Science.gov

Sample records for additional physical processes

  1. [Adaptive reactions of dehydrogenation processes in root voles during additional impacts of the physical nature].

    PubMed

    Kudiasheva, A G; Taskaev, A I

    2011-01-01

    Variations of the dehydrogenation enzyme activity (succinate dehydrogenase, pyruvate dehydrogenase, lactate dehydrogenase) in the heart muscle, liver and brain of root voles (Microtus oeconomus Pall.) and their progeny associated with additional stress effects (chronic low-level gamma-irradiation, short-term exposure to cold) have been studied. Root voles (parents) were caught in the areas with a normal and high-level natural radioactivity in the Republic of Komi. It has been revealed that the direction of shifts of the dehydrogenation enzyme activity in response to the factors of the physical nature is determined by the initial level of the oxidation process in tissues of root voles and their progeny that haven't been subjected to these actions. The reaction of root voles and their progeny (1-3 generations) from the radium zone has lower reserve functional possibilities in relation to the additional exposure as compared with the animals from the control zone. In some cases, chronic low-level irradiation and short-term cooling lead to leveling of differences between groups of animals which initially varied from each other in biochemical indexes. PMID:22279768

  2. Effect of Surface-active Additives on Physical Properties of Slurries of Vapor-process Magnesium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinns, Murray L

    1955-01-01

    The presence of 3 to 5 percent surface-active additive gave the lowest Brookfield apparent viscosity, plastic viscosity, and yield value that were obtained for slurry fuels containing approximately 50 percent vapor-process magnesium in JP-1 fuel. The slurries settled little and were easily remixed. A polyoxyethylene dodecyl alcohol was the most effective of 13 additives tested in reducing the Brookfield apparent viscosity and the yield value of the slurry. The seven most effective additives all had a hydroxyl group plus an ester or polyoxethylene group in the molecule. The densities of some of the slurries were measured.

  3. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. R.; St. Clair, T. L.; Burks, H. D.; Stoakley, D. M.

    1987-01-01

    A method has been found for enhancing the melt flow of thermoplastic polyimides during processing. A high molecular weight 422 copoly(amic acid) or copolyimide was fused with approximately 0.05 to 5 pct by weight of a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive, and this melt was studied by capillary rheometry. Excellent flow and improved composite properties on graphite resulted from the addition of a PMDA-aniline additive to LARC-TPI. Solution viscosity studies imply that amic acid additives temporarily lower molecular weight and, hence, enlarge the processing window. Thus, compositions containing the additive have a lower melt viscosity for a longer time than those unmodified.

  4. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, James C. (Inventor); Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  5. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of the additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  6. Oil additive process

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, H.

    1988-10-18

    This patent describes a method of making an additive comprising: (a) adding 2 parts by volume of 3% sodium hypochlorite to 45 parts by volume of diesel oil fuel to form a sulphur free fuel, (b) removing all water and foreign matter formed by the sodium hypochlorite, (c) blending 30 parts by volume of 24% lead naphthanate with 15 parts by volume of the sulphur free fuel, 15 parts by volume of light-weight material oil to form a blended mixture, and (d) heating the blended mixture slowly and uniformly to 152F.

  7. Attitude Towards Physics and Additional Mathematics Achievement Towards Physics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veloo, Arsaythamby; Nor, Rahimah; Khalid, Rozalina

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to identify the difference in students' attitude towards Physics and Additional Mathematics achievement based on gender and relationship between attitudinal variables towards Physics and Additional Mathematics achievement with achievement in Physics. This research focused on six variables, which is attitude towards…

  8. Physical processes in comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, F. L.; Huebner, W. F.

    1976-01-01

    The paper discusses physical processes in comets which involve solar and nuclear radial forces that affect the motions of gases and icy grains, gas-phase chemistry very close to the nuclei of large comets near the sun, sublimation of icy grains, dissociation of parent molecules into radicals and of radicals into atoms, and ionization by sunlight and collisions. The composition and dimensions of nuclei are examined along with variations in intrinsic brightness, the nature of volatiles, gas production rates in the coma, characteristics of icy grains in the coma, and the structure of streamers, ion tails, and dust tails. The structure of the coma is described in detail on the basis of spectroscopic observations of several comets. The origin of comets is briefly reviewed together with the relation of comets to earth, the interplanetary complex, and the interstellar medium. Desirable future observations are noted, especially by space missions to comets.

  9. Energetic additive manufacturing process with feed wire

    SciTech Connect

    Harwell, Lane D.; Griffith, Michelle L.; Greene, Donald L.; Pressly, Gary A.

    2000-11-07

    A process for additive manufacture by energetic wire deposition is described. A source wire is fed into a energy beam generated melt-pool on a growth surface as the melt-pool moves over the growth surface. This process enables the rapid prototyping and manufacture of fully dense, near-net shape components, as well as cladding and welding processes. Alloys, graded materials, and other inhomogeneous materials can be grown using this process.

  10. Computational Process Modeling for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagg, Stacey; Zhang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Computational Process and Material Modeling of Powder Bed additive manufacturing of IN 718. Optimize material build parameters with reduced time and cost through modeling. Increase understanding of build properties. Increase reliability of builds. Decrease time to adoption of process for critical hardware. Potential to decrease post-build heat treatments. Conduct single-track and coupon builds at various build parameters. Record build parameter information and QM Meltpool data. Refine Applied Optimization powder bed AM process model using data. Report thermal modeling results. Conduct metallography of build samples. Calibrate STK models using metallography findings. Run STK models using AO thermal profiles and report STK modeling results. Validate modeling with additional build. Photodiode Intensity measurements highly linear with power input. Melt Pool Intensity highly correlated to Melt Pool Size. Melt Pool size and intensity increase with power. Applied Optimization will use data to develop powder bed additive manufacturing process model.

  11. Roles for RNA in Telomerase Nucleotide and Repeat Addition Processivity

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Cary K.; Miller, Michael C.; Collins, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    Summary Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein reverse transcriptase with two subunits critical for catalytic activity, the protein telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and telomerase RNA. In this study, we establish additional roles of the telomerase RNA subunit by demonstrating that RNA motifs stimulate the processivity of nucleotide and repeat addition. These functions are both functionally and physically separable from the roles of other RNA motifs in establishing a properly defined template. Binding of Tetrahymena telomerase RNA stem IV to TERT enhances nucleotide addition processivity, while a cooperation of the RNA pseudoknot and stem IV promotes repeat addition processivity. The low processivity of DNA synthesis by telomerase ribonucleoproteins lacking the pseudoknot and/or stem IV can be rescued by addition of the deleted region in trans. These findings demonstrate RNA elements with roles in telomerase elongation processivity that are distinct from RNA elements that specify the internal template. PMID:12820978

  12. Computational Process Modeling for Additive Manufacturing (OSU)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagg, Stacey; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Powder-Bed Additive Manufacturing (AM) through Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) or Selective Laser Melting (SLM) is being used by NASA and the Aerospace industry to "print" parts that traditionally are very complex, high cost, or long schedule lead items. The process spreads a thin layer of metal powder over a build platform, then melts the powder in a series of welds in a desired shape. The next layer of powder is applied, and the process is repeated until layer-by-layer, a very complex part can be built. This reduces cost and schedule by eliminating very complex tooling and processes traditionally used in aerospace component manufacturing. To use the process to print end-use items, NASA seeks to understand SLM material well enough to develop a method of qualifying parts for space flight operation. Traditionally, a new material process takes many years and high investment to generate statistical databases and experiential knowledge, but computational modeling can truncate the schedule and cost -many experiments can be run quickly in a model, which would take years and a high material cost to run empirically. This project seeks to optimize material build parameters with reduced time and cost through modeling.

  13. Situ process for making multifunctional fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Carrier, R.C.; Allen, B.R.

    1984-02-28

    Disclosed is an in situ or ''one pot'' process for making a fuel additive comprising reacting an excess of at least one N-primary alkylalkylene diamine with maleic anhydride in the presence of from 20 to 36 weight percent of a mineral oil reaction diluent at a temperature ranging from ambient to about 225/sup 0/ F. and recovering a product containing a primary aliphatic hydrocarbon amino alkylene substituted asparagine, an N-primary alkylalkylene diamine in the reaction oil with the product having a by-product succinimide content not in excess of 1.0 weight percent, based on the weight of asparagine present.

  14. Fundamental Aspects of Selective Melting Additive Manufacturing Processes

    SciTech Connect

    van Swol, Frank B.; Miller, James E.

    2014-12-01

    Certain details of the additive manufacturing process known as selective laser melting (SLM) affect the performance of the final metal part. To unleash the full potential of SLM it is crucial that the process engineer in the field receives guidance about how to select values for a multitude of process variables employed in the building process. These include, for example, the type of powder (e.g., size distribution, shape, type of alloy), orientation of the build axis, the beam scan rate, the beam power density, the scan pattern and scan rate. The science-based selection of these settings con- stitutes an intrinsically challenging multi-physics problem involving heating and melting a metal alloy, reactive, dynamic wetting followed by re-solidification. In addition, inherent to the process is its considerable variability that stems from the powder packing. Each time a limited number of powder particles are placed, the stacking is intrinsically different from the previous, possessing a different geometry, and having a different set of contact areas with the surrounding particles. As a result, even if all other process parameters (scan rate, etc) are exactly the same, the shape and contact geometry and area of the final melt pool will be unique to that particular configuration. This report identifies the most important issues facing SLM, discusses the fundamental physics associated with it and points out how modeling can support the additive manufacturing efforts.

  15. Physical Processing of Cometary Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, Paul R.; Stern, S. Alan

    1997-01-01

    Cometary nuclei preserve a cosmo-chemical record of conditions and processes in the primordial solar nebula, and possibly even the interstellar medium. However, that record is not perfectly preserved over the age of the solar system due to a variety of physical processes which act to modify cometary surfaces and interiors. Possible structural and/or internal processes include: collisional accretion, disruption, and reassembly during formation; internal heating by long and short-lived radionuclides; amorphous to crystalline phase transitions, and thermal stresses. Identified surface modification processes include: irradiation by galactic cosmic rays, solar protons, UV photons, and the Sun's T Tauri stage mass outflow; heating by passing stars and nearby supernovae; gardening by debris impacts; the accretion of interstellar dust and gas and accompanying erosion by hypervelocity dust impacts and sputtering; and solar heating with accompanying crust formation. These modification processes must be taken into account in both the planning and the interpretation of the results of a Comet Nucleus Sample Return Mission. Sampling of nuclei should be done at as great a depth below the surface crust as technically feasible, and at vents or fissures leading to exposed volatiles at depth. Samples of the expected cometary crust and near-surface layers also need to be returned for analysis to achieve a better understanding of the effects of these physical processes. We stress that comets are still likely less modified dm any other solar system bodies, but the degree of modification can vary greatly from one comet to the next.

  16. Golographic interferometry of physical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrovskaya, G. V.

    2016-06-01

    This paper is devoted to the contribution of Yuri Ostrovsky to holographic interferometry, one of the fundamental scientific and practical applications of holography. The title of this paper is the same as the title of his doctoral thesis that he defended in 1974, and, as it seems to me, reflects most of the specific features of the majority of his scientific publications, viz., an inseparable link of the methods developed by him with the results obtained with the help of these methods in a wide range of investigations of physical processes and phenomena.

  17. Physical Fitness and the Stress Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ensel, Walter M.; Lin, Nan

    2004-01-01

    In the current paper we focus on the role of physical fitness in the life stress process for both psychological and physical well-being. The major research question posed in the current study is: Does physical fitness deter distress in a model containing the major components of the life stress process? That is, do individuals who exercise show…

  18. EXPOSURE TO CHEMICAL ADDITIVES FROM POLYVINYL CHLORIDE POLYMER EXTRUSION PROCESSING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents a model to predict worker inhalation exposure due to off-gassing of additives during polyvinyl chloride (PVC) extrusion processing. ata on off-gassing of additives were reviewed in the literature, the off-gassing at normal PVC processing temperatures was stud...

  19. Laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing of metals; physics, computational, and materials challenges

    SciTech Connect

    King, W. E.; Anderson, A. T.; Ferencz, R. M.; Hodge, N. E.; Kamath, C.; Khairallah, S. A.; Rubencik, A. M.

    2015-12-29

    The production of metal parts via laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing is growing exponentially. However, the transition of this technology from production of prototypes to production of critical parts is hindered by a lack of confidence in the quality of the part. Confidence can be established via a fundamental understanding of the physics of the process. It is generally accepted that this understanding will be increasingly achieved through modeling and simulation. However, there are significant physics, computational, and materials challenges stemming from the broad range of length and time scales and temperature ranges associated with the process. In this study, we review the current state of the art and describe the challenges that need to be met to achieve the desired fundamental understanding of the physics of the process.

  20. Laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing of metals; physics, computational, and materials challenges

    SciTech Connect

    King, W. E.; Anderson, A. T.; Ferencz, R. M.; Hodge, N. E.; Khairallah, S. A.; Kamath, C.; Rubenchik, A. M.

    2015-12-15

    The production of metal parts via laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing is growing exponentially. However, the transition of this technology from production of prototypes to production of critical parts is hindered by a lack of confidence in the quality of the part. Confidence can be established via a fundamental understanding of the physics of the process. It is generally accepted that this understanding will be increasingly achieved through modeling and simulation. However, there are significant physics, computational, and materials challenges stemming from the broad range of length and time scales and temperature ranges associated with the process. In this paper, we review the current state of the art and describe the challenges that need to be met to achieve the desired fundamental understanding of the physics of the process.

  1. Laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing of metals; physics, computational, and materials challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, W. E.; Anderson, A. T.; Ferencz, R. M.; Hodge, N. E.; Kamath, C.; Khairallah, S. A.; Rubenchik, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    The production of metal parts via laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing is growing exponentially. However, the transition of this technology from production of prototypes to production of critical parts is hindered by a lack of confidence in the quality of the part. Confidence can be established via a fundamental understanding of the physics of the process. It is generally accepted that this understanding will be increasingly achieved through modeling and simulation. However, there are significant physics, computational, and materials challenges stemming from the broad range of length and time scales and temperature ranges associated with the process. In this paper, we review the current state of the art and describe the challenges that need to be met to achieve the desired fundamental understanding of the physics of the process.

  2. Laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing of metals; physics, computational, and materials challenges

    DOE PAGESBeta

    King, W. E.; Anderson, A. T.; Ferencz, R. M.; Hodge, N. E.; Kamath, C.; Khairallah, S. A.; Rubencik, A. M.

    2015-12-29

    The production of metal parts via laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing is growing exponentially. However, the transition of this technology from production of prototypes to production of critical parts is hindered by a lack of confidence in the quality of the part. Confidence can be established via a fundamental understanding of the physics of the process. It is generally accepted that this understanding will be increasingly achieved through modeling and simulation. However, there are significant physics, computational, and materials challenges stemming from the broad range of length and time scales and temperature ranges associated with the process. In thismore » study, we review the current state of the art and describe the challenges that need to be met to achieve the desired fundamental understanding of the physics of the process.« less

  3. Processing multidimensional nuclear physics data

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, J.

    1994-11-15

    Modern Ge detector arrays for gamma-ray spectroscopy are producing data sets unprecedented in size and event multiplicity. Gammasphere, the DOE sponsored array, has the following characteristics: (1) High granularity (110 detectors); (2) High efficiency (10%); and (3) Precision energy measurements (Delta EE = 0.2%). Characteristics of detector line shape, the data set, and the standard practice in the nuclear physics community to the nuclear gamma-ray cascades from the 4096 times 4096 times 4096 data cube will be discussed.

  4. Exposure to chemical additives from polyvinyl chloride polymer extrusion processing

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, C.S.

    1989-12-01

    The report presents a model to predict worker inhalation exposure due to off-gassing of additives during polyvinyl chloride (PVC) extrusion processing. Data on off-gassing of additives were reviewed in the literature, the off-gassing at normal PVC processing temperatures was studied in the laboratory, process variables were estimated from an equipment manufacturer survey, and worker-activities and possible exposure sources were observed in an industrial survey. The purpose of the study was to develop a theoretical model to predict worker inhalation exposure to additives used during PVC extrusion processing. A model to estimate the generation rate of the additive from the polymer extrudate was derived from the mass transport equations governing diffusion. The mass flow rate, initial additive volatile weight fraction, off-gassing time, diffusivity, and slab thickness are required to determine the generation rate from the model.

  5. Porosity of additive manufacturing parts for process monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Slotwinski, J. A.; Garboczi, E. J.

    2014-02-18

    Some metal additive manufacturing processes can produce parts with internal porosity, either intentionally (with careful selection of the process parameters) or unintentionally (if the process is not well-controlled.) Material porosity is undesirable for aerospace parts - since porosity could lead to premature failure - and desirable for some biomedical implants, since surface-breaking pores allow for better integration with biological tissue. Changes in a part's porosity during an additive manufacturing build may also be an indication of an undesired change in the process. We are developing an ultrasonic sensor for detecting changes in porosity in metal parts during fabrication on a metal powder bed fusion system, for use as a process monitor. This paper will describe our work to develop an ultrasonic-based sensor for monitoring part porosity during an additive build, including background theory, the development and detailed characterization of reference additive porosity samples, and a potential design for in-situ implementation.

  6. Porosity of additive manufacturing parts for process monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slotwinski, J. A.; Garboczi, E. J.

    2014-02-01

    Some metal additive manufacturing processes can produce parts with internal porosity, either intentionally (with careful selection of the process parameters) or unintentionally (if the process is not well-controlled.) Material porosity is undesirable for aerospace parts - since porosity could lead to premature failure - and desirable for some biomedical implants, since surface-breaking pores allow for better integration with biological tissue. Changes in a part's porosity during an additive manufacturing build may also be an indication of an undesired change in the process. We are developing an ultrasonic sensor for detecting changes in porosity in metal parts during fabrication on a metal powder bed fusion system, for use as a process monitor. This paper will describe our work to develop an ultrasonic-based sensor for monitoring part porosity during an additive build, including background theory, the development and detailed characterization of reference additive porosity samples, and a potential design for in-situ implementation.

  7. NUMERICAL MODELING OF FINE SEDIMENT PHYSICAL PROCESSES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoellhamer, David H.

    1985-01-01

    Fine sediment in channels, rivers, estuaries, and coastal waters undergo several physical processes including flocculation, floc disruption, deposition, bed consolidation, and resuspension. This paper presents a conceptual model and reviews mathematical models of these physical processes. Several general fine sediment models that simulate some of these processes are reviewed. These general models do not directly simulate flocculation and floc disruption, but the conceptual model and existing functions are shown to adequately model these two processes for one set of laboratory data.

  8. Physical Processes Controlling Earth's Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genio, Anthony Del

    2013-01-01

    As background for consideration of the climates of the other terrestrial planets in our solar system and the potential habitability of rocky exoplanets, we discuss the basic physics that controls the Earths present climate, with particular emphasis on the energy and water cycles. We define several dimensionless parameters relevant to characterizing a planets general circulation, climate and hydrological cycle. We also consider issues associated with the use of past climate variations as indicators of future anthropogenically forced climate change, and recent advances in understanding projections of future climate that might have implications for Earth-like exoplanets.

  9. Additive manufacturing of stretchable tactile sensors: Processes, materials, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vatani, Morteza

    3D printing technology is becoming more ubiquitous every day especially in the area of smart structures. However, fabrication of multi-material, functional, and smart structures is problematic because of the process and material limitations. This thesis sought to develop a Direct Print Photopolymerization (DPP) fabrication technique that appreciably extends the manufacturing space for the 3D smart structures. This method employs a robotically controlled micro-extrusion of a filament equipped with a photopolymerization process. The ability to use polymers and ultimately their nanocomposites in this process is the advantage of the proposed process over the current fabrication methods in the fabrication of 3D structures featuring mechanical, physical, and electrical functionalities. In addition, this study focused to develop a printable, conductive, and stretchable nanocomposite based on a photocurable and stretchable liquid resin filled with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). This nanocomposite exhibited piezoresistivity, means its resistivity changes as it deforms. This property is a favorable factor in developing resistance based tactile sensors. They were also able to resist high tensile strains while they showed conductivity. Furthermore, this study offered a possible and low-cost method to have a unique and highly stretchable pressure sensitive polymer. This disruptive pressure sensitive polymer composed of an Ionic Liquid (IL) and a stretchable photopolymer embedded between two layers of Carbon Nanotube (CNTs) based stretchable electrodes. The developed IL-polymer showed both field effect property and piezoresistivity that can detect large tensile strains up 30%. In summary, this research study focused to present feasible methods and materials for printing a 3D smart structure especially in the context of flexible tactile sensors. This study provides a foundation for the future efforts in fabrication of skin like tactile sensors in three-dimensional motifs

  10. Mathematical and physical modelling of materials processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Mathematical and physical modeling of turbulence phenomena in metals processing, electromagnetically driven flows in materials processing, gas-solid reactions, rapid solidification processes, the electroslag casting process, the role of cathodic depolarizers in the corrosion of aluminum in sea water, and predicting viscoelastic flows are described.

  11. 10 CFR 73.60 - Additional requirements for physical protection at nonpower reactors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Additional requirements for physical protection at nonpower reactors. 73.60 Section 73.60 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF PLANTS AND MATERIALS Physical Protection Requirements at Fixed Sites § 73.60 Additional requirements for physical protection at nonpower...

  12. Kinetic Processes in Solar Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKinnon, A.

    2008-09-01

    Non-maxwellian particle distributions seem to occur commonly in the collisionless conditions of the corona and solar wind. The most extreme examples accompany the events of solar flares, when we find ions on occasions attaining energies in the 10 GeV range. In the denser atmosphere, temperature scale lengths comparable to mean free paths will induce strongly non-maxwellian distributions. Even when there is no direct evidence for their presence, we must expect these to be present in low density plasmas. How do we account for these distributions? What roles must they play in energy transport, in equilibrium and stability, in the interpretation of diagnostics? We first review some textbook ideas on the situations that demand kinetic descriptions, and the extent to which this can be achieved via moment descriptions. We next consider some key problems in solar physics: thermal conductivity in steep temperature gradients; energy release and particle acceleration in solar flares; the origin of non-maxwellian velocity distributions in the solar wind; coherent radio emission. In each case we try to characterise the problem in a general way, then discuss some recent advances in understanding. We conclude with some comments on the implications of such distributions in situations where their presence is at first not recognised.

  13. Simple Additivity of Stochastic Psychological Processes: Tests and Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balakrishnan, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    Methods of testing relatively complete (distributional) models of internal psychological processes are described. It is shown that there is a sufficient condition for additive models to imply this property of the likelihood ratio. Also discussed are the examination of hazard rate functions of component processes and change in cumulative…

  14. Cleaning Process Development for Metallic Additively Manufactured Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tramel, Terri L.; Welker, Roger; Lowery, Niki; Mitchell, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Additive Manufacturing of metallic components for aerospace applications offers many advantages over traditional manufacturing techniques. As a new technology, many aspects of its widespread utilization remain open to investigation. Among these are the cleaning processes that can be used for post finishing of parts and measurements to verify effectiveness of the cleaning processes. Many cleaning and drying processes and measurement methods that have been used for parts manufactured using conventional techniques are candidates that may be considered for cleaning and verification of additively manufactured parts. Among these are vapor degreasing, ultrasonic immersion and spray cleaning, followed by hot air drying, vacuum baking and solvent displacement drying. Differences in porosity, density, and surface finish of additively manufactured versus conventionally manufactured parts may introduce new considerations in the selection of cleaning and drying processes or the method used to verify their effectiveness. This presentation will review the relative strengths and weaknesses of different candidate cleaning and drying processes as they may apply to additively manufactured metal parts for aerospace applications. An ultrasonic cleaning technique for exploring the cleanability of parts will be presented along with an example using additively manufactured Inconel 718 test specimens to illustrate its use. The data analysis shows that this ultrasonic cleaning approach results in a well-behaved ultrasonic cleaning/extraction behavior. That is, it does not show signs of accelerated cavitation erosion of the base material, which was later confirmed by neutron imaging. In addition, the analysis indicated that complete cleaning would be achieved by ultrasonic immersion cleaning at approximately 5 minutes, which was verified by subsequent cleaning of additional parts.

  15. Control of pyrite addition in coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Schmid, Bruce K.; Junkin, James E.

    1982-12-21

    Pyrite addition to a coal liquefaction process (22, 26) is controlled (118) in inverse proportion to the calcium content of the feed coal to maximize the C.sub.5 --900.degree. F. (482.degree. C.) liquid yield per unit weight of pyrite added (110). The pyrite addition is controlled in this manner so as to minimize the amount of pyrite used and thus reduce pyrite contribution to the slurry pumping load and disposal problems connected with pyrite produced slag.

  16. Infrared thermography for laser-based powder bed fusion additive manufacturing processes

    SciTech Connect

    Moylan, Shawn; Whitenton, Eric; Lane, Brandon; Slotwinski, John

    2014-02-18

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to revolutionize discrete part manufacturing, but improvements in processing of metallic materials are necessary before AM will see widespread adoption. A better understanding of AM processes, resulting from physics-based modeling as well as direct process metrology, will form the basis for these improvements. Infrared (IR) thermography of AM processes can provide direct process metrology, as well as data necessary for the verification of physics-based models. We review selected works examining how IR thermography was implemented and used in various powder-bed AM processes. This previous work, as well as significant experience at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in temperature measurement and IR thermography for machining processes, shapes our own research in AM process metrology with IR thermography. We discuss our experimental design, as well as plans for future IR measurements of a laser-based powder bed fusion AM process.

  17. Infrared thermography for laser-based powder bed fusion additive manufacturing processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moylan, Shawn; Whitenton, Eric; Lane, Brandon; Slotwinski, John

    2014-02-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to revolutionize discrete part manufacturing, but improvements in processing of metallic materials are necessary before AM will see widespread adoption. A better understanding of AM processes, resulting from physics-based modeling as well as direct process metrology, will form the basis for these improvements. Infrared (IR) thermography of AM processes can provide direct process metrology, as well as data necessary for the verification of physics-based models. We review selected works examining how IR thermography was implemented and used in various powder-bed AM processes. This previous work, as well as significant experience at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in temperature measurement and IR thermography for machining processes, shapes our own research in AM process metrology with IR thermography. We discuss our experimental design, as well as plans for future IR measurements of a laser-based powder bed fusion AM process.

  18. Effects of acetylacetone additions on PZT thin film processing

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, R.W.; Assink, R.A.; Dimos, D.; Sinclair, M.B.; Boyle, T.J.; Buchheit, C.D.

    1995-02-01

    Sol-gel processing methods are frequently used for the fabrication of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin films for many electronic applications. Our standard approach for film fabrication utilizes lead acetate and acetic acid modified metal alkoxides of zirconium and titanium in the preparation of our precursor solutions. This report highlights some of our recent results on the effects of the addition of a second chelating ligand, acetylacetone, to this process. The authors discuss the changes in film drying behavior, densification and ceramic microstructure which accompany acetylacetone additions to the precursor solution and relate the observed variations in processing behavior to differences in chemical precursor structure induced by the acetylacetone ligand. Improvements in thin film microstructure, ferroelectric and optical properties are observed when acetylacetone is added to the precursor solution.

  19. Additive Manufacturing of High-Entropy Alloys by Laser Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocelík, V.; Janssen, N.; Smith, S. N.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2016-07-01

    This contribution concentrates on the possibilities of additive manufacturing of high-entropy clad layers by laser processing. In particular, the effects of the laser surface processing parameters on the microstructure and hardness of high-entropy alloys (HEAs) were examined. AlCoCrFeNi alloys with different amounts of aluminum prepared by arc melting were investigated and compared with the laser beam remelted HEAs with the same composition. Attempts to form HEAs coatings with a direct laser deposition from the mixture of elemental powders were made for AlCoCrFeNi and AlCrFeNiTa composition. A strong influence of solidification rate on the amounts of face-centered cubic and body-centered cubic phase, their chemical composition, and spatial distribution was detected for two-phase AlCoCrFeNi HEAs. It is concluded that a high-power laser is a versatile tool to synthesize interesting HEAs with additive manufacturing processing. Critical issues are related to the rate of (re)solidification, the dilution with the substrate, powder efficiency during cladding, and differences in melting points of clad powders making additive manufacturing processing from a simple mixture of elemental powders a challenging approach.

  20. Additive Manufacturing of High-Entropy Alloys by Laser Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocelík, V.; Janssen, N.; Smith, S. N.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2016-04-01

    This contribution concentrates on the possibilities of additive manufacturing of high-entropy clad layers by laser processing. In particular, the effects of the laser surface processing parameters on the microstructure and hardness of high-entropy alloys (HEAs) were examined. AlCoCrFeNi alloys with different amounts of aluminum prepared by arc melting were investigated and compared with the laser beam remelted HEAs with the same composition. Attempts to form HEAs coatings with a direct laser deposition from the mixture of elemental powders were made for AlCoCrFeNi and AlCrFeNiTa composition. A strong influence of solidification rate on the amounts of face-centered cubic and body-centered cubic phase, their chemical composition, and spatial distribution was detected for two-phase AlCoCrFeNi HEAs. It is concluded that a high-power laser is a versatile tool to synthesize interesting HEAs with additive manufacturing processing. Critical issues are related to the rate of (re)solidification, the dilution with the substrate, powder efficiency during cladding, and differences in melting points of clad powders making additive manufacturing processing from a simple mixture of elemental powders a challenging approach.

  1. The metallurgy and processing science of metal additive manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Sames, William J.; List, III, Frederick Alyious; Pannala, Sreekanth; Dehoff, Ryan R.; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Here, additive Manufacturing (AM), widely known as 3D printing, is a method of manufacturing that forms parts from powder, wire, or sheets in a process that proceeds layer-by-layer.Many techniques (using many different names) have been developed to accomplish this via melting or solid - state joining. In this review, these techniques for producing metal parts are explored, with a focus on the science of metal AM: processing defects, heat transfer, solidification, solid- state precipitation, mechanical properties, and post-processing metallurgy. The various metal AM techniques are compared, with analysis of the strengths and limitations of each. Few alloys have been developed for commercial production, but recent development efforts are presented as a path for the ongoing development of new materials for AM processes.

  2. The metallurgy and processing science of metal additive manufacturing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sames, William J.; List, III, Frederick Alyious; Pannala, Sreekanth; Dehoff, Ryan R.; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh

    2016-03-07

    Here, additive Manufacturing (AM), widely known as 3D printing, is a method of manufacturing that forms parts from powder, wire, or sheets in a process that proceeds layer-by-layer.Many techniques (using many different names) have been developed to accomplish this via melting or solid - state joining. In this review, these techniques for producing metal parts are explored, with a focus on the science of metal AM: processing defects, heat transfer, solidification, solid- state precipitation, mechanical properties, and post-processing metallurgy. The various metal AM techniques are compared, with analysis of the strengths and limitations of each. Few alloys have been developedmore » for commercial production, but recent development efforts are presented as a path for the ongoing development of new materials for AM processes.« less

  3. Physical conditions for the r-process

    SciTech Connect

    Wanajo, S.; Tachibana, T.; Goriely, S.

    2012-11-12

    Recent works show that the r-process can proceed by competition between neutron capture and {beta}-decay in low temperature environments (< 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} K; cold r-process) where photo-disintegration plays no role. This is in contrast to the traditional picture of the r-process in high temperature environments ({approx} 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} K; hot r-process) where the (n, {gamma})-({gamma}, n) equilibrium holds. In this study, we explore nucleosynthesis calculations based on a site-independent model to elucidate the physical conditions leading to cold and hot r-processes.

  4. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  5. Physical processes mediating climate impacts in shelf sea ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Jason; Schrum, Corinna; Cannaby, Heather; Allen, Icarus; Artioli, Yuri; Butenschon, Momme; Daewel, Ute; Fach, Bettina; Pushpadas, Dhanya; Salihoglu, Baris; Wakelin, Sarah

    2013-04-01

    How global scale climate change might impact coastal and shelf seas is far from straightforward. A myriad of physical processes can potentially act as vectors transferring the larger scale oceanic and atmospheric variability and change to shelf sea physics, biogeochemistry and lower trophic level ecosystems. These act on a wide range of time scales, being strongly dependent on the prevailing conditions of an individual shelf sea basin. Examples of the physical processes include upper ocean warming, seasonal/permanent stratification, wind mixing, convective mixing, light climate, terrestrial input, circulation and ocean-shelf exchange. These potentially impact ecosystem processes such as primary production, plankton community structured, bloom timing, and mid-water production. However, different processes often act in a different sense and are not necessarily additive, leading to damping or amplification effects. During the MEECE project (www.meece.eu) we conducted a series of coordinated downscaled coupled physics-ecosystem model experiments to explore these issues. Here, we review the prevailing physical processes, contrasting five very different shelf sea regions: North Sea, Celtic seas, Baltic Sea, Black sea and Barents Sea, using results from three different model systems: POLCOMS-ERSEM, ECOSMO, BIMS-ECO. Using this ensemble of simulations, along with process sensitivity studies and multiple forcing studies, we are able to identify which physical processes are important in which region, and how they interact. This builds up a picture of contrasting vulnerability of these regions to different vectors of change.

  6. Structural order in additive processed bulk heterojunction organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, James Thomas

    Considerable academic and industrial efforts have been dedicated to resolving scientific and technological issues associated with the fabrication of efficient plastic solar cells via solution deposition techniques. The most successful strategy used to generate solution processable devices implements a two component donor-acceptor type system composed of a (p-type) narrow bandgap conjugated polymer donor blended with a (n-type) fullerene acceptor. Due to the limited exciton diffusion lengths (~10 nm) inherent to these materials, efficient photoinduced charge generation requires heterojunction formation (i.e. donor/acceptor interfaces) in close proximity to the region of exciton generation. Maximal charge extraction therefore requires that donor and acceptor components form nanoscale phase separated percolating pathways to their respective electrodes. Devices exhibiting these structural characteristics are termed bulk heterojunction devices (BHJ). Although the BHJ architecture highlights the basic characteristics of functional donor-acceptor type organic solar cells, device optimization requires internal order within each phase and proper organization relative to the substrate in order to maximize charge transport efficiencies and minimize charge carrier recombination losses. The economic viability of BHJ solar cells hinges upon the minimization of processing costs; thus, commercially relevant processing techniques should generate optimal structural characteristics during film formation, eliminating the need for additional post deposition processing steps. Empirical optimization has shown that solution deposition using high boiling point additives (e.g. octanedithiol (ODT)) provides a simple and widely used fabrication method for maximizing the power conversion efficiencies of BHJ solar cells. This work will show using x-ray scattering that a small percentage of ODT (~2%) in chlorobenzene induces the nucleation of polymeric crystallites within 2 min of deposition

  7. Space plasma physics: I - Stationary processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Sato, Tetsuya

    1989-01-01

    The physics of stationary processes in space plasmas is examined theoretically in an introduction intended for graduate students. The approach involves the extensive use of numerical simulations. Chapters are devoted to fundamental principles, small-amplitude waves, and the stationary solar plasma system; typical measurement data and simulation results are presented graphically.

  8. Processable high temperature resistant addition type polyimide laminating resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafini, T. T.; Delvigs, P.

    1973-01-01

    Basic studies that were performed using model compounds to elucidate the polymerization mechanism of the so-called addition-type (A-type) polyimides are reviewed. The fabrication and properties of polyimide/graphite fiber composites using A-type polyimide prepolymers as the matrix are also reviewed. An alternate method for preparing processable A-type polyimides by means of in situ polymerization of monomer reactants (PMR) on the fiber reinforcement is described. The elevated temperature properties of A-type PMR/graphite fiber composites are also presented.

  9. Process monitoring of additive manufacturing by using optical tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Zenzinger, Guenter E-mail: alexander.ladewig@mtu.de; Bamberg, Joachim E-mail: alexander.ladewig@mtu.de; Ladewig, Alexander E-mail: alexander.ladewig@mtu.de; Hess, Thomas E-mail: alexander.ladewig@mtu.de; Henkel, Benjamin E-mail: alexander.ladewig@mtu.de; Satzger, Wilhelm E-mail: alexander.ladewig@mtu.de

    2015-03-31

    Parts fabricated by means of additive manufacturing are usually of complex shape and owing to the fabrication procedure by using selective laser melting (SLM), potential defects and inaccuracies are often very small in lateral size. Therefore, an adequate quality inspection of such parts is rather challenging, while non-destructive-techniques (NDT) are difficult to realize, but considerable efforts are necessary in order to ensure the quality of SLM-parts especially used for aerospace components. Thus, MTU Aero Engines is currently focusing on the development of an Online Process Control system which monitors and documents the complete welding process during the SLM fabrication procedure. A high-resolution camera system is used to obtain images, from which tomographic data for a 3dim analysis of SLM-parts are processed. From the analysis, structural irregularities and structural disorder resulting from any possible erroneous melting process become visible and may be allocated anywhere within the 3dim structure. Results of our optical tomography (OT) method as obtained on real defects are presented.

  10. Process monitoring of additive manufacturing by using optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenzinger, Guenter; Bamberg, Joachim; Ladewig, Alexander; Hess, Thomas; Henkel, Benjamin; Satzger, Wilhelm

    2015-03-01

    Parts fabricated by means of additive manufacturing are usually of complex shape and owing to the fabrication procedure by using selective laser melting (SLM), potential defects and inaccuracies are often very small in lateral size. Therefore, an adequate quality inspection of such parts is rather challenging, while non-destructive-techniques (NDT) are difficult to realize, but considerable efforts are necessary in order to ensure the quality of SLM-parts especially used for aerospace components. Thus, MTU Aero Engines is currently focusing on the development of an Online Process Control system which monitors and documents the complete welding process during the SLM fabrication procedure. A high-resolution camera system is used to obtain images, from which tomographic data for a 3dim analysis of SLM-parts are processed. From the analysis, structural irregularities and structural disorder resulting from any possible erroneous melting process become visible and may be allocated anywhere within the 3dim structure. Results of our optical tomography (OT) method as obtained on real defects are presented.

  11. Process for the physical segregation of minerals

    DOEpatents

    Yingling, Jon C.; Ganguli, Rajive

    2004-01-06

    With highly heterogeneous groups or streams of minerals, physical segregation using online quality measurements is an economically important first stage of the mineral beneficiation process. Segregation enables high quality fractions of the stream to bypass processing, such as cleaning operations, thereby reducing the associated costs and avoiding the yield losses inherent in any downstream separation process. The present invention includes various methods for reliably segregating a mineral stream into at least one fraction meeting desired quality specifications while at the same time maximizing yield of that fraction.

  12. Method for controlling a laser additive process using intrinsic illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tait, Robert; Cai, Guoshuang; Azer, Magdi; Chen, Xiaobin; Liu, Yong; Harding, Kevin

    2015-05-01

    One form of additive manufacturing is to use a laser to generate a melt pool from powdered metal that is sprayed from a nozzle. The laser net-shape machining system builds the part a layer at a time by following a predetermined path. However, because the path may need to take many turns, maintaining a constant melt pool may not be easy. A straight section may require one speed and power while a sharp bend would over melt the metal at the same settings. This paper describes a process monitoring method that uses the intrinsic IR radiation from the melt pool along with a process model configured to establish target values for the parameters associated with the manufacture or repair. This model is based upon known properties of the metal being used as well as the properties of the laser beam. An adaptive control technique is then employed to control process parameters of the machining system based upon the real-time weld pool measurement. Since the system uses the heat radiant from the melt pool, other previously deposited metal does not confuse the system as only the melted material is seen by the camera.

  13. Analysis of physical processes via imaging vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volovodenko, V.; Efremova, N.; Efremov, V.

    2016-06-01

    Practically, all modeling processes in one way or another are random. The foremost formulated theoretical foundation embraces Markov processes, being represented in different forms. Markov processes are characterized as a random process that undergoes transitions from one state to another on a state space, whereas the probability distribution of the next state depends only on the current state and not on the sequence of events that preceded it. In the Markov processes the proposition (model) of the future by no means changes in the event of the expansion and/or strong information progression relative to preceding time. Basically, modeling physical fields involves process changing in time, i.e. non-stationay processes. In this case, the application of Laplace transformation provides unjustified description complications. Transition to other possibilities results in explicit simplification. The method of imaging vectors renders constructive mathematical models and necessary transition in the modeling process and analysis itself. The flexibility of the model itself using polynomial basis leads to the possible rapid transition of the mathematical model and further analysis acceleration. It should be noted that the mathematical description permits operator representation. Conversely, operator representation of the structures, algorithms and data processing procedures significantly improve the flexibility of the modeling process.

  14. Physical processes in spin polarized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kulsrud, R.M.; Valeo, E.J.; Cowley, S.

    1984-05-01

    If the plasma in a nuclear fusion reactor is polarized, the nuclear reactions are modified in such a way as to enhance the reactor performance. We calculate in detail the modification of these nuclear reactions by different modes of polarization of the nuclear fuel. We also consider in detail the various physical processes that can lead to depolarization and show that they are by and large slow enough that a high degree of polarization can be maintained.

  15. Fabrication of a Flexible Amperometric Glucose Sensor Using Additive Processes

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiaosong; Durgan, Christopher J.; Matthews, David J.; Motley, Joshua R.; Tan, Xuebin; Pholsena, Kovit; Árnadóttir, Líney; Castle, Jessica R.; Jacobs, Peter G.; Cargill, Robert S.; Ward, W. Kenneth; Conley, John F.; Herman, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    This study details the use of printing and other additive processes to fabricate a novel amperometric glucose sensor. The sensor was fabricated using a Au coated 12.7 μm thick polyimide substrate as a starting material, where micro-contact printing, electrochemical plating, chloridization, electrohydrodynamic jet (e-jet) printing, and spin coating were used to pattern, deposit, chloridize, print, and coat functional materials, respectively. We have found that e-jet printing was effective for the deposition and patterning of glucose oxidase inks with lateral feature sizes between ~5 to 1000 μm in width, and that the glucose oxidase was still active after printing. The thickness of the permselective layer was optimized to obtain a linear response for glucose concentrations up to 32 mM and no response to acetaminophen, a common interfering compound, was observed. The use of such thin polyimide substrates allow wrapping of the sensors around catheters with high radius of curvature ~250 μm, where additive and microfabrication methods may allow significant cost reductions. PMID:26634186

  16. Porosity Measurements and Analysis for Metal Additive Manufacturing Process Control

    PubMed Central

    Slotwinski, John A; Garboczi, Edward J; Hebenstreit, Keith M

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques can produce complex, high-value metal parts, with potential applications as critical metal components such as those found in aerospace engines and as customized biomedical implants. Material porosity in these parts is undesirable for aerospace parts - since porosity could lead to premature failure - and desirable for some biomedical implants - since surface-breaking pores allows for better integration with biological tissue. Changes in a part’s porosity during an additive manufacturing build may also be an indication of an undesired change in the build process. Here, we present efforts to develop an ultrasonic sensor for monitoring changes in the porosity in metal parts during fabrication on a metal powder bed fusion system. The development of well-characterized reference samples, measurements of the porosity of these samples with multiple techniques, and correlation of ultrasonic measurements with the degree of porosity are presented. A proposed sensor design, measurement strategy, and future experimental plans on a metal powder bed fusion system are also presented. PMID:26601041

  17. Porosity Measurements and Analysis for Metal Additive Manufacturing Process Control.

    PubMed

    Slotwinski, John A; Garboczi, Edward J; Hebenstreit, Keith M

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques can produce complex, high-value metal parts, with potential applications as critical metal components such as those found in aerospace engines and as customized biomedical implants. Material porosity in these parts is undesirable for aerospace parts - since porosity could lead to premature failure - and desirable for some biomedical implants - since surface-breaking pores allows for better integration with biological tissue. Changes in a part's porosity during an additive manufacturing build may also be an indication of an undesired change in the build process. Here, we present efforts to develop an ultrasonic sensor for monitoring changes in the porosity in metal parts during fabrication on a metal powder bed fusion system. The development of well-characterized reference samples, measurements of the porosity of these samples with multiple techniques, and correlation of ultrasonic measurements with the degree of porosity are presented. A proposed sensor design, measurement strategy, and future experimental plans on a metal powder bed fusion system are also presented. PMID:26601041

  18. Physical processes causing the formation of penitentes.

    PubMed

    Claudin, P; Jarry, H; Vignoles, G; Plapp, M; Andreotti, B

    2015-09-01

    Snow penitentes form in sublimation conditions by differential ablation. Here we investigate the physical processes at the initial stage of penitente growth and perform the linear stability analysis of a flat surface submitted to the solar heat flux. We show that these patterns do not simply result from the self-illumination of the surface-a scale-free process-but are primarily controlled by vapor diffusion and heat conduction. The wavelength at which snow penitentes emerge is derived and discussed. We found that it is controlled by aerodynamic mixing of vapor above the ice surface. PMID:26465564

  19. Automating the initial physics chart checking process.

    PubMed

    Furhang, Eli E; Dolan, James; Sillanpaa, Jussi K; Harrison, Louis B

    2009-01-01

    The initial physics chart check, an essential quality assurance process, verifies that the physician intent is properly expressed in the treatment plan, the treatment plan is reasonable, and the Record and Verify (RV) system properly captures the plan parameters. In this work the process was automated by characterizing the initial physics chart check as a universal set of steps, compartmentalized into intra-plan and inter-plan reviews. The intra-plan review confirms the diagnosis-prescription-plan correlation, and verifies transfer accuracy of the signed treatment plan parameters into the RV system. The inter-plan review tabulates all RV parameters for similar cases, and highlights outliers. The tabulation of RV parameters for similar cases enables a summation of experience across staff members, and facilitates a comparison using the Statistical Process Control (SPC) formalism. A summary sheet, added to each reviewed chart, automatically documents deviations noted during the review process. Forty-five patient charts were analyzed using the software. The length of time for the entire initial chart-checking process was reduced from about an hour to a few minutes. The code developed in this work allows the user to consider the big picture, trusting the software to track details. PMID:19223834

  20. Free electron laser physical process code (FELPPC)

    SciTech Connect

    Thode, L.E.; Chan, K.C.D.; Schmitt, M.J.

    1995-02-01

    Even at the conceptual level, the strong coupling between subsystem elements complicates the understanding and design of a free electron laser (FEL). Given the requirements for high-performance FELS, the coupling between subsystems must be included to obtain a realistic picture of the potential operational capability. The concept of an Integrated Numerical Experiment (INEX) was implemented to accurately calculate the coupling between the FEL subsystems. During the late 1980`s, the INEX approach was successfully applied to a large number of accelerator and FEL experiments. Unfortunately, because of significant manpower and computational requirements, the integrated approach is difficult to apply to trade-off and initial design studies. However, the INEX codes provided a base from which realistic accelerator, wiggler, optics, and control models could be developed. The Free Electron Laser Physical Process Code (FELPPC) includes models developed from the INEX codes, provides coupling between the subsystem models, and incorporates application models relevant to a specific study. In other words, FELPPC solves the complete physical process model using realistic physics and technology constraints. FELPPC can calculate complex FEL configurations including multiple accelerator and wiggler combinations. When compared with the INEX codes, the subsystem models have been found to be quite accurate over many orders-of-magnitude. As a result, FELPPC has been used for the initial design studies of a large number of FEL applications: high-average-power ground, space, plane, and ship based FELS; beacon and illuminator FELS; medical and compact FELS; and XUV FELS.

  1. 17 CFR 38.252 - Additional requirements for physical-delivery contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... TRADING COMMISSION DESIGNATED CONTRACT MARKETS Prevention of Market Disruption § 38.252 Additional requirements for physical-delivery contracts. For physical-delivery contracts, the designated contract market... underlying commodity market and to the convergence between the contract price and the price of the...

  2. Pyrrolidinone derivatives as processing additives for solution processed organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vongsaysy, Uyxing; Pavageau, Bertrand; Servant, Laurent; Aziz, Hany

    2014-10-01

    Processing additives are widely used to increase the efficiency of solution processed organic solar cells. We use the Hansen solubility parameters (HSPs) to investigate novel processing additives. The HSPs predict pyrrolidinone derivatives to be efficient processing additives for OSC systems based on poly(3-hexylthiophene)/[6,6]-phenyl-C61- butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT/PCBM). Two pyrrolidinone derivatives are identified: 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone and 1- benzyl-2-pyrrolidinone. The processing additives are introduced with various concentrations in the formulation of P3HT and PCBM solution. The electrical characterizations show that the two processing additives significantly increase the short circuit current and thus the power conversion efficiency of the OSCs. The results thus highlight HSPs as an effective and relatively straightforward tool that can be employed to optimize OSC morphology from a theoretical standpoint. Such a tool will be invaluable for identifying additives for novel high efficiency polymer species as they are synthesized, and thus to streamline the device fabrication and device optimization process.

  3. Thermal processing of EVA encapsulants and effects of formulation additives

    SciTech Connect

    Pern, F.J.; Glick, S.H.

    1996-05-01

    The authors investigated the in-situ processing temperatures and effects of various formulation additives on the formation of ultraviolet (UV) excitable chromophores, in the thermal lamination and curing of ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) encapsulants. A programmable, microprocessor-controlled, double-bag vacuum laminator was used to study two commercial as formulated EVA films, A9918P and 15295P, and solution-cast films of Elvaxrm (EVX) impregnated with various curing agents and antioxidants. The results show that the actual measured temperatures of EVA lagged significantly behind the programmed profiles for the heating elements and were affected by the total thermal mass loaded inside the laminator chamber. The antioxidant Naugard P{trademark}, used in the two commercial EVA formulations, greatly enhances the formation of UV-excitable, short chromophores upon curing, whereas other tested antioxidants show little effect. A new curing agent chosen specifically for the EVA formulation modification produces little or no effect on chromophore formation, no bubbling problems in the glass/EVX/glass laminates, and a gel content of {approximately}80% when cured at programmed 155{degrees}C for 4 min. Also demonstrated is the greater discoloring effect with higher concentrations of curing-generated chromophores.

  4. Additions and Improvements to the FLASH Code for Simulating High Energy Density Physics Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, D. Q.; Daley, C.; Dubey, A.; Fatenejad, M.; Flocke, N.; Graziani, C.; Lee, D.; Tzeferacos, P.; Weide, K.

    2015-11-01

    FLASH is an open source, finite-volume Eulerian, spatially adaptive radiation hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics code that incorporates capabilities for a broad range of physical processes, performs well on a wide range of computer architectures, and has a broad user base. Extensive capabilities have been added to FLASH to make it an open toolset for the academic high energy density physics (HEDP) community. We summarize these capabilities, with particular emphasis on recent additions and improvements. These include advancements in the optical ray tracing laser package, with methods such as bi-cubic 2D and tri-cubic 3D interpolation of electron number density, adaptive stepping and 2nd-, 3rd-, and 4th-order Runge-Kutta integration methods. Moreover, we showcase the simulated magnetic field diagnostic capabilities of the code, including induction coils, Faraday rotation, and proton radiography. We also describe several collaborations with the National Laboratories and the academic community in which FLASH has been used to simulate HEDP experiments. This work was supported in part at the University of Chicago by the DOE NNSA ASC through the Argonne Institute for Computing in Science under field work proposal 57789; and the NSF under grant PHY-0903997.

  5. Physical characteristics of welding arc ignition process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Linan; Song, Yonglun; Xiao, Tianjiao; Ran, Guowei

    2012-07-01

    The existing research of welding arc mainly focuses on the stable combustion state and the research on the mechanism of welding arc ignition process is quite lack. The tungsten inert gas(TIG) touch arc ignition process is observed via a high speed camera and the high time resolution spectral diagnosis system. The changing phenomenon of main ionized element provided the electrons in the arc ignition is found. The metallic element is the main contributor to provide the electrons at the beginning of the discharging, and then the excitated shielding gas element replaces the function of the metallic element. The electron density during the period of the arc ignition is calculated by the Stark-broadened lines of Hα. Through the discussion with the repeatability in relaxation phenomenon, the statistical regularity in the arc ignition process is analyzed. The similar rules as above are observed through the comparison with the laser-assisted arc ignition experiments and the metal inert gas(MIG) arc ignition experiments. This research is helpful to further understanding on the generation mechanism of welding arc ignition and also has a certain academic and practical significance on enriching the welding physical theoretical foundation and improving the precise monitoring on automatic arc welding process.

  6. Physics of the spatially averaged snowmelt process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, Federico E.; Kavvas, M. Levent

    1997-04-01

    It has been recognized that the snowmelt models developed in the past do not fully meet current prediction requirements. Part of the reason is that they do not account for the spatial variation in the dynamics of the spatially heterogeneous snowmelt process. Most of the current physics-based distributed snowmelt models utilize point-location-scale conservation equations which do not represent the spatially varying snowmelt dynamics over a grid area that surrounds a computational node. In this study, to account for the spatial heterogeneity of the snowmelt dynamics, areally averaged mass and energy conservation equations for the snowmelt process are developed. As a first step, energy and mass conservation equations that govern the snowmelt dynamics at a point location are averaged over the snowpack depth, resulting in depth averaged equations (DAE). In this averaging, it is assumed that the snowpack has two layers. Then, the point location DAE are averaged over the snowcover area. To develop the areally averaged equations of the snowmelt physics, we make the fundamental assumption that snowmelt process is spatially ergodic. The snow temperature and the snow density are considered as the stochastic variables. The areally averaged snowmelt equations are obtained in terms of their corresponding ensemble averages. Only the first two moments are considered. A numerical solution scheme (Runge-Kutta) is then applied to solve the resulting system of ordinary differential equations. This equation system is solved for the areal mean and areal variance of snow temperature and of snow density, for the areal mean of snowmelt, and for the areal covariance of snow temperature and snow density. The developed model is tested using Scott Valley (Siskiyou County, California) snowmelt and meteorological data. The performance of the model in simulating the observed areally averaged snowmelt is satisfactory.

  7. Bringing life to soil physical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallett, P. D.

    2013-12-01

    When Oklahoma's native prairie grass roots were replaced by corn, the greatest environmental (and social) disaster ever to hit America ensued. The soils lost structure, physical binding by roots was annihilated and when drought came the Great Dust Bowl commenced. This form of environmental disaster has repeated over history and although not always apparent, similar processes drive the degradation of seemingly productive farmland and forests. But just as negative impacts on biology are deleterious to soil physical properties, positive impacts could reverse these trends. In finding solutions to soil sustainability and food security, we should be able to exploit biological processes to improve soil physical properties. This talk will focus on a quantitative understanding of how biology changes soil physical behaviour. Like the Great Dust Bowl, it starts with reinforcement mechanisms by plant roots. We found that binding of soil by cereal (barley) roots within 5 weeks of planting can more than double soil shear strength, with greater plant density causing greater reinforcement. With time, however, the relative impact of root reinforcement diminishes due to root turnover and aging of the seedbed. From mechanical tests of individual roots, reasonable predictions of reinforcement by tree roots are possible with fibre bundle models. With herbaceous plants like cereals, however, the same parameters (root strength, stiffness, size and distribution) result in a poor prediction. We found that root type, root age and abiotic factors such as compaction and waterlogging affect mechanical behaviour, further complicating the understanding and prediction of root reinforcement. For soil physical stability, the interface between root and soil is an extremely important zone in terms of resistance of roots to pull-out and rhizosphere formation. Compounds analogous to root exudates have been found with rheological tests to initially decrease the shear stress where wet soils flow, but

  8. Evaluation of Select Surface Processing Techniques for In Situ Application During the Additive Manufacturing Build Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Book, Todd A.; Sangid, Michael D.

    2016-07-01

    Although additive manufacturing offers numerous performance advantages for different applications, it is not being used for critical applications due to uncertainties in structural integrity as a result of innate process variability and defects. To minimize uncertainty, the current approach relies on the concurrent utilization of process monitoring, post-processing, and non-destructive inspection in addition to an extensive material qualification process. This paper examines an alternative approach by evaluating the application of select surface process techniques, to include sliding severe plastic deformation (SPD) and fine particle shot peening, on direct metal laser sintering-produced AlSi10Mg materials. Each surface processing technique is compared to baseline as-built and post-processed samples as a proof of concept for surface enhancement. Initial results pairing sliding SPD with the manufacture's recommended thermal stress relief cycle demonstrated uniform recrystallization of the microstructure, resulting in a more homogeneous distribution of strain among the microstructure than as-built or post-processed conditions. This result demonstrates the potential for the in situ application of various surface processing techniques during the layerwise direct metal laser sintering build process.

  9. Evaluation of Select Surface Processing Techniques for In Situ Application During the Additive Manufacturing Build Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Book, Todd A.; Sangid, Michael D.

    2016-03-01

    Although additive manufacturing offers numerous performance advantages for different applications, it is not being used for critical applications due to uncertainties in structural integrity as a result of innate process variability and defects. To minimize uncertainty, the current approach relies on the concurrent utilization of process monitoring, post-processing, and non-destructive inspection in addition to an extensive material qualification process. This paper examines an alternative approach by evaluating the application of select surface process techniques, to include sliding severe plastic deformation (SPD) and fine particle shot peening, on direct metal laser sintering-produced AlSi10Mg materials. Each surface processing technique is compared to baseline as-built and post-processed samples as a proof of concept for surface enhancement. Initial results pairing sliding SPD with the manufacture's recommended thermal stress relief cycle demonstrated uniform recrystallization of the microstructure, resulting in a more homogeneous distribution of strain among the microstructure than as-built or post-processed conditions. This result demonstrates the potential for the in situ application of various surface processing techniques during the layerwise direct metal laser sintering build process.

  10. Physical processes in collapse driven supernova

    SciTech Connect

    Mayle, R.W.

    1985-11-01

    A model of the supernova explosion is discussed. The method of neutrino transport is discussed, since the explosive mechanism depends on neutrino heating of the material behind the accretion shock. The core region of these exploding stars becomes unstable to convective motions during the supernova evolution. Convective mixing allows more neutrinos to escape from under the neutrinosphere, and thus increases the amount of heating by neutrinos. An approximate method of incorporating convection is described, and some results of including convection in a computer model is presented. Another phenomena is seen in computer simulations of supernova, oscillations in the neutrino luminosity and mass accretion rate onto the protoneutron star. The last topic discussed in this thesis describes the attempt to understand this oscillation by perturbation of the steady state solution to equations approximating the complex physical processes occurring in the late time supernova. 42 refs., 31 figs.

  11. Combining Advanced Oxidation Processes: Assessment Of Process Additivity, Synergism, And Antagonism

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Robert W.; Sharma, M.P.; Gbadebo Adewuyi, Yusuf

    2007-07-01

    This paper addresses the process interactions from combining integrated processes (such as advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), biological operations, air stripping, etc.). AOPs considered include: Fenton's reagent, ultraviolet light, titanium dioxide, ozone (O{sub 3}), hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), sonication/acoustic cavitation, among others. A critical review of the technical literature has been performed, and the data has been analyzed in terms of the processes being additive, synergistic, or antagonistic. Predictions based on the individual unit operations are made and compared against the behavior of the combined unit operations. The data reported in this paper focus primarily on treatment of petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents. (authors)

  12. Effects of chemical additives on microbial enhanced oil recovery processes

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, R.S.; Chase, K.L.; Bertus, K.M.; Stepp, A.K.

    1989-12-01

    An extensive laboratory study has been conducted to determine (1) the role of the microbial cells and products in oil displacement, (2) the relative rates of transport of microbial cells and chemical products from the metabolism of nutrient in porous media, and (3) the effects of chemical additives on the oil recovery efficiency of microbial formulations. This report describes experiments relating to the effects of additives on oil recovery efficiency of microbial formulations. The effects of additives on the oil recovery efficiency of microbial formulations were determined by conducting oil displacement experiments in 1-foot-long Berea sandstone cores. Sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP), a low-molecular-weight polyacrylamide polymer, a lignosulfonate surfactant, and sodium bicarbonate were added to a microbial formulation at a concentration of 1%. The effects of using these additives in a preflush prior to injection of the microbial formulation were also evaluated. Oil-displacement experiments with and without a sodium bicarbonate preflush were conducted in 4-foot-long Berea sandstone cores, and samples of in situ fluids were collected at various times at four intermediate points along the core. The concentrations of metabolic products and microbes in the fluid samples were determined. 9 refs., 22 figs., 8 tabs.

  13. Physical disintegration of biochar: An overlooked process

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Data collected from both artificially and field (naturally) weathered biochar suggest that a potentially significant pathway of biochar disappearance is through physical breakdown of the biochar structure. Through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) we characterized this physical weathering which inc...

  14. Physical processes in EUV sources for microlithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banine, V. Y.; Koshelev, K. N.; Swinkels, G. H. P. M.

    2011-06-01

    The source is an integral part of an extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) tool. Such a source, as well as the EUVL tool, has to fulfil very high demands both technical and cost oriented. The EUVL tool operates at a wavelength of 13.5 nm, which requires the following new developments. The light production mechanism changes from conventional lamps and lasers to relatively high-temperature emitting plasmas. The light transport, mainly refractive for deep ultraviolet (DUV), should be reflective for EUV. The source specifications as derived from the customer requirements on wafer throughput mean that the output EUV source power has to be hundreds of watts. This in its turn means that tens to hundreds of kilowatts of dissipated power has to be managed in a relatively small volume. In order to keep lithography costs as low as possible, the lifetime of the components should be as long as possible and at least of the order of thousands of hours. This poses a challenge for the sources, namely how to design and manufacture components robust enough to withstand the intense environment of high heat dissipation, flows of several keV ions as well as the atomic and particular debris within the source vessel. As with all lithography tools, the imaging requirements demand a narrow illumination bandwidth. Absorption of materials at EUV wavelengths is extreme with extinguishing lengths of the order of tens of nanometres, so the balance between high transmission and spectral purity requires careful engineering. All together, EUV lithography sources present technological challenges in various fields of physics such as plasma, optics and material science. These challenges are being tackled by the source manufacturers and investigated extensively in the research facilities around the world. An overview of the published results on the topic as well as the analyses of the physical processes behind the proposed solutions will be presented in this paper.

  15. Microstructure-controllable Laser Additive Manufacturing Process for Metal Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei-Chin; Chuang, Chuan-Sheng; Lin, Ching-Chih; Wu, Chih-Hsien; Lin, De-Yau; Liu, Sung-Ho; Tseng, Wen-Peng; Horng, Ji-Bin

    Controlling the cooling rate of alloy during solidification is the most commonly used method for varying the material microstructure. However, the cooling rate of selective laser melting (SLM) production is constrained by the optimal parameter settings for a dense product. This study proposes a method for forming metal products via the SLM process with electromagnetic vibrations. The electromagnetic vibrations change the solidification process for a given set of SLM parameters, allowing the microstructure to be varied via magnetic flux density. This proposed method can be used for creating microstructure-controllable bio-implant products with complex shapes.

  16. The Stress Process in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankenship, Bonnie Tjeerdsma

    2007-01-01

    Negative stress in physical education can reduce a student's enjoyment of physical activity and destroy the individual's desire to be a lifelong mover. The purpose of this article is to explore the concept of stress in physical education. Stress is defined as a substantial imbalance between the demand of a situation and the individual's capability…

  17. Physics as an Enterprise of Process Philosophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rangacharyulu, Chary

    2005-01-01

    Physics, as a discipline, attempts to discern the mysteries of physical universe and it is also an inspiration for technological innovations which contribute to the good or demise of human civilization. While it continues to have tremendous impact on the technological front, one wonders if physics, as an enterprise engaged in providing a coherent…

  18. Part height control of laser metal additive manufacturing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yu-Herng

    Laser Metal Deposition (LMD) has been used to not only make but also repair damaged parts in a layer-by-layer fashion. Parts made in this manner may produce less waste than those made through conventional machining processes. However, a common issue of LMD involves controlling the deposition's layer thickness. Accuracy is important, and as it increases, both the time required to produce the part and the material wasted during the material removal process (e.g., milling, lathe) decrease. The deposition rate is affected by multiple parameters, such as the powder feed rate, laser input power, axis feed rate, material type, and part design, the values of each of which may change during the LMD process. Using a mathematical model to build a generic equation that predicts the deposition's layer thickness is difficult due to these complex parameters. In this thesis, we propose a simple method that utilizes a single device. This device uses a pyrometer to monitor the current build height, thereby allowing the layer thickness to be controlled during the LMD process. This method also helps the LMD system to build parts even with complex parameters and to increase material efficiency.

  19. Thermographic process monitoring in powderbed based additive manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, Harald Zaeh, Michael F.; Zeugner, Thomas

    2015-03-31

    Selective Laser Melting is utilized to build metallic parts directly from CAD-Data by solidification of thin powder layers through application of a fast scanning laser beam. In this study layerwise monitoring of the temperature distribution is used to gather information about the process stability and the resulting part quality. The heat distribution varies with different kinds of parameters including scan vector length, laser power, layer thickness and inter-part distance in the job layout which in turn influence the resulting part quality. By integration of an off-axis mounted uncooled thermal detector the solidification as well as the layer deposition are monitored and evaluated. Errors in the generation of new powder layers usually result in a locally varying layer thickness that may cause poor part quality. For effect quantification, the locally applied layer thickness is determined by evaluating the heat-up of the newly deposited powder. During the solidification process space and time-resolved data is used to characterize the zone of elevated temperatures and to derive locally varying heat dissipation properties. Potential quality indicators are evaluated and correlated to the resulting part quality: Thermal diffusivity is derived from a simplified heat dissipation model and evaluated for every pixel and cool-down phase of a layer. This allows the quantification of expected material homogeneity properties. Maximum temperature and time above certain temperatures are measured in order to detect hot spots or delamination issues that may cause a process breakdown. Furthermore, a method for quantification of sputter activity is presented. Since high sputter activity indicates unstable melt dynamics this can be used to identify parameter drifts, improper atmospheric conditions or material binding errors. The resulting surface structure after solidification complicates temperature determination on the one hand but enables the detection of potential surface defects

  20. Thermographic process monitoring in powderbed based additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, Harald; Zeugner, Thomas; Zaeh, Michael F.

    2015-03-01

    Selective Laser Melting is utilized to build metallic parts directly from CAD-Data by solidification of thin powder layers through application of a fast scanning laser beam. In this study layerwise monitoring of the temperature distribution is used to gather information about the process stability and the resulting part quality. The heat distribution varies with different kinds of parameters including scan vector length, laser power, layer thickness and inter-part distance in the job layout which in turn influence the resulting part quality. By integration of an off-axis mounted uncooled thermal detector the solidification as well as the layer deposition are monitored and evaluated. Errors in the generation of new powder layers usually result in a locally varying layer thickness that may cause poor part quality. For effect quantification, the locally applied layer thickness is determined by evaluating the heat-up of the newly deposited powder. During the solidification process space and time-resolved data is used to characterize the zone of elevated temperatures and to derive locally varying heat dissipation properties. Potential quality indicators are evaluated and correlated to the resulting part quality: Thermal diffusivity is derived from a simplified heat dissipation model and evaluated for every pixel and cool-down phase of a layer. This allows the quantification of expected material homogeneity properties. Maximum temperature and time above certain temperatures are measured in order to detect hot spots or delamination issues that may cause a process breakdown. Furthermore, a method for quantification of sputter activity is presented. Since high sputter activity indicates unstable melt dynamics this can be used to identify parameter drifts, improper atmospheric conditions or material binding errors. The resulting surface structure after solidification complicates temperature determination on the one hand but enables the detection of potential surface defects

  1. Statistical physics of media processes: Mediaphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Dmitri V.; Mandel, Igor

    2007-04-01

    The processes of mass communications in complicated social or sociobiological systems such as marketing, economics, politics, animal populations, etc. as a subject for the special scientific subbranch-“mediaphysics”-are considered in its relation with sociophysics. A new statistical physics approach to analyze these phenomena is proposed. A keystone of the approach is an analysis of population distribution between two or many alternatives: brands, political affiliations, or opinions. Relative distances between a state of a “person's mind” and the alternatives are measures of propensity to buy (to affiliate, or to have a certain opinion). The distribution of population by those relative distances is time dependent and affected by external (economic, social, marketing, natural) and internal (influential propagation of opinions, “word of mouth”, etc.) factors, considered as fields. Specifically, the interaction and opinion-influence field can be generalized to incorporate important elements of Ising-spin-based sociophysical models and kinetic-equation ones. The distributions were described by a Schrödinger-type equation in terms of Green's functions. The developed approach has been applied to a real mass-media efficiency problem for a large company and generally demonstrated very good results despite low initial correlations of factors and the target variable.

  2. Proton computed tomography from multiple physics processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bopp, C.; Colin, J.; Cussol, D.; Finck, Ch; Labalme, M.; Rousseau, M.; Brasse, D.

    2013-10-01

    Proton CT (pCT) nowadays aims at improving hadron therapy treatment planning by mapping the relative stopping power (RSP) of materials with respect to water. The RSP depends mainly on the electron density of the materials. The main information used is the energy of the protons. However, during a pCT acquisition, the spatial and angular deviation of each particle is recorded and the information about its transmission is implicitly available. The potential use of those observables in order to get information about the materials is being investigated. Monte Carlo simulations of protons sent into homogeneous materials were performed, and the influence of the chemical composition on the outputs was studied. A pCT acquisition of a head phantom scan was simulated. Brain lesions with the same electron density but different concentrations of oxygen were used to evaluate the different observables. Tomographic images from the different physics processes were reconstructed using a filtered back-projection algorithm. Preliminary results indicate that information is present in the reconstructed images of transmission and angular deviation that may help differentiate tissues. However, the statistical uncertainty on these observables generates further challenge in order to obtain an optimal reconstruction and extract the most pertinent information.

  3. Proton computed tomography from multiple physics processes.

    PubMed

    Bopp, C; Colin, J; Cussol, D; Finck, Ch; Labalme, M; Rousseau, M; Brasse, D

    2013-10-21

    Proton CT (pCT) nowadays aims at improving hadron therapy treatment planning by mapping the relative stopping power (RSP) of materials with respect to water. The RSP depends mainly on the electron density of the materials. The main information used is the energy of the protons. However, during a pCT acquisition, the spatial and angular deviation of each particle is recorded and the information about its transmission is implicitly available. The potential use of those observables in order to get information about the materials is being investigated. Monte Carlo simulations of protons sent into homogeneous materials were performed, and the influence of the chemical composition on the outputs was studied. A pCT acquisition of a head phantom scan was simulated. Brain lesions with the same electron density but different concentrations of oxygen were used to evaluate the different observables. Tomographic images from the different physics processes were reconstructed using a filtered back-projection algorithm. Preliminary results indicate that information is present in the reconstructed images of transmission and angular deviation that may help differentiate tissues. However, the statistical uncertainty on these observables generates further challenge in order to obtain an optimal reconstruction and extract the most pertinent information. PMID:24076769

  4. Filamentous fungi for production of food additives and processing aids.

    PubMed

    Archer, David B; Connerton, Ian F; MacKenzie, Donald A

    2008-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are metabolically versatile organisms with a very wide distribution in nature. They exist in association with other species, e.g. as lichens or mycorrhiza, as pathogens of animals and plants or as free-living species. Many are regarded as nature's primary degraders because they secrete a wide variety of hydrolytic enzymes that degrade waste organic materials. Many species produce secondary metabolites such as polyketides or peptides and an increasing range of fungal species is exploited commercially as sources of enzymes and metabolites for food or pharmaceutical applications. The recent availability of fungal genome sequences has provided a major opportunity to explore and further exploit fungi as sources of enzymes and metabolites. In this review chapter we focus on the use of fungi in the production of food additives but take a largely pre-genomic, albeit a mainly molecular, view of the topic. PMID:18253709

  5. Human sperm rheotaxis: a passive physical process.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuoran; Liu, Jun; Meriano, Jim; Ru, Changhai; Xie, Shaorong; Luo, Jun; Sun, Yu

    2016-01-01

    A long-standing question in natural reproduction is how mammalian sperm navigate inside female reproductive tract and finally reach the egg cell, or oocyte. Recently, fluid flow was proposed as a long-range guidance cue for sperm navigation. Coitus induces fluid flow from oviduct to uterus, and sperm align themselves against the flow direction and swim upstream, a phenomenon termed rheotaxis. Whether sperm rheotaxis is a passive process dominated by fluid mechanics, or sperm actively sense and adapt to fluid flow remains controversial. Here we report the first quantitative study of sperm flagellar motion during human sperm rheotaxis and provide direct evidence indicating that sperm rheotaxis is a passive process. Experimental results show that there is no significant difference in flagellar beating amplitude and asymmetry between rheotaxis-turning sperm and those sperm swimming freely in the absence of fluid flow. Additionally, fluorescence image tracking shows no Ca(2+) influx during sperm rheotaxis turning, further suggesting there is no active signal transduction during human sperm rheotaxis. PMID:27005727

  6. Human sperm rheotaxis: a passive physical process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhuoran; Liu, Jun; Meriano, Jim; Ru, Changhai; Xie, Shaorong; Luo, Jun; Sun, Yu

    2016-03-01

    A long-standing question in natural reproduction is how mammalian sperm navigate inside female reproductive tract and finally reach the egg cell, or oocyte. Recently, fluid flow was proposed as a long–range guidance cue for sperm navigation. Coitus induces fluid flow from oviduct to uterus, and sperm align themselves against the flow direction and swim upstream, a phenomenon termed rheotaxis. Whether sperm rheotaxis is a passive process dominated by fluid mechanics, or sperm actively sense and adapt to fluid flow remains controversial. Here we report the first quantitative study of sperm flagellar motion during human sperm rheotaxis and provide direct evidence indicating that sperm rheotaxis is a passive process. Experimental results show that there is no significant difference in flagellar beating amplitude and asymmetry between rheotaxis-turning sperm and those sperm swimming freely in the absence of fluid flow. Additionally, fluorescence image tracking shows no Ca2+ influx during sperm rheotaxis turning, further suggesting there is no active signal transduction during human sperm rheotaxis.

  7. Human sperm rheotaxis: a passive physical process

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhuoran; Liu, Jun; Meriano, Jim; Ru, Changhai; Xie, Shaorong; Luo, Jun; Sun, Yu

    2016-01-01

    A long-standing question in natural reproduction is how mammalian sperm navigate inside female reproductive tract and finally reach the egg cell, or oocyte. Recently, fluid flow was proposed as a long–range guidance cue for sperm navigation. Coitus induces fluid flow from oviduct to uterus, and sperm align themselves against the flow direction and swim upstream, a phenomenon termed rheotaxis. Whether sperm rheotaxis is a passive process dominated by fluid mechanics, or sperm actively sense and adapt to fluid flow remains controversial. Here we report the first quantitative study of sperm flagellar motion during human sperm rheotaxis and provide direct evidence indicating that sperm rheotaxis is a passive process. Experimental results show that there is no significant difference in flagellar beating amplitude and asymmetry between rheotaxis-turning sperm and those sperm swimming freely in the absence of fluid flow. Additionally, fluorescence image tracking shows no Ca2+ influx during sperm rheotaxis turning, further suggesting there is no active signal transduction during human sperm rheotaxis. PMID:27005727

  8. Nitrogen addition using a gas blow in an ESR process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, S.; Momoi, Y.; Kajikawa, K.

    2016-07-01

    A new nitrogen method for adding in an ESR process using nitrogen gas blown in through the electrode was investigated. Nitrogen gas blown through a center bore of the electrode enabled contact between the nitrogen gas and the molten steel directly underneath the electrode tip. A ɸ 145mm diameter, laboratory-sized PESR furnace was used for the study on the reaction kinetics. Also, we carried out a water-model experiment in order to check the injection depth of the gas blown in the slag. The water model showed that the gas did not reach the upper surface of the molten metal and flowed on the bottom surface of the electrode only. An EPMA was carried out for a droplet remaining on the tip of the electrode after melting. The molten steel from the tip of the electrode shows that nitrogen gas absorption occurred at the tip of the electrode. The mass transfer coefficient was around 1.0x10-2 cm/sec in the system. This value is almost the same as the coefficient at the molten steel free surface.

  9. Thermodynamics of Irreversible Processes. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Transport Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Michael; Gallucci, V. F.

    These materials were designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. This module describes the application of irreversible thermodynamics to biology. It begins with…

  10. Probing new physics in rare charm processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, J.L.

    1994-09-01

    The possibility of using the charm system to search for new physics is addressed. Phenomena such as D{sup 0} - {bar D}{sup 0} mixing and rare decays of charmed mesons are first examined in the Standard Model to test the present understanding and to serve as benchmarks for signals from new sources. The effects of new physics from various classes of non-standard dynamical models on D{sup 0} - {bar D}{sup 0} mixing are investigated.

  11. Foreword: Additive Manufacturing: Interrelationships of Fabrication, Constitutive Relationships Targeting Performance, and Feedback to Process Control

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Carpenter, John S.; Beese, Allison M.; Bourell, David L.; Hamilton, Reginald F.; Mishra, Rajiv; Sears, James

    2015-06-26

    Additive manufacturing (AM) offers distinct advantages over conventional manufacturing processes including the capability to both build and repair complex part shapes; to integrate and consolidate parts and thus overcome joining concerns; and to locally tailor material compositions as well as properties. Moreover, a variety of fields such as aerospace, military, automotive, and biomedical are employing this manufacturing technique as a way to decrease costs, increase manufacturing agility, and explore novel geometry/functionalities. In order to increase acceptance of AM as a viable processing method, pathways for qualifying both the material and the process need to be developed and, perhaps, standardized. Thismore » symposium was designed to serve as a venue for the international AM community—including government, academia, and industry—to define the fundamental interrelationships between feedstock, processing, microstructure, shape, mechanical behavior/materials properties, and function/performance. Eventually, insight into the connections between processing, microstructure, property, and performance will be achieved through experimental observations, theoretical advances, and computational modeling of physical processes. Finally, once this insight matures, AM will be able to move from the realm of making parts to making qualified materials that are certified for use with minimal need for post-fabrication characterization.« less

  12. Foreword: Additive Manufacturing: Interrelationships of Fabrication, Constitutive Relationships Targeting Performance, and Feedback to Process Control

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, John S.; Beese, Allison M.; Bourell, David L.; Hamilton, Reginald F.; Mishra, Rajiv; Sears, James

    2015-06-26

    Additive manufacturing (AM) offers distinct advantages over conventional manufacturing processes including the capability to both build and repair complex part shapes; to integrate and consolidate parts and thus overcome joining concerns; and to locally tailor material compositions as well as properties. Moreover, a variety of fields such as aerospace, military, automotive, and biomedical are employing this manufacturing technique as a way to decrease costs, increase manufacturing agility, and explore novel geometry/functionalities. In order to increase acceptance of AM as a viable processing method, pathways for qualifying both the material and the process need to be developed and, perhaps, standardized. This symposium was designed to serve as a venue for the international AM community—including government, academia, and industry—to define the fundamental interrelationships between feedstock, processing, microstructure, shape, mechanical behavior/materials properties, and function/performance. Eventually, insight into the connections between processing, microstructure, property, and performance will be achieved through experimental observations, theoretical advances, and computational modeling of physical processes. Finally, once this insight matures, AM will be able to move from the realm of making parts to making qualified materials that are certified for use with minimal need for post-fabrication characterization.

  13. Characterization and nultivariate analysis of physical properties of processing peaches

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Characterization of physical properties of fruits represents the first vital step to ensure optimal performance of fruit processing operations and is also a prerequisite in the development of new processing equipment. In this study, physical properties of engineering significance to processing of th...

  14. Additive manufacturing of Inconel 718 using electron beam melting: Processing, post-processing, & mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sames, William James, V.

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) process parameters were studied for production of the high temperature alloy Inconel 718 using Electron Beam Melting (EBM) to better understand the relationship between processing, microstructure, and mechanical properties. Processing parameters were analyzed for impact on process time, process temperature, and the amount of applied energy. The applied electron beam energy was shown to be integral to the formation of swelling defects. Standard features in the microstructure were identified, including previously unidentified solidification features such as shrinkage porosity and non-equilibrium phases. The as-solidified structure does not persist in the bulk of EBM parts due to a high process hold temperature (˜1000°C), which causes in situ homogenization. The most significant variability in as-fabricated microstructure is the formation of intragranular delta-phase needles, which can form in samples produced with lower process temperatures (< 960°C). A novel approach was developed and demonstrated for controlling the temperature of cool down, thus providing a technique for in situ heat treatment of material. This technique was used to produce material with hardness of 478+/-7 HV with no post-processing, which exceeds the hardness of peak-aged Inconel 718. Traditional post-processing methods of hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and solution treatment and aging (STA) were found to result in variability in grain growth and phase solution. Recrystallization and grain structure are identified as possible mechanisms to promote grain growth. These results led to the conclusion that the first step in thermal post-processing of EBM Inconel 718 should be an optimized solution treatment to reset phase variation in the as-fabricated microstructure without incurring significant grain growth. Such an optimized solution treatment was developed (1120°C, 2hr) for application prior to aging or HIP. The majority of as-fabricated tensile properties met ASTM

  15. CHEMICAL AND PHYSICAL PROCESS AND MECHANISM MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this task is to develop and test chemical and physical mechanisms for use in the chemical transport models of EPA's Models-3. The target model for this research is the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model. These mechanisms include gas and aqueous phase ph...

  16. Framework for Understanding Lenr Processes, Using Conventional Condensed Matter Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubb, Scott R.

    2006-02-01

    Conventional condensed matter physics provides a unifying framework for understanding low-energy nuclear reactions (LENRs) in solids. In the paper, standard many-body physics techniques are used to illustrate this fact. Specifically, the paper shows that formally the theories by Schwinger, Hagelstein, and Chubb and Chubb (C&C), all can be related to a common set of equations, associated with reaction rate and energy transfer, through a standard many-body physics procedure (R-matrix theory). In each case, particular forms of coherence are used that implicitly provide a mechanism for understanding how LENRs can proceed without the emission of high-energy particles. In addition, additional ideas, associated with Conventional Condensed Matter physics, are used to extend the earlier ion band state (IBS) model by C&C. The general model clarifies the origin of coherent processes that initiate LENRs, through the onset of ion conduction that can occur through ionic fluctuations in nanoscale crystals. In the case of PdDx, these fluctuations begin to occur as x → 1 in sub-lattice structures with characteristic dimensions of 60 nm. The resulting LENRs are triggered by the polarization between injected d's and electrons (immediately above the Fermi energy) that takes place in finite-size PdD crystals. During the prolonged charging of PdDx, the applied, external electric field induces these fluctuations through a form of Zener tunneling that mimics the kind of tunneling, predicted by Zener, that is responsible for possible conduction (referred to as Zener-electric breakdown) in insulators. But because the fluctuations are ionic, and they occur in PdD, nano-scale structures, a more appropriate characterization is Zener-ionic breakdown in nano-crystalline PdD. Using the underlying dynamics, it is possible to relate triggering times that are required for the initiation of the effect, to crystal size and externally applied fields.

  17. Electrical Storm Simulation to Improve the Learning Physics Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martínez Muñoz, Miriam; Jiménez Rodríguez, María Lourdes; Gutiérrez de Mesa, José Antonio

    2013-01-01

    This work is part of a research project whose main objective is to understand the impact that the use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) has on the teaching and learning process on the subject of Physics. We will show that, with the use of a storm simulator, physics students improve their learning process on one hand they understand…

  18. Foundations of Physical Theory, I: Force and Energy. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Fundamentals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Nolan E.

    This module is part of a series designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. This module is one of two units on the foundations of physical theory and the…

  19. Physical processes at high field strengths

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, C.K.

    1986-01-01

    Measurements of the radiation produced by the high field interaction with the rare gases have revealed the presence of both copious harmonic production and fluorescence. The highest harmonic observed was the seventeenth (14.6 rm) in Ne, the shortest wavelength ever produced by that means. Strong fluorescence was seen in Ar, Kr, and Xe with the shortest wavelengths observed being below 10 nm. Furthermore, radiation from inner-shell excited configurations in Xe, specifically the 4d/sup 9/5s5p ..-->.. 4d/sup 10/5s manifold at approx. 17.7 nm, was detected. The behaviors of the rare gases with respect to multiquantum ionization, harmonic production, and fluorescence were found to be correlated so that the materials fell into two groups, He and Ne in one and Ar, Kr, and Xe in the other. These experimental findings, in alliance with other studies on inner-shell decay processes, give evidence for a role of atomic correlations in a direct nonlinear process of inner-shell excitation. It is expected that an understanding of these high-field processes will enable the generation of stimulated emission in the x-ray range. 59 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Parameter Estimation for a Physically-Based Model Using Multi-Objective Approach Constrained With Additional Internal States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G.; Fenicia, F.; Savenije, H. H.

    2007-12-01

    Parameter estimation (i.e. model calibration) is a critical procedure for not only determining a successful model application, but also assessing model uncertainties, thus helping improve model development. Physically-based distributed hydrological models are increasingly used as required in water management because of the complexity of the processes to be represented. Given the fact that the distributed catchment characteristics, represented by parameters, could not be directly measured in most cases, model calibration is therefore inevitable. Calibration and uncertainty assessment for such complex models are more challenging than for those simpler ones due to the large number of parameters associated with integrated multiple processes description and large computing resources demands. There is ample literature on the approaches to model parameter estimation and applications of such approaches. Multi-objective Pareto-optimality approaches, such as MOSCEM-UA, are amongst the state-the-art approaches in modeling practices. The multi-objective optimization approaches, however, have not yet widely applied to physically-based distributed models, due to the aforementioned challenging issues. This work presents an application of MOSCEM-UA algorithm to a newly developed physically-based model REWASH. REWASH is a model based on the Representative Elementary Watershed (REW) concept that describes hydrological processes at the watershed scale, using the basic physical conservation laws. The elementary watersheds, i.e. the sub-watersheds are the hydrological response units of a catchment when using REWASH model. In this study, REWASH model was applied to simulate rainfall-runoff relation for the Hesperange catchment in Luxembourg. Due to its physically-based and semi-distributed nature, the applied hydrological model reproduces not only stream flows at the catchment outlet and the sub-watersheds' outlets, but subsurface flows and groundwater table variations as well

  1. Additive effects of physical stress and herbivores on intertidal seaweed biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Williams, Susan L; Bracken, Matthew E S; Jones, Emily

    2013-05-01

    Patterns in rocky intertidal seaweed biodiversity influence the resilience and functioning of these important primary producer communities. In turn, seaweed biodiversity patterns are the result of many ecological factors. We determined the influences of thermal and desiccation stress, herbivory, and nutrients on seaweed biodiversity on a northern California rocky shoreline. In a fully crossed design at two tidal heights at wave-protected and exposed sites, we deployed screens to reduce stress, removed herbivores, and added nutrients for 18 months. The treatments reduced temperature, increased relative humidity, decreased herbivore abundances, and increased nitrogen in both seawater and seaweeds. Seaweed abundance and biodiversity (cover, biomass, species richness, diversity, evenness, and community composition) were influenced by tidal height, physical stress, and herbivores. Wave exposure affected all response variables except biomass and evenness. Stress and herbivores had independent additive effects on seaweed abundance and diversity. Physical stress did not make the community as a whole more susceptible to herbivores, and screens had overarching positive effects on seaweed biodiversity even though they also had positive effects on herbivore abundance. Nutrients had virtually no effect on seaweed biodiversity, and we observed no bottom-up effects of nutrient addition on herbivore density or biomass. Small green algae and diatoms were important contributors to overall algal cover and to changes in composition across treatments, but larger macroalgae dominated the species richness response. The striking absence of interactions between stress and herbivory highlights how seaweed communities can respond independently to important drivers of biodiversity. Thus, nonadditive, potentially synergistic effects do not necessarily complicate the understanding of how seaweed biodiversity responds to environmental change. PMID:23858649

  2. Two-Photon Physics in Hadronic Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Carl Carlson; Marc Vanderhaeghen

    2007-11-01

    Two-photon exchange contributions to elastic electron-scattering are reviewed. The apparent discrepancy in the extraction of elastic nucleon form factors between unpolarized Rosenbluth and polarization transfer experiments is discussed, as well as the understanding of this puzzle in terms of two-photon exchange corrections. Calculations of such corrections both within partonic and hadronic frameworks are reviewed. In view of recent spin-dependent electron scattering data, the relation of the two-photon exchange process to the hyperfine splitting in hydrogen is critically examined. The imaginary part of the two-photon exchange amplitude as can be accessed from the beam normal spin asymmetry in elastic electron-nucleon scattering is reviewed. Further extensions and open issues in this field are outlined.

  3. Turbulence and Fluid Flow: Perspectives. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Transport Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, James R.

    This module is part of a series on Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems. The materials were designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process.…

  4. Physical processes in polar stratospheric ice clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Turco, Richard; Jordan, Joseph

    1988-01-01

    A one dimensional model of cloud microphysics was used to simulate the formation and evolution of polar stratospheric ice clouds. Some of the processes which are included in the model are outlined. It is found that the clouds must undergo preferential nucleation upon the existing aerosols just as do tropospheric cirrus clouds. Therefore, there is an energy barrier between stratospheric nitric acid particles and ice particles implying that nitric acid does not form a continuous set of solutions between the trihydrate and ice. The Kelvin barrier is not significant in controlling the rate of formation of ice particles. It was found that the cloud properties are sensitive to the rate at which the air parcels cool. In wave clouds, with cooling rates of hundreds of degrees per day, most of the existing aerosols nucleate and become ice particles. Such clouds have particles with sizes on the order of a few microns, optical depths on order of unity and are probably not efficient at removing materials from the stratosphere. In clouds which form with cooling rates of a few degrees per day or less, only a small fraction of the aerosols become cloud particles. In such clouds the particle radius is larger than 10 microns, the optical depths are low and water vapor is efficiently removed. Seasonal simulations show that the lowest water vapor mixing ratio is determined by the lowest temperature reached, and that the time when clouds disappear is controlled by the time when temperatures begin to rise above the minimum values.

  5. The physics of bat echolocation: Signal processing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denny, Mark

    2004-12-01

    The physical principles and signal processing techniques underlying bat echolocation are investigated. It is shown, by calculation and simulation, how the measured echolocation performance of bats can be achieved.

  6. Distributed System of Processing of Data of Physical Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarov, A. A.; Moiseev, A. N.

    2014-11-01

    Complication of physical experiments and increasing volumes of experimental data necessitate the application of supercomputer and distributed computing systems for data processing. Design and development of such systems, their mathematical modeling, and investigation of their characteristics and functional capabilities is an urgent scientific and practical problem. In the present work, the characteristics of operation of such distributed system of processing of data of physical experiments are investigated using the apparatus of theory of queuing networks.

  7. Role of the subgrid-scale physical processes in supermodelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, J.

    2011-12-01

    The basic ides of supermodelling is in overcoming deficits of existing models by combining them together to improve our ability of climate simulations and prediction. However, in order to exploit this method better, we have to pay special attention to the common defects of the current climate models. Representation of subgrid-scale physical processes is such a particular example. . The present talk presents the author's point of view on representation of subgrid-scale processes in the above general question in mind. The focus of the talk will be on interplay between traditional parameterizations and recently proposed superparameterization (also often called "multiscale modelling"), but it also covers the issues of downscaling as well as possibilities of introducing mesh-refinement approaches into the context of subgrid-scale modelling. The author's main perspective is that the subgrid-scale parameterization should not be considered as a distinguished approach in contrast to explicit (more direct) modelling, such as superparameterization, but a hierarchy of modelling approaches should be constructed by taking various intermediate approaches. The mass-flux convection parameterization is taken as an example in order to make this point. It will be shown that at the most basic level, the mass-flux parameterization is equivalent to a finite-volume numerical approach, though various additional approximations and hypotheses must be introduced in order to arrive at a classical mass-flux parameterization. At the mathematical level, the multiresolution analysis based on wavelet provides a basic source of inspirations for developing this general perspective. From this perspective, the issue of parameterization is considered as "compression" of a full explicit model in the same sense as the wavelet can be used for the image compression. This perspective also leads to a concept of compression of physics. Compression of cloud microphysics would be the most urgent issue

  8. Nanoclay addition to a conventional glass ionomer cements: Influence on physical properties

    PubMed Central

    Fareed, Muhammad A.; Stamboulis, Artemis

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the present study is to investigate the reinforcement effect of polymer-grade montmorillonite (PGN nanoclay) on physical properties of glass ionomer cement (GIC). Materials and Methods: The PGN nanoclay was dispersed in the liquid portion of GIC (HiFi, Advanced Healthcare, Kent, UK) at 1%, 2% and 4% (w/w). Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to quantify the polymer liquid of GICs after dispersion of nanoclay. The molecular weight (Mw) of HiFi liquid was determined by gel permeation chromatography. The compressive strength (CS), diametral-tensile strength, flexural strength (FS) and flexural modulus (Ef) of cements (n = 20) were measured after storage for 1 day, 1 week and 1 month. Fractured surface was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The working and setting time (WT and ST) of cements was measured by a modified Wilson's rheometer. Results: The FTIR results showed a new peak at 1041 cm−1 which increased in intensity with an increase in the nanoclay content and was related to the Si-O stretching mode in PGN nanoclay. The Mw of poly (acrylic acid) used to form cement was in the range of 53,000 g/mol. The nanoclay reinforced GICs containing <2% nanoclays exhibited higher CS and FS. The Ef cement with 1% nanoclays was significantly higher. The WT and ST of 1% nanoclay reinforced cement were similar to the control cement but were reduced with 2% and 4% nanoclay addition. Conclusion: The dispersion of nanoclays in GICs was achieved, and GIC containing 2 wt% nanoclay is a promising restorative materials with improved physical properties. PMID:25512724

  9. Impact of physical permafrost processes on hydrological change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagemann, Stefan; Blome, Tanja; Beer, Christian; Ekici, Altug

    2015-04-01

    Permafrost or perennially frozen ground is an important part of the terrestrial cryosphere; roughly one quarter of Earth's land surface is underlain by permafrost. As it is a thermal phenomenon, its characteristics are highly dependent on climatic factors. The impact of the currently observed warming, which is projected to persist during the coming decades due to anthropogenic CO2 input, certainly has effects for the vast permafrost areas of the high northern latitudes. The quantification of these effects, however, is scientifically still an open question. This is partly due to the complexity of the system, where several feedbacks are interacting between land and atmosphere, sometimes counterbalancing each other. Moreover, until recently, many global circulation models (GCMs) and Earth system models (ESMs) lacked the sufficient representation of permafrost physics in their land surface schemes. Within the European Union FP7 project PAGE21, the land surface scheme JSBACH of the Max-Planck-Institute for Meteorology ESM (MPI-ESM) has been equipped with the representation of relevant physical processes for permafrost studies. These processes include the effects of freezing and thawing of soil water for both energy and water cycles, thermal properties depending on soil water and ice contents, and soil moisture movement being influenced by the presence of soil ice. In the present study, it will be analysed how these permafrost relevant processes impact projected hydrological changes over northern hemisphere high latitude land areas. For this analysis, the atmosphere-land part of MPI-ESM, ECHAM6-JSBACH, is driven by prescribed SST and sea ice in an AMIP2-type setup with and without the newly implemented permafrost processes. Observed SST and sea ice for 1979-1999 are used to consider induced changes in the simulated hydrological cycle. In addition, simulated SST and sea ice are taken from a MPI-ESM simulation conducted for CMIP5 following the RCP8.5 scenario. The

  10. Defining physics: The Nobel Prize selection process, 1901-1937

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLachlan, James

    1991-02-01

    The great prestige of the Nobel Prizes has come virtually to define physics in the public mind. An examination of the nominations and the selections in the first 37 years of Nobel awards shows that those in charge of the selections went through a process of development as they refined their conceptions of the kind of work appropriate to be rewarded. Analyses are presented of the 1800 nominations made by 448 nominators for 213 scientists, of whom 44 received physics prizes between 1901 and 1937, 10 more who were awarded Nobel Prizes in physics after 1937, and 12 in chemistry, although nominated also in physics.

  11. Technical options for processing additional light tight oil volumes within the United States

    EIA Publications

    2015-01-01

    This report examines technical options for processing additional LTO volumes within the United States. Domestic processing of additional LTO would enable an increase in petroleum product exports from the United States, already the world’s largest net exporter of petroleum products. Unlike crude oil, products are not subject to export limitations or licensing requirements. While this is one possible approach to absorbing higher domestic LTO production in the absence of a relaxation of current limitations on crude exports, domestic LTO would have to be priced at a level required to encourage additional LTO runs at existing refinery units, debottlenecking, or possible additions of processing capacity.

  12. INDUSTRIAL PROCESS PROFILES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL USE. CHAPTER 10B. PLASTICS ADDITIVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research presents an analysis of the chemicals used as additives in the production and processing of plastics, their environmental release, and occupational exposure. It describes in detail each chemical additive used in the plastics industry. The plastics additives are prese...

  13. Physical Processes in the MAGO/MFT Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Garanin, Sergey F; Reinovsky, Robert E.

    2015-03-23

    The Monograph is devoted to theoretical discussion of the physical effects, which are most significant for the alternative approach to the problem of controlled thermonuclear fusion (CTF): the MAGO/MTF approach. The book includes the description of the approach, its difference from the major CTF systems—magnetic confinement and inertial confinement systems. General physical methods of the processes simulation in this approach are considered, including plasma transport phenomena and radiation, and the theory of transverse collisionless shock waves, the surface discharges theory, important for such kind of research. Different flows and magneto-hydrodynamic plasma instabilities occurring in the frames of this approach are also considered. In virtue of the general physical essence of the considered phenomena the presented results are applicable to a wide range of plasma physics and hydrodynamics processes. The book is intended for the plasma physics and hydrodynamics specialists, post-graduate students, and senior students-physicists.

  14. Ontology of physics for biology: representing physical dependencies as a basis for biological processes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In prior work, we presented the Ontology of Physics for Biology (OPB) as a computational ontology for use in the annotation and representations of biophysical knowledge encoded in repositories of physics-based biosimulation models. We introduced OPB:Physical entity and OPB:Physical property classes that extend available spatiotemporal representations of physical entities and processes to explicitly represent the thermodynamics and dynamics of physiological processes. Our utilitarian, long-term aim is to develop computational tools for creating and querying formalized physiological knowledge for use by multiscale “physiome” projects such as the EU’s Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) and NIH’s Virtual Physiological Rat (VPR). Results Here we describe the OPB:Physical dependency taxonomy of classes that represent of the laws of classical physics that are the “rules” by which physical properties of physical entities change during occurrences of physical processes. For example, the fluid analog of Ohm’s law (as for electric currents) is used to describe how a blood flow rate depends on a blood pressure gradient. Hooke’s law (as in elastic deformations of springs) is used to describe how an increase in vascular volume increases blood pressure. We classify such dependencies according to the flow, transformation, and storage of thermodynamic energy that occurs during processes governed by the dependencies. Conclusions We have developed the OPB and annotation methods to represent the meaning—the biophysical semantics—of the mathematical statements of physiological analysis and the biophysical content of models and datasets. Here we describe and discuss our approach to an ontological representation of physical laws (as dependencies) and properties as encoded for the mathematical analysis of biophysical processes. PMID:24295137

  15. Additional evidence of far transfer of scientific reasoning skills acquired in a CLASP reformed physics course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Wendell H.; Lynch, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    The introductory physics course taken by biological science majors at UC Davis, Physics 7, was radically reformed 16 years ago in order to explicitly emphasize the development of scientific reasoning skills in all elements of the course. We have previously seen evidence of increased performance on the biological and physical science portions of the MCAT exam, in a rigorous systemic physiology course, and higher graduating GPAs for students who took Physics 7 rather than a traditionally taught introductory physics course. We report here on the increased performance by a group of biological-science majors in a general chemistry course who took the first quarter of Physics 7 prior to beginning the chemistry course sequence compared to a similar group who began taking physics after completing the first two quarters of general chemistry.

  16. Process Evaluation Results from the HEALTHY Physical Education Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, William J.; Zeveloff, Abigail; Steckler, Allan; Schneider, Margaret; Thompson, Deborah; Pham, Trang; Volpe, Stella L.; Hindes, Katie; Sleigh, Adriana; McMurray, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    Process evaluation is an assessment of the implementation of an intervention. A process evaluation component was embedded in the HEALTHY study, a primary prevention trial for Type 2 diabetes implemented over 3 years in 21 middle schools across the United States. The HEALTHY physical education (PE) intervention aimed at maximizing student…

  17. Physical-chemical processes in a protoplanetary cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavrukhina, Avgusta K.

    1991-01-01

    Physical-chemical processes in a protoplanetary cloud are discussed. The following subject areas are covered: (1) characteristics of the chemical composition of molecular interstellar clouds; (2) properties and physico-chemical process in the genesis of interstellar dust grains; and (3) the isotope composition of volatiles in bodies of the Solar System.

  18. Physical processes within the nocturnal stratus-topped boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moeng, Chin-Hoh; Shen, Shaohua; Randall, David A.

    1992-01-01

    There are many physical processes involved in the stratus-topped boundary layer: longwave radiation cooling, entrainment, latent heating, surface heating, solar heating, and drizzling, for example. The manner in which the processes combine to maintain the turbulence within the stratus-topped boundary layer remains an unsolved problem. The large eddy simulation technique is used to examine the first four physical processes mentioned above. First, the contribution of each physical process to the thermodynamic differences between the updraft and downdraft branches of turbulent circulations is examined through a conditional sampling. Second, these mean thermodynamic differences are shown to express well the vertical distributions of heat and moisture fluxes within stratus-topped boundary layers. These provide a method to validate the process partitioning technique. (This technique assumes that the net flux profile can be partitioned into different component-flux profiles according to physical processes, and that each partitioned component flux is linear in height.) In this paper, the heat and moisture fluxes are process partitioned, and each component-flux is found to contribute to the net flux in a way that is consistent with its corresponding process contribution to the mean thermodynamic differences between updrafts and downdrafts. Also, the net flux obtained by summing all component-fluxes agrees very well with that obtained directly from the large-eddy simulations.

  19. Physical processes within the nocturnal stratus-topped boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Moeng, C.H.; Shen, S. ); Randall, D.A. )

    1992-12-15

    Within the stratus-topped boundary layer many physical processes are involved: longwave radiation cooling, entrainment, latent heating, surface heating, solar heating, drizzling, etc. How all processes combine to maintain the turbulence within the stratus-topped boundary layer remains an unsolved problem. The large-eddy simulation technique is used to examine the first four physical processes mentioned. First, the contribution of each physical process to the thermodynamic differences between the updraft and downdraft branches of turbulent circulations is examined through a conditional sampling. Second, these mean thermodynamic differences are shown to express well the vertical distributions of heat and moisture fluxes within stratus-topped boundary layers. These provide a method to validate the process-partitioning technique. (This technique assumes that the net flux profile can be partitioned into different component-flux profiles according to physical processes and that each partitioned component flux is linear in height.) In this paper, the heat and moisture fluxes are process partitioned, and each component flux is found to contribute to the net flux in a way that is consistent with its corresponding process contribution to the mean thermodynamic differences between updrafts and downdrafts. Also, the net flux obtained by summing all component fluxes agrees well with that obtained directly from the large-eddy simulations.

  20. Process evaluation results from the HEALTHY physical education intervention

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Process evaluation is an assessment of the implementation of an intervention. A process evaluation component was embedded in the HEALTHY study, a primary prevention trial for Type 2 diabetes implemented over 3 years in 21 middle schools across the United States. The HEALTHY physical education (PE) i...

  1. Movement of radionuclides in terrestrial ecosystems by physical processes.

    PubMed

    Anspaugh, Lynn R; Simon, Steven L; Gordeev, Konstantin I; Likhtarev, Ilya A; Maxwell, Reed M; Shinkarev, Sergei M

    2002-05-01

    Physical processes that effect the movement of radionuclides in the temperate environments post-deposition are considered in this paper. The physical processes considered include the interception of radionuclides by vegetation, resuspension, and vertical migration in soil. United States and Russian results on the interception of radionuclides are reviewed and defined in terms of models that are currently undergoing evaluation and revision. New results on resuspension are evaluated, and a preliminary new model for the time-dependent resuspension factor is proposed. Chernobyl-related results on the movement of radionuclides into the soil column are presented, as is a revised model for this process based upon recent results from Ukraine. PMID:12003017

  2. Valuation of OSA process and folic acid addition as excess sludge minimization alternatives applied in the activated sludge process.

    PubMed

    Martins, C L; Velho, V F; Ramos, S R A; Pires, A S C D; Duarte, E C N F A; Costa, R H R

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of the oxic-settling-anaerobic (OSA)-process and the folic acid addition applied in the activated sludge process to reduce the excess sludge production. The study was monitored during two distinct periods: activated sludge system with OSA-process, and activated sludge system with folic acid addition. The observed sludge yields (Yobs) were 0.30 and 0.08 kgTSS kg(-1) chemical oxygen demand (COD), control phase and OSA-process (period 1); 0.33 and 0.18 kgTSS kg(-1) COD, control phase and folic acid addition (period 2). The Yobs decreased by 73 and 45% in phases with the OSA-process and folic acid addition, respectively, compared with the control phases. The sludge minimization alternatives result in a decrease in excess sludge production, without negatively affecting the performance of the effluent treatment. PMID:26901714

  3. Late Chondritic Additions and Planet and Planetesimal Growth: Evaluation of Physical and Chemical Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Studies of terrestrial peridotite and martian and achondritic meteorites have led to the conclusion that addition of chondritic material to growing planets or planetesimals, after core formation, occurred on Earth, Mars, asteroid 4 Vesta, and the parent body of the angritic meteorites [1-4]. One study even proposed that this was a common process in the final stages of growth [5]. These conclusions are based almost entirely on the highly siderophile elements (HSE; Re, Au, Pt, Pd, Rh, Ru, Ir, Os). The HSE are a group of eight elements that have been used to argue for late accretion of chondritic material to the Earth after core formation was complete (e.g., [6]). This idea was originally proposed because the D(metal/silicate) values for the HSE are so high, yet their concentration in the mantle is too high to be consistent with such high Ds. The HSE also are present in chondritic relative abundances and hence require similar Ds if this is the result of core-mantle equilibration. Since the work of [6] there has been a realization that core formation at high PT conditions can explain the abundances of many siderophile elements in the mantle (e.g., [7]), but such detailed high PT partitioning data are lacking for many of the HSE to evaluate whether such ideas are viable for all four bodies. Consideration of other chemical parameters reveals larger problems that are difficult to overcome, but must be addressed in any scenario which calls on the addition of chondritic material to a reduced mantle. Yet these problems are rarely discussed or emphasized, making the late chondritic (or late veneer) addition hypothesis suspect.

  4. Simulation of Powder Layer Deposition in Additive Manufacturing Processes Using the Discrete Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Herbold, E. B.; Walton, O.; Homel, M. A.

    2015-10-26

    This document serves as a final report to a small effort where several improvements were added to a LLNL code GEODYN-­L to develop Discrete Element Method (DEM) algorithms coupled to Lagrangian Finite Element (FE) solvers to investigate powder-­bed formation problems for additive manufacturing. The results from these simulations will be assessed for inclusion as the initial conditions for Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) simulations performed with ALE3D. The algorithms were written and performed on parallel computing platforms at LLNL. The total funding level was 3-­4 weeks of an FTE split amongst two staff scientists and one post-­doc. The DEM simulations emulated, as much as was feasible, the physical process of depositing a new layer of powder over a bed of existing powder. The DEM simulations utilized truncated size distributions spanning realistic size ranges with a size distribution profile consistent with realistic sample set. A minimum simulation sample size on the order of 40-­particles square by 10-­particles deep was utilized in these scoping studies in order to evaluate the potential effects of size segregation variation with distance displaced in front of a screed blade. A reasonable method for evaluating the problem was developed and validated. Several simulations were performed to show the viability of the approach. Future investigations will focus on running various simulations investigating powder particle sizing and screen geometries.

  5. Estuarine Physical Processes Research: Some Recent Studies and Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uncles, R. J.

    2002-12-01

    The literature on estuarine physical studies is vast, diverse and contains many valuable case studies in addition to pure, process-based research. This essay is an attempt to summarize both some of the more recent studies that have been undertaken during the last several years, as well as some of the trends in research direction and progress that they represent. The topics covered include field and theoretical studies on hydrodynamics, turbulence, salt and fine sediment transport and morphology. The development and ease-of-application of numerical and analytical models and technical software has been essential for much of the progress, allowing the interpretation of large amounts of data and assisting with the understanding of complex processes. The development of instrumentation has similarly been essential for much of the progress with field studies. From a process viewpoint, much more attention is now being given to interpreting intratidal behaviour, including the effects of tidal straining and suspended fine sediment on water column stratification, stability and turbulence generation and dissipation. Remote sensing from satellites and aircraft, together with fast sampling towed instruments and high frequency radar now provide unique, frequently high resolution views of spatial variability, including currents, frontal and plume phenomena, and tidal and wave-generated turbidity. Observations of fine sediment characteristics (floc size, aggregation mechanisms, organic coatings and settling velocity) are providing better parameterizations for sediment transport models. These models have enhanced our understanding both of the estuarine turbidity maximum and its relationship to fronts and intratidal hydrodynamic and sedimentological variability, as well as that of simple morphological features such as intertidal mudflats. Although few, interdisciplinary studies to examine the relationships between biology and estuarine morphology show that bivalve activity and the

  6. Soil physical and hydrological properties as affected by long-term addition of various organic amendments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eden, Marie; Völkel, Jörg; Mercier, Vincent; Labat, Christophe; Houot, Sabine

    2014-05-01

    The use of organic residues as soil amendments in agriculture not only reduces the amount of waste needing to be disposed of; it may also lead to improvements in soil properties, including physical and hydrological ones. The present study examines a long-term experiment called "Qualiagro", run jointly by INRA and Veolia Environment in Feucherolles, France (near Paris). It was initiated in 1998 on a loess-derived silt loam (787 g/kg silt, 152 g/kg clay) and includes ten treatments: four types of organic amendments and a control (CNT) each at two levels of mineral nitrogen (N) addition: minimal (Nmin) and optimal (Nopt). The amendments include three types of compost and farmyard manure (FYM), which were applied every other year at a rate of ca. 4 t carbon ha-1. The composts include municipal solid waste compost (MSW), co-compost of green wastes and sewage sludge (GWS), and biowaste compost (BIO). The plots are arranged in a randomized block design and have a size of 450 m²; each treatment is replicated four times (total of 40 plots). Ca. 15 years after the start of the experiment soil organic carbon (OC) had continuously increased in the amended plots, while it remained stable or decreased in the control plots. This compost- or manure-induced increase in OC plays a key role, affecting numerous dependant soil properties like bulk density, porosity and water retention. The water holding capacity (WHC) of a soil is of particular interest to farmers in terms of water supply for plants, but also indicates soil quality and functionality. Addition of OC may affect WHC in different ways: carbon-induced aggregation may increase larger-pore volume and hence WHC at the wet end while increased surface areas may lead to an increased retention of water at the dry end. Consequently it is difficult to predict (e.g. with pedotransfer functions) the impact on the amount of water available for plants (PAW), which was experimentally determined for the soils, along with the entire range

  7. Physics-based signal processing algorithms for micromachined cantilever arrays

    DOEpatents

    Candy, James V; Clague, David S; Lee, Christopher L; Rudd, Robert E; Burnham, Alan K; Tringe, Joseph W

    2013-11-19

    A method of using physics-based signal processing algorithms for micromachined cantilever arrays. The methods utilize deflection of a micromachined cantilever that represents the chemical, biological, or physical element being detected. One embodiment of the method comprises the steps of modeling the deflection of the micromachined cantilever producing a deflection model, sensing the deflection of the micromachined cantilever and producing a signal representing the deflection, and comparing the signal representing the deflection with the deflection model.

  8. Canada's physical activity guides: background, process, and development.

    PubMed

    Sharratt, Michael T; Hearst, William E

    2007-01-01

    This historical background paper chronicles the major events leading to the development of Canada's physical activity guides (for children, youth, adults, and older adults). The paper outlines the process and the steps used, including information (where applicable) regarding national partners, project administration, Health Canada communications, product development, endorsement, distribution and implementation, collateral activities, media relations and evaluation framework. Brief summaries of the science that led to the recommended guidelines are included. The paper also summarizes the various physical activity guide assessment and evaluation projects and their findings, particularly as they relate to research carried out on Canada's physical activity guides for children and youth (and the associated support resources). PMID:18213939

  9. [Physical activity guidelines in Canada: context, process and development].

    PubMed

    Sharratt, Michael T; Hearst, William E

    2007-01-01

    This historical background paper chronicles the major events leading to the development of Canada's physical activity guides (for children, youth, adults, and older adults). The paper outlines the process and the steps used, including information (where applicable) regarding national partners, project administration, Health Canada communications, product development, endorsement, distribution and implementation, collateral activities, media relations and evaluation framework. Brief summaries of the science that led to the recommended guidelines are included. The paper also summarizes the various physical activity guide assessment and evaluation projects and their findings, particularly as they relate to research carried out on Canada's physical activity guides for children and youth (and the associated support resources). PMID:19377535

  10. The effect of silane addition timing on mixing processability and properties of silica reinforced rubber compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hee-Hoon; Jin, Hyun-Ho; Ha, Sung-Ho; Jang, Suk-Hee; Kang, Yong-Gu; Han, Min-Hyun

    2016-03-01

    A series of experiments were performed to determine an optimum balance between processability and performance of a highly loaded silica compound. The experiments evaluated 4 different silane injection times. All mixing related to silane addition was conducted with a scaled up "Tandem" mixer line. With exception to silane addition timing, almost all operating conditions were controlled between experimental features. It was found that when the silane addition was introduced earlier in the mixing cycle both the reaction was more complete and the bound rubber content was higher. But processability indicators such as sheet forming and Mooney plasticity were negatively impacted. On the other hand, as silane injection was delayed to later in the mixing process the filler dispersion and good sheet forming was improved. However both the bound rubber content and Silane reaction completion were decreased. With the changes in silane addition time, the processability and properties of a silica compound can be controlled.

  11. Process for improving moisture resistance of epoxy resins by addition of chromium ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, A. K.; Stoakley, D. M.; St.clair, T. L.; Singh, J. J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A process for improving the moisture resistance properties of epoxidized TGMDA and DGEBA resin system by chemically incorporating chromium ions is described. The addition of chromium ions is believed to prevent the absorption of water molecules.

  12. 10 CFR 73.60 - Additional requirements for physical protection at nonpower reactors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... nonpower reactors. 73.60 Section 73.60 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PHYSICAL PROTECTION... requirements for physical protection at nonpower reactors. Each nonpower reactor licensee who, pursuant to the... nonpower reactors licensed to operate at or above a power level of 2 megawatts thermal....

  13. 10 CFR 73.60 - Additional requirements for physical protection at nonpower reactors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... nonpower reactors. 73.60 Section 73.60 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PHYSICAL PROTECTION... requirements for physical protection at nonpower reactors. Each nonpower reactor licensee who, pursuant to the... nonpower reactors licensed to operate at or above a power level of 2 megawatts thermal....

  14. 10 CFR 73.60 - Additional requirements for physical protection at nonpower reactors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... nonpower reactors. 73.60 Section 73.60 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PHYSICAL PROTECTION... requirements for physical protection at nonpower reactors. Each nonpower reactor licensee who, pursuant to the... nonpower reactors licensed to operate at or above a power level of 2 megawatts thermal....

  15. Generating Student Interest in Physics: Using Relevant and Exciting Curriculum Additions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdul-Razzaq, Wathiq; Bushey, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    As physics teachers at the collegiate level, we are faced with the difficulty of lack of interest in science among non-science majors. An example of this occurred in a conceptual physics course at West Virginia University, where we taught mostly students attending the education college. A poll taken of the class found 62% of the students wrote…

  16. Adaptive, maladaptive, mediational, and bidirectional processes of relational and physical aggression, relational and physical victimization, and peer liking.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Yoshito; Tseng, Wan-Ling; Crick, Nicki R

    2014-01-01

    A three-wave longitudinal study among ethnically diverse preadolescents (N = 597 at Time 1, ages 9-11) was conducted to examine adaptive, maladaptive, mediational, and bidirectional processes of relational and physical aggression, victimization, and peer liking indexed by peer acceptance and friendships. A series of nested structural equation models tested the hypothesized links among these peer-domain factors. It was hypothesized that (1) relational aggression trails both adaptive and maladaptive processes, linking to more peer victimization and more peer liking, whereas physical aggression is maladaptive, resulting in more peer victimization and less peer liking; (2) physical and relational victimization is maladaptive, relating to more aggression and less peer liking; (3) peer liking may be the social context that promotes relational aggression (not physical aggression), whereas peer liking may protect against peer victimization, regardless of its type; and (4) peer liking mediates the link between forms of aggression and forms of peer victimization. Results showed that higher levels of peer liking predicted relative increases in relational aggression (not physical aggression), which in turn led to more peer liking. On the other hand, more peer liking was predictive of relative decreases in relational aggression and relational victimization in transition to the next grade (i.e., fifth grade). In addition, relational victimization predicted relative increases in relational aggression and relative decreases in peer liking. Similarly, physical aggression was consistently and concurrently associated more physical victimization and was marginally predictive of relative increases in physical victimization in transition to the next grade. More peer liking predicted relative decreases in physical victimization, which resulted in lower levels of peer liking. The directionality and magnitude of these paths did not differ between boys and girls. PMID:24318459

  17. The r-Process Elements: Physics, Origin, and RIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Yong-Zhong

    2003-10-01

    Approximately half of the heavy elements with A>70 are made via rapid neutron capture, the r-process. The conditions required for this process have been examined in terms of the parameters for adiabatic expansion from high temperature and density. There have been many developments regarding core-collapse supernova and neutron star merger models of the r-process. Meteoritic data and observations of metal-poor stars have demonstrated the diversity of r-process sources. Stellar observations have also found some regularity in r-process abundance patterns and large dispersions in r-process abundances at low metallicities. This talk will summarize the recent results from parametric studies, astrophysical models, and observational studies of the r-process. The interplay between nuclear physics and astrophysics will be emphasized. Possible measurements crucial to r-process studies will be discussed in connection with rare isotope accelerator facilities such as RIA .

  18. Restructuring the introductory physics lab with the addition of computer-based laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Pierri-Galvao, Monica

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays, data acquisition software and sensors are being widely used in introductory physics laboratories. This allows the student to spend more time exploring the data that is collected by the computer hence focusing more on the physical concept. Very often, a faculty is faced with the challenge of updating or introducing a microcomputer-based laboratory (MBL) at his or her institution. This article will provide a list of experiments and equipment needed to convert about half of the traditional labs on a 1-year introductory physics lab into MBLs. PMID:22346229

  19. Effects of xanthan, guar, carrageenan and locust bean gum addition on physical, chemical and sensory properties of meatballs.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Zeynep Ozben; Yılmaz, Ismail; Demirci, Ahmet Şukru

    2014-05-01

    This study evaluated the effects of xanthan gum, guar gum, carrageenan and locust bean gum on physical, chemical and sensory properties of meatballs. Meatball samples were produced with three different formulations including of 0.5, 1, and 1.5% each gum addition and gum added samples were compared with the control meatballs. Physical and chemical analyses were carried out on raw and cooked samples separately. Moisture contents of raw samples decreased by addition of gums. There were significant decreases (p < 0.05) in moisture and fat contents of raw and cooked meatball samples formulated with gum when compared with control. Ash contents and texture values increased with gum addition to meatballs. Meatball redness decreased with more gum addition in raw and cooked meatball samples, which means that addition of gums resulted in a lighter-coloured product. According to sensory analysis results, locust bean gum added (1%) samples were much preferred by the panelists. PMID:24803701

  20. Gendering Processes in the Field of Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Paivi; Lahelma, Elina

    2010-01-01

    In Finnish secondary schools, girls and boys are taught physical education (PE) in separate groups. A male teacher normally teaches the boys and a female teacher teaches the girls. Focusing on PE teachers' comments in two different ethnographic studies of seventh graders (13-14-year-olds), we examine the processes that reproduce or challenge the…

  1. The Philosophic Process in Physical Education. 3rd Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, William A.; And Others

    This book on the process of philosophic thought as it relates to physical education is divided into four parts. The first part, "Philosophy as Action," aims to help the student to develop and refine his ability to philosophize, to direct reasoned beliefs toward a goal, to see that reasoned beliefs derive from thinking, to avoid error and dangers…

  2. Heat Transfer Processes for the Thermal Energy Balance of Organisms. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Transport Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, R. D.

    This module is part of a series designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. This module describes heat transfer processes involved in the exchange of heat…

  3. Physics-based model for electro-chemical process

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jinsuo

    2013-07-01

    Considering the kinetics of electrochemical reactions and mass transfer at the surface and near-surface of the electrode, a physics-based separation model for separating actinides from fission products in an electro-refiner is developed. The model, taking into account the physical, chemical and electrochemical processes at the electrode surface, can be applied to study electrorefining kinetics. One of the methods used for validation has been to apply the developed model to the computation of the cyclic voltammetry process of PuCl{sub 3} and UCl{sub 3} at a solid electrode in molten KCl-LiCl. The computed results appear to be similar to experimental measures. The separation model can be applied to predict materials flows under normal and abnormal operation conditions. Parametric studies can be conducted based on the model to identify the most important factors that affect the electrorefining processes.

  4. Addition of a Project-Based Component to a Conventional Expository Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsaparlis, Georgios; Gorezi, Marianna

    2007-01-01

    Students should enjoy their laboratory classes and for this purpose a project-based activity is added to a conventional physical chemistry laboratory. Students were given project work instead of conventional experiment and then they had to make progress in the project according to instructions and then carry out experiments related to the project.

  5. Addition of cover crops enhances no-till potential for improving soil physical properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interest in the use of cover crops (CC) is growing. Inclusion of CC may be a potential strategy to boost no-till performance by improving soil physical properties. To assess this potential, we utilized a wheat [Triticum aestivum (L.)]-grain sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] rotation, four N rate...

  6. Light and Sound: Evolutionary Aspects. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Transport Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roseman, Leonard D.

    These materials were designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. This module is concerned with the exchange of energy between an organism and its environment in…

  7. Pressure and Buoyancy in Aquatic Ecosystems. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Transport Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Christina E.

    This module is part of a series designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. This module explores some of the characteristics of aquatic organisms which can be…

  8. Fluid Dynamics Applied to Streams. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Transport Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Christina E.

    This module is part of a series designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. This module deals specifically with concepts that are basic to fluid flow and…

  9. Transpiration and Leaf Temperature. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Transport Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gates, David M.

    These materials were designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. This report introduces two models of the thermal energy budget of a leaf. Typical values for…

  10. Soil Heat Flow. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Transport Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, James R.

    These materials were designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. Soil heat flow and the resulting soil temperature distributions have ecological consequences…

  11. Biological Production in Lakes. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Ecological Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, R. A.; Carey, G. F.

    These materials were designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. Primary production in aquatic ecosystems is carried out by phytoplankton, microscopic plants…

  12. Being qua becoming: Aristotle's "Metaphysics", quantum physics, and Process Philosophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, David Kelley

    In Aristotle's First Philosophy, science and philosophy were partners, but with the rise of empiricism, went their separate ways. Metaphysics combined the rational and irrational (i.e. final cause/unmoved mover) elements of existence to equate being with substance, postulating prime matter as pure potential that was actuated by form to create everything. Modern science reveres pure reason and postulates its theory of being by a rigorous scientific methodology. The Standard Model defines matter as energy formed into fundamental particles via forces contained in fields. Science has proved Aristotle's universe wrong in many ways, but as physics delves deeper into the quantum world, empiricism is reaching its limits concerning fundamental questions of existence. To achieve its avowed mission of explaining existence completely, physics must reunite with philosophy in a metascience modeled on the First Philosophy of Aristotle. One theory of being that integrates quantum physics and metaphysics is Process Philosophy.

  13. How Physicists Made Stable Lévy Processes Physically Plausible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schinckus, Christophe

    2013-08-01

    Stable Lévy processes have very interesting properties for describing the complex behaviour of non-equilibrium dissipative systems such as turbulence, anomalous diffusion or financial markets. However, although these processes better fit the empirical data, some of their statistical properties can raise several theoretical problems in empirical applications because they generate infinite variables. Econophysicists have developed statistical solutions to make these processes physically plausible. This paper presents a review of these analytical solutions (truncations) for stable Lévy processes and how econophysicists transformed them into data-driven processes. The evolution of these analytical solutions is presented as a progressive research programme provided by (econo)physicists for theoretical problems encountered in financial economics in the 1960s and the 1970s.

  14. A Pilot Study to Examine the Effect of Additional Structured Outdoor Playtime on Preschoolers' Physical Activity Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alhassan, Sofiya; Nwaokelemeh, Ogechi; Lyden, Kate; Goldsby, TaShauna; Mendoza, Albert

    2013-01-01

    The impact of additional structured outdoor playtime on preschoolers'; physical activity (PA) level is unclear. The purpose of this pilot study was to explore the effects of increasing structured outdoor playtime on preschoolers'; PA levels. Eight full-day classrooms (n = 134 children) from two preschool programmes were randomised into a treatment…

  15. Assessing processes in uncertain, complex physical phenomena and manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, J. M.; Kerscher, W. J. III; Smith, R. E.

    2002-01-01

    PREDICT (Performance and Reliability Evaluation with Diverse Information Combination and Tracking) is a set of structured quantitative approaches for the evaluation of system performance based on multiple information sources. The methodology integrates diverse types and sources of information, and their associated uncertainties, to develop full distributions for performance metrics, such as reliability. The successful application of PREDICT has involved system performance assessment in automotive product development, aging nuclear weapons, and fatigued turbine jet engines. In each of these applications, complex physical, mechanical and materials processes affect performance, safety and reliability assessments. Processes also include the physical actions taken during manufacturing, quality control, inspections, assembly, etc. and the steps involved in product design, development and certification. In this paper, we will examine the various types of processes involved in the decision making leading to production in an automotive system reliability example. Analysis of these processes includes not only understanding their impact on performance and reliability, but also the uncertainties associated with them. The automotive example demonstrates some of the tools used in tackling the complex problem of understanding processes. While some tools and methods exist for understanding processes (man made and natural) and the uncertainties associated with them, many of the complex issues discussed are open for continued research efforts.

  16. Levels of processing and picture memory: the physical superiority effect.

    PubMed

    Intraub, H; Nicklos, S

    1985-04-01

    Six experiments studied the effect of physical orienting questions (e.g., "Is this angular?") and semantic orienting questions (e.g., "Is this edible?") on memory for unrelated pictures at stimulus durations ranging from 125-2,000 ms. Results ran contrary to the semantic superiority "rule of thumb," which is based primarily on verbal memory experiments. Physical questions were associated with better free recall and cued recall of a diverse set of visual scenes (Experiments 1, 2, and 4). This occurred both when general and highly specific semantic questions were used (Experiments 1 and 2). Similar results were obtained when more simplistic visual stimuli--photographs of single objects--were used (Experiments 5 and 6). As in the case of the semantic superiority effect with words, the physical superiority effect for pictures was eliminated or reversed when the same physical questions were repeated throughout the session (Experiments 4 and 6). Conflicts with results of previous levels of processing experiments with words and nonverbal stimuli (e.g., faces) are explained in terms of the sensory-semantic model (Nelson, Reed, & McEvoy, 1977). Implications for picture memory research and the levels of processing viewpoint are discussed. PMID:3157769

  17. Physical activity across the curriculum: year one process evaluation results

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Cheryl A; Smith, Bryan K; DuBose, Katrina D; Greene, J Leon; Bailey, Bruce W; Williams, Shannon L; Ryan, Joseph J; Schmelzle, Kristin H; Washburn, Richard A; Sullivan, Debra K; Mayo, Matthew S; Donnelly, Joseph E

    2008-01-01

    Background Physical Activity Across the Curriculum (PAAC) is a 3-year elementary school-based intervention to determine if increased amounts of moderate intensity physical activity performed in the classroom will diminish gains in body mass index (BMI). It is a cluster-randomized, controlled trial, involving 4905 children (2505 intervention, 2400 control). Methods We collected both qualitative and quantitative process evaluation data from 24 schools (14 intervention and 10 control), which included tracking teacher training issues, challenges and barriers to effective implementation of PAAC lessons, initial and continual use of program specified activities, and potential competing factors, which might contaminate or lessen program effects. Results Overall teacher attendance at training sessions showed exceptional reach. Teachers incorporated active lessons on most days, resulting in significantly greater student physical activity levels compared to controls (p < 0.0001). Enjoyment ratings for classroom-based lessons were also higher for intervention students. Competing factors, which might influence program results, were not carried out at intervention or control schools or were judged to be minimal. Conclusion In the first year of the PAAC intervention, process evaluation results were instrumental in identifying successes and challenges faced by teachers when trying to modify existing academic lessons to incorporate physical activity. PMID:18606013

  18. A combined physical/microbial process for coal beneficiation

    SciTech Connect

    Noah, K.S.; Glenn, A.W.; Stevens, C.J.; McAtee, N.B.; McIlwain, M.E.; Andrews, G.F.

    1993-11-01

    A combined physical/microbial process for the removal of pyritic sulfur from coal was demonstrated in a 200 L aerated trough slurry reactor. The reactor was divided into six sections, each of which acted as both a physical separator and a bioreactor. Settled solids from sections 2 through 6 were recycled to section 1 which acted as a rougher. The objective was physical removal of the larger pyritic inclusions, which would take many days to biodegrade, and biodegradation of the micropyrite, which is difficult to remove physically. The process was operated continuously for 8 months, treating two Illinois No. 6 coals (4 months each). Reduction of 90% in-pyritic sulfur with 90% energy recovery and 35% ash removal was obtained for a low pyrite Monterey coal at a 5 day coal retention time and 20% (w/w) slurry concentration. Increased coal loading reduced performance apparently due to losses of sulfur oxidizing bacteria. A low pyrite Consol coal gave 63--77% pyrite reduction with 23--30% ash removal and 77--90% heating value recovery. Product coal pyritic sulfur analysis indicated no differences between treatments of Consol coal. This suggests that the coal residence time could be further reduced and the slurry concentration increased in future work.

  19. CLARA: A Contemporary Approach to Physics Data Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyurjyan, V.; Abbott, D.; Carbonneau, J.; Gilfoyle, G.; Heddle, D.; Heyes, G.; Paul, S.; Timmer, C.; Weygand, D.; Wolin, E.

    2011-12-01

    CLARA (CLAS12 Reconstruction and Analysis framework) is CLAS12 physics data processing (PDP) application development framework based on a service oriented architecture (SOA). This framework allows users to design and deploy data processing services as well as dynamically compose PDP applications using available services. Services can be written in Java, C++, and Python languages. The PDP service bus provides a layer on top of a distributed pub-sub middleware implementation. This allows complex service composition and integration without writing a code. We believe that by deviating from the traditional self contained, monolithic PDP application models we can improve maintenance, scalability and quality of physics data analysis. The SOA approach also helps us to separate a specific service programmer from a PDP application designer. Examples of service creation and deployment, along with the CLAS12 track reconstruction application design are presented.

  20. The Role of Additional Processing Time and Lexical Constraint in Spoken Word Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LoCasto, Paul C.; Connine, Cynthia M.; Patterson, David

    2007-01-01

    Three phoneme monitoring experiments examined the manner in which additional processing time influences spoken word recognition. Experiment 1a introduced a version of the phoneme monitoring paradigm in which a silent interval is inserted prior to the word-final target phoneme. Phoneme monitoring reaction time decreased as the silent interval…

  1. 15 CFR 713.4 - Advance declaration requirements for additionally planned production, processing, or consumption...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING...)(ii) of the CWCR will produce, process, or consume a Schedule 2 chemical above the applicable...)(ii) of the CWCR an additional Schedule 2 chemical above the applicable declaration threshold;...

  2. 15 CFR 713.4 - Advance declaration requirements for additionally planned production, processing, or consumption...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING...)(ii) of the CWCR will produce, process, or consume a Schedule 2 chemical above the applicable...)(ii) of the CWCR an additional Schedule 2 chemical above the applicable declaration threshold;...

  3. 15 CFR 713.4 - Advance declaration requirements for additionally planned production, processing, or consumption...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING...)(ii) of the CWCR will produce, process, or consume a Schedule 2 chemical above the applicable...)(ii) of the CWCR an additional Schedule 2 chemical above the applicable declaration threshold;...

  4. 15 CFR 713.4 - Advance declaration requirements for additionally planned production, processing, or consumption...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Advance declaration requirements for additionally planned production, processing, or consumption of Schedule 2 chemicals. 713.4 Section 713.4 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF...

  5. 15 CFR 713.4 - Advance declaration requirements for additionally planned production, processing, or consumption...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING...)(ii) of the CWCR will produce, process, or consume a Schedule 2 chemical above the applicable...)(ii) of the CWCR an additional Schedule 2 chemical above the applicable declaration threshold;...

  6. 25 CFR 1000.356 - May the trust evaluation process be used for additional reviews?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false May the trust evaluation process be used for additional reviews? 1000.356 Section 1000.356 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ANNUAL FUNDING AGREEMENTS UNDER THE TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNMENT ACT AMENDMENTS TO...

  7. The physical basis of explosion and blast injury processes.

    PubMed

    Proud, W G

    2013-03-01

    Energetic materials are widely used in civilian and military applications, such as quarrying and mining, flares, and in munitions. Recent conflicts have involved the widespread use of improvised explosive devices to attack military, civilians and infrastructure. This article gives a basic overview of explosive technology and the underlying physical processes that produce the injuries encountered. In particular aspects relevant to primary and secondary injuries are discussed. PMID:23631318

  8. Influence of different natural physical fields on biological processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashinsky, A. L.

    2001-01-01

    In space flight conditions gravity, magnetic, and electrical fields as well as ionizing radiation change both in size, and in direction. This causes disruptions in the conduct of some physical processes, chemical reactions, and metabolism in living organisms. In these conditions organisms of different phylogenetic level change their metabolic reactions undergo changes such as disturbances in ionic exchange both in lower and in higher plants, changes in cell morphology for example, gyrosity in Proteus ( Proteus vulgaris), spatial disorientation in coleoptiles of Wheat ( Triticum aestivum) and Pea ( Pisum sativum) seedlings, mutational changes in Crepis ( Crepis capillaris) and Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana) seedling. It has been found that even in the absence of gravity, gravireceptors determining spatial orientation in higher plants under terrestrial conditions are formed in the course of ontogenesis. Under weightlessness this system does not function and spatial orientation is determined by the light flux gradient or by the action of some other factors. Peculiarities of the formation of the gravireceptor apparatus in higher plants, amphibians, fish, and birds under space flight conditions have been observed. It has been found that the system in which responses were accompanied by phase transition have proven to be gravity-sensitive under microgravity conditions. Such reactions include also the process of photosynthesis which is the main energy production process in plants. In view of the established effects of microgravity and different natural physical fields on biological processes, it has been shown that these processes change due to the absence of initially rigid determination. The established biological effect of physical fields influence on biological processes in organisms is the starting point for elucidating the role of gravity and evolutionary development of various organisms on Earth.

  9. Additional Contributions to the Development of the New Snow-Physics Scheme for SSiB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mocko, David M.; Sud, Y. C.

    1999-01-01

    The Simplified Simple Biosphere Model (SSiB) had a well-documented problem with snowmelt timing and infiltration. A new snow-physics scheme was developed for use in SSIB. In this, the snow layer is separated from the soil, with its own energy budget and temperature. Solar energy reaching the top of the snowpack is divided into three parts: one, reflected by the snow; two, absorbed by the snow; and three, transmitted to the ground following a simple extinction relation. Heat is exchanged between the ground and snow by conduction and by radiation through an arbitrary air-gap between them. In the GSWP exercise using the GEWEX ISLSCP Initiative I forcing data (hereafter "offline"), it was found that the new snow scheme ameliorated a significant fraction of snowmelt time-delay as compared to observations from satellite. It also produced warmer ground temperatures under the snowpack, which allowed realistic meltwater infiltration, resulting in better simulated spring soil moisture recharge and peak runoff amount as compared to observations. An ensemble of six June-July-August (JJA) simulations for 1987 and 1988 were performed with the NASA Goddard GEOS II GCM coupled with the new snow-physics SSIB using new initial soil moisture (ISM) from the offline simulations. The GCM produced more realistic precipitation in northern regions that had large snowmelt and wetter ISM in response to better snow-physics, as compared to simulations with ISM without the new snow scheme. The new SSiB-GCM also increased the interannual precipitation signal in the Indian monsoon region, resulting from changes in ISM in the Himalayas and central Asia.

  10. Spatial correlations, additivity, and fluctuations in conserved-mass transport processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Arghya; Chatterjee, Sayani; Pradhan, Punyabrata

    2016-06-01

    We exactly calculate two-point spatial correlation functions in steady state in a broad class of conserved-mass transport processes, which are governed by chipping, diffusion, and coalescence of masses. We find that the spatial correlations are in general short-ranged and, consequently, on a large scale, these transport processes possess a remarkable thermodynamic structure in the steady state. That is, the processes have an equilibrium-like additivity property and, consequently, a fluctuation-response relation, which help us to obtain subsystem mass distributions in the limit of subsystem size large.

  11. Urgency of evolution-process congruent thinking in physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychoudhuri, Chandrasekhar

    2015-09-01

    It is now generally recognized that physics has not been contributing anything conceptually fundamentally new beyond the century old Relativity and 90 years old Quantum Mechanics [1-4]. We have also started recognizing that there is an increasing rate of species extinction all over the world, especially since the last century [5]; and we are beginning to understand that the related problems are being steadily accelerated by human behavior to conquer nature, rather than understanding nature as is and living within its system logics [6,7]. We are beginning to appreciate that our long-term sustainability as a species literally depends upon proactively learning to nurture the entire bio-diversity [8-10]. Thus, humans must consciously become evolution process congruent thinkers. The evolutionary biologists have been crying out loud for us to listen [5,6, 8-10]. Social scientists, political scientists, economic scientists [13] have started chiming in to become consilient thinkers [6] for re-constructing sustainable societies. But, the path to consilient thinking requires us to recognize and accept a common vision based thinking process, which functionally serves as a uniting platform. I am articulating that platform as the "evolution process congruent thinking" (EPCT). Do physicists have any obligation to co-opt this EPCT? Is there any immediate and/or long-term gain for them? This paper argues affirmatively that co-opting EPCT is the best way to re-anchor physics back to reality ontology and develop newer and deeper understanding of natural phenomena based on understanding of the diverse interaction processes going on in nature. Physics is mature enough to acknowledge that all of our theories are "work in progress". This is a good time to start iteratively re-evaluating and re-structuring all the foundational postulates behind all the working theories. This will also consistently energize all the follow-on generation of physicists to keep on fully utilizing their

  12. Effects of a noncoplanar biphenyldiamine on the processing and properties of addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, Kathy C.; Vannucci, Raymond D.; Moore, Brad W.

    1992-01-01

    Addition curing polyimides, prepared from noncoplanar 2,2'-bis(trifluoromethyl) 4,4' diaminobiphenyl (BTDB) with various dianhydrides were evaluated as high temperature polymer matrix materials. T sub g of these polymers were measured by mechanical methods as well as by thermal mechanical analysis. Physical and mechanical properties as well as the thermo-oxidative stability of neat resins and the corresponding G40-600 graphite fiber reinforced composites were compared to that of PMR-II-50 and V-CAP-75.

  13. Electric poling-assisted additive manufacturing process for PVDF polymer-based piezoelectric device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, ChaBum; Tarbutton, Joshua A.

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a new additive manufacturing (AM) process to directly and continuously print piezoelectric devices from polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) polymeric filament rods under a strong electric field. This process, called ‘electric poling-assisted additive manufacturing or EPAM, combines AM and electric poling processes and is able to fabricate free-form shape piezoelectric devices continuously. In this process, the PVDF polymer dipoles remain well-aligned and uniform over a large area in a single design, production and fabrication step. During EPAM process, molten PVDF polymer is simultaneously mechanically stresses in-situ by the leading nozzle and electrically poled by applying high electric field under high temperature. The EPAM system was constructed to directly print piezoelectric structures from PVDF polymeric filament while applying high electric field between nozzle tip and printing bed in AM machine. Piezoelectric devices were successfully fabricated using the EPAM process. The crystalline phase transitions that occurred from the process were identified by using the Fourier transform infrared spectroscope. The results indicate that devices printed under a strong electric field become piezoelectric during the EPAM process and that stronger electric fields result in greater piezoelectricity as marked by the electrical response and the formation of sharper peaks at the polar β crystalline wavenumber of the PVDF polymer. Performing this process in the absence of an electric field does not result in dipole alignment of PVDF polymer. The EPAM process is expected to lead to the widespread use of AM to fabricate a variety of piezoelectric PVDF polymer-based devices for sensing, actuation and energy harvesting applications with simple, low cost, single processing and fabrication step.

  14. Process depending morphology and resulting physical properties of TPU

    SciTech Connect

    Frick, Achim Spadaro, Marcel

    2015-12-17

    Thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) is a rubber like material with outstanding properties, e.g. for seal applications. TPU basically provides high strength, low frictional behavior and excellent wear resistance. Though, due to segmented structure of TPU, which is composed of hard segments (HSs) and soft segments (SSs), physical properties depend strongly on the morphological arrangement of the phase separated HSs at a certain ratio of HSs to SSs. It is obvious that the TPU deforms differently depending on its bulk morphology. Basically, the morphology can either consist of HSs segregated into small domains, which are well dispersed in the SS matrix or of few strongly phase separated large size HS domains embedded in the SS matrix. The morphology development is hardly ruled by the melt processing conditions of the TPU. Depending on the morphology, TPU provides quite different physical properties with respect to strength, deformation behavior, thermal stability, creep resistance and tribological performance. The paper deals with the influence of important melt processing parameters, such as temperature, pressure and shear conditions, on the resulting physical properties tested by tensile and relaxation experiments. Furthermore the morphology is studied employing differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), transmission light microscopy (TLM), scanning electron beam microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron beam microscopy (TEM) investigations. Correlations between processing conditions and resulting TPU material properties are elaborated. Flow and shear simulations contribute to the understanding of thermal and flow induced morphology development.

  15. Process depending morphology and resulting physical properties of TPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frick, Achim; Spadaro, Marcel

    2015-12-01

    Thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) is a rubber like material with outstanding properties, e.g. for seal applications. TPU basically provides high strength, low frictional behavior and excellent wear resistance. Though, due to segmented structure of TPU, which is composed of hard segments (HSs) and soft segments (SSs), physical properties depend strongly on the morphological arrangement of the phase separated HSs at a certain ratio of HSs to SSs. It is obvious that the TPU deforms differently depending on its bulk morphology. Basically, the morphology can either consist of HSs segregated into small domains, which are well dispersed in the SS matrix or of few strongly phase separated large size HS domains embedded in the SS matrix. The morphology development is hardly ruled by the melt processing conditions of the TPU. Depending on the morphology, TPU provides quite different physical properties with respect to strength, deformation behavior, thermal stability, creep resistance and tribological performance. The paper deals with the influence of important melt processing parameters, such as temperature, pressure and shear conditions, on the resulting physical properties tested by tensile and relaxation experiments. Furthermore the morphology is studied employing differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), transmission light microscopy (TLM), scanning electron beam microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron beam microscopy (TEM) investigations. Correlations between processing conditions and resulting TPU material properties are elaborated. Flow and shear simulations contribute to the understanding of thermal and flow induced morphology development.

  16. Rationalization of Microstructure Heterogeneity in INCONEL 718 Builds Made by the Direct Laser Additive Manufacturing Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yuan; McAllister, Donald; Colijn, Hendrik; Mills, Michael; Farson, Dave; Nordin, Mark; Babu, Sudarsanam

    2014-09-01

    Simulative builds, typical of the tip-repair procedure, with matching compositions were deposited on an INCONEL 718 substrate using the laser additive manufacturing process. In the as-processed condition, these builds exhibit spatial heterogeneity in microstructure. Electron backscattering diffraction analyses showed highly misoriented grains in the top region of the builds compared to those of the lower region. Hardness maps indicated a 30 pct hardness increase in build regions close to the substrate over those of the top regions. Detailed multiscale characterizations, through scanning electron microscopy, electron backscattered diffraction imaging, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and ChemiSTEM, also showed microstructure heterogeneities within the builds in different length scales including interdendritic and interprecipitate regions. These multiscale heterogeneities were correlated to primary solidification, remelting, and solid-state precipitation kinetics of γ″ induced by solute segregation, as well as multiple heating and cooling cycles induced by the laser additive manufacturing process.

  17. Statistics-related and reliability-physics-related failure processes in electronics devices and products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhir, E.

    2014-05-01

    The well known and widely used experimental reliability "passport" of a mass manufactured electronic or a photonic product — the bathtub curve — reflects the combined contribution of the statistics-related and reliability-physics (physics-of-failure)-related processes. When time progresses, the first process results in a decreasing failure rate, while the second process associated with the material aging and degradation leads to an increased failure rate. An attempt has been made in this analysis to assess the level of the reliability physics-related aging process from the available bathtub curve (diagram). It is assumed that the products of interest underwent the burn-in testing and therefore the obtained bathtub curve does not contain the infant mortality portion. It has been also assumed that the two random processes in question are statistically independent, and that the failure rate of the physical process can be obtained by deducting the theoretically assessed statistical failure rate from the bathtub curve ordinates. In the carried out numerical example, the Raleigh distribution for the statistical failure rate was used, for the sake of a relatively simple illustration. The developed methodology can be used in reliability physics evaluations, when there is a need to better understand the roles of the statistics-related and reliability-physics-related irreversible random processes in reliability evaluations. The future work should include investigations on how powerful and flexible methods and approaches of the statistical mechanics can be effectively employed, in addition to reliability physics techniques, to model the operational reliability of electronic and photonic products.

  18. Physical Processes of Poloidal Flux Injection in CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, James

    2011-05-01

    The erupting flux rope (EFR) model of CMEs has been extensively tested against CME dynamics observed by SOHO and STEREO, demonstrating good agreement between model results and data: the best-fit solutions can reproduce observed CME trajectories from the Sun to 1 AU to within 1-2% of the data, and such solutions yield the poloidal flux injection function whose temporal profiles closely match those of the associated soft X-ray flare emissions. This provides evidence that the flux injection function captures the underlying physical connection between CME acceleration and flare energy release [1]. This mathematical function admits two distinct physical interpretations. In this talk, the physical processes that can contribute to poloidal flux injection are discussed, one involving flux of subphotospheric source and the other of coronal source. Recently, Schuck [2] and earlier, Forbes [3] argued that there is insufficient Poynting flux observable through the photosphere to support the subphotospheric flux injection hypothesis. These calculations, however, impose ad hoc large-scale coherent horizontal fields in the photosphere and do not have any subphotospheric source of flux or any equations of motion describing an ``injection'' process from a source through a medium. That is, these arguments contain no flux injection mechanism that they purport to ``falsify'' and no physical properties of the convection zone. Physically relevant signatures of subphotospheric flux injection are discussed. [1] Chen, J., and Kunkel, V. 2010, ApJ, 717, 1105. [2] Schuck, P. W. 2010, 714, 68. [3] Forbes, T. G. 2001, Eos Trans. AGU, 82(20), SH41C-03.

  19. Effects of different additives on the performance of spray dryer system during incineration process.

    PubMed

    Wey, M Y; Peng, C Y; Wu, H Y; Chiang, B C; Liu, Z S

    2002-06-01

    The spray dryer system was conventionally employed to remove the SOx, NOx, and HCl in the flue gas. However, the removal efficiency of acid gas in the practical incineration flue gas, which contains dust, heavy metals, and acid gas itself, was seldom mentioned in the literature. The alkaline sorbents possess large specific surface that was a main factor on the adsorption of heavy metals and acid gas. Therefore, the primary objective of this study was focused on the effect of different additives on the removal efficiency of acid gas and heavy metals (Cr, Cd and Pb). The mass and element size distribution of heavy metals in fly ash under different additives were also investigated. The results indicated that the removal efficiency of HCl in the spray dryer system was higher than 97.8%. The effects of additives on the removal efficiency of HCl, however, were undistinguished. In the desulfurization process, the highest removal efficiency was 71.3% when the additive of amorphous SiO2 was added in the spray dryer system. The removal efficiency was 66.0% with the additive of CaCl2 and 63.1% without any additives, respectively. It was also found that the spray dryer system could decrease the concentration of metal in fly ash but increase the amount of fly ash. In addition, amorphous SiO2 in the alkaline sorbent tended to increase the adsorption of heavy metal on reactant, because it could enhance the dispersion of alkaline sorbent. PMID:12118621

  20. Effect of Fruit Pomace Addition on Shortbread Cookies to Improve Their Physical and Nutritional Values.

    PubMed

    Tańska, Małgorzata; Roszkowska, Beata; Czaplicki, Sylwester; Borowska, Eulalia Julitta; Bojarska, Justyna; Dąbrowska, Aneta

    2016-09-01

    Fruit pomace remaining after juice extraction is still a source of bioactive compounds. Especially rich in these compounds is the pomace from blackcurrant fruit and from fruits of little-known horticultural plants, like: rowan, rosehip and elderberry. The addition of fruit pomace to bakery and confectionery products, especially to those made of white flour, may significantly enrich their composition with dietary fiber, vitamins and phenolic compounds. This study was aimed at determining the effect of 20 % addition of fruit pomace from rosehip, rowan, blackcurrant and elderberry on the properties of shortbread cookies. The pomace-containing cookies, compared to those without additives, were characterized by a darker color with a higher contribution of yellowness, and by higher hardness. The overall organoleptic assessment was comparable for all types of cookies, however the cookies with pomace were characterized by more perceptible taste and aroma, and were sourer. The extracts from pomace-supplemented cookies had a significantly stronger antioxidant capacity than that from the cookies without pomace, but they were ineffective in inhibiting lipid oxidation. The study showed that fruit pomace could improve the nutritional value of shortbread cookies. Furthermore, non-typical color of such a new product may be attractive to consumers. PMID:27319014

  1. A Pilot Test of the Additive Benefits of Physical Exercise to CBT for OCD.

    PubMed

    Rector, Neil A; Richter, Margaret A; Lerman, Bethany; Regev, Rotem

    2015-01-01

    The majority of "responders" to first-line cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) and pharmacological treatments for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) are left with residual symptoms that are clinically relevant and disabling. Therefore, there is pressing need for widely accessible efficacious alternative and/or adjunctive treatments for OCD. Accumulating evidence suggests that physical exercise may be one such intervention in the mood and anxiety disorders broadly, although we are aware of only two positive small-scale pilot studies that have tested its clinical benefits in OCD. This pilot study aimed to test the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of adding a structured physical exercise programme to CBT for OCD. A standard CBT group was delivered concurrently with a 12-week customized exercise programme to 11 participants. The exercise regimen was individualized for each participant based on peak heart rate measured using an incremental maximal exercise test. Reports of exercise adherence across the 12-week regimen exceeded 80%. A paired-samples t-test indicated very large treatment effects in Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale scores from pre- to post-treatment in CBT group cohorts led by expert CBT OCD specialists (d = 2.55) and junior CBT clinician non-OCD specialists (d = 2.12). These treatment effects are very large and exceed effects typically observed with individual and group-based CBT for OCD based on leading meta-analytic reviews, as well as previously obtained treatment effects for CBT using the same recruitment protocol without exercise. As such, this pilot work demonstrates the feasibility and significant potential clinical utility of a 12-week aerobic exercise programme delivered in conjunction with CBT for OCD. PMID:25738234

  2. Multiscale simulation process and application to additives in porous composite battery electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieser, Christian; Prill, Torben; Schladitz, Katja

    2015-03-01

    Structure-resolving simulation of porous materials in electrochemical cells such as fuel cells and lithium ion batteries allows for correlating electrical performance with material morphology. In lithium ion batteries characteristic length scales of active material particles and additives range several orders of magnitude. Hence, providing a computational mesh resolving all length scales is not reasonably feasible and requires alternative approaches. In the work presented here a virtual process to simulate lithium ion batteries by bridging the scales is introduced. Representative lithium ion battery electrode coatings comprised of μm-scale graphite particles as active material and a nm-scale carbon/polymeric binder mixture as an additive are imaged with synchrotron radiation computed tomography (SR-CT) and sequential focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM), respectively. Applying novel image processing methodologies for the FIB/SEM images, data sets are binarized to provide a computational grid for calculating the effective mass transport properties of the electrolyte phase in the nanoporous additive. Afterwards, the homogenized additive is virtually added to the micropores of the binarized SR-CT data set representing the active particle structure, and the resulting electrode structure is assembled to a virtual half-cell for electrochemical microheterogeneous simulation. Preliminary battery performance simulations indicate non-negligible impact of the consideration of the additive.

  3. Physical process first law for bifurcate Killing horizons

    SciTech Connect

    Amsel, Aaron J.; Marolf, Donald; Virmani, Amitabh

    2008-01-15

    The physical process version of the first law for black holes states that the passage of energy and angular momentum through the horizon results in a change in area ({kappa}/8{pi}){delta}A={delta}E-{omega}{delta}J, so long as this passage is quasistationary. A similar physical process first law can be derived for any bifurcate Killing horizon in any spacetime dimension d{>=}3 using much the same argument. However, to make this law nontrivial, one must show that sufficiently quasistationary processes do in fact occur. In particular, one must show that processes exist for which the shear and expansion remain small, and in which no new generators are added to the horizon. Thorne, MacDonald, and Price considered related issues when an object falls across a d=4 black hole horizon. By generalizing their argument to arbitrary d{>=}3 and to any bifurcate Killing horizon, we derive a condition under which these effects are controlled and the first law applies. In particular, by providing a nontrivial first law for Rindler horizons, our work completes the parallel between the mechanics of such horizons and those of black holes for d{>=}3. We also comment on the situation for d=2.

  4. Process evaluation results from the HEALTHY physical education intervention.

    PubMed

    Hall, William J; Zeveloff, Abigail; Steckler, Allan; Schneider, Margaret; Thompson, Deborah; Pham, Trang; Volpe, Stella L; Hindes, Katie; Sleigh, Adriana; McMurray, Robert G

    2012-04-01

    Process evaluation is an assessment of the implementation of an intervention. A process evaluation component was embedded in the HEALTHY study, a primary prevention trial for Type 2 diabetes implemented over 3 years in 21 middle schools across the United States. The HEALTHY physical education (PE) intervention aimed at maximizing student engagement in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity through delivery of structured lesson plans by PE teachers. Process evaluation data collected via class observations and interventionist interviews assessed fidelity, dose delivered, implementor participation, dose received and barriers. Process evaluation results indicate a high level of fidelity in implementing HEALTHY PE activities and offering 225 min of PE every 10 school days. Concerning dose delivered, students were active for approximately 33 min of class, representing an average of 61% of the class time. Results also indicate that PE teachers were generally engaged in implementing the HEALTHY PE curriculum. Data on dose received showed that students were highly engaged with the PE intervention; however, student misbehavior was the most common barrier observed during classes. Other barriers included teacher disengagement, large classes, limited gym space and poor classroom management. Findings suggest that the PE intervention was generally implemented and received as intended despite several barriers. PMID:22156231

  5. Process evaluation results from the HEALTHY physical education intervention

    PubMed Central

    Hall, William J.; Zeveloff, Abigail; Steckler, Allan; Schneider, Margaret; Thompson, Deborah; Pham, Trang; Volpe, Stella L.; Hindes, Katie; Sleigh, Adriana; McMurray, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    Process evaluation is an assessment of the implementation of an intervention. A process evaluation component was embedded in the HEALTHY study, a primary prevention trial for Type 2 diabetes implemented over 3 years in 21 middle schools across the United States. The HEALTHY physical education (PE) intervention aimed at maximizing student engagement in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity through delivery of structured lesson plans by PE teachers. Process evaluation data collected via class observations and interventionist interviews assessed fidelity, dose delivered, implementor participation, dose received and barriers. Process evaluation results indicate a high level of fidelity in implementing HEALTHY PE activities and offering 225 min of PE every 10 school days. Concerning dose delivered, students were active for approximately 33 min of class, representing an average of 61% of the class time. Results also indicate that PE teachers were generally engaged in implementing the HEALTHY PE curriculum. Data on dose received showed that students were highly engaged with the PE intervention; however, student misbehavior was the most common barrier observed during classes. Other barriers included teacher disengagement, large classes, limited gym space and poor classroom management. Findings suggest that the PE intervention was generally implemented and received as intended despite several barriers. PMID:22156231

  6. The effects of Na/K additives and flyash on NO reduction in a SNCR process.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jiangtao; Yu, Wei; Lu, Ping; Zhang, Yufei; Zhu, Xiuming

    2015-03-01

    An experimental study of Na/K additives and flyash on NO reduction during the selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) process were carried out in an entrained flow reactor (EFR). The effects of reaction temperature (Tr), water vapor, Na/K additives (NaCl, KCl, Na2CO3) and flyash characteristics on NO reduction were analyzed. The results indicated that NO removal efficiency shows a pattern of increasing first and decreasing later with the increase of the temperature at Tr=850-1150°C. Water vapor can improve the performance of NO reduction, and the NO reduction of 70.5% was obtained while the flue gas containing 4% water vapor at 950°C. Na/K additives have a significant promoting effect on NO reduction and widen the SNCR temperature window, the promoting effect of the test additives is ordered as Na2CO3>KCl>NaCl. NO removal efficiency with 125ppm Na2CO3 and 4% water vapor can reach up to 84.9% at the optimal reaction temperature. The additive concentration has no significant effects on NO reduction while its concentration is above 50ppm. Addition of circulating fluidized combustion (CFB) flyash deteriorates NO reduction significantly. However, CFB flyash and Na/K additives will get a coupling effect on NO reduction during the SNCR process, and the best NO reduction can reach 72.3% while feeding Na2CO3-impregnated CFB flyash at 125ppm Na2CO3 and Tr=950°C. PMID:25532766

  7. Upconversion luminescent nanoparticles in physical sensing and in monitoring physical processes in biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Béjar, María; Pérez-Prieto, Julia

    2015-12-01

    The most frequently used strategy for sensing is based on the emission variation of a photoactive system and it can be classified as chemical or physical depending on its response to either a chemical or a physical stimulus. There are a large number of luminescent nanomaterials that respond to chemical species, but comparatively, with the exception of temperature sensing, to date there are few examples showing the capacity of photoactive nanosystems responsive to physical stimuli, such as magnetic and electric fields, high radiation energy, tension/pressure, viscosity, etc, and very few of them comprise upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs). These nanomaterials consist of an inorganic matrix doped with rare earth (RE) ions and can be advantageously used in sensing due to their unique optical features: near-infrared excitation, anti-Stokes emission, multiplexed emissions that span over a broad range (i.e. from the UV to NIR region depending on the nature of the RE ions), narrow emission bands, long emission lifetimes, high photostability, and non-photoblinking, among others. In this review we focus on the advances in the application of the luminescence of UCNPs for sensing environmental physical changes and for tracking physical processes in living systems.

  8. Health physics aspects of processing EBR-I coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, L.L.; Thalgott, J.O.; Poston, J.W. Jr.

    1998-12-31

    The sodium-potassium reactor coolant removed from the Experimental Breeder Reactor Number One after a partial reactor core meltdown had been stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory for 40 years. The State of Idaho considered this waste the most hazardous waste stored in the state and required its processing. The reactor coolant was processed in three phases. The first phase converted the alkali metal into a liquid sodium-potassium hydroxide. The second phase converted this caustic to a liquid sodium-potassium carbonate. The third phase solidified the sodium-potassium carbonate into a form acceptable for land disposal. Health physics aspects and dose received during each phase of the processing are discussed.

  9. Physical processes in the plasma mantle of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szego, K.; Shapiro, V. S.; Shevchenko, V. I.; Sagdeev, R. Z.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Nagy, A. F.

    1991-01-01

    The results are presented of a study, which analyzed data from 10 Pioneer Venus orbits in order to see whether similar wave particle interaction processes also exist in the corresponding region around Venus. The first conclusion is that the apparent physical processes in the mantle are indeed similar around Venus and Mars. The planetary thermal O(+) ions outside the ionopause interact with the shocked solar wind and excite electrostatic waves close to the lower hybrid frequency. These waves propagate inwards, heating first the electron and deeper down in the ionosphere the thermal ion population. The observed superthermal ions are believed to be the product of this wave particle interaction process. It is also concluded that the wave energy transferred to the thermal electrons is of the right magnitude (about 4 x 10 exp 9 eV/sq cm s) to provide the supplemental heat source necessary to reconcile observed and calculated electron temperatures in the ionosphere.

  10. Detectors and signal processing for high-energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Rehak, P.

    1981-01-01

    Basic principles of the particle detection and signal processing for high-energy physics experiments are presented. It is shown that the optimum performance of a properly designed detector system is not limited by incidental imperfections, but solely by more fundamental limitations imposed by the quantum nature and statistical behavior of matter. The noise sources connected with the detection and signal processing are studied. The concepts of optimal filtering and optimal detector/amplifying device matching are introduced. Signal processing for a liquid argon calorimeter is analyzed in some detail. The position detection in gas counters is studied. Resolution in drift chambers for the drift coordinate measurement as well as the second coordinate measurement is discussed.

  11. Ultrasonic online monitoring of additive manufacturing processes based on selective laser melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, Hans; Dillhöfer, Alexander; Spies, Martin; Bamberg, Joachim; Hess, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Additive manufacturing processes have become commercially available and are particularly interesting for the production of free-formed parts. Selective laser melting allows to manufacture components by localized melting of successive layers of metal powder. In order to be able to describe and to understand the complex dynamics of selective laser melting processes more accurately, online measurements using ultrasound have been performed for the first time. In this contribution, we report on the integration of the measurement technique into the manufacturing facility and on a variety of promising monitoring results.

  12. Surface Modified Particles By Multi-Step Addition And Process For The Preparation Thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Ronald Lee; Elliott, Brian John; Luebben, Silvia DeVito; Myers, Andrew William; Smith, Bryan Matthew

    2006-01-17

    The present invention relates to a new class of surface modified particles and to a multi-step surface modification process for the preparation of the same. The multi-step surface functionalization process involves two or more reactions to produce particles that are compatible with various host systems and/or to provide the particles with particular chemical reactivities. The initial step comprises the attachment of a small organic compound to the surface of the inorganic particle. The subsequent steps attach additional compounds to the previously attached organic compounds through organic linking groups.

  13. Physical-mechanical properties of Bis-EMA based root canal sealer with different fillers addition

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Marcela Oliveira; Branco Leitune, Vicente Castelo; Bohn, Priscila Veit; Werner Samuel, Susana Maria; Collares, Fabrício Mezzomo

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate influence of three different filler particles on an experimental Bisphenol A ethoxylated dimethacrylate (Bis-EMA) based root filling material. Materials and Methods: Resin-based endodontic sealers were produced using Bis-EMA, camphorquinone, ethyl 4-dimethylaminobenzoate (EDAB), N, N-dihydroxyethyl-p-toluidine (DHEPT), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), and benzoyl peroxide. The experimental groups were formulated adding 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50% of calcium tungstate (CaWO4), ytterbium trifluoride(YbF3), and tantalum oxide(Ta2O5). Flow, thickness, and radiopacity tests were conducted in accordance with ISO 6876. Sorption and solubility (SL) tests were conducted in accordance with ISO 4049, pH was measured with a pH meter, and degree of conversion (DC) was evaluated with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). For radiopacity, two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's multiple comparison test was performed. For DC analysis, one-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparison test was performed. All statistical analyses were performed with a significance level of 5%. Results: All groups showed lower flow with increased filler concentration. All groups showed film thickness values lower than 50μm, as ISO recommends, except CaWO450% group (76.7μm). pH values varied from 5.95 (± 0.07) in YbF340% group to 6.90 (± 0.07) in Ta2O540% group. In the radiopacity test, YbF330%, Ta2O540%, and Ta2O550% groups showed no statistical significant difference to 3mmAl. Ta2O5 and YbF3 groups in 10, 20, and 30% concentrations presented sorption and SL values as ISOrecommendation. Addition ofTa2O5 and CaWO4 decreased DC after 14 days. YbF3 addition showed no difference in DC from control group. Conclusion: YbF3 filler addition promoted higher properties compared to CaWO4 and Ta2O5 on Bis-EMA based root canal sealer. PMID:26069410

  14. Influence of an alloy addition on the physical and clinical behaviour of glass ionomer cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abour, Mohamed Abour Bashir

    These in vitro studies compared the various properties of an experimental high powder liquid content glass ionomer cement (EXPT) with those of a metal addition GIC (Hi-Dense) and disperse phase amalgam (Dispersalloy). Bi-axial, four point flexural and compressive tests were used to evaluate strength. Six groups of ten specimens were constructed for each test for each material and allowed to set in an oven at 37°C for 60 minutes. Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C until testing at one day, one week, one, three, six months and year. It was found that the strength of Hi-Dense increased and then maintained over extended time, whereas the strength of EXPT showed a declined at 3 months. The bond strengths of the materials to both enamel and dentine were also evaluated. Ten groups of ten teeth, five for each surface for each glass ionomer materials, were prepared. Teeth were aligned leaving the enamel and dentine surfaces exposed. The mixed material was condensed into a cylinder placed on the appropriate surface. These specimens were also stored in distilled water at 37°C. It was found that Hi-Dense had a higher bond strength to enamel that increased with time. The bond strength to dentine was maintained over the test period. The erosion rate of the materials was evaluated using the lactic acid erosion test. Three groups of six specimens for each material were constructed and tested after one hour, one day and at six months. Each specimen was subjected to an impinging jet of lactic acid solution. The erosion rate was determined by weight loss and dimensional change. It was found that Hi-Dense had a high erosion resistance which was slightly better than the experimental material. The microleakage, around restorations prepared, using the glass ionomer materials, was evaluated after cyclical loading the restoration-tooth complex. It was found that there was less leakage around Hi-Dense than EXPT at both the cervical and occlusal margins. In a clinical

  15. Reactive nanophase oxide additions to melt-processed high-{Tc} superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Goretta, K.C.; Brandel, B.P.; Lanagan, M.T.; Hu, J.; Miller, D.J.; Sengupta, S.; Parker, J.C.; Ali, M.N.; Chen, Nan

    1994-10-01

    Nanophase TiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powders were synthesized by a vapor-phase process and mechanically mixed with stoichiometric YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} and TlBa{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} powders in 20 mole % concentrations. Pellets produced from powders with and without nanophase oxides were heated in air or O{sub 2} above the peritectic melt temperature and slow-cooled. At 4.2 K, the intragranular critical current density (J{sub c}) increased dramatically with the oxide additions. At 35--50 K, effects of the oxide additions were positive, but less pronounced. At 77 K, the additions decreased J{sub c}, probably because of inducing a depresion of the transition temperature.

  16. Reactive nanophase oxide additions to melt-processed high-T(sub c) superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goretta, K. C.; Brandel, B. P.; Lanagan, M. T.; Hu, J.; Miller, D. J.; Sengupta, S.; Parker, J. C.; Ali, M. N.; Chen, Nan

    1994-10-01

    Nanophase TiO2 and Al2O3 powders were synthesized by a vapor-phase process and mechanically mixed with stoichiometric YBa2Cu3O(x) and TlBa2Ca2Cu3O(x) powders in 20 mole % concentrations. Pellets produced from powders with and without nanophase oxides were heated in air or O2 above the peritectic melt temperature and slow-cooled. At 4.2 K, the intragranular critical current density J(sub c)) increased dramatically with the oxide additions. At 35-50 K, effects of the oxide additions were positive, but less pronounced. At 77 K, the additions decreased J(sub c), probably because of inducing a depression of the transition temperature.

  17. Effect of galactooligosaccharide addition on the physical, optical, and sensory acceptance of vanilla ice cream.

    PubMed

    Balthazar, C F; Silva, H L A; Celeguini, R M S; Santos, R; Pastore, G M; Junior, C A Conte; Freitas, M Q; Nogueira, L C; Silva, M C; Cruz, A G

    2015-07-01

    The effect of the addition of galactooligosaccharide (GOS) on the physicochemical, optical, and sensory characteristics of ice cream was investigated. Vanilla ice cream was supplemented with 0, 1.5, and 3.0% (wt/wt) GOS and characterized for pH, firmness, color, melting, overrun, as well as subjected to a discriminative sensory test (triangle test). For comparison purposes, ice creams containing fructooligosaccharide were also manufactured. The GOS ice creams were characterized by increased firmness and lower melting rates. Different perceptions were reported in the sensory evaluation for the 3.0% GOS ice cream when compared with the control, which was not observed for the fructooligosaccharide ice cream. Overall, the findings suggest it is possible to produce GOS ice cream with improved stability in relation to the physicochemical parameters and sensory perception. PMID:25912870

  18. Physical Properties of Nanostructured CdO Films from Alkaline Baths Containing Saccharin as Additive

    PubMed Central

    Şahin, Bünyamin

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured cadmium oxide (CdO) films were fabricated on glass substrates from alkaline baths containing saccharin as an additive by a successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method. The effects of saccharin concentration in the bath on the structural, morphological, and optical properties were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), photoluminescence, and Raman spectroscopy. The analyses showed that the surface morphologies, XRD peak intensities, Raman spectroscopy, and photoluminescence properties of CdO films changed with saccharin concentration. From the results, it can be said that morphological characteristic and optical properties of the films could be calibrated by adding various saccharin percentages in the growth bath. PMID:23844379

  19. Seismic Electric Signals: An additional fact showing their physical interconnection with seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varotsos, P. A.; Sarlis, N. V.; Skordas, E. S.; Lazaridou, M. S.

    2013-03-01

    Natural time analysis reveals novel dynamical features hidden behind time series in complex systems. By applying it to the time series of earthquakes, we find that the order parameter of seismicity exhibits a unique change approximately at the date(s) at which Seismic Electric Signals (SES) activities have been reported to initiate. In particular, we show that the fluctuations of the order parameter of seismicity in Japan exhibits a clearly detectable minimum approximately at the time of the initiation of the SES activity observed by Uyeda and coworkers almost two months before the onset of the volcanic-seismic swarm activity in 2000 in the Izu Island region, Japan. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that, well before the occurrence of major earthquakes, anomalous changes are found to appear almost simultaneously in two independent datasets of different geophysical observables (geoelectrical measurements, seismicity). In addition, we show that these two phenomena are also linked closely in space.

  20. Monitoring Residual Solvent Additives and Their Effects in Solution Processed Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogel, Derek M.; Basham, James I.; Engmann, Sebastian; Pookpanratana, Sujitra J.; Bittle, Emily G.; Jurchescu, Oana D.; Gundlach, David J.

    2015-03-01

    High boiling point solvent additives are a widely adopted approach for increasing bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cell efficiency. However, experiments show residual solvent can persist for hours after film deposition, and certain common additives are unstable or reactive. We report here on the effects of residual 1,8-diiodooctane on the electrical performance of poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT): phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC[71]BM) BHJ photovoltaic cells. We optimized our fabrication process for efficiency at an active layer thickness of 220 nm, and all devices were processed in parallel to minimize unintentional variations between test structures. The one variable in this study is the active layer post spin drying time. Immediately following the cathode deposition, we measured the current-voltage characteristics at one sun equivalent illumination intensity, and performed impedance spectroscopy to quantify charge density, lifetime, and recombination process. Spectroscopic ellipsometry, FTIR, and XPS are also used to monitor residual solvent and correlated with electrical performance. We find that residual additive degrades performance by increasing the series resistance and lowering efficiency, fill factor, and free carrier lifetime.

  1. Influence of Alumina Additions on the Physical and Chemical Properties of Lithium-iron-phosphate Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huali; Yang, Ruijuan; Wang, Yinghui; Liu, Shiquan

    Alumina improves the properties and depresses the devitrification of soda-lime-silicate glasses. Herein, the influence of alumina on the glass transition temperature, density, chemical durability, crystallization of lithium-iron-phosphate (LIP) glass has been investigated. As alumina was added to replace the iron oxide in a base LIP glass with the molar composition of Li2O:Fe2O3:P2O5=30:20:50, the alumina-containing glasses have increased Tg, densities and chemical stabilities than the base glass. When the amount of alumina is increased from 2 to 6 mol, the Tg value slightly increases, whereas the density decreases. However, the smallest weight loss is shown for the glass containing 3.2 mol of alumina. The variations of the properties with alumina are explained based on the infrared structure analysis results. In addition, it is found the either the base or the alumina-containing glasses have surface crystallization upon heat-treatments. Under the same treatment conditions, the base glass exhibits a thin layer of crystallization with LiFeP2O7 as the main phase. In contrast, alumina-containing glasses show much higher degree of crystallization, which is further increased with the amount of alumina. This trend is opposite to that of silicate glass. Besides the LiFeP2O7 main phase, Fe7(PO4) phase is also identified in the crystallized alumina-containing glasses.

  2. Understanding Solidification of Polythiophene Thin Films during Spin-Coating: Effects of Spin-Coating Time and Processing Additives

    PubMed Central

    Na, Jin Yeong; Kang, Boseok; Sin, Dong Hun; Cho, Kilwon; Park, Yeong Don

    2015-01-01

    Spin-coating has been used extensively in the fabrication of electronic devices; however, the effects of the processing parameters have not been fully explored. Here, we systematically characterize the effects of the spin-coating time on the microstructure evolution during semiconducting polymer solidification in an effort to establish the relationship between this parameter and the performances of the resulting polymer field-effect transistors (FETs). We found that a short spin-coating time of a few seconds dramatically improve the morphology and molecular order in a conjugated polymer thin film because the π-π stacking structures formed by the polymer molecules grow slowly and with a greater degree of order due to the residual solvent present in the wet film. The improved ordering is correlated with improved charge carrier transport in the FETs prepared from these films. We also demonstrated the effects of various processing additives on the resulting FET characteristics as well as on the film drying behavior during spin-coating. The physical properties of the additives are found to affect the film drying process and the resulting device performance. PMID:26299676

  3. Design and tuning of standard additive model based fuzzy PID controllers for multivariable process systems.

    PubMed

    Harinath, Eranda; Mann, George K I

    2008-06-01

    This paper describes a design and two-level tuning method for fuzzy proportional-integral derivative (FPID) controllers for a multivariable process where the fuzzy inference uses the inference of standard additive model. The proposed method can be used for any n x n multi-input-multi-output process and guarantees closed-loop stability. In the two-level tuning scheme, the tuning follows two steps: low-level tuning followed by high-level tuning. The low-level tuning adjusts apparent linear gains, whereas the high-level tuning changes the nonlinearity in the normalized fuzzy output. In this paper, two types of FPID configurations are considered, and their performances are evaluated by using a real-time multizone temperature control problem having a 3 x 3 process system. PMID:18558531

  4. Influence of wheat kernel physical properties on the pulverizing process.

    PubMed

    Dziki, Dariusz; Cacak-Pietrzak, Grażyna; Miś, Antoni; Jończyk, Krzysztof; Gawlik-Dziki, Urszula

    2014-10-01

    The physical properties of wheat kernel were determined and related to pulverizing performance by correlation analysis. Nineteen samples of wheat cultivars about similar level of protein content (11.2-12.8 % w.b.) and obtained from organic farming system were used for analysis. The kernel (moisture content 10 % w.b.) was pulverized by using the laboratory hammer mill equipped with round holes 1.0 mm screen. The specific grinding energy ranged from 120 kJkg(-1) to 159 kJkg(-1). On the basis of data obtained many of significant correlations (p < 0.05) were found between wheat kernel physical properties and pulverizing process of wheat kernel, especially wheat kernel hardness index (obtained on the basis of Single Kernel Characterization System) and vitreousness significantly and positively correlated with the grinding energy indices and the mass fraction of coarse particles (> 0.5 mm). Among the kernel mechanical properties determined on the basis of uniaxial compression test only the rapture force was correlated with the impact grinding results. The results showed also positive and significant relationships between kernel ash content and grinding energy requirements. On the basis of wheat physical properties the multiple linear regression was proposed for predicting the average particle size of pulverized kernel. PMID:25328207

  5. Thermographic In-Situ Process Monitoring of the Electron Beam Melting Technology used in Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton; Dehoff, Ryan R; Lloyd, Peter D; Lowe, Larry E; Ulrich, Joseph B

    2013-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been utilizing the ARCAM electron beam melting technology to additively manufacture complex geometric structures directly from powder. Although the technology has demonstrated the ability to decrease costs, decrease manufacturing lead-time and fabricate complex structures that are impossible to fabricate through conventional processing techniques, certification of the component quality can be challenging. Because the process involves the continuous deposition of successive layers of material, each layer can be examined without destructively testing the component. However, in-situ process monitoring is difficult due to metallization on inside surfaces caused by evaporation and condensation of metal from the melt pool. This work describes a solution to one of the challenges to continuously imaging inside of the chamber during the EBM process. Here, the utilization of a continuously moving Mylar film canister is described. Results will be presented related to in-situ process monitoring and how this technique results in improved mechanical properties and reliability of the process.

  6. The r-process nucleosynthesis: Nuclear physics challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Goriely, S.

    2012-10-20

    About half of the nuclei heavier than iron observed in nature are produced by the socalled rapid neutron capture process, or r-process, of nucleosynthesis. The identification of the astrophysics site and the specific conditions in which the r-process takes place remains, however, one of the still-unsolved mysteries of modern astrophysics. Another underlying difficulty associated with our understanding of the r-process concerns the uncertainties in the predictions of nuclear properties for the few thousands exotic neutron-rich nuclei involved and for which essentially no experimental data exist. The present contribution emphasizes some important future challenges faced by nuclear physics in this problem, particularly in the determination of the nuclear structure properties of exotic neutron-rich nuclei as well as their radiative neutron capture rates and their fission probabilities. These quantities are particularly relevant to determine the composition of the matter resulting from the r-process. Their impact on the r-abundance distribution resulting from the decompression of neutron star matter is discussed.

  7. Control of physical properties on solid surface via laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonemoto, Yukihiro; Nishimura, Akihiko

    2012-07-01

    In a safety operation of a nuclear power plant, vapor conditions such as a droplet or liquid membrane toward a solid surface of a heat exchanger and reactor vessel is important. In the present study, focusing on the droplet, the wettability on solid surface and surface free energy of solid are evaluated. In addition, wettability on a metal plate fabricated by laser processing is also considered for the nuclear engineering application.

  8. Physics students' approaches to learning and cognitive processes in solving physics problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Josee

    This study examined traditional instruction and problem-based learning (PBL) approaches to teaching and the extent to which they foster the development of desirable cognitive processes, including metacognition, critical thinking, physical intuition, and problem solving among undergraduate physics students. The study also examined students' approaches to learning and their perceived role as physics students. The research took place in the context of advanced courses of electromagnetism at a Canadian research university. The cognitive science, expertise, physics and science education, instructional psychology, and discourse processes literature provided the framework and background to conceptualize and structure this study. A within-stage mixed-model design was used and a number of instruments, including a survey, observation grids, and problem sets were developed specifically for this study. A special one-week long problem-based learning (PBL) intervention was also designed. Interviews with the instructors participating in the study provided complementary data. Findings include evidence that students in general engage in metacognitive processes in the organization of their personal study time. However, this potential, including the development of other cognitive processes, might not be stimulated as much as it could in the traditional lecture instructional context. The PBL approach was deemed as more empowering for the students. An unexpected finding came from the realisation that a simple exposure to a structured exercise of problem-solving (pre-test) was sufficient to produce superior planning and solving strategies on a second exposure (post-test) even for the students who had not been exposed to any special treatment. Maturation was ruled out as a potential threat to the validity of this finding. Another promising finding appears to be that the problem-based learning (PBL) intervention tends to foster the development of cognitive competencies, particularly

  9. Solar physics applications of computer graphics and image processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altschuler, M. D.

    1985-01-01

    Computer graphics devices coupled with computers and carefully developed software provide new opportunities to achieve insight into the geometry and time evolution of scalar, vector, and tensor fields and to extract more information quickly and cheaply from the same image data. Two or more different fields which overlay in space can be calculated from the data (and the physics), then displayed from any perspective, and compared visually. The maximum regions of one field can be compared with the gradients of another. Time changing fields can also be compared. Images can be added, subtracted, transformed, noise filtered, frequency filtered, contrast enhanced, color coded, enlarged, compressed, parameterized, and histogrammed, in whole or section by section. Today it is possible to process multiple digital images to reveal spatial and temporal correlations and cross correlations. Data from different observatories taken at different times can be processed, interpolated, and transformed to a common coordinate system.

  10. Effect of almond shell biochar addition on the hydro-physical properties of an arable Central Valley soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, V.; Ghezzehei, T. A.

    2014-12-01

    Biochar is composed of any carbonaceous matter pyrolyzed under low oxygen exposure. Its use as a soil amendment to address soil infertility has been accelerated by studies reporting positive effects of enhanced nutrient retention, cation exchange capacity, microbial activity, and vegetative growth over time. Biochar has also been considered as a carbon sequestration method because of its reported environmental persistence. While the aforementioned effects are positive benefits of biochar's use, its impact on soil physical properties and water flow are equally important in maintaining soil fertility. This study aims to show how soil physical and hydraulic properties change over time with biochar addition. To address these aims, we conducted a 9 week microcosm incubation experiment with local arable loamy sand soils amended with biochar. Biochar was created from locally collected almond shells and differs by pyrolysis temperatures (350°C, 700°C) and size (<250 μm, 1-2mm). Additionally, biochar was applied to soil at a low (10 t/ha) or high (60 t/ha) rates. Changes in soil water flow properties were analyzed by infiltration or pressure cell experiments immediately after creating our soil-biochar mixtures. These experiments were repeated during and after the incubation period to observe if and how flow is altered over time. Following incubation and hydraulic experiments, a water drop penetration time (WDPT) test was conducted to observe any alterations in surface hydrophobicity. Changes in soil physical properties were analyzed by determining content of water stable aggregates remaining after wet sieving. This series of experiments is expected to provide a greater understanding on the impact biochar addition on soil physical and hydraulic properties. Furthermore, it provides insight into whether or not converting local agricultural waste into biochar for soil use will be beneficial, especially in agricultural systems undergoing climate stress.

  11. A combined physical/microbial process for the beneficiation of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, G.F.; Stevens, C.J.; Noah, K.S.; McIlwain, M.E.

    1993-09-01

    A large-laboratory scale physical/microbial process was demonstrated for the removal of pyritic sulfur from coal. The process took place in an aerated-trough slurry reactor with a total slurry volume of 150 L. The reactor was divided into six sections, each of which acted as a physical separator and a bioreactor. The process objective was to physically remove the larger pyritic inclusions and to biodegrade the small inclusions (micropyrite). The process was continuously operated for 120 days, treating approximately 1 ton of Illinois {number_sign}6 coal. Ninety percent pyrite removal was achieved at a 20% slurry concentration and a reactor residence time of 5 days. Additional research should be performed to find the optimum values for reactor residence time, slurry concentration, and process hydraulic residence time (or recycle ratio). Finding these optimum values will enable a process to be developed that will maximize the amount of coal that can be processed per unit reactor volume per unit time with the desired level of pyritic sulfur removal.

  12. Consistency check of photon beam physical data after recommissioning process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadman, B.; Chawapun, N.; Ua-apisitwong, S.; Asakit, T.; Chumpu, N.; Rueansri, J.

    2016-03-01

    In radiotherapy, medical linear accelerator (Linac) is the key system used for radiation treatments delivery. Although, recommissioning was recommended after major modification of the machine by AAPM TG53, but it might not be practical in radiotherapy center with heavy workloads. The main purpose of this study was to compare photon beam physical data between initial commissioning and recommissioning of 6 MV Elekta Precise linac. The parameters for comparing were the percentage depth dose (PDD) and beam profiles. The clinical commissioning test cases followed IAEA-TECDOC-1583 were planned on REF 91230 IMRT Dose Verification Phantom by Philips’ Pinnacle treatment planning system. The Delta4PT was used for dose distribution verification with 90% passing criteria of the gamma index (3%/3mm). Our results revealed that the PDDs and beam profiles agreed within a tolerance limit recommended by TRS430. Most of the point doses and dose distribution verification passed the acceptance criteria. This study showed the consistency of photon beam physical data after recommissioning process. There was a good agreement between initial commissioning and recommissioning within a tolerance limit, demonstrated that the full recommissioning process might not be required. However, in the complex treatment planning geometry, the initial data should be applied with great caution.

  13. Physical anthropology: the search for general processes and principles.

    PubMed

    Lasker, G W

    1970-02-01

    Physical anthropology consists of two interdependent types of study: (1) the biological history of man and (2) general biological processes in man (such as mechanisms of evolution and growth). Popular interest may focus on the former, the fascinating story of the origin of man and of specific people, but the latter affords physical anthropology potential practical value in respect to medicine, dentistry, public health, and population policy. The study of general processes is the study of human beings in particular situations, not for what we can learn about these particular populations but for the sake of generalization about mankind anywhere in comparable situations. This is, of course, the purpose of experimental science in general, but in anthropology the method is usually comparative. Long ago the study of the growth of the two sexes and of children in different countries was started on a comparative basis as was the study of the so-called secular change in adult stature. By 1911 Franz Boas had compared the changes in stature and head form of children of several different immigrant groups in the United States. There have since been comparative studies of the amount and distribution of body fat (but not yet adequate comparative measurements of the relation of tissue components to diet and to diseases). Demographic patterns, inbreeding, outbreeding, and their effects are other general problems. The Human Adaptability Project of the International Biological Program promises studies of human response to heat, cold, altitude, and other conditions on a wide international basis. If supported, these could turn physical anthropology's search in a useful direction. The functional biology of people of even out-of-the-way communities will be compared with each other. These studies can yield general statements concerning human response to types of ecological situation including such sociocultural conditions as those of hunting-gathering tribes and urban slums. PMID:19681215

  14. Integration of Consonant and Pitch Processing as Revealed by the Absence of Additivity in Mismatch Negativity

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Diankun; Chen, Sifan; Kendrick, Keith M.; Yao, Dezhong

    2012-01-01

    Consonants, unlike vowels, are thought to be speech specific and therefore no interactions would be expected between consonants and pitch, a basic element for musical tones. The present study used an electrophysiological approach to investigate whether, contrary to this view, there is integrative processing of consonants and pitch by measuring additivity of changes in the mismatch negativity (MMN) of evoked potentials. The MMN is elicited by discriminable variations occurring in a sequence of repetitive, homogeneous sounds. In the experiment, event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded while participants heard frequently sung consonant-vowel syllables and rare stimuli deviating in either consonant identity only, pitch only, or in both dimensions. Every type of deviation elicited a reliable MMN. As expected, the two single-deviant MMNs had similar amplitudes, but that of the double-deviant MMN was also not significantly different from them. This absence of additivity in the double-deviant MMN suggests that consonant and pitch variations are processed, at least at a pre-attentive level, in an integrated rather than independent way. Domain-specificity of consonants may depend on higher-level processes in the hierarchy of speech perception. PMID:22693614

  15. Vitrification of F006 plating waste sludge by Reactive Additive Stabilization Process (RASP)

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, H.L.; Jantzen, C.M.; Pickett, J.B.

    1994-06-01

    Solidification into glass of nickel-on-uranium plating wastewater treatment plant sludge (F006 Mixed Waste) has been demonstrated at the Savannah River She (SRS). Vitrification using high surface area additives, the Reactive Additive Stabilization Process (RASP), greatly enhanced the solubility and retention of heavy metals In glass. The bench-scale tests using RASP achieved 76 wt% waste loading In both soda-lime-silica and borosilicate glasses. The RASP has been Independently verified by a commercial waste management company, and a contract awarded to vitrify the approximately 500,000 gallons of stored waste sludge. The waste volume reduction of 89% will greatly reduce the disposal costs, and delisting of the glass waste is anticipated. This will be the world`s first commercial-scale vitrification system used for environmental cleanup of Mixed Waste. Its stabilization and volume reduction abilities are expected to set standards for the future of the waste management Industry.

  16. CLARA: A Contemporary Approach to Physics Data Processing

    SciTech Connect

    V Gyurjyan, D Abbott, J Carbonneau, G Gilfoyle, D Heddle, G Heyes, S Paul, C Timmer, D Weygand, E Wolin

    2011-12-01

    In traditional physics data processing (PDP) systems, data location is static and is accessed by analysis applications. In comparison, CLARA (CLAS12 Reconstruction and Analysis framework) is an environment where data processing algorithms filter continuously flowing data. In CLARA's domain of loosely coupled services, data is not stored, but rather flows from one service to another, mutating constantly along the way. Agents, performing event processing, can then subscribe to particular data/events at any stage of the data transformation, and make intricate decisions (e.g. particle ID) by correlating events from multiple, parallel data streams and/or services. This paper presents a PDP application development framework based on service oriented and event driven architectures. This system allows users to design (Java, C++, and Python languages are supported) and deploy data processing services, as well as dynamically compose PDP applications using available services. The PDP service bus provides a layer on top of a distributed pub-sub middleware implementation, which allows complex service composition and integration without writing code. Examples of service creation and deployment, along with the CLAS12 track reconstruction application design will be presented.

  17. Guidelines for Automatic Data Processing Physical Security and Risk Management. Federal Information Processing Standards Publication 31.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC.

    These guidelines provide a handbook for use by federal organizations in structuring physical security and risk management programs for their automatic data processing facilities. This publication discusses security analysis, natural disasters, supporting utilities, system reliability, procedural measures and controls, off-site facilities,…

  18. Investigation of the effects of short chain processing additives on polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Stclair, T. L.; Pratt, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of low level concentrations of several short chain processing additives on the properties of the 4,4'-bis(3,4-dicarboxyphenoxy) diphenylsulfide dianhydride (BDSDA)/4,4'-diaminodiphenyl ether (ODA)/1,3'-diaminobenzene (m-phenylene diamine) (MPA) (422) copolyimide were investigated. It was noted that 5 percent MPD/phthalic anhydride (PA) is more effective than 5 percent ODA/PA and BDSDA/aniline (AN) in strengthening the host material. However, the introduction of 10 percent BDSDA/AN produces disproportionately high effects on free volume and free electron density in the host copolyimide.

  19. A review of processable high temperature resistant addition-type laminating resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafini, T. T.; Delvigs, P.

    1973-01-01

    An important finding that resulted from research that was conducted to develop improved ablative resins was the discovery of a novel approach to synthesize processable high temperature resistant polymers. Low molecular weight polyimide prepolymers end-capped with norbornene groups were polymerized into thermo-oxidatively stable modified polyimides without the evolution of void producing volatile materials. This paper reviews basic studies that were performed using model compounds to elucidate the polymerization mechanism of the so-called addition-type polyimides. The fabrication and properties of polyimide/graphite fiber composites using A-type polyimide prepolymer as the matrix are described. An alternate method for preparing processable A-type polyimides by means of in situ polymerization of monomeric reactants on the fiber reinforcement is also described. Polyimide/graphite fiber composite performance at elevated temperatures is presented for A-type polyimides.

  20. Scanning laser ultrasound and wavenumber spectroscopy for in-process inspection of additively manufactured parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koskelo, EliseAnne C.; Flynn, Eric B.

    2016-04-01

    We present a new in-process laser ultrasound inspection technique for additive manufacturing. Ultrasonic energy was introduced to the part by attaching an ultrasonic transducer to the printer build-plate and driving it with a single-tone, harmonic excitation. The full-field response of the part was measured using a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer after each printer layer. For each scan, we analyzed both the local amplitudes and wavenumbers of the response in order to identify defects. For this study, we focused on the detection of delamination between layers in a fused deposition modeling process. Foreign object damage, localized heating damage, and the resulting delamination between layers were detected in using the technique as indicated by increased amplitude and wavenumber responses within the damaged area.

  1. 3D Machine Vision and Additive Manufacturing: Concurrent Product and Process Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyas, Ismet P.

    2013-06-01

    The manufacturing environment rapidly changes in turbulence fashion. Digital manufacturing (DM) plays a significant role and one of the key strategies in setting up vision and strategic planning toward the knowledge based manufacturing. An approach of combining 3D machine vision (3D-MV) and an Additive Manufacturing (AM) may finally be finding its niche in manufacturing. This paper briefly overviews the integration of the 3D machine vision and AM in concurrent product and process development, the challenges and opportunities, the implementation of the 3D-MV and AM at POLMAN Bandung in accelerating product design and process development, and discusses a direct deployment of this approach on a real case from our industrial partners that have placed this as one of the very important and strategic approach in research as well as product/prototype development. The strategic aspects and needs of this combination approach in research, design and development are main concerns of the presentation.

  2. Thermoplastic starch/polyester films: effects of extrusion process and poly (lactic acid) addition.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Marianne Ayumi; Olivato, Juliana Bonametti; Garcia, Patrícia Salomão; Müller, Carmen Maria Olivera; Grossmann, Maria Victória Eiras; Yamashita, Fabio

    2013-10-01

    Biodegradable films were produced using the blown extrusion method from blends that contained cassava thermoplastic starch (TPS), poly(butylene adipate-co-terephthalate) (PBAT) and poly(lactic acid) (PLA) with two different extrusion processes. The choice of extrusion process did not have a significant effect on the mechanical properties, water vapor permeability (WVP) or viscoelasticity of the films, but the addition of PLA decreased the elongation, blow-up ratio (BUR) and opacity and increased the elastic modulus, tensile strength and viscoelastic parameters of the films. The films with 20% PLA exhibited a lower WVP due to the hydrophobic nature of this polymer. Morphological analyses revealed the incompatibility between the polymers used. PMID:23910321

  3. Reducing Dangerous Effects of Unsymmetrical Dimethylhydrazine as a Liquid Propellant by Addition of Hydroxyethylhydrazine—Part I: Physical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshavarz, Mohammad Hossein; Ramadan, Alireza; Mousaviazar, Ali; Zali, Abbas; Esmaeilpour, Karim; Atabaki, Fariborz; Shokrolahi, Arash

    2011-01-01

    In this work, the effect of low volatile hydroxyethylhydrazine (HEH) as a solute on unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) has been studied in order to reduce harmful effects of UDMH vapors. Desirable physical properties of binary mixtures UDMH/HEH have been measured and compared to pure UDMH. These properties include boiling point, viscosity, density, and vapor pressure that are important for using binary mixtures of UDMH/HEH as less dangerous liquid propellants. Due to the formation of strong hydrogen bonding between UDMH and HEH, the volatility of UDMH has been reduced appreciably upon the addition of HEH. It is indicated that the measured physical properties may deviate significantly compared to corresponding predicted values. Binary mixtures of UDMH/HEH can also react spontaneously in contact with nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) and red fuming nitric acid (RFNA), so they can be called hypergolic propellants.

  4. Modification of physical properties of poly(L-lactic acid) by addition of methyl-β-cyclodextrin

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Ei, Ayaka; Takada, Yoshihisa; Uehara, Hiroki; Takahashi, Keiko

    2014-01-01

    Summary Poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) is a biodegradable plastic and one of the most famous plastics made from biobased materials. However, its physical strength is insufficient compared to general-purpose plastics. In this study, the effect of methylcyclodextrin (MeCD) addition on the structure and physical properties, especially the drawing behavior, of PLLA was investigated. Through thermal analysis, it was found that MeCD addition lowers the crystallinity and enhances the mobility of PLLA. The sample containing approximately 17% MeCD was drawn to more than 1000% at 60 °C, although PLLA fractured at a strain of less than 100%. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC)-Raman in situ measurements also revealed decreases in the glass transition temperature (T g), cold crystallization temperature (T c), and melting point (T m), and improvement in structural distribution with temperature. DSC-Raman measurements simultaneously supplied information about crystallinity and thermal properties. Thus, it was concluded that MeCD had high affinity for PLLA, and the addition of MeCD increased the amorphous component of PLLA and enhanced the drawability. PMID:25670970

  5. [Effects of different perlite additions on physical and chemical properties of sewage sludge compost and growth of Tagetes patula].

    PubMed

    Hu, Yu-Tong; Shi, Lian-Hui; Liu, Deng-Min; Tong, Shao-Wei; Wei, Mei-Yan; Sun, Jie

    2014-07-01

    In order to resolve the problem of poor permeability of sewage sludge compost (SSC) which was used as the substitution of peat, perlite was used to regulate the permeability of the sewage. The pure SSC was used as control. The proportions of perlite in the mixtures with SSC were 20%, 40%, 60%, 80% and 100% (V/V), respectively. The effects of different perlite ratios on the physical and chemical properties and the growth of Tagetes patula were studied. The bulk density, water holding porosity and water holding porosity to aeration porosity decreased, but the total porosity and aeration porosity increased with the increasing addition of perlite to the SSC. For the chemical properties, the pH increased, and the EC and nutrient contents decreased with the increasing addition of perlite to the SSC. The aboveground biomass and flowers of T. patula were the highest in the 60% perlite treatment, and the lowest in the pure SSC treatment. The root morphology and activity were the best in the 40%, 60% and 80% perlite treatments. Aeration was the strongest factor to impact the maximum root length and average root diameter. Perlite promoted the growth of T. patula mainly through impacting the physical properties of the SSC. The addition of 60% perlite to the SSC could significantly improve the poor aeration and decrease the high salinity greatly in the SSC and regulate the growth of the root and aboveground of T. patula. PMID:25345044

  6. Evaluation of alternative chemical additives for high-level waste vitrification feed preparation processing

    SciTech Connect

    Seymour, R.G.

    1995-06-07

    During the development of the feed processing flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), research had shown that use of formic acid (HCOOH) could accomplish several processing objectives with one chemical addition. These objectives included the decomposition of tetraphenylborate, chemical reduction of mercury, production of acceptable rheological properties in the feed slurry, and controlling the oxidation state of the glass melt pool. However, the DEPF research had not shown that some vitrification slurry feeds had a tendency to evolve hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) as the result of catalytic decomposition of CHOOH with noble metals (rhodium, ruthenium, palladium) in the feed. Testing conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory and later at the Savannah River Technical Center showed that the H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} could evolve at appreciable rates and quantities. The explosive nature of H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} (as ammonium nitrate) warranted significant mitigation control and redesign of both facilities. At the time the explosive gas evolution was discovered, the DWPF was already under construction and an immediate hardware fix in tandem with flowsheet changes was necessary. However, the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) was in the design phase and could afford to take time to investigate flowsheet manipulations that could solve the problem, rather than a hardware fix. Thus, the HWVP began to investigate alternatives to using HCOOH in the vitrification process. This document describes the selection, evaluation criteria, and strategy used to evaluate the performance of the alternative chemical additives to CHOOH. The status of the evaluation is also discussed.

  7. Process for producing biodiesel, lubricants, and fuel and lubricant additives in a critical fluid medium

    DOEpatents

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Fox, Robert V.

    2005-05-03

    A process for producing alkyl esters useful in biofuels and lubricants by transesterifying glyceride- or esterifying free fatty acid-containing substances in a single critical phase medium is disclosed. The critical phase medium provides increased reaction rates, decreases the loss of catalyst or catalyst activity and improves the overall yield of desired product. The process involves the steps of dissolving an input glyceride- or free fatty acid-containing substance with an alcohol or water into a critical fluid medium; reacting the glyceride- or free fatty acid-containing substance with the alcohol or water input over either a solid or liquid acidic or basic catalyst and sequentially separating the products from each other and from the critical fluid medium, which critical fluid medium can then be recycled back in the process. The process significantly reduces the cost of producing additives or alternatives to automotive fuels and lubricants utilizing inexpensive glyceride- or free fatty acid-containing substances, such as animal fats, vegetable oils, rendered fats, and restaurant grease.

  8. Physical Processes Involved In Yellow Sea Solitary Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warn-Varnas, A.; Chin-Bing, S.; King, D.; Lamb, K.; Hawkins, J.; Teixeira, M.

    The study area is located south of the Shandong peninsula. In this area, soliton gener- ation and propagation studies are per formed with the Lamb(1994) model. The model is nonhydrostatic and is formulated in 2 1/2 dimensions for terrain following c oordi- nates. In the area, 20 to 30 m topographic variations over distances of 10 to 20 km are found to occur in the digit al atlas of Choi (1999). The area is shallow with maximum depths ranging from 40 m to 70 m. Along the southern boundary of the region the semi-diurnal tidal strength magnitude varies from .6 m/sec to 1.2 m/sec, Fang(1994). We show that, for sum mer conditions, the existing physical processes associated with the semi-diurnal tidal flow over the topographic variations , in the shelfbreak region, lead to the formation of internal bores in the model simulations. Through acting phys- ical proce sses, the internal bores propagate on and off the shelf. A disintegration process of internal bores into solitary waves occ urs through frequency and ampli- tude dispersion. SAR observations of the area show images containing six events con- sisting of internal bores and solitary waves that travel in a well-defined direction for two and a half days. The origin of the trains appeared to be at a point along a steep topo graphic drop. The SAR observations are used for guiding and tuning the model simulations, by comparing spectra of observed and modeled wavelengths. The tuned model yields wavelengths that are within a factor of 2 of the SAR data. The modeled amp litudes are within a factor of 2 of amplitudes obtained with a two-layer model and the SAR data The signature on the acoustical field of ongoing physical processes through the interaction of the resultant oceanic struct ure with the acoustical field is pursued. Internal bore and solitary wave structures interact with the acoustic field. A re distribution of acoustical energy to higher acoustical modes occurs at some fre- quencies. Mode decomposition of the

  9. Processing of multi-digit additions in high math-anxious individuals: psychophysiological evidence

    PubMed Central

    Núñez-Peña, María Isabel; Suárez-Pellicioni, Macarena

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the time course of neural processing of multi-digit additions in high- (HMA) and low-math anxious (LMA) individuals. Seventeen HMA and 17 LMA individuals were presented with two-digit additions and were asked to perform a verification task. Behavioral data showed that HMA individuals were slower and more error prone than their LMA peers, and that incorrect solutions were solved more slowly and less accurately than correct ones. Moreover, HMA individuals tended to need more time and commit more errors when having to verify incorrect solutions than correct ones. ERPs time-locked to the presentation of the addends (calculation phase) and to the presentation of the proposed solution (verification phase) were also analyzed. In both phases, a P2 component of larger amplitude was found for HMA individuals than for their LMA peers. Because the P2 component is considered to be a biomarker of the mobilization of attentional resources toward emotionally negative stimuli, these results suggest that HMA individuals may have invested more attentional resources both when processing the addends (calculation phase) and when they had to report whether the proposed solution was correct or not (verification phase), as compared to their LMA peers. Moreover, in the verification phase, LMA individuals showed a larger late positive component (LPC) for incorrect solutions at parietal electrodes than their HMA counterparts. The smaller LPC shown by HMA individuals when verifying incorrect solutions suggests that these solutions may have been appeared more plausible to them than to their LMA counterparts. PMID:26347705

  10. EFFECT OF STARCH ADDITION ON THE PERFORMANCE AND SLUDGE CHARACTERIZATION OF UASB PROCESS TREATING METHANOLIC WASTEWATER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Feng; Kobayashi, Takuro; Takahashi, Shintaro; Li, Yu-You; Omura, Tatsuo

    A mesophilic(35℃) UASB reactor treating synthetic wastewater containing methanol with addition of starch was continuously operated for over 430 days by changing the organic loading rate from 2.5 to 120kg-COD/m3.d. The microbial community structure of the granules was analyzed with the molecular tools and its metabolic characteristics were evaluated using specific methanogenic activity tests. The process was successfully operated with over 98% soluble COD removal efficiency at VLR 30kg-COD/m3.d for approximately 300 days, and granulation satisfactory proceeded. The results of cloning and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis suggest that groups related the genus Methanomethylovorans and the genus Methanosaeta were predominant in the reactor although only the genus Methanomethylovorans was predominant in the reactor treating methanolic wastewater in the previous study. Abundance of the granules over 0.5 mm in diameter in the reactor treating methanolic wastewater with addition of starch was 3 times larger than that in the reactor treating methanolic wastewater. Specific methanogenic activity tests in this study indicate that the methanol-methane pathway and the methanol-H2/CO2-methane pathway were predominant, and however, there was a certain level of activity for acetate-methane pathway unlike the reactor treating methanolic wastewater. These results suggest addition of starch might be responsible for diversifying the microbial community and encouraging the granulation.

  11. Framework for Understanding LENR Processes, Using Ordinary Condensed Matter Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubb, Scott

    2005-03-01

    As I have emphasizedootnotetextS.R. Chubb, Proc. ICCF10 (in press). Also, http://www.lenr-canr.org/acrobat/ChubbSRnutsandbol.pdf http://www.lenr-canr.org/acrobat/ChubbSRnutsandbol.pdf, S.R. Chubb, Trans. Amer. Nuc. Soc. 88 , 618 (2003)., in discussions of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions(LENRs), mainstream many-body physics ideas have been largely ignored. A key point is that in condensed matter, delocalized, wave-like effects can allow large amounts of momentum to be transferred instantly to distant locations, without any particular particle (or particles) acquiring high velocity through a Broken Gauge Symmetry. Explicit features in the electronic structure explain how this can occur^1 in finite size PdD crystals, with real boundaries. The essential physics^1 can be related to standard many-body techniquesootnotetextBurke,P.G. and K.A. Berrington, Atomic and Molecular Processes:an R matrix Approach (Bristol: IOP Publishing, 1993).. In the paper, I examine this relationship, the relationship of the theory^1 to other LENR theories, and the importance of certain features (for example, boundaries^1) that are not included in the other LENR theories.

  12. Physical processes associated with current collection by plasma contactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Ira; Davis, Victoria A.

    1990-01-01

    Recent flight data confirms laboratory observations that the release of neutral gas increases plasma sheath currents. Plasma contactors are devices which release a partially ionized gas in order to enhance the current flow between a spacecraft and the space plasma. Ionization of the expellant gas and the formation of a double layer between the anode plasma and the space plasma are the dominant physical processes. A theory is presented of the interaction between the contactor plasma and the background plasma. The conditions for formation of a double layer between the two plasmas are derived. Double layer formation is shown to be a consequence of the nonlinear response of the plasmas to changes in potential. Numerical calculations based upon this model are compared with laboratory measurements of current collection by hollow cathode-based plasma contactors.

  13. Absorption and emission by atmospheric gases - The physical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCartney, E. J.

    This book has been written for those who wish to understand better the processes of absorption and emission and their manifold effects. Persons having such interests or needs are the workers in meteorology, atmospheric physics, aerospace surveillance, and air-pollution control. Introductory ideas and useful facts are presented, taking into account an overview of absorption and emission, the electromagnetic spectrum and its parameters, the quantization of energy, the molecular origins of spectra, and the laws of blackbody radiation. Gas properties are considered along with thermodynamics, molecular kinetics, quantized energy states and population, molecular internal energies, spectra of energy transitions, and parameters of line and band absorption. Attention is given to molecular dipole moments, rotational energy and transitions, vibrational energy and transitions, and absorption and emission data.

  14. Convection in the Physical Vapor Transport Process-I: Thermal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, Walter M. B.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of convection on diffusive-convective physical vapor transport process are examined computationally. We analyze conditions ranging from typical laboratory conditions to conditions achievable only in a low gravity environment. This corresponds to thermal Rayleigh numbers Ra, ranging from 1.80 x 10 to 1.92 x 10(exp 6). Our results indicate that the effect of the sublimation and condensation fluxes at the boundaries is to increase the threshold of instability. For typical ground based conditions, time dependent oscillatory convection can occur. This results in unsteady transport, and non- uniform temperature and concentration gradients at the crystal interface. Spectral analysis of the flow field shows parametric regions exhibiting both an oscillatory approach to steady state and a chaotic transient to a periodic state. Low gravity conditions stabilize the flow field. Convective effects are effectively reduced, thus resulting in uniform temperature and concentration gradients at the interface, a desirable condition for crystal growth.

  15. Convection in the Physical Vapor Transport Process. 1; Thermal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, Walter M. B.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of convection on diffusive-convective physical vapor transport process are examined computationally. We analyze conditions ranging from typical laboratory conditions to conditions achievable only in a low gravity environment. This corresponds to thermal Rayleigh numbers Ra(sub tau) ranging from 1.80 x 10 to 1.92 x 10(exp 6). Our results indicate that the effect of the sublimation and condensation fluxes at the boundaries is to increase the threshold of instability. For typical ground based conditions, time dependent oscillatory convection can occur. This results in unsteady transport, and non-uniform temperature and concentration gradients at the crystal interface. Spectral analysis of the flow field shows parametric regions exhibiting both an oscillatory approach to steady state and a chaotic transient to a periodic state. Low gravity conditions stabilize the flow field. Convective effects are effectively reduced, thus resulting in uniform temperature and concentration gradients at the interface, a desirable condition for crystal growth.

  16. Hydration process of cement in the presence of a cellulosic additive. A calorimetric investigation.

    PubMed

    Ridi, Francesca; Fratini, Emiliano; Mannelli, Francesca; Baglioni, Piero

    2005-08-01

    In the cement industry, the extrusion technique is used to produce flat shapes with improved resistance to compression. Extrusion is a plastic-forming process that consists of forcing a highly viscous plastic mixture through a shaped die. The material should be fluid enough to be mixed and to pass through the die, and on the other hand, the extruded specimen should be stiff enough to be handled without changing in shape or cracking. These characteristics are industrially obtained by adding cellulosic polymers to the mixture. The aim of this work is to understand the action mechanism of these additives on the major pure phases constituting a typical Portland cement: tricalcium silicate (C(3)S), dicalcium silicate (C(2)S), tricalcium aluminate (C(3)A), and tetracalcium iron-aluminate (C(4)AF). In particular, a methylhydroxyethyl cellulose (MHEC) was selected from the best-performing polymers for further study. The effect of this additive on the hydration kinetics (rate constants, activation energies, and diffusional constants) was evaluated by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) while the hydration products were studied by using thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). MHEC addition in calcium silicate pastes produces an increase in the induction time without affecting the nucleation-and-growth period. A less dense CSH gel was deduced from the diffusional constants in the presence of MHEC. Moreover, CSH laminar features and poorly structured hydrates were noted during the first hours of hydration. In the case of the aluminous phases, the additive inhibits the growth of stable cubic hydrated phases (C(3)AH(6)), with the advantage of the metastable hexagonal phases being formed in the earliest minutes of hydration. PMID:16852857

  17. Physical processes mediating climate change impacts on regional sea ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, J.; Schrum, C.; Cannaby, H.; Daewel, U.; Allen, I.; Artioli, Y.; Bopp, L.; Butenschon, M.; Fach, B. A.; Harle, J.; Pushpadas, D.; Salihoglu, B.; Wakelin, S.

    2014-02-01

    Regional seas are exceptionally vulnerable to climate change, yet are the most directly societally important regions of the marine environment. The combination of widely varying conditions of mixing, forcing, geography (coastline and bathymetry) and exposure to the open-ocean makes these seas subject to a wide range of physical processes that mediates how large scale climate change impacts on these seas' ecosystems. In this paper we explore these physical processes and their biophysical interactions, and the effects of atmospheric, oceanic and terrestrial change on them. Our aim is to elucidate the controlling dynamical processes and how these vary between and within regional seas. We focus on primary production and consider the potential climatic impacts: on long term changes in elemental budgets, on seasonal and mesoscale processes that control phytoplankton's exposure to light and nutrients, and briefly on direct temperature response. We draw examples from the MEECE FP7 project and five regional models systems using ECOSMO, POLCOMS-ERSEM and BIMS_ECO. These cover the Barents Sea, Black Sea, Baltic Sea, North Sea, Celtic Seas, and a region of the Northeast Atlantic, using a common global ocean-atmosphere model as forcing. We consider a common analysis approach, and a more detailed analysis of the POLCOMS-ERSEM model. Comparing projections for the end of the 21st century with mean present day conditions, these simulations generally show an increase in seasonal and permanent stratification (where present). However, the first order (low- and mid-latitude) effect in the open ocean projections of increased permanent stratification leading to reduced nutrient levels, and so to reduced primary production, is largely absent, except in the NE Atlantic. Instead, results show a highly heterogeneous picture of positive and negative change arising from the varying mixing and circulation conditions. Even in the two highly stratified, deep water seas (Black and Baltic Seas) the

  18. Physical processes effecting the baryonic matter content of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panayotova, Mariana

    2015-01-01

    We have discussed physical processes effecting the generation of the matter content of the Universe. First we have studied the processes effecting Big Bang Nucleosynthesis during which the chemical content of the baryonic component of the Universe was produced. We have provided detail numerical analysis of the BBN production of ^4He, Y_p, in the presence of ν_e ← ν_s neutrino oscillations, effective after electron neutrino decoupling. We have accounted for all known effects of neutrino oscillations on cosmological nucleosyntesis. We have obtained cosmological bounds corresponding to δ Y_p/Y_p= 5.2 % in correspondance with the recently found higher uncertainty in ^4He. Iso-helium contours for δ Y_p/Y_p > 5% and population of the ν_s state δ N_s = 0; 0.5; 0.7; 0.9, both for resonant and non-resonant oscillations have been calculated. Next we have studied the processes effecting the formation of the baryon content of the Universe. We have investigated a baryogenesis model based on Affleck and Dine baryogenesis scenario, Scalar Field Condensate (SFC) baryogenesis model. We have provided precise numerical analysis of the SFC baryogenesis model numerically accounting for the particle creation processes by the time varying scalar field. We have numerically obtained the dependence of the field and baryon charge evolution and their final values on the model's parameters, namely: the gauge coupling constant α, the Hubble constant during inflation H_I, the mass of the field m and the self coupling constants λ_i. We have found the range of the model parameters for which a baryon asymmetry value close to the observed one can be generated.

  19. Precipitation process in a Mg–Gd–Y alloy grain-refined by Al addition

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Jichun; Zhu, Suming; Easton, Mark A.; Xu, Wenfan; Wu, Guohua; Ding, Wenjiang

    2014-02-15

    The precipitation process in Mg–10Gd–3Y (wt.%) alloy grain-refined by 0.8 wt.% Al addition has been investigated by transmission electron microscopy. The alloy was given a solution treatment at 520 °C for 6 h plus 550 °C for 7 h before ageing at 250 °C. Plate-shaped intermetallic particles with the 18R-type long-period stacking ordered structure were observed in the solution-treated state. Upon isothermal ageing at 250 °C, the following precipitation sequence was identified for the α-Mg supersaturated solution: β″ (D0{sub 19}) → β′ (bco) → β{sub 1} (fcc) → β (fcc). The observed precipitation process and age hardening response in the Al grain-refined Mg–10Gd–3Y alloy are compared with those reported in the Zr grain-refined counterpart. - Highlights: • The precipitation process in Mg–10Gd–3Y–0.8Al (wt.%) alloy has been investigated. • Particles with the 18R-type LPSO structure were observed in the solution state. • Upon ageing at 250 °C, the precipitation sequence is: β″ → β′ → β1 (fcc) → β. • The Al grain-refined alloy has a lower hardness than the Zr refined counterpart.

  20. IMPACTS OF ANTIFOAM ADDITIONS AND ARGON BUBBLING ON DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY REDUCTION/OXIDATION

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.; Johnson, F.

    2012-06-05

    During melting of HLW glass, the REDOX of the melt pool cannot be measured. Therefore, the Fe{sup +2}/{Sigma}Fe ratio in the glass poured from the melter must be related to melter feed organic and oxidant concentrations to ensure production of a high quality glass without impacting production rate (e.g., foaming) or melter life (e.g., metal formation and accumulation). A production facility such as the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) cannot wait until the melt or waste glass has been made to assess its acceptability, since by then no further changes to the glass composition and acceptability are possible. therefore, the acceptability decision is made on the upstream process, rather than on the downstream melt or glass product. That is, it is based on 'feed foward' statistical process control (SPC) rather than statistical quality control (SQC). In SPC, the feed composition to the melter is controlled prior to vitrification. Use of the DWPF REDOX model has controlled the balanjce of feed reductants and oxidants in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT). Once the alkali/alkaline earth salts (both reduced and oxidized) are formed during reflux in the SRAT, the REDOX can only change if (1) additional reductants or oxidants are added to the SRAT, the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), or the Melter Feed Tank (MFT) or (2) if the melt pool is bubble dwith an oxidizing gas or sparging gas that imposes a different REDOX target than the chemical balance set during reflux in the SRAT.

  1. Improvement of pattern collapse issue by additive-added D.I. water rinse process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Keiichi; Naito, Ryoichiro; Kitada, Tomohiro; Kiba, Yukio; Yamada, Yoshiaki; Kobayashi, Masakazu; Ichikawa, Hiroyuki

    2003-06-01

    Reduction of critical dimension in lithography technology is aggressively promoted. At the same time, further resist thickness reduction is being pursued to increase the resolution capabilities of resist. However, thin film has its limitation because of etch requirements etc. As that result, the promotion of reduction results in increasing the aspect ratio, which leads to pattern collapse. It is well known that at drying step in developing process the capillary effect operates the photoresist pattern. If the force of the capillary effect is greater than the aggregation force of the resist pattern, the pattern collapse is generated. And the key parameters of the capillary effect are the space width between patterns, the aspect ratio, the contact angle of the D.I water rinse and the surface tension of rinse solution. Among these parameters the surface tension of rinse solution can be controlled by us. On the other hand, we've already reported that the penetration of TMAH and D.I water into the resist plays an important role on the lithographic latitude. For example, when we use the resist which TMA ion can be easily diffuse into, D.I water and TMA ion which are penetrated in the resist decreases the aggregation force of resist pattern and causes the pattern collapse even by the weak force against resist pattern. These results indicate that the swelling of photoresist by TMA ion and water is very important factor for controlling the pattern collapse. Currently, two methods are mainly tried to reduce the surface tension of rinse solution: SCF (Super Critical Fluid) and addition of additive to D.I water rinse. We used the latter method this time, because this technique has retrofittability and not special tool. And in this evaluation, we found that the degree of suppressing pattern collapse depends on the additive chemistry or formulation. With consideration given to process factors such as above, we investigated what factors contribute to suppressing pattern collapse

  2. Design and development of a layer-based additive manufacturing process for the realization of metal parts of designed mesostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Christopher Bryant

    Low-density cellular materials, metallic bodies with gaseous voids, are a unique class of materials that are characterized by their high strength, low mass, good energy absorption characteristics, and good thermal and acoustic insulation properties. In an effort to take advantage of this entire suite of positive mechanical traits, designers are tailoring the cellular mesostructure for multiple design objectives. Unfortunately, existing cellular material manufacturing technologies limit the design space as they are limited to certain part mesostructure, material type, and macrostructure. The opportunity that exists to improve the design of existing products, and the ability to reap the benefits of cellular materials in new applications is the driving force behind this research. As such, the primary research goal of this work is to design, embody, and analyze a manufacturing process that provides a designer the ability to specify the material type, material composition, void morphology, and mesostructure topology for any conceivable part geometry. The accomplishment of this goal is achieved in three phases of research: (1) Design---Following a systematic design process and a rigorous selection exercise, a layer-based additive manufacturing process is designed that is capable of meeting the unique requirements of fabricating cellular material geometry. Specifically, metal parts of designed mesostructure are fabricated via three-dimensional printing of metal oxide ceramic powder followed by post-processing in a reducing atmosphere. (2) Embodiment ---The primary research hypothesis is verified through the use of the designed manufacturing process chain to successfully realize metal parts of designed mesostructure. (3) Modeling & Evaluation ---The designed manufacturing process is modeled in this final research phase so as to increase understanding of experimental results and to establish a foundation for future analytical modeling research. In addition to an analysis of

  3. Processing of New Materials by Additive Manufacturing: Iron-Based Alloys Containing Silver for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niendorf, Thomas; Brenne, Florian; Hoyer, Peter; Schwarze, Dieter; Schaper, Mirko; Grothe, Richard; Wiesener, Markus; Grundmeier, Guido; Maier, Hans Jürgen

    2015-07-01

    In the biomedical sector, production of bioresorbable implants remains challenging due to improper dissolution rates or deficient strength of many candidate alloys. Promising materials for overcoming the prevalent drawbacks are iron-based alloys containing silver. However, due to immiscibility of iron and silver these alloys cannot be manufactured based on conventional processing routes. In this study, iron-manganese-silver alloys were for the first time synthesized by means of additive manufacturing. Based on combined mechanical, microscopic, and electrochemical studies, it is shown that silver particles well distributed in the matrix can be obtained, leading to cathodic sites in the composite material. Eventually, this results in an increased dissolution rate of the alloy. Stress-strain curves showed that the incorporation of silver barely affects the mechanical properties.

  4. Transition metal-catalyzed process for addition of amines to carbon-carbon double bonds

    DOEpatents

    Hartwig, John F.; Kawatsura, Motoi; Loeber, Oliver

    2002-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a process for addition of amines to carbon-carbon double bonds in a substrate, comprising: reacting an amine with a compound containing at least one carbon-carbon double bond in the presence a transition metal catalyst under reaction conditions effective to form a product having a covalent bond between the amine and a carbon atom of the former carbon-carbon double bond. The transition metal catalyst comprises a Group 8 metal and a ligand containing one or more 2-electron donor atoms. The present invention is also directed to enantioselective reactions of amine compounds with compounds containing carbon-carbon double bonds, and a calorimetric assay to evaluate potential catalysts in these reactions.

  5. Reactive Additive Stabilization Process (RASP) for hazardous and mixed waste vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.; Pickett, J.B.; Ramsey, W.G.

    1993-07-01

    Solidification of hazardous/mixed wastes into glass is being examined at the Savannah River Site (SRS) for (1) nickel plating line (F006) sludges and (2) incinerator wastes. Vitrification of these wastes using high surface area additives, the Reactive Additive Stabilization Process (RASP), has been determined to greatly enhance the dissolution and retention of hazardous, mixed, and heavy metal species in glass. RASP lowers melt temperatures (typically 1050-- 1150{degrees}C), thereby minimizing volatility concerns during vitrification. RASP maximizes waste loading (typically 50--75 wt% on a dry oxide basis) by taking advantage of the glass forming potential of the waste. RASP vitrification thereby minimizes waste disposal volume (typically 86--97 vol. %), and maximizes cost savings. Solidification of the F006 plating line sludges containing depleted uranium has been achieved in both soda-lime-silica (SLS) and borosilicate glasses at 1150{degrees}C up to waste loadings of 75 wt%. Solidification of incinerator blowdown and mixtures of incinerator blowdown and bottom kiln ash have been achieved in SLS glass at 1150{degrees}C up to waste loadings of 50% using RASP. These waste loadings correspond to volume reductions of 86 and 94 volume %, respectively, with large associated savings in storage costs.

  6. Physical Education for Children: A Focus on the Teaching Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logsdon, Bette J.; And Others

    This book is written for the physical education teacher at the elementary school level. In its ten chapters the following topics are covered: (1) an historical and philosophical examination of physical education in the American schools; (2) changes and new goals in the field of physical education; (3) concepts of learning and development in the…

  7. Physical processes in grid control gas discharge device Tacitron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arefiev, Alexander; Vereschagin, Nicolay; Kruglov, Sergey

    2003-10-01

    Physical processes in grid control gas discharge device Tacitron Arefjev A.S., Vereschagin N.M., Kruglov S. A. Radioengineering Academy, Ryazan, Russia Nowdays pulsed power units is getting widely used for cleaning biogas and water. Their parameters and dimension defines by the current commutator, which is used as a switch for interrupting the current in the circuit. Experimental investigations have been carried out to find out the propeties of the one type of the current commutator - the so-called tacitron. It has specific construction of the control grid ,which enables to control the moment of the discharge plasma distinguish and consequently a tacitron has ability to distinguish the discharge, e.i. to interrupt the current, flowing through the device. The grid of a tacitron is constructed of small-mesh metal. The dimension of the small-mesh cell must be compare with Debay radius at the proper discharge conditions. It is stipulated by the fact that if the dimensions of the grid cell are compare with Debay radius then ionic sheaths on the negative electrode as if 'overlap' each other. Then if to supply the controlling impulse to the grid of the tacitron one can ensure interrupting the current through the tacitron. Thus a tacitron is full controlling discharge current commutator. There has been performed experimental investigation of the process of the current interruption.(distinguishing of the gas discharge), taking place in the discharge space between the anode and the cathode of the tacitron. The outcomes of experiments show that the process of the distinguishing may be divided on 4 stages, which differ one from another by elementary processes, going on there : - delay of the distinguishing of the discharge; - so-called 'slow ' stage; - decay of plasma inside the anode - grid gap; - decay of plasma inside the cathode - grid gap. The whole duration of the process of the discharge distinguishing equals mostly the second and the third stages together. The duration

  8. Synthesis mechanism of nanoporous Sn3O4 nanosheets by hydrothermal process without any additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jun-Hua; Tan, Rui-Qin; Yang, Ye; Xu, Wei; Li, Jia; Shen, Wen-Feng; Wu, Guo-Qiang; Zhu, You-Liang; Yang, Xu-Feng; Song, Wei-Jie

    2015-06-01

    Nanoporous anorthic-phase Sn3O4 nanosheets are successfully fabricated via a hydrothermal process without any additives. With the pH value of the precursor increasing from 2.0 to 11.8, the valence of the precursor changes from mixed valence (the ratio of Sn2+ to Sn4+ is 2.7:1) to pure bivalent, and the product transformed from Sn3O4 to SnO mesocrystals. When doping SbCl3 to the alkaline precursor, the valence of the precursor shows mixed valence with the ratio of Sn2+ to Sn4+ being 2.6:1 and Sn3O4 is synthesized after the hydrothermal process. The valence state of Sn species in the precursor is the key factor of the formation of Sn3O4. The synthesis mechanism is discussed and proposed. These experimental results expand the knowledge base that can be used to guide technological applications of intermediate tin oxide materials. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21377063, 51102250, 21203226, and 21205127) and the Personnel Training Foundation of Quzhou University (Grant No. BSYJ201412).

  9. New pyrometallurgical process of EAF dust treatment with CaO addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chairaksa-Fujimoto, Romchat; Inoue, Yosuke; Umeda, Naoyoshi; Itoh, Satoshi; Nagasaka, Tetsuya

    2015-08-01

    The non-carbothermic zinc pyrometallurgical processing of electric arc furnace (EAF) dust was investigated on a laboratory scale. The main objective of this process was to convert highly stable zinc ferrite (ZnFe2O4), which accounts for more than half of total zinc in the EAF dust, into ZnO and Ca2Fe2O5 by CaO addition. The EAF dust was mixed with CaO powder in various ratios, pressed into pellets, and heated in a muffle furnace in air at temperatures ranging from 700 to 1100°C for a predetermined holding time. All ZnFe2O4 was transformed into ZnO and Ca2Fe2O5 at a minimum temperature of 900°C within 1 h when sufficient CaO to achieve a Ca/Fe molar ratio of 1.1 was added. However, at higher temperatures, excess CaO beyond the stoichiometric ratio was required because it was consumed by reactions leading to the formation of compounds other than ZnFe2O4. The evaporation of halides and heavy metals in the EAF dust was also studied. These components could be preferentially volatilized into the gas phase at 1100°C when CaO was added.

  10. Linking stochastic sediment transport to physical processes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerolmack, D. J.; Martin, R.; Paola, C.; Reitz, M. D.; Schumer, R.

    2010-12-01

    Intermittent transport is the rule rather than the exception in sedimentary systems. Avalanching dynamics in granular flows is known to produce stochastic transport fluctuations over a wide range of scales - for example, the well known power-law distributions of landslide magnitudes. Similar stochastic dynamics can occur in multi-phase flows, e.g., bedload transport in rivers. A generalized theoretical framework for understanding stochastic transport is lacking. A pragmatic alternative is the stochastic processes approach: using (fractional) advection-diffusion equations, conditioned with measured statistics from a real system, to make future predictions about transport. Linking the macroscopic statistics described by such models to the microscopic physics of sediment transport will require a new statistical mechanics approach. We propose to begin by delineating generic categories of transport mechanics - universality classes - and determining their statistical signatures through theory and experiment. A first separation may be drawn between periodic and aperiodic transport fluctuations. Periodic transport fluctuations have been observed in both sand piles and river delta experiments, and appear to arise under conditions of a well-defined transport threshold (e.g., an angle of repose) and limited dissipation. Under these conditions, inertia overwhelms system heterogeneity and gives rise to periodic oscillations having a characteristic magnitude. Aperiodic transport fluctuations often imply a strong control of system heterogeneity, and/or significant dissipation or friction capable of “breaking up” sediment pulses. For example, varying soil properties give rise to a range of critical failure slopes for landslides. Transitions in the dominant transport process from small to large time or space scales are expected to result in transitions in scaling. Bedload transport is super-diffusive at short timescales because of correlated motion due to particle momentum. At

  11. Carbonate Beaches: A Balance Between Biological and Physical Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nairn, R.; Risk, M.

    2004-12-01

    Carbonate beaches are a unique example of the interaction between biological processes, creating the sediments, and physical processes, moving and often removing the sediments. On the sediment supply side, carbonate sediments are born, not made. They exist in dynamic equilibrium between production and destruction. Following the creation of carbonate sediment in coral reef and lagoon environments, the sediments are moved shoreward to the beach, transport along the shore and sometimes, eventually lost offshore, often as the result of tropical storms. Comprehensive studies of the balance between the supply and loss of carbonate sediments and beach dynamics have been completed for the islands of Mauritius and Barbados. Field studies and remote sensing (Compact Airborne Spectrometry Imaging) have been applied to develop carbonate sediment production rates for a range of reef and lagoon conditions. Using GIS, these production rates have been integrated to determine sediment supply rates for different segments of the coastline. 1-D and 2-D models of waves, hydrodynamics, sediment transport and morphodynamics were set-up and tested against observed beach response to storm events or a sequence of storm events. These complex deterministic models are not suitable for application over periods of decades. However, it was possible to characterize storm events by the extent of sand loss, and relate this to key descriptive factors for groups of storm events, thereby encapsulating the erosion response. A long-term predictive tool for evaluating beach erosion and accretion response, over a period of several decades, was developed by combining the supply rates for carbonate sediment and the encapsulated representation of the loss rates through physical processes. The ability of this predictive tool was successfully tested against observed long term beach evolution along sections of the coast in Barbados and Mauritius using air photo analysis in GIS for shoreline change over periods

  12. Characterization and comparative study of coal combustion residues from a primary and additional flue gas secondary desulfurization process

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, S.; Francois, M.; Evrard, O.; Pellissier, C.

    1998-11-01

    An extensive characterization and comparative study was done on two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) residues derived from the same coal. LR residues (originated from Loire/Rhone in the south of Lyon, France) are obtained after a primary desulfurization process (SO{sub 2} is trapped by reaction with CaO at a temperature of about 1100 C), and LM residues (originating from La Maxe, near Metz in the east of France) are obtained after an additional secondary desulfurization process (SO{sub 2} is removed further by reaction with Ca(OH){sub 2} at a temperature of about 120 C). Various and complementary investigation methods were used to determine their chemical, physical, and mineralogical properties: x-ray fluorescence and diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetry analysis, granulometric distribution, pycnometric density, BET specific surface area and pH, conductivity measurements, and chemical analysis of their insoluble fraction. The FGD residues contain basically two main components: a silico-aluminous fly ash part and calcic FGD phases. In the LR residues the two components can be considered as independent, whereas they are linked in the LM residues because chemical reactions have occurred, leading to the formation of silico-calcic gel CSH, hydrated aluminate AFm, and AFt phases.

  13. Convection in the Physical Vapor Transport Process. Part 2; Thermosolutal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, Walter M. B.

    1994-01-01

    We consider the effect of an inert gas on the diffusive-convective physical vapor transport process. We investigate the case when the temperature gradient is stabilizing and the concentration gradient is destabilizing for a wide parametric range. When an inert gas is present, the thermal and solutal convection oppose each other. The solutal field is destabilizing while the thermal field and the advective-diffusive flux stabilize the flow field. When the pressure of the inert component is increased, the stabilizing effect of the advective-diffusive flux is decreased. The intensity of convection as well as the oscillatory transient time increases. Below, the critical Rayleigh number, the nonlinear dynamics of the flow field show an oscillatory approach to steady state. For parametric values in the neighborhood of the critical Rayleigh number, the flow field undergoes a chaotic transient which settles to a periodic state. The asymptotic state of the flow field shows that growth and amalgamation of cells yields an overturning motion which results in an asymmetric cellular structure. The low gravity environment yields the stabilizing advective-diffusive flow which results in uniform temperature and concentration gradients near the crystal interface.

  14. Continuous Digital Light Processing (cDLP): Highly Accurate Additive Manufacturing of Tissue Engineered Bone Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Dean, David; Jonathan, Wallace; Siblani, Ali; Wang, Martha O; Kim, Kyobum; Mikos, Antonios G; Fisher, John P

    2012-03-01

    Highly accurate rendering of the external and internal geometry of bone tissue engineering scaffolds effects fit at the defect site, loading of internal pore spaces with cells, bioreactor-delivered nutrient and growth factor circulation, and scaffold resorption. It may be necessary to render resorbable polymer scaffolds with 50 μm or less accuracy to achieve these goals. This level of accuracy is available using Continuous Digital Light processing (cDLP) which utilizes a DLP(®) (Texas Instruments, Dallas, TX) chip. One such additive manufacturing device is the envisionTEC (Ferndale, MI) Perfactory(®). To use cDLP we integrate a photo-crosslinkable polymer, a photo-initiator, and a biocompatible dye. The dye attenuates light, thereby limiting the depth of polymerization. In this study we fabricated scaffolds using the well-studied resorbable polymer, poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF), titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) as a dye, Irgacure(®) 819 (BASF [Ciba], Florham Park, NJ) as an initiator, and diethyl fumarate as a solvent to control viscosity. PMID:23066427

  15. Continuous Digital Light Processing (cDLP): Highly Accurate Additive Manufacturing of Tissue Engineered Bone Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Dean, David; Wallace, Jonathan; Siblani, Ali; Wang, Martha O.; Kim, Kyobum; Mikos, Antonios G.; Fisher, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Highly accurate rendering of the external and internal geometry of bone tissue engineering scaffolds effects fit at the defect site, loading of internal pore spaces with cells, bioreactor-delivered nutrient and growth factor circulation, and scaffold resorption. It may be necessary to render resorbable polymer scaffolds with 50 μm or less accuracy to achieve these goals. This level of accuracy is available using Continuous Digital Light processing (cDLP) which utilizes a DLP® (Texas Instruments, Dallas, TX) chip. One such additive manufacturing device is the envisionTEC (Ferndale, MI) Perfactory®. To use cDLP we integrate a photo-crosslinkable polymer, a photo-initiator, and a biocompatible dye. The dye attenuates light, thereby limiting the depth of polymerization. In this study we fabricated scaffolds using the well-studied resorbable polymer, poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF), titanium dioxide (TiO2) as a dye, Irgacure® 819 (BASF [Ciba], Florham Park, NJ) as an initiator, and diethyl fumarate as a solvent to control viscosity. PMID:23066427

  16. Influence of microbubble in physical cleaning of MF membrane process for wastewater reuse.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eui-Jong; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Hyung-Soo; Jang, Am

    2015-06-01

    Currently, there is a growing emphasis on wastewater reclamation and reuse all over the world due to restricted water resources. Among a variety of wastewater reuse technologies, the use of microfiltration membranes (MF) is one of the popular processes because it has the ability to successfully eliminate particulates and colloidal matters. However, successful fouling control is not easy because effluents from the activated sludge process still contain small particulates and colloidal matters such as extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) and soluble microbial products (SMP). On the other hand, microbubbles have advantageous properties compared to common bubbles, but there hasn't been reporting of the use of microbubbles in physical cleaning instead of aeration. Encouraging results were obtained herein through the application of microbubbles for physical cleaning. In evaluation of the cleaning efficiency, the efficiency of microbubbles was observed to be twice as high as that of aeration, except during the course of the initial 30 min. Total organic carbon (TOC) concentration of the membrane tank after treatment with microbubbles was more than twice as high as that after aeration for physical cleaning. The membrane cleaned with microbubbles also had the smoothest surface, with a roughness of 42.5 nm. In addition, microbubbles were found to effectively remove EPS and make the structure of the gel layer loose. In particular, the microbubbles had the ability to remove proteins through the effect of pyrolytic decomposition. Therefore, in FT-IR spectra of the membrane surfaces taken before and after physical cleaning, while each treatment showed similar peak positions, the peak values of the membrane treated with microbubbles were the lowest. Through various analyses, it was confirmed that microbubbles can remove foulants on the gel layer in spite of their very low shear force. This means that microbubble cleaning has full potential for use as a physical cleaning

  17. The Development and Validation of a Process Instrument for a Unit of the Physical Science Study Committee Physics Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penny, Maria Bramtot

    The purpose of this study was to prepare a valid and reliable instrument to evaluate the objectives dealing with the behaviors expected in Part 1 of the Physical Science Study Committee (PSSC) physics course. There were six phases to the study: (1) identification of the processes, (2) selection thereof, (3) construction of instrument, (4) pilot…

  18. Physical Abuse, Cognitive and Emotional Processes, and Aggressive/Disruptive Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teisl, Michael; Cicchetti, Dante

    2008-01-01

    Cognitive and emotional processes were examined in maltreated children with a history of physical abuse (n = 76), children with a history of maltreatment other than physical abuse (i.e., sexual abuse, physical neglect, and emotional maltreatment; n = 91), and a group of non-maltreated comparison children (N = 100). Physical abuse was associated…

  19. Process monitoring using automatic physical measurement based on electrical and physical variability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shauly, Eitan N.; Levi, Shimon; Schwarzband, Ishai; Adan, Ofer; Latinsky, Sergey

    2015-04-01

    A fully automated silicon-based methodology for systematic analysis of electrical features is shown. The system was developed for process monitoring and electrical variability reduction. A mapping step was created by dedicated structures such as static-random-access-memory (SRAM) array or standard cell library, or by using a simple design rule checking run-set. The resulting database was then used as an input for choosing locations for critical dimension scanning electron microscope images and for specific layout parameter extraction then was input to SPICE compact modeling simulation. Based on the experimental data, we identified two items that must be checked and monitored using the method described here: transistor's sensitivity to the distance between the poly end cap and edge of active area (AA) due to AA rounding, and SRAM leakage due to a too close N-well to P-well. Based on this example, for process monitoring and variability analyses, we extensively used this method to analyze transistor gates having different shapes. In addition, analysis for a large area of high density standard cell library was done. Another set of monitoring focused on a high density SRAM array is also presented. These examples provided information on the poly and AA layers, using transistor parameters such as leakage current and drive current. We successfully define "robust" and "less-robust" transistor configurations included in the library and identified unsymmetrical transistors in the SRAM bit-cells. These data were compared to data extracted from the same devices at the end of the line. Another set of analyses was done to samples after Cu M1 etch. Process monitoring information on M1 enclosed contact was extracted based on contact resistance as a feedback. Guidelines for the optimal M1 space for different layout configurations were also extracted. All these data showed the successful in-field implementation of our methodology as a useful process monitoring method.

  20. Food additives

    MedlinePlus

    Food additives are substances that become part of a food product when they are added during the processing or making of that food. "Direct" food additives are often added during processing to: Add nutrients ...

  1. Effects of physical processes on structure and transport of thin zooplankton layers in the coastal ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McManus, M.A.; Cheriton, O.M.; Drake, P.J.; Holliday, D.V.; Storlazzi, C.D.; Donaghay, P.L.; Greenlaw, C.F.

    2005-01-01

    Thin layers of plankton are recurrent features in a variety of coastal systems. These layers range in thickness from a few centimeters to a few meters. They can extend horizontally for kilometers and have been observed to persist for days. Densities of organisms found within thin layers are far greater than those above or below the layer, and as a result, thin layers may play an important role in the marine ecosystem. The paramount objective of this study was to understand the physical processes that govern the dynamics of thin layers of zooplankton in the coastal ocean. We deployed instruments to measure physical processes and zooplankton distribution in northern Monterey Bay; during an 11 d period of persistent upwelling-favorable winds, 7 thin zooplankton layers were observed. These zooplankton layers persisted throughout daylight hours, but were observed to dissipate during evening hours. These layers had an average vertical thickness of 1.01 m. No layers were found in regions where the Richardson number was <0.25. In general, when the Richardson number is <0.25 the water column is unstable, and incapable of supporting thin layers. Thin zooplankton layers were also located in regions of reduced flow. In addition, our observations show that the vertical depth distribution of thin zooplankton layers is modulated by high-frequency internal waves, with periods of 18 to 20 min. Results from this study clearly show an association between physical structure, physical processes and the presence of thin zooplankton layers in Monterey Bay. With this new understanding we may identify other coastal regions that have a high probability of supporting thin layers. ?? Inter-Research 2005.

  2. Physical Education Resources, Class Management, and Student Physical Activity Levels: A Structure-Process-Outcome Approach to Evaluating Physical Education Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bevans, Katherine B.; Fitzpatrick, Leslie-Anne; Sanchez, Betty M.; Riley, Anne W.; Forrest, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Background: This study was conducted to empirically evaluate specific human, curricular, and material resources that maximize student opportunities for physical activity during physical education (PE) class time. A structure-process-outcome model was proposed to identify the resources that influence the frequency of PE and intensity of physical…

  3. Boundary Conditions for the Paleoenvironment: Chemical and Physical Processes in the Pre-Solar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, William M.; Schloerb, F. Peter

    1997-01-01

    The basic theme of this program is the study of molecular complexity and evolution in interstellar clouds and in primitive solar system objects. Research has included the detection and study of a number of new interstellar molecules and investigation of reaction pathways for astrochemistry from a comparison of theory and observed molecular abundances. The latter includes studies of cold, dark clouds in which ion-molecule chemistry should predominate, searches for the effects of interchange of material between the gas and solid phases in interstellar clouds, unbiased spectral surveys of particular sources, and systematic investigation of the interlinked chemistry and physics of dense interstellar clouds. In addition, the study of comets has allowed a comparison between the chemistry of such minimally thermally processed objects and that of interstellar clouds, shedding light on the evolution of the biogenic elements during the process of solar system formation.

  4. Preliminary evaluation of feeder and lint slide moisture addition on ginning, fiber quality, and textile processing of western cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of moisture addition at the gin stand feeder conditioning hopper and/or the battery condenser slide on gin performance and Western cotton fiber quality and textile processing. The test treatments included no moisture addition, feeder hopper hum...

  5. The Sounds of Sentences: Differentiating the Influence of Physical Sound, Sound Imagery, and Linguistically Implied Sounds on Physical Sound Processing.

    PubMed

    Dudschig, Carolin; Mackenzie, Ian Grant; Strozyk, Jessica; Kaup, Barbara; Leuthold, Hartmut

    2016-10-01

    Both the imagery literature and grounded models of language comprehension emphasize the tight coupling of high-level cognitive processes, such as forming a mental image of something or language understanding, and low-level sensorimotor processes in the brain. In an electrophysiological study, imagery and language processes were directly compared and the sensory associations of processing linguistically implied sounds or imagined sounds were investigated. Participants read sentences describing auditory events (e.g., "The dog barks"), heard a physical (environmental) sound, or had to imagine such a sound. We examined the influence of the 3 sound conditions (linguistic, physical, imagery) on subsequent physical sound processing. Event-related potential (ERP) difference waveforms indicated that in all 3 conditions, prime compatibility influenced physical sound processing. The earliest compatibility effect was observed in the physical condition, starting in the 80-110 ms time interval with a negative maximum over occipital electrode sites. In contrast, the linguistic and the imagery condition elicited compatibility effects starting in the 180-220 ms time window with a maximum over central electrode sites. In line with the ERPs, the analysis of the oscillatory activity showed that compatibility influenced early theta and alpha band power changes in the physical, but not in the linguistic and imagery, condition. These dissociations were further confirmed by dipole localization results showing a clear separation between the source of the compatibility effect in the physical sound condition (superior temporal area) and the source of the compatibility effect triggered by the linguistically implied sounds or the imagined sounds (inferior temporal area). Implications for grounded models of language understanding are discussed. PMID:27473463

  6. Corrosion Resistance of Powder Metallurgy Processed TiC/316L Composites with Mo Additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shaojiang; Xiong, Weihao

    2015-06-01

    To find out the effects of Mo addition on corrosion resistance of TiC/316L stainless steel composites, TiC/316L composites with addition of different contents of Mo were prepared by powder metallurgy. The corrosion resistance of these composites was evaluated by the immersion tests and polarization curves experiments. Results indicated that Mo addition decreased the corrosion rates of TiC/316L composites in H2SO4 solution in the case of Mo content below 2% whereas it displayed an opposite effect when Mo content was above that value. It was found that with an increase in the Mo content, the pitting corrosion resistance increased monotonically for TiC/316L composites in NaCl solution.

  7. Intensification of catalytic cracking process by addition of heavy catalytic gasoil

    SciTech Connect

    Serikov, P.Yu.; Zaitseva, N.P.; Smidovich, E.V.

    1987-11-01

    The addition of heavy catalytic gasoil to cat cracker feed as a means of reducing the formation of coke was investigated. A vacuum gasoil was used as the feedstock, and a lube oil solvent extract and heavy catalytic gasoil were used as the activating additives. Data showed that feedstocks with the highest kinetic stability had the lowest coke formation in cracking. Kinetic stability was determined by the viscometric method. Test results show that heavy catalytic gasoil has a greater effect on reducing coke yield than the extract used.

  8. Applications of Emerging Satellites for Ocean Bio-geo Chemical and Physical Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnone, R.; Ladner, S. D.

    2012-12-01

    Emerging satellites for hyper and multispectral sensing of the oceans spectral ocean color are enabling improved capability for monitoring real-time ocean conditions and processes. These sensors can define physical and biological processes occurring at space scales from lakes and estuaries to coastal and open waters and will resolve temporal scales at hourly, daily to seasonal variability. These emerging satellite products are critical for data assimilation into ocean physical and ecological modeling and providing future capability for ocean forecasting. Emerging polar orbiters to be discussed are: 1) VIIRS with new ocean color, SST and day night bands and 2) HICO - hyperspectral high resolution coastal imager. Additionally emerging geostationary sensors to be discussed are: 1) GOCI - Korean ocean color satellite and 2) GeoCape - planned ocean color sensor. New products and applications to exploit emerging sensors for ocean monitoring of water quality and physical conditions in based on importance of inter-satellite radiometric calibration to maintain consistency between sensors and products. These products will address the impact of increased anthropogenic activity along coasts and rivers. Methods and procedures to insure sensor calibration insures future products can be merged at different time and space scales. Emerging capabilities include: 1) improved surface heat flux for physical models 2) new near shore products in optically shallow water such as sea grass mapping, bathymetry and bio-optical water quality 3) tracking surface currents and ecological sources and sinks. 4) Improved spatial and temporal changes in bio-optical conditions to characterize changes in ecological water quality (dissolved organics, carbon flux, phytoplankton biomass, particle composition and size.) 5) Inland lakes and river monitoring.

  9. Effects of additives on the processing and properties of LARC-TPI polyimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elandjian, L.; Haghighat, R.; Lusignea, R.; Wallis, R.

    1990-01-01

    The blending of LARC-TPI polyimide with the thermotropic liquid crystal polymer designated Xydar and with four different oligomeric imide materials has facilitated the resulting resin systems' processing into films while enhancing their mechanical properties and lowering their coefficient of thermal expansion to virtually zero. Two film-formation processes have been evaluated: (1) the casting of polyamic acid films followed by thermal imidization and biaxial stretching, and (2) the blown-film melt-extrusion of fully imidized LARC-TPI polymer. The best results have been obtained through the use of Xydar as a processing aid at levels in the 10-30 percent range.

  10. Process Drama: The Use of Affective Space to Reduce Language Anxiety in the Additional Language Learning Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piazzoli, Erika

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a research project designed to find out what happens when process drama strategies are applied to an advanced level of additional language learning. In order to answer this question, the author designed and facilitated six process drama workshops as part of a third-year course of Italian at a university in Brisbane, Australia.…

  11. 12 CFR 390.128 - If the FDIC requests additional information to complete my application, how will it process my...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... complete my application, how will it process my application? 390.128 Section 390.128 Banks and Banking... additional information to complete my application, how will it process my application? (a) You may use the... will notify you that it has extended the period before the end of the initial 15-day period and...

  12. Dimension of physical systems, information processing, and thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Nicolas; Kaplan, Marc; Leverrier, Anthony; Skrzypczyk, Paul

    2014-12-01

    We ask how quantum theory compares to more general physical theories from the point of view of dimension. To do so, we first give two model-independent definitions of the dimension of physical systems, based on measurements and the capacity of storing information. While both definitions are equivalent in classical and quantum mechanics, they are different in generalized probabilistic theories. We discuss in detail the case of a theory known as ‘boxworld’, and show that such a theory features systems with dimension mismatch. This dimension mismatch can be made arbitrarily large using an amplification procedure. Furthermore, we show that the dimension mismatch of boxworld has strong consequences on its power for performing information-theoretic tasks, leading to the collapse of communication complexity and to the violation of information causality. Finally, we discuss the consequences of a dimension mismatch from the perspective of thermodynamics, and ask whether this effect could break Landauer's erasure principle and thus the second law.

  13. EFFECT OF A WHOLE-CATCHMENT N ADDITION ON STREAM DETRITUS PROCESSING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Bear Brook Watershed in Maine (BBWM) is a paired catchment study investigating ecosystem effects of N and S deposition. Because of the decade long (NH4)2SO4 addition, the treatment catchment has higher stream NO3 and enriched foliar N concentrations compared to the reference ...

  14. Process for lowering the dielectric constant of polyimides using diamic acid additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); St.clair, Anne K. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Linear aromatic polyimides with low dielectric constants are produced by adding a diamic acid additive to the polyamic acid resin formed by the condensation of an aromatic dianhydride with an aromatic diamine. The resulting modified polyimide is a better electrical insulator than state-of-the-art commercially available polyimides.

  15. 46 CFR 39.1009 - Additional tank vessel vapor processing unit requirements-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... engineering requirements of 46 CFR chapter I, subchapter F. (b) Electrical equipment comprising the... the electrical engineering requirements of 46 CFR chapter I, subchapter J. (c) In addition to... comply with applicable requirements of 33 CFR part 154, subpart P. (d) When differences between...

  16. 46 CFR 39.1009 - Additional tank vessel vapor processing unit requirements-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... engineering requirements of 46 CFR chapter I, subchapter F. (b) Electrical equipment comprising the... the electrical engineering requirements of 46 CFR chapter I, subchapter J. (c) In addition to... comply with applicable requirements of 33 CFR part 154, subpart P. (d) When differences between...

  17. The addition of silicon carbide to surrogate nuclear fuel kernels made by the internal gelation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, R. D.; Hunn, J. D.; Birdwell, J. F.; Lindemer, T. B.; Collins, J. L.

    2010-06-01

    The US Department of Energy plans to use the internal gelation process to make tristructural isotropic (TRISO)-coated transuranic (TRU) fuel particles. The focus of this work is to develop TRU fuel kernels with high crush strengths, good ellipticity, and adequately dispersed silicon carbide (SiC). The submicron SiC particles in the TRU kernels are to serve as getters for excess oxygen and to potentially sequester palladium, rhodium, and ruthenium, which could damage the coatings during irradiation. Zirconium oxide microspheres stabilized with yttrium were used as surrogates because zirconium and TRU microspheres from the internal gelation process are amorphous and encounter similar processing problems. The hardness of SiC required modifications to the experimental system that was used to make uranium carbide kernels. Suitable processing conditions and equipment changes were identified so that the SiC could be homogeneously dispersed in gel spheres for subsequent calcination into strong spherical kernels.

  18. The Process of Physics Teaching Assistants' Pedagogical Content Knowledge Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seung, Eulsun

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the process of physics teaching assistants' (TAs) PCK development in the context of teaching a new undergraduate introductory physics course. "Matter and Interactions" (M&I) has recently adopted a new introductory physics course that focuses on the application of a small number of fundamental physical…

  19. Discriminating between the physical processes that drive spheroid size evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Bundy, Kevin; Hernquist, Lars; Wuyts, Stijn; Cox, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Observations have shown that massive galaxies at high redshift have much smaller effective radii than galaxies of similar mass today; however, recent work has shown that they have similar central densities. The primary growth of size, therefore, relates to the apparent relative abundance of low-density material at low redshifts. But various models have been proposed to accomplish this, and the exact contribution of these mechanisms, relative to others that would, for example, lower the density of the system uniformly, or relate to possible observational misestimates of the stellar mass distribution, remain uncertain, as does the degree to which this evolution is driven by processes of initial spheroid formation versus subsequent `dry' assembly of spheroids. These different possibilities also yield dramatically different constraints on any possible evolution in the MBH-σ relation. Here, we compile observations of spheroid properties as a function of redshift and use them to test the different proposed models, each of which we have calibrated and studied in a suite of high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations. We show that the evolution in progenitor disc gas fractions with redshift gives rise to the initial formation of smaller spheroids at high redshift. We then consider how these early-forming systems must evolve to be consistent with the larger sizes of old spheroids today. We consider (1) equal-density `dry' mergers, (2) later major or minor `dry' mergers with less dense galaxies, (3) adiabatic expansion, after significant gas mass loss, (4) gradients in stellar mass-to-light ratios from young nuclear stellar populations (yielding smaller Re at early times, which vanish as the system fades), (5) biases in the stellar mass estimation of high-redshift (young) systems (from e.g. uncertain asymptotic giant branch starlight contributions) and (6) observational effects (possible biases in fitting or missed light from surface brightness dimming, or the effects of

  20. From lab to industrial: PZT nanoparticles synthesis and process control for application in additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hsien-Lin

    Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) nanoparticles hold many promising current and future applications, such as PZT ink for 3-D printing or seeds for PZT thick films. One common method is hydrothermal growth, in which temperature, duration time, or mineralizer concentrations are optimized to produce PZT nanoparticles with desired morphology, controlled size and size distribution. A modified hydrothermal process is used to fabricate PZT nanoparticles. The novelty is to employ a high ramping rate (e.g., 20 deg C/min) to generate abrupt supersaturation so as to promote burst nucleation of PZT nanoparticles as well as a fast cooling rate (e.g., 5 deg C/min) with a controlled termination of crystal growth. As a result, PZT nanoparticles with a size distribution ranging from 200 nm to 800 nm are obtained with cubic morphology and good crystallinity. The identification of nanoparticles is confirmed through use of X-ray diffractometer (XRD). XRD patterns are used to compare sample variations in their microstructures such as lattice parameter. A cubic morphology and particle size are also examined via SEM images. The hydrothermal process is further modified with excess lead (from 20% wt. to 80% wt.) to significantly reduce amorphous phase and agglomeration of the PZT nanoparticles. With a modified process, the particle size still remains within the 200 nm to 800 nm. Also, the crystal structures (microstructure) of the samples show little variations. Finally, a semi-continuous hydrothermal manufacturing process was developed to substantially reduce the fabrication time and maintained the same high quality as the nanoparticles prepared in an earlier stage. In this semi-continuous process, a furnace is maintained at the process temperature (200 deg C), whereas autoclaves containing PZT sol are placed in and out of the furnace to control the ramp-up and cooling rates. This setup eliminates an extremely time-consuming step of cooling down the furnace, thus saving tremendous amount of

  1. Some Physics Processes in the Nitrogen-Filled Photoluminescence Cell - Rev. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D D

    2006-06-22

    As shown in Ref. [1], the photoluminescence cell is a viable candidate for monitoring the total energy in the Linac Coherent Light Source. In Ref. [1], most of the discussion was concentrated on the cell with argon as a working gas. In the present note I provide a discussion of some physics processes that may affect the performance of the photoluminescence cell with the nitrogen fill. In particular, I will consider the role of the space charge effects, ambipolar diffusion, and recombination processes. This group of phenomena determines the duration of the afterglow process that follows an initial short (<100 ns) burst of optical radiation. The presence of this afterglow can be of some significance for the detection system. Compared to my previous note with the same title UCRL-TR-222274, a more detailed discussion of space charge effects is provided, with an emphasis on the electrostatic confinement of the primary electrons. Also, some additional atomic data are included into sections describing recombination processes. The general template for this discussion follows a draft report [1] where the argon-filled cell was considered. But some processes in nitrogen are different and require separate consideration. In what follows, I am not attempting to produce ''exact'' results, but rather to provide a quick order-of-magnitude scoping study.

  2. Radiation processing of thermoplastic starch by blending aromatic additives: Effect of blend composition and radiation parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandal, Dhriti; Mikus, Pierre-Yves; Dole, Patrice; Coqueret, Xavier

    2013-03-01

    This paper reports on the effects of electron beam (EB) irradiation on poly α-1,4-glucose oligomers (maltodextrins) in the presence of water and of various aromatic additives, as model blends for gaining a better understanding at a molecular level the modifications occurring in amorphous starch-lignin blends submitted to ionizing irradiation for improving the properties of this type of bio-based thermoplastic material. A series of aromatic compounds, namely p-methoxy benzyl alcohol, benzene dimethanol, cinnamyl alcohol and some related carboxylic acids namely cinnamic acid, coumaric acid, and ferulic acid, was thus studied for assessing the ability of each additive to counteract chain scission of the polysaccharide and induce interchain covalent linkages. Gel formation in EB-irradiated blends comprising of maltodextrin was shown to be dependent on three main factors: the type of aromatic additive, presence of glycerol, and irradiation dose. The chain scission versus grafting phenomenon as a function of blend composition and dose were studied using Size Exclusion Chromatography by determining the changes in molecular weight distribution (MWD) from Refractive Index (RI) chromatograms and the presence of aromatic grafts onto the maltodextrin chains from UV chromatograms. The occurrence of crosslinking was quantified by gel fraction measurements allowing for ranking the cross-linking efficiency of the additives. When applying the method to destructurized starch blends, gel formation was also shown to be strongly affected by the moisture content of the sample submitted to irradiation. The results demonstrate the possibility to tune the reactivity of tailored blend for minimizing chain degradation and control the degree of cross-linking.

  3. Analysis on Soil Seed Bank Diversity Characteristics and Its Relation with Soil Physical and Chemical Properties after Substrate Addition

    PubMed Central

    He, Mengxuan; Lv, Lingyue; Li, Hongyuan; Meng, Weiqing; Zhao, Na

    2016-01-01

    Aims Considered as an essential measure in the application of soil seed bank (SSB) projects, the mixing of substrate and surface soil can effectively improve soil condition. This research is aimed at exploring the diversity characteristics of SSBs and the relationships between SSBs and soil properties. Methods Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) was adopted to describe the ordination of SSBs on soil properties’ gradients; multiple linear regressions were adopted to analyze the relationship between average growth height and soil properties, density and soil properties. Results Experimental groups of mixed substrate (the mixture of organic and inorganic substrates) had high diversity indexes, especially the Shannon-Wiener Index compared with those of single substrate. Meanwhile, a higher number of species and increased density were also noted in those of mixed substrate. The best test group, No.16, had the highest diversity indexes with a Shannon-Wiener of 1.898, Simpson of 0.633 and Pielou of 0.717, and also showed the highest density of 14000 germinants /m2 and 21 species. In addition, an improvement of the soil’s chemical and physical properties was noted when the substrates were mixed. The mixed substrate of turfy soil and perlite could effectively enhance the soil moisture content, whilst a mixed substrate of rice husk carbon and vermiculite could improve the content of available potassium (AK) and phosphorus (AP) and strengthen soil fertility. The germinated plants also reflected obvious regularities of ordination on soil factor gradients. Three distinct cluster groups were presented, of which the first cluster was distributed in an area with a relatively higher content of AK and AP; the second cluster was distributed at places with relatively higher soil moisture content; and the third cluster of plants didn’t show any obvious relationship with soil physical and chemical properties. Through CCA analysis, AK and AP were considered the most important

  4. Heat Balance of a Sheep in the Sun. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Transport Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatheway, W. H.

    These materials were designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. Specifically, this module develops a method for calculating the exchange of heat between an…

  5. Animal Thermoregulation and the Operative Environmental (Equivalent) Temperature. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Transport Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, R. D.

    These materials were designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. Thermoregulation is defined as the ability of an organism to modify its body temperature. This…

  6. Core Formation Under Dynamic Conditions: Physical Processes and Geochemical Signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rushmer, T.; Gaetani, G.; Jones, J. H.; Sparks, J.

    2001-01-01

    We have experimentally investigated liquid metal segregation from a solid silicate matrix under conditions of applied stress. Liquid moves in fractures and formation of fayalitic olivine from orthopyroxene by migrating Fe-Ni-S-O liquids is observed. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  7. The Effects of Polyphosphate Additives on Campylobacter Survival in Processed Chicken Exudates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Campylobacter spp. are responsible for a large number of food-borne illness cases worldwide. Despite being sensitive to oxygen and nutritionally fastidious, Campylobacter spp. are able to survive in food processing environments and reach consumers in sufficient numbers to cause disease. To investi...

  8. PowerPoint Presentations: A Creative Addition to the Research Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Alan E.

    2003-01-01

    Contends that the requirement of a PowerPoint presentation as part of the research process would benefit students in the following ways: learning how to conduct research; starting their research project sooner; honing presentation and public speaking skills; improving cooperative and social skills; and enhancing technology skills. Outlines the…

  9. Effect of two-stage coagulant addition on coagulation-ultrafiltration process for treatment of humic-rich water.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting; Chen, Zhong-lin; Yu, Wen-zheng; Shen, Ji-min; Gregory, John

    2011-08-01

    A novel two-stage coagulant addition strategy applied in a coagulation-ultrafiltration (UF) process for treatment of humic-rich water at neutral pH was investigated in this study. When aluminum sulfate (alum) doses were set at a ratio of 3:1 added during rapid mix stage and half way through flocculation stage, the integrated process of two-stage alum addition achieved almost the same organic matter removal as that of conventional one-stage alum addition at the same overall dose. Whereas membrane fouling could be effectively mitigated by the two-stage addition exhibited by trans-membrane pressure (TMP) developments. The TMP developments were found to be primarily attributed to external fouling on membrane surface, which was closely associated with floc characteristics. The results of jar tests indicated that the average size of flocs formed in two-stage addition mode roughly reached one half larger than that in one-stage addition mode, which implied a beneficial effect on membrane fouling reduction. Moreover, the flocs with more irregular structure and lower effective density resulted from the two-stage alum addition, which caused higher porosity of cake layer formed by such flocs on membrane surface. Microscopic observations of membrane surface demonstrated that internal fouling in membrane pores could be also remarkably limited by two-stage alum addition. It is likely that the freshly formed hydroxide precipitates were distinct in surface characteristics from the aged precipitates due to formation of more active groups or adsorption of more labile aluminum species. Consequently, the flocs could further connect and aggregate to contribute to preferable properties for filtration performance of the coagulation-UF process. As a simple and efficient approach, two-stage coagulant addition strategy could have great practical significance in coagulation-membrane processes. PMID:21704354

  10. A Library Manager's Guide to the Physical Processing of Nonprint Materials. The Greenwood Library Management Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Driessen, Karen C.; Smyth, Shelia A.

    The librarian is presented with a foundation for decision making as it relates to the physical processing of nonprint materials, and with a demonstration of how these decisions move from theoretical to practical physical processing issues. Such issues include packaging and repackaging; treating accompanying materials; labeling; preparing…

  11. Flagella, flexibility and flow: Physical processes in microbial ecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumley, D. R.; Rusconi, R.; Son, K.; Stocker, R.

    2015-12-01

    How microorganisms interact with their environment and with their conspecifics depends strongly on their mechanical properties, on the hydrodynamic signatures they generate while swimming and on fluid flows in their environment. The rich fluid-structure interaction between flagella - the appendages microorganisms use for propulsion - and the surrounding flow, has broad reaching effects for both eukaryotic and prokaryotic microorganisms. Here, we discuss selected recent advances in our understanding of the physical ecology of microorganisms, which have hinged on the ability to directly interrogate the movement of individual cells and their swimming appendages, in precisely controlled fluid environments, and to image them at appropriately fast timescales. We review how a flagellar buckling instability can unexpectedly serve a fundamental function in the motility of bacteria, we elucidate the role of hydrodynamics and flexibility in the emergent properties of groups of eukaryotic flagella, and we show how fluid flows characteristic of microbial habitats can strongly bias the migration and spatial distribution of bacteria. The topics covered here are illustrative of the potential inherent in the adoption of experimental methods and conceptual frameworks from physics in understanding the lives of microorganisms.

  12. Perceptual and processing differences between physical and dichorhinic odor mixtures.

    PubMed

    Schütze, M; Negoias, S; Olsson, M J; Hummel, T

    2014-01-31

    Perceptual integration of sensory input from our two nostrils has received little attention in comparison to lateralized inputs for vision and hearing. Here, we investigated whether a binary odor mixture of eugenol and l-carvone (smells of cloves and caraway) would be perceived differently if presented as a mixture in one nostril (physical mixture), vs. the same two odorants in separate nostrils (dichorhinic mixture). In parallel, we investigated whether the different types of presentation resulted in differences in olfactory event-related potentials (OERP). Psychophysical ratings showed that the dichorhinic mixtures were perceived as more intense than the physical mixtures. A tendency for shift in perceived quality was also observed. In line with these perceptual changes, the OERP showed a shift in latencies and amplitudes for early (more "sensory") peaks P1 and N1 whereas no significant differences were observed for the later (more "cognitive") peak P2. The results altogether suggest that the peripheral level is a site of interaction between odorants. Both psychophysical ratings and, for the first time, electrophysiological measurements converge on this conclusion. PMID:24240030

  13. Coupled model of physical and biological processes affecting maize pollination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arritt, R.; Westgate, M.; Riese, J.; Falk, M.; Takle, E.

    2003-04-01

    Controversy over the use of genetically modified (GM) crops has led to increased interest in evaluating and controlling the potential for inadvertent outcrossing in open-pollinated crops such as maize. In response to this problem we have developed a Lagrangian model of pollen dispersion as a component of a coupled end-to-end (anther to ear) physical-biological model of maize pollination. The Lagrangian method is adopted because of its generality and flexibility: first, the method readily accommodates flow fields of arbitrary complexity; second, each element of the material being transported can be identified by its source, time of release, or other properties of interest. The latter allows pollen viability to be estimated as a function of such factors as travel time, temperature, and relative humidity, so that the physical effects of airflow and turbulence on pollen dispersion can be considered together with the biological aspects of pollen release and viability. Predicted dispersion of pollen compares well both to observations and to results from a simpler Gaussian plume model. Ability of the Lagrangian model to handle complex air flows is demonstrated by application to pollen dispersion in the vicinity of an agricultural shelter belt. We also show results indicating that pollen viability can be quantified by an "aging function" that accounts for temperature, humidity, and time of exposure.

  14. Tailoring the physical properties of homopolymers and polymer nanocomposites via solid-state processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre, Cynthia

    Numerous approaches can be used to modify polymer properties. In this thesis, it is demonstrated that an innovative, continuous, industrially scalable process called solid-state shear pulverization (SSSP) can be used to enhance polymer properties with and without the addition of nanofillers. The SSSP process employs a modified twin-screw extruder in which the barrel is cooled rather than heated, resulting in the polymer being processed at a temperature below its glass transition temperature, if the polymer is amorphous, or its melt transition temperature, if the polymer is semi-crystalline. The material processed via SSSP experiences high levels of shear and compressive stresses, resulting in many repeated fragmentation and fusion steps during pulverization, which can lead to mechanochemistry. This research provides the first in-depth study on the effect of SSSP processing on the molecular structure as well as physical properties of homopolymers. Rheological characterization has demonstrated an increase in the melt viscosity of pulverized poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), which can be ascribed to the in situ formation of lightly branched PET. Further evidence of branched PET is provided via a dramatic increase in the rate of crystallization of the pulverized samples. These results suggest that SSSP processing can enhance the reuse and recyclability of PET. While SSSP processing has dramatic effects on the structure of polyesters and consequently their properties, a mild effect is observed for polyolefins. This thesis also demonstrates via a combination of methods that the well-exfoliated state can be achieved via SSSP processing of various polymer nanocomposites, using as-received, unmodified fillers. For example, extensive comparisons are made concerning the thermal stability in air or nitrogen atmosphere of polypropylene (PP)/clay, PP/graphite, and PP/carbon nanotube (CNT) nanocomposites made by SSSP. These comparisons suggest that the mechanism by which CNTs

  15. Crystallization processes in poly(ethylene terephthalate) as modified by polymer additives and fiber reinforcement

    SciTech Connect

    Reinsch, V.E.; Rebenfeld, L.

    1993-12-31

    The effect of fiber reinforcement on the crystallization of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) was investigated using differential scanning calorimetry. The objective of the study was to determine how the effects of fiber reinforcement on PET crystallization are modified by the presence of polymer additives. The interaction of fiber effects and nucleating and plasticizing agents was studied. Unidirectional fiber composites were prepared using aramid and glass fibers in PET. The rate of crystallization of PET, as reflected by crystallization half-time, it seem to depend on reinforcing fiber type, crystallization temperature, and presence of nucleant or plasticizer. However, degree of crytallinity of PET is largely unaffected by the presence of additives and reinforcing fibers. Crystallization kinetics are analyzed using a series Avrami model for PET volume crystallized as a function of time. The using a series Arami model for PET volume crystallized as a function of time. The crystalline morphology of fiber reinforced PET was studied using polarized light microscopy. Results concerning nucleation density, chain mobility, and growth morphology are used in explaining differences seen in crystallization kinetics in fiber reinforced systems.

  16. Process for improving mechanical properties of epoxy resins by addition of cobalt ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St.clair, A. K. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A resin product useful as an adhesive, composite or casting resin is described as well as the process used in its preparation to improve its flexural strength mechanical property characteristics. Improved flexural strength is attained with little or no change in density, thermal stability or moisture resistance by chemically incorporating 1.2% to 10.6% by weight Co(3) ions in an epoxidized resin system.

  17. Ecotoxicity of arsenic contaminated sludge after mixing with soils and addition into composting and vermicomposting processes.

    PubMed

    Vašíčková, Jana; Maňáková, Blanka; Šudoma, Marek; Hofman, Jakub

    2016-11-01

    Sludge coming from remediation of groundwater contaminated by industry is usually managed as hazardous waste despite it might be considered for further processing as a source of nutrients. The ecotoxicity of phosphorus rich sludge contaminated with arsenic was evaluated after mixing with soil and cultivation with Sinapis alba, and supplementation into composting and vermicomposting processes. The Enchytraeus crypticus and Folsomia candida reproduction tests and the Lactuca sativa root growth test were used. Invertebrate bioassays reacted sensitively to arsenic presence in soil-sludge mixtures. The root elongation of L. sativa was not sensitive and showed variable results. In general, the relationship between invertebrate tests results and arsenic mobile concentration was indicated in majority endpoints. Nevertheless, significant portion of the results still cannot be satisfactorily explained by As chemistry data. Composted and vermicomposted sludge mixtures showed surprisingly high toxicity on all three tested organisms despite the decrease in arsenic mobility, probably due to toxic metabolites of bacteria and earthworms produced during these processes. The results from the study indicated the inability of chemical methods to predict the effects of complex mixtures on living organisms with respect to ecotoxicity bioassays. PMID:27348256

  18. Dynamics and materials physics of fault rupture and glacial processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, John Daniel

    This thesis focuses on two main topics, the physics governing how faults rapidly weaken during an earthquake and the thermal and mechanical structure of ice stream shear margins. The common theme linking these two projects is the desire to understand how the complicated interactions between stress and temperature control deformation and failure. All of the problems in this thesis are attacked using a combination of analytic and numerical methods, and the interplay between these two approaches provides a powerful way to understand the different physical balances that dominate in different regimes. We also use aspects of materials science to understand how the often complicated rheologies are controlled by underlying physical phenomena such as melting, phase transitions, diffusion, and dislocation motion. With regards to fault mechanics, we begin by showing how co-seismic weakening mechanisms driven by elevated pore fluid pressures lead to micron-scale strain localization during an earthquake. We solve for the localized zone thickness for a range of fault temperatures, test these predictions using numerical simulations, and show how the onset of localization accelerates fault weakening. Next we present the first solutions to account for thermal decomposition reactions during a dynamic rupture, showing that the activation of thermal decomposition may lead to a larger slip duration and total slip. Finally we present a new set of experiments studying flash heating of serpentinite, highlighting the dependence of friction on normal stress and the presence of gouge, and producing the first model to explain the hysteresis commonly observed in flash heating experiments. With regards to ice stream shear margins, we begin by extending the work of Perol and Rice [2011] to study the formation of temperate ice in shear margins, and quantify the total melt that may be generated within the shear margins. We conclude by investigating how the presence of such a channel alters the

  19. Surface Modified Particles By Multi-Step Michael-Type Addition And Process For The Preparation Thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Ronald Lee; Elliott, Brian John; Luebben, Silvia DeVito; Myers, Andrew William; Smith, Bryan Matthew

    2005-05-03

    A new class of surface modified particles and a multi-step Michael-type addition surface modification process for the preparation of the same is provided. The multi-step Michael-type addition surface modification process involves two or more reactions to compatibilize particles with various host systems and/or to provide the particles with particular chemical reactivities. The initial step comprises the attachment of a small organic compound to the surface of the inorganic particle. The subsequent steps attach additional compounds to the previously attached organic compounds through reactive organic linking groups. Specifically, these reactive groups are activated carbon—carbon pi bonds and carbon and non-carbon nucleophiles that react via Michael or Michael-type additions.

  20. Relativity Based on Physical Processes Rather Than Space-Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giese, Albrecht

    2013-09-01

    Physicists' understanding of relativity and the way it is handled is at present dominated by the interpretation of Albert Einstein, who related relativity to specific properties of space and time. The principal alternative to Einstein's interpretation is based on a concept proposed by Hendrik A. Lorentz, which uses knowledge of classical physics to explain relativistic phenomena. In this paper, we will show that on the one hand the Lorentz-based interpretation provides a simpler mathematical way of arriving at the known results for both Special and General Relativity. On the other hand, it is able to solve problems which have remained open to this day. Furthermore, a particle model will be presented, based on Lorentzian relativity, which explains the origin of mass without the use of the Higgs mechanism, based on the finiteness of the speed of light, and which provides the classical results for particle properties that are currently only accessible through quantum mechanics.

  1. Processes in karst systems, physics, chemistry, and geology

    SciTech Connect

    Dreybrodt, W.

    1988-01-01

    Dreybrodt deals quantitatively with many of the chemical and hydrological processes involved in the formation of karst systems. The book is divided into 3 major parts. The first part develops the basic chemical and fluid-flow principles needed in modeling karst systems. The second part investigates the experimental kinetics of calcite dissolution and precipitation and applies the resulting kinetic laws to the modeling of these processes in systems both open and closed to carbon dioxide. The last part of the book includes a qualitative examination of karst systems, quantitative modeling of the development of karst features, and an examination and modeling of the growth of spelotherms in caves.

  2. Physical Education Resources, Class Management, and Student Physical Activity Levels: A Structure-Process-Outcome Approach to Evaluating Physical Education Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Bevans, Katherine B.; Fitzpatrick, Leslie-Anne; Sanchez, Betty M.; Riley, Anne W.; Forrest, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND This study was conducted to empirically evaluate specific human, curricular, and material resources that maximize student opportunities for physical activity during physical education (PE) class time. A structure-process-outcome model was proposed to identify the resources that influence the frequency of PE and intensity of physical activity during PE. The proportion of class time devoted to management was evaluated as a potential mediator of the relations between resource availability and student activity levels. METHODS Data for this cross-sectional study were collected from interviews conducted with 46 physical educators and the systematic observation of 184 PE sessions in 34 schools. Regression analyses were conducted to test for the main effects of resource availability and the mediating role of class management. RESULTS Students who attended schools with a low student-to-physical educator ratio had more PE time and engaged in higher levels of physical activity during class time. Access to adequate PE equipment and facilities was positively associated with student activity levels. The availability of a greater number of physical educators per student was found to impact student activity levels by reducing the amount of session time devoted to class management. CONCLUSION The identification of structure and process predictors of student activity levels in PE will support the allocation of resources and encourage instructional practices that best support increased student activity levels in the most cost-effective way possible. Implications for PE policies and programs are discussed. PMID:21087253

  3. Speaking and Speaking Education as Physical Process in Turkish Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurudayioglu, Mehmet

    2011-01-01

    Speaking is sending the message which is desired to be transferred to another one with vocal organs and produced by complicated operations in the brain. Speaking, which is a complicated process, is the most common and important means of communication among people. Speaking, which has essential place both individually and socially, affects success…

  4. Simulation of Forming Process as an Educational Tool Using Physical Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdullah, A. B.; Muda, M. R.; Samad, Z.

    2008-01-01

    Metal forming process simulation requires a very high cost including the cost for dies, machine and material and tight process control since the process involve very huge pressure. A physical modeling technique is developed and initiates a new era of educational tool of simulating the process effectively. Several publications and findings have…

  5. A digital process for additive manufacturing of occlusal splints: a clinical pilot study.

    PubMed

    Salmi, Mika; Paloheimo, Kaija-Stiina; Tuomi, Jukka; Ingman, Tuula; Mäkitie, Antti

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a digital process for manufacturing of occlusal splints. An alginate impression was taken from the upper and lower jaws of a patient with temporomandibular disorder owing to cross bite and wear of the teeth, and then digitized using a table laser scanner. The scanned model was repaired using the 3Data Expert software, and a splint was designed with the Viscam RP software. A splint was manufactured from a biocompatible liquid photopolymer by stereolithography. The system employed in the process was SLA 350. The splint was worn nightly for six months. The patient adapted to the splint well and found it comfortable to use. The splint relieved tension in the patient's bite muscles. No sign of tooth wear or significant splint wear was detected after six months of testing. Modern digital technology enables us to manufacture clinically functional occlusal splints, which might reduce costs, dental technician working time and chair-side time. Maximum-dimensional errors of approximately 1 mm were found at thin walls and sharp corners of the splint when compared with the digital model. PMID:23614943

  6. A digital process for additive manufacturing of occlusal splints: a clinical pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Salmi, Mika; Paloheimo, Kaija-Stiina; Tuomi, Jukka; Ingman, Tuula; Mäkitie, Antti

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a digital process for manufacturing of occlusal splints. An alginate impression was taken from the upper and lower jaws of a patient with temporomandibular disorder owing to cross bite and wear of the teeth, and then digitized using a table laser scanner. The scanned model was repaired using the 3Data Expert software, and a splint was designed with the Viscam RP software. A splint was manufactured from a biocompatible liquid photopolymer by stereolithography. The system employed in the process was SLA 350. The splint was worn nightly for six months. The patient adapted to the splint well and found it comfortable to use. The splint relieved tension in the patient's bite muscles. No sign of tooth wear or significant splint wear was detected after six months of testing. Modern digital technology enables us to manufacture clinically functional occlusal splints, which might reduce costs, dental technician working time and chair-side time. Maximum-dimensional errors of approximately 1 mm were found at thin walls and sharp corners of the splint when compared with the digital model. PMID:23614943

  7. The Circadian Timing System: A Recent Addition in the Physiological Mechanisms Underlying Pathological and Aging Processes

    PubMed Central

    Arellanes-Licea, Elvira; Caldelas, Ivette; De Ita-Pérez, Dalia; Díaz-Muñoz, Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    Experimental findings and clinical observations have strengthened the association between physio-pathologic aspects of several diseases, as well as aging process, with the occurrence and control of circadian rhythms. The circadian system is composed by a principal pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SNC) which is in coordination with a number of peripheral circadian oscillators. Many pathological entities such as metabolic syndrome, cancer and cardiovascular events are strongly connected with a disruptive condition of the circadian cycle. Inadequate circadian physiology can be elicited by genetic defects (mutations in clock genes or circadian control genes) or physiological deficiencies (desynchronization between SCN and peripheral oscillators). In this review, we focus on the most recent experimental findings regarding molecular defects in the molecular circadian clock and the altered coordination in the circadian system that are related with clinical conditions such as metabolic diseases, cancer predisposition and physiological deficiencies associated to jet-lag and shiftwork schedules. Implications in the aging process will be also reviewed. PMID:25489492

  8. A study of internal structure in components made by additive manufacturing process using 3 D X-ray tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raguvarun, K.; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan; Rajagopal, Prabhu; Palanisamy, Suresh; Nagarajah, Romesh; Hoye, Nicholas; Curiri, Dominic; Kapoor, Ajay

    2015-03-01

    Additive manufacturing methods are gaining increasing popularity for rapidly and efficiently manufacturing parts and components in the industrial context, as well as for domestic applications. However, except when used for prototyping or rapid visualization of components, industries are concerned with the load carrying capacity and strength achievable by additive manufactured parts. In this paper, the wire-arc additive manufacturing (AM) process based on gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) has been examined for the internal structure and constitution of components generated by the process. High-resolution 3D X-ray tomography is used to gain cut-views through wedge-shaped parts created using this GTAW additive manufacturing process with titanium alloy materials. In this work, two different control conditions for the GTAW process are considered. The studies reveal clusters of porosities, located in periodic spatial intervals along the sample cross-section. Such internal defects can have a detrimental effect on the strength of the resulting AM components, as shown in destructive testing studies. Closer examination of this phenomenon shows that defect clusters are preferentially located at GTAW traversal path intervals. These results highlight the strong need for enhanced control of process parameters in ensuring components with minimal defects and higher strength.

  9. A study of internal structure in components made by additive manufacturing process using 3 D X-ray tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Raguvarun, K. Balasubramaniam, Krishnan Rajagopal, Prabhu; Palanisamy, Suresh; Nagarajah, Romesh; Kapoor, Ajay; Hoye, Nicholas; Curiri, Dominic

    2015-03-31

    Additive manufacturing methods are gaining increasing popularity for rapidly and efficiently manufacturing parts and components in the industrial context, as well as for domestic applications. However, except when used for prototyping or rapid visualization of components, industries are concerned with the load carrying capacity and strength achievable by additive manufactured parts. In this paper, the wire-arc additive manufacturing (AM) process based on gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) has been examined for the internal structure and constitution of components generated by the process. High-resolution 3D X-ray tomography is used to gain cut-views through wedge-shaped parts created using this GTAW additive manufacturing process with titanium alloy materials. In this work, two different control conditions for the GTAW process are considered. The studies reveal clusters of porosities, located in periodic spatial intervals along the sample cross-section. Such internal defects can have a detrimental effect on the strength of the resulting AM components, as shown in destructive testing studies. Closer examination of this phenomenon shows that defect clusters are preferentially located at GTAW traversal path intervals. These results highlight the strong need for enhanced control of process parameters in ensuring components with minimal defects and higher strength.

  10. Use of fiber-optic DTS to investigate physical processes in thermohaline environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, F. I.; Sarabia, A.; Silva, C.

    2014-12-01

    Salt-gradient solar ponds are artificial thermohaline environments that collect and store thermal energy for long time-periods. A solar pond consists of three distinctive zones: the upper convective zone, which is a thin layer of cooler, less salty water; the non-convective zone that has gradients in temperature and salinity; and the lower convective zone, a layer of high salinity brine where temperatures are the highest. The solar radiation that penetrates the upper layers of the pond reaches the lower convective zone and heats the high salinity brine, which does not rise beyond the lower convective zone because the effect of salinity on density is greater than the effect of temperature. The sediments beneath the pond are also heated due to the temperature increase in the lower convective zone, providing an additional volume for energy storage. To study the different physical processes occurring within a solar pond and its surroundings, we deployed a helicoidally wrapped distributed-temperature-sensing (DTS) system in a small-scale solar pond (1-m deep, 2.5-m long and 1.5-m width). In this installation, the pond is surrounded by a sandy soil that serves as an additional energy storage volume. The thermal profile is observed at a spatial sampling resolution of 1.1 cm (spatial resolution of 2.2. cm), a temporal resolution ranging from 15 s to 5 min, and a thermal resolution ranging from 0.05 to 0.5°C. These resolutions allow closing the energy balance and inferring physical processes such as double-diffusive convection, solar radiation absorption, and heat conduction through the sediments or through the non-convective zone. Independent thermal measurements are also being made to evaluate strengths and limitations of DTS systems in thermohaline environments, and to assess different calibration algorithms that have been proposed in the past.

  11. Boundary Conditions for the Paleoenvironment: Chemical and Physical Processes in Dense Interstellar Clouds: Summary of Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, William M.

    1999-01-01

    The basic theme of this program was the study of molecular complexity and evolution for the biogenic elements and compounds in interstellar clouds and in primitive solar system objects. Research included the detection and study of new interstellar and cometary molecules and investigation of reaction pathways for astrochemistry from a comparison of theory and observed molecular abundances. The latter includes studies of cold, dark clouds in which ion-molecule chemistry should predominate, searches for the effects of interchange of material between the gas and solid phases in interstellar clouds, unbiased spectral surveys of particular sources, and systematic investigation of the interlinked chemistry and physics of dense interstellar clouds. In addition, the study of comets has allowed a comparison between the chemistry of such minimally thermally processed objects and that of interstellar clouds, shedding light on the evolution of the biogenic elements during the process of solar system formation. One PhD dissertation on this research was completed by a graduate student at the University of Massachusetts. An additional 4 graduate students at the University of Massachusetts and 5 graduate students from other institutions participated in research supported by this grant, with 6 of these thus far receiving PhD degrees from the University of Massachusetts or their home institutions. Four postdoctoral research associates at the University of Massachusetts also participated in research supported by this grant, receiving valuable training.

  12. Cognitive training with and without additional physical activity in healthy older adults: cognitive effects, neurobiological mechanisms, and prediction of training success

    PubMed Central

    Rahe, Julia; Becker, Jutta; Fink, Gereon R.; Kessler, Josef; Kukolja, Juraj; Rahn, Andreas; Rosen, Jan B.; Szabados, Florian; Wirth, Brunhilde; Kalbe, Elke

    2015-01-01

    Data is inconsistent concerning the question whether cognitive-physical training (CPT) yields stronger cognitive gains than cognitive training (CT). Effects of additional counseling, neurobiological mechanisms, and predictors have scarcely been studied. Healthy older adults were trained with CT (n = 20), CPT (n = 25), or CPT with counseling (CPT+C; n = 23). Cognition, physical fitness, BDNF, IGF-1, and VEGF were assessed at pre- and post-test. No interaction effects were found except for one effect showing that CPT+C led to stronger gains in verbal fluency than CPT (p = 0.03). However, this superiority could not be assigned to additional physical training gains. Low baseline cognitive performance and BDNF, not carrying apoE4, gains in physical fitness and the moderation of gains in physical fitness × gains in BDNF predicted training success. Although all types of interventions seem successful to enhance cognition, our data do not support the hypotheses that CPT shows superior CT gains compared to CT or that CPT+C adds merit to CPT. However, as CPT leads to additional gains in physical fitness which in turn is known to have positive impact on cognition in the long-term, CPT seems more beneficial. Training success can partly be predicted by neuropsychological, neurobiological, and genetic parameters. Unique Identifier: WHO ICTRP (http://www.who.int/ictrp); ID: DRKS00005194. PMID:26528177

  13. A physical interpretation for the natural photosynthetic process

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Robert; Rich, Peter R.

    1983-01-01

    The efficiency of the process of photosynthesis is shown to depend on the molecular conversion of power. This requires establishment of a discipline that is now implicit in current thought and that offers a definition of relationship between equilibrium state and power. The quantum aspect for the microscopic process is different from the macroscopic system idealized as the heat engine and is required for the interpretation of molecular machinery. By using three postulates the ideal maximal efficiency for the molecular energy conversion is calculated from the data, which are assembled in the form of the “Z scheme” for photosynthesis. The observed and the calculated efficiencies for a green plant are substantially in agreement. PMID:16593282

  14. Cosmochemical implications of the physical processing of cometary nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    McSween, H.Y. Jr. ); Weissman, P.R. )

    1989-12-01

    Comets are not necessarily pristine nebular and interstellar material, despite a common perception to that effect. Alteration processes may occur during comet formation in the outer planet region, during their dispersal to or residence within the Oort cloud, and after their return to the planetary region. Processes that may have significantly modified cometary nuclei include heating, impacts, and irradiation. Possible consequences include phase changes in ices, hydration reactions in silicates, synthesis of organic compounds, collisional disruption and re-accretion, shock and irradiation effects in minerals and ices, cosmogenic nuclide formation, redistribution or loss of volatiles, and formation of a refractory veneer. A model of cometary nuclei that emerges from these considerations provides a framework for understanding observations of comets and future samples.

  15. Selective effects of physical exercise on choice reaction processes.

    PubMed

    Arcelin, R; Delignieres, D; Brisswalter, J

    1998-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of an exercise of moderate intensity (60% of maximal aerobic power) on specific information-processing mechanisms. 22 students completed 3 10-min. exercise bouts on a bicycle ergometer. Concomitantly, participants performed six manual-choice-reaction tasks manipulating task variables (Signal Intensity, Stimulus-Response Compatibility, and Time Uncertainty) on two levels. Reaction tests, randomly ordered, were administered at rest and during exercise. A significant underadditive interaction between Time Uncertainty and exercise was found for the highest quartiles of the distribution of reaction times. No other interaction effects were obtained for the other variables. These results reasonably support that moderate aerobic exercise showed selective rather than general influences on information processing. PMID:9760644

  16. Features of quasistable laminar flows of He II and an additional dissipative process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsenko, I. A.; Klokol, K. A.; Sokolov, S. S.; Sheshin, G. A.

    2016-03-01

    Quasistable laminar flow of He II at a temperature of 140 mK is studied experimentally. The liquid flow was excited by a vibrating quartz tuning fork with a resonance frequency of about 24 kHz. It was found that for velocities of the tuning fork oscillations from 0.046 to 0.16 m/s, the He II flow can be both quasistable laminar and turbulent. Transitions between these flow regimes were observed. When the velocity of the tuning fork oscillations increases more rapidly, the velocity at which the quasistable flow becomes unstable and undergoes a transition to a turbulent flow is higher. Mechanisms for the dissipation of the energy of the oscillating tines of the tuning fork in the quasistable laminar flow regime are analyzed. It is found that there is an additional mechanism for dissipation of the energy of the oscillating tuning fork beyond internal friction in the quartz. This mechanism is associated with mutual friction owing to scattering of thermal excitations of He II on quantized vortices and leads to a cubic dependence of the exciting force on the fluid velocity.

  17. Value Addition to Sulfate Waste Pickle Liquor of Steel Industry Using Hydrometallurgical Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Archana; Sahu, K. K.

    2009-12-01

    The solvent extraction of concentrated acid was investigated from sulfate waste pickle liquors using Cyanex 923 (trialkylphosphine oxide (TRPO); manufactured by Cytec Industries Inc., Woodland Park, NJ; provided by Cyanamid Canada Inc. (Markham, Canada)) as an extractant. The effect of various parameters was studied such as extractant concentration, organic-to-aqueous phase ratio, temperature. and retention time on acid extraction from the waste pickle liquor to the organic phase, After the saturation of the organic phase with sulfuric acid, stripping studies were performed to back-extract the pure acid into the aqueous phase. The raffinate of the solvent extraction process that contains both ferrous and ferric iron as well as trace impurities was subjected to oxidation and hydrothermal treatment to precipitate iron with a well-defined pseudo-cubic morphology and a high coercivity value that renders it suitable for high-grade ferrite production.

  18. Experiments to Populate and Validate a Processing Model for Polyurethane Foam: Additional Data for Structural Foams.

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Rekha R.; Celina, Mathias C.; Giron, Nicholas Henry; Long, Kevin Nicholas; Russick, Edward M.

    2015-01-01

    We are developing computational models to help understand manufacturing processes, final properties and aging of structural foam, polyurethane PMDI. Th e resulting model predictions of density and cure gradients from the manufacturing process will be used as input to foam heat transfer and mechanical models. BKC 44306 PMDI-10 and BKC 44307 PMDI-18 are the most prevalent foams used in structural parts. Experiments needed to parameterize models of the reaction kinetics and the equations of motion during the foam blowing stages were described for BKC 44306 PMDI-10 in the first of this report series (Mondy et al. 2014). BKC 44307 PMDI-18 is a new foam that will be used to make relatively dense structural supports via over packing. It uses a different catalyst than those in the BKC 44306 family of foams; hence, we expect that the reaction kineti cs models must be modified. Here we detail the experiments needed to characteriz e the reaction kinetics of BKC 44307 PMDI-18 and suggest parameters for the model based on these experiments. In additi on, the second part of this report describes data taken to provide input to the preliminary nonlinear visco elastic structural response model developed for BKC 44306 PMDI-10 foam. We show that the standard cu re schedule used by KCP does not fully cure the material, and, upon temperature elevation above 150 o C, oxidation or decomposition reactions occur that alter the composition of the foam. These findings suggest that achieving a fully cured foam part with this formulation may be not be possible through therma l curing. As such, visco elastic characterization procedures developed for curing thermosets can provide only approximate material properties, since the state of the material continuously evolves during tests.

  19. Physical processes affecting the sedimentary environments of Long Island Sound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Signell, R.P.; Knebel, H. J.; List, J.H.; Farris, A.S.

    1997-01-01

    A modeling study was undertaken to simulate the bottom tidal-, wave-, and wind-driven currents in Long Island Sound in order to provide a general physical oceanographic framework for understanding the characteristics and distribution of seafloor sedimentary environments. Tidal currents are important in the funnel-shaped eastern part of the Sound, where a strong gradient of tidal-current speed was found. This current gradient parallels the general westward progression of sedimentary environments from erosion or non-deposition, through bedload transport and sediment sorting, to fine-grained deposition. Wave-driven currents, meanwhile, appear to be important along the shallow margins of the basin, explaining the occurrence of relatively coarse sediments in regions where tidal currents alone are not strong enough to move sediment. Finally, westerly wind events are shown to locally enhance bottom currents along the axial depression of the sound, providing a possible explanation for the relatively coarse sediments found in the depression despite tide- and wave-induced currents below the threshold of sediment movement. The strong correlation between the near-bottom current intensity based on the model results and the sediment response as indicated by the distribution of sedimentary environments provides a framework for predicting the long-term effects of anthropogenic activities.

  20. Biocompatible sodium alginate fibers by aqueous processing and physical crosslinking.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wei; Hsieh, You-Lo

    2014-02-15

    Sodium alginate (SA) hybrid fibers have been robustly fabricated by electrospinning of aqueous mixtures containing as high as 60% SA in the presence of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). Solution viscosities of SA, PVA and their mixtures showed fiber spinning to be strongly influenced by the balance between SA-PVA and PVA-PVA intermolecular polar interaction and SA-SA repulsion. Low viscosity SAl (50 mPas at 1%) enabled higher SA loadings without significantly increasing mixture viscosities, producing more cylindrical fibers. All aqueous mixtures containing 33.3-60% SAl (5.68-7.15% total SAl-PVA) had viscosities ranging from 530 to 3600 mPas and could be electrospun continuously for at least 48 h. The SA-PVA hybrid fibers had diameters ranging from ca. 140 to 350 nm and were rendered stable in water via simultaneous ionic-crosslinking SA and crystallization of PVA (5% CaCl2 in 75% EtOH for 30 min). This aqueous electrospinning and physical crosslinking approach is a green and highly efficient alternative to create alginate hybrid fibers that are biologically compatible and ingestible for potential biomedical, food and other applications. PMID:24507361

  1. Physical Processes for Driving Ionospheric Outflows in Global Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas Earle; Strangeway, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    We review and assess the importance of processes thought to drive ionospheric outflows, linking them as appropriate to the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field, and to the spatial and temporal distribution of their magnetospheric internal responses. These begin with the diffuse effects of photoionization and thermal equilibrium of the ionospheric topside, enhancing Jeans' escape, with ambipolar diffusion and acceleration. Auroral outflows begin with dayside reconnexion and resultant field-aligned currents and driven convection. These produce plasmaspheric plumes, collisional heating and wave-particle interactions, centrifugal acceleration, and auroral acceleration by parallel electric fields, including enhanced ambipolar fields from electron heating by precipitating particles. Observations and simulations show that solar wind energy dissipation into the atmosphere is concentrated by the geomagnetic field into auroral regions with an amplification factor of 10-100, enhancing heavy species plasma and gas escape from gravity, and providing more current carrying capacity. Internal plasmas thus enable electromagnetic driving via coupling to the plasma, neutral gas and by extension, the entire body " We assess the Importance of each of these processes in terms of local escape flux production as well as global outflow, and suggest methods for their implementation within multispecies global simulation codes. We complete 'he survey with an assessment of outstanding obstacles to this objective.

  2. Processing of Speech Signals for Physical and Sensory Disabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitt, Harry

    1995-10-01

    Assistive technology involving voice communication is used primarily by people who are deaf, hard of hearing, or who have speech and/or language disabilities. It is also used to a lesser extent by people with visual or motor disabilities. A very wide range of devices has been developed for people with hearing loss. These devices can be categorized not only by the modality of stimulation [i.e., auditory, visual, tactile, or direct electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve (auditory-neural)] but also in terms of the degree of speech processing that is used. At least four such categories can be distinguished: assistive devices (a) that are not designed specifically for speech, (b) that take the average characteristics of speech into account, (c) that process articulatory or phonetic characteristics of speech, and (d) that embody some degree of automatic speech recognition. Assistive devices for people with speech and/or language disabilities typically involve some form of speech synthesis or symbol generation for severe forms of language disability. Speech synthesis is also used in text-to-speech systems for sightless persons. Other applications of assistive technology involving voice communication include voice control of wheelchairs and other devices for people with mobility disabilities.

  3. Didactical Reconstruction of Processes in Knowledge Construction: Pre-service Physics Teachers Learning the Law of Electromagnetic Induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäntylä, Terhi

    2012-08-01

    In physics teacher education, two central goals are first to learn the structures of physics knowledge, and second the processes of its construction. To know the structure is to know the framework of concepts and laws; to know the processes is to know where the knowledge comes from, how the framework is constructed, and how it can be justified. This article introduces a way to approach these goals in the form of a graphical tool called the didactical reconstruction of processes (DRP), where knowledge is constructed to the extent that experiments and models have an equally important role in the construction process. In practice, the DRP is a graphical network representation or a `flow chart' with a specific structure, which aims to give an image of the processes of physical concept formation, while at the same time bearing in mind the educational goals. The DRP was tested in an instruction unit for pre-service physics teachers, where students drew flow charts for representing how the law of electromagnetic induction is formed. In addition to flow charts, students also wrote essays clarifying the content of the flow charts. The flow charts and essays were analysed through a qualitative categorisation of structural and knowledge claim patterns. The results show that the DRP helps students in arguing how to form the electromagnetic induction law and that the experiments and models have a distinct role in supporting students' knowledge claims.

  4. Shades of Emotion: What the Addition of Sunglasses or Masks to Faces Reveals about the Development of Facial Expression Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberson, Debi; Kikutani, Mariko; Doge, Paula; Whitaker, Lydia; Majid, Asifa

    2012-01-01

    Three studies investigated developmental changes in facial expression processing, between 3 years-of-age and adulthood. For adults and older children, the addition of sunglasses to upright faces caused an equivalent decrement in performance to face inversion. However, younger children showed "better" classification of expressions of faces wearing…

  5. 12 CFR 516.220 - If OTS requests additional information to complete my application, how will it process my...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... complete my application, how will it process my application? 516.220 Section 516.220 Banks and Banking... Standard Treatment § 516.220 If OTS requests additional information to complete my application, how will it... your response. OTS will notify you that it has extended the period before the end of the initial...

  6. 12 CFR 116.220 - If the OCC requests additional information to complete my application, how will it process my...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... complete my application, how will it process my application? 116.220 Section 116.220 Banks and Banking... Treatment § 116.220 If the OCC requests additional information to complete my application, how will it... that it has extended the period before the end of the initial 15-day period and will briefly...

  7. 12 CFR 516.220 - If OTS requests additional information to complete my application, how will it process my...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... complete my application, how will it process my application? 516.220 Section 516.220 Banks and Banking... Standard Treatment § 516.220 If OTS requests additional information to complete my application, how will it... your response. OTS will notify you that it has extended the period before the end of the initial...

  8. Processing of noisy magnetotelluric data using digital filters and additional data selection criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontes, S. L.; Harinarayana, T.; Dawes, G. J. K.; Hutton, V. R. S.

    1988-10-01

    Although the magnetotelluric (MT) method is known to be effective and fast in probing the electrical conductivity structure of the Earth at crustal depths, the results are often degraded by industrial and cultural noise. To obtain reliable processed results for modelling, it is first necessary to extract or select the natural signals from the contaminated time series. Various noise-reduction techniques based on digital filters are discussed with special reference to persistent noise signals, e.g. from power lines, DC-operated railways and electrical fences. Both previously suggested techniques (delay-line and notch filtering) and two other procedures (maximum entropy extension and deconvolution filtering) are applied to both synthetic data and to field observations from southern Scotland and the Italian Alps. Better quality data sets and more geophysically acceptable Earth models are shown to result. Noise of a more intermittent nature has recently been observed in MT observations near the development site of the geothermal power station on Milos, Greece. Large highly coherent electromagnetic field signals were observed to coincide with the opening and closure of the valves on the test wells. In this case, meaningful apparent resistivity curves could be obtained from an undisturbed subset of the previously accepted data, which had been selected mainly on the basis of signal power. Delay-line filtering is shown to be superior to notch filtering in eliminating non-sinusoidal noise, while both the MEM extension and the window deconvolution techniques are found to be useful in spike removal. These studies illustrate that use of an automatic data selection procedure should only be undertaken with great care in areas where the cultural noise is high. In such cases, continuous time-domain monitoring of the MT signals is recommended. The appropriate techniques of noise reduction can then be applied.

  9. Long term effects of annual additions of animal manure on soil chemical, physical, and biological properties in the Great Plains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of long-term annual beef manure amendments and wheat and rye cover crops on selected chemical, physical and biological properties of a typical Midwest U.S. soil under corn silage production. The treatments included: manure application/cover cr...

  10. Understanding system disturbance and ecosystem services in restored saltmarshes: Integrating physical and biogeochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, K. L.; Harvey, G. L.

    2012-06-01

    Coastal saltmarsh ecosystems occupy only a small percentage of Earth's land surface, yet contribute a wide range of ecosystem services that have significant global economic and societal value. These environments currently face significant challenges associated with climate change, sea level rise, development and water quality deterioration and are consequently the focus of a range of management schemes. Increasingly, soft engineering techniques such as managed realignment (MR) are being employed to restore and recreate these environments, driven primarily by the need for habitat (re)creation and sustainable coastal flood defence. Such restoration schemes also have the potential to provide additional ecosystem services including climate regulation and waste processing. However, these sites have frequently been physically impacted by their previous land use and there is a lack of understanding of how this 'disturbance' impacts the delivery of ecosystem services or of the complex linkages between ecological, physical and biogeochemical processes in restored systems. Through the exploration of current data this paper determines that hydrological, geomorphological and hydrodynamic functioning of restored sites may be significantly impaired with respects to natural 'undisturbed' systems and that links between morphology, sediment structure, hydrology and solute transfer are poorly understood. This has consequences for the delivery of seeds, the provision of abiotic conditions suitable for plant growth, the development of microhabitats and the cycling of nutrients/contaminants and may impact the delivery of ecosystem services including biodiversity, climate regulation and waste processing. This calls for a change in our approach to research in these environments with a need for integrated, interdisciplinary studies over a range of spatial and temporal scales incorporating both intensive and extensive research design.

  11. spatial heterogeneity of bioreductive processes within physically complex media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallud, C.; Meile, C.; Fendorf, S.

    2006-12-01

    Soils and sediments act as open bio-physico-chemical reactors where chemical changes are driven by the interactions between moving fluids, solid- and aqueous-phase constituents, and microorganisms. They represent complex multiphase environments, with structural and geochemical heterogeneities expressed over spatial scales ranging from the molecular to field scale. In situ rates at which resident microbial populations produce and consume chemical constituents are often dictated by the transport of reactants and products to and from the location of biogeochemical transformation, and by the spatial distribution of microorganisms in the soil environment. In structured media, the distribution of chemical species can be strongly localized due to mass transfer limitations and redox gradients within soil aggregates. A qualitative and quantitative understanding of variations in the redox processes operating at the microscale will therefore be critical in developing comprehensive and predictive models describing the dynamics of biogeochemical systems. Here we present a combination of an experimental and a modeling approaches aimed at the quantification of bioreductive processes at the scale of soil aggregates. Using flow-through reactors containing a single artificial soil aggregate made of ferrihydrite coated-sand, the change in solution composition is monitored over time. The soil aggregate is inoculated with the dissimilatory iron reducing bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens str. CN32, which is also capable of aerobic respiration. Environmental conditions are varied by altering both the carbon source and oxygen content of the input solution, and the initial condition within the soil aggregate. A constant flow rate is imposed by peristaltic pumps and transport characteristics are quantified using bromide as a flow tracer. Iron concentrations, as well as carbon substrates and products in the outflow are monitored over time. At the end of the experiments, aggregates are sliced

  12. Study of basic physical processes in liquid rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.; Chen, C. P.

    1992-01-01

    Inconsistencies between analytical results and measurements for liquid rocket thrust chamber performance, which escape suitable explanations, have motivated the examination of the basic phys ical modeling formulations as to their unlimited application. The publication of Prof. D. Straub's book, 'Thermofluid-dynamics of Optimized Rocket Propulsions,' further stimulated the interest of understanding the gas dynamic relationships in chemically reacting mixtures. A review of other concepts proposed by Falk-Ruppel (Gibbsian Thermodynamics), Straub (Alternative Theory, AT), Prigogine (Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics), Boltzmann (Kinetic Theory), and Truesdell (Rational Mechanism) has been made to obtain a better understanding of the Navier-Stokes equation, which is now used extensively for chemically reacting flow treatment in combustion chambers. In addition to the study of the different concepts, two workshops were conducted to clarify some of the issues. The first workshop centered on Falk-Ruppel's new 'dynamics' concept, while the second one concentrated on Straub's AT. In this report brief summaries of the reviewed philosophies are presented and compared with the classical Navier-Stokes formulation in a tabular arrangement. Also the highlights of both workshops are addressed.

  13. Nuclear physics experiments for the astrophysical p process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauerwein, A.; Elvers, M.; Endres, J.; Hasper, J.; Hennig, A.; Netterdon, L.; Zilges, A.

    2011-04-01

    We studied the two astrophysically interesting reactions 141PrPm and 92MoTc with the activation method and with the in-beam method, respectively. The 141PrPm experiment was performed at the cyclotron of the ‘Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB)’ in Braunschweig, Germany, and the reaction was studied within and just above the so-called Gamow window. In this proceedings, we present the experimental details of this measurement. The proton-capture reaction on the neutron-magic nucleus 92Mo was studied at energies relevant for the astrophysical p process. The reaction was investigated by the in-beam technique using the γ-ray detector array HORUS (High efficient Observatory for γ-Ray Unique Spectroscopy) at the TANDEM ion accelerator at the University of Cologne. The preliminary experimental results are compared to data stemming from other measurements.

  14. Radon: Chemical and physical processes associated with its distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Castleman, A.W. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Assessing the mechanisms which govern the distribution, fate, and pathways of entry into biological systems, as well as the ultimate hazards associated with the radon progeny and their secondary reaction products, depends on knowledge of their chemistry. Our studies are directed toward developing fundamental information which will provide a basis for modeling studies that are requisite in obtaining a complete picture of growth, attachment to aerosols, and transport to the bioreceptor and ultimate incorporation within. Our program is divided into three major areas of research. These include measurement of the determination of their mobilities, study of the role of radon progeny ions in affecting reactions, including study of the influence of the degree of solvation (clustering), and examination of the important secondary reaction products, with particular attention to processes leading to chemical conversion of either the core ions or the ligands as a function of the degree of clustering.

  15. Model reduction and physical understanding of slowly oscillating processes : the circadian cycle.

    SciTech Connect

    Goussis, Dimitris A.; Najm, Habib N.

    2006-01-01

    A differential system that models the circadian rhythm in Drosophila is analyzed with the computational singular perturbation (CSP) algorithm. Reduced nonstiff models of prespecified accuracy are constructed, the form and size of which are time-dependent. When compared with conventional asymptotic analysis, CSP exhibits superior performance in constructing reduced models, since it can algorithmically identify and apply all the required order of magnitude estimates and algebraic manipulations. A similar performance is demonstrated by CSP in generating data that allow for the acquisition of physical understanding. It is shown that the processes driving the circadian cycle are (i) mRNA translation into monomer protein, and monomer protein destruction by phosphorylation and degradation (along the largest portion of the cycle); and (ii) mRNA synthesis (along a short portion of the cycle). These are slow processes. Their action in driving the cycle is allowed by the equilibration of the fastest processes; (1) the monomer dimerization with the dimer dissociation (along the largest portion of the cycle); and (2) the net production of monomer+dimmer proteins with that of mRNA (along the short portion of the cycle). Additional results (regarding the time scales of the established equilibria, their origin, the rate limiting steps, the couplings among the variables, etc.) highlight the utility of CSP for automated identification of the important underlying dynamical features, otherwise accessible only for simple systems whose various suitable simplifications can easily be recognized.

  16. Effect of Nano-Particle Addition on Grain Structure Evolution of Friction Stir-Processed Al 6061 During Postweld Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Junfeng; Lee, Bing Yang; Du, Zhenglin; Bi, Guijun; Tan, Ming Jen; Wei, Jun

    2016-06-01

    The fabrication of nano-composites is challenging because uniform dispersion of nano-sized reinforcements in metallic substrate is difficult to achieve using powder metallurgy or liquid processing methods. In the present study, Al-based nano-composites reinforced with Al2O3 particles have been successfully fabricated using friction stir processing. The effects of nano-Al2O3 particle addition on grain structure evolution of friction stir-processed Al matrix during post-weld annealing were investigated. It was revealed that the pinning effect of Al2O3 particles retarded grain growth and completely prevented abnormal grain growth during postweld annealing at 470°C. However, abnormal grain growth can still occur when the composite material was annealed at 530°C. The mechanism involved in the grain structure evolution and the effect of nano-sized particle addition on the mechanical properties were discussed therein.

  17. A novel approach for phosphorus recovery and no wasted sludge in enhanced biological phosphorus removal process with external COD addition.

    PubMed

    Xia, Cheng-Wang; Ma, Yun-Jie; Zhang, Fang; Lu, Yong-Ze; Zeng, Raymond J

    2014-01-01

    In enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) process, phosphorus (P) in wastewater is removed via wasted sludge without actual recovery. A novel approach to realize phosphorus recovery with special external chemical oxygen demand (COD) addition in EBPR process was proposed. During the new operating approach period, it was found that (1) no phosphorus was detected in the effluent; (2) with an external addition of 10 % of influent COD amount, 79 % phosphorus in the wastewater influent was recovered; (3) without wasted sludge, the MLVSS concentration in the system increased from 2,010 to 3,400 mg/L and kept stable after day 11 during 24-day operating period. This demonstrates that the novel approach is feasible to realize phosphorus recovery with no wasted sludge discharge in EBPR process. Furthermore, this approach decouples P removal and sludge age, which may enhance the application of membrane bioreactor for P removal. PMID:24122666

  18. Multi-spacecraft Observations of Heavy Ion Dropouts: Physical Processes, Fractionation Rates, and Release Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weberg, M. J.; Lepri, S. T.; Zurbuchen, T.

    2014-12-01

    Heavy ion dropouts in the solar wind are thought to originate from large, closed coronal loops. The distinctive, mass-dependent fractionation patterns of the dropouts requires that their source loops are relatively quiet and stable long enough (on the order of a day) to undergo gravitational settling. Therefore by studying the composition of heavy ion dropouts we are able to peer into the solar corona and glean information about the fine balance of physical processes. Additionally, the occurrence rates and magnetic profiles of dropouts suggest specific forms of magnetic reconnection are responsible for the release of the otherwise trapped plasma into the solar wind. In this study we identify and compare dropouts observed by two different satellites, ACE and Ulysses, which together provide over 20 years of continuous observations at a variety of heliographic latitudes and radii. The resulting partial global view (or 3D view) enables us to identify coronal source regions and release mechanisms of heavy ion dropouts. We also discuss a physical model of gravitational settling which can be used to reconcile fractionation rates with the rate at which plasma must be escaping via reconnection. Our conclusions and results may contribute towards the ongoing refinement and validation of theories which predict the origin of "slow type" solar wind.

  19. CO2-ECBM related coupled physical and mechanical transport processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gensterblum, Y.; Sartorius, M.; Busch, A.; Krooss, B. M.; Littke, R.

    2012-12-01

    The interrelation of cleat transport processes and mechanical properties was investigated by permeability tests at different stress levels (60% to 130% of in-situ stress) with sorbing (CH4, CO2) and inert gases (N2, Ar, He) on a subbituminous A coal from the Surat Basin, Queensland Australia (figure). From the flow tests under controlled triaxial stress conditions the Klinkenberg-corrected "true" permeability coefficients and the Klinkenberg slip factors were derived. The "true"-, absolute or Klinkenberg-corrected permeability depends on gas type. Following the approach of Seidle et al. (1992) the cleat volume compressibility (cf) was calculated from observed changes in apparent permeability upon variation of external stress (at equal mean gas pressures). The observed effects also show a clear dependence on gas type. Due to pore or cleat compressibility the cleat aperture decreases with increasing effective stress. Vice versa, with increasing mean pore pressure at lower confining pressure an increase in permeability is observed, which is attributed to a widening of cleat aperture. Non-sorbing gases like helium and argon show higher apparent permeabilities than sorbing gases like methane and CO2. Permeability coefficients measured with successively increasing mean gas pressures were consistently lower than those determined at decreasing mean gas pressures. The kinetics of matrix transport processes were studied by sorption tests on different particle sizes at various moisture contents and temperatures (cf. Busch et al., 2006). Methane uptake rates were determined from the pressure decline curves recorded for each particle-size fraction, and "diffusion coefficients" were calculated using several unipore and bidisperse diffusion models. While the CH4 sorption capacity of moisture-equilibrated coals was significantly lower (by 50%) than that of dry coals, no hysteresis was observed between sorption and desorption on dry and moisture-equilibrated samples and the

  20. Application of green IT for physics data processing at INCDTIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farcas, Felix; Trusca, Radu; Albert, Stefan; Szabo, Izabella; Popeneciu, Gabriel

    2012-02-01

    Green IT is the next generation technology used in all datacenter around the world. Its benefit is of economic and financial interest. The new technologies are energy efficient, reduce cost and avoid potential disruptions to the existing infrastructure. The most important problem appears at the cooling systems which are the most important in the functionality of a datacenter. Green IT used in Grid Network will benefit the environment and is the next phase in computer infrastructure that will fundamentally change the way we think about and use computing power. At the National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies Cluj-Napoca (INCDTIM) we have implemented such kind of technology and its support helped us in processing multiple data in different domains, which brought INCDTIM on the major Grid domain with the RO-14-ITIM Grid site. In this paper we present benefits that the new technology brought us and the result obtained in the last year after the implementation of the new green technology.

  1. The Impact of Additional Weekdays of Active Commuting to School on Children Achieving a Criterion of 300+ Minutes of Moderate-to-Vigorous Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly-Smith, Andy J. W.; McKenna, Jim; Radley, Duncan; Long, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the value of additional days of active commuting for meeting a criterion of 300+ minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA; 60+ mins/day x 5) during the school week. Methods: Based on seven-day diaries supported by teachers, binary logistic regression analyses were used to predict achievement of MVPA…

  2. Free Radical Addition Polymerization Kinetics without Steady-State Approximations: A Numerical Analysis for the Polymer, Physical, or Advanced Organic Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iler, H. Darrell; Brown, Amber; Landis, Amanda; Schimke, Greg; Peters, George

    2014-01-01

    A numerical analysis of the free radical addition polymerization system is described that provides those teaching polymer, physical, or advanced organic chemistry courses the opportunity to introduce students to numerical methods in the context of a simple but mathematically stiff chemical kinetic system. Numerical analysis can lead students to an…

  3. CO2-ECBM related coupled physical and mechanical transport processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gensterblum, Yves; Satorius, Michael; Busch, Andreas; Krooß, Bernhard

    2013-04-01

    The interrelation of cleat transport processes and mechanical properties was investigated by permeability tests at different stress levels (60% to 130% of in-situ stress) with sorbing (CH4, CO2) and inert gases (N2, Ar, He) on a sub bituminous A coal from the Surat Basin, Queensland Australia. From the flow tests under controlled triaxial stress conditions the Klinkenberg-corrected "true" permeability coefficients and the Klinkenberg slip factors were derived. The "true"-, absolute or Klinkenberg corrected permeability shows a gas type dependence. Following the approach of Seidle et al. (1992) the cleat volume compressibility (cf) was calculated from observed changes in apparent permeability upon variation of external stress (at equal mean gas pressures). The observed effects also show a clear dependence on gas type. Due to pore or cleat compressibility the cleat aperture decreases with increasing effective stress. Vice versa we observe with increasing mean pressure at lower confining pressure an increase in permeability which we attribute to a cleat aperture widening. The cleat volume compressibility (cf) also shows a dependence on the mean pore pressure. Non-sorbing gases like helium and argon show higher apparent permeabilities than sorbing gases like methane. Permeability coefficients measured with successively increasing mean gas pressures were consistently lower than those determined at decreasing mean gas pressures. This permeability hysteresis is in accordance with results reported by Harpalani and McPherson (1985). The kinetics of matrix transport processes were studied by sorption tests on different particle sizes at various moisture contents and temperatures (cf. Busch et al., 2006). Methane uptake rates were determined from the pressure decline curves recorded for each particle-size fraction, and "diffusion coefficients" were calculated using several unipore and bidisperse diffusion models. While the CH4 sorption capacity of moisture-equilibrated coals

  4. CO2-ECBM related coupled physical and mechanical transport processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gensterblum, Y.; Sartorius, M.; Busch, A.; Cumming, D.; Krooss, B. M.

    2012-04-01

    The interrelation of cleat transport processes and mechanical properties was investigated by permeability tests at different stress levels (60% to 130% of in-situ stress) with sorbing (CH4, CO2) and inert gases (N2, Ar, He) on a sub bituminous A coal from the Surat Basin, Queensland Australia. From the flow tests under controlled triaxial stress conditions the Klinkenberg-corrected "true" permeability coefficients and the Klinkenberg slip factors were derived. The "true"-, absolute or Klinkenberg corrected permeability shows a gas type dependence. Following the approach of Seidle et al. (1992) the cleat volume compressibility (cf) was calculated from observed changes in apparent permeability upon variation of external stress (at equal mean gas pressures). The observed effects also show a clear dependence on gas type. Due to pore or cleat compressibility the cleat aperture decreases with increasing effective stress. Vice versa we observe with increasing mean pressure at lower confining pressure an increase in permeability which we attribute to a cleat aperture widening. The cleat volume compressibility (cf) also shows a dependence on the mean pore pressure. Non-sorbing gases like helium and argon show higher apparent permeabilities than sorbing gases like methane. Permeability coefficients measured with successively increasing mean gas pressures were consistently lower than those determined at decreasing mean gas pressures. This permeability hysteresis is in accordance with results reported by Harpalani and McPherson (1985). The kinetics of matrix transport processes were studied by sorption tests on different particle sizes at various moisture contents and temperatures (cf. Busch et al., 2006). Methane uptake rates were determined from the pressure decline curves recorded for each particle-size fraction, and "diffusion coefficients" were calculated using several unipore and bidisperse diffusion models. While the CH4 sorption capacity of moisture-equilibrated coals

  5. A Model of the Creative Process Based on Quantum Physics and Vedic Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Laura Hall

    1988-01-01

    Using tenets from Vedic science and quantum physics, this model of the creative process suggests that the unified field of creation is pure consciousness, and that the development of the creative process within individuals mirrors the creative process within the universe. Rational and supra-rational creative thinking techniques are also described.…

  6. Mathematical modeling of physical processes in inorganic chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, H.L.

    1988-01-01

    The first part deals with the rapid calculation of steady-state concentration profiles in contactors using the Purex Process. Most of the computer codes simulating the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel generate the steady-state properties by calculating the transient behavior of the contactors. In this study, the author simulates the steady-state concentration profiles directly without first generating the transient behavior. Two computer codes are developed, PUMA (Plutonium-Uranium-Matrix-Algorithm) and PUNE (Plutonium-Uranium-Non-Equilibrium). The first one simulates the steady-state concentration profiles under conditions of equilibrium mass transfer. The second one accounts for deviations from mass transfer equilibrium. The second part of this dissertation shows how to use the classical trajectory method to study the equilibrium and saddle-point geometries of MX{sub n} (n = 2-7) molecules. Two nuclear potential functions that have the property of invariance to the operations of the permutation group of nuclei in molecules of the general formula MX{sub n} are described. Such potential functions allow equivalent isomers to have equal energies so that various statistical mechanical properties can be simply determined. The first function contains two center interactions between pairs of peripheral atoms and its defined by V(r) = 1/2{Sigma}{sub {alpha}}k{triangle}r{sub {alpha}{mu}}{sup 2} + {Sigma}{sub {alpha}< {beta}} QR{sub {alpha}{beta}}{sup {minus}n} (n = 1,2...). The second function contains two and three center interactions and is defined by V({Theta}) = 1/2{Sigma}{sub {alpha}}K{triangle}{sub {alpha}{mu}}{sup 2} + 1/2{Sigma}{sub {alpha}<{beta}}Qr{sub 0}{sup 2} ({Theta}{sub {alpha}{mu}{beta}} - {pi}){sup 2}.

  7. Explorations of the viability of ARM and Xeon Phi for physics processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdurachmanov, David; Arya, Kapil; Bendavid, Josh; Boccali, Tommaso; Cooperman, Gene; Dotti, Andrea; Elmer, Peter; Eulisse, Giulio; Giacomini, Francesco; Jones, Christopher D.; Manzali, Matteo; Muzaffar, Shahzad

    2014-06-01

    We report on our investigations into the viability of the ARM processor and the Intel Xeon Phi co-processor for scientific computing. We describe our experience porting software to these processors and running benchmarks using real physics applications to explore the potential of these processors for production physics processing.

  8. Calculus-Integration. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Applied Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hertzberg, Richard C.

    These materials were designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. The module is directed toward intermediate undergraduate students of the ecological sciences…

  9. Applications of the First Law to Ecological Systems. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Thermodynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, R. D.

    These materials were designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. This report describes concepts presented in another module called "The First Law of…

  10. Programmer's Guide for FFORM. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Computer Programs and Graphics Capabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Lougenia; Gales, Larry

    This module is part of a series designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. FFORM is a portable format-free input subroutine package written in ANSI Fortran IV…

  11. The First Law of Thermodynamics for Ecosystems. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Thermodynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, R. D.

    These materials were designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. This module and a comparison module are concerned with elementary concepts of thermodynamics as…

  12. Cognitive Processes and Knowledge Structures Used in Solving Physics Problems. Final Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Gordon S., Jr.

    Cognitive processes and knowledge structures used in physics problem-solving at the high school or freshmen college level were investigated by analysis of expert and novice human problem-solving behavior and by development of computer programs which can solve informally-stated physics problems. Computer representations for the information…

  13. Calculus - Differentiation. Physical Processes in Terrestrial and Aquatic Ecosystems, Applied Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hertzberg, Richard C.

    This module is part of a series designed to be used by life science students for instruction in the application of physical theory to ecosystem operation. Most modules contain computer programs which are built around a particular application of a physical process. This module is used to introduce the biology student to differential calculus, a…

  14. Determining the Volume of Additive Solution and Residual Plasma in Whole Blood Filtered and Buffy Coat Processed Red Cell Concentrates

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Andrew; Acker, Jason P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Residual plasma in transfused red cell concentrates (RCCs) has been associated with adverse transfusion outcomes. Despite this, there is no consensus on the standard procedure for measuring residual plasma volume. Methods The volumes of residual plasma and additive solution were measured in RCCs processed using two separation methods: whole blood filtration (WBF) and buffy coat (BC)/RCC filtration. The concentration of mannitol and albumin in RCC components was measured using colorimetric assays. Mannitol concentration was used to calculate additive solution volume. Residual plasma volume was calculated using two methods. Results Calculated RCC supernatant volumes were much lower in BC-processed components compared to WBF-processed components (BC = 97 ± 6 ml, WBF = 109 ± 4 ml; p < 0.05). Calculated additive solution volumes were greater in WBF- than in BC-processed components (BC = 81 ± 4 ml, WBF = 105 ± 2 ml; p < 0.05). Absolute residual plasma volume varied significantly based on the calculation method used. Conclusion Disparity between plasma volume calculation methods was observed. Efforts should be made to standardize residual plasma volume measurement methods in order to accurately assess the impact of residual plasma on transfusion outcomes. PMID:27330533

  15. The Kinetics and Thermodynamics of the Phenol from Cumene Process: A Physical Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Edward C. M.; Sjoberg, Stephen L.

    1980-01-01

    Presents a physical chemistry experiment demonstrating the differences between thermodynamics and kinetics. The experiment used the formation of phenol and acetone from cumene hydroperoxide, also providing an example of an industrially significant process. (CS)

  16. Hydro-gel environment and solution additives modify calcite growth mechanism to an accretion process of amorphous nanospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, A.; Kahil, K.; Habraken, W.; Gur, D.; Fratzl, P.; Addadi, L.; Weiner, S.

    2013-12-01

    Various biominerals form via the transformation of a transient amorphous precursor phase into a mature crystalline phase. The mature biominerals usually exhibit morphology reminiscent of aggregated nanoparticles. Although these observations suggest an accretion-based growth process consisting on nanoparticles, the key factors that control the accretion process are unknown. We investigated the transformation of solid amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) into calcite. When plant cystoliths, a biogenic stable ACC phase, are transformed into calcite in vitro by immersion in water, calcite crystals grow in two distinct steps (Gal et al., Angewandte Chemie, 2013). First, rhombohedral crystals grow that show flat facets as expected from ion-by-ion growth. These crystals then grow by the aggregation and crystallization of the original ACC nanospheres leading to a surface morphology dominated by aggregated spheres. The transformation process occurs within an organic hydro-gel that originates from inside the cystoliths. We tested the importance of the gel phase to the transformation process by transforming synthetic ACC into calcite inside various gels. In all the investigated systems: in gelatin, agarose, and pectin gels, calcite crystals grew that showed the nanosphere aggregation morphology. In additional experiments we demonstrated that also other additives, such as phosphate ions and biogenic macromolecules, that slow down ACC dissolution and calcite precipitation from ions can induce the accretion process dominance (see figure attached). These experiments show that although in solution the dominant process is dissolution to ions of the ACC and crystal growth by ion-by-ion mechanism, the presence of an additive that slows the ion-mediated processes makes the ACC nanospheres stable long enough to interact with the crystal surface. As a result, the metastable ACC nanospheres undergo secondary nucleation on the crystal surface without dissolving. These experiments highlight

  17. Analysis of physical-chemical processes governing SSME internal fluid flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, A. K.; Owens, S. F.; Mukerjee, T.; Prakash, C.; Przekwas, A. J.; Kannapel, M.

    1985-01-01

    The basic issues concerning the physical chemical processes of the Space Shuttle Main Engine are discussed. The objectives being to supply the general purpose CFD code PHOENICS and the associated interactive graphics package - GRAFFIC; to demonstrate code usage on SSME related problems; to perform computations and analyses of problems relevant to current and future SSME's; and to participate in the development of new physical models of various processes present in SSME components. These objectives are discussed in detail.

  18. The work of the European Union Reference Laboratory for Food Additives (EURL) and its support for the authorisation process of feed additives in the European Union: a review

    PubMed Central

    von Holst, Christoph; Robouch, Piotr; Bellorini, Stefano; de la Huebra, María José González; Ezerskis, Zigmas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This paper describes the operation of the European Union Reference Laboratory for Feed Additives (EURL) and its role in the authorisation procedure of feed additives in the European Union. Feed additives are authorised according to Regulation (EC) No. 1831/2003, which introduced a completely revised authorisation procedure and also established the EURL. The regulations authorising feed additives contain conditions of use such as legal limits of the feed additives, which require the availability of a suitable method of analysis for official control purposes under real world conditions. It is the task of the EURL to evaluate the suitability of analytical methods as proposed by the industry for this purpose. Moreover, the paper shows that one of the major challenges is the huge variety of the methodology applied in feed additive analysis, thus requiring expertise in quite different analytical areas. In order to cope with this challenge, the EURL is supported by a network of national reference laboratories (NRLs) and only the merged knowledge of all NRLs allows for a scientifically sound assessment of the analytical methods. PMID:26540604

  19. BESIII Physics Data Storing and Processing on HBase and MapReduce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LEI, Xiaofeng; Li, Qiang; Kan, Bowen; Sun, Gongxing; Sun, Zhenyu

    2015-12-01

    In the past years, we have successfully applied Hadoop to high-energy physics analysis. Although, it has not only improved the efficiency of data analysis, but also reduced the cost of cluster building so far, there are still some spaces to be optimized, like inflexible pre-selection, low-efficient random data reading and I/O bottleneck caused by Fuse that is used to access HDFS. In order to change this situation, this paper presents a new analysis platform for high-energy physics data storing and analysing. The data structure is changed from DST tree-like files to HBase according to the features of the data itself and analysis processes, since HBase is more suitable for processing random data reading than DST files and enable HDFS to be accessed directly. A few of optimization measures are taken for the purpose of getting a good performance. A customized protocol is defined for data serializing and desterilizing for the sake of decreasing the storage space in HBase. In order to make full use of locality of data storing in HBase, utilizing a new MapReduce model and a new split policy for HBase regions are proposed in the paper. In addition, a dynamic pluggable easy-to-use TAG (event metadata) based pre-selection subsystem is established. It can assist physicists even to filter out 999%o uninterested data, if the conditions are set properly. This means that a lot of I/O resources can be saved, the CPU usage can be improved and consuming time for data analysis can be reduced. Finally, several use cases are designed, the test results show that the new platform has an excellent performance with 3.4 times faster with pre-selection and 20% faster without preselection, and the new platform is stable and scalable as well.

  20. Physical processes impacting passive particle dispersal in the Upper Florida Keys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiechter, Jerome; Haus, Brian K.; Melo, Nelson; Mooers, Christopher N. K.

    2008-06-01

    Physical processes affecting the dispersion of passive particles (e.g., coral larvae, pollutants) in the Upper Florida Keys are investigated through in situ observations (acoustic Doppler current profilers and surface drifters) and numerical ocean circulation modeling (horizontal resolution: 800 m, vertical resolution: 0.1-1 m). During the study period in August 2006 (set to coincide with an annual coral spawning event), Lagrangian trajectories in the vicinity of the reef tract indicate that alongshelf advection was mainly poleward and due to the subtidal flow of the Florida Current, while cross-shelf advection was mainly onshore and due to wind-driven currents. Tidal currents resulted in predominantly alongshelf displacements, but did not contribute significantly to net passive particle transport on a weekly timescale. Typical advection distances were of the order of 10 to 50 km for pelagic durations of 1 week, with significant variability linked to geographical location. In contrast, the direction of transport from the offshore reefs remained essentially constant (i.e., potential dispersion pathways were limited). In addition, Lagrangian trajectories and progressive vector diagrams in the vicinity of the reef tract indicate that alongshelf variations in the cross-shelf velocity gradient associated with the FC are relatively weak on an alongshore scale of ca. 50 km. For August 2006, the highest particle concentrations typically occur inshore of the reef tract, thereby suggesting that onshore transport associated with wind-driven currents contributes significantly to the local retention of passive organisms (and other tracers) in the Upper Florida Keys. Overall, the results illustrate the necessity of conducting targeted in situ observations and numerical model predictions to quantify the physical processes affecting reef-scale advection, especially in an effort to understand local retention and dispersion mechanisms for larval marine organisms.

  1. The Evolving Physical Processes In Interacting Galaxies Traced By Their Spectral Energy Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Howard

    Hernquist et al. models. SEDs for the simulations will be calculated in each case using the SUNRISE radiative transfer code. We will identify the simulation and interacting stage/age that best reproduces each observed merger TMs properties. The results will allow us to refine and test how physical parameters develop in mergers of various kinds, as well as help test the reliability of the simulation assumptions. We will in addition analyze 25 non-interacting galaxies as comparisons. We have already successfully completed the analyses suite on a subset of 31 galaxies in 14 merger groups. This initial set contained all the Keel-Kennicutt mergers for which suitable Herschel data were in the archive when the project began several years ago. Our conclusions, published in Lanz et al. (2013), demonstrate the power of the techniques to trace physical activity across the merger sequence. The conclusions, however, were limited by the small numbers. Today the available dataset is much larger and, with the end of Herschel, is in some sense complete. We propose a focused effort to extend our work to the large sample described. The much larger sample will enable us to reach much firmer statistical conclusions, and to address the processes in intermediate interaction stages across a wider range of galaxy mass-ratios and impact parameters. Our catalog of ~23-band UV-FIR photometry on these 180 (+25) galaxies will constitute a legacy contribution. Our conclusions will have application for mergers in the more distant universe. Our team is expert in the important and difficult issues of data reduction and analysis in the many bands required for this project, in modeling and using Bayesian and other methods to obtain the best fits to the observations from multi-component galaxy models, in the simulations, and in understanding physical processes in galaxies.

  2. Student Understanding Of The Physics And Mathematics Of Process Variables In P-V Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, Evan B.; Thompson, John R.; Mountcastle, Donald B.

    2007-11-01

    Students in an upper-level thermal physics course were asked to compare quantities related to the First Law of Thermodynamics along with similar mathematical questions devoid of all physical context. We report on a comparison of student responses to physics questions involving interpretation of ideal gas processes on P-V diagrams and to analogous mathematical qualitative questions about the signs of and comparisons between the magnitudes of various integrals. Student performance on individual questions combined with performance on the paired questions shows evidence of isolated understanding of physics and mathematics. Some difficulties are addressed by instruction.

  3. Invited Review Article: Review of post-process optical form metrology for industrial-grade metal additive manufactured parts.

    PubMed

    Stavroulakis, P I; Leach, R K

    2016-04-01

    The scope of this review is to investigate the main post-process optical form measurement technologies available in industry today and to determine whether they are applicable to industrial-grade metal additive manufactured parts. An in-depth review of the operation of optical three-dimensional form measurement technologies applicable to metal additive manufacturing is presented, with a focus on their fundamental limitations. Looking into the future, some alternative candidate measurement technologies potentially applicable to metal additive manufacturing will be discussed, which either provide higher accuracy than currently available techniques but lack measurement volume, or inversely, which operate in the appropriate measurement volume but are not currently accurate enough to be used for industrial measurement. PMID:27131645

  4. Invited Review Article: Review of post-process optical form metrology for industrial-grade metal additive manufactured parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavroulakis, P. I.; Leach, R. K.

    2016-04-01

    The scope of this review is to investigate the main post-process optical form measurement technologies available in industry today and to determine whether they are applicable to industrial-grade metal additive manufactured parts. An in-depth review of the operation of optical three-dimensional form measurement technologies applicable to metal additive manufacturing is presented, with a focus on their fundamental limitations. Looking into the future, some alternative candidate measurement technologies potentially applicable to metal additive manufacturing will be discussed, which either provide higher accuracy than currently available techniques but lack measurement volume, or inversely, which operate in the appropriate measurement volume but are not currently accurate enough to be used for industrial measurement.

  5. Physical Methods for Intracellular Delivery: Practical Aspects from Laboratory Use to Industrial-Scale Processing

    PubMed Central

    Meacham, J. Mark; Durvasula, Kiranmai; Degertekin, F. Levent; Fedorov, Andrei G.

    2015-01-01

    Effective intracellular delivery is a significant impediment to research and therapeutic applications at all processing scales. Physical delivery methods have long demonstrated the ability to deliver cargo molecules directly to the cytoplasm or nucleus, and the mechanisms underlying the most common approaches (microinjection, electroporation, and sonoporation) have been extensively investigated. In this review, we discuss established approaches, as well as emerging techniques (magnetofection, optoinjection, and combined modalities). In addition to operating principles and implementation strategies, we address applicability and limitations of various in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo platforms. Importantly, we perform critical assessments regarding (1) treatment efficacy with diverse cell types and delivered cargo molecules, (2) suitability to different processing scales (from single cell to large populations), (3) suitability for automation/integration with existing workflows, and (4) multiplexing potential and flexibility/adaptability to enable rapid changeover between treatments of varied cell types. Existing techniques typically fall short in one or more of these criteria; however, introduction of micro-/nanotechnology concepts, as well as synergistic coupling of complementary method(s), can improve performance and applicability of a particular approach, overcoming barriers to practical implementation. For this reason, we emphasize these strategies in examining recent advances in development of delivery systems. PMID:23813915

  6. Physical methods for intracellular delivery: practical aspects from laboratory use to industrial-scale processing.

    PubMed

    Meacham, J Mark; Durvasula, Kiranmai; Degertekin, F Levent; Fedorov, Andrei G

    2014-02-01

    Effective intracellular delivery is a significant impediment to research and therapeutic applications at all processing scales. Physical delivery methods have long demonstrated the ability to deliver cargo molecules directly to the cytoplasm or nucleus, and the mechanisms underlying the most common approaches (microinjection, electroporation, and sonoporation) have been extensively investigated. In this review, we discuss established approaches, as well as emerging techniques (magnetofection, optoinjection, and combined modalities). In addition to operating principles and implementation strategies, we address applicability and limitations of various in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo platforms. Importantly, we perform critical assessments regarding (1) treatment efficacy with diverse cell types and delivered cargo molecules, (2) suitability to different processing scales (from single cell to large populations), (3) suitability for automation/integration with existing workflows, and (4) multiplexing potential and flexibility/adaptability to enable rapid changeover between treatments of varied cell types. Existing techniques typically fall short in one or more of these criteria; however, introduction of micro-/nanotechnology concepts, as well as synergistic coupling of complementary method(s), can improve performance and applicability of a particular approach, overcoming barriers to practical implementation. For this reason, we emphasize these strategies in examining recent advances in development of delivery systems. PMID:23813915

  7. Introduction of a pyramid guiding process for general musculoskeletal physical rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Stark, Timothy W

    2006-01-01

    Successful instruction of a complicated subject as Physical Rehabilitation demands organization. To understand principles and processes of such a field demands a hierarchy of steps to achieve the intended outcome. This paper is intended to be an introduction to a proposed pyramid scheme of general physical rehabilitation principles. The purpose of the pyramid scheme is to allow for a greater understanding for the student and patient. As the respected Food Guide Pyramid accomplishes, the student will further appreciate and apply supported physical rehabilitation principles and the patient will understand that there is a progressive method to their functional healing process. PMID:16759396

  8. Processing time of addition or withdrawal of single or combined balance-stabilizing haptic and visual information.

    PubMed

    Honeine, Jean-Louis; Crisafulli, Oscar; Sozzi, Stefania; Schieppati, Marco

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the integration time of haptic and visual input and their interaction during stance stabilization. Eleven subjects performed four tandem-stance conditions (60 trials each). Vision, touch, and both vision and touch were added and withdrawn. Furthermore, vision was replaced with touch and vice versa. Body sway, tibialis anterior, and peroneus longus activity were measured. Following addition or withdrawal of vision or touch, an integration time period elapsed before the earliest changes in sway were observed. Thereafter, sway varied exponentially to a new steady-state while reweighting occurred. Latencies of sway changes on sensory addition ranged from 0.6 to 1.5 s across subjects, consistently longer for touch than vision, and were regularly preceded by changes in muscle activity. Addition of vision and touch simultaneously shortened the latencies with respect to vision or touch separately, suggesting cooperation between sensory modalities. Latencies following withdrawal of vision or touch or both simultaneously were shorter than following addition. When vision was replaced with touch or vice versa, adding one modality did not interfere with the effect of withdrawal of the other, suggesting that integration of withdrawal and addition were performed in parallel. The time course of the reweighting process to reach the new steady-state was also shorter on withdrawal than addition. The effects of different sensory inputs on posture stabilization illustrate the operation of a time-consuming, possibly supraspinal process that integrates and fuses modalities for accurate balance control. This study also shows the facilitatory interaction of visual and haptic inputs in integration and reweighting of stance-stabilizing inputs. PMID:26334013

  9. Additive genetic variance in polyandry enables its evolution, but polyandry is unlikely to evolve through sexy or good sperm processes.

    PubMed

    Travers, L M; Simmons, L W; Garcia-Gonzalez, F

    2016-05-01

    Polyandry is widespread despite its costs. The sexually selected sperm hypotheses ('sexy' and 'good' sperm) posit that sperm competition plays a role in the evolution of polyandry. Two poorly studied assumptions of these hypotheses are the presence of additive genetic variance in polyandry and sperm competitiveness. Using a quantitative genetic breeding design in a natural population of Drosophila melanogaster, we first established the potential for polyandry to respond to selection. We then investigated whether polyandry can evolve through sexually selected sperm processes. We measured lifetime polyandry and offensive sperm competitiveness (P2 ) while controlling for sampling variance due to male × male × female interactions. We also measured additive genetic variance in egg-to-adult viability and controlled for its effect on P2 estimates. Female lifetime polyandry showed significant and substantial additive genetic variance and evolvability. In contrast, we found little genetic variance or evolvability in P2 or egg-to-adult viability. Additive genetic variance in polyandry highlights its potential to respond to selection. However, the low levels of genetic variance in sperm competitiveness suggest that the evolution of polyandry may not be driven by sexy sperm or good sperm processes. PMID:26801640

  10. Preservation of physical properties of stochastic Maxwell equations with additive noise via stochastic multi-symplectic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chuchu; Hong, Jialin; Zhang, Liying

    2016-02-01

    Stochastic Maxwell equations with additive noise are a system of stochastic Hamiltonian partial differential equations intrinsically, possessing the stochastic multi-symplectic conservation law. It is shown that the averaged energy increases linearly with respect to the evolution of time and the flow of stochastic Maxwell equations with additive noise preserves the divergence in the sense of expectation. Moreover, we propose three novel stochastic multi-symplectic methods to discretize stochastic Maxwell equations in order to investigate the preservation of these properties numerically. We make theoretical discussions and comparisons on all of the three methods to observe that all of them preserve the corresponding discrete version of the averaged divergence. Meanwhile, we obtain the corresponding dissipative property of the discrete averaged energy satisfied by each method. Especially, the evolution rates of the averaged energies for all of the three methods are derived which are in accordance with the continuous case. Numerical experiments are performed to verify our theoretical results.

  11. Assessment of Physical and Mechanical Properties of Cement Panel Influenced by Treated and Untreated Coconut Fiber Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Alida; Jamaludin, Shamsul Baharin; Anwar, Mohamed Iylia; Noor, Mazlee Mohd; Hussin, Kamarudin

    This project was conducted to produce a cement panel with the addition of treated and untreated coconut fiber in cement panel. Coconut fiber was added to replace coarse aggregate (sand) in this cement panel. In this project, the ratios used to design the mixture were 1:1:0, 1:0.97:0.03, 1:0.94:0.06, 1:0.91:0.09 (cement: sand: coconut fiber). The water cement ratio was constant at 0.55. The sizes of sample tested were, 160 mm x 40 mm x 40 mm for compression test, and 100 mm x 100 mm x 40 mm for density, moisture content and water absorption tests. After curing samples for 28 days, it was found that the addition of coconut fiber, further increase in compressive strength of cement panel with untreated coconut fiber. Moisture content of cement panel with treated coconut fiber increased with increasing content of coconut fiber whereas water absorption of cement panel with untreated coconut fiber increased with increasing content of coconut fiber. The density of cement panel decreased with the addition of untreated and treated coconut fiber.

  12. Understanding the Interplay Between Neighborhood Structural Factors, Social Processes, and Alcohol Outlets on Child Physical Abuse.

    PubMed

    Freisthler, Bridget; Maguire-Jack, Kathryn

    2015-11-01

    This article seeks to understand the relative influence of neighborhood structural characteristics (e.g., disadvantage) and social processes (e.g., interactions between residents) on child physical abuse. Using multilevel modeling in a sample of 3,023 parents in 194 zip codes, structural characteristics of factor scores representing residential stability and foreign-born Latino males were negatively related to child physical abuse. High proportions of naturalized and Asian/Pacific Islander families were positively related to the frequency of physical abuse. Higher levels of neighborhood social disorder were related to more frequent physical abuse, while higher levels of collective efficacy were related to less frequent physical abuse. Programs designed to alleviate disorder and increase neighborly interactions may be effective at reducing physical abuse. By understanding the relative importance of the demographic characteristics of neighborhoods and the actions and interactions of residents within the neighborhoods, policy and practice can be tailored more effectively to prevent maltreatment. PMID:26251328

  13. Additive Fabrication of Conductive Patterns by a Template Transfer Process Based on Benzotriazole Adsorption As a Separation Layer.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu; Yang, Zhen-Guo

    2016-06-01

    The traditional subtractive process to fabricate conductive patterns is environmentally harmful, wasteful, and limited in line width. The additive process, including direct printing of conductive paste or ink, direct printing of catalytic ink, laser-induced forward transfer, etc., can solve these problems. However, the current additive process also faces many difficulties such as low electrical and adhesion properties, low pattern thickness, high cost, etc. Benzotriazole (BTA), as widely used corrosion inhibitor, can be adsorbed onto a copper surface. The electroplated copper film on BTA-adsorbed copper foil shows poor adhesion. On the basis of this phenomenon, a novel template transfer process to additively fabricate conductive patterns has been developed. A permeant antiadhesive mask is printed on carrier copper foil, and then, BTA is adsorbed onto the exposed area of the carrier foil, thus forming the template. The template is electroplated to grow conductive patterns in the exposed parts, and then can be adhered to the flexible substrate. The substrate is peeled off, with the transfer of the conductive patterns to the substrate, to form the designed conductive patterns on PET. By reimmersing the template into BTA solution, the template can be used again. The mechanism of BTA adsorption and the reason for the low peeling strength are researched using Raman spectra, XPS and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Copper patterns more than 20 μm in thickness can be prepared on PET, the resistivity of the prepared copper patterns is 2.01 μΩ cm, which is about the same as bulk copper, and the peeling strength of the pattern on PET is measured to be 6.97 N/cm. This template transfer process, with no waste, low pollution, high electrical and adhesion properties, and low cost, shows high potential in the large scale manufacturing of electronic devices, such as RFID circuitry, FPCs, etc. PMID:27171553

  14. The problems of solar-terrestrial coupling and new processes introduced to the physics of the ionosphere from the physics of atomic collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avakyan, Sergei

    2010-05-01

    Further progress in research of solar-terrestrial coupling requires better understanding of solar variability influence on the ionosphere. The most powerful manifestations of solar variability are solar flares and geomagnetic storms. During a flare EUV/X-ray irradiations are completely absorbed in the ionosphere producing SID. During geomagnetic storms precipitations of electrons with energy of several keV (and to a lesser extent protons precipitations) from radiation belts and geomagnetosphere produce additional ionization and low latitude auroras. Considering the physics of ionosphere during the last several decades we have been taking into account three novel processes well known in the physics of atomic collisions. These are Auger effect [S. V. Avakyan, The consideration of Auger processes in the upper atmosphere of Earth. In Abstracts of paper presented at the Tenth scien. and techn. Conf. of young specialists of S.I. Vavilov State Optical Institute, 1974, 29-31.], multiple photoionization of upper, valence shell [S.V. Avakyan, The source of O++ ions in the upper atmosphere, 1979, Cosmic Res, 17, 942 - 943] and Rydberg excitation of all the components of upper atmosphere [S.V. Avakyan, The new factor in the physics of solar - terrestrial relations - Rydberg atomic and molecules states. Conf. on Physics of solar-terrestrial relationships, 1994, Almaty, 3 - 5]. In the present paper the results of bringing these new processes in the ionospheric physics are discussed and also its possible role in the physics of solar-terrestrial coupling is considered. Involving these processes to the model estimations allowed us for the first time to come to the following important conclusions: - Auger electrons play the determinant role at the formation of energy spectrum of photoelectrons and secondary auroral electrons at the range above 150 eV; - double photoionization of the outer shell of the oxygen atom (by a single photon) plays a dominant role in the formation of

  15. Alternative Processes for Water Reclamation and Solid Waste Processing in a Physical/chemical Bioregenerative Life Support System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Tom D.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on alternative processes for water reclamation and solid waste processing in a physical/chemical-bioregenerative life support system are presented. The main objective is to focus attention on emerging influences of secondary factors (i.e., waste composition, type and level of chemical contaminants, and effects of microorganisms, primarily bacteria) and to constructively address these issues by discussing approaches which attack them in a direct manner.

  16. Intensity Maps Production Using Real-Time Joint Streaming Data Processing From Social and Physical Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kropivnitskaya, Y. Y.; Tiampo, K. F.; Qin, J.; Bauer, M.

    2015-12-01

    Intensity is one of the most useful measures of earthquake hazard, as it quantifies the strength of shaking produced at a given distance from the epicenter. Today, there are several data sources that could be used to determine intensity level which can be divided into two main categories. The first category is represented by social data sources, in which the intensity values are collected by interviewing people who experienced the earthquake-induced shaking. In this case, specially developed questionnaires can be used in addition to personal observations published on social networks such as Twitter. These observations are assigned to the appropriate intensity level by correlating specific details and descriptions to the Modified Mercalli Scale. The second category of data sources is represented by observations from different physical sensors installed with the specific purpose of obtaining an instrumentally-derived intensity level. These are usually based on a regression of recorded peak acceleration and/or velocity amplitudes. This approach relates the recorded ground motions to the expected felt and damage distribution through empirical relationships. The goal of this work is to implement and evaluate streaming data processing separately and jointly from both social and physical sensors in order to produce near real-time intensity maps and compare and analyze their quality and evolution through 10-minute time intervals immediately following an earthquake. Results are shown for the case study of the M6.0 2014 South Napa, CA earthquake that occurred on August 24, 2014. The using of innovative streaming and pipelining computing paradigms through IBM InfoSphere Streams platform made it possible to read input data in real-time for low-latency computing of combined intensity level and production of combined intensity maps in near-real time. The results compare three types of intensity maps created based on physical, social and combined data sources. Here we correlate

  17. Thermographic in-situ process monitoring of the electron-beam melting technology used in additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinwiddie, Ralph B.; Dehoff, Ryan R.; Lloyd, Peter D.; Lowe, Larry E.; Ulrich, Joe B.

    2013-05-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been utilizing the ARCAM electron beam melting technology to additively manufacture complex geometric structures directly from powder. Although the technology has demonstrated the ability to decrease costs, decrease manufacturing lead-time and fabricate complex structures that are impossible to fabricate through conventional processing techniques, certification of the component quality can be challenging. Because the process involves the continuous deposition of successive layers of material, each layer can be examined without destructively testing the component. However, in-situ process monitoring is difficult due to metallization on inside surfaces caused by evaporation and condensation of metal from the melt pool. This work describes a solution to one of the challenges to continuously imaging inside of the chamber during the EBM process. Here, the utilization of a continuously moving Mylar film canister is described. Results will be presented related to in-situ process monitoring and how this technique results in improved mechanical properties and reliability of the process.

  18. Physical Alteration of Martian Dust Grains, Its Influence on Detection of Clays and Identification of Aqueous Processes on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Drief, Ahmed; Dyar, Darby

    2003-01-01

    Clays, if present on Mars, have been illusive. Determining whether or not clay minerals and other aqueous alteration species are present on Mars provides key information about the extent and duration of aqueous processes on Mars. The purpose of this study is to characterize in detail changes in the mineral grains resulting from grinding and to assess the influence of physical processes on clay minerals on the surface of Mars. Physical alteration through grinding was shown to greatly affect the structure and a number of properties of antigorite and kaolinite. This project builds on an initial study and includes a combination of SEM, HRTEM, reflectance and M ssbauer spectroscopies. Grain size was found to decrease, as expected, with grinding. In addition, nanophase carbonate, Si-OH and iron oxide species were formed.

  19. A comparative evaluation of the effect of various additives on selected physical properties of white mineral trioxide aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Anushree; Pushpa, Shankarappa; Arunagiri, Doraiswamy; Sawhny, Asheesh; Misra, Abhinav; Sujatha, Ramamurthy

    2015-01-01

    Aims: This study examined the setting time, compressive strength, and pH of white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) mixed with various additives: Calcium chloride (CaCl2), calcium formate (CaF), disodium hydrogen orthophosphate (Na2HPO4). Materials and Methods: Group 1 (Control) was obtained by mixing MTA with distilled water. In Groups 2 and 3, MTA containing 10% CaCl2 and 20% CaF, respectively, was mixed with distilled water. In Group 4, MTA was mixed with 15% Na2HPO4. Setting time, compressive strength, and pH of each group were examined. Statistical Analysis Used: Analysis was done using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 14. A P-value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Comparison of mean values was done using analysis of variance (ANOVA) with post-hoc Games-Howell test. Results: The setting time of test groups were significantly shorter than that of control group (P < 0.001). The compressive strengths of test groups were lower than that of control group (P < 0.001). The pH value obtained for Groups 3 and 4 were higher than that of the control group (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Study result showed that additives significantly reduced the setting time of MTA and also maintained the pH at a high value. However, there was not much improvement in the compressive strength of the material. PMID:26069412

  20. Feel Good--Be Good: Subject Content and Governing Processes in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohman, Marie; Quennerstedt, Mikael

    2008-01-01

    Background: In this paper a study of both subject "content" and governing "processes" in Swedish physical education is presented. The reason why an analysis of both content and processes is of special interest is that it makes it possible to understand the encounter between the institutional level and the practice of education. Purpose: The…

  1. Executive Functions in Learning Processes: Do They Benefit from Physical Activity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barenberg, Jonathan; Berse, Timo; Dutke, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    As executive functions play an essential role in learning processes, approaches capable of enhancing executive functioning are of particular interest to educational psychology. Recently, the hypothesis has been advanced that executive functioning may benefit from changes in neurobiological processes induced by physical activity. The present…

  2. Overland erosion of uranium-mill-tailings impoundments: physical processes and computational methods

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, M.H.

    1983-03-01

    The surface runoff and erosional processes of watersheds caused by rainfall-runoff are reviewed. Soil properties, topography, and rainstorm distribution are discussed with respect to their effects on soil erosion. The effects of climate and vegetation are briefly presented. Regression models and physical process simulation models are reviewed.

  3. The Inclusion of Science Process Skills in Yemeni Secondary School Physics Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aziz, Majed S.; Zain, Ahmad Nurulazam Md

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare and contrast the science process skills (SPS) included in the 10th-12th grade physics textbooks content utilized in Yemeni schools. The study revealed weaknesses and strengths in the textbooks' content. For instance, a number of science process skills (SPS), such as measuring, predicting and hypothesizing, have…

  4. Physical processes involved in strip electrode welding using the method of slatted splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Bushma, V. O.

    2010-12-15

    Physical processes that take place in a strip electrode during welding using the slatted splicing technique are considered. Flowing of the welding current in the electrode is shown to be the key process which determines electrode heating and melting. Technological receipts are proposed that allow obtaining high-quality welds by the method of slatted splicing.

  5. The effects of physical environments in medical wards on medication communication processes affecting patient safety.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Manias, Elizabeth; Gerdtz, Marie

    2014-03-01

    Physical environments of clinical settings play an important role in health communication processes. Effective medication management requires seamless communication among health professionals of different disciplines. This paper explores how physical environments affect communication processes for managing medications and patient safety in acute care hospital settings. Findings highlighted the impact of environmental interruptions on communication processes about medications. In response to frequent interruptions and limited space within working environments, nurses, doctors and pharmacists developed adaptive practices in the local clinical context. Communication difficulties were associated with the ward physical layout, the controlled drug key and the medication retrieving device. Health professionals should be provided with opportunities to discuss the effects of ward environments on medication communication processes and how this impacts medication safety. Hospital administrators and architects need to consider health professionals' views and experiences when designing hospital spaces. PMID:24486620

  6. Effect of coated and uncoated ground flaxseed addition on rheological, physical and sensory properties of Taftoon bread.

    PubMed

    Roozegar, M H; Shahedi, M; Keramet, J; Hamdami, N; Roshanak, S

    2015-08-01

    Flaxseed is used to fortify bread. In order to reduce cyanogenic glycosides compounds of flaxseed, ground flaxseed was incubated at 30 °C and heated in a kitchen microwave oven. The cyanogenic compounds of flaxseed were reduced to 13.4 %. Treated ground flaxseed was coated with Arabic gum solution containing ascorbic acid and hydrogenated fat and was stored at 25 °C for 80 days in order to prevent oxidation of flaxseed oil. Results showed that oxidation in coated samples was lower than that in control samples and that there was a significant difference between them (p < 0.01). Coated and uncoated ground flaxseed was added to wheat flour in 5, 15 and 25 % levels in order to produce fortified Taftoon bread. Rheological, physical and organoleptic tests were carried out in order to evaluate dough and bread properties. Results showed that with increasing coated and uncoated ground flaxseed percentages, a decrease in water absorption and an increase in stability, dough development and relaxation time of dough occurred. The lowest water absorption was observed by adding 25 % coated ground flaxseed with hydrogenated fat. The highest dough development and dough stability time were observed by adding 25 % coated ground flaxseed with Arabic gum. Results indicated that coated and uncoated ground flaxseed has a good effect on decreasing the staling rate compared to the control bread. Results of organoleptic test showed that bread with 5 and 15 % coated and uncoated ground flaxseed had better acceptability. PMID:26243931

  7. Comparison of strength training, aerobic training, and additional physical therapy as supplementary treatments for Parkinson’s disease: pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Alessandro; Barbirato, Dannyel; Araujo, Narahyana; Martins, Jose Vicente; Cavalcanti, Jose Luiz Sá; Santos, Tony Meireles; Coutinho, Evandro S; Laks, Jerson; Deslandes, Andrea C

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Physical rehabilitation is commonly used in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) to improve their health and alleviate the symptoms. Objective We compared the effects of three programs, strength training (ST), aerobic training (AT), and physiotherapy, on motor symptoms, functional capacity, and electroencephalographic (EEG) activity in PD patients. Methods Twenty-two patients were recruited and randomized into three groups: AT (70% of maximum heart rate), ST (80% of one repetition maximum), and physiotherapy (in groups). Subjects participated in their respective interventions twice a week for 12 weeks. The assessments included measures of disease symptoms (Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale [UPDRS]), functional capacity (Senior Fitness Test), and EEG before and after 12 weeks of intervention. Results The PD motor symptoms (UPDRS-III) in the group of patients who performed ST and AT improved by 27.5% (effect size [ES]=1.25, confidence interval [CI]=−0.11, 2.25) and 35% (ES=1.34, CI=−0.16, 2.58), respectively, in contrast to the physiotherapy group, which showed a 2.9% improvement (ES=0.07, CI=−0.85, 0.99). Furthermore, the functional capacity of all three groups improved after the intervention. The mean frequency of the EEG analysis mainly showed the effect of the interventions on the groups (F=11.50, P=0.0001). Conclusion ST and AT in patients with PD are associated with improved outcomes in disease symptoms and functional capacity. PMID:25609935

  8. Linking process, structure, property, and performance for metal-based additive manufacturing: computational approaches with experimental support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jacob; Xiong, Wei; Yan, Wentao; Lin, Stephen; Cheng, Puikei; Kafka, Orion L.; Wagner, Gregory J.; Cao, Jian; Liu, Wing Kam

    2016-04-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) methods for rapid prototyping of 3D materials (3D printing) have become increasingly popular with a particular recent emphasis on those methods used for metallic materials. These processes typically involve an accumulation of cyclic phase changes. The widespread interest in these methods is largely stimulated by their unique ability to create components of considerable complexity. However, modeling such processes is exceedingly difficult due to the highly localized and drastic material evolution that often occurs over the course of the manufacture time of each component. Final product characterization and validation are currently driven primarily by experimental means as a result of the lack of robust modeling procedures. In the present work, the authors discuss primary detrimental hurdles that have plagued effective modeling of AM methods for metallic materials while also providing logical speculation into preferable research directions for overcoming these hurdles. The primary focus of this work encompasses the specific areas of high-performance computing, multiscale modeling, materials characterization, process modeling, experimentation, and validation for final product performance of additively manufactured metallic components.

  9. Patterning of nanodiamond tracks and nanocrystalline diamond films using a micropipette for additive direct-write processing.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Alice C; Edgington, Robert; Jackman, Richard B

    2015-04-01

    The ability to pattern the seeding of nanodiamonds (NDs), and thus selectively control areas of diamond growth, is a useful capability for many applications, including photonics, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) prototyping, and biomaterial design. A microprinting technique using a computer-driven micropipette has been developed to deposit patterns of ND monolayers from an unreactive water/glycerol ND ink to 5-μm resolution. The concentration and composition of the ND solution were optimized to realize high-density monolayers of NDs and consistent ND printing. Subsequent nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) patterns grown using chemical vapor deposition showed a high level of compliance with the printed ND pattern. This "direct-write", bottom-up, and additive process offers a versatile and simple alternative to pattern diamond. The process has the particular advantage that it does not require lithography or destructive processing such as reactive-ion etching (RIE) and, pertinently, does not involve reactive chemicals that could alter the surface chemistry of NDs. Furthermore, given that this process obviates the use of conventional lithography, substrates that are not suitable for lithographic processing (e.g., excessively small or three-dimensional structured substrates) can be inscribed with ND patterns. The technique also allows for the growth of discrete, localized, single-crystal nanodiamonds with applications in quantum technology. PMID:25669757

  10. Laser and electron-beam powder-bed additive manufacturing of metallic implants: A review on processes, materials and designs.

    PubMed

    Sing, Swee Leong; An, Jia; Yeong, Wai Yee; Wiria, Florencia Edith

    2016-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM), also commonly known as 3D printing, allows the direct fabrication of functional parts with complex shapes from digital models. In this review, the current progress of two AM processes suitable for metallic orthopaedic implant applications, namely selective laser melting (SLM) and electron beam melting (EBM) are presented. Several critical design factors such as the need for data acquisition for patient-specific design, design dependent porosity for osteo-inductive implants, surface topology of the implants and design for reduction of stress-shielding in implants are discussed. Additive manufactured biomaterials such as 316L stainless steel, titanium-6aluminium-4vanadium (Ti6Al4V) and cobalt-chromium (CoCr) are highlighted. Limitations and future potential of such technologies are also explored. PMID:26488900

  11. The effect of activated carbon addition on membrane bioreactor processes for wastewater treatment and reclamation - A critical review.

    PubMed

    Skouteris, George; Saroj, Devendra; Melidis, Paraschos; Hai, Faisal I; Ouki, Sabèha

    2015-06-01

    This review concentrates on the effect of activated carbon (AC) addition to membrane bioreactors (MBRs) treating wastewaters. Use of AC-assisted MBRs combines adsorption, biodegradation and membrane filtration. This can lead to advanced removal of recalcitrant pollutants and mitigation of membrane fouling. The relative contribution of adsorption and biodegradation to overall removal achieved by an AC-assisted MBR process can vary, and "biological AC" may not fully develop due to competition of target pollutants with bulk organics in wastewater. Thus periodic replenishment of spent AC is necessary. Sludge retention time (SRT) governs the frequency of spent AC withdrawal and addition of fresh AC, and is an important parameter that significantly influences the performance of AC-assisted MBRs. Of utmost importance is AC dosage because AC overdose may aggravate membrane fouling, increase sludge viscosity, impair mass transfer and reduce sludge dewaterability. PMID:25801795

  12. Effect of amino acid additives on the growth and physical properties of potassium acid phthalate (KAP) crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumaran, A. Elakkina; Kanchana, P.; Sekar, C.

    2012-06-01

    Single crystals of potassium acid phthalate (KAP) have been grown from aqueous solution by slow evaporation technique by adding L-alanine (LA), glycine (Gly) and L-tyrosine (LT) as additives. Powder X-ray diffraction studies confirmed the phase formation and amino acids doping into KAP crystals. The optical absorption studies reveal that the LA doped crystals possess less absorption of visible ray than the pristine, Gly and LT doped KAP crystals. Optical transmission is found to be low in LT doped KAP than in all the other crystals. TG-DTA studies show the decomposition temperatures to be 255 °C, 232 °C, 258 °C and 264 °C for pure, LA, Gly and LT doped KAP crystals respectively. SHG efficiency of LA doped KAP crystal was found to be 1.1 times (31 mV for KDP and 34 mV for LA doped KAP) that of potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystal. This is much higher when compared to that of undoped KAP crystal (12 mV). The grown crystals were also subjected to FTIR, microhardness and dielectric studies.

  13. Physical, Mechanical, and Dry Sliding Wear Properties of Fe-Cr-W-C Hardfacing Alloys Under Different Tungsten Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajihashemi, Mahdi; Shamanian, Morteza; Azimi, Ghasem

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the effects of tungsten on microstructure and wear performance of Fe-Cr-C claddings were evaluated. In this regard, tungsten inert gas surfacing process was employed to deposit Fe-Cr-C and Fe-Cr-C-W hardfacing alloys on plain carbon steel substrate using preplaced powders. Phase composition, microstructure, and wear behavior of clad layers were investigated using X-ray diffraction analysis, optical and scanning electron microscopy, and reciprocating wear tests, respectively. The claddings were well bonded to the substrate and showed a uniform microstructure. Cr7C3 and WC carbides were detected in the deposited layers. Further investigations indicated that the hardness and wear resistance can be improved by adding tungsten into Fe-Cr-C hardfacing alloys.

  14. Effect of silver addition on mechanical properties of melt-processed Sm-Ba-Cu-O bulk superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Naomichi; Miyamoto, Takeshi; Seo, Seokjong; Nariki, Shinya; Murakami, Masato

    1999-11-01

    The authors have studied mechanical properties of melt-processed single-grain Sm-Ba-Cu-O (Sm123+Sm211) bulks with and without silver doping. Tensile stress is induced by thermal stress during heat treatment, and also induced by applying magnetic fields. It is found that the silver addition was effective in decreasing the thermal stress and increasing the tensile strength of the Sm-Ba-Cu-O bulk. The tensile strength of the silver doped sample was 37.4MPa, which is about one and half times larger than that of the undoped sample.

  15. Electron-ion collisions. [Basic physics of inelastic processes of excitation, ionization, and recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, D.H.

    1982-01-01

    This discussion concentrates on basic physics aspects of inelastic processes of excitation, ionization, and recombination that occur during electron-ion collisions. Except for cases of illustration along isoelectronic sequences, only multicharged (at least +2) ions will be specifically discussed with some emphasis of unique physics aspects associated with ionic charge. The material presented will be discussed from a primarily experimental viewpoint with most attention to electron-ion interacting beams experiments.

  16. Effects of calcium hydroxide addition on the physical and chemical properties of a calcium silicate-based sealer

    PubMed Central

    KUGA, Milton Carlos; DUARTE, Marco Antonio Hungaro; SANT'ANNA-JÚNIOR, Arnaldo; KEINE, Kátia Cristina; FARIA, Gisele; DANTAS, Andrea Abi Rached; GUIOTTI, Flávia Angélica

    2014-01-01

    Recently, various calcium silicate-based sealers have been introduced for use in root canal filling. The MTA Fillapex is one of these sealers, but some of its physicochemical properties are not in accordance with the ISO requirements. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the flowability, pH level and calcium release of pure MTA Fillapex (MTAF) or containing 5% (MTAF5) or 10% (MTAF10) calcium hydroxide (CH), in weight, in comparison with AH Plus sealer. Material and Methods The flowability test was performed according to the ISO 6876:2001 requirements. For the pH level and calcium ion release analyses, the sealers were placed individually (n=10) in plastic tubes and immersed in deionized water. After 24 hours, 7 and 14 days, the water in which each specimen had been immersed was evaluated to determine the pH level changes and calcium released. Flowability, pH level and calcium release data were analyzed statistically by the ANOVA test (α=5%). Results In relation to flowability: MTAF>AH Plus>MTAF5>MTAF10. In relation to the pH level, for 24 h: MTAF5=MTAF10=MTAF>AH Plus; for 7 and 14 days: MTAF5=MTAF10>MTAF>AH Plus. For the calcium release, for all periods: MTAF>MTAF5=MTAF10>AH Plus. Conclusions The addition of 5% CH to the MTA Fillapex (in weight) is an alternative to reduce the high flowability presented by the sealer, without interfering in its alkalization potential. PMID:25025558

  17. A Survey of Private Ohio Academic Libraries' Physical Processing Practices for Circulating Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Factor, Olivia Spaid

    Little guidance is given in today's general technical services or cataloging textbooks to assist librarians in making decisions on procedures for the physical preparation of materials prior to placement on the shelves for public access. As small, private academic libraries face automation of circulation, addition of security systems, and debates…

  18. Effect of sucrose and pectin addition on physical, chemical, thermal and rheological properties of frozen/thawed pineapple pulps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conceição, Márcia Cavalcante; Fernandes, Tatiana Nunes; Prado, Mônica Elisabeth Torres; de Resende, Jaime Vilela

    2012-09-01

    Pectin (0-1.0 g/100 mL) and sucrose (0-20 g/100 mL) were added to pineapple pulp to improve their rheological properties, thermal properties and stability after freezing and thawing processes. The properties of the mixes were characterized before and after freezing and thawing. Samples were frozen at -20°C, and the freeze concentration was evaluated every 60 min. The thawing rate was evaluated at 19°C and quantified by photographic editing and image analysis software. The thawing rates and values for the freeze concentration were leveled out at pectin concentrations above 0.5 g/100 mL pectin, which indicated that pectin functions to maintain structural homogeneity during freezing. In the thawed samples, the plastic viscosity values were leveled out from pectin concentrations (0.25-0.75 g/100 mL) as the sucrose concentration increased when compared to unfrozen samples. The differences between the rheological parameters of the unfrozen and frozen/thawed pulps, the higher yield stress values after thawing were attributed to the size of suspended particles in the pulp. Applications can specify formulations of frozen products containing pectin, where these properties can be handled after thawing the product.

  19. Testing principle working mechanisms of the health action process approach for subjective physical age groups.

    PubMed

    Wienert, Julian; Kuhlmann, Tim; Fink, Sebastian; Hambrecht, Rainer; Lippke, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated differences in social-cognitive predictors and self-regulatory planning, as proposed by the health action process approach (HAPA), across three different subjective physical age groups for physical activity. With a cross-sectional design, 521 participants across the chronological age span from 25 to 86 years (M = 48.79; SD = 12.66) were separated into three groups: those who feel physically younger than they are in terms of chronological age, the same perceived and chronological age, and feeling physically older compared to their chronological age. Participants were assessed regarding their perceived vulnerability, outcome expectancies, general intentions, planning, self-efficacy, and stages of physical activity (non-intenders, intenders, and actors). Data were analysed via mean comparison and multigroup structural equation modelling. Mean differences for all but one construct were eminent in all groups, generally showing that those feeling physically younger also report better social-cognitive predictors of physical activity (e.g. lower perceived vulnerability) in comparison to those who feel the same age or older. The model showed that basic working mechanisms of the HAPA can be applied to all groups. With that, the results provide for the first time evidence that principle working mechanism of the HAPA can be applied to all subjective physical age groups. These may be used to tailor health promoting interventions according to participants' needs as a more suitable proxy than chronological age. PMID:26967593

  20. Sediment and process water characterization in support of 300 Area North Process Pond physical soil washing test

    SciTech Connect

    Field, J.G.

    1994-02-18

    The sediments in the 300 Area North Process Pond are being considered for clean-up using soil washing processes. Prior to site clean-up several preliminary pilot-scale physical washing campaigns were performed by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) staff in the summer of 1993. WHC used equipment that was obtained from the US Environmental Protection Agency. Specific details are found in the 300-FF-1 Physical Separations CERCLA Treatability Test Plan. Physical soil washing includes separation and proper containment of the contaminant-rich fines and residual liquid effluent and release of the coarse ``clean`` fraction, should it meet minimum performance levels for residual contaminant concentration to the site being cleaned. A goal of the demonstration is to concentrate the contaminants into {le}10% of the soil volume excavated and, therefore, to release {ge}90% of the soil back to the site as clean soil. To support interpretation of the WHC soil washing treatability study, PNL performed some sediment and process water characterization on samples taken during three major and one small campaign. This report documents particle-size distributions in various field washed piles, and chemical and gama emitting radionuclide contents as a function of particle-size distribution for the field washed sediments and contents in the spent process water. All of the particle fractions were separated by wet sieving, but two field samples were also subjected to dry sieving and attrition scrubbing followed by wet sieving.

  1. Physical oceanographic processes influence bio-optical properties in the Tasman Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherukuru, Nagur; Davies, Peter L.; Brando, Vittorio E.; Anstee, Janet M.; Baird, Mark E.; Clementson, Lesley A.; Doblin, Martina A.

    2016-04-01

    Remote sensing observations show optical signatures to conform to the physical oceanographic patterns in the Tasman Sea. To test the link between physical oceanographic processes and bio-optical properties we investigated an in situ bio-optical dataset collected in the Tasman Sea. Analysis of in situ observations showed the presence of four different water masses in the Tasman Sea, formed by the relatively warm and saline East Australia Current (EAC) water, a mesoscale cold core eddy on the continental slope, cooler Tasman Sea water on the shelf and river plume water. The distribution of suspended substances and their inherent optical properties in these water masses were distinctly different. Light absorption and attenuation budgets indicate varying optical complexity between the water masses. Specific inherent optical properties of suspended particulate and dissolved substances in each group were different as they were influenced by physical and biogeochemical processes specific to that water mass. Remote sensing reflectance signature varied in response to changing bio-optical properties between the water masses; thus providing the link between physical oceanographic processes, bio-optical properties and the optical signature. Findings presented here extend our knowledge of the Tasman Sea, its optical environment and the role of physical oceanographic processes in influencing the inherent optical properties and remote sensing signature in this complex oceanographic region.

  2. Understanding salinisation processes for a restored coastal wetland at the Baltic Sea in Germany using Generalised Additive Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selle, Benny; Gräff, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    This contribution reports on the analysis of monitoring data for a 490 ha coastal wetland called Hütelmoor at the Baltic Sea in Germany. Protection measures against sand erosion on the adjacent coastline began in 1963 and stopped seawater intrusions. The wetland was intensively drained and agriculturally used from 1970 until 1989. During the last 25 years, a realignment scheme was implemented which included the termination of beach and dune nourishment, drainage measures as well as agricultural activity. From 2011, water levels and the electrical conductivity were measured for several monitoring wells in the area to better understand the re-salinisation and re-wetting processes including its implications for the development of habitat for flora and fauna. Time series of electrical conductivity were analysed using Generalised Additive Models with additional data on the hydraulic gradient between the water levels in the observation wells and the Baltic sea, rainfall and potential evapotranspiration. Using this analysis, we were able to separate out different processes governing groundwater salinity for the Hütelmoor including dilution from groundwater recharge and seawater intrusion.

  3. EFFECT OF MINOR ADDITIONS OF HYDROGEN TO ARGON SHIELDING GAS WHEN WELDING AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL WITH THE GTAW PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    CANNELL, G.R.

    2004-12-15

    This paper provides the technical basis to conclude that the use of hydrogen containing shielding gases during welding of austenitic stainless steels will not lead to hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) of the weld or weld heat affected zone. Argon-hydrogen gas mixtures, with hydrogen additions up to 35% [1], have been successfully used as the shielding gas in gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) of austenitic stainless steels. The addition of hydrogen improves weld pool wettability, bead shape control, surface cleanliness and heat input. The GTAW process is used extensively for welding various grades of stainless steel and is preferred when a very high weld quality is desired, such as that required for closure welding of nuclear materials packages. The use of argon-hydrogen gas mixtures for high-quality welding is occasionally questioned, primarily because of concern over the potential for HIC. This paper was written specifically to provide a technical basis for using an argon-hydrogen shielding gas in conjunction with the development, at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC), of an ''optimized'' closure welding process for the DOE standardized spent nuclear fuel canister [2]. However, the basis developed here can be applied to other applications in which the use of an argon-hydrogen shielding gas for GTAW welding of austenitic stainless steels is desired.

  4. Migration of additive molecules in a polymer filament obtained by melt spinning: Influence of the fiber processing steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gesta, E.; Skovmand, O.; Espuche, E.; Fulchiron, R.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand the influence of the yarn processing on the migration of additives molecules, especially insecticide, within polyethylene (PE) yarns. Yarns were manufactured in the laboratory focusing on three key-steps (spinning, post-stretching and heat-setting). Influence of each step on yarn properties was investigated using tensile tests, differential scanning calorimetry and wide-angle X-ray diffraction. The post-stretching step was proved to be critical in defining yarn mechanical and structural properties. Although a first orientation of polyethylene crystals was induced during spinning, the optimal orientation was only reached by post-stretching. The results also showed that the heat-setting did not significantly change these properties. The presence of additives crystals at the yarn surface was evidenced by scanning-electron microscopy. These studies performed at each yarn production step allowed a detailed analysis of the additives' ability to migrate. It is concluded that while post-stretching decreased the migration rate, heat-setting seems to boost this migration.

  5. Installation of semiconductor crystal growth and processing facilities in the Building 166 addition at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    A new addition has been constructed to Building 166 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This addition is intended to contain facilities as described below. The Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) facility is a proposed facility for the growth of semiconductor crystals composed of various combinations of gallium, aluminum, indium, arsenic, phosphorous, antimony, silicon, and zinc. This facility will utilize hazardous metal hydride gases (arsine, silane, and disilane) and pyrophoric materials (metal alkyls). The MOCVD process has been intensively developed over the past 10 years and is being safetly utilized in over 75 locations worldwide in both research and manufacturing applications. All equipment in the LLNL MOCVD facility is commercially available and is typical of that used in similar facilities in both industry and academia. The Semiconductor Device Fabrication (SDF) facility is a proposed facility for the fabrication of semiconductor devices from crystals grown in the MOCVD facility. General laboratory chemicals and silane gas will be utilized in this facility. The remaining space in the building addition will consist of an optics laboratory and general purpose work area. The only hazardous materials to be used in these areas are small quantities of common laboratory solvents. For the purposes of this Environmental Assessment, these areas will be considered to be part of the SDF. 27 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Additive Manufacturing of IN100 Superalloy Through Scanning Laser Epitaxy for Turbine Engine Hot-Section Component Repair: Process Development, Modeling, Microstructural Characterization, and Process Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, Ranadip; Das, Suman

    2015-09-01

    This article describes additive manufacturing (AM) of IN100, a high gamma-prime nickel-based superalloy, through scanning laser epitaxy (SLE), aimed at the creation of thick deposits onto like-chemistry substrates for enabling repair of turbine engine hot-section components. SLE is a metal powder bed-based laser AM technology developed for nickel-base superalloys with equiaxed, directionally solidified, and single-crystal microstructural morphologies. Here, we combine process modeling, statistical design-of-experiments (DoE), and microstructural characterization to demonstrate fully metallurgically bonded, crack-free and dense deposits exceeding 1000 μm of SLE-processed IN100 powder onto IN100 cast substrates produced in a single pass. A combined thermal-fluid flow-solidification model of the SLE process compliments DoE-based process development. A customized quantitative metallography technique analyzes digital cross-sectional micrographs and extracts various microstructural parameters, enabling process model validation and process parameter optimization. Microindentation measurements show an increase in the hardness by 10 pct in the deposit region compared to the cast substrate due to microstructural refinement. The results illustrate one of the very few successes reported for the crack-free deposition of IN100, a notoriously "non-weldable" hot-section alloy, thus establishing the potential of SLE as an AM method suitable for hot-section component repair and for future new-make components in high gamma-prime containing crack-prone nickel-based superalloys.

  7. Aluminizing Oil Casing Steel N80 by a Low-Temperature Pack Processing Modified with Zinc Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Min; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Xiao Yong

    Different aluminide coatings were prepared on oil casing steel N80 at a relatively lower temperature of 530°C for 2 h by pack powder modified with different content of zinc (Zn). The cross-sectional microstructure, element distribution and properties of as-aluminized oil casing steel N80 were investigated by SEM, EDS, micro-hardness test and electrochemical corrosion measurement. Results show that aluminide coating with around 50 μm in thickness can be successfully achieved by a low-temperature pack aluminizing processing with the addition of Zn. Zn in the pack powder can enhance the uniformity and continuity of the coating layer, while it has little effect on the thickness of as-packed coating with the increasing content of Zn from 38.8 wt.% to 84.4 wt.%. As the content of Zn is over 58.8 wt.%, two layer coating consisting of pure Zn layer and Fe-Al aluminide layer can be formed on oil casing steel N80 substrate. Furthermore, oil casing steel N80 with aluminizing coating shows a higher microhardness than that of original one except in the depth range of pure Zn layer, but the microhardness of oil casing steel substrate does not decrease after aluminizing which can be inferred that low-temperature aluminizing processing reported here will not bring any damages on the mechanical properties of oil casing steel N80. Additionally, a lower self-corrosion current density of oil casing steel N80 with aluminizing coating also indicates that low-temperature aluminizing processing is helpful to the corrosion resistance of oil casing steel N80.

  8. Physical Processes and Real-Time Chemical Measurement of the Insect Olfactory Environment

    PubMed Central

    Abrell, Leif; Hildebrand, John G.

    2009-01-01

    Odor-mediated insect navigation in airborne chemical plumes is vital to many ecological interactions, including mate finding, flower nectaring, and host locating (where disease transmission or herbivory may begin). After emission, volatile chemicals become rapidly mixed and diluted through physical processes that create a dynamic olfactory environment. This review examines those physical processes and some of the analytical technologies available to characterize those behavior-inducing chemical signals at temporal scales equivalent to the olfactory processing in insects. In particular, we focus on two areas of research that together may further our understanding of olfactory signal dynamics and its processing and perception by insects. First, measurement of physical atmospheric processes in the field can provide insight into the spatiotemporal dynamics of the odor signal available to insects. Field measurements in turn permit aspects of the physical environment to be simulated in the laboratory, thereby allowing careful investigation into the links between odor signal dynamics and insect behavior. Second, emerging analytical technologies with high recording frequencies and field-friendly inlet systems may offer new opportunities to characterize natural odors at spatiotemporal scales relevant to insect perception and behavior. Characterization of the chemical signal environment allows the determination of when and where olfactory-mediated behaviors may control ecological interactions. Finally, we argue that coupling of these two research areas will foster increased understanding of the physicochemical environment and enable researchers to determine how olfactory environments shape insect behaviors and sensory systems. PMID:18548311

  9. Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromley, D. Allan

    1980-01-01

    The author presents the argument that the past few years, in terms of new discoveries, insights, and questions raised, have been among the most productive in the history of physics. Selected for discussion are some of the most important new developments in physics research. (Author/SA)

  10. Additive Manufacturing of Single-Crystal Superalloy CMSX-4 Through Scanning Laser Epitaxy: Computational Modeling, Experimental Process Development, and Process Parameter Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basak, Amrita; Acharya, Ranadip; Das, Suman

    2016-06-01

    This paper focuses on additive manufacturing (AM) of single-crystal (SX) nickel-based superalloy CMSX-4 through scanning laser epitaxy (SLE). SLE, a powder bed fusion-based AM process was explored for the purpose of producing crack-free, dense deposits of CMSX-4 on top of similar chemistry investment-cast substrates. Optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigations revealed the presence of dendritic microstructures that consisted of fine γ' precipitates within the γ matrix in the deposit region. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-based process modeling, statistical design of experiments (DoE), and microstructural characterization techniques were combined to produce metallurgically bonded single-crystal deposits of more than 500 μm height in a single pass along the entire length of the substrate. A customized quantitative metallography based image analysis technique was employed for automatic extraction of various deposit quality metrics from the digital cross-sectional micrographs. The processing parameters were varied, and optimal processing windows were identified to obtain good quality deposits. The results reported here represent one of the few successes obtained in producing single-crystal epitaxial deposits through a powder bed fusion-based metal AM process and thus demonstrate the potential of SLE to repair and manufacture single-crystal hot section components of gas turbine systems from nickel-based superalloy powders.

  11. Additive Manufacturing of Single-Crystal Superalloy CMSX-4 Through Scanning Laser Epitaxy: Computational Modeling, Experimental Process Development, and Process Parameter Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basak, Amrita; Acharya, Ranadip; Das, Suman

    2016-08-01

    This paper focuses on additive manufacturing (AM) of single-crystal (SX) nickel-based superalloy CMSX-4 through scanning laser epitaxy (SLE). SLE, a powder bed fusion-based AM process was explored for the purpose of producing crack-free, dense deposits of CMSX-4 on top of similar chemistry investment-cast substrates. Optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigations revealed the presence of dendritic microstructures that consisted of fine γ' precipitates within the γ matrix in the deposit region. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-based process modeling, statistical design of experiments (DoE), and microstructural characterization techniques were combined to produce metallurgically bonded single-crystal deposits of more than 500 μm height in a single pass along the entire length of the substrate. A customized quantitative metallography based image analysis technique was employed for automatic extraction of various deposit quality metrics from the digital cross-sectional micrographs. The processing parameters were varied, and optimal processing windows were identified to obtain good quality deposits. The results reported here represent one of the few successes obtained in producing single-crystal epitaxial deposits through a powder bed fusion-based metal AM process and thus demonstrate the potential of SLE to repair and manufacture single-crystal hot section components of gas turbine systems from nickel-based superalloy powders.

  12. Hierarchical random additive process and logarithmic scaling of generalized high order, two-point correlations in turbulent boundary layer flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X. I. A.; Marusic, I.; Meneveau, C.

    2016-06-01

    Townsend [Townsend, The Structure of Turbulent Shear Flow (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, 1976)] hypothesized that the logarithmic region in high-Reynolds-number wall-bounded flows consists of space-filling, self-similar attached eddies. Invoking this hypothesis, we express streamwise velocity fluctuations in the inertial layer in high-Reynolds-number wall-bounded flows as a hierarchical random additive process (HRAP): uz+=∑i=1Nzai . Here u is the streamwise velocity fluctuation, + indicates normalization in wall units, z is the wall normal distance, and ai's are independently, identically distributed random additives, each of which is associated with an attached eddy in the wall-attached hierarchy. The number of random additives is Nz˜ln(δ /z ) where δ is the boundary layer thickness and ln is natural log. Due to its simplified structure, such a process leads to predictions of the scaling behaviors for various turbulence statistics in the logarithmic layer. Besides reproducing known logarithmic scaling of moments, structure functions, and correlation function [" close="]3/2 uz(x ) uz(x +r ) >, new logarithmic laws in two-point statistics such as uz4(x ) > 1 /2, 1/3, etc. can be derived using the HRAP formalism. Supporting empirical evidence for the logarithmic scaling in such statistics is found from the Melbourne High Reynolds Number Boundary Layer Wind Tunnel measurements. We also show that, at high Reynolds numbers, the above mentioned new logarithmic laws can be derived by assuming the arrival of an attached eddy at a generic point in the flow field to be a Poisson process [Woodcock and Marusic, Phys. Fluids 27, 015104 (2015), 10.1063/1.4905301]. Taken together, the results provide new evidence supporting the essential ingredients of the attached eddy hypothesis to describe streamwise velocity fluctuations of large, momentum transporting eddies in wall-bounded turbulence, while

  13. Physical Ion Sputtering At Glancing Angles As A Novel IC De-processing Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Vyatkin, A. F.; Zinenko, V. I.

    2011-01-07

    Failure analysis (de-processing) techniques are becoming more and more important in tackling integrated circuits (IC) process-related problems. Particularly, failure analysis of ICs requires opening and de-layering a chip in a layer by layer mode in order to find hidden defects. Selective chemical etching, reactive ion etching, plasma etching and chemical mechanical polishing or a combination of these techniques are traditionally used for de-processing of IC. In this work a novel technique which is physical ion sputtering at glancing incidence angles allowing precise information about possible reasons of IC failures occurring at different steps of IC processing is proposed.

  14. Impact E-Learning Platform Moodle on the Physic's Learning Process in the High School's Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Montealban, Jonas; Ruiz-Chavarria, Gregorio; Gomez-Lozoya, Enrique Armando

    2011-03-01

    As a didactic proposal, moodle e-learning platform was implemented in one of two Physics High School's group at UACH, in order to show how the use of new technologies can improve the learning progress linked to physics concepts. As a result, the first group worked at the same time with inside class activities as well as outside resources from the moodle e-platform. The second group only worked with inside class activities. This teaching application was developed in six sections. Section I defines the educational framework. Section II identifies the key physic's concepts to be studied in each proposed activity. Section III describes the didactic model. Section IV displays the compared results between similarities and differences in both groups. Section VI shows the gathered information in order to be discussed as a topic related on how new technologies improve the Physic's learning process in the high school' students.

  15. Processing-structure-property relationships in electron beam physical vapor deposited yttria stabilized zirconia coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, D. Srinivasa; Valleti, Krishna; Joshi, S. V.; Janardhan, G. Ranga

    2011-05-15

    The physical and mechanical properties of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings deposited by the electron beam physical vapor deposition technique have been investigated by varying the key process variables such as vapor incidence angle and sample rotation speed. The tetragonal zirconia coatings formed under varying process conditions employed were found to have widely different surface and cross-sectional morphologies. The porosity, phase composition, planar orientation, hardness, adhesion, and surface residual stresses in the coated specimens were comprehensively evaluated to develop a correlation with the process variables. Under transverse scratch test conditions, the YSZ coatings exhibited two different crack formation modes, depending on the magnitude of residual stress. The influence of processing conditions on the coating deposition rate, column orientation angle, and adhesion strength has been established. Key relationships between porosity, hardness, and adhesion are also presented.

  16. Physical processes, field estimation and an approach to interdisciplinary ocean modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, A. R.

    1996-04-01

    This review is concerned with the estimation of physical fields and the use of such fields in interdisciplinary research and modeling. Field estimates via data assimilation meld observations and dynamics and provide an efficient means of representing the physical processes which influence biogeochemical, ecological, acoustical and other processes in the sea. High derivatives can be taken from dynamically adjusted fields. Thus balance of terms in model equations is possible, which allows the inference of dynamical processes from observations via the quantitative study of energy and vorticity budgets, productivity rates, etc. A general discussion of processes and methodology is followed by a detailed review of the ocean forecast system developed at Harvard University. The model sets and algorithms are first overviewed and then the relebant scientific and technical issues are illustrated by nowcasts, forecasts and simulations carried out in various locations in the world ocean.

  17. Cold comfort at the Magh Mela: social identity processes and physical hardship.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Kavita; Stevenson, Clifford; Shankar, Shail; Hopkins, Nicholas P; Reicher, Stephen D

    2014-12-01

    Humans inhabit environments that are both social and physical, and in this article we investigate if and how social identity processes shape the experience and negotiation of physically demanding environmental conditions. Specifically, we consider how severe cold can be interpreted and experienced in relation to group members' social identity. Our data comprise ethnographic observation and semi-structured interviews with pilgrims attending a month-long winter Hindu religious festival that is characterized by near-freezing conditions. The analysis explores (1) how pilgrims appraised the cold and how these appraisals were shaped by their identity as pilgrims; (2) how shared identity with other pilgrims led to forms of mutual support that made it easier to cope with the cold. Our findings therefore extend theorizing on social identity processes to highlight their relevance to physical as well as social conditions. PMID:24261786

  18. Basic physical and chemical processes in space radiation effects on polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamaratos, E.; Wilson, J. W.; Chang, C. K.; Xu, Y. J.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of space ionizing radiation on polymers is investigated in terms of operative physical and chemical processes. A useful model of charged particle impact with a polymer was designed. Principle paths of molecular relaxation were identified and energy handling processes were considered. The focus of the study was on energy absorption and the immediately following events. Further study of the radiation degradation of polymers is suggested.

  19. Predicting Success: A Study of Admission Processes and Passing the National Physical Therapy Examination for Physical Therapist Assistants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaab, Kathryn R.

    2013-01-01

    In order to practice physical therapy, physical therapist assistants (PTAs) must graduate from an accredited academic program and pass the National Physical Therapy Examination for Physical Therapist Assistants (PTA-NPTE). The primary objective of academic programs is to prepare students to successfully complete these two milestones to become…

  20. Hybrid models for the simulation of microstructural evolution influenced by coupled, multiple physical processes.

    SciTech Connect

    Tikare, Veena; Hernandez-Rivera, Efrain; Madison, Jonathan D.; Holm, Elizabeth Ann; Patterson, Burton R.; Homer, Eric R.

    2013-09-01

    Most materials microstructural evolution processes progress with multiple processes occurring simultaneously. In this work, we have concentrated on the processes that are active in nuclear materials, in particular, nuclear fuels. These processes are coarsening, nucleation, differential diffusion, phase transformation, radiation-induced defect formation and swelling, often with temperature gradients present. All these couple and contribute to evolution that is unique to nuclear fuels and materials. Hybrid model that combines elements from the Potts Monte Carlo, phase-field models and others have been developed to address these multiple physical processes. These models are described and applied to several processes in this report. An important feature of the models developed are that they are coded as applications within SPPARKS, a Sandiadeveloped framework for simulation at the mesoscale of microstructural evolution processes by kinetic Monte Carlo methods. This makes these codes readily accessible and adaptable for future applications.

  1. Parental Perceptions of Neighborhood Processes, Stress, Personal Control, and Risk for Physical Child Abuse and Neglect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guterman, Neil B.; Lee, Shawna J.; Taylor, Catherine A.; Rathouz, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study set out to examine whether mothers' individual perceptions of their neighborhood social processes predict their risk for physical child abuse and neglect directly and/or indirectly via pathways involving parents' reported stress and sense of personal control in the parenting role. Methods: In-home and phone interview data…

  2. Direct, physically motivated derivation of the contagion condition for spreading processes on generalized random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodds, Peter Sheridan; Harris, Kameron Decker; Payne, Joshua L.

    2011-05-01

    For a broad range of single-seed contagion processes acting on generalized random networks, we derive a unifying analytic expression for the possibility of global spreading events in a straightforward, physically intuitive fashion. Our reasoning lays bare a direct mechanical understanding of an archetypal spreading phenomena that is not evident in circuitous extant mathematical approaches.

  3. Learning "through" Computers: Uncovering Students' Thought Processes while Solving Physics Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soong, Benson

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a study that illustrates how the author and an in service secondary school teacher used basic synchronous computer mediated communications (CMC) technology to help them uncover students' physics preconceptions and thought processes (including their misconceptions and misunderstandings) in a real class setting. In this paper, I…

  4. Chronic Family Economic Hardship, Family Processes and Progression of Mental and Physical Health Symptoms in Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Tae Kyoung; Wickrama, K. A. S.; Simons, Leslie Gordon

    2013-01-01

    Research has documented the relationship between family stressors such as family economic hardship and marital conflict and adolescents' mental health symptoms, especially depressive symptoms. Few studies, however, have examined the processes whereby supportive parenting lessens this effect and the progression of mental health and physical health…

  5. CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF MELT PROCESSED- AND SOLUTION-CROSS LINKED CORN ZEIN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn zein was cross linked with glutaraldehyde (GDA) and with glacial acetic acid (HAc) as catalyst with the objective to enhance the mechanical properties of poured films which were compared with the physical properties of compression molded tensile bars from melt processed zein with GDA. A reacti...

  6. Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Physical Processes in Human Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Emblem, Kyrre E.; Andronesi, Ovidiu; Rosen, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    The most common malignant primary brain tumor, glioblastoma (GBM) is a devastating disease with a grim prognosis. Patient survival is typically less than 2 years and fewer than 10% of patients survive more than 5 years. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can have great utility in the diagnosis, grading and management of patients with GBM as many of the physical manifestations of the pathological processes in GBM can be visualized and quantified using MRI. Newer MRI techniques such as dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI provide functional information regarding the tumor hemodynamic status. Diffusion MRI can shed light on tumor cellularity and the disruption of white matter tracts in the proximity of tumors. MR spectroscopy can be used to study new tumor tissue markers such as IDH mutations. MRI is helping to noninvasively explore the link between the molecular basis of gliomas and the imaging characteristics of their physical processes. We will review several approaches to MR-based imaging and discuss the potential for these techniques to quantify the physical processes in glioblastoma including tumor cellularity and vascularity, metabolite expression, and patterns of tumor growth and recurrence. We will conclude with challenges and opportunities for further research in applying physical principles to better understand the biological process in this deadly disease. PMID:25183787

  7. EPR Studies of Spin-Spin Exchange Processes: A Physical Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastman, Michael P.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical background, experimental procedures, and analysis of experimental results are provided for an undergraduate physical chemistry experiment on electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) linewidths. Source of line broadening observed in a spin-spin exchange process between radicals formed in aqueous solutions of potassium peroxylamine…

  8. Revision Vodcast Influence on Assessment Scores and Study Processes in Secondary Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marencik, Joseph J.

    2012-01-01

    A quasi-experimental switching replications design with matched participants was employed to determine the influence of revision vodcasts, or video podcasts, on students' assessment scores and study processes in secondary physics. This study satisfied a need for quantitative results in the area of vodcast influence on students' learning…

  9. Processes in scientific workflows for information seeking related to physical sample materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramdeen, S.

    2014-12-01

    The majority of State Geological Surveys have repositories containing cores, cuttings, fossils or other physical sample material. State surveys maintain these collections to support their own research as well as the research conducted by external users from other organizations. This includes organizations such as government agencies (state and federal), academia, industry and the public. The preliminary results presented in this paper will look at the research processes of these external users. In particular: how they discover, access and use digital surrogates, which they use to evaluate and access physical items in these collections. Data such as physical samples are materials that cannot be completely replaced with digital surrogates. Digital surrogates may be represented as metadata, which enable discovery and ultimately access to these samples. These surrogates may be found in records, databases, publications, etc. But surrogates do not completely prevent the need for access to the physical item as they cannot be subjected to chemical testing and/or other similar analysis. The goal of this research is to document the various processes external users perform in order to access physical materials. Data for this study will be collected by conducting interviews with these external users. During the interviews, participants will be asked to describe the workflow that lead them to interact with state survey repositories, and what steps they took afterward. High level processes/categories of behavior will be identified. These processes will be used in the development of an information seeking behavior model. This model may be used to facilitate the development of management tools and other aspects of cyberinfrastructure related to physical samples.

  10. Migration of additive molecules in a polymer filament obtained by melt spinning: Influence of the fiber processing steps

    SciTech Connect

    Gesta, E.; Skovmand, O.; Espuche, E. Fulchiron, R.

    2015-12-17

    The purpose of this study is to understand the influence of the yarn processing on the migration of additives molecules, especially insecticide, within polyethylene (PE) yarns. Yarns were manufactured in the laboratory focusing on three key-steps (spinning, post-stretching and heat-setting). Influence of each step on yarn properties was investigated using tensile tests, differential scanning calorimetry and wide-angle X-ray diffraction. The post-stretching step was proved to be critical in defining yarn mechanical and structural properties. Although a first orientation of polyethylene crystals was induced during spinning, the optimal orientation was only reached by post-stretching. The results also showed that the heat-setting did not significantly change these properties. The presence of additives crystals at the yarn surface was evidenced by scanning-electron microscopy. These studies performed at each yarn production step allowed a detailed analysis of the additives’ ability to migrate. It is concluded that while post-stretching decreased the migration rate, heat-setting seems to boost this migration.

  11. The effect of terebinth (Pistacia terebinthus L.) coffee addition on the chemical and physical characteristics, colour values, organic acid profiles, mineral compositions and sensory properties of ice creams.

    PubMed

    Yüksel, Arzu Kavaz; Şat, Ihsan Güngör; Yüksel, Mehmet

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the effect of terebinth (Pistacia terebinthus L.) coffee addition (0.5, 1 and 2 %) on the chemical and physical properties, colour values, organic acid profiles, mineral contents and sensory characteristics of ice creams. The total solids, fat, titratable acidity, viscosity, first dripping time and complete melting time values, a (*) and b (*) colour properties, citric, lactic, acetic and butyric acid levels and Ca, Cu, Mg, Fe, K, Zn and Na concentrations of ice creams showed an increase with the increment of terebinth coffee amount, while protein, pH, L (*), propionic acid and orotic acid values decreased. However, Al and malic acid were not detected in any of the samples. The overall acceptability scores of the sensory properties showed that the addition of 1 % terebinth coffee to the ice cream was more appreciated by the panellists. PMID:26604374

  12. Diagnosing the Systematic Effects of Parametrized Physical Processes in a Numerical Weather Prediction Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffin, Leo; Methven, John; Gray, Sue

    2016-04-01

    Numerical models of the atmosphere combine a dynamical core, which approximates solutions to the adiabatic and frictionless governing equations, with the tendencies arising from the parametrization of physical processes. Tracers of potential vorticity (PV) can be used to accumulate the tendencies of parametrized physical processes and diagnose their impacts on the large-scale dynamics. This is due to two key properties of PV, conservation following an air mass and invertibility which relates the PV distribution to the balanced dynamics of the atmosphere. Applying the PV tracers to many short forecasts allows for a systematic investigation of the behaviour of parametrized physical processes. The forecasts are 2.5 day lead time forecasts run using the Met Office Unified Model (MetUM) initialised at 0Z for each day in November/December/January 2013/14. The analysis of the PV tracers has been focussed on regions where diabatic processes can be important (tropopause ridges and troughs, frontal regions and the boundary layer top). The tropopause can be described as a surface of constant PV with a sharp PV gradient. Previous work using the PV tracers in individual case studies has shown that parametrized physical processes act to enhance the tropopause PV contrast which can affect the Rossby wave phase speed. The short forecasts show results consistent with a systematic enhancement of tropopause PV contrast by diabatic processes and show systematically different behaviour between ridges and troughs. The implication of this work is that a failure to correctly represent the effects of diabatic processes on the tropopause in models can lead to poor Rossby wave evolution and potentially downstream forecast busts.

  13. Addition of telephone coaching to a physiotherapist-delivered physical activity program in people with knee osteoarthritis: A randomised controlled trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    -up assessments will also occur at 12 and 18 months. Discussion The findings will help determine whether the addition of telephone coaching sessions can improve sustainability of outcomes from a physiotherapist-delivered physical activity intervention in people with knee OA. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry reference: ACTRN12612000308897 PMID:23231928

  14. Additive Manufacturing of 17-4 PH Stainless Steel: Post-processing Heat Treatment to Achieve Uniform Reproducible Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheruvathur, Sudha; Lass, Eric A.; Campbell, Carelyn E.

    2016-03-01

    17-4 precipitation hardenable (PH) stainless steel is a useful material when a combination of high strength and good corrosion resistance up to about 315°C is required. In the wrought form, this steel has a fully martensitic structure that can be strengthened by precipitation of fine Cu-rich face-centered cubic phase upon aging. When fabricated via additive manufacturing (AM), specifically laser powder-bed fusion, 17-4 PH steel exhibits a dendritic structure containing a substantial fraction of nearly 50% of retained austenite along with body centered cubic/martensite and fine niobium carbides preferentially aligned along interdendritic boundaries. The effect of post-build thermal processing on the material microstructure is studied in comparison to that of conventionally produced wrought 17-4 PH with the intention of creating a more uniform, fully martensitic microstructure. The recommended stress relief heat treatment currently employed in industry for post-processing of AM 17-4 PH steel is found to have little effect on the as-built dendritic microstructure. It is found that, by implementing the recommended homogenization heat treatment regimen of Aerospace Materials Specification 5355 for CB7Cu-1, a casting alloy analog to 17-4 PH, the dendritic solidification structure is eliminated, resulting in a microstructure containing about 90% martensite with 10% retained austenite.

  15. Vertical structure and physical processes of the Madden-Julian oscillation: Exploring key model physics in climate simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xianan; Waliser, Duane E.; Xavier, Prince K.; Petch, Jon; Klingaman, Nicholas P.; Woolnough, Steven J.; Guan, Bin; Bellon, Gilles; Crueger, Traute; DeMott, Charlotte; Hannay, Cecile; Lin, Hai; Hu, Wenting; Kim, Daehyun; Lappen, Cara-Lyn; Lu, Mong-Ming; Ma, Hsi-Yen; Miyakawa, Tomoki; Ridout, James A.; Schubert, Siegfried D.; Scinocca, John; Seo, Kyong-Hwan; Shindo, Eiki; Song, Xiaoliang; Stan, Cristiana; Tseng, Wan-Ling; Wang, Wanqiu; Wu, Tongwen; Wu, Xiaoqing; Wyser, Klaus; Zhang, Guang J.; Zhu, Hongyan

    2015-05-01

    Aimed at reducing deficiencies in representing the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) in general circulation models (GCMs), a global model evaluation project on vertical structure and physical processes of the MJO was coordinated. In this paper, results from the climate simulation component of this project are reported. It is shown that the MJO remains a great challenge in these latest generation GCMs. The systematic eastward propagation of the MJO is only well simulated in about one fourth of the total participating models. The observed vertical westward tilt with altitude of the MJO is well simulated in good MJO models but not in the poor ones. Damped Kelvin wave responses to the east of convection in the lower troposphere could be responsible for the missing MJO preconditioning process in these poor MJO models. Several process-oriented diagnostics were conducted to discriminate key processes for realistic MJO simulations. While large-scale rainfall partition and low-level mean zonal winds over the Indo-Pacific in a model are not found to be closely associated with its MJO skill, two metrics, including the low-level relative humidity difference between high- and low-rain events and seasonal mean gross moist stability, exhibit statistically significant correlations with the MJO performance. It is further indicated that increased cloud-radiative feedback tends to be associated with reduced amplitude of intraseasonal variability, which is incompatible with the radiative instability theory previously proposed for the MJO. Results in this study confirm that inclusion of air-sea interaction can lead to significant improvement in simulating the MJO.

  16. Influence of NH4Cl Powder Addition for Fabrication of Aluminum Nitride Coating in Reactive Atmospheric Plasma Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahien, Mohammed; Yamada, Motohiro; Yasui, Toshiaki; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2011-01-01

    Reactive plasma spray is the key to fabricating aluminum nitride (AlN) thermally sprayed coatings. It was possible to fabricate AlN/Al composite coatings using atmospheric plasma spray process through plasma nitriding of Al powders (Al 30 μm). The nitriding reaction and the AlN content could be improved by controlling the spray distance and the feedstock powder particle size. Increasing the spray distance and/or using smaller particle size of Al powders improved the in-flight nitriding reaction. However, it was difficult to fabricate thick and dense AlN coatings with an increase in the spray distance and/or when using fine particles. Thus, the coatings thickness was suppressed because of the complete nitriding of some particles (formation of AlN particles) during flight, which prevents the particle deposition. Furthermore, the excessive vaporization of Al fine particles (due to increased particle temperature) decreased the deposition efficiency. To fabricate thick AlN coatings in the reactive plasma spray process, improving the nitriding reaction of the large Al particles at short spray distance is required to decrease the vaporization of Al particles during flight. This study investigated the influence of adding ammonium chloride (NH4Cl) powders on the nitriding process of large Al powders and on the microstructure of the fabricated coatings. It was possible to fabricate thick AlN coatings at 100 mm spray distance with small addition of NH4Cl powders to the Al feedstock powders (30 μm). Addition of NH4Cl to the starting Al powders promoted the formation of AlN through changing the reaction path to vapor-phase nitridation chlorination-nitridation sequences as confirmed by the thermodynamic analysis of possible intermediate reactions. This changes the nitriding reaction to a mild way, so it is more controlled with no explosive mode and with relatively low heating rates. Thus, NH4Cl acts as a catalyst, nitrogen source, and diluent agent. Furthermore, the evolved

  17. Sample data processing in an additive and reproducible taxonomic workflow by using character data persistently linked to preserved individual specimens

    PubMed Central

    Kilian, Norbert; Henning, Tilo; Plitzner, Patrick; Müller, Andreas; Güntsch, Anton; Stöver, Ben C.; Müller, Kai F.; Berendsohn, Walter G.; Borsch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We present the model and implementation of a workflow that blazes a trail in systematic biology for the re-usability of character data (data on any kind of characters of pheno- and genotypes of organisms) and their additivity from specimen to taxon level. We take into account that any taxon characterization is based on a limited set of sampled individuals and characters, and that consequently any new individual and any new character may affect the recognition of biological entities and/or the subsequent delimitation and characterization of a taxon. Taxon concepts thus frequently change during the knowledge generation process in systematic biology. Structured character data are therefore not only needed for the knowledge generation process but also for easily adapting characterizations of taxa. We aim to facilitate the construction and reproducibility of taxon characterizations from structured character data of changing sample sets by establishing a stable and unambiguous association between each sampled individual and the data processed from it. Our workflow implementation uses the European Distributed Institute of Taxonomy Platform, a comprehensive taxonomic data management and publication environment to: (i) establish a reproducible connection between sampled individuals and all samples derived from them; (ii) stably link sample-based character data with the metadata of the respective samples; (iii) record and store structured specimen-based character data in formats allowing data exchange; (iv) reversibly assign sample metadata and character datasets to taxa in an editable classification and display them and (v) organize data exchange via standard exchange formats and enable the link between the character datasets and samples in research collections, ensuring high visibility and instant re-usability of the data. The workflow implemented will contribute to organizing the interface between phylogenetic analysis and revisionary taxonomic or monographic work

  18. High School Roundtable Discussion on the Process and Implications of the Physics TEKS Revision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Hugh

    2008-03-01

    On January 29 - February 2, 2008, several committees appointed by the Texas State Board of Education and consisting of high school and college teachers met in Austin to revise the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) for all high school science courses, including physics, chemistry, integrated physics and chemistry (IPC), biology, astronomy, environmental systems, and aquatic science. Members of the Physics TEKS revision committee were Jill Marshall, Daniel Marble, Jeff Funkhouser, Cheryl Cowley, and Hugh Henderson. The committee members began the process by considering the revision suggestions made by members of TSAAPT during the past year. This session will clarify the TEKS revision process and communicate the changes to the Physics TEKS suggested by the committee, as well as provide a panel discussion on political and policy implications of TEKS revision, implications of TEKS revision for future teachers, and possible implications for physics education at the university level. All pre-college science teachers and college faculty are encouraged to attend and join the discussion. In collaboration with Chris Comer, Science Consultant; Jill Marshall, University of Texas; David Bixler, Angelo State University; and Toni Sauncy, Angelo State University.

  19. Modelling the historical changes in physical soil properties caused by wind erosion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lackóová, Lenka

    2016-04-01

    Soil physical properties could be significantly affected by land degradation processes. Spatial variation modelling of physical soil properties in time is important in areas where wind erosion occurs regularly. The objectives of this study were to determine the changes of spatial variability of sand, silt and clay % contents in selected area in Slovakia over 45 years using topsoil physical properties at European scale (using LUCAS topsoil) and historical Complex Soil Survey Data. The Complex Soil Survey was made in the period 1960-1970 for the whole of the Slovak Republic, using a unified methodology to build an important soil properties database including physical topsoil properties. Spatial model distribution using regression kriging algorithm created by Soil Science and Conservation Research Institute was used for comparison with LUCAS topsoil particle size distribution datasets and their derived products of clay, sand and silt % content. The results of this study will show the effects of wind erosion in long time scale. Continual total mass removal during wind erosion can produce dramatic changes in the texture of the soil surface. Fine particles are removed, which tend to concentrate sand as erosion continues. Wind erosion physically removes the most fertile portion of the soil which may lead to lower productivity or destroying the characteristics of topsoil beneficial to plant growth. Historical changes of physical soil properties are discussed in this study.

  20. Natural physical and biological processes compromise the long-term performance of compacted soil caps

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, E.D.

    1995-12-01

    Compacted soil barriers are components of essentially all caps placed on closed waste disposal sites. The intended functions of soil barriers in waste facility caps include restricting infiltration of water and release of gases and vapors, either independently or in combination with synthetic membrane barriers, and protecting other manmade or natural barrier components. Review of the performance of installed soil barriers and of natural processes affecting their performance indicates that compacted soil caps may function effectively for relatively short periods (years to decades), but natural physical and biological processes can be expected to cause them to fail in the long term (decades to centuries). This paper addresses natural physical and biological processes that compromise the performance of compacted soil caps and suggests measures that may reduce the adverse consequences of these natural failure mechanisms.

  1. [Monitoring the physical processes of sterilization in hospitals in the state of Goiás].

    PubMed

    Tipple, Anaclara Ferreira Veiga; Pires, Francine Vieira; Guadagnin, Simone Vieira Toledo; Melo, Dulcelene de Sousa

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this descriptive study was to identify the physical, chemical and biological controls of the sterilization process by saturated steam in Pasteur autoclaves at Material and Sterilization Centers (MSC). The data was obtained by interviewing the worker responsible for the MSC of the largest hospital in every city in the interior of Goiás that had population of at least 20,000, in the period from August 2005 to June 2006. A total 44 municipalities participated. The analysis was performed using SPSS software. In 31 (94.0%) hospitals there were no nurses exclusive to the MSC, the workers responsible for the center were nursing aides and technicians. Most did not perform any physical, chemical and biological control of the sterilization process, and, in one case only these controls were performed simultaneously. Failing to monitor the sterilization cycles, and thus not ensuring the quality of the processes, is a risk to the population being assisted. PMID:21710085

  2. Interacting Physical and Biological Processes Affecting Nutrient Transport Through Human Dominated Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlay, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Human activities increasingly dominate biogeochemical cycles of limiting nutrients on Earth. Urban and agricultural landscapes represent the largest sources of excess nutrients that drive water quality degradation. The physical structure of both urban and agricultural watersheds has been extensively modified, and these changes have large impacts on water and nutrient transport. Despite strong physical controls over nutrient transport in human dominated landscapes, biological processes play important roles in determining the fates of both nitrogen and phosphorus. This talk uses examples from research in urban and agricultural watersheds in the Midwestern USA to illustrate interactions of physical and biological controls over nutrient cycles that have shifted nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) sources and cycling in unexpected ways in response to management changes. In urban watersheds, efforts to improve water quality have been hindered by legacy sources of phosphorus added to storm water through transport to drainage systems by vegetation. Similarly, reductions in field erosion in agricultural watersheds have not led to major reductions in phosphorus transport, because of continued release of biological sources of P. Where management of phosphorus has been most effective in reducing eutrophication of lakes, decreases in N removal processes have led to long term increases in N concentration and transport. Together, these examples show important roles for biological processes affecting nutrient movement in highly modified landscapes. Consideration of the downstream physical and biological responses of management changes are thus critical toward identification of actions that will most effectively reduce excess nutrients watersheds and coastal zones.

  3. Application of Innovative Methods to Optimize the Learning Process in Physics for Medical Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlateva, Genoveva; Tsankova, Emilya

    2010-01-01

    Unlike chemistry and biology courses in the high schools which occupy the attention and interest of students as they need to achieve maximum results of examinations for admission in higher medical schools, physics remains away from their interest. Striving for awakening the interest of medical students to classes in physics and diversification of the learning process requires the continuous search of new forms of organization of this process in order to fulfill the main task of education: optimal development of each student, creating conditions for creative work with the highest possible productivity. Using innovations in teaching physics, aimed at the purpose of training in non-traditional way, transforms the passive learning in an active creative process. This allows rapid identification and compensation of gaps in the knowledge, which in turn leads to a rationalization and a more complete and lasting control of educational content. The aim of the study is analysis and evaluation of the effectiveness of the implementation of innovative educational methods to increase motivation and the quality of teaching physics to students of medicine. The discussion is based on the opinions expressed in surveys of students and results of various forms of feedback.

  4. The effects of practice on speed of information processing using the Adjusting-Paced Serial Addition Test (Adjusting-PSAT) and the Computerized Tests of Information Processing (CTIP).

    PubMed

    Baird, B J; Tombaugh, Thomas N; Francis, M

    2007-01-01

    Three experiments were conducted to determine the effects of practice on the Adjusting-Paced Serial Addition Task (Adjusting-PSAT) (Tombaugh, 1999) and the Computerized Tests of Information Processing (CTIP) (Tombaugh & Rees, 2000). The Adjusting-PSAT is a computerized modification of the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT) (Gronwall, 1977) that makes the interval between digits contingent on the correctness of the response. This titration procedure permits a threshold value to be derived that represents the shortest presentation interval in which a person can process the digits to produce the correct sum. The CTIP consists of three reaction time tests that are progressively more difficult. Results showed that robust practice effects occurred with the Adjusting-PSAT, with the greatest increase in performance occurring on the first retest trial. Practice effects were equally prominent regardless of whether the first retest trial occurred 20A min, 1 week, or 3 months after the first administration. These gains were maintained for periods up to 6 months and were independent of modality of presentation (visual or auditory) and type of number list (easy or hard). In contrast to the findings with the Adjusting-PSAT, only minimal practice effects were observed with the CTIP. The major clinical implication of the study is that the high reliability coefficients for the CTIP, the lack of anxiety associated with its administration, and its insensitivity to variables such as numerical and verbal ability make the CTIP ideally suited for the serial evaluation of cognitive status. These characteristics also make the CTIP a viable alternative to the Adjusting-PSAT or PASAT for measuring speed of information processing. If the Adjusting-PSAT is administered repeatedly in clinical evaluations, a "dual baseline" or "run in" procedure should be used, with the second administration serving as the baseline measurement. PMID:17523883

  5. Heterogeneous physical and chemical processes in a rarefied-gas flow in channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebrov, A. K.; Yudin, I. B.

    2016-05-01

    A flow with physical and chemical reactions on hot surfaces is investigated. On the basis of physical experiments, determining the hydrogen-dissociation degree in rarefied gas and calculation of the flow by the method of direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC), it is possible to specify certain unknown constants of interaction of molecules and atoms with a tungsten surface. By the example of the hydrogen flow in a hightemperature tungsten cylindrical channel, the role of dissociation, sorption, and recombination processes is shown in a wide range of flow regimes from free-molecular to continuum.

  6. Chemical and physical processes in Tank 241-SY-101: A preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-02-01

    Since 1942, chemical and radioactive waste have been stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site. In March 1981 one of the double shell tanks, 241-SY-101 (called 101-SY), began venting large quantities of gas, primarily hydrogen and nitrous oxide. Because of the potential for explosion Westinghouse Hanford Company and the US Department of Energy realized the need for knowledge about the processes occurring in this tank that lead to generation of the gases. In June 1990, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory began assembling a Tank Waste Science Panel to develop a better understanding of the processes occurring the Tank 101-SY. This knowledge is necessary to provide a technically defensible basis for the safety analyses, which will allow the tank contents to be sampled, as well as for the future remediation of the tank and its contents. The Panel concluded that the data available on Tank 101-SY are insufficient to allow the critical chemical and physical processes giving rise to gas formation and release to be unambiguously identified. To provide the needed information the Panel recommends that Tank 101-SY by physically and chemically characterized as fully as possible and as expeditiously as safety considerations allow, and laboratory studies and modeling efforts be undertaken the chemical and physical processes involved in gas generation and release. Finally, the Panel recommends that no remediation steps be taken until there is a better understanding of the chemical and physical phenomena occurring in Tank 101-SY. Premature remediation steps may only serve to compound the problem. Furthermore, such steps may change the chemical and physical characteristics of the tank and prevent a true understanding of the phenomena involved. As a consequence, similar problems in other tanks on the site may not be adequately addressed. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Lifetime effectiveness of mifamurtide addition to chemotherapy in nonmetastatic and metastatic osteosarcoma: a Markov process model analysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun Jin; Lee, Jun Ah; Han, Euna; Lee, Eui-Kyung

    2015-09-01

    The mortality and progression rates in osteosarcoma differ depending on the presence of metastasis. A decision model would be useful for estimating long-term effectiveness of treatment with limited clinical trial data. The aim of this study was to explore the lifetime effectiveness of the addition of mifamurtide to chemotherapy for patients with metastatic and nonmetastatic osteosarcoma. The target population was osteosarcoma patients with or without metastasis. A Markov process model was used, whose time horizon was lifetime with a starting age of 13 years. There were five health states: disease-free (DF), recurrence, post-recurrence disease-free, post-recurrence disease-progression, and death. Transition probabilities of the starting state, DF, were calculated from the INT-0133 clinical trials for chemotherapy with and without mifamurtide. Quality-adjusted life-years (QALY) increased upon addition of mifamurtide to chemotherapy by 10.5 % (10.13 and 9.17 QALY with and without mifamurtide, respectively) and 45.2 % (7.23 and 4.98 QALY with and without mifamurtide, respectively) relative to the lifetime effectiveness of chemotherapy in nonmetastatic and metastatic osteosarcoma, respectively. Life-years gained (LYG) increased by 10.1 % (13.10 LYG with mifamurtide and 11.90 LYG without mifamurtide) in nonmetastatic patients and 42.2 % (9.43 LYG with mifamurtide and 6.63 LYG without mifamurtide) in metastatic osteosarcoma patients. The Markov model analysis showed that chemotherapy with mifamurtide improved the lifetime effectiveness compared to chemotherapy alone in both nonmetastatic and metastatic osteosarcoma. Relative effectiveness of the therapy was higher in metastatic than nonmetastatic osteosarcoma over lifetime. However, absolute lifetime effectiveness was higher in nonmetastatic than metastatic osteosarcoma. PMID:25835978

  8. Advances in chemical and physical properties of electric arc furnace carbon steel slag by hot stage processing and mineral mixing.

    PubMed

    Liapis, Ioannis; Papayianni, Ioanna

    2015-01-01

    Slags are recognised as a highly efficient, cost effective tool in the metal processing industry, by minimising heat losses, reducing metal oxidation through contact with air, removing metal impurities and protecting refractories and graphite electrodes. When compared to natural aggregates for use in the construction industry, slags have higher specific weight that acts as an economic deterrent. A method of altering the specific weight of EAFC slag by hot stage processing and mineral mixing, during steel production is presented in this article. The method has minimal interference with the production process of steel, even by limited additions of appropriate minerals at high temperatures. Five minerals are examined, namely perlite, ladle furnace slag, bauxite, diatomite and olivine. Measurements of specific weight are accompanied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and fluorescence (XRF) analysis and scanning electron microscopy spectral images. It is also shown how altering the chemical composition is expected to affect the furnace refractory lining. Additionally, the process has been repeated for the most suitable mix in gas furnace and physical properties (FI, SI, LA, PSV, AAV, volume stability) examined. Alteration of the specific weight can result in tailoring slag properties for specific applications in the construction sector. PMID:25261762

  9. Examination of the physical processes associated with the keyhole region of variable polarity plasma arc welds in aluminum alloy 2219

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Daniel W.

    1987-01-01

    The morphology and properties of the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) weld composite zone are intimately related to the physical processes associated with the keyhole. This study examined the effects of oxide, halide, and sulfate additions to the weld plate on the keyhole and the weld pool. Changes in both the arc plasma character and the bead morphology were correlated to the chemical environment of the weld. Pool behavior was observed by adding flow markers to actual VPPA welds. A low temperature analog to the welding process was developed. The results of the study indicate that oxygen, even at low partial pressures, can disrupt the stable keyhole and weld pool. The results also indicate that the Marangoni surface tension driven flows dominate the weld pool over the range of welding currents studied.

  10. Congruency proportion reveals asymmetric processing of irrelevant physical and numerical dimensions in the size congruity paradigm.

    PubMed

    Borgmann, Karl; Fugelsang, Jonathan; Ansari, Daniel; Besner, Derek

    2011-06-01

    When the proportion of congruent trials in conflict tasks is manipulated (e.g., Stroop, Simon), the typical result is that the magnitude of the conflict effect increases as the proportion of congruent trials increases. The present experiment investigated the influence of Congruency Proportion in the context of the Size Congruity Paradigm. Congruency Proportion had a significant impact on the Numerical Judgement Task (judging which of two numbers is numerically larger), but not on the Physical Judgement Task (judging which of two numbers is printed in a larger font). These data support the inference that physical size information is processed before, and more fluently than, numerical size information. The implications of this asymmetry are discussed in terms of the relative role of semantic and physical size information in representations of magnitude, and the role they play in both of these tasks. PMID:21668091

  11. Examination of physical processes of convective cell evolved from a MCS - using a different model initialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiridonov, Vlado; Ćurić, Mladjen

    2016-06-01

    The present study is focused on examination of the physical processes of convective cell evolved from a MCS occurred on 4 November 2011 over Genoa, Italy. The Quantitative Precipitation Forecasts (QPF) have been performed using WRF v3.6 model under different configurations and cloud permitting simulations. The results indicate underestimation of the amount of precipitation and spatial displacement of the area with a peak 24-h accumulated rainfall in (mm). Our main objective in the research is to test the cloud model ability and performance in simulation of this particular case. For that purpose a set of sensitivity experiments under different model initializations and initial data have been conducted. The results also indicate that the merging process apparently alters the physical processes through low- and middle-level forcing, increasing cloud depth, and enhancing convection. The examination of the microphysical process simulated by the model indicates that dominant production terms are the accretion of rain by graupel and snow, probabilistic freezing of rain to form graupel and dry and wet growth of graupel. Experiment under WRF v3.6 model initialization has shown some advantage in simulation of the physical processes responsible for production and initiation of heavy rainfall compared to other model runs. Most of the precipitation came from ice-phase particles-via accretion processes and the graupel melting at temperature T0 ≥ 0°C. The rainfall intensity and accumulated rainfall calculated by the model closely reflect the amount of rainfall recorded. Thus, the main benefit is to better resolve convective showers or storms which, in extreme cases, can give rise to major flooding events. In such a way, this model may become major contributor to improvements in weather analysis and small-scale atmospheric predictions and early warnings of such subscale processes.

  12. The Impact of Internet Virtual Physics Laboratory Instruction on the Achievement in Physics, Science Process Skills and Computer Attitudes of 10th-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Kun-Yuan; Heh, Jia-Sheng

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare the impact of Internet Virtual Physics Laboratory (IVPL) instruction with traditional laboratory instruction in physics academic achievement, performance of science process skills, and computer attitudes of tenth grade students. One-hundred and fifty students from four classes at one private…

  13. Gamma radiation induced synthesis of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) mediated by Reversible Addition-Fragmentation Chain Transfer (RAFT) process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiraç, Feyza; Güven, Olgun

    2015-07-01

    Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNiPAAm) is synthesized by gamma radiation induced Reversible Addition-Fragmentation Chain Transfer (RAFT) polymerization. The monomer is polymerized in the presence of two different trithiocarbonate-based RAFT agents i.e., Cyanomethyldodecyltrithiocarbonate (CDTC) and 2-(Dodecylthiocarbonothioylthio)-2-methylpropionic acid (DMPA) in dimethylformamide (DMF) at room temperature under nitrogen atmosphere. Number-average molecular weights (Mn) and dispersities of the polymers were determined by Size Exclusion Chromatography (SEC). Dispersities (Ɖ) of the resulting polymers are narrow, i.e., Ɖ≤1.18, indicating the occurrence of well-controlled polymerization via radiation induced RAFT process. %Conversion is determined by gravimetric method and also confirmed by Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (1H-NMR) Spectroscopy. By selecting proper [Monomer]/[RAFT] ratio and controlling conversion it is possible to synthesize PNiPAAm in the molecular weight range of 2400-72400 with extremely low molecular weight distributions with the anticipation of preparing corresponding size-controlled nanogels. The phase transition of PNiPAAm with low dispersity synthesized by RAFT is sharper than PNiPAAm synthesized by free radical polymerization.

  14. Effect of nonionic surfactant addition on Pyrex glass ablation using water-assisted CO2 laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, C. K.; Liao, M. W.; Lin, S. L.

    2010-04-01

    Pyrex glass etching using laser ablation is an important technology for the microfluid application to lab-on-a-chip devices but suffers from the formation of surface crack. In this article, the addition of nonionic surfactant to water for glass ablation using water-assisted CO2 laser processing (WACLAP) has been investigated to enhance ablation rate and to eliminate conventional surface defects of cracks in air. WACLAP for Pyrex glass ablation can reduce thermal-stress-induced crack with water cooling and hydrophilic nonionic surfactant to water can enhance ablation performance. Compared to pure water, the 15% weight percent Lauramidopropyl Betaine surfactant solutions for WACLAP can enhance ablation rate from 13.6 to 25 μm/pass of Pyrex glass ablation at a linear laser energy density of 2.11 J/cm, i.e., 24 W power, 114 mm/s scanning speed, and obtain through-wafer etching at 3.16 J/cm for 20 passes without cracks on the surface. Effect of surfactant concentration and linear energy density on WACLAP was also examined. The possible mechanism of surfactant-enhanced phenomenon was discussed by the Newton’s law of viscosity of surfactant solution.

  15. Assessing the addition of mineral processing waste to green waste-derived compost: an agronomic, environmental and economic appraisal.

    PubMed

    Jones, D L; Chesworth, S; Khalid, M; Iqbal, Z

    2009-01-01

    The overall aim of this study was to evaluate the benefit of mixing two large volume wastes, namely mineral processing waste and source-segregated green waste compost, on the growth performance of plants targeted towards high (horticulture/agriculture) and low (amenity/restoration) value markets. The secondary aims were to evaluate the influence of mineral waste type on plant growth performance and to undertake a simple economic analysis of the use of mineral-compost mixtures in land restoration. Our results showed that in comparison to organic wastes, mineral wastes contained a low available nutrient content which reduces compost quality. This is supported by growth trials with tomato, wheat and grass which showed that, irrespective of mineral source, plants performed poorly in compost blended with mineral waste in comparison to those grown in green waste or peat-based compost alone. In terms of consumer confidence, unlike other wastes (e.g. biosolids and construction/demolition waste) the mineral quarry wastes can be expected to be free of potentially toxic elements, however, the production costs of compost-mineral waste mixtures and subsequent transport costs may limit its widespread use. In addition, handling of the material can be difficult under wet conditions and effective blending may require the purchase of specialist equipment. From our results, we conclude that mineral fines may prove useful for low quality, low value landscaping activities close to the source of production but are unsuited to high value markets. PMID:18809319

  16. Removal of organic and inorganic sulfur from Ohio coal by combined physical and chemical process. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Attia, Y.A.; Zeky, M.El.; Lei, W.W.; Bavarian, F.; Yu, S.

    1989-04-28

    This project consisted of three sections. In the first part, the physical cleaning of Ohio coal by selective flocculation of ultrafine slurry was considered. In the second part, the mild oxidation process for removal of pyritic and organic sulfur.was investigated. Finally, in-the third part, the combined effects of these processes were studied. The physical cleaning and desulfurization of Ohio coal was achieved using selective flocculation of ultrafine coal slurry in conjunction with froth flotation as flocs separation method. The finely disseminated pyrite particles in Ohio coals, in particular Pittsburgh No.8 seam, make it necessary to use ultrafine ({minus}500 mesh) grinding to liberate the pyrite particles. Experiments were performed to identify the ``optimum`` operating conditions for selective flocculation process. The results indicated that the use of a totally hydrophobic flocculant (FR-7A) yielded the lowest levels of mineral matters and total sulfur contents. The use of a selective dispersant (PAAX) increased the rejection of pyritic sulfur further. In addition, different methods of floc separation techniques were tested. It was found that froth flotation system was the most efficient method for separation of small coal flocs.

  17. PREFACE: First International Workshop on Nonequilibrium Processes in Plasma Physics and Studies of Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, Z. Lj; Malović, G.; Tasić, M.; Nikitović, Ž.

    2007-06-01

    This volume is a collection of papers associated with a series of invited lectures presented at the First Workshop on Nonequilibrium processes in Plasma Physics and studies of Environment that was held at Mt Kopaonik in August 2006. The workshop originated as a part of the FP6 COE 026328 which had the basic aim of promoting centers of excellence in Western Balkan countries, to facilitate dissemination of their results and to help them establish themselves in the broader arena of European and international science. So the best way to achieve all those goals was to prepare a workshop associated with the local conference SPIG (Symposium on Physics of Ionized Gases) where the participants could attend sessions in which the host Laboratory presented progress reports and papers and thereby gain a full perspective of our results. At the same time this allowed participants in the COE the opportunity to compare their results with the results of external speakers and to gain new perspectives and knowledge. The program of the workshop was augmented by inviting some of our colleagues who visited the COE in recent years or have an active collaboration with a participating member. In that respect this volume is not only a proceedings of the workshop but a collection of papers related to the topic of the workshop: Non-equilibrium phenomena in plasmas and in the science of our environment. The idea is to offer review articles either summarizing a broader area of published or about to be published work or to give overviews showing preliminary results of the works in progress. The refereeing of the papers consisted of two parts, first in selection of the invitees and second in checking the submitted manuscripts. The papers were refereed to the standard of the Journal. As the program of the COE covers a wide area of topics from application of plasmas in nano- electronics to monitoring and removal of pollutants in the atmosphere, so the program of the workshop covered an even broader

  18. Decoupling the influence of biological and physical processes on the dissolved oxygen in the Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jiabi; Shen, Jian

    2015-01-01

    is instructive and essential to decouple the effects of biological and physical processes on the dissolved oxygen condition, in order to understand their contribution to the interannual variability of hypoxia in Chesapeake Bay since the 1980s. A conceptual bottom DO budget model is applied, using the vertical exchange time scale (VET) to quantify the physical condition and net oxygen consumption rate to quantify biological activities. By combining observed DO data and modeled VET values along the main stem of the Chesapeake Bay, the monthly net bottom DO consumption rate was estimated for 1985-2012. The DO budget model results show that the interannual variations of physical conditions accounts for 88.8% of the interannual variations of observed DO. The high similarity between the VET spatial pattern and the observed DO suggests that physical processes play a key role in regulating the DO condition. Model results also show that long-term VET has a slight increase in summer, but no statistically significant trend is found. Correlations among southerly wind strength, North Atlantic Oscillation index, and VET demonstrate that the physical condition in the Chesapeake Bay is highly controlled by the large-scale climate variation. The relationship is most significant during the summer, when the southerly wind dominates throughout the Chesapeake Bay. The seasonal pattern of the averaged net bottom DO consumption rate (B'20) along the main stem coincides with that of the chlorophyll-a concentration. A significant correlation between nutrient loading and B'20 suggests that the biological processes in April-May are most sensitive to the nutrient loading.

  19. Food additives.

    PubMed

    Berglund, F

    1978-01-01

    The use of additives to food fulfils many purposes, as shown by the index issued by the Codex Committee on Food Additives: Acids, bases and salts; Preservatives, Antioxidants and antioxidant synergists; Anticaking agents; Colours; Emulfifiers; Thickening agents; Flour-treatment agents; Extraction solvents; Carrier solvents; Flavours (synthetic); Flavour enhancers; Non-nutritive sweeteners; Processing aids; Enzyme preparations. Many additives occur naturally in foods, but this does not exclude toxicity at higher levels. Some food additives are nutrients, or even essential nutritents, e.g. NaCl. Examples are known of food additives causing toxicity in man even when used according to regulations, e.g. cobalt in beer. In other instances, poisoning has been due to carry-over, e.g. by nitrate in cheese whey - when used for artificial feed for infants. Poisonings also occur as the result of the permitted substance being added at too high levels, by accident or carelessness, e.g. nitrite in fish. Finally, there are examples of hypersensitivity to food additives, e.g. to tartrazine and other food colours. The toxicological evaluation, based on animal feeding studies, may be complicated by impurities, e.g. orthotoluene-sulfonamide in saccharin; by transformation or disappearance of the additive in food processing in storage, e.g. bisulfite in raisins; by reaction products with food constituents, e.g. formation of ethylurethane from diethyl pyrocarbonate; by metabolic transformation products, e.g. formation in the gut of cyclohexylamine from cyclamate. Metabolic end products may differ in experimental animals and in man: guanylic acid and inosinic acid are metabolized to allantoin in the rat but to uric acid in man. The magnitude of the safety margin in man of the Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) is not identical to the "safety factor" used when calculating the ADI. The symptoms of Chinese Restaurant Syndrome, although not hazardous, furthermore illustrate that the whole ADI

  20. PEET: a Matlab tool for estimating physical gate errors in quantum information processing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocker, David; Kosut, Robert; Rabitz, Herschel

    2016-06-01

    A Physical Error Estimation Tool (PEET) is introduced in Matlab for predicting physical gate errors of quantum information processing (QIP) operations by constructing and then simulating gate sequences for a wide variety of user-defined, Hamiltonian-based physical systems. PEET is designed to accommodate the interdisciplinary needs of quantum computing design by assessing gate performance for users familiar with the underlying physics of QIP, as well as those interested in higher-level computing operations. The structure of PEET separates the bulk of the physical details of a system into Gate objects, while the construction of quantum computing gate operations are contained in GateSequence objects. Gate errors are estimated by Monte Carlo sampling of noisy gate operations. The main utility of PEET, though, is the implementation of QuantumControl methods that act to generate and then test gate sequence and pulse-shaping techniques for QIP performance. This work details the structure of PEET and gives instructive examples for its operation.

  1. Microbiology and atmospheric processes: biological, physical and chemical characterization of aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgakopoulos, D. G.; Després, V.; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, J.; Psenner, R.; Ariya, P. A.; Pósfai, M.; Ahern, H. E.; Moffett, B. F.; Hill, T. C. J.

    2008-04-01

    The interest in bioaerosols has traditionally been linked to health hazards for humans, animals and plants. However, several components of bioaerosols exhibit physical properties of great significance for cloud processes, such as ice nucleation and cloud condensation. To gain a better understanding of their influence on climate, it is therefore important to determine the composition, concentration, seasonal fluctuation, regional diversity and evolution of bioaerosols. In this paper, we will review briefly the existing techniques for detection, quantification, physical and chemical analysis of biological particles, attempting to bridge physical, chemical and biological methods for analysis of biological particles and integrate them with aerosol sampling techniques. We will also explore some emerging spectroscopy techniques for bulk and single-particle analysis that have potential for in-situ physical and chemical analysis. Lastly, we will outline open questions and further desired capabilities (e.g., in-situ, sensitive, both broad and selective, on-line, time-resolved, rapid, versatile, cost-effective techniques) required prior to comprehensive understanding of chemical and physical characterization of bioaerosols.

  2. Microbiology and atmospheric processes: biological, physical and chemical characterization of aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgakopoulos, D. G.; Després, V.; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, J.; Psenner, R.; Ariya, P. A.; Pósfai, M.; Ahern, H. E.; Moffett, B. F.; Hill, T. C. J.

    2009-04-01

    The interest in bioaerosols has traditionally been linked to health hazards for humans, animals and plants. However, several components of bioaerosols exhibit physical properties of great significance for cloud processes, such as ice nucleation and cloud condensation. To gain a better understanding of their influence on climate, it is therefore important to determine the composition, concentration, seasonal fluctuation, regional diversity and evolution of bioaerosols. In this paper, we will review briefly the existing techniques for detection, quantification, physical and chemical analysis of biological particles, attempting to bridge physical, chemical and biological methods for analysis of biological particles and integrate them with aerosol sampling techniques. We will also explore some emerging spectroscopy techniques for bulk and single-particle analysis that have potential for in-situ physical and chemical analysis. Lastly, we will outline open questions and further desired capabilities (e.g., in-situ, sensitive, both broad and selective, on-line, time-resolved, rapid, versatile, cost-effective techniques) required prior to comprehensive understanding of chemical and physical characterization of bioaerosols.

  3. Exploring the physical controls of regional patterns of flow duration curves - Part 2: Role of seasonality and associated process controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, S.; Yaeger, M. A.; Coopersmith, E.; Cheng, L.; Sivapalan, M.

    2012-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to explore the process controls underpinning regional patterns of variations of runoff regime behavior, i.e., the mean seasonal variation of runoff within the year, across the continental United States. The ultimate motivation is to use the resulting process understanding to generate insights into the physical controls of Flow Duration Curves, in view of the close connection between these two alternative signatures of runoff variability. To achieve these aims a top-down modeling approach is adopted; we start with a simple two-stage bucket model, which is systematically enhanced through addition of new processes on the basis of model performance assessment in relation to observations, using rainfall-runoff data from 197 United States catchments belonging to the MOPEX dataset. Exploration of dominant processes and the determination of required model complexity are carried out through model-based sensitivity analyses, guided by a performance metric. Results indicated systematic regional trends in dominant processes: snowmelt was a key process control in cold mountainous catchments in the north and north-west, whereas snowmelt and vegetation cover dynamics were key controls in the north-east; seasonal vegetation cover dynamics (phenology and interception) were important along the Appalachian mountain range in the east. A simple two-bucket model (with no other additions) was found to be adequate in warm humid catchments along the west coast and in the south-east, with both regions exhibiting strong seasonality, whereas much more complex models are needed in the dry south and south-west. Agricultural catchments in the mid-west were found to be difficult to predict with the use of simple lumped models, due to the strong influence of human activities. Overall, these process controls arose from general east-west (seasonality) and north-south (aridity, temperature) trends in climate (with some exceptions), compounded by complex dynamics of

  4. Growth kinetics of physical vapor transport processes: Crystal growth of the optoelectronic material mercurous chloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N. B.; Duval, W. M.

    1991-01-01

    Physical vapor transport processes were studied for the purpose of identifying the magnitude of convective effects on the crystal growth process. The effects of convection on crystal quality were were studied by varying the aspect ratio and those thermal conditions which ultimately affect thermal convection during physical vapor transport. An important outcome of the present study was the observation that the convection growth rate increased up to a certain value and then dropped to a constant value for high aspect ratios. This indicated that a very complex transport had occurred which could not be explained by linear stability theory. Better quality crystals grown at a low Rayleigh number confirmed that improved properties are possible in convectionless environments.

  5. Some case studies of ocean wave physical processes utilizing the GSFC airborne radar ocean wave spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, F. C.

    1984-01-01

    The NASA K sub u band Radar Ocean Wave Spectrometer (ROWS) is an experimental prototype of a possible future satellite instrument for low data rate global waves measurements. The ROWS technique, which utilizes short pulse radar altimeters in a conical scan mode near vertical incidence to map the directional slope spectrum in wave number and azimuth, is briefly described. The potential of the technique is illustrated by some specific case studies of wave physical processes utilizing the aircraft ROWS data. These include: (1) an evaluation of numerical hindcast model performance in storm sea conditions, (2) a study of fetch limited wave growth, and (3) a study of the fully developed sea state. Results of these studies, which are briefly summarized, show how directional wave spectral observations from a mobile platform can contribute enormously to our understanding of wave physical processes.

  6. Protein extraction from heat-stabilized defatted rice bran. 1. Physical processing and enzyme treatments.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shanhu; Hettiarachchy, Navam S; Shellhammer, Thomas H

    2002-12-01

    Physical processing with or without enzyme treatments on protein extraction from heat-stabilized defatted rice bran (HDRB) was evaluated. Freeze-thaw, sonication, high-speed blending, and high-pressure methods extracted 12%, 15%, 16%, and 11% protein, respectively. Sonication (0-100%, 750 W), followed by amylase and combined amylase and protease treatments, extracted 25.6-33.9% and 54.0-57.8% protein, respectively. Blending followed by amylase and protease treatment extracted 5.0% more protein than the nonblended enzymatic treatments. High-pressure treatments, 0-800 MPa, with water or amylase-protease combinations, extracted 10.5-11.1% or 61.8-66.6% protein, respectively. These results suggest that physical processing in combination with enzyme treatments can be effective in extracting protein from HDRB. PMID:12452673

  7. Understanding the Internal Chemical Composition and Physical Processes of the Solar Interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Sarbani; Grevesse, Nicolas; Mathis, Stephane; Turck-Chièze, Sylvaine

    2015-12-01

    The Sun, the closest and most well studied of stars, is generally used as a standard that other stars are compared to. Models of the Sun are constantly tested with helioseismic data. These data allow us to probe the internal structure and dynamics of the Sun. Among the main sources of the data is the SOHO spacecraft that has been continuously observing the Sun for more than a solar cycle. Current solar models, although good, do not include all the physical processes that are present in the Sun. In this chapter we focus on specific inputs to solar models and discuss generally neglected dynamical physical processes whose inclusion could result in models that are much better representatives of the Sun.

  8. A pox on the mind: Disjunction of attention and memory in the processing of physical disfigurement

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, Joshua M.; Becker, D. Vaughn; Mortensen, Chad R.; Sasaki, Takao; Neuberg, Steven L.; Kenrick, Douglas T.

    2009-01-01

    The unfavorable treatment of people with physical disfigurements is well-documented, yet little is known about basic perceptual and cognitive responses to disfigurement. Here, we identify a specialized pattern of cognitive processing consistent with the hypothesis that disfigurements act as heuristic cues to contagious disease. Disfigurements are often invariant across time and difficult to conceal, and thus observers can detect the presence of such cues without necessarily remembering the particular individuals bearing these cues. Indeed, despite the fact that disfigured faces were especially likely to hold disease-sensitive perceivers’ attention (Study 1), disfigured individuals were often confused with one another and thus not well remembered later (Study 2), revealing a disjunction of the typical relationship between elevated attention and elevated memory. We discuss the implications of our results for stigmatization of people with and without physical abnormalities and suggest the possibility that cognitive mechanisms for processing social information may be functionally tuned to the variant nature of important cues. PMID:19578547

  9. Effect of biomass feedstock chemical and physical properties on energy conversion processes: Volume 1, Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Butner, R.S.; Elliott, D.C.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Pyne, J.W.

    1988-12-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory has completed an initial investigation of the effects of physical and chemical properties of biomass feedstocks relative to their performance in biomass energy conversion systems. Both biochemical conversion routes (anaerobic digestion and ethanol fermentation) and thermochemical routes (combustion, pyrolysis, and gasification) were included in the study. Related processes including chemical and physical pretreatment to improve digestibility, and size and density modification processes such as milling and pelletizing were also examined. This overview report provides background and discussion of feedstock and conversion relationships, along with recommendations for future research. The recommendations include (1) coordinate production and conversion research programs; (2) quantify the relationship between feedstock properties and conversion priorities; (3) develop a common framework for evaluating and characterizing biomass feedstocks; (4) include conversion effects as part of the criteria for selecting feedstock breeding programs; and (5) continue emphasis on multiple feedstock/conversion options for biomass energy systems. 9 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Physics and Process Modeling (PPM) and Other Propulsion R and T. Volume 1; Materials Processing, Characterization, and Modeling; Lifting Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This CP contains the extended abstracts and presentation figures of 36 papers presented at the PPM and Other Propulsion R&T Conference. The focus of the research described in these presentations is on materials and structures technologies that are parts of the various projects within the NASA Aeronautics Propulsion Systems Research and Technology Base Program. These projects include Physics and Process Modeling; Smart, Green Engine; Fast, Quiet Engine; High Temperature Engine Materials Program; and Hybrid Hyperspeed Propulsion. Also presented were research results from the Rotorcraft Systems Program and work supported by the NASA Lewis Director's Discretionary Fund. Authors from NASA Lewis Research Center, industry, and universities conducted research in the following areas: material processing, material characterization, modeling, life, applied life models, design techniques, vibration control, mechanical components, and tribology. Key issues, research accomplishments, and future directions are summarized in this publication.

  11. Design of the SHAPE-2 study: the effect of physical activity, in addition to weight loss, on biomarkers of postmenopausal breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Physical inactivity and overweight are two known risk factors for postmenopausal breast cancer. Former exercise intervention studies showed that physical activity influences sex hormone levels, known to be related to postmenopausal breast cancer, mainly when concordant loss of body weight was achieved. The question remains whether there is an additional beneficial effect of physical activity when weight loss is reached. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect attributable to exercise on postmenopausal breast cancer risk biomarkers, when equivalent weight loss is achieved compared with diet-induced weight loss. Design The SHAPE-2 study is a three-armed, multicentre trial. 243 sedentary, postmenopausal women who are overweight or obese (BMI 25–35 kg/m2) are enrolled. After a 4-6 week run-in period, wherein a baseline diet is prescribed, women are randomly allocated to (1) a diet group, (2) an exercise group or (3) a control group. The aim of both intervention groups is to lose an amount of 5–6 kg body weight in 10–14 weeks. The diet group follows an energy restricted diet and maintains the habitual physical activity level. The exercise group participates in a 16-week endurance and strength training programme of 4 hours per week. Furthermore, they are prescribed a moderate caloric restriction. The control group is asked to maintain body weight and continue the run-in baseline diet. Measurements include blood sampling, questionnaires, anthropometrics (weight, height, waist and hip circumference), maximal cycle exercise test (VO2peak), DEXA-scan (body composition) and abdominal MRI (subcutaneous and visceral fat). Primary outcomes are serum levels of oestradiol, oestrone, testosterone and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG). Discussion This study will give insight in the potential attributable effect of physical activity on breast cancer risk biomarkers and whether this effect is mediated by changes in body composition, in postmenopausal

  12. TEACHING PHYSICS: An experiment to demonstrate the principles and processes involved in medical Doppler ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, D. G. H.

    2000-09-01

    Doppler ultrasound is widely used in medicine for measuring blood velocity. This paper describes an experiment illustrating the principles of medical Doppler ultrasound. It is designed with A-level/undergraduate physics students in mind. Ultrasound is transmitted in air and reflected from a moving target. The return signal is processed using a series of modules, so that students can discover for themselves how each stage in the instrument works. They can also obtain a quantitative value of the speed of the target.

  13. Physical Meaning of the Optimum Measurement Process in Quantum Detection Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osaki, Masao; Kozuka, Haruhisa; Hirota, Osamu

    1996-01-01

    The optimum measurement processes are represented as the optimum detection operators in the quantum detection theory. The error probability by the optimum detection operators goes beyond the standard quantum limit automatically. However the optimum detection operators are given by pure mathematical descriptions. In order to realize a communication system overcoming the standard quantum limit, we try to give the physical meaning of the optimum detection operators.

  14. The physical processes occuring during the deep penetration of metals by a laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedenov, A. A.; Gladush, G. G.; Drobiazko, S. V.; Levchenko, E. B.

    1983-08-01

    Theoretical models describing the various aspects of the physical processes that occur in metals penetrated by a laser beam are examined. In particular, attention is given to channeling of the laser beam, the principles governing the formation of a crater, and the mechanisms of deep penetration by continuous and pulsed laser beams. Model predictions are compared with experimental data, and the areas where further research is needed are identified.

  15. A Study of the Nature of Students' Models of Microscopic Processes in the Context of Modern Physics Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thacker, Beth Ann

    2003-01-01

    Interviews university students in modern physics about their understanding of three fundamental experiments. Explores their development of models of microscopic processes. Uses interactive demonstrations to probe student understanding of modern physics experiments in two high school physics classes. Analyzes the nature of students' models and the…

  16. The Impact of Physical and Ergonomic Hazards on Poultry Abattoir Processing Workers: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Harmse, Johannes L.; Engelbrecht, Jacobus C.; Bekker, Johan L.

    2016-01-01

    The poultry abattoir industry continues to grow and contribute significantly to the gross domestic product in many countries. The industry expects working shifts of eight to eleven hours, during which workers are exposed to occupational hazards which include physical hazards ranging from noise, vibration, exposure to cold and ergonomic stress from manual, repetitive tasks that require force. A PubMed, Medline and Science Direct online database search, using specific keywords was conducted and the results confirmed that physical and ergonomic hazards impact on abattoir processing workers health, with harm not only to workers’ health but also as an economic burden due to the loss of their livelihoods and the need for treatment and compensation in the industry. This review endeavours to highlight the contribution poultry processing plays in the development of physical agents and ergonomic stress related occupational diseases in poultry abattoir processing workers. The impact includes noise-induced hearing loss, increased blood pressure, menstrual and work related upper limb disorders. These are summarised as a quick reference guide for poultry abattoir owners, abattoir workers, poultry associations, occupational hygienists and medical practitioners to assist in the safer management of occupational health in poultry abattoirs. PMID:26861374

  17. Radiological/Health physics program assessement at Rocky Flats, the process

    SciTech Connect

    Psomas, P.O.

    1996-06-01

    The Department of Energy, Rocky Flats Office, Safety and Health Group, Health Physics Team (HPT) is responsible for oversight of the Radiation Protection and Health Physics Program (RPHP) of the Integrating Management Contractor (IMC), Kaiser-Hill (K-H) operations at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). As of 1 January 1996 the Rocky Flats Plant employed 300 DOE and 4,300 contractor personnel (K-H and their subcontractors). WSI is a subcontractor and provides plant security. To accomplish the RPHP program oversight HPT personnel developed a systematic methodology for performing a functional RPHP Assessment. The initial process included development of a flow diagram identifying all programmatic elements and assessment criteria documents. Formulation of plans for conducting interviews and performance of assessments constituted the second major effort. The generation of assessment reports was the final step, based on the results of this process. This assessment will be a 6 person-year effort, over the next three years. This process is the most comprehensive assessment of any Radiation Protection and Health Physics (RPHP) Program ever performed at Rocky Flats. The results of these efforts will establish a baseline for future RPHP Program assessments at RFETS. This methodology has been well-received by contractor personnel and creates no Privacy Act violations or other misunderstandings.

  18. The Impact of Physical and Ergonomic Hazards on Poultry Abattoir Processing Workers: A Review.

    PubMed

    Harmse, Johannes L; Engelbrecht, Jacobus C; Bekker, Johan L

    2016-02-01

    The poultry abattoir industry continues to grow and contribute significantly to the gross domestic product in many countries. The industry expects working shifts of eight to eleven hours, during which workers are exposed to occupational hazards which include physical hazards ranging from noise, vibration, exposure to cold and ergonomic stress from manual, repetitive tasks that require force. A PubMed, Medline and Science Direct online database search, using specific keywords was conducted and the results confirmed that physical and ergonomic hazards impact on abattoir processing workers health, with harm not only to workers' health but also as an economic burden due to the loss of their livelihoods and the need for treatment and compensation in the industry. This review endeavours to highlight the contribution poultry processing plays in the development of physical agents and ergonomic stress related occupational diseases in poultry abattoir processing workers. The impact includes noise-induced hearing loss, increased blood pressure, menstrual and work related upper limb disorders. These are summarised as a quick reference guide for poultry abattoir owners, abattoir workers, poultry associations, occupational hygienists and medical practitioners to assist in the safer management of occupational health in poultry abattoirs. PMID:26861374

  19. Neurophysiological and epigenetic effects of physical exercise on the aging process.

    PubMed

    Kaliman, Perla; Párrizas, Marcelina; Lalanza, Jaume F; Camins, Antoni; Escorihuela, Rosa Maria; Pallàs, Mercè

    2011-09-01

    Aging is a gradual process during which molecular and cellular processes deteriorate progressively, often leading to such pathological conditions as vascular and metabolic disorders and cognitive decline. Although the mechanisms of aging are not yet fully understood, inflammation, oxidative damage, mitochondrial dysfunction, functional alterations in specific neuronal circuits and a restricted degree of apoptosis are involved. Physical exercise improves the efficiency of the capillary system and increases the oxygen supply to the brain, thus enhancing metabolic activity and oxygen intake in neurons, and increases neurotrophin levels and resistance to stress. Regular exercise and an active lifestyle during adulthood have been associated with reduced risk and protective effects for mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease. Similarly, studies in animal models show that physical activity has positive physiological and cognitive effects that correlate with changes in transcriptional profiles. According to numerous studies, epigenetic events that include changes in DNA methylation patterns, histone modification and alterations in microRNA profiles seem to be a signature of aging. Hence, insight into the epigenetic mechanisms involved in the aging process and their modulation through lifestyle interventions such as physical exercise might open new avenues for the development of preventive and therapeutic strategies to treat aging-related diseases. PMID:21624506

  20. Selected KSC Applied Physics Lab Responses to Shuttle Processing Measurement Requests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C.

    2010-01-01

    The KSC Applied Physics Lab has been supporting Shuttle Ground Processing for over 20 years by solving problems brought to us by Shuttle personnel. Roughly half of the requests to our lab have been to find ways to make measurements, or to improve on an existing measurement process. This talk will briefly cover: 1) Centering the aft end of the External Tank between the Solid Rocket Boosters; 2) Positioning the GOX Vent Hood over the External Tank; 3) Remote Measurements of External Tank Damage; 4) Strain Measurement in the Orbiter Sling; and 5) Over-center Distance Measurement in an Over-center Mechanism.

  1. Radiological, physical, and chemical characterization of additional alpha contaminated and mixed low-level waste for treatment at the advanced mixed waste treatment project

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, D.P.

    1995-07-01

    This document provides physical, chemical, and radiological descriptive information for a portion of mixed waste that is potentially available for private sector treatment. The format and contents are designed to provide treatment vendors with preliminary information on the characteristics and properties for additional candidate portions of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and offsite mixed wastes not covered in the two previous characterization reports for the INEL-stored low-level alpha-contaminated and transuranic wastes. This report defines the waste, provides background information, briefly reviews the requirements of the Federal Facility Compliance Act (P.L. 102-386), and relates the Site Treatment Plans developed under the Federal Facility Compliance Act to the waste streams described herein. Each waste is summarized in a Waste Profile Sheet with text, charts, and tables of waste descriptive information for a particular waste stream. A discussion of the availability and uncertainty of data for these waste streams precedes the characterization descriptions.

  2. Reinforcement of acrylic resins for provisional fixed restorations. Part III: effects of addition of titania and zirconia mixtures on some mechanical and physical properties.

    PubMed

    Panyayong, W; Oshida, Y; Andres, C J; Barco, T M; Brown, D T; Hovijitra, S

    2002-01-01

    Acrylic resins have been used in many different applications in dentistry, especially in the fabrication of provisional fixed partial dentures. Ideally, a provisional crown and bridge material should be easy to handle and should protect teeth against physical, chemical, and thermal injuries. Some of the problems associated with this use are related to the material's poor mechanical properties. It has been demonstrated that acrylic resin can be strengthened through the addition of structural component of different size distributed in the acrylic matrix, thus forming a composite structure. The purpose of this study was to investigate the addition effects of mixtures of titania (titanium dioxide, TiO(2)) powder and zirconia (zirconium dioxide, ZrO(2)) powder being incorporated with pre-polymerized beads mixed in monomer liquid, on some mechanical and physical properties of PMMA resin. The pre-polymerized powder poly(methyl methacrylate) resin was admixed with titania and zirconia powder. A mixing ratio was controlled by volume % of 0, 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 (samples with 0 v/o served as control groups). For using mixture of titania and zirconia, total amount of the mixture was controlled by volume % of 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0, in which titania and zirconia were mixed at the ratio 1 :1, 1 :2 and 2 :1. Prior to mechanical tests, all rectangular-shaped samples (25 mm x 2 mm x 5 mm) were stored in 37 degrees C distilled water for 7 days after polishing all six sides of samples. Samples were then subjected to the three-point bending flexion test to evaluate the bending strength as well as the modulus of elasticity. Weight gain and exothermic reaction survey were investigated as well. All data were collected and analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Sidak method (p=0.05). It was found that the addition of particles generally decreased the water absorbed by the composite system. Only 1 percent by volume concentration of 1 :1 ratio and 2 percent by volume concentration

  3. Overview of Space Station attached payloads in the areas of solar physics, solar terrestrial physics, and plasma processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, W. T.; Kropp, J.; Taylor, W. W. L.

    1986-01-01

    This paper outlines the currently planned utilization of the Space Station to perform investigations in solar physics, solar terrestrial physics, and plasma physics. The investigations and instrumentation planned for the Solar Terrestrial Observatory (STO) and its associated Space Station accommodation requirements are discussed as well as the planned placement of the STO instruments and typical operational scenarios. In the area of plasma physics, some preliminary plans for scientific investigations and for the accommodation of a plasma physics facility attached to the Space Station are outlined. These preliminary experiment concepts use the space environment around the Space Station as an unconfined plasma laboratory. In solar physics, the initial instrument complement and associated accommodation requirements of the Advanced Solar Observatory are described. The planned evolutionary development of this observatory is outlined, making use of the Space Station capabilities for servicing and instrument reconfiguration.

  4. Processes at the sediment water interface after addition of organic matter and lime to an acid mine pit lake mesocosm

    SciTech Connect

    Matthias Koschorreck; Elke Bozau; Rene Froemmichen; Walter Geller; Peter Herzsprung; Katrin Wendt-Potthoff

    2007-03-01

    A strategy to neutralize acidic pit lakes was tested in a field mesocosm of 4500 m{sup 3} volume in the Acidic Pit Mine Lake 111 in the Koyne-Plessa lignite mining district of Lusatia, Germany. Carbokalk, a byproduct from sugar production, and wheat straw was applied near to the sediment surface to stimulate in lake microbial alkalinity generation by sulfate and iron reduction. The biogeochemical processes at the sediment-water interface were studied over 3 years by geochemical monitoring and an in situ microprofiler. Substrate addition generated a reactive zone at the sediment surface where sulfate and iron reduction proceeded. Gross sulfate reduction reached values up to 10 mmol m{sup -2} d{sup -1}. The neutralization rates between 27 and 0 meq m{sup -2} d{sup -1} were considerably lower than in previous laboratory experiments. The precipitation of ferric iron minerals resulted in a growing acidic sediment layer on top of the neutral sediment. In this layer sulfate reduction was observed but iron sulfides could not precipitate. In the anoxic sediment H{sub 2}S was oxidized by ferric iron minerals. H{sub 2}S partly diffused to the water column where it was oxidized. As a result the net formation of iron sulfides decreased after 1 year although gross sulfate reduction rates continued to be high. The rate of iron reduction exceeded the sulfate reduction rate, which resulted in high fluxes of ferrous iron out of the sediment. 46 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Optimization of palm oil physical refining process for reduction of 3-monochloropropane-1,2-diol (3-MCPD) ester formation.

    PubMed

    Zulkurnain, Musfirah; Lai, Oi Ming; Tan, Soo Choon; Abdul Latip, Razam; Tan, Chin Ping

    2013-04-01

    The reduction of 3-monochloropropane-1,2-diol (3-MCPD) ester formation in refined palm oil was achieved by incorporation of additional processing steps in the physical refining process to remove chloroester precursors prior to the deodorization step. The modified refining process was optimized for the least 3-MCPD ester formation and acceptable refined palm oil quality using response surface methodology (RSM) with five processing parameters: water dosage, phosphoric acid dosage, degumming temperature, activated clay dosage, and deodorization temperature. The removal of chloroester precursors was largely accomplished by increasing the water dosage, while the reduction of 3-MCPD esters was a compromise in oxidative stability and color of the refined palm oil because some factors such as acid dosage, degumming temperature, and deodorization temperature showed contradictory effects. The optimization resulted in 87.2% reduction of 3-MCPD esters from 2.9 mg/kg in the conventional refining process to 0.4 mg/kg, with color and oil stability index values of 2.4 R and 14.3 h, respectively. PMID:23464796

  6. Do Physical Oceanographers Care About Coastal Processes in Water Less Than 20-m Deep?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muenchow, A.

    2004-12-01

    The resounding yes may surprise Arctic researchers and old-style oceanographers, but the physics of coastal waters less than 20-m deep has been the subject of intense experimental and theoretical study over the last decade by physical oceanographers. For example, discoveries on the dynamics of (often sediment ladden) freshwater discharges into the coastal ocean relate to many Arctic systems that receive freshwater from rivers and ice melt. Boundary layer processes due to bottom and surface friction, too, often dominate coastal dynamics. Material transport and fluxes both along and across the coastal zone are strongly affected by stress- and buoyancy induced physical processes that mid-latitude physical oceanographers have explored extensively. Much of this progress has yet to migrate into the Arctic research community where oceanographers appear to focus on steady-state and deep-basin problems with little interest to processes impacted by the presence of a coastline and/or flow phenomena at the internal Rossby radius of deformation. This situation has left geological and biological scientists working on pressing Arctic coastal zone problems isolated from new advances, understanding, and technologies of exchange processes at the land-ocean interface that generally is less than 20-m deep. More specifically, I discuss published and unpublished observational and theoretical model results from both Arctic and mid-latitude inner shelf systems. The inner shelf is here defined as the region where surface and bottom boundary layers overlap. I will contrast data from the Canadian Mackenzie and Russian East Siberian shelf seas with similar data (and models to explain them) from North- and South-American inner shelves. I will demonstrate conceptionally how frictional and buoyancy forces interact in waters less than 20-m deep to cause circulations, vertical stratification, and depth-dependent material transport that differs substantially from steady and linear perceptions of a

  7. Didactical Reconstruction of Processes in Knowledge Construction: Pre-Service Physics Teachers Learning the Law of Electromagnetic Induction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mantyla, Terhi

    2012-01-01

    In physics teacher education, two central goals are first to learn the structures of physics knowledge, and second the processes of its construction. To know the structure is to know the framework of concepts and laws; to know the processes is to know where the knowledge comes from, how the framework is constructed, and how it can be justified.…

  8. The effect of processing on the surface physical stability of amorphous solid dispersions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ziyi; Nollenberger, Kathrin; Albers, Jessica; Moffat, Jonathan; Craig, Duncan; Qi, Sheng

    2014-11-01

    The focus of this study was to investigate the effect of processing on the surface crystallization of amorphous molecular dispersions and gain insight into the mechanisms underpinning this effect. The model systems, amorphous molecular dispersions of felodipine-EUDRAGIT® E PO, were processed both using spin coating (an ultra-fast solvent evaporation based method) and hot melt extrusion (HME) (a melting based method). Amorphous solid dispersions with drug loadings of 10-90% (w/w) were obtained by both processing methods. Samples were stored under 75% RH/room temperatures for up to 10months. Surface crystallization was observed shortly after preparation for the HME samples with high drug loadings (50-90%). Surface crystallization was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and imaging techniques (SEM, AFM and localized thermal analysis). Spin coated molecular dispersions showed significantly higher surface physical stability than hot melt extruded samples. For both systems, the progress of the surface crystal growth followed zero order kinetics on aging. Drug enrichment at the surfaces of HME samples on aging was observed, which may contribute to surface crystallization of amorphous molecular dispersions. In conclusion it was found the amorphous molecular dispersions prepared by spin coating had a significantly higher surface physical stability than the corresponding HME samples, which may be attributed to the increased process-related apparent drug-polymer solubility and reduced molecular mobility due to the quenching effect caused by the rapid solvent evaporation in spin coating. PMID:25111184

  9. Physical characteristics of olive stone wooden residues: possible bulking material for composting process.

    PubMed

    Vlyssides, A G; Barampouti, E M P; Mai, S Th

    2008-04-01

    The present work focuses on the study of the physical characteristics of olive stone wooden residues at the prospect of its use as a bulking material in compost process. The physical characteristics that were studied according to particle mesh classification, were the apparent density, porosity, water holding capacity, air free space and air pressure drop. From the experimental results, it was proved that only the fraction of 6.8-12.5 mesh, which is 29.40% of the substrate, could maintain the moisture in the optimum range 40-60%. The fraction of the particles of 2.6-23.6 mesh, which was 74.68% of the substrate, had appropriate porosity for composting. It was also proved that for dried substrate and air velocity 300 m h(-1), acceptable pressure drop (10 cm H2O m(-1)) was observed for the fraction of the particles of 2.6-27.5 mesh, which was 80.08% of the substrate, while for dried substrate and air velocity 150 m h(-1), the respective fraction was particles of 2.6-37.9 mesh which accounted for the 89.48% of the substrate. Conclusively, olive oil processing solid residues have the physical characteristics, so as to be used for composting or as a substrate for co-composting with high strength wastewater. PMID:17534724

  10. Efficient Physical Embedding of Topologically Complex Information Processing Networks in Brains and Computer Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Moore, Simon W.; Bullmore, Edward T.

    2010-01-01

    Nervous systems are information processing networks that evolved by natural selection, whereas very large scale integrated (VLSI) computer circuits have evolved by commercially driven technology development. Here we follow historic intuition that all physical information processing systems will share key organizational properties, such as modularity, that generally confer adaptivity of function. It has long been observed that modular VLSI circuits demonstrate an isometric scaling relationship between the number of processing elements and the number of connections, known as Rent's rule, which is related to the dimensionality of the circuit's interconnect topology and its logical capacity. We show that human brain structural networks, and the nervous system of the nematode C. elegans, also obey Rent's rule, and exhibit some degree of hierarchical modularity. We further show that the estimated Rent exponent of human brain networks, derived from MRI data, can explain the allometric scaling relations between gray and white matter volumes across a wide range of mammalian species, again suggesting that these principles of nervous system design are highly conserved. For each of these fractal modular networks, the dimensionality of the interconnect topology was greater than the 2 or 3 Euclidean dimensions of the space in which it was embedded. This relatively high complexity entailed extra cost in physical wiring: although all networks were economically or cost-efficiently wired they did not strictly minimize wiring costs. Artificial and biological information processing systems both may evolve to optimize a trade-off between physical cost and topological complexity, resulting in the emergence of homologous principles of economical, fractal and modular design across many different kinds of nervous and computational networks. PMID:20421990

  11. Physics and modeling of ion implantation induced transient deactivation and diffusion processes in boron doped silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarthi, Srinivasan

    The economics of silicon processing requires predictive modeling capabilities for the continued rapid advancement of semiconductor technology. This is because it has become prohibitively expensive to develop a new process by running a large series of test lots through multi-billion dollar fabrication facilities. Effective process modeling requires an accurate physical understanding of the various interacting processes. The complexity of this problem is compounded by highly non-equilibrium phenomena associated with IC fabrication processes such as implantation annealing. Point defect supersaturations of many orders of magnitude are introduced following ion implantation, which is used to introduce the dopants into silicon. Such supersaturations dramatically alter the diffusion of dopants and reduce the electrical activation during the initial phase of the anneal. Boron is the primary p-type dopant used in silicon and thus understanding and modeling its deactivation/activation and diffusion is critical to predictive process simulation. Since boron is smaller than silicon, boron agglomerates with interstitials becoming electrically inactive. Modeling of boron clusters is complicated, as there is a huge array of potential boron-interstitial cluster compositions. A physical model for boron clustering is derived by identifying dominant clusters and rate limiting steps via atomistic calculations performed at Lawrence Livermore National Labs. The model is then used successfully to match a wide variety of chemical and electrical data. We further apply this model to understand and successfully predict ultra shallow junction formation. We find it is possible to explain some intriguing phenomenon observed during the formation of ultra shallow junctions, like saturation in junction depth despite increasing ramp-up rates. Researchers are exploring novel experimental processing steps like high energy Si pre-implants to produce highly active and shallow B junctions. To understand

  12. Highly Efficient, Reproducible, Uniform (CH3 NH3 )PbI3 Layer by Processing Additive Dripping for Solution-Processed Planar Heterojunction Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hansol; Jeong, Hanbin; Lee, Jae Kwan

    2016-09-01

    A processing additive dripping (PAD) approach to forming highly efficient (CH3 NH3 )PbI3 (MAPbI3 ) perovskite layers was investigated. A MAPbI3 (CB/DIO) perovskite film fabricated by this approach, which included briefly dripping chlorobenzene incorporating a small amount of diiodooctane (DIO) during casting of a MAPbI3 perovskite precursor dissolved in dimethylformamide, exhibited superior smooth, uniform morphologies with high crystallinity and large grains and revealed completely homogeneous surface coverage. The surface coverage and morphology of the substrate significantly affected the photovoltaic performance of planar heterojunction (PHJ) perovskite solar cells (PrSCs), resulting in a power conversion efficiency of 11.45 % with high open-circuit voltage of 0.91 V and the highest fill factor of 80.87 %. Moreover, the PAD approach could effectively provide efficient MAPbI3 (CB/DIO) perovskite layers for highly efficient, reproducible, uniform PHJ PrSC devices without performance loss or variation even over larger active areas. PMID:27414840

  13. Effective parameters, effective processes: From porous flow physics to in situ remediation technology

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.

    1995-06-01

    This paper examines the conceptualization of multiphase flow processes on the macroscale, as needed in field applications. It emphasizes that upscaling from the pore-level will in general not only introduce effective parameters but will also give rise to ``effective processes,`` i.e., the emergence of new physical effects that may not have a microscopic counterpart. ``Phase dispersion`` is discussed as an example of an effective process for the migration and remediation of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) contaminants in heterogeneous media. An approximate space-and-time scaling invariance is derived for gravity-driven liquid flow in unsaturated two-dimensional porous media (fractures). Issues for future experimental and theoretical work are identified.

  14. Boundary conditions for the paleoenvironment: Chemical and Physical Processes in dense interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, W. M.; Schloerb, F. P.; Ziurys, L. M.

    1986-01-01

    The present research includes searches for important new interstellar constituents; observations relevant to differentiating between different models for the chemical processes that are important in the interstellar environment; and coordinated studies of the chemistry, physics, and dynamics of molecular clouds which are the sites or possible future sites of star formation. Recent research has included the detection and study of four new interstellar molecules; searches which have placed upper limits on the abundance of several other potential constituents of interstellar clouds; quantitative studies of comparative molecular abundances in different types of interstellar clouds; investigation of reaction pathways for astrochemistry from a comparison of theory and the observed abundance of related species such as isomers and isotopic variants; studies of possible tracers of energenic events related to star formation, including silicon and sulfur containing molecules; and mapping of physical, chemical, and dynamical properties over extended regions of nearby cold molecular clouds.

  15. Combustion synthesis and effects of processing parameters on physical properties of {alpha}-alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, M.V.; Hirschfeld, D.A.; Shea, L.E.

    2000-01-04

    Fine particle porous {alpha}-alumina has been prepared by a wet chemical method of combustion synthesis using an aqueous precursor containing aluminum nitrate (oxidizer) and carbohydrazide, an organic fuel as starting materials. The aluminum nitrate and carbohydrazide were reacted exothermically at 400--600 C. The synthesis of {alpha}-alumina ({alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) was used as a model for understanding the effects of processing parameters on physical properties such as surface area, average pore size, and residual carbon content. The porous powders were characterized using x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), BET surface area analysis and elemental analysis. The decomposition of the starting materials was investigated using differential thermal and thermogravimetric analyses (DTA/TGA). It has been shown that the furnace temperature, fuel/oxidizer ratio, and precursor water content can be tailored to produce powders with different physical properties.

  16. Review of searches for rare processes and physics beyond the Standard Model at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    South, David M.; Turcato, Monica

    2016-06-01

    The electron-proton collisions collected by the H1 and ZEUS experiments at HERA comprise a unique particle physics data set, and a comprehensive range of measurements has been performed to provide new insight into the structure of the proton. The high centre of mass energy at HERA has also allowed rare processes to be studied, including the production of W and Z0 bosons and events with multiple leptons in the final state. The data have also opened up a new domain to searches for physics beyond the Standard Model including contact interactions, leptoquarks, excited fermions and a number of supersymmetric models. This review presents a summary of such results, where the analyses reported correspond to an integrated luminosity of up to 1 fb^{-1}, representing the complete data set recorded by the H1 and ZEUS experiments.

  17. TIME SERIES ANALYSIS OF REMOTELY-SENSED TIR EMISSION: linking anomalies to physical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlidou, E.; van der Meijde, M.; Hecker, C.; van der Werff, H.; Ettema, J.

    2013-12-01

    In the last 15 years, remote sensing has been evaluated for detecting thermal anomalies as precursor to earthquakes. Important issues that need yet to be tackled include definition of: (a) thermal anomaly, taking into account weather conditions, observation settings and ';natural' variability caused by background sources (b) the length of observations required for this purpose; and (c) the location of detected anomalies, which should be physically related to the tectonic activity. To determine whether thermal anomalies are statistical noise, mere meteorological conditions, or actual earthquake-related phenomena, we apply a novel approach. We use brightness temperature (top-of-atmosphere) data from thermal infrared imagery acquired at a hypertemporal (sub-hourly) interval, from geostationary weather satellites over multiple years. The length of the time series allows for analysis of meteorological effects (diurnal, seasonal or annual trends) and background variability, through the application of a combined spatial and temporal filter to distinguish extreme occurrences from trends. The definition of potential anomalies is based on statistical techniques, taking into account published (geo)physical characteristics of earthquake related thermal anomalies. We use synthetic data to test the performance of the proposed detection method and track potential factors affecting the results. Subsequently, we apply the method on original data from Iran and Turkey, in quiescent and earthquake-struck periods alike. We present our findings with main focus to assess resulting anomalies in relation to physical processes thereby considering: (a) meteorological effects, (b) the geographical, geological and environmental settings, and (c) physically realistic distances and potential physical relations with the activity of causative faults.

  18. New Mass Spectrometry Techniques for Studying Physical Chemistry of Atmospheric Heterogeneous Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Nizkorodov, Sergey

    2013-03-01

    Ambient particles and droplets have a significant effect on climate, visibility, and human health. Once formed, they undergo continuous transformations through condensation and evaporation of water, uptake of low-volatility organic molecules, and photochemical reactions involving various gaseous and condensed-phase species in the atmosphere. These transformations determine the physical and chemical properties of airborne particles, such as their ability to absorb and scatter solar radiation and nucleate cloud droplets. The complexity, heterogeneity, and size of ambient particles make it challenging to understand the kinetics and mechanisms of their formation and chemical transformations. Mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful analytical technique that enables detailed chemical characterization of both small and large molecules in complex matrices. We present an overview of new and emerging experimental MS-based approaches for understanding physical chemistry of environmental particles, droplets, and surfaces. In addition, we emphasize the role of fundamental physical chemistry studies in the development of new methods for chemical analysis of ambient particles and droplets.

  19. Simulating Cortical Development as a Self Constructing Process: A Novel Multi-Scale Approach Combining Molecular and Physical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Zubler, Frederic; Hauri, Andreas; Pfister, Sabina; Bauer, Roman; Anderson, John C.; Whatley, Adrian M.; Douglas, Rodney J.

    2013-01-01

    Current models of embryological development focus on intracellular processes such as gene expression and protein networks, rather than on the complex relationship between subcellular processes and the collective cellular organization these processes support. We have explored this collective behavior in the context of neocortical development, by modeling the expansion of a small number of progenitor cells into a laminated cortex with layer and cell type specific projections. The developmental process is steered by a formal language analogous to genomic instructions, and takes place in a physically realistic three-dimensional environment. A common genome inserted into individual cells control their individual behaviors, and thereby gives rise to collective developmental sequences in a biologically plausible manner. The simulation begins with a single progenitor cell containing the artificial genome. This progenitor then gives rise through a lineage of offspring to distinct populations of neuronal precursors that migrate to form the cortical laminae. The precursors differentiate by extending dendrites and axons, which reproduce the experimentally determined branching patterns of a number of different neuronal cell types observed in the cat visual cortex. This result is the first comprehensive demonstration of the principles of self-construction whereby the cortical architecture develops. In addition, our model makes several testable predictions concerning cell migration and branching mechanisms. PMID:23966845

  20. The association of physical activity to neural adaptability during visuo-spatial processing in healthy elderly adults: A multiscale entropy analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Hao; Tsai, Chia-Liang; Tseng, Philip; Yang, Albert C; Lo, Men-Tzung; Peng, Chung-Kang; Wang, Hsin-Yi; Muggleton, Neil G; Juan, Chi-Hung; Liang, Wei-Kuang

    2014-10-29

    Physical activity has been shown to benefit brain and cognition in late adulthood. However, this effect is still unexplored in terms of brain signal complexity, which reflects the level of neural adaptability and efficiency during cognitive processing that cannot be acquired via averaged neuroelectric signals. Here we employed multiscale entropy analysis (MSE) of electroencephalography (EEG), a new approach that conveys important information related to the temporal dynamics of brain signal complexity across multiple time scales, to reveal the association of physical activity with neural adaptability and efficiency in elderly adults. A between-subjects design that included 24 participants (aged 66.63±1.31years; female=12) with high physical activity and 24 age- and gender-matched low physical activity participants (aged 67.29±1.20years) was conducted to examine differences related to physical activity in performance and MSE of EEG signals during a visuo-spatial cognition task. We observed that physically active elderly adults had better accuracy on both visuo-spatial attention and working memory conditions relative to their sedentary counterparts. Additionally, these physically active elderly adults displayed greater MSE values at larger time scales at the Fz electrode in both attention and memory conditions. The results suggest that physical activity may be beneficial for adaptability of brain systems in tasks involving visuo-spatial information. MSE thus might be a promising approach to test the effects of the benefits of exercise on cognition. PMID:25463141