Science.gov

Sample records for additional physical processes

  1. Effect of Surface-active Additives on Physical Properties of Slurries of Vapor-process Magnesium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinns, Murray L

    1955-01-01

    The presence of 3 to 5 percent surface-active additive gave the lowest Brookfield apparent viscosity, plastic viscosity, and yield value that were obtained for slurry fuels containing approximately 50 percent vapor-process magnesium in JP-1 fuel. The slurries settled little and were easily remixed. A polyoxyethylene dodecyl alcohol was the most effective of 13 additives tested in reducing the Brookfield apparent viscosity and the yield value of the slurry. The seven most effective additives all had a hydroxyl group plus an ester or polyoxethylene group in the molecule. The densities of some of the slurries were measured.

  2. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. R.; St. Clair, T. L.; Burks, H. D.; Stoakley, D. M.

    1987-01-01

    A method has been found for enhancing the melt flow of thermoplastic polyimides during processing. A high molecular weight 422 copoly(amic acid) or copolyimide was fused with approximately 0.05 to 5 pct by weight of a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive, and this melt was studied by capillary rheometry. Excellent flow and improved composite properties on graphite resulted from the addition of a PMDA-aniline additive to LARC-TPI. Solution viscosity studies imply that amic acid additives temporarily lower molecular weight and, hence, enlarge the processing window. Thus, compositions containing the additive have a lower melt viscosity for a longer time than those unmodified.

  3. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, James C. (Inventor); Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  4. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of the additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  5. Attitude Towards Physics and Additional Mathematics Achievement Towards Physics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veloo, Arsaythamby; Nor, Rahimah; Khalid, Rozalina

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to identify the difference in students' attitude towards Physics and Additional Mathematics achievement based on gender and relationship between attitudinal variables towards Physics and Additional Mathematics achievement with achievement in Physics. This research focused on six variables, which is attitude towards…

  6. Physics as Information Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro

    2011-03-01

    I review some recent advances in foundational research at Pavia QUIT group. The general idea is that there is only Quantum Theory without quantization rules, and the whole Physics—including space-time and relativity—is emergent from the quantum-information processing. And since Quantum Theory itself is axiomatized solely on informational principles, the whole Physics must be reformulated in information-theoretical terms: this is the It from bit of J. A. Wheeler. The review is divided into four parts: a) the informational axiomatization of Quantum Theory; b) how space-time and relativistic covariance emerge from quantum computation; c) what is the information-theoretical meaning of inertial mass and of ℏ, and how the quantum field emerges; d) an observational consequence of the new quantum field theory: a mass-dependent refraction index of vacuum. I will conclude with the research lines that will follow in the immediate future.

  7. Energetic additive manufacturing process with feed wire

    DOEpatents

    Harwell, Lane D.; Griffith, Michelle L.; Greene, Donald L.; Pressly, Gary A.

    2000-11-07

    A process for additive manufacture by energetic wire deposition is described. A source wire is fed into a energy beam generated melt-pool on a growth surface as the melt-pool moves over the growth surface. This process enables the rapid prototyping and manufacture of fully dense, near-net shape components, as well as cladding and welding processes. Alloys, graded materials, and other inhomogeneous materials can be grown using this process.

  8. Computational Process Modeling for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagg, Stacey; Zhang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Computational Process and Material Modeling of Powder Bed additive manufacturing of IN 718. Optimize material build parameters with reduced time and cost through modeling. Increase understanding of build properties. Increase reliability of builds. Decrease time to adoption of process for critical hardware. Potential to decrease post-build heat treatments. Conduct single-track and coupon builds at various build parameters. Record build parameter information and QM Meltpool data. Refine Applied Optimization powder bed AM process model using data. Report thermal modeling results. Conduct metallography of build samples. Calibrate STK models using metallography findings. Run STK models using AO thermal profiles and report STK modeling results. Validate modeling with additional build. Photodiode Intensity measurements highly linear with power input. Melt Pool Intensity highly correlated to Melt Pool Size. Melt Pool size and intensity increase with power. Applied Optimization will use data to develop powder bed additive manufacturing process model.

  9. Interstellar Dust: Physical Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, A. P.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    1993-01-01

    Dust is formed in stellar environments, and destroyed by sputtering, shattering and vaporization in shock waves due to cloud-cloud collisions and supernova blast waves. Dust is also destroyed during star formation. We review the dust formation and destruction balance. The calculated destruction time-scale is less than or equal to one billion years and the star dust injection time-scale is approx. 2.5 billion years. Hence, the fractions of elemental carbon and silicon locked up in stardust are less than 0.3 and less than 0.15, respectively. An efficient ISM dust formation route is therefore implied. In particular, in dense clouds dust grows; through the processes of coagulation and the accretion of gas phase molecules e.g. H20, CO, CH4. These icy materials may then be photoprocessed to refractory materials in more diffuse regions. The resulting carbonaceous grain mantle may actually be the glue that holds the coagulated grains together.

  10. Computational Process Modeling for Additive Manufacturing (OSU)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagg, Stacey; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Powder-Bed Additive Manufacturing (AM) through Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) or Selective Laser Melting (SLM) is being used by NASA and the Aerospace industry to "print" parts that traditionally are very complex, high cost, or long schedule lead items. The process spreads a thin layer of metal powder over a build platform, then melts the powder in a series of welds in a desired shape. The next layer of powder is applied, and the process is repeated until layer-by-layer, a very complex part can be built. This reduces cost and schedule by eliminating very complex tooling and processes traditionally used in aerospace component manufacturing. To use the process to print end-use items, NASA seeks to understand SLM material well enough to develop a method of qualifying parts for space flight operation. Traditionally, a new material process takes many years and high investment to generate statistical databases and experiential knowledge, but computational modeling can truncate the schedule and cost -many experiments can be run quickly in a model, which would take years and a high material cost to run empirically. This project seeks to optimize material build parameters with reduced time and cost through modeling.

  11. Fundamental Aspects of Selective Melting Additive Manufacturing Processes

    SciTech Connect

    van Swol, Frank B.; Miller, James E.

    2014-12-01

    Certain details of the additive manufacturing process known as selective laser melting (SLM) affect the performance of the final metal part. To unleash the full potential of SLM it is crucial that the process engineer in the field receives guidance about how to select values for a multitude of process variables employed in the building process. These include, for example, the type of powder (e.g., size distribution, shape, type of alloy), orientation of the build axis, the beam scan rate, the beam power density, the scan pattern and scan rate. The science-based selection of these settings con- stitutes an intrinsically challenging multi-physics problem involving heating and melting a metal alloy, reactive, dynamic wetting followed by re-solidification. In addition, inherent to the process is its considerable variability that stems from the powder packing. Each time a limited number of powder particles are placed, the stacking is intrinsically different from the previous, possessing a different geometry, and having a different set of contact areas with the surrounding particles. As a result, even if all other process parameters (scan rate, etc) are exactly the same, the shape and contact geometry and area of the final melt pool will be unique to that particular configuration. This report identifies the most important issues facing SLM, discusses the fundamental physics associated with it and points out how modeling can support the additive manufacturing efforts.

  12. Physical Processing of Cometary Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissman, Paul R.; Stern, S. Alan

    1997-12-01

    Cometary nuclei preserve a cosmo-chemical record of conditions and processes in the primordial solar nebula, and possibly even the interstellar medium. However, that record is not perfectly preserved over the age of the solar system due to a variety of physical processes which act to modify cometary surfaces and interiors. Possible structural and/or internal processes include: collisional accretion, disruption, and reassembly during formation; internal heating by long and short-lived radionuclides; amorphous to crystalline phase transitions, and thermal stresses. Identified surface modification processes include: irradiation by galactic cosmic rays, solar protons, UV photons, and the Sun's T Tauri stage mass outflow; heating by passing stars and nearby supernovae; gardening by debris impacts; the accretion of interstellar dust and gas and accompanying erosion by hypervelocity dust impacts and sputtering; and solar heating with accompanying crust formation. These modification processes must be taken into account in both the planning and the interpretation of the results of a Comet Nucleus Sample Return Mission. Sampling of nuclei should be done at as great a depth below the surface crust as technically feasible, and at vents or fissures leading to exposed volatiles at depth. Samples of the expected cometary crust and near-surface layers also need to be returned for analysis to achieve a better understanding of the effects of these physical processes. We stress that comets are still likely less modified dm any other solar system bodies, but the degree of modification can vary greatly from one comet to the next.

  13. Physical Processing of Cometary Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, Paul R.; Stern, S. Alan

    1997-01-01

    Cometary nuclei preserve a cosmo-chemical record of conditions and processes in the primordial solar nebula, and possibly even the interstellar medium. However, that record is not perfectly preserved over the age of the solar system due to a variety of physical processes which act to modify cometary surfaces and interiors. Possible structural and/or internal processes include: collisional accretion, disruption, and reassembly during formation; internal heating by long and short-lived radionuclides; amorphous to crystalline phase transitions, and thermal stresses. Identified surface modification processes include: irradiation by galactic cosmic rays, solar protons, UV photons, and the Sun's T Tauri stage mass outflow; heating by passing stars and nearby supernovae; gardening by debris impacts; the accretion of interstellar dust and gas and accompanying erosion by hypervelocity dust impacts and sputtering; and solar heating with accompanying crust formation. These modification processes must be taken into account in both the planning and the interpretation of the results of a Comet Nucleus Sample Return Mission. Sampling of nuclei should be done at as great a depth below the surface crust as technically feasible, and at vents or fissures leading to exposed volatiles at depth. Samples of the expected cometary crust and near-surface layers also need to be returned for analysis to achieve a better understanding of the effects of these physical processes. We stress that comets are still likely less modified dm any other solar system bodies, but the degree of modification can vary greatly from one comet to the next.

  14. Additional applications of the Lambert W function in physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houari, Ahmed

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, using the Lambert W function, I derive closed-form analytical expressions for the decay constant of an exponentially decaying process and the time constant of a process subject to a linear resistive force. Similarly, I derive closed-form analytical formulae for the electrical resistivity of a metal and the temperature of a thermionic emitter material. Besides their theoretical importance, the results obtained will be of interest to teachers involved in undergraduate physics experiments.

  15. Physics as quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauro D'Ariano, Giacomo

    2011-10-01

    The experience from Quantum Information has lead us to look at Quantum Theory (QT) and the whole Physics from a different angle. The information-theoretical paradigm—It from Bit— prophesied by John Archibald Wheeler is relentlessly advancing. Recently it has been shown that QT is derivable from pure informational principles. The possibility that there is only QT at the foundations of Physics has been then considered, with space-time, Relativity, quantization rules and Quantum Field Theory (QFT) emerging from a quantum-information processing. The resulting theory is a discrete version of QFT with automatic relativistic invariance, and without fields, Hamiltonian, and quantization rules. In this paper I review some recent advances on these lines. In particular: i) How space-time and relativistic covariance emerge from the quantum computation; ii) The derivation of the Dirac equation as free information flow, without imposing Lorentz covariance; iii) the information-theoretical meaning of inertial mass and Planck constant; iv) An observable consequence of the theory: a mass-dependent refraction index of vacuum. I will then conclude with two possible routes to Quantum Gravity.

  16. Physical Fitness and the Stress Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ensel, Walter M.; Lin, Nan

    2004-01-01

    In the current paper we focus on the role of physical fitness in the life stress process for both psychological and physical well-being. The major research question posed in the current study is: Does physical fitness deter distress in a model containing the major components of the life stress process? That is, do individuals who exercise show…

  17. 17 CFR 37.402 - Additional requirements for physical-delivery swaps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Additional requirements for physical-delivery swaps. 37.402 Section 37.402 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION SWAP EXECUTION FACILITIES Monitoring of Trading and Trade Processing § 37.402...

  18. Composing Models of Geographic Physical Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofer, Barbara; Frank, Andrew U.

    Processes are central for geographic information science; yet geographic information systems (GIS) lack capabilities to represent process related information. A prerequisite to including processes in GIS software is a general method to describe geographic processes independently of application disciplines. This paper presents such a method, namely a process description language. The vocabulary of the process description language is derived formally from mathematical models. Physical processes in geography can be described in two equivalent languages: partial differential equations or partial difference equations, where the latter can be shown graphically and used as a method for application specialists to enter their process models. The vocabulary of the process description language comprises components for describing the general behavior of prototypical geographic physical processes. These process components can be composed by basic models of geographic physical processes, which is shown by means of an example.

  19. Processing multidimensional nuclear physics data

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, J.

    1994-11-15

    Modern Ge detector arrays for gamma-ray spectroscopy are producing data sets unprecedented in size and event multiplicity. Gammasphere, the DOE sponsored array, has the following characteristics: (1) High granularity (110 detectors); (2) High efficiency (10%); and (3) Precision energy measurements (Delta EE = 0.2%). Characteristics of detector line shape, the data set, and the standard practice in the nuclear physics community to the nuclear gamma-ray cascades from the 4096 times 4096 times 4096 data cube will be discussed.

  20. Laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing of metals; physics, computational, and materials challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, W. E.; Anderson, A. T.; Ferencz, R. M.; Hodge, N. E.; Kamath, C.; Khairallah, S. A.; Rubenchik, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    The production of metal parts via laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing is growing exponentially. However, the transition of this technology from production of prototypes to production of critical parts is hindered by a lack of confidence in the quality of the part. Confidence can be established via a fundamental understanding of the physics of the process. It is generally accepted that this understanding will be increasingly achieved through modeling and simulation. However, there are significant physics, computational, and materials challenges stemming from the broad range of length and time scales and temperature ranges associated with the process. In this paper, we review the current state of the art and describe the challenges that need to be met to achieve the desired fundamental understanding of the physics of the process.

  1. Laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing of metals; physics, computational, and materials challenges

    SciTech Connect

    King, W. E.; Anderson, A. T.; Ferencz, R. M.; Hodge, N. E.; Kamath, C.; Khairallah, S. A.; Rubencik, A. M.

    2015-12-29

    The production of metal parts via laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing is growing exponentially. However, the transition of this technology from production of prototypes to production of critical parts is hindered by a lack of confidence in the quality of the part. Confidence can be established via a fundamental understanding of the physics of the process. It is generally accepted that this understanding will be increasingly achieved through modeling and simulation. However, there are significant physics, computational, and materials challenges stemming from the broad range of length and time scales and temperature ranges associated with the process. In this study, we review the current state of the art and describe the challenges that need to be met to achieve the desired fundamental understanding of the physics of the process.

  2. Laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing of metals; physics, computational, and materials challenges

    SciTech Connect

    King, W. E.; Anderson, A. T.; Ferencz, R. M.; Hodge, N. E.; Khairallah, S. A.; Kamath, C.; Rubenchik, A. M.

    2015-12-15

    The production of metal parts via laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing is growing exponentially. However, the transition of this technology from production of prototypes to production of critical parts is hindered by a lack of confidence in the quality of the part. Confidence can be established via a fundamental understanding of the physics of the process. It is generally accepted that this understanding will be increasingly achieved through modeling and simulation. However, there are significant physics, computational, and materials challenges stemming from the broad range of length and time scales and temperature ranges associated with the process. In this paper, we review the current state of the art and describe the challenges that need to be met to achieve the desired fundamental understanding of the physics of the process.

  3. Laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing of metals; physics, computational, and materials challenges

    DOE PAGES

    King, W. E.; Anderson, A. T.; Ferencz, R. M.; ...

    2015-12-29

    The production of metal parts via laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing is growing exponentially. However, the transition of this technology from production of prototypes to production of critical parts is hindered by a lack of confidence in the quality of the part. Confidence can be established via a fundamental understanding of the physics of the process. It is generally accepted that this understanding will be increasingly achieved through modeling and simulation. However, there are significant physics, computational, and materials challenges stemming from the broad range of length and time scales and temperature ranges associated with the process. In thismore » study, we review the current state of the art and describe the challenges that need to be met to achieve the desired fundamental understanding of the physics of the process.« less

  4. NUMERICAL MODELING OF FINE SEDIMENT PHYSICAL PROCESSES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoellhamer, David H.

    1985-01-01

    Fine sediment in channels, rivers, estuaries, and coastal waters undergo several physical processes including flocculation, floc disruption, deposition, bed consolidation, and resuspension. This paper presents a conceptual model and reviews mathematical models of these physical processes. Several general fine sediment models that simulate some of these processes are reviewed. These general models do not directly simulate flocculation and floc disruption, but the conceptual model and existing functions are shown to adequately model these two processes for one set of laboratory data.

  5. Physical Processes Controlling Earth's Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genio, Anthony Del

    2013-01-01

    As background for consideration of the climates of the other terrestrial planets in our solar system and the potential habitability of rocky exoplanets, we discuss the basic physics that controls the Earths present climate, with particular emphasis on the energy and water cycles. We define several dimensionless parameters relevant to characterizing a planets general circulation, climate and hydrological cycle. We also consider issues associated with the use of past climate variations as indicators of future anthropogenically forced climate change, and recent advances in understanding projections of future climate that might have implications for Earth-like exoplanets.

  6. Porosity of additive manufacturing parts for process monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Slotwinski, J. A.; Garboczi, E. J.

    2014-02-18

    Some metal additive manufacturing processes can produce parts with internal porosity, either intentionally (with careful selection of the process parameters) or unintentionally (if the process is not well-controlled.) Material porosity is undesirable for aerospace parts - since porosity could lead to premature failure - and desirable for some biomedical implants, since surface-breaking pores allow for better integration with biological tissue. Changes in a part's porosity during an additive manufacturing build may also be an indication of an undesired change in the process. We are developing an ultrasonic sensor for detecting changes in porosity in metal parts during fabrication on a metal powder bed fusion system, for use as a process monitor. This paper will describe our work to develop an ultrasonic-based sensor for monitoring part porosity during an additive build, including background theory, the development and detailed characterization of reference additive porosity samples, and a potential design for in-situ implementation.

  7. Porosity of additive manufacturing parts for process monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slotwinski, J. A.; Garboczi, E. J.

    2014-02-01

    Some metal additive manufacturing processes can produce parts with internal porosity, either intentionally (with careful selection of the process parameters) or unintentionally (if the process is not well-controlled.) Material porosity is undesirable for aerospace parts - since porosity could lead to premature failure - and desirable for some biomedical implants, since surface-breaking pores allow for better integration with biological tissue. Changes in a part's porosity during an additive manufacturing build may also be an indication of an undesired change in the process. We are developing an ultrasonic sensor for detecting changes in porosity in metal parts during fabrication on a metal powder bed fusion system, for use as a process monitor. This paper will describe our work to develop an ultrasonic-based sensor for monitoring part porosity during an additive build, including background theory, the development and detailed characterization of reference additive porosity samples, and a potential design for in-situ implementation.

  8. Additive manufacturing of stretchable tactile sensors: Processes, materials, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vatani, Morteza

    3D printing technology is becoming more ubiquitous every day especially in the area of smart structures. However, fabrication of multi-material, functional, and smart structures is problematic because of the process and material limitations. This thesis sought to develop a Direct Print Photopolymerization (DPP) fabrication technique that appreciably extends the manufacturing space for the 3D smart structures. This method employs a robotically controlled micro-extrusion of a filament equipped with a photopolymerization process. The ability to use polymers and ultimately their nanocomposites in this process is the advantage of the proposed process over the current fabrication methods in the fabrication of 3D structures featuring mechanical, physical, and electrical functionalities. In addition, this study focused to develop a printable, conductive, and stretchable nanocomposite based on a photocurable and stretchable liquid resin filled with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). This nanocomposite exhibited piezoresistivity, means its resistivity changes as it deforms. This property is a favorable factor in developing resistance based tactile sensors. They were also able to resist high tensile strains while they showed conductivity. Furthermore, this study offered a possible and low-cost method to have a unique and highly stretchable pressure sensitive polymer. This disruptive pressure sensitive polymer composed of an Ionic Liquid (IL) and a stretchable photopolymer embedded between two layers of Carbon Nanotube (CNTs) based stretchable electrodes. The developed IL-polymer showed both field effect property and piezoresistivity that can detect large tensile strains up 30%. In summary, this research study focused to present feasible methods and materials for printing a 3D smart structure especially in the context of flexible tactile sensors. This study provides a foundation for the future efforts in fabrication of skin like tactile sensors in three-dimensional motifs

  9. Cleaning Process Development for Metallic Additively Manufactured Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tramel, Terri L.; Welker, Roger; Lowery, Niki; Mitchell, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Additive Manufacturing of metallic components for aerospace applications offers many advantages over traditional manufacturing techniques. As a new technology, many aspects of its widespread utilization remain open to investigation. Among these are the cleaning processes that can be used for post finishing of parts and measurements to verify effectiveness of the cleaning processes. Many cleaning and drying processes and measurement methods that have been used for parts manufactured using conventional techniques are candidates that may be considered for cleaning and verification of additively manufactured parts. Among these are vapor degreasing, ultrasonic immersion and spray cleaning, followed by hot air drying, vacuum baking and solvent displacement drying. Differences in porosity, density, and surface finish of additively manufactured versus conventionally manufactured parts may introduce new considerations in the selection of cleaning and drying processes or the method used to verify their effectiveness. This presentation will review the relative strengths and weaknesses of different candidate cleaning and drying processes as they may apply to additively manufactured metal parts for aerospace applications. An ultrasonic cleaning technique for exploring the cleanability of parts will be presented along with an example using additively manufactured Inconel 718 test specimens to illustrate its use. The data analysis shows that this ultrasonic cleaning approach results in a well-behaved ultrasonic cleaning/extraction behavior. That is, it does not show signs of accelerated cavitation erosion of the base material, which was later confirmed by neutron imaging. In addition, the analysis indicated that complete cleaning would be achieved by ultrasonic immersion cleaning at approximately 5 minutes, which was verified by subsequent cleaning of additional parts.

  10. Control of pyrite addition in coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Schmid, Bruce K.; Junkin, James E.

    1982-12-21

    Pyrite addition to a coal liquefaction process (22, 26) is controlled (118) in inverse proportion to the calcium content of the feed coal to maximize the C.sub.5 --900.degree. F. (482.degree. C.) liquid yield per unit weight of pyrite added (110). The pyrite addition is controlled in this manner so as to minimize the amount of pyrite used and thus reduce pyrite contribution to the slurry pumping load and disposal problems connected with pyrite produced slag.

  11. Infrared thermography for laser-based powder bed fusion additive manufacturing processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moylan, Shawn; Whitenton, Eric; Lane, Brandon; Slotwinski, John

    2014-02-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to revolutionize discrete part manufacturing, but improvements in processing of metallic materials are necessary before AM will see widespread adoption. A better understanding of AM processes, resulting from physics-based modeling as well as direct process metrology, will form the basis for these improvements. Infrared (IR) thermography of AM processes can provide direct process metrology, as well as data necessary for the verification of physics-based models. We review selected works examining how IR thermography was implemented and used in various powder-bed AM processes. This previous work, as well as significant experience at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in temperature measurement and IR thermography for machining processes, shapes our own research in AM process metrology with IR thermography. We discuss our experimental design, as well as plans for future IR measurements of a laser-based powder bed fusion AM process.

  12. Infrared thermography for laser-based powder bed fusion additive manufacturing processes

    SciTech Connect

    Moylan, Shawn; Whitenton, Eric; Lane, Brandon; Slotwinski, John

    2014-02-18

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to revolutionize discrete part manufacturing, but improvements in processing of metallic materials are necessary before AM will see widespread adoption. A better understanding of AM processes, resulting from physics-based modeling as well as direct process metrology, will form the basis for these improvements. Infrared (IR) thermography of AM processes can provide direct process metrology, as well as data necessary for the verification of physics-based models. We review selected works examining how IR thermography was implemented and used in various powder-bed AM processes. This previous work, as well as significant experience at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in temperature measurement and IR thermography for machining processes, shapes our own research in AM process metrology with IR thermography. We discuss our experimental design, as well as plans for future IR measurements of a laser-based powder bed fusion AM process.

  13. Effects of acetylacetone additions on PZT thin film processing

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, R.W.; Assink, R.A.; Dimos, D.; Sinclair, M.B.; Boyle, T.J.; Buchheit, C.D.

    1995-02-01

    Sol-gel processing methods are frequently used for the fabrication of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin films for many electronic applications. Our standard approach for film fabrication utilizes lead acetate and acetic acid modified metal alkoxides of zirconium and titanium in the preparation of our precursor solutions. This report highlights some of our recent results on the effects of the addition of a second chelating ligand, acetylacetone, to this process. The authors discuss the changes in film drying behavior, densification and ceramic microstructure which accompany acetylacetone additions to the precursor solution and relate the observed variations in processing behavior to differences in chemical precursor structure induced by the acetylacetone ligand. Improvements in thin film microstructure, ferroelectric and optical properties are observed when acetylacetone is added to the precursor solution.

  14. Additive Manufacturing of High-Entropy Alloys by Laser Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocelík, V.; Janssen, N.; Smith, S. N.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2016-07-01

    This contribution concentrates on the possibilities of additive manufacturing of high-entropy clad layers by laser processing. In particular, the effects of the laser surface processing parameters on the microstructure and hardness of high-entropy alloys (HEAs) were examined. AlCoCrFeNi alloys with different amounts of aluminum prepared by arc melting were investigated and compared with the laser beam remelted HEAs with the same composition. Attempts to form HEAs coatings with a direct laser deposition from the mixture of elemental powders were made for AlCoCrFeNi and AlCrFeNiTa composition. A strong influence of solidification rate on the amounts of face-centered cubic and body-centered cubic phase, their chemical composition, and spatial distribution was detected for two-phase AlCoCrFeNi HEAs. It is concluded that a high-power laser is a versatile tool to synthesize interesting HEAs with additive manufacturing processing. Critical issues are related to the rate of (re)solidification, the dilution with the substrate, powder efficiency during cladding, and differences in melting points of clad powders making additive manufacturing processing from a simple mixture of elemental powders a challenging approach.

  15. Generalised additive modelling approach to the fermentation process of glutamate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Bo; Li, Yun; Pan, Feng; Shi, Zhong-Ping

    2011-03-01

    In this work, generalised additive models (GAMs) were used for the first time to model the fermentation of glutamate (Glu). It was found that three fermentation parameters fermentation time (T), dissolved oxygen (DO) and oxygen uptake rate (OUR) could capture 97% variance of the production of Glu during the fermentation process through a GAM model calibrated using online data from 15 fermentation experiments. This model was applied to investigate the individual and combined effects of T, DO and OUR on the production of Glu. The conditions to optimize the fermentation process were proposed based on the simulation study from this model. Results suggested that the production of Glu can reach a high level by controlling concentration levels of DO and OUR to the proposed optimization conditions during the fermentation process. The GAM approach therefore provides an alternative way to model and optimize the fermentation process of Glu.

  16. The metallurgy and processing science of metal additive manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Sames, William J.; List, III, Frederick Alyious; Pannala, Sreekanth; Dehoff, Ryan R.; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh

    2016-03-07

    Here, additive Manufacturing (AM), widely known as 3D printing, is a method of manufacturing that forms parts from powder, wire, or sheets in a process that proceeds layer-by-layer.Many techniques (using many different names) have been developed to accomplish this via melting or solid - state joining. In this review, these techniques for producing metal parts are explored, with a focus on the science of metal AM: processing defects, heat transfer, solidification, solid- state precipitation, mechanical properties, and post-processing metallurgy. The various metal AM techniques are compared, with analysis of the strengths and limitations of each. Few alloys have been developed for commercial production, but recent development efforts are presented as a path for the ongoing development of new materials for AM processes.

  17. The metallurgy and processing science of metal additive manufacturing

    DOE PAGES

    Sames, William J.; List, III, Frederick Alyious; Pannala, Sreekanth; ...

    2016-03-07

    Here, additive Manufacturing (AM), widely known as 3D printing, is a method of manufacturing that forms parts from powder, wire, or sheets in a process that proceeds layer-by-layer.Many techniques (using many different names) have been developed to accomplish this via melting or solid - state joining. In this review, these techniques for producing metal parts are explored, with a focus on the science of metal AM: processing defects, heat transfer, solidification, solid- state precipitation, mechanical properties, and post-processing metallurgy. The various metal AM techniques are compared, with analysis of the strengths and limitations of each. Few alloys have been developedmore » for commercial production, but recent development efforts are presented as a path for the ongoing development of new materials for AM processes.« less

  18. Modeling of additive manufacturing processes for metals: Challenges and opportunities

    DOE PAGES

    Francois, Marianne M.; Sun, Amy; King, Wayne E.; ...

    2017-01-09

    Here, with the technology being developed to manufacture metallic parts using increasingly advanced additive manufacturing processes, a new era has opened up for designing novel structural materials, from designing shapes and complex geometries to controlling the microstructure (alloy composition and morphology). The material properties used within specific structural components are also designable in order to meet specific performance requirements that are not imaginable with traditional metal forming and machining (subtractive) techniques.

  19. Cold Spraying of Armstrong Process Titanium Powder for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, D.; Fernández, R.; Delloro, F.; Jodoin, B.

    2016-12-01

    Titanium parts are ideally suited for aerospace applications due to their unique combination of high specific strength and excellent corrosion resistance. However, titanium as bulk material is expensive and challenging/costly to machine. Production of complex titanium parts through additive manufacturing looks promising, but there are still many barriers to overcome before reaching mainstream commercialization. The cold gas dynamic spraying process offers the potential for additive manufacturing of large titanium parts due to its reduced reactive environment, its simplicity to operate, and the high deposition rates it offers. A few challenges are to be addressed before the additive manufacturing potential of titanium by cold gas dynamic spraying can be reached. In particular, it is known that titanium is easy to deposit by cold gas dynamic spraying, but the deposits produced are usually porous when nitrogen is used as the carrier gas. In this work, a method to manufacture low-porosity titanium components at high deposition efficiencies is revealed. The components are produced by combining low-pressure cold spray using nitrogen as the carrier gas with low-cost titanium powder produced using the Armstrong process. The microstructure and mechanical properties of additive manufactured titanium components are investigated.

  20. Stable Measures and Processes in Statistical Physics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-01

    IN STATISTICAL PHYSICS 0 by Aleksander Weron and Karina Weron Tecnicl Rpor #8Th November 1984) 0 0 85 01 16 099 0 L-SYCLASS1IEA.EDTISAG SfCUAI;V...Stochastic Processes" Department of Statistics J______ University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, NC 27514 f n -- and , -" ::i 7Codes ot : ’r ; Karina Weron...2 p.-t ,i7i;7, ~Department of Physics and Astronomy Louisiana State University Baton Rouge, LA 70803 Abstract. It is shown how a-stable distributions

  1. Process for the physical segregation of minerals

    DOEpatents

    Yingling, Jon C.; Ganguli, Rajive

    2004-01-06

    With highly heterogeneous groups or streams of minerals, physical segregation using online quality measurements is an economically important first stage of the mineral beneficiation process. Segregation enables high quality fractions of the stream to bypass processing, such as cleaning operations, thereby reducing the associated costs and avoiding the yield losses inherent in any downstream separation process. The present invention includes various methods for reliably segregating a mineral stream into at least one fraction meeting desired quality specifications while at the same time maximizing yield of that fraction.

  2. Additive Manufacturing of Tooling for Refrigeration Cabinet Foaming Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Post, Brian K; Nuttall, David; Cukier, Michael; Hile, Michael

    2016-07-29

    The primary objective of this project was to leverage the Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) process and materials into a long term, quick change tooling concept to drastically reduce product lead and development timelines and costs. Current refrigeration foam molds are complicated to manufacture involving casting several aluminum parts in an approximate shape, machining components of the molds and post fitting and shimming of the parts in an articulated fixture. The total process timeline can take over 6 months. The foaming process is slower than required for production, therefore multiple fixtures, 10 to 27, are required per refrigerator model. Molds are particular to a specific product configuration making mixed model assembly challenging for sequencing, mold changes or auto changeover features. The initial goal was to create a tool leveraging the ORNL materials and additive process to build a tool in 4 to 6 weeks or less. A secondary goal was to create common fixture cores and provide lightweight fixture sections that could be revised in a very short time to increase equipment flexibility reduce lead times, lower the barriers to first production trials, and reduce tooling costs.

  3. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  4. Physical processes in spin polarized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kulsrud, R.M.; Valeo, E.J.; Cowley, S.

    1984-05-01

    If the plasma in a nuclear fusion reactor is polarized, the nuclear reactions are modified in such a way as to enhance the reactor performance. We calculate in detail the modification of these nuclear reactions by different modes of polarization of the nuclear fuel. We also consider in detail the various physical processes that can lead to depolarization and show that they are by and large slow enough that a high degree of polarization can be maintained.

  5. Electroacoustics modeling of piezoelectric welders for ultrasonic additive manufacturing processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hehr, Adam; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasonic additive manufacturing (UAM) is a recent 3D metal printing technology which utilizes ultrasonic vibrations from high power piezoelectric transducers to additively weld similar and dissimilar metal foils. CNC machining is used intermittent of welding to create internal channels, embed temperature sensitive components, sensors, and materials, and for net shaping parts. Structural dynamics of the welder and work piece influence the performance of the welder and part quality. To understand the impact of structural dynamics on UAM, a linear time-invariant model is used to relate system shear force and electric current inputs to the system outputs of welder velocity and voltage. Frequency response measurements are combined with in-situ operating measurements of the welder to identify model parameters and to verify model assumptions. The proposed LTI model can enhance process consistency, performance, and guide the development of improved quality monitoring and control strategies.

  6. Processable high temperature resistant addition type polyimide laminating resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafini, T. T.; Delvigs, P.

    1973-01-01

    Basic studies that were performed using model compounds to elucidate the polymerization mechanism of the so-called addition-type (A-type) polyimides are reviewed. The fabrication and properties of polyimide/graphite fiber composites using A-type polyimide prepolymers as the matrix are also reviewed. An alternate method for preparing processable A-type polyimides by means of in situ polymerization of monomer reactants (PMR) on the fiber reinforcement is described. The elevated temperature properties of A-type PMR/graphite fiber composites are also presented.

  7. Thermodynamically reversible processes in statistical physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, John D.

    2017-02-01

    Equilibrium states are used as limit states to define thermodynamically reversible processes. When these processes are understood in terms of statistical physics, these limit states can change with time due to thermal fluctuations. For macroscopic systems, the changes are insignificant on ordinary time scales and what little change there is can be suppressed by macroscopically negligible, entropy-creating dissipation. For systems of molecular sizes, the changes are large on short time scales. They can only sometimes be suppressed with significant entropy-creating dissipation, and this entropy creation is unavoidable if any process is to proceed to completion. As a result, at molecular scales, thermodynamically reversible processes are impossible in principle. Unlike the macroscopic case, they cannot be realized even approximately when we account for all sources of dissipation, and argumentation invoking them on molecular scales can lead to spurious conclusions.

  8. Process monitoring of additive manufacturing by using optical tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Zenzinger, Guenter E-mail: alexander.ladewig@mtu.de; Bamberg, Joachim E-mail: alexander.ladewig@mtu.de; Ladewig, Alexander E-mail: alexander.ladewig@mtu.de; Hess, Thomas E-mail: alexander.ladewig@mtu.de; Henkel, Benjamin E-mail: alexander.ladewig@mtu.de; Satzger, Wilhelm E-mail: alexander.ladewig@mtu.de

    2015-03-31

    Parts fabricated by means of additive manufacturing are usually of complex shape and owing to the fabrication procedure by using selective laser melting (SLM), potential defects and inaccuracies are often very small in lateral size. Therefore, an adequate quality inspection of such parts is rather challenging, while non-destructive-techniques (NDT) are difficult to realize, but considerable efforts are necessary in order to ensure the quality of SLM-parts especially used for aerospace components. Thus, MTU Aero Engines is currently focusing on the development of an Online Process Control system which monitors and documents the complete welding process during the SLM fabrication procedure. A high-resolution camera system is used to obtain images, from which tomographic data for a 3dim analysis of SLM-parts are processed. From the analysis, structural irregularities and structural disorder resulting from any possible erroneous melting process become visible and may be allocated anywhere within the 3dim structure. Results of our optical tomography (OT) method as obtained on real defects are presented.

  9. Method for controlling a laser additive process using intrinsic illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tait, Robert; Cai, Guoshuang; Azer, Magdi; Chen, Xiaobin; Liu, Yong; Harding, Kevin

    2015-05-01

    One form of additive manufacturing is to use a laser to generate a melt pool from powdered metal that is sprayed from a nozzle. The laser net-shape machining system builds the part a layer at a time by following a predetermined path. However, because the path may need to take many turns, maintaining a constant melt pool may not be easy. A straight section may require one speed and power while a sharp bend would over melt the metal at the same settings. This paper describes a process monitoring method that uses the intrinsic IR radiation from the melt pool along with a process model configured to establish target values for the parameters associated with the manufacture or repair. This model is based upon known properties of the metal being used as well as the properties of the laser beam. An adaptive control technique is then employed to control process parameters of the machining system based upon the real-time weld pool measurement. Since the system uses the heat radiant from the melt pool, other previously deposited metal does not confuse the system as only the melted material is seen by the camera.

  10. Atomic physics processes in radial transport calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, J.T.

    1983-02-01

    These lectures were intended as preparation for detailed discussions of the role of atomic and molecular physics in confinement research at the 1982 NATO Advanced Study Institute. They begin with a description of the major approaches to magnetic confinement: tandem (ambipolar) mirrors with their associated auxiliary barriers, tokamaks, and stellarators. The leading alternatives, the ELMO Bumpy Torus and the reversed field pinch, are also treated. The evolution equations for particle, energy, and (where relevant) field diffusion are presented and discussed. This is the context for atomic and molecular processes relevant to confinement.

  11. Physics of a random biological process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canessa, E.; Calmetta, A.

    1994-07-01

    We analyze the successive fluctuations of the daytime and nighttime sleep pattern of a newborn baby by using tools of far-from-equilibrium statistical physics. We find that this class of natural random biological process displays a remarkable long-range power-law correlation that extends for, at least, the first six months of life. Such a scaling behavior might help to characterize the underlying dynamics of the (early) growth and development of humans through analyzing the time series generated when asleep.

  12. Fabrication of a Flexible Amperometric Glucose Sensor Using Additive Processes.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaosong; Durgan, Christopher J; Matthews, David J; Motley, Joshua R; Tan, Xuebin; Pholsena, Kovit; Árnadóttir, Líney; Castle, Jessica R; Jacobs, Peter G; Cargill, Robert S; Ward, W Kenneth; Conley, John F; Herman, Gregory S

    This study details the use of printing and other additive processes to fabricate a novel amperometric glucose sensor. The sensor was fabricated using a Au coated 12.7 μm thick polyimide substrate as a starting material, where micro-contact printing, electrochemical plating, chloridization, electrohydrodynamic jet (e-jet) printing, and spin coating were used to pattern, deposit, chloridize, print, and coat functional materials, respectively. We have found that e-jet printing was effective for the deposition and patterning of glucose oxidase inks with lateral feature sizes between ~5 to 1000 μm in width, and that the glucose oxidase was still active after printing. The thickness of the permselective layer was optimized to obtain a linear response for glucose concentrations up to 32 mM and no response to acetaminophen, a common interfering compound, was observed. The use of such thin polyimide substrates allow wrapping of the sensors around catheters with high radius of curvature ~250 μm, where additive and microfabrication methods may allow significant cost reductions.

  13. Fabrication of a Flexible Amperometric Glucose Sensor Using Additive Processes

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiaosong; Durgan, Christopher J.; Matthews, David J.; Motley, Joshua R.; Tan, Xuebin; Pholsena, Kovit; Árnadóttir, Líney; Castle, Jessica R.; Jacobs, Peter G.; Cargill, Robert S.; Ward, W. Kenneth; Conley, John F.; Herman, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    This study details the use of printing and other additive processes to fabricate a novel amperometric glucose sensor. The sensor was fabricated using a Au coated 12.7 μm thick polyimide substrate as a starting material, where micro-contact printing, electrochemical plating, chloridization, electrohydrodynamic jet (e-jet) printing, and spin coating were used to pattern, deposit, chloridize, print, and coat functional materials, respectively. We have found that e-jet printing was effective for the deposition and patterning of glucose oxidase inks with lateral feature sizes between ~5 to 1000 μm in width, and that the glucose oxidase was still active after printing. The thickness of the permselective layer was optimized to obtain a linear response for glucose concentrations up to 32 mM and no response to acetaminophen, a common interfering compound, was observed. The use of such thin polyimide substrates allow wrapping of the sensors around catheters with high radius of curvature ~250 μm, where additive and microfabrication methods may allow significant cost reductions. PMID:26634186

  14. Porosity Measurements and Analysis for Metal Additive Manufacturing Process Control

    PubMed Central

    Slotwinski, John A; Garboczi, Edward J; Hebenstreit, Keith M

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques can produce complex, high-value metal parts, with potential applications as critical metal components such as those found in aerospace engines and as customized biomedical implants. Material porosity in these parts is undesirable for aerospace parts - since porosity could lead to premature failure - and desirable for some biomedical implants - since surface-breaking pores allows for better integration with biological tissue. Changes in a part’s porosity during an additive manufacturing build may also be an indication of an undesired change in the build process. Here, we present efforts to develop an ultrasonic sensor for monitoring changes in the porosity in metal parts during fabrication on a metal powder bed fusion system. The development of well-characterized reference samples, measurements of the porosity of these samples with multiple techniques, and correlation of ultrasonic measurements with the degree of porosity are presented. A proposed sensor design, measurement strategy, and future experimental plans on a metal powder bed fusion system are also presented. PMID:26601041

  15. Porosity Measurements and Analysis for Metal Additive Manufacturing Process Control.

    PubMed

    Slotwinski, John A; Garboczi, Edward J; Hebenstreit, Keith M

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques can produce complex, high-value metal parts, with potential applications as critical metal components such as those found in aerospace engines and as customized biomedical implants. Material porosity in these parts is undesirable for aerospace parts - since porosity could lead to premature failure - and desirable for some biomedical implants - since surface-breaking pores allows for better integration with biological tissue. Changes in a part's porosity during an additive manufacturing build may also be an indication of an undesired change in the build process. Here, we present efforts to develop an ultrasonic sensor for monitoring changes in the porosity in metal parts during fabrication on a metal powder bed fusion system. The development of well-characterized reference samples, measurements of the porosity of these samples with multiple techniques, and correlation of ultrasonic measurements with the degree of porosity are presented. A proposed sensor design, measurement strategy, and future experimental plans on a metal powder bed fusion system are also presented.

  16. 10 CFR 73.60 - Additional requirements for physical protection at nonpower reactors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... nonpower reactors. 73.60 Section 73.60 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF PLANTS AND MATERIALS Physical Protection Requirements at Fixed Sites § 73.60 Additional... nuclear material from theft or diversion pursuant to the requirements of paragraphs 73.67 (a), (b),...

  17. 10 CFR 73.60 - Additional requirements for physical protection at nonpower reactors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... nonpower reactors. 73.60 Section 73.60 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF PLANTS AND MATERIALS Physical Protection Requirements at Fixed Sites § 73.60 Additional... nuclear material from theft or diversion pursuant to the requirements of paragraphs 73.67 (a), (b),...

  18. Post Processing Methods used to Improve Surface Finish of Products which are Manufactured by Additive Manufacturing Technologies: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumbhar, N. N.; Mulay, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    The Additive Manufacturing (AM) processes open the possibility to go directly from Computer-Aided Design (CAD) to a physical prototype. These prototypes are used as test models before it is finalized as well as sometimes as a final product. Additive Manufacturing has many advantages over the traditional process used to develop a product such as allowing early customer involvement in product development, complex shape generation and also save time as well as money. Additive manufacturing also possess some special challenges that are usually worth overcoming such as Poor Surface quality, Physical Properties and use of specific raw material for manufacturing. To improve the surface quality several attempts had been made by controlling various process parameters of Additive manufacturing and also applying different post processing techniques on components manufactured by Additive manufacturing. The main objective of this work is to document an extensive literature review in the general area of post processing techniques which are used in Additive manufacturing.

  19. Additions and improvements to the high energy density physics capabilities in the FLASH code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, D. Q.; Flocke, N.; Graziani, C.; Tzeferacos, P.; Weide, K.

    2016-10-01

    FLASH is an open source, finite-volume Eulerian, spatially adaptive radiation magnetohydrodynamics code that has the capabilities to treat a broad range of physical processes. FLASH performs well on a wide range of computer architectures, and has a broad user base. Extensive high energy density physics (HEDP) capabilities have been added to FLASH to make it an open toolset for the academic HEDP community. We summarize these capabilities, emphasizing recent additions and improvements. In particular, we showcase the ability of FLASH to simulate the Faraday Rotation Measure produced by the presence of magnetic fields; and proton radiography, proton self-emission, and Thomson scattering diagnostics with and without the presence of magnetic fields. We also describe several collaborations with the academic HEDP community in which FLASH simulations were used to design and interpret HEDP experiments. This work was supported in part at the University of Chicago by the DOE NNSA ASC through the Argonne Institute for Computing in Science under field work proposal 57789; and the NSF under Grant PHY-0903997.

  20. Additions and Improvements to the FLASH Code for Simulating High Energy Density Physics Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, D. Q.; Daley, C.; Dubey, A.; Fatenejad, M.; Flocke, N.; Graziani, C.; Lee, D.; Tzeferacos, P.; Weide, K.

    2015-11-01

    FLASH is an open source, finite-volume Eulerian, spatially adaptive radiation hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics code that incorporates capabilities for a broad range of physical processes, performs well on a wide range of computer architectures, and has a broad user base. Extensive capabilities have been added to FLASH to make it an open toolset for the academic high energy density physics (HEDP) community. We summarize these capabilities, with particular emphasis on recent additions and improvements. These include advancements in the optical ray tracing laser package, with methods such as bi-cubic 2D and tri-cubic 3D interpolation of electron number density, adaptive stepping and 2nd-, 3rd-, and 4th-order Runge-Kutta integration methods. Moreover, we showcase the simulated magnetic field diagnostic capabilities of the code, including induction coils, Faraday rotation, and proton radiography. We also describe several collaborations with the National Laboratories and the academic community in which FLASH has been used to simulate HEDP experiments. This work was supported in part at the University of Chicago by the DOE NNSA ASC through the Argonne Institute for Computing in Science under field work proposal 57789; and the NSF under grant PHY-0903997.

  1. Pyrrolidinone derivatives as processing additives for solution processed organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vongsaysy, Uyxing; Pavageau, Bertrand; Servant, Laurent; Aziz, Hany

    2014-10-01

    Processing additives are widely used to increase the efficiency of solution processed organic solar cells. We use the Hansen solubility parameters (HSPs) to investigate novel processing additives. The HSPs predict pyrrolidinone derivatives to be efficient processing additives for OSC systems based on poly(3-hexylthiophene)/[6,6]-phenyl-C61- butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT/PCBM). Two pyrrolidinone derivatives are identified: 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone and 1- benzyl-2-pyrrolidinone. The processing additives are introduced with various concentrations in the formulation of P3HT and PCBM solution. The electrical characterizations show that the two processing additives significantly increase the short circuit current and thus the power conversion efficiency of the OSCs. The results thus highlight HSPs as an effective and relatively straightforward tool that can be employed to optimize OSC morphology from a theoretical standpoint. Such a tool will be invaluable for identifying additives for novel high efficiency polymer species as they are synthesized, and thus to streamline the device fabrication and device optimization process.

  2. Thermal processing of EVA encapsulants and effects of formulation additives

    SciTech Connect

    Pern, F.J.; Glick, S.H.

    1996-05-01

    The authors investigated the in-situ processing temperatures and effects of various formulation additives on the formation of ultraviolet (UV) excitable chromophores, in the thermal lamination and curing of ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) encapsulants. A programmable, microprocessor-controlled, double-bag vacuum laminator was used to study two commercial as formulated EVA films, A9918P and 15295P, and solution-cast films of Elvaxrm (EVX) impregnated with various curing agents and antioxidants. The results show that the actual measured temperatures of EVA lagged significantly behind the programmed profiles for the heating elements and were affected by the total thermal mass loaded inside the laminator chamber. The antioxidant Naugard P{trademark}, used in the two commercial EVA formulations, greatly enhances the formation of UV-excitable, short chromophores upon curing, whereas other tested antioxidants show little effect. A new curing agent chosen specifically for the EVA formulation modification produces little or no effect on chromophore formation, no bubbling problems in the glass/EVX/glass laminates, and a gel content of {approximately}80% when cured at programmed 155{degrees}C for 4 min. Also demonstrated is the greater discoloring effect with higher concentrations of curing-generated chromophores.

  3. Bringing life to soil physical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallett, P. D.

    2013-12-01

    When Oklahoma's native prairie grass roots were replaced by corn, the greatest environmental (and social) disaster ever to hit America ensued. The soils lost structure, physical binding by roots was annihilated and when drought came the Great Dust Bowl commenced. This form of environmental disaster has repeated over history and although not always apparent, similar processes drive the degradation of seemingly productive farmland and forests. But just as negative impacts on biology are deleterious to soil physical properties, positive impacts could reverse these trends. In finding solutions to soil sustainability and food security, we should be able to exploit biological processes to improve soil physical properties. This talk will focus on a quantitative understanding of how biology changes soil physical behaviour. Like the Great Dust Bowl, it starts with reinforcement mechanisms by plant roots. We found that binding of soil by cereal (barley) roots within 5 weeks of planting can more than double soil shear strength, with greater plant density causing greater reinforcement. With time, however, the relative impact of root reinforcement diminishes due to root turnover and aging of the seedbed. From mechanical tests of individual roots, reasonable predictions of reinforcement by tree roots are possible with fibre bundle models. With herbaceous plants like cereals, however, the same parameters (root strength, stiffness, size and distribution) result in a poor prediction. We found that root type, root age and abiotic factors such as compaction and waterlogging affect mechanical behaviour, further complicating the understanding and prediction of root reinforcement. For soil physical stability, the interface between root and soil is an extremely important zone in terms of resistance of roots to pull-out and rhizosphere formation. Compounds analogous to root exudates have been found with rheological tests to initially decrease the shear stress where wet soils flow, but

  4. Physical processes in collapse driven supernova

    SciTech Connect

    Mayle, R.W.

    1985-11-01

    A model of the supernova explosion is discussed. The method of neutrino transport is discussed, since the explosive mechanism depends on neutrino heating of the material behind the accretion shock. The core region of these exploding stars becomes unstable to convective motions during the supernova evolution. Convective mixing allows more neutrinos to escape from under the neutrinosphere, and thus increases the amount of heating by neutrinos. An approximate method of incorporating convection is described, and some results of including convection in a computer model is presented. Another phenomena is seen in computer simulations of supernova, oscillations in the neutrino luminosity and mass accretion rate onto the protoneutron star. The last topic discussed in this thesis describes the attempt to understand this oscillation by perturbation of the steady state solution to equations approximating the complex physical processes occurring in the late time supernova. 42 refs., 31 figs.

  5. Physical processes in the growth of the continental crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, G.

    1988-01-01

    Major mechanisms of crustal addition are volcanism and plutonism at plate boundaries and within plate interiors. One approach to deciding if island arc magmatism dominated ancient crustal growth is to assess the rate at which the process has operated in the recent past. The localized addition rates were found to be comparable to present day global rates. One physical observable that was used to constrain models of crustal growth is sea level. A simple physical model was developed to explore the consequences of constant freeboard (the height of the continents above sea level). Global geoid and sea floor topography data were used to identify and study oceanic plateaus and swells that have either continental crustal roots or anomalously thick ocean crusts.

  6. New process additive reduces HF cloud-forming potential

    SciTech Connect

    Sheckler, J.C.; Hammershaimb, H.U. ); Ross, L.J. ); Comey, K.R. III )

    1994-08-22

    The Texaco-UOP HF additive technology has demonstrated significant aerosol reduction in both small-scale and large-scale releases. The pilot plant testing did not indicate any adverse impact on the alkylation reaction, as was confirmed in a short trial at Texaco Refining and Marketing Inc.'s El Dorado, Kan., refinery in 1992. Equipment to enable continuous addition of the additive was installed in the second quarter of 1994 at the refinery. The paper discusses HF alkylation, mitigation technology, additive development, aerosol reduction, and testing on pilot scale and large scale.

  7. Physical disintegration of biochar: An overlooked process

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Data collected from both artificially and field (naturally) weathered biochar suggest that a potentially significant pathway of biochar disappearance is through physical breakdown of the biochar structure. Through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) we characterized this physical weathering which inc...

  8. Physics as an Enterprise of Process Philosophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rangacharyulu, Chary

    2005-01-01

    Physics, as a discipline, attempts to discern the mysteries of physical universe and it is also an inspiration for technological innovations which contribute to the good or demise of human civilization. While it continues to have tremendous impact on the technological front, one wonders if physics, as an enterprise engaged in providing a coherent…

  9. The Stress Process in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankenship, Bonnie Tjeerdsma

    2007-01-01

    Negative stress in physical education can reduce a student's enjoyment of physical activity and destroy the individual's desire to be a lifelong mover. The purpose of this article is to explore the concept of stress in physical education. Stress is defined as a substantial imbalance between the demand of a situation and the individual's capability…

  10. Physical processes in EUV sources for microlithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banine, V. Y.; Koshelev, K. N.; Swinkels, G. H. P. M.

    2011-06-01

    The source is an integral part of an extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) tool. Such a source, as well as the EUVL tool, has to fulfil very high demands both technical and cost oriented. The EUVL tool operates at a wavelength of 13.5 nm, which requires the following new developments. The light production mechanism changes from conventional lamps and lasers to relatively high-temperature emitting plasmas. The light transport, mainly refractive for deep ultraviolet (DUV), should be reflective for EUV. The source specifications as derived from the customer requirements on wafer throughput mean that the output EUV source power has to be hundreds of watts. This in its turn means that tens to hundreds of kilowatts of dissipated power has to be managed in a relatively small volume. In order to keep lithography costs as low as possible, the lifetime of the components should be as long as possible and at least of the order of thousands of hours. This poses a challenge for the sources, namely how to design and manufacture components robust enough to withstand the intense environment of high heat dissipation, flows of several keV ions as well as the atomic and particular debris within the source vessel. As with all lithography tools, the imaging requirements demand a narrow illumination bandwidth. Absorption of materials at EUV wavelengths is extreme with extinguishing lengths of the order of tens of nanometres, so the balance between high transmission and spectral purity requires careful engineering. All together, EUV lithography sources present technological challenges in various fields of physics such as plasma, optics and material science. These challenges are being tackled by the source manufacturers and investigated extensively in the research facilities around the world. An overview of the published results on the topic as well as the analyses of the physical processes behind the proposed solutions will be presented in this paper.

  11. Pre-earthquake signals: Underlying physical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Friedemann

    2011-06-01

    Prior to large earthquakes the Earth sends out transient signals, sometimes strong, more often subtle and fleeting. These signals may consist of local magnetic field variations, electromagnetic emissions over a wide range of frequencies, a variety of atmospheric and ionospheric phenomena. Great uncertainty exists as to the nature of the processes that could produce such signals, both inside the Earth's crust and at the surface. The absence of a comprehensive physical mechanism has led to a patchwork of explanations, which are not internally consistent. The recognition that most crustal rocks contain dormant electronic charge carriers in the form of peroxy defects, OSi/⧹SiO, holds the key to a deeper understanding of these pre-earthquake signals from a solid state physics perspective. When rocks are stressed, peroxy links break, releasing electronic charge carriers, h ·, known as positive holes. The positive holes are highly mobile and can flow out of the stressed subvolume. The situation is similar to that in a battery. The h · outflow is possible when the battery circuit closes. The h · outflow constitutes an electric current, which generates magnetic field variations and low frequency EM emissions. When the positive holes arrive at the Earth's surface, they lead to ionization of air at the ground-air interface. Under certain conditions corona discharges occur, which cause RF emission. The upward expansion of ionized air may be the reason for perturbations in the ionosphere. Recombination of h · charge carriers at the surface leads to a spectroscopically distinct, non-thermal IR emission.

  12. Evaluation of Select Surface Processing Techniques for In Situ Application During the Additive Manufacturing Build Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Book, Todd A.; Sangid, Michael D.

    2016-07-01

    Although additive manufacturing offers numerous performance advantages for different applications, it is not being used for critical applications due to uncertainties in structural integrity as a result of innate process variability and defects. To minimize uncertainty, the current approach relies on the concurrent utilization of process monitoring, post-processing, and non-destructive inspection in addition to an extensive material qualification process. This paper examines an alternative approach by evaluating the application of select surface process techniques, to include sliding severe plastic deformation (SPD) and fine particle shot peening, on direct metal laser sintering-produced AlSi10Mg materials. Each surface processing technique is compared to baseline as-built and post-processed samples as a proof of concept for surface enhancement. Initial results pairing sliding SPD with the manufacture's recommended thermal stress relief cycle demonstrated uniform recrystallization of the microstructure, resulting in a more homogeneous distribution of strain among the microstructure than as-built or post-processed conditions. This result demonstrates the potential for the in situ application of various surface processing techniques during the layerwise direct metal laser sintering build process.

  13. Combining Advanced Oxidation Processes: Assessment Of Process Additivity, Synergism, And Antagonism

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Robert W.; Sharma, M.P.; Gbadebo Adewuyi, Yusuf

    2007-07-01

    This paper addresses the process interactions from combining integrated processes (such as advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), biological operations, air stripping, etc.). AOPs considered include: Fenton's reagent, ultraviolet light, titanium dioxide, ozone (O{sub 3}), hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), sonication/acoustic cavitation, among others. A critical review of the technical literature has been performed, and the data has been analyzed in terms of the processes being additive, synergistic, or antagonistic. Predictions based on the individual unit operations are made and compared against the behavior of the combined unit operations. The data reported in this paper focus primarily on treatment of petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents. (authors)

  14. What Can You Do with a Physics Education...in Addition to Becoming a Professor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dion-Schwarz, Cynthia

    2005-04-01

    Physics professors have often said that an education in physics will prepare you for just about anything. Certainly, the numerical and computer skills of physics students are widely known. The broad mathematical skills of physicists regularly lead to positions throughout the financial or engineering world, and the computer skills are a basis for employment in essentially all areas. However, these are features of all technical educations. What a physics curriculum provides as well, through the understanding of classical and quantum physics, is the basis for a quick understanding of the essential features of the world around us, and the devices we use to negotiate that world. This talk will discuss examples of how physics arguments have influenced a number of major government programs by providing decision makers with a simple and clear yet technically sound understanding of the underlying issues. In addition, examples of current problems in Defense that are subject to active research and debate will be discussed. The talk will conclude with a description of qualities and qualifications needed for a physicist to successfully transition to becoming an analyst. Cynthia Dion-Schwarz, Ph.D., (George Mason University, B.S. Physics and Mathematics, 1988, University of Maryland, Ph.D. Physics, 1995) is an Assistant Director in a technical studies and analysis research organization serving the Department of Defense. She has also worked in the Pentagon as a Science Advisor in the Office of the Secretary of Defense. Before transitioning to a career as a defense analyst and technical manager, she conducted Astrophysics research at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Naval Research Laboratory. She has published over 50 articles in both physics- and defense-related venues, is an officer in the American Physical Society/Forum for Industrial and Applied Physics, and has won numerous awards for research and community service.

  15. Statistical physics of media processes: Mediaphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Dmitri V.; Mandel, Igor

    2007-04-01

    The processes of mass communications in complicated social or sociobiological systems such as marketing, economics, politics, animal populations, etc. as a subject for the special scientific subbranch-“mediaphysics”-are considered in its relation with sociophysics. A new statistical physics approach to analyze these phenomena is proposed. A keystone of the approach is an analysis of population distribution between two or many alternatives: brands, political affiliations, or opinions. Relative distances between a state of a “person's mind” and the alternatives are measures of propensity to buy (to affiliate, or to have a certain opinion). The distribution of population by those relative distances is time dependent and affected by external (economic, social, marketing, natural) and internal (influential propagation of opinions, “word of mouth”, etc.) factors, considered as fields. Specifically, the interaction and opinion-influence field can be generalized to incorporate important elements of Ising-spin-based sociophysical models and kinetic-equation ones. The distributions were described by a Schrödinger-type equation in terms of Green's functions. The developed approach has been applied to a real mass-media efficiency problem for a large company and generally demonstrated very good results despite low initial correlations of factors and the target variable.

  16. Human sperm rheotaxis: a passive physical process

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhuoran; Liu, Jun; Meriano, Jim; Ru, Changhai; Xie, Shaorong; Luo, Jun; Sun, Yu

    2016-01-01

    A long-standing question in natural reproduction is how mammalian sperm navigate inside female reproductive tract and finally reach the egg cell, or oocyte. Recently, fluid flow was proposed as a long–range guidance cue for sperm navigation. Coitus induces fluid flow from oviduct to uterus, and sperm align themselves against the flow direction and swim upstream, a phenomenon termed rheotaxis. Whether sperm rheotaxis is a passive process dominated by fluid mechanics, or sperm actively sense and adapt to fluid flow remains controversial. Here we report the first quantitative study of sperm flagellar motion during human sperm rheotaxis and provide direct evidence indicating that sperm rheotaxis is a passive process. Experimental results show that there is no significant difference in flagellar beating amplitude and asymmetry between rheotaxis-turning sperm and those sperm swimming freely in the absence of fluid flow. Additionally, fluorescence image tracking shows no Ca2+ influx during sperm rheotaxis turning, further suggesting there is no active signal transduction during human sperm rheotaxis. PMID:27005727

  17. Human sperm rheotaxis: a passive physical process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhuoran; Liu, Jun; Meriano, Jim; Ru, Changhai; Xie, Shaorong; Luo, Jun; Sun, Yu

    2016-03-01

    A long-standing question in natural reproduction is how mammalian sperm navigate inside female reproductive tract and finally reach the egg cell, or oocyte. Recently, fluid flow was proposed as a long–range guidance cue for sperm navigation. Coitus induces fluid flow from oviduct to uterus, and sperm align themselves against the flow direction and swim upstream, a phenomenon termed rheotaxis. Whether sperm rheotaxis is a passive process dominated by fluid mechanics, or sperm actively sense and adapt to fluid flow remains controversial. Here we report the first quantitative study of sperm flagellar motion during human sperm rheotaxis and provide direct evidence indicating that sperm rheotaxis is a passive process. Experimental results show that there is no significant difference in flagellar beating amplitude and asymmetry between rheotaxis-turning sperm and those sperm swimming freely in the absence of fluid flow. Additionally, fluorescence image tracking shows no Ca2+ influx during sperm rheotaxis turning, further suggesting there is no active signal transduction during human sperm rheotaxis.

  18. Microstructure-controllable Laser Additive Manufacturing Process for Metal Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei-Chin; Chuang, Chuan-Sheng; Lin, Ching-Chih; Wu, Chih-Hsien; Lin, De-Yau; Liu, Sung-Ho; Tseng, Wen-Peng; Horng, Ji-Bin

    Controlling the cooling rate of alloy during solidification is the most commonly used method for varying the material microstructure. However, the cooling rate of selective laser melting (SLM) production is constrained by the optimal parameter settings for a dense product. This study proposes a method for forming metal products via the SLM process with electromagnetic vibrations. The electromagnetic vibrations change the solidification process for a given set of SLM parameters, allowing the microstructure to be varied via magnetic flux density. This proposed method can be used for creating microstructure-controllable bio-implant products with complex shapes.

  19. Part height control of laser metal additive manufacturing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yu-Herng

    Laser Metal Deposition (LMD) has been used to not only make but also repair damaged parts in a layer-by-layer fashion. Parts made in this manner may produce less waste than those made through conventional machining processes. However, a common issue of LMD involves controlling the deposition's layer thickness. Accuracy is important, and as it increases, both the time required to produce the part and the material wasted during the material removal process (e.g., milling, lathe) decrease. The deposition rate is affected by multiple parameters, such as the powder feed rate, laser input power, axis feed rate, material type, and part design, the values of each of which may change during the LMD process. Using a mathematical model to build a generic equation that predicts the deposition's layer thickness is difficult due to these complex parameters. In this thesis, we propose a simple method that utilizes a single device. This device uses a pyrometer to monitor the current build height, thereby allowing the layer thickness to be controlled during the LMD process. This method also helps the LMD system to build parts even with complex parameters and to increase material efficiency.

  20. Thermodynamics of Irreversible Processes. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Transport Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Michael; Gallucci, V. F.

    These materials were designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. This module describes the application of irreversible thermodynamics to biology. It begins with…

  1. Thermographic process monitoring in powderbed based additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, Harald; Zeugner, Thomas; Zaeh, Michael F.

    2015-03-01

    Selective Laser Melting is utilized to build metallic parts directly from CAD-Data by solidification of thin powder layers through application of a fast scanning laser beam. In this study layerwise monitoring of the temperature distribution is used to gather information about the process stability and the resulting part quality. The heat distribution varies with different kinds of parameters including scan vector length, laser power, layer thickness and inter-part distance in the job layout which in turn influence the resulting part quality. By integration of an off-axis mounted uncooled thermal detector the solidification as well as the layer deposition are monitored and evaluated. Errors in the generation of new powder layers usually result in a locally varying layer thickness that may cause poor part quality. For effect quantification, the locally applied layer thickness is determined by evaluating the heat-up of the newly deposited powder. During the solidification process space and time-resolved data is used to characterize the zone of elevated temperatures and to derive locally varying heat dissipation properties. Potential quality indicators are evaluated and correlated to the resulting part quality: Thermal diffusivity is derived from a simplified heat dissipation model and evaluated for every pixel and cool-down phase of a layer. This allows the quantification of expected material homogeneity properties. Maximum temperature and time above certain temperatures are measured in order to detect hot spots or delamination issues that may cause a process breakdown. Furthermore, a method for quantification of sputter activity is presented. Since high sputter activity indicates unstable melt dynamics this can be used to identify parameter drifts, improper atmospheric conditions or material binding errors. The resulting surface structure after solidification complicates temperature determination on the one hand but enables the detection of potential surface defects

  2. Thermographic process monitoring in powderbed based additive manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, Harald Zaeh, Michael F.; Zeugner, Thomas

    2015-03-31

    Selective Laser Melting is utilized to build metallic parts directly from CAD-Data by solidification of thin powder layers through application of a fast scanning laser beam. In this study layerwise monitoring of the temperature distribution is used to gather information about the process stability and the resulting part quality. The heat distribution varies with different kinds of parameters including scan vector length, laser power, layer thickness and inter-part distance in the job layout which in turn influence the resulting part quality. By integration of an off-axis mounted uncooled thermal detector the solidification as well as the layer deposition are monitored and evaluated. Errors in the generation of new powder layers usually result in a locally varying layer thickness that may cause poor part quality. For effect quantification, the locally applied layer thickness is determined by evaluating the heat-up of the newly deposited powder. During the solidification process space and time-resolved data is used to characterize the zone of elevated temperatures and to derive locally varying heat dissipation properties. Potential quality indicators are evaluated and correlated to the resulting part quality: Thermal diffusivity is derived from a simplified heat dissipation model and evaluated for every pixel and cool-down phase of a layer. This allows the quantification of expected material homogeneity properties. Maximum temperature and time above certain temperatures are measured in order to detect hot spots or delamination issues that may cause a process breakdown. Furthermore, a method for quantification of sputter activity is presented. Since high sputter activity indicates unstable melt dynamics this can be used to identify parameter drifts, improper atmospheric conditions or material binding errors. The resulting surface structure after solidification complicates temperature determination on the one hand but enables the detection of potential surface defects

  3. The Plasma Physics of Processing Discharges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-28

    Karachevtsev, Ref. 6, Chapter 12 82 52. H. Furth, J Killeen, and M Rosenbluth, Physics Fluids, 6, 459, (1963) 53. W. Manheimer and C. Lashmore - Davies, MHD and Microinstabilities in Confined Plasmas, Adam Hilger, (1989) 83

  4. Nitrogen addition using a gas blow in an ESR process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, S.; Momoi, Y.; Kajikawa, K.

    2016-07-01

    A new nitrogen method for adding in an ESR process using nitrogen gas blown in through the electrode was investigated. Nitrogen gas blown through a center bore of the electrode enabled contact between the nitrogen gas and the molten steel directly underneath the electrode tip. A ɸ 145mm diameter, laboratory-sized PESR furnace was used for the study on the reaction kinetics. Also, we carried out a water-model experiment in order to check the injection depth of the gas blown in the slag. The water model showed that the gas did not reach the upper surface of the molten metal and flowed on the bottom surface of the electrode only. An EPMA was carried out for a droplet remaining on the tip of the electrode after melting. The molten steel from the tip of the electrode shows that nitrogen gas absorption occurred at the tip of the electrode. The mass transfer coefficient was around 1.0x10-2 cm/sec in the system. This value is almost the same as the coefficient at the molten steel free surface.

  5. Rapid rotation and mixing in active OB stars - Physical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahn, Jean-Paul

    2011-07-01

    In the standard description of stellar interiors, O and B stars possess a thoroughly mixed convective core surrounded by a stable radiative envelope in which no mixing occurs. But as is well known, this model disagrees strongly with the spectroscopic diagnostic of these stars, which reveals the presence at their surface of chemical elements that have been synthesized in the core. Hence the radiation zone must be the seat of some mild mixing mechanisms. The most likely to operate there are linked with the rotation: these are the shear instabilites triggered by the differential rotation, and the meridional circulation caused by the changes in the rotation profile accompanying the non-homologous evolution of the star. In addition to these hydrodynamical processes, magnetic stresses may play an important role in active stars, which host a magnetic field. These physical processes will be critically examined, together with some others that have been suggested.

  6. The Process of Physical Fitness Standards Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-12-01

    subjects, some very interesting dimensions of the effects of exercise on anxiety were documented and are summarized below- - Trainingprograms...a specific cause-and- effect relationship is difficult to estab- lish. The research certainly indicates that physical activity may help the disorder ...technically managed by the Air Force Research Laboratory Human Effectiveness Directorate, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, and operated by

  7. Foreword: Additive Manufacturing: Interrelationships of Fabrication, Constitutive Relationships Targeting Performance, and Feedback to Process Control

    DOE PAGES

    Carpenter, John S.; Beese, Allison M.; Bourell, David L.; ...

    2015-06-26

    Additive manufacturing (AM) offers distinct advantages over conventional manufacturing processes including the capability to both build and repair complex part shapes; to integrate and consolidate parts and thus overcome joining concerns; and to locally tailor material compositions as well as properties. Moreover, a variety of fields such as aerospace, military, automotive, and biomedical are employing this manufacturing technique as a way to decrease costs, increase manufacturing agility, and explore novel geometry/functionalities. In order to increase acceptance of AM as a viable processing method, pathways for qualifying both the material and the process need to be developed and, perhaps, standardized. Thismore » symposium was designed to serve as a venue for the international AM community—including government, academia, and industry—to define the fundamental interrelationships between feedstock, processing, microstructure, shape, mechanical behavior/materials properties, and function/performance. Eventually, insight into the connections between processing, microstructure, property, and performance will be achieved through experimental observations, theoretical advances, and computational modeling of physical processes. Finally, once this insight matures, AM will be able to move from the realm of making parts to making qualified materials that are certified for use with minimal need for post-fabrication characterization.« less

  8. Foreword: Additive Manufacturing: Interrelationships of Fabrication, Constitutive Relationships Targeting Performance, and Feedback to Process Control

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, John S.; Beese, Allison M.; Bourell, David L.; Hamilton, Reginald F.; Mishra, Rajiv; Sears, James

    2015-06-26

    Additive manufacturing (AM) offers distinct advantages over conventional manufacturing processes including the capability to both build and repair complex part shapes; to integrate and consolidate parts and thus overcome joining concerns; and to locally tailor material compositions as well as properties. Moreover, a variety of fields such as aerospace, military, automotive, and biomedical are employing this manufacturing technique as a way to decrease costs, increase manufacturing agility, and explore novel geometry/functionalities. In order to increase acceptance of AM as a viable processing method, pathways for qualifying both the material and the process need to be developed and, perhaps, standardized. This symposium was designed to serve as a venue for the international AM community—including government, academia, and industry—to define the fundamental interrelationships between feedstock, processing, microstructure, shape, mechanical behavior/materials properties, and function/performance. Eventually, insight into the connections between processing, microstructure, property, and performance will be achieved through experimental observations, theoretical advances, and computational modeling of physical processes. Finally, once this insight matures, AM will be able to move from the realm of making parts to making qualified materials that are certified for use with minimal need for post-fabrication characterization.

  9. Coronal loop seismology using damping of standing kink oscillations by mode coupling. II. additional physical effects and Bayesian analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascoe, D. J.; Anfinogentov, S.; Nisticò, G.; Goddard, C. R.; Nakariakov, V. M.

    2017-04-01

    Context. The strong damping of kink oscillations of coronal loops can be explained by mode coupling. The damping envelope depends on the transverse density profile of the loop. Observational measurements of the damping envelope have been used to determine the transverse loop structure which is important for understanding other physical processes such as heating. Aims: The general damping envelope describing the mode coupling of kink waves consists of a Gaussian damping regime followed by an exponential damping regime. Recent observational detection of these damping regimes has been employed as a seismological tool. We extend the description of the damping behaviour to account for additional physical effects, namely a time-dependent period of oscillation, the presence of additional longitudinal harmonics, and the decayless regime of standing kink oscillations. Methods: We examine four examples of standing kink oscillations observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). We use forward modelling of the loop position and investigate the dependence on the model parameters using Bayesian inference and Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling. Results: Our improvements to the physical model combined with the use of Bayesian inference and MCMC produce improved estimates of model parameters and their uncertainties. Calculation of the Bayes factor also allows us to compare the suitability of different physical models. We also use a new method based on spline interpolation of the zeroes of the oscillation to accurately describe the background trend of the oscillating loop. Conclusions: This powerful and robust method allows for accurate seismology of coronal loops, in particular the transverse density profile, and potentially reveals additional physical effects.

  10. Electrical Storm Simulation to Improve the Learning Physics Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martínez Muñoz, Miriam; Jiménez Rodríguez, María Lourdes; Gutiérrez de Mesa, José Antonio

    2013-01-01

    This work is part of a research project whose main objective is to understand the impact that the use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) has on the teaching and learning process on the subject of Physics. We will show that, with the use of a storm simulator, physics students improve their learning process on one hand they understand…

  11. Additive manufacturing of Inconel 718 using electron beam melting: Processing, post-processing, & mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sames, William James, V.

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) process parameters were studied for production of the high temperature alloy Inconel 718 using Electron Beam Melting (EBM) to better understand the relationship between processing, microstructure, and mechanical properties. Processing parameters were analyzed for impact on process time, process temperature, and the amount of applied energy. The applied electron beam energy was shown to be integral to the formation of swelling defects. Standard features in the microstructure were identified, including previously unidentified solidification features such as shrinkage porosity and non-equilibrium phases. The as-solidified structure does not persist in the bulk of EBM parts due to a high process hold temperature (˜1000°C), which causes in situ homogenization. The most significant variability in as-fabricated microstructure is the formation of intragranular delta-phase needles, which can form in samples produced with lower process temperatures (< 960°C). A novel approach was developed and demonstrated for controlling the temperature of cool down, thus providing a technique for in situ heat treatment of material. This technique was used to produce material with hardness of 478+/-7 HV with no post-processing, which exceeds the hardness of peak-aged Inconel 718. Traditional post-processing methods of hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and solution treatment and aging (STA) were found to result in variability in grain growth and phase solution. Recrystallization and grain structure are identified as possible mechanisms to promote grain growth. These results led to the conclusion that the first step in thermal post-processing of EBM Inconel 718 should be an optimized solution treatment to reset phase variation in the as-fabricated microstructure without incurring significant grain growth. Such an optimized solution treatment was developed (1120°C, 2hr) for application prior to aging or HIP. The majority of as-fabricated tensile properties met ASTM

  12. Polypropylene Crystallization as Physical Gelation Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogodina, N. V.; Winter, H. H.

    1998-03-01

    Early stages of crystallization of polymers may be viewed as physical gelation. This will be shown with 4 commercial isotactic polypropylenes which have been studied by dynamic mechanical experiments at low degrees of supercooling below their melting temperature. The physical gel point is manifested in the power law behavior of the shear relaxation modulus G(t)=St^-n for λo < t < λ_pg where S is the gel stiffness, n is the relaxation exponent, λo and λ_pg are the shortest and the longest relaxation times correspondingly. With an increase of supercooling the relaxation exponent decreases, gel stiffness increases, the gel time at which the material passes the gel point decreases exponentially. Relative crystallinity is governed by the ratio of gelation and crystallization rates. The degree of crystallinity at the gel point is very low (about 5% or less), that confirms the first result of Schwittay et.al., Faraday Discussions, 101, 93, (1995). This very low degree of crystallinity suggests that only few junctions are necessary to form a network that spans the entire sample. The network in this case is "loose" and the critical gel is soft.

  13. Foundations of Physical Theory, I: Force and Energy. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Fundamentals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Nolan E.

    This module is part of a series designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. This module is one of two units on the foundations of physical theory and the…

  14. Effect of PMMA filler particles addition on the physical properties of resin composite.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yoshiko; Takagaki, Tomohiro; Okuda, Makoto; Ikeda, Masaomi; Kadoma, Yoshinori; Yamauchi, Junichi; Okada, Koichi; Sadr, Alireza; Nikaido, Toru; Tagami, Junji

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of additional polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) fillers on the physical properties of experimental resin composites. PMMA particles (d=30 µm) were added to an experimental methacrylate-based resin composite in five concentrations of 0, 2.0, 4.8, 9.1, and 23.1 wt%. Properties such as contact angle, water sorption and compressive strength were measured and the fractured specimens were observed with a scanning electron microscope. The results showed that a small amount (2 wt%) of additional PMMA fillers inhibited the crack propagation and enhanced compressive strengths of the resin composites, without a significant change in water contact angle of surface or increased water sorption. However, in higher portions, the mechanical properties were not improved as a debonding at the interface between untreated fillers and the matrix, or failure within the organic filler could reduce the compressive yield strength of the composite.

  15. Turbulence and Fluid Flow: Perspectives. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Transport Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, James R.

    This module is part of a series on Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems. The materials were designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process.…

  16. Black rings and the physical process version of the first law of thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Rogatko, Marek

    2005-10-01

    We consider the problem of the physical process version of the first law of black ring thermodynamics in n-dimensional Einstein gravity with additional (p+1)-form field strength and dilaton fields. The first order variations of mass, angular momentum and local charge for black ring are derived. From them we prove the physical process version of the first law of thermodynamic for stationary black rings.

  17. Effect of addition of Versagel on microbial, chemical, and physical properties of low-fat yogurt.

    PubMed

    Ramchandran, L; Shah, N P

    2008-09-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of Versagel on the growth and proteolytic activity of Streptococcus thermophilus 1275 and Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus 1368 and angiotensin-I converting enzyme inhibitory activity of the peptides generated thereby as well as on the physical properties of low-fat yogurt during a storage period of 28 d at 4 degrees C. Three different types of low-fat yogurts, YV0, YV1, and YV2, were prepared using Versagel as a fat replacer. The fermentation time of the low-fat yogurts containing Versagel was less than that of the control yogurt (YV0). The starter cultures maintained their viability (8.68 to 8.81 log CFU/g of S. thermophilus and 8.51 to 8.81 log CFU/g of L. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus) in all the yogurts throughout the storage period. There was some decrease in the pH of the yogurts during storage and an increase in the concentration of lactic acid. However, the proteolytic and ACE-inhibitory potential of the starter cultures was suppressed in the presence of Versagel. On the other hand, the addition of Versagel had a positive impact on the physical properties of the low-fat yogurt, namely, spontaneous whey separation, firmness, and pseudoplastic properties.

  18. Distributed System of Processing of Data of Physical Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarov, A. A.; Moiseev, A. N.

    2014-11-01

    Complication of physical experiments and increasing volumes of experimental data necessitate the application of supercomputer and distributed computing systems for data processing. Design and development of such systems, their mathematical modeling, and investigation of their characteristics and functional capabilities is an urgent scientific and practical problem. In the present work, the characteristics of operation of such distributed system of processing of data of physical experiments are investigated using the apparatus of theory of queuing networks.

  19. Additive effects of physical stress and herbivores on intertidal seaweed biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Williams, Susan L; Bracken, Matthew E S; Jones, Emily

    2013-05-01

    Patterns in rocky intertidal seaweed biodiversity influence the resilience and functioning of these important primary producer communities. In turn, seaweed biodiversity patterns are the result of many ecological factors. We determined the influences of thermal and desiccation stress, herbivory, and nutrients on seaweed biodiversity on a northern California rocky shoreline. In a fully crossed design at two tidal heights at wave-protected and exposed sites, we deployed screens to reduce stress, removed herbivores, and added nutrients for 18 months. The treatments reduced temperature, increased relative humidity, decreased herbivore abundances, and increased nitrogen in both seawater and seaweeds. Seaweed abundance and biodiversity (cover, biomass, species richness, diversity, evenness, and community composition) were influenced by tidal height, physical stress, and herbivores. Wave exposure affected all response variables except biomass and evenness. Stress and herbivores had independent additive effects on seaweed abundance and diversity. Physical stress did not make the community as a whole more susceptible to herbivores, and screens had overarching positive effects on seaweed biodiversity even though they also had positive effects on herbivore abundance. Nutrients had virtually no effect on seaweed biodiversity, and we observed no bottom-up effects of nutrient addition on herbivore density or biomass. Small green algae and diatoms were important contributors to overall algal cover and to changes in composition across treatments, but larger macroalgae dominated the species richness response. The striking absence of interactions between stress and herbivory highlights how seaweed communities can respond independently to important drivers of biodiversity. Thus, nonadditive, potentially synergistic effects do not necessarily complicate the understanding of how seaweed biodiversity responds to environmental change.

  20. Role of the subgrid-scale physical processes in supermodelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, J.

    2011-12-01

    The basic ides of supermodelling is in overcoming deficits of existing models by combining them together to improve our ability of climate simulations and prediction. However, in order to exploit this method better, we have to pay special attention to the common defects of the current climate models. Representation of subgrid-scale physical processes is such a particular example. . The present talk presents the author's point of view on representation of subgrid-scale processes in the above general question in mind. The focus of the talk will be on interplay between traditional parameterizations and recently proposed superparameterization (also often called "multiscale modelling"), but it also covers the issues of downscaling as well as possibilities of introducing mesh-refinement approaches into the context of subgrid-scale modelling. The author's main perspective is that the subgrid-scale parameterization should not be considered as a distinguished approach in contrast to explicit (more direct) modelling, such as superparameterization, but a hierarchy of modelling approaches should be constructed by taking various intermediate approaches. The mass-flux convection parameterization is taken as an example in order to make this point. It will be shown that at the most basic level, the mass-flux parameterization is equivalent to a finite-volume numerical approach, though various additional approximations and hypotheses must be introduced in order to arrive at a classical mass-flux parameterization. At the mathematical level, the multiresolution analysis based on wavelet provides a basic source of inspirations for developing this general perspective. From this perspective, the issue of parameterization is considered as "compression" of a full explicit model in the same sense as the wavelet can be used for the image compression. This perspective also leads to a concept of compression of physics. Compression of cloud microphysics would be the most urgent issue

  1. Physical Processes in the MAGO/MFT Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Garanin, Sergey F; Reinovsky, Robert E.

    2015-03-23

    The Monograph is devoted to theoretical discussion of the physical effects, which are most significant for the alternative approach to the problem of controlled thermonuclear fusion (CTF): the MAGO/MTF approach. The book includes the description of the approach, its difference from the major CTF systems—magnetic confinement and inertial confinement systems. General physical methods of the processes simulation in this approach are considered, including plasma transport phenomena and radiation, and the theory of transverse collisionless shock waves, the surface discharges theory, important for such kind of research. Different flows and magneto-hydrodynamic plasma instabilities occurring in the frames of this approach are also considered. In virtue of the general physical essence of the considered phenomena the presented results are applicable to a wide range of plasma physics and hydrodynamics processes. The book is intended for the plasma physics and hydrodynamics specialists, post-graduate students, and senior students-physicists.

  2. 15 CFR 713.4 - Advance declaration requirements for additionally planned production, processing, or consumption...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING SCHEDULE 2 CHEMICALS § 713.4 Advance declaration requirements for additionally planned production... additionally planned production, processing, or consumption of Schedule 2 chemicals. 713.4 Section...

  3. 15 CFR 713.4 - Advance declaration requirements for additionally planned production, processing, or consumption...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING SCHEDULE 2 CHEMICALS § 713.4 Advance declaration requirements for additionally planned production... additionally planned production, processing, or consumption of Schedule 2 chemicals. 713.4 Section...

  4. 15 CFR 713.4 - Advance declaration requirements for additionally planned production, processing, or consumption...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING SCHEDULE 2 CHEMICALS § 713.4 Advance declaration requirements for additionally planned production... additionally planned production, processing, or consumption of Schedule 2 chemicals. 713.4 Section...

  5. 15 CFR 713.4 - Advance declaration requirements for additionally planned production, processing, or consumption...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING SCHEDULE 2 CHEMICALS § 713.4 Advance declaration requirements for additionally planned production... additionally planned production, processing, or consumption of Schedule 2 chemicals. 713.4 Section...

  6. Ontology of physics for biology: representing physical dependencies as a basis for biological processes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In prior work, we presented the Ontology of Physics for Biology (OPB) as a computational ontology for use in the annotation and representations of biophysical knowledge encoded in repositories of physics-based biosimulation models. We introduced OPB:Physical entity and OPB:Physical property classes that extend available spatiotemporal representations of physical entities and processes to explicitly represent the thermodynamics and dynamics of physiological processes. Our utilitarian, long-term aim is to develop computational tools for creating and querying formalized physiological knowledge for use by multiscale “physiome” projects such as the EU’s Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) and NIH’s Virtual Physiological Rat (VPR). Results Here we describe the OPB:Physical dependency taxonomy of classes that represent of the laws of classical physics that are the “rules” by which physical properties of physical entities change during occurrences of physical processes. For example, the fluid analog of Ohm’s law (as for electric currents) is used to describe how a blood flow rate depends on a blood pressure gradient. Hooke’s law (as in elastic deformations of springs) is used to describe how an increase in vascular volume increases blood pressure. We classify such dependencies according to the flow, transformation, and storage of thermodynamic energy that occurs during processes governed by the dependencies. Conclusions We have developed the OPB and annotation methods to represent the meaning—the biophysical semantics—of the mathematical statements of physiological analysis and the biophysical content of models and datasets. Here we describe and discuss our approach to an ontological representation of physical laws (as dependencies) and properties as encoded for the mathematical analysis of biophysical processes. PMID:24295137

  7. Motor imagery of locomotion with an additional load: actual load experience does not affect differences between physical and mental durations.

    PubMed

    Munzert, Jörn; Blischke, Klaus; Krüger, Britta

    2015-03-01

    Motor imagery relies strongly on motor representations. Currently, it is widely accepted that both the imagery and execution of actions share the same neural representations (Jeannerod, Neuroimage 14:S103-S109, 2001). Comparing mental with actual movement durations opens a window through which to examine motor representations and how they relate to cognitive motor processes. The present experiment examined mental durations reported by participants standing upright who imagined walking either with or without an additional load while actually carrying or not carrying that same load. Results showed a robust effect of longer durations when imagining the additional load during mental walking, whereas physical walking with an additional load did not extend movement durations accordingly. However, experiencing an actual load during imagery did not influence mental durations substantially. This dissociation of load-related effects can be interpreted as being due to an interaction of motor processes and their cognitive representation along with a reduction in neural activity in vestibular and somatosensory areas during imagery of locomotion. It is argued that this effect might be specific to locomotion and not generalize to a broader range of movements.

  8. Development of magnetodielectric materials to be used in additive manufacturing processes for high-frequency applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Paul Emerson, II

    Electrical devices for very-high frequency (VHF, 0.03 -- 0.3 GHz) and ultra-high frequency (UHF, 0.3 -- 3.0 GHz) are commonly used for communications. However, the wavelengths, lambda, of these frequency bands correspond to lengths between 10 and 0.1 m, resulting in prohibitively large devices. Materials with an index of refraction, n, greater than 1 can be used to effectively shrink these devices by a factor of 1/ n. In this thesis, magnetodielectric materials (MDM), where n ≥1, have been made to be used in additive manufacturing processes with strict particle size requirements and were developed using various methods, such as polyol reduction and conventional ceramic solid state processing. These materials were characterized using x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM), to determine their crystalline, physical, and direct current (DC) magnetization properties. The techniques used to synthesize the MDM yielded particles that were chemically similar, but had drastically different physical properties which heavily influences their high-frequency electromagnetic properties. These materials were then uniformly dispersed into a non-conducting medium, such as a low-electrical loss polymer or resin, and formed into composite samples with variable volumetric loading. These composite samples were measured using several techniques to characterize the frequency-dependent electromagnetic (EM) properties, such as relative permeability, relative permittivity, and their respective losses. Finite element method (FEM) simulations were performed using these MDM-composites to design a spiral antenna to be used at approximately 585 MHz.

  9. Effect of processing parameters and glycerin addition on the properties of Al foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilani, Hossein; Jafari, Sajjad; Gholami, Roozbeh; Habibolahzadeh, Ali; Mirshahi, Mohammad

    2012-04-01

    Aluminum foam has been produced by sintering and dissolution processes using NaCl powders as a space holder. In this research, glycerin is used as a novel lubricant along with acetone. The effects of the processing parameters including compacting pressure, sintering temperatures (620, 640 and 650 °C), size, and volume fraction of the space holder, on the physical and mechanical properties of the produced foams have been investigated. Due to segregation of the Al and NaCl powders at high compaction pressures, spalling of Al foams was observed. Meanwhile, adding small amounts of acetone and glycerin to the mixture ensures homogeneity and prevents segregation of dissimilar powders at varying pressure. Moreover, the addition of glycerin provides an improved homogenous stress distribution within the produced foams during mechanical testing, which in turn halts crack propagation. Meanwhile, an alternative technique to remove NaCl particles during the dissolution stage has been proposed. The results showed that high quality foams were successfully produced under a compaction pressure range of 250-265 MPa and sintering temperature of 650 °C.

  10. Nanoclay addition to a conventional glass ionomer cements: Influence on physical properties

    PubMed Central

    Fareed, Muhammad A.; Stamboulis, Artemis

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the present study is to investigate the reinforcement effect of polymer-grade montmorillonite (PGN nanoclay) on physical properties of glass ionomer cement (GIC). Materials and Methods: The PGN nanoclay was dispersed in the liquid portion of GIC (HiFi, Advanced Healthcare, Kent, UK) at 1%, 2% and 4% (w/w). Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to quantify the polymer liquid of GICs after dispersion of nanoclay. The molecular weight (Mw) of HiFi liquid was determined by gel permeation chromatography. The compressive strength (CS), diametral-tensile strength, flexural strength (FS) and flexural modulus (Ef) of cements (n = 20) were measured after storage for 1 day, 1 week and 1 month. Fractured surface was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The working and setting time (WT and ST) of cements was measured by a modified Wilson's rheometer. Results: The FTIR results showed a new peak at 1041 cm−1 which increased in intensity with an increase in the nanoclay content and was related to the Si-O stretching mode in PGN nanoclay. The Mw of poly (acrylic acid) used to form cement was in the range of 53,000 g/mol. The nanoclay reinforced GICs containing <2% nanoclays exhibited higher CS and FS. The Ef cement with 1% nanoclays was significantly higher. The WT and ST of 1% nanoclay reinforced cement were similar to the control cement but were reduced with 2% and 4% nanoclay addition. Conclusion: The dispersion of nanoclays in GICs was achieved, and GIC containing 2 wt% nanoclay is a promising restorative materials with improved physical properties. PMID:25512724

  11. Physical-chemical processes in a protoplanetary cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavrukhina, Avgusta K.

    1991-01-01

    Physical-chemical processes in a protoplanetary cloud are discussed. The following subject areas are covered: (1) characteristics of the chemical composition of molecular interstellar clouds; (2) properties and physico-chemical process in the genesis of interstellar dust grains; and (3) the isotope composition of volatiles in bodies of the Solar System.

  12. Process Evaluation Results from the HEALTHY Physical Education Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, William J.; Zeveloff, Abigail; Steckler, Allan; Schneider, Margaret; Thompson, Deborah; Pham, Trang; Volpe, Stella L.; Hindes, Katie; Sleigh, Adriana; McMurray, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    Process evaluation is an assessment of the implementation of an intervention. A process evaluation component was embedded in the HEALTHY study, a primary prevention trial for Type 2 diabetes implemented over 3 years in 21 middle schools across the United States. The HEALTHY physical education (PE) intervention aimed at maximizing student…

  13. Physical processes within the nocturnal stratus-topped boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Moeng, C.H.; Shen, S. ); Randall, D.A. )

    1992-12-15

    Within the stratus-topped boundary layer many physical processes are involved: longwave radiation cooling, entrainment, latent heating, surface heating, solar heating, drizzling, etc. How all processes combine to maintain the turbulence within the stratus-topped boundary layer remains an unsolved problem. The large-eddy simulation technique is used to examine the first four physical processes mentioned. First, the contribution of each physical process to the thermodynamic differences between the updraft and downdraft branches of turbulent circulations is examined through a conditional sampling. Second, these mean thermodynamic differences are shown to express well the vertical distributions of heat and moisture fluxes within stratus-topped boundary layers. These provide a method to validate the process-partitioning technique. (This technique assumes that the net flux profile can be partitioned into different component-flux profiles according to physical processes and that each partitioned component flux is linear in height.) In this paper, the heat and moisture fluxes are process partitioned, and each component flux is found to contribute to the net flux in a way that is consistent with its corresponding process contribution to the mean thermodynamic differences between updrafts and downdrafts. Also, the net flux obtained by summing all component fluxes agrees well with that obtained directly from the large-eddy simulations.

  14. Process evaluation results from the HEALTHY physical education intervention

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Process evaluation is an assessment of the implementation of an intervention. A process evaluation component was embedded in the HEALTHY study, a primary prevention trial for Type 2 diabetes implemented over 3 years in 21 middle schools across the United States. The HEALTHY physical education (PE) i...

  15. Optimization of NLC machine parameters for specific physics processes

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Kathleen A

    1999-10-11

    We examine the optimization of NLC parameters at 500, 1000, and 1500 GeV c.m. energy for specific classes of physics processes, in particular, top and stop pair production, and W-W scattering processes. Our focus is on optimizing the luminosity spectrum, while maintaining or improving machine operability.

  16. The diagnostic process: examples in orthopedic physical therapy.

    PubMed

    Delitto, A; Snyder-Mackler, L

    1995-03-01

    Diagnosis by the physical therapist has received increased attention in the physical therapy literature. The contributions thus far are in agreement that although physical therapists do not identify disease in the sense of pathology, they certainly can identify clusters of signs, symptoms, symptom-related behavior, and other data from patient history and other testing. These clusters can be labeled as classifications or diagnoses by physical therapists and can guide management of the patient. The purpose of this article is to discuss what has yet to be included in articles about diagnosis: the diagnostic process. We first acknowledge the complexity of the diagnostic process, reviewing the study of clinical diagnosis mostly from the field of medicine, including statistical as well as process-tracing approaches. We next discuss steps we believe are important to consider in order to interface the diagnostic process into entry-level training curricula, urging teachers and mentors of future physical therapists to rethink our emphasis on the problem-oriented medical record's "SOAP" type of approach as a clinical decision-making format. We next discuss error and clinical judgment and strategies to constructively deal with error in the clinical environment. We urge physical therapists to strive to reach a point at which we can (1) identify and classify patients in such a manner that allows for more efficient treatment management and (2) demonstrate such abilities in peer-reviewed publication form.

  17. Chemical and Physical Reactions of Wellbore Cement under CO2 Storage Conditions: Effects of Cement Additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutchko, B. G.; Strazisar, B. R.; Huerta, N.; Lowry, G. V.; Dzombak, D. A.; Thaulow, N.

    2008-12-01

    Sequestration of CO2 into geologic formations requires long-term storage and low leakage rates to be effective. Active and abandoned wells in candidate storage formations must be evaluated as potential leakage points. Wellbore integrity is an important part of an overall integrated assessment program being developed at NETL to assess potential risks at CO2 storage sites. Such a program is needed for ongoing policy and regulatory decisions for geologic carbon sequestration. The permeability and integrity of the cement in the well is a primary factor affecting its ability to prevent leakage. Cement must be able to maintain low permeability over lengthy exposure to reservoir conditions in a CO2 injection and storage scenario. Although it is known that cement may be altered by exposure to CO2, the results of ongoing research indicate that cement curing conditions, fluid properties, and cement additives play a significant role in the rate of alteration and reaction. The objective of this study is to improve understanding of the factors affecting wellbore cement integrity for large-scale geologic carbon sequestration projects. Due to the high frequency use of additives (pozzolan) in wellbore cement, it is also essential to understand the reaction of these cement-pozzolan systems upon exposure to CO2 under sequestration conditions (15.5 MPa and 50°C). Laboratory experiments were performed to determine the physical and chemical changes, as well as the rate of alteration of commonly used pozzolan-cement systems under simulated sequestration reservoir conditions, including both supercritical CO2 and CO2-saturated brine. The rate of alteration of the cement-pozzolan systems is considerably faster than with neat cement. However, the alteration of physical properties is much less significant with the pozzolanic blends. Permeability of a carbonated pozzolanic cement paste remains sufficiently small to block significant vertical migration of CO2 in a wellbore. All of the

  18. Effect of tellurium addition on the physical properties of germanium selenide glassy semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Pankaj; Katyal, S. C.

    2008-10-01

    Effect of tellurium (Te) addition on the physical properties, density ( ρ), molar volume ( Vm), compactness ( δ), cohesive energy (CE), coordination number ( m), lone pair electrons ( L) and glass transition temperature ( Tg) of Ge 10Se 90-xTe x ( x=0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50) bulk glassy alloy has been investigated. The density of the glassy alloys has been found to increase with the increasing Te content. The molar volume and compactness of the structure of the glass, determined from measured density of the glass, have been found to increase with the increase of Te content. The CE of the investigated samples has been calculated using the chemical bond approach (CBA) and is correlated with decrease in optical band gap with the increase of Te content. The glass transition temperature has been estimated using Tichy-Ticha approach and found to increase with the increase of Te content. This has been observed that the estimated glass transition temperature using Tichy-Ticha approach is not consistent with experimental results.

  19. Integrated Modeling and Analysis of Physical Oceanographic and Acoustic Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    Oceanographic and Acoustic Processes Timothy F. Duda Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Department, MS 11 Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Woods... Hole , MA 02543 phone: (508) 289-2495 fax: (508) 457-2194 email: tduda@whoi.edu James F. Lynch Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering...Department, MS 11 Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Woods Hole , MA 02543 phone: (508) 289-2230 fax: (508) 457-2194 email: jlynch@whoi.edu Ying

  20. Physics-based signal processing algorithms for micromachined cantilever arrays

    DOEpatents

    Candy, James V; Clague, David S; Lee, Christopher L; Rudd, Robert E; Burnham, Alan K; Tringe, Joseph W

    2013-11-19

    A method of using physics-based signal processing algorithms for micromachined cantilever arrays. The methods utilize deflection of a micromachined cantilever that represents the chemical, biological, or physical element being detected. One embodiment of the method comprises the steps of modeling the deflection of the micromachined cantilever producing a deflection model, sensing the deflection of the micromachined cantilever and producing a signal representing the deflection, and comparing the signal representing the deflection with the deflection model.

  1. Technical options for processing additional light tight oil volumes within the United States

    EIA Publications

    2015-01-01

    This report examines technical options for processing additional LTO volumes within the United States. Domestic processing of additional LTO would enable an increase in petroleum product exports from the United States, already the world’s largest net exporter of petroleum products. Unlike crude oil, products are not subject to export limitations or licensing requirements. While this is one possible approach to absorbing higher domestic LTO production in the absence of a relaxation of current limitations on crude exports, domestic LTO would have to be priced at a level required to encourage additional LTO runs at existing refinery units, debottlenecking, or possible additions of processing capacity.

  2. Canada's physical activity guides: background, process, and development.

    PubMed

    Sharratt, Michael T; Hearst, William E

    2007-01-01

    This historical background paper chronicles the major events leading to the development of Canada's physical activity guides (for children, youth, adults, and older adults). The paper outlines the process and the steps used, including information (where applicable) regarding national partners, project administration, Health Canada communications, product development, endorsement, distribution and implementation, collateral activities, media relations and evaluation framework. Brief summaries of the science that led to the recommended guidelines are included. The paper also summarizes the various physical activity guide assessment and evaluation projects and their findings, particularly as they relate to research carried out on Canada's physical activity guides for children and youth (and the associated support resources).

  3. Late Chondritic Additions and Planet and Planetesimal Growth: Evaluation of Physical and Chemical Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Studies of terrestrial peridotite and martian and achondritic meteorites have led to the conclusion that addition of chondritic material to growing planets or planetesimals, after core formation, occurred on Earth, Mars, asteroid 4 Vesta, and the parent body of the angritic meteorites [1-4]. One study even proposed that this was a common process in the final stages of growth [5]. These conclusions are based almost entirely on the highly siderophile elements (HSE; Re, Au, Pt, Pd, Rh, Ru, Ir, Os). The HSE are a group of eight elements that have been used to argue for late accretion of chondritic material to the Earth after core formation was complete (e.g., [6]). This idea was originally proposed because the D(metal/silicate) values for the HSE are so high, yet their concentration in the mantle is too high to be consistent with such high Ds. The HSE also are present in chondritic relative abundances and hence require similar Ds if this is the result of core-mantle equilibration. Since the work of [6] there has been a realization that core formation at high PT conditions can explain the abundances of many siderophile elements in the mantle (e.g., [7]), but such detailed high PT partitioning data are lacking for many of the HSE to evaluate whether such ideas are viable for all four bodies. Consideration of other chemical parameters reveals larger problems that are difficult to overcome, but must be addressed in any scenario which calls on the addition of chondritic material to a reduced mantle. Yet these problems are rarely discussed or emphasized, making the late chondritic (or late veneer) addition hypothesis suspect.

  4. Simulation of Powder Layer Deposition in Additive Manufacturing Processes Using the Discrete Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Herbold, E. B.; Walton, O.; Homel, M. A.

    2015-10-26

    This document serves as a final report to a small effort where several improvements were added to a LLNL code GEODYN-­L to develop Discrete Element Method (DEM) algorithms coupled to Lagrangian Finite Element (FE) solvers to investigate powder-­bed formation problems for additive manufacturing. The results from these simulations will be assessed for inclusion as the initial conditions for Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) simulations performed with ALE3D. The algorithms were written and performed on parallel computing platforms at LLNL. The total funding level was 3-­4 weeks of an FTE split amongst two staff scientists and one post-­doc. The DEM simulations emulated, as much as was feasible, the physical process of depositing a new layer of powder over a bed of existing powder. The DEM simulations utilized truncated size distributions spanning realistic size ranges with a size distribution profile consistent with realistic sample set. A minimum simulation sample size on the order of 40-­particles square by 10-­particles deep was utilized in these scoping studies in order to evaluate the potential effects of size segregation variation with distance displaced in front of a screed blade. A reasonable method for evaluating the problem was developed and validated. Several simulations were performed to show the viability of the approach. Future investigations will focus on running various simulations investigating powder particle sizing and screen geometries.

  5. Soil physical and hydrological properties as affected by long-term addition of various organic amendments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eden, Marie; Völkel, Jörg; Mercier, Vincent; Labat, Christophe; Houot, Sabine

    2014-05-01

    The use of organic residues as soil amendments in agriculture not only reduces the amount of waste needing to be disposed of; it may also lead to improvements in soil properties, including physical and hydrological ones. The present study examines a long-term experiment called "Qualiagro", run jointly by INRA and Veolia Environment in Feucherolles, France (near Paris). It was initiated in 1998 on a loess-derived silt loam (787 g/kg silt, 152 g/kg clay) and includes ten treatments: four types of organic amendments and a control (CNT) each at two levels of mineral nitrogen (N) addition: minimal (Nmin) and optimal (Nopt). The amendments include three types of compost and farmyard manure (FYM), which were applied every other year at a rate of ca. 4 t carbon ha-1. The composts include municipal solid waste compost (MSW), co-compost of green wastes and sewage sludge (GWS), and biowaste compost (BIO). The plots are arranged in a randomized block design and have a size of 450 m²; each treatment is replicated four times (total of 40 plots). Ca. 15 years after the start of the experiment soil organic carbon (OC) had continuously increased in the amended plots, while it remained stable or decreased in the control plots. This compost- or manure-induced increase in OC plays a key role, affecting numerous dependant soil properties like bulk density, porosity and water retention. The water holding capacity (WHC) of a soil is of particular interest to farmers in terms of water supply for plants, but also indicates soil quality and functionality. Addition of OC may affect WHC in different ways: carbon-induced aggregation may increase larger-pore volume and hence WHC at the wet end while increased surface areas may lead to an increased retention of water at the dry end. Consequently it is difficult to predict (e.g. with pedotransfer functions) the impact on the amount of water available for plants (PAW), which was experimentally determined for the soils, along with the entire range

  6. Structural, Thermal, Physical, Mechanical, and Barrier Properties of Chitosan Films with the Addition of Xanthan Gum.

    PubMed

    de Morais Lima, Maria; Carneiro, Lucia Cesar; Bianchini, Daniela; Dias, Alvaro Renato Guerra; Zavareze, Elessandra da Rosa; Prentice, Carlos; Moreira, Angelita da Silveira

    2017-03-01

    Films based on chitosan and xanthan gum were prepared using casting technique aiming to investigate the potential of these polymers as packaging materials. Six formulations of films were studied varying the proportion of chitosan and xanthan gum: 100:0 (chitosan:xanthan gum, w/w, C100XG0 film); 90:10 (chitosan:xanthan gum, w/w, C90XG10 film); 80:20 (chitosan:xanthan gum, w/w, C80XG20 film); 70:30 (chitosan:xanthan gum, w/w, C70XG30 film); 60:40 (chitosan:xanthan gum, w/w, C60XG40 film); and 50:50 (chitosan:xanthan gum, w/w, C50XG50 film). The total quantity of solids (chitosan and xanthan gum) in the filmogenic solution was 1.5 g per 100 mL of aqueous solution for all treatments, according to the proportion of each polymer. The films were evaluated by their functional groups, structural, thermal, morphological, physical, mechanical, and barrier properties. All films have presented endothermic peaks in the range of 122 to 175 °C and broad exothermic peaks above 200 °C, which were assigned to the melting temperature and thermal decomposition, respectively. These results demonstrated that films with xanthan gum have the highest Tm and Δm H. The films containing higher content of xanthan gum show also the highest tensile strength and the lowest elongation. Xanthan gum addition did not affect the water vapor permeability, solubility, and moisture of films. This set of data suggests the formation of chitosan-xanthan complexes in the films.

  7. Physical mechanism and statistics of occurrence of an additional layer in the equatorial ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balan, N.; Batista, I. S.; Abdu, M. A.; MacDougall, J.; Bailey, G. J.

    1998-12-01

    A physical mechanism and the location and latitudinal extent of an additional layer, called the F3 layer, that exists in the equatorial ionosphere are presented. A statistical analysis of the occurrence of the layer recorded at the equatorial station Fortaleza (4°S, 38°W dip 9°S) in Brazil is also presented. The F3 layer forms during the morning-noon period in that equatorial region where the combined effect of the upward E×B drift and neutral wind provides a vertically upward plasma drift velocity at altitudes near and above the F2 peak. This velocity causes the F2 peak to drift upward and form the F3 layer while the normal F2 layer develops at lower altitudes through the usual photochemical and dynamical effects of the equatorial region. The peak electron density of the F3 layer can exceed that of the F2 layer. The F3 layer is predicted to be distinct on the summer side of the geomagnetic equator during periods of low solar activity and to become less distinct as the solar activity increases. Ionograms recorded at Fortaleza in 1995 show the existence of an F3 layer on 49% of the days, with the occurrence being most frequent (75%) and distinct in summer, as expected. During summer the layer occurs earlier and lasts longer compared to the other seasons; on the average, the layer occurs at around 0930 LT and lasts for about 3 hours. The altitude of the layer is also high in summer, with the mean peak virtual height being about 570 km. However, the critical frequency of the layer (foF3) exceeds that of the F2 layer (foF2) by the largest amounts in winter and equinox; foF3 exceeds foF2 by a yearly average of about 1.3 MHz.

  8. Valuation of OSA process and folic acid addition as excess sludge minimization alternatives applied in the activated sludge process.

    PubMed

    Martins, C L; Velho, V F; Ramos, S R A; Pires, A S C D; Duarte, E C N F A; Costa, R H R

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of the oxic-settling-anaerobic (OSA)-process and the folic acid addition applied in the activated sludge process to reduce the excess sludge production. The study was monitored during two distinct periods: activated sludge system with OSA-process, and activated sludge system with folic acid addition. The observed sludge yields (Yobs) were 0.30 and 0.08 kgTSS kg(-1) chemical oxygen demand (COD), control phase and OSA-process (period 1); 0.33 and 0.18 kgTSS kg(-1) COD, control phase and folic acid addition (period 2). The Yobs decreased by 73 and 45% in phases with the OSA-process and folic acid addition, respectively, compared with the control phases. The sludge minimization alternatives result in a decrease in excess sludge production, without negatively affecting the performance of the effluent treatment.

  9. 10 CFR 73.60 - Additional requirements for physical protection at nonpower reactors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... nonpower reactors. 73.60 Section 73.60 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PHYSICAL PROTECTION... requirements for physical protection at nonpower reactors. Each nonpower reactor licensee who, pursuant to the... nonpower reactors licensed to operate at or above a power level of 2 megawatts thermal....

  10. 10 CFR 73.60 - Additional requirements for physical protection at nonpower reactors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... nonpower reactors. 73.60 Section 73.60 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PHYSICAL PROTECTION... requirements for physical protection at nonpower reactors. Each nonpower reactor licensee who, pursuant to the... nonpower reactors licensed to operate at or above a power level of 2 megawatts thermal....

  11. Grammatical Processing Using the Mechanisms of Physical Inference

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-07

    empty-category principle, subjacency and the anaphoric binding principles that occur in some form in most mature formal theories of human syntax...that a single cognitive process (meronomic inhibition) can help syntactic inference conform to a grammatical constraint (on anaphoric binding ) and on...condition on binding , can be explained by a cognitive process used in physical reasoning. Several consequences for language development and the

  12. Gendering Processes in the Field of Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Paivi; Lahelma, Elina

    2010-01-01

    In Finnish secondary schools, girls and boys are taught physical education (PE) in separate groups. A male teacher normally teaches the boys and a female teacher teaches the girls. Focusing on PE teachers' comments in two different ethnographic studies of seventh graders (13-14-year-olds), we examine the processes that reproduce or challenge the…

  13. The s process: Nuclear physics, stellar models, and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Käppeler, F.; Gallino, R.; Bisterzo, S.; Aoki, Wako

    2011-01-01

    Nucleosynthesis in the s process takes place in the He-burning layers of low-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and during the He- and C-burning phases of massive stars. The s process contributes about half of the element abundances between Cu and Bi in solar system material. Depending on stellar mass and metallicity the resulting s-abundance patterns exhibit characteristic features, which provide comprehensive information for our understanding of the stellar life cycle and for the chemical evolution of galaxies. The rapidly growing body of detailed abundance observations, in particular, for AGB and post-AGB stars, for objects in binary systems, and for the very faint metal-poor population represents exciting challenges and constraints for stellar model calculations. Based on updated and improved nuclear physics data for the s-process reaction network, current models are aiming at an ab initio solution for the stellar physics related to convection and mixing processes. Progress in the intimately related areas of observations, nuclear and atomic physics, and stellar modeling is reviewed and the corresponding interplay is illustrated by the general abundance patterns of the elements beyond iron and by the effect of sensitive branching points along the s-process path. The strong variations of the s-process efficiency with metallicity bear also interesting consequences for galactic chemical evolution.

  14. The effect of silane addition timing on mixing processability and properties of silica reinforced rubber compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hee-Hoon; Jin, Hyun-Ho; Ha, Sung-Ho; Jang, Suk-Hee; Kang, Yong-Gu; Han, Min-Hyun

    2016-03-01

    A series of experiments were performed to determine an optimum balance between processability and performance of a highly loaded silica compound. The experiments evaluated 4 different silane injection times. All mixing related to silane addition was conducted with a scaled up "Tandem" mixer line. With exception to silane addition timing, almost all operating conditions were controlled between experimental features. It was found that when the silane addition was introduced earlier in the mixing cycle both the reaction was more complete and the bound rubber content was higher. But processability indicators such as sheet forming and Mooney plasticity were negatively impacted. On the other hand, as silane injection was delayed to later in the mixing process the filler dispersion and good sheet forming was improved. However both the bound rubber content and Silane reaction completion were decreased. With the changes in silane addition time, the processability and properties of a silica compound can be controlled.

  15. Process for improving moisture resistance of epoxy resins by addition of chromium ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; Stoakley, D. M.; St.clair, T. L.; Singh, J. J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A process for improving the moisture resistance properties of epoxidized TGMDA and DGEBA resin system by chemically incorporating chromium ions is described. The addition of chromium ions is believed to prevent the absorption of water molecules.

  16. Heat Transfer Processes for the Thermal Energy Balance of Organisms. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Transport Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, R. D.

    This module is part of a series designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. This module describes heat transfer processes involved in the exchange of heat…

  17. Photoresist surface roughness characterization in additive lithography processes for fabrication of phase-only optical vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poutous, Menelaos K.; Hosseinimakarem, Zahra; Johnson, Eric G.

    2012-10-01

    Roughness on the surface of phase-only micro-optical elements limits their performance. An optical vortex phase element was fabricated, using additive lithography, with an optimized process to achieve minimal surface roughness. Shipley S1827 photoresist was used in order to obtain the appropriate additive lithography dynamic range for the desired phase profile. We investigated the effects of both postapplied and postexposure baking processes, bias exposure dose, as well as the effects of surfactant in the developer. We found the resist surface roughness to be a function of both the temperature and the time of the postapplication baking cycles, as well as the developer surfactant content. Based on our findings, an empirical correlation model was constructed to relate the process parameters with surface roughness measured quantities. The maximum roughness of the optical surface, for the optimized process, was reduced to 40 percent of the value for the unoptimized process and the additive lithography useful exposure range was increased by 10 percent.

  18. Process Control and Development for Ultrasonic Additive Manufacturing with Embedded Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hehr, Adam J.

    Ultrasonic additive manufacturing (UAM) is a recent additive manufacturing technology which combines ultrasonic metal welding, CNC machining, and mechanized foil layering to create large gapless near net-shape metallic parts. The process has been attracting much attention lately due to its low formation temperature, the capability to join dissimilar metals, and the ability to create complex design features not possible with traditional subtractive processes alone. These process attributes enable light-weighting of structures and components in an unprecedented way. However, UAM is currently limited to niche areas due to the lack of quality tracking and inadequate scientific understanding of the process. As a result, this thesis work is focused on improving both component quality tracking and process understanding through the use of average electrical power input to the welder. Additionally, the understanding and application space of embedding fibers into metals using UAM is investigated, with particular focus on NiTi shape memory alloy fibers.

  19. Physical conditions and chemical processes during single-bubble sonoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flannigan, David J.

    In order to gain insight into the physical conditions and chemical processes associated with single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL), nonvolatile liquids such as concentrated sulfuric acid (H2SO 4) were explored. The SBSL radiant powers from H2SO 4 aqueous solutions were found to be over 103 times larger than those typically observed for SBSL from water. In addition, the emission spectra contain extensive bands and lines from molecules, atoms, and ions. The population of high-energy states of atoms (20 eV) and ions (37 eV) provides definitive experimental evidence of the formation of a plasma. By using various techniques (e.g., small molecules and atoms as intra-cavity probes, standard methods of plasma diagnostics, and spectrometric methods of pyrometry), it was possible to quantify the heavy particle temperatures (15,000 K), heavy particle densities (1021 cm-3) and pressures (4,000 bar), and plasma electron densities (1018 cm -3) generated during SBSL from H2SO4. It was also found that SBSL from H2SO4 containing mixtures of noble gas and air was quenched up to a critical acoustic pressure, above which the radiant powers increased by 104. From the spectral profiles it was determined that the air limited heating and plasma formation by endothermic chemical reactions and energy-transfer reactions. Simultaneous stroboscopic and spectroscopic studies of SBSL in H2SO4 containing alkali-metal sulfates showed that dramatic changes in the bubble dynamics correlated with the onset of emission from nonvolatile species such as Na and K atoms. These effects were attributed to the development of interfacial instabilities with increasing translational velocity of the bubble.

  20. Fluid Dynamics Applied to Streams. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Transport Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Christina E.

    This module is part of a series designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. This module deals specifically with concepts that are basic to fluid flow and…

  1. Transpiration and Leaf Temperature. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Transport Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gates, David M.

    These materials were designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. This report introduces two models of the thermal energy budget of a leaf. Typical values for…

  2. Soil Heat Flow. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Transport Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, James R.

    These materials were designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. Soil heat flow and the resulting soil temperature distributions have ecological consequences…

  3. Biological Production in Lakes. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Ecological Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, R. A.; Carey, G. F.

    These materials were designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. Primary production in aquatic ecosystems is carried out by phytoplankton, microscopic plants…

  4. Light and Sound: Evolutionary Aspects. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Transport Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roseman, Leonard D.

    These materials were designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. This module is concerned with the exchange of energy between an organism and its environment in…

  5. Pressure and Buoyancy in Aquatic Ecosystems. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Transport Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Christina E.

    This module is part of a series designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. This module explores some of the characteristics of aquatic organisms which can be…

  6. High performance poly(etherketoneketone) (PEKK) composite parts fabricated using Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) processes

    SciTech Connect

    Kunc, Vlastimil; Kishore, Vidya; Chen, Xun; Ajinjeru, Christine; Duty, Chad; Hassen, Ahmed A

    2016-09-01

    ORNL collaborated with Arkema Inc. to investigate poly(etherketoneketone) (PEKK) and its composites as potential feedstock material for Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) system. In this work thermal and rheological properties were investigated and characterized in order to identify suitable processing conditions and material flow behavior for BAAM process.

  7. Being qua becoming: Aristotle's "Metaphysics", quantum physics, and Process Philosophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, David Kelley

    In Aristotle's First Philosophy, science and philosophy were partners, but with the rise of empiricism, went their separate ways. Metaphysics combined the rational and irrational (i.e. final cause/unmoved mover) elements of existence to equate being with substance, postulating prime matter as pure potential that was actuated by form to create everything. Modern science reveres pure reason and postulates its theory of being by a rigorous scientific methodology. The Standard Model defines matter as energy formed into fundamental particles via forces contained in fields. Science has proved Aristotle's universe wrong in many ways, but as physics delves deeper into the quantum world, empiricism is reaching its limits concerning fundamental questions of existence. To achieve its avowed mission of explaining existence completely, physics must reunite with philosophy in a metascience modeled on the First Philosophy of Aristotle. One theory of being that integrates quantum physics and metaphysics is Process Philosophy.

  8. Levels of processing and picture memory: the physical superiority effect.

    PubMed

    Intraub, H; Nicklos, S

    1985-04-01

    Six experiments studied the effect of physical orienting questions (e.g., "Is this angular?") and semantic orienting questions (e.g., "Is this edible?") on memory for unrelated pictures at stimulus durations ranging from 125-2,000 ms. Results ran contrary to the semantic superiority "rule of thumb," which is based primarily on verbal memory experiments. Physical questions were associated with better free recall and cued recall of a diverse set of visual scenes (Experiments 1, 2, and 4). This occurred both when general and highly specific semantic questions were used (Experiments 1 and 2). Similar results were obtained when more simplistic visual stimuli--photographs of single objects--were used (Experiments 5 and 6). As in the case of the semantic superiority effect with words, the physical superiority effect for pictures was eliminated or reversed when the same physical questions were repeated throughout the session (Experiments 4 and 6). Conflicts with results of previous levels of processing experiments with words and nonverbal stimuli (e.g., faces) are explained in terms of the sensory-semantic model (Nelson, Reed, & McEvoy, 1977). Implications for picture memory research and the levels of processing viewpoint are discussed.

  9. Assessing processes in uncertain, complex physical phenomena and manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, J. M.; Kerscher, W. J. III; Smith, R. E.

    2002-01-01

    PREDICT (Performance and Reliability Evaluation with Diverse Information Combination and Tracking) is a set of structured quantitative approaches for the evaluation of system performance based on multiple information sources. The methodology integrates diverse types and sources of information, and their associated uncertainties, to develop full distributions for performance metrics, such as reliability. The successful application of PREDICT has involved system performance assessment in automotive product development, aging nuclear weapons, and fatigued turbine jet engines. In each of these applications, complex physical, mechanical and materials processes affect performance, safety and reliability assessments. Processes also include the physical actions taken during manufacturing, quality control, inspections, assembly, etc. and the steps involved in product design, development and certification. In this paper, we will examine the various types of processes involved in the decision making leading to production in an automotive system reliability example. Analysis of these processes includes not only understanding their impact on performance and reliability, but also the uncertainties associated with them. The automotive example demonstrates some of the tools used in tackling the complex problem of understanding processes. While some tools and methods exist for understanding processes (man made and natural) and the uncertainties associated with them, many of the complex issues discussed are open for continued research efforts.

  10. Addition of a Project-Based Component to a Conventional Expository Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsaparlis, Georgios; Gorezi, Marianna

    2007-01-01

    Students should enjoy their laboratory classes and for this purpose a project-based activity is added to a conventional physical chemistry laboratory. Students were given project work instead of conventional experiment and then they had to make progress in the project according to instructions and then carry out experiments related to the project.

  11. 10 CFR 73.60 - Additional requirements for physical protection at nonpower reactors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... vault-type room shall be controlled as a separate material access area. (4) Enriched uranium scrap in... perform their duties. (6) Prior to entry into a material access area, packages shall be searched for... OF PLANTS AND MATERIALS Physical Protection Requirements at Fixed Sites § 73.60...

  12. Integrated Modeling and Analysis of Physical Oceanographic and Acoustic Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    in the abyssal oceans , where typically SIW/Stopo > 1 for tall seamounts and ridges , the entire bottom topography contributes to the generation of...internal waves. In contrast, for (a) (b) 18 moderate ocean depths (say less than 4 km), where typically SIW/Stopo < 1 for seamounts and ridges , the...Oceanographic and Acoustic Processes Timothy F. Duda Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Department, MS 11 Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods

  13. The physical basis of explosion and blast injury processes.

    PubMed

    Proud, W G

    2013-03-01

    Energetic materials are widely used in civilian and military applications, such as quarrying and mining, flares, and in munitions. Recent conflicts have involved the widespread use of improvised explosive devices to attack military, civilians and infrastructure. This article gives a basic overview of explosive technology and the underlying physical processes that produce the injuries encountered. In particular aspects relevant to primary and secondary injuries are discussed.

  14. Numerical analysis of a deep drawing process with additional force transmission for an extension of the process limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, B.-A.; Bonk, C.; Grbic, N.; Vucetic, M.

    2017-02-01

    By sheet metal forming processes the forming limits and part characteristics are defined through the process specific loads. In deep drawing processes the maximum deep draw ratios as well as the springback behaviour of the metal parts are depending on the stress distribution in the part material during the forming process. While exceeding the load limits, a failure in the material occurs, which can be avoided by additional force transmission activated in the deep drawing process before the forming limit of material is achieved. This contribution deals with numerical investigation of process effect caused by additional force transmission regarding the extension of the process limits. Here, the steel material HCT 600X+Z (1.0941) in thickness s 0 = 1.0 mm is analyzed numerically using the anisotropic model Hill48. This model is validated by the means of cup test by Swift. Both, the FEA of conventional and forming process with additional force transmission are carried out. The numerical results are compared with reference geometry of rectangle cup.

  15. Influence of different natural physical fields on biological processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashinsky, A. L.

    2001-01-01

    In space flight conditions gravity, magnetic, and electrical fields as well as ionizing radiation change both in size, and in direction. This causes disruptions in the conduct of some physical processes, chemical reactions, and metabolism in living organisms. In these conditions organisms of different phylogenetic level change their metabolic reactions undergo changes such as disturbances in ionic exchange both in lower and in higher plants, changes in cell morphology for example, gyrosity in Proteus ( Proteus vulgaris), spatial disorientation in coleoptiles of Wheat ( Triticum aestivum) and Pea ( Pisum sativum) seedlings, mutational changes in Crepis ( Crepis capillaris) and Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana) seedling. It has been found that even in the absence of gravity, gravireceptors determining spatial orientation in higher plants under terrestrial conditions are formed in the course of ontogenesis. Under weightlessness this system does not function and spatial orientation is determined by the light flux gradient or by the action of some other factors. Peculiarities of the formation of the gravireceptor apparatus in higher plants, amphibians, fish, and birds under space flight conditions have been observed. It has been found that the system in which responses were accompanied by phase transition have proven to be gravity-sensitive under microgravity conditions. Such reactions include also the process of photosynthesis which is the main energy production process in plants. In view of the established effects of microgravity and different natural physical fields on biological processes, it has been shown that these processes change due to the absence of initially rigid determination. The established biological effect of physical fields influence on biological processes in organisms is the starting point for elucidating the role of gravity and evolutionary development of various organisms on Earth.

  16. Influence of different natural physical fields on biological processes.

    PubMed

    Mashinsky, A L

    2001-01-01

    In space flight conditions gravity, magnetic, and electrical fields as well as ionizing radiation change both in size, and in direction. This causes disruptions in the conduct of some physical processes, chemical reactions, and metabolism in living organisms. In these conditions organisms of different phylogenetic level change their metabolic reactions undergo changes such as disturbances in ionic exchange both in lower and in higher plants, changes in cell morphology for example, gyrosity in Proteus (Proteus vulgaris), spatial disorientation in coleoptiles of Wheat (Triticum aestivum) and Pea (Pisum sativum) seedlings, mutational changes in Crepis (Crepis capillaris) and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedling. It has been found that even in the absence of gravity, gravireceptors determining spatial orientation in higher plants under terrestrial conditions are formed in the course of ontogenesis. Under weightlessness this system does not function and spatial orientation is determined by the light flux gradient or by the action of some other factors. Peculiarities of the formation of the gravireceptor apparatus in higher plants, amphibians, fish, and birds under space flight conditions have been observed. It has been found that the system in which responses were accompanied by phase transition have proven to be gravity-sensitive under microgravity conditions. Such reactions include also the process of photosynthesis which is the main energy production process in plants. In view of the established effects of microgravity and different natural physical fields on biological processes, it has been shown that these processes change due to the absence of initially rigid determination. The established biological effect of physical fields influence on biological processes in organisms is the starting point for elucidating the role of gravity and evolutionary development of various organisms on Earth.

  17. Urgency of evolution-process congruent thinking in physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychoudhuri, Chandrasekhar

    2015-09-01

    It is now generally recognized that physics has not been contributing anything conceptually fundamentally new beyond the century old Relativity and 90 years old Quantum Mechanics [1-4]. We have also started recognizing that there is an increasing rate of species extinction all over the world, especially since the last century [5]; and we are beginning to understand that the related problems are being steadily accelerated by human behavior to conquer nature, rather than understanding nature as is and living within its system logics [6,7]. We are beginning to appreciate that our long-term sustainability as a species literally depends upon proactively learning to nurture the entire bio-diversity [8-10]. Thus, humans must consciously become evolution process congruent thinkers. The evolutionary biologists have been crying out loud for us to listen [5,6, 8-10]. Social scientists, political scientists, economic scientists [13] have started chiming in to become consilient thinkers [6] for re-constructing sustainable societies. But, the path to consilient thinking requires us to recognize and accept a common vision based thinking process, which functionally serves as a uniting platform. I am articulating that platform as the "evolution process congruent thinking" (EPCT). Do physicists have any obligation to co-opt this EPCT? Is there any immediate and/or long-term gain for them? This paper argues affirmatively that co-opting EPCT is the best way to re-anchor physics back to reality ontology and develop newer and deeper understanding of natural phenomena based on understanding of the diverse interaction processes going on in nature. Physics is mature enough to acknowledge that all of our theories are "work in progress". This is a good time to start iteratively re-evaluating and re-structuring all the foundational postulates behind all the working theories. This will also consistently energize all the follow-on generation of physicists to keep on fully utilizing their

  18. Process depending morphology and resulting physical properties of TPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frick, Achim; Spadaro, Marcel

    2015-12-01

    Thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) is a rubber like material with outstanding properties, e.g. for seal applications. TPU basically provides high strength, low frictional behavior and excellent wear resistance. Though, due to segmented structure of TPU, which is composed of hard segments (HSs) and soft segments (SSs), physical properties depend strongly on the morphological arrangement of the phase separated HSs at a certain ratio of HSs to SSs. It is obvious that the TPU deforms differently depending on its bulk morphology. Basically, the morphology can either consist of HSs segregated into small domains, which are well dispersed in the SS matrix or of few strongly phase separated large size HS domains embedded in the SS matrix. The morphology development is hardly ruled by the melt processing conditions of the TPU. Depending on the morphology, TPU provides quite different physical properties with respect to strength, deformation behavior, thermal stability, creep resistance and tribological performance. The paper deals with the influence of important melt processing parameters, such as temperature, pressure and shear conditions, on the resulting physical properties tested by tensile and relaxation experiments. Furthermore the morphology is studied employing differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), transmission light microscopy (TLM), scanning electron beam microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron beam microscopy (TEM) investigations. Correlations between processing conditions and resulting TPU material properties are elaborated. Flow and shear simulations contribute to the understanding of thermal and flow induced morphology development.

  19. Process depending morphology and resulting physical properties of TPU

    SciTech Connect

    Frick, Achim Spadaro, Marcel

    2015-12-17

    Thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) is a rubber like material with outstanding properties, e.g. for seal applications. TPU basically provides high strength, low frictional behavior and excellent wear resistance. Though, due to segmented structure of TPU, which is composed of hard segments (HSs) and soft segments (SSs), physical properties depend strongly on the morphological arrangement of the phase separated HSs at a certain ratio of HSs to SSs. It is obvious that the TPU deforms differently depending on its bulk morphology. Basically, the morphology can either consist of HSs segregated into small domains, which are well dispersed in the SS matrix or of few strongly phase separated large size HS domains embedded in the SS matrix. The morphology development is hardly ruled by the melt processing conditions of the TPU. Depending on the morphology, TPU provides quite different physical properties with respect to strength, deformation behavior, thermal stability, creep resistance and tribological performance. The paper deals with the influence of important melt processing parameters, such as temperature, pressure and shear conditions, on the resulting physical properties tested by tensile and relaxation experiments. Furthermore the morphology is studied employing differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), transmission light microscopy (TLM), scanning electron beam microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron beam microscopy (TEM) investigations. Correlations between processing conditions and resulting TPU material properties are elaborated. Flow and shear simulations contribute to the understanding of thermal and flow induced morphology development.

  20. A Pilot Study to Examine the Effect of Additional Structured Outdoor Playtime on Preschoolers' Physical Activity Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alhassan, Sofiya; Nwaokelemeh, Ogechi; Lyden, Kate; Goldsby, TaShauna; Mendoza, Albert

    2013-01-01

    The impact of additional structured outdoor playtime on preschoolers'; physical activity (PA) level is unclear. The purpose of this pilot study was to explore the effects of increasing structured outdoor playtime on preschoolers'; PA levels. Eight full-day classrooms (n = 134 children) from two preschool programmes were randomised into a treatment…

  1. Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS{trademark}) for additive component processing

    SciTech Connect

    Keicher, D.M.; Romero, J.A.; Atwood, C.L.; Griffith, M.L.; Jeantette, F.P.; Harwell, L.D.; Greene, D.L.; Smugeresky, J.E.

    1996-05-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is presently developing an additive component processing technology called Laser Engineered Net Shaping, (LENS{trademark}). This process allows complex 3-dimensional solid metallic objects to be directly fabricated from a CAD solid model. Currently, this process functions similar to the Stereo Lithography process in which a faceted file is generated from the CAD solid model and then sliced into a sequence of layers. The sliced file is then input into another interpreter program which converts the sliced file into a series of tool path patterns required to build the entire layer. The component is fabricated by first generating an outline of the key component features and then filled using a rastering technique. This file is then used to drive the laser system to produce the desired component one layer at a time. This process differs from present rapid prototyping (RP) processes in that a fully dense, metallic component can be produced using this process.

  2. Effect of additives on isothermal crystallization kinetics and physical characteristics of coconut oil.

    PubMed

    Chaleepa, Kesarin; Szepes, Anikó; Ulrich, Joachim

    2010-05-01

    The effect of lauric acid and low-HLB sucrose esters (L-195, S170) on the isothermal crystallization of coconut oil was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry. The fundamental crystallization parameters, such as induction time of nucleation and crystallization rate, were obtained by using the Gompertz equation. The Gibb's free energy of nucleation was calculated via the Fisher-Turnbull equation based on the equilibrium melting temperature. All additives, investigated in this work, proved to have an inhibition effect on nucleation and crystallization kinetics of coconut oil. Our results revealed that the inhibition effect is related to the dissimilarity of the molecular characteristics between coconut oil and the additives. The equilibrium melting temperature (T(m) degrees ) of the coconut oil-additive mixtures estimated by the Hoffman-Weeks method was decreased with the addition of lauric acid and increased by using sucrose esters as additives. Micrographs showing simultaneous crystallization of coconut oil and lauric acid indicated that strong molecular interaction led to the increase in lamellar thickness resulting in the T(m) degrees depression of coconut oil. The addition of L-195 modified the crystal morphology of coconut oil into large, dense, non-porous crystals without altering the polymorphic occurrence of coconut oil. The enhancement in lamellar thickness and crystal perfection supported the T(m) degrees elevation of coconut oil.

  3. The Effect of Alloy Additions on Superplasticity in Thermomechanically Processed High Magnesium Aluminum-Magnesium Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    AD-Ri55 142 THE EFFECT OF ALLOY ADDITIONS ON SUPERPLASTICITY IN I/2 THERMOMECHANICALLY PR-.(U) NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL UNCLSSIIED MONTEREY CA R J...Ln Monterey, California DTr J U N 1985 * THESIS THE EFFECT OF ALLOY ADDITIONS ON SUPERPLASTICITY IN THERMOMECHANICALLY PROCESSED HIGH MAGNESIUM *0...ALUMINUM-MAGNESIUM ALLOYS >by 0 (Richard J. Self December 1984 C-31 Thesis Advisor: Terry McNelley Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited

  4. Biocompatibility of hydroxyapatite scaffolds processed by lithography-based additive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Tesavibul, Passakorn; Chantaweroad, Surapol; Laohaprapanon, Apinya; Channasanon, Somruethai; Uppanan, Paweena; Tanodekaew, Siriporn; Chalermkarnnon, Prasert; Sitthiseripratip, Kriskrai

    2015-01-01

    The fabrication of hydroxyapatite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications by using lithography-based additive manufacturing techniques has been introduced due to the abilities to control porous structures with suitable resolutions. In this research, the use of hydroxyapatite cellular structures, which are processed by lithography-based additive manufacturing machine, as a bone tissue engineering scaffold was investigated. The utilization of digital light processing system for additive manufacturing machine in laboratory scale was performed in order to fabricate the hydroxyapatite scaffold, of which biocompatibilities were eventually evaluated by direct contact and cell-culturing tests. In addition, the density and compressive strength of the scaffolds were also characterized. The results show that the hydroxyapatite scaffold at 77% of porosity with 91% of theoretical density and 0.36 MPa of the compressive strength are able to be processed. In comparison with a conventionally sintered hydroxyapatite, the scaffold did not present any cytotoxic signs while the viability of cells at 95.1% was reported. After 14 days of cell-culturing tests, the scaffold was able to be attached by pre-osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1) leading to cell proliferation and differentiation. The hydroxyapatite scaffold for bone tissue engineering was able to be processed by the lithography-based additive manufacturing machine while the biocompatibilities were also confirmed.

  5. A novel motif in telomerase reverse transcriptase regulates telomere repeat addition rate and processivity

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Mingyi; Podlevsky, Joshua D.; Qi, Xiaodong; Bley, Christopher J.; Chen, Julian J.-L.

    2010-01-01

    Telomerase is a specialized reverse transcriptase that adds telomeric DNA repeats onto chromosome termini. Here, we characterize a new telomerase-specific motif, called motif 3, in the catalytic domain of telomerase reverse transcriptase, that is crucial for telomerase function and evolutionally conserved between vertebrates and ciliates. Comprehensive mutagenesis of motif 3 identified mutations that remarkably increase the rate or alter the processivity of telomere repeat addition. Notably, the rate and processivity of repeat addition are affected independently by separate motif 3 mutations. The processive telomerase action relies upon a template translocation mechanism whereby the RNA template and the telomeric DNA strand separate and realign between each repeat synthesis. By analyzing the mutant telomerases reconstituted in vitro and in cells, we show that the hyperactive mutants exhibit higher repeat addition rates and faster enzyme turnovers, suggesting higher rates of strand-separation during template translocation. In addition, the strong correlation between the processivity of the motif 3 mutants and their ability to use an 8 nt DNA primer, suggests that motif 3 facilitates realignment between the telomeric DNA and the template RNA following strand-separation. These findings support motif 3 as a key determinant for telomerase activity and processivity. PMID:20044353

  6. Process evaluation results from the HEALTHY physical education intervention

    PubMed Central

    Hall, William J.; Zeveloff, Abigail; Steckler, Allan; Schneider, Margaret; Thompson, Deborah; Pham, Trang; Volpe, Stella L.; Hindes, Katie; Sleigh, Adriana; McMurray, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    Process evaluation is an assessment of the implementation of an intervention. A process evaluation component was embedded in the HEALTHY study, a primary prevention trial for Type 2 diabetes implemented over 3 years in 21 middle schools across the United States. The HEALTHY physical education (PE) intervention aimed at maximizing student engagement in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity through delivery of structured lesson plans by PE teachers. Process evaluation data collected via class observations and interventionist interviews assessed fidelity, dose delivered, implementor participation, dose received and barriers. Process evaluation results indicate a high level of fidelity in implementing HEALTHY PE activities and offering 225 min of PE every 10 school days. Concerning dose delivered, students were active for approximately 33 min of class, representing an average of 61% of the class time. Results also indicate that PE teachers were generally engaged in implementing the HEALTHY PE curriculum. Data on dose received showed that students were highly engaged with the PE intervention; however, student misbehavior was the most common barrier observed during classes. Other barriers included teacher disengagement, large classes, limited gym space and poor classroom management. Findings suggest that the PE intervention was generally implemented and received as intended despite several barriers. PMID:22156231

  7. Physical process first law for bifurcate Killing horizons

    SciTech Connect

    Amsel, Aaron J.; Marolf, Donald; Virmani, Amitabh

    2008-01-15

    The physical process version of the first law for black holes states that the passage of energy and angular momentum through the horizon results in a change in area ({kappa}/8{pi}){delta}A={delta}E-{omega}{delta}J, so long as this passage is quasistationary. A similar physical process first law can be derived for any bifurcate Killing horizon in any spacetime dimension d{>=}3 using much the same argument. However, to make this law nontrivial, one must show that sufficiently quasistationary processes do in fact occur. In particular, one must show that processes exist for which the shear and expansion remain small, and in which no new generators are added to the horizon. Thorne, MacDonald, and Price considered related issues when an object falls across a d=4 black hole horizon. By generalizing their argument to arbitrary d{>=}3 and to any bifurcate Killing horizon, we derive a condition under which these effects are controlled and the first law applies. In particular, by providing a nontrivial first law for Rindler horizons, our work completes the parallel between the mechanics of such horizons and those of black holes for d{>=}3. We also comment on the situation for d=2.

  8. Process evaluation results from the HEALTHY physical education intervention.

    PubMed

    Hall, William J; Zeveloff, Abigail; Steckler, Allan; Schneider, Margaret; Thompson, Deborah; Pham, Trang; Volpe, Stella L; Hindes, Katie; Sleigh, Adriana; McMurray, Robert G

    2012-04-01

    Process evaluation is an assessment of the implementation of an intervention. A process evaluation component was embedded in the HEALTHY study, a primary prevention trial for Type 2 diabetes implemented over 3 years in 21 middle schools across the United States. The HEALTHY physical education (PE) intervention aimed at maximizing student engagement in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity through delivery of structured lesson plans by PE teachers. Process evaluation data collected via class observations and interventionist interviews assessed fidelity, dose delivered, implementor participation, dose received and barriers. Process evaluation results indicate a high level of fidelity in implementing HEALTHY PE activities and offering 225 min of PE every 10 school days. Concerning dose delivered, students were active for approximately 33 min of class, representing an average of 61% of the class time. Results also indicate that PE teachers were generally engaged in implementing the HEALTHY PE curriculum. Data on dose received showed that students were highly engaged with the PE intervention; however, student misbehavior was the most common barrier observed during classes. Other barriers included teacher disengagement, large classes, limited gym space and poor classroom management. Findings suggest that the PE intervention was generally implemented and received as intended despite several barriers.

  9. A Novel Processing Approach for Additive Manufacturing of Commercial Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Christopher E.; Bourell, David; Watt, Trevor; Cohen, Julien

    Aluminum 6061 is of great commercial interest due to its ubiquitous use in manufacturing, advantageous mechanical properties, and its successful certification in aerospace applications. However, as an off-eutectic with accompanying large freezing range, attempts to process the material by additive manufacturing have resulted in part cracking and diminished mechanical properties. A unique approach using mixed powders is presented to process this historically difficult-to-process material. Expansion of this combined-powder approach to other materials systems not typically compatible with additive manufacturing is possible. Dense parts without solidification cracking have been produced by the SLM process, as verified using SEM and EDS. An overview of this approach is presented along with test results using an Al-Si mixture.

  10. Additional Contributions to the Development of the New Snow-Physics Scheme for SSiB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mocko, David M.; Sud, Y. C.

    1999-01-01

    The Simplified Simple Biosphere Model (SSiB) had a well-documented problem with snowmelt timing and infiltration. A new snow-physics scheme was developed for use in SSIB. In this, the snow layer is separated from the soil, with its own energy budget and temperature. Solar energy reaching the top of the snowpack is divided into three parts: one, reflected by the snow; two, absorbed by the snow; and three, transmitted to the ground following a simple extinction relation. Heat is exchanged between the ground and snow by conduction and by radiation through an arbitrary air-gap between them. In the GSWP exercise using the GEWEX ISLSCP Initiative I forcing data (hereafter "offline"), it was found that the new snow scheme ameliorated a significant fraction of snowmelt time-delay as compared to observations from satellite. It also produced warmer ground temperatures under the snowpack, which allowed realistic meltwater infiltration, resulting in better simulated spring soil moisture recharge and peak runoff amount as compared to observations. An ensemble of six June-July-August (JJA) simulations for 1987 and 1988 were performed with the NASA Goddard GEOS II GCM coupled with the new snow-physics SSIB using new initial soil moisture (ISM) from the offline simulations. The GCM produced more realistic precipitation in northern regions that had large snowmelt and wetter ISM in response to better snow-physics, as compared to simulations with ISM without the new snow scheme. The new SSiB-GCM also increased the interannual precipitation signal in the Indian monsoon region, resulting from changes in ISM in the Himalayas and central Asia.

  11. Real-time interferometric monitoring and measuring of photopolymerization based stereolithographic additive manufacturing process: sensor model and algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, X.; Rosen, D. W.

    2017-01-01

    As additive manufacturing is poised for growth and innovations, it faces barriers of lack of in-process metrology and control to advance into wider industry applications. The exposure controlled projection lithography (ECPL) is a layerless mask-projection stereolithographic additive manufacturing process, in which parts are fabricated from photopolymers on a stationary transparent substrate. To improve the process accuracy with closed-loop control for ECPL, this paper develops an interferometric curing monitoring and measuring (ICM&M) method which addresses the sensor modeling and algorithms issues. A physical sensor model for ICM&M is derived based on interference optics utilizing the concept of instantaneous frequency. The associated calibration procedure is outlined for ICM&M measurement accuracy. To solve the sensor model, particularly in real time, an online evolutionary parameter estimation algorithm is developed adopting moving horizon exponentially weighted Fourier curve fitting and numerical integration. As a preliminary validation, simulated real-time measurement by offline analysis of a video of interferograms acquired in the ECPL process is presented. The agreement between the cured height estimated by ICM&M and that measured by microscope indicates that the measurement principle is promising as real-time metrology for global measurement and control of the ECPL process.

  12. Longitudinal functional additive model with continuous proportional outcomes for physical activity data.

    PubMed

    Li, Haocheng; Kozey-Keadle, Sarah; Kipnis, Victor; Carroll, Raymond J

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by physical activity data obtained from the BodyMedia FIT device (www.bodymedia.com), we take a functional data approach for longitudinal studies with continuous proportional outcomes. The functional structure depends on three factors. In our three-factor model, the regression structures are specified as curves measured at various factor-points with random effects that have a correlation structure. The random curve for the continuous factor is summarized using a few important principal components. The difficulties in handling the continuous proportion variables are solved by using a quasilikelihood type approximation. We develop an efficient algorithm to fit the model, which involves the selection of the number of principal components. The method is evaluated empirically by a simulation study. This approach is applied to the BodyMedia data with 935 males and 84 consecutive days of observation, for a total of 78, 540 observations. We show that sleep efficiency increases with increasing physical activity, while its variance decreases at the same time.

  13. Physical processes in the plasma mantle of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szego, K.; Shapiro, V. S.; Shevchenko, V. I.; Sagdeev, R. Z.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Nagy, A. F.

    1991-01-01

    The results are presented of a study, which analyzed data from 10 Pioneer Venus orbits in order to see whether similar wave particle interaction processes also exist in the corresponding region around Venus. The first conclusion is that the apparent physical processes in the mantle are indeed similar around Venus and Mars. The planetary thermal O(+) ions outside the ionopause interact with the shocked solar wind and excite electrostatic waves close to the lower hybrid frequency. These waves propagate inwards, heating first the electron and deeper down in the ionosphere the thermal ion population. The observed superthermal ions are believed to be the product of this wave particle interaction process. It is also concluded that the wave energy transferred to the thermal electrons is of the right magnitude (about 4 x 10 exp 9 eV/sq cm s) to provide the supplemental heat source necessary to reconcile observed and calculated electron temperatures in the ionosphere.

  14. Detectors and signal processing for high-energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Rehak, P.

    1981-01-01

    Basic principles of the particle detection and signal processing for high-energy physics experiments are presented. It is shown that the optimum performance of a properly designed detector system is not limited by incidental imperfections, but solely by more fundamental limitations imposed by the quantum nature and statistical behavior of matter. The noise sources connected with the detection and signal processing are studied. The concepts of optimal filtering and optimal detector/amplifying device matching are introduced. Signal processing for a liquid argon calorimeter is analyzed in some detail. The position detection in gas counters is studied. Resolution in drift chambers for the drift coordinate measurement as well as the second coordinate measurement is discussed.

  15. 25 CFR 1000.356 - May the trust evaluation process be used for additional reviews?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... reviews? 1000.356 Section 1000.356 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT... INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Trust Evaluation Review Annual Trust Evaluations § 1000.356 May the trust evaluation process be used for additional reviews? Yes, if the parties agree....

  16. Electric poling-assisted additive manufacturing process for PVDF polymer-based piezoelectric device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, ChaBum; Tarbutton, Joshua A.

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a new additive manufacturing (AM) process to directly and continuously print piezoelectric devices from polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) polymeric filament rods under a strong electric field. This process, called ‘electric poling-assisted additive manufacturing or EPAM, combines AM and electric poling processes and is able to fabricate free-form shape piezoelectric devices continuously. In this process, the PVDF polymer dipoles remain well-aligned and uniform over a large area in a single design, production and fabrication step. During EPAM process, molten PVDF polymer is simultaneously mechanically stresses in-situ by the leading nozzle and electrically poled by applying high electric field under high temperature. The EPAM system was constructed to directly print piezoelectric structures from PVDF polymeric filament while applying high electric field between nozzle tip and printing bed in AM machine. Piezoelectric devices were successfully fabricated using the EPAM process. The crystalline phase transitions that occurred from the process were identified by using the Fourier transform infrared spectroscope. The results indicate that devices printed under a strong electric field become piezoelectric during the EPAM process and that stronger electric fields result in greater piezoelectricity as marked by the electrical response and the formation of sharper peaks at the polar β crystalline wavenumber of the PVDF polymer. Performing this process in the absence of an electric field does not result in dipole alignment of PVDF polymer. The EPAM process is expected to lead to the widespread use of AM to fabricate a variety of piezoelectric PVDF polymer-based devices for sensing, actuation and energy harvesting applications with simple, low cost, single processing and fabrication step.

  17. Compact effector optics for processing in limited physical access situations.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Andreas; Fox, Mahlen D T; French, Paul W; Hettrick, Simon; Hand, Duncan P; Shi, Yi-Wei; Matsuura, Yuji; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Watkins, Kenneth G; Ireland, Clive L M; Jones, Julian D C

    2003-09-01

    A major advantage of fiber-optic beam delivery in laser materials processing is the ability to guide the laser power to the location where it is needed, leaving the laser itself remote and protected from the process. This is of special importance if the processing is to be performed in a hazardous environment. Particular problems are faced by the nuclear industry where weld repair and surface treatment work are required inside radioactive installations. By use of fiber beam delivery, only part of the delivery system and effector optics become contaminated, but the expensive laser system does not. However, in many cases the region where repair is required is not only radioactive but has only limited physical access, e.g., inside tubes or into corners, which prevents use of standard effector optics. We present a new design to deal with such constraints of a 2-mm outer diameter employing a hollow waveguide and gas shielding. This design is optically characterized and its performance assessed in welding and surface treatment applications. The potential of this compact effector optics in limited physical access situations is clearly demonstrated.

  18. The physics of spreading processes in multilayer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Domenico, Manlio; Granell, Clara; Porter, Mason A.; Arenas, Alex

    2016-10-01

    Despite the success of traditional network analysis, standard networks provide a limited representation of complex systems, which often include different types of relationships (or `multiplexity’) between their components. Such structural complexity has a significant effect on both dynamics and function. Throwing away or aggregating available structural information can generate misleading results and be a major obstacle towards attempts to understand complex systems. The recent multilayer approach for modelling networked systems explicitly allows the incorporation of multiplexity and other features of realistic systems. It allows one to couple different structural relationships by encoding them in a convenient mathematical object. It also allows one to couple different dynamical processes on top of such interconnected structures. The resulting framework plays a crucial role in helping to achieve a thorough, accurate understanding of complex systems. The study of multilayer networks has also revealed new physical phenomena that remain hidden when using ordinary graphs, the traditional network representation. Here we survey progress towards attaining a deeper understanding of spreading processes on multilayer networks, and we highlight some of the physical phenomena related to spreading processes that emerge from multilayer structure.

  19. Effect of addition of hydroxyapatite on the physical properties of IRM.

    PubMed

    Owadally, I D; Pitt Ford, T R

    1994-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of adding 10% and 20% hydroxyapatite (HAP) to Intermediate Restorative Material (IRM) on physical properties such as working time, setting time, compressive strength and disintegration rate. The working and setting times were determined by an indentation method. The ISO recommended method was used to determine compressive strength. The rate of disintegration in vitro was evaluated in buffered sodium citrate at pH 4.5, 5.8, buffered phosphate at pH 7.0 and in bovine serum (pH 6.8), and examined using a replica method and scanning electron microscopy. Kalzinol and EBA were used as control materials for the disintegration experiment. IRM had longer mean working (4 min 43.5 s) and mean setting (6 min 28.5 s) times than IRM + 10 or 20% HAP (P < 0.001), the mean reductions being 16% and 9% for IRM + 10% HAP, and 29% and 19% for IRM + 20% HAP, respectively. IRM had a greater compressive strength (68.5 MPa, P < 0.01) than IRM + 10% HAP (65.0 MPa) or IRM + 20% HAP (60.0 MPa, P < 0.001). Kalzinol, IRM + 10% HAP and IRM + 20% HAP were found to disintegrate after 8 weeks in buffered phosphate and in bovine serum. In contrast, IRM and EBA showed no noticeable signs of disintegration after 6 months in the same media. The physical properties of IRM + 10% HAP and IRM + 20% HAP were reduced compared with IRM but the reductions were not considered to be of clinical significance.

  20. A Pilot Test of the Additive Benefits of Physical Exercise to CBT for OCD.

    PubMed

    Rector, Neil A; Richter, Margaret A; Lerman, Bethany; Regev, Rotem

    2015-01-01

    The majority of "responders" to first-line cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) and pharmacological treatments for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) are left with residual symptoms that are clinically relevant and disabling. Therefore, there is pressing need for widely accessible efficacious alternative and/or adjunctive treatments for OCD. Accumulating evidence suggests that physical exercise may be one such intervention in the mood and anxiety disorders broadly, although we are aware of only two positive small-scale pilot studies that have tested its clinical benefits in OCD. This pilot study aimed to test the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of adding a structured physical exercise programme to CBT for OCD. A standard CBT group was delivered concurrently with a 12-week customized exercise programme to 11 participants. The exercise regimen was individualized for each participant based on peak heart rate measured using an incremental maximal exercise test. Reports of exercise adherence across the 12-week regimen exceeded 80%. A paired-samples t-test indicated very large treatment effects in Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale scores from pre- to post-treatment in CBT group cohorts led by expert CBT OCD specialists (d = 2.55) and junior CBT clinician non-OCD specialists (d = 2.12). These treatment effects are very large and exceed effects typically observed with individual and group-based CBT for OCD based on leading meta-analytic reviews, as well as previously obtained treatment effects for CBT using the same recruitment protocol without exercise. As such, this pilot work demonstrates the feasibility and significant potential clinical utility of a 12-week aerobic exercise programme delivered in conjunction with CBT for OCD.

  1. Effect of Fruit Pomace Addition on Shortbread Cookies to Improve Their Physical and Nutritional Values.

    PubMed

    Tańska, Małgorzata; Roszkowska, Beata; Czaplicki, Sylwester; Borowska, Eulalia Julitta; Bojarska, Justyna; Dąbrowska, Aneta

    2016-09-01

    Fruit pomace remaining after juice extraction is still a source of bioactive compounds. Especially rich in these compounds is the pomace from blackcurrant fruit and from fruits of little-known horticultural plants, like: rowan, rosehip and elderberry. The addition of fruit pomace to bakery and confectionery products, especially to those made of white flour, may significantly enrich their composition with dietary fiber, vitamins and phenolic compounds. This study was aimed at determining the effect of 20 % addition of fruit pomace from rosehip, rowan, blackcurrant and elderberry on the properties of shortbread cookies. The pomace-containing cookies, compared to those without additives, were characterized by a darker color with a higher contribution of yellowness, and by higher hardness. The overall organoleptic assessment was comparable for all types of cookies, however the cookies with pomace were characterized by more perceptible taste and aroma, and were sourer. The extracts from pomace-supplemented cookies had a significantly stronger antioxidant capacity than that from the cookies without pomace, but they were ineffective in inhibiting lipid oxidation. The study showed that fruit pomace could improve the nutritional value of shortbread cookies. Furthermore, non-typical color of such a new product may be attractive to consumers.

  2. Rationalization of Microstructure Heterogeneity in INCONEL 718 Builds Made by the Direct Laser Additive Manufacturing Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yuan; McAllister, Donald; Colijn, Hendrik; Mills, Michael; Farson, Dave; Nordin, Mark; Babu, Sudarsanam

    2014-09-01

    Simulative builds, typical of the tip-repair procedure, with matching compositions were deposited on an INCONEL 718 substrate using the laser additive manufacturing process. In the as-processed condition, these builds exhibit spatial heterogeneity in microstructure. Electron backscattering diffraction analyses showed highly misoriented grains in the top region of the builds compared to those of the lower region. Hardness maps indicated a 30 pct hardness increase in build regions close to the substrate over those of the top regions. Detailed multiscale characterizations, through scanning electron microscopy, electron backscattered diffraction imaging, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and ChemiSTEM, also showed microstructure heterogeneities within the builds in different length scales including interdendritic and interprecipitate regions. These multiscale heterogeneities were correlated to primary solidification, remelting, and solid-state precipitation kinetics of γ″ induced by solute segregation, as well as multiple heating and cooling cycles induced by the laser additive manufacturing process.

  3. Spring Deposits on Mars: Physical Processes from Terrestrial Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crumpler, L. S.

    2003-01-01

    An important first step in the current Mars exploration strategy is the detection of sites where there is evidence for past or present near-surface water on Mars. This study evaluates the large-scale morphology of spring deposits and the physical processes of their formation, growth, and evolution in terms that relate to (1) their identification in image data, (2) their formation, evolution, and preservation in the environment of Mars, and (3) their potential as sites of long-term or late stage shallow groundwater emergence at the surface of Mars.

  4. Measurement of powder bed density in powder bed fusion additive manufacturing processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, G.; Donmez, A.; Slotwinski, J.; Moylan, S.

    2016-11-01

    Many factors influence the performance of additive manufacturing (AM) processes, resulting in a high degree of variation in process outcomes. Therefore, quantifying these factors and their correlations to process outcomes are important challenges to overcome to enable widespread adoption of emerging AM technologies. In the powder bed fusion AM process, the density of the powder layers in the powder bed is a key influencing factor. This paper introduces a method to determine the powder bed density (PBD) during the powder bed fusion (PBF) process. A complete uncertainty analysis associated with the measurement method was also described. The resulting expanded measurement uncertainty, U PBD (k  =  2), was determined as 0.004 g · cm-3. It was shown that this expanded measurement uncertainty is about three orders of magnitude smaller than the typical powder bed density. This method enables establishing correlations between the changes in PBD and the direction of motion of the powder recoating arm.

  5. Influence of wheat kernel physical properties on the pulverizing process.

    PubMed

    Dziki, Dariusz; Cacak-Pietrzak, Grażyna; Miś, Antoni; Jończyk, Krzysztof; Gawlik-Dziki, Urszula

    2014-10-01

    The physical properties of wheat kernel were determined and related to pulverizing performance by correlation analysis. Nineteen samples of wheat cultivars about similar level of protein content (11.2-12.8 % w.b.) and obtained from organic farming system were used for analysis. The kernel (moisture content 10 % w.b.) was pulverized by using the laboratory hammer mill equipped with round holes 1.0 mm screen. The specific grinding energy ranged from 120 kJkg(-1) to 159 kJkg(-1). On the basis of data obtained many of significant correlations (p < 0.05) were found between wheat kernel physical properties and pulverizing process of wheat kernel, especially wheat kernel hardness index (obtained on the basis of Single Kernel Characterization System) and vitreousness significantly and positively correlated with the grinding energy indices and the mass fraction of coarse particles (> 0.5 mm). Among the kernel mechanical properties determined on the basis of uniaxial compression test only the rapture force was correlated with the impact grinding results. The results showed also positive and significant relationships between kernel ash content and grinding energy requirements. On the basis of wheat physical properties the multiple linear regression was proposed for predicting the average particle size of pulverized kernel.

  6. Physics students' approaches to learning and cognitive processes in solving physics problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Josee

    This study examined traditional instruction and problem-based learning (PBL) approaches to teaching and the extent to which they foster the development of desirable cognitive processes, including metacognition, critical thinking, physical intuition, and problem solving among undergraduate physics students. The study also examined students' approaches to learning and their perceived role as physics students. The research took place in the context of advanced courses of electromagnetism at a Canadian research university. The cognitive science, expertise, physics and science education, instructional psychology, and discourse processes literature provided the framework and background to conceptualize and structure this study. A within-stage mixed-model design was used and a number of instruments, including a survey, observation grids, and problem sets were developed specifically for this study. A special one-week long problem-based learning (PBL) intervention was also designed. Interviews with the instructors participating in the study provided complementary data. Findings include evidence that students in general engage in metacognitive processes in the organization of their personal study time. However, this potential, including the development of other cognitive processes, might not be stimulated as much as it could in the traditional lecture instructional context. The PBL approach was deemed as more empowering for the students. An unexpected finding came from the realisation that a simple exposure to a structured exercise of problem-solving (pre-test) was sufficient to produce superior planning and solving strategies on a second exposure (post-test) even for the students who had not been exposed to any special treatment. Maturation was ruled out as a potential threat to the validity of this finding. Another promising finding appears to be that the problem-based learning (PBL) intervention tends to foster the development of cognitive competencies, particularly

  7. Addition of silver nanoparticles to composite resin: effect on physical and bactericidal properties in vitro.

    PubMed

    das Neves, Patrícia Bolzan Agnelli; Agnelli, José Augusto Marcondes; Kurachi, Cristina; de Souza, Clovis Wesley Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate physical properties and antibacterial activity of a light-activated composite modified with silver nanoparticles. Discs were produced with unmodified resin (control group - CG) and modified resin with silver nanoparticles at two concentrations, 0.3% wt (MR03) and 0.6% wt (MR06). Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus biofilms were induced in vitro by incubation of discs in a 20% sucrose medium, followed by sonication and counting of viable cells after 1, 4 and 7 days (n=9). The arithmetic roughness of all three groups was evaluated by atomic force microscopy (n=9). Compression assay was conducted in all groups to measure the compressive strength at failure and elasticity modulus (n=5). Data were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey's tests (α=0.05%). At all three time points the number of viable cells was statistically lower for MR03 and MR06 compared with CG, for both specimens. MR03 and MR06 showed no significant differences. Microscopic analysis demonstrated no significant differences for roughness among the three groups (p>0.05). The MR03 was stronger to compression than CG, and MR06 was statistically lower than CG and MR03. It was concluded that the MR03 were less conducive to biofilm growth, without compromising the strength in compression and surface roughness.

  8. Multiscale simulation process and application to additives in porous composite battery electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieser, Christian; Prill, Torben; Schladitz, Katja

    2015-03-01

    Structure-resolving simulation of porous materials in electrochemical cells such as fuel cells and lithium ion batteries allows for correlating electrical performance with material morphology. In lithium ion batteries characteristic length scales of active material particles and additives range several orders of magnitude. Hence, providing a computational mesh resolving all length scales is not reasonably feasible and requires alternative approaches. In the work presented here a virtual process to simulate lithium ion batteries by bridging the scales is introduced. Representative lithium ion battery electrode coatings comprised of μm-scale graphite particles as active material and a nm-scale carbon/polymeric binder mixture as an additive are imaged with synchrotron radiation computed tomography (SR-CT) and sequential focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM), respectively. Applying novel image processing methodologies for the FIB/SEM images, data sets are binarized to provide a computational grid for calculating the effective mass transport properties of the electrolyte phase in the nanoporous additive. Afterwards, the homogenized additive is virtually added to the micropores of the binarized SR-CT data set representing the active particle structure, and the resulting electrode structure is assembled to a virtual half-cell for electrochemical microheterogeneous simulation. Preliminary battery performance simulations indicate non-negligible impact of the consideration of the additive.

  9. Solar physics applications of computer graphics and image processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altschuler, M. D.

    1985-01-01

    Computer graphics devices coupled with computers and carefully developed software provide new opportunities to achieve insight into the geometry and time evolution of scalar, vector, and tensor fields and to extract more information quickly and cheaply from the same image data. Two or more different fields which overlay in space can be calculated from the data (and the physics), then displayed from any perspective, and compared visually. The maximum regions of one field can be compared with the gradients of another. Time changing fields can also be compared. Images can be added, subtracted, transformed, noise filtered, frequency filtered, contrast enhanced, color coded, enlarged, compressed, parameterized, and histogrammed, in whole or section by section. Today it is possible to process multiple digital images to reveal spatial and temporal correlations and cross correlations. Data from different observatories taken at different times can be processed, interpolated, and transformed to a common coordinate system.

  10. An explanatory model of physics faculty conceptions about the problem-solving process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Hsia-Po Vincent

    One commonly stated instructor goal for an introductory calculus-based physics course is to improve students' problem-solving skills. There is, however, a growing body of research evidence to suggest that this goal is not frequently accomplished in a typical college or university physics course. In response to this evidence, researchers and curriculum developers have developed a wide variety of curricular materials and instructional strategies that have been shown to be more effective in improving student problem solving performance. In spite of the availability of these materials and strategies, relatively few physics instructors have chosen to use them. One likely reason is that these materials and strategies are not consistent with the ways that physics instructors think about the teaching and learning of problem solving. This has led the Physics Education Research Group at the University of Minnesota to undertake a multistage research program to understand physics instructors' conceptions about the teaching and learning of problem solving. In the first stage, semi-structured interviews with higher education physics instructors in Minnesota were conducted. Based on an in-depth analysis of interview transcripts with six research university physics instructors, an initial explanatory model was developed that described the range and nature of conceptions for these instructors. Part of this initial model identified these instructors' conceptions of the problem-solving process. Around the same time, interviews were also conducted with 24 additional instructors from other types of higher education institutions in Minnesota. The current study is the second stage of that research program. The goal of this study is to modify and refine the part of the initial explanatory model dealing with instructor conceptions about the problem-solving process using the 24 additional interviews. With the expanded sample, this current study seeks to converge on a more viable explanatory

  11. Influence of an alloy addition on the physical and clinical behaviour of glass ionomer cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abour, Mohamed Abour Bashir

    These in vitro studies compared the various properties of an experimental high powder liquid content glass ionomer cement (EXPT) with those of a metal addition GIC (Hi-Dense) and disperse phase amalgam (Dispersalloy). Bi-axial, four point flexural and compressive tests were used to evaluate strength. Six groups of ten specimens were constructed for each test for each material and allowed to set in an oven at 37°C for 60 minutes. Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C until testing at one day, one week, one, three, six months and year. It was found that the strength of Hi-Dense increased and then maintained over extended time, whereas the strength of EXPT showed a declined at 3 months. The bond strengths of the materials to both enamel and dentine were also evaluated. Ten groups of ten teeth, five for each surface for each glass ionomer materials, were prepared. Teeth were aligned leaving the enamel and dentine surfaces exposed. The mixed material was condensed into a cylinder placed on the appropriate surface. These specimens were also stored in distilled water at 37°C. It was found that Hi-Dense had a higher bond strength to enamel that increased with time. The bond strength to dentine was maintained over the test period. The erosion rate of the materials was evaluated using the lactic acid erosion test. Three groups of six specimens for each material were constructed and tested after one hour, one day and at six months. Each specimen was subjected to an impinging jet of lactic acid solution. The erosion rate was determined by weight loss and dimensional change. It was found that Hi-Dense had a high erosion resistance which was slightly better than the experimental material. The microleakage, around restorations prepared, using the glass ionomer materials, was evaluated after cyclical loading the restoration-tooth complex. It was found that there was less leakage around Hi-Dense than EXPT at both the cervical and occlusal margins. In a clinical

  12. Consistency check of photon beam physical data after recommissioning process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadman, B.; Chawapun, N.; Ua-apisitwong, S.; Asakit, T.; Chumpu, N.; Rueansri, J.

    2016-03-01

    In radiotherapy, medical linear accelerator (Linac) is the key system used for radiation treatments delivery. Although, recommissioning was recommended after major modification of the machine by AAPM TG53, but it might not be practical in radiotherapy center with heavy workloads. The main purpose of this study was to compare photon beam physical data between initial commissioning and recommissioning of 6 MV Elekta Precise linac. The parameters for comparing were the percentage depth dose (PDD) and beam profiles. The clinical commissioning test cases followed IAEA-TECDOC-1583 were planned on REF 91230 IMRT Dose Verification Phantom by Philips’ Pinnacle treatment planning system. The Delta4PT was used for dose distribution verification with 90% passing criteria of the gamma index (3%/3mm). Our results revealed that the PDDs and beam profiles agreed within a tolerance limit recommended by TRS430. Most of the point doses and dose distribution verification passed the acceptance criteria. This study showed the consistency of photon beam physical data after recommissioning process. There was a good agreement between initial commissioning and recommissioning within a tolerance limit, demonstrated that the full recommissioning process might not be required. However, in the complex treatment planning geometry, the initial data should be applied with great caution.

  13. A combined physical/microbial process for the beneficiation of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, G.F.; Stevens, C.J.; Noah, K.S.; McIlwain, M.E.

    1993-09-01

    A large-laboratory scale physical/microbial process was demonstrated for the removal of pyritic sulfur from coal. The process took place in an aerated-trough slurry reactor with a total slurry volume of 150 L. The reactor was divided into six sections, each of which acted as a physical separator and a bioreactor. The process objective was to physically remove the larger pyritic inclusions and to biodegrade the small inclusions (micropyrite). The process was continuously operated for 120 days, treating approximately 1 ton of Illinois {number_sign}6 coal. Ninety percent pyrite removal was achieved at a 20% slurry concentration and a reactor residence time of 5 days. Additional research should be performed to find the optimum values for reactor residence time, slurry concentration, and process hydraulic residence time (or recycle ratio). Finding these optimum values will enable a process to be developed that will maximize the amount of coal that can be processed per unit reactor volume per unit time with the desired level of pyritic sulfur removal.

  14. Physical Properties of Nanostructured CdO Films from Alkaline Baths Containing Saccharin as Additive

    PubMed Central

    Şahin, Bünyamin

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured cadmium oxide (CdO) films were fabricated on glass substrates from alkaline baths containing saccharin as an additive by a successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method. The effects of saccharin concentration in the bath on the structural, morphological, and optical properties were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), photoluminescence, and Raman spectroscopy. The analyses showed that the surface morphologies, XRD peak intensities, Raman spectroscopy, and photoluminescence properties of CdO films changed with saccharin concentration. From the results, it can be said that morphological characteristic and optical properties of the films could be calibrated by adding various saccharin percentages in the growth bath. PMID:23844379

  15. Physical properties of nanostructured CdO films from alkaline baths containing saccharin as additive.

    PubMed

    Şahin, Bünyamin

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured cadmium oxide (CdO) films were fabricated on glass substrates from alkaline baths containing saccharin as an additive by a successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method. The effects of saccharin concentration in the bath on the structural, morphological, and optical properties were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), photoluminescence, and Raman spectroscopy. The analyses showed that the surface morphologies, XRD peak intensities, Raman spectroscopy, and photoluminescence properties of CdO films changed with saccharin concentration. From the results, it can be said that morphological characteristic and optical properties of the films could be calibrated by adding various saccharin percentages in the growth bath.

  16. Effect of galactooligosaccharide addition on the physical, optical, and sensory acceptance of vanilla ice cream.

    PubMed

    Balthazar, C F; Silva, H L A; Celeguini, R M S; Santos, R; Pastore, G M; Junior, C A Conte; Freitas, M Q; Nogueira, L C; Silva, M C; Cruz, A G

    2015-07-01

    The effect of the addition of galactooligosaccharide (GOS) on the physicochemical, optical, and sensory characteristics of ice cream was investigated. Vanilla ice cream was supplemented with 0, 1.5, and 3.0% (wt/wt) GOS and characterized for pH, firmness, color, melting, overrun, as well as subjected to a discriminative sensory test (triangle test). For comparison purposes, ice creams containing fructooligosaccharide were also manufactured. The GOS ice creams were characterized by increased firmness and lower melting rates. Different perceptions were reported in the sensory evaluation for the 3.0% GOS ice cream when compared with the control, which was not observed for the fructooligosaccharide ice cream. Overall, the findings suggest it is possible to produce GOS ice cream with improved stability in relation to the physicochemical parameters and sensory perception.

  17. Surface Modified Particles By Multi-Step Addition And Process For The Preparation Thereof

    DOEpatents

    Cook, Ronald Lee; Elliott, Brian John; Luebben, Silvia DeVito; Myers, Andrew William; Smith, Bryan Matthew

    2006-01-17

    The present invention relates to a new class of surface modified particles and to a multi-step surface modification process for the preparation of the same. The multi-step surface functionalization process involves two or more reactions to produce particles that are compatible with various host systems and/or to provide the particles with particular chemical reactivities. The initial step comprises the attachment of a small organic compound to the surface of the inorganic particle. The subsequent steps attach additional compounds to the previously attached organic compounds through organic linking groups.

  18. Photoresist roughness characterization in additive lithography processes for the fabrication of phase-only optical vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinimakarem, Zahra; Poutous, Menelaos K.; Johnson, Eric G.

    2012-03-01

    The roughness on the surface of phase-only micro-optical elements can limit their performance. An optical vortex phase element was fabricated by using additive lithography with an optimized process to have minimal surface roughness. Thick photoresist was used in order to obtain the appropriate dynamic range for the desired phase profile. We investigated the effects of both post applied and post exposure baking processes, as well as the effects of surfactant in the developer. We found the resist surface roughness to be a function of both the temperature and the time of the respective bakes, as well as the developer surfactant content.

  19. CLARA: A Contemporary Approach to Physics Data Processing

    SciTech Connect

    V Gyurjyan, D Abbott, J Carbonneau, G Gilfoyle, D Heddle, G Heyes, S Paul, C Timmer, D Weygand, E Wolin

    2011-12-01

    In traditional physics data processing (PDP) systems, data location is static and is accessed by analysis applications. In comparison, CLARA (CLAS12 Reconstruction and Analysis framework) is an environment where data processing algorithms filter continuously flowing data. In CLARA's domain of loosely coupled services, data is not stored, but rather flows from one service to another, mutating constantly along the way. Agents, performing event processing, can then subscribe to particular data/events at any stage of the data transformation, and make intricate decisions (e.g. particle ID) by correlating events from multiple, parallel data streams and/or services. This paper presents a PDP application development framework based on service oriented and event driven architectures. This system allows users to design (Java, C++, and Python languages are supported) and deploy data processing services, as well as dynamically compose PDP applications using available services. The PDP service bus provides a layer on top of a distributed pub-sub middleware implementation, which allows complex service composition and integration without writing code. Examples of service creation and deployment, along with the CLAS12 track reconstruction application design will be presented.

  20. Additive Manufacturing: Building the Pathway Towards Process and Material Qualification”

    DOE PAGES

    Carpenter, John S.; Beese, Allison M.; Bourell, David L.; ...

    2016-06-14

    The potential benefits of metal additive manufacturing, as compared with more traditional, subtractive-only approaches, has created excitement within design circles seeking to take advantage of the ability to build and repair complex shapes, to integrate or consolidate multiple parts and minimize joining concerns, and to locally tailor material properties to increase functionality. Tempering the excitement of designers, however, has been concerns with the material deposited by the process. It is not enough for a part to ‘look’ right from a geometric perspective. Rather, the metallurgical aspects associated with the material being deposited must ‘look’ and ‘behave’ correctly along with themore » aforementioned geometric accuracy. Finally, without elucidation of the connections between processing, microstructure, properties, and performance from a materials science perspective, metal additive manufacturing will not realize its potential to change the manufacturing world for property and performance-critical engineering applications.« less

  1. Additive Manufacturing: Building the Pathway Towards Process and Material Qualification”

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, John S.; Beese, Allison M.; Bourell, David L.; Hamilton, Reginald F.; Herderick, Edward; Mishra, Rajiv S.; Sears, James

    2016-06-14

    The potential benefits of metal additive manufacturing, as compared with more traditional, subtractive-only approaches, has created excitement within design circles seeking to take advantage of the ability to build and repair complex shapes, to integrate or consolidate multiple parts and minimize joining concerns, and to locally tailor material properties to increase functionality. Tempering the excitement of designers, however, has been concerns with the material deposited by the process. It is not enough for a part to ‘look’ right from a geometric perspective. Rather, the metallurgical aspects associated with the material being deposited must ‘look’ and ‘behave’ correctly along with the aforementioned geometric accuracy. Finally, without elucidation of the connections between processing, microstructure, properties, and performance from a materials science perspective, metal additive manufacturing will not realize its potential to change the manufacturing world for property and performance-critical engineering applications.

  2. Application of antibodies for the identification of polysaccharide gum additives in processed foods.

    PubMed

    Pazur, J H; Li, N-Q

    2004-11-01

    Anti-carbohydrate antibodies with specificities for polysaccharide gums were isolated from the serum of rabbits that were immunized with a solution of the gums and Freund's complete adjuvant. The primary objective was to test an immunological method for the detection of the polysaccharide gums as additives to processed foods. Analysis involved the extraction of food with phosphate buffer and the testing of the extract for a reaction with anti-gum antibodies by the agar diffusion method. Reaction by a specific gum with the homologous antibodies establishes the presence of the gum in the food. The method is a novel application of antibodies. The antibody method is highly specific for a gum and thus possesses advantages over other methods of analysis for polysaccharide gums as additives in processed foods.

  3. Influence of Alumina Additions on the Physical and Chemical Properties of Lithium-iron-phosphate Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huali; Yang, Ruijuan; Wang, Yinghui; Liu, Shiquan

    Alumina improves the properties and depresses the devitrification of soda-lime-silicate glasses. Herein, the influence of alumina on the glass transition temperature, density, chemical durability, crystallization of lithium-iron-phosphate (LIP) glass has been investigated. As alumina was added to replace the iron oxide in a base LIP glass with the molar composition of Li2O:Fe2O3:P2O5=30:20:50, the alumina-containing glasses have increased Tg, densities and chemical stabilities than the base glass. When the amount of alumina is increased from 2 to 6 mol, the Tg value slightly increases, whereas the density decreases. However, the smallest weight loss is shown for the glass containing 3.2 mol of alumina. The variations of the properties with alumina are explained based on the infrared structure analysis results. In addition, it is found the either the base or the alumina-containing glasses have surface crystallization upon heat-treatments. Under the same treatment conditions, the base glass exhibits a thin layer of crystallization with LiFeP2O7 as the main phase. In contrast, alumina-containing glasses show much higher degree of crystallization, which is further increased with the amount of alumina. This trend is opposite to that of silicate glass. Besides the LiFeP2O7 main phase, Fe7(PO4) phase is also identified in the crystallized alumina-containing glasses.

  4. Guidelines for Automatic Data Processing Physical Security and Risk Management. Federal Information Processing Standards Publication 31.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC.

    These guidelines provide a handbook for use by federal organizations in structuring physical security and risk management programs for their automatic data processing facilities. This publication discusses security analysis, natural disasters, supporting utilities, system reliability, procedural measures and controls, off-site facilities,…

  5. Reactive nanophase oxide additions to melt-processed high-{Tc} superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Goretta, K.C.; Brandel, B.P.; Lanagan, M.T.; Hu, J.; Miller, D.J.; Sengupta, S.; Parker, J.C.; Ali, M.N.; Chen, Nan

    1994-10-01

    Nanophase TiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powders were synthesized by a vapor-phase process and mechanically mixed with stoichiometric YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} and TlBa{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} powders in 20 mole % concentrations. Pellets produced from powders with and without nanophase oxides were heated in air or O{sub 2} above the peritectic melt temperature and slow-cooled. At 4.2 K, the intragranular critical current density (J{sub c}) increased dramatically with the oxide additions. At 35--50 K, effects of the oxide additions were positive, but less pronounced. At 77 K, the additions decreased J{sub c}, probably because of inducing a depresion of the transition temperature.

  6. Long term effect of MnO2 powder addition on nitrogen removal by anammox process.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Sen; Bi, Zhen; Zhou, Jiti; Cheng, Yingjun; Zhang, Jie; Bhatti, Zafar

    2012-11-01

    This study examined long-term effect of MnO(2) powder (average diameter of 4-7 μm) on nitrogen removal in anammox process. Two lab-scale up-flow anammox reactors were operated for 380 days, one with and one without MnO(2) powder addition. During the period when only substrate concentrations varied, the maximum nitrogen removal rate in the reactor with MnO(2) addition reached 920.9 g-N/m(3)/d. This value was 2-folds higher than that (464.6 g-N/m(3)/d) of the reactor without MnO(2) addition. The crude enzyme activities of the anammox biomass from the two reactors was measured as 0.531±0.019 and 0.298±0.007 μmol cytochrome c reduced/mg protein/min, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy observation demonstrated more undefined particles existing inside anammox bacterial cell in the reactor with MnO(2) powder addition. Furthermore, filament-like structures inside anammoxosome were observed, which formed a net-like structure with particles as the connecting nodes. The experiment results demonstrated that MnO(2) improved nitrogen removal performance of anammox process.

  7. Monitoring Residual Solvent Additives and Their Effects in Solution Processed Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogel, Derek M.; Basham, James I.; Engmann, Sebastian; Pookpanratana, Sujitra J.; Bittle, Emily G.; Jurchescu, Oana D.; Gundlach, David J.

    2015-03-01

    High boiling point solvent additives are a widely adopted approach for increasing bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cell efficiency. However, experiments show residual solvent can persist for hours after film deposition, and certain common additives are unstable or reactive. We report here on the effects of residual 1,8-diiodooctane on the electrical performance of poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT): phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC[71]BM) BHJ photovoltaic cells. We optimized our fabrication process for efficiency at an active layer thickness of 220 nm, and all devices were processed in parallel to minimize unintentional variations between test structures. The one variable in this study is the active layer post spin drying time. Immediately following the cathode deposition, we measured the current-voltage characteristics at one sun equivalent illumination intensity, and performed impedance spectroscopy to quantify charge density, lifetime, and recombination process. Spectroscopic ellipsometry, FTIR, and XPS are also used to monitor residual solvent and correlated with electrical performance. We find that residual additive degrades performance by increasing the series resistance and lowering efficiency, fill factor, and free carrier lifetime.

  8. Effect of almond shell biochar addition on the hydro-physical properties of an arable Central Valley soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, V.; Ghezzehei, T. A.

    2014-12-01

    Biochar is composed of any carbonaceous matter pyrolyzed under low oxygen exposure. Its use as a soil amendment to address soil infertility has been accelerated by studies reporting positive effects of enhanced nutrient retention, cation exchange capacity, microbial activity, and vegetative growth over time. Biochar has also been considered as a carbon sequestration method because of its reported environmental persistence. While the aforementioned effects are positive benefits of biochar's use, its impact on soil physical properties and water flow are equally important in maintaining soil fertility. This study aims to show how soil physical and hydraulic properties change over time with biochar addition. To address these aims, we conducted a 9 week microcosm incubation experiment with local arable loamy sand soils amended with biochar. Biochar was created from locally collected almond shells and differs by pyrolysis temperatures (350°C, 700°C) and size (<250 μm, 1-2mm). Additionally, biochar was applied to soil at a low (10 t/ha) or high (60 t/ha) rates. Changes in soil water flow properties were analyzed by infiltration or pressure cell experiments immediately after creating our soil-biochar mixtures. These experiments were repeated during and after the incubation period to observe if and how flow is altered over time. Following incubation and hydraulic experiments, a water drop penetration time (WDPT) test was conducted to observe any alterations in surface hydrophobicity. Changes in soil physical properties were analyzed by determining content of water stable aggregates remaining after wet sieving. This series of experiments is expected to provide a greater understanding on the impact biochar addition on soil physical and hydraulic properties. Furthermore, it provides insight into whether or not converting local agricultural waste into biochar for soil use will be beneficial, especially in agricultural systems undergoing climate stress.

  9. Understanding Solidification of Polythiophene Thin Films during Spin-Coating: Effects of Spin-Coating Time and Processing Additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Jin Yeong; Kang, Boseok; Sin, Dong Hun; Cho, Kilwon; Park, Yeong Don

    2015-08-01

    Spin-coating has been used extensively in the fabrication of electronic devices; however, the effects of the processing parameters have not been fully explored. Here, we systematically characterize the effects of the spin-coating time on the microstructure evolution during semiconducting polymer solidification in an effort to establish the relationship between this parameter and the performances of the resulting polymer field-effect transistors (FETs). We found that a short spin-coating time of a few seconds dramatically improve the morphology and molecular order in a conjugated polymer thin film because the π-π stacking structures formed by the polymer molecules grow slowly and with a greater degree of order due to the residual solvent present in the wet film. The improved ordering is correlated with improved charge carrier transport in the FETs prepared from these films. We also demonstrated the effects of various processing additives on the resulting FET characteristics as well as on the film drying behavior during spin-coating. The physical properties of the additives are found to affect the film drying process and the resulting device performance.

  10. Understanding Solidification of Polythiophene Thin Films during Spin-Coating: Effects of Spin-Coating Time and Processing Additives

    PubMed Central

    Na, Jin Yeong; Kang, Boseok; Sin, Dong Hun; Cho, Kilwon; Park, Yeong Don

    2015-01-01

    Spin-coating has been used extensively in the fabrication of electronic devices; however, the effects of the processing parameters have not been fully explored. Here, we systematically characterize the effects of the spin-coating time on the microstructure evolution during semiconducting polymer solidification in an effort to establish the relationship between this parameter and the performances of the resulting polymer field-effect transistors (FETs). We found that a short spin-coating time of a few seconds dramatically improve the morphology and molecular order in a conjugated polymer thin film because the π-π stacking structures formed by the polymer molecules grow slowly and with a greater degree of order due to the residual solvent present in the wet film. The improved ordering is correlated with improved charge carrier transport in the FETs prepared from these films. We also demonstrated the effects of various processing additives on the resulting FET characteristics as well as on the film drying behavior during spin-coating. The physical properties of the additives are found to affect the film drying process and the resulting device performance. PMID:26299676

  11. Understanding Solidification of Polythiophene Thin Films during Spin-Coating: Effects of Spin-Coating Time and Processing Additives.

    PubMed

    Na, Jin Yeong; Kang, Boseok; Sin, Dong Hun; Cho, Kilwon; Park, Yeong Don

    2015-08-24

    Spin-coating has been used extensively in the fabrication of electronic devices; however, the effects of the processing parameters have not been fully explored. Here, we systematically characterize the effects of the spin-coating time on the microstructure evolution during semiconducting polymer solidification in an effort to establish the relationship between this parameter and the performances of the resulting polymer field-effect transistors (FETs). We found that a short spin-coating time of a few seconds dramatically improve the morphology and molecular order in a conjugated polymer thin film because the π-π stacking structures formed by the polymer molecules grow slowly and with a greater degree of order due to the residual solvent present in the wet film. The improved ordering is correlated with improved charge carrier transport in the FETs prepared from these films. We also demonstrated the effects of various processing additives on the resulting FET characteristics as well as on the film drying behavior during spin-coating. The physical properties of the additives are found to affect the film drying process and the resulting device performance.

  12. Physical Processes Involved In Yellow Sea Solitary Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warn-Varnas, A.; Chin-Bing, S.; King, D.; Lamb, K.; Hawkins, J.; Teixeira, M.

    The study area is located south of the Shandong peninsula. In this area, soliton gener- ation and propagation studies are per formed with the Lamb(1994) model. The model is nonhydrostatic and is formulated in 2 1/2 dimensions for terrain following c oordi- nates. In the area, 20 to 30 m topographic variations over distances of 10 to 20 km are found to occur in the digit al atlas of Choi (1999). The area is shallow with maximum depths ranging from 40 m to 70 m. Along the southern boundary of the region the semi-diurnal tidal strength magnitude varies from .6 m/sec to 1.2 m/sec, Fang(1994). We show that, for sum mer conditions, the existing physical processes associated with the semi-diurnal tidal flow over the topographic variations , in the shelfbreak region, lead to the formation of internal bores in the model simulations. Through acting phys- ical proce sses, the internal bores propagate on and off the shelf. A disintegration process of internal bores into solitary waves occ urs through frequency and ampli- tude dispersion. SAR observations of the area show images containing six events con- sisting of internal bores and solitary waves that travel in a well-defined direction for two and a half days. The origin of the trains appeared to be at a point along a steep topo graphic drop. The SAR observations are used for guiding and tuning the model simulations, by comparing spectra of observed and modeled wavelengths. The tuned model yields wavelengths that are within a factor of 2 of the SAR data. The modeled amp litudes are within a factor of 2 of amplitudes obtained with a two-layer model and the SAR data The signature on the acoustical field of ongoing physical processes through the interaction of the resultant oceanic struct ure with the acoustical field is pursued. Internal bore and solitary wave structures interact with the acoustic field. A re distribution of acoustical energy to higher acoustical modes occurs at some fre- quencies. Mode decomposition of the

  13. Modified lignosulfonates as additives in oil recovery processes involving chemical recovery agents

    SciTech Connect

    Kalfoglou, G.

    1982-08-17

    A process for producing petroleum from subterranean formations is disclosed wherein production from the formation is obtained by driving a fluid from an injection well to a production well. The process involves injecting via the injection well into the formation an aqueous solution of modified lignosulfonate salt as a sacrificial agent to inhibit the deposition of surfactant and/or polymer on the reservoir matrix. The process may best be carried out by injecting the modified lignosulfonates into the formation through the injection well mixed with either a polymer, a surfactant solution and/or a micellar dispersion. This mixture would then be followed by a drive fluid such as water to push the chemicals to the production well. The lignosulfonates may be modified by any combination of any two or more of: reaction with chloroacetic acid, reaction with carbon dioxide, addition of the methylene sulfonate radical to the lignosulfonate molecule and oxidation with oxygen.

  14. Design and tuning of standard additive model based fuzzy PID controllers for multivariable process systems.

    PubMed

    Harinath, Eranda; Mann, George K I

    2008-06-01

    This paper describes a design and two-level tuning method for fuzzy proportional-integral derivative (FPID) controllers for a multivariable process where the fuzzy inference uses the inference of standard additive model. The proposed method can be used for any n x n multi-input-multi-output process and guarantees closed-loop stability. In the two-level tuning scheme, the tuning follows two steps: low-level tuning followed by high-level tuning. The low-level tuning adjusts apparent linear gains, whereas the high-level tuning changes the nonlinearity in the normalized fuzzy output. In this paper, two types of FPID configurations are considered, and their performances are evaluated by using a real-time multizone temperature control problem having a 3 x 3 process system.

  15. Experimental Studies of Nuclear Physics Input for γ -Process Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, Philipp; Heim, Felix; Mayer, Jan; Netterdon, Lars; Zilges, Andreas

    The predictions of reaction rates for the γ process in the scope of the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model crucially depend on nuclear physics input-parameters as optical-model potentials (OMP) or γ -ray strength functions. Precise cross-section measurements at astrophysically relevant energies help to constrain adopted models and, therefore, to reduce the uncertainties in the theoretically predicted reaction rates. During the last years, several cross-sections of charged-particle induced reactions on heavy nuclei have been measured at the University of Cologne. Either by means of the in-beam method at the HORUS γ -ray spectrometer or the activation technique using the Cologne Clover Counting Setup, total and partial cross-sections could be used to further constrain different models for nuclear physics input-parameters. It could be shown that modifications on the α -OMP in the case of the 112Sn(α , γ ) reaction also improve the description of the recently measured cross sections of the 108Cd(α , γ ) and 108Cd(α , n) reaction and other reactions as well. Partial cross-sections of the 92Mo(p, γ ) reaction were used to improve the γ -strength function model in 93Tc in the same way as it was done for the 89Y(p, γ ) reaction.

  16. Corrosion processes of physical vapor deposition-coated metallic implants.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Renato Altobelli; de Oliveira, Mara Cristina Lopes

    2009-01-01

    Protecting metallic implants from the harsh environment of physiological fluids is essential to guaranteeing successful long-term use in a patient's body. Chemical degradation may lead to the failure of an implant device in two different ways. First, metal ions may cause inflammatory reactions in the tissues surrounding the implant and, in extreme cases, these reactions may inflict acute pain on the patient and lead to loosening of the device. Therefore, increasing wear strength is beneficial to the performance of the metallic implant. Second, localized corrosion processes contribute to the nucleation of fatigue cracks, and corrosion fatigue is the main reason for the mechanical failure of metallic implants. Common biomedical alloys such as stainless steel, cobalt-chrome alloys, and titanium alloys are prone to at least one of these problems. Vapor-deposited hard coatings act directly to improve corrosion, wear, and fatigue resistances of metallic materials. The effectiveness of the corrosion protection is strongly related to the structure of the physical vapor deposition layer. The aim of this paper is to present a comprehensive review of the correlation between the structure of physical vapor deposition layers and the corrosion properties of metallic implants.

  17. Thermographic In-Situ Process Monitoring of the Electron Beam Melting Technology used in Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton; Dehoff, Ryan R; Lloyd, Peter D; Lowe, Larry E; Ulrich, Joseph B

    2013-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been utilizing the ARCAM electron beam melting technology to additively manufacture complex geometric structures directly from powder. Although the technology has demonstrated the ability to decrease costs, decrease manufacturing lead-time and fabricate complex structures that are impossible to fabricate through conventional processing techniques, certification of the component quality can be challenging. Because the process involves the continuous deposition of successive layers of material, each layer can be examined without destructively testing the component. However, in-situ process monitoring is difficult due to metallization on inside surfaces caused by evaporation and condensation of metal from the melt pool. This work describes a solution to one of the challenges to continuously imaging inside of the chamber during the EBM process. Here, the utilization of a continuously moving Mylar film canister is described. Results will be presented related to in-situ process monitoring and how this technique results in improved mechanical properties and reliability of the process.

  18. Convection in the Physical Vapor Transport Process. 1; Thermal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, Walter M. B.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of convection on diffusive-convective physical vapor transport process are examined computationally. We analyze conditions ranging from typical laboratory conditions to conditions achievable only in a low gravity environment. This corresponds to thermal Rayleigh numbers Ra(sub tau) ranging from 1.80 x 10 to 1.92 x 10(exp 6). Our results indicate that the effect of the sublimation and condensation fluxes at the boundaries is to increase the threshold of instability. For typical ground based conditions, time dependent oscillatory convection can occur. This results in unsteady transport, and non-uniform temperature and concentration gradients at the crystal interface. Spectral analysis of the flow field shows parametric regions exhibiting both an oscillatory approach to steady state and a chaotic transient to a periodic state. Low gravity conditions stabilize the flow field. Convective effects are effectively reduced, thus resulting in uniform temperature and concentration gradients at the interface, a desirable condition for crystal growth.

  19. Convection in the Physical Vapor Transport Process-I: Thermal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, Walter M. B.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of convection on diffusive-convective physical vapor transport process are examined computationally. We analyze conditions ranging from typical laboratory conditions to conditions achievable only in a low gravity environment. This corresponds to thermal Rayleigh numbers Ra, ranging from 1.80 x 10 to 1.92 x 10(exp 6). Our results indicate that the effect of the sublimation and condensation fluxes at the boundaries is to increase the threshold of instability. For typical ground based conditions, time dependent oscillatory convection can occur. This results in unsteady transport, and non- uniform temperature and concentration gradients at the crystal interface. Spectral analysis of the flow field shows parametric regions exhibiting both an oscillatory approach to steady state and a chaotic transient to a periodic state. Low gravity conditions stabilize the flow field. Convective effects are effectively reduced, thus resulting in uniform temperature and concentration gradients at the interface, a desirable condition for crystal growth.

  20. Physical processes in prediction of explosive maritime cyclogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, C.-S.; Elsberry, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    Explosive maritime cyclogenetic events are usually aligned with the warm currents off the east coasts of Japan and the U.S. One such event occurred during FGGE in an area which featured good instrumented ship and aircraft coverage. The UCLA 4th order GMC was employed to generate predictions of the event for comparisons with the real-world data. FGGE III-b data were used to initialize the model calculations. Attention was directed to the physical processes causing the onset of the cyclogenesis, particularly the heat budgets of the fluxes involved. The diabatic heating was observed to be equivalent to the horizontal temperature advection. The main source of energy around the cyclone center was identified as the conversion of energy from static energy to kinetic energy. Further analyses of similar events are required if the present results are to be validated.

  1. Physical processes associated with current collection by plasma contactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Ira; Davis, Victoria A.

    1990-01-01

    Recent flight data confirms laboratory observations that the release of neutral gas increases plasma sheath currents. Plasma contactors are devices which release a partially ionized gas in order to enhance the current flow between a spacecraft and the space plasma. Ionization of the expellant gas and the formation of a double layer between the anode plasma and the space plasma are the dominant physical processes. A theory is presented of the interaction between the contactor plasma and the background plasma. The conditions for formation of a double layer between the two plasmas are derived. Double layer formation is shown to be a consequence of the nonlinear response of the plasmas to changes in potential. Numerical calculations based upon this model are compared with laboratory measurements of current collection by hollow cathode-based plasma contactors.

  2. Extrinsic visual feedback and additional cognitive/physical demands affect single-limb balance control in individuals with ankle instability

    PubMed Central

    Hung, You-jou; Miller, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the impact of extrinsic visual feedback and additional cognitive/physical demands on single-limb balance in individuals with ankle instability. METHODS Sixteen subjects with ankle instability participated in the study. Ankle instability was identified using the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool (CAIT). The subject’s unstable ankle was examined using the Athletic Single Leg Stability Test of the Biodex Balance System with 4 different protocols: (1) default setting with extrinsic visual feedback from the monitor; (2) no extrinsic visual feedback; (3) no extrinsic visual feedback with cognitive demands; and (4) no extrinsic visual feedback with physical demands. For the protocol with added cognitive demands, subjects were asked to continue subtracting 7 from a given number while performing the same test without extrinsic visual feedback. For the protocol with added physical demands, subjects were asked to pass and catch a basketball to and from the examiner while performing the same modified test. RESULTS The subject’s single-limb postural control varied significantly among different testing protocols (F = 103; P = 0.000). Subjects’ postural control was the worst with added physical demands and the best with the default condition with extrinsic visual feedback. Pairwise comparison shows subjects performed significantly worse in all modified protocols (P < 0.01 in all comparisons) compared to the default protocol. Results from all 4 protocols are significantly different from each other (P < 0.01) except for the comparison between the “no extrinsic visual feedback” and “no extrinsic visual feedback with cognitive demands” protocols. Comparing conditions without extrinsic visual feedback, adding a cognitive demand did not significantly compromise single-limb balance control but adding a physical demand did. Scores from the default protocol are significantly correlated with the results from all 3 modified protocols: No extrinsic visual

  3. [Effects of different perlite additions on physical and chemical properties of sewage sludge compost and growth of Tagetes patula].

    PubMed

    Hu, Yu-Tong; Shi, Lian-Hui; Liu, Deng-Min; Tong, Shao-Wei; Wei, Mei-Yan; Sun, Jie

    2014-07-01

    In order to resolve the problem of poor permeability of sewage sludge compost (SSC) which was used as the substitution of peat, perlite was used to regulate the permeability of the sewage. The pure SSC was used as control. The proportions of perlite in the mixtures with SSC were 20%, 40%, 60%, 80% and 100% (V/V), respectively. The effects of different perlite ratios on the physical and chemical properties and the growth of Tagetes patula were studied. The bulk density, water holding porosity and water holding porosity to aeration porosity decreased, but the total porosity and aeration porosity increased with the increasing addition of perlite to the SSC. For the chemical properties, the pH increased, and the EC and nutrient contents decreased with the increasing addition of perlite to the SSC. The aboveground biomass and flowers of T. patula were the highest in the 60% perlite treatment, and the lowest in the pure SSC treatment. The root morphology and activity were the best in the 40%, 60% and 80% perlite treatments. Aeration was the strongest factor to impact the maximum root length and average root diameter. Perlite promoted the growth of T. patula mainly through impacting the physical properties of the SSC. The addition of 60% perlite to the SSC could significantly improve the poor aeration and decrease the high salinity greatly in the SSC and regulate the growth of the root and aboveground of T. patula.

  4. Modification of physical properties of poly(L-lactic acid) by addition of methyl-β-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Ei, Ayaka; Takada, Yoshihisa; Uehara, Hiroki; Yamanobe, Takeshi; Takahashi, Keiko

    2014-01-01

    Poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) is a biodegradable plastic and one of the most famous plastics made from biobased materials. However, its physical strength is insufficient compared to general-purpose plastics. In this study, the effect of methylcyclodextrin (MeCD) addition on the structure and physical properties, especially the drawing behavior, of PLLA was investigated. Through thermal analysis, it was found that MeCD addition lowers the crystallinity and enhances the mobility of PLLA. The sample containing approximately 17% MeCD was drawn to more than 1000% at 60 °C, although PLLA fractured at a strain of less than 100%. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC)-Raman in situ measurements also revealed decreases in the glass transition temperature (T g), cold crystallization temperature (T c), and melting point (T m), and improvement in structural distribution with temperature. DSC-Raman measurements simultaneously supplied information about crystallinity and thermal properties. Thus, it was concluded that MeCD had high affinity for PLLA, and the addition of MeCD increased the amorphous component of PLLA and enhanced the drawability.

  5. Modification of physical properties of poly(L-lactic acid) by addition of methyl-β-cyclodextrin

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Ei, Ayaka; Takada, Yoshihisa; Uehara, Hiroki; Takahashi, Keiko

    2014-01-01

    Summary Poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) is a biodegradable plastic and one of the most famous plastics made from biobased materials. However, its physical strength is insufficient compared to general-purpose plastics. In this study, the effect of methylcyclodextrin (MeCD) addition on the structure and physical properties, especially the drawing behavior, of PLLA was investigated. Through thermal analysis, it was found that MeCD addition lowers the crystallinity and enhances the mobility of PLLA. The sample containing approximately 17% MeCD was drawn to more than 1000% at 60 °C, although PLLA fractured at a strain of less than 100%. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC)-Raman in situ measurements also revealed decreases in the glass transition temperature (T g), cold crystallization temperature (T c), and melting point (T m), and improvement in structural distribution with temperature. DSC-Raman measurements simultaneously supplied information about crystallinity and thermal properties. Thus, it was concluded that MeCD had high affinity for PLLA, and the addition of MeCD increased the amorphous component of PLLA and enhanced the drawability. PMID:25670970

  6. Additive effects of serotonin transporter and tryptophan hydroxylase-2 gene variation on emotional processing.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Martin J; Huter, Theresa; Müller, Frauke; Mühlberger, Andreas; Pauli, Paul; Reif, Andreas; Renner, Tobias; Canli, Turhan; Fallgatter, Andreas J; Lesch, Klaus-Peter

    2007-05-01

    Prior studies reported that functional variants of both the serotonin transporter (5-HTT) and tryptophan hydroxylase-2 genes (TPH2), 2 key regulators of the serotonergic signaling pathway, modulate amygdala activation during emotional processing. We addressed the question whether these 2 gene variants modulate each other, using an emotional picture-processing task. Specifically, we measured event-related potentials (ERPs) during a passive emotional picture perception task, focusing on ERPs for the early posterior negativity (EPN) around 240 ms and for the slow wave starting at 315 ms. We found evidence for increased neural activity at 240 ms in individuals who carried 1 or 2 copies of the low-expression short variant of the 5-HTT. Carriers of T variant of the TPH2 also showed a tendency toward increased neural activity at 240 ms. Moreover, we observed an additive effect of both genotypes for EPN, with highest neural activity to emotional stimuli in individuals carrying combination of both short variant of 5-HTT and T variant of TPH2. Our results indicate that both the 5-HTT and the TPH2 genotypes modulate the sensory encoding of affective stimuli during early steps of visual processing and reveal additive effects of 2 genes in the serotonergic control of emotion regulation.

  7. Process-Structure-Property Relationships for 316L Stainless Steel Fabricated by Additive Manufacturing and Its Implication for Component Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Nancy; Yee, J.; Zheng, B.; Gaiser, K.; Reynolds, T.; Clemon, L.; Lu, W. Y.; Schoenung, J. M.; Lavernia, E. J.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the process-structure-property relationships for 316L stainless steel prototyping utilizing 3-D laser engineered net shaping (LENS), a commercial direct energy deposition additive manufacturing process. The study concluded that the resultant physical metallurgy of 3-D LENS 316L prototypes is dictated by the interactive metallurgical reactions, during instantaneous powder feeding/melting, molten metal flow and liquid metal solidification. The study also showed 3-D LENS manufacturing is capable of building high strength and ductile 316L prototypes due to its fine cellular spacing from fast solidification cooling, and the well-fused epitaxial interfaces at metal flow trails and interpass boundaries. However, without further LENS process control and optimization, the deposits are vulnerable to localized hardness variation attributed to heterogeneous microstructure, i.e., the interpass heat-affected zone (HAZ) from repetitive thermal heating during successive layer depositions. Most significantly, the current deposits exhibit anisotropic tensile behavior, i.e., lower strain and/or premature interpass delamination parallel to build direction (axial). This anisotropic behavior is attributed to the presence of interpass HAZ, which coexists with flying feedstock inclusions and porosity from incomplete molten metal fusion. The current observations and findings contribute to the scientific basis for future process control and optimization necessary for material property control and defect mitigation.

  8. Nucleophilic addition/double cyclization cascade processes between enynyl Fischer carbene complexes and alkynyl malonates.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Fernández, Ana; Suárez-Rodríguez, Tatiana; Suárez-Sobrino, Ángel L

    2014-07-18

    Two new selective cascade processes for enynyl Fischer carbene complexes 1 are described in their reaction with alkynyl malonates. When carbene complexes 1 react with the sodium enolate of homopropargyl malonates 3 a consecutive Michael-type addition/cyclopentannulation/6-exo cyclization takes place leading, in a regio- and stereoselective way, to n/5/6 angular tricyclic compounds 5. Furthermore, when propargylic malonates are used, a delayed protonation of the reaction mixture allows intermediate 1,4-addition adduct Ia to evolve through a 5-exo cyclization, consisting of an intramolecular nucleophilic attack from the central carbon of the allenylmetallate over the triple C-C bond. Further spontaneous cyclopentannulation of the resulting metallatriene gives rise to bicyclic and linear polycyclic compounds 6 and 7, some of them bearing a polyquinane framework.

  9. Vitrification of F006 plating waste sludge by Reactive Additive Stabilization Process (RASP)

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, H.L.; Jantzen, C.M.; Pickett, J.B.

    1994-06-01

    Solidification into glass of nickel-on-uranium plating wastewater treatment plant sludge (F006 Mixed Waste) has been demonstrated at the Savannah River She (SRS). Vitrification using high surface area additives, the Reactive Additive Stabilization Process (RASP), greatly enhanced the solubility and retention of heavy metals In glass. The bench-scale tests using RASP achieved 76 wt% waste loading In both soda-lime-silica and borosilicate glasses. The RASP has been Independently verified by a commercial waste management company, and a contract awarded to vitrify the approximately 500,000 gallons of stored waste sludge. The waste volume reduction of 89% will greatly reduce the disposal costs, and delisting of the glass waste is anticipated. This will be the world`s first commercial-scale vitrification system used for environmental cleanup of Mixed Waste. Its stabilization and volume reduction abilities are expected to set standards for the future of the waste management Industry.

  10. Effects of whey or maltodextrin addition during production on physical quality of white cheese powder during storage.

    PubMed

    Erbay, Zafer; Koca, Nurcan

    2015-12-01

    There is an increasing demand for cheese as a food ingredient, especially as a flavoring agent. One of the most important cheese flavoring agents is cheese powder. To obtain an intense cheese flavor, ripened cheese is used as a raw material in cheese powder but this increases production costs. Moreover, use of natural cheese decreases the physical quality of powder because of its high fat content. In this study, we evaluated opportunities to use whey or maltodextrin for improving the physical quality of powders in production of white cheese powder. We produced cheese powders with 3 different formulations-control (CON), whey-added (WACP), and maltodextrin-added (MACP)-and determined the effects of formulation on cheese powder quality. Physical quality parameters such as color, densities, reconstitution properties, free fat content, particle morphology, and sensory characteristics were investigated. The different cheese powders were stored for 12 mo at 20°C and we evaluated the effect of storage on powder quality. Addition of maltodextrin to cheese powder formulations significantly improved their physical quality. The densities and reconstitution properties of cheese powder were increased and free fat content was decreased by use of maltodextrin. The MACP particles were spherical with a uniform distribution and larger particle sizes, whereas CON and WACP particles were wrinkled, irregular shaped with deep surface dents, and variable in size. Although caking was observed in scanning electron micrographs after 12 mo of storage, it was not detected by sensory panelists. The color of cheese powders changed very slowly during storage but browning was detected. The results of this study show that it is possible to use maltodextrin or whey in production of white cheese powder to reduce production costs and improve the physical quality of powders.

  11. Role of additives in wood polymer composites. Relationship to analogous radiation grafting and curing processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Loo-Teck; Garnett, John L.; Mohajerani, Shahroo

    1999-08-01

    Wood polymer composites (WPC) were prepared by impregnating an Australian softwood, Pinus radiata with methyl methacrylate which subsequently underwent in situ polymerisation utilising either γ radiation or the catalyst-accelerator method. Novel additives including thermal initiator, crosslinking agents, an inclusion compound and oxygen scavenger were incorporated to improve the polymer loading and properties of the resulting WPC. Polymer loadings of WPC obtained utilising the accelerator-catalyst method corresponded well with those obtained using γ radiation with 20 kGy radiation dose. The mechanistic significance of the current work in analogous radiation grafting and curing processes is discussed.

  12. Investigation of the effects of short chain processing additives on polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Stclair, T. L.; Pratt, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of low level concentrations of several short chain processing additives on the properties of the 4,4'-bis(3,4-dicarboxyphenoxy) diphenylsulfide dianhydride (BDSDA)/4,4'-diaminodiphenyl ether (ODA)/1,3'-diaminobenzene (m-phenylene diamine) (MPA) (422) copolyimide were investigated. It was noted that 5 percent MPD/phthalic anhydride (PA) is more effective than 5 percent ODA/PA and BDSDA/aniline (AN) in strengthening the host material. However, the introduction of 10 percent BDSDA/AN produces disproportionately high effects on free volume and free electron density in the host copolyimide.

  13. Characterization of Ti and Co based biomaterials processed via laser based additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahasrabudhe, Himanshu

    Titanium and Cobalt based metallic materials are currently the most ideal materials for load-bearing metallic bio medical applications. However, the long term tribological degradation of these materials still remains a problem that needs a solution. To improve the tribological performance of these two metallic systems, three different research approaches were adapted, stemming out four different research projects. First, the simplicity of laser gas nitriding was utilized with a modern LENS(TM) technology to form an in situ nitride rich later in titanium substrate material. This nitride rich composite coating improved the hardness by as much as fifteen times and reduced the wear rate by more than a magnitude. The leaching of metallic ions during wear was also reduced by four times. In the second research project, a mixture of titanium and silicon were processed on a titanium substrate in a nitrogen rich environment. The results of this reactive, in situ additive manufacturing process were Ti-Si-Nitride coatings that were harder than the titanium substrate by more than twenty times. These coatings also reduced the wear rate by more than two magnitudes. In the third research approach, composites of CoCrMo alloy and Calcium phosphate (CaP) bio ceramic were processed using LENS(TM) based additive manufacturing. These composites were effective in reducing the wear in the CoCrMo alloy by more than three times as well as reduce the leaching of cobalt and chromium ions during wear. The novel composite materials were found to develop a tribofilm during wear. In the final project, a combination of hard nitride coating and addition of CaP bioceramic was investigated by processing a mixture of Ti6Al4V alloy and CaP in a nitrogen rich environment using the LENS(TM) technology. The resultant Ti64-CaP-Nitride coatings significantly reduced the wear damage on the substrate. There was also a drastic reduction in the metal ions leached during wear. The results indicate that the three

  14. Suppression of flow pulsation activity by relaxation process of additive effect on viscous media transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharlamov, S.; Dedeyev, P.; Meucci, L.; Shenderova, I.; Manastirniy, A.; Usenko, M.

    2015-11-01

    The article presents the analysis of the processes occurring together with the turbulent transfer of impulse in mixture of hydrocarbon fluid and polymer solutions (anti-turbulent additives). The study evaluates complex shear flows by popular theoretical and practical methods. Understanding of hydrodynamic and dissipative effects of laminar-turbulent transition tightening and turbulence suppression is provided. The peculiarities of "thin" flow structure in pipeline zones with complex shape walls are evaluated. Recommendations to forecast the local flow parameters, calculation of hydraulic resistance are given.

  15. A review of processable high temperature resistant addition-type laminating resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafini, T. T.; Delvigs, P.

    1973-01-01

    An important finding that resulted from research that was conducted to develop improved ablative resins was the discovery of a novel approach to synthesize processable high temperature resistant polymers. Low molecular weight polyimide prepolymers end-capped with norbornene groups were polymerized into thermo-oxidatively stable modified polyimides without the evolution of void producing volatile materials. This paper reviews basic studies that were performed using model compounds to elucidate the polymerization mechanism of the so-called addition-type polyimides. The fabrication and properties of polyimide/graphite fiber composites using A-type polyimide prepolymer as the matrix are described. An alternate method for preparing processable A-type polyimides by means of in situ polymerization of monomeric reactants on the fiber reinforcement is also described. Polyimide/graphite fiber composite performance at elevated temperatures is presented for A-type polyimides.

  16. Thermoplastic starch/polyester films: effects of extrusion process and poly (lactic acid) addition.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Marianne Ayumi; Olivato, Juliana Bonametti; Garcia, Patrícia Salomão; Müller, Carmen Maria Olivera; Grossmann, Maria Victória Eiras; Yamashita, Fabio

    2013-10-01

    Biodegradable films were produced using the blown extrusion method from blends that contained cassava thermoplastic starch (TPS), poly(butylene adipate-co-terephthalate) (PBAT) and poly(lactic acid) (PLA) with two different extrusion processes. The choice of extrusion process did not have a significant effect on the mechanical properties, water vapor permeability (WVP) or viscoelasticity of the films, but the addition of PLA decreased the elongation, blow-up ratio (BUR) and opacity and increased the elastic modulus, tensile strength and viscoelastic parameters of the films. The films with 20% PLA exhibited a lower WVP due to the hydrophobic nature of this polymer. Morphological analyses revealed the incompatibility between the polymers used.

  17. 3D Machine Vision and Additive Manufacturing: Concurrent Product and Process Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyas, Ismet P.

    2013-06-01

    The manufacturing environment rapidly changes in turbulence fashion. Digital manufacturing (DM) plays a significant role and one of the key strategies in setting up vision and strategic planning toward the knowledge based manufacturing. An approach of combining 3D machine vision (3D-MV) and an Additive Manufacturing (AM) may finally be finding its niche in manufacturing. This paper briefly overviews the integration of the 3D machine vision and AM in concurrent product and process development, the challenges and opportunities, the implementation of the 3D-MV and AM at POLMAN Bandung in accelerating product design and process development, and discusses a direct deployment of this approach on a real case from our industrial partners that have placed this as one of the very important and strategic approach in research as well as product/prototype development. The strategic aspects and needs of this combination approach in research, design and development are main concerns of the presentation.

  18. Evaluation of alternative chemical additives for high-level waste vitrification feed preparation processing

    SciTech Connect

    Seymour, R.G.

    1995-06-07

    During the development of the feed processing flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), research had shown that use of formic acid (HCOOH) could accomplish several processing objectives with one chemical addition. These objectives included the decomposition of tetraphenylborate, chemical reduction of mercury, production of acceptable rheological properties in the feed slurry, and controlling the oxidation state of the glass melt pool. However, the DEPF research had not shown that some vitrification slurry feeds had a tendency to evolve hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) as the result of catalytic decomposition of CHOOH with noble metals (rhodium, ruthenium, palladium) in the feed. Testing conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory and later at the Savannah River Technical Center showed that the H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} could evolve at appreciable rates and quantities. The explosive nature of H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} (as ammonium nitrate) warranted significant mitigation control and redesign of both facilities. At the time the explosive gas evolution was discovered, the DWPF was already under construction and an immediate hardware fix in tandem with flowsheet changes was necessary. However, the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) was in the design phase and could afford to take time to investigate flowsheet manipulations that could solve the problem, rather than a hardware fix. Thus, the HWVP began to investigate alternatives to using HCOOH in the vitrification process. This document describes the selection, evaluation criteria, and strategy used to evaluate the performance of the alternative chemical additives to CHOOH. The status of the evaluation is also discussed.

  19. Physical Education for Children: A Focus on the Teaching Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logsdon, Bette J.; And Others

    This book is written for the physical education teacher at the elementary school level. In its ten chapters the following topics are covered: (1) an historical and philosophical examination of physical education in the American schools; (2) changes and new goals in the field of physical education; (3) concepts of learning and development in the…

  20. Fractionation of the noble metals by physical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballhaus, Chris; Bockrath, Conny; Wohlgemuth-Ueberwasser, Cora; Laurenz, Vera; Berndt, Jasper

    2006-12-01

    During partial melting in the earth’s mantle, the noble metals become fractionated. Os, Ir, Ru, and Rh tend to remain in the mantle residue whereas Pt, Pd, and Re behave mildly incompatible and are sequestered to the silicate melt. There is consensus that sulfide plays a role in the fractionation process; the major noble metal repository in the mantle is sulfide, and most primitive mantle melts are sulfide-saturated when they leave their mantle sources. However, with sulfide-silicate partitioning, the fractionation cannot be modeled properly. All sulfide-silicate partition coefficients are so extremely high that a silicate melt segregating from a mantle source with residual sulfide should be largely platinum-group elements free. We offer a physical alternative to sulfide-silicate chemical partitioning and provide a mechanism of generating a noble metal-rich melt from a sulfide-saturated source: Because sulfide is at least partially molten at asthenospheric temperature, it will behave physically incompatible during melt segregation, and a silicate melt segregating from a mantle residue will entrain molten residual sulfide in suspension and incorporate it in the basaltic pool melt. The noble metal abundances of a basalt then become independent of sulfide-silicate chemical partitioning. They reflect the noble metal abundances in the drained sulfide fraction as well as the total amount of sulfide entrained. Contrary to convention, we suggest that a fertile, sulfide-rich mantle source has more potential to generate a noble metal-enriched basaltic melt than a refractory mantle source depleted by previous partial melting events.

  1. Process for producing biodiesel, lubricants, and fuel and lubricant additives in a critical fluid medium

    DOEpatents

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Fox, Robert V.

    2005-05-03

    A process for producing alkyl esters useful in biofuels and lubricants by transesterifying glyceride- or esterifying free fatty acid-containing substances in a single critical phase medium is disclosed. The critical phase medium provides increased reaction rates, decreases the loss of catalyst or catalyst activity and improves the overall yield of desired product. The process involves the steps of dissolving an input glyceride- or free fatty acid-containing substance with an alcohol or water into a critical fluid medium; reacting the glyceride- or free fatty acid-containing substance with the alcohol or water input over either a solid or liquid acidic or basic catalyst and sequentially separating the products from each other and from the critical fluid medium, which critical fluid medium can then be recycled back in the process. The process significantly reduces the cost of producing additives or alternatives to automotive fuels and lubricants utilizing inexpensive glyceride- or free fatty acid-containing substances, such as animal fats, vegetable oils, rendered fats, and restaurant grease.

  2. Optimization of solution-processed oligothiophene:fullerene based organic solar cells by using solvent additives.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Gisela L; Urdanpilleta, Marta; Fitzner, Roland; Brier, Eduard; Mena-Osteritz, Elena; Reinold, Egon; Bäuerle, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The optimization of solution-processed organic bulk-heterojunction solar cells with the acceptor-substituted quinquethiophene DCV5T-Bu 4 as donor in conjunction with PC61BM as acceptor is described. Power conversion efficiencies up to 3.0% and external quantum efficiencies up to 40% were obtained through the use of 1-chloronaphthalene as solvent additive in the fabrication of the photovoltaic devices. Furthermore, atomic force microscopy investigations of the photoactive layer gave insight into the distribution of donor and acceptor within the blend. The unique combination of solubility and thermal stability of DCV5T-Bu 4 also allows for fabrication of organic solar cells by vacuum deposition. Thus, we were able to perform a rare comparison of the device characteristics of the solution-processed DCV5T-Bu 4 :PC61BM solar cell with its vacuum-processed DCV5T-Bu 4 :C60 counterpart. Interestingly in this case, the efficiencies of the small-molecule organic solar cells prepared by using solution techniques are approaching those fabricated by using vacuum technology. This result is significant as vacuum-processed devices typically display much better performances in photovoltaic cells.

  3. Physical Properties and Processing of Asteroid Regoliths and Interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Pascal Clayton-Clyde

    1997-11-01

    Four aspects of the physical properties and processing of asteroid regoliths and interiors are examined: (1) impact cratering, (2) thermal cycling, (3) electrostatic processing, and (4) asteroid densities. These aspects contribute to understanding the production, emplacement, redistribution, segregation, disruption, loss, and overall state of regoliths on asteroids. Impact cratering (Chapter 2) is considered through a study of the scaling characteristics and distribution of the large blocks revealed on 243 Ida in Galileo images. The blocks are interpreted as coarse impact ejecta fragments, most of them remaining within or in the vicinity of the large impact structures from which they were excavated. Alternative origins and the probable age of the blocks are discussed. Extrapolation of ejecta scaling laws applicable to Ida lead to predicting maximum ejecta blocks sizes on other asteroids. Thermal cycling, the periodic stressing and straining of asteroid regolith materials due to insolation-induced diurnal and orbital temperature variations, is investigated as another process whereby asteroid regoliths might be disrupted (thermal weathering and disaggregation; thermal quakes), and transported (thermal creep) (Chapter 3). Thermal cycling is found to be of minor significance in the evolution of asteroid regoliths. Electrostatic processing, the levitation, transport, and/or ejection of charged dust under electrostatic fields produced on resistive surfaces by insolation-induced photoelectron emission, is proposed as a contributing mechanism whereby asteroid regoliths may be sorted, redistributed, and winnowed of their finest particle size fraction (Chapter 4). The process may help explain differences in regolith texture between asteroids and the Moon, and among various types of asteroids. Finally, asteroid and meteorite density data are reviewed and interpreted to constrain the internal structure of asteroids (Chapter 5). A relation between meteorite and asteroid

  4. Processing of multi-digit additions in high math-anxious individuals: psychophysiological evidence

    PubMed Central

    Núñez-Peña, María Isabel; Suárez-Pellicioni, Macarena

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the time course of neural processing of multi-digit additions in high- (HMA) and low-math anxious (LMA) individuals. Seventeen HMA and 17 LMA individuals were presented with two-digit additions and were asked to perform a verification task. Behavioral data showed that HMA individuals were slower and more error prone than their LMA peers, and that incorrect solutions were solved more slowly and less accurately than correct ones. Moreover, HMA individuals tended to need more time and commit more errors when having to verify incorrect solutions than correct ones. ERPs time-locked to the presentation of the addends (calculation phase) and to the presentation of the proposed solution (verification phase) were also analyzed. In both phases, a P2 component of larger amplitude was found for HMA individuals than for their LMA peers. Because the P2 component is considered to be a biomarker of the mobilization of attentional resources toward emotionally negative stimuli, these results suggest that HMA individuals may have invested more attentional resources both when processing the addends (calculation phase) and when they had to report whether the proposed solution was correct or not (verification phase), as compared to their LMA peers. Moreover, in the verification phase, LMA individuals showed a larger late positive component (LPC) for incorrect solutions at parietal electrodes than their HMA counterparts. The smaller LPC shown by HMA individuals when verifying incorrect solutions suggests that these solutions may have been appeared more plausible to them than to their LMA counterparts. PMID:26347705

  5. Decomposition strategies in the problems of simulation of additive laser technology processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomenko, M. D.; Dubrov, A. V.; Mirzade, F. Kh.

    2016-11-01

    The development of additive technologies and their application in industry is associated with the possibility of predicting the final properties of a crystallized added material. This paper describes the problem characterized by a dynamic and spatially nonuniform computational complexity, which, in the case of uniform decomposition of a computational domain, leads to an unbalanced load on computational cores. The strategy of partitioning of the computational domain is used, which minimizes the CPU time losses in the serial computations of the additive technological process. The chosen strategy is optimal from the standpoint of a priori unknown dynamic computational load distribution. The scaling of the computational problem on the cluster of the Institute on Laser and Information Technologies (RAS) that uses the InfiniBand interconnect is determined. The use of the parallel code with optimal decomposition made it possible to significantly reduce the computational time (down to several hours), which is important in the context of development of the software package for support of engineering activity in the field of additive technology.

  6. The effects of a liquid dispersing agent and a microcrystalline additive on the physical properties of type IV gypsum.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, M R; Johnston, W M; Reisbick, M H; Campagni, W V

    1988-11-01

    This study evaluated the effects of a liquid dispersing agent (LDA) and a microcrystalline additive (MCA) on selected physical properties of type IV gypsum. Working consistency, setting time, setting expansion, and compressive strength (1 hour and 7 days) were determined, following ADA Specification No. 25, on a standard, LDA (0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2 mL), MCA (21.1, 24.1, and 27.1 gm), and combination (LDA 0.75 mL + MCA 12.05 gm) mixes per 300 gm of gypsum. Results indicate that the additives affect the consistency of the mix, but consistency can be kept close to that of the standard by lowering the water/powder ratio. Statistical analysis of the data indicated that the additives significantly affected the setting time, setting expansion, and both the 1-hour and the 7-day compressive strengths. SEM examination of fractured surfaces of test mixes indicated improved crystal packing. The properties of type IV gypsum can be improved by optimizing the amount of LDA and MCA additives.

  7. Carbonate Beaches: A Balance Between Biological and Physical Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nairn, R.; Risk, M.

    2004-12-01

    Carbonate beaches are a unique example of the interaction between biological processes, creating the sediments, and physical processes, moving and often removing the sediments. On the sediment supply side, carbonate sediments are born, not made. They exist in dynamic equilibrium between production and destruction. Following the creation of carbonate sediment in coral reef and lagoon environments, the sediments are moved shoreward to the beach, transport along the shore and sometimes, eventually lost offshore, often as the result of tropical storms. Comprehensive studies of the balance between the supply and loss of carbonate sediments and beach dynamics have been completed for the islands of Mauritius and Barbados. Field studies and remote sensing (Compact Airborne Spectrometry Imaging) have been applied to develop carbonate sediment production rates for a range of reef and lagoon conditions. Using GIS, these production rates have been integrated to determine sediment supply rates for different segments of the coastline. 1-D and 2-D models of waves, hydrodynamics, sediment transport and morphodynamics were set-up and tested against observed beach response to storm events or a sequence of storm events. These complex deterministic models are not suitable for application over periods of decades. However, it was possible to characterize storm events by the extent of sand loss, and relate this to key descriptive factors for groups of storm events, thereby encapsulating the erosion response. A long-term predictive tool for evaluating beach erosion and accretion response, over a period of several decades, was developed by combining the supply rates for carbonate sediment and the encapsulated representation of the loss rates through physical processes. The ability of this predictive tool was successfully tested against observed long term beach evolution along sections of the coast in Barbados and Mauritius using air photo analysis in GIS for shoreline change over periods

  8. Enhancement of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) thermal and processing stability using a bio-waste derived additive.

    PubMed

    Persico, Paola; Ambrogi, Veronica; Baroni, Antonio; Santagata, Gabriella; Carfagna, Cosimo; Malinconico, Mario; Cerruti, Pierfrancesco

    2012-12-01

    Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) is a biodegradable polymer, whose applicability is limited by its brittleness and narrow processing window. In this study a pomace extract (EP), from the bio-waste of winery industry, was used as thermal and processing stabilizer for PHB, aimed to engineer a totally bio-based system. The results showed that EP enhanced the thermal stability of PHB, which maintained high molecular weights after processing. This evidence was in agreement with the slower decrease in viscosity over time observed by rheological tests. EP also affected the melt crystallization kinetics and the overall crystallinity extent. Finally, dynamic mechanical and tensile tests showed that EP slightly improved the polymer ductility. The results are intriguing, in view of the development of sustainable alternatives to synthetic polymer additives, thus increasing the applicability of bio-based materials. Moreover, the reported results demonstrated the feasibility of the conversion of an agro-food by-product into a bio-resource in an environmentally friendly and cost-effective way.

  9. Learning Additional Languages as Hierarchical Probabilistic Inference: Insights From First Language Processing.

    PubMed

    Pajak, Bozena; Fine, Alex B; Kleinschmidt, Dave F; Jaeger, T Florian

    2016-12-01

    We present a framework of second and additional language (L2/Ln) acquisition motivated by recent work on socio-indexical knowledge in first language (L1) processing. The distribution of linguistic categories covaries with socio-indexical variables (e.g., talker identity, gender, dialects). We summarize evidence that implicit probabilistic knowledge of this covariance is critical to L1 processing, and propose that L2/Ln learning uses the same type of socio-indexical information to probabilistically infer latent hierarchical structure over previously learned and new languages. This structure guides the acquisition of new languages based on their inferred place within that hierarchy, and is itself continuously revised based on new input from any language. This proposal unifies L1 processing and L2/Ln acquisition as probabilistic inference under uncertainty over socio-indexical structure. It also offers a new perspective on crosslinguistic influences during L2/Ln learning, accommodating gradient and continued transfer (both negative and positive) from previously learned to novel languages, and vice versa.

  10. IMPACTS OF ANTIFOAM ADDITIONS AND ARGON BUBBLING ON DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY REDUCTION/OXIDATION

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.; Johnson, F.

    2012-06-05

    During melting of HLW glass, the REDOX of the melt pool cannot be measured. Therefore, the Fe{sup +2}/{Sigma}Fe ratio in the glass poured from the melter must be related to melter feed organic and oxidant concentrations to ensure production of a high quality glass without impacting production rate (e.g., foaming) or melter life (e.g., metal formation and accumulation). A production facility such as the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) cannot wait until the melt or waste glass has been made to assess its acceptability, since by then no further changes to the glass composition and acceptability are possible. therefore, the acceptability decision is made on the upstream process, rather than on the downstream melt or glass product. That is, it is based on 'feed foward' statistical process control (SPC) rather than statistical quality control (SQC). In SPC, the feed composition to the melter is controlled prior to vitrification. Use of the DWPF REDOX model has controlled the balanjce of feed reductants and oxidants in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT). Once the alkali/alkaline earth salts (both reduced and oxidized) are formed during reflux in the SRAT, the REDOX can only change if (1) additional reductants or oxidants are added to the SRAT, the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), or the Melter Feed Tank (MFT) or (2) if the melt pool is bubble dwith an oxidizing gas or sparging gas that imposes a different REDOX target than the chemical balance set during reflux in the SRAT.

  11. Convection in the Physical Vapor Transport Process. Part 2; Thermosolutal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, Walter M. B.

    1994-01-01

    We consider the effect of an inert gas on the diffusive-convective physical vapor transport process. We investigate the case when the temperature gradient is stabilizing and the concentration gradient is destabilizing for a wide parametric range. When an inert gas is present, the thermal and solutal convection oppose each other. The solutal field is destabilizing while the thermal field and the advective-diffusive flux stabilize the flow field. When the pressure of the inert component is increased, the stabilizing effect of the advective-diffusive flux is decreased. The intensity of convection as well as the oscillatory transient time increases. Below, the critical Rayleigh number, the nonlinear dynamics of the flow field show an oscillatory approach to steady state. For parametric values in the neighborhood of the critical Rayleigh number, the flow field undergoes a chaotic transient which settles to a periodic state. The asymptotic state of the flow field shows that growth and amalgamation of cells yields an overturning motion which results in an asymmetric cellular structure. The low gravity environment yields the stabilizing advective-diffusive flow which results in uniform temperature and concentration gradients near the crystal interface.

  12. Personnel Security Clearances: Additional Guidance and Oversight Needed at DHS and DOD to Ensure Consistent Application of Revocation Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Application of Revocation Process Report to the Ranking Member, Committee on Homeland Security, House of Representatives September 2014 GAO-14-640...Personnel Security Clearances: Additional Guidance and Oversight Needed at DHS and DOD to Ensure Consistent Application of Revocation Process 5a. CONTRACT...2014 PERSONNEL SECURITY CLEARANCES Additional Guidance and Oversight Needed at DHS and DOD to Ensure Consistent Application of Revocation Process

  13. Design and development of a layer-based additive manufacturing process for the realization of metal parts of designed mesostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Christopher Bryant

    Low-density cellular materials, metallic bodies with gaseous voids, are a unique class of materials that are characterized by their high strength, low mass, good energy absorption characteristics, and good thermal and acoustic insulation properties. In an effort to take advantage of this entire suite of positive mechanical traits, designers are tailoring the cellular mesostructure for multiple design objectives. Unfortunately, existing cellular material manufacturing technologies limit the design space as they are limited to certain part mesostructure, material type, and macrostructure. The opportunity that exists to improve the design of existing products, and the ability to reap the benefits of cellular materials in new applications is the driving force behind this research. As such, the primary research goal of this work is to design, embody, and analyze a manufacturing process that provides a designer the ability to specify the material type, material composition, void morphology, and mesostructure topology for any conceivable part geometry. The accomplishment of this goal is achieved in three phases of research: (1) Design---Following a systematic design process and a rigorous selection exercise, a layer-based additive manufacturing process is designed that is capable of meeting the unique requirements of fabricating cellular material geometry. Specifically, metal parts of designed mesostructure are fabricated via three-dimensional printing of metal oxide ceramic powder followed by post-processing in a reducing atmosphere. (2) Embodiment ---The primary research hypothesis is verified through the use of the designed manufacturing process chain to successfully realize metal parts of designed mesostructure. (3) Modeling & Evaluation ---The designed manufacturing process is modeled in this final research phase so as to increase understanding of experimental results and to establish a foundation for future analytical modeling research. In addition to an analysis of

  14. Processing of New Materials by Additive Manufacturing: Iron-Based Alloys Containing Silver for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niendorf, Thomas; Brenne, Florian; Hoyer, Peter; Schwarze, Dieter; Schaper, Mirko; Grothe, Richard; Wiesener, Markus; Grundmeier, Guido; Maier, Hans Jürgen

    2015-07-01

    In the biomedical sector, production of bioresorbable implants remains challenging due to improper dissolution rates or deficient strength of many candidate alloys. Promising materials for overcoming the prevalent drawbacks are iron-based alloys containing silver. However, due to immiscibility of iron and silver these alloys cannot be manufactured based on conventional processing routes. In this study, iron-manganese-silver alloys were for the first time synthesized by means of additive manufacturing. Based on combined mechanical, microscopic, and electrochemical studies, it is shown that silver particles well distributed in the matrix can be obtained, leading to cathodic sites in the composite material. Eventually, this results in an increased dissolution rate of the alloy. Stress-strain curves showed that the incorporation of silver barely affects the mechanical properties.

  15. Transition metal-catalyzed process for addition of amines to carbon-carbon double bonds

    DOEpatents

    Hartwig, John F.; Kawatsura, Motoi; Loeber, Oliver

    2002-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a process for addition of amines to carbon-carbon double bonds in a substrate, comprising: reacting an amine with a compound containing at least one carbon-carbon double bond in the presence a transition metal catalyst under reaction conditions effective to form a product having a covalent bond between the amine and a carbon atom of the former carbon-carbon double bond. The transition metal catalyst comprises a Group 8 metal and a ligand containing one or more 2-electron donor atoms. The present invention is also directed to enantioselective reactions of amine compounds with compounds containing carbon-carbon double bonds, and a calorimetric assay to evaluate potential catalysts in these reactions.

  16. Influence of microbubble in physical cleaning of MF membrane process for wastewater reuse.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eui-Jong; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Hyung-Soo; Jang, Am

    2015-06-01

    Currently, there is a growing emphasis on wastewater reclamation and reuse all over the world due to restricted water resources. Among a variety of wastewater reuse technologies, the use of microfiltration membranes (MF) is one of the popular processes because it has the ability to successfully eliminate particulates and colloidal matters. However, successful fouling control is not easy because effluents from the activated sludge process still contain small particulates and colloidal matters such as extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) and soluble microbial products (SMP). On the other hand, microbubbles have advantageous properties compared to common bubbles, but there hasn't been reporting of the use of microbubbles in physical cleaning instead of aeration. Encouraging results were obtained herein through the application of microbubbles for physical cleaning. In evaluation of the cleaning efficiency, the efficiency of microbubbles was observed to be twice as high as that of aeration, except during the course of the initial 30 min. Total organic carbon (TOC) concentration of the membrane tank after treatment with microbubbles was more than twice as high as that after aeration for physical cleaning. The membrane cleaned with microbubbles also had the smoothest surface, with a roughness of 42.5 nm. In addition, microbubbles were found to effectively remove EPS and make the structure of the gel layer loose. In particular, the microbubbles had the ability to remove proteins through the effect of pyrolytic decomposition. Therefore, in FT-IR spectra of the membrane surfaces taken before and after physical cleaning, while each treatment showed similar peak positions, the peak values of the membrane treated with microbubbles were the lowest. Through various analyses, it was confirmed that microbubbles can remove foulants on the gel layer in spite of their very low shear force. This means that microbubble cleaning has full potential for use as a physical cleaning

  17. Physical Abuse, Cognitive and Emotional Processes, and Aggressive/Disruptive Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teisl, Michael; Cicchetti, Dante

    2008-01-01

    Cognitive and emotional processes were examined in maltreated children with a history of physical abuse (n = 76), children with a history of maltreatment other than physical abuse (i.e., sexual abuse, physical neglect, and emotional maltreatment; n = 91), and a group of non-maltreated comparison children (N = 100). Physical abuse was associated…

  18. Reactive Additive Stabilization Process (RASP) for hazardous and mixed waste vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.; Pickett, J.B.; Ramsey, W.G.

    1993-07-01

    Solidification of hazardous/mixed wastes into glass is being examined at the Savannah River Site (SRS) for (1) nickel plating line (F006) sludges and (2) incinerator wastes. Vitrification of these wastes using high surface area additives, the Reactive Additive Stabilization Process (RASP), has been determined to greatly enhance the dissolution and retention of hazardous, mixed, and heavy metal species in glass. RASP lowers melt temperatures (typically 1050-- 1150{degrees}C), thereby minimizing volatility concerns during vitrification. RASP maximizes waste loading (typically 50--75 wt% on a dry oxide basis) by taking advantage of the glass forming potential of the waste. RASP vitrification thereby minimizes waste disposal volume (typically 86--97 vol. %), and maximizes cost savings. Solidification of the F006 plating line sludges containing depleted uranium has been achieved in both soda-lime-silica (SLS) and borosilicate glasses at 1150{degrees}C up to waste loadings of 75 wt%. Solidification of incinerator blowdown and mixtures of incinerator blowdown and bottom kiln ash have been achieved in SLS glass at 1150{degrees}C up to waste loadings of 50% using RASP. These waste loadings correspond to volume reductions of 86 and 94 volume %, respectively, with large associated savings in storage costs.

  19. Addition of cattle manure to sheep bedding allows vermicomposting process and improves vermicompost quality.

    PubMed

    Cestonaro, Taiana; Costa, Mônica Sarolli Silva de Mendonça; Costa, Luiz Antonio de Mendonça; Pereira, Dercio Ceri; Rozatti, Marcos A T; Martins, Marcos F Leal

    2017-03-01

    Animal waste is usually a good substrate for vermicomposting. However, numerous animal husbandry systems use bedding that consists primarily of lignocellulosic substrates, which hinders earthworm and microorganism's development and thus, the entire bioconversion process. One possible solution is to mix the used bedding with other waste materials that are more amenable to earthworm ingestion and can provide better conditions for earthworm population growth. Here, we have aimed to examine the effectiveness of such procedure by mixing rice-husk-based sheep bedding with cattle manure in different proportions (0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%). We have carried out vermicomposting experiments in benchtop vermireactors inoculated with 0.88kg of dry matter (sheep bedding+cattle manure). Data used in the Principal Component Analysis were the multiple vermicomposting variables (i.e., EC; pH; HA/FA and C/N ratios; P, K, cellulose, and hemicellulose content). The effect of the treatment on earthworm count was analyzed with ANOVA. We have observed that the addition of at least 25% of cattle manure to sheep bedding allows vermicomposting process but it is necessary 148days to obtain a stabilized vermicompost. However, increasing the proportion of cattle manure to sheep bedding, the vermicomposting time decreases proportionally to 94days. We concluded that vermicomposting can be considered a bioprocess to stabilize rice husk after being used as sheep bedding.

  20. Characterization and comparative study of coal combustion residues from a primary and additional flue gas secondary desulfurization process

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, S.; Francois, M.; Evrard, O.; Pellissier, C.

    1998-11-01

    An extensive characterization and comparative study was done on two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) residues derived from the same coal. LR residues (originated from Loire/Rhone in the south of Lyon, France) are obtained after a primary desulfurization process (SO{sub 2} is trapped by reaction with CaO at a temperature of about 1100 C), and LM residues (originating from La Maxe, near Metz in the east of France) are obtained after an additional secondary desulfurization process (SO{sub 2} is removed further by reaction with Ca(OH){sub 2} at a temperature of about 120 C). Various and complementary investigation methods were used to determine their chemical, physical, and mineralogical properties: x-ray fluorescence and diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetry analysis, granulometric distribution, pycnometric density, BET specific surface area and pH, conductivity measurements, and chemical analysis of their insoluble fraction. The FGD residues contain basically two main components: a silico-aluminous fly ash part and calcic FGD phases. In the LR residues the two components can be considered as independent, whereas they are linked in the LM residues because chemical reactions have occurred, leading to the formation of silico-calcic gel CSH, hydrated aluminate AFm, and AFt phases.

  1. Process monitoring using automatic physical measurement based on electrical and physical variability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shauly, Eitan N.; Levi, Shimon; Schwarzband, Ishai; Adan, Ofer; Latinsky, Sergey

    2015-04-01

    A fully automated silicon-based methodology for systematic analysis of electrical features is shown. The system was developed for process monitoring and electrical variability reduction. A mapping step was created by dedicated structures such as static-random-access-memory (SRAM) array or standard cell library, or by using a simple design rule checking run-set. The resulting database was then used as an input for choosing locations for critical dimension scanning electron microscope images and for specific layout parameter extraction then was input to SPICE compact modeling simulation. Based on the experimental data, we identified two items that must be checked and monitored using the method described here: transistor's sensitivity to the distance between the poly end cap and edge of active area (AA) due to AA rounding, and SRAM leakage due to a too close N-well to P-well. Based on this example, for process monitoring and variability analyses, we extensively used this method to analyze transistor gates having different shapes. In addition, analysis for a large area of high density standard cell library was done. Another set of monitoring focused on a high density SRAM array is also presented. These examples provided information on the poly and AA layers, using transistor parameters such as leakage current and drive current. We successfully define "robust" and "less-robust" transistor configurations included in the library and identified unsymmetrical transistors in the SRAM bit-cells. These data were compared to data extracted from the same devices at the end of the line. Another set of analyses was done to samples after Cu M1 etch. Process monitoring information on M1 enclosed contact was extracted based on contact resistance as a feedback. Guidelines for the optimal M1 space for different layout configurations were also extracted. All these data showed the successful in-field implementation of our methodology as a useful process monitoring method.

  2. Physical Modeling of Hydrologic Processes in South Central Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hassan, A.; Sharif, H.; Xie, H.; Terrance, J.; Mcclelland, J.

    2012-04-01

    Flood magnitude and recurrence modeling and analysis play an important role in water resources planning, management, and permitting. In both urban and rural situations, flood analysis is important to flood plain mapping and the development of best management practices for both environmental and engineering concerns. The majority of annual precipitation in South Texas results from extreme, large storm events, which produce flash floods (the number one cause of weather-related deaths in Texas). Surface geology such as such as Edward out crop faulting zone at Balcones escarpment has different properties than the classified soil; affect the soil parameters such as infiltration or hydraulic conductivity. This result in a very high infiltration and channel loss as a recharge component to the Edward aquifer from the surface runoff and rivers that are crossing the recharge zone, such as Nueces, San Antonio, Guadalupe and Colorado Rivers. Water quality is another issue in hydrological modeling, specifically in south central Texas. Water quality assessment is another issue on hydrological modeling in south central Texas. SWAT Soil and water assessment tool model is used for water quality assessment in San Antonio River basin since the rainfall runoff simulation is a necessity to derive the surface water quality process especially in the streams. With the advances in the Geographical information system (GIS) and instant precipitation products such as next generation radar (NEXRAD) and data acquisition for these products, the accuracy of the hydrological models has improved. Different hydrological models were used to evaluate the surface water and other hydrological cycle components in different watersheds in south central Texas through different events and their different causes and effects in these watersheds. Some of them are semi distributed and lumped models such as Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), Hydrologic Modeling System (HEC-HMS) and physically based

  3. Physical Education Resources, Class Management, and Student Physical Activity Levels: A Structure-Process-Outcome Approach to Evaluating Physical Education Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bevans, Katherine B.; Fitzpatrick, Leslie-Anne; Sanchez, Betty M.; Riley, Anne W.; Forrest, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Background: This study was conducted to empirically evaluate specific human, curricular, and material resources that maximize student opportunities for physical activity during physical education (PE) class time. A structure-process-outcome model was proposed to identify the resources that influence the frequency of PE and intensity of physical…

  4. Effects of physical processes on structure and transport of thin zooplankton layers in the coastal ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McManus, M.A.; Cheriton, O.M.; Drake, P.J.; Holliday, D.V.; Storlazzi, C.D.; Donaghay, P.L.; Greenlaw, C.F.

    2005-01-01

    Thin layers of plankton are recurrent features in a variety of coastal systems. These layers range in thickness from a few centimeters to a few meters. They can extend horizontally for kilometers and have been observed to persist for days. Densities of organisms found within thin layers are far greater than those above or below the layer, and as a result, thin layers may play an important role in the marine ecosystem. The paramount objective of this study was to understand the physical processes that govern the dynamics of thin layers of zooplankton in the coastal ocean. We deployed instruments to measure physical processes and zooplankton distribution in northern Monterey Bay; during an 11 d period of persistent upwelling-favorable winds, 7 thin zooplankton layers were observed. These zooplankton layers persisted throughout daylight hours, but were observed to dissipate during evening hours. These layers had an average vertical thickness of 1.01 m. No layers were found in regions where the Richardson number was <0.25. In general, when the Richardson number is <0.25 the water column is unstable, and incapable of supporting thin layers. Thin zooplankton layers were also located in regions of reduced flow. In addition, our observations show that the vertical depth distribution of thin zooplankton layers is modulated by high-frequency internal waves, with periods of 18 to 20 min. Results from this study clearly show an association between physical structure, physical processes and the presence of thin zooplankton layers in Monterey Bay. With this new understanding we may identify other coastal regions that have a high probability of supporting thin layers. ?? Inter-Research 2005.

  5. Boundary Conditions for the Paleoenvironment: Chemical and Physical Processes in the Pre-Solar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, William M.; Schloerb, F. Peter

    1997-01-01

    The basic theme of this program is the study of molecular complexity and evolution in interstellar clouds and in primitive solar system objects. Research has included the detection and study of a number of new interstellar molecules and investigation of reaction pathways for astrochemistry from a comparison of theory and observed molecular abundances. The latter includes studies of cold, dark clouds in which ion-molecule chemistry should predominate, searches for the effects of interchange of material between the gas and solid phases in interstellar clouds, unbiased spectral surveys of particular sources, and systematic investigation of the interlinked chemistry and physics of dense interstellar clouds. In addition, the study of comets has allowed a comparison between the chemistry of such minimally thermally processed objects and that of interstellar clouds, shedding light on the evolution of the biogenic elements during the process of solar system formation.

  6. Process evaluation of a school-based intervention to increase physical activity and reduce bullying.

    PubMed

    Bowes, Donna; Marquis, Monica; Young, Wendy; Holowaty, Philippa; Isaac, Winston

    2009-07-01

    Increases in schoolyard bullying and physical inactivity have become important issues to many stakeholders. Peers Running Organized Play Stations (PROPS) is a program designed to address these two issues in elementary schools. Using a "train the trainer" approach, PROPS was introduced to 41 schools. Results of a process evaluation indicate that the implementation rate was 39%. Resources were identified by some respondents as an implementation facilitator. A variety of barriers to implementation were identified: The PROPS program was not a component of anyone's job at the school level, teachers or parent volunteers are needed to run the program, and there is no funding to purchase equipment or storage bins for the equipment. In addition, support for PROPS is vulnerable to changing environments. This process evaluation points to some needed changes for long-term sustainability of the program while highlighting challenges associated with implementing a program in the elementary school setting.

  7. Physical processes of quartz amorphization due to friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Muto, J.; Nagahama, H.; Miura, T.; Arakawa, I.; Shimizu, I.

    2011-12-01

    Solid state amorphization of minerals occurs in indentations, in shock experiments, and in high pressure metamorphic quartz rock. A production of amorphous material is also reported in experimentally created silicate gouges (Yund et al., 1990), and in San Andreas Fault core samples (Janssen et al., 2010). Rotary-shear friction experiments of quartz rocks imply dynamic weakening at seismic rates (Di Toro et al., 2004). These experiments have suggested that weakening is caused by formation and thixotropic behavior of a silica gel layer which comprises of very fine particles of hydrated amorphous silica on fault gouges (Goldsby & Tullis, 2002; Hayashi & Tsutsumi, 2010). Therefore, physical processes of amorphization are important to better understand weakening of quartz bearing rocks. In this study, we conducted a pin-on-disk friction experiment to investigate details of quartz amorphization (Muto et al, 2007). Disks were made of single crystals of synthetic and Brazilian quartz. The normal load F and sliding velocity V were ranged from 0.01 N to 1 N and from 0.01 m/s to 2.6 m/s, respectively. The friction was conducted using quartz and diamond pins (curvature radii of 0.2 ~ 3 mm) to large displacements (> 1000 m) under controlled atmosphere. We analyzed experiment samples by Raman spectroscopy and FT-IR. Raman spectroscopy (excitation wavelength 532.1 nm) provides lattice vibration modes, and was used to investigate the degree of amorphization of samples. Raman spectra of friction tracks on the disk show clear bands at wavenumbers of 126, 204, 356, 394, and 464 cm-1, characteristic of intact α-quartz. Remarkably, in experiments using diamond pins (F = 0.8 N, normal stress σr calculated by contact area = 293 ~ 440 MPa, V = 0.12 ~ 0.23 m/s), the bands at 204 and 464 cm-1 gradually broaden to reveal shoulders on the higher-wavenumber sides of these peaks. Especially, two distinguished peaks at 490 and 515 cm-1 and a weak broad peak at 606 cm-1 appear sporadically on

  8. Applications of Emerging Satellites for Ocean Bio-geo Chemical and Physical Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnone, R.; Ladner, S. D.

    2012-12-01

    Emerging satellites for hyper and multispectral sensing of the oceans spectral ocean color are enabling improved capability for monitoring real-time ocean conditions and processes. These sensors can define physical and biological processes occurring at space scales from lakes and estuaries to coastal and open waters and will resolve temporal scales at hourly, daily to seasonal variability. These emerging satellite products are critical for data assimilation into ocean physical and ecological modeling and providing future capability for ocean forecasting. Emerging polar orbiters to be discussed are: 1) VIIRS with new ocean color, SST and day night bands and 2) HICO - hyperspectral high resolution coastal imager. Additionally emerging geostationary sensors to be discussed are: 1) GOCI - Korean ocean color satellite and 2) GeoCape - planned ocean color sensor. New products and applications to exploit emerging sensors for ocean monitoring of water quality and physical conditions in based on importance of inter-satellite radiometric calibration to maintain consistency between sensors and products. These products will address the impact of increased anthropogenic activity along coasts and rivers. Methods and procedures to insure sensor calibration insures future products can be merged at different time and space scales. Emerging capabilities include: 1) improved surface heat flux for physical models 2) new near shore products in optically shallow water such as sea grass mapping, bathymetry and bio-optical water quality 3) tracking surface currents and ecological sources and sinks. 4) Improved spatial and temporal changes in bio-optical conditions to characterize changes in ecological water quality (dissolved organics, carbon flux, phytoplankton biomass, particle composition and size.) 5) Inland lakes and river monitoring.

  9. Modeling Physical Processes at Galactic Scales and Above

    SciTech Connect

    Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2014-12-16

    What should these lectures be? The subject is so broad that many books can be written about it. I decided to prepare these lectures as if I were teaching my own graduate student. Given my research interests, I selected what the student would need to know to be able to discuss science with me and to work on joint research projects. So, the story presented below is both personal and incomplete, but it does cover several subjects that are poorly represented in the existing textbooks (if at all). Some of topics I focus on below are closely connected, others are disjoint, some are just side detours on specific technical questions. There is an overlapping theme, however. Our goal is to follow the cosmic gas from large scales, low densities, (relatively) simple physics to progressively smaller scales, higher densities, closer relation to galaxies, and more complex and uncertain physics. We follow a "yellow brick road" from the gas well beyond any galaxy confines to the actual sites of star formation and stellar feedback. On the way we will stop at some places for a tour and run without looking back through some others. So, the road will be uneven. The organization of the material is as follows: physics of the intergalactic medium, from intergalactic medium to circumgalactic medium, interstellar medium: gas in galaxies, star formation, and stellar feedback.

  10. Physical Processes in the Vicinity of a Supermassive Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Tuan

    2010-08-01

    cluster in the innermost 0.16 pc of the Galaxy as measured by the number density profile of late-type giants. Using laser guide star adaptive optics in conjunction with the integral field spectrograph, OSIRIS, at the Keck II telescope, we are able to differentiate between the older, late-type (˜ 1 Gyr) stars, which are presumed to be dynamically relaxed, and the unrelaxed young (˜ 6 Myr) population. This distinction is crucial for testing models of stellar cusp formation in the vicinity of a black hole, as the models assume that the cusp stars are in dynamical equilibrium in the black hole potential. In the survey region, we classified 77 stars as early-type 79 stars as late-type. We find that contamination from young stars is significant, with more than twice as many young stars as old stars in our sensitivity range (K' < 15.5) within the central arcsecond. Based on the late-type stars alone, the surface stellar number density profile, Σ(R) ∝ R(-Γ) , is flat, with Γ = -0.26±0.24. Monte Carlo simulations of the possible de-projected volume density profile, n(r) ∝ r^{-γ}, show that γ is less than 1.0 at the 99.7 % confidence level. These results are consistent with the nuclear star cluster having no cusp, with a core profile that is significantly flatter than predicted by most cusp formation theories, and even allows for the presence of a central hole in the stellar distribution. Of the possible dynamical interactions that can lead to the depletion of the red giants observable in this survey - stellar collisions, mass segregation from stellar remnants, or a recent merger event - mass segregation is the only one that can be ruled out as the dominant depletion mechanism. The degeneracy in the true distribution of stars cannot be broken with number counts alone, but we show how the addition of kinematic measurements can remov! e the degeneracy. Resolving the physical origin of the lack of a stellar cusp will have important implications for black hole growth models

  11. Examination of the steps leading up to the physical developer process for developing fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Jeffrey Daniel; Cantu, Antonio A; Antonopoulos, George; Surrency, Marc J

    2007-03-01

    This is a systematic study that examines several acid prewashes and water rinses on paper bearing latent prints before its treatment with a silver physical developer. Specimens or items processed with this method are usually pretreated with an acid wash to neutralize calcium carbonate from the paper before the treatment with a physical developer. Two different acids at varying concentrations were tested on fingerprints. Many different types of paper were examined in order to determine which acid prewash was the most beneficial. Various wash times as well as the addition of a water rinse step before the development were also examined. A pH study was included that monitored the acidity of the solution during the wash step. Scanning electron microscopy was used to verify surface calcium levels for the paper samples throughout the experiment. Malic acid at a concentration of 2.5% proved to be an ideal acid for most papers, providing good fingerprint development with minimal background development. Water rinses were deemed unnecessary before physical development.

  12. Chronic family economic hardship, family processes and progression of mental and physical health symptoms in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae Kyoung; Wickrama, K A S; Simons, Leslie Gordon

    2013-06-01

    Research has documented the relationship between family stressors such as family economic hardship and marital conflict and adolescents' mental health symptoms, especially depressive symptoms. Few studies, however, have examined the processes whereby supportive parenting lessens this effect and the progression of mental health and physical health symptoms in adolescence. The present study investigates the influences of chronic family economic hardship on adolescents' multiple health problem symptoms (i.e., symptoms of anxiety, and depression and physical complaints) through parents' marital conflict, and supportive parenting; it also examines how there adolescents' health problems mutually influence one another throughout adolescence. We used Structural Equation Modeling to analyze data from a longitudinal sample of European American mothers, fathers, and target adolescents (N = 451, 53% female) to examine direct and indirect effects. Findings generally supported the hypothesized model. Chronic family economic hardship contributed to mental and physical health problems of adolescents. This influence largely was mediated through supportive parenting. Moreover, supportive parenting buffered marital conflict on depressive symptoms of adolescents. Also, there was a tendency for females to show more stable depressive symptoms than males. The study demonstrates key mediating pathways and additional moderating influences based on the family stress model and also highlights the importance of improving health resources for adolescents.

  13. Discriminating between the physical processes that drive spheroid size evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Bundy, Kevin; Hernquist, Lars; Wuyts, Stijn; Cox, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Observations have shown that massive galaxies at high redshift have much smaller effective radii than galaxies of similar mass today; however, recent work has shown that they have similar central densities. The primary growth of size, therefore, relates to the apparent relative abundance of low-density material at low redshifts. But various models have been proposed to accomplish this, and the exact contribution of these mechanisms, relative to others that would, for example, lower the density of the system uniformly, or relate to possible observational misestimates of the stellar mass distribution, remain uncertain, as does the degree to which this evolution is driven by processes of initial spheroid formation versus subsequent `dry' assembly of spheroids. These different possibilities also yield dramatically different constraints on any possible evolution in the MBH-σ relation. Here, we compile observations of spheroid properties as a function of redshift and use them to test the different proposed models, each of which we have calibrated and studied in a suite of high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations. We show that the evolution in progenitor disc gas fractions with redshift gives rise to the initial formation of smaller spheroids at high redshift. We then consider how these early-forming systems must evolve to be consistent with the larger sizes of old spheroids today. We consider (1) equal-density `dry' mergers, (2) later major or minor `dry' mergers with less dense galaxies, (3) adiabatic expansion, after significant gas mass loss, (4) gradients in stellar mass-to-light ratios from young nuclear stellar populations (yielding smaller Re at early times, which vanish as the system fades), (5) biases in the stellar mass estimation of high-redshift (young) systems (from e.g. uncertain asymptotic giant branch starlight contributions) and (6) observational effects (possible biases in fitting or missed light from surface brightness dimming, or the effects of

  14. Heat Balance of a Sheep in the Sun. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Transport Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatheway, W. H.

    These materials were designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. Specifically, this module develops a method for calculating the exchange of heat between an…

  15. Animal Thermoregulation and the Operative Environmental (Equivalent) Temperature. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Transport Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, R. D.

    These materials were designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. Thermoregulation is defined as the ability of an organism to modify its body temperature. This…

  16. Some Physics Processes in the Nitrogen-Filled Photoluminescence Cell - Rev. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D D

    2006-06-22

    As shown in Ref. [1], the photoluminescence cell is a viable candidate for monitoring the total energy in the Linac Coherent Light Source. In Ref. [1], most of the discussion was concentrated on the cell with argon as a working gas. In the present note I provide a discussion of some physics processes that may affect the performance of the photoluminescence cell with the nitrogen fill. In particular, I will consider the role of the space charge effects, ambipolar diffusion, and recombination processes. This group of phenomena determines the duration of the afterglow process that follows an initial short (<100 ns) burst of optical radiation. The presence of this afterglow can be of some significance for the detection system. Compared to my previous note with the same title UCRL-TR-222274, a more detailed discussion of space charge effects is provided, with an emphasis on the electrostatic confinement of the primary electrons. Also, some additional atomic data are included into sections describing recombination processes. The general template for this discussion follows a draft report [1] where the argon-filled cell was considered. But some processes in nitrogen are different and require separate consideration. In what follows, I am not attempting to produce ''exact'' results, but rather to provide a quick order-of-magnitude scoping study.

  17. A Library Manager's Guide to the Physical Processing of Nonprint Materials. The Greenwood Library Management Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Driessen, Karen C.; Smyth, Shelia A.

    The librarian is presented with a foundation for decision making as it relates to the physical processing of nonprint materials, and with a demonstration of how these decisions move from theoretical to practical physical processing issues. Such issues include packaging and repackaging; treating accompanying materials; labeling; preparing…

  18. Preliminary evaluation of feeder and lint slide moisture addition on ginning, fiber quality, and textile processing of western cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of moisture addition at the gin stand feeder conditioning hopper and/or the battery condenser slide on gin performance and Western cotton fiber quality and textile processing. The test treatments included no moisture addition, feeder hopper hum...

  19. Perceptual and processing differences between physical and dichorhinic odor mixtures.

    PubMed

    Schütze, M; Negoias, S; Olsson, M J; Hummel, T

    2014-01-31

    Perceptual integration of sensory input from our two nostrils has received little attention in comparison to lateralized inputs for vision and hearing. Here, we investigated whether a binary odor mixture of eugenol and l-carvone (smells of cloves and caraway) would be perceived differently if presented as a mixture in one nostril (physical mixture), vs. the same two odorants in separate nostrils (dichorhinic mixture). In parallel, we investigated whether the different types of presentation resulted in differences in olfactory event-related potentials (OERP). Psychophysical ratings showed that the dichorhinic mixtures were perceived as more intense than the physical mixtures. A tendency for shift in perceived quality was also observed. In line with these perceptual changes, the OERP showed a shift in latencies and amplitudes for early (more "sensory") peaks P1 and N1 whereas no significant differences were observed for the later (more "cognitive") peak P2. The results altogether suggest that the peripheral level is a site of interaction between odorants. Both psychophysical ratings and, for the first time, electrophysiological measurements converge on this conclusion.

  20. Coupled model of physical and biological processes affecting maize pollination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arritt, R.; Westgate, M.; Riese, J.; Falk, M.; Takle, E.

    2003-04-01

    Controversy over the use of genetically modified (GM) crops has led to increased interest in evaluating and controlling the potential for inadvertent outcrossing in open-pollinated crops such as maize. In response to this problem we have developed a Lagrangian model of pollen dispersion as a component of a coupled end-to-end (anther to ear) physical-biological model of maize pollination. The Lagrangian method is adopted because of its generality and flexibility: first, the method readily accommodates flow fields of arbitrary complexity; second, each element of the material being transported can be identified by its source, time of release, or other properties of interest. The latter allows pollen viability to be estimated as a function of such factors as travel time, temperature, and relative humidity, so that the physical effects of airflow and turbulence on pollen dispersion can be considered together with the biological aspects of pollen release and viability. Predicted dispersion of pollen compares well both to observations and to results from a simpler Gaussian plume model. Ability of the Lagrangian model to handle complex air flows is demonstrated by application to pollen dispersion in the vicinity of an agricultural shelter belt. We also show results indicating that pollen viability can be quantified by an "aging function" that accounts for temperature, humidity, and time of exposure.

  1. Flagella, flexibility and flow: Physical processes in microbial ecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumley, D. R.; Rusconi, R.; Son, K.; Stocker, R.

    2015-12-01

    How microorganisms interact with their environment and with their conspecifics depends strongly on their mechanical properties, on the hydrodynamic signatures they generate while swimming and on fluid flows in their environment. The rich fluid-structure interaction between flagella - the appendages microorganisms use for propulsion - and the surrounding flow, has broad reaching effects for both eukaryotic and prokaryotic microorganisms. Here, we discuss selected recent advances in our understanding of the physical ecology of microorganisms, which have hinged on the ability to directly interrogate the movement of individual cells and their swimming appendages, in precisely controlled fluid environments, and to image them at appropriately fast timescales. We review how a flagellar buckling instability can unexpectedly serve a fundamental function in the motility of bacteria, we elucidate the role of hydrodynamics and flexibility in the emergent properties of groups of eukaryotic flagella, and we show how fluid flows characteristic of microbial habitats can strongly bias the migration and spatial distribution of bacteria. The topics covered here are illustrative of the potential inherent in the adoption of experimental methods and conceptual frameworks from physics in understanding the lives of microorganisms.

  2. Nuclear Physics Issues of r-Process Nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kratz, K.-L.

    2006-03-13

    Nucleosynthesis theory predicts that about half of the chemical elements above iron are formed in explosive stellar scenarios by the r-process, i.e. a combination of rapid neutron captures, inverse photodisintegrations, and slower {beta}-decays, {beta}-delayed processes, as well as fission and possibly interactions with neutrinos. A correct modelling of this process, therefore, requires the knowledge of nuclear properties very far from stability and a detailed description of the astrophysical environments. With respect to nuclear data, after an initial period of measuring classical 'waiting-point' nuclei with magic neutron numbers, recent investigations have paid special attention to shape transitions and the erosion of classical shell gaps with possible occurrence of new magic numbers. The status of experimental and theoretical nuclear data on masses and {beta}-decay properties will be briefly reviewed, and consequences on the overall r-process matter flow up to the cosmochronometers 232Th and 238U will be discussed.

  3. Core Formation Under Dynamic Conditions: Physical Processes and Geochemical Signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rushmer, T.; Gaetani, G.; Jones, J. H.; Sparks, J.

    2001-01-01

    We have experimentally investigated liquid metal segregation from a solid silicate matrix under conditions of applied stress. Liquid moves in fractures and formation of fayalitic olivine from orthopyroxene by migrating Fe-Ni-S-O liquids is observed. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  4. Corrosion Resistance of Powder Metallurgy Processed TiC/316L Composites with Mo Additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shaojiang; Xiong, Weihao

    2015-06-01

    To find out the effects of Mo addition on corrosion resistance of TiC/316L stainless steel composites, TiC/316L composites with addition of different contents of Mo were prepared by powder metallurgy. The corrosion resistance of these composites was evaluated by the immersion tests and polarization curves experiments. Results indicated that Mo addition decreased the corrosion rates of TiC/316L composites in H2SO4 solution in the case of Mo content below 2% whereas it displayed an opposite effect when Mo content was above that value. It was found that with an increase in the Mo content, the pitting corrosion resistance increased monotonically for TiC/316L composites in NaCl solution.

  5. Tailoring the physical properties of homopolymers and polymer nanocomposites via solid-state processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre, Cynthia

    Numerous approaches can be used to modify polymer properties. In this thesis, it is demonstrated that an innovative, continuous, industrially scalable process called solid-state shear pulverization (SSSP) can be used to enhance polymer properties with and without the addition of nanofillers. The SSSP process employs a modified twin-screw extruder in which the barrel is cooled rather than heated, resulting in the polymer being processed at a temperature below its glass transition temperature, if the polymer is amorphous, or its melt transition temperature, if the polymer is semi-crystalline. The material processed via SSSP experiences high levels of shear and compressive stresses, resulting in many repeated fragmentation and fusion steps during pulverization, which can lead to mechanochemistry. This research provides the first in-depth study on the effect of SSSP processing on the molecular structure as well as physical properties of homopolymers. Rheological characterization has demonstrated an increase in the melt viscosity of pulverized poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), which can be ascribed to the in situ formation of lightly branched PET. Further evidence of branched PET is provided via a dramatic increase in the rate of crystallization of the pulverized samples. These results suggest that SSSP processing can enhance the reuse and recyclability of PET. While SSSP processing has dramatic effects on the structure of polyesters and consequently their properties, a mild effect is observed for polyolefins. This thesis also demonstrates via a combination of methods that the well-exfoliated state can be achieved via SSSP processing of various polymer nanocomposites, using as-received, unmodified fillers. For example, extensive comparisons are made concerning the thermal stability in air or nitrogen atmosphere of polypropylene (PP)/clay, PP/graphite, and PP/carbon nanotube (CNT) nanocomposites made by SSSP. These comparisons suggest that the mechanism by which CNTs

  6. [Comprehensive Assessment of Psychiatric Residents: An Addition to the Program Admission Process].

    PubMed

    Luis, E Jaramillo G; Elena, Martín C

    2012-01-01

    The training of medical specialists is a long and complex process. Its purpose is to guarantee the society that they are the right professionals to meet the health needs of the population. The first step to ensure this objective is the admission process. In psychiatry this process, monitoring resident students and the criteria for each one are different in each country. Admission in Colombia is a heterogeneous process, not standardized, which varies greatly from one university to another, even between private and public universities. At the National University of Colombia, the admissions process is handled by the Admissions Office and includes: a written test for which you must obtain a minimum score, a resume rating and an interview. The Teaching Committee and the Department of Psychiatry considered the admission procedure in general to be good, but in need of refinement. Due to the experience of some teachers and given the current rules, a "comprehensive assessment" for master and doctoral students was required and in 1996 it was decided that this method of assessment for admission to a specialization in Psychiatry would serve to complement the admission process. The article describes the experience of the process and its outcomes, strengths and weaknesses.

  7. Constraining the North Pacific carbon sink: biological and physical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayers, J.; Lozier, M.

    2010-12-01

    The transition zone region of the North Pacific is a notably large sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide on a mean annual basis, though seasonally the region varies between strong wintertime uptake and weak summertime outgassing. Because the direction of air-sea carbon flux is effectively set by the sea surface pCO2, we seek to identify and quantify those processes most responsible for its variability in this region. While changes in temperature, salinity, dissolved inorganic carbon, and alkalinity are all factors that impact sea surface pCO2 on a seasonal basis, on a mean annual basis the region must be maintained as a sink by processes that remove carbon from surface waters: biological drawdown as well as the result of advection/mixing. In this work we constrain the quantitative contribution of each of these processes throughout an annual cycle. The least constrained of these processes is the biological pump, which we estimate in two independent ways: bottom-up, using satellite data-based primary productivity models coupled with export estimates from literature; and top-down, by determining what the biological pump would need to be to maintain the observed sea surface pCO2 values in the region, given our estimates of all the other regulatory processes.

  8. Relativity Based on Physical Processes Rather Than Space-Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giese, Albrecht

    2013-09-01

    Physicists' understanding of relativity and the way it is handled is at present dominated by the interpretation of Albert Einstein, who related relativity to specific properties of space and time. The principal alternative to Einstein's interpretation is based on a concept proposed by Hendrik A. Lorentz, which uses knowledge of classical physics to explain relativistic phenomena. In this paper, we will show that on the one hand the Lorentz-based interpretation provides a simpler mathematical way of arriving at the known results for both Special and General Relativity. On the other hand, it is able to solve problems which have remained open to this day. Furthermore, a particle model will be presented, based on Lorentzian relativity, which explains the origin of mass without the use of the Higgs mechanism, based on the finiteness of the speed of light, and which provides the classical results for particle properties that are currently only accessible through quantum mechanics.

  9. Aerosol physical properties and their impact on climate change processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strzalkowska, Agata; Zielinski, Tymon; Petelski, Tomasz; Makuch, Przemyslaw; Pakszys, Paulina; Markuszewski, Piotr; Piskozub, Jacek; Drozdowska, Violetta; Gutowska, Dorota; Rozwadowska, Anna

    2013-04-01

    Characterizing aerosols involves the specification of not only their spatial and temporal distributions but their multi-component composition, particle size distribution and physical properties as well. Due to their light attenuation and scattering properties, aerosols influence radiance measured by satellite for ocean color remote sensing. Studies of marine aerosol production and transport are important for many earth sciences such as cloud physics, atmospheric optics, environmental pollution studies, and interaction between ocean and atmosphere. It was one of the reasons for the growth in the number of research programs dealing with marine aerosols. Sea salt aerosols are among the most abundant components of the atmospheric aerosol, and thus it exerts a strong influence on radiation, cloud formation, meteorology and chemistry of the marine atmosphere. An accurate understanding and description of these mechanisms is crucial to modeling climate and climate change. This work provides information on combined aerosol studies made with lidars and sun photometers onboard the ship and in different coastal areas. We concentrate on aerosol optical thickness and its variations with aerosol advections into the study area. We pay special attention to the problem of proper data collection and analyses techniques. We showed that in order to detect the dynamics of potential aerosol composition changes it is necessary to use data from different stations where measurements are made using the same techniques. The combination of such information with air mass back-trajectories and data collected at stations located on the route of air masses provides comprehensive picture of aerosol variations in the study area both vertically and horizontally. Acknowledgements: The support for this study was provided by the project Satellite Monitoring of the Baltic Sea Environment - SatBałtyk founded by European Union through European Regional Development Fund contract No. POIG 01

  10. Inelastic processes in atomic, molecular and chemical physics (in honour of Andrey K. Belyaev)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barklem, Paul S.; Tscherbul, Timur V.

    2015-11-01

    This Special Issue is dedicated to Professor Andrey K. Belyaev, on the occasion of his 60th birthday and in celebration of his productive career in theoretical atomic, molecular, and chemical physics. It brings together 12 research studies of Inelastic Processes in Atomic, Molecular and Chemical Physics, a research area where Andrey himself made significant contributions. Inelastic processes are central to many different areas of physics, including atmospheric physics, astrophysics, and plasma physics to name a few, as well as in related technological applications such as lasers and fusion reactors. Quantitative understanding of the mechanisms of inelastic processes in atoms and molecules is therefore a problem of fundamental importance in physics, astrophysics, and chemistry. It is precisely this challenging problem that Andrey's research addresses using a broad arsenal of theoretical tools and techniques.

  11. The addition of silicon carbide to surrogate nuclear fuel kernels made by the internal gelation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, R. D.; Hunn, J. D.; Birdwell, J. F.; Lindemer, T. B.; Collins, J. L.

    2010-06-01

    The US Department of Energy plans to use the internal gelation process to make tristructural isotropic (TRISO)-coated transuranic (TRU) fuel particles. The focus of this work is to develop TRU fuel kernels with high crush strengths, good ellipticity, and adequately dispersed silicon carbide (SiC). The submicron SiC particles in the TRU kernels are to serve as getters for excess oxygen and to potentially sequester palladium, rhodium, and ruthenium, which could damage the coatings during irradiation. Zirconium oxide microspheres stabilized with yttrium were used as surrogates because zirconium and TRU microspheres from the internal gelation process are amorphous and encounter similar processing problems. The hardness of SiC required modifications to the experimental system that was used to make uranium carbide kernels. Suitable processing conditions and equipment changes were identified so that the SiC could be homogeneously dispersed in gel spheres for subsequent calcination into strong spherical kernels.

  12. 12 CFR 390.128 - If the FDIC requests additional information to complete my application, how will it process my...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... complete my application, how will it process my application? 390.128 Section 390.128 Banks and Banking... additional information to complete my application, how will it process my application? (a) You may use the... will notify you that it has extended the period before the end of the initial 15-day period and...

  13. Processes in karst systems, physics, chemistry, and geology

    SciTech Connect

    Dreybrodt, W.

    1988-01-01

    Dreybrodt deals quantitatively with many of the chemical and hydrological processes involved in the formation of karst systems. The book is divided into 3 major parts. The first part develops the basic chemical and fluid-flow principles needed in modeling karst systems. The second part investigates the experimental kinetics of calcite dissolution and precipitation and applies the resulting kinetic laws to the modeling of these processes in systems both open and closed to carbon dioxide. The last part of the book includes a qualitative examination of karst systems, quantitative modeling of the development of karst features, and an examination and modeling of the growth of spelotherms in caves.

  14. Removal of B from Si by Hf addition during Al–Si solvent refining process

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Yun; Ma, Wenhui; Sun, Luen; Wu, Jijun; Dai, Yongnian; Morita, Kazuki

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A small amount of Hf was employed as a new additive to improve B removal in the electromagnetic solidification refinement of Si with an Al–Si melt, because Hf has a very strong affinity for B. The segregation ratio of Hf between the solid Si and Al–Si melt was estimated to range from 4.9 × 10−6 to 8.8 × 10−7 for Al concentrations of 0 to 64 at.%, respectively. The activity coefficient of Hf in solid Si at its infinite dilution was also estimated. A small addition of Hf (<1025 parts per million atoms, ppma) significantly improved the B removal. It was confirmed that the use of an increased Hf addition, slower cooling rate, and Al-rich Al–Si melt as the refining solvent removed B more efficiently. B in Si could be removed as much as 98.2% with 410 ppma Hf addition when the liquidus temperature of the Al–Si melt was 1173 K and the cooling rate was 4.5–7.6 K min–1. The B content in Si could be controlled from 153 ppma to 2.7 ppma, which meets the acceptable level for solar-grade Si. PMID:27877853

  15. Process for lowering the dielectric constant of polyimides using diamic acid additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); St.clair, Anne K. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Linear aromatic polyimides with low dielectric constants are produced by adding a diamic acid additive to the polyamic acid resin formed by the condensation of an aromatic dianhydride with an aromatic diamine. The resulting modified polyimide is a better electrical insulator than state-of-the-art commercially available polyimides.

  16. EFFECT OF A WHOLE-CATCHMENT N ADDITION ON STREAM DETRITUS PROCESSING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Bear Brook Watershed in Maine (BBWM) is a paired catchment study investigating ecosystem effects of N and S deposition. Because of the decade long (NH4)2SO4 addition, the treatment catchment has higher stream NO3 and enriched foliar N concentrations compared to the reference ...

  17. Selective Morphology Control of Bulk Heterojunction in Polymer Solar Cells Using Binary Processing Additives.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yen-Sook; Yeo, Jun-Seok; Kim, Nam-Koo; Lee, Sehyun; Kim, Dong-Yu

    2016-11-09

    We report the effect of binary additives on the fabrication of polymer solar cells (PSCs) based on a bulk heterojunction (BHJ) system. The combination of 1,8-diiodooctane (DIO), a high-boiling and selective solvent, for fullerene derivatives and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) precursor, a nonvolatile insulating additive, affords complementary functions on the effective modulation of BHJ morphology. It was found that DIO and PDMS precursor each play different roles in the control of BHJ morphology, and thus, the power conversion efficiency (PCE) can be further enhanced to 7.6% by improving the fill factor (FF) from 6.8% compared to that achieved using a conventional device employing only a DIO additive. In the BHJ of the active layer, DIO suppressed the large phase separation of PBDTTT-CF and PC71BM while allowing the formation of continuous polymer networks in the donor polymer through phase separation of the PDMS precursor and BHJ components. The appropriate amount of PDMS precursor does not disturb charge transport in the BHJ despite having insulating properties. In addition, the dependence of photovoltaic parameters on different light intensities reveals that the charge recombination in the device with DIO and PDMS precursor decreases compared to that achieved using the device with only DIO.

  18. Simulation of Forming Process as an Educational Tool Using Physical Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdullah, A. B.; Muda, M. R.; Samad, Z.

    2008-01-01

    Metal forming process simulation requires a very high cost including the cost for dies, machine and material and tight process control since the process involve very huge pressure. A physical modeling technique is developed and initiates a new era of educational tool of simulating the process effectively. Several publications and findings have…

  19. Aluminium content of some processed foods, raw materials and food additives in China by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Deng, Gui-Fang; Li, Ke; Ma, Jing; Liu, Fen; Dai, Jing-Jing; Li, Hua-Bin

    2011-01-01

    The level of aluminium in 178 processed food samples from Shenzhen city in China was evaluated using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Some processed foods contained a concentration of up to 1226 mg/kg, which is about 12 times the Chinese food standard. To establish the main source in these foods, Al levels in the raw materials were determined. However, aluminium concentrations in raw materials were low (0.10-451.5 mg/kg). Therefore, aluminium levels in food additives used in these foods was determined and it was found that some food additives contained a high concentration of aluminium (0.005-57.4 g/kg). The results suggested that, in the interest of public health, food additives containing high concentrations of aluminium should be replaced by those containing less. This study has provided new information on aluminium levels in Chinese processed foods, raw materials and a selection of food additives.

  20. Analysis on Soil Seed Bank Diversity Characteristics and Its Relation with Soil Physical and Chemical Properties after Substrate Addition

    PubMed Central

    He, Mengxuan; Lv, Lingyue; Li, Hongyuan; Meng, Weiqing; Zhao, Na

    2016-01-01

    Aims Considered as an essential measure in the application of soil seed bank (SSB) projects, the mixing of substrate and surface soil can effectively improve soil condition. This research is aimed at exploring the diversity characteristics of SSBs and the relationships between SSBs and soil properties. Methods Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) was adopted to describe the ordination of SSBs on soil properties’ gradients; multiple linear regressions were adopted to analyze the relationship between average growth height and soil properties, density and soil properties. Results Experimental groups of mixed substrate (the mixture of organic and inorganic substrates) had high diversity indexes, especially the Shannon-Wiener Index compared with those of single substrate. Meanwhile, a higher number of species and increased density were also noted in those of mixed substrate. The best test group, No.16, had the highest diversity indexes with a Shannon-Wiener of 1.898, Simpson of 0.633 and Pielou of 0.717, and also showed the highest density of 14000 germinants /m2 and 21 species. In addition, an improvement of the soil’s chemical and physical properties was noted when the substrates were mixed. The mixed substrate of turfy soil and perlite could effectively enhance the soil moisture content, whilst a mixed substrate of rice husk carbon and vermiculite could improve the content of available potassium (AK) and phosphorus (AP) and strengthen soil fertility. The germinated plants also reflected obvious regularities of ordination on soil factor gradients. Three distinct cluster groups were presented, of which the first cluster was distributed in an area with a relatively higher content of AK and AP; the second cluster was distributed at places with relatively higher soil moisture content; and the third cluster of plants didn’t show any obvious relationship with soil physical and chemical properties. Through CCA analysis, AK and AP were considered the most important

  1. Speaking and Speaking Education as Physical Process in Turkish Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurudayioglu, Mehmet

    2011-01-01

    Speaking is sending the message which is desired to be transferred to another one with vocal organs and produced by complicated operations in the brain. Speaking, which is a complicated process, is the most common and important means of communication among people. Speaking, which has essential place both individually and socially, affects success…

  2. Integrated Modeling and Analysis of Physical Oceanographic and Acoustic Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    gravity waves and other submesoscale features are of specific interest. There are many open questions regarding the processes of internal-wave...modeling suite that includes submesoscale features as well as data assimilation is expected to be a valuable asset to apply in numerous ocean regions

  3. Processing and physical properties of chia-oat hydrocolloids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chia-oat dry blended composites and their processed hydrocolloids containing omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids from chia along with soluble ß-glucan from three oat products were developed and studied. Chia’s omega-3 fatty acids and soluble ß-glucan from oat products are recognized for preventing heart...

  4. Experimental Fluidic Investigation of Degradation of Pico-liter Oil Droplets by Physical and Biological Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalali, Maryam; Sheng, Jian

    2016-11-01

    This study used laboratory experiments to assess degradation of crude oil by physical and biological processes including dissolution and consumption. To perform this study, we have developed a bioassay that consists of a flow chamber with a bottom glass substrate printed with an array of pico-liter oil droplets using micro-Transfer Printing. The technique allows the printing of highly homogeneous pico-liter droplet array with different dimensions and shapes that can be maintained for weeks. Since the droplets are pinned and stationary on the bottom substrate, the key processes can be evaluated by measuring the change of shape and volume using Atomic Force Microscopy. Parallel microfluidic bioassays are established at the beginning, exposed to abiotic/biotic solutions, and scarified for characterization at given time intervals for each experiment. Two processes, dissolution and consumption, are investigated. In addition, the effects of dispersant on these processes are also studied. The results show that the amount of oil degraded by bacteria accounts for almost 50% of the total volume in comparison to 25% via dissolution. Although dispersant has a subtle effect on dissolution, the effect on rates of consumption and its asymptotic behavior are substantial. Experiments involving different bacterial strains, dispersant concentration, and flow shear rate are on-going.

  5. From lab to industrial: PZT nanoparticles synthesis and process control for application in additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hsien-Lin

    Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) nanoparticles hold many promising current and future applications, such as PZT ink for 3-D printing or seeds for PZT thick films. One common method is hydrothermal growth, in which temperature, duration time, or mineralizer concentrations are optimized to produce PZT nanoparticles with desired morphology, controlled size and size distribution. A modified hydrothermal process is used to fabricate PZT nanoparticles. The novelty is to employ a high ramping rate (e.g., 20 deg C/min) to generate abrupt supersaturation so as to promote burst nucleation of PZT nanoparticles as well as a fast cooling rate (e.g., 5 deg C/min) with a controlled termination of crystal growth. As a result, PZT nanoparticles with a size distribution ranging from 200 nm to 800 nm are obtained with cubic morphology and good crystallinity. The identification of nanoparticles is confirmed through use of X-ray diffractometer (XRD). XRD patterns are used to compare sample variations in their microstructures such as lattice parameter. A cubic morphology and particle size are also examined via SEM images. The hydrothermal process is further modified with excess lead (from 20% wt. to 80% wt.) to significantly reduce amorphous phase and agglomeration of the PZT nanoparticles. With a modified process, the particle size still remains within the 200 nm to 800 nm. Also, the crystal structures (microstructure) of the samples show little variations. Finally, a semi-continuous hydrothermal manufacturing process was developed to substantially reduce the fabrication time and maintained the same high quality as the nanoparticles prepared in an earlier stage. In this semi-continuous process, a furnace is maintained at the process temperature (200 deg C), whereas autoclaves containing PZT sol are placed in and out of the furnace to control the ramp-up and cooling rates. This setup eliminates an extremely time-consuming step of cooling down the furnace, thus saving tremendous amount of

  6. Lignosulfonates carboxylated with chloroacetic acid as additives in oil recovery processes involving chemical recovery agents

    SciTech Connect

    Kalfoglou, G.

    1981-05-19

    A process for producing petroleum from subterranean formations is disclosed wherein production from the formation is obtained by driving a fluid from an injection well to a production well. The process involves injecting via the injection well into the formation an aqueous solution of lignosulfonates carboxylated with chloroacetic acid as a sacrificial agent to inhibit the deposition of surfactant and/or polymer on the reservoir matrix. The process may best be carried out by injecting the lignosulfonates carboxylated with chloroacetic acid into the formation through the injection well mixed with either a polymer, a surfactant solution and/or a micellar dispersion. This mixture would then be followed by a drive fluid such as water to push the chemicals to the production well.

  7. Radiation processing of thermoplastic starch by blending aromatic additives: Effect of blend composition and radiation parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandal, Dhriti; Mikus, Pierre-Yves; Dole, Patrice; Coqueret, Xavier

    2013-03-01

    This paper reports on the effects of electron beam (EB) irradiation on poly α-1,4-glucose oligomers (maltodextrins) in the presence of water and of various aromatic additives, as model blends for gaining a better understanding at a molecular level the modifications occurring in amorphous starch-lignin blends submitted to ionizing irradiation for improving the properties of this type of bio-based thermoplastic material. A series of aromatic compounds, namely p-methoxy benzyl alcohol, benzene dimethanol, cinnamyl alcohol and some related carboxylic acids namely cinnamic acid, coumaric acid, and ferulic acid, was thus studied for assessing the ability of each additive to counteract chain scission of the polysaccharide and induce interchain covalent linkages. Gel formation in EB-irradiated blends comprising of maltodextrin was shown to be dependent on three main factors: the type of aromatic additive, presence of glycerol, and irradiation dose. The chain scission versus grafting phenomenon as a function of blend composition and dose were studied using Size Exclusion Chromatography by determining the changes in molecular weight distribution (MWD) from Refractive Index (RI) chromatograms and the presence of aromatic grafts onto the maltodextrin chains from UV chromatograms. The occurrence of crosslinking was quantified by gel fraction measurements allowing for ranking the cross-linking efficiency of the additives. When applying the method to destructurized starch blends, gel formation was also shown to be strongly affected by the moisture content of the sample submitted to irradiation. The results demonstrate the possibility to tune the reactivity of tailored blend for minimizing chain degradation and control the degree of cross-linking.

  8. Physical processes affecting the sedimentary environments of Long Island Sound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Signell, R.P.; Knebel, H. J.; List, J.H.; Farris, A.S.; ,

    1997-01-01

    A modeling study was undertaken to simulate the bottom tidal-, wave-, and wind-driven currents in Long Island Sound in order to provide a general physical oceanographic framework for understanding the characteristics and distribution of seafloor sedimentary environments. Tidal currents are important in the funnel-shaped eastern part of the Sound, where a strong gradient of tidal-current speed was found. This current gradient parallels the general westward progression of sedimentary environments from erosion or non-deposition, through bedload transport and sediment sorting, to fine-grained deposition. Wave-driven currents, meanwhile, appear to be important along the shallow margins of the basin, explaining the occurrence of relatively coarse sediments in regions where tidal currents alone are not strong enough to move sediment. Finally, westerly wind events are shown to locally enhance bottom currents along the axial depression of the sound, providing a possible explanation for the relatively coarse sediments found in the depression despite tide- and wave-induced currents below the threshold of sediment movement. The strong correlation between the near-bottom current intensity based on the model results and the sediment response as indicated by the distribution of sedimentary environments provides a framework for predicting the long-term effects of anthropogenic activities.

  9. Boundary Conditions for the Paleoenvironment: Chemical and Physical Processes in Dense Interstellar Clouds: Summary of Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, William M.

    1999-01-01

    The basic theme of this program was the study of molecular complexity and evolution for the biogenic elements and compounds in interstellar clouds and in primitive solar system objects. Research included the detection and study of new interstellar and cometary molecules and investigation of reaction pathways for astrochemistry from a comparison of theory and observed molecular abundances. The latter includes studies of cold, dark clouds in which ion-molecule chemistry should predominate, searches for the effects of interchange of material between the gas and solid phases in interstellar clouds, unbiased spectral surveys of particular sources, and systematic investigation of the interlinked chemistry and physics of dense interstellar clouds. In addition, the study of comets has allowed a comparison between the chemistry of such minimally thermally processed objects and that of interstellar clouds, shedding light on the evolution of the biogenic elements during the process of solar system formation. One PhD dissertation on this research was completed by a graduate student at the University of Massachusetts. An additional 4 graduate students at the University of Massachusetts and 5 graduate students from other institutions participated in research supported by this grant, with 6 of these thus far receiving PhD degrees from the University of Massachusetts or their home institutions. Four postdoctoral research associates at the University of Massachusetts also participated in research supported by this grant, receiving valuable training.

  10. Development of coatings for ultrasonic additive manufacturing sonotrode using laser direct metal deposition process

    SciTech Connect

    Sridharan, Niyanth; Dehoff, Ryan R.; Jordan, Brian H.; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh

    2016-10-01

    ORNL partnered with Fabrisonic, LLC to develop galling resistant hard facing coatings on sonotrodes used to fabricate 3D printed materials using ultrasonic additive manufacturing. The development and deployment of a coated sonotrode is expected to push the existing state of the art to facilitate the solidstate additive manufacturing of hard steels and titanium alloys. To this effect a structurally amorphous stainless steel material and cobalt chrome material were deposited on the sonotrode material. Both the deposits showed good adhesion to the substrate. The coatings made using the structurally amorphous steel materials showed cracking during the initial trials and cracking was eliminated by deposition on a preheated substrate. Both the coatings show hardness in excess of 600 HVN. Thus the phase 1 of this project has been used to identify suitable materials to use to coat the sonotrode. Despite the fact that successful deposits were obtained, the coatings need to be evaluated by performing detailed galling tests at various temperatures. In addition field tests are also necessary to test the stability of these coatings in a high cycle ultrasonic vibration mode. If awarded, phase 2 of the project would be used to optimize the composition of the deposit material to maximize galling resistance. The industrial partner would then use the coated sonotrode to fabricate builds made of austenitic stainless steel to test the viability of using a coated sonotrode.

  11. A physical interpretation for the natural photosynthetic process

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Robert; Rich, Peter R.

    1983-01-01

    The efficiency of the process of photosynthesis is shown to depend on the molecular conversion of power. This requires establishment of a discipline that is now implicit in current thought and that offers a definition of relationship between equilibrium state and power. The quantum aspect for the microscopic process is different from the macroscopic system idealized as the heat engine and is required for the interpretation of molecular machinery. By using three postulates the ideal maximal efficiency for the molecular energy conversion is calculated from the data, which are assembled in the form of the “Z scheme” for photosynthesis. The observed and the calculated efficiencies for a green plant are substantially in agreement. PMID:16593282

  12. Cosmochemical implications of the physical processing of cometary nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    McSween, H.Y. Jr. ); Weissman, P.R. )

    1989-12-01

    Comets are not necessarily pristine nebular and interstellar material, despite a common perception to that effect. Alteration processes may occur during comet formation in the outer planet region, during their dispersal to or residence within the Oort cloud, and after their return to the planetary region. Processes that may have significantly modified cometary nuclei include heating, impacts, and irradiation. Possible consequences include phase changes in ices, hydration reactions in silicates, synthesis of organic compounds, collisional disruption and re-accretion, shock and irradiation effects in minerals and ices, cosmogenic nuclide formation, redistribution or loss of volatiles, and formation of a refractory veneer. A model of cometary nuclei that emerges from these considerations provides a framework for understanding observations of comets and future samples.

  13. Physical-Chemical Studies of Solutions Processing of Nematic Polymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-02-08

    be used in the preparation of molecular composites . The system has h-en studied prevIousiv, principally with respect to its use in the formation of...filmq [6]. A single phase of the three component solutions is an essential requirement in the preparation of A molecular composite . Accordingly, ternary...discussed in the preceding section [51. Such aggregation could have a deleterious effect on the mechanical properties a molecular composite processed fr

  14. Terrestrial physical and chemical processes for liquid waste treatment.

    PubMed

    McCarty, P L

    1991-10-01

    Experiences gained from full-scale evaluation of advanced treatment processes used for reclaiming wastewaters should help in the evaluation of potential treatment systems for treatment and reuse of water in space. Water Factory 21 is a 0.66 m3 s-1 (15 million gallons per day) water reclamation plant in California that has been in operation since 1976. The plant receives biologically treated wastewater. Lime treatment is effective for removal of heavy metals. Volatile organic constitutes are efficiently removed by air stripping. Non-volatile organic constituents are removed by activated carbon adsorption and reverse osmosis (RO). RO is a highly effective polishing step, and removes most of the remaining materials including inorganic salts, heavy metals, and organics. RO removed 85% of the total organic carbon, down to about 1 mg l-1, which is lower than in many treated drinking waters. The series of treatment processes used insured virus and pathogen removal, with lime treatment and chlorination together proving highly effective. Sufficient data has been collected to provide statistically reliable confidence limits to be set on the performance of each unit process.

  15. PowerPoint Presentations: A Creative Addition to the Research Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Alan E.

    2003-01-01

    Contends that the requirement of a PowerPoint presentation as part of the research process would benefit students in the following ways: learning how to conduct research; starting their research project sooner; honing presentation and public speaking skills; improving cooperative and social skills; and enhancing technology skills. Outlines the…

  16. Assessing an unknown evolutionary process: effect of increasing site-specific knowledge through taxon addition.

    PubMed

    Pollock, D D; Bruno, W J

    2000-12-01

    Assessment of the evolutionary process is crucial for understanding the effect of protein structure and function on sequence evolution and for many other analyses in molecular evolution. Here, we used simulations to study how taxon sampling affects accuracy of parameter estimation and topological inference in the absence of branch length asymmetry. With maximum-likelihood analysis, we find that adding taxa dramatically improves both support for the evolutionary model and accurate assessment of its parameters when compared with increasing the sequence length. Using a method we call "doppelgänger trees," we distinguish the contributions of two sources of improved topological inference: greater knowledge about internal nodes and greater knowledge of site-specific rate parameters. Surprisingly, highly significant support for the correct general model does not lead directly to improved topological inference. Instead, substantial improvement occurs only with accurate assessment of the evolutionary process at individual sites. Although these results are based on a simplified model of the evolutionary process, they indicate that in general, assuming processes are not independent and identically distributed among sites, more extensive sampling of taxonomic biodiversity will greatly improve analytical results in many current sequence data sets with moderate sequence lengths.

  17. 15 CFR 713.4 - Advance declaration requirements for additionally planned production, processing, or consumption...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... multipurpose activities; (v) Changes to the plant site's status relating to domestic transfer of the chemical; (vi) Changes to the plant site's purposes for which the chemical will be produced, processed or consumed; or (vii) Changes to the plant site's status relating to exports of the chemical or the...

  18. Effect of two-stage coagulant addition on coagulation-ultrafiltration process for treatment of humic-rich water.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting; Chen, Zhong-lin; Yu, Wen-zheng; Shen, Ji-min; Gregory, John

    2011-08-01

    A novel two-stage coagulant addition strategy applied in a coagulation-ultrafiltration (UF) process for treatment of humic-rich water at neutral pH was investigated in this study. When aluminum sulfate (alum) doses were set at a ratio of 3:1 added during rapid mix stage and half way through flocculation stage, the integrated process of two-stage alum addition achieved almost the same organic matter removal as that of conventional one-stage alum addition at the same overall dose. Whereas membrane fouling could be effectively mitigated by the two-stage addition exhibited by trans-membrane pressure (TMP) developments. The TMP developments were found to be primarily attributed to external fouling on membrane surface, which was closely associated with floc characteristics. The results of jar tests indicated that the average size of flocs formed in two-stage addition mode roughly reached one half larger than that in one-stage addition mode, which implied a beneficial effect on membrane fouling reduction. Moreover, the flocs with more irregular structure and lower effective density resulted from the two-stage alum addition, which caused higher porosity of cake layer formed by such flocs on membrane surface. Microscopic observations of membrane surface demonstrated that internal fouling in membrane pores could be also remarkably limited by two-stage alum addition. It is likely that the freshly formed hydroxide precipitates were distinct in surface characteristics from the aged precipitates due to formation of more active groups or adsorption of more labile aluminum species. Consequently, the flocs could further connect and aggregate to contribute to preferable properties for filtration performance of the coagulation-UF process. As a simple and efficient approach, two-stage coagulant addition strategy could have great practical significance in coagulation-membrane processes.

  19. Physical Processes for Driving Ionospheric Outflows in Global Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas Earle; Strangeway, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    We review and assess the importance of processes thought to drive ionospheric outflows, linking them as appropriate to the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field, and to the spatial and temporal distribution of their magnetospheric internal responses. These begin with the diffuse effects of photoionization and thermal equilibrium of the ionospheric topside, enhancing Jeans' escape, with ambipolar diffusion and acceleration. Auroral outflows begin with dayside reconnexion and resultant field-aligned currents and driven convection. These produce plasmaspheric plumes, collisional heating and wave-particle interactions, centrifugal acceleration, and auroral acceleration by parallel electric fields, including enhanced ambipolar fields from electron heating by precipitating particles. Observations and simulations show that solar wind energy dissipation into the atmosphere is concentrated by the geomagnetic field into auroral regions with an amplification factor of 10-100, enhancing heavy species plasma and gas escape from gravity, and providing more current carrying capacity. Internal plasmas thus enable electromagnetic driving via coupling to the plasma, neutral gas and by extension, the entire body " We assess the Importance of each of these processes in terms of local escape flux production as well as global outflow, and suggest methods for their implementation within multispecies global simulation codes. We complete 'he survey with an assessment of outstanding obstacles to this objective.

  20. Process for improving mechanical properties of epoxy resins by addition of cobalt ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St.clair, A. K. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A resin product useful as an adhesive, composite or casting resin is described as well as the process used in its preparation to improve its flexural strength mechanical property characteristics. Improved flexural strength is attained with little or no change in density, thermal stability or moisture resistance by chemically incorporating 1.2% to 10.6% by weight Co(3) ions in an epoxidized resin system.

  1. Poly(ether ester) Ionomers as Water-Soluble Polymers for Material Extrusion Additive Manufacturing Processes.

    PubMed

    Pekkanen, Allison M; Zawaski, Callie; Stevenson, André T; Dickerman, Ross; Whittington, Abby R; Williams, Christopher B; Long, Timothy E

    2017-04-12

    Water-soluble polymers as sacrificial supports for additive manufacturing (AM) facilitate complex features in printed objects. Few water-soluble polymers beyond poly(vinyl alcohol) enable material extrusion AM. In this work, charged poly(ether ester)s with tailored rheological and mechanical properties serve as novel materials for extrusion-based AM at low temperatures. Melt transesterification of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG, 8k) and dimethyl 5-sulfoisophthalate afforded poly(ether ester)s of sufficient molecular weight to impart mechanical integrity. Quantitative ion exchange provided a library of poly(ether ester)s with varying counterions, including both monovalent and divalent cations. Dynamic mechanical and tensile analysis revealed an insignificant difference in mechanical properties for these polymers below the melting temperature, suggesting an insignificant change in final part properties. Rheological analysis, however, revealed the advantageous effect of divalent countercations (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and Zn(2+)) in the melt state and exhibited an increase in viscosity of two orders of magnitude. Furthermore, time-temperature superposition identified an elevation in modulus, melt viscosity, and flow activation energy, suggesting intramolecular interactions between polymer chains and a higher apparent molecular weight. In particular, extrusion of poly(PEG8k-co-CaSIP) revealed vast opportunities for extrusion AM of well-defined parts. The unique melt rheological properties highlighted these poly(ether ester) ionomers as ideal candidates for low-temperature material extrusion additive manufacturing of water-soluble parts.

  2. Optimization of the integrated citric acid-methane fermentation process by air stripping and glucoamylase addition.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Chen, Yang-Qiu; Zhang, Hong-Jian; Wang, Ke; Tang, Lei; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Chen, Xu-Sheng; Mao, Zhong-Gui

    2015-03-01

    To solve the problem of extraction wastewater in citric acid industry, an integrated citric acid-methane fermentation process was proposed. In the integrated process, extraction wastewater was treated by mesophilic anaerobic digestion and then reused to make mash for the next batch of citric acid fermentation. In this study, an Aspergillus niger mutant strain exhibiting resistance to high metal ions concentration was used to eliminate the inhibition of 200 mg/L Na(+) and 300 mg/L K(+) in anaerobic digestion effluent (ADE) and citric acid production increased by 25.0 %. Air stripping was used to remove ammonium, alkalinity, and part of metal ions in ADE before making mash. In consequence, citric acid production was significantly improved but still lower by 6.1 % than the control. Results indicated that metal ions in ADE synergistically inhibited the activity of glucoamylase, thus reducing citric acid production. When 130 U/g glucoamylase was added before fermentation, citric acid production was 141.5 g/L, which was even higher than the control (140.4 g/L). This process could completely eliminate extraction wastewater discharge and reduce water resource consumption.

  3. Ecotoxicity of arsenic contaminated sludge after mixing with soils and addition into composting and vermicomposting processes.

    PubMed

    Vašíčková, Jana; Maňáková, Blanka; Šudoma, Marek; Hofman, Jakub

    2016-11-05

    Sludge coming from remediation of groundwater contaminated by industry is usually managed as hazardous waste despite it might be considered for further processing as a source of nutrients. The ecotoxicity of phosphorus rich sludge contaminated with arsenic was evaluated after mixing with soil and cultivation with Sinapis alba, and supplementation into composting and vermicomposting processes. The Enchytraeus crypticus and Folsomia candida reproduction tests and the Lactuca sativa root growth test were used. Invertebrate bioassays reacted sensitively to arsenic presence in soil-sludge mixtures. The root elongation of L. sativa was not sensitive and showed variable results. In general, the relationship between invertebrate tests results and arsenic mobile concentration was indicated in majority endpoints. Nevertheless, significant portion of the results still cannot be satisfactorily explained by As chemistry data. Composted and vermicomposted sludge mixtures showed surprisingly high toxicity on all three tested organisms despite the decrease in arsenic mobility, probably due to toxic metabolites of bacteria and earthworms produced during these processes. The results from the study indicated the inability of chemical methods to predict the effects of complex mixtures on living organisms with respect to ecotoxicity bioassays.

  4. Effects of processing treatment and sorbate addition on the flavor characteristics of apple cider.

    PubMed

    Boylston, Terri D; Wang, Hui; Reitmeier, Cheryll A; Glatz, Bonita A

    2003-03-26

    Processing treatments used to produce a microbiologically "safe" apple cider were evaluated to determine the impact of these treatments on the overall flavor characteristics. Apple cider with (0.1%) and without (0%) potassium sorbate was subjected to four processing treatments: untreated, irradiated at 2 kGy, irradiated at 4 kGy, and pasteurized. Volatile flavor compounds were isolated from the cider using solid-phase microextraction methods with gas chromatographic analysis. A trained descriptive analysis panel evaluated sensory attributes. The effects of the processing treatment were dependent on the presence of sorbate in the apple cider. Irradiation treatments resulted in a decrease in the content of esters characteristic of apple flavor and an increase in the content of alcohols and aldehydes formed through lipid oxidation reactions. The presence of sorbate reduced the effects of the irradiation treatments on these volatile flavor compounds. Sensory panelists, however, detected higher intensities of undesirable flavor attributes, including "cardboard flavor", and lower intensities of the desirable "apple flavor" in irradiated cider with added sorbate.

  5. Understanding system disturbance and ecosystem services in restored saltmarshes: Integrating physical and biogeochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, K. L.; Harvey, G. L.

    2012-06-01

    Coastal saltmarsh ecosystems occupy only a small percentage of Earth's land surface, yet contribute a wide range of ecosystem services that have significant global economic and societal value. These environments currently face significant challenges associated with climate change, sea level rise, development and water quality deterioration and are consequently the focus of a range of management schemes. Increasingly, soft engineering techniques such as managed realignment (MR) are being employed to restore and recreate these environments, driven primarily by the need for habitat (re)creation and sustainable coastal flood defence. Such restoration schemes also have the potential to provide additional ecosystem services including climate regulation and waste processing. However, these sites have frequently been physically impacted by their previous land use and there is a lack of understanding of how this 'disturbance' impacts the delivery of ecosystem services or of the complex linkages between ecological, physical and biogeochemical processes in restored systems. Through the exploration of current data this paper determines that hydrological, geomorphological and hydrodynamic functioning of restored sites may be significantly impaired with respects to natural 'undisturbed' systems and that links between morphology, sediment structure, hydrology and solute transfer are poorly understood. This has consequences for the delivery of seeds, the provision of abiotic conditions suitable for plant growth, the development of microhabitats and the cycling of nutrients/contaminants and may impact the delivery of ecosystem services including biodiversity, climate regulation and waste processing. This calls for a change in our approach to research in these environments with a need for integrated, interdisciplinary studies over a range of spatial and temporal scales incorporating both intensive and extensive research design.

  6. Surface Modified Particles By Multi-Step Michael-Type Addition And Process For The Preparation Thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Ronald Lee; Elliott, Brian John; Luebben, Silvia DeVito; Myers, Andrew William; Smith, Bryan Matthew

    2005-05-03

    A new class of surface modified particles and a multi-step Michael-type addition surface modification process for the preparation of the same is provided. The multi-step Michael-type addition surface modification process involves two or more reactions to compatibilize particles with various host systems and/or to provide the particles with particular chemical reactivities. The initial step comprises the attachment of a small organic compound to the surface of the inorganic particle. The subsequent steps attach additional compounds to the previously attached organic compounds through reactive organic linking groups. Specifically, these reactive groups are activated carbon—carbon pi bonds and carbon and non-carbon nucleophiles that react via Michael or Michael-type additions.

  7. Study of basic physical processes in liquid rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.; Chen, C. P.

    1992-01-01

    Inconsistencies between analytical results and measurements for liquid rocket thrust chamber performance, which escape suitable explanations, have motivated the examination of the basic phys ical modeling formulations as to their unlimited application. The publication of Prof. D. Straub's book, 'Thermofluid-dynamics of Optimized Rocket Propulsions,' further stimulated the interest of understanding the gas dynamic relationships in chemically reacting mixtures. A review of other concepts proposed by Falk-Ruppel (Gibbsian Thermodynamics), Straub (Alternative Theory, AT), Prigogine (Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics), Boltzmann (Kinetic Theory), and Truesdell (Rational Mechanism) has been made to obtain a better understanding of the Navier-Stokes equation, which is now used extensively for chemically reacting flow treatment in combustion chambers. In addition to the study of the different concepts, two workshops were conducted to clarify some of the issues. The first workshop centered on Falk-Ruppel's new 'dynamics' concept, while the second one concentrated on Straub's AT. In this report brief summaries of the reviewed philosophies are presented and compared with the classical Navier-Stokes formulation in a tabular arrangement. Also the highlights of both workshops are addressed.

  8. Study of basic physical processes in liquid rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S. T.; Chen, C. P.

    1992-09-01

    Inconsistencies between analytical results and measurements for liquid rocket thrust chamber performance, which escape suitable explanations, have motivated the examination of the basic phys ical modeling formulations as to their unlimited application. The publication of Prof. D. Straub's book, 'Thermofluid-dynamics of Optimized Rocket Propulsions,' further stimulated the interest of understanding the gas dynamic relationships in chemically reacting mixtures. A review of other concepts proposed by Falk-Ruppel (Gibbsian Thermodynamics), Straub (Alternative Theory, AT), Prigogine (Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics), Boltzmann (Kinetic Theory), and Truesdell (Rational Mechanism) has been made to obtain a better understanding of the Navier-Stokes equation, which is now used extensively for chemically reacting flow treatment in combustion chambers. In addition to the study of the different concepts, two workshops were conducted to clarify some of the issues. The first workshop centered on Falk-Ruppel's new 'dynamics' concept, while the second one concentrated on Straub's AT. In this report brief summaries of the reviewed philosophies are presented and compared with the classical Navier-Stokes formulation in a tabular arrangement. Also the highlights of both workshops are addressed.

  9. Process simulation in the pharmaceutical industry: a review of some basic physical models.

    PubMed

    Kremer, D M; Hancock, B C

    2006-03-01

    This study reviews process modeling efforts which have been developed to elucidate the fundamental physical process underlying the manufacture and delivery of pharmaceutical dosage forms. Within the pharmaceutical industry, process models have been applied to a diverse array of physical processes at length and time scales that vary by orders of magnitude. As such, both large-scale continuum and particle-scale discrete approaches will be discussed in this study. Challenges associated with the practical application of process models within the pharmaceutical industry will be discussed, and opportunities for future research will be identified.

  10. Model reduction and physical understanding of slowly oscillating processes : the circadian cycle.

    SciTech Connect

    Goussis, Dimitris A.; Najm, Habib N.

    2006-01-01

    A differential system that models the circadian rhythm in Drosophila is analyzed with the computational singular perturbation (CSP) algorithm. Reduced nonstiff models of prespecified accuracy are constructed, the form and size of which are time-dependent. When compared with conventional asymptotic analysis, CSP exhibits superior performance in constructing reduced models, since it can algorithmically identify and apply all the required order of magnitude estimates and algebraic manipulations. A similar performance is demonstrated by CSP in generating data that allow for the acquisition of physical understanding. It is shown that the processes driving the circadian cycle are (i) mRNA translation into monomer protein, and monomer protein destruction by phosphorylation and degradation (along the largest portion of the cycle); and (ii) mRNA synthesis (along a short portion of the cycle). These are slow processes. Their action in driving the cycle is allowed by the equilibration of the fastest processes; (1) the monomer dimerization with the dimer dissociation (along the largest portion of the cycle); and (2) the net production of monomer+dimmer proteins with that of mRNA (along the short portion of the cycle). Additional results (regarding the time scales of the established equilibria, their origin, the rate limiting steps, the couplings among the variables, etc.) highlight the utility of CSP for automated identification of the important underlying dynamical features, otherwise accessible only for simple systems whose various suitable simplifications can easily be recognized.

  11. KF addition to Cu2SnS3 thin films prepared by sulfurization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Mitsuki; Fujimoto, Junya; Yamaguchi, Toshiyuki; Sasano, Junji; Izaki, Masanobu

    2017-04-01

    Cu2SnS3 thin films were fabricated by sulfurization with KF addition and applied to photovoltaic devices. Two methods, two-stage annealing and the use of four-layer precursors, were employed, and the quantity of NaF and KF and the annealing temperature were changed. By electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), the Cu/Sn mole ratio was found to range from 0.81 to 1.51. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and Raman spectra indicated that the fabricated thin films had a monoclinic Cu2SnS3 structure. The Cu2SnS3 thin films fabricated by two-stage annealing had a close-packed structure and a pinhole-free surface morphology. The best solar cell in this study showed V oc of 293 mV, which surpassed the previously reported value.

  12. Nutrient addition differentially affects ecological processes of Avicennia germinans in nitrogen versus phosphorus limited mangrove ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feller, Ilka C.; Lovelock, C.E.; McKee, K.L.

    2007-01-01

    Nutrient over-enrichment is a major threat to marine environments, but system-specific attributes of coastal ecosystems may result in differences in their sensitivity and susceptibility to eutrophication. We used fertilization experiments in nitrogen (N)- and phosphorus (P)-limited mangrove forests to test the hypothesis that alleviating different kinds of nutrient limitation may have different effects on ecosystem structure and function in natural systems. We compared a broad range of ecological processes to determine if these systems have different thresholds where shifts might occur in nutrient limitation. Growth responses indicated N limitation in Avicennia germinans (black mangrove) forests in the Indian River Lagoon (IRL), Florida, and P limitation at Twin Cays, Belize. When nutrient deficiency was relieved, A. germinans grew out of its stunted form by increasing wood relative to leaf biomass and shoot length relative to lateral growth. At the P-limited site, P enrichment (+P) increased specific leaf area, N resorption, and P uptake, but had no effect on P resorption. At the N-limited site, +N increased both N and P resorption, but did not alter biomass allocation. Herbivory was greater at the P-limited site and was unaffected by +P, whereas +N led to increased herbivory at the N-limited site. The responses to nutrient enrichment depended on the ecological process and limiting nutrient and suggested that N- versus P-limited mangroves do have different thresholds. +P had a greater effect on more ecological processes at Twin Cays than did +N at the IRL, which indicated that the P-limited site was more sensitive to nutrient loading. Because of this sensitivity, eutrophication is more likely to cause a shift in nutrient limitation at P-limited Twin Cays than N-limited IRL. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  13. A digital process for additive manufacturing of occlusal splints: a clinical pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Salmi, Mika; Paloheimo, Kaija-Stiina; Tuomi, Jukka; Ingman, Tuula; Mäkitie, Antti

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a digital process for manufacturing of occlusal splints. An alginate impression was taken from the upper and lower jaws of a patient with temporomandibular disorder owing to cross bite and wear of the teeth, and then digitized using a table laser scanner. The scanned model was repaired using the 3Data Expert software, and a splint was designed with the Viscam RP software. A splint was manufactured from a biocompatible liquid photopolymer by stereolithography. The system employed in the process was SLA 350. The splint was worn nightly for six months. The patient adapted to the splint well and found it comfortable to use. The splint relieved tension in the patient's bite muscles. No sign of tooth wear or significant splint wear was detected after six months of testing. Modern digital technology enables us to manufacture clinically functional occlusal splints, which might reduce costs, dental technician working time and chair-side time. Maximum-dimensional errors of approximately 1 mm were found at thin walls and sharp corners of the splint when compared with the digital model. PMID:23614943

  14. The Circadian Timing System: A Recent Addition in the Physiological Mechanisms Underlying Pathological and Aging Processes

    PubMed Central

    Arellanes-Licea, Elvira; Caldelas, Ivette; De Ita-Pérez, Dalia; Díaz-Muñoz, Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    Experimental findings and clinical observations have strengthened the association between physio-pathologic aspects of several diseases, as well as aging process, with the occurrence and control of circadian rhythms. The circadian system is composed by a principal pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SNC) which is in coordination with a number of peripheral circadian oscillators. Many pathological entities such as metabolic syndrome, cancer and cardiovascular events are strongly connected with a disruptive condition of the circadian cycle. Inadequate circadian physiology can be elicited by genetic defects (mutations in clock genes or circadian control genes) or physiological deficiencies (desynchronization between SCN and peripheral oscillators). In this review, we focus on the most recent experimental findings regarding molecular defects in the molecular circadian clock and the altered coordination in the circadian system that are related with clinical conditions such as metabolic diseases, cancer predisposition and physiological deficiencies associated to jet-lag and shiftwork schedules. Implications in the aging process will be also reviewed. PMID:25489492

  15. Novel approach to DPI carrier lactose with mechanofusion process with additives and evaluation by IGC.

    PubMed

    Kumon, Michiko; Suzuki, Masahiko; Kusai, Akira; Yonemochi, Etsuo; Terada, Katsuhide

    2006-11-01

    The effect of lactose carrier surface property on the inhalation profile of dry powder inhaler (DPI) was evaluated using a micronized drug (Compound A) by inverse gas chromatography (IGC). Mechanofusion with magnesium stearate (Mg-St) or sucrose stearate increased the fine particle fraction (FPF), considered to be due to decrease in the interaction between Compound A and the lactose carrier. The effect of Compound A concentration on FPF was smaller in mechanofusion-processed lactose compared to intact lactose, especially when processed with Mg-St. The relationship between the IGC parameters of the lactose and FPF was also investigated. FPF increased as both the dispersive component of the surface energy and acidity similarity between the lactose carriers and Compound A increased. Although further investigation is necessary, it could be suggested that acidity similarity decreases the interaction between Compound A and lactose, thus contributing to the increase in the FPF. In conclusion, (1) mechanofusion with Mg-St or sucrose stearate could be an effective method to improve FPF of a DPI drug formulation; (2) IGC would be a valuable method to investigate the interaction between a drug and the DPI carrier; and (3) a relationship between surface acidity and inhalation profile was suggested.

  16. Programmer's Guide for FFORM. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Computer Programs and Graphics Capabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Lougenia; Gales, Larry

    This module is part of a series designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. FFORM is a portable format-free input subroutine package written in ANSI Fortran IV…

  17. Applications of the First Law to Ecological Systems. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Thermodynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, R. D.

    These materials were designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. This report describes concepts presented in another module called "The First Law of…

  18. The First Law of Thermodynamics for Ecosystems. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Thermodynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, R. D.

    These materials were designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. This module and a comparison module are concerned with elementary concepts of thermodynamics as…

  19. Calculus-Integration. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Applied Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hertzberg, Richard C.

    These materials were designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. The module is directed toward intermediate undergraduate students of the ecological sciences…

  20. Calculus - Differentiation. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Applied Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hertzberg, Richard C.

    This module is part of a series designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. This module is used to introduce the biology student to differential calculus, a…

  1. A Model of the Creative Process Based on Quantum Physics and Vedic Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Laura Hall

    1988-01-01

    Using tenets from Vedic science and quantum physics, this model of the creative process suggests that the unified field of creation is pure consciousness, and that the development of the creative process within individuals mirrors the creative process within the universe. Rational and supra-rational creative thinking techniques are also described.…

  2. A study of internal structure in components made by additive manufacturing process using 3 D X-ray tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Raguvarun, K. Balasubramaniam, Krishnan Rajagopal, Prabhu; Palanisamy, Suresh; Nagarajah, Romesh; Kapoor, Ajay; Hoye, Nicholas; Curiri, Dominic

    2015-03-31

    Additive manufacturing methods are gaining increasing popularity for rapidly and efficiently manufacturing parts and components in the industrial context, as well as for domestic applications. However, except when used for prototyping or rapid visualization of components, industries are concerned with the load carrying capacity and strength achievable by additive manufactured parts. In this paper, the wire-arc additive manufacturing (AM) process based on gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) has been examined for the internal structure and constitution of components generated by the process. High-resolution 3D X-ray tomography is used to gain cut-views through wedge-shaped parts created using this GTAW additive manufacturing process with titanium alloy materials. In this work, two different control conditions for the GTAW process are considered. The studies reveal clusters of porosities, located in periodic spatial intervals along the sample cross-section. Such internal defects can have a detrimental effect on the strength of the resulting AM components, as shown in destructive testing studies. Closer examination of this phenomenon shows that defect clusters are preferentially located at GTAW traversal path intervals. These results highlight the strong need for enhanced control of process parameters in ensuring components with minimal defects and higher strength.

  3. Effect of additive on electrochemical corrosion properties of plasma electrolytic oxidation coatings formed on CP Ti under different processing frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaei, Mahdi; Dehghanian, Changiz; Vanaki, Mojtaba

    2015-12-01

    The plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating containing zirconium oxide was fabricated on CP Ti at different processing frequencies viz., 100 Hz and 1000 Hz in a (Na2ZrO3, Na2SiO3)-additive containing NaH2PO4-based solution, and long-term electrochemical corrosion behavior of the coatings was studied using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. Electrochemical degradation behavior of two-layered coatings formed at different frequencies was turned out to be governed by concentration of electrolyte additive. With increasing additive concentration, the coating obtained at frequency of 1000 Hz exhibited enhanced corrosion resistance. However, corrosion resistance of the coating prepared at 100 Hz was found to decrease with increased additive, which was attributed to intensified microdischarges damaging the protective effect of inner layer. Nevertheless, the electrolyte additive was found to mitigate the long-term degradation of the coatings to a significant extent.

  4. Combined effect of alkali pretreatment and sodium chloride addition on the olive fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Chammem, N; Kachouri, M; Mejri, M; Peres, C; Boudabous, A; Hamdi, M

    2005-07-01

    Green olives of the Tunisian variety "Meski" were treated according to a Spanish-style green olive preservation process by using an alkaline treatment (1.5, 2 and 2.5% (w/v) NaOH) to eliminate bitterness, combined with different brine concentrations (6, 9 and 12% (w/v) NaCl). A spontaneous fermentation by the environmental microflora took place. Results showed that 2% NaOH solution and 9% sodium chloride brine was an optimal combination inducing the best growth of Lactobacillus species (10(8) CFU/ml) and acidity of 0.726 g lactic acid/100 ml brine. In all trials and independently of the treatment, Lb. plantarum was the most dominant strain of Lactobacillus. Moreover, pretreatment with lye and lactic fermentation of olives contributed to coliform elimination.

  5. Mathematical modeling of physical processes in inorganic chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, H.L.

    1988-01-01

    The first part deals with the rapid calculation of steady-state concentration profiles in contactors using the Purex Process. Most of the computer codes simulating the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel generate the steady-state properties by calculating the transient behavior of the contactors. In this study, the author simulates the steady-state concentration profiles directly without first generating the transient behavior. Two computer codes are developed, PUMA (Plutonium-Uranium-Matrix-Algorithm) and PUNE (Plutonium-Uranium-Non-Equilibrium). The first one simulates the steady-state concentration profiles under conditions of equilibrium mass transfer. The second one accounts for deviations from mass transfer equilibrium. The second part of this dissertation shows how to use the classical trajectory method to study the equilibrium and saddle-point geometries of MX{sub n} (n = 2-7) molecules. Two nuclear potential functions that have the property of invariance to the operations of the permutation group of nuclei in molecules of the general formula MX{sub n} are described. Such potential functions allow equivalent isomers to have equal energies so that various statistical mechanical properties can be simply determined. The first function contains two center interactions between pairs of peripheral atoms and its defined by V(r) = 1/2{Sigma}{sub {alpha}}k{triangle}r{sub {alpha}{mu}}{sup 2} + {Sigma}{sub {alpha}< {beta}} QR{sub {alpha}{beta}}{sup {minus}n} (n = 1,2...). The second function contains two and three center interactions and is defined by V({Theta}) = 1/2{Sigma}{sub {alpha}}K{triangle}{sub {alpha}{mu}}{sup 2} + 1/2{Sigma}{sub {alpha}<{beta}}Qr{sub 0}{sup 2} ({Theta}{sub {alpha}{mu}{beta}} - {pi}){sup 2}.

  6. Experiments to Populate and Validate a Processing Model for Polyurethane Foam: Additional Data for Structural Foams

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Rekha R.; Celina, Mathias C.; Giron, Nicholas Henry; Long, Kevin Nicholas; Russick, Edward M.

    2015-01-01

    We are developing computational models to help understand manufacturing processes, final properties and aging of structural foam, polyurethane PMDI. Th e resulting model predictions of density and cure gradients from the manufacturing process will be used as input to foam heat transfer and mechanical models. BKC 44306 PMDI-10 and BKC 44307 PMDI-18 are the most prevalent foams used in structural parts. Experiments needed to parameterize models of the reaction kinetics and the equations of motion during the foam blowing stages were described for BKC 44306 PMDI-10 in the first of this report series (Mondy et al. 2014). BKC 44307 PMDI-18 is a new foam that will be used to make relatively dense structural supports via over packing. It uses a different catalyst than those in the BKC 44306 family of foams; hence, we expect that the reaction kineti cs models must be modified. Here we detail the experiments needed to characteriz e the reaction kinetics of BKC 44307 PMDI-18 and suggest parameters for the model based on these experiments. In additi on, the second part of this report describes data taken to provide input to the preliminary nonlinear visco elastic structural response model developed for BKC 44306 PMDI-10 foam. We show that the standard cu re schedule used by KCP does not fully cure the material, and, upon temperature elevation above 150°C, oxidation or decomposition reactions occur that alter the composition of the foam. These findings suggest that achieving a fully cured foam part with this formulation may be not be possible through therma l curing. As such, visco elastic characterization procedures developed for curing thermosets can provide only approximate material properties, since the state of the material continuously evolves during tests.

  7. Potential environmental impact of effluents from the artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) byproduct ensiling process using additives.

    PubMed

    Megías, M D; Martínez-Teruel, A; Hérnandez, M R

    1999-06-01

    Three treatments have been tested on canned artichoke byproduct after 50 days of ensilage: formic acid at 20% in doses of 2 mL. kg(-)(1) (FA), cane sugar molasses at 50 g.kg(-)(1) (M), and sodium chloride at 30 g.kg(-)(1) (SC). A fourth batch acted as a control group (C). The nutritive value, fermentation characteristics, environmental pollution effect, and total volume of effluents released have been studied. The highest nutritive value recorded was with SC silage. The use of the additives did not significantly improve the fermentation stability of the silage, but the total production of effluents in each treatment-52.7 (FA), 46.9 (M), and 55.2 (SC)-was significantly lower (P < 0.01) than that of the control group (70.1 L.Tm(-)(1)). The chemical oxygen demand (COD), 117300 mg of O(2).L(-)(1), and the conductivity, 46.4 microOmega(-)(1). cm(-)(1), were significantly higher (P < 0.01) in M and SC, respectively, than in the other group.

  8. The Kinetics and Thermodynamics of the Phenol from Cumene Process: A Physical Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Edward C. M.; Sjoberg, Stephen L.

    1980-01-01

    Presents a physical chemistry experiment demonstrating the differences between thermodynamics and kinetics. The experiment used the formation of phenol and acetone from cumene hydroperoxide, also providing an example of an industrially significant process. (CS)

  9. Analysis of physical-chemical processes governing SSME internal fluid flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, A. K.; Owens, S. F.; Mukerjee, T.; Prakash, C.; Przekwas, A. J.; Kannapel, M.

    1985-01-01

    The basic issues concerning the physical chemical processes of the Space Shuttle Main Engine are discussed. The objectives being to supply the general purpose CFD code PHOENICS and the associated interactive graphics package - GRAFFIC; to demonstrate code usage on SSME related problems; to perform computations and analyses of problems relevant to current and future SSME's; and to participate in the development of new physical models of various processes present in SSME components. These objectives are discussed in detail.

  10. BESIII Physics Data Storing and Processing on HBase and MapReduce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LEI, Xiaofeng; Li, Qiang; Kan, Bowen; Sun, Gongxing; Sun, Zhenyu

    2015-12-01

    In the past years, we have successfully applied Hadoop to high-energy physics analysis. Although, it has not only improved the efficiency of data analysis, but also reduced the cost of cluster building so far, there are still some spaces to be optimized, like inflexible pre-selection, low-efficient random data reading and I/O bottleneck caused by Fuse that is used to access HDFS. In order to change this situation, this paper presents a new analysis platform for high-energy physics data storing and analysing. The data structure is changed from DST tree-like files to HBase according to the features of the data itself and analysis processes, since HBase is more suitable for processing random data reading than DST files and enable HDFS to be accessed directly. A few of optimization measures are taken for the purpose of getting a good performance. A customized protocol is defined for data serializing and desterilizing for the sake of decreasing the storage space in HBase. In order to make full use of locality of data storing in HBase, utilizing a new MapReduce model and a new split policy for HBase regions are proposed in the paper. In addition, a dynamic pluggable easy-to-use TAG (event metadata) based pre-selection subsystem is established. It can assist physicists even to filter out 999%o uninterested data, if the conditions are set properly. This means that a lot of I/O resources can be saved, the CPU usage can be improved and consuming time for data analysis can be reduced. Finally, several use cases are designed, the test results show that the new platform has an excellent performance with 3.4 times faster with pre-selection and 20% faster without preselection, and the new platform is stable and scalable as well.

  11. Processing of noisy magnetotelluric data using digital filters and additional data selection criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontes, S. L.; Harinarayana, T.; Dawes, G. J. K.; Hutton, V. R. S.

    1988-10-01

    Although the magnetotelluric (MT) method is known to be effective and fast in probing the electrical conductivity structure of the Earth at crustal depths, the results are often degraded by industrial and cultural noise. To obtain reliable processed results for modelling, it is first necessary to extract or select the natural signals from the contaminated time series. Various noise-reduction techniques based on digital filters are discussed with special reference to persistent noise signals, e.g. from power lines, DC-operated railways and electrical fences. Both previously suggested techniques (delay-line and notch filtering) and two other procedures (maximum entropy extension and deconvolution filtering) are applied to both synthetic data and to field observations from southern Scotland and the Italian Alps. Better quality data sets and more geophysically acceptable Earth models are shown to result. Noise of a more intermittent nature has recently been observed in MT observations near the development site of the geothermal power station on Milos, Greece. Large highly coherent electromagnetic field signals were observed to coincide with the opening and closure of the valves on the test wells. In this case, meaningful apparent resistivity curves could be obtained from an undisturbed subset of the previously accepted data, which had been selected mainly on the basis of signal power. Delay-line filtering is shown to be superior to notch filtering in eliminating non-sinusoidal noise, while both the MEM extension and the window deconvolution techniques are found to be useful in spike removal. These studies illustrate that use of an automatic data selection procedure should only be undertaken with great care in areas where the cultural noise is high. In such cases, continuous time-domain monitoring of the MT signals is recommended. The appropriate techniques of noise reduction can then be applied.

  12. The Evolving Physical Processes In Interacting Galaxies Traced By Their Spectral Energy Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Howard

    Hernquist et al. models. SEDs for the simulations will be calculated in each case using the SUNRISE radiative transfer code. We will identify the simulation and interacting stage/age that best reproduces each observed merger TMs properties. The results will allow us to refine and test how physical parameters develop in mergers of various kinds, as well as help test the reliability of the simulation assumptions. We will in addition analyze 25 non-interacting galaxies as comparisons. We have already successfully completed the analyses suite on a subset of 31 galaxies in 14 merger groups. This initial set contained all the Keel-Kennicutt mergers for which suitable Herschel data were in the archive when the project began several years ago. Our conclusions, published in Lanz et al. (2013), demonstrate the power of the techniques to trace physical activity across the merger sequence. The conclusions, however, were limited by the small numbers. Today the available dataset is much larger and, with the end of Herschel, is in some sense complete. We propose a focused effort to extend our work to the large sample described. The much larger sample will enable us to reach much firmer statistical conclusions, and to address the processes in intermediate interaction stages across a wider range of galaxy mass-ratios and impact parameters. Our catalog of ~23-band UV-FIR photometry on these 180 (+25) galaxies will constitute a legacy contribution. Our conclusions will have application for mergers in the more distant universe. Our team is expert in the important and difficult issues of data reduction and analysis in the many bands required for this project, in modeling and using Bayesian and other methods to obtain the best fits to the observations from multi-component galaxy models, in the simulations, and in understanding physical processes in galaxies.

  13. 12 CFR 516.220 - If OTS requests additional information to complete my application, how will it process my...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... complete my application, how will it process my application? 516.220 Section 516.220 Banks and Banking... Standard Treatment § 516.220 If OTS requests additional information to complete my application, how will it... your response. OTS will notify you that it has extended the period before the end of the initial...

  14. 12 CFR 116.220 - If the OCC requests additional information to complete my application, how will it process my...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... complete my application, how will it process my application? 116.220 Section 116.220 Banks and Banking... Treatment § 116.220 If the OCC requests additional information to complete my application, how will it... that it has extended the period before the end of the initial 15-day period and will briefly...

  15. 12 CFR 516.220 - If OTS requests additional information to complete my application, how will it process my...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... complete my application, how will it process my application? 516.220 Section 516.220 Banks and Banking... Standard Treatment § 516.220 If OTS requests additional information to complete my application, how will it... your response. OTS will notify you that it has extended the period before the end of the initial...

  16. Shades of Emotion: What the Addition of Sunglasses or Masks to Faces Reveals about the Development of Facial Expression Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberson, Debi; Kikutani, Mariko; Doge, Paula; Whitaker, Lydia; Majid, Asifa

    2012-01-01

    Three studies investigated developmental changes in facial expression processing, between 3 years-of-age and adulthood. For adults and older children, the addition of sunglasses to upright faces caused an equivalent decrement in performance to face inversion. However, younger children showed "better" classification of expressions of faces wearing…

  17. Free Radical Addition Polymerization Kinetics without Steady-State Approximations: A Numerical Analysis for the Polymer, Physical, or Advanced Organic Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iler, H. Darrell; Brown, Amber; Landis, Amanda; Schimke, Greg; Peters, George

    2014-01-01

    A numerical analysis of the free radical addition polymerization system is described that provides those teaching polymer, physical, or advanced organic chemistry courses the opportunity to introduce students to numerical methods in the context of a simple but mathematically stiff chemical kinetic system. Numerical analysis can lead students to an…

  18. Introduction of a pyramid guiding process for general musculoskeletal physical rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Stark, Timothy W

    2006-06-08

    Successful instruction of a complicated subject as Physical Rehabilitation demands organization. To understand principles and processes of such a field demands a hierarchy of steps to achieve the intended outcome. This paper is intended to be an introduction to a proposed pyramid scheme of general physical rehabilitation principles. The purpose of the pyramid scheme is to allow for a greater understanding for the student and patient. As the respected Food Guide Pyramid accomplishes, the student will further appreciate and apply supported physical rehabilitation principles and the patient will understand that there is a progressive method to their functional healing process.

  19. Effects of V2O5 addition on NiZn ferrite synthesized using two-step sintering process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jun; Shi, Gang; Ni, Zheming; Zheng, Li; Chen, Aimin

    2012-06-01

    The combined influence of a two-step sintering (TSS) process and addition of V2O5 on the microstructure and magnetic properties of NiZn ferrite was investigated. As comparison, samples prepared by the conventional single-step sintering (SSS) procedure were also studied. It was found that with 0.3 wt% V2O5 additive, the sample sintered by the two-step sintering process at a high temperature of 1250 °C for 30 min and a lower temperature of 1180 °C for 3 h exhibited more homogeneous microstructure and higher permeability with a high Q-factor. The results showed that the TSS method with suitable additive brought positive improvement of the microstructure and magnetic properties of NiZn ferrite.

  20. Understanding the Interplay Between Neighborhood Structural Factors, Social Processes, and Alcohol Outlets on Child Physical Abuse.

    PubMed

    Freisthler, Bridget; Maguire-Jack, Kathryn

    2015-11-01

    This article seeks to understand the relative influence of neighborhood structural characteristics (e.g., disadvantage) and social processes (e.g., interactions between residents) on child physical abuse. Using multilevel modeling in a sample of 3,023 parents in 194 zip codes, structural characteristics of factor scores representing residential stability and foreign-born Latino males were negatively related to child physical abuse. High proportions of naturalized and Asian/Pacific Islander families were positively related to the frequency of physical abuse. Higher levels of neighborhood social disorder were related to more frequent physical abuse, while higher levels of collective efficacy were related to less frequent physical abuse. Programs designed to alleviate disorder and increase neighborly interactions may be effective at reducing physical abuse. By understanding the relative importance of the demographic characteristics of neighborhoods and the actions and interactions of residents within the neighborhoods, policy and practice can be tailored more effectively to prevent maltreatment.

  1. Physical methods for intracellular delivery: practical aspects from laboratory use to industrial-scale processing.

    PubMed

    Meacham, J Mark; Durvasula, Kiranmai; Degertekin, F Levent; Fedorov, Andrei G

    2014-02-01

    Effective intracellular delivery is a significant impediment to research and therapeutic applications at all processing scales. Physical delivery methods have long demonstrated the ability to deliver cargo molecules directly to the cytoplasm or nucleus, and the mechanisms underlying the most common approaches (microinjection, electroporation, and sonoporation) have been extensively investigated. In this review, we discuss established approaches, as well as emerging techniques (magnetofection, optoinjection, and combined modalities). In addition to operating principles and implementation strategies, we address applicability and limitations of various in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo platforms. Importantly, we perform critical assessments regarding (1) treatment efficacy with diverse cell types and delivered cargo molecules, (2) suitability to different processing scales (from single cell to large populations), (3) suitability for automation/integration with existing workflows, and (4) multiplexing potential and flexibility/adaptability to enable rapid changeover between treatments of varied cell types. Existing techniques typically fall short in one or more of these criteria; however, introduction of micro-/nanotechnology concepts, as well as synergistic coupling of complementary method(s), can improve performance and applicability of a particular approach, overcoming barriers to practical implementation. For this reason, we emphasize these strategies in examining recent advances in development of delivery systems.

  2. Physical Methods for Intracellular Delivery: Practical Aspects from Laboratory Use to Industrial-Scale Processing

    PubMed Central

    Meacham, J. Mark; Durvasula, Kiranmai; Degertekin, F. Levent; Fedorov, Andrei G.

    2015-01-01

    Effective intracellular delivery is a significant impediment to research and therapeutic applications at all processing scales. Physical delivery methods have long demonstrated the ability to deliver cargo molecules directly to the cytoplasm or nucleus, and the mechanisms underlying the most common approaches (microinjection, electroporation, and sonoporation) have been extensively investigated. In this review, we discuss established approaches, as well as emerging techniques (magnetofection, optoinjection, and combined modalities). In addition to operating principles and implementation strategies, we address applicability and limitations of various in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo platforms. Importantly, we perform critical assessments regarding (1) treatment efficacy with diverse cell types and delivered cargo molecules, (2) suitability to different processing scales (from single cell to large populations), (3) suitability for automation/integration with existing workflows, and (4) multiplexing potential and flexibility/adaptability to enable rapid changeover between treatments of varied cell types. Existing techniques typically fall short in one or more of these criteria; however, introduction of micro-/nanotechnology concepts, as well as synergistic coupling of complementary method(s), can improve performance and applicability of a particular approach, overcoming barriers to practical implementation. For this reason, we emphasize these strategies in examining recent advances in development of delivery systems. PMID:23813915

  3. A novel approach for phosphorus recovery and no wasted sludge in enhanced biological phosphorus removal process with external COD addition.

    PubMed

    Xia, Cheng-Wang; Ma, Yun-Jie; Zhang, Fang; Lu, Yong-Ze; Zeng, Raymond J

    2014-01-01

    In enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) process, phosphorus (P) in wastewater is removed via wasted sludge without actual recovery. A novel approach to realize phosphorus recovery with special external chemical oxygen demand (COD) addition in EBPR process was proposed. During the new operating approach period, it was found that (1) no phosphorus was detected in the effluent; (2) with an external addition of 10 % of influent COD amount, 79 % phosphorus in the wastewater influent was recovered; (3) without wasted sludge, the MLVSS concentration in the system increased from 2,010 to 3,400 mg/L and kept stable after day 11 during 24-day operating period. This demonstrates that the novel approach is feasible to realize phosphorus recovery with no wasted sludge discharge in EBPR process. Furthermore, this approach decouples P removal and sludge age, which may enhance the application of membrane bioreactor for P removal.

  4. Effect of Nano-Particle Addition on Grain Structure Evolution of Friction Stir-Processed Al 6061 During Postweld Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Junfeng; Lee, Bing Yang; Du, Zhenglin; Bi, Guijun; Tan, Ming Jen; Wei, Jun

    2016-08-01

    The fabrication of nano-composites is challenging because uniform dispersion of nano-sized reinforcements in metallic substrate is difficult to achieve using powder metallurgy or liquid processing methods. In the present study, Al-based nano-composites reinforced with Al2O3 particles have been successfully fabricated using friction stir processing. The effects of nano-Al2O3 particle addition on grain structure evolution of friction stir-processed Al matrix during post-weld annealing were investigated. It was revealed that the pinning effect of Al2O3 particles retarded grain growth and completely prevented abnormal grain growth during postweld annealing at 470°C. However, abnormal grain growth can still occur when the composite material was annealed at 530°C. The mechanism involved in the grain structure evolution and the effect of nano-sized particle addition on the mechanical properties were discussed therein.

  5. Experimental and modeling study of the effects of multicomponent gas additives on selective non-catalytic reduction process.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qingxi; Wu, Shaohua; Lui, Hui; Liu, Dunyu; Qiu, Penghua

    2009-08-01

    The influence of multicomponent additives on NO reduction by selective non-catalytic reduction process has been investigated experimentally in an electricity-heated tube reactor. The multicomponent additives are composed of two species of CO, CH(4) and H(2), and the molar ratio of their two components varies from 1/3 to 3/1. The results show that all the investigated additives could decrease the optimal temperature for NO reduction effectively, but the contributions of their components are different. The performance of multicomponent additive composed of CO and CH(4) depends mainly on CH(4) component. The function of CO component is shifting the temperature window for NO reduction to lower temperature slightly and narrowing the temperature window a little. The temperature window with multicomponent additive composed of H(2) and CH(4) is distinct from that with its each component, so both H(2) and CH(4) component make important contributions. While the fraction of CO is no more than that of H(2) in multicomponent additives composed of them, the performance of multicomponent additives is dominated by H(2) component; while the fraction of CO becomes larger, the influence of CO component becomes notable. Qualitatively the modeling results using a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism exhibit the same characteristics of the temperature window shift as observed experimentally. By reaction mechanism analysis, the distinct influences of CO, CH(4) or H(2) component on the property of multicomponent additive are mainly caused by the different production rates of (*)OH radical in their own oxidation process.

  6. The problems of solar-terrestrial coupling and new processes introduced to the physics of the ionosphere from the physics of atomic collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avakyan, Sergei

    2010-05-01

    Further progress in research of solar-terrestrial coupling requires better understanding of solar variability influence on the ionosphere. The most powerful manifestations of solar variability are solar flares and geomagnetic storms. During a flare EUV/X-ray irradiations are completely absorbed in the ionosphere producing SID. During geomagnetic storms precipitations of electrons with energy of several keV (and to a lesser extent protons precipitations) from radiation belts and geomagnetosphere produce additional ionization and low latitude auroras. Considering the physics of ionosphere during the last several decades we have been taking into account three novel processes well known in the physics of atomic collisions. These are Auger effect [S. V. Avakyan, The consideration of Auger processes in the upper atmosphere of Earth. In Abstracts of paper presented at the Tenth scien. and techn. Conf. of young specialists of S.I. Vavilov State Optical Institute, 1974, 29-31.], multiple photoionization of upper, valence shell [S.V. Avakyan, The source of O++ ions in the upper atmosphere, 1979, Cosmic Res, 17, 942 - 943] and Rydberg excitation of all the components of upper atmosphere [S.V. Avakyan, The new factor in the physics of solar - terrestrial relations - Rydberg atomic and molecules states. Conf. on Physics of solar-terrestrial relationships, 1994, Almaty, 3 - 5]. In the present paper the results of bringing these new processes in the ionospheric physics are discussed and also its possible role in the physics of solar-terrestrial coupling is considered. Involving these processes to the model estimations allowed us for the first time to come to the following important conclusions: - Auger electrons play the determinant role at the formation of energy spectrum of photoelectrons and secondary auroral electrons at the range above 150 eV; - double photoionization of the outer shell of the oxygen atom (by a single photon) plays a dominant role in the formation of

  7. The Wacker process: inner- or outer-sphere nucleophilic addition? New insights from ab initio molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Comas-Vives, Aleix; Stirling, András; Lledós, Agustí; Ujaque, Gregori

    2010-08-02

    The Wacker process consists of the oxidation of ethylene catalyzed by a Pd(II) complex. The reaction mechanism has been largely debated in the literature; two modes for the nucleophilic addition of water to a Pd-coordinated alkene have been proposed: syn-inner- and anti-outer-sphere mechanisms. These reaction steps have been theoretically evaluated by means of ab initio molecular dynamics combined with metadynamics by placing the [Pd(C(2)H(4))Cl(2)(H(2)O)] complex in a box of water molecules, thereby resembling experimental conditions at low [Cl(-)]. The nucleophilic addition has also been evaluated for the [Pd(C(2)H(4))Cl(3)](-) complex, thus revealing that the water by chloride ligand substitution trans to ethene is kinetically favored over the generally assumed cis species in water. Hence, the resulting trans species can only directly undertake the outer-sphere nucleophilic addition, whereas the inner-sphere mechanism is hindered since the attacking water is located trans to ethene. In addition, all the simulations from the [Pd(C(2)H(4))Cl(2)(H(2)O)] species (either cis or trans) support an outer-sphere mechanism with a free-energy barrier compatible with that obtained experimentally, whereas that for the inner-sphere mechanism is significantly higher. Moreover, additional processes for a global understanding of the Wacker process in solution have also been identified, such as ligand substitutions, proton transfers that involve the aquo ligand, and the importance of the trans effect of the ethylene in the nucleophilic addition attack.

  8. Alternative Processes for Water Reclamation and Solid Waste Processing in a Physical/chemical Bioregenerative Life Support System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Tom D.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on alternative processes for water reclamation and solid waste processing in a physical/chemical-bioregenerative life support system are presented. The main objective is to focus attention on emerging influences of secondary factors (i.e., waste composition, type and level of chemical contaminants, and effects of microorganisms, primarily bacteria) and to constructively address these issues by discussing approaches which attack them in a direct manner.

  9. Intensity Maps Production Using Real-Time Joint Streaming Data Processing From Social and Physical Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kropivnitskaya, Y. Y.; Tiampo, K. F.; Qin, J.; Bauer, M.

    2015-12-01

    Intensity is one of the most useful measures of earthquake hazard, as it quantifies the strength of shaking produced at a given distance from the epicenter. Today, there are several data sources that could be used to determine intensity level which can be divided into two main categories. The first category is represented by social data sources, in which the intensity values are collected by interviewing people who experienced the earthquake-induced shaking. In this case, specially developed questionnaires can be used in addition to personal observations published on social networks such as Twitter. These observations are assigned to the appropriate intensity level by correlating specific details and descriptions to the Modified Mercalli Scale. The second category of data sources is represented by observations from different physical sensors installed with the specific purpose of obtaining an instrumentally-derived intensity level. These are usually based on a regression of recorded peak acceleration and/or velocity amplitudes. This approach relates the recorded ground motions to the expected felt and damage distribution through empirical relationships. The goal of this work is to implement and evaluate streaming data processing separately and jointly from both social and physical sensors in order to produce near real-time intensity maps and compare and analyze their quality and evolution through 10-minute time intervals immediately following an earthquake. Results are shown for the case study of the M6.0 2014 South Napa, CA earthquake that occurred on August 24, 2014. The using of innovative streaming and pipelining computing paradigms through IBM InfoSphere Streams platform made it possible to read input data in real-time for low-latency computing of combined intensity level and production of combined intensity maps in near-real time. The results compare three types of intensity maps created based on physical, social and combined data sources. Here we correlate

  10. Determining the Volume of Additive Solution and Residual Plasma in Whole Blood Filtered and Buffy Coat Processed Red Cell Concentrates

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Andrew; Acker, Jason P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Residual plasma in transfused red cell concentrates (RCCs) has been associated with adverse transfusion outcomes. Despite this, there is no consensus on the standard procedure for measuring residual plasma volume. Methods The volumes of residual plasma and additive solution were measured in RCCs processed using two separation methods: whole blood filtration (WBF) and buffy coat (BC)/RCC filtration. The concentration of mannitol and albumin in RCC components was measured using colorimetric assays. Mannitol concentration was used to calculate additive solution volume. Residual plasma volume was calculated using two methods. Results Calculated RCC supernatant volumes were much lower in BC-processed components compared to WBF-processed components (BC = 97 ± 6 ml, WBF = 109 ± 4 ml; p < 0.05). Calculated additive solution volumes were greater in WBF- than in BC-processed components (BC = 81 ± 4 ml, WBF = 105 ± 2 ml; p < 0.05). Absolute residual plasma volume varied significantly based on the calculation method used. Conclusion Disparity between plasma volume calculation methods was observed. Efforts should be made to standardize residual plasma volume measurement methods in order to accurately assess the impact of residual plasma on transfusion outcomes. PMID:27330533

  11. Physical Alteration of Martian Dust Grains, Its Influence on Detection of Clays and Identification of Aqueous Processes on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Drief, Ahmed; Dyar, Darby

    2003-01-01

    Clays, if present on Mars, have been illusive. Determining whether or not clay minerals and other aqueous alteration species are present on Mars provides key information about the extent and duration of aqueous processes on Mars. The purpose of this study is to characterize in detail changes in the mineral grains resulting from grinding and to assess the influence of physical processes on clay minerals on the surface of Mars. Physical alteration through grinding was shown to greatly affect the structure and a number of properties of antigorite and kaolinite. This project builds on an initial study and includes a combination of SEM, HRTEM, reflectance and M ssbauer spectroscopies. Grain size was found to decrease, as expected, with grinding. In addition, nanophase carbonate, Si-OH and iron oxide species were formed.

  12. Hydro-gel environment and solution additives modify calcite growth mechanism to an accretion process of amorphous nanospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, A.; Kahil, K.; Habraken, W.; Gur, D.; Fratzl, P.; Addadi, L.; Weiner, S.

    2013-12-01

    Various biominerals form via the transformation of a transient amorphous precursor phase into a mature crystalline phase. The mature biominerals usually exhibit morphology reminiscent of aggregated nanoparticles. Although these observations suggest an accretion-based growth process consisting on nanoparticles, the key factors that control the accretion process are unknown. We investigated the transformation of solid amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) into calcite. When plant cystoliths, a biogenic stable ACC phase, are transformed into calcite in vitro by immersion in water, calcite crystals grow in two distinct steps (Gal et al., Angewandte Chemie, 2013). First, rhombohedral crystals grow that show flat facets as expected from ion-by-ion growth. These crystals then grow by the aggregation and crystallization of the original ACC nanospheres leading to a surface morphology dominated by aggregated spheres. The transformation process occurs within an organic hydro-gel that originates from inside the cystoliths. We tested the importance of the gel phase to the transformation process by transforming synthetic ACC into calcite inside various gels. In all the investigated systems: in gelatin, agarose, and pectin gels, calcite crystals grew that showed the nanosphere aggregation morphology. In additional experiments we demonstrated that also other additives, such as phosphate ions and biogenic macromolecules, that slow down ACC dissolution and calcite precipitation from ions can induce the accretion process dominance (see figure attached). These experiments show that although in solution the dominant process is dissolution to ions of the ACC and crystal growth by ion-by-ion mechanism, the presence of an additive that slows the ion-mediated processes makes the ACC nanospheres stable long enough to interact with the crystal surface. As a result, the metastable ACC nanospheres undergo secondary nucleation on the crystal surface without dissolving. These experiments highlight

  13. Feel Good--Be Good: Subject Content and Governing Processes in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohman, Marie; Quennerstedt, Mikael

    2008-01-01

    Background: In this paper a study of both subject "content" and governing "processes" in Swedish physical education is presented. The reason why an analysis of both content and processes is of special interest is that it makes it possible to understand the encounter between the institutional level and the practice of education.…

  14. New Physics search in the processes of the electroweak top quark production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskakov, Alexey; Boos, Edward; Bunichev, Vycheslav; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Myagkov, Igor; Perfilov, Maxim; Vorotnikov, Georgy

    2016-10-01

    The processes involving single top quark production have an electroweak nature with unique properties. They are very interesting from both theoretical and experimental points of view. The article contains a brief overview of possible "New Physics" manifestations in the single top quark production processes.

  15. Executive Functions in Learning Processes: Do They Benefit from Physical Activity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barenberg, Jonathan; Berse, Timo; Dutke, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    As executive functions play an essential role in learning processes, approaches capable of enhancing executive functioning are of particular interest to educational psychology. Recently, the hypothesis has been advanced that executive functioning may benefit from changes in neurobiological processes induced by physical activity. The present…

  16. Physical processes involved in strip electrode welding using the method of slatted splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Bushma, V. O.

    2010-12-15

    Physical processes that take place in a strip electrode during welding using the slatted splicing technique are considered. Flowing of the welding current in the electrode is shown to be the key process which determines electrode heating and melting. Technological receipts are proposed that allow obtaining high-quality welds by the method of slatted splicing.

  17. Physical processes and modeling of plasma deposition and hardening of coatings-switched electrical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadyrmetov, A. M.; Sharifullin, S. N.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents the results of simulation of plasma deposition and hardening of coatings in modulating the electrical parameters. Mathematical models are based on physical models of gas-dynamic mechanisms more dynamic and thermal processes of the plasma jet. As an example the modeling of dynamic processes of heterogeneous plasma jet, modulated current pulses indirect arc plasma torch.

  18. Revision Vodcast Influence on Assessment Scores and Study Processes in Secondary Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marencik, Joseph J.

    2012-01-01

    A quasi-experimental switching replications design with matched participants was employed to determine the influence of revision vodcasts, or video podcasts, on students' assessment scores and study processes in secondary physics. This study satisfied a need for quantitative results in the area of vodcast influence on students' learning processes.…

  19. The Inclusion of Science Process Skills in Yemeni Secondary School Physics Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aziz, Majed S.; Zain, Ahmad Nurulazam Md

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare and contrast the science process skills (SPS) included in the 10th-12th grade physics textbooks content utilized in Yemeni schools. The study revealed weaknesses and strengths in the textbooks' content. For instance, a number of science process skills (SPS), such as measuring, predicting and hypothesizing, have…

  20. Preservation of physical properties of stochastic Maxwell equations with additive noise via stochastic multi-symplectic methods

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chuchu Hong, Jialin Zhang, Liying

    2016-02-01

    Stochastic Maxwell equations with additive noise are a system of stochastic Hamiltonian partial differential equations intrinsically, possessing the stochastic multi-symplectic conservation law. It is shown that the averaged energy increases linearly with respect to the evolution of time and the flow of stochastic Maxwell equations with additive noise preserves the divergence in the sense of expectation. Moreover, we propose three novel stochastic multi-symplectic methods to discretize stochastic Maxwell equations in order to investigate the preservation of these properties numerically. We make theoretical discussions and comparisons on all of the three methods to observe that all of them preserve the corresponding discrete version of the averaged divergence. Meanwhile, we obtain the corresponding dissipative property of the discrete averaged energy satisfied by each method. Especially, the evolution rates of the averaged energies for all of the three methods are derived which are in accordance with the continuous case. Numerical experiments are performed to verify our theoretical results.

  1. The work of the European Union Reference Laboratory for Food Additives (EURL) and its support for the authorisation process of feed additives in the European Union: a review

    PubMed Central

    von Holst, Christoph; Robouch, Piotr; Bellorini, Stefano; de la Huebra, María José González; Ezerskis, Zigmas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This paper describes the operation of the European Union Reference Laboratory for Feed Additives (EURL) and its role in the authorisation procedure of feed additives in the European Union. Feed additives are authorised according to Regulation (EC) No. 1831/2003, which introduced a completely revised authorisation procedure and also established the EURL. The regulations authorising feed additives contain conditions of use such as legal limits of the feed additives, which require the availability of a suitable method of analysis for official control purposes under real world conditions. It is the task of the EURL to evaluate the suitability of analytical methods as proposed by the industry for this purpose. Moreover, the paper shows that one of the major challenges is the huge variety of the methodology applied in feed additive analysis, thus requiring expertise in quite different analytical areas. In order to cope with this challenge, the EURL is supported by a network of national reference laboratories (NRLs) and only the merged knowledge of all NRLs allows for a scientifically sound assessment of the analytical methods. PMID:26540604

  2. Invited Review Article: Review of post-process optical form metrology for industrial-grade metal additive manufactured parts.

    PubMed

    Stavroulakis, P I; Leach, R K

    2016-04-01

    The scope of this review is to investigate the main post-process optical form measurement technologies available in industry today and to determine whether they are applicable to industrial-grade metal additive manufactured parts. An in-depth review of the operation of optical three-dimensional form measurement technologies applicable to metal additive manufacturing is presented, with a focus on their fundamental limitations. Looking into the future, some alternative candidate measurement technologies potentially applicable to metal additive manufacturing will be discussed, which either provide higher accuracy than currently available techniques but lack measurement volume, or inversely, which operate in the appropriate measurement volume but are not currently accurate enough to be used for industrial measurement.

  3. Invited Review Article: Review of post-process optical form metrology for industrial-grade metal additive manufactured parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavroulakis, P. I.; Leach, R. K.

    2016-04-01

    The scope of this review is to investigate the main post-process optical form measurement technologies available in industry today and to determine whether they are applicable to industrial-grade metal additive manufactured parts. An in-depth review of the operation of optical three-dimensional form measurement technologies applicable to metal additive manufacturing is presented, with a focus on their fundamental limitations. Looking into the future, some alternative candidate measurement technologies potentially applicable to metal additive manufacturing will be discussed, which either provide higher accuracy than currently available techniques but lack measurement volume, or inversely, which operate in the appropriate measurement volume but are not currently accurate enough to be used for industrial measurement.

  4. Processing time of addition or withdrawal of single or combined balance-stabilizing haptic and visual information

    PubMed Central

    Honeine, Jean-Louis; Crisafulli, Oscar; Sozzi, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the integration time of haptic and visual input and their interaction during stance stabilization. Eleven subjects performed four tandem-stance conditions (60 trials each). Vision, touch, and both vision and touch were added and withdrawn. Furthermore, vision was replaced with touch and vice versa. Body sway, tibialis anterior, and peroneus longus activity were measured. Following addition or withdrawal of vision or touch, an integration time period elapsed before the earliest changes in sway were observed. Thereafter, sway varied exponentially to a new steady-state while reweighting occurred. Latencies of sway changes on sensory addition ranged from 0.6 to 1.5 s across subjects, consistently longer for touch than vision, and were regularly preceded by changes in muscle activity. Addition of vision and touch simultaneously shortened the latencies with respect to vision or touch separately, suggesting cooperation between sensory modalities. Latencies following withdrawal of vision or touch or both simultaneously were shorter than following addition. When vision was replaced with touch or vice versa, adding one modality did not interfere with the effect of withdrawal of the other, suggesting that integration of withdrawal and addition were performed in parallel. The time course of the reweighting process to reach the new steady-state was also shorter on withdrawal than addition. The effects of different sensory inputs on posture stabilization illustrate the operation of a time-consuming, possibly supraspinal process that integrates and fuses modalities for accurate balance control. This study also shows the facilitatory interaction of visual and haptic inputs in integration and reweighting of stance-stabilizing inputs. PMID:26334013

  5. Additive Fabrication of Conductive Patterns by a Template Transfer Process Based on Benzotriazole Adsorption As a Separation Layer.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu; Yang, Zhen-Guo

    2016-06-08

    The traditional subtractive process to fabricate conductive patterns is environmentally harmful, wasteful, and limited in line width. The additive process, including direct printing of conductive paste or ink, direct printing of catalytic ink, laser-induced forward transfer, etc., can solve these problems. However, the current additive process also faces many difficulties such as low electrical and adhesion properties, low pattern thickness, high cost, etc. Benzotriazole (BTA), as widely used corrosion inhibitor, can be adsorbed onto a copper surface. The electroplated copper film on BTA-adsorbed copper foil shows poor adhesion. On the basis of this phenomenon, a novel template transfer process to additively fabricate conductive patterns has been developed. A permeant antiadhesive mask is printed on carrier copper foil, and then, BTA is adsorbed onto the exposed area of the carrier foil, thus forming the template. The template is electroplated to grow conductive patterns in the exposed parts, and then can be adhered to the flexible substrate. The substrate is peeled off, with the transfer of the conductive patterns to the substrate, to form the designed conductive patterns on PET. By reimmersing the template into BTA solution, the template can be used again. The mechanism of BTA adsorption and the reason for the low peeling strength are researched using Raman spectra, XPS and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Copper patterns more than 20 μm in thickness can be prepared on PET, the resistivity of the prepared copper patterns is 2.01 μΩ cm, which is about the same as bulk copper, and the peeling strength of the pattern on PET is measured to be 6.97 N/cm. This template transfer process, with no waste, low pollution, high electrical and adhesion properties, and low cost, shows high potential in the large scale manufacturing of electronic devices, such as RFID circuitry, FPCs, etc.

  6. Physical oceanographic processes influence bio-optical properties in the Tasman Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherukuru, Nagur; Davies, Peter L.; Brando, Vittorio E.; Anstee, Janet M.; Baird, Mark E.; Clementson, Lesley A.; Doblin, Martina A.

    2016-04-01

    Remote sensing observations show optical signatures to conform to the physical oceanographic patterns in the Tasman Sea. To test the link between physical oceanographic processes and bio-optical properties we investigated an in situ bio-optical dataset collected in the Tasman Sea. Analysis of in situ observations showed the presence of four different water masses in the Tasman Sea, formed by the relatively warm and saline East Australia Current (EAC) water, a mesoscale cold core eddy on the continental slope, cooler Tasman Sea water on the shelf and river plume water. The distribution of suspended substances and their inherent optical properties in these water masses were distinctly different. Light absorption and attenuation budgets indicate varying optical complexity between the water masses. Specific inherent optical properties of suspended particulate and dissolved substances in each group were different as they were influenced by physical and biogeochemical processes specific to that water mass. Remote sensing reflectance signature varied in response to changing bio-optical properties between the water masses; thus providing the link between physical oceanographic processes, bio-optical properties and the optical signature. Findings presented here extend our knowledge of the Tasman Sea, its optical environment and the role of physical oceanographic processes in influencing the inherent optical properties and remote sensing signature in this complex oceanographic region.

  7. Comparison of strength training, aerobic training, and additional physical therapy as supplementary treatments for Parkinson’s disease: pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Alessandro; Barbirato, Dannyel; Araujo, Narahyana; Martins, Jose Vicente; Cavalcanti, Jose Luiz Sá; Santos, Tony Meireles; Coutinho, Evandro S; Laks, Jerson; Deslandes, Andrea C

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Physical rehabilitation is commonly used in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) to improve their health and alleviate the symptoms. Objective We compared the effects of three programs, strength training (ST), aerobic training (AT), and physiotherapy, on motor symptoms, functional capacity, and electroencephalographic (EEG) activity in PD patients. Methods Twenty-two patients were recruited and randomized into three groups: AT (70% of maximum heart rate), ST (80% of one repetition maximum), and physiotherapy (in groups). Subjects participated in their respective interventions twice a week for 12 weeks. The assessments included measures of disease symptoms (Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale [UPDRS]), functional capacity (Senior Fitness Test), and EEG before and after 12 weeks of intervention. Results The PD motor symptoms (UPDRS-III) in the group of patients who performed ST and AT improved by 27.5% (effect size [ES]=1.25, confidence interval [CI]=−0.11, 2.25) and 35% (ES=1.34, CI=−0.16, 2.58), respectively, in contrast to the physiotherapy group, which showed a 2.9% improvement (ES=0.07, CI=−0.85, 0.99). Furthermore, the functional capacity of all three groups improved after the intervention. The mean frequency of the EEG analysis mainly showed the effect of the interventions on the groups (F=11.50, P=0.0001). Conclusion ST and AT in patients with PD are associated with improved outcomes in disease symptoms and functional capacity. PMID:25609935

  8. Revision Vodcast Influence on Assessment Scores and Study Processes in Secondary Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marencik, Joseph J.

    A quasi-experimental switching replications design with matched participants was employed to determine the influence of revision vodcasts, or video podcasts, on students' assessment scores and study processes in secondary physics. This study satisfied a need for quantitative results in the area of vodcast influence on students' learning processes. Thirty-eight physics students in an urban Ohio public high school participated in the study. The students in one Physics class were paired with students in another Physics class through the matching characteristics of current student cumulative test score mean and baseline study process as measured by the Study Process Questionnaire (SPQ). Students in both classes were given identical pedagogic treatment and access to traditional revision tools except for the supplemental revision vodcasts given to the experimental group. After students in the experimental group viewed the revision vodcast for a particular topic, the assessment scores of the students in the experimental group were compared to the assessment scores of the control group through the direct-difference, D, test to determine any difference between the assessment score means of each group. The SPQ was given at the beginning of the experiment and after each physics assessment. The direct-difference method was again used to determine any difference between the SPQ deep approach scores of each group. The SPQ was also used to determine any correlative effects between study process and revision vodcast use on students' assessment scores through descriptive statistics and an analysis of variance (ANOVA) test. Analysis indicated that revision vodcast use significantly increased students' assessment scores (p<.05), but did not significantly influence students' deep approach to studying ( p>.05). There were no significant correlative effects of revision vodcast use and study processes on students' assessment scores (p>.05). This study offers educators the empirical

  9. Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromley, D. Allan

    1980-01-01

    The author presents the argument that the past few years, in terms of new discoveries, insights, and questions raised, have been among the most productive in the history of physics. Selected for discussion are some of the most important new developments in physics research. (Author/SA)

  10. Physical, Mechanical, and Dry Sliding Wear Properties of Fe-Cr-W-C Hardfacing Alloys Under Different Tungsten Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajihashemi, Mahdi; Shamanian, Morteza; Azimi, Ghasem

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the effects of tungsten on microstructure and wear performance of Fe-Cr-C claddings were evaluated. In this regard, tungsten inert gas surfacing process was employed to deposit Fe-Cr-C and Fe-Cr-C-W hardfacing alloys on plain carbon steel substrate using preplaced powders. Phase composition, microstructure, and wear behavior of clad layers were investigated using X-ray diffraction analysis, optical and scanning electron microscopy, and reciprocating wear tests, respectively. The claddings were well bonded to the substrate and showed a uniform microstructure. Cr7C3 and WC carbides were detected in the deposited layers. Further investigations indicated that the hardness and wear resistance can be improved by adding tungsten into Fe-Cr-C hardfacing alloys.

  11. Effect of amino acid additives on the growth and physical properties of potassium acid phthalate (KAP) crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumaran, A. Elakkina; Kanchana, P.; Sekar, C.

    2012-06-01

    Single crystals of potassium acid phthalate (KAP) have been grown from aqueous solution by slow evaporation technique by adding L-alanine (LA), glycine (Gly) and L-tyrosine (LT) as additives. Powder X-ray diffraction studies confirmed the phase formation and amino acids doping into KAP crystals. The optical absorption studies reveal that the LA doped crystals possess less absorption of visible ray than the pristine, Gly and LT doped KAP crystals. Optical transmission is found to be low in LT doped KAP than in all the other crystals. TG-DTA studies show the decomposition temperatures to be 255 °C, 232 °C, 258 °C and 264 °C for pure, LA, Gly and LT doped KAP crystals respectively. SHG efficiency of LA doped KAP crystal was found to be 1.1 times (31 mV for KDP and 34 mV for LA doped KAP) that of potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystal. This is much higher when compared to that of undoped KAP crystal (12 mV). The grown crystals were also subjected to FTIR, microhardness and dielectric studies.

  12. Physical Processes and Real-Time Chemical Measurement of the Insect Olfactory Environment

    PubMed Central

    Abrell, Leif; Hildebrand, John G.

    2009-01-01

    Odor-mediated insect navigation in airborne chemical plumes is vital to many ecological interactions, including mate finding, flower nectaring, and host locating (where disease transmission or herbivory may begin). After emission, volatile chemicals become rapidly mixed and diluted through physical processes that create a dynamic olfactory environment. This review examines those physical processes and some of the analytical technologies available to characterize those behavior-inducing chemical signals at temporal scales equivalent to the olfactory processing in insects. In particular, we focus on two areas of research that together may further our understanding of olfactory signal dynamics and its processing and perception by insects. First, measurement of physical atmospheric processes in the field can provide insight into the spatiotemporal dynamics of the odor signal available to insects. Field measurements in turn permit aspects of the physical environment to be simulated in the laboratory, thereby allowing careful investigation into the links between odor signal dynamics and insect behavior. Second, emerging analytical technologies with high recording frequencies and field-friendly inlet systems may offer new opportunities to characterize natural odors at spatiotemporal scales relevant to insect perception and behavior. Characterization of the chemical signal environment allows the determination of when and where olfactory-mediated behaviors may control ecological interactions. Finally, we argue that coupling of these two research areas will foster increased understanding of the physicochemical environment and enable researchers to determine how olfactory environments shape insect behaviors and sensory systems. PMID:18548311

  13. Linking process, structure, property, and performance for metal-based additive manufacturing: computational approaches with experimental support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jacob; Xiong, Wei; Yan, Wentao; Lin, Stephen; Cheng, Puikei; Kafka, Orion L.; Wagner, Gregory J.; Cao, Jian; Liu, Wing Kam

    2016-04-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) methods for rapid prototyping of 3D materials (3D printing) have become increasingly popular with a particular recent emphasis on those methods used for metallic materials. These processes typically involve an accumulation of cyclic phase changes. The widespread interest in these methods is largely stimulated by their unique ability to create components of considerable complexity. However, modeling such processes is exceedingly difficult due to the highly localized and drastic material evolution that often occurs over the course of the manufacture time of each component. Final product characterization and validation are currently driven primarily by experimental means as a result of the lack of robust modeling procedures. In the present work, the authors discuss primary detrimental hurdles that have plagued effective modeling of AM methods for metallic materials while also providing logical speculation into preferable research directions for overcoming these hurdles. The primary focus of this work encompasses the specific areas of high-performance computing, multiscale modeling, materials characterization, process modeling, experimentation, and validation for final product performance of additively manufactured metallic components.

  14. Comparison of electron beam and laser beam powder bed fusion additive manufacturing process for high temperature turbine component materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dryepondt, Sebastien N; Pint, Bruce A; Ryan, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The evolving 3D printer technology is now at the point where some turbine components could be additive manufactured (AM) for both development and production purposes. However, this will require a significant evaluation program to qualify the process and components to meet current design and quality standards. The goal of the project was to begin characterization of the microstructure and mechanical properties of Nickel Alloy X (Ni-22Cr-18Fe-9Mo) test bars fabricated by powder bed fusion (PBF) AM processes that use either an electron beam (EB) or laser beam (LB) power source. The AM materials produced with the EB and LB processes displayed significant differences in microstructure and resultant mechanical properties. Accordingly, during the design analysis of AM turbine components, the specific mechanical behavior of the material produced with the selected AM process should be considered. Comparison of the mechanical properties of both the EB and LB materials to those of conventionally processed Nickel Alloy X materials indicates the subject AM materials are viable alternatives for manufacture of some turbine components.

  15. The effect of activated carbon addition on membrane bioreactor processes for wastewater treatment and reclamation - A critical review.

    PubMed

    Skouteris, George; Saroj, Devendra; Melidis, Paraschos; Hai, Faisal I; Ouki, Sabèha

    2015-06-01

    This review concentrates on the effect of activated carbon (AC) addition to membrane bioreactors (MBRs) treating wastewaters. Use of AC-assisted MBRs combines adsorption, biodegradation and membrane filtration. This can lead to advanced removal of recalcitrant pollutants and mitigation of membrane fouling. The relative contribution of adsorption and biodegradation to overall removal achieved by an AC-assisted MBR process can vary, and "biological AC" may not fully develop due to competition of target pollutants with bulk organics in wastewater. Thus periodic replenishment of spent AC is necessary. Sludge retention time (SRT) governs the frequency of spent AC withdrawal and addition of fresh AC, and is an important parameter that significantly influences the performance of AC-assisted MBRs. Of utmost importance is AC dosage because AC overdose may aggravate membrane fouling, increase sludge viscosity, impair mass transfer and reduce sludge dewaterability.

  16. Laser and electron-beam powder-bed additive manufacturing of metallic implants: A review on processes, materials and designs.

    PubMed

    Sing, Swee Leong; An, Jia; Yeong, Wai Yee; Wiria, Florencia Edith

    2016-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM), also commonly known as 3D printing, allows the direct fabrication of functional parts with complex shapes from digital models. In this review, the current progress of two AM processes suitable for metallic orthopaedic implant applications, namely selective laser melting (SLM) and electron beam melting (EBM) are presented. Several critical design factors such as the need for data acquisition for patient-specific design, design dependent porosity for osteo-inductive implants, surface topology of the implants and design for reduction of stress-shielding in implants are discussed. Additive manufactured biomaterials such as 316L stainless steel, titanium-6aluminium-4vanadium (Ti6Al4V) and cobalt-chromium (CoCr) are highlighted. Limitations and future potential of such technologies are also explored.

  17. Dithienobenzodithiophene-Based Small Molecule Organic Solar Cells with over 7% Efficiency via Additive- and Thermal-Annealing-Free Processing.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyeng Gun; Kim, Yu Jin; Lee, Ji Sang; Kim, Yun-Hi; Park, Chan Eon; Kwon, Soon-Ki

    2016-12-21

    Here we introduce a novel small molecule based on dithienobenzodithiophene and rhodanine, DTBDT-Rho, developed to study the effect of the rhodanine substitutuent on small molecule bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. DTBDT-Rho possesses distinct crystalline characteristics, sufficient solubility in chlorinated solvents, and broad absorption properties. Therefore, solution-processed BHJ photovoltaic cells made with DTBDT-Rho:PC71BM blends showed an extremely high power conversion efficiency (PCE; 7.10%); notably, this PCE value was obtained without the use of additives or thermal treatments. To our knowledge, the PCE over 7% is a significantly powerful value among rhodanine-based small molecule BHJ solar cells without additives or thermal treatments.

  18. Effect of sucrose and pectin addition on physical, chemical, thermal and rheological properties of frozen/thawed pineapple pulps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conceição, Márcia Cavalcante; Fernandes, Tatiana Nunes; Prado, Mônica Elisabeth Torres; de Resende, Jaime Vilela

    2012-09-01

    Pectin (0-1.0 g/100 mL) and sucrose (0-20 g/100 mL) were added to pineapple pulp to improve their rheological properties, thermal properties and stability after freezing and thawing processes. The properties of the mixes were characterized before and after freezing and thawing. Samples were frozen at -20°C, and the freeze concentration was evaluated every 60 min. The thawing rate was evaluated at 19°C and quantified by photographic editing and image analysis software. The thawing rates and values for the freeze concentration were leveled out at pectin concentrations above 0.5 g/100 mL pectin, which indicated that pectin functions to maintain structural homogeneity during freezing. In the thawed samples, the plastic viscosity values were leveled out from pectin concentrations (0.25-0.75 g/100 mL) as the sucrose concentration increased when compared to unfrozen samples. The differences between the rheological parameters of the unfrozen and frozen/thawed pulps, the higher yield stress values after thawing were attributed to the size of suspended particles in the pulp. Applications can specify formulations of frozen products containing pectin, where these properties can be handled after thawing the product.

  19. Impact E-Learning Platform Moodle on the Physic's Learning Process in the High School's Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Montealban, Jonas; Ruiz-Chavarria, Gregorio; Gomez-Lozoya, Enrique Armando

    2011-03-01

    As a didactic proposal, moodle e-learning platform was implemented in one of two Physics High School's group at UACH, in order to show how the use of new technologies can improve the learning progress linked to physics concepts. As a result, the first group worked at the same time with inside class activities as well as outside resources from the moodle e-platform. The second group only worked with inside class activities. This teaching application was developed in six sections. Section I defines the educational framework. Section II identifies the key physic's concepts to be studied in each proposed activity. Section III describes the didactic model. Section IV displays the compared results between similarities and differences in both groups. Section VI shows the gathered information in order to be discussed as a topic related on how new technologies improve the Physic's learning process in the high school' students.

  20. Processing-structure-property relationships in electron beam physical vapor deposited yttria stabilized zirconia coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, D. Srinivasa; Valleti, Krishna; Joshi, S. V.; Janardhan, G. Ranga

    2011-05-15

    The physical and mechanical properties of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings deposited by the electron beam physical vapor deposition technique have been investigated by varying the key process variables such as vapor incidence angle and sample rotation speed. The tetragonal zirconia coatings formed under varying process conditions employed were found to have widely different surface and cross-sectional morphologies. The porosity, phase composition, planar orientation, hardness, adhesion, and surface residual stresses in the coated specimens were comprehensively evaluated to develop a correlation with the process variables. Under transverse scratch test conditions, the YSZ coatings exhibited two different crack formation modes, depending on the magnitude of residual stress. The influence of processing conditions on the coating deposition rate, column orientation angle, and adhesion strength has been established. Key relationships between porosity, hardness, and adhesion are also presented.

  1. Predicting Success: A Study of Admission Processes and Passing the National Physical Therapy Examination for Physical Therapist Assistants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaab, Kathryn R.

    2013-01-01

    In order to practice physical therapy, physical therapist assistants (PTAs) must graduate from an accredited academic program and pass the National Physical Therapy Examination for Physical Therapist Assistants (PTA-NPTE). The primary objective of academic programs is to prepare students to successfully complete these two milestones to become…

  2. Development of an Interface for Using EGS4 Physics Processes in Geant4

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, K.

    2004-01-21

    As simulation system, the variety of physics processes implemented is one of the most important functionalities. In that sense, Geant4 is one of the most powerful simulation toolkits. Its flexibility and expansibility brought by object-oriented approach make it possible for us to easily assimilate external simulation packages into the Geant4 system as modules of physics processes. We developed an interface for using EGS4, which is another of the most well-known simulation package for electromagnetic physics, in Geant4. By means of this interface, EGS4 users can share Geant4 powerful resources, such as geometry, tracking, etc. It is also important that it can provide a common environment for comparison tests between EGS4 and Geant4. In this paper, we describe our design and implementation of the interface.

  3. Basic physical and chemical processes in space radiation effects on polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamaratos, E.; Wilson, J. W.; Chang, C. K.; Xu, Y. J.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of space ionizing radiation on polymers is investigated in terms of operative physical and chemical processes. A useful model of charged particle impact with a polymer was designed. Principle paths of molecular relaxation were identified and energy handling processes were considered. The focus of the study was on energy absorption and the immediately following events. Further study of the radiation degradation of polymers is suggested.

  4. Parental Perceptions of Neighborhood Processes, Stress, Personal Control, and Risk for Physical Child Abuse and Neglect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guterman, Neil B.; Lee, Shawna J.; Taylor, Catherine A.; Rathouz, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study set out to examine whether mothers' individual perceptions of their neighborhood social processes predict their risk for physical child abuse and neglect directly and/or indirectly via pathways involving parents' reported stress and sense of personal control in the parenting role. Methods: In-home and phone interview data…

  5. EPR Studies of Spin-Spin Exchange Processes: A Physical Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastman, Michael P.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical background, experimental procedures, and analysis of experimental results are provided for an undergraduate physical chemistry experiment on electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) linewidths. Source of line broadening observed in a spin-spin exchange process between radicals formed in aqueous solutions of potassium peroxylamine…

  6. Study of Some Numerical Phenomena Intervening in the Computer Simulations of Some Physical Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iordache, D. A.; Delsanto, P. P.; Iordache, V.

    2007-04-01

    The mechanisms of the computing schemes leading to the main numerical phenomena: instabilities, divergence or pseudo-convergence, distortions, as well as of the stability and convergence radii, and of the optimization possibilities of the computer simulations of some physical processes were studied by this work.

  7. CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF MELT PROCESSED- AND SOLUTION-CROSS LINKED CORN ZEIN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn zein was cross linked with glutaraldehyde (GDA) and with glacial acetic acid (HAc) as catalyst with the objective to enhance the mechanical properties of poured films which were compared with the physical properties of compression molded tensile bars from melt processed zein with GDA. A reacti...

  8. Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Physical Processes in Human Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Emblem, Kyrre E.; Andronesi, Ovidiu; Rosen, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    The most common malignant primary brain tumor, glioblastoma (GBM) is a devastating disease with a grim prognosis. Patient survival is typically less than 2 years and fewer than 10% of patients survive more than 5 years. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can have great utility in the diagnosis, grading and management of patients with GBM as many of the physical manifestations of the pathological processes in GBM can be visualized and quantified using MRI. Newer MRI techniques such as dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI provide functional information regarding the tumor hemodynamic status. Diffusion MRI can shed light on tumor cellularity and the disruption of white matter tracts in the proximity of tumors. MR spectroscopy can be used to study new tumor tissue markers such as IDH mutations. MRI is helping to noninvasively explore the link between the molecular basis of gliomas and the imaging characteristics of their physical processes. We will review several approaches to MR-based imaging and discuss the potential for these techniques to quantify the physical processes in glioblastoma including tumor cellularity and vascularity, metabolite expression, and patterns of tumor growth and recurrence. We will conclude with challenges and opportunities for further research in applying physical principles to better understand the biological process in this deadly disease. PMID:25183787

  9. Chronic Family Economic Hardship, Family Processes and Progression of Mental and Physical Health Symptoms in Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Tae Kyoung; Wickrama, K. A. S.; Simons, Leslie Gordon

    2013-01-01

    Research has documented the relationship between family stressors such as family economic hardship and marital conflict and adolescents' mental health symptoms, especially depressive symptoms. Few studies, however, have examined the processes whereby supportive parenting lessens this effect and the progression of mental health and physical health…

  10. Hybrid models for the simulation of microstructural evolution influenced by coupled, multiple physical processes.

    SciTech Connect

    Tikare, Veena; Hernandez-Rivera, Efrain; Madison, Jonathan D.; Holm, Elizabeth Ann; Patterson, Burton R.; Homer, Eric R.

    2013-09-01

    Most materials microstructural evolution processes progress with multiple processes occurring simultaneously. In this work, we have concentrated on the processes that are active in nuclear materials, in particular, nuclear fuels. These processes are coarsening, nucleation, differential diffusion, phase transformation, radiation-induced defect formation and swelling, often with temperature gradients present. All these couple and contribute to evolution that is unique to nuclear fuels and materials. Hybrid model that combines elements from the Potts Monte Carlo, phase-field models and others have been developed to address these multiple physical processes. These models are described and applied to several processes in this report. An important feature of the models developed are that they are coded as applications within SPPARKS, a Sandiadeveloped framework for simulation at the mesoscale of microstructural evolution processes by kinetic Monte Carlo methods. This makes these codes readily accessible and adaptable for future applications.

  11. The Impact of Internet Virtual Physics Laboratory Instruction on the Achievement in Physics, Science Process Skills and Computer Attitudes of 10th-Grade Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kun-Yuan; Heh, Jia-Sheng

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare the impact of Internet Virtual Physics Laboratory (IVPL) instruction with traditional laboratory instruction in physics academic achievement, performance of science process skills, and computer attitudes of tenth grade students. One-hundred and fifty students from four classes at one private senior high school in Taoyuan Country, Taiwan, R.O.C. were sampled. All four classes contained 75 students who were equally divided into an experimental group and a control group. The pre-test results indicated that the students' entry-level physics academic achievement, science process skills, and computer attitudes were equal for both groups. On the post-test, the experimental group achieved significantly higher mean scores in physics academic achievement and science process skills. There was no significant difference in computer attitudes between the groups. We concluded that the IVPL had potential to help tenth graders improve their physics academic achievement and science process skills.

  12. Lycopene in tomatoes: chemical and physical properties affected by food processing.

    PubMed

    Shi, J; Le Maguer, M

    2000-01-01

    Lycopene is the pigment principally responsible for the characteristic deep-red color of ripe tomato fruits and tomato products. It has attracted attention due to its biological and physicochemical properties, especially related to its effects as a natural antioxidant. Although it has no provitamin A activity, lycopene does exhibit a physical quenching rate constant with singlet oxygen almost twice as high as that of beta-carotene. This makes its presence in the diet of considerable interest. Increasing clinical evidence supports the role of lycopene as a micronutrient with important health benefits, because it appears to provide protection against a broad range of epithelial cancers. Tomatoes and related tomato products are the major source of lycopene compounds, and are also considered an important source of carotenoids in the human diet. Undesirable degradation of lycopene not only affects the sensory quality of the final products, but also the health benefit of tomato-based foods for the human body. Lycopene in fresh tomato fruits occurs essentially in the all-trans configuration. The main causes of tomato lycopene degradation during processing are isomerization and oxidation. Isomerization converts all-trans isomers to cis-isomers due to additional energy input and results in an unstable, energy-rich station. Determination of the degree of lycopene isomerization during processing would provide a measure of the potential health benefits of tomato-based foods. Thermal processing (bleaching, retorting, and freezing processes) generally cause some loss of lycopene in tomato-based foods. Heat induces isomerization of the all-trans to cis forms. The cis-isomers increase with temperature and processing time. In general, dehydrated and powdered tomatoes have poor lycopene stability unless carefully processed and promptly placed in a hermetically sealed and inert atmosphere for storage. A significant increase in the cis-isomers with a simultaneous decrease in the all

  13. Additive Manufacturing of IN100 Superalloy Through Scanning Laser Epitaxy for Turbine Engine Hot-Section Component Repair: Process Development, Modeling, Microstructural Characterization, and Process Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Ranadip; Das, Suman

    2015-09-01

    This article describes additive manufacturing (AM) of IN100, a high gamma-prime nickel-based superalloy, through scanning laser epitaxy (SLE), aimed at the creation of thick deposits onto like-chemistry substrates for enabling repair of turbine engine hot-section components. SLE is a metal powder bed-based laser AM technology developed for nickel-base superalloys with equiaxed, directionally solidified, and single-crystal microstructural morphologies. Here, we combine process modeling, statistical design-of-experiments (DoE), and microstructural characterization to demonstrate fully metallurgically bonded, crack-free and dense deposits exceeding 1000 μm of SLE-processed IN100 powder onto IN100 cast substrates produced in a single pass. A combined thermal-fluid flow-solidification model of the SLE process compliments DoE-based process development. A customized quantitative metallography technique analyzes digital cross-sectional micrographs and extracts various microstructural parameters, enabling process model validation and process parameter optimization. Microindentation measurements show an increase in the hardness by 10 pct in the deposit region compared to the cast substrate due to microstructural refinement. The results illustrate one of the very few successes reported for the crack-free deposition of IN100, a notoriously "non-weldable" hot-section alloy, thus establishing the potential of SLE as an AM method suitable for hot-section component repair and for future new-make components in high gamma-prime containing crack-prone nickel-based superalloys.

  14. EFFECT OF MINOR ADDITIONS OF HYDROGEN TO ARGON SHIELDING GAS WHEN WELDING AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL WITH THE GTAW PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    CANNELL, G.R.

    2004-12-15

    This paper provides the technical basis to conclude that the use of hydrogen containing shielding gases during welding of austenitic stainless steels will not lead to hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) of the weld or weld heat affected zone. Argon-hydrogen gas mixtures, with hydrogen additions up to 35% [1], have been successfully used as the shielding gas in gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) of austenitic stainless steels. The addition of hydrogen improves weld pool wettability, bead shape control, surface cleanliness and heat input. The GTAW process is used extensively for welding various grades of stainless steel and is preferred when a very high weld quality is desired, such as that required for closure welding of nuclear materials packages. The use of argon-hydrogen gas mixtures for high-quality welding is occasionally questioned, primarily because of concern over the potential for HIC. This paper was written specifically to provide a technical basis for using an argon-hydrogen shielding gas in conjunction with the development, at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC), of an ''optimized'' closure welding process for the DOE standardized spent nuclear fuel canister [2]. However, the basis developed here can be applied to other applications in which the use of an argon-hydrogen shielding gas for GTAW welding of austenitic stainless steels is desired.

  15. Understanding salinisation processes for a restored coastal wetland at the Baltic Sea in Germany using Generalised Additive Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selle, Benny; Gräff, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    This contribution reports on the analysis of monitoring data for a 490 ha coastal wetland called Hütelmoor at the Baltic Sea in Germany. Protection measures against sand erosion on the adjacent coastline began in 1963 and stopped seawater intrusions. The wetland was intensively drained and agriculturally used from 1970 until 1989. During the last 25 years, a realignment scheme was implemented which included the termination of beach and dune nourishment, drainage measures as well as agricultural activity. From 2011, water levels and the electrical conductivity were measured for several monitoring wells in the area to better understand the re-salinisation and re-wetting processes including its implications for the development of habitat for flora and fauna. Time series of electrical conductivity were analysed using Generalised Additive Models with additional data on the hydraulic gradient between the water levels in the observation wells and the Baltic sea, rainfall and potential evapotranspiration. Using this analysis, we were able to separate out different processes governing groundwater salinity for the Hütelmoor including dilution from groundwater recharge and seawater intrusion.

  16. Water properties and structure of pork sausages as affected by high-pressure processing and addition of carrot fibre.

    PubMed

    Møller, Sandie M; Grossi, Alberto; Christensen, Mette; Orlien, Vibeke; Søltoft-Jensen, Jakob; Straadt, Ida K; Thybo, Anette K; Bertram, Hanne C

    2011-04-01

    The effects of high-pressure processing (HPP) and addition of carrot fibre on pork sausages have been studied using NMR T₂ relaxometry and measurements of water-binding capacity (WBC) by centrifugation. Significant effects of temperature (raw, 40, 50, or 60 °C), holding time (1s, 3, 6, or 9 min), and addition of carrot fibre on the distribution and mobility of water were found. However, the effect of carrot fibre could not be explained by structural changes in the sausages when examined by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Correlations between T₂ relaxation measurements and WBC determined by centrifugation revealed that T₂ relaxation times were able to explain more than 90% of the variation in WBC for both non-pressure and pressure-treated sausages. However, only 49% of the variation was explained for pressure-treated sausages with carrot fibre, indicating that combining addition of fibre and high pressure treatment causes non-coherent changes in T₂ NMR relaxation times.

  17. High School Roundtable Discussion on the Process and Implications of the Physics TEKS Revision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Hugh

    2008-03-01

    On January 29 - February 2, 2008, several committees appointed by the Texas State Board of Education and consisting of high school and college teachers met in Austin to revise the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) for all high school science courses, including physics, chemistry, integrated physics and chemistry (IPC), biology, astronomy, environmental systems, and aquatic science. Members of the Physics TEKS revision committee were Jill Marshall, Daniel Marble, Jeff Funkhouser, Cheryl Cowley, and Hugh Henderson. The committee members began the process by considering the revision suggestions made by members of TSAAPT during the past year. This session will clarify the TEKS revision process and communicate the changes to the Physics TEKS suggested by the committee, as well as provide a panel discussion on political and policy implications of TEKS revision, implications of TEKS revision for future teachers, and possible implications for physics education at the university level. All pre-college science teachers and college faculty are encouraged to attend and join the discussion. In collaboration with Chris Comer, Science Consultant; Jill Marshall, University of Texas; David Bixler, Angelo State University; and Toni Sauncy, Angelo State University.

  18. The influence of stoichiometry on electrical properties of silicon carbide grown by physical vapor transport process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang

    The purposes of this thesis were to investigate the influence of the vapor phase stoichiometry in the ambient on electrical properties of silicon carbide grown by physical vapor transport (PVT) process in order to provide a better understanding of the nature of the compensation mechanisms in semi-insulating SiC crystals. Standard PVT and hydrogen-assisted PVT processes have been used to grow SiC single crystals. Chemical elemental analysis, contactless resistivity mapping (COREMA), temperature dependent Hall measurements (TDH), deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS), and minority diffusion length measurements were performed to characterize the properties of SiC wafers. The nitrogen contamination, the net carrier concentrations, and the concentrations of the major deep traps in the undoped and nitrogen-doped SiC crystals were found to substantially decrease during the standard PVT growth when moving from seed to tail of the crystal. Addition of hydrogen to the growth ambient changed all the properties in the same direction. As a consequence of the doping and deep traps variations, the electrical properties including resistivity, Fermi energy, and minority carrier lifetime continuously changed during the growth. The results of the hydrogen-assisted PVT growth and the virtual reactor growth modeling indicated that the electrical properties change as a function of stoichiometry in the vapor phase, and the carbon transport efficiency can be enhanced by the reactions of hydrogen with the SiC charge material and the graphite parts of the crucible. Thermodynamic calculation of the vapor phase stoichiometry and the studies of the properties of H2-assisted PVT-grown crystals have shown that hydrogen can be used as a key factor controlling the vapor phase stoichiometry in the PVT process; in this manner the purity, electrical uniformities and the yield of the semi-insulating wafers can be improved to a great extent. The electron mobility values were found unusually low in

  19. Fates of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in aerobic biological treatment processes: the effects of aeration and sludge addition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Hsiang; Yang, Wen-Ben; Yuan, Chung-Shin; Yang, Jun-Chen; Zhao, Qing-Liang

    2014-05-01

    The emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is becoming an environmental issue of increasing concern. As biological treatment has been considered as one important approach for VOC removal, lab-scale batch experiments were conducted in this study to investigate the fates of four chlorinated hydrocarbons, including chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, trichloroethylene (TCE), and tetrachloroethylene (PERC), in the biological treatment processes with respect to the effects of aeration and sludge addition. The VOC concentrations in the phases of air, water, and sludge under four simulated treatment stages (the first sedimentation, the forepart and rear part of aerobic biological treatment, and the second sedimentation) were analyzed. The results were used to understand the three-phase partitioning of these compounds and to estimate their potentials for volatilization and biological sorption and degradation in these technologies with the concept of fugacity. It was observed that the VOCs were mainly present in the water phase through the experiments. The effects of aeration or sludge addition on the fates of these VOCs occurred but appeared to be relatively limited. The concentration distributions of the VOCs were well below the reported partitioning coefficients. It was suggested that these compounds were unsaturated in the air and sludge phases, enhancing their potentials for volatilization and biological sorption/degradation through the processes. However, the properties of these chlorinated VOCs such as the volatility, polarity, or even biodegradability caused by their structural characteristics (e.g., the number of chlorine, saturated or unsaturated) may represent more significant factors for their fates in the aerobic biological treatment processes. These findings prove the complication behind the current knowledge of VOC pollutions in WWTPs and are of help to manage the adverse impacts on the environment and public

  20. Natural physical and biological processes compromise the long-term performance of compacted soil caps

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, E.D.

    1995-12-01

    Compacted soil barriers are components of essentially all caps placed on closed waste disposal sites. The intended functions of soil barriers in waste facility caps include restricting infiltration of water and release of gases and vapors, either independently or in combination with synthetic membrane barriers, and protecting other manmade or natural barrier components. Review of the performance of installed soil barriers and of natural processes affecting their performance indicates that compacted soil caps may function effectively for relatively short periods (years to decades), but natural physical and biological processes can be expected to cause them to fail in the long term (decades to centuries). This paper addresses natural physical and biological processes that compromise the performance of compacted soil caps and suggests measures that may reduce the adverse consequences of these natural failure mechanisms.

  1. Application of Innovative Methods to Optimize the Learning Process in Physics for Medical Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlateva, Genoveva; Tsankova, Emilya

    2010-01-01

    Unlike chemistry and biology courses in the high schools which occupy the attention and interest of students as they need to achieve maximum results of examinations for admission in higher medical schools, physics remains away from their interest. Striving for awakening the interest of medical students to classes in physics and diversification of the learning process requires the continuous search of new forms of organization of this process in order to fulfill the main task of education: optimal development of each student, creating conditions for creative work with the highest possible productivity. Using innovations in teaching physics, aimed at the purpose of training in non-traditional way, transforms the passive learning in an active creative process. This allows rapid identification and compensation of gaps in the knowledge, which in turn leads to a rationalization and a more complete and lasting control of educational content. The aim of the study is analysis and evaluation of the effectiveness of the implementation of innovative educational methods to increase motivation and the quality of teaching physics to students of medicine. The discussion is based on the opinions expressed in surveys of students and results of various forms of feedback.

  2. Sensitivity of movement and intensity of severe cyclone AILA to the physical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambabu, S.; Gayatri Vani, D.; Ramakrishna, S. S. V. S.; Rama, G. V.; Apparao, B. V.

    2013-08-01

    Accurate prediction of movement and intensity of tropical cyclone is still most challenging problem in numerical weather prediction. The positive progress in this field can be achieved by providing network of observations in the storm region and best representation of atmospheric physical processes in the model. In the present study later part was attempted to investigate the sensitivity of movement and intensity of the severe cyclonic storm AILA to different physical processes in the Weather Research and Forecasting model. Three sets of experiments were conducted for convection, microphysics (MP) and planetary boundary layer (PBL) processes. Model-simulated fields like minimum central surface pressure, maximum surface wind, track and vector displacement error are considered to test the sensitivity. The results indicate that the movement of the system is more sensitive to the cumulus physics and the intensity of the cyclone is sensitive to both PBL and cumulus physics. The combination of Betts Miller Janjic (BMJ) for convection, Yonsei University (YSU) for PBL and Purdue Lin (LIN) for microphysics is found to perform better than other combination schemes. The horizontal and vertical features of the system along with its special features like complete northward movement of the system throughout the travel period and the consistent cyclonic storm intensity until 15 hrs after the landfall could be well simulated by the model.

  3. Interacting Physical and Biological Processes Affecting Nutrient Transport Through Human Dominated Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlay, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Human activities increasingly dominate biogeochemical cycles of limiting nutrients on Earth. Urban and agricultural landscapes represent the largest sources of excess nutrients that drive water quality degradation. The physical structure of both urban and agricultural watersheds has been extensively modified, and these changes have large impacts on water and nutrient transport. Despite strong physical controls over nutrient transport in human dominated landscapes, biological processes play important roles in determining the fates of both nitrogen and phosphorus. This talk uses examples from research in urban and agricultural watersheds in the Midwestern USA to illustrate interactions of physical and biological controls over nutrient cycles that have shifted nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) sources and cycling in unexpected ways in response to management changes. In urban watersheds, efforts to improve water quality have been hindered by legacy sources of phosphorus added to storm water through transport to drainage systems by vegetation. Similarly, reductions in field erosion in agricultural watersheds have not led to major reductions in phosphorus transport, because of continued release of biological sources of P. Where management of phosphorus has been most effective in reducing eutrophication of lakes, decreases in N removal processes have led to long term increases in N concentration and transport. Together, these examples show important roles for biological processes affecting nutrient movement in highly modified landscapes. Consideration of the downstream physical and biological responses of management changes are thus critical toward identification of actions that will most effectively reduce excess nutrients watersheds and coastal zones.

  4. Physical processes and the maintenance of nutrient-rich euphotic zones

    SciTech Connect

    Gargett, A.E. )

    1991-12-01

    Oceanic euphotic zones characterized by high macronutrients but low primary productivity are found in the upwelling gyres of the world ocean. This paper reviews the physical processes which interact to maintain high nutrient concentrations in the near-surface ocean in such regions, illustrating the range of relevant forcing functions with regional examples. Predictions of the direction of change of the physical systems in these areas under increasing greenhouse gas concentrations can be based on the present generation of coupled ocean-atmosphere global circulation models, but these results have significant uncertainty.

  5. Modulating the physical microenvironment to study regenerative processes in vitro using cells from mouse phalangeal elements.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Kristen M; Ahsan, Tabassum

    2013-06-01

    Epimorphic regeneration in humans of complex multitissue structures is primarily limited to the digit tip. In a comparable mouse model, the response is level-specific in that regeneration occurs after amputation at the distal end of the terminal phalanx, but not more proximally. Recent isolation of stromal cells from CD1 murine phalangeal elements two and three (P2 and P3) allow for comparative studies of cells prevalent at the amputation plane of a more proximal region (considered nonregenerative) and a more distal region (considered regenerative), respectively. This study used adherent, suspension, and collagen gel cultures to investigate cellular processes relevant to the initial response to injury. Overall, P2 cells were both more migratory and able to compact collagen gels to a greater extent compared to P3 cells. This observed increased capacity of P2 cells to generate traction forces was likely related to the higher expression of key cytoskeletal proteins (e.g., microfilament, nonkeratin intermediate filaments, and microtubules) compared to P3 cells. In contrast, P3 cells were found to be more proliferative than P2 cells under all three culture conditions and to have higher expression of keratin proteins. In addition, when cultured in suspension rather than on adherent surfaces, P3 cells were both more proliferative and had greater gene expression for matrix proteins. Together these results add to the known inherent differences in these stromal cells by characterizing responses to the physical microenvironment. Further, while compaction by P2 cells confirm that collagen gels is a useful model to study wound healing, the response of P3 cells indicate that suspension culture, in which cell-cell interactions dominate like in the blastema, may be better suited to study regeneration. Therefore, this study can help develop clinical strategies for promoting regeneration through increased understanding in the properties of cells involved in endogenous repair as well

  6. Physical Processes of Substorm Onset and Current Disruption Observed by AMPTE/CCE

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.; Lui, A.T.Y.

    1998-03-01

    A new scenario of AMPTE/CCE observation of substorm onset and current disruption and the corresponding physical processes is presented. Toward the end of the late growth phase, plasma beta increases to greater than or equal to 50 and a low-frequency instability with a wave period of 50-75 seconds is excited and grows exponentially to a large amplitude at the onset of current disruption. At the current disruption onset, higher-frequency instabilities are excited so that the plasma and electromagnetic field form a turbulent state. Plasma transport and heating take place to reduce plasma beta and modify the ambient plasma pressure and velocity profiles so that the ambient magnetic field recovers from a tail-like geometry to a more dipole- like geometry. To understand the excitation of the low-frequency global instability, a new theory of kinetic ballooning instability (KBI) is proposed to explain the high critical beta threshold (greater than or equal to 50) of the low-frequency global instability observed by the AMPTE/CCE. The stabilization kinetic effects of trapped electron and finite ion Larmor radii give rise to a large parallel electric field and hence a parallel current that greatly enhances the stabilizing effect of field line tension to the ballooning mode. As a result, the high critical beta threshold for excitation of KBI is greatly increased over the ideal MHD ballooning instability threshold by greater than O(10 squared). The wave-ion magnetic drift resonance effect typically reduces the high critical beta threshold by up to 20% and produces a perturbed resonant ion velocity distribution with a duskward velocity roughly equal to the average ion magnetic drift velocity as the KBI grows to a large amplitude. Higher-frequency instabilities, such as the cross-field current instability (CCI), can be excited by the additional velocity space free energy associated with the positive slope in the perturbed resonant ion velocity distribution.

  7. An analysis of learning process based on scientific approach in physical chemsitry experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arlianty, Widinda Normalia; Febriana, Beta Wulan; Diniaty, Artina

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to analysis the quality of learning process based on scientific approach in physical chemistry experiment of Chemistry Education students, Islamic University of Indonesia. The research was descriptive qualitative. The samples of this research were 2nd semester student, class of 2015. Scientific data of learning process were collected by observation sheet and documentation of seven title experimental. The results showed that the achievement of scientific learning process on observing, questioning, experimenting and associating data were 73.98%; 81.79%; 80.74%; and 76.94% respectively, which categorized as medium. Furthermore, for aspect communicating had high category at 86.11% of level achievement.

  8. Chemical and physical processes in Tank 241-SY-101: A preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-02-01

    Since 1942, chemical and radioactive waste have been stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site. In March 1981 one of the double shell tanks, 241-SY-101 (called 101-SY), began venting large quantities of gas, primarily hydrogen and nitrous oxide. Because of the potential for explosion Westinghouse Hanford Company and the US Department of Energy realized the need for knowledge about the processes occurring in this tank that lead to generation of the gases. In June 1990, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory began assembling a Tank Waste Science Panel to develop a better understanding of the processes occurring the Tank 101-SY. This knowledge is necessary to provide a technically defensible basis for the safety analyses, which will allow the tank contents to be sampled, as well as for the future remediation of the tank and its contents. The Panel concluded that the data available on Tank 101-SY are insufficient to allow the critical chemical and physical processes giving rise to gas formation and release to be unambiguously identified. To provide the needed information the Panel recommends that Tank 101-SY by physically and chemically characterized as fully as possible and as expeditiously as safety considerations allow, and laboratory studies and modeling efforts be undertaken the chemical and physical processes involved in gas generation and release. Finally, the Panel recommends that no remediation steps be taken until there is a better understanding of the chemical and physical phenomena occurring in Tank 101-SY. Premature remediation steps may only serve to compound the problem. Furthermore, such steps may change the chemical and physical characteristics of the tank and prevent a true understanding of the phenomena involved. As a consequence, similar problems in other tanks on the site may not be adequately addressed. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Hierarchical random additive process and logarithmic scaling of generalized high order, two-point correlations in turbulent boundary layer flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X. I. A.; Marusic, I.; Meneveau, C.

    2016-06-01

    Townsend [Townsend, The Structure of Turbulent Shear Flow (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, 1976)] hypothesized that the logarithmic region in high-Reynolds-number wall-bounded flows consists of space-filling, self-similar attached eddies. Invoking this hypothesis, we express streamwise velocity fluctuations in the inertial layer in high-Reynolds-number wall-bounded flows as a hierarchical random additive process (HRAP): uz+=∑i=1Nzai . Here u is the streamwise velocity fluctuation, + indicates normalization in wall units, z is the wall normal distance, and ai's are independently, identically distributed random additives, each of which is associated with an attached eddy in the wall-attached hierarchy. The number of random additives is Nz˜ln(δ /z ) where δ is the boundary layer thickness and ln is natural log. Due to its simplified structure, such a process leads to predictions of the scaling behaviors for various turbulence statistics in the logarithmic layer. Besides reproducing known logarithmic scaling of moments, structure functions, and correlation function [" close="]3/2 uz(x ) uz(x +r ) >, new logarithmic laws in two-point statistics such as uz4(x ) > 1 /2, 1/3, etc. can be derived using the HRAP formalism. Supporting empirical evidence for the logarithmic scaling in such statistics is found from the Melbourne High Reynolds Number Boundary Layer Wind Tunnel measurements. We also show that, at high Reynolds numbers, the above mentioned new logarithmic laws can be derived by assuming the arrival of an attached eddy at a generic point in the flow field to be a Poisson process [Woodcock and Marusic, Phys. Fluids 27, 015104 (2015), 10.1063/1.4905301]. Taken together, the results provide new evidence supporting the essential ingredients of the attached eddy hypothesis to describe streamwise velocity fluctuations of large, momentum transporting eddies in wall-bounded turbulence, while

  10. Addition of telephone coaching to a physiotherapist-delivered physical activity program in people with knee osteoarthritis: A randomised controlled trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    -up assessments will also occur at 12 and 18 months. Discussion The findings will help determine whether the addition of telephone coaching sessions can improve sustainability of outcomes from a physiotherapist-delivered physical activity intervention in people with knee OA. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry reference: ACTRN12612000308897 PMID:23231928

  11. The effect of terebinth (Pistacia terebinthus L.) coffee addition on the chemical and physical characteristics, colour values, organic acid profiles, mineral compositions and sensory properties of ice creams.

    PubMed

    Yüksel, Arzu Kavaz; Şat, Ihsan Güngör; Yüksel, Mehmet

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the effect of terebinth (Pistacia terebinthus L.) coffee addition (0.5, 1 and 2 %) on the chemical and physical properties, colour values, organic acid profiles, mineral contents and sensory characteristics of ice creams. The total solids, fat, titratable acidity, viscosity, first dripping time and complete melting time values, a (*) and b (*) colour properties, citric, lactic, acetic and butyric acid levels and Ca, Cu, Mg, Fe, K, Zn and Na concentrations of ice creams showed an increase with the increment of terebinth coffee amount, while protein, pH, L (*), propionic acid and orotic acid values decreased. However, Al and malic acid were not detected in any of the samples. The overall acceptability scores of the sensory properties showed that the addition of 1 % terebinth coffee to the ice cream was more appreciated by the panellists.

  12. Analysis of the laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing process through experimental measurement and finite element modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, Alexander Jay

    The objective in this work is to provide rigourous experimental measurements to aid in the development of laser powder bed fusion (LPBF) additive manufacturing (AM). A specialized enclosed instrumented measurement system is designed to provide in situ experimental measurements of temperature and distortion. Experiments include comparisons of process parameters, materials and LPBF machines. In situ measurements of distortion and temperature made throughout the build process highlight inter-layer distortion effects previously undocumented for laser powder bed fusion. Results from these experiments are also be implemented in the development and validation of finite element models of the powder bed build process. Experimental analysis is extended from small-scale to larger part-scale builds where experimental post-build measurements are used in analysis of distortion profiles. Experimental results provided from this study are utilized in the validation of a finite element model capable of simulating production scale parts. The validated finite element model is then implemented in the analysis of the part to provide information regarding the distortion evolution process. A combination of experimental measurements and simulation results are used to identify the mechanism that results in the measured distortion profile for this geometry. Optimization of support structure primarily focuses on the minimization of material use and scan time, but no information regarding failure criteria for support structure is available. Tensile test samples of LPBF built support structure are designed, built, and tested to provide measurements of mechanical properties of the support structure. Experimental tests show that LPBF built support structure has only 30-40% of the ultimate tensile strength of solid material built in the same machine. Experimental measurement of LPBF built support structure provides clear failure criteria to be utilized in the future design and implementation of

  13. The Impact of Internet Virtual Physics Laboratory Instruction on the Achievement in Physics, Science Process Skills and Computer Attitudes of 10th-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Kun-Yuan; Heh, Jia-Sheng

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare the impact of Internet Virtual Physics Laboratory (IVPL) instruction with traditional laboratory instruction in physics academic achievement, performance of science process skills, and computer attitudes of tenth grade students. One-hundred and fifty students from four classes at one private…

  14. Remediation of hexavalent chromium contamination in chromite ore processing residue by sodium dithionite and sodium phosphate addition and its mechanism.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunyi; Cundy, Andrew B; Feng, Jingxuan; Fu, Hang; Wang, Xiaojing; Liu, Yangsheng

    2017-05-01

    Large amounts of chromite ore processing residue (COPR) wastes have been deposited in many countries worldwide, generating significant contamination issues from the highly mobile and toxic hexavalent chromium species (Cr(VI)). In this study, sodium dithionite (Na2S2O4) was used to reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III) in COPR containing high available Fe, and then sodium phosphate (Na3PO4) was utilized to further immobilize Cr(III), via a two-step procedure (TSP). Remediation and immobilization processes and mechanisms were systematically investigated using batch experiments, sequential extraction studies, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Results showed that Na2S2O4 effectively reduced Cr(VI) to Cr(III), catalyzed by Fe(III). The subsequent addition of Na3PO4 further immobilized Cr(III) by the formation of crystalline CrPO4·6H2O. However, addition of Na3PO4 simultaneously with Na2S2O4 (via a one-step procedure, OSP) impeded Cr(VI) reduction due to the competitive reaction of Na3PO4 and Na2S2O4 with Fe(III). Thus, the remediation efficiency of the TSP was much higher than the corresponding OSP. Using an optimal dosage in the two-step procedure (Na2S2O4 at a dosage of 12× the stoichiometric requirement for 15 days, and then Na3PO4 in a molar ratio (i.e. Na3PO4: initial Cr(VI)) of 4:1 for another 15 days), the total dissolved Cr in the leachate determined via Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP Cr) testing of our samples was reduced to 3.8 mg/L (from an initial TCLP Cr of 112.2 mg/L, i.e. at >96% efficiency).

  15. Porous calcium polyphosphate bone substitutes: additive manufacturing versus conventional gravity sinter processing-effect on structure and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Hu, Youxin; Shanjani, Yaser; Toyserkani, Ehsan; Grynpas, Marc; Wang, Rizhi; Pilliar, Robert

    2014-02-01

    Porous calcium polyphosphate (CPP) structures proposed as bone-substitute implants and made by sintering CPP powders to form bending test samples of approximately 35 vol % porosity were machined from preformed blocks made either by additive manufacturing (AM) or conventional gravity sintering (CS) methods and the structure and mechanical characteristics of samples so made were compared. AM-made samples displayed higher bending strengths (≈1.2-1.4 times greater than CS-made samples), whereas elastic constant (i.e., effective elastic modulus of the porous structures) that is determined by material elastic modulus and structural geometry of the samples was ≈1.9-2.3 times greater for AM-made samples. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that samples made by either method displayed the same crystal structure forming β-CPP after sinter annealing. The material elastic modulus, E, determined using nanoindentation tests also showed the same value for both sample types (i.e., E ≈ 64 GPa). Examination of the porous structures indicated that significantly larger sinter necks resulted in the AM-made samples which presumably resulted in the higher mechanical properties. The development of mechanical properties was attributed to the different sinter anneal procedures required to make 35 vol % porous samples by the two methods. A primary objective of the present study, in addition to reporting on bending strength and sample stiffness (elastic constant) characteristics, was to determine why the two processes resulted in the observed mechanical property differences for samples of equivalent volume percentage of porosity. An understanding of the fundamental reason(s) for the observed effect is considered important for developing improved processes for preparation of porous CPP implants as bone substitutes for use in high load-bearing skeletal sites.

  16. Examination of the physical processes associated with the keyhole region of variable polarity plasma arc welds in aluminum alloy 2219

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Daniel W.

    1987-01-01

    The morphology and properties of the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) weld composite zone are intimately related to the physical processes associated with the keyhole. This study examined the effects of oxide, halide, and sulfate additions to the weld plate on the keyhole and the weld pool. Changes in both the arc plasma character and the bead morphology were correlated to the chemical environment of the weld. Pool behavior was observed by adding flow markers to actual VPPA welds. A low temperature analog to the welding process was developed. The results of the study indicate that oxygen, even at low partial pressures, can disrupt the stable keyhole and weld pool. The results also indicate that the Marangoni surface tension driven flows dominate the weld pool over the range of welding currents studied.

  17. Effects on nutrient digestion of wheat processing and methods of tallow addition to the diets of lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Espindola, M S; DePeters, E J; Fadel, J G; Zinn, R A; Perez-Monti, H

    1997-06-01

    Five multiparous Holstein cows in midlactation that were fitted with ruminal and duodenal cannulas were used in a 3 x 5 incomplete Latin square. The objective of this study was to examine the effects on nutrient digestion of wheat processing and method of tallow addition to the diets of lactating dairy cows. Diets consisted of 45% forage and 55% concentrate, and each diet contained 20% wheat and 2% tallow (as-fed basis). Treatments were dry-rolled wheat with tallow added to the concentrate, steam-rolled wheat with tallow added to the concentrate, and steam-rolled wheat with tallow added first to the wheat. The dry matter intake; digestion of starch, fiber, and fatty acids; ammonia N concentration; and molar proportions of volatile fatty acids in ruminal fluid were not affected by treatments. The apparent digestibility in the total tract of organic matter and nitrogenous compounds was significantly higher for the steam-rolled treatment with tallow added first to the wheat. Mean ruminal fluid pH was similar across treatments; however, cows fed the diet containing steam-rolled wheat with tallow added first to the wheat had the smallest pH change from 0 to 2 h postfeeding. Milk yield did not differ, regardless of cow diet. Method of tallow addition had marked effects on the apparent digestibility of organic matter and N in the total tract of lactating dairy cows.

  18. Migration of additive molecules in a polymer filament obtained by melt spinning: Influence of the fiber processing steps

    SciTech Connect

    Gesta, E.; Skovmand, O.; Espuche, E. Fulchiron, R.

    2015-12-17

    The purpose of this study is to understand the influence of the yarn processing on the migration of additives molecules, especially insecticide, within polyethylene (PE) yarns. Yarns were manufactured in the laboratory focusing on three key-steps (spinning, post-stretching and heat-setting). Influence of each step on yarn properties was investigated using tensile tests, differential scanning calorimetry and wide-angle X-ray diffraction. The post-stretching step was proved to be critical in defining yarn mechanical and structural properties. Although a first orientation of polyethylene crystals was induced during spinning, the optimal orientation was only reached by post-stretching. The results also showed that the heat-setting did not significantly change these properties. The presence of additives crystals at the yarn surface was evidenced by scanning-electron microscopy. These studies performed at each yarn production step allowed a detailed analysis of the additives’ ability to migrate. It is concluded that while post-stretching decreased the migration rate, heat-setting seems to boost this migration.

  19. Additive-Driven Assembly of Block Copolymer-Nanoparticle Hybrid Materials for Solution Processable Floating Gate Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qingshuo; Lin, Ying; Anderson, Eric; Briseno, Alejandro; Gido, Samuel; Watkins, James

    2012-02-01

    The preparation of well-ordered hybrid materials at nanoscale is not only fundamentally interesting but also of significant importance for the development of next generation functional devices. In this study, we present a simple approach for the preparation of well-ordered polymer/NP composites through the concept of additive-driven assembly, and its application for the fabrication of floating gate organic FET memory devices. The addition of gold NPs that selectively hydrogen bond with pyridine in poly(styrene-b-2-vinyl pyridine) is shown to induce an ordered structure. This enables the fabrication of well-ordered hybrid materials with lamellar domains at Au NP loadings of more than 40 wt%. The fabrication of floating gate memory devices was demonstrated by the ordered Au NPs / block copolymer hybrid film as a charge trapping layer, which is sandwiched between a SiO2 dielectric layer and a poly(3-hexylthiophene) semiconductor layer. This approach enables us to fabricate well-ordered charge storage layers by solution processing and to achieve facile control of the memory windows by changing the density of gold NPs. The devices show high carrier mobility (> 0.1 cm^2/Vs), controllable memory windows (0˜50V), high on/off ratio (>10^5) between memory states and long retention times (>10^4 s). This approach is potentially suitable for roll-to-roll printing techniques to make flexible, large area and high density devices.

  20. Effects of particle size and acid addition on the remediation of chromite ore processing residue using ferrous sulfate.

    PubMed

    Jagupilla, Santhi Chandra; Moon, Deok Hyun; Wazne, Mahmoud; Christodoulatos, Christos; Kim, Min Gyu

    2009-08-30

    A bench-scale treatability study was conducted to assess the effects of particle size and acid addition on the remediation of chromite ore processing residue (COPR) using ferrous sulfate. The remediation scheme entailed the chemical reduction of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] and the mitigation of swell potential. Leaching tests and the EQ3/6 geochemical model were used to estimate the acid dosage required to destabilize Cr(VI)-bearing and swell-causing minerals. The model predicted greater acid dosage than that estimated from the batch leaching tests. This indicated that mass transfer limitation may be playing a significant role in impeding the dissolution of COPR minerals following acid addition and hence hindering the remediation of COPR. Cr(VI) concentrations determined by alkaline digestion for the treated samples were less than the current NJDEP standard. However, Cr(VI) concentrations measured by X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) were greater than those measured by alkaline digestion. Greater Cr(VI) percentages were reduced for acid pretreated and also for smaller particle size COPR samples. Upon treatment, brownmillerite content was greatly reduced for the acid pretreated samples. Conversely, ettringite, a swell-causing mineral, was not observed in the treated COPR.

  1. Advances in chemical and physical properties of electric arc furnace carbon steel slag by hot stage processing and mineral mixing.

    PubMed

    Liapis, Ioannis; Papayianni, Ioanna

    2015-01-01

    Slags are recognised as a highly efficient, cost effective tool in the metal processing industry, by minimising heat losses, reducing metal oxidation through contact with air, removing metal impurities and protecting refractories and graphite electrodes. When compared to natural aggregates for use in the construction industry, slags have higher specific weight that acts as an economic deterrent. A method of altering the specific weight of EAFC slag by hot stage processing and mineral mixing, during steel production is presented in this article. The method has minimal interference with the production process of steel, even by limited additions of appropriate minerals at high temperatures. Five minerals are examined, namely perlite, ladle furnace slag, bauxite, diatomite and olivine. Measurements of specific weight are accompanied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and fluorescence (XRF) analysis and scanning electron microscopy spectral images. It is also shown how altering the chemical composition is expected to affect the furnace refractory lining. Additionally, the process has been repeated for the most suitable mix in gas furnace and physical properties (FI, SI, LA, PSV, AAV, volume stability) examined. Alteration of the specific weight can result in tailoring slag properties for specific applications in the construction sector.

  2. Decoupling the influence of biological and physical processes on the dissolved oxygen in the Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jiabi; Shen, Jian

    2015-01-01

    is instructive and essential to decouple the effects of biological and physical processes on the dissolved oxygen condition, in order to understand their contribution to the interannual variability of hypoxia in Chesapeake Bay since the 1980s. A conceptual bottom DO budget model is applied, using the vertical exchange time scale (VET) to quantify the physical condition and net oxygen consumption rate to quantify biological activities. By combining observed DO data and modeled VET values along the main stem of the Chesapeake Bay, the monthly net bottom DO consumption rate was estimated for 1985-2012. The DO budget model results show that the interannual variations of physical conditions accounts for 88.8% of the interannual variations of observed DO. The high similarity between the VET spatial pattern and the observed DO suggests that physical processes play a key role in regulating the DO condition. Model results also show that long-term VET has a slight increase in summer, but no statistically significant trend is found. Correlations among southerly wind strength, North Atlantic Oscillation index, and VET demonstrate that the physical condition in the Chesapeake Bay is highly controlled by the large-scale climate variation. The relationship is most significant during the summer, when the southerly wind dominates throughout the Chesapeake Bay. The seasonal pattern of the averaged net bottom DO consumption rate (B'20) along the main stem coincides with that of the chlorophyll-a concentration. A significant correlation between nutrient loading and B'20 suggests that the biological processes in April-May are most sensitive to the nutrient loading.

  3. PREFACE: First International Workshop on Nonequilibrium Processes in Plasma Physics and Studies of Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, Z. Lj; Malović, G.; Tasić, M.; Nikitović, Ž.

    2007-06-01

    This volume is a collection of papers associated with a series of invited lectures presented at the First Workshop on Nonequilibrium processes in Plasma Physics and studies of Environment that was held at Mt Kopaonik in August 2006. The workshop originated as a part of the FP6 COE 026328 which had the basic aim of promoting centers of excellence in Western Balkan countries, to facilitate dissemination of their results and to help them establish themselves in the broader arena of European and international science. So the best way to achieve all those goals was to prepare a workshop associated with the local conference SPIG (Symposium on Physics of Ionized Gases) where the participants could attend sessions in which the host Laboratory presented progress reports and papers and thereby gain a full perspective of our results. At the same time this allowed participants in the COE the opportunity to compare their results with the results of external speakers and to gain new perspectives and knowledge. The program of the workshop was augmented by inviting some of our colleagues who visited the COE in recent years or have an active collaboration with a participating member. In that respect this volume is not only a proceedings of the workshop but a collection of papers related to the topic of the workshop: Non-equilibrium phenomena in plasmas and in the science of our environment. The idea is to offer review articles either summarizing a broader area of published or about to be published work or to give overviews showing preliminary results of the works in progress. The refereeing of the papers consisted of two parts, first in selection of the invitees and second in checking the submitted manuscripts. The papers were refereed to the standard of the Journal. As the program of the COE covers a wide area of topics from application of plasmas in nano- electronics to monitoring and removal of pollutants in the atmosphere, so the program of the workshop covered an even broader

  4. PEET: a Matlab tool for estimating physical gate errors in quantum information processing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocker, David; Kosut, Robert; Rabitz, Herschel

    2016-09-01

    A Physical Error Estimation Tool (PEET) is introduced in Matlab for predicting physical gate errors of quantum information processing (QIP) operations by constructing and then simulating gate sequences for a wide variety of user-defined, Hamiltonian-based physical systems. PEET is designed to accommodate the interdisciplinary needs of quantum computing design by assessing gate performance for users familiar with the underlying physics of QIP, as well as those interested in higher-level computing operations. The structure of PEET separates the bulk of the physical details of a system into Gate objects, while the construction of quantum computing gate operations are contained in GateSequence objects. Gate errors are estimated by Monte Carlo sampling of noisy gate operations. The main utility of PEET, though, is the implementation of QuantumControl methods that act to generate and then test gate sequence and pulse-shaping techniques for QIP performance. This work details the structure of PEET and gives instructive examples for its operation.

  5. Validity of Processes of Change in Physical Activity Among College Students in the TIGER Study

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Andrew S.; Bray, Molly S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To test the factorial validity and measurement equivalence/invariance of scales used to measure processes of change derived from the Transtheoretical Model (TTM) applied to physical activity. Methods Confirmatory factor analysis of questionnaire responses obtained from a diverse sample (N=1,429) of students enrolled in the Training Interventions and Genetics of Exercise Response (TIGER) Study at the University of Houston during academic years 2004–2005 through 2007–2008. Cohorts of students (N=1,163) completed the scales at the beginning and end of each Fall semester, permitting longitudinal analysis. Results Theoretically and statistically sound models were developed that support the factorial validity of nine of the ten hypothesized 1st-order factors. A structure of nine correlated 1st order factors or a hierarchical structure of those factors subordinate to two correlated 2nd-order factors were each defensible. Multi-group invariance of each model was confirmed across race/ethnicity groups (African American, Hispanic, non-Hispanic White), gender, age, BMI levels, employment status, physical activity level, and study adherence. Longitudinal invariance across the semester was also confirmed. Conclusion The scores from the scales provide valid assessments that can be used in observational studies of naturally occurring change or in interventions designed to test the usefulness of TTM processes as mediators of change in physical activity among college students. Item content and factor structure require further evaluation in other samples in order to advance TTM theory applied to physical activity. PMID:20734174

  6. Physical activity is associated with cognitive processing speed in persons with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sandroff, Brian M; Dlugonski, Deirdre; Pilutti, Lara A; Pula, John H; Benedict, Ralph H B; Motl, Robert W

    2014-01-01

    The impairment of cognitive processing speed is common, disabling, and poorly managed in multiple sclerosis (MS). This study examined the association between objectively-measured physical activity and cognitive processing speed (CPS) in a large sample of persons with MS. Patients (N=212) underwent two valid neuropsychological tests of CPS, completed the Timed 25-Foot Walk (T25FW), and wore an ActiGraph model GT3X accelerometer during the waking hours of a 7-day period for objectively measuring physical activity as steps/day. Physical activity was significantly associated with CPS (r=.39, p<.01), even when controlling for age, sex, and education (pr=.26, p<.01). This association was attenuated, but still significant after further controlling for T25FW performance (pr=.13, p=.03). Physical activity behavior is positively and independently, albeit weakly, associated with CPS in persons with MS, and may play an important role in managing this aspect of cognition as it does in other outcomes in MS.

  7. Removal of organic and inorganic sulfur from Ohio coal by combined physical and chemical process. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Attia, Y.A.; Zeky, M.El.; Lei, W.W.; Bavarian, F.; Yu, S.

    1989-04-28

    This project consisted of three sections. In the first part, the physical cleaning of Ohio coal by selective flocculation of ultrafine slurry was considered. In the second part, the mild oxidation process for removal of pyritic and organic sulfur.was investigated. Finally, in-the third part, the combined effects of these processes were studied. The physical cleaning and desulfurization of Ohio coal was achieved using selective flocculation of ultrafine coal slurry in conjunction with froth flotation as flocs separation method. The finely disseminated pyrite particles in Ohio coals, in particular Pittsburgh No.8 seam, make it necessary to use ultrafine ({minus}500 mesh) grinding to liberate the pyrite particles. Experiments were performed to identify the ``optimum`` operating conditions for selective flocculation process. The results indicated that the use of a totally hydrophobic flocculant (FR-7A) yielded the lowest levels of mineral matters and total sulfur contents. The use of a selective dispersant (PAAX) increased the rejection of pyritic sulfur further. In addition, different methods of floc separation techniques were tested. It was found that froth flotation system was the most efficient method for separation of small coal flocs.

  8. Additive Manufacturing of 17-4 PH Stainless Steel: Post-processing Heat Treatment to Achieve Uniform Reproducible Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheruvathur, Sudha; Lass, Eric A.; Campbell, Carelyn E.

    2016-03-01

    17-4 precipitation hardenable (PH) stainless steel is a useful material when a combination of high strength and good corrosion resistance up to about 315°C is required. In the wrought form, this steel has a fully martensitic structure that can be strengthened by precipitation of fine Cu-rich face-centered cubic phase upon aging. When fabricated via additive manufacturing (AM), specifically laser powder-bed fusion, 17-4 PH steel exhibits a dendritic structure containing a substantial fraction of nearly 50% of retained austenite along with body centered cubic/martensite and fine niobium carbides preferentially aligned along interdendritic boundaries. The effect of post-build thermal processing on the material microstructure is studied in comparison to that of conventionally produced wrought 17-4 PH with the intention of creating a more uniform, fully martensitic microstructure. The recommended stress relief heat treatment currently employed in industry for post-processing of AM 17-4 PH steel is found to have little effect on the as-built dendritic microstructure. It is found that, by implementing the recommended homogenization heat treatment regimen of Aerospace Materials Specification 5355 for CB7Cu-1, a casting alloy analog to 17-4 PH, the dendritic solidification structure is eliminated, resulting in a microstructure containing about 90% martensite with 10% retained austenite.

  9. Helium processing for deuterium/helium burns in ITER's physics phase

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, P.A.; Sze, D.K.

    1991-01-01

    The requirements for vacuum pumping and fuel processing for deuterium/helium (D/{sup 3}He) burns in the physics operating phase for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) were assessed. These burns are expected to have low fusion power (100 MW), short burn times ({le}30 s), limited operation (2000 shots), and a fractional burn {approximately}0.3%. For the physics phase, the fuel processing system will include several units to separate deuterium and helium (activated charcoal bed, SAES getter and a Pd/Ag diffuser), as well as an isotopic separation system to separate {sup 3}He and {sup 4}He. The needed vacuum system's cryosorption surface area may be as large as 10 m{sup 2} if the burn time is {approximately}200 s, the fractional burn is <0.3%, or the fusion power is >100 MW. 8 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  10. Effect of biomass feedstock chemical and physical properties on energy conversion processes: Volume 1, Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Butner, R.S.; Elliott, D.C.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Pyne, J.W.

    1988-12-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory has completed an initial investigation of the effects of physical and chemical properties of biomass feedstocks relative to their performance in biomass energy conversion systems. Both biochemical conversion routes (anaerobic digestion and ethanol fermentation) and thermochemical routes (combustion, pyrolysis, and gasification) were included in the study. Related processes including chemical and physical pretreatment to improve digestibility, and size and density modification processes such as milling and pelletizing were also examined. This overview report provides background and discussion of feedstock and conversion relationships, along with recommendations for future research. The recommendations include (1) coordinate production and conversion research programs; (2) quantify the relationship between feedstock properties and conversion priorities; (3) develop a common framework for evaluating and characterizing biomass feedstocks; (4) include conversion effects as part of the criteria for selecting feedstock breeding programs; and (5) continue emphasis on multiple feedstock/conversion options for biomass energy systems. 9 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Growth kinetics of physical vapor transport processes: Crystal growth of the optoelectronic material mercurous chloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N. B.; Duval, W. M.

    1991-01-01

    Physical vapor transport processes were studied for the purpose of identifying the magnitude of convective effects on the crystal growth process. The effects of convection on crystal quality were were studied by varying the aspect ratio and those thermal conditions which ultimately affect thermal convection during physical vapor transport. An important outcome of the present study was the observation that the convection growth rate increased up to a certain value and then dropped to a constant value for high aspect ratios. This indicated that a very complex transport had occurred which could not be explained by linear stability theory. Better quality crystals grown at a low Rayleigh number confirmed that improved properties are possible in convectionless environments.

  12. A pox on the mind: Disjunction of attention and memory in the processing of physical disfigurement

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, Joshua M.; Becker, D. Vaughn; Mortensen, Chad R.; Sasaki, Takao; Neuberg, Steven L.; Kenrick, Douglas T.

    2009-01-01

    The unfavorable treatment of people with physical disfigurements is well-documented, yet little is known about basic perceptual and cognitive responses to disfigurement. Here, we identify a specialized pattern of cognitive processing consistent with the hypothesis that disfigurements act as heuristic cues to contagious disease. Disfigurements are often invariant across time and difficult to conceal, and thus observers can detect the presence of such cues without necessarily remembering the particular individuals bearing these cues. Indeed, despite the fact that disfigured faces were especially likely to hold disease-sensitive perceivers’ attention (Study 1), disfigured individuals were often confused with one another and thus not well remembered later (Study 2), revealing a disjunction of the typical relationship between elevated attention and elevated memory. We discuss the implications of our results for stigmatization of people with and without physical abnormalities and suggest the possibility that cognitive mechanisms for processing social information may be functionally tuned to the variant nature of important cues. PMID:19578547

  13. Physical modification and characterization of starch using pregelatinization and co-process of various tubers from Yogyakarta as an excipient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awaluddin, Rizki; Prasetya, Arif Widya; Nugraha, Yayan; Suweleh, Mohammad Fahmi; Kusuma, Aris Perdana; Indrati, Oktavia

    2017-03-01

    Starch is an economical excipient that is used in oral dosage form. It has poor compressibility and flowability. Pregelatinization and co-process as a physical modification technique have been conducted widely; nevertheless, the single modification shows a limitation. This study aims to assess and characterize the starch result of the modification of various tubers by a combination of modification methods. The starches from various tubers were extracted by sedimentation. Starch pregelatinization was conducted by manufacturing a starch suspension and was heated at 55°C for 70 minutes, and then it was mixed using concentrations HPMC k15 of 2, 3, and 4% (w/w) of the starch weight. The evaluations that were conducted are general identification, amylose concentration, physical properties, and physicochemical identification. The obtained starch of the extraction was 10-18% of the fresh tubers, with the concentration of amylose around 21-37%. The shape and particle size of the starch affected the amylose concentration. The starch modification showed an improvement of the granules physical properties by addition of HPMC. The amylose concentration of yam starch was 37.60% and showed the optimum modification result in the addition of HPMC 4%. There were no changes in the physicochemical properties of the result of IR and X-ray diffraction analysis. The melting point of yam starch-HPMC 4% was 151.24°C with reduction of the maximum weight at 328.52°C. This study indicated that the yam starch has the highest amylose concentration with optimum granules result of the modification in addition of HPMC 4% that could be used as an alternative excipient.

  14. Modeling external carbon addition in biological nutrient removal processes with an extension of the international water association activated sludge model.

    PubMed

    Swinarski, M; Makinia, J; Stensel, H D; Czerwionka, K; Drewnowski, J

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to expand the International Water Association Activated Sludge Model No. 2d (ASM2d) to account for a newly defined readily biodegradable substrate that can be consumed by polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (PAOs) under anoxic and aerobic conditions, but not under anaerobic conditions. The model change was to add a new substrate component and process terms for its use by PAOs and other heterotrophic bacteria under anoxic and aerobic conditions. The Gdansk (Poland) wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), which has a modified University of Cape Town (MUCT) process for nutrient removal, provided field data and mixed liquor for batch tests for model evaluation. The original ASM2d was first calibrated under dynamic conditions with the results of batch tests with settled wastewater and mixed liquor, in which nitrate-uptake rates, phosphorus-release rates, and anoxic phosphorus uptake rates were followed. Model validation was conducted with data from a 96-hour measurement campaign in the full-scale WWTP. The results of similar batch tests with ethanol and fusel oil as the external carbon sources were used to adjust kinetic and stoichiometric coefficients in the expanded ASM2d. Both models were compared based on their predictions of the effect of adding supplemental carbon to the anoxic zone of an MUCT process. In comparison with the ASM2d, the new model better predicted the anoxic behaviors of carbonaceous oxygen demand, nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N), and phosphorous (PO4-P) in batch experiments with ethanol and fusel oil. However, when simulating ethanol addition to the anoxic zone of a full-scale biological nutrient removal facility, both models predicted similar effluent NO3-N concentrations (6.6 to 6.9 g N/m3). For the particular application, effective enhanced biological phosphorus removal was predicted by both models with external carbon addition but, for the new model, the effluent PO4-P concentration was approximately one-half of that found from

  15. A Study of the Nature of Students' Models of Microscopic Processes in the Context of Modern Physics Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thacker, Beth Ann

    2003-01-01

    Interviews university students in modern physics about their understanding of three fundamental experiments. Explores their development of models of microscopic processes. Uses interactive demonstrations to probe student understanding of modern physics experiments in two high school physics classes. Analyzes the nature of students' models and the…

  16. Sample data processing in an additive and reproducible taxonomic workflow by using character data persistently linked to preserved individual specimens

    PubMed Central

    Kilian, Norbert; Henning, Tilo; Plitzner, Patrick; Müller, Andreas; Güntsch, Anton; Stöver, Ben C.; Müller, Kai F.; Berendsohn, Walter G.; Borsch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We present the model and implementation of a workflow that blazes a trail in systematic biology for the re-usability of character data (data on any kind of characters of pheno- and genotypes of organisms) and their additivity from specimen to taxon level. We take into account that any taxon characterization is based on a limited set of sampled individuals and characters, and that consequently any new individual and any new character may affect the recognition of biological entities and/or the subsequent delimitation and characterization of a taxon. Taxon concepts thus frequently change during the knowledge generation process in systematic biology. Structured character data are therefore not only needed for the knowledge generation process but also for easily adapting characterizations of taxa. We aim to facilitate the construction and reproducibility of taxon characterizations from structured character data of changing sample sets by establishing a stable and unambiguous association between each sampled individual and the data processed from it. Our workflow implementation uses the European Distributed Institute of Taxonomy Platform, a comprehensive taxonomic data management and publication environment to: (i) establish a reproducible connection between sampled individuals and all samples derived from them; (ii) stably link sample-based character data with the metadata of the respective samples; (iii) record and store structured specimen-based character data in formats allowing data exchange; (iv) reversibly assign sample metadata and character datasets to taxa in an editable classification and display them and (v) organize data exchange via standard exchange formats and enable the link between the character datasets and samples in research collections, ensuring high visibility and instant re-usability of the data. The workflow implemented will contribute to organizing the interface between phylogenetic analysis and revisionary taxonomic or monographic work

  17. Modern meta-heuristics based on nonlinear physics processes: A review of models and design procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salcedo-Sanz, S.

    2016-10-01

    Meta-heuristic algorithms are problem-solving methods which try to find good-enough solutions to very hard optimization problems, at a reasonable computation time, where classical approaches fail, or cannot even been applied. Many existing meta-heuristics approaches are nature-inspired techniques, which work by simulating or modeling different natural processes in a computer. Historically, many of the most successful meta-heuristic approaches have had a biological inspiration, such as evolutionary computation or swarm intelligence paradigms, but in the last few years new approaches based on nonlinear physics processes modeling have been proposed and applied with success. Non-linear physics processes, modeled as optimization algorithms, are able to produce completely new search procedures, with extremely effective exploration capabilities in many cases, which are able to outperform existing optimization approaches. In this paper we review the most important optimization algorithms based on nonlinear physics, how they have been constructed from specific modeling of a real phenomena, and also their novelty in terms of comparison with alternative existing algorithms for optimization. We first review important concepts on optimization problems, search spaces and problems' difficulty. Then, the usefulness of heuristics and meta-heuristics approaches to face hard optimization problems is introduced, and some of the main existing classical versions of these algorithms are reviewed. The mathematical framework of different nonlinear physics processes is then introduced as a preparatory step to review in detail the most important meta-heuristics based on them. A discussion on the novelty of these approaches, their main computational implementation and design issues, and the evaluation of a novel meta-heuristic based on Strange Attractors mutation will be carried out to complete the review of these techniques. We also describe some of the most important application areas, in

  18. Physical Meaning of the Optimum Measurement Process in Quantum Detection Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osaki, Masao; Kozuka, Haruhisa; Hirota, Osamu

    1996-01-01

    The optimum measurement processes are represented as the optimum detection operators in the quantum detection theory. The error probability by the optimum detection operators goes beyond the standard quantum limit automatically. However the optimum detection operators are given by pure mathematical descriptions. In order to realize a communication system overcoming the standard quantum limit, we try to give the physical meaning of the optimum detection operators.

  19. Physics and Process Modeling (PPM) and Other Propulsion R and T. Volume 1; Materials Processing, Characterization, and Modeling; Lifting Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This CP contains the extended abstracts and presentation figures of 36 papers presented at the PPM and Other Propulsion R&T Conference. The focus of the research described in these presentations is on materials and structures technologies that are parts of the various projects within the NASA Aeronautics Propulsion Systems Research and Technology Base Program. These projects include Physics and Process Modeling; Smart, Green Engine; Fast, Quiet Engine; High Temperature Engine Materials Program; and Hybrid Hyperspeed Propulsion. Also presented were research results from the Rotorcraft Systems Program and work supported by the NASA Lewis Director's Discretionary Fund. Authors from NASA Lewis Research Center, industry, and universities conducted research in the following areas: material processing, material characterization, modeling, life, applied life models, design techniques, vibration control, mechanical components, and tribology. Key issues, research accomplishments, and future directions are summarized in this publication.

  20. The Impact of Physical and Ergonomic Hazards on Poultry Abattoir Processing Workers: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Harmse, Johannes L.; Engelbrecht, Jacobus C.; Bekker, Johan L.

    2016-01-01

    The poultry abattoir industry continues to grow and contribute significantly to the gross domestic product in many countries. The industry expects working shifts of eight to eleven hours, during which workers are exposed to occupational hazards which include physical hazards ranging from noise, vibration, exposure to cold and ergonomic stress from manual, repetitive tasks that require force. A PubMed, Medline and Science Direct online database search, using specific keywords was conducted and the results confirmed that physical and ergonomic hazards impact on abattoir processing workers health, with harm not only to workers’ health but also as an economic burden due to the loss of their livelihoods and the need for treatment and compensation in the industry. This review endeavours to highlight the contribution poultry processing plays in the development of physical agents and ergonomic stress related occupational diseases in poultry abattoir processing workers. The impact includes noise-induced hearing loss, increased blood pressure, menstrual and work related upper limb disorders. These are summarised as a quick reference guide for poultry abattoir owners, abattoir workers, poultry associations, occupational hygienists and medical practitioners to assist in the safer management of occupational health in poultry abattoirs. PMID:26861374

  1. The Impact of Physical and Ergonomic Hazards on Poultry Abattoir Processing Workers: A Review.

    PubMed

    Harmse, Johannes L; Engelbrecht, Jacobus C; Bekker, Johan L

    2016-02-06

    The poultry abattoir industry continues to grow and contribute significantly to the gross domestic product in many countries. The industry expects working shifts of eight to eleven hours, during which workers are exposed to occupational hazards which include physical hazards ranging from noise, vibration, exposure to cold and ergonomic stress from manual, repetitive tasks that require force. A PubMed, Medline and Science Direct online database search, using specific keywords was conducted and the results confirmed that physical and ergonomic hazards impact on abattoir processing workers health, with harm not only to workers' health but also as an economic burden due to the loss of their livelihoods and the need for treatment and compensation in the industry. This review endeavours to highlight the contribution poultry processing plays in the development of physical agents and ergonomic stress related occupational diseases in poultry abattoir processing workers. The impact includes noise-induced hearing loss, increased blood pressure, menstrual and work related upper limb disorders. These are summarised as a quick reference guide for poultry abattoir owners, abattoir workers, poultry associations, occupational hygienists and medical practitioners to assist in the safer management of occupational health in poultry abattoirs.

  2. Radiological/Health physics program assessement at Rocky Flats, the process

    SciTech Connect

    Psomas, P.O.

    1996-06-01

    The Department of Energy, Rocky Flats Office, Safety and Health Group, Health Physics Team (HPT) is responsible for oversight of the Radiation Protection and Health Physics Program (RPHP) of the Integrating Management Contractor (IMC), Kaiser-Hill (K-H) operations at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). As of 1 January 1996 the Rocky Flats Plant employed 300 DOE and 4,300 contractor personnel (K-H and their subcontractors). WSI is a subcontractor and provides plant security. To accomplish the RPHP program oversight HPT personnel developed a systematic methodology for performing a functional RPHP Assessment. The initial process included development of a flow diagram identifying all programmatic elements and assessment criteria documents. Formulation of plans for conducting interviews and performance of assessments constituted the second major effort. The generation of assessment reports was the final step, based on the results of this process. This assessment will be a 6 person-year effort, over the next three years. This process is the most comprehensive assessment of any Radiation Protection and Health Physics (RPHP) Program ever performed at Rocky Flats. The results of these efforts will establish a baseline for future RPHP Program assessments at RFETS. This methodology has been well-received by contractor personnel and creates no Privacy Act violations or other misunderstandings.

  3. Selected KSC Applied Physics Lab Responses to Shuttle Processing Measurement Requests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C.

    2010-01-01

    The KSC Applied Physics Lab has been supporting Shuttle Ground Processing for over 20 years by solving problems brought to us by Shuttle personnel. Roughly half of the requests to our lab have been to find ways to make measurements, or to improve on an existing measurement process. This talk will briefly cover: 1) Centering the aft end of the External Tank between the Solid Rocket Boosters; 2) Positioning the GOX Vent Hood over the External Tank; 3) Remote Measurements of External Tank Damage; 4) Strain Measurement in the Orbiter Sling; and 5) Over-center Distance Measurement in an Over-center Mechanism.

  4. Physical Modeling of Contact Processes on the Cutting Tools Surfaces of STM When Turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belozerov, V. A.; Uteshev, M. H.

    2016-08-01

    This article describes how to create an optimization model of the process of fine turning of superalloys and steel tools from STM on CNC machines, flexible manufacturing units (GPM), machining centers. Creation of the optimization model allows you to link (unite) contact processes simultaneously on the front and back surfaces of the tool from STM to manage contact processes and the dynamic strength of the cutting tool at the top of the STM. Established optimization model of management of the dynamic strength of the incisors of the STM in the process of fine turning is based on a previously developed thermomechanical (physical, heat) model, which allows the system thermomechanical approach to choosing brands STM (domestic and foreign) for cutting tools from STM designed for fine turning of heat resistant alloys and steels.

  5. Lifetime effectiveness of mifamurtide addition to chemotherapy in nonmetastatic and metastatic osteosarcoma: a Markov process model analysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun Jin; Lee, Jun Ah; Han, Euna; Lee, Eui-Kyung

    2015-09-01

    The mortality and progression rates in osteosarcoma differ depending on the presence of metastasis. A decision model would be useful for estimating long-term effectiveness of treatment with limited clinical trial data. The aim of this study was to explore the lifetime effectiveness of the addition of mifamurtide to chemotherapy for patients with metastatic and nonmetastatic osteosarcoma. The target population was osteosarcoma patients with or without metastasis. A Markov process model was used, whose time horizon was lifetime with a starting age of 13 years. There were five health states: disease-free (DF), recurrence, post-recurrence disease-free, post-recurrence disease-progression, and death. Transition probabilities of the starting state, DF, were calculated from the INT-0133 clinical trials for chemotherapy with and without mifamurtide. Quality-adjusted life-years (QALY) increased upon addition of mifamurtide to chemotherapy by 10.5 % (10.13 and 9.17 QALY with and without mifamurtide, respectively) and 45.2 % (7.23 and 4.98 QALY with and without mifamurtide, respectively) relative to the lifetime effectiveness of chemotherapy in nonmetastatic and metastatic osteosarcoma, respectively. Life-years gained (LYG) increased by 10.1 % (13.10 LYG with mifamurtide and 11.90 LYG without mifamurtide) in nonmetastatic patients and 42.2 % (9.43 LYG with mifamurtide and 6.63 LYG without mifamurtide) in metastatic osteosarcoma patients. The Markov model analysis showed that chemotherapy with mifamurtide improved the lifetime effectiveness compared to chemotherapy alone in both nonmetastatic and metastatic osteosarcoma. Relative effectiveness of the therapy was higher in metastatic than nonmetastatic osteosarcoma over lifetime. However, absolute lifetime effectiveness was higher in nonmetastatic than metastatic osteosarcoma.

  6. Shining Light on Copper: Unique Opportunities for Visible-Light-Catalyzed Atom Transfer Radical Addition Reactions and Related Processes.

    PubMed

    Reiser, Oliver

    2016-09-20

    Visible-light photoredox catalysis offers exciting opportunities to achieve challenging carbon-carbon bond formations under mild and ecologically benign conditions. Desired features of photoredox catalysts are photostability, long excited-state lifetimes, strong absorption in the visible region, and high reduction or oxidation potentials to achieve electron transfer to substrates, thus generating radicals that can undergo synthetic organic transformations. These requirements are met in a convincing way by Ru(II)(phenanthroline)3- and Ir(III)(phenylpyridine)3-type complexes and, as a low-cost alternative, by organic dyes that offer a metal-free catalyst but suffer in general from lower photostability. Cu(I)(phenanthroline)2 complexes have been recognized for more than 30 years as photoresponsive compounds with highly negative Cu(I)* → Cu(II) oxidation potentials, but nevertheless, they have not been widely considered as suitable photoredox catalysts, mainly because their excited lifetimes are shorter by a factor of 5 to 10 compared with Ru(II) and Ir(III) complexes, their absorption in the visible region is weak, and their low Cu(II) → Cu(I) reduction potentials might impede the closure of a catalytic cycle for a given process. Contrasting again with Ru(II)L3 and Ir(III)L3 complexes, Cu(I)L2 assemblies undergo more rapid ligand exchange in solution, thus potentially reducing the concentration of the photoactive species. Focusing on atom transfer radical addition (ATRA) reactions and related processes, we highlight recent developments that show the utility of Cu(I)(phenanthroline)2 complexes as photoredox catalysts, demonstrating that despite their short excited-state lifetimes and weak absorption such complexes are efficient at low catalyst loadings. Moreover, some of the inherent disadvantages stated above can even be turned to advantages: (1) the low Cu(II) → Cu(I) reduction potential might efficiently promote reactions via a radical chain pathway, and (2

  7. Design of the SHAPE-2 study: the effect of physical activity, in addition to weight loss, on biomarkers of postmenopausal breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Physical inactivity and overweight are two known risk factors for postmenopausal breast cancer. Former exercise intervention studies showed that physical activity influences sex hormone levels, known to be related to postmenopausal breast cancer, mainly when concordant loss of body weight was achieved. The question remains whether there is an additional beneficial effect of physical activity when weight loss is reached. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect attributable to exercise on postmenopausal breast cancer risk biomarkers, when equivalent weight loss is achieved compared with diet-induced weight loss. Design The SHAPE-2 study is a three-armed, multicentre trial. 243 sedentary, postmenopausal women who are overweight or obese (BMI 25–35 kg/m2) are enrolled. After a 4-6 week run-in period, wherein a baseline diet is prescribed, women are randomly allocated to (1) a diet group, (2) an exercise group or (3) a control group. The aim of both intervention groups is to lose an amount of 5–6 kg body weight in 10–14 weeks. The diet group follows an energy restricted diet and maintains the habitual physical activity level. The exercise group participates in a 16-week endurance and strength training programme of 4 hours per week. Furthermore, they are prescribed a moderate caloric restriction. The control group is asked to maintain body weight and continue the run-in baseline diet. Measurements include blood sampling, questionnaires, anthropometrics (weight, height, waist and hip circumference), maximal cycle exercise test (VO2peak), DEXA-scan (body composition) and abdominal MRI (subcutaneous and visceral fat). Primary outcomes are serum levels of oestradiol, oestrone, testosterone and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG). Discussion This study will give insight in the potential attributable effect of physical activity on breast cancer risk biomarkers and whether this effect is mediated by changes in body composition, in postmenopausal

  8. Optimization of palm oil physical refining process for reduction of 3-monochloropropane-1,2-diol (3-MCPD) ester formation.

    PubMed

    Zulkurnain, Musfirah; Lai, Oi Ming; Tan, Soo Choon; Abdul Latip, Razam; Tan, Chin Ping

    2013-04-03

    The reduction of 3-monochloropropane-1,2-diol (3-MCPD) ester formation in refined palm oil was achieved by incorporation of additional processing steps in the physical refining process to remove chloroester precursors prior to the deodorization step. The modified refining process was optimized for the least 3-MCPD ester formation and acceptable refined palm oil quality using response surface methodology (RSM) with five processing parameters: water dosage, phosphoric acid dosage, degumming temperature, activated clay dosage, and deodorization temperature. The removal of chloroester precursors was largely accomplished by increasing the water dosage, while the reduction of 3-MCPD esters was a compromise in oxidative stability and color of the refined palm oil because some factors such as acid dosage, degumming temperature, and deodorization temperature showed contradictory effects. The optimization resulted in 87.2% reduction of 3-MCPD esters from 2.9 mg/kg in the conventional refining process to 0.4 mg/kg, with color and oil stability index values of 2.4 R and 14.3 h, respectively.

  9. A comparison of additional treatment processes to limit particle accumulation and microbial growth during drinking water distribution.

    PubMed

    Liu, G; Lut, M C; Verberk, J Q J C; Van Dijk, J C

    2013-05-15

    Water quality changes, particle accumulation and microbial growth occurring in pilot-scale water distribution systems fed with normally treated and additional treated groundwater were monitored over a period of almost one year. The treatment processes were ranked in the following order: nanofiltration (NF) > (better than) ultrafiltration (UF) > ion exchange (IEX) for limiting particle accumulation. A different order was found for limiting overall microbial growth: NF > IEX > UF. There were strong correlations between particle load and particle accumulation, and between nutrient load and microbial growth. It was concluded that particle accumulation can be controlled by reducing the particle load in water treatment plants; and the microbial growth can be better controlled by limiting organic nutrients rather than removing biomass in water treatment plants. The major focus of this study was on microbial growth. The results demonstrated that growth occurred in all types of treated water, including the phases of bulk water, biofilm and loose deposits. Considering the growth in different phases, similar growth in bulk water was observed for all treatments; NF strongly reduced growth both in loose deposits and in biofilm; UF promoted growth in biofilm, while strongly limiting growth in loose deposits. IEX had good efficiency in between UF and NF, limiting both growths in loose deposits and in biofilm. Significant growth was found in loose deposits, suggesting that loose deposit biomass should be taken into account for growth evaluation and/or prediction. Strong correlations were found between microbial growth and pressure drop in a membrane fouling simulator which proved that a membrane fouling simulator can be a fast growth predictor (within a week). Different results obtained by adenosine triphosphate and flow cytometry cell counts revealed that ATP can accurately describe both suspended and particle-associated biomass, and flow cytometry files of TCC measurements needs

  10. Didactical Reconstruction of Processes in Knowledge Construction: Pre-Service Physics Teachers Learning the Law of Electromagnetic Induction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mantyla, Terhi

    2012-01-01

    In physics teacher education, two central goals are first to learn the structures of physics knowledge, and second the processes of its construction. To know the structure is to know the framework of concepts and laws; to know the processes is to know where the knowledge comes from, how the framework is constructed, and how it can be justified.…

  11. Visual search for conjunctions of physical and numerical size shows that they are processed independently.

    PubMed

    Sobel, Kenith V; Puri, Amrita M; Faulkenberry, Thomas J; Dague, Taylor D

    2017-03-01

    The size congruity effect refers to the interaction between numerical magnitude and physical digit size in a symbolic comparison task. Though this effect is well established in the typical 2-item scenario, the mechanisms at the root of the interference remain unclear. Two competing explanations have emerged in the literature: an early interaction model and a late interaction model. In the present study, we used visual conjunction search to test competing predictions from these 2 models. Participants searched for targets that were defined by a conjunction of physical and numerical size. Some distractors shared the target's physical size, and the remaining distractors shared the target's numerical size. We held the total number of search items fixed and manipulated the ratio of the 2 distractor set sizes. The results from 3 experiments converge on the conclusion that numerical magnitude is not a guiding feature for visual search, and that physical and numerical magnitude are processed independently, which supports a late interaction model of the size congruity effect. (PsycINFO Database Record

  12. Investigation of environmental physical parameters and processes complementing the search for signatures of life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, L.; Horneck, G.; Kochan, H.; Rabbow, E.; Rettberg, P.; Ulamec, S.

    In general, the search for signatures of life on other planets follows different lines: one is to study life in extreme natural environments on the Earth, another one is to perform laboratory experiments under simulated natural conditions in order define the limits for formation and survival of life, and finally space missions to perform in situ measurements on planetary surfaces outside the Earth to look for indicators of extinct or extant life. For the case of the planet Mars, relevant surface conditions are roughly known from orbiter as well as lander missions. In an extrapolation of terrestrial conditions, laboratory studies are conducted on terrestrial biota from extreme environments under various simulated planetary surface conditions in order to investigate general biological survivability as a function of physical and chemical parameters (radiation, UV flux, atmosphere, temperature, humidity, soil properties including mineralogy and toxicity, etc.). This way, physical parameters and processes acting on planetary bodies and their interrelations are studied in parallel with the search for surviving biota. Several suitable test chambers for physical and for biological investigations of this type are available at DLR Cologne. Ultimately, the same physical quantities should be measured concurrently with biological measurements during future planetary landing missions searching for signatures of life. The general question, however, remains whether life on Earth shows any biochemical resemblance with hypothetical life on ancient or modern Mars.

  13. Influence of nano-Cu additive on MgB2 phase formation, processing temperature, and transport properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Neson; Vinod, K.; Rahul, S.; Devadas, K. M.; Thomas, Syju; Pradhan, S.; Syamaprasad, U.

    2011-02-01

    Pure and nano-Cu doped MgB2/Fe superconducting wires were prepared by in situ powder-in-tube method at different temperatures (550-675 °C). The phase formation, microstructure, and transport critical current density of the wires were investigated as a function of the heat-treatment temperature. A small amount of nano-Cu addition (2.5 wt %) was found to dramatically decrease the reaction temperature of magnesium and boron, forming MgB2 without any degradation in the transport critical current. From x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy analyses, it was found that the added Cu form a reacted phase Mg2Cu with Mg which melts at around 550 °C. This liquid phase helps the formation of MgB2 at a significant lower temperature with improved grain connectivity, grain size, and density. All Cu doped samples heat treated in the range of 550-650 °C exhibited a transport JC quite comparable to that of the pure sample processed at 650 °C, which shows that high quality MgB2 conductors can be produced even at 550 °C with minor Cu doping.

  14. A historical review of additives and modifiers used in paving asphalt refining processes in the United States.

    PubMed

    Mundt, Diane J; Adams, Robert C; Marano, Kristin M

    2009-11-01

    The U.S. asphalt paving industry has evolved over time to meet various performance specifications for liquid petroleum asphalt binder (known as bitumen outside the United States). Additives to liquid petroleum asphalt produced in the refinery may affect exposures to workers in the hot mix paving industry. This investigation documented the changes in the composition and distribution of the liquid petroleum asphalt products produced from petroleum refining in the United States since World War II. This assessment was accomplished by reviewing documents and interviewing individual experts in the industry to identify current and historical practices. Individuals from 18 facilities were surveyed; the number of facilities reporting use of any material within a particular class ranged from none to more than half the respondents. Materials such as products of the process stream, polymers, elastomers, and anti-strip compounds have been added to liquid petroleum asphalt in the United States over the past 50 years, but modification has not been generally consistent by geography or time. Modifications made to liquid petroleum asphalt were made generally to improve performance and were dictated by state specifications.

  15. Assessing the addition of mineral processing waste to green waste-derived compost: an agronomic, environmental and economic appraisal.

    PubMed

    Jones, D L; Chesworth, S; Khalid, M; Iqbal, Z

    2009-01-01

    The overall aim of this study was to evaluate the benefit of mixing two large volume wastes, namely mineral processing waste and source-segregated green waste compost, on the growth performance of plants targeted towards high (horticulture/agriculture) and low (amenity/restoration) value markets. The secondary aims were to evaluate the influence of mineral waste type on plant growth performance and to undertake a simple economic analysis of the use of mineral-compost mixtures in land restoration. Our results showed that in comparison to organic wastes, mineral wastes contained a low available nutrient content which reduces compost quality. This is supported by growth trials with tomato, wheat and grass which showed that, irrespective of mineral source, plants performed poorly in compost blended with mineral waste in comparison to those grown in green waste or peat-based compost alone. In terms of consumer confidence, unlike other wastes (e.g. biosolids and construction/demolition waste) the mineral quarry wastes can be expected to be free of potentially toxic elements, however, the production costs of compost-mineral waste mixtures and subsequent transport costs may limit its widespread use. In addition, handling of the material can be difficult under wet conditions and effective blending may require the purchase of specialist equipment. From our results, we conclude that mineral fines may prove useful for low quality, low value landscaping activities close to the source of production but are unsuited to high value markets.

  16. The effect of processing on the surface physical stability of amorphous solid dispersions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ziyi; Nollenberger, Kathrin; Albers, Jessica; Moffat, Jonathan; Craig, Duncan; Qi, Sheng

    2014-11-01

    The focus of this study was to investigate the effect of processing on the surface crystallization of amorphous molecular dispersions and gain insight into the mechanisms underpinning this effect. The model systems, amorphous molecular dispersions of felodipine-EUDRAGIT® E PO, were processed both using spin coating (an ultra-fast solvent evaporation based method) and hot melt extrusion (HME) (a melting based method). Amorphous solid dispersions with drug loadings of 10-90% (w/w) were obtained by both processing methods. Samples were stored under 75% RH/room temperatures for up to 10months. Surface crystallization was observed shortly after preparation for the HME samples with high drug loadings (50-90%). Surface crystallization was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and imaging techniques (SEM, AFM and localized thermal analysis). Spin coated molecular dispersions showed significantly higher surface physical stability than hot melt extruded samples. For both systems, the progress of the surface crystal growth followed zero order kinetics on aging. Drug enrichment at the surfaces of HME samples on aging was observed, which may contribute to surface crystallization of amorphous molecular dispersions. In conclusion it was found the amorphous molecular dispersions prepared by spin coating had a significantly higher surface physical stability than the corresponding HME samples, which may be attributed to the increased process-related apparent drug-polymer solubility and reduced molecular mobility due to the quenching effect caused by the rapid solvent evaporation in spin coating.

  17. Exercise training alone or with the addition of activity counseling improves physical activity levels in COPD: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Lahham, Aroub; McDonald, Christine F; Holland, Anne E

    2016-01-01

    Background Physical inactivity is associated with poor outcomes in COPD, and as a result, interventions to improve physical activity (PA) are a current research focus. However, many trials have been small and inconclusive. Objective The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to study the effects of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) targeting PA in COPD. Methods Databases (Physiotherapy Evidence Database [PEDro], Embase, MEDLINE, CINAHL and the Cochrane Central Register for Controlled Trials) were searched using the following keywords: “COPD”, “intervention” and “physical activity” from inception to May 20, 2016; published RCTs that aimed to increase PA in individuals with COPD were included. The PEDro scale was used to rate study quality. Standardized mean differences (effect sizes, ESs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were determined. Effects of included interventions were also measured according to the minimal important difference (MID) in daily steps for COPD (599 daily steps). Results A total of 37 RCTs with 4,314 participants (mean forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) % predicted 50.5 [SD=10.4]) were identified. Interventions including exercise training (ET; n=3 studies, 103 participants) significantly increased PA levels in COPD compared to standard care (ES [95% CI]; 0.84 [0.44–1.25]). The addition of activity counseling to pulmonary rehabilitation (PR; n=4 studies, 140 participants) showed important effects on PA levels compared to PR alone (0.47 [0.02–0.92]), achieving significant increases that exceeded the MID for daily steps in COPD (mean difference [95% CI], 1,452 daily steps [549–2,356]). Reporting of methodological quality was poor in most included RCTs. Conclusion Interventions that included ET and PA counseling during PR were effective strategies to improve PA in COPD. PMID:27994451

  18. Radiological, physical, and chemical characterization of additional alpha contaminated and mixed low-level waste for treatment at the advanced mixed waste treatment project

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, D.P.

    1995-07-01

    This document provides physical, chemical, and radiological descriptive information for a portion of mixed waste that is potentially available for private sector treatment. The format and contents are designed to provide treatment vendors with preliminary information on the characteristics and properties for additional candidate portions of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and offsite mixed wastes not covered in the two previous characterization reports for the INEL-stored low-level alpha-contaminated and transuranic wastes. This report defines the waste, provides background information, briefly reviews the requirements of the Federal Facility Compliance Act (P.L. 102-386), and relates the Site Treatment Plans developed under the Federal Facility Compliance Act to the waste streams described herein. Each waste is summarized in a Waste Profile Sheet with text, charts, and tables of waste descriptive information for a particular waste stream. A discussion of the availability and uncertainty of data for these waste streams precedes the characterization descriptions.

  19. Reinforcement of acrylic resins for provisional fixed restorations. Part III: effects of addition of titania and zirconia mixtures on some mechanical and physical properties.

    PubMed

    Panyayong, W; Oshida, Y; Andres, C J; Barco, T M; Brown, D T; Hovijitra, S

    2002-01-01

    Acrylic resins have been used in many different applications in dentistry, especially in the fabrication of provisional fixed partial dentures. Ideally, a provisional crown and bridge material should be easy to handle and should protect teeth against physical, chemical, and thermal injuries. Some of the problems associated with this use are related to the material's poor mechanical properties. It has been demonstrated that acrylic resin can be strengthened through the addition of structural component of different size distributed in the acrylic matrix, thus forming a composite structure. The purpose of this study was to investigate the addition effects of mixtures of titania (titanium dioxide, TiO(2)) powder and zirconia (zirconium dioxide, ZrO(2)) powder being incorporated with pre-polymerized beads mixed in monomer liquid, on some mechanical and physical properties of PMMA resin. The pre-polymerized powder poly(methyl methacrylate) resin was admixed with titania and zirconia powder. A mixing ratio was controlled by volume % of 0, 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 (samples with 0 v/o served as control groups). For using mixture of titania and zirconia, total amount of the mixture was controlled by volume % of 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0, in which titania and zirconia were mixed at the ratio 1 :1, 1 :2 and 2 :1. Prior to mechanical tests, all rectangular-shaped samples (25 mm x 2 mm x 5 mm) were stored in 37 degrees C distilled water for 7 days after polishing all six sides of samples. Samples were then subjected to the three-point bending flexion test to evaluate the bending strength as well as the modulus of elasticity. Weight gain and exothermic reaction survey were investigated as well. All data were collected and analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Sidak method (p=0.05). It was found that the addition of particles generally decreased the water absorbed by the composite system. Only 1 percent by volume concentration of 1 :1 ratio and 2 percent by volume concentration

  20. Blooming gelatin: an individual additive for enhancing nanoapatite precipitation, physical properties, and osteoblastic responses of nanostructured macroporous calcium phosphate bone cements

    PubMed Central

    Orshesh, Ziba; Hesaraki, Saeed; Khanlarkhani, Ali

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a great interest in using natural polymers in the composition of calcium phosphate bone cements to enhance their physical, mechanical, and biological performance. Gelatin is a partially hydrolyzed form of collagen, a natural component of bone matrix. In this study, the effect of blooming gelatin on the nanohydroxyapatite precipitation, physical and mechanical properties, and cellular responses of a calcium phosphate bone cement (CPC) was investigated. Various concentrations of blooming gelatin (2, 5, and 8 wt.%) were used as the cement liquid and an equimolar mixture of tetracalcium phosphate and dicalcium phosphate was used as solid phase. The CPC without any gelatin additive was also evaluated as a control group. The results showed that gelatin accelerated hydraulic reactions of the cement paste, in which the reactants were immediately converted into nanostructured apatite precipitates after hardening. Gelatin molecules induced 4%–10% macropores (10–300 μm) into the cement structure, decreased initial setting time by ~190%, and improved mechanical strength of the as-set cement. Variation in the above-mentioned properties was influenced by the gelatin concentration and progressed with increasing the gelatin content. The numbers of the G-292 osteoblastic cells on gelatin-containing CPCs were higher than the control group at entire culture times (1–14 days), meanwhile better alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was determined using blooming gelatin additive. The observation of cell morphologies on the cement surfaces revealed an appropriate cell attachment with extended cell membranes on the cements. Overall, adding gelatin to the composition of CPC improved the handling characteristics such as setting time and mechanical properties, enhanced nanoapatite precipitation, and augmented the early cell proliferation rate and ALP activity. PMID:28176961

  1. Blooming gelatin: an individual additive for enhancing nanoapatite precipitation, physical properties, and osteoblastic responses of nanostructured macroporous calcium phosphate bone cements.

    PubMed

    Orshesh, Ziba; Hesaraki, Saeed; Khanlarkhani, Ali

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a great interest in using natural polymers in the composition of calcium phosphate bone cements to enhance their physical, mechanical, and biological performance. Gelatin is a partially hydrolyzed form of collagen, a natural component of bone matrix. In this study, the effect of blooming gelatin on the nanohydroxyapatite precipitation, physical and mechanical properties, and cellular responses of a calcium phosphate bone cement (CPC) was investigated. Various concentrations of blooming gelatin (2, 5, and 8 wt.%) were used as the cement liquid and an equimolar mixture of tetracalcium phosphate and dicalcium phosphate was used as solid phase. The CPC without any gelatin additive was also evaluated as a control group. The results showed that gelatin accelerated hydraulic reactions of the cement paste, in which the reactants were immediately converted into nanostructured apatite precipitates after hardening. Gelatin molecules induced 4%-10% macropores (10-300 μm) into the cement structure, decreased initial setting time by ~190%, and improved mechanical strength of the as-set cement. Variation in the above-mentioned properties was influenced by the gelatin concentration and progressed with increasing the gelatin content. The numbers of the G-292 osteoblastic cells on gelatin-containing CPCs were higher than the control group at entire culture times (1-14 days), meanwhile better alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was determined using blooming gelatin additive. The observation of cell morphologies on the cement surfaces revealed an appropriate cell attachment with extended cell membranes on the cements. Overall, adding gelatin to the composition of CPC improved the handling characteristics such as setting time and mechanical properties, enhanced nanoapatite precipitation, and augmented the early cell proliferation rate and ALP activity.

  2. Efficient physical embedding of topologically complex information processing networks in brains and computer circuits.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Danielle S; Greenfield, Daniel L; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Weinberger, Daniel R; Moore, Simon W; Bullmore, Edward T

    2010-04-22

    Nervous systems are information processing networks that evolved by natural selection, whereas very large scale integrated (VLSI) computer circuits have evolved by commercially driven technology development. Here we follow historic intuition that all physical information processing systems will share key organizational properties, such as modularity, that generally confer adaptivity of function. It has long been observed that modular VLSI circuits demonstrate an isometric scaling relationship between the number of processing elements and the number of connections, known as Rent's rule, which is related to the dimensionality of the circuit's interconnect topology and its logical capacity. We show that human brain structural networks, and the nervous system of the nematode C. elegans, also obey Rent's rule, and exhibit some degree of hierarchical modularity. We further show that the estimated Rent exponent of human brain networks, derived from MRI data, can explain the allometric scaling relations between gray and white matter volumes across a wide range of mammalian species, again suggesting that these principles of nervous system design are highly conserved. For each of these fractal modular networks, the dimensionality of the interconnect topology was greater than the 2 or 3 Euclidean dimensions of the space in which it was embedded. This relatively high complexity entailed extra cost in physical wiring: although all networks were economically or cost-efficiently wired they did not strictly minimize wiring costs. Artificial and biological information processing systems both may evolve to optimize a trade-off between physical cost and topological complexity, resulting in the emergence of homologous principles of economical, fractal and modular design across many different kinds of nervous and computational networks.

  3. Review of searches for rare processes and physics beyond the Standard Model at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    South, David M.; Turcato, Monica

    2016-06-01

    The electron-proton collisions collected by the H1 and ZEUS experiments at HERA comprise a unique particle physics data set, and a comprehensive range of measurements has been performed to provide new insight into the structure of the proton. The high centre of mass energy at HERA has also allowed rare processes to be studied, including the production of W and Z0 bosons and events with multiple leptons in the final state. The data have also opened up a new domain to searches for physics beyond the Standard Model including contact interactions, leptoquarks, excited fermions and a number of supersymmetric models. This review presents a summary of such results, where the analyses reported correspond to an integrated luminosity of up to 1 fb^{-1}, representing the complete data set recorded by the H1 and ZEUS experiments.

  4. Boundary conditions for the paleoenvironment: Chemical and Physical Processes in dense interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, W. M.; Schloerb, F. P.; Ziurys, L. M.

    1986-01-01

    The present research includes searches for important new interstellar constituents; observations relevant to differentiating between different models for the chemical processes that are important in the interstellar environment; and coordinated studies of the chemistry, physics, and dynamics of molecular clouds which are the sites or possible future sites of star formation. Recent research has included the detection and study of four new interstellar molecules; searches which have placed upper limits on the abundance of several other potential constituents of interstellar clouds; quantitative studies of comparative molecular abundances in different types of interstellar clouds; investigation of reaction pathways for astrochemistry from a comparison of theory and the observed abundance of related species such as isomers and isotopic variants; studies of possible tracers of energenic events related to star formation, including silicon and sulfur containing molecules; and mapping of physical, chemical, and dynamical properties over extended regions of nearby cold molecular clouds.

  5. A physical explanation of the temperature dependence of physiological processes mediated by cilia and flagella

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    The majority of biological rates are known to exhibit temperature dependence. Here I reveal a direct link between temperature and ecologically relevant rates such as swimming speeds in Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukaryotes as well as fluid-pumping and filtration rates in many metazoans, and show that this relationship is driven by movement rates of cilia and flagella. I develop models of the temperature dependence of cilial and flagellar movement rates and evaluate these with an extensive compilation of data from the literature. The model captures the temperature dependence of viscosity and provides a mechanistic and biologically interpretable explanation for the temperature dependence of a range of ecologically relevant processes; it also reveals a clear dependence on both reaction rate-like processes and the physics of the environment. The incorporation of viscosity allows further insight into the effects of environmental temperature variation and of processes, such as disease, that affect the viscosity of blood or other body fluids. PMID:23959901

  6. The association of physical activity to neural adaptability during visuo-spatial processing in healthy elderly adults: A multiscale entropy analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Hao; Tsai, Chia-Liang; Tseng, Philip; Yang, Albert C; Lo, Men-Tzung; Peng, Chung-Kang; Wang, Hsin-Yi; Muggleton, Neil G; Juan, Chi-Hung; Liang, Wei-Kuang

    2014-10-29

    Physical activity has been shown to benefit brain and cognition in late adulthood. However, this effect is still unexplored in terms of brain signal complexity, which reflects the level of neural adaptability and efficiency during cognitive processing that cannot be acquired via averaged neuroelectric signals. Here we employed multiscale entropy analysis (MSE) of electroencephalography (EEG), a new approach that conveys important information related to the temporal dynamics of brain signal complexity across multiple time scales, to reveal the association of physical activity with neural adaptability and efficiency in elderly adults. A between-subjects design that included 24 participants (aged 66.63±1.31years; female=12) with high physical activity and 24 age- and gender-matched low physical activity participants (aged 67.29±1.20years) was conducted to examine differences related to physical activity in performance and MSE of EEG signals during a visuo-spatial cognition task. We observed that physically active elderly adults had better accuracy on both visuo-spatial attention and working memory conditions relative to their sedentary counterparts. Additionally, these physically active elderly adults displayed greater MSE values at larger time scales at the Fz electrode in both attention and memory conditions. The results suggest that physical activity may be beneficial for adaptability of brain systems in tasks involving visuo-spatial information. MSE thus might be a promising approach to test the effects of the benefits of exercise on cognition.

  7. TIME SERIES ANALYSIS OF REMOTELY-SENSED TIR EMISSION: linking anomalies to physical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlidou, E.; van der Meijde, M.; Hecker, C.; van der Werff, H.; Ettema, J.

    2013-12-01

    In the last 15 years, remote sensing has been evaluated for detecting thermal anomalies as precursor to earthquakes. Important issues that need yet to be tackled include definition of: (a) thermal anomaly, taking into account weather conditions, observation settings and ';natural' variability caused by background sources (b) the length of observations required for this purpose; and (c) the location of detected anomalies, which should be physically related to the tectonic activity. To determine whether thermal anomalies are statistical noise, mere meteorological conditions, or actual earthquake-related phenomena, we apply a novel approach. We use brightness temperature (top-of-atmosphere) data from thermal infrared imagery acquired at a hypertemporal (sub-hourly) interval, from geostationary weather satellites over multiple years. The length of the time series allows for analysis of meteorological effects (diurnal, seasonal or annual trends) and background variability, through the application of a combined spatial and temporal filter to distinguish extreme occurrences from trends. The definition of potential anomalies is based on statistical techniques, taking into account published (geo)physical characteristics of earthquake related thermal anomalies. We use synthetic data to test the performance of the proposed detection method and track potential factors affecting the results. Subsequently, we apply the method on original data from Iran and Turkey, in quiescent and earthquake-struck periods alike. We present our findings with main focus to assess resulting anomalies in relation to physical processes thereby considering: (a) meteorological effects, (b) the geographical, geological and environmental settings, and (c) physically realistic distances and potential physical relations with the activity of causative faults.

  8. Real-Time Joint Streaming Data Processing from Social and Physical Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kropivnitskaya, Y. Y.; Qin, J.; Tiampo, K. F.; Bauer, M.

    2014-12-01

    The results of the technological breakthroughs in computing that have taken place over the last few decades makes it possible to achieve emergency management objectives that focus on saving human lives and decreasing economic effects. In particular, the integration of a wide variety of information sources, including observations from spatially-referenced physical sensors and new social media sources, enables better real-time seismic hazard analysis through distributed computing networks. The main goal of this work is to utilize innovative computational algorithms for better real-time seismic risk analysis by integrating different data sources and processing tools into streaming and cloud computing applications. The Geological Survey of Canada operates the Canadian National Seismograph Network (CNSN) with over 100 high-gain instruments and 60 low-gain or strong motion seismographs. The processing of the continuous data streams from each station of the CNSN provides the opportunity to detect possible earthquakes in near real-time. The information from physical sources is combined to calculate a location and magnitude for an earthquake. The automatically calculated results are not always sufficiently precise and prompt that can significantly reduce the response time to a felt or damaging earthquake. Social sensors, here represented as Twitter users, can provide information earlier to the general public and more rapidly to the emergency planning and disaster relief agencies. We introduce joint streaming data processing from social and physical sensors in real-time based on the idea that social media observations serve as proxies for physical sensors. By using the streams of data in the form of Twitter messages, each of which has an associated time and location, we can extract information related to a target event and perform enhanced analysis by combining it with physical sensor data. Results of this work suggest that the use of data from social media, in conjunction

  9. Simulating Cortical Development as a Self Constructing Process: A Novel Multi-Scale Approach Combining Molecular and Physical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Zubler, Frederic; Hauri, Andreas; Pfister, Sabina; Bauer, Roman; Anderson, John C.; Whatley, Adrian M.; Douglas, Rodney J.

    2013-01-01

    Current models of embryological development focus on intracellular processes such as gene expression and protein networks, rather than on the complex relationship between subcellular processes and the collective cellular organization these processes support. We have explored this collective behavior in the context of neocortical development, by modeling the expansion of a small number of progenitor cells into a laminated cortex with layer and cell type specific projections. The developmental process is steered by a formal language analogous to genomic instructions, and takes place in a physically realistic three-dimensional environment. A common genome inserted into individual cells control their individual behaviors, and thereby gives rise to collective developmental sequences in a biologically plausible manner. The simulation begins with a single progenitor cell containing the artificial genome. This progenitor then gives rise through a lineage of offspring to distinct populations of neuronal precursors that migrate to form the cortical laminae. The precursors differentiate by extending dendrites and axons, which reproduce the experimentally determined branching patterns of a number of different neuronal cell types observed in the cat visual cortex. This result is the first comprehensive demonstration of the principles of self-construction whereby the cortical architecture develops. In addition, our model makes several testable predictions concerning cell migration and branching mechanisms. PMID:23966845

  10. Simulating cortical development as a self constructing process: a novel multi-scale approach combining molecular and physical aspects.

    PubMed

    Zubler, Frederic; Hauri, Andreas; Pfister, Sabina; Bauer, Roman; Anderson, John C; Whatley, Adrian M; Douglas, Rodney J

    2013-01-01

    Current models of embryological development focus on intracellular processes such as gene expression and protein networks, rather than on the complex relationship between subcellular processes and the collective cellular organization these processes support. We have explored this collective behavior in the context of neocortical development, by modeling the expansion of a small number of progenitor cells into a laminated cortex with layer and cell type specific projections. The developmental process is steered by a formal language analogous to genomic instructions, and takes place in a physically realistic three-dimensional environment. A common genome inserted into individual cells control their individual behaviors, and thereby gives rise to collective developmental sequences in a biologically plausible manner. The simulation begins with a single progenitor cell containing the artificial genome. This progenitor then gives rise through a lineage of offspring to distinct populations of neuronal precursors that migrate to form the cortical laminae. The precursors differentiate by extending dendrites and axons, which reproduce the experimentally determined branching patterns of a number of different neuronal cell types observed in the cat visual cortex. This result is the first comprehensive demonstration of the principles of self-construction whereby the cortical architecture develops. In addition, our model makes several testable predictions concerning cell migration and branching mechanisms.

  11. Influence of processing parameters and alloying additions on the mechanically determined no-recrystallization temperature in niobium microalloyed steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homsher-Ritosa, Caryn Nicole

    TNR_Tor was determined by finding the intersection point of two linear regressions fit to the data. The TNR_Tor values were compared with measured TNR values from double-hit compression tests and with predicted values using empirical equations from the literature. Light optical micrographs and electron backscatter diffraction scans were examined for samples quenched from just above and just below the experimentally determined values of TNR_Tor for the high Nb, low Ti, and commercially produced 10V45 alloys to help verify the prior austenite grain morphology. For all processing conditions, the low Nb alloy was the least effective in increasing TNR_Tor and the high additions of Ti were the most effective at increasing TNR_Tor. The additions of V were not significantly effective in altering TNR_Tor and it is believed the Nb overpowered any influence the V additions may have had on TNR_Tor. An increase in strain or an increase strain rate decreased TNR_Tor. The T NR values measured from multistep hot torsion testing were lower than the TNR values measured from double-hit compression tests. The use of the mean flow stress versus inverse temperature curve to determine TNR_Tor does not correlate to the microstructural meaning of T NR (i.e. no recrystallization). The transition from completely recrystallized grains to less than complete recrystallization is not properly modeled by the intersection of two linear regions and is more gradual than the mechanical test implies. From the microstructural analysis of a10V45 steel, there is evidence of recrystallization at temperatures 200 °C below the measured TNR_Tor. The slope change on the mean flow stress versus inverse temperature curves is believed to be, in part, accumulated strain as well as refinement of continuously recrystallized grains causing a Hall-Petch type strength increase.

  12. Physical and processing properties of milk, butter, and cheddar cheese from cows fed supplemental fish meal.

    PubMed

    Avramis, C A; Wang, H; McBride, B W; Wright, T C; Hill, A R

    2003-08-01

    Physical, chemical, sensory and processing properties of milk produced by feeding a rumen-undegradable fish meal protein supplement to Holstein cows were investigated. The supplement contained (as fed basis) 25% soft-white wheat, 60% herring meal, and 15% feather meal. The total fat level in the milk decreased to 2.43%. For both pasteurized and ultra-high temperature processed drinking milk, no difference was found between fish meal (FM) milk and control milk in terms of color, flavor and flavor stability; in particular, no oxidized flavor was observed. Cheddar cheese made from FM milk ripened faster after 3 mo of ripening and developed a more desirable texture and stronger Cheddar flavor. The yield efficiencies for FM and control cheese, 94.4 (+/- 2.44 SE) and 96.4 (+/- 2.26 SE), respectively, were not different. Relative to controls, average fat globule size was smaller in FM milk and churning time of FM cream was longer. FM butter had softer texture and better cold spreadability, and butter oils from FM enriched milk had lower dropping points compared to control butter oil (average 32.89 versus 34.06 degrees C). These differences in physical properties of butter fat were greater than expected considering that iodine values were not different. This study demonstrates the feasibility of producing high quality products from milk naturally supplemented with FM, but the results also show that dietary changes affect processing properties.

  13. Significance of chamber pressure to complex multi-phase physics in jet engine fuel injection processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahms, Rainer; Oefelein, Joseph

    2014-11-01

    Injection processes in jet engines at chamber pressures in excess of the thermodynamic critical pressure of the liquid fuel are not well understood. Under some conditions, a distinct two-phase interface may not exist anymore which eliminates the presence of classical spray atomization phenomena. A comprehensive model for jet engine fuel injections is derived to quantify the conditions under which the interfacial dynamics transition to diffusion-dominated mixing processes without surface tension. At certain conditions, the model shows two-phase interfaces with substantially increased thicknesses and distinctively reduced mean free paths in comparison to ambient pressure conditions. Then, the underlying assumptions of a distinct two-phase interface do not apply anymore and the interface along with its surface tension is shown to deteriorate as it broadens substantially. As a consequence of this physical complexity, the conceptual view of spray atomization and evaporation as an appropriate model for jet engine injection processes is, contrary to conventional wisdom, questionable at certain operating conditions. Instead, a Large Eddy Simulation using a dense-fluid approximation is applied which takes the complex thermo-physics of real-fluid behavior into account.

  14. LIGHT SOURCE: Physical design of a 10 MeV LINAC for polymer radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Guang-Yao; Pei, Yuan-Ji; Wang, Lin; Zhang, Shan-Cai; Wu, Cong-Feng; Jin, Kai; Li, Wei-Min

    2009-06-01

    In China, polymer radiation processing has become one of the most important processing industries. The radiation processing source may be an electron beam accelerator or a radioactive source. Physical design of an electron beam facility applied for radiation crosslinking is introduced in this paper because of it's much higher dose rate and efficiency. Main part of this facility is a 10 MeV travelling wave electron linac with constant impedance accelerating structure. A start to end simulation concerning the linac is reported in this paper. The codes Opera-3d, Poisson-superfish and Parmela are used to describe electromagnetic elements of the accelerator and track particle distribution from the cathode to the end of the linac. After beam dynamic optimization, wave phase velocities in the structure have been chosen to be 0.56, 0.9 and 0.999 respectively. Physical parameters about the main elements such as DC electron gun, iris-loaded periodic structure, solenoids, etc, are presented. Simulation results proves that it can satisfy the industrial requirement. The linac is under construction. Some components have been finished. Measurements proved that they are in a good agreement with the design values.

  15. Processes at the sediment water interface after addition of organic matter and lime to an acid mine pit lake mesocosm

    SciTech Connect

    Matthias Koschorreck; Elke Bozau; Rene Froemmichen; Walter Geller; Peter Herzsprung; Katrin Wendt-Potthoff

    2007-03-01

    A strategy to neutralize acidic pit lakes was tested in a field mesocosm of 4500 m{sup 3} volume in the Acidic Pit Mine Lake 111 in the Koyne-Plessa lignite mining district of Lusatia, Germany. Carbokalk, a byproduct from sugar production, and wheat straw was applied near to the sediment surface to stimulate in lake microbial alkalinity generation by sulfate and iron reduction. The biogeochemical processes at the sediment-water interface were studied over 3 years by geochemical monitoring and an in situ microprofiler. Substrate addition generated a reactive zone at the sediment surface where sulfate and iron reduction proceeded. Gross sulfate reduction reached values up to 10 mmol m{sup -2} d{sup -1}. The neutralization rates between 27 and 0 meq m{sup -2} d{sup -1} were considerably lower than in previous laboratory experiments. The precipitation of ferric iron minerals resulted in a growing acidic sediment layer on top of the neutral sediment. In this layer sulfate reduction was observed but iron sulfides could not precipitate. In the anoxic sediment H{sub 2}S was oxidized by ferric iron minerals. H{sub 2}S partly diffused to the water column where it was oxidized. As a result the net formation of iron sulfides decreased after 1 year although gross sulfate reduction rates continued to be high. The rate of iron reduction exceeded the sulfate reduction rate, which resulted in high fluxes of ferrous iron out of the sediment. 46 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Impact of soil parameter and physical process on reproducibility of hydrological processes by land surface model in semiarid grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, S.; Yorozu, K.; Asanuma, J.; Kondo, M.; Saito, K.

    2014-12-01

    The land surface model (LSM) takes part in the land-atmosphere interaction on the earth system model for the climate change research. In this study, we evaluated the impact of soil parameters and physical process on reproducibility of hydrological process by LSM Minimal Advanced Treatments of Surface Interaction and RunOff (MATSIRO; Takata et al, 2003, GPC) forced by the meteorological data observed at grassland in semiarid climate in China and Mongolia. The testing of MATSIRO was carried out offline mode over the semiarid grassland sites at Tongyu (44.42 deg. N, 122.87 deg. E, altitude: 184m) in China, Kherlen Bayan Ulaan (KBU; 47.21 deg. N, 108.74 deg. E, altitude: 1235m) and Arvaikheer (46.23 N, 102.82E, altitude: 1,813m) in Mongolia. Although all sites locate semiarid grassland, the climate condition is different among sites, which the annual air temperature and precipitation are 5.7 deg. C and 388mm (Tongyu), 1.2 deg.C and 180mm (KBU), and 0.4 deg. C and 245mm(Arvaikheer). We can evaluate the effect of climate condition on the model performance. Three kinds of experiments have been carried out, which was run with the default parameters (CTL), the observed parameters (OBS) for soil physics and hydrology, and vegetation, and refined MATSIRO with the effect of ice in thermal parameters and unfrozen water below the freezing with same parameters as OBS run (OBSr). The validation data has been provided by CEOP(http://www.ceop.net/) , RAISE(http://raise.suiri.tsukuba.ac.jp/), GAME-AAN (Miyazaki et al., 2004, JGR) for Tongyu, KBU, and Arvaikheer, respectively. The reproducibility of the net radiation, the soil temperature (Ts), and latent heat flux (LE) were well reproduced by OBS and OBSr run. The change of soil physical and hydraulic parameter affected the reproducibility of soil temperature (Ts) and soil moisture (SM) as well as energy flux component especially for the sensible heat flux (H) and soil heat flux (G). The reason for the great improvement on the

  17. Effect of electric pulse processing on physical and chemical properties of inorganic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakipova, S. E.; Nussupbekov, B. R.; Ospanova, D.; Khassenov, A.; Sakipova, Sh E.

    2015-04-01

    This article analyzes various aspects of the practical application of electric pulse technology of industrial raw materials processing as a result of a spark electric discharge in a liquid solution of the raw material under processing. The object of the study are samples of technogenic materials from a deposit in Central Kazakhstan, which are crushed and ground to particles with a preset degree of fragmentation. The electric pulse processing is performed by using different numbers of discharges. The effect of electric pulse processing with different electrical parameters is carried out on the basis of comparison of the properties and structure of metal-containing and industrial raw materials after machining and electric pulse processing. The X-ray spectral microanalysis was performed using a scanning microscope. The researchers obtained data on changes in the microstructure and elemental composition of inorganic material samples as a result of electric pulse processing. It was established that the technology of electric pulse crushing and grinding of inorganic materials makes it possible to obtain not only a final product with desired size of dispersed particles, but also to change their physical and chemical properties.

  18. Comparisons of chemical and physical properties of catfish oils prepared from different extracting processes.

    PubMed

    Sathivel, S; Yin, H; Prinyawiwatkul, W; King, J M

    2009-03-01

    Four different catfish oil extraction processes were used to extract oil from catfish viscera: process CF1 involved a mixture of ground catfish viscera and water, no heat treatment, and centrifugation; process CF2 involved ground catfish viscera (no added water), heat treatment, and centrifugation; process CF3 involved a mixture of ground catfish viscera and water, heat treatment, and centrifugation; process CF4 involved ground catfish viscera, enzymatic hydrolysis, and centrifugation. Chemical and physical properties of the resulting of catfish oils were evaluated. The CF4 process recovered significantly higher amounts of crude oil from catfish viscera than the other 3 extraction methods. The CF4 oil contained a higher percent of free fatty acid and peroxide values than CF1, CF2, and CF3 oils. Oleic acid in catfish oil was the predominant fatty acid accounting for about 50% of total fatty acids. Weight loss of oils increased with increasing temperatures between 250 and 500 degrees C. All the catfish oil samples melted around -32 degrees C regardless of the extraction methods. The flow behavior index of all the oil samples was less than 1, which indicated that the catfish oils exhibited non-Newtonian fluid behavior. The apparent viscosity at -5 and 0 degrees C was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than those at 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 degrees C. The average magnitude of activation energy for apparent viscosity of the oil was higher for CF2 than CF1, CF3, and CF4.

  19. Integration of Science on Biological and Physical Processes to Understand Ecological Diversity of Stream Fishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieman, B.; Dunham, J.

    2002-12-01

    The integration of biological and physical sciences has been important in efforts to understand and conserve aquatic species such as the stream fishes found in the Pacific Northwest. Traditionally that integration has focused at relatively fine scales and on what were perceived as more or less static conditions of stream habitats to explain the abundance and distribution of select species. Scientists and managers were intent on defining and creating optimal conditions to maximize the abundance of those species. There is growing recognition that habitats are dynamic and that populations of many species may be structured by biological and physical processes operating over much larger spatial and temporal scales. Natural disturbance, hydrology, and geomorphic constraints lead to variation in the distribution, size, and productivity of habitats for different species through time and space. That variation could influence the distribution and persistence of populations and the diversity that is expressed within and among those populations. It may even be critical to long-term evolutionary potential. Metapopulation theory, for example, suggests the geometry and interconnection of habitats will be key to the occurrence and persistence of many populations. Recent work with bull trout and Lahontan cutthroat trout support those predictions and demonstrate that the large-scale geometry of habitat networks is essentially defined by the variation in stream topology and temperature. Life history diversity and phenotypic plasticity are thought to be mechanisms that allow species populations to adapt to, fully exploit, and persist in variable and changing environments. The expression of that diversity may depend on historical patterns of disturbance and the interconnection and diversity of environments that are currently available. Conservation of aquatic biological diversity will depend on our understanding of the processes that generate that diversity. The application of new

  20. Modelling accumulation of marine plastics in the coastal zone; what are the dominant physical processes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Critchell, Kay; Lambrechts, Jonathan

    2016-03-01

    Anthropogenic marine debris, mainly of plastic origin, is accumulating in estuarine and coastal environments around the world causing damage to fauna, flora and habitats. Plastics also have the potential to accumulate in the food web, as well as causing economic losses to tourism and sea-going industries. If we are to manage this increasing threat, we must first understand where debris is accumulating and why these locations are different to others that do not accumulate large amounts of marine debris. This paper demonstrates an advection-diffusion model that includes beaching, settling, resuspension/re-floating, degradation and topographic effects on the wind in nearshore waters to quantify the relative importance of these physical processes governing plastic debris accumulation. The aim of this paper is to prioritise research that will improve modelling outputs in the future. We have found that the physical characteristic of the source location has by far the largest effect on the fate of the debris. The diffusivity, used to parameterise the sub-grid scale movements, and the relationship between debris resuspension/re-floating from beaches and the wind shadow created by high islands also has a dramatic impact on the modelling results. The rate of degradation of macroplastics into microplastics also have a large influence in the result of the modelling. The other processes presented (settling, wind drift velocity) also help determine the fate of debris, but to a lesser degree. These findings may help prioritise research on physical processes that affect plastic accumulation, leading to more accurate modelling, and subsequently management in the future.