others

    Papers presented at the Institute which were concerned with keeping of church archives are entitled: "St. Mary's Episcopal Church, Eugene, Oregon;""Central Lutheran Church, Eugene, Oregon: A History;""Mormon Church Archives: An Overview;""Sacramental Records of St. Mary's Catholic Church, Eugene, Oregon;""Chronology of St. Mary's Catholic Church,…

  9. Tame the paper tiger.

    PubMed

    Demarest, P; Burnett, C

    1998-07-01

    Computerizing an organization's policies and guidelines is difficult but rewarding. The assessment, planning, implementation, and evaluation of converting all paper policies and procedures into a computerized system are outlined, with particular focus on organizing guidelines according to the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organization's (JCAHO) functional standards. PMID:9807446

  10. Cogeneration handbook for the pulp and paper industry. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, E.A.; Moore, N.L.; Fassbender, L.L.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Fassbender, A.G.; Eakin, D.E.; Gorges, H.A.

    1984-03-01

    The decision of whether to cogenerate involves several considerations, including technical, economic, environmental, legal, and regulatory issues. Each of these issues is addressed separately in this handbook. In addition, a chapter is included on preparing a three-phase work statement, which is needed to guide the design of a cogeneration system. In addition, an annotated bibliography and a glossary of terminology are provided. Appendix A provides an energy-use profile of the pulp and paper industry. Appendices B and O provide specific information that will be called out in subsequent chapters.

  11. Heisenberg's First Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassidy, David C.

    1978-01-01

    Describes some of the discussion, correspondances and assumptions of Heisenberg. Includes clarifying and defending his explanation of the anomalous Zeeman Effect to the Quantum Physicists of his time. (GA)

  12. Selected Papers on Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, K. R.; Cassen, P. M.; Wasson, J. T.; Woolum, D. S.; Klahr, H. H.; Henning, Th.

    2004-01-01

    Three papers present studies of thermal balances, dynamics, and electromagnetic spectra of protoplanetary disks, which comprise gas and dust orbiting young stars. One paper addresses the reprocessing, in a disk, of photons that originate in the disk itself in addition to photons that originate in the stellar object at the center. The shape of the disk is found to strongly affect the redistribution of energy. Another of the three papers reviews an increase in the optical luminosity of the young star FU Orionis. The increase began in the year 1936 and similar increases have since been observed in other stars. The paper summarizes astronomical, meteoric, and theoretical evidence that these increases are caused by increases in mass fluxes through the inner portions of the protoplanetary disks of these stars. The remaining paper presents a mathematical-modeling study of the structures of protostellar accretion disks, with emphasis on limits on disk flaring. Among the conclusions reached in the study are that (1) the radius at which a disk becomes shadowed from its central stellar object depends on radial mass flow and (2) most planet formation has occurred in environments unheated by stellar radiation.

  13. Selected papers from ESSDERC 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bez, Roberto; Meneghesso, Gaudenzio; Pavan, Paolo; Zanoni, Enrico

    2015-11-01

    This special issue of Solid State Electronics includes 28 paper selected from the best presentations given at the 44th European Solid-State Device Research Conference (ESSDERC 2014, September 22-26, 2014 - Venice, Italy). These papers cover different topics in the research on solid-state devices. These topics are used also to organize the conference presentations in 7 tracks: Advanced CMOS: Devices, Process and Integration; Microwave, Opto and Power Solid-State Devices; Modeling and Simulation; Characterization, Reliability and Yield; Advanced and Emerging Memories; MEMS, NEMS, Bio-sensors and Display Technologies; Emerging non-CMOS Devices and Technologies.

  14. Recycling waste-paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Widener, Edward L.

    1990-01-01

    Perhaps 80 percent of papermaking energy is expended in chemical pulping of vegetable cellulose, a natural polymer. Commercial supplies of wood, bagasse, cotton and flax are valued as renewable resources and bio-mass assets; however, few enterprises will salvage waste-paper and cardboard from their trash. A basic experiment in the Materials Lab uses simple equipment to make crude handsheets. Students learn to classify secondary fibers, identify contraries, and estimate earnings.

  15. Paper. Environmental Ecological Education Project. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkway School District, Chesterfield, MO.

    This unit is designed to help the intermediate elementary school student become aware of the history of paper, the papermaking process, the variety of uses and kinds of paper, the economic aspects of the paper industry, and the importance of recycling. It includes 13 major concepts relating to paper, the behavioral objectives and expected student…

  16. Working Papers in Art Education, 1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zurmuehlen, Marilyn, Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Papers by graduate students, and occasionally papers from their mentors which establish a context for the student papers, are organized into four sections. Section 1, "Observation," includes two papers, "Observation Children at a Puppet Theater Performance" (Grace Johnson), and "Manipulations: Clay Construction" (Kim Spradling). Section 2,…

  17. CLE Working Papers 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blue, George, Ed.

    This third volume by the Centre for Language in Education (CLE) is intended to bring together a number of concerns currently under review at the Centre. Articles in this issue include: "Managing Open Learning" (Vicky Wright); "Self-Assessment of Foreign Language Skills: Does It Work?" (George Blue); "Language Awareness and Language Development:…

  18. NACCIS Working Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Advisory Council for Computer Implementation in Schools, Tucson, AZ.

    Problems and issues related to the financing and use of educational technologies in Arizona schools are addressed from both short- and long-term considerations. A brief review of the spread of computers in schools includes projections for future use of computers in education and a discussion of factors affecting the market, the convergence of…

  19. United Kingdom Country Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Marcus

    The Department of Education and Employment is responsible for the system of education and training in England, including careers information, education, and guidance. After the age of 16, when education is no longer compulsory, young people have a variety of choices. Training is available from private and public sector providers. Career…

  20. Outstanding student papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ten presentations were named Outstanding Student Papers in the Space Physics and Aeronomy Section at the 1995 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, California.Richard Andrulis presented “Transverse Ion Acceleration by Lower Hybrid Waves.” Andrulis obtained a B.S. in engineering from The Pennsylvania State University. He has been a Ph.D. student at Cornell University for the past six years and plans to defend his doctoral thesis in July 1996. His thesis research has utilized computer simulations to investigate the interaction of lower hybrid wave with quasi-stationary density depletions and the subsequent effect on transverse acceleration of ionospheric ions.

  1. Outstanding Student Paper Awards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-01-01

    The following members in the Space Physics & Aeronomy Section received Outstanding Student Paper Awards at the 2003 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, California. Arve Aksnes; Aroh Barjatya; Jacob Bortnik; Amir Caspi; Ruben Delgado; Galen Fowler; Paul G. Hanlon; Sid Henderson; Tara B. Hiebert; Chia-Lin Huang; Steven P. Joy; Eun-Hwa Kim; Colby Lemon; Yingjuan Ma; Elizabeth A. MacDonald; Jaco Minnie; Mitsuo Oka; Yoshitaka Okazaki; Erin J. Rigler; Ina P. Robertson; Patrick A. Roddy; Sang-Il Roh; Albert Y. Shih; Christopher Smithtro; Emma Spanswick; Maria Spasojevic; Hiroki Tanaka; Linghua Wang; Deirdre E. Wendel; Jichun Zhang>

  2. Outstanding Student Paper Awards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-04-01

    The following members in the Space Physics & Aeronomy Section received Outstanding Student Paper Awards at the 2003 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, California. Arve Aksnes; Aroh Barjatya; Jacob Bortnik; Amir Caspi; Ruben Delgado; Galen Fowler; Paul G. Hanlon; Sid Henderson; Tara B. Hiebert; Chia-Lin Huang; Steven P. Joy; Eun-Hwa Kim; Colby Lemon; Yingjuan Ma; Elizabeth A. MacDonald; Jaco Minnie; Mitsuo Oka; Yoshitaka Okazaki; Erin J. Rigler; Ina P. Robertson; Patrick A. Roddy; Sang-Il Roh; Albert Y. Shih; Christopher Smithtro; Emma Spanswick; Maria Spasojevic; Hiroki Tanaka; Linghua Wang; Deirdre E. Wendel; Jichun Zhang>

  3. Outstanding student paper awards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Hydrology Section presented six outstanding student paper awards at the 2000 AGU Spring Meeting in Washington, D.C., last June.Wade T. Crow presented a poster titled Impacts of Upscaling Soil Moisture During SGP 97. He received a B.A. in physics from Carleton College in 1995, and a M.S.E.in civil and environmental engineering from Princeton University in 1998. Wade is currently completing his Ph.D. at Princeton. His dissertation work, supervised by Eric F Wood, focuses on spatial scale issues surrounding both the retrieval of soil moisture imagery by microwave remote sensors and the eventual assimilation of this imagery into hydrologic models.

  4. Center for Beam Physics papers

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1996-06-01

    Six papers are included in this collection. They cover: a second interaction region for gamma-gamma, gamma-electron and electron- electron collisions; constraints on laser-driven accelerators for a high-energy linear collider; progress on the design of a high luminosity muon-muon collider; RF power source development at the RTA test facility; sensitivity studies of crystalline beams; and single bunch collective effects in muon colliders.

  5. Outstanding student paper award

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Planetology Section presented an outstanding student paper award to Julie Ann Rathbun at the AGU 1998 Spring Meeting in Boston, Mass., last May. Julie Ann Rathbun presented a paper titled “Ice Diapirs on Europa and Their Implications."” Julie received her B.S. degree in physics from the State University of New York at Buffalo in May 1994. She has an M.S. in astronomy from Cornell University that she received in July 1997. At present, she is working towards a Ph.D. in astronomy from Cornell under the direction of Steven Squyres. Julie's thesis topic is studying thermal upwellings on Venus and Europa using techniques developed for Coronae formation. She is doing this study in order to understand the subsurface structure of the bodies and how similar processes can differ in icy and rocky bodies. Work already accomplished toward this thesis are Magellan data used to model the formation of Beta Regio and Theia Mons, and Galileo data used to model the formation of small topographic domes to show that a liquid water ocean must have been present at the time of their formation.

  6. Corrosion/95 conference papers

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The papers in this conference represent the latest technological advances in corrosion control and prevention. The following subject areas are covered: cathodic protection in natural waters; materials for fossil fuel combustion and conversion systems; modern problems in atmospheric corrosion; innovative ideas for controlling the decaying infrastructure; deposits and their effects on corrosion in industry; volatile high temperature and non aqueous corrosion inhibitors; corrosion of light-weight and precoated metals for automotive application; refining industry corrosion; corrosion in pulp and paper industry; arctic/cold weather corrosion; materials selection for waste incinerators and associated equipment; corrosion measurement technology; environmental cracking of materials; advancing technology in the coating industry; corrosion in gas treating; green inhibition; recent advances in corrosion control of rail equipment; velocity effects and erosion corrosion in oil and gas production; marine corrosion; corrosion of materials in nuclear systems; underground corrosion control; corrosion in potable and industrial water systems in buildings and its impact on environmental compliance; deposit related boiler tube failures; boiler systems monitoring and control; recent developments and experiences in reactive metals; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion and corrosion control for steel reinforced concrete; international symposium on the use of 12 and 13 Cr stainless steels in oil and gas production environments; subsea corrosion /erosion monitoring in production facilities; fiberglass reinforced pipe and tubulars in oilfield service; corrosion control technology in power transmission and distribution; mechanisms and methods of scale and deposit control; closing the loop -- results oriented cooling system monitoring and control; and minimization of aqueous discharge.

  7. The Additional Uses of CALL in the Endangered Language Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Monica

    2004-01-01

    This paper considers the additional uses of CALL in the Endangered Language (EL) context. It briefly reviews ELs and reports on CALL for ELs in general. It then reviews the extra uses of CALL for ELs; these include changing negative attitudes towards the language, arousing interest in the language and contributing to language maintenance and…

  8. Papering Over Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center's battle against corrosion led to a new coating that was licensed to GeoTech and is commercially sold as Catize. The coating uses ligno sulfonic acid doped polyaniline (Ligno-Pani), also known as synthetic metal. Ligno-Pani can be used to extend the operating lives of steel bridges as one example of its applications. future applications include computers, televisions, cellular phones, conductive inks, and stealth technology.

  9. Summer Internship Summary Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, H D

    2006-08-08

    The visualization of biological molecules and assemblies can provide enormous insight into protein structure-function relationships, as well as practical applications to fields such as microbial forensics. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a powerful tool for imaging soft biomaterials such as cells, spores, and proteins with nanometer resolution. The goal of this work is to understand pathogen architecture and its application to microbial forensics and medicine. Initial work has focused on imaging Bacillus species; both live cells and dormant spores. Experiments have shown AFM capable of visualizing the fine structures of cell wall peptidoglycan and spore coat proteins. Work completed thus far indicates that AFM will be able to resolve some persistent questions in microbiology concerning structure-function relationships at cell surfaces, as well as assist in understanding the formulation and processing of spores used for bio-terrorism. In addition to imaging results, we have developed a robust method for the attachment of cells to surfaces for imaging in liquid.

  10. [Food additives and healthiness].

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Additives are used for improving food structure or preventing its spoilage, for example. Many substances used as additives are also naturally present in food. The safety of additives is evaluated according to commonly agreed principles. If high concentrations of an additive cause adverse health effects for humans, a limit of acceptable daily intake (ADI) is set for it. An additive is a risk only when ADI is exceeded. The healthiness of food is measured on the basis of nutrient density and scientifically proven effects. PMID:24772784

  11. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. R.; St. Clair, T. L.; Burks, H. D.; Stoakley, D. M.

    1987-01-01

    A method has been found for enhancing the melt flow of thermoplastic polyimides during processing. A high molecular weight 422 copoly(amic acid) or copolyimide was fused with approximately 0.05 to 5 pct by weight of a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive, and this melt was studied by capillary rheometry. Excellent flow and improved composite properties on graphite resulted from the addition of a PMDA-aniline additive to LARC-TPI. Solution viscosity studies imply that amic acid additives temporarily lower molecular weight and, hence, enlarge the processing window. Thus, compositions containing the additive have a lower melt viscosity for a longer time than those unmodified.

  12. Position paper on mesotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Rashmi; Garg, Vijay Kumar; Mysore, Venkataram

    2011-01-01

    Mesotherapy is a controversial cosmetic procedure which has received publicity among the lay people, in the internet and in the media. It refers to minimally invasive techniques which consist of the use of intra- or subcutaneous injections containing liquid mixture of compounds (pharmaceutical and homeopathic medications, plant extracts, vitamins and other ingredients) to treat local medical and cosmetic conditions. This position paper has examined the available evidence and finds that acceptable scientific evidence for its effectiveness and safety is lacking. IADVL taskforce, therefore would like to state that the use of this technique remains controversial at present. Further research and well-designed controlled scientific studies are required to substantiate the claims of benefit of this mode of therapy. PMID:21393967

  13. From Paper to Electron

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Kent R.

    2000-01-01

    The Internet represents a different type of technology for publishers of scientific, technical, and medical journals. It is not a technology that sustains current markets and creates new efficiencies but is, rather, a disruptive technology that could radically alter market forces, profit expectations, and business models. This paper is a translation and amplification of the research done in this area, applied to a large-circulation new science journal, Pediatrics. The findings suggest that the journal of the future will be electronic, have a less volatile cost structure, be supported more by services than by content, be less able to rely on subscription revenues, and abandon certain elements of current value networks. It also provides a possible framework for other publishers to use to evaluate their own journals relative to this disruptive technology. PMID:10833160

  14. Interstellar Dust: Contributed Papers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, Alexander G. G. M. (Editor); Allamandola, Louis J. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    A coherent picture of the dust composition and its physical characteristics in the various phases of the interstellar medium was the central theme. Topics addressed included: dust in diffuse interstellar medium; overidentified infrared emission features; dust in dense clouds; dust in galaxies; optical properties of dust grains; interstellar dust models; interstellar dust and the solar system; dust formation and destruction; UV, visible, and IR observations of interstellar extinction; and quantum-statistical calculations of IR emission from highly vibrationally excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules.

  15. Femtosecond fiber laser additive manufacturing of tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Shuang; Liu, Jian; Yang, Pei; Zhai, Meiyu; Huang, Huan; Yang, Lih-Mei

    2016-04-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is promising to produce complex shaped components, including metals and alloys, to meet requirements from different industries such as aerospace, defense and biomedicines. Current laser AM uses CW lasers and very few publications have been reported for using pulsed lasers (esp. ultrafast lasers). In this paper, additive manufacturing of Tungsten materials is investigated by using femtosecond (fs) fiber lasers. Various processing conditions are studied, which leads to desired characteristics in terms of morphology, porosity, hardness, microstructural and mechanical properties of the processed components. Fully dense Tungsten part with refined grain and increased hardness was obtained and compared with parts made with different pulse widths and CW laser. The results are evidenced that the fs laser based AM provides more dimensions to modify mechanical properties with controlled heating, rapid melting and cooling rates compared with a CW or long pulsed laser. This can greatly benefit to the make of complicated structures and materials that could not be achieved before.

  16. EDITORIAL: MST Best Paper Award for 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Patrick

    2004-09-01

    For the last 12 years, Measurement Science and Technology has awarded a Best Paper prize. The Editorial Board of the journal believes that such a prize is an opportunity to thank authors for submitting their work, and serves as an integral part of the on-going quality review of the journal. An Editorial Board working party, comprising Patrick Gill (Chairman), Ralph Tatam and David Birch, was convened to determine a single contributed paper describing new and significant work, well aligned with the measurement scope of the journal, and presented in clear and rigorous form. They received a number of recommendations from the Editorial and International Advisory Board Members, and they would like to record their thanks to the Members for these recommendations, as they form an all-important first stage in the assessment process. There were responses from some 12 Board Members. In total, there were 31 papers nominated. To aid the process, additional information in the form of the 2003 MST papers top rated by referees, and the top papers ranked by most electronic accesses, was accessed. Reviews, and papers which included a Board Member as an author, were automatically excluded. From the totality of nominations and working party deliberations, there emerged a clear winner. Thus the paper recommended by the working party for the MST Best Paper Award for 2003 is: 'Extension of the torsional crystal viscometer to measurements in the time domain' by Richard F Hafer and Arno Laesecke, 14 663-673 (2003) This paper describes a significant advance in viscosity measurement using torsional vibration in piezoelectric rods. The method reported here demonstrates the use of free-decay time-domain measurements as opposed to the more established steady-state forced-mode resonance technique. The time domain technique is faster and more sensitive, with the potential for improved accuracy due to the lack of large time constants necessary for the interpretation of forced mode data. It offers

  17. 40 CFR 247.10 - Paper and paper products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Paper and paper products. 247.10... COMPREHENSIVE PROCUREMENT GUIDELINE FOR PRODUCTS CONTAINING RECOVERED MATERIALS Item Designations § 247.10 Paper and paper products. Paper and paper products, excluding building and construction paper grades....

  18. 40 CFR 247.10 - Paper and paper products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Paper and paper products. 247.10... COMPREHENSIVE PROCUREMENT GUIDELINE FOR PRODUCTS CONTAINING RECOVERED MATERIALS Item Designations § 247.10 Paper and paper products. Paper and paper products, excluding building and construction paper grades....

  19. 40 CFR 247.10 - Paper and paper products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Paper and paper products. 247.10... COMPREHENSIVE PROCUREMENT GUIDELINE FOR PRODUCTS CONTAINING RECOVERED MATERIALS Item Designations § 247.10 Paper and paper products. Paper and paper products, excluding building and construction paper grades....

  20. 40 CFR 247.10 - Paper and paper products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Paper and paper products. 247.10... COMPREHENSIVE PROCUREMENT GUIDELINE FOR PRODUCTS CONTAINING RECOVERED MATERIALS Item Designations § 247.10 Paper and paper products. Paper and paper products, excluding building and construction paper grades....

  1. 40 CFR 247.10 - Paper and paper products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Paper and paper products. 247.10... COMPREHENSIVE PROCUREMENT GUIDELINE FOR PRODUCTS CONTAINING RECOVERED MATERIALS Item Designations § 247.10 Paper and paper products. Paper and paper products, excluding building and construction paper grades....

  2. Summer Research Paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Zarana

    2011-01-01

    Certain populations such as chemotherapy patients and atomic bomb survivors have been exposed to ionizing radiation and experience tissue damage and cancer initiation and progression. One cancer that can be initiated from radiation is esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), an epithelial cancer that has a survival rate as low as 20%. Researchers have found that when protein tyrosine kinase receptors (RPTK) activate oncogenes, they can create epithelial tumors and cause deadly cancers like ESCC. The RPTK family has one group, MET, that has only two receptors, MET and RON, present in the human body. MET s ligand is the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and RON's ligand is the macrophage-stimulating protein (MSP-1). Both HGF and MSP-1 have been shown to activate their receptors and are implicated in certain processes. Since radiation damages cells throughout the biological system, researchers are investigating whether or not HGF and MSP-1 protects or kills certain normal and cancerous cells by being part of cell recovery processes. One research group recently reviewed that the HGF-MET pathway has an important role in the embryonic development in the liver, migration of myogenic precursor cells, regulation of epithelial morphogenesis and growth, and regeneration and protection in tissues. In addition, since the RON receptor is more commonly expressed in cells of epithelial origin, and when activated is part of epithelial cell matrix invasion, dissociation, and migration processes, scientists conclude that RON might be one of the factors causing epithelial cancer initiation in the biological system. In order to examine HGF and MSP-1 s effect on cancer initiation and progression we used two immortalized esophageal epithelial cell lines. One is a normal human cell line (EPC2-hTERT), while the other had a p53 mutation at the 175th amino acid position (EPC2-hTERT-p53(sup R175H)). For this investigation, we used 0(control), 2, and 4 Gray doses of gamma (Cs137) radiation and

  3. System Engineering Paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heise, James; Hull, Bethanne J.; Bauer, Jonathan; Beougher, Nathan G.; Boe, Caleb; Canahui, Ricardo; Charles, John P.; Cooper, Zachary Davis Job; DeShaw, Mark A.; Fontanella, Luan Gasparetto; Friel, Mark; Goebel, Katie; Grant, Alex Martinsdacosta; Graves, Matt; Harms, Ryan Andrew; Hill, Aren; Lsely, Kevin Lee; Jose, Sonia; Klein, Andrew; Kolstad, Lauren Wickham; Lamp, Daniel A.; Lindquist, Mariangela Martin; Lopes, Daniel da Paula; Lourens, Rob; Matthews, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The Iowa State University team, Team LunaCY, is composed of the following sub-teams: the main student organization, the Lunabotics Club; a senior mechanical engineering design course, ME 415; a senior multidisciplinary design course, ENGR 466; and a senior design course from Wartburg College in Waverly, Iowa. Team LunaCY designed and fabricated ART-E III, Astra Robotic Tractor- Excavator the Third, for the team's third appearance in the NASA Lunabotic Mining competition. While designing ART-E III, the team had four main goals for this year's competition:to reduce the total weight of the robot, to increase the amount of regolith simulant mined, to reduce dust, and to make ART-E III autonomous. After many designs and research, a final robot design was chosen that obtained all four goals of Team LunaCY. A few changes Team LunaCY made this year was to go to the electrical, computer, and software engineering club fest at Iowa State University to recruit engineering students to accomplish the task of making ART-E III autonomous. Team LunaCY chose to use LabView to program the robot and various sensors were installed to measure the distance between the robot and the surroundings to allow ART-E III to maneuver autonomously. Team LunaCY also built a testing arena to test prototypes and ART-E III in. To best replicate the competition arena at the Kennedy Space Center, a regolith simulant was made from sand, QuickCrete, and fly ash to cover the floor of the arena. Team LunaCY also installed fans to allow ventilation in the arena and used proper safety attire when working in the arena . With the additional practice in the testing arena and innovative robot design, Team LunaCY expects to make a strong appearance at the 2012 NASA Lunabotic Mining Competition. .

  4. An additional middle cuneiform?

    PubMed Central

    Brookes-Fazakerley, S.D.; Jackson, G.E.; Platt, S.R.

    2015-01-01

    Additional cuneiform bones of the foot have been described in reference to the medial bipartite cuneiform or as small accessory ossicles. An additional middle cuneiform has not been previously documented. We present the case of a patient with an additional ossicle that has the appearance and location of an additional middle cuneiform. Recognizing such an anatomical anomaly is essential for ruling out second metatarsal base or middle cuneiform fractures and for the preoperative planning of arthrodesis or open reduction and internal fixation procedures in this anatomical location. PMID:26224890

  5. [INVITED] Lasers in additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkerton, Andrew J.

    2016-04-01

    Additive manufacturing is a topic of considerable ongoing interest, with forecasts predicting it to have major impact on industry in the future. This paper focusses on the current status and potential future development of the technology, with particular reference to the role of lasers within it. It begins by making clear the types and roles of lasers in the different categories of additive manufacturing. This is followed by concise reviews of the economic benefits and disadvantages of the technology, current state of the market and use of additive manufacturing in different industries. Details of these fields are referenced rather than expanded in detail. The paper continues, focusing on current indicators to the future of additive manufacturing. Barriers to its development, trends and opportunities in major industrial sectors, and wider opportunities for its development are covered. Evidence indicates that additive manufacturing may not become the dominant manufacturing technology in all industries, but represents an excellent opportunity for lasers to increase their influence in manufacturing as a whole.

  6. Paper Inside? - New Thinking for Biochip and Other Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steckl, Andrew

    2012-02-01

    The drive to improve the performance and reduce the cost of electronic, photonic and fluidic devices is starting to focus on the use of materials that are exotic for these applications but actually readily available in other fields. In this talk the use of paper in biochip and other applications will be reviewed. Paper is a very attractive material for many device applications: very low cost, available in almost any size, versatile surface finishes, portable and flexible. From an environmental point of view, paper is a renewable resource and is readily disposable (incineration, biodegradable). Applications of paper-based electronics currently being considered or investigated include biochips, sensors, communication circuits, batteries, smart packaging, displays. The potential advantages of paper-based devices are in many cases very compelling. For example, biochips fabricated on paper can use the capillary properties of paper to operate without the need of external power sources, greatly simplifying the design and reducing the cost. For e-reader devices, in addition to flexibility, the ideal solution for providing the look-and-feel of ink on paper is to have e-paper on paper.

  7. Additive manufacturing in production: challenges and opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Bhrigu; Karg, Michael; Schmidt, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Additive manufacturing, characterized by its inherent layer by layer fabrication methodology has been coined by many as the latest revolution in the manufacturing industry. Due to its diversification of Materials, processes, system technology and applications, Additive Manufacturing has been synonymized with terminology such as Rapid prototyping, 3D printing, free-form fabrication, Additive Layer Manufacturing, etc. A huge media and public interest in the technology has led to an innovative attempt of exploring the technology for applications beyond the scope of the traditional engineering industry. Nevertheless, it is believed that a critical factor for the long-term success of Additive Manufacturing would be its ability to fulfill the requirements defined by the traditional manufacturing industry. A parallel development in market trends and product requirements has also lead to a wider scope of opportunities for Additive Manufacturing. The presented paper discusses some of the key challenges which are critical to ensure that Additive Manufacturing is truly accepted as a mainstream production technology in the industry. These challenges would highlight on various aspects of production such as product requirements, process management, data management, intellectual property, work flow management, quality assurance, resource planning, etc. In Addition, changing market trends such as product life cycle, mass customization, sustainability, environmental impact and localized production will form the foundation for the follow up discussion on the current limitations and the corresponding research opportunities. A discussion on ongoing research to address these challenges would include topics like process monitoring, design complexity, process standardization, multi-material and hybrid fabrication, new material development, etc.

  8. Educational paper: ciliopathies.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Carsten

    2012-09-01

    Cilia are antenna-like organelles found on the surface of most cells. They transduce molecular signals and facilitate interactions between cells and their environment. Ciliary dysfunction has been shown to underlie a broad range of overlapping, clinically and genetically heterogeneous phenotypes, collectively termed ciliopathies. Literally, all organs can be affected. Frequent cilia-related manifestations are (poly)cystic kidney disease, retinal degeneration, situs inversus, cardiac defects, polydactyly, other skeletal abnormalities, and defects of the central and peripheral nervous system, occurring either isolated or as part of syndromes. Characterization of ciliopathies and the decisive role of primary cilia in signal transduction and cell division provides novel insights into tumorigenesis, mental retardation, and other common causes of morbidity and mortality, including diabetes mellitus and obesity. New technologies ("Next generation sequencing/NGS") have considerably improved genetic research and diagnostics by allowing simultaneous investigation of all disease genes at reduced costs and lower turn-around times. This is undoubtedly a result of the dynamic development in the field of human genetics and deserves increased attention in genetic counselling and the management of affected families. PMID:21898032

  9. Metal Additive Manufacturing: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazier, William E.

    2014-06-01

    This paper reviews the state-of-the-art of an important, rapidly emerging, manufacturing technology that is alternatively called additive manufacturing (AM), direct digital manufacturing, free form fabrication, or 3D printing, etc. A broad contextual overview of metallic AM is provided. AM has the potential to revolutionize the global parts manufacturing and logistics landscape. It enables distributed manufacturing and the productions of parts-on-demand while offering the potential to reduce cost, energy consumption, and carbon footprint. This paper explores the material science, processes, and business consideration associated with achieving these performance gains. It is concluded that a paradigm shift is required in order to fully exploit AM potential.

  10. Carbamate deposit control additives

    SciTech Connect

    Honnen, L.R.; Lewis, R.A.

    1980-11-25

    Deposit control additives for internal combustion engines are provided which maintain cleanliness of intake systems without contributing to combustion chamber deposits. The additives are poly(oxyalkylene) carbamates comprising a hydrocarbyloxyterminated poly(Oxyalkylene) chain of 2-5 carbon oxyalkylene units bonded through an oxycarbonyl group to a nitrogen atom of ethylenediamine.

  11. IFLA General Conference, 1992. Contributed Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions, London (England).

    Eight contributed papers given at a general session of the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions 1992 annual meeting are presented. These papers deal with a variety of library issues, and are generally, but not exclusively, focused on developing countries. The following papers are included: (1) "Community Information…

  12. Mathematics/Science. Educational Policy Seminar Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    City Univ. of New York, NY.

    Seven papers presenting recent findings on mathematics and science education are included in this report. Most of the papers deal with improving the mathematics/science instruction for minorities and women, and were presented at a series of seminars for the improvement of teaching math and science. Paper titles (and authors) are: (1) "Neurological…

  13. Collaborative Assessment: Working with Students Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired, Including Those with Additional Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Stephen A., Ed.; Wittenstein, Stuart H., Ed.

    This book offers a comprehensive text on the assessment of students with blindness or visual impairment with a focus on approaches used at the California School for the Blind. An introductory chapter is by Frances K. Liefert and Marsha A. Silver. Eleven chapters have the following titles and authors: (1) "Introduction to Visual Impairment"…

  14. Food Additives and Hyperkinesis: A Controlled Double-Blind Experiment. (Includes NIE Staff Critique).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conners, C. Keith; And Others

    Fifteen hyperkinetic children (6-12 years old) were involved in a pilot study to test B. Feingold's hypothesis that hyperkinesis may be caused by artificial flavors and colors in food. Prior to treatment, parents and teachers completed bi-weekly questionnaires regarding each Ss' behavior both on medication (pretreatment period) and when medication…

  15. Combustion Module-2 Preparations Completed for SPACEHAB Mission Including the Addition of a New Major Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Over, Ann P.

    2001-01-01

    The Combustion Module-1 (CM-1) was a large, state-of-the-art space shuttle Spacelab facility that was designed, built, and operated on STS-83 and STS-94 by a team from the NASA Glenn Research Center composed of civil servants and local support contractors (Analex and Zin Technologies). CM-1 accomplished the incredible task of providing a safe environment to support flammable and toxic gases while providing a suite of diagnostics for science measurements more extensive than any prior shuttle experiment (or anything since). Finally, CM-1 proved that multiple science investigations can be accommodated in one facility, a crucial step for Glenn's Fluids and Combustion Facility developed for the International Space Station. However, the story does not end with CM-1. In 1998, CM-2 was authorized to take the CM-1 accomplishments a big step further by completing three major steps: Converting the entire experiment to operate in a SPACEHAB module. Conducting an extensive hardware refurbishment and upgrading diagnostics (e.g., cameras, gas chromatograph, and numerous sensors). Adding a new, completely different combustion experiment.

  16. Additions to the knowledge of the land snails of Sabah (Malaysia, Borneo), including 48 new species

    PubMed Central

    Vermeulen, Jaap J.; Liew, Thor-Seng; Schilthuizen, Menno

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We present reviews of the Sabah (Malaysia, on the island of Borneo) species of the following problematical genera of land snails (Mollusca, Gastropoda): Acmella and Anaglyphula (Caenogastropoda: Assimineidae); Ditropopsis (Caenogastropoda: Cyclophoridae); Microcystina (Pulmonata: Ariophantidae); Philalanka and Thysanota (Pulmonata: Endodontidae); Kaliella, Rahula, (Pulmonata: Euconulidae); Trochomorpha and Geotrochus (Pulmonata: Trochomorphidae). Next to this, we describe new species in previously revised genera, such as Diplommatina (Diplommatinidae); Georissa (Hydrocenidae); as well as some new species of genera not revised previously, such as Japonia (Cyclophoridae); Durgella and Dyakia (Ariophantidae); Amphidromus, and Trachia (Camaenidae); Paralaoma (Punctidae); Curvella (Subulinidae). All descriptions are based on the morphology of the shells. We distinguish the following 48 new species: Acmella cyrtoglyphe, Acmella umbilicata, Acmella ovoidea, Acmella nana, Acmella subcancellata, Acmella striata, and Anaglyphula sauroderma (Assimineidae); Ditropopsis davisoni, Ditropopsis trachychilus, Ditropopsis constricta, Ditropopsis tyloacron, Ditropopsis cincta, and Japonia anceps (Cyclophoridae); Diplommatina bidentata and Diplommatina tylocheilos (Diplommatinidae); Georissa leucococca and Georissa nephrostoma (Hydrocenidae); Durgella densestriata, Dyakia chlorosoma, Microcystina microrhynchus, Microcystina callifera, Microcystina striatula, Microcystina planiuscula, and Microcystina physotrochus (Ariophantidae); Amphidromus psephos and Trachia serpentinitica (Camaenidae); Philalanka tambunanensis, Philalanka obscura, Philalanka anomphala, Philalanka rugulosa, and Philalanka malimgunung (Endodontidae); Kaliella eurytrochus, Kaliella sublaxa, Kaliella phacomorpha, Kaliella punctata, Kaliella microsoma, Rahula delopleura, (Euconulidae); Paralaoma angusta (Punctidae); Curvella hadrotes (Subulinidae); Trochomorpha trachus, Trochomorpha haptoderma, Trochomorpha thelecoryphe, Geotrochus oedobasis, Geotrochus spilokeiria, Geotrochus scolops, Geotrochus kitteli, Geotrochus subscalaris, and Geotrochus meristorhachis (Trochomorphidae). PMID:26692803

  17. Paper Document Storage: A Summary of Options.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Ross

    1995-01-01

    Discusses problems with paper storage; considers organizational requirements for storage, including access, cost, and security; describes storage options, including filing cabinets, open shelving, cabinets, carousels, mobile racking, and rotary storage; and examines paper storage as part of a records management strategy. (LRW)

  18. French and English Together: An "Additive" Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiltshire, Jessica; Harbon, Lesley

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the nature of the "additive" experience of a bilingual French-English curriculum at Killarney Heights Public School in New South Wales. Predictably, the well-supported "additive" nature of the languages program model elicited positive reactions regarding educational success. The paper also explores issues for administration,…

  19. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, James C. (Inventor); Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  20. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of the additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  1. Smog control fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Lundby, W.

    1993-06-29

    A method is described of controlling, reducing or eliminating, ozone and related smog resulting from photochemical reactions between ozone and automotive or industrial gases comprising the addition of iodine or compounds of iodine to hydrocarbon-base fuels prior to or during combustion in an amount of about 1 part iodine per 240 to 10,000,000 parts fuel, by weight, to be accomplished by: (a) the addition of these inhibitors during or after the refining or manufacturing process of liquid fuels; (b) the production of these inhibitors for addition into fuel tanks, such as automotive or industrial tanks; or (c) the addition of these inhibitors into combustion chambers of equipment utilizing solid fuels for the purpose of reducing ozone.

  2. Food Additives and Hyperkinesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wender, Ester H.

    1977-01-01

    The hypothesis that food additives are causally associated with hyperkinesis and learning disabilities in children is reviewed, and available data are summarized. Available from: American Medical Association 535 North Dearborn Street Chicago, Illinois 60610. (JG)

  3. Additional Types of Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... A A Listen En Español Additional Types of Neuropathy Charcot's Joint Charcot's Joint, also called neuropathic arthropathy, ... can stop bone destruction and aid healing. Cranial Neuropathy Cranial neuropathy affects the 12 pairs of nerves ...

  4. Effect of paper porosity on OCT images: Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillin, Mikhail Yu.; Priezzhev, Alexander V.; Myllylä, Risto

    2008-06-01

    Non-invasive measurement of paper porosity is an important problem for papermaking industry. Presently used techniques are invasive and require long time for processing the sample. In recent years optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been proved to be an effective tool for non-invasive study of optically non-uniform scattering media including paper. The aim of present work is to study the potential ability of OCT for sensing the porosity of a paper sample by means of numerical simulations. The paper sample is characterized by variation of porosity along the sample while numerical simulations allow one to consider the samples with constant porosity which is useful for evaluation of the technique abilities. The calculations were performed implementing Monte Carlo-based technique developed earlier for simulation of OCT signals from multilayer paper models. A 9-layer model of paper consisting of five fiber layers and four air layers with non-planar boundaries was considered. The porosity of the samples was varied from 30 to 80% by varying the thicknesses of the layers. The simulations were performed for model paper samples without and with optical clearing agents (benzyl alcohol, 1-pentanol, isopropanol) applied. It was shown that the simulated OCT images of model paper with various porosities significantly differ revealing the potentiality of the OCT technique for sensing the porosity. When obtaining the images of paper samples with optical clearing agents applied, the inner structure of the samples is also revealed providing additional information about the samples under study.

  5. Additive manufacturing of glass for optical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Junjie; Gilbert, Luke J.; Bristow, Douglas A.; Landers, Robert G.; Goldstein, Jonathan T.; Urbas, Augustine M.; Kinzel, Edward C.

    2016-04-01

    Glasses including fused quartz have significant scientific and engineering applications including optics, communications, electronics, and hermetic seals. This paper investigates a filament fed process for Additive Manufacturing (AM) of fused quartz. Additive manufacturing has several potential benefits including increased design freedom, faster prototyping, and lower processing costs for small production volumes. However, current research in AM of glasses is limited and has focused on non-optical applications. Fused quartz is studied here because of its desirability for high-quality optics due to its high transmissivity and thermal stability. Fused quartz also has a higher working temperature than soda lime glass which poses a challenge for AM. In this work, fused quartz filaments are fed into a CO2 laser generated melt pool, smoothly depositing material onto the work piece. Single tracks are printed to explore the effects that different process parameters have on the morphology of printed fused quartz. A spectrometer is used to measure the thermal radiation incandescently emitted from the melt pool. Thin-walls are printed to study the effects of layer-to-layer height. Finally, a 3D fused quartz cube is printed using the newly acquired layer height and polished on each surface. The transmittance and index homogeneity of the polished cube are both measured. These results show that the filament fed process has the potential to print fused quartz with optical transparency and of index of refraction uniformity approaching bulk processed glass.

  6. Electrical insulated paper from cotton linter.

    PubMed

    El-Saied, Houssni; El-Meligy, Magda G; Mohamed, Samar H; El-Mongy, S Abd

    2012-09-01

    Insulated paper had been prepared from cotton linter containing certain additives. Strength properties had been studied for all paper prepared from cotton linter, before and after impregnating in the linseed oil. Also, the dielectric constant (έ) and AC electrical conductivity with frequencies over the range (100 kHz to 3 MHz) and at different temperatures were studied. Blended cotton linter with glass fiber or polyester fiber increased the dielectric constant. Since the glass fibers lowered the power factor from 0.63 to 0.28% and enhanced dielectric constant. The addition of hydrophilic fibers such as rayon or polyester fiber can be made paper of low porosity, low density and high dielectric resistance. Also, the addition of lead sulphate improved dielectric constant of paper since it has dielectric coefficient >20. The dielectric constant in sample which dipped in oil is higher than the sample without oil. PMID:24751023

  7. Evaluation of certain food additives.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, and to prepare specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of and assessment of dietary exposure to food additives, including flavouring agents. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and dietary exposure data for eight food additives (Benzoe tonkinensis; carrageenan; citric and fatty acid esters of glycerol; gardenia yellow; lutein esters from Tagetes erecta; octenyl succinic acid-modified gum arabic; octenyl succinic acid-modified starch; paprika extract; and pectin) and eight groups of flavouring agents (aliphatic and alicyclic hydrocarbons; aliphatic and aromatic ethers; ionones and structurally related substances; miscellaneous nitrogen-containing substances; monocyclic and bicyclic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; phenol and phenol derivatives; phenyl-substituted aliphatic alcohols and related aldehydes and esters; and sulfur-containing heterocyclic compounds). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: citric acid; gellan gum; polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monostearate; potassium aluminium silicate; and Quillaia extract (Type 2). Annexed to the report are tables summarizing the Committee's recommendations for dietary exposures to and toxicological evaluations of all of the food additives and flavouring agents considered at this meeting. PMID:26118220

  8. Additive Manufacturing of Aerospace Propulsion Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.; Grady, Joseph E.; Carter, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The presentation will provide an overview of ongoing activities on additive manufacturing of aerospace propulsion components, which included rocket propulsion and gas turbine engines. Future opportunities on additive manufacturing of hybrid electric propulsion components will be discussed.

  9. Additive Manufacturing Infrared Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, Darrell

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is a rapid prototyping technology that allows parts to be built in a series of thin layers from plastic, ceramics, and metallics. Metallic additive manufacturing is an emerging form of rapid prototyping that allows complex structures to be built using various metallic powders. Significant time and cost savings have also been observed using the metallic additive manufacturing compared with traditional techniques. Development of the metallic additive manufacturing technology has advanced significantly over the last decade, although many of the techniques to inspect parts made from these processes have not advanced significantly or have limitations. Several external geometry inspection techniques exist such as Coordinate Measurement Machines (CMM), Laser Scanners, Structured Light Scanning Systems, or even traditional calipers and gages. All of the aforementioned techniques are limited to external geometry and contours or must use a contact probe to inspect limited internal dimensions. This presentation will document the development of a process for real-time dimensional inspection technique and digital quality record of the additive manufacturing process using Infrared camera imaging and processing techniques.

  10. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamine, containing phenylethvnvl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynviphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pvrrolidinone to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  11. Additives in plastics.

    PubMed Central

    Deanin, R D

    1975-01-01

    The polymers used in plastics are generally harmless. However, they are rarely used in pure form. In almost all commercial plastics, they are "compounded" with monomeric ingredients to improve their processing and end-use performance. In order of total volume used, these monomeric additives may be classified as follows: reinforcing fibers, fillers, and coupling agents; plasticizers; colorants; stabilizers (halogen stabilizers, antioxidants, ultraviolet absorbers, and biological preservatives); processing aids (lubricants, others, and flow controls); flame retardants, peroxides; and antistats. Some information is already available, and much more is needed, on potential toxicity and safe handling of these additives during processing and manufacture of plastics products. PMID:1175566

  12. Recyclable Waste Paper Sorting Using Template Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osiur Rahman, Mohammad; Hussain, Aini; Scavino, Edgar; Hannan, M. A.; Basri, Hassan

    This paper explores the application of image processing techniques in recyclable waste paper sorting. In recycling, waste papers are segregated into various grades as they are subjected to different recycling processes. Highly sorted paper streams will facilitate high quality end products, and save processing chemicals and energy. Since 1932 to 2009, different mechanical and optical paper sorting methods have been developed to fill the demand of paper sorting. Still, in many countries including Malaysia, waste papers are sorted into different grades using manual sorting system. Due to inadequate throughput and some major drawbacks of mechanical paper sorting systems, the popularity of optical paper sorting systems is increased. Automated paper sorting systems offer significant advantages over human inspection in terms of fatigue, throughput, speed, and accuracy. This research attempts to develop a smart vision sensing system that able to separate the different grades of paper using Template Matching. For constructing template database, the RGB components of the pixel values are used to construct RGBString for template images. Finally, paper object grade is identified based on the maximum occurrence of a specific template image in the search image. The outcomes from the experiment in classification for White Paper, Old Newsprint Paper and Old Corrugated Cardboard are 96%, 92% and 96%, respectively. The remarkable achievement obtained with the method is the accurate identification and dynamic sorting of all grades of papers using simple image processing techniques.

  13. Interactive Visualization Applets for Modular Exponentiation Using Addition Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahig, Hatem M.; Kotb, Yasser

    Online visualization systems have come to be heavily used in education, particularly for online learning. Most e-learning systems, including interactive learning systems, have been designed to simplify understanding the ideas of some main problems or in general overall course materials. This paper presents a novel interactive visualization system for one of the most important operation in public-key cryptosystems. This operation is modular exponentiation using addition chains. An addition chain for a natural number e is a sequence 1 = a 0 < a 1 < ... < a r = e of numbers such that for each 0 < i ≤ r, a i = a j + a k for some 0 ≤ k ≤ j < i. Finding an addition chain with minimal length is NP-hard problem. The proposed system visualizes how to generate addition chains with minimal length using depth-first branch and bound technique and how to compute the modular exponentiation using addition chains.

  14. Biobased lubricant additives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fully biobased lubricants are those formulated using all biobased ingredients, i.e. biobased base oils and biobased additives. Such formulations provide the maximum environmental, safety, and economic benefits expected from a biobased product. Currently, there are a number of biobased base oils that...

  15. Manipulating crystallization with molecular additives.

    PubMed

    Shtukenberg, Alexander G; Lee, Stephanie S; Kahr, Bart; Ward, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Given the importance of organic crystals in a wide range of industrial applications, the chemistry, biology, materials science, and chemical engineering communities have focused considerable attention on developing methods to control crystal structure, size, shape, and orientation. Tailored additives have been used to control crystallization to great effect, presumably by selectively binding to particular crystallographic surfaces and sites. However, substantial knowledge gaps still exist in the fundamental mechanisms that govern the formation and growth of organic crystals in both the absence and presence of additives. In this review, we highlight research discoveries that reveal the role of additives, either introduced by design or present adventitiously, on various stages of formation and growth of organic crystals, including nucleation, dislocation spiral growth mechanisms, growth inhibition, and nonclassical crystal morphologies. The insights from these investigations and others of their kind are likely to guide the development of innovative methods to manipulate crystallization for a wide range of materials and applications. PMID:24579880

  16. The Great Paper Towel Race.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrows, Wayne R.

    1997-01-01

    Outlines a class project in which students explore characteristics of paper towels and paper towel advertising. Students design a variety of experiments related to paper towels and their claims. Provides four activities. (DDR)

  17. Boron addition to alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Coad, B. C.

    1985-08-20

    A process for addition of boron to an alloy which involves forming a melt of the alloy and a reactive metal, selected from the group consisting of aluminum, titanium, zirconium and mixtures thereof to the melt, maintaining the resulting reactive mixture in the molten state and reacting the boric oxide with the reactive metal to convert at least a portion of the boric oxide to boron which dissolves in the resulting melt, and to convert at least portion of the reactive metal to the reactive metal oxide, which oxide remains with the resulting melt, and pouring the resulting melt into a gas stream to form a first atomized powder which is subsequently remelted with further addition of boric oxide, re-atomized, and thus reprocessed to convert essentially all the reactive metal to metal oxide to produce a powdered alloy containing specified amounts of boron.

  18. Tackifier for addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, J. M.; St.clair, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    A modification to the addition polyimide, LaRC-160, was prepared to improve tack and drape and increase prepeg out-time. The essentially solventless, high viscosity laminating resin is synthesized from low cost liquid monomers. The modified version takes advantage of a reactive, liquid plasticizer which is used in place of solvent and helps solve a major problem of maintaining good prepeg tack and drape, or the ability of the prepeg to adhere to adjacent plies and conform to a desired shape during the lay up process. This alternate solventless approach allows both longer life of the polymer prepeg and the processing of low void laminates. This approach appears to be applicable to all addition polyimide systems.

  19. Vinyl capped addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D. (Inventor); Malarik, Diane C. (Inventor); Delvigs, Peter (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Polyimide resins (PMR) are generally useful where high strength and temperature capabilities are required (at temperatures up to about 700 F). Polyimide resins are particularly useful in applications such as jet engine compressor components, for example, blades, vanes, air seals, air splitters, and engine casing parts. Aromatic vinyl capped addition polyimides are obtained by reacting a diamine, an ester of tetracarboxylic acid, and an aromatic vinyl compound. Low void materials with improved oxidative stability when exposed to 700 F air may be fabricated as fiber reinforced high molecular weight capped polyimide composites. The aromatic vinyl capped polyimides are provided with a more aromatic nature and are more thermally stable than highly aliphatic, norbornenyl-type end-capped polyimides employed in PMR resins. The substitution of aromatic vinyl end-caps for norbornenyl end-caps in addition polyimides results in polymers with improved oxidative stability.

  20. [Biologically active food additives].

    PubMed

    Velichko, M A; Shevchenko, V P

    1998-07-01

    More than half out of 40 projects for the medical science development by the year of 2000 have been connected with the bio-active edible additives that are called "the food of XXI century", non-pharmacological means for many diseases. Most of these additives--nutricevtics and parapharmacevtics--are intended for the enrichment of food rations for the sick or healthy people. The ecologicaly safest and most effective are combined domestic adaptogens with immuno-modulating and antioxidating action that give anabolic and stimulating effect,--"leveton", "phytoton" and "adapton". The MKTs-229 tablets are residue discharge means. For atherosclerosis and general adiposis they recommend "tsar tablets" and "aiconol (ikhtien)"--on the base of cod-liver oil or "splat" made out of seaweed (algae). All these preparations have been clinically tested and received hygiene certificates from the Institute of Dietology of the Russian Academy of Medical Science. PMID:9752776

  1. Electrophilic addition of astatine

    SciTech Connect

    Norseev, Yu.V.; Vasaros, L.; Nhan, D.D.; Huan, N.K.

    1988-03-01

    It has been shown for the first time that astatine is capable of undergoing addition reactions to unsaturated hydrocarbons. A new compound of astatine, viz., ethylene astatohydrin, has been obtained, and its retention numbers of squalane, Apiezon, and tricresyl phosphate have been found. The influence of various factors on the formation of ethylene astatohydrin has been studied. It has been concluded on the basis of the results obtained that the univalent cations of astatine in an acidic medium is protonated hypoastatous acid.

  2. Hydrocarbon fuel additive

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrogio, S.

    1989-02-28

    This patent describes the method of fuel storage or combustion, wherein the fuel supply contains small amounts of water, the step of adding to the fuel supply an additive comprising a blend of a hydrophilic agent chosen from the group of ethylene glycol, n-butyl alcohol, and cellosolve in the range of 22-37% by weight; ethoxylated nonylphenol in the range of 26-35% by weight; nonylphenol polyethylene glycol ether in the range of 32-43% by weight.

  3. Functional Generalized Additive Models.

    PubMed

    McLean, Mathew W; Hooker, Giles; Staicu, Ana-Maria; Scheipl, Fabian; Ruppert, David

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the functional generalized additive model (FGAM), a novel regression model for association studies between a scalar response and a functional predictor. We model the link-transformed mean response as the integral with respect to t of F{X(t), t} where F(·,·) is an unknown regression function and X(t) is a functional covariate. Rather than having an additive model in a finite number of principal components as in Müller and Yao (2008), our model incorporates the functional predictor directly and thus our model can be viewed as the natural functional extension of generalized additive models. We estimate F(·,·) using tensor-product B-splines with roughness penalties. A pointwise quantile transformation of the functional predictor is also considered to ensure each tensor-product B-spline has observed data on its support. The methods are evaluated using simulated data and their predictive performance is compared with other competing scalar-on-function regression alternatives. We illustrate the usefulness of our approach through an application to brain tractography, where X(t) is a signal from diffusion tensor imaging at position, t, along a tract in the brain. In one example, the response is disease-status (case or control) and in a second example, it is the score on a cognitive test. R code for performing the simulations and fitting the FGAM can be found in supplemental materials available online. PMID:24729671

  4. Widespread occurrence of bisphenol A in paper and paper products: implications for human exposure.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chunyang; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2011-11-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is used in a variety of consumer products, including some paper products, particularly thermal receipt papers, for which it is used as a color developer. Nevertheless, little is known about the magnitude of BPA contamination or human exposure to BPA as a result of contact with paper and paper products. In this study, concentrations of BPA were determined in 15 types of paper products (n = 202), including thermal receipts, flyers, magazines, tickets, mailing envelopes, newspapers, food contact papers, food cartons, airplane boarding passes, luggage tags, printing papers, business cards, napkins, paper towels, and toilet paper, collected from several cities in the USA. Thermal receipt papers also were collected from Japan, Korea, and Vietnam. BPA was found in 94% of thermal receipt papers (n = 103) at concentrations ranging from below the limit of quantitation (LOQ, 1 ng/g) to 13.9 mg/g (geometric mean: 0.211 mg/g). The majority (81%) of other paper products (n = 99) contained BPA at concentrations ranging from below the LOQ to 14.4 μg/g (geometric mean: 0.016 μg/g). Whereas thermal receipt papers contained the highest concentrations of BPA (milligram-per-gram), some paper products, including napkins and toilet paper, made from recycled papers contained microgram-per-gram concentrations of BPA. Contamination during the paper recycling process is a source of BPA in paper products. Daily intake (DI) of BPA through dermal absorption was estimated based on the measured BPA concentrations and handling frequency of paper products. The daily intake of BPA (calculated from median concentrations) through dermal absorption from handling of papers was 17.5 and 1300 ng/day for the general population and occupationally exposed individuals, respectively; these values are minor compared with exposure through diet. Among paper products, thermal receipt papers contributed to the majority (>98%) of the exposures. PMID:21939283

  5. Interaction: Additivity plus Nonlinearity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchinson, T. P.

    2004-01-01

    Whether or not there is an interaction between two factors in their effects on a dependent variable is often a central question. This paper proposes a general mechanism by which an interaction may arise: (a) the two factors are the same thing--or, at least, have a dimension in common--in the sense that it is meaningful to add (or subtract) them;…

  6. Additional evidence of Mercurian volcanism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trask, N.J.; Strom, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    Evidence concerned with (1) the character and distribution of terrain surrounding fresh basins, (2) albedo, color and temporal differences between a basin rim and smooth plains on its floor, and (3) the stratigraphic relations and local distribution of smooth plains in the hilly and lineated terrain are cited as additional evidence for an internal origin of much of the Mercurian smooth plains. Altough the question of Mercurian volcanism should be kept open, this evidence together with that presented in an earlier paper suggests that volcanism occurred on Mercury early in its history. ?? 1976.

  7. Pertussis vaccines: WHO position paper, August 2015--Recommendations.

    PubMed

    2016-03-14

    This article presents the World Health Organization's (WHO) recommendations for the use of vaccines against Bordetella pertussis from the WHO position paper on Pertussis vaccines: WHO position paper--August 2015, recently published in the Weekly Epidemiological Record (Pertussis vaccines: WHO position paper. Wkly Epidemiol Rec 2015;90(August(35)):433-60). This position paper summarizes the most recent developments in the field of pertussis disease and its prevention by vaccination. It includes the WHO position on the choice of Pertussis vaccine as well as on the use of additional strategies, particularly vaccination during pregnancy, for prevention of early infant mortality. This document replaces the first WHO position paper on vaccines against disease caused by Pertussis published in 2010 (Pertussis vaccines: WHO position paper. Wkly Epidemiol Rec 2010;85(October(40)):385-400) and incorporates the revised guidance on the choice of pertussis vaccines published in July 2014 (Pertussis vaccines: WHO position paper. Wkly Epidemiol Rec 2014;89(July(30)):337-44). Footnotes to this paper provide a number of core references. In accordance with its mandate to provide guidance to Member States on health policy matters, WHO issues a series of regularly updated position papers on vaccines and combinations of vaccines against diseases that have an international public health impact. These papers are concerned primarily with the use of vaccines in large-scale immunization programmes; they summarize essential background information on diseases and vaccines, and conclude with WHO's current position on the use of vaccines in the global context. This paper reflects the recommendations of WHO's Strategic Advisory Group of Experts (SAGE) on immunization. These recommendations were discussed by SAGE at its April 2014 and April 2015 meetings. The evidence presented at the meetings can be accessed at http://www.who.int/immunization/sage/previous/en/index.html. PMID:26562318

  8. Implementing an EMR: paper's last hurrah.

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, D. N.; Carpenter, P. C.; Claus, P. L.; Hagen, P. T.; Karsell, P. R.; Van Scoy, R. E.

    1995-01-01

    The implementation of an electronic medical record system in any large organization is as complex a task as the design of the system. During implementation, it is necessary that health care providers using the electronic system are able to communicate with colleagues who are continuing to work with the paper record. The Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, is well along the path to implementing an electronic medical record system. One of the key issues addressed has been the need for the electronic system to integrate with the paper record. This need to function in the dual electronic/paper environment has placed new demands on printers, required revision of some paper forms, and required the electronic system to create facsimilies of paper record forms. In addition, new security issues have been raised. Dual paper/electronic environment issues are an important challenge in the implementation of an electronic medical record. PMID:8563257

  9. Siloxane containing addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maudgal, S.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1984-01-01

    Addition polyimide oligomers have been synthesized from bis(gamma-aminopropyl) tetramethyldisiloxane and 3, 3', 4, 4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride using a variety of latent crosslinking groups as endcappers. The prepolymers were isolated and characterized for solubility (in amide, chlorinated and ether solvents), melt flow and cure properties. The most promising systems, maleimide and acetylene terminated prepolymers, were selected for detailed study. Graphite cloth reinforced composites were prepared and properties compared with those of graphite/Kerimid 601, a commercially available bismaleimide. Mixtures of the maleimide terminated system with Kerimid 601, in varying proportions, were also studied.

  10. Oil additive process

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, H.

    1988-10-18

    This patent describes a method of making an additive comprising: (a) adding 2 parts by volume of 3% sodium hypochlorite to 45 parts by volume of diesel oil fuel to form a sulphur free fuel, (b) removing all water and foreign matter formed by the sodium hypochlorite, (c) blending 30 parts by volume of 24% lead naphthanate with 15 parts by volume of the sulphur free fuel, 15 parts by volume of light-weight material oil to form a blended mixture, and (d) heating the blended mixture slowly and uniformly to 152F.

  11. Electronic Paper Turns the Page.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Charles C.

    2001-01-01

    Suggests that, rather than the electronic book, the technology that is most likely to transform reading and writing will be electronic paper (e-paper). Traces the evolution of e-paper from its prototype created by Xerox PARC's Nick Sheridon in 1975 to the E Ink/Lucent e-paper made from e-ink and plastic transistors. Highlights future…

  12. Resource Papers No. 4-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council for Resource Development, Washington, DC.

    This document compiles nine papers issued by the National Council for Resource Development. Papers include: (1) "How to Be Successful at Grantsmanship--Guidelines for Proposal Writing--Foundation Proposals"; (2) "A Federal Glossary" (acronyms); (3) "Special Projects" (a working model for an institutional development office); (4) "The Role of the…

  13. Outfoxing Fraud: Research Papers without Repression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Eileen N.

    This paper discusses four strategies used by the author in college English courses to discourage fraud yet to allow students enough freedom to conduct original research. The strategies include generating "topic lists," in hope of beating term paper "clearinghouses," which must certainly have a time-lag on the topics in their collections; an…

  14. Prevention of Disabilities: Topic Paper D.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on the Handicapped, Washington, DC.

    As one of a series of topic papers assessing federal laws and programs affecting persons with disabilities, this paper describes the major components of a comprehensive program to prevent disabilities, including programs to maximize health care, programs to maximize educational growth and sound psychological development, and programs for public…

  15. International Issues. Paper Presentations: Session C.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This document contains eight papers from the international issues section of an international conference on vocational education and training (VET) for lifelong learning in the information era. The following papers are included: "The Impact of Globalisation and the Changing Nature of Work on Vocational Education and Training" (Chris Robinson); "In…

  16. Recycled Office Paper: Why It Costs More.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usherson, Judy

    1992-01-01

    Discusses obstacles to making recycled office paper cheaper. Explains how the economics of recycled office paper discourages recycling by commodity mills. Includes discussion of integrated and nonintegrated mills, commodity and specialty mills, specialty printing and writing mills, postconsumer material, supply and demand, and economic…

  17. Popullution: A Position Paper on Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durner, Mary Beth

    This position paper presents an interdisciplinary approach to the study of population. Six main sections are included in the paper: Introduction, The Growth of the Human Population, The Psychological Effects of Population Growth, Overpopulated America, Myths Concerning Population Growth and Control, and Population Education. Section 1, an…

  18. Edinburgh Working Papers in Applied Linguistics, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkinson, Brian, Ed.; Mitchell, Keith

    1996-01-01

    This monograph contains papers on research work in progress at the Department of Applied Linguistics and Institute for Applied Language Studies at the University of Edinburgh (Scotland). Topics addressed include general English teaching, English for Academic Purposes teaching, Modern Language teaching, and teacher education. Papers are: "Cultural…

  19. Urban Schools in Urban Systems, Selected Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gappert, Gary, Ed.

    This volume contains papers which were presented at a conference focusing on the themes of partnership and progress in urban education. The following papers are included: (1) an introduction to the volume, by Gary Gappert; (2) "Urban Education: Past, Present and Future," by Bernard G. Watson; (3) "Variables Affecting the Learning of Inner City…

  20. Papers of The Seventh Algonquian Conference, 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, William, Ed.

    This volume contains twenty-five of the papers presented at the Seventh Algonquian conference. Topics covered in the papers include recently discovered linguistic fragments of Ocanahowan, the Wittiko people, ethno-history and archeology of the Mushuan, color terms in Narragansett, the Christian holidays of the Wabanaki, dialects of the Eastern…

  1. Staff Issue Paper on Institutional Arrangements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of State, Washington, DC.

    Staff Issue Papers for the Secretary of State's Advisory Committee on the 1972 United Nations Conference on the Human Environment, Stockholm, Sweden, are summarized in this compendium. Papers developed by the various sub-committees are included for: (1) institutional arrangements; (2) development and the environment; (3) human settlements; (4)…

  2. Programme Development. Paper Presentations: Session F.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This document contains 35 papers from the program development section of an international conference on vocational education and training (VET) for lifelong learning in the information era. The following are among the papers included: "Using Quality Indicators to Create World-Class Curricula: From Concept to Application" (Curtis Finch, Timo…

  3. The Research Paper for Advanced ESL Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Donald; And Others

    A strategy for including writing of a research paper in a university's advanced intensive English course for students of English as a second language is described. The method consists of eight assignments given over the course of 11 weeks, resulting in a short research paper. The method is designed to minimize error by dealing with specific…

  4. Employer Sponsored Child Care: Four Issues Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettygrove, Willa

    This publication of the California Governor's Advisory Committee on Child Development Programs includes four issues papers dealing with employer sponsored child care. The first paper describes three approaches to employer support of child care, lists the elements of the system planners must consider when designing appropriate responses to…

  5. Evaluation of certain food additives.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, with a view to concluding as to safety concerns and to preparing specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of and assessment of dietary exposure to food additives, including flavouring agents. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and dietary exposure data for five food additives (magnesium dihydrogen diphosphate; mineral oil (medium and low viscosity) classes II and III; 3-phytase from Aspergillus niger expressed in Aspergillus niger; serine protease (chymotrypsin) from Nocardiopsis prasina expressed in Bacillus licheniformis; and serine protease (trypsin) from Fusarium oxysporum expressed in Fusarium venenatum) and 16 groups of flavouring agents (aliphatic and aromatic amines and amides; aliphatic and aromatic ethers; aliphatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and related esters, sulfides, disulfides and ethers containing furan substitution; aliphatic linear alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes, acids and related alcohols, acetals and esters; amino acids and related substances; epoxides; furfuryl alcohol and related substances; linear and branched-chain aliphatic, unsaturated, unconjugated alcohols, aldehydes, acids and related esters; miscellaneous nitrogen-containing substances; phenol and phenol derivatives; pyrazine derivatives; pyridine, pyrrole and quinoline derivatives; saturated aliphatic acyclic branched-chain primary alcohols, aldehydes and acids; simple aliphatic and aromatic sulfides and thiols; sulfur-containing heterocyclic compounds; and sulfur-substituted furan derivatives). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: ethyl cellulose, mineral oil (medium viscosity), modified starches and titanium

  6. Carboxymethylated glucomannan as paper strengthening agent.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; He, Weitao; Wang, Shun; Song, Xianliang

    2015-07-10

    Strength additives play an important role in allowing the papermaking industry to achieve its objectives. In this study, a new kind of paper strengthening agent based on glucomannan was developed by treating it with sodium chloroacetate under alkaline conditions, and the effects on paper properties were evaluated. Results indicated that carboxymethylated glucomannan could significantly improve the paper properties. Compared to the untreated paper, the density, burst index, tensile index, and folding endurance were increased by 15.2%, 22.8%, 34.6%, 179.0%, respectively, when 0.9% carboxymethylated glucomannan was used. Polyamide-epichlorohydrin (PAE) was used to improve the wet strength of the paper. When 0.6% PAE and 0.6% carboxymethylated glucomannan were used, the burst index, dry tensile index, wet tensile index of paper were increased by 14.1%, 25%, 34.3%, respectively, as compared to that of the control, while the folding endurance decreased slightly. In addition, dry tensile index and wet tensile index were increased with increasing the carboxymethylation time of glucomannan. The results demonstrated that PAE and carboxymethylated glucomannan displayed a synergistic effect. SEM analysis illustrated that paper strengthening agent could increase the combination of fibers in paper. PMID:25857990

  7. Neoclassical Transport Including Collisional Nonlinearity

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.; Belli, E. A.

    2011-06-10

    In the standard {delta}f theory of neoclassical transport, the zeroth-order (Maxwellian) solution is obtained analytically via the solution of a nonlinear equation. The first-order correction {delta}f is subsequently computed as the solution of a linear, inhomogeneous equation that includes the linearized Fokker-Planck collision operator. This equation admits analytic solutions only in extreme asymptotic limits (banana, plateau, Pfirsch-Schlueter), and so must be solved numerically for realistic plasma parameters. Recently, numerical codes have appeared which attempt to compute the total distribution f more accurately than in the standard ordering by retaining some nonlinear terms related to finite-orbit width, while simultaneously reusing some form of the linearized collision operator. In this work we show that higher-order corrections to the distribution function may be unphysical if collisional nonlinearities are ignored.

  8. Papers in Nonphonology. Working Papers in Linguistics, No. 21.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwicky, Arnold M., Ed.

    The eight papers in this issue are addressed to issues in pragmatics, semantics, syntax, discourse analysis, morphology, and particularly to issues touching on two or more of these areas at once. The final paper touches on phonology as well. The papers are: "The Myth of Semantic Presupposition," by Steven Boer and William Lycan; "A Reconsideration…

  9. The Chemistry of Paper Preservation: Part 5. Permanent Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Henry A.

    2007-01-01

    The acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose accounts for the deterioration of paper in library books and other written records. To combat this threat to our written heritage, new permanent papers have been developed that are relatively chemically stable and undergo a very slow rate of deterioration. Many of these new papers are manufactured from…

  10. An Integrated Biochemistry Laboratory, Including Molecular Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Adele J. Wolfson Mona L.; Branham, Thomas R.

    1996-11-01

    ), time of incubation, wavelength of measurement, addition of salts, and addition of detergent. In these independent projects, students sometimes discover ways to improve the methodology for the assays, and these improvements are incorporated into the suggested procedures for the rest of the semester. The results of this project are written up as a short paper in a style appropriate for a rapid communication in a scientific journal. The papers go through a round of peer review and revision. Ion-Exchange Chromatography Once each group has decided on a project and discussed the details with the instructor, they prepare their own buffers and equilibrate the resins. DEAE-Sephacel and CM-Sepharose, both from Pharmacia/LKB (Piscataway, NJ) are supplied, about 20 mL of packed resin for each egg-white preparation. (These resins can be regenerated and reused many times.) Each group uses one egg white for the entire purification project. The egg white is filtered through one layer of cheesecloth and diluted 5-fold with the starting buffer. The first step is done batchwise because of the viscosity of the sample. The diluted egg white is mixed with the resin for approximately 15 min, then centrifuged at 1500 μ g for 15 min. The supernatant, containing those proteins not adsorbed to the resin, is decanted. Subsequent washing and elution can then be carried out batchwise or by transferring to a column [1.5 - 20 cm Econocolumns (BioRad)]. The options for recovery of the enzyme from the CM resin include a batch or column method, elution by change in pH or ionic strength, and gradient or stepwise elution. Those carrying out elutions from a column use an automatic fraction collector; gradient formers are available for those who choose to elute with a linear salt gradient. When elution is carried out by a change in pH, it should be noted that lysozyme may precipitate near its isoelectric point, especially at low ionic strength. SDS - polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis is used to monitor

  11. Evolution of the scientific paper

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, J.E.

    1992-09-01

    The first papers reporting original research results in technical periodicals and proceedings appeared in the late 17th century. Since that time, the typical scientific paper has evolved from a fairly simple document, accessible to a general audience, to a much more complex one, aimed at a specialized audience. The purpose of this article is to give an overview of what the first scientific papers were like and how they evolved to their present form and style. To facilitate this discussion, the scientific paper`s development has arbitrarily been divided into four stages: the origin and formative years of the scientific paper (1665-1765), emergence of scientific papers written for specialized publications (1765-1865), development of the modem scientific paper (1865-1965), and hyperspecialization and computerization of the modem scientific paper (1965-?).

  12. Performance Boosting Additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Mainstream Engineering Corporation was awarded Phase I and Phase II contracts from Goddard Space Flight Center's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program in early 1990. With support from the SBIR program, Mainstream Engineering Corporation has developed a unique low cost additive, QwikBoost (TM), that increases the performance of air conditioners, heat pumps, refrigerators, and freezers. Because of the energy and environmental benefits of QwikBoost, Mainstream received the Tibbetts Award at a White House Ceremony on October 16, 1997. QwikBoost was introduced at the 1998 International Air Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Exposition. QwikBoost is packaged in a handy 3-ounce can (pressurized with R-134a) and will be available for automotive air conditioning systems in summer 1998.

  13. Sewage sludge additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalvinskas, J. J.; Mueller, W. A.; Ingham, J. D. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The additive is for a raw sewage treatment process of the type where settling tanks are used for the purpose of permitting the suspended matter in the raw sewage to be settled as well as to permit adsorption of the dissolved contaminants in the water of the sewage. The sludge, which settles down to the bottom of the settling tank is extracted, pyrolyzed and activated to form activated carbon and ash which is mixed with the sewage prior to its introduction into the settling tank. The sludge does not provide all of the activated carbon and ash required for adequate treatment of the raw sewage. It is necessary to add carbon to the process and instead of expensive commercial carbon, coal is used to provide the carbon supplement.

  14. New addition curing polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frimer, Aryeh A.; Cavano, Paul

    1991-01-01

    In an attempt to improve the thermal-oxidative stability (TOS) of PMR-type polymers, the use of 1,4-phenylenebis (phenylmaleic anhydride) PPMA, was evaluated. Two series of nadic end-capped addition curing polyimides were prepared by imidizing PPMA with either 4,4'-methylene dianiline or p-phenylenediamine. The first resulted in improved solubility and increased resin flow while the latter yielded a compression molded neat resin sample with a T(sub g) of 408 C, close to 70 C higher than PME-15. The performance of these materials in long term weight loss studies was below that of PMR-15, independent of post-cure conditions. These results can be rationalized in terms of the thermal lability of the pendant phenyl groups and the incomplete imidization of the sterically congested PPMA. The preparation of model compounds as well as future research directions are discussed.

  15. Additional Improvements to the NASA Lewis Ice Accretion Code LEWICE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, William B.; Bidwell, Colin S.

    1995-01-01

    Due to the feedback of the user community, three major features have been added to the NASA Lewis ice accretion code LEWICE. These features include: first, further improvements to the numerics of the code so that more time steps can be run and so that the code is more stable; second, inclusion and refinement of the roughness prediction model described in an earlier paper; third, inclusion of multi-element trajectory and ice accretion capabilities to LEWICE. This paper will describe each of these advancements in full and make comparisons with the experimental data available. Further refinement of these features and inclusion of additional features will be performed as more feedback is received.

  16. Collected software engineering papers, volume 11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This document is a collection of selected technical papers produced by participants in the Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) from November 1992 through November 1993. The purpose of the document is to make available, in one reference, some results of SEL research that originally appeared in a number of different forums. This is the 11th such volume of technical papers produced by the SEL. Although these papers cover several topics related to software engineering, they do not encompass the entire scope of SEL activities and interests. Additional information about the SEL and its research efforts may be obtained from the sources listed in the bibliography at the end of this document.

  17. Collected software engineering papers, volume 12

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This document is a collection of selected technical papers produced by participants in the Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) from November 1993 through October 1994. The purpose of the document is to make available, in one reference, some results of SEL research that originally appeared in a number of different forums. This is the 12th such volume of technical papers produced by the SEL. Although these papers cover several topics related to software engineering, they do not encompass the entire scope of SEL activities and interests. Additional information about the SEL and its research efforts may be obtained from the sources listed in the bibliography at the end of this document.

  18. Porosity of additive manufacturing parts for process monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Slotwinski, J. A.; Garboczi, E. J.

    2014-02-18

    Some metal additive manufacturing processes can produce parts with internal porosity, either intentionally (with careful selection of the process parameters) or unintentionally (if the process is not well-controlled.) Material porosity is undesirable for aerospace parts - since porosity could lead to premature failure - and desirable for some biomedical implants, since surface-breaking pores allow for better integration with biological tissue. Changes in a part's porosity during an additive manufacturing build may also be an indication of an undesired change in the process. We are developing an ultrasonic sensor for detecting changes in porosity in metal parts during fabrication on a metal powder bed fusion system, for use as a process monitor. This paper will describe our work to develop an ultrasonic-based sensor for monitoring part porosity during an additive build, including background theory, the development and detailed characterization of reference additive porosity samples, and a potential design for in-situ implementation.

  19. Porosity of additive manufacturing parts for process monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slotwinski, J. A.; Garboczi, E. J.

    2014-02-01

    Some metal additive manufacturing processes can produce parts with internal porosity, either intentionally (with careful selection of the process parameters) or unintentionally (if the process is not well-controlled.) Material porosity is undesirable for aerospace parts - since porosity could lead to premature failure - and desirable for some biomedical implants, since surface-breaking pores allow for better integration with biological tissue. Changes in a part's porosity during an additive manufacturing build may also be an indication of an undesired change in the process. We are developing an ultrasonic sensor for detecting changes in porosity in metal parts during fabrication on a metal powder bed fusion system, for use as a process monitor. This paper will describe our work to develop an ultrasonic-based sensor for monitoring part porosity during an additive build, including background theory, the development and detailed characterization of reference additive porosity samples, and a potential design for in-situ implementation.

  20. Decontamination formulation with sorbent additive

    DOEpatents

    Tucker; Mark D. , Comstock; Robert H.

    2007-10-16

    A decontamination formulation and method of making that neutralizes the adverse health effects of both chemical and biological compounds, especially chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents, and toxic industrial chemicals. The formulation provides solubilizing compounds that serve to effectively render the chemical and biological compounds, particularly CW and BW compounds, susceptible to attack, and at least one reactive compound that serves to attack (and detoxify or kill) the compound. The formulation includes at least one solubilizing agent, a reactive compound, a bleaching activator, a sorbent additive, and water. The highly adsorbent, water-soluble sorbent additive (e.g., sorbitol or mannitol) is used to "dry out" one or more liquid ingredients, such as the liquid bleaching activator (e.g., propylene glycol diacetate or glycerol diacetate) and convert the activator into a dry, free-flowing powder that has an extended shelf life, and is more convenient to handle and mix in the field.

  1. Computer Software & Intellectual Property. Background Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Office of Technology Assessment.

    This background paper reviews copyright, patent, and trade secret protections as these issues are related to computer software. Topics discussed include current issues regarding legal protection for computer software including the necessity for defining intellectual property, determining what should or should not be protected, commerical piracy,…

  2. Evolution of the scientific paper

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    The first papers reporting original research results in technical periodicals and proceedings appeared in the late 17th century. Since that time, the typical scientific paper has evolved from a fairly simple document, accessible to a general audience, to a much more complex one, aimed at a specialized audience. The purpose of this article is to give an overview of what the first scientific papers were like and how they evolved to their present form and style. To facilitate this discussion, the scientific paper's development has arbitrarily been divided into four stages: the origin and formative years of the scientific paper (1665-1765), emergence of scientific papers written for specialized publications (1765-1865), development of the modem scientific paper (1865-1965), and hyperspecialization and computerization of the modem scientific paper (1965- ).

  3. Fire-Retardant Polymeric Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha K.; Smith, Trent M.

    2011-01-01

    Polyhydroxyamide (PHA) and polymethoxyamide (PMeOA) are fire-retardant (FR) thermoplastic polymers and have been found to be useful as an additive for imparting fire retardant properties to other compatible, thermoplastic polymers (including some elastomers). Examples of compatible flammable polymers include nylons, polyesters, and acrylics. Unlike most prior additives, PHA and PMeOA do not appreciably degrade the mechanical properties of the matrix polymer; indeed, in some cases, mechanical properties are enhanced. Also, unlike some prior additives, PHA and PMeOA do not decompose into large amounts of corrosive or toxic compounds during combustion and can be processed at elevated temperatures. PMeOA derivative formulations were synthesized and used as an FR additive in the fabrication of polyamide (PA) and polystyrene (PS) composites with notable reduction (>30 percent for PS) in peak heat release rates compared to the neat polymer as measured by a Cone Calorimeter (ASTM E1354). Synergistic effects were noted with nanosilica composites. These nanosilica composites had more than 50-percent reduction in peak heat release rates. In a typical application, a flammable thermoplastic, thermoplastic blend, or elastomer that one seeks to render flame-retardant is first dry-mixed with PHA or PMeOA or derivative thereof. The proportion of PHA or PMeOA or derivative in the mixture is typically chosen to lie between 1 and 20 weight percent. The dry blend can then be melt-extruded. The extruded polymer blend can further be extruded and/or molded into fibers, pipes, or any other of a variety of objects that may be required to be fire-retardant. The physical and chemical mechanisms which impart flame retardancy of the additive include inhibiting free-radical oxidation in the vapor phase, preventing vaporization of fuel (the polymer), and cooling through the formation of chemical bonds in either the vapor or the condensed phase. Under thermal stress, the cyclic hydroxyl/ methoxy

  4. Selected Papers in School Finance, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, William J., Jr.

    Of all the areas within public elementary and secondary education that are experiencing rapid change, none is experiencing more turmoil than school finance. This publication contains papers commissioned by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) to address the twin concerns of what additional school-finance information NCES should…

  5. Ionic liquids, electrolyte solutions including the ionic liquids, and energy storage devices including the ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Gering, Kevin L.; Harrup, Mason K.; Rollins, Harry W.

    2015-12-08

    An ionic liquid including a phosphazene compound that has a plurality of phosphorus-nitrogen units and at least one pendant group bonded to each phosphorus atom of the plurality of phosphorus-nitrogen units. One pendant group of the at least one pendant group comprises a positively charged pendant group. Additional embodiments of ionic liquids are disclosed, as are electrolyte solutions and energy storage devices including the embodiments of the ionic liquid.

  6. Student Papers in Local History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson County Community Coll., Overland Park, KS. Johnson County Center for Local History.

    Thirteen papers on Kansas and Johnson County, Kansas history are presented. The papers were written by students in a course at the Johnson County Center for Local History or for independent study in local history. The papers are: "Conditions and Construction of Gardner Lake"; "The History of St. Joseph's Church, Shawnee, Kansas"; "Patrons of…

  7. Addenda to the Preceding Paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatnagar, Rajat; Finn, Robert

    2016-05-01

    This work contains largely afterthoughts, relating to the paper immediately preceding it. We correlate and interpret our contributions in that paper, relative to those of an earlier publication by Aspley, He and McCuan. We propose specific laboratory experiments, suggested by formal predictions of those two papers.

  8. Wood lens design philosophy based on a binary additive manufacturing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marasco, Peter L.; Bailey, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    Using additive manufacturing techniques in optical engineering to construct a gradient index (GRIN) optic may overcome a number of limitations of GRIN technology. Such techniques are maturing quickly, yielding additional design degrees of freedom for the engineer. How best to employ these degrees of freedom is not completely clear at this time. This paper describes a preliminary design philosophy, including assumptions, pertaining to a particular printing technique for GRIN optics. It includes an analysis based on simulation and initial component measurement.

  9. Urine-activated paper batteries for biosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang Lee, Ki

    2005-09-01

    The first urine-activated laminated paper batteries have been demonstrated and reported in this paper. A simple and cheap fabrication process for the paper batteries has been developed which is compatible with the existing plastic laminating technologies or plastic molding technologies. In this battery, a magnesium (Mg) layer and copper chloride (CuCl) in the filter paper are used as the anode and the cathode, respectively. A stack consisting of a Mg layer, CuCl-doped filter paper and a copper (Cu) layer sandwiched between two plastic layers is laminated into the paper batteries by passing through the heating roller at 120 °C. The paper battery is tested and it can deliver a power greater than 1.5 mW. In addition, these urine-activated laminated paper batteries could be integrated with bioMEMS devices such as home-based health test kits providing a power source for the electronic circuit. A portion of this paper was presented at The 4th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2004), 28 30 November, 2004, Kyoto, Japan.

  10. Addressing questions about including environmental effects in the DMSO HLA

    SciTech Connect

    Hummel, J.R.

    1996-10-01

    The Defense Modeling and Simulation Office (DMSO) is developing a High Level Architecture (HLA) to support the DOD Modeling and Simulation (M and S) community. Many, if not all, of the simulations involve the environment in some fashion. In some applications, the simulation takes place in an acknowledged environment without any environmental functionality being taken into account. The Joint Training Federation Prototype (JTFp) is one of several prototype efforts that have been created to provide a test of the DMSO HLA. In addition to addressing the applicability of the HLA to a training community, the JTFp is also one of two prototype efforts that is explicitly including environmental effects in their simulation effort. These two prototyping efforts are examining the issues associated with the inclusion of the environment in an HLA federation. In deciding whether or not to include an environmental federation in the JTFp effort, a number of questions have been raised about the environment and the HLA. These questions have raised the issue of incompatibility between the environment and the HLA and also shown that there is something unique about including the environment in simulations. The purpose of this White Paper, which was developed with inputs from the National Air and Space [Warfare] Model Program among others, is to address the various questions that have been posed about including environmental effects in an HLA simulation.

  11. An unusual case of xylophagia (paper-eating)

    PubMed Central

    Gowda, Mahesh; Patel, Bhavin M.; Preeti, S.; Chandrasekar, M.

    2014-01-01

    Xylophagia is a condition involving the consumption of paper and form of eating disorder known as pica. Pica is an unusual craving for ingestion of either edible or inedible substances. Inhalants are volatile substances, which produce chemical vapors that can be inhaled to induce a psycho-active or mind altering effect. Although, pica is not linked to solvent abuse, here we report an adolescent case of paper-eating with solvent dependence. PMID:25535449

  12. Should Relational Aggression Be Included in DSM-V?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keenan, Kate; Coyne, Claire; Lahey, Benjamin B.

    2008-01-01

    The study examines whether relational aggression should be included in DSM-V disruptive behavior disorders. The results conclude that some additional information is gathered from assessing relational aggression but not enough to be included in DSM-V.

  13. Call for Papers: Photonics in Switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosinska, Lena; Glick, Madeleine

    2006-04-01

    Call for Papers: Photonics in Switching

    Guest Editors:

    Lena Wosinska, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) / ICT Sweden Madeleine Glick, Intel Research, Cambridge, UK

    Technologies based on DWDM systems allow data transmission with bit rates of Tbit/s on a single fiber. To facilitate this enormous transmission volume, high-capacity and high-speed network nodes become inevitable in the optical network. Wideband switching, WDM switching, optical burst switching (OBS), and optical packet switching (OPS) are promising technologies for harnessing the bandwidth of WDM optical fiber networks in a highly flexible and efficient manner. As a number of key optical component technologies approach maturity, photonics in switching is becoming an increasingly attractive and practical solution for the next-generation of optical networks. The scope of this special issue is focused on the technology and architecture of optical switching nodes, including the architectural and algorithmic aspects of high-speed optical networks.

    Scope of Submission

    The scope of the papers includes, but is not limited to, the following topics:
    • WDM node architectures
    • Novel device technologies enabling photonics in switching, such as optical switch fabrics, optical memory, and wavelength conversion
    • Routing protocols
    • WDM switching and routing
    • Quality of service
    • Performance measurement and evaluation
    • Next-generation optical networks: architecture, signaling, and control
    • Traffic measurement and field trials
    • Optical burst and packet switching
    • OBS/OPS node architectures
    • Burst/Packet scheduling and routing algorithms
    • Contention resolution/avoidance strategies
    • Services and applications for OBS/OPS (e.g., grid networks, storage-area networks, etc.)
    • Burst assembly and ingress traffic shaping

    • Paper diagnostic device for quantitative electrochemical detection of ricin at picomolar levels.

      PubMed

      Cunningham, Josephine C; Scida, Karen; Kogan, Molly R; Wang, Bo; Ellington, Andrew D; Crooks, Richard M

      2015-01-01

      We report a paper-based assay platform for detection of ricin a chain. The paper platform is assembled by simple origami paper folding. The sensor is based on quantitative, electrochemical detection of silver nanoparticle labels linked to a magnetic microbead support via a ricin immunosandwich. Importantly, ricin was detected at concentrations as low as 34 pM. Additionally, the assay is robust, even in the presence of 100-fold excess hoax materials. Finally, the device is easily remediated after use by incineration. The cost of the device, not including reagents, is just $0.30. The total assay time, including formation of the immunosandwich, is 9.5 min. PMID:26224395

    • Numerical Simulation of Liquid Jet Atomization Including Turbulence Effects

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Trinh, Huu P.; Chen, C. P.; Balasubramanyam, M. S.

      2005-01-01

      This paper describes numerical implementation of a newly developed hybrid model, T-blob/T-TAB, into an existing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) program for primary and secondary breakup simulation of liquid jet atomization. This model extend two widely used models, the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability of Reitz (blob model) and the Taylor-Analogy-Breakup (TAB) secondary droplet breakup by O'Rourke and Amsden to include turbulence effects. In the primary breakup model, the level of the turbulence effect on the liquid breakup depends on the characteristic scales and the initial flow conditions. For the secondary breakup, an additional turbulence force acted on parent drops is modeled and integrated into the TAB governing equation. Several assessment studies are presented and the results indicate that the existing KH and TAB models tend to under-predict the product drop size and spray angle, while the current model provides superior results when compared with the measured data.

    • The Chemistry of Paper Preservation Part 4. Alkaline Paper.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Carter, Henry A.

      1997-01-01

      Discusses the problem of the inherent instability of paper due to the presence of acids that catalyze the hydrolytic degradation of cellulose. Focuses on the chemistry involved in the sizing of both acid and alkaline papers and the types of fillers used. Discusses advantages and problems of alkaline papermaking. Contains 48 references. (JRH)

    • Forest products: Fiber loading for paper manufacturing

      SciTech Connect

      1999-09-29

      Fact sheet on manufacturing filler during paper manufacturing written for the NICE3 Program. With its new fiber loading process, Voith Sulzer, Inc., is greatly improving the efficiency of paper production and recycling. Fiber loading produces precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) filler in the pulp recycling process at costs below conventional means. Fiber loading allows papermakers to use as much filler, like PCC, as possible because it costs 80% less than fiber. In addition, increased filler and fines retention due to fiber loading reduces the quantity of greenhouse gas emissions, deinking sludge, and other waste while substantially lowering energy costs. Currently, the most efficient way to produce PCC as filler is to make it in a satellite plant adjacent to a paper mill. Satellite plants exist near large scale paper mills (producing 700 tons per day) because the demand at large mills justifies building a costly ($15 million, average) satellite plant. This new fiber loading process combines the PCC manufacturing technology used in a satellite plant with the pulp processing operations of a paper mill. It is 33% less expensive to augment an existing paper mill with fiber loading technology than to build a satellite plant for the same purpose. This technology is applicable to the manufacturing of all printing and writing paper, regardless of the size or capacity of the paper mill.

    • A simulation of energy utilization and technological change in the pulp and paper industry

      SciTech Connect

      Hyman, B.; Roop, J.M.

      1996-12-31

      The ITEMS software package is used to simulate adoption of energy-efficient technologies in the paper industry under several scenarios. The simulation is calibrated so that the reference year replicates the 1991 fuel utilization and end use patterns in the paper industry. This paper describes the main features of the ITEMS, including its technology database, the manner in which it simulates the key process steps in producing paper products, and the decision-making rules use in ITEMS regarding technology adoption. In addition, the paper describes the pulp and paper-making technologies included in the simulation. The value of ITEMS in assessing the impacts of R and D investments in energy-efficiency and other policy options is examined.

    • Introduction to the Paper Symposium

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Carpenter, D. K.

      1996-05-01

      by so doing initiated the discussion and controversy that eventually led to the following four papers. In this step they took as the thermodynamic system of interest not just the ether but the ether together with the entire container that separates it from the surrounding constant-temperature, constant-pressure fluid. For this system, they argued, the criterion deltaG < 0 is valid. This conclusion of theirs has been seriously criticized, especially by Tykodi (2), and later by Noyes (3). Extensive discussion ensued, including several other people who were drawn into the controversy, of whom only Wood and Battino (4) chose to submit a manuscript as part of this symposium. The original controversy dealt with the question: is deltaG for the Bates process negative as argued by Schomaker and Waser (1), or zero (or almost so), as argued by Tykodi (2)? This led to concerns by Noyes about how the pressure should be defined (3) and by Wood and Battino that it is not appropriate to utilize the Gibbs function in describing the Bates process (4). The various authors not only disagreed, sometimes sharply, on these matters but eventually carried the discussion into related but somewhat more distant areas including the following: The role of the container walls, which experience a change in the differential pressure on the inside and outside surfaces (5). The question of whether it is possible to define a Gibbs function for anisotropic solids (6) and if it is, how it should be done (5,7). The use of "Global" intensive properties (in particular pressure) of the surroundings to characterize a system in which such properties may not be uniform (5). The relationship of the variance (in the sense of the phase rule) of a system to its most appropriate thermodynamic function (4). A historical issue--exactly what did J. W. Gibbs say regarding the definition of a Gibbs function for systems in which the pressure was not uniform and/or there were anisotropic solids present (5-7)? When it

    • Additional EIPC Study Analysis. Final Report

      SciTech Connect

      Hadley, Stanton W; Gotham, Douglas J.; Luciani, Ralph L.

      2014-12-01

      Between 2010 and 2012 the Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative (EIPC) conducted a major long-term resource and transmission study of the Eastern Interconnection (EI). With guidance from a Stakeholder Steering Committee (SSC) that included representatives from the Eastern Interconnection States Planning Council (EISPC) among others, the project was conducted in two phases. Phase 1 involved a long-term capacity expansion analysis that involved creation of eight major futures plus 72 sensitivities. Three scenarios were selected for more extensive transmission- focused evaluation in Phase 2. Five power flow analyses, nine production cost model runs (including six sensitivities), and three capital cost estimations were developed during this second phase. The results from Phase 1 and 2 provided a wealth of data that could be examined further to address energy-related questions. A list of 14 topics was developed for further analysis. This paper brings together the earlier interim reports of the first 13 topics plus one additional topic into a single final report.

  1. 31 CFR 601.2 - Description of paper.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Secretary of the Treasury. All currency paper shall contain distinctive fibers, colored red and blue... addition to distinctive red and blue fibers, currency paper shall contain, for denominations prescribed...

  2. Design and fabrication of superamphiphobic paper surfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Lester; Breedveld, Victor; Hess, Dennis W

    2013-06-12

    Cellulose-based paper remains a vital component of modern day society; however, its use is severely limited in certain applications because of hydrophilic and oleophilic properties. In this manuscript we present a novel method to create superamphiphobic paper by combining the control of fiber size and structure with plasma etching and fluoropolymer deposition. The heterogeneous nature of the paper structure is drastically different from that of artificially created superamphiphobic surfaces. By refining the wood fibers, smaller diameter fibers (fibrils) are created to support fluid droplets. After oxygen plasma etching and deposition of a fluoropolymer film, paper samples are able to support motor oil contact angles of 149 ± 3°, although these structures readily absorb n-hexadecane. Exchange of water in the pulp solution with sec-butanol provides additional control over fiber spacing to create superamphiphobic substrates with contact angles >150° for water, ethylene glycol, motor oil, and n-hexadecane. PMID:23647359

  3. Should family planning include STD services?

    PubMed

    Finger, W R

    1994-05-01

    Recent reviews suggest that the addition of programs aimed at preventing and controlling sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), specifically human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), to existing family planning programs does not necessarily dilute overall program effectiveness. In Colombia, Mexico, and Jamaica, where condom distribution and/or information to prevent HIV transmission was integrated into the activities of family planning field workers, no negative effect on the image of condoms as a pregnancy prevention method was observed and there was a great demand on the part of family planning clients for information about acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). In Brazil, family planning staff are receiving training in HIV risk assessment and the counseling of women in partner negotiation skills. However, steps must be taken to reach men since it is their high-risk behavior that puts most women at risk of HIV. Both separate STD clinics for men and condom social marketing projects have yielded promising results. Obstacles to the addition of STD services to family planning programs include the need to treat male partners as well as female clients, a shortage of diagnostic tools and antibiotics for treatment, and the fact that the majority of women with STDs are asymptomatic. Indicative of the increased attention being given this approach, however, is the recent release of guidelines by the US Agency for International Development Office of Population on how family planning programs should approach integration. Suggested activities include condom promotion, behavior change, counseling, information, contraceptive development, and selected efforts at STD treatment. PMID:12287744

  4. EDITORIAL: Selected papers from Photon06

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Julian D. C.

    2007-06-01

    Photon06 is the fourth in a biennial series of events that began in 2000 and has grown to become the UK's largest optics research meeting. Photon06 is a set of co-located meetings, including the Institute of Physics conferences Optics and Photonics and Quantum Electronics and Photonics QEP-17, plus an exhibition, and the Industry Technology Programme. Photon06 is organized by the UK Consortium for Photonics and Optics (UKCPO), whose members comprise all organizations that represent the UK's optics community, whether learned societies, professional institutions, trade associations or regional special interest groups. In hosting the Photon series it has been the objective of the UKCPO to provide a single forum for UK optics. Photon06 was held at the University of Manchester, 4 7 September 2006, and was attended by around 500 people. Attendance was predominantly from the UK, although international representation is growing steadily. Within the science programme, over 300 papers were presented. The purpose of this special issue is to present a representative selection of the research reported at Photon06. On behalf of the conference, I am grateful to the editors of Journal of Optics A for the opportunity to provide an archival record of a sample of Photon06, as they did for Photon04. Once again, it turns out that the majority of the papers in the special issue follow the theme of measurement and instrumentation. These are subjects where the conference and the UK community have been traditionally strong, and continue to be so, spanning the interests of the Optical Group and the Instrument Science and Technology Group of the Institute of Physics, and the Fringe Analysis Special Interest Group. There can be few areas of physics so diverse in application, and of such immediate value in the wider world. The range of applications covered in this issue is illustrated by two of the papers, that by Blazej et al dealing with photon counting for altimetry in planetary exploration

  5. Paper: Too Valuable to Buy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemecology, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Presents a simplified version of the commercial papermaking process as an activity for students to make new paper from the recycling of used paper. Describes the necessary equipment and ingredients and the steps in the papermaking process that extend over several days. (MCO)

  6. Paper Airplanes: A Classroom Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Painter, Richard A.

    1976-01-01

    A learning experience is described for upper elementary or junior high students involving the manufacture, transportation, and marketing of a product for consumers. Steps are given and roles are assigned for students to convert raw material (paper) to a finished product (paper airplanes) and to sell it. (AV)

  7. WATESOL Working Papers, No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meloni, Christine, Ed.; Haack, Ellen, Ed.

    This document contains six papers relating to the teaching of English as a foreign language. The titles and authors are as follows: "The Fail-Safe Micro Research Paper" (Mary Anne Saunders); "Is Role Playing an Effective EFL Teaching Technique?" (Frances L. Smith); "Research on the Cloze Procedure of Reading Comprehension and Its Use in the EFL…

  8. Influential Papers in Child Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oates, R. Kim; Donnelly, Anne Cohn

    1997-01-01

    Child protection professionals (N=242) were surveyed regarding their picks for the best papers or book chapters in the field. A citation search was also conducted. Eight papers appeared in the top 15 of both the professional survey and the citation search, with "The Battered Child Syndrome" (Kempe, et al., 1962) appearing at the top of both lists.…

  9. Marbleized Paper: A Scientific Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grambo, Gregory

    1994-01-01

    Discusses marbleized paper, which originated in Japan in the eighth century and became quite popular in Europe and the United States in the nineteenth century. Describes the scientific process behind marbleization, and explains how students can produce their own colorful designs by placing a sheet of paper on top of oil-based paints floated in a…

  10. Happy Birthday with Handmade Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skophammer, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Making paper in the blender is always exciting for students. When coupled with using the paper to make a mural for a birthday celebration, the excitement swells. Eric Carle is a great inspiration to children with the books he has written and illustrated, such as "The Very Hungry Caterpillar" and "The Very Busy Spider." In this article, the author…

  11. [Papers of the ELF Project].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Philip; And Others

    The five papers in this collection discuss various aspects of the Electronic Learning-Package Factory (ELF) project at the University of Bradford in England. In the first paper, "Adoption of CAL in Higher Education: A Cooperative Approach to Research, Development and Implementation," Philip Barker considers the opportunities for collaborative…

  12. Problem Solving through Paper Folding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wares, Arsalan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a couple of challenging mathematical problems that involve paper folding. These problem-solving tasks can be used to foster geometric and algebraic thinking among students. The context of paper folding makes some of the abstract mathematical ideas involved relatively concrete. When implemented…

  13. CO2 laser cutting and ablative etching for the fabrication of paper-based devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spicar-Mihalic, P.; Toley, B.; Houghtaling, J.; Liang, T.; Yager, P.; Fu, E.

    2013-06-01

    We describe a method for fabricating paper-based microfluidic devices using a commercially available CO2 laser system. The method is versatile and allows for controlled through-cutting and ablative etching of nitrocellulose substrates. In addition, the laser system can cut a variety of components that are useful in the fabrication of paper-based devices, including cellulose wicking pads, glass fiber source pads and Mylar-based substrates for the device housing.

  14. Quantification of chemical contaminants in the paper and board fractions of municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Pivnenko, K; Olsson, M E; Götze, R; Eriksson, E; Astrup, T F

    2016-05-01

    Chemicals are used in materials as additives in order to improve the performance of the material or the production process itself. The presence of these chemicals in recyclable waste materials may potentially affect the recyclability of the materials. The addition of chemicals may vary depending on the production technology or the potential end-use of the material. Paper has been previously shown to potentially contain a large variety of chemicals. Quantitative data on the presence of chemicals in paper are necessary for appropriate waste paper management, including the recycling and re-processing of paper. However, a lack of quantitative data on the presence of chemicals in paper is evident in the literature. The aim of the present work is to quantify the presence of selected chemicals in waste paper derived from households. Samples of paper and board were collected from Danish households, including both residual and source-segregated materials, which were disposed of (e.g., through incineration) and recycled, respectively. The concentration of selected chemicals was quantified for all of the samples. The quantified chemicals included mineral oil hydrocarbons, phthalates, phenols, polychlorinated biphenyls, and selected toxic metals (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, and Pb). The results suggest large variations in the concentration of chemicals depending on the waste paper fraction analysed. Research on the fate of chemicals in waste recycling and potential problem mitigation measures should be focused on in further studies. PMID:26969284

  15. FY 1989 scientific and technical reports, articles, papers, and presentations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Joyce E. (Compiler)

    1989-01-01

    A compendium of bibliographic references to papers presented by Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) personnel and contractors during FY 1989 is provided. The papers include formal NASA technical reports, memoranda, papers which were published in technical journals, and presentations by MSFC personnel. The formal NASA technical reports and memoranda have abstracts included. Sources for obtaining these documents are also included.

  16. Paper recycling framework, the "Wheel of Fiber".

    PubMed

    Ervasti, Ilpo; Miranda, Ruben; Kauranen, Ilkka

    2016-06-01

    At present, there is no reliable method in use that unequivocally describes paper industry material flows and makes it possible to compare geographical regions with each other. A functioning paper industry Material Flow Account (MFA) that uses uniform terminology and standard definitions for terms and structures is necessary. Many of the presently used general level MFAs, which are called frameworks in this article, stress the importance of input and output flows but do not provide a uniform picture of material recycling. Paper industry is an example of a field in which recycling plays a key role. Additionally, terms related to paper industry recycling, such as collection rate, recycling rate, and utilization rate, are not defined uniformly across regions and time. Thus, reliably comparing material recycling activity between geographical regions or calculating any regional summaries is difficult or even impossible. The objective of this study is to give a partial solution to the problem of not having a reliable method in use that unequivocally describes paper industry material flows. This is done by introducing a new material flow framework for paper industry in which the flow and stage structure supports the use of uniform definitions for terms related to paper recycling. This new framework is termed the Detailed Wheel of Fiber. PMID:26994970

  17. Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility Position Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Oral, H Sarp; Hill, Jason J; Thach, Kevin G; Podhorszki, Norbert; Klasky, Scott A; Rogers, James H; Shipman, Galen M

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the business, administration, reliability, and usability aspects of storage systems at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF). The OLCF has developed key competencies in architecting and administration of large-scale Lustre deployments as well as HPSS archival systems. Additionally as these systems are architected, deployed, and expanded over time reliability and availability factors are a primary driver. This paper focuses on the implementation of the Spider parallel Lustre file system as well as the implementation of the HPSS archive at the OLCF.

  18. Evaluation of certain food additives.

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, with a view to recommending acceptable daily intakes (ADIs) and to preparing specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation and assessment of intake of food additives (in particular, flavouring agents). A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and intake data for certain food additives (asparaginase from Aspergillus niger expressed in A. niger, calcium lignosulfonate (40-65), ethyl lauroyl arginate, paprika extract, phospholipase C expressed in Pichia pastoris, phytosterols, phytostanols and their esters, polydimethylsiloxane, steviol glycosides and sulfites [assessment of dietary exposure]) and 10 groups of related flavouring agents (aliphatic branched-chain saturated and unsaturated alcohols, aldehydes, acids and related esters; aliphatic linear alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes, acids and related alcohols, acetals and esters; aliphatic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; alkoxy-substituted allylbenzenes present in foods and essential oils and used as flavouring agents; esters of aliphatic acyclic primary alcohols with aliphatic linear saturated carboxylic acids; furan-substituted aliphatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and related esters, sulfides, disulfides and ethers; miscellaneous nitrogen-containing substances; monocyclic and bicyclic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; hydroxy- and alkoxy-substituted benzyl derivatives; and substances structurally related to menthol). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: canthaxanthin; carob bean gum and carob bean gum (clarified); chlorophyllin copper complexes, sodium and potassium salts; Fast Green FCF; guar gum and guar gum (clarified

  19. Biomineralization Guided by Paper Templates.

    PubMed

    Camci-Unal, Gulden; Laromaine, Anna; Hong, Estrella; Derda, Ratmir; Whitesides, George M

    2016-01-01

    This work demonstrates the fabrication of partially mineralized scaffolds fabricated in 3D shapes using paper by folding, and by supporting deposition of calcium phosphate by osteoblasts cultured in these scaffolds. This process generates centimeter-scale free-standing structures composed of paper supporting regions of calcium phosphate deposited by osteoblasts. This work is the first demonstration that paper can be used as a scaffold to induce template-guided mineralization by osteoblasts. Because paper has a porous structure, it allows transport of O2 and nutrients across its entire thickness. Paper supports a uniform distribution of cells upon seeding in hydrogel matrices, and allows growth, remodelling, and proliferation of cells. Scaffolds made of paper make it possible to construct 3D tissue models easily by tuning material properties such as thickness, porosity, and density of chemical functional groups. Paper offers a new approach to study mechanisms of biomineralization, and perhaps ultimately new techniques to guide or accelerate the repair of bone. PMID:27277575

  20. Biomineralization Guided by Paper Templates

    PubMed Central

    Camci-Unal, Gulden; Laromaine, Anna; Hong, Estrella; Derda, Ratmir; Whitesides, George M.

    2016-01-01

    This work demonstrates the fabrication of partially mineralized scaffolds fabricated in 3D shapes using paper by folding, and by supporting deposition of calcium phosphate by osteoblasts cultured in these scaffolds. This process generates centimeter-scale free-standing structures composed of paper supporting regions of calcium phosphate deposited by osteoblasts. This work is the first demonstration that paper can be used as a scaffold to induce template-guided mineralization by osteoblasts. Because paper has a porous structure, it allows transport of O2 and nutrients across its entire thickness. Paper supports a uniform distribution of cells upon seeding in hydrogel matrices, and allows growth, remodelling, and proliferation of cells. Scaffolds made of paper make it possible to construct 3D tissue models easily by tuning material properties such as thickness, porosity, and density of chemical functional groups. Paper offers a new approach to study mechanisms of biomineralization, and perhaps ultimately new techniques to guide or accelerate the repair of bone. PMID:27277575

  1. CALL FOR PAPERS: Quantum control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, Stefano; Wiseman, Howard M.; Man'ko, Vladimir I.

    2004-10-01

    Over the last few decades, the achievements of highly precise technologies for manipulating systems at quantum scales have paved the way for the development of quantum control. Moreover, the proliferation of results in quantum information suggest that control theory might profitably be re-examined from this perspective. Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics will publish a topical issue devoted to quantum control. The Guest Editors invite contributions from researchers working in any area related to quantum control. Topics to be covered include: • Quantum Hamiltonian dynamics and programming control • Quantum decoherence control • Open loop control • Closed loop (feedback) control • Quantum measurement theory • Quantum noise and filtering • Estimation and decision theory • Quantum error correction • Group representation in quantum control • Coherent control in quantum optics and lasers • Coherent control in cavity QED and atom optics • Coherent control in molecular dynamics The topical issue is scheduled for publication in November 2005 and the DEADLINE for submission of contributions is 28 February 2005. All contributions will be peer-reviewed in accordance with the normal refereeing procedures and standards of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics. Submissions should preferably be in either standard LaTeX form or Microsoft Word. Advice on publishing your work in the journal may be found at www.iop.org/journals/authors/jopb. Enquiries regarding this topical issue may be addressed to the Publisher, Dr Claire Bedrock (claire.bedrock@iop.org). There are no page charges for publication. The corresponding author of each paper published will receive a complimentary copy of the topical issue. Contributions to the topical issue should preferably be submitted electronically at www.iop.org/journals/authors/jopb or by e-mail to jopb@iop.org. Authors unable to submit online or by e-mail may send hard copy contributions

  2. 16 CFR 1102.16 - Additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... PUBLICLY AVAILABLE CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY INFORMATION DATABASE (Eff. Jan. 10, 2011) Content Requirements... notices, the CPSC shall include in the Database any additional information it determines to be in...

  3. 19 CFR 134.2 - Additional duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... COUNTRY OF ORIGIN MARKING General Provisions § 134.2 Additional duties. Articles not marked as required by... container) to indicate the English name of the country of origin of the article or to include words...

  4. Paper Institute Restructures Grad Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Describes a restructuring program that places more emphasis on blending research and teaching at the practical level. Heavier emphasis will be placed on engineering and additional consideration given to environmental technology, economics, business, and law. (GS)

  5. Seminar on Cataloguing (1970): Working Paper and Proceedings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Documentation Research and Training Centre, Bangalore (India).

    The publication includes papers from the opening session, eighteen working papers on library cataloging, eighteen papers presented at group meetings and plenary sessions, and papers from the concluding session. The inaugural address "Cataloging Enters the Spiral of Scientific Method" was presented by S.R. Ranganathan. The working paper topics…

  6. 78 FR 22209 - Additional Synthetic Drug Testing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ... COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 26 Additional Synthetic Drug Testing AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION... NRC amend its Fitness for Duty program regulations to amend drug testing requirements to test for additional synthetic drugs currently not included in the regulations. The NRC determined that the...

  7. Asthma and anaphylactoid reactions to food additives.

    PubMed Central

    Tarlo, S. M.; Sussman, G. L.

    1993-01-01

    Presumed allergic reactions to hidden food additives are both controversial and important. Clinical manifestations include asthma, urticaria, angioedema, and anaphylactic-anaphylactoid events. Most adverse reactions are caused by just a few additives, such as sulfites and monosodium glutamate. Diagnosis is suspected from the history and confirmed by specific challenge. The treatment is specific avoidance. PMID:8499792

  8. Addition polyimide end cap study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    The characterization of addition polyimides with various end caps for adhesive applications at 120-250 C environments is discussed. Oligometric polyimides were prepared from 3,3',4,4'-benzophenone tetracarboxylic dianhydride and 3,3'-methylenedianiline which were end-capped with functionally reactive moities which cause crosslinking when the oligomers are heated to 200-400 C. The syntheses of the oligomers are outlined. The thermolysis of the oligomers was studied by differential scanning calorimetry and the resulting polymers were characterized by differential thermal analysis and adhesive performance. The adhesive data include lap shear strengths on titanium 6-4 adherends both before and after aging for 1000 hours at 121 C and/or 232 C.

  9. The Mystery of Photographic Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girvin, Robert

    1975-01-01

    Do your beginning photographic students ever wonder why photographic paper reacts the way it does? One way that this question can be answered is by making a photogram. Article explained the steps necessary for making a photogram. (Author/RK)

  10. Understanding Stirling engines. Technical paper

    SciTech Connect

    Beale, W.

    1984-01-01

    The paper describes the basic Stirling engine, as well as some of the most promising modern varieties. The intent is to familiarize people in developing countries with the engine's operation and range of applications.

  11. Genealogical Trees of Scientific Papers

    PubMed Central

    Waumans, Michaël Charles; Bersini, Hugues

    2016-01-01

    Many results have been obtained when studying scientific papers citations databases in a network perspective. Articles can be ranked according to their current in-degree and their future popularity or citation counts can even be predicted. The dynamical properties of such networks and the observation of the time evolution of their nodes started more recently. This work adopts an evolutionary perspective and proposes an original algorithm for the construction of genealogical trees of scientific papers on the basis of their citation count evolution in time. The fitness of a paper now amounts to its in-degree growing trend and a “dying” paper will suddenly see this trend declining in time. It will give birth and be taken over by some of its most prevalent citing “offspring”. Practically, this might be used to trace the successive published milestones of a research field. PMID:26954677

  12. Infrared Analysis Using Tissue Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Noel L.; Wood, Steven G.

    1987-01-01

    Described is a quick, easy, and cheap, but effective method of obtaining infrared spectra of solids and nonvolatile liquids by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The technique uses tissue paper as a support matrix. (RH)

  13. Thermal Conductivity of Coated Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, Lei L; Pan, Yun-Long; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton; Wang, Hsin; Peterson, Robert C.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a method for measuring the thermal conductivity of paper using a hot disk system. To the best of our knowledge, few publications are found discussing the thermal conductivity of a coated paper although it is important to various forms of today s digital printing where heat is used for imaging as well as for toner fusing. This motivates us to investigate the thermal conductivity of paper coating. Our investigation demonstrates that thermal conductivity is affected by the coat weight and the changes in the thermal conductivity affect ink gloss and density. As the coat weight increases, the thermal conductivity increases. Both the ink gloss and density decrease as the thermal conductivity increases. The ink gloss appears to be more sensitive to the changes in the thermal conductivity.

  14. Another Day, Another White Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomlinson, Sally

    2006-01-01

    This article argues that the proposals in the 2005 White Paper can be largely explained by a New Labour emphasis on "meritocracy" merging with a right-wing belief in education as a means of creating an hierarchical society.

  15. Student Papers on Macroeconomic Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fels, Rendigs

    1984-01-01

    A project for a seminar course in macroeconomic policy which involved students in writing, presenting, and discussing a position paper on a specific policy issue is described. Students rated the exercise very highly. (RM)

  16. Adverse reactions to food additives.

    PubMed

    Simon, R A

    1986-01-01

    There are thousands of agents that are intentionally added to the food that we consume. These include preservatives, stabilizers, conditioners, thickeners, colorings, flavorings, sweeteners, antioxidants, etc. etc. Yet only a surprisingly small number have been associated with hypersensitivity reactions. Amongst all the additives, FD&C dyes have been most frequently associated with adverse reactions. Tartrazine is the most notorious of them all; however, critical review of the medical literature and current Scripps Clinic studies would indicate that tartrazine has been confirmed to be at best only occasionally associated with flares of urticaria or asthma. There is no convincing evidence in the literature of reactivity to the other azo or nonazo dyes. This can also be said of BHA/BHT, nitrites/nitrates and sorbates. Parabens have been shown to elicit IgE mediated hypersensitivity reactions when used as pharmaceutical preservatives; however, as with the other additives noted above, ingested parabens have only occasionally been associated with adverse reactions. MSG, the cause of the 'Chinese restaurant syndrome' has only been linked to asthma in one report. Sulfiting agents used primarily as food fresheners and to control microbial growth in fermented beverages have been established as the cause of any where from mild to severe and even fatal reactions in at least 5% of the asthmatic population. Other reactions reported to follow sulfite ingestion include anaphylaxis, gastro intestinal complaints and dermatological eruptions. The prevalence of these non asthmatic reactions is unknown. The mechanism of sulfite sensitive asthma is also unknown but most likely involves hyperreactivity to inhale SO2 in the great majority of cases; however, there are reports of IgE mediated reactions and other sulfite sensitive asthmatics have been found with low levels of sulfite oxidase; necessary to oxidize endogenous sulfite to sulfate. PMID:3302664

  17. Stimulating Class Discussion Using an Online Newspaper Created with Twitter and Paper.li

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFall, Kevin Stanley; Morgan, Kate

    2013-01-01

    The authors describe an assignment in which first-year university students develop a sense of community by discussing personally relevant topics via the shared experience enabled by the social media tools Twitter and Paper.li. A list of references and suggested readings is included.

  18. Additives in fibers and fabrics.

    PubMed

    Barker, R H

    1975-06-01

    The additives and contaminants which occur in textile fibers vary widely, depending on the type of fiber and the pretreatment which it has received. Synthetic fibers such as nylon and polyester contain trace amounts of contaminants such as catalysts and catalyst deactivators which remain after the synthesis of the basic polymers. In addition, there are frequently a number of materials which are added to perform specific functions in almost all man-made fibers. Examples of these would include traces of metals or metal salts used as tracers for identification of specific lots of fiber, TiO2 or similar materials added as delustrants, and a host of organic species added for such special purposes as antistatic agents or flame retardants. There may also be considerable quantities of residual monomer or small oligomers dissolved in the polymer matrix. The situation becomes even more complex after the fibers are converted into fabric form. Numerous materials are applied at various stages of fabric preparation to act as lubricants, sizing agents, antistats, bleaches, and wetting agents to facilitate the processing, but these are normally removed before the fabric reaches the cutters of the ultimate consumers and therefore usually do not constitute potential hazards. However, there are many other chemical agents which are frequently added during the later stages of fabric preparation and which are not designed to be removed. Aside from dyes and printing pigments, the most common additive for apparel fabrics is a durable press treatment. This generally involves the use of materials capable of crosslinking cellulosics by reacting through such functions as N-methylolated amides or related compounds such as ureas and carbamates. These materials pose some potential hazards due to both the nitrogenous bases and the formaldehyde which they usually release. There is usually also some residual catalyst in fabrics which have received such treatments. Other types of chemical treatments

  19. Additives in fibers and fabrics.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, R H

    1975-01-01

    The additives and contaminants which occur in textile fibers vary widely, depending on the type of fiber and the pretreatment which it has received. Synthetic fibers such as nylon and polyester contain trace amounts of contaminants such as catalysts and catalyst deactivators which remain after the synthesis of the basic polymers. In addition, there are frequently a number of materials which are added to perform specific functions in almost all man-made fibers. Examples of these would include traces of metals or metal salts used as tracers for identification of specific lots of fiber, TiO2 or similar materials added as delustrants, and a host of organic species added for such special purposes as antistatic agents or flame retardants. There may also be considerable quantities of residual monomer or small oligomers dissolved in the polymer matrix. The situation becomes even more complex after the fibers are converted into fabric form. Numerous materials are applied at various stages of fabric preparation to act as lubricants, sizing agents, antistats, bleaches, and wetting agents to facilitate the processing, but these are normally removed before the fabric reaches the cutters of the ultimate consumers and therefore usually do not constitute potential hazards. However, there are many other chemical agents which are frequently added during the later stages of fabric preparation and which are not designed to be removed. Aside from dyes and printing pigments, the most common additive for apparel fabrics is a durable press treatment. This generally involves the use of materials capable of crosslinking cellulosics by reacting through such functions as N-methylolated amides or related compounds such as ureas and carbamates. These materials pose some potential hazards due to both the nitrogenous bases and the formaldehyde which they usually release. There is usually also some residual catalyst in fabrics which have received such treatments. Other types of chemical treatments

  20. Paper or Plastic? Data Equivalence in Paper and Electronic Diaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Amie S.; Rafaeli, Eshkol; Bolger, Niall; Shrout, Patrick E.; Reis, Harry T.

    2006-01-01

    Concern has been raised about the lack of participant compliance in diary studies that use paper-and-pencil as opposed to electronic formats. Three studies explored the magnitude of compliance problems and their effects on data quality. Study 1 used random signals to elicit diary reports and found close matches to self-reported completion times,…

  1. Thermal Paper Exposed: The Secret of "Smart Paper"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diener, Lynn; McCall, Brian; Gimm, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses how, as part of a National Science Foundation-funded internship program, the authors translated smart papers into an exciting and informative activity for the middle school classroom. This activity opens students' eyes to an everyday technology and inspires them to ask questions about other hidden technologies that they…

  2. Higher Education in TAFE: An Issues Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moodie, Gavin; Wheelahan, Leesa; Billett, Stephen; Kelly, Ann

    2009-01-01

    Growth in mixed-sector institutions offering both vocational and higher education qualifications is expected to increase given recent and predicted policy changes. This issues paper focuses on the provision and management of higher education in technical and further education (TAFE) institutes. Issues raised for discussion include the governance…

  3. Statistics Section. Management and Technology Division. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on the application of statistics to library research and library administration which were presented at the 1982 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) "Price Indexes for Library Materials: Steps toward International Standardization" by Frederick C. Lynden (United States); (2) "Australian Census of…

  4. Brookings Papers on Education Policy, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravitch, Diane, Ed.

    In this inaugural issue of "Brookings Papers on Education Policy" a varied group of scholars considers different dimensions of student performance. Several contributors try to offer a clear picture of how American students are performing as compared with their international peers and with the past. The following are included: (1) "Introduction"…

  5. Conservation Section. Management and Technology Division. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on book and document conservation and restoration, which were presented at the 1983 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference, include: (1) "The Problems of Conservation of Valuable Library Possessions," in which Karl Jackel (West Germany) discusses problems in obtaining restoration materials, storage facilities,…

  6. Computer versus Paper Testing in Precollege Economics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butters, Roger B.; Walstad, William B.

    2011-01-01

    Interest is growing at the precollege level in computer testing (CT) instead of paper-and-pencil testing (PT) for subjects in the school curriculum, including economics. Before economic educators adopt CT, a better understanding of its likely effects on test-taking behavior and performance compared with PT is needed. Using two volunteer student…

  7. The Fail-Safe Micro Research Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Mary Anne

    A key element in a research paper writing assignment modified for students of English as a second language to assure their success is teacher control over most of the process. A chronological plan for action for the micro research project includes these steps: creating an awareness of current events and controversial issues, practicing necessary…

  8. Language Teaching Methodology. ERIC Issue Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, Theodore S.

    This paper gives an overview of 10 directions language teachers might take in the future. After providing background on the history of language teaching, language teaching methodology is defined and a distinction is made between methodologies and approaches. Next, the 10 scenarios are briefly described. They include the following: teacher/learner…

  9. Statistics Section. Management and Technology Division. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on library statistics, which were presented at the 1983 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference, include: (1) "Network Statistics and Library Management," in which Glyn T. Evans (United States) suggests that network statistics can be used to improve internal library decisionmaking, enhance group resource sharing…

  10. CUHK Papers in Linguistics, Number 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Gladys, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    Papers in this issue include the following: "Code-Mixing in Hongkong Cantonese-English Bilinguals: Constraints and Processes" (Brian Chan Hok-shing); "Information on Quantifiers and Argument Structure in English Learner's Dictionaries" (Thomas Hun-tak Lee); "Systematic Variability: In Search of a Linguistic Explanation" (Gladys Tang); "Aspect…

  11. Interlending Section. Collections and Services Division. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on interlibrary lending which were presented at the 1982 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) "Inter-Library Loan Service of the National Library of China," a description by Huang Jungui and Zhao Qikang (People's Republic of China) of the history, organization, purposes, and possible future…

  12. Opening Statements and Speeches. Plenary Session. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Official opening statements, organizational reports, and papers on libraries in a technological world, which were presented at the 1983 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) welcoming addresses by Franz Georg Kaltwasser and Mathilde Berghofer-Weichner; (2) opening speeches by Else Granheim (IFLA president)…

  13. Art Libraries Section. Special Libraries Division. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on art libraries and information services for the arts, which were presented at the 1983 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference, include: (1) "'I See All': Information Technology and the Universal Availability of Images" by Philip Pacey (United Kingdom); (2) "Online Databases in the Fine Arts" by Michael Rinehart…

  14. MITA Working Papers in Psycholinguistics, Volume 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otsu, Yukio, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This volume of working papers in psycholinguistics, from the "MITA Psycholinguistics Circle", contains the following articles: "Some Problems in the Acquisition of Derived Nouns" (Mika Endo); "World Knowledge in Children's Sentence Comprehension" (Yuki Hirose); "Examining the Including and Excluding Roles of Positive Evidence: A Study of a Case…

  15. Texas Papers in Foreign Language Education, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madden, John, Ed.; Johanson, Robert, Ed.; Carpenter, Mark, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    Four papers on second language learning are include. "Comparing Native and Nonnative Speakers' Error Correction in Foreign Language Writing" (Catherine A. Jolivet) examines differences between native and nonnative French speaking teachers in their error correction on students' compositions. "ESL Students' Opinions About Instruction in…

  16. College Quality Assurance Assurances. Mendip Papers 020.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sallis, E.; Hingley, P.

    This paper discusses the increasing interest in quality assurance in British education including its measurement and management through the introduction of a quality assurance system. The reasons and benefits of beginning a quality assurance system are discussed, and questions of what constitutes quality, whether it is quality in fact…

  17. Africa Section. Regional Activities Division. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on the role and services of African libraries and the education of African librarians, which were presented at the 1983 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference, include: (1) "The Information Sector in the Economic Development of Africa: The Potential Role for Libraries," in which Benzies Y. Boadi (Nigeria)…

  18. The Bradford Papers Annual, Volume II, 1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robb, Gary M., Ed.; And Others

    This annual collection promotes scholarly writing, applied research findings, and innovative programs and activities in experiential education. 1987 papers include: (1) "The Effects of a Structured Camp Experience on Perceived Freedom in Leisure" (Mark James) on the effects of a structured camp experience on handicapped participants' perceived…

  19. Edinburgh Working Papers in Applied Linguistics, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkinson, Brian, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    Papers on applied linguistics and language pedagogy include: "Non-Exact Quantification in Slide Presentations of Medical Research" (Ron Howard); "Modality and Point of View: A Contrastive Analysis of Japanese Wartime and Peacetime Newspaper Discourse" (Noriko Iwamoto); "Classroom Transcripts and 'Noticing' in Teacher Education" (Tony Lynch);…

  20. CUHK Papers in Linguistics, Number 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yip, Virginia, Ed.

    1991-01-01

    Papers in this volume include the following: "Constraints on Dative Acquisition by Chinese ESL Learners" (Hua Dong Fan); "The Learnability of Locality Conditions on Quantification" (Thomas Lee); "Do Learning Environments Make a Difference? A Study on the Acquisition of the English Interrogatives by Three Types of Cantonese Classroom Learners"…

  1. Optical Imaging versus Paper Records Storage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldygo, Robert

    1999-01-01

    States that the maintenance and storage of paper documents has many inherent weaknesses, including hidden costs and attached risks. Asserts that document imaging is a viable, up-to-date technology that could eliminate many of these costs and risks. Describes the system benefits, scope, requirements, and costs and the legality of optically stored…

  2. Working Papers in Linguistics No. l5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malikouti-Drachman, Angeliki; And Others

    This issue is devoted to first language acquisition. It includes twelve papers concerning: the acquisition of liquids ("1" and "r"); creative errors in the written syntax of deaf children; theoretical and methodological problems in the acquisition of phonology, illustrated from Greek and English: the basis of articulation; the philosophy of…

  3. Edinburgh Working Papers in Applied Linguistics, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Keith, Ed.; Parkinson, Brian, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    Papers on applied linguistics and language pedagogy include: "A Genre Analysis Study of 80 Medical Abstracts" (Kenneth Anderson, Joan Maclean); "Oral Classroom Testing in an Adult French Community Class" (Sheena Davies, Aileen Irvine, Jacqueline Larrieu); "Whose Relevance? Interpretation of Hybrid Texts by a Multiple Audience" (Katalin Egri…

  4. PT3 Papers. [SITE 2001 Section].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierson, Melissa, Ed.; Thompson, Mary, Ed.; Adams, Angelle, Ed.; Beyer, Evelyn, Ed.; Cheriyan, Saru, Ed.; Starke, Leslie, Ed.

    This document contains the papers on the PT3 (Preparing Tomorrow's Teachers to use Technology) program from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2001 conference. Topics covered include: modeling instruction with modern information and communications technology; transforming computer coursework for preservice teachers;…

  5. Teaching Nuclear Issues. Occasional Paper No. 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, David W.

    The nuclear debate is one of critical importance and should be explored as part of the school curriculum. The psychology of denying the issue of nuclear arms and the psychological effects of the arms race on children is examined in this paper. A number of topics that might be included in discussion of nuclear issues are the arms race, politics,…

  6. Evaluating Parent Involvement. Issue Paper No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safran, Daniel

    This paper poses a series of questions to assist programs in deciding what it is about parent involvement that they wish to evaluate. The questions focus on the nature of parent involvement, why parent involvement is needed, and what evaluation of parent involvement should include. A conceptual framework for research on the impact of parent…

  7. Rural Extension Services. Policy Research Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Jock R.; Feder, Gershon

    This paper analyzes the considerations that lead policy makers to undertake extension investments as a key public responsibility, as well as the complex set of factors and intra-agency incentives that explain variations in performance between different extension systems. The goals of extension include transferring knowledge from researchers to…

  8. Varia. Working Papers in Linguistics No. 47.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowty, David, Ed.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Papers in phonology, psycholinguistics, and syntax include: "Discriminating between Syntactic and Semantic Processing: Evidence from Event-Related Potentials" (Kim Ainsworth-Darnell); "The Syntactic Structure of Chinese Formal Focus" (Qian Gao); "Employing a Multimodal Logic in an Approach to German Pronoun Fronting" (Karin Golde); "The…

  9. Additive discrete 1D linear canonical transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liang; Healy, John J.; Guo, Chang-liang; Sheridan, John T.

    2015-09-01

    The continuous linear canonical transforms (LCT) can describe a wide variety of wave field propagations through paraxial (first order) optical systems. Digital algorithms to numerically calculate the LCT are therefore important in modelling scalar wave field propagations and are also of interest for many digital signal processing applications. The continuous LCT is additive, but discretization can remove this property. In this paper we discuss three special cases of the LCT for which constraints can be identified to ensure the DLCT is additive.

  10. Electronic versus paper instruments for daily data collection.

    PubMed

    Johannes; Woods; Crawford; Cochran; Tran; Schuth

    2000-10-01

    PURPOSE: Collecting daily information on a series of similar, recurring events such as menstrual bleeding, headaches, or insulin levels using paper instruments is subject to problems such as missing or incorrectly recorded data, and retrospective data entry. The authors are developing and evaluating electronic data collection using hand-held personal computers (H/PC) for a variety of health-related applications, including tracking premenstrual syndrome (PMS), fertility awareness, and headaches, to improve accuracy and timeliness of data collection.METHODS: ProCycle is a prototype electronic diary for collection of daily data on menstrual bleeding, medications, and health symptoms. In a 3-month pilot test in 25 regularly cycling women, we compared its performance with a paper calendar regarding missing and incorrect data, data entry lag, data cleaning time, and users' preferences with respect to factors such as remembering to enter data, convenience, and overall preference. Additional programs for PMS, fertility, and headaches are being field tested on subjects from the Boston and New York areas, comparing performance with paper versions.RESULTS: In the pilot test, missing data occurred less frequently with ProCycle than with paper, particularly for any days with missing symptoms (4% vs. 35%, p < 0.05). ProCycle did not permit any data recording mistakes such as circling contradictory responses (e.g., bleeding and no bleeding), compared with incorrect data on 13% of paper calendars. Data entry/cleaning time was 81% lower for ProCycle. 70% of users preferred ProCycle overall, compared with 9% preferring paper (p < 0.01).CONCLUSIONS: Although the initial cost of the H/PC is significantly higher than paper, there are no recurring charges for printing or data entry, and data cleaning is minimal. Electronic instruments on an H/PC provide an efficient, accurate method of data collection, applicable to a number of areas of health-related research involving daily data

  11. Collected Software Engineering Papers, Volume 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This document is a collection of selected technical papers produced by participants in the Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) from Oct. 1991 - Nov. 1992. The purpose of the document is to make available, in one reference, some results of SEL research that originally appeared in a number of different forums. Although these papers cover several topics related to software engineering, they do not encompass the entire scope of SEL activities and interests. Additional information about the SEL and its research efforts may be obtained from the sources listed in the bibliography at the end of this document. For the convenience of this presentation, the 11 papers contained here are grouped into 5 major sections: (1) the Software Engineering Laboratory; (2) software tools studies; (3) software models studies; (4) software measurement studies; and (5) Ada technology studies.

  12. Collected software engineering papers, volume 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    A collection of selected technical papers produced by participants in the Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) during the period November 1989 through October 1990 is presented. The purpose of the document is to make available, in one reference, some results of SEL research that originally appeared in a number of different forums. Although these papers cover several topics related to software engineering, they do not encompass the entire scope of SEL activities and interests. Additional information about the SEL and its research efforts may be obtained from the sources listed in the bibliography. The seven presented papers are grouped into four major categories: (1) experimental research and evaluation of software measurement; (2) studies on models for software reuse; (3) a software tool evaluation; and (4) Ada technology and studies in the areas of reuse and specification.

  13. "Paper Machine" for Molecular Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Connelly, John T; Rolland, Jason P; Whitesides, George M

    2015-08-01

    Clinical tests based on primer-initiated amplification of specific nucleic acid sequences achieve high levels of sensitivity and specificity. Despite these desirable characteristics, these tests have not reached their full potential because their complexity and expense limit their usefulness to centralized laboratories. This paper describes a device that integrates sample preparation and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) with end point detection using a hand-held UV source and camera phone. The prototype device integrates paper microfluidics (to enable fluid handling) and a multilayer structure, or a "paper machine", that allows a central patterned paper strip to slide in and out of fluidic path and thus allows introduction of sample, wash buffers, amplification master mix, and detection reagents with minimal pipetting, in a hand-held, disposable device intended for point-of-care use in resource-limited environments. This device creates a dynamic seal that prevents evaporation during incubation at 65 °C for 1 h. This interval is sufficient to allow a LAMP reaction for the Escherichia coli malB gene to proceed with an analytical sensitivity of 1 double-stranded DNA target copy. Starting with human plasma spiked with whole, live E. coli cells, this paper demonstrates full integration of sample preparation with LAMP amplification and end point detection with a limit of detection of 5 cells. Further, it shows that the method used to prepare sample enables concentration of DNA from sample volumes commonly available from fingerstick blood draw. PMID:26104869

  14. Industrial application of radiographic paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domanus, J. C.; Ruault, P. A.

    1980-03-01

    The paper presents the results of a comparison made among high speed Kodak Industrex D X-ray film, Industrex Instant 600 and 620, and Agfa Gevaert Structuric IC radiograph papers. It is shown that the quality of the radiographic image was tested by the use of standard and special IQIs as well as Al step wedges and artificial and natural defects. The speeds, contrasts, and exposure latitudes were calculated from the characteristic curves. An analysis is made of the quality of information available in the radiograph and the merits of the constant exposure technique are stressed. Finally, conclusions are drawn about information quality, sensitometric properties, equipment, and areas of application for radiographic paper.

  15. Thermal Conductivity of Coated Paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, Lei L.; Pan, Yun-Long; Dinwiddie, Ralph B.; Wang, Hsin; Peterson, Robert C.

    2009-04-01

    In this article, a method for measuring the thermal conductivity of paper using a hot disk system is introduced. To the best of our knowledge, few publications are found discussing the thermal conductivity of a coated paper, although it is important to various forms of today’s digital printing where heat is used for imaging, as well as for toner fusing. This motivated an investigation of the thermal conductivity of paper coating. This study demonstrates that the thermal conductivity is affected by the coating mass and the changes in the thermal conductivity affect toner gloss and density. As the coating mass increases, the thermal conductivity increases. Both the toner gloss and density decrease as the thermal conductivity increases. The toner gloss appears to be more sensitive to the changes in the thermal conductivity.

  16. Sustainability Characterization for Additive Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Mahesh; Lyons, Kevin W; Gupta, SK

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to create geometrically complex parts that require a high degree of customization, using less material and producing less waste. Recent studies have shown that AM can be an economically viable option for use by the industry, yet there are some inherent challenges associated with AM for wider acceptance. The lack of standards in AM impedes its use for parts production since industries primarily depend on established standards in processes and material selection to ensure the consistency and quality. Inability to compare AM performance against traditional manufacturing methods can be a barrier for implementing AM processes. AM process sustainability has become a driver due to growing environmental concerns for manufacturing. This has reinforced the importance to understand and characterize AM processes for sustainability. Process characterization for sustainability will help close the gaps for comparing AM performance to traditional manufacturing methods. Based on a literature review, this paper first examines the potential environmental impacts of AM. A methodology for sustainability characterization of AM is then proposed to serve as a resource for the community to benchmark AM processes for sustainability. Next, research perspectives are discussed along with relevant standardization efforts. PMID:26601038

  17. Sustainability Characterization for Additive Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Mani, Mahesh; Lyons, Kevin W; Gupta, S K

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to create geometrically complex parts that require a high degree of customization, using less material and producing less waste. Recent studies have shown that AM can be an economically viable option for use by the industry, yet there are some inherent challenges associated with AM for wider acceptance. The lack of standards in AM impedes its use for parts production since industries primarily depend on established standards in processes and material selection to ensure the consistency and quality. Inability to compare AM performance against traditional manufacturing methods can be a barrier for implementing AM processes. AM process sustainability has become a driver due to growing environmental concerns for manufacturing. This has reinforced the importance to understand and characterize AM processes for sustainability. Process characterization for sustainability will help close the gaps for comparing AM performance to traditional manufacturing methods. Based on a literature review, this paper first examines the potential environmental impacts of AM. A methodology for sustainability characterization of AM is then proposed to serve as a resource for the community to benchmark AM processes for sustainability. Next, research perspectives are discussed along with relevant standardization efforts. PMID:26601038

  18. Additive attacks on speaker recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrokh Baroughi, Alireza; Craver, Scott

    2014-02-01

    Speaker recognition is used to identify a speaker's voice from among a group of known speakers. A common method of speaker recognition is a classification based on cepstral coefficients of the speaker's voice, using a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) to model each speaker. In this paper we try to fool a speaker recognition system using additive noise such that an intruder is recognized as a target user. Our attack uses a mixture selected from a target user's GMM model, inverting the cepstral transformation to produce noise samples. In our 5 speaker data base, we achieve an attack success rate of 50% with a noise signal at 10dB SNR, and 95% by increasing noise power to 0dB SNR. The importance of this attack is its simplicity and flexibility: it can be employed in real time with no processing of an attacker's voice, and little computation is needed at the moment of detection, allowing the attack to be performed by a small portable device. For any target user, knowing that user's model or voice sample is sufficient to compute the attack signal, and it is enough that the intruder plays it while he/she is uttering to be classiffed as the victim.

  19. Analysis of CNT additives in porous layered thin film lubrication with electric double layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, T. V. V. L. N.; Rani, A. M. A.; Sufian, S.; Mohamed, N. M.

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents an analysis of thin film lubrication of porous layered carbon nanotubes (CNTs) additive slider bearing with electric double layer. The CNTs additive lubricant flow in the thin fluid film and porous layers are governed by Stokes and Brinkman equations respectively, including electro-kinetic force. The apparent viscosity and nondimensional pressure expression are derived. The nondimensional load capacity increases under the influence of electro-viscosity, CNT additives volume fraction, permeability and thickness of porous layer. A CNTs additive lubricated porous thin film slider bearing with electric double layer provides higher load capacity.

  20. Additional historical solid rocket motor burns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedemann, Carsten; Homeister, Maren; Oswald, Michael; Stabroth, Sebastian; Klinkrad, Heiner; Vörsmann, Peter

    2009-06-01

    The use of orbital solid rocket motors (SRM) is responsible for the release of a high number of slag and Al 2O 3 dust particles which contribute to the space debris environment. This contribution has been modeled for the ESA space debris model MASTER (Meteoroid and Space Debris Terrestrial Environment Reference). The current model version, MASTER-2005, is based on the simulation of 1076 orbital SRM firings which mainly contributed to the long-term debris environment. SRM firings on very low earth orbits which produce only short living particles are not considered. A comparison of the modeled flux with impact data from returned surfaces shows that the shape and quantity of the modeled SRM dust distribution matches that of recent Hubble Space Telescope (HST) solar array measurements very well. However, the absolute flux level for dust is under-predicted for some of the analyzed Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) surfaces. This indicates that some past SRM firings are not included in the current event database. Thus it is necessary to investigate, if additional historical SRM burns, like the retro-burn of low orbiting re-entry capsules, may be responsible for these dust impacts. The most suitable candidates for these firings are the large number of SRM retro-burns of return capsules. This paper focuses on the SRM retro-burns of Russian photoreconnaissance satellites, which were used in high numbers during the time of the LDEF mission. It is discussed which types of satellites and motors may have been responsible for this historical contribution. Altogether, 870 additional SRM retro-burns have been identified. An important task is the identification of such missions to complete the current event data base. Different types of motors have been used to de-orbit both large satellites and small film return capsules. The results of simulation runs are presented.

  1. Overload characteristics of paper-polypropylene-paper cable

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, A. )

    1990-09-01

    The short-time rating of PPP pipe-type cable may be lower than the equivalent paper cable sized to carry the same normal load. The ratings depend on the relative conductor sizes and the maximum allowable conductor temperatures of the insulation. The insulation thermal resistivity may be a significant parameter for overload times of approximately one hour and should be verified for PPP insulation. The thermal capacitance temperature characteristic of PPP insulation is not known. However, the overload ratings are not very sensitive to this parameter. Overload ratings are given for maximum conductor temperatures from 105 C to 130 C. Use of ratings based on temperatures greater than 105 C would require testing to determine the extent of degradation of the insulation at these higher temperatures. PPP-insulated cable will be thermally stable over a wider range of operating conditions (voltage and current) compared with paper-insulated cable. The short-circuit ratings of PPP- and paper-insulated cable systems and the positive/negative and zero sequence impedances are compared. 21 refs., 22 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. ACHA Campus Violence White Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Joetta L.; Ward, Robert L.

    2006-01-01

    In 1999, the American College Health Association (ACHA) adopted a position statement for the Association that addresses acts of violence, bias, and other violations of human rights that have been occurring all too often within or adjacent to college communities. The purpose of this ACHA White Paper is to confront this serious college health issue…

  3. Policy Statements and Position Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1981

    1981-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools' policy statements on elements of preprofessional, predoctoral, advanced, continuing, and auxiliary education and research, and delivery of care are presented. Position papers on peer review, freedoms and responsibilities of individuals and institutions, national health programs, interdisciplinary…

  4. Policy Statements and Position Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Policy statements and position papers are presented that are intended as recommendations and guidelines for member institutions. They cover education, research, delivery of care, peer review, freedoms and responsibilities of individuals and institutions, national health programs, interdisciplinary education, radiation, and due process. (MLW)

  5. Teacher Pensions: A Background Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Janet S.

    2008-01-01

    Pensions are an important but comparatively unexamined component of human resource policies in education. In an increasingly competitive world where employees are more mobile than ever, pension policies that were designed in the last century may be out of step with the needs of both individuals and schools. This background paper aims to foster…

  6. Readiness for Change. White Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howley, Caitlin

    2012-01-01

    This white paper by ICF International's Caitlin Howley discusses commonalities and differences among various understandings of readiness and highlights conceptualizations of readiness for change in selected change models. How leaders can use such theories to best to prepare their organizations--and the people enlivening them--for new ways of…

  7. Working Papers in Linguistics 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of Trondheim Working Papers in Linguistics, 1993

    1993-01-01

    In this volume, five working papers are presented. "Accessing Contexts with Intonation" (Thorstein Fretheim) discusses the use of intonation as a tool for understanding the context of an utterance, particularly in combination with reference. Examples are offered in Norwegian. In "'Altsa' and 'Nemlig': Two Views of Causality" (Ildiko Vasko), some…

  8. Scientific papers: A new paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, George C.

    The problem of how to organize and write a scientific paper is a very basic one for most of us. A scientific paper is, after all, the only tangible product of a research scientist and, like all products, will be a failure if not marketed properly to reach its potential buyers. I think that a lack of attention to this “marketing and sales” aspect of research is a serious fault in our community, by which I mean those of us who publish in AGU journals.The potential audience for a scientific paper can be divided roughly into three distinct categories. The first group is usually rather small in number, consisting of fellow scientists working in a very closely related field, and to whom the details of the work are of major importance. The second group is also fellow scientists, but their interest is less sharply focused, and they are concerned with the broad outlines of the work and essential results. The third group is the sponsors and the people who actually pay for the work, whose interest in the details is minimal and they, sadly enough, are often concerned only with the fact that a paper has been published rather than its content.

  9. Evaluating Impact. Education Research Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKay, Veronica, Ed.; Treffgarne, Carew, Ed.

    Papers in this collection address issues related to participatory approaches to assessing impact. The first section, "What Is an Impact Study and How Should We Do It?" contains: (1) "Participatory Impact Assessment" (John Shotton); (2) "Participatory Action Research as an Approach to Impact Assessment" (Victoria McKay); (3) "Participatory…

  10. Overview paper on nuclear power

    SciTech Connect

    Spiewak, I.; Cope, D.F.

    1980-09-01

    This paper was prepared as an input to ORNL's Strategic Planning Activity, ORNL National Energy Perspective (ONEP). It is intended to provide historical background on nuclear power, an analysis of the mission of nuclear power, a discussion of the issues, the technology choices, and the suggestion of a strategy for encouraging further growth of nuclear power.

  11. Research Paper on Curricular Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Arnita Rena

    2006-01-01

    The focus of this research paper is on the role of teachers and the teaching strategies used in classrooms. The premise is that teachers are now realizing that they need to reach beyond traditional ways of teaching in order to assist their students in acquiring a deeper understanding of the topics being studied while developing critical thinking…

  12. The WARNET Papers. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genet, Russell M.

    This report consists of several papers written, but not published, during the course of the WARNET study of requirements for a network of relatively low-cost, interconnected combat simulators for use in training pilots for combat readiness. It is projected that such a network would allow a number of aircraft to fight each other in simulated but…

  13. Computers on Campus: Working Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Marc S., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Papers on the acquisition and use of computers and telecommunications systems by colleges and universities are presented ("Information Technology: Instruction Is the Issue--An Introduction"; "The 'Star Wars' Universities: Carnegie-Mellon, Brown, and M.I.T."; and "Instruction and the Computer"). The first section describes developments at…

  14. Fake Papers as Investigation Prompts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Tim; Ayars, Eric

    2005-01-01

    We describe an intriguing genre of assignment in which students respond to a fake scientific paper by designing an experiment to test its claims. Put another way, we ask students to be experimentalists, albeit in an artificially controlled and prescribed domain; we hope that through this, students get a better picture of what science is about and…

  15. Time to Terminate Toilet Papering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moscinski, David

    2008-01-01

    Each September in Wisconsin students return to school, football games draw enthusiastic crowds, and homecoming week is celebrated. Trees lose their leaves only to be re-adorned in white in that generation bridging tradition known as toilet papering. Community residents have differing opinions on "tp"ing, in large part determined by whether they…

  16. Behaviorally Engineered Environments. Staff Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morreau, Larry E.; And Others

    This collection of papers represents the developmental research as well as the thrust of the Regional Laboratory's (UMREL) program. UMREL has been developing behaviorally engineered educational environments through a cross-disciplinary effort in education and the behavioral sciences. The program began with the establishment of demonstration…

  17. Management and Technology Division. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Two papers on copyright and privacy considerations of international information transfer were presented at the 1982 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference. In "Findings of the IFLA International Study on the Copyright of Bibliographic Records in Machine-Readable Form," Dennis D. McDonald, Eleanor Jo Rodger, and Jeffrey…

  18. New Indian Tribalism. Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckmann, Kathleen

    The purposes of this paper are to identify the problems Washington State Indians face and to provide considerations that might assist in promoting the welfare and well-being of American Indians. It is stated that the major barrier to the Indian's success in American society is the attitude of the Anglo towards the Indian. Thus, the programs and…

  19. Errata: Papers in Error Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svartvik, Jan, Ed.

    Papers presented at the symposium of error analysis in Lund, Sweden, in September 1972, approach error analysis specifically in its relation to foreign language teaching and second language learning. Error analysis is defined as having three major aspects: (1) the description of the errors, (2) the explanation of errors by means of contrastive…

  20. NATURAL SURFACTANTS IN PAPER RECYCLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this project is to introduce new types of surfactants based on renewable materials (sugar surfactants) for use in ink removal from recycled paper. By applying green chemistry approaches we not only will solve an important industry and environmental problem but...

  1. Invited Papers. [SITE 2002 Section].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains the following invited papers from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2001 conference: (1) "Information and Communications Technology in Education: A Personal Perspective" (David Moursund); (2) "A Model for Creating an Art Museum-University Partnership To Develop Technology-Based Educational…

  2. New type of nonflammable paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, G. K.

    1970-01-01

    Nonflammable paper is made from fibers of chrysotile asbestos, beta-glass fibers, glass microfibers, and a little nonflammable organic binder. It does not propagate flame in an atmosphere of 16.5-psig oxygen, and it is resistant to rot and mold, making it acceptable as wrapping material and for stored documents.

  3. Aerosol simulation including chemical and nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Marwil, E.S.; Lemmon, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    The numerical simulation of aerosol transport, including the effects of chemical and nuclear reactions presents a challenging dynamic accounting problem. Particles of different sizes agglomerate and settle out due to various mechanisms, such as diffusion, diffusiophoresis, thermophoresis, gravitational settling, turbulent acceleration, and centrifugal acceleration. Particles also change size, due to the condensation and evaporation of materials on the particle. Heterogeneous chemical reactions occur at the interface between a particle and the suspending medium, or a surface and the gas in the aerosol. Homogeneous chemical reactions occur within the aersol suspending medium, within a particle, and on a surface. These reactions may include a phase change. Nuclear reactions occur in all locations. These spontaneous transmutations from one element form to another occur at greatly varying rates and may result in phase or chemical changes which complicate the accounting process. This paper presents an approach for inclusion of these effects on the transport of aerosols. The accounting system is very complex and results in a large set of stiff ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The techniques for numerical solution of these ODEs require special attention to achieve their solution in an efficient and affordable manner. 4 refs.

  4. Recent Progress on Cellulose-Based Electro-Active Paper, Its Hybrid Nanocomposites and Applications.

    PubMed

    Khan, Asif; Abas, Zafar; Kim, Heung Soo; Kim, Jaehwan

    2016-01-01

    We report on the recent progress and development of research into cellulose-based electro-active paper for bending actuators, bioelectronics devices, and electromechanical transducers. The cellulose electro-active paper is characterized in terms of its biodegradability, chirality, ample chemically modifying capacity, light weight, actuation capability, and ability to form hybrid nanocomposites. The mechanical, electrical, and chemical characterizations of the cellulose-based electro-active paper and its hybrid composites such as blends or coatings with synthetic polymers, biopolymers, carbon nanotubes, chitosan, and metal oxides, are explained. In addition, the integration of cellulose electro-active paper is highlighted to form various functional devices including but not limited to bending actuators, flexible speaker, strain sensors, energy harvesting transducers, biosensors, chemical sensors and transistors for electronic applications. The frontiers in cellulose paper devices are reviewed together with the strategies and perspectives of cellulose electro-active paper and cellulose nanocomposite research and applications. PMID:27472335

  5. CALL FOR PAPERS: Photorefractive Materials and Effects for Photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-01-01

    Guest editors: Professor Valentin Vlad National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Bucharest, Romania Professor Eugenio Fazio Università di Roma `La Sapienza', Italy Professor Mike Damzen Imperial College, London, UK A topical issue of Journal of Optics A: Pure and Applied Optics will be devoted to papers reporting new results in the field of photorefractive effects and their applications in photonics. The topics to be covered will include, but are not limited to: bulletnew photorefractive materials (fast, sensitive in IR) bulletwave mixing in photorefractives bulletphotorefractive phase conjugators bulletholographic storage in photorefractive materials bulletphotorefractive spatial solitons bulletadaptive interconnection with photorefractive devices bulletphase conjugate interferometry bulletoptical analogue and digital computing (including optical correlators) bulletother applications and devices using photorefractive effects. The topical issue is scheduled for publication in November 2003. All papers will be peer reviewed and the normal refereeing standards of Journal of Optics A: Pure and Applied Optics will be maintained. Manuscripts should be prepared according to the general guidelines for authors published in the journal. Full details on how to structure an article, including specific information on figures, tables and references, are available from our Web site at www.iop.org/journals/authors/jopa. There are no page charges. In addition to the usual 25 free offprints, the contributing author of each paper published will receive a complimentary copy of the topical issue. Manuscripts should be submitted to the Publisher by 1 May 2003, although authors are strongly encouraged to submit their work as soon as possible. Please include a covering letter stating that the submission is intended for the Photorefractive Materials and Effects for Photonics special issue, to avoid treatment as a regular submission. Submission address: Dr Claire Blay

  6. Major oil, gas reserve additions reported

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-10

    Several large, internationally active, US-based companies have recently reported sizable gains in oil and gas reserves in 1996. The biggest reserves addition in absolute terms reported to date belongs to Exxon Corp. However, Amoco Corp. scored the largest percentage gain. The paper discusses gains reported by Exxon, Amoco, ARCO, Phillips, and Oryx.

  7. Helping School Paraprofessionals Develop Additional Communication Styles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Clara Franklin

    In addition to providing a short history of the idea behind and duties of black paraprofessionals in the English classroom, this paper explains how a seven-week skills course was developed to help paraprofessionals develop the necessary Standard English writing and speaking skills, and details many of the excercises used in the course. The paper…

  8. Paper as a platform for sensing applications and other devices: a review.

    PubMed

    Mahadeva, Suresha K; Walus, Konrad; Stoeber, Boris

    2015-04-29

    Paper is a ubiquitous material that has various applications in day to day life. A sheet of paper is produced by pressing moist wood cellulose fibers together. Paper offers unique properties: paper allows passive liquid transport, it is compatible with many chemical and biochemical moieties, it exhibits piezoelectricity, and it is biodegradable. Hence, paper is an attractive low-cost functional material for sensing devices. In recent years, researchers in the field of science and engineering have witnessed an exponential growth in the number of research contributions that focus on the development of cost-effective and scalable fabrication methods and new applications of paper-based devices. In this review article, we highlight recent advances in the development of paper-based sensing devices in the areas of electronics, energy storage, strain sensing, microfluidic devices, and biosensing, including piezoelectric paper. Additionally, this review includes current limitations of paper-based sensing devices and points out issues that have limited the commercialization of some of the paper-based sensing devices. PMID:25745887

  9. Paper like cholesteric interferential mirror.

    PubMed

    Petriashvili, Gia; Japaridze, Kokhta; Devadze, Lali; Zurabishvili, Cisana; Sepashvili, Nino; Ponjavidze, Nino; De Santo, Maria P; Matranga, Mario A; Hamdi, Ridha; Ciuchi, Federica; Barberi, Riccardo

    2013-09-01

    A new type of flexible cholesteric liquid crystal mirror is presented. The simple and effective method for the deposition of a cholesteric mixture on a paper substrate and the particular design of the device give a homogeneous alignment of the cholesteric texture providing mirrors with an intense and uniform light reflectance. A desired polarization state for the reflected light, linear or circular, can be easily obtained varying the thickness and optical anisotropy of the polymer cover film. By using non-azobenzene based photosensitive materials a permanent array of RGB mirrors with high reflectivity can be obtained on the same device. Paper like reflective mirrors are versatile and they can find applications in reflective displays, adaptive optics, UV detectors and dosimeters, information recording, medicine and IR converters. PMID:24103954

  10. A tale of two papers.

    PubMed

    Saura, Anssi

    2014-12-01

    Two papers published in HEREDITAS between 1921 and 1939 show how the attitude towards race biology changed in the course of the interwar period in the Nordic countries. In the early 1920s race biology was seen to constitute a legitimate science. Ordinary human genetics prevailed, however, over race biology already in the very beginning on the pages of HEREDITAS. Population thinking was introduced into the study of human heredity around the year 1930. It effectively contradicted the concept of the race. Interestingly, HEREDITAS does not carry a single paper on eugenics and sterilization. In 1939 we see a final repudiation of the doctrines on race. Times had changed and the National Socialists had usurped the doctrines of race in Germany. PMID:25588299

  11. Enhancing Research Papers in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroffe, Kerry; McCann, G.

    2013-01-01

    XML-based production of journal articles, combined with real-time transformations, now make it possible to develop new enhancements to the reading experience and to the content of the article itself. Papers from AAS journals are now available in ‘Article Evolution’ HTML format, providing both familiar and new functionality that improves the reading experience. This poster will outline the roadmap for the development of ‘Article Evolution’ functionality and ask for input to help shape future enhancements that meet the needs of the astronomy community. Two of the ongoing developments described are ’semantic enrichment’ of articles and adoption of ORCID (Open Researcher and Contributor ID). Both of these have exciting possibilities at an article level within ‘Article Evolution’ but will also impact widely on third party services, such as linking and discovery of research papers.

  12. Ridge network in crumpled paper.

    PubMed

    Andresen, Christian André; Hansen, Alex; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2007-08-01

    The network formed by ridges in a straightened sheet of crumpled paper is studied using a laser profilometer. Square sheets of paper were crumpled into balls, unfolded, and their height profile measured. From these profiles the imposed ridges were extracted as networks. Nodes were defined as intersections between ridges, and links as the various ridges connecting the nodes. Many network and spatial properties have been investigated. The tail of the ridge length distribution was found to follow a power law, whereas the shorter ridges followed a log-normal distribution. The degree distribution was found to have an exponentially decaying tail, and the degree correlation was found to be disassortative. The facets created by the ridges and the Voronoi diagram formed by the nodes have also been investigated. PMID:17930105

  13. Construction-Paper Puzzle Masterpieces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vance, Shelly

    2010-01-01

    Creating an appreciation of art history in her junior-high students has always been one of the author's greatest challenges as an art teacher. In this article, the author describes how her eighth-grade students re-created a famous work of art--piece by piece, like a puzzle or a stained-glass window--out of construction paper. (Contains 1 resource.)

  14. Relativity on Rotated Graph Paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado, Roberto

    2011-11-01

    We present visual calculations in special relativity using spacetime diagrams drawn on graph paper that has been rotated by 45 degrees. The rotated lines represent lightlike directions in Minkowski spacetime, and the boxes in the grid (called light-clock diamonds) represent ticks of an inertial observer's lightclock. We show that many quantitative results can be read off a spacetime diagram by counting boxes, using a minimal amount of algebra.

  15. Position paper: Seismic design criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Farnworth, S.K.

    1995-05-22

    The purpose of this paper is to document the seismic design criteria to be used on the Title 11 design of the underground double-shell waste storage tanks and appurtenant facilities of the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) project, and to provide the history and methodologies for determining the recommended Design Basis Earthquake (DBE) Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) anchors for site-specific seismic response spectra curves. Response spectra curves for use in design are provided in Appendix A.

  16. Aligators for Arrays (Tool Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henzinger, Thomas A.; Hottelier, Thibaud; Kovács, Laura; Rybalchenko, Andrey

    This paper presents Aligators, a tool for the generation of universally quantified array invariants. Aligators leverages recurrence solving and algebraic techniques to carry out inductive reasoning over array content. The Aligators' loop extraction module allows treatment of multi-path loops by exploiting their commutativity and serializability properties. Our experience in applying Aligators on a collection of loops from open source software projects indicates the applicability of recurrence and algebraic solving techniques for reasoning about arrays.

  17. Photoerasing paper and thermocoloring film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanakkanatt, Sebastian V.

    1997-08-01

    Thermal coloration of spiropyrans and spiroxazines at or above their melting point is well known to photochromists. The erasure of the color developed by exposure of photochromic paper by radiations of certain wavelengths in the visible region is little known. Six-nitrospirobenzopyran and 8- nitrospirobenzopyran, 8-methoxy-6-nitrospirobenzo-pyran, 6- methoxy-8-nitrospirobenzopyran, and 6,8-dinitrospirobenzopyran have been studied. The medium in which these photochromic dyes were dissolved or incorporated was limited to cellulose derivatives such as cellulose acetate, cellulose acetate- butyrate, and cellulose trinitrate. Paper coated with 6- nitrospirobenzopyran dissolved in an ethyl acetate solution of cellulose trinitrate readily colored on exposure to UV light or IR radiation and faded on exposure to light in the visible range. This unusual phenomenon, although not fully understood, is believed to be a selective light sensitizing ability of nitro groups. The applications of photoerasing paper and thermally colorable films are numerous, such as in polaroid type photography, in copy machines, and in thermally stable photochromic ophthalmic lenses.

  18. 5. View of north elevation, including saw dust collector and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. View of north elevation, including saw dust collector and brick addition, looking south east. - General Dynamics Corporation Shipyard, Joiner & Sheet Metal Shops, 97 East Howard Street, Quincy, Norfolk County, MA

  19. External Environment Papers. Working Papers of Planning and Development Research. Working Paper 88-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TV Ontario, Toronto.

    These papers present the major issues and directions in five areas: (1) the socioeconomic and demographic environment (demography, the economies and labor forces of Canada and of Ontario, and the international and social environments); (2) education (K-12, postsecondary, adult, and the educational media resource market); (3) the broadcast…

  20. Analysis of Smart Composite Structures Including Debonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Seeley, Charles E.

    1997-01-01

    Smart composite structures with distributed sensors and actuators have the capability to actively respond to a changing environment while offering significant weight savings and additional passive controllability through ply tailoring. Piezoelectric sensing and actuation of composite laminates is the most promising concept due to the static and dynamic control capabilities. Essential to the implementation of these smart composites are the development of accurate and efficient modeling techniques and experimental validation. This research addresses each of these important topics. A refined higher order theory is developed to model composite structures with surface bonded or embedded piezoelectric transducers. These transducers are used as both sensors and actuators for closed loop control. The theory accurately captures the transverse shear deformation through the thickness of the smart composite laminate while satisfying stress free boundary conditions on the free surfaces. The theory is extended to include the effect of debonding at the actuator-laminate interface. The developed analytical model is implemented using the finite element method utilizing an induced strain approach for computational efficiency. This allows general laminate geometries and boundary conditions to be analyzed. The state space control equations are developed to allow flexibility in the design of the control system. Circuit concepts are also discussed. Static and dynamic results of smart composite structures, obtained using the higher order theory, are correlated with available analytical data. Comparisons, including debonded laminates, are also made with a general purpose finite element code and available experimental data. Overall, very good agreement is observed. Convergence of the finite element implementation of the higher order theory is shown with exact solutions. Additional results demonstrate the utility of the developed theory to study piezoelectric actuation of composite

  1. 7 CFR 97.402 - Service of papers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Service of papers. 97.402 Section 97.402 Agriculture... Service of papers. (a) Every paper required to be served on opposing parties and filed in the Office in... § 97.403. (b) The requirement in certain sections that a specified paper shall be served includes...

  2. 7 CFR 97.402 - Service of papers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Service of papers. 97.402 Section 97.402 Agriculture... Service of papers. (a) Every paper required to be served on opposing parties and filed in the Office in... § 97.403. (b) The requirement in certain sections that a specified paper shall be served includes...

  3. 32 CFR Appendix D to Part 290 - Audit Working Papers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Audit Working Papers D Appendix D to Part 290.... 290, App. D Appendix D to Part 290—Audit Working Papers (a) Definition (1) Audit working papers... interviews and inquiries, and other available sources. Audit working papers may also include contract...

  4. 7 CFR 97.402 - Service of papers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Service of papers. 97.402 Section 97.402 Agriculture... Service of papers. (a) Every paper required to be served on opposing parties and filed in the Office in... § 97.403. (b) The requirement in certain sections that a specified paper shall be served includes...

  5. 7 CFR 97.402 - Service of papers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Service of papers. 97.402 Section 97.402 Agriculture... Service of papers. (a) Every paper required to be served on opposing parties and filed in the Office in... § 97.403. (b) The requirement in certain sections that a specified paper shall be served includes...

  6. 32 CFR Appendix D to Part 290 - Audit Working Papers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Audit Working Papers D Appendix D to Part 290.... 290, App. D Appendix D to Part 290—Audit Working Papers (a) Definition (1) Audit working papers... interviews and inquiries, and other available sources. Audit working papers may also include contract...

  7. 32 CFR Appendix D to Part 290 - Audit Working Papers

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Audit Working Papers D Appendix D to Part 290.... 290, App. D Appendix D to Part 290—Audit Working Papers (a) Definition (1) Audit working papers... interviews and inquiries, and other available sources. Audit working papers may also include contract...

  8. 7 CFR 97.402 - Service of papers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Service of papers. 97.402 Section 97.402 Agriculture... Service of papers. (a) Every paper required to be served on opposing parties and filed in the Office in... § 97.403. (b) The requirement in certain sections that a specified paper shall be served includes...

  9. Additive Transforms Paint into Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Tech Traders Inc. sought assistance developing low-cost, highly effective coatings and paints that created useful thermal reflectance and were safe and non-toxic. In cooperation with a group of engineers at Kennedy Space Center., Tech Traders created Insuladd, a powder additive made up of microscopic, inert gas-filled, ceramic microspheres that can be mixed into ordinary interior or exterior paint, allowing the paint to act like a layer of insulation. When the paint dries, this forms a radiant heat barrier, turning the ordinary house paint into heat-reflecting thermal paint. According to Tech Traders, the product works with all types of paints and coatings and will not change the coverage rate, application, or adhesion of the paint. Other useful applications include feed storage silos to help prevent feed spoilage, poultry hatcheries to reduce the summer heat and winter cold effects, and on military vehicles and ships. Tech Traders has continued its connection to the aerospace community by recently providing Lockheed Martin Corporation with one of its thermal products for use on the F-22 Raptor.

  10. Cellulose nanofibers use in coated paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, Finley

    Cellulose Nanofibers (CNF) are materials that can be obtained by the mechanical breakdown of natural fibers. CNF have the potential to be produced at low cost in a paper mill and may provide novel properties to paper, paper coatings, paints, or other products. However, suspensions have a complex rheology even at low solid contents. To be able to coat, pump, or mix CNF at moderate solids, it is critical to understand the rheology of these suspensions and how they flow in process equipment; current papers only report the rheology up to 6% solids. Few publications are available that describe the coating of CNF onto paper or the use of CNF as an additive into a paper coating. The rheology of CNF suspensions and coatings that contain CNF were characterized with parallel-disk geometry in a controlled stress rheometer. The steady shear viscosity, the complex viscosity, the storage modulus, and the yield stress were determined for the range of solids or concentrations (2.5-10.5%). CNF were coated onto paper with a laboratory rod coater, a size press and a high speed cylindrical laboratory coater (CLC). For each case, the coat weights were measures and the properties of the papers were characterized. CNF water base suspension was found to be a shear thinning with a power law index of around 0.1. Oscillatory tests showed a linear viscoelastic region at low strains and significant storage and loss moduli even at low solids. The Cox Merz rule does not hold for CNF suspensions or coating formulations that contain CNF with complex viscosities that are about 100 times larger than the steady shear viscosities. Paper coating formulations that contain CNF were found to have viscosities and storage and loss moduli that are over ten times larger than coatings that contain starch at similar solids. CNF suspensions were coated on papers with low amount transferred on paper either at high solids or high nip loadings. The amount transferred appears to be controlled by an interaction of

  11. Incorporation of additives into polymers

    DOEpatents

    McCleskey, T. Mark; Yates, Matthew Z.

    2003-07-29

    There has been invented a method for incorporating additives into polymers comprising: (a) forming an aqueous or alcohol-based colloidal system of the polymer; (b) emulsifying the colloidal system with a compressed fluid; and (c) contacting the colloidal polymer with the additive in the presence of the compressed fluid. The colloidal polymer can be contacted with the additive by having the additive in the compressed fluid used for emulsification or by adding the additive to the colloidal system before or after emulsification with the compressed fluid. The invention process can be carried out either as a batch process or as a continuous on-line process.

  12. Deciphering the roles of multiple additives in organocatalyzed Michael additions.

    PubMed

    Günler, Z Inci; Companyó, Xavier; Alfonso, Ignacio; Burés, Jordi; Jimeno, Ciril; Pericàs, Miquel A

    2016-05-21

    The synergistic effects of multiple additives (water and acetic acid) on the asymmetric Michael addition of acetone to nitrostyrene catalyzed by primary amine-thioureas (PAT) were precisely determined. Acetic acid facilitates hydrolysis of the imine intermediates, thus leading to catalytic behavior, and minimizes the formation of the double addition side product. In contrast, water slows down the reaction but minimizes catalyst deactivation, eventually leading to higher final yields. PMID:27128165

  13. INTERIOR VIEW WITH STOCK INCLUDING THESE GATE AND GLOBE VALVES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH STOCK INCLUDING THESE GATE AND GLOBE VALVES FOR THE PULP AND PAPER INDUSTRIES READY FOR SHIPPING - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Warehouse, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  14. Accountability in Education: Discussion Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton.

    To make the education system more open and accountable, Alberta (Canada) designated in 1994 the formation of an MLA (Member of Legislative Assembly) implementation team for educational accountability. The MLA team is consulting with Albertans about which results should be included in school reports, which measures should be used to report…

  15. Observing Teaching. SEDA Paper 79.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Sally, Ed.; And Others

    This publication offers practical support to those in British higher education implementing the Observation of Teaching governmental directives. It provides discussion of key issues as well as a range of materials on how to carry out teaching observation including 23 checklists. The materials are grouped in four main areas: general issues, self…

  16. York Papers in Linguistics, 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlow, S. J., Ed.; Warner, A. R., Ed.

    Articles on diverse areas of linguistics include the following: "Correlative Constructions in Chinese" (Steve Harlow, Connie Cullen); "Xhosa Isinkalakahliso Again" (John Kelly); "Conversational Phonetics: Some Aspects of News Receipts in Everyday Talk" (John Local); "Parametric Interpretation in Yorktalk" (Richard Ogden); "English in Contact with…

  17. Selected Papers on Noctilucent Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    The papers presented herein were taken from two Russian publications on the International Geophysical Year. The first four articles (footnoted Certain Articles Regarding Meteorology") are from Nekotoryye Problemy Meteorologii; Sbornik Statey, II Razdel Programmy MGG (Meteorologiya), No. 1, Izdat. Akademii Nauk SSSR (Certain Problems Regarding Meteorology; Collection of Articles, Second Section of the IGY Program (Meteorology), No. 1. Published by the Academy of Sciences Press) Moscow, 1960. The last two articles (footnoted "International Geophysical Year") are from Mezhdunarodnoy Geofizicheskiy God; Sbornik Statey i Materialov, Izdat. Leningradskogo Universiteta (International Geophysical Year; Collection of Articles and Materials. Published by the Leningrad University Press) 1960.

  18. Research Abstracts of ACE 2001 Research Paper Presentations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Applied Communications, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Provides abstracts of nine research papers presented at the 2001 Agricultural Communication in Education annual conference. Includes papers on food safety, critical thinking, distance education, information technologies, agricultural news sources, and genetically engineered foods. (JOW)

  19. FY 1986 scientific and technical reports, articles, papers and presentations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Joyce E. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    Formal NASA technical reports, papers published in technical journals, and presentations by Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) personnel in FY-86 are presented. Also included are papers of MSFC contractors.

  20. 77 FR 70477 - Verso Paper Corporation, Sartell Mill Division, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Securitas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-26

    ... Company, Bell Timber, Inc., Benson Timber, Inc., Big H Logging, Demenge Trucking & Forest Products, LLC...., Banick Logging, Inc., Beck Lumber Company, Bell Timber, Inc., Benson Timber, Inc., Big H Logging, Demenge... Timber, Inc., Benson Timber, Inc., Big H Logging, Demenge Trucking & Forest Products, LLC, Dick...

  1. The Diffuse Interstellar Bands: Contributed papers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, Alexander G. G. M. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    Drawing a coherent picture of the observational characteristics of the Diffuse Interstellar Bands (DIB's) and the physical and chemical properties of its proposed carriers was the focus of this NASA sponsored conference. Information relating to absoption spectra, diffuse radiation carriers, carbon compounds, stellar composition, and interstellar extinction involving T-Tauri stars, Reflection Nebulae, Red Giants, and accretion discs are discussed from those papers presented at the conference, which are included in this analytic.

  2. Collected software engineering papers, volume 9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This document is a collection of selected technical papers produced by participants in the Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) from November 1990 through October 1991. The purpose of the document is to make available, in one reference, some results of SEL research that originally appeared in a number of different forums. This is the ninth such volume of technical papers produced by the SEL. Although these papers cover several topics related to software engineering, they do not encompass the entire scope of SEL activities and interests. For the convenience of this presentation, the eight papers contained here are grouped into three major categories: (1) software models studies; (2) software measurement studies; and (3) Ada technology studies. The first category presents studies on reuse models, including a software reuse model applied to maintenance and a model for an organization to support software reuse. The second category includes experimental research methods and software measurement techniques. The third category presents object-oriented approaches using Ada and object-oriented features proposed for Ada. The SEL is actively working to understand and improve the software development process at GSFC.

  3. Bacteria repelling poly(methylmethacrylate-co-dimethylacrylamide) coatings for biomedical devices† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Polymer microarray screening, including analysis of bacterial adhesion by fluorescence microscopy and SEM, and chemical composition of bacteria repelling polymers identified in the screen; polymer synthesis and characterisation; preparation of catheter pieces and solvent studies, and details for confocal imaging/analysis. See DOI: 10.1039/c4tb01129e Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Venkateswaran, Seshasailam; Wu, Mei; Gwynne, Peter J.; Hardman, Ailsa; Lilienkampf, Annamaria; Pernagallo, Salvatore; Blakely, Garry; Swann, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Nosocomial infections due to bacteria have serious implications on the health and recovery of patients in a variety of medical scenarios. Since bacterial contamination on medical devices contributes to the majority of nosocomical infections, there is a need for redesigning the surfaces of medical devices, such as catheters and tracheal tubes, to resist the binding of bacteria. In this work, polyurethanes and polyacrylates/acrylamides, which resist binding by the major bacterial pathogens underpinning implant-associated infections, were identified using high-throughput polymer microarrays. Subsequently, two ‘hit’ polymers, PA13 (poly(methylmethacrylate-co-dimethylacrylamide)) and PA515 (poly(methoxyethylmethacrylate-co-diethylaminoethylacrylate-co-methylmethacrylate)), were used to coat catheters and substantially shown to decrease binding of a variety of bacteria (including isolates from infected endotracheal tubes and heart valves from intensive care unit patients). Catheters coated with polymer PA13 showed up to 96% reduction in bacteria binding in comparison to uncoated catheters. PMID:25580245

  4. Cost analysis for computer supported multiple-choice paper examinations

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Alexander; Hörnlein, Alexander; Ifland, Marianus; Lüneburg, Edeltraud; Deckert, Jürgen; Puppe, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Multiple-choice-examinations are still fundamental for assessment in medical degree programs. In addition to content related research, the optimization of the technical procedure is an important question. Medical examiners face three options: paper-based examinations with or without computer support or completely electronic examinations. Critical aspects are the effort for formatting, the logistic effort during the actual examination, quality, promptness and effort of the correction, the time for making the documents available for inspection by the students, and the statistical analysis of the examination results. Methods: Since three semesters a computer program for input and formatting of MC-questions in medical and other paper-based examinations is used and continuously improved at Wuerzburg University. In the winter semester (WS) 2009/10 eleven, in the summer semester (SS) 2010 twelve and in WS 2010/11 thirteen medical examinations were accomplished with the program and automatically evaluated. For the last two semesters the remaining manual workload was recorded. Results: The cost of the formatting and the subsequent analysis including adjustments of the analysis of an average examination with about 140 participants and about 35 questions was 5-7 hours for exams without complications in the winter semester 2009/2010, about 2 hours in SS 2010 and about 1.5 hours in the winter semester 2010/11. Including exams with complications, the average time was about 3 hours per exam in SS 2010 and 2.67 hours for the WS 10/11. Discussion: For conventional multiple-choice exams the computer-based formatting and evaluation of paper-based exams offers a significant time reduction for lecturers in comparison with the manual correction of paper-based exams and compared to purely electronically conducted exams it needs a much simpler technological infrastructure and fewer staff during the exam. PMID:22205913

  5. Citation Sentiment Analysis in Clinical Trial Papers

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jun; Zhang, Yaoyun; Wu, Yonghui; Wang, Jingqi; Dong, Xiao; Xu, Hua

    2015-01-01

    In scientific writing, positive credits and negative criticisms can often be seen in the text mentioning the cited papers, providing useful information about whether a study can be reproduced or not. In this study, we focus on citation sentiment analysis, which aims to determine the sentiment polarity that the citation context carries towards the cited paper. A citation sentiment corpus was annotated first on clinical trial papers. The effectiveness of n-gram and sentiment lexicon features, and problem-specified structure features for citation sentiment analysis were then examined using the annotated corpus. The combined features from the word n-grams, the sentiment lexicons and the structure information achieved the highest Micro F-score of 0.860 and Macro-F score of 0.719, indicating that it is feasible to use machine learning methods for citation sentiment analysis in biomedical publications. A comprehensive comparison between citation sentiment analysis of clinical trial papers and other general domains were conducted, which additionally highlights the unique challenges within this domain. PMID:26958274

  6. Graphene-on-paper sound source devices.

    PubMed

    Tian, He; Ren, Tian-Ling; Xie, Dan; Wang, Yu-Feng; Zhou, Chang-Jian; Feng, Ting-Ting; Fu, Di; Yang, Yi; Peng, Ping-Gang; Wang, Li-Gang; Liu, Li-Tian

    2011-06-28

    We demonstrate an interesting phenomenon that graphene can emit sound. The application of graphene can be expanded in the acoustic field. Graphene-on-paper sound source devices are made by patterning graphene on paper substrates. Three graphene sheet samples with the thickness of 100, 60, and 20 nm were fabricated. Sound emission from graphene is measured as a function of power, distance, angle, and frequency in the far-field. The theoretical model of air/graphene/paper/PCB board multilayer structure is established to analyze the sound directivity, frequency response, and efficiency. Measured sound pressure level (SPL) and efficiency are in good agreement with theoretical results. It is found that graphene has a significant flat frequency response in the wide ultrasound range 20-50 kHz. In addition, the thinner graphene sheets can produce higher SPL due to its lower heat capacity per unit area (HCPUA). The infrared thermal images reveal that a thermoacoustic effect is the working principle. We find that the sound performance mainly depends on the HCPUA of the conductor and the thermal properties of the substrate. The paper-based graphene sound source devices have highly reliable, flexible, no mechanical vibration, simple structure and high performance characteristics. It could open wide applications in multimedia, consumer electronics, biological, medical, and many other areas. PMID:21591811

  7. A review on engineering of cellulosic cigarette paper to reduce carbon monoxide delivery of cigarettes.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jing; Li, Jinsong; Qian, Xueren; Ren, Wanshan; Fatehi, Pedram

    2014-01-30

    In cigarette production, the cellulosic paper essentially derived from flax fibers or other fiber materials is used as the wrapping material. During smoking of cigarettes, the highly toxic carbon monoxide is produced. To decrease the amount of carbon monoxide emission in the mainstream smoke, the engineering of all cigarette components including cellulosic cigarette paper and tobacco column is critical. This review summarizes the concepts related to engineering of cigarette paper. These mainly include permeability control, increased use of burn additives, optimization of fiber basis weight, engineering of calcium carbonate fillers, and incorporation of catalysts/oxidants. In particular, catalytic and/or oxidative conversion of carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide has been very widely reported. The control of permeability/diffusivity of cigarette paper is also of critical importance for enhanced diffusion of carbon monoxide out of the cigarette. The development of new concepts and combination of various concepts may lead to breakthroughs in this area. PMID:24299837

  8. Revisiting Additivity Violation of Quantum Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Motohisa

    2014-12-01

    We prove additivity violation of minimum output entropy of quantum channels by straightforward application of -net argument and Lévy's lemma. The additivity conjecture was disproved initially by Hastings. Later, a proof via asymptotic geometric analysis was presented by Aubrun, Szarek and Werner, which uses Dudley's bound on Gaussian process (or Dvoretzky's theorem with Schechtman's improvement). In this paper, we develop another proof along Dvoretzky's theorem in Milman's view, showing additivity violation in broader regimes than the existing proofs. Importantly,Dvoretzky's theorem works well with norms to give strong statements, but these techniques can be extended to functions which have norm-like structures-positive homogeneity and triangle inequality. Then, a connection between Hastings' method and ours is also discussed. In addition, we make some comments on relations between regularized minimum output entropy and classical capacity of quantum channels.

  9. Extending Newtonian Dynamics to Include Stochastic Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    2009-01-01

    A paper presents further results of continuing research reported in several previous NASA Tech Briefs articles, the two most recent being Stochastic Representations of Chaos Using Terminal Attractors (NPO-41519), [Vol. 30, No. 5 (May 2006), page 57] and Physical Principle for Generation of Randomness (NPO-43822) [Vol. 33, No. 5 (May 2009), page 56]. This research focuses upon a mathematical formalism for describing post-instability motions of a dynamical system characterized by exponential divergences of trajectories leading to chaos (including turbulence as a form of chaos). The formalism involves fictitious control forces that couple the equations of motion of the system with a Liouville equation that describes the evolution of the probability density of errors in initial conditions. These stabilizing forces create a powerful terminal attractor in probability space that corresponds to occurrence of a target trajectory with probability one. The effect in configuration space (ordinary three-dimensional space as commonly perceived) is to suppress exponential divergences of neighboring trajectories without affecting the target trajectory. As a result, the post-instability motion is represented by a set of functions describing the evolution of such statistical quantities as expectations and higher moments, and this representation is stable.

  10. [Contracts including performance and management of uncertainty].

    PubMed

    Duru, G; Garassus, P; Auray, J-P

    2013-09-01

    Since many decades in France, the most important part of ambulatory health care expenditure is represented by drug consumption. By the fact, French patient is indeed the greatest world consumer of pharmaceuticals treatments. Therefore, the regulation authorities by successive strategies, attempt to limit or even restrict market access for new drugs in the health care sector secured by public social insurance coverage. Common objectives are to assess the reimbursement to scientific studies and to fix the price of therapeutics at an acceptable level for both industries and government. New trends try then to determine recently the drug price in a dual approach, as a component of global and effective contract, including performance and outcome. The first diffusion authorization is diffusion concerned, but this concept takes into account the eventual success of new produces in long-term survey. Signed for a fixed period as reciprocal partnership between regulation authorities and pharmaceutics industries, the contract integrates two dimensions of incertitude. The first one is represented by the strategy of new treatments development according to efficacy and adapted price, and the second one is linked to the result of diffusion and determines adapted rules if eventual non-respects of the previous engagement are registered. This paper discusses problems related to this new dimension of incertitude affected by conditional drug prices in market access strategy and the adapted follow-up of new treatment diffusion fixed by "outcome" contract between French regulation administration and pharmaceutics industries in our recent economic context. PMID:24075704

  11. The NBER-Rensselaer Scientific Papers Database: Form, Nature, and Function. NBER Working Paper No. 14575

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, James D.; Clemmons, J. Roger

    2008-01-01

    This article is a guide to the NBER-Rensselaer Scientific Papers Database, which includes more than 2.5 million scientific publications and over 21 million citations to those papers. The data cover an important sample of 110 top U.S. universities and 200 top U.S.-based R&D-performing firms during the period 1981-1999. This article describes the…

  12. Preparation and Characterization of Graphene Oxide Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Dikin,D.; Stankovich, S.; Zimney, E.; Piner, R.; Dommett, G.; Evmenenko, G.; Nguyen, S.; Ruoff, R.

    2007-01-01

    Free-standing paper-like or foil-like materials are an integral part of our technological society. Their uses include protective layers, chemical filters, components of electrical batteries or supercapacitors, adhesive layers, electronic or optoelectronic components, and molecular storage. Inorganic 'paper-like' materials based on nanoscale components such as exfoliated vermiculite or mica platelets have been intensively studied and commercialized as protective coatings, high-temperature binders, dielectric barriers and gas-impermeable membranes. Carbon-based flexible graphite foils composed of stacked platelets of expanded graphite have long been used in packing and gasketing applications because of their chemical resistivity against most media, superior sealability over a wide temperature range, and impermeability to fluids. The discovery of carbon nanotubes brought about bucky paper, which displays excellent mechanical and electrical properties that make it potentially suitable for fuel cell and structural composite applications. Here we report the preparation and characterization of graphene oxide paper, a free-standing carbon-based membrane material made by flow-directed assembly of individual graphene oxide sheets. This new material outperforms many other paper-like materials in stiffness and strength. Its combination of macroscopic flexibility and stiffness is a result of a unique interlocking-tile arrangement of the nanoscale graphene oxide sheets.

  13. Effusion plate using additive manufacturing methods

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Thomas Edward; Keener, Christopher Paul; Ostebee, Heath Michael; Wegerif, Daniel Gerritt

    2016-04-12

    Additive manufacturing techniques may be utilized to construct effusion plates. Such additive manufacturing techniques may include defining a configuration for an effusion plate having one or more internal cooling channels. The manufacturing techniques may further include depositing a powder into a chamber, applying an energy source to the deposited powder, and consolidating the powder into a cross-sectional shape corresponding to the defined configuration. Such methods may be implemented to construct an effusion plate having one or more channels with a curved cross-sectional geometry.

  14. Object technology: A white paper

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, S.R.; Arrowood, L.F.; Cain, W.D.; Stephens, W.M.; Vickers, B.D.

    1992-05-11

    Object-Oriented Technology (OOT), although not a new paradigm, has recently been prominently featured in the trade press and even general business publications. Indeed, the promises of object technology are alluring: the ability to handle complex design and engineering information through the full manufacturing production life cycle or to manipulate multimedia information, and the ability to improve programmer productivity in creating and maintaining high quality software. Groups at a number of the DOE facilities have been exploring the use of object technology for engineering, business, and other applications. In this white paper, the technology is explored thoroughly and compared with previous means of developing software and storing databases of information. Several specific projects within the DOE Complex are described, and the state of the commercial marketplace is indicated.

  15. A Collection of Technical Papers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Papers presented at the 6th Space Logistics Symposium covered such areas as: The International Space Station; The Hubble Space Telescope; Launch site computer simulation; Integrated logistics support; The Baikonur Cosmodrome; Probabalistic tools for high confidence repair; A simple space station rescue vehicle; Integrated Traffic Model for the International Space Station; Packaging the maintenance shop; Leading edge software support; Storage information management system; Consolidated maintenance inventory logistics planning; Operation concepts for a single stage to orbit vehicle; Mission architecture for human lunar exploration; Logistics of a lunar based solar power satellite scenario; Just in time in space; NASA acquisitions/logistics; Effective transition management; Shuttle logistics; and Revitalized space operations through total quality control management.

  16. Relativity on rotated graph paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado, Roberto B.

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a method for constructing spacetime diagrams for special relativity on graph paper that has been rotated by 45°. The diagonal grid lines represent light-flash worldlines in Minkowski spacetime, and the boxes in the grid (called "clock diamonds") represent units of measurement corresponding to the ticks of an inertial observer's light clock. We show that many quantitative results can be read off a spacetime diagram simply by counting boxes, with very little algebra. In particular, we show that the squared interval between two events is equal to the signed area of the parallelogram on the grid (called the "causal diamond") with opposite vertices corresponding to those events. We use the Doppler effect—without explicit use of the Doppler formula—to motivate the method.

  17. Interactive paper as security substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robillard, Jean J.

    1997-08-01

    The threat of counterfeiting Bank Notes and other security documents is steadily increasing with the continuous improvement of printing and copying technologies. The perfect reproduction of a document is indeed reachable with the right combination of technique and economics. Our only protection is to make it difficult by introducing artifacts which appear only through the counterfeiting process or reduce significantly the efficiency of that process. A number of methods are available to defeat counterfeiting none of which are completely satisfactory. The difficulty is not as much the prevention of the duplication than doing it while safeguarding the intrinsic properties (durability) of the documents as far as permanent readability, resistance to wear, etc. Basic approaches are: (1) The light switch: a transparent coating which becomes opaque during any attempt of duplication. (2) An alternative to this first approach is an ink which becomes transparent at the time of duplication. (3) The use of a substrate (paper stock) whose optical density will rise to that of the printed graphic on the bill at the time of copying. This would be a true interactive paper. (4) Luminescent materials that would blind the photoreceptor during exposure. Such material could be in the substrate or in the printing ink. (5) Introduction of an artefact in the printed copy through a hologram hidden in a transparent coating or embossed in the substrate. All approaches have been investigated to a certain extent with variable success. We report hereafter the results of investigations made by the author on alternatives (1) and (2) in this laboratory and at the University of Texas at El Paso under contract from the National Bank of Belgium and with the collaboration of the CNRS in Paris and the University of Marseille France.

  18. Enantioselective Michael Addition of Water

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bi-Shuang; Resch, Verena; Otten, Linda G; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    The enantioselective Michael addition using water as both nucleophile and solvent has to date proved beyond the ability of synthetic chemists. Herein, the direct, enantioselective Michael addition of water in water to prepare important β-hydroxy carbonyl compounds using whole cells of Rhodococcus strains is described. Good yields and excellent enantioselectivities were achieved with this method. Deuterium labeling studies demonstrate that a Michael hydratase catalyzes the water addition exclusively with anti-stereochemistry. PMID:25529526

  19. Emulsion templated scaffolds that include gelatin and glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed

    Barbetta, Andrea; Massimi, Mara; Di Rosario, Biancalucia; Nardecchia, Stefania; De Colli, Marianna; Devirgiliis, Laura Conti; Dentini, Mariella

    2008-10-01

    Gelatin is one of the most commonly used biopolymer for creating cellular scaffolds due to its innocuous nature. To create stable gelatin scaffolds at physiological temperature (37 degrees C), chemical cross-linking is a necessary step. In a previous paper (Biomacromolecules 2006, 7, 3059-3068), cross-linking was carried out by either radical polymerization of the methacrylated derivative of gelatin (GMA) or through the formation of isopeptide bonds catalyzed by transglutaminase. The method of scaffold production was based on emulsion templating in which an organic phase is dispersed in the form of discrete droplets into a continuous aqueous solution of the biopolymer. Both kinds of scaffolds were tested as culture medium for hepatocytes. It turned out that the enzymatic cross-linked scaffold performed superiorily in this respect, even though it was mechanically less stable than the GMA scaffold. In the present paper, in an attempt to improve the biocompatibility of the GMA-based scaffold, biopolymers present in the extracellular matrix (ECM) were included in scaffold formulation, namely, chondroitin sulfate and hyaluronic acid. These biopolymers were derivatized with methacrylic moieties to undergo radical polymerization together with GMA. The morphology of the scaffolds was tuned to some extent by varying the volume fraction of the internal phase and to a larger extent by inducing a controlled destabilization of the precursor emulsion through the use of additives. In this way, scaffolds with 44% of the void volume attributable to voids with a diameter exceeding 60 microm and with 79% of the interconnect area attributable to interconnects with a diameter exceeding 20 microm in diameter could be successfully synthesized. To test whether the inclusion of ECM components into scaffold formulation resolves in an improvement of their biocompatibility with respect to GMA scaffolds, hepatocytes were seeded on both kinds of scaffolds and cell viability and function assays

  20. Measuring additive interaction using odds ratios

    PubMed Central

    Kalilani, Linda; Atashili, Julius

    2006-01-01

    Interaction measured on the additive scale has been argued to be better correlated with biologic interaction than when measured on the multiplicative scale. Measures of interaction on the additive scale have been developed using risk ratios. However, in studies that use odds ratios as the sole measure of effect, the calculation of these measures of additive interaction is usually performed by directly substituting odds ratios for risk ratios. Yet assessing additive interaction based on replacing risk ratios by odds ratios in formulas that were derived using the former may be erroneous. In this paper, we evaluate the extent to which three measures of additive interaction – the interaction contrast ratio (ICR), the attributable proportion due to interaction (AP), and the synergy index (S), estimated using odds ratios versus using risk ratios differ as the incidence of the outcome of interest increases in the source population and/or as the magnitude of interaction increases. Our analysis shows that the difference between the two depends on the measure of interaction used, the type of interaction present, and the baseline incidence of the outcome. Substituting odds ratios for risk ratios, when calculating measures of additive interaction, may result in misleading conclusions. Of the three measures, AP appears to be the most robust to this direct substitution. Formulas that use stratum specific odds and odds ratios to accurately calculate measures of additive interaction are presented. PMID:16620385

  1. Fabrication and Operation of Paper-Based Analytical Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiao; Fan, Z. Hugh

    2016-06-01

    This review focuses on the fabrication techniques and operational components of microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (μPADs). Being low-cost, user-friendly, fast, and simple, μPADs have seen explosive growth in the literature in the last decade. Many different materials and technologies have been employed to fabricate μPADs for various applications, including those that employ patterning, the creation of physical boundaries, and three-dimensional structures. In addition to fabrication techniques, flow control and other operational components in μPADs are of great interest. These components enable μPADs to control flow rates, direct flow paths via valves, sequentially deliver reagents automatically, and display test results, all of which will make μPADs more suitable for point-of-care applications.

  2. Fabrication and Operation of Paper-Based Analytical Devices.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiao; Fan, Z Hugh

    2016-06-12

    This review focuses on the fabrication techniques and operational components of microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (μPADs). Being low-cost, user-friendly, fast, and simple, μPADs have seen explosive growth in the literature in the last decade. Many different materials and technologies have been employed to fabricate μPADs for various applications, including those that employ patterning, the creation of physical boundaries, and three-dimensional structures. In addition to fabrication techniques, flow control and other operational components in μPADs are of great interest. These components enable μPADs to control flow rates, direct flow paths via valves, sequentially deliver reagents automatically, and display test results, all of which will make μPADs more suitable for point-of-care applications. PMID:27070184

  3. Environmental Sustainability - Including Land and Water Use

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessments of environmental sustainability can be conducted in many ways with one of the most quantitative methods including Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA). While historically LCIA has included a comprehensive list of impact categories including: ozone depletion, global c...

  4. Production scheduling with discrete and renewable additional resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinowski, K.; Grabowik, C.; Paprocka, I.; Kempa, W.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper an approach to planning of additional resources when scheduling operations are discussed. The considered resources are assumed to be discrete and renewable. In most research in scheduling domain, the basic and often the only type of regarded resources is a workstation. It can be understood as a machine, a device or even as a separated space on the shop floor. In many cases, during the detailed scheduling of operations the need of using more than one resource, required for its implementation, can be indicated. Resource requirements for an operation may relate to different resources or resources of the same type. Additional resources are most often referred to these human resources, tools or equipment, for which the limited availability in the manufacturing system may have an influence on the execution dates of some operations. In the paper the concept of the division into basic and additional resources and their planning method was shown. A situation in which sets of basic and additional resources are not separable - the same additional resource may be a basic resource for another operation is also considered. Scheduling of operations, including greater amount of resources can cause many difficulties, depending on whether the resource is involved in the entire time of operation, only in the selected part(s) of operation (e.g. as auxiliary staff at setup time) or cyclic - e.g. when an operator supports more than one machine, or supervises the execution of several operations. For this reason the dates and work times of resources participation in the operation can be different. Presented issues are crucial when modelling of production scheduling environment and designing of structures for the purpose of scheduling software development.

  5. Patterned fluoropolymer barriers for containment of organic solvents within paper-based microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Chen, Benny; Kwong, Philip; Gupta, Malancha

    2013-12-11

    In this study, we demonstrate for the first time the ability to pattern lipophobic fluoropolymer barriers for the incorporation of pure organic solvents as operating liquids within paper-based microfluidic devices. Our fabrication method involves replacing traditional wax barriers with fluoropolymer coatings by combining initiated chemical vapor deposition with inhibiting transition metal salt to pattern the polymer. Multiple techniques for patterning the transition metal salt are tested including painting, spray coating, and selective wetting through the use of a photoresist. The efficacy of the barrier coatings to contain organic solvents is found to be dependent on the conformality of the polymer deposited around the paper fibers. We demonstrate examples of the benefits provided by the containment of organic solvents in paper-based microfluidic applications including the ability to tune the separation of analytes by varying the operating solvent and by modifying the channel region of the devices with additional polymer coatings. The work exhibited in this paper has the potential to significantly expand the applications of paper-based microfluidics to include detection of water insoluble analytes. Additionally, the generality of the patterning process allows this technique to be extended to other applications that may require the use of patterned hydrophobic and lipophobic regions, such as biosensing, chemical detection, and optics. PMID:24283374

  6. Replacing paper with digital recording.

    PubMed

    Amin, Kawa

    2015-01-01

    Addressing the needs to achieve the highest standards at multidisciplinary team meetings at the Stroke Unit of Broomfield Hospital, an electronic version is applied instead of the traditional paper model. This is to ensure that patients within the unit are receiving appropriate care and their progress is monitored throughout their entire journey. This also enables the stroke team to retrieve old information anywhere in the hospital, electronically, from previous documentations to compare progress of rehabilitation. The electronic model also helps when assessing readmission or those who attend the stroke clinics to clarify new onset changes from residual weakness. The tool kit estimates Barthel Index score for activities of daily living and Rivermead Mobility Index for physical capacity assessment weekly as the team attending the meetings. The goals from all disciplines, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, speech and language therapists, and nurses are clearly documented along with patient cognition, emotion, and perception. This initiative commenced in late April 2013 and the first clinical outcome assessments performed at the beginning of September 2013, enabling the stroke team to assess rehabilitation activities and achievements. Front-line staff expressed satisfaction with the initiative model, which successfully managed to monitor and analyze the rehabilitation activities within the stroke unit. PMID:25440331

  7. White paper on science operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreier, Ethan J.

    1991-01-01

    Major changes are taking place in the way astronomy gets done. There are continuing advances in observational capabilities across the frequency spectrum, involving both ground-based and space-based facilities. There is also very rapid evolution of relevant computing and data management technologies. However, although the new technologies are filtering in to the astronomy community, and astronomers are looking at their computing needs in new ways, there is little coordination or coherent policy. Furthermore, although there is great awareness of the evolving technologies in the arena of operations, much of the existing operations infrastructure is ill-suited to take advantage of them. Astronomy, especially space astronomy, has often been at the cutting edge of computer use in data reduction and image analysis, but has been somewhat removed from advanced applications in operations, which have tended to be implemented by industry rather than by the end-user scientists. The purpose of this paper is threefold. First, we briefly review the background and general status of astronomy-related computing. Second, we make recommendations in three areas: data analysis; operations (directed primarily to NASA-related activities); and issues of management and policy, believing that these must be addressed to enable technological progress and to proceed through the next decade. Finally, we recommend specific NASA-related work as part of the Astrotech-21 plans, to enable better science operations in the operations of the Great Observatories and in the lunar outpost era.

  8. Color Addition and Subtraction Apps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Frances; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Color addition and subtraction apps in HTML5 have been developed for students as an online hands-on experience so that they can more easily master principles introduced through traditional classroom demonstrations. The evolution of the additive RGB color model is traced through the early IBM color adapters so that students can proceed step by step…

  9. 75 FR 27313 - Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ... FROM PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED PROCUREMENT LIST Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed additions to the... or Severely Disabled, Jefferson Plaza 2, Suite 10800, 1421 Jefferson Davis Highway,...

  10. Automated solar collector installation design including ability to define heterogeneous design preferences

    DOEpatents

    Wayne, Gary; Frumkin, Alexander; Zaydman, Michael; Lehman, Scott; Brenner, Jules

    2013-01-08

    Embodiments may include systems and methods to create and edit a representation of a worksite, to create various data objects, to classify such objects as various types of pre-defined "features" with attendant properties and layout constraints. As part of or in addition to classification, an embodiment may include systems and methods to create, associate, and edit intrinsic and extrinsic properties to these objects. A design engine may apply of design rules to the features described above to generate one or more solar collectors installation design alternatives, including generation of on-screen and/or paper representations of the physical layout or arrangement of the one or more design alternatives. Embodiments may also include definition of one or more design apertures, each of which may correspond to boundaries in which solar collector layouts should comply with distinct sets of user-defined design preferences. Distinct apertures may provide heterogeneous regions of collector layout according to the user-defined design preferences.

  11. Automated solar collector installation design including ability to define heterogeneous design preferences

    DOEpatents

    Wayne, Gary; Frumkin, Alexander; Zaydman, Michael; Lehman, Scott; Brenner, Jules

    2014-04-29

    Embodiments may include systems and methods to create and edit a representation of a worksite, to create various data objects, to classify such objects as various types of pre -defined "features" with attendant properties and layout constraints. As part of or in addition to classification, an embodiment may include systems and methods to create, associate, and edit intrinsic and extrinsic properties to these objects. A design engine may apply of design rules to the features described above to generate one or more solar collectors installation design alternatives, including generation of on-screen and/or paper representations of the physical layout or arrangement of the one or more design alternatives. Embodiments may also include definition of one or more design apertures, each of which may correspond to boundaries in which solar collector layouts should comply with distinct sets of user-defined design preferences. Distinct apertures may provide heterogeneous regions of collector layout according to the user-defined design preferences.

  12. An Integrated Biochemistry Laboratory, Including Molecular Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Adele J. Wolfson Mona L.; Branham, Thomas R.

    1996-11-01

    ) experience with methods of protein purification; (iii) incorporation of appropriate controls into experiments; (iv) use of basic statistics in data analysis; (v) writing papers and grant proposals in accepted scientific style; (vi) peer review; (vii) oral presentation of results and proposals; and (viii) introduction to molecular modeling. Figure 1 illustrates the modular nature of the lab curriculum. Elements from each of the exercises can be separated and treated as stand-alone exercises, or combined into short or long projects. We have been able to offer the opportunity to use sophisticated molecular modeling in the final module through funding from an NSF-ILI grant. However, many of the benefits of the research proposal can be achieved with other computer programs, or even by literature survey alone. Figure 1.Design of project-based biochemistry laboratory. Modules (projects, or portions of projects) are indicated as boxes. Each of these can be treated independently, or used as part of a larger project. Solid lines indicate some suggested paths from one module to the next. The skills and knowledge required for protein purification and design are developed in three units: (i) an introduction to critical assays needed to monitor degree of purification, including an evaluation of assay parameters; (ii) partial purification by ion-exchange techniques; and (iii) preparation of a grant proposal on protein design by mutagenesis. Brief descriptions of each of these units follow, with experimental details of each project at the end of this paper. Assays for Lysozyme Activity and Protein Concentration (4 weeks) The assays mastered during the first unit are a necessary tool for determining the purity of the enzyme during the second unit on purification by ion exchange. These assays allow an introduction to the concept of specific activity (units of enzyme activity per milligram of total protein) as a measure of purity. In this first sequence, students learn a turbidimetric assay

  13. Flow Analysis Tool White Paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boscia, Nichole K.

    2012-01-01

    Faster networks are continually being built to accommodate larger data transfers. While it is intuitive to think that implementing faster networks will result in higher throughput rates, this is often not the case. There are many elements involved in data transfer, many of which are beyond the scope of the network itself. Although networks may get bigger and support faster technologies, the presence of other legacy components, such as older application software or kernel parameters, can often cause bottlenecks. Engineers must be able to identify when data flows are reaching a bottleneck that is not imposed by the network and then troubleshoot it using the tools available to them. The current best practice is to collect as much information as possible on the network traffic flows so that analysis is quick and easy. Unfortunately, no single method of collecting this information can sufficiently capture the whole endto- end picture. This becomes even more of a hurdle when large, multi-user systems are involved. In order to capture all the necessary information, multiple data sources are required. This paper presents a method for developing a flow analysis tool to effectively collect network flow data from multiple sources and provide that information to engineers in a clear, concise way for analysis. The purpose of this method is to collect enough information to quickly (and automatically) identify poorly performing flows along with the cause of the problem. The method involves the development of a set of database tables that can be populated with flow data from multiple sources, along with an easyto- use, web-based front-end interface to help network engineers access, organize, analyze, and manage all the information.

  14. English as an Additional Language: Changing Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Constant, Ed.; Cable, Carrie, Ed.

    This volume highlights the language and learning needs of pupils with English as an additional language in the United Kingdom. It includes chapters by British teachers and researchers working in this field. The book addresses a number of issues of interest to practitioners, scholars, teacher educators, and policy makers. Each chapter is prefaced…

  15. 36 CFR 1290.7 - Additional guidance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Section 1290.7 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION JFK... ASSASSINATION RECORDS COLLECTION ACT OF 1992 (JFK ACT) § 1290.7 Additional guidance. (a) A government agency, office, or entity includes, for purposes of interpreting and implementing the JFK Act, all current,...

  16. Capacitive Proximity Sensors With Additional Driven Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcconnell, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    Improved capacitive proximity sensors constructed by incorporating one or more additional driven shield(s). Sensitivity and range of sensor altered by adjusting driving signal(s) applied to shield(s). Includes sensing electrode and driven isolating shield that correspond to sensing electrode and driven shield.

  17. The Pill vs. the Sword: Additional Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Lottes, Ilsa L.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, I present additional information for policy-makers and researchers to consider in response to the view proposed by Potts et al that "the pill is mightier than the sword." I identify states with both high rates of terrorism and a youth bulge and discuss correlates of both these societal characteristics. The research examined supports the view that factors other than access to family planning are more important in facilitating terrorism. PMID:26673473

  18. 78 FR 38953 - Procurement List Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-28

    ... INFORMATION: Additions On 4/19/2013 (78 FR 23542-23543); 4/26/2013 (78 FR 24732-24733); 5/ 3/2013 (78 FR 25970-25971); and 5/10/2013 (78 FR 27368-27369), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or...: ] Products NSN: 7520-00-NSH-0189--Hole Punch, Paper, Light Duty, 3-Hole, Adjustable, 10 sheet capacity,...

  19. Color Addition and Subtraction Apps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Frances; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2015-10-01

    Color addition and subtraction apps in HTML5 have been developed for students as an online hands-on experience so that they can more easily master principles introduced through traditional classroom demonstrations. The evolution of the additive RGB color model is traced through the early IBM color adapters so that students can proceed step by step in understanding mathematical representations of RGB color. Finally, color addition and subtraction are presented for the X11 colors from web design to illustrate yet another real-life application of color mixing.

  20. Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Heffner, Grayson

    2009-02-01

    While there is general agreement that demand response (DR) is a valued component in a utility resource plan, there is a lack of consensus regarding how to value DR. Establishing the value of DR is a prerequisite to determining how much and what types of DR should be implemented, to which customers DR should be targeted, and a key determinant that drives the development of economically viable DR consumer technology. Most approaches for quantifying the value of DR focus on changes in utility system revenue requirements based on resource plans with and without DR. This ''utility centric'' approach does not assign any value to DR impacts that lower energy and capacity prices, improve reliability, lower system and network operating costs, produce better air quality, and provide improved customer choice and control. Proper valuation of these benefits requires a different basis for monetization. The review concludes that no single methodology today adequately captures the wide range of benefits and value potentially attributed to DR. To provide a more comprehensive valuation approach, current methods such as the Standard Practice Method (SPM) will most likely have to be supplemented with one or more alternative benefit-valuation approaches. This report provides an updated perspective on the DR valuation framework. It includes an introduction and four chapters that address the key elements of demand response valuation, a comprehensive literature review, and specific research recommendations.

  1. Collected software engineering papers, volume 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    A collection is presented of selected technical papers produced by participants in the Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) during the period Dec. 1988 to Oct. 1989. The purpose of the document is to make available, in one reference, some results of SEL research that originally appeared in a number of different forums. For the convenience of this presentation, the seven papers contained here are grouped into three major categories: (1) Software Measurement and Technology Studies; (2) Measurement Environment Studies; and (3) Ada Technology Studies. The first category presents experimental research and evaluation of software measurement and technology; the second presents studies on software environments pertaining to measurement. The last category represents Ada technology and includes research, development, and measurement studies.

  2. Spacecraft crew procedures from paper to computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oneal, Michael; Manahan, Meera

    1993-01-01

    Large volumes of paper are launched with each Space Shuttle Mission that contain step-by-step instructions for various activities that are to be performed by the crew during the mission. These instructions include normal operational procedures and malfunction or contingency procedures and are collectively known as the Flight Data File (FDF). An example of nominal procedures would be those used in the deployment of a satellite from the Space Shuttle; a malfunction procedure would describe actions to be taken if a specific problem developed during the deployment. A new FDF and associated system is being created for Space Station Freedom. The system will be called the Space Station Flight Data File (SFDF). NASA has determined that the SFDF will be computer-based rather than paper-based. Various aspects of the SFDF are discussed.

  3. Collected software engineering papers, volume 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A collection is presented of technical papers produced by participants in the Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) during the period 1 Jun. 1987 to 1 Jan. 1989. The purpose of the document is to make available, in one reference, some results of SEL research that originally appeared in a number of different forums. For the convenience of this presentation, the twelve papers contained here are grouped into three major categories: (1) Software Measurement and Technology Studies; (2) Measurement Environment Studies; and (3) Ada Technology Studies. The first category presents experimental research and evaluation of software measurement and technology; the second presents studies on software environments pertaining to measurement. The last category represents Ada technology and includes research, development, and measurement studies.

  4. Commentaries of three papers of Cornelius Lanczos

    SciTech Connect

    Jea, K.C.; Young, D.M.

    1991-10-01

    This report contains commentaries on these three papers of Cornelius Lanczos: (A) Cornelius Lanczos [1952], ``Iterative Solution of Systems of Linear Equations by Minimized Iterations,`` Journal of Research of the National Bureau of Standards, 49, 33--53; (B) Cornelius Lanczos [1953], ``Chebyshev Polynomials in the Solution of Large-Scale Linear Systems,`` Proceedings of the ACM Conference held in Toronto, California in 1952, Sauls L. Lithograph Co., Washington, DC; (C) Cornelius Lanczos [1958], ``Iterative Solutions of Large-Scale Linear Systems,`` J. Soc. Indust. Appl. Math., 6, 91--109. These commentaries will be included in a volume of the collected published Lanczos papers which will be published as part of the Cornelius Lanczos Centenary Celebration at North Carolina State University. The volume is scheduled for publication in December 1993.

  5. Papers from the Linguistics Laboratory. Working Papers in Linguistics No. 43.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sook-Hyang, Ed.; Jun, Sun-Ah, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This collection of papers on linguistic experiments includes: "Initial Tones and Prominence in Seoul Korean" (Ken de Jong); "The Domains of Laryngeal Feature Lenition Effects in Chonnam Korean" (Sun-Ah Jun); "The Timing of Lip Rounding and Tongue Backing for /u/" Gina M. Lee); "Prosody and Intrasyllabic Timing in French" (Janet Fletcher, Eric…

  6. Papers from the Linguistics Laboratory. Working Papers in Linguistics No. 44.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venditti, Jennifer J., Ed.

    1994-01-01

    The collection of papers on linguistic experiments includes: "Discourse Functions of Pitch Range in Spontaneous and Read Speech" (Gayle M. Ayers); "When Is a Syllable Not a Syllable?" (Mary E. Beckman); "The Relationship between Syntactic and Semantic Processes in Sentence Comprehension" (Julie E. Boland); "The Influence of Orthography and…

  7. Papers on Morphology. The Ohio State University Working Papers in Linguistics #29.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwicky, Arnold M., Ed.; Wallace, Rex E., Ed.

    A collection of papers on morphology in relation to other grammar components and on the morphology-syntax interface includes: "Locative Plural Forms in Classical Sanskrit" (Belinda Brodie); "On Explaining Morpheme Structure" (Donald G. Churma); "Lexical Relatedness, Head of a Word and the Misanalysis of Latin" (Brian D. Joseph and Rex E. Wallace);…

  8. Aboriginal and Islander Grammars: Collected Papers. Work Papers of SIL-AAB, Series A, Volume 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, S., Ed.

    Six papers on Australian Aboriginal and Islander grammars include: "Repetition of Tiwi at Clause Level" (Marie P. Godfrey); "Iwaidja Verbal Clauses" (Noreen Pym); "Murinbata Noun Clauses" (Chester S. Street); "Clauses in Kala Lagaw Ya" (Rod Kennedy); "Kalaw Kawaw Verbs" (Rod Kennedy); and "Kalaw Kawaw Verbs: Speaker Perspective and Tense, Mood,…

  9. Coyote Papers: Working Papers in Linguistics from A-Z, Volume 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fountain, Amy, Ed.; Hendricks, Sean, Ed.; Ohno, Sachiko, Ed.; Miyashita, Mizuki, Ed.; Cole, Debbie, Ed.

    The papers in this volume are all phonological in nature, and all but one of them are written within the framework of Optmality Theory. This volume includes work on a variety of languages: American Indian (Kiowa, Koasati, Shoshoni), Austronesian (Muna and Nancowry), Bantu (Tsonga), and Indo European (English and Spanish). The following articles…

  10. Sublingual immunotherapy: World Allergy Organization position paper 2013 update.

    PubMed

    Canonica, Giorgio Walter; Cox, Linda; Pawankar, Ruby; Baena-Cagnani, Carlos E; Blaiss, Michael; Bonini, Sergio; Bousquet, Jean; Calderón, Moises; Compalati, Enrico; Durham, Stephen R; van Wijk, Roy Gerth; Larenas-Linnemann, Désirée; Nelson, Harold; Passalacqua, Giovanni; Pfaar, Oliver; Rosário, Nelson; Ryan, Dermot; Rosenwasser, Lanny; Schmid-Grendelmeier, Peter; Senna, Gianenrico; Valovirta, Erkka; Van Bever, Hugo; Vichyanond, Pakit; Wahn, Ulrich; Yusuf, Osman

    2014-01-01

    We have prepared this document, "Sublingual Immunotherapy: World Allergy Organization Position Paper 2013 Update", according to the evidence-based criteria, revising and updating chapters of the originally published paper, "Sublingual Immunotherapy: World Allergy Organization Position Paper 2009", available at http://www.waojournal.org. Namely, these comprise: "Mechanisms of sublingual immunotherapy;" "Clinical efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy" - reporting all the data of all controlled trials published after 2009; "Safety of sublingual immunotherapy" - with the recently published Grading System for adverse reactions; "Impact of sublingual immunotherapy on the natural history of respiratory allergy" - with the relevant evidences published since 2009; "Efficacy of SLIT in children" - with detailed analysis of all the studies; "Definition of SLIT patient selection" - reporting the criteria for eligibility to sublingual immunotherapy; "The future of immunotherapy in the community care setting"; "Methodology of clinical trials according to the current scientific and regulatory standards"; and "Guideline development: from evidence-based medicine to patients' views" - including the evolution of the methods to make clinical recommendations.Additionally, we have added new chapters to cover a few emerging crucial topics: "Practical aspects of schedules and dosages and counseling for adherence" - which is crucial in clinical practice for all treatments; "Perspectives and new approaches" - including recombinant allergens, adjuvants, modified allergens, and the concept of validity of the single products. Furthermore, "Raising public awareness about sublingual immunotherapy", as a need for our patients, and strategies to increase awareness of allergen immunotherapy (AIT) among patients, the medical community, all healthcare stakeholders, and public opinion, are also reported in detail. PMID:24679069

  11. Sublingual immunotherapy: World Allergy Organization position paper 2013 update

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We have prepared this document, “Sublingual Immunotherapy: World Allergy Organization Position Paper 2013 Update”, according to the evidence-based criteria, revising and updating chapters of the originally published paper, “Sublingual Immunotherapy: World Allergy Organization Position Paper 2009”, available at http://www.waojournal.org. Namely, these comprise: “Mechanisms of sublingual immunotherapy;” “Clinical efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy” – reporting all the data of all controlled trials published after 2009; “Safety of sublingual immunotherapy” – with the recently published Grading System for adverse reactions; “Impact of sublingual immunotherapy on the natural history of respiratory allergy” – with the relevant evidences published since 2009; “Efficacy of SLIT in children” – with detailed analysis of all the studies; “Definition of SLIT patient selection” – reporting the criteria for eligibility to sublingual immunotherapy; “The future of immunotherapy in the community care setting”; “Methodology of clinical trials according to the current scientific and regulatory standards”; and “Guideline development: from evidence-based medicine to patients' views” – including the evolution of the methods to make clinical recommendations. Additionally, we have added new chapters to cover a few emerging crucial topics: “Practical aspects of schedules and dosages and counseling for adherence” – which is crucial in clinical practice for all treatments; “Perspectives and new approaches” – including recombinant allergens, adjuvants, modified allergens, and the concept of validity of the single products. Furthermore, “Raising public awareness about sublingual immunotherapy”, as a need for our patients, and strategies to increase awareness of allergen immunotherapy (AIT) among patients, the medical community, all healthcare stakeholders, and public opinion, are also reported in detail. PMID:24679069

  12. Misconstrual of EAPC's position paper on euthanasia.

    PubMed

    Materstvedt, Lars Johan

    2015-08-01

    This is a response to Barutta and Vollmann's article 'Physician-assisted death with limited access to palliative care.' I show how they misconstrue a key empirical statement made by the European Association for Palliative Care regarding legalisation of euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. Additionally, I include some further remarks on the relationship between euthanasia and palliative care. I read with interest the article, which delineate well several positions and gives a nice overview of arguments presented on either side. I also found the line of argument unprejudiced and clear, and am sure people working within palliative care would benefit from reading it. PMID:25948759

  13. Active mineral additives of sapropel ashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomich, V. A.; Danilina, E. V.; Krivonos, O. I.; Plaksin, G. V.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the presented research is to establish a scientific rational for the possibility of sapropel ashes usage as an active mineral additive. The research included the study of producing active mineral additives from sapropels by their thermal treatment at 850900 °C and afterpowdering, the investigation of the properties of paste matrix with an ash additive, and the study of the ash influence on the cement bonding agent. Thermogravimetric analysis and X-ray investigations allowed us to establish that while burning, organic substances are removed, clay minerals are dehydrated and their structure is broken. Sapropel ashes chemical composition was determined. An amorphous ash constituent is mainly formed from silica of the mineral sapropel part and alumosilicagels resulted from clay minerals decomposition. Properties of PC 400 and PC 500A0 sparopel ash additives were studied. Adding ashes containing Glenium plasticizer to the cement increases paste matrix strength and considerably reduces its water absorption. X-ray phase analysis data shows changes in the phase composition of the paste matrix with an ash additive. Ash additives produce a pozzolanic effect on the cement bonding agent. Besides, an ash additive due to the alumosilicagels content causes transformation from unstable calcium aluminate forms to the stable ones.

  14. Evaluation of certain food additives and contaminants.

    PubMed

    2001-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives and contaminants, with a view to recommending Acceptable Daily Intakes (ADIs) and tolerable intakes, respectively, and to prepare specifications for the identity and purity of food additives. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of food additives and contaminants (including flavouring agents), and the establishment and revision of specifications. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of toxicological data on various specific food additives (furfural, paprika oleoresin, caramel colour II, cochineal extract, carmines, aspartame-acesulfame salt, D-tagatose, benzoyl peroxide, nitrous oxide, stearyl tartrate and trehalose), flavouring agents and contaminants (cadmium and tin), and of intake data on calcium from calcium salts of food additives. Annexed to the report are tables summarizing the Committee's recommendations for ADIs of the food additives and tolerable intakes of the contaminants considered, changes in the status of specifications of these food additives and specific flavouring agents, and further information required or desired. PMID:11588830

  15. Evaluation of certain food additives and contaminants.

    PubMed

    2002-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives and contaminants, with a view to recommending Acceptable Daily Intakes (ADIs) and tolerable intakes, respectively, and to prepare specifications for the identity and purity of food additives. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of food additives (including flavouring agents) and contaminants, assessments of intake, and the establishment and revision of specifications for food additives. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of toxicological and intake data on various specific food additives (diacetyltartaric and fatty acid esters of glycerol, quillaia extracts, invertase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, beta-carotene from Blakeslea trispora, curcumin, phosphates, diphosphates and polyphosphates, hydrogenated poly-1-decene, natamycin, D-tagatose, carrageenan, processed Eucheuma seaweed, curdlan, acetylated oxidized starch, alpha-cyclodextrin and sodium sulfate), flavouring agents and contaminants (3-chloro-1,2-propanediol, 1,3-dichloro-2-propanol, and a large number of polychlorinated dibenzodioxins, polychlorinated dibenzofurans and coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls). Annexed to the report are tables summarizing the Committee's recommendations for ADIs of the food additives and tolerable intakes of the contaminants considered, changes in the status of specifications of these food additives and specific flavouring agents, and further information required or desired. PMID:12564044

  16. Additive manufacturing of materials: Opportunities and challenges

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh; Love, Lonnie J.; Dehoff, Ryan R.; Peter, William H.; Watkins, Thomas R.; Pannala, Sreekanth

    2015-11-01

    Additive manufacturing (also known as 3D printing) is considered a disruptive technology for producing components with topologically optimized complex geometries as well as functionalities that are not achievable by traditional methods. The realization of the full potential of 3D printing is stifled by a lack of computational design tools, generic material feedstocks, techniques for monitoring thermomechanical processes under in situ conditions, and especially methods for minimizing anisotropic static and dynamic properties brought about by microstructural heterogeneity. In this paper, we discuss the role of interdisciplinary research involving robotics and automation, process control, multiscale characterization of microstructure and properties, and high-performancemore » computational tools to address each of these challenges. In addition, emerging pathways to scale up additive manufacturing of structural materials to large sizes (>1 m) and higher productivities (5–20 kg/h) while maintaining mechanical performance and geometrical flexibility are also discussed.« less

  17. Additive manufacturing of materials: Opportunities and challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh; Love, Lonnie J.; Dehoff, Ryan R.; Peter, William H.; Watkins, Thomas R.; Pannala, Sreekanth

    2015-11-01

    Additive manufacturing (also known as 3D printing) is considered a disruptive technology for producing components with topologically optimized complex geometries as well as functionalities that are not achievable by traditional methods. The realization of the full potential of 3D printing is stifled by a lack of computational design tools, generic material feedstocks, techniques for monitoring thermomechanical processes under in situ conditions, and especially methods for minimizing anisotropic static and dynamic properties brought about by microstructural heterogeneity. In this paper, we discuss the role of interdisciplinary research involving robotics and automation, process control, multiscale characterization of microstructure and properties, and high-performance computational tools to address each of these challenges. In addition, emerging pathways to scale up additive manufacturing of structural materials to large sizes (>1 m) and higher productivities (5–20 kg/h) while maintaining mechanical performance and geometrical flexibility are also discussed.

  18. Packaging and Transportation of Additional Neptunium Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, R.; Jordan, J.; Hensel, S.

    2010-05-05

    The Savannah River Site's HB-Line Facility completed a second neptunium oxide production campaign in which nine (9) additional cans of neptunium oxide were produced and shipped to the Idaho National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the 9975 shipping container. These additional cans were from a different feed solution than the first fifty (50) cans of neptunium oxide that were previously produced and shipped via a Letter of Amendment to the 9975 Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) content table. This paper will address the challenges associated with demonstrating the neptunium oxide produced from the additional feed solution was equivalent to the original neptunium oxide and within the content description of the Letter of Amendment.

  19. Additional Reflections on Microforms and the Historian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Lamar M.

    1988-01-01

    Responds to a critique of a previously published paper on the development of a microform collection of British historical documents at the University of California, Irvine (UCI). Issues addressed include the completeness of the UCI collection, the value of using microform collections, and alternatives to filming of historical documents. (MES)

  20. Calculators and Computers: Graphical Addition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spero, Samuel W.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program is presented that generates problem sets involving sketching graphs of trigonometric functions using graphical addition. The students use calculators to sketch the graphs and a computer solution is used to check it. (MP)