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Sample records for additional pituitary hormone

  1. 21 CFR 522.1820 - Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. 522... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1820 Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. (a) Specifications. The drug is a... standard pituitary luteinizing hormone and is reconstituted for use by addition of 5 milliliters of...

  2. 21 CFR 522.1820 - Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. 522... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1820 Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. (a) Specifications. The drug is a... standard pituitary luteinizing hormone and is reconstituted for use by addition of 5 milliliters of...

  3. 21 CFR 522.1820 - Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. 522... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1820 Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. (a) Specifications. The drug is a... standard pituitary luteinizing hormone and is reconstituted for use by addition of 5 milliliters of...

  4. 21 CFR 522.1820 - Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. 522... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1820 Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. (a) Specifications. The drug is a... standard pituitary luteinizing hormone and is reconstituted for use by addition of 5 milliliters of...

  5. Update: brain and pituitary hormones of lampreys.

    PubMed

    Sower, S A; Kawauchi, H

    2001-06-01

    Lampreys and hagfish of the class Agnatha are of particular importance in understanding endocrinological relationships since they represent the oldest lineages of extant vertebrates which evolved over 550 million years ago. This review briefly summarizes the latest findings on the reproductive endocrinology of the sea lampreys. Since the First International Symposium of Fish Endocrinology in 1988, when virtually little was known of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, substantial new biochemical, molecular, physiological and immunological evidence has now clearly shown that lamprey reproduction is controlled by the neuroendocrine axis. In addition, five brain and six pituitary hormones of lampreys have been identified mainly by Sower and Kawauchi and colleagues between 1986 and 2000. We now hypothesize that lamprey reproduction is a highly synchronized process that is initiated or mediated by a coordination of complex integration of environmental cues and hormonal mechanisms which is broadly similar to that exhibited by gnathostome vertebrates.

  6. 21 CFR 522.1820 - Pituitary luteinizing hormone powder for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pituitary luteinizing hormone powder for injection... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1820 Pituitary luteinizing hormone powder for injection. (a) Specifications. The drug... milligrams of standard pituitary luteinizing hormone and is reconstituted for use by addition of...

  7. THE INTRACELLULAR LOCALIZATION OF PITUITARY THYROTROPIC HORMONE

    PubMed Central

    Greenspan, Francis S.; Hargadine, Judy R.

    1965-01-01

    The intracellular localization of a bovine anterior pituitary preparation of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) was studied in guinea pigs and dogs. The preparation was administered intravascularly or applied directly to tissue sections. TSH was detected by an indirect technique utilizing bovine TSH antiserum and fluorescein-labeled anti-rabbit globulin; the presence of TSH in the tissue was indicated by fluorescence when the tissue was examined under the microscope with an ultraviolet light source. After either intravascular administration or direct application of the TSH preparation, striking fluorescence was found in the nuclei of the thyroid cells and to a lesser degree in the nuclei of retro-orbital fat tissue and kidney tubules in both species studied. A little fluorescence was also seen in spleen tissue. No fluorescence was noted in comparable tissues removed from control animals injected with bovine albumin or globulin or when the tissues were treated with the fluorescein-labeled globulin alone. Fluorescence was also noted in the nuclei of adrenal cells treated with unabsorbed antiserum, but this was greatly diminished when antiserum absorbed with crystalline ACTH was used. The positive reactions were all markedly decreased when the tissues were treated with antisera absorbed with the original TSH preparation. Fluorescence was noted in the cytoplasm of pituitary tissue from both treated and control animals, suggesting a cross-reaction between the bovine pituitary antisera and guinea pig or dog hypophysis. The indirect technique seems to be highly satisfactory for demonstration of the pitiutary hormone within the cell. In addition, the demonstration of immunologically active anterior pituitary TSH bound to cell nuclei offers a clue to the site of action of this hormone. PMID:5323607

  8. Genetics Home Reference: combined pituitary hormone deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... People with combined pituitary hormone deficiency may have hypothyroidism, which is underactivity of the butterfly-shaped thyroid gland in the lower neck. Hypothyroidism can cause many symptoms, including weight gain and ...

  9. The pituitary growth hormone cell in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, Wesley C.; Grindeland, R.

    1989-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH), produced and secreted from specialized cells in the pituitary gland, controls the metabolism of protein, fat, and carbohydrate. It is also probably involved in the regulation of proper function of bone, muscle and immune systems. The behavior of the GH cell system was studied by flying either isolated pituitary cells or live rats. In the latter case, pituitary GH cells are prepared on return to earth and then either transplanted into hypophysectomized rats or placed into cell culture so that function of GH cells in-vivo vs. in-vitro can be compared. The results from three flights to date (STS-8, 1983; SL-3, 1985; Cosmos 1887, 1987) established that the ability of GH cells to release hormone, on return to earth, is compromised. The mechanism(s) responsible for this attenuation response is unknown. However, the data are sufficiently positive to indicate that the nature of the secretory defect resides directly within the GH cells.

  10. Pituitary responsiveness to luteinizing-hormone-releasing hormone in different reproductive disorders. A review.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, J M; Greenblatt, R B

    1985-08-01

    As a result of the use of synthetic luteinizing-hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) (and its analogs), significant advances in modern clinical practice are being realized. We studied the use of LHRH as a test for pituitary reserve for gonadotropin secretion in different reproductive disorders. Synthetic LHRH was used as a diagnostic test for discriminating pituitary from hypothalamic disorders. After appropriate LHRH priming of the pituitary, LHRH was used to document hypothalamic dysfunction in patients with Kallmann's syndrome who had normal gonadotropin responsiveness to LHRH. The gonadotropin responsiveness to 100 micrograms of LHRH was impaired or absent in patients with panhypopituitarism, craniopharyngiomas, hemochromatosis and acromegaly accompanied by abnormal lactation. In women with gonadal dysgenesis, the absence of gonadal steroid feedback exacerbated the pituitary responsiveness to LHRH. Women with hyperprolactinemia are also known to have a blunted gonadotropin response to endogenous and exogenous LHRH. An experimental rat model was developed in our laboratory to study the site of prolactin action on gonadotropin secretion. LHRH challenge tests during perphenazine-induced hyperprolactinemia in rats indicated that prolactin may decrease pituitary sensitivity to LHRH. Additional experiments indicated that the increased progesterone produced in these hyperprolactinemic (pseudopregnant) rats was probably responsible for the decreased pituitary responsiveness to LHRH. Further studies will be necessary to determine whether prolactin, which can alter ovarian steroidogenesis in vitro, interferes with ovulation directly in addition to affecting the hypothalamic-pituitary axis.

  11. Purification and cultivation of human pituitary growth hormone secreting cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.

    1984-01-01

    A multiphase study was conducted to examine the properties of growth hormone cells. Topics investigated included: (1) to determine if growth hormone (GH) cells contained within the rat pituitary gland can be separated from the other hormone producing cell types by continuous flow electrophoresis (CFE); (2) to determine what role, if any, gravity plays in the electrophoretic separation of GH cells; (3) to compare in vitro GH release from rat pituitary cells previously exposed to microgravity conditions vs release from cells not exposed to microgravity; (4) to determine if the frequency of different hormone producing pituitary cell types contained in cell suspensions can be quantitated by flow cytometry; and (5) to determine if GH contained within the human post mortem pituitary gland can be purified by CFE. Specific experimental procedures and results are included.

  12. Borjeson-Forssman-Lehmann syndrome and multiple pituitary hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Birrell, G; Lampe, A; Richmond, S; Bruce, S N; Gécz, J; Lower, K; Wright, M; Cheetham, T D

    2003-12-01

    We describe two brothers with Borjeson-Forssman-Lehmann syndrome and the 22A-->T (Lys8X) PHF6 mutation, who presented with the symptoms and signs of multiple pituitary hormone deficiency. Biochemical investigations and radiology confirmed growth hormone (GH), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) as well as gonadotrophin deficiency. They were also found to have optic nerve hypoplasia. This family suggests that the BFL gene product may play an important role in midline neuro-development including the hypothalamo-pituitary axis.

  13. Purification and cultivation of human pituitary growth hormone secreting cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.

    1978-01-01

    The maintainance of actively secreting human pituitary growth hormone cells (somatotrophs) in vitro was studied. The primary approach was the testing of agents which may be expected to increase the release of the human growth hormone (hGH). A procedure for tissue procurement is described along with the methodologies used to dissociate human pituitary tissue (obtained either at autopsy or surgery) into single cell suspensions. The validity of the Biogel cell column perfusion system for studying the dynamics of GH release was developed and documented using a rat pituitary cell system.

  14. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist-induced pituitary apoplexy

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Fergus; Navin, Patrick; Brett, Francesca; Dennedy, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    Summary Pituitary apoplexy represents an uncommon endocrine emergency with potentially life-threatening consequences. Drug-induced pituitary apoplexy is a rare but important consideration when evaluating patients with this presentation. We describe an unusual case of a patient with a known pituitary macroadenoma presenting with acute-onset third nerve palsy and headache secondary to tumour enlargement and apoplexy. This followed gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRH) agonist therapy used to treat metastatic prostate carcinoma. Following acute management, the patient underwent transphenoidal debulking of his pituitary gland with resolution of his third nerve palsy. Subsequent retrospective data interpretation revealed that this had been a secretory gonadotropinoma and GNRH agonist therapy resulted in raised gonadotropins and testosterone. Hence, further management of his prostate carcinoma required GNRH antagonist therapy and external beam radiotherapy. This case demonstrates an uncommon complication of GNRH agonist therapy in the setting of a pituitary macroadenoma. It also highlights the importance of careful, serial data interpretation in patients with pituitary adenomas. Finally, this case presents a unique insight into the challenges of managing a hormonal-dependent prostate cancer in a patient with a secretory pituitary tumour. Learning points While non-functioning gonadotropinomas represent the most common form of pituitary macroadenoma, functioning gonadotropinomas are exceedingly rare. Acute tumour enlargement, with potential pituitary apoplexy, is a rare but important adverse effect arising from GNRH agonist therapy in the presence of both functioning and non-functioning pituitary gonadotropinomas. GNRH antagonist therapy represents an alternative treatment option for patients with hormonal therapy-requiring prostate cancer, who also have diagnosed with a pituitary gonadotropinoma. PMID:27284452

  15. Purification and cultivation of human pituitary growth hormone secreting cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    Efforts were directed towards maintenance of actively secreting human pituitary growth hormone cells (somatotrophs) in vitro. The production of human growth hormone (hGH) by this means would be of benefit for the treatment of certain human hypopituitary diseases such as dwarfism. One of the primary approaches was the testing of agents which may logically be expected to increase hGH release. The progress towards this goal is summarized. Results from preliminary experiments dealing with electrophoresis of pituitary cell for the purpose of somatotroph separation are described.

  16. Control of pituitary thyroid-stimulating hormone synthesis and secretion by thyroid hormones during Xenopus metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Robin M; Thoemke, Kara R; Korte, Joseph J; Moen, Scott M; Olson, Jessica M; Korte, Lisa; Tietge, Joseph E; Degitz, Sigmund J

    2011-09-15

    We used ex vivo and in vivo experiments with Xenopus laevis tadpoles to examine the hypothesis that the set-point for negative feedback on pituitary thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) synthesis and secretion by thyroid hormones (THs) increases as metamorphosis progresses to allow for the previously documented concomitant increase in serum TH concentrations and pituitary TSH mRNA expression during this transformative process. First, pituitaries from climactic tadpoles were cultured for up to 96 h to characterize the ability of pituitary explants to synthesize and secrete TSHβ in the absence of hypothalamic and circulating hormones. Next, pituitary explants from tadpoles NF stages 54-66 were exposed to physiologically-relevant concentrations of THs to determine whether stage-specific differences exist in pituitary sensitivity to negative feedback by THs. Finally, in vivo exposures of tadpoles to THs were conducted to confirm the results of the ex vivo experiments. When pituitaries from climactic tadpoles were removed from the influence of endogenous hormones, TSHβ mRNA expression increased late or not at all whereas the rate of TSHβ secreted into media increased dramatically, suggesting that TSH secretion, but not TSH mRNA expression, is under the negative regulation of an endogenous signal during the climactic stages of metamorphosis. Pituitaries from pre- and prometamorphic tadpoles were more sensitive to TH-induced inhibition of TSHβ mRNA expression and secretion than pituitaries from climactic tadpoles. The observed decrease in sensitivity of pituitary TSHβ mRNA expression to negative feedback by THs from premetamorphosis to metamorphic climax was confirmed by in vivo experiments in which tadpoles were reared in water containing THs. Based on the results of this study, a model is proposed to explain the seemingly paradoxical, concurrent rise in serum TH concentrations and pituitary TSH mRNA expression during metamorphosis in larval anurans.

  17. cDNA microarray reveals signaling pathways involved in hormones expression of human pituitary.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yue-Yun; Qi, Xiao-Fei; Song, Shao-Jun; Zhao, Zhan-Yong; Zhu, Zhi-Dong; Qi, Jia; Zhang, Xin; Xiao, Hua-Sheng; Teng, Yun; Han, Ze-Guang

    2005-09-01

    Pituitary, a master gland of neuroendocrine system, secretes hormones that orchestrate many physiological processes, under the regulation of multiple signaling pathways. To investigate the genes involved in hormones expression of human pituitary, homemade cDNA microarray containing 14,800 human genes/ESTs were used to profile the gene expression in both fetal and adult pituitaries. Seven hundred and twelve known genes changed over 2-fold between the both tissues. Of which, 23 genes were changed with hormones expression in aging were confirmed by RT-PCR, not only the known regulators such as Pit1, GATA4, ESRRA, GABA-A, and EMK, but also LOC55884, DUSP3, PNN, and RCL, which had not been reported to be involved in the hormones expression. Correspondingly, the mRNAs of GH, PRL, POMC, TSH-beta, FSH-beta, and LH-beta, was increased as much as 6- to 20-fold in adult pituitary than those in fetal pituitary, by real-time quantitative RT-PCR assay. In addition, the mRNAs of signaling pathways, such as cAMP-PKA-CREB, PI3K-Akt, and PKA-ERK were further investigated. Of them, it was only cAMP-PKA-CREB pathway, but not PI3K-Akt and PKA-ERK have the same expressing pattern as hormones. It suggested that cDNA microarray is highly advantages to profile the differential expressed genes that were involved in hormones expression of human pituitary, but it might ignore some responding proteins regulated posttranscriptionally.

  18. Pituitary and placental hormone levels in pseudocyesis.

    PubMed

    Osotimehin, B O; Ladipo, O A; Adejuwon, C A; Otolorin, E O

    1981-10-01

    Twelve patients with clinical features of pseudocyesis were divided into two groups according to the presence or absence of galactorrhea. The mean serum prolactin level of patients with galactorrhea was significantly higher than the normal values of the patients without galactorrhea. The mean serum levels of luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone were markedly elevated in patients without galactorrhea. This was especially true of luteinizing hormone. Serum levels of human chorionic gonadotropin were undetectable in all patients. The significance of these observations is discussed.

  19. PHYSICOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF PITUITARY FOLLICLE-STIMULATING HORMONE

    PubMed Central

    Li, Choh Hao; Pedersen, Kai O.

    1952-01-01

    The physiochemical characteristics of the follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) from whole sheep pituitary glands have been studied. The hormone behaves as a single protein in electrophoresis, diffusion, and ultracentrifugation. It has an isoelectric point at pH 4.5 and a molecular weight of 67,000 and contains 1.23 per cent hexose and 1.51 per cent hexosamine. The amino acid composition has also been determined in large part. The stability of the hormone to acid and heat has been investigated. PMID:14898040

  20. Gigantism caused by growth hormone secreting pituitary adenoma.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Noorisaem; Jeong, Kumi; Yang, Eun Mi; Kim, Chan Jong

    2014-06-01

    Gigantism indicates excessive secretion of growth hormones (GH) during childhood when open epiphyseal growth plates allow for excessive linear growth. Case one involved a 14.7-year-old boy presented with extreme tall stature. His random serum GH level was 38.4 ng/mL, and failure of GH suppression was noted during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT; nadir serum GH, 22.7 ng/mL). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain revealed a 12-mm-sized pituitary adenoma. Transsphenoidal surgery was performed and a pituitary adenoma displaying positive immunohistochemical staining for GH was reported. Pituitary MRI scan was performed 4 months after surgery and showed recurrence/residual tumor. Medical treatment with a long-acting somatostatin analogue for six months was unsuccessful. As a result, secondary surgery was performed. Three months after reoperation, the GH level was 0.2 ng/mL and insulin-like growth factor 1 was 205 ng/mL. Case two involved a 14.9-year-old boy, who was referred to our department for his tall stature. His basal GH level was 9.3 ng/mL, and failure of GH suppression was reported during OGTT (nadir GH, 9.0 ng/mL). Pituitary MRI showed a 6-mm-sized pituitary adenoma. Surgery was done and histopathological examination demonstrated a pituitary adenoma with positive staining for GH. Three months after surgery, the GH level was 0.2 ng/mL and nadir GH during OGTT was less than 0.1 ng/mL. Pituitary MRI scans showed no residual tumor. We present two cases of gigantism caused by a GH-secreting pituitary adenoma with clinical and microscopic findings. PMID:25077093

  1. Gigantism caused by growth hormone secreting pituitary adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Noorisaem; Jeong, Kumi; Yang, Eun Mi

    2014-01-01

    Gigantism indicates excessive secretion of growth hormones (GH) during childhood when open epiphyseal growth plates allow for excessive linear growth. Case one involved a 14.7-year-old boy presented with extreme tall stature. His random serum GH level was 38.4 ng/mL, and failure of GH suppression was noted during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT; nadir serum GH, 22.7 ng/mL). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain revealed a 12-mm-sized pituitary adenoma. Transsphenoidal surgery was performed and a pituitary adenoma displaying positive immunohistochemical staining for GH was reported. Pituitary MRI scan was performed 4 months after surgery and showed recurrence/residual tumor. Medical treatment with a long-acting somatostatin analogue for six months was unsuccessful. As a result, secondary surgery was performed. Three months after reoperation, the GH level was 0.2 ng/mL and insulin-like growth factor 1 was 205 ng/mL. Case two involved a 14.9-year-old boy, who was referred to our department for his tall stature. His basal GH level was 9.3 ng/mL, and failure of GH suppression was reported during OGTT (nadir GH, 9.0 ng/mL). Pituitary MRI showed a 6-mm-sized pituitary adenoma. Surgery was done and histopathological examination demonstrated a pituitary adenoma with positive staining for GH. Three months after surgery, the GH level was 0.2 ng/mL and nadir GH during OGTT was less than 0.1 ng/mL. Pituitary MRI scans showed no residual tumor. We present two cases of gigantism caused by a GH-secreting pituitary adenoma with clinical and microscopic findings. PMID:25077093

  2. Gigantism caused by growth hormone secreting pituitary adenoma.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Noorisaem; Jeong, Kumi; Yang, Eun Mi; Kim, Chan Jong

    2014-06-01

    Gigantism indicates excessive secretion of growth hormones (GH) during childhood when open epiphyseal growth plates allow for excessive linear growth. Case one involved a 14.7-year-old boy presented with extreme tall stature. His random serum GH level was 38.4 ng/mL, and failure of GH suppression was noted during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT; nadir serum GH, 22.7 ng/mL). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain revealed a 12-mm-sized pituitary adenoma. Transsphenoidal surgery was performed and a pituitary adenoma displaying positive immunohistochemical staining for GH was reported. Pituitary MRI scan was performed 4 months after surgery and showed recurrence/residual tumor. Medical treatment with a long-acting somatostatin analogue for six months was unsuccessful. As a result, secondary surgery was performed. Three months after reoperation, the GH level was 0.2 ng/mL and insulin-like growth factor 1 was 205 ng/mL. Case two involved a 14.9-year-old boy, who was referred to our department for his tall stature. His basal GH level was 9.3 ng/mL, and failure of GH suppression was reported during OGTT (nadir GH, 9.0 ng/mL). Pituitary MRI showed a 6-mm-sized pituitary adenoma. Surgery was done and histopathological examination demonstrated a pituitary adenoma with positive staining for GH. Three months after surgery, the GH level was 0.2 ng/mL and nadir GH during OGTT was less than 0.1 ng/mL. Pituitary MRI scans showed no residual tumor. We present two cases of gigantism caused by a GH-secreting pituitary adenoma with clinical and microscopic findings.

  3. Control of Pituitary Thyroid-stimulating Hormone Synthesis and Secretion by Thyroid Hormones during Xenopus Metamorphosis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Serum thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations in anuran larvae rise rapidly during metamorphosis. Such a rise in an adult anuran would inevitably trigger a negative feedback response resulting in decreased synthesis and secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) by the pituitary....

  4. Expression of growth hormone (GH)-releasing factor gene in GH-producing pituitary adenoma.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, I; Inokuchi, K; Hasegawa, O; Sugihara, H; Minami, S

    1992-02-01

    Pituitary cells synthesize various neuropeptides that influence pituitary hormone secretion. GH-releasing factor (GRF) may also be produced by normal or pituitary tumor cells. We examined GRF gene expression in pituitary tumors. Standard techniques for the analysis of GRF gene expression did not appear to be suitable. Highly sensitive reverse transcription coupled to polymerase chain reaction was used. Specimens of pituitary adenoma were obtained by transsphenoidal adenomectomy from six patients with acromegaly and three patients with no clinical evidence of pituitary hormone overproduction; non-functioning adenoma. Pituitary glands were collected at autopsy from three patients who died from nonendocrine disorders. A specific GRF gene transcript was detected in five out of six GH-producing pituitary adenomas, whereas this was not found in three separate specimens of nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma or anterior and posterior pituitary tissue. The data suggest that GRF is synthesized as an intrinsic product in human GH-producing pituitary adenoma.

  5. Silent pituitary macroadenoma co-secreting growth hormone and thyroid stimulating hormone.

    PubMed

    Sen, Orhan; Ertorer, M Eda; Aydin, M Volkan; Erdogan, Bulent; Altinors, Nur; Zorludemir, Suzan; Guvener, Nilgun

    2005-04-01

    Silent pituitary adenomas are a group of tumors showing heterogenous morphological features with no hormonal function observed clinically. To date no explanation has been provided as to why these tumors remain "silent". We report a case of a silent macroadenoma with both growth hormone (GH) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) staining and secretion but with no clinical manifestations, in particular, the absence of features of acromegaly or hyperthyroidism. The relevant literature is reviewed. PMID:15851094

  6. Pituitary hormone level changes and hypxonatremia in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    MAIMAITILI, AISHA; MAIMAITILI, MIJITI; REXIDAN, AIKEREMU; LU, JUNYI; AJIMU, KUERBAN; CHENG, XIAOJIANG; LUO, KUN; SAILIKE, DUISHANBAI; LIU, YUAN; KAHEERMAN, KADEER; TANG, CHANGJIU; ZHANG, TINGRONG

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in serum pituitary hormone levels and the mechanism of hyponatremia in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Nuclear medical tests and serum electrolyte monitoring were performed in 49 aneurysmal SAH cases and 10 healthy volunteers. The levels of serum pituitary hormones were significantly higher in the SAH patients compared with the control group on days 1–3 and 7–9 after SAH onset (P<0.05). The peak value occurred on days 7–9. The rate of hyponatremia was 49.0% in the 49 SAH patients. The incidence of severe hyponatremia was significantly higher in Fisher grades III–IV and Hunt-Hess grades III–IV compared with Fisher grades I–II and Hunt-Hess grades I–II, respectively (P<0.05). There was no correlation between the site of aneurysm and the rate of hyponatremia. The incidence of symptomatic cerebral vasospasm was significantly higher in the hyponatremia group and Fisher grades III–IV compared with the normal serum sodium group and Fisher grades I–II, respectively. Serum pituitary hormone levels were positively correlated with blood loss and disease severity in patients with aneurysmal SAH. Hyponatremia may be considered an important indicator of SAH. SAH patients are likely to benefit from intense monitoring and regulation of serum sodium. PMID:23837049

  7. GH and Pituitary Hormone Alterations After Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Karaca, Züleyha; Tanrıverdi, Fatih; Ünlühızarcı, Kürşad; Kelestimur, Fahrettin

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a crucially important public health problem around the world, which gives rise to increased mortality and is the leading cause of physical and psychological disability in young adults, in particular. Pituitary dysfunction due to TBI was first described 95 years ago. However, until recently, only a few papers have been published in the literature and for this reason, TBI-induced hypopituitarism has been neglected for a long time. Recent studies have revealed that TBI is one of the leading causes of hypopituitarism. TBI which causes hypopituitarism may be characterized by a single head injury such as from a traffic accident or by chronic repetitive head trauma as seen in combative sports including boxing, kickboxing, and football. Vascular damage, hypoxic insult, direct trauma, genetic predisposition, autoimmunity, and neuroinflammatory changes may have a role in the development of hypopituitarism after TBI. Because of the exceptional structure of the hypothalamo-pituitary vasculature and the special anatomic location of anterior pituitary cells, GH is the most commonly lost hormone after TBI, and the frequency of isolated GHD is considerably high. TBI-induced pituitary dysfunction remains undiagnosed and therefore untreated in most patients because of the nonspecific and subtle clinical manifestations of hypopituitarism. Treatment of TBI-induced hypopituitarism depends on the deficient anterior pituitary hormones. GH replacement therapy has some beneficial effects on metabolic parameters and neurocognitive dysfunction. Patients with TBI without neuroendocrine changes and those with TBI-induced hypopituitarism share the same clinical manifestations, such as attention deficits, impulsion impairment, depression, sleep abnormalities, and cognitive disorders. For this reason, TBI-induced hypopituitarism may be neglected in TBI victims and it would be expected that underlying hypopituitarism would aggravate the clinical picture of TBI

  8. Luteinizing hormone and follicle stimulating hormone-releasing hormone test in patients with hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, C H; Besser, G M; McNeilly, A S; Marshall, J C; Harsoulis, P; Tunbridge, W M; Gomez-Pan, A; Hall, R

    1973-10-13

    A standard intravenous 100 mug luteinizing hormone/follicle stimulating hormone-releasing hormone (LH/FSH-RH) test was used to assess the pituitary gonadotrophin responses in 155 patients with a variety of diseases of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. In all but nine patients there was an increase in circulating levels of either LH or FSH in response to the releasing hormone though 137 (88%) were clinically hypogonadal. It was not possible with this test to distinguish between hypothalamic and pituitary causes of hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism, since a variety of LH and FSH responses emerged within the disease groups. However, primary gonadal failure characteristically resulted in exaggerated gonadotrophin response. The potential therapeutic use of the gonadotrophin releasing decapeptide is suggested in certain patients with hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism.

  9. Cadmium effects on hypothalamic activity and pituitary hormone secretion in the male.

    PubMed

    Lafuente, A; Esquifino, A I

    1999-11-22

    Cadmium specifically modify amine metabolism at the central nervous system and pituitary hormone secretions. Thus, the physiological functions controlled by these hormones can be modulated by cadmium. This xenobiotic is associated with deleterious effects on the gonadal function and with changes in the secretory pattern of other pituitary hormones like prolactin, ACTH, GH or TSH. The observed changes in pituitary hormone secretion do not correlate with the modifications of central nervous system metabolism of the neurotransmitters involved in their regulation. The accumulative data indicates the existence of a disruption in the regulatory mechanisms of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. The physiological significance of these effects remains to be elucidated.

  10. Purification and Cultivation of Human Pituitary Growth Hormones Secreting Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.; Todd, P.; Grindeland, R.; Lanham, W.; Morrison, D.

    1985-01-01

    The rat and human pituitary gland contains a mixture of hormone producing cell types. The separation of cells which make growth hormone (GH) is attempted for the purpose of understanding how the hormone molecule is made within the pituitary cell; what form(s) it takes within the cell; and what form(s) GH assumes as it leaves the cell. Since GH has a number of biological targets (e.g., muscle, liver, bone), the assessment of the activities of the intracellular/extracellular GH by new and sensitive bioassays. GH cells contained in the mixture was separated by free flow electrophoresis. These experiments show that GH cells have different electrophoretic mobilities. This is relevant to NASA since a lack of GH could be a prime causative factor in muscle atrophy. Further, GH has recently been implicated in the etiology of motion sickness in space. Continous flow electrophoresis experiment on STS-8 showed that GH cells could be partially separated in microgravity. However, definitive cell culture studies could not be done due to insufficient cell recoveries.

  11. Differential social regulation of two pituitary gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Au, Teresa M; Greenwood, Anna K; Fernald, Russell D

    2006-06-30

    In many vertebrates, social interactions regulate reproductive capacity by altering the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. To better understand the mechanisms underlying social regulation of reproduction, we investigated the relationship between social status and one main component of the HPG axis: expression levels of gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRH-R). Social interactions dictate reproductive capacity in the cichlid fish Astatotilapia burtoni. Reproductively active territory holders suppress the HPG axis of non-territorial males through repeated aggressive encounters. To determine whether the expression of GnRH-R is socially regulated, we quantified mRNA levels of two GnRH-R variants in the pituitaries and brains of territorial (T) and non-territorial (NT) A. burtoni males. We found that T males had significantly higher levels of pituitary GnRH-R1 mRNA than NT males. In contrast, GnRH-R2 mRNA levels in the pituitary did not vary with social status. Pituitaries from both T and NT males expressed significantly higher mRNA levels of GnRH-R1 than GnRH-R2. GnRH mRNA levels in the brain correlated positively with GnRH-R1 mRNA levels in the pituitary but did not correlate with pituitary GnRH-R2. Measurements of GnRH-R1 and GnRH-R2 mRNA levels across the whole brain revealed no social status differences. These results show that, in addition to the known effects of social status on other levels of the HPG axis, GnRH receptor in the pituitary is also a target of social regulation.

  12. Neonatal sex hormones have 'organizational' effects on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis of male rats.

    PubMed

    McCormick, C M; Furey, B F; Child, M; Sawyer, M J; Donohue, S M

    1998-02-10

    Sex hormones have activational effects on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in adulthood: For example, corticosterone release is influenced by gonadal status. These experiments investigated whether sex hormones have organizational effects on the HPA axis of male rats: Do sex hormones have relatively permanent effects on its development? In adults, both neonatal (neoGDX) and adult gonadectomy (adult GDX) resulted in elevated corticosterone (CORT) levels in response to stress compared to intact rats. Five days of testosterone propionate (TP) replacement was not as effective at attenuating CORT levels in neoGDX rats as in adult GDX rats. Neonatal GDX elevated corticosterone binding globulin (CBG) levels, whereas adult GDX was without effect. In Experiment 2 the effects of neonatal gonadectomy and neonatal treatment with either TP, estradiol benzoate (EB), or oil vehicle was examined. Despite 14 days of hormone replacement, neoGDX showed elevated CORT levels in response to stress compared to all other groups. A single neonatal dose of TP or EB in neoGDX rats eliminated the increased responsiveness. Neonatal TP and EB were without effect in sham-operated rats. Plasma CBG levels were elevated in neoGDX groups regardless of neonatal hormone treatment. Corticosteroid receptor binding levels were examined in various brain areas and the pituitary in two groups most different in their androgen experience: NeoGDX and shams that did not receive treatments as adults. NeoGDX had lower levels of glucocorticoid receptor, and higher levels of mineralocorticoid receptor binding in the pituitary. No other receptor differences were found. These experiments suggest that neonatal sex hormones influence the sensitivity of the HPA axis to sex hormones in adulthood and, thus, that they have organizational effects in addition to activational effects on HPA function.

  13. Serum Growth Hormone Levels and the Response of Diabetic Retinopathy to Pituitary Ablation*

    PubMed Central

    Wright, A. D.; Kohner, E. M.; Oakley, N. W.; Hartog, M.; Joplin, G. F.; Fraser, T. Russell

    1969-01-01

    Serum growth hormone levels were measured during insulin tolerance tests in 36 patients after yttrium-90 pituitary implantation for diabetic retinopathy. The response of the new blood vessels was more clearly related to loss of growth hormone function than was the improvement of retinal haemorrhages and microaneurysms. The overall response of the retinopathy was greatest when growth hormone function was lost. Since the loss of growth hormone function was related to the loss of other aspects of anterior pituitary function, a unique role of growth hormone in the response of diabetic retinopathy to pituitary ablation could not be established. PMID:5768460

  14. A growth hormone receptor mutation impairs growth hormone autofeedback signaling in pituitary tumors.

    PubMed

    Asa, Sylvia L; Digiovanni, Rebecca; Jiang, Jing; Ward, Megan L; Loesch, Kimberly; Yamada, Shozo; Sano, Toshiaki; Yoshimoto, Katsuhiko; Frank, Stuart J; Ezzat, Shereen

    2007-08-01

    Pituitary tumors are a diverse group of neoplasms that are classified based on clinical manifestations, hormone excess, and histomorphologic features. Those that cause growth hormone (GH) excess and acromegaly are subdivided into morphologic variants that have not yet been shown to have pathogenetic significance or predictive value for therapy and outcome. Here, we identify a selective somatic histidine-to-leucine substitution in codon 49 of the extracellular domain of the GH receptor (GHR) in a morphologic subtype of human GH-producing pituitary tumors that is characterized by the presence of cytoskeletal aggresomes. This GHR mutation significantly impairs glycosylation-mediated receptor processing, maturation, ligand binding, and signaling. Pharmacologic GH antagonism recapitulates the morphologic phenotype of pituitary tumors from which this mutation was identified, inducing the formation of cytoskeletal keratin aggresomes. This novel GHR mutation provides evidence for impaired hormone autofeedback in the pathogenesis of these pituitary tumors. It explains the lack of responsiveness to somatostatin analogue therapy of this tumor type, in contrast to the exquisite sensitivity of tumors that lack aggresomes, and has therapeutic implications for the safety of GH antagonism as a therapeutic modality in acromegaly. PMID:17671221

  15. Pituitary function and growth hormone dynamics in acromegaloidism.

    PubMed

    Mims, R B

    1978-12-01

    Acromegaloidism is a condition which resembles acromegaly by its clinical manifestations but is not due to pituitary or hypothalamic dysfunction. Twenty patients were diagnosed as having this disorder and the results from studying growth hormone (GH) responses in 15 patients (11 women and four men) were included in this report. Clinical manifestations closely resembled those of acromegalics, including history of progressive changes, acral enlargement, visual disturbances, abnormal visual fields in four patients, and sella turcica enlargement in two patients. The glucose tolerance test (GTT) was abnormal in 12/15 patients, 13/15 were > 10 percent obese, 8/15 had hypertension, 7/15 had large-statured relatives, but lactorrhea was absent in all patients. The mean serum GH concentration was 2.2 ng/ml, which suppressed to 0.6 ng/ml during the GTT; increased to 24 ng/ml during hypoglycemia; and increased to 10.3 ng/ml after L-dopa ingestion. Other pituitary hormones (LH, FSH, TSH, prolactin), the metyrapone test, 24-hour random and nocturnal sleeping GH concentrations were normal. These GH values and responses helped to differentiate acromegaloidism from treated and untreated acromegaly. The pathogenesis of acromegaloidism was not determined, but somatomedin studies may prove helpful in further defining this disorder. PMID:731719

  16. Ultrastructural study of mixed growth hormone & prolactin secreting pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, C; Dinda, A K; Roy, S; Kochupillai, N; Kharbanda, K; Tandon, P N

    1992-08-01

    An ultrastructural study was done on 15 mixed growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL)-secreting pituitary adenomas surgically removed from acromegalic patients with hyper-prolactinaemia, in order to see whether the 2 hormones were present in the same cell or in different cells. Double labelling immunogold technique was used for simultaneous ultrastructural localization of GH and PRL. It was found that each neoplastic cell in these 15 tumours (30 to 50 cells were studied in each case) contained 4 populations of granules viz., (i) granules positive for only GH; (ii) granules positive for only PRL; (iii) granules positive for both GH and PRL; and (iv) granules negative for both GH and PRL (unlabelled). Though the relative percentage of these 4 types of granules varied from cell to cell even within the same tumour, the major population (49.9 to 96%) was constituted by the mixed granules showing labelling for both GH and PRL. Almost all the cells examined from each tumour appeared to be mammosomatotrophs. Thus, the study indicated that mammosomatotroph adenomas are perhaps more common among mixed GH and PRL--secreting pituitary adenomas than previously believed. It could be important to recognize these tumours from the therapeutic point of view.

  17. Pituitary gland

    MedlinePlus

    ... glands. Located above the pituitary gland is the hypothalamus. The hypothalamus decides which hormones the pituitary should release by ... messages. In response to hormonal messages from the hypothalamus, the pituitary gland releases the following hormones: GH ( ...

  18. Hypothalamic neuronal hamartoma associated with pituitary growth hormone cell adenoma and acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Asa, S L; Bilbao, J M; Kovacs, K; Linfoot, J A

    1980-01-01

    A hypothalamic neuronal hamartoma associated with a sparsely granulated growth hormone cell adenoma of the pituitary and acromegaly is reported. It is suggested that the patient had a primary neuronal tumor, whose neurosecretory activity promoted the development of the growth hormone secreting pituitary adenoma causing acromegaly.

  19. Pituitary Stalk Interruption Syndrome from Infancy to Adulthood: Clinical, Hormonal, and Radiological Assessment According to the Initial Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Bar, Céline; Zadro, Charline; Diene, Gwenaelle; Oliver, Isabelle; Pienkowski, Catherine; Jouret, Béatrice; Cartault, Audrey; Ajaltouni, Zeina; Salles, Jean-Pierre; Sevely, Annick; Tauber, Maithé; Edouard, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with pituitary stalk interruption syndrome (PSIS) are initially referred for hypoglycemia during the neonatal period or growth retardation during childhood. PSIS is either isolated (nonsyndromic) or associated with extra-pituitary malformations (syndromic). Objective To compare baseline characteristics and long-term evolution in patients with PSIS according to the initial presentation. Study Design Sixty-seven patients with PSIS were included. Data from subgroups were compared: neonates (n = 10) versus growth retardation patients (n = 47), and syndromic (n = 32) versus nonsyndromic patients (n = 35). Results Neonates displayed a more severe hormonal and radiological phenotype than children referred for growth retardation, with a higher incidence of multiple hormonal deficiencies (100% versus 34%; P = 0.0005) and a nonvisible anterior pituitary lobe (33% versus 2%; P = 0.0017). Regular follow-up of growth might have allowed earlier diagnosis in the children with growth retardation, as decreased growth velocity and growth retardation were present respectively 3 and 2 years before referral. We documented a progressive worsening of endocrine impairment throughout childhood in these patients. Presence of extra-pituitary malformations (found in 48%) was not associated with more severe hormonal and radiological characteristics. Growth under GH treatment was similar in the patient groups and did not vary according to the pituitary MRI findings. Conclusions PSIS diagnosed in the neonatal period has a particularly severe hormonal and radiological phenotype. The progressive worsening of endocrine impairment throughout childhood justifies periodic follow-up to check for additional hormonal deficiencies. PMID:26562670

  20. Hedgehog signaling activation induces stem cell proliferation and hormone release in the adult pituitary gland

    PubMed Central

    Pyczek, Joanna; Buslei, Rolf; Schult, David; Hölsken, Annett; Buchfelder, Michael; Heß, Ina; Hahn, Heidi; Uhmann, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog (HH) signaling is known to be essential during the embryonal development of the pituitary gland but the knowledge about its role in the adult pituitary and in associated tumors is sparse. In this report we investigated the effect of excess Hh signaling activation in murine pituitary explants and analyzed the HH signaling status of human adenopituitary lobes and a large cohort of pituitary adenomas. Our data show that excess Hh signaling led to increased proliferation of Sox2+ and Sox9+ adult pituitary stem cells and to elevated expression levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (Acth), growth hormone (Gh) and prolactin (Prl) in the adult gland. Inhibition of the pathway by cyclopamine reversed these effects indicating that active Hh signaling positively regulates proliferative processes of adult pituitary stem cells and hormone production in the anterior pituitary. Since hormone producing cells of the adenohypophysis as well as ACTH-, GH- and PRL-immunopositive adenomas express SHH and its target GLI1, we furthermore propose that excess HH signaling is involved in the development/maintenance of hormone-producing pituitary adenomas. These findings advance the understanding of physiological hormone regulation and may open new treatment options for pituitary tumors. PMID:27109116

  1. Derivation of Diverse Hormone-Releasing Pituitary Cells from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Bastian; Piao, Jinghua; Ramnarine, Kiran; Tomishima, Mark J; Tabar, Viviane; Studer, Lorenz

    2016-06-14

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) provide an unlimited cell source for regenerative medicine. Hormone-producing cells are particularly suitable for cell therapy, and hypopituitarism, a defect in pituitary gland function, represents a promising therapeutic target. Previous studies have derived pituitary lineages from mouse and human ESCs using 3D organoid cultures that mimic the complex events underlying pituitary gland development in vivo. Instead of relying on unknown cellular signals, we present a simple and efficient strategy to derive human pituitary lineages from hPSCs using monolayer culture conditions suitable for cell manufacturing. We demonstrate that purified placode cells can be directed into pituitary fates using defined signals. hPSC-derived pituitary cells show basal and stimulus-induced hormone release in vitro and engraftment and hormone release in vivo after transplantation into a murine model of hypopituitarism. This work lays the foundation for future cell therapy applications in patients with hypopituitarism.

  2. Pituitary Gland Development and Disease: From Stem Cell to Hormone Production

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Shannon W.; Ellsworth, Buffy S.; Peréz Millan, María Inés; Gergics, Peter; Schade, Vanessa; Foyouzi, Nastaran; Brinkmeier, Michelle L.; Mortensen, Amanda H.

    2014-01-01

    Many aspects of pituitary development have become better understood in the last two decades. The signaling pathways regulating pituitary growth and shape have emerged, and the balancing interactions between the pathways are now appreciated. Markers for multi-potent progenitor cells are being identified, and signature transcription factors have been discovered for most hormone producing cell types. We now realize that pulsatile hormone secretion involves a 3-D integration of cellular networks. About a dozen genes are known to cause pituitary hypoplasia when mutated due to their essential roles in pituitary development. Similarly, a few genes are known that predispose to familial endocrine neoplasia, and several genes mutated in sporadic pituitary adenomas are documented. In the next decade we anticipate gleaning a deeper appreciation of these processes at the molecular level, insight into the development of the hypophyseal portal blood system, and evolution of better therapeutics for congenital and acquired hormone deficiencies and for common craniopharyngiomas and pituitary adenomas. PMID:24290346

  3. Diagnostic Accuracy of Perioperative Measurement of Basal Anterior Pituitary and Target Gland Hormones in Predicting Adrenal Insufficiency After Pituitary Surgery.

    PubMed

    Cerina, Vatroslav; Kruljac, Ivan; Radosevic, Jelena Marinkovic; Kirigin, Lora Stanka; Stipic, Darko; Pecina, Hrvoje Ivan; Vrkljan, Milan

    2016-03-01

    The insulin tolerance test (ITT) is the gold standard for diagnosing adrenal insufficiency (AI) after pituitary surgery. The ITT is unpleasant for patients, requires close medical supervision and is contraindicated in several comorbidities. The aim of this study was to analyze whether tumor size, remission rate, preoperative, and early postoperative baseline hormone concentrations could serve as predictors of AI in order to increase the diagnostic accuracy of morning serum cortisol. This prospective study enrolled 70 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed pituitary adenomas. Thirty-seven patients had nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NPA), 28 had prolactinomas and 5 had somatotropinomas. Thyroxin (T4), thyrotropin (TSH), prolactin, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone, and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I) were measured preoperatively and on the sixth postoperative day. Serum morning cortisol was measured on the third postoperative day (CORT3) as well as the sixth postoperative day (CORT6). Tumor mass was measured preoperatively and remission was assessed 3 months after surgery. An ITT was performed 3 to 6 months postoperatively. Remission was achieved in 48% of patients and AI occurred in 51%. Remission rates and tumor type were not associated with AI. CORT3 had the best predictive value for AI (area under the curve (AUC) 0.868, sensitivity 82.4%, specificity 83.3%). Tumor size, preoperative T4, postoperative T4, and TSH were also associated with AI in a multivariate regression model. A combination of all preoperative and postoperative variables (excluding serum cortisol) had a sensitivity of 75.0% and specificity of 77.8%. The predictive power of CORT3 substantially improved by adding those variables into the model (AUC 0.921, sensitivity 94.1%, specificity 78.3%, PPV 81.9%, NPV of 92.7%). In a subgroup analysis that included only female patients with NPA, LH had exactly the same predictive value as CORT3. The addition

  4. Diagnostic Accuracy of Perioperative Measurement of Basal Anterior Pituitary and Target Gland Hormones in Predicting Adrenal Insufficiency After Pituitary Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cerina, Vatroslav; Kruljac, Ivan; Radosevic, Jelena Marinkovic; Kirigin, Lora Stanka; Stipic, Darko; Pecina, Hrvoje Ivan; Vrkljan, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The insulin tolerance test (ITT) is the gold standard for diagnosing adrenal insufficiency (AI) after pituitary surgery. The ITT is unpleasant for patients, requires close medical supervision and is contraindicated in several comorbidities. The aim of this study was to analyze whether tumor size, remission rate, preoperative, and early postoperative baseline hormone concentrations could serve as predictors of AI in order to increase the diagnostic accuracy of morning serum cortisol. This prospective study enrolled 70 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed pituitary adenomas. Thirty-seven patients had nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NPA), 28 had prolactinomas and 5 had somatotropinomas. Thyroxin (T4), thyrotropin (TSH), prolactin, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone, and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I) were measured preoperatively and on the sixth postoperative day. Serum morning cortisol was measured on the third postoperative day (CORT3) as well as the sixth postoperative day (CORT6). Tumor mass was measured preoperatively and remission was assessed 3 months after surgery. An ITT was performed 3 to 6 months postoperatively. Remission was achieved in 48% of patients and AI occurred in 51%. Remission rates and tumor type were not associated with AI. CORT3 had the best predictive value for AI (area under the curve (AUC) 0.868, sensitivity 82.4%, specificity 83.3%). Tumor size, preoperative T4, postoperative T4, and TSH were also associated with AI in a multivariate regression model. A combination of all preoperative and postoperative variables (excluding serum cortisol) had a sensitivity of 75.0% and specificity of 77.8%. The predictive power of CORT3 substantially improved by adding those variables into the model (AUC 0.921, sensitivity 94.1%, specificity 78.3%, PPV 81.9%, NPV of 92.7%). In a subgroup analysis that included only female patients with NPA, LH had exactly the same predictive value as CORT3. The

  5. Radioimmunoassay of human growth hormone: technique and application to plasma, cerebrospinal fluid, and pituitary extracts

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Frances J.; Lloyd, H. M.; Thomas, M. J.

    1972-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay for human growth hormone using activated charcoal is described and its precision, accuracy, and sensitivity are defined. Results are presented for growth hormone measurements in plasma obtained during hypoglycaemia induced with insulin in patients of short stature and during glucose tolerance tests in patients with acromegaly. The method was used to measure growth hormone concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid and in extracts of pituitary tumours. No growth hormone was detected in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients without acromegaly. In patients with acromegaly, the concentration of growth hormone in cerebrospinal fluid was measurable and was considerably elevated in one patient with extrasellar extension of a pituitary tumour. Extracts of chromophobe pituitary tumours contained very small concentrations of growth hormone. In extracts of pituitary tumours removed from acromegalic patients, concentrations fell either below or within the normal range. PMID:5086220

  6. Isolated double adrenocorticotropic hormone-secreting pituitary adenomas: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    PU, JIUJUN; WANG, ZHIMING; ZHOU, HUI; ZHONG, AILING; JIN, KAI; RUAN, LUNLIANG; YANG, GANG

    2016-01-01

    Only a few cases of double or multiple pituitary adenomas have previously been reported in the literature; however, isolated double adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting pituitary adenomas are even more rare. The present study reports a rare case of a 50-year-old female patient who presented with typical clinical features of Cushing's disease and was diagnosed with isolated double ACTH-secreting pituitary adenomas. Endocrinological examination revealed an ACTH-producing pituitary adenoma, and preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a microadenoma with a lower intensity on the right side of the pituitary gland. The patient underwent endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery, which revealed another pituitary tumor in the left side of the pituitary gland. The two, clearly separated, pituitary adenomas identified in the same gland were completely resected. Immunohistochemistry and pathology revealed that the clearly separated double pituitary adenomas were positive for ACTH, thyroid-stimulating, growth and prolactin hormones. Postoperatively, the levels of ACTH and cortisol hormone decreased rapidly. The case reported in the present study is considerably rare, due to the presence of a second pituitary adenoma in the same gland, which was not detected by preoperative MRI scan, but was noticed during surgery. Intraoperative evaluation may be important in the identification of double or multiple pituitary adenomas. PMID:27347184

  7. Effects of aging on pituitary and testicular luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone receptors in the rat.

    PubMed

    Limonta, P; Dondi, D; Maggi, R; Martini, L; Piva, F

    1988-01-01

    Aging exerts profound influences on the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular-axis. This work has been performed in order to verify whether, in male rats, the decreased secretion of LH and testosterone (T) occurring in old animals is reflected by modifications of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptors at the level of the anterior pituitary and of the testes. To this purpose, the affinity constant (Ka) and the maximal binding capacity (Bmax) for the LHRH analog [D-Ser(tBu)6]des-Gly10-LHRH-N-ethylamide were evaluated, by means of a receptor binding assay, in membrane preparations derived from the anterior pituitary and testicular Leydig cells of male rats of 3 and 19 months of age. Serum levels of LH and T were measured by specific RIAs. The results obtained show that, in aged male rats, the concentration of pituitary LHRH receptors is significantly lower than that found in young animals. On the other hand, the concentration of LHRH binding sites is significantly increased on the membranes of Leydig cells of old rats. In no instance the Ka for the LHRH analog is significantly affected. Serum levels of LH and T are significantly lower in old than in young male rats. In conclusion, these results suggest that the reduced secretion of LH in old male rats may be linked, at least partially, to a decrease of the number of pituitary LHRH receptors. The impaired production of testosterone occurring in aged rats is accompanied by a significant increase of the number of testicular LHRH receptors, indicating that also the intratesticular mechanisms controlling testosterone release undergo significant alterations with aging.

  8. Exogenous action of 5-lipoxygenase by its metabolites on luteinizing hormone release in rat pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Przylipiak, A; Kiesel, L; Habenicht, A J; Przylipiak, M; Runnebaum, B

    1990-02-12

    The stimulatory effect of exogenously administered potato 5-lipoxygenase (0.1-0.3 U/2 ml) on luteinizing hormone (LH) release was demonstrated in rat anterior pituitary cells in a superfusion system. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), an inhibitor of 5-lipoxygenase, abolished the effect of the enzyme on LH secretion. The secretory effect on LH after 5-lipoxygenase administration was biphasic and dependent on Ca2+ indicating that 5-lipoxygenase affects LH release through its oxygenation reaction. Another series of experiments demonstrated that activation of 5-lipoxygenase, expressed as production of leukotriene (LT) B4 and C4 (728 +/- 127 pg/10(6) cells and 178 +/- 23 pg/10(6) cells, respectively) occurs in rat pituitary cells after addition of Ca2+ ionophore A23187. However, LTB4 and LTC4 were not formed by pituitary cells that had previously been desensitized by gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), the physiological ligand of LH release. These results are consistent with a role of 5-lipoxygenase metabolites in the mechanism of GnRH-induced LH secretion. PMID:2157615

  9. Adipocyte Versus Pituitary Leptin in the Regulation of Pituitary Hormones: Somatotropes Develop Normally in the Absence of Circulating Leptin

    PubMed Central

    Odle, Angela K.; Haney, Anessa; Allensworth-James, Melody; Akhter, Noor

    2014-01-01

    Leptin is a cytokine produced by white fat cells, skeletal muscle, the placenta, and the pituitary gland among other tissues. Best known for its role in regulating appetite and energy expenditure, leptin is produced largely by and in proportion to white fat cells. Leptin is also important to the maintenance and function of the GH cells of the pituitary. This was shown when the deletion of leptin receptors on somatotropes caused decreased numbers of GH cells, decreased circulating GH, and adult-onset obesity. To determine the source of leptin most vital to GH cells and other pituitary cell types, we compared two different leptin knockout models with Cre-lox technology. The global Lep-null model is like the ob/ob mouse, whereby only the entire exon 3 is deleted. The selective adipocyte-Lep-null model lacks adipocyte leptin but retains pituitary leptin, allowing us to investigate the pituitary as a potential source of circulating leptin. Male and female mice lacking adipocyte leptin (Adipocyte-lep-null) did not produce any detectable circulating leptin and were infertile, suggesting that the pituitary does not contribute to serum levels. In the presence of only pituitary leptin, however, these same mutants were able to maintain somatotrope numbers and GH mRNA levels. Serum GH trended low, but values were not significant. However, hypothalamic GHRH mRNA was significantly reduced in these animals. Other serum hormone and pituitary mRNA differences were observed, some of which varied from previous results reported in ob/ob animals. Whereas pituitary leptin is capable of maintaining somatotrope numbers and GH mRNA production, the decreased hypothalamic GHRH mRNA and low (but not significant) serum GH levels indicate an important role for adipocyte leptin in the regulation of GH secretion in the mouse. Thus, normal GH secretion may require the coordinated actions of both adipocyte and pituitary leptin. PMID:25116704

  10. Further studies on phosphorylated pituitary somatotropin (growth hormone)

    SciTech Connect

    Kornberg, L.J.; Liberti, J.P.

    1987-05-01

    This laboratory made the original observation that naturally-occurring ovine growth hormone (GH) is phosphorylated and that slices of pituitary glands from male rats synthesize and secrete /sup 32/P-GH. This observation has been extended to explore the generality of this process. After incubation in PO/sub 4/-free Ham's F-10 medium (PFH) or in saline/Hepes (SH) containing 300..mu..Ci /sup 32/Pi/mL, tissue and medium were separated and a cell extract was prepared. GH in the medium and extract was recovered by immunoprecipitation using rat GH antiserum. The samples were electrophoresed under denaturating conditions and processed for autoradiography. /sup 32/P-GH was characterized by the presence of a protein-staining band and radioactive area which migrated the same as authentic GH and /sup 125/I-GH. Slices of glands from male rats incubated for 2h in PFH secreted /sup 32/P-GH. Similar results were found upon incubation of slices from female rats in the presence of SH. Short-term incubations of acutely dispersed pituitary cells obtained from young and old male rats also synthesized and secreted /sup 32/P-GH. Thus, the production of /sup 32/P-GH occurs (a) in simple and complex incubaton media, (b) in slices and cells from glands from older and younger rats and (c) in female as well as male rats. Therefore, phosphorylation of GH appears to be a general phenomenon. The physiological action(s) of phosphorylated GH in growth and development is under study.

  11. Regional differences in the pituitary distribution of luteinizing hormone in the gonadectomized and proestrous female rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous data have shown regional differences in the presence of anterior pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH) that generally correlate with comparable disparities in the distribution of gonadotropes throughout the gland. In female rats, the differences are apparent over the estro...

  12. Pathology of growth hormone-producing tumors of the human pituitary.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, K; Horvath, E

    1986-02-01

    This paper reviews the morphologic features of growth hormone-producing tumors of the human pituitary. These tumors are associated with elevated blood growth hormone levels and acromegaly or gigantism and can be classified into the following morphologically distinct entities by the combined application of histology, immunocytology, and electron microscopy: densely granulated growth hormone cell adenoma; sparsely granulated growth hormone cell adenoma; mixed growth hormone cell- prolactin cell-adenoma; acidophil stem cell adenoma; mammosomatotroph cell adenoma; growth hormone cell carcinoma; plurihormonal adenoma with growth hormone production. PMID:3303228

  13. High-Cholesterol Diet Disrupts the Levels of Hormones Derived from Anterior Pituitary Basophilic Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, J; Zhang, X; Liu, Z; Yuan, Z; Song, Y; Shao, S; Zhou, X; Yan, H; Guan, Q; Gao, L; Zhang, H; Zhao, J

    2016-03-01

    Emerging evidence shows that elevated cholesterol levels are detrimental to health. However, it is unclear whether there is an association between cholesterol and the pituitary. We investigated the effects of a high-cholesterol diet on pituitary hormones using in vivo animal studies and an epidemiological study. In the animal experiments, rats were fed a high-cholesterol or control diet for 28 weeks. In rats fed the high-cholesterol diet, serum levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH; also known as thyrotrophin), luteinising hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) produced by the basophilic cells of the anterior pituitary were elevated in a time-dependent manner. Among these hormones, TSH was the first to undergo a significant change, whereas adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH), another hormone produced by basophilic cells, was not changed significantly. As the duration of cholesterol feeding increased, cholesterol deposition increased gradually in the pituitary. Histologically, basophilic cells, and especially thyrotrophs and gonadotrophs, showed an obvious increase in cell area, as well as a potential increase in their proportion of total pituitary cells. Expression of the β-subunit of TSH, FSH and LH, which controls hormone specificity and activity, exhibited a corresponding increase. In the epidemiological study, we found a similar elevation of serum TSH, LH and FSH and a decrease in ACTH in patients with hypercholesterolaemia. Significant positive correlations existed between serum total cholesterol and TSH, FSH or LH, even after adjusting for confounding factors. Taken together, the results of the present study suggest that the high-cholesterol diet affected the levels of hormones derived from anterior pituitary basophilic cells. This phenomenon might contribute to the pituitary functional disturbances described in hypercholesterolaemia.

  14. Daylong pituitary hormones in morbid obesity: effects of bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Camastra, S; Manco, M; Frascerra, S; Iaconelli, A; Mingrone, G; Ferrannini, E

    2009-01-01

    Moderate obesity is known to be associated with multiple endocrine abnormalities. Less information is available on the hormonal status of patients with morbid obesity and on the effects of major weight loss. We studied 16 severely obese (BMI 40.6-69.9 kg/m(2)) nondiabetic patients and 7 nonobese (BMI range 24.6-27.7 kg/m(2)), sex- and age-matched healthy volunteers. During 24 h in a metabolic ward, four meals were administered and hourly blood samples were drawn from a central venous catheter for the measurement of glucose, insulin, leptin, thyrotropic hormone (TSH), growth hormone (GH) and prolactin. Insulin sensitivity was measured by a euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic clamp. Studies were repeated 6 months after biliopancreatic diversion, a mainly malabsorptive surgical approach, which caused an average weight loss of 35+/-4 kg (or 26+/-2% of initial weight). Compared with controls, patients were hyperinsulinaemic (290+/-31 vs 88+/-4 pmol l(-1), P=0.0002), insulin resistant (23.5+/-2.8 vs 52.9+/-4.9 micromol min(-1) kg(FFM)(-1), P=0.0006) and hyperleptinaemic (52.5+/-5.8 vs 10.9+/-3 ng ml(-1), P=0.0002). Plasma TSH levels were increased throughout the day-night cycle (averaging 2.02+/-0.18 vs 1.09+/-0.19 muU ml(-1) of controls, P=0.01), whereas serum GH levels were suppressed (0.46+/-0.10 vs 3.01+/-1.15, P=0.002). Following surgery, the hyperinsulinaemia and insulin resistance were fully normalized; in concomitance with a major drop in leptin levels (to 14.4+/-2.7 ng ml(-1), P=0.02), TSH decreased and GH increased to near-normal levels. In the whole dataset, mean 24-h leptin levels were directly related to mean 24-h TSH levels after controlling for confounders this relationship was lost only after adjusting for fat mass. We conclude that in morbid obesity leptin is a determinant of changes in pituitary function.

  15. Elevation of serum creatine phosphokinase during growth hormone treatment in patients with multiple pituitary hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Momoi, T; Yamanaka, C; Tanaka, R; Yoshida, A; Okumura, M; Yamakura, S; Takasaki, Y; Sasaki, H; Kawai, M

    1995-11-01

    Serum creatinine phosphokinase (s-CPK) increased to more than 500 U/l in 5 out of 21 patients with growth hormone (GH) deficiency during the 2 years of treatment with biosynthetic GH. In three of these five patients, s-CPK had elevated gradually after the start of GH treatment and remained high in one patient except in the period when GH injection was interrupted, and gradually decreased in the other two patients during treatment. These three patients had complete GH deficiency associated with multiple pituitary hormone deficiency due to pituitary stalk transection. One of the remaining two patients had Noonan syndrome and his s-CPK levels before therapy were relatively high. The fifth patient was a baseball athlete and the elevation of s-CPK seemed to be attributable to the strenuous exercise. Conclusion. s-CPK increases significantly in a certain group of patients with GH deficiency during GH replacement therapy. Measurement of s-CPK is to be included in the follow up laboratory tests at least in the 1st treatment year to evaluate the potential hazardous effects of GH on muscle.

  16. Sexually dimorphic expression of pituitary glycoprotein hormones in a sex-changing fish (Pseudolabrus sieboldi).

    PubMed

    Ohta, Kohei; Mine, Takayuki; Yamaguchi, Akihiko; Matsuyama, Michiya

    2008-11-01

    It is widely accepted that the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis is involved in gonadal sex change in socially controlled sex-changing fish. However, the specific secretion profiles of pituitary gonadotropins (GtHs) in this type of fish are not known. To address this fundamental question, we demonstrated that the diurnal secretion patterns of GtHs differ distinctly between males and females in a socially controlled sex-changing fish. We analyzed the pituitary mRNA levels of glycoprotein hormone subunits (i.e., the common alpha-subunit and specific beta-subunits follicle-stimulating hormone beta, luteinizing hormone beta, and thyroid-stimulating hormone beta) in the wrasse Pseudolabrus sieboldi, which is a model fish that exhibits accurate diurnal rhythms of gametogenesis in both males and females. Northern blots clearly showed that each subunit gene exhibits a diurnal rhythm of expression in the pituitary and that the expression patterns differ distinctly between the sexes. Our results suggest that oogenesis and spermatogenesis in this hermaphroditic fish are regulated differentially through the distinct secretion patterns of pituitary glycoprotein hormones. This study also provides direct evidence of the sexual plasticity of pituitary GtH secretion in a socially controlled sex-changing fish.

  17. Genetic analyses of bone morphogenetic protein 2, 4 and 7 in congenital combined pituitary hormone deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The complex process of development of the pituitary gland is regulated by a number of signalling molecules and transcription factors. Mutations in these factors have been identified in rare cases of congenital hypopituitarism but for most subjects with combined pituitary hormone deficiency (CPHD) genetic causes are unknown. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) affect induction and growth of the pituitary primordium and thus represent plausible candidates for mutational screening of patients with CPHD. Methods We sequenced BMP2, 4 and 7 in 19 subjects with CPHD. For validation purposes, novel genetic variants were genotyped in 1046 healthy subjects. Additionally, potential functional relevance for most promising variants has been assessed by phylogenetic analyses and prediction of effects on protein structure. Results Sequencing revealed two novel variants and confirmed 30 previously known polymorphisms and mutations in BMP2, 4 and 7. Although phylogenetic analyses indicated that these variants map within strongly conserved gene regions, there was no direct support for their impact on protein structure when applying predictive bioinformatics tools. Conclusions A mutation in the BMP4 coding region resulting in an amino acid exchange (p.Arg300Pro) appeared most interesting among the identified variants. Further functional analyses are required to ultimately map the relevance of these novel variants in CPHD. PMID:24289245

  18. Ghrelin-induced growth hormone release from goldfish pituitary cells is nitric oxide dependent.

    PubMed

    Grey, Caleb L; Chang, John P

    2012-11-01

    Ghrelin (GRLN) is an important neuroendocrine regulator of growth hormone (GH) release in vertebrates. Previous studies show goldfish (g)GRLN(19)-induced GH from the goldfish pituitary involves voltage sensitive Ca(2+) channels, increases in intracellular Ca(2+) and the PKC signalling pathway. We set out to examine the role of the nitric oxide (NO) pathway in gGLRN(19)-induced GH release from primary cultures of goldfish pituitary cells using pharmacological regulators in cell column perifusion systems. The NO scavenger PTIO abolished gGRLN(19)-induced GH release and co-treatment with the NO donor SNP and GRLN did not produce additive GH release responses. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors 1400 W and 7-Ni abolished GRLN-induced GH release while treatment with another NOS inhibitor, AGH, had no significant effect. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the NOS/NO is an integral component of gGRLN(19)-induced signalling within the goldfish pituitary cells, and given the relative specificity of AGH for inducible NOS and endothelial NOS isoforms, suggests that neuronal NOS is the likely NOS isoform utilized in goldfish somatotropes by this physiological regulator.

  19. [Neuropharmacological regulation of pituitary hormones. Role of acetylcholine, gamma-aminobutyric acid, histamine and endorphins (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Martin-du Pan, R; Gomez, F

    1981-01-01

    The secretion of pituitary hormones is controlled by hypothalamic hormones which are synthetized by neurosecreting cells whose activity is modulated by different neurotransmitters as dopamine and serotonin. Centrally acting drugs interfere with the activity of these neurotransmitters. Thus they may influence the secretion of pituitary hormones. Acetylcholine, gamma-aminobutyric acid, histamine and endorphins seem also to influence the pituitary secretion. The endocrine effects of drugs (opiates, antiparkinson, antiepileptic, and antihistaminic agents) acting on these neurotransmitters is reviewed.

  20. Role of abnormal anterior pituitary hormones-growth hormone and prolactin in active systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaohua; Xu, Jinhua; Li, Shujuan; Huang, Wen; Li, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Background: The role of anterior pituitary hormones in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) remains controversial. Aims and Objectives: We determined the expression levels of human growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), and their receptors in subjects presenting with SLE, and modulation of disease severity. Materials and methods: Forty-seven subjects and ten healthy controls were assessed for possible association between SLE disease activity and levels of serum PRL, GH and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH). In peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), specific binding and mRNA expression of receptors for GH (GHR), and PRL (PRLR) were determined by receptor-ligand binding assay (RLBA) and RT-PCR. PBMC of recruited subjects were treated with hPRL and rhGH to assess IgG production and antibodies against dsDNA. Results: In active SLE subjects we found elevated PRL and GH levels. Study subject PBMCs displayed augmented GHR and PRLR protein and mRNA expression. Study subjects also showed a positive correlation in serum PRL levels and specific antibodies against dsDNA, SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI), and proteinuria. However, a negative correlation was found between serum PRL levels and complement component C3. We found a positive correlation between specific binding rates of PRLR and GHR and both SLE activity and dsDNA antibody titers. Enhanced IgG and anti-dsDNA secretion was observed in cultured PBMC stimulated by PRL or GH with/without PHA, PWM, IL-2 or IL-10. In active SLE, a close association was found between augmented PRL and GH levels, expression and specific binding activities of PRLR and GHR, and changes in the specific titer of anti-dsDNA. Conclusion: Anterior pituitary hormones play an important role in the pathogenesis of SLE. High levels of growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) play a role in pathogenesis of SLE, which is correlated with SLE disease activity and antibodies against dsDNA. The mechanism of GH and PRL in SLE was complicated and should

  1. Invasive Growth Hormone Producing Pituitary Adenoma With Lymphocytic Infiltration: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Bidari-Zerehpoosh, Farahnaz; Sharifi, Gieve; Novin, Kambiz; Mortazavi, Nafiseh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We have presented a rare case of growth hormone (GH) producing pituitary adenoma with lymphocytic infiltration and brain parenchyma invasion. Case Presentation: A 37-year-old woman has presented with complaints of headache, amenorrhea and acromegalic features. Her laboratory studies showed markedly elevated levels of Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 (IGF-1), and low levels of follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone. Computerized tomography has revealed a pituitary mass without extra-sellar extension. The tumor has completely excised via trans-nasal endoscopic approach. Histologically, the tumor has diagnosed as a pituitary adenoma with GH positive cells. The serum IGF1 levels have gradually decreased to the normal range and the patient was symptom free for three and a half years when she has returned with complaint of visual impairment. The brain MRI that time has shown a supra-sellar mass growing independently into the remaining sellar part. Subsequently, surgical operation has performed via trans-nasal endoscopic approach. Histopathological and immunohistochemistry examination have revealed a rare case of growth hormone producing pituitary adenoma with brain invasion and lymphocytic infiltration. Conclusions: The aim of this publication was to present a rare case of growth hormone producing pituitary adenoma with brain invasion and lymphocytic infiltration. PMID:26855718

  2. Curcumin (Diferuloylmethane) Inhibits Cell Proliferation, Induces Apoptosis, and Decreases Hormone Levels and Secretion in Pituitary Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Matthew; Chen, Shenglin; Woodliff, Jeffrey; Kansra, Sanjay

    2008-01-01

    Prolactinomas are the most prevalent functional pituitary adenomas. Dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) agonists, such as bromocriptine are the first line of therapy; however, drug intolerance/resistance to D2R agonists exists. Apart from D2R agonists, there is no established medical therapy for prolactinomas; therefore, identifying novel therapeutics is warranted. Curcumin, a commonly used food additive in South Asian cooking, inhibits proliferation of several tumor cell lines; however, its effect on pituitary tumor cell proliferation has not been determined. Our objectives were to: 1) determine whether curcumin inhibits proliferation of pituitary tumor cell lines; 2) identify the signaling intermediaries that mediate the effect of curcumin; 3) examine whether curcumin inhibited pituitary hormone production and release; and 4) examine whether curcumin could enhance the growth-inhibitory effect of bromocriptine. Using rat lactotroph cell lines, GH3 and MMQ cells, we report that curcumin had a robust dose and time-dependent inhibitory effect on GH3 and MMQ cell proliferation. Inhibitory effects of curcumin persisted, even on removal of curcumin, and curcumin also blocked colony formation ability of pituitary tumor cells. The growth-inhibitory effect of curcumin was accompanied by decreased expression of cyclin D3 and ser 780 phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein. In addition, curcumin also induced apoptosis in both GH3 and MMQ cells. Furthermore, curcumin suppresses intracellular levels and release of both prolactin and GH. Finally, we show that low concentrations of curcumin enhanced the growth-inhibitory effect of bromocriptine on MMQ cell proliferation. Taken together we demonstrate that curcumin inhibits pituitary tumor cell proliferation, induces apoptosis, and decreases hormone production and release, and thus, we propose developing curcumin as a novel therapeutic tool in the management of prolactinomas. PMID:18450960

  3. Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) inhibits cell proliferation, induces apoptosis, and decreases hormone levels and secretion in pituitary tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Miller, Matthew; Chen, Shenglin; Woodliff, Jeffrey; Kansra, Sanjay

    2008-08-01

    Prolactinomas are the most prevalent functional pituitary adenomas. Dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) agonists, such as bromocriptine are the first line of therapy; however, drug intolerance/resistance to D2R agonists exists. Apart from D2R agonists, there is no established medical therapy for prolactinomas; therefore, identifying novel therapeutics is warranted. Curcumin, a commonly used food additive in South Asian cooking, inhibits proliferation of several tumor cell lines; however, its effect on pituitary tumor cell proliferation has not been determined. Our objectives were to: 1) determine whether curcumin inhibits proliferation of pituitary tumor cell lines; 2) identify the signaling intermediaries that mediate the effect of curcumin; 3) examine whether curcumin inhibited pituitary hormone production and release; and 4) examine whether curcumin could enhance the growth-inhibitory effect of bromocriptine. Using rat lactotroph cell lines, GH3 and MMQ cells, we report that curcumin had a robust dose and time-dependent inhibitory effect on GH3 and MMQ cell proliferation. Inhibitory effects of curcumin persisted, even on removal of curcumin, and curcumin also blocked colony formation ability of pituitary tumor cells. The growth-inhibitory effect of curcumin was accompanied by decreased expression of cyclin D3 and ser 780 phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein. In addition, curcumin also induced apoptosis in both GH3 and MMQ cells. Furthermore, curcumin suppresses intracellular levels and release of both prolactin and GH. Finally, we show that low concentrations of curcumin enhanced the growth-inhibitory effect of bromocriptine on MMQ cell proliferation. Taken together we demonstrate that curcumin inhibits pituitary tumor cell proliferation, induces apoptosis, and decreases hormone production and release, and thus, we propose developing curcumin as a novel therapeutic tool in the management of prolactinomas.

  4. Transformation of a Microprolactinoma into a Mixed Growth Hormone and Prolactin-Secreting Pituitary Adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Dessimoz, Cédric; Browaeys, Patrick; Maeder, Philippe; Lhermitte, Benoît; Pitteloud, Nelly; Momjian, Shahan; Pralong, François P.

    2012-01-01

    Combined prolactin (PRL) and growth hormone (GH) secretion by a single pituitary tumor can occur in approximately 5% of cases. However, in all previously reported patients, combined secretion of both hormones was present at the time of diagnosis. Here we describe a patient initially diagnosed with a pure prolactin-secreting microadenoma, who experienced the progressive apparition of symptomatic autonomous GH secretion while on intermittent long term dopamine agonist therapy. She was operated on, and immunohistochemical analysis of tumor tissue confirmed the diagnosis of pituitary adenoma with uniform co-staining of all cells for both GH and PRL. This patient represents the first documented occurrence of asynchronous development of combined GH and PRL secretion in a pituitary adenoma. Although pathogenic mechanisms implicated remain largely speculative, it emphasizes the need for long term hormonal follow up of patients harboring prolactinomas. PMID:22654846

  5. Intra-pituitary relationship of follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone during pubertal development in Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus).

    PubMed

    Berkovich, Nadia; Corriero, Aldo; Santamaria, Nicoletta; Mylonas, Constantinos C; Vassallo-Aguis, Robert; de la Gándara, Fernando; Meiri-Ashkenazi, Iris; Zlatnikov, Vered; Gordin, Hillel; Bridges, Christopher R; Rosenfeld, Hanna

    2013-12-01

    As part of the endeavor aiming at the domestication of Atlantic bluefin tuna (BFT; Thunnus thynnus), first sexual maturity in captivity was studied by documenting its occurrence and by characterizing the key hormones of the reproductive axis: follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH). The full length sequence encoding for the related hormone β-subunits, bftFSHβ and bftLHβ, were determined, revealing two bftFSHβ mRNA variants, differing in their 5' untranslated region. A quantitative immuno-dot-blot assay to measure pituitary FSH content in BFT was developed and validated enabling, for the first time in this species, data sets for both LH and FSH to be compared. The expression and accumulation patterns of LH in the pituitary showed a steady increase of this hormone, concomitant with fish age, reaching higher levels in adult females compared to males of the same age class. Conversely, the pituitary FSH levels were elevated only in 2Y and adult fish. The pituitary FSH to LH ratio was consistently higher (>1) in immature than in maturing or pubertal fish, resembling the situation in mammals. Nevertheless, the results suggest that a rise in the LH storage level above a minimum threshold may be an indicator of the onset of puberty in BFT females. The higher pituitary LH levels in adult females over males may further support this notion. In contrast three year-old (3Y) males were pubertal while cognate females were still immature. However, it is not yet clear whether the advanced puberty in the 3Y males was a general feature typifying wild BFT populations or was induced by the culture conditions. Future studies testing the effects of captivity and hormonal treatments on precocious maturity may allow for improved handling of this species in a controlled environment which would lead to more cost-efficient farming.

  6. Characterization of growth hormone and prolactin produced by human pituitary in culture.

    PubMed

    Skyler, J S; Rogol, A D; Lovenberg, W; Knazek, R A

    1977-02-01

    Fragments of a pituitary tumor from a patient with acromegaly were grown in tissue culture. The tumor secreted both growth hormone and prolactin,which were recovered in high concentrations. The nonpurified hormones were characterized and compared to their respective counterparts obtained by extraction from normal pituitaries obtained at autopsy. The tissue culture and pituitary extracted hormones were eluted from Sephadex G-100 with the same partition coefficients. Growth hormone from both sources showed parallel dose-response displacement curves, by logit-log transformation, in both specific immunoassay and in a specific lymphocyte binding assay. Prolactin from both sources was compared in specific immunoassay using three different antisera. Parallel logit-log displacement curves were seen with one antiserum, while the other two antisera yielded non-parallel curves, indicating structural differences between prolactin from the two sources. Quantitative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was performed using multiphasic buffer systems previously developed for characterization of each hormone. By the criteria of joint 95% confidence envelopes of retardation co-efficient and relative free mobility, tissue culture growth hormone and prolactin were indistinguishable from their pituitary-extracted counterparts. This study demonstrates that, prior to purification, tissue culture derived hormone can be characterized by multiple criteria and compared to a standard preparation. Structural differences can be detected, as in the case of prolactin. When the hormones are indistinguishable, as in the case of growth hormone, it becomes worthwhile to increase the scale of tissue cultured production, with the prospect that tissue culture may serve as a source of hormone for both experimental and therapeutic use.

  7. Pituitary hormone mRNA expression in European sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax in seawater and following acclimation to fresh water.

    PubMed

    Varsamos, Stamatis; Xuereb, Benoît; Commes, Thérèse; Flik, Gert; Spanings-Pierrot, Céline

    2006-11-01

    The mRNA expression of pituitary prolactin (prl), growth hormone (gh), somatolactin (sl), proopiomelanocortin (pomc), and gonadotropins (gthI and gthII) was quantified by real-time PCR, in sea bass, Dicentrarchus labrax, adapted for 1 month to seawater (SW) or freshwater (FW). In addition, IGF-I (igfI) mRNA expression in liver and branchial Na+/K+ -ATPase activity were determined. L17 ribosomal protein (rpL17) and elongation factor 1alpha (ef1alpha) were validated as reference genes in real-time PCR in the experimental context. The real-time PCR assays were validated for the different hormone genes considered. Expression of pituitary pomc, gthI, gthII, gh, and liver igfI was not significantly different between FW and SW fish. Pituitary prlwas 4.5-foldhigher in FWthan in SW, whereas pituitary sl was 1.8-fold higher in SW- compared with FW-adapted fish. Gill Na+/K+ -ATPase specific activity was 2.3-fold higher in FW sea bass compared with SW fish. Plasma cortisol levels were 6.5-fold lower in SW- than in FW-adapted specimens. The results are discussed in relation to the osmoregulatory strategy of this euryhaline SW species, which displays features that do not fit present models based on salmonids and FWeuryhaline teleosts.

  8. Emergence of an Ancestral Glycoprotein Hormone in the Pituitary of the Sea Lamprey, a Basal Vertebrate.

    PubMed

    Sower, Stacia A; Decatur, Wayne A; Hausken, Krist N; Marquis, Timothy J; Barton, Shannon L; Gargan, James; Freamat, Mihael; Wilmot, Michael; Hollander, Lian; Hall, Jeffrey A; Nozaki, Masumi; Shpilman, Michal; Levavi-Sivan, Berta

    2015-08-01

    The gnathostome (jawed vertebrates) classical pituitary glycoprotein hormones, FSH, LH, and TSH, consist of a common α-subunit (GpA1) and unique β-subunits (Gpβ1, -2, and -3), whereas a recently identified pituitary glycoprotein hormone, thyrostimulin, consists of GpA2 and GpB5. This paper reports the identification, expression, and function of an ancestral, nonclassical, pituitary heterodimeric glycoprotein hormone (GpH) consisting of the thyrostimulin A2 subunit with the classical β-subunit in the sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus, a jawless basal vertebrate. Lamprey (l) GpA2, and lGpHβ were shown to form a heterodimer by coimmunoprecipitation of lGpA2 with FLAG-tagged lGpHβ after the overexpression in transiently transfected COS7 cells using a bipromoter vector. Dual-label fluorescent in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry showed the coexpression of individual subunits in the proximal pars distalis of the pituitary. GnRH-III (1μΜ) significantly increased the expression of lGpHβ and lGpA2 in in vitro pituitary culture. Recombinant lamprey GpH was constructed by tethering the N terminal of lGpA2 to the C terminal of lGpHβ with a linker region composed of six histidine residues followed by three glycine-serine repeats. This recombinant lamprey GpH activated the lamprey glycoprotein hormone receptor I as measured by increased cAMP/luciferase activity. These data are the first to demonstrate a functional, unique glycoprotein heterodimer that is not found in any other vertebrate. These data suggest an intermediate stage of the structure-function of the gonadotropin/thyroid-stimulating hormone in a basal vertebrate, leading to the emergence of the highly specialized gonadotropin hormones and thyroid stimulating hormones in gnathostomes.

  9. Hormonal regulation of prolactin storage in a clonal strain of rat pituitary tumor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kiino, D. R.; Dannies, P. S.

    1982-01-01

    GH4C1 cells (GH cells) are a clonal strain of rat pituitary tumor cells which secrete prolactin. GH cells have been used to study hormone secretion, but they store relatively little prolactin compared to normal prolactin-secreting cells. They are not suitable, therefore, for studying some aspects of pituitary function. We have found that the amount of prolactin GH cells store can be regulated. When GH cells were plated at 10(6) cells/well and treated for six days with 180 nM insulin or 1 nM estradiol, there was a 60 percent increase in prolactin storage compared to control cells. Insulin and estradiol in combination acted synergistically to cause a 190 percent increase in prolactin storage. In contrast, they were additive in increasing extracellular prolactin; there was a 40 percent increase in extracellular prolactin after insulin, a 20 percent increase after estradiol, and a 50 percent increase after insulin plus estradiol. The increases in prolactin storage were always greater than the increases in extracellular prolactin. The increases in prolactin storage were dose-dependent and reached maximal levels after four days of treatment with 180 nM insulin plus 1 nM estradiol. Reducing the plating density to 10(3) cells/well increased the response to insulin and estradiol to nineteenfold. Epidermal growth factor (10 nM) acted synergistically with estradiol and insulin in combination to increase prolactin storage 27-fold. The insulin- and estradiol-induced increase in extracellular prolactin was caused by a specific increase in the rate of prolactin synthesis. The fractional increase in prolactin storage above the increase in prolactin production could not be explained by an increase in prolactin synthesis, an increase in intracellular transit time, or a change in the cell-cycle distribution of the population. Hormone storage can, therefore, be regulated independently from other processes which control hormone production. The prolactin stored in response to insulin

  10. [Thyroid-stimulating hormone-secreting pituitary adenoma].

    PubMed

    Tóth, M; Rácz, K; Kiss, R; Fütö, L; Varga, I; Karlinger, K; Dékány, E; Czirják, S; Pásztor, E; Gláz, E

    1994-12-01

    A 40-year-old male patient with a 2 years history of recurring hyperthyroidism is presented with clinical hyperthyroidism and diffuse goiter. Despite thyreostatic treatment and surgical thyroid ablation the hyperthyroidism recurred. The patient had laboratory evidence of hyperthyroidism and his serum TSH was persistently and enormously elevated (T4:214 nmol/l, T3:6.9 nmol/l, TSH:218 mIU/l)> Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed a pituitary mass of 7 cm in a-p diameter, with supra-, parasellar and sphenoidal extension. The pituitary adenoma was partially resected by transsphenoidal surgery, which failed to result in a substantial decrease in the serum thyrotropin level. Pituitary irradiation and a long-term somatostatin analog octreotide treatment (300-600 micrograms/die) combined with bromocriptine therapy resulted in a significant, but still incomplete suppression of thyrotropin secretion (TSH level about 15 mIU/l) and persisting mild hyperthyroidism. The size of the adenoma was unchanged during the two years of highdose octreotide treatment period. According to our best knowledge this is the first reported case of a thyrotropin-secreting pituitary adenoma in Hungary. PMID:7991245

  11. High prevalence rate of pituitary incidentaloma: is it associated with the age-related decline of the sex hormones levels?

    PubMed

    Kastelan, Darko; Korsic, Mirko

    2007-01-01

    Incidental pituitary adenoma is the common finding during brain imaging. According to multistep model of pituitary tumourigenesis genetic alterations provide the initiating event that transforms cells while hormones play a role in promoting cell proliferation. Development of pituitary adenoma in a case of excessive hypophysiotrophic hormones production or reduced feedback suppression by target gland hormones emphasizes the importance of hormonal stimulation in pituitary tumourigenesis. Pituitary hyperplasia has been reported in pregnancy, hypothyroidism and conditions such as CRH or GHRH hypersecretion. Moreover, recent study reported one case of gonadotroph macroadenoma and two cases of gonadotroph cells hyperplasia in patients with Klinefelter syndrome probably due to protracted stimulation of gonadotroph cells because of lack of androgen feedback. Significant changes of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis occurred with aging. In females, after menopause, estradiol level decreases by 35-fold and estrone level by 20-fold that results in increased gonadotropins levels. Similarly, FSH, but not LH, level is increased with advancing age in men, too, although the age-related difference in the level is less in comparison with women. Regarding these data, we hypothesised that high prevalence rate of pituitary incidentaloma in the elderly is associated with age-related decline in sex hormones levels and subsequent lack of feedback suppression leading to permanent gonadotrophs stimulation which is the crucial step in the pituitary tumour development. According to previously mentioned multistep model of pituitary tumourigenesis, incidentaloma will develop only in persons with already present intrinsic pituitary cell defects. However, further studies have to answer the questions of whether the incidence of pituitary tumours is more frequent in elderly, whether women with late onset menopause or those taking long-term hormone replacement therapy have lower rate of

  12. Human growth hormone and prolactin secreting pituitary adenomas analyzed by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, R V; Cano, M; Chandler, W F; Barkan, A L; Horvath, E; Kovacs, K

    1989-03-01

    Acidophilic pituitary adenomas commonly produce growth hormone (GH) or prolactin (PRL), according to studies employing immunohistochemical and ultrastructural methods. To examine this question, in situ hybridization with oligonucleotide probes was done on routinely processed tissues received in the pathology laboratory to analyze for the presence of GH and PRL messenger RNA (mRNA) in 4 normal pituitaries, 10 prolactinomas, and 16 GH-secreting adenomas. Most acidophilic cells in normal pituitaries expressed either GH or PRL hormone and the respective mRNAs, but GH mRNA and PRL hormone were also detected in some of the same cells. Patients with a clinical diagnosis of prolactinoma had cells with only PRL mRNA in their tumors, while most (14 of 16) patients with a clinical diagnosis of acromegaly or gigantism had both GH and PRL mRNAs in their tumors. The GH adenomas varied in these studies. In situ hybridization was helpful in characterizing the adenoma from a patient with acromegaly who had immunoreactive PRL, but no immunoreactive GH in the resected tumor; in situ hybridization analysis revealed mRNAs for both GH and PRL in the same tumor cells. Our findings indicate that pituitary adenomas from patients with acromegaly commonly express PRL mRNA. It is concluded that in situ hybridization provides new information about the clinical biology and the histopathologic classification of pituitary adenomas. PMID:2466405

  13. Expression and regulation of the pituitary- and placenta-specific human glycoprotein hormone alpha-subunit gene is restricted to the pituitary in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, N; Solter, D

    1988-01-01

    Expression of the glycoprotein hormone alpha subunit occurs in both the pituitary and placenta in humans. However, this study found that expression of this subunit is restricted to the pituitary in mice. An interspecies analysis of human alpha-subunit gene regulation was undertaken, using the transgenic-mouse approach. In mice transgenic for a genomic clone containing the complete human alpha-subunit gene and several kilobases of 5'- and 3'-flanking sequences, cell-type-specific expression and hormonal regulation of the human alpha-subunit transgene occurred in the mouse pituitary, whereas no expression of the transgene was detectable in the mouse placenta. These findings provide strong evidence that a common trans-acting factor(s) regulates glycoprotein hormone alpha-subunit gene expression in the human and mouse pituitaries; however, this factor(s) or a unique factor(s), though functional in the human placenta, is either nonfunctional or absent in the mouse placenta. Images PMID:2468998

  14. Immediate postoperative radiotherapy in residual nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma: Beneficial effect on local control without additional negative impact on pituitary function and life expectancy

    SciTech Connect

    Bergh, Alfons C.M. van den . E-mail: a.c.m.van.den.bergh@rt.umcg.nl; Berg, Gerrit van den; Schoorl, Michiel A.; Sluiter, Wim J.; Vliet, Anton M. van der; Hoving, Eelco W.; Szabo, Ben G.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R.; Dullaart, Robin P.F.

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the benefit of immediate postoperative radiotherapy in residual nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma (NFA) in perspective to the need for hormonal substitution and life expectancy. Methods and Materials: Retrospective cohort analysis of 122 patients, operated for NFA between 1979 and 1998. Recurrence was defined as regrowth on computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. The occurrence of hormonal deficiencies was defined as the starting date of hormonal substitution therapy. Results: Seventy-six patients had residual NFA after surgery and received immediate postoperative radiotherapy (Group 1); three patients developed a recurrence, resulting in a 95% local control rate at 10 years. Twenty-eight patients had residual NFA after surgery, but were followed by a wait-and-see policy (Group 2). Sixteen developed a recurrence, resulting in a local control rate of 49% at 5 years and 22% at 10 years (p < 0.001 compared with Group 1). There were no differences between Group 1 and 2 regarding the need for substitution with thyroid hormone, glucocorticoids, and sex hormones before first surgery, directly after surgery and at end of follow-up. There were no differences in hormone substitution free survival between Group 1 and Group 2 during the study period after first surgery. Life expectancy was similar in Group 1 and 2, and their median life expectancy did not differ from median life expectancy in the general population. Conclusions: Immediate postoperative radiotherapy provides a marked improvement of local control among patients with residual NFA compared with surgery alone, without an additional deleterious effect on pituitary function and life expectancy.

  15. Single-Cell Phenotypic Characterization of Human Pituitary GHomas and Non-Functioning Adenomas Based on Hormone Content and Calcium Responses to Hypothalamic Releasing Hormones.

    PubMed

    Senovilla, Laura; Núñez, Lucía; de Campos, José María; de Luis, Daniel A; Romero, Enrique; García-Sancho, Javier; Villalobos, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Human pituitary tumors are generally benign adenomas causing considerable morbidity due to excess hormone secretion, hypopituitarism, and other tumor mass effects. Pituitary tumors are highly heterogeneous and difficult to type, often containing mixed cell phenotypes. We have used calcium imaging followed by multiple immunocytochemistry to type growth hormone secreting (GHomas) and non-functioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs). Individual cells were typed for stored hormones and calcium responses to classic hypothalamic releasing hormones (HRHs). We found that GHomas contained growth hormone cells either lacking responses to HRHs or responding to all four HRHs. However, most GHoma cells were polyhormonal cells responsive to both thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and GH-releasing hormone. NFPAs were also highly heterogeneous. Some of them contained ACTH cells lacking responses to HRHs or polyhormonal gonadotropes responsive to LHRH and TRH. However, most NFPAs were made of cells storing no hormone and responded only to TRH. These results may provide new insights on the ontogeny of GHomas and NFPAs.

  16. Pituitary Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... or milk production), sex hormones (control the menstrual cycle and other sexual functions), thyroid gland hormones (control the thyroid gland), adrenal gland hormones, and vasopressin (a hormone involved in water and electrolyte balance). Symptoms of pituitary adenoma and ...

  17. [Therapeutic possibilities in patients with selective pituitary resistance to thyroid hormones].

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Pedro; Díez, Juan José

    2008-03-15

    Selective pituitary resistance to thyroid hormones (SPRTH) is a non-neoplastic form of inappropriate secretion of thyrotropin (TSH). The etiology of this hormonal resistance is linked to inactivating mutations in the thyroid hormone receptor beta (TR-beta) gene. These mutations affect critical portions of the receptor's triiodothyronine (T3)-binding domain. Clinically, SPRTH is characterized by hyperthyroidism with goiter and absence of pituitary mass in the morphologic study. Laboratory data show an elevation of free T3 and free thyroxine concentrations without suppression of TSH, with normal molar subunit alpha/TSH ratio. At this time, there is no specific therapy for SPRHT. Beta blockers, such as atenolol, and benzodiazepines have been used as a symptomatic therapy. Among the drugs with the capacity for reducing TSH secretion are TR agonists, such as triiodothyroacetic acid, D-thyroxine, triiodothyropropionic acid, and L-T3. PMID:18373914

  18. Biosynthesis of growth hormone in the rat anterior pituitary gland. Stimulation of biosynthesis in vitro by insulin

    PubMed Central

    Betteridge, A.; Wallis, M.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of insulin on the incorporation of radioactive leucine into growth hormone was investigated by using rat anterior pituitary glands incubated in vitro. A 50% stimulation over control values was observed at insulin concentrations above 2μm (280munits/ml). The effect was specific for growth hormone biosynthesis, over the range 1–5μm-insulin (140–700munits/ml). Lower more physiological concentrations had no significant effect in this system. Above 10μm (1.4 units/ml) total protein synthesis was also increased. The stimulation of growth hormone synthesis could be partially blocked by the addition of actinomycin D, suggesting that RNA synthesis was involved. Insulin was found to stimulate the rate of glucose utilization in a similar way to growth hormone synthesis. 2-Deoxyglucose and phloridzin, which both prevented insulin from stimulating glucose utilization, also prevented the effect of insulin on growth hormone synthesis. If glucose was replaced by fructose in the medium, the effect of insulin on growth hormone synthesis was decreased. We conclude that the rate of utilization of glucose may be an important step in mediating the effect of insulin on growth hormone synthesis. PMID:4762755

  19. [Pituitary hormone secretion induced by optokinetic stimulation (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Mang, W L; Scherer, H; Eversmann, T; Gottsmann, M

    1978-08-01

    A slight optokinetic stimulation induces a significant increase of serum levels of antidiuretic hormone 1,1 +/- 0.8 pg/ml (mean +/- SD) to 3,3 +/- 1,9 pg/ml (mean +/- SD). Serum levels of gGH and cortisol remain unchanged, whereas serum prolactin levels decrease slightly. The ADH secretion seems to be the most sensitive hormonal parameter of the stimulation of the vestibular nuclei induced either by the optokinetic stimulation or by the Coriolis effect.

  20. Making pituitary hormone-producing cells in a dish [Review].

    PubMed

    Suga, Hidetaka

    2016-08-31

    The hypothalamic-pituitary system is essential for maintaining life and controlling systemic homeostasis. The functional disorder makes patients suffer from various symptoms all their lives. Pluripotent stem cells, such as embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, differentiate into neuroectodermal progenitors when cultured as floating aggregates under serum-free conditions. Recent results have shown that strict removal of exogenous patterning factors during the early differentiation period induces rostral hypothalamic-like progenitors from mouse ES cells. The use of growth factor-free, chemically defined medium was critical for this induction. The ES cell-derived hypothalamic-like progenitors generated rostral-dorsal hypothalamic neurons, in particular magnocellular vasopressinergic neurons. We subsequently reported self-formation of adenohypophysis in three-dimensional floating cultures of mouse ES cells. The ES cell aggregates were stimulated to differentiate into both non-neural head ectoderm and hypothalamic neuroectoderm in adjacent layers. Self-organization of Rathke's pouch-like structures occurred at the interface of the two epithelia in vitro. Various pituitary endocrine cells including corticotrophs and somatotrophs were subsequently produced from the Rathke's pouch-like structures. The induced corticotrophs efficiently secreted ACTH in response to CRH. Furthermore, when engrafted in vivo, these cells rescued systemic glucocorticoid levels in hypopituitary mice. Our latest study aimed to prepare hypothalamic and pituitary tissues from human pluripotent stem cells. We succeeded in establishing the differentiation method using human ES/iPS cells. The culture method is characterized by replication of stepwise embryonic differentiation. Therefore, these methods could potentially be used as developmental and disease models, as well as for future regenerative medicine. PMID:27245938

  1. Characterization of pituitary growth hormone and its receptor in the green iguana (Iguana iguana).

    PubMed

    Ávila-Mendoza, José; Carranza, Martha; Pérez-Rueda, Ernesto; Luna, Maricela; Arámburo, Carlos

    2014-07-01

    Pituitary growth hormone (GH) has been studied in most vertebrate groups; however, only a few studies have been carried out in reptiles. Little is known about pituitary hormones in the order Squamata, to which the green iguana (gi) belongs. In this work, we characterized the hypophysis of Iguana iguana morphologically. The somatotrophs (round cells of 7.6-10 μm containing 250- to 300-nm secretory granules where the giGH is stored) were found, by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, exclusively in the caudal lobe of the pars distalis, whereas the lactotrophs were distributed only in the rostral lobe. A pituitary giGH-like protein was obtained by immuno-affinity chromatography employing a heterologous antibody against chicken GH. giGH showed molecular heterogeneity (22, 44, and 88 kDa by SDS-PAGE/Western blot under non-reducing conditions and at least four charge variants (pIs 6.2, 6.5, 6.9, 7.4) by isoelectric focusing. The pituitary giGH cDNA (1016 bp), amplified by PCR and RACE, encodes a pre-hormone of 218 aa, of which 190 aa correspond to the mature protein and 28 aa to the signal peptide. The giGH receptor cDNA was also partially sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses of the amino acid sequences of giGH and giGHR homologs in vertebrates suggest a parallel evolution and functional relationship between the GH and its receptor. PMID:24769041

  2. Characterization of pituitary growth hormone and its receptor in the green iguana (Iguana iguana).

    PubMed

    Ávila-Mendoza, José; Carranza, Martha; Pérez-Rueda, Ernesto; Luna, Maricela; Arámburo, Carlos

    2014-07-01

    Pituitary growth hormone (GH) has been studied in most vertebrate groups; however, only a few studies have been carried out in reptiles. Little is known about pituitary hormones in the order Squamata, to which the green iguana (gi) belongs. In this work, we characterized the hypophysis of Iguana iguana morphologically. The somatotrophs (round cells of 7.6-10 μm containing 250- to 300-nm secretory granules where the giGH is stored) were found, by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, exclusively in the caudal lobe of the pars distalis, whereas the lactotrophs were distributed only in the rostral lobe. A pituitary giGH-like protein was obtained by immuno-affinity chromatography employing a heterologous antibody against chicken GH. giGH showed molecular heterogeneity (22, 44, and 88 kDa by SDS-PAGE/Western blot under non-reducing conditions and at least four charge variants (pIs 6.2, 6.5, 6.9, 7.4) by isoelectric focusing. The pituitary giGH cDNA (1016 bp), amplified by PCR and RACE, encodes a pre-hormone of 218 aa, of which 190 aa correspond to the mature protein and 28 aa to the signal peptide. The giGH receptor cDNA was also partially sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses of the amino acid sequences of giGH and giGHR homologs in vertebrates suggest a parallel evolution and functional relationship between the GH and its receptor.

  3. Ontogeny and pituitary regulation of testicular growth hormone-releasing hormone-like messenger ribonucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Berry, S A; Pescovitz, O H

    1990-09-01

    The testis is rich in central nervous system-type neuropeptides, including a GH-releasing hormone (GHRH)-like substance. We examined the ontogeny and pituitary regulation of testicular GHRH-like mRNA (t-GHRH mRNA) and compared this to expression of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and IGF-II mRNA in developing testis. t-GHRH mRNA was measured by dot blot hybridization and quantitated using a hypothalamic GHRH cRNA standard. t-GHRH mRNA was not detectable in Northern blots in fetal testis on day 19 of gestation, but was present in low but detectable amounts in testicular dot blots on day 2 of life (0.44 pg/micrograms total RNA). Levels of the RNA increased beginning on day 21 (1.72 +/- 0.23 pg/micrograms total RNA) and reached adult levels by day 30 (4.96 +/- 0.84 pg/micrograms total RNA). The GHRH species on Northern analysis was about 1750 nucleotides at all ages examined; there was a larger species of about 3350 nucleotides seen on days 65 and 90. There was no correlation between the ontogeny of t-GHRH mRNA and either IGF-I or IGF-II mRNAs, which were maximally expressed in the testes of day 2 animals and decreased with age. To examine the influence of the pituitary gland on t-GHRH mRNA, levels of the mRNA were measured in the tests of hypophysectomized animals and age-matched controls. In animals hypophysectomized on day 21 and killed on day 42 and in animals hypophysectomized on day 42 and killed on day 63, there was marked diminution of t-GHRH mRNA (19 +/- 5% and 9 +/- 2% of age-matched controls, respectively). In contrast, in animals hypophysectomized on day 65 and killed on either day 80 or 90, there was a much smaller difference in levels of t-GHRH mRNA compared to values in control animals (73 +/- 20%). This was unlike the effect of hypophysectomy on testicular IGF-I mRNA, where uniform diminution was seen in all three groups. Because GH is important in the regulation of hypothalamic GHRH mRNA, we examined the effects of administration of recombinant

  4. Pituitary gigantism.

    PubMed

    Daughaday, W H

    1992-09-01

    Pituitary gigantism is a rare condition whose association with McCune-Albright syndrome suggests that mutations in alpha-subunit of a Gs protein are an important cause of this condition. In addition to somatotroph adenoma, it is now recognized that somatotroph hyperplasia can also result from increased levels of growth hormone-releasing hormone. Transgenic rats with hypersomatotrophism are prone to renal and hepatic pathology. PMID:1521516

  5. Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    Hormones are your body's chemical messengers. They travel in your bloodstream to tissues or organs. They work ... glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, ...

  6. Transient pituitary hypothyroidism in a patient with ectopic adrenocorticotrophic hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Espinosa, J; Urgell, E; Montesinos, J; Domingo, P; Webb, S M

    2000-05-01

    We report the case of a 55-year-old woman who presented with hypercortisolism secondary to ectopic adrenocorticotrophic hormone secretion and severe non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) due to metastatic small cell lung carcinoma associated with severe infections. The patient initially showed hormonal profiles of pituitary hypothyroidism and gonadal hypofunction. After decrease in cortisol production following treatment with chemotherapy and metyrapone, serum thyroid hormones and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) concentrations normalized. Study of the relative contributions of cortisol and pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor alpha) to the overall variability in thyroid function tests disclosed a significant and independent effect of serum cortisol on serum TSH concentrations; the variability in free thyroid hormone concentration was explained only by changes in TSH concentration. These observations indicate that cortisol could be the major determinant of changes in serum TSH concentrations in clinical conditions accompanied by hypercortisolism, as occurs in NTIS.

  7. Direct effects of triiodothyronine on production of anterior pituitary hormones and gonadal steroids in goldfish.

    PubMed

    Allan, Euan R O; Habibi, Hamid R

    2012-09-01

    The present study investigated the effects of triiodothyronine (T3) on pituitary gonadotropin (GTH) subunits, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) β subunit, and growth hormone (GH) mRNA levels, as well as gonadal steroid secretion during different stages of reproduction in goldfish. Goldfish pituitary cells cultured with T3 exhibited lower tshβ mRNA levels in all reproductive stages and lower luteinising hormone β (lhβ) mRNA levels in early recrudescence, whereas gh and fshβ mRNA levels were not altered. T3 injections significantly reduced circulating oestrogen (OE2) concentrations in early and mid recrudescent male goldfish, but were without effect on the circulating level of OE2 in female fish. T3 injections also reduced circulating levels of testosterone in both male and female goldfish during the mid stage of gonadal recrudescence. In vitro culture of goldfish ovarian follicles at the late stage of gonadal recrudescence, in the presence of T3, resulted in reduced OE2 secretion; no consistent effect of T3 on testosterone secretion was observed in cultured goldfish ovarian follicles and testis. These findings support the hypothesis that T3 impairs reproduction by inhibiting production of gonadal steroids and pituitary luteinising hormone production in goldfish.

  8. Molecular mechanisms of regulation of growth hormone gene expression in cultured rat pituitary cells by thyroid and glucocorticoid hormones

    SciTech Connect

    Yaffe, B.M.

    1989-01-01

    In cultured GC cells, a rat pituitary tumor cell line, growth hormone (GH) is induced in a synergistic fashion by physiologic concentrations of thyroid and glucocorticoid hormones. Abundant evidence indicates that these hormones mediate this response via their specific receptors. The purpose of this thesis is to explore the mechanisms by which these hormones affect GH production. When poly (A){sup +} RNA was isolated from cells grown both with and without hormones and translated in a cell-free wheat germ system, the preGH translation products were shown to be proportional to immunoassayable GH production under all combinations of hormonal milieux, indicating that changes in GH production is modulated at a pretranslational level. A cDNA library was constructed from poly (A){sup +}RNA and one clone containing GH cDNA sequences was isolated. This was used to confirm the above results by Northern dot blot analysis. This probe was also used to assess hormonal effects on GH mRNA half-life and synthetic rates as well as GH gene transcription rates in isolated nuclei. Using a pulse-chase protocol in which cellular RNA was labeled in vivo with ({sup 3}H)uridine, and quantitating ({sup 3}H)GHmRNA directly by hybridization to GH cDNA bound to nitrocellulose filters, GHmRNA was found to have a half-life of approximately 50 hours, and was not significantly altered by the presence of inducing hormones.

  9. The relationship of appetitive, reproductive and posterior pituitary hormones to alcoholism and craving in humans.

    PubMed

    Kenna, George A; Swift, Robert M; Hillemacher, Thomas; Leggio, Lorenzo

    2012-09-01

    A significant challenge for understanding alcoholism lies in discovering why some, but not other individuals, become dependent on alcohol. Genetic, environmental, cultural, developmental, and neurobiological influences are recognized as essential factors underlying a person's risk for becoming alcohol dependent (AD); however, the neurobiological processes that trigger this vulnerability are still poorly understood. Hormones are important in the regulation of many functions and several hormones are strongly associated with alcohol use. While medical consequences are important, the primary focus of this review is on the underlying confluence of appetitive/feeding, reproductive and posterior pituitary hormones associated with distinct phases of alcoholism or assessed by alcohol craving in humans. While these hormones are of diverse origin, the involvement with alcoholism by these hormone systems is unmistakable, and demonstrates the complexity of interactions with alcohol and the difficulty of successfully pursuing effective treatments. Whether alcohol associated changes in the activity of certain hormones are the result of alcohol use or are the result of an underlying predisposition for alcoholism, or a combination of both, is currently of great scientific interest. The evidence we present in this review suggests that appetitive hormones may be markers as they appear involved in alcohol dependence and craving, that reproductive hormones provide an example of the consequences of drinking and are affected by alcohol, and that posterior pituitary hormones have potential for being targets for treatment. A better understanding of the nature of these associations may contribute to diagnosing and more comprehensively treating alcoholism. Pharmacotherapies that take advantage of our new understanding of hormones, their receptors, or their potential relationship to craving may shed light on the treatment of this disorder.

  10. Learning and Behavior (I): Effects of Pituitary Hormones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marx, Jean L.

    1975-01-01

    Describes research which indicates that a number of peptide hormones act directly on the brain to affect learning and behavior. Investigations are currently being conducted to determine if these substances can be used to treat learning disorders or to improve the memories of normal people. (MLH)

  11. Skeletal muscle afferent regulation of bioassayable growth hormone in the rat pituitary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosselink, K. L.; Grindeland, R. E.; Roy, R. R.; Zhong, H.; Bigbee, A. J.; Grossman, E. J.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1998-01-01

    There are forms of growth hormone (GH) in the plasma and pituitary of the rat and in the plasma of humans that are undetected by presently available immunoassays (iGH) but can be measured by bioassay (bGH). Although the regulation of iGH release is well documented, the mechanism(s) of bGH release is unclear. On the basis of changes in bGH and iGH secretion in rats that had been exposed to microgravity conditions, we hypothesized that neural afferents play a role in regulating the release of these hormones. To examine whether bGH secretion can be modulated by afferent input from skeletal muscle, the proximal or distal ends of severed hindlimb fast muscle nerves were stimulated ( approximately 2 times threshold) in anesthetized rats. Plasma bGH increased approximately 250%, and pituitary bGH decreased approximately 60% after proximal nerve trunk stimulation. The bGH response was independent of muscle mass or whether the muscles were flexors or extensors. Distal nerve stimulation had little or no effect on plasma or pituitary bGH. Plasma iGH concentrations were unchanged after proximal nerve stimulation. Although there may be multiple regulatory mechanisms of bGH, the present results demonstrate that the activation of low-threshold afferents from fast skeletal muscles can play a regulatory role in the release of bGH, but not iGH, from the pituitary in anesthetized rats.

  12. Pituitary response to thyrotropin releasing hormone in children with overweight and obesity.

    PubMed

    Rijks, Jesse; Penders, Bas; Dorenbos, Elke; Straetemans, Saartje; Gerver, Willem-Jan; Vreugdenhil, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) concentrations in the high normal range are common in children with overweight and obesity, and associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk. Prior studies aiming at unravelling the mechanisms underlying these high TSH concentrations mainly focused on factors promoting thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) production as a cause for high TSH concentrations. However, it is unknown whether TSH release of the pituitary in response to TRH is affected in children with overweight and obesity. Here we describe TSH release of the pituitary in response to exogenous TRH in 73 euthyroid children (39% males) with overweight or (morbid) obesity. Baseline TSH concentrations (0.9-5.5 mU/L) were not associated with BMI z score, whereas these concentrations were positively associated with TSH concentrations 20 minutes after TRH administration (r(2) = 0.484, p < 0.001) and the TSH incremental area under the curve during the TRH stimulation test (r(2) = 0.307, p < 0.001). These results suggest that pituitary TSH release in response to TRH stimulation might be an important factor contributing to high normal serum TSH concentrations, which is a regular finding in children with overweight and obesity. The clinical significance and the intermediate factors contributing to pituitary TSH release need to be elucidated in future studies. PMID:27485208

  13. Pituitary response to thyrotropin releasing hormone in children with overweight and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Rijks, Jesse; Penders, Bas; Dorenbos, Elke; Straetemans, Saartje; Gerver, Willem-Jan; Vreugdenhil, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) concentrations in the high normal range are common in children with overweight and obesity, and associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk. Prior studies aiming at unravelling the mechanisms underlying these high TSH concentrations mainly focused on factors promoting thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) production as a cause for high TSH concentrations. However, it is unknown whether TSH release of the pituitary in response to TRH is affected in children with overweight and obesity. Here we describe TSH release of the pituitary in response to exogenous TRH in 73 euthyroid children (39% males) with overweight or (morbid) obesity. Baseline TSH concentrations (0.9–5.5 mU/L) were not associated with BMI z score, whereas these concentrations were positively associated with TSH concentrations 20 minutes after TRH administration (r2 = 0.484, p < 0.001) and the TSH incremental area under the curve during the TRH stimulation test (r2 = 0.307, p < 0.001). These results suggest that pituitary TSH release in response to TRH stimulation might be an important factor contributing to high normal serum TSH concentrations, which is a regular finding in children with overweight and obesity. The clinical significance and the intermediate factors contributing to pituitary TSH release need to be elucidated in future studies. PMID:27485208

  14. Pituitary and testicular response to luteinizing hormone releasing hormone in normal and sulpiride-induced hyperprolactinaemic men.

    PubMed

    Nakano, R; Yagi, S; Nishi, T

    1988-05-01

    Pituitary and testicular response to an intravenous infusion of 480 micrograms luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) for 8 hours (1 microgram/min) was investigated in 8 male volunteers in normal and hyperprolactinaemic state. Eight normal men were given 150 mg of sulpiride daily for 14 days. Serum prolactin (PRL) levels were elevated significantly, but basal serum levels of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) did not change following daily oral administration of sulpiride in 8 normal men. Eight men showed biphasic LH response to LHRH infusion in both normal and hyperprolactinaemic state, and there was a rather exaggerated response in serum LH concentration in hyperprolactinaemic state. Serum FSH response to LHRH was similar in normal and hyperprolactinaemic state. Although slight increase in serum testosterone concentration was observed during LHRH infusion in normal and hyperprolactinaemic state, the statistical difference was not significant. The result of the present study suggests that the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis, as measured by serum gonadotrophin and testosterone responses, is well reserved.

  15. Induction of sensitivity of fibroblast cultures to pituitary growth hormone by a thermostable serum factor

    SciTech Connect

    Bulatov, A.A.; Osipova, T.A.; Pankov, Y.A.; Terekhov, S.M.

    1985-05-01

    This paper presents data to show that highly purified pituitary growth hormone (GH) preparations, themselves unable to stimulate DNA biosynthesis in cultures of adult human skin fibroblasts, acquire this ability if the cells are treated simultaneously with a factor present in a thermostable and acid-resistant fraction of rat blood serum. Activity of this factor in rat blood serum has been shown to depend on the pituitary, and to increase after hypophysectomy. Human GH, while not exhibiting activity itself, if added to the medium simultaneously with serum fraction from hypophysectomized rats, stimulated DNA biosynthesis by fibroblasts significantly. The increase in tritium-thymidine incorporation under the influence of the hormone together with the serum fraction amounted to 233%. It is important to not that serum fraction of intact rats of the same age in a concentration of 1% was unable to induce sensitivity of the fibroblasts to human GH.

  16. Hypothalamic-pituitary hormones during critical illness: a dynamic neuroendocrine response.

    PubMed

    Langouche, Lies; Van den Berghe, Greet

    2014-01-01

    Independent of the underlying condition, critical illness is characterized by a uniform dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-peripheral axes. In most axes a clear biphasic pattern can be distinguished. The acute phase of critical illness is characterized by low peripheral effector hormone levels such as T3, IGF-1 and testosterone, despite an actively secreting pituitary. The adrenal axis with high cortisol levels in the presence of low ACTH levels is a noteworthy exception. In the prolonged phase of critical illness, low peripheral effector hormone levels coincide with a uniform suppression of the neuroendocrine axes, predominantly of hypothalamic origin. The severity of the alterations in the different neuroendocrine axes is associated with a high risk of morbidity and mortality, but it remains unknown whether the observed changes are cause or consequence of adverse outcome. Several studies have identified therapeutic potential of hypothalamic releasing factors, but clinical outcome remains to be investigated with sufficiently powered randomized controlled trials.

  17. A silent follicle-stimulating hormone-producing pituitary adenoma in a teenage male.

    PubMed

    Tamiya, Hiroyuki; Fukuhara, Noriaki; Yoshida, Naohiro; Suzuki, Hisanori; Takeshita, Akira; Inoshita, Naoko; Nishioka, Hiroshi; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Sano, Toshiaki; Yamada, Shozo

    2011-12-01

    An 18-year-old male was referred to Toranomon Hospital seeking reoperation for recurrent clinically nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma. A pituitary macroadenoma was first suspected at age 15 due to intractable headaches. Endocrine data were unremarkable except slightly elevated serum follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). Transsphenoidal surgery done at another hospital achieved partial tumor removal but the remaining tumor regrew 2 years after surgery. The recurrent tumor was completely and selectively removed on repeat surgery at Toranomon Hospital. Pathological examination confirmed a silent FSH-producing pituitary adenoma. Forty-five patients less than 20 years old underwent transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary adenoma at Toranomon Hospital between 1993 and 2010. Of the 45 patients, 36 (80.0%) had clinically functioning adenomas and the other 9 (20.0%) had clinically non-functioning adenomas. No patients, other than the present case, had a silent gonadotroph adenoma. In contrast, among 579 patients over 20 years old undergoing surgery for nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas between 2006 and 2010 at Toranomon Hospital, 304 (52.3%) had silent gonadotroph adenomas. Gonadotroph adenomas are more common with aging: for example, 37 (61.7%) of 60 patients more than 70 years old at the time of operation had gonadotroph adenomas. In conclusion, gonadotroph adenomas, especially silent gonadotroph adenomas, are extremely rare in childhood and adolescence.

  18. Fluoride Exposure, Follicle Stimulating Hormone Receptor Gene Polymorphism and Hypothalamus-pituitary-ovarian Axis Hormones in Chinese Women.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming Xu; Zhou, Guo Yu; Zhu, Jing Yuan; Gong, Biao; Hou, Jia Xiang; Zhou, Tong; Duan, Li Ju; Ding, Zhong; Cui, Liu Xin; Ba, Yue

    2015-09-01

    The effects of fluoride exposure on the functions of reproductive and endocrine systems have attracted widespread attention in academic circle nowadays. However, it is unclear whether the gene-environment interaction may modify the secretion and activity of hypothalamus-pituitary- ovarian (HPO) axis hormones. Thus, the aim of this study was to explore the influence of fluoride exposure and follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) gene polymorphism on reproductive hormones in Chinese women. A cross sectional study was conducted in seven villages of Henan Province, China during 2010-2011. A total of 679 women aged 18-48 years were recruited through cluster sampling and divided into three groups, i.e. endemic fluorosis group (EFG), defluoridation project group (DFPG), and control group (CG) based on the local fluoride concentration in drinking water. The serum levels of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and estradiol (E2) were determined respectively and the FSHR polymorphism was detected by real time PCR assay. The results provided the preliminary evidence indicating the gene-environment interaction on HPO axis hormones in women.

  19. Fluoride Exposure, Follicle Stimulating Hormone Receptor Gene Polymorphism and Hypothalamus-pituitary-ovarian Axis Hormones in Chinese Women.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming Xu; Zhou, Guo Yu; Zhu, Jing Yuan; Gong, Biao; Hou, Jia Xiang; Zhou, Tong; Duan, Li Ju; Ding, Zhong; Cui, Liu Xin; Ba, Yue

    2015-09-01

    The effects of fluoride exposure on the functions of reproductive and endocrine systems have attracted widespread attention in academic circle nowadays. However, it is unclear whether the gene-environment interaction may modify the secretion and activity of hypothalamus-pituitary- ovarian (HPO) axis hormones. Thus, the aim of this study was to explore the influence of fluoride exposure and follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) gene polymorphism on reproductive hormones in Chinese women. A cross sectional study was conducted in seven villages of Henan Province, China during 2010-2011. A total of 679 women aged 18-48 years were recruited through cluster sampling and divided into three groups, i.e. endemic fluorosis group (EFG), defluoridation project group (DFPG), and control group (CG) based on the local fluoride concentration in drinking water. The serum levels of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and estradiol (E2) were determined respectively and the FSHR polymorphism was detected by real time PCR assay. The results provided the preliminary evidence indicating the gene-environment interaction on HPO axis hormones in women. PMID:26464260

  20. Proteome and radioimmunoassay analyses of pituitary hormones and proteins in response to feed restriction of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Kuhla, Björn; Albrecht, Dirk; Bruckmaier, Rupert; Viergutz, Torsten; Nürnberg, Gerd; Metges, Cornelia C

    2010-12-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary system controls homeostasis during feed energy reduction. In order to examine which pituitary proteins and hormone variants are potentially associated with metabolic adaptation, pituitary glands from ad libitum and energy restrictively fed dairy cows were characterized using RIA and 2-DE followed by MALDI-TOF-MS. We found 64 different spots of regulatory hormones: growth hormone (44), preprolactin (16), luteinizing hormone (LH) (1), thyrotropin (1), proopiomelanocortin (1) and its cleavage product lipotropin (1), but none of these did significantly differ between feeding groups. Quantification of total pituitary LH and prolactin concentrations by RIA confirmed the results obtained by proteome analysis. Also, feed energy restriction provoked increasing non-esterified fatty acid, decreasing prolactin, but unaltered glucose, LH and growth hormone plasma concentrations. Energy restriction decreased the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein, triosephosphate isomerase, purine-rich element-binding protein A and elongation factor Tu, whereas it increased expression of proline synthetase co-transcribed homolog, peroxiredoxin III, β-tubulin and annexin A5 which is involved in the hormone secretion process. Our results indicate that in response to feed energy restriction the pituitary reservoir of all posttranslationally modified hormone forms remains constant. Changing plasma hormone concentrations are likely attributed to a regulated releasing process from the gland into the blood.

  1. Effect of single-dose radiation on cell survival and growth hormone secretion by rat anterior pituitary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hochberg, Z.; Kuten, A.; Hertz, P.; Tatcher, M.; Kedar, A.; Benderly, A.

    1983-06-01

    Cranial irradiation has been shown to impair growth hormone secretion in children. In this study a cell culture of dispersed rat anterior pituitary cells was exposed to single doses of radiation in the range of 100 to 1500 rad. Survival curves were obtained for the different anterior pituitary cell lines, and growth hormone secretion was measured in the tissue culture medium. Both survival and growth hormone secretion curves showed an initial shoulder in the range of 0 to 300 rad, followed by a decline between 300 to 750 rad. It is concluded that growth hormone secreting acidophilic pituicytes are sensitive to radiation at single doses greater than 300 rad.

  2. Diurnal profiles of testosterone and pituitary hormones suggest different mechanisms for menstrual disturbances in endurance athletes.

    PubMed

    Rickenlund, Anette; Thorén, Marja; Carlström, Kjell; von Schoultz, Bo; Hirschberg, Angelica Lindén

    2004-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diurnal pattern of testosterone and pituitary hormones in endurance female athletes with different types of menstrual disorder. Age- and body mass index-matched groups of endurance athletes with amenorrhea (n = 10) and oligomenorrhea (n = 6), regularly cycling athletes (n = 8), and sedentary controls (n = 8) were compared with respect to 24-h hormonal profiles of testosterone, LH, prolactin (PRL), GH, insulin, IGF binding protein 1 (IGFBP-1), and cortisol. The 24-h hormone profiles in amenorrheic athletes were characterized by decreased LH pulsatility and peak amplitude of PRL and increased baseline levels of GH and cortisol. However, oligomenorrheic athletes displayed a significantly different pattern with higher diurnal testosterone secretion than all other groups. Furthermore, LH, PRL, GH, and cortisol secretions were comparable with regularly menstruating subjects. In the combined group of athletes with menstrual disturbances, diurnal secretions of testosterone, LH, and PRL were positively, whereas cortisol was negatively correlated with the number of menstruations the last year. Although this could be explained by a gradual inhibition of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, our results indicate that the symptoms of amenorrhea and oligomenorrhea may reflect two hormonally distinct conditions. Thus, amenorrheic athletes displayed a hormonal pattern in agreement with hypothalamic inhibition due to energy deficiency, whereas oligomenorrheic athletes demonstrated increased diurnal secretion of testosterone, suggesting a different mechanism, e.g. essential hyperandrogenism.

  3. Pituitary Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... the "master control gland" - it makes hormones that affect growth and the functions of other glands in the body. With pituitary disorders, you often have too much or too little of one of your hormones. Injuries can cause pituitary disorders, but the most common cause is a pituitary tumor.

  4. Pituitary-gonadal hormones during prolonged residency in Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Sawhney, R C; Malhotra, A S; Prasad, R; Pal, K; Kumar, R; Bajaj, A C

    1998-08-01

    Plasma luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), prolactin (PRL) and testosterone levels were measured in nine eugonadal men in New Delhi and during the 1st week of different months of their stay at Dakshin Gangotri in Antarctica. During their 12-month stay in Antarctica, they were exposed to a severely cold climate, long polar nights and polar days, high wind velocity, increased amounts of solar and ultraviolet radiation and geomagnetism, as well as physical and social isolation. Plasma testosterone tended to increase in March, but a significant increase (P < 0.05) was not seen until April. The mean testosterone levels in May, June, September and November were also significantly higher than the March or New Delhi values. The absolute values of LH, FSH and PRL did not show any month-to-month changes in Antarctica. However, when the hormone levels were expressed as a percentage of the individual annual Antarctic mean, significant differences as a percentage of the individual annual Antarctic mean, significant differences were observed. The testosterone peak in April, May and June was associated with an increase in LH. The nadirs of testosterone, LH, FSH and PRL were seen in either July or August. FSH showed the highest values in March, whereas the highest PRL values were seen in November. These observations suggest the presence of circannual variations in gonadotropin, PRL and LH in Antarctica which are independent of polar days and polar nights. It appears that factors other than the duration of daylight might be involved in regulating these changes. The significance of maintenance of testosterone levels in the supra-physiological range in Antarctica remains unknown but may be important in acclimatization/habituation to the extreme polar cold by increasing basal metabolic rate, protein synthesis and erythropoiesis. PMID:9780846

  5. Pituitary-gonadal hormones during prolonged residency in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawhney, R. C.; Malhotra, A. S.; Prasad, Rajendra; Pal, Karan; Kumar, Rajesh; Bajaj, A. C.

    Plasma luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), prolactin (PRL) and testosterone levels were measured in nine eugonadal men in New Delhi and during the 1st week of different months of their stay at Dakshin Gangotri in Antarctica. During their 12-month stay in Antarctica, they were exposed to a severely cold climate, long polar nights and polar days, high wind velocity, increased amounts of solar and ultraviolet radiation and geomagnetism, as well as physical and social isolation. Plasma testosterone tended to increase in March, but a significant increase (P<0.05) was not seen until April. The mean testosterone levels in May, June, September and November were also significantly higher than the March or New Delhi values. The absolute values of LH, FSH and PRL did not show any month-to-month changes in Antarctica. However, when the hormone levels were expressed as a percentage of the individual annual Antarctic mean, significant differences as a percentage of the individual annual Antarctic mean, significant differences were observed. The testosterone peak in April, May and June was associated with an increase in LH. The nadirs of testosterone, LH, FSH and PRL were seen in either July or August. FSH showed the highest values in March, whereas the highest PRL values were seen in November. These observations suggest the presence of circannual variations in gonadotropin, PRL and LH in Antarctica which are independent of polar days and polar nights. It appears that factors other than the duration of daylight might be involved in regulating these changes. The significance of maintenance of testosterone levels in the supra-physiological range in Antarctica remains unknown but may be important in acclimatization/habituation to the extreme polar cold by increasing basal metabolic rate, protein synthesis and erythropoiesis.

  6. Maximal expression of Foxl2 in pituitary gonadotropes requires ovarian hormones.

    PubMed

    Herndon, Maria K; Nilson, John H

    2015-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and activin regulate synthesis of FSH and ultimately fertility. Recent in vivo studies cast SMAD4 and FOXL2 as master transcriptional mediators of activin signaling that act together and independently of GnRH to regulate Fshb gene expression and female fertility. Ovarian hormones regulate GnRH and its receptor (GNRHR) through negative and positive feedback loops. In contrast, the role of ovarian hormones in regulating activin, activin receptors, and components of the activin signaling pathway, including SMAD4 and FOXL2, remains understudied. The widespread distribution of activin and many of its signaling intermediates complicates analysis of the effects of ovarian hormones on their synthesis in gonadotropes, one of five pituitary cell types. We circumvented this complication by using a transgenic model that allows isolation of polyribosomes selectively from gonadotropes of intact females and ovariectomized females treated with or without a GnRH antagonist. This paradigm allows assessment of ovarian hormonal feedback and distinguishes responses that are either independent or dependent on GnRH. Surprisingly, our results indicate that Foxl2 levels in gonadotropes decline significantly in the absence of ovarian input and independently of GnRH. Expression of the genes encoding other members of the activin signaling pathway are unaffected by loss of ovarian hormonal feedback, highlighting their selective effect on Foxl2. Expression of Gnrhr, a known target of FOXL2, also declines upon ovariectomy consistent with reduced expression of Foxl2 and loss of ovarian hormones. In contrast, Fshb mRNA increases dramatically post-ovariectomy due to increased compensatory input from GnRH. Together these data suggest that ovarian hormones regulate expression of Foxl2 thereby expanding the number of genes controlled by the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis that ultimately dictate reproductive fitness.

  7. Physiological significance of the rhythmic secretion of hypothalamic and pituitary hormones.

    PubMed

    Gan, Earn-Hui; Quinton, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The various hypothalamic-pituitary-end-organ/gland axes are central to the regulation of mammalian homeostasis. These have a core role in integrating the response of both endocrine and nervous systems to external and internal stimuli, by means of multi-level signalling through negative and positive feedback loops. The content of these hormonal signals is overwhelmingly conveyed in a rhythmic secretory pattern (frequency modulation of signal) that is energetically more efficient in transmitting neuroendocrine signals than the alternatives (modulation of signal by amplitude or by total area-under-curve). These rhythmic neuroendocrine secretions are individually distinct but the majority display a common feature of low-level basal secretion with superimposed pulsatile rhythms. The underlying mechanisms contributing to this unique rhythmic secretion are complicated and incompletely understood, but are beginning to be better defined as a result of several elegant studies performed in recent years. In some cases, signal transduction in the target tissue is critically dependent upon a pulsatile input, but in others the observed pulsatility is a downstream echo of obligate pulsatility exhibited by a higher-level control hormone. Thus, the gonads are presented with a pulsatile gonadotrophin signal, not because this is essential to gonadotrophin action (the same level of stimulation can be elicited by a continuous input), but as a downstream consequence of pulsatile GnRH-mediated stimulation of pituitary gonadotrophs. By contrast, rhythmicity of signal is embedded at all levels of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis. Hypothalamic-pituitary rhythmic secretions are influenced by various internal and external inputs such as age, gender, sleep and wakefulness, food intake, light (photoperiod) or exposure to stress. Understanding the physiological significance of the rhythmic secretion of hypothalamic and pituitary hormones has the potential to provide insights into disease

  8. Episodic molecular evolution of pituitary growth hormone in Cetartiodactyla.

    PubMed

    Maniou, Zoitsa; Wallis, O Caryl; Wallis, Michael

    2004-06-01

    The sequence of growth hormone (GH) is generally strongly conserved in mammals, but episodes of rapid change occurred during the evolution of primates and artiodactyls, when the rate of GH evolution apparently increased substantially. As a result the sequences of higher primate and ruminant GHs differ markedly from sequences of other mammalian GHs. In order to increase knowledge of GH evolution in Cetartiodactyla (Artiodactyla plus Cetacea) we have cloned and characterized GH genes from camel (Camelus dromedarius), hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius), and giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis), using genomic DNA and a polymerase chain reaction technique. As in other mammals, these GH genes comprise five exons and four introns. Two very similar GH gene sequences (encoding identical proteins) were found in each of hippopotamus and giraffe. The deduced sequence for the mature hippopotamus GH is identical to that of dolphin, in accord with current ideas of a close relationship between Cetacea and Hippopotamidae. The sequence of camel GH is identical to that reported previously for alpaca GH. The sequence of giraffe GH is very similar to that of other ruminants but differs from that of nonruminant cetartiodactyls at about 18 residues. The results demonstrate that the apparent burst of rapid evolution of GH occurred largely after the separation of the line leading to ruminants from other cetartiodactyls. PMID:15461431

  9. The hypothalamic-pituitary response in SLE. Regulation of prolactin, growth hormone and cortisol release.

    PubMed

    Rovenský, J; Blazícková, S; Rauová, L; Jezová, D; Koska, J; Lukác, J; Vigas, M

    1998-01-01

    It has been suggested that neuroendocrine regulation plays an important role in the pathogenesis and activation of autoimmune diseases. The aim of this investigation was to clarify the hypothalamic-pituitary response to a well-defined stimulus under standardised conditions in patients with SLE. Plasma concentrations of prolactin (PRL), growth hormone (GH) and cortisol were determined in venous blood drawn through an indwelling cannula during insulin-induced hypoglycaemia (0.1 U/kg b.w., i.v.) in ten patients and in 12 age-, gender- and weight-matched healthy subjects. Basal PRL concentrations were higher in patients vs healthy controls (12 vs 6 ng/ml, P < 0.01), though still within the physiological range. Insulin-induced plasma PRL and GH were significantly increased both in patients and healthy subjects; however, the increments or areas under the curves were not different in the two groups. Plasma cortisol response showed moderate attenuation in patients. Sensitivity of pituitary lactotrothrops to thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) administration (200 microg, i.v.) was the same in patients and control subjects. In SLE patients with low activity of the disease the sensitivity of pituitary PRL release to TRH administration remained unchanged. The hypothalamic response to stress stimulus (hypoglycaemia) was comparable in patients and healthy subjects. PMID:9736325

  10. Luteinizing hormone-releasing immunization alters pituitary hormone synthesis and storage in bulls and steers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives of this study were (1) to determine if trenbolone acetate (TBA) co-administered with LHRH immunization would suppress reproductive function in beef bulls and (2) to examine the effects of LHRH immunization and TBA treatment on pituitary function. To address these objectives 44 Angus x He...

  11. Gonadotrophin-releasing activity of neurohypophysial hormones: II. The pituitary oxytocin receptor mediating gonadotrophin release differs from that of corticotrophs.

    PubMed

    Evans, J J; Catt, K J

    1989-07-01

    Neurohypophysial hormones stimulate gonadotrophin release from dispersed rat anterior pituitary cells in vitro, acting through receptors distinct from those which mediate the secretory response to gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH). The LH response to oxytocin was not affected by the presence of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor, methyl isobutylxanthine, but was diminished in the absence of extracellular calcium and was progressively increased as the calcium concentration in the medium was raised to normal. In addition, the calcium channel antagonist, nifedipine, suppressed oxytocin-stimulated secretion of LH. It is likely that the mechanisms of LH release induced by GnRH and neurohypophysial hormones are similar, although stimulation of gonadotrophin secretion is mediated by separate receptor systems. Oxytocin was more active than vasopressin in releasing LH, but less active in releasing ACTH. The highly selective oxytocin agonist, [Thr4,Gly7]oxytocin, elicited concentration-dependent secretion of LH but had little effect on corticotrophin secretion. The neurohypophysial hormone antagonist analogues, [d(CH2)5Tyr(Me)2]vasopressin, [d(CH2)5Tyr(Me)2,Orn8]vasotocin and [d(CH2)5D-Tyr(Et)2Val4,Cit8]vasopressin, inhibited the LH response to both oxytocin and vasopressin. However, [d(CH2)5Tyr(Me)2]vasopressin was much less effective in inhibiting the ACTH response to the neurohypophysial hormones, and [d(CH2)5Tyr-(Me)2,Orn8]vasotocin and [d(CH2)5D-Tyr(Et)2,Val4,Cit8]vasopressin exhibited no inhibitory activity against ACTH release. Thus, agonist and antagonist analogues of neurohypophysial hormones display divergent activities with regard to LH and ACTH responses, and the neuropeptide receptor mediating gonadotroph activation is clearly different from that on the corticotroph. Whereas the corticotroph receptor is a vasopressin-type receptor an oxytocin-type receptor is responsible for gonadotrophin release by neurohypophysial hormones.

  12. Pituitary Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... pituitary is the "master control gland" - it makes hormones that affect growth and the functions of other glands in the body. Pituitary tumors are common, but often they don't cause health ... tumor produces hormones and disrupts the balance of hormones in your ...

  13. Changes in pituitary growth hormone cells prepared from rats flown on Spacelab 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindeland, R.; Hymer, W. C.; Farrington, M.; Fast, T.; Hayes, C.; Motter, K.; Patil, L.; Vasques, M.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of exposure to microgravity on pituitary gland was investigated by examining cells isolated from anterior pituitaries of rats flown on the 7-day Spacelab 3 mission and, subsequently, cultured for 6 days. Compared with ground controls, flight cells contained more intracellular growth hormone (GH); however, the flight cells released less GH over the 6-day culture period and after implantation into hypophysectomized rats than did the control cells. Compared with control rats, glands from large rats (400 g) contained more somatotrophs (44 percent compared with 37 percent in control rats); small rats (200 g) showed no difference. No major differences were found in the somatotroph ultrastructure (by TEM) or in the pattern of the immunoactive GH variants. However, high-performance liquid chromatography fractionation of culture media indicated that flight cells released much less of a biologically active high-molecular weight GH variant, suggesting that space flight may lead to secretory dysfunction.

  14. Hormonal interrelationships between hypothalamus, pituitary and testis of rams and bulls.

    PubMed

    Schanbacher, B D

    1982-01-01

    This mini-review aims to summarize some of our recent findings relating to testicular function and feedback control of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis by testicular steroids in rams and bulls. Testosterone secretion in intact males is not tonic, but is characterized by episodic pulses. This pattern of secretion is dictated by inputs of the central nervous system via secretions of the hypothalamus (luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone; LHRH) and anterior pituitary (luteinizing hormone; LH). A temporal relationship exists between concentrations of LH and testosterone in serum and evidence is presented that strongly suggests that their episodic secretion is dependent on discrete episodes of LHRH discharge from the hypothalamus. Based on data from experiments with rams and bulls, I suggest that acutely castrated males (but not chronic castrates) remain susceptible to the negative feedback effects of testosterone, i.e., LH concentrations remain suppressed in serum of animals given testosterone replacement therapy immediately following castration. Estradiol-17 beta, on the other hand, abolishes pulsatile LH release and suppresses mean LH concentrations in both acute and chronic castrates. Therefore, testosterone feedback on LH secretion may, in part, involve extragonadal conversion to estradiol-17 beta to block pulsatile LHRH release. The potent inhibitory effects of estradiol on LH secretion provide an experimental probe for future investigations relating to mechanisms controlling male reproduction.

  15. Experimental Modification of Rat Pituitary Growth Hormone Cell Function During and After Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.; Salada, T.; Nye, P.; Grossman, E. J.; Lane, P. K.; Grindeland, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    Space-flown rats show a number of flight-induced changes in the structure and function of pituitary Growth Hormone (GH) cells after in vitro postflight testing. To evaluate the possible effects of microgravity on GH cells themselves, freshly dispersed rat anterior pituitary gland cells were seeded into vials containing serum +/- 1 micron HydroCortisone (HC) before flight. Five different cell preparations were used: the entire mixed-cell population of various hormone-producing cell types, cells of density less than 1.071 g/sq cm (band 1), cells of density greater than 1.071 g/sq cm (band 2), and cells prepared from either the dorsal or ventral part of the gland. Relative to ground control samples, bioactive GH released from dense cells during flight was reduced in HC-free medium but was increased in HC-containing medium. Band I and mixed cells usually showed opposite HC-dependent responses. Release of bioactive GH from ventral flight cells was lower; postflight responses to GH-releasing hormone challenge were reduced, and the cytoplasmic area occupied by GH in the dense cells was greater. Collectively, the data show that the chemistry and cellular makeup of the culture system modifies the response of GH cells to microgravity. As such, these cells offer a system to identify gravisensing mechanisms in secretory cells in future microgravity research.

  16. Circulating hormones and pituitary responsiveness in young epileptic men receiving long-term antiepileptic medication.

    PubMed

    Macphee, G J; Larkin, J G; Butler, E; Beastall, G H; Brodie, M J

    1988-01-01

    Impairment of libido and sexual potency are commonly reported by male epileptic patients. This may be partly a consequence of medication. Circulating hormones were measured in 53 postpubertal male epileptic patients less than 45 years of age and in an age-matched control group (n = 40), consisting of 14 untreated epileptic patients and 26 unmedicated healthy subjects. A subgroup also underwent a combined gonadotrophin- and thyrotrophin-releasing hormone (LH-RH/TRH) pituitary stimulation test. Untreated patients did not differ from healthy subjects for any parameter, and their data were combined for comparison with the treated epileptic patients. Total testosterone (T), androstenedione, and basal follicle-stimulating hormone concentrations were similar in all patient groups. Patients receiving more than one drug had higher sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) (p less than 0.01) and lower free T and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHAS) levels (both p less than 0.001) than controls. Carbamazepine (CBZ) monotherapy also reduced free T (p less than 0.05) and DHAS (p less than 0.001) and increased basal prolactin (p less than 0.01). In these two groups of patients, basal luteinising hormone (LH) was elevated (p less than 0.01), presumably as a pituitary response to increased T catabolism. There was a negative correlation between free T and circulating CBZ (r = -0.54, p less than 0.05) in the monotherapy patients. Phenytoin (PHT) was associated with a rise in SHBG (p less than 0.01) and a fall in DHAS (p less than 0.001). Basal LH was also elevated, but this just failed to reach statistical significance (p less than 0.1).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Secretion of growth hormone-releasing hormone in patients with idiopathic pituitary dwarfism and acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, R; Saito, H; Kameyama, K; Hosoi, E; Saito, S

    1988-03-01

    The plasma levels of immunoreactive-GHRH in patients with idiopathic pituitary dwarfism and acromegaly were studied in the basal state and during various tests by a sensitive and specific RIA. The fasting plasma GHRH level in 22 patients with idiopathic pituitary dwarfism was 6.3 +/- 2.3 ng/l (mean +/- SD), which was significantly lower than that in normal children (9.8 +/- 2.8 ng/l, N = 21), and eight of them had undetectable concentrations (less than 4.0 ng/l). Little or no response of plasma GHRH to oral administration of L-dopa was observed in 7 of 10 pituitary dwarfs, and 3 of the 7 patients showed a response of plasma GH to iv administration of GHRH (1 microgram/kg). These findings suggest that one of the causes of idiopathic pituitary dwarfism is insufficient GHRH release from the hypothalamus. The fasting plasma GHRH level in 14 patients with acromegaly and one patient with gigantism was 8.0 +/- 3.9 ng/l, which was slightly lower than that in normal adults (10.4 +/- 4.1 ng/l, N = 72). One acromegalic patient with multiple endocrine neoplasia type I had a high level of plasma GHRH (270 ng/l) with no change in response to L-dopa and TRH test. In 3 untreated patients with acromegaly L-dopa did not induce any response of plasma GHRH in spite of inconsistent GH release, and in 4 patients with acromegaly, TRH evoked no response of plasma GHRH in spite of a marked GH release, suggesting that the GH responses are not mediated by hypothalamic GHRH.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2898191

  18. Melatonin modulates secretion of growth hormone and prolactin by trout pituitary glands and cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Falcón, J; Besseau, L; Fazzari, D; Attia, J; Gaildrat, P; Beauchaud, M; Boeuf, G

    2003-10-01

    In Teleost fish, development, growth, and reproduction are influenced by the daily and seasonal variations of photoperiod and temperature. Early in vivo studies indicated the pineal gland mediates the effects of these external factors, most probably through the rhythmic production of melatonin. The present investigation was aimed at determining whether melatonin acts directly on the pituitary to control GH and prolactin (PRL) secretion in rainbow trout. We show that 2-[125I]-iodomelatonin, a melatonin analog, binds selectively to membrane preparations and tissue sections from trout pituitaries. The affinity was within the range of that found for the binding to brain microsomal preparations, but the number of binding sites was 20-fold less than in the brain. In culture, melatonin inhibited pituitary cAMP accumulation induced by forskolin, the adenyl cyclase stimulator. Forskolin also induced an increase in GH release, which was reduced in the presence of picomolar concentrations of melatonin. At higher concentrations, the effects of melatonin became stimulatory. In the absence of forskolin, melatonin induced a dose-dependent increase in GH release, and a dose-dependent decrease in PRL release. Melatonin effects were abolished upon addition of luzindole, a melatonin antagonist. Our results provide the first evidence that melatonin modulates GH and PRL secretion in Teleost fish pituitary. Melatonin effects on GH have never been reported in any vertebrate before. The effects result from a direct action of melatonin on pituitary cells. The complexity of the observed responses suggests several types of melatonin receptors might be involved.

  19. Does aerobic exercise affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal hormonal response in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Genc, Aysun; Tur, Birkan Sonel; Aytur, Yesim Kurtais; Oztuna, Derya; Erdogan, Murat Faik

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in the etiopathogenesis of fibromyalgia is not clear. This study aimed to analyze the effects of a 6-week aerobic exercise program on the HPA axis in patients with fibromyalgia and to investigate the effects of this program on the disease symptoms, patients’ fitness, disability, and quality of life. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty fibromyalgia patients were randomized to Group 1 (stretching and flexibility exercises at home for 6 weeks) and Group 2 (aerobic exercise three times a week and the same at-home exercises as Group 1 for 6 weeks). Serum levels of cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1, and growth hormone were analyzed at baseline and at the end of, and 1 hr after an exercise stress test. [Results] Group 2 showed better improvement in morning stiffness duration and pain. Growth hormone levels significantly increased after intervention and cortisol levels significantly decreased at time-time interaction in both groups. No significant differences in adrenocorticotropic hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1 were found. [Conclusion] The results of this study seem to support the hypothesis that there is a dysregulation of the HPA axis in patients with FM, and that a six-week exercise program can influence symptoms and affect the HPA axis hormones. PMID:26311959

  20. Hypergravity and estrogen effects on avian anterior pituitary growth hormone and prolactin levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiorindo, R. P.; Negulesco, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    Developing female chicks with fractured right radii were maintained for 14 d at either earth gravity (1 g) or a hypergravity state (2 g). The birds at 1 g were divided into groups which received daily injections of (1) saline, (2) 200 micrograms estrone, and (3) 400 micrograms estrone for 14 d. The 2-g birds were divided into three similarly treated groups. All 2-g birds showed significantly lower body weights than did 1-g birds. Anterior pituitary (AP) glands were excised and analyzed for growth hormone and prolactin content by analytical electrophoresis. The 1-g chicks receiving either dose of daily estrogen showed increased AP growth hormone levels, whereas hypergravity alone did not affect growth hormone content. Chicks exposed to daily estrogen and hypergravity displayed reduced growth hormone levels. AP prolactin levels were slightly increased by the lower daily estrogen dose in 1-g birds, but markedly reduced in birds exposed only to hypergravity. Doubly-treated chicks displayed normal prolactin levels. Reduced growth in 2-g birds might be due, in part, to reduced AP levels of prolactin and/or growth hormone.

  1. In vivo and in vitro effects of chromium VI on anterior pituitary hormone release and cell viability.

    PubMed

    Quinteros, Fernanda A; Poliandri, Ariel H B; Machiavelli, Leticia I; Cabilla, Jimena P; Duvilanski, Beatriz H

    2007-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr VI) is a highly toxic metal and an environmental pollutant. Different studies indicate that Cr VI exposure adversely affects reproductive functions. This metal has been shown to affect several tissues and organs but Cr VI effects on pituitary gland have not been reported. Anterior pituitary hormones are central for the body homeostasis and have a fundamental role in reproductive physiology. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Cr VI at the pituitary level both in vivo and in vitro. We showed that Cr VI accumulates in the pituitary and hypothalamus, and decreases serum prolactin levels in vivo but observed no effects on LH levels. In anterior pituitary cells in culture, the effect of Cr VI on hormone secretion followed the same differential pattern. Besides, lactotrophs were more sensitive to the toxicity of the metal. As a result of oxidative stress generation, Cr VI induced apoptosis evidenced by nuclear fragmentation and caspase 3 activation. Our results indicate that the anterior pituitary gland can be a target of Cr VI toxicity in vivo and in vitro, thus producing a negative impact on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and affecting the normal endocrine function.

  2. In vivo and in vitro effects of chromium VI on anterior pituitary hormone release and cell viability

    SciTech Connect

    Quinteros, Fernanda A.; Poliandri, Ariel H.B.; Machiavelli, Leticia I.; Cabilla, Jimena P.; Duvilanski, Beatriz H. . E-mail: neuroend@ffyb.uba.ar

    2007-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr VI) is a highly toxic metal and an environmental pollutant. Different studies indicate that Cr VI exposure adversely affects reproductive functions. This metal has been shown to affect several tissues and organs but Cr VI effects on pituitary gland have not been reported. Anterior pituitary hormones are central for the body homeostasis and have a fundamental role in reproductive physiology. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Cr VI at the pituitary level both in vivo and in vitro. We showed that Cr VI accumulates in the pituitary and hypothalamus, and decreases serum prolactin levels in vivo but observed no effects on LH levels. In anterior pituitary cells in culture, the effect of Cr VI on hormone secretion followed the same differential pattern. Besides, lactotrophs were more sensitive to the toxicity of the metal. As a result of oxidative stress generation, Cr VI induced apoptosis evidenced by nuclear fragmentation and caspase 3 activation. Our results indicate that the anterior pituitary gland can be a target of Cr VI toxicity in vivo and in vitro, thus producing a negative impact on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and affecting the normal endocrine function.

  3. Calcitonin: regional distribution of the hormone and its binding sites in the human brain and pituitary.

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, J A; Tobler, P H; Kaufmann, M; Born, W; Henke, H; Cooper, P E; Sagar, S M; Martin, J B

    1981-01-01

    Immunoreactive calcitonin (CT), indistinguishable from human CT-(1-32) and its sulfoxide, has been identified in extracts of the hypothalamus, the pituitary, and the thyroid obtained from human subjects at autopsy. DCT concentrations were highest in a region encompassing the posterior hypothalamus, the median eminence, and the pituitary; intermediate in the substantia nigra, the anterior hypothalamus, the globus pallidus, and the inferior colliculus; and low in the caudate nucleus, the hippocampus, the amygdala, and the cerebral and cerebellar cortices. Specific CT binding measured with 125I-labeled salmon CT was highest in homogenates of the posterior hypothalamus and the median eminence, shown to contain the highest concentrations of endogenous CT in the brain; CT binding was less than 12% of hypothalamic binding in all of the other regions of the brain examined and was negligible in the pituitary. Half-maximal binding was achieved with 0.1 nM nonradioactive salmon CT-(1-32), and the binding was directed to structural or conformational sites, or both, in the COOH-terminal half of salmon CT. The rank order of the inhibition of the binding by CT from different species and analogues of the human hormone was the same as in receptors on a human lymphoid cell line (Moran, J., Hunziker, W. & Fischer, J. A. (1978) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 75, 3984-3988). The functional role of CT and of its binding sites in the brain remains to be elucidated. PMID:6950419

  4. Single-Cell Phenotypic Characterization of Human Pituitary GHomas and Non-Functioning Adenomas Based on Hormone Content and Calcium Responses to Hypothalamic Releasing Hormones

    PubMed Central

    Senovilla, Laura; Núñez, Lucía; de Campos, José María; de Luis, Daniel A.; Romero, Enrique; García-Sancho, Javier; Villalobos, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Human pituitary tumors are generally benign adenomas causing considerable morbidity due to excess hormone secretion, hypopituitarism, and other tumor mass effects. Pituitary tumors are highly heterogeneous and difficult to type, often containing mixed cell phenotypes. We have used calcium imaging followed by multiple immunocytochemistry to type growth hormone secreting (GHomas) and non-functioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs). Individual cells were typed for stored hormones and calcium responses to classic hypothalamic releasing hormones (HRHs). We found that GHomas contained growth hormone cells either lacking responses to HRHs or responding to all four HRHs. However, most GHoma cells were polyhormonal cells responsive to both thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and GH-releasing hormone. NFPAs were also highly heterogeneous. Some of them contained ACTH cells lacking responses to HRHs or polyhormonal gonadotropes responsive to LHRH and TRH. However, most NFPAs were made of cells storing no hormone and responded only to TRH. These results may provide new insights on the ontogeny of GHomas and NFPAs. PMID:26106585

  5. Hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis hormones stimulate mitochondrial function and biogenesis in human hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Vidali, Silvia; Knuever, Jana; Lerchner, Johannes; Giesen, Melanie; Bíró, Tamás; Klinger, Matthias; Kofler, Barbara; Funk, Wolfgang; Poeggeler, Burkhard; Paus, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormones regulate mitochondrial function. As other hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis hormones, i.e., thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and thyrotropin (TSH), are expressed in human hair follicles (HFs) and regulate mitochondrial function in human epidermis, we investigated in organ-cultured human scalp HFs whether TRH (30 nM), TSH (10 mU ml(-1)), thyroxine (T4) (100 nM), and triiodothyronine (T3) (100 pM) alter intrafollicular mitochondrial energy metabolism. All HPT-axis members increased gene and protein expression of mitochondrial-encoded subunit 1 of cytochrome c oxidase (MTCO1), a subunit of respiratory chain complex IV, mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), and Porin. All hormones also stimulated intrafollicular complex I/IV activity and mitochondrial biogenesis. The TSH effects on MTCO1, TFAM, and porin could be abolished by K1-70, a TSH-receptor antagonist, suggesting a TSH receptor-mediated action. Notably, as measured by calorimetry, T3 and TSH increased follicular heat production, whereas T3/T4 and TRH stimulated ATP production in cultured HF keratinocytes. HPT-axis hormones did not increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Rather, T3 and T4 reduced ROS formation, and all tested HPT-axis hormones increased the transcription of ROS scavengers (catalase, superoxide dismutase 2) in HF keratinocytes. Thus, mitochondrial biology, energy metabolism, and redox state of human HFs are subject to profound (neuro-)endocrine regulation by HPT-axis hormones. The neuroendocrine control of mitochondrial biology in a complex human mini-organ revealed here may be therapeutically exploitable. PMID:23949722

  6. Sexually dimorphic expression of gonadotropin subunits in the pituitary of protogynous honeycomb grouper (Epinephelus merra): evidence that follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) induces gonadal sex change.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yasuhisa; Alam, Mohammad Ashraful; Horiguchi, Ryo; Shimizu, Akio; Nakamura, Masaru

    2010-06-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis is involved in gonadal sex change in sex-changing teleosts. However, its underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. In this study, we focused on the distinct roles of two gonadotropins (GTHs), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH), in the protogynous hermaphrodite teleost, honeycomb grouper (Epinephelus merra). First, we investigated the expression pattern of mRNAs for GTH subunits (cga, fshb, and lhb) in the pituitaries from fish at the different sexual phases. Real-time RT-PCR analyses showed that fhsb mRNA levels in the female pituitary were low. However, fshb transcripts increased dramatically in association with testis development. In contrast, levels of cga and lhb mRNAs did not significantly vary during sex change. In addition, immunohistochemical observations of Fshb- and Lhb-producing cells in the pituitary, through the use of specific antibodies for detections of teleost GTH subunits, were consistent with sexually dimorphic expression of Fshb. In order to identify the role of GTH in gonad of honeycomb grouper, we treated females with bovine FSH (50 or 500 ng/fish) or LH (500 ng/fish) in vivo. After 3 wk, FSH treatments induced female-to-male sex change and up-regulated endogenous androgen levels and fshb transcripts, whereas LH treatment had no effect on sex change. These results suggest that FSH may trigger the female-to-male sex change in honeycomb grouper.

  7. Naltrexone effects on pituitary and gonadal hormones in male and female rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Mello, N K; Mendelson, J H; Bree, M P; Skupny, A

    1988-11-01

    The long-acting opioid antagonist, naltrexone, stimulates LH and FSH in women during the early follicular phase of the menstrual cycle and is a new provocative test of hypothalamic-pituitary function (42,63). The acute effects of naltrexone (0.25, 0.50 and 1.0 mg/kg IV) on anterior pituitary (LH, FSH, PRL) and gonadal steroid (T or E2) hormones were studied in 7 female and 4 male rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). Integrated plasma samples were collected at 20 min intervals for 60 min before and for 300 min after intravenous infusion of naltrexone over 10 min. In females studied during the early follicular phase (cycle days 1-3), naltrexone did not stimulate LH and significantly suppressed E2 (p less than 0.0003-0.0001) and FSH (p less than 0.006-0.0001). Naltrexone (0.50 and 1.0 mg/kg) also did not stimulate LH release in late follicular phase females (cycle days 10-12) when estradiol levels were in the peri-ovulatory range. FSH and E2 were significantly suppressed (p less than 0.01-0.05) after 1.0 mg/kg naltrexone, but not after 0.5 mg/kg naltrexone. However, in males all doses of naltrexone significantly stimulated LH (p less than 0.003-0.0001) and T (p less than 0.001-0.0001) but not FSH. LH increased significantly above baseline within 20 to 40 min and T increased significantly within 60 min. These gender differences in naltrexone's effects on pituitary gonadotropins and gonadal steroid hormones were unanticipated. These data are not concordant with clinical studies which report significant naltrexone stimulation of LH in men and in women during the early follicular phase.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3150786

  8. Role of calcium in gonadotropin releasing hormone-induced luteinizing hormone secretion from the bovine pituitary

    SciTech Connect

    Kile, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    The hypothesis was tested that GnRH acts to release LH by increasing calcium uptake by gonadotroph which in turn stimulates calcium-calmodulin activity and results in LH release from bovine pituitary cells as it does in the rat. Pituitary glands of calves (4-10 months of age) were enzymatically dispersed (0.2% collagenase) and grown for 5 days to confluency in multiwell plates (3 x 10/sup 5//well). Cells treated with GnRH Ca/sup + +/ ionophore A23187, and ouabain all produced significant releases of LH release in a pronounced all or none fashion, while thorough washing of the cells with 0.5 mM EGTA in Ca/sup + +/-free media prevented the action of GnRH. GnRH caused a rapid efflux of /sup 45/Ca/sup + +/. Both GnRH-stimulated /sup 45/Ca efflux and LH release could be partially blocked by verapamil GnRH-induced LH release could also be blocked by nifedipine and tetrodotoxin, although these agents did not affect /sup 45/Ca efflux. The calmodulin antagonists calmidazolium and W7 were found to block GnRH induced LH release, as well as LH release induced by theophylline, KC PGE/sub 2/ and estradiol. These data indicated that: (1) calcium is required for GnRH action, but extracellular Ca/sup + +/ does not regulate LH release; (2) GnRH elevates intracellular Ca/sup + +/ by opening both voltage sensitive and receptor mediated Ca/sup + +/ channels; (3) activation of calmodulin is one mechanism involved in GnRH-induced LH release.

  9. Reevaluation of the relative activities of the pituitary glycoprotein hormones (follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, and thyrotrophin) from the green sea turtle, Chelonia mydas.

    PubMed

    Licht, P; Papkoff, H

    1985-06-01

    The discovery that the follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) previously prepared from the green sea turtle, Chelonia mydas, contained a major neurohypophysial contaminant prompted a repurification and characterization of the glycoprotein hormones in this turtle. Results reaffirmed the physicochemical distinctiveness of the three hormones. Minimal cross-contamination between hormones (less than 2%) was achieved by ion-exchange chromatography, subunit dissociation (of contaminating luteinizing hormone (LH], gel filtration, and immuno-affinity chromatography. New preparations of FSH and thyrotrophin (TSH) derived from adult pituitaries proved to be more potent than those described previously (the degree depending on the nature of the assay); FSH showed the expected increase in activity based on estimated contamination of previous preparations. LH was similar to original preparations except for enhanced activity in FSH radioreceptor assays. Binding assays (in heterologous and homologous systems) again demonstrated the general absence of an FSH-specific receptor in the reptilian (chelonian and squamate) testes. In an in vivo bioassay in the lizard Anolis, the turtle FSH was orders of magnitude more potent than LH in stimulating both testis growth and androgen secretion, but in vitro LH was considerably more potent than FSH in stimulating androgen secretion in squamate and chelonian testes. Thus, the possibility exists that androgen secretion in some chelonian systems may exhibit a high degree of LH specificity like that of mammals and birds.

  10. Effect of aging on GHRF-induced growth hormone release from anterior pituitary cells in primary culture

    SciTech Connect

    Spik, K.W.; Boyd, R.L.; Sonntag, W.E.

    1991-03-01

    Five criteria were developed to validate the primary cell culture model for comparison of GRF-induced release of growth hormone in pituitary tissue from aging animals. Pituitaries from young (5-mo), middle-aged (14-mo), and old (24-mo) male Fischer 344 rats were dispersed using either trypsin/trypsin inhibitor or dispase and compared with respect to the number of pituitary cells recovered, cell viability, 3H-leucine incorporation into total protein, time course for recovery of optimal response to GRF, and the dose-relationship for GRF-induced release of growth hormone 2, 4, and 6 days after dispersal. Results indicated that direct comparison of cellular responses between tissues from young, middle-aged, and old rats in primary cell culture is confounded by variations in time for recovery of optimal responses, the effects of the enzymes used for dispersal, and the methods used to express the data.

  11. SPECTROPHOTOMETRY OF THE PERIODIC ACID-SCHIFF REACTION WITH PITUITARY HORMONES IN VITRO AND IN HISTOLOGICAL SECTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Fand, Sally B.; Thorell, Bo

    1962-01-01

    The spectral light absorption of the in vitro periodic acid-Schiff reactions of 4 purified pituitary hormones is described. The absorption spectra present a maximum between 560 and 565 mµ. The color developed conforms with Beer's law for the ranges of concentration examined. The different hormones exhibit different chromogenicity per unit of biological activity: the color produced by 1 unit of FSH is equivalent to approximately 2 of TSH, 4 of LH, and 30 of ACTH. Microspectrophotometric measurements of the PAS-positive structures in histological sections of the human pituitary give absorption curves with shapes similar to those obtained in vitro, although quantitative differences exist. It is concluded that under the proper experimental conditions microspectra of the pituitary structures might, in the future, prove to give a quantitative measure of aldehyde groups generated from glycoprotein tropins by periodate oxidation. PMID:13891517

  12. Microgravity associated changes in pituitary growth hormone (GH) cells prepared from rats flown on Space Lab 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.; Farrington, M.; Hayes, C.; Grindeland, R.; Fast, T.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of microgravity on the release of pituitary growth hormone (GH) in rats is studied. The pituitary glands from six adult rats exposed to microgravity are analyzed for in vitro and in vivo changes in pituitary growth hormone cells. The GH cell functions in the somatotrophs of flight rats are compared to a control group. The two assay procedures employed in the experiment are described. It is observed that intracellular levels of GH are two to three times greater in the flight rats than in the control group; however, the amount of GH released from the somatotrophs is 1.11 + or - 0.4 micrograms for the flight rats and 1.85 + or - 1.3 micrograms for the control rats.

  13. Investigation of Responsiveness to Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone in Growth Hormone-Producing Pituitary Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Sang Ouk; Hwang, You-Cheol; Jeong, In-Kyung; Oh, Seungjoon

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate how the paradoxical response of GH secretion to TRH changes according to tumor volumes. Methods. Patients with newly diagnosed acromegaly were classified as either TRH responders or nonresponders according to the results of a TRH stimulation test (TST), and their clinical characteristics were compared according to responsiveness to TRH and tumor volumes. Results. A total of 41 acromegalic patients who underwent the TST were included in this study. Between TRH responders and nonresponders, basal GH, IGF-I levels, peak GH levels, and tumor volume were not significantly different, but the between-group difference of GH levels remained near significant over the entire TST time. ΔGHmax-min during the TST were significantly different according to the responsiveness to TRH. Peak GH levels and ΔGHmax-min during the TST showed significantly positive correlations with tumor volume with higher levels in macroadenomas than in microadenomas. GH levels over the entire TST time also remained significantly higher in macroadenomas than in microadenomas. Conclusion. Our data demonstrated that the paradoxical response of GH secretion to TRH in GH-producing pituitary adenomas was not inversely correlated with tumor volumes. PMID:24348552

  14. Morphological effects of octreotide on growth hormone-producing pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Ezzat, S; Horvath, E; Harris, A G; Kovacs, K

    1994-07-01

    The SRIH analog octreotide is a potent GH-inhibiting agent that has been used to effectively treat patients with acromegaly. To investigate the morphological changes induced by octreotide on GH-producing pituitary tumors, we examined 86 adenomas from acromegalic patients who participated in a multicenter study. GH- producing pituitary adenomas removed from 43 patients treated preoperatively with octreotide for 4 months were compared to those obtained from 43 untreated acromegalic patients. Tissue samples were studied by histology, immunohistochemistry, and transmission electron microscopy as well as light microscopic and ultrastructural morphometry. The morphological appearance of some tumors was unaltered by octreotide treatment. Necrotic changes were not apparent in any. Acidophilia and GH immunoreactivity were more pronounced in the octreotide-treated tumors. Perivascular and interstitial fibrosis was more prevalent in the octreotide group (72% vs. 42%). An increase in hormone granularity was obvious in 4 of 15 densely granulated and 2 of 9 sparsely granulated (SG) tumors from treated patients. A decrease in cell size was conspicuous in 4 of 15 densely granulated and 2 of 10 SG adenomas. There was a slight downward trend in the cell and cytoplasmic size in all treated tumors and a slight upward trend in secretory granule size in treated SG adenomas. Only 2 of 9 SG adenomas in the octreotide group, however, demonstrated a statistically significant reduction in cell and cytoplasmic size. There was no statistically significant change in the size of nuclei, secretory granules, or lysosomes between the 2 groups. Decreased cell size and increased granularity were not linked, however. We conclude that there are no striking morphological alterations in GH pituitary adenomas that can be consistently associated with octreotide treatment.

  15. Gonadotropin releasing hormone stimulates the formation of inositol phosphates in rat anterior pituitary tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Schrey, M P

    1985-01-01

    The production of inositol phosphates in response to gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) was studied in rat anterior pituitary tissue preincubated with [3H]inositol. Prelabelled paired hemipituitaries from prepubertal female rats were incubated in the presence or absence of GnRH in medium containing 10 mM-Li+ X Li+, which inhibits myo-inositol-1-phosphatase, greatly amplified the stimulation of inositol phosphate production by GnRH (10(-7) M) to 159, 198 and 313% of paired control values for inositol 1-phosphate, inositol bisphosphate and inositol trisphosphate respectively after 20 min. The percentage distribution of [3H]inositol within the phosphoinositides was 91.3, 6.3 and 2.4 for phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate respectively and was unaffected by GnRH. The stimulation of inositol trisphosphate production by GnRH was evident after 5 min incubation, was dose-dependent with a half-maximal effect around 11 nM, and was not inhibited by removal of extracellular Ca2+. Elevation of cytosolic Ca2+ by membrane depolarization with 50 mM-K+ had no significant effect on inositol phosphate production. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that GnRH action in the anterior pituitary involves the hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate. The resulting elevation of inositol trisphosphate may in turn lead to intracellular Ca2+ mobilization and subsequent stimulation of gonadotropin secretion. PMID:2986599

  16. [A Case of an Adrenocorticotropic Hormone-Producing Pituitary Adenoma Removed via Electromagnetic-Guided Neuroendoscopy].

    PubMed

    Tomita, Yusuke; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Terasaka, Tomohiro; Inagaki, Kenichi; Otsuka, Fumio; Date, Isao

    2016-06-01

    The use of navigation systems is safe and reliable for neurological surgery. We performed endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery to totally resect an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-producing pituitary adenoma associated with oculomotor nerve palsy. A 70-year-old woman developed right ptosis 4 months before admission. She developed anisocoria 2 months later and was referred to the department of neurology from clinic. Brain magnetic resonance imaging(MRI)showed an intrasellar tumor that partially invaded the right cavernous sinus, and she was then referred to our department. She exhibited a round face ("moon face") and central obesity. Laboratory test results showed a high urinary cortisol level and high serum ACTH level, and neither the serum cortisol nor ACTH level was suppressed by a low-dose dexamethasone test. We performed transsphenoidal surgery using high-dimensional endoscopy under electromagnetic navigation. The tumor invading the cavernous sinus was visualized via endoscopy and confirmed on navigation using a flexible needle probe. Postoperative MRI showed total removal of the tumor, and the serum ACTH level recovered to the normal range. The patient's right oculomotor palsy resolved within 1 week postoperatively. In summary, electromagnetic navigation was useful for total resection of a pituitary tumor invading the cavernous sinus, contributing to normalization of the ACTH level and improvement in neurological symptoms.

  17. [A Case of an Adrenocorticotropic Hormone-Producing Pituitary Adenoma Removed via Electromagnetic-Guided Neuroendoscopy].

    PubMed

    Tomita, Yusuke; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Terasaka, Tomohiro; Inagaki, Kenichi; Otsuka, Fumio; Date, Isao

    2016-06-01

    The use of navigation systems is safe and reliable for neurological surgery. We performed endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery to totally resect an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-producing pituitary adenoma associated with oculomotor nerve palsy. A 70-year-old woman developed right ptosis 4 months before admission. She developed anisocoria 2 months later and was referred to the department of neurology from clinic. Brain magnetic resonance imaging(MRI)showed an intrasellar tumor that partially invaded the right cavernous sinus, and she was then referred to our department. She exhibited a round face ("moon face") and central obesity. Laboratory test results showed a high urinary cortisol level and high serum ACTH level, and neither the serum cortisol nor ACTH level was suppressed by a low-dose dexamethasone test. We performed transsphenoidal surgery using high-dimensional endoscopy under electromagnetic navigation. The tumor invading the cavernous sinus was visualized via endoscopy and confirmed on navigation using a flexible needle probe. Postoperative MRI showed total removal of the tumor, and the serum ACTH level recovered to the normal range. The patient's right oculomotor palsy resolved within 1 week postoperatively. In summary, electromagnetic navigation was useful for total resection of a pituitary tumor invading the cavernous sinus, contributing to normalization of the ACTH level and improvement in neurological symptoms. PMID:27270145

  18. Direct effects of catecholamines, thyrotropin-releasing hormone, and somatostatin on growth hormone and prolactin secretion from adenomatous and nonadenomatous human pituitary cells in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, M; Yamaji, T

    1984-01-01

    To determine the mechanism and the site of action of catecholamines as well as hormones including thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH)1 and somatostatin on pituitary hormone release in patients with acromegaly and in normal subjects, the effects of these substances on growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) secretion from adenomatous and nonadenomatous human pituitary cells in culture were examined. When dopamine (0.01-0.1 microM) or bromocriptine (0.01-0.1 microM) was added to the culture media, a significant inhibition of GH and PRL secretion from adenoma cells from acromegalic patients was observed. This inhibition was blocked by D2 receptor blockade with metoclopramide or sulpiride, but not by D1 receptor blockade. Similarly, dopamine suppressed GH and PRL release by nonadenomatous pituitary cells in a dose-dependent manner, which was again blocked by D2 receptor blockade. The minimum effective concentration of dopamine required for a significant inhibition of PRL secretion (0.01 microM) was lower than that for GH release (0.1 microM). Norepinephrine, likewise, caused a suppression of PRL secretion from adenomatous and nonadenomatous pituitary cells. This effect was blocked by sulpiride, phentolamine, however, was ineffective. When TRH was added to the media, both GH and PRL secretion were enhanced in adenoma cells, while only the stimulation of PRL release was observed in nonadenomatous pituitary cells. Coincubation of TRH and dopamine resulted in variable effects on GH and PRL secretion. Somatostatin consistently lowered GH and PRL secretion in both adenomatous and nonadenomatous pituitary cells and completely blocked the TRH-induced stimulation of GH and PRL secretion from adenoma cells. Opioid peptides (1 microM) failed to affect hormone release. These results suggest that no qualitative difference in GH and PRL responses to dopaminergic agonists or to somatostatin exists between adenoma cells of acromegalic patients and normal pituitary cells, and that the

  19. In vitro impact of pegvisomant on growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Cuny, Thomas; Zeiller, Caroline; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Défilles, Céline; Roche, Catherine; Blanchard, Marie-Pierre; Theodoropoulou, Marily; Graillon, Thomas; Pertuit, Morgane; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Enjalbert, Alain; Brue, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Pegvisomant (PEG), an antagonist of growth hormone (GH)-receptor (GHR), normalizes insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) oversecretion in most acromegalic patients unresponsive to somatostatin analogs (SSAs) and/or uncontrolled by transsphenoidal surgery. The residual GH-secreting tumor is therefore exposed to the action of circulating PEG. However, the biological effect of PEG at the pituitary level remains unknown. To assess the impact of PEG in vitro on the hormonal secretion (GH and prolactin (PRL)), proliferation and cellular viability of eight human GH-secreting tumors in primary cultures and of the rat somatolactotroph cell line GH4C1. We found that the mRNA expression levels of GHR were characterized in 31 human GH-secreting adenomas (0.086 copy/copy β-Gus) and the GHR was identified by immunocytochemistry staining. In 5/8 adenomas, a dose-dependent inhibition of GH secretion was observed under PEG with a maximum of 38.2±17% at 1μg/mL (P<0.0001 vs control). A dose-dependent inhibition of PRL secretion occurred in three mixed GH/PRL adenomas under PEG with a maximum of 52.8±11.5% at 10μg/mL (P<0.0001 vs control). No impact on proliferation of either human primary tumors or GH4C1 cell line was observed. We conclude that PEG inhibits the secretion of GH and PRL in primary cultures of human GH(/PRL)-secreting pituitary adenomas without effect on cell viability or cell proliferation. PMID:27267119

  20. In vitro impact of pegvisomant on growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cuny, Thomas; Zeiller, Caroline; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Défilles, Céline; Roche, Catherine; Blanchard, Marie-Pierre; Theodoropoulou, Marily; Graillon, Thomas; Pertuit, Morgane; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Enjalbert, Alain; Brue, Thierry; Barlier, Anne

    2016-07-01

    Pegvisomant (PEG), an antagonist of growth hormone (GH)-receptor (GHR), normalizes insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) oversecretion in most acromegalic patients unresponsive to somatostatin analogs (SSAs) and/or uncontrolled by transsphenoidal surgery. The residual GH-secreting tumor is therefore exposed to the action of circulating PEG. However, the biological effect of PEG at the pituitary level remains unknown. To assess the impact of PEG in vitro on the hormonal secretion (GH and prolactin (PRL)), proliferation and cellular viability of eight human GH-secreting tumors in primary cultures and of the rat somatolactotroph cell line GH4C1. We found that the mRNA expression levels of GHR were characterized in 31 human GH-secreting adenomas (0.086 copy/copy β-Gus) and the GHR was identified by immunocytochemistry staining. In 5/8 adenomas, a dose-dependent inhibition of GH secretion was observed under PEG with a maximum of 38.2±17% at 1μg/mL (P<0.0001 vs control). A dose-dependent inhibition of PRL secretion occurred in three mixed GH/PRL adenomas under PEG with a maximum of 52.8±11.5% at 10μg/mL (P<0.0001 vs control). No impact on proliferation of either human primary tumors or GH4C1 cell line was observed. We conclude that PEG inhibits the secretion of GH and PRL in primary cultures of human GH(/PRL)-secreting pituitary adenomas without effect on cell viability or cell proliferation. PMID:27267119

  1. Paradoxical effects of D-Trp6-luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in immature female rats.

    PubMed

    Vilchez-Martinez, J A; Pedroza, E; Arimura, A; Schally, A V

    1979-06-01

    The effect of administration of a superactive and long-acting analog of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH), D-Trp6-LH-RH, in doses of 0.05 or 1 microgram/day for 10 days on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis was studied in immature female rats. Treatment with a 0.05-microgram dose of analog produced few changes as compared with the control group. Treatment with 1 microgram of D-Trp6-LH-RH did not affect the body weight or the pituitary weight, but increased ovarian weight and decreased uterine weight; elevated serum gonadotropin levels; and lowered the pituitary LH content. This depletion of pituitary LH content was associated with a low pituitary responsiveness to LH-RH. Serum estradiol levels were not modified, suggesting that decreased uterine weight reflects a direct and extrapituitary effect of this analog. The hypothalamic LH-RH content was higher, indicating a possible inhibition of the release of endogenous LH-RH. A delay in vaginal opening was also observed. This indicates that large doses of D-Trp6-LH-RH may interfere with the process of puberty in rats. These findings extend other reports about the paradoxical antifertility effects of large doses of stimulatory analogs of LH-RH.

  2. Proteomic and functional profiles of a follicle-stimulating hormone positive human nonfunctional pituitary adenoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaowei; Guo, Tianyao; Peng, Fang; Long, Ying; Mu, Yun; Yang, Haiyan; Ye, Ningrong; Li, Xuejun; Zhan, Xianquan

    2015-06-01

    Nonfunctional pituitary adenoma (NFPA) is highly heterogeneous with different hormone-expressed subtypes in NFPA tissues including follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) positive, luteinizing hormone-positive, FSH/luteinizing hormone-positive, and negative types. To analyze in-depth the variations in the proteomes among different NFPA subtypes for our long-term goal to clarify molecular mechanisms of NFPA and to detect tumor biomarker for personalized medicine practice, a reference map of proteome of a human FSH-expressed NFPA tissue was described here. 2DE and PDQuest image analysis were used to array each protein. MALDI-TOF PMF and human Swiss-Prot databases with MASCOT search were used to identify each protein. A good 2DE pattern with high level of between-gel reproducibility was attained with an average positional deviation 1.98 ± 0.75 mm in the IEF direction and 1.62 ± 0.68 mm in the SDS-PAGE direction. Approximately 1200 protein spots were 2DE-detected and 192 redundant proteins that were contained in 141 protein spots were PMF-identified, representing 107 nonredundant proteins. Those proteins were located in cytoplasm, nucleus, plasma membrane, extracellular space, and so on, and those functioned in transmembrane receptor, ion channel, transcription/translation regulator, transporter, enzyme, phosphatase, kinase, and so on. Several important pathway networks were characterized from those identified proteins with DAVID and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis systems, including gluconeogenesis and glycolysis, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, cell-cycle alteration, MAPKsignaling system, immune response, TP53-signaling, VEGF-signaling, and inflammation signaling pathways. Those resulting data contribute to a functional profile of the proteome of a human FSH-positive NFPA tissue, and will serve as a reference for the heterogeneity analysis of NFPA proteomes. PMID:25809007

  3. Thyrotropin-induced hyperthyroidism caused by selective pituitary resistance to thyroid hormone. A new syndrome of "inappropriate secretion of TSH".

    PubMed Central

    Gershengorn, M C; Weintraub, B D

    1975-01-01

    An 18-yr-old woman with clinical and laboratory features of hyperthyroidism had persistently elevated serum levels of immunoreative thyrotropin (TSH). During 11 yr of follow-up there had been no evidence of a pituitary tumor. After thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), there was a marked increase in TSH and secondarily in triiodothyronine (T3), the latter observation confirming the biologic activity of the TSH. Exogenous T3 raised serum T3 and several measurements of peripheral thyroid hormone effect, while decreasing serum TSH, thyroxine (T4), and thyroidal radioiodine uptake. After T3, the TRH-stimulated TSH response was decreased but was still inappropriate for the elevated serum T3 levels. Dexamethasone reduced serum TSH but did not inhibit TRH stimulation of TSH. Propylthiouracil reduced serum T4 and T3 and raised TSH. This patient represents a new syndrome of TSH-induced hyperthyroidism, differing from previous reports in the absence of an obvious pituitary tumor and in the responsiveness of the TSH to TRH stimulation and thyroid hormone suppression. This syndrome appears to be caused by a selective, partial resistance of the pituitary to the action of thyroid hormone. This case is also compared with previous reports in the literature of patients with elevated serum levels of immunoreactive TSH in the presence of elevated total and free thyroid hormones. A classification of these cases, termed "inappropriate secretion of TSH," is proposed. PMID:1159077

  4. Pituitary and adrenal hormone responses to pharmacological, physical, and psychological stimulation in habitual smokers and nonsmokers.

    PubMed

    Kirschbaum, C; Scherer, G; Strasburger, C J

    1994-10-01

    Hormone responses to injection of corticotropin-releasing hormone following bicycle ergometry and psychological stress were studied in ten habitual smokers and ten nonsmokers. Compared to injection of saline, significant increases were found in adrenocorticotropin, prolactin, growth hormone, total serum cortisol, and salivary cortisol under all three stimulations except for salivary cortisol under ergometry. Furthermore, the smokers showed significant elevations of all five hormones investigated following the smoking of two cigarettes of the subject's preferred brand. Comparisons of hormone responses between smokers and nonsmokers revealed a general trend towards stronger responses in nonsmokers. However, due to the small number of subjects investigated and considerable variation in the individual hormone responses these differences reached statistical significance only for growth hormone responses following ergometry and salivary cortisol responses after psychological stress. In addition, the circadian rhythm of salivary cortisol was measured on two occasions between 9 a.m. and 9 p.m. in the subject's natural environment. The typical circadian pattern of decreasing cortisol levels was observed, with no significant differences between smokers and nonsmokers. We conclude that chronic nicotine consumption may lead to lower responses of multiple hormones not only to nicotine but to a variety of stimuli, and that these alterations do not necessarily affect unstimulated circadian profiles of free cortisol. PMID:7865987

  5. Negative regulation of expression of the pituitary-specific transcription factor GHF-1/Pit-1 by thyroid hormones through interference with promoter enhancer elements.

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Pacheco, A; Palomino, T; Aranda, A

    1995-01-01

    Expression of the growth hormone gene is due to the presence of the pituitary-specific transcription factor GHF-1/Pit-1. The action of the thyroid hormone T3 is mediated by nuclear receptors that regulate transcription by interaction with DNA elements located near promoters of the regulated genes. In this study, we show that T3 inhibits expression of the GHF-1/Pit-1 gene in rat pituitary GH4C1 cells by a novel mechanism that involves transcriptional interference with other regulatory elements of the promoter. Sequences between bp -90 and -200 of the rat GHF-1/Pit-1 gene which do not contain a hormone response element but contain two cyclic AMP-responsive elements mediate most of the repressive effect of T3. The hormone reduces basal levels of GHF-1/Pit-1 promoter activity and antagonizes its response to cyclic AMP and the tumor promoter TPA (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate). A similar repression is found with a heterologous promoter that contains four copies of the cyclic AMP-responsive element motif. This regulation provides a novel example of the cross-talk between the thyroid hormone receptor and the signal transduction pathways used by different hormones and growth factors. Additionally, T3 interferes with in vitro binding of GHF-1/Pit-1 to a positive autoregulatory element located at bp -45 to -63 and has a detectable inhibitory effect on the activity of a promoter construct which extends to bp -90 of 5'-flanking DNA. The regulation of the transcription factor provides a novel example of negative transcriptional regulation by thyroid hormones. PMID:7565785

  6. Evidence for a defect in pituitary secretion of luteinizing hormone in chronic alcoholic men.

    PubMed

    Van Thiel, D H; Lester, R; Vaitukaitis, J

    1978-09-01

    To characterize the defect in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis of alcoholic men, acute and chronic LRF responses were evaluated in 22 chronic alcoholic men with varying degrees of biochemically and histologically confirmed liver disease. In addition, acute LRF responses in 14 normal men, before and at the end of 72 h of administration of 2 ml/kg/day 95% ethanol, were evaluated. The alcoholics hd significantly reduced basal testosterone and elevated gonadotropin levels (both FSH and LH) compared to the normal volunteers (P less than 0.02). Serum concentrations of estradiol and PRL did not differ between alcoholics and normal volunteers. A 100-micrograms bolus of LRF resulted in a 3-fold increase of LH in alcoholic men as compared to a 6-fold increase of serum LH in normal volunteers. No significant difference in the LRF-induced FSH responses was observed. When the response of normal volunteers to LRF before and after ethanol administration was evaluated, basal levels of both gonadotropins were increased after alcohol administration and a reduced LRF-induced LH response was observed. Based upon these results, we conclude that: 1) the central hypothalamic-pituitary defect known to exist for LH secretion is in part due to inadequate pituitary secretion and 2) acute alcohol ingestion in normal men suppresses the LRF-induced LH but not the FSH response.

  7. A Histopathological Study of Multi-hormone Producing Proliferative Lesions in Estrogen-induced Rat Pituitary Prolactinoma

    PubMed Central

    Takekoshi, Susumu; Yasui, Yuzo; Inomoto, Chie; Kitatani, Kanae; Nakamura, Naoya; Osamura, Robert Yoshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Rats with estrogen-induced prolactin-producing pituitary adenoma (E2-PRLoma) have been employed as an animal model of human PRL-producing pituitary adenoma in a large number of studies. Presently, we found that long-term administration of estrogen to SD rats resulted in the development of E2-PRLomas, some of which included multi-hormone producing nodules. We herein report results of histopathological analyses of these lesions. PRLoma models were created in female SD rats by 22 weeks or longer administration of a controlled-release preparation of estradiol at a dose of 10 mg/kg/2 weeks. Ten of the 11 PRLoma model rats had proliferative nodular lesions composed of large eosinophilic cells like gonadotrophs inside the PRLoma. These lesions were positive for PRL, TSHβ, and α subunits and were negative for GH, LHβ, ACTH, and S-100. Double immunostaining revealed that these large eosinophilic cells showed coexpression of PRL and TSHβ, PRL and α subunits, and TSHβ and α subunits. Those results clarified that long-term estrogen administration to female SD rats induced multi-hormone producing neoplastic pituitary nodules that expressed PRL, TSHβ, and α subunits. We studied these neoplastic nodules obtained by laser microdissection to acquire findings similar to those of the immuno­histochemical analysis. We consider that this animal model is useful for pathogenesis analyses and therapeutic agent development concerning human multi-hormone producing pituitary adenomas. PMID:25392569

  8. Long-Term Follow-Up of Growth Hormone-Producing Pituitary Carcinoma With Multiple Spinal Metastases Following Multiple Surgeries: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Toshihide; Kato, Naoki; Aoki, Ken; Watanabe, Mitsuyoshi; Arai, Takao; Hasegawa, Yuzuru; Abe, Toshiaki

    2013-01-01

    This report describes a rare case of a patient with growth hormone (GH)-secreting pituitary adenoma with malignant transformation resulting in multiple metastases to the dura mater of the cerebral convexity and high cervical spine. The patient was a 60-year-old man with a previous history of pituitary adenoma with suprasellar extension who had undergone transsphenoidal surgery, craniotomy for a convexity tumor, and suboccipital craniotomy for a cerebellar tumor. Thirteen years after the initial surgery, suboccipital craniotomy for a cervicomedullary junction tumor and cervicospinal surgery for a metastatic tumor was performed. Histologic findings of resected specimens demonstrated that the primary pituitary tumor was typical adenoma (similar to specimens from the initial surgery) but that the cerebellar and the dural tumor from the high cervical spine had a high incidence of mitotic figures, and cellular anaplasia with nuclear polymorphism and necrosis. In addition, the serum levels of GH were noted to have decreased with recurrence of the tumor. It was concluded that patients with pituitary adenoma, even when benign, must be carefully followed for signs of malignant transformation, and spinal or distant metastases. PMID:24077272

  9. Direct evidence of estrogen modulation of pituitary sensitivity to luteinizing hormone-releasing factor during the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, C F; Yen, S S

    1975-01-01

    To delineate the role of estradiol in the augmented pituitary gonadotropin responsiveness to synthetic luteinizing hormone releasing factor (LRF) seen during high-estrogen phases of the ovulatory cycles (late follicular and midluteal phases), the anti-estrogenic effect of clomiphene citrate (Clomid) on pituitary response to LRF was evaluated during different phases of the ovulatory cycle. Clomid administration (100 mg/day times 5 days) completely negates the augmented gonadotropin responses to LRF (150 mug) during late follicular and midluteal phases observed during the control studies. Thus, a quantitatively and qualitatively similar pituitary sensitivity to LRF during three distinct phases of the menstrual cycle was induced by Clomid treatment that resembles the LRF responsiveness of themale pituitary. The present study demonstrates the pituitary component of the estrogen-induced changes in the sensitivity to LRF. From this and previous data, we conclude that the increases of estradiol secretion associated with the follicular maturation and corpus luteum formation represent a major component of the feedback signal in the modulation of cyclic gonadotropin release occasioned in a large measure by the augmented pituitary sensitivity to LRF. PMID:1088908

  10. Clinical guidelines for management of diabetes insipidus and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion after pituitary surgery.

    PubMed

    Lamas, Cristina; del Pozo, Carlos; Villabona, Carles

    2014-04-01

    Changes in water metabolism and regulation of vasopressin (AVP) or antidiuretic hormone (ADH) are common complications of pituitary surgery. The scarcity of studies comparing different treatment and monitoring strategies for these disorders and the lack of prior clinical guidelines makes it difficult to provide recommendations following a methodology based on grades of evidence. This study reviews the pathophysiology of diabetes insipidus and inappropriate ADH secretion after pituitary surgery, and is intended to serve as a guide for their diagnosis, differential diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring.

  11. Sex steroid levels, oocyte maturation and spawning performance in Waigieu seaperch (Psammoperca waigiensis) exposed to thyroxin, human chorionic gonadotropin, luteinizing hormone releasing hormone and carp pituitary extract.

    PubMed

    Pham, Hung Quoc; Nguyen, Anh Tuong; Nguyen, Mao Dinh; Arukwe, Augustine

    2010-02-01

    In the present study, we have investigated the sex steroid hormone levels, oocyte maturation and spawning performance in Waigieu seaperch (Psammoperca waigiensis) exposed to different doses (0, (control), 0.05, 0.25 and 0.5 mg/kg fish) of thyroxin (T(4)) both through diet (continuously) and injection (single injection). In addition, we also studied plasma steroid hormone levels and spawning performances in female fish injected with a single dose of D-Ala(6), Pro(9)-Net-mGnRH (LHRHa: 50 microg/kg), human chronic gonadotropin (HCG: 1,500 IU/kg) and carp pituitary extract (CPE: 10 mg/kg). In all experiments, samples were collected at 0, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h after exposure. T4 exposure via dietary route produced differential and enhanced effects, compared with when the compound was injected to the broodstock. A significant association between exposure to dietary T4, elevated plasma steroid hormone levels, maturation-, spawning-, fertilization- and hatching rate, egg diameter, embryogenesis and larval growth were observed. Interestingly, we observed that broodstock groups fed with T4 doses spawned 20 days earlier than the control group. Thus, we propose that these differences may be attributed to higher systemic availability of T4 due to dietary exposure that is easily transferable to eggs and embryos, as opposed to injection that require absorption to increase bioavailability. Furthermore, our results show that LHRHa, CPE and HCG produced significant increase in spawning rate, but significantly reduced fertilization- and hatching rates. Waigieu seaperch is a new candidate for marine aquaculture in Vietnam and relatively little is known about the reproductive biology and endocrinology of this species. Therefore, the present study forms an integral basis for understanding the reproductive endocrinology of a tropical marine finfish with increasing aquaculture prospects and may also contribute in the development of sustainable aquaculture of this species in a developing

  12. Testosterone regulates the secretion of thyrotrophin-releasing hormone (TRH) and TRH precursor in the rat hypothalamic-pituitary axis.

    PubMed

    Pekary, A E; Knoble, M; Garcia, N H; Bhasin, S; Hershman, J M

    1990-05-01

    Orchidectomy has been reported to decrease concentrations of thyrotrophin (TSH) in the circulation of male rats without affecting serum levels of thyroid hormones. To understand the mechanism underlying this observation, we have measured the effect of gonadal status on the in-vitro release of TSH-releasing hormone (TRH) by male rat hypothalamic fragments. Because hormone release rates can be affected by changes in the post-translational processing of the hormonal precursors, we have also studied the corresponding changes in the concentrations of TRH and TRH-Gly, a TRH precursor peptide in hypothalamus and pituitary, by radioimmunoassay. We observed a significant decline in the in-vitro release of TRH from incubated hypothalami 1 week after castration, which was quantitatively reversed by testosterone replacement. Concentrations of TRH and TRH-Gly in the posterior pituitary, on the other hand, which derive from neurones of hypothalamic origin, increased significantly with castration and were returned to the normal range by testosterone replacement. We conclude that the primary effect of testosterone is the stimulation of hypothalamic TRH release, resulting in the depletion of TRH and TRH precursors from TRH-containing neurones which project into the median eminence and posterior pituitary.

  13. High Prevalence of Chronic Pituitary and Target-Organ Hormone Abnormalities after Blast-Related Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Charles W.; Pagulayan, Kathleen F.; Petrie, Eric C.; Mayer, Cynthia L.; Colasurdo, Elizabeth A.; Shofer, Jane B.; Hart, Kim L.; Hoff, David; Tarabochia, Matthew A.; Peskind, Elaine R.

    2011-01-01

    Studies of traumatic brain injury from all causes have found evidence of chronic hypopituitarism, defined by deficient production of one or more pituitary hormones at least 1 year after injury, in 25–50% of cases. Most studies found the occurrence of posttraumatic hypopituitarism (PTHP) to be unrelated to injury severity. Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) and hypogonadism were reported most frequently. Hypopituitarism, and in particular adult GHD, is associated with symptoms that resemble those of PTSD, including fatigue, anxiety, depression, irritability, insomnia, sexual dysfunction, cognitive deficiencies, and decreased quality of life. However, the prevalence of PTHP after blast-related mild TBI (mTBI), an extremely common injury in modern military operations, has not been characterized. We measured concentrations of 12 pituitary and target-organ hormones in two groups of male US Veterans of combat in Iraq or Afghanistan. One group consisted of participants with blast-related mTBI whose last blast exposure was at least 1 year prior to the study. The other consisted of Veterans with similar military deployment histories but without blast exposure. Eleven of 26, or 42% of participants with blast concussions were found to have abnormal hormone levels in one or more pituitary axes, a prevalence similar to that found in other forms of TBI. Five members of the mTBI group were found with markedly low age-adjusted insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) levels indicative of probable GHD, and three had testosterone and gonadotropin concentrations consistent with hypogonadism. If symptoms characteristic of both PTHP and PTSD can be linked to pituitary dysfunction, they may be amenable to treatment with hormone replacement. Routine screening for chronic hypopituitarism after blast concussion shows promise for appropriately directing diagnostic and therapeutic decisions that otherwise may remain unconsidered and for markedly facilitating recovery and rehabilitation. PMID

  14. Clinical applications of somatostatin analogs for growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ji-Wen; Li, Ying; Mao, Zhi-Gang; Hu, Bin; Jiang, Xiao-Bing; Song, Bing-Bing; Wang, Xin; Zhu, Yong-Hong; Wang, Hai-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Excessive growth hormone (GH) is usually secreted by GH-secreting pituitary adenomas and causes gigantism in juveniles or acromegaly in adults. The clinical complications involving cardiovascular, respiratory, and metabolic systems lead to elevated morbidity in acromegaly. Control of serum GH and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) 1 hypersecretion by surgery or pharmacotherapy can decrease morbidity. Current pharmacotherapy includes somatostatin analogs (SAs) and GH receptor antagonist; the former consists of lanreotide Autogel (ATG) and octreotide long-acting release (LAR), and the latter refers to pegvisomant. As primary medical therapy, lanreotide ATG and octreotide LAR can be supplied in a long-lasting formulation to achieve biochemical control of GH and IGF-1 by subcutaneous injection every 4-6 weeks. Lanreotide ATG and octreotide LAR provide an effective medical treatment, whether as a primary or secondary therapy, for the treatment of GH-secreting pituitary adenoma; however, to maximize benefits with the least cost, several points should be emphasized before the application of SAs. A comprehensive assessment, especially of the observation of clinical predictors and preselection of SA treatment, should be completed in advance. A treatment process lasting at least 3 months should be implemented to achieve a long-term stable blood concentration. More satisfactory surgical outcomes for noninvasive macroadenomas treated with presurgical SA may be achieved, although controversy of such adjuvant therapy exists. Combination of SA and pegvisomant or cabergoline shows advantages in some specific cases. Thus, an individual treatment program should be established for each patient under a full evaluation of the risks and benefits. PMID:24421637

  15. Clinical applications of somatostatin analogs for growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ji-wen; Li, Ying; Mao, Zhi-gang; Hu, Bin; Jiang, Xiao-bing; Song, Bing-bing; Wang, Xin; Zhu, Yong-hong; Wang, Hai-jun

    2014-01-01

    Excessive growth hormone (GH) is usually secreted by GH-secreting pituitary adenomas and causes gigantism in juveniles or acromegaly in adults. The clinical complications involving cardiovascular, respiratory, and metabolic systems lead to elevated morbidity in acromegaly. Control of serum GH and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) 1 hypersecretion by surgery or pharmacotherapy can decrease morbidity. Current pharmacotherapy includes somatostatin analogs (SAs) and GH receptor antagonist; the former consists of lanreotide Autogel (ATG) and octreotide long-acting release (LAR), and the latter refers to pegvisomant. As primary medical therapy, lanreotide ATG and octreotide LAR can be supplied in a long-lasting formulation to achieve biochemical control of GH and IGF-1 by subcutaneous injection every 4–6 weeks. Lanreotide ATG and octreotide LAR provide an effective medical treatment, whether as a primary or secondary therapy, for the treatment of GH-secreting pituitary adenoma; however, to maximize benefits with the least cost, several points should be emphasized before the application of SAs. A comprehensive assessment, especially of the observation of clinical predictors and preselection of SA treatment, should be completed in advance. A treatment process lasting at least 3 months should be implemented to achieve a long-term stable blood concentration. More satisfactory surgical outcomes for noninvasive macroadenomas treated with presurgical SA may be achieved, although controversy of such adjuvant therapy exists. Combination of SA and pegvisomant or cabergoline shows advantages in some specific cases. Thus, an individual treatment program should be established for each patient under a full evaluation of the risks and benefits. PMID:24421637

  16. Cyproheptadine-mediated inhibition of growth hormone and prolactin release from pituitary adenoma cells of acromegaly and gigantism in culture.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, M; Fukushima, T; Yamaji, T

    1985-08-01

    The effect of cyproheptadine on growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (Prl) secretion from cultured pituitary adenoma cells of acromegaly and pituitary gigantism was studied. When varying doses of cyproheptadine ranging from 0.01 to 1 microM were added to the incubation media, GH secretion was consistently inhibited and a dose-response relationship was observed between the cyproheptadine concentrations and the amounts of GH released into the media. In pituitary adenomas which concurrently produced and secreted Prl, cyproheptadine likewise suppressed Prl release in a dose-related manner. This effect of cyproheptadine was not blocked by coincubation with serotonin. Similarly, coincubation with a dopaminergic antagonist, haloperidol, failed to reverse the inhibitory action produced by cyproheptadine. When coincubated with dopamine, cyproheptadine further inhibited GH and Prl secretion. These results suggest that cyproheptadine possesses a direct action on human somatotroph adenoma cells to inhibit GH and Prl secretion by an unknown mechanism that is different from serotonergic and dopaminergic systems. PMID:2994332

  17. Transgenic mice expressing the human growth hormone gene provide a model system to study human growth hormone synthesis and secretion in non-tumor-derived pituitary cells: differential effects of dexamethasone and thyroid hormone.

    PubMed

    Vakili, Hana; Jin, Yan; Nagy, James I; Cattini, Peter A

    2011-10-15

    Growth hormone (GH) is regulated by pituitary and hypothalamic factors as well as peripheral endocrine factors including glucocorticoids and thyroid hormone. Studies on human GH are limited largely to the assessment of plasma levels in endocrine disorders. Thus, insight into the regulation of synthesis versus secretion has come mainly from studies done on non-human GH and/or pituitary tumor cells. However, primate and non-primate GH gene loci have differences in their structure and, by extension, regulation. We generated transgenic (171hGH/CS-TG) mice containing the intact hGH1 gene and locus control region, including sequences required for integration-independent and preferential pituitary expression. Here, we show hGH co-localizes with mouse (m) GH in somatotrophs in situ and in primary pituitary cells. Dexamethasone treatment increased hGH and mGH, as well as GH releasing hormone (GHRH) receptor RNA levels, and hGH release was stimulated by GHRH treatment. By contrast, triiodothyronine decreased or had no effect on hGH and mGH production, respectively, and the negative effect on hGH was also seen in the presence of dexamethasone. Thus, 171hGH/CS-TG mouse pituitary cultures represent a model system to investigate hormonal control of hGH synthesis and secretion.

  18. A FEEDBACK MODEL FOR TESTICULAR-PITUITARY AXIS HORMONE KINETICS AND THEIR EFFECTS ON THE REGULATION OF THE PROSTATE IN ADULT MALE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The testicular-hypothalamic-pituitary axis regulates male reproductive system functions. A model describing the kinetics and dynamics of testosterone (T), dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and luteinizing hormone (LH) was developed based on a model by Barton and Anderson (1997). The mode...

  19. Pituitary gonadotrophic hormone synthesis, secretion, subunit gene expression and cell structure in normal and follicle-stimulating hormone β knockout, follicle-stimulating hormone receptor knockout, luteinising hormone receptor knockout, hypogonadal and ovariectomised female mice.

    PubMed

    Abel, M H; Widen, A; Wang, X; Huhtaniemi, I; Pakarinen, P; Kumar, T R; Christian, H C

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the relationship between gonadotroph function and ultrastructure, we have compared, in parallel in female mice, the effects of several different mutations that perturb the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Specifically, serum and pituitary gonadotrophin concentrations, gonadotrophin gene expression, gonadotroph structure and number were measured. Follicle-stimulating hormone β knockout (FSHβKO), follicle-stimulating hormone receptor knockout (FSHRKO), luteinising hormone receptor knockout (LuRKO), hypogonadal (hpg) and ovariectomised mice were compared with control wild-type or heterozygote female mice. Serum levels of LH were elevated in FSHβKO and FSHRKO compared to heterozygote females, reflecting the likely decreased oestrogen production in KO females, as demonstrated by the threadlike uteri and acyclicity. As expected, there was no detectable FSH in the serum or pituitary and an absence of expression of the FSHβ subunit gene in FSHβKO mice. However, there was a significant increase in expression of the FSHβ and LHβ subunit genes in FSHRKO female mice. The morphology of FSHβKO and FSHRKO gonadotrophs was not significantly different from the control, except that secretory granules in FSHRKO gonadotrophs were larger in diameter. In LuRKO and ovariectomised mice, stimulation of LHβ and FSHβ mRNA, as well as serum protein concentrations, were reflected in subcellular changes in gonadotroph morphology, including more dilated rough endoplasmic reticula and fewer, larger secretory granules. In the gonadotophin-releasing hormone deficient hpg mouse, gonadotrophin mRNA and protein levels were significantly lower than in control mice and gonadotrophs were correspondingly smaller with less abundant endoplasmic reticula and reduced numbers of secretory granules. In summary, major differences in pituitary content and serum concentrations of the gonadotrophins LH and FSH were found between control and mutant female mice. These changes were

  20. pNET co-secreting GHRH and calcitonin: ex vivo hormonal studies in human pituitary cells

    PubMed Central

    Rubinfeld, Hadara; Lysyy, Lyudmila; Schiller, Tal; Raverot, Véronique; Shimon, Ilan; Knobler, Hilla

    2016-01-01

    Summary Acromegaly due to ectopic GHRH secretion from a neuroendocrine tumor (NET) is rare and comprises <1% of all acromegaly cases. Herein we present a 57-year-old woman with clinical and biochemical features of acromegaly and a 6 cm pancreatic NET (pNET), secreting GHRH and calcitonin. Following surgical resection of the pancreatic tumor, IGF1, GH and calcitonin normalized, and the clinical features of acromegaly improved. In vitro studies confirmed that the tumor secreted large amounts of both GHRH and calcitonin, and incubation of pNET culture-derived conditioned media stimulated GH release from a cultured human pituitary adenoma. This is a unique case of pNET secreting both GHRH and calcitonin. The ability of the pNET-derived medium to stimulate in vitro GH release from a human pituitary-cell culture, combined with the clinical and hormonal remission following tumor resection, confirmed the ectopic source of acromegaly in this patient. Learning points Signs, symptoms and initial work-up of acromegaly due to ectopic GHRH secretion are similar to pituitary-dependent acromegaly. However, if no identifiable pituitary lesion is found, somatostatin receptor scan and further imaging (CT, MRI) should be performed.Detection of GHRH in the blood and in the tumor-derived medium supports the diagnosis of ectopic GHRH secretion.Functional bioactivity of pNET-secreted GHRH can be proved in vitro by releasing GH from human pituitary cells. PMID:26904199

  1. Growth hormone-releasing hormone stimulates GH release while inhibiting ghrelin- and sGnRH-induced LH release from goldfish pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Grey, Caleb L; Chang, John P

    2013-06-01

    Goldfish GH-releasing hormone (gGHRH) has been recently identified and shown to stimulate GH release in goldfish. In goldfish, neuroendocrine regulation of GH release is multifactorial and known stimulators include goldfish ghrelin (gGRLN19) and salmon gonadotropin-releasing hormone (sGnRH), factors that also enhance LH secretion. To further understand the complex regulation of pituitary hormone release in goldfish, we examined the interactions between gGHRH, gGRLN19, and sGnRH on GH and LH release from primary cultures of goldfish pituitary cells in perifusion. Treatment with 100nM gGHRH for 55min stimulated GH release. A 5-min pulse of either 1nM gGRLN19 or 100nM sGnRH induced GH release in naïve cells, and these were just as effective in cells receiving gGHRH. Interestingly, gGHRH abolished both gGRLN19- and sGnRH-induced LH release and reduced basal LH secretion levels. These results suggest that gGHRH does not interfere with sGnRH or gGRLN19 actions in the goldfish somatotropes and further reveal, for the first time, that GHRH may act as an inhibitor of stimulated and basal LH release by actions at the level of pituitary cells.

  2. Cortisol and hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis hormones in follicular-phase women with fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome and effect of depressive symptoms on these hormones.

    PubMed

    Gur, Ali; Cevik, Remzi; Nas, Kemal; Colpan, Leyla; Sarac, Serdar

    2004-01-01

    We investigated abnormalities of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and cortisol concentrations in women with fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) who were in the follicular phase of their menstrual cycle, and whether their scores for depressive symptoms were related to levels of these hormones. A total of 176 subjects participated - 46 healthy volunteers, 68 patients with fibromyalgia, and 62 patients with CFS. We examined concentrations of follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone (LH), estradiol, progesterone, prolactin, and cortisol. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Cortisol levels were significantly lower in patients with fibromyalgia or CFS than in healthy controls (P < 0.05); there were no significant differences in other hormone levels between the three groups. Fibromyalgia patients with high BDI scores had significantly lower cortisol levels than controls (P < 0.05), and so did CFS patients, regardless of their BDI scores (P < 0.05). Among patients without depressive symptoms, cortisol levels were lower in CFS than in fibromyalgia (P < 0.05). Our study suggests that in spite of low morning cortisol concentrations, the only abnormalities in hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis hormones among follicular-phase women with fibromyalgia or CFS are those of LH levels in fibromyalgia patients with a low BDI score. Depression may lower cortisol and LH levels, or, alternatively, low morning cortisol may be a biological factor that contributes to depressive symptoms in fibromyalgia. These parameters therefore must be taken into account in future investigations.

  3. All Hormone-Producing Cell Types of the Pituitary Intermediate and Anterior Lobes Derive From Prop1-Expressing Progenitors.

    PubMed

    Davis, Shannon W; Keisler, Jessica L; Pérez-Millán, María I; Schade, Vanessa; Camper, Sally A

    2016-04-01

    Mutations in PROP1, the most common known cause of combined pituitary hormone deficiency in humans, can result in the progressive loss of all hormones of the pituitary anterior lobe. In mice, Prop1 mutations result in the failure to initiate transcription of Pou1f1 (also known as Pit1) and lack somatotropins, lactotropins, and thyrotropins. The basis for this species difference is unknown. We hypothesized that Prop1 is expressed in a progenitor cell that can develop into all anterior lobe cell types, and not just the somatotropes, thyrotropes, and lactotropes, which are collectively known as the PIT1 lineage. To test this idea, we produced a transgenic Prop1-cre mouse line and conducted lineage-tracing experiments of Prop1-expressing cells. The results reveal that all hormone-secreting cell types of both the anterior and intermediate lobes are descended from Prop1-expressing progenitors. The Prop1-cre mice also provide a valuable genetic reagent with a unique spatial and temporal expression for generating tissue-specific gene rearrangements early in pituitary gland development. We also determined that the minimal essential sequences for reliable Prop1 expression lie within 10 kilobases of the mouse gene and demonstrated that human PROP1 can substitute functionally for mouse Prop1. These studies enhance our understanding of the pathophysiology of disease in patients with PROP1 mutations. PMID:26812162

  4. All Hormone-Producing Cell Types of the Pituitary Intermediate and Anterior Lobes Derive From Prop1-Expressing Progenitors.

    PubMed

    Davis, Shannon W; Keisler, Jessica L; Pérez-Millán, María I; Schade, Vanessa; Camper, Sally A

    2016-04-01

    Mutations in PROP1, the most common known cause of combined pituitary hormone deficiency in humans, can result in the progressive loss of all hormones of the pituitary anterior lobe. In mice, Prop1 mutations result in the failure to initiate transcription of Pou1f1 (also known as Pit1) and lack somatotropins, lactotropins, and thyrotropins. The basis for this species difference is unknown. We hypothesized that Prop1 is expressed in a progenitor cell that can develop into all anterior lobe cell types, and not just the somatotropes, thyrotropes, and lactotropes, which are collectively known as the PIT1 lineage. To test this idea, we produced a transgenic Prop1-cre mouse line and conducted lineage-tracing experiments of Prop1-expressing cells. The results reveal that all hormone-secreting cell types of both the anterior and intermediate lobes are descended from Prop1-expressing progenitors. The Prop1-cre mice also provide a valuable genetic reagent with a unique spatial and temporal expression for generating tissue-specific gene rearrangements early in pituitary gland development. We also determined that the minimal essential sequences for reliable Prop1 expression lie within 10 kilobases of the mouse gene and demonstrated that human PROP1 can substitute functionally for mouse Prop1. These studies enhance our understanding of the pathophysiology of disease in patients with PROP1 mutations.

  5. In vivo genomic footprinting of thyroid hormone-responsive genes in pituitary tumor cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S W; Ahn, I M; Larsen, P R

    1996-01-01

    We studied the effects of thyroid hormone (T3) on nuclear protein-DNA interactions by using dimethyl sulfate (DMS) and DNase I ligation-mediated PCR footprinting. We examined an endogenous gene the growth hormone (GH) gene, and a stably transfected plasmid containing the chicken lysozyme silencer (F2) T3 response element (TRE) gene, F2-TRE-TK-CAT, both in pituitary tumor (GC) cells. The 235-1 cell line, which expresses prolactin (PRL) and Pit-1, but not the T3 receptor (TR) or GH, was used as a control. DMS and DNase I footprinting identified protected G residues in the Pit-1, Sp1, and Zn-15 binding sites of the GH gene in GC, but not in 235-1, cells. There was no specific protection of the tripartite GH TRE at -180 bp against either DMS or DNase I in the absence or presence of T3 in either cell line. However, T3 increased protection of the Pit-1 and Sp1 binding sites against DMS in GC cells. In GC cells stably transfected with a plasmid containing F2-TRE-TK-CAT or TRalpha, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase expression was T3 inducible and DMS footprinting revealed both F2 TRE TR-binding half sites in a pattern suggesting the binding of TR homodimers before and during T3 exposure. We conclude that the GH gene is accessible to specific nuclear proteins in GC, but not in 235-1, cells and that T3 enhances this interaction, although there is no evidence of TR binding to the low-affinity rat GH TRE. The presence of TR binding to the high-affinity F2 TRE before and during T3 exposure suggests that reversible interaction of T3 with DNA-bound TRs, rather than transient T3-TR contact with TREs, determines the level of T3-stimulated transcriptional activation. PMID:8754847

  6. Influence of morphine during pregnancy on neuroendocrine regulation of pituitary hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Litto, W J; Griffin, J P; Rabii, J

    1983-08-01

    The effects of exposure to morphine during pregnancy on postnatal neuroendocrine systems were investigated. Rats received morphine sulphate or 0.9% (w/v) NaCl twice daily on days 5-12 of pregnancy. A dose of 5 mg morphine sulphate/kg was administered for the first three injections while 10 mg/kg was used for each of the remaining 13. This treatment regimen led to a significant delay in the onset of vaginal opening in the female offspring. Mothers treated with morphine sulphate showed a marked attenuation of their prolactin response to the suckling stimulus, although they still released significant amounts of the hormone. Both male and female offspring of the opiate-treated dams showed a major reduction in the sensitivity of their hypothalamic-pituitary axis to gonadal steroids at 15 days of age. No significant differences were found in the acute thyrotrophin response to single injection of morphine sulphate of prepuberal male and female pups of morphine- and saline-treated dams. These data show that exposure to opiates during critical periods of prenatal development lead to long-lasting alterations in the neuroendocrine control systems of the animal. These alterations may then have significant consequences on the physiological maturation and adult behaviour of the animal.

  7. The forkhead transcription factor, Foxd1, is necessary for pituitary luteinizing hormone expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Gumbel, Jason H; Patterson, Elizabeth M; Owusu, Sarah A; Kabat, Brock E; Jung, Deborah O; Simmons, Jasmine; Hopkins, Torin; Ellsworth, Buffy S

    2012-01-01

    The pituitary gland regulates numerous physiological functions including growth, reproduction, temperature and metabolic homeostasis, lactation, and response to stress. Pituitary organogenesis is dependent on signaling factors that are produced in and around the developing pituitary. The studies described in this report reveal that the forkhead transcription factor, Foxd1, is not expressed in the developing mouse pituitary gland, but rather in the mesenchyme surrounding the pituitary gland, which is an essential source of signaling factors that regulate pituitary organogenesis. Loss of Foxd1 causes a morphological defect in which the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland protrudes through the cartilage plate that is developing ventral to the pituitary at embryonic days (e)14.5, e16.5, and e18.5. The number of proliferating pituitary cells is increased at e14.5 and e16.5. Loss of Foxd1 also results in significantly decreased levels of Lhb expression at e18.5. This decrease in Lhb expression does not appear to be due to a change in the number of gonadotrope cells in the pituitary gland. Previous studies have shown that loss of the LIM homeodomain factor, Lhx3, which is activated by the FGF signaling pathway, results in loss of LH production. Although there is a difference in Lhb expression in Foxd1 null mice, the expression pattern of LHX3 is not altered in Foxd1 null mice. These studies suggest that Foxd1 is indirectly required for normal Lhb expression and cartilage formation. PMID:23284914

  8. Atrazine inhibits pulsatile luteinizing hormone release without altering pituitary sensitivity to a gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor agonist in female Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Foradori, Chad D; Hinds, Laura R; Hanneman, William H; Legare, Marie E; Clay, Colin M; Handa, Robert J

    2009-07-01

    Atrazine [2-chloro-4-(ethylamino)-6-(isopropylamino)-s-tri-azine] is one of the most commonly used herbicides in the United States. Atrazine has been shown to suppress luteinizing hormone (LH) release and can lead to a prolongation of the estrous cycle in the rat. The objectives of this study were to examine the effects of atrazine on normal tonic release of LH and to elucidate the site of action of atrazine in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Episodic release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and the corresponding release of LH from the anterior pituitary gland are required for normal reproductive function. To determine if atrazine affects pulsatile LH release, ovariectomized adult female Wistar rats were administered atrazine (50, 100, or 200 mg/kg of body weight daily by gavage) or vehicle control for 4 days. On the final day of atrazine treatment, blood samples were obtained using an indwelling right atrial cannula. In the group receiving 200 mg/kg, there was a significant reduction in LH pulse frequency and a concomitant increase in pulse amplitude. To determine if the effects of atrazine on LH release were due to changes at the level of the pituitary, animals were passively immunized against endogenous GnRH, treated with atrazine, and challenged with a GnRH receptor agonist. Atrazine failed to alter pituitary sensitivity to the GnRH receptor agonist at any dose used. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that high doses of atrazine affect the GnRH pulse generator in the brain and not at the level of gonadotrophs in the pituitary.

  9. The effect of an exteroceptive stimulus on the concentration of melanocyte-stimulating hormone in the pituitary of lactating rats

    PubMed Central

    Deis, R. P.; Orias, R.

    1968-01-01

    1. A study was made of the effect of an exteroceptive stimulus, produced by a team of lactating rats and of litters while suckling, on the pituitary melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH) activity of a group of lactating rats. 2. After being isolated for 9 hr from their litter, one group of lactating rats was killed after being allowed to nurse for 30 min, another group was subjected to the exteroceptive stimulus for 15 min and then killed. Control rats were killed after 9 hr of isolation from the litter without being subjected to either suckling or the exteroceptive stimulus. 3. The group of rats which had suckled their young showed a pituitary MSH activity equal to 35 ± 2·29%, and the group exposed to the exteroceptive stimulus an activity equal to 59·5 ± 3·16% of that in the control animals. 4. When deaf rats were used, only the suckled mother showed a decrease of the pituitary MSH activity which was similar to that obtained with the normal suckled mother, indicating that the exteroceptive stimulus depended on hearing for its effect. 5. A light dose of sodium pentobarbitone was sufficient to block the effect of suckling and the auditory stimuli on the pituitary MSH activity. 6. The role of the central nervous system in this phenomenon and the possibility that MSH is implicated in the process of lactation are discussed. PMID:5691946

  10. Anti-Müllerian hormone: a new actor of sexual dimorphism in pituitary gonadotrope activity before puberty

    PubMed Central

    Garrel, Ghislaine; Racine, Chrystèle; L’Hôte, David; Denoyelle, Chantal; Guigon, Céline J.; di Clemente, Nathalie; Cohen-Tannoudji, Joëlle

    2016-01-01

    Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) contributes to male sexual differentiation and acts on gonads of both sexes. Identification of AMH receptivity in both pituitary and brain has led to the intriguing idea that AMH participates to the hypothalamic-pituitary control of reproduction, however in vivo experimental evidence is still lacking. We show that AMH stimulates secretion and pituitary gene expression of the gonadotropin FSH in vivo in rats. AMH action is sex-dependent, being restricted to females and occurring before puberty. Accordingly, we report higher levels of pituitary AMH receptor transcripts in immature females. We show that AMH is functionally coupled to the Smad pathway in LβT2 gonadotrope cells and dose-dependently increases Fshb transcript levels. Furthermore, AMH was shown to establish complex interrelations with canonical FSH regulators as it cooperates with activin to induce Fshb expression whereas it reduces BMP2 action. We report that GnRH interferes with AMH by decreasing AMH receptivity in vivo in females. Moreover, AMH specifically regulates FSH and not LH, indicating that AMH is a factor contributing to the differential regulation of gonadotropins. Overall, our study uncovers a new role for AMH in regulating gonadotrope function and suggests that AMH participates in the postnatal elevation of FSH secretion in females. PMID:27030385

  11. Narcotics and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axix: acute effects on luteinizing hormone, testosterone and androgen-dependent systems.

    PubMed

    Cicero, T J; Bell, R D; Meyer, E R; Schweitzer, J

    1977-04-01

    The effects of narcotics on several aspects of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis were examined in the male rat. Our results indicate that a large number of narcotics acutely depress serum luteinizing hormone levels and that these reduced gonadotropin levels lead to a subsequent fall (1-2 hours later) in serum testosterone levels. The luteinizing hormone-depleting effect of the narcotics appears to represent a specific narcotic action since the (-)-isomers of the narcotics were much more effective than the ()-isomers, naloxone antagonized their effects and tolerance rapidly developed. Further, our studies indicate that the impairment of the functional and structural integrity of the secondary sex organs produced by chronic narcotic administration is not due to a direct effect of these drugs since they have no effect on the uptake of subcellular distribution of testosterone in the secondary sex organs or on the androgen-dependent accumulation of myo-inositol. Consequently, it appears that the testosterone depletion produced by the narcotics is solely responsible for their adverse effect on the secondary sex organs. The results of these studies suggest that the effects of the narcotics on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis are confined to either the hypthalamus or the pituitary gland.

  12. An investigation into pituitary gonadotrophic hormone synthesis, secretion, subunit gene expression and cell structure in normal and mutant male mice.

    PubMed

    Abel, M H; Charlton, H M; Huhtaniemi, I; Pakarinen, P; Kumar, T R; Christian, H C

    2013-10-01

    To investigate brain-pituitary-gonadal inter-relationships, we have compared the effects of mutations that perturb the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in male mice. Specifically, serum and pituitary gonadotrophin concentrations, gonadotrophin gene expression, and gonadotroph structure and number were measured. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)β knockout (FSHβKO), FSH receptor knockout (FSHRKO), luteinising hormone (LH) receptor knockout (LuRKO), hypogonadal (hpg), testicular feminised (tfm) and gonadectomised mice were compared with control wild-type mice or heterozygotes. Serum levels of LH were similar in FSHβKO, FSHRKO and heterozygote males despite decreased androgen production in KO males. As expected, there was no detectable FSH in the serum or pituitary and an absence of expression of the FSHβ subunit gene in FSHβKO mice. However, there was a significant increase in expression of the common α and LHβ subunit genes in FSHRKO males. The morphology of FSHβKO and FSHRKO gonadotrophs was not significantly different from controls, except that the subpopulation of granules consisting of an electron-dense core and electron-lucent 'halo' was not observed in FSHβKO gonadotrophs and the granules were smaller in diameter. In the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone deficient hpg mouse, gonadotrophin mRNA and hormone levels were significantly lower compared to control mice and gonadotrophs were correspondingly smaller, with less abundant endoplasmic reticulum and reduced secretory granules. In LuRKO, tfm and gonadectomised mice, hyperstimulation of LHβ and FSHβ mRNA and serum protein concentrations was reflected by subcellular changes in gonadotroph morphology, including more dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum and more secretory granules distributed adjacent to the plasma membrane. In summary, major differences in pituitary content and serum concentrations of the gonadotrophins LH and FSH have been found between normal and mutant male mice. These changes are

  13. Data on the characterization of follicle-stimulating hormone monoclonal antibodies and localization in Japanese eel pituitary.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Jung; Park, Chae-Won; Byambaragchaa, Munkhzaya; Kim, Shin-Kwon; Lee, Bae-Ik; Hwang, Hyung-Kyu; Myeong, Jeong-In; Hong, Sun-Mee; Kang, Myung-Hwa; Min, Kwan-Sik

    2016-09-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were generated against recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone (rec-FSH) from Japanese eel Anguilla japonica; rec-FSH was produced in Escherichia coli and purified using Ni-NTA Sepharose column chromatography. In support of our recent publication, "Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against recombinant tethered follicle-stimulating hormone from Japanese eel Anguilla japonica" [1], it was important to characterize the specificity of eel follicle-stimulating hormone antibodies. Here, the production and ELISA system of these monoclonal antibodies are presented. The affinity-purified monoclonal antibodies specifically detected eel rec-FSH in ELISA and on western blots of rec-FSH produced from CHO cells. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that FSH staining was specifically localized in the eel pituitary. PMID:27331121

  14. Expression of the putative gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone receptor, NPFFR1, in the anterior pituitary gland of the gilt is affected by age and sexual maturation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) purportedly suppresses secretion of luteinizing hormone (LH) by acting through a G-protein coupled receptor (NPFFR1) in the anterior pituitary gland and hypothalamus. The objective of these studies was to determine if expression of mRNA for NPFFR1 in the reprod...

  15. Desensitization, Trafficking, and Resensitization of the Pituitary Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Hinkle, Patricia M.; Gehret, Austin U.; Jones, Brian W.

    2012-01-01

    The pituitary receptor for thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) is a calcium-mobilizing G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that signals through Gq/11, elevating calcium, and activating protein kinase C. TRH receptor signaling is quickly desensitized as a consequence of receptor phosphorylation, arrestin binding, and internalization. Following activation, TRH receptors are phosphorylated at multiple Ser/Thr residues in the cytoplasmic tail. Phosphorylation catalyzed by GPCR kinase 2 (GRK2) takes place rapidly, reaching a maximum within seconds. Arrestins bind to two phosphorylated regions, but only arrestin bound to the proximal region causes desensitization and internalization. Phosphorylation at Thr365 is critical for these responses. TRH receptors internalize in clathrin-coated vesicles with bound arrestin. Following endocytosis, vesicles containing phosphorylated TRH receptors soon merge with rab5-positive vesicles. Over approximately 20 min these form larger endosomes rich in rab4 and rab5, early sorting endosomes. After TRH is removed from the medium, dephosphorylated receptors start to accumulate in rab4-positive, rab5-negative recycling endosomes. The mechanisms responsible for sorting dephosphorylated receptors to recycling endosomes are unknown. TRH receptors from internal pools help repopulate the plasma membrane. Dephosphorylation of TRH receptors begins when TRH is removed from the medium regardless of receptor localization, although dephosphorylation is fastest when the receptor is on the plasma membrane. Protein phosphatase 1 is involved in dephosphorylation but the details of how the enzyme is targeted to the receptor remain obscure. It is likely that future studies will identify biased ligands for the TRH receptor, novel arrestin-dependent signaling pathways, mechanisms responsible for targeting kinases and phosphatases to the receptor, and principles governing receptor trafficking. PMID:23248581

  16. Hormone levels

    MedlinePlus

    Blood or urine tests can determine the levels of various hormones in the body. This includes reproductive hormones, thyroid hormones, adrenal hormones, pituitary hormones, and many others. For more information, see: ...

  17. Serotonin and acetylcholine affect the release of prolactin and growth hormone from pituitary glands of domestic fowl in vitro in the presence of hypothalamic tissue.

    PubMed

    Hall, T R; Harvey, S; Chadwick, A

    1984-04-01

    Anterior pituitary glands from broiler fowl were incubated alone or with hypothalamic tissue in medium containing either serotonin or serotoninergic drugs, acetylcholine or cholinergic drugs, and the release of prolactin (Prl) and growth hormone (GH) measured by homologous radioimmunoassays. The neurotransmitters and drugs affected the release of hormones from the pituitary gland only when hypothalamic tissue was also present. Serotonin and its agonist quipazine stimulated the release of Prl and inhibited release of GH in a concentration-related manner. The antagonist methysergide blocked the effects of serotonin and quipazine on Prl. Acetylcholine and its agonist pilocarpine also stimulated release of Prl and inhibited release of GH in a concentration-related manner. Atropine blocked these responses. The results show that serotonin and acetylcholine affect pituitary hormone secretion by acting on the hypothalamus. They may stimulate the secretion of a Prl releasing hormone and somatostatin. PMID:6144226

  18. Serotonin and acetylcholine affect the release of prolactin and growth hormone from pituitary glands of domestic fowl in vitro in the presence of hypothalamic tissue.

    PubMed

    Hall, T R; Harvey, S; Chadwick, A

    1984-04-01

    Anterior pituitary glands from broiler fowl were incubated alone or with hypothalamic tissue in medium containing either serotonin or serotoninergic drugs, acetylcholine or cholinergic drugs, and the release of prolactin (Prl) and growth hormone (GH) measured by homologous radioimmunoassays. The neurotransmitters and drugs affected the release of hormones from the pituitary gland only when hypothalamic tissue was also present. Serotonin and its agonist quipazine stimulated the release of Prl and inhibited release of GH in a concentration-related manner. The antagonist methysergide blocked the effects of serotonin and quipazine on Prl. Acetylcholine and its agonist pilocarpine also stimulated release of Prl and inhibited release of GH in a concentration-related manner. Atropine blocked these responses. The results show that serotonin and acetylcholine affect pituitary hormone secretion by acting on the hypothalamus. They may stimulate the secretion of a Prl releasing hormone and somatostatin.

  19. Overexpression of the growth-hormone-releasing hormone gene in acromegaly-associated pituitary tumors. An event associated with neoplastic progression and aggressive behavior.

    PubMed Central

    Thapar, K.; Kovacs, K.; Stefaneanu, L.; Scheithauer, B.; Killinger, D. W.; Lioyd, R. V.; Smyth, H. S.; Barr, A.; Thorner, M. O.; Gaylinn, B.; Laws, E. R.

    1997-01-01

    The clinical behavior of growth hormone (GH)-producing pituitary tumors is known to vary greatly; however, the events underlying this variability remain poorly understood. Herein we demonstrate that tumor overexpression of the GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) gene is one prognostically informative event associated with the clinical aggressiveness of somatotroph pituitary tumors. Accumulation of GHRH mRNA transcripts was demonstrated in 91 of a consecutive series of 100 somatotroph tumors by in situ hybridization; these findings were corroborated by Northern analysis and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, and protein translation was confirmed by Western blotting. By comparison, transcript accumulation was absent or negligibly low in 30 normal pituitary glands. GHRH transcripts were found to preferentially accumulate among clinically aggressive tumors. Specifically, GHRH mRNA signal intensity was 1) linearly correlated with Ki-67 tumor growth fractions (r = 0.71; P < 0.001), 2) linearly correlated with preoperative serum GH levels (r = 0.56; p = 0.01), 3) higher among invasive tumors (P < 0.001), and 4) highest in those tumors in which post-operative remission was not achieved (P < 0.001). Using multivariate logistic regression, a model of postoperative remission likelihood was derived wherein remission was defined by the single criterion of suppressibility of GH levels to less than 2 ng/ml during an oral glucose tolerance test. In this outcome model, GHRH mRNA signal intensity proved to be the most important explanatory variable overall, eclipsing any and all conventional clinicopathological predictors as the single most significant predictor of postoperative remission; increases in GHRH mRNA signal were associated with marked declines in remission likelihood. The generalizability of this outcome model was further validated by the model's significant performance in predicting postoperative remission in a random sample of 30 somatotroph tumors treated at

  20. Immunocytochemical and pharmacological evidence for an intrinsic cholinomimetic system modulating prolactin and growth hormone release in rat pituitary.

    PubMed

    Carmeliet, P; Denef, C

    1988-08-01

    Pituitary cells were cultured as three-dimensional reaggregates in serum-free chemically defined medium supplemented with different concentrations of dexamethasone. Immunostaining of the cells using a polyclonal antiserum and three monoclonal antibodies raised against choline acetyl transferase (CAT), revealed the presence of CAT immunoreactivity in 4-10% of anterior pituitary cells depending on the antibody used. CAT immunoreactivity was also found in freshly dispersed anterior pituitary cells. CAT-immunoreactive cells could be enriched on BSA and Percoll gradients and codistributed with ACTH-immunoreactive cells in these gradients. Perifusion of the aggregates with the potent muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine (Atr) resulted in a dose-dependent (0.1-100 nM) increase in both basal PRL and GH secretion; the response was dependent on the dexamethasone concentration in the culture medium. A similar response to Atr was observed in organ-cultured pituitaries. The specificity of the Atr effect was supported by the findings that the potent and highly specific muscarinic receptor blocker dexetimide showed a similar action, whereas its inactive enantiomer levetimide and the nicotinic receptor blocker hexamethonium failed to do so. Two other muscarinic antagonists, benzatropine and pirenzepine, showed a dose-dependent hormone-releasing action similar to that of Atr, but were less potent than the latter. Pirenzepine was only effective at high molar concentrations, suggesting that an M2 muscarinic receptor subtype was mediating the present phenomenon. Atr also potentiated GH release stimulated by the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol and PRL release stimulated by vasoactive intestinal peptide, but had no effect on GRF-stimulated GH release. The choline uptake blocker hemicholinium abolished the effect of Atr on GH and PRL release. These data suggest that certain pituitary cells can express CAT activity and that these cells exert a tonic inhibitory activity on GH and

  1. [Effect of epidural anesthesia on the function of hormonal regulation in the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis].

    PubMed

    Nagata, A; Yoshida, H; Imamura, K; Masuda, Y; Hosoyamada, A

    1990-08-01

    To evaluate the effects of epidural anesthesia on the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis, we examined the concentrations of luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and testosterone (T). The effects of epidural anesthesia on plasma levels of LH, FSH and T were investigated in 8 men aged from 64 to 87 years, suffering from untreated prostate cancer. There were no significant differences in plasma levels of LH, FSH or T between patients under epidural anesthesia and patients under no anesthesia. The effects of epidural anesthesia on plasma levels of LH, FSH and T after LH releasing hormone (LH-RH) administration were studied in 10 men between 65 and 84 years with diagnoses of untreated prostate cancer. Plasma LH and FSH levels increased significantly after LH-RH administration under epidural anesthesia or no anesthesia. Plasma LH and FSH were lower under epidural anesthesia than under no anesthesia. No change in plasma T level was observed after LH-RH administration under epidural anesthesia. We conclude that there is no effect of epidural anesthesia on the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis.

  2. Early hyperbaric oxygen therapy inhibits aquaporin 4 and adrenocorticotropic hormone expression in the pituitary gland of rabbits with blast-induced craniocerebral injury★

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Jian; Liu, Jiachuan; Wang, Jinbiao; Zhang, Yongming; Wang, Chunlin; Yang, Yanyan; Sun, Wenjiang; Xu, Shaonian

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, rabbits were treated with hyperbaric oxygen for 1 hour after detonator-blast- induced craniocerebral injury. Immunohistochemistry showed significantly reduced aquaporin 4 expression and adrenocorticotropic hormone expression in the pituitary gland of rabbits with craniocerebral injury. Aquaporin 4 expression was positively correlated with adrenocorticotropic hormone expression. These findings indicate that early hyperbaric oxygen therapy may suppress adrenocorticotropic hormone secretion by inhibiting aquaporin 4 expression. PMID:25624795

  3. Early hyperbaric oxygen therapy inhibits aquaporin 4 and adrenocorticotropic hormone expression in the pituitary gland of rabbits with blast-induced craniocerebral injury.

    PubMed

    Huo, Jian; Liu, Jiachuan; Wang, Jinbiao; Zhang, Yongming; Wang, Chunlin; Yang, Yanyan; Sun, Wenjiang; Xu, Shaonian

    2012-08-01

    In the present study, rabbits were treated with hyperbaric oxygen for 1 hour after detonator-blast- induced craniocerebral injury. Immunohistochemistry showed significantly reduced aquaporin 4 expression and adrenocorticotropic hormone expression in the pituitary gland of rabbits with craniocerebral injury. Aquaporin 4 expression was positively correlated with adrenocorticotropic hormone expression. These findings indicate that early hyperbaric oxygen therapy may suppress adrenocorticotropic hormone secretion by inhibiting aquaporin 4 expression.

  4. Hormonal status modifies renin-angiotensin system-regulating aminopeptidases and vasopressin-degrading activity in the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis of male mice.

    PubMed

    García, María Jesús; Martínez-Martos, José Manuel; Mayas, María Dolores; Carrera, María Pilar; Ramírez-Expósito, María Jesús

    2003-06-20

    Local renin-angiotensin systems (RAS) have been postulated in brain, pituitary and adrenal glands. These local RAS have been implicated, respectively, in the central regulation of the cardiovascular system and body water balance, the secretion of pituitary hormones and the secretion of aldosterone by adrenal glands. By other hand, it is known that the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is involved in blood pressure regulation, and is affected by sex hormones. The aim of the present work is to analyze the influence of testosterone on RAS-regulating aminopeptidase A, B and M activities and vasopressin-degrading activity in the HPA axis, measuring these activities in their soluble and membrane-bound forms in the hypothalamus, pituitary and adrenal glands of orchidectomized males and orchidectomized males treated subcutaneously with several doses of testosterone. The present data suggest that in male mice, testosterone influences the RAS- and vasopressin-degrading activities at all levels of the HPA axis.

  5. The effects of subchronic acrylamide exposure on gene expression, neurochemistry, hormones, and histopathology in the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis of male Fischer 344 rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bowyer, J.F.; Latendresse, J.R.; Delongchamp, R.R.; Muskhelishvili, L.; Warbritton, A.R.; Thomas, M.; Tareke, E.; McDaniel, L.P.; Doerge, D.R.

    2008-07-15

    Acrylamide (AA) is an important industrial chemical that is neurotoxic in rodents and humans and carcinogenic in rodents. The observation of cancer in endocrine-responsive tissues in Fischer 344 rats has prompted hypotheses of hormonal dysregulation, as opposed to DNA damage, as the mechanism for tumor induction by AA. The current investigation examines possible evidence for disruption of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis from 14 days of repeated exposure of male Fischer 344 rats to doses of AA that range from one that is carcinogenic after lifetime exposure (2.5 mg/kg/d), an intermediate dose (10 mg/kg/d), and a high dose (50 mg/kg/d) that is neurotoxic for this exposure time. The endpoints selected include: serum levels of thyroid and pituitary hormones; target tissue expression of genes involved in hormone synthesis, release, and receptors; neurotransmitters in the CNS that affect hormone homeostasis; and histopathological evaluation of target tissues. These studies showed virtually no evidence for systematic alteration of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis and do not support hormone dysregulation as a plausible mechanism for AA-induced thyroid cancer in the Fischer 344 rat. Specifically, there were no significant changes in: 1) mRNA levels in hypothalamus or pituitary for TRH, TSH, thyroid hormone receptor {alpha} and {beta}, as well 10 other hormones or releasing factors; 2) mRNA levels in thyroid for thyroglobulin, thyroid peroxidase, sodium iodide symporter, or type I deiodinases; 3) serum TSH or T3 levels (T4 was decreased at high dose only); 4) dopaminergic tone in the hypothalamus and pituitary or importantly 5) increased cell proliferation (Mki67 mRNA and Ki-67 protein levels were not increased) in thyroid or pituitary. These negative findings are consistent with a genotoxic mechanism of AA carcinogenicity based on metabolism to glycidamide and DNA adduct formation. Clarification of this mechanistic dichotomy may be useful in human cancer risk

  6. Pathogenesis of pituitary tumors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Run; Melmed, Shlomo

    2010-01-01

    Pituitary tumors are common and mostly benign neoplasia which cause excess or deficiency of pituitary hormones and compressive damage to adjacent organs. Oncogene activation [e.g. PTTG (pituitary tumor-transforming gene) and HMGA2], tumor suppressor gene inactivation (e.g. MEN1 and PRKAR1A), epigenetic changes (e.g. methylation) and humoral factors (e.g. ectopic production of stimulating hormones) are all possible pituitary tumor initiators; the micro-environment of pituitary tumors including steroid milieu, angiogenesis and abnormal cell adhesion further promote tumor growth. Senescence, a cellular defence mechanism against malignant transformation, may explain the benign nature of at least some pituitary tumors. We suggest that future research on pituitary tumor pathogenesis should incorporate systems approaches, and address regulatory mechanisms for pituitary cell proliferation, development of new animal models of pituitary tumor and isolation of functional human pituitary tumor cell lines. PMID:20541667

  7. Sex steroid hormones do not enhance the direct stimulatory effect of kisspetin-10 on the secretion of growth hormone from bovine anterior pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Ezzat Ahmed, Ahmed; Saito, Hayato; Sawada, Tatsuru; Yaegashi, Tomoyoshi; Jin, Jin; Sawai, Ken; Yamashita, Tetsuro; Hashizume, Tsutomu

    2011-02-01

    The aims of the present study were to clarify the effect of kisspeptin10 (Kp10) on the secretion of growth hormone (GH) from bovine anterior pituitary (AP) cells, and evaluate the ability of sex steroid hormones to enhance the sensitivity of somatotrophic cells to Kp10. AP cells prepared from 8-11-month-old castrated calves were incubated for 12 h with estradiol (E(2), 10(-8) mol/L),progesterone (P(4), 10(-8) mol/L), testosterone (T, 10(-8) mol/L), or vehicle only (control), and then for 2 h with Kp10. The amount of GH released in the medium was measured by a time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay. Kp10 (10(-6) or 10(-5) mol/L) significantly stimulated the secretion of GH from the AP cells regardless of steroid treatments (P < 0.05), and E(2), P(4), and T had no effect on this response. The GH-releasing response to growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH, 10(-8) mol/L) was significantly greater than that to Kp10 (P < 0.05). The present results suggest that Kp10 directly stimulates the release of GH from somatotrophic cells and sex steroid hormones do not enhance the sensitivity of these cells to Kp10. Furthermore, they suggest that the GH-releasing effect of Kp10 is less potent than that of GHRH.

  8. Negative Feedback Control of Pituitary Thyroid-stimulating Hormone Synthesis and Secretion by Thyroid Hormones during Metamorphosis in Xenopus laevis

    EPA Science Inventory

    A basic understanding of the endocrinology of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis of anuran larvae is necessary for predicting the consequences of HPT perturbation by thyroid-disrupting chemicals (TDCs) on the whole organism. This project examined negative feedback con...

  9. Adrenocorticotropin- and opiate-like hormones from pituitaries of the sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka.

    PubMed

    Ng, T B; Hon, W K; Idler, D R

    1987-04-01

    The pituitaries of vitellogenic sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) were extracted with a mixture of acetone, water, and hydrochloric acid. The precipitate which formed upon the addition of a copious volume of acetone to the extract, designated acid acetone powder, was subjected to salt fractionation and desalting, followed by ion-exchange chromatography on CM-cellulose. An unadsorbed fraction (S-1) and four adsorbed fractions (S-2, S-3, S-4 and S-5) were obtained. Adrenocorticotropic activity was detected in the fractions by their ability to stimulate isolated rat adrenal decapsular cells to produce corticosterone and by their immunoreactivities in an adrenocorticotropin-specific radioimmunoassay. The steroidogenic activities of all fractions, except S-4, were blocked by corticotropin inhibiting peptide. Opiate activity was detected in the fractions by their ability to inhibit the binding of either [3H]naloxone or (D-ala2, D-leu5)-[3H]enkephalin to rat brain membranes. There was a discrepancy in the potencies of the five fractions in the two opiate radioreceptor assays, indicating the presence of opiate peptides with different affinities of binding to the micron- and delta-opiate receptors of the rat brain. There was a separation between adrenocorticotropic and opiate receptor binding activities, suggesting that the activities were due to separate molecular entities. PMID:3038149

  10. The role of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal hormones in the normal structure and functioning of the brain.

    PubMed

    Vadakkadath Meethal, S; Atwood, C S

    2005-02-01

    Receptors for hormones of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis that regulate reproductive function are expressed throughout the brain, and in particular the limbic system. The most studied of these hormones, the sex steroids, contain receptors throughout the brain, and numerous estrogenic, progestrogenic and androgenic effects have been reported in the brain related to development, maintenance and cognitive functions. Although less studied, receptors for gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and activins also are found throughout the limbic system on a number of cell types, and they too transduce signals from circulating hormones as demonstrated by their multiple effects on the growth, development, maintenance and function of the brain. This review highlights the point that because of the feedback loops within the HPG axis, it is difficult to ascribe structural and functional changes during development, adulthood and senescence to a single HPG hormone, since a change in the concentration of any hormone in the axis will modulate hormone concentrations and/or receptor expression patterns for all other members of the axis. The most studied of these situations is the change in serum and neuronal concentrations of HPG hormones associated with menopause/andropause. Dysregulation of the HPG axis at this time results in increases in the concentrations of serum GnRH, gonadotropins and activins, decreases in the serum concentrations of sex steroid and inhibin, and increases in GnRH and LH receptor expression. Such changes would result in significantly altered neuronal signaling, with the final result being that there is i.e. increased neuronal GnRH, LH and activin signaling, but decreased sex steroid signaling. Therefore, loss of cognitive function during senescence, typically ascribed to sex steroids, may also result from increased signaling via GnRH, LH or activin receptors. Future studies will be required to differentiate which hormones

  11. Gene expression in the brain-pituitary adipose tissue axis and luteinising hormone secretion during pubertal development in the gilt.

    PubMed

    Barb, C R; Hausman, G J; Rekaya, R

    2006-01-01

    The occurrence of puberty in the female is due to the interplay of central and peripheral mechanisms in which the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis regulates growth and gonadal function, as well as adipocyte hormone secretion. Hypothalamic GnRH mRNA expression increased at 3.5 months of age and declined by 6 months of age. Concomitant with the age related reduction in the oestrogen negative feedback on LH secretion was a decline in hypothalamic oestrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha) expression and increased expression of repressor of ER activity gene (REA) at 210 days of age. Hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin expression increased at 6 months of age followed by increased expression of progesterone receptor (PR) membrane compliment-1 and steroid membrane binding protein gene at 210 days of age. This represents development of the endogenous opioid peptide-progesterone dependent LH inhibitory pathway. Adipose tissue leptin and insulin like growth factor-I (IGF-I) gene expression increased with age and adiposity. Pituitary transcription factors, steroidogenic factor 1 (SF1) and Lhx3, and LHbeta and FSHbeta gene expression increased with age. These results identify key hypothalamic and pituitary genes associated with changes in LH secretion and growth during pubertal development and adipose tissue genes and secreted proteins related to maturation of the neuroendocrine axis and puberty.

  12. Outcome of Endoscopic Transsphenoidal Surgery in Combination with Somatostatin Analogues in Patients with Growth Hormone Producing Pituitary Adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tao; Wang, Fuyu; Meng, Xianghui; Ba, Jianmin; Wei, Shaobo

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the efficacy of endoscopic surgery in combination with long-acting somatostatin analogues (SSAs) in treating patients with growth hormone (GH)-secreting pituitary tumor. Methods We performed retrospective analysis of 133 patients with GH producing pituitary adenoma who underwent pure endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery in our center from January 2007 to July 2012. Patients were followed up for a range of 3-48 months. The radiological remission, biochemical remission and complication were evaluated. Results A total of 110 (82.7%) patients achieved radiological complete resection, 11 (8.2%) subtotal resection, and 12 (9.0%) partial resection. Eighty-eight (66.2%) patients showed nadir GH level less than 1 ng/mL after oral glucose administration. No mortality or severe disability was observed during follow up. Preoperative long-acting SSA successfully improved left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) and blood glucose in three patients who subsequently underwent success operation. Long-acting SSA (20 mg every 30 days) achieved biochemical remission in 19 out 23 (82.6%) patients who showed persistent high GH level after surgery. Conclusion Endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery can biochemically cure the majority of GH producing pituitary adenoma. Post-operative use of SSA can improve biochemical remission. PMID:25535518

  13. Interaction of growth hormone overexpression and nutritional status on pituitary gland clock gene expression in coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Hyoung; White, Samantha L; Devlin, Robert H

    2015-02-01

    Clock genes are involved in generating a circadian rhythm that is integrated with the metabolic state of an organism and information from the environment. Growth hormone (GH) transgenic coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch, show a large increase in growth rate, but also attenuated seasonal growth modulations, modified timing of physiological transformations (e.g. smoltification) and disruptions in pituitary gene expression compared with wild-type salmon. In several fishes, circadian rhythm gene expression has been found to oscillate in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, as well as in multiple peripheral tissues, but this control system has not been examined in the pituitary gland nor has the effect of transgenic growth modification been examined. Thus, the daily expression of 10 core clock genes has been examined in pituitary glands of GH transgenic (T) and wild-type coho salmon (NT) entrained on a regular photocycle (12L: 12D) and provided either with scheduled feeding or had food withheld for 60 h. Most clock genes in both genotypes showed oscillating patterns of mRNA levels with light and dark cycles. However, T showed different amplitudes and patterns of expression compared with wild salmon, both in fed and starved conditions. The results from this study indicate that constitutive expression of GH is associated with changes in clock gene regulation, which may play a role in the disrupted behavioural and physiological phenotypes observed in growth-modified transgenic strains.

  14. Analysis of differential gene expression by bead-based fiber-optic array in growth-hormone-secreting pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhiquan; Gui, Songbo; Zhang, Yazhuo

    2010-09-01

    Growth-hormone-secreting pituitary adenomas (GHomas) account for approximately 20% of all pituitary neoplasms. However, the pathogenesis of GHomas remains to be elucidated. To explore the possible pathogenesis of GHomas, we used bead-based fiber-optic arrays to examine the gene expression in five GHomas and compared them to three healthy pituitaries. Four differentially expressed genes were chosen randomly for validation by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. We then performed pathway analysis on the identified differentially expressed genes using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes. Array analysis showed significant increases in the expression of 353 genes and 206 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and decreases in 565 genes and 29 ESTs. Bioinformatic analysis showed that the genes HIGD1B, HOXB2, ANGPT2, HPGD and BTG2 may play an important role in the tumorigenesis and progression of GHomas. Pathway analysis showed that the wingless-type signaling pathway and extracellular-matrix receptor interactions may play a key role in the tumorigenesis and progression of GHomas. Our data suggested that there are numerous aberrantly expressed genes and pathways involved in the pathogenesis of GHomas. Bead-based fiber-optic arrays combined with pathway analysis of differentially expressed genes appear to be a valid method for investigating the pathogenesis of tumors. PMID:22993617

  15. Leucine-enkephalin-like immunoreactivity is localized in luteinizing hormone-producing cells in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) pituitary.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hirohumi; Yamamoto, Toshiharu

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we used immunohistochemical techniques to determine the cell type of leucine-enkephalin (Leu-ENK)-immunoreactive cells in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) pituitary. Immunoreactive cells were scattered throughout the pars distalis except for the dorso-caudal portion. These cells were immuno-positive for luteinizing hormone (LH), but they were immuno-negative for adrenocorticotrophic, growth, and thyroid-stimulating hormones, as well as prolactin. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated that Leu-ENK-like substance and LH co-localized within the same secretory granules. Leu-ENK secreted from gonadotrophs may participate in LH secretion in an autocrine fashion, and/or may participate in the release of sex steroids together with LH.

  16. Leucine-enkephalin-like immunoreactivity is localized in luteinizing hormone-producing cells in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) pituitary.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hirohumi; Yamamoto, Toshiharu

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we used immunohistochemical techniques to determine the cell type of leucine-enkephalin (Leu-ENK)-immunoreactive cells in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) pituitary. Immunoreactive cells were scattered throughout the pars distalis except for the dorso-caudal portion. These cells were immuno-positive for luteinizing hormone (LH), but they were immuno-negative for adrenocorticotrophic, growth, and thyroid-stimulating hormones, as well as prolactin. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated that Leu-ENK-like substance and LH co-localized within the same secretory granules. Leu-ENK secreted from gonadotrophs may participate in LH secretion in an autocrine fashion, and/or may participate in the release of sex steroids together with LH. PMID:24034715

  17. Pregnancy and pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Glezer, Andrea; Jallad, Raquel S; Machado, Marcio C; Fragoso, Maria C; Bronstein, Marcello D

    2016-09-01

    Infertility is frequent in patients harboring pituitary adenomas. The mechanisms involved include hypogonadism secondary to hormonal hypersecretion (prolactin, growth hormone and cortisol), stalk disconnection and pituitary damage. With the improvement of clinical and surgical treatment, pregnancy in women harboring pituitary adenomas turned into a reality. Pituitary hormonal hyper- and hyposecretion influences pregnancy outcomes, as well as pregnancy can interfere on pituitary tumors, especially in prolactinomas. We review literature about specific follow-up and management in pregnant women harboring prolactinomas, acromegaly, or Cushings disease and the impact of clinical and surgical treatment on each condition. PMID:26977888

  18. Molecular cloning of pituitary glycoprotein alpha-subunit and follicle stimulating hormone and chorionic gonadotropin beta-subunits from New World squirrel monkey and owl monkey.

    PubMed

    Scammell, Jonathan G; Funkhouser, Jane D; Moyer, Felricia S; Gibson, Susan V; Willis, Donna L

    2008-02-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize the gonadotropins expressed in pituitary glands of the New World squirrel monkey (Saimiri sp.) and owl monkey (Aotus sp.). The various subunits were amplified from total RNA from squirrel monkey and owl monkey pituitary glands by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and the deduced amino acid sequences compared to those of other species. Mature squirrel monkey and owl monkey glycoprotein hormone alpha-polypeptides (96 amino acids in length) were determined to be 80% homologous to the human sequence. The sequences of mature beta subunits of follicle stimulating hormone (FSHbeta) from squirrel monkey and owl monkey (111 amino acids in length) are 92% homologous to human FSHbeta. New World primate glycoprotein hormone alpha-polypeptides and FSHbeta subunits showed conservation of all cysteine residues and consensus N-linked glycosylation sites. Attempts to amplify the beta-subunit of luteinizing hormone from squirrel monkey and owl monkey pituitary glands were unsuccessful. Rather, the beta-subunit of chorionic gonadotropin (CG) was amplified from pituitaries of both New World primates. Squirrel monkey and owl monkey CGbeta are 143 and 144 amino acids in length and 77% homologous with human CGbeta. The greatest divergence is in the C terminus, where all four sites for O-linked glycosylation in human CGbeta, responsible for delayed metabolic clearance, are predicted to be absent in New World primate CGbetas. It is likely that CG secreted from pituitary of New World primates exhibits a relatively short half-life compared to human CG.

  19. Functional anterior pituitary generated in self-organizing culture of human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ozone, Chikafumi; Suga, Hidetaka; Eiraku, Mototsugu; Kadoshima, Taisuke; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Takata, Nozomu; Oiso, Yutaka; Tsuji, Takashi; Sasai, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Anterior pituitary is critical for endocrine systems. Its hormonal responses to positive and negative regulators are indispensable for homeostasis. For this reason, generating human anterior pituitary tissue that retains regulatory hormonal control in vitro is an important step for the development of cell transplantation therapy for pituitary diseases. Here we achieve this by recapitulating mouse pituitary development using human embryonic stem cells. We find that anterior pituitary self-forms in vitro following the co-induction of hypothalamic and oral ectoderm. The juxtaposition of these tissues facilitated the formation of pituitary placode, which subsequently differentiated into pituitary hormone-producing cells. They responded normally to both releasing and feedback signals. In addition, after transplantation into hypopituitary mice, the in vitro-generated corticotrophs rescued physical activity levels and survival of the hosts. Thus, we report a useful methodology for the production of regulator-responsive human pituitary tissue that may benefit future studies in regenerative medicine. PMID:26762480

  20. Functional anterior pituitary generated in self-organizing culture of human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ozone, Chikafumi; Suga, Hidetaka; Eiraku, Mototsugu; Kadoshima, Taisuke; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Takata, Nozomu; Oiso, Yutaka; Tsuji, Takashi; Sasai, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Anterior pituitary is critical for endocrine systems. Its hormonal responses to positive and negative regulators are indispensable for homeostasis. For this reason, generating human anterior pituitary tissue that retains regulatory hormonal control in vitro is an important step for the development of cell transplantation therapy for pituitary diseases. Here we achieve this by recapitulating mouse pituitary development using human embryonic stem cells. We find that anterior pituitary self-forms in vitro following the co-induction of hypothalamic and oral ectoderm. The juxtaposition of these tissues facilitated the formation of pituitary placode, which subsequently differentiated into pituitary hormone-producing cells. They responded normally to both releasing and feedback signals. In addition, after transplantation into hypopituitary mice, the in vitro-generated corticotrophs rescued physical activity levels and survival of the hosts. Thus, we report a useful methodology for the production of regulator-responsive human pituitary tissue that may benefit future studies in regenerative medicine. PMID:26762480

  1. Molecular cloning of growth hormone-releasing hormone/pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating polypeptide in the frog Xenopus laevis: brain distribution and regulation after castration.

    PubMed

    Hu, Z; Lelievre, V; Tam, J; Cheng, J W; Fuenzalida, G; Zhou, X; Waschek, J A

    2000-09-01

    Pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) appears to regulate several neuroendocrine functions in the frog, but its messenger RNA (mRNA) structure and brain distribution are unknown. To understand the potential role of PACAP in the male frog hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, we cloned the frog Xenopus laevis PACAP mRNA and determined its distribution in the brain. We then analyzed the castration-induced alterations of mRNA expression for PACAP and its selective type I receptor (PAC1) in the hypothalamic anterior preoptic area, a region known to regulate reproductive function. The PACAP mRNA encodes a peptide precursor predicted to give rise to both GH-releasing hormone and PACAP. The deduced peptide sequence of PACAP-38 was nearly identical to that of human PACAP with one amino acid substitution. Abundant PACAP mRNA was detected in the brain, but not several other tissues, including the testis. In situ hybridization revealed strong expression of the PACAP gene in the dorsal pallium, ventral hypothalamus, and nuclei of cerebellum. PACAP mRNA signals were weak to moderate in the hypothalamic anterior preoptic area and were absent in the pituitary. Castration induced an increase in the expression of PACAP and PAC1 receptor mRNAs in the hypothalamic anterior preoptic area after 3 days. Replacement with testosterone prevented the castration-induced changes. These results provide a molecular basis for studying the physiological functions of PACAP in frog brain and suggest that PACAP may be involved in the feedback regulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

  2. Profiling of adrenocorticotropic hormone and arginine vasopressin in human pituitary gland and tumor thin tissue sections using droplet-based liquid-microjunction surface-sampling-HPLC–ESI-MS–MS

    SciTech Connect

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Calligaris, David; Feldman, Daniel R.; Changelian, Armen; Laws, Edward R.; Santagata, Sandro; Agar, Nathalie Y. R.; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2015-06-18

    Described here are the results from the profiling of the proteins arginine vasopressin (AVP) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) from normal human pituitary gland and pituitary adenoma tissue sections using a fully automated droplet-based liquid microjunction surface sampling-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS system for spatially resolved sampling, HPLC separation, and mass spectral detection. Excellent correlation was found between the protein distribution data obtained with this droplet-based liquid microjunction surface sampling-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS system and those data obtained with matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) chemical imaging analyses of serial sections of the same tissue. The protein distributions correlated with the visible anatomic pattern of the pituitary gland. AVP was most abundant in the posterior pituitary gland region (neurohypophysis) and ATCH was dominant in the anterior pituitary gland region (adenohypophysis). The relative amounts of AVP and ACTH sampled from a series of ACTH secreting and non-secreting pituitary adenomas correlated with histopathological evaluation. ACTH was readily detected at significantly higher levels in regions of ACTH secreting adenomas and in normal anterior adenohypophysis compared to non-secreting adenoma and neurohypophysis. AVP was mostly detected in normal neurohypophysis as anticipated. This work demonstrates that a fully automated droplet-based liquid microjunction surface sampling system coupled to HPLC-ESI-MS/MS can be readily used for spatially resolved sampling, separation, detection, and semi-quantitation of physiologically-relevant peptide and protein hormones, such as AVP and ACTH, directly from human tissue. In addition, the relative simplicity, rapidity and specificity of the current methodology support the potential of this basic technology with further advancement for assisting surgical decision-making.

  3. Profiling of adrenocorticotropic hormone and arginine vasopressin in human pituitary gland and tumor thin tissue sections using droplet-based liquid-microjunction surface-sampling-HPLC–ESI-MS–MS

    DOE PAGES

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Calligaris, David; Feldman, Daniel R.; Changelian, Armen; Laws, Edward R.; Santagata, Sandro; Agar, Nathalie Y. R.; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2015-06-18

    Described here are the results from the profiling of the proteins arginine vasopressin (AVP) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) from normal human pituitary gland and pituitary adenoma tissue sections using a fully automated droplet-based liquid microjunction surface sampling-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS system for spatially resolved sampling, HPLC separation, and mass spectral detection. Excellent correlation was found between the protein distribution data obtained with this droplet-based liquid microjunction surface sampling-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS system and those data obtained with matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) chemical imaging analyses of serial sections of the same tissue. The protein distributions correlated with the visible anatomic pattern of the pituitary gland.more » AVP was most abundant in the posterior pituitary gland region (neurohypophysis) and ATCH was dominant in the anterior pituitary gland region (adenohypophysis). The relative amounts of AVP and ACTH sampled from a series of ACTH secreting and non-secreting pituitary adenomas correlated with histopathological evaluation. ACTH was readily detected at significantly higher levels in regions of ACTH secreting adenomas and in normal anterior adenohypophysis compared to non-secreting adenoma and neurohypophysis. AVP was mostly detected in normal neurohypophysis as anticipated. This work demonstrates that a fully automated droplet-based liquid microjunction surface sampling system coupled to HPLC-ESI-MS/MS can be readily used for spatially resolved sampling, separation, detection, and semi-quantitation of physiologically-relevant peptide and protein hormones, such as AVP and ACTH, directly from human tissue. In addition, the relative simplicity, rapidity and specificity of the current methodology support the potential of this basic technology with further advancement for assisting surgical decision-making.« less

  4. 60 YEARS OF NEUROENDOCRINOLOGY: TRH, the first hypophysiotropic releasing hormone isolated: control of the pituitary-thyroid axis.

    PubMed

    Joseph-Bravo, Patricia; Jaimes-Hoy, Lorraine; Uribe, Rosa-María; Charli, Jean-Louis

    2015-08-01

    This review presents the findings that led to the discovery of TRH and the understanding of the central mechanisms which control hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis (HPT) activity. The earliest studies on thyroid physiology are now dated a century ago when basal metabolic rate was associated with thyroid status. It took over 50 years to identify the key elements involved in the HPT axis. Thyroid hormones (TH: T4 and T3) were characterized first, followed by the semi-purification of TSH whose later characterization paralleled that of TRH. Studies on the effects of TH became possible with the availability of synthetic hormones. DNA recombinant techniques facilitated the identification of all the elements involved in the HPT axis, including their mode of regulation. Hypophysiotropic TRH neurons, which control the pituitary-thyroid axis, were identified among other hypothalamic neurons which express TRH. Three different deiodinases were recognized in various tissues, as well as their involvement in cell-specific modulation of T3 concentration. The role of tanycytes in setting TRH levels due to the activity of deiodinase type 2 and the TRH-degrading ectoenzyme was unraveled. TH-feedback effects occur at different levels, including TRH and TSH synthesis and release, deiodinase activity, pituitary TRH-receptor and TRH degradation. The activity of TRH neurons is regulated by nutritional status through neurons of the arcuate nucleus, which sense metabolic signals such as circulating leptin levels. Trh expression and the HPT axis are activated by energy demanding situations, such as cold and exercise, whereas it is inhibited by negative energy balance situations such as fasting, inflammation or chronic stress. New approaches are being used to understand the activity of TRHergic neurons within metabolic circuits. PMID:26101376

  5. Multihormonal pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Heitz, P U

    1979-01-01

    66 pituitary tumors detected at autopsy were investigated for the presence of corticotropin, beta-lipotrophin, growth hormone, prolactin, thyrotropin and gonadotropins by immunocytochemistry. 56 tumors contained hormone-producing cells; 45 were found to contain 2 or more hormones. This finding confirms and extends previous morphologic and clinical observations. The majority of pituitary tumors are mixed and they probably arise from impaired regulation at the hypothalamic and/or pituitary level.

  6. Mathematical model describing the thyroids-pituitary axis with distributed time delays in hormone transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neamţu, Mihaela; Stoian, Dana; Navolan, Dan Bogdan

    2014-12-01

    In the present paper we provide a mathematical model that describe the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis in autoimmune (Hashimoto's) thyroiditis. Since there is a spatial separation between thyroid and pituitary gland in the body, time is needed for transportation of thyrotropin and thyroxine between the glands. Thus, the distributed time delays are considered as both weak and Dirac kernels. The delayed model is analyzed regarding the stability and bifurcation behavior. The last part contains some numerical simulations to illustrate the effectiveness of our results and conclusions.

  7. Localization of the aromatase enzyme expression in the human pituitary gland and its effect on growth hormone, prolactin, and thyroid stimulating hormone axis.

    PubMed

    Caglar, Asli Sezgin; Kapucu, Aysegul; Dar, Kadriye Akgun; Ozkaya, Hande Mefkure; Caglar, Erkan; Ince, Haluk; Kadioglu, Pinar

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate aromatase expression in prolactin (PRL), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), and growth hormone (GH) secreting cells. Nontumoral human pituitary specimens were obtained from autopsy samples. Aromatase co-expression was determined by double immunohistochemical staining and assessed using H scores. H scores for GH-aromatase co-expression (GH-aromatase), TSH-aromatase co-expression (TSH-aromatase), and PRL-aromatase co-expression (PRL-aromatase) were 83.1 ± 13.1, 95.6 ± 16.1, and 83.7 ± 14.5, respectively. TSH producing cells exhibited the highest H score for co-expression of aromatase (p < 0.001). There was no gender difference in terms of H scores for aromatase expression and double immunohistochemical staining results (p > 0.05 for all). There was a negative correlation between the H scores for aromatase and PRL-aromatase, GH-aromatase and TSH-aromatase, respectively (r = -0.592, p < 0.001; r = -0.593, p < 0.001; r = -0.650, p < 0.001, respectively). Also, H scores for aromatase co-expression of each hormone were negatively correlated with the H scores for the corresponding hormone (r = -0.503, p < 0.001 for PRL-aromatase and PRL; r = -0.470, p < 0.001 for GH-aromatase, and GH; r = -0.641, p < 0.001 for TSH-aromatase and TSH). H scores for mean aromatase, GH-aromatase, TSH-aromatase were invariant of age (p > 0.05 for all). Age was negatively correlated with PRL-aromatase H score (r = -0.373, p = 0.008). Our study demonstrated significant aromatase co-expression in PRL, GH, and TSH secreting cells of the human anterior pituitary gland. The mutual paracrinal regulation between aromatase and three adenohypophyseal hormones indicates that aromatase may have a regulatory role on the synthesis and secretion of these hormones.

  8. Neurology of the pituitary.

    PubMed

    Samarasinghe, Shanika; Emanuele, Mary Ann; Mazhari, Alaleh

    2014-01-01

    The anterior pituitary hormones are essential for reproduction, growth, metabolic homeostasis, stress response, and adaptation to changes in the external environment. Each pituitary hormone is secreted in a distinctive pulsatile manner reflecting its regulation by the central nervous system through a complex interaction between hypothalamic neuroendocrine pathways, feedback effects from peripheral target gland hormones, and intrapituitary mechanisms. While the most common cause of a pituitary mass is an adenoma, the differential diagnosis is broad and includes pituitary hyperplasia, lymphocytic hypophysitis, craniopharyngioma among others. Patients with pituitary adenomas can be asymptomatic or present with symptoms due to mass effect, pituitary hormone dysfunction, or both. Prolactinomas represent 40% of pituitary adenomas, the majority of which are microadenomas. Hyperfunction of growth hormone and ACTH are far less common, while TSH-producing tumors are exceedingly rare. Hypopituitarism in patients with pituitary adenomas can be partial or complete. The clinical picture will depend on the type, degree, and rapidity of onset of pituitary hormone deficiency. An MRI specifically focused on the sellar region is the imaging modality of choice to detect pituitary pathology. Management of pituitary tumors ranges from observation of nonfunctioning microadenomas through medical, surgical, and radiotherapeutic approaches dependent on tumor type, function, size, and invasiveness.

  9. Effects of gonadal steroid hormones on the hypothalamo-pituitary-liver axis in the control of sex differences in hepatic steroid metabolism in the rat.

    PubMed

    Mode, A; Norstedt, G

    1982-11-01

    The site of action of gonadal hormones in the regulation of hepatic steroid metabolism was investigated by measuring the effects of (i) implantation of estradiol into the pituitary gland or anterior hypothalamus of males and (ii) subcutaneous injection of a synthetic androgen in differentiated male and female rats. The hepatic responses measured in vitro were 5 alpha-reduction, and 6 beta- and 16 alpha-hydroxylation of androstenedione. After intrapituitary or intrahypothalamic implantation of oestradiol, 5 alpha-reductase activity increased and 6 beta- and 16 alpha-hydroxylase activity decreased in males relative to the enzyme activities of cholesterol-implanted animals, indicating a feminizing effect of the oestrogen. This effect could not be accomplished by subcutaneous injection of the same oestrogen preparation. Deafferentation had no effect on hepatic steroid metabolism in females, but caused a feminization in males. In addition, subcutaneous treatment of intact females with the synthetic androgen caused masculinization of hepatic steroid metabolism, but was without effect in differentiated animals. Treatment with synthetic androgens had no effect on the hepatic steroid metabolism in differentiated male animals. Subcutaneous injection of a potent synthetic progestagen had little effect on hepatic steroid metabolism in intact females. It is concluded that oestrogen feminizes hepatic steroid metabolism by an action at the hypothalamic-pituitary level and that an intact hypothalamic-pituitary axis is required for the masculinizing action of the synthetic androgen on hepatic steroid metabolism. It is possible that the site of action of androgens is in the anterior hypothalamus or in adjacent areas of the brain.

  10. Single or group housing altered hormonal physiology and affected pituitary and interstitial cell kinetics

    EPA Science Inventory

    A significant negative correlation between testicular interstitial cell tumors and pituitary tumors in control male F344 rats has been reported associated with the number of animals per cage. Change in numbers of animals per cage may cause stress and increased serum corticosteroi...

  11. Prenatal development of gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptors in the rat anterior pituitary

    SciTech Connect

    Jennes, L. )

    1990-02-01

    The development of pituitary GnRH receptors was studied in the rat with in vitro and in vivo autoradiography. GnRH receptors were first seen in pituitary primordia of 13-day-old fetuses. The binding was specific and saturable and was abolished in the presence of 10 microM synthetic GnRH. To examine whether GnRH was available to the fetus, amnionic fluid was collected on days E 12-18. RIA analyses showed that GnRH levels in the amnionic fluid were low on days 12 and 13 (0-20 pM/ml) and rose to 225 pM/ml on day E 16 before they declined to 110 pM/ml on fetal day E 18. The highest levels of GnRH in the amnionic fluid on day E 16 coincided with the first appearance of immunoreactive LH cells, as determined by immunohistochemistry. Intravenous injection of 500 microliters amnionic fluid into pentobarbital-anesthetized adult rats caused a transient 40-60% increase in circulating serum LH in the recipient animal. To show that GnRH from the amnionic fluid has access to the developing pituitary, the 125I-labeled GnRH agonist Buserelin was injected into the amnionic fluid of 13-, 14-, and 15-day-old fetuses in the presence or absence of 10 microM unlabeled GnRH. Autoradiographic analysis of the fetal tissue indicated that the labeled GnRH agonist bound to specific receptors in the primordial pituitaries. The results suggest that the pituitary gonadotropes are differentiated before day E 13 because the expression of GnRH receptors is already an indication of cell determination. Since GnRH is present in the amnionic fluid in a biologically active form and can reach the fetal pituitary, it is concluded that GnRH may be an important factor determining the onset LH synthesis, but not the differentiation, of primordial pituitary cells.

  12. PPARG regulates gonadotropin-releasing hormone signaling in LbetaT2 cells in vitro and pituitary gonadotroph function in vivo in mice.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shweta; Sharma, Prem M; Mistry, Devendra S; Chang, R Jeffery; Olefsky, Jerrold M; Mellon, Pamela L; Webster, Nicholas J G

    2011-03-01

    Peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor gamma (PPARG) ligands improve insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetes and polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Despite clinical studies showing normalization of pituitary responsiveness to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in patients with PCOS, the precise role of PPARG in regulating the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis remains unclear. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the PPARG agonist rosiglitazone has a direct effect on the pituitary. In mouse LbetaT2 immortalized gonadotrophs, rosiglitazone treatment inhibited GnRH stimulation of the stress kinases p38MAPK and MAPKs/JNKs, but did not alter activation of ERKs, both in the presence and absence of activin. Furthermore, p38MAPK signaling was critical for both Lhb and Fshb promoter activity, and rosiglitazone suppressed the GnRH-mediated induction of Lhb and Fshb mRNA. Depletion of PPARG using a lentivirally encoded short hairpin RNA abolishes the effect of rosiglitazone to suppress activation of JNKs and induction of the transcription factors EGR1 and FOS as well as the gonadotropin genes Lhb and Fshb. Lastly, we show conditional knockout of Pparg in pituitary gonadotrophs caused an increase in luteinizing hormone levels in female mice, a decrease in follicle-stimulating hormone in male mice, and a fertility defect characterized by reduced litter size. Taken together, our data support a direct role for PPARG in modulating pituitary function in vitro and in vivo.

  13. Asparagine-linked oligosaccharides on lutropin, follitropin, and thyrotropin: structural elucidation of the sulfated and sialylated oligosaccharides on bovine, ovine, and human pituitary glycoprotein hormones

    SciTech Connect

    Green, E.D.; Baenziger, J.U.

    1988-01-05

    The authors have elucidated the structures of the anionic asparagine-linked oligosaccharides present on the glycoprotein hormones lutropin (luteinizing hormone), follitropin (follicle-stimulating hormone), and thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone). Purified hormones, isolated from bovine, ovine, and human pituitaries, were digested with N-glycanase, and the released oligosaccharides were reduced with NaB(/sup 3/H)/sub 4/. The /sup 3/H-labeled oligosaccharides from each hormone were then fractionated by anion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) into populations differing in the number of sulfate and/or sialic acid moieties. The sulfated, sialylated, and sulfated/sialylated structures, which together comprised 67-90% of the asparagine-linked oligosaccharides on the pituitary glycoprotein hormones, were highly heterogeneous and displayed hormone- as well as animal species-specific features. A previously uncharacterized dibranched oligosaccharide, bearing one residue each of sulfate and sialic acid, was found on all of the hormones except bovine lutropin. In this study, they describe the purification and detailed structural characterizations of the sulfated, sialylated, and sulfated/sialylated oligosaccharides found on lutropin, follitropin, and thyrotropin from several animal species.

  14. Prevalence of Pituitary Hormone Dysfunction, Metabolic Syndrome, and Impaired Quality of Life in Retired Professional Football Players: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Chaloner, Charlene; Evans, Diana; Mathews, Amy; Cohan, Pejman; Wang, Christina; Swerdloff, Ronald; Sim, Myung-Shin; Lee, Jihey; Wright, Mathew J.; Kernan, Claudia; Barkhoudarian, Garni; Yuen, Kevin C.J.; Guskiewicz, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Hypopituitarism is common after moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Herein, we address the association between mild TBI (mTBI) and pituitary and metabolic function in retired football players. Retirees 30–65 years of age, with one or more years of National Football League (NFL) play and poor quality of life (QoL) based on Short Form 36 (SF-36) Mental Component Score (MCS) were prospectively enrolled. Pituitary hormonal and metabolic syndrome (MetS) testing was performed. Using a glucagon stimulation test, growth hormone deficiency (GHD) was defined with a standard cut point of 3 ng/mL and with a more stringent body mass index (BMI)-adjusted cut point. Subjects with and without hormonal deficiency (HD) were compared in terms of QoL, International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) scores, metabolic parameters, and football career data. Of 74 subjects, 6 were excluded because of significant non-football-related TBIs. Of the remaining 68 subjects (mean age, 47.3±10.2 years; median NFL years, 5; median NFL concussions, 3; mean BMI, 33.8±6.0), 28 (41.2%) were GHD using a peak GH cutoff of <3 ng/mL. However, with a BMI-adjusted definition of GHD, 13 of 68 (19.1%) were GHD. Using this BMI-adjusted definition, overall HD was found in 16 (23.5%) subjects: 10 (14.7%) with isolated GHD; 3 (4.4%) with isolated hypogonadism; and 3 (4.4%) with both GHD and hypogonadism. Subjects with HD had lower mean scores on the IIEF survey (p=0.016) and trended toward lower scores on the SF-36 MCS (p=0.113). MetS was present in 50% of subjects, including 5 of 6 (83%) with hypogonadism, and 29 of 62 (46.8%) without hypogonadism (p=0.087). Age, BMI, median years in NFL, games played, number of concussions, and acknowledged use of performance-enhancing steroids were similar between HD and non-HD groups. In summary, in this cohort of retired NFL players with poor QoL, 23.5% had HD, including 19% with GHD (using a BMI-adjusted definition), 9% with hypogonadism, and

  15. Prevalence of pituitary hormone dysfunction, metabolic syndrome, and impaired quality of life in retired professional football players: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Daniel F; Chaloner, Charlene; Evans, Diana; Mathews, Amy; Cohan, Pejman; Wang, Christina; Swerdloff, Ronald; Sim, Myung-Shin; Lee, Jihey; Wright, Mathew J; Kernan, Claudia; Barkhoudarian, Garni; Yuen, Kevin C J; Guskiewicz, Kevin

    2014-07-01

    Hypopituitarism is common after moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Herein, we address the association between mild TBI (mTBI) and pituitary and metabolic function in retired football players. Retirees 30-65 years of age, with one or more years of National Football League (NFL) play and poor quality of life (QoL) based on Short Form 36 (SF-36) Mental Component Score (MCS) were prospectively enrolled. Pituitary hormonal and metabolic syndrome (MetS) testing was performed. Using a glucagon stimulation test, growth hormone deficiency (GHD) was defined with a standard cut point of 3 ng/mL and with a more stringent body mass index (BMI)-adjusted cut point. Subjects with and without hormonal deficiency (HD) were compared in terms of QoL, International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) scores, metabolic parameters, and football career data. Of 74 subjects, 6 were excluded because of significant non-football-related TBIs. Of the remaining 68 subjects (mean age, 47.3±10.2 years; median NFL years, 5; median NFL concussions, 3; mean BMI, 33.8±6.0), 28 (41.2%) were GHD using a peak GH cutoff of <3 ng/mL. However, with a BMI-adjusted definition of GHD, 13 of 68 (19.1%) were GHD. Using this BMI-adjusted definition, overall HD was found in 16 (23.5%) subjects: 10 (14.7%) with isolated GHD; 3 (4.4%) with isolated hypogonadism; and 3 (4.4%) with both GHD and hypogonadism. Subjects with HD had lower mean scores on the IIEF survey (p=0.016) and trended toward lower scores on the SF-36 MCS (p=0.113). MetS was present in 50% of subjects, including 5 of 6 (83%) with hypogonadism, and 29 of 62 (46.8%) without hypogonadism (p=0.087). Age, BMI, median years in NFL, games played, number of concussions, and acknowledged use of performance-enhancing steroids were similar between HD and non-HD groups. In summary, in this cohort of retired NFL players with poor QoL, 23.5% had HD, including 19% with GHD (using a BMI-adjusted definition), 9% with hypogonadism, and 50% had Met

  16. Cortisol augments synthesis of growth hormone, but does not alter synthesis of prolactin and proopiomelanocortin, in the 120- to 125-day fetal ovine pituitary.

    PubMed

    Miller, W L; Leisti, S

    1984-07-01

    In adult animal pituitaries or in cultured pituitary tumor cells, glucocorticoids are regulators of GH, PRL, and proopiomelancortin (POMC) synthesis. However, ovine fetal plasma cortisol concentrations are low until shortly before parturition, suggesting that cortisol may not normally regulate hormone synthesis in the fetal pituitary. To investigate whether cortisol could affect fetal synthesis of GH, PRL, and POMC, we obtained fetal pituitary tissue from normal fetuses and from fetuses which had received cortisol infusion for 48 h. Tissues were labeled in short term organ culture and the newly synthesized proteins were displayed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Results were quantified by computerized integration of the area and density of the autoradiographic spots after high resolution television scanning. Cortisol infusion augmented synthesis of GH in comparison to controls (P = 0.01), but did not alter PRL synthesis. Cortisol also did not inhibit POMC synthesis in either the anterior pituitary or the neurointermediate lobe. These data suggest that the pituitary-adrenocortical slow feedback inhibition of POMC synthesis is not functional in the ovine fetus at 120 to 125-days gestation, but that pituitary somatotropes are responsive to glucocorticoids at this stage of fetal development. PMID:6734516

  17. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) stimulates cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript gene (CART1) expression through CRH type 1 receptor (CRHR1) in chicken anterior pituitary.

    PubMed

    Mo, Chunheng; Cai, Guoqing; Huang, Long; Deng, Qiuyang; Lin, Dongliang; Cui, Lin; Wang, Yajun; Li, Juan

    2015-12-01

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptide(s) is generally viewed as neuropeptide(s) and can control food intake in vertebrates, however, our recent study revealed that CART1 peptide is predominantly expressed in chicken anterior pituitary, suggesting that cCART1 peptide is a novel pituitary hormone in chickens and its expression is likely controlled by hypothalamic factor(s). To test this hypothesis, in this study, we examined the spatial expression of CART1 in chicken anterior pituitary and investigated the effect of hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) on pituitary cCART1 expression. The results showed that: 1) CART1 is expressed in both caudal and cephalic lobes of chicken anterior pituitary, revealed by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), western blot and immuno-histochemical staining; 2) CRH potently stimulates cCART1 mRNA expression in cultured chick pituitary cells, as examined by qPCR, and this effect is blocked by CP154526 (and not K41498), an antagonist specific for chicken CRH type I receptor (cCRHR1), suggesting that cCRHR1 expressed on corticotrophs mediates this action; 3) the stimulatory effect of CRH on pituitary cCART1 expression is inhibited by pharmacological drugs targeting the intracellular AC/cAMP/PKA, PLC/IP3/Ca(2+), and MEK/ERK signaling pathways. This finding, together with the functional coupling of these signaling pathways to cCRHR1 expressed in CHO cells demonstrated by luciferase reporter assay systems, indicates that these intracellular signaling pathways coupled to cCRHR1 can mediate CRH action. Collectively, our present study offers the first substantial evidence that hypothalamic CRH can stimulate pituitary CART1 expression via activation of CRHR1 in a vertebrate species.

  18. Pituitary Tumors: Condition Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... stress. Growth hormone helps control body growth and metabolism. Thyroid-stimulating hormone is involved in growth, body temperature, and heart rate. Nonfunctioning pituitary tumors (also called nonsecretory tumors) do ...

  19. Effects of irradiation and semistarvation on rat thyrotropin beta subunit messenger ribonucleic acid, pituitary thyrotropin content, and thyroid hormone levels

    SciTech Connect

    Litten, R.Z. ); Carr, F.E. ); Fein, H.G.; Smallridge, R.C. )

    1990-01-01

    The effect of radiation-induced anorexia on serum thyrotropin (TSH), pituitary TSH-{beta} mRNA, pituitary TSH content, serum thyroxine (T{sub 4}), and serum 3,5,3{prime}-triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}) was investigated using feed-matched controls. Rats received 10 Gy gamma whole-body irradiation and were examined 1-3 days postirradiation. Feed-matched and untreated controls were also studied. The average food intake of the irradiated and feed-matched groups was approximately 18% of the untreated controls. Over the three day period both the irradiated and feed-matched groups lost a significant amount of body weight. The serum T{sub 4} levels of both the irradiated and feed-matched groups were not significantly different from each other, but were significantly depressed when compared to the untreated control group. The serum TSH and T{sub 3} were, however, significantly greater in the irradiated than the feed-matched groups at day 3 posttreatment. To determine if the difference in the serum TSH level between the two groups was due to a pretranslational alteration in TSH production, we measured the TSH-{beta} mRNA using an RNA blot hybridization assay. We found that the TSH-{beta} mRNA level was the same in the irradiated and feed-matched groups, suggesting that the mechanism responsible for the radiation-induced increase in the serum TSH level is posttranscriptional. Pituitary TSH content in the irradiated rats was significantly less than in pair-fed controls, suggesting that irradiation may permit enhanced secretion of stored hormone.

  20. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and sex hormones in chronic stress and obesity: pathophysiological and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Pasquali, Renato

    2012-08-01

    Obesity, particularly the abdominal phenotype, has been ascribed to an individual maladaptation to chronic environmental stress exposure mediated by a dysregulation of related neuroendocrine axes. Alterations in the control and action of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis play a major role in this context, with the participation of the sympathetic nervous system. The ability to adapt to chronic stress may differ according to sex, with specific pathophysiological events leading to the development of stress-related chronic diseases. This seems to be influenced by the regulatory effects of sex hormones, particularly androgens. Stress may also disrupt the control of feeding, with some differences according to sex. Finally, the amount of experimental data in both animals and humans may help to shed more light on specific phenotypes of obesity, strictly related to the chronic exposure to stress. This challenge may potentially imply a different pathophysiological perspective and, possibly, a specific treatment.

  1. Anophthalmia, hearing loss, abnormal pituitary development and response to growth hormone therapy in three children with microdeletions of 14q22q23

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Microdeletions of 14q22q23 have been associated with eye abnormalities and pituitary defects. Other phenotypic features in deletion carriers including hearing loss and response to growth hormone therapy are less well recognized. We studied genotype and phenotype of three newly identified children with 14q22q23 deletions, two girls and one boy with bilateral anophthalmia, and compared them with previously published deletion patients and individuals with intragenic defects in genes residing in the region. Results The three deletions were de novo and ranged in size between 5.8 and 8.9 Mb. All three children lacked one copy of the OTX2 gene and in one of them the deletion involved also the BMP4 gene. All three patients presented partial conductive hearing loss which tended to improve with age. Analysis of endocrine and growth phenotypes showed undetectable anterior pituitary, growth hormone deficiency and progressive growth retardation in all three patients. Growth hormone therapy led to partial catch-up growth in two of the three patients but just prevented further height loss in the third. Conclusions The pituitary hypoplasia, growth hormone deficiency and growth retardation associated with 14q22q23 microdeletions are very remarkable, and the latter appears to have an atypical response to growth hormone therapy in some of the cases. PMID:24581273

  2. Thyroid hormone status and pituitary function in adult rats given oral doses of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) is widely distributed and persistent in humans and wildlife. Prior toxicological studies have reported decreased total and free thyroid hormones in serum without a major compensatory rise in thyrotropin (TSH) or altered thyroid gland histology. Alt...

  3. Effects of spaceflight on hypothalamic peptide systems controlling pituitary growth hormone dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawchenko, P. E.; Arias, C.; Krasnov, I.; Grindeland, R. E.; Vale, W.

    1992-01-01

    Possible effects of reduced gravity on central hypophysiotropic systems controlling growth hormone (GH) secretion were investigated in rats flown on Cosmos 1887 and 2044 biosatellites. Immunohistochemical (IHC)staining for the growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF), somatostatin (SS), and other hypothalamic hormones was performed on hypothalami obtained from rats. IHC analysis was complemented by quantitative in situ assessments of mRNAs encoding the precursors for these hormones. Data obtained suggest that exposure to microgravity causes a preferential reduction in GRF peptide and mRNA levels in hypophysiotropic neurons, which may contribute to impared GH secretion in animals subjected to spaceflight. Effects of weightlessness are not mimicked by hindlimb suspension in this system.

  4. Endocrine disrupting effects of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane analogues on gonadotropin hormones in pituitary gonadotrope cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jinghua; Yang, Ye; Xiong, Kang; Liu, Jing

    2014-05-01

    It has been shown that exposure to dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) analogues leads to disharmony of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH). However, the effects and mechanisms of DDT analogues on the expression of gonadotropin genes (FSHβ, LHβ and Cgα), which is the rate-limiting step of FSH and LH biosynthesis, remain unknown. In this study, we assessed the effects of p,p'-DDT, o,p'-DDT, p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE) and methoxychlor (MXC) on gonadotropin genes expression and hormones synthesis in gonadotrope cells. p,p'-DDT and MXC at test concentrations ranging from 10(-9) to 10(-7)mol/L, stimulated gonadotropin genes expression and hormones synthesis in a dose-dependent manner. The activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) was required for the induction of gonadotropin genes expression and hormones synthesis by p,p'-DDT or MXC exposure. This study showed for the first time that p,p'-DDT and MXC regulated gonadotropin genes expression and hormones synthesis through ERK pathway in gonadotrope cells.

  5. Growth hormone- and prolactin-producing cells in the pituitary gland of striped bass (Morone saxatilis): immunocytochemical characterization at different life stages.

    PubMed

    Huang, L; Specker, J L

    1994-05-01

    The striped bass (Morone saxatilis) is a seasonally breeding, long-lived, anadromous fish of growing economic importance. To describe the apparent activities of growth hormone (GH)- and prolactin (PRL)-producing cells, pituitaries were collected from captive juveniles and from wild adult fish in late spring off the Rhode Island coast during their coastal migration and in the Hudson River during the spawning migration. GH and PRL were separated by reversed-phase HPLC of pituitary extracts from captive adults and characterized as having apparent molecular masses of 23 kDa (GH) and 26 kDa (PRL) by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Antisera generated in rabbits against synthetic fragments of GH and PRL188 from tilapia were shown by Western blot analysis of reversed-phase HPLC-purified striped bass GH and PRL and of striped bass pituitary extract to be specific for the appropriate hormone and were used to localize GH and PRL cells. GH cells and PRL cells lie in the proximal pars distalis and the rostral pars distalis, respectively. Small clusters of GH- and PRL-immunoreactive cells were found at ectopic sites within the pituitary. There were many intensely labeled GH cells in the pituitaries of juvenile and adult striped bass, whereas the immunoreactivity of GH cells in the pituitaries of spawning fish decreased. PRL cells in juvenile fish kept in fresh water had big, round-nuclei, and were heavily labeled, indicating that they were active. PRL cells in adult fish from seawater were also intensely labeled, but had kidney-shaped nuclei, indicating inactivity. PRL cells in fish from the spawning ground had polymorphic nuclei, appearing as round, indented or kidney-shaped forms, and they were unevenly and lightly labeled, suggesting highly variable stages of activity. No difference was found between males and females. The apparent activities of GH- and PRL-producing cells differ among these life stages, suggesting changing roles for the hormones.

  6. Gonadotropin-Releasing hormones in the brain and pituitary of the white sucker

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, T. Craig; Tobet, Stuart A.; Chase, Cindy; Waldron, Travis; Sower, Stacia A.

    2000-01-01

    The present study investigated GnRH forms within the brain of a representative of the order Cypriniformes, the white sucker, Catostomus commersoni, using HPLC, RIA, andimmunocytochemistry. Several immunoreactive (ir) GnRH forms were identified in the brain of the white sucker by chromatography and radioimmunoassay, including ir-salmon GnRH, ir-lamprey GnRH-I and -III, and ir-chicken GnRH-II. Results from immunocytochemical studies were consistent with multiple GnRH forms distributed in different patterns, particularly for fibers. Neuronal perikarya containing ir-salmon GnRH and ir-lamprey-like GnRH were found laterally within the preoptic area and rostralhypothalamus. Cells containing exclusively ir-salmon GnRH appeared slightly more rostrally, but in the same region. Fibers containing ir-salmon GnRH and ir-lamprey-like GnRH were seen throughout the caudal telencephalon and extended into thediencephalon, toward the pituitary. Fibers containing ir-chicken-II-like GnRH were also seen in the caudal telencephalon, but were concentrated more dorsally in the diencephalon. Within the pituitary, fibers containing ir-salmon GnRH and ir-lamprey-like GnRH entered the neurohypophysis, but differed in their destinations. Fibers containing ir-salmon GnRH remained within the neurohypophysis, while fibers containing ir-lamprey-like GnRH targeted adenohypophyseal tissue. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that multiple GnRH forms with multiple functions exist within the brain and pituitary of teleosts and provide further evidence of a lamprey-like GnRH within an early evolved teleost species.

  7. Murine sex-limited protein expression requires androgens and pituitary hormones.

    PubMed

    Danoff, T M; Goldman, M B; Goldman, J N

    1986-01-01

    Levels of the murine sex-limited protein (Slp) were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in normal and hypophysectomized female CDF1 (Slpa) mice before and after a 15-day treatment with testosterone proprionate. Both groups of mice initially had undetectable levels of circulating Slp. After treatment, Slp serum levels of the nonhypophysectomized group had risen significantly above the Slp serum levels of the hypophysectomized group and the pretreatment controls. This indicates that the pituitary gland is necessary for the androgen-induced expression of Slp.

  8. Effects of aqueous extract from Asparagus officinalis L. roots on hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis hormone levels and the number of ovarian follicles in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Karimi Jashni, Hojatollah; Kargar Jahromi, Hossein; Ghorbani Ranjbary, Ali; Kargar Jahromi, Zahra; Khabbaz Kherameh, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Asparagus is a plant with high nutritional, pharmaceutical, and industrial values. Objective: The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of aqueous extract of asparagus roots on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis hormones and oogenesis in female rats. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 40 adult female Wistar rats were divided into five groups, which consist 8 rats. Groups included control, sham and three experimental groups receiving different doses (100, 200, 400 mg/kg/bw) of aqueous extract of asparagus roots. All dosages were administered orally for 28 days. Blood samples were taken from rats to evaluate serum levels of Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH), follicular stimulating hormone (FSH), Luteinal hormone (LH), estrogen, and progesterone hormones. The ovaries were removed, weighted, sectioned, and studied by light microscope. Results: Dose-dependent aqueous extract of asparagus roots significantly increased serum levels of GnRH, FSH, LH, estrogen, and progestin hormones compared to control and sham groups. Increase in number of ovarian follicles and corpus luteum in groups treated with asparagus root extract was also observed (p<0.05). Conclusion: Asparagus roots extract stimulates secretion of hypothalamic- pituitary- gonadal axis hormones. This also positively affects oogenesis in female rats. PMID:27200420

  9. Localization of gonadotrophic hormones in the dog pituitary gland. A study using immunoenzyme histochemistry and chemical staining.

    PubMed

    El Etreby, M F; Fath El Bab, M R

    1977-09-26

    Using the immunoperoxidase technique and antisera to the specific beta (beta) subunits of FSH and LH1, selective immunochemical staining was localized mostly in the same cell type in the pars distalis and pars tuberalis of the dog pituitary gland. However, some cells were consistently shown to react solely with antisera to either LH beta of FSH beta. The cells stained for FSH beta were at least 1.5 times less numerous than those shown to contain LH beta. In the pars distalis of adult male dogs the immunoreactive gonadotrophs varied greatly in their relative proportion and were mostly shown to be much less numerous than in bitches in the anestrus phase of the sexual cycle. These cells were found to be positive to aldehyde fuchsin, alcian blue, periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) and aniline blue. The performic acid-alcian blue (pH 0.2)-PAS-orange G procedure stained the FSH/LH cells blue or turquoise, demonstrating TSH cells (blue-purple), ACTH/MSH cells (red-purple) and PRL cells (orange-red). The FSH/LH cells were further differentiated from other functional cell types of the pars distalis on the basis of their typical cytological features, intraglandular distribution and by immunochemical double staining. These observations support the concept that the one cell-one hormone theory may not apply to gonadotrophic hormones, although some cells seem to be the source of either FSH or LH.

  10. Heroin and naltrexone effects on pituitary-gonadal hormones in man: interaction of steroid feedback effects, tolerance and supersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Mendelson, J H; Ellingboe, J; Kuehnle, J C; Mello, N K

    1980-09-01

    The acute and chronic effects of heroin, and the opiate antagonist naltrexone, on integrated plasma samples analyzed for luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone (T) levels were studied in six adult males with a history of heroin addiction. Acute doses of heroin (10 mg i.v.) significantly suppressed LH levels. Chronic heroin use was also associated with a significant decrease in plasma T levels. LH levels after chronic heroin use were lower than control levels but the degree of LH suppression was approximately the same as after the acute doses of heroin. Acute naltrexone administration did not alter T levels appreciably but was associated with a significant elevation in LH levels. After 22 days of chronic naltrexone maintenance, T levels were in the high normal range and LH levels were in the low normal range. These data suggest the development of tolerance and supersensitivity to opiate agonist and antagonist effects on pituitary-gonadal hormones involves interaction between the direct effects of these drugs on LH followed by steroid feedback effects of T on gonadotrophin secretory activity. PMID:7400959

  11. Quantifying Pituitary-Adrenal Dynamics and Deconvolution of Concurrent Cortisol and Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Data by Compressed Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Faghih, Rose T.; Dahleh, Munther A.; Adler, Gail K.; Klerman, Elizabeth B.; Brown, Emery N.

    2015-01-01

    Pulsatile release of cortisol from the adrenal glands is governed by pulsatile release of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) from the anterior pituitary. In return, cortisol has a negative feedback effect on ACTH release. Simultaneous recording of ACTH and cortisol is not typical, and determining the number, timing, and amplitudes of pulsatile events from simultaneously recorded data is challenging because of several factors: (I) stimulator ACTH pulse activity, (II) kinematics of ACTH and cortisol, (III) the sampling interval, and (IV) the measurement error. We model ACTH and cortisol secretion simultaneously using a linear differential equations model with Gaussian errors and sparse pulsatile events as inputs to the model. We propose a novel framework for recovering pulses and parameters underlying the interactions between ACTH and cortisol. We recover the timing and amplitudes of pulses using compressed sensing, and employ generalized cross validation for determining the number of pulses. We analyze serum ACTH and cortisol levels sampled at 10-minute intervals over 24 hours from 10 healthy women. We recover physiologically plausible timing and amplitudes for these pulses and model the feedback effect of cortisol. We recover 15 to 18 pulses over 24 hours, which is highly consistent with the results of another cortisol data analysis approach. Modeling the interactions between ACTH and cortisol allows for accurate quantification of pulsatile events, and normal and pathological states. This could lay the basis for a more physiologically-based approach for administering cortisol therapeutically. The proposed approach can be adapted to deconvolve other pairs of hormones with similar interactions. PMID:25935025

  12. Gps mutations in Chilean patients harboring growth hormone-secreting pituitary tumors.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M C; Codner, E; Eggers, M; Mosso, L; Rodriguez, J A; Cassorla, F

    1999-01-01

    Hypersecretion of GH is usually caused by a pituitary adenoma and about 40% of these tumors exhibit missense gsp mutations in Arg201 or Gln227 of the Gs, gene. We studied 20 pituitary tumors obtained from patients with GH hypersecretion. One tumor was resected from an 11 year-old boy with a 3 year history of accelerated growth, associated with increased concentrations of serum GH and IGF-I, which were not suppressed by glucose administration. The remaining 19 tumors were obtained from adult acromegalic patients, who had elevated baseline serum GH levels that did not show evidence of suppression after administration of glucose. The gsp mutations were studied by enzymatic digestion of the amplified PCR fragment of exon 8 (Arg201) and exon 9 (Gln227) with the enzymes NlaIII and NgoAIV, respectively. The tumors obtained from the boy and from nine of the 19 patients with acromegaly exhibited the gsp mutation R201H. None of the tumors had the Gln227 mutation. The gsp positive patients tended to be older, had smaller tumors, and had preoperative basal serum GH levels which were significantly lower (21 +/- 6 vs 56 +/- 16 microg/l, p<0.05) than the gsp negative patients. In this study, we documented the presence of a gsp mutation in Arg201 in a boy with gigantism and in approximately half of 19 Chilean adult patients with acromegaly, similar to other populations. PMID:10821217

  13. A reference preparation of buffalo pituitary follicle stimulating hormone using lectin affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chand, Hitendra S; Chaudhary, Rajesh; Muralidhar, K

    2005-01-01

    An improved and cost effective method to isolate FSH from buffalo pituitary glands is described here. The buFSH activity was monitored throughout by a highly sensitive heterologous radioimmunoassay (sensitivity 0.2 ng oFSH/mL) and the in vivo biological activity of the final preparation was also established. A biologically active buFSH-enriched preparation with a moderate recovery (42%) was obtained. The yield of the final buFSH-enriched preparation was 26.5 mg/kg of buffalo pituitary gland. In SDS-PAGE, the purified buFSH resolved as a heterodimer of 30 kDa molecular size, with a 21 kDa presumptive alpha-subunit. This preparation was also characterized in terms of biological and some of its physicochemical properties. A high-titer antiserum to buFSH was also raised in rabbit using this preparation. The reagents generated, buFSH and buFSH-specific polyclonal antisera, have possible diagnostic and therapeutic usage for improvement of reproductive health of water buffaloes.

  14. Effects of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone outside the hypothalamic-pituitary-reproductive axis.

    PubMed

    Skinner, D C; Albertson, A J; Navratil, A; Smith, A; Mignot, M; Talbott, H; Scanlan-Blake, N

    2009-03-01

    Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is a hypothalamic decapeptide with an undisputed role as a primary regulator of gonadal function. It exerts this regulation by controlling the release of gonadotrophins. However, it is becoming apparent that GnRH may have a variety of other vital roles in normal physiology. A reconsideration of the potential widespread action that this traditional reproductive hormone exerts may lead to the generation of novel therapies and provide insight into seemingly incongruent outcomes from current treatments using GnRH analogues to combat diseases such as prostate cancer.

  15. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis response to acute psychosocial stress: Effects of biological sex and circulating sex hormones.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Mary Ann C; Mahon, Pamela B; McCaul, Mary E; Wand, Gary S

    2016-04-01

    Dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis influences the risk for developing stress-related disorders. Sex-dependent differences in the HPA axis stress response are believed to contribute to the different prevalence rates of stress-related disorders found in men and women. However, studies examining the HPA axis stress response have shown mixed support for sex differences, and the role of endogenous sex hormones on HPA axis response has not been adequately examined in humans. This study utilized the largest sample size to date to analyze the effects of biological sex and sex hormones on HPA axis social stress responses. Healthy, 18- to 30- year-old community volunteers (N=282) completed the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), a widely used and well-validated stress-induction laboratory procedure. All women (n=135) were tested during the follicular phase of their menstrual cycle (when progesterone levels are most similar to men). Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol measures were collected at multiple points throughout pre- and post-TSST. Testosterone and progesterone (in men) and progesterone and estradiol (in women) were determined pre-TSST. Following the TSST, men had greater ACTH and cortisol levels than women. Men had steeper baseline-to-peak and peak-to-end ACTH and cortisol response slopes than women; there was a trend for more cortisol responders among men than women. Testosterone negatively correlated with salivary cortisol response in men, while progesterone negatively correlated with ACTH and cortisol responses in women. These data confirm that men show more robust activation of the HPA axis response to the TSST than do women in the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. Testosterone results suggest an inhibitory effect on HPA axis reactivity in men. Progesterone results suggest an inhibitory effect on HPA axis reactivity in women. Future work is needed to explain why men mount a greater ACTH and cortisol response to the

  16. Alterations in hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal/thyroid axes and gonadotropin-releasing hormone in the patients with primary insomnia: a clinical research.

    PubMed

    Xia, Lan; Chen, Gui-Hai; Li, Zhi-Hua; Jiang, Song; Shen, Jianhua

    2013-01-01

    The hypothalamus-pituitary-target gland axis is thought to be linked with insomnia, yet there has been a lack of further systematic studies to prove this. This study included 30 patients with primary insomnia (PI), 30 patients with depression-comorbid insomnia (DCI), and 30 healthy controls for exploring the alterations in the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal/thyroid axes' hormones and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was used to evaluate sleep quality in all subjects. The serum concentrations of corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH), thyrotrophin-releasing hormone (TRH), GnRH, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), cortisol, total triiodothyronine (TT3), and total thyroxine (TT4) in the morning (between 0730 h and 0800 h) were detected. Compared to the controls, all hormonal levels were elevated in the insomniacs, except ACTH and TSH in the PI group. Compared to the DCI patients, the PI patients had higher levels of CRH, cortisol, TT3, and TT4 but lower levels of TRH, GnRH, and ACTH. Spearman's correlation analysis indicated that CRH, TRH, GnRH, TSH, cortisol, TT4, and TT3 were positively correlated with the severity of insomnia. The linear regression analysis showed that only CRH, GnRH, cortisol, and TT3 were affected by the PSQI scores among all subjects, and only CRH was included in the regression model by the "stepwise" method in the insomnia patients. Our results indicated that PI patients may have over-activity of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal/thyroid axes and an elevated level of GnRH in the morning.

  17. Concentrations of the adrenocorticotropic hormone, corticosterone and sex steroid hormones and the expression of the androgen receptor in the pituitary and adrenal glands of male turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) during growth and development.

    PubMed

    Kiezun, J; Kaminska, B; Jankowski, J; Dusza, L

    2015-01-01

    Androgens take part in the regulation of puberty and promote growth and development. They play their biological role by binding to a specific androgen receptor (AR). The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of AR mRNA and protein in the pituitary and adrenal glands, to localize AR protein in luteinizing hormone (LH)-producing pituitary and adrenocortical cells, to determine plasma concentrations of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone and the concentrations of corticosterone, testosterone (T), androstenedione (A4) and oestradiol (E2) in the adrenal glands of male turkeys at the age of 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24 and 28weeks. The concentrations of hormones and the expression of AR varied during development. The expression of AR mRNA and protein in pituitary increased during the growth. The increase of AR mRNA levels in pituitary occurred earlier than increase of AR protein. The percentage of pituitary cells expressing ARs in the population of LH-secreting cells increased in week 20. It suggests that AR expression in LH-producing pituitary cells is determined by the phase of development. The drop in adrenal AR mRNA and protein expression was accompanied by an increase in the concentrations of adrenal androgens. Those results could point to the presence of a compensatory mechanism that enables turkeys to avoid the potentially detrimental effects of high androgen concentrations. Our results will expand our knowledge of the role of steroids in the development of the reproductive system of turkeys from the first month of age until maturity.

  18. Concentrations of the adrenocorticotropic hormone, corticosterone and sex steroid hormones and the expression of the androgen receptor in the pituitary and adrenal glands of male turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) during growth and development.

    PubMed

    Kiezun, J; Kaminska, B; Jankowski, J; Dusza, L

    2015-01-01

    Androgens take part in the regulation of puberty and promote growth and development. They play their biological role by binding to a specific androgen receptor (AR). The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of AR mRNA and protein in the pituitary and adrenal glands, to localize AR protein in luteinizing hormone (LH)-producing pituitary and adrenocortical cells, to determine plasma concentrations of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone and the concentrations of corticosterone, testosterone (T), androstenedione (A4) and oestradiol (E2) in the adrenal glands of male turkeys at the age of 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24 and 28weeks. The concentrations of hormones and the expression of AR varied during development. The expression of AR mRNA and protein in pituitary increased during the growth. The increase of AR mRNA levels in pituitary occurred earlier than increase of AR protein. The percentage of pituitary cells expressing ARs in the population of LH-secreting cells increased in week 20. It suggests that AR expression in LH-producing pituitary cells is determined by the phase of development. The drop in adrenal AR mRNA and protein expression was accompanied by an increase in the concentrations of adrenal androgens. Those results could point to the presence of a compensatory mechanism that enables turkeys to avoid the potentially detrimental effects of high androgen concentrations. Our results will expand our knowledge of the role of steroids in the development of the reproductive system of turkeys from the first month of age until maturity. PMID:25776460

  19. Somatotroph pituitary tumors in budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus).

    PubMed

    Langohr, I M; Garner, M M; Kiupel, M

    2012-05-01

    A series of 11 pituitary tumors in budgerigars were classified on the basis of their clinical, gross, microscopic, and immunohistochemical characteristics. Affected birds were young to middle-aged. Clinically, neurologic signs--including difficulties flying, ataxia, and blindness--were most commonly reported. Additional clinical signs included weight loss, abnormal feathers or molting, increased respiratory efforts, and exophthalmos. Nine birds were diagnosed with chromophobic pituitary adenomas, and 2 birds had chromophobic pituitary carcinomas. Only 1 tumor was delimited to the pituitary gland; the other 10 variably invaded the brain, skull, and retrobulbar space. Distant metastases were identified in 2 birds. All tumors were immunohistochemically strongly positive for growth hormone, consistent with the diagnosis of somatotroph tumors. The common occurrence and early onset may suggest a genetic predisposition of budgerigars to develop somatotroph pituitary tumors with a high incidence of local invasion and with metastatic potential. PMID:21900544

  20. Age-related changes in the concentrations of cytosol receptors for sex steroid hormones in the hypothalamus and pituitary gland of the rat.

    PubMed

    Haji, M; Kato, K I; Nawata, H; Ibayashi, H

    1981-01-12

    Estrogen and androgen receptors were measured in cytosols from hypothalamus, pituitary and uterus or prostate of rats at 3 stages in life, from 90 to 650 days old in females and from 90 to 550 days old in males. Saturation analysis of cytosol 17 beta-estradiol receptors in females demonstrated a significant age-associated reduction in maximum binding capacity in hypothalamus and uterus already at 300-330 days of life, but there was no significant change in pituitary gland. However, there was no difference in binding affinity, steroid specificity, sedimentation coefficient, chemical nature and heat lability of cytosol 17 beta-estradiol binding of these tissues among the 3 age groups. In males, each receptor for 17 beta-estradiol, testosterone and 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone was isolated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation from hypothalamic, pituitary and prostate cytosols. These receptors showed the same sedimentation coefficient of 8-9S in all age groups. Androgen binding by cytosols already decreased at 300-330 days of life, but estrogen binding was lower at 500-550 days of life than in younger adults. The increase in the serum luteinizing hormone level after gonadectomy was significantly depressed with aging in both females and males. These findings suggested that the age-associated reduction in cytosol sex steroid hormone receptors was ascribable to changes of numbers of binding sites. These age-related changes may be concerned with feedback system dysfunction of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in aged rats.

  1. Pituitary diseases and bone.

    PubMed

    Mazziotti, Gherardo; Chiavistelli, Silvia; Giustina, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    Pituitary hormones have direct and indirect effects on bone remodeling, and skeletal fragility is a frequent complication of pituitary diseases. Fragility fractures may occur in many patients with prolactinomas, acromegaly, Cushing disease, and hypopituitarism. As in other forms of secondary osteoporosis, pituitary diseases generally affect bone quality more than bone quantity, and fractures may occur even in the presence of normal or low-normal bone mineral density, making difficult the prediction of fractures in these settings. Treatment of excess and defective pituitary hormone generally improves skeletal health, although some patients remain at high risk for fractures, necessitating treatment with bone-active drugs.

  2. Distribution of LPXRFa, a gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone ortholog peptide, and LPXRFa receptor in the brain and pituitary of the tilapia.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Satoshi; Sivalingam, Mageswary; Biran, Jakob; Golan, Matan; Anthonysamy, Rachel Shalini; Levavi-Sivan, Berta; Parhar, Ishwar S

    2016-10-01

    In vertebrates, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH), respectively, regulate reproduction in positive and negative manners. GnIH belongs to the LPXRFa family of peptides previously identified in mammalian and nonmammalian vertebrates. Studying the detailed distribution of LPXRFa as well as its receptor (LPXRFa-R) in the brain and pituitary is important for understanding their multiple action sites and potential functions. However, the distribution of LPXRFa and LPXRFa-R has not been studied in teleost species, partially because of the lack of fish-specific antibodies. Therefore, in the present study, we generated specific antibodies against LPXRFa and its receptor from Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), and examined their distributions in the brain and pituitary by immunohistochemistry. Tilapia LPXRFa-immunoreactive neurons lie in the posterior ventricular nucleus of the caudal preoptic area, whereas LPXRFa-R-immunoreactive cells are distributed widely. Double immunofluorescence showed that neither LPXRFa-immunoreactive fibers nor LPXRFa-R is closely associated or coexpressed with GnRH1, GnRH3, or kisspeptin (Kiss2) neurons. In the pituitary, LPXRFa fibers are closely associated with gonadotropic endocrine cells [expressing luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)], with adrenocorticomelanotropic cells [corticotropin (ACTH) and α-melanotropin (α-MSH)], and with somatolactin endocrine cells. In contrast, LPXRFa-R are expressed only in LH, ACTH, and α-MSH cells. These results suggest that LPXRFa and LPXRFa-R signaling acts directly on the pituitary cells independent from GnRH or kisspeptin and could play multiple roles in reproductive and nonreproductive functions in teleosts. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2753-2775, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26917324

  3. Hyperpolarization of the Membrane Potential Caused by Somatostatin in Dissociated Human Pituitary Adenoma Cells that Secrete Growth Hormone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Naohide; Shibuya, Naohiko; Ogata, Etsuro

    1986-08-01

    Membrane electrical properties and the response to somatostatin were examined in dissociated human pituitary adenoma cells that secrete growth hormone (GH). Under current clamp condition with a patch electrode, the resting potential was -52.4 ± 8.0 mV, and spontaneous action potentials were observed in 58% of the cells. Under voltage clamp condition an outward K+ current, a tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na+ current, and a Ca2+ current were observed. Cobalt ions suppressed the Ca2+ current. The threshold of Ca2+ current activation was about -60 mV. Somatostatin elicited a membrane hyperpolarization associated with increased membrane permeability in these cells. The reversal potential of somatostatin-induced hyperpolarization was -78.4 ± 4.3 mV in 6 mM K+ medium and -97.2 ± 6.4 mV in 3 mM K+ medium. These reversal potential values and a shift with the external K+ concentration indicated that membrane hyperpolarization was caused by increased permeability to K+. The hyperpolarized membrane potential induced by somatostatin was -63.6 ± 5.9 mV in the standard medium. This level was subthreshold for Ca2+ and Na+ currents and was sufficient to inhibit spontaneous action potentials. Hormone secretion was significantly suppressed by somatostatin and cobalt ions. Therefore, we suggest that Ca2+ entering the cell through voltage-dependent channels are playing an important role for GH secretion and that somatostatin suppresses GH secretion by blocking Ca2+ currents. Finally, we discuss other possibilities for the inhibitory effect of somatostatin on GH secretion.

  4. Metabolic impact of adult-onset, isolated, growth hormone deficiency (AOiGHD) due to destruction of pituitary somatotropes.

    PubMed

    Luque, Raul M; Lin, Qing; Córdoba-Chacón, José; Subbaiah, Papasani V; Buch, Thorsten; Waisman, Ari; Vankelecom, Hugo; Kineman, Rhonda D

    2011-01-19

    Growth hormone (GH) inhibits fat accumulation and promotes protein accretion, therefore the fall in GH observed with weight gain and normal aging may contribute to metabolic dysfunction. To directly test this hypothesis a novel mouse model of adult onset-isolated GH deficiency (AOiGHD) was generated by cross breeding rat GH promoter-driven Cre recombinase mice (Cre) with inducible diphtheria toxin receptor mice (iDTR) and treating adult Cre(+/-),iDTR(+/-) offspring with DT to selectively destroy the somatotrope population of the anterior pituitary gland, leading to a reduction in circulating GH and IGF-I levels. DT-treated Cre(-/-),iDTR(+/-) mice were used as GH-intact controls. AOiGHD improved whole body insulin sensitivity in both low-fat and high-fat fed mice. Consistent with improved insulin sensitivity, indirect calorimetry revealed AOiGHD mice preferentially utilized carbohydrates for energy metabolism, as compared to GH-intact controls. In high-fat, but not low-fat fed AOiGHD mice, fat mass increased, hepatic lipids decreased and glucose clearance and insulin output were impaired. These results suggest the age-related decline in GH helps to preserve systemic insulin sensitivity, and in the context of moderate caloric intake, prevents the deterioration in metabolic function. However, in the context of excess caloric intake, low GH leads to impaired insulin output, and thereby could contribute to the development of diabetes.

  5. Neutralization of gonadotropin-releasing hormone in neonatal rats with permanent impairment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis.

    PubMed

    Bercu, B B

    1982-05-01

    Males rats were passively immunized at 5 days of age with a single 0.25 ml i.p. injection of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antiserum. Control animals were given an equal volume of normal rabbit serum (NRS). Serial blood determinations of gonadotropins, testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) were obtained at intervals ranging from early in life through adult life. Gonadotropin secretion was reduced (P less than 0.025) up to 35 days of age. Androgen secretion (testosterone) was reduced (P less than 0.05) at 10 and 33 days of age. When hCG was given to 54-day-old (young adult), and 100-day-old and 15-month-old animals, testosterone concentrations were similar in both experimental and control groups 1 h after hCG stimulation. As adults, basal gonadotropins were the same in both groups; however, after GnRH stimulation, the GnRH antiserum-treated groups showed an increased gonadotropin response when compared to the NRS control group. In order to determine whether there was an alteration in steroid feedback, other animals were castrated at adult age (approximately 100 days old), and exogenous testosterone was given in increasing increments. However, serum gonadotropins decreased similarly in treated and control groups. These data indicate that a single injection of GnRH antiserum early in life decreased gonadotropin secretion temporarily during prepubertal sexual development and caused a permanent alteration in hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular function.

  6. Cardiovascular responses and mammary substrate uptake in Jersey cows treated with pituitary-derived growth hormone during late lactation.

    PubMed

    Fullerton, F M; Fleet, I R; Heap, R B; Hart, I C; Ben Mepham, T

    1989-02-01

    Pituitary-derived bovine growth hormone (bGH) was administered to Jersey cows during late lactation for 7 d. Milk yield increased significantly during treatment and by a maximum of 49.6% on d 7. The magnitude of the increase was similar to that of mammary plasma flow (47.8 +/- 18.3%) over the same period. By 15-21 d after treatment, both variables had returned to pretreatment values. With respect to milk composition, bGH had negligible effect on lactose and fat concentrations but there were significant decreases in protein, sodium and chloride. Arterial plasma concentrations of bGH increased substantially during treatment, but the associated rise in insulin was not statistically significant. Haematocrit decreased significantly, the lowest value being recorded 3 d after bGH treatment ceased. Mammary respiratory quotient fell progressively after the start of bGH treatment and reached the lowest recorded value 3 d after treatment ceased (62.2 +/- 7.3% of pretreatment value). Glucose and acetate uptake by the mammary gland increased significantly during treatment, increase in glucose uptake being due both to a greater arterio-venous difference and to mammary plasma flow. There was strong evidence that the acute response in increased milk yield was associated with multiple effects in terms of mammary plasma flow and metabolism, as well as haematocrit changes indicative of increased plasma volume.

  7. Anterior pituitary leptin expression changes in different reproductive states: in vitro stimulation by gonadotropin-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Akhter, Noor; Johnson, Brandy W; Crane, Christopher; Iruthayanathan, Mary; Zhou, Yi-Hong; Kudo, Akihiko; Childs, Gwen V

    2007-02-01

    This study was designed to learn more about the changes in expression of rat anterior pituitary (AP) leptin during the estrous cycle. QRT-PCR assays of cycling rat AP leptin mRNA showed 2-fold increases from metestrus to diestrus followed by an 86% decrease on the morning of proestrus. Percentages of leptin cells increased in proestrus and pregnancy to 55-60% of AP cells. Dual labeling for leptin proteins and growth hormone (GH) or gonadotropins showed that the rise in leptin protein-bearing cells from diestrus to proestrus was mainly in GH cells. Only 10-20% of leptin cells in male or cycling female rats coexpress gonadotropins. In contrast, 50-73% of leptin cells from pregnant or lactating females coexpress gonadotropins and only 19% coexpress GH, indicating plasticity in the distribution of leptin. Leptin cells expressed GnRH receptors, and estrogen and GnRH together increased the coexpression of leptin mRNA and gonadotropins. GnRH increased cellular leptin proteins three to four times and mRNA 9.8 times in proestrous rats and stimulated leptin secretion in cultures from diestrous, proestrous, and pregnant rats. These regulatory influences, and the high expression of AP leptin during proestrus and pregnancy, suggest a supportive role for leptin during key events involved with reproduction.

  8. Habituation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis hormones to repeated homotypic stress and subsequent heterotypic stressor exposure in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Babb, Jessica A; Masini, Cher V; Day, Heidi E W; Campeau, Serge

    2014-05-01

    Understanding potential sex differences in repeated stress-induced hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis habituation could provide insight into the sex-biased prevalence of certain affective disorders such as anxiety and depression. Therefore in these studies, male and female rats were exposed to 30 min of either audiogenic or restraint stress daily for 10 days in order to determine whether sex regulates the extent to which HPA axis hormone release is attenuated upon repeated homotypic stressor presentation. In response to the initial exposure, both stressors robustly increased plasma concentrations of both adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone (CORT) in both sexes. Acutely, females displayed higher ACTH and CORT concentrations following restraint stress, whereas males exhibited higher hormone concentrations following loud noise stress. HPA axis hormone responses to both stressors decreased incrementally over successive days of exposure to each respective stressor. Despite the differential effect of sex on acute hormone responses, the extent to which HPA axis hormone response was attenuated did not differ between male and female animals following either stressor. Furthermore, ACTH and CORT responses to a novel environment were not affected by prior exposure to stress of either modality in either male or female rats. These experiments demonstrate that despite the acute stress response, male and female rats exhibit similar habituation of HPA axis hormones upon repeated homotypic stressor presentations, and that exposure to repeated stress does not produce exaggerated HPA axis hormone responses to a novel environment in either female or male rats.

  9. [Anterior pituitary hypersecretion syndromes].

    PubMed

    Gómez, F; Steinhäuslin, F; Crottaz, B; Temler, E

    1987-01-17

    Anterior pituitary hypersecretion can be due to abnormal hypothalamic regulation, decreased peripheral hormone feedback or pituitary tumor. In some cases hypersecretion gives rise to a typical clinical syndrome involving acromegaly, hyperprolactinemia, and excess corticotropin (ACTH). The etiology of acromegaly is a growth hormone (GH)-secreting pituitary tumor in the vast majority of cases. Hyperprolactinemia and excess cortisol, however, may be due to many causes among which prolactin (PRL)- and ACTH-secreting pituitary tumors are not frequent. Glycoprotein-secreting pituitary tumors, especially gonadotropin (LH and FSH) and free subunits usually do not cause a typical excess hormone syndrome. Perhaps for this reason they are seldom recognized clinically, although histopathological studies are increasingly disclosing the gonadotrope nature of many pituitary tumors. Mixed hormonal secretions are common. When pituitary hormone secretion can be selectively suppressed by medical therapy, a significant reduction of tumor size is by no means rare. In other cases, pituitary irradiation or surgery, or even treatment aimed at a peripheral target gland, may be necessary. PMID:3029861

  10. Effects of perchlorate on BDE-47-induced alteration thyroid hormone and gene expression of in the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xuesong; Wang, Shutao; Li, Dongmei; You, Hong; Ren, Xin

    2013-11-01

    To investigate the effects of perchlorate on thyroid hormone disturbances induced by 2,2',4',4-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) via thyroid hormone (TH)-mediated pathways, zebrafish embryos were exposed to a combination of BDE-47 and PER from the time of fertilisation to 14 d (dpf). The whole-body content of TH and the expression of genes and proteins related to the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis were analysed. Co-exposure to BDE-47 and PER decreased the body weight and increased malformation rates relative to the effects of exposure to only BDE-47. Compared with the exposure to BDE-47 alone, the exposure to a combination of BDE-47 (10 μg/L) and PER (3.5 mg/L) significantly up-regulated the expression of genes involved in TH synthesis (NIS and Nkx2.1a) and significantly down-regulated the expression of genes related to the regulation of the HPT axis (CRH and TSHβ). The expression of TG at the gene and protein levels was significantly up-regulated, but the expression of TTR was significantly down-regulated in the co-exposures relative to BDE-47 treated alone. In addition, the larger reduction in the T4 level resulting from exposure to the mixture of BDE-47 and PER demonstrated that PER enhanced the thyroid-disruptive effects of BDE-47. These results help to elucidate the complicated chemical interactions and the molecular mechanism of action of these two TH disruptors. PMID:24177579

  11. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis response to acute psychosocial stress: Effects of biological sex and circulating sex hormones.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Mary Ann C; Mahon, Pamela B; McCaul, Mary E; Wand, Gary S

    2016-04-01

    Dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis influences the risk for developing stress-related disorders. Sex-dependent differences in the HPA axis stress response are believed to contribute to the different prevalence rates of stress-related disorders found in men and women. However, studies examining the HPA axis stress response have shown mixed support for sex differences, and the role of endogenous sex hormones on HPA axis response has not been adequately examined in humans. This study utilized the largest sample size to date to analyze the effects of biological sex and sex hormones on HPA axis social stress responses. Healthy, 18- to 30- year-old community volunteers (N=282) completed the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), a widely used and well-validated stress-induction laboratory procedure. All women (n=135) were tested during the follicular phase of their menstrual cycle (when progesterone levels are most similar to men). Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol measures were collected at multiple points throughout pre- and post-TSST. Testosterone and progesterone (in men) and progesterone and estradiol (in women) were determined pre-TSST. Following the TSST, men had greater ACTH and cortisol levels than women. Men had steeper baseline-to-peak and peak-to-end ACTH and cortisol response slopes than women; there was a trend for more cortisol responders among men than women. Testosterone negatively correlated with salivary cortisol response in men, while progesterone negatively correlated with ACTH and cortisol responses in women. These data confirm that men show more robust activation of the HPA axis response to the TSST than do women in the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. Testosterone results suggest an inhibitory effect on HPA axis reactivity in men. Progesterone results suggest an inhibitory effect on HPA axis reactivity in women. Future work is needed to explain why men mount a greater ACTH and cortisol response to the

  12. Growth hormone modulates hypothalamic inflammation in long-lived pituitary dwarf mice.

    PubMed

    Sadagurski, Marianna; Landeryou, Taylor; Cady, Gillian; Kopchick, John J; List, Edward O; Berryman, Darlene E; Bartke, Andrzej; Miller, Richard A

    2015-12-01

    Mice in which the genes for growth hormone (GH) or GH receptor (GHR(-/-) ) are disrupted from conception are dwarfs, possess low levels of IGF-1 and insulin, have low rates of cancer and diabetes, and are extremely long-lived. Median longevity is also increased in mice with deletion of hypothalamic GH-releasing hormone (GHRH), which leads to isolated GH deficiency. The remarkable extension of longevity in hypopituitary Ames dwarf mice can be reversed by a 6-week course of GH injections started at the age of 2 weeks. Here, we demonstrate that mutations that interfere with GH production or response, in the Snell dwarf, Ames dwarf, or GHR(-/-) mice lead to reduced formation of both orexigenic agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and anorexigenic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) projections to the main hypothalamic projection areas: the arcuate nucleus (ARH), paraventricular nucleus (PVH), and dorsomedial nucleus (DMH). These mutations also reduce hypothalamic inflammation in 18-month-old mice. GH injections, between 2 and 8 weeks of age, reversed both effects in Ames dwarf mice. Disruption of GHR specifically in liver (LiGHRKO), a mutation that reduces circulating IGF-1 but does not lead to lifespan extension, had no effect on hypothalamic projections or inflammation, suggesting an effect of GH, rather than peripheral IGF-1, on hypothalamic development. Hypothalamic leptin signaling, as monitored by induction of pStat3, is not impaired by GHR deficiency. Together, these results suggest that early-life disruption of GH signaling produces long-term hypothalamic changes that may contribute to the longevity of GH-deficient and GH-resistant mice.

  13. Growth hormone modulates hypothalamic inflammation in long-lived pituitary dwarf mice.

    PubMed

    Sadagurski, Marianna; Landeryou, Taylor; Cady, Gillian; Kopchick, John J; List, Edward O; Berryman, Darlene E; Bartke, Andrzej; Miller, Richard A

    2015-12-01

    Mice in which the genes for growth hormone (GH) or GH receptor (GHR(-/-) ) are disrupted from conception are dwarfs, possess low levels of IGF-1 and insulin, have low rates of cancer and diabetes, and are extremely long-lived. Median longevity is also increased in mice with deletion of hypothalamic GH-releasing hormone (GHRH), which leads to isolated GH deficiency. The remarkable extension of longevity in hypopituitary Ames dwarf mice can be reversed by a 6-week course of GH injections started at the age of 2 weeks. Here, we demonstrate that mutations that interfere with GH production or response, in the Snell dwarf, Ames dwarf, or GHR(-/-) mice lead to reduced formation of both orexigenic agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and anorexigenic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) projections to the main hypothalamic projection areas: the arcuate nucleus (ARH), paraventricular nucleus (PVH), and dorsomedial nucleus (DMH). These mutations also reduce hypothalamic inflammation in 18-month-old mice. GH injections, between 2 and 8 weeks of age, reversed both effects in Ames dwarf mice. Disruption of GHR specifically in liver (LiGHRKO), a mutation that reduces circulating IGF-1 but does not lead to lifespan extension, had no effect on hypothalamic projections or inflammation, suggesting an effect of GH, rather than peripheral IGF-1, on hypothalamic development. Hypothalamic leptin signaling, as monitored by induction of pStat3, is not impaired by GHR deficiency. Together, these results suggest that early-life disruption of GH signaling produces long-term hypothalamic changes that may contribute to the longevity of GH-deficient and GH-resistant mice. PMID:26268661

  14. FSH and TSH in the regulation of bone mass: the pituitary/immune/bone axis.

    PubMed

    Colaianni, Graziana; Cuscito, Concetta; Colucci, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidences have highlighted that the pituitary hormones have profound effects on bone, so that the pituitary-bone axis is now becoming an important issue in the skeletal biology. Here, we discuss the topical evidence about the dysfunction of the pituitary-bone axis that leads to osteoporotic bone loss. We will explore the context of FSH and TSH hormones arguing their direct or indirect role in bone loss. In addition, we will focus on the knowledge that both FSH and TSH have influence on proinflammatory and proosteoclastogenic cytokine expression, such as TNF α and IL-1, underlining the correlation of pituitary-bone axis to the immune system.

  15. The role of sexual steroid hormones in the direct stimulation by Kisspeptin-10 of the secretion of luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone and prolactin from bovine anterior pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Ezzat, A Ahmed; Saito, H; Sawada, T; Yaegashi, T; Goto, Y; Nakajima, Y; Jin, J; Yamashita, T; Sawai, K; Hashizume, T

    2010-09-01

    The aims of the present study were to clarify the effect of Kisspeptin-10 (Kp10) on the secretion of luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and prolactin (PRL) from bovine anterior pituitary (AP) cells and evaluate the ability of sex steroids to enhance the sensitivity of gonadotropic and lactotropic cells to Kp10. AP cells prepared from 7-week-old male calves were incubated for 12h with estradiol (E(2); 10(-8)M), progesterone (P(4); 10(-8)M), testosterone (T; 10(-8)M), or vehicle only (control), and then for 2h with Kp10 (10(-6)M). The amounts of LH, FSH and PRL released into the culture medium after the 2-h incubation period were examined. Kp10 significantly stimulated the secretion of LH from the AP cells treated with E(2) and T (P<0.05), but not from the P(4)-treated cells. In contrast, Kp10 had no effect on the secretion of FSH regardless of the steroid treatment. Kp10 significantly stimulated the secretion of PRL (P<0.05), the sexual steroid hormones having no effect. The LH- or FSH-releasing response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH; 10(-8)M) and PRL-releasing response to thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH; 10(-8)M) were significantly greater than those to Kp10 (P<0.05). The present results suggest that E(2) and T, but not P(4), enhance the sensitivity of gonadotropic cells to the secretion of LH in response to Kp10. However, Kp10 had no stimulatory effect on the secretion of FSH regardless of the effect of sex steroids. Kp10 directly stimulates the secretion of PRL from the pituitary cells, and sex steroids do not enhance the sensitivity of lactotropic cells to Kp10. Furthermore, the LH- and FSH-releasing effect and the PRL-releasing effect of Kp10 are less potent than that of GnRH and TRH, respectively.

  16. Melanin-concentrating hormone: unique peptide neuronal systems in the rat brain and pituitary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Zamir, N.; Skofitsch, G.; Bannon, M.J.; Jacobowitz, D.M.

    1986-03-01

    A unique neuronal system was detected in the rat central nervous system by immunohistochemistry and radioimmunoassay with antibodies to salmon melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH). MCH-like immunoreactive (MCH-LI) cell bodies were confined to the hypothalamus. MCH-LI fibers were found throughout the brain but were most prevalent in hypothalamus, mesencephalon, and pons-medulla regions. High concentrations of MCH-LI were measured in the hypothalamic medial forebrain bundle (MFB), posterior hypothalamic nucleus, and nucleus of the diagonal band. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography of MFB extracts from rat brain indicate that MCH-like peptide from the rat has a different retention time than that of the salmon MCH. An osmotic stimuls (2% NaCl as drinking water for 120 hr) caused a marked increase in MCH-LI concentrations in the lateral hypothalamus and neurointermediate lobe. The present studies establish the presence of MCH-like peptide in the rat brain. The MCH-LI neuronal system is well situated to coordinate complex functions such as regulation of water intake.

  17. Receptors of Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Ovarian-Axis Hormone in Uterine Myomas

    PubMed Central

    Plewka, Danuta; Marczyński, Jacek; Morek, Michał; Bogunia, Edyta

    2014-01-01

    In this study the expression of GnRH, FSH, LH, ER-α, ER-β, and PR receptors was examined in uterine myomas of women in reproductive and perimenopausal age. In cases of GnRH and tropic hormones a membranous and cytoplasmic immunohistochemical reaction was detected, in cases of ER-α and PR the reaction was located in cell nucleus, and in the case of ER-β it manifested also a cytoplasmic location. In some of the examined cases the expression was detected in endometrium, myocytes, and endothelium of blood vessels, in uterine glands and myoma cells. In myometrium the level of GnRH and LH receptors increases with age, whereas the level of progesterone and both estrogen receptors decreases. In myomas of women in reproductive age, independently of their size, expression of GnRH, FSH, and LH receptors was more pronounced than in myometrium. In women of perimenopausal age, independently of myoma size, expression of LH and estrogen α receptors was higher while expression of GnRH receptors was lower than in myometrium. FSH receptor expression was not observed. Expression of estrogen receptor β was not affected by age of the woman or size of myoma. Analysis of obtained results indicates on existing in small myomas local feedback axis between GnRH-LH-progesterone. PMID:25050358

  18. Pituitary incidentaloma.

    PubMed

    Orija, Israel B; Weil, Robert J; Hamrahian, Amir H

    2012-02-01

    Pituitary incidentalomas (PIs) are commonly encountered in clinical practice. While most are microincidentalomas (<1 cm) and not functional, in some cases their identification may lead to discovery of unrecognized abnormalities such as pituitary hormonal deficiencies, excess hormone secretion or visual field defects. Although the majority are pituitary adenomas, the potential list of differential diagnosis is extensive. A limited biochemical work up for asymptomatic patients with microincidentalomas, to include measurement of prolactin and IGF-1, is reasonable, with further studies to be tailored based on the clinical picture. All patients with macroincidentalomas (≥1 cm) should be evaluated for hypopituitarism and undergo visual field testing if the sellar mass abuts or compresses the optic chiasm. Most PIs can be followed, closely without surgery over time, but some may require surgical removal, especially if they are found to be macroincidentalomas at presentation, encroaching on or abutting the optic chiasm, or are found to be functional, excluding prolactinomas. Recovery of pituitary function may be seen in some patients with mass effect following resection of a sellar mass. The association of headache and pituitary incidentalomas remains a diagnostic challenge. There are no randomized controlled studies to guide the follow up approach when surgery is not indicated; most of the follow up algorithms in the literature are based on personal experience. Most retrospective series on natural history indicate that microincidentalomas tend not to grow; without a need for long-term follow up unless the patient becomes symptomatic. Macroincidentalomas, on the other hand, have a propensity to grow and need a more aggressive follow up approach to minimize morbidity. PMID:22305452

  19. MJA Practice Essentials--Endocrinology. 9: Pituitary disease in adults.

    PubMed

    Hurley, David M; Ho, Ken K Y

    2004-04-19

    Pituitary adenomas are found in 10%-25% of unselected autopsy series and are evident in about 10% of asymptomatic individuals by magnetic resonance imaging. Diagnosis of pituitary disorders is often delayed by lack of awareness and the subtlety of symptoms and signs. Hypopituitarism is suspected when peripheral hormone concentrations are low without an elevation in the corresponding pituitary tropic hormone(s). Severe adult-onset growth-hormone deficiency results in reduced muscle mass, increased fat mass and diminished quality of life, which are reversed by growth hormone replacement therapy. While trans-sphenoidal surgery remains first-line treatment for acromegaly, drug treatment has an important role in controlling residual growth-hormone excess and, in some circumstances, as first-line treatment. Dopamine-agonist therapy (cabergoline or bromocriptine) is the treatment of choice for micro- and macroprolactinomas. In patients with suggestive clinical features, elevated 24-hour urine free cortisol level is usually sufficient to diagnose endogenous Cushing's syndrome; careful additional investigation is needed to determine whether the cause is Cushing's disease (pituitary adenoma secreting adrenocorticotropic hormone [ACTH]), ectopic ACTH secretion or adrenal disease. Heightened awareness is needed to detect the sometimes subtle symptoms and signs of pituitary disease

  20. Effects of low-dose cranial radiation on growth hormone secretory dynamics and hypothalamic-pituitary function

    SciTech Connect

    Costin, G.

    1988-08-01

    Spontaneous growth hormone (GH) secretory dynamics and hypothalamic-pituitary function were studied in 16 long-term survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia who were aged 9 to 15 1/2 years and had been treated with prophylactic central nervous system radiation and combined chemotherapy. At the time of study, the mean height was -1.5 SD score below the mean, less than genetic potential, and significantly less than the mean pretreatment height of -0.25 SD score. Height velocity was subnormal for age and sexual stage in all patients. Two patients had compensated hypothyroidism, and four had evidence of gonadal failure. In 11 patients, the peak GH level after two provocative tests was below 10 micrograms/L, which was consistent with GH deficiency. In ten of 13 patients tested, spontaneous GH secretion determined by a 24-hour GH concentration (GHC), GH pulse amplitude, frequency of GH pulses greater than or equal to 5 micrograms/L, and GH peak during wake and sleep hours was significantly less than in normal height controls. Although in three pubertal patients the 24-hour GHC was within normal limits, the GHC during sleep hours, GH pulse amplitude during 24 hours and sleep hours, and peak GH during wake hours were significantly less than in normal height controls. In all pubertal and in two of the prepubertal patients, the somatomedin C (SmC) level was significantly less than in controls. The 24-hour GHC correlated well with the GHC during sleep, peak-stimulated GH level, gonadal steroid level, and the SmC level, but not with height velocity, dose of radiation, or age at radiation. A significant increase in height velocity and the SmC level was noted in all patients treated with GH. These results indicate that GH deficiency occurs after 18 to 24 Gy of cranial radiation and that the puberty-associated growth spurt may mask the decline in height velocity owing to GH deficiency.

  1. Relationship between nitric oxide- and calcium-dependent signal transduction pathways in growth hormone release from dispersed goldfish pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, John P; Sawisky, Grant R; Davis, Philip J; Pemberton, Joshua G; Rieger, Aja M; Barreda, Daniel R

    2014-09-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) and Ca(2+) are two of the many intracellular signal transduction pathways mediating the control of growth hormone (GH) secretion from somatotropes by neuroendocrine factors. We have previously shown that the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) elicits Ca(2+) signals in identified goldfish somatotropes. In this study, we examined the relationships between NO- and Ca(2+)-dependent signal transduction mechanisms in GH secretion from primary cultures of dispersed goldfish pituitary cells. Morphologically identified goldfish somatotropes stained positively for an NO-sensitive dye indicating they may be a source of NO production. In 2h static incubation experiments, GH release responses to the NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-d,l-penicillamine (SNAP) were attenuated by CoCl2, nifedipine, verapamil, TMB-8, BHQ, and KN62. In column perifusion experiments, the ability of SNP to induce GH release was impaired in the presence of TMB-8, BHQ, caffeine, and thapsigargin, but not ryanodine. Caffeine-elicited GH secretion was not affected by the NO scavenger PTIO. These results suggest that NO-stimulated GH release is dependent on extracellular Ca(2+) availability and voltage-sensitive Ca(2+) channels, as well as intracellular Ca(2+) store(s) that possess BHQ- and/or thapsigargin-inhibited sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPases, as well as TMB-8- and/or caffeine-sensitive, but not ryanodine-sensitive, Ca(2+)-release channels. Calmodulin kinase-II also likely participates in NO-elicited GH secretion but caffeine-induced GH release is not upstream of NO production. These findings provide insights into how NO actions many integrate with Ca(2+)-dependent signalling mechanisms in goldfish somatotropes and how such interactions may participate in the GH-releasing actions of regulators that utilize both NO- and Ca(2+)-dependent transduction pathways. PMID:25038498

  2. Relationship between nitric oxide- and calcium-dependent signal transduction pathways in growth hormone release from dispersed goldfish pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, John P; Sawisky, Grant R; Davis, Philip J; Pemberton, Joshua G; Rieger, Aja M; Barreda, Daniel R

    2014-09-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) and Ca(2+) are two of the many intracellular signal transduction pathways mediating the control of growth hormone (GH) secretion from somatotropes by neuroendocrine factors. We have previously shown that the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) elicits Ca(2+) signals in identified goldfish somatotropes. In this study, we examined the relationships between NO- and Ca(2+)-dependent signal transduction mechanisms in GH secretion from primary cultures of dispersed goldfish pituitary cells. Morphologically identified goldfish somatotropes stained positively for an NO-sensitive dye indicating they may be a source of NO production. In 2h static incubation experiments, GH release responses to the NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-d,l-penicillamine (SNAP) were attenuated by CoCl2, nifedipine, verapamil, TMB-8, BHQ, and KN62. In column perifusion experiments, the ability of SNP to induce GH release was impaired in the presence of TMB-8, BHQ, caffeine, and thapsigargin, but not ryanodine. Caffeine-elicited GH secretion was not affected by the NO scavenger PTIO. These results suggest that NO-stimulated GH release is dependent on extracellular Ca(2+) availability and voltage-sensitive Ca(2+) channels, as well as intracellular Ca(2+) store(s) that possess BHQ- and/or thapsigargin-inhibited sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPases, as well as TMB-8- and/or caffeine-sensitive, but not ryanodine-sensitive, Ca(2+)-release channels. Calmodulin kinase-II also likely participates in NO-elicited GH secretion but caffeine-induced GH release is not upstream of NO production. These findings provide insights into how NO actions many integrate with Ca(2+)-dependent signalling mechanisms in goldfish somatotropes and how such interactions may participate in the GH-releasing actions of regulators that utilize both NO- and Ca(2+)-dependent transduction pathways.

  3. Growth Hormone Therapy Benefits Pituitary Stalk Interruption Syndrome Patients with Short Stature: A Retrospective Study of 75 Han Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cheng-Zhi; Guo, Ling-Ling; Han, Bai-Yu; Wang, An-Ping; Liu, Hong-Yan; Su, Xing; Guo, Qing-Hua; Mu, Yi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Objective. We aim to investigate the long-term benefits of growth hormone (GH) therapy in short stature adolescents and adults with pituitary stalk interruption syndrome (PSIS), which would be beneficial for future clinical applications. Design and Methods. In this study, initial height, final height, total height gain, and GH treatment history were retrospectively investigated in 75 Chinese PSIS patients. We compared height gain between the GH treated cohort and untreated cohort and explored the impact of different GH therapy duration on height gain. Results. For GH treated patients, their final height (SDS) increased from −1.99 ± 1.91 (−6.93~2.80) at bone age (BA) of 11.2 (5.0~17.0) years to −1.47 ± 1.64 (−7.82~1.05) at BA of 16.6 (8.0~18.0) years (P = 0.016). And GH treated patients had more height gain than the untreated patients (P < 0.05). There was a significant difference between the different GH therapy duration groups (P = 0.001): GH 0 versus GH 3, P = 0.000; GH 1 versus GH 3, P = 0.028; GH 2 versus GH 3, P = 0.044. Conclusion. Adult Chinese PSIS patients with short stature benefited the most from at least 12 months of GH therapy. Although patient diagnosis age was lagged behind in the developing countries, GH treatment was still effective for them and resulted in a higher final height and more height gain. PMID:27190512

  4. Di-(2-ethylhexyl)-phthalate disrupts pituitary and testicular hormonal functions to reduce sperm quality in mature goldfish.

    PubMed

    Golshan, Mahdi; Hatef, Azadeh; Socha, Magdalena; Milla, Sylvain; Butts, Ian A E; Carnevali, Oliana; Rodina, Marek; Sokołowska-Mikołajczyk, Mirosława; Fontaine, Pascal; Linhart, Otomar; Alavi, Sayyed Mohammad Hadi

    2015-06-01

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) interferes with male reproductive endocrine system in mammals, however its effects on fish reproduction are largely unknown. We evaluated sperm quality and investigated reproductive endocrine system in mature goldfish (Carassius auratus) exposed to nominal 1, 10, and 100μg/L DEHP. To examine DEHP estrogenic activity, one group of goldfish was exposed to 17β-estradiol (5μg/L E2) for comparison. Following 30d of exposure, sperm production was decreased and suppressed in DEHP and E2 treated goldfish, respectively. Sperm motility and velocity were decreased in goldfish exposed to 100 and 10μg/L DEHP at 15s post-sperm activation, respectively. Compared to control, 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT) levels were decreased at 10 and 1μg/L DEHP at day 15 and 30, respectively. In E2 treated goldfish, 11-KT levels were decreased compared to control during the period of exposure. E2 levels were increased in goldfish exposed to E2, but remained unchanged in DEHP treated goldfish during the period of exposure. StAR mRNA levels encoding regulator of cholesterol transfer to steroidogenesis were decreased in DEHP and E2 treated goldfish following 15 and 30d of exposure, respectively. Luteinizing hormone (LH) levels were decreased in DEHP and E2 treated goldfish following 15 and 30d of exposure, respectively. In DEHP treated goldfish, gnrh3, kiss1 and its receptor (gpr54) mRNA levels did not change during the experimental period. In E2 treated goldfish, gnrh3 mRNA levels were decreased at day 7, but kiss1 and gpr54 mRNA levels were increased at day 30 of exposure. The mRNA levels of genes encoding testicular LH and androgen receptors remained unchanged in DEHP and E2 treated goldfish. In contrast to E2 treated goldfish, vitellogenin production was not induced in DEHP treated goldfish and mRNA levels of genes with products mediating estrogenic effects remained unchanged or decreased. In conclusion, DEHP interferes with testis and pituitary hormonal

  5. Suckling and salsolinol attenuate responsiveness of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis to stress: focus on catecholamines, corticotrophin-releasing hormone, adrenocorticotrophic hormone, cortisol and prolactin secretion in lactating sheep.

    PubMed

    Hasiec, M; Tomaszewska-Zaremba, D; Misztal, T

    2014-12-01

    In mammals, the responsiveness of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis to stress is reduced during lactation and this mainly results from suckling by the offspring. The suckling stimulus causes a release of the hypothalamic 1-metyl-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline (salsolinol) (a derivative of dopamine), one of the prolactin-releasing factors. To investigate the involvement of salsolinol in the mechanism suppressing stress-induced HPA axis activity, we conducted a series of experiments on lactating sheep, in which they were treated with two kinds of isolation stress (isolation from the flock with lamb present or absent), combined with suckling and/or i.c.v infusion of salsolinol and 1-methyl-3,4-dihydro-isoqinoline (1-MeDIQ; an antagonistic analogue of salsolinol). Additionally, a push-pull perfusion of the infundibular nucleus/median eminence (IN/ME) and blood sample collection with 10-min intervals were performed during the experiments. Concentrations of perfusate corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) and catecholamines (noradrenaline, dopamine and salsolinol), as well as concentrations of plasma adenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH), cortisol and prolactin, were assayed. A significant increase in perfusate noradrenaline, plasma ACTH and cortisol occurred in response to both kinds of isolation stress. Suckling and salsolinol reduced the stress-induced increase in plasma ACTH and cortisol concentrations. Salsolinol also significantly reduced the stress-induced noradrenaline and dopamine release within the IN/ME. Treatment with 1-MeDIQ under the stress conditions significantly diminished the salsolinol concentration and increased CRH and cortisol concentrations. Stress and salsolinol did not increase the plasma prolactin concentration, in contrast to the suckling stimulus. In conclusion, salsolinol released in nursing sheep may have a suppressing effect on stress-induced HPA axis activity and peripheral prolactin does not appear to participate in

  6. In vivo and in vitro characterization of antalarmin, a nonpeptide corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) receptor antagonist: suppression of pituitary ACTH release and peripheral inflammation.

    PubMed

    Webster, E L; Lewis, D B; Torpy, D J; Zachman, E K; Rice, K C; Chrousos, G P

    1996-12-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) secreted from the hypothalamus is the major regulator of pituitary ACTH release and consequent glucocorticoid secretion. CRH secreted in the periphery also acts as a proinflammatory modulator. CRH receptors (CRH-R1, R2alpha, R2beta) exhibit a specific tissue distribution. Antalarmin, a novel pyrrolopyrimidine compound, displaced 12SI-oCRH binding in rat pituitary, frontal cortex and cerebellum, but not heart, consistent with antagonism at the CRHR1 receptor. In vivo antalarmnin (20 mg/kg body wt.) significantly inhibited CRH-stimulated ACTH release and carageenin-induced subcutaneous inflammation in rats. Antalarmin, or its analogs, hold therapeutic promise in disorders with putative CRH hypersecretion, such as melancholic depression and inflammatory disorders. PMID:8940412

  7. Effects of acute organophosphate poisoning on pituitary target gland hormones at admission, discharge and three months after poisoning: A hospital based pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Pinaki; Kamath, Shruthi S.; Bhalla, Ashish; Shah, V.N.; Srinivasan, Anand; Gupta, Prakamya; Singh, Surjit

    2015-01-01

    Background: Organophosphate compound (OPC) poisoning is common in the developing countries such as India. The acute and later effects of OPC poisoning on pituitary and target gland hormones is largely unknown. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was conducted at Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research between January 2012 and March 2013. Fourteen patients (8 males, age 18-50 years) with acute OPC poisoning were included in the study based on the history and clinical features, documented decreased in plasma cholinesterase activity or presence of the OPC in gastric lavage/blood samples. The hormonal parameters were done at baseline, at the time of discharge and at three months of follow-up. Results: A total of 14 patients out of 46 with the mean age of 30.1 ± 10.3 years were finally eligible for the study. Hormonal alterations at admission were similar to sick euhormonal syndrome. Overall 7 of them had nine hormonal deficits at three months of follow up, 4 having sub normal basal cortisol level and two each had low testosterone and growth hormone and only one had thyroxine deficiency. Conclusion: Acute organophosphate poisoning results in endocrine dysfunction akin to sick euhormonal syndrome. However, in a small subset of patients, varying level of hormonal insufficiency may occur either at admission or later. These observations need re-validation in a larger group of patients with specific OPC. PMID:25593838

  8. Changes in brain gonadotropin-releasing hormone, pituitary and plasma gonadotropins, and plasma thyroxine during smoltification in chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tschawytscha).

    PubMed

    Lewis, K A; Swanson, P; Sower, S A

    1992-09-01

    Concentrations of brain salmon gonadotropin-releasing hormone (sGnRH), plasma gonadotropin I (GTH I), and pituitary GTH I and GTH II were determined in yearling chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tschawytscha) during the parr-smolt transformation in two successive seasons. There were significant elevations in brain sGnRH content from February to March in 1988, and from February to April in 1989. Increases in brain sGnRH content coincided with elevations in plasma thyroxine levels that occurred from February to March, 1988 and 1989. Plasma GTH levels were relatively constant (1-2 ng/ml) throughout the period of sampling. However, during 1988, plasma concentrations of GTH I decreased significantly between late March and early April. During 1989, plasma GTH I levels appeared to reach a peak (2 ng/ml) in mid-February, but otherwise remained near 1 ng/ml. Previous studies have shown that GTH II was not detectable in plasma at this stage. During 1989, pituitary GTH I concentrations were 50- to 70-fold higher than that of GTH II, and increased, though not significantly, from February through April. Although GTH II was detected in the pituitary by RIA, it is likely that the measurable levels are due to GTH I cross-reaction in the GTH II RIA. Histological examination of the gonads indicated that throughout smoltification the oocytes remained in the perinucleolar stage of oogenesis and the testes were in the spermatogonial stage of spermatogenesis. Although no observable changes in gametogenesis occurred, the changes in brain sGnRH content, plasma GTH I levels, and pituitary GTH content suggest that some changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis may occur during smoltification.

  9. Growth hormone-secreting macroadenoma of the pituitary gland successfully treated with the radiolabeled somatostatin analog (90)Y-DOTATATE: case report.

    PubMed

    Waligórska-Stachura, Joanna; Gut, Paweł; Sawicka-Gutaj, Nadia; Liebert, Włodzimierz; Gryczyńska, Maria; Baszko-Błaszyk, Daria; Blanco-Gangoo, Al Ricardo; Ruchała, Marek

    2016-08-01

    Pituitary tumors causing acromegaly are usually macroadenomas at the time of diagnosis, and they can grow aggressively, infiltrating surrounding tissues. Difficulty in achieving complete tumor removal at surgery can lead toward a strong tendency for recurrence, making it necessary to consider a means of treatment other than those currently used such as somatostatin analogs (SSAs), growth hormone (GH) receptor antagonist, surgical removal, and radiotherapy. The purpose of this paper is to describe a patient diagnosed with an aggressive, giant GH-secreting tumor refractory to medical therapy but ultimately treated with the radiolabeled somatostatin analog (90)Y-DOTATATE. A 26-year-old male with an invasive macroadenoma of the pituitary gland (5.6 × 2.5 × 3.6 cm) and biochemically confirmed acromegaly underwent 2 partial tumor resections: the first used the transsphenoidal approach and the second used the transcranial method. The patient received SSAs pre- and postoperatively. Because of the progression in pituitary tumor size, he underwent classic irradiation of the tumor (50 Gy). One and a half years later, the patient presented with clinically and biochemically active disease, and the tumor size was still 52 mm in diameter (height). Two neurosurgeons disqualified him from further surgical procedures. After confirming the presence of somatostatin receptors in the pituitary tumor by using (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT, we treated the patient 4 times with an SSA bound with (90)Y-DOTATATE. After this treatment, the patient attained partial biochemical remission and a reduction in the tumor mass for the first time. Treatment with an SSA bound with (90)Y-DOTATATE may be a promising option for some aggressive GH-secreting pituitary adenomas when other methods have failed. PMID:26636388

  10. Diabetes-related changes in brain beta adrenoreceptors in rats as assessed by quantitative autoradiography: relationship to hypothalamic norepinephrine metabolism and pituitary-gonadal hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Bitar, M S; DeSouza, E B

    1990-09-01

    Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes produced significant and selective alterations in brain beta adrenoreceptor subtypes, norepinephrine (NE) metabolism and pituitary-testicular hormone in male rats. The densities of beta-1 but not beta-2 adrenoreceptors were increased in hypothalamus (anterior and lateral nuclei), thalamus (ventral posterior nucleus) and amygdala (basolateral nucleus) of the STZ diabetic rats. In contrast, a decrease in the rate of metabolism of NE (estimated by the concentration of the NE metabolite, 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol) was observed in these STZ-treated animals. Serum concentrations of luteinizing hormone and testosterone were lower in the STZ diabetic rats. Pretreatment of rats with nicotinamide prevented the induction of hyperglycemia, upregulation of brain beta-1 adrenoreceptors, decreases in NE metabolism and reduction in serum levels of luteinizing hormone and testosterone seen in STZ-treated rats. These data suggest that derangements in the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis seen in uncontrolled diabetes may be secondary to decreases in NE metabolism and compensatory upregulation of beta-1 adrenoreceptors in brain.

  11. The genetics of pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Vandeva, Silvia; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie-Lise; Daly, Adrian F; Tichomirowa, Maria; Zacharieva, Sabina; Beckers, Albert

    2010-06-01

    Pituitary adenomas are one of the most frequent intracranial tumors with a prevalence of clinically-apparent tumors close to 1:1000 of the general population. They are clinically significant because of hormone overproduction and/or tumor mass effects in addition to the need for neurosurgery, medical therapies and radiotherapy. The majority of pituitary adenomas have a sporadic origin with recognized genetic mutations seldom being found; somatotropinomas are an exception, presenting frequent somatic GNAS mutations. In this and other phenotypes, tumorigenesis could possibly be explained by altered function of genes implicated in cell cycle regulation, growth factors or their receptors, cell-signaling pathways, specific hormonal factors or other molecules with still unclear mechanisms of action. Genetic changes, such as allelic loss or gene amplification, and epigenetic changes, usually by promoter methylation, have been implicated in abnormal gene expression, but alternative mechanisms may be present. Familial cases of pituitary adenomas represent 5% of all pituitary tumors. MEN1 mutations cause multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), while the Carney complex (CNC) is characterized by mutations in the protein kinase A regulatory subunit-1alpha (PRKAR1A) gene or changes in a locus at 2p16. Recently, a MEN1-like condition, MEN4, was found to be related to mutations in the CDKN1B gene. The clinical entity of familial isolated pituitary adenomas (FIPA) is characterized by genetic defects in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene in about 15% of all kindreds and 50% of homogenous somatotropinoma families. Identification of familial cases of pituitary adenomas is important as these tumors may be more aggressive than their sporadic counterparts. PMID:20833337

  12. Prolactin-deficient variants of GH3 rat pituitary tumor cells: linked expression of prolactin and another hormonally responsive protein in GH3 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ivarie, R D; Morris, J A; Martial, J A

    1982-01-01

    GH3 cells normally synthesize and secrete two pituitary polypeptide hormones, prolactin and growth hormone. From an ethyl methane sulfonate-mutagenized population, prolactin low-producing variants have been isolated at a frequency near 20%. Intracellular prolactin synthesis in the variants was reduced 40- to 100-fold compared to wild-type cells while growth hormone synthesis varied less than 2-fold. This decrease was paralleled by a decrease in intracellular preprolactin mRNA. Although reduced, prolactin synthesis was still repressible by glucocorticoids. There was a coordinate loss of expression of p21, a thyroid and glucocorticoid hormone-regulated protein, in GH3 cells, whereas the synthesis and regulation of other hormonally responsive proteins were unimpaired in the variants. Since p21 expression was coordinately regained in a high-producing prolactin revertant cell, expression of the two proteins is tightly coupled in GH3 cells. The stability of the low-producing phenotype differed among variants. One (B2) gave rise to revertants at about 20% frequency even after two rounds of subcloning, whereas another (B3) was more stable in that only 1 weak revertant was found in 47 subclones. The reversion frequency of B3 cells was also measured at less than 0.5%. Unmutagenized GH3 cells were phenotypically stable in that no prolactin-deficient variant was found among 57 subclones. Since variants were ony found after ethyl methane sulfonate mutagenesis, the DNA alkylating agent appears to have promoted an epigenetic change in pituitary gene expression. Images PMID:7110131

  13. Hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal endocrine system in the hagfish.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Masumi

    2013-12-30

    The hypothalamic-pituitary system is considered to be a seminal event that emerged prior to or during the differentiation of the ancestral agnathans (jawless vertebrates). Hagfishes as one of the only two extant members of the class of agnathans are considered the most primitive vertebrates known, living or extinct. Accordingly, studies on their reproduction are important for understanding the evolution and phylogenetic aspects of the vertebrate reproductive endocrine system. In gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates), the hormones of the hypothalamus and pituitary have been extensively studied and shown to have well-defined roles in the control of reproduction. In hagfish, it was thought that they did not have the same neuroendocrine control of reproduction as gnathostomes, since it was not clear whether the hagfish pituitary gland contained tropic hormones of any kind. This review highlights the recent findings of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal endocrine system in the hagfish. In contrast to gnathostomes that have two gonadotropins (GTH: luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone), only one pituitary GTH has been identified in the hagfish. Immunohistochemical and functional studies confirmed that this hagfish GTH was significantly correlated with the developmental stages of the gonads and showed the presence of a steroid (estradiol) feedback system at the hypothalamic-pituitary levels. Moreover, while the identity of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) has not been determined, immunoreactive (ir) GnRH has been shown in the hagfish brain including seasonal changes of ir-GnRH corresponding to gonadal reproductive stages. In addition, a hagfish PQRFamide peptide was identified and shown to stimulate the expression of hagfish GTHβ mRNA in the hagfish pituitary. These findings provide evidence that there are neuroendocrine-pituitary hormones that share common structure and functional features compared to later evolved vertebrates.

  14. Investigation of hypothalamic-pituitary disease.

    PubMed

    Lamberton, R P; Jackson, I M

    1983-11-01

    It can be readily appreciated from the preceding discussion that many endocrine and non-endocrine tests are available for the evaluation of patients with suspected hypothalamic-pituitary disease. The endocrine evaluation of these subjects should be tailored according to the type and extent of pathology suspected (see Tables 2 and 3). For patients with pituitary adenomas and clinical features of hyperpituitarism, such as hyperprolactinaemia, Cushing's disease or acromegaly, the initial tests should be directed at the hormone whose excess is suspected. For example, a glucose suppression test for acromegaly or dexamethasone suppression test for Cushing's disease should be performed early in the evaluation. The possibility of deficiencies of the other pituitary hormones should then be addressed in patients with secretory tumours, but initially in those with apparent non-functioning adenomas. In patients with large macroadenomas pituitary hormone deficiencies are almost invariable with GH and FSH/LH being the most commonly affected, followed by TSH and ACTH in that order (Snyder et al, 1979a; Valenta et al, 1982). Basal thyroid function tests, serum oestradiol or testosterone, and basal gonodotrophins should be routinely obtained in patients with macroadenomas. Additionally, the integrity of the pituitary-adrenal axis should be determined and an overnight water deprivation test for assessment of neurohypophyseal function is also recommended. GH stimulation testing is valuable as a test of pituitary function in patients with suspected pituitary tumours since GH reserve is lost very early in the development of hypopituitarism. Evaluation of the pituitary-thyroid axis with TRH or the pituitary gonadal axis with LHRH generally provides limited additional information of diagnostic value in individual patients with macroadenomas. However, the 'paradoxical' responses to TRH and LHRH may be useful as a biological marker following therapy in patients with GH- or ACTH

  15. Heart in pituitary diseases.

    PubMed

    Hradec, J; Marek, J; Král, J; Simper, D; Spácil, J

    1992-01-01

    Of hormones secreted by the pituitary, a direct effect on cardiac metabolism and function is exerted only by growth hormone (GH). Its chronic overproduction in adulthood leads to acromegaly. The main cardiovascular manifestations of acromegaly are hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy. The paper summarizes the results of clinical research into the "acromegalic heart" in an internationally unique group of 78 patients with acromegaly on long-term follow-up. Both clinical findings and experimental data available in the literature indicate that cardiac hypertrophy is due to a direct effect of GH on the myocardium. Hypertension occurs in 50% of patients, has the nature of volume hypertension and exerts only an additive effect on the development of left ventricular hypertrophy. Once GH overproduction has been eliminated, cardiac hypertrophy and hypertension can be reversed to a certain stage, a finding highlighting the necessity of instituting treatment of acromegaly as early and as vigorous as possible. PMID:1304450

  16. Genesis of two most prevalent PROP1 gene variants causing combined pituitary hormone deficiency in 21 populations.

    PubMed

    Dusatkova, Petra; Pfäffle, Roland; Brown, Milton R; Akulevich, Natallia; Arnhold, Ivo J P; Kalina, Maria A; Kot, Karolina; Krzisnik, Ciril; Lemos, Manuel C; Malikova, Jana; Navardauskaite, Ruta; Obermannova, Barbora; Pribilincova, Zuzana; Sallai, Agnes; Stipancic, Gordana; Verkauskiene, Rasa; Cinek, Ondrej; Blum, Werner F; Parks, John S; Austerlitz, Frederic; Lebl, Jan

    2016-03-01

    Two variants (c.[301_302delAG];[301_302delAG] and c.[150delA];[150delA]) in the PROP1 gene are the most common genetic causes of recessively inherited combined pituitary hormones deficiency (CPHD). Our objective was to analyze in detail the origin of the two most prevalent variants. In the multicentric study were included 237 patients with CPHD and their 15 relatives carrying c.[301_302delAG];[301_302delAG] or c.[150delA];[150delA] or c.[301_302delAG];[ 150delA]. They originated from 21 different countries worldwide. We genotyped 21 single-nucleotide variant markers flanking the 9.6-Mb region around the PROP1 gene that are not in mutual linkage disequilibrium in the general populations--a finding of a common haplotype would be indicative of ancestral origin of the variant. Haplotypes were reconstructed by Phase and Haploview software, and the variant age was estimated using an allelic association method. We demonstrated the ancestral origin of both variants--c.[301_302delAG] was carried on 0.2 Mb-long haplotype in a majority of European patients arising ~101 generations ago (confidence interval 90.1-116.4). Patients from the Iberian Peninsula displayed a different haplotype, which was estimated to have emerged 23.3 (20.1-29.1) generations ago. Subsequently, the data indicated that both the haplotypes were transmitted to Latin American patients ~13.8 (12.2-17.0) and 16.4 (14.4-20.1) generations ago, respectively. The c.[150delA] variant that was carried on a haplotype spanning about 0.3 Mb was estimated to appear 43.7 (38.4-52.7) generations ago. We present strong evidence that the most frequent variants in the PROP1 gene are not a consequence of variant hot spots as previously assumed, but are founder variants.

  17. Effects of age and reproductive experience on the distribution of prolactin and growth hormone secreting cells in the anterior pituitary of a passerine.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Debora; Vleck, Carol M

    2015-10-01

    Plasma prolactin (PRL) is released from lactotrophs in the anterior pituitary. As plasma PRL levels rise during incubation in domestic fowl, the number of lactotrophs (PRL-immunoreactive, PRL-IR cells) increases while the number of growth hormone secreting cells, somatotrophs (GH-IR cells), declines. We measured plasma PRL levels using radioimmunoassay (RIA) and examined the distribution of lactotrophs and somatotrophs in the anterior pituitary of breeding and nonbreeding zebra finches of known ages with and without prior breeding experience using fluorescent immunohistochemistry (IHC). Plasma PRL levels were higher in breeding than in nonbreeding birds, regardless of age, sex, or previous breeding history. PRL-IR cells were localized primarily, but not exclusively, to the cephalic aspect of the anterior pituitary (AP) and along the ventral margin. Birds with prior reproductive experience had more PRL-IR cells than birds with no prior reproductive experience and breeders had slightly higher PRL-IR cell counts than did nonbreeders, but there was no correlation between the number of PRL-IR cells and plasma PRL levels. GH-IR cells were concentrated in the caudal aspect of the AP with some cells in the cephalic lobe, but numbers did not differ between any of the groups studied. An increase in PRL-IR cells corresponded with an increase in GH-IR cells. An increase in lactotroph number with reproductive experience in zebra finches may facilitate future reproductive events by allowing for more robust PRL secretion and increased reproductive success.

  18. Marked reduction in gonadal steroid hormone levels in rats treated neonatally with monosodium L-glutamate: further evidence for disruption of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis regulation.

    PubMed

    Nemeroff, C B; Lamartiniere, C A; Mason, G A; Squibb, R E; Hong, J S; Bondy, S C

    1981-11-01

    Serum levels of luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), prolactin, estradiol-17 beta and testosterone were determined in adult rats that were treated in the neonatal period with monosodium L-glutamate (MSG) which has previously been shown to reliably produce destruction of arcuate nucleus perikarya. MSG-treated males had significantly smaller accessory sexual organs (seminal vesicles and ventral prostate) and tests and had significantly lower serum concentrations of FSH and testosterone than sex-matched controls. MSG-treated females had significantly lower serum concentrations of LH, FSH and estradiol-17 beta. Prolactin levels of MSG-treated rats were no different than sex-matched controls. This marked reduction in gonadal steroid levels (decreases 68%) and inappropriately low gonadotropin levels further characterizes the deficit of feedback regulation in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in MSG-treated rats.

  19. Effects of STX, a novel estrogen membrane receptor agonist, on GnRH-induced luteinizing hormone secretion from cultured bovine anterior pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Faidiban Oktofianus; Kadokawa, Hiroya

    2014-12-01

    STX is an agonist for a recently characterized membrane estrogen receptor whose structure has not been identified. We evaluated whether STX suppresses gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-induced luteinizing hormone (LH) release from bovine anterior pituitary (AP) cells. We cultured AP cells (n=12) for 3 days in steroid-free conditions, followed by increasing concentrations (0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1 and 10 nM) of 17β-estradiol or STX for 5 min before GnRH stimulation until the end of the experiment. Estradiol (0.001 to 0.1 nM) significantly suppressed GnRH-stimulated LH secretion, whereas STX did not affect GnRH-stimulated LH secretion at any of the tested concentrations. In conclusion, STX, unlike estradiol, possesses no suppressive effect on GnRH-induced LH release from bovine AP cells.

  20. Effects of Barium Chloride Exposure on Hormones and Genes of the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Gonad Axis, and Reproduction of Zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Kwon, Bareum; Ha, Nayoung; Jung, Joeun; Kim, Pan-Gyi; Kho, Younglim; Choi, Kyungho; Ji, Kyunghee

    2016-03-01

    Adult zebrafish pairs were exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of BaCl2 for 21 days, and the effects on reproduction, sex steroid hormones, and transcription of the genes belonging to the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonad (HPG) axis were investigated. The adverse effects on performances of F1 generation were further examined with or without subsequent exposure to BaCl2. Egg production was significantly decreased, and parental exposure to BaCl2 resulted in lesser rates of hatching. In males, exposure to BaCl2 resulted in greater concentrations of E2 along with greater mRNA expression of cyp19a. The results demonstrated that BaCl2 could modulate gene transcriptions and hormone production of the HPG axis in a sex-dependent way, which could cause adverse effects on reproduction and the development of offspring.

  1. Triiodothyronine expands the lactotroph and maintains the lactosomatotroph population, whereas thyrotrophin-releasing hormone augments thyrotroph abundance in aggregate cell cultures of postnatal rat pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Pals, K; Vankelecom, H; Denef, C

    2006-03-01

    In the present study, we used a three-dimensional pituitary cell culture system from early postnatal rats to examine the in vitro developmental potential of triiodothyronine (T3) and thyrotrophin-releasing hormone (TRH). Cell types were identified at the hormone mRNA level by single-cell reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and any change in abundance was further examined by immunofluorescence staining of the corresponding hormone protein. In aggregates from 14-day-old rats, long-term (12-16 days) treatment with T3 (0.5 nM) increased the abundance of cells expressing prolactin mRNA (PRLmRNA cells) by 2.5-fold and lowered that of nonhormonal cells and thyroid-stimulating hormone beta (TSHbeta)mRNA cells. The abundance of growth hormone (GH)mRNA cells decreased during culture compared to that in the freshly dispersed pituitary gland and T3 did not significantly affect this cell population. Cells coexpressing PRL mRNA and GH mRNA virtually disappeared during culture but reappeared in the presence of T3. T3 increased the abundance of PRL-immunoreactive (ir) cells in aggregates from 14-day-old rats, as well as in aggregates from newborn and 1-week-old rats. As estimated by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labelling, a 3-day treatment with T3 enhanced the number of PRL-ir cells that had incorporated BrdU, but did not yet expand the total population of PRL-ir cells. Long-term treatment with TRH (100 nM) did not affect the proportion of PRLmRNA or GHmRNA cells, but consistently increased the proportional number of TSHbeta(mRNA) and TSHbeta-ir cells. The present data confirm the findings obtained in recent in vivo loss of function genetic studies suggesting that T3 plays a prominent role in postnatal expansion of the lactotroph population and that TRH is important for thyrotroph development. The data suggest that the effect of T3 is brought about by a direct action on the pituitary gland through a cell proliferation mechanism. T3 also appears to support the

  2. Advances in understanding pituitary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Renner, Ulrich; Karl Stalla, Günter

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary tumors are common in the general population. Since neuroimaging techniques have improved, pituitary tumors are more often diagnosed incidentally. About 16.7% of the general population show changes in the pituitary gland. Predominantly, pituitary tumors are benign pituitary adenomas. Pituitary carcinomas or aggressive pituitary tumors are extremely rare. They might develop from benign adenomas. New genetic and epigenetic abnormalities help us to understand pituitary tumorigenesis and might lead to therapeutical targeting drugs in the future. Macroadenomas (>1 cm) can lead to visual field disturbances, compression of cranial nerves, hypopituitarism, and infiltration of the cavernous sinuses. The functional status of the pituitary tumor is important. About half to one third of all pituitary tumors are non-functioning pituitary adenomas. The other pituitary tumors show a specific pattern of hormone secretion. About 25% to 41% of all pituitary tumors are prolactinomas, acromegaly with production of growth hormone represents 10% to 15% of adenomas, Cushing's disease with production of adrenocorticotropic hormone accounts for 10%, and other hormonal characteristics are less common. Transsphenoidal resection and total adenomectomy are desirable. Radiosurgery has enriched the surgical treatment options. Surgical treatment is the intervention of choice except for prolactinomas, where pharmaceutical treatment is recommended. Pharmaceutical treatment consists of dopamine agonists such as cabergoline and somatostatin analogues that include octreotide and pasireotide; retinoic acid is of theoretical interest while peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma-ligands are not clinically useful. In acromegaly, pegvisomant is a further treatment option. Temozolomide should be considered in aggressive pituitary tumors. In general, pharmaceutical options developed recently have extended the repertoire of treatment possibilities of pituitary tumors. PMID:24592317

  3. Regulated expression of chimaeric genes containing the 5'-flanking regions of human growth hormone-related genes in transiently transfected rat anterior pituitary tumor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cattini, P A; Eberhardt, N L

    1987-01-01

    The expression and hormonal regulation of chimaeric genes containing the 5'-flanking regions of the normal human growth hormone (hGH-1), the variant hGH (hGH-2) and chorionic somatomammotropin (hCS-1) genes fused to the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene has been examined after transient transfection into cultured rat pituitary (GC), and non-pituitary (HeLa and Rat 2) tumor cells. As assessed by levels of CAT activity, the hGH-1 and hCS-1 gene hybrids were expressed at 5- to 25-fold higher levels in GC cells than in HeLa or Rat 2 cells. The hGH-2 gene hybrid was expressed at very low levels in all 3 cell types. Triiodothyronine treatment of transiently transfected GC cells had little effect on CAT activity from the hGH-1 gene hybrid but increased CAT activity from the hCS-1 gene hybrid. A slight but significant increase in CAT expression was detected with both genes after dexamethasone treatment. The data indicate that elements present on the hGH-1 and hCS-1 genes' 5'-flanking DNA are required for the efficient expression of these genes in GC cells. Images PMID:3644237

  4. Pituitary specific retinoid-X receptor ligand interactions with thyroid hormone receptor signaling revealed by high throughput reporter and endogenous gene responses.

    PubMed

    Mengeling, Brenda J; Furlow, J David

    2015-10-01

    Disruption of thyroid hormone (TH) signaling can compromise vital processes both during development and in the adult. We previously reported on high-throughput screening experiments for man-made TH disruptors using a stably integrated line of rat pituitary cells, GH3.TRE-Luc, in which a thyroid hormone receptor (TR) response element drives luciferase (Luc) expression. In these experiments, several retinoid/rexinoid compounds activated the reporter. Here we show that all-trans and 13-cis retinoic acid appear to function through the heterodimer partners of TRs, retinoid-X receptors (RXRs), as RXR antagonists abrogated retinoid-induced activation. The retinoids also induced known endogenous TR target genes, showing good correlation with Luc activity. Synthetic RXR-specific agonists significantly activated all tested TR target genes, but interestingly, retinoid/rexinoid activation was more consistent between genes than the extent of T3-induced activation. In contrast, the retinoids neither activated the Luc reporter construct in transient transfection assays in the human hepatocarcinoma cell line HuH7, nor two of the same T3-induced genes examined in pituitary cells. These data demonstrate the suitability and sensitivity of GH3.TRE-Luc cells for screening chemical compound libraries for TH disruption and suggest that the extent of disruption can vary on a cell type and gene-specific bases, including an underappreciated contribution by RXRs. PMID:26096596

  5. [Impact on human health of hormonal additives used in animal production].

    PubMed

    Larrea, Fernando; Chirinos, Mayel

    2007-01-01

    The establishment of the impact of environmental compounds or additives with hormone-like activity on human health still requires further investigation, as well as a reexamination of biologic models and experimental methodology employed so far. In 1988, the FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives Joint with the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) considered that sexual hormone residues usually present in meat do not represent a risk for human consumption. Nevertheless, this resolution seems to be uncertain since the scientific elements employed for this statement may not be adequate. In this review the principal objections to the evidence used to establish the innocuousness of growth promoter hormones are considered.

  6. [Impact on human health of hormonal additives used in animal production].

    PubMed

    Larrea, Fernando; Chirinos, Mayel

    2007-01-01

    The establishment of the impact of environmental compounds or additives with hormone-like activity on human health still requires further investigation, as well as a reexamination of biologic models and experimental methodology employed so far. In 1988, the FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives Joint with the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) considered that sexual hormone residues usually present in meat do not represent a risk for human consumption. Nevertheless, this resolution seems to be uncertain since the scientific elements employed for this statement may not be adequate. In this review the principal objections to the evidence used to establish the innocuousness of growth promoter hormones are considered. PMID:17910413

  7. A rare case of type 1 diabetes mellitus with pituitary hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Jostol; Sudeep, K; Venkatesha, B M

    2014-01-01

    Growth failure and pubertal abnormalities are not uncommon in chronic uncontrolled metabolic diseases like diabetes mellitus. We present a young girl with uncontrolled type 1 diabetes mellitus, who presented with short stature and primary amenorrhea, and on evaluation was found to have anterior pituitary hypoplasia. In addition to uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, she presented with early onset growth failure and lack of spontaneous secondary sexual characteristics. She had central hypothyroidism and inappropriately normal gonadotropin levels. However her serum cortisol levels were normal. MRI of the sellar-suprasellar region revealed a small anterior pituitary gland with thinning of the pituitary stalk consistent with pituitary hypoplasia. While uncontrolled type 1 diabetes itself may cause growth retardation and pubertal abnormalities, this girl had coexisting pituitary maldevelopment - a rare co-existence of two major illnesses of unrelated etiologies. The partial pituitary hormonal deficiency, which spared the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis, may be due to a transcription factor defect.

  8. Intracellular mechanisms involved in copper-gonadotropin-releasing hormone (Cu-GnRH) complex-induced cAMP/PKA signaling in female rat anterior pituitary cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gajewska, Alina; Zielinska-Gorska, Marlena; Wolinska-Witort, Ewa; Siawrys, Gabriela; Baran, Marta; Kotarba, Grzegorz; Biernacka, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    The copper-gonadotropin-releasing hormone molecule (Cu-GnRH) is a GnRH analog, which preserves its amino acid sequence, but which contains a Cu(2+) ion stably bound to the nitrogen atoms including that of the imidazole ring of Histidine(2). A previous report indicated that Cu-GnRH was able to activate cAMP/PKA signaling in anterior pituitary cells in vitro, but raised the question of which intracellular mechanism(s) mediated the Cu-GnRH-induced cAMP synthesis in gonadotropes. To investigate this mechanism, in the present study, female rat anterior pituitary cells in vitro were pretreated with 0.1 μM antide, a GnRH antagonist; 0.1 μM cetrorelix, a GnRH receptor antagonist; 0.1 μM PACAP6-38, a PAC-1 receptor antagonist; 2 μM GF109203X, a protein kinase C inhibitor; 50 mM PMA, a protein kinase C activator; the protein kinase A inhibitors H89 (30 μM) and KT5720 (60 nM); factors affecting intracellular calcium activity: 2.5 mM EGTA; 2 μM thapsigargin; 5 μM A23187, a Ca(2+) ionophore; or 10 μg/ml cycloheximide, a protein synthesis inhibitor. After one of the above pretreatments, cells were incubated in the presence of 0.1 μM Cu-GnRH for 0.5, 1, and 3 h. Radioimmunoassay analysis of cAMP confirmed the functional link between Cu-GnRH stimulation and cAMP/PKA signal transduction in rat anterior pituitary cells, demonstrating increased intracellular cAMP, which was reduced in the presence of specific PKA inhibitors. The stimulatory effect of Cu-GnRH on cAMP production was partly dependent on GnRH receptor activation. In addition, an indirect and Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism might be involved in intracellular adenylate cyclase stimulation. Neither activation of protein kinase C nor new protein synthesis was involved in the Cu-GnRH-induced increase of cAMP in the rat anterior pituitary primary cultures. Presented data indicate that conformational changes of GnRH molecule resulting from cooper ion coordination affect specific pharmacological properties of Cu

  9. POTENTIAL ROLE OF TUBERO-INFUNDIBULAR DOPAMINERGIC NEURONS IN THE DISRUPTION OF PITUITARY HORMONE SECRETION BY ATRAZINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previously, we demonstrated that atrazine suppressed the ovulatory surge of luteininzing hormone and disrupted estrous cycles in the female rat. We also reported that this disruption of ovulation is likely the result of atrazine's effect on hypothalamic gonadotropin hormone rele...

  10. Endogenous opioids participate in the regulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-luteinizing hormone axis and testosterone's negative feedback control of luteinizing hormone.

    PubMed

    Cicero, T J; Schainker, B A; Meyer, E R

    1979-05-01

    Two narcotic antagonists, naloxone and naltrexone, significantly elevated serum LH levels in male rats within minutes after their sc injection. The peak increase in serum LH occurred 20 min after the injection. Naloxone increased LH levels up to a dose of 1 mg/kg, after which no further increases were found. A dose of 0.35 mg/kg produced a half-maximal response. The exogenous opioid morphine blocked the increase in LH produced by naloxone in a dose-dependent fashion, suggesting that the specific receptor-blocking effects of the antagonist could account for its enhancement of serum LH levels. The locus of action of naloxone within the hypothalamic-pituitary-LH axis appeared to be at the level of the hypothalamus since the drug had no effect on LHRH-stimulated release of LH by the anterior pituitary and did not block dihydrotestosterone's suppression of pituitary LH release in vitro. Naloxone also prevented testosterone's negative feedback inhibition of serum LH in the castrated male rat. The results of these studies suggest that endogenous opioids exist in brain tissue which normally inhibit activity in the hypothalamic-pituitary-LH axis and participate in the androgen-dependent feedback control of LH elaboration by this axis. PMID:374068

  11. Regulation of Thyroid-stimulating Hormone Release from the Pituitary by Thyroxine during Metamorphosis in Xenopus laevis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmentally-relevant chemicals such as perchlorate have the ability to disrupt the hypothalamo-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis of exposed individuals. Larval anurans are a particularly suitable model species for studying the effects of thyroid-disrupting chemicals (TDCs) becaus...

  12. Influence of season and nutritional status on the direct effects of leptin, orexin-A and ghrelin on luteinizing hormone and growth hormone secretion in the ovine pituitary explant model.

    PubMed

    Kirsz, K; Szczesna, M; Dudek, K; Bartlewski, P M; Zieba, D A

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether leptin (anorexigenic peptide), orexin-A, and ghrelin (orexigenic peptides) could directly (ie, independently of hypothalamic influences) affect the secretion of luteinizing hormone (LH) and growth hormone (GH) by adenohypophyseal (AP) explants obtained from normally fed or fasted (48 h) ewes during the breeding and nonbreeding seasons. In addition, a specific ovine super leptin antagonist (SLAN-3) was used to assess the interactions between leptin and ghrelin and/or orexin-A. Pituitary glands from 16 ovariectomized Polish Longwool ewes that had received estradiol-releasing subcutaneous implants were collected in the breeding (November; n = 8) and nonbreeding (May; n = 8) seasons. The AP explants were incubated for 240 min in a gas-liquid interface and treated with leptin (50 ng/mL), ghrelin (100 ng/mL), orexin-A (100 ng/mL), and SLAN-3 (500 ng/mL) with orexin-A or ghrelin. Treatments with leptin and SLAN-3 + orexin-A increased (P < 0.05) LH concentrations in the cultures of AP explants from fasted animals in the breeding season. Orexin-A increased (P < 0.05) LH secretion by AP explants from both fasted and fed animals in the breeding season. Ghrelin stimulated (P < 0.05) GH secretion by AP explants collected from fasted animals in nonbreeding season and from normally fed ewes in both seasons. Leptin decreased (P < 0.05) GH secretion by AP explants collected from fasted ewes in both seasons and from nonfasted ewes in the breeding season. However, the treatment with SLAN-3 + ghrelin resulted in greater (P < 0.05) GH concentrations compared with leptin treatment of AP explants from fasted ewes in the breeding season and from normally fed ewes in nonbreeding season. In summary, leptin, orexin-A, and ghrelin exerted direct effects on AP secretory function in an ex situ model and both the reproductive season and nutritional status of the animals impinged on the direct effects of the peptides on LH and GH release

  13. Pituitary resistance to thyroid hormone associated with a base mutation in the hormone-binding domain of the human 3, 5,3[prime]-triiodothyronine receptor-[beta

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Shigekazu; Nakamura, Hirotoshi; Tagami, Tetsuya; Miyoshi, Yohzi; Nogimori, Tsuyoshi; Mitsuma, Terunori; Imura, Hiroo )

    1993-05-01

    Point mutations in the human T[sub 3] receptor-[beta] (TR[beta]) gene causing single amino acid substitutions have been identified in several different kindred with generalized resistance to thyroid hormone. Until now, no study has been reported on the TR gene in cases of pituitary resistance (PRTH). In the present study, the authors analyzed the TR[beta] gene in a 30-yr-old Japanese female with PRTH. She exhibited clinical features of hyperthyroidism, elevated serum thyroid hormone levels accompanied by inappropriately increased secretion of TSH, mildly elevated basal metabolic rate, and increased urinary excretion of hydroxyproline. No pituitary tumor was detected. DNA fragments of exons 3-8 of the geonomic TR[beta] gene were generated by the polymerase chain reaction and analyzed by a single stranded conformation polymorphism method. Exon 7 of the patient's TR[beta] gene showed an abnormal band, suggesting the existence of mutation(s). By subcloning and sequencing the DNA, a point mutation was identified in one allele at nucleotide 1297 (C to T), which altered the 333rd amino acid, arginine, to tryptophan. Neither of her apparently normal parents had any mutations of the TR[beta] gene. In vitro translation products of the mutant TR[beta] gene showed remarkably decreased T[sub 3]-binding activity (K[sub a], 2.1 [times] 10[sup 8] M[sup [minus]1]; normal TR[beta] K[sub a], 1.1 [times] 10[sup 10] M[sup [minus]1]). Since the molecular defect detected in a patient with PRTH is similar to that seen in subjects with generalized resistance to thyroid hormone, both types of the syndrome may represent a continuous spectrum of the same etiological defect with variable tissue resistance to thyroid hormone.

  14. Pituitary function following treatment with reproductive toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, R.L.; Goldman, J.M.; Rehnberg, G.L.

    1986-12-01

    Appropriate regulation of reproductive processes are dependent upon the integrity of pituitary function. In this selected review, the authors evaluate the evidence that certain environmental compounds exert their effect on reproductive function via a direct action on the pituitary gland. They also discuss examples of changes in pituitary hormone secretion that occur in response to changes in neuronal or gonadal control of the pituitary. A limited number of studies suggest that measures of pituitary hormone secretion provide an early and sensitive measure of a compound's potential effects on the reproductive system. However, the most striking aspect of this area is the sparse and inconsistent information describing pituitary function following exposure to environmental pollutants.

  15. A model for pharmacokinetics and physiological feedback among hormones of the testicular-pituitary axis in adult male rats: a framework for evaluating effects of endocrine active compounds.

    PubMed

    Barton, H A; Andersen, M E

    1998-10-01

    The testicular-hypothalamic-pituitary axis controls reproductive functions in males. A description of the basic physiological interactions in adult rats among testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH), and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) was developed, permitting simulation of hormone levels in testes and blood. This model was used to simulate hormone levels in intact, castrate, ethane dimethanesulfonate-treated, and antiandrogen-treated rats. A large gradient of testosterone concentrations from testicular interstitial fluid to low levels in peripheral blood is created by the testicular blood flow. The dominant feedback loop is positive regulation of testosterone synthesis by LH and negative feedback of testosterone on LH and FSH. The utility of the model for placing in vitro data in the context of in vivo physiology was illustrated for the case of continued synthesis of testosterone by the isolated testes. In the absence of blood flow, very low residual testosterone synthesis can substantially increase testosterone concentration in isolated testes. Effects of an exogenous endocrine active compound were illustrated by modeling altered LH and FSH regulation by testosterone in the presence of an antiandrogen acting as a competitive ligand for the androgen receptor. Increasing concentrations have no effect on steady-state hormone levels until sufficient levels of antiandrogen are achieved to reduce negative feedback of testosterone on LH and FSH. In summary, a model has been developed that provides a basis for initiating evaluations of key issues of concern for the risk assessment of endocrine active compounds including in vitro to in vivo extrapolation and their dose-response behaviors.

  16. Hypothalamic and pituitary dysfunction in obese males.

    PubMed

    Amatruda, J M; Hochstein, M; Hsu, T H; Lockwood, D H

    1982-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated dysfunction of the hypothalamic-hypophyseal axis in obesity. We have studied 12 obese males to further characterize the extent of this dysfunction. The hypothalamic-hypophyseal-gonadal axis is normal as determined by the testicular response to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), the pituitary response to 200 micrograms gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), and the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular response to clomiphene. Although L-dopa suppresses prolactin normally, the ability of thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) to stimulate the release of prolactin and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) is blunted. These latter responses are inversely related to the degree of obesity. The response to chlorpromazine, a hypothalamic stimulus for prolactin secretion, is also blunted, and to a greater extent than the prolactin response to TRH. These data indicate that exogenous obesity in males is associated with more extensive hypothalamic and pituitary dysfunction than previously realized. The abnormalities with regard to prolactin and TSH release become progressively worse when body weight exceeds 200 percent of ideal. In addition, when evaluating pituitary function with regard to gonadotropin release, obese males may have an abnormal response to 100 micrograms GnRH but respond normally to 200 micrograms.

  17. Cardiac and metabolic effects of chronic growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor I excess in young adults with pituitary gigantism.

    PubMed

    Bondanelli, Marta; Bonadonna, Stefania; Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria; Doga, Mauro; Gola, Monica; Onofri, Alessandro; Zatelli, Maria Chiara; Giustina, Andrea; degli Uberti, Ettore C

    2005-09-01

    Chronic growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) excess is associated with considerable mortality in acromegaly, but no data are available in pituitary gigantism. The aim of the study was to evaluate the long-term effects of early exposure to GH and IGF-I excess on cardiovascular and metabolic parameters in adult patients with pituitary gigantism. Six adult male patients with newly diagnosed gigantism due to GH secreting pituitary adenoma were studied and compared with 6 age- and sex-matched patients with acromegaly and 10 healthy subjects. Morphologic and functional cardiac parameters were evaluated by Doppler echocardiography. Glucose metabolism was assessed by evaluating glucose tolerance and homeostasis model assessment index. Disease duration was significantly longer (P<.05) in patients with gigantism than in patients with acromegaly, whereas GH and IGF-I concentrations were comparable. Left ventricular mass was increased both in patients with gigantism and in patients with acromegaly, as compared with controls. Left ventricular hypertrophy was detected in 2 of 6 of both patients with gigantism and patients with acromegaly, and isolated intraventricular septum thickening in 1 patient with gigantism. Inadequate diastolic filling (ratio between early and late transmitral flow velocity<1) was detected in 2 of 6 patients with gigantism and 1 of 6 patients with acromegaly. Impaired glucose metabolism occurrence was higher in patients with acromegaly (66%) compared with patients with gigantism (16%). Concentrations of IGF-I were significantly (P<.05) higher in patients with gigantism who have cardiac abnormalities than in those without cardiac abnormalities. In conclusion, our data suggest that GH/IGF-I excess in young adult patients is associated with morphologic and functional cardiac abnormalities that are similar in patients with gigantism and in patients with acromegaly, whereas occurrence of impaired glucose metabolism appears to be higher in

  18. Cardiac and metabolic effects of chronic growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor I excess in young adults with pituitary gigantism.

    PubMed

    Bondanelli, Marta; Bonadonna, Stefania; Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria; Doga, Mauro; Gola, Monica; Onofri, Alessandro; Zatelli, Maria Chiara; Giustina, Andrea; degli Uberti, Ettore C

    2005-09-01

    Chronic growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) excess is associated with considerable mortality in acromegaly, but no data are available in pituitary gigantism. The aim of the study was to evaluate the long-term effects of early exposure to GH and IGF-I excess on cardiovascular and metabolic parameters in adult patients with pituitary gigantism. Six adult male patients with newly diagnosed gigantism due to GH secreting pituitary adenoma were studied and compared with 6 age- and sex-matched patients with acromegaly and 10 healthy subjects. Morphologic and functional cardiac parameters were evaluated by Doppler echocardiography. Glucose metabolism was assessed by evaluating glucose tolerance and homeostasis model assessment index. Disease duration was significantly longer (P<.05) in patients with gigantism than in patients with acromegaly, whereas GH and IGF-I concentrations were comparable. Left ventricular mass was increased both in patients with gigantism and in patients with acromegaly, as compared with controls. Left ventricular hypertrophy was detected in 2 of 6 of both patients with gigantism and patients with acromegaly, and isolated intraventricular septum thickening in 1 patient with gigantism. Inadequate diastolic filling (ratio between early and late transmitral flow velocity<1) was detected in 2 of 6 patients with gigantism and 1 of 6 patients with acromegaly. Impaired glucose metabolism occurrence was higher in patients with acromegaly (66%) compared with patients with gigantism (16%). Concentrations of IGF-I were significantly (P<.05) higher in patients with gigantism who have cardiac abnormalities than in those without cardiac abnormalities. In conclusion, our data suggest that GH/IGF-I excess in young adult patients is associated with morphologic and functional cardiac abnormalities that are similar in patients with gigantism and in patients with acromegaly, whereas occurrence of impaired glucose metabolism appears to be higher in

  19. Supplementation of dietary vitamins, protein and probiotics on semen traits and immunohistochemical study of pituitary hormones in zinc-induced molted broiler breeders.

    PubMed

    Khan, Rifat Ullah; Rahman, Zia-ur-; Javed, Ijaz; Muhammad, Faqir

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of dietary vitamin E and vitamin C, probiotics mixture and protein level and their combination on semen quality and immunohistochemical study of some pituitary hormones in male broiler breeders. One hundred and eighty male broiler breeders 65 weeks old were divided into six groups by completely randomized design. The birds were subjected to zinc-induced molt by mixing zinc oxide at the rate of 3000mg/kg in the feed. After molting, one group was fed control diet (CP16%). The other groups were fed vitamin E (100IU/kg), vitamin C (500IU/kg), probiotics (50mg/L of drinking water), protein (CP14%) and combination of these components. These treatments were given for five weeks. After the feeding period, semen samples were taken and analyzed for semen volume, sperm concentration, motility and dead sperm percentage. Pituitary samples were collected from three birds per replicate and were processed for immunohistochemical study. The results of semen quality parameters revealed that semen volume and sperm motility were significantly high in the vitamin E fed group, while the dead sperm percentage decreased significantly in the vitamin C group. The morphometric analysis revealed that compared to other groups, vitamin E caused a significant increase in the size and area of FSH, LH gonadotropes and lactotropes. These results showed that vitamin E alone may play some role in the enhancement of semen quality and growth of gonadotropes and lactotropes.

  20. The pituitary hormones arginine vasopressin-neurophysin II and oxytocin-neurophysin I show close linkage with interleukin-1 on mouse chromosome 2

    SciTech Connect

    Marini, J.C.; Nelson, K.K.; Siracusa, L.D. ); Battey, J. )

    1993-01-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) and oxytocin (OXT) are posterior pituitary hormones. AVP is involved in fluid homeostasis, while OXT is involved in lactation and parturition. AVP is derived from a larger precursor, prepro-arginine-vasopressin-neurophysin II (prepro-AVP-NP II; AVP), and is physically linked to prepro-oxytocin-neurophysin I (prepro-OXT-NPI1; OXT). The genes for AVP and OXT are separated by only 12 kb of DNA in humans, whereas in the mouse 3.5 kb of intergenic sequence lies between Avp and Oxt. Interspecific backcross analysis has now been used to map the Avp/Oxt complex to chromosome 2 in the mouse. This map position confirms and extends the known region of linkage conservation between mouse chromosome 2 and human chromosome 20. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Hormonal status modifies renin-angiotensin system-regulating aminopeptidases and vasopressin-degrading activity in the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis of female mice.

    PubMed

    García, María Jesús; Martínez-Martos, José Manuel; Mayas, María Dolores; Carrera, María Pilar; De la Chica, Susana; Cortés, Pedro; Ramírez-Expósito, María Jesús

    2008-07-01

    The hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) participates in the maintenance of cardiovascular functions and in the control of blood pressure. By other hand, it is known that blood pressure regulation and HPA activity are affected by sex hormones. The aim of the present work is to analyze the influence of estradiol and progesterone on renin-angiotensin system (RAS)-regulating aminopeptidase A, aminopeptidase B and aminopeptidase N activities and vasopressin-degrading activity in the HPA axis of ovariectomized mice and ovariectomized mice treated subscutaneously with different doses of estradiol and progesterone. Our data suggest that in female mice, estradiol and progesterone influence RAS-regulating and vasopressin-degrading activities at different levels of the HPA axis.

  2. Anterior pituitary function in patients with newly diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Templ, E; Koeller, M; Riedl, M; Wagner, O; Graninger, W; Luger, A

    1996-04-01

    Hormonal dysfunction involving the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, prolactin (PRL) secretion and sex hormone status has been supposed to contribute to the development or persistence of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In addition, a reduced number of glucocorticoid receptors on circulating lymphocytes has been found in patients with RA. However, so far most studies have been performed in pre-treated patients. A combined test for total anterior pituitary reserve was performed in 10 patients with newly diagnosed untreated RA. Before and after stimulation with the respective hypothalamic releasing hormones, RA patients showed no difference in plasma concentrations of adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH), cortisol, prolactin (PRL) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) when compared to healthy controls. In contrast, the growth hormone (GH) response to growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) was blunted in RA patients. The hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid/gonadal and adrenal axes seem to be unaltered in RA. However, if one considers the presence of chronic inflammation, normal plasma ACTH and cortisol concentrations must be considered as inappropriately low. The observed blunted GH release could be mediated by cytokines (e.g. IL-1), which are known to be elevated in RA.

  3. Familial pituitary tumors.

    PubMed

    Alband, Neda; Korbonits, Márta

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas are benign intracranial neoplasms that present a major clinical concern due to hormone overproduction and/or tumor mass effects. The majority of pituitary adenomas occur sporadically; however, familial cases are increasingly being recognized, such as multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), Carney complex (CNC), and familial isolated pituitary adenoma (FIPA). Familial pituitary tumors appear to differ from their sporadic counterparts both in their genetic basis and in clinical characteristics. Evidence suggests that, especially in MEN1 and FIPA, tumors are more aggressive and affect patients at a younger age, therefore justifying the importance of early diagnosis, while in Carney complex pituitary hyperplasia is common. The genetic alterations responsible for the formation of familial pituitary syndromes include the MEN1 gene, responsible for about 80% of MEN1 cases, the regulatory subunit of the protein kinase A, PRKAR1A, responsible for about 70% of Carney complex cases, and AIP, the gene coding the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein, responsible for about 20% of FIPA cases. Rarely other genes have also been found responsible for familial pituitary adenoma cases. McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) also has a genetic origin due to mosaic mutations in the G protein-coupled α subunit coded by the GNAS1 gene. In this chapter, we summarize the genetic and clinical characteristics of these familial pituitary syndromes and MAS. PMID:25248598

  4. Double, synchronous pituitary adenomas causing acromegaly and Cushing's disease. A case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Zieliński, Grzegorz; Maksymowicz, Maria; Podgórski, Jan; Olszewski, Włodzimierz T

    2013-06-01

    Double pituitary adenomas are very rare and present up to 1 % of pituitary adenomas in unselected autopsy series and up to 2 % in large surgical series. We report a case of a 47-year-old man presented slight clinical features of acromegaly with 2 years duration. Endocrine evaluation confirmed active acromegaly and revealed adrenocorticotropin hormone-dependent hypercortisolemia. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging of the pituitary demonstrated clearly separated double microadenomas with different intensity. The patient underwent transsphenoidal surgery and both tumors were completely removed and were fixed separately. The histological and ultrastructural examination confirmed coincidence of the double, clearly separated pituitary adenomas in one gland. Postoperative function of the hypothalamo-hypophyseal axis was normalized. We conclude from this case and a literature review that double endocrinologically active pituitary adenomas leading to acromegaly and Cushing's disease may occur. Additionally, a review of the literature regarding multiple pituitary adenomas has also been performed.

  5. Blood, pituitary, and brain renin-angiotensin systems and regulation of secretion of anterior pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Ganong, W F

    1993-07-01

    In addition to increasing blood pressure, stimulating aldosterone and vasopressin secretion, and increasing water intake, angiotensin II affects the secretion of anterior pituitary hormones. Some of these effects are direct. There are angiotensin II receptors on lactotropes and corticotropes in rats, and there may be receptors on thyrotropes and other secretory cells. Circulating angiotensin II reaches these receptors, but angiotensin II is almost certainly generated locally by the pituitary renin-angiotensin system as well. There are also indirect effects produced by the effects of brain angiotensin II on the secretion of hypophyseotropic hormones. In the anterior pituitary of the rat, the gonadotropes contain renin, angiotensin II, and some angiotensin-converting enzyme. There is debate about whether these cells also contain small amounts of angiotensinogen, but most of the angiotensinogen is produced by a separate population of cells and appears to pass in a paracrine fashion to the gonadotropes. An analogous situation exists in the brain. Neurons contain angiotensin II and probably renin, but most angiotensin-converting enzyme is located elsewhere and angiotensinogen is primarily if not solely produced by astrocytes. Angiotensin II causes secretion of prolactin and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) when added to pituitary cells in vitro. Paracrine regulation of prolactin secretion by angiotensin II from the gonadotropes may occur in vitro under certain circumstances, but the effects of peripheral angiotensin II on ACTH secretion appear to be mediated via the brain and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). In the brain, there is good evidence that locally generated angiotensin II causes release of norepinephrine that in turn stimulates gonadotropin-releasing hormone-secreting neurons, increasing circulating luteinizing hormone. In addition, there is evidence that angiotensin II acts in the arcuate nuclei to increase the secretion of dopamine into the portal

  6. Connecting proximate mechanisms and evolutionary patterns: pituitary gland size and mammalian life history.

    PubMed

    Kamilar, J M; Tecot, S R

    2015-11-01

    At the proximate level, hormones are known to play a critical role in influencing the life history of mammals, including humans. The pituitary gland is directly responsible for producing several hormones, including those related to growth and reproduction. Although we have a basic understanding of how hormones affect life history characteristics, we still have little knowledge of this relationship in an evolutionary context. We used data from 129 mammal species representing 14 orders to investigate the relationship between pituitary gland size and life history variation. Because pituitary gland size should be related to hormone production and action, we predicted that species with relatively large pituitaries should be associated with fast life histories, especially increased foetal and post-natal growth rates. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that total pituitary size and the size of the anterior lobe of the pituitary significantly predicted a life history axis that was correlated with several traits including body mass, and foetal and post-natal growth rates. Additional models directly examining the association between relative pituitary size and growth rates produced concordant results. We also found that relative pituitary size variation across mammals was best explained by an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck model of evolution, suggesting an important role of stabilizing selection. Our results support the idea that the size of the pituitary is linked to life history variation through evolutionary time. This pattern is likely due to mediating hormone levels but additional work is needed. We suggest that future investigations incorporating endocrine gland size may be critical for understanding life history evolution. PMID:26249034

  7. Clinical features and differential diagnosis of pituitary tumours with emphasis on acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Hennessey, J V; Jackson, I M

    1995-04-01

    Pituitary adenomas are frequently encountered, benign intracranial tumours. Clinically classified according to their capacity to produce and secrete hormones, pituitary tumours are diagnosed from the clinical manifestations and biochemical findings of specific pituitary hormone overproduction or of impaired pituitary function due to pressure on normal pituitary cells, the pituitary stalk or the hypothalamus. Additionally, the tumour may result in neurological manifestations due to its effect as an intracranial space-occupying lesion. Pituitary adenomas may present acutely with pituitary apoplexy after intrapituitary haemorrhage or infarction. The subsequent hypofunction of the pituitary with concomitant neurological sequelae of an expanding intracranial mass are often associated with excruciating headache, diplopia and visual field defects. Gradually developing neurological deficits or secondary endocrine failure over several years may precede the recognition of non-secretory tumours (30-40% of pituitary adenomas) as well as some of the hormone-producing adenomas, especially when they expand beyond the confines of the sella turcica. Asymptomatic masses occur in the pituitary in 5-27% of unselected autopsy series. About 10-20% of pituitaries imaged as part of a brain study contain lesions 'consistent with a pituitary adenoma', with about half being pituitary adenomas ('incidentalomas'). Many advocate screening such cases for a wide spectrum of pituitary function abnormalities. Clinical judgement should be utilized to determine the extent of the work-up and the frequency of follow-up. Acromegaly, a clinical syndrome caused by excess growth hormone secretion, accounts for one-sixth of resected pituitary tumours. This disorder leads to chronic progressive disability and a shortened life span, with approximately 50% of untreated acromegalic patients experiencing premature death. The prevalence of acromegaly has been estimated to range from 50 to 70 per million, with the

  8. Clinical features and differential diagnosis of pituitary tumours with emphasis on acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Hennessey, J V; Jackson, I M

    1995-04-01

    Pituitary adenomas are frequently encountered, benign intracranial tumours. Clinically classified according to their capacity to produce and secrete hormones, pituitary tumours are diagnosed from the clinical manifestations and biochemical findings of specific pituitary hormone overproduction or of impaired pituitary function due to pressure on normal pituitary cells, the pituitary stalk or the hypothalamus. Additionally, the tumour may result in neurological manifestations due to its effect as an intracranial space-occupying lesion. Pituitary adenomas may present acutely with pituitary apoplexy after intrapituitary haemorrhage or infarction. The subsequent hypofunction of the pituitary with concomitant neurological sequelae of an expanding intracranial mass are often associated with excruciating headache, diplopia and visual field defects. Gradually developing neurological deficits or secondary endocrine failure over several years may precede the recognition of non-secretory tumours (30-40% of pituitary adenomas) as well as some of the hormone-producing adenomas, especially when they expand beyond the confines of the sella turcica. Asymptomatic masses occur in the pituitary in 5-27% of unselected autopsy series. About 10-20% of pituitaries imaged as part of a brain study contain lesions 'consistent with a pituitary adenoma', with about half being pituitary adenomas ('incidentalomas'). Many advocate screening such cases for a wide spectrum of pituitary function abnormalities. Clinical judgement should be utilized to determine the extent of the work-up and the frequency of follow-up. Acromegaly, a clinical syndrome caused by excess growth hormone secretion, accounts for one-sixth of resected pituitary tumours. This disorder leads to chronic progressive disability and a shortened life span, with approximately 50% of untreated acromegalic patients experiencing premature death. The prevalence of acromegaly has been estimated to range from 50 to 70 per million, with the

  9. Effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on hormones and genes of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonad axis, and reproduction of zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Ji, Kyunghee; Liu, Xiaoshan; Lee, Saeram; Kang, Sungeun; Kho, Younglim; Giesy, John P; Choi, Kyungho

    2013-06-15

    This study was conducted in two experiments, to identify non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) with high endocrine disruption potentials, and to understand consequences of exposure to such NSAIDs in fish. In the first experiment, the effects of five NSAIDs on hormones and gene transcriptions of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonad (HPG) axis were evaluated after 14 d exposure of adult zebrafish. Ibuprofen and mefenamic acids were identified to increase the concentrations of 17β-estradiol and testosterone in females significantly, while decreased those of testosterone among male fish. Significant up-regulation of fshβ, lhβ, fshr and lhr were observed in females, whereas down-regulation was observed in males exposed to each NSAID. In the second experiment, ibuprofen was chosen as a model chemical. Adult zebrafish pairs were exposed to ibuprofen for 21 d, and the effects on reproduction and development of offspring were examined. The egg production was significantly decreased at ≥1 μg/L ibuprofen, and parental exposure resulted in delayed hatching even when they were transferred to clean water for hatching. The results demonstrated that ibuprofen could modulate hormone production and related gene transcription of the HPG axis in a sex-dependent way, which could cause adverse effects on reproduction and the development of offspring.

  10. Pyroglutamylated RFamide peptide 43 stimulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis via gonadotropin-releasing hormone in rats.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sejal R; Murphy, Kevin G; Thompson, Emily L; Patterson, Michael; Curtis, Annette E; Ghatei, Mohammad A; Bloom, Stephen R

    2008-09-01

    Although it is established that other members of the RFamide family stimulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, the influence of the novel pyroglutamylated RFamide peptide 43 (QRFP43) is not known. We show intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of QRFP43 (2 nmol) to male rats increased plasma LH and FSH levels at 40 min after injection. icv administration of 3 nmol QRFP43 did not affect food intake in ad-libitum-fed male rats. The icv administration of 2 nmol QRFP43 did not significantly influence behavior in male rats. Intraperitoneal administration of doses up to 1200 nmol/kg QRFP43 in male rats did not significantly influence circulating gonadotropin or sex steroid levels. In vitro, QRFP43 stimulated GnRH release from hypothalamic explants from male rats and from GT1-7 cells. Pretreatment with a GnRH receptor antagonist, cetrorelix, blocked the increase in plasma LH levels after icv administration of QRFP43 (2 nmol). These results suggest that icv QRFP43 activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis via GnRH.

  11. Growth hormone expression in murine bone marrow cells is independent of the pituitary transcription factor Pit-1.

    PubMed

    Kooijman, R; Malur, A; Van Buul-Offers, S C; Hooghe-Peters, E L

    1997-09-01

    GH has been shown to promote the development and function of leukocytes. The expression of both GH and GH-receptors in lymphoid cells has led to the hypothesis that GH acts in an autocrine or paracrine fashion. The described effects of GH on hematopoiesis and B cell development, led us to investigate GH expression in bone marrow cells. By immunocytochemistry, we show that bone marrow-derived granulocytes and macrophages contain immunoreactive GH. We found that 65 +/- 24% of the granulocytes were stained with anti-GH, whereas 5.8 +/- 1.5% of the granulocytes contained detectable amounts of GH mRNA as assessed by in situ hybridization. To address a possible alternative regulation mechanism in bone marrow and to establish whether locally derived GH might still play a role in pituitary-deficient dwarf mice, we also addressed GH expression in bone marrow from hypopituitary Snell dwarf mice. These mice have a mutated gene for the pituitary transcription factor Pit-1 that is deficient in DNA binding. Our finding that GH expression (immunoreactive protein and mRNA) in bone marrow cells from dwarf mice is similar to that in normal mice points to a Pit-1 independent regulation of GH in mouse bone marrow.

  12. Hypothalamic and pituitary function in hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Paulson, D F; Wiebe, H R; Hammond, C B

    1975-09-01

    Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism has been identified as a cause of partial or complete failure of puberty, may be familial and may have other associated abnormalities of hyposmia, intellectual retardation, perceptive deafness, color blindness, skeletal deformities, and gynecomastia. Pituitary function is usually normal with the primary defect believed to be hypothalamic. A twenty-year-old white male with a clinical diagnosis of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and anosmia under-went complete endocrine evaluation with evaluation of the pituitary response to luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone. FSH (follicle-stimulating hormone) and LH (luteinizing hormone) release after luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone did occur, but the response was less than that seen in normal controls. Evaluation demonstrated that the pituitary-gonadal axis was intact with the hypothalamic-pituitary axis being defective. Therapy with the synthetic decapeptide (luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone) is correct theoretically and may be superior to therapy with exogenous gonadotropins.

  13. Age-related alterations in pituitary and testicular functions in long-lived growth hormone receptor gene-disrupted mice.

    PubMed

    Chandrashekar, Varadaraj; Dawson, Christina R; Martin, Eric R; Rocha, Juliana S; Bartke, Andrzej; Kopchick, John J

    2007-12-01

    The somatotropic axis, GH, and IGF-I interact with the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in health and disease. GH-resistant GH receptor-disrupted knockout (GHRKO) male mice are fertile but exhibit delayed puberty and decreases in plasma FSH levels, testicular content of LH, and prolactin (PRL) receptors, whereas PRL levels are elevated. Because the lifespan of GHRKO mice is much greater than the lifespan of their normal siblings, it was of interest to compare age-related changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in GHRKO and normal animals. Plasma IGF-I, insulin, PRL, LH, FSH, androstenedione and testosterone levels, and acute responses to GnRH and LH were measured in young (2-4 and 5-6 months of age) and old (18-19 and 23-26 months of age) male GHRKO mice and their normal siblings. Plasma IGF-I was not detectable in GHRKO mice. Plasma PRL levels increased with age in normal mice but declined in GHRKO males, and did not differ in old GHRKO and normal animals. Plasma LH responses to acute GnRH stimulation were attenuated in GHRKO mice but increased with age only in normal mice. Plasma FSH levels were decreased in GHRKO mice regardless of age. Plasma testosterone responses to LH stimulation were attenuated in old mice regardless of genotype, whereas plasma androstenedione responses were reduced with age only in GHRKO mice. Testicular IGF-I mRNA levels were normal in young and increased in old GHRKO mice, whereas testicular concentrations and total IGF-I levels were decreased in these animals. These findings indicate that GH resistance due to targeted disruption of the GH receptor gene in mice leads to suppression of testicular IGF-I levels, and modifies the effects of aging on plasma PRL levels and responses of the pituitary and testes to GnRH and LH stimulation. Plasma testosterone levels declined during aging in normal but not in GHRKO mice, and the age-related increase in the LH responses to exogenous GnRH was absent in GHRKO mice, perhaps reflecting a

  14. SAH pituitary adrenal dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Vespa, P

    2011-09-01

    Disruption of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis may occur after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, resulting in hypopituitarism. An electronic literature search was conducted to identify articles with English-language abstracts published between 1980 and March 2011 that addressed hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis insufficiency and hormone replacement. A total of 18 observational and prospective, randomized studies were selected for this review. Limited data are available evaluating pituitary effects during the acute stage after subarachnoid hemorrhage, with inconsistent results reported. Overall, acutely after subarachnoid hemorrhage, cortisol levels may initially be supranormal, decreasing toward normal levels over time. During the months to years after subarachnoid hemorrhage, pituitary deficiency may occur in up to one in three patients. Limited data suggest modest outcome benefits with fludrocortisone and no benefit or harm from corticosteroids. PMID:21800209

  15. Relative effectiveness of carp pituitary extract, luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analog LHRHa injections and LHRHa implants for producing hybrid catfish fry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adoption of the hybrid catfish (channel catfish, Ictalruus punctatus, female x blue catfish, I. furcatus, male) is increasing in the catfish industry. The most effective way to produce fry is hormone induced spawning of females coupled with hand stripping and in vitro fertilization. The success of...

  16. Pituitary Disorders and Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Jawiarczyk-Przybyłowska, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Various hormonal disorders can influence bone metabolism and cause secondary osteoporosis. The consequence of this is a significant increase of fracture risk. Among pituitary disorders such effects are observed in patients with Cushing's disease, hyperprolactinemia, acromegaly, and hypopituitarism. Severe osteoporosis is the result of the coexistence of some of these disorders and hypogonadism at the same time, which is quite often. PMID:25873948

  17. Mortality and pituitary disease.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Paul M; Sherlock, Mark

    2012-04-01

    Outcome data from large series confirm increased mortality of patients with pituitary tumours, predominantly due to vascular disease. Control of cortisol secretion and growth hormone (GH) hypersecretion (together with cardiovascular risk factor reduction) is key in the normalisation of mortality rates in patients with Cushing's disease and acromegaly, respectively, though some excess mortality may persist even in "cured" patients.

  18. Imaging of the pituitary and parasellar region.

    PubMed

    Zee, Chi S; Go, John L; Kim, Paul E; Mitchell, David; Ahmadi, Jamshid

    2003-01-01

    The pituitary is part of a chain of enormous biologic amplification, which is regulated by a small amount of releasing factors in the portal blood from the hypothalamus. The pituitary is a master gland that regulates a number of hormones. A subtle abnormality in the pituitary can cause significant changes in body metabolism. Because the pituitary glands are small structures, high-resolution imaging techniques are required to satisfactorily evaluate the gland. It is imperative for the radiologist to be familiar with the anatomy, physiology, and pathology of the pituitary gland, which provides a solid foundation for accurate interpretation of the imaging studies of the pituitary gland. PMID:12690979

  19. Gene Therapy for Pituitary Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Seilicovich, Adriana; Pisera, Daniel; Sciascia, Sandra A.; Candolfi, Marianela; Puntel, Mariana; Xiong, Weidong; Jaita, Gabriela; Castro, Maria G.

    2009-01-01

    Pituitary tumors are the most common primary intracranial neoplasms. Although most pituitary tumors are considered typically benign, others can cause severe and progressive disease. The principal aims of pituitary tumor treatment are the elimination or reduction of the tumor mass, normalization of hormone secretion and preservation of remaining pituitary function. In spite of major advances in the therapy of pituitary tumors, for some of the most difficult tumors, current therapies that include medical, surgical and radiotherapeutic methods are often unsatisfactory and there is a need to develop new treatment strategies. Gene therapy, which uses nucleic acids as drugs, has emerged as an attractive therapeutic option for the treatment of pituitary tumors that do not respond to classical treatment strategies if the patients become intolerant to the therapy. The development of animal models for pituitary tumors and hormone hypersecretion has proven to be critical for the implementation of novel treatment strategies and gene therapy approaches. Preclinical trials using several gene therapy approaches for the treatment of anterior pituitary diseases have been successfully implemented. Several issues need to be addressed before clinical implementation becomes a reality, including the development of more effective and safer viral vectors, uncovering novel therapeutic targets and development of targeted expression of therapeutic transgenes. With the development of efficient gene delivery vectors allowing long-term transgene expression with minimal toxicity, gene therapy will become one of the most promising approaches for treating pituitary adenomas. PMID:16457646

  20. Comparison of effects of estradiol with those of octylmethoxycinnamate and 4-methylbenzylidene camphor on fat tissue, lipids and pituitary hormones

    SciTech Connect

    Seidlova-Wuttke, Dana; Christoffel, Julie; Rimoldi, Guillermo; Jarry, Hubertus; Wuttke, Wolfgang . E-mail: ufkendo@med.uni-goettingen.de

    2006-07-01

    Octylmethoxycinnamate (OMC) and 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4MBC) are commercially used absorbers of ultraviolet (UV) light. In rats, they were shown to exert endocrine disrupting including uterotrophic, i.e. estrogenic effects. Estrogens have also metabolic effects, therefore the impact of oral application of the two UV absorbers at 2 doses for 3 months on lipids and hormones were compared with those of estradiol-17{beta} (E2). E2, OMC and 4MBC reduced weight gain, the size of fat depots and serum leptin, a lipocyte-derived hormone, when compared to the ovariectomized control animals. Serum triglycerides were also reduced by the UV screens but not by E2. On the other hand, E2 and OMC reduced serum cholesterol, low density lipoproteins and high density lipoproteins; this effect was not shared by 4MBC. While E2 inhibited, OMC and 4MBC stimulated serum LH levels. In the uterus, both UV filters had mild stimulatory effects. 4MBC inhibited serum T4 resulting in increased serum TSH levels. It is concluded that OMC and 4MBC have effects on several metabolic parameters such as fat and lipid homeostasis as well as on thyroid hormone production. Many of these effects are not shared by E2. Hence, other than estrogen-receptive mechanisms may be responsible for these effects.

  1. Comparison of effects of estradiol with those of octylmethoxycinnamate and 4-methylbenzylidene camphor on fat tissue, lipids and pituitary hormones.

    PubMed

    Seidlová-Wuttke, Dana; Christoffel, Julie; Rimoldi, Guillermo; Jarry, Hubertus; Wuttke, Wolfgang

    2006-07-01

    Octylmethoxycinnamate (OMC) and 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4MBC) are commercially used absorbers of ultraviolet (UV) light. In rats, they were shown to exert endocrine disrupting including uterotrophic, i.e. estrogenic effects. Estrogens have also metabolic effects, therefore the impact of oral application of the two UV absorbers at 2 doses for 3 months on lipids and hormones were compared with those of estradiol-17beta (E2). E2, OMC and 4MBC reduced weight gain, the size of fat depots and serum leptin, a lipocyte-derived hormone, when compared to the ovariectomized control animals. Serum triglycerides were also reduced by the UV screens but not by E2. On the other hand, E2 and OMC reduced serum cholesterol, low density lipoproteins and high density lipoproteins; this effect was not shared by 4MBC. While E2 inhibited, OMC and 4MBC stimulated serum LH levels. In the uterus, both UV filters had mild stimulatory effects. 4MBC inhibited serum T4 resulting in increased serum TSH levels. It is concluded that OMC and 4MBC have effects on several metabolic parameters such as fat and lipid homeostasis as well as on thyroid hormone production. Many of these effects are not shared by E2. Hence, other than estrogen-receptive mechanisms may be responsible for these effects.

  2. Ghrelin and anterior pituitary function.

    PubMed

    Lanfranco, Fabio; Motta, Giovanna; Baldi, Matteo; Gasco, Valentina; Grottoli, Silvia; Benso, Andrea; Broglio, Fabio; Ghigo, Ezio

    2010-01-01

    Ghrelin, a 28-amino-acid octanoylated peptide predominantly produced by the stomach, was discovered to be the natural ligand of the type 1a GH secretagogue receptor. Thus, it was considered as a natural GH secretagogue (GHS) additional to GHRH, although later on ghrelin has mostly been considered a major orexigenic factor. The GH-releasing action of ghrelin takes place both directly on pituitary cells and through modulation of GHRH from the hypothalamus; some functional anti-somatostatin action has also been shown. However, even at the neuroendocrine level, ghrelin is much more than a natural GHS. In fact, it significantly stimulates prolactin secretion in humans, independent of both gender and age and probably involving a direct action on somatomammotroph cells. Above all, ghrelin and synthetic GHS possess an acute stimulatory effect on the activity of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis in humans, which is, at least, similar to that of the opioid antagonist naloxone, arginine vasopressin and even corticotropin-releasing hormone. Also, ghrelin plays a relevant role in the modulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal function, with a predominantly CNS-mediated inhibitory effect upon the gonadotropin pulsatility both in animals and in humans.

  3. Endocrinology of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis with particular reference to the hormonal control of spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, A M; Bremner, W J

    1987-02-01

    The normal physiology of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis in man is reviewed. According to current concepts, LH plays an important role in the initiation and maintenance of spermatogenesis by stimulating Leydig cell production of high concentrations of T within the testes. FSH is thought to be important in spermatid maturation (spermiogenesis) during the initiation of spermatogenesis by stimulation of Sertoli cells. Studies of selective gonadotrophin replacement in experimentally-induced hypogonadotrophic hypogonadal men demonstrate that qualitatively normal sperm production can be achieved by replacement of either LH or FSH alone, but both LH and FSH are necessary to maintain quantitatively normal spermatogenesis. Studies of gonadotrophin replacement in spontaneously-occurring hypogonadotrophic men suggest that the requirement for FSH activity to stimulate sperm production is greatest during the initiation of sperm production at the time of puberty. The initiation of spermatogenesis in postpubertal men with acquired hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism and the maintenance of spermatogenesis after its initiation can often be achieved with LH activity alone.

  4. Waterborne exposure to fluorotelomer alcohol 6:2 FTOH alters plasma sex hormone and gene transcription in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis of zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunsheng; Yu, Liqin; Deng, Jun; Lam, Paul K S; Wu, Rudolf S S; Zhou, Bingsheng

    2009-06-28

    Fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs) have shown estrogenic activity in vitro and in vivo, but the mechanism of this activity is not known. In this study, 18-week-old zebrafish (Danio rerio) were exposed to 0, 0.03, 0.3 and 3.0mg/l 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctan-1-ol (6:2 FTOH) for 7 days, and the effects on plasma sex hormone levels were measured followed by use of real-time PCR to examine selected gene expression in hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis and liver. Exposure to 6:2 FTOH significantly increased plasma estradiol (E2) and testosterone (T) levels in both males and females. Furthermore, the ratio of T/E2 was reduced in females while increased in males. In females, the increase of E2 was accompanied by up-regulated hepatic estrogenic receptor alpha (ERalpha) and vitellogenin (VTG1 and VTG3) expression. In males, the elevation of the T level is consistent with the up-regulation of cytochrome P450 c17alpha-hydroxylase, 17, 20-lase (CYP17) and the down-regulation of cytochrome P450 aromatase A (CYP19A). The present study demonstrated that waterborne exposure to 6:2 FTOH alter plasma sex hormone levels and the ratio of T/E2, as well as the transcriptional profiles of some genes in the HPG axis and liver. The results suggested that FTOHs may disturb fish reproduction through endocrine disrupted activity.

  5. Cloning of cDNA encoding the common alpha subunit precursor molecule of pituitary glycoprotein hormones in the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri.

    PubMed

    Arai, Y; Kubokawa, K; Ishii, S; Joss, J M

    1998-05-01

    We have isolated cDNA clones encoding a putative glycoprotein hormone alpha subunit precursor molecule from a pituitary cDNA library of the Australian lungfish (Neoceratodus forsteri) by a two-step plaque hybridization technique initially using cDNA encoding the toad glycoprotein hormone alpha subunit precursor molecule as the hybridization probe. The inserts (799 bp) of two of the isolated cDNA clones contained sequences of 5' and 3' untranslated regions, including a poly(A) stretch, and the entire coding sequence of the alpha subunit precursor molecule. The deduced amino acid sequence showed that its signal peptide consists of 24 residues and its mature protein 97 residues. In the mature protein, there is an insert of one residue (Ala) just after the 9th residue. This insert is unique to the Australian lungfish among vertebrate species studied. The amino acid sequence of the mature protein shares the common, or the same-group, amino acid residues at 9 positions with tetrapod and not actinopterygian vertebrates, while only one residue is common to some teleosts and the lungfish to the exclusion of the tetrapods. The overall sequence of the mature protein of the Australian lungfish also shares more similarity with those of tetrapods (69 to 84%) than it does with teleosts (57 to 74%). These results on the relation of the alpha subunit precursor molecule between the lungfish and other vertebrates are consistent with the recent molecular phylogenetic studies suggesting a closer relationship between lungfish and tetrapods than between lungfish and teleosts. We also found that the primary structure of the lungfish alpha subunit is slightly but significantly more similar to that of homeothermic vertebrates than to that of amphibians. This may be due to specialization of the amphibian alpha subunit molecules.

  6. Anatomy, Physiology, and Laboratory Evaluation of the Pituitary Gland.

    PubMed

    Hong, Gregory K; Payne, Spencer C; Jane, John A

    2016-02-01

    The pituitary gland functions prominently in the control of most endocrine systems in the body. Diverse processes such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, and water balance are tightly regulated by the pituitary in conjunction with the hypothalamus and various downstream endocrine organs. Benign tumors of the pituitary gland are the primary cause of pituitary pathology and can result in inappropriate secretion of pituitary hormones or loss of pituitary function. First-line management of clinically significant tumors often involves surgical resection. Understanding of normal pituitary physiology and basic testing strategies to assess for pituitary dysfunction should be familiar to any skull base surgeon. PMID:26614827

  7. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Pituitary Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sapochnik, Melanie; Nieto, Leandro Eduardo; Fuertes, Mariana; Arzt, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    During the last years, progress has been made on the identification of mechanisms involved in anterior pituitary cell transformation and tumorigenesis. Oncogene activation, tumor suppressor gene inactivation, epigenetic changes, and microRNAs deregulation contribute to the initiation of pituitary tumors. Despite the high prevalence of pituitary adenomas, they are mostly benign, indicating that intrinsic mechanisms may regulate pituitary cell expansion. Senescence is characterized by an irreversible cell cycle arrest and represents an important protective mechanism against malignancy. Pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG) is an oncogene involved in early stages of pituitary tumor development, and also triggers a senescence response by activating DNA-damage signaling pathway. Cytokines, as well as many other factors, play an important role in pituitary physiology, affecting not only cell proliferation but also hormone secretion. Special interest is focused on interleukin-6 (IL-6) because its dual function of stimulating pituitary tumor cell growth but inhibiting normal pituitary cells proliferation. It has been demonstrated that IL-6 has a key role in promoting and maintenance of the senescence program in tumors. Senescence, triggered by PTTG activation and mediated by IL-6, may be a mechanism for explaining the benign nature of pituitary tumors.

  8. Aryl-hydrocarbon receptor activity modulates prolactin expression in the pituitary.

    PubMed

    Moran, Tyler B; Brannick, Katherine E; Raetzman, Lori T

    2012-11-15

    Pituitary tumors account for 15% of intracranial neoplasms, however the extent to which environmental toxicants contribute to the proliferation and hormone expression of pituitary cells is unknown. Aryl-hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) interacting protein (AIP) loss of function mutations cause somatotrope and lactotrope adenomas in humans. AIP sequesters AhR and inhibits its transcriptional function. Because of the link between AIP and pituitary tumors, we hypothesize that exposure to dioxins, potent exogenous ligands for AhR that are persistent in the environment, may predispose to pituitary dysfunction through activation of AhR. In the present study, we examined the effect of AhR activation on proliferation and endogenous pituitary hormone expression in the GH3 rat somatolactotrope tumor cell line and the effect of loss of AhR action in knockout mice. GH3 cells respond to nM doses of the reversible AhR agonist β-naphthoflavone with a robust induction of Cyp1a1. Although mRNA levels of the anti-proliferative signaling cytokine TGFbeta1 are suppressed upon β-naphthoflavone treatment, we did not observe an alteration in cell proliferation. AhR activation with β-naphthoflavone suppresses Ahr expression and impairs expression of prolactin (PRL), but not growth hormone (GH) mRNA in GH3 cells. In mice, loss of Ahr similarly leads to a reduction in Prl mRNA at P3, while Gh is unaffected. Additionally, there is a significant reduction in pituitary hormones Lhb and Fshb in the absence of Ahr. Overall, these results demonstrate that AhR is important for pituitary hormone expression and suggest that environmental dioxins can exert endocrine disrupting effects at the pituitary.

  9. Iatrogenic CJD due to pituitary-derived growth hormone with genetically determined incubation times of up to 40 years.

    PubMed

    Rudge, Peter; Jaunmuktane, Zane; Adlard, Peter; Bjurstrom, Nina; Caine, Diana; Lowe, Jessica; Norsworthy, Penny; Hummerich, Holger; Druyeh, Ron; Wadsworth, Jonathan D F; Brandner, Sebastian; Hyare, Harpreet; Mead, Simon; Collinge, John

    2015-11-01

    Patients with iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease due to administration of cadaver-sourced growth hormone during childhood are still being seen in the UK 30 years after cessation of this treatment. Of the 77 patients who have developed iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, 56 have been genotyped. There has been a marked change in genotype profile at polymorphic codon 129 of the prion protein gene (PRNP) from predominantly valine homozygous to a mixed picture of methionine homozygous and methionine-valine heterozygous over time. The incubation period of iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is significantly different between all three genotypes. This experience is a striking contrast with that in France and the USA, which may relate to contamination of different growth hormone batches with different strains of human prions. We describe the clinical, imaging, molecular and autopsy features in 22 of 24 patients who have developed iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in the UK since 2003. Mean age at onset of symptoms was 42.7 years. Gait ataxia and lower limb dysaesthesiae were the most frequent presenting symptoms. All had cerebellar signs, and the majority had myoclonus and lower limb pyramidal signs, with relatively preserved cognitive function, when first seen. There was a progressive decline in neurological and cognitive function leading to death after 5-32 (mean 14) months. Despite incubation periods approaching 40 years, the clinical duration in methionine homozygote patients appeared to be shorter than that seen in heterozygote patients. MRI showed restricted diffusion in the basal ganglia, thalamus, hippocampus, frontal and the paracentral motor cortex and cerebellar vermis. The electroencephalogram was abnormal in 15 patients and cerebrospinal fluid 14-3-3 protein was positive in half the patients. Neuropathological examination was conducted in nine patients. All but one showed synaptic prion deposition with numerous kuru type plaques in the basal ganglia

  10. Reproductive toxicity of inorganic mercury exposure in adult zebrafish: Histological damage, oxidative stress, and alterations of sex hormone and gene expression in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qun-Fang; Li, Ying-Wen; Liu, Zhi-Hao; Chen, Qi-Liang

    2016-08-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a prominent environmental contaminant that causes a variety of adverse effects on aquatic organisms. However, the mechanisms underlying inorganic Hg-induced reproductive impairment in fish remains largely unknown. In this study, adult zebrafish were exposed to 0 (control), 15 and 30μg Hg/l (added as mercuric chloride, HgCl2) for 30days, and the effects on histological structure, antioxidant status and sex hormone levels in the ovary and testis, as well as the mRNA expression of genes involved in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis were analyzed. Exposure to Hg caused pathological lesions in zebrafish gonads, and changed the activities and mRNA levels of antioxidant enzymes (catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx)) as well as the content of glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA). In females, although ovarian 17β-estradiol (E2) content remained relatively stable, significant down-regulation of lhβ, gnrh2, gnrh3, lhr and erα were observed. In males, testosterone (T) levels in the testis significantly decreased after Hg exposure, accompanied by down-regulated expression of gnrh2, gnrh3, fshβ and lhβ in the brain as well as fshr, lhr, ar, cyp17 and cyp11b in the testis. Thus, our study indicated that waterborne inorganic Hg exposure caused histological damage and oxidative stress in the gonads of zebrafish, and altered sex hormone levels by disrupting the transcription of related HPG-axis genes, which could subsequently impair the reproduction of fish. Different response of the antioxidant defense system, sex hormone and HPG-axis genes between females and males exposed to inorganic Hg indicated the gender-specific regulatory effect by Hg. To our knowledge, this is the first time to explore the effects and mechanisms of inorganic Hg exposure on reproduction at the histological, enzymatic and molecular levels, which will greatly extend our understanding on the mechanisms underlying of reproductive

  11. Dose-response relationship of 15alpha-hydroxylated sex steroids to gonadotropin-releasing hormones and pituitary extract in male sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus).

    PubMed

    Young, Bradley A; Bryan, Mara B; Glenn, Jessica R; Yun, Sang Seon; Scott, Alexander P; Li, Weiming

    2007-03-01

    The sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) is one of the earliest extant vertebrates for which the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis has been shown to control and regulate reproduction in a similar fashion to gnathostome vertebrates. While the two forms of gonadotropin-releasing hormones in the sea lamprey (GnRH I and GnRH III) have been studied extensively, their in vivo effect on synthesis of 15alpha-hydroxytestosterone (15alpha-T) and 15alpha-hydroxyprogesterone (15alpha-P) have only been partially characterized. In the present study, plasma concentrations of 15alpha-T and 15alpha-P were measured in prespermiating sea lampreys that were given a single injection of either GnRH I or GnRH III in doses ranging from 5 to 100 microg/kg, or of pituitary extract (as a source of gonadotropin). Plasma was sampled at 1-6h and 6-48 h post-injection, in separate experiments, in order to characterize the peak and duration of responses. 15alpha-T plasma concentrations increased slightly in response to all three treatments, but not in a dose-dependent manner, and the timing of peak concentrations varied between doses. However, 15alpha-P plasma concentrations showed a greater range of response (between 1 and 100 ng/ml) and were clearly correlated with the injection dose. Plasma concentrations of 15alpha-P also responded to far lower doses of GnRH I and GnRH III than any other steroid previously investigated in lampreys. The plasma concentrations of 15alpha-P peaked at 6h after injection for all three treatments, and levels reached a mean of 53.1 ng/ml. In female lampreys that were injected twice with 50 microg/ml GnRH I or III, 15alpha-T concentrations did not exceed 0.5 ng/ml and 15alpha-P concentrations did not exceed 1 ng/ml. These results lend further support to the hypothesis that 15alpha-P plays an important role in the reproductive endocrinology of male lampreys.

  12. Purification of an equine apotransferrin variant (thyromedin) essential for thyroid hormone dependent growth of GH1 rat pituitary tumor cells in chemically defined culture.

    PubMed

    Sirbasku, D A; Stewart, B H; Pakala, R; Eby, J E; Sato, H; Roscoe, J M

    1991-01-01

    Pituitary tumor cells require thyroid hormones for growth in vivo [Sorrentino, J. M., Kirkland, W. L., & Sirbasku, D. A. (1976) J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 56, 1155-1158]. In vitro, GH1 rat pituitary tumor cells were studied in a serum-free defined medium (PCM-10) formulated with Ham's F12 and Dulbecco's modified Eagle's media (1:1, v/v) supplemented with 2.2 g/L sodium bicarbonate, 15 mM 4-(2-hydroxy-ethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid (pH 7.2), 10 micrograms/mL human transferrin, 50 microM ethanolamine, 10 micrograms/mL insulin, 10 ng/mL selenous acid, 0.1 nM 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3) and 500 micrograms/mL bovine serum albumin and in the same medium without T3 (PCM-0). The cells only grew in PCM-10 when low concentrations of horse serum were added. Attempts to replace the serum factor requirement with known growth factors and adhesion proteins were unsuccessful. The Mr 65,000-72,000 serum factor regulating T3-induced growth (thyromedin) was purified to homogeneity and identified as equine transferrin R and/or D by amino acid sequencing. The ED50 in PCM-10 was 17-40 micrograms/mL (260-620 nM) while in PCM-0 half-maximum growth was not achieved at 200 micrograms/mL. Concentrations of 75 micrograms/mL in PCM-10 caused 80% of serum-stimulated growth rate. Removal of iron from thyromedin, and assay in iron salts reduced PCM-10, increased the specific activity 110-270-fold to ED50 150 ng/mL (2.3 nM); at 1.0 micrograms/mL, growth in PCM-10 was 16-fold greater than in PCM-0. Iron saturation of thyromedin caused total loss of biological activity. We conclude that the horse transferrin variant isolated in this report is active as apotransferrin. PMID:1988026

  13. MANAGEMENT OF ENDOCRINE DISEASE: Pituitary 'incidentaloma': neuroradiological assessment and differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Vasilev, Vladimir; Rostomyan, Liliya; Daly, Adrian F; Potorac, Iulia; Zacharieva, Sabina; Bonneville, Jean-François; Beckers, Albert

    2016-10-01

    Pituitary incidentalomas are a by-product of modern imaging technology. The term 'incidentaloma' is neither a distinct diagnosis nor a pathological entity. Rather, it is a collective designation for different entities that are discovered fortuitously, requiring a working diagnosis based on the input of the radiologist, endocrinologist and often a neurosurgeon. In addition to pathological conditions affecting the pituitary gland, a thorough knowledge of the radiological characteristics of normal variants and technical artifacts is required to arrive at an accurate differential diagnosis. After careful radiological and hormonal evaluation, the vast majority of pituitary incidentalomas turn out to be non-functioning pituitary microadenomas and Rathke's cleft cysts (RCCs). Based on the low growth potential of non-functioning pituitary microadenomas and RCCs, periodic MRI surveillance is currently considered the optimal management strategy. Stricter follow-up is required for macroadenomas, as increases in size occur more frequently. PMID:27068689

  14. Pituitary function and morphology in Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Maione, Luigi; Tortora, Fabio; Modica, Roberta; Ramundo, Valeria; Riccio, Eleonora; Daniele, Aurora; Belfiore, Maria Paola; Colao, Annamaria; Pisani, Antonio; Faggiano, Antongiulio

    2015-11-01

    Endocrine abnormalities are known to affect patients with Fabry disease (FD). Pituitary gland theoretically represents an ideal target for FD because of high vascularization and low proliferation rate. We explored pituitary morphology and function in a cohort of FD patients through a prospectic, monocentric study at an Academic Tertiary Center. The study population included 28 FD patients and 42 sex and age-matched normal subjects. The protocol included a contrast enhancement pituitary MRI, the assessment of pituitary hormones, anti-pituitary, and anti-hypothalamus antibodies. At pituitary MRI, an empty sella was found in 11 (39%) FD patients, and in 2 (5%) controls (p < 0.001). Pituitary volume was significantly smaller in FD than in controls (p < 0.001). Determinants of pituitary volume were age and alpha-galactosidase enzyme activity. Both parameters resulted independently correlated at multivariate analysis. Pituitary function was substantially preserved in FD patients. Empty sella is a common finding in patients with FD. The major prevalence in the elderly supports the hypothesis of a progressive pituitary shrinkage overtime. Pituitary function seems not to be impaired in FD. An endocrine workup with pituitary hormone assessment should be periodically performed in FD patients, who are already at risk of cardiovascular complications.

  15. Heterogeneity in the growth hormone pituitary gland system of rats and humans: Implications to microgravity based research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.; Grindeland, R.; Hayes, C.; Lanham, J. W.; Cleveland, C.; Todd, P.; Morrison, Dennis R.

    1988-01-01

    The cell separation techniques of velocity sedimentation, flow cytometry and continuous flow electrophoresis were used to obtain enriched populations of growth hormone (GH) cells. The goal was to isolate a GH cell subpopulation which releases GH molecules which are very high in biological activity, it was important to use a method which was effective in processing large numbers of cells over a short time span. The techniques based on sedimentation are limited by cell density overlaps and streaming. While flow cytometry is useful in the analytical mode for objectively establishing cell purity, the numbers of cells which can be processed in the sort mode are so small as to make this approach ineffective in terms of the long term goals. It was shown that continuous flow electrophoresis systems (CFES) can separate GH cells from other cell types on the basis of differences in surface charge. The bioreactive producers appear to be more electrophoretically mobile than the low producers. Current ground based CFES efforts are hampered by cell clumping in low ionic strength buffers and poor cell recoveries from the CFES device.

  16. Central regulation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis: focus on clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Fliers, E; Boelen, A; van Trotsenburg, A S P

    2014-01-01

    The hypothalamus is the most prominent brain region involved in setpoint regulation of the thyroid axis. It generates the diurnal thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) rhythm, and it plays a central role in the adaptation of the thyroid axis to environmental factors such as caloric deprivation or infection. Many studies, including studies in human post-mortem tissue samples, have confirmed a key role for the thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) neuron in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) in thyroid axis regulation. In addition to their negative feedback action on TRH neurons in the hypothalamus, intrahypothalamic thyroid hormones can also modulate metabolism in adipose tissue and the liver via the autonomic nervous system. Congenital or acquired dysfunction of the hypothalamus or pituitary gland may result in central hypothyroidism (CeH). In the Netherlands, the prevalence of permanent congenital CeH as detected by neonatal screening is approximately 1 in 18000. In most neonates congenital CeH is accompanied by additional anterior pituitary hormone deficiencies, and many show clear morphological abnormalities such as a small anterior gland, a thin or absent pituitary stalk, or an ectopic posterior pituitary gland. Recently, a mutation in the immunoglobulin superfamily member 1 (IGSF1) gene was reported as a novel cause of X-linked, apparently isolated CeH occurring in neonates, children and adults. In adults, the most frequent cause of acquired CeH is a pituitary macroadenoma, usually accompanied by other pituitary hormone deficiencies. Central hyperthyroidism is a rare disorder, especially in children. In adults, it is mostly caused by a TSH-secreting pituitary adenoma.

  17. Hypothalamic-pituitary function in the Bardet-Biedl syndrome.

    PubMed

    Leroith, D; Farkash, Y; Bar-Ziev, J; Spitz, I M

    1980-07-01

    Four siblings with classic Bardet-Biedl syndrome were studied. The brother had hypogonadism of testiculr origin, with high gonadotropin levels and exaggerated responses to luteinizing-hormone-releasing hormone, whereas the three sisters showed a normal hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. The remaining pituitary hormone function was intact.

  18. Pituitary gigantism: Causes and clinical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Rostomyan, Liliya; Daly, Adrian F; Beckers, Albert

    2015-12-01

    Acromegaly and pituitary gigantism are very rare conditions resulting from excessive secretion of growth hormone (GH), usually by a pituitary adenoma. Pituitary gigantism occurs when GH excess overlaps with the period of rapid linear growth during childhood and adolescence. Until recently, its etiology and clinical characteristics have been poorly understood. Genetic and genomic causes have been identified in recent years that explain about half of cases of pituitary gigantism. We describe these recent discoveries and focus on some important settings in which gigantism can occur, including familial isolated pituitary adenomas (FIPA) and the newly described X-linked acrogigantism (X-LAG) syndrome. PMID:26585365

  19. Pituitary gigantism: Causes and clinical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Rostomyan, Liliya; Daly, Adrian F; Beckers, Albert

    2015-12-01

    Acromegaly and pituitary gigantism are very rare conditions resulting from excessive secretion of growth hormone (GH), usually by a pituitary adenoma. Pituitary gigantism occurs when GH excess overlaps with the period of rapid linear growth during childhood and adolescence. Until recently, its etiology and clinical characteristics have been poorly understood. Genetic and genomic causes have been identified in recent years that explain about half of cases of pituitary gigantism. We describe these recent discoveries and focus on some important settings in which gigantism can occur, including familial isolated pituitary adenomas (FIPA) and the newly described X-linked acrogigantism (X-LAG) syndrome.

  20. Hormonal and metabolic adaptation to fasting: effects on the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis and reproductive performance of rabbit does.

    PubMed

    Brecchia, Gabriele; Bonanno, Adriana; Galeati, Giovanna; Federici, Claudia; Maranesi, Margherita; Gobbetti, Anna; Zerani, Massimo; Boiti, Cristiano

    2006-08-01

    To assess the impact of acute caloric shortage on reproduction, rabbit does were either fed ad libitum (control, AL), or fasted for 24 (STF) or 48 h (LTF) before induction of ovulation with GnRH injection. Blood samples were collected during the last 3 h of fasting, and the following 4 h after GnRH injection, when feed was provided again, to measure plasma concentrations of LH, estradiol-17beta, leptin, insulin, T3, corticosterone, glucose, and NEFA. Before re-feeding, plasma leptin, insulin, and T3 concentrations were lower (P < or = 0.01) in both fasted groups than in controls, but then gradually increased following realimentation to match those of controls. During fasting, corticosterone levels were higher (P < or = 0.01) in LTF than in STF and AL does, but decreased to control values soon after realimentation. During fasting, plasma glucose concentrations did not differ among groups, but upon re-feeding they markedly increased (P < or= 0.01) both in STF and LTF does. NEFA levels were also more elevated (P < or = 0.01) in fasted rabbits than in controls, and rapidly decreased (P < or = 0.01) after re-feeding. Following GnRH injection, LH peak was lower (P < or = 0.01) in LTF than in AL and STF does. Estradiol-17beta showed higher pulse frequency and amplitude in AL than in STF and LTF does. Compared to controls, receptivity rate of STF and LTF artificially inseminated does declined respectively by -20.5% (P < or = 0.05) and -22.7%, and fertility rate by -23.9% (P < or = 0.05) and 21.4%, but no difference was found in ovulation rate. In summary, nutritional status of does, as modified by fasting, greatly influenced fertility, metabolic and reproductive hormones.

  1. Altered serotonergic neurotransmission but normal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis activity in mice chronically treated with the corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor type 1 antagonist NBI 30775.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Akihiko; Flachskamm, Cornelia; Reul, Johannes M H M; Holsboer, Florian; Linthorst, Astrid C E

    2003-12-01

    Antagonists of the corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor type 1 (CRH-R1) are regarded as promising tools for the treatment of stress-related psychiatric disorders. Owing to the intricate relationship between CRH and serotonin (5-HT), we studied the effects of chronic oral treatment of C57Bl6/N mice with the CRH-R1 antagonist NBI 30775 (formerly known as R121919) on hippocampal serotonergic neurotransmission during basal (on 15th day of treatment) and stress (forced swimming; on 16th day of treatment) conditions by in vivo microdialysis. Given the important role of CRH in the regulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis activity and behavior, the effects of NBI 30775 on dialysate-free corticosterone levels, and on home cage and forced swimming-related behavior were also assessed. Chronic administration of NBI 30775 (18.4+/-0.9 mg/kg/day) did not result in alterations in food consumption and body weight. NBI 30775 caused complex changes in hippocampal serotonergic neurotransmission. Whereas no effects on the diurnal rhythms of 5-HT and its metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid were found, the responses of the neurotransmitter and its metabolite to 10 min of forced swim stress were reduced and prolonged, respectively. NBI 30775 did not change free corticosterone levels over the diurnal rhythm. Moreover, NBI 30775-treated mice showed a similar forced swim stress-induced increase in corticosterone as observed in the control group. No effects of NBI 30775 on home cage, and swim stress-related active behaviors (climbing, swimming) and immobility were found. Thus, whereas chronic antagonism of CRH-R1 did not compromise HPA axis performance and behavior, distinct changes in serotonergic neurotransmission developed. Owing to the important role of 5-HT in the pathophysiology of mood and anxiety disorders, the latter observation may contribute to the therapeutical efficacy of CRH-R1 antagonists in these illnesses. PMID:12915860

  2. Androgens alter corticotropin releasing hormone and arginine vasopressin mRNA within forebrain sites known to regulate activity in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.

    PubMed

    Viau, V; Soriano, L; Dallman, M F

    2001-05-01

    To reveal direct effects of androgens, independent of glucocorticoids, we studied the effects of gonadectomy (GDX) in adrenalectomized (ADX) rats with or without androgen replacement on corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) mRNA expression within various forebrain sites known to regulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. These included the medial parvocellular portion of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (mp PVN), the central and medial nuclei of the amygdala and bed nuclei of the stria terminalis (BNST). In the mp PVN, ADX stimulated both CRH and AVP mRNA expression. Combined ADX + GDX inhibited only AVP, and testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) restored AVP mRNA. In the central nucleus of the amygdala, ADX decreased CRH mRNA expression, and this response was unaffected by GDX +/- testosterone or DHT replacement. In the medial amygdala, AVP mRNA expression was decreased by ADX, abolished by ADX + GDX, and restored by androgen replacement. ADX had no effect on CRH and AVP mRNA expression in the BNST. GDX + ADX, however, reduced CRH mRNA expression only within the fusiform nuclei of the BNST and reduced the number of AVP-expressing neurones in the posterior BNST. Androgen replacement reversed both responses. In summary, in ADX rats, AVP, but not CRH mRNA expression in the amygdala and mp PVN, is sensitive to GDX +/- androgen replacement. Both CRH- and AVP-expressing neurones in the BNST respond to GDX and androgen replacement, but not to ADX alone. Because androgen receptors are not expressed by hypophysiotropic PVN neurones, we conclude that glucocorticoid-independent, androgenic influences on medial parvocellular AVP mRNA expression are mediated upstream from the PVN, and may involve AVP-related pathways in the medial amygdala, relayed to and through CRH- and AVP-expressing neurones of the BNST.

  3. Long-term results of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy with CyberKnife for growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenoma: evaluation by the Cortina consensus.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Hiromitsu; Sato, Kengo; Nomura, Ryutaro; Tabei, Yusuke; Suzuki, Ichiro; Yokota, Naoki; Inoue, Mitsuhiro; Ohta, Seiji; Yamada, Shozo; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the safety and feasibility of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) with CyberKnife for growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenoma (GH-PA). Fifty-two patients with GH-PA were treated with hypofractionated SRT between September 2001 and October 2012. Eight patients had clinically silent GH-PA and 44 were symptomatic. Only 1 patient was inoperable. The other patients had recurrent or postoperative residual tumors on MRI. All patients had received pharmacotherapy prior to SRT with a somatostatin analog, dopamine agonist, and/or GH receptor antagonist. The marginal doses were 17.4-26.8 Gy for the 3-fraction schedule and 20.0-32.0 Gy for the 5-fraction schedule. Endocrinological remission was assessed by the Cortina consensus criteria 2010 (random GH <1 ng/ml or nadir GH after an oral glucose tolerance test <0.4 ng/ml and normalization of age- and sex-adjusted insulin-like growth factor-1). The median follow-up period was 60 months (range 27-137). The 5-year overall survival, local control, and disease-free survival rates were 100, 100, and 96 %, respectively. Nine patients (5 clinically silent and 4 symptomatic patients) satisfied the Cortina criteria without receiving further pharmacotherapy, whereas the remaining 43 patients did not. No post-SRT grade 2 or higher visual disorder occurred. Symptomatic post-SRT hypopituitarism was observed in 1 patient. CyberKnife hypofractionated SRT is safe and effective when judged by imaging findings for GH-PA. However, it may be difficult to satisfy the Cortina consensus criteria in most symptomatic patients with SRT alone. Further investigations of optimal treatments are warranted. PMID:26961771

  4. Clinical results of stereotactic hellium-ion radiosurgery of the pituitary gland at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, R.P.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Lyman, J.T.; Frankel, K.A.; Phillips, M.H.; Lawrence, J.H.; Tobias, C.A.

    1989-12-01

    The first therapeutic clinical trial using accelerated heavy-charged particles in humans was performed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the treatment of various endocrine and metabolic disorders of the pituitary gland, and as suppressive therapy for adenohypophyseal hormone-responsive carcinomas and diabetic retinopathy. In acromegaly, Cushing's disease, Nelson's syndrome and prolactin-secreting tumors, the therapeutic goal in the 433 patients treated has been to destroy or inhibit the growth of the pituitary tumor and control hormonal hypersecretion, while preserving a functional rim of tissue with normal hormone-secreting capacity, and minimizing neurologic injury. An additional group of 34 patients was treated for nonsecreting chromophobe adenomas. This paper discusses the methods and results of stereotactic helium-ion radiosurgery of the pituitary gland at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. 11 refs.

  5. Clinical results of stereotactic helium-ion radiosurgery of the pituitary gland at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, R.P.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Lyman, J.T.; Frankel, K.A.; Phillips, M.H.; Lawrence, J.H.; Tobias, C.A.

    1989-12-01

    The first therapeutic clinical trial using accelerated heavy-charged particles in humans was performed for the treatment of various endocrine and metabolic disorders of the pituitary gland, and as suppressive therapy for adenohypophyseal hormone-responsive carcinomas and diabetic retinopathy. Since then, over 800 patients have received stereotactically-directed plateau-beam heavy-charged particle pituitary irradiation at this institution. In acromegaly, Cushing's disease, Nelson's syndrome and prolactin-secreting tumors, the therapeutic goal in the 433 patients treated has been to destroy or inhibit the growth of the pituitary tumor and control hormonal hypersecretion, while preserving a functional rim of tissue with normal hormone-secreting capacity, and minimizing neurologic injury. An additional group of 34 patients was treated for nonsecreting chromophobe adenomas. This paper discusses the methods and results of these treatments. 11 refs.

  6. Imaging of pediatric pituitary endocrinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Vikas; Bano, Shahina

    2012-01-01

    Accurate investigation of the hypothalamic-pituitary area is required in pediatric patients for diagnosis of endocrine-related disorders. These disorders include hypopituitarism, growth failure, diencephalic syndrome, delayed puberty, precocious puberty, diabetes insipidus, syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) secretion, and hyperpituitarism. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the modality of choice to visualize hypothalamic-pituitary axis and associated endocrinopathies. Neuroimaging can be normal or disclose abnormalities related to pituitary-hypothalamic axis like (i) congenital and developmental malformations; (ii) tumors; (iii) cystic lesions; and (iv) infectious and inflammatory conditions. Classical midline anomalies like septo-optic dysplasias or corpus callosum agenesis are commonly associated with pituitary endocrinopathies and also need careful evaluation. In this radiological review, we will discuss neuroendocrine disorders related to hypothalamic pituitary-axis. PMID:23087850

  7. Pituitary cells in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hymer, W. C.; Shellenberger, K.; Grindeland, R.

    1994-08-01

    Cells of the mammalian pituitary gland synthesize and secrete several protein hormones which regulate a number of organ systems throughout the body. These include the musculoskeletal, immune, vascular and endocrine systems. Since changes occur in these tissues as a result of spaceflight, and since pituitary growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) play a role in the control of these systems on earth, we have focused attention over the last 10 years on GH and PRL cell function during and after spaceflight. The cumulative results of 4 spaceflight missions and several mimicked microgravity (μG) experiments establish 1) that production and release of biologically active GH and PRL is repeatedly and significantly attenuated (usually > 50%) and 2) that changes in cell morphology also occur. In this paper we describe our results within the framework of methodologies and approaches frequently used to study pituitary cell function on earth. In so doing we hope to develop future flight experiments aimed at uncovering possible μG ``sensing systems'' within the pituitary cell.

  8. Pituitary cells in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.; Shellenberger, K.; Grindeland, R.

    1994-01-01

    Cells of the mammalian pituitary gland synthesize and secrete several protein hormones which regulate a number of organ systems throughout the body. These include the musculoskeletal, immune, vascular and endocrine systems. Since changes occur in these tissues as a result of spaceflight, and since pituitary growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) play a role in the control of these systems on earth, we have focused attention over the last 10 years on GH and PRL cell function during and after spaceflight. The cumulative results of 4 spaceflight missions and several mimicked microgravity experiments establish 1) that production and release of biologically active GH and PRL is repeatedly and significantly attenuated (usually >50%) and 2) that changes in cell morphology also occur. In this paper we describe our results within the framework of methodologies and approaches frequently used to study pituitary cell function on earth. In so doing we hope to develop future flight experiments aimed at uncovering possible microgravity 'sensing systems' within the pituitary cell.

  9. Neuroendocrine disorders: pituitary imaging.

    PubMed

    Faje, Alexander; Tritos, Nicholas A; Swearingen, Brooke; Klibanski, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Significant advances in pituitary imaging have taken place in the past several decades, including the introduction of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This imaging modality has vastly improved our ability to detect and characterize sellar masses and more accurately characterize the extent and spread of lesions in and around the sella. Intraoperative MRI may help improve the completeness of resection of sellar masses. Other imaging modalities, including magnetic resonance angiography, computed tomography (CT), and CT angiography, have an important role in specific cases. Interventional methods, including bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling, may establish the pituitary origin of corticotropin (ACTH) excess in patients with ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome. Pituitary imaging should be obtained in patients with pituitary hormone excess, hypopituitarism, or mass effect in the sella. Despite rapid advances in pituitary imaging, there are several diagnostic challenges remaining. Future research may help improve the radiographic detection of small sellar lesions, such as ACTH-secreting adenomas causing Cushing's disease, accurately characterize the type and extent of sellar pathologies, and provide prognostic information regarding their growth potential. PMID:27430447

  10. The Molecular Pathogenesis of Pituitary Adenomas: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaobing

    2013-01-01

    Pituitary tumors represent the most common intracranial neoplasms accompanying serious morbidity through mass effects and inappropriate secretion of pituitary hormones. Understanding the etiology of pituitary tumorigenesis will facilitate the development of satisfactory treatment for pituitary adenomas. Although the pathogenesis of pituitary adenomas is largely unknown, considerable evidence indicates that the pituitary tumorigenesis is a complex process involving multiple factors, including genetic and epigenetic changes. This review summarized the recent progress in the study of pituitary tumorigenesis, focusing on the role of tumor suppressor genes, oncogenes and microRNAs. PMID:24396688

  11. Effect of Chlorotriazine Pesticides on Gonadotrophin Releasing Hormone in the Neuronal GT1-7 Cell Line and Hypothalamic Explants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulates the release of pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone. These pituitary hormones are necessary for normal reproductive function in both males and females. It is well recognized that disruption of nor...

  12. Pituitary function following treatment with reproductive toxins.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, R L; Goldman, J M; Rehnberg, G L

    1986-01-01

    Appropriate regulation of reproductive processes are dependent upon the integrity of pituitary function. In this selected review, we evaluate the evidence that certain environmental compounds exert their effect on reproductive function via a direct action on the pituitary gland. We also discuss examples of changes in pituitary hormone secretion that occur in response to changes in neuronal or gonadal control of the pituitary. A limited number of studies suggest that measures of pituitary hormone secretion provide an early and sensitive measure of a compound's potential effects on the reproductive system. However, the most striking aspect of this area is the sparse and inconsistent information describing pituitary function following exposure to environmental pollutants. PMID:3830104

  13. Effect of very high dose D-leucine6-gonadotropin-releasing hormone proethylamide on the hypothalamic-pituitary testicular axis in patients with prostatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Warner, B; Worgul, T J; Drago, J; Demers, L; Dufau, M; Max, D; Santen, R J

    1983-06-01

    Potent synthetic analogs of gonadotropin-releasing hormone produce parodoxical antireproductive effects when administered chronically. These compounds are minimally toxic and may exhibit no plateau of the dose-response curve even at very high doses. These considerations served as the basis for our systematic evaluation of [D-leucine6-desarginine-glycine-NH2(10)]gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH-A) proethylamide in the very high dose range (i.e., 10-fold larger amounts than previously used). In rats given the analog for 12 wk, prostate, testis, and seminal vesicle weights were suppressed to a greater extent with 200 micrograms q.d. than with 40 micrograms q.d. (P less than 0.01 prostate, less than 0.01 testis, less than 0.01 seminal vesicles), indicating dose-response effects in the very high dose range. 200 micrograms of [D-Leu6-des-Gly-NH2(10]-GnRH-A consistently suppressed leutinizing hormone (LH) values at 6 and 12 wk (basal 71 +/- 9.5; 6 wk 34 +/- 3.8; 12 wk 28 +/- 5 ng/ml) whereas 40 micrograms suppressed LH variably (basal 33 +/- 3.8; 6 wk 17 +/- 3.9; 12 wk 32 +/- 5.2). Testosterone fell to 15 +/- 2.4 and 19 +/- 2.0 ng/100 ml in response to 200 micrograms q.d. and to 27 +/- 6.4 and 22 +/- 7.4 ng/100 ml with the 40-micrograms dose. These findings in the rodent prompted treatment of stage D prostate cancer patients with similarly high doses of [D-Leu6-des-Gly-NH2(10)]-GnRH-A. After treatment for 11 wk with 1,000 or 10,000 micrograms/d of the analog, testosterone and dihydrotestosterone levels transiently rose and then fell into the surgically castrate range (testosterone 19 +/- 4.4 ng/100 ml [D-Leu6-des-Gly-NH2(10)]-GnRH-A vs. surgically castrate 11 +/- 0.9 ng/100 ml, P = NS; dihydrotestosterone 15 +/- 1.7 ng/100 ml GnRH-A vs. surgically castrate 15 +/- 4.1 ng/100 ml. P = NS). However, unlike the chronic stimulatory effect on the pituitary at lower doses, very high dose therapy resulted in profound suppression of plasma and urine LH. Plasma levels fell to

  14. Five-day pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone administration unveils combined hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal defects underlying profound hypoandrogenism in men with prolonged critical illness.

    PubMed

    van den Berghe, G; Weekers, F; Baxter, R C; Wouters, P; Iranmanesh, A; Bouillon, R; Veldhuis, J D

    2001-07-01

    Central hyposomatotropism and hypothyroidism have been inferred in long-stay intensive care patients. Pronounced hypoandrogenism presumably also contributes to the catabolic state of critical illness. Accordingly, the present study appraises the mechanism(s) of failure of the gonadotropic axis in prolonged critically ill men by assessing the effects of pulsatile GnRH treatment in this unique clinical context. To this end, 15 critically ill men (mean +/- SD age, 67 +/- 12 yr; intensive care unit stay, 25 +/- 9 days) participated, with baseline values compared with those of 50 age- and BMI-matched healthy men. Subjects were randomly allocated to 5 days of placebo or pulsatile iv GnRH administration (0.1 microg/kg every 90 min). LH, GH, and TSH secretion was quantified by deconvolution analysis of serum hormone concentration-time series obtained by sampling every 20 min from 2100-0600 h at baseline and on nights 1 and 5 of treatment. Serum concentrations of gonadal and adrenal steroids, T(4), T(3), insulin-like growth factor I (IGF), and IGF-binding proteins as well as circulating levels of cytokines and selected metabolic markers were measured. During prolonged critical illness, pulsatile LH secretion and mean LH concentrations (1.8 +/- 2.2 vs. 6.0 +/- 2.2 IU/L) were low in the face of extremely low circulating total testosterone (0.27 +/- 0.18 vs. 12.7 +/- 4.07 nmol/L; P < 0.0001) and relatively low estradiol (E(2); 58.3 +/- 51.9 vs. 85.7 +/- 18.6 pmol/L; P = 0.009) and sex hormone-binding globulin (39.1 +/- 11.7 vs. 48.6 +/- 27.8 nmol/L; P = 0.01). The molar ratio of E(2)/T was elevated 37-fold in ill men (P < 0.0001) and correlated negatively with the mean serum LH concentrations (r = -0.82; P = 0.0002). Pulsatile GH and TSH secretion were suppressed (P < or = 0.0004), as were mean serum IGF-I, IGF-binding protein-3, and acid-labile subunit concentrations; thyroid hormone levels; and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate. Morning cortisol was within the normal range

  15. Regulation of genes encoding steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1) and gonadotropin subunits in the ovine pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Baratta, M; Turzillo, A M; Arreguin-Arevalo, A; Clay, C M; Nett, T M

    2003-07-01

    Steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1) is a transcription factor originally characterized as a mediator of gene expression in steroidogenic tissues. Studies in SF-1 knockout mice revealed that SF-1 has additional roles at multiple levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, including regulation of gene expression in pituitary gonadotropes. Specific binding sites for SF-1 have been demonstrated in several pituitary genes with essential roles in gonadotropin synthesis, including alpha subunit, LHbeta subunit, and GnRH receptor. In studies aimed at identifying physiological factors controlling pituitary expression of SF-1, GnRH has been implicated as a co-regulator of SF-1 and gonadotropin subunit genes. In both rats and ewes, elevated endogenous secretion of GnRH following ovariectomy was associated with increased amounts of SF-1 mRNA in the anterior pituitary gland. Conversely, removal of GnRH input to the pituitary gland by hypothalamic-pituitary disconnection (HPD) in ovariectomized (OVX) ewes reduced SF-1 expression. Despite these changes, however, treatment of OVX ewes with GnRH following HPD only partially restored levels of SF-1 mRNA in the pituitary gland. Therefore, it is possible that regulation of SF-1 gene expression by GnRH during the estrous cycle may involve ovarian hormones or other hypothalamic factors. Additional studies are required to further define the physiological roles of SF-1 in regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in domestic ruminants.

  16. Angiotensin II in the brain and pituitary: contrasting roles in the regulation of adenohypophyseal secretion.

    PubMed

    Ganong, W F

    1989-01-01

    Angiotensin II (AII) is present in gonadotropes in rats, and there are AII receptors on lactotropes and corticotropes. AII may be a paracrine mediator that stimulates the secretion of prolactin and adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) at the level of the pituitary, but additional research is needed to define its exact role. Angiotensinogen may also reach the gonadotropes via a paracrine route. On the other hand, there is considerable evidence that brain AII stimulates the secretion of luteinizing hormone (LH) by increasing the secretion of LH-releasing hormone, and that this effect is due to AII-mediated release of norepinephrine from noradrenergic nerve terminals in the preoptic region of the hypothalamus. In addition, brain AII inhibits the secretion of prolactin, probably by increasing the release of dopamine into the portal hypophyseal vessels. Circulating AII stimulates the secretion of a third anterior pituitary hormone, ACTH, by acting on one or more of the circumventricular organs to increase the secretion of corticotropin-releasing hormone.

  17. D-aspartic acid supplementation combined with 28 days of heavy resistance training has no effect on body composition, muscle strength, and serum hormones associated with the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis in resistance-trained men.

    PubMed

    Willoughby, Darryn S; Leutholtz, Brian

    2013-10-01

    It was hypothesized that D-aspartic acid (D-ASP) supplementation would not increase endogenous testosterone levels or improve muscular performance associated with resistance training. Therefore, body composition, muscle strength, and serum hormone levels associated with the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis were studied after 28 days of resistance training and D-ASP supplementation. Resistance-trained men resistance trained 4 times/wk for 28 days while orally ingesting either 3 g of placebo or 3 g of D-ASP. Data were analyzed with 2 × 2 analysis of variance (P < .05). Before and after resistance training and supplementation, body composition and muscle strength, serum gonadal hormones, and serum D-ASP and d-aspartate oxidase (DDO) were determined. Body composition and muscle strength were significantly increased in both groups in response to resistance training (P < .05) but not different from one another (P > .05). Total and free testosterone, luteinizing hormone, gonadotropin-releasing hormone, and estradiol were unchanged with resistance training and D-ASP supplementation (P > .05). For serum D-ASP and DDO, D-ASP resulted in a slight increase compared with baseline levels (P > .05). For the D-ASP group, the levels of serum DDO were significantly increased compared with placebo (P < .05). The gonadal hormones were unaffected by 28 days of D-ASP supplementation and not associated with the observed increases in muscle strength and mass. Therefore, at the dose provided, D-ASP supplementation is ineffective in up-regulating the activity of the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis and has no anabolic or ergogenic effects in skeletal muscle.

  18. Mutation Analysis of Inhibitory Guanine Nucleotide Binding Protein Alpha (GNAI) Loci in Young and Familial Pituitary Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Hande; Donner, Iikki; Kivipelto, Leena; Kuismin, Outi; Schalin-Jäntti, Camilla; De Menis, Ernesto; Karhu, Auli

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas are neoplasms of the anterior pituitary lobe and account for 15–20% of all intracranial tumors. Although most pituitary tumors are benign they can cause severe symptoms related to tumor size as well as hypopituitarism and/or hypersecretion of one or more pituitary hormones. Most pituitary adenomas are sporadic, but it has been estimated that 5% of patients have a familial background. Germline mutations of the tumor suppressor gene aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) predispose to hereditary pituitary neoplasia. Recently, it has been demonstrated that AIP mutations predispose to pituitary tumorigenesis through defective inhibitory GTP binding protein (Gαi) signaling. This finding prompted us to examine whether germline loss-of-function mutations in inhibitory guanine nucleotide (GTP) binding protein alpha (GNAI) loci are involved in genetic predisposition of pituitary tumors. To our knowledge, this is the first time GNAI genes are sequenced in order to examine the occurrence of inactivating germline mutations. Thus far, only somatic gain-of-function hot-spot mutations have been studied in these loci. Here, we have analyzed the coding regions of GNAI1, GNAI2, and GNAI3 in a set of young sporadic somatotropinoma patients (n = 32; mean age of diagnosis 32 years) and familial index cases (n = 14), thus in patients with a disease phenotype similar to that observed in AIP mutation carriers. In addition, expression of Gαi proteins was studied in human growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting and non-functional pituitary tumors. No pathogenic germline mutations affecting the Gαi proteins were detected. The result suggests that loss-of-function mutations of GNAI loci are rare or nonexistent in familial pituitary adenomas. PMID:25291362

  19. Pituitary apoplexy

    MedlinePlus

    ... body's sex glands produce little or no hormones) Hypothyroidism (thyroid gland does not make enough thyroid hormone) ... other missing hormones are not replaced, symptoms of hypothyroidism and hypogonadism may develop.

  20. Pituitary adenomas in childhood and adolescence.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Suzanne; Diamond, Frank

    2013-07-01

    Scientific advances are revealing the complexity of pituitary development, which is controlled by multiple transcription factors and signaling molecules. Unregulated pituitary cell growth, resulting in pituitary adenoma, is usually sporadic and results from monoclonal expansion of a single mutated cell. However, some adenomas develop as part of a genetic syndrome. Prolactinoma is the most common hormonally active pituitary adenoma in children. The non-functioning (non-secreting) pituitary adenoma is the second most common and often stains positive for GH, PRL, and/or TSH. While Cushing disease, resulting from an ACTH-secreting adenoma, commonly manifests as weight gain with growth deceleration in children, GH excess causes gigantism with rapid, accelerated growth inappropriate for the height of the family. TSH secreting pituitary adenomas are rare, and biochemical analysis will show an elevated thyroxine level with a non-suppressed or high TSH. Though the natural history of pituitary incidentalomas in children is unknown, adult practice guidelines are established. PMID:23957196

  1. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor induces prolactin expression in rat pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Satoya; Kurotani, Reiko; Miyano, Yuki; Sakahara, Satoshi; Koike, Kanako; Maruyama, Minoru; Ishikawa, Fumio; Sakatai, Ichiro; Abe, Hiroyuki; Sakai, Takafumi

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the role of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) in the pituitary gland to understand the effect of M-CSF on pituitary hormones and the relationship between the endocrine and immune systems. When we attempted to establish pituitary cell lines from a thyrotropic pituitary tumor (TtT), a macrophage cell line, TtT/M-87, was established. We evaluated M-CSF-like activity in conditioned media (CM) from seven pituitary cell lines using TtT/M-87 cells. TtT/M-87 proliferation significantly increased in the presence of CM from TtT/GF cells, a pituitary folliculostellate (FS) cell line. M-CSF mRNA was detected in TtT/GF and MtT/E cells by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and its expression in TtT/GF cells was increased in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) dose-dependent manner. M-CSF mRNA expression was also increased in rat anterior pituitary glands by LPS. M-CSF receptor (M-CSFR) mRNA was only detected in TtT/ M-87 cells and increased in the LPS-stimulated rat pituitary glands. In rat pituitary glands, M-CSF and M-CSFR were found to be localized in FS cells and prolactin (PRL)-secreting cells, respectively, by immunohistochemistry. The PRL concentration in rat sera was significantly increased at 24 h after M-CSF administration, and mRNA levels significantly increased in primary culture cells of rat anterior pituitary glands. In addition, TNF-α mRNA was increased in the primary culture cells by M-CSF. These results revealed that M-CSF was secreted from FS cells and M-CSF regulated PRL expression in rat pituitary glands.

  2. The chronic syndromes after previous treatment of pituitary tumours.

    PubMed

    Romijn, Johannes A

    2016-09-01

    Ultimately, almost all patients who are appropriately treated for pituitary tumours enter a chronic phase with control or cure of hormonal excess, adequate treatment of pituitary insufficiency and relief of mass effects. This phase is associated with improvement of initial signs and symptoms, but also with the persistent consequences of the initial disease and associated treatments. Pituitary insufficiency is a common denominator in many of these patients, and is associated with a reduction in quality of life, despite adequate endocrine substitution. Hypothalamic dysfunction can be present in patients previously treated for visual impairments caused by large suprasellar adenomas, or craniopharyngiomas. In addition to hypopituitarism, these patients can have multisystem morbidities caused by altered hypothalamic function, including weight gain and disturbed regulation of sleep-wake cycles. Mortality can also be affected. Patients cured of Cushing disease or acromegaly have chronic multisystem morbidities (in the case of Cushing disease, also affecting mortality) caused by irreversible effects of the previous excesses of cortisol in Cushing disease and growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1 in acromegaly. In addition to early diagnosis and treatment of pituitary tumours, research should focus on the amenability of these chronic post-treatment syndromes to therapeutic intervention, to improve quality of life and clinical outcomes. PMID:27259177

  3. Contemporary issues in the evaluation and management of pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Pekic, S; Stojanovic, M; Popovic, V

    2015-12-01

    Pituitary adenomas are common benign monoclonal neoplasms accounting for about 15% of intracranial neoplasms. Data from postmortem studies and imaging studies suggest that 1 of 5 individuals in the general population may have pituitary adenoma. Some pituitary adenomas (mainly microadenomas which have a diameter of less than 1 cm) are exceedingly common and are incidentally diagnosed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed for an unrelated reason (headache, vertigo, head trauma). Most microadenomas remain clinically occult and stable in size, without an increase in tumor cells and without local mass effects. However, some pituitary adenomas grow slowly, enlarge by expansion and become demarcated from normal pituitary (macroadenomas have a diameter greater than 1 cm). They may be clinically silent or secrete anterior pituitary hormones in excess such as prolactin, growth hormone (GH), or adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) causing diseases like prolactinoma, acromegaly, Cushing's disease or rarely thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) or gonadotropins (LH, FSH). The incidence of the various subtypes of pituitary adenoma varies but the most common is prolactinoma. Clinically non-functioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs), which do not secrete hormones often cause local mass symptoms and represent one-third of pituitary adenomas. Given the high prevalence of pituitary adenomas and their heterogeneity (different tumor subtypes), it is critical that clinicians have a thorough understanding of the potential abnormalities in pituitary function and prognostic factors for behavior of pituitary adenomas in order to timely implement specific treatment modalities. Regarding pathogenesis of these tumors genetics, epigenetics and signaling pathways are the focus of current research yet our understanding of pituitary tumorigenesis remains incomplete. Although several genes and signaling pathways have been identified as important factors in the development of pituitary tumors, current

  4. Crossover of the hypothalamic pituitary-adrenal/interrenal, -thyroid, and -gonadal axes in testicular development.

    PubMed

    Castañeda Cortés, Diana C; Langlois, Valerie S; Fernandino, Juan I

    2014-01-01

    Besides the well-known function of thyroid hormones (THs) for regulating metabolism, it has recently been discovered that THs are also involved in testicular development in mammalian and non-mammalian species. THs, in combination with follicle stimulating hormone, lead to androgen synthesis in Danio rerio, which results in the onset of spermatogenesis in the testis, potentially relating the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) gland to the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axes. Furthermore, studies in non-mammalian species have suggested that by stimulating the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), THs can be induced by corticotropin-releasing hormone. This suggests that the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal/interrenal gland (HPA) axis might influence the HPT axis. Additionally, it was shown that hormones pertaining to both HPT and HPA could also influence the HPG endocrine axis. For example, high levels of androgens were observed in the testis in Odonthestes bonariensis during a period of stress-induced sex-determination, which suggests that stress hormones influence the gonadal fate toward masculinization. Thus, this review highlights the hormonal interactions observed between the HPT, HPA, and HPG axes using a comparative approach in order to better understand how these endocrine systems could interact with each other to influence the development of testes.

  5. A case of pituitary abscess presenting without a source of infection or prior pituitary pathology

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Philip A

    2016-01-01

    Summary Pituitary abscess is a relatively uncommon cause of pituitary hormone deficiencies and/or a suprasellar mass. Risk factors for pituitary abscess include prior surgery, irradiation and/or pathology of the suprasellar region as well as underlying infections. We present the case of a 22-year-old female presenting with a spontaneous pituitary abscess in the absence of risk factors described previously. Her initial presentation included headache, bitemporal hemianopia, polyuria, polydipsia and amenorrhoea. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of her pituitary showed a suprasellar mass. As the patient did not have any risk factors for pituitary abscess or symptoms of infection, the diagnosis was not suspected preoperatively. She underwent transsphenoidal resection and purulent material was seen intraoperatively. Culture of the surgical specimen showed two species of alpha hemolytic Streptococcus, Staphylococcus capitis and Prevotella melaninogenica. Urine and blood cultures, dental radiographs and transthoracic echocardiogram failed to show any source of infection that could have caused the pituitary abscess. The patient was treated with 6weeks of oral metronidazole and intravenous vancomycin. After 6weeks of transsphenoidal resection and just after completion of antibiotic therapy, her headache and bitemporal hemianopsia resolved. However, nocturia and polydipsia from central diabetes insipidus and amenorrhoea from hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism persisted. Learning points Pituitary abscesses typically develop in patients who have other sources of infection or disruption of the normal suprasellar anatomy by either surgery, irradiation or pre-existing pathology; however, they can develop in the absence of known risk factors. Patients with pituitary abscesses typically complain of headache, visual changes and symptoms of pituitary hormone deficiencies. As other pituitary neoplasms present with similar clinical findings, the diagnosis of pituitary abscess is often not

  6. Management of nonfunctioning pituitary incidentaloma.

    PubMed

    Galland, Françoise; Vantyghem, Marie-Christine; Cazabat, Laure; Boulin, Anne; Cotton, François; Bonneville, Jean-François; Jouanneau, Emmanuel; Vidal-Trécan, Gwénaelle; Chanson, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    Prevalence of pituitary incidentaloma is variable: between 1.4% and 27% at autopsy, and between 3.7% and 37% on imaging. Pituitary microincidentalomas (serendipitously discovered adenoma <1cm in diameter) may increase in size, but only 5% exceed 10mm. Pituitary macroincidentalomas (serendipitously discovered adenoma>1cm in diameter) show increased size in 20-24% and 34-40% of cases at respectively 4 and 8years' follow-up. Radiologic differential diagnosis requires MRI centered on the pituitary gland. Initial assessment of nonfunctioning (NF) microincidentaloma is firstly clinical, the endocrinologist looking for signs of hypersecretion (signs of hyperprolactinemia, acromegaly or Cushing's syndrome), followed up by systematic prolactin and IGF-1 assay. Initial assessment of NF macroincidentaloma is clinical, the endocrinologist looking for signs of hormonal hypersecretion or hypopituitarism, followed up by hormonal assay to screen for hypersecretion or hormonal deficiency and by ophthalmologic assessment (visual acuity and visual field) if and only if the lesion is near the optic chiasm (OC). NF microincidentaloma of less than 5mm requires no surveillance; those of≥5mm are not operated on but rather monitored on MRI at 6months and then 2years. Macroincidentaloma remote from the OC is monitored on MRI at 1year, with hormonal exploration (for anterior pituitary deficiency), then every 2years. When macroincidentaloma located near the OC is managed by surveillance rather than surgery, MRI is recommended at 6months, with hormonal and visual exploration, then annual MRI and hormonal and visual assessment every 6months. Surgery is indicated in the following cases: evolutive NF microincidentaloma, NF macroincidentaloma associated with hypopituitarism or showing progression, incidentaloma compressing the OC, possible malignancy, non-compliant patient, pregnancy desired in the short-term, or context at risk of apoplexy.

  7. Hormonal adaptation to real and simulated microgravity.

    PubMed

    Strollo, F; Strollo, G; More, M; Bollanti, L; Ciarmatori, A; Longo, E; Quintiliani, R; Mambro, A; Mangrossa, N; Ferretti, C

    1998-07-01

    The authors provide an overview of relevant results from endocrine studies in astronauts before, during, and after space flight. The hormonal systems examined are the water-electrolyte regulation, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, the hypothalamic-pituitary gonadal axis, the growth hormone-insulin like growth factor 1-prolactin system, hormones which affect bone turnover, the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis, and the endocrine pancreas. Hormones studied include renin, aldosterone, vasopressin, atrial natriuretic factor, cortisol, testosterone, lutenizing hormone, prolactin, growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1, insulin, glucose, T4, thyroid stimulating hormone, calcitonin, active D3, and parathyroid hormone.

  8. Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Fridlyand, Leonid E.; Tamarina, Natalia A.; Schally, Andrew V.; Philipson, Louis H.

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) is produced by the hypothalamus and stimulates growth hormone synthesis and release in the anterior pituitary gland. In addition, GHRH is an important regulator of cellular functions in many cells and organs. Expression of GHRH G-Protein Coupled Receptor (GHRHR) has been demonstrated in different peripheral tissues and cell types, including pancreatic islets. Among the peripheral activities, recent studies demonstrate a novel ability of GHRH analogs to increase and preserve insulin secretion by beta-cells in isolated pancreatic islets, which makes them potentially useful for diabetes treatment. This review considers the role of GHRHR in the beta-cell and addresses the unique engineered GHRH agonists and antagonists for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We discuss the similarity of signaling pathways activated by GHRHR in pituitary somatotrophs and in pancreatic beta-cells and possible ways as to how the GHRHR pathway can interact with glucose and other secretagogues to stimulate insulin secretion. We also consider the hypothesis that novel GHRHR agonists can improve glucose metabolism in Type 2 diabetes by preserving the function and survival of pancreatic beta-cells. Wound healing and cardioprotective action with new GHRH agonists suggest that they may prove useful in ameliorating certain diabetic complications. These findings highlight the future potential therapeutic effectiveness of modulators of GHRHR activity for the development of new therapeutic approaches in diabetes and its complications. PMID:27777568

  9. [Old phenotype and new genotypes. Pituitary adenomas].

    PubMed

    Gérard, C; Jedidi, H; Petrossians, P; Krzesinski, F; Daly, A; Beckers, A

    2015-11-01

    Gigantism and acromegaly, usually caused by a pituitary adenoma linked inappropriate secretion of growth hormone (GH), are generally considered as very rare diseases, even if, according to some authors, their cumulative prevalence is about 1/5000. Starting from the historical case of a giant from Liège we shall describe the different types of GH pituitary adenomas and their pathophysiology. We shall particularly discuss rare forms of inherited GH secreting pituitary adenomas like the FIPA (familial inherited isolated pituitary adenomas) and the X-LAG (X linked acrogigantism), both described for the first time in Liège, in 2000 and 2014, respectively. PMID:26738269

  10. [Old phenotype and new genotypes. Pituitary adenomas].

    PubMed

    Gérard, C; Jedidi, H; Petrossians, P; Krzesinski, F; Daly, A; Beckers, A

    2015-11-01

    Gigantism and acromegaly, usually caused by a pituitary adenoma linked inappropriate secretion of growth hormone (GH), are generally considered as very rare diseases, even if, according to some authors, their cumulative prevalence is about 1/5000. Starting from the historical case of a giant from Liège we shall describe the different types of GH pituitary adenomas and their pathophysiology. We shall particularly discuss rare forms of inherited GH secreting pituitary adenomas like the FIPA (familial inherited isolated pituitary adenomas) and the X-LAG (X linked acrogigantism), both described for the first time in Liège, in 2000 and 2014, respectively.

  11. Growth hormone stimulation test - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The growth hormone (GH) is a protein hormone released from the anterior pituitary gland under the control of the hypothalamus. ... performed on infants and children to identify human growth hormone (hGH) deficiency as a cause of growth retardation. ...

  12. The hypothalamic-pituitary axis in men and women with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Holley, Jean L

    2004-10-01

    Although the precise abnormalities that lead to failure of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in men and women with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) remains undefined, evidence exists for defects in both the hypothalamus and the pituitary. The lack of appropriate cyclic release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) by the hypothalamus leads to loss of normal pulsatile luteinizing hormone (LH) release by the pituitary, which results in impaired ovulation in women and reduced testosterone and sperm production in men. The cause of impaired cyclic release of GnRH is unclear, but hyperprolactinemia, elevated endorphins, and high levels of GnRH and LH caused by reduced clearance may contribute. Perturbations of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadaotropin axis in CKD lead to high rates of infertility, dysfunctional uterine bleeding, and impaired puberty in children. Only through additional study of the complex effects of CKD on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis will the precise abnormalities in hormonal control of reproduction be explained.

  13. Pituitary Apoplexy.

    PubMed

    Briet, Claire; Salenave, Sylvie; Bonneville, Jean-François; Laws, Edward R; Chanson, Philippe

    2015-12-01

    Pituitary apoplexy, a rare clinical syndrome secondary to abrupt hemorrhage or infarction, complicates 2%-12% of pituitary adenomas, especially nonfunctioning tumors. Headache of sudden and severe onset is the main symptom, sometimes associated with visual disturbances or ocular palsy. Signs of meningeal irritation or altered consciousness may complicate the diagnosis. Precipitating factors (increase in intracranial pressure, arterial hypertension, major surgery, anticoagulant therapy or dynamic testing, etc) may be identified. Corticotropic deficiency with adrenal insufficiency may be life threatening if left untreated. Computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging confirms the diagnosis by revealing a pituitary tumor with hemorrhagic and/or necrotic components. Formerly considered a neurosurgical emergency, pituitary apoplexy always used to be treated surgically. Nowadays, conservative management is increasingly used in selected patients (those without important visual acuity or field defects and with normal consciousness), because successive publications give converging evidence that a wait-and-see approach may also provide excellent outcomes in terms of oculomotor palsy, pituitary function and subsequent tumor growth. However, it must be kept in mind that studies comparing surgical approach and conservative management were retrospective and not controlled. PMID:26414232

  14. The role of microRNAs in the pathogenesis of pituitary tumors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiu Juan; Xu, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary tumors, the most common intracranial tumors, lead to serious morbidity through the inappropriate secretion of pituitary hormones. The anomalous expression of microRNAs (miRNAs), which have a crucial status in the development and function of pituitary gland, promotes the tumorigenesis of hypothalamic-pituitary axis-related pituitary tumors. This mainly leads to alterations in the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and hypothalamic-pituitary-growth hormone. In the tumorigenesis of pituitary tumors, miRNAs have complex roles. They can induce cell cycle arrest, inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis via different pathways; however, they also promote the occurrence of pituitary tumors through direct interactions with transcription factors. This review summarizes recent progress in the study of miRNAs on the pathogenesis of pituitary tumors.

  15. Monomorphous Plurihormonal Pituitary Adenoma of Pit-1 Lineage in a Giant Adolescent with Central Hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Bernardo Dias; Raimundo, Luísa; Mete, Ozgur; Oliveira, Ana; Portugal, Jorge; Asa, Sylvia L

    2016-03-01

    Thyrotropin (TSH)-secreting pituitary adenomas are exceedingly rare at the pediatric age and no cases of co-secretion with other pituitary hormones in these tumors have been described in this age range. We present a case of a monomorphous plurihormonal pituitary adenoma that co-secreted TSH and GH in a pediatric patient. A 13-year-old male presented with increasing height velocity (17.75 cm/year, 9.55SD), weight loss, and visual impairment. Initial biochemical evaluations revealed secondary hyperthyroidism. A giant pituitary tumor compressing the surrounding structures was detected by magnetic resonance, and a transsphenoidal surgery was initially performed. Pathological examinations revealed an atypical, monomorphous plurihormonal Pit-1 lineage tumor with mixed features of silent subtype 3 adenoma and acidophil stem cell adenoma. In the postoperative period, secondary hyperthyroidism recurred with high levels of both GH and IGF1. In addition, due to tumor re-growth, a multimodality treatment plan was undertaken including surgery, somatostatin analogs, and radiotherapy. We report the first pediatric case of a plurihormonal TSH- and GH-secreting pituitary adenoma, further expanding the clinical manifestations of pediatric pituitary tumors. Comprehensive pathological evaluation and close follow-up surveillance are crucial to the prompt delivery of the best therapeutic options in the context of this particularly aggressive pituitary tumor. PMID:26330191

  16. Do the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Interacting Protein Variants (Q228K and Q307R) Play a Role in Patients with Familial and Sporadic Hormone-Secreting Pituitary Adenomas?

    PubMed Central

    Ogret, Yeliz Duvarci; Oguz, Fatma Savran

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to examine mutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene by sequence analysis of exons 1–6 using leukocyte genomic DNA obtained from a cohort of familial isolated pituitary adenoma (FIPA) and apparent sporadic functional pituitary adenoma Turkish patients. Methods: Fourteen FIPA and 90 sporadic pituitary adenoma (somatotrophinoma, prolactinoma, and corticotrophinoma) patients, 1 sporadic gigantism case, and 70 healthy controls were included in the study. Results: We did not detect AIP mutations in patients with FIPAs or sporadic pituitary adenomas, including the gigantism case. Only two exonic homozygous missense single-nucleotide polymorphisms (rs641081 [Q228K] and rs4930195 [Q307R]) were identified in the AIP locus. Minor allele frequencies of the Q307R and Q228K variants were significantly higher in FIPA patients compared to controls. In addition, the minor allele frequency of the Q228K variant was significantly increased in patients with sporadic somatotrophinomas compared to controls, whereas the minor allele frequency of the Q307R variant was significantly increased in corticotrophinoma patients compared to controls. Conversely, the minor allele frequencies of Q228R and Q307R variants were similar between patients with prolactinomas and controls. No AIP gene mutation or variant was observed in the sporadic gigantism patient. These results suggest that Q228K and Q307R variants in the AIP gene might be involved in the genetic susceptibility to familial and sporadic pituitary adenomas (somatotrophinoma and corticotrophinoma) in the Turkish population. PMID:25938168

  17. Pituitary gigantism causing diabetic ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Alvi, N S; Kirk, J M

    1999-01-01

    Although growth hormone excess (acromegaly) in association with glucose intolerance and diabetes mellitus is well documented in adult medicine, it is much less common in the paediatric age group. We report the case of a 13 year-old boy who presented with tall stature secondary to a large growth hormone secreting adenoma of the pituitary gland. Random growth hormone was 630 mIU/l and did not suppress during an oral glucose tolerance test. Following debulking of the tumour, he developed diabetic ketoacidosis requiring insulin treatment, but after further surgery glucose handling returned to normal. He has been started on testosterone to arrest further increase in height. PMID:10614552

  18. Aryl‐hydrocarbon receptor activity modulates prolactin expression in the pituitary

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, Tyler B.; Brannick, Katherine E.; Raetzman, Lori T.

    2012-11-15

    Pituitary tumors account for 15% of intracranial neoplasms, however the extent to which environmental toxicants contribute to the proliferation and hormone expression of pituitary cells is unknown. Aryl-hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) interacting protein (AIP) loss of function mutations cause somatotrope and lactotrope adenomas in humans. AIP sequesters AhR and inhibits its transcriptional function. Because of the link between AIP and pituitary tumors, we hypothesize that exposure to dioxins, potent exogenous ligands for AhR that are persistent in the environment, may predispose to pituitary dysfunction through activation of AhR. In the present study, we examined the effect of AhR activation on proliferation and endogenous pituitary hormone expression in the GH3 rat somatolactotrope tumor cell line and the effect of loss of AhR action in knockout mice. GH3 cells respond to nM doses of the reversible AhR agonist β-naphthoflavone with a robust induction of Cyp1a1. Although mRNA levels of the anti-proliferative signaling cytokine TGFbeta1 are suppressed upon β-naphthoflavone treatment, we did not observe an alteration in cell proliferation. AhR activation with β-naphthoflavone suppresses Ahr expression and impairs expression of prolactin (PRL), but not growth hormone (GH) mRNA in GH3 cells. In mice, loss of Ahr similarly leads to a reduction in Prl mRNA at P3, while Gh is unaffected. Additionally, there is a significant reduction in pituitary hormones Lhb and Fshb in the absence of Ahr. Overall, these results demonstrate that AhR is important for pituitary hormone expression and suggest that environmental dioxins can exert endocrine disrupting effects at the pituitary. -- Highlights: ► AhR signaling suppresses Prl mRNA expression. ► AhR signaling does not influence pituitary proliferation in culture. ► AhR is necessary for Prl, Lhb and Fshb expression at postnatal day 3.

  19. Pituitary tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... visual field loss, drooping eyelids or changes in color vision Headache Lack of energy Nasal drainage of clear fluid Nausea and vomiting Problems with the sense of smell In rare cases, these symptoms occur suddenly and can be severe ( pituitary apoplexy ).

  20. Pituitary Involvement in Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis

    PubMed Central

    De Parisot, Audrey; Puéchal, Xavier; Langrand, Corinne; Raverot, Gerald; Gil, Helder; Perard, Laurent; Le Guenno, Guillaume; Berthier, Sabine; Tschirret, Olivier; Eschard, Jean Paul; Vinzio, Stephane; Guillevin, Loïc; Sève, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pituitary dysfunction is a rare manifestation of granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) (Wegener). The main aim of this multicenter retrospective study was to describe the characteristics and outcomes of pituitary manifestations in patients with GPA included in the French Vasculitis Study Group database. Among the 819 GPA patients included in the database, 9 (1.1%) had pituitary involvement. The median age at diagnosis of GPA and pituitary involvement was 46 and 50.8 years, respectively. Pituitary involvement was present at onset of GPA in 1 case and occurred later in 8 patients after a median follow up of 58.5 months. When pituitary dysfunction occurred, 8 patients had active disease at other sites including ENT (n = 6), eye (n = 4), or central nervous system (n = 3) involvement. The most common hormonal dysfunctions were diabetes insipidus (n = 7) and hypogonadism (n = 7). Magnetic resonance imaging was abnormal in 7 patients. The most common lesions were an enlargement of the pituitary gland, thickening of the pituitary stalk, and loss of posterior hypersignal on T1-weighed images. All patients were treated with corticosteroid therapy and 8 patients received immunosuppressive agents for the pituitary involvement, including cyclophosphamide (n = 3), rituximab (n = 2), and methotrexate (n = 3). After a median follow-up of 9.2 years, GPA was in complete remission in 7 patients, but 8 patients were still under hormone replacement therapy. Among the 5 patients who had a subsequent MRI, 2 had complete resolution of pituitary lesions.By combining our study and the literature review, the frequency of hypogonadism and diabetes insipidus, among the patients with pituitary dysfunction, can be estimated at 78% and 71% respectively. Despite a high rate of systemic disease remission on maintenance therapy, 86% of the patients had persistent pituitary dysfunction. The patients who recovered from pituitary dysfunction had all been

  1. The pituitary - Aging and spaceflown rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.; Grindeland, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Decrements in growth hormone (GH) release we observed in two spaceflight experiments and four tail-suspended rat studies mimic age-associated changes in the mammalian pituitary GH system seen by Meites and others. The spaceflight data suggest that formation of high molecular weight bioactive disulfide-linked aggregates of the 20 and 22K monomeric GH forms may be reduced in microgravity, thereby, reducing target tissue activity. Correlative studies to confirm spaceflight as a model for pituitary GH system aging should include: (1) investigation of mechanisms of intracellular hormone packaging, (2) consequences to biological activity of the hormone molecule, and (3) study of intracellular microtubule dynamics.

  2. GnRH decreases adiponectin expression in pituitary gonadotropes via the calcium and PKA pathways.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jonathan; Zheng, Weiming; Grafer, Constance; Mann, Merry Lynn; Halvorson, Lisa M

    2013-08-01

    As endocrinologically active cells, adipocytes are capable of secreting various adipocytokines such as leptin, resistin, and adiponectin to impact metabolic function. Although adipocytes remain to be the primary site of synthesis and secretion, there is now growing evidence that supports the presence of adiponectin and its receptors within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, providing a possible link between obesity and abnormal reproductive physiology. It has been demonstrated that adiponectin may reduce gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion from the hypothalamus as well as modulate gonadal steroid hormone production. Furthermore, prior data indicate that adiponectin may play a role in decreasing luteinizing hormone secretion from pituitary gonadotropes. We aimed to identify the hormonal regulators of adiponectin and its receptors, AdipoR1 and AdipoR2, in pituitary gonadotropes using immortalized gonadotropic LβT2 cells and primary rat pituitary cells. Our study shows significant alterations in adiponectin expression across the estrous cycle. In addition, we present a novel finding that GnRH suppresses pituitary adiponectin expression via the calcium and protein kinase A intracellular pathways in both cultured rat primary pituitary cells and the LβT2 gonadotrope cell line. The GnRH did not alter expression of the adiponectin receptors, AdipoR1 and AdipoR2, in cultured gonadotropes. Expression of the adiponectin receptors, AdipoR1 and AdipoR2, was not altered by GnRH in cell culture but in vivo or in vitro. Our data suggest that gonadotrope function may be modulated by GnRH-mediated changes in adiponectin expression.

  3. Familial pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Vandeva, S; Vasilev, V; Vroonen, L; Naves, L; Jaffrain-Rea, M-L; Daly, A F; Zacharieva, S; Beckers, A

    2010-12-01

    Pituitary adenomas are benign intracranial neoplasms that present a major clinical concern because of hormonal overproduction or compression symptoms of adjacent structures. Most arise in a sporadic setting with a small percentage developing as a part of familial syndromes such as multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), Carney complex (CNC), and the recently described familial isolated pituitary adenomas (FIPA) and MEN-4. While the genetic alterations responsible for the formation of sporadic adenomas remain largely unknown, considerable advances have been made in defining culprit genes in these familial syndromes. Mutations in MEN1 and PRKAR1A genes are found in the majority of MEN1 and CNC patients, respectively. About 15% of FIPA kindreds present with mutations of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene. Mutations in the CDKN1B gene, encoding p27(Kip)¹ were identified in MEN4 cases. Familial tumours appear to differ from their sporadic counterparts not only in genetic basis but also in clinical characteristics. Evidence suggests that, especially in MEN1 and FIPA, they are more aggressive and affect patients at younger age, therefore justifying the importance of early diagnosis. In this review, we summarize the genetic and clinical characteristics of these familial pituitary adenomas. PMID:20961530

  4. Prolactin acts on the hypothalamic-pituitary axis to modulate follicle-stimulating hormone gene expression in the female brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula).

    PubMed

    Crawford, J L; Mester, B; Thomson, B; Lawrence, S B; Eckery, D C

    2011-03-01

    Brushtail possums exhibit a distinct preovulatory pattern of prolactin (Prl) secretion suggesting that Prl is involved in normal reproductive function. In some mammals, Prl is essential for corpus luteum (CL) function and/or modulation of steroidal effects on hypothalamic-pituitary activity. The aim of this study was to test the effects of biologically active recombinant possum Prl (recPosPrl) on both pituitary gland and CL function in possums. To confirm biological activity, administration of recPosPrl-N2C1 (10 μg) resulted in an 18-fold stimulation (P<0.05) of progesterone (P(4)) production by possum granulosa cells in vitro. Based on these findings, minipumps containing either recPosPrl-N2C1 (n=10) or saline (n=8) were inserted into lactating female possums. The expression levels of pituitary-derived PRL, LHB, FSHB and GNRHR and CL-derived LHR mRNA were quantified. Following a resumption of reproductive activity, no differences in ovulation incidence or plasma Prl concentrations were observed. Plasma Prl levels were less variable (P<0.001) in Prl-treated possums, confirming a self-regulatory role for Prl in this species. There was a marked down-regulation (P<0.001) of FSHB mRNA at the mid-luteal stage in Prl-treated possums, whereas mean PRL, LHB, GNRHR and LHR mRNA expression levels were not different between experimental groups. Plasma P(4) concentrations were not different (P=0.05) in Prl-treated possums, although tended to be higher in the peri-ovulatory and early-luteal phase. We conclude in the brushtail possum that Prl is self-regulated via a short-feedback loop common to all mammals studied and is able to modulate FSHB expression probably at the level of the hypothalamus and/or pituitary gland.

  5. Localization of amylin-like immunoreactivity in melanocyte-stimulating hormone-containing cells of the pars intermedia but not those of the pars distalis in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) pituitary.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hirohumi; Yamamoto, Toshiharu

    2016-04-01

    Immunohistochemical techniques were employed to investigate the distribution of amylin-like immunoreactivity in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) pituitary. Amylin-immunoreactive cells were observed in the pars intermedia, and these cells were found to be immunoreactive for α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (αMSH) as well. In contrast, αMSH-immunoreactive cells in the pars distalis were immuno-negaitive for amylin. These light microscopic findings were confirmed by immunoelectron microscopy. Amylin-immunoreactive signals were located on the haloes of presumable secretory granules in association with αMSH-immunoreactive signals in the amylin-positive cells. However, in the pars distalis, the αMSH-positive cells did not contain amylin-immunoreactive secretory granules. Western blot analysis of axolotl pituitary extracts revealed the labeling of a protein band at approximately 10.5-kDa by the anti-rat amylin serum, which was not labeled by the anti-αMSH antibody. These findings indicate that amylin secreted from MSH-producing cells in the pars intermedia may modulate MSH secretion in an autocrine fashion and may participate in MSH functions such as fatty homeostasis together with MSH.

  6. Localization of amylin-like immunoreactivity in melanocyte-stimulating hormone-containing cells of the pars intermedia but not those of the pars distalis in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) pituitary.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hirohumi; Yamamoto, Toshiharu

    2016-04-01

    Immunohistochemical techniques were employed to investigate the distribution of amylin-like immunoreactivity in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) pituitary. Amylin-immunoreactive cells were observed in the pars intermedia, and these cells were found to be immunoreactive for α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (αMSH) as well. In contrast, αMSH-immunoreactive cells in the pars distalis were immuno-negaitive for amylin. These light microscopic findings were confirmed by immunoelectron microscopy. Amylin-immunoreactive signals were located on the haloes of presumable secretory granules in association with αMSH-immunoreactive signals in the amylin-positive cells. However, in the pars distalis, the αMSH-positive cells did not contain amylin-immunoreactive secretory granules. Western blot analysis of axolotl pituitary extracts revealed the labeling of a protein band at approximately 10.5-kDa by the anti-rat amylin serum, which was not labeled by the anti-αMSH antibody. These findings indicate that amylin secreted from MSH-producing cells in the pars intermedia may modulate MSH secretion in an autocrine fashion and may participate in MSH functions such as fatty homeostasis together with MSH. PMID:26797189

  7. A comparative study of the effects of ranitidine and cimetidine on carbohydrate tolerance, growth hormone secretion and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in man.

    PubMed

    Scobie, I N; Saunders, J; Barnes, G D; Hoad, J; Wheeler, M J; Lowry, C; Sonksen, P H; Amphlett, G; Riley, A J

    1986-01-01

    The effect of chronic oral administration of cimetidine (1 g per day) and ranitidine (300 mg per day) on plasma levels of prolactin (PRL), testosterone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) and human growth hormone was compared in 2 groups of male patients who presented with dyspeptic symptoms. Eight were treated with ranitidine and 9 with cimetidine for 4 weeks. The glucose and insulin response to a 100 g oral glucose load was also assessed. Cimetidine treatment resulted in a significant increase in plasma testosterone levels which was not found in the ranitidine group. No significant change occurred in PRL, LH, FSH, SHBG, DHT and growth hormone. There was no evidence of a significant alteration in carbohydrate metabolism.

  8. Suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis by TAK-385 (relugolix), a novel, investigational, orally active, small molecule gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist: studies in human GnRH receptor knock-in mice.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Daisuke; Masaki, Tsuneo; Tanaka, Akira; Yoshimatsu, Mie; Akinaga, Yumiko; Asada, Mari; Sasada, Reiko; Takeyama, Michiyasu; Miwa, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Tatsuya; Kusaka, Masami

    2014-01-15

    TAK-385 (relugolix) is a novel, non-peptide, orally active gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist, which builds on previous work with non-peptide GnRH antagonist TAK-013. TAK-385 possesses higher affinity and more potent antagonistic activity for human and monkey GnRH receptors compared with TAK-013. Both TAK-385 and TAK-013 have low affinity for the rat GnRH receptor, making them difficult to evaluate in rodent models. Here we report the human GnRH receptor knock-in mouse as a humanized model to investigate pharmacological properties of these compounds on gonadal function. Twice-daily oral administration of TAK-013 (10mg/kg) for 4 weeks decreased the weights of testes and ventral prostate in male knock-in mice but not in male wild-type mice, demonstrating the validity of this model to evaluate antagonists for the human GnRH receptor. The same dose of TAK-385 also reduced the prostate weight to castrate levels in male knock-in mice. In female knock-in mice, twice-daily oral administration of TAK-385 (100mg/kg) induced constant diestrous phases within the first week, decreased the uterus weight to ovariectomized levels and downregulated GnRH receptor mRNA in the pituitary after 4 weeks. Gonadal function of TAK-385-treated knock-in mice began to recover after 5 days and almost completely recovered within 14 days after drug withdrawal in both sexes. Our findings demonstrate that TAK-385 acts as an antagonist for human GnRH receptor in vivo and daily oral administration potently, continuously and reversibly suppresses the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. TAK-385 may provide useful therapeutic interventions in hormone-dependent diseases including endometriosis, uterine fibroids and prostate cancer.

  9. Modeling the involvement of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axes in autoimmune and stress-related rheumatic syndromes in women.

    PubMed

    Crofford, L J; Jacobson, J; Young, E

    1999-03-01

    Autoimmune and stress-related rheumatic diseases are significantly more common in women than in men. Our group has focused on the role of two principal neuroendocrine axes, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, in this increased susceptibility to rheumatic disease. We review the physiology of the HPA and HPG axes and discuss their reciprocal interactions. Mechanisms by which hormones of the HPA and HPG axes influence the immune system and modulate the course of autoimmune inflammatory diseases in animal models of rheumatic disease are described. In addition, we review the data suggesting the importance of these neurohormonal systems in rheumatic diseases. These data provide insights into why women may be at increased risk and how we might better understand the mechanisms that provoke expression of rheumatic diseases in women. To advance research in this area, it is critical to develop methods to evaluate the function of the neuroendocrine axes. Secretion of both HPA and HPG axis hormones, particularly the hormones of the hypothalamus and anterior pituitary, is largely by intermittent pulses. In addition, the HPA axis exhibits a profound circadian, or near 24-hour, variation, and HPG axis hormones fluctuate over the monthly cycle. These factors make meaningful analysis of these axes quite complex. We discuss models used in the analyses of neuroendocrine axes and the use of challenge testing to assess the integrity of neuroendocrine axes.

  10. PI3K signalling in GnRH actions on dispersed goldfish pituitary cells: relationship with PKC-mediated LH and GH release and regulation of long-term effects on secretion and total cellular hormone availability.

    PubMed

    Pemberton, Joshua G; Orr, Michael E; Stafford, James L; Chang, John P

    2014-09-01

    Goldfish pituitary cells are exposed to two GnRHs, salmon (s)GnRH and chicken (c)GnRH-II. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and protein kinase C (PKC) both participate in acute sGnRH- and cGnRH-II-stimulated LH and GH release. Using goldfish pituitary cells, we examined the relationship between PI3K and PKC in acute LH and GH secretion, and PI3K involvement in chronic hormone release and total LH and GH availability. The PI3K inhibitor LY294002 did not affect PKC agonists-induced LH or GH release, and PKC agonists did not alter PI3K p85 phosphorylation, suggesting PKC activation is not upstream of PI3K in acute hormone release. In 2, 6, 12 and 24h treatments, LY294002 did not affect LH release but stimulated total LH availability at 6h. sGnRH stimulatory actions on LH release and total availability at 12 and 24h, and cGnRH-II effects on these parameters at 6h were inhibited by LY294002. LY294002 enhanced basal GH release at 2 and 6h, but reduced total GH at 12 and 24h. Increased GH release was seen following 6, 12 and 24h of sGnRH, and 2, 6 and 24h of cGnRH-II treatment but total GH availability was only elevated by 24h cGnRH-II treatment. Whereas LY294002 inhibited GH release responses to sGnRH at 12h and cGnRH-II at 6h, it attenuated cGnRH-II-elicited, but not sGnRH-induced, effects on total GH. These results indicate that PI3K differentially modulates long-term basal and GnRH-stimulated hormone release, and total hormone availability, in a time-, cell-type-, and GnRH isoform-selective manner.

  11. Functional relationships of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular system in Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Földes, J; Bános, C; Fehér, T; Bodrogi, L; Szalay, F; Borvendég, J; Csillag, J; Takó, J

    1982-01-01

    An increased secretion of gonadotropic hormone was found in hyperthyroid males despite the high basal serum total testosterone and oestradiol levels. This suggests that hyperthyroidism affects the responsiveness of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis to sexual steroid hormones. While in the hyperthyroid patients the elevation of the serum testosterone level in response to chorionic gonadotropin was lower than normally, the LH and FSH responses to LRH were increased. The results indicate that male hyperthyroidism is associated with a loss of responsiveness of the Leydig-cells to adequate stimuli, to which the pituitary reacts by a compensatory increase in its LH-secretion and by an increased reactivity to LRH. It is suggested that in addition to the direct effect of the increased thyroid hormone levels, a secondary elevation of the oestradiol concentration plays a major part in the alterations in question.

  12. Regulation of Pituitary MT1 Melatonin Receptor Expression by Gonadotrophin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH) and Early Growth Response Factor-1 (Egr-1): In Vivo and In Vitro Studies

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Sung-Eun; Wright, Ian K.; Wyse, Cathy; Samson-Desvignes, Nathalie; Le Blanc, Pascale; Laroche, Serge; Hazlerigg, David G.; Johnston, Jonathan D.

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin receptor expression exhibits profound developmental changes through poorly understood mechanisms. In mammals, a current model suggests that pubertal reactivation of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion down-regulates MT1 melatonin receptors in pituitary gonadotroph cells, via the induction of early growth response factor-1 (EGR-1). Here we have examined this model by testing the hypotheses that inhibition of Mt1 expression by GnRH occurs directly in gonadotroph cells, can be reversed in adulthood by blockade of GnRH receptors, and requires EGR-1. We first confirmed the endogenous expression of Mt1 mRNA in the αT3-1 gonadotroph cell line. Stimulation of these cells with a GnRH agonist resulted in a rapid increase of Egr-1 mRNA expression, which peaked after 30–60 minutes, and a more prolonged elevation of nuclear EGR-1 immunoreactivity. Moreover, the GnRH agonist significantly decreased Mt1 mRNA. We then treated adult male rats with the GnRH antagonist cetrorelix or saline. After 4 weeks of daily injections, cetrorelix significantly reduced serum LH concentration and testis weight, with histological analysis confirming absence of spermatogenesis. Despite the successful inhibition of GnRH signalling, pituitary Mt1 expression was unchanged. Next we studied the proximal region of the rat Mt1 promoter. Consistent with previous work, over-expression of the transcription factor PITX-1 increased Mt1-luciferase reporter activity; this effect was dependent on the presence of consensus PITX-1 promoter binding regions. Over-expression of EGR-1 inhibited PITX-1-stimulated activity, even following mutation of the consensus EGR-1 binding site. Finally, we studied Egr1−/− mice and observed no difference in pituitary Mt1 expression between Egr1−/− and wild-type litter mates. This work demonstrates that GnRH receptor activation directly down-regulates Mt1 expression in gonadotroph cells. However, pituitary Mt1 expression in adults is unaltered by

  13. Regulation of pituitary MT1 melatonin receptor expression by gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and early growth response factor-1 (Egr-1): in vivo and in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Bae, Sung-Eun; Wright, Ian K; Wyse, Cathy; Samson-Desvignes, Nathalie; Le Blanc, Pascale; Laroche, Serge; Hazlerigg, David G; Johnston, Jonathan D

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin receptor expression exhibits profound developmental changes through poorly understood mechanisms. In mammals, a current model suggests that pubertal reactivation of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion down-regulates MT1 melatonin receptors in pituitary gonadotroph cells, via the induction of early growth response factor-1 (EGR-1). Here we have examined this model by testing the hypotheses that inhibition of Mt1 expression by GnRH occurs directly in gonadotroph cells, can be reversed in adulthood by blockade of GnRH receptors, and requires EGR-1. We first confirmed the endogenous expression of Mt1 mRNA in the αT3-1 gonadotroph cell line. Stimulation of these cells with a GnRH agonist resulted in a rapid increase of Egr-1 mRNA expression, which peaked after 30-60 minutes, and a more prolonged elevation of nuclear EGR-1 immunoreactivity. Moreover, the GnRH agonist significantly decreased Mt1 mRNA. We then treated adult male rats with the GnRH antagonist cetrorelix or saline. After 4 weeks of daily injections, cetrorelix significantly reduced serum LH concentration and testis weight, with histological analysis confirming absence of spermatogenesis. Despite the successful inhibition of GnRH signalling, pituitary Mt1 expression was unchanged. Next we studied the proximal region of the rat Mt1 promoter. Consistent with previous work, over-expression of the transcription factor PITX-1 increased Mt1-luciferase reporter activity; this effect was dependent on the presence of consensus PITX-1 promoter binding regions. Over-expression of EGR-1 inhibited PITX-1-stimulated activity, even following mutation of the consensus EGR-1 binding site. Finally, we studied Egr1-/- mice and observed no difference in pituitary Mt1 expression between Egr1-/- and wild-type litter mates. This work demonstrates that GnRH receptor activation directly down-regulates Mt1 expression in gonadotroph cells. However, pituitary Mt1 expression in adults is unaltered by blockade of

  14. Nitric oxide signaling in ghrelin-induced LH release from goldfish pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Grey, Caleb L; Chang, John P

    2013-03-01

    Among its many known functions, ghrelin has been proposed to participate in the regulation of reproduction; however, its effect on pituitary LH release is controversial, especially in mammals. In the goldfish, ghrelin directly stimulates pituitary LH release via increased entry of calcium through voltage sensitive channels and activation of protein kinase C. Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signaling molecule in many physiological systems including hormone regulation at the level of the pituitary. Goldfish pituitary cells and extracts have previously been reported to express immunoreactivity for inducible and neuronal NO synthase (iNOS and nNOS). In this study, we determined if NO is involved in goldfish ghrelin (gGRLN(19))-induced LH release from primary cultures of dispersed goldfish pituitary cells in column perifusion. Treatment with the NO scavenger PTIO significantly decreased gGRLN(19)-induced LH release and co-treatment with the NO donor SNP and gGRLN(19) did not induce an additive increase in LH release, suggesting that NO is critical to gGRLN(19) stimulation of LH release in goldfish pituitary cells. Further work examined the involvement of the NOS using the NOS isoform-selective inhibitors 1400W, 7-Ni, and AGH. While 1400W (selective for iNOS) and AGH (selective for iNOS and nNOS) abolished gGRLN(19)-induced LH release from goldfish pituitary cells, 7-Ni (selective for nNOS and endothelial NOS) had no significant effect on this stimulation. Our results indicate, for the first time in a teleost species, that gGRLN(19)-induced LH release from pituitary cells is NO-dependent and likely involves iNOS, adding to the understanding of GRLN intracellular signaling in general and specifically to the regulation of LH release from the pituitary.

  15. Hypothalamic-pituitary function (LH, FSH and prolactin) in males with chronic liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Geisthövel, W

    1979-07-01

    Because of the central importance of the liver for the metabolism of estrogens and androgens the chronically ill liver per se represents an essential disturbing factor within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis caused by the altered hepatic metabolism of the steroid hormones as well as the abnormal synthesis of steroid-hormone-binding proteins with changed free fractions of sex hormones. The question has been differently answered whether a chronic hepatic disease can also be the reason for disturbance on hypothalamic-pituitary and/or testicular level. Recent plasma determination of LH/FSH before and after LHRH and clomiphene, of sex hormones before and after HCG as well as unbound sex hormones in males with chronic hepatic diseases lead to the following conclusion. 1. Chronic liver disease (without idopathic hemochromatosis). Even sever chronic hepatic diseases are not accompanied by primary hypopituitarism. With regard to the impaired Leydig cells stimulation by HCG and the abnormal seminal fluid and testicular histology one can suppose a primary gonadal hypogonadism. However, an additional hypothalamic disturbance has to be considered. 2. Idiopathic hemochromatosis. Presumably in hemochromatosis a primary insufficiency of pituitary and/or testes can take place related to the general metabolic disturbances of this illness. The classic hypothesis of an exclusively primary lesion with secondary hypogonadism does not appear to be correct.

  16. Does a nonclassical signaling mechanism underlie an increase of estradiol-mediated gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor binding in ovine pituitary cells?

    PubMed

    Davis, Tracy L; Whitesell, Jennifer D; Cantlon, Jeremy D; Clay, Colin M; Nett, Terry M

    2011-10-01

    Estradiol-17beta (E2) is the major regulator of GnRH receptor (GnRHR) gene expression and number during the periovulatory period; however, the mechanisms underlying E2 regulation of the GNRHR gene remain undefined. Herein, we find that E2 conjugated to BSA (E2-BSA) mimics the stimulatory effect of E2 on GnRH binding in primary cultures of ovine pituitary cells. The time course for maximal GnRH analog binding was similar for both E2 and E2-BSA. The ability of E2 and E2-BSA to increase GnRH analog binding was blocked by the estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist ICI 182,780. Also, increased GnRH analog binding in response to E2 and the selective ESR1 agonist propylpyrazole triol was blocked by expression of a dominant-negative form of ESR1 (L540Q). Thus, membrane-associated ESR1 is the likely candidate for mediating E2 activation of the GNRHR gene. As cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) is an established target for E2 activation in gonadotrophs, we next explored a potential role for this protein as an intracellular mediator of the E2 signal. Consistent with this possibility, adenoviral-mediated expression of a dominant-negative form of CREB (A-CREB) completely abolished the ability of E2 to increase GnRH analog binding in primary cultures of ovine pituitary cells. Finally, the presence of membrane-associated E2 binding sites on ovine pituitary cells was demonstrated using a fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugate of E2-BSA. We suggest that E2 regulation of GnRHR number during the preovulatory period reflects a membrane site of action and may proceed through a nonclassical signaling mechanism, specifically a CREB-dependent pathway.

  17. Genetically modified mouse models in studies of luteinising hormone action.

    PubMed

    Huhtaniemi, Ilpo; Ahtiainen, Petteri; Pakarainen, Tomi; Rulli, Susana B; Zhang, Fu-Ping; Poutanen, Matti

    2006-06-27

    Numerous genetically modified mouse models have recently been developed for the study of the pituitary-gonadal interactions. They include spontaneous or engineered knockouts (KO) of the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and its receptor, the gonadotrophin common-alpha(Calpha), luteinising hormone (LH) beta and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) beta subunits, and the two gonadotrophin receptors (R), LHR and FSHR. In addition, there are also transgenic (TG) mice overexpressing gonadotrophin subunits and producing supraphysiological levels of these hormones. These models have offered relevant phenocopies for similar mutations in humans and to a great extent expanded our knowledge on normal and pathological functions of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. The purpose of this article is to review some of our recent findings on two such mouse models, the LHR KO mouse (LuRKO), and the hCG overexpressing TG mouse (hCG+).

  18. The role of leptin in the sporadic form of Alzheimer's disease. Interactions with the adipokines amylin, ghrelin and the pituitary hormone prolactin.

    PubMed

    Folch, Jaume; Patraca, Iván; Martínez, Nohora; Pedrós, Ignacio; Petrov, Dmitry; Ettcheto, Miren; Abad, Sonia; Marin, Miguel; Beas-Zarate, Carlos; Camins, Antoni

    2015-11-01

    Leptin (Lep) is emerging as a pivotal molecule involved in both the early events and the terminal phases of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the canonical pathway, Lep acts as an anorexigenic factor via its effects on hypothalamic nucleus. However, additional functions of Lep in the hippocampus and cortex have been unravelled in recent years. Early events in the sporadic form of AD likely involve cellular level alterations which can have an effect on food intake and metabolism. Thus, AD can be conceivably interpreted as a multiorgan pathology that not only results in a dramatic neuronal loss in brain areas such as the hippocampus and the cortex (ultimately leading to a significant cognitive impairment) but as a disease which also affects body-weight homeostasis. According to this view, body-weight control disruptions are to be expected in both the early- and late-stage AD, concomitant with changes in serum Lep content, alterations in Lep transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and Lep receptor-related signalling abnormalities. Lep is a member of the adipokine family of molecules, while the Lep receptor belongs to the class I cytokine receptors. Since cellular response to adipokine signalling can be either potentiated or diminished as a result of specific ligand-receptor interactions, Lep interactions with other members of the adipokine family including amylin, ghrelin and hormones such as prolactin require further investigation. In this review, we provide a general perspective on the functions of Lep in the brain, with a particular focus on the sporadic AD.

  19. The Effects of Smoked Nicotine on Measures of Subjective states and Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Hormones in Women during the Follicular and Luteal Phases of the Menstrual Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Goletiani, Nathalie V.; Siegel, Arthur J.; Lukas, Scott E.; Hudson, James I.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the acute effects of cigarette smoking on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) hormones and subjective states as a function of the menstrual cycle in nicotine-dependent women. Methods Seventeen healthy nicotine-dependent women were studied during the follicular and/or luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Due to observation of a possible bimodal distribution of progesterone levels within the luteal phase group, we performed a set of a posteriori analyses. Therefore, we divided the luteal group into a low progesterone and a high progesterone groups. Results Smoked nicotine activated HPA, measured by ACTH, cortisol, and DHEA response and affected subjective states in both follicular and luteal phases, with increased “High”, “Rush”, and decreased “Craving”. The HPA stimulation revealed a blunting of ACTH response. There was only modest evidence for a blunting of subjective state responses in the luteal phase. However upon post hoc analyses, the high progesterone luteal group showed a marked blunting of measures of subjective states and a blunted ACTH response. Examining the association between hormone and measures of subjective states revealed tentative associations of ACTH stimulation with increased “Rush” and “Craving”, and DHEA stimulation with increased “Craving”. Conclusions This pilot study suggests that menstrual cycle phase differences in progesterone levels may attenuate nicotine’s addictive effects via diminution of its reinforcing properties, and augmentation of its aversive effects interfering with the pleasure associated with cigarette smoking. PMID:25783522

  20. Pulsatile administration of gonadotropin-releasing hormone does not alter the follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) isoform distribution pattern of pituitary or circulating FSH in nutritionally growth-restricted ovariectomized lambs.

    PubMed

    Hassing, J M; Kletter, G B; I'Anson, H; Wood, R I; Beitins, I Z; Foster, D L; Padmanabhan, V

    1993-04-01

    The experimental induction of puberty by GnRH administration to prepubertal lambs increases serum bioactive FSH (B-FSH) as measured in the rat Sertoli cell aromatase induction bioassay. Serum immunoreactive FSH (I-FSH) levels are unchanged. The increase in serum B-FSH is associated with an increase in the proportion of less acidic and more biopotent FSH serum isoforms. However, it is unknown if this effect of GnRH on serum FSH microheterogeneity is direct or mediated by gonadal factors. We have used the nutritionally growth-restricted ovariectomized lamb as a model of the neuroendocrine regulation of FSH isoform microheterogeneity. With this model, the hypothalamic-pituitary component of the neuroendocrine axis may be isolated from gonadal factors. In the present study, using the nutritionally growth-restricted ovariectomized lamb as a model, we investigated the role of GnRH on the regulation of FSH microheterogeneity. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that GnRH increases the proportion of the less acidic (more biopotent) serum FSH isoforms. As an in vitro correlate, we investigated the effect of GnRH on gonadotropin secretion and FSH isoform distribution in ovine pituitary explant cultures. Seven ovariectomized nutritionally restricted lambs were administered GnRH (i.v., 2 ng/kg) for 36 h (at 2-h intervals for 24 h, then hourly for the final 12 h). Six others served as controls. Blood samples were withdrawn at 12-min intervals during the last 4 h for the measurement of serum immunoactive LH (I-LH) and I-FSH. Pituitary homogenates and serum from four animals from each group were individually chromatofocused, and the FSH isoform distribution patterns were determined. Pulsatile administration of GnRH to nutritionally growth-restricted lambs increased circulating I-LH concentrations from 0.6 +/- 1.0 to 5.9 +/- 3.1 ng/ml (P < 0.01), but did not significantly change circulating I-FSH (4.9 +/- 1.8 vs. 11.5 +/- 4.2 ng/ml) nor B-FSH concentrations (3.9 +/- 1.2 vs. 5

  1. Dioxin-induced retardation of development through a reduction in the expression of pituitary hormones and possible involvement of an aryl hydrocarbon receptor in this defect: A comparative study using two strains of mice with different sensitivities to dioxin

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Tomoki; Taura, Junki; Hattori, Yukiko; Ishii, Yuji; Yamada, Hideyuki

    2014-08-01

    We have previously revealed that treating pregnant rats with 2,3,7,8-tetracholorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) reduces the expression of gonadotropins and growth hormone (GH) in the fetal and neonatal pituitary. A change in gonadotropin expression impairs the testicular expression of steroidogenic proteins in perinatal pups, and imprint defects in sexual behavior after reaching maturity. In this study, we examined whether TCDD also affects the expression of gonadotropin and GH in mice using C57BL/6J and DBA/2J strains which express the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr) exhibiting a different affinity for TCDD. When pregnant C57BL/6J mice at gestational day (GD) 12 were given oral TCDD (0.2–20 μg/kg), all doses significantly attenuated the pituitary expression of gonadotropin mRNAs in fetuses at GD18. On the other hand, in DBA/2J mice, a much higher dose of TCDD (20 μg/kg) was needed to produce a significant attenuation. Such reduction in the C57BL/6J strain continued until at least postnatal day (PND) 4. In agreement with this, TCDD reduced the testicular expression of steroidogenic proteins in C57BL/6J neonates at PND2 and 4, although the same did not occur in the fetal testis and ovary. Furthermore, TCDD reduced the perinatal expression of GH, litter size and the body weight of newborn pups only in the C57BL/6J strain. These results suggest that 1) also in mice, maternal exposure to TCDD attenuates gonadotropin-regulated steroidogenesis and GH expression leading to the impairment of pup development and sexual immaturity; and 2) Ahr activation during the late fetal and early postnatal stages is required for these defects. - Highlights: • The effect of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on mouse growth was studied. • TCDD reduced the levels of luteinizing hormone and growth hormone in perinatal pups. • Maternal exposure to TCDD also attenuated testicular steroidogenesis in pups. • The above effects of TCDD were more pronounced in C57BL/6J than in DBA/2J

  2. The Pituitary in Gigantism.

    PubMed

    Scheithauer, Bernd W.; Kovacs, Kalman T.; Stefaneanu, Lucia; Horvath, Eva; Kane, Laurie A.; Young, William F.; Lloyd, Ricardo V.; Randall, Raymond V.; Davis, Dudley H.

    1995-01-01

    To compare the pituitary pathology of gigantism to that of acromegaly, 19 surgically resected lesions were studied from 10 males and 9 females, ages 13-49 (mean, 19 yr) with excessive height (>/=95th percentile), onset of disease prior to puberty, elevated growth hormone (GH) levels despite glucose suppression, and a pathologically confirmed GH-producing pituitary mass. One patient had MEN-I. The lesions included 18 adenomas and 1 case of pure hyperplasia. The median, mean, and range of serum GH and prolactin (PRL) levels were 64, 235, 5-1000 ng/mL and 47, 146, 29-770 ng/mL, respectively. Of the 8 adenoma specimens accompanied by nontumoral pituitary (i.e., tissue wherein the presence of hyperplasia was assessable), 3 (37%) demonstrated both. Of the 18 tumors, 78% were macroadenomas and 22% were grossly invasive; their immunophenotypes included GH (5%), GH and PRL (19%), and GHPRL and a glycoprotein hormone, usually TSH and/or a-subunit (76%). Of the 10 adenoma-containing lesions subject to electron microscopy (EM), 2 consisted of GH cells alone; 2 of mammosomatotroph (MS) cells alone; 1 of GH and MS cells; 1 of GH and PRL cells; 2 of GH, PRL, and MS cells; 1 of GH, PRL, and glycoprotein cells; and 1 was a subtype 3 adenoma. Ultrastructurally, GH cells and/or MS cells predominated in these lesions. Immuno-EM of one CH and PRL cell and of one GH-PR-MS tumor showed GH and PRL to be present not only in single cells but within the same granules. Nine of 12 adenoma-associated lesions subject to combined in situ hybridization (ISH) and immunostaining showed double labeling for PRL (or GH) mRNA and for GH (or PRL), respectively, features indicating MS differentiation. In the 4 lesions exhibiting hyperplasia, either alone (1) or in association with adenoma (3), EM showed MS cells in 3, and immuno-EM as well as combined immunohistochemistry and ISH showed double labeling for GH and PRL in both of the 2 cases studied. In summary, although in terms of their tinctorial

  3. Stem cells in the canine pituitary gland and in pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    van Rijn, Sarah J; Tryfonidou, Marianna A; Hanson, Jeanette M; Penning, Louis C; Meij, Björn P

    2013-12-01

    Cushing's disease (CD) or pituitary-dependent hypercortisolism is a common endocrinopathy in dogs, with an estimated prevalence of 1 or 2 in 1000 dogs per year. It is caused by an adrenocorticotropic hormone secreting adenoma in the pars distalis or pars intermedia of the pituitary gland. The pituitary gland is a small endocrine gland located in the pituitary fossa. In the postnatal individual, the hypothalamus-pituitary axis plays a central role in maintaining homeostatic functions, like control of metabolism, reproduction, and growth. Stem cells are suggested to play a role in the homeostatic adaptations of the adult pituitary gland, such as the rapid specific cell-type expansion in response to pregnancy or lactation. Several cell populations have been suggested as pituitary stem cells, such as Side Population cells and cells expressing Sox2 or Nestin. These cell populations are discussed in this review. Also, stem and progenitor cells are thought to play a role in pituitary tumorigenesis, such as the development of pituitary adenomas in dogs. There are limited reports on the role of stem cells in pituitary adenomas, especially in dogs. Further studies are needed to identify and characterize this cell population and to develop specific cell targeting therapeutic strategies as a new way of treating canine CD.

  4. Stages of Pituitary Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumors that may spread to bones of the skull or the sinus cavity below the pituitary gland. ... sella (the bone at the base of the skull , where the pituitary gland sits). Recurrent Pituitary Tumors ...

  5. Prenatal melatonin and its interaction with tachykinins in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

    PubMed

    Díaz López, B; Debeljuk, L

    2007-01-01

    The pineal gland, through its hormone melatonin, influences the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Tachykinins are bioactive peptides whose presence has been demonstrated in the pineal gland, hypothalamus, anterior pituitary gland and the gonads, in addition to other central and peripheral structures. Tachykinins have been demonstrated to influence the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, acting as paracrine factors at each of these levels. In the present review, we examine the available evidence supporting a role for melatonin in the regulation of reproductive functions, the possible role of tachykinins in pineal function and the possible interactions between melatonin and tachykinins in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Evidence is presented showing that melatonin, given to pregnant rats, influences the developmental pattern of tachykinins in the hypothalamus and the anterior pituitary gland of the offspring during postnatal life. In the gonads, the effects of melatonin on the tachykinin developmental pattern were rather modest. In particular, in the present review, we have included a summary of our own work performed in the past few years on the effect of melatonin on tachykinin levels in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

  6. Effect of lacidipine on pituitary function in essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Carpené, G; Opocher, G; Zanferrari, G; Rizzini, P; Mantero, F

    1991-01-01

    Calcium plays an important role in endocrine reactions such as hormone biosynthesis, release, secretion, and action on target organs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a new long-lasting calcium-channel blocker, lacidipine, on basal and stimulated anterior pituitary hormone secretion. In a single-blind crossover study comparing lacidipine 4 mg p.o. once daily with placebo, variations in plasma levels of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), prolactin (PRL), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) were evaluated in 10 hypertensive patients. Basal or stimulated anterior pituitary hormone secretion was similar after lacidipine and placebo. Lacidipine treatment significantly reduced blood pressure. It can thus be concluded that lacidipine is an effective calcium antagonist that has no effect on pituitary function.

  7. Ontogeny of pituitary-gonadal interactions: current advances and controversies.

    PubMed

    Huhtaniemi, I T; Warren, D W

    1990-01-01

    The different compartments of the fetal hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, the hypothalamus, anterior pituitary, and gonads, probably start their embryonic development independently, and become fully interactive as the last link o f their maturation. The developing hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis offers a good model for studies on the mechanisms of regulation of fetal hormonal systems. It is evident that fetal hormonal functions are not the same as those of the adult on a smaller scale, but that there are fundamental differences between the fetus and adult in basic features of the mechanisms o f reproductive hormone action.

  8. Heavy Resistance Training and Supplementation With the Alleged Testosterone Booster Nmda has No Effect on Body Composition, Muscle Performance, and Serum Hormones Associated With the Hypothalamo-Pituitary-Gonadal Axis in Resistance-Trained Males

    PubMed Central

    Willoughby, Darryn S.; Spillane, Mike; Schwarz, Neil

    2014-01-01

    The effects of 28 days of heavy resistance training while ingesting the alleged testosterone-boosting supplement, NMDA, were determined on body composition, muscle strength, serum cortisol, prolactin, and hormones associated with the hypothalamo-pituitary- gonadal (HPG) axis. Twenty resistance-trained males engaged in 28 days of resistance training 4 times/wk while orally ingesting daily either 1.78 g of placebo (PLAC) or NMDA. Data were analyzed with separate 2 x 2 ANOVA (p < 0.05). Criterion measures involved body composition, muscle strength, serum cortisol, prolactin, and gonadal hormone levels [free and total testosterone, luteininzing hormome (LH), gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH), estradiol], and were assessed before (Day 0) and after (Day 29) resistance training and supplementation. No changes were noted for total body water and fat mass in response to resistance training (p > 0.05) or supplementation (p > 0.05). In regard to total body mass and fat-free mass, however, each was significantly increased in both groups in response to resistance training (p < 0.05), but were not affected by supplementation (p > 0.05). In both groups, lower-body muscle strength was significantly increased in response to resistance training (p < 0.05); however, supplementation had no effect (p > 0.05). All serum hormones (total and free testosterone, LH, GnRH, estradiol, cortisol, prolactin) were unaffected by resistance training (p > 0.05) or supplementation (p > 0.05). The gonadal hormones and cortisol and prolactin were unaffected by 28 days of NMDA supplementation and not associated with the observed increases in muscle strength and mass. At the dose provided, NMDA had no effect on HPG axis activity or ergogenic effects in skeletal muscle. Key Points In response to 28 days of heavy resistance training and NMDA supplementation, similar increases in muscle mass and strength in both groups occurred; however, the increases were not different between supplement groups. The

  9. Foetal Hypothalamic and Pituitary Expression of Gonadotrophin Releasing Hormone and Galanin Systems is Disturbed by Exposure to Sewage Sludge Chemicals via Maternal Ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Bellingham, Michelle; Fowler, Paul A.; Amezaga, Maria R.; Whitelaw, Christine M.; Rhind, Stewart M.; Cotinot, Corinne; Mandon-Pepin, Beatrice; Sharpe, Richard M.; Evans, Neil P.

    2016-01-01

    Animals and humans are chronically exposed to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) which are ubiquitous in the environment. There are strong circumstantial links between environmental EDC exposure and both declining human/wildlife reproductive health and the increasing incidence of reproductive system abnormalities. Verification of such links, however, is difficult and requires animal models exposed to 'real life', environmentally relevant concentrations/mixtures of environmental contaminants (ECs), particularly in- utero, when sensitivity to EC exposure is high. The aim of this study was to determine whether the fetal sheep reproductive neuroendocrine axis, particularly GnRH and galaninergic systems were affected by maternal exposure to a complex mixture of chemicals, applied to pasture, in the form of sewage sludge. Sewage sludge contains high concentrations of a spectrum of EDCs and other pollutants, relative to environmental concentrations but is frequently recycled to land as a fertiliser. We found that foetuses exposed, to the EDC mixture in-utero through their mothers, had lower GnRH mRNA expression in the hypothalamus and lower GnRHR and galanin receptor (GALR) mRNA expression in the hypothalamus and pituitary gland. Strikingly, this, treatment had no significant effect on maternal GnRH or GnRHR mRNA expression although GALR mRNA expression within the maternal hypothalamus and pituitary gland was reduced. This study clearly demonstrates that the developing foetal neuroendocrine axis is sensitive to real-world mixtures of environmental chemicals. Given the important role of GnRH and GnRHR in the regulation of reproductive function, its known in-utero programming role, and the role of galanin in the regulation of many physiological/neuroendocrine systems, in-utero changes in the activity of these systems are likely to have long term consequences in adulthood and represent a novel pathway through which EC mixtures could perturb normal reproductive function

  10. Pituitary adenoma-neuronal choristoma is a pituitary adenoma with ganglionic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Michaela T; Lavi, Ehud

    2015-12-01

    The presence of ganglion cells within an endocrine pituitary tumor has been named hamartoma, choristoma, gangliocytoma, or most recently pituitary adenoma-neuronal choristoma (PANCH). The presence of neuronal differentiation in regular pituitary adenomas has been previously suggested, however, its origin, the extent of its presence, and the relationship between the neuronal elements and the pituitary adenoma remain uncertain. Thus, to further explore the neuronal potential of pituitary tumors, we used immunohistochemistry on pituitary tumors of different grades, with a neuronal antigen protein (NeuN) antibody as a specific marker for mature neuronal differentiation. We found NeuN expression in 26.47% (9/34) cases of pituitary tumors without ganglionic differentiation (7 adenomas, 1 atypical adenoma and 1 pituitary carcinoma), in addition to NeuN expression in pituitary adenomas with ganglionic cells (2/2). Thus, neuronal expression is an innate property of pituitary adenomas. We propose that the rare presence of ganglionic cells in pituitary adenomas is not the result of a separate lesion or "collision sellar tumors", as previously suggested, but a ganglionic neuronal differentiation in an endocrine neoplasm. The ganglionic cells may be arising from uncommitted stem/progenitor cells that contain both neuronal and endocrine properties. A label of "pituitary adenoma with ganglionic differentiation" would better reflect the dual differentiation in a neuroendocrine tumor than the current label "PANCH".

  11. Anti-Müllerian Hormone: A Valuable Addition to the Toolbox of the Pediatric Endocrinologist

    PubMed Central

    Josso, Nathalie; Rey, Rodolfo A.; Picard, Jean-Yves

    2013-01-01

    Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH), secreted by immature Sertoli cells, provokes the regression of male fetal Müllerian ducts. FSH stimulates AMH production; during puberty, AMH is downregulated by intratesticular testosterone and meiotic germ cells. In boys, AMH determination is useful in the clinical setting. Serum AMH, which is low in infants with congenital central hypogonadism, increases with FSH treatment. AMH is also low in patients with primary hypogonadism, for instance in Down syndrome, from early postnatal life and in Klinefelter syndrome from midpuberty. In boys with nonpalpable gonads, AMH determination, without the need for a stimulation test, is useful to distinguish between bilaterally abdominal gonads and anorchism. In patients with disorders of sex development (DSD), serum AMH determination helps as a first line test to orientate the etiologic diagnosis: low AMH is indicative of dysgenetic DSD whereas normal AMH is suggestive of androgen synthesis or action defects. Finally, in patients with persistent Müllerian duct syndrome (PMDS), undetectable serum AMH drives the genetic search to mutations in the AMH gene, whereas normal or high AMH is indicative of an end organ defect due to AMH receptor gene defects. PMID:24382961

  12. Possible association of human growth hormone treatment with an occurrence of acute myeloblastic leukemia with an inversion of chromosome 3 in a child of pituitary dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Endo, M; Kaneko, Y; Shikano, T; Minami, H; Chino, J

    1988-01-01

    An 11-yr-old girl, who had been treated with human growth hormone (h-GH) for 31 months, developed acute myeloblastic leukemia with an inv(3)(q21q26). Since GH has been suggested to influence the genesis of leukemia, and the inversion 3 has been reported only in adult leukemia patients, the GH treatment may have caused the development of leukemia or accelerated the proliferation of the leukemia cells.

  13. Pituitary tuberculoma: A consideration in the differential diagnosis in a patient manifesting with pituitary apoplexy-like syndrome.

    PubMed

    Srisukh, Sasima; Tanpaibule, Tananun; Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin; Boongird, Atthaporn; Wattanatranon, Duangkamon; Panyaping, Theerapol; Sriphrapradang, Chutintorn

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary tuberculoma is extremely rare, even in endemic regions of tuberculosis and much less frequently as a presentation of pituitary apoplexy. We describe a 25-year-old female presented with sudden onset of headache and vision loss of left eye which mimicking symptoms of pituitary apoplexy. MRI of the pituitary gland showed a rim-enhancing lesion at the intrasellar region extending into the suprasellar area, but absence of posterior bright spot with enhancement of the pituitary stalk. Pituitary hormonal evaluation revealed panhypopituitarism and diabetes insipidus. An urgent transphenoidal surgery of the pituitary gland was undertaken for which the histopathology showed necrotizing granulomatous inflammation with infarcted adjacent pituitary tissue. Despite negative fungal and AFB staining, pituitary tuberculoma was presumptively diagnosed based on imaging, pathology and the high incidence of tuberculosis in the country. After the course of anti-tuberculosis therapy, the clinical findings were dramatically improved, supporting the diagnosis. Pituitary tuberculoma is extremely rare in particular with an apoplexy-like presentation but should be one of the differential diagnosis list of intrasellar lesions in the patient presenting with sudden onset of headache and visual loss. The presence of diabetes insipidus and thickened with enhancement of pituitary stalk on MRI were very helpful in diagnosing pituitary tuberculosis. PMID:27516966

  14. Pituitary granulomatosis with polyangiitis

    PubMed Central

    Slabu, Hannah; Arnason, Terra

    2013-01-01

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) is a small vessel vasculitis that can affect several organs, most commonly the respiratory tract and kidneys. Pituitary involvement is exceptionally rare. Most case reports of GPA of the pituitary gland have been described in middle-aged women who have concomitant ears, nose and throat involvement. The most frequent manifestation is diabetes insipidus due to a preponderance of posterior pituitary infiltration. The majority of cases sustain permanent damage to the pituitary gland even with remission of the underlying granulomatous disease. Here, the authors describe a case of pituitary GPA involving both the anterior and posterior pituitary glands with permanent residual pituitary insufficiency. PMID:23645699

  15. Multiple cytosolic calcium buffers in posterior pituitary nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Shane M; Chang, Che-Wei; Jackson, Meyer B

    2016-03-01

    Cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers bind to a large fraction of Ca(2+) as it enters a cell, shaping Ca(2+) signals both spatially and temporally. In this way, cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers regulate excitation-secretion coupling and short-term plasticity of release. The posterior pituitary is composed of peptidergic nerve terminals, which release oxytocin and vasopressin in response to Ca(2+) entry. Secretion of these hormones exhibits a complex dependence on the frequency and pattern of electrical activity, and the role of cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers in controlling pituitary Ca(2+) signaling is poorly understood. Here, cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers were studied with two-photon imaging in patch-clamped nerve terminals of the rat posterior pituitary. Fluorescence of the Ca(2+) indicator fluo-8 revealed stepwise increases in free Ca(2+) after a series of brief depolarizing pulses in rapid succession. These Ca(2+) increments grew larger as free Ca(2+) rose to saturate the cytosolic buffers and reduce the availability of Ca(2+) binding sites. These titration data revealed two endogenous buffers. All nerve terminals contained a buffer with a Kd of 1.5-4.7 µM, and approximately half contained an additional higher-affinity buffer with a Kd of 340 nM. Western blots identified calretinin and calbindin D28K in the posterior pituitary, and their in vitro binding properties correspond well with our fluorometric analysis. The high-affinity buffer washed out, but at a rate much slower than expected from diffusion; washout of the low-affinity buffer could not be detected. This work has revealed the functional impact of cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers in situ in nerve terminals at a new level of detail. The saturation of these cytosolic buffers will amplify Ca(2+) signals and may contribute to use-dependent facilitation of release. A difference in the buffer compositions of oxytocin and vasopressin nerve terminals could contribute to the differences in release plasticity of these two hormones.

  16. Effects of rat growth hormone (rGH)-releasing factor and somatostatin on the release and synthesis of rGH in dispersed pituitary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fukata, J.; Diamond, D.J.; Martin, J.B.

    1985-08-01

    The effects of rat hypothalamic GH-releasing factor (GRF) and somatostatin (SRIF) on the release and biosynthesis of rat GH were studied by RIA and quantitative immunoprecipitation using monolayer cultures of rat anterior pituitary cells. In kinetic studies, GRF stimulation of GH release appeared at the first sampling time (20-min incubation) and the effect began to diminish after 2-h incubation with GRF. On the other hand, total (cell plus medium) content of GH significantly increased only after 24-h incubation. To examine the GH-synthesizing effect of GRF more directly, newly synthesized GH labeled by (TVS)methionine during incubation with GRF was quantified by immunoprecipitation. The amount of immunoprecipitable GH increased significantly and specifically also only after 24-h incubation. When GH pools were labeled with (TVS)methionine under different schedules, the basal release of newly synthesized GH, which was labeled for 1 h immediately before chase incubation was lower during the first 15 min than stored GH which had been labeled earlier. Basal newly synthesized GH secretion exceeded stored GH secretion after 30 min. In this system, SRIF suppressed both the basal and stimulated release of GH but did not modify GH biosynthesis under either condition. Newly synthesized GH showed significant degradation during 24-h incubation; neither GRF nor SRIF affected the rate of GH degradation during the same incubation period.

  17. Social regulation of the brain-pituitary-gonadal axis.

    PubMed

    Francis, R C; Soma, K; Fernald, R D

    1993-08-15

    Reproduction in vertebrates is regulated by the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis via neural and hormonal feedback. This axis is also subject to exogenous influences, particularly social signals. In the African cichlid fish Haplochromis burtoni, gonadal development in males is socially regulated. A small fraction of the males, which are brightly colored, maintain territories and aggressively dominate inconspicuously colored nonterritorial males. Here we show through manipulation of the social and endocrine environment that changes in social status and gonadal state are accompanied by soma size changes in a population of gonadotropin-releasing hormone-containing neurons in the ventral forebrain. In territorial males, these cells are significantly larger than in nonterritorial males. When an animal switches from being territorial to nonterritorial through a change in social situation, these cells shrink; in animals that change from nonterritorial to territorial status, the cells enlarge. These gonadotropin-releasing hormone-containing cells project to the pituitary and are ultimately responsible for regulating gonadal growth. This mechanism of socially induced cell size change provides the potential for relatively quick adaptive changes in the neuron-endocrine system without nerve cell addition or death. Since the structure of this regulatory axis is conserved among all vertebrates, other species with socially modulated reproductive physiology may exhibit a similar form of physiological regulation.

  18. In vitro pituitary and thyroid cell proliferation assays and their relevance as alternatives to animal testing.

    PubMed

    Jomaa, Barae; Aarts, Jac M M J G; de Haan, Laura H J; Peijnenburg, Ad A C M; Bovee, Toine F H; Murk, Albertinka J; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the in vitro effect of eleven thyroid-active compounds known to affect pituitary and/or thyroid weights in vivo, using the proliferation of GH3 rat pituitary cells in the so-called "T-screen," and of FRTL-5 rat thyroid cells in a newly developed test denoted "TSH-screen" to gain insight into the relative value of these in vitro proliferation tests for an integrated testing strategy (ITS) for thyroid activity. Pituitary cell proliferation in the T-screen was stimulated by three out of eleven tested compounds, namely thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH), triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4). Of these three compounds, only T4 causes an increase in relative pituitary weight, and thus T4 was the only compound for which the effect in the in vitro assay correlated with a reported in vivo effect. As to the newly developed TSH-screen, two compounds had an effect, namely, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) induced and T4 antagonized FRTL-5 cell proliferation. These effects correlated with in vivo changes induced by these compounds on thyroid weight. Altogether, the results indicate that most of the selected compounds affect pituitary and thyroid weights by modes of action different from a direct thyroid hormone receptor (THR) or TSH receptor (TSHR)-mediated effect, and point to the need for additional in vitro tests for an ITS. Additional analysis of the T-screen revealed a positive correlation between the THR-mediated effects of the tested compounds in vitro and their effects on relative heart weight in vivo, suggesting that the T-screen may directly predict this THR-mediated in vivo adverse effect.

  19. A history of pituitary pathology.

    PubMed

    Asa, Sylvia L; Mete, Ozgur

    2014-03-01

    The history of pituitary pathology is a long one that dates back to biblical times, but the last 25 years have represented an era of "coming of age." The role of the pituitary in health and disease was the subject of many studies over the last century. With the development of electron microscopy, immunoassays, and immunohistochemistry, the functional alterations associated with pituitary disease have been clarified. The additional information provided by molecular genetic studies has allowed progress in understanding the pathogenesis of pituitary disorders. Nevertheless, many questions remain to be answered. For example, pathologists cannot morphologically distinguish locally aggressive adenomas from carcinomas when tumor is confined to the sella. Sadly, basal cell carcinoma, the most common carcinoma of skin, usually causes less morbidity than pituitary adenomas, which occur in almost 20 % of the general population, can cause significant illness and even death, and yet are still classified as benign. The opportunity to increase awareness of the impact of these common lesions on quality of life is the current challenge for physicians and patients. We anticipate that ongoing multidisciplinary approaches to pituitary disease research will offer new insights into diseases arising from this fascinating organ.

  20. Long-term effects of bisphenol AF (BPAF) on hormonal balance and genes of hypothalamus-pituitary-gonad axis and liver of zebrafish (Danio rerio), and the impact on offspring.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiachen; Jiao, Zhihao; Zheng, Sai; Li, Ming; Zhang, Jing; Feng, Yixing; Yin, Jie; Shao, Bing

    2015-06-01

    Bisphenol AF (BPAF) is one of the analogues of bisphenol A (BPA) and is widely used as a raw material in the plastics industry. The potential toxicity to fish from exposure to BPAF in the aquatic environment is largely unknown. In this study, zebrafish (Danio rerio) were exposed to BPAF at 5, 25 and 125 μg L(-1), from 4 hour-post-fertilization (hpf) to 120 day-post-fertilization (dpf), representing the period from embryo to adult. The levels of plasma hormones were measured and the expression of selected representative genes along the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonad (HPG) axis and liver were examined. The concentration of 17β-estradiol (E2) was significantly increased in male and female fish and a significant decrease of testosterone (T) was observed in male fish. The mRNA expression of genes along the HPG axis and in liver tissues in F0 generation fish demonstrated that the steroid hormonal balances of zebrafish were modulated through the alteration of steroidgenesis. The significant decrease of egg fertilization among offspring indicates the possibility of sperm deterioration of parent following exposure to BPAF. The higher occurrence of malformation and lower survival rate in the offspring from the exposure group suggested a possibility of maternal transfer of BPAF, which could be responsible for the increased prevalence of adverse health signs in the offspring. The hatching delay in 5 μg L(-1) BPAF indicated that parental exposure to environmentally relevant concentration of BPAF would result in delayed hatching of the offspring. A potential consequence of adverse effects in the offspring by BPAF deserves further investigation. PMID:25723718

  1. Prospective investigation of pituitary functions in patients with acute infectious meningitis: is acute meningitis induced pituitary dysfunction associated with autoimmunity?

    PubMed

    Tanriverdi, F; De Bellis, A; Teksahin, H; Alp, E; Bizzarro, A; Sinisi, A A; Bellastella, G; Paglionico, V A; Bellastella, A; Unluhizarci, K; Doganay, M; Kelestimur, F

    2012-12-01

    Previous case reports and retrospective studies suggest that pituitary dysfunction may occur after acute bacterial or viral meningitis. In this prospective study we assessed the pituitary functions, lipid profile and anthropometric measures in adults with acute bacterial or viral meningitis. Moreover, in order to investigate whether autoimmune mechanisms could play a role in the pathogenesis of acute meningitis-induced hypopituitarism we also investigated the anti-pituitary antibodies (APA) and anti-hypothalamus antibodies (AHA) prospectively. Sixteen patients (10 males, 6 females; mean ± SD age 40.9 ± 15.9) with acute infectious meningitis were included and the patients were evaluated in the acute phase, and at 6 and 12 months after the acute meningitis. In the acute phase 18.7% of the patients had GH deficiency, 12.5% had ACTH and FSH/LH deficiencies. At 12 months after acute meningitis 6 of 14 patients (42.8%) had GH deficiency, 1 of 14 patients (7.1%) had ACTH and FSH/LH deficiencies. Two of 14 patients (14.3%) had combined hormone deficiencies and four patients (28.6%) had isolated hormone deficiencies at 12 months. Four of 9 (44.4%) hormone deficiencies at 6 months were recovered at 12 months, and 3 of 8 (37.5%) hormone deficiencies at 12 months were new-onset hormone deficiencies. At 12 months there were significant negative correlations between IGF-I level vs. LDL-C, and IGF-I level vs. total cholesterol. The frequency of AHA and APA positivity was substantially high, ranging from 35 to 50% of the patients throughout the 12 months period. However there were no significant correlations between AHA or APA positivity and hypopituitarism. The risk of hypopituitarism, GH deficiency in particular, is substantially high in the acute phase, after 6 and 12 months of the acute infectious meningitis. Moreover we found that 6th month after meningitis is too early to make a decision for pituitary dysfunction and these patients should be screened for at least 12 months

  2. Electrotonic Coupling in the Pituitary Supports the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Gonadal Axis in a Sex Specific Manner.

    PubMed

    Göngrich, Christina; García-González, Diego; Le Magueresse, Corentin; Roth, Lena C; Watanabe, Yasuhito; Burks, Deborah J; Grinevich, Valery; Monyer, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Gap junctions are present in many cell types throughout the animal kingdom and allow fast intercellular electrical and chemical communication between neighboring cells. Connexin-36 (Cx36), the major neuronal gap junction protein, synchronizes cellular activity in the brain, but also in other organs. Here we identify a sex-specific role for Cx36 within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis at the level of the anterior pituitary gland (AP). We show that Cx36 is expressed in gonadotropes of the AP sustaining their synchronous activity. Cx36 ablation affects the entire downstream HPG axis in females, but not in males. We demonstrate that Cx36-mediated coupling between gonadotropes in the AP supports gonadotropin-releasing hormone-induced secretion of luteinizing hormone. Furthermore, we provide evidence for negative feedback regulation of Cx36 expression in the AP by estradiol. We thus, conclude that hormonally-controlled plasticity of gap junction communication at the level of the AP constitutes an additional mechanism affecting female reproduction.

  3. Electrotonic Coupling in the Pituitary Supports the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Gonadal Axis in a Sex Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Göngrich, Christina; García-González, Diego; Le Magueresse, Corentin; Roth, Lena C.; Watanabe, Yasuhito; Burks, Deborah J.; Grinevich, Valery; Monyer, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Gap junctions are present in many cell types throughout the animal kingdom and allow fast intercellular electrical and chemical communication between neighboring cells. Connexin-36 (Cx36), the major neuronal gap junction protein, synchronizes cellular activity in the brain, but also in other organs. Here we identify a sex-specific role for Cx36 within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis at the level of the anterior pituitary gland (AP). We show that Cx36 is expressed in gonadotropes of the AP sustaining their synchronous activity. Cx36 ablation affects the entire downstream HPG axis in females, but not in males. We demonstrate that Cx36-mediated coupling between gonadotropes in the AP supports gonadotropin-releasing hormone-induced secretion of luteinizing hormone. Furthermore, we provide evidence for negative feedback regulation of Cx36 expression in the AP by estradiol. We thus, conclude that hormonally-controlled plasticity of gap junction communication at the level of the AP constitutes an additional mechanism affecting female reproduction. PMID:27587994

  4. Electrotonic Coupling in the Pituitary Supports the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Gonadal Axis in a Sex Specific Manner.

    PubMed

    Göngrich, Christina; García-González, Diego; Le Magueresse, Corentin; Roth, Lena C; Watanabe, Yasuhito; Burks, Deborah J; Grinevich, Valery; Monyer, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Gap junctions are present in many cell types throughout the animal kingdom and allow fast intercellular electrical and chemical communication between neighboring cells. Connexin-36 (Cx36), the major neuronal gap junction protein, synchronizes cellular activity in the brain, but also in other organs. Here we identify a sex-specific role for Cx36 within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis at the level of the anterior pituitary gland (AP). We show that Cx36 is expressed in gonadotropes of the AP sustaining their synchronous activity. Cx36 ablation affects the entire downstream HPG axis in females, but not in males. We demonstrate that Cx36-mediated coupling between gonadotropes in the AP supports gonadotropin-releasing hormone-induced secretion of luteinizing hormone. Furthermore, we provide evidence for negative feedback regulation of Cx36 expression in the AP by estradiol. We thus, conclude that hormonally-controlled plasticity of gap junction communication at the level of the AP constitutes an additional mechanism affecting female reproduction. PMID:27587994

  5. A Rare Corticotroph-Secreting Tumor with Coexisting Prolactin and Growth Hormone Staining Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Subramanian; Staugaitis, Susan M.; Weil, Robert J.; Hatipoglu, Betul

    2012-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas can express and secrete different hormones. Expression of pituitary hormones in nonneoplastic pituitary cells is regulated by different transcription factors. Some pituitary adenomas show plurihormonal expression. The most commonly reported plurihormonal adenomas are composed of somatotrophs, lactotrophs, thyrotrophs and gonadotrophs. Pituitary adenomas composed of both corticotroph and somatolactotroph secreting cells are not common because transcription factors regulating the expression of these hormones are different. We report a rare case of pituitary adenoma with concomitant corticotroph, prolactin, and growth hormone staining cells, review literature on similar cases, and discuss possible biological mechanisms underlying these plurihormonal tumors. PMID:23320206

  6. Rheumatic manifestations of pituitary tumors.

    PubMed

    Stavrou, S; Kleinberg, D L

    2001-10-01

    Pituitary tumors may cause rheumatologic problems as a result of under production or overproduction of one pituitary hormone. Excessive growth hormone causes destruction of cartilage by a direct action. Facial and acral changes and arthralgias may be some of the first symptoms of acromegaly. The arthritis associated with acromegaly is often devastating. Carpal tunnel syndrome is very common in patients with acromegaly. Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) has indirect effects via the action of glucocorticoid on bones, muscles, and the immune system. Proximal muscle weakness is a characteristic feature of Cushing's syndrome. Patients with Cushing's syndrome commonly have osteopenia and osteoporosis that lead to an increase in bone fractures. Avascular necrosis is associated with exogenous steroid administration. The effects of too much glucocorticoid or too rapid withdrawal can be severe. Gonadotropins act via the gonadal steroids and protect bone mass from loss. Prolactin is less involved in rheumatologic disease; the data for which are limited in humans. Pituitary tumors can have manifestations similar to rheumatologic disorders and should be included in the differential diagnosis of these diseases.

  7. Pituitary Gigantism: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Rana; Roy, Ajitesh; Goswami, Soumik; Selvan, Chitra; Chakraborty, Partha P.; Ghosh, Sujoy; Biswas, Dibakar; Dasgupta, Ranen; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Chowdhury, Subhankar

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To present a rare case of gigantism. Case Report: A 25-year-old lady presented with increased statural growth and enlarged body parts noticed since the age of 14 years, primary amenorrhea, and frontal headache for the last 2 years. She has also been suffering from non-inflammatory low back pain with progressive kyphosis and pain in the knees, ankles, and elbows for the last 5 years. There was no history of visual disturbance, vomiting, galactorrhoea, cold intolerance. She had no siblings. Family history was non-contributory. Blood pressure was normal. Height 221 cm, weight 138 kg, body mass index (BMI)28. There was coarsening of facial features along with frontal bossing and prognathism, large hands and feet, and small goitre. Patient had severe kyphosis and osteoarthritis of knees. Confrontation perimetry suggested bitemporal hemianopia. Breast and pubic hair were of Tanner stage 1. Serum insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF1) was 703 ng/ml with all glucose suppressedgrowth hormone (GH)values of >40 ng/ml. Prolactin was 174 ng/ml. Basal serum Lutenising Hormone (LH), follicle stimulating Hormone (FSH) was low. Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), liver and renal function tests, basal cortisol and thyroid profile, Calcium, phosphorus and Intact Parathyroid hormone (iPTH) were normal. Computed tomographyscan of brain showed large pituitary macroadenoma. Automated perimetry confirmed bitemporal hemianopia. A diagnosis of gigantism due to GH secreting pituitary macroadenoma with hypogonadotrophichypogonadism was made. Debulking pituitary surgery followed by somatostatin analogue therapy with gonadal steroid replacement had been planned, but the patient refused further treatment. PMID:23565401

  8. Perturbations of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and adrenal androgen functions in rheumatoid arthritis: an odyssey of hormonal relationships to the disease.

    PubMed

    Masi, A T; Chatterton, R T; Aldag, J C

    1999-06-22

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a heterogeneous disease with a diverse spectrum of manifestations and course of illness. Multiple factors are believed to contribute to its etiology. Nevertheless, consistent features are observed across populations, which include (1) increased familial or immunogenetic risk in younger-onset disease; (2) female predisposition, particularly during child-bearing ages; (3) predictable clinical improvement during pregnancy and worsening postpartum; and (4) increased incidence with aging, which suggest that hormonal factors influence the disease. In 1974, serum was prospectively obtained from pre-RA cases, 4 to 20 (mean = 12.0) years prior to onset of disease and concurrently from controls (CN) matched (4 CN per 1 RA) on age (+/- 2 years), race (all Caucasians), and entry menopausal status (EMS). CN have no known rheumatic disease. Pre-RA were divided into subgroups, according to EMS, i.e., premenopausal vs. non-premenopausal (peri- or post-menopausal), and either age at entry in 1974 or age at onset of RA. For example, one 3-way subgrouping includes: I. Entry premenopausal and RA onset < age 50 years; II. Entry premenopausal and RA onset age 50+ years, and III. Entry postmenopausal. The 11 youngest pre-RA (I) had a mean entry age of 29 years and RA onset of 41 years. An alternative 4-way subgrouping (a, b, c, d) divided the female subjects into premenopausal (last menstrual period [LMP], 0-31 days) and non-premenopausal major groups, as well as younger vs. older subgroups within the major EMS categories. The younger premenopausal women in each subgrouping system, that is, I or a, overlap almost entirely. Assays (RIA) of the major sex hormones were performed, e.g., luteinizing hormone (LH); follicle stimulating (FSH); estradiol (E2); progesterone (P4); and total testosterone (T); as well as adrenal hormones, including androstenendione (A4); dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA); its sulfate (DHEAS); and cortisol (C). A significantly lower entry mean

  9. MALDI mass spectrometry imaging analysis of pituitary adenomas for near-real-time tumor delineation

    PubMed Central

    Calligaris, David; Feldman, Daniel R.; Norton, Isaiah; Olubiyi, Olutayo; Changelian, Armen N.; Machaidze, Revaz; Vestal, Matthew L.; Laws, Edward R.; Dunn, Ian F.; Santagata, Sandro; Agar, Nathalie Y. R.

    2015-01-01

    We present a proof of concept study designed to support the clinical development of mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) for the detection of pituitary tumors during surgery. We analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) MSI six nonpathological (NP) human pituitary glands and 45 hormone secreting and nonsecreting (NS) human pituitary adenomas. We show that the distribution of pituitary hormones such as prolactin (PRL), growth hormone (GH), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) in both normal and tumor tissues can be assessed by using this approach. The presence of most of the pituitary hormones was confirmed by using MS/MS and pseudo-MS/MS methods, and subtyping of pituitary adenomas was performed by using principal component analysis (PCA) and support vector machine (SVM). Our proof of concept study demonstrates that MALDI MSI could be used to directly detect excessive hormonal production from functional pituitary adenomas and generally classify pituitary adenomas by using statistical and machine learning analyses. The tissue characterization can be completed in fewer than 30 min and could therefore be applied for the near-real-time detection and delineation of pituitary tumors for intraoperative surgical decision-making. PMID:26216958

  10. Pituitary tumours: acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Chanson, Philippe; Salenave, Sylvie; Kamenicky, Peter; Cazabat, Laure; Young, Jacques

    2009-10-01

    Excessive production of the growth hormone (GH) is responsible for acromegaly. It is related to a pituitary GH-secreting adenoma in most cases. Prevalence is estimated 40-130 per million inhabitants. It is characterised by slowly progressive acquired somatic disfigurement (mainly involving the face and extremities) and systemic manifestations. The rheumatologic, cardiovascular, respiratory and metabolic consequences determine its prognosis. The diagnosis is confirmed by an increased serum GH concentration, unsuppressible by an oral glucose load and by detection of increased levels of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). Treatment is aimed at correcting (or preventing) tumour compression by excising the disease-causing lesion, and at reducing GH and IGF-I levels to normal values. When surgery, the usual first-line treatment, fails to correct GH/IGF-I hypersecretion, medical treatment with somatostatin analogues and/or radiotherapy can be used. The GH-receptor antagonist (pegvisomant) is helpful in patients who are resistant to somatostatin analogues. Thanks to this multistep therapeutic strategy, adequate hormonal disease control is achieved in most cases, allowing a normal life expectancy. PMID:19945023

  11. [Familial pituitary tumors].

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, K; Saito, S

    1995-11-01

    Familial pituitary tumors are relatively rare. Most commonly, they occur as a part of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN 1). However, familial pituitary adenomas unrelated MEN 1 (familial pituitary adenomas) are extremely rare. In review of MEN 1 in Japan, 60% of the patients with MEN 1 had pituitary tumors. Only 45 cases of familial pituitary adenomas have been reported from 20 families. In our review of familial pituitary adenomas, 30 (67%) of 45 reported cases are acromegaly or gigantism. This incidence is much higher than 28% in MEN 1 patients with pituitary tumors. Allelic deletions at 11q13 were identified in MEN 1 associated pituitary adenomas and familial pituitary adenomas in two gigantism brothers. PMID:8538028

  12. Effects of exogenous and endogenous opiates on the hypothalamic--pituitary--gonadal axis in the male.

    PubMed

    Cicero, T J

    1980-06-01

    Narcotics acutely depress serum testosterone levels in the male. Three mechanisms could be involved: an enhancement of the degradation of testosterone; a direct inhibition of testicular steroidogenesis; or, finally, an inhibition of the hypothalamic-pituitary-luteinizing hormone (LH) axis resulting in a reduction in LH-dependent testicular steroidogenesis. The currently available evidence indicates that narcotics do not affect the catabolism of testosterone by the liver or testicular steroidogenesis. Rather, the data favor a direct action on the hypothalamic--pituitary--LH axis, probably by inhibiting the secretion of LH-releasing hormone (LH-RH) from the hypothalamus. The effects of narcotics on serum LH appear to be mediated via specific opioid receptors, suggesting that a naturally occurring opioid-like substance exists that normally inhibits LH. In support of this conclusion, opiate receptor blockers markedly increase serum LH levels shortly after their subcutaneous administration. In addition, endogenous opioids also seem to participate in testosterone's negative feedback control of the hypothalamic--pituitary--LH axis. Thus, it appears that opiate drugs inhibit the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis by occupying opiate receptors in the hypothalamus and, moreover, that endogenous opioids exist that normally bind to these receptors and regulate activity in this axis.

  13. Effect of acute ether stress on monoamine metabolism in median eminence and discrete hypothalamic nuclei of the rat brain and on anterior pituitary hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Johnston, C A; Spinedi, E J; Negro-Vilar, A

    1985-07-01

    This study was designed to correlate the endocrine responses elicited by acute ether stress with the changes in metabolism of several monoamines in discrete nuclei of the rat brain. Concentrations of norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and also of the specific metabolites of NE, DA, and 5-HT, 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylethylene glycol, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, and 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid, respectively, were concurrently measured in microdissected nuclei using high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. The ratio of the metabolites to their respective amines was used as an estimate of the metabolism of NE, DA, and 5-HT. Acute exposure to ether vapors induced, within 5-15 min, large increments in plasma levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), beta-endorphin, and prolactin (PRL), and decrements in the levels of plasma growth hormone (GH). Significant increases in NE metabolism were observed in the rostral (ANr) and caudal (ANc) divisions of the arcuate nucleus, as well as in the paraventricular (PVN) and dorsomedial nuclei, 15 min after ether stress. A significant decrease in 5-HT metabolism was observed in the PVN, supraoptic nucleus, and ANc, whereas significant increases in 5-HT metabolism were detected in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and ANr. DA metabolism selectively increased in the ANr. The present results indicate that the acute changes in ACTH, beta-endorphin, PRL, and GH release induced by ether exposure are temporally correlated with increases in NE metabolism in many hypothalamic nuclei; a selective increase in DA metabolism restricted to the ANr, and differential effects on 5-HT metabolism, probably reflecting selective activation or inhibition of different populations of 5-HT neurons.

  14. Electrophoretic separation of kidney and pituitary cells on STS-8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, D. R.; Nachtwey, D. S.; Barlow, G. H.; Cleveland, C.; Lanham, J. W.; Farrington, M. A.; Hatfield, J. M.; Hymer, W. C.; Grindeland, R.; Lewis, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    Specific secretory cells were separated from suspensions of cultured primary human embryonic cells and rat pituitary cells in microgravity conditions, with an objective of isolating the subfractions of kidney cells that produce the largest amount of urakinase, and the subfractions of rat pituitary cells that secrete growth hormones (GH), prolactin (PRL), and other hormones. It is inferred from the experimental observations that the surface charge distributions of the GH-containing cells differ from those of the PRL-containing cells, which is explained by the presence of secretory products on the surface of pituitary cells. For kidney cells, the electrophoretic mobility distributions in flight experiments were spread more than the ground controls.

  15. Body-fat distribution and responsiveness of the pituitary-adrenal axis to corticotropin-releasing-hormone stimulation in sedentary and exercising women.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, A; Giannini, D; Aversa, A; De Martino, M U; Fabbrini, E; Franceschi, F; Moretti, C; Frajese, G; Isidori, A

    1999-05-01

    Excess upper-body (android) fat is considered an health hazard. Exercise training is known to have the potential to modify body composition and to induce a preferential loss of abdominal fat. We studied and compared the composition of whole body and major body regions using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) in 21 exercising (3-4 hours of intense physical activity/day) and 21 sedentary eumenorrhoic women of similar ages, body mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) and age of menarche. In a small number of women in each group (6 out of 21), the ACTH and cortisol response to CRH test and the 24-h urinary cortisol excretion was evaluated. Exercising women had 10% higher total and leg lean mass (p<0.05), and 38% lower total fat mass (p<0.01) than sedentary women. Furthermore, the proportion of android fat was 22% lower in exercising than sedentary women (p<0.01), while the proportion of lower-body (gynoid fat) was unchanged. BMI and WHR were not different between the two groups, while the android/gynoid fat ratios were 16% lower in exercising than in sedentary women (p<0.01). In the exercising women, ACTH and cortisol plasma levels, as well as the 24-h urinary cortisol excretion, were significantly (p<0.01) higher than in the sedentary women studied. In these subjects, a direct relationship between the peak delta percentage increases of ACTH and cortisol after the CRH test and the proportion of android fat was found (r=0.60, p<0.05 and r=0.69, p<0.02, respectively). These results demonstrate that in women who practise intense exercise there are significant differences in body fat distribution in comparison to sedentary women, with a marked less amount of android fat, and suggest that this difference may be related to a reduced response of the pituitary-adrenal axis to CRH. PMID:10401712

  16. ZBTB20 is required for anterior pituitary development and lactotrope specification.

    PubMed

    Cao, Dongmei; Ma, Xianhua; Cai, Jiao; Luan, Jing; Liu, An-Jun; Yang, Rui; Cao, Yi; Zhu, Xiaotong; Zhang, Hai; Chen, Yu-Xia; Shi, Yuguang; Shi, Guang-Xia; Zou, Dajin; Cao, Xuetao; Grusby, Michael J; Xie, Zhifang; Zhang, Weiping J

    2016-01-01

    The anterior pituitary harbours five distinct hormone-producing cell types, and their cellular differentiation is a highly regulated and coordinated process. Here we show that ZBTB20 is essential for anterior pituitary development and lactotrope specification in mice. In anterior pituitary, ZBTB20 is highly expressed by all the mature endocrine cell types, and to some less extent by somatolactotropes, the precursors of prolactin (PRL)-producing lactotropes. Disruption of Zbtb20 leads to anterior pituitary hypoplasia, hypopituitary dwarfism and a complete loss of mature lactotropes. In ZBTB20-null mice, although lactotrope lineage commitment is normally initiated, somatolactotropes exhibit profound defects in lineage specification and expansion. Furthermore, endogenous ZBTB20 protein binds to Prl promoter, and its knockdown decreases PRL expression and secretion in a lactotrope cell line MMQ. In addition, ZBTB20 overexpression enhances the transcriptional activity of Prl promoter in vitro. In conclusion, our findings point to ZBTB20 as a critical regulator of anterior pituitary development and lactotrope specification. PMID:27079169

  17. TSH-secreting pituitary adenomas: follow-up of 11 cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ness-Abramof, Rosane; Ishay, Avraham; Harel, Gideon; Sylvetzky, Noa; Baron, Elzbieta; Greenman, Yona; Shimon, Ilan

    2007-01-01

    Thyrotropin (TSH)-secreting pituitary adenomas account for less than 1% of all pituitary tumors. In the last two decades, their clinical management has changed markedly due to technological advances that made earlier diagnosis possible and the introduction of somatostatin analog therapy. We retrieved the data of 11 patients in Israel diagnosed with TSH-secreting pituitary tumors since 1989. There were six men and five women of mean age 44.8 +/- 19.5 years (range 18-80 years). All had elevated thyroxine and triidothyronine levels with nonsuppressed TSH and imaging evidence of a pituitary tumor. In three patients the tumor co-secreted growth hormone. Ten patients had macroadenomas (> or =10 mm) and one patient had a microadenoma (<10 mm). Nine patients underwent surgery, and all had postoperative evidence of residual tumor. Ten patients received long-term somatostatin analog therapy (9 postoperatively, 1 primarily), which controlled the hyperthyroidism in all of them. In addition, three patients showed tumor shrinkage and seven, stabilization of tumor growth.In conclusion, in patients with TSH-secreting pituitary adenomas, somatostatin therapy appears to be highly effective in treating hyperthyroidism and in halting tumor growth or promoting tumor shrinkage. PMID:17347873

  18. Transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary tumours

    PubMed Central

    Massoud, A; Powell, M; Williams, R; Hindmarsh, P; Brook, C

    1997-01-01

    Accepted 29 January 1997
 OBJECTIVES—Transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) is the preferred method for the excision of pituitary microadenomas in adults. This study was carried out to establish the long term efficacy and safety of TSS in children.
STUDY DESIGN—A 14 year retrospective analysis was carried out on 23 children (16 boys and seven girls), all less than 18 years of age, who had undergone TSS at our centre.
RESULTS—Twenty nine transsphenoidal surgical procedures were carried out. The most common diagnosis was an adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) secreting adenoma (14 (61%) patients). The median length of follow up was 8.0 years (range 0.3-14.0 years). Eighteen (78%) patients were cured after the first procedure. No death was related to the operation. The most common postoperative complication was diabetes insipidus, which was transient in most patients. Other complications were headaches in two patients and cerebrospinal fluid leaks in two patients. De novo endocrine deficiencies after TSS in children were as follows: three (14%) patients developed panhypopituitarism, eight (73%) developed growth hormone insufficiency, three (14%) developed secondary hypothyroidism, and four (21%) developed gonadotrophin deficiency. Permanent ACTH deficiency occurred in five (24%) patients, though all patients received postoperative glucocorticoid treatment until dynamic pituitary tests were performed three months after TSS.
CONCLUSIONS—TSS in children is a safe and effective treatment for pituitary tumours, provided it is performed by surgeons with considerable experience and expertise. Surgical complications are minimal. Postoperative endocrine deficit is considerable, but is only permanent in a small proportion of patients.

 • Transsphenoidal surgery is a safe and effective treatment for pituitary tumours in children • Transsphenoidal surgery should be performed by surgeons with considerable experience and expertise • Surgical complications of

  19. Endocrine changes in histiocytosis of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis.

    PubMed

    Toro Galván, Silvia; Planas Vilaseca, Alejandra; Michalopoulou Alevras, Theodora; Torres Díaz, Alberto; Suárez Balaguer, Javier; Villabona Artero, Carles

    2015-02-01

    Histiocytosis is characterized by proliferation of cells from the mononuclear phagocyte system, and may be divided into Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) and non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis (including Erdheim-Chester disease [ECD]). While diabetes insipidus (DI) is the most common hypothalamic-pituitary consequence, anterior pituitary deficiencies are less known. This study analyzed the frequency and progression of pituitary hormone deficiencies and the radiographic findings in 9 patients (7 with LCH and 2 with ECD) with hypothalamic-pituitary (HP) axis. Eighty-nine percent of patients had DI (62% at diagnosis), and 78% had one or more anterior pituitary deficiencies (71% at diagnosis). HP involvement is relatively common in patients diagnosed with histiocytosis and hormone deficiencies may be present at diagnosis or appear gradually during the course of disease. Regular monitoring of these patients is recommended.

  20. Growth hormone: its physiology and control.

    PubMed

    Scanes, C G; Lauterio, T J

    1984-12-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is a protein hormone produced by the somatotrophs of the anterior pituitary gland of birds and other vertebrates. The secretion of GH in birds is under hypothalamic control; it involves three peptidergic releasing factors: growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) (stimulatory); thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) (stimulatory); and somatostatin (SRIF) (inhibitory). In addition, there is evidence for effects of biogenic amines (including serotonin and norepinephrine) and prostaglandins at the level of the hypothalamus and possibly also the pituitary gland. In all avian species examined, plasma concentrations of GH are high in young posthatching chicks but low in the adult and embryo. The difference in plasma concentrations of GH between young and adult birds is due to both greater GH secretion and reduced clearance. The lower secretion of GH in adult birds reflects fewer somatotrophs in the pituitary, changes in somatotroph structure, and reduced GH responses to TRH or GRF administration. There is only limited data on the role of GH in birds. GH appears to be required for normal growth; acting at least in part by increasing somatomedin production. However, plasma concentrations of GH do not necessarily correlate with growth rate. For instance, in chicks with reduced growth rate owing to either goitrogen or protein deficiency in the diet, plasma concentrations of GH are elevated. GH also can influence lipid metabolism by increasing lipolysis, decreasing lipogenesis, and stimulating the uptake of glucose by adipose tissue. The physiological significance of these actions is, however, not established. In addition, GH affects the secretion of other hormones, the immune system, and perhaps also the reproductive system. PMID:6151579

  1. Effect of transcription factor ZBTB20 on mouse pituitary development.

    PubMed

    Dong, Q; Chen, X Y; Li, G M

    2015-12-21

    Pituitary, a critical component in the neuroendocrine system, plays an indispensable role in the regulation of body growth. The transcriptional factor ZBTB20 is widely expressed in brain tissues and participates in hippocampal development; however, the detailed molecular mechanism remains unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ZBTB20 on mouse pituitary development and related mechanisms in ZBTB20 gene knockout mice. The expressional profiles of ZBTB20 in various neuroendocrinal cells during the different developmental stages (from E10 to P0) were described by immunofluorescence staining. A ZBTB20 gene knockout mouse model was then generated. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting assays were used to detect the levels of five hormones: growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). ZBTB20 protein expression was identified from E14 until birth. A majority of the pituitary endocrinal cells were ZBTB20-positive. In ZBTB20 knockout mice, the level of GH decreased by half and PRL expression was eliminated. No significant change was observed in the other three hormones (LH, FSH, and TSH). ZBTB20, an important transcriptional factor in pituitary development, is mainly responsible for the terminal differentiation of prolactin-secreting cells, thereby regulating the secretion of the pituitary hormones.

  2. Addition of crude glycerin to pig diets: sow and litter performance, and metabolic and feed intake regulating hormones.

    PubMed

    Hernández, F; Orengo, J; Villodre, C; Martínez, S; López, M J; Madrid, J

    2016-06-01

    The continued growth in biofuel production has led to a search for alternative value-added applications of its main by-product, crude glycerin. The surplus glycerin production and a higher cost of feedstuffs have increased the emphasis on evaluating its nutritive value for animal feeding. The aim of this research was to evaluate the effect of the dietary addition of crude glycerin on sow and litter performance, and to determine the serum concentrations of hormones related to energy metabolism and feed intake in sows during gestation and lactation. A total of 63 sows were assigned randomly to one of three dietary treatments, containing 0, 3 or 6% crude glycerin (G0, G3 and G6, respectively) added to a barley-soybean meal-based diet. During gestation, none of the dietary treatments had an effect on performance, while during lactation, glycerin-fed sows consumed less feed than those fed the control diet (3.8 v. 4.2kg DM/day; P=0.007). Although lactating sows fed the G3 diet had a higher BW loss than those fed the control diet (���20.6 v. ���8.7 kg; P=0.002), this difference was not reflected in litter performance. In gestation, the inclusion of glycerin did not affect blood concentrations of insulin or cortisol. However, pregnant sows fed diets supplemented with glycerin showed lower concentrations of acyl-ghrelin and higher concentrations of leptin (���55 and +68%, respectively; P<0.001). In lactating sows, there were no differences between dietary treatments for any of the hormones measured. Pre-prandial acyl-ghrelin concentrations were positively correlated with cortisol concentrations during gestation (r=0.81; P=0.001) and lactation (r=0.61; P=0.015). In conclusion, the inclusion of up to 6% crude glycerin did not affect the performance of sows during the gestation period; however it had a negative effect on the feed intake and weight loss of lactating sows. Moreover, further research is needed to elucidate the potential relationship between

  3. Impact of gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist addition on pregnancy rates in gonadotropin-stimulated intrauterine insemination cycles

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Shikha; Majumdar, Abha

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of the study is to evaluate the efficacy of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist in improving clinical pregnancy rate in gonadotropin-stimulated intrauterine insemination (IUI) cycles in patients of unexplained infertility. STUDY DESIGN: This was a prospective, randomized case-controlled study. SETTINGS: The study was conducted in the infertility clinic of a tertiary care center. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Four hundred twenty-seven women undergoing IUI following controlled ovarian stimulation with gonadotropins (recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone [r-FSH] 75 IU/day) were randomly divided into two groups. Women in Group I received GnRH antagonist (Cetrorelix 0.25 mg/day) in a multiple dose flexible protocol. Women in Group II received r-FSH alone. Ovulatory trigger was given with human chorionic gonadotropin 5000 IU when dominant follicle was ≥18 mm. IUI was performed within 44–48 h. Both groups received similar luteal phase support. Primary outcome measure was clinical pregnancy rate. The trial was powered to detect an absolute increase in clinical pregnancy rate by 13% from an assumed 20% clinical pregnancy rate in the control group, with an alpha error level of 0.05 and a beta error level of 0.20. RESULTS: Clinical pregnancy rate in Groups I and II was 27.6% (n = 56) and 26.5% (n = 54), respectively (P=0.800). Ongoing pregnancy and multiple pregnancy rates were likewise similar between the groups. CONCLUSIONS: Addition of GnRH antagonist to gonadotropin-stimulated IUI cycles results in no significant difference in clinical pregnancy rate. PMID:27803582

  4. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma in the human pituitary gland: expression and splicing pattern in adenomas versus normal pituitary.

    PubMed

    Occhi, G; Albiger, N; Berlucchi, S; Gardiman, M; Scanarini, M; Scienza, R; Fassina, A; Mantero, F; Scaroni, C

    2007-07-01

    Pituitary adenomas are slow-growing tumours arising within the pituitary gland. If secreting, they give rise to well-known syndromes such as Cushing's disease or acromegaly; when hormonally inactive, they come to clinical attention often with local mass effects or pituitary deficiency. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma), a nuclear hormone receptor with a key role in fat and glucose metabolism, but also involved in several neoplasia, has recently been detected in pituitary adenomas. In the present study, we evaluated the occurrence and splicing profile of PPARgamma in 43 cases of pituitary adenoma of different subtypes and compared it to 12 normal pituitary glands. By real-time polymerase chain reaction, PPARgamma was expressed as much in adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH)-secreting and ACTH-silent adenomas as in controls, with a moderate underexpression in somatotrophinomas and prolactinomas and overexpression in 54% of nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFPA). There was no apparent qualitative change in the splicing profile of pathological pituitary glands, nor was the presence of specific isoforms with dominant negative effects against PPARgamma detected. Western blotting revealed similar expression levels in the different subgroups of pituitary adenomas and normal glands. Immunohistochemistry confirmed PPARgamma expression in approximately one-half of analysed samples. The intra- and intergroup differences observed in pituitary adenomas may represent new elements in the process of understanding the different clinical responses of Cushing's and Nelson patients to PPARgamma-ligand treatment. Moreover, the higher level of PPARgamma expression detected in the NFPA subgroup may suggest its possible role as a molecular target in these pituitary adenomas, paving the way for investigations on the effectiveness of treatment with thiazolidinediones in such patients. PMID:17561883

  5. Effects of hypophysectomy and administration of pituitary hormones on luteal function and uptake of high density lipoproteins by luteinized ovaries and adrenals of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, B.D.; Rajkumar, K.; McKibbin, P.E.; Macdonald, G.J.; Buhr, M.M.; Grinwich, D.L.

    1985-04-01

    The role of plasma lipoproteins and hypophyseal hormones in the maintenance of progesterone secretion by the rat corpus luteum was investigated. In the first experiment, rats were treated daily from days 1-6 of pregnancy with 5 mg/kg 4-aminopyrozolopyramidine (4APP), a blocker of hepatic lipoprotein secretion, or with 5 mg/kg 4APP and 1 or 2 mg ovine PRL or 0.1 ml 0.5% phosphoric acid (4APP vehicle). The administration of 4APP reduced serum cholesterol and progesterone levels on days 2-6 of pregnancy and ovarian progesterone on day 6. The reduced progesterone secretion had no effect on embryo implantation. PRL, in the doses used, was incapable of abrogating the effects of 4APP on circulating or ovarian progesterone levels. Ovaries and adrenals, but not kidneys, of pseudopregnant rats exhibited specific and saturable uptake of porcine high density lipoprotein (HDL). Time-course studies indicated that the uptake of HDL was rapid in ovaries compared to that in adrenals. Ovaries from rats not only exhibited uptake of porcine HDL, but also were capable of using it for progesterone synthesis. Treatment with 4APP increased the adrenal uptake of HDL, but ovarian uptake was not different from that in the control group. Hypophysectomy reduced both adrenal and ovarian uptake of HDL. In adrenals only ACTH at the dose employed ameliorated reduction of HDL uptake induced by hypophysectomy, while in the ovaries, both PRL and LH reversed the effect of hypophysectomy. The effect of PRL on uptake was specific to (/sup 125/I)HDL and did not alter (/sup 125/I)albumin uptake. It is concluded that: 1) hypophysectomy reduces HDL uptake in the luteinized rat ovary; and 2) PRL and LH replacement therapy maintain ovarian uptake of HDL, suggesting a direct effect of these luteotropins on lipoprotein uptake.

  6. Cytokines and hypothalamic-pituitary function.

    PubMed

    Jones, T H; Kennedy, R L

    1993-11-01

    Several cytokines are now known to affect the release of anterior pituitary hormones by an action on the hypothalamus and/or the pituitary gland. The major cytokines involved are IL-1, IL-2, IL-6, TNF-alpha and interferon-tau. Their predominant effects are to stimulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and to suppress the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid and gonadal axes, and growth hormone release. The relative importance of systemically and locally produced cytokines in achieving these responses and their precise sites of action have not been fully established. There are indeed conflicting reports on the individual effects of each cytokine which need to be clarified. There is now cumulating evidence that there are important interactions between the immune and neuroendocrine systems which may explain in part, some of the effects on growth, thyroid, adrenal and reproductive functions which occur in acute and chronic disease. This article reviews the current knowledge of the effects of some cytokines on hypothalamic-pituitary function.

  7. Dual pathways of calcium entry in spike and plateau phases of luteinizing hormone release from chicken pituitary cells: sequential activation of receptor-operated and voltage-sensitive calcium channels by gonadotropin-releasing hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J.S.; Wakefield, I.K.; King, J.A.; Mulligan, G.P.; Millar, R.P.

    1988-04-01

    It has previously been shown that, in pituitary gonadotrope cells, the initial rise in cytosolic Ca2+ induced by GnRH is due to a Ca2+ mobilization from intracellular stores. This raises the possibility that the initial transient spike phase of LH release might be fully or partially independent of extracellular Ca2+. We have therefore characterized the extracellular Ca2+ requirements, and the sensitivity to Ca2+ channel blockers, of the spike and plateau phases of secretion separately. In the absence of extracellular Ca2+ the spike and plateau phases were inhibited by 65 +/- 4% and 106 +/- 3%, respectively. Both phases exhibited a similar dependence on concentration of extracellular Ca2+. However, voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channel blockers D600 and nifedipine had a negligible effect on the spike phase, while inhibiting the plateau phase by approximately 50%. In contrast, ruthenium red, Gd3+ ions, and Co2+ ions inhibited both spike and plateau phases to a similar extent as removal of extracellular Ca2+. A fraction (35 +/- 4%) of spike phase release was resistant to removal of extracellular Ca2+. This fraction was abolished after calcium depletion of the cells by preincubation with EGTA in the presence of calcium ionophore A23187, indicating that it depends on intracellular Ca2+ stores. Neither absence of extracellular Ca2+, nor the presence of ruthenium red or Gd3+ prevented mobilization of 45Ca2+ from intracellular stores by GnRH. We conclude that mobilization of intracellular stored Ca2+ is insufficient by itself to account for full spike phase LH release.

  8. Neuroprotective Actions of Ghrelin and Growth Hormone Secretagogues

    PubMed Central

    Frago, Laura M.; Baquedano, Eva; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A.

    2011-01-01

    The brain incorporates and coordinates information based on the hormonal environment, receiving information from peripheral tissues through the circulation. Although it was initially thought that hormones only acted on the hypothalamus to perform endocrine functions, it is now known that they in fact exert diverse actions on many different brain regions including the hypothalamus. Ghrelin is a gastric hormone that stimulates growth hormone secretion and food intake to regulate energy homeostasis and body weight by binding to its receptor, growth hormone secretagogues–GH secretagogue-receptor, which is most highly expressed in the pituitary and hypothalamus. In addition, ghrelin has effects on learning and memory, reward and motivation, anxiety, and depression, and could be a potential therapeutic agent in neurodegenerative disorders where excitotoxic neuronal cell death and inflammatory processes are involved. PMID:21994488

  9. Forkhead Box O1 is present in quiescent pituitary cells during development and is increased in the absence of p27 Kip1.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Sreeparna; Farris, Corrie L; Kabat, Brock E; Jung, Deborah O; Ellsworth, Buffy S

    2012-01-01

    Congenital pituitary hormone deficiencies have been reported in approximately one in 4,000 live births, however studies reporting mutations in some widely studied transcription factors account for only a fraction of congenital hormone deficiencies in humans. Anterior pituitary hormones are required for development and function of several glands including gonads, adrenals, and thyroid. In order to identify additional factors that contribute to human congenital hormone deficiencies, we are investigating the forkhead transcription factor, FOXO1, which has been implicated in development of several organs including ovary, testis, and brain. We find that FOXO1 is present in the nuclei of non-dividing pituitary cells during embryonic development, consistent with a role in limiting proliferation and/or promoting differentiation. FOXO1 is present in a subset of differentiated cells at e18.5 and in adult with highest level of expression in somatotrope cells. We detected FOXO1 in p27(Kip1)-positive cells at e14.5. In the absence of p27(Kip1) the number of pituitary cells containing FOXO1 is significantly increased at e14.5 suggesting that a feedback loop regulates the interplay between FOXO1 and p27(Kip1). PMID:23251696

  10. Mutations along the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis affecting male reproduction.

    PubMed

    Huhtaniemi, Ilpo; Alevizaki, Maria

    2007-12-01

    Disorders in male reproductive function are caused by mutations of key genes at all levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary- testicular axis. They may affect the ontogeny and function of the hypothalamic centres governing gonadotrophin synthesis and secretion, the development of the anterior pituitary gland, the production of gonadotrophins and the function of their receptor genes, and finally the genes responsible for testicular hormone production and gametogenesis. This review focuses on mutations that affect the synthesis and secretion of hypothalamic gonadotrophin-releasing hormone, pituitary follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinising hormone, as well as their testicular receptors, thus covering a selected group of genetic causes of hypo- and hypergonadotrophic male hypogonadism.

  11. Impaired Pituitary Axes Following Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Scranton, Robert A.; Baskin, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary dysfunction following traumatic brain injury (TBI) is significant and rarely considered by clinicians. This topic has received much more attention in the last decade. The incidence of post TBI anterior pituitary dysfunction is around 30% acutely, and declines to around 20% by one year. Growth hormone and gonadotrophic hormones are the most common deficiencies seen after traumatic brain injury, but also the most likely to spontaneously recover. The majority of deficiencies present within the first year, but extreme delayed presentation has been reported. Information on posterior pituitary dysfunction is less reliable ranging from 3%–40% incidence but prospective data suggests a rate around 5%. The mechanism, risk factors, natural history, and long-term effect of treatment are poorly defined in the literature and limited by a lack of standardization. Post TBI pituitary dysfunction is an entity to recognize with significant clinical relevance. Secondary hypoadrenalism, hypothyroidism and central diabetes insipidus should be treated acutely while deficiencies in growth and gonadotrophic hormones should be initially observed. PMID:26239686

  12. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  13. Separation of rat pituitary secretory granules by continuous flow electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, Daniel; Exton, Carrie; Salada, Thomas; Shellenberger, Kathy; Waddle, Jenny; Hymer, W. C.

    1990-01-01

    The separation of growth hormone-containing cytoplasmic secretory granules from the rat pituitary gland by continuous flow electrophoresis is described. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that granule subpopulations can be separated due to differences in surface charge; these, in turn, may be related to the oligomeric state of the hormone.

  14. Reproductive hormones and bone.

    PubMed

    Nicks, Kristy M; Fowler, Tristan W; Gaddy, Dana

    2010-06-01

    Hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulates secretion of pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), which directly regulate ovarian function. Pituitary FSH can modulate osteoclast development, and thereby influence bone turnover. Pituitary oxytocin and prolactin effects on the skeleton are not merely limited to pregnancy and lactation; oxytocin stimulates osteoblastogenesis and bone formation, whereas prolactin exerts skeletal effects in an age-dependent manner. Cyclic levels of inhibins and estrogen suppress FSH and LH, respectively, and also suppress bone turnover via their suppressive effects on osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation. However, continuous exposure to inhibins or estrogen/androgens is anabolic for the skeleton in intact animals and protects against gonadectomy-induced bone loss. Alterations of one hormone in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis influence other bone-active hormones in the entire feedback loop in the axis. Thus, we propose that the action of the HPG axis should be extended to include its combined effects on the skeleton, thus creating the HPG skeletal (HPGS) axis.

  15. Modeling the brain-pituitary-gonad axis in salmon

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jonghan; Hayton, William L.; Schultz, Irv R.

    2006-08-24

    To better understand the complexity of the brain-pituitary-gonad axis (BPG) in fish, we developed a biologically based pharmacodynamic model capable of accurately predicting the normal functioning of the BPG axis in salmon. This first-generation model consisted of a set of 13 equations whose formulation was guided by published values for plasma concentrations of pituitary- (FSH, LH) and ovary- (estradiol, 17a,20b-dihydroxy-4-pregnene-3-one) derived hormones measured in Coho salmon over an annual spawning period. In addition, the model incorporated pertinent features of previously published mammalian models and indirect response pharmacodynamic models. Model-based equations include a description of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) synthesis and release from the hypothalamus, which is controlled by environmental variables such as photoperiod and water temperature. GnRH stimulated the biosynthesis of mRNA for FSH and LH, which were also influenced by estradiol concentration in plasma. The level of estradiol in the plasma was regulated by the oocytes, which moved along a maturation progression. Estradiol was synthesized at a basal rate and as oocytes matured, stimulation of its biosynthesis occurred. The BPG model can be integrated with toxico-genomic, -proteomic data, allowing linkage between molecular based biomarkers and reproduction in fish.

  16. A pediatric case of pituitary macroadenoma presenting with pituitary apoplexy and cranial nerve involvement: case report

    PubMed Central

    Özçetin, Mustafa; Karacı, Mehmet; Toroslu, Ertuğ; Edebali, Nurullah

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas usually arise from the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland and are manifested with hormonal disorders or mass effect. Mass effect usually occurs in nonfunctional tumors. Pituitary adenomas may be manifested with visual field defects or rarely in the form of total oculomotor palsy. Visual field defect is most frequently in the form of bitemporal hemianopsia and superior temporal defect. Sudden loss of vision, papilledema and ophthalmoplegia may be observed. Pituitary apoplexy is defined as an acute clinical syndrome characterized with headache, vomiting, loss of vision, ophthalmoplegia and clouding of consciousness. The problem leading to pituitary apoplexy may be decreased blood supply in the adenoma and hemorrhage following this decrease or hemorrhage alone. In this article, we present a patient who presented with fever, vomiting and sudden loss of vision and limited outward gaze in the left eye following trauma and who was found to have pituitary macroadenoma causing compression of the optic chiasma and optic nerve on the left side on cranial and pituitary magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:27738402

  17. Radiation and hypothalamic-pituitary function.

    PubMed

    Littley, M D; Shalet, S M; Beardwell, C G

    1990-03-01

    In adults, hypopituitarism is a common consequence of external radiotherapy. The clinical manifestations may be subtle and develop insidiously many years after radiotherapy. Anterior pituitary deficiencies can therefore only be detected by regular testing, including dynamic tests of GH and ACTH reserve. Although the deficiencies most commonly develop in the order GH, gonadotrophins, ACTH then TSH, this sequence may not be predictable in an individual patient and comprehensive testing is therefore required. The tests should ideally be performed annually for at least 10 years after treatment or until deficiency has been detected and treated. It is not only the patients with pituitary disease who are at risk of developing hypopituitarism after radiotherapy. Any patient who receives a total dose of irradiation of 20 Gy or more to the hypothalamic-pituitary axis is at risk of hypopituitarism, although the threshold dose may be lower than this. This is particularly important in the long-term survivors of malignant disease in whom endocrine morbidity may be relatively common and in whom this can be easily treated, with consequent improvement in quality of life. Whilst patients who receive a high total dose of irradiation are at increased risk of developing multiple deficiencies, a higher fraction size also increases the risk of anterior pituitary failure. There is good evidence that the earliest damage to the hypothalamic-pituitary axis after external radiotherapy is at the level of the hypothalamus. However, patients who undergo pituitary ablation with interstitial radiotherapy or heavy particle beams are likely to sustain direct damage to the pituitary. In these patients, the sequence in which individual pituitary hormone deficiencies develop is generally the same as that observed with the hypothalamic damage after conventional external radiotherapy. The increasing use of radiotherapy as a means of treatment for malignant disease means that new groups of patients with

  18. Pharmacoeconomic aspects of the treatment of pituitary gland tumours

    PubMed Central

    Sowiński, Jerzy; Piątek, Katarzyna; Zybek, Ariadna; Ruchała, Marek

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays physicians are under economic pressure; therefore therapeutic decisions based on safety, efficacy, and the effectiveness of the medication also require economic analysis. The aim of this review is to discuss data concerning the cost-effectiveness of drug therapy in patients with hormonally active pituitary adenomas, namely growth hormone, adrenocorticotropic hormone, thyroid-stimulating hormone-secreting pituitary adenomas, prolactinoma and pituitary incidentaloma. In acromegalic patients using lanreotide is cheaper for health care payers and more convenient for physicians and patients because of the opportunity for self/partner injections, lower clogging risk and possibility of longer intervals between injections, while the efficacy is comparable with octreotide. Patients with prolactinomas should be treated with novel dopamine agonists, such as cabergoline or quinagolide, however, bromocriptine still remains a cheaper and almost as effective alternative. There are no easy methods or algorithms, but in general, extracting the maximum value from the investment in treatment is essential. PMID:23788980

  19. Pathogenesis analysis of pituitary adenoma based on gene expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    WANG, WEIMIN; XU, ZHIMING; FU, LI; LIU, WEI; LI, XINGANG

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the pathogenesis of pituitary adenoma through screening of the differentially-expressed genes (DEGs) and proteins in normal pituitary and pituitary adenoma tissues, and analyzing the interactions among them. Following the acquisition of gene expression profiling data from a public functional genomics data repository, Gene Expression Omnibus, DEGs were screened in normal pituitary and pituitary adenoma tissues. Upregulated and downregulated DEGs were further identified through gene ontology functional enrichment analysis. Subsequently, the DEGs were mapped to the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes database, and the protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks of the upregulated and downregulated DEGs were constructed. Finally, the functional modules of the PPI network of the downregulated DEGs were analyzed. In total, 211 upregulated and 413 downregulated DEGs were screened between the normal pituitary and pituitary adenoma samples. Downregulated DEGs were associated with certain functions, including the immune response, hormone regulation and cell proliferation. Upregulated genes were associated with cation transport functions. Five modules were acquired from the PPI network of the downregulated DEGs. Transcription factors, including signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), interleukin 6 (IL-6), B-cell lymphoma 6 protein, early growth response 1, POU1F1, jun B proto-oncogene and FOS were the core nodes in the functional modules. In summary, the DEGs and proteins were identified through screening gene expression profiling and PPI networks. The results of the present study indicated that low expression levels of hormone- and immune-related genes facilitated the occurrence of pituitary adenoma. Low expression levels of IL-6 and STAT3 were significant in the dysimmunity of pituitary adenoma. Furthermore, the low expression level of POU1F1 contributed to the reduction in pituitary hormone

  20. Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Thyroid Axis.

    PubMed

    Ortiga-Carvalho, Tania M; Chiamolera, Maria I; Pazos-Moura, Carmen C; Wondisford, Fredic E

    2016-01-01

    The hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis determines the set point of thyroid hormone (TH) production. Hypothalamic thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) stimulates the synthesis and secretion of pituitary thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone, TSH), which acts at the thyroid to stimulate all steps of TH biosynthesis and secretion. The THs thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) control the secretion of TRH and TSH by negative feedback to maintain physiological levels of the main hormones of the HPT axis. Reduction of circulating TH levels due to primary thyroid failure results in increased TRH and TSH production, whereas the opposite occurs when circulating THs are in excess. Other neural, humoral, and local factors modulate the HPT axis and, in specific situations, determine alterations in the physiological function of the axis. The roles of THs are vital to nervous system development, linear growth, energetic metabolism, and thermogenesis. THs also regulate the hepatic metabolism of nutrients, fluid balance and the cardiovascular system. In cells, TH actions are mediated mainly by nuclear TH receptors (210), which modify gene expression. T3 is the preferred ligand of THR, whereas T4, the serum concentration of which is 100-fold higher than that of T3, undergoes extra-thyroidal conversion to T3. This conversion is catalyzed by 5'-deiodinases (D1 and D2), which are TH-activating enzymes. T4 can also be inactivated by conversion to reverse T3, which has very low affinity for THR, by 5-deiodinase (D3). The regulation of deiodinases, particularly D2, and TH transporters at the cell membrane control T3 availability, which is fundamental for TH action. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:1387-1428, 2016. PMID:27347897

  1. Combined Use of Etomidate and Dexmedetomidine Produces an Additive Effect in Inhibiting the Secretion of Human Adrenocortical Hormones

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Hongbin; Zhang, Mazhong; Cai, Meihua; Liu, Jinfen

    2015-01-01

    Background The direct effects of etomidate were investigated on the secretion of cortisol and its precursors by dispersed cells from the adrenal cortex of human of animals. Dexmedetomidine (DEX) is an anesthetic agent that may interfere with cortisol secretion via an unknown mechanism, such as involving inhibition of 11β-hydroxylase and the cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme system. The aim of this study was to determine whether dexmedetomidine (DEX) has a similar inhibitory effect on adrenocortical function, and whether combined use of etomidate (ETO) and DEX could produce a synergistic action in inhibiting the secretion of human adrenocortical hormones. Material/Methods Human adrenocortical cells were exposed to different concentrations of ETO and DEX. The dose-effect model between the ETO concentration and the mean secretion of cortisone (CORT) and aldosterone (ALDO) per hour was estimated. Results Hill’s equation well-described the dose-effect correlation between the ETO concentration and the amount of ALDO and CORT secretion. When the DEX concentration was introduced into the model by using E0 (basal secretion) as the covariate, the goodness of fit of the ETO-CORT dose-effect model was improved significantly and the objective function value was reduced by 4.55 points (P<0.05). The parameters of the final ETO-ALDO pharmacodynamics model were EC50=9.74, Emax=1.20, E0=1.33, and γ=18.5; the parameters of the final ETO-CORT pharmacodynamics model were EC50=9.49, Emax=8.16, E0=8.57, and γ=37.0. In the presence of DEX, E0 was 8.57–0.0247×(CDEX–4.6), and the other parameters remained unchanged. All parameters but γ were natural logarithm conversion values. Conclusions Combined use of DEX and ETO reduced ETO’s inhibitory E0 (basal secretion) of CORT from human adrenocortical cells in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that combined use of ETO and DEX produced an additive effect in inhibiting the secretion of human adrenocortical hormones. PMID

  2. Extrapituitary growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Harvey, S

    2010-12-01

    Pituitary somatotrophs secrete growth hormone (GH) into the bloodstream, to act as a hormone at receptor sites in most, if not all, tissues. These endocrine actions of circulating GH are abolished after pituitary ablation or hypophysectomy, indicating its pituitary source. GH gene expression is, however, not confined to the pituitary gland, as it occurs in neural, immune, reproductive, alimentary, and respiratory tissues and in the integumentary, muscular, skeletal, and cardiovascular systems, in which GH may act locally rather than as an endocrine. These actions are likely to be involved in the proliferation and differentiation of cells and tissues prior to the ontogeny of the pituitary gland. They are also likely to complement the endocrine actions of GH and are likely to maintain them after pituitary senescence and the somatopause. Autocrine or paracrine actions of GH are, however, sometimes mediated through different signaling mechanisms to those mediating its endocrine actions and these may promote oncogenesis. Extrapituitary GH may thus be of physiological and pathophysiological significance.

  3. Non-functioning pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Chanson, P; Brochier, S

    2005-01-01

    The vast majority (>80%) of clinically non-functioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs) are gonadotroph-cell adenomas, as demonstrated by immunocytochemistry. However, they are rarely associated with increased levels of dimeric LH or FSH. Increased levels of uncombined subunits (free alpha-subunit mainly, LH-beta subunit more rarely) are more frequently encountered, but are generally modest. The main problems raised by NFPA are mass effects problems, responsible for optic chiasm compression or deficient hormone secretion resulting from compression of normal anterior pituitary cells. The therapeutic management of NFPA may require combination of different options. The strategy of observation only for patients with incidentally discovered pituitary adenomas may be appropriate, provided that the tumor is well-delimited, small, has no extension with risk of neurological or visual chiasm compression, and that a meticulous hormonal work-up has ruled out the possibility of a minimal hormonal hypersecretion. Transsphenoidal surgery allows improvement in visual disturbances due to chiasmal syndrome in most patients, and sometimes, in pituitary function. After surgery alone, nearly 30% (between 10 and 69%, according to the series) of patients relapse within 5 to 10 yr. Radiotherapy is proposed either as a systematic adjunct or only if a significant remnant persists. Systematic radiation therapy is supported by the low relapse rate (mean, 11%; range, 6-21%) observed when radiation therapy is systematically associated with surgery. However, irradiation is almost always followed by hypopituitarism which might be associated with a reduction in life expectancy, despite appropriate replacement therapy. Results of medical treatment are disappointing. Dopamine agonist bromocriptine decreases gonadotropin and alpha-subunit in vitro and in vivo, but, in clinical studies, was poorly effective in reducing supranormal gonadotropins and free subunits levels, and rarely produced a minimal tumoral

  4. Addition of gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist for luteal phase support in in-vitro fertilization: an analysis of 2739 cycles

    PubMed Central

    Şimşek, Erhan; Kılıçdağ, Esra Bulgan; Aytaç, Pınar Çağlar; Çoban, Gonca; Şimşek, Seda Yüksel; Çok, Tayfun; Haydardedeoğlu, Bülent

    2015-01-01

    Objective Luteal phase is defective in in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles, and many regimens were tried for the very best luteal phase support (LPS). Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist use, which was administered as an adjunct to the luteal phase support in IVF cycles, was suggested to improve pregnancy outcome measures in certain randomized studies. We analyzed the effects of addition of GnRH agonist to standard progesterone luteal support on pregnancy outcome measures, particularly the live birth rates. Material and Methods This is a retrospective cohort study, including 2739 IVF cycles. Long GnRH agonist and antagonist stimulation IVF cycles with cleavage-stage embryo transfer were included. Cycles were divided into two groups: Group A included cycles with single-dose GnRH agonist plus progesterone LPS and Group B included progesterone only LPS. Live birth rates were the primary outcome measures of the analysis. Miscarriage rates and multiple pregnancy rates were the secondary outcome measures. Results Live birth rates were not statistically different in GnRH agonist plus progesterone (Group A) and progesterone only (Group B) groups in both the long agonist and antagonist stimulation arms (40.8%/41.2% and 32.8%/34.4%, p<0.05 respectively). Moreover, pregnancy rates, implantation rates, and miscarriage rates were found to be similar between groups. Multiple pregnancy rates in antagonist cycles were significantly higher in Group A than those in Group B (12.0% and 6.9%, respectively). Conclusion A beneficial effect of a single dose of GnRH agonist administration as a luteal phase supporting agent is yet to be determined because of the wide heterogeneity of data present in literature. Well-designed randomized clinical studies are required to clarify any effect of luteal GnRH agonist addition on pregnancy outcome measures with different doses, timing, and administration routes of GnRH agonists. PMID:26097392

  5. Pituitary progesterone receptor expression and plasma gonadotrophin concentrations in the reproductively dysfunctional mutant restricted ovulator chicken.

    PubMed

    Ocón-Grove, Olga M; Maddineni, Sreenivasa; Hendricks, Gilbert L; Elkin, Robert G; Proudman, John A; Ramachandran, Ramesh

    2007-04-01

    Female mutant restricted ovulator (RO) chickens of the White Leghorn strain carry a naturally occurring single nucleotide mutation in the very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) gene. Due to this mutation, RO hens fail to express a functional VLDLR protein on the oocyte membrane, which results in an impaired uptake of circulating yolk precursor macromolecules. Mutant RO hens subsequently develop hyperlipidemia and generally fail to lay eggs due to follicular atresia. Since RO hens also reportedly have three-fold higher basal plasma estrogen concentrations, combined with four-fold lower levels of circulating progesterone as compared to wild-type (WT) hens, we hypothesized that RO hens would have an increased abundance of pituitary progesterone receptor (PR) mRNA and PR isoforms A and B as well as alterations in circulating gonadotrophin levels. Quantitative PCR assays revealed significantly greater (Ppituitary PR mRNA abundance in RO hens as compared to WT hens. Similarly, pituitary PR isoforms A and B quantities were significantly greater (Paddition, mutant RO hens had significantly greater plasma concentrations of luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone, estrone, and estradiol, but lower circulating progesterone levels. Collectively, elevated circulating estrogen and/or decreased progesterone levels may have contributed to the upregul