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Sample records for additional phase iii

  1. PLCO Ovarian Phase III Validation Study — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Our preliminary data indicate that the performance of CA 125 as a screening test for ovarian cancer can be improved upon by additional biomarkers. With completion of one additional validation step, we will be ready to test the performance of a consensus marker panel in a phase III validation study. Given the original aims of the PLCO trial, we believe that the PLCO represents an ideal longitudinal cohort offering specimens for phase III validation of ovarian cancer biomarkers.

  2. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program: Phase III

    SciTech Connect

    G.T. Amrhein; R.T. Bailey; W. Downs; M.J. Holmes; G.A. Kudlac; D.A. Madden

    1999-07-01

    removals when the scrubber is operated downstream of an ESP. Phase III (Advanced Concepts and Comparison Coals) testing was directed at the development of enhanced air toxics emissions control strategies to further reduce the emissions of mercury. Phase III results further supported the findings of previous phases and demonstrated several methods of enhancing mercury control for both unscrubbed systems and systems equipped with WFGD. Results confirmed that the addition of sorbents can be used to significantly improve the capture of mercury in downstream particulate collection equipment. In addition, Phase III testing demonstrated three methods of minimizing the potential negative impact of an ESP on downstream control of mercury in WFGD systems. These methods included decreased oxidation air flow, the addition of H{sub 2}S into the flue gas at the scrubber inlet, and the addition of EDTA into the absorber reaction tank.

  3. Failures in Phase III: Causes and Consequences.

    PubMed

    Seruga, Bostjan; Ocana, Alberto; Amir, Eitan; Tannock, Ian F

    2015-10-15

    Phase III randomized controlled trials (RCT) in oncology fail to lead to registration of new therapies more often than RCTs in other medical disciplines. Most RCTs are sponsored by the pharmaceutical industry, which reflects industry's increasing responsibility in cancer drug development. Many preclinical models are unreliable for evaluation of new anticancer agents, and stronger evidence of biologic effect should be required before a new agent enters the clinical development pathway. Whenever possible, early-phase clinical trials should include pharmacodynamic studies to demonstrate that new agents inhibit their molecular targets and demonstrate substantial antitumor activity at tolerated doses in an enriched population of patients. Here, we review recent RCTs and found that these conditions were not met for most of the targeted anticancer agents, which failed in recent RCTs. Many recent phase III RCTs were initiated without sufficient evidence of activity from early-phase clinical trials. Because patients treated within such trials can be harmed, they should not be undertaken. The bar should also be raised when making decisions to proceed from phase II to III and from phase III to marketing approval. Many approved agents showed only better progression-free survival than standard treatment in phase III trials and were not shown to improve survival or its quality. Introduction of value-based pricing of new anticancer agents would dissuade the continued development of agents with borderline activity in early-phase clinical trials. When collaborating with industry, oncologists should be more critical and better advocates for cancer patients. PMID:26473191

  4. Laparoscopic Radiofrequency Fibroid Ablation: Phase II and Phase III Results

    PubMed Central

    Pemueller, Rodolfo Robles; Garza Leal, José Gerardo; Abbott, Karen R.; Falls, Janice L.; Macer, James

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: To review phase II and phase III treatments of symptomatic uterine fibroids (myomas) using laparoscopic radiofrequency volumetric thermal ablation (RFVTA). Methods: We performed a retrospective, multicenter clinical analysis of 206 consecutive cases of ultrasound-guided laparoscopic RFVTA of symptomatic myomas conducted on an outpatient basis under two phase II studies at 2 sites (n = 69) and one phase III study at 11 sites (n = 137). Descriptive and exploratory, general trend, and matched-pair analyses were applied. Results: From baseline to 12 months in the phase II study, the mean transformed symptom severity scores improved from 53.9 to 8.8 (P < .001) (n = 57), health-related quality-of-life scores improved from 48.5 to 92.0 (P < .001) (n = 57), and mean uterine volume decreased from 204.4 cm3 to 151.4 cm3 (P = .008) (n = 58). Patients missed a median of 4 days of work (range, 2–10 days). The rate of possible device-related adverse events was 1.4% (1 of 69). In the phase III study, approximately 98% of patients were assessed at 12 months, and their transformed symptom severity scores, health-related quality-of-life scores, mean decrease in uterine volume, and mean menstrual bleeding reduction were also significant. Patients in phase III missed a median of 5 days of work (range, 1–29 days). The rate of periprocedural device-related adverse events was 3.5% (5 of 137). Despite the enrollment requirement for patients in both phases to have completed childbearing, 4 pregnancies occurred within the first year after treatment. Conclusions: RFVTA does not require any uterine incisions and provides a uterine-sparing procedure with rapid recovery, significant reduction in uterine size, significant reduction or elimination of myoma symptoms, and significant improvement in quality of life. PMID:24960480

  5. Moon Phase & Libration 2013: Additional Graphics

    NASA Video Gallery

    This visualization shows the phase and libration of the Moon throughout the year 2013, at hourly intervals. Each frame represents one hour. In addition, this version of the visualization shows addi...

  6. Space Phase III - The commercial era dawns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allnutt, R. F.

    1983-01-01

    After the 'Phase I' of space activities, the period bounded by Sputnik and Apollo, 'Phase II', has been entered, a phase in which concerns over the use and the protection of space assets which support national security predominate. However, it is only when the commercial motive becomes prominent that human activity in new regions truly prospers and enters periods of exponential growth. It is believed that there are increasing signs that such a period, called 'Space Phase III', may be coming soon. A description is presented of developments and results upon which this conclusion is based. Since 1980, there have been three developments of great importance for the future of space activities. Six highly successful flights have demonstrated that the Space Shuttle concept works. A series of Soviet missions are related to the emergence of a capability to construct and service modular space stations. Successful tests of the European Ariane 1 indicate an end to U.S. monopoly with respect to the provision of launch services to the Western World.

  7. Benchmark On Sensitivity Calculation (Phase III)

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, Tatiana; Laville, Cedric; Dyrda, James; Mennerdahl, Dennis; Golovko, Yury; Raskach, Kirill; Tsiboulia, Anatoly; Lee, Gil Soo; Woo, Sweng-Woong; Bidaud, Adrien; Patel, Amrit; Bledsoe, Keith C; Rearden, Bradley T; Gulliford, J.

    2012-01-01

    The sensitivities of the keff eigenvalue to neutron cross sections have become commonly used in similarity studies and as part of the validation algorithm for criticality safety assessments. To test calculations of the sensitivity coefficients, a benchmark study (Phase III) has been established by the OECD-NEA/WPNCS/EG UACSA (Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis for Criticality Safety Assessment). This paper presents some sensitivity results generated by the benchmark participants using various computational tools based upon different computational methods: SCALE/TSUNAMI-3D and -1D, MONK, APOLLO2-MORET 5, DRAGON-SUSD3D and MMKKENO. The study demonstrates the performance of the tools. It also illustrates how model simplifications impact the sensitivity results and demonstrates the importance of 'implicit' (self-shielding) sensitivities. This work has been a useful step towards verification of the existing and developed sensitivity analysis methods.

  8. ADVANCED HYBRID PARTICULATE COLLECTOR - PHASE III

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley J. Miller; Ye Zhuang; Michael E. Collings; Michelle R. Olderbak

    2000-10-01

    A new concept in particulate control, called an advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC), is being developed under funding from the U.S. Department of Energy. The AHPC combines the best features of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses in a unique configuration. The AHPC concept consists of a combination of fabric filtration and electrostatic precipitation in the same housing, providing major synergism between the two collection methods, both in the particulate collection step and in the transfer of dust to the hopper. The AHPC provides ultrahigh collection efficiency, overcoming the problem of excessive fine-particle emission with conventional ESPs, and it solves the problem of reentrainment and re-collection of dust in conventional baghouses. In Phase II, a 2.5-MW-scale AHPC was designed, constructed, installed, and tested at the Big Stone power station. For Phase III, further testing of an improved version of the 2.5-MW-scale AHPC at the Big Stone power station is being conducted to facilitate commercialization of the AHPC technology.

  9. CONVERSION EXTRACTION DESULFURIZATION (CED) PHASE III

    SciTech Connect

    James Boltz

    2005-03-01

    This project was undertaken to refine the Conversion Extraction Desulfurization (CED) technology to efficiently and economically remove sulfur from diesel fuel to levels below 15-ppm. CED is considered a generic term covering all desulfurization processes that involve oxidation and extraction. The CED process first extracts a fraction of the sulfur from the diesel, then selectively oxidizes the remaining sulfur compounds, and finally extracts these oxidized materials. The Department of Energy (DOE) awarded Petro Star Inc. a contract to fund Phase III of the CED process development. Phase III consisted of testing a continuous-flow process, optimization of the process steps, design of a pilot plant, and completion of a market study for licensing the process. Petro Star and the Degussa Corporation in coordination with Koch Modular Process Systems (KMPS) tested six key process steps in a 7.6-centimeter (cm) (3.0-inch) inside diameter (ID) column at gas oil feed rates of 7.8 to 93.3 liters per hour (l/h) (2.1 to 24.6 gallons per hour). The team verified the technical feasibility with respect to hydraulics for each unit operation tested and successfully demonstrated pre-extraction and solvent recovery distillation. Test operations conducted at KMPS demonstrated that the oxidation reaction converted a maximum of 97% of the thiophenes. The CED Process Development Team demonstrated that CED technology is capable of reducing the sulfur content of light atmospheric gas oil from 5,000-ppm to less than 15-ppm within the laboratory scale. In continuous flow trials, the CED process consistently produced fuel with approximately 20-ppm of sulfur. The process economics study calculated an estimated process cost of $5.70 per product barrel. The Kline Company performed a marketing study to evaluate the possibility of licensing the CED technology. Kline concluded that only 13 refineries harbored opportunity for the CED process. The Kline study and the research team's discussions with

  10. 76 FR 33589 - Standards Improvement Project-Phase III

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-08

    ...Phase III of the Standards Improvement Project (SIP-III) is the third in a series of rulemaking actions to improve and streamline OSHA standards. The Standards Improvement Project removes or revises individual requirements within rules that are confusing, outdated, duplicative, or inconsistent. OSHA identified several requirements for SIP-III (e.g., rigging, NIOSH records, and training......

  11. Separation studies of As(III), Sb(III) and Bi(III) by reversed-phase paper chromatographic technique

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, B.; Shinde, V.M.

    1987-07-01

    Reversed-phase paper chromatographic separations of As(III), Sb(III) and Bi(III) have been carried out on Whatman No 1 filter paper impregnated with triphenylphosphine oxide as stationary phase and using organic complexing agents such as sodium acetate, sodium succinate and sodium malonate solutions as active mobile phases. Results for the separation of binary and ternary mixtures are reported and the method has been successfully applied to the separation and detection of these elements present in real samples and at ppm level concentration.

  12. The coupling of thermochemistry and phase diagrams for group III-V semiconductor systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, T.J.

    1998-07-21

    The project was directed at linking the thermochemical properties of III-V compound semiconductors systems with the reported phase diagrams. The solid-liquid phase equilibrium problem was formulated and three approaches to calculating the reduced standard state chemical potential were identified and values were calculated. In addition, thermochemical values for critical properties were measured using solid state electrochemical techniques. These values, along with the standard state chemical potentials and other available thermochemical and phase diagram data, were combined with a critical assessment of selected III-V systems. This work was culminated with a comprehensive assessment of all the III-V binary systems. A novel aspect of the experimental part of this project was the demonstration of the use of a liquid encapsulate to measure component activities by a solid state emf technique in liquid III-V systems that exhibit high vapor pressures at the measurement temperature.

  13. Photometric geodesy of main-belt asteroids. III. Additional lightcurves

    SciTech Connect

    Weidenschilling, S.J.; Chapman, C.R.; Davis, D.R.; Greenberg, R.; Levy, D.H. )

    1990-08-01

    A total of 107 complete or partial lightcurves are presented for 59 different asteroids over the 1982-1989 period. Unusual lightcurves with unequal minima and maxima at large amplitudes are preferentially seen for M-type asteroids. Some asteroids, such as 16 Psyche and 201 Penelope, exhibit lightcurves combining large amplitude with very unequal brightness for both maxima and both minima, even at small phase angles. An M-type asteroid is believed to consist of a metal core of a differentiated parent body that has had its rocky mantle completely removed by one or more large impacts. 39 refs.

  14. Photometric geodesy of main-belt asteroids. III - Additional lightcurves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidenschilling, S. J.; Chapman, C. R.; Davis, D. R.; Greenberg, R.; Levy, D. H.

    1990-01-01

    A total of 107 complete or partial lightcurves are presented for 59 different asteroids over the 1982-1989 period. Unusual lightcurves with unequal minima and maxima at large amplitudes are preferentially seen for M-type asteroids. Some asteroids, such as 16 Psyche and 201 Penelope, exhibit lightcurves combining large amplitude with very unequal brightness for both maxima and both minima, even at small phase angles. An M-type asteroid is believed to consist of a metal core of a differentiated parent body that has had its rocky mantle completely removed by one or more large impacts.

  15. 75 FR 14575 - Voting Equipment Evaluations Phase III

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Institute of Standards and Technology Voting Equipment Evaluations Phase III AGENCY: National... Development Committee Resolution 05-05, Human Performance-Based Standards and Usability Testing. NIST...

  16. Alloy Phase Diagrams for III-P Semiconductor Crystal Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gennett, Adam

    and error experimentation to determine said condition would be time consuming and costly. To reduce the amount of experimentation that must be done equilibrium phase diagram are constructed using the CALPHAD method. Calculations are performed using Gibbs free energy minimization software commercially available from Thermo-Calc Software, Inc., and databases containing thermochemical data on binary III-V material systems. Diagrams were calculated for temperatures between 530 °C and 1475 °C, thus providing coverage of the entire temperature range where both a segregated liquid and solid phase exist and liquid phase solution growth is possible. Data from these phase diagrams were used to establish conditions of temperature and melt composition for growth of any solid composition of GaxIn1-xP, as well as theoretical Scheil solidification profiles for various starting charge compositions. Additionally, equilibrium phase data was used to create models for rates at which the depleted phosphide components (GaP and InP) must be replenished in the melt solution in order to grow bulk crystals of uniform axial compositions. It was also determined from the Scheil solidification curves that it is theoretically possible for self-grading of the solid composition to occur followed by growth of a solid with uniform axial composition simply by cooling a system with sufficiently high atom fractions of phosphorus and sufficiently low atom fractions of gallium. Experiments were carried out to test conditions for growth given by the phase diagrams, as well as validate the Scheil solidification profiles and the possibility of compositional grading to high-GaP compositions through feed of GaP. Growth of different GaxIn1-xP compositions from this melt and compositional grading toward high-GaP compositions was demonstrated to feasible. In addition, the extent of the solubility of GaP and InP as well as their low diffusion rates in InSb was demonstrated. Finally, high sensitivity of the solid

  17. Comprehensive Evaluation of the Geothermal Resource Potential within the Pyramid Lake Paiute Reservation Phase III Report

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, Donna

    2013-12-01

    This project integrated state-of-the-art exploration technologies with a geologic framework and reservoir modeling to ultimately determine the efficacy of future geothermal production within the PLPT reservation. The information gained during this study should help the PLPT to make informed decisions regarding construction of a geothermal power plant. Additional benefits included the transfer of new technologies and geothermal data to the geothermal industry and it created and/or preserved nearly three dozen jobs accordance with the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. A variety of tasks were conducted to achieve the above stated objectives. The following are the tasks completed within the project: 1. Permitting 2. Shallow temperature survey 3. Seismic data collection and analysis 4. Fracture stress analysis 5. Phase I reporting Permitting 7. Shallow temperature survey 8. Seismic data collection and analysis 9. Fracture stress analysis 10. Phase I reporting 11. Drilling two new wells 12. Borehole geophysics 13. Phase II reporting 14. Well testing and geochemical analysis 15. Three-dimensional geologic model 16. Three-dimensional reservoir analysis 17. Reservation wide geothermal potential analysis 18. Phase III reporting Phase I consisted of tasks 1 – 5, Phase II tasks 6 – 8, and Phase III tasks 9 – 13. This report details the results of Phase III tasks. Reports are available for Phase I, and II as separate documents.

  18. Seeking the Profile of an Elementary Educator: Phase III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arth, Alfred A.; And Others

    This paper presents the third phase of a student-faculty investigation seeking the profile of the elementary school teacher. Phase I discovered an indication of different personality traits in elementary and secondary teachers. Phase II redesigned the original questionnaire and supported the findings with additional research. This third phase…

  19. Transitional liquid crystalline phases between the hexagonal and lamellar phases in ternary cesium N-tetradecanoate-water-additive mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, J.C.; Kilpatrick, P.K. )

    1993-04-01

    The effects of added salt (CsOH, CsCl), long-chain carboxylic acid, and long-chain alcohol on the lyotropic liquid crystalline phase behavior in the cesium n-tetradecanoate (CsTD)-water system is reported. The transitional region between the hexagonal (H) and lamellar (L) phases was the compositional range of focus. Three transitional phases were observed: (i) the ribbon (R) phase, a biaxial phase consisting of cylinders of ellipsoidal cross section; (ii) the viscous isotropic (VI) phase, an isotropic phase thought to consist of interconnected rods on an Ia3d lattice; and (iii) the intermediate (Int) phase, a uniaxial anisotropic phase thought to consist of interconnected rods on a planar lattice. The effect of the additives was to decrease the interfacial curvature of the surfactant head group layer by varying head group repulsion and by varying the surfactant tail volume relative to the surfactant head group area. These changes resulted in formation of transitional phases seeming to possess curvature between that of the cylindrical H phase and the planar L phase. The ionic repulsion between carboxylate head groups was reduced by the addition of CsOH or CsCl, and resulted in destabilization of the VI phase and the formation of the anisotropic Int phase. With the addition of cosurfactants, n-tetradecanoic acid (TDA) and 1-tetradecanol (TDOH), no Int phase was observed. With 7 wt% added TDA the R phase was stabilized up to temperatures of 336 K, above the 330 K temperature limit in the binary CsTD-D[sub 2]O system. In all four systems, sufficient additive (5-10 wt%) resulted in a transition to the L phase, which was stable over a large portion of the compositional range. In order of apparently decreasing mean curvature, the phase sequence is: hexagonal, ribbon, viscous isotropic, intermediate, and lamellar.

  20. Parenchymal mechanics, gas mixing, and the slope of phase III.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Theodore A

    2013-07-01

    A model of parenchymal mechanics is revisited with the objective of investigating the differences in parenchymal microstructure that underlie the differences in regional compliance that are inferred from gas-mixing studies. The stiffness of the elastic line elements that lie along the free edges of alveoli and form the boundary of the lumen of the alveolar duct is the dominant determinant of parenchymal compliance. Differences in alveolar size cause parallel shifts of the pressure-volume curve, but have little effect on compliance. However, alveolar size also affects the relation between surface tension and pressure during the breathing cycle. Thus regional differences in alveolar size generate regional differences in surface tension, and these drive Marangoni surface flows that equilibrate surface tension between neighboring acini. Surface tension relaxation introduces phase differences in regional volume oscillations and a dependence of expired gas concentration on expired volume. A particular example of different parenchymal properties in two neighboring acini is described, and gas exchange in this model is calculated. The efficiency of mixing and slope of phase III for the model agree well with published data. This model constitutes a new hypothesis concerning the origin of phase III. PMID:23599394

  1. High pressure phase transition in group III nitrides compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, Shubhangi; Verma, S.; Kaurav, Netram; Choudhary, K. K.

    2016-05-01

    Using an effective interionic interaction potential (EIOP), the pressure induced structural phase transformation from ZnS-type (B3) to NaCl-type (B1) structure in group III Post-Transition Metal Nitrides [TMN; TM=Ga and Tl] were investigated. The long range Coulomb, van der Waals (vdW) interaction and the short-range repulsive interaction upto second-neighbor ions within the Hafemeister and Flygare approach with modified ionic charge are properly incorporated in the EIOP. The vdW coefficients are computed following the Slater-Kirkwood variational method, as both the ions are polarizable. The estimated value of the phase transition pressure (Pt) and the magnitude of the discontinuity in volume at the transition pressure are consistent as compared to the reported data.

  2. Novel approaches to incorporating pharmacoeconomic studies into phase III clinical trials for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Fillit, H; Cummings, J; Neumann, P; McLaughlin, T; Salavtore, P; Leibman, C

    2010-10-01

    The societal and individual costs of Alzheimer's disease are significant, worldwide. As the world ages, these costs are increasing rapidly, while health systems face finite budgets. As a result, many regulators and payers will require or at least consider phase III cost-effectiveness data (in addition to safety and efficacy data) for drug approval and reimbursement, increasing the risks and costs of drug development. Incorporating pharmacoeconomic studies in phase III clinical trials for Alzheimer's disease presents a number of challenges. We propose several specific suggestions to improve the design of pharmacoeconomic studies in phase III clinical trials. We propose that acute episodes of care are key outcome measures for pharmacoeconomic studies. To improve the possibility of detecting a pharmacoeconomic impact in phase III, we suggest several strategies including; study designs for enrichment of pharmacoeconomic outcomes that include co-morbidity of patients; reducing variability of care that can affect pharmacoeconomic outcomes through standardized care management; employing administrative claims data to better capture meaningful pharmacoeconomic data; and extending clinical trials in open label follow-up periods in which pharmacoeconomic data are captured electronically by administrative claims. Specific aspects of power analysis for pharmacoeconomic studies are presented. The particular pharmacoeconomic challenges caused by the use of biomarkers in clinical trials, the increasing use of multinational studies, and the pharmacoeconomic challenges presented by biologicals in development for Alzheimer's disease are discussed. In summary, since we are entering an era in which pharmacoeconomic studies will be essential in drug development for supporting regulatory approval, payor reimbursement and integration of new therapies into clinical care, we must consider the design and incorporation of pharmacoeconomic studies in phase III clinical trials more seriously

  3. Shock and Recovery of Polytetrafluoroethylene Above and Below the Phase II to Phase III Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Eric N.; Rae, Philip J.; Trujillo, Carl P.; Dattelbaum, Dana M.; Gray, George T.; Bourne, Neil K.

    2006-07-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is a semi-crystalline polymer exhibiting complicated pressure and temperature dependent phases. High strain rate applications in aerospace, defense, and automotive industries have lead to interest in the shock response of PTFE and resulting changes in the polymer structure. Experimental studies on pressure-induced phase transitions using shock-loading techniques and the resulting changes in crystalline structure are presented. Gas launcher experiments were performed on pedigreed PTFE 7C momentum trapped assemblies with impact pressures from 0.4 to 0.85 GPa to investigate the material response above and below the phase II to phase III crystalline transition. [LAUR-05-5945

  4. Quantification of mixed-phase hybridization on polymer microparticles by europium(III) ion fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Ketomäki, Kaisa; Lönnberg, Harri

    2007-01-01

    A protocol for quantification of oligonucleotide hybridization on polymer microparticles by europium(III) ion fluorescence is described. The procedure involves modification of commercially available amino-functionalized microparticles in such a manner that oligonucleotide probes may be assembled in situ on these particles or, alternatively, they may be immobilized postsynthetically. The oligonucleotide-coated particles obtained are then used as the solid phase in a mixed-phase hybridization assay. The efficiency of hybridization is quantified with the aid of oligonucleotides tagged with a europium(III) chelate. Either, the fluorescently tagged probe is hybridized directly to a complementary particle-anchored oligonucleotide, or a sandwich-type assay set up, where a third oligonucleotide complementary both to the tagged and particle-bound probe mediates the attachment to the particles, is exploited. The number of europium(III) ions attached to the solid-phase is determined by the DELFIA protocol, involving release of the europium(III) ions in solution and development of the fluorescence by addition of an enhancement solution. Alternatively, the fluorescence intensity of the photoluminescent chelate may be measured directly from a single particle. PMID:17984531

  5. Water ice phases II, III, and V - Plastic deformation and phase relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, W. B.; Boro, C. O.; Kirby, S. H.; Stern, L. A.; Heard, H. C.

    1988-01-01

    The ordinary water phase I was transformed to the ice phases that are known to exist in the interiors of large ice moons, such as Ganymede and Callisto for the purpose of investigating plastic deformation behavior of these ices. Ices II, III, and V were prepared using an apparatus and techniques similar to those described by Durham et al. (1983) and subsequently deformed in a gas deformation apparatus, and their deformation data were obtained. It was found that ice II was the strongest of the high-pressure phases, with a strength that was comparable to that of ice I; ice III was very weak, with the flow rate 100 to 1000 times higher than that of ice II at the same levels of stress. It was also found that ices III and V can exist metastably within the ice II field and that they may be deformed plastically within much of the metastable region without reverting to ice II. It is suggested that the weakness of the ice III phase may have profoundly influenced the evolution and the present-day behavior of the icy moons.

  6. Reactor physics studies in the GCFR Phase III critical assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Morman, J A

    1980-03-01

    The third phase of the gas cooled fast reactor (GCFR) program, ZPR-9 Assembly 30, is based on a multi-zoned core of PuO/sub 2/-UO/sub 2/ with radial and axial blankets of UO/sub 2/. Studies performed in this assembly will be compared to the previous phases of the GCFR program and will help to define parameters in this power-flattened demonstration plant-type core. Measurements in the Phase III program included small sample reactivity worths of various materials, central reaction rates and reaction rate distributions, absorption-to-fission ratios and the central point conversion ratio and the worth of steam entry into a small central zone. The reactivity change associated with the construction of a central pin zone in the core and axial blanket was measured. Reaction rate and steam entry measurements were repeated in the pin environment. Standard analysis methods using ENDF/B-IV data are described and the results are compared to measurements performed during the program.

  7. Evaluating the performance of copula models in phase I-II clinical trials under model misspecification

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Traditionally, phase I oncology trials are designed to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), defined as the highest dose with an acceptable probability of dose limiting toxicities(DLT), of a new treatment via a dose escalation study. An alternate approach is to jointly model toxicity and efficacy and allow dose escalation to depend on a pre-specified efficacy/toxicity tradeoff in a phase I-II design. Several phase I-II trial designs have been discussed in the literature; while these model-based designs are attractive in their performance, they are potentially vulnerable to model misspecification. Methods Phase I-II designs often rely on copula models to specify the joint distribution of toxicity and efficacy, which include an additional correlation parameter that can be difficult to estimate. We compare and contrast three models for the joint probability of toxicity and efficacy, including two copula models that have been proposed for use in phase I-II clinical trials and a simple model that assumes the two outcomes are independent. We evaluate the performance of the various models through simulation both when the models are correct and under model misspecification. Results Both models exhibited similar performance, as measured by the probability of correctly identifying the optimal dose and the number of subjects treated at the optimal dose, regardless of whether the data were generated from the correct or incorrect copula, even when there is substantial correlation between the two outcomes. Similar results were observed for a simple model that assumes independence, even in the presence of strong correlation. Further simulation results indicate that estimating the correlation parameter in copula models is difficult with the sample sizes used in Phase I-II clinical trials. Conclusions Our simulation results indicate that the operating characteristics of phase I-II clinical trials are robust to misspecification of the copula model but that a simple

  8. Contributions to reversed-phase column selectivity: III. Column hydrogen-bond basicity.

    PubMed

    Carr, P W; Dolan, J W; Dorsey, J G; Snyder, L R; Kirkland, J J

    2015-05-22

    Column selectivity in reversed-phase chromatography (RPC) can be described in terms of the hydrophobic-subtraction model, which recognizes five solute-column interactions that together determine solute retention and column selectivity: hydrophobic, steric, hydrogen bonding of an acceptor solute (i.e., a hydrogen-bond base) by a stationary-phase donor group (i.e., a silanol), hydrogen bonding of a donor solute (e.g., a carboxylic acid) by a stationary-phase acceptor group, and ionic. Of these five interactions, hydrogen bonding between donor solutes (acids) and stationary-phase acceptor groups is the least well understood; the present study aims at resolving this uncertainty, so far as possible. Previous work suggests that there are three distinct stationary-phase sites for hydrogen-bond interaction with carboxylic acids, which we will refer to as column basicity I, II, and III. All RPC columns exhibit a selective retention of carboxylic acids (column basicity I) in varying degree. This now appears to involve an interaction of the solute with a pair of vicinal silanols in the stationary phase. For some type-A columns, an additional basic site (column basicity II) is similar to that for column basicity I in primarily affecting the retention of carboxylic acids. The latter site appears to be associated with metal contamination of the silica. Finally, for embedded-polar-group (EPG) columns, the polar group can serve as a proton acceptor (column basicity III) for acids, phenols, and other donor solutes. PMID:25890437

  9. [Phase I-II study of recombinant interferon gamma].

    PubMed

    Adachi, K; Ogawa, M; Usui, N; Inagaki, J; Horikoshi, N; Inoue, K; Nakada, H; Tada, A; Yamazaki, H; Mukaiyama, T

    1985-06-01

    A phase I-II study of human recombinant interferon gamma (rIFN-gamma) was conducted in patients with various advanced cancer refractory to standard chemotherapies. In the phase I study, seven patients received 14 courses of escalating doses ranging from 2 X 10(6)U/m2 to 64 X 10(6)U/m2 by 1-hour intravenous infusion for 5 consecutive days. The toxicities were high fever with chills, anorexia, occasional nausea and vomiting, elevation of serum GOT, and dose-related leukopenia and neurotoxic symptoms such as heavy fatigue with somnolence or lethargy, both of which were reversible. The pharmacokinetics showed that the peak levels of serum rIFN-gamma activity were dose-related but decreased rapidly to below measurable levels within 6 hours after infusion in patients receiving less than 12 X 10(6)U/m2. Considering these data, the dosage of rIFN-gamma 6 X 10(6) U/m2 by daily intramuscular injection for more than 4 weeks was selected for the early phase II study. There was no partial response out of 11 evaluable patients but a stable condition was observed in 2 cases of renal cell carcinoma and one case each of breast cancer and ovarian cancer. All toxicities seen were similar to those observed in the phase I study, but no tachyphylaxis developed with continued dosage. The antitumor effect of rIFN-gamma remains to be evaluated in a further study employing higher doses. PMID:2988459

  10. Los Angeles International Airport Runway Incursion Studies: Phase III--Center-Taxiway Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madson, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    Phase III of the Los Angeles International Airport Runway Incursion Studies was conducted, under an agreement with HNTB Corporation, at the NASA Ames FutureFlight Central (FFC) facility in June 2003. The objective of the study was the evaluation of a new center-taxiway concept at LAX. This study is an extension of the Phase I and Phase II studies previously conducted at FFC. This report presents results from Phase III of the study, in which a center-taxiway concept between runways 25L and 25R was simulated and evaluated. Phase III data were compared objectively against the Baseline data. Subjective evaluations by participating LAX controllers were obtained with regard to workload, efficiency, and safety criteria. To facilitate a valid comparison between Baseline and Phase III data, the same scenarios were used for Phase III that were tested during Phases I and II. This required briefing participating controllers on differences in airport and airline operations between 2001 and today.

  11. Phase III ResonantSonic{reg_sign} report

    SciTech Connect

    Newcomer, D.R.; Last, G.V.; Friley, J.R.; Strope, L.A.; Johnston, B.V.

    1996-09-01

    The ResonantSonic drilling system was tested at the hanford Site in the fiscal year 1991-1992 under the auspices of the Drilling Technology Development Program and the Environmental Restoration Program. The purpose of that program was to develop, test, and demonstrate drilling methods that are environmentally acceptable, safe, efficient, and cost effective when drilling and sampling in hazardous and radioactive waste sites. The cable-tool method has historically been the primary drilling method employed for characterization and remediation projects at the Hanford site. The cable-tool method can be used reliably in a wide variety of geologic conditions and yields continuous, relatively intact core samples. however, the disadvantages of this method are that the penetration rates are slow relative to most other drilling techniques. This report represents the completion of the ResonantSonic drilling program test activities. A brief description of the ResonantSonic drilling program is given. Phases I and II activities are also presented. Phase III activities are outlined. The conclusions drawn from the results and recommendations for further work to improve the drilling technology are discussed.

  12. Final report : Phase III targeted investigation, Everest, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-01-31

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), formerly operated grain storage facilities at two different locations at Everest, Kansas (Figure 1.1). One facility (referred to in this report as the Everest facility) was at the western edge of the city. The second facility (referred to in this report as Everest East) was about 0.5 mi northeast of the town. The CCC/USDA operated these facilities from the early 1950s until the early 1970s, at a time when commercial fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were in common use by the CCC/USDA and private industry for the preservation of grain in storage. In 1997 the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) sampled several domestic drinking water and non-drinking water wells in the Everest area as part of the CCC/USDA Private Well Sampling Program. All of the sampled wells were outside the Everest city limits. Carbon tetrachloride contamination was identified at a single domestic drinking water well (the Nigh well, DW06; Figure 1.1) approximately 3/8 mi northwest of the former Everest CCC/USDA grain storage facility. Subsequent KDHE investigations suggested that the contamination in DW06 could be linked to the former use of grain fumigants at the CCC/USDA facility. For this reason, the CCC/USDA is conducting a phased environmental study to determine the source and extent of the carbon tetrachloride contamination at Everest and to identify potential remedial options. The studies are being performed by the Environmental Research Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Two phases of investigation were completed previously; this report presents the findings of the targeted Phase III investigation at Everest.

  13. Lipolytic and metabolic response to glucagon in fasting king penguins: phase II vs. phase III.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Servane F; Thil, Marie-Anne; Groscolas, Rene

    2003-02-01

    This study aims to determine how glucagon intervenes in the regulation of fuel metabolism, especially lipolysis, at two stages of a spontaneous long-term fast characterized by marked differences in lipid and protein availability and/or utilization (phases II and III). Changes in the plasma concentration of various metabolites and hormones, and in lipolytic fluxes as determined by continuous infusion of [2-3H]glycerol and [1-14C]palmitate, were examined in vivo in a subantarctic bird (king penguin) before, during, and after a 2-h glucagon infusion. In the two fasting phases, glucagon infusion at a rate of 0.025 microg. kg(-1). min(-1) induced a three- to fourfold increase in the plasma concentration and in the rate of appearance (Ra) of glycerol and nonesterified fatty acids, the percentage of primary reesterification remaining unchanged. Infusion of glucagon also resulted in a progressive elevation of the plasma concentration of glucose and beta-hydroxybutyrate and in a twofold higher insulinemia. These changes were not significantly different between the two phases. The plasma concentrations of triacylglycerols and uric acid were unaffected by glucagon infusion, except for a 40% increase in plasma uric acid in phase II birds. Altogether, these results indicate that glucagon in a long-term fasting bird is highly lipolytic, hyperglycemic, ketogenic, and insulinogenic, these effects, however, being similar in phases II and III. The maintenance of the sensitivity of adipose tissue lipolysis to glucagon could suggest that the major role of the increase in basal glucagonemia observed in phase III is to stimulate gluconeogenesis rather than fatty acid delivery. PMID:12388477

  14. Design and calibration of zero-additional-phase SPIDER

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, Peter; Riedle, Eberhard

    2005-09-01

    Zero-additional-phase spectral phase interferometry for direct electric field reconstruction (ZAP-SPIDER) is a novel technique for measuring the temporal shape and phase of ultrashort optical pulses directly at the interaction point of a spectroscopic experiment. The scheme is suitable for an extremely wide wavelength region from the ultraviolet to the near infrared. We present a comprehensive description of the experimental setup and design guidelines to effectively apply the technique to various wavelengths and pulse durations. The calibration of the setup and procedures to check the consistency of the measurement are discussed in detail. We show experimental data for various center wavelengths and pulse durations down to 7 fs to verify the applicability to a wide range of pulse parameters.

  15. Shock and Recovery of Polytetrafluoroethylene Above and Below the Phase II To Phase III Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Eric N.; Bourne, Neil K.

    2005-07-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is semi-crystalline in nature with its linear chains forming complicated temperature and pressure dependent phases. Due to its desirable mechanical properties applications of PTFE include structures designed for dynamic largescale plasticity excursions. Experimental studies on pressure-induced phase transitions using shock-loading techniques and the resulting changes in crystalline structure are presented. Disks of pedigreed PTFE 7C have been shock loaded in momentum trapped assemblies using a 80 mm gas launcher. Challenges in momentum trapping and soft recovery arising from the low yield stress of PTFE (9 MPa at room temperature) are discussed. Experiments were performed with impact pressures from 0.4 to 0.85 GPa to investigate the material response above and below the phase II to phase III crystalline transition. Changes in crystalline structure of the recovered materials were quantified using dynamic scanning calorimetry (DSC) and density.

  16. Additional approaches to solving the phase problem in optics.

    PubMed

    Zenkova, C Yu; Gorsky, M P; Ryabiy, P A; Angelskaya, A O

    2016-04-20

    The paper presents principal approaches to diagnosing the structure-forming skeleton of a complex optical field. Analysis of optical field singularity algorithms, depending on intensity discretization and image resolution, has been carried out. An optimal approach is chosen, which allows us to get much closer to the solution of the phase problem of localization speckle-field special points. The use of a "window" 2D Hilbert transform for reconstruction of the phase distribution of the intensity of a speckle field is proposed. It is shown that the advantage of this approach consists in the invariance of a phase map to a position change of the kernel of transformation and in a possibility to reconstruct the structure-forming elements of the skeleton of an optical field, including singular points and saddle points. We demonstrate the possibility to reconstruct the equi-phase lines within a narrow confidence interval and introduce an additional algorithm for solving the phase problem for random 2D intensity distributions. PMID:27140136

  17. GLASS COMPOSITIONS FOR THE NEPHELINE PHASE III STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

    2009-06-29

    A series of 29 test glass compositions were selected for Phase III of the nepheline study using a combination of two approaches. The first approach was based on evaluating the glass composition region allowable by all of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Product Composition Control System (PCCS) models with the exception of the current nepheline discriminator. This approach was taken to determine whether there are glass compositions that, while predicted to crystallize nepheline upon slow cooling, would otherwise be acceptable for processing in the DWPF. The second approach was based on quasicrystalline theory of glass structure, which helped predict compositional regions where nepheline should form. A detailed description of this methodology is forthcoming. The selection strategy outlined here will provide an opportunity to determine experimentally whether the glasses that fail the current nepheline discriminator but pass the newly proposed nepheline discriminator are indeed free of nepheline after slow cooling. If this is the case, these data will serve as a significant step toward reducing conservatism in the current nepheline discriminator. The 29 glass compositions selected for testing address both the PCCS model and quasicrystalline theory approaches in evaluating both a reduction in conservatism for the current nepheline discriminator and possible implementation of the newly proposed discriminator based on glass structural theory. These glasses will be fabricated and characterized in the laboratory, with the results and conclusions described in a technical report.

  18. Evaluate fundamental approaches to longwall dust control. Phase III report

    SciTech Connect

    Babbitt, C.; Bartlett, P.; Kelly, J.; Ludlow, J.; Mangolds, A.; Rajan, S.; Ruggieri, S.; Varga, E.

    1984-03-31

    The overall objective of the contract is to evaluate the effectiveness of available dust control technology for double-drum shearer longwall sections in a coordinated, systematic program at a few longwall test sections and to make the results available to the entire coal mining industry. This program is investigating nine different dust control techniques. These nine subprograms encompass a broad range of dust control measures ranging from administrative controls to new hardware. They span not only presently employed methods but also those recently adopted in the United States and those proposed for the future. This report documents the Phase III effort on each of the subprograms. For clarity, the report is divided in sections by subprogram as follows: Section 2, Subprogram A - passive barriers/spray air movers for dust control; Section 3, Subprogram B - practical aspects of deep cutting; Section 4, Subprogram C - stage loader dust control; Section 5, Subprogram D - longwall automation technology; Section 6, Subprogram E - longwall application of ventilation curtains; Section 7, Subprogram F - reversed drum rotation; Section 8, Subprogram G - reduction of shield generated dust; Section 9, Subprogram H - air canopies for longwalls; and Section 10, Subprogram I - mining practices. 43 figures, 11 tables.

  19. Simultaneous determination of chromium(III), aluminum(III), and iron(II) in tannery sludge acid extracts by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, A.; Passino, R.; Tiravanti, G. ); Rotunno, T.; Palmisano, F.; Zambonin, P.G. )

    1991-07-01

    A new chromatographic method for the simultaneous determination of Cu(II), Zn(II), Cr(III), Al(III), and Fe(III) or Fe(II) has been developed. The method is based on precolumn formation of stable metal-8-hydroxyquinoline chelates, their separation on a C-18 reversed-phase column by HPLC, and their UV-vis detection at 400 nm. The experimental conditions giving the highest chelate yields resulted: pH 4.2; T = 90C; reaction time 30 min; reaction mixture composition methanol (66.7%)/acetonitrile (13.3%)/water (20%) (v/v/v) plus 10 mM 8-hydroxyquinoline. The mobile-phase composition giving the best resolution of Cr(III)- and Al(III)-8-hydroxyquinoline chromatographic peaks has been optimized by the simplex algorithm: acetonitrile (13.5%)/methanol (29%)/0.1 acetate buffer pH 6.8 (13.5%) (v/v/v) plus 100 mM 8-hydroxyquinoline. The method has been applied to synthetic solutions as well as, after sample pretreatment on XAD-7 resin, to real sulfuric acid extracts of tannery sludges. As for this latter matrix, additional information on Cr and Fe oxidation states has been obtained, combining the proposed method with atomic absorption spectroscopy and ion chromatography.

  20. EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS OF THE NEPHELINE PHASE III STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

    2009-11-09

    This study is the third phase in a series of experiments designed to reduce conservatism in the model that predicts the formation of nepheline, a crystalline phase that can reduce the durability of high level waste glass. A Phase I study developed a series of glass compositions that were very durable while their nepheline discriminator values were well below the current nepheline discriminator limit of 0.62, where nepheline is predicted to crystallize upon slow cooling. A Phase II study selected glass compositions to identify any linear effects of composition on nepheline crystallization and that were restricted to regions that fell within the validation ranges of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Product Composition Control System (PCCS) models. However, it was not possible to identify any linear effects of composition on chemical durability performance for this set of study glasses. The results of the Phase II study alone were not sufficient to recommend modification of the current nepheline discriminator. It was recommended that the next series of experiments continue to focus not only on compositional regions where the PCCS models are considered applicable (i.e., the model validation ranges), but also be restricted to compositional regions where the only constraint limiting processing is the current nepheline discriminator. Two methods were used in selecting glasses for this Phase III nepheline study. The first was based on the relationship of the current nepheline discriminator model to the other DWPF PCCS models, and the second was based on theory of crystallization in mineral and glass melts. A series of 29 test glass compositions was selected for this study using a combination of the two approaches. The glasses were fabricated and characterized in the laboratory. After reviewing the data, the study glasses generally met the target compositions with little issue. Product Consistency Test results correlated well with the crystallization analyses in

  1. 77 FR 40936 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Passport Demand Forecasting Study Phase III

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-11

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Passport Demand Forecasting Study Phase III ACTION: Notice of request for public comments. SUMMARY: The Department of State is seeking Office of Management and Budget...: Passport Demand Forecasting Study Phase III. OMB Control Number: None. Type of Request: Reinstatement of...

  2. Dynamic observation of phase transformation behaviors in indium(III) selenide nanowire based phase change memory.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Ting; Huang, Chun-Wei; Chen, Jui-Yuan; Ting, Yi-Hsin; Lu, Kuo-Chang; Chueh, Yu-Lun; Wu, Wen-Wei

    2014-09-23

    Phase change random access memory (PCRAM) has been extensively investigated for its potential applications in next-generation nonvolatile memory. In this study, indium(III) selenide (In2Se3) was selected due to its high resistivity ratio and lower programming current. Au/In2Se3-nanowire/Au phase change memory devices were fabricated and measured systematically in an in situ transmission electron microscope to perform a RESET/SET process under pulsed and dc voltage swept mode, respectively. During the switching, we observed the dynamic evolution of the phase transformation process. The switching behavior resulted from crystalline/amorphous change and revealed that a long pulse width would induce the amorphous or polycrystalline state by different pulse amplitudes, supporting the improvement of the writing speed, retention, and endurance of PCRAM. PMID:25133955

  3. A Black Phosphate Conversion Coating on Steel Surface Using Antimony(III)-Tartrate as an Additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng; Wang, Guiping

    2016-05-01

    A novel black phosphate conversion coating was formed on steel surface through a Zn-Mn phosphating bath containing mainly ZnO, H3PO4, Mn(H2PO4)2, and Ca(NO3)2, where antimony(III)-tartrate was used as the blackening agent of phosphatization. The surface morphology and composition of the coating were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersion spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Corrosion resistance of the coating was studied by potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The pH value of the solution had significant influence on the formation and corrosion resistance of the coating. The experimental results indicated that the Sb plays a vital role in the blackening of phosphate conversion coating. The optimal concentration of antimony(III)-tartrate in the phosphating bath used in this experiment was 1.0 g L-1, as higher values reduced the corrosion resistance of the coating. In addition, by saponification and oil seals, the corrosion duration of the black phosphate coating in a copper sulfate spot test can be as long as 20 min.

  4. The role of technology in reducing health care costs. Phase II and phase III.

    SciTech Connect

    Cilke, John F.; Parks, Raymond C.; Funkhouser, Donald Ray; Tebo, Michael A.; Murphy, Martin D.; Hightower, Marion Michael; Gallagher, Linda K.; Craft, Richard Layne, II; Garcia, Rudy John

    2004-04-01

    In Phase I of this project, reported in SAND97-1922, Sandia National Laboratories applied a systems approach to identifying innovative biomedical technologies with the potential to reduce U.S. health care delivery costs while maintaining care quality. The effort provided roadmaps for the development and integration of technology to meet perceived care delivery requirements and an economic analysis model for development of care pathway costs for two conditions: coronary artery disease (CAD) and benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). Phases II and III of this project, which are presented in this report, were directed at detailing the parameters of telemedicine that influence care delivery costs and quality. These results were used to identify and field test the communication, interoperability, and security capabilities needed for cost-effective, secure, and reliable health care via telemedicine.

  5. Simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of chromium(VI) and iron (III) by H-point standard addition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larionova, E. V.; Bulygina, K. A.

    2016-02-01

    In this work the possibility of simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of chromium (VI) and iron (III) in alloys with help of the mixed organic reagent (diphenylcarbazide and 1,10-phenanthroline) is studied. We have applied H-point standard addition method to determine concentrations of chromium (VI) and iron (III) from the mixture. The pure signals of complexes of chromium (VI) with diphenylcarbazide and iron (III) with the 1,10-phenanthroline and their calibration plots are previously carried out. We established the possibility of simultaneous determination of chromium (VI) and iron (III) in the different concentration ranges by H-point standard addition method. Correctness of determination of concentration by means of the offered technique is proved by "added-found" method for a series of mixtures with different ratios of concentration of chromium (VI) and iron (III). It is founded that the error of determination of concentration doesn't exceed 33%.

  6. Immunotoxicity of the colour additive caramel colour III; a review on complicated issues in the safety evaluation of a food additive.

    PubMed

    Houben, G F; Penninks, A H

    1994-08-12

    Food additives can be regarded as the safest constituents of our daily food. Nevertheless, complicated issues with respect to their safety evaluation do also occur. In this review paper, some of these issues are illustrated by the description and evaluation of the research on the immunotoxicity of the food additive Caramel Colour III. Caramel Colour III is commonly used as a color additive in many products for human consumption. Toxicity studies conducted in the seventies demonstrated that administration of Caramel Colour III can cause a reduction in total white blood cell counts in rats, due to reduced lymphocyte counts. Studies reviewed in this paper demonstrated several other effects of Caramel Colour III on the immune system of rodents, including disturbed immune functions and changed resistance in infection models. In addition, studies in rats demonstrated that most of the effects occur only when the animals are fed a diet low in vitamin B6. The imidazole derivative 2-acetyl-4(5)-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydroxy-butyl)-imidazole (THI) was found to be responsible for the immunotoxicity. Issues such as the mechanism of action of THI and the role of vitamin B6 are discussed. Finally, the results of a human intervention study and the observed effect levels of THI in rats are discussed in terms of safety of the use of Caramel Colour III in our daily food supply. PMID:8079366

  7. Phase III Advanced Anodes and Cathodes Utilized in Energy Efficient Aluminum Production Cells

    SciTech Connect

    R.A. Christini; R.K. Dawless; S.P. Ray; D.A. Weirauch, Jr.

    2001-11-05

    During Phase I of the present program, Alcoa developed a commercial cell concept that has been estimated to save 30% of the energy required for aluminum smelting. Phase ii involved the construction of a pilot facility and operation of two pilots. Phase iii of the Advanced Anodes and Cathodes Program was aimed at bench experiments to permit the resolution of certain questions to be followed by three pilot cells. All of the milestones related to materials, in particular metal purity, were attained with distinct improvements over work in previous phases of the program. NiO additions to the ceramic phase and Ag additions to the Cu metal phase of the cermet improved corrosion resistance sufficiently that the bench scale pencil anodes met the purity milestones. Some excellent metal purity results have been obtained with anodes of the following composition: Further improvements in anode material composition appear to be dependent on a better understanding of oxide solubilities in molten cryolite. For that reason, work was commissioned with an outside consultant to model the MeO - cryolite systems. That work has led to a better understanding of which oxides can be used to substitute into the NiO-Fe2O3 ceramic phase to stabilize the ferrites and reduce their solubility in molten cryolite. An extensive number of vertical plate bench electrolysis cells were run to try to find conditions where high current efficiencies could be attained. TiB2-G plates were very inconsistent and led to poor wetting and drainage. Pure TiB2 did produce good current efficiencies at small overlaps (shadowing) between the anodes and cathodes. This bench work with vertical plate anodes and cathodes reinforced the importance of good cathode wetting to attain high current efficiencies. Because of those conclusions, new wetting work was commissioned and became a major component of the research during the third year of Phase III. While significant progress was made in several areas, much work needs to be

  8. Effects of Fe(III) and organic matter additions on methanogenic activity and Fe(III) reduction in boreal lake and wetland sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karvinen, Anu; Lehtinen, Lotta; Kankaala, Paula

    2013-04-01

    We studied potential methane production and Fe(III) reduction activity in lake sediments and wetland peat sampled from 14 sites in southern and eastern Finland. The concentration of total iron in the sediments and peat varied between 0.5 and 1200 ppm and their organic matter content (loss of ignition) varied between 1-98% of dry weight. Also the effects of added amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxide and organic matter (ammoniumacetate and/or sodiumacetate) on methanogenic and Fe(III) reduction activities were studied in anaerobic laboratory incubations (in vitro) lasting 5-20 days at 15 °C in darkness. Potential methane production and the effects of iron and acetate additions were highly variable between lake and peatland sites. The highest methanogenic potential was generally measured in productive littoral sites, especially in those dominated by Phragmites australis vegetation stands. In these sediments the total iron concentrations were high and acetate additions clearly increased methane production whereas Fe(III) additions decreased it. Our results demonstrate that microbial Fe(III) reduction plays an important role in the anaerobic organic matter decomposition in many boreal lakes.

  9. Immunotoxic effects of the color additive caramel color III: immune function studies in rats.

    PubMed

    Houben, G F; Penninks, A H; Seinen, W; Vos, J G; Van Loveren, H

    1993-01-01

    Administration of the color additive caramel color III (AC) may cause a reduction in total white blood cell counts in rats due to reduced lymphocyte counts. Beside lymphopenia, several other effects in rat have been described. The effects are caused by the imidazole derivative 2-acetyl-4(5)-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydroxybutyl)imidazole (THI) and occur in rats fed a diet low in vitamin B6. In the present paper, immune function studies on AC and THI with rats fed a diet low, but not deficient in vitamin B6 are presented and discussed. Rats were exposed to 0.4 or 4% AC or to 5.72 ppm THI in drinking water during and for 28 days prior to the start of immune function assays. Resistance to Trichinella spiralis was examined in an oral infection model and clearance of Listeria monocytogenes upon an intravenous infection was studied. In addition, natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity of splenic and nonadherent peritoneal cells and the antibody response to sheep red blood cells were studied. From the results it is concluded that exposure of rats to AC or THI influenced various immune function parameters. Thymus-dependent immunity was suppressed, while parameters of the nonspecific resistance were also affected, as shown by a decreased natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity in the spleen and an enhanced clearance of L. monocytogenes. PMID:8432426

  10. Novel Agents for Multiple Myeloma to Overcome Resistance in Phase III Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Orlowski, Robert Z.

    2013-01-01

    The incorporation of novel agents such as bortezomib and lenalidomide into initial therapy for multiple myeloma has improved the response rate of induction regimens. Also, these drugs are being increasingly used in the peri-transplant setting for transplant-eligible patients, and as part of consolidation and/or maintenance after front-line treatment, including in transplant-ineligible patients. Together, these and other strategies have contributed to a prolongation of progression-free and overall survival in myeloma patients, and an increasing proportion are able to sustain a remission for many years. Despite these improvements, however, the vast majority of patients continue to suffer relapses, which suggests a prominent role for either primary, innate drug resistance, or secondary, acquired drug resistance. As a result, there remains a strong need to develop new proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory agents, as well as new drug classes, which would be effective in the relapsed and/or refractory setting, and overcome drug resistance. This review will focus on novel drugs that have reached phase III trials, including carfilzomib and pomalidomide, which have recently garnered regulatory approvals. In addition, agents that are in phase II or III, potentially registration-enabling trials will be described as well, to provide an overview of the possible landscape in the relapsed and/or refractory arena over the next five years. PMID:24135408

  11. National Geoscience Data Repository System -- Phase III: Implementation and Operation of the Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Keane, Christopher M.

    2002-05-28

    The National Geoscience Data Repository System, Phase III was an operational project focused on coordinating and facilitating transfers of at-risk geoscience data from the private sector to the public domain.

  12. Phase III Simplified Integrated Test (SIT) results - Space Station ECLSS testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barry C.; Carrasquillo, Robyn L.; Dubiel, Melissa Y.; Ogle, Kathryn Y.; Perry, Jay L.; Whitley, Ken M.

    1990-01-01

    During 1989, phase III testing of Space Station Freedom Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) began at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) with the Simplified Integrated Test. This test, conducted at the MSFC Core Module Integration Facility (CMIF), was the first time the four baseline air revitalization subsystems were integrated together. This paper details the results and lessons learned from the phase III SIT. Future plans for testing at the MSFC CMIF are also discussed.

  13. Phase mixed rotation magnetoconvection and Taylor's condition III. Wave trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewen, Susan A.; Soward, Andrew M.

    Nonlinear amplitude equations governing the radial modulation of quasi-geostrophic convective rolls, which occur in a rapidly rotating self-gravitating sphere permeated by a weak azimuthal magnetic field (small Elsasser number), were derived in Part I. Stationary and travelling pulse solutions were obtained in Part II. That analysis is extended here; wave train solutions are sought and their stability tested. Special features of the equations include: nonlinear diffusion and dispersion; also phase mixing, which leads to a lack of translational invariance of the system. In spite of the latter, the underlying structure of the wave trains sought is spatially periodic on a length L, but modulated by a time dependent Floquet exponent. Consequently, a Fourier representation is employed and the time evolution of the Fourier coefficients is determined numerically. It is shown that pulses confined to lengths l(< L) can be superimposed non-interactively to form wave trains. The numerical demonstration relies on establishing that the pseudo-energy based on the time averaged wave train amplitude coincides with the corresponding pulse energy E calculated in Part II. When l and L are comparable some pulse interaction can be inferred. Available numerical evidence suggests that wave trains, and by implication pulses, are unstable. The geophysical implications are discussed. All finite amplitude solutions pertain to the Ekman regime in which the modified Taylor's condition is satisfied by small magnetic field perturbations. Only in the infinite amplitude limit do the solutions determine true Taylor states. It is anticipated that following instability in the Ekman regime convection equilibrates in some large amplitude Taylor state, which is determined when additional ageostrophic effects are taken into account. Analysis of that state lies outside the range of validity of our amplitude equations.

  14. DELICIOUS III: A multipurpose double imaging particle coincidence spectrometer for gas phase vacuum ultraviolet photodynamics studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, G. A.; Cunha de Miranda, B. K.; Tia, M.; Daly, S.; Nahon, L.

    2013-05-01

    We present a versatile double imaging particle coincidence spectrometer operating in fully continuous mode, named DELICIOUS III, which combines a velocity map imaging device and a modified Wiley-McLaren time of flight momentum imaging analyzer for photoelectrons and photoions, respectively. The spectrometer is installed in a permanent endstation on the DESIRS vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) beamline at the French National Synchrotron Radiation Facility SOLEIL, and is dedicated to gas phase VUV spectroscopy, photoionization, and molecular dynamics studies. DELICIOUS III is capable of recording mass-selected threshold photoelectron photoion coincidence spectra with a sub-meV resolution, and the addition of a magnifying lens inside the electron drift tube provides a sizeable improvement of the electron threshold/ion mass resolution compromise. In fast electron mode the ultimate kinetic energy resolution has been measured at ΔE/E = 4%. The ion spectrometer offers a mass resolution—full separation of adjacent masses—of 250 amu for moderate extraction fields and the addition of an electrostatic lens in the second acceleration region allows measuring the full 3D velocity vector for a given mass with an ultimate energy resolution of ΔE/E = 15%, without sacrificing the mass resolution. Hence, photoelectron images are correlated both to the mass and to the ion kinetic energy and recoil direction, to access the electron spectroscopy of size-selected species, to study the photodissociation processes of state-selected cations in detail, or to measure in certain cases photoelectron angular distributions in the ion recoil frame. The performances of DELICIOUS III are explored through several examples including the photoionization of N2, NO, and CF3.

  15. 75 FR 38645 - Standards Improvement Project-Phase III

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-02

    ...The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is continuing its efforts to remove or revise outdated, duplicative, unnecessary, and inconsistent requirements in its safety and health standards. This effort builds on the success of Standards Improvement Project (SIP)--Phase I published on June 18, 1998, and SIP--Phase II published on January 5, 2005. The Agency believes that the......

  16. Biomarker-Guided Adaptive Trial Designs in Phase II and Phase III: A Methodological Review

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Miranta; Jorgensen, Andrea L; Kolamunnage-Dona, Ruwanthi

    2016-01-01

    Background Personalized medicine is a growing area of research which aims to tailor the treatment given to a patient according to one or more personal characteristics. These characteristics can be demographic such as age or gender, or biological such as a genetic or other biomarker. Prior to utilizing a patient’s biomarker information in clinical practice, robust testing in terms of analytical validity, clinical validity and clinical utility is necessary. A number of clinical trial designs have been proposed for testing a biomarker’s clinical utility, including Phase II and Phase III clinical trials which aim to test the effectiveness of a biomarker-guided approach to treatment; these designs can be broadly classified into adaptive and non-adaptive. While adaptive designs allow planned modifications based on accumulating information during a trial, non-adaptive designs are typically simpler but less flexible. Methods and Findings We have undertaken a comprehensive review of biomarker-guided adaptive trial designs proposed in the past decade. We have identified eight distinct biomarker-guided adaptive designs and nine variations from 107 studies. Substantial variability has been observed in terms of how trial designs are described and particularly in the terminology used by different authors. We have graphically displayed the current biomarker-guided adaptive trial designs and summarised the characteristics of each design. Conclusions Our in-depth overview provides future researchers with clarity in definition, methodology and terminology for biomarker-guided adaptive trial designs. PMID:26910238

  17. Phase transitions in Group III-V and II-VI semiconductors at high pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, S. C.; Liu, C. Y.; Spain, I. L.; Skelton, E. F.

    1979-01-01

    The structures and transition pressures of Group III-V and II-VI semiconductors and of a pseudobinary system (Ga/x/In/1-x/Sb) have been investigated. Results indicate that GaP, InSb, GaSb, GaAs and possible AlP assume Metallic structures at high pressures; a tetragonal, beta-Sn-like structure is adopted by only InSb and GaSb. The rocksalt phase is preferred in InP, InAs, AlSb, ZnO and ZnS. The model of Van Vechten (1973) gives transition pressures which are in good agreement with measured values, but must be refined to account for the occurrence of the ionic rocksalt structure in some compounds. In addition, discrepancies between the theoretical scaling values for volume changes at the semiconductor-to-metal transitions are observed.

  18. Phase transitions in new BEDT-TTF κ-phase salts with hexacyanometalate anions [M(CN) 63- M=Co(III) and Fe(III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre Le Maguerè; Ouahab, Lahcène; Corian, Nathalie; Gómez-García, Carlos J.; Delhaès, Pierre; Even, Jacky; Bertault, Marcel

    1996-01-01

    The preparation, crystal structure determination and physical properties of the compounds formulated as κ-(BEDT-TTF) 4((C 2H 5) 4N)M(CN) 6.3H 2O (M= Co III and Fe III) are presented. Organic ET layers with packing of orthogonalized dimers containing charge carriers and inorganic octahedral hexacyanometalate anions with diamagnetic or paramagnetic transition metals coexist in the title compounds. Two phase transitions occuring respectively at 150 K and in the 230-260 K range have been evidenced by magnetic (SQUID and ESR), DSC measurements. However, preliminary X-Ray studies revealed a structural change around 240 K only.

  19. Addition of Japanese terms to MEDLINE File-Service through JOIS-III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoe, Takao; Sakagami, Yasuhiko; Kawano, Koreni

    This paper describes new service through JOIS-III(JICST Online Information System-III) which enabled English databases, MEDLINE, TOXLINE, and CANCERLIT, to search and output both with Japanese MeSH terms and with English MeSH terms by adding terms of MeSH translated into Japanese to these three files. In this paper, circumstances and background of this plan, cooperation of the work between JICST and The Japan Medical Library Association(JMLA) , fundamental conception and rules for translation of MeSH thesaurus terms into Japanese, practical translation work, search and output by JOIS-III using Japanese MeSH terms translated, relation between JOIS-III and Japanese version of MeSH in book style published by JMLA, and future issues are also described.

  20. Local Area Network Implementation: Moving toward Phase III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoehl, Susan B.

    1989-01-01

    Describes a LAN (local area network)-based automation project which has neared completion of the first phase of implementation at the Health Sciences Library of Allegheny General Hospital (Pittsburgh, PA). Changes in the library and its objectives with increased technological experience are examined. Diagrams of the current LAN configuration and…

  1. A general access to organogold(iii) complexes by oxidative addition of diazonium salts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Long; Rominger, Frank; Rudolph, Matthias; Hashmi, A Stephen K

    2016-05-11

    At room temperature under mild photochemical conditions, namely irradiation with a simple blue light LED, gold(i) chloro complexes of both phosphane and carbene ligands in combination with aryldiazonium salts afford arylgold(iii) complexes. With chelating P,N-ligands cationic six- or five-membered chelate complexes were isolated in the form of salts with weakly coordinating counter anions that were brought in from the diazonium salt. With monodentate P ligands or N-heterocyclic carbene ligands and diazonium chlorides neutral arylgold(iii) dichloro complexes were obtained. The coordination geometry was determined by X-ray crystal structure analyses of representative compounds, a cis arrangement of the aryl and the phosphane ligand at the square planar gold(iii) center is observed. PMID:27094217

  2. Cobalt(III)-Catalyzed Synthesis of Indazoles and Furans by C–H Bond Functionalization/Addition/Cyclization Cascades

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The development of operationally straightforward and cost-effective routes for the assembly of heterocycles from simple inputs is important for many scientific endeavors, including pharmaceutical, agrochemical, and materials research. In this article we describe the development of a new air-stable cationic Co(III) catalyst for convergent, one-step benchtop syntheses of N-aryl-2H-indazoles and furans by C–H bond additions to aldehydes followed by in situ cyclization and aromatization. Only a substoichiometric amount of AcOH is required as an additive that is both low-cost and convenient to handle. The syntheses of these heterocycles are the first examples of Co(III)-catalyzed additions to aldehydes, and reactions are demonstrated for a variety of aromatic, heteroaromatic, and aliphatic derivatives. The syntheses of both N-aryl-2H-indazoles and furans have been performed on 20 mmol scales and should be readily applicable to larger scales. The reported heterocycle syntheses also demonstrate the use of directing groups that have not previously been applied to Co(III)-catalyzed C–H bond functionalizations. Additionally, the synthesis of furans demonstrates the first example of Co(III)-catalyzed functionalization of alkenyl C–H bonds. PMID:25494296

  3. Individualized Inservice Teacher Education (Project In-Step). Evaluation Report. Phase III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurber, John C.

    This is a report on the third phase of Project IN-STEP, which was intended to develop a viable model for individualized, multi-media in-service teacher education programs. (Phase I and II are reported in ED 033 905, and ED 042 709). The rationale for Phase III was to see if the model could be successfully transferred to an area other than teaching…

  4. A Phase I/II Trial of Topotecan and Radiation Therapy for Brain Metastases in Patients With Solid Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Hedde, Jan-Peter; Neuhaus, Thomas . E-mail: t.neuhaus@jk-bonn.de; Schueller, Heinrich; Metzler, Ute; Schmidt-Wolf, Ingo G.H.; Kleinschmidt, Rolf; Losem, Christoph; Lange, Oliver; Grohe, Christian; Stier, Sebastian; Ko, Yon-Dschun

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: Outcomes in patients with brain metastases undergoing whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) are hardly encouraging, and an improvement in results is therefore needed. One possible approach is the addition of chemotherapeutics. However the data presented thus far are also disappointing. A promising substance in this setting could become topotecan, which is known to cross the blood-brain barrier and additionally offers radiosensitizing effects. Therefore we performed a phase I/II trial to evaluate the feasibility of a concurrent radiochemotherapy regimen. Methods and Materials: From January 1999 to July 2001, a total of 75 patients (10 in phase I and 65 in phase II) were included. The WBRT was applied with a fraction size of 2 Gy/day for a total of 40 Gy. Topotecan was administered as a 30-min infusion with 0.2 to 0.5 mg/m{sup 2}/day for 5 days over 4 weeks within 2 h to radiation therapy. Results: Because of the higher toxic rates seen in patients receiving 0.5 mg/m{sup 2}/day, the recommended dosage for phase II was 0.4 mg/m{sup 2}/day. In this group Grade 3/4 hematologic and nonhematologic side effects occurred in 19% and 21% of the patients, respectively. The overall response rate was 72% with an overall survival of 17 weeks and 30 weeks among the responders. Conclusions: Based on the moderate toxicity profile presented here we recommend to perform a phase III trial to confirm the promising phase I/II data.

  5. Effect of Pulse Duration on Polytetrafluoroethylene Shocked above the Crystalline Phase II-Iii Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, E. N.; Gray, G. T.; Rae, P. J.; Trujillo, C. P.; Bourne, N. K.

    2007-12-01

    We present an experimental study of crystalline structure evolution of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) due to pressure-induced phase transitions in a semi-crystalline polymer using soft-recovery, shock-loading techniques coupled with mechanical and chemical post-shock analysis. Gas-launched, plate impact experiments have been performed on pedigreed PTFE 7C, mounted in momentum-trapped, shock assemblies, with impact pressures above and below the phase II to phase III crystalline transition. Below the phase transition only subtle changes were observed in the crystallinity, microstructure, and mechanical response of PTFE. Shock loading of PTFE 7C above the phase II-III transition was seen to cause both an increase in crystallinity from 38% to ˜53% and a finer crystalline microstructure, and changed the yield and flow stress behavior. We particularly focus on the effect of pulse duration on the microstructure evolution.

  6. Shock Pulse Effects in PTFE Shocked Through the Crystalline Phase II--III Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Eric N.; Gray, George T., III; Rae, Philip J.; Bourne, Neil K.

    2008-03-01

    We present an experimental study of crystalline structure evolution of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) due to pressure-induced phase transitions in a semi-crystalline polymer using soft-recovery, shock-loading techniques coupled with mechanical and chemical post-shock analysis. Gas-launched, plate impact experiments have been performed on pedigreed PTFE 7C, mounted in momentum-trapped, shock assemblies, with impact pressures above and below the phase II to phase III crystalline transition. Below the phase transition only subtle changes were observed in the crystallinity, microstructure, and mechanical response of PTFE. Shock loading of PTFE 7C above the phase II--III transition was seen to cause both an increase in crystallinity from 38% to ˜53% (by Differential Scanning Calorimetry, DSC) and a finer crystalline microstructure, and changed the yield and flow stress behavior. We particularly focus on the effect of pulse duration on the microstructure evolution.

  7. Effect of Pulse Duration on Polytetrafluoroethylene Shocked Above the Crystalline Phase II--III Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Eric N.; Gray, George T., III; Rae, Philip J.; Trujillo, Carl P.; Bourne, Neil K.

    2007-06-01

    We present an experimental study of crystalline structure evolution of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) due to pressure-induced phase transitions in a semi-crystalline polymer using soft-recovery, shock-loading techniques coupled with mechanical and chemical post-shock analysis. Gas-launched, plate impact experiments have been performed on pedigreed PTFE 7C, mounted in momentum-trapped, shock assemblies, with impact pressures above and below the phase II to phase III crystalline transition. Below the phase transition only subtle changes were observed in the crystallinity, microstructure, and mechanical response of PTFE. Shock loading of PTFE 7C above the phase II--III transition was seen to cause both an increase in crystallinity from 38% to ˜53% (by Differential Scanning Calorimetry, DSC) and a finer crystalline microstructure, and changed the yield and flow stress behavior. We particularly focus on the effect of pulse duration on the microstructure evolution.

  8. Brazing of the Tore Supra actively cooled Phase III Limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Nygren, R.E.; Walker, C.A.; Lutz, T.J.; Hosking, F.M.; McGrath, R.T.

    1993-12-31

    The head of the water-cooled Tore Supra Phase 3 Limiter is a bank of 14 round OFHC copper tubes, curved to fit the plasma radius, onto which several hundred pyrolytic graphite (PG) tiles and a lesser number of carbon fiber composite tiles are brazed. The small allowable tolerances for fitting the tiles to the tubes and mating of compound curvatures made the brazing and fabrication extremely challenging. The paper describes the fabrication process with emphasis on the procedure for brazing. In the fixturing for vacuum furnace brazing, the tiles were each independently clamped to the tube with an elaborate set of window frame clamps. Braze quality was evaluated with transient heating tests. Some rebrazing was necessary.

  9. Age Strengthening of Gray Cast Iron Phase III

    SciTech Connect

    Von L. Richards; Wayne Nicola

    2003-06-26

    The primary objective of this research is to identify the age strengthening mechanism in gray and ductile cast iron, and to quantify the parameters that control it. It is also to contribute to a new predictive model for gray and ductile iron strength and hardness. This work shows that age strengthening occurs on a sigmoidal-logarithmic scale in gray and ductile cast irons, to a statistically significant extent. This is similar to Avrami-Johnson-Mehl kinetics for phase transformations in metals. It occurs in both cupola-melted iron and induction melted iron. However, it does not happen in all compositions. We have developed some understanding of the process. Data suggests that nitrogen and nitride-forming trace elements have a significant role in the process, but that is yet not fully characterized. Also, the time dependence of the bulk hardness and strength increase, the nano-scale precipitation evidence from neutron scattering, differential scanning calorimetry results and matrix micro-hardness increase in ferrite all indicate that age strengthening occurs by a precipitation or pre-precipitate cluster formation mechanism.

  10. Situational Lightning Climatologies for Central Florida: Phase III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Joe H., III

    2008-01-01

    This report describes work done by the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to add composite soundings to the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS). This allows National Weather Service (NWS) forecasters to compare the current atmospheric state with climatology. In a previous phase, the AMU created composite soundings for four rawinsonde observation stations in Florida, for each of eight flow regimes. The composite soundings were delivered to the NWS Melbourne (MLB) office for display using the NSHARP software program. NWS MLB requested that the AMU make the composite soundings available for display in AWIPS. The AMU first created a procedure to customize AWIPS so composite soundings could be displayed. A unique four-character identifier was created for each of the 32 composite soundings. The AMU wrote a Tool Command Language/Tool Kit (TcVTk) software program to convert the composite soundings from NSHARP to Network Common Data Form (NetCDF) format. The NetCDF files were then displayable by AWIPS.

  11. Effects of the colour additive caramel colour III on the immune system: a study with human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Houben, G F; Abma, P M; van den Berg, H; van Dokkum, W; van Loveren, H; Penninks, A H; Seinen, W; Spanhaak, S; Vos, J G; Ockhuizen, T

    1992-09-01

    Administration of the colour additive Caramel Colour III to rats has been associated with decreased numbers of lymphocytes and several other changes in the immune system, as well as in immune function parameters, specifically in animals fed a diet with a relatively low vitamin B6 content. The effects are caused by the imidazole derivative 2-acetyl-4(5)-tetrahydroxybutylimidazole (THI). Caramel Colour III is commonly used in food products such as bakery products, soya-bean sauces, brown sauces, gravies, soup aromas, brown (dehydrated) soups, brown malt caramel blend for various applications, vinegars and beers, and effects in humans on dietary intake cannot be excluded. Elderly male volunteers with a marginal deficit in vitamin B6 were considered a relevant and potentially sensitive group to study possible effects of Caramel Colour III on blood lymphocyte numbers (total and within subsets) or on proliferative responses of lymphocytes to mitogenic stimulation. In addition, several other haematological parameters, as well as serum immunoglobulin levels and immunoglobulin production in vitro by pokeweed mitogen-stimulated mononuclear blood cells were studied. The results of this double-blind intervention study demonstrated that in a selected test group of apparently healthy elderly male volunteers with a biochemically marginally deficient vitamin B6 status, Caramel Colour III containing 23 (commercial sample) or 143 (research sample) ppm THI and administered at the level of the current acceptable daily intake of 200 mg/kg body weight/day for 7 days did not affect any of the factors investigated. PMID:1427513

  12. Velaglucerase alfa (VPRIV) enzyme replacement therapy in patients with Gaucher disease: Long-term data from phase III clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Derralynn A; Gonzalez, Derlis E; Lukina, Elena A; Mehta, Atul; Kabra, Madhulika; Elstein, Deborah; Kisinovsky, Isaac; Giraldo, Pilar; Bavdekar, Ashish; Hangartner, Thomas N; Wang, Nan; Crombez, Eric; Zimran, Ari

    2015-07-01

    Type 1 Gaucher disease is an inherited lysosomal enzyme deficiency with variable age of symptom onset. Common presenting signs include thrombocytopenia, anemia, hepatosplenomegaly, bone abnormalities, and, additionally in children, growth failure. Fifty-seven patients aged 3-62 years at the baseline of two phase III trials for velaglucerase alfa treatment were enrolled in the single extension study. In the extension, they received every-other-week velaglucerase alfa intravenous infusions for 1.2-4.8 years at 60 U/kg, although 10 patients experienced dose reduction. No patient experienced a drug-related serious adverse event or withdrew due to an adverse event. One patient died following a convulsion that was reported as unrelated to the study drug. Only one patient tested positive for anti-velaglucerase alfa antibodies. Combining the experience of the initial phase III trials and the extension study, significant improvements were observed in the first 24 months from baseline in hematology variables, organ volumes, plasma biomarkers, and, in adults, the lumbar spine bone mineral density Z-score. Improvements were maintained over longer-term treatment. Velaglucerase alfa had a good long-term safety and tolerability profile, and patients continued to respond clinically, which is consistent with the results of the extension study to the phase I/II trial of velaglucerase alfa. EudraCT number 2008-001965-27; www.clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00635427. PMID:25801797

  13. Velaglucerase alfa (VPRIV) enzyme replacement therapy in patients with Gaucher disease: Long-term data from phase III clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Derralynn A; Gonzalez, Derlis E; Lukina, Elena A; Mehta, Atul; Kabra, Madhulika; Elstein, Deborah; Kisinovsky, Isaac; Giraldo, Pilar; Bavdekar, Ashish; Hangartner, Thomas N; Wang, Nan; Crombez, Eric; Zimran, Ari

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 Gaucher disease is an inherited lysosomal enzyme deficiency with variable age of symptom onset. Common presenting signs include thrombocytopenia, anemia, hepatosplenomegaly, bone abnormalities, and, additionally in children, growth failure. Fifty-seven patients aged 3–62 years at the baseline of two phase III trials for velaglucerase alfa treatment were enrolled in the single extension study. In the extension, they received every-other-week velaglucerase alfa intravenous infusions for 1.2–4.8 years at 60 U/kg, although 10 patients experienced dose reduction. No patient experienced a drug-related serious adverse event or withdrew due to an adverse event. One patient died following a convulsion that was reported as unrelated to the study drug. Only one patient tested positive for anti-velaglucerase alfa antibodies. Combining the experience of the initial phase III trials and the extension study, significant improvements were observed in the first 24 months from baseline in hematology variables, organ volumes, plasma biomarkers, and, in adults, the lumbar spine bone mineral density Z-score. Improvements were maintained over longer-term treatment. Velaglucerase alfa had a good long-term safety and tolerability profile, and patients continued to respond clinically, which is consistent with the results of the extension study to the phase I/II trial of velaglucerase alfa. EudraCT number 2008-001965-27; http://www.clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00635427. Am. J. Hematol. 90:584–591, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25801797

  14. Twenty-Seven Years of Phase III Trials for Patients with Extensive Disease Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Disappointing Results

    PubMed Central

    Oze, Isao; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Ochi, Nobuaki; Takigawa, Nagio; Fujiwara, Yoshiro; Tabata, Masahiro; Tanimoto, Mitsune

    2009-01-01

    Background Few studies have formally assessed whether treatment outcomes have improved substantially over the years for patients with extensive disease small-cell lung cancer (ED-SCLC) enrolled in phase III trials. The objective of the current investigation was to determine the time trends in outcomes for the patients in those trials. Methods and Findings We searched for trials that were reported between January 1981 and August 2008. Phase III randomized controlled trials were eligible if they compared first-line, systemic chemotherapy for ED-SCLC. Data were evaluated by using a linear regression analysis. Results: In total, 52 trials were identified that had been initiated between 1980 and 2006; these studies involved 10,262 patients with 110 chemotherapy arms. The number of randomized patients and the proportion of patients with good performance status (PS) increased over time. Cisplatin-based regimens, especially cisplatin and etoposide (PE) regimen, have increasingly been studied, whereas cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and vincristine–based regimens have been less investigated. Multiple regression analysis showed no significant improvement in survival over the years. Additionally, the use of a PE regimen did not affect survival, whereas the proportion of patients with good PS and the trial design of assigning prophylactic cranial irradiation were significantly associated with favorable outcome. Conclusions and Significance The survival of patients with ED-SCLC enrolled in phase III trials did not improve significantly over the years, suggesting the need for further development of novel targets, newer agents, and comprehensive patient care. PMID:19915681

  15. Phase III: Implementation and Operation of the Repository

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1998-07-01

    The metadata catalog was brought online for public access May 14, 1998. Since then dozens of users have registered and began to access the system. The system was demonstrated at the AAPG annual meeting in Salt Lake City and the EAGE (European Association of Geoscientists and Engineers) annual meeting in Leipzig, Germany. Hart Publications and PTTC "NetworkNews" have published articles about the metadata catalog, and articles for the AAPG Explorer and GSA Today are being developed. A back-up system at AGI headquarters was established. In support of the metadata catalog system, a leased-line Internet connection and two servers were installed. Porting of the GeoTrek server software to the new systems has begun. The back-up system will be operational during the 3 rd quarter of 1998 and will serve the NGDRS needs during periods when access to the site in Houston is down. Additionally, experimentation with new data types and deployment schemes will be tested on the system at AGI. The NGDRS has picked-up additional endorsements from the American Association of State Geologists, the MMS Outer Continental Shelf Policy Committee, and a new endorsement is being formulated by the AAPG Core Preservation Committee for consideration by the AAPG Executive Committee. The Texas Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) is currently geocoding the well locations for the metadata catalog. Also, they have solicited proposals for the development of a core inventory control system that will work hand-in-hand with GeoTrek. A contract for that system will probably be given during the 3 rd quarter of 1998. The Texas Railroad Commission proposes to test the application of GeoTrek for accessing data in a joint project with the BEG. Several data transfer projects are underway. Vastar has committed to the transfer of 2D Appalachian seismic lines to the NDGRS clearinghouse. Receiving repositories have been identified and the final preparations are being made for transfer to these public repositories

  16. Phase III: Implementation and Operation of the Repository

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    All of the hardware is installed and all available databases are loaded into the metadata repository. The final stages of beta testing of GeoTrek and necessary revisions are underway, with a targeted public release of the NGDRS system in April or May 1998. The Eastern Gulf Region PTTC, Oklahoma Geological Survey, and A2D databases have been converted and loaded into the metadata repository. These are in addition to the four previously installed databases, including the BEG, MMS, PGS, and Fairfield. Data quality improvements, particularly with the MMS and BEG data is continuing, including making the data more intuitive for the typical user. The beta-testing process has resulted in a number of action items that have been reviewed and addressed. Most of these issues have been resolved, and the remaining issues will be resolved early in the second quarter of 1998, leading to the public launch of the NGDRS metadata repository. Installation of GeoTrek at the BEG, in an effort to bring their core holdings into the NDGRS, was completed in December. A review was held concerning the experiences of the BEG with GeoTrek during January. The feedback was largely positive, with only a couple technical details to address. A number of companies have also expressed interest and/or are evaluating PetroTrek, the commercial version of GeoTrek. Thus far, most of those companies, including PGS and Fairfield, which have licensed PetroTrek have simultaneously joined the NGDRS as well. Several data transfer efforts are underway. Vastar has committed to the transfer of 2D Appalachian seismic lines to the NDGRS clearinghouse. Receiving repositories have been identified and the final preparations are being made for transfer to these public repositories. Additionally, discussions continue with the Stapleton Development Corporation concerning the transfer of facilities in Denver for use as a central core repository.

  17. Remedial Action Report for Operable Units 6-05 and 10-04, Phase III

    SciTech Connect

    R. P. Wells

    2007-08-15

    This Phase III remedial action report addresses the remediation of lead-contaminated soils found at the Security Training Facility STF-02 Gun Range at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. Phase I, consisting of developing and implementing institutional controls at Operble Unit 10-04 sites and developing and implementing Idaho National Laboratory Site-wide plans for both institutional controls and ecological monitoring, was addressed in a previous report. Phase II will remediate sites contaminated with trinitrotoluene and Royal Demolition Explosive. Phase IV will remediate hazards from unexploded ordnance.

  18. Courtyard Commons retail addition. Phase I. Final design documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-25

    The project consists of a retail addition to an existing cluster of buildings located on the main commercial street in Santa Cruz, California. The existing complex is formed by two wings of one-story buildings enclosing an open courtyard now used for circulation, a coffee shop seating area, a flower stand, and access to four retail stores. The program calls for an addition of new retail space above the existing buildings constructed of eight inch concrete blocks. In order to provide for the year around use of the courtyard, the program also calls for a flexible glass cover which could be removed during the sunny warm summer days. The main requirements of the program finally, are to develop an energy efficient and cost effective design which uses natural light at its full potential for both the courtyard and interior spaces. This report includes sections of the following: overview of final design; unavailable solar design information; incremental passive design cost, energy performance analysis and results; economic analysis and results; architectural compatibility; NBSGLD output and documentation; and design development drawings.

  19. Development and testing of commercial-scale, coal-fired combustion systems: Phase III. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    Based on studies that indicated a large potential for significantly increased coal-firing in the commercial sector, the U.S. Department of Energy`s Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) sponsored a multi-phase development effort for advanced coal combustion systems. This Final Report presents the results of the last phase (Phase III) of a project for the development of an advanced coal-fired system for the commercial sector of the economy. The project performance goals for the system included dual-fuel capability (i.e., coal as primary fuel and natural gas as secondary fuel), combustion efficiency exceeding 99 percent, thermal efficiency greater than 80 percent, turndown of at least 3:1, dust-free and semi-automatic dry ash removal, fully automatic start-up with system purge and ignition verification, emissions performance exceeding New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) and approaching those produced by oil-fired, Commercial-sized units, and reliability, safety, operability, maintainability, and service life comparable to oil-fired units. The program also involved a site demonstration at a large facility owned by Striegel Supply Company, a portion of which was leased to MTCI. The site, mostly warehouse space, was completely unheated and the advanced coal-fired combustion system was designed and sized to heat this space. Three different coals were used in the project, one low and one high sulfur pulverized Pittsburgh No. 8 coal, and a micronized low volatile, bituminous coal. The sorbents used were Pfizer dolomitic limestone and an Anvil lime. More than 100 hours of screening test`s were performed to characterize the system. The parameters examined included coal firing rate, excess air level, ash recycle rate, coal type, dolomitic limestone feed rate, and steam injection rate. These tests indicated that some additional modifications for coal burning in the system were required.

  20. Effects of PECS Phase III Application Training on Independent Mands in Young Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Jessica June

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of PECS phase III application training on independent mands in young children with autism. Participants were five children with autism ranging from ages 2 to 4 years old. A multiple baseline across participants was used to evaluate acquisition of independent correct mands across baseline and…

  1. What Works in Oklahoma Schools: A Comprehensive Needs Assessment of Oklahoma Schools. Phase III Action Steps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marzano Research Laboratory, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This document contains the Phase III report from the "What Works in Oklahoma Schools" study. As opposed to describing the findings from the study that was conducted, it provides a tool-kit that can be used by Oklahoma principals and teachers to determine the best courses of action for their schools and classrooms. The tools provided in this report…

  2. SPSP Phase III Recruiting, Selecting, and Developing Secure Power Systems Professionals. Job Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neil, Lori Ross; Conway, T. J.; Tobey, D. H.; Greitzer, Frank L.; Dalton, Angela C.; Pusey, Portia K.

    2015-03-01

    The Secure Power Systems Professional Phase III final report was released last year which an appendix of Job Profiles. This new report is that appendix broken out as a standalone document to assist utilities in recruiting and developing Secure Power Systems Professionals at their site.

  3. SPSP Phase III Recruiting, Selecting, and Developing Secure Power Systems Professionals. Individual and Team Performance Guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neil, Lori Ross; Conway, T. J.; Tobey, D. H.; Greitzer, Frank L.; Dalton, Angela C.; Pusey, Portia K.

    2015-03-01

    The Secure Power Systems Professional Phase III final report was released last year which an appendix of Individual and Team Performance Guidelines. This new report is that appendix broken out as a standalone document to assist utilities in recruiting and developing Secure Power Systems Professionals at their site.

  4. Selected Findings from Phase III-B. BTES. Beginning Teacher Evaluation Study. Supplement. Preliminary Version.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Charles W.; And Others

    This series of six papers concerning the Beginning Teacher Evaluation Study (BTES) starts with Teaching Behaviors, Academic Learning Time and Student Achievement: An Overview of Phase III-B of the Beginning Teacher Evaluation Study by the project director, Charles Fisher. As an introduction, it describes a model of classroom instruction based on…

  5. Negative results in phase III trials of complex interventions: cause for concern or just good science?

    PubMed

    Crawford, Mike J; Barnicot, Kirsten; Patterson, Sue; Gold, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Not all interventions that show promise in exploratory trials will be supported in phase III studies. But the high failure rate in recent trials of complex mental health interventions is a concern. Proper consideration of trial processes and greater use of adaptive trial designs could ensure better use of available resources. PMID:27369475

  6. Convergent Synthesis of Diverse Nitrogen Heterocycles via Rh(III)-Catalyzed C-H Conjugate Addition/Cyclization Reactions.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Adam B; Ellman, Jonathan A

    2016-07-01

    The development of Rh(III)-catalyzed C-H conjugate addition/cyclization reactions that provide access to synthetically useful fused bi- and tricyclic nitrogen heterocycles is reported. A broad scope of C-H functionalization substrates and electrophilic olefin coupling partners is effective, and depending on the nature of the directing group, cyclic imide, amide, or heteroaromatic products are obtained. An efficient synthesis of a pyrrolophenanthridine alkaloid natural product, oxoassoanine, highlights the utility of this method. PMID:27337641

  7. Detection of lack of fusion using opaque additives, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Two major problems in welded aluminum spacecraft structure, reliable nondestructive inspection for incomplete weldment penetration and the rapid oxidation of aluminum surfaces left exposed to the atmosphere are investigated. The approach employed to solve both problems was to employ copper as a coating to prevent oxidation of the aluminum and as an opaque additive in the weldment to enhance X-ray detection in the event of incomplete penetration. Both plasma spray and vacuum vapor deposition techniques were evaluated for depositing the copper. A series of welded panels was made using three thicknesses of vacuum-vapor-deposited copper. All weldments were nondestructively inspected by X-ray, then excised into tensile and bend specimens. Mechanical tests were conducted and all data evaluated. It was determined that the vacuum-vapor-deposited coating was superior to a plasma sprayed coating of the same thickness. The vacuum-vapor-deposited coating was more uniform in thickness, provided complete coverage of the aluminum, and was free of cracks and porosity.

  8. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  9. Theoretical investigation on mechanism of asymmetric Michael addition of malononitrile to chalcones catalyzed by Cinchona alkaloid aluminium(III) complex.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhishan; Lee, Hai Whang; Kim, Chan Kyung

    2011-09-21

    The mechanism of Michael addition of malononitrile to chalcones catalyzed by Cinchona alkaloid aluminium(III) complex has been investigated by DFT and ONIOM methods. Calculations indicate that the reaction proceeds through a dual activation mechanism, in which Al(III) acts as a Lewis acid to activate the electrophile α,β-unsaturated carbonyl substrate while the tertiary amine in the Cinchona alkaloid works as a Lewis base to promote the activation of the malononitrile and deprotonation. A stepwise pathway involving C-C bond formation followed by proton transfer from the catalyst to the carbonyl substrate is adopted, and latter step is predicted to be the rate-determining-step in the reaction with an energy barrier of 12.4 kcal mol(-1). In the absence of the Al(III)-complex, a Cinchona alkaloid activates the carbonyl substrate by a hydrogen bonding of the hydroxyl group, involving a higher energy barrier of 30.4 kcal mol(-1). The steric repulsion between the phenyl group attached to the carbonyl group in the chalcone and isopropoxyl groups of the Al(III)-complex may play an important role in the control of stereoselectivity. The π-π stacking effect between the quinuclidine ring of the quinine and the phenyl group of the chalcones may also help the stabilization of the preferred molecular complex. These results are in agreement with experimental observations. PMID:21796318

  10. Two-phase treatment of patients with crossbite and tendency toward skeletal Class III malocclusion*

    PubMed Central

    Bayerl, Maria de Lourdes Machado

    2014-01-01

    Angle Class III malocclusion is characterized by an inadequate anteroposterior dental relationship which may or may not be accompanied by skeletal changes. In general, patients are distressed by a significantly compromised facial aspect which, when associated with a deficient middle third, encourages patients to seek treatment. This article reports a two-phase treatment carried out in a female patient aged six years and six months with a tendency towards a Class III skeletal pattern. This case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Facial Orthopedics (BBO). It is representative of the Discrepancy Index (DI) category, and fulfills part of the requirements for obtaining BBO Diploma. PMID:25279531

  11. Grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging at PETRA III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hipp, A.; Beckmann, F.; Lytaev, P.; Greving, I.; Lottermoser, L.; Dose, T.; Kirchhof, R.; Burmester, H.; Schreyer, A.; Herzen, J.

    2014-09-01

    Conventional absorption-based imaging often lacks in good contrast at special applications like visualization of soft tissue or weak absorbing material in general. To overcome this limitation, several new X-ray phase-contrast imaging methods have been developed at synchrotron radiation facilities. Our aim was to establish the possibility of different phase-contrast imaging modalities at the Imaging Beamline (IBL, P05) and the High Energy Material Science beamline (HEMS, P07) at Petra III (DESY, Germany). Here we present the instrumentation and the status of the currently successfully established phase-contrast imaging techniques. First results from measurements of biomedical samples will be presented as demonstration.

  12. Predicted band structures of III-V semiconductors in the wurtzite phase

    SciTech Connect

    De, A.; Pryor, Craig E.

    2010-04-15

    While non-nitride III-V semiconductors typically have a zinc-blende structure, they may also form wurtzite crystals under pressure or when grown as nanowhiskers. This makes electronic structure calculation difficult since the band structures of wurtzite III-V semiconductors are poorly characterized. We have calculated the electronic band structure for nine III-V semiconductors in the wurtzite phase using transferable empirical pseudopotentials including spin-orbit coupling. We find that all the materials have direct gaps. Our results differ significantly from earlier ab initio calculations, and where experimental results are available (InP, InAs, and GaAs) our calculated band gaps are in good agreement. We tabulate energies, effective masses, and linear and cubic Dresselhaus zero-field spin-splitting coefficients for the zone-center states. The large zero-field spin-splitting coefficients we find may facilitate the development of spin-based devices.

  13. HEAT: High accuracy extrapolated ab initio thermochemistry. III. Additional improvements and overview.

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, M. E.; Vazquez, J.; Ruscic, B.; Wilson, A. K.; Gauss, J.; Stanton, J. F.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Univ. t Mainz; The Univ. of Texas; Univ. of North Texas

    2008-01-01

    Effects of increased basis-set size as well as a correlated treatment of the diagonal Born-Oppenheimer approximation are studied within the context of the high-accuracy extrapolated ab initio thermochemistry (HEAT) theoretical model chemistry. It is found that the addition of these ostensible improvements does little to increase the overall accuracy of HEAT for the determination of molecular atomization energies. Fortuitous cancellation of high-level effects is shown to give the overall HEAT strategy an accuracy that is, in fact, higher than most of its individual components. In addition, the issue of core-valence electron correlation separation is explored; it is found that approximate additive treatments of the two effects have limitations that are significant in the realm of <1 kJ mol{sup -1} theoretical thermochemistry.

  14. Phase variable type III restriction-modification systems of host-adapted bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Fox, Kate L; Srikhanta, Yogitha N; Jennings, Michael P

    2007-09-01

    Phase variation, the high-frequency on/off switching of gene expression, is a common feature of host-adapted bacterial pathogens. Restriction-modification (R-M) systems, which are ubiquitous among bacteria, are classically assigned the role of cellular defence against invasion of foreign DNA. These enzymes are not obvious candidates for phase variable expression, a characteristic usually associated with surface-expressed molecules subject to host immune selection. Despite this, numerous type III R-M systems in bacterial pathogens contain repetitive DNA motifs that suggest the potential for phase variation. Several roles have been proposed for phase variable R-M systems based on DNA restriction function. However, there is now evidence in several important human pathogens, including Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae, that these systems are 'phasevarions' (phase variable regulons) controlling expression of multiple genes via a novel epigenetic mechanism. PMID:17714447

  15. Evolution of the DSCS phase III satellite through the 1990's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, R.; Kelley, R.; Swimm, K.

    The Defense Satellite Communications Systems (DSCS) initiated its third generation when the first DSCS, Phase III (DSCS III) satellite was successfully launched in late 1982. DSCS III features a multibeam receive nulling antenna, six independent channels and a 10 year lifetime giving better jamming protection, operational flexibility and life cycle costs. DSCS III also supplies AFSATCOM service. During the 1980s DSCS III will incorporate solid state amplifiers, more redundancy, new COMSEC devices, an SHF AFSATCOM downlink, more autonomy and wider channel bandwidths to improve spacecraft reliability and mission performance. By the early 1990s new payloads enhancing mission capabilities are feasible. Possibilities include advanced wideband user and AFSATCOM payloads. The new wideband payload could feature EHF links, adaptive nulling, on-board despreading, and an active transmit array giving higher capacity and jammer protection. The AFSATCOM payload could include EHF and UHF links plus multichannel digital demodulation to give higher jamming protection and capacity in a MILSTAR backup role and EHF telemetry/commanding. Both payloads could utilize satellite crosslinks to improve global netting.

  16. Alirocumab for hyperlipidemia: ODYSSEY Phase III clinical trial results and US FDA approval indications.

    PubMed

    Roth, Eli M

    2016-03-01

    A new class of lipid-lowering drugs, inhibitors of PCSK9 has been generating impressive clinical trial data over the last several years, and alirocumab (Praluent) has become the first to be approved by the US FDA. Alirocumab has been shown to lower low density lipoprotein cholesterol by 45-62% with a safety profile generally comparable to placebo. Alirocumab is a monoclonal antibody to PCSK9 administered subcutaneously and has been evaluated in 16 Phase III clinical trials, the majority of which have been enrolled or completed. This article will be a review of the available Phase III safety and efficacy data of the ODYSSEY studies including a brief description of each of the 16 studies. PMID:26785741

  17. Trimebutine-induced phase III-like activity in infants with intestinal motility disorders.

    PubMed

    Boige, N; Cargill, G; Mashako, L; Cezard, J P; Navarro, J

    1987-01-01

    Duodenal manometric recordings were performed in five male children (mean age 11.7 +/- 6.8 months) suffering from severe digestive pathology with clinical findings of dysmotility; they required total parenteral nutrition: one case of enteropathy following intestinal resection for congenital small bowel atresia, and four cases of intestinal pseudoobstruction. The basal 3-h fasting recordings showed complete disorganization of interdigestive activity characterized by an absence of migrating motor complexes and a marked basal hypomotility with motor indices lower than in control subjects. Intravenous trimebutine (3 mg/kg) produced a phase III-like activity 88 +/- 121 s after administration in four cases. The activity lasted 236 +/- 105 s and had a mean frequency of 11.75 +/- 0.86 waves/min. It was propagated aborally in the two patients having two duodenal recording sites. Trimebutine-induced phase III activity was followed by signs of peristalsis in two patients. PMID:3430262

  18. Nivolumab for advanced non-small cell lung cancer: an evaluation of a phase III study.

    PubMed

    Ulmeanu, Ruxandra; Antohe, Ileana; Anisie, Ecaterina; Antoniu, Sabina

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer still remains associated with a high mortality rate and more efficacious therapies are needed in order to improve the disease outcome. Nivolumab is a monoclonal antibody which blocks the programmed death-1 receptor which is currently evaluated in phase III clinical trials in advanced lung cancer. Here, we evaluate the results of a phase III study in which nivolumab efficacy and safety were compared to those of docetaxel. Nivolumab was able to improve survival and progression-free survival and exhibited a very good safety profile. Further clinical data are needed in order to better position this therapy among the existing methods. The promising results support the use of this therapy as a stand-alone approach. PMID:26634873

  19. Phase-correlated P Cygni profile variations of the C III multiplet in UW Canis Majoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drechsel, H.; Kondo, Y.; Mccluskey, G. E., Jr.; Rahe, J.

    1981-01-01

    The interacting close binary system UW CMa has been observed, in the wavelength range from 1161 to 1188 A, continuously during a complete orbital cycle in 1979 with the Copernicus (OAO-3) U2 spectrometer. The C III multiplet at 1175 A, observed as a P Cygni feature, exhbits a clear dependence on the orbital phase of the binary; the radial velocity variation of this feature lags behind that of the O7 primary component by 0.1 orbital phase, which agrees with the anticipations in an earlier study by the same authors. The radiation-driven matter, flowing out of the binary, originates in the primary component.

  20. Soft recovery of polytetrafluoroethylene shocked through the crystalline phase II-III transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, E. N.; Trujillo, C. P.; Gray, G. T.; Rae, P. J.; Bourne, N. K.

    2007-01-01

    Polymers are increasingly being utilized as monolithic materials and composite matrices for structural applications historically reserved for metals. High strain-rate applications in aerospace, defense, and the automotive industries have lead to interest in the shock response of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and the ensuing changes in polymer structure due to shock prestraining. We present an experimental study of crystalline structure evolution due to pressure-induced phase transitions in a semicrystalline polymer using soft-recovery, shock loading techniques coupled with mechanical and chemical postshock analyses. Gas-launched, plate impact experiments have been performed on pedigreed PTFE 7C, mounted in momentum trapped, shock assemblies, with impact pressures above and below the phase II to phase III crystalline transition. Below the phase transition only subtle changes were observed in the crystallinity, microstructure, and mechanical response of PTFE. Shock loading of PTFE 7C above the phase II-III transition was seen to cause both an increase in crystallinity from 38% to ˜53% (by differential scanning calorimetry) and a finer crystalline microstructure, and changed the yield and flow stress behavior.

  1. The Galactic O-Star Spectroscopic Survey (GOSSS). III. 142 Additional O-type Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maíz Apellániz, J.; Sota, A.; Arias, J. I.; Barbá, R. H.; Walborn, N. R.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Negueruela, I.; Marco, A.; Leão, J. R. S.; Herrero, A.; Gamen, R. C.; Alfaro, E. J.

    2016-05-01

    This is the third installment of the Galactic O-Star Spectroscopic Survey (GOSSS), a massive spectroscopic survey of Galactic O stars, based on new homogeneous, high signal-to-noise ratio, R ˜ 2500 digital observations selected from the Galactic O-Star Catalog. In this paper, we present 142 additional stellar systems with O stars from both hemispheres, bringing the total of O-type systems published within the project to 590. Among the new objects, there are 20 new O stars. We also identify 11 new double-lined spectroscopic binaries, 6 of which are of O+O type and 5 of O+B type, and an additional new tripled-lined spectroscopic binary of O+O+B type. We also revise some of the previous GOSSS classifications, present some egregious examples of stars erroneously classified as O-type in the past, introduce the use of luminosity class IV at spectral types O4-O5.5, and adapt the classification scheme to the work of Arias et al. The GOSSS spectroscopic data in this article were gathered with five facilities: the 1.5 m Telescope at the Observatorio de Sierra Nevada (OSN), the 2.5 m du Pont Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO), the 3.5 m Telescope at Calar Alto Observatory (CAHA), and the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope (WHT) and 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) at Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (ORM).

  2. The Galactic O-Star Spectroscopic Survey (GOSSS). III. 142 Additional O-type Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maíz Apellániz, J.; Sota, A.; Arias, J. I.; Barbá, R. H.; Walborn, N. R.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Negueruela, I.; Marco, A.; Leão, J. R. S.; Herrero, A.; Gamen, R. C.; Alfaro, E. J.

    2016-05-01

    This is the third installment of the Galactic O-Star Spectroscopic Survey (GOSSS), a massive spectroscopic survey of Galactic O stars, based on new homogeneous, high signal-to-noise ratio, R ∼ 2500 digital observations selected from the Galactic O-Star Catalog. In this paper, we present 142 additional stellar systems with O stars from both hemispheres, bringing the total of O-type systems published within the project to 590. Among the new objects, there are 20 new O stars. We also identify 11 new double-lined spectroscopic binaries, 6 of which are of O+O type and 5 of O+B type, and an additional new tripled-lined spectroscopic binary of O+O+B type. We also revise some of the previous GOSSS classifications, present some egregious examples of stars erroneously classified as O-type in the past, introduce the use of luminosity class IV at spectral types O4-O5.5, and adapt the classification scheme to the work of Arias et al. The GOSSS spectroscopic data in this article were gathered with five facilities: the 1.5 m Telescope at the Observatorio de Sierra Nevada (OSN), the 2.5 m du Pont Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO), the 3.5 m Telescope at Calar Alto Observatory (CAHA), and the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope (WHT) and 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) at Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (ORM).

  3. A varying-stage adaptive phase II/III clinical trial design.

    PubMed

    Dong, Gaohong

    2014-04-15

    Currently, adaptive phase II/III clinical trials are typically carried out with a strict two-stage design. The first stage is a learning stage called phase II, and the second stage is a confirmatory stage called phase III. Following phase II analysis, inefficacious or harmful dose arms are dropped, then one or two promising dose arms are selected for the second stage. However, there are often situations in which researchers are in dilemma to make 'go or no-go' decision and/or to select 'best' dose arm(s), as data from the first stage may not provide sufficient information for their decision making. In this case, it is challenging to follow a strict two-stage plan. Therefore, we propose a varying-stage adaptive phase II/III clinical trial design, in which we consider whether there is a need to have an intermediate stage to obtain more data, so that a more informative decision could be made. Hence, the number of further investigational stages in our design is determined on the basis of data accumulated to the interim analysis. With respect to adaptations, we consider dropping dose arm(s), switching another plausible endpoint as the primary study endpoint, re-estimating sample size, and early stopping for futility. We use an adaptive combination test to perform final analyses. By applying closed testing procedure, we control family-wise type I error rate at the nominal level of α in the strong sense. We delineate other essential design considerations including the threshold parameters and the proportion of alpha allocated in the two-stage versus three-stage setting. PMID:24273128

  4. [Effect of addition of instant corn flour on rheological characteristics of wheat flour and breadmaking III].

    PubMed

    Martínez, F; el-Dahs, A A

    1993-12-01

    The instant corn flour prepared by the hydrothermal process using corn grits soaked in water at room temperature (28-30 degrees C) for 5 hours and steaming for 1 minute at 118 degrees C presented characteristics similar to that of flours prepared with grits soaked in water at temperature higher than room temperature and different steaming time (5 and 15 minutes). The addition of instant corn flour up of a 25% mixture with wheat flour reduced the peak of maximum viscosity during the heating cycle; however, the final viscosity during the cooling cycle was increased. The water absorption was increased with the increase of substitution in the level of wheat flour. Extensibility, maximum resistance and values of area were reduced with an increase in the level of instant corn flour in the mixture. However, extension resistance and proportional number were increased. Bread prepared from a mixture of instant corn flour and wheat flour showed higher weight with low loaf volume, color and texture of the crumb related to bread wheat. PMID:7872835

  5. The addition of a second lanthanide ion to increase the luminescence of europium(III) macrocyclic complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bromm, A.J. Jr.; Vallarino, L.M.; Leif, R.C.; Quagliano, J.R.

    1998-12-29

    At present, the microscopic visualization of luminescent labels containing lanthanide(III) ions, primarily europium(III), as light-emitting centers is best performed with time-gated instrumentation, which by virtually eliminating the background fluorescence results in an improved signal to noise ratio. However, the use of the europium(III) macrocycle, Quantum Dye{trademark}, in conjunction with the strong luminescence enhancing effect (cofluorescence) of yttrium(III) or gadolinium(III), can eliminate the need for such specialized instrumentation. In the presence of Gd(III), the luminescence of the Eu(III)-macrocycles can be conveniently observed with conventional fluorescence instrumentation at previously unattainable low levels. The Eu(III) {sup 5}D{sub 0} {r_arrow} {sup 7}F{sub 2} emission of the Eu(III)-macrocycles was observed as an extremely sharp band with a maximum at 619 nm and a clearly resolved characteristic pattern. At very low Eu(III)-macrocycle concentrations, another sharp emission was detected at 614 nm, arising from traces of Eu(III) present in even the purest commercially available gadolinium products. Discrimination of the resolved emissions of the Eu(III)-macrocycle and Eu(III) contaminant should provide a means to further lower the limit of detection of the Eu(III)-macrocycle.

  6. Predicting Pattern Tooling and Casting Dimensions for Investment Casting, Phase III

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2008-04-01

    Efforts during Phase III focused mainly on the shell-alloy systems. A high melting point alloy, 17-4PH stainless steel, was considered. The experimental part of the program was conducted at ORNL and commercial foundries, where wax patterns were injected, molds were invested, and alloys were poured. Shell molds made of fused-silica and alumino-silicates were considered. A literature review was conducted on thermophysical and thermomechanical properties alumino-silicates. Material property data, which were not available from material suppliers, was obtained. For all the properties of 17-4PH stainless steel, the experimental data available in the literature did not cover the entire temperature range necessary for process simulation. Thus, some material properties were evaluated using ProCAST, based on CompuTherm database. A comparison between the predicted material property data and measured property data was made. It was found that most material properties were accurately predicted only over several temperature ranges. No experimental data for plastic modulus were found. Thus, several assumptions were made and ProCAST recommendations were followed in order to obtain a complete set of mechanical property data at high temperatures. Thermal expansion measurements for the 17-4PH alloy were conducted during heating and cooling. As a function of temperature, the thermal expansion for both the alloy and shell mold materials showed different evolution on heating and cooling. Numerical simulations were performed using ProCAST for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts in fused silica molds using the thermal expansion obtained on heating and another one with thermal expansion obtained on cooling. Since the fused silica shells had the lowest thermal expansion properties in the industry, the dewaxing phase, including the coupling between wax-shell systems, was neglected. The shell mold was considered to be a pure elastic material. The alloy dimensions were

  7. Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project Probability/Coordination Study Resident Fish and Wildlife Impacts Phase III, 1997 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Leitzinger, Eric J.

    1998-10-01

    Phase III began in 1995 with the overall goal of quantifying changes in resident fish habitat in the Snake River Basin upstream of Brownlee Reservoir resulting from the release of salmon flow augmentation water.

  8. Phase diagrams for the adsorption of monomers with non-additive interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, O. A.; Ramirez-Pastor, A. J.; Nieto, F.

    2016-09-01

    In several experimental systems phase diagrams coverage-temperature show a strong asymmetry. This behavior can be reproduced by including non-additive lateral interactions. In this work a Monte Carlo study on the canonical assembly of the criticality of monomer adsorption with non-additive interactions is presented. Traditional pairwise energies were replaced by other more general ones where the lateral interaction between two ad-atoms depends on the coverage at first sphere of coordination. This kind of energies includes multibody interactions like three-body interactions and four-body interactions, etc. These energies induce the formation of several non-additive ordered structures. Finite size scaling method was used to classify the order of phase transition of each non-additive phase. On the other hand, the corresponding phase diagrams are formed naturally, in which case the diagrams show strong asymmetries.

  9. Embracing failure: What the Phase III progesterone studies can teach about TBI clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Donald G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Despite positive preclinical studies and two positive Phase II clinical trials, two large Phase III clinical trials of progesterone treatment of acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) recently ended with negative results, so a 100% failure rate continues to plague the field of TBI trials. Methods: This paper reviews and analyses the trial structures and outcomes and discusses the implications of these failures for future drug and clinical trial development. Persistently negative trial outcomes have led to disinvestment in new drug research by companies and policy-makers and disappointment for patients and their families, failures which represent a major public health concern. The problem is not limited to TBI. Failure rates are high for trials in stroke, sepsis, cardiology, cancer and orthopaedics, among others. Results: This paper discusses some of the reasons why the Phase III trials have failed. These reasons may include faulty extrapolation from pre-clinical data in designing clinical trials and the use of subjective outcome measures that accurately reflect neither the nature of the deficits nor long-term quantitative recovery. Conclusions: Better definitions of injury and healing and better outcome measures are essential to change the embrace of failure that has dominated the field for over 30 years. This review offers suggestions to improve the situation. PMID:26274493

  10. An Application of Graphical Approach to Construct Multiple Testing Procedures in a Hypothetical Phase III Design

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bushi; Ting, Naitee

    2014-01-01

    Many multiple testing procedures (MTP) have been developed in recent years. Among these new procedures, the graphical approach is flexible and easy to communicate with non-statisticians. A hypothetical Phase III clinical trial design is introduced in this manuscript to demonstrate how graphical approach can be applied in clinical product development. In this design, an active comparator is used. It is thought that this test drug under development could potentially be superior to this comparator. For comparison of efficacy, the primary endpoint is well established and widely accepted by regulatory agencies. However, an important secondary endpoint based on Phase II findings looks very promising. The target dose may have a good opportunity to deliver superiority to the comparator. Furthermore, a lower dose is included in case the target dose may demonstrate potential safety concerns. This Phase III study is designed as a non-inferiority trial with two doses, and two endpoints. This manuscript will illustrate how graphical approach is applied to this design in handling multiple testing issues. PMID:24432299

  11. A Phase I-II Study of Postoperative Capecitabine-Based Chemoradiotherapy in Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, Edwin; Crosby, Tom D.L.; Dubbelman, Ria; Bartelink, Harry; Verheij, Marcel

    2007-12-01

    Background: The Intergroup 0116 randomized study showed that postoperative 5-fluorouracil-based chemoradiotherapy improved locoregional control and overall survival in patients with gastric cancer. We hypothesized that these results could be improved further by using a more effective, intensified, and convenient chemotherapy schedule. Therefore, this Phase I-II dose-escalation study was performed to determine the maximal tolerated dose and toxicity profile of postoperative radiotherapy combined with concurrent capecitabine. Patients and Methods: After recovery from surgery for adenocarcinoma of the gastroesophageal junction or stomach, all patients were treated with capecitabine monotherapy, 1,000 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily for 2 weeks. After a 1-week treatment-free interval, patients received capecitabine (650-1,000 mg/m{sup 2} orally twice daily 5 days/week) in a dose-escalation schedule combined with radiotherapy on weekdays for 5 weeks. Radiotherapy was delivered to a total dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions to the gastric bed, anastomoses, and regional lymph nodes. Results: Sixty-six patients were treated accordingly. Two patients went off study before or shortly after the start of chemoradiotherapy because of progressive disease. Therefore, 64 patients completed treatment as planned. During the chemoradiotherapy phase, 4 patients developed four items of Grade III dose-limiting toxicity (3 patients in Dose Level II and 1 patient in Dose Level IV). The predefined highest dose of capecitabine, 1,000 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily orally, was tolerated well and, therefore, considered safe for further clinical evaluation. Conclusions: This Phase I-II study shows that intensified chemoradiotherapy with daily capecitabine is feasible in postoperative patients with gastroesophageal junction and gastric cancer.

  12. Investor Outlook: Focus on Upcoming LCA2 Gene Therapy Phase III Results.

    PubMed

    Schimmer, Joshua; Breazzano, Steven

    2015-09-01

    Investor interest in gene therapy has increased substantially over the past few years, and the next major catalyst for the field is likely to be Spark Therapeutics's phase III trial for the treatment of visual impairment caused by RPE65 gene mutations (often referred to as Leber congenital amaurosis type 2, or LCA2, but may include other retinal disorders). Analysis of the approach from the basic genetics, underlying visual mechanisms, clinical data, and commercialization considerations helps frame investor expectations and the potential implications for the broader field. PMID:26390089

  13. INL Results for Phases I and III of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhard Strydom; Javier Ortensi; Sonat Sen; Hans Hammer

    2013-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office (TDO) Methods Core Simulation group led the construction of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR) 350 MW benchmark for comparing and evaluating prismatic VHTR analysis codes. The benchmark is sponsored by the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), and the project will yield a set of reference steady-state, transient, and lattice depletion problems that can be used by the Department of Energy (DOE), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and vendors to assess their code suits. The Methods group is responsible for defining the benchmark specifications, leading the data collection and comparison activities, and chairing the annual technical workshops. This report summarizes the latest INL results for Phase I (steady state) and Phase III (lattice depletion) of the benchmark. The INSTANT, Pronghorn and RattleSnake codes were used for the standalone core neutronics modeling of Exercise 1, and the results obtained from these codes are compared in Section 4. Exercise 2 of Phase I requires the standalone steady-state thermal fluids modeling of the MHTGR-350 design, and the results for the systems code RELAP5-3D are discussed in Section 5. The coupled neutronics and thermal fluids steady-state solution for Exercise 3 are reported in Section 6, utilizing the newly developed Parallel and Highly Innovative Simulation for INL Code System (PHISICS)/RELAP5-3D code suit. Finally, the lattice depletion models and results obtained for Phase III are compared in Section 7. The MHTGR-350 benchmark proved to be a challenging simulation set of problems to model accurately, and even with the simplifications introduced in the benchmark specification this activity is an important step in the code-to-code verification of modern prismatic VHTR codes. A final OECD/NEA comparison report will compare the Phase I and III results

  14. Microwave-hydrothermal synthesis of nanostructured Na-birnessites and phase transformation by arsenic(III) oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Dias, Anderson Sa, Rodrigo G.; Spitale, Matheus C.; Athayde, Maycon; Ciminelli, Virginia S.T.

    2008-06-03

    Microwave-hydrothermal synthesis was employed to produce Na-birnessites. Crystalline, single-phase materials were obtained at temperatures as low as 120 deg. C and times as short as 1 min. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the structural features of the nanostructured powders. Birnessites possessed a monoclinic structure in space group C2/m with nine Raman-active bands, all of which were observed for the first time due to optimized acquisition of the spectroscopic data. The highly reactive materials produced were submitted to sorption experiments with As(III). An oxidative precipitation occurred with the production of Mn(II) arsenate at higher arsenic concentrations. In addition, the formation of hausmannite (Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}) was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and Raman analyses of the reacted solid phase. The observed 14 Raman-active modes were adjusted according to the tetragonal I4{sub 1}/amd space group for hausmannite. An additional band related to the breathing mode of the arsenate was observed, leading to the conclusion that adsorption onto hausmannite takes place in addition to the oxidative precipitation of manganese arsenate.

  15. THE PHASES DIFFERENTIAL ASTROMETRY DATA ARCHIVE. III. LIMITS TO TERTIARY COMPANIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Muterspaugh, Matthew W.; Lane, Benjamin F.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Konacki, Maciej; Burke, Bernard F.; Colavita, M. M.; Shao, M. E-mail: blane@draper.co

    2010-12-15

    The Palomar High-precision Astrometric Search for Exoplanet Systems (PHASES) monitored 51 subarcsecond binary systems to evaluate whether tertiary companions as small as Jovian planets orbited either the primary or secondary stars, perturbing their otherwise smooth Keplerian motions. Twenty-one of those systems were observed 10 or more times and show no evidence of additional companions. A new algorithm is presented for identifying astrometric companions and establishing the (companion mass)-(orbital period) combinations that can be excluded from existence with high confidence based on the PHASES observations, and the regions of mass-period phase space being excluded are presented for 21 PHASES binaries.

  16. Status of DOE/JAERI collaborative program phase II and phase III capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, J.P.; Lenox, K.E.; Ioka, I.; Wakai, E.

    1997-04-01

    Significant progress has been made during the last year in the post-irradiation examinations (PIE) of the specimens from nine DOE ORNL/JAERI collaborative capsules and in the design and fabrication of four additional capsules. JP21, JP22, CTR-62, and CTR-63 were disassembled, JP20 tensile specimens were tested, and a variety of specimens from the RB-60J-1, 330J-1, and 400J-1 capsules were tested. Fabrication of RB-11J and 12J was completed and progress made in the matrix finalization and design of RB-10J and JP25.

  17. TAILORING INORGANIC SORBENTS FOR SRS STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDE SEPARATIONS: MODIFIED MONOSODIUM TITANATE PHASE III FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Hobbs, D.

    2010-09-01

    This document provides a final report of Phase III testing activities for the development of modified monosodium titanate (mMST), which exhibits improved strontium and actinide removal characteristics compared to the baseline MST material. The activities included characterization of the crystalline phases present at varying temperatures, solids settling characteristics, quantification of the peroxide content; evaluation of the post-synthesis gas release under different conditions; the extent of desorption of {sup 85}Sr, Np, and Pu under washing conditions; and the effects of age and radiation on the performance of the mMST. Key findings and conclusions include the following. The peroxide content of several mMST samples was determined using iodometric titration. The peroxide content was found to decrease with age or upon extended exposure to elevated temperature. A loss of peroxide was also measured after exposure of the material to an alkaline salt solution similar in composition to the simulated waste solution. To determine if the loss of peroxide with age affects the performance of the material, Sr and actinide removal tests were conducted with samples of varying age. The oldest sample (4 years and 8 months) did show lower Sr and Pu removal performance. When compared to the youngest sample tested (1 month), the oldest sample retained only 15% of the DF for Pu. Previous testing with this sample indicated no decrease in Pu removal performance up to an age of 30 months. No loss in Np removal performance was observed for any of the aged samples, and no uptake of uranium occurred at the typical sorbent loading of 0.2 g/L. Additional testing with a uranium only simulant and higher mMST loading (3.0 g/L) indicated a 10% increase of uranium uptake for a sample aged 3 years and 8 months when compared to the results of the same sample measured at an age of 1 year and 5 months. Performance testing with both baseline-MST and mMST that had been irradiated in a gamma source to

  18. Treatment of primary glioblastoma multiforme with cetuximab, radiotherapy and temozolomide (GERT) – phase I/II trial: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Combs, Stephanie E; Heeger, Steffen; Haselmann, Renate; Edler, Lutz; Debus, Jürgen; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela

    2006-01-01

    Background The implementation of combined radiochemotherapy (RCHT) with temozolomide (TMZ) has lead to a significant increase in overall survival times in patients with Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), however, outcome still remains unsatisfactory. The majority of GBMs show an overexpression and/or amplification of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Therefore, addition of EGFR-inhibition with cetuximab to the current standard treatment approach with radiotherapy and TMZ seems promising. Methods/design GERT is a one-armed single-center phase I/II trial. In a first step, dose-escalation of TMZ from 50 mg/m2 to 75 mg/m2 together with radiotherapy and cetuximab will be performed. Should safety be proven, the phase II trial will be initiated with the standard dose of 75 mg/m2 of TMZ. Cetuximab will be applied in the standard application dose of 400 mg/m2 in week 1, thereafter at a dose of 250 mg/m2 weekly. A total of 46 patients will be included into this phase I/II trial. Primary endpoints are feasibility and toxicity, secondary endpoints are overall and progression-free survival. An interim analysis will be performed after inclusion of 15 patients into the main study. Patients' enrolment will be performed over a period of 2 years. The observation time will end 2 years after inclusion of the last patient. Discussion The goal of this study is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of combined RCHT-immunotherapy with TMZ and cetuximab as first-line treatment for patients with primary GBM. PMID:16709245

  19. Phase III Preclinical Trials in Translational Stroke Research: Community Response on Framework and Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Boltze, Johannes; Wagner, Daniel-Christoph; Henninger, Nils; Plesnila, Nikolaus; Ayata, Cenk

    2016-08-01

    The multicenter phase III preclinical trial concept is currently discussed to enhance the predictive value of preclinical stroke research. After public announcement, we collected a community feedback on the concept with emphasis on potential design features and guidelines by an anonymous survey. Response analysis was conducted after plausibility checks by applying qualitative and quantitative measures. Most respondents supported the concept, including the implementation of a centralized steering committee. Based on received feedback, we suggest careful, stepwise implementation and to leave selected competencies and endpoint analysis at the discretion of participating centers. Strict application of quality assurance methods is accepted, but should be harmonized. However, received responses also indicate that the application of particular quality assurance models may require more attention throughout the community. Interestingly, clear and pragmatic preferences were given regarding publication and financing, suggesting the establishing of writing committees similar to large-scale clinical trials and global funding resources for financial support. The broad acceptance among research community encourages phase III preclinical trial implementation. PMID:27297402

  20. Effects of strongly selective additives on volume phase transition in gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uematsu, Yuki; Araki, Takeaki

    2012-07-01

    We investigate volume phase transition in gels immersed in mixture solvents, on the basis of a three-component Flory-Rehner theory. When the selectivity of the minority solvent component to the polymer network is strong, the gel tends to shrink with an increasing concentration of the additive, regardless of whether it is good or poor. This behavior originates from the difference of the additive concentration between inside and outside the gel. We also found the gap of the gel volume at the transition point can be controlled by adding the strongly selective solutes. By dissolving a strongly poor additive, for instance, the discontinuous volume phase transition can be extinguished. Furthermore, we observed that another volume phase transition occurs far from the original transition point. These behaviors can be well explained by a simplified theory neglecting the nonlinearity of the additive concentration.

  1. Nrf2-regulated phase-II detoxification enzymes and phase-III transporters are induced by thyroid hormone in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Cornejo, Pamela; Vargas, Romina; Videla, Luis A

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (T₃)-induced calorigenesis triggers the hepatic production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and redox-sensitive nuclear transcription factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) activation. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that in vivo T₃ administration upregulates the expression of phase II and III detoxification proteins that is controlled by Nrf2. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given a single intraperitoneal dose of 0.1 mg T₃/kg or T₃ vehicle (controls). After treatment, rectal temperature of the animals, liver Nrf2 DNA binding (EMSA), protein levels of epoxide hydrolase 1 (Eh1), NADPH-quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), glutathione-S-transferases Ya (GST Ya) and Yp (GST Yp), and multidrug resistance-associated proteins 2 (MRP-2) and 4 (MRP-4) (Western blot), and MRP-3 (RT-PCR) were determined at different times. T₃ significantly rose the rectal temperature of the animals in the time period studied, concomitantly with increases (P < 0.05) of liver Nrf2 DNA binding at 1 and 2 h after treatment, which was normalized at 4-12 h. Within 1-2 h after T₃ treatment, liver phase II enzymes Eh1, NQO1, GST Ya, and GST Yp were enhanced (P < 0.05) as did phase III transporters MRP-2 and MRP-3, whereas MRP-4 remained unchanged. In conclusion, enhancement of liver Nrf2 DNA binding elicited by in vivo T₃ administration is associated with upregulation of the expression of detoxification and drug transport proteins. These changes, in addition to antioxidant protein induction previously observed, may represent cytoprotective mechanisms underlying T₃ preconditioning against liver injury mediated by ROS and chemical toxicity. PMID:23554160

  2. Effect of phase III cardiac rehabilitation and relaxation on the quality of life in patients with cardiac syndrome X

    PubMed Central

    Feizi, Aram; Ghaderi, Chiman; Dehghani, Mohammad R.; Khalkhali, Hamid R.; Sheikhi, Siamak

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cardiac syndrome X is a relatively common disorder, and still not much is known about the causative factors or its pathophysiology, which makes it difficult to cure. Due to its chronic nature and debilitating symptoms, many patients have significantly reduced quality of life (QOL).The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of phase III cardiac rehabilitation (CR) and relaxation on the QOL of patients. Materials and Methods: This research is a randomized clinical trial study. Forty eligible and consenting women (age 30-65 years) were randomly assigned to four groups. In the first group (n = 11), progressive muscle relaxation (PMR); in the second group (n = 11), phase III CR; and in the third group (n = 11), PMR along with phase III CR were performed for 8 weeks at home. The fourth group (n = 7) was used as the control group. Short form of QOL questionnaire (SF-36) was used for data gathering. Data analysis was performed using χ2, Kruskal-Wallis, and rank sum difference tests. Results: After phase III CR, relaxation, and combination of CR and relaxation, patients demonstrated improved QOL (P < 0.001). The results of post-test multiple comparisons showed that there were statistically significant differences between control and all intervention groups (P < 0.05). There was also statistically significant difference between relaxation and combination of phase III CR and relaxation groups (P < 0.5). Conclusions: An 8-week phase III CR program together with relaxation improved QOL of patients with cardiac syndrome X. We suggest phase III CR program together with relaxation as an effective treatment in these patients. PMID:23922604

  3. Hepatocellular carcinoma: reasons for phase III failure and novel perspectives on trial design.

    PubMed

    Llovet, Josep M; Hernandez-Gea, Virginia

    2014-04-15

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a major health problem. Most patients with HCC experience a recurrence after resection/ablation or are diagnosed at advanced stages. Sorafenib remains the only approved systemic drug for these patients. Molecular therapies targeting signaling cascades involved in hepatocarcinogenesis have been explored in phase III clinical trials. However, none of the drugs tested have shown positive results in the first-line (brivanib, sunitinib, erlotinib, and linifanib) or second-line (brivanib, everolimus) setting after sorafenib progression. Reasons for failure are heterogeneous and include lack of understanding of critical drivers of tumor progression/dissemination, liver toxicity, flaws in trial design, or marginal antitumoral potency. These trials are also challenging time to progression as a surrogate endpoint of survival. Trials ongoing testing drugs head-to-head versus sorafenib in "all comers" might have difficulties in achieving superior results in the first line. Novel trials are also designed testing drugs in biomarker-based subpopulations of patients with HCC. Most common mutations, however, are undruggable, such as p53 and CTNNB1. Two types of studies are proposed: (i) phase II pivotal proof-of-concept studies testing drugs blocking potential oncogenic addiction loops, such as the one testing MEK inhibitors in RAS(+) patients or amplification of FGF19 as a target; and (ii) phase II to III studies using biomarker-based trial enrichment for defining HCC subpopulations, such as the case of enriching for MET-positive tumors. These strategies have been deemed successful in breast, melanoma, and lung cancers, and are expected to change the landscape of trial design of HCC. PMID:24589894

  4. Oxidative Addition to Gold(I) by Photoredox Catalysis: Straightforward Access to Diverse (C,N)-Cyclometalated Gold(III) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Tlahuext-Aca, Adrian; Hopkinson, Matthew N; Daniliuc, Constantin G; Glorius, Frank

    2016-08-01

    Herein, we report the oxidative addition of aryldiazonium salts to ligand-supported gold(I) complexes under visible light photoredox conditions. This method provides experimental evidence for the involvement of such a process in dual gold/photoredox-catalyzed reactions and delivers well-defined (C,N)-cyclometalated gold(III) species. The remarkably mild reaction conditions and the ability to widely vary the ancillary ligand make this method a potentially powerful synthetic tool to access diverse gold(III) complexes for systematic studies into their properties and reactivity. Initial studies show that these species can undergo chloride abstraction to afford Lewis acidic dicationic gold(III) species. PMID:27338119

  5. A new ion imprinted polymer based on Ru(III)-thiobarbituric acid complex for solid phase extraction of ruthenium(III) prior to its determination by ETAAS.

    PubMed

    Zambrzycka, Elżbieta; Godlewska-Żyłkiewicz, Beata

    2014-01-01

    A new ruthenium ion imprinted polymer was prepared from the Ru(III) 2-thiobarbituric acid complex (the template), methacrylic acid or acrylamide (the functional monomers), and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (the cross-linking agent) using 2,2'-azobisisobutyronitrile as the radical initiator. The ion imprinted polymer was characterized and used as a selective sorbent for the solid phase extraction of Ru(III) ions. The effects of type of functional monomer, sample volume, solution pH and flow rate on the extraction efficiency were studied in the dynamic mode. Ru(III) ion was quantitatively retained on the sorbents in the pH range from 3.5 to 10, and can be eluted with 4 mol L(-1) aqueous ammonia. The affinity of Ru(III) for the ion imprinted polymer based on the acrylamide monomer is weaker than that for the polymer based on the methacrylic acid monomer, which therefore was used in interference studies and in analytical applications. Following extraction of Ru(III) ions with the imprint and their subsequent elution from the polymer with aqueous ammonia, Ru(III) was detected by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with a detection limit of 0.21 ng mL(-1). The method was successfully applied to the determination of trace amounts of Ru(III) in water, waste, road dust and platinum ore (CRM SARM 76) with a reproducibility (expressed as RSD) below 6.4 %. FigureThe new ion imprinted polymer was prepared and used for the separation of ruthenium from water and most complex environmental samples, such as road dust and platinum ore (CRM SARM 76) prior ETAAS determination. PMID:24966442

  6. How to improve the clinical development paradigm and its division into phases I, II and III.

    PubMed

    Bamberger, Marion; Moore, Nicholas; Lechat, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Based on the observation that over the last 30 years the cost of development has risen regularly as the number of new chemical entities reaching the market has fallen, how can "savings" be made in terms of clinical development, the objective being more rapid access to a drug for medical needs that are not covered? Several instruments exist to enable innovative products to be made available more quickly: temporary use authorisations, which are not concerned by this work (ATUs), conditional marketing authorisations (MAs) and MAs under exceptional circumstances. These aspects have been taken up in the European medicines agency (EMA)'s "Road Map", which states "A key issue for Regulators will be if a more "staggered" approval should be envisaged, characterised by a better defined/more restricted population of good responders, followed by a broadening of the population post-authorisation when more "real life" data are available. In addition, maximising the value of information generated in the post-authorisation phase should be developed through the use of cohorts and other prospectively collected use data, especially in the case of conditional marketing authorisations." The rules of procedure of the Transparency Commission for their part provide for the notion of preliminary examination: in order to prepare as best as possible the examination of dossiers of products assumed to be innovative and to limit delays, the office can undertake a preliminary study as soon as the dossier has been filed at the Committee for medicinal products for human use (CHMP). It may, at this time, request the firm to provide further information and may call on external experts. The implementation of this preliminary study does not exonerate the firm of the obligation of filing a complete dossier. The post inscription studies requested by the Transparency Commission (ISPEP - public health benefit and post-marketing studies) are usually requested in the case of hesitations regarding the level

  7. Effect of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Sacral Chordoma: Results of Phase I-II and Phase II Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, Reiko; Kamada, Tadashi; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Sugawara, Shinji; Serizawa, Itsuko; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tatezaki, Shin-ichiro

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To summarize the results of treatment for sacral chordoma in Phase I-II and Phase II carbon ion radiotherapy trials for bone and soft-tissue sarcomas. Patients and Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 38 patients with medically unresectable sacral chordomas treated with the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, Japan between 1996 and 2003. Of the 38 patients, 30 had not received previous treatment and 8 had locally recurrent tumor after previous resection. The applied carbon ion dose was 52.8-73.6 Gray equivalents (median, 70.4) in a total of 16 fixed fractions within 4 weeks. Results: The median patient age was 66 years. The cranial tumor extension was S2 or greater in 31 patients. The median clinical target volume was 523 cm{sup 3}. The median follow-up period was 80 months. The 5-year overall survival rate was 86%, and the 5-year local control rate was 89%. After treatment, 27 of 30 patients with primary tumor remained ambulatory with or without supportive devices. Two patients experienced severe skin or soft-tissue complications requiring skin grafts. Conclusion: Carbon ion radiotherapy appears effective and safe in the treatment of patients with sacral chordoma and offers a promising alternative to surgery.

  8. Population pharmacokinetics of imatinib mesylate in patients with chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukaemia: results of a phase III study

    PubMed Central

    Schmidli, H; Peng, B; Riviere, G-J; Capdeville, R; Hensley, M; Gathmann, I; Bolton, A E; Racine-Poon, A

    2005-01-01

    Aims This study was designed to investigate the biochemical and physiological covariates or comedications that affect the pharmacokinetics of imatinib mesylate in patients with chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukaemia (CP CML). Methods Pharmacokinetic data were analyzed in 371 patients receiving 400 mg imatinib once daily during a phase III trial of imatinib vs interferon-alfa plus cytarabine for the treatment of newly diagnosed CP CML. Covariates included age, weight, sex, ethnicity, haemoglobin (Hb) concentration, white blood cell (WBC) count, liver function, and creatinine concentration. Blood samples for imatinib analysis were taken on treatment days 1 and 29. Nonlinear mixed effects modelling was used for the population pharmacokinetic analysis. Results Population mean estimates (95% confidence interval) at day 1 for apparent clearance (CL) and apparent volume of distribution (V) of imatinib were 14 (13–15) l h−1 and 252 (237–267) l, respectively. Modelling suggested that CL decreased by 4 (3-5) l h−1 from day 1 to day 29, whereas V remained unchanged. Interindividual variability in CL and V was 32% and 31%, respectively. Weight, Hb, and WBC count demonstrated small effects on CL and V. Doubling body weight or Hb or halving the WBC count was associated with a 12%, 86% and 8% increase in CL, respectively, and a 32%, 60% and 5% increase in V, respectively. Comedications showed no clear effects on imatinib CL. Conclusions Population covariates and coadministered drugs minimally affected imatinib pharmacokinetics in newly diagnosed CP CML patients. PMID:15963092

  9. Laser induced chemical vapor phase epitaxial growth of III-V semiconductor films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Shirley S.; Chu, Ting L.

    1991-05-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate the homo- and hetero-epitaxial growth of device quality III-V semiconductor films by the free electron laser (FEL) induced growth at lower temperatures. An ArF excimer laser was used in this investigation. Metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) is the commonly used technique in the growth of III-V compounds and alloys. The major concern to the use of MOVPE is the hazard involved in using highly toxic arsine and phosphine gases as the group V source materials. Efforts during this period have been focused to the homoepitaxial growth of GaAs and heteroepitaxial growth of InP on GaAs using alternate sources to eliminate the use of arsine and phosphine. Good quality epitaxial GaAs films have been prepared from elemental arsenic for the first time by either conventional substrate heating or laser enhanced processes. The epitaxial GaAs films grown from elemental arsenic are suitable for many GaAs based devices, particularly for large area devices such as solar cells. Significant cost reduction and less stringent safety requirements are major advantages.

  10. Structural and phase transformation of A{sup III}B{sup V}(100) semiconductor surface in interaction with selenium

    SciTech Connect

    Bezryadin, N. N.; Kotov, G. I. Kuzubov, S. V.

    2015-03-15

    Surfaces of GaAs(100), InAs(100), and GaP(100) substrates thermally treated in selenium vapor have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy and electron probe X-ray microanalysis. Some specific features and regularities of the formation of A{sub 3}{sup III}B{sub 4}{sup VI} (100)c(2 × 2) surface phases and thin layers of gallium or indium selenides A{sub 2}{sup III}B{sub 3}{sup VI} (100) on surfaces of different A{sup III}B{sup V}(100) semiconductors are discussed within the vacancy model of surface atomic structure.

  11. Lunar exploration phase III: Launch window and trajectory design for a lunar lander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingyang; Yang, Hongwei; Baoyin, Hexi

    2015-09-01

    The lunar exploration phase III mission is a part of the China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation's lunar exploration program that will perform a soft-landing and sample return from the Moon to test the key technologies that are required for human lunar missions. This paper focuses primarily on the trajectory design and orbital launch window generation for a lunar probe that are consistent with the constraints imposed by third phase of lunar exploration. Two categories of trajectories are explored: Earth-to-Moon and Moon-to-Earth. With the patched conic technique, the analytical and modified analytical models of the transfer trajectories are developed. The requirement of high-latitude landing for the return phase trajectory is considered in the modified model. By varying the initial input conditions and with a fast convergence iteration scheme, different characteristics of the transfer trajectory are generated. The orbital launch windows are established to study the mission sensitivities to time and fuel consumption and to provide a launch timetable that is compatible with this mission's requirements. The lunar surface stay time is analyzed for different conditions. The high-fidelity gravitational model is introduced to demonstrate the accuracy and convergence behavior of the analytical solution. The design method can also be used as a basis for the future human lunar missions.

  12. Double phase-retarder set-up at beamline P09 at PETRA III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francoual, S.; Strempfer, J.; Reuther, D.; Shukla, D. K.; Skaugen, A.

    2013-03-01

    Beamline P09 at PETRA III, DESY, is designed for general diffraction and resonant X-ray scattering experiments at low temperatures and high magnetic fields. The dependence of the X-ray cross-sections (Thomson, non-resonant magnetic, resonant exchange scattering, ATS) on the polarization state of the incident X-rays is an important property that one might want to capitalize on in a diffraction experiment. To that purpose, P09 is equipped with a double phase-retarder and diamond phase-plates making for the production of linearly and circularly polarized X-rays in the energy range between 3.5 and 8.5 keV as yet. Here we describe the double phase-retarder setup at P09, its principles of operation and its performances with respect to the generation of linearly polarized incident X-rays rotated by a variable angle η around the X-ray beam using two quarter-wave plates in series or a single half-wave plate.

  13. Investor Outlook: Significance of the Positive LCA2 Gene Therapy Phase III Results.

    PubMed

    Schimmer, Joshua; Breazzano, Steven

    2015-12-01

    Spark Therapeutics recently reported positive phase III results for SPK-RPE65 targeting the treatment of visual impairment caused by RPE65 gene mutations (often referred to as Leber congenital amaurosis type 2, or LCA2, but may include other retinal disorders), marking an important inflection point for the field of gene therapy. The results highlight the ability to successfully design and execute a randomized trial of a gene therapy and also reinforce the potentially predictive nature of early preclinical and clinical data. The results are expected to pave the way for the first approved gene therapy product in the United States and should sustain investor interest and confidence in gene therapy for many approaches, including retina targeting and beyond. PMID:26684444

  14. Runaway electron damage to the Tore Supra Phase III outboard pump limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Nygren, R.; Lutz, T.; Walsh, D.; Martin, G.; Chatelier, M.; Loarer, T.; Guilhem, D.

    1996-08-01

    Operation of the Phase III outboard pump limiter (OPL) in Tore Supra in 1994 was terminated prematurely when runaway electrons during the current decay following a disruption pierced leading edge tube on the electron side and caused a water leak. The location, about 20 mm outside the last closed flux surface during normal operation, and the infrared (IR) images of the limiter indicate that the runaways moved in large outward steps, i.e. tens of millimeters, in one toroidal revolution. For plasma (runaway) currents in the range of 155 to 250 kA, the drift orbits open to the outside. Basic trajectory computations suggest that such motion is possible under the conditions present for this experiment. Activation measurements made on sections of the tube to indicate the area of local damage are presented here. An understanding of this event may provide important guidance regarding the potential damage from runaways in future tokamaks.

  15. Objective Lightning Probability Forecasting for Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Phase III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Winifred C.

    2010-01-01

    The AMU created new logistic regression equations in an effort to increase the skill of the Objective Lightning Forecast Tool developed in Phase II (Lambert 2007). One equation was created for each of five sub-seasons based on the daily lightning climatology instead of by month as was done in Phase II. The assumption was that these equations would capture the physical attributes that contribute to thunderstorm formation more so than monthly equations. However, the SS values in Section 5.3.2 showed that the Phase III equations had worse skill than the Phase II equations and, therefore, will not be transitioned into operations. The current Objective Lightning Forecast Tool developed in Phase II will continue to be used operationally in MIDDS. Three warm seasons were added to the Phase II dataset to increase the POR from 17 to 20 years (1989-2008), and data for October were included since the daily climatology showed lightning occurrence extending into that month. None of the three methods tested to determine the start of the subseason in each individual year were able to discern the start dates with consistent accuracy. Therefore, the start dates were determined by the daily climatology shown in Figure 10 and were the same in every year. The procedures used to create the predictors and develop the equations were identical to those in Phase II. The equations were made up of one to three predictors. TI and the flow regime probabilities were the top predictors followed by 1-day persistence, then VT and Ll. Each equation outperformed four other forecast methods by 7-57% using the verification dataset, but the new equations were outperformed by the Phase II equations in every sub-season. The reason for the degradation may be due to the fact that the same sub-season start dates were used in every year. It is likely there was overlap of sub-season days at the beginning and end of each defined sub-season in each individual year, which could very well affect equation

  16. Malate metabolism in Hoya carnosa mitochondria and its role in photosynthesis during CAM phase III.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hoang Thi Kim; Nose, Akihiro; Agarie, Sakae; Yoshida, Takayuki

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the respiratory properties and the role of the mitochondria isolated from one phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK)-CAM plant, Hoya carnosa, in malate metabolism during CAM phase III. The mitochondria showed high malate dehydrogenase (mMDH) and aspartate amino transferase (mAST), and a significant amount of malic enzyme (mME) activities. H. carnosa readily oxidized malate via mME and mMDH in the presence of some cofactors such as thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP), coenzyme A (CoA) or NAD(+). A high respiration rate of malate oxidation was observed at pH 7.2 with NAD(+) and glutamate (Glu). Providing AST and Glu simultaneously into the respiratory medium strongly increased the rates of malate oxidation, and this oxidation was gradually inhibited by an inhibitor of alpha-ketoglutarate (alpha-KG) carrier, pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP). The mitochondria readily oxidized aspartate (Asp) or alpha-KG individually with low rates, while they oxidized Asp and alpha-KG simultaneously with high rates, and this simultaneous oxidation was also inhibited by PLP. By measuring the capacity of the mitochondrial shuttle, it was found that the OAA produced via mMDH seemed not to be transported outside the mitochondria, but mAST interconverted OAA and Glu to Asp and alpha-KG, respectively, and exported them out via a malate-aspartate (malate-Asp) shuttle. The data in this research suggest that during phase III of PCK-CAM, H. carnosa mitochondria oxidized malate via both mME and the mMDH systems depending on metabolic requirements. However, malate metabolism by the mMDH system did not operate via a malate-OAA shuttle similarly to Ananas comosus mitochondria, but it operated via a malate-Asp shuttle similarly to Kalanchoë daigremontiana mitochondria. PMID:18403382

  17. Unbiased estimation in seamless phase II/III trials with unequal treatment effect variances and hypothesis-driven selection rules.

    PubMed

    Robertson, David S; Prevost, A Toby; Bowden, Jack

    2016-09-30

    Seamless phase II/III clinical trials offer an efficient way to select an experimental treatment and perform confirmatory analysis within a single trial. However, combining the data from both stages in the final analysis can induce bias into the estimates of treatment effects. Methods for bias adjustment developed thus far have made restrictive assumptions about the design and selection rules followed. In order to address these shortcomings, we apply recent methodological advances to derive the uniformly minimum variance conditionally unbiased estimator for two-stage seamless phase II/III trials. Our framework allows for the precision of the treatment arm estimates to take arbitrary values, can be utilised for all treatments that are taken forward to phase III and is applicable when the decision to select or drop treatment arms is driven by a multiplicity-adjusted hypothesis testing procedure. © 2016 The Authors. Statistics in Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:27103068

  18. Room temperature ionic liquids enhanced the speciation of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) by hollow fiber liquid phase microextraction combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Chujie; Lin, Yao; Zhou, Neng; Zheng, Jiaoting; Zhang, Wei

    2012-10-30

    A new method for the speciation of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) based on enhancement effect of room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) for hollow fiber liquid phase microextraction (HF-LPME) combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) was developed. Room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) and diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) were used enhancement reagents and chelating reagent, respectively. The addition of room temperature ionic liquids led to 3.5 times improvement in the determination of Cr(VI). In this method, Cr(VI) reacts with DDTC yielding a hydrophobic complex, which is subsequently extracted into the lumen of hollow fiber, whereas Cr(III) is remained in aqueous solutions. The extraction organic phase was injected into FAAS for the determination of Cr(VI). Total Cr concentration was determined after oxidizing Cr(III) to Cr(VI) in the presence of KMnO(4) and using the extraction procedure mentioned above. Cr(III) was calculated by subtracting of Cr(VI) from the total Cr. Under optimized conditions, a detection limit of 0.7 ng mL(-1) and an enrichment factor of 175 were achieved. The relative standard deviation (RSD) was 4.9% for Cr(VI) (40 ng mL(-1), n=5). The proposed method was successfully applied to the speciation of chromium in natural water samples with satisfactory results. PMID:22981284

  19. On estimating the phase of periodic waveform in additive Gaussian noise, part 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, L. L.

    1984-11-01

    Motivated by advances in signal processing technology that support more complex algorithms, a new look is taken at the problem of estimating the phase and other parameters of a periodic waveform in additive Gaussian noise. The general problem was introduced and the maximum a posteriori probability criterion with signal space interpretation was used to obtain the structures of optimum and some suboptimum phase estimators for known constant frequency and unknown constant phase with an a priori distribution. Optimal algorithms are obtained for some cases where the frequency is a parameterized function of time with the unknown parameters and phase having a joint a priori distribution. In the last section, the intrinsic and extrinsic geometry of hypersurfaces is introduced to provide insight to the estimation problem for the small noise and large noise cases.

  20. The costs and effectiveness of large Phase III pre-licensure vaccine clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Black, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Prior to the 1980s, most vaccines were licensed based upon safety and effectiveness studies in several hundred individuals. Beginning with the evaluation of Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines, much larger pre-licensure trials became common. The pre-licensure trial for Haemophilus influenzae oligosaccharide conjugate vaccine had more than 60,000 children and that of the seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine included almost 38,000 children. Although trial sizes for both of these studies were driven by the sample size required to demonstrate efficacy, the sample size requirements for safety evaluations of other vaccines have subsequently increased. With the demonstration of an increased risk of intussusception following the Rotashield brand rotavirus vaccine, this trend has continued. However, routinely requiring safety studies of 20,000-50,000 or more participants has two major downsides. First, the cost of performing large safety trials routinely prior to licensure of a vaccine is very large, with some estimates as high at US$200 million euros for one vaccine. This high financial cost engenders an opportunity cost whereby the number of vaccines that a company is willing or able to develop to meet public health needs becomes limited by this financial barrier. The second downside is that in the pre-licensure setting, such studies are very time consuming and delay the availability of a beneficial vaccine substantially. One might argue that in some situations, this financial commitment is warranted such as for evaluations of the risk of intussusception following newer rotavirus vaccines. However, it must be noted that while an increased risk of intussusception was not identified in large pre-licensure studies, in post marketing evaluations an increased risk of this outcome has been identified. Thus, even the extensive pre-licensure evaluations conducted did not identify an associated risk. The limitations of large Phase III trials have also been

  1. Swelling of Bicontinuous Cubic Phases in Guerbet Glycolipid: Effects of Additives.

    PubMed

    Salim, Malinda; Wan Iskandar, Wan Farah Nasuha; Patrick, Melonney; Zahid, N Idayu; Hashim, Rauzah

    2016-06-01

    Inverse bicontinuous cubic phases of lyotropic liquid crystal self-assembly have received much attention in biomedical, biosensing, and nanotechnology applications. An Ia3d bicontinuous cubic based on the gyroid G-surface can be formed by the Guerbet synthetic glucolipid 2-hexyl-decyl-β-d-glucopyranoside (β-Glc-OC6C10) in excess water. The small water channel diameter of this cubic phase could provide nanoscale constraints in encapsulation of large molecules and crystallization of membrane proteins, hence stresses the importance of water channel tuning ability. This work investigates the swelling behavior of lyotropic self-assembly of β-Glc-OC6C10 which could be controlled and modulated by different surfactants as a hydration-modulating agent. Our results demonstrate that addition of nonionic glycolipid octyl-β-d-glucopyranoside (β-Glc-OC8) at 20 and 25 mol % gives the largest attainable cubic water channel diameter of ca. 62 Å, and formation of coacervates which may be attributed to a sponge phase were seen at 20 mol % octyl-β-d-maltopyranoside (β-Mal-OC8). Swelling of the cubic water channel can also be attained in charged surfactant-doped systems dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate (AOT) and hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), of which phase transition occurred from cubic to a lamellar phase. Destabilization of the cubic phase to an inverse hexagonal phase was observed when a high amount of charged lecithin (LEC) and stearylamine (SA) was added to the lipid self-assembly. PMID:27183393

  2. A randomized phase III trial comparing S-1 versus UFT as adjuvant chemotherapy for stage II/III rectal cancer (JFMC35-C1: ACTS-RC)

    PubMed Central

    Oki, E.; Murata, A.; Yoshida, K.; Maeda, K.; Ikejiri, K.; Munemoto, Y.; Sasaki, K.; Matsuda, C.; Kotake, M.; Suenaga, T.; Matsuda, H.; Emi, Y.; Kakeji, Y.; Baba, H.; Hamada, C.; Saji, S.; Maehara, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds Preventing distant recurrence and achieving local control are important challenges in rectal cancer treatment, and use of adjuvant chemotherapy has been studied. However, no phase III study comparing adjuvant chemotherapy regimens for rectal cancer has demonstrated superiority of a specific regimen. We therefore conducted a phase III study to evaluate the superiority of S-1 to tegafur–uracil (UFT), a standard adjuvant chemotherapy regimen for curatively resected stage II/III rectal cancer in Japan, in the adjuvant setting for rectal cancer. Patients and methods The ACTS-RC trial was an open-label, randomized, phase III superiority trial conducted at 222 sites in Japan. Patients aged 20–80 with stage II/III rectal cancer undergoing curative surgery without preoperative therapy were randomly assigned to receive UFT (500–600 mg/day on days 1–5, followed by 2 days rest) or S-1 (80–120 mg/day on days 1–28, followed by 14 days rest) for 1 year. The primary end point was relapse-free survival (RFS), and the secondary end points were overall survival and adverse events. Results In total, 961 patients were enrolled from April 2006 to March 2009. The primary analysis was conducted in 480 assigned to receive UFT and 479 assigned to receive S-1. Five-year RFS was 61.7% [95% confidence interval (CI) 57.1% to 65.9%] for UFT and 66.4% (95% CI 61.9% to 70.5%) for S-1 [P = 0.0165, hazard ratio (HR): 0.77, 95% CI 0.63–0.96]. Five-year survival was 80.2% (95% CI 76.3% to 83.5%) for UFT and 82.0% (95% CI 78.3% to 85.2%) for S-1. The main grade 3 or higher adverse events were increased alanine aminotransferase and diarrhea (each 2.3%) in the UFT arm and anorexia, diarrhea (each 2.6%), and fatigue (2.1%) in the S-1 arm. Conclusion One-year S-1 treatment is superior to UFT with respect to RFS and has therefore become a standard adjuvant chemotherapy regimen for stage II/III rectal cancer following curative resection. PMID:27056996

  3. Simulations using a drug-disease modeling framework and phase II data predict phase III survival outcome in first-line non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Claret, L; Lu, J-F; Bruno, R; Hsu, C-P; Hei, Y-J; Sun, Y-N

    2012-11-01

    Simulations were performed for carboplatin/paclitaxel (C/P) plus motesanib or bevacizumab vs. C/P as first-line treatment for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) using a published drug-disease model. With 700 patients in each arm, simulated hazard ratios for motesanib (0.87; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.71-1.1) and bevacizumab (0.89; 95% CI, 0.73-1.1) agreed with results from the respective phase III studies but did not discriminate between failed and successful studies. The current model may require further enhancement to improve its utility for predicting phase III outcomes. PMID:22910440

  4. Phase III Drilling Operations at the Long Valley Exploratory Well (LVF 51-20)

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, R.D.

    1999-06-01

    During July-September, 1998, a jointly funded drilling operation deepened the Long Valley Exploratory Well from 7178 feet to 9832 feet. This was the third major drilling phase of a project that began in 1989, but had sporadic progress because of discontinuities in tiding. Support for Phase III came from the California Energy Commission (CEC), the International Continental Drilling Program (ICDP), the US Geological Survey (USGS), and DOE. Each of these agencies had a somewhat different agenda: the CEC wants to evaluate the energy potential (specifically energy extraction from magma) of Long Valley Caldera; the ICDP is studying the evolution and other characteristics of young, silicic calderas; the USGS will use this hole as an observatory in their Volcano Hazards program; and the DOE, through Sandia, has an opportunity to test new geothermal tools and techniques in a realistic field environment. This report gives a description of the equipment used in drilling and testing; a narrative of the drilling operations; compiled daily drilling reports; cost information on the project; and a brief summary of engineering results related to equipment performance and energy potential. Detailed description of the scientific results will appear in publications by the USGS and other researchers.

  5. Effect of addition of palladium on properties of Ag2Hg3 (gamma 1) phase.

    PubMed

    Chern Lin, J H; Lee, H C; Ju, C P

    1997-07-01

    The effect of palladium addition on the microstructure, compressive strength, creep rate and mercury release rate of Ag2Hg3 (gamma 1) phase was evaluated. Experimental results indicated that fairly pure gamma 1 phase could be fabricated using the present trituration method. The heat treatment of gamma 1 at 90 degrees C increased porosity level, increased dimensional shrinkage, increased mercury vapour release and enhanced the formation of beta1 phase. Addition of palladium in gamma 1 slowed down the amalgamation reaction, largely suppressed the phase transition to beta1 and caused a slight shift in open circuit potential toward the anodic direction. Although the overall anodic polarization profiles did not show a significant effect of palladium, scanning electron microscopy revealed morphological differences between pure and palladium-containing gamma 1. Addition of palladium in gamma 1 also increased compressive strength, increased creep resistance, and largely reduced both mercury vapour and ion release rates. Considering overall performance, the optimal palladium content in gamma 1 seems to be in the range between 0.50 and 0.75 wt%. PMID:9199764

  6. Erythropoietin Neuroprotection in Neonatal Cardiac Surgery: A Phase I/II Safety and Efficacy Trial

    PubMed Central

    Andropoulos, Dean B.; Brady, Ken; Easley, R. Blaine; Dickerson, Heather A.; Voigt, Robert G.; Shekerdemian, Lara S.; Meador, Marcie R.; Eisenman, Carol A.; Hunter, Jill V.; Turcich, Marie; Rivera, Carlos; McKenzie, E. Dean; Heinle, Jeffrey S.; Fraser, Charles D.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Neonates undergoing complex congenital heart surgery have a significant incidence of neurological problems. Erythropoietin has anti-apoptotic, anti-excitatory, and anti-inflammatory properties to prevent neuronal cell death in animal models, and improves neurodevelopmental outcomes in full term neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. We designed a prospective phase I/II trial of erythropoietin neuroprotection in neonatal cardiac surgery to assess safety, and indicate efficacy. Methods Neonates undergoing surgery for D-transposition of the great vessels, hypoplastic left heart syndrome, or aortic arch reconstruction were randomized to 3 perioperative doses of erythropoietin, or placebo. Neurodevelopmental testing with Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development III was performed at age 12 months. Results 59 patients received study drug. Safety profile, including MRI brain injury, clinical events, and death, was not different between groups. 3 patients in each group died. 42 patients (22 erythropoietin, 20 placebo, 79% of survivors) returned for 12-month follow-up. The mean Cognitive Scores were erythropoietin, 101.1 ± 13.6, placebo, 106.3 ± 10.8 (p=0.19); Language Scores were erythropoietin 88.5 ± 12.8, placebo 92.4 ± 12.4 (p=0.33); and Motor Scores were erythropoietin 89.9 ± 12.3, placebo 92.6 ± 14.1, (p=0.51). Conclusions Safety profile for erythropoietin administration was not different than placebo. Neurodevelopmental outcomes were not different between groups, however this pilot study was not powered to definitively address this outcome. Lessons learned from the current study suggest optimized study design features for a larger prospective trial to definitively address the utility of erythropoietin for neuroprotection in this population. PMID:23102686

  7. The inactive-active phase transition in the noisy additive (exclusive-or) probabilistic cellular automaton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonça, J. Ricardo G.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the inactive-active phase transition in an array of additive (exclusive-or) cellular automata (CA) under noise. The model is closely related with the Domany-Kinzel (DK) probabilistic cellular automaton (PCA), for which there are rigorous as well as numerical estimates on the transition probabilities. Here, we characterize the critical behavior of the noisy additive cellular automaton by mean field analysis and finite-size scaling and show that its phase transition belongs to the directed percolation universality class of critical behavior. As a by-product of our analysis, we argue that the critical behavior of the noisy elementary CA 90 and 102 (in Wolfram’s enumeration scheme) must be the same. We also perform an empirical investigation of the mean field equations to assess their quality and find that away from the critical point (but not necessarily very far away) the mean field approximations provide a reasonably good description of the dynamics of the PCA.

  8. Promising short-term clinical results of the cementless Oxford phase III medial unicondylar knee prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    van Dorp, Karin B; Breugem, Stefan JM; Bruijn, Daniël J; Driessen, Marcel JM

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the short-term clinical results of the Oxford phase III cementless medial unicondylar knee prosthesis (UKP) compared to the cemented medial UKP. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study in a tertairy orthopedic centre between the period of May 2010 and September 2012. We included 99 medial UKP in 97 patients and of these UKP, 53 were cemented and 46 were cementless. Clinical outcome was measured using a questionnaire, containing a visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain, Oxford Knee score, Kujala score and SF-12 score. Knee function was tested using the American Knee Society score. Complications, reoperations and revisions were recorded. Statistical significance was defined as a P value < 0.05. RESULTS: In a mean follow-up time of 19.5 mo, three cemented medial UKP were revised to a total knee prosthesis. Reasons for revision were malrotation of the tibial component, aseptic loosening of the tibial component and progression of osteoarthritis in the lateral- and patellofemoral compartment. In five patients a successful reoperation was performed, because of impingement or (sub)luxation of the polyethylene bearing. Patients with a reoperation were significant younger than patients in the primary group (56.7 vs 64.0, P = 0.01) and were more likely to be male (85.7% vs 38.8%, P = 0.015). Overall the cementless medial UKP seems to perform better, but the differences in clinical outcome are not significant; a VAS pain score of 7.4 vs 11.7 (P = 0.22), an Oxford Knee score of 43.3 vs 41.7 (P = 0.27) and a Kujala score of 79.6 vs 78.0 (P = 0.63). The American Knee Society scores were slightly better in the cementless group with 94.5 vs 90.2 (P = 0.055) for the objective score and 91.2 vs 87.8 (P = 0.25) for the subjective score. CONCLUSION: The cementless Oxford phase III medial UKP shows good short-term clinical results, when used in a specialist clinic by an experienced surgeon. PMID:27114932

  9. Georgetown University Integrated Community Energy System (GU-ICES). Phase III, Stage I: feasibility analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, Victor

    1980-10-01

    Candidate energy alternatives are analyzed in Phase III, Stage I, and the appendices are presented for the feasibility analysis. Information in eight appendices includes the following: detailed statement of work; PEPCO rate schedules; cogeneration schemes; added coal, limestone, and ash storage; hot and cold thermal storage; absorption refrigeration; high temperature heat pumps; and life cycle cost analysis. (MCW)

  10. SPSP Phase III Recruiting, Selecting, and Developing Secure Power Systems Professionals: Behavioral Interview Guidelines by Job Roles

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neil, Lori Ross; Conway, T. J.; Tobey, D. H.; Greitzer, Frank L.; Dalton, Angela C.; Pusey, Portia K.

    2015-03-01

    The Secure Power Systems Professional Phase III final report was released last year which an appendix of Behavioral Interview Guidelines by Job Roles. This new report is that appendix broken out as a standalone document to assist utilities in recruiting and developing Secure Power Systems Professionals at their site.

  11. A Sequenced Instructional Program in Physical Education for the Handicapped, Phase III. Producing and Disseminating Demonstration Packages. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Dorothy B.; Avance, Lyonel D.

    Presented is a sequenced instructional program in physical education which constitutes the third of a three-phase, 4-year project, funded by Title III, for handicapped children, preschool through high school levels, in the Los Angeles Unified School District. Described are the project setting and the following accomplishments: a curriculum guide…

  12. Clinical phase I/II research on ultrasound thermo-chemotherapy in oral and maxillofacial-head and neck carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Guofeng; Ren, Guoxin; Guo, Wei; Chen, Yazhu

    2012-11-01

    The principle of a ultrasound thermo-chemotherapy instrument and the clinical phase I/II research on short-term and long-term therapeutic effect and main side-effect of ultrasound hyperthermia combined with chemotherapy in oral and maxillofacial-head & neck carcinoma by the instrument will be presented in this paper.

  13. 78 FR 73555 - Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill; Draft Programmatic and Phase III Early Restoration Plan and Draft...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-06

    ... Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill; Draft Programmatic and Phase III Early Restoration Plan and Draft Early... as a result of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The restoration alternatives are comprised of early... the Framework for Early Restoration Addressing Injuries Resulting from the Deepwater Horizon Oil...

  14. METHODS FOR AQUATIC TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION EVALUATIONS: PHASE III TOXICITY CONFIRMATION PROCEDURES FOR SAMPLES EXHIBITING ACUTE AND CHRONIC TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1989, the guidance document for acutely toxic effluents titled Methods for Aquatic Toxicity Identification Evaluations: Phase III Toxicity Confirmation Procedures was published (EPA, 1989D)This manual and its companion documents (EPA, 1991A; EPA, 1992; EPA, 1993A) are intended...

  15. Explorations of new phases in the Ga(III)/In(III)-Cu(II)-Se(IV)-O system.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fang; Lin, Qi-Pu; Yi, Fei-Yan; Mao, Jiang-Gao

    2009-07-20

    Four new gallium(III)/indium(III), copper(II), selenium(IV) oxides, namely, Ga(2)Cu(SeO(3))(4) (1), Ga(2)CuO(SeO(3))(3) (2), and M(2)Cu(3)(SeO(3))(6) (M = Ga 3, In 4), have been synthesized by hydrothermal or high-temperature solid-state reactions. The structure of Ga(2)Cu(SeO(3))(4) (1) features a 2D layer of corner-sharing GaO(6) and CuO(6) octahedra with the SeO(3) groups hanging on both sides of the 2D layer. Ga(2)CuO(SeO(3))(3) (2) features a pillared layered structure in which the 1D Cu(SeO(3))(3)(4-) chains act as the pillars between 2D layers formed by corner- and edge-sharing GaO(n) (n = 4, 5) polyhedra. Although the chemical compositions of M(2)Cu(3)(SeO(3))(6) (M = Ga 3, In 4) are comparable, they belong to two different structural types. Ga(2)Cu(3)(SeO(3))(6) (3) exhibits a pillared layered structure built by [Ga(2)Cu(3)(SeO(3))(4)](4+) thick layers with Se(3)O(3)(2-) groups as pillars. The structure of In(2)Cu(3)(SeO(3))(6) (4) features a 3D network composed of [In(2)(SeO(3))(2)](2+) layers and [Cu(3)(SeO(3))(4)](2-) layers interconnected through Se-O-Cu and In-O-Cu bridges, exhibiting 8-MR helical tunnels along the a-axis. Results of magnetic property measurements indicate that there are considerable antiferromagnetic interactions between copper(II) centers in Ga(2)CuO(SeO(3))(3) (2) and M(2)Cu(3)(SeO(3))(6) (M = Ga 3, In 4). Interestingly, Ga(2)Cu(3)(SeO(3))(6) (3) behaves as a weak ferromagnet below the critical temperature of T(c) = 15 K. Further magnetic studies indicate that the compound is a canted antiferromagnet with a large canting angle of about 7.1 degrees. PMID:20507114

  16. Full range complex spectral domain optical coherence tomography without additional phase shifters.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Bernhard; Pircher, Michael; Götzinger, Erich; Hitzenberger, Christoph K

    2007-10-01

    We demonstrate a new full range complex spectral domain optical coherence tomography (FRC SD-OCT) method. Other than FRC SD-OCT systems reported in literature, which employed devices such as electro-/acousto optic modulators or piezo-driven mirrors providing the phase modulations necessary for retrieval of the complex-valued signal, the system presented works without any additional phase shifting device. The required phase shift is introduced by the galvanometer scanner used for transversally scanning the sample beam. By means of a slight displacement of the probe beam with respect to the scanning mirror's pivot axis, the sample arm length and thus the phase is continuously modulated as the beam is scanned in lateral direction. From such modulated spectral data, the complex-valued data yielding a twofold increase of accessible depth range can be calculated using an algorithm based on the Hilbert transform. To demonstrate the performance of our method quantitative measurements of the suppression of mirror images as a function of induced phase shift were performed. In order to validate the FRC SD-OCT technique for high-speed imaging of biological tissue, we present full-range images of the human anterior chamber in vivo. PMID:19550607

  17. IMPROVEMENT TO PIPELINE COMPRESSOR ENGINE RELIABILITY THROUGH RETROFIT MICRO-PILOT IGNITION SYSTEM -- PHASE III

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Chase; Daniel Olsen; Ted Bestor

    2005-03-01

    This report documents the third year's effort towards a 3-year program conducted by the Engines & Energy Conversion Laboratory (EECL) at Colorado State University (CSU) to develop micropilot ignition systems for existing pipeline compressor engines. Research activities for the overall program were conducted with the understanding that the efforts are to result in a commercial product to capture and disseminate the efficiency and environmental benefits of this new technology. Commercially-available fuel injection products were identified and applied to the program where appropriate. This approach will minimize the overall time-to-market requirements, while meeting performance and cost criteria. Two earlier phases of development precede this report. The objective for Phase I was to demonstrate the feasibility of retrofit micropilot ignition (RMI) systems for large bore, slow speed engines operating at low compression ratios under laboratory conditions at the EECL. The objective for Phase II was to further develop and optimize the micropilot ignition system at the EECL for large bore, slow speed engines operating at low compression ratios. These laboratory results were enhanced, then verified via a field demonstration project during Phase III of the Micropilot Ignition program. An Implementation Team of qualified engine retrofit service providers was assembled to install the retrofit micropilot ignition system for an engine operated by El Paso Pipeline Group at a compressor station near Window Rock, Arizona. Testing of this demonstration unit showed that the same benefits identified by laboratory testing at CSU, i.e., reduced fuel consumption and exhaust emissions (NOx, THC, CO, and CH2O). Installation efforts at Window Rock were completed towards the end of the budget period, which did not leave sufficient time to complete the durability testing. These efforts are ongoing, with funding provided by El Paso Pipeline Group, and the results will be documented in a report

  18. Epitaxial growth of three dimensionally structured III-V photonic crystal via hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Qiye; Kim, Honggyu; Zhang, Runyu; Zuo, Jianmin; Braun, Paul V.; Sardela, Mauro; Balaji, Manavaimaran; Lourdudoss, Sebastian; Sun, Yan-Ting

    2015-12-14

    Three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals are one class of materials where epitaxy, and the resultant attractive electronic properties, would enable new functionalities for optoelectronic devices. Here we utilize self-assembled colloidal templates to fabricate epitaxially grown single crystal 3D mesostructured Ga{sub x}In{sub 1−x}P (GaInP) semiconductor photonic crystals using hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). The epitaxial relationship between the 3D GaInP and the substrate is preserved during the growth through the complex geometry of the template as confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. XRD reciprocal space mapping of the 3D epitaxial layer further demonstrates the film to be nearly fully relaxed with a negligible strain gradient. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy reflection measurement indicates the optical properties of the photonic crystal which agree with finite difference time domain simulations. This work extends the scope of the very few known methods for the fabrication of epitaxial III-V 3D mesostructured materials to the well-developed HVPE technique.

  19. Tier I ecological evaluation for phase III channel improvements to the John. F. Baldwin ship channel

    SciTech Connect

    Bienert, R.W.; Shreffler, D.K.; Word, J.Q.; Kohn, N.P.

    1994-05-01

    To assist the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) in determing whether the material from proposed dredging of the John F. Baldwin Ship Channel (JFBSC) is suitable for unrestricted, unconfined open-ocean disposal, Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) prepared this report. Based on these findings, sediments that would be removed during Phase III improvements to the JFBSC fail to meet the three suitability criteria for open-ocean disposal. Firstly, fine-grained sediments comprise a significant fraction of the bottom material in some areas of the channel, and this material is not exposed to high current or wave energy. Dredged material from the JFBSC is not being proposed for beach nourishment; therefore the second criterion is not met. JFBSC sediments do not meet the third criterion because, although they may be substantially similar to substrates at several of the proposed disposal sites, they are from an area that historically has experienced loading of contaminants, which toxicology studies have shown have the potential to result in acute toxicity or significant bioaccumulation.

  20. Phage idiotype vaccination: first phase I/II clinical trial in patients with multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Multiple myeloma is characterized by clonal expansion of B cells producing monoclonal immunoglobulins or fragments thereof, which can be detected in the serum and/or urine and are ideal target antigens for patient-specific immunotherapies. Methods Using phage particles as immunological carriers, we employed a novel chemically linked idiotype vaccine in a clinical phase I/II trial including 15 patients with advanced multiple myeloma. Vaccines composed of purified paraproteins linked to phage were manufactured successfully for each patient. Patients received six intradermal immunizations with phage idiotype vaccines in three different dose groups. Results Phage idiotype was well tolerated by all study participants. A subset of patients (80% in the middle dose group) displayed a clinical response indicated by decrease or stabilization of paraprotein levels. Patients exhibiting a clinical response to phage vaccines also raised idiotype-specific immunoglobulins. Induction of a cellular immune response was demonstrated by a cytotoxicity assay and delayed type hypersensitivity tests. Conclusion We present a simple, time- and cost-efficient phage idiotype vaccination strategy, which represents a safe and feasible patient-specific therapy for patients with advanced multiple myeloma and produced promising anti-tumor activity in a subset of patients. PMID:24885819

  1. Reconstruction of genealogical relationships with applications to Phase III of HapMap

    PubMed Central

    Kyriazopoulou-Panagiotopoulou, Sofia; Kashef Haghighi, Dorna; Aerni, Sarah J.; Sundquist, Andreas; Bercovici, Sivan; Batzoglou, Serafim

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: Accurate inference of genealogical relationships between pairs of individuals is paramount in association studies, forensics and evolutionary analyses of wildlife populations. Current methods for relationship inference consider only a small set of close relationships and have limited to no power to distinguish between relationships with the same number of meioses separating the individuals under consideration (e.g. aunt–niece versus niece–aunt or first cousins versus great aunt–niece). Results: We present CARROT (ClAssification of Relationships with ROTations), a novel framework for relationship inference that leverages linkage information to differentiate between rotated relationships, that is, between relationships with the same number of common ancestors and the same number of meioses separating the individuals under consideration. We demonstrate that CARROT clearly outperforms existing methods on simulated data. We also applied CARROT on four populations from Phase III of the HapMap Project and detected previously unreported pairs of third- and fourth-degree relatives. Availability: Source code for CARROT is freely available at http://carrot.stanford.edu. Contact: sofiakp@stanford.edu PMID:21685089

  2. A decision-theoretic phase I-II design for ordinal outcomes in two cycles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juhee; Thall, Peter F; Ji, Yuan; Müller, Peter

    2016-04-01

    This paper is motivated by a phase I-II clinical trial of a targeted agent for advanced solid tumors. We study a stylized version of this trial with the goal to determine optimal actions in each of two cycles of therapy. A design is presented that generalizes the decision-theoretic two-cycle design of Lee and others (2015. Bayesian dose-finding in two treatment cycles based on the joint utility of efficacy and toxicity. Journal of the American Statistical Association, to appear) to accommodate ordinal outcomes. Backward induction is used to jointly optimize the actions taken for each patient in each of the two cycles, with the second action accounting for the patient's cycle 1 dose and outcomes. A simulation study shows that simpler designs obtained by dichotomizing the ordinal outcomes either perform very similarly to the proposed design, or have much worse performance in some scenarios. We also compare the proposed design with the simpler approaches of optimizing the doses in each cycle separately, or ignoring the distinction between cycles 1 and 2. PMID:26553915

  3. Epitaxial growth of three dimensionally structured III-V photonic crystal via hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qiye; Kim, Honggyu; Zhang, Runyu; Sardela, Mauro; Zuo, Jianmin; Balaji, Manavaimaran; Lourdudoss, Sebastian; Sun, Yan-Ting; Braun, Paul V.

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals are one class of materials where epitaxy, and the resultant attractive electronic properties, would enable new functionalities for optoelectronic devices. Here we utilize self-assembled colloidal templates to fabricate epitaxially grown single crystal 3D mesostructured GaxIn1-xP (GaInP) semiconductor photonic crystals using hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). The epitaxial relationship between the 3D GaInP and the substrate is preserved during the growth through the complex geometry of the template as confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. XRD reciprocal space mapping of the 3D epitaxial layer further demonstrates the film to be nearly fully relaxed with a negligible strain gradient. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy reflection measurement indicates the optical properties of the photonic crystal which agree with finite difference time domain simulations. This work extends the scope of the very few known methods for the fabrication of epitaxial III-V 3D mesostructured materials to the well-developed HVPE technique.

  4. Investigational drug tracking: phases I-III and NDA submissions--Part II.

    PubMed

    Grant, K L

    1994-10-01

    The author catalogs over 800 investigational drugs/biologicals currently in Phase I, II or III clinical trials or drugs/biologicals submitted to the FDA as new drug applications. Part I of this article appeared in the September issue of Hospital Pharmacy. The list assists in predicting when new drugs will be marketed. The entries include generic/chemical name, investigational drug number, synonyms, trade names, manufacturers, clinical trial status, predicted approval year, indications or drug class, whether the drug has been developed through biotechnology, and references. Entries were gleaned from medical journals, stock market analysis publications, and the Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association's Medicines in Development Series. The list is alphabetized by the generic/chemical name or investigational drug number and cross-indexed by the trade name and synonyms. The list reflects those drugs which were not FDA approved as of April 15, 1994. Part I concludes with the remaining alphabetical listing by generic/chemical name or investigational drug number. PMID:10137850

  5. Synthesis and structural characterization of new bismuth (III) nano coordination polymer: A precursor to produce pure phase nano-sized bismuth (III) oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanifehpour, Younes; Mirtamizdoust, Babak; Hatami, Masoud; Khomami, Bamin; Joo, Sang Woo

    2015-07-01

    A novel bismuth (III) nano coordination polymer, {[Bi (pcih)(NO3)2]ṡMeOH}n (1), ("pcih" is the abbreviations of 2-pyridinecarbaldehyde isonicotinoylhydrazoneate) were synthesized by a sonochemical method. The new nano-structure was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray powder diffraction, elemental analyses and IR spectroscopy. Single crystalline material was obtained using a heat gradient applied to a solution of the reagents. Compound 1 was structurally characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The determination of the structure by single crystal X-ray crystallography shows that the complex forms a zig-zag one dimensional polymer in the solid state and the coordination number of BiIII ions is seven, (BiN3O4), with three N-donor and one O-donor atoms from two "pcih" and three O-donors from nitrate anions. It has a hemidirected coordination sphere. The supramolecular features in these complexes are guided and controlled by weak directional intermolecular interactions. The chains interact with each other through π-π stacking interactions creating a 3D framework. After thermolysis of 1 at 230 °C with oleic acid, pure phase nano-sized bismuth (III) oxide was produced. The morphology and size of the prepared Bi2O3 samples were further observed using SEM.

  6. SURFACE CHEMKIN-III: A Fortran package for analyzing heterogeneous chemical kinetics at a solid-surface - gas-phase interface

    SciTech Connect

    Coltrin, M.E.; Kee, R.J.; Rupley, F.M.; Meeks, E.

    1996-05-01

    This document is the user`s manual for the SURFACE CHEMKIN-III package. Together with CHEMKIN-III, this software facilitates the formation, solution, and interpretation of problems involving elementary heterogeneous and gas-phase chemical kinetics in the presence of a solid surface. The package consists of two major software components: an Interpreter and a Surface Subroutine Library. The Interpreter is a program that reads a symbolic description of a user-specified chemical reaction mechanism. One output from the Interpreter is a data file that forms a link to the Surface Subroutine Library, which is a collection of about seventy modular Fortran subroutines that may be called from a user`s application code to return information on chemical production rates and thermodynamic properties. This version of SURFACE CHEMKIN-III includes many modifications to allow treatment of multi-fluid plasma systems, for example modeling the reactions of highly energetic ionic species with a surface. Optional rate expressions allow reaction rates to depend upon ion energy rather than a single thermodynamic temperature. In addition, subroutines treat temperature as an array, allowing an application code to define a different temperature for each species. This version of SURFACE CHEMKIN-III allows use of real (non-integer) stoichiometric coefficients; the reaction order with respect to species concentrations can also be specified independent of the reaction`s stoichiometric coefficients. Several different reaction mechanisms can be specified in the Interpreter input file through the new construct of multiple materials.

  7. Kinetic spectrophotometric determination of Fe(II) in the presence of Fe(III) by H-point standard addition method in mixed micellar medium.

    PubMed

    Hasani, Masoumeh; Rezaei, Alireza; Abdollahi, Hamid

    2007-11-01

    The H-point standard addition method was applied to kinetic data for simultaneous determination of Fe(II) and Fe(III) or selective determination of Fe(II) in the presence of Fe(III). The method is based on the difference in the rate of complex formation between iron in two different oxidation states and methylthymol blue (MTB) at pH 3.5 in mixed cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and Triton X-100 micellar medium. Fe(II) can be determined in the range 0.25-2.5 microg ml(-1) with satisfactory accuracy and precision in the presence of excess Fe(III) and other metal ions that rapidly form complexes with MTB under working condition. The proposed method was successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of Fe(II) and Fe(III) or selective determination of Fe(II) in the presence of Fe(III) in spiked real environmental and synthetic samples with complex composition. PMID:17329160

  8. Characteristics of phase-change materials containing oxide nano-additives for thermal storage

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the authors report the production of nanocomposite-enhanced phase-change materials (NEPCMs) using the direct-synthesis method by mixing paraffin with alumina (Al2O3), titania (TiO2), silica (SiO2), and zinc oxide (ZnO) as the experimental samples. Al2O3, TiO2, SiO2, and ZnO were dispersed into three concentrations of 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 wt.%. Through heat conduction and differential scanning calorimeter experiments to evaluate the effects of varying concentrations of the nano-additives on the heat conduction performance and thermal storage characteristics of NEPCMs, their feasibility for use in thermal storage was determined. The experimental results demonstrate that TiO2 is more effective than the other additives in enhancing both the heat conduction and thermal storage performance of paraffin for most of the experimental parameters. Furthermore, TiO2 reduces the melting onset temperature and increases the solidification onset temperature of paraffin. This allows the phase-change heat to be applicable to a wider temperature range, and the highest decreased ratio of phase-change heat is only 0.46%, compared to that of paraffin. Therefore, this study demonstrates that TiO2, added to paraffin to form NEPCMs, has significant potential for enhancing the thermal storage characteristics of paraffin. PMID:23127224

  9. Unexpected δ-Phase Formation in Additive-Manufactured Ni-Based Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idell, Y.; Levine, L. E.; Allen, A. J.; Zhang, F.; Campbell, C. E.; Olson, G. B.; Gong, J.; Snyder, D. R.; Deutchman, H. Z.

    2016-03-01

    An as-built and solutionized Ni-based superalloy built by additive manufacturing through a direct metal laser sintering technique is characterized to understand the microstructural differences as compared to the as-wrought alloy. Initially, each layer undergoes rapid solidification as it is melted by the laser; however, as the part is built, the underlying layers experience a variety of heating and cooling cycles that produce significant microsegregation of niobium which allows for the formation of the deleterious δ-phase. The as-built microstructure was characterized through Vickers hardness, optical microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, electron back-scattering diffraction, x-ray diffraction, and synchrotron x-ray microLaue diffraction. The isothermal formation and growth of the δ-phase were characterized using synchrotron-based in situ small angle and wide angle x-ray scattering experiments. These experimental results are compared with multicomponent diffusion simulations that predict the phase fraction and composition. The high residual stresses and unexpected formation of the δ-phase will require further annealing treatments to be designed so as to remove these deficiencies and obtain an optimized microstructure.

  10. One-frame two-dimensional deflectometry for phase retrieval by addition of orthogonal fringe patterns.

    PubMed

    Flores, Jorge L; Bravo-Medina, Beethoven; Ferrari, José A

    2013-09-10

    Deflectometry is a well-known method to characterize pure phase objects by measuring the deformation of fringes. In principle, the retrieved magnitude is the partial derivative of the phase along the coordinate orthogonal to the fringes. In order to recover the phase it is necessary to know the derivatives in two orthogonal directions, which is usually achieved by rotating 90° the original fringes and acquiring a new deformed pattern. This "time-multiplexed" two-dimensional deflectometry is a time-consuming operation if the goal is to characterize phase objects in real time. In the present paper we propose a kind of two-dimensional deflectometry that allows acquisition of fringe patterns in two orthogonal directions in a single frame. The proposed procedure utilizes a two-dimensional ("additive") fringe pattern that allows the application of Takeda's method to each coordinate independently. The advantage of the method (with respect to the traditional one) is that it simplifies the setup and reduces the acquisition time. Validation experiments are presented. PMID:24085130

  11. NOVEL CONCEPTS FOR THE COMPRESSION OF LARGE VOLUMES OF CARBON DIOXIDE-PHASE III

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J. Jeffrey; Allison, Timothy; Evans, Neal; Moreland, Brian; Hernandez, Augusto; Day, Meera; Ridens, Brandon

    2014-06-30

    successfully demonstrated good performance and mechanical behavior. In Phase III, a pilot compression plant consisting of a multi-stage centrifugal compressor with cooled diaphragm technology has been designed, constructed, and tested. Comparative testing of adiabatic and cooled tests at equivalent inlet conditions shows that the cooled diaphragms reduce power consumption by 3-8% when the compressor is operated as a back-to-back unit and by up to 9% when operated as a straight-though compressor with no intercooler. The power savings, heat exchanger effectiveness, and temperature drops for the cooled diaphragm were all slightly higher than predicted values but showed the same trends.

  12. Phase I/II Study of Nilotinib/Ruxolitinb Therapy for TKI Resistant Ph-Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-04

    Chronic Phase Chronic Myeloid Leukemia; Accelerated Phase Chronic Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myeloid Leukemia; Philadelphia Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Resistant to Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Therapy

  13. A Phase I/II Trial of Gefitinib Given Concurrently With Radiotherapy in Patients With Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Joensuu, Greetta; Joensuu, Timo; Nokisalmi, Petri

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: To estimate the safety and tolerability of daily administration of 250 mg of gefitinib given concurrently with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for patients with nonmetastatic prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 42 patients with T2-T3N0M0 tumors were treated in a nonrandomized single-center study. A prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level of <20 and a good performance status (WHO, 0-1) were required. Adjuvant or neoadjuvant hormone treatments were not allowed. A daily regimen of 250 mg of gefitinib was started 1 week before radiation therapy began and lasted for the duration of radiation therapy. A dose of 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/day) was administered to the tumor, prostate, and seminal vesicles, followed by a 22-Gy booster (2 Gy/day) for a total dose of 72.4 Gy. Correlative studies included analysis of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), EGFRvIII, and phosphorylated EGFR in tumors and tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1{alpha} (IL-1{alpha}), and IL-6 in serum. Results: Maximum tolerated dose was not reached in phase I (12 patients), and 30 additional patients were treated in phase II. Thirty (71.4%) patients completed trial medication. Dose-limiting toxicities were recorded for 16 (38.1%) patients, the most common of which was a grade 3 to 4 increase in transaminase (6 patients). After a median follow-up of 38 months, there were no deaths due to prostate cancer. The estimated PSA relapse-free survival rate at 4 years (Kaplan-Meier) was 97%, the salvage therapy-free survival rate was 91%, and the overall survival rate was 87%. These figures compared favorably with those of matched patients treated with radiation only at higher doses. Conclusions: The combination of gefitinib and radiation is reasonably well tolerated and has promising activity against nonmetastatic prostate cancer.

  14. Noble metals (Ag, Au) nanoparticles addition effects on superconducting properties of CuTl-1223 phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabbar, Abdul; Mumtaz, Muhammad; Nadeem, Kashif

    2015-03-01

    Low anisotropic (Cu0.5Tl0.5) Ba2Ca2Cu3O10 - δ (CuTl-1223) high temperature superconducting phase was synthesized by solid-state reaction, silver (Ag) nanoparticles were prepared by sol-gel method and gold (Au) nanoparticles were extracted from colloidal solution. We added Ag and Au nanoparticles in CuTl-1223 matrix separately with same concentration during the final sintering process to get (M)x/CuTl-1223; M = Ag nanoparticles or Au nanoparticles (x = 0 and 1.0 wt.%) nano-superconductor composites. We investigated and compared the effects of these noble metals nanoparticles addition on structural, morphological and superconducting transport properties of CuTl-1223 phase. The crystal structure of the host CuTl-1223 superconducting phase was not affected significantly after the addition of these nanoparticles. The enhancement of superconducting properties was observed after the addition of both Ag and Au nanoparticles, which is most probably due to improved inter-grains weak-links and reduction of defects such as oxygen deficiencies, etc. The reduction of normal state room temperature resistivity is the finger prints of the reduction of barriers and facilitation to the carriers transport across the inter-crystallite sites due to improved inter-grains weak-links. The greater improvement of superconducting properties in Ag nanoparticles added samples is attributed to the higher conductivity of silver as compared to gold, which also suits for practical applications due to lower cost and easy synthesis of Ag nanoparticles as compared to Au nanoparticles.

  15. Phase I-II Study of Hypofractionated Simultaneous Integrated Boost With Tomotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Di Muzio, Nadia Fiorino, Claudio; Cozzarini, Cesare; Alongi, Filippo; Broggi, Sara; Mangili, Paola; Guazzoni, Giorgio; Valdagni, Riccardo; Calandrino, Riccardo; Fazio, Ferruccio

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: To report planning and acute toxicity data of the first 60 patients treated within a Phase I-II study with moderate hypofractionation by image-guided helical tomotherapy. Methods and Materials: Various clinical target volumes (CTVs) were defined: CTV1-pelvic nodes; CTV2-upper portion of seminal vesicles; CTV3-lower portion of SV; CTV4-prostate; overlap between planning target volume (PTV) 4 and rectum. Different doses to each PTV were simultaneously delivered in 28 fractions. For 31 low-risk patients: 56.0, 61.6, and 71.4 Gy for PTV2-4, respectively; for 20 intermediate-risk patients: 51.8, 61.6, 65.5, and 74.2 Gy for PTV1-4, respectively; for 9 high-risk patients: 51.8 and 65.5 Gy for PTV1-2 and 74.2 Gy for PTV3-4. For all patients, the dose to overlap was 65.5 Gy. Results: The mean fraction of rectum receiving more than 65 Gy (V65) and rectal Dmax were 10% and 70.8 Gy respectively. In cases of pelvic node irradiation, the intestinal cavity (outside PTV) receiving > 45 and 50 Gy was 86 and 12 cc, respectively. A homogeneous dose distribution within each PTV was guaranteed. Acute genitourinary toxicity according to RTOG scoring system was as follows: 21/60 (35%) Grade 1, 12/60 (20%) Grade 2, 2/60 (3%) Grade 3. Acute rectal toxicities were: 18/60 (30%) Grade 1. Twelve (20%) patients showed Grade 1 upper intestinal toxicity (uGI). No patients experienced {>=} Grade 2 acute rectal or uGI side effects. Conclusions: This study shows excellent results with regard to acute toxicity. Further research is necessary to assess definitive late toxicity and tumor control outcome.

  16. Phase III Trial of Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Sorafenib in Metastatic Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Flaherty, Keith T.; Lee, Sandra J.; Zhao, Fengmin; Schuchter, Lynn M.; Flaherty, Lawrence; Kefford, Richard; Atkins, Michael B.; Leming, Philip; Kirkwood, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The primary objective of this study was to determine whether carboplatin, paclitaxel, and sorafenib (CPS) improve overall survival (OS) compared with carboplatin and paclitaxel (CP) in chemotherapy-naive patients with metastatic melanoma. Patients and Methods In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled phase III study, all patients received carboplatin at area under the [concentration-time] curve 6 and paclitaxel 225 mg/m2 intravenously once every 21 days with random assignment to sorafenib 400 mg orally twice per day on days 2 through 19 every 21 days or placebo. The primary end point was OS, and secondary end points included progression-free survival, objective tumor response, and toxicity. Results In all, 823 patients were enrolled over 34 months. At final analysis, the median OS was 11.3 months (95% CI, 9.8 to 12.2 months) for CP and 11.1 months (95% CI, 10.3 to 12.3 months) for CPS; the difference in the OS distribution was not statistically significant by the stratified log-rank test, stratified on American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status, and prior therapy (P = .878). Median progression-free survival was 4.9 months for CPS and 4.2 months for CP (P = .092, stratified log-rank test). Response rate was 20% for CPS and 18% for CP (P = .427). More patients on the CPS arm had grade 3 or higher toxicities (84% v 78%; P = .027), with increased rash, hand-foot syndrome, and thrombocytopenia accounting for most of the difference. Conclusion Sorafenib does not improve OS when given in combination with CP for chemotherapy-naive patients with metastatic melanoma. This study establishes benchmark end points for the CP regimen in first-line therapy of metastatic melanoma. PMID:23248256

  17. Progressive Staging of Pilot Studies to Improve Phase III Trials for Motor Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Dobkin, Bruce H.

    2014-01-01

    Based on the suboptimal research pathways that finally led to multicenter randomized clinical trials (MRCTs) of treadmill training with partial body weight support and of robotic assistive devices, strategically planned successive stages are proposed for pilot studies of novel rehabilitation interventions Stage 1, consideration-of-concept studies, drawn from animal experiments, theories, and observations, delineate the experimental intervention in a small convenience sample of participants, so the results must be interpreted with caution. Stage 2, development-of-concept pilots, should optimize the components of the intervention, settle on most appropriate outcome measures, and examine dose-response effects. A well-designed study that reveals no efficacy should be published to counterweight the confirmation bias of positive trials. Stage 3, demonstration-of-concept pilots, can build out from what has been learned to test at least 15 participants in each arm, using random assignment and blinded outcome measures. A control group should receive an active practice intervention aimed at the same primary outcome. A third arm could receive a substantially larger dose of the experimental therapy or a combinational intervention. If only 1 site performed this trial, a different investigative group should aim to reproduce positive outcomes based on the optimal dose of motor training. Stage 3 studies ought to suggest an effect size of 0.4 or higher, so that approximately 50 participants in each arm will be the number required to test for efficacy in a stage 4, proof-of-concept MRCT. By developing a consensus around acceptable and necessary practices for each stage, similar to CONSORT recommendations for the publication of phase III clinical trials, better quality pilot studies may move quickly into better designed and more successful MRCTs of experimental interventions. PMID:19240197

  18. Genomic Scans of Zygotic Disequilibrium and Epistatic SNPs in HapMap Phase III Populations

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xin-Sheng; Hu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Previous theory indicates that zygotic linkage disequilibrium (LD) is more informative than gametic or composite digenic LD in revealing natural population history. Further, the difference between the composite digenic and maximum zygotic LDs can be used to detect epistatic selection for fitness. Here we corroborate the theory by investigating genome-wide zygotic LDs in HapMap phase III human populations. Results show that non-Africa populations have much more significant zygotic LDs than do Africa populations. Africa populations (ASW, LWK, MKK, and YRI) possess more significant zygotic LDs for the double-homozygotes (DAABB) than any other significant zygotic LDs (DAABb, DAaBB, and DAaBb), while non-Africa populations generally have more significant DAaBb’s than any other significant zygotic LDs (DAABB, DAABb, and DAaBB). Average r-squares for any significant zygotic LDs increase generally in an order of populations YRI, MKK, CEU, CHB, LWK, JPT, CHD, TSI, GIH, ASW, and MEX. Average r-squares are greater for DAABB and DAaBb than for DAaBB and DAABb in each population. YRI and MKK can be separated from LWK and ASW in terms of the pattern of average r-squares. All population divergences in zygotic LDs can be interpreted with the model of Out of Africa for modern human origins. We have also detected 19735-95921 SNP pairs exhibiting strong signals of epistatic selection in different populations. Gene-gene interactions for some epistatic SNP pairs are evident from empirical findings, but many more epistatic SNP pairs await evidence. Common epistatic SNP pairs rarely exist among all populations, but exist in distinct regions (Africa, Europe, and East Asia), which helps to understand geographical genomic medicine. PMID:26126177

  19. OHANA Phase III: scientific operation of an 800 meter Mauna Kea interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Olivier; Ridgway, Stephen T.; Lena, Pierre J.; Perrin, Guy S.; Fahlman, Gregory; Adamson, Andrew J.; Tokunaga, Alan T.; Nishikawa, Jun; Wizinowich, Peter L.; Rigaut, Francois J.

    2003-02-01

    Once the proof of concept of the OHANA Array has been demonstrated, the Phase II capabilities can be put into regular science operation, and the OHANA facility can be upgraded to extend interferometric operation to include all of the telescopes of the OHANA Consortium member observatories. This will constitute the Phase III of OHANA. The technical developments required will be relatively straight-forward. Longer fiber sets will be procured (fiber losses are not a limiting factor at the OHANA scale). An enhanced delay line capability will be needed in order to exploit longer baselines with good sky coverage and ample super-synthesis (several compact, multi-pass long optical delay concepts are under investigation). The scheduling and operation modes of an instrument such as OHANA present interesting opportunities and complications. We envision a place for both collaborative consortium science, based on mutual allocation of facility access, and PI-driven access, based on telescope access exchange between consortium members. The most potentially successful mode of operation would imply a community driven model, open to proposals from the different time allocation comittees. This poster looks at possible methods of allocation and operation, inspired by the UKIRT infrared survey (UKIDSS), the European VLBI, and the very interesting possibility of a Mauna Kea telescope time exchange scheme. The issue of data property is of course intimately tied with the proposal/operation system, and means of data availability and distribution are discussed, along with data interpretation tools, which may be modeled on existing systems such as the ISC at Caltech or the JMMC in France. when weighed against the UV coverage, the potential science and the uniqueness of this project, all these issues are worth an in depth study. Discussions are starting as to an OHANA Operation Committee, the goal of which would be to discuss, define and eventually carry out operational modes. The goal, of

  20. Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan for Operable Units 6-05 and 10-04, Phase III

    SciTech Connect

    R. P. Wells

    2006-09-19

    The remedial design/remedial action for Operable Unit 6-05 (Waste Area Group 6) and Operable Unit 10-04 (Waste Area Group 10) - collectively called Operable Unit 10-04 has been divided into four phases. Phase I consists of developing and implementing institutional controls at Operable Unit 10-04 sites and developing and implementing Idaho National Laboratory-wide plans for both institutional controls and ecological monitoring. Phase II will remediate sites contaminated with trinitrotoluene and Royal Demolition Explosive. Phase III will remediate lead contamination at a gun range, and Phase IV will remediate hazards from unexploded ordnance. This Phase III remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan addresses the remediation of lead-contaminated soils found at the Security Training Facility (STF)-02 Gun Range located at the Idaho National Laboratory. Remediation of the STF-02 Gun Range will include excavating contaminated soils; physically separating copper and lead for recycling; returning separated soils below the remediation goal to the site; stabilizing contaminated soils, as required, and disposing of the separated soils that exceed the remediation goal; encapsulating and disposing of creosote-contaminated railroad ties and power poles; removing and disposing of the wooden building and asphalt pads found at the STF-02 Gun Range; sampling and analyzing soil to determine the excavation requirements; and when the remediation goals have been met, backfilling and contouring excavated areas and revegetating the affected area.

  1. A Fully Nonmetallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing of Ceramic Composites. Part III; Additive Manufacturing and Characterization of Ceramic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Grady, Joseph E.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Ramsey, Jack; Patterson, Clark; Santelle, Tom

    2015-01-01

    This publication is the third part of a three part report of the project entitled "A Fully Nonmetallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing" funded by NASA Aeronautics Research Institute (NARI). The objective of this project was to conduct additive manufacturing to produce ceramic matrix composite materials and aircraft engine components by the binder jet process. Different SiC powders with median sizes ranging from 9.3 to 53.0 microns were investigated solely and in powder blends in order to maximize powder packing. Various infiltration approaches were investigated to include polycarbosilane (SMP-10), phenolic, and liquid silicon. Single infiltrations of SMP-10 and phenolic only slightly filled in the interior. When the SMP-10 was loaded with sub-micron sized SiC powders, the infiltrant gave a much better result of filling in the interior. Silicon carbide fibers were added to the powder bed to make ceramic matrix composite materials. Microscopy showed that the fibers were well distributed with no preferred orientation on the horizontal plane and fibers in the vertical plane were at angles as much as 45deg. Secondary infiltration steps were necessary to further densify the material. Two to three extra infiltration steps of SMP-10 increased the density by 0.20 to 0.55 g/cc. However, the highest densities achieved were 2.10 to 2.15 g/cc. Mechanical tests consisting of 4 point bend tests were conducted. Samples from the two CMC panels had higher strengths and strains to failure than the samples from the two nonfiber reinforced panels. The highest strengths were from Set N with 65 vol% fiber loading which had an average strength of 66 MPa. Analysis of the fracture surfaces did not reveal pullout of the reinforcing fibers. Blunt fiber failure suggested that there was not composite behavior. The binder jet additive manufacturing method was used to also demonstrate the fabrication of turbine engine vane components of two different designs and sizes. The

  2. Phase I/II Trial Evaluating Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Salvaging Treatment of Locally Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Lin; Hu, Jiyi; Guan, Xiyin; Gao, Jing; Lu, Rong; Lu, Jiade J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Radiation therapy is the mainstay strategy for the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). Intensity-modulated X-ray therapy (IMXT) alone is the current standard for stage I and II NPC. For stage III and IV A/B diseases, concurrent chemotherapy should be provided in addition to IMXT. However, optimal treatment for locally recurrent NPC after previous definitive dose of radiotherapy is lacking. Various techniques including brachytherapy, IMXT, stereotactic radiosurgery or radiotherapy (SRS or SBRT) have been used in the management of locally recurrent NPC. Due to the inherent limitation of these techniques, i.e., limited range of irradiation or over-irradiation to surrounding normal tissues, moderate efficacy has been observed at the cost of severe toxicities. Carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT) offers potential physical and biological advantages over photon and proton radiotherapy. Due to the inverted dose profile of particle beams and their greater energy deposition within the Bragg peak, precise dose delivery to the target volume(s) without exposing the surrounding organs at risk to extra doses is possible. In addition, CIRT provides an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE) as compared to photon and proton radiotherapy. Such advantages may translate to improved outcomes after irradiation in terms of disease control in radio-resistant and previously treated, recurrent malignancies. It is therefore reasonable to postulate that recurrent NPC after high-dose radiotherapy could be more resistant to re-irradiation using photons. Reports on the treatment of radio-resistant malignancies in the head and neck region such as melanoma, sarcoma, and adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) have demonstrated superior local control rates from CIRT as compared to photon irradiation. Thus patients with recurrent NPC are likely to benefit from the enhanced biological effectiveness of carbon ions. As effective retreatment strategy is lacking for locally recurrent NPC

  3. Design and analysis of phase III trials with ordered outcome scales: the concept of the sliding dichotomy.

    PubMed

    Murray, Gordon D; Barer, David; Choi, Sung; Fernandes, Helen; Gregson, Barbara; Lees, Kennedy R; Maas, Andrew I R; Marmarou, Anthony; Mendelow, A David; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Taylor, Gillian S; Teasdale, Graham M; Weir, Christopher J

    2005-05-01

    The conventional approach to the analysis of a Phase III trial in head injury or stroke takes an ordered scale measuring functional outcome and collapses the scale to a binary outcome of favorable versus unfavorable. This discards potentially relevant information which limits statistical power and moreover is not in accord with clinical practice. We propose an alternative approach where a favorable outcome is defined as better than would be expected, taking account of each individual patient's baseline prognosis. This is illustrated through a worked example based on data from a Phase III trial in head injury. The approach is also compared with the proportional odds model, which is another statistical approach that can exploit an ordered outcome scale. The approach raises issues of clinical, statistical, and regulatory importance, and we initiate what we believe needs to become a widespread debate amongst the community involved in clinical research in head injury and stroke. PMID:15892597

  4. Mono- and polynucleation, atomistic growth, and crystal phase of III-V nanowires under varying group V flow

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrovskii, V. G.

    2015-05-28

    We present a refined model for the vapor-liquid-solid growth and crystal structure of Au-catalyzed III-V nanowires, which revisits several assumptions used so far and is capable of describing the transition from mononuclear to polynuclear regime and ultimately to regular atomistic growth. We construct the crystal phase diagrams and calculate the wurtzite percentages, elongation rates, critical sizes, and polynucleation thresholds of Au-catalyzed GaAs nanowires depending on the As flow. We find a non-monotonic dependence of the crystal phase on the group V flow, with the zincblende structure being preferred at low and high group V flows and the wurtzite structure forming at intermediate group V flows. This correlates with most of the available experimental data. Finally, we discuss the atomistic growth picture which yields zincblende crystal structure and should be very advantageous for fabrication of ternary III-V nanowires with well-controlled composition and heterointerfaces.

  5. Mono- and polynucleation, atomistic growth, and crystal phase of III-V nanowires under varying group V flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovskii, V. G.

    2015-05-01

    We present a refined model for the vapor-liquid-solid growth and crystal structure of Au-catalyzed III-V nanowires, which revisits several assumptions used so far and is capable of describing the transition from mononuclear to polynuclear regime and ultimately to regular atomistic growth. We construct the crystal phase diagrams and calculate the wurtzite percentages, elongation rates, critical sizes, and polynucleation thresholds of Au-catalyzed GaAs nanowires depending on the As flow. We find a non-monotonic dependence of the crystal phase on the group V flow, with the zincblende structure being preferred at low and high group V flows and the wurtzite structure forming at intermediate group V flows. This correlates with most of the available experimental data. Finally, we discuss the atomistic growth picture which yields zincblende crystal structure and should be very advantageous for fabrication of ternary III-V nanowires with well-controlled composition and heterointerfaces.

  6. Considerations in the rational design and conduct of phase I/II pediatric clinical trials: avoiding the problems and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, S M; Reed, M D; Wells, T G; Kearns, G L

    2007-04-01

    Over the past decade, there has been a heightened awareness of the need to include children in the drug development process. With this awareness has come an expansion of the infrastructure for conducting studies in children and an increase in the sponsorship of pediatric clinical trials. However, the growth in pediatric research has, in many cases, not been accompanied by an increase in the involvement of trained pediatric investigators when it comes to trial design and/or interpretation. Pediatric phase I/II protocols continue to span a spectrum from those that are carefully constructed to those that are poorly designed. This paper highlights the basic elements of phase I/II protocols that merit unique consideration when the clinical trial involves children. Illustrations are provided from our experience, which highlight problems that may arise when trials are not designed with the pediatric patient in mind. PMID:17329988

  7. Adsorption of As(III), As(V) and Cu(II) on zirconium oxide immobilized alginate beads in aqueous phase.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh-Hun; Kim, Jong-Oh; Cho, Dong-Wan; Kumar, Rahul; Baek, Seung Han; Kurade, Mayur B; Jeon, Byong-Hun

    2016-10-01

    A composite adsorbent to remove arsenite [As(III)], arsenate [As(V)], and copper [Cu(II)] from aqueous phase was synthesized by immobilizing zirconium oxide on alginate beads (ZOAB). The composition (wt%) of ZOAB (Zr-34.0; O-32.7; C-21.3; Ca-1.0) was confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. Sorption studies were conducted on single and binary sorbate systems, and the effects of contact time, initial adsorbate concentration, and pH on the adsorption performance of ZOAB (pHPZC = 4.3) were monitored. The sorption process for As(III)/As(V) and Cu(II) reached an equilibrium state within 240 h and 24 h, respectively, with maximum sorption capacities of 32.3, 28.5, and 69.9 mg g(-1), respectively. The addition of Cu(II) was favorable for As(V) sorption in contrast to As(III). In the presence of 48.6 mg L(-1) Cu(II), the sorption capacity of As(V) increased from 1.5 to 3.8 mg g(-1) after 240 h. The sorption data for As(III)/As(V) and Cu(II) conformed the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models, respectively. The adsorption of As(III), As(V), and Cu(II) followed pseudo second order kinetics. The effect of arsenic species on Cu(II) sorption was insignificant. The results of present study demonstrated that the synthesized sorbent could be useful for the simultaneous removal of both anionic and cationic contaminants from wastewaters. PMID:27372261

  8. Phase I/II trial of 2-weekly docetaxel combined with cisplatin plus fluorouracil in metastatic esophageal cancer (JCOG0807).

    PubMed

    Hironaka, Shuichi; Tsubosa, Yasuhiro; Mizusawa, Junki; Kii, Takayuki; Kato, Ken; Tsushima, Takahiro; Chin, Keisho; Tomori, Akihisa; Okuno, Tatsuya; Taniki, Toshikatsu; Ura, Takashi; Matsushita, Hisayuki; Kojima, Takashi; Doki, Yuichiro; Kusaba, Hitoshi; Fujitani, Kazumasa; Taira, Koichi; Seki, Shiko; Nakamura, Tsutomu; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2014-09-01

    We carried out a phase I/II trial of adding 2-weekly docetaxel to cisplatin plus fluorouracil (CF) therapy (2-weekly DCF regimen) in esophageal cancer patients to investigate its safety and antimetastatic activity. Patients received 2-weekly docetaxel (30 mg/m(2) [dose level (DL)1] or 40 mg/m(2) [DL2] with a 3 + 3 design in phase I, on days 1 and 15) in combination with fixed-dose CF (80 mg/m(2) cisplatin, day 1; 800 mg/m(2) fluorouracil, days 1-5) repeated every 4 weeks. The primary endpoint was dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) in phase I and central peer review-based response rate in phase II. At least 22 responders among 50 patients were required to satisfy the primary endpoint with a threshold of 35%. Sixty-two patients were enrolled in phase I and II. In phase I, 10 patients were enrolled with DLT of 0/3 at DL1 and 2/7 in DL2. Considering DLT and treatment compliance, the recommended phase II dose was determined as DL1. In phase II, the response rate was 62% (P < 0.0001; 95% confidence interval, 48-75%); median overall survival and progression-free survival were 11.1 and 5.8 months, respectively. Common grade 3/4 adverse events were neutropenia (25%), anemia (36%), hyponatremia (29%), anorexia (24%), and nausea (11%). No febrile neutropenia was observed. Pneumonitis caused treatment-related death in one patient. The 2-weekly DCF regimen showed promising antimetastatic activity and tolerability. A phase III study comparing this regimen with CF therapy is planned by the Japan Clinical Oncology Group. This study was registered at the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry as UMIN 000001737. PMID:25041052

  9. Effects of gelatin sponge combined with moist wound-healing nursing intervention in the treatment of phase III bedsore

    PubMed Central

    LI, YANLING; YAO, MEIYING; WANG, XIA; ZHAO, YANQING

    2016-01-01

    Pressure sore pertains to tissue damage or necrosis that occurs due to lack of adequate nutrition following long-term exposure to pressure and decreased blood circulation. The aim of the study was to examine the effects of gelatin sponge combined with moist wound-healing nursing intervention in the treatment of phase III bedsore. In total, 50 patients with phase III bedsore were included in the present study. The patients were randomly divided into the control (n=25) and observation (n=25) groups. Patients in the control group received conventional nursing, while those in the observation group received gelatin sponge combined with moist wound healing nursing. The effects of the two nursing methods were compared and analyzed. The results showed that the improvement rate of the observation group was significantly higher than that of the control group (P<0.05). The Branden score and area of pressure sore of the observation group were significantly lower than those of the control group (P<0.05). The frequency and time of dressing change and the average cost of hospitalization of the observation group were significantly lower than those of the control group (P<0.001). In conclusion, gelatin sponge combined with moist wound-healing nursing intervention may significantly improve the treatment of phase III bedsore. PMID:27313666

  10. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume III - Groundwater Recharge and Discharge Data Documentation Package

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    Volume III of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the data covering groundwater recharge and discharge. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  11. Reservoir analysis study: Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Elk Hills Field, Kern County, California: Phase 3 report, Recommended additional reservoir engineering analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    The basis for completion of the Phase III tasks above were the reports of Phases I and II and the associated backup material. The Phase II report was reviewed to identify the major uncertainties in all of the reserve assignments. In addition to the Proved, Probable and Possible reserves of Phase II, ''potential reserves'' or those associated with a greater degree of risk than the Possible reserves included in the Phase II report, were also identified based on the work performed by Bergeson through the Phase II reporting date. Thirty-three specific studies were identified to address the major Phase II reserve uncertainties or these potential reserves. These studies are listed in Table 1 and are grouped by the Elk Hills pool designation. The basis and need for each study are elaborated in the discussion which follows. Where possible, the need for the study was quantified by associating the study with a particular reserve estimate which would be clarified by the analysis. This reserve value was either the Probable or Possible reserves which were being studied, the potential reserves that were identified, or simply the uncertainty inherent in the proved reserves as identified in the study purpose. The costs associated with performing the study are also shown in Table 1 and were estimated based on Bergeson's knowledge of the Elk Hills reservoirs and data base following Phases I and II, as well as the company's experience in performing similar studies in other fields. The cost estimates are considered reasonable for general budgeting purposes, but may require refinement prior to actual initiation of these studies. This is particularly true for studies involving field testing to obtain additional log, core or test information as the cost of such items is not considered in this report. 51 figs., 46 tabs.

  12. Safety with Ocrelizumab in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Results from the Ocrelizumab Phase III Program

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Paul; Rigby, William; Tak, Paul P.; Dörner, Thomas; Olech, Ewa; Martin, Carmen; Millar, Laurie; Travers, Helen; Fisheleva, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective was to determine the safety of ocrelizumab (OCR) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods This was an analysis of the double-blind, placebo-controlled periods and long-term follow-up of 4 OCR phase III trials in RA (SCRIPT, STAGE, FILM and FEATURE). Safety data per study and the results of a meta-analysis of serious infectious events (SIEs) are presented. Results Overall, 868 patients received placebo, 1064 patients OCR 200 mg×2 (or 400 mg×1) (OCR200), and 827 patients OCR 500 mg×2 (OCR500) plus background methotrexate (MTX) at baseline and 24 weeks. During the double-blind, placebo-controlled periods, the incidence of adverse events and serious adverse events was comparable between the OCR+MTX and placebo +MTX groups. Infusion-related reactions were more common with OCR+MTX and decreased in frequency with subsequent infusions. Serious infusion-related reactions were rare (0.1%). Serious infections occurred more frequently with OCR500+MTX. In the meta-analysis, a statistically significant difference from placebo +MTX in incidence of SIEs per 100 patient-years of 2.4 (95% CI, 0.3–4.5) was observed with OCR500+MTX, but not with OCR200+MTX (0.6; 95% CI, −1.3 to 2.4). Patients recruited in Asia exhibited a higher risk of serious infections (hazard ratio, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.03–3.06). The incidence of human anti-human antibodies was <5%. Long-term follow-up indicated no differences in malignancy rates between the treatment groups. There was no apparent difference in time to B-cell repletion between the OCR dose groups. Conclusions In placebo-controlled clinical trials of RA, OCR500+MTX was associated with a higher risk of serious infections compared with placebo +MTX. The safety profile of OCR 200+MTX was comparable with placebo+MTX. Trial Registration STAGE Clinical Trials.gov NCT00406419 SCRIPT Clinical Trials.gov NCT00476996 FILM Clinical Trials.gov NCT00485589 FEATURE Clinical Trials.gov NCT00673920 PMID:24498318

  13. Breast cancer follow-up strategies in randomized phase III adjuvant clinical trials: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of different breast cancer follow-up procedures to decrease breast cancer mortality are still an object of debate, even if intensive follow-up by imaging modalities is not recommended by international guidelines since 1997. We conducted a systematic review of surveillance procedures utilized, in the last ten years, in phase III randomized trials (RCTs) of adjuvant treatments in early stage breast cancer with disease free survival as primary endpoint of the study, in order to verify if a similar variance exists in the scientific world. Follow-up modalities were reported in 66 RCTs, and among them, minimal and intensive approaches were equally represented, each being followed by 33 (50%) trials. The minimal surveillance regimen is preferred by international and North American RCTs (P = 0.001) and by trials involving more than one country (P = 0.004), with no relationship with the number of participating centers (P = 0.173), with pharmaceutical industry sponsorship (P = 0.80) and with trials enrolling > 1000 patients (P = 0.14). At multivariate regression analysis, only geographic location of the trial was predictive for a distinct follow-up methodology (P = 0.008): Western European (P = 0.004) and East Asian studies (P = 0.010) use intensive follow-up procedures with a significantly higher frequency than international RCTs, while no differences have been detected between North American and international RCTs. Stratifying the studies according to the date of beginning of patients enrollment, before or after 1998, in more recent RCTs the minimal approach is more frequently followed by international and North American RCTs (P = 0.01), by trials involving more than one country (P = 0.01) and with more than 50 participating centers (P = 0.02). It would be highly desirable that in the near future breast cancer follow-up procedures will be homogeneous in RCTs and everyday clinical settings. PMID:24438135

  14. Obtaining Valid Laboratory Data in Clinical Trials Conducted in Resource Diverse Settings: Lessons Learned from a Microbicide Phase III Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Crucitti, Tania; Fransen, Katrien; Maharaj, Rashika; Tenywa, Tom; Massinga Loembé, Marguerite; Murugavel, Kailapuri Gangatharan; Mendonca, Kevin; Abdellati, Said; Beelaert, Greet; Van Damme, Lut

    2010-01-01

    Background Over the last decade several phase III microbicides trials have been conducted in developing countries. However, laboratories in resource constrained settings do not always have the experience, infrastructure, and the capacity to deliver laboratory data meeting the high standards of clinical trials. This paper describes the design and outcomes of a laboratory quality assurance program which was implemented during a phase III clinical trial evaluating the efficacy of the candidate microbicide Cellulose Sulfate 6% (CS) [1]. Methodology In order to assess the effectiveness of CS for HIV and STI prevention, a phase III clinical trial was conducted in 5 sites: 3 in Africa and 2 in India. The trial sponsor identified an International Central Reference Laboratory (ICRL), responsible for the design and management of a quality assurance program, which would guarantee the reliability of laboratory data. The ICRL provided advice on the tests, assessed local laboratories, organized trainings, conducted supervision visits, performed re-tests, and prepared control panels. Local laboratories were provided with control panels for HIV rapid tests and Chlamydia trachomatis/Neisseria gonorrhoeae (CT/NG) amplification technique. Aliquots from respective control panels were tested by local laboratories and were compared with results obtained at the ICRL. Results Overall, good results were observed. However, discordances between the ICRL and site laboratories were identified for HIV and CT/NG results. One particular site experienced difficulties with HIV rapid testing shortly after study initiation. At all sites, DNA contamination was identified as a cause of invalid CT/NG results. Both problems were timely detected and solved. Through immediate feedback, guidance and repeated training of laboratory staff, additional inaccuracies were prevented. Conclusions Quality control guidelines when applied in field laboratories ensured the reliability and validity of final study data

  15. Structural and Ferromagnetic Properties of an Orthorhombic Phase of MnBi Stabilized with Rh Additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taufour, Valentin; Thimmaiah, Srinivasa; March, Stephen; Saunders, Scott; Sun, Kewei; Lamichhane, Tej Nath; Kramer, Matthew J.; Bud'ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2015-07-01

    The article addresses the possibility of alloy elements in MnBi which may modify the thermodynamic stability of the NiAs-type structure without significantly degrading the magnetic properties. The addition of small amounts of Rh and Mn provides an improvement in the thermal stability with some degradation of the magnetic properties. The small amounts of Rh and Mn additions in MnBi stabilize an orthorhombic phase whose structural and magnetic properties are closely related to the ones of the previously reported high-temperature phase of MnBi (HT MnBi). To date, the properties of the HT MnBi, which is stable between 613 and 719 K, have not been studied in detail because of its transformation to the stable low-temperature MnBi (LT MnBi), making measurements near and below its Curie temperature difficult. The Rh-stabilized MnBi with chemical formula Mn1.0625 -xRhx Bi [x =0.02 (1 ) ] adopts a new superstructure of the NiAs /Ni2In structure family. It is ferromagnetic below a Curie temperature of 416 K. The critical exponents of the ferromagnetic transition are not of the mean-field type but are closer to those associated with the Ising model in three dimensions. The magnetic anisotropy is uniaxial; the anisotropy energy is rather large, and it does not increase when raising the temperature, contrary to what happens in LT MnBi. The saturation magnetization is approximately 3 μB/f .u . at low temperatures. While this exact composition may not be application ready, it does show that alloying is a viable route to modifying the stability of this class of rare-earth-free magnet alloys.

  16. Structural and ferromagnetic properties of an orthorhombic phase of MnBi stabilized with Rh additions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Taufour, Valentin; Thimmaiah, Srinivasa; March, Stephen; Saunders, Scott; Sun, Kewei; Lamichhane, Tej Nath; Kramer, Matthew J.; Bud’ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2015-07-28

    The article addresses the possibility of alloy elements in MnBi which may modify the thermodynamic stability of the NiAs-type structure without significantly degrading the magnetic properties. The addition of small amounts of Rh and Mn provides an improvement in the thermal stability with some degradation of the magnetic properties. The small amounts of Rh and Mn additions in MnBi stabilize an orthorhombic phase whose structural and magnetic properties are closely related to the ones of the previously reported high-temperature phase of MnBi (HT MnBi). The properties of the HT MnBi, which is stable between 613 and 719 K, have notmore » been studied in detail because of its transformation to the stable low-temperature MnBi (LT MnBi), making measurements near and below its Curie temperature difficult. The Rh-stabilized MnBi with chemical formula Mn1.0625–xRhxBi [x=0.02(1)] adopts a new superstructure of the NiAs/Ni2In structure family. It is ferromagnetic below a Curie temperature of 416 K. The critical exponents of the ferromagnetic transition are not of the mean-field type but are closer to those associated with the Ising model in three dimensions. The magnetic anisotropy is uniaxial; the anisotropy energy is rather large, and it does not increase when raising the temperature, contrary to what happens in LT MnBi. The saturation magnetization is approximately 3μB/f.u. at low temperatures. Thus, while this exact composition may not be application ready, it does show that alloying is a viable route to modifying the stability of this class of rare-earth-free magnet alloys.« less

  17. Structural and ferromagnetic properties of an orthorhombic phase of MnBi stabilized with Rh additions

    SciTech Connect

    Taufour, Valentin; Thimmaiah, Srinivasa; March, Stephen; Saunders, Scott; Sun, Kewei; Lamichhane, Tej Nath; Kramer, Matthew J.; Bud’ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2015-07-28

    The article addresses the possibility of alloy elements in MnBi which may modify the thermodynamic stability of the NiAs-type structure without significantly degrading the magnetic properties. The addition of small amounts of Rh and Mn provides an improvement in the thermal stability with some degradation of the magnetic properties. The small amounts of Rh and Mn additions in MnBi stabilize an orthorhombic phase whose structural and magnetic properties are closely related to the ones of the previously reported high-temperature phase of MnBi (HT MnBi). The properties of the HT MnBi, which is stable between 613 and 719 K, have not been studied in detail because of its transformation to the stable low-temperature MnBi (LT MnBi), making measurements near and below its Curie temperature difficult. The Rh-stabilized MnBi with chemical formula Mn1.0625–xRhxBi [x=0.02(1)] adopts a new superstructure of the NiAs/Ni2In structure family. It is ferromagnetic below a Curie temperature of 416 K. The critical exponents of the ferromagnetic transition are not of the mean-field type but are closer to those associated with the Ising model in three dimensions. The magnetic anisotropy is uniaxial; the anisotropy energy is rather large, and it does not increase when raising the temperature, contrary to what happens in LT MnBi. The saturation magnetization is approximately 3μB/f.u. at low temperatures. Thus, while this exact composition may not be application ready, it does show that alloying is a viable route to modifying the stability of this class of rare-earth-free magnet alloys.

  18. Crystallization of grain boundary phases in silicon nitride with low additive contents by microwave annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Tiegs, T.N.; Ploetz, K.L.; Kiggans, J.O.; Yeckley, R.L.

    1993-06-01

    Microwave annealing of dense Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-4% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} materials showed improvements over conventional heating. Increases in fracture toughness were observed for annealing between 1200--1650C. The high temperature strength was related to the residual {alpha}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} content which is indicative of a finer average grain size in the specimens. The high temperature dynamic fatigue showed increased stress to failure for specimens microwave annealed between 1400--1550C for periods >5 h. Silicon nitrides with different sintering additives would require different conditions for optimum crystallization. While there were some observed property improvements, they were not so dramatic to justify abandoning conventional over microwave heating. The Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-4% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} materials used in the study were developed for elevated temperature use and already posses excellent good high temperature strength, fatigue resistance and creep properties. This is due to the very refractory nature of the grain boundary phases and the small quantity of secondary phase present. However, microwave annealing of these materials may be necessary in applications where the maximum in fracture toughness and fatigue resistance are required and thus justifies its use.

  19. A new phase diagram of water under negative pressure: The rise of the lowest-density clathrate s-III

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yingying; Zhu, Chongqin; Wang, Lu; Cao, Xiaoxiao; Su, Yan; Jiang, Xue; Meng, Sheng; Zhao, Jijun; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Ice and ice clathrate are not only omnipresent across polar regions of Earth or under terrestrial oceans but also ubiquitous in the solar system such as on comets, asteroids, or icy moons of the giant planets. Depending on the surrounding environment (temperature and pressure), ice alone exhibits an exceptionally rich and complicated phase diagram with 17 known crystalline polymorphs. Water molecules also form clathrate compounds with inclusion of guest molecules, such as cubic structure I (s-I), cubic structure II (s-II), hexagonal structure H (s-H), tetragonal structure T (s-T), and tetragonal structure K (s-K). Recently, guest-free clathrate structure II (s-II), also known as ice XVI located in the negative-pressure region of the phase diagram of water, is synthesized in the laboratory and motivates scientists to reexamine other ice clathrates with low density. Using extensive Monte Carlo packing algorithm and dispersion-corrected density functional theory optimization, we predict a crystalline clathrate of cubic structure III (s-III) composed of two large icosihexahedral cavities (8668412) and six small decahedral cavities (8248) per unit cell, which is dynamically stable by itself and can be fully stabilized by encapsulating an appropriate guest molecule in the large cavity. A new phase diagram of water ice with TIP4P/2005 (four-point transferable intermolecular potential/2005) model potential is constructed by considering a variety of candidate phases. The guest-free s-III clathrate with ultralow density overtakes s-II and s-H phases and emerges as the most stable ice polymorph in the pressure region below −5834 bar at 0 K and below −3411 bar at 300 K. PMID:26933681

  20. A new phase diagram of water under negative pressure: The rise of the lowest-density clathrate s-III.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yingying; Zhu, Chongqin; Wang, Lu; Cao, Xiaoxiao; Su, Yan; Jiang, Xue; Meng, Sheng; Zhao, Jijun; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2016-02-01

    Ice and ice clathrate are not only omnipresent across polar regions of Earth or under terrestrial oceans but also ubiquitous in the solar system such as on comets, asteroids, or icy moons of the giant planets. Depending on the surrounding environment (temperature and pressure), ice alone exhibits an exceptionally rich and complicated phase diagram with 17 known crystalline polymorphs. Water molecules also form clathrate compounds with inclusion of guest molecules, such as cubic structure I (s-I), cubic structure II (s-II), hexagonal structure H (s-H), tetragonal structure T (s-T), and tetragonal structure K (s-K). Recently, guest-free clathrate structure II (s-II), also known as ice XVI located in the negative-pressure region of the phase diagram of water, is synthesized in the laboratory and motivates scientists to reexamine other ice clathrates with low density. Using extensive Monte Carlo packing algorithm and dispersion-corrected density functional theory optimization, we predict a crystalline clathrate of cubic structure III (s-III) composed of two large icosihexahedral cavities (8(6)6(8)4(12)) and six small decahedral cavities (8(2)4(8)) per unit cell, which is dynamically stable by itself and can be fully stabilized by encapsulating an appropriate guest molecule in the large cavity. A new phase diagram of water ice with TIP4P/2005 (four-point transferable intermolecular potential/2005) model potential is constructed by considering a variety of candidate phases. The guest-free s-III clathrate with ultralow density overtakes s-II and s-H phases and emerges as the most stable ice polymorph in the pressure region below -5834 bar at 0 K and below -3411 bar at 300 K. PMID:26933681

  1. Can high pressure I-II transitions in semiconductors be affected by plastic flow and nanocrystal precipitation in phase I?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinstein, B. A.; Lindberg, G. P.

    Pressure-Raman spectroscopy in ZnSe and ZnTe single crystals reveals that Se and Te nano-crystals (NCs) precipitate in these II-VI hosts for pressures far below their I-II phase transitions. The inclusions are evident from the appearance and negative pressure-shift of the A1 Raman peaks of Se and Te (trigonal phase). The Se and Te NCs nucleate at dislocations and grain boundaries that arise from pressure-induced plastic flow. This produces chemical and structural inhomogeneities in the zincblende phase of the host. At substantially higher pressures, the I-II transition proceeds in the presence of these inhomogenities. This can affect the transition's onset pressure Pt and width ΔPt, and the occurrence of metastable phases along the transition path. Precipitation models in metals show that nucleation of inclusions depends on the Peierls stress τp and a parameter α related to the net free energy gained on nucleation. For favorable values of τp and α, NC precipitation at pressures below the I-II transition could occur in other compounds. We propose criteria to judge whether this is likely based on the observed ranges of τp in the hosts, and estimates of α derived from the cohesive energy densities of the NC materials. One finds trends that can serve as a useful guide, both to test the proposed criteria, and to decide when closer scrutiny of phase transition experiments is warranted, e.g., in powders where high dislocation densities are initially created

  2. A Phase I/II Radiation Dose Escalation Study With Concurrent Chemotherapy for Patients With Inoperable Stages I to III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Phase I Results of RTOG 0117

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Moughan, Jennifer; Graham, Mary V.; Byhardt, Roger; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Fowler, Jack; Purdy, James A.; Michalski, Jeff M.; Gore, Elizabeth; Choy, Hak

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: In preparation for a Phase III comparison of high-dose versus standard-dose radiation therapy, this Phase I/II study was initiated to establish the maximum tolerated dose of radiation therapy in the setting of concurrent chemotherapy, using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligibility included patients with histologically proven, unresectable Stages I to III non-small-cell lung cancer. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of paclitaxel, 50 mg/m{sup 2}, and carboplatin, AUC of 2, given weekly. The radiation dose was to be sequentially intensified by increasing the daily fraction size, starting from 75.25 Gy/35 fractions. Results: The Phase I portion of this study accrued 17 patients from 10 institutions and was closed in January 2004. After the initial 8 patients were accrued to cohort 1, the trial closed temporarily on September 26, 2002, due to reported toxicity. Two acute treatment-related dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) were reported at the time: a case of grade 5 and grade 3 radiation pneumonitis. The protocol, therefore, was revised to de-escalate the radiation therapy dose (74 Gy/37 fractions). Patients in cohort 1 continued to develop toxicity, with 6/8 (75%) patients eventually developing grade >=3 events. Cohort 2 accrued 9 patients. There was one DLT, a grade 3 esophagitis, in cohort 2 in the first 5 patients (1/5 patients) and no DLTs for the next 2 patients (0/2 patients). Conclusions: The maximum tolerated dose was determined to be 74 Gy/37 fractions (2.0 Gy per fraction) using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with concurrent paclitaxel and carboplatin therapy. This dose level in the Phase II portion has been well tolerated, with low rates of acute and late lung toxicities.

  3. Tai Chi as an adjunct physical activity for adults aged 45 years and older enrolled in phase III cardiac rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Taylor-Piliae, Ruth E; Silva, Edna; Sheremeta, Sharon Peachey

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiac rehabilitation improves physical, cognitive and psychosocial functioning, yet services are greatly underutilized with increasing patterns of attrition over time. Tai Chi has been suggested as a possible adjunct to cardiac rehabilitation exercise training. Aim To describe differences in physical, cognitive and psychosocial functioning among adults ≥ 45 years old attending phase III cardiac rehabilitation, who have or have not self-selected Tai Chi exercise as an adjunct physical activity. Methods A cross-sectional design compared subjects attending group-based Wu style Tai Chi classes plus cardiac rehabilitation, with cardiac rehabilitation only. Subjects had a battery of physical and cognitive functioning tests administered to examine aerobic endurance, balance, strength, and flexibility, verbal retrieval/recall, attention, concentration and tracking. Subjects completed a health survey to ascertain cardiac event information, medical history, and psychosocial functioning (i.e. health-related quality of life, stress, depressive symptoms, social support, and Tai Chi self-efficacy). Results A total of 51 subjects (75% married, 84% college-educated, 96% White/European-American) participated. Subjects were on average 70 (± 8) years old and had attended cardiac rehabilitation for 45 (± 37) months. Approximately 45% (n = 23) attended Tai Chi classes plus cardiac rehabilitation, while 55% (n = 28) attended cardiac rehabilitation only. Subjects attending Tai Chi plus cardiac rehabilitation had better balance, perceived physical health, and Tai Chi self-efficacy compared to those attending cardiac rehabilitation only (p ≤ 0.03). Conclusion Tai Chi can be easily implemented in any community/cardiac rehabilitation facility, and may offer adults additional options after a cardiac event. PMID:21095159

  4. Attosecond Pulse Carrier-Envelope Phase Effects: Roles of Frequency, Intensity and an Additional IR Pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pronin, Evgeny A.; Peng, Liang-You; Starace, Anthony F.

    2008-05-01

    The effects of the carrier-envelope phase (CEP) of a few-cycle attosecond pulse on ionized electron momentum and energy spectra are analyzed, both with and without an additional few-cycle IR pulse [1, 2]. In the absence of an IR pulse, the CEP-induced asymmetries in the ionized electron momentum distributions are shown to vary as the 3/2 power of the attosecond pulse intensity. These asymmetries are also found to satisfy an approximate scaling law involving the frequency and intensity of the attosecond pulse. In the presence of even a very weak IR pulse, the attosecond pulse CEP-induced asymmetries are found to be significantly augmented. In addition, for higher IR laser intensities, we observe for low electron energies peaks separated by the IR photon energy in one electron momentum direction along the laser polarization axis; in the opposite direction, we find structured peaks that are spaced by twice the IR photon energy. Possible physical mechanisms for such asymmetric, low-energy structures in the ionized electron momentum distribution are proposed. Our results are based on single-active-electron solutions of the 3D TDSE for H and He. [1] Peng LY, Pronin EA, and Starace AF, New J. Phys. 10, xxx (2008); [2] Peng LY, Starace AF, Phys. Rev. A 76, 043401 (2007)

  5. Utilization of modified corn silk as a biosorbent for solid-phase extraction of Cr(III) and chromium speciation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongmei; Pang, Jing; Wu, Mei; Wu, Qiaoli; Huo, Cuixiu

    2014-01-01

    The ues of corn silk modified with diluted nitric acid (HNO3-MCS) as a novel biosorbent has been established for solid-phase extraction of Cr(III) and chromium speciation in water samples. The functional groups of the HNO3-MCS surface are favorable for the adsorption of Cr(III). Effective extraction conditions were optimized in both batch and column methods. At pH 3.0 - 6.0, a discrimination of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) is achieved on the HNO3-MCS surface. Cr(III) ions are retained onto the HNO3-MCS surface, however, the adsorption of Cr(VI) is negligible under the same conditions. The adsorption isotherm of HNO3-MCS for Cr(III) has been demonstrated in accordance with a linear form of the Langmuir equation, and the maximum adsorption capacity is 35.21 mg g(-1). The well fitted linear regression of the pseudo-second order model showed the indication of a chemisorption mechanism for the entire concentration range. Thermodynamic studies have shown that the adsorption process is spontaneous and endothermic. The adsorbed Cr(III) was quantitatively eluted by a nitric acid solution with detection by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). With a sample volume of 30 mL, a detection limit (3σ) of 0.85 μg L(-1) and a precision of 2.0% RSD at the 40 μg L(-1) level were achieved. The concentration of Cr(III) could be accurately quantified within a linear range of 3 - 200 μg L(-1). After Cr(VI) has been reduced to Cr(III) with hydroxylamine hydrochloride, the total amount of chromium was obtained, and the content of Cr(VI) was given by subtraction. The procedure was validated by analyzing chromium in a certified reference material (GBW (E) 080039). It was also successfully applied for the speciation of chromium in wastewater samples. PMID:25382045

  6. ABE Phase III: Progress and Problems. September 1, 1969-April 1, 1970.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southwestern Cooperative Educational Lab., Albuquerque, NM.

    Interim information concerning the ABE III grants is provided in the three parts of this report. Part 1 (outline) describes the goals and objectives of each component; Part 2 describes accomplishments and problems to date; and Part 3 deals with coordination and supervision activities undertaken by the Lab. The components of the program are: (1)…

  7. Phase I/II Pilot Study of Mixed Chimerism to Treat Inherited Metabolic Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-05

    Hurler Syndrome (MPS I); Hurler-Scheie Syndrome With Early Neurologic Involvement and/or Sensitization to Enzyme Replacement Therapy (ERT); Hunter Syndrome (MPS II); Sanfilippo Syndrome (MPS III); Krabbe Disease (Globoid Leukodystrophy); Metachromatic Leukodystrophy (MLD); Adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD and AMN); Sandhoff Disease; Tay Sachs Disease; Pelizaeus Merzbacher (PMD); Niemann-Pick Disease; Alpha-mannosidosis

  8. Temperature Dependence of the Damping Constant Close to the I-II Phase Transition in s-TRIAZINE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavruk, D.; Yurtseven, H.

    The damping constant is calculated here at various temperatures for the Raman mode II in s-triazine using the soft mode-hard mode coupling model. The temperature dependence of the order parameter is used as the input data to calculate the damping constant of the Raman mode studied in this coupling model for s-triazine close to the I-II transition (Tc = 198 K). The soft mode-hard mode coupling model which considers the coupling of the soft acoustic mode with the optic modes in s-triazine, is fitted to the observed halfwidths of the Raman mode II close to the I-II phase transition in this crystal.

  9. Charge-Transfer Phase Transition of a Cyanide-Bridged Fe(II) /Fe(III) Coordination Polymer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kuirun; Kang, Soonchul; Yao, Zi-Shuo; Nakamura, Kazusa; Yamamoto, Takashi; Einaga, Yasuaki; Azuma, Nobuaki; Miyazaki, Yuji; Nakano, Motohiro; Kanegawa, Shinji; Sato, Osamu

    2016-05-10

    Heterometallic Prussian blue analogues are known to exhibit thermally induced charge transfer, resulting in switching of optical and magnetic properties. However, charge-transfer phase transitions have not been reported for the simplest FeFe cyanide-bridged systems. A mixed-valence Fe(II) /Fe(III) cyanide-bridged coordination polymer, {[Fe(Tp)(CN)3 ]2 Fe(bpe)⋅5 H2 O}n , which demonstrates a thermally induced charge-transfer phase transition, is described. As a result of the charge transfer during this phase transition, the high-spin state of the whole system does not change to a low-spin state. This result is in contrast to FeCo cyanide-bridged systems that exhibit charge-transfer-induced spin transitions. PMID:27061860

  10. Nanoscopic Dynamics of Phospholipid Based Unilamellar Vesicles: Effect of Phase Transition and Addition of Melittin Peptide and Cholesterol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, V. K.; Mamontov, E.; Anunciado, D. B.; O'Neill, H.; Urban, V.

    2015-03-01

    Dynamics of DMPC phospholipid in unilamellar vesicles (ULV) has been investigated using quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) techniques and reported here. Effect of addition of melittin and cholesterol on the dynamics of the lipid molecules in the ULV is also investigated. For DMPC ULV, a sharp fall in the elastic scan intensity is observed at 296 K, which is an indication of a solid gel to fluid phase transition. The addition of cholesterol or melittin inhibits this steep fall indicating that these molecules do have an influence on the main phase transition of DMPC ULV. QENS experiments have been carried out on DMPC ULV solution in the presence and absence of these additives at 280 K, in the solid gel phase, and at 310K, where lipids are in the fluid phase. The data analysis clearly shows the presence of two distinct motions: lateral and internal motions of the DMPC monomer. Both lateral and internal motions are found to be affected by the main phase transition. The addition of cholesterol or melittin influences the dynamics significantly in a different way, depending on the phase of lipid bilayers and the nature of additives. Effect of phase transition and additives on the dynamics of lipid in ULV will be discussed in details.

  11. The effect of direct addition of iron(III) on anaerobic digestion efficiency and odor causing compounds.

    PubMed

    Park, Chang Min; Novak, John T

    2013-01-01

    The role of iron addition to sewage sludge prior to anaerobic digestion was evaluated to determine the effect of iron on digestion performance and generation of odor-causing compounds. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and volatile organic sulfur compounds (VOSCs) were the odorous gases evaluated in this study. Samples were obtained from seven municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), and batch anaerobic digestion tests were conducted using primary and secondary sludges at 30 day solids retention time (SRT) under mesophilic conditions. Volatile solid removal (VSR) was highly predictable with background iron concentrations measured in the combined sludge. They were likely to increase as influent iron content increased. 1.25% w/w ferric chloride (FeCl3) was added to the anaerobic digester feed in order to simulate iron addition for sulfide control in full-scale WWTPs. The results showed that it had a positive impact on digestion performance with higher VSR and odor control with reduced H2S and TVOSCs in the headspace gas of dewatered biosolids considered in the tests. Ferric chloride is considered a beneficial additive as a strategy for an odor mitigation, not to mention more efficient digestion under anaerobic conditions. PMID:24334887

  12. Influence of Radiation and Multivalent Cation Additions on Phase Separation and Crystallization of Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Michael C. Weinberg; Donald R. Uhlmann; Gary L. Smith

    2002-08-09

    This report presents results of: (1) measurement of valence state ratios of iron in glass, and (2) a study of the effect of iron redox ratio on phase separation behavior in a glass. The redox ratio of iron in two sodium silicate (NS) glasses has been determined using a colorimetric method, Moessbauer analysis, and optical absorption. The experimental procedures were described in a previous report. We found that these three methods gave excellent agreement for the values of the Fe++/Fe+++ (redox ratio) in the glasses. Also, using the results of the colorimetric analysis we were able to find the extinction coefficients for the18.56% NS and the 13% NS glasses. We have utilized the optical absorption data that was taken for purposes of determining redox ratios to provide glass structural information. In particular, it has been suggested that the band centered near 14,500 cm-1 is indicative of Fe2+ - O2- - Fe3+ formation. In addition, the relative band intensities at 10,000 cm-1 and 4,800 cm-1 could give us information as to the environment around the Fe2+ responsible for the 4,800 cm-1 band. The Moessbauer data will provide supporting structural information. For example, the relative number of clustered and free ferric ions can be computed from the ratio of areas under the doublet and sextet in the liquid He spectra. Also, the change in shift parameter with redox ratio will provide an indication of whether there is an increase or decrease in tetrahedral site symmetry about both ferrous and ferric ions. Finally, the quadrupole splitting parameter provides information regarding the site symmetries about the Fe++ and Fe+++. Currently, we are analyzing the spectral data for these purposes. The Moessbauer work was done in conjunction with colleagues at PNNL, and a manuscript is currently in preparation. The effect of oxidation state of iron on the phase separation of xNa2O {center_dot}(100-x)SiO2 glasses, x = 18.56 and 13, containing 0.5 mole % iron oxide was studied. The

  13. Observation Targeting for the Tehachapi Pass and Mid-Columbia Basin: WindSENSE Phase III Project Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hanley, D

    2011-10-22

    The overall goal of this multi-phased research project known as WindSENSE is to develop an observation system deployment strategy that would improve wind power generation forecasts. The objective of the deployment strategy is to produce the maximum benefit for 1- to 6-hour ahead forecasts of wind speed at hub-height ({approx}80 m). In Phase III of the project, the focus was on the Mid-Columbia Basin region which encompasses the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) wind generation area shown in Figure 1 that includes Klondike, Stateline, and Hopkins Ridge wind plants. The typical hub height of a wind turbine is approximately 80-m above ground level (AGL). So it would seem that building meteorological towers in the region upwind of a wind generation facility would provide data necessary to improve the short-term forecasts for the 80-m AGL wind speed. However, this additional meteorological information typically does not significantly improve the accuracy of the 0- to 6-hour ahead wind power forecasts because processes controlling wind variability change from day-to-day and, at times, from hour-to-hour. It is also important to note that some processes causing significant changes in wind power production function principally in the vertical direction. These processes will not be detected by meteorological towers at off-site locations. For these reasons, it is quite challenging to determine the best type of sensors and deployment locations. To address the measurement deployment problem, Ensemble Sensitivity Analysis (ESA) was applied in the Phase I portion of the WindSENSE project. The ESA approach was initially designed to produce spatial fields that depict the sensitivity of a forecast metric to a set of prior state variables selected by the user. The best combination of variables and locations to improve the forecast was determined using the Multiple Observation Optimization Algorithm (MOOA) developed in Phase I. In Zack et al. (2010a), the ESA-MOOA approach was

  14. Systems Description; Sperry Low Temperature Geothermal Conversion System - Phase I and Phase II; Final Report, Volume III

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Hugh B.

    1982-01-01

    This Volume should be considered the introductory volume to the series of six volumes even though numbered out of sequence. Volumes I and II were completed first and released in 1981 while a staff member was available to do the work. Volumes III through VI are being written and released some two years later as DOE funding became available for the purpose. They are as complete as possible considering that almost all the people involved in the program are now unavailable. This Volume III is an overview of the entire program, and many of the items presented herein briefly will be found in expanded form in one of the other five volumes. It will be noticed that assumptions and parameters such as well flow, well temperature, wet bulb temperatures, etc., involved in the several different performance calculations in the volume vary somewhat. These calculations were made at different times for different purposes and no attempt has been made to bring them into exact agreement.

  15. Preliminary results of a phase I/II study of sodium pentosanpolysulfate in the treatment of chronic radiation-induced proctitis

    SciTech Connect

    Grigsby, P.W.; Pilepich, M.V.; Parsons, C.L. )

    1990-02-01

    This is a report of a phase I/II study of 13 patients treated with sodium pentosanpolysulfate (PPS) for chronic radiation-induced proctitis. A complete response was obtained in 82%, a partial response occurred in 9%, and 9% failed to respond to therapy. No significant toxicity was observed. It is concluded that PPS is an effective treatment for chronic radiation-induced proctitis and a phase III randomized, double-blind study of PPS versus placebo is planned.

  16. Integrated low emissions cleanup system for coal fueled turbines Phase III bench-scale testing and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.

    1995-08-01

    The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of coal-fired turbine technologies such as Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC), coal Gasification Combined Cycles (GCC), and Direct Coal-Fired Turbines (DCFT). A major technical development challenge remaining for coal-fired turbine systems is high-temperature gas cleaning to meet environmental emissions standards, as well as to ensure acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, has evaluated an Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concept that has been configured to meet this technical challenge. This ceramic hot gas filter (HGF), ILEC concept controls particulate emissions, while simultaneously contributing to the control of sulfur and alkali vapor contaminants in high-temperature, high-pressure, fuel gases or combustion gases. This document reports on the results of Phase III of the ILEC evaluation program, the final phase of the program. In Phase III, a bench-scale ILEC facility has been tested to (1) confirm the feasibility of the ILEC concept, and (2) to resolve some major filter cake behavior issues identified in PFBC, HGF applications.

  17. Once-daily USL255 as adjunctive treatment of partial-onset seizures: Randomized phase III study

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Steve S; Fakhoury, Toufic A; Hogan, R Edward; Nagaraddi, Venkatesh N; Blatt, Ilan; Lawson, Balduin; Arnold, Stephan; Anders, Bob; Clark, Annie M; Laine, Dawn; Meadows, R Shawn; Halvorsen, Mark B

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of USL255, Qudexy™ XR (topiramate) extended-release capsules, as an adjunctive treatment for refractory partial-onset seizures (POS) in adults taking one to three concomitant antiepileptic drugs. Methods In this global phase III study (PREVAIL; NCT01142193), 249 adults with POS were randomized 1:1 to once-daily USL255 (200 mg/day) or placebo. The primary and key secondary efficacy endpoints were median percent reduction in weekly POS frequency and responder rate (proportion of patients with ≥50% reduction in seizure frequency). Seizure freedom was also assessed. Safety (adverse events, clinical and laboratory findings), as well as treatment effects on quality of life (QOLIE-31-P) and clinical global impression of change (CGI-C), were evaluated. Results Across the entire 11-week treatment phase, USL255 significantly reduced the median percent seizure frequency and significantly improved responder rate compared with placebo. Efficacy over placebo was observed early in treatment, in patients with highly refractory POS, and in those with the most debilitating seizure types (i.e., complex partial, partial secondarily generalized). USL255 was safe and generally well tolerated with a low incidence of neurocognitive adverse events. USL255 was associated with significant clinical improvement without adversely affecting quality of life. Significance The PREVAIL phase III clinical study demonstrated that once-daily USL255 (200 mg/day) significantly improved seizure control and was safe and generally well tolerated with few neurocognitive side effects. PMID:24902983

  18. Additions and corrections to the check list of the Noctuoidea (Insecta, Lepidoptera) of North America north of Mexico III

    PubMed Central

    Lafontaine, J. Donald; Schmidt, B. Christian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A total of 124 additions and corrections are listed and discussed for the check list of the Noctuoidea of North America north of Mexico published in 2010. Twenty-eight species are added to the list, 16 through new species descriptions, eight as a result of taxonomic splits, and four based on newly recorded species. Forty-eight species are deleted from the list, 41 through synonymy, and seven that were based on misidentifications. Twelve changes are corrections in the spelling of names, or changes in parentheses on dates of publication. Twenty-seven are changes in taxonomy of names where no species are added or deleted; eight changes involve the renumbering of existing species for better taxonomic arrangement. Within the text 2 stat. n., 10 stat. rev., 27 syn. n., 5 syn. rev., and 1 comb. n. are proposed for the first time. PMID:26692790

  19. Doped-CuCl2/Al2O3 catalysts for ethylene oxychlorination: Influence of additives on the nature of active phase and reducibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianolio, D.; Muddada, N. B.; Olsbye, U.; Lamberti, C.

    2012-08-01

    Doped CuCl2/Al2O3 is an industrial catalyst used to produce dichloroethane, key intermediate of the polyvinyl chloride (PVC) chemistry. Using in situ and operando X-ray absorption spectroscopies, combined with laboratory techniques, we succeeded in understanding the nature of the active phase and the role played by most used additives for fluid and fixed beds technologies (LiCl, KCl, CsCl, MgCl2, and LaCl3). Moreover we were able to quantify relative fraction, reducibility and dispersion of Cu-phases adjoining catalytic tests in a pulse reactor. EXAFS and XANES highlighted that all additives contribute more or less efficiently in increasing the fraction of the active species (supported CuCl2). EXAFS directly, UV-vis and IR spectroscopies indirectly proved the formation of mixed salts, when KCl or CsCl are added, so displacing the rate determining step from the CuCl oxidation to the CuCl2 reduction. Fully oxidized catalyst is inactive, so copper in the working catalyst, exhibits a I/II mixed valence state. Coupling the ethylene conversion, measured with a pulse reactor, with XANES spectra collected after interaction with C2H4, we could differentiate the ability of doped samples to be reduced by ethylene. We obtained slightly different results explainable by the different dispersion of the active phase, measured by CO chemisorption.

  20. In-plant demonstration of optimization of energy utilization in beck dyeing of carpet. Proposed Part III, Phase III extension of DOE contract

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    A proposal to demonstrate on a commercial scale an optimized procedure for beck dyeing of carpet to improve energy utilization is discussed. The proposal is for Phase III. A number of energy conserving procedural and equipment modification including lower dyeing temperature, lower liquor ratio, lower air exhaust flows, and recycle of hot spent dyebaths will be demonstrated in the plant dyeings. Pilot-scale experiments suggest that these modifications will reduce direct energy consumption in carpet dyeing by 400 Btu per pound of carpet processed. Adoption of the modified process by only 50% of the carpet industry would yield an annual reduction in energy consumption of 1 x 10/sup 12/ Btu's (1.7 x 10/sup 5/ BOE). The pilot-scale experiments also indicate that a cost savings of approximately 2 cents per pound of carpet dyed can be achieved with the suggested modifications. The demonstrated technology will have application in other types of nylon and polyester fiber dyeing. The Salem Carpet Mills carpet dyeing facility at Chickamauga, Georgia, will be the site of the demonstration.

  1. High-pressure single-crystal elasticity study of CO2 across phase I-III transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin S.; Shieh, Sean R.; Bass, Jay D.; Dera, Przemyslaw; Prakapenka, Vitali

    2014-04-01

    Sound velocities and elastic moduli of solid single-crystal CO2 were measured at pressures up to 11.7(3) GPa by Brillouin spectroscopy. The aggregate adiabatic bulk modulus (KS), shear modulus (G), and their pressure derivatives for CO2 Phase I are KS0 = 3.4(6) GPa, G0 = 1.8(2) GPa, (dKS/dP)0 = 7.8(3), (dG/dP)0 = 2.5(1), (d2KS/dP2)0 = -0.23(3) GPa-1, and (d2G/dP2)0 = -0.10(1) GPa-1. A small increase of elastic properties was observed between 9.8(1) and 10.5(3) GPa, in agreement with the CO2 I-III transition pressure determined from previous x-ray diffraction experiments. Above the transition pressure PT, we observed a mixture dominated by CO2-I, with minor CO2-III. The CO2-I + III mixture shows slightly increased sound velocities compared to pure CO2-I. Elastic anisotropy calculated from the single-crystal elasticity tensor exhibits a decrease with pressure beginning at 7.9(1) GPa, which is lower than PT. Our results coincide with recent X-ray Raman observations, suggesting that a pressure-induced electronic transition is related to local structural and optical changes.

  2. Phase I/II study of a short course of weekly cisplatin in patients with advanced solid tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Planting, A. S.; van der Burg, M. E.; de Boer-Dennert, M.; Stoter, G.; Verweij, J.

    1993-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with advanced solid tumours were entered in a phase I/II study of six, weekly cycles of cisplatin. Nineteen patients were chemonaive and six were previously treated. The starting dose was 50 mg m-2 week-1. This dose could be escalated without major toxicity to 70 mg m-2 week-1. At a dose of 80 mg m-2 myelosuppression grade 3 occurred as well as grade 1 nephro- and neurotoxicity. The maximum tolerated dose was 85 mg m-2 with dose limiting thrombocytopenia. Hypertonic saline was effective in preventing nephrotoxicity. Ondansetron was a very effective antiemetic in the first weeks of treatment but its efficacy waned later on. Responses were observed in head and neck cancer, melanoma and mesothelioma. At the dose level of 80 mg m-2 the optimal dose intensity was reached. This schedule will be tested further in phase II studies. PMID:8398709

  3. Phase stabilization of magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles with B2O3 addition: A significant enhancement on the phase transition temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topal, Uğur; Aksan, Mehmet Ali

    2016-05-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) are extensively investigated for biomedical applications, particularly as contrast agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging and as drug delivery agent and heat mediators for cancer therapy. Tuning the magnetic properties of the magnetite nanoparticles with doping of foreign atoms has a crucial importance for determining the application areas of these materials and so attracts much interests. On the other hand the doping with foreign atoms requires high temperature annealing, and it causes a phase transition to the hematite phase above 400 °C. In this work the phase transition temperature from the magnetite to the hematite phase has been increased by 200 °C, which is the highest enhancement reported in literature. It was achieved by addition of the appropriate amounts of B2O3. Our experiments indicates that the 5.0 wt% of B2O3 addition stabilizes and keeps the existence of single phase magnetite up to 600 °C.

  4. Open-label, randomized, comparative, phase III study on effects of reducing steroid use in combination with Palonosetron.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Yoshito; Okita, Kenji; Yuki, Satoshi; Furuhata, Tomohisa; Fukushima, Hiraku; Masuko, Hiroyuki; Kawamoto, Yasuyuki; Isobe, Hiroshi; Miyagishima, Takuto; Sasaki, Kazuaki; Nakamura, Michio; Ohsaki, Yoshinobu; Nakajima, Junta; Tateyama, Miki; Eto, Kazunori; Minami, Shinya; Yokoyama, Ryoji; Iwanaga, Ichiro; Shibuya, Hitoshi; Kudo, Mineo; Oba, Koji; Takahashi, Yasuo

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the efficacy of a single administration of dexamethasone (DEX) on day 1 against DEX administration on days 1-3 in combination with palonosetron (PALO), a second-generation 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) in non-anthracycline and cyclophosphamide (AC) moderately-emetogenic chemotherapy (MEC). This phase III trial was conducted with a multi-center, randomized, open-label, non-inferiority design. Patients who received non-AC MEC as an initial chemotherapy were randomly assigned to either a group administered PALO (0.75 mg, i.v.) and DEX (9.9 mg, i.v.) prior to chemotherapy (study treatment group), or a group administered additional DEX (8 mg, i.v. or p.o.) on days 2-3 (control group). The primary endpoint was complete response (CR) rate. The CR rate difference was estimated by logistic regression with allocation factors as covariates. The non-inferiority margin was set at -15% (study treatment group - control group). From April 2011 to March 2013, 305 patients who received non-AC MEC were randomly allocated to one of two study groups. Overall, the CR rate was 66.2% in the study treatment group (N = 151) and 63.6% in the control group (N = 154). PALO plus DEX day 1 was non-inferior to PALO plus DEX days 1-3 (difference, 2.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -7.8%-12.8%; P-value for non-inferiority test = 0.0004). There were no differences between the two groups in terms of complete control rate (64.9 vs 61.7%) and total control rate (49.7% vs 47.4%). Anti-emetic DEX administration on days 2-3 may be eliminated when used in combination with PALO in patients receiving non-AC MEC. PMID:25872578

  5. Open-label, randomized, comparative, phase III study on effects of reducing steroid use in combination with Palonosetron

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Yoshito; Okita, Kenji; Yuki, Satoshi; Furuhata, Tomohisa; Fukushima, Hiraku; Masuko, Hiroyuki; Kawamoto, Yasuyuki; Isobe, Hiroshi; Miyagishima, Takuto; Sasaki, Kazuaki; Nakamura, Michio; Ohsaki, Yoshinobu; Nakajima, Junta; Tateyama, Miki; Eto, Kazunori; Minami, Shinya; Yokoyama, Ryoji; Iwanaga, Ichiro; Shibuya, Hitoshi; Kudo, Mineo; Oba, Koji; Takahashi, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the efficacy of a single administration of dexamethasone (DEX) on day 1 against DEX administration on days 1–3 in combination with palonosetron (PALO), a second-generation 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) in non-anthracycline and cyclophosphamide (AC) moderately-emetogenic chemotherapy (MEC). This phase III trial was conducted with a multi-center, randomized, open-label, non-inferiority design. Patients who received non-AC MEC as an initial chemotherapy were randomly assigned to either a group administered PALO (0.75 mg, i.v.) and DEX (9.9 mg, i.v.) prior to chemotherapy (study treatment group), or a group administered additional DEX (8 mg, i.v. or p.o.) on days 2–3 (control group). The primary endpoint was complete response (CR) rate. The CR rate difference was estimated by logistic regression with allocation factors as covariates. The non-inferiority margin was set at −15% (study treatment group − control group). From April 2011 to March 2013, 305 patients who received non-AC MEC were randomly allocated to one of two study groups. Overall, the CR rate was 66.2% in the study treatment group (N = 151) and 63.6% in the control group (N = 154). PALO plus DEX day 1 was non-inferior to PALO plus DEX days 1–3 (difference, 2.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: −7.8%–12.8%; P-value for non-inferiority test = 0.0004). There were no differences between the two groups in terms of complete control rate (64.9 vs 61.7%) and total control rate (49.7% vs 47.4%). Anti-emetic DEX administration on days 2–3 may be eliminated when used in combination with PALO in patients receiving non-AC MEC. PMID:25872578

  6. Phase III trial of nonpegylated liposomal doxorubicin in combination with trastuzumab and paclitaxel in HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Baselga, J.; Manikhas, A.; Cortés, J.; Llombart, A.; Roman, L.; Semiglazov, V. F.; Byakhov, M.; Lokanatha, D.; Forenza, S.; Goldfarb, R. H.; Matera, J.; Azarnia, N.; Hudis, C. A.; Rozencweig, M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Nonpegylated liposomal doxorubicin liposomal doxorubicin, (Myocet™; Sopherion Therapeutics, Inc Canada, and Cephalon, Europe) (NPLD; Myocet®) in combination with trastuzumabHerceptin® (Hoffmann-La Roche) has shown promising activity and cardiac safety. We conducted a randomized phase III trial of first-line NPLD plus trastuzumab and paclitaxel (Pharmachemie B.V.) (MTP) versus trastuzumab plus paclitaxel (TP) in patients with human epidermal growth factor 2 receptor (HER2)-positive metastatic breast cancer. Patients and Methods Patients were randomly assigned to NPLD (M, 50 mg/m2 every 3 weeks for six cycles), trastuzumab (T, 4 mg/kg loading dose followed by 2 mg/kg weekly), and paclitaxel (P, 80 mg/m2 weekly) or T + P at the same doses until progression or toxicity. The primary efficacy outcome was progression-free survival (PFS). Results One hundred and eighty-one patients were allocated to receive MTP, and 183 to TP. Median PFS was 16.1 and 14.5 months with MTP and TP, respectively [hazard ratio (HR) 0.84; two-sided P = 0.174]. In patients with estrogen receptor (ER)- and progesterone receptor (PR)-negative tumors, PFS was 20.7 and 14.0 months, respectively [HR 0.68; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.47–0.99]. Median overall survival (OS) was 33.6 and 28.9 months with MTP and TP, respectively (HR 0.79; two-sided P = 0.083). In ER- and PR-negative tumors, OS was 38.2 and 27.9 months, respectively (HR 0.63; 95% CI 0.42–0.93). The frequency of adverse events was higher with MTP, but there was no significant difference in cardiac toxicity between treatment arms. Conclusion(s) The trial failed to demonstrate a significant clinical improvement with the addition of M to TP regimen. The clinical benefit observed in an exploratory analysis in the ER- and PR-negative population deserves consideration for further clinical trials. Clinical trial number NCT00294996. PMID:24401928

  7. An Experimental Evaluation of Hyperactivity and Food Additives. 1977-Phase II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harley, J. Preston; And Others

    Phase II of a study on the effectiveness of B. Feingold's recommended diet for hyperactive children involved the nine children (mean age 9 years) who had shown the "best" response to diet manipulation in Phase I. Each child served as his own control and was challenged with specified amounts of placebo and artificial color containing food items…

  8. Scattering in the atmosphere of Venus. III - Line profiles and phase curves for Rayleigh scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, L. D. G.; Kattawar, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    Spectral line profiles, curves of growth, and curves for the equivalent width of a line as a function of Venus phase angle have been computed for a Rayleigh scattering cloud and compared with those for a cloud of isotropic scatterers. The results are very similar for the two kinds of scattering, with the exception of the curves of equivalent width as a function of Venus phase angle. These latter curves exhibit the 'inverse phase effect' and rule out a scale height of the clouds much less than half the scale height of the gas. The optical depth of the clouds is approximately 100.

  9. MONITORING, MODELING, AND ASSESSMENT OF THE EVERGLADES ECOSYSTEM: R-EMAP PHASE III

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project is a comprehensive evaluation of the ecological condition of the greater Everglades ecosystem. The project builds on its previous phases to document ecosystem responses as Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Program (CERP) restoration efforts change the quality, qu...

  10. Sediment Toxicity Identification and Evaluation (TIE) Phases I, II and III Guidance Document

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation summarizes the sediment toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) techniques that allow researchers to characterize and identify chemical causes of acute toxicity in sediments that can be applied using the 10-d solid-phase sediment toxicity tests.

  11. Phase Coupling in Langmuir Wave Packets: Evidence for Four Wave Interactions in Solar Type III Radio Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R. J.; Bergamo, M.

    2012-01-01

    The four wave interaction process, known as the oscillating two stream instability (OTSI) is considered as one of the mechanisms responsible for stabilizing the electron beams associated with solar type III radio bursts. It has been reported that (1) an intense localized Langmuir wave packet associated with a type III burst contains the spectral characteristics of the OTSI: (a) a resonant peak at the local electron plasma frequency, f(sub pe), (b) a Stokes peak at a frequency slightly lower than f(sub pe), (c) anti-Stokes peak at a frequency slightly higher than f(sub pe), and (d) a low frequency enhancement below a few hundred Hz, (2) the frequencies and wave numbers of these spectral components satisfy the resonance conditions of the OTSI, and (3) the peak intensity of the wave packet is well above the thresholds for the OTSI as well as spatial collapse of envelope solitons. Here, for the first time, applying the trispectral analysis on this wave packet, we show that the tricoherence, which measures the degree of coherent four-wave coupling amongst the observed spectral components exhibits a peak. This provides an additional evidence for the OTSI and related spatial collapse of Langmuir envelope solitons in type III burst sources.

  12. Gene expression of transporters and phase I/II metabolic enzymes in murine small intestine during fasting

    PubMed Central

    van den Bosch, Heleen M; Bünger, Meike; de Groot, Philip J; van der Meijde, Jolanda; Hooiveld, Guido JEJ; Müller, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Background Fasting has dramatic effects on small intestinal transport function. However, little is known on expression of intestinal transport and phase I/II metabolism genes during fasting and the role the fatty acid-activated transcription factor PPARα may play herein. We therefore investigated the effects of fasting on expression of these genes using Affymetrix GeneChip MOE430A arrays and quantitative RT-PCR. Results After 24 hours of fasting, expression levels of 33 of the 253 analyzed transporter and phase I/II metabolism genes were changed. Upregulated genes were involved in transport of energy-yielding molecules in processes such as glycogenolysis (G6pt1) and mitochondrial and peroxisomal oxidation of fatty acids (Cact, Mrs3/4, Fatp2, Cyp4a10, Cyp4b1). Other induced genes were responsible for the inactivation of the neurotransmitter serotonin (Sert, Sult1d1, Dtd, Papst2), formation of eicosanoids (Cyp2j6, Cyp4a10, Cyp4b1), or for secretion of cholesterol (Abca1 and Abcg8). Cyp3a11, typically known because of its drug metabolizing capacity, was also increased. Fasting had no pronounced effect on expression of phase II metabolic enzymes, except for glutathione S-transferases which were down-regulated. Time course studies revealed that some genes were acutely regulated, whereas expression of other genes was only affected after prolonged fasting. Finally, we identified 8 genes that were PPARα-dependently upregulated upon fasting. Conclusion We have characterized the response to fasting on expression of transporters and phase I/II metabolic enzymes in murine small intestine. Differentially expressed genes are involved in a variety of processes, which functionally can be summarized as a) increased oxidation of fat and xenobiotics, b) increased cholesterol secretion, c) increased susceptibility to electrophilic stressors, and d) reduced intestinal motility. This knowledge increases our understanding of gut physiology, and may be of relevance for e.g. pre

  13. Dependence of polarity inversion on V/III ratio in ‑c-GaN growth by oxide vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniyama, Yuki; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Takatsu, Hiroaki; Sumi, Tomoaki; Kitamoto, Akira; Imade, Mamoru; Yoshimura, Masashi; Isemura, Masashi; Mori, Yusuke

    2016-05-01

    One of the issues in bulk c-GaN growth is the decrease in the diameter of crystals with an increase in thickness owing to the appearance of inclined \\{ 10\\bar{1}1\\} and \\{ 10\\bar{1}2\\} facets. In this study, we performed ‑c-GaN growth by oxide vapor phase epitaxy (OVPE). As a result, truncated-inverted-pyramidal crystals were successfully grown on dot-patterned ‑c-GaN substrates. The diameter of the top surface of crystals was larger than that of windows. We further investigated the dependence of the ratio of inversion-domain area to growth area (R ID) on growth temperature, V/III ratio, and growth rate. The remained results revealed that R ID decreased with increasing growth temperature and V/III ratio, and kept constant for growth rate. Additionally, an epitaxial layer on ‑c-GaN substrates with a growth rate of 12.4 µm/h and an R ID as low as 3.8% was obtained under an NH3 partial pressure (P NH3) of 83 kPa at 1200 °C.

  14. Microbial Mineral Transformations at the Fe(II)/Fe(III) Redox Boundary for Solid Phase Capture of Strontium and Other Metal/Radionuclide Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    F. G. Ferris; E. E. Roden

    2000-01-31

    The migration of {sup 90}Sr in groundwater is a significant environmental concern at former nuclear weapons production sites in the US and abroad. Although retardation of {sup 90}Sr transport relative to mean groundwater velocity is known to occur in contaminated aquifers, Sr{sup 2+} does not sorb as strongly to iron oxides and other mineral phases as do other metal-radionuclides contaminants. Thus, some potential exists for extensive {sup 90}Sr migration from sources of contamination. Chemical or biological processes capable of retarding or immobilizing Sr{sup 2+} in groundwater environments are of interest from the standpoint of understanding controls on subsurface Sr{sup 2+} migration. In addition, it may be possible to exploit such processes for remediation of subsurface Sr contamination. In this study the authors examined the potential for the solid phase sorption and incorporation of Sr{sup 2+} into carbonate minerals formed during microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction as a first step toward evaluating whether this process could be used to promote retardation of {sup 90}Sr migrations in anaerobic subsurface environments. The demonstration of Sr{sup 2+} capture in carbonate mineral phases formed during bacterial HFO reduction and urea hydrolysis suggests that microbial carbonate mineral formation could contribute to Sr{sup 2+} retardation in groundwater environments. This process may also provide a mechanism for subsurface remediation of Sr{sup 2+} and other divalent metal contaminants that form insoluble carbonate precipitates.

  15. CHEMKIN-III: A FORTRAN chemical kinetics package for the analysis of gas-phase chemical and plasma kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Kee, R.J.; Rupley, F.M.; Meeks, E.; Miller, J.A.

    1996-05-01

    This document is the user`s manual for the third-generation CHEMKIN package. CHEMKIN is a software package whose purpose is to facilitate the formation, solution, and interpretation of problems involving elementary gas-phase chemical kinetics. It provides a flexible and powerful tool for incorporating complex chemical kinetics into simulations of fluid dynamics. The package consists of two major software components: an Interpreter and a Gas-Phase Subroutine Library. The Interpreter is a program that reads a symbolic description of an elementary, user-specified chemical reaction mechanism. One output from the Interpreter is a data file that forms a link to the Gas-Phase Subroutine Library. This library is a collection of about 100 highly modular FORTRAN subroutines that may be called to return information on equations of state, thermodynamic properties, and chemical production rates. CHEMKIN-III includes capabilities for treating multi-fluid plasma systems, that are not in thermal equilibrium. These new capabilities allow researchers to describe chemistry systems that are characterized by more than one temperature, in which reactions may depend on temperatures associated with different species; i.e. reactions may be driven by collisions with electrons, ions, or charge-neutral species. These new features have been implemented in such a way as to require little or no changes to CHEMKIN implementation for systems in thermal equilibrium, where all species share the same gas temperature. CHEMKIN-III now has the capability to handle weakly ionized plasma chemistry, especially for application related to advanced semiconductor processing.

  16. Selective solid-phase extraction and analysis of trace-level Cr(III), Fe(III), Pb(II), and Mn(II) Ions in wastewater using diethylenetriamine-functionalized carbon nanotubes dispersed in graphene oxide colloids.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiangbing; Cui, Yuemei; Chang, Xijun; Wang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MCNTs) were dispersed in graphene oxide (GO) colloids to be further functionalized with diethylenetriamine (DETA), resulting in GO-MCNTs-DETA nanocomposites for the solid-phase extraction and analysis of Cr(III), Fe(III), Pb(II), and Mn(II) ions at the trace levels in wastewater. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) indicates that this new solid-phase sorbent could facilitate the maximum static adsorption capacities of 5.4, 13.8, 6.6 and 9.5 mg g(-1) for Cr(III), Fe(III), Pb(II), and Mn(II) ions, respectively, showing the adsorption capacity up to 95% within about 30 min. Moreover, the detection limits of the GO-MCNTs-DETA-based analysis method were found to be 0.16, 0.50, 0.24 and 0.38 ng mL(-1) for Cr(III), Fe(III), Pb(II), and Mn(II) ions, respectively, with the relative standard deviation of lower than 3.0% (n=5). Importantly, common coexisting ions showed no significant interference on the separation and pre-concentration of these heavy metal ions at pH 4.0. Subsequently, the GO-MCNTs-DETA sorbent was successfully employed for the separation and analysis of trace-level Cr(III), Fe(III), Pb(II), and Mn(II) ions in wastewater samples yielding 75-folds concentration factors. PMID:26695275

  17. Effect of biochar addition on hydrogen and methane production in two-phase anaerobic digestion of aqueous carbohydrates food waste.

    PubMed

    Sunyoto, Nimas M S; Zhu, Mingming; Zhang, Zhezi; Zhang, Dongke

    2016-11-01

    Effect of biochar addition on hydrogen and methane production in two-phase anaerobic digestion of aqueous carbohydrates was studied using bench-scale bioreactors. The cultures with biochar additions were placed in 100ml reactors and incubated at 35°C and pH 5 for hydrogen production. The residual cultures were then used for methane production, incubated at 35°C and pH 7. Daily yields of hydrogen and methane and weekly yield of volatile fatty acids (VFA) were measured. The hydrogen and methane production potentials, rate and lag phases of the two phases were analysed using the Gompertz model. The results showed that biochar addition increased the maximum production rates of hydrogen by 32.5% and methane 41.6%, improved hydrogen yield by 31.0% and methane 10.0%, and shortened the lag phases in the two phases by 36.0% and 41.0%, respectively. Biochar addition also enhanced VFA generation during hydrogen production and VFA degradation in methane production. PMID:27474855

  18. Engineering development of coal-fired high performance power systems, Phase II and III

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-01

    The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: thermal efficiency (HHV) {ge} 47%, NOx, SOx, and particulates {le} 10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard) coal providing {ge} 65% of heat input, all solid wastes benign, and cost of electricity {le} 90% of present plants. Phase 1, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase 1 also included preliminary R and D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This phase, Phase 2, involves the development and testing of plant subsystems, refinement and updating of the HIPPS commercial plant design, and the site selection and engineering design of a HIPPS prototype plant. Work reported herein is from: Task 2.1 HITAC Combustors; Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

  19. Engineering development of coal-fired high performance power systems, Phase II and III

    SciTech Connect

    1999-01-01

    The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: thermal efficiency (HHV) {ge} 47%; NOx, SOx, and particulates {le} 10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard) coal providing {ge} 65% of heat input; all solid wastes benign; cost of electricity {le} 90% of present plants. Phase 1, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase 1 also included preliminary R and D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This phase, Phase 2, involves the development and testing of plant subsystems, refinement and updating of the HIPPS commercial plant design, and the site selection and engineering design of a HIPPS prototype plant. Work reported herein is from: Task 2.1 HITAC Combustors; Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

  20. Phase stability of cubic pyrochlore rare earth tantalate pinning additives in YBa2Cu3O7- superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Wee, Sung Hun; Cantoni, Claudia; Zuev, Yuri L; Specht, Eliot D; Goyal, Amit

    2012-01-01

    Phase stability of cubic-pyrochlore-structured RE3TaO7 (RTO, where RE = rare earth elements) pinning additives in YBa2Cu3O7- (YBCO) superconductor and the pinning properties influenced by RTO addition into YBCO films were investigated. RTO completely reacts with YBCO and is converted to cubic-double-perovskite-structured Ba2RETaO6 (BRETO), a more thermodynamically stable tantalate phase within YBCO. In RTO-doped YBCO films, BRETO self-assembled nanocolumnns align along the c-axis of the film and play a major role in the improvement of flux pinning and Jc performance over wide magnetic field and angular ranges.

  1. Confirmation of model-based dose selection for a Japanese phase III study of rivaroxaban in non-valvular atrial fibrillation patients.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Masato; Tanigawa, Takahiko; Hashizume, Kensei; Kajikawa, Mariko; Tajiri, Masahiro; Mueck, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to confirm the appropriateness of the dose setting for a Japanese phase III study of rivaroxaban in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF), which had been based on model simulation employing phase II study data. The previously developed mixed-effects pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) model, which consisted of an oral one-compartment model parameterized in terms of clearance, volume and a first-order absorption rate, was rebuilt and optimized using the data for 597 subjects from the Japanese phase III study, J-ROCKET AF. A mixed-effects modeling technique in NONMEM was used to quantify both unexplained inter-individual variability and inter-occasion variability, which are random effect parameters. The final PK and PK-PD models were evaluated to identify influential covariates. The empirical Bayes estimates of AUC and C(max) from the final PK model were consistent with the simulated results from the Japanese phase II study. There was no clear relationship between individual estimated exposures and safety-related events, and the estimated exposure levels were consistent with the global phase III data. Therefore, it was concluded that the dose selected for the phase III study with Japanese NVAF patients by means of model simulation employing phase II study data had been appropriate from the PK-PD perspective. PMID:23337693

  2. High-pressure single-crystal elasticity study of CO{sub 2} across phase I-III transition

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jin S. Bass, Jay D.; Shieh, Sean R.; Dera, Przemyslaw; Prakapenka, Vitali

    2014-04-07

    Sound velocities and elastic moduli of solid single-crystal CO{sub 2} were measured at pressures up to 11.7(3) GPa by Brillouin spectroscopy. The aggregate adiabatic bulk modulus (K{sub S}), shear modulus (G), and their pressure derivatives for CO{sub 2} Phase I are K{sub S0} = 3.4(6) GPa, G{sub 0} = 1.8(2) GPa, (dK{sub S}/dP){sub 0} = 7.8(3), (dG/dP){sub 0} = 2.5(1), (d{sup 2}K{sub S}/dP{sup 2}){sub 0} = −0.23(3) GPa{sup −1}, and (d{sup 2}G/dP{sup 2}){sub 0} = −0.10(1) GPa{sup −1}. A small increase of elastic properties was observed between 9.8(1) and 10.5(3) GPa, in agreement with the CO{sub 2} I-III transition pressure determined from previous x-ray diffraction experiments. Above the transition pressure P{sub T}, we observed a mixture dominated by CO{sub 2}-I, with minor CO{sub 2}-III. The CO{sub 2}-I + III mixture shows slightly increased sound velocities compared to pure CO{sub 2}-I. Elastic anisotropy calculated from the single-crystal elasticity tensor exhibits a decrease with pressure beginning at 7.9(1) GPa, which is lower than P{sub T}. Our results coincide with recent X-ray Raman observations, suggesting that a pressure-induced electronic transition is related to local structural and optical changes.

  3. Potential surrogate endpoints for overall survival in locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma: an analysis of a phase III randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Pei; Chen, Yong; Zhang, Wen-Na; Liang, Shao-Bo; Zong, Jing-Feng; Chen, Lei; Mao, Yan-Ping; Tang, Ling-Long; Li, Wen-Fei; Liu, Xu; Guo, Ying; Lin, Ai-Hua; Liu, Meng-Zhong; Sun, Ying; Ma, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The gold standard endpoint in trials of locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is overall survival (OS). Using data from a phase III randomized trial, we evaluated whether progression-free survival (PFS), failure-free survival (FFS), distant failure-free survival (D-FFS) or locoregional failure-free survival (LR-FFS) could be reliable surrogate endpoints for OS. Between July 2002 and September 2005, 316 eligible patients with stage III-IVB NPC were randomly assigned to receive either radiotherapy alone or chemoradiotherapy. 2- and 3-year PFS, FFS, D-FFS, and LR-FFS were tested as surrogate endpoints for 5-year OS using Prentice’s four criteria. The Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient was calculated to assess the strength of the associations. After a median follow-up time of 5.8 years, 2- and 3-year D-FFS and LR-FFS were not significantly different between treatment arms, in rejection of Prentice’s second criterion. Being consistent with all Prentice’s criteria, 2- and 3-year PFS and FFS were valid surrogate endpoints for 5-year OS; the rank correlation coefficient was highest (0.84) between 3-year PFS and 5-year OS. In conclusion, PFS and FFS at 2 and 3 years may be candidate surrogate endpoints for OS at 5 years; 3-year PFS may be more appropriate for early assessment of long-term survival. PMID:26219568

  4. Phase Stability of Chromium(III) Oxide Hydroxide in Alkaline Sodium Phosphate Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    S.E. Ziemniak; E.P. Opalka

    2003-07-08

    Grimaldiite ({alpha}-CrOOH) is shown to transform to a sodium-chromium(III)-hydroxyphosphate compound (SCHP) in alkaline sodium phosphate solutions at elevated temperatures via CrOOH(s) + 4Na{sup +} + 2HPO{sub 4}{sup 2-} = Na{sub 4}Cr(OH)(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}(s) + H{sub 2}O. X-ray diffraction analyses indicate that SCHP possesses an orthorhombic lattice having the same space group symmetry (Ibam, No.72) as sodium ferric hydroxyphosphate. A structurally-consistent designation for SCHP is Na{sub 3}Cr(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} {center_dot} NaOH; the molar volume of SCHP is estimated to be 1552 cm{sup 3}. The thermodynamic equilibrium for the above reaction was defined in the system Na{sub 2}O-P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O for Na/P molar ratios between 2.0 and 2.4. On the basis of observed reaction threshold values for sodium phosphate concentration and temperature, the standard molar entropy (S{sup o}), heat capacity (C{sub p}{sup o}) and free energy of formation ({Delta}G{sub f}{sup o}) for SCHP were calculated to be 690 J/(mol-K), 622 J/(mol-K) and -3509.97 kJ/mol, respectively.

  5. Phase Coupling Between Spectral Components of Collapsing Langmuir Solitons in Solar Type III Radio Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R. J.; Bergamo, M.

    2012-01-01

    We present the high time resolution observations of one of the Langmuir wave packets obtained in the source region of a solar type III radio burst. This wave packet satisfies the threshold condition of the supersonic modulational instability, as well as the criterion of a collapsing Langmuir soliton, i.e., the spatial scale derived from its peak intensity is less than that derived from its short time scale. The spectrum of t his wave packet contains an intense spectral peak at local electron plasma frequency, f(sub pe) and relatively weaker peaks at 2f(sub pe) and 3f(sub pe). We apply the wavelet based bispectral analysis technique on this wave packet and compute the bicoherence between its spectral components. It is found that the bicoherence exhibits two peaks at (approximately f(sub pe), approximately f(sub pe)) and (approximately f(sub pe) approximately 2f(sub pe)), which strongly suggest that the spectral peak at 2f(sub pe) probably corresponds to the second harmonic radio emission, generated as a result of the merging of antiparallel propagating Langmuir waves trapped in the collapsing Langmuir soliton, and, the spectral peak at 3f(sub pe) probably corresponds to the third harmonic radio emission, generated as a result of merging of a trapped Langmuir wave and a second harmonic electromagnetic wave.

  6. A phase I/II trial of BNC105P with everolimus in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC)

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Sumanta; Azad, Arun; Bhatia, Shailender; Drabkin, Harry; Costello, Brian; Sarantopoulos, John; Kanesvaran, Ravindran; Lauer, Richard; Starodub, Alexander; Hauke, Ralph; Sweeney, Christopher J.; Hahn, Noah M.; Sonpavde, Guru; Richey, Stephen; Breen, Timothy; Kremmidiotis, Gabriel; Leske, Annabell; Doolin, Elizabeth; Bibby, David C.; Simpson, Jeremy; Iglesias, Jose; Hutson, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Purpose BNC105P inhibits tubulin polymerization, and preclinical studies suggest possible synergy with everolimus. In this phase I/II study, efficacy and safety of the combination were explored in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). Experimental Design A phase I study in patients with clear cell mRCC and any prior number of therapies was conducted using a classical 3+3 design to evaluate standard doses of everolimus with increasing doses of BNC105P. At the recommended phase II dose (RP2D), patients with clear cell mRCC and 1-2 prior therapies (including ≥1 VEGF-TKI) were randomized to BNC105P with everolimus (Arm A) or everolimus alone (Arm B). The primary endpoint of the study was 6-month progression-free survival (6MPFS). Secondary endpoints included response rate, PFS, overall survival (OS) and exploratory biomarker analyses. Results In the phase I study (n=15), a dose of BNC105P at 16 mg/m2 with everolimus at 10 mg daily was identified as the RP2D. In the phase II study, 139 patients were randomized, with 69 and 67 evaluable patients in Arms A and B, respectively. 6MPFS was similar in the treatment arms (Arm A: 33.82% v Arm B: 30.30%, P=0.66) and no difference in median PFS was observed (Arm A: 4.7 mos v Arm B: 4.1 mos; P=0.49). Changes in matrix metalloproteinase-9, stem cell factor, sex hormone binding globulin and serum amyloid A protein were associated with clinical outcome with BNC105P. Conclusions Although the primary endpoint was not met in an unselected population, correlative studies suggest several biomarkers that warrant further prospective evaluation. PMID:25788492

  7. Phase I/II study of 131I-MIBG with vincristine and 5 days of irinotecan for advanced neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    DuBois, S G; Allen, S; Bent, M; Hilton, J F; Hollinger, F; Hawkins, R; Courtier, J; Mosse, Y P; Matthay, K K

    2015-01-01

    Background: 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) is an active radiopharmaceutical in neuroblastoma. A previous study demonstrated that MIBG could be combined with vincristine and prolonged irinotecan, although 25% of first courses had grade 3 diarrhoea. The current phase I/II study evaluated MIBG with vincristine and 5 days of higher-dose irinotecan. Methods: Patients 1–30 years old with advanced neuroblastoma were eligible. Patients received cefixime on days −1 to +6, irinotecan (50 mg m−2 per dose IV) on days 0–4, vincristine (2 mg m−2) on day 0, MIBG (555 or 666 MBq kg−1) on day 1, and peripheral blood stem cells on day 13. UGT1A1 genotyping was performed in consenting patients. Results: Thirty-two patients (12 phase I ; 20 phase II) received 42 courses. No dose-limiting toxicities were seen during dose escalation and the recommended administered activity was 666 MBq kg−1. Myelosuppression and diarrhoea were the most common toxicities, with grade 3 diarrhoea in 6% of first courses. Patients homozygous for UGT1A1*28 had more grade 4 thrombocytopenia (80% vs 37% P=0.14). Responses (five complete and four partial) occurred in 9 out of 32 (28%) patients. Conclusions: MIBG (666 MBq kg−1) with vincristine and this irinotecan schedule is tolerable and active, with less severe diarrhoea compared with a regimen using more protracted irinotecan. PMID:25602966

  8. Evaluation of hydrothermal resources of North Dakota. Phase III final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, K.L.; Howell, F.L.; Wartman, B.L.; Anderson, S.B.

    1982-08-01

    The hydrothermal resources of North Dakota were evaluated. This evaluation was based on existing data on file with the North Dakota Geological Survey (NDGS) and other state and federal agencies, and field and laboratory studies conducted. The principal sources of data used during the study were WELLFILE, the computer library of oil and gas well data developed during the Phase I study, and WATERCAT, a computer library system of water well data assembled during the Phase II study. A field survey of the shallow geothermal gradients present in selected groundwater observation holes was conducted. Laboratory determinations of the thermal conductivity of core samples were done to facilitate heat-flow calculations on those holes-of-convenience cased.

  9. Phase 0/I/II Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials Program (Consortia) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Five cancer research centers lead multiple collaborative networks to assess potential cancer preventive agents and to conduct early clinical development of promising preventive agents. Also called the Consortia for Early Phase Prevention Trials, the studies require extensive biomarker analysis, investigation of the biologic effects of the cancer preventive agents on their intended molecular targets and on multiple endpoints associated with carcinogenesis, and correlation with clinically relevant endpoints.  | Systematic early clinical development of promising preventive agents through five major medical research centers.

  10. MCNP6 Results for the Phase III Sensitivity Benchmark of the OCED/NEA Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis for Criticality Safety Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Kiedrowski, Brian C.

    2012-06-19

    Within the last decade, there has been increasing interest in the calculation of cross section sensitivity coefficients of k{sub eff} for integral experiment design and uncertainty analysis. The OECD/NEA has an Expert Group devoted to Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis within the Working Party for Nuclear Criticality Safety. This expert group has developed benchmarks to assess code capabilities and performance for doing sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. Phase III of a set of sensitivity benchmarks evaluates capabilities for computing sensitivity coefficients. MCNP6 has the capability to compute cross section sensitivities for k{sub eff} using continuous-energy physics. To help verify this capability, results for the Phase III benchmark cases are generated and submitted to the Expert Group for comparison. The Phase III benchmark has three cases: III.1, an array of MOX fuel pins, III.2, a series of infinite lattices of MOX fuel pins with varying pitches, and III.3 two spheres with homogeneous mixtures of UF{sub 4} and polyethylene with different enrichments.

  11. Lack of patient-reported outcomes assessment in phase III breast cancer studies: a missed opportunity for informed decision making.

    PubMed

    Blinder, Victoria S

    2014-01-01

    A phase III study comparing capecitabine monotherapy to combination treatment with capecitabine and sunitinib in patients with metastatic breast cancer failed to demonstrate a benefit in terms of progression-free or overall survival. Both regimens were reasonably well tolerated with some differences noted in the specific toxicity profiles. However, the study failed to incorporate an assessment of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) such as self-reported pain, quality of life, or employment outcomes. This is a missed opportunity. If more clinical trials included such measures, they would provide valuable information to patients and clinicians choosing from a wide array of available and otherwise similarly effective systemic therapies for metastatic breast cancer. PMID:25841482

  12. Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project probability/coordination study resident fish and wildlife impacts, Phase III. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Leitzinger, E.

    1996-09-01

    Phase III began in 1995 with the overall goal of quantifying changes in resident fish habitat in the Snake River basin upstream of Brownlee Reservoir resulting from the release of salmon flow augmentation water. Existing data, in the form of weighted usable area versus flow relationships, were used to estimate habitat changes for white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)in the Snake River between C.J. Strike Dam and Brownlee pool. The increased flows resulted in increased white sturgeon habitat for most life stages. Rainbow trout adult and spawning habitat increased while juvenile and fry habitat generally decreased. Whether or not these short term increases in habitat result in long term benefits to the fish populations has yet to be determined.

  13. OECD/NEA expert group on uncertainty analysis for criticality safety assessment: Results of benchmark on sensitivity calculation (phase III)

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, T.; Laville, C.; Dyrda, J.; Mennerdahl, D.; Golovko, Y.; Raskach, K.; Tsiboulia, A.; Lee, G. S.; Woo, S. W.; Bidaud, A.; Sabouri, P.; Bledsoe, K.; Rearden, B.; Gulliford, J.; Michel-Sendis, F.

    2012-07-01

    The sensitivities of the k{sub eff} eigenvalue to neutron cross sections have become commonly used in similarity studies and as part of the validation algorithm for criticality safety assessments. To test calculations of the sensitivity coefficients, a benchmark study (Phase III) has been established by the OECD-NEA/WPNCS/EG UACSA (Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis for Criticality Safety Assessment). This paper presents some sensitivity results generated by the benchmark participants using various computational tools based upon different computational methods: SCALE/TSUNAMI-3D and -1D, MONK, APOLLO2-MORET 5, DRAGON-SUSD3D and MMKKENO. The study demonstrates the performance of the tools. It also illustrates how model simplifications impact the sensitivity results and demonstrates the importance of 'implicit' (self-shielding) sensitivities. This work has been a useful step towards verification of the existing and developed sensitivity analysis methods. (authors)

  14. Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project Probability/Coordination Study Resident Fish and Wildlife Impact Phase III, 1995 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Leitzinger, Eric J.

    1996-09-01

    Phase III began in 1995 with the overall goal of quantifying changes in resident fish habitat in the Snake River basin upstream of Brownlee Reservoir resulting from the release of salmon flow augmentation water. Existing data, in the form of weighted usable area versus flow relationships, were used to estimate habitat changes for white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in the Snake River between C.J. Strike Dam and Brownlee pool. The increased flows resulted in increased white sturgeon habitat for most life stages. Rainbow trout adult and spawning habitat increased while juvenile and fry habitat generally decreased. Whether or not these short term increases in habitat result in long term benefits to the fish populations has yet to be determined.

  15. Phase III trial comparing two low dose rates in brachytherapy of cervix carcinoma: Report at two years

    SciTech Connect

    Lambin, P.; Gerbaulet, A.; Kramer, A.; Haie-Meder, C.; Malaise, E.P.; Chassagne, D. ); Scalliet, P. )

    1993-02-15

    This Phase III randomized trial examined the effect of two low dose rates (0.73 or 0.38 Gy[center dot]h[sup [minus]1]) on the local control, survival, relapse-free survival, complications, and secondary effects in the treatment of cervical cancers. A total of 204 Stage Ib or II cervical carcinoma patients were included between January 1985 and September 1988. Treatment consisted of uterovaginal [sup 137]Cs irradiation followed by surgery. The two groups were similar for age, tumor stage and medical or surgical history. Their brachytherapy parameters were also similar (60 Gy pear dimensions, dose to critical organs, total kerma, etc....). There were no differences in the short-term effects or therapeutic outcome. However, overall complications and side effects observed after 6 months were significantly more frequent (p < 0.01) in the higher dose rate group. 40 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. Influence of salt additives on phase transformation of guanosine 5-monophosphate disodium in anti-solvent crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Anh-Tuan; Kang, Jeongki; Kim, Woo-Sik

    2013-06-01

    The influence of sodium chloride (NaCl) as an additive on the anti-solvent crystallization of guanosine 5-monophosphate disodium (GMP-2Na) was investigated in continuous Couette-Taylor (CT) and batch mixing tank (MT) crystallizers. The anti-solvent crystallization initially precipitated amorphous solids of GMP-2Na, which then slowly transformed into hydrate crystals in the solution. However, the phase transformation of GMP-2Na was markedly promoted by the sodium chloride additive due to the common ion effect. While the normal phase transformation in the batch MT crystallizer required over 120 min of crystallization time without using the sodium chloride additive, the process was completed within 60 min when a small amount of the salt additive was added. The phase transformation was also significantly accelerated in the continuous CT crystallizer. Without using the sodium chloride additive, 7 min of the mean residence time was required for the production of 100% hydrate GMP crystals. However, when using the sodium chloride additive, a mean residence time of only 2 min was sufficient to completely transform the amorphous solids of GMP-2Na into hydrate crystals due to the common ion effect combined with the effective fluid motion of the Taylor vortex for the mass transfer.

  17. Design of Phosphonium-Type Zwitterion as an Additive to Improve Saturated Water Content of Phase-Separated Ionic Liquid from Aqueous Phase toward Reversible Extraction of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Yoritsugu; Kohno, Yuki; Nakamura, Nobuhumi; Ohno, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    We designed phosphonium-type zwitterion (ZI) to control the saturated water content of separated ionic liquid (IL) phase in the hydrophobic IL/water biphasic systems. The saturated water content of separated IL phase, 1-butyl-3-methyimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, was considerably improved from 0.4 wt% to 62.8 wt% by adding N,N,N-tripentyl-4-sulfonyl-1-butanephosphonium-type ZI (P555C4S). In addition, the maximum water content decreased from 62.8 wt% to 34.1 wt% by increasing KH2PO4/K2HPO4 salt content in upper aqueous phosphate buffer phase. Horse heart cytochrome c (cyt.c) was dissolved selectively in IL phase by improving the water content of IL phase, and spectroscopic analysis revealed that the dissolved cyt.c retained its higher ordered structure. Furthermore, cyt. c dissolved in IL phase was re-extracted again from IL phase to aqueous phase by increasing the concentration of inorganic salts of the buffer solution. PMID:24013379

  18. Phase III Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing Tremelimumab With Standard-of-Care Chemotherapy in Patients With Advanced Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Ribas, Antoni; Kefford, Richard; Marshall, Margaret A.; Punt, Cornelis J.A.; Haanen, John B.; Marmol, Maribel; Garbe, Claus; Gogas, Helen; Schachter, Jacob; Linette, Gerald; Lorigan, Paul; Kendra, Kari L.; Maio, Michele; Trefzer, Uwe; Smylie, Michael; McArthur, Grant A.; Dreno, Brigitte; Nathan, Paul D.; Mackiewicz, Jacek; Kirkwood, John M.; Gomez-Navarro, Jesus; Huang, Bo; Pavlov, Dmitri; Hauschild, Axel

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In phase I/II trials, the cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated antigen-4–blocking monoclonal antibody tremelimumab induced durable responses in a subset of patients with advanced melanoma. This phase III study evaluated overall survival (OS) and other safety and efficacy end points in patients with advanced melanoma treated with tremelimumab or standard-of-care chemotherapy. Patients and Methods Patients with treatment-naive, unresectable stage IIIc or IV melanoma were randomly assigned at a ratio of one to one to tremelimumab (15 mg/kg once every 90 days) or physician's choice of standard-of-care chemotherapy (temozolomide or dacarbazine). Results In all, 655 patients were enrolled and randomly assigned. The test statistic crossed the prespecified futility boundary at second interim analysis after 340 deaths, but survival follow-up continued. At final analysis with 534 events, median OS by intent to treat was 12.6 months (95% CI, 10.8 to 14.3) for tremelimumab and 10.7 months (95% CI, 9.36 to 11.96) for chemotherapy (hazard ratio, 0.88; P = .127). Objective response rates were similar in the two arms: 10.7% in the tremelimumab arm and 9.8% in the chemotherapy arm. However, response duration (measured from date of random assignment) was significantly longer after tremelimumab (35.8 v 13.7 months; P = .0011). Diarrhea, pruritus, and rash were the most common treatment-related adverse events in the tremelimumab arm; 7.4% had endocrine toxicities. Seven deaths in the tremelimumab arm and one in the chemotherapy arm were considered treatment related by either investigators or sponsor. Conclusion This study failed to demonstrate a statistically significant survival advantage of treatment with tremelimumab over standard-of-care chemotherapy in first-line treatment of patients with metastatic melanoma. PMID:23295794

  19. Comprehensive safety assessment of a human inactivated diploid enterovirus 71 vaccine based on a phase III clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Kong, Yujia; Jiang, Zhiwei; Li, Chanjuan; Wang, Ling; Xia, Jielai

    2016-04-01

    Human enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a causative agent of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD). In a previous phase III trial in children, a human diploid cell-based inactivated EV71 vaccine elicited EV71 specific immune responses and protection against EV71 associated HFMD. This study aimed to assess the factors influencing the severity of adverse events observed in this previous trial. This was a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, phase III clinical trial of a human diploid vaccine carried out in 12,000 children in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01569581). Solicited events were recorded for 7 days and unsolicited events were reported for 28 days after each injection. Age trend analysis of adverse reaction was conducted in each treatment group. Multiple logistic regression models were built to identify factors influencing the severity of adverse reactions. Fewer solicited adverse reactions were observed in older participants within the first 7 days after vaccination (P < 0.0001), except local pain and pruritus. More severe adverse reactions were observed after the initial injection than after the booster injection. Serious cold or respiratory tract infections (RTI) were observed more often in children aged 6-36 months than in older children. Only the severity of local swelling was associated with body mass index. Children with throat discomfort before injection had a higher risk of serious cold or RTI. These results indicated that the human diploid cell-based vaccine achieved a satisfactory safety profile. PMID:26837471

  20. Matching of additive and polarizable force fields for multiscale condensed phase simulations

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Christopher M.; Best, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    Inclusion of electronic polarization effects is one of the key aspects in which the accuracy of current biomolecular force fields may be improved. The principal drawback of such approaches is the computational cost, which typically ranges from 3 – 10 times that of the equivalent additive model, and may be greater for more sophisticated treatments of polarization or other many-body effects. Here, we present a multiscale approach which may be used to enhance the sampling in simulations with polarizable models, by using the additive model as a tool to explore configuration space. We use a method based on information theory to determine the charges for an additive model that has optimal overlap with the polarizable one, and we demonstrate the feasibility of enhancing sampling via a hybrid replica exchange scheme for several model systems. An additional advantage is that, in the process, we obtain a systematic method for deriving charges for an additive model that will be the natural complement to its polarizable parent. The additive charges are found by an effective coarse-graining of the polarizable force field, rather than by ad hoc procedures. PMID:23997691

  1. Tuning protein-protein interactions using cosolvents: specific effects of ionic and non-ionic additives on protein phase behavior.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jan; Platten, Florian; Wagner, Dana; Egelhaaf, Stefan U

    2016-04-21

    Cosolvents are routinely used to modulate the (thermal) stability of proteins and, hence, their interactions with proteins have been studied intensely. However, less is known about their specific effects on protein-protein interactions, which we characterize in terms of the protein phase behavior. We analyze the phase behavior of lysozyme solutions in the presence of sodium chloride (NaCl), guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl), glycerol, and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). We experimentally determined the crystallization boundary (XB) and, in combination with data on the cloud-point temperatures (CPTs), the crystallization gap. In agreement with other studies, our data indicate that the additives might affect the protein phase behavior through electrostatic screening and additive-specific contributions. At high salt concentrations, where electrostatic interactions are screened, both the CPT and the XB are found to be linear functions of the additive concentration. Their slopes quantify the additive-specific changes of the phase behavior and thus of the protein-protein interactions. While the specific effect of NaCl is to induce attractions between proteins, DMSO, glycerol and GuHCl (with increasing strength) weaken attractions and/or induce repulsions. Except for DMSO, changes of the CPT are stronger than those of the XB. Furthermore, the crystallization gap widens in the case of GuHCl and glycerol and narrows in the case of NaCl. We relate these changes to colloidal interaction models, namely square-well and patchy interactions. PMID:27020538

  2. Controlling Phase Separation of Tough Interpenetrating Polymer Networks via Addition of Amphiphilic Block Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohde, Brian; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan; Robertson, Megan

    Interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs) offer a unique way to combine the mechanical properties of two thermoset systems. Often used to create a material that possesses both high toughness and tensile properties, here we use polydicyclopentadiene, cured via ring opening metathesis polymerization, to contribute high toughness and diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A cured via anhydride chemistry to contribute high tensile strength and modulus. As the uncompatibilized system reacts in the presence of one another, mesoscopic phase separation occurs and dictates the overall efficacy of combining mechanical properties. To control phase separation and drive the system towards more mechanically robust nanostructed IPNs, amphiphilic block copolymers of polybutadiene- b-polyethylene oxide, where one block possesses strong affinity to polyDCPD and the other the DGEBA, were added to the system. Here we present a systematic study of the influence of block copolymer composition in the overall blend on degree of phase separation and morphology using a combination of small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. The resultant mechanical properties are then explored in an effort to link mechanical properties to blend morphology.

  3. Controlling Phase Separation of Interpenetrating Polymer Networks by Addition of Block Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohde, Brian; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan; Robertson, Megan

    2015-03-01

    Interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs) offer a unique way to produce mechanically superior thermoset blends relative to the neat components. In this study, IPNs were prepared consisting of polydicyclopentadiene (polyDCPD), contributing high fracture toughness, and an epoxy resin (the diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A cured with nadic methyl anhydride), contributing high tensile strength and modulus. In the absence of compatibilization, the simultaneous curing of the networks leads to a macroscopically phase separated blend that exhibits poor mechanical behavior. To control phase separation and drive the system towards more mechanically robust nanostructured IPNs, block copolymers were designed to compatibilize this system, where one block possesses affinity to polyDCPD (polynorbornene in this study) and the other block possesses affinity to DGEBA (poly(ɛ-caprolactone) in this study). The influence of the block copolymer composition on the degree of phase separation and interfacial adhesion in the IPN was studied using a combination of small-angle scattering and imaging techniques. The resultant mechanical properties were explored and structure-property relationships were developed in this blend system.

  4. Nutritional Status Assessment During the Phase IIA and Phase III Lunar/Mars Life Support Test Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.; Block, Gladys; Davis-Street, Janis E.; DeKerlegand, Diane E.; Fanselow, Stephanie A.; Fesperman, J. Vernell; Gillman, Patricia L.; Nillen, Jeannie I.; Rice, Barbara L.; Smith, Myra D.

    2000-01-01

    Nutrition is a critical concern for extended-duration space missions (Smith and Lane, 1999). Loss of body weight is a primary consequence of altered nutrition, and is frequently observed during space flight (Smith and Lane; 1999). Other existing dietary concerns for space flight include excessive intakes of sodium and iron, and insufficient intakes of water and vitamin D (Smith and Lane, 1999). Furthermore, dependence on closed or semi-closed food systems increases the likelihood of inadequate intakes of key nutrients. This is a significant concern for extended-duration space missions. Space nutrition research often necessitates detailed recording of all food consumption. While this yields extremely accurate data, it requires considerable time and effort, and thus is not suitable for routine medical monitoring during space flight. To alleviate this problem, a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) was designed to provide a quick and easy, yet reasonably accurate, method for crewmembers to provide dietary intake information to the ground. We report here a study which was designed to assess nutritional status before, during, and after the 60-d and 91-d chamber stays. An additional goal of the study was to validate a food frequency questionnaire designed specifically for use with space flight food systems.

  5. Intercalation-induced phases in layer compounds of the A /SUP III/ B /SUP VI/ -type

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalyuk, Z.D.; Pyrlya, M.N.; Seredyuk, A.I.; Tovstyuk, K.D.

    1986-03-01

    The authors investigate the kinetics of combined electrochemical intercalation and the physicochemical properties of the introduced phases. InSe and GaSe single crystals were used in the experiments; the crystals were grown by the Bridgman method. The authors determined the concentration dependences of the electrode potentials and electrical conductivity of the compounds InSe and GaSe intercalated with lithium and lead. The results of the measurements are presented. Lithium and lead enter into the matrix of the crystals in a nonconducting state.

  6. [Optimization of the transition from phase II to III of cardiac rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Keck, M

    2000-04-01

    A decisive element of reliable maintenance of the rehabilitation result achieved by patients undergoing inpatient cardiac rehabilitation has turned out to be comprehensive and successful management of the transition into the outpatient phase. This requires concrete planning and implementation of the concept, to be based on patient-related approaches and including the family physician, relatives, occupational institutions, and local and regional partners such as adult education centres, health insurances, sports clubs, psychological individual care, etc. Problem-orientated planning adapted to the individual requirements and expectations of the patient is of utmost importance. PMID:10832165

  7. A Qualitative Study of Phase III Cancer Clinical Trial Enrollment Decision-Making: Perspectives from Adolescents, Young Adults, Caregivers, and Providers

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Lisa A.; Reilly, Anne; Deatrick, Janet A.; Balis, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The mortality reduction rate for adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer has not demonstrated the same rate of improvement as for children, due partly to insufficient phase III cancer clinical trial enrollment. This study describes three key components of phase III cancer clinical trial enrollment—family decision-making patterns, factors that influence AYAs' involvement, and attitudes (perceived barriers and benefits) toward trial participation—and evaluated a measure of attitudes. Methods: Participants were AYAs (15–23 years old at study) diagnosed with cancer and offered a phase III cancer clinical trial within the past 3–21 months, their primary caregivers, and their healthcare providers. Interviews assessed: (a) phase III clinical trial decision-making experiences and (b) relevance of the Pediatric Research Participation Questionnaire (PRPQ) in the assessment of AYAs' attitudes toward enrollment on phase III cancer clinical trials. Results: Thirteen AYAs, 16 caregivers, and 11 providers were interviewed. Four decision-making patterns were identified, with AYA abdicates to caregiver and caregiver-based and AYA-endorsed the most commonly described, but with variation across respondents. Distress and reduced health-related quality of life limited AYAs' involvement in the enrollment decision, while developmental and emotional maturity facilitated involvement. Perceived barriers and benefits to enrollment were reported, and the PRPQ was deemed relevant with minor modifications. Conclusions: Findings suggest that AYAs may not be fully involved in phase III cancer clinical trial enrollment decision-making, and caregivers and providers are challenged to overcome factors that limit their involvement. The PRPQ shows promise as a tool for systematically evaluating clinical trial attitudes. PMID:24669354

  8. A Qualitative Study of Phase III Cancer Clinical Trial Enrollment Decision-Making: Perspectives from Adolescents, Young Adults, Caregivers, and Providers.

    PubMed

    Barakat, Lamia P; Schwartz, Lisa A; Reilly, Anne; Deatrick, Janet A; Balis, Frank

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: The mortality reduction rate for adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer has not demonstrated the same rate of improvement as for children, due partly to insufficient phase III cancer clinical trial enrollment. This study describes three key components of phase III cancer clinical trial enrollment-family decision-making patterns, factors that influence AYAs' involvement, and attitudes (perceived barriers and benefits) toward trial participation-and evaluated a measure of attitudes. Methods: Participants were AYAs (15-23 years old at study) diagnosed with cancer and offered a phase III cancer clinical trial within the past 3-21 months, their primary caregivers, and their healthcare providers. Interviews assessed: (a) phase III clinical trial decision-making experiences and (b) relevance of the Pediatric Research Participation Questionnaire (PRPQ) in the assessment of AYAs' attitudes toward enrollment on phase III cancer clinical trials. Results: Thirteen AYAs, 16 caregivers, and 11 providers were interviewed. Four decision-making patterns were identified, with AYA abdicates to caregiver and caregiver-based and AYA-endorsed the most commonly described, but with variation across respondents. Distress and reduced health-related quality of life limited AYAs' involvement in the enrollment decision, while developmental and emotional maturity facilitated involvement. Perceived barriers and benefits to enrollment were reported, and the PRPQ was deemed relevant with minor modifications. Conclusions: Findings suggest that AYAs may not be fully involved in phase III cancer clinical trial enrollment decision-making, and caregivers and providers are challenged to overcome factors that limit their involvement. The PRPQ shows promise as a tool for systematically evaluating clinical trial attitudes. PMID:24669354

  9. Calibration artefacts in radio interferometry - III. Phase-only calibration and primary beam correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grobler, T. L.; Stewart, A. J.; Wijnholds, S. J.; Kenyon, J. S.; Smirnov, O. M.

    2016-09-01

    This is the third installment in a series of papers in which we investigate calibration artefacts. Calibration artefacts (also known as ghosts or spurious sources) are created when we calibrate with an incomplete model. In the first two papers of this series, we developed a mathematical framework which enabled us to study the ghosting mechanism itself. An interesting concomitant of the second paper was that ghosts appear in symmetrical pairs. This could possibly account for spurious symmetrization. Spurious symmetrization refers to the appearance of a spurious source (the antighost) symmetrically opposite an unmodelled source around a modelled source. The analysis in the first two papers indicates that the antighost is usually very faint, in particular, when a large number of antennas are used. This suggests that spurious symmetrization will mainly occur at an almost undetectable flux level. In this paper, we show that phase-only calibration produces an antighost that is N-times (where N denotes the number of antennas in the array) as bright as the one produced by phase and amplitude calibration and that this already bright ghost can be further amplified by the primary beam correction.

  10. [Emergence times, hemodynamics and adverse effects of sevoflurane and isoflurane: an open, randomized, comparative phase iii study].

    PubMed

    Wiesner, G; Schwürzer, S; Hörauf, K; Hobbhahn, J

    1994-09-01

    Sevoflurane is a "new" volatile inhaled anaesthetic that is currently undergoing phase III clinical trial in Europe and the United States. Owing to the low blood solubility, rapid induction of anaesthesia and emergence from anaesthesia would be expected. In this study, we compared emergence times and haemodynamics in patients receiving either sevoflurane or isoflurane. Furthermore, all adverse effects were recorded and the relationship to the drug administered was rated. METHODS. Fifty ASA physical status I and II patients were studied in an open, prospective, randomised clinical trial. Anaesthesia was induced with fentanyl, thiopentone, and vecuronium for facilitating endotracheal intubation and maintained with sevoflurane or isoflurane, 60% nitrous oxide (N2O) in oxygen (O2), and additional doses of fentanyl (1-2 micrograms/kg.h). The electrocardiogram, blood pressure (non-invasive), O2 saturation, temperature, and end-tidal concentrations of sevoflurane or isoflurane, N2O, and carbon dioxide were monitored continuously. At the end of surgery, administration of sevoflurane or isoflurane and N2O was discontinued without tapering and emergence times were recorded. All adverse events that occurred until the 3rd postoperative day were recorded and the relationship to the inhaled anaesthetic was rated as "none", "unlikely", "possible", "probable", or "highly probable". RESULTS. With the exception of gender, the two patient groups were comparable (Tables 1 and 2). Due to the higher MAC value, mean end-tidal concentrations were higher for sevoflurane (0.82% vs. 0.59% for isoflurane). The duration of anaesthetic exposure was 1.3 MAC h (calculation with FIO2 = 1.0 MAC value) and 3.1 MAC h (calculation with FIO2 = 0.4 in N2O MAC value), respectively, for both inhaled anaesthetics. Pulmonary elimination was faster (Fig. 1) and emergence time shorter (7 min vs. 11.5 min, Table 3) with sevoflurane. There was no difference in the time courses of heart rate and mean arterial

  11. Hollow fiber liquid phase microextraction combined with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for the speciation of arsenic (III) and arsenic (V) in fresh waters and human hair extracts.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hongmei; Hu, Bin; Chen, Beibei; Xia, Linbo

    2009-02-16

    A new method of hollow fiber liquid phase microextraction (HF-LPME) using ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC) as extractant combined with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) using Pd as permanent modifier has been described for the speciation of As(III) and As(V). In a pH range of 3.0-4.0, the complex of As(III)-APDC complex can be extracted using toluene as the extraction solvent leaving As(V) in the aqueous layer. The post extraction organic phase was directly injected into ETAAS for the determination of As(III). To determine total arsenic in the samples, first As(V) was reduced to As(III) by l-cysteine, and then a microextraction method was performed prior to the determination of total arsenic. As(V) assay was based on subtracting As(III) form the total arsenic. All parameters, such as pH of solution, type of organic solvent, the amount of APDC, stirring rate and extraction time, affecting the separation of As(III) from As(V) and the extraction efficiency of As(III) were investigated, and the optimized extraction conditions were established. Under optimized conditions, a detection limit of 0.12ngmL(-1) with enrichment factor of 78 was achieved. The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) of the method for five replicate determinations of 5ngmL(-1) As(III) was 8%. The developed method was applied to the speciation of As(III) and As(V) in fresh water and human hair extracts, and the recoveries for the spiked samples are 86-109%. In order to validate the developed method, three certified reference materials such as GBW07601 human hair, BW3209 and BW3210 environmental water were analyzed, and the results obtained were in good agreement with the certified values provided. PMID:19154804

  12. Influence of Addition of Nb on Phase Transformation, Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Equiatomic NiTi SMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shuyong; Liang, Yulong; Zhang, Yanqiu; Zhao, Yanan; Zhao, Chengzhi

    2016-08-01

    Three novel NiTiNb shape memory alloys, which possess a nominal chemical composition of Ni50-x/2-Ti50-x/2-Nb x (at.%) where x stands for 2, 4 and 6, respectively, were designed in order to investigate the influence of the addition of Nb on phase transformation, microstructure and mechanical properties of equiatomic NiTi shape memory alloy. All the three NiTiNb shape memory alloys contain B2 austenite phase, B19' martensite phase and β-Nb precipitate phase. Martensite type II twin can be observed in the case of Ni49Ti49Nb2 alloy. In the case of Ni48Ti48Nb4 alloy, there exists a boundary between Ti2Ni precipitate phase and β-Nb precipitate phase. As for Ni47Ti47Nb6 alloy, it can be observed that there exists an orientation relationship of [01bar{1}]_{{β{{ - Nb}}}} //[01bar{1}]_{{B2}} between β-Nb precipitate phase and B2 austenite matrix. The increase in Nb content contributes to enhancing the yield stress of NiTiNb shape memory alloy, but it leads to the decrease in compression fracture stress. The addition of Nb to equiatomic NiTi shape memory alloy does not have a significant influence on the transformation hysteresis of the alloy, which is attributed to the fact that NiTiNb shape memory alloy is not subjected to plastic deformation and hence β-Nb precipitate phase is unable to relax the elastic strain in the martensite interface.

  13. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) Refrigerator System at Brookhaven National Laboratory: Phase III of the System Performance and Operations Upgrades for 2006

    SciTech Connect

    A. Sidi-Yekhlef; R. Than; J. Tuozzolo; V. Ganni; P. Knudsen; D. Arenius

    2006-05-01

    An ongoing program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) consists of improving the efficiency of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) cryogenic system and reducing its power consumption. Phase I and II of the program addressed plant operational improvements and modifications that resulted in substantial operational cost reduction and improved system reliability and stability, and a compressor input power reduction of 2 MW has been demonstrated. Phase III, now under way, consists of plans for further increasing the efficiency of the plant by adding a load ''wet'' turbo-expander and its associated heat exchangers at the low temperature end of the plant. This additional stage of cooling at the coldest level will further reduce the required compressor flow and therefore compressor power input. This paper presents the results of the plant characterization, as it is operating presently, as well as the results of the plant simulations of the various planned upgrades for the plant. The immediate upgrade includes the changes associated with the load expander. The subsequent upgrade will involve the resizing of expander 5 and 6 to increase their efficiencies. The paper summarizes the expected improvement in the plant efficiency and the overall reduction in the compressor power.

  14. Biological sulfate reduction in the acidogenic phase of anaerobic digestion under dissimilatory Fe (III)--reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingxin; Zhang, Yaobin; Chang, Jinghui; Quan, Xie; Li, Qi

    2013-04-15

    In this study, a novel approach was developed for sulfate - containing wastewater treatment via dosing Fe₂O₃ in a two - stage anaerobic reactor (A1, S1). The addition of Fe₂O₃ in its second stage i.e. acidogenic sulfate-reducing reactor (S1) resulted in microbial reduction of Fe (III), which significantly enhanced the biological sulfate reduction. In reactor S1, increasing influent sulfate concentration to 1400 mg/L resulted in a higher COD removal (27.3%) and sulfate reduction (57.9%). In the reference reactor without using Fe₂O₃ (S2), the COD and sulfate removal were 15.6% and 29%, respectively. The combined performance of the two-stage anaerobic reactor (A1, S1) also showed a higher COD removal of 74.2%. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and phylogenetic analysis showed that the dominant bacteria with high similarity to IRB species as well as sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio and acidogenic bacteria (AB) were enriched in S1. Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) analysis presented a higher proportion of sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio marrakechensis and Fe (III) reducer Iron-reducing bacteria HN54 in S1. PMID:23411038

  15. NATIONAL GEOSCIENCE DATA REPOSITORY SYSTEM PHASE III: IMPLEMENTATION AND OPERATION OF THE REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus Milling

    2000-04-01

    In the past six months the NGDRS program has continued to engaged new contacts, identify additional data transfer targets, and improve the metadata catalog for both easier use and long-term maintainability. With industry conditions continuing to rapidly change and evolve, the primary core and cuttings preservation strategy has evolved as well. With the severe lack of available public data repository space and the establishment of a major national geoscience data repository facility unlikely in the near future, the focus is on increasing public awareness and access to nonproprietary company data holdings that remain in the public and private sector. Efforts still continue to identify and facilitate the entry of new repository space into the public sector. Additionally, AGI has been working with the National Academy of Sciences Board on Earth Sciences and Resources staff to initiate a study and workshop to develop a policy recommendation on geoscience data preservation and prioritization of efforts. Additional data transfer efforts were undertaken during the first half of FY00. AGI is working with the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology to assist in the transfer of Altura's midland core holdings to the University of Texas. Phillips has made selected seismic data from the Santa Barbara Channel available for transfer. A pilot test has been initiated to determine the cost and potential success rate at transcription of the original tapes. Additionally, redesign of the GeoTrek metadata catalog was initiated, including both a redesign of the user interface as well as making GeoTrek fully a broker, accessing multiple databases at remote locations in real time.

  16. An Experimental Evaluation of Hyperactivity and Food Additives. 1977-Phase I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harley, J. Preston

    Reported are findings of a study involving 46 families in which the effect of the Feingold (additive free) diet on hyperactivity in preschool and elementary age children was investigated. Eleven sections cover the following project components: introduction (definition of hyperactivity and the B. Feingold hypothesis), methodology, demographic…

  17. Subcutaneous Progesterone Is Effective and Safe for Luteal Phase Support in IVF: An Individual Patient Data Meta-Analysis of the Phase III Trials

    PubMed Central

    Doblinger, Jakob; Cometti, Barbara; Trevisan, Silvia; Griesinger, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Objective To summarize efficacy and safety data on a new progesterone compound which is available for subcutaneous administration as compared to vaginally administered progesterone for luteal phase support in patients undergoing IVF treatment. Design Data from two randomized phase III trials (07EU/Prg06 and 07USA/Prg05) performed according to GCP standards with a total sample size of 1435 per-protocol patients were meta-analyzed on an individual patient data level. Setting University affiliated reproductive medicine unit. Patients Subcutaneous progesterone was administered to a total of 714 subjects and vaginal progesterone was administered to a total of 721 subjects who underwent fresh embryo transfer after ovarian stimulation followed by IVF or ICSI. The subjects were between 18 and 42 years old and had a BMI <30kg/m2. Interventions Subcutaneous progesterone 25 mg daily vs. either progesterone vaginal gel 90 mg daily (07EU/Prg06) or 100 mg intravaginal twice a day (07USA/Prg05) for luteal phase support in IVF patients. Main outcome measures Ongoing pregnancy rate beyond 10 gestational weeks, live birth rate and OHSS risk. Results The administration of subcutaneous progesterone versus intra-vaginal progesterone had no impact on ongoing pregnancy likelihood (OR = 0.865, 95% CI 0.694 to 1.077; P = n.s.), live birth likelihood (OR = 0.889, 95% CI 0.714 to 1.106; P = n.s.) or OHSS risk (OR = 0.995, 95% CI 0.565 to 1.754; P = n.s.) in regression analyses accounting for clustering of patients within trials, while adjusting for important confounders. Only female age and number of oocytes retrieved were significant predictors of live birth likelihood and OHSS risk. Conclusion No statistical significant or clinical significant differences exist between subcutaneous and vaginal progesterone for luteal phase support. PMID:26991890

  18. NATIONAL GEOSCIENCE DATA REPOSITORY SYSTEM PHASE III: IMPLEMENTATION AND OPERATION OF THE REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus Milling

    2000-12-01

    In the past six months the NGDRS program has seen a new spike in activity, particularly in October 2000. This new spike in activity is the result of increased activities in the petroleum sector, including new funding to examine infrastructure issues facing many of the companies over the long-term. With industry conditions continuing to rapidly change and evolve, the primary core and cuttings preservation strategy has evolved as well. With the severe lack of available public data repository space and the establishment of a major national geoscience data repository facility unlikely in the near future, the focus is on increasing public awareness and access to nonproprietary company data holdings that remain in the public and private sector. Efforts still continue to identify and facilitate the entry of new repository space into the public sector. Additionally, AGI has been working with the National Academy of Sciences Board on Earth Sciences and Resources staff to initiate a study and workshop to develop a policy recommendation on geoscience data preservation and prioritization of efforts. Additional data transfer efforts were undertaken during the second half of FY00. Altura's Permian Basin core was contributed to the Texas BEG's facility in Midland. Transcription and evaluation of selected seismic data from the Santa Barbara Channel previously owned by Phillips was completed. Additionally, Chevron has released over 180,000 boxes of cores to the public through the NGDRS metadata catalog.

  19. "Brief report: increase in production of spoken words in some children with autism after PECS teaching to Phase III".

    PubMed

    Carr, Deborah; Felce, Janet

    2007-04-01

    The context for this work was an evaluation study [Carr, D., & Felce, J. A. (in press)] of the early phases of the Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) [Frost, L. A., & Bondy, A. S. (1994). The picture exchange communication system training manual. Cherry Hill, NJ: Pyramid Educational Consultants, Inc.; Frost, L. A., & Bondy, A. S. (2004). The picture exchange communication system training manual, 2nd edn. Newark, DE: Pyramid Educational Consultants, Inc.]. This paper reports that five of 24 children who received 15 h of PECS teaching towards Phase III over a period of 4-5 weeks, showed concomitant increases in speech production, either in initiating communication with staff or in responding, or both. No children in the PECS group demonstrated a decrease in spoken words after receiving PECS teaching. In the control group, only one of 17 children demonstrated a minimal increase and four of 17 children demonstrated a decrease in use of spoken words after a similar period without PECS teaching. PMID:17048094

  20. Phase IIB/III Trial of Tenecteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke: Results of a Prematurely Terminated Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Haley, E. Clarke; Thompson, John L.P.; Grotta, James C.; Lyden, Patrick D.; Hemmen, Thomas G.; Brown, Devin L.; Fanale, Christopher; Libman, Richard; Kwiatkowski, Thomas G.; Llinas, Rafael H.; Levine, Steven R.; Johnston, Karen C.; Buchsbaum, Richard; Levy, Gilberto; Levin, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Background: Intravenous alteplase (rt-PA) remains the only approved treatment for acute ischemic stroke, but its use remains limited. In a previous pilot dose-escalation study, intravenous tenecteplase showed promise as a potentially safer alternative. Therefore, a Phase IIB clinical trial was begun to a) choose a best dose of tenecteplase to carry forward, and b) to provide evidence for either promise or futility of further testing of tenecteplase versus rt-PA. If promise was established, then the trial would continue as a Phase III efficacy trial comparing the selected tenecteplase dose to standard rt-PA. Methods: The trial began as a small, multi-center, randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial comparing 0.1, 0.25, and 0.4 mg/kg tenecteplase with standard 0.9 mg/kg rt-PA in patients with acute stroke within 3 hours of onset. An adaptive sequential design used an early (24 hour) assessment of major neurological improvement balanced against occurrence of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) to choose a “best” dose of tenecteplase to carry forward. Once a “best” dose was established, the trial was to continue until at least 100 pairs of the selected tenecteplase dose versus standard rt-PA could be compared by 3 month outcome using the modified Rankin Scale in an interim analysis. Decision rules were devised to yield a clear recommendation to either stop for futility or to continue into Phase III. Results: The trial was prematurely terminated for slow enrollment after only 112 patients had been randomized at 8 clinical centers between 2006 and 2008. The 0.4 mg/kg dose was discarded as inferior after only 73 patients were randomized, but the selection procedure was still unable to distinguish between 0.1 mg/kg and 0.25 mg/kg as a propitious dose at the time the trial was stopped. There were no statistically persuasive differences in 3 month outcomes between the remaining tenecteplase groups and rt-PA. Symptomatic ICH rates were highest in the

  1. NATIONAL GEOSCIENCE DATA REPOSITORY SYSTEM PHASE III: IMPLEMENTATION AND OPERATION ON THE REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus Milling

    2001-10-01

    The NGDRS has attained 72% of its targeted goal for cores and cuttings transfers, with over 12 million linear feet of cores and cuttings, in addition to large numbers of paleontological samples and are now available for public use. Additionally, large-scale transfers of seismic data have been evaluated, but based on the recommendation of the NGDRS steering committee, cores have been given priority because of the vast scale of the seismic data problem relative to the available funding. The rapidly changing industry conditions have required that the primary core and cuttings preservation strategy evolve as well. Additionally, the NGDRS clearinghouse is evaluating the viability of transferring seismic data covering the western shelf of the Florida Gulf Coast. AGI remained actively involved in assisting the National Research Council with background materials and presentations for their panel convened to study the data preservation issue. A final report of the panel is expected in early 2002. GeoTrek has been ported to Linux and MySQL, ensuring a purely open-source version of the software. This effort is key in ensuring long-term viability of the software so that is can continue basic operation regardless of specific funding levels. Work has commenced on a major revision of GeoTrek, using the open-source MapServer project and its related MapScript language. This effort will address a number of key technology issues that appear to be rising for 2002, including the discontinuation of the use of Java in future Microsoft operating systems. Discussions have been held regarding establishing potential new public data repositories, with hope for final determination in 2002.

  2. Institute for High Heat Flux Removal (IHHFR). Phases I, II, and III

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, Ronald D.

    2014-08-31

    The IHHFR focused on interdisciplinary applications as it relates to high heat flux engineering issues and problems which arise due to engineering systems being miniaturized, optimized, or requiring increased high heat flux performance. The work in the IHHFR focused on water as a coolant and includes: (1) the development, design, and construction of the high heat flux flow loop and facility; (2) test section development, design, and fabrication; and, (3) single-side heat flux experiments to produce 2-D boiling curves and 3-D conjugate heat transfer measurements for single-side heated test sections. This work provides data for comparisons with previously developed and new single-side heated correlations and approaches that address the single-side heated effect on heat transfer. In addition, this work includes the addition of single-side heated circular TS and a monoblock test section with a helical wire insert. Finally, the present work includes: (1) data base expansion for the monoblock with a helical wire insert (only for the latter geometry), (2) prediction and verification using finite element, (3) monoblock model and methodology development analyses, and (4) an alternate model development for a hypervapotron and related conjugate heat transfer controlling parameters.

  3. Improved stability of w/o/w multiple emulsions by addition of hydrophilic colloid components in the aqueous phases.

    PubMed

    Vaziri, A; Warburton, B

    1995-01-01

    To improve the stability of w/o/w multiple emulsions of arachis and olive oil the stabilizing effect of cherry gum, in combination with acacia and gelatin, was examined. The outstanding film-forming properties of this gum having already been noted; the effect of its addition to the aqueous phases was measured by the coalescence of emulsion globules. The enhanced stability, as compared to controls, was achieved at a minimum concentration which liquid crystal-bearing interfacial films seem to appear. Creation of more coherent interfaces, inhibiting transfer of phases, could be the basis of the improved stability of the emulsion. PMID:7730952

  4. National Geoscience Data Repository System: Phase III - Implementation and Operataion of the Repository.

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    Activities during the second quarter dealt with the deployment of the NGDRS technological infrastructure (hardware, software and network components). Orders were placed for all major items (Sun servers and Xyplex 9000 data router). Sun servers are expected to be delivered during the week of July 21. Setting up of NGDRS continued with the development of the front-end pages for web site and with the development of software items that permit or facilitate the tasks of NGDRS users. Activity on Project Task 1. 0, the conversion and installation of electronic databases, continues at a slower pace until the basic Metadata Repository infrastructure is in place. The additional contacts established with PGS, BEG, Kansas Geological Survey (KGS), Oklahoma Geological Survey (OGS), and Minerals Management Service have led to good progress. A NGDRS project meeting was held on June 18 in Houston to review progress, discuss new targets and define new steps.

  5. A phase I/II study of neoadjuvant liposomal doxorubicin, paclitaxel, and hyperthermia in locally advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Kim, Dong W.; Jones, Ellen; Lan, Lan; McCall, Linda; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Craciunescu, Oana; Stauffer, Paul; Liotcheva, Vlayka; Betof, Allison; Blackwell, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The prognosis for locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) patients continues to be poor, with an estimated five-year survival of only 50–60%. Preclinical data demonstrates enhanced therapeutic efficacy with liposomal encapsulation of doxorubicin combined with hyperthermia (HT). Therefore this phase I/II study was designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a novel neoadjuvant combination treatment of paclitaxel, liposomal doxorubicin, and hyperthermia. Materials and methods Eligible patients received four cycles of neoadjuvant liposomal doxorubicin (30–75 mg/m2), paclitaxel (100–175 mg/m2), and hyperthermia. They subsequently underwent either a modified radical mastectomy or lumpectomy with axillary node dissection followed by radiation therapy and then eight cycles of CMF (cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, 5-fluorouracil) chemotherapy. Results Forty-seven patients with stage IIB-III LABC were enrolled and 43 patients were evaluable. Fourteen patients (33%) had inflammatory breast cancer. Combined (partial + complete) clinical response rate was 72% and combined pathological response rate was 60%. Four patients achieved a pathologically complete response. Sixteen patients were eligible for breast-conserving surgery. The cumulative equivalent minutes (CEM 43) at T90 (tenth percentile of temperature distribution) was significantly greater for those with a pathological response. Four-year disease-free survival was 63% (95% CI, 46%–76%) and the four-year overall survival was 75% (95% CI, 58–86%). Conclusions Neoadjuvant therapy using paclitaxel, liposomal doxorubicin and hyperthermia is a feasible and well tolerated treatment strategy in patients with LABC. The thermal dose parameter CEM 43 T90 was significantly correlated with attaining a pathological response. PMID:20377362

  6. NATIONAL GEOSCIENCE DATA REPOSITORY SYSTEM PHASE III: IMPLEMENTATION AND OPERATION OF THE REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus Milling

    2002-10-01

    The NGDRS has facilitated 85% of cores, cuttings, and other data identified available for transfer to the public sector. Over 12 million linear feet of cores and cuttings, in addition to large numbers of paleontological samples and are now available for public use. To date, with industry contributions for program operations and data transfers, the NGDRS project has realized a 6.5 to 1 return on investment to Department of Energy funds. Large-scale transfers of seismic data have been evaluated, but based on the recommendation of the NGDRS steering committee, cores have been given priority because of the vast scale of the seismic data problem relative to the available funding. The rapidly changing industry conditions have required that the primary core and cuttings preservation strategy evolve as well. Additionally, the NGDRS clearinghouse is evaluating the viability of transferring seismic data covering the western shelf of the Florida Gulf Coast. AGI remains actively involved in working to realize the vision of the National Research Council's report of geoscience data preservation. GeoTrek has been ported to Linux and MySQL, ensuring a purely open-source version of the software. This effort is key in ensuring long-term viability of the software so that is can continue basic operation regardless of specific funding levels. Work has commenced on a major revision of GeoTrek, using the open-source MapServer project and its related MapScript language. This effort will address a number of key technology issues that appear to be rising for 2002, including the discontinuation of the use of Java in future Microsoft operating systems. Discussions have been held regarding establishing potential new public data repositories, with hope for final determination in 2002.

  7. NATIONAL GEOSCIENCE DATA REPOSITORY SYSTEM PHASE III: IMPLEMENTATION AND OPERATION OF THE REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus Milling

    2003-04-01

    The NGDRS has facilitated 85% of cores, cuttings, and other data identified available for transfer to the public sector. Over 12 million linear feet of cores and cuttings, in addition to large numbers of paleontological samples and are now available for public use. To date, with industry contributions for program operations and data transfers, the NGDRS project has realized a 6.5 to 1 return on investment to Department of Energy funds. Large-scale transfers of seismic data have been evaluated, but based on the recommendation of the NGDRS steering committee, cores have been given priority because of the vast scale of the seismic data problem relative to the available funding. The rapidly changing industry conditions have required that the primary core and cuttings preservation strategy evolve as well. Additionally, the NGDRS clearinghouse is evaluating the viability of transferring seismic data covering the western shelf of the Florida Gulf Coast. AGI remains actively involved in working to realize the vision of the National Research Council's report of geoscience data preservation. GeoTrek has been ported to Linux and MySQL, ensuring a purely open-source version of the software. This effort is key in ensuring long-term viability of the software so that is can continue basic operation regardless of specific funding levels. Work has commenced on a major revision of GeoTrek, using the open-source MapServer project and its related MapScript language. This effort will address a number of key technology issues that appear to be rising for 2002, including the discontinuation of the use of Java in future Microsoft operating systems. Discussions have been held regarding establishing potential new public data repositories, with hope for final determination in 2002.

  8. Randomized phase II/III clinical trial of elpamotide for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer: PEGASUS-PC Study.

    PubMed

    Yamaue, Hiroki; Tsunoda, Takuya; Tani, Masaji; Miyazawa, Motoki; Yamao, Kenji; Mizuno, Nobumasa; Okusaka, Takuji; Ueno, Hideki; Boku, Narikazu; Fukutomi, Akira; Ishii, Hiroshi; Ohkawa, Shinichi; Furukawa, Masayuki; Maguchi, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Masafumi; Togashi, Yosuke; Nishio, Kazuto; Ohashi, Yasuo

    2015-07-01

    Gemcitabine is a key drug for the treatment of pancreatic cancer; however, with its limitation in clinical benefits, the development of another potent therapeutic is necessary. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 is an essential target for tumor angiogenesis, and we have conducted a phase I clinical trial using gemcitabine and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 peptide (elpamotide). Based on the promising results of this phase I trial, a multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind phase II/III clinical trial has been carried out for pancreatic cancer. The eligibility criteria included locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer. Patients were assigned to either the Active group (elpamotide + gemcitabine) or Placebo group (placebo + gemcitabine) in a 2:1 ratio by the dynamic allocation method. The primary endpoint was overall survival. The Harrington-Fleming test was applied to the statistical analysis in this study to evaluate the time-lagged effect of immunotherapy appropriately. A total of 153 patients (Active group, n = 100; Placebo group, n = 53) were included in the analysis. No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups in the prolongation of overall survival (Harrington-Fleming P-value, 0.918; log-rank P-value, 0.897; hazard ratio, 0.87, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.486-1.557). Median survival time was 8.36 months (95% CI, 7.46-10.18) for the Active group and 8.54 months (95% CI, 7.33-10.84) for the Placebo group. The toxicity observed in both groups was manageable. Combination therapy of elpamotide with gemcitabine was well tolerated. Despite the lack of benefit in overall survival, subgroup analysis suggested that the patients who experienced severe injection site reaction, such as ulceration and erosion, might have better survival. PMID:25867139

  9. ASSESSMENT OF SUBSURFACE FATE OF MONOETHANOLAMINE AT SOUR GAS PROCESSING PLANT SITES-PHASE III

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Sorensen

    1999-02-01

    Alkanolamines are commonly used by the natural gas industry to remove hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide, and other acid gases from the natural gas in which they occur (''sour'' gas if hydrogen sulfide is present). At sour gas-processing plants, as at all plants that use alkanolamines for acid gas removal (AGR), spills and on-site management of wastes containing alkanolamines and associated reaction products have occasionally resulted in subsurface contamination that is presently the focus of some environmental concern. In 1994, the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) initiated a three-phase program to investigate the natural attenuation processes that control the subsurface transport and fate of the most commonly used alkanolamine in Canada, monoethanolamine (MEA). Funding for the MEA research program was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP), Canadian Occidental Petroleum Ltd. (CanOxy), Gas Research Institute (GRI), Environment Canada, and the National Energy Board of Canada. The MEA research program focused primarily on examining the biodegradability of MEA and MEA-related waste materials in soils and soil-slurries under a variety of environmentally relevant conditions, evaluating the mobility of MEA in soil and groundwater and the effectiveness of bioremediation techniques for removing contaminants and toxicity from MEA-contaminated soil. The presently inactive Okotoks sour gas-processing plant, owned by CanOxy in Alberta, Canada, was the source of samples and field data for much of the laboratory-based experimental work and was selected to be the location for the field-based efforts to evaluate remediation techniques. The objective of the research program is to provide the natural gas industry with ''real world'' data and insights developed under laboratory and field conditions regarding the effective and environmentally sound use of biological methods for the remediation of soil

  10. NATIONAL GEOSCIENCE DATA REPOSITORY SYSTEM PHASE III: IMPLEMENTATION AND OPERATION OF THE REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus Milling

    2001-04-01

    The NGDRS has attained 72% of its targeted goal for cores and cuttings transfers, with over 12M linear feet of cores and cuttings now available for public use. Additionally, large-scale transfers of seismic data have been evaluated, but based on the recommendation of the NGDRS steering committee, cores have been given priority because of the vast scale of the seismic data problem relative to the available funding. The rapidly changing industry conditions have required that the primary core and cuttings preservation strategy evolve as well. A Steering Committee meeting held on November 30, 2000 focused on current achievements, how the situation in the petroleum industry affects the NGDRS activities, and the nature of the study by the National Research Council on data preservation. AGI remained actively involved in assisting the National Research Council with background materials and presentations for their panel convened to study the data preservation issue. The GeoTrek metadata catalog system continues to expand and attract new users. Current GeoTrek revision efforts are being retargeted given the identification of new open source technologies with will provide for a flexible, user-friendly GeoTrek, Version 3.

  11. National Geoscience Data Repositry System: Phase III - Implementation and Operation of the Repository.

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    Most of our activities during the third quarter dealt with the deployment and the starting of the utilization of the NGDRS technological infrastructure. We dealt primarily with the installation of the Sun Microsystems computer servers. The installation has been very smooth with no particular problems to highlight. Installation of the Oracle database management system on the Sun servers is currently underway. On the software side, work continued with the development of the front-end pages for the web site, and with modifications and additions to the GeoTrek software to fulfill the specific needs of the repository system. Activity on Project 1.0, the conversion and installation of electronic databases continued. We have located and obtained from the BLM the software needed to translate the Oklahoma Geological Survey data set Township/Range/Section coordinates into Lat/Long. We have received and are currently loading the new updated data sets (cores and well log headers) from the BEG. We attended a meeting at the Kansas Geological Survey (KGS) on September 24 to define the participation of the KGS in the NGDRS project. No project review was held in August.

  12. Co(II), Mn(II), and Cr(III) iminodiacetate complexes heterogenized on silica gel in the liquid-phase oxidation of cyclohexene

    SciTech Connect

    Berentsveig, V.V.; Barinova, T.V.; Lisichkin, G.V.; Nga, C.B.

    1985-06-01

    A study was carried out on the catalytic properties of Co(II), Mn(II), and Cr(III) iminodiacetate complexes heterogenized on silica gel. The liquid-phase oxidation of cyclohexene in the presence of these catalysts proceeds mainly by a heterogeneous-homogeneous radical chain methanism. Variation in the selectivity of this liquid-phase reaction is possible by changing the nature of the transition metal ion.

  13. Enantioseparation of Citalopram by RP-HPLC, Using Sulfobutyl Ether-β-Cyclodextrin as a Chiral Mobile Phase Additive

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yangfeng; He, Quan Sophia; Cai, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Enantiomeric separation of citalopram (CIT) was developed using a reversed phase HPLC (RP-HPLC) with sulfobutylether-β-cyclodextrin (SBE-β-CD) as a chiral mobile phase additive. The effects of the pH value of aqueous buffer, concentration of chiral additive, composition of mobile phase, and column temperature on the enantioseparation of CIT were investigated on the Hedera ODS-2 C18 column (250 mm × 4.6 mm × 5.0 um). A satisfactory resolution was achieved at 25°C using a mobile phase consisting of a mixture of aqueous buffer (pH of 2.5, 5 mM sodium dihydrogen phosphate, and 12 mM SBE-β-CD), methanol, and acetonitrile with a volumetric ratio of 21 : 3 : 1 and flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. This analytical method was evaluated by examining the precision (lower than 3.0%), linearity (regression coefficients close to 1), limit of detection (0.070 µg/mL for (R)-CIT and 0.076 µg/mL for (S)-CIT), and limit of quantitation (0.235 µg/mL for (R)-CIT and 0.254 µg/mL for (S)-CIT). PMID:26880921

  14. Enantioseparation of Citalopram by RP-HPLC, Using Sulfobutyl Ether-β-Cyclodextrin as a Chiral Mobile Phase Additive.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yangfeng; He, Quan Sophia; Cai, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Enantiomeric separation of citalopram (CIT) was developed using a reversed phase HPLC (RP-HPLC) with sulfobutylether-β-cyclodextrin (SBE-β-CD) as a chiral mobile phase additive. The effects of the pH value of aqueous buffer, concentration of chiral additive, composition of mobile phase, and column temperature on the enantioseparation of CIT were investigated on the Hedera ODS-2 C18 column (250 mm × 4.6 mm × 5.0 um). A satisfactory resolution was achieved at 25°C using a mobile phase consisting of a mixture of aqueous buffer (pH of 2.5, 5 mM sodium dihydrogen phosphate, and 12 mM SBE-β-CD), methanol, and acetonitrile with a volumetric ratio of 21 : 3 : 1 and flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. This analytical method was evaluated by examining the precision (lower than 3.0%), linearity (regression coefficients close to 1), limit of detection (0.070 µg/mL for (R)-CIT and 0.076 µg/mL for (S)-CIT), and limit of quantitation (0.235 µg/mL for (R)-CIT and 0.254 µg/mL for (S)-CIT). PMID:26880921

  15. Prophylactic nimodipine treatment for cochlear and facial nerve preservation after vestibular schwannoma surgery: a randomized multicenter Phase III trial.

    PubMed

    Scheller, Christian; Wienke, Andreas; Tatagiba, Marcos; Gharabaghi, Alireza; Ramina, Kristofer F; Ganslandt, Oliver; Bischoff, Barbara; Zenk, Johannes; Engelhorn, Tobias; Matthies, Cordula; Westermaier, Thomas; Antoniadis, Gregor; Pedro, Maria Teresa; Rohde, Veit; von Eckardstein, Kajetan; Kretschmer, Thomas; Kornhuber, Malte; Steighardt, Jörg; Richter, Michael; Barker, Fred G; Strauss, Christian

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT A pilot study of prophylactic nimodipine and hydroxyethyl starch treatment showed a beneficial effect on facial and cochlear nerve preservation following vestibular schwannoma (VS) surgery. A prospective Phase III trial was undertaken to confirm these results. METHODS An open-label, 2-arm, randomized parallel group and multicenter Phase III trial with blinded expert review was performed and included 112 patients who underwent VS surgery between January 2010 and February 2013 at 7 departments of neurosurgery to investigate the efficacy and safety of the prophylaxis. The surgery was performed after the patients were randomly assigned to one of 2 groups using online randomization. The treatment group (n = 56) received parenteral nimodipine (1-2 mg/hr) and hydroxyethyl starch (hematocrit 30%-35%) from the day before surgery until the 7th postoperative day. The control group (n = 56) was not treated prophylactically. RESULTS Intent-to-treat analysis showed no statistically significant effects of the treatment on either preservation of facial nerve function (35 [67.3%] of 52 [treatment group] compared with 34 [72.3%] of 47 [control group]) (p = 0.745) or hearing preservation (11 [23.4%] of 47 [treatment group] compared with 15 [31.2%] of 48 [control group]) (p = 0.530) 12 months after surgery. Since tumor sizes were significantly larger in the treatment group than in the control group, logistic regression analysis was required. The risk for deterioration of facial nerve function was adjusted nearly the same in both groups (OR 1.07 [95% CI 0.34-3.43], p = 0.91). In contrast, the risk for postoperative hearing loss was adjusted 2 times lower in the treatment group compared with the control group (OR 0.49 [95% CI 0.18-1.30], p = 0.15). Apart from dose-dependent hypotension (p < 0.001), no clinically relevant adverse reactions were observed. CONCLUSIONS There were no statistically significant effects of the treatment. Despite the width of the confidence intervals, the

  16. A National Study of Internal Medicine--Phase III. Analysis of 1976-1977 Resident Cohort Currently in Practice. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schleiter, Mary Kay; Tarlov, Alvin R.

    The different practice styles of young internists and the relationship between training and practice were studied as part of the National Study of Internal Medicine Manpower, Phase III. The practices of four groups of physicians were compared: general internists with traditional residencies, general internists who received their residency training…

  17. EVALUATION OF DEMONSTRATED AND EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE TREATMENT OF CONTAMINATED LAND AND GROUNDWATER (PHASE III) - 1999 SPECIAL SESSION ON MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report includes the papers presented at the NATO/CCMS Pilot Study Meeting in Angers, France, May 9-14, 1999, for the special session on Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA). This is the Phase III of the Evaluation of Demonstrated and Emerging Technologies for the Treatment a...

  18. EERC Center for Biomass Utilization 2008-2010. Phases I-III

    SciTech Connect

    Zygarlicke, Christopher J.; Hurley, John P.; Auich, Ted R.; Folkedahl, Bruce C.; Strege, Josua R.; Patel, Nikhil M.; Swanson, Michael L.; Martin, Christopher L; Olson, Edwin S.; Oster, Benjamin G.; Stanislowski, Joshua J.; Nyberg, Carolyn M.; Wocken, Chad A.; Pansegrau, Paul D.

    2015-07-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration (EIA) projects nonhydro renewable electric energy increases of 140% and liquid transportation biofuels growing by 32,200 barrels a day between 2012 and 2040 (U.S. Energy Information Administration, 2014). This is the EIA base case scenario, and this outlook could be a low estimate depending on the many assumptions involved in making such projections, not the least of which are climate change and the resultant legislation. The climate change postulate is based on increasing levels of CO2 being introduced into the atmosphere through anthropogenic activity such as fossil fuel combustion for energy use. Renewable energy, and biomass conversion to energy in particular, is a net-zero CO2 emission generator. When biomass is converted to energy, it emits CO2; however, this CO2 is balanced in a cycle where the production of biomass removes CO2 from the atmosphere for growth and then releases it back into the atmosphere to be taken up by new growth of biomass feedstocks for energy. In comparison, fossil fuels are examples of CO2 that has been removed from the atmosphere and sequestered and which, when converted to energy, is a new addition to the atmospheric levels of CO2, which has been linked to climate change. While recent advances in technology used for extracting oil and gas from tight formations have increased the availability of fossil fuels for energy, the end game needs to focus on providing sustainable energy sources for the United States as well as the world. If, in the future, legislation is enacted that places a fee on atmospheric CO2 emissions, this may make the use of biomass for energy more economically attractive, increasing its use. Research that focuses on the future sustainability of energy production is part of the answer to bringing about game-changing technologies that can provide energy in a

  19. Topical report on subsurface fracture mapping from geothermal wellbores. Phase I. Pulsed radar techniques. Phase II. Conventional logging methods. Phase III. Magnetic borehole ranging

    SciTech Connect

    Hartenbaum, B.A.; Rawson, G.

    1980-09-01

    To advance the state-of-the-art in Hot Dry Rock technology, an evaluation is made of (i) the use of radar to map far-field fractures, (ii) the use of more than twenty different conventional well logging tools to map borehole-fracture intercepts, and (iii) the use of magnetic dipole ranging to determine the relative positions of the injection well and the production well within the fractured zone. It is found that according to calculations, VHF backscatter radar has the potential for mapping fractures within a distance of 50 +- 20 meters from the wellbore. A new technique for improving fracture identification is presented. Analyses of extant data indicate that when used synergistically the (1) caliper, (2) resistivity dipmeter, (3) televiewer, (4) television, (5) impression packer, and (6) acoustic transmission are useful for mapping borehole-fracture intercepts. Improvements in both data interpretation techniques and high temperature operation are required. The surveying of one borehole from another appears feasible at ranges of up to 200 to 500 meters by using a low frequency magnetic field generated by a moderately strong dipole source (a solenoid) located in one borehole, a sensitive B field detector that traverses part of the second borehole, narrow band filtering, and special data inversion techniques.

  20. Three phase III randomized controlled trials of topical resiquimod 0.01-percent gel to reduce anogenital herpes recurrences.

    PubMed

    Mark, Karen E; Spruance, Spotswood; Kinghorn, George R; Sacks, Stephen L; Slade, Herbert B; Meng, Tze-Chiang; Selke, Stacy; Magaret, Amalia; Wald, Anna

    2014-09-01

    Resiquimod, a Toll-like receptor 7 and 8 agonist, stimulates production of cytokines that promote an antigen-specific T helper type 1 acquired immune response. Animal and phase II human trials showed posttreatment efficacy in reducing recurrent herpes lesion days and/or time to first recurrence. Three phase III randomized, double-blind, vehicle-controlled trials of topical resiquimod to reduce anogenital herpes recurrences were conducted in healthy adults with ≥4 recurrences within the prior year. Participants applied resiquimod 0.01% gel or vehicle gel 2 times per week for 3 weeks to each recurrence for 12 months. Trials 1 and 2 had 2:1 resiquimod-vehicle randomization. Trial 3 had 1:1:1 randomization for resiquimod and 500 mg valacyclovir orally twice daily for 5 days (RESI-VAL), resiquimod and oral placebo (RESI-PLA), and vehicle and oral placebo (VEH-PLA). The median time to first recurrence was similar for resiquimod and vehicle (trial 1, 60 and 56 days, P=0.7; trial 2, 54 and 48 days, P=0.47; trial 3, 51 [RESI-VAL], 55 [RESI-PLA], and 44 [VEH-PLA] days, P=not significant [NS]). The median time to healing of initial treated recurrence was longer for resiquimod (trial 1, 18 compared to 10 days, P<0.001; trial 2, 19 compared to 13 days, P=0.16; trial 3, 14 [RESI-VAL], 16 [RESI-PLA], and 8 [VEH-PLA] days, P<0.001). In trials 1 and 2, moderate to severe erythema and erosion/ulceration at the application site were more common in resiquimod recipients. In conclusion, no posttreatment efficacy of resiquimod 0.01% gel was observed. Increased application site reactions and initial recurrence healing time are consistent with resiquimod-induced cytokine effects. PMID:24709264

  1. Intravitreal Sirolimus for the Treatment of Geographic Atrophy: Results of a Phase I/II Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Petrou, Philip A.; Cunningham, Denise; Shimel, Katherine; Harrington, Molly; Hammel, Keri; Cukras, Catherine A.; Ferris, Frederick L.; Chew, Emily Y.; Wong, Wai T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the safety and effects of intravitreal sirolimus for the potential treatment of geographic atrophy (GA). Methods. The study was a single-center, open-label, phase I/II trial enrolling six participants with bilateral GA treated with intravitreal sirolimus in only one randomly assigned eye, with the fellow eye as control. The primary efficacy outcome measure was the change in total GA area from baseline on color fundus photography (CFP); secondary outcomes included changes in GA area on fundus autofluorescence (FAF), visual acuity, central retinal thickness (CRT), and macular sensitivity from baseline. Results. Although no systemic adverse events were attributed to treatment, two of six participants had ocular adverse events that were possibly associated. The treated eye of one participant developed abnormal paralesional changes on FAF that were associated with accelerated retinal thinning. This accelerated retinal thinning was also seen in the treated eye of a second participant. Because of concern that these events were associated with treatment, treatment was suspended. Comparisons of treated and fellow eyes for change in visual acuity, change in GA area, and change in CRT showed no evidence of treatment benefit and generally favored the untreated fellow eye. Conclusions. While paralesional FAF changes and rapid retinal thinning observed are potentially part of the natural course of GA, they may possibly be related to treatment. No general evidence of anatomical or functional benefit was detected in treated eyes. Further data on intravitreal sirolimus for GA treatment will be available from a larger phase II trial. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01445548.) PMID:25525171

  2. A chromatographic estimate of the degree of surface heterogeneity of RPLC packing materials. III. Endcapped amido-embedded reversed phase

    SciTech Connect

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges A

    2006-01-01

    The difference in adsorption behavior between a conventional monomeric endcapped C{sub 18} stationary phase (3.43 {micro}mol/m{sup 2}) and an endcapped polymeric RP-Amide phase (3.31 {micro}mol/m{sup 2}) was investigated. The adsorption isotherms of four compounds (phenol, caffeine, sodium 2-naphthalene sulfonate, and propranololium chloride) were measured by frontal analysis (FA) and the degree of heterogeneity of each phase for each solute was characterized by their adsorption energy distributions (AED), derived using the Expectation-Maximization method. The results show that only certain analytes (phenol and 2-naphthalene sulfonate) are sensitive to the presence of the polar embedded amide groups within the RP phase. Their binding constants on the amide-bonded phase are significantly higher than on conventional RPLC phases. Furthermore, an additional type of adsorption sites was observed for these two compounds. However, these sites having a low density, their presence does not affect much the retention factors of the two analytes. On the other hand, the adsorption behavior of the other two analytes (caffeine and propranololium chloride) is almost unaffected by the presence of the amide group in the bonded layer. Strong selective interactions may explain these observations. For example, hydrogen-bond interactions between an analyte (e.g., phenol or naphthalene sulfonate) and the carbonyl group (acceptor) or the nitrogen (donor) of the amido-embedded group may take place. No such interactions may take place with either caffeine or the cation propranololium chloride. This study confirms the hypothesis that analytes have ready access to locations deep inside the bonded layer, where the amide groups are present.

  3. Utilization of deep eutectic solvents as novel mobile phase additives for improving the separation of bioactive quaternary alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ting; Zhang, Mingliang; Wan, Yiqun; Qiu, Hongdeng

    2016-03-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) were used as novel mobile phase additives to improve chromatographic separation of four quaternary alkaloids including coptisine chloride, sanguinarine, berberine chloride and chelerythrine on a C18 column. DESs as a new class of ionic liquids are renewably sourced, environmentally benign, low cost and easy to prepare. Seven DESs were obtained by mixing different hydrogen acceptors and hydrogen-bond donors. The effects of organic solvents, the concentration of DESs, the types of DESs and the pH values of the buffer solution on the separation of the analytes were investigated. The composition of acetonitrile and 1.0% deep eutectic solvents aqueous solution (pH 3.3, adjusted with hydrochloric acid) in a 32:68 (v/v) ratio was used as optimized mobile phase, with which four quaternary alkaloids were well separated. When a small amount of DESs was added in the mobile phase for the separation of alkaloids on the C18 column, noticeable improvements were distinctly observed such as decreasing peak tailing and improving resolution. The separation mechanism mediated by DESs as mobile phase additives can be attributed to combined effect of both hydrogen acceptors and hydrogen-bond donors. For example, choline chloride can effectively cover the residual silanols on silica surface and ethylene glycol can reduce the retention time of analytes. The proposed method has been applied to determine BerbC in Lanqin Chinese herbal oral solution and BerbC tablet. Utilization of DESs in mobile phase can efficiently improve separation and selectivity of analytes from complex samples. PMID:26717817

  4. Effect of Al2O3 Addition on the Precipitated Phase Transformation in Ti-Bearing Blast Furnace Slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhongmin; Li, Jinfu; Sun, Yongqi; Seetharaman, Seshadri; Liu, Lili; Wang, Xidong; Zhang, Zuotai

    2016-04-01

    The present paper aims to provide a fundamental understanding on phase change of Ti-enriched crystalline phase induced by Al2O3 addition in Ti-bearing blast furnace slags with different basicities using Single Hot Thermocouple Technique and X-ray Diffraction. The results showed that an increase in the Al2O3 content led to phase change from rutile or perovskite to Mg3Al4Ti8O25 and prompted crystallization of the slags with basicity of 0.60 and 0.75, whereas only CaTiO3 was precipitated at a basicity of 0.95. Both thermodynamic and kinetic analyses were conducted to study the slag crystallization, which would throw light on phase change and enhanced crystallization. To further reveal the relationship with Al2O3 addition on slag structure and crystallization, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and magic angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance were adopted, with AlO4 tetrahedra and AlO6 octahedra observed in the slag. For slags with the basicity of 0.60 and 0.75, AlO6 octahedron, which was suggested to induce the phase change from TiO2 or CaTiO3 to Mg3Al4Ti8O25, was detected at high Al2O3 content. On the other hand, in slags with the basicity of 0.95, abundant Ca2+ may be connected to TiO6 octahedra, resulting in CaTiO3 formation.

  5. Efficacy and toxicity of bevacizumab in recurrent ovarian disease: an update meta-analysis on phase III trials

    PubMed Central

    Palaia, Innocenza; Musella, Angela; Di Donato, Violante; Gasparri, Maria Luisa; Musio, Daniela; Muzii, Ludovico; Tombolini, Vincenzo; Panici, Pierluigi Benedetti

    2016-01-01

    Background To analyze the efficacy and toxicity of bevacizumab on survival outcomes in recurrent ovarian cancer. Results Bevacizumab was associated with significant improvement of PFS and OS compared with standard treatment with HRs of 0.53 (95% CI 0.44 − 0.63; p < 0.00001) and 0.87 (95% CI, 0.77 to 0.99; p = 0.03), respectively. Bevacizumab increased the incidence of G3/G4 hypertension (RR 19.01, 95% CI 7.77 – 46.55; p < 0.00001), proteinuria (RR 17.31, 95% CI 5.42 − 55.25; p < 0.00001), arterial thromboembolic events (ATE) (RR 4.99, 95% CI 1.29 − 19.27; p = 0.02) and bleeding (RR 3.14, 95% CI 1.35 – 7.32; p = 0.008). Materials and Methods Three randomized phase III trials representing 1502 patients were identified. Pooled hazard ratio (HR), odd ratio (OR), risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated using fixed or random effects model. Conclusions Adding bevacizumab to standard chemotherapy improved ORR, PFS and OS, and it had a higher, but manageable, incidence of toxicities graded 3 to 4. PMID:26657509

  6. Phase I/II study of trastuzumab, paclitaxel, cisplatin and radiation for locally advanced, HER2 overexpressing, esophageal adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Safran, Howard . E-mail: hsafran@lifespan.org; Di Petrillo, Thomas; Akerman, Paul; Ng, Thomas; Evans, Devon; Steinhoff, Margaret; Benton, David; Purviance, John; Goldstein, Lisa; Tantravahi, Umadevi; Kennedy, Teresa R.N.

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the overall survival for patients with locally advanced, HER2 overexpressing, esophageal adenocarcinoma receiving trastuzumab, paclitaxel, cisplatin, and radiation on a Phase I-II study. Methods and Materials: Patients with adenocarcinoma of the esophagus without distant organ metastases and 2+/3+ HER2 overexpression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) were eligible. All patients received cisplatin 25 mg/m{sup 2} and paclitaxel 50 mg/m{sup 2} weekly for 6 weeks with radiation therapy (RT) 50.4 Gy. Patients received trastuzumab at dose levels of 1, 1.5, or 2 mg/kg weekly for 5 weeks after an initial bolus of 2, 3, or 4 mg/kg. Results: Nineteen patients were entered: 7 (37%) had celiac adenopathy, and 7 (37%) had retroperitoneal, portal adenopathy, or scalene adenopathy. Fourteen of 19 patients (74%) had either 3+ HER2 expression by immunohistochemistry, or an increase in HER2 gene copy number by HER2 gene amplification or high polysomy by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The median survival of all patients was 24 months and the 2-year survival was 50%. Conclusions: Assessment of the effect of trastuzumab in the treatment of patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma overexpressing HER2 is limited by the small number of patients in this study. Overall survival, however, was similar to prior studies without an increase in toxicity. Evaluation of HER2 status should be performed in future trials for patients with adenocarcinoma of the esophagus that investigate therapies targeting the HER family.

  7. Phase I/II Trial of Dose-Escalated Busulfan Delivered by Prolonged Continuous Infusion in Allogeneic Transplant Patients.

    PubMed

    Shea, Thomas C; Walko, Christine; Chung, Yunro; Ivanova, Anastasia; Sheets, Julia; Rao, Kamakshi; Gabriel, Don; Comeau, Terry; Wood, William; Coghill, James; Armistead, Paul; Sarantopoulos, Stefanie; Serody, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    Intensive chemotherapy or chemotherapy plus irradiation and allogeneic stem cell transplantation can be curative for patients with hematologic diseases. Reduced-intensity transplants can also achieve cure and result in less treatment-related mortality but higher relapse rates. Thus, optimizing the conditioning regimens used in allogeneic transplantation remains an important goal. We conducted a phase I/II trial to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) of a continuous infusion of busulfan over 90 hours in conjunction with fludarabine followed by allogeneic related or unrelated donor transplant. Fifty-four patients with advanced hematologic malignancies were enrolled on this study. The MTD was identified as a 24-hour area under the curve (AUC) of approximately 7095 μM/min, which represents a 43% increase over the standard total daily AUC dose of 4800 μM/min given by intermittent schedules. DLTs at doses over 8000 μM/min were identified by a desquamative skin rash and mucositis. No dose-related increase in hepatic, pulmonary, or other organ toxicities were seen, whereas efficacy appeared to be improved at higher dose levels. Continuous-infusion busulfan with intermittent fludarabine provides an alternative treatment strategy that is generally well tolerated and permits an increase in total busulfan dose with encouraging efficacy. (NCI study no. NCT00448357.). PMID:26210442

  8. Phase I/II study of vaccination with dendritic-like leukaemia cells for the immunotherapy of acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Roddie, H; Klammer, M; Thomas, C; Thomson, R; Atkinson, A; Sproul, A; Waterfall, M; Samuel, K; Yin, J; Johnson, P; Turner, M

    2006-04-01

    Twenty-two patients with acute myeloid leukaemia were recruited into a phase I/II clinical trial investigating the vaccination of patients in complete remission (CR) with autologous dendritic-like leukaemia cells (DLLC). At trial entry, leukaemia cells were harvested and tested for their ability to undergo cytokine-induced dendritic cell differentiation. Patients were then treated with intensive chemotherapy. Five patients achieved both CR and had leukaemia cells that successfully underwent differentiation and therefore proceeded to vaccination. Four escalating doses of DLLC were administered weekly by subcutaneous injection. Vaccination was generally well tolerated although one patient developed extensive eczema and an increased antinuclear factor titre possibly indicating induction of autoimmunity. Development of anti-leukaemic T-cell responses was assessed by enzyme-linked immunospot analysis of gamma-interferon secreting T lymphocytes and by human leucocyte antigen tetramer analysis for WT1-specific T cells. Increases in anti-leukaemic T-cell responses were demonstrated in four patients, but only two of the five remained in remission more than 12 months postvaccination. The study has demonstrated that generation of DLLC is feasible in only a subgroup of patients and is currently neither broadly applicable or clinically effective. PMID:16611305

  9. Tank vapor sampling and analysis data package for tank 241-C-106 waste retrieval sluicing system process test phase III

    SciTech Connect

    LOCKREM, L.L.

    1999-08-13

    This data package presents sampling data and analytical results from the March 28, 1999, vapor sampling of Hanford Site single-shell tank 241-C-106 during active sluicing. Samples were obtained from the 296-C-006 ventilation system stack and ambient air at several locations. Characterization Project Operations (CPO) was responsible for the collection of all SUMMATM canister samples. The Special Analytical Support (SAS) vapor team was responsible for the collection of all triple sorbent trap (TST), sorbent tube train (STT), polyurethane foam (PUF), and particulate filter samples collected at the 296-C-006 stack. The SAS vapor team used the non-electrical vapor sampling (NEVS) system to collect samples of the air, gases, and vapors from the 296-C-006 stack. The SAS vapor team collected and analyzed these samples for Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation (LMHC) and Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) in accordance with the sampling and analytical requirements specified in the Waste Retrieval Sluicing System Vapor Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for Evaluation of Organic Emissions, Process Test Phase III, HNF-4212, Rev. 0-A, (LMHC, 1999). All samples were stored in a secured Radioactive Materials Area (RMA) until the samples were radiologically released and received by SAS for analysis. The Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) performed the radiological analyses. The samples were received on April 5, 1999.

  10. A Phase I/II Clinical Trial in Localized Prostate Cancer of an Adenovirus Expressing Nitroreductase with CB1984

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Prashant; Young, J Graham; Mautner, Vivien; Ashdown, Daniel; Bonney, Sarah; Pineda, Robert G; Collins, Stuart I; Searle, Peter F; Hull, Diana; Peers, Elizabeth; Chester, John; Wallace, D Michael; Doherty, Alan; Leung, Hing; Young, Lawrence S; James, Nicholas D

    2009-01-01

    We report a phase I/II clinical trial in prostate cancer (PCa) using direct intraprostatic injection of a replication defective adenovirus vector (CTL102) encoding bacterial nitroreductase (NTR) in conjunction with systemic prodrug CB1954. One group of patients with localized PCa scheduled for radical prostatectomy received virus alone, prior to surgery, in a dose escalation to establish safety, tolerability, and NTR expression. A second group with local failure following primary treatment received virus plus prodrug to establish safety and tolerability. Based on acceptable safety data and indications of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) responses, an extended cohort received virus at a single dose level plus prodrug. The vector was well tolerated with minimal side effects, had a short half-life in the circulation, and stimulated a robust antibody response. Immunohistochemistry of resected prostate demonstrated NTR staining in tumor and glandular epithelium at all dose levels [5 × 1010–1 × 1012 virus particles (vp)]. A total of 19 patients received virus plus prodrug and 14 of these had a repeat treatment; minimal toxicity was observed and there was preliminary evidence of change in PSA kinetics, with an increase in the time to 10% PSA progression in 6 out of 18 patients at 6 months. PMID:19367257

  11. Utility-Based Optimization of Combination Therapy Using Ordinal Toxicity and Efficacy in Phase I/II Trials

    PubMed Central

    Houede, Nadine; Thall, Peter F.; Nguyen, Hoang; Paoletti, Xavier; Kramar, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    An outcome-adaptive Bayesian design is proposed for choosing the optimal dose pair of a chemotherapeutic agent and a biologic agent used in combination in a phase I/II clinical trial. Patient outcome is characterized as a vector of two ordinal variables accounting for toxicity and treatment efficacy. A generalization of the Aranda-Ordaz model (1983, Biometrika 68, 357–363) is used for the marginal outcome probabilities as functions of dose pair, and a Gaussian copula is assumed to obtain joint distributions. Numerical utilities of all elementary patient outcomes, allowing the possibility that efficacy is inevaluable due to severe toxicity, are obtained using an elicitation method aimed to establish consensus among the physicians planning the trial. For each successive patient cohort, a dose pair is chosen to maximize the posterior mean utility. The method is illustrated by a trial in bladder cancer, including simulation studies of the method’s sensitivity to prior parameters, the numerical utilities, correlation between the outcomes, sample size, cohort size and starting dose pair. PMID:19673865

  12. Ovarian Transcriptome Analysis of Portunus trituberculatus Provides Insights into Genes Expressed during Phase III and IV Development

    PubMed Central

    Han, Tao; Liu, Tao; Wang, Chunlin; Xiao, Jia; Mu, Changkao; Li, Ronghua; Yu, Fangping; Shi, Huilai

    2015-01-01

    Enhancing the production of aquatic animals is crucial for fishery management and aquaculture applications. Ovaries are specialized tissues that play critical roles in producing oocytes and hormones. Significant biochemical changes take place during the sexual maturation of Portunus trituberculatus, but the genetics of this process has not been extensively studied. Transcriptome sequencing can be used to determine gene expression changes within specific periods. In the current study, we used transcriptome sequencing to produce a comprehensive transcript dataset for the ovarian development of P. trituberculatus. Approximately 100 million sequencing reads were generated, and 126,075 transcripts were assembled. Functional annotation of the obtained transcripts revealed important pathways in ovarian development, such as those involving the vitellogenin gene. Also, we performed deep sequencing of ovaries in phases III and IV of sexual maturation in P. trituberculatus. Differential analysis of gene expression identified 506 significantly differentially expressed genes, which belong to 20 pathway, transporters, development, transcription factors, metabolism of other amino acids, carbohydrate and lipid, solute carrier family members, and enzymes. Taken together, our study provides the first comprehensive transcriptomic resource for P. trituberculatus ovaries, which will strengthen understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the sexual maturation process and advance molecular nutritional studies of P. trituberculatus. PMID:26431399

  13. Intravenous amifostine during chemoradiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer: A randomized placebo-controlled phase III study

    SciTech Connect

    Buentzel, Jens . E-mail: jens.buentzel@shk-ndh.de; Micke, Oliver; Adamietz, Irenaus A.; Monnier, Alain; Glatzel, Michael; Vries, Alexander de

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: Clinical trials demonstrated the efficacy and safety of intravenous (i.v.) or subcutaneous (s.c.) amifostine for reducing xerostomia and mucositis after radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy for head-and-neck cancer. This randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, phase III study evaluated the efficacy and safety of i.v. amifostine during radiochemotherapy for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients from European and American study centers received i.v. amifostine 300 mg/m{sup 2} (n = 67) or placebo (n = 65) before carboplatin 70 mg/m{sup 2} and radiotherapy on Days 1 to 5 and 21 to 25, and i.v. amifostine 200 mg/m{sup 2} or placebo before radiotherapy on other days. Results: Toxicity incidences were (amifostine, placebo, p value): Grade 2 or higher acute xerostomia (39%, 34%, 0.715), Grade 3 or higher acute mucositis (39%, 22%, 0.055), Grade 2 or higher late xerostomia (37%, 24%, 0.235), and Grade 3 or higher treatment-related adverse events (42%, 20%, 0.008). One-year rates of locoregional failure, progression-free survival, and overall survival were not significantly different between treatments. Conclusions: The used amifostine doses were not able to reduce the toxicity of simultaneous radiochemotherapy for head-and-neck cancer. The safety of amifostine and the lack of tumor protection were consistent with previous studies.

  14. Nature of the Blue-Phase-III{endash}isotropic critical point: An analogy with the liquid-gas transition

    SciTech Connect

    Anisimov, M.A.; Agayan, V.A.; Collings, P.J.

    1998-01-01

    The analogy with the liquid-gas critical point is analyzed to clarify the nature of the pretransitional behavior of physical properties in the vicinity of the Blue-Phase-III{endash}isotropic transition in chiral liquid crystalline systems. The analogy is unusual: temperature serves as the ordering field and entropy plays the role of the order parameter. Both mean field and parametric equations of state are formulated in terms of scaling fields. The scaling fields are linear combinations of the physical fields, which are temperature and chirality. It is shown that mixing of the physical field variables naturally leads to a strong asymmetry with respect to the transition temperature in the behavior of the physical properties that cannot be described by simple power laws. While the mean field theory gives a good description of the experimental data, the scaling theory, if one incorporates mixing of the field variables, gives even better agreement with the experimental data, placing this transition in the same universality class as the three-dimensional Ising model. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. Ultrasound assisted-deep eutectic solvent based on emulsification liquid phase microextraction combined with microsample injection flame atomic absorption spectrometry for valence speciation of chromium(III/VI) in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Erkan; Soylak, Mustafa

    2016-11-01

    A new type of deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have been prepared and used as extraction solvents for ultrasound assisted-deep eutectic solvent based emulsification liquid phase microextraction method (UA-DES-ELPME) for the determination and speciation of total chromium, chromium(III) and chromium(VI). The chromium concentration in DES rich phase (extraction phase) was determined by using microsample injection flame atomic absorption spectrometer (FAAS). The detection limit (LOD), the quantification limit (LOQ), preconcentration factor and relative standard deviation were found as 5.5µgL(-1), 18.2µgL(-1), 20 and 6%, respectively. The accuracy of the developed method was evaluated by the analysis of water the certified reference materials (TMDA-53.3 Fortified environmental water and TMDA-54.4 Fortified Lake Water) and addition-recovery tests for water samples. PMID:27591663

  16. Independent Review of E2100: A Phase III Trial of Bevacizumab Plus Paclitaxel Versus Paclitaxel in Women With Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Robert; Bhattacharya, Suman; Bowden, Christopher; Miller, Kathy; Comis, Robert L.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose E2100, an open-label, randomized, phase III trial conducted by the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG), demonstrated a significant improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) and overall response rate (ORR) with paclitaxel plus bevacizumab compared with paclitaxel alone as initial chemotherapy for patients with HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer. Methods An independent, blinded review of radiologic and clinical data was performed, assessing progression and response according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors. In addition, ECOG's investigator assessments were reanalyzed using the same methods applied to the independent review. The primary end point was PFS as assessed by an independent review facility (IRF). Results The addition of bevacizumab to paclitaxel resulted in a statistically significant improvement in PFS using both the IRF and investigator assessments. Hazard ratios for PFS (0.48, 95% CI, 0.385 to 0.607; P < .0001 for the IRF v 0.42, 95% CI, 0.34 to 0.52; P < .0001 for ECOG investigators) and the improvement in median PFS (11.3 v 5.8 months for the IRF v 11.4 v 5.8 months for ECOG investigators) were similar. Among patients with measurable disease at baseline, the IRF-assessed ORR was significantly higher in patients treated with paclitaxel and bevacizumab (48.9% v 22.2%; P < .0001). Conclusion The risk of progression was reduced by more than half and the ORR more than doubled with the addition of bevacizumab to weekly paclitaxel in both analyses, confirming a substantial and robust bevacizumab treatment effect. The consistency between the IRF and ECOG analyses validates the original data previously reported by ECOG in this open-label trial. PMID:19720913

  17. Innovative applications of energy storage in a restructured electricity marketplace : Phase III final report : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.

    SciTech Connect

    Eyer, James M.; Erdman, Bill; Iannucci, Joseph J., Jr.

    2005-03-01

    This report describes Phase III of a project entitled Innovative Applications of Energy Storage in a Restructured Electricity Marketplace. For this study, the authors assumed that it is feasible to operate an energy storage plant simultaneously for two primary applications: (1) energy arbitrage, i.e., buy-low-sell-high, and (2) to reduce peak loads in utility ''hot spots'' such that the utility can defer their need to upgrade transmission and distribution (T&D) equipment. The benefits from the arbitrage plus T&D deferral applications were estimated for five cases based on the specific requirements of two large utilities operating in the Eastern U.S. A number of parameters were estimated for the storage plant ratings required to serve the combined application: power output (capacity) and energy discharge duration (energy storage). In addition to estimating the various financial expenditures and the value of electricity that could be realized in the marketplace, technical characteristics required for grid-connected distributed energy storage used for capacity deferral were also explored.

  18. Effect of Si additions on thermal stability and the phase transition sequence of sputtered amorphous alumina thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Bolvardi, H.; Baben, M. to; Nahif, F.; Music, D. Schnabel, V.; Shaha, K. P.; Mráz, S.; Schneider, J. M.; Bednarcik, J.; Michalikova, J.

    2015-01-14

    Si-alloyed amorphous alumina coatings having a silicon concentration of 0 to 2.7 at. % were deposited by combinatorial reactive pulsed DC magnetron sputtering of Al and Al-Si (90-10 at. %) split segments in Ar/O{sub 2} atmosphere. The effect of Si alloying on thermal stability of the as-deposited amorphous alumina thin films and the phase formation sequence was evaluated by using differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction. The thermal stability window of the amorphous phase containing 2.7 at. % of Si was increased by more than 100 °C compared to that of the unalloyed phase. A similar retarding effect of Si alloying was also observed for the α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} formation temperature, which increased by more than 120 °C. While for the latter retardation, the evidence for the presence of SiO{sub 2} at the grain boundaries was presented previously, this obviously cannot explain the stability enhancement reported here for the amorphous phase. Based on density functional theory molecular dynamics simulations and synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments for amorphous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with and without Si incorporation, we suggest that the experimentally identified enhanced thermal stability of amorphous alumina with addition of Si is due to the formation of shorter and stronger Si–O bonds as compared to Al–O bonds.

  19. Stabilization of Stormwater Biofilters: Impacts of Wetting and Drying Phases and the Addition of Organic Matter to Filter Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, D. N.; Egodawatta, P.; Mather, P.; Rajapakse, J. P.

    2015-09-01

    Ripening period refers to a phase of stabilization in sand filters in water treatment systems that follow a new installation or cleaning of the filter. Intermittent wetting and drying, a unique property of stormwater biofilters, would similarly be subjected to a phase of stabilization. Suspended solids are an important parameter that is often used to monitor the stabilization of sand filters in water treatment systems. Stormwater biofilters, however, contain organic material that is added to the filter layer to enhance nitrate removal, the dynamics of which is seldom analyzed in stabilization of stormwater biofilters. Therefore, in this study of stormwater biofiltration in addition to suspended solids (turbidity), organic matter (TOC, DOC, TN, and TKN) was also monitored as a parameter for stabilization of the stormwater biofilter. One Perspex bioretention column (94 mm internal diameter) was fabricated with filter layer that contained 8 % organic material and fed with tapwater with different antecedent dry days (0-40 day) at 100 mL/min. Samples were collected from the outflow at different time intervals between 2 and 150 min and were tested for total organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, total nitrogen, total Kjeldhal nitrogen, and turbidity. The column was observed to experience two phases of stabilization, one at the beginning of each event that lasted for 30 min, while the other phase was observed across subsequent events that are related to the age of filter.

  20. Stabilization of Stormwater Biofilters: Impacts of Wetting and Drying Phases and the Addition of Organic Matter to Filter Media.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, D N; Egodawatta, P; Mather, P; Rajapakse, J P

    2015-09-01

    Ripening period refers to a phase of stabilization in sand filters in water treatment systems that follow a new installation or cleaning of the filter. Intermittent wetting and drying, a unique property of stormwater biofilters, would similarly be subjected to a phase of stabilization. Suspended solids are an important parameter that is often used to monitor the stabilization of sand filters in water treatment systems. Stormwater biofilters, however, contain organic material that is added to the filter layer to enhance nitrate removal, the dynamics of which is seldom analyzed in stabilization of stormwater biofilters. Therefore, in this study of stormwater biofiltration in addition to suspended solids (turbidity), organic matter (TOC, DOC, TN, and TKN) was also monitored as a parameter for stabilization of the stormwater biofilter. One Perspex bioretention column (94 mm internal diameter) was fabricated with filter layer that contained 8 % organic material and fed with tapwater with different antecedent dry days (0-40 day) at 100 mL/min. Samples were collected from the outflow at different time intervals between 2 and 150 min and were tested for total organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, total nitrogen, total Kjeldhal nitrogen, and turbidity. The column was observed to experience two phases of stabilization, one at the beginning of each event that lasted for 30 min, while the other phase was observed across subsequent events that are related to the age of filter. PMID:25971737

  1. Crystal phase competition by addition of a second metal cation in solid solution metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Blas, C; Snejko, N; de la Peña-O'Shea, V A; Gallardo, J; Gutiérrez-Puebla, E; Monge, M A; Gándara, F

    2016-03-14

    Herein we report a synthetic study focused on the preparation of solid-solution metal-organic frameworks, MOFs, with the use of two kinds of linkers. In particular, we have explored the system composed by zinc, cobalt, 1,2,4-triazole and 4,4′-hexafluoroisopropylidenebisbenzoic acid (H2hfipbb). During this study, four new MOFs have been isolated, denoted TMPF-88 [M3(hfipbb)2(triazole)2(H2O)], TMPF-90 [M2(triazole)3(OCH2CH3)], TMPF-91 [M2(hfipbb)(triazole)2(H2O)] and TMPF-95 [M5(hfipbb)4(triazole)2(H2O)] (TMPF = transition metal polymeric framework, M = Zn, Co, or mixture of them). The study demonstrates that the addition of a second metal element during the MOF synthesis has a major effect in the formation of new phases, even at very high Zn/Co metal ratios. Furthermore, we show that during the MOF formation reaction, there is a competition among different crystal phases, where kinetically favoured phases of various compositions crystallize in short reaction times, precluding the formation of the pure solid-solution phases of other energetically more stable MOFs. PMID:26674593

  2. Additive effect of mPer1 and mPer2 antisense oligonucleotides on light-induced phase shift.

    PubMed

    Wakamatsu, H; Takahashi, S; Moriya, T; Inouye, S T; Okamura, H; Akiyama, M; Shibata, S

    2001-01-22

    It is well known that light induces both mPer1 and mPer2 mRNA in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. We have reported that mPer1 antisense oligonucleotides (ODNs) inhibited the light-induced phase delays of mouse locomotor rhythm. In this study, we asked whether both or either mPer1 or mPer2 expression is necessary to induce the phase shift. We examined the effects of inhibition of mRNA expression on light-induced phase delays of mouse circadian behavior rhythm. Light-induced phase delays were moderately attenuated by microinjection of mPer1 or mPer2 antisense ODN, but not by mPer3 antisense or mPer1, mPer2 scrambled ODNs, whereas following simultaneous injection of both mPer1 and mPer2 antisense ODNs they disappeared. The present results suggest that acute induction of mPer1 and mPer2 gene play an additive effect on photic entrainment. PMID:11201072

  3. Post Hoc analyses of intention-to-treat population in phase III comparison of NovoTTF-100A™ system versus best physician's choice chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kanner, Andrew A; Wong, Eric T; Villano, John L; Ram, Zvi

    2014-10-01

    We performed a treatment-based analysis of data from the pivotal phase III trial of the NovoTTF-100A System™ versus best physician's choice (BPC) chemotherapy in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), with particular focus on efficacy in patients using NovoTTF Therapy as intended. Median overall survival (OS) was compared for recurrent GBM patients receiving at least one full cycle of treatment with NovoTTF-100A System or BPC chemotherapy (modified intention-to-treat [mITT] population) in the recently reported phase III trial. The relationship between NovoTTF-100A System compliance and OS was evaluated in the ITT population. Kaplan-Meier analyses examined treatment-related differences in OS for various patient subgroups. Median OS was significantly higher in patients receiving≥1 course of NovoTTF Therapy versus BPC (7.7 v 5.9 months; hazard ratio, 0.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.52-0.91; P = .0093). Median OS was also significantly higher in patients receiving NovoTTF Therapy with a maximal monthly compliance rate≥75% (≥18 hours daily) versus those with a<75% compliance rate (7.7 v 4.5 months; P = .042), and Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated a significant trend for improved median OS with higher compliance (P = .039). Additional post hoc analysis showed significantly higher median OS with NovoTTF Therapy than with BPC for patients with prior low-grade glioma, tumor size≥18 cm(2), Karnofsky performance status≥80, and those who had previously failed bevacizumab therapy. When used as intended in mITT patients with recurrent GBM, NovoTTF Therapy provides an OS benefit compared with chemotherapy in patients with recurrent GBM. This contrasts with the equivalent efficacy reported previously based on analysis of all randomized ITT subjects, including many who did not receive a full cycle of treatment. Higher NovoTTF Therapy compliance corresponds with greater survival benefit in the present study. PMID:25213871

  4. Alcohol consumption and colon cancer prognosis among participants in north central cancer treatment group phase III trial N0147.

    PubMed

    Phipps, Amanda I; Shi, Qian; Limburg, Paul J; Nelson, Garth D; Sargent, Daniel J; Sinicrope, Frank A; Chan, Emily; Gill, Sharlene; Goldberg, Richard M; Kahlenberg, Morton; Nair, Suresh; Shields, Anthony F; Newcomb, Polly A; Alberts, Steven R

    2016-09-01

    Alcohol consumption is associated with a modest increased risk of colon cancer, but its relationship with colon cancer survival has not been elucidated. Using data from a phase III randomized adjuvant trial, we assessed the association of alcohol consumption with colon cancer outcomes. Patients completed a risk factor questionnaire before randomization to FOLFOX or FOLFOX + cetuximab (N = 1984). Information was collected on lifestyle factors, including smoking, physical activity and consumption of different types of alcohol. Cox models assessed the association between alcohol consumption and outcomes of disease-free survival (DFS), time-to-recurrence (TTR) and overall survival (OS), adjusting for age, sex, study arm, body mass, smoking, physical activity and performance status. No statistically significant difference in outcomes between ever and never drinkers were noted [hazard ratio (HR)DFS  = 0.86, HRTTR  = 0.87, HROS  = 0.86, p-values = 0.11-0.17]. However, when considering alcohol type, ever consumers of red wine (n = 628) had significantly better outcomes than never consumers (HRDFS  = 0.80, HRTTR  = 0.81, HROS  = 0.78, p-values = 0.01-0.02). Favorable outcomes were confirmed in patients who consumed 1-30 glasses/month of red wine (n = 601, HR = 0.80-0.83, p-values = 0.03-0.049); there was a suggestion of more favorable outcomes in patients who consumed >30 glasses/month of red wine (n = 27, HR = 0.33-0.38, p-values = 0.05-0.06). Beer and liquor consumption were not associated with outcomes. Although alcohol consumption was not associated with colon cancer outcomes overall, mild to moderate red wine consumption was suggestively associated with longer OS, DFS and TTR in stage III colon cancer patients. PMID:27060850

  5. Rational molecular dynamics scheme for predicting optimum concentration loading of nano-additive in phase change materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, Monisha; Vaish, Rahul; Madhar, Niyaz Ahamad; Shaikh, Hamid; Al-Zahrani, S. M.

    2015-10-01

    The present study deals with the diffusion and phase transition behaviour of paraffin reinforced with carbon nano-additives namely graphene oxide (GO) and surface functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). Bulk disordered systems of paraffin hydrocarbons impregnated with carbon nano-additives have been generated in realistic equilibrium conformations for potential application as latent heat storage systems. Ab initio molecular dynamics(MD) in conjugation with COMPASS forcefield has been implemented using periodic boundary conditions. The proposed scheme allows determination of optimum nano-additive loading for improving thermo-physical properties through analysis of mass, thermal and transport properties; and assists in determination of composite behaviour and related performance from microscopic point of view. It was observed that nanocomposites containing 7.8 % surface functionalised SWCNT and 55% GO loading corresponds to best latent heat storage system. The propounded methodology could serve as a by-pass route for economically taxing and iterative experimental procedures required to attain the optimum composition for best performance. The results also hint at the large unexplored potential of ab-initio classical MD techniques for predicting performance of new nanocomposites for potential phase change material applications.

  6. Evaluation of the thermal performance of fire fighter protective clothing with the addition of phase change material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Lee K.

    Fire fighters rely on fire fighter protective clothing (FFPC) to provide adequate protection in the various hazardous environments they may encounter during operations. FFPC has seen significant advancement in technology over the past few decades. The addition of phase change material (PCM) to FFPC is a new technology with potential to enhance the thermal protection provided by the FFPC. To explore this technology, data from bench-scale experiments involving FFPC with PCMs are compared with a theoretical finite difference heat transfer model. The results demonstrate an effective method to mathematically model the heat transfer and provide insight into the effectiveness of improving the thermal protection of FFPC. The experiments confirm that the latent heat absorbed during the phase change reduces temperatures that might be experienced at the fire fighter's skin surface, advancing the high temperature performance of FFPC.

  7. Effect of additional optical pumping injection into the ground-state ensemble on the gain and the phase recovery acceleration of quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungho

    2014-02-01

    The effect of additional optical pumping injection into the ground-state ensemble on the ultrafast gain and the phase recovery dynamics of electrically-driven quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers is numerically investigated by solving 1088 coupled rate equations. The ultrafast gain and the phase recovery responses are calculated with respect to the additional optical pumping power. Increasing the additional optical pumping power can significantly accelerate the ultrafast phase recovery, which cannot be done by increasing the injection current density.

  8. Addition of gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist for luteal phase support in in-vitro fertilization: an analysis of 2739 cycles

    PubMed Central

    Şimşek, Erhan; Kılıçdağ, Esra Bulgan; Aytaç, Pınar Çağlar; Çoban, Gonca; Şimşek, Seda Yüksel; Çok, Tayfun; Haydardedeoğlu, Bülent

    2015-01-01

    Objective Luteal phase is defective in in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles, and many regimens were tried for the very best luteal phase support (LPS). Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist use, which was administered as an adjunct to the luteal phase support in IVF cycles, was suggested to improve pregnancy outcome measures in certain randomized studies. We analyzed the effects of addition of GnRH agonist to standard progesterone luteal support on pregnancy outcome measures, particularly the live birth rates. Material and Methods This is a retrospective cohort study, including 2739 IVF cycles. Long GnRH agonist and antagonist stimulation IVF cycles with cleavage-stage embryo transfer were included. Cycles were divided into two groups: Group A included cycles with single-dose GnRH agonist plus progesterone LPS and Group B included progesterone only LPS. Live birth rates were the primary outcome measures of the analysis. Miscarriage rates and multiple pregnancy rates were the secondary outcome measures. Results Live birth rates were not statistically different in GnRH agonist plus progesterone (Group A) and progesterone only (Group B) groups in both the long agonist and antagonist stimulation arms (40.8%/41.2% and 32.8%/34.4%, p<0.05 respectively). Moreover, pregnancy rates, implantation rates, and miscarriage rates were found to be similar between groups. Multiple pregnancy rates in antagonist cycles were significantly higher in Group A than those in Group B (12.0% and 6.9%, respectively). Conclusion A beneficial effect of a single dose of GnRH agonist administration as a luteal phase supporting agent is yet to be determined because of the wide heterogeneity of data present in literature. Well-designed randomized clinical studies are required to clarify any effect of luteal GnRH agonist addition on pregnancy outcome measures with different doses, timing, and administration routes of GnRH agonists. PMID:26097392

  9. Cytokine Profile of Children Hospitalized with Virologically-Confirmed Dengue during Two Phase III Vaccine Efficacy Trials

    PubMed Central

    Harenberg, Anke; de Montfort, Aymeric; Jantet-Blaudez, Frédérique; Bonaparte, Matthew; Boudet, Florence; Saville, Melanie; Jackson, Nicholas; Guy, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Background Two large-scale efficacy studies with the recombinant yellow fever-17D–dengue virus, live-attenuated, tetravalent dengue vaccine (CYD-TDV) candidate undertaken in Asia (NCT01373281) and Latin America (NCT01374516) demonstrated significant protection against dengue disease during two years’ active surveillance (active phase). Long-term follow up of participants for breakthrough disease leading to hospitalization is currently ongoing (hospital phase). Methodology/Principal findings We assessed the cytokine profile in acute sera from selected participants hospitalized (including during the active phase) up to the beginning of the second year of long-term follow up for both studies. The serum concentrations of 38 cytokines were measured in duplicate using the Milliplex Human Cytokine MAGNETIC BEAD Premixed 38 Plex commercial kit (Millipore, Billerica, MA, USA). Partial least squares discriminant analyses did not reveal any difference in the overall cytokine profile of CYD-TDV and placebo recipients hospitalized for breakthrough dengue regardless of stratification used. In addition, there was no difference in the cytokine profile for breakthrough dengue among those aged <9 years versus those aged ≥ 9 years. Conclusions/Significance These exploratory findings show that CYD-TDV does not induce a particular immune profile versus placebo, corroborating the clinical profile observed. PMID:27459266

  10. Expectation of Volunteers Towards the Vaccine Efficacy of the Prime-Boost HIV Vaccine Phase III Trial During Unblinding

    PubMed Central

    Khowsroy, Kessuda; Sabmee, Yupa; Laowarakul, Pataramon; Wattanakitwichai, Jutarat; Auetian, Jiraporn; Lothong, Kannika; Boondao, Roongtip; Maythaarttaphong, Sarawan; Yaemwong, Sunee; Excler, Jean-Louis; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A Phase III community-based HIV vaccine trial using the ALVAC-HIV and AIDSVAX B/E prime-boost regimen (RV144) showed a modest vaccine efficacy of 31.2% against HIV acquisition. Participant's understanding of the trial is a key element of its success. This study aimed to understand participant's expectation and response to the overall results of the trial as well after unblinding. Using an open-ended questionnaire, data were collected from 400 participants who came for the unblinding visit. Fifty-three percent received the vaccine and 47% were placebo recipients. The median age was 30 years (range: 22–37). The observed vaccine efficacy of 31.2% was lower than expected by 67.75% of participants compared to higher than expected (by 6%), as expected (by 11.25%), and those with no expectation (15%). A majority of participants (71.5%) were happy and proud, and indicated that it was a good result. The rest were sad or disappointed (22.75%) or acquiescent (5.75%). After unblinding, 67.92% of the vaccine recipients had a positive response and 32.08% were acquiescent. Among placebo recipients, 85.11% were acquiescent and 10.11% indicated that being assigned to the vaccine group would have been better even though vaccine efficacy was only 31.2%. Despite the modest vaccine efficacy, a majority of study participants acknowledged the value of the trial and hoped that information from RV144 could be used for future vaccine development. PMID:24906244

  11. Phase III randomized trial of sunitinib versus capecitabine in patients with previously treated HER2-negative advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mei-Ching; Lee, Soo Chin; Vanlemmens, Laurence; Ferrero, Jean-Marc; Tabei, Toshio; Pivot, Xavier; Iwata, Hiroji; Aogi, Kenjiro; Lugo-Quintana, Roberto; Harbeck, Nadia; Brickman, Marla J.; Zhang, Ke; Kern, Kenneth A.; Martin, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    This multicenter, randomized, open-label phase III trial (planned enrollment: 700 patients) was conducted to test the hypothesis that single-agent sunitinib improves progression-free survival (PFS) compared with capecitabine as treatment for advanced breast cancer (ABC). Patients with HER2-negative ABC that recurred after anthracycline and taxane therapy were randomized (1:1) to sunitinib 37.5 mg/day or capecitabine 1,250 mg/m2 (1,000 mg/m2 in patients >65 years) BID on days 1–14 q3w. The independent data-monitoring committee (DMC) determined during the first interim analysis (238 patients randomized to sunitinib, 244 to capecitabine) that the trial be terminated due to futility in reaching the primary endpoint. No statistical evidence supported the hypothesis that sunitinib improved PFS compared with capecitabine (one-sided P = 0.999). The data indicated that PFS was shorter with sunitinib than capecitabine (median 2.8 vs. 4.2 months, respectively; HR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.16–1.87; two-sided P = 0.002). Median overall survival (15.3 vs. 24.6 months; HR, 1.17; two-sided P = 0.350) and objective response rates (11 vs. 16%; odds ratio, 0.65; P = 0.109) were numerically inferior with sunitinib versus capecitabine. While no new or unexpected safety findings were reported, sunitinib treatment was associated with higher frequencies and greater severities of many common adverse events (AEs) compared with capecitabine, resulting in more temporary discontinuations due to AEs with sunitinib (66 vs. 51%). The relative dose intensity was lower with sunitinib than capecitabine (73 vs. 95%). Based on these efficacy and safety results, sunitinib should not be used as monotherapy for patients with ABC. PMID:20339913

  12. Tolerance and Acceptance Results of a Palladium-103 Permanent Breast Seed Implant Phase I/II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Pignol, Jean-Philippe Rakovitch, Eileen; Keller, Brian M.; Sankreacha, Raxa; Chartier, Carole

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To test, in a prospective Phase I/II trial, a partial breast irradiation technique using a {sup 103}Pd permanent breast seed implant (PBSI) realized in a single 1-h procedure under sedation and local freezing. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had infiltrating ductal carcinoma {<=}3 cm in diameter, surgical margin {>=}2 mm, no extensive intraductal component, no lymphovascular invasion, and negative lymph nodes. Patients received a permanent seed implant, and a minimal peripheral dose of 90 Gy was prescribed to the clinical target volume, with a margin of 1.5 cm. Results: From May 2004 to April 2007, 67 patients received the PBSI treatment. The procedure was well tolerated, with 17% of patients having significant pain after the procedure. Only 1 patient (1.5%) had an acute skin reaction (Grade 3 according to the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria). The rates of acute moist desquamation, erythema, and indurations were 10.4%, 42%, and 27%, respectively. At 1 year the rate of Grade 1 telangiectasia was 14%. The rate of skin reaction decreased from 65% to 28% when skin received less than the 85% isodose. According to a Radiation Therapy Oncology Group questionnaire, 80-90% of patients were very satisfied with their treatment, and the remainder were satisfied. One patient (1.5%) developed an abscess, which resolved after the use of antibiotics. There was no recurrence after a median follow-up of 32 months (range, 11-49 months). Conclusions: The feasibility, safety, and tolerability of PBSI compares favorably with that of external beam and other partial breast irradiation techniques.

  13. A phase III trial evaluating the efficacy and tolerability of nimesulide 1% spray in patients with soft-tissue injuries

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mazharuddin Ali; Rao, Madhusudhan; Reddy, Madan M.; Tamloorker, Datta; Gumdal, Vishesh; Latha, Moodahadu S.; Krishnankutty, Binny

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of nimesulide 1% w/w spray in minor soft-tissue injuries in adult Indians through a multicentric, open-labeled, phase III trial. Materials and Methods: 125 eligible patients, who met the selection criteria and gave written informed consent, were screened, enrolled, and treated with nimesulide 1% spray for seven days. Patients were assessed at baseline, day 1, day 4, and day 8 for efficacy and safety. Primary efficacy variable pain intensity, was measured using a NRS 1-100 mm (numerical rating scale). Secondary efficacy variables were degree of inflammation and edema and degree of functional impairment; overall assessment of efficacy was done by patient (patient global assessment – PGA) and by investigator (investigator global assessment – IGA) on days 4 and 8. Result: There was a statistically significant reduction in the NRS score, degree of pain, edema (inflammation), and improvement in functional impairment on days 4 and 8 and in serum creatine kinase levels on day 8 in comparison with baseline. Global assessment of efficacy on day 8 was rated as “very good (21%),” “good (67.70%),” and “fair (11.30%)” by investigators and “very good (25%),” “good (58.90%),” and “fair (16.1%)” by patients. Two mild adverse events were reported in two patients, which resolved without any intervention. One (local irritation) was reported as not related, while the other (itching sensation) was probably related to the study drug. Conclusion: Nimesulide 1% spray was effective with a good safety profile and can be considered is a good alternative to oral analgesic therapy in minor soft-tissue injuries. PMID:23724380

  14. Difluprednate 0.05% Versus Prednisolone Acetate 1% for Endogenous Anterior Uveitis: A Phase III, Multicenter, Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, John D.; Toyos, Melissa M.; Kempen, John H.; Kaur, Paramjit; Foster, C. Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Endogenous anterior uveitis (AU), when untreated, may lead to vision loss. This study compared the safety and efficacy of difluprednate versus prednisolone acetate for the treatment of this condition. Methods. This phase III, double-masked, noninferiority study randomized patients with mild to moderate endogenous AU to receive difluprednate 0.05% (n = 56) four times daily, alternating with vehicle four times daily, or prednisolone acetate 1% (n = 54) eight times daily. The 14-day treatment period was followed by a 14-day dose-tapering period and a 14-day observation period. The primary efficacy end point was change in anterior chamber cell grade (range, 0 for ≤1 cell to 4 for >50 cells) from baseline to day 14. Results. At day 14, the mean change in anterior chamber cell grade with difluprednate was noninferior to that with prednisolone acetate (−2.2 vs. −2.0, P = 0.16). The proportions of difluprednate-treated patients versus prednisolone acetate–treated patients demonstrating complete clearing of anterior chamber cells at day 3 were 13.0% vs. 2.1% (P = 0.046) and at day 21 were 73.9% vs. 63.8% (P = 0.013). A significant between-group difference in the mean IOP increase was seen at day 3 (2.5 mm Hg for difluprednate-treated patients and 0.1 mm Hg for prednisolone acetate–treated patients, P = 0.0013) but not at other time points. The mean IOP values in both groups remained less than 21 mm Hg throughout the study. Conclusions. Difluprednate 0.05% four times daily is well tolerated and is noninferior to prednisolone acetate 1% eight times daily for the treatment of endogenous AU. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01201798.) PMID:24677110

  15. Telomerase peptide vaccination of patients with non-resectable pancreatic cancer: a dose escalating phase I/II study

    PubMed Central

    Bernhardt, S L; Gjertsen, M K; Trachsel, S; Møller, M; Eriksen, J A; Meo, M; Buanes, T; Gaudernack, G

    2006-01-01

    Patients with inoperable pancreatic cancer have a dismal prognosis with a mean life expectancy of 3–6 months. New treatment modalities are thus urgently needed. Telomerase is expressed in 85–90% of pancreas cancer, and immunogenic telomerase peptides have been characterised. A phase I/II study was conducted to investigate the safety, tolerability, and immunogenecity of telomerase peptide vaccination. Survival of the patients was also recorded. Forty-eight patients with non-resectable pancreatic cancer received intradermal injections of the telomerase peptide GV1001 at three dose levels, in combination with granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor. The treatment period was 10 weeks. Monthly booster vaccinations were offered as follow-up treatment. Immune responses were measured as delayed-type hypersensitivity skin reaction and in vitro T-cell proliferation. GV1001 was well tolerated. Immune responses were observed in 24 of 38 evaluable patients, with the highest ratio (75%) in the intermediate dose group. Twenty-seven evaluable patients completed the study. Median survival for the intermediate dose-group was 8.6 months, significantly longer for the low- (P=0.006) and high-dose groups (P=0.05). One-year survival for the evaluable patients in the intermediate dose group was 25%. The results demonstrate that GV1001 is immunogenic and safe to use. The survival data indicate that induction of an immune response is correlated with prolonged survival, and the vaccine may offer a new treatment option for pancreatic cancer patients, encouraging further clinical studies. PMID:17060934

  16. Telomerase peptide vaccination of patients with non-resectable pancreatic cancer: A dose escalating phase I/II study.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, S L; Gjertsen, M K; Trachsel, S; Møller, M; Eriksen, J A; Meo, M; Buanes, T; Gaudernack, G

    2006-12-01

    Patients with inoperable pancreatic cancer have a dismal prognosis with a mean life expectancy of 3-6 months. New treatment modalities are thus urgently needed. Telomerase is expressed in 85-90% of pancreas cancer, and immunogenic telomerase peptides have been characterised. A phase I/II study was conducted to investigate the safety, tolerability, and immunogenecity of telomerase peptide vaccination. Survival of the patients was also recorded. Forty-eight patients with non-resectable pancreatic cancer received intradermal injections of the telomerase peptide GV1001 at three dose levels, in combination with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. The treatment period was 10 weeks. Monthly booster vaccinations were offered as follow-up treatment. Immune responses were measured as delayed-type hypersensitivity skin reaction and in vitro T-cell proliferation. GV1001 was well tolerated. Immune responses were observed in 24 of 38 evaluable patients, with the highest ratio (75%) in the intermediate dose group. Twenty-seven evaluable patients completed the study. Median survival for the intermediate dose-group was 8.6 months, significantly longer for the low- (P = 0.006) and high-dose groups (P = 0.05). One-year survival for the evaluable patients in the intermediate dose group was 25%. The results demonstrate that GV1001 is immunogenic and safe to use. The survival data indicate that induction of an immune response is correlated with prolonged survival, and the vaccine may offer a new treatment option for pancreatic cancer patients, encouraging further clinical studies. PMID:17060934

  17. Phase I-II clinical trial of hyaluronan-cisplatin nanoconjugate in dogs with naturally occurring malignant tumors.

    PubMed

    Cai, Shuang; Zhang, Ti; Forrest, W C; Yang, Qiuhong; Groer, Chad; Mohr, Eva; Aires, Daniel J; Axiak-Bechtel, Sandra M; Flesner, Brian K; Henry, Carolyn J; Selting, Kimberly A; Tate, Deborah; Swarz, Jeffrey A; Bryan, Jeffrey N; Forrest, M Laird

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To conduct a phase I-II clinical trial of hyaluronan-cisplatin nanoconjugate (HA-Pt) in dogs with naturally occurring malignant tumors. ANIMALS 18 healthy rats, 9 healthy mice, and 16 dogs with cancer. PROCEDURES HA-Pt was prepared and tested by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry; DNA-platinum adduct formation and antiproliferation effects of cisplatin and HA-Pt were compared in vitro. Effects of cisplatin (IV) and HA-Pt (SC) in rodents were tested by clinicopathologic assays. In the clinical trial, dogs with cancer received 1 to 4 injections of HA-Pt (10 to 30 mg/m(2), intratumoral or peritumoral, q 3 wk). Blood samples were collected for pharmacokinetic analysis; CBC, serum BUN and creatinine concentration measurement, and urinalysis were conducted before and 1 week after each treatment. Some dogs underwent hepatic enzyme testing. Tumors were measured before the first treatment and 3 weeks after each treatment to assess response. RESULTS No adverse drug effects were detected in pretrial assessments in rodents. Seven of 16 dogs completed the study; 3 had complete tumor responses, 3 had stable disease, and 1 had progressive disease. Three of 7 dogs with oral and nasal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) that completed the study had complete responses. Myelosuppression and cardiotoxicosis were identified in 6 and 2 dogs, respectively; none had nephrotoxicosis. Four of 5 dogs with hepatic enzymes assessed had increased ALT activities, attributed to diaquated cisplatin products in the HA-Pt. Pharmacokinetic data fit a 3-compartment model. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE HA-Pt treatment resulted in positive tumor responses in some dogs, primarily those with SCC. The adverse effect rate was high. IMPACT FOR HUMAN MEDICINE Oral SCC in dogs has characteristics similar to human head and neck SCC; these results could be useful in developing human treatments. PMID:27580113

  18. Phase III randomized trial of CED of IL13-PE38QQR vs Gliadel wafers for recurrent glioblastoma†

    PubMed Central

    Kunwar, Sandeep; Chang, Susan; Westphal, Manfred; Vogelbaum, Michael; Sampson, John; Barnett, Gene; Shaffrey, Mark; Ram, Zvi; Piepmeier, Joseph; Prados, Michael; Croteau, David; Pedain, Christoph; Leland, Pamela; Husain, Syed R.; Joshi, Bharat H.; Puri, Raj K.

    2010-01-01

    Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of cintredekin besudotox (CB) was compared with Gliadel wafers (GW) in adult patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) at first recurrence. Patients were randomized 2:1 to receive CB or GW. CB (0.5 µg/mL; total flow rate 0.75 mL/h) was administered over 96 hours via 2–4 intraparenchymal catheters placed after tumor resection. GW (3.85%/7.7 mg carmustine per wafer; maximum 8 wafers) were placed immediately after tumor resection. The primary endpoint was overall survival from the time of randomization. Prestated interim analyses were built into the study design. Secondary and tertiary endpoints were safety and health-related quality-of-life assessments. From March 2004 to December 2005, 296 patients were enrolled at 52 centers. Demographic and baseline characteristics were balanced between the 2 treatment arms. Median survival was 36.4 weeks (9.1 months) for CB and 35.3 weeks (8.8 months) for GW (P = .476). For the efficacy evaluable population, the median survival was 45.3 weeks (11.3 months) for CB and 39.8 weeks (10 months) for GW (P = .310). The adverse-events profile was similar in both arms, except that pulmonary embolism was higher in the CB arm (8% vs 1%, P = .014). This is the first randomized phase III evaluation of an agent administered via CED and the first with an active comparator in GBM patients. There was no survival difference between CB administered via CED and GW. Drug distribution was not assessed and may be crucial for evaluating future CED-based therapeutics. PMID:20511192

  19. Ren Shen Yangrong Tang for Fatigue in Cancer Survivors: A Phase I/II Open-Label Study

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yichen; Chen, Yanzhi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: This open-label, prospective, phase I/II trial was performed to establish the safety and efficacy of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) herbal products for treating non–anemia-related fatigue in patients with cancer. Although this practice is widespread in China, it has not been confirmed in a prospective clinical study. Design: Thirty-three patients who had completed cancer treatment, had stable disease and no anemia, and reported moderate to severe fatigue (rated ≥4 on a 0–10 scale) were enrolled in a TCM outpatient clinic. Patients took Ren Shen Yangrong Tang (RSYRT) decoction, a soup containing 12 TCM herbs, twice a day for 6 weeks. RSYRT aims to correct qi deficiency. Fatigue was assessed before and after RSYRT therapy, which all patients completed. Results: No discomfort or toxicity was observed. Before the study, all patients had had fatigue for at least 4 months. Fatigue severity decreased significantly from before therapy to 6 weeks after therapy: from 7.06 to 3.30 on a 0–10 scale (p<0.001). Fatigue category (mild, moderate, severe) shifted significantly (p=0.024): Of 22 patients with severe fatigue (rated ≥7) before therapy, 11 had mild fatigue and 11 had moderate fatigue after TCM treatment. The time-to-fatigue-alleviation was 2–3 weeks. Conclusion: RSYRT therapy was safe and was associated with fatigue improvement in nonanemic cancer survivors, consistent with historical TCM clinical practice experience. Because of a possible placebo effect in this open-label study, decoction RSYRT warrants further study in randomized clinical trials to confirm its effectiveness for managing moderate to severe fatigue. PMID:25918996

  20. CF102 for the Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Phase I/II, Open-Label, Dose-Escalation Study

    PubMed Central

    Stemmer, Salomon M.; Benjaminov, Ofer; Medalia, Gal; Ciuraru, Noab B.; Silverman, Michael H.; Bar-Yehuda, Sara; Fishman, Sari; Harpaz, Zivit; Farbstein, Motti; Cohen, Shira; Patoka, Renana; Singer, Barak; Kerns, William D.

    2013-01-01

    Background. The A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR) is overexpressed in the tumor and in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The orally active drug candidate CF102, an A3AR agonist, induces apoptosis of HCC cells via deregulation of the Wnt signaling pathway. In this open label phase I/II trial, the safety and clinical effects of CF102 were assessed in patients with advanced unresectable HCC. Methods. The primary objectives of this trial were to examine the safety and pharmacokinetic (PK) behavior of CF102 given orally (1, 5, and 25 mg BID) in 28-day cycles. Evaluation of anti-tumor effects and the utilization of A3AR as a biological predictive marker of response to CF102 were the secondary objectives. Results. Eighteen patients received CF102—six at each dose level. No serious drug-related adverse events or dose-limiting toxicities were observed. CF102 demonstrated good oral bioavailability and linear PK behavior. Median overall survival in the study population, 67% of whom had received prior sorafenib, was 7.8 months, and for Child Pugh B patients (28%) it was 8.1 months. Stable disease by RECIST was observed in four patients for at least 4 months. CF102 maintained liver function over a 6-month period. A correlation between receptor overexpression levels at baseline and patients' overall survival was found. One of the patients who presented with skin nodules that were biopsy-proven to be HCC metastases prior to the trial showed complete metastasis regression during three months of treatment with CF102. Conclusions. CF102 is safe and well-tolerated, showing favorable PK characteristics in Child Pugh A and B HCC patients, justifying further clinical development. PMID:23299770

  1. Late radiation toxicity after intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) for breast cancer: results from the randomized phase III trial TARGIT A.

    PubMed

    Sperk, Elena; Welzel, Grit; Keller, Anke; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Gerhardt, Axel; Sütterlin, Marc; Wenz, Frederik

    2012-08-01

    The randomized phase III trial TARGIT A showed non-inferiority regarding local control after intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT 20 Gy which was followed by whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT) in patients with risk factors only) in comparison to standard WBRT (50-56 Gy) after breast-conserving surgery in selected patients. This is the first analysis of long-term toxicities in the setting of TARGIT. Between 02/2002 and 12/2008, 305 patients were treated within TARGIT A (Arm A: n = 34 IORT, n = 20 IORT + WBRT for risk factors; Arm B WBRT: n = 55) or received IORT as a planned boost (control group: n = 196) at a single center. Toxicity was assessed according to the LENT SOMA scales. No significant differences were seen between Arm A and Arm B regarding fibrosis, breast edema, retraction, ulceration, lymphedema, hyperpigmentation, and pain. Arm A had significantly less telangiectases compared to Arm B (p = 0.049). In the subanalysis (Arm A IORT vs. Arm A IORT + WBRT vs. Arm B), fibrosis had a cumulative rate of 5.9 versus 37.5 versus 18.4 %, respectively (38.2 % IORT boost control group), at 3 years. No telangiectases were seen after IORT alone (0 % Arm A IORT vs. 17.5 % Arm A IORT + WBRT vs. 17.7 % Arm B). The hazard ratio of higher grade toxicity as first event was 0.46 (95 % CI, 0.26-0.83) for Arm A IORT as compared to Arm B (p = 0.010). No recurrences were seen after a median follow-up of 40 months (Arm A) and 42 months (Arm B). With its very low chronic skin toxicity rates and outstanding long-term results regarding toxicity and local control, IORT with 50 kV X-rays is a safe and effective method for treatment of selected breast cancer patients. PMID:22842984

  2. Anatomical effects of dexamethasone intravitreal implant in diabetic macular oedema: a pooled analysis of 3-year phase III trials

    PubMed Central

    Danis, Ronald P; Sadda, Srinivas; Li, Xiao-Yan; Cui, Harry; Hashad, Yehia; Whitcup, Scott M

    2016-01-01

    Background/aim To assess long-term effects of dexamethasone intravitreal implant (DEX implant) monotherapy on retinal morphology in diabetic macular oedema (DME). Methods Two multicentre, masked, phase III studies with identical protocols randomised patients with DME, best-corrected visual acuity of 34–68 Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study letters and central subfield retinal thickness (CSRT) ≥300 µm to DEX implant 0.7, 0.35 mg or sham procedure. Patients were followed up for 3 years (39 months if treated at month 36), with retreatment allowed at ≥6-month intervals. Patients needing other macular oedema (ME) therapy exited the study. Changes from baseline in CSRT, macular volume and ME grade, area of retinal thickening, macular leakage, macular capillary loss and diabetic retinopathy severity were assessed. Results After 3 years, more eyes treated with DEX implant 0.7 and 0.35 mg than sham showed improvement (although small) in ME grade (p<0.05 vs sham). DEX implant 0.7 mg delayed time to onset of two-step progression in diabetic retinopathy severity by ∼12 months. DEX implant 0.7 and 0.35 mg produced small, non-sustained reductions in macular leakage but had no significant effect on macular capillary loss. Conclusions DEX implant 0.7 or 0.35 mg, administered at ≥6-month intervals over 3 years, produced sustained retinal structural improvement in DME. Trial registration number NCT00168337 and NCT00168389. PMID:26581718

  3. A phase III randomised controlled trial of single-dose triple therapy in COPD: the IMPACT protocol.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, Steven J; Lipson, David A; Locantore, Nicholas; Barnacle, Helen; Brealey, Noushin; Mohindra, Rajat; Dransfield, Mark T; Pavord, Ian; Barnes, Neil

    2016-08-01

    Patients with symptomatic advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who experience recurrent exacerbations are particularly at risk of poor outcomes and present a significant burden on healthcare systems. The relative merits of treating with different inhaled combination therapies e.g. inhaled corticosteroids (ICS)/long-acting β2-agonist (LABA), LABA/long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LAMA), ICS/LABA/LAMA, in this patient group are poorly understood, as is reflected in current guidelines. The InforMing the PAthway of COPD Treatment (IMPACT) study will evaluate the efficacy and safety of fluticasone furoate (FF)/umeclidinium (UMEC)/vilanterol (VI) versus FF/VI or UMEC/VI over a 52-week treatment period. The study has been designed with a focus on understanding the comparative merits of each treatment modality in different phenotypes/endotypes.This is a phase III, randomised, double-blind, three-arm, parallel-group, global multicentre study comparing the rate of moderate and severe exacerbations between FF/UMEC/VI and FF/VI or UMEC/VI over a 52-week treatment period. The study aims to recruit 10 000 patients from approximately 1070 centres. Eligible patients are aged ≥40 years, with symptomatic advanced COPD (Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) group D) and an exacerbation in the previous 12 months.The first patients were recruited to the IMPACT study (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02164513) in June 2014 and the anticipated completion date is July 2017. PMID:27418551

  4. Randomized phase III trial of treatment duration for oral uracil and tegafur plus leucovorin as adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with stage IIB/III colon cancer: final results of JFMC33-0502

    PubMed Central

    Sadahiro, S.; Tsuchiya, T.; Sasaki, K.; Kondo, K.; Katsumata, K.; Nishimura, G.; Kakeji, Y.; Baba, H.; Sato, S.; Koda, K.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Morita, T.; Matsuoka, J.; Usuki, H.; Hamada, C.; Kodaira, S.

    2015-01-01

    Background While adjuvant chemotherapy is preferable for high-risk colon cancer, treatment duration is controversial. Oral uracil and tegafur (UFT)/leucovorin (LV) is widely used as a standard adjuvant chemotherapy for colon cancer in Japan. We conducted a phase III trial to investigate the optimal duration of adjuvant chemotherapy for stage IIB/III colon cancer. Patients and methods Patients with curatively resected stage IIB/III colon cancer were eligible for enrollment in this trial. Patients were registered within 6 weeks after surgery and were randomly assigned to receive UFT/LV for 28 of 35 days for 6 months in the control group or for 5 consecutive days per week for 18 months in the study group. The primary end point was the disease-free survival (DFS), and the secondary end points were overall survival (OS) and safety. Result A total of 1071 patients were registered from 233 centers. A statistically significant difference in DFS was not observed between the study group and the control group; the 5-year DFS was 69% in the study group and 69% in the control group. The 5-year OS was 85% in the study group and 85% in the control group. Conclusion Eighteen-month treatment with UFT/LV did not improve DFS or OS compared with 6-month UFT/LV treatment in patients with stage IIB/III colon cancer. The important finding from this study is that not 18 months but 6 months of treatment is enough for postoperative UFT/LV for stage IIB/III colon cancer. Clinical trial number UMIN-CTR C000000245. PMID:26347106

  5. Identification of multiple reflected phases from migration receiver function profile: An example for the INDEPTH-III passive teleseismic P waveform data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiaobo; Wu, Qingju; Zhang, Zhongjie; Teng, Jiwen; Zeng, Rongsheng

    2005-04-01

    The crustal multiple reflected phases usually interfere with those converted phases from the topmost mantle discontinuities, which make them difficult to be identified and should be carefully interpreted in a migration receiver functions profile. We propose a simple scheme to identify the crustal multiples in a migration receiver functions profile. The scheme is based on the differences in both geometric and dynamic features resolved using AVP (amplitude variation verse ray parameter) and DVP (discontinuity depth variation verse ray parameter). Synthetic data shows that the crustal multiples can be distinguished from those converted phases in the receiver function migration profile, especially when the receiver functions are migrated using velocities lower than the actual velocities. As an example, we apply our procedure to the INDEPTH-III passive teleseismic P waveform data. Our results indicate that a possible converted phase from the ``220-km'' discontinuity is a crustal multiple reflected phase.

  6. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Cr(VI) Formation via the Oxidation of Cr(III) Solid Phases by Chlorine in Drinking Water.

    PubMed

    Chebeir, Michelle; Liu, Haizhou

    2016-01-19

    Hexavalent chromium Cr(VI), typically existing as the oxyanion form of CrO4(2-), is being considered for more stringent drinking water standards by regulatory agencies. Cr(VI) can be inadvertently produced via the oxidation of trivalent chromium Cr(III) solids. This study investigated the kinetics and mechanisms of Cr(III) solids oxidation by chlorine in drinking water and associated Cr(VI) formation. Batch experiments were carried out with three Cr(III) solids of environmental relevance, i.e., chromium hydroxide Cr(OH)3(s), chromium oxide Cr2O3(s), and copper chromite Cu2Cr2O5(s). Impacts of water chemical parameters including pH (6.0-8.5) and bromide concentration (0-5 mg/L) were examined. Results showed that the rapid oxidation of Cr(III) solid phases by chlorine was accompanied by Cr(VI) formation and an unexpected production of dissolved oxygen. Analysis of reaction stoichiometry indicated the existence of Cr intermediate species that promoted the autocatalytic decay of chlorine. An increase in pH modestly enhanced Cr(VI) formation due to changes of reactive Cr(III) surface hydroxo species. Bromide, a trace chemical constituent in source waters, exhibited a catalytic effect on Cr(VI) formation due to an electron shuttle mechanism between Cr(III) and chlorine and the bypass of Cr intermediate formation. The kinetics data obtained from this study suggest that the oxidation of Cr(III) solids by chlorine in water distribution systems can contribute to Cr(VI) occurrence in tap water, especially in the presence of a trace level of bromide. PMID:26647114

  7. Magnetic solid-phase extraction combined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for speciation of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in environmental waters.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hong-mei; Yang, Ting; Wang, Yan-hong; Lian, Hong-zhen; Hu, Xin

    2013-11-15

    A new approach of magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) coupled with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) has been developed for the speciation of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) using zincon-immobilized silica-coated magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles (Zincon-Si-MNPs) as the MSPE absorbent. Cr(III) was quantitatively reserved on the absorbent at pH 9.1 while total Cr was reserved at pH 6.5. The absorbed Cr species were eluted by using 2 mol/L HCl and detected by GFAAS. The concentration of Cr(VI) could be calculated by subtracting Cr(III) from total Cr. All the parameters affecting the separation and extraction efficiency of Cr species such as pH, extraction time, concentration and volume of eluent, sample volume and influence of co-existing ions were systematically examined and the optimized conditions were established accordingly. The detection limit (LOD) of the method was 0.016 and 0.011 ng mL(-1) for Cr(III) and Cr(VI), respectively, with the enrichment factor of 100 and 150. The precisions of this method (Relative standard deviation, RSD, n=7) for Cr(III) and Cr(VI) at 0.1 ng mL(-1) were 6.0% and 6.2%, respectively. In order to validate the proposed method, a certified reference material of environmental water was analyzed, and the result of Cr speciation was in good agreement with the certified value. This MSPE-GFAAS method has been successfully applied for the speciation of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in lake and tap waters with the recoveries of 88-109% for the spiked samples. Moreover, the MSPE separation mechanism of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) based on their adsorption-desorption on Zincon-Si-MNPs has been explained through various spectroscopic characterization. PMID:24148416

  8. Muonium Addition Reactions and Kinetic Isotope Effects in the Gas Phase: k∞ Rate Constants for Mu + C2H2.

    PubMed

    Arseneau, Donald J; Garner, David M; Reid, Ivan D; Fleming, Donald G

    2015-07-16

    The kinetics of the addition reaction of muonium (Mu) to acetylene have been studied in the gas phase at N2 moderator pressures mainly from ∼800 to 1000 Torr and over the temperature range from 168 to 446 K, but also down to 200 Torr at 168 K and over a much higher range of pressures, from 10 to 44 bar at 295 K, demonstrating pressure-independent rate constants, kMu(T). Even at 200 Torr moderator pressure, the kinetics for Mu + C2H2 addition behave as if effectively in the high-pressure limit, giving k∞ = kMu due to depolarization of the muon spin in the MuC2H2 radical formed in the addition step. The rate constants kMu(T) exhibit modest Arrhenius curvature over the range of measured temperatures. Comparisons with data and with calculations for the corresponding H(D) + C2H2 addition reactions reveal a much faster rate for the Mu reaction at the lowest temperatures, by 2 orders of magnitude, in accord with the propensity of Mu to undergo quantum tunneling. Moreover, isotopic atom exchange, which contributes in a major way to the analogous D atom reaction, forming C2HD + H, is expected to be unimportant in the case of Mu addition, a consequence of the much higher zero-point energy and hence weaker C-Mu bond that would form, meaning that the present report of the Mu + C2H2 reaction is effectively the only experimental study of kinetic isotope effects in the high-pressure limit for H-atom addition to acetylene. PMID:25664674

  9. Effect of 1-olefin addition on supercritical phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over Co/SiO{sub 2} catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, S.R.; Zhang, Z.X.; Zhou, J.L.; Fan, L.; Fujimoto, Kaoru

    1997-12-31

    Hydrocarbon wax produced by Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) has been used in many fields for its high quality, such as high melting point, high hardness value, low viscosity, being nitrogen sulfur and aromatics-free. Selective synthesis of FT wax has generated great interest, especially in the case of lower oil-prices. As a polymerization process, however, in conventional gas phase FTS, selectivity of wax is constrained by the Anderson-Schultz-Flory (ASF) kinetics. Supercritical phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis co-fed with 1-tetradecene over Co/SiO{sub 2} catalysts has been carried out. It was found that added 1-tetradecene could reach the surface of the catalyst by the aid of a supercritical fluid, and participate in the chain growth process there, which was indistinguishable from the original chain propagation. Consequently, the yield of hydrocarbons larger than C{sub 14} increased significantly, while the selectivity of C{sub 1}-C{sub 13} decreased correspondingly, which made the carbon number distribution deviate from ASF kinetics drastically. In addition, the analytical results of wax showed that average molecular weight and degree of saturation of the wax increased, while the content of oxygenates in the wax decreased due to the addition of 1-tetradecene.

  10. Photocurable high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs) containing hydroxyapatite for additive manufacture of tissue engineering scaffolds with multi-scale porosity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ai-Juan; Paterson, Thomas; Owen, Robert; Sherborne, Colin; Dugan, James; Li, Jun-Ming; Claeyssens, Frederik

    2016-10-01

    Porous composites containing hydroxyapatite (HA) were templated from high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs) and were further structured using direct-write UV stereolithography to produce composite scaffolds with multi-scale porosity. FTIR, TGA and SEM analyses confirmed that HA was retained after photocuring and subsequent treatments and was incorporated within the polymerised HIPE (polyHIPE). The addition of HA particles to the polyHIPE caused changes in the mechanical properties of the material. An increase in both the Young's modulus and maximum stress at yield was observed compared with the pure polyHIPE from 1.544±0.231 to 4.614±0.775 and 0.177±0.009 to 0.267±0.034MPa, respectively. Except at very high concentrations, adding HA did not adversely cause the phase separation of the HIPE or the porous microstructure of the resulting polyHIPE. In combination with a photoinitiator, the HIPE emulsion containing HA was investigated as a photocurable resin for stereolithography-based additive manufacturing. The material was readily processable into "woodpile" structures via direct-write UV stereolithography, producing scaffolds with multi-scale porosity which may be useful for medical applications such as tissue engineering. In conclusion, HA was successfully added into polyHIPEs, producing a similar porous structure to that of the pure polyHIPE whilst improving the mechanical performance. PMID:27287098

  11. Effect of V/III ratio on the growth of (11 2 bar 2) AlGaN by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinh, Duc V.; Alam, S. N.; Parbrook, P. J.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of V/III ratio on the growth and properties of AlGaN layers grown on (112bar2) AlN templates grown on (101bar0) sapphire by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy was studied. The surface morphology of the (112bar2) AlGaN layers and the (112bar2) AlN templates showed an undulation along [ 1 1 bar 00 ] AlGaN , AlN. The Al-content and thickness of the layers increased with decreasing V/III ratio due to a reduction in the parasitic reactions of the precursors. The Al-content of the (112bar2) layers was found to be in the range of 29.5-47.9%, which is lower than the composition of the simultaneously grown (0001) reference layers (30.4-58.0%). This was attributed to a higher density of cation (nitrogen) dangling bonds on the (112bar2) surface. Low temperature photoluminescence measurements of the (112bar2) layers showed an emission wavelength that shifts gradually from 273 nm to 306 nm with increasing V/III ratio. A decreased PL intensity of the layers with decreasing V/III ratio was attributed to an increase in cation vacancies. The Stokes-shift of the (112bar2) layers was estimated to be about 60-194 meV, and this shift increases with increasing Al-content (decreasing V/III ratio) correlated to an increased exciton localization.

  12. Access to 3-Acyl-(2H)-indazoles via Rh(III)-Catalyzed C-H Addition and Cyclization of Azobenzenes with α-Keto Aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Taejoo; Han, Sang Hoon; Han, Sangil; Sharma, Satyasheel; Park, Jihye; Lee, Jong Suk; Kwak, Jong Hwan; Jung, Young Hoon; Kim, In Su

    2016-01-15

    The rhodium(III)-catalyzed direct C-H functionalization of azobenzenes with ethyl glyoxalate and aryl glyoxals is described. This protocol provides the facile and efficient formation of various C3-acylated-(2H)-indazoles in moderate to high yields. PMID:26741169

  13. Potential for nitrate and Fe(III) additions to control indicator bacteria, retain nitrogen, and reduce odors in beef cattle feedlot soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A wide variety of volatile odor compounds accumulate during the anaerobic fermentation of livestock wastes. Since these compounds are easily degraded in other environments when alternate electron acceptors (compounds other than O2) are available, we evaluated the use of amending NO3- and Fe(III) in...

  14. Reduction in lipoprotein-associated apoC-III levels following volanesorsen therapy: phase 2 randomized trial results.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaohong; Lee, Sang-Rok; Choi, Yun-Seok; Alexander, Veronica J; Digenio, Andres; Yang, Qingqing; Miller, Yury I; Witztum, Joseph L; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2016-04-01

    Elevated apoC-III levels predict increased cardiovascular risk when present on LDL and HDL particles. We developed novel high-throughput chemiluminescent ELISAs that capture apoB, lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)], and apoA-I in plasma and then detect apoC-III on these individual lipoproteins as apoCIII-apoB, apoCIII-Lp(a), and apoCIII-apoAI complexes, respectively. We assessed the effects on these complexes of placebo or 100-300 mg volanesorsen, a generation 2.0+ antisense drug that targets apoC3 mRNA in patients with hypertriglyceridemia, including familial chylomicronemia syndrome (n = 3), volanesorsen monotherapy (n = 51), and as add-on to fibrate (n = 26), treated for 85 days and followed for 176 days. Compared with placebo, volanesorsen was associated with an 82.3 ± 11.7%, 81.3 ± 15.7%, and 80.8 ± 13.6% reduction in apoCIII-apoB, apoCIII-Lp(a), and apoCIII-apoA-I, respectively (300 mg dose;P< 0.001 for all), at day 92. Strong correlations in all assay measures were noted with total plasma apoC-III, chylomicron-apoC-III, and VLDL-apoC-III. In conclusion, novel high-throughput ELISAs were developed to detect lipoprotein-associated apoC-III, including for the first time on Lp(a). Volanesorsen uniformly lowers apoC-III on apoB-100, Lp(a), and apoA-I lipoproteins, and may be a potent agent to reduce triglycerides and cardiovascular risk mediated by apoC-III. PMID:26848137

  15. The development of decision limits for the GH-2000 detection methodology using additional insulin-like growth factor-I and amino-terminal pro-peptide of type III collagen assays.

    PubMed

    Holt, Richard I G; Böhning, Walailuck; Guha, Nishan; Bartlett, Christiaan; Cowan, David A; Giraud, Sylvain; Bassett, E Eryl; Sönksen, Peter H; Böhning, Dankmar

    2015-09-01

    The GH-2000 and GH-2004 projects have developed a method for detecting GH misuse based on measuring insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and the amino-terminal pro-peptide of type III collagen (P-III-NP). The objectives were to analyze more samples from elite athletes to improve the reliability of the decision limit estimates, to evaluate whether the existing decision limits needed revision, and to validate further non-radioisotopic assays for these markers. The study included 998 male and 931 female elite athletes. Blood samples were collected according to World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) guidelines at various sporting events including the 2011 International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) World Athletics Championships in Daegu, South Korea. IGF-I was measured by the Immunotech A15729 IGF-I IRMA, the Immunodiagnostic Systems iSYS IGF-I assay and a recently developed mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method. P-III-NP was measured by the Cisbio RIA-gnost P-III-P, Orion UniQ™ PIIINP RIA and Siemens ADVIA Centaur P-III-NP assays. The GH-2000 score decision limits were developed using existing statistical techniques. Decision limits were determined using a specificity of 99.99% and an allowance for uncertainty because of the finite sample size. The revised Immunotech IGF-I - Orion P-III-NP assay combination decision limit did not change significantly following the addition of the new samples. The new decision limits are applied to currently available non-radioisotopic assays to measure IGF-I and P-III-NP in elite athletes, which should allow wider flexibility to implement the GH-2000 marker test for GH misuse while providing some resilience against manufacturer withdrawal or change of assays. PMID:25645199

  16. Phase III study of cisplatin with pemtrexed or vinorelbine plus concurrent late course accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy in patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qian; Wang, Zhongtang; Huang, Wei; Wang, Qiang; Yu, Shuzeng; Zhou, Tao; Han, Dan; Wu, Zhenying; Gong, Heyi; Sun, Hongfu; Zhang, Jian; Wei, Yumei; Li, Hongsheng; Zhang, Zicheng; Lin, Haiqun; Li, Baosheng

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of cisplatin with pemtrexed or vinorelbine and concurrent late course accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy (LCAHRT). Patients with unresectable stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were randomly assigned to two regimens. The experimental (PP) arm included cisplatin, pemtrexed and concurrent LCAHRT based on bilateral lung V20 = 33%. The control (NP) arm used cisplatin, vinorelbine with the same radiotherapy protocol. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Median survival times were 26.0 months (95% CI 23.2 to 28.7 months) and 28.5 months (95% CI 17.1 to 39.9 months) for the NP and PP arms, respectively (P = 0.26). Median progression-free survival was 12.5 months and 17.5 months in the NP and PP arms (P = 0.07). In both arms of the study, there were no differences in overall survival between patients with squamous and nonsquamous NSCLC. The incidences of grade 3 or 4 toxicity were higher in NP than PP arm. With concurrent LCAHRT, pemetrexed/cisplatin was equally as efficacious as vinorelbine/cisplatin, but showed a more favorable toxicity profile. PMID:26761213

  17. Phase I-II Trial of Cetuximab, Capecitabine, Oxaliplatin, and Radiotherapy as Preoperative Treatment in Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Roedel, Claus Arnold, Dirk; Hipp, Matthias; Liersch, Torsten; Dellas, Kathrin; Iesalnieks, Igors; Hermann, Robert Michael; Lordick, Florian; Hohenberger, Werner; Sauer, Rolf

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and activity of preoperative radiotherapy (RT) with concurrent cetuximab, capecitabine, and oxaliplatin in rectal cancer patients. Patients and Methods: A total of 60 patients with rectal cancer (T3-T4 or N+, M1 allowed) entered the trial at five investigator sites; the data from 58 patients were assessable. Cetuximab was given as an initial dose of 400 mg/m{sup 2} 7 days before the start of RT, and then at 250 mg/m{sup 2} once weekly during RT (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions). Capecitabine and oxaliplatin were administered according to an established schedule of oxaliplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1, 8, 22, and 29) and capecitabine (Days 1-14 and 22-35) at three dose levels: 1,000, 1,300, and 1,650 mg/m{sup 2}/d during the Phase I part of the study. The main endpoint of the Phase II was the pathologic complete response rate. Results: Thirteen patients were included in the Phase I part of the study, and the maximal tolerated dose was not reached. Overall, 48 patients were treated at the recommended dose of capecitabine (1,650 mg/m{sup 2}) and 45 patients (94%) underwent surgery. A pathologic complete response was observed in 4 patients (9%), and moderate (n = 12), minimal (n = 10), and no tumor regression (n = 2) was noted in 24 (53%) of 45 patients. The mean radiation dose intensity, cetuximab, capecitabine, oxaliplatin was 98%, 95%, 94%, and 94%, respectively. The incidence of Grade 3-4 diarrhea was restricted to 19%. Postoperative complications of any grade occurred in 33% of patients. Conclusions: The results of our study have shown that cetuximab can be combined safely with capecitabine and oxaliplatin plus RT. The low pathologic complete response rate achieved should stimulate additional preclinical investigations to establish the best sequence of triple combinations.

  18. Installing an additional emission quenching pathway in the design of iridium(III)-based phosphorogenic biomaterials for bioorthogonal labelling and imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Steve Po-Yam; Yip, Alex Man-Hei; Liu, Hua-Wei; Lo, Kenneth Kam-Wing

    2016-10-01

    We report the synthesis, characterization, photophysical and electrochemical behaviour and biological labelling applications of new phosphorogenic bioorthogonal probes derived from iridium(III) polypyridine complexes containing a 1,2,4,5-tetrazine moiety. In contrast to common luminescent cyclometallated iridium(III) polypyridine complexes, these tetrazine complexes are almost non-emissive due to effective Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and/or photoinduced electron transfer (PET) from the excited iridium(III) polypyridine unit to the appended tetrazine moiety. However, they exhibited significant emission enhancement upon reacting with (1R,8S,9s)-bicyclo[6.1.0]non-4-yn-9-ylmethanol (BCN-OH) (ca. 19.5-121.9 fold) and BCN-modified bovine serum albumin (BCN-BSA) (ca. 140.8-1133.7 fold) as a result of the conversion of the tetrazine unit to a non-quenching pyridazine derivative. The complexes were applied to image azide-modified glycans in live cells using a homobifunctional crosslinker, 1,13-bis((1R,8S,9s)-bicyclo[6.1.0]non-4-yn-9-ylmethyloxycarbonylamino)-4,7,10-trioxatridecane (bis-BCN). PMID:27429251

  19. Influence of nanogold additives on phase formation, microstructure and dielectric properties of perovskite BaTiO3 ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonkumwong, Jeeranan; Ananta, Supon; Srisombat, Laongnuan

    2015-06-01

    The formation of perovskite phase, microstructure and dielectric properties of nanogold-modified barium titanate (BaTiO3) ceramics was examined as a function of gold nanoparticle contents by employing a combination of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray, Archimedes principle and dielectric measurement techniques. These ceramics were fabricated from a simple mixed-oxide method. The amount of gold nanoparticles was found to be one of the key factors controlling densification, grain growth and dielectric response in BaTiO3 ceramics. It was found that under suitable amount of nanogold addition (4 mol%), highly dense perovskite BaTiO3 ceramics with homogeneous microstructures of refined grains (~0.5-3.1 μm) and excellence dielectric properties can be produced.

  20. Patient-reported quality-of-life analysis of radium-223 dichloride from the phase III ALSYMPCA study

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, S.; Cislo, P.; Sartor, O.; Vogelzang, N. J.; Coleman, R. E.; O'Sullivan, J. M.; Reuning-Scherer, J.; Shan, M.; Zhan, L.; Parker, C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Radium-223 dichloride (radium-223), a first-in-class α-emitting radiopharmaceutical, is recommended in both pre- and post-docetaxel settings in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and symptomatic bone metastases based on overall survival benefit demonstrated in the phase III ALSYMPCA study. ALSYMPCA included prospective measurements of health-related quality of life (QOL) using two validated instruments: the general EuroQoL 5D (EQ-5D) and the disease-specific Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate (FACT-P). Patients and methods Analyses were conducted to determine treatment effects of radium-223 plus standard of care (SOC) versus placebo plus SOC on QOL using FACT-P and EQ-5D. Outcomes assessed were percentage of patients experiencing improvement, percentage of patients experiencing worsening, and mean QOL scores during the study. Results Analyses were carried out on the intent-to-treat population of patients randomized to receive radium-223 (n = 614) or placebo (n = 307). The mean baseline EQ-5D utility and FACT-P total scores were similar between treatment groups. A significantly higher percentage of patients receiving radium-223 experienced meaningful improvement in EQ-5D utility score on treatment versus placebo {29.2% versus 18.5%, respectively; P = 0.004; odds ratio (OR) = 1.82 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.21–2.74]}. Findings were similar for FACT-P total score [24.6% versus 16.1%, respectively; P = 0.020; OR = 1.70 (95% CI 1.08–2.65)]. A lower percentage of patients receiving radium-223 experienced meaningful worsening versus placebo measured by EQ-5D utility score and FACT-P total score. Prior docetaxel use and current bisphosphonate use did not affect these findings. Treatment was a significant predictor of EQ-5D utility score, with radium-223 associated with higher scores versus placebo (0.56 versus 0.50, respectively; P = 0.002). Findings were similar for FACT-P total score (99.08 versus 95

  1. Taking Personalized Medicine Seriously: Biomarker Approaches in Phase IIb/III Studies in Major Depression and Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Laughren, Thomas; Lamers, Femke; Picard, Rosalind; Walther, Sebastian; Goff, Donald; Sainati, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    and integration of such markers into clinical research is both required and feasible in order to meet the benefit of personalized medicine. This article is based on proceedings from the “Taking Personalized Medicine Seriously—Biomarker Approaches in Phase IIb/III Studies in Major Depression and Schizophrenia” session, which was held during the 10th Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society for Clinical Trials Meeting (ISCTM) in Washington, DC, February 18 to 20, 2014. PMID:25977838

  2. Efficacy and Safety of Cariprazine in Acute Exacerbation of Schizophrenia: Results From an International, Phase III Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Kane, John M; Zukin, Stephen; Wang, Yao; Lu, Kaifeng; Ruth, Adam; Nagy, Krisztián; Laszlovszky, István; Durgam, Suresh

    2015-08-01

    This phase III study evaluated the efficacy and safety of cariprazine, a dopamine D3 and D2 receptor partial agonist with preferential binding to D3 receptors, in patients with acute exacerbation of schizophrenia. Patients were randomized to 6-week double-blind treatment with placebo, cariprazine 3 to 6 mg/d, or cariprazine 6 to 9 mg/d. Primary and secondary efficacy: change from baseline to week 6 in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale total and Clinical Global Impressions-Severity scores, respectively, analyzed using a mixed-effects model for repeated measures adjusting for multiple comparisons. Safety included treatment-emergent adverse events, clinical laboratory values, vital signs, electrocardiograms, ophthalmologic examination, Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale, and extrapyramidal symptom scales. In the Safety Population (placebo, n = 147; cariprazine 3-6 mg/d, n = 151; cariprazine 6-9 mg/d, n = 148), 60.5% of patients completed the study. At week 6, statistically significant least squares mean differences in favor of cariprazine versus placebo were observed for Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale total score (3-6 mg/d: -6.8, P = 0.003; 6-9 mg/d: -9.9, P < 0.001) and Clinical Global Impressions-Severity (3-6 mg/d: -0.3, P = 0.012; 6-9 mg/d: -0.5, P < 0.001). Common treatment-emergent adverse events (≥5% and twice the rate of placebo) in both cariprazine groups were akathisia, extrapyramidal disorder, and tremor; most were mild to moderate in severity. Mean changes in metabolic parameters were generally small and similar between groups. Prolactin levels decreased in all groups. In conclusion, cariprazine 3 to 6 and 6 to 9 mg/d versus placebo demonstrated significant improvement on primary and secondary efficacy parameters. Cariprazine was generally well tolerated. These results suggest that cariprazine may be a new and effective treatment for schizophrenia. PMID:26075487

  3. Hypofractionated Helical Tomotherapy for Older Aged Patients With Prostate Cancer: Preliminary Results of a Phase I-II Trial.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-Xia; Du, Lei; Yu, Wei; Cai, Bo-Ning; Xu, Shou-Ping; Xie, Chuan-Bin; Ma, Lin

    2016-08-01

    In our center, the feasibility and related acute toxicities of hypofractionated helical tomotherapy have been evaluated in older aged patients with prostate cancer . Between February 2009 and February 2014, 67 patients (older than 65 years) were enrolled in a prospective phase I-II study (registered number, ChiCTR-ONC-13004037). Patients in cohort 1 (n = 33) and cohort 2 (n = 34) received 76 Gy in 34 fractions (2.25 Gy/F) and 71.6 Gy in 28 fractions (2.65 Gy/F), respectively, to the prostate and seminal vesicles, while 25 patients in cohort 2 also received integrated elective lymph node irradiation (50.4 Gy). All patients were treated with helical tomotherapy, and daily image guidance was performed before each treatment. Acute toxicities were assessed with Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)/European Organization for Research on Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) criteria. No significant difference was detected between the 2 cohorts in the incidence of acute toxicities. In cohort 1, the incidences of grade 1 and 2 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were 45.5% and 45.4%, respectively, and without grade 3 and 4 toxicities. In cohort 2, the incidences of acute grade 1 and 2 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were 47.1% and 55.9%, respectively, and grade 3 genitourinary toxicity (hematuria) was noted only in 1 patient. No significant difference was detected in the incidence of acute toxicities between the patients receiving integrated elective lymph node irradiation and those receiving irradiation to prostate and seminal vesicle in cohort 2. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed with clinical parameters. Only the baseline weight was found negatively correlated with genitourinary toxicities at a weak level (relative risk = 0.946, 95% confidence interval 0.896-0.998], P = .043). This study shows that 2 hypofractionation regimens (76 Gy/34F and 71.6 Gy/28F) delivered with HT are well tolerated in older aged patients having prostate cancer

  4. Ionic liquids as mobile phase additives for the high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis of fluoroquinolone antibiotics in water samples.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Herrera, Antonio V; Hernández-Borges, Javier; Rodríguez-Delgado, Miguel Angel

    2008-12-01

    In this work, four ionic liquids differing in the length of the alkyl chain on the imidazolium cation and one ionic liquid containing tetraethylammonium, all with the same counterion, (i.e. 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (EMIm-BF(4)), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BMIm-BF(4)), 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (HMIm-BF(4)), 1-methyl-3-octylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (MOIm-BF(4)), and tetraethylammonium tetrafluroborate (Et(4)N-BF(4))) were tested as mobile phase additives for HPLC separation of a group of seven basic fluoroquinolone (FQ) antibiotics for human and veterinary use (i.e. fleroxacin, ciprofloxacin, lomefloxacin, danofloxacin, enrofloxacin, sarafloxacin, and difloxacin) using a conventional reversed-phase Nova-Pak C(18) column. Fluorescence detection was used. Among the ionic liquids selected, use of BMIm-BF(4) enabled effective separation of these compounds with relatively low analysis time (14 min). The best separation was achieved by isocratic elution at 1 mL min(-1) with 5 mmol L(-1) BMIm-BF(4) and 10 mmol L(-1) ammonium acetate at pH 3.0 with 13% (v/v) acetonitrile. Limits of detection (LODs) for fluorescence detection were in the range 0.5-11 microg L(-1). The method was tested by analyzing several water samples after the optimization of a suitable solid-phase extraction (SPE) procedure using Oasis HLB cartridges. Mean recovery values were above 84% for all analytes with LODs in the range 1-29 ng L(-1). PMID:18854988

  5. Neural Correlates of Task Cost for Stance Control with an Additional Motor Task: Phase-Locked Electroencephalogram Responses

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Ing-Shiou; Huang, Cheng-Ya

    2016-01-01

    With appropriate reallocation of central resources, the ability to maintain an erect posture is not necessarily degraded by a concurrent motor task. This study investigated the neural control of a particular postural-suprapostural procedure involving brain mechanisms to solve crosstalk between posture and motor subtasks. Participants completed a single posture task and a dual-task while concurrently conducting force-matching and maintaining a tilted stabilometer stance at a target angle. Stabilometer movements and event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded. The added force-matching task increased the irregularity of postural response rather than the size of postural response prior to force-matching. In addition, the added force-matching task during stabilometer stance led to marked topographic ERP modulation, with greater P2 positivity in the frontal and sensorimotor-parietal areas of the N1-P2 transitional phase and in the sensorimotor-parietal area of the late P2 phase. The time-frequency distribution of the ERP primary principal component revealed that the dual-task condition manifested more pronounced delta (1–4 Hz) and beta (13–35 Hz) synchronizations but suppressed theta activity (4–8 Hz) before force-matching. The dual-task condition also manifested coherent fronto-parietal delta activity in the P2 period. In addition to a decrease in postural regularity, this study reveals spatio-temporal and temporal-spectral reorganizations of ERPs in the fronto-sensorimotor-parietal network due to the added suprapostural motor task. For a particular set of postural-suprapostural task, the behavior and neural data suggest a facilitatory role of autonomous postural response and central resource expansion with increasing interregional interactions for task-shift and planning the motor-suprapostural task. PMID:27010634

  6. Neural Correlates of Task Cost for Stance Control with an Additional Motor Task: Phase-Locked Electroencephalogram Responses.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ing-Shiou; Huang, Cheng-Ya

    2016-01-01

    With appropriate reallocation of central resources, the ability to maintain an erect posture is not necessarily degraded by a concurrent motor task. This study investigated the neural control of a particular postural-suprapostural procedure involving brain mechanisms to solve crosstalk between posture and motor subtasks. Participants completed a single posture task and a dual-task while concurrently conducting force-matching and maintaining a tilted stabilometer stance at a target angle. Stabilometer movements and event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded. The added force-matching task increased the irregularity of postural response rather than the size of postural response prior to force-matching. In addition, the added force-matching task during stabilometer stance led to marked topographic ERP modulation, with greater P2 positivity in the frontal and sensorimotor-parietal areas of the N1-P2 transitional phase and in the sensorimotor-parietal area of the late P2 phase. The time-frequency distribution of the ERP primary principal component revealed that the dual-task condition manifested more pronounced delta (1-4 Hz) and beta (13-35 Hz) synchronizations but suppressed theta activity (4-8 Hz) before force-matching. The dual-task condition also manifested coherent fronto-parietal delta activity in the P2 period. In addition to a decrease in postural regularity, this study reveals spatio-temporal and temporal-spectral reorganizations of ERPs in the fronto-sensorimotor-parietal network due to the added suprapostural motor task. For a particular set of postural-suprapostural task, the behavior and neural data suggest a facilitatory role of autonomous postural response and central resource expansion with increasing interregional interactions for task-shift and planning the motor-suprapostural task. PMID:27010634

  7. Effect of Protein Incorporation on the Nanostructure of the Bicontinuous Microemulsion Phase of Winsor-III Systems: A Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, Douglas G.; Gomez del Rio, Javier A.; Ye, Ran; Urban, Volker S.; Pingali, Sai Venkatesh; O’Neill, Hugh M.

    2015-01-20

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) analysis using the Teubner₋Strey model has been employed to evaluate the effect of protein incorporation into the middle, bicontinuous microemulsion (BμE) phase of Winsor-III (WIII) systems formed by an aerosol-OT (AOT)/alkyl ethoxylate mixed surfactant system to understand better the extraction of proteins into and out of BμEs and to study the effect of proteins on a system that serves as a biomimetic analog of cell membranes. Under conditions of high salinity, the incorporation of positively charged proteins cytochrome c, lysozyme, and α-chymotrypsin, near their solubilization limit in the BμEs promoted the release of water and oil from the BμEs, a decrease in the quasi-periodic repeat distance (d), an increase in ordering (a decrease in the amphiphilicity factor, fa) for the surfactant monolayers, and a decrease in the surface area per surfactant headgroup, suggesting that the proteins affected the self-assembly of components in the BμE phase and produced Debye shielding of AOTs sulfonate headgroup. For WIII systems possessing lower salinity, cytochrome c reduced the efficiency of surfactant in the BμE phase, noted by increases in d and fa, suggesting that the enzyme and AOT underwent ion pairing. We find that the results of this study demonstrate the importance of ionic strength to modulate proteinsurfactant interactions, which in turn will control the release of proteins encapsulated in the BμEs, relevant to WIII-based protein extraction and controlled release from BμE delivery systems, and demonstrate the utility of BμEs as a model system to understand the effect of proteins on biomembranes.

  8. Japanese POEMS syndrome with Thalidomide (J-POST) Trial: study protocol for a phase II/III multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Kanako; Misawa, Sonoko; Sato, Yasunori; Sobue, Gen; Yabe, Ichiro; Watanabe, Osamu; Nishizawa, Masatoyo; Kusunoki, Susumu; Kikuchi, Seiji; Nakashima, Ichiro; Ikeda, Shu-ichi; Kohara, Nobuo; Kanda, Takashi; Kira, Jun-ichi; Hanaoka, Hideki; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M-protein and skin changes (POEMS) syndrome is a fatal systemic disorder associated with plasma cell dyscrasia and the overproduction of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Recently, the prognosis of POEMS was substantially improved by introduction of therapeutic intervention for myeloma. However, no randomised clinical trial has been performed because of the rarity and severity of the disease. Methods and analysis The Japanese POEMS syndrome with Thalidomide (J-POST) Trial is a phase II/III multicentre, double-blinded, randomised, controlled trial that aims to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a 24-week treatment with thalidomide in POEMS syndrome, with an additional 48-week open-label safety study. Adults with POEMS syndrome who have no indication for transplantation are assessed for eligibility at 12 tertiary neurology centres in Japan. Patients who satisfy the eligibility criteria are randomised (1:1) to receive thalidomide (100–300 mg daily) plus dexamethasone (12 mg/m2 on days 1–4 of a 28-day cycle) or placebo plus dexamethasone. Both treatments were administered for 24 weeks (six cycles; randomised comparative study period). Patients who complete the randomised study period or show subacute deterioration during the randomised period participate in the subsequent 48-week open-label safety study (long-term safety period). The primary end point of the study is the reduction rate of serum VEGF levels at 24 weeks. Ethics and dissemination The protocol was approved by the Institutional Review Board of each hospital. The trial was notified and registered at the Pharmaceutical and Medical Devices Agency, Japan (No. 22-1716). The J-POST Trial is currently ongoing and is due to finish in August 2015. The findings of this trial will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations and will also be disseminated to participants. Trial registration number

  9. Three-year outcomes from BENEFIT-EXT: a phase III study of belatacept versus cyclosporine in recipients of extended criteria donor kidneys.

    PubMed

    Pestana, J O Medina; Grinyo, J M; Vanrenterghem, Y; Becker, T; Campistol, J M; Florman, S; Garcia, V D; Kamar, N; Lang, P; Manfro, R C; Massari, P; Rial, M D C; Schnitzler, M A; Vitko, S; Duan, T; Block, A; Harler, M B; Durrbach, A

    2012-03-01

    Recipients of extended-criteria donor (ECD) kidneys have poorer long-term outcomes compared to standard-criteria donor kidney recipients. We report 3-year outcomes from a randomized, phase III study in recipients of de novo ECD kidneys (n = 543) assigned (1:1:1) to either a more intensive (MI) or less intensive (LI) belatacept regimen, or cyclosporine. Three hundred twenty-three patients completed treatment by year 3. Patient survival with a functioning graft was comparable between groups (80% in MI, 82% in LI, 80% in cyclosporine). Mean calculated GFR (cGFR) was 11 mL/min higher in belatacept-treated versus cyclosporine-treated patients (42.7 in MI, 42.2 in LI, 31.5 mL/min in cyclosporine). More cyclosporine-treated patients (44%) progressed to GFR <30 mL/min (chronic kidney disease [CKD] stage 4/5) than belatacept-treated patients (27-30%). Acute rejection rates were similar between groups. Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) occurrence was higher in belatacept-treated patients (two in MI, three in LI), most of which occurred during the first 18 months; four additional cases (3 in LI, 1 in cyclosporine) occurred after 3 years. Tuberculosis was reported in two MI, four LI and no cyclosporine patients. In conclusion, at 3 years after transplantation, immunosuppression with belatacept resulted in similar patient survival, graft survival and acute rejection, with better renal function compared with cyclosporine. As previously reported, PTLD and tuberculosis were the principal safety findings associated with belatacept in this study population. PMID:22300431

  10. A pooled analysis of overall survival in COMFORT-I and COMFORT-II, 2 randomized phase III trials of ruxolitinib for the treatment of myelofibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Vannucchi, Alessandro M.; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Kiladjian, Jean-Jacques; Gotlib, Jason; Cervantes, Francisco; Mesa, Ruben A.; Sarlis, Nicholas J.; Peng, Wei; Sandor, Victor; Gopalakrishna, Prashanth; Hmissi, Abdel; Stalbovskaya, Viktoriya; Gupta, Vikas; Harrison, Claire; Verstovsek, Srdan

    2015-01-01

    Ruxolitinib, a potent Janus kinase 1/2 inhibitor, resulted in rapid and durable improvements in splenomegaly and disease-related symptoms in the 2 phase III COMFORT studies. In addition, ruxolitinib was associated with prolonged survival compared with placebo (COMFORT-I) and best available therapy (COMFORT-II). We present a pooled analysis of overall survival in the COMFORT studies using an intent-to-treat analysis and an analysis correcting for crossover in the control arms. Overall, 301 patients received ruxolitinib (COMFORT-I, n=155; COMFORT-II, n=146) and 227 patients received placebo (n=154) or best available therapy (n=73). After a median three years of follow up, intent-to-treat analysis showed that patients who received ruxolitinib had prolonged survival compared with patients who received placebo or best available therapy [hazard ratio=0.65; 95% confidence interval (95%CI): 0.46–0.90; P=0.01]; the crossover-corrected hazard ratio was 0.29 (95%CI: 0.13–0.63). Both patients with intermediate-2– or high-risk disease showed prolonged survival, and patients with high-risk disease in the ruxolitinib group had survival similar to that of patients with intermediate-2–risk disease in the control group. The Kaplan-Meier estimate of overall survival at week 144 was 78% in the ruxolitinib arm, 61% in the intent-to-treat control arm, and 31% in the crossover-adjusted control arm. While larger spleen size at baseline was prognostic for shortened survival, reductions in spleen size with ruxolitinib treatment correlated with longer survival. These findings are consistent with previous reports and support that ruxolitinib offers a survival benefit for patients with myelofibrosis compared with conventional therapies. (clinicaltrials.gov identifiers: COMFORT-I, NCT00952289; COMFORT-II, NCT00934544) PMID:26069290

  11. Double-blind randomised placebo-controlled phase III study of an E. coli extract plus 5-fluorouracil versus 5-fluorouracil in patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Unger, C; Häring, B; Kruse, A; Thumann, A; Schneider, B; Clemm, C; Weber, B; Clevert, H D; Hockertz, S; Kalousek, M B

    2001-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the toxicity (mucositis, diarrhea and leucopenia) of a therapy with 5-fluorouracil (CAS 51-21-8; 5-FU) plus an E. coli extract (LC-Extract, Laves coli extract, Colibiogen inject, cell-free soluble fraction from lysed E. coli, Laves strain) in comparison with 5-FU plus placebo. Secondary endpoints included general toxicity, response rate according to WHO, survival time and quality of life. 164 patients with advanced colorectal cancer were enrolled in this randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind, multicenter phase III study. The treatment consisted of 0.167 ml/kg/d LC-Extract or placebo followed by 500-750 mg/m2/d 5-FU on five consecutive days, repeated every three weeks for up to six treatment cycles. 158 (77 verum, 81 placebo) patients were evaluable for toxicity, 144 (72 verum, 72 placebo) evaluable for response. The therapy with LC-Extract was well tolerated. Adverse events that occurred during the study were mainly judged as 5-FU- or tumor-related. Toxicity from treatment with 600 mg/m2/d 5-FU in both treatment groups was very low. After treatment with 750 mg/m2/d 5-FU patients in the placebo-group experienced a higher CTC toxicity than in the LC-Extract groups. Remission rate and survival time showed a slight trend in favour of LC-Extract. These results suggest a positive benefit-risk ratio of the additional application of LC-Extract to 5-FU in the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer especially for administration of high doses of 5-FU. PMID:11367875

  12. The trifunctional antibody catumaxomab for the treatment of malignant ascites due to epithelial cancer: Results of a prospective randomized phase II/III trial

    PubMed Central

    Heiss, Markus M; Murawa, Pawel; Koralewski, Piotr; Kutarska, Elzbieta; Kolesnik, Olena O; Ivanchenko, Vladimir V; Dudnichenko, Alexander S; Aleknaviciene, Birute; Razbadauskas, Arturas; Gore, Martin; Ganea-Motan, Elena; Ciuleanu, Tudor; Wimberger, Pauline; Schmittel, Alexander; Schmalfeldt, Barbara; Burges, Alexander; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Lindhofer, Horst; Lahr, Angelika; Parsons, Simon L

    2010-01-01

    Malignant ascites is a common manifestation of advanced cancers, and treatment options are limited. The trifunctional antibody catumaxomab (anti-epithelial cell-adhesion molecule x anti-CD3) represents a targeted immunotherapy for the intraperitoneal (i.p.) treatment of malignant ascites secondary to epithelial cancers. In this phase II/III trial (EudraCT 2004-000723-15; NCT00836654), cancer patients (n = 258) with recurrent symptomatic malignant ascites resistant to conventional chemotherapy were randomized to paracentesis plus catumaxomab (catumaxomab) or paracentesis alone (control) and stratified by cancer type (129 ovarian and 129 nonovarian). Catumaxomab was administered as an i.p. infusion on Days 0, 3, 7 and 10 at doses of 10, 20, 50 and 150 μg, respectively. The primary efficacy endpoint was puncture-free survival. Secondary efficacy parameters included time to next paracentesis, ascites signs and symptoms and overall survival (OS). Puncture-free survival was significantly longer in the catumaxomab group (median 46 days) than the control group (median 11 days) (hazard ratio = 0.254: p < 0.0001) as was median time to next paracentesis (77 versus 13 days; p < 0.0001). In addition, catumaxomab patients had fewer signs and symptoms of ascites than control patients. OS showed a positive trend for the catumaxomab group and, in a prospectively planned analysis, was significantly prolonged in patients with gastric cancer (n = 66; 71 versus 44 days; p = 0.0313). Although adverse events associated with catumaxomab were frequent, they were manageable, generally reversible and mainly related to its immunologic mode of action. Catumaxomab showed a clear clinical benefit in patients with malignant ascites secondary to epithelial cancers, especially gastric cancer, with an acceptable safety profile. PMID:20473913

  13. Selenium catalyzed Fe(III)-EDTA reduction by Na2SO3: a reaction-controlled phase transfer catalysis.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Kaisong; Liu, Hui; Yang, Bentao; Zhang, Cong; Yang, Shu; Liu, Zhilou; Liu, Cao; Xie, Xiaofeng; Chai, Liyuan; Min, Xiaobo

    2016-04-01

    Fe(II)-EDTA, a typical chelated iron, is able to coordinate with nitric oxide (NO) which accelerates the rates and kinetics of the absorption of flue gas. However, Fe(II)-EDTA can be easily oxidized to Fe(III)-EDTA which is unable to absorb NO. Therefore, the regeneration of fresh Fe(II)-EDTA, which actually is the reduction of Fe(III)-EDTA to Fe(II)-EDTA, becomes a crucial step in the denitrification process. To enhance the reduction rate of Fe(III)-EDTA, selenium was introduced into the SO3 (2-)/Fe(III)-EDTA system as catalyst for the first time. By comparison, the reduction rate was enhanced by four times after adding selenium even at room temperature (25 °C). Encouragingly, elemental Se could precipitate out when SO3 (2-) was consumed up by oxidation to achieve self-separation. A catalysis mechanism was proposed with the aid of ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy, Tyndall scattering, horizontal attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (HATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction (XRD). In the catalysis process, the interconversion between SeSO3 (2-) and nascent Se formed a catalysis circle for Fe(III)-EDTA reduction in SO3 (2-) circumstance. PMID:26888642

  14. Liquid phase epitaxy of binary III-V nanocrystals in thin Si layers triggered by ion implantation and flash lamp annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wutzler, Rene; Rebohle, Lars; Prucnal, Slawomir; Bregolin, Felipe L.; Hübner, Rene; Voelskow, Matthias; Helm, Manfred; Skorupa, Wolfgang

    2015-05-01

    The integration of III-V compound semiconductors in Si is a crucial step towards faster and smaller devices in future technologies. In this work, we investigate the formation process of III-V compound semiconductor nanocrystals, namely, GaAs, GaSb, and InP, by ion implantation and sub-second flash lamp annealing in a SiO2/Si/SiO2 layer stack on Si grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Raman spectroscopy, Rutherford Backscattering spectrometry, and transmission electron microscopy were performed to identify the structural and optical properties of these structures. Raman spectra of the nanocomposites show typical phonon modes of the compound semiconductors. The formation process of the III-V compounds is found to be based on liquid phase epitaxy, and the model is extended to the case of an amorphous matrix without an epitaxial template from a Si substrate. It is shown that the particular segregation and diffusion coefficients of the implanted group-III and group-V ions in molten Si significantly determine the final appearance of the nanostructure and thus their suitability for potential applications.

  15. The Systems Approach to Functional Job Analysis. Task Analysis of the Physician's Assistant: Volume II--Curriculum and Phase I Basic Core Courses and Volume III--Phases II and III--Clinical Clerkships and Assignments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wake Forest Univ., Winston Salem, NC. Bowman Gray School of Medicine.

    This publication contains a curriculum developed through functional job analyses for a 24-month physician's assistant training program. Phase 1 of the 3-phase program is a 6-month basic course program in clinical and bioscience principles and is required of all students regardless of their specialty interest. Phase 2 is a 6 to 10 month period of…

  16. Improving access to preparatory information for children undergoing general anaesthesia for tooth extraction and their families: study protocol for a Phase III randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Children can find anaesthesia induction especially distressing and postoperative psychological and physical morbidity are common. Preparation programmes for general anaesthesia (GA) are highly effective in reducing this distress. A Phase II study has already verified the effectiveness of a prototype preoperative GA-coping computer game to help children cope with induction in a dental GA setting. The biggest patient users of pediatric GA services in the UK are children who need to have teeth removed (estimated to be 100,000 yearly). Tooth decay is the most common disease in children worldwide. This study is a Phase III randomized controlled trial (RCT) and will evaluate the effectiveness of the new internet version of this game. Methods/design The Phase III RCT will use a double-blind three-armed design. The clinical trial will recruit up to 210 children and will compare the web-based game against standard care and another non-medical game. At least 53 patients in each group will be required for 90% statistical power. Distress will be assessed through an evaluation of the child’s behaviour during the visit and later parental reports of physical and psychological morbidity. The satisfaction of parents and children will be measured; the mode of usage of the web-based game will be automatically recorded and the impact on the service (for example, recovery time and throughput) will be reported. The Phase III study primary outcome will measure: (1) patient experience: acceptance of anaesthetic induction, child cooperation and distress, reduction of peri- and postoperative morbidity, child and family satisfaction, and (2) service improvement: anaesthetic time and improvement in throughput. Measures will be administered at baseline, at the time of the GA treatment visit, and at 48 hours and one week postoperatively. Discussion This study aims to determine the effectiveness of an online GA-coping game for children and families undergoing tooth extraction under

  17. Preliminary results of a phase I/II trial of paclitaxel in patients with relapsed or cisplatin-refractory testicular cancer.

    PubMed

    Bokemeyer, C; Schmoll, H J; Natt, F; Knoche, M; Beyer, J; Souchon, R

    1994-01-01

    Paclitaxel represents a novel antitumour agent with demonstrated activity in cisplatin-sensitive tumours, particularly ovarian cancer. In addition, responses to paclitaxel have been observed in patients with cisplatin-refractory ovarian cancer. The role of paclitaxel in the treatment of testicular cancer has not been explored so far. Despite the generally high cure rates in patients with metastatic testicular cancer, patients with relapsed disease not responding to platin-based salvage chemotherapy have an extremely poor prognosis. In a phase I/II trial 10 patients with relapsed, cisplatin-refractory malignant germ-cell tumours were treated with paclitaxel as 6-h infusions (8 patients) or 3-h infusions (2 patients) at doses from 135 mg/m2 to 310 mg/m2 at 3-week intervals. Three patients achieved a response to paclitaxel, but disease recurred shortly in two patients after two and four cycles of therapy, respectively. One patient has remained in marker-negative partial response for more than 5 months. The toxicity of paclitaxel was tolerable for a dose range from 135 mg/m2 to 225 mg/m2. Granulocytopenia, WHO grades 3 and 4, occurred in all patients but was of short duration (median 3 days; range: 2-7 days). Other toxicities such as mucositis (5 patients grade 1), neurotoxicity (1 patient grade 1, 2 patients grade 2), infection (1 patient grade 3) and diarrhoea (1 patient grade 2) were not dose-limiting. There were no hypersensitivity reactions, but 1 patient developed severe myalgias during therapy with paclitaxel. Six patients with documented cisplatin-refractory disease were retreated with cisplatin-based chemotherapy after paclitaxel treatment and, in 4 of these, tumour responses of 3, 4, 5 and more than 5 months duration were achieved. In order to explore the role of paclitaxel in relapsed and/or cisplatin-refractory testicular cancer a phase II study using a 3-h infusion of 225 mg/m2 paclitaxel every 3 weeks, conducted by the German Testicular Cancer Study Group

  18. A Phase I/II Study of Oblimersen Plus Cisplatin and Fluorouracil in Gastric & Esophageal Junction Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-10

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus; Stage III Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  19. Lattice Dynamical Properties of Group-III Nitrides AN (A = B, Al, Ga and In) in Zinc-Blende Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, A. K.

    2016-03-01

    In the present paper, we have calculated the phonon dispersion relations, phonon density of states, Debye characteristic temperature and the zone boundary phonons for group-III nitrides AN (A = B, Al, Ga and In) using eleven-parameter three-body shell model with both the ions being polarizable. Our calculated results are in good agreement with experimental results available in the literature.

  20. Interfacial Area and Interfacial Transfer in Two-Phase Flow Systems (Volume III. Chapters 11-14)

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, T.; Park, J.; Kojasoy, G.

    2003-03-15

    Experiments were performed on horizontal air-water bubbly two-phase flow, axial flow, stratified wavy flow, and annular flow. Theoretical studies were also undertaken on interfacial parameters for a horizontal two-phase flow.

  1. Water-soluble oxoglaucine-Y(III), Dy(III) complexes: in vitro and in vivo anticancer activities by triggering DNA damage, leading to S phase arrest and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jian-Hua; Chen, Zhen-Feng; Qin, Jiao-Lan; Liu, Yan-Cheng; Li, Zhu-Quan; Khan, Taj-Malook; Wang, Meng; Jiang, Yan-Hua; Shen, Wen-Ying; Liang, Hong

    2015-07-01

    Complexes of yttrium(III) and dysprosium(III) with the traditional Chinese medicine active ingredient oxoglaucine (OG), namely [Y(OG)2(NO3)3]·CH3OH (1) and [Dy(OG)2(NO3)3]·H2O (2), were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, ESI-MS, (1)H and (13)C NMR as well as single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. In vitro the complexes exhibited higher anticancer activity than the free ligand OG against the tested cancer cell lines. Among the tested cell lines, HepG2 is the most sensitive to the complexes. Complex 2 can trigger DNA damage in HepG2 cells, resulting in cell cycle arrest in the S phase and leading to cell apoptosis. The S phase cell-cycle arrest is caused via the ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated)-Chk2-Cdc25A pathway. Chk2 is phosphorylated and activated in an ATM-dependent manner. It, in turn, phosphorylates Cdc25A phosphatise on serine124, causing the inactivation of Cdc25A in ubiquitin-mediated proteolytic degradation. The cyclin-Cdk complexes of the S phase could also be inhibited by limited supply of cyclins A and E. This irreversible cell cycle arrest process ultimately induces mitochondria-involved apoptotic cell death via the activation of Bcl-2 protein. Complex e2 ffectively inhibited tumour growth in the BEL-7402 xenograft mouse model and exhibited higher safety in vivo than cisplatin. PMID:26017376

  2. Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project Probability/Coordination Study Resident Fish and Wildlife Impacts Phase III, 1996 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Leitzinger, Eric J.

    1997-12-01

    Phase 3 began in 1995 with the overall goal of quantifying changes in resident fish habitat in the Snake River Basin upstream of Brownlee Reservoir resulting from the release of salmon flow augmentation water. Existing data, in the form of weighted usable area versus flow relationships, were used to estimate habitat changes for white sturgeon (Acipenser transinontanus) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in the Snake River between C.J. Strike Dam and Brownlee pool. The increased flows resulted in increased habitat for adult and juvenile white sturgeon and adult rainbow trout. But, the flows have failed to meet mean monthly flow recommendations for the past three years despite the addition of the flow augmentation releases. It is unlikely that the flow augmentation releases have had any significant long-term benefit for sturgeon and rainbow trout in the Snake River. Flow augmentation releases from the Boise and Payette rivers have in some years helped to meet or exceed minimum flow recommendations in these tributaries. The minimum flows would not have been reached without the flow augmentation releases. But, in some instances, the timing of the releases need to be adjusted in order to maximize benefits to resident fishes in the Boise and Payette rivers.

  3. Long-term results of a randomized phase III trial of TPF induction chemotherapy followed by surgery and radiation in locally advanced oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Lai-ping; Zhang, Chen-ping; Ren, Guo-xin; Guo, Wei; William, William N; Hong, Christopher S; Sun, Jian; Zhu, Han-guang; Tu, Wen-yong; Li, Jiang; Cai, Yi-li; Yin, Qiu-ming; Wang, Li-zhen; Wang, Zhong-he; Hu, Yong-jie; Ji, Tong; Yang, Wen-jun; Ye, Wei-min; Li, Jun; He, Yue; Wang, Yan-an; Xu, Li-qun; Zhuang, Zhengping; Lee, J Jack; Myers, Jeffrey N; Zhang, Zhi-yuan

    2015-07-30

    Previously, we conducted a randomized phase III trial of TPF (docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil) induction chemotherapy in surgically managed locally advanced oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and found no improvement in overall survival. This study reports long-term follow-up results from our initial trial. All patients had clinical stage III or IVA locally advanced OSCC. In the experimental group, patients received two cycles of TPF induction chemotherapy (75mg/m2 docetaxel d1, 75mg/m2 cisplatin d1, and 750mg/m2/day 5-fluorouracil d1-5) followed by radical surgery and post-operative radiotherapy; in the control group, patients received upfront radical surgery and post-operative radiotherapy. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Among 256 enrolled patients with a median follow-up of 70 months, estimated 5-year overall survival, disease-free survival, locoregional recurrence-free survival, and distant metastasis-free survival rates were 61.1%, 52.7%, 55.2%, and 60.4%, respectively. There were no significant differences in survival rates between experimental and control groups. However, patients with favorable pathologic responses had improved outcomes compared to those with unfavorable pathologic responses and to those in the control group. Although TPF induction chemotherapy did not improve long-term survival compared to surgery upfront in patients with stage III and IVA OSCC, a favorable pathologic response after induction chemotherapy may be used as a major endpoint and prognosticator in future studies. Furthermore, the negative results observed in this trial may be represent type II error from an underpowered study. Future larger scale phase III trials are warranted to investigate whether a significant benefit exists for TPF induction chemotherapy in surgically managed OSCC. PMID:26124084

  4. Phase I/II study of erlotinib and temsirolimus for patients with recurrent malignant gliomas: North American Brain Tumor Consortium trial 04-02

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Patrick Y.; Chang, Susan M.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Kuhn, John G.; Norden, Andrew D.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Robins, H. Ian; Lieberman, Frank S.; Gilbert, Mark R.; Mehta, Minesh P.; Drappatz, Jan; Groves, Morris D.; Santagata, Sandro; Ligon, Azra H.; Yung, W.K. Alfred; Wright, John J.; Dancey, Janet; Aldape, Kenneth D.; Prados, Michael D.; Ligon, Keith L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) may have synergistic antitumor effects in high-grade glioma patients. Methods We conducted a phase I/II study of the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib (150 mg/day) and the mTOR inhibitor temsirolimus. Patients initially received temsirolimus 50 mg weekly, and the dose adjusted based on toxicities. In the phase II component, the primary endpoint was 6-month progression-free survival (PFS6) among glioblastoma patients. Results Twenty-two patients enrolled in phase I, 47 in phase II. Twelve phase I patients treated at the maximum tolerated dosage were included in the phase II cohort for analysis. The maximum tolerated dosage was 15 mg temsirolimus weekly with erlotinib 150 mg daily. Dose-limiting toxicities were rash and mucositis. Among 42 evaluable glioblastoma patients, 12 (29%) achieved stable disease, but there were no responses, and PFS6 was 13%. Among 16 anaplastic glioma patients, 1 (6%) achieved complete response, 1 (6%) partial response, and 2 (12.5%) stable disease, with PFS6 of 8%. Tumor levels of both drugs were low, and posttreatment tissue in 3 patients showed no reduction in the mTOR target phosphorylated (phospho-)S6S235/236 but possible compensatory increase in phospho-AktS473. Presence of EGFR variant III, phospho-EGFR, and EGFR amplification did not correlate with survival, but patients with elevated phospho–extracellular signal-regulated kinase or reduced phosphatase and tensin homolog protein expression had decreased progression-free survival at 4 months. Conclusion Because of increased toxicity, the maximum tolerated dosage of temsirolimus in combination with erlotinib proved lower than expected. Insufficient tumor drug levels and redundant signaling pathways may partly explain the minimal antitumor activity noted. PMID:24470557

  5. Correct usage, ease of use, and preference of two dry powder inhalers in patients with COPD: analysis of five phase III, randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    Riley, John H; Tabberer, Maggie; Richard, Nathalie; Donald, Alison; Church, Alison; Harris, Stephanie S

    2016-01-01

    Background Handheld inhalers are used to deliver treatment for COPD. Incorrect usage leads to suboptimal disease control. Complex treatment regimens and use of multiple inhalers may reduce patient compliance. The Anoro Ellipta™ dry powder inhaler (DPI) simultaneously delivers umeclidinium bromide (UMEC) and vilanterol (VI) without coformulation being required. Aim To assess the correct usage and ease of use of the Ellipta™ DPI administering UMEC/VI and to compare patient preference for Ellipta™ with the HandiHaler® through exploratory analyses of patient and observer questionnaires in five Phase III studies. Methods Two Phase III, 3-month double-blind, placebo-controlled studies assessed the correct usage of the Ellipta™ DPI at Day 1 and after 6 weeks, and ease of use of the Ellipta™ DPI using a nonvalidated patient questionnaire after 6 weeks or early withdrawal. In three 6-month, blinded double-dummy, active comparator studies (two Phase IIIa and one Phase IIIb), patients completed a COPD device preference questionnaire between the Ellipta™ DPI and the Handi-Haler® at Day 168 (Week 24) or early withdrawal. Results In the 3-month placebo-controlled studies, ≥98% of patients used the Ellipta™ DPI correctly and 99% of patients found the inhaler easy/very easy-to-use and the dose counter easy/very easy to read. Across the two Phase IIIa active comparator studies, patients consistently stated a preference for the Ellipta™ DPI over HandiHaler® regarding the number of steps to use (59% vs 17%), time taken to use (62% vs 14%), and ease of use (63% vs 15%) regardless of which inhaler contained active drug. Results were consistent in the Phase IIIb active comparator study. Conclusion Delivery of UMEC/VI via the Ellipta™ DPI was considered easy-to-use, and patients with COPD demonstrated clear preference for this inhaler compared with HandiHaler®. PMID:27578968

  6. Intramuscular depot formulations of leuprolide acetate suppress testosterone levels below a 20 ng/dL threshold: a retrospective analysis of two Phase III studies

    PubMed Central

    Spitz, Aaron; Gittelman, Marc; Karsh, Lawrence I; Dragnic, Sanja; Soliman, Ahmed M; Lele, Aditya; Gruca, Damian; Norton, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogs is a standard treatment for advanced prostate cancer. GnRH analog therapy can reduce testosterone to “castrate” levels, historically defined as <50 ng/dL. With the advent of newer assays, a lower threshold of <20 ng/dL has recently been proposed. We report the results of a retrospective analysis of two Phase III trials of 4- and 6-month depot microsphere formulations of leuprolide acetate (LA), a GnRH agonist that has previously demonstrated efficacy in testosterone suppression to <50 ng/dL in patients on ADT. This analysis investigates the ability of these LA formulations to suppress to ≤20 ng/dL levels. Methods In two of five AbbVie/Abbott clinical trials of microsphere formulations of LA for ADT, analytic technology permitting testosterone detection as low as 3 ng/dL was used and thus was selected for this analysis. Both trials were open-label, fixed-dose studies in prostate cancer patients, naïve to ADT. Patients received either 30 mg (4-month formulation; n=49) or 45 mg (6-month formulation; n=151) depot injections of LA microspheres. Treatment duration was up to 32 weeks for the 4-month formulation and 48 weeks for the 6-month formulation. The proportion of patients achieving the 20 ng/dL threshold was determined every 4 weeks. Results Pooled analysis showed that 152 of 193 (79%) of patients achieved serum testosterone levels of ≤20 ng/dL at 4 weeks, and sustained the improvement at week 24 (169/189, 89%). Additionally, in the 6-month study, 127/135 (94.1%) patients were suppressed to ≤20 ng/dL at 48 weeks. Conclusion Both 4- and 6-month intramuscular depot formulations of LA achieved and maintained mean serum testosterone levels ≤20 ng/dL in the vast majority of patients as early as 4 weeks following treatment initiation. Additional research on the clinical relevance of this lower testosterone threshold is warranted. PMID:27602344

  7. Two-phase olive mill waste composting: enhancement of the composting rate and compost quality by grape stalks addition.

    PubMed

    Cayuela, Maria Luz; Sánchez-Monedero, Miguel A; Roig, Asunción

    2010-06-01

    Two-phase olive mill waste (TPOMW) is a semisolid sludge generated by the olive oil industry. Its recycling as a soil amendment, either unprocessed or composted, is being promoted as a beneficial agricultural practice in the Mediterranean area. One of the major difficulties when composting TPOMW is the compaction of the material due to its dough-like texture, which leads to an inadequate aeration. For this reason, the addition of bulking agents is particularly important to attain a proper composting process. In this study we followed the evolution of two composting mixtures (A and B) prepared by mixing equal amounts of TPOMW and sheep litter (SL) (in a dry weight basis). In pile B grape stalks (GS) were added (10% dry weight) as bulking agent to study their effect on the development of the composting process and the final compost quality. The incorporation of grape stalks to the composting mixture changed the organic matter (OM) degradation dynamics and notably reduced the total amount of lixiviates. The evolution of several maturation indices (C/N, germination index, water soluble carbon, humification indices, C/N in the leachates) showed a faster and improved composting process when GS were added. Moreover, chemical (NH4+, NO3(-), cation exchange capacity, macro and micronutrients, heavy metals) and physical properties (bulk and real densities, air content, total water holding capacity, porosity) of the final composts were analysed and confirmed the superior quality of the compost where GS were added. PMID:19946735

  8. Structure and properties of PVDF membrane with PES-C addition via thermally induced phase separation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lishun; Sun, Junfen

    2014-12-01

    Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane and PVDF membrane with phenolphthalein polyethersulfone (PES-C) addition were prepared via thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) method by using diphenyl carbonate (DPC) and dimethyl acetamide (DMAc) as mixed diluents. The effects of coagulation temperature and pre-evaporation time on structure and properties of membranes were studied. The changes of sewage flux in MBR and the attenuation coefficient of sewage flux were investigated. The resistance distributions of PVDF and PVDF/PES-C membranes were compared by resistance analysis. Membrane composition and structure were characterized by ATR-FTIR, TGA, SEM and AFM. The foulant on membranes was analyzed by FTIR. The contact angle of PVDF/PES-C membrane was lower than that of PVDF membrane. A thinner skin layer and a porous cellular support layer formed in PVDF/PES-C membrane and resulted in a higher porosity and pure water flux. The pure water flux and porosity of PVDF/PES-C membrane increased with rising coagulation temperature and decreased with extending pre-evaporation time. The flux attenuation coefficient, the cake layer resistance and internal fouling resistance of PVDF/PES-C membrane in MBR were smaller than those of PVDF membrane in MBR. The FTIR spectrum of foulant on membrane indicated that the foulant on PVDF/PES-C membrane was mostly composed of protein and polysaccharide, while the foulant on pure PVDF membrane included biopolymer clusters besides protein and polysaccharide.

  9. Structure of the CFA/III major pilin subunit CofA from human enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli determined at 0.90 Å resolution by sulfur-SAD phasing.

    PubMed

    Fukakusa, Shunsuke; Kawahara, Kazuki; Nakamura, Shota; Iwashita, Takaki; Baba, Seiki; Nishimura, Mitsuhiro; Kobayashi, Yuji; Honda, Takeshi; Iida, Tetsuya; Taniguchi, Tooru; Ohkubo, Tadayasu

    2012-10-01

    CofA, a major pilin subunit of colonization factor antigen III (CFA/III), forms pili that mediate small-intestinal colonization by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC). In this study, the crystal structure of an N-terminally truncated version of CofA was determined by single-wavelength anomalous diffraction (SAD) phasing using five sulfurs in the protein. Given the counterbalance between anomalous signal strength and the undesired X-ray absorption of the solvent, diffraction data were collected at 1.5 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. These data were sufficient to elucidate the sulfur substructure at 1.38 Å resolution. The low solvent content (29%) of the crystal necessitated that density modification be performed with an additional 0.9 Å resolution data set to reduce the phase error caused by the small sulfur anomalous signal. The CofA structure showed the αβ-fold typical of type IVb pilins and showed high structural homology to that of TcpA for toxin-coregulated pili of Vibrio cholerae, including spatial distribution of key residues critical for pilin self-assembly. A pilus-filament model of CofA was built by computational docking and molecular-dynamics simulation using the previously reported filament model of TcpA as a structural template. This model revealed that the CofA filament surface was highly negatively charged and that a 23-residue-long loop between the α1 and α2 helices filled the gap between the pilin subunits. These characteristics could provide a unique binding epitope for the CFA/III pili of ETEC compared with other type IVb pili. PMID:22993096

  10. Development of a GMP Phase III purification process for VB4-845, an immunotoxin expressed in E. coli using high cell density fermentation.

    PubMed

    Premsukh, Arjune; Lavoie, Joelle M; Cizeau, Jeannick; Entwistle, Joycelyn; MacDonald, Glen C

    2011-07-01

    VB4-845 is a recombinant immunotoxin comprised of an anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) scFv fused to a truncated form of the bacterial toxin, Pseudomonas exotoxin A. VB4-845, purified from TB fed-batch fermentation, showed clinical efficacy when administered locally to treat non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) and squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (SCCHN). Here, we describe the implementation of an Escherichia coli high cell density (HCD) cultivation and purification process for VB4-845. HCD cultivation was a prerequisite for achieving higher yields necessary for Phase III clinical trials and commercialization. Using this process, the VB4-845 titer in the supernatant was increased by 30-fold over the original TB fed-batch cultivation. To obtain clinical grade material, a process involving a five-step column purification procedure was implemented and led to an overall recovery of ∼ 40%. VB4-845 purity of >97% was achieved after the first three columns following the removal of low-molecular weight product-related impurities and aggregates. Endotoxins were effectively separated from VB4-845 on the Q-columns and by washing the Ni-column with a detergent buffer while host cell proteins were removed using ceramic hydroxyapatite. Comparability studies demonstrated that the purified product from the Phase III process was identical to the Phase II reference standard produced using TB fed-batch fermentation. PMID:21421055

  11. A Phase I/II adaptive design to determine the optimal treatment regimen from a set of combination immunotherapies in high-risk melanoma.

    PubMed

    Wages, Nolan A; Slingluff, Craig L; Petroni, Gina R

    2015-03-01

    In oncology, vaccine-based immunotherapy often investigates regimens that demonstrate minimal toxicity overall and higher doses may not correlate with greater immune response. Rather than determining the maximum tolerated dose, the goal of the study becomes locating the optimal biological dose, which is defined as a safe dose demonstrating the greatest immunogenicity, based on some predefined measure of immune response. Incorporation of adjuvants, new or optimized peptide vaccines, and combining vaccines with immune modulators may enhance immune response, with the aim of improving clinical response. Innovative dose escalation strategies are needed to establish the safety and immunogenicity of new immunologic combinations. We describe the implementation of an adaptive design for identifying the optimal treatment strategy in a multi-site, FDA-approved, phase I/II trial of a novel vaccination approach using long-peptides plus TLR agonists for resected stage IIB-IV melanoma. Operating characteristics of the design are demonstrated under various possible true scenarios via simulation studies. Overall performance indicates that the design is a practical Phase I/II adaptive method for use with combined immunotherapy agents. The simulation results demonstrate the method's ability to effectively recommend optimal regimens in a high percentage of trials with manageable sample sizes. The numerical results presented in this work include the type of simulation information that aid review boards in understanding design performance, such as average sample size and frequency of early trial termination, which we hope will augment early-phase trial design in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25638752

  12. Gallium(III)- and calcium(II)-catalyzed Meyer-Schuster rearrangements followed by intramolecular aldol condensation or endo-Michael addition.

    PubMed

    Presset, M; Michelet, B; Guillot, R; Bour, C; Bezzenine-Lafollée, S; Gandon, V

    2015-03-28

    The first gallium- and calcium-catalyzed Meyer-Schuster rearrangements are described. Under substrate control, the incipient conjugated ketones can be trapped intramolecularly by β-keto esters or amides to yield cyclic products after aldol condensation or endo-Michael addition. An interesting additive effect that promotes the latter tandem process with calcium has been found. PMID:25503868

  13. Effect of Teduglutide, a Glucagon-like Peptide 2 Analog, on Citrulline Levels in Patients With Short Bowel Syndrome in Two Phase III Randomized Trials

    PubMed Central

    Seidner, Douglas L; Joly, Francisca; Youssef, Nader N

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: In clinical trials, treatment with the glucagon-like peptide 2 analog teduglutide was associated with improved fluid and nutrient absorption and increased intestinal villus height and crypt depth in patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS). Plasma citrulline, an amino acid produced by enterocytes, is considered a measure of enterocyte mass. This analysis assessed changes in plasma citrulline levels in patients with SBS in 2 phase III clinical studies of teduglutide. Methods: Both teduglutide studies (0.05 or 0.10 mg/kg/day in CL0600-004 and 0.05 mg/kg/day in CL0600-020) were phase III, 24-week, double-blind, and placebo controlled. Plasma citrulline levels were analyzed and validated by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. Results: In both the CL0600-004 and CL0600-020 studies, change in mean plasma citrulline concentrations at Week 24 vs. baseline was significantly greater with teduglutide compared with placebo (10.9 (0.05-mg/kg/day dose) and 15.7 (0.10-mg/kg/day dose) vs. 2.0 μmol/L and 20.6 vs. 0.7 μmol/L, respectively, for each study (P≤0.0001 for each comparison with placebo)). Teduglutide treatment was associated with reductions from baseline in PS (parenteral support) volume requirements; however, a significant correlation between PS reduction and increase in plasma citrulline at Week 24 was observed in only one out of the three teduglutide treatment groups. Conclusions: In 2 phase III studies, patients receiving teduglutide had significant increases in plasma citrulline at Week 24 compared with patients receiving placebo. Increases in plasma citrulline concentrations likely reflect enterocyte mass expansion, but no clear correlation was detected between change in plasma citrulline and change in weekly PS volume. PMID:26111125

  14. Iron(III) hydroxide-loaded coral limestone as an adsorbent for arsenic(III) and arsenic (V)

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Shigeru; Ohki, Akira; Saikoji, Shunsuke; Naka, Kensuke )

    1992-04-01

    Trace levels of As(III) and As(V) in aqueous media were effectively adsorbed onto a coral limestone loaded by Fe(OH){sub 3}. The adsorption of As(III) was almost comparable to that of As(V). The adsorption of As(III) and As(V) was almost independent of the pH of the aqueous phase (pH range: 3-10) because of a self-buffering effect of the coral. The addition of such anions as chloride, nitrate, sulfate, and acetate in the aqueous phase did not significantly affect the adsorption of As(III), whereas the addition of phosphate brought about a great decrease in the adsorption. The arsenic adsorption was effectively applied to the column method. Unloaded coral itself was effective as an adsorbent for As(V) when Fe(III) coexisted in the aqueous solutions.

  15. Chitosan film loaded with silver nanoparticles-sorbent for solid phase extraction of Al(III), Cd(II), Cu(II), Co(II), Fe(III), Ni(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II).

    PubMed

    Djerahov, Lubomir; Vasileva, Penka; Karadjova, Irina; Kurakalva, Rama Mohan; Aradhi, Keshav Krishna

    2016-08-20

    The present study describes the ecofriendly method for the preparation of chitosan film loaded with silver nanoparticles (CS-AgNPs) and application of this film as efficient sorbent for separation and enrichment of Al(III), Cd(II), Cu(II), Co(II), Fe(III), Ni(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II). The stable CS-AgNPs colloid was prepared by dispersing the AgNPs sol in chitosan solution at appropriate ratio and further used to obtain a cast film with very good stability under storage and good mechanical strength for easy handling in aqueous medium. The incorporation of AgNPs in the structure of CS film and interaction between the polymer matrix and nanoparticles were confirmed by UV-vis and FTIR spectroscopy. The homogeneously embedded AgNPs (average diameter 29nm, TEM analysis) were clearly observed throughout the film by SEM. The CS-AgNPs nanocomposite film shows high sorption activity toward trace metals under optimized chemical conditions. The results suggest that the CS-AgNPs nanocomposite film can be feasibly used as a novel sorbent material for solid-phase extraction of metal pollutants from surface waters. PMID:27178907

  16. Phase 3 Trial of Postoperative Chemotherapy Alone Versus Chemoradiation Therapy in Stage III-IV Gastric Cancer Treated With R0 Gastrectomy and D2 Lymph Node Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Park, Sook Ryun; Ryu, Keun Won; Kim, Young-Woo; Bae, Jae-Moon; Lee, Jun Ho; Choi, Il Ju; Kim, Yeon-Joo; Kim, Dae Yong

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To compare chemotherapy alone with chemoradiation therapy in stage III-IV(M0) gastric cancer treated with R0 gastrectomy and D2 lymph node dissection. Methods and Materials: The chemotherapy arm received 5 cycles of fluorouracil and leucovorin (FL), and the chemoradiation therapy arm received 1 cycle of FL, then radiation therapy of 45 Gy concurrently with 2 cycles of FL, followed by 2 cycles of FL. Intent-to-treat analysis and per-protocol analyses were performed. Results: Between May 6, 2002 and June 29, 2006, a total of 90 patients were enrolled. Forty-four were randomly assigned to the chemotherapy arm and 46 to the chemoradiation therapy arm. Treatment was completed as planned by 93.2% of patients in the chemotherapy arm and 87.0% in the chemoradiation therapy arm. Overall intent-to-treat analysis showed that addition of radiation therapy to chemotherapy significantly improved locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRRFS) but not disease-free survival. In subgroup analysis for stage III, chemoradiation therapy significantly prolonged the 5-year LRRFS and disease-free survival rates compared with chemotherapy (93.2% vs 66.8%, P=.014; 73.5% vs 54.6%, P=.056, respectively). Conclusions: Addition of radiation therapy to chemotherapy could improve the LRRFS in stage III gastric cancer treated with R0 gastrectomy and D2 lymph node dissection.

  17. Microseismic monitoring for evidence of geothermal heat in the capital district of New York. Final report, Phases I-III

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-06-01

    The seismic monitoring work of the geothermal project was initiated for the purpose of determining more exactly the relationship between seismicity and the postulated geothermal and related activity in the Albany-Saratoga Springs area in upstate New York. The seismic monitoring aspect of this work consisted of setting up and operating a network of seven seismograph stations within and around the study area capable of detecting and locating small earthquakes. To supplement the evidence from present day seismic activity, a list of all known historical and early instrumental earthquakes was compiled and improved from original sources for a larger region centered on the study area. Additional field work was done to determine seismic velocities of P and S phases by special recording of quarry blasts. The velocity results were used both as an aid to improve earthquake locations based on computer programs and to make inferences about the existence of temperature anomalies, and hence geothermal potential, at depths beneath the study area. Finally, the level in the continuous background earth vibration, microseisms, was measured throughout the study area to test a possibility that a relationship may exist at the surface between the level in microseisms and the geothermal or related activity. The observed seismic activity within the study area, although considerably higher (two to three times) than inferred from the historical and early instrumental data, is still not only low for a potential geothermal area but appears to be related to coherent regional tectonic stresses and not to the proposed more localized geothermal activity reflected in the mineralized, CO/sub 2/ rich spring discharge.

  18. Flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of μg amounts of Fe (III) ions after solid phase extraction using modified octadecyl silica membrane disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashhadizadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Azimi, Mansoureh Sadat; Pesteh, Mahnaz; Sheikhshoaei, Iran; Ardakani, Mohammad Mazloum; Karimi, Mohammad Ali

    2008-08-01

    A simple, rapid and reliable method has been developed to selectively separate and concentrate ultra trace amounts of Fe (III) ions from aqueous samples for the measurement by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). By the passage of aqueous samples through an octadecyl silica membrane disk modified by a recently synthesized Schiff base (Bis-(4-nitro phenyl azo) salisilidine-1,3-diamino propane), Fe(III) ions adsorb quantitatively and most of matrix elements will pass through the disk to drain. The retained iron ions are then stripped from the disk by minimal amount of 0.1 mol l - 1 sulfuric acid as eluent. Extraction efficiency and the influence of pH, flow rates, amount of ligand, type and least amount of stripping acid as eluent were evaluated. The recovery of the iron from aqueous solution on the membrane disk modified with 3 mg Schiff's base was quantitative over pH 2-4.5. The linear dynamic range of the proposed method for Fe (III) ions was found in a wide concentration range of 0.20 (± 0.05)-680 (± 2) μg l - 1 . The detection limit and preconcentration factor of this solid phase extraction method were found 20.0 (± 0.7) ng l - 1 and 100 respectively. The reproducibility of the procedure is at the most 1.5%.

  19. Mechanical properties and phase composition of potential biodegradable Mg-Zn-Mn-base alloys with addition of rare earth elements

    SciTech Connect

    Stulikova, Ivana; Smola, Bohumil

    2010-10-15

    Mechanical properties and creep resistance of the MgY4Zn1Mn1 alloy in the as cast as well as in the T5 condition were compared to those of the MgCe4Zn1Mn1 alloy in the same conditions. Yield tensile stress and ultimate tensile strength of the MgY4Zn1Mn1 alloy are slightly better in the temperature range 20 deg. C-400 deg. C than these of the MgCe4Zn1Mn1 alloy. Better thermal stability of ultimate tensile strength was observed in the T5 treated MgCe4Zn1Mn1 alloy than in this material in the as cast condition. An outstanding creep resistance at 225 deg. C-350 deg. C found in the MgY4Zn1Mn1 alloy is due to the existence of the 18R long period stacking structure persisting in this alloy even a long heat treatment of 500 deg. C/32 h. No similar stacking effects happen when Ce substitutes Y in approximately the same concentration. The creep resistance deteriorates considerably in the MgCe4Zn1Mn1 alloy. Rectangular particles of the equilibrium Mg{sub 12}Ce phase dominate in the microstructure of as cast as well as of high temperature heat-treated MgCe4Zn1Mn1 alloy. A population of small oval particles containing Mg and Zn develops additionally during annealing of this alloy. These particles pin effectively dislocations and can be responsible for the better thermal stability of the T5 treated material.

  20. Suppressing Respiration Effects when Geometric Distortion Is Corrected Dynamically by Phase Labeling for Additional Coordinate Encoding (PLACE) during Functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Faraji-Dana, Zahra; Tam, Fred; Chen, J. Jean; Graham, Simon J.

    2016-01-01

    Echo planar imaging (EPI) suffers from geometric distortions caused by magnetic field inhomogeneities, which can be time-varying as a result of small amounts of head motion that occur over seconds and minutes during fMRI experiments, also known as “dynamic geometric distortion”. Phase Labeling for Additional Coordinate Encoding (PLACE) is a promising technique for geometric distortion correction without reduced temporal resolution and in principle can be used to correct for motion-induced dynamic geometric distortion. PLACE requires at least two EPI images of the same anatomy that are ideally acquired with no variation in the magnetic field inhomogeneities. However, head motion and lung ventilation during the respiratory cycle can cause changes in magnetic field inhomogeneities within the EPI pair used for PLACE. In this work, we exploited dynamic off-resonance in k-space (DORK) and averaging to correct the within EPI pair magnetic field inhomogeneities; and hence proposed a combined technique (DORK+PLACE+averaging) to mitigate dynamic geometric distortion in EPI-based fMRI while preserving the temporal resolution. The performance of the combined DORK, PLACE and averaging technique was characterized through several imaging experiments involving test phantoms and six healthy adult volunteers. Phantom data illustrate reduced temporal standard deviation of fMRI signal intensities after use of combined dynamic PLACE, DORK and averaging compared to the standard processing and static geometric distortion correction. The combined technique also substantially improved the temporal standard deviation and activation maps obtained from human fMRI data in comparison to the results obtained by standard processing and static geometric distortion correction, highlighting the utility of the approach. PMID:27258194

  1. Phase I/II Study of Erlotinib Combined With Cisplatin and Radiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Herchenhorn, Daniel; Dias, Fernando L.; Viegas, Celia M.P.; Federico, Miriam H.; Araujo, Carlos Manoel M.; Small, Isabelle; Bezerra, Marcos; Fontao, Karina M.D.; Knust, Renata E.; Ferreira, Carlos G.; Martins, Renato G.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: Erlotinib, an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is active against head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and possibly has a synergistic interaction with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. We investigated the safety and efficacy of erlotinib added to cisplatin and radiotherapy in locally advanced HNSCC. Methods and Materials: In this Phase I/II trial 100 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin was administered on Days 8, 29, and 50, and radiotherapy at 70 Gy was started on Day 8. During Phase I, the erlotinib dose was escalated (50 mg, 100 mg, and 150 mg) in consecutive cohorts of 3 patients, starting on Day 1 and continuing during radiotherapy. Dose-limiting toxicity was defined as any Grade 4 event requiring radiotherapy interruptions. Phase II was initiated 8 weeks after the last Phase I enrollment. Results: The study accrued 9 patients in Phase I and 28 in Phase II; all were evaluable for efficacy and safety. No dose-limiting toxicity occurred in Phase I, and the recommended Phase II dose was 150 mg. The most frequent nonhematologic toxicities were nausea/vomiting, dysphagia, stomatitis, xerostomia and in-field dermatitis, acneiform rash, and diarrhea. Of the 31 patients receiving a 150-mg daily dose of erlotinib, 23 (74%; 95% confidence interval, 56.8%-86.3%) had a complete response, 3 were disease free after salvage surgery, 4 had inoperable residual disease, and 1 died of sepsis during treatment. With a median 37 months' follow-up, the 3-year progression-free and overall survival rates were 61% and 72%, respectively. Conclusions: This combination appears safe, has encouraging activity, and deserves further studies in locally advanced HNSCC.

  2. Phase I/II study of sorafenib in combination with temsirolimus for recurrent glioblastoma or gliosarcoma: North American Brain Tumor Consortium study 05-02

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eudocia Q.; Kuhn, John; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Abrey, Lauren; DeAngelis, Lisa M.; Lieberman, Frank; Robins, H. Ian; Chang, Susan M.; Yung, W. K. Alfred; Drappatz, Jan; Mehta, Minesh P.; Levin, Victor A.; Aldape, Kenneth; Dancey, Janet E.; Wright, John J.; Prados, Michael D.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Gilbert, Mark R.; Wen, Patrick Y.

    2012-01-01

    The activity of single-agent targeted molecular therapies in glioblastoma has been limited to date. The North American Brain Tumor Consortium examined the safety, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy of combination therapy with sorafenib, a small molecule inhibitor of Raf, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor–β, and temsirolimus (CCI-779), an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin. This was a phase I/II study. The phase I component used a standard 3 × 3 dose escalation scheme to determine the safety and tolerability of this combination therapy. The phase II component used a 2-stage design; the primary endpoint was 6-month progression-free survival (PFS6) rate. Thirteen patients enrolled in the phase I component. The maximum tolerated dosage (MTD) for combination therapy was sorafenib 800 mg daily and temsirolimus 25 mg once weekly. At the MTD, grade 3 thrombocytopenia was the dose-limiting toxicity. Eighteen patients were treated in the phase II component. At interim analysis, the study was terminated and did not proceed to the second stage. No patients remained progression free at 6 months. Median PFS was 8 weeks. The toxicity of this combination therapy resulted in a maximum tolerated dose of temsirolimus that was only one-tenth of the single-agent dose. Minimal activity in recurrent glioblastoma multiforme was seen at the MTD of the 2 combined agents. PMID:23099651

  3. Phase I/II study of sorafenib in combination with temsirolimus for recurrent glioblastoma or gliosarcoma: North American Brain Tumor Consortium study 05-02.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eudocia Q; Kuhn, John; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Abrey, Lauren; DeAngelis, Lisa M; Lieberman, Frank; Robins, H Ian; Chang, Susan M; Yung, W K Alfred; Drappatz, Jan; Mehta, Minesh P; Levin, Victor A; Aldape, Kenneth; Dancey, Janet E; Wright, John J; Prados, Michael D; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Gilbert, Mark R; Wen, Patrick Y

    2012-12-01

    The activity of single-agent targeted molecular therapies in glioblastoma has been limited to date. The North American Brain Tumor Consortium examined the safety, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy of combination therapy with sorafenib, a small molecule inhibitor of Raf, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β, and temsirolimus (CCI-779), an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin. This was a phase I/II study. The phase I component used a standard 3 × 3 dose escalation scheme to determine the safety and tolerability of this combination therapy. The phase II component used a 2-stage design; the primary endpoint was 6-month progression-free survival (PFS6) rate. Thirteen patients enrolled in the phase I component. The maximum tolerated dosage (MTD) for combination therapy was sorafenib 800 mg daily and temsirolimus 25 mg once weekly. At the MTD, grade 3 thrombocytopenia was the dose-limiting toxicity. Eighteen patients were treated in the phase II component. At interim analysis, the study was terminated and did not proceed to the second stage. No patients remained progression free at 6 months. Median PFS was 8 weeks. The toxicity of this combination therapy resulted in a maximum tolerated dose of temsirolimus that was only one-tenth of the single-agent dose. Minimal activity in recurrent glioblastoma multiforme was seen at the MTD of the 2 combined agents. PMID:23099651

  4. Phase II Study of Chemoradiotherapy With 5-Fluorouracil and Cisplatin for Stage II-III Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma: JCOG Trial (JCOG 9906)

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Ken; Muro, Kei; Minashi, Keiko; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Ishikura, Satoshi; Boku, Narikazu; Takiuchi, Hiroya; Komatsu, Yoshito; Miyata, Yoshinori; Fukuda, Haruhiko

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: In this Phase II study, we evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of chemoradiotherapy (CRT) with cisplatin (CDDP) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) for Stage II-III esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Patients and Methods: Patients with clinical Stage II-III (T1N1M0 or T2-3N0-1M0) thoracic ESCC were enrolled between April 2000 and March 2002. Chemotherapy comprised two courses of protracted infusion of 5-FU (400 mg/m{sup 2}/day) on Days 1-5 and 8-12, and 2-h infusion of CDDP (40 mg/m{sup 2}) on Days 1 and 8; this regimen was repeated every 5 weeks. Concurrent radiotherapy involved 60-Gy irradiation (30 fractions) for 8 weeks with a 2-week break. Responders received two courses of 5-FU (800 mg/m{sup 2}/day) on Days 1-5 and CDDP (80 mg/m{sup 2}) on Day 1. Final analysis was conducted in March 2007. Survival and late toxicities were monitored for 5 years. Results: The characteristics of the 76 patients enrolled were as follows: median age, 61 years; male/female, 68/8; performance status 0/1, 59/17 patients; Stage IIA/IIB/III, 26/12/38 patients. Of the 74 eligible patients, 46 (62.2%) achieved complete response. Median survival time was 29 months, with 3- and 5-year survival rates of 44.7% and 36.8%, respectively. Acute toxicities included Grade 3/4 esophagitis (17%), nausea (17%), hyponatremia (16%), and infection without neutropenia (12%). Late toxicities comprised Grade 3/4 esophagitis (13%), pericardial (16%) and pleural (9%) effusion, and radiation pneumonitis (4%), causing 4 deaths. Conclusions: CRT is effective for Stage II-III ESCC with manageable acute toxicities and can provide a nonsurgical treatment option. However, further improvement is required for reduction in late toxicity.

  5. Design of the randomized, Phase III, QUAZAR AML Maintenance trial of CC-486 (oral azacitidine) maintenance therapy in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Roboz, Gail J; Montesinos, Pau; Selleslag, Dominik; Wei, Andrew; Jang, Jun-Ho; Falantes, Jose; Voso, Maria T; Sayar, Hamid; Porkka, Kimmo; Marlton, Paula; Almeida, Antonio; Mohan, Sanjay; Ravandi, Farhad; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Skikne, Barry; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2016-02-01

    Older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have worse rates of complete remission and shorter overall survival than younger patients. The epigenetic modifier CC-486 is an oral formulation of azacitidine with promising clinical activity in patients with AML in Phase I studies. The Phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled QUAZAR AML Maintenance trial (CC-486-AML-001) examines CC-486 maintenance therapy (300 mg/day for 14 days of 28-day treatment cycles) for patients aged ≥55 years with AML in first complete remission. The primary end point is overall survival. Secondary end points include relapse-free survival, safety, health-related quality of life and healthcare resource utilization. This trial will investigate whether CC-486 maintenance can prolong remission and improve survival for older patients with AML. PMID:26785287

  6. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM LANDFILL GAS - PHASE III. DEMONSTRATION TESTS - PHASE IV. GUIDELINES AND RECOMMENDATIONS- VOLUME 1. TECHNICAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes the results of a four-phase program to demonstrate that fuel cell energy recovery using a commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell is both environmentally sound and commercially feasible. Phase I, a conceptual design and evaluation study, addressed the technical...

  7. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM LANDFILL GAS - PHASE III. DEMONSTRATION TESTS - PHASE IV. GUIDELINES AND DEMONSTRATIONS - VOLUME 2. APPENDICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes the results of a four-phase program to demonstrate that fuel cell energy recovery using a commercial phosphoric acid fuel cell is both environmentally sound and commercially feasible. Phase I, a conceptual design and evaluation study, addressed the technical...

  8. Deep sequencing analysis of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase at baseline and time of failure in patients receiving rilpivirine in the phase III studies ECHO and THRIVE.

    PubMed

    Van Eygen, Veerle; Thys, Kim; Van Hove, Carl; Rimsky, Laurence T; De Meyer, Sandra; Aerssens, Jeroen; Picchio, Gaston; Vingerhoets, Johan

    2016-05-01

    Minority variants (1.0-25.0%) were evaluated by deep sequencing (DS) at baseline and virological failure (VF) in a selection of antiretroviral treatment-naïve, HIV-1-infected patients from the rilpivirine ECHO/THRIVE phase III studies. Linkage between frequently emerging resistance-associated mutations (RAMs) was determined. DS (llIumina®) and population sequencing (PS) results were available at baseline for 47 VFs and time of failure for 48 VFs; and at baseline for 49 responders matched for baseline characteristics. Minority mutations were accurately detected at frequencies down to 1.2% of the HIV-1 quasispecies. No baseline minority rilpivirine RAMs were detected in VFs; one responder carried 1.9% F227C. Baseline minority mutations associated with resistance to other non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) were detected in 8/47 VFs (17.0%) and 7/49 responders (14.3%). Baseline minority nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) RAMs M184V and L210W were each detected in one VF (none in responders). At failure, two patients without NNRTI RAMs by PS carried minority rilpivirine RAMs K101E and/or E138K; and five additional patients carried other minority NNRTI RAMs V90I, V106I, V179I, V189I, and Y188H. Overall at failure, minority NNRTI RAMs and NRTI RAMs were found in 29/48 (60.4%) and 16/48 VFs (33.3%), respectively. Linkage analysis showed that E138K and K101E were usually not observed on the same viral genome. In conclusion, baseline minority rilpivirine RAMs and other NNRTI/NRTI RAMs were uncommon in the rilpivirine arm of the ECHO and THRIVE studies. DS at failure showed emerging NNRTI resistant minority variants in seven rilpivirine VFs who had no detectable NNRTI RAMs by PS. J. Med. Virol. 88:798-806, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26412111

  9. A meta-analysis of combination therapy versus single-agent therapy in anthracycline- and taxane-pretreated metastatic breast cancer: results from nine randomized Phase III trials.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liang; Wu, Xiaobo; Hu, Chun; Zhang, Zhiying; Zhang, Le; Liang, Shujing; Xu, Yingchun; Zhang, Fengchun

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the philosophy of treating metastatic breast cancer (MBC) is slowly evolving. Especially for the anthracycline- and taxane-pretreated MBC patients, no standard therapy exists in this setting. Whether to choose doublet agents or single agent as salvage treatment remains fiercely debated. Thus, we conducted a meta-analysis to resolve this problem. Databases including PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane library were searched for Phase III randomized clinical trials (published before August 2015) comparing the efficacy and adverse effects between the combination therapy and single-agent therapy in anthracycline- and taxane-pretreated MBC patients. The primary end point was the overall survival (OS), and the secondary end points were the progression-free survival (PFS), overall response rate (ORR), and grade 3 or 4 toxicities. The pooled hazard ratio (HR) and pooled risk ratio (RR) were used to evaluate the efficacy. Analyses were also performed to estimate the side effects and safety of both groups. In all, nine eligible randomized clinical trials were included in this meta-analysis. Improvements were proven in the doublet agents group on OS (HR 0.90, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.84-0.96, P=0.002), PFS (HR 0.81, 95% CI 0.76-0.88, P<0.001), and ORR (RR 1.72, 95% CI 1.34-2.21, P<0.001). Notably, subgroup analysis failed to favor the targeted agent-based combination in terms of OS (HR 1.08, 95% CI 0.89-1.31, P=0.365), PFS (HR 1.09, 95% CI 0.88-1.35, P=0.433), and ORR (RR 1.60, 95% CI 0.69-3.71, P=0.278) compared with single agent. In addition, although more hematological and gastrointestinal toxicities were observed in the doublet agents group, they were acceptable and manageable. Taken together, when compared with single-agent therapy, doublet agents should be considered a treatment option because of the superior efficacy and the manageable safety profile for the prior anthracycline- and taxane-treated MBC patients. PMID:27445497

  10. Chemotherapy with or without low-dose interleukin-2 in advanced non-small cell lung cancer: results from a phase III randomized multicentric trial.

    PubMed

    Ridolfi, Laura; Bertetto, Oscar; Santo, Antonio; Naglieri, Emanuele; Lopez, Massimo; Recchia, Francesco; Lissoni, Paolo; Galliano, Marco; Testore, Franco; Porta, Camillo; Maglie, Monica; Dall'agata, Monia; Fumagalli, Luca; Ridolfi, Ruggero

    2011-10-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is associated with IL-2-dependent cell-mediated immunodeficiency. As IL-2 is the main lymphocyte growth factor, a phase III randomized multicenter trial was conducted to evaluate the impact of subcutaneous low-dose IL-2 added to standard chemotherapy (CT) on overall survival (OS) in advanced NSCLC patients. Patients (n=241) with histologically confirmed stage IIIb or IV non-operable NSCLC underwent stratified randomization on the basis of center, ECOG PS, stage of disease and percentage of weight loss. Patients received gemcitabine (1000 mg/m2) on days 1 and 8 + cisplatin (100 mg/m2) on day 2 every 21 days for a maximum of 6 cycles [chemotherapy (CT) arm]. In the CT+IL-2 arm, patients also received low-dose subcutaneous IL-2 3,000,000 IU/die on days 3-5, 9-11, 15-17. The study had 90% power to detect a 20% absolute increase in 1-year OS with 118 patients/arm. An overall response (OR) rate of 12.8% (14% in the CT+IL-2 arm and 11.4% in CT arm) was observed. Stable disease was 70 and 66.7%, and progressive disease 16 and 21.8% in the CT+IL-2 and CT arms, respectively. No differences in response were found in any subgroup analysis. At a median follow-up of 32 months, 1-year OS was 45% for the CT+IL-2 arm vs. 51% for the CT arm (p=0.456 log-rank). Median progression-free survival was 6.6 months in the CT+IL-2 arm vs. 6.9 months in the CT arm (p=0.573, log-rank). A higher number of grade 4 toxicities were reported with CT+IL-2. The most common grade ≥3 adverse events were gastrointestinal toxicity (mainly nausea and diarrhea) and myelosuppression. No relevant differences in clinical outcome were observed from the addition of IL-2 to CT. Future studies investigating the role of T-regulators in chemoimmunotherapeutic regimens could be performed. PMID:21720704

  11. A meta-analysis of combination therapy versus single-agent therapy in anthracycline- and taxane-pretreated metastatic breast cancer: results from nine randomized Phase III trials

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liang; Wu, Xiaobo; Hu, Chun; Zhang, Zhiying; Zhang, Le; Liang, Shujing; Xu, Yingchun; Zhang, Fengchun

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the philosophy of treating metastatic breast cancer (MBC) is slowly evolving. Especially for the anthracycline- and taxane-pretreated MBC patients, no standard therapy exists in this setting. Whether to choose doublet agents or single agent as salvage treatment remains fiercely debated. Thus, we conducted a meta-analysis to resolve this problem. Databases including PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane library were searched for Phase III randomized clinical trials (published before August 2015) comparing the efficacy and adverse effects between the combination therapy and single-agent therapy in anthracycline- and taxane-pretreated MBC patients. The primary end point was the overall survival (OS), and the secondary end points were the progression-free survival (PFS), overall response rate (ORR), and grade 3 or 4 toxicities. The pooled hazard ratio (HR) and pooled risk ratio (RR) were used to evaluate the efficacy. Analyses were also performed to estimate the side effects and safety of both groups. In all, nine eligible randomized clinical trials were included in this meta-analysis. Improvements were proven in the doublet agents group on OS (HR 0.90, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.84–0.96, P=0.002), PFS (HR 0.81, 95% CI 0.76–0.88, P<0.001), and ORR (RR 1.72, 95% CI 1.34–2.21, P<0.001). Notably, subgroup analysis failed to favor the targeted agent-based combination in terms of OS (HR 1.08, 95% CI 0.89–1.31, P=0.365), PFS (HR 1.09, 95% CI 0.88–1.35, P=0.433), and ORR (RR 1.60, 95% CI 0.69–3.71, P=0.278) compared with single agent. In addition, although more hematological and gastrointestinal toxicities were observed in the doublet agents group, they were acceptable and manageable. Taken together, when compared with single-agent therapy, doublet agents should be considered a treatment option because of the superior efficacy and the manageable safety profile for the prior anthracycline- and taxane-treated MBC patients. PMID:27445497

  12. Efficacy and tolerability of adjunct perampanel based on number of antiepileptic drugs at baseline and baseline predictors of efficacy: A phase III post-hoc analysis.

    PubMed

    Glauser, Tracy; Laurenza, Antonio; Yang, Haichen; Williams, Betsy; Ma, Tony; Fain, Randi

    2016-01-01

    Perampanel is a selective, noncompetitive AMPA receptor antagonist with demonstrated efficacy and tolerability in partial seizures in patients aged ≥ 12 years in Phase III studies. Post-hoc analysis of these studies was conducted to determine the efficacy and tolerability of perampanel based on the number of concomitant antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) at baseline, as well as to examine which baseline characteristics, if any, were predictors of efficacy. Efficacy parameters were based on the number of baseline AEDs, and logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate the association of demographic and baseline clinical factors with probability of ≥ 50% reduction in seizure frequency. Patients on 1 AED at baseline were significantly more likely to have reduced seizure frequency (P<0.02) and improved 50% responder rate (P<0.02) than patients on 3 AEDs at baseline. Secondarily generalized seizures at baseline, unknown etiology, and use of concomitant non-inducer AEDs were also established as positive predictors of efficacy (50% responder rate; P<0.01). Patients with more AEDs at baseline were associated with greater use of inducers (P<0.01), which may result in decreased exposure of perampanel in these patients and lower efficacy. Patients with 1 AED at baseline had a significantly shorter time since diagnosis compared with patients in the 3 (P<0.01) AEDs group, as well as a lower median seizure frequency at baseline compared to patients on 3 AEDs (P<0.05), suggesting that the reduced efficacy of perampanel with 3 AEDs may also be associated with the greater severity of seizures in the patient groups. The incidence of adverse events in perampanel-treated patients was similar regardless of the number of AEDs at baseline. Greater efficacy is predicted for patients receiving fewer concomitant AEDs when starting perampanel, as well as for those receiving concomitant treatment with AEDs that are not CYP3A4 enzyme-inducers, compared to patients treated with multiple

  13. Allogeneic marrow transplantation following cyclophosphamide and escalating doses of hyperfractionated total body irradiation in patients with advanced lymphoid malignancies: A phase I/II trial

    SciTech Connect

    Demirer, T.; Petersen, F.B.; Appelbaum, F.R.

    1995-07-15

    The purpose of this investigation was to define the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of unshielded total body irradiation (TBI) delivered from dual {sup 60}C sources at an exposure rate of 0.08 Gy/min and given in thrice daily fractions of 1.2 Gy in patients with advanced lymphoid malignancies. Forty-four patients with a median age of 28 (range 6-48) years were entered into a Phase I/II study. All patients received cyclophosphamide (Cy), 120 mg/kg administered over 2 days before TBI. Marrow from human leukocyte antigen (HLA) identical siblings was infused following the last dose of TBI. An escalation-deescalation schema designed to not exceed an incidence of 25% of Grade 3-4 regimen-related toxicities (RRTs) was used. The first dose level tested was 13.2 Gy followed by 14.4 Gy. None of the four patients at the dose level of 13.2 Gy developed Grade 3-4 RRT. Two of the first eight patients receiving 14.4 Gy developed Grade 3-4 RRT, establishing this as the MTD. An additional 32 patients were evaluated at the 14.4 Gy level to confirm these initial observations. Of 40 patients receiving 14.4 Gy, 13 (32.5%) developed Grade 3-4 RRTs; 46% in adults and 12% in children. The primary dose limiting toxicity was Grade 3-4 hepatic toxicity, which occurred in 12.5% of patients. Noninfectious Grade 3-4 interstitial pneumonia syndrome occurred in 5% of patients. The actuarial probabilities of event-free survival, relapse, and nonrelapse mortality at 2 years were 0.10, 0.81, and 0.47, respectively, for patients who received 14.4 Gy of TBI. The outcome for patients receiving 14.4 Gy of TBI was not different from previous studies of other CY and TBI regimens in patients with advanced lymphoid malignancies. These data showed that the incidence of Grade 3-4 RRTs in adults was greater than the 25% maximum set as the goal of this study, suggesting that 13.2 Gy is a more appropriate dose of TBI for adults, while 14.4 Gy is an appropriate dose for children. 36 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  14. S0502: A SWOG Phase III Randomized Study of Imatinib, With or Without Bevacizumab, in Patients With Untreated Metastatic or Unresectable Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, Cathy; Corless, Christopher; Eary, Janet F.; Mulder, Karen; Okuno, Scott H.; George, Suzanne; Heinrich, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Lessons Learned Despite having significant rationale, S0502 failed to accrue for a number of reasons. Vetting a trial first, with scientific experts and funding agencies, does not guarantee success, especially when dealing with a rare tumor and/or one with an existing highly effective therapy. In the present case, adding an intravenous drug to an oral medication as part of a regimen expected to be continued for many years likely decreased patient (and physician) convenience and, thus, interest in the study. Background. Imatinib mesylate, a potent inhibitor of the KIT and PDGFR tyrosine kinases, is highly effective in the treatment of advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). However, most imatinib-treated tumors eventually become resistant, accounting for a median progression-free survival of 19–23 months. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) correlates with poor prognosis in GIST; bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody against VEGF, is effective in a variety of solid tumors. We postulated combination therapy with imatinib plus bevacizumab would benefit patients with advanced GIST, particularly those reliant on VEGFA-dependent angiogenesis. Methods. Patients with metastatic or surgically unresectable GIST were eligible for this phase III open-label clinical trial, S0502. At registration, patients were randomly assigned to either imatinib 400 mg (standard) or 800 mg (patients with exon 9 KIT mutations), or imatinib plus bevacizumab, 7.5 mg/kg i.v. every 3 weeks. Patients were treated to progression, symptomatic deterioration, unacceptable toxicity, treatment delay greater than 4 weeks, or patient choice to withdraw from the study. The primary objective was to determine whether the addition of bevacizumab to imatinib would improve progression-free survival (PFS) in first-line treatment of incurable GIST. Results. S0502 opened on April 15, 2008. As of fall 2009, only 12 patients from at least 178 eligible SWOG centers plus those participating

  15. Expressions of the multidrug resistance-related proteins in the rat olfactory epithelium: a possible role in the phase III xenobiotic metabolizing function.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Hideaki; Doi, Yoshiaki; Fujimoto, Sunao

    2010-01-01

    The xenobiotic metabolizing system is considered to play important roles in the olfaction by the chemical homeostasis. Several phase I and phase II xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes are expressed in the olfactory epithelium in vertebrates. Multidrug resistance-related proteins (MRPs) are the phase III xenobiotic metabolizing pumps that eliminate some conjugated ligands from cells. However, the MRP-expressions in the olfactory epithelium have not been confirmed in the mammals. We investigated gene and protein expressions of MRP type 1 (MRP1) and type 2 (MRP2) isoforms in the adult rat olfactory epithelium in order to clarify the existence of phase III xenobiotic metabolizing pumps in the olfactory organs. Expressions of MRP1 mRNA were detected in the nasal cavity by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The nucleoside sequence of the RT-PCR products were completely identical to that found in other organs of rat. On the contrary, the analysis did not detect expressions of MRP2 mRNA in the nasal cavity. By in situ hybridization using a digoxigenin-labeled MRP1 cRNA probe, signals for MRP1 mRNA were observed preferentially in the perinuclear regions of supporting cells. However, the respiratory epithelial cells did not show the signals for MRP1 mRNA. By immunohistochemistry using a specific antibody to MRP1, MRP1-immunoreactivities were seen mainly on the supporting cells. These findings suggest that MRP1 is involved in olfaction as a part of the "olfactory signal termination" by the chemical homeostasis in the "perireceptor events" of the olfactory epithelium. PMID:19879335

  16. Simultaneous determination of Cr(iii) and Cr(vi) using reversed-phased ion-pairing liquid chromatography with dynamic reaction cell inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolf, R.E.; Morrison, J.M.; Goldhaber, M.B.

    2007-01-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of Cr(iii) and Cr(vi) species in waters, soil leachates and synthetic bio-fluids is described. The method uses reversed-phase ion-pairing liquid chromatography to separate the chromium species and a dynamic reaction cell (DRC??) equipped ICP-MS for detection of chromium. Separation of the chromium species is carried out in less than 2 min. Cr(iii) is complexed with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) prior to separation by mixing samples with the mobile phase containing 2.0 mM tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (TBAOH), 0.5 mM EDTA (dipotassium salt), and 5% (vol/vol) methanol, adjusted to pH 7.6. The interfering 40Ar 12C+ background peak at mass 52 was reduced by over four orders of magnitude to less than 200 cps by using 0.65 mL min-1 ammonia as a reaction gas and an RPq setting on the DRC of 0.75. Method detection limits (MDLs) of 0.09 ??g L-1 for Cr(iii) and 0.06 ??g L-1 for Cr(vi) were obtained based on peak areas at mass 52 for 50 ??L injections of low level spikes. Reproducibility at 2 ??g L-1 was 3% RSD for 5 replicate injections. The tolerance of the method to various levels of common cations and anions found in natural waters and to matrix constituents found in soil leachates and simulated gastric and lung fluids was tested by performing spike recovery calculations for a variety of samples. ?? The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  17. Microbial mineral transformations at the Fe(II)/Fe(III) redox boundary for solid phase capture of strontium and other metal/radionuclide contaminants. Annual progress report, September 15, 1996--June 15, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Ferris, F.G.; Roden, E.E.

    1997-01-01

    'The objectives of the project remain the same as those stated in the original proposal. Specifically, to determine microbiological and geochemical controls on carbonate mineral precipitation reactions that are caused by bacterial reduction of Fe(III)-oxides, and identify contributions of these processes to solid phase capture of strontium and other metal/radionuclide contaminants. The project on microbial mineral transformations at the Fe(II)/Fe(III) redox boundary for the solid phase capture of strontium is progressing well. Thus far, the authors have been able to demonstrate that: pH and DIC concentrations increase during microbial reduction of HFO in batch culture experiments with G. metallireducens lasting 30 days with high concentrations of strontium (1.0 \\265m) and calcium (10 \\265m) do not inhibit microbial HFO reduction, the extent of change in pH and DIC concentrations brings about supersaturation with respect to carbonate minerals including siderite (FeCO{sub 3}), strontianite (SrCO{sub 3}), and calcite/aragonite (CaCO{sub 3}); in addition, precipitation of siderite has been documented in cultures of HFO reducing bacteria significant amounts of strontium and calcium (40 to 50% of the total initial concentration) sorb to particulate solids (i.e., HFO and bacteria cells)-in batch culture experiments l sorption of strontium to HFO conforms with Langmuir single site sorption models derived from corresponding mass action and mass balance relationships anticipated from thermodynamic equilibrium considerations the sorption behavior of strontium with S. alga is more complex and seems to involve two sets of reactive surface sites on the bacterial cells; a high affinity site of low total sorption capacity, and a low affinity site with high sorption capacity the total strontium sorption capacities of S. alga and HFO are comparable the observed solid phase partioning of strontium in the culture experiments is in excellent agreement with sorption characteristics

  18. The HELIOS trial protocol: a phase III study of ibrutinib in combination with bendamustine and rituximab in relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hallek, Michael; Kay, Neil E; Osterborg, Anders; Chanan-Khan, Asher A; Mahler, Michelle; Salman, Mariya; Wan, Ying; Sun, Steven; Zhuang, Sen Hong; Howes, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Ibrutinib is an orally administered, covalent inhibitor of Bruton's tyrosine kinase with activity in B-cell malignancies based on Phase I/II studies. We describe the design and rationale for the Phase III HELIOS trial (trial registration: EudraCT No. 2012-000600-15; UTN No. U1111-1135-3745) investigating whether ibrutinib added to bendamustine and rituximab (BR) provides benefits over BR alone in patients with relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma. Eligible patients must have relapsed/refractory disease measurable on CT scan and meet ≥ 1 International Workshop on Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia criterion for requiring treatment; patients with del(17p) are excluded. All patients receive BR (maximum six cycles) as background therapy and are randomized 1:1 to placebo or ibrutinib 420 mg/day. Treatment with ibrutinib or placebo will start concomitantly with BR and continue until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The primary end point is progression-free survival. Secondary end points include safety, objective response rate, overall survival, rate of minimal residual disease-negative remissions, and patient-reported outcomes. Tumor response will be assessed using the International Workshop on Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia guidelines. PMID:24901734

  19. Whole Brain Radiotherapy and RRx-001: Two Partial Responses in Radioresistant Melanoma Brain Metastases from a Phase I/II Clinical Trial12

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Michelle M.; Parmar, Hemant; Cao, Yue; Pramanik, Priyanka; Schipper, Matthew; Hayman, James; Junck, Larry; Mammoser, Aaron; Heth, Jason; Carter, Corey A.; Oronsky, Arnold; Knox, Susan J.; Caroen, Scott; Oronsky, Bryan; Scicinski, Jan; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Lao, Christopher D.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Kim et al. report two patients with melanoma metastases to the brain that responded to treatment with RRx-001 and whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) without neurologic or systemic toxicity in the context of a phase I/II clinical trial. RRx-001 is an reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS)-dependent systemically nontoxic hypoxic cell radiosensitizer with vascular normalizing properties under investigation in patients with various solid tumors including those with brain metastases. SIGNIFICANCE: Metastatic melanoma to the brain is historically associated with poor outcomes and a median survival of 4 to 5 months. WBRT is a mainstay of treatment for patients with multiple brain metastases, but no significant therapeutic advances for these patients have been described in the literature. To date, candidate radiosensitizing agents have failed to demonstrate a survival benefit in patients with brain metastases, and in particular, no agent has demonstrated improved outcome in patients with metastatic melanoma. Kim et al. report two patients with melanoma metastases to the brain that responded to treatment with novel radiosensitizing agent RRx-001 and WBRT without neurologic or systemic toxicity in the context of a phase I/II clinical trial. PMID:27084426

  20. The role of additives in moderating the influence of Fe(III) and Cu(II) on the radiochemical yield of [⁶⁸Ga(DOTATATE)].

    PubMed

    Oehlke, Elisabeth; Lengkeek, Nigel A; Le, Van So; Pellegrini, Paul A; Greguric, Ivan; Weiner, Ron

    2016-01-01

    [(68)Ga(DOTATATE)] has demonstrated its clinical usefulness. Both Fe(3+) and Cu(2+), potential contaminants in Gallium-68 generator eluent, substantially reduce the radiochemical (RC) yield of [(68)Ga(DOTATATE)] if the metal/ligand ratio of 1:1 is exceeded. A variety of compounds were examined for their potential ability to reduce this effect. Most had no effect on RC yield. However, addition of phosphate diminished the influence of Fe(3+) by likely forming an insoluble iron salt. Addition of ascorbic acid reduced Cu(2+) and Fe(3+) to Cu(+) and Fe(2+) respectively, both of which have limited impact on RC yields. At low ligand amounts (5 nmol DOTATATE), the addition of 30 nmol phosphate (0.19 mM) increased the tolerance of Fe(3+) from 4 nmol to 10 nmol (0.06 mM), while the addition of ascorbic acid allowed high RC yields (>95%) in the presence of 40 nmol Fe(3+) (0.25 mM) and 100 nmol Cu(2+) (0.63 mM). The effect of ascorbic acid was highly pH-dependant, and gave optimal results at pH 3. PMID:26405839

  1. Phase I/II Study of HSP90 Inhibitor AUY922 and Erlotinib for EGFR-Mutant Lung Cancer With Acquired Resistance to Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Melissa L.; Yu, Helena A.; Hart, Eric M.; Weitner, Bing Bing; Rademaker, Alfred W.; Patel, Jyoti D.; Kris, Mark G.; Riely, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose AUY922 is an HSP90 inhibitor that causes degradation of HSP chaperones and their client proteins, including epidermal growth factor receptor. We conducted a phase I/II trial to evaluate AUY922 and erlotinib for patients with EGFR-mutant lung cancer and disease progression during erlotinib treatment. Patients and Methods All patients had developed acquired resistance after treatment with erlotinib and underwent repeat tumor biopsies before study entry to assess for EGFR T790M. In phase I, 18 patients were treated with AUY922 intravenously once per week and erlotinib once per day in 28-day cycles using a 3 + 3 dose-escalation design. In phase II, 19 additional patients were treated at the maximum-tolerated dose. The primary end point of the phase II trial was complete plus partial response rate. Results In phase I (n = 18), three patients were treated in each cohort, except the highest-dose cohort (AUY922 70 mg and erlotinib 150 mg), which expanded to six patients because of a dose-limiting toxicity (ie, junctional cardiac rhythm). Common drug-related adverse events were diarrhea, skin rash, hyperglycemia, and night blindness. All patients treated at maximum-tolerated dose (n = 25) were evaluable for response. The partial response rate was 16% (four of 25 patients; 95% CI, 5% to 36%) and was independent of tumor T790M status. Conclusion Partial responses were observed, but the duration of treatment with AUY922 and erlotinib was limited by toxicities, especially night blindness. This phase II study of AUY922 and erlotinib did not meet its primary end point. PMID:25870087

  2. Characterization of solid-phase extraction of Fe(III) by unloaded polyurethane foam as thiocyanate complex.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Gil Nunes; de Sousa, Leandro M; Pereira Netto, Annibal D; Cassella, Ricardo J

    2007-11-01

    This work presents a detailed study about the adsorption of iron(III)-thiocyanate complexes onto unloaded polyether-type polyurethane foam (PUF). A novel strategy was employed for this purpose, utilizing the adjustment of the plug cylinder of PUF to the arm of an overhead stirrer. The system was characterized in relation to equilibrium and kinetic aspects and it was modeled by applying Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The results obtained showed that adsorption occurs on a monolayer and that external transport of the solute from solution to adsorbent was the rate-determining mechanism. A maximum adsorption capacity of 2.06 x 10(-4) mol Fe g(-1) was obtained under established experimental conditions (0.5 mol L(-1) SCN(-) and 0.005 mol L(-1) HCl). Sequential extraction experiments were carried out by changing PUF in time intervals previously defined (5, 20, and 40 min), and the obtained results showed that it is possible to remove around 95% of the Fe(III) in solution through five consecutive extractions of 5 min with five 200 mg PUF cylinders. PMID:17662992

  3. Reinforcement of acrylic resins for provisional fixed restorations. Part III: effects of addition of titania and zirconia mixtures on some mechanical and physical properties.

    PubMed

    Panyayong, W; Oshida, Y; Andres, C J; Barco, T M; Brown, D T; Hovijitra, S

    2002-01-01

    Acrylic resins have been used in many different applications in dentistry, especially in the fabrication of provisional fixed partial dentures. Ideally, a provisional crown and bridge material should be easy to handle and should protect teeth against physical, chemical, and thermal injuries. Some of the problems associated with this use are related to the material's poor mechanical properties. It has been demonstrated that acrylic resin can be strengthened through the addition of structural component of different size distributed in the acrylic matrix, thus forming a composite structure. The purpose of this study was to investigate the addition effects of mixtures of titania (titanium dioxide, TiO(2)) powder and zirconia (zirconium dioxide, ZrO(2)) powder being incorporated with pre-polymerized beads mixed in monomer liquid, on some mechanical and physical properties of PMMA resin. The pre-polymerized powder poly(methyl methacrylate) resin was admixed with titania and zirconia powder. A mixing ratio was controlled by volume % of 0, 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 (samples with 0 v/o served as control groups). For using mixture of titania and zirconia, total amount of the mixture was controlled by volume % of 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0, in which titania and zirconia were mixed at the ratio 1 :1, 1 :2 and 2 :1. Prior to mechanical tests, all rectangular-shaped samples (25 mm x 2 mm x 5 mm) were stored in 37 degrees C distilled water for 7 days after polishing all six sides of samples. Samples were then subjected to the three-point bending flexion test to evaluate the bending strength as well as the modulus of elasticity. Weight gain and exothermic reaction survey were investigated as well. All data were collected and analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Sidak method (p=0.05). It was found that the addition of particles generally decreased the water absorbed by the composite system. Only 1 percent by volume concentration of 1 :1 ratio and 2 percent by volume concentration

  4. LIQUID PHASE FISCHER-TROPSCH (III & IV) DEMONSTRATION IN THE LAPORTE ALTERNATIVE FUELS DEVELOPMENT UNIT. Final Topical Report. Volume I/II: Main Report. Task 1: Engineering Modifications (Fischer-Tropsch III & IV Demonstration) and Task 2: AFDU Shakedown, Operations, Deactivation (Shut-Down) and Disposal (Fischer-Tropsch III & IV Demonstration).

    SciTech Connect

    Bharat L. Bhatt

    1999-06-01

    Slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch technology was successfully demonstrated in DOE's Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) at LaPorte, Texas. Earlier work at LaPorte, with iron catalysts in 1992 and 1994, had established proof-of-concept status for the slurry phase process. The third campaign (Fischer-Tropsch III), in 1996, aimed at aggressively extending the operability of the slurry reactor using a proprietary cobalt catalyst. Due to an irreversible plugging of catalyst-wax separation filters as a result of unexpected catalyst fines generation, the operations had to be terminated after seven days on-stream. Following an extensive post-run investigation by the participants, the campaign was successfully completed in March-April 1998, with an improved proprietary cobalt catalyst. These runs were sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Air Products & Chemicals, Inc., and Shell Synthetic Fuels, Inc. (SSFI). A productivity of approximately 140 grams (gm) of hydrocarbons (HC)/ hour (hr)-liter (lit) of expanded slurry volume was achieved at reasonable system stability during the second trial (Fischer-Tropsch IV). The productivity ranged from 110-140 at various conditions during the 18 days of operations. The catalyst/wax filters performed well throughout the demonstration, producing a clean wax product. For the most part, only one of the four filter housings was needed for catalyst/wax filtration. The filter flux appeared to exceed the design flux. A combination of use of a stronger catalyst and some innovative filtration techniques were responsible for this success. There was no sign of catalyst particle attrition and very little erosion of the slurry pump was observed, in contrast to the Fischer-Tropsch III operations. The reactor operated hydrodynamically stable with uniform temperature profile and gas hold-ups. Nuclear density and differential pressure measurements indicated somewhat higher than expected gas hold-up (45 - 50 vol%) during Fischer-Tropsch IV

  5. LIQUID PHASE FISCHER-TROPSCH (III IV) DEMONSTRATION IN THE LAPORTE ALTERNATIVE FUELS DEVELOPMENT UNIT. Final Topical Report. Volume I/II: Main Report. Task 1: Engineering Modifications (Fischer-Tropsch III IV Demonstration) and Task 2: AFDU Shakedown, Operations, Deactivation (Shut-Down) and Disposal (Fischer-Tropsch III IV Demonstration)

    SciTech Connect

    Bharat L. Bhatt.

    1999-06-01

    Slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch technology was successfully demonstrated in DOE's Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) at LaPorte, Texas. Earlier work at LaPorte, with iron catalysts in 1992 and 1994, had established proof-of-concept status for the slurry phase process. The third campaign (Fischer-Tropsch III), in 1996, aimed at aggressively extending the operability of the slurry reactor using a proprietary cobalt catalyst. Due to an irreversible plugging of catalyst-wax separation filters as a result of unexpected catalyst fines generation, the operations had to be terminated after seven days on-stream. Following an extensive post-run investigation by the participants, the campaign was successfully completed in March-April 1998, with an improved proprietary cobalt catalyst. These runs were sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Air Products Chemicals, Inc., and Shell Synthetic Fuels, Inc. (SSFI). A productivity of approximately 140 grams (gm) of hydrocarbons (HC)/ hour (hr)-liter (lit) of expanded slurry volume was achieved at reasonable system stability during the second trial (Fischer-Tropsch IV). The productivity ranged from 110-140 at various conditions during the 18 days of operations. The catalyst/wax filters performed well throughout the demonstration, producing a clean wax product. For the most part, only one of the four filter housings was needed for catalyst/wax filtration. The filter flux appeared to exceed the design flux. A combination of use of a stronger catalyst and some innovative filtration techniques were responsible for this success. There was no sign of catalyst particle attrition and very little erosion of the slurry pump was observed, in contrast to the Fischer-Tropsch III operations. The reactor operated hydrodynamically stable with uniform temperature profile and gas hold-ups. Nuclear density and differential pressure measurements indicated somewhat higher than expected gas hold-up (45 - 50 vol%) during Fischer-Tropsch IV

  6. Grain-boundary phases in hot-pressed silicon nitride containing Y2O3 and CeO2 additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guha, J. P.; Hench, L. L.

    1983-01-01

    Auger electron spectroscopy in conjunction with X-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy is used to analyze the grain-boundary phases of Y2O3- and CeO2-doped Si3N4 hot-pressed materials in order to demonstrate that the additives concentrate predominantly in the grain boundaries of Si3N4 in the form of various oxynitride phases. A high oxygen content observed in sample fracture surfaces was found to be consistent with the existence of an oxygen-enriched phase in the grain boundaries. The presence of yttrium and cerium in the fracture surfaces and an overall increase in the O/N ratio imply that the additive oxides are predominantly concentrated in the intergranular phases.

  7. Cisplatin/Tegafur/Uracil/Irinotecan Triple Combination Therapy for Recurrent/Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Phase I/II Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, San-Chi; Chang, Peter Mu-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    Lessons Learned Cisplatin/tegafur/uracil/irinotecan triple combination therapy shows moderate response, especially in patients without previous chemoradiotherapy within the 6 months before this combination therapy. Toxicity is tolerable, and quality of life is improved in responders. Background. The prognosis is poor in recurrent/metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (R/M HNSCC). Triple combination therapy may increase tumor response. Methods. This phase I/II prospective trial first determined the dose-limiting toxicity and recommended dose of irinotecan with cisplatin and tegafur/uracil (UFUR) in phase I. Irinotecan was supplied at doses of 40, 50, 60, and 70 mg/m2 by using a standard 3+3 design. Doses of cisplatin and UFUR were held stable. In phase II, the recommended dose of irinotecan was administered intravenously (i.v.) over 90 min on day 1, with cisplatin 50 mg/m2 i.v. over 60 min also on day 1, and oral UFUR 200 mg twice a day for 5 days every 2 weeks a cycle. Results. In the phase I portion, 14 patients were enrolled, and the dose level of irinotecan at 60 mg/m2 was defined as the recommended dose for the phase II portion of the study. Among 43 patients enrolled in the phase II portion, complete response was seen in 2 patients (4.7%) and partial response in 10 patients (23.3%), and the disease control rate was 39.5%. In a subgroup analysis of patients whose prior chemoradiotherapy was more than 6 months earlier, a response rate of 40.7% and disease control rate of 59.3% were observed. Conclusion. Cisplatin/UFUR/irinotecan triple combination therapy is tolerated and effective for selected patients. Individualized choice of treatment will influence prognosis and quality of life in R/M HNSCC patients. PMID:27091418

  8. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Review of Experience of a Multicenter Phase I/II Dose-Escalation Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, D. W. Nathan; Straka, Christopher; Cho, L. Chinsoo; Timmerman, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is an area of active investigation for treatment of prostate cancer. In our phase I dose-escalation study, maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) was not reached, and subsequently phase II study has been completed. The purpose of this article is to review our experiences of dose-escalated SBRT for localized prostate cancer. Methods and materials: Patients enrolled to phase I/II study from 2006 to 2011 were reviewed. Prescription dose groups were 45, 47.5, and 50 Gray (Gy) in five fractions over 2.5 weeks. Toxicity and quality of life questionnaire data were collected and analyzed. Descriptive statistics were obtained in the form of means, medians, and ranges for the continuous variables, and frequencies and percentages for the categoric variables. Results: Ninety-one patients were enrolled from five institutions. Median follow-up for prostate specific antigen (PSA) evaluation was 42 months. PSA control remains at 99%. While the MTD was not reached in the phase I study, excess high grade rectal toxicity (10.6%) was noted in the phase II study. The 13 patients treated to 50 Gy in the phase I study that did not have high grade rectal toxicity, in retrospect met these parameters and have not had further events on longer follow-up. Conclusion: Prostate specific antigen control rate, even for patients with intermediate risk, is thus far excellent at these dose levels. This study provides a platform for exploration of SBRT based clinical trials aimed at optimizing outcome for intermediate and high risk patients. High grade toxicities specifically related to the rectum were observed in a small but meaningful minority at the highest dose level. Dose constraints based on physiologic parameters have been defined to mitigate this risk, and strategies to minimize rectal exposure to such doses are being explored. PMID:25505731

  9. Investigation of helium addition for laser-induced plasma spectroscopy of pure gas phase systems: Analyte interactions and signal enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, C. A.; Diwakar, P. K.; Hahn, D. W.

    2007-12-01

    The role of helium addition on the analyte signal enhancement in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for analysis of pure gaseous systems was examined using carbon and hydrogen atomic emission lines. Increased analyte response, as measured by peak-to-base and signal-to-noise ratios, was observed with increasing helium addition, with maximum enhancement approaching a factor of 7. Additional measurements revealed a significant decrease in plasma electron density with increasing helium addition. To explore the mechanisms of analyte signal enhancement, the helium emission lines were also examined and found to be effectively quenched with nitrogen addition. In consideration of the data, it is concluded that the role of metastable helium is not as important as the overall changes in plasma properties, namely electron density and laser-plasma coupling. Helium addition is concluded to affect the electron density via Penning ionization, as well as to play a role in the initial plasma breakdown processes.

  10. Field Coordination: Phase III-B, Beginning Teacher Evaluation Study. Technical Note Series. Technical Note II-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, W. Pearl; Rice, Carol F.

    The activities included in the field coordination and data collection phase of the Beginning Teacher Evaluation Study are described. A history of the recruitment, selection, and training of field personnel, a description of coordination efforts with teachers and school districts, a discussion of the various aspects of scheduling, and the…

  11. Homebased Computer Assisted Adult Education Project--Phase III. Final Project Report, September 1, 1982, through August 31, 1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broussard, Rolland L.

    The purpose of this multi-year project was to develop a delivery system for adult education through expanded outreach opportunities using computer-assisted instruction (CAI) and computer-managed instruction (CMI) for undereducated adults in a home-based context. In phase 1 of the three-year project, planning, development, and testing of CAI in a…

  12. "Brief Report: Increase in Production of Spoken Words in Some Children with Autism after PECS Teaching to Phase III"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Deborah; Felce, Janet

    2007-01-01

    The context for this work was an evaluation study [Carr, D., & Felce, J. A. (in press)] of the early phases of the Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) [Frost, L. A., & Bondy, A. S. (1994). "The picture exchange communication system training manual." Cherry Hill, NJ: Pyramid Educational Consultants, Inc.; Frost, L. A., & Bondy, A. S.…

  13. Formation of the χ-Phase Precipitate in Co-28Cr-6Mo Alloys with Additional Si and C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, Kei; Alfirano; Mineta, Shingo; Ueda, Kyosuke; Narushima, Takayuki

    2015-09-01

    The precipitates of biomedical Co-28Cr-6Mo-(0.5 to 2)Si-(0.05 to 0.35)C alloys (mass pct) have been investigated before and after heat treatment, focusing on the formation of the χ-phase precipitate. The precipitates were precisely and directly analyzed after using electrolytic extraction to separate the precipitates from the alloys. Heat treatment was performed at 1523 K (1250 °C) for a holding time of 0.6 ks. The χ-phase precipitate was detected with Si content of 1.3 to 2 mass pct and C content of 0.05 to 0.15 mass pct in both the as-cast and heat-treated alloys. The higher Si content and the mid-level C content of about 0.15 mass pct favored the formation of the χ-phase precipitate. Moreover, the χ-phase precipitate was not observed in the compositional range of the ASTM F 75 standard: Si content ≤1.0 mass pct and C content ≤0.35 mass pct. In the as-cast Co-28Cr-6Mo-1.3Si-0.15C alloy, which is outside of the ASTM F 75 standard, the content of the χ-phase precipitate was around 6 pct in area percent; the decrease in the ductility was detected in the tensile test of this alloy. The amount of precipitates decreased due to heat treatment at 1523 K (1250 °C), where the dissolution of precipitates occurred. After the heat treatment, a single χ-phase precipitate region was detected.

  14. Sensitive determination of As (III) and As (V) by magnetic solid phase extraction with Fe@polyethyleneimine in combination with hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qingxiang; Zheng, Zhenwen; Xiao, Junping; Fan, Huili

    2016-08-15

    The magnetic nanomaterial Fe@polyethyleneimine (Fe@PEI) was successfully synthesized and used as an effective adsorbent material for magnetic solid phase extraction(MSPE) of As(III) and As(V) from water samples. Fe@SiO2 nanoparticles were prepared by one pot synthetic method using a borohydride reduction method, then modified with (3-chloropropyl)trimethoxysilane to obtain Fe@SiO2-Cl by chloropropylation, which was reacted with PEI to achieve Fe@polyethyleneimine (Fe@PEI). The microstructure and morphology of Fe@PEI were characterized by transmission electron microscoscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The experimental results showed that Fe@PEI demonstrated excellent adsorption for As(III) and As(V). Based on this fact, the determination method for these two arsenic species earned good limits of detection (LODs) of 0.002μgL(-1) and wide calibration curves in the concentration range from 0.008 to 0.2μgL(-1). The precisions of As (III) and As (V)were 1.95% and 2.55% (RSD, n=6), respectively. The proposed method was validated with real samples and the spiked recoveries were in the range of 82.7-98.3% and the accuracies were in the range of 2-13.3%. The results demonstrated that the developed MSPE method had good advantages such as simplicity, rapid separation, low cost, easy to reuse and high-quality analytical performances, which made it attractive for rapid and efficient extraction of inorganic arsenic species in the environmental water samples. PMID:27260453

  15. Randomized Phase III Study Comparing Paclitaxel/Cisplatin/ Gemcitabine and Gemcitabine/Cisplatin in Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Urothelial Cancer Without Prior Systemic Therapy: EORTC Intergroup Study 30987

    PubMed Central

    Bellmunt, Joaquim; von der Maase, Hans; Mead, Graham M.; Skoneczna, Iwona; De Santis, Maria; Daugaard, Gedske; Boehle, Andreas; Chevreau, Christine; Paz-Ares, Luis; Laufman, Leslie R.; Winquist, Eric; Raghavan, Derek; Marreaud, Sandrine; Collette, Sandra; Sylvester, Richard; de Wit, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The combination of gemcitabine plus cisplatin (GC) is a standard regimen in patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer. A phase I/II study suggested that a three-drug regimen that included paclitaxel had greater antitumor activity and might improve survival. Patients and Methods We conducted a randomized phase III study to compare paclitaxel/cisplatin/gemcitabine (PCG) with GC in patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial carcinoma. Primary outcome was overall survival (OS). Secondary outcomes were progression-free survival (PFS), overall response rate, and toxicity. Results From 2001 to 2004, 626 patients were randomly assigned; 312 patients were assigned to PCG, and 314 patients were assigned to GC. After a median follow-up of 4.6 years, the median OS was 15.8 months on PCG versus 12.7 months on GC (hazard ratio [HR], 0.85; P = .075). OS in the subgroup of all eligible patients was significantly longer on PCG (3.2 months; HR, 0.82; P = .03), as was the case in patients with bladder primary tumors. PFS was not significantly longer on PCG (HR, 0.87; P = .11). Overall response rate was 55.5% on PCG and 43.6% on GC (P = .0031). Both treatments were well tolerated, with more thrombocytopenia and bleeding on GC than PCG (11.4% v 6.8%, respectively; P = .05) and more febrile neutropenia on PCG than GC (13.2% v 4.3%, respectively; P < .001). Conclusion The addition of paclitaxel to GC provides a higher response rate and a 3.1-month survival benefit that did not reach statistical significance. Novel approaches will be required to obtain major improvements in survival of incurable urothelial cancer. PMID:22370319

  16. Effect of Partition of Photo-Initiator Components and Addition of Iodonium Salt on the Photopolymerization of Phase-Separated Dental Adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedin, Farhana; Ye, Qiang; Song, Linyong; Ge, Xueping; Camarda, Kyle; Spencer, Paulette

    2016-04-01

    The polymerization kinetics of physically separated hydrophobic- and hydrophilic-rich phases of a model dental adhesive have been investigated. The two phases were prepared from neat resin containing 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and bisphenol A glycerolate dimethacrylate (BisGMA) in the ratio of 45:55 (wt./wt.). Neat resins containing various combinations of popular photo-initiating compounds, e.g., camphoquinone (CQ), ethyl 4-(dimethylamino)benzoate (EDMAB), 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA), and diphenyliodonium hexafluorophosphate (DPIHP), were prepared. To obtain the two phases, 33 wt.% of deuterium oxide (D2O) was added to the neat resins. This amount of D2O exceeded the miscibility limit for the resins. The concentration of each component of the photo-initiating system in the two phases was quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). When combined with CQ, DMAEMA is less efficient as a co-initiator compared to EDMAB. The addition of DPIHP as the third component into either CQ/EDMAB or CQ/DMAEMA photo-initiating systems led to comparable performance in both the hydrophobic- and hydrophilic-rich phases. The addition of the iodonium salt significantly improved the photopolymerization of the hydrophilic-rich phase; the latter exhibited extremely poor polymerization when the iodonium salt was not included in the formulation. The partition concentration of EDMAB in the hydrophilic-rich phase was significantly lower than that of DMAEMA or DPIHP. This study indicates the need for a combination of hydrophobic/hydrophilic photosensitizer and addition of iodonium salt to improve polymerization within the hydrophilic-rich phase of the dental adhesive.

  17. Phase I/II study of sagopilone (ZK-EPO) plus carboplatin in women with recurrent platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    McMeekin, S; Patel, R; Verschraegen, C; Celano, P; Burke, J; Plaxe, S; Ghatage, P; Giurescu, M; Stredder, C; Wang, Y; Schmelter, T

    2012-01-01

    Background: Sagopilone is the first fully synthetic epothilone in clinical development and has demonstrated promising preclinical activity. This phase I/II, prospective, open-label trial investigated the efficacy and safety of sagopilone plus carboplatin in patients with recurrent platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer (OC). Methods: In phase I (dose-escalation stage), patients with OC recurring at least 6 months after platinum-containing chemotherapy received 3-h infusions of sagopilone (initial dose of 12 mg m−2) followed by carboplatin every 3 weeks, for 2–6 treatment courses. Patients enrolled in phase II received 3-h infusions of 16 mg m−2 sagopilone. Efficacy was assessed using modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (modRECIST) and Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup CA125 criteria. The safety and tolerability of sagopilone were also evaluated. Results: In all, 45 patients received sagopilone at 12 mg m−2 or 16 mg m−2. There were 29 confirmed tumour responses (21 modRECIST and 8 CA125) across both treatment groups, indicating that the primary objective of the study was reached. The main adverse events (AEs) reported were peripheral neuropathy (75.6%), fatigue (71.1%) and nausea (64.4%). Grade ⩾3 AEs occurred in 35 patients (77.8%). No deaths related to the study drug were reported. Conclusion: Sagopilone in combination with carboplatin was effective and toxicities were manageable in patients with recurrent platinum-sensitive OC. PMID:22108514

  18. Variability in the Propagation Phase of CFD-Based Noise Prediction: Summary of Results From Category 8 of the BANC-III Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopes, Leonard; Redonnet, Stephane; Imamura, Taro; Ikeda, Tomoaki; Zawodny, Nikolas; Cunha, Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    The usage of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) in noise prediction typically has been a two part process: accurately predicting the flow conditions in the near-field and then propagating the noise from the near-field to the observer. Due to the increase in computing power and the cost benefit when weighed against wind tunnel testing, the usage of CFD to estimate the local flow field of complex geometrical structures has become more routine. Recently, the Benchmark problems in Airframe Noise Computation (BANC) workshops have provided a community focus on accurately simulating the local flow field near the body with various CFD approaches. However, to date, little effort has been given into assessing the impact of the propagation phase of noise prediction. This paper includes results from the BANC-III workshop which explores variability in the propagation phase of CFD-based noise prediction. This includes two test cases: an analytical solution of a quadrupole source near a sphere and a computational solution around a nose landing gear. Agreement between three codes was very good for the analytic test case, but CFD-based noise predictions indicate that the propagation phase can introduce 3dB or more of variability in noise predictions.

  19. Integrated Sensing & Controls for Coal Gasification - Development of Model-Based Controls for GE's Gasifier & Syngas Cooler. Topical Rerport for Phase III

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Aditya

    2011-02-17

    This Topical Report for the final Phase III of the program summarizes the results from the Task 3 of the program. In this task, the separately designed extended Kalman Filter (EKF) and model predictive controls (MPC) with ideal sensing, developed in Phase II, were integrated to achieve the overall sensing and control system for the gasification section of an IGCC plant. The EKF and MPC algorithms were updated and re-tuned to achieve closed-loop system stability as well as good steady-state and transient control response. In particular, the performance of the integrated EKF and MPC solution was tested extensively through multiple simulation studies to achieve improved steady-state as well as transient performance, with coal as well as coal-petcoke blended fuel, in the presence of unknown modeling errors as well as sensor errors (noise and bias). The simulation studies demonstrated significant improvements in steady state and transient operation performance, similar to that achieved by MPC with ideal sensors in Phase II of the program.

  20. Drilling, Completion, and Data Collection Plans An Assessment of Geological Carbon Sequestration Options in the Illinois Basin: Phase III

    SciTech Connect

    Malkewicz, Nicholas; Kirksey, Jim; Finley, Robert

    2015-05-01

    Executive Summary The Illinois Basin – Decatur Project (IBDP) is managed by the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) and is led by the Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS) at the University of Illinois. The project site is located on the Archer Daniels Midland Company (ADM) property in Decatur, Illinois, and is a fully integrated carbon capture and storage (CCS) project that uses CO₂ captured from the ethanol-producing fermentation process at the ADM corn-processing plant (Finley et. al., 2013). IBDP has a goal of injecting one million tonnes of CO₂ into the basal sands of the Mt. Simon Sandstone over a three-year period. This is a multifaceted project, and this report details the planning and results of the drilling, completions, well testing, log data acquisition, and the Health, Safety, and Environment (HSE) aspects of the project. Three deep wells were planned for the IBDP: • The injection well: Injection Well #1 (CCS1); • The monitoring well (both in-zone and above seal): Verification Well #1 (VW1); and • The geophone monitoring well: Geophysical Monitoring Well #1 (GM1). The detailed plans for these wells are attached to the appendices of this document. The wells were drilled successfully with little deviation from the original plans. The biggest change from the plan to execution was the need to adjust for larger-than-expected loss of circulation in the Potosi section of the Knox Formation. The completions reports also attached to this document detail the well constructions as they were actually built. Injectivity testing was carried out, and the perforating plans were adjusted based on the results. Additional perforations and acidizing were performed as a result of the injectivity testing. The testing plans are detailed in this report along with the actual testing results. The injectivity testing results were used in the modeling and simulation efforts. Detailed HSE plans were developed and implemented during the planning and

  1. A Prospective Randomised Phase III Clinical Trial Testing the Role of Prophylactic Cranial Radiotherapy in Patients Treated with Trastuzumab for Metastatic Breast Cancer - Anglo Celtic VII.

    PubMed

    Canney, P; Murray, E; Dixon-Hughes, J; Lewsley, L-A; Paul, J

    2015-08-01

    A high incidence of central nervous system (CNS) metastases has been reported in patients with HER2-positive tumours receiving trastuzumab therapy for metastatic breast cancer. This study tested whether prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) could reduce the incidence of CNS metastases in this setting. This was a prospective, randomised phase III trial. Patients were randomised 1:1 to no PCI or PCI delivered at around 6 weeks after study entry. Cognitive function was assessed prospectively. In total, 51 patients were randomised over a 3 year period; 25 received PCI and 26 did not. The cumulative incidence of CNS metastases at 2 years was 32.4% (standard error = 9.8%) on the no PCI arm and 21.0% (standard error = 8.6%) on the PCI arm; the associated hazard ratio was 0.57 (95% confidence interval 0.18-1.74; P = 0.32). There was no evidence of cognitive dysfunction in PCI patients. PMID:25976296

  2. Delafloxacin, a non-zwitterionic fluoroquinolone in Phase III of clinical development: evaluation of its pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and clinical efficacy.

    PubMed

    Van Bambeke, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    Delafloxacin is a fluoroquinolone lacking a basic substituent in position 7. It shows MICs remarkably low against Gram-positive organisms and anaerobes and similar to those of ciprofloxacin against Gram-negative bacteria. It remains active against most fluoroquinolone-resistant strains, except enterococci. Its potency is further increased in acidic environments (found in many infection sites). Delafloxacin is active on staphylococci growing intracellularly or in biofilms. It is currently evaluated as an intravenous and intravenous/oral stepdown therapy in Phase III trials for the treatment of complicated skin/skin structure infections. It was also granted as Qualified Infectious Disease Product for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia, due to its high activity on pneumococci and atypical pathogens. PMID:26119479

  3. Progress and Continuing Challenges in GaSb-based III-V Alloys and Heterostructures Grown by Organometallic Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    CA Wang

    2004-05-06

    This paper discusses progress in the preparation of mid-IR GaSb-based III-V materials grown by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE). The growth of these materials is complex, and fundamental and practical issues associated with their growth are outlined. Approaches that have been explored to further improve the properties and performance are briefly reviewed. Recent materials and device results on GaInAsSb bulk layers and GaInAsSb/AlGaAsSb heterostructures, grown lattice matched to GaSb, are presented. State-of-the-art GaInAsSb materials and thermophotovoltaic devices have been achieved. This progress establishes the high potential of OMVPE for mid-IR GaSb-based devices.

  4. Statistical methodology for the evaluation of vaccine efficacy in a phase III multi-centre trial of the RTS,S/AS01 malaria vaccine in African children

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There has been much debate about the appropriate statistical methodology for the evaluation of malaria field studies and the challenges in interpreting data arising from these trials. Methods The present paper describes, for a pivotal phase III efficacy of the RTS, S/AS01 malaria vaccine, the methods of the statistical analysis and the rationale for their selection. The methods used to estimate efficacy of the primary course of vaccination, and of a booster dose, in preventing clinical episodes of uncomplicated and severe malaria, and to determine the duration of protection, are described. The interpretation of various measures of efficacy in terms of the potential public health impact of the vaccine is discussed. Conclusions The methodology selected to analyse the clinical trial must be scientifically sound, acceptable to regulatory authorities and meaningful to those responsible for malaria control and public health policy. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00866619 PMID:21816030

  5. Phase III trial of chemotherapy using 5-fluorouracil and streptozotocin compared with interferon alpha for advanced carcinoid tumors: FNCLCC-FFCD 9710.

    PubMed

    Dahan, Laetitia; Bonnetain, Frank; Rougier, Philippe; Raoul, Jean-Luc; Gamelin, Eric; Etienne, Pierre-Luc; Cadiot, Guillaume; Mitry, Emmanuel; Smith, Denis; Cvitkovic, Frédérique; Coudert, Bruno; Ricard, Floriane; Bedenne, Laurent; Seitz, Jean-François

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this randomized multicenter phase III trial was to compare chemotherapy and interferon (IFN) in patients with metastatic carcinoid tumors. Patients with documented progressive, unresectable, metastatic carcinoid tumors were randomized between 5-fluorouracil plus streptozotocin (day 1-5) and recombinant IFN-alpha-2a (3 MU x 3 per week). Primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). From February 1998 to June 2004, 64 patients were included. The two arms were well matched for median age, sex ratio, PS 0-1, previous chemotherapy, surgery, or radiotherapy. The median PFS for chemotherapy was 5.5 months versus 14.1 for IFN (hazard ratio=0.75 (0.41-1.36)). Overall survival (OS), tolerance, and effects on carcinoid symptoms were not significantly different. Despite a trend in favor of IFN, there was no difference in PFS and OS in advanced metastatic carcinoid tumors and therapeutic effect of both treatments was mild. PMID:19726540

  6. Phase I/II Trial of Imatinib and Bevacizumab in Patients With Advanced Melanoma and Other Advanced Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Betty K.; Rosen, Mark A.; Amaravadi, Ravi K.; Schuchter, Lynn M.; Gallagher, Maryann; Chen, Helen; Sehgal, Chandra; O’Dwyer, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Vascular endothelial growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor signaling in the tumor microenvironment appear to cooperate in promoting tumor angiogenesis. Patients and Methods. We conducted a phase I trial combining bevacizumab (i.v. every 2 weeks) and imatinib (oral daily). Once a recommended phase II dose combination was established, a phase II trial was initiated in patients with metastatic melanoma. A Simon 2-stage design was used with 23 patients required in the first stage and 41 patients in total should the criteria to proceed be met. We required that 50% of the patients be progression-free at 16 weeks. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and power Doppler ultrasonography were performed in patients with metastatic tumors amenable to imaging with these methods at baseline and after 4 weeks. Results. A total of 17 patients were accrued to 4 dose and combination levels. Bevacizumab 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks could be safely combined with imatinib 800 mg daily. Common toxicities included fatigue, nausea, vomiting, edema, proteinuria, and anemia, but were not commonly severe. A total of 23 patients with metastatic melanoma (48% with American Joint Commission on Cancer stage M1c; median age, 63 years) were enrolled in the first stage of phase II. The 16-week progression-free survival rate was 35%, leading to termination of phase II after the first stage. In the small subset of patients who remained on study with lesions evaluable by DCE-MRI, significant decreases in tumor vascular permeability were noted, despite early disease progression using the Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors. Conclusion. Bevacizumab and imatinib can be safely combined at the maximum doses used for each agent. We did not observe significant clinical activity with this regimen in melanoma patients. Implications for Practice: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-targeted antiangiogenic therapy has proven clinical efficacy as a

  7. Phase I/II Clinical Trial of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Malignant Gliomas: Combined X-Ray Radiotherapy, Chemotherapy, and Carbon Ion Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mizoe, Jun-Etsu Tsujii, Hirohiko; Hasegawa, Azusa D.D.S.; Yanagi, Tsuyoshi; Takagi, Ryo D.D.S.; Kamada, Tadashi; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Takakura, Kintomo

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To report the results of a Phase I/II clinical trial for patients with malignant gliomas, treated with combined X-ray radiotherapy (XRT), chemotherapy, and carbon ion radiotherapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Between October 1994 and February 2002, 48 patients with histologically confirmed malignant gliomas (16 anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) and 32 glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) were enrolled in a Phase I/II clinical study. The treatment involved the application of 50 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks of XRT, followed by CRT at 8 fractions/2 weeks. Nimustine hydrochloride (ACNU) were administered at a dose of 100 mg/m{sup 2} concurrently in weeks 1, 4, or 5 of XRT. The carbon ion dose was increased from 16.8 to 24.8 Gray equivalent (GyE) in 10% incremental steps (16.8, 18.4, 20.0, 22.4, and 24.8 GyE, respectively). Results: There was no Grade 3 or higher acute reaction in the brain. The late reactions included four cases of Grade 2 brain morbidity and four cases of Grade 2 brain reaction among 48 cases. The median survival time (MST) of AA patients was 35 months and that of GBM patients 17 months (p = 0.0035). The median progression-free survival and MST of GBM showed 4 and 7 months for the low-dose group, 7 and 19 months for the middle-dose group, and 14 and 26 months for the high-dose group. Conclusion: The results of combined therapy using XRT, ACNU chemotherapy, and CRT showed the potential efficacy of CRT for malignant gliomas in terms of the improved survival rate in those patients who received higher carbon doses.

  8. Development of standardized laboratory methods and quality processes for a phase III study of the RTS, S/AS01 candidate malaria vaccine

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A pivotal phase III study of the RTS,S/AS01 malaria candidate vaccine is ongoing in several research centres across Africa. The development and establishment of quality systems was a requirement for trial conduct to meet international regulatory standards, as well as providing an important capacity strengthening opportunity for study centres. Methods Standardized laboratory methods and quality assurance processes were implemented at each of the study centres, facilitated by funding partners. Results A robust protocol for determination of parasite density based on actual blood cell counts was set up in accordance with World Health Organization recommendations. Automated equipment including haematology and biochemistry analyzers were put in place with standard methods for bedside testing of glycaemia, base excess and lactacidaemia. Facilities for X-rays and basic microbiology testing were also provided or upgraded alongside health care infrastructure in some centres. External quality assurance assessment of all major laboratory methods was established and method qualification by each laboratory demonstrated. The resulting capacity strengthening has ensured laboratory evaluations are conducted locally to the high standards required in clinical trials. Conclusion Major efforts by study centres, together with support from collaborating parties, have allowed standardized methods and robust quality assurance processes to be put in place for the phase III evaluation of the RTS, S/AS01 malaria candidate vaccine. Extensive training programmes, coupled with continuous commitment from research centre staff, have been the key elements behind the successful implementation of quality processes. It is expected these activities will culminate in healthcare benefits for the subjects and communities participating in these trials. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00866619 PMID:21816032

  9. A phase II trial of RCHOP followed by radioimmunotherapy for early stage (stages I/II) diffuse large B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma: ECOG3402.

    PubMed

    Witzig, Thomas E; Hong, Fangxin; Micallef, Ivana N; Gascoyne, Randy D; Dogan, Ahmet; Wagner, Henry; Kahl, Brad S; Advani, Ranjana H; Horning, Sandra J

    2015-09-01

    Patients with early stage diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) receive RCHOP (rituximab cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone) alone or with involved field radiotherapy (IFRT). Anti-CD20 radioimmunotherapy (RIT) delivers radiation to microscopic sites outside of known disease. This phase II study aimed to achieve a functional complete response (CR) rate of ≥75% to RCHOP and (90) Yttrium-ibritumomab tiuxetan RIT. Patients with stages I/II DLBCL received 4-6 cycles of RCHOP followed by RIT [14·8 MBq/kg (0·4 mCi/kg)]; patients with positron emission tomographypositive sites of disease after RCHOP/RIT received 30 Gy IFRT. Of the 62 patients enrolled; 53 were eligible. 42% (22/53) had stage I/IE; 58% (31/53) stage II/IIE. After RCHOP, 79% (42/53) were in CR/unconfirmed CR. Forty-eight patients proceeded to RIT. One partial responder after RIT received IFRT and achieved a CR. The best response after RCHOP + RIT in all 53 patients was a functional CR rate of 89% (47/53; 95% confidence interval: 77-96%). With a median follow-up of 5·9 years, 7 (13%) patients have progressed and 4 (8%) have died (2 with DLBCL). At 5 years, 78% of patients remain in remission and 94% are alive. Chemoimmunotherapy and RIT is an active regimen for early stage DLBCL patients. Eighty-nine percent of patients achieved functional CR without the requirement of IFRT. This regimen is worthy of further study for early stage DLBCL in a phase III trial. PMID:25974212

  10. Surface decoration of amine-rich carbon nitride with iron nanoparticles for arsenite (As(III)) uptake: The evolution of the Fe-phases under ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Y; Mouzourakis, E; Bourlinos, A B; Zboril, R; Karakassides, M A; Douvalis, A P; Bakas, Th; Deligiannakis, Y

    2016-07-15

    A novel hybrid material (gC3N4-rFe) consisting of amine-rich graphitic carbon nitride (gC3N4), decorated with reduced iron nanoparticles (rFe) is presented. XRD and TEM show that gC3N4-rFe bears aggregation-free Fe-nanoparticles (10nm) uniformly dispersed over the gC3N4 surface. In contrast, non-supported iron nanoparticles are strongly aggregated, with non-uniform size distribution (20-100nm). (57)Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy, dual-mode electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and magnetization measurements, allow a detailed mapping of the evolution of the Fe-phases after exposure to ambient O2. The as-prepared gC3N4-rFe bears Fe(2+) and Fe° phases, however only after long exposure to ambient O2, a Fe-oxide layer is formed around the Fe° core. In this [Fe°/Fe-oxide] core-shell configuration, the gC3N4-rFe hybrid shows enhanced As(III) uptake capacity of 76.5mgg(-1), i.e., ca 90% higher than the unmodified carbonaceous support, and 300% higher than the non-supported Fe-nanoparticles. gC3N4-rFe is a superior As(III) sorbent i.e., compared to its single counterparts or vs. graphite/graphite oxide or activated carbon analogues (11-36mgg(-1)). The present results demonstrate that the gC3N4 matrix is not simply a net that holds the particles, but rather an active component that determines particle formation dynamics and ultimately their redox profile, size and surface dispersion homogeneity. PMID:27037479

  11. The Value of Botox-A in Acute Radiation Proctitis: Results From a Phase I/II Study Using a Three-Dimensional Scoring System

    SciTech Connect

    Vuong, Te; Waschke, Kevin; Niazi, Tamim; Richard, Carole; Parent, Josee; Liberman, Sender; Mayrand, Serge; Loungnarath, Rasmy; Stein, Barry; Devic, Slobodan

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: Acute radiation proctitis (ARP) is a common side effect of pelvic radiotherapy, and its management is challenging in daily practice. The present phase I/II study evaluates the safety and efficacy of the botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) in ARP treatment for rectal cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant high-dose-rate endorectal brachytherapy (HDREBT). Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients, treated with neoadjuvant HDREBT, 26-Gy in 4 fractions, received the study treatment that consisted of a single injection of BTX-A into the rectal wall. The injection was performed post-HDREBT and prior to the development of ARP. The control group, 20 such patients, did not receive the BTX-A injection. Both groups had access to standard treatment with hydrocortisone rectal aerosol foam (Cortifoam) and anti-inflammatory and narcotic medication. The ARP was clinically evaluated by self-administered daily questionnaires using visual analog scores to document frequency and urgency of bowel movements, rectal burning/tenesmus, and pain symptoms before and after HDREBT. Results: At the time of this analysis, there was no observed systemic toxicity. Patient compliance with the self-administered questionnaire was 100% from week 1 to 4, 70% during week 5, and 40% during week 6. The maximum tolerated dose was established at the 100-U dose level, and noticeable mean differences were observed in bowel frequency (p = 0.016), urgency (p = 0.007), and pain (p = 0.078). Conclusions: This study confirms the feasibility and efficacy of BTX-A intervention at 100-U dose level for study patients compared to control patients. A phase III study with this dose level is planned to validate these results.

  12. Analysis of Regional Timelines To Set Up a Global Phase III Clinical Trial in Breast Cancer: The Adjuvant Lapatinib and/or Trastuzumab Treatment Optimization Experience

    PubMed Central

    de Azambuja, Evandro; Bradbury, Ian; Saini, Kamal S.; Bines, José; Simon, Sergio D.; Dooren, Veerle Van; Aktan, Gursel; Pritchard, Kathleen I.; Wolff, Antonio C.; Smith, Ian; Jackisch, Christian; Lang, Istvan; Untch, Michael; Boyle, Frances; Xu, Binghe; Baselga, Jose; Perez, Edith A.; Piccart-Gebhart, Martine

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. This study measured the time taken for setting up the different facets of Adjuvant Lapatinib and/or Trastuzumab Treatment Optimization (ALTTO), an international phase III study being conducted in 44 participating countries. Methods. Time to regulatory authority (RA) approval, time to ethics committee/institutional review board (EC/IRB) approval, time from study approval by EC/IRB to first randomized patient, and time from first to last randomized patient were prospectively collected in the ALTTO study. Analyses were conducted by grouping countries into either geographic regions or economic classes as per the World Bank's criteria. Results. South America had a significantly longer time to RA approval (median: 236 days, range: 21–257 days) than Europe (median: 52 days, range: 0–151 days), North America (median: 26 days, range: 22–30 days), and Asia-Pacific (median: 62 days, range: 37–75 days). Upper-middle economies had longer times to RA approval (median: 123 days, range: 21–257 days) than high-income (median: 47 days, range: 0–112 days) and lower-middle income economies (median: 57 days, range: 37–62 days). No significant difference was observed for time to EC/IRB approval across the studied regions (median: 59 days, range 0–174 days). Overall, the median time from EC/IRB approval to first recruited patient was 169 days (range: 26–412 days). Conclusion. This study highlights the long time intervals required to activate a global phase III trial. Collaborative research groups, pharmaceutical industry sponsors, and regulatory authorities should analyze the current system and enter into dialogue for optimizing local policies. This would enable faster access of patients to innovative therapies and enhance the efficiency of clinical research. PMID:23359433

  13. Phase III Trial of Bevacizumab Plus Interferon Alfa Versus Interferon Alfa Monotherapy in Patients With Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: Final Results of CALGB 90206

    PubMed Central

    Rini, Brian I.; Halabi, Susan; Rosenberg, Jonathan E.; Stadler, Walter M.; Vaena, Daniel A.; Archer, Laura; Atkins, James N.; Picus, Joel; Czaykowski, Piotr; Dutcher, Janice; Small, Eric J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Bevacizumab is an antibody that binds vascular endothelial growth factor and has activity in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Interferon alfa (IFN-α) is the historic standard initial treatment for RCC. A prospective, randomized, phase III trial of bevacizumab plus IFN-α versus IFN-α monotherapy was conducted. Patients and Methods Patients with previously untreated, metastatic clear cell RCC were randomly assigned to receive either bevacizumab (10 mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks) plus IFN-α (9 million units subcutaneously three times weekly) or the same dose and schedule of IFN-α monotherapy in a multicenter phase III trial. The primary end point was overall survival (OS). Secondary end points were progression-free survival (PFS), objective response rate, and safety. Results Seven hundred thirty-two patients were enrolled. The median OS time was 18.3 months (95% CI, 16.5 to 22.5 months) for bevacizumab plus IFN-α and 17.4 months (95% CI, 14.4 to 20.0 months) for IFN-α monotherapy (unstratified log-rank P = .097). Adjusting on stratification factors, the hazard ratio was 0.86 (95% CI, 0.73 to 1.01; stratified log-rank P = .069) favoring bevacizumab plus IFN-α. There was significantly more grade 3 to 4 hypertension (HTN), anorexia, fatigue, and proteinuria for bevacizumab plus IFN-α. Patients who developed HTN on bevacizumab plus IFN-α had a significantly improved PFS and OS versus patients without HTN. Conclusion OS favored the bevacizumab plus IFN-α arm but did not meet the predefined criteria for significance. HTN may be a biomarker of outcome with bevacizumab plus IFN-α. PMID:20368558

  14. Estimation of drug cost avoidance and pathology cost avoidance through participation in NCIC Clinical Trials Group phase III clinical trials in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Tang, P.A.; Hay, A.E.; O’Callaghan, C.J.; Mittmann, N.; Chambers, C.R.; Pater, J.L.; Leighl, N.B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cost avoidance occurs when, because of provision of a drug therapy [drug cost avoidance (dca)] or a pathology test [pathology cost avoidance (pca)] during trial participation, health care payers need not pay for standard treatments or testing. The aim of our study was to estimate the total dca and pca for Canadian patients enrolled in relevant phase iii trials conducted by the ncic Clinical Trials Group. Methods Phase iii trials that had completed accrual and resulted in dca or pca were identified. The pca was calculated based on the number of patients screened and the test cost. The dca was estimated based on patients randomized, the protocol dosing regimen, drug cost, median dose intensity, and median duration of therapy. Costs are presented in Canadian dollars. No adjustment was made for inflation. Results From 1999 to 2011, 4 trials (1479 patients) resulted in pca and 17 trials (3195 patients) resulted in dca. The total pca was estimated at $4,194,849, which included testing for KRAS ($141,058), microsatellite instability ($18,600), and 21-gene recurrence score ($4,035,191). The total dca was estimated at $27,952,512, of which targeted therapy constituted 43% (five trials). The combined pca and dca was $32,147,361. Conclusions Over the study period, trials conducted by the ncic Clinical Trials Group resulted in total cost avoidance (pca and dca) of approximately $7,518 per patient. Although not all trials lead to cost avoidance, such savings should be taken account when the financial impact of conducting clinical research is being considered. PMID:26985151

  15. Effects of Mg/Ga and V/III source ratios on hole concentration of N-polar (000\\bar{1}) p-type GaN grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonoda, Ryohei; Shojiki, Kanako; Tanikawa, Tomoyuki; Kuboya, Shigeyuki; Katayama, Ryuji; Matsuoka, Takashi

    2016-05-01

    The effects of growth conditions such as Mg/Ga and V/III ratios on the properties of N-polar (000\\bar{1}) p-type GaN grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy were studied. Photoluminescence spectra from Mg-doped GaN depended on Mg/Ga and V/III ratios. For the lightly doped samples, the band-to-acceptor emission was observed at 3.3 eV and its relative intensity decreased with increasing V/III ratio. For the heavily doped samples, the donor-acceptor pair emission was observed at 2.8 eV and its peak intensity monotonically decreased with V/III ratio. The hole concentration was maximum for the Mg/Ga ratio. This is the same tendency as in group-III polar (0001) growth. The V/III ratio also reduced the hole concentration. The higher V/III ratio reduced the concentration of residual donors such as oxygen by substituting nitrogen atoms. The surface became rougher with increasing V/III ratio and the hillock density increased.

  16. Fe3O4@ZrO2 nanoparticles magnetic solid phase extraction coupled with flame atomic absorption spectrometry for chromium(III) speciation in environmental and biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yi-Wei; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Jun-Feng; Chen, Lin; Deng, Zhen-Li; Han, Mu-Xian; Wei, Xiao-Shu; Yu, Ai-Min; Zhang, Hai-Li

    2012-07-01

    A new method for Cr(III) speciation in seven kinds of environmental and biological samples by Fe3O4@ZrO2 nanoparticles magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) and flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) has been developed. Fe3O4@ZrO2 nanoparticles were simply prepared by sol-gel method, and the adsorptive behaviors of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) on Fe3O4@ZrO2 nanoparticles were assessed. At pH 8.0-9.0, Fe3O4@ZrO2 nanoparticles were selective towards Cr(III) but hardly Cr(VI). The retained Cr(III) was subsequently eluted with 3.0 mL of 0.5 mol L-1 HNO3 followed by magnetic decantation. Total chromium was determined after reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) by ascorbic acid. Various parameters affecting Fe3O4@ZrO2 nanoparticles MSPE were optimized systematically. Under the optimum conditions, the adsorption capacity of Fe3O4@ZrO2 nanoparticles for Cr(III) is 24.5 mg g-1. With an enrichment factor (EF) of 25, detection limit of Cr(III) was 0.69 ng mL-1, and the proposed method has been successfully applied for Cr(III) speciation in seven kinds of environmental and biological samples with satisfactory results.

  17. Human exposure assessment to a large set of polymer additives through the analysis of urine by solid phase extraction followed by ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pouech, Charlène; Kiss, Agneta; Lafay, Florent; Léonard, Didier; Wiest, Laure; Cren-Olivé, Cécile; Vulliet, Emmanuelle

    2015-12-01

    Polymer items are extensively present in the human environment. Humans may be consequently exposed to some compounds, such as additives, incorporated in these items. The objective of this work is to assess the human exposure to the main additives such as those authorized in the packaging for pharmaceutical products. The urinary matrix was selected to optimally answer this challenge because it has already been proven that the exposure to chemicals can be revealed by the analysis of this biological matrix. A multi-residue analytical method for the trace analysis at ng/mL in human urine was developed, and consisted of an extraction of analytes from urine by solid phase extraction (SPE) and an analysis by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to a tandem mass spectrometer (UHPLC-MS/MS). Even if the quantification of these compounds was an analytical challenge because of (i) the presence of these substances in the analytical process, (ii) the diversity of their physicochemical properties, and (iii) the complexity of the matrix, the optimized method exhibited quantification limits lower than 25ng/mL and recoveries between 51% and 120% for all compounds. The method was validated and applied to 52 human urines. To the best of our knowledge, this work presents the first study allowing the assessment of the occurrence of more than twenty polymer additives at ng/mL in human urine. PMID:26554294

  18. Deformation-induced ω phase in modified Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr alloy by Cr addition.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Niinomi, Mitsuo; Hieda, Junko; Nakai, Masaaki; Cho, Ken

    2013-08-01

    For spinal-fixation applications, implants should have a high Young's modulus to reduce springback during operations, though a low Young's modulus is required to prevent stress shielding for patients after surgeries. In the present study, Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr alloy (TNTZ) with a low Young's modulus was modified by adding Cr to obtain a higher deformation-induced Young's modulus in order to satisfy these contradictory requirements. Two newly designed alloys, TNTZ-8Ti-2Cr and TNTZ-16Ti-4Cr, possess more stable β phases than TNTZ. These alloys consist of single β phases and exhibit relatively low Young's moduli of <65GPa after solution treatment. However, after cold rolling, they exhibit higher Young's moduli owing to a deformation-induced ω-phase transformation. These modified TNTZ alloys show significantly less springback than the original TNTZ alloy based on tensile and bending loading-unloading tests. Thus, the Cr-added TNTZ alloys are beneficial for spinal-fixation applications. PMID:23624220

  19. From the Disordered State to the Frank-Kasper Sigma Phase: Readily Tuning the Phase Behavior of Block Polymers via Lithium Salt Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwin, Matthew; Hickey, Robert; Bates, Frank; Lodge, Timothy

    Sphere-forming block copolymers have long been known to assemble onto a body-centered cubic (BCC) lattice, but recent work has demonstrated that with the correct thermal treatments, more exotic morphologies such as dodecagonal quasicrystals or the Frank-Kasper sigma phase can be observed. In this presentation, we show that a similar variety of morphologies can be obtained by simply adding small amounts of lithium bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide (LiTFSI), which preferentially partitions into one of the domains. Using small-angle X-ray scattering, we have found that block copolymers, which are disordered when neat, can form spheres with liquid-like packing, BCC crystals, the Frank-Kasper sigma phase, or hexagonally close packed crystals upon increasing the salt loading. This work demonstrates a unique, alternative route to highly segregated sphere-forming block copolymers and examines the universality of the formation of these complex morphologies.

  20. Follow-up of phase I trial of adalimumab and rosiglitazone in FSGS: III. Report of the FONT study group

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients with resistant primary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) are at high risk of progression to chronic kidney disease stage V. Antifibrotic agents may slow or halt this process. We present outcomes of follow-up after a Phase I trial of adalimumab and rosiglitazone, antifibrotic drugs tested in the Novel Therapies in Resistant FSGS (FONT) study. Methods 21 patients -- 12 males and 9 females, age 16.0 ± 7.5 yr, and estimated GFR (GFRe) 121 ± 56 mL/min/1.73 m2 -- received adalimumab (n = 10), 24 mg/m2 every 14 days or rosiglitazone (n = 11), 3 mg/m2 per day for 16 weeks. The change in GFRe per month prior to entry and after completion of the Phase I trial was compared. Results 19 patients completed the 16-week FONT treatment phase. The observation period pre-FONT was 18.3 ± 10.2 months and 16.1 ± 5.7 months after the study. A similar percentage of patients, 71% and 56%, in the rosiglitazone and adalimumab cohorts, respectively, had stabilization in GFRe, defined as a reduced negative slope of the line plotting GFRe versus time without requiring renal replacement therapy after completion of the FONT treatment period (P = 0.63). Conclusion Nearly 50% of patients with resistant FSGS who receive novel antifibrotic agents may have a legacy effect with delayed deterioration in kidney function after completion of therapy. Based on this proof-of-concept preliminary study, we recommend long-term follow-up of patients enrolled in clinical trials to ascertain a more comprehensive assessment of the efficacy of experimental treatments. PMID:20113498

  1. Linear canonical transformations of coherent and squeezed states in the Wigner phase space. III - Two-mode states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, D.; Kim, Y. S.; Noz, Marilyn E.

    1990-01-01

    It is shown that the basic symmetry of two-mode squeezed states is governed by the group SP(4) in the Wigner phase space which is locally isomorphic to the (3 + 2)-dimensional Lorentz group. This symmetry, in the Schroedinger picture, appears as Dirac's two-oscillator representation of O(3,2). It is shown that the SU(2) and SU(1,1) interferometers exhibit the symmetry of this higher-dimensional Lorentz group. The mathematics of two-mode squeezed states is shown to be applicable to other branches of physics including thermally excited states in statistical mechanics and relativistic extended hadrons in the quark model.

  2. Spectrally resolved and phase-sensitive far-field measurement for the coherent addition of laser pulses in a tiled grating compressor.

    PubMed

    Hornung, Marco; Bödefeld, Ragnar; Kessler, Alexander; Hein, Joachim; Kaluza, Malte C

    2010-06-15

    We describe a method that can be used for the coherent addition of laser pulses. As different laser pulses are initially generated in a laser-pulse compressor equipped with a tiled grating, such a coherent addition is indispensable in order to maximize the intensity in the laser far field. We present measurements in this context where, up to now, an unavoidable difference in the grating constants between the phased gratings reduced the maximum achievable intensity. The method significantly facilitates the high-precision alignment of a tiled grating compressor and could also be used for a coherent addition of laser pulses. PMID:20548390

  3. Phase III randomized study of fotemustine and dacarbazine versus dacarbazine with or without interferon-α in advanced malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The effect of the addition of fotemustine and/or interferon (IFN) to standard therapy with dacarbazine alone in patients with advanced malignant melanoma was investigated in a multicenter, randomized 2x2 factorial design trial. Methods A total of 260 patients were randomly assigned to one of four treatment groups: (A) fotemustine and dacarbazine repeated on 3-week cycle; (B) same treatment as (A) plus IFN-α2b three times per week; (C) dacarbazine alone repeated on 3-week cycle; (D) same treatment as (C) plus IFN-α2b three times per week. Two comparisons were planned to assess the efficacy of fotemustine (groups A+B vs. C+D) and IFN-α2b (groups A+C vs. B+D). Results Addition of fotemustine did not significantly improve overall survival (OS) (p=0.28) or progression-free survival (PFS) (p=0.55); Hazard ratio (HR) for OS was 0.93 (95% CI 0.71-1.21). Similarly, addition of IFN-α2b did not improve OS (p=0.68) or PFS (p=0.65); HR for OS was 0.92 (95% CI 0.70-1.20). Overall response rate was not improved by the addition of either fotemustine (p=0.87) or IFN-α2b (p=0.57). The combination of all three drugs resulted in the highest occurrence of adverse events. Conclusions No significant improvement in outcomes were observed with the addition of either fotemustine or IFN-α2b to dacarbazine. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01359956 PMID:23402397

  4. Optimization of the β-Elimination/Michael Addition Chemistry on Reversed-Phase Supports for Mass Spectrometry Analysis of O-Linked Protein Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Nika, Heinz; Nieves, Edward; Hawke, David H.; Angeletti, Ruth Hogue

    2013-01-01

    We previously adapted the β-elimination/Michael addition chemistry to solid-phase derivatization on reversed-phase supports, and demonstrated the utility of this reaction format to prepare phosphoseryl peptides in unfractionated protein digests for mass spectrometric identification and facile phosphorylation-site determination. Here, we have expanded the use of this technique to β-N-acetylglucosamine peptides, modified at serine/threonine, phosphothreonyl peptides, and phosphoseryl/phosphothreonyl peptides, followed in sequence by proline. The consecutive β-elimination with Michael addition was adapted to optimize the solid-phase reaction conditions for throughput and completeness of derivatization. The analyte remained intact during derivatization and was recovered efficiently from the silica-based, reversed-phase support with minimal sample loss. The general use of the solid-phase approach for enzymatic dephosphorylation was demonstrated with phosphoseryl and phosphothreonyl peptides and was used as an orthogonal method to confirm the identity of phosphopeptides in proteolytic mixtures. The solid-phase approach proved highly suitable to prepare substrates from low-level amounts of protein digests for phosphorylation-site determination by chemical-targeted proteolysis. The solid-phase protocol provides for a simple, robust, and efficient tool to prepare samples for phosphopeptide identification in MALDI mass maps of unfractionated protein digests, using standard equipment available in most biological laboratories. The use of a solid-phase analytical platform is expected to be readily expanded to prepare digest from O-glycosylated- and O-sulfonated proteins for mass spectrometry-based structural characterization. PMID:23997661

  5. Comparison of the performance of non-ionic and anionic surfactants as mobile phase additives in the RPLC analysis of basic drugs.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Ángel, María J; García-Álvarez-Coque, María C

    2011-03-01

    Surfactants added to the mobile phases in reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) give rise to a modified stationary phase, due to the adsorption of surfactant monomers. Depending on the surfactant nature (ionic or non-ionic), the coated stationary phase can exhibit a positive net charge, or just change its polarity remaining neutral. Also, micelles in the mobile phase introduce new sites for solute interaction. This affects the chromatographic behavior, especially in the case of basic compounds. Two surfactants of different nature, the non-ionic Brij-35 and the anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) added to water or aqueous-organic mixtures, are here compared in the separation of basic compounds (β-blockers and tricyclic antidepressants). The reversible/irreversible adsorption of the monomers of both surfactants on the stationary phase was examined. The changes in the nature of the chromatographic system using different columns and chromatographic conditions were followed based on the changes in retention and peak shape. The study revealed that Brij-35 is suitable for analyzing basic compounds of intermediate polarity, using "green chemistry", since the addition of an organic solvent is not needed and Brij-35 is a biodegradable surfactant. In contrast, RPLC with hydro-organic mixtures or mobile phases containing SDS required high concentrations of organic solvents. PMID:21328695

  6. Silicon materials task of the low cost solar array project (Phase III). Effects of impurities and processing on silicon solar cells. Phase III summary and seventeenth quarterly report, Volume 2: analysis of impurity behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, R.H.; Davis, J.R.; Rohatgi, A.; Campbell, R.B.; Blais, P.D.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Stapleton, R.E.; Mollenkopf, H.C.; McCormick, J.R.

    1980-01-23

    The object of this phase of the program has been to investigate the effects of various processes, metal contaminants and contaminant-process interactions on the properties of silicon and on the performance of terrestrial silicon solar cells. The study encompassed topics including thermochemical (gettering) treatments, base doping concentration, base doping type (n vs. p), grain boundary-impurity interaction, non-uniformity of impurity distribution, long term effects of impurities, as well as synergic and complexing phenomena. The program approach consists in: (1) the growth of doubly and multiply-doped silicon single crystals containing a baseline boron or phosphorus dopant and specific impurities which produce deep levels in the forbidden band gap; (2) assessment of these crystals by chemical, microstructural, electrical and solar cell tests; (3) correlation of the impurity type and concentration with crystal quality and device performance; and (4) delineation of the role of impurities and processing on subsequent silicon solar cell performance. The overall results reported are based on the assessment of nearly 200 silicon ingots. (WHK)

  7. 78 FR 32224 - Availability of Version 3.1.2 of the Connect America Fund Phase II Cost Model; Additional...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ... as part of the Model Design PN, 77 FR 38804, June 29, 2012, of the possible significant economic...). See Electronic Filing of Documents in Rulemaking Proceedings, 63 FR 24121, May 1, 1998. Electronic...; Additional Discussion Topics in Connect America Cost Model Virtual Workshop AGENCY: Federal...

  8. ENHANCED GROWTH RATE AND SILANE UTILIZATION IN AMORPHOUS SILICON AND NANOCRYSTALLINE-SILICON SOLAR CELL DEPOSITION VIA GAS PHASE ADDITIVES

    SciTech Connect

    Ridgeway, R G; Hegedus, S S; Podraza, N J

    2012-08-31

    Air Products set out to investigate the impact of additives on the deposition rate of both CSi and Si-H films. One criterion for additives was that they could be used in conventional PECVD processing, which would require sufficient vapor pressure to deliver material to the process chamber at the required flow rates. The flow rate required would depend on the size of the substrate onto which silicon films were being deposited, potentially ranging from 200 mm diameter wafers to the 5.7 m2 glass substrates used in GEN 8.5 flat-panel display tools. In choosing higher-order silanes, both disilane and trisilane had sufficient vapor pressure to withdraw gas at the required flow rates of up to 120 sccm. This report presents results obtained from testing at Air Products electronic technology laboratories, located in Allentown, PA, which focused on developing processes on a commercial IC reactor using silane and mixtures of silane plus additives. These processes were deployed to compare deposition rates and film properties with and without additives, with a goal of maximizing the deposition rate while maintaining or improving film properties.

  9. Phase II Results of RTOG 0537: A Phase II/III Study Comparing Acupuncture-like Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation Versus Pilocarpine in Treating Early Radiation-Induced Xerostomia

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Raimond K. W.; James, Jennifer L.; Sagar, Stephen; Wyatt, Gwen; Nguyen-Tân, Phuc Felix; Singh, Anurag K.; Lukaszczyk, Barbara; Cardinale, Francis; Yeh, Alexander M.; Berk, Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This phase II component of a multi-institutional phase II/III randomized trial assessed the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of acupuncture-like transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (ALTENS) in reducing radiation-induced xerostomia. Methods Head and neck cancer patients who were 3–24 months from completing radiotherapy ± chemotherapy (RT±C) and experiencing xerostomia symptoms with basal whole saliva production ≥0.1 ml/min and without recurrence were eligible. Patients received twice weekly ALTENS sessions (24 over 12 weeks) using a Codetron™ unit. The primary objective assessed the feasibility of ALTENS treatment. A patient was considered compliant if 19/24 ALTENS were delivered, with a targeted 85% compliance rate. Secondary objectives measured treatment-related toxicities and ALTENS effect on overall radiation-induced xerostomia burden using the University of Michigan Xerostomia-Related Quality of Life Scale (XeQOLS). Results Of 48 accrued patients, 47 were evaluable. Median age was 60 years; 84% were male, 70% completed RT±C for > 12 months and 21% had received prior pilocarpine. All ALTENS sessions were completed in 34 patients, but 9 and 1 completed 20–23 and 19 sessions respectively, representing a 94% total compliance rate. 6-month XeQOLS scores were available for 35 patients; 30 (86%) achieved a positive treatment response with a mean reduction of 35.9% (SD 36.1). Five patients developed grade 1–2 gastrointestinal toxicity and one had grade 1 pain event. Conclusions ALTENS treatment for radiation-induced xerostomia can be uniformly delivered in a cooperative multicenter setting and has possible beneficial treatment response. Given these results, the phase III component of this study was initiated. PMID:22252927

  10. Quantum dynamics calculations using symmetrized, orthogonal Weyl-Heisenberg wavelets with a phase space truncation scheme. III. Representations and calculations.

    PubMed

    Poirier, Bill; Salam, A

    2004-07-22

    In a previous paper [J. Theo. Comput. Chem. 2, 65 (2003)], one of the authors (B.P.) presented a method for solving the multidimensional Schrodinger equation, using modified Wilson-Daubechies wavelets, and a simple phase space truncation scheme. Unprecedented numerical efficiency was achieved, enabling a ten-dimensional calculation of nearly 600 eigenvalues to be performed using direct matrix diagonalization techniques. In a second paper [J. Chem. Phys. 121, 1690 (2004)], and in this paper, we extend and elaborate upon the previous work in several important ways. The second paper focuses on construction and optimization of the wavelength functions, from theoretical and numerical viewpoints, and also examines their localization. This paper deals with their use in representations and eigenproblem calculations, which are extended to 15-dimensional systems. Even higher dimensionalities are possible using more sophisticated linear algebra techniques. This approach is ideally suited to rovibrational spectroscopy applications, but can be used in any context where differential equations are involved. PMID:15260721

  11. Phase I/II Study of the Antibody-Drug Conjugate Glembatumumab Vedotin in Patients With Advanced Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Ott, Patrick A.; Hamid, Omid; Pavlick, Anna C.; Kluger, Harriet; Kim, Kevin B.; Boasberg, Peter D.; Simantov, Ronit; Crowley, Elizabeth; Green, Jennifer A.; Hawthorne, Thomas; Davis, Thomas A.; Sznol, Mario; Hwu, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The antibody-drug conjugate glembatumumab vedotin links a fully human immunoglobulin G2 monoclonal antibody against the melanoma-related glycoprotein NMB (gpNMB) to the potent cytotoxin monomethyl auristatin E. This study evaluated the safety and activity of glembatumumab vedotin in patients with advanced melanoma. Patients and Methods Patients received glembatumumab vedotin every 3 weeks (schedule 1) in a dose escalation and phase II expansion at the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD). Dosing during 2 of 3 weeks (schedule 2) and weekly (schedule 3) was also assessed. The primary end points were safety and pharmacokinetics. The secondary end points included antitumor activity, gpNMB expression, and immunogenicity. Results One hundred seventeen patients were treated using schedule 1 (n = 79), schedule 2 (n = 15), or schedule 3 (n = 23). The MTDs were 1.88, 1.5, and 1.0 mg/kg for schedules 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Grade 3/4 treatment-related toxicities that occurred in two or more patients included rash, neutropenia, fatigue, neuropathy, arthralgia, myalgia, and diarrhea. Three treatment-related deaths (resulting from pneumococcal sepsis, toxic epidermal necrolysis, and renal failure) occurred at doses exceeding the MTDs. In the schedule 1 phase II expansion cohort (n = 34), five patients (15%) had a partial response and eight patients (24%) had stable disease for ≥ 6 months. The objective response rate (ORR) was 2 of 6 (33%) for the schedule 2 MTD and 3 of 12 (25%) for the schedule 3 MTD. Rash was correlated with a greater ORR and improved progression-free survival. Conclusion Glembatumumab vedotin is active in advanced melanoma. The schedule 1 MTD (1.88 mg/kg once every 3 weeks) was associated with a promising ORR and was generally well tolerated. More frequent dosing was potentially associated with a greater ORR but increased toxicity. PMID:25267741

  12. Nanostructures produced by phase-separation during growth of (III-V).sub.1-x(IV.sub.2).sub.x alloys

    DOEpatents

    Norman, Andrew G.; Olson, Jerry M.

    2007-06-12

    Nanostructures (18) and methods for production thereof by phase separation during metal organic vapor-phase epitaxy (MOVPE). An embodiment of one of the methods may comprise providing a growth surface in a reaction chamber and introducing a first mixture of precursor materials into the reaction chamber to form a buffer layer (12) thereon. A second mixture of precursor materials may be provided into the reaction chamber to form an active region (14) on the buffer layer (12), wherein the nanostructure (18) is embedded in a matrix (16) in the active region (14). Additional steps are also disclosed for preparing the nanostructure (18) product for various applications.

  13. An Unexpected Observation Concerning the Effect of Anionic Additives on the Retention Behavior of Basic Drugs and Peptides in Reversed-Phase Liquid Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoli; Carr, Peter W.

    2011-01-01

    Anionic species with ion pair forming ability are commonly used to enhance the retention and efficiency of basic analytes in RPLC separations. However, little is known about the interactions between organic mobile phase modifiers and such ion pairing anions. In this work, we measured the magnitude of the retention increase of basic drugs and peptides upon addition of strong inorganic ion pairing anions (e.g. perchlorate) as a function of the volume fraction of modifier in acidic water-acetonitrile mobile phases on two different stationary phases. We found that the increase in retention upon addition of various salts depended strongly on the eluent strength. In general, larger retention increases upon addition of the anion were observed at higher organic fractions. Regression of retention against the volume fraction of organic modifier indicated that the ion pair forming anions substantially decreased S values while only slightly changing ln k’w values. The decrease in S is the major cause of the retention increase of basic drugs and peptides when such anions are added to the mobile phase. PMID:17448482

  14. Structure and Three-Dimensional Crystal Packing Preferences for mer-Tris (8-quinolinolato) Indium (III) Vapor-Phase-Grown Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Sapochak, Linda S.; Ranasinghe, Asanga; Kohlmann, Holger; Ferris, Kim F.; Burrows, Paul E.

    2004-02-10

    Evaluation of indium(III) tris(8-quinolinolato) (Inq3) chelate crystals grown slowly from the vapor phase under vacuum ({approx}10-6 Torr) was compared to the aluminum analogue, Alq3. In both cases, a previously unidentified close - interaction is identified, which likely impacts charge conduction. In the case of Inq3, we observe a mixture of both meridianal (mer) and facial (fac) crystals. The larger pseudohexagon mer-Inq3 crystals were analyzed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and showed average In-N and In-O bond lengths significantly longer (0.22 and 0.26 ?, respectively) than Alq3 and bond angles about the In3+ ion more distorted from an ideal octahedral geometry. The crystalline packing of mer-Inq3 is found to closely resemble the -Alq3 phase, where both metal chelates are characterized by pairing of symmetry-related mer-optical isomers in three-dimensional - stacking interactions ({approx}3.5 ? or less). The smaller needlelike crystals were determined to be pure fac-Inq3 by powder X-ray diffraction studies. An equivalent is not observed when Alq3 is processed in an identical manner.

  15. Treatment-Related Death in Patients with Small-Cell Lung Cancer in Phase III Trials over the Last Two Decades

    PubMed Central

    Ochi, Nobuaki; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Takigawa, Nagio; Oze, Isao; Fujiwara, Yoshiro; Ichihara, Eiki; Hisamoto, Akiko; Tabata, Masahiro; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Treatment-related death (TRD) remains a serious problem in small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), despite recent improvements in supportive care. However, few studies have formally assessed time trends in the proportion of TRD over the past two decades. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and pattern of TRD over time. Methods We examined phase 3 trials conducted between 1990 and 2010 to address the role of systemic treatment for SCLC. The time trend was assessed using linear regression analysis. Results In total, 97 trials including nearly 25,000 enrolled patients were analyzed. The overall TRD proportion was 2.95%. Regarding the time trend, while it was not statistically significant, it tended to decrease, with a 0.138% decrease per year and 2.76% decrease per two decades. The most common cause of death was febrile neutropenia without any significant time trend in its incidence over the years examined (p = 0.139). However, deaths due to febrile neutropenia as well as all causes in patients treated with non-platinum chemotherapy increased significantly (p = 0.033). Conclusions The overall TRD rate has been low, but not negligible, in phase III trials for SCLC over the past two decades. PMID:22880112

  16. ACRIM III

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-12-30

    ACRIM III Data and Information Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance ... the ACRIMSAT spacecraft on December 20, 1999. ACRIM III data are reprocessed every 90 days to utilize instrument recalibration.   ... ACRIM III Instrument Team Page ACRIM II Data Sets SCAR-B Block:  SCAR-B Products ...

  17. Group additive values for the gas-phase standard enthalpy of formation, entropy and heat capacity of oxygenates.

    PubMed

    Paraskevas, Paschalis D; Sabbe, Maarten K; Reyniers, Marie-Françoise; Papayannakos, Nikos; Marin, Guy B

    2013-11-25

    A complete and consistent set of 60 Benson group additive values (GAVs) for oxygenate molecules and 97 GAVs for oxygenate radicals is provided, which allow to describe their standard enthalpies of formation, entropies and heat capacities. Approximately half of the GAVs for oxygenate molecules and the majority of the GAVs for oxygenate radicals have not been reported before. The values are derived from an extensive and accurate database of thermochemical data obtained by ab initio calculations at the CBS-QB3 level of theory for 202 molecules and 248 radicals. These compounds include saturated and unsaturated, α- and β-branched, mono- and bifunctional oxygenates. Internal rotations were accounted for by using one-dimensional hindered rotor corrections. The accuracy of the database was further improved by adding bond additive corrections to the CBS-QB3 standard enthalpies of formation. Furthermore, 14 corrections for non-nearest-neighbor interactions (NNI) were introduced for molecules and 12 for radicals. The validity of the constructed group additive model was established by comparing the predicted values with both ab initio calculated values and experimental data for oxygenates and oxygenate radicals. The group additive method predicts standard enthalpies of formation, entropies, and heat capacities with chemical accuracy, respectively, within 4 kJ mol(-1) and 4 J mol(-1) K(-1) for both ab initio calculated and experimental values. As an alternative, the hydrogen bond increment (HBI) method developed by Lay et al. (T. H. Lay, J. W. Bozzelli, A. M. Dean, E. R. Ritter, J. Phys. Chem.- 1995, 99, 14514) was used to introduce 77 new HBI structures and to calculate their thermodynamic parameters (Δ(f)H°, S°, C(p)°). The GAVs reported in this work can be reliably used for the prediction of thermochemical data for large oxygenate compounds, combining rapid prediction with wide-ranging application. PMID:24123572

  18. [Simultaneous rapid determination of eight food additives in foods by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography].

    PubMed

    Zhang, X Y

    2000-11-01

    A simple and rapid method for the determination of eight food additives by RP-HPLC is described. They were saccharin, aspartame, benzoic acid, sorbic acid, vanillin, caffeine, carmine and sunset yellow. The experiments were carried on Shim-pack CLC-ODS (150 mm x 6.0 mm i.d.) with methanol-20 mmol/L NH4Ac (44:56, V/V; pH 7.0) as the eluent at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. The UV detection wavelength was fixed at 220 nm. The food samples, after precipitation of the impurities with Carrez reagent, were injected directly into the HPLC system. The average recoveries of all the eight additives were between 91.9%-108.5%, and the RSDs were lower than 4% (n = 5). The analysis of a single sample required only 8 min. This method has been successfully applied to the routine analysis of these additives in foods. PMID:12541745

  19. A Phase III, Randomized, Multi-Center, Double-Masked, Matched-Pairs, Active-Controlled Trial to Compare the Efficacy and Safety between Neuramis Deep and Restylane in the Correction of Nasolabial Folds

    PubMed Central

    Pak, Changsik; Park, Jihoon; Hong, Jinmyung; Jeong, Jaehoon; Bang, Saik

    2015-01-01

    Background We conducted this clinical study to compare the efficacy and safety between Neuramis Deep and Restylane in the correction of nasolabial folds. Methods In this phase III, randomized, multi-center, double-masked, matched-pairs, active-controlled trial (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01585220), we evaluated a total of 67 subjects (n=67). All the subjects underwent Neuramis Deep treatment on one side and Restylane on the contralateral side of the bilateral nasolabial folds at a ratio of 1:1. To compare the efficacy of Neuramis Deep and Restylane, we evaluated the Wrinkle Severity Rating Scale scores and those of the Global Aesthetic Improvement Scale. In addition, we compared the safety of Neuramis Deep and Restylane based on adverse events, physical examination, and clinical laboratory tests. Results Neuramis Deep was not inferior in improving the nasolabial folds as compared with Restylane. In addition, there was no significant difference in the efficacy between Neuramis Deep and Restylane. There were no significant differences in safety parameters between Neuramis Deep and Restylane. Conclusions In conclusion, our results indicate that Neuramis Deep may be a safe, effective material for improving the nasolabial folds. However, further studies are warranted to compare the tolerability of Neuramis Deep and Restylane based on histopathologic findings. PMID:26618119

  20. Prognostic significance of S100A4 expression in stage II and III colorectal cancer: results from a population-based series and a randomized phase III study on adjuvant chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Boye, Kjetil; Jacob, Havjin; Frikstad, Kari-Anne M; Nesland, Jahn M; Maelandsmo, Gunhild M; Dahl, Olav; Nesbakken, Arild; Flatmark, Kjersti

    2016-08-01

    Current clinical algorithms are unable to precisely predict which colorectal cancer patients would benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy, and there is a need for novel biomarkers to improve the selection of patients. The metastasis-promoting protein S100A4 predicts poor outcome in colorectal cancer, but whether it could be used to guide clinical decision making remains to be resolved. S100A4 expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in primary colorectal carcinomas from a consecutively collected, population-representative cohort and a randomized phase III study on adjuvant 5-fluorouracil/levamisole. Sensitivity to treatment with 5-fluorouracil in S100A4 knockdown cells was investigated using 2D and 3D cell culture assays. Strong nuclear expression of S100A4 was detected in 19% and 23% of the tumors in the two study cohorts, respectively. In both cohorts, nuclear immunoreactivity was associated with reduced relapse-free (P < 0.001 and P = 0.010) and overall survival (P = 0.046 and P = 0.006) in univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, nuclear S100A4 was a predictor of poor relapse-free survival in the consecutive series (P = 0.002; HR 1.9), but not in the randomized study. Sensitivity to treatment with 5-fluorouracil was not affected by S100A4 expression in in vitro cell culture assays, and there was no indication from subgroup analyses in the randomized study that S100A4 expression was associated with increased benefit of adjuvant treatment with 5-fluorouracil/levamisole. The present study confirms that nuclear S100A4 expression is a negative prognostic biomarker in colorectal cancer, but the clinical utility in selection of patients for adjuvant fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy is limited. PMID:27273130

  1. Georgetown University Integrated Community Energy System (GU-ICES). Phase III, Stage II. Preliminary design. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-11-01

    Results are presented for two elements in the Georgetown University ICES program - the installation of a 2500-kW backpressure steam-turbine generator within a new extension to the heating and cooling plant (cogeneration) and the provision of four additional ash silos for the university's atmospheric fluidized-bed boiler plant (added storage scheme). The preliminary design and supporting documentation for the work items and architectural drawings are presented. Section 1 discusses the basis for the report, followed by sections on: feasibility analysis update; preliminary design documents; instrumentation and testing; revised work management plan; and appendices including outline constructions, turbine-generator prepurchase specification, design calculations, cost estimates, and Potomac Electric Company data. (MCW)

  2. Does Concurrent Radiochemotherapy Affect Cosmetic Results in the Adjuvant Setting After Breast-Conserving Surgery? Results of the ARCOSEIN Multicenter, Phase III Study: Patients' and Doctors' Views

    SciTech Connect

    Toledano, Alain H. . E-mail: alain.toledano@gmail.com; Bollet, Marc A.; Fourquet, Alain; Azria, David; Gligorov, Joseph; Garaud, Pascal; Serin, Daniel; Bosset, Jean-Francois; Miny-Buffet, Joelle; Favre, Anne; Le Foch, Olivier; Calais, Gilles

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the cosmetic results of sequential vs. concurrent adjuvant chemotherapy with radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer, and to compare ratings by patients and physicians. Methods and Materials: From 1996 to 2000, 716 patients with Stage I-II breast cancers were included in a multicenter, Phase III trial (the ARCOSEIN study) comparing, after breast-conserving surgery with axillary dissection, sequential treatment with chemotherapy first followed by radiotherapy vs. chemotherapy administered concurrently with radiotherapy. Cosmetic results with regard to both the overall aspect of the breast and specific changes (color, scar) were evaluated in a total of 214 patients (107 in each arm) by means of questionnaires to both the patient and a physician whose rating was blinded to treatment allocation. Results: Patients' overall satisfaction with cosmesis was not statistically different between the two arms, with approximately 92% with at least satisfactory results (p = 0.72), although differences between the treated and untreated breasts were greater after the concurrent regimen (29% vs. 14% with more than moderate differences; p 0.0015). Physician assessment of overall cosmesis was less favorable, with lower rates of at least satisfactory results in the concurrent arm (60% vs. 85%; p = 0.001). Consequently, the concordance for overall satisfaction with cosmesis between patients and doctors was only fair ({kappa} = 0.62). Conclusion: After breast-conserving surgery, the concurrent use of chemotherapy with radiotherapy is significantly associated with greater differences between the breasts. These differences do not translate into patients' lessened satisfaction with cosmesis.

  3. Effects of Single Low Dose of Dexamethasone before Noncardiac and Nonneurologic Surgery and General Anesthesia on Postoperative Cognitive Dysfunction—A Phase III Double Blind, Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Valeria Fontenelle Angelim; Pietrobon, Ricardo S.; Schmidt, Andre P.; Oses, Jean P.; Portela, Luis V.; Souza, Diogo O.; Vissoci, João Ricardo Nickenig; da Luz, Vinicius Fernando; Trintoni, Leticia Maria de Araujo de Souza; Nielsen, Karen C.; Carmona, Maria José Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is a multifactorial adverse event most frequently in elderly patients. This study evaluated the effect of dexamethasone on POCD incidence after noncardi