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Sample records for additional pituitary hormone

  1. 21 CFR 522.1820 - Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. 522... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1820 Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. (a) Specifications. The drug is a... standard pituitary luteinizing hormone and is reconstituted for use by addition of 5 milliliters of...

  2. 21 CFR 522.1820 - Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. 522... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1820 Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. (a) Specifications. The drug is a... standard pituitary luteinizing hormone and is reconstituted for use by addition of 5 milliliters of...

  3. 21 CFR 522.1820 - Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. 522... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1820 Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. (a) Specifications. The drug is a... standard pituitary luteinizing hormone and is reconstituted for use by addition of 5 milliliters of...

  4. 21 CFR 522.1820 - Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. 522... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1820 Pituitary luteinizing hormone for injection. (a) Specifications. The drug is a... standard pituitary luteinizing hormone and is reconstituted for use by addition of 5 milliliters of...

  5. 21 CFR 522.1820 - Pituitary luteinizing hormone powder for injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pituitary luteinizing hormone powder for injection... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1820 Pituitary luteinizing hormone powder for injection. (a) Specifications. The drug... milligrams of standard pituitary luteinizing hormone and is reconstituted for use by addition of...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: combined pituitary hormone deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... People with combined pituitary hormone deficiency may have hypothyroidism, which is underactivity of the butterfly-shaped thyroid gland in the lower neck. Hypothyroidism can cause many symptoms, including weight gain and ...

  7. Somatostatin system: molecular mechanisms regulating anterior pituitary hormones.

    PubMed

    Eigler, Tamar; Ben-Shlomo, Anat

    2014-08-01

    The somatostatin (SRIF) system, which includes the SRIF ligand and receptors, regulates anterior pituitary gland function, mainly inhibiting hormone secretion and to some extent pituitary tumor cell growth. SRIF-14 via its cognate G-protein-coupled receptors (subtypes 1-5) activates multiple cellular signaling pathways including adenylate cyclase/cAMP, MAPK, ion channel-dependent pathways, and others. In addition, recent data have suggested SRIF-independent constitutive SRIF receptor activity responsible for GH and ACTH inhibition in vitro. This review summarizes current knowledge on ligand-dependent and independent SRIF receptor molecular and functional effects on hormone-secreting cells in the anterior pituitary gland.

  8. The pituitary growth hormone cell in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, Wesley C.; Grindeland, R.

    1989-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH), produced and secreted from specialized cells in the pituitary gland, controls the metabolism of protein, fat, and carbohydrate. It is also probably involved in the regulation of proper function of bone, muscle and immune systems. The behavior of the GH cell system was studied by flying either isolated pituitary cells or live rats. In the latter case, pituitary GH cells are prepared on return to earth and then either transplanted into hypophysectomized rats or placed into cell culture so that function of GH cells in-vivo vs. in-vitro can be compared. The results from three flights to date (STS-8, 1983; SL-3, 1985; Cosmos 1887, 1987) established that the ability of GH cells to release hormone, on return to earth, is compromised. The mechanism(s) responsible for this attenuation response is unknown. However, the data are sufficiently positive to indicate that the nature of the secretory defect resides directly within the GH cells.

  9. Novel mutations associated with combined pituitary hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Romero, Christopher J; Pine-Twaddell, Elyse; Radovick, Sally

    2011-06-01

    The pituitary gland produces hormones that play important roles in both the development and the homeostasis of the body. A deficiency of two or several of these pituitary hormones, known as combined pituitary hormone deficiency, may present in infants or children due to an unknown etiology and is considered congenital or idiopathic. Advancements in our understanding of pituitary development have provided a genetic basis to explain the pathophysiological basis of pituitary hormone disease. Nevertheless, there are several challenges to the precise characterization of abnormal genotypes; these exist secondary to the complexities of several of the hypothalamic/pituitary developmental factors and signals, which ultimately integrate in a temporal and spatial dependent manner to produce a mature gland. Furthermore, the clinical presentation of pituitary hormone disease may be dynamic as subsequent hormone deficiencies may develop over time. The characterization of patients with mutations in genes responsible for pituitary development provides an opportunity to discover potential novel mechanisms responsible for pituitary pathophysiology. The focus of this review is to report the most recent mutations in genes responsible for pituitary development in patients with hypopituitarism and emphasize the importance to physicians and researchers for characterizing these patients. Continuing efforts toward understanding the molecular basis of pituitary development as well as genetic screening of patients with pituitary disease will offer new insights into both diagnostic and potential therapeutic options that will decrease the morbidity and mortality in patients with hypopituitarism.

  10. Pituitary resistance to thyroid hormones: pathophysiology and therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Satoru; Shigematsu, Satoshi; Inaba, Hidefumi; Takei, Masahiro; Takeda, Teiji; Komatsu, Mitsuhisa

    2011-12-01

    Thyroid hormone secretion suppresses the expression of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), both of which are strictly controlled by a negative feedback loop between the hypothalamus-pituitary and thyroid. Pituitary resistance to thyroid hormone (PRTH) is defined as resistance to the action of thyroid hormone that is more severe in the pituitary than at the peripheral tissue level. Although the molecular basis of PRTH is not well understood, the clinical issue mainly involves imbalance between the hypothalamus-pituitary and peripheral thyroid hormone responsivity, which may induce peripheral thyrotoxic phenomena. Here, we review the pathogenesis and molecular aspects of PRTH, present a single case with inappropriate TSH secretion suffering from thyrotoxicosis treated with PTU, and discuss the possible choice of therapeutic options to correct the imbalance of thyroid hormone responsivity in both the hypothalamus-pituitary and peripheral tissues.

  11. Purification and cultivation of human pituitary growth hormone secreting cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.

    1984-01-01

    A multiphase study was conducted to examine the properties of growth hormone cells. Topics investigated included: (1) to determine if growth hormone (GH) cells contained within the rat pituitary gland can be separated from the other hormone producing cell types by continuous flow electrophoresis (CFE); (2) to determine what role, if any, gravity plays in the electrophoretic separation of GH cells; (3) to compare in vitro GH release from rat pituitary cells previously exposed to microgravity conditions vs release from cells not exposed to microgravity; (4) to determine if the frequency of different hormone producing pituitary cell types contained in cell suspensions can be quantitated by flow cytometry; and (5) to determine if GH contained within the human post mortem pituitary gland can be purified by CFE. Specific experimental procedures and results are included.

  12. Ovarian control of pituitary hormone secretion in early human pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Emmi, A M; Skurnick, J; Goldsmith, L T; Gagliardi, C L; Schmidt, C L; Kleinberg, D; Weiss, G

    1991-06-01

    To determine the influence of ovarian relaxin on the secretion of pituitary GH and PRL in vivo, we evaluated circulating serum hormone levels in 17 pregnant patients with functional corpora lutea (group I) and compared them to levels in 10 patients with premature ovarian failure (POF; group II) who became pregnant with egg donation and did not have corpora lutea. Group II patients had exogenous hormonal support. Serum relaxin (RLX), GH, PRL, estradiol (E2), and progesterone levels were measured weekly by RIA from weeks 4-8 of pregnancy. Analysis of variance and covariance were used to determine hormonal relationships. Serum RLX was present in the natural pregnancy group, with a mean of 1.94 micrograms/L over the study period. Serum RLX was undetectable in the POF patients (less than 0.16 micrograms/L). No significant difference in PRL or progesterone levels between the two groups was noted. E2 levels showed an upward trend in both groups with time and were significantly higher in patients of the POF group than in group I women (P = 0.001). GH levels were significantly higher in the natural cycle patients (P = 0.02) despite lower E2 levels. These data provide additional support for the concept that RLX production in early pregnancy originates from the corpus luteum. They suggest that a luteal product, probably RLX, stimulates GH secretion in early pregnancy. This is a previously undescribed role for RLX in pituitary physiology during human pregnancy.

  13. Purification and cultivation of human pituitary growth hormone secreting cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.

    1978-01-01

    The maintainance of actively secreting human pituitary growth hormone cells (somatotrophs) in vitro was studied. The primary approach was the testing of agents which may be expected to increase the release of the human growth hormone (hGH). A procedure for tissue procurement is described along with the methodologies used to dissociate human pituitary tissue (obtained either at autopsy or surgery) into single cell suspensions. The validity of the Biogel cell column perfusion system for studying the dynamics of GH release was developed and documented using a rat pituitary cell system.

  14. Activation of GABA B receptors in the anterior pituitary inhibits prolactin and luteinizing hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Lux-Lantos, V; Rey, E; Libertun, C

    1992-11-01

    Previous work from our laboratory showed that baclofen could lower serum prolactin (PRL) levels acting at the central nervous system. The present experiments were designed to evaluate whether the gamma-aminobutyric acid B agonist was also effective in inhibiting hormone release at the pituitary level. In monolayer cultures of adenohypophyseal dispersed cells, baclofen inhibited basal PRL secretion after 1 or 2 h of incubation. This inhibition was significantly abolished by three antagonists: phaclofen, 3-aminopropyl-phosphonic acid and 4-aminobutylphosphonic acid. Furthermore, baclofen inhibited the thyrotropin-releasing hormone-induced PRL release in a concentration-dependent manner. With regard to gonadotropin secretion, baclofen was unable to modify basal luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion, but significantly inhibited the LH-releasing hormone-induced LH release. These results show that baclofen, in addition to its central neuroendocrine effects, inhibits pituitary hormone secretion, under basal and/or stimulated conditions, by direct action at the pituitary level.

  15. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist-induced pituitary apoplexy

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Fergus; Navin, Patrick; Brett, Francesca; Dennedy, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    Summary Pituitary apoplexy represents an uncommon endocrine emergency with potentially life-threatening consequences. Drug-induced pituitary apoplexy is a rare but important consideration when evaluating patients with this presentation. We describe an unusual case of a patient with a known pituitary macroadenoma presenting with acute-onset third nerve palsy and headache secondary to tumour enlargement and apoplexy. This followed gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRH) agonist therapy used to treat metastatic prostate carcinoma. Following acute management, the patient underwent transphenoidal debulking of his pituitary gland with resolution of his third nerve palsy. Subsequent retrospective data interpretation revealed that this had been a secretory gonadotropinoma and GNRH agonist therapy resulted in raised gonadotropins and testosterone. Hence, further management of his prostate carcinoma required GNRH antagonist therapy and external beam radiotherapy. This case demonstrates an uncommon complication of GNRH agonist therapy in the setting of a pituitary macroadenoma. It also highlights the importance of careful, serial data interpretation in patients with pituitary adenomas. Finally, this case presents a unique insight into the challenges of managing a hormonal-dependent prostate cancer in a patient with a secretory pituitary tumour. Learning points While non-functioning gonadotropinomas represent the most common form of pituitary macroadenoma, functioning gonadotropinomas are exceedingly rare. Acute tumour enlargement, with potential pituitary apoplexy, is a rare but important adverse effect arising from GNRH agonist therapy in the presence of both functioning and non-functioning pituitary gonadotropinomas. GNRH antagonist therapy represents an alternative treatment option for patients with hormonal therapy-requiring prostate cancer, who also have diagnosed with a pituitary gonadotropinoma. PMID:27284452

  16. Parathyroid hormone-related protein is a factor in normal fish pituitary.

    PubMed

    Danks, J A; Devlin, A J; Ho, P M; Diefenbach-Jagger, H; Power, D M; Canario, A; Martin, T J; Ingleton, P M

    1993-11-01

    Using antibodies to the amino-terminal region of human parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) we have demonstrated PTHrP immunoreactivity in pituitaries and plasma of the sea bream (Sparus aurata). Pituitary cells at two distinct locations contained immunodetectable PTHrP; an anterior group in the rostral pars distalis which also contained immunoreactive thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), and a posterior group lying at the border of the pars intermedia and proximal pars distalis between cells which stained with antibody to human corticotrophin-like intermediate lobe peptide. By Western blot analysis pituitary extracts contained two immunoreactive isoforms of PTHrP, one of 29 kDa and the other of 26 kDa. Media of pituitaries incubated for up to 14 days in Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate also had several isoforms of immunodetectable PTHrP, two of them corresponding to the 29- and 26-kDa molecular forms but there were in addition both larger and smaller molecules. The concentration of PTHrP in sea bream plasma was comparable with levels observed in human subjects with humoral hypercalcaemia of malignancy. There was no reaction between pituitary cells or pituitary extracts and antibody to human parathyroid hormone. Thus sea bream pituitary contains immunoreactive PTHrP, which appears to be released into medium during in vitro incubation and which may be a significant source of plasma immunoreactive PTHrP in vivo.

  17. Purification and cultivation of human pituitary growth hormone secreting cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    Efforts were directed towards maintenance of actively secreting human pituitary growth hormone cells (somatotrophs) in vitro. The production of human growth hormone (hGH) by this means would be of benefit for the treatment of certain human hypopituitary diseases such as dwarfism. One of the primary approaches was the testing of agents which may logically be expected to increase hGH release. The progress towards this goal is summarized. Results from preliminary experiments dealing with electrophoresis of pituitary cell for the purpose of somatotroph separation are described.

  18. Three Novel Missense Mutations within the LHX4 Gene Are Associated with Variable Pituitary Hormone Deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Pfaeffle, Roland W.; Hunter, Chad S.; Savage, Jesse J.; Duran-Prado, Mario; Mullen, Rachel D.; Neeb, Zachary P.; Eiholzer, Urs; Hesse, Volker; Haddad, Nadine G.; Stobbe, Heike M.; Blum, Werner F.; Weigel, Johannes F. W.; Rhodes, Simon J.

    2008-01-01

    Context: The LHX4 LIM-homeodomain transcription factor has essential roles in pituitary gland and nervous system development. Heterozygous mutations in LHX4 are associated with combined pituitary hormone deficiency. Objectives: Our objectives were to determine the nature and frequency of LHX4 mutations in patients with pituitary hormone deficiency and to examine the functional outcomes of observed mutations. Design: The LHX4 gene sequence was determined from patient DNA. The biochemical and gene regulatory properties of aberrant LHX4 proteins were characterized using structural predictions, pituitary gene transcription assays, and DNA binding experiments. Patients: A total of 253 patients from 245 pedigrees with GH deficiency and deficiency of at least one additional pituitary hormone was included in the study. Results: In five patients, three types of heterozygous missense mutations in LHX4 that result in substitution of conserved amino acids were identified. One substitution is between the LIM domains (R84C); the others are in the homeodomain (L190R; A210P). The patients have GH deficiency; some also display reductions in TSH, LH, FSH, or ACTH, and aberrant pituitary morphology. Structural models predict that the aberrant L190R and A210P LHX4 proteins would have impaired DNA binding and gene activation properties. Consistent with these models, EMSAs and transfection experiments using pituitary gene promoters demonstrate that whereas the R84C form has reduced activity, the L190R and A210P proteins are inactive. Conclusions: LHX4 mutations are a relatively rare cause of combined pituitary hormone deficiency. This report extends the range of phenotypes associated with LHX4 gene mutations and describes three novel exonic mutations in the gene. PMID:18073311

  19. Control of pituitary thyroid-stimulating hormone synthesis and secretion by thyroid hormones during Xenopus metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Robin M; Thoemke, Kara R; Korte, Joseph J; Moen, Scott M; Olson, Jessica M; Korte, Lisa; Tietge, Joseph E; Degitz, Sigmund J

    2011-09-15

    We used ex vivo and in vivo experiments with Xenopus laevis tadpoles to examine the hypothesis that the set-point for negative feedback on pituitary thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) synthesis and secretion by thyroid hormones (THs) increases as metamorphosis progresses to allow for the previously documented concomitant increase in serum TH concentrations and pituitary TSH mRNA expression during this transformative process. First, pituitaries from climactic tadpoles were cultured for up to 96 h to characterize the ability of pituitary explants to synthesize and secrete TSHβ in the absence of hypothalamic and circulating hormones. Next, pituitary explants from tadpoles NF stages 54-66 were exposed to physiologically-relevant concentrations of THs to determine whether stage-specific differences exist in pituitary sensitivity to negative feedback by THs. Finally, in vivo exposures of tadpoles to THs were conducted to confirm the results of the ex vivo experiments. When pituitaries from climactic tadpoles were removed from the influence of endogenous hormones, TSHβ mRNA expression increased late or not at all whereas the rate of TSHβ secreted into media increased dramatically, suggesting that TSH secretion, but not TSH mRNA expression, is under the negative regulation of an endogenous signal during the climactic stages of metamorphosis. Pituitaries from pre- and prometamorphic tadpoles were more sensitive to TH-induced inhibition of TSHβ mRNA expression and secretion than pituitaries from climactic tadpoles. The observed decrease in sensitivity of pituitary TSHβ mRNA expression to negative feedback by THs from premetamorphosis to metamorphic climax was confirmed by in vivo experiments in which tadpoles were reared in water containing THs. Based on the results of this study, a model is proposed to explain the seemingly paradoxical, concurrent rise in serum TH concentrations and pituitary TSH mRNA expression during metamorphosis in larval anurans.

  20. Pituitary transplantation: Part 1. Successful reconstitution of pituitary-dependent hormone levels.

    PubMed

    Tulipan, N B; Zacur, H A; Allen, G S

    1985-03-01

    Neonatal or adult pituitary glands were transplanted to the median eminence of adult rats of the same or a histoincompatible inbred strain. The hormonal status of 39 transplanted rats and of control animals was evaluated by serial determination of serum prolactin and thyroxine. Grafts of neonatal tissue to adults of the same strain resulted in normal postoperative hormone levels. This indicates not only that pituitary grafts had survived, but also that the transplants were under hypothalamic control. Grafts of adult tissue were less successful. The prolactin value was lower, but still within the normal range, whereas the thyroxine value was lower than normal, suggesting that viable pituitary tissue had survived but was not under hypothalamic control. Transplantation across a histocompatibility barrier was uniformly unsuccessful. Postoperative prolactin levels were low and thyroxine levels were not significantly different from those in hypophysectomized controls.

  1. Gigantism caused by growth hormone secreting pituitary adenoma.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Noorisaem; Jeong, Kumi; Yang, Eun Mi; Kim, Chan Jong

    2014-06-01

    Gigantism indicates excessive secretion of growth hormones (GH) during childhood when open epiphyseal growth plates allow for excessive linear growth. Case one involved a 14.7-year-old boy presented with extreme tall stature. His random serum GH level was 38.4 ng/mL, and failure of GH suppression was noted during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT; nadir serum GH, 22.7 ng/mL). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain revealed a 12-mm-sized pituitary adenoma. Transsphenoidal surgery was performed and a pituitary adenoma displaying positive immunohistochemical staining for GH was reported. Pituitary MRI scan was performed 4 months after surgery and showed recurrence/residual tumor. Medical treatment with a long-acting somatostatin analogue for six months was unsuccessful. As a result, secondary surgery was performed. Three months after reoperation, the GH level was 0.2 ng/mL and insulin-like growth factor 1 was 205 ng/mL. Case two involved a 14.9-year-old boy, who was referred to our department for his tall stature. His basal GH level was 9.3 ng/mL, and failure of GH suppression was reported during OGTT (nadir GH, 9.0 ng/mL). Pituitary MRI showed a 6-mm-sized pituitary adenoma. Surgery was done and histopathological examination demonstrated a pituitary adenoma with positive staining for GH. Three months after surgery, the GH level was 0.2 ng/mL and nadir GH during OGTT was less than 0.1 ng/mL. Pituitary MRI scans showed no residual tumor. We present two cases of gigantism caused by a GH-secreting pituitary adenoma with clinical and microscopic findings.

  2. Control of Pituitary Thyroid-stimulating Hormone Synthesis and Secretion by Thyroid Hormones during Xenopus Metamorphosis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Serum thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations in anuran larvae rise rapidly during metamorphosis. Such a rise in an adult anuran would inevitably trigger a negative feedback response resulting in decreased synthesis and secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) by the pituitary....

  3. Ontogeny of pituitary growth hormone and growth hormone mRNA in the chicken.

    PubMed

    McCann-Levorse, L M; Radecki, S V; Donoghue, D J; Malamed, S; Foster, D N; Scanes, C G

    1993-01-01

    The changes in pituitary growth hormone (GH) mRNA levels have been determined by Northern blot analysis and laser densitometry during embryonic development and posthatch growth of white Leghorn cockerels. Pituitary GH mRNA levels were observed to progressively increase between 18 days of embryonic development to a maximum at 4 weeks of age (posthatch). Subsequently, pituitary GH mRNA levels declined between 4 and 8 weeks of age, and between 12 weeks of age and adulthood. Pituitary GH contents showed increases during embryonic development and posthatch growth that paralleled the rise in GH mRNA. The decline in pituitary GH mRNA levels between 4 weeks of age and adulthood occurs when GH secretion has been observed previously to decline.

  4. Pituitary hormone level changes and hypxonatremia in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    MAIMAITILI, AISHA; MAIMAITILI, MIJITI; REXIDAN, AIKEREMU; LU, JUNYI; AJIMU, KUERBAN; CHENG, XIAOJIANG; LUO, KUN; SAILIKE, DUISHANBAI; LIU, YUAN; KAHEERMAN, KADEER; TANG, CHANGJIU; ZHANG, TINGRONG

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in serum pituitary hormone levels and the mechanism of hyponatremia in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Nuclear medical tests and serum electrolyte monitoring were performed in 49 aneurysmal SAH cases and 10 healthy volunteers. The levels of serum pituitary hormones were significantly higher in the SAH patients compared with the control group on days 1–3 and 7–9 after SAH onset (P<0.05). The peak value occurred on days 7–9. The rate of hyponatremia was 49.0% in the 49 SAH patients. The incidence of severe hyponatremia was significantly higher in Fisher grades III–IV and Hunt-Hess grades III–IV compared with Fisher grades I–II and Hunt-Hess grades I–II, respectively (P<0.05). There was no correlation between the site of aneurysm and the rate of hyponatremia. The incidence of symptomatic cerebral vasospasm was significantly higher in the hyponatremia group and Fisher grades III–IV compared with the normal serum sodium group and Fisher grades I–II, respectively. Serum pituitary hormone levels were positively correlated with blood loss and disease severity in patients with aneurysmal SAH. Hyponatremia may be considered an important indicator of SAH. SAH patients are likely to benefit from intense monitoring and regulation of serum sodium. PMID:23837049

  5. GH and Pituitary Hormone Alterations After Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Karaca, Züleyha; Tanrıverdi, Fatih; Ünlühızarcı, Kürşad; Kelestimur, Fahrettin

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a crucially important public health problem around the world, which gives rise to increased mortality and is the leading cause of physical and psychological disability in young adults, in particular. Pituitary dysfunction due to TBI was first described 95 years ago. However, until recently, only a few papers have been published in the literature and for this reason, TBI-induced hypopituitarism has been neglected for a long time. Recent studies have revealed that TBI is one of the leading causes of hypopituitarism. TBI which causes hypopituitarism may be characterized by a single head injury such as from a traffic accident or by chronic repetitive head trauma as seen in combative sports including boxing, kickboxing, and football. Vascular damage, hypoxic insult, direct trauma, genetic predisposition, autoimmunity, and neuroinflammatory changes may have a role in the development of hypopituitarism after TBI. Because of the exceptional structure of the hypothalamo-pituitary vasculature and the special anatomic location of anterior pituitary cells, GH is the most commonly lost hormone after TBI, and the frequency of isolated GHD is considerably high. TBI-induced pituitary dysfunction remains undiagnosed and therefore untreated in most patients because of the nonspecific and subtle clinical manifestations of hypopituitarism. Treatment of TBI-induced hypopituitarism depends on the deficient anterior pituitary hormones. GH replacement therapy has some beneficial effects on metabolic parameters and neurocognitive dysfunction. Patients with TBI without neuroendocrine changes and those with TBI-induced hypopituitarism share the same clinical manifestations, such as attention deficits, impulsion impairment, depression, sleep abnormalities, and cognitive disorders. For this reason, TBI-induced hypopituitarism may be neglected in TBI victims and it would be expected that underlying hypopituitarism would aggravate the clinical picture of TBI

  6. Triiodothyronine stimulates specifically growth hormone mRNA in rat pituitary tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Seo, H; Vassart, G; Brocas, H; Refetoff, S

    1977-05-01

    In a cell-free protein-synthesizing system from a rabbit reticulocyte lysate, total RNA extracted from cultured rat pituitary tumor (GH3) cells directed, in a dose-related manner, the synthesis of proteins that were precipitated by antisera specific to rat growth hormone (somatotropin) and rat prolactin. A marked decrease in growth hormone secretion and growth hormone mRNA activity was observed when cells were grown in a medium deficient in thyroid hormone. Addition of triiodothyronine in physiologic amounts both prevented and completely reversed this effect within 48 hr. Thyroid hormone had no effect on prolactin secretion or prolactin mRNA activity. These data suggest that thyroid hormone may stimulate synthesis of growth hormone through induction of transcriptional activity. The possibility of an additional effect at the posttranscriptional level has not been excluded. Although thyroid hormone is believed to have a general effect on a variety of metabolic processes, some effects, at the molecular level, may be quite selective, as indicated by the observed changes in growth hormone but not prolactin mRNA activity. The GH3 cell model is useful in the study of triiodothyronine action because of independence from secondary hormonal effects caused by hypothyroidism and because simultaneous measurement of prolactin mRNA activity serves as a unique internal control.

  7. Purification and Cultivation of Human Pituitary Growth Hormones Secreting Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.; Todd, P.; Grindeland, R.; Lanham, W.; Morrison, D.

    1985-01-01

    The rat and human pituitary gland contains a mixture of hormone producing cell types. The separation of cells which make growth hormone (GH) is attempted for the purpose of understanding how the hormone molecule is made within the pituitary cell; what form(s) it takes within the cell; and what form(s) GH assumes as it leaves the cell. Since GH has a number of biological targets (e.g., muscle, liver, bone), the assessment of the activities of the intracellular/extracellular GH by new and sensitive bioassays. GH cells contained in the mixture was separated by free flow electrophoresis. These experiments show that GH cells have different electrophoretic mobilities. This is relevant to NASA since a lack of GH could be a prime causative factor in muscle atrophy. Further, GH has recently been implicated in the etiology of motion sickness in space. Continous flow electrophoresis experiment on STS-8 showed that GH cells could be partially separated in microgravity. However, definitive cell culture studies could not be done due to insufficient cell recoveries.

  8. Immunohistochemical localization of anterior pituitary hormones in S-100 protein-positive cells in the rat pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Motoshi; Yatabe, Megumi; Tando, Yukiko; Yashiro, Takashi

    2011-09-01

    In the anterior and intermediate lobes of the rat pituitary gland, non-hormone-producing cells that express S-100 protein coexist with various types of hormone-producing cells and are believed to function as phagocytes, supporting and paracrine-controlling cells of hormone-producing cells and stem cells, among other functions; however, their cytological characteristics are not yet fully understood. Using a transgenic rat that expresses green fluorescent protein under the promoter of the S100β protein gene, we immunohistochemically detected expression of the luteinizing hormone, thyroid-stimulating hormone, prolactin, growth hormone and proopiomelanocortin by S-100 protein-positive cells located between clusters of hormone-producing cells in the intermediate lobe. These findings lend support to the hypothesis that S-100 protein-positive cells are capable of differentiating into hormone-producing cells in the adult rat pituitary gland.

  9. Multicenter study on adult growth hormone level in postoperative pituitary tumor patients.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jing-min; Gu, Jian-wen; Kuang, Yong-qin; Ma, Yuan; Xia, Xun; Yang, Tao; Lu, Min; He, Wei-qi; Sun, Zhi-yong; Zhang, Yan-chao

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study is to observe the adult growth hormone level in postoperative pituitary tumor patients of multi-centers, and explore the change of hypophyseal hormones in postoperative pituitary tumor patients. Sixty patients with pituitary tumor admitted during March, 2011-March, 2012 were selected. Postoperative hypophyseal hormone deficiency and the change of preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative growth hormone levels were recorded. Growth hormone hypofunction was the most common hormonal hypofunction, which took up to 85.0 %. Adrenocortical hormone hypofunction was next to it and accounted for 58.33 %. GH + ACTH + TSH + Gn deficiency was the most common in postoperative hormone deficiency, which took up to 40.00 %, and GH + ACTH + TSH + Gn + AVP and GH deficiencies were next to it and accounted for 23.33 and 16.67 %, respectively. The hormone levels in patients after total pituitary tumor resection were significantly lower than those after partial pituitary tumor resection, and the difference was statistically significant; growth hormone and serum prolactin levels after surgery in two groups were decreased, and the difference was statistically significant. The incidence rate of growth hormone deficiency in postoperative pituitary tumor patients is high, which is usually complicated with deficiency of various hypophyseal hormones. In clinical, we should pay attention to the levels of the hypopnyseal hormones, and take timely measures to avoid postoperative complications.

  10. Pituitary Stalk Interruption Syndrome from Infancy to Adulthood: Clinical, Hormonal, and Radiological Assessment According to the Initial Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Bar, Céline; Zadro, Charline; Diene, Gwenaelle; Oliver, Isabelle; Pienkowski, Catherine; Jouret, Béatrice; Cartault, Audrey; Ajaltouni, Zeina; Salles, Jean-Pierre; Sevely, Annick; Tauber, Maithé; Edouard, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with pituitary stalk interruption syndrome (PSIS) are initially referred for hypoglycemia during the neonatal period or growth retardation during childhood. PSIS is either isolated (nonsyndromic) or associated with extra-pituitary malformations (syndromic). Objective To compare baseline characteristics and long-term evolution in patients with PSIS according to the initial presentation. Study Design Sixty-seven patients with PSIS were included. Data from subgroups were compared: neonates (n = 10) versus growth retardation patients (n = 47), and syndromic (n = 32) versus nonsyndromic patients (n = 35). Results Neonates displayed a more severe hormonal and radiological phenotype than children referred for growth retardation, with a higher incidence of multiple hormonal deficiencies (100% versus 34%; P = 0.0005) and a nonvisible anterior pituitary lobe (33% versus 2%; P = 0.0017). Regular follow-up of growth might have allowed earlier diagnosis in the children with growth retardation, as decreased growth velocity and growth retardation were present respectively 3 and 2 years before referral. We documented a progressive worsening of endocrine impairment throughout childhood in these patients. Presence of extra-pituitary malformations (found in 48%) was not associated with more severe hormonal and radiological characteristics. Growth under GH treatment was similar in the patient groups and did not vary according to the pituitary MRI findings. Conclusions PSIS diagnosed in the neonatal period has a particularly severe hormonal and radiological phenotype. The progressive worsening of endocrine impairment throughout childhood justifies periodic follow-up to check for additional hormonal deficiencies. PMID:26562670

  11. Effects of cabergoline in a pituitary adenoma secreting follicle-stimulating hormone.

    PubMed Central

    Leese, G.; Jeffreys, R.; Vora, J.

    1997-01-01

    A patient with a pituitary adenoma secreting follicle-stimulating hormone with co-existent primary hyperaldosteronism is described. After his second transsphenoidal surgery, the patient developed a Staphylococcus aureus pituitary abscess. Symptoms improved after abscess drainage. Subsequent cabergoline therapy arrested the deterioration of symptoms. and decreased serum follicle-stimulating hormone concentrations. Cabergoline may be a useful treatment for aggressively growing non-prolactin-secreting pituitary adenomas. PMID:9307745

  12. Hedgehog signaling activation induces stem cell proliferation and hormone release in the adult pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Pyczek, Joanna; Buslei, Rolf; Schult, David; Hölsken, Annett; Buchfelder, Michael; Heß, Ina; Hahn, Heidi; Uhmann, Anja

    2016-04-25

    Hedgehog (HH) signaling is known to be essential during the embryonal development of the pituitary gland but the knowledge about its role in the adult pituitary and in associated tumors is sparse. In this report we investigated the effect of excess Hh signaling activation in murine pituitary explants and analyzed the HH signaling status of human adenopituitary lobes and a large cohort of pituitary adenomas. Our data show that excess Hh signaling led to increased proliferation of Sox2(+) and Sox9(+) adult pituitary stem cells and to elevated expression levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (Acth), growth hormone (Gh) and prolactin (Prl) in the adult gland. Inhibition of the pathway by cyclopamine reversed these effects indicating that active Hh signaling positively regulates proliferative processes of adult pituitary stem cells and hormone production in the anterior pituitary. Since hormone producing cells of the adenohypophysis as well as ACTH-, GH- and PRL-immunopositive adenomas express SHH and its target GLI1, we furthermore propose that excess HH signaling is involved in the development/maintenance of hormone-producing pituitary adenomas. These findings advance the understanding of physiological hormone regulation and may open new treatment options for pituitary tumors.

  13. Hedgehog signaling activation induces stem cell proliferation and hormone release in the adult pituitary gland

    PubMed Central

    Pyczek, Joanna; Buslei, Rolf; Schult, David; Hölsken, Annett; Buchfelder, Michael; Heß, Ina; Hahn, Heidi; Uhmann, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog (HH) signaling is known to be essential during the embryonal development of the pituitary gland but the knowledge about its role in the adult pituitary and in associated tumors is sparse. In this report we investigated the effect of excess Hh signaling activation in murine pituitary explants and analyzed the HH signaling status of human adenopituitary lobes and a large cohort of pituitary adenomas. Our data show that excess Hh signaling led to increased proliferation of Sox2+ and Sox9+ adult pituitary stem cells and to elevated expression levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (Acth), growth hormone (Gh) and prolactin (Prl) in the adult gland. Inhibition of the pathway by cyclopamine reversed these effects indicating that active Hh signaling positively regulates proliferative processes of adult pituitary stem cells and hormone production in the anterior pituitary. Since hormone producing cells of the adenohypophysis as well as ACTH-, GH- and PRL-immunopositive adenomas express SHH and its target GLI1, we furthermore propose that excess HH signaling is involved in the development/maintenance of hormone-producing pituitary adenomas. These findings advance the understanding of physiological hormone regulation and may open new treatment options for pituitary tumors. PMID:27109116

  14. Development of gonadotropin-releasing hormone secretion and pituitary response.

    PubMed

    Glanowska, Katarzyna M; Burger, Laura L; Moenter, Suzanne M

    2014-11-05

    Acquisition of a mature pattern of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion from the CNS is a hallmark of the pubertal process. Little is known about GnRH release during sexual maturation, but it is assumed to be minimal before later stages of puberty. We studied spontaneous GnRH secretion in brain slices from male mice during perinatal and postnatal development using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) to detect directly the oxidation of secreted GnRH. There was good correspondence between the frequency of GnRH release detected by FSCV in the median eminence of slices from adults with previous reports of in vivo luteinizing hormone (LH) pulse frequency. The frequency of GnRH release in the late embryonic stage was surprisingly high, reaching a maximum in newborns and remaining elevated in 1-week-old animals despite low LH levels. Early high-frequency GnRH release was similar in wild-type and kisspeptin knock-out mice indicating that this release is independent of kisspeptin-mediated excitation. In vivo treatment with testosterone or in vitro treatment with gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) reduced GnRH release frequency in slices from 1-week-old mice. RF9, a putative GnIH antagonist, restored GnRH release in slices from testosterone-treated mice, suggesting that testosterone inhibition may be GnIH-dependent. At 2-3 weeks, GnRH release is suppressed before attaining adult patterns. Reduction in early life spontaneous GnRH release frequency coincides with the onset of the ability of exogenous GnRH to induce pituitary LH secretion. These findings suggest that lack of pituitary secretory response, not lack of GnRH release, initially blocks downstream activation of the reproductive system.

  15. Pituitary Gland Development and Disease: From Stem Cell to Hormone Production

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Shannon W.; Ellsworth, Buffy S.; Peréz Millan, María Inés; Gergics, Peter; Schade, Vanessa; Foyouzi, Nastaran; Brinkmeier, Michelle L.; Mortensen, Amanda H.

    2014-01-01

    Many aspects of pituitary development have become better understood in the last two decades. The signaling pathways regulating pituitary growth and shape have emerged, and the balancing interactions between the pathways are now appreciated. Markers for multi-potent progenitor cells are being identified, and signature transcription factors have been discovered for most hormone producing cell types. We now realize that pulsatile hormone secretion involves a 3-D integration of cellular networks. About a dozen genes are known to cause pituitary hypoplasia when mutated due to their essential roles in pituitary development. Similarly, a few genes are known that predispose to familial endocrine neoplasia, and several genes mutated in sporadic pituitary adenomas are documented. In the next decade we anticipate gleaning a deeper appreciation of these processes at the molecular level, insight into the development of the hypophyseal portal blood system, and evolution of better therapeutics for congenital and acquired hormone deficiencies and for common craniopharyngiomas and pituitary adenomas. PMID:24290346

  16. Pituitary gland development and disease: from stem cell to hormone production.

    PubMed

    Davis, Shannon W; Ellsworth, Buffy S; Peréz Millan, María Inés; Gergics, Peter; Schade, Vanessa; Foyouzi, Nastaran; Brinkmeier, Michelle L; Mortensen, Amanda H; Camper, Sally A

    2013-01-01

    Many aspects of pituitary development have become better understood in the past two decades. The signaling pathways regulating pituitary growth and shape have emerged, and the balancing interactions between the pathways are now appreciated. Markers for multipotent progenitor cells are being identified, and signature transcription factors have been discovered for most hormone-producing cell types. We now realize that pulsatile hormone secretion involves a 3D integration of cellular networks. About a dozen genes are known to cause pituitary hypoplasia when mutated due to their essential roles in pituitary development. Similarly, a few genes are known that predispose to familial endocrine neoplasia, and several genes mutated in sporadic pituitary adenomas are documented. In the next decade, we anticipate gleaning a deeper appreciation of these processes at the molecular level, insight into the development of the hypophyseal portal blood system, and evolution of better therapeutics for congenital and acquired hormone deficiencies and for common craniopharyngiomas and pituitary adenomas.

  17. Isolated double adrenocorticotropic hormone-secreting pituitary adenomas: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    PU, JIUJUN; WANG, ZHIMING; ZHOU, HUI; ZHONG, AILING; JIN, KAI; RUAN, LUNLIANG; YANG, GANG

    2016-01-01

    Only a few cases of double or multiple pituitary adenomas have previously been reported in the literature; however, isolated double adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting pituitary adenomas are even more rare. The present study reports a rare case of a 50-year-old female patient who presented with typical clinical features of Cushing's disease and was diagnosed with isolated double ACTH-secreting pituitary adenomas. Endocrinological examination revealed an ACTH-producing pituitary adenoma, and preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a microadenoma with a lower intensity on the right side of the pituitary gland. The patient underwent endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery, which revealed another pituitary tumor in the left side of the pituitary gland. The two, clearly separated, pituitary adenomas identified in the same gland were completely resected. Immunohistochemistry and pathology revealed that the clearly separated double pituitary adenomas were positive for ACTH, thyroid-stimulating, growth and prolactin hormones. Postoperatively, the levels of ACTH and cortisol hormone decreased rapidly. The case reported in the present study is considerably rare, due to the presence of a second pituitary adenoma in the same gland, which was not detected by preoperative MRI scan, but was noticed during surgery. Intraoperative evaluation may be important in the identification of double or multiple pituitary adenomas. PMID:27347184

  18. Isolated double adrenocorticotropic hormone-secreting pituitary adenomas: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Pu, Jiujun; Wang, Zhiming; Zhou, Hui; Zhong, Ailing; Jin, Kai; Ruan, Lunliang; Yang, Gang

    2016-07-01

    Only a few cases of double or multiple pituitary adenomas have previously been reported in the literature; however, isolated double adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting pituitary adenomas are even more rare. The present study reports a rare case of a 50-year-old female patient who presented with typical clinical features of Cushing's disease and was diagnosed with isolated double ACTH-secreting pituitary adenomas. Endocrinological examination revealed an ACTH-producing pituitary adenoma, and preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a microadenoma with a lower intensity on the right side of the pituitary gland. The patient underwent endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery, which revealed another pituitary tumor in the left side of the pituitary gland. The two, clearly separated, pituitary adenomas identified in the same gland were completely resected. Immunohistochemistry and pathology revealed that the clearly separated double pituitary adenomas were positive for ACTH, thyroid-stimulating, growth and prolactin hormones. Postoperatively, the levels of ACTH and cortisol hormone decreased rapidly. The case reported in the present study is considerably rare, due to the presence of a second pituitary adenoma in the same gland, which was not detected by preoperative MRI scan, but was noticed during surgery. Intraoperative evaluation may be important in the identification of double or multiple pituitary adenomas.

  19. Diagnostic Accuracy of Perioperative Measurement of Basal Anterior Pituitary and Target Gland Hormones in Predicting Adrenal Insufficiency After Pituitary Surgery.

    PubMed

    Cerina, Vatroslav; Kruljac, Ivan; Radosevic, Jelena Marinkovic; Kirigin, Lora Stanka; Stipic, Darko; Pecina, Hrvoje Ivan; Vrkljan, Milan

    2016-03-01

    The insulin tolerance test (ITT) is the gold standard for diagnosing adrenal insufficiency (AI) after pituitary surgery. The ITT is unpleasant for patients, requires close medical supervision and is contraindicated in several comorbidities. The aim of this study was to analyze whether tumor size, remission rate, preoperative, and early postoperative baseline hormone concentrations could serve as predictors of AI in order to increase the diagnostic accuracy of morning serum cortisol. This prospective study enrolled 70 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed pituitary adenomas. Thirty-seven patients had nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NPA), 28 had prolactinomas and 5 had somatotropinomas. Thyroxin (T4), thyrotropin (TSH), prolactin, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone, and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I) were measured preoperatively and on the sixth postoperative day. Serum morning cortisol was measured on the third postoperative day (CORT3) as well as the sixth postoperative day (CORT6). Tumor mass was measured preoperatively and remission was assessed 3 months after surgery. An ITT was performed 3 to 6 months postoperatively. Remission was achieved in 48% of patients and AI occurred in 51%. Remission rates and tumor type were not associated with AI. CORT3 had the best predictive value for AI (area under the curve (AUC) 0.868, sensitivity 82.4%, specificity 83.3%). Tumor size, preoperative T4, postoperative T4, and TSH were also associated with AI in a multivariate regression model. A combination of all preoperative and postoperative variables (excluding serum cortisol) had a sensitivity of 75.0% and specificity of 77.8%. The predictive power of CORT3 substantially improved by adding those variables into the model (AUC 0.921, sensitivity 94.1%, specificity 78.3%, PPV 81.9%, NPV of 92.7%). In a subgroup analysis that included only female patients with NPA, LH had exactly the same predictive value as CORT3. The addition

  20. Diagnostic Accuracy of Perioperative Measurement of Basal Anterior Pituitary and Target Gland Hormones in Predicting Adrenal Insufficiency After Pituitary Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cerina, Vatroslav; Kruljac, Ivan; Radosevic, Jelena Marinkovic; Kirigin, Lora Stanka; Stipic, Darko; Pecina, Hrvoje Ivan; Vrkljan, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The insulin tolerance test (ITT) is the gold standard for diagnosing adrenal insufficiency (AI) after pituitary surgery. The ITT is unpleasant for patients, requires close medical supervision and is contraindicated in several comorbidities. The aim of this study was to analyze whether tumor size, remission rate, preoperative, and early postoperative baseline hormone concentrations could serve as predictors of AI in order to increase the diagnostic accuracy of morning serum cortisol. This prospective study enrolled 70 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed pituitary adenomas. Thirty-seven patients had nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NPA), 28 had prolactinomas and 5 had somatotropinomas. Thyroxin (T4), thyrotropin (TSH), prolactin, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone, and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I) were measured preoperatively and on the sixth postoperative day. Serum morning cortisol was measured on the third postoperative day (CORT3) as well as the sixth postoperative day (CORT6). Tumor mass was measured preoperatively and remission was assessed 3 months after surgery. An ITT was performed 3 to 6 months postoperatively. Remission was achieved in 48% of patients and AI occurred in 51%. Remission rates and tumor type were not associated with AI. CORT3 had the best predictive value for AI (area under the curve (AUC) 0.868, sensitivity 82.4%, specificity 83.3%). Tumor size, preoperative T4, postoperative T4, and TSH were also associated with AI in a multivariate regression model. A combination of all preoperative and postoperative variables (excluding serum cortisol) had a sensitivity of 75.0% and specificity of 77.8%. The predictive power of CORT3 substantially improved by adding those variables into the model (AUC 0.921, sensitivity 94.1%, specificity 78.3%, PPV 81.9%, NPV of 92.7%). In a subgroup analysis that included only female patients with NPA, LH had exactly the same predictive value as CORT3. The

  1. STAT3 upregulation in pituitary somatotroph adenomas induces growth hormone hypersecretion.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Cuiqi; Jiao, Yonghui; Wang, Renzhi; Ren, Song-Guang; Wawrowsky, Kolja; Melmed, Shlomo

    2015-04-01

    Pituitary somatotroph adenomas result in dysregulated growth hormone (GH) hypersecretion and acromegaly; however, regulatory mechanisms that promote GH hypersecretion remain elusive. Here, we provide evidence that STAT3 directly induces somatotroph tumor cell GH. Evaluation of pituitary tumors revealed that STAT3 expression was enhanced in human GH-secreting adenomas compared with that in nonsecreting pituitary tumors. Moreover, STAT3 and GH expression were concordant in a somatotroph adenoma tissue array. Promoter and expression analysis in a GH-secreting rat cell line (GH3) revealed that STAT3 specifically binds the Gh promoter and induces transcription. Stable expression of STAT3 in GH3 cells induced expression of endogenous GH, and expression of a constitutively active STAT3 further enhanced GH production. Conversely, expression of dominant-negative STAT3 abrogated GH expression. In primary human somatotroph adenoma-derived cell cultures, STAT3 suppression with the specific inhibitor S3I-201 attenuated GH transcription and reduced GH secretion in the majority of derivative cultures. In addition, S3I-201 attenuated somatotroph tumor growth and GH secretion in a rat xenograft model. GH induced STAT3 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation, indicating a positive feedback loop between STAT3 and GH in somatotroph tumor cells. Together, these results indicate that adenoma GH hypersecretion is the result of STAT3-dependent GH induction, which in turn promotes STAT3 expression, and suggest STAT3 as a potential therapeutic target for pituitary somatotroph adenomas.

  2. Thyroid hormone modulation of the hypothalamic growth hormone (GH)-releasing factor-pituitary GH axis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Miki, N; Ono, M; Hizuka, N; Aoki, T; Demura, H

    1992-01-01

    Both thyroid hormone and hypothalamic growth hormone (GH)-releasing factor (GRF) facilitate pituitary somatotroph function. However, the pathophysiological role of thyroid hormone in GRF secretion is less well understood. Thyrotoxicosis, induced by administration of thyroxine (T4) in rats, inhibited both pituitary GH levels and immunoreactive GRF secretion from incubated hypothalamus. At the highest dose of T4 given for 12 d, GRF secretion and pituitary GH decreased by 50 and 39%, respectively. Hypothyroidism induced by thyroidectomy (Tx) enhanced GRF secretion approximately twofold while depleting pituitary GH by greater than 99%. Both of these hypothalamic and pituitary effects were reversed by replacement of T4 but not human GH for 7 or 14 d. Human GH was as potent as T4 in restoring decreased body weight gains or serum insulin-like growth factor-1 levels in Tx rats. These results indicate that at both physiological and pathological concentrations in serum, thyroid hormone acts as an inhibitory modulator of GRF secretion, probably not involving a feedback mechanism through GH. A biphasic effect of thyroid hormone on pituitary GH levels appears to derive from the difference in primary target tissues of hyper- and hypothyroidism, the hypothalamus and the pituitary, respectively. PMID:1634603

  3. Topographical localization of the receptors for luteinizing hormone- releasing hormone on the surface of dissociated pituitary cells

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    A derivative of the hypothalamic peptide luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) has been coupled to ferritin and the conjugate purified by gel chromatography. In its ability to stimulate the secretion of luteinizing hormone from pituitary cells in vitro, the conjugate has the same potency and specificity as the native peptide. When dissociated pituitary cells maintained in short-term culture are lightly fixed with formaldehyde and then incubated with the conjugate, examination in the electron microscope shows an even distribution of ferritin particles over the free cell surface of the gonadotrophin cells. This binding appears to be specific for the LHRH receptor since it is prevented by a 10-fold excess of native peptide. In addition to the gonadotrophin cells, some somatotrophin and thyrotrophin cells bind conjugate on their free surfaces under similar conditions. If living cells are incubated with the conjugate for 15 min, the bound conjugate becomes aggregated and then concentrated in one localized area of the cell surface. In this area, which lies immediately above the juxtanuclear Golgi complex, the plasma membrane is frequently invaginated in a manner which suggests that the bound, aggregated conjugate is internalized by endocytosis. PMID:233747

  4. Further studies on phosphorylated pituitary somatotropin (growth hormone)

    SciTech Connect

    Kornberg, L.J.; Liberti, J.P.

    1987-05-01

    This laboratory made the original observation that naturally-occurring ovine growth hormone (GH) is phosphorylated and that slices of pituitary glands from male rats synthesize and secrete /sup 32/P-GH. This observation has been extended to explore the generality of this process. After incubation in PO/sub 4/-free Ham's F-10 medium (PFH) or in saline/Hepes (SH) containing 300..mu..Ci /sup 32/Pi/mL, tissue and medium were separated and a cell extract was prepared. GH in the medium and extract was recovered by immunoprecipitation using rat GH antiserum. The samples were electrophoresed under denaturating conditions and processed for autoradiography. /sup 32/P-GH was characterized by the presence of a protein-staining band and radioactive area which migrated the same as authentic GH and /sup 125/I-GH. Slices of glands from male rats incubated for 2h in PFH secreted /sup 32/P-GH. Similar results were found upon incubation of slices from female rats in the presence of SH. Short-term incubations of acutely dispersed pituitary cells obtained from young and old male rats also synthesized and secreted /sup 32/P-GH. Thus, the production of /sup 32/P-GH occurs (a) in simple and complex incubaton media, (b) in slices and cells from glands from older and younger rats and (c) in female as well as male rats. Therefore, phosphorylation of GH appears to be a general phenomenon. The physiological action(s) of phosphorylated GH in growth and development is under study.

  5. Regional differences in the pituitary distribution of luteinizing hormone in the gonadectomized and proestrous female rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous data have shown regional differences in the presence of anterior pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH) that generally correlate with comparable disparities in the distribution of gonadotropes throughout the gland. In female rats, the differences are apparent over the estro...

  6. Effects of retinoic acid on growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor gene expression and growth hormone secretion in rat anterior pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Maliza, Rita; Fujiwara, Ken; Tsukada, Takehiro; Azuma, Morio; Kikuchi, Motoshi; Yashiro, Takashi

    2016-06-30

    Retinoic acid (RA) is an important signaling molecule in embryonic development and adult tissue. The actions of RA are mediated by the nuclear receptors retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and retinoid X receptor (RXR), which regulate gene expression. RAR and RXR are widely expressed in the anterior pituitary gland. RA was reported to stimulate growth hormone (GH) gene expression in the anterior pituitary cells. However, current evidence is unclear on the role of RA in gene expression of growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor (Ghrh-r), growth hormone secretagogue receptor (Ghs-r) and somatostatin receptors (Sst-rs). Using isolated anterior pituitary cells of rats, we examined the effects of RA on gene expression of these receptors and GH release. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA; 10(-6) M) for 24 h increased gene expression levels of Ghrh-r and Ghs-r; however, expressions of Sst-r2 and Sst-r5 were unchanged. Combination treatment with the RAR-agonist Am80 and RXR-agonist PA024 mimicked the effects of ATRA on Ghrh-r and Ghs-r gene expressions. Exposure of isolated pituitary cells to ATRA had no effect on basal GH release. In contrast, ATRA increased growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH)- and ghrelin-stimulated GH release from cultured anterior pituitary cells. Our results suggest that expressions of Ghrh-r and Ghs-r are regulated by RA through the RAR-RXR receptor complex and that RA enhances the effects of GHRH and ghrelin on GH release from the anterior pituitary gland.

  7. High-Cholesterol Diet Disrupts the Levels of Hormones Derived from Anterior Pituitary Basophilic Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, J; Zhang, X; Liu, Z; Yuan, Z; Song, Y; Shao, S; Zhou, X; Yan, H; Guan, Q; Gao, L; Zhang, H; Zhao, J

    2016-03-01

    Emerging evidence shows that elevated cholesterol levels are detrimental to health. However, it is unclear whether there is an association between cholesterol and the pituitary. We investigated the effects of a high-cholesterol diet on pituitary hormones using in vivo animal studies and an epidemiological study. In the animal experiments, rats were fed a high-cholesterol or control diet for 28 weeks. In rats fed the high-cholesterol diet, serum levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH; also known as thyrotrophin), luteinising hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) produced by the basophilic cells of the anterior pituitary were elevated in a time-dependent manner. Among these hormones, TSH was the first to undergo a significant change, whereas adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH), another hormone produced by basophilic cells, was not changed significantly. As the duration of cholesterol feeding increased, cholesterol deposition increased gradually in the pituitary. Histologically, basophilic cells, and especially thyrotrophs and gonadotrophs, showed an obvious increase in cell area, as well as a potential increase in their proportion of total pituitary cells. Expression of the β-subunit of TSH, FSH and LH, which controls hormone specificity and activity, exhibited a corresponding increase. In the epidemiological study, we found a similar elevation of serum TSH, LH and FSH and a decrease in ACTH in patients with hypercholesterolaemia. Significant positive correlations existed between serum total cholesterol and TSH, FSH or LH, even after adjusting for confounding factors. Taken together, the results of the present study suggest that the high-cholesterol diet affected the levels of hormones derived from anterior pituitary basophilic cells. This phenomenon might contribute to the pituitary functional disturbances described in hypercholesterolaemia.

  8. Effect of thyroid hormones on pituitary neuromedin B and possible interaction between thyroid hormones and neuromedin B on thyrotropin secretion.

    PubMed

    Ortiga-Carvalho, T M; Polak, J; McCann, S; Pazos-Moura, C C

    1996-11-14

    Neuromedin B (NB), a bombesin-like peptide, has been recently characterized as a physiological paracrine/autocrine inhibitor of thyrotropin (TSH) secretion. We hypothesized on the basis of our prior experiments that thyroid hormones stimulate pituitary NB secretion which mediates, at least in part, the TSH-suppressive effect of thyroid hormone. Here, we evaluated the time-course of the effect of thyroid hormones administration to eu- and hypothyroid rats on the anterior pituitary content of NB and on serum TSH. As previously reported, the pituitary content of NB increased in hyperthyroidism and decreased in hypothyroidism. Chronic treatment of hypothyroid rats with a physiological dose of thyroxine (0.8 microgram/100 g b.w. s.c, for 3 or 5 days) normalized pituitary NB content, while 5 days of treatment with a pharmacological dose of thriiodothyronine (0.4 microgram/100 g b.w.) induced an increase above that of normal pituitaries. Thyroxine and triiodothyronine injected once, s.c., into hypothyroid rats required 30 min to normalize NB content, which reached higher than normal values in 3-6 h. At these times, the increment in NB preceded or was simultaneous with the suppression of serum TSH. This rapid and marked effect on pituitary neuromedin B content, associated in time with TSH suppression, is in agreement with the hypothesis that neuromedin B may mediate at least in part, the acute suppression of TSH release by thyroid hormone, a hypothesis that still needs further verification.

  9. Role of abnormal anterior pituitary hormones-growth hormone and prolactin in active systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaohua; Xu, Jinhua; Li, Shujuan; Huang, Wen; Li, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Background: The role of anterior pituitary hormones in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) remains controversial. Aims and Objectives: We determined the expression levels of human growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), and their receptors in subjects presenting with SLE, and modulation of disease severity. Materials and methods: Forty-seven subjects and ten healthy controls were assessed for possible association between SLE disease activity and levels of serum PRL, GH and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH). In peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), specific binding and mRNA expression of receptors for GH (GHR), and PRL (PRLR) were determined by receptor-ligand binding assay (RLBA) and RT-PCR. PBMC of recruited subjects were treated with hPRL and rhGH to assess IgG production and antibodies against dsDNA. Results: In active SLE subjects we found elevated PRL and GH levels. Study subject PBMCs displayed augmented GHR and PRLR protein and mRNA expression. Study subjects also showed a positive correlation in serum PRL levels and specific antibodies against dsDNA, SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI), and proteinuria. However, a negative correlation was found between serum PRL levels and complement component C3. We found a positive correlation between specific binding rates of PRLR and GHR and both SLE activity and dsDNA antibody titers. Enhanced IgG and anti-dsDNA secretion was observed in cultured PBMC stimulated by PRL or GH with/without PHA, PWM, IL-2 or IL-10. In active SLE, a close association was found between augmented PRL and GH levels, expression and specific binding activities of PRLR and GHR, and changes in the specific titer of anti-dsDNA. Conclusion: Anterior pituitary hormones play an important role in the pathogenesis of SLE. High levels of growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) play a role in pathogenesis of SLE, which is correlated with SLE disease activity and antibodies against dsDNA. The mechanism of GH and PRL in SLE was complicated and should

  10. Aberrant luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-stimulated adrenocorticotropic hormone secretion in a patient with pituitary hyperplasia due to primary hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Ban, Y; Ban, Y; Taniyama, M; Hara, H; Abe, T; Katagiri, T

    2000-08-01

    We report a patient with primary hypothyroidism associated with an aberrant ACTH response to the LH-RH test. A 40-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital displaying headache, nausea, and numbness on the left side of her face, upper limbs, and tips of her toes. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass-like lesion in the pituitary. A high serum TSH concentration with concomitant low thyroid hormone concentrations resulted in a diagnosis of primary hypothyroidism. To exclude the possibility of a coexisting pituitary tumor including a TSH-secreting tumor, we performed dynamic TSH secretion tests. TRH testing showed an excessive, delayed TSH response, typical of primary hypothyroidism. Serum TSH decreased not only after administration of CRH, octreotide, or L-DOPA, but also after administration of LH-RH. In this case, LH-RH testing induced ACTH secretion. To determine if aberrant ACTH secretion in response to LH-RH loading is a common phenomenon in severe primary hypothyroidism, we performed the LH-RH test on 4 additional patients with pituitary enlargement due to primary hypothyroidism. Two patients demonstrated aberrant ACTH secretion in response to LH-RH loading, but the others did not. To our knowledge, this is the first report of aberrant LH-RH-stimulated ACTH secretion in primary hypothyroidism.

  11. Geometric survey on magnetic resonance imaging of growth hormone producing pituitary adenoma.

    PubMed

    Bakhtiar, Yuriz; Hanaya, Ryosuke; Tokimura, Hiroshi; Hirano, Hirofumi; Oyoshi, Tatsuki; Fujio, Shingo; Bohara, Manoj; Arita, Kazunori

    2014-04-01

    Apart from the radiologic features regarding size and invasiveness, we had noticed some differences in morphology among types of pituitary adenomas. We conducted this study to verify the differences in radiologic morphology between growth hormone producing pituitary adenomas (GHoma) and nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFoma). Pre-surgical magnetic resonance images (MRIs) were assessed in 50 cases of GHoma and 50 cases of NFoma. Geometric parameters on MRI were set in accordance with sellar anatomy. Intensity of T1-weighted image was not different between the two groups, but hypo-intensity of T2-weighted image was more frequently seen in GHoma. Predominant inferior extension of tumor was seen mostly in GHoma (88 vs. 38%). Extension of the tumor to the superior compartment of cavernous sinus was more frequent in NFoma. Pituitary gland was generally located superior to GHoma and postero-superior to NFoma. Growth characteristics of pituitary adenoma were confirmed to differ between GHoma and NFoma.

  12. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone is prerequisite for the constitutive expression of pituitary annexin A5.

    PubMed

    Yonezawa, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Aiko; Kurusu, Shiro; Kawaminami, Mitsumori

    2015-01-01

    Annexin A5 (ANXA5), a member of the structurally related family of annexin proteins, is expressed in pituitary gonadotropes. We previously reported that ANXA5 expression is stimulated by gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). In the present study, we investigated ANXA5 expression in the anterior pituitary gland of GnRH-deficient mutant hypogonadal (hpg) mice. RT-PCR demonstrated that luteinizing hormone β subunit (LHβ) and ANXA5 mRNA levels were both lower in the pituitary gland of hpg mice than in wild-type mice. Immunohistochemistry showed that ANXA5 expression throughout the pituitary gland was very low in hpg mice, suggesting that ANXA5 is diminished in gonadotropes and also in other cell types. Subcutaneous administration of a GnRH analogue, des-gly10 (Pro9)-GnRH ethylamide (1 μg/day for 7 days), augmented the expression of LHβ and ANXA5 in the pituitary gland in hpg mice. However, LHβ- and ANXA5-positive cells did not show exactly matched spatial distributions. These findings suggest that GnRH is necessary for constitutive ANXA5 expression in the pituitary gland, not only in gonadotropes but also in other pituitary gland cell types. A close relationship between ANXA5 and LHβ expression was confirmed. It is suggested that a significant role of ANXA5 in the physiologic secretion of LH.

  13. Transformation of a Microprolactinoma into a Mixed Growth Hormone and Prolactin-Secreting Pituitary Adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Dessimoz, Cédric; Browaeys, Patrick; Maeder, Philippe; Lhermitte, Benoît; Pitteloud, Nelly; Momjian, Shahan; Pralong, François P.

    2012-01-01

    Combined prolactin (PRL) and growth hormone (GH) secretion by a single pituitary tumor can occur in approximately 5% of cases. However, in all previously reported patients, combined secretion of both hormones was present at the time of diagnosis. Here we describe a patient initially diagnosed with a pure prolactin-secreting microadenoma, who experienced the progressive apparition of symptomatic autonomous GH secretion while on intermittent long term dopamine agonist therapy. She was operated on, and immunohistochemical analysis of tumor tissue confirmed the diagnosis of pituitary adenoma with uniform co-staining of all cells for both GH and PRL. This patient represents the first documented occurrence of asynchronous development of combined GH and PRL secretion in a pituitary adenoma. Although pathogenic mechanisms implicated remain largely speculative, it emphasizes the need for long term hormonal follow up of patients harboring prolactinomas. PMID:22654846

  14. Hormones and the bone marrow: panhypopituitarism and pancytopenia in a man with a pituitary adenoma.

    PubMed

    Lang, Dianna; Mead, Jennifer S; Sykes, David B

    2015-05-01

    In rare cases, pancytopenia results from hormonal deficiencies that arise in the setting of panhypopituitarism. Here we describe the unusual case of a 60-year-old man who presented with progressive fatigue and polyuria, and whose laboratory workup revealed a deficiency of the five hormones associated with the action of the anterior pituitary (thyroid hormone, testosterone, cortisol, prolactin, and insulin-like growth factor-1). Imaging of the pituitary demonstrated a cystic mass consistent with a pituitary adenoma replacing much of the normal pituitary tissue. His symptoms and hematologic abnormalities rapidly resolved with prednisone and levothyroxine supplementation. While the majority of reported cases of panhypopituitarism with bone marrow suppression are the result of peripartum sepsis or hemorrhage leading to pituitary gland necrosis (Sheehan's syndrome), it is also important to consider the diagnosis of hypopituitarism in patients with hypothyroidism, low cortisol levels, and pancytopenia. The causal relationship between pancytopenia and panhypopituitarism is not well understood, though it does reinforce the important influence of these endocrine hormones on the health of the bone marrow.

  15. Establishment and characterization of dairy cow growth hormone secreting anterior pituitary cell model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Fa; Fu, Shou-Peng; Li, Su-Nan; Yang, Zhan-Qing; Xue, Wen-Jing; Li, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Wei; Liu, Ju-Xiong

    2014-02-01

    A dairy cow anterior pituitary cell (DCAPC) model was established in vitro for the study of growth hormone (GH) synthesis and secretion in the anterior pituitary gland of the dairy cow. Pituitary glands were obtained from Holstein dairy cows' heads cut by electric saw, and the posterior pituitary glands were removed to obtain integrated anterior pituitary glands. Immunohistochemistry assay of GH in the anterior pituitary glands showed that most somatotrophs were located within the lateral wings of the anterior pituitary. Tissues of the lateral wings of the anterior pituitary were dispersed and cultured in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum. The DCAPCs displayed a monolayer, cobblestone, epithelial-like morphology which are the typical characteristics of the anterior pituitary cells. The DCAPCs were subcultured continuously over ten passages. GH immunoreactivity was present in DCAPCs at passage 10. The transcription of the bovine GH mRNA in DCAPCs at passage 10 was decreased to below 50% compared with the lateral wings of the anterior pituitary tissues. Thus, our DCAPCs model is effective for the in vitro examination of GH synthesis and secretion in the dairy cow anterior pituitary gland. The effects of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) on the expression of GH mRNA in DCAPCs at passage 3 were also investigated. There were no obvious changes in transcription of the GH gene after treatment with TGF-β1 for 24 h, while IFN-γ increased transcription of the GH gene in a dose-dependent manner.

  16. Emergence of an Ancestral Glycoprotein Hormone in the Pituitary of the Sea Lamprey, a Basal Vertebrate.

    PubMed

    Sower, Stacia A; Decatur, Wayne A; Hausken, Krist N; Marquis, Timothy J; Barton, Shannon L; Gargan, James; Freamat, Mihael; Wilmot, Michael; Hollander, Lian; Hall, Jeffrey A; Nozaki, Masumi; Shpilman, Michal; Levavi-Sivan, Berta

    2015-08-01

    The gnathostome (jawed vertebrates) classical pituitary glycoprotein hormones, FSH, LH, and TSH, consist of a common α-subunit (GpA1) and unique β-subunits (Gpβ1, -2, and -3), whereas a recently identified pituitary glycoprotein hormone, thyrostimulin, consists of GpA2 and GpB5. This paper reports the identification, expression, and function of an ancestral, nonclassical, pituitary heterodimeric glycoprotein hormone (GpH) consisting of the thyrostimulin A2 subunit with the classical β-subunit in the sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus, a jawless basal vertebrate. Lamprey (l) GpA2, and lGpHβ were shown to form a heterodimer by coimmunoprecipitation of lGpA2 with FLAG-tagged lGpHβ after the overexpression in transiently transfected COS7 cells using a bipromoter vector. Dual-label fluorescent in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry showed the coexpression of individual subunits in the proximal pars distalis of the pituitary. GnRH-III (1μΜ) significantly increased the expression of lGpHβ and lGpA2 in in vitro pituitary culture. Recombinant lamprey GpH was constructed by tethering the N terminal of lGpA2 to the C terminal of lGpHβ with a linker region composed of six histidine residues followed by three glycine-serine repeats. This recombinant lamprey GpH activated the lamprey glycoprotein hormone receptor I as measured by increased cAMP/luciferase activity. These data are the first to demonstrate a functional, unique glycoprotein heterodimer that is not found in any other vertebrate. These data suggest an intermediate stage of the structure-function of the gonadotropin/thyroid-stimulating hormone in a basal vertebrate, leading to the emergence of the highly specialized gonadotropin hormones and thyroid stimulating hormones in gnathostomes.

  17. Synchronous esthesioneuroblastoma and growth-hormone-secreting pituitary macroadenoma: combined open and endoscopic management.

    PubMed

    Valdes, Costanza J; Tewfik, Marc A; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Di Maio, Salvatore

    2014-12-01

    Background Esthesioneuroblastoma is an uncommon malignant neoplasm that arises from the olfactory neuroepithelium. In this article we report a case of esthesioneuroblastoma presenting concomitantly with a growth-hormone (GH)-secreting pituitary macroadenoma. Results A 52 year old woman underwent surgery for suspected nasal polyps. Intralesional debulking of an intranasal tumor disclosed a low-grade esthesioneuroblastoma. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a large nasal and intracranial tumor, in addition to a separate sellar and suprasellar tumor. The patient was frankly acromegalic. She underwent a first-stage gross total resection of the esthesioneuroblastoma via a combined extended subfrontal and extended endonasal approach, followed by focused radiation therapy. She then returned for endoscopic removal of the GH-secreting pituitary macroadenoma. Conclusion The combined open and endoscopic management of this patient is described and a review of the literature presented. To our knowledge this is the first case of synchronous esthesioneuroblastoma and macroadenoma, in this case GH secreting, described in the literature.

  18. Chicken egg antibodies for immunohistochemical labeling of growth hormone and prolactin in bovine pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, P; Erhard, M H; Schams, D; Hafner, A; Folger, S; Lösch, U

    1993-09-01

    We describe the production of polyclonal chicken antibodies specific for bovine growth hormone (bGH) and prolactin (PRL). Antibodies were generated by immunization of laying hens with recombinant bGH (rbGH), pituitary derived bGH (pbGH), and ovine PRL (oPRL). After the lipoprotein fraction was removed by dextran sulfate precipitation the antibodies were isolated from the egg yolks by ammonium sulfate precipitation. Immunization with rbGH and oPRL generated large amounts of specific antibodies, as revealed by ELISA and Western blot analysis. Antibodies against pbGH showed pronounced crossreactions with oPRL. The antibodies against rbGH and oPRL were well suited for sensitive and specific labeling of the GH- and PRL-synthesizing cells in bovine pituitary glands by immunohistochemistry. In addition, a quick and sensitive procedure for demonstration of both bGH- and PRL-synthesizing cells in a single paraffin section by double immunohistochemistry is presented. The chicken anti-bGH antibodies showed excellent results in combination with rabbit anti-PRL antibodies. The main advantage of avian antibodies in double immunostaining methods is the lack of crossreactions between avian antibodies and mammalian immunoglobulins and receptors which bind to the crystalline fragment of mammalian immunoglobulins (Fc receptors).

  19. Normal pituitary hormone response to thyrotrophin and gonadotrophin releasing hormones in subjects exposed to elemental mercury vapour.

    PubMed Central

    Erfurth, E M; Schütz, A; Nilsson, A; Barregård, L; Skerfving, S

    1990-01-01

    Exposure to elemental mercury (Hg) vapour results in an accumulation of Hg in the pituitary, the thyroid, and the testis. In this study, basal serum concentrations of pituitary hormones (thyrotrophin (TSH), prolactin (PRL), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), and luteinising hormone (LH] or their response after administration of thyrotrophin and gonadotrophin releasing hormones did not differ between 11 male workers (mean urinary Hg (U Hg) concentration 26 nmol/mmol creatinine) and nine male dentists (U Hg concentration 1.3 nmol/mmol creatinine) exposed to elemental Hg vapour when compared with matched referent groups (U Hg concentration 0.6 and 0.4 nmol/mmol creatinine). Thus there was no evidence of an effect of Hg on the pituitary. Neither was there any association between exposure to Hg and serum concentrations of free thyroid hormones (S FT3, S FT4), testosterone, or cortisol. Increased plasma concentrations of selenium (Se) were associated with increased basal serum concentrations of TSH, decreased concentrations of basal serum cortisol, and decreased release of FSH. PMID:2119795

  20. Immediate postoperative radiotherapy in residual nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma: Beneficial effect on local control without additional negative impact on pituitary function and life expectancy

    SciTech Connect

    Bergh, Alfons C.M. van den . E-mail: a.c.m.van.den.bergh@rt.umcg.nl; Berg, Gerrit van den; Schoorl, Michiel A.; Sluiter, Wim J.; Vliet, Anton M. van der; Hoving, Eelco W.; Szabo, Ben G.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R.; Dullaart, Robin P.F.

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the benefit of immediate postoperative radiotherapy in residual nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma (NFA) in perspective to the need for hormonal substitution and life expectancy. Methods and Materials: Retrospective cohort analysis of 122 patients, operated for NFA between 1979 and 1998. Recurrence was defined as regrowth on computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. The occurrence of hormonal deficiencies was defined as the starting date of hormonal substitution therapy. Results: Seventy-six patients had residual NFA after surgery and received immediate postoperative radiotherapy (Group 1); three patients developed a recurrence, resulting in a 95% local control rate at 10 years. Twenty-eight patients had residual NFA after surgery, but were followed by a wait-and-see policy (Group 2). Sixteen developed a recurrence, resulting in a local control rate of 49% at 5 years and 22% at 10 years (p < 0.001 compared with Group 1). There were no differences between Group 1 and 2 regarding the need for substitution with thyroid hormone, glucocorticoids, and sex hormones before first surgery, directly after surgery and at end of follow-up. There were no differences in hormone substitution free survival between Group 1 and Group 2 during the study period after first surgery. Life expectancy was similar in Group 1 and 2, and their median life expectancy did not differ from median life expectancy in the general population. Conclusions: Immediate postoperative radiotherapy provides a marked improvement of local control among patients with residual NFA compared with surgery alone, without an additional deleterious effect on pituitary function and life expectancy.

  1. Pituitary Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... or milk production), sex hormones (control the menstrual cycle and other sexual functions), thyroid gland hormones (control the thyroid gland), adrenal gland hormones, and vasopressin (a hormone involved in water and electrolyte balance). Symptoms of pituitary adenoma and ...

  2. Single-Cell Phenotypic Characterization of Human Pituitary GHomas and Non-Functioning Adenomas Based on Hormone Content and Calcium Responses to Hypothalamic Releasing Hormones.

    PubMed

    Senovilla, Laura; Núñez, Lucía; de Campos, José María; de Luis, Daniel A; Romero, Enrique; García-Sancho, Javier; Villalobos, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Human pituitary tumors are generally benign adenomas causing considerable morbidity due to excess hormone secretion, hypopituitarism, and other tumor mass effects. Pituitary tumors are highly heterogeneous and difficult to type, often containing mixed cell phenotypes. We have used calcium imaging followed by multiple immunocytochemistry to type growth hormone secreting (GHomas) and non-functioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs). Individual cells were typed for stored hormones and calcium responses to classic hypothalamic releasing hormones (HRHs). We found that GHomas contained growth hormone cells either lacking responses to HRHs or responding to all four HRHs. However, most GHoma cells were polyhormonal cells responsive to both thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and GH-releasing hormone. NFPAs were also highly heterogeneous. Some of them contained ACTH cells lacking responses to HRHs or polyhormonal gonadotropes responsive to LHRH and TRH. However, most NFPAs were made of cells storing no hormone and responded only to TRH. These results may provide new insights on the ontogeny of GHomas and NFPAs.

  3. Growth hormone is a cellular senescence target in pituitary and nonpituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Chesnokova, Vera; Zhou, Cuiqi; Ben-Shlomo, Anat; Zonis, Svetlana; Tani, Yuji; Ren, Song-Guang; Melmed, Shlomo

    2013-08-27

    Premature proliferative arrest in benign or early-stage tumors induced by oncoproteins, chromosomal instability, or DNA damage is associated with p53/p21 activation, culminating in either senescence or apoptosis, depending on cell context. Growth hormone (GH) elicits direct peripheral metabolic actions as well as growth effects mediated by insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1). Locally produced peripheral tissue GH, in contrast to circulating pituitary-derived endocrine GH, has been proposed to be both proapoptotic and prooncogenic. Pituitary adenomas expressing and secreting GH are invariably benign and exhibit DNA damage and a senescent phenotype. We therefore tested effects of nutlin-induced p53-mediated senescence in rat and human pituitary cells. We show that DNA damage senescence induced by nutlin triggers the p53/p21 senescent pathway, with subsequent marked induction of intracellular pituitary GH in vitro. In contrast, GH is not induced in cells devoid of p53. Furthermore we show that p53 binds specific GH promoter motifs and enhances GH transcription and secretion in senescent pituitary adenoma cells and also in nonpituitary (human breast and colon) cells. In vivo, treatment with nutlin results in up-regulation of both p53 and GH in the pituitary gland, as well as increased GH expression in nonpituitary tissues (lung and liver). Intracrine GH acts in pituitary cells as an apoptosis switch for p53-mediated senescence, likely protecting the pituitary adenoma from progression to malignancy. Unlike in the pituitary, in nonpituitary cells GH exerts antiapoptotic properties. Thus, the results show that GH is a direct p53 transcriptional target and fulfills criteria as a p53 target gene. Induced GH is a readily measurable cell marker for p53-mediated cellular senescence.

  4. Pulsatility of Hypothalamo-Pituitary Hormones: A Challenge in Quantification

    PubMed Central

    Keenan, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine systems control many of the most fundamental physiological processes, e.g., reproduction, growth, adaptations to stress, and metabolism. Each such system involves the hypothalamus, the pituitary, and a specific target gland or organ. In the quantification of the interactions among these components, biostatistical modeling has played an important role. In the present article, five key challenges to an understanding of the interactions of these systems are illustrated and discussed critically. PMID:26674550

  5. Analysis of the correlation between lipotoxicity and pituitary-thyroid axis hormone levels in men and male rats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jianmei; Zhou, Xiaoming; Zhang, Xu; Hu, Jianting; Gao, Ling; Song, Yongfeng; Yu, Chunxiao; Shao, Shanshan; Yuan, Zhongshang; Sun, Yan; Yan, Huili; Li, Guimei; Zhao, Jiajun

    2016-01-01

    Lipotoxicity seriously harms human health, but it is unclear whether lipotoxicity is detrimental to the pituitary. We investigated the correlation between serum triglyceride and pituitary axis hormone levels in epidemiological and animal studies. In the epidemiological study, serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) levels were greater in male patients with isolated hypertriglyceridemia than in controls, whereas adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) levels were lower in the patients with hypertriglyceridemia. Pituitary hormone levels correlated with triglyceride levels, even after adjustment for potential confounders. In the animal study, male rats were fed a high-fat or control diet for 28 weeks. As the duration of high-fat feeding increased, the serum and pituitary triglyceride concentrations increased. At early times, the high-fat diet elevated serum TSH and triiodothyronine. At later times, much higher serum TSH levels coupled with reduced thyroxine were observed in the high-fat group. Serum levels of pituitary-gonadal and pituitary-adrenal axis hormones were not affected by the diet. The mRNA and protein expression of Tshβ were greater in the high-fat group than in the control group, whereas expression of Fshβ, Lhβ and Acth had no difference between the groups. Overall, serum triglyceride levels were associated with pituitary-thyroid axis hormone levels. PMID:27322428

  6. A mathematical model of pulse-coded hormone signal responses in pituitary gonadotroph cells

    PubMed Central

    Magill, John C.; Ciccone, Nick A.; Kaiser, Ursula B.

    2014-01-01

    Cells in the pituitary that synthesize luteinizing and follicle-stimulating hormones regulate the relative production of these two key reproductive hormones in response to signals from the hypothalamus. These signals are encoded in the frequency of gonadotrophin-releasing-hormone pulses. In vitro experiments with a murine-derived cell line have identified key elements of the processes that decode the signal to regulate transcription of the subunits encoding these hormones. The mathematical model described in this paper is based on the results of those experiments and advances quantitative understanding of the biochemical decoder. The model consists of non-linear differential equations for each of six processes that lead to the synthesis of follicle-stimulating hormone. Simulations of the model exhibit key characteristics found in the experiments, including a preference for follicle-stimulating hormone synthesis at low pulse frequencies and a loss of this characteristic when a mutation is introduced. PMID:24095971

  7. Characterization of pituitary growth hormone and its receptor in the green iguana (Iguana iguana).

    PubMed

    Ávila-Mendoza, José; Carranza, Martha; Pérez-Rueda, Ernesto; Luna, Maricela; Arámburo, Carlos

    2014-07-01

    Pituitary growth hormone (GH) has been studied in most vertebrate groups; however, only a few studies have been carried out in reptiles. Little is known about pituitary hormones in the order Squamata, to which the green iguana (gi) belongs. In this work, we characterized the hypophysis of Iguana iguana morphologically. The somatotrophs (round cells of 7.6-10 μm containing 250- to 300-nm secretory granules where the giGH is stored) were found, by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, exclusively in the caudal lobe of the pars distalis, whereas the lactotrophs were distributed only in the rostral lobe. A pituitary giGH-like protein was obtained by immuno-affinity chromatography employing a heterologous antibody against chicken GH. giGH showed molecular heterogeneity (22, 44, and 88 kDa by SDS-PAGE/Western blot under non-reducing conditions and at least four charge variants (pIs 6.2, 6.5, 6.9, 7.4) by isoelectric focusing. The pituitary giGH cDNA (1016 bp), amplified by PCR and RACE, encodes a pre-hormone of 218 aa, of which 190 aa correspond to the mature protein and 28 aa to the signal peptide. The giGH receptor cDNA was also partially sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses of the amino acid sequences of giGH and giGHR homologs in vertebrates suggest a parallel evolution and functional relationship between the GH and its receptor.

  8. Placental corticotropin-releasing hormone may be a stimulator of maternal pituitary adrenocorticotropic hormone secretion in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, A; Shinkawa, O; Yoshinaga, K

    1989-01-01

    To clarify the physiological role of placental corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), we measured plasma CRH, ACTH, and cortisol throughout pregnancy. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) CRH levels and ACTH responsiveness to synthetic CRH were also quantified in pregnant and nonpregnant women. Maternal plasma CRH levels, which increased progressively during pregnancy, correlated well with both ACTH and cortisol in early labor, delivery, and postpartum samples, and also with cortisol levels in samples before labor. CSF CRH levels in term pregnant women did not differ from those of nonpregnant women. CRH infusion that attained similar plasma CRH levels to those found in late pregnancy elicited significant ACTH release in vivo and regular CRH test provoked normal ACTH response during early pregnancy but no response during late pregnancy. We concluded that: (a) maternal pituitary-adrenal axis correlates well with plasma CRH levels, which are high enough to provoke ACTH release from maternal pituitary; (b) hypothalamic CRH secretion in term pregnant women is not exaggerated; and (c) maternal pituitary is responsive to synthetic CRH in early but not late pregnancy, suggesting that maternal pituitary-adrenal axis is already activated by high circulating CRH. Placental CRH may be an important stimulator of the maternal pituitary-adrenal axis during pregnancy. Images PMID:2556451

  9. Multiple-scale neuroendocrine signals connect brain and pituitary hormone rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Romanò, Nicola; Guillou, Anne; Martin, Agnès O; Mollard, Patrice

    2017-01-01

    Small assemblies of hypothalamic “parvocellular” neurons release their neuroendocrine signals at the median eminence (ME) to control long-lasting pituitary hormone rhythms essential for homeostasis. How such rapid hypothalamic neurotransmission leads to slowly evolving hormonal signals remains unknown. Here, we show that the temporal organization of dopamine (DA) release events in freely behaving animals relies on a set of characteristic features that are adapted to the dynamic dopaminergic control of pituitary prolactin secretion, a key reproductive hormone. First, locally generated DA release signals are organized over more than four orders of magnitude (0.001 Hz–10 Hz). Second, these DA events are finely tuned within and between frequency domains as building blocks that recur over days to weeks. Third, an integration time window is detected across the ME and consists of high-frequency DA discharges that are coordinated within the minutes range. Thus, a hierarchical combination of time-scaled neuroendocrine signals displays local–global integration to connect brain–pituitary rhythms and pace hormone secretion. PMID:28193889

  10. Cloning and identification of a novel thyroid hormone receptor β isoform expressed in the pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Rong-Lan; Sun, Bei; Liu, Ying; Li, Jing-Hua; Xiong, Wei-Li; Liang, Dong-Chun; Guo, Gang; Zuo, Ai-Jun; Zhang, Jing-Yu

    2014-04-01

    We have previously identified a novel Trβ isoform (TrβΔ) in the rat, in which a novel exon N (108 bps) was found between exon 3 and exon 4 of TrβΔ, which represents the only difference between TrβΔ and Trβ1. In this study, we searched for an elongated Trβ2-like subtype with one additional exon N. We successfully isolated the entire mRNA/cDNA of a novel elongated Trβ2 isoform via PCR in the rat pituitary gland. The mRNA/cDNA was only 108 bps (exon N) longer than that Trβ2, and the extension of the sequence was between exon 3 and 4 of Trβ. The whole sequence of this novel Trβ isoform has been published in NCBI GenBank (HM043807.1); it is named TRbeta2Delta (Trβ2Δ). In adult rat pituitary tissue, quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that the mRNA levels of Trβ2Δ and Trβ2 were roughly equal (P > 0.05). We cloned, expressed, and purified the His-Trβ2Δ protein [recombinant TRβ2Δ (rTRβ2Δ)]. SDS-PAGE and western blotting revealed that the molecular weight of rTRβ2Δ was 58.2 kDa. Using a radioligand binding assay and an electrophoretic mobility shift assay, rTRβ2Δ-bound T3 with high affinity and recognized thyroid hormone response element (TRE) binding sites. Finally, in vitro transfection experiments further confirmed that rTRβ2Δ binding T3 significantly promotes the transcription of target genes via the TRE. Here, we have provided evidence suggesting that rTRβ2Δ is a novel functional TR isoform.

  11. The Relationship of Appetitive, Reproductive and Posterior Pituitary Hormones to Alcoholism and Craving in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Kenna, George A.; Swift, Robert M.; Hillemacher, Thomas; Leggio, Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    A significant challenge for understanding alcoholism lies in discovering why some, but not other individuals, become dependent on alcohol. Genetic, environmental, cultural, developmental, and neurobiological influences are recognized as essential factors underlying a person's risk for becoming alcohol dependent (AD); however, the neurobiological processes that trigger this vulnerability are still poorly understood. Hormones are important in the regulation of many functions and several hormones are strongly associated with alcohol use. While medical consequences are important, the primary focus of this review is on the underlying confluence of appetitive/feeding, reproductive and posterior pituitary hormones associated with distinct phases of alcoholism or assessed by alcohol craving in humans. While these hormones are of diverse origin, the involvement with alcoholism by these hormone systems is unmistakable, and demonstrates the complexity of interactions with alcohol and the difficulty of successfully pursuing effective treatments. Whether alcohol associated changes in the activity of certain hormones are the result of alcohol use or are the result of an underlying predisposition for alcoholism, or a combination of both, is currently of great scientific interest. The evidence we present in this review suggests that appetitive hormones may be markers as they appear involved in alcohol dependence and craving, that reproductive hormones provide an example of the consequences of drinking and are affected by alcohol, and that posterior pituitary hormones have potential for being targets for treatment. A better understanding of the nature of these associations may contribute to diagnosing and more comprehensively treating alcoholism. Pharmacotherapies that take advantage of our new understanding of hormones, their receptors, or their potential relationship to craving may shed light on the treatment of this disorder. PMID:22772772

  12. The relationship of appetitive, reproductive and posterior pituitary hormones to alcoholism and craving in humans.

    PubMed

    Kenna, George A; Swift, Robert M; Hillemacher, Thomas; Leggio, Lorenzo

    2012-09-01

    A significant challenge for understanding alcoholism lies in discovering why some, but not other individuals, become dependent on alcohol. Genetic, environmental, cultural, developmental, and neurobiological influences are recognized as essential factors underlying a person's risk for becoming alcohol dependent (AD); however, the neurobiological processes that trigger this vulnerability are still poorly understood. Hormones are important in the regulation of many functions and several hormones are strongly associated with alcohol use. While medical consequences are important, the primary focus of this review is on the underlying confluence of appetitive/feeding, reproductive and posterior pituitary hormones associated with distinct phases of alcoholism or assessed by alcohol craving in humans. While these hormones are of diverse origin, the involvement with alcoholism by these hormone systems is unmistakable, and demonstrates the complexity of interactions with alcohol and the difficulty of successfully pursuing effective treatments. Whether alcohol associated changes in the activity of certain hormones are the result of alcohol use or are the result of an underlying predisposition for alcoholism, or a combination of both, is currently of great scientific interest. The evidence we present in this review suggests that appetitive hormones may be markers as they appear involved in alcohol dependence and craving, that reproductive hormones provide an example of the consequences of drinking and are affected by alcohol, and that posterior pituitary hormones have potential for being targets for treatment. A better understanding of the nature of these associations may contribute to diagnosing and more comprehensively treating alcoholism. Pharmacotherapies that take advantage of our new understanding of hormones, their receptors, or their potential relationship to craving may shed light on the treatment of this disorder.

  13. Molecular mechanisms of regulation of growth hormone gene expression in cultured rat pituitary cells by thyroid and glucocorticoid hormones

    SciTech Connect

    Yaffe, B.M.

    1989-01-01

    In cultured GC cells, a rat pituitary tumor cell line, growth hormone (GH) is induced in a synergistic fashion by physiologic concentrations of thyroid and glucocorticoid hormones. Abundant evidence indicates that these hormones mediate this response via their specific receptors. The purpose of this thesis is to explore the mechanisms by which these hormones affect GH production. When poly (A){sup +} RNA was isolated from cells grown both with and without hormones and translated in a cell-free wheat germ system, the preGH translation products were shown to be proportional to immunoassayable GH production under all combinations of hormonal milieux, indicating that changes in GH production is modulated at a pretranslational level. A cDNA library was constructed from poly (A){sup +}RNA and one clone containing GH cDNA sequences was isolated. This was used to confirm the above results by Northern dot blot analysis. This probe was also used to assess hormonal effects on GH mRNA half-life and synthetic rates as well as GH gene transcription rates in isolated nuclei. Using a pulse-chase protocol in which cellular RNA was labeled in vivo with ({sup 3}H)uridine, and quantitating ({sup 3}H)GHmRNA directly by hybridization to GH cDNA bound to nitrocellulose filters, GHmRNA was found to have a half-life of approximately 50 hours, and was not significantly altered by the presence of inducing hormones.

  14. Growth hormone deficiency and pituitary malformation in a recurrent Cat-Eye syndrome: a family report.

    PubMed

    Jedraszak, Guillaume; Braun, Karine; Receveur, Aline; Decamp, Matthieu; Andrieux, Joris; Rabbind Singh, Amrathlal; Copin, Henri; Bremond-Gignac, Dominique; Mathieu, Michèle; Rochette, Jacques; Morin, Gilles

    2015-10-01

    Growth hormone deficiency affects roughly between one in 3000 and one in 4000 children with most instances of growth hormone deficiency being idiopathic. Growth hormone deficiency can also be associated with genetic diseases or chromosome abnormalities. Association of growth hormone deficiency together with hypothalamic-pituitary axis malformation and Cat-Eye syndrome is a very rare condition. We report a family with two brothers presenting with growth delay due to a growth hormone deficiency associated with a polymalformation syndrome. They both displayed pre-auricular pits and tags, imperforate anus and Duane retraction syndrome. Both parents and a third unaffected son displayed normal growth pattern. Cerebral MRI showed a hypothalamic-pituitary axis malformation in the two affected brothers. Cytogenetic studies revealed a type I small supernumerary marker chromosome derived from chromosome 22 resulting in a tetrasomy 22pter-22q11.21 characteristic of the Cat-Eye syndrome. The small supernumerary marker chromosome was present in the two affected sons and the mother in a mosaic state. Patients with short stature due to growth hormone deficiency should be evaluated for chromosomal abnormality. Family study should not be underestimated.

  15. Learning and Behavior (I): Effects of Pituitary Hormones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marx, Jean L.

    1975-01-01

    Describes research which indicates that a number of peptide hormones act directly on the brain to affect learning and behavior. Investigations are currently being conducted to determine if these substances can be used to treat learning disorders or to improve the memories of normal people. (MLH)

  16. Corticotropin-releasing hormone links pituitary adrenocorticotropin gene expression and release during adrenal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Muglia, L J; Jacobson, L; Luedke, C; Vogt, S K; Schaefer, M L; Dikkes, P; Fukuda, S; Sakai, Y; Suda, T; Majzoub, J A

    2000-05-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH)-deficient (KO) mice provide a unique system to define the role of CRH in regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Despite several manifestations of chronic glucocorticoid insufficiency, basal pituitary proopiomelanocortin (POMC) mRNA, adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) peptide content within the pituitary, and plasma ACTH concentrations are not elevated in CRH KO mice. The normal POMC mRNA content in KO mice is dependent upon residual glucocorticoid secretion, as it increases in both KO and WT mice after adrenalectomy; this increase is reversed by glucocorticoid, but not aldosterone, replacement. However, the normal plasma levels of ACTH in CRH KO mice are not dependent upon residual glucocorticoid secretion, because, after adrenalectomy, these levels do not undergo the normal increase seen in KO mice despite the increase in POMC mRNA content. Administration of CRH restores ACTH secretion to its expected high level in adrenalectomized CRH KO mice. Thus, in adrenal insufficiency, loss of glucocorticoid feedback by itself can increase POMC gene expression in the pituitary; but CRH action is essential for this to result in increased secretion of ACTH. This may explain why, after withdrawal of chronic glucocorticoid treatment, reactivation of CRH secretion is a necessary prerequisite for recovery from suppression of the HPA axis.

  17. Pituitary response to thyrotropin releasing hormone in children with overweight and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Rijks, Jesse; Penders, Bas; Dorenbos, Elke; Straetemans, Saartje; Gerver, Willem-Jan; Vreugdenhil, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) concentrations in the high normal range are common in children with overweight and obesity, and associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk. Prior studies aiming at unravelling the mechanisms underlying these high TSH concentrations mainly focused on factors promoting thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) production as a cause for high TSH concentrations. However, it is unknown whether TSH release of the pituitary in response to TRH is affected in children with overweight and obesity. Here we describe TSH release of the pituitary in response to exogenous TRH in 73 euthyroid children (39% males) with overweight or (morbid) obesity. Baseline TSH concentrations (0.9–5.5 mU/L) were not associated with BMI z score, whereas these concentrations were positively associated with TSH concentrations 20 minutes after TRH administration (r2 = 0.484, p < 0.001) and the TSH incremental area under the curve during the TRH stimulation test (r2 = 0.307, p < 0.001). These results suggest that pituitary TSH release in response to TRH stimulation might be an important factor contributing to high normal serum TSH concentrations, which is a regular finding in children with overweight and obesity. The clinical significance and the intermediate factors contributing to pituitary TSH release need to be elucidated in future studies. PMID:27485208

  18. Pituitary transcription factor Prop-1 stimulates porcine follicle-stimulating hormone beta subunit gene expression.

    PubMed

    Aikawa, Satoko; Kato, Takako; Susa, Takao; Tomizawa, Kyoko; Ogawa, Satoshi; Kato, Yukio

    2004-11-12

    Molecular cloning of the transcription factor that modulates the expression of porcine follicle-stimulating hormone beta subunit (FSHbeta) gene was performed by the yeast one-hybrid cloning system using the -852/-746 upstream region (Fd2) as a bait sequence. We eventually cloned a pituitary transcription factor, Prop-1, which has been identified as an upstream transcription factor of Pit-1 gene. Binding ability of Prop-1 to the bait sequence was confirmed using recombinant Prop-1, and the binding property was investigated by DNase I footprinting, revealing that Prop-1 certainly bound to the large AT-rich region throughout the Fd2. Co-transfection of Prop-1 expression vector together with a reporter gene fused with Fd2 in CHO cells demonstrated an attractive stimulation of reporter gene expression. Immunohistochemistry of adult porcine pituitary confirmed the colocalization of the Prop-1 and FSHbeta subunit. This study is the first to report that Prop-1 participates in the regulation of FSHbeta gene. The present finding will provide new insights into the development of pituitary cell lineage and combined pituitary hormone deficiency (CPHD), since why the defect of Prop-1 causes CPHD including gonadotropins (FSH and LH) has yet to be clarified.

  19. Skeletal muscle afferent regulation of bioassayable growth hormone in the rat pituitary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosselink, K. L.; Grindeland, R. E.; Roy, R. R.; Zhong, H.; Bigbee, A. J.; Grossman, E. J.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1998-01-01

    There are forms of growth hormone (GH) in the plasma and pituitary of the rat and in the plasma of humans that are undetected by presently available immunoassays (iGH) but can be measured by bioassay (bGH). Although the regulation of iGH release is well documented, the mechanism(s) of bGH release is unclear. On the basis of changes in bGH and iGH secretion in rats that had been exposed to microgravity conditions, we hypothesized that neural afferents play a role in regulating the release of these hormones. To examine whether bGH secretion can be modulated by afferent input from skeletal muscle, the proximal or distal ends of severed hindlimb fast muscle nerves were stimulated ( approximately 2 times threshold) in anesthetized rats. Plasma bGH increased approximately 250%, and pituitary bGH decreased approximately 60% after proximal nerve trunk stimulation. The bGH response was independent of muscle mass or whether the muscles were flexors or extensors. Distal nerve stimulation had little or no effect on plasma or pituitary bGH. Plasma iGH concentrations were unchanged after proximal nerve stimulation. Although there may be multiple regulatory mechanisms of bGH, the present results demonstrate that the activation of low-threshold afferents from fast skeletal muscles can play a regulatory role in the release of bGH, but not iGH, from the pituitary in anesthetized rats.

  20. Ghrelin receptor expression and colocalization with anterior pituitary hormones using a GHSR-GFP mouse line.

    PubMed

    Reichenbach, Alex; Steyn, Frederik J; Sleeman, Mark W; Andrews, Zane B

    2012-11-01

    Ghrelin is the endogenous ligand for the GH secretagogue receptor (GHSR) and robustly stimulates GH release from the anterior pituitary gland. Ghrelin also regulates the secretion of anterior pituitary hormones including TSH, LH, prolactin (PRL), and ACTH. However, the relative contribution of a direct action at the GHSR in the anterior pituitary gland vs. an indirect action at the GHSR in the hypothalamus remains undefined. We used a novel GHSR-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) reporter mouse to quantify GHSR coexpression with GH, TSH, LH, PRL, and ACTH anterior pituitary cells in males vs. females and in chow-fed or calorie-restricted (CR) mice. GHSR-eGFP-expressing cells were only observed in anterior pituitary. The number of GHSR-eGFP-expressing cells was higher in male compared with females, and CR did not affect the GHSR-eGFP cell number. Double staining revealed 77% of somatotrophs expressed GHSR-eGFP in both males and females. Nineteen percent and 12.6% of corticotrophs, 21% and 9% of lactotrophs, 18% and 19% of gonadotrophs, and 3% and 9% of males and females, respectively, expressed GHSR-eGFP. CR increased the number of TSH cells, but suppressed the number of lactotrophs and gonadotrophs, expressing GHSR-eGFP compared with controls. These studies support a robust stimulatory action of ghrelin via the GHSR on GH secretion and identify a previously unknown sexual dimorphism in the GHSR expression in the anterior pituitary. CR affects GHSR-eGFP expression on lactotrophs, gonadotrophs, and thyrotrophs, which may mediate reproductive function and energy metabolism during periods of negative energy balance. The low to moderate expression of GHSR-eGFP suggests that ghrelin plays a minor direct role on remaining anterior pituitary cells.

  1. Synthesis and secretion of phosphorylated growth hormone by rat pituitary glands in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Liberti, J.P.; Joshi, G.S.

    1986-06-13

    Rat anterior pituitary glands were incubated in buffered medium, pH 7.4, containing /sup 32/Pi. After incubation the tissue and medium were separated and a post-mitochondrial supernate (PMS) of the tissue homogenate was prepared. Gel filtration of the PMS and medium resulted in a radioactive peak which coincided with the elution volume of authentic rat growth hormone (rGH). Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the radioactive peak under denaturing condition resulted in a protein-staining band having the same mobility as authentic rGH. Autoradiography of the gels revealed radioactivity precisely at the position of growth hormone as well as elsewhere. The specific radioactivity of the PMS (/sup 32/P)GH was estimated to be 5 to 10 times greater than that of tissue (/sup 32/P)GH. These results indicate that phosphorylated GH is synthesized and secreted by pituitary glands in vitro.

  2. Effects of forced swimming stress on thyroid function, pituitary thyroid-stimulating hormone and hypothalamus thyrotropin releasing hormone expression in adrenalectomy Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qiuyan; Liu, Aihua; Ma, Yanan; Wang, Anyi; Guo, Xinhong; Teng, Weiping; Jiang, Yaqiu

    2016-01-01

    In order to study the impact that is imposed on the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis of adrenalectomy male Wistar rats by stress caused by swimming, the blood level of triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), the expression of TSHβ mRNA at the pituitary and thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) expression at the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) were measured. A total of 50 male Wistar rats of 6–8 weeks of age and with an average weight of 190–210 grams were randomly divided into the following two groups: The surgical (without adrenal glands) and non-surgical (adrenalectomy) group. These two groups were then divided into the following five groups, according to the time delay of sacrifice following forced swim (10 min, 2 h, 12 h and 24 h) and control (not subjected to swimming) groups. A bilateral adrenalectomy animal model was established. Serum TSH in the blood was measurement by chemiluminescent immunoassay, and cerebrum tissue were excised for the measurement of TRH expression using an immunohistochemistry assay. In addition, pituitaries were excised for the extraction of total RNA. Finally, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed for quantitation of TSHβ. Following swimming, the serum T3, T4 and TSH, the TSHβ mRNA expression levels in the pituitary and the TRH expression in the PVN of the surgical group were gradually increased. In the non-surgical group, no significant differences were observed in the serum T3, T4 and TSH levels compared with the control group. The TSHβ mRNA expression at the pituitary showed a similar result. Furthermore, the TRH expression at PVN was gradually increased and stress from swimming could increase the blood T4, T3 and TSH levels, TSHβ mRNA expression at the pituitary and TRH expression at the PVN in adrenalectomy Wistar rats. Moreover, the index in the surgical group changed significantly compared with the non-surgical group. In conclusion, the

  3. Fluoride Exposure, Follicle Stimulating Hormone Receptor Gene Polymorphism and Hypothalamus-pituitary-ovarian Axis Hormones in Chinese Women.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming Xu; Zhou, Guo Yu; Zhu, Jing Yuan; Gong, Biao; Hou, Jia Xiang; Zhou, Tong; Duan, Li Ju; Ding, Zhong; Cui, Liu Xin; Ba, Yue

    2015-09-01

    The effects of fluoride exposure on the functions of reproductive and endocrine systems have attracted widespread attention in academic circle nowadays. However, it is unclear whether the gene-environment interaction may modify the secretion and activity of hypothalamus-pituitary- ovarian (HPO) axis hormones. Thus, the aim of this study was to explore the influence of fluoride exposure and follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) gene polymorphism on reproductive hormones in Chinese women. A cross sectional study was conducted in seven villages of Henan Province, China during 2010-2011. A total of 679 women aged 18-48 years were recruited through cluster sampling and divided into three groups, i.e. endemic fluorosis group (EFG), defluoridation project group (DFPG), and control group (CG) based on the local fluoride concentration in drinking water. The serum levels of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and estradiol (E2) were determined respectively and the FSHR polymorphism was detected by real time PCR assay. The results provided the preliminary evidence indicating the gene-environment interaction on HPO axis hormones in women.

  4. Effect of single-dose radiation on cell survival and growth hormone secretion by rat anterior pituitary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hochberg, Z.; Kuten, A.; Hertz, P.; Tatcher, M.; Kedar, A.; Benderly, A.

    1983-06-01

    Cranial irradiation has been shown to impair growth hormone secretion in children. In this study a cell culture of dispersed rat anterior pituitary cells was exposed to single doses of radiation in the range of 100 to 1500 rad. Survival curves were obtained for the different anterior pituitary cell lines, and growth hormone secretion was measured in the tissue culture medium. Both survival and growth hormone secretion curves showed an initial shoulder in the range of 0 to 300 rad, followed by a decline between 300 to 750 rad. It is concluded that growth hormone secreting acidophilic pituicytes are sensitive to radiation at single doses greater than 300 rad.

  5. Thyroid-stimulating hormone-secreting ectopic pituitary adenoma of the nasopharynx.

    PubMed

    Nishiike, Suetaka; Tatsumi, Ke-ita; Shikina, Takashi; Masumura, Chisako; Inohara, Hidenori

    2014-12-01

    Thyroid-stimulating hormone-secreting ectopic pituitary adenoma of the nasopharynx is highly unusual, with only three reported cases in the world literature. We describe the clinical presentation and radiologic findings in one patient with such rare lesions. A 46-year-old male with typical symptoms of Grave's disease was found to have a mass on magnetic resonance imaging. An otolaryngologic examination revealed a nasopharyngeal mass lesion, which was endoscopically resected. The results of immunohistochemical staining for thyroid-stimulating hormone were positive. After the resection, the patient's TSH was within normal limits. The clinical significance of the case and a brief literature review are presented.

  6. Laboratory diagnosis of multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies: issues with testing of the growth and thyroid axes.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Jon

    2009-01-01

    Clinical manifestations of hypopituitarism are variable and depend on the severity of hormone deficiency, creating a diagnostic challenge for diagnosis of the non-classical patient who may have a less severe growth hormone (GH) deficiency and only a suggestion of possible hypothyroidism. Laboratory tests contribute to the diagnostic process, but the tests for growth and thyroid dysfunction, two of the most common manifestations of multiple pituitary hormone deficiency, are some of the most problematic from a methodological perspective. Patients in the "grey zone" of diagnosis, for whom there is no distinct dividing line or gold standard diagnostic test, are the focus of this article. Issues relating to the use of laboratory tests involving GH, insulin-like growth factor-I, and free thyroxine in the diagnosis of GH and thyroid deficiency are reviewed. Assay harmonization initiatives are required before clinical research studies are performed to establish diagnostic thresholds for GH and thyroid hormone deficiencies.

  7. Pituitary-gonadal hormones during prolonged residency in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawhney, R. C.; Malhotra, A. S.; Prasad, Rajendra; Pal, Karan; Kumar, Rajesh; Bajaj, A. C.

    Plasma luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), prolactin (PRL) and testosterone levels were measured in nine eugonadal men in New Delhi and during the 1st week of different months of their stay at Dakshin Gangotri in Antarctica. During their 12-month stay in Antarctica, they were exposed to a severely cold climate, long polar nights and polar days, high wind velocity, increased amounts of solar and ultraviolet radiation and geomagnetism, as well as physical and social isolation. Plasma testosterone tended to increase in March, but a significant increase (P<0.05) was not seen until April. The mean testosterone levels in May, June, September and November were also significantly higher than the March or New Delhi values. The absolute values of LH, FSH and PRL did not show any month-to-month changes in Antarctica. However, when the hormone levels were expressed as a percentage of the individual annual Antarctic mean, significant differences as a percentage of the individual annual Antarctic mean, significant differences were observed. The testosterone peak in April, May and June was associated with an increase in LH. The nadirs of testosterone, LH, FSH and PRL were seen in either July or August. FSH showed the highest values in March, whereas the highest PRL values were seen in November. These observations suggest the presence of circannual variations in gonadotropin, PRL and LH in Antarctica which are independent of polar days and polar nights. It appears that factors other than the duration of daylight might be involved in regulating these changes. The significance of maintenance of testosterone levels in the supra-physiological range in Antarctica remains unknown but may be important in acclimatization/habituation to the extreme polar cold by increasing basal metabolic rate, protein synthesis and erythropoiesis.

  8. Pituitary-gonadal hormones during prolonged residency in Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Sawhney, R C; Malhotra, A S; Prasad, R; Pal, K; Kumar, R; Bajaj, A C

    1998-08-01

    Plasma luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), prolactin (PRL) and testosterone levels were measured in nine eugonadal men in New Delhi and during the 1st week of different months of their stay at Dakshin Gangotri in Antarctica. During their 12-month stay in Antarctica, they were exposed to a severely cold climate, long polar nights and polar days, high wind velocity, increased amounts of solar and ultraviolet radiation and geomagnetism, as well as physical and social isolation. Plasma testosterone tended to increase in March, but a significant increase (P < 0.05) was not seen until April. The mean testosterone levels in May, June, September and November were also significantly higher than the March or New Delhi values. The absolute values of LH, FSH and PRL did not show any month-to-month changes in Antarctica. However, when the hormone levels were expressed as a percentage of the individual annual Antarctic mean, significant differences as a percentage of the individual annual Antarctic mean, significant differences were observed. The testosterone peak in April, May and June was associated with an increase in LH. The nadirs of testosterone, LH, FSH and PRL were seen in either July or August. FSH showed the highest values in March, whereas the highest PRL values were seen in November. These observations suggest the presence of circannual variations in gonadotropin, PRL and LH in Antarctica which are independent of polar days and polar nights. It appears that factors other than the duration of daylight might be involved in regulating these changes. The significance of maintenance of testosterone levels in the supra-physiological range in Antarctica remains unknown but may be important in acclimatization/habituation to the extreme polar cold by increasing basal metabolic rate, protein synthesis and erythropoiesis.

  9. Human and murine pituitary expression of leukemia inhibitory factor. Novel intrapituitary regulation of adrenocorticotropin hormone synthesis and secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Akita, S; Webster, J; Ren, S G; Takino, H; Said, J; Zand, O; Melmed, S

    1995-01-01

    Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) gene expression was detected in human fetal pituitary tissue by expression of LIF mRNA transcripts, protein immunocytochemistry, and immunoelectron microscopy. Fetal LIF immunoreactivity colocalized with 30% of ACTH-expressing cells, approximately 20% of somatotrophs, and approximately 15% of non-hormone-expressing cells. LIF was also strongly expressed in normal adult pituitary and in four growth hormone-producing and two ACTH-producing adenomas, but not in eight nonfunctioning pituitary tumors. Culture of fetal cells expressing surface LIF-binding sites demonstrated predominance of in vitro ACTH secretion as compared with other pituitary hormones. In AtT-20 murine cells, LIF (ED50 10 pM) stimulated basal proopiomelanocortin mRNA levels by 40% and corticotropin-releasing hormone-induced ACTH secretion (two- to threefold), as did oncostatin M (ED50 30 pM), a related peptide. ACTH responses were not further enhanced by both cytokines together, which is consistent with their shared receptor. Anti-LIF antiserum neutralized basal and LIF-induced ACTH secretion, suggesting autocrine regulation of ACTH by LIF. The results show that human pituitary cells express the LIF gene and LIF-binding sites, predominantly in corticotrophs. Pituitary LIF expression and LIF regulation of proopiomelanocortin and ACTH reflect an intrapituitary role for LIF in modulating early embryonic determination of specific human pituitary cells and as a paracrine or autocrine regulator of mature ACTH. Images PMID:7883977

  10. Seasonal effect of gonadotrophin inhibitory hormone on gonadotrophin-releasing hormone-induced gonadotroph functions in the goldfish pituitary.

    PubMed

    Moussavi, M; Wlasichuk, M; Chang, J P; Habibi, H R

    2013-05-01

    We have shown that native goldfish gonadotrophin inhibitory hormone (gGnIH) differentially regulates luteinsing hormone (LH)-β and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)-β expression. To further understand the functions of gGnIH, we examined its interactions with two native goldfish gonadotrophin-releasing hormones, salmon gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (sGnRH) and chicken (c)GnRH-II in vivo and in vitro. Intraperitoneal injections of gGnIH alone reduced serum LH levels in fish in early and mid gonadal recrudescence; this inhibition was also seen in fish co-injected with either sGnRH or cGnRH-II during early recrudescence. Injection of gGnIH alone elevated pituitary LH-β and FSH-β mRNA levels at early and mid recrudescence, and FSH-β mRNA at late recrudescence. Co-injection of gGnIH attenuated the stimulatory influences of sGnRH on LH-β in early recrudescence, and LH-β and FSH-β mRNA levels in mid and late recrudescence, as well as the cGnRH-II-elicited increase in LH-β, but not FSH-β, mRNA expression at mid and late recrudescence. sGnRH and cGnRH-II injection increased pituitary gGnIH-R mRNA expression in mid and late recrudescence but gGnIH reduced gGnIH-R mRNA levels in late recrudescence. gGnIH did not affect basal LH release from perifused pituitary cells and continual exposure to gGnIH did not alter the LH responses to acute applications of GnRH. However, a short 5-min GnIH treatment in the middle of a 60-min GnRH perifusion selectively reduced the cGnRH-II-induced release of LH. These novel results indicate that, in goldfish, gGnIH and GnRH modulate pituitary GnIH-R expression and gGnIH differentially affects sGnRH and cGnRH-II regulation of LH secretion and gonadotrophin subunit mRNA levels. Furthermore, these actions are manifested in a reproductive stage-dependent manner.

  11. Plurihormonal pituitary adenoma with concomitant adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and growth hormone (GH) secretion: a report of two cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Rasul, Fahid Tariq; Jaunmuktane, Zane; Khan, Akbar Ali; Phadke, Rahul; Powell, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Plurihormonal pituitary adenomas are tumours that show immunoreactivity for more than one hormone that cannot be explained by normal adenohypophysial cytodifferentiation. The most common combinations in these adenomas include growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL) and one or more glycoprotein hormone sub-units (β-TSH, β-FSH, β-LH and αSU). The authors report two cases of a plurihormonal pituitary adenoma expressing the rare combination of ACTH and GH. They both underwent successful transphenoidal hypophysectomy (TSH). Long-term post-operative follow-up revealed no evidence of tumour recurrence. Due to the multiple secretions and plurihormonal characteristics clinical diagnosis of composite pituitary adenomas can be difficult. The authors discuss the diagnosis and management of composite pituitary adenomas and review the literature regarding this rare phenomenon.

  12. Aberrant alternative splicing of thyroid hormone receptor in a TSH-secreting pituitary tumor is a mechanism for hormone resistance.

    PubMed

    Ando, S; Sarlis, N J; Krishnan, J; Feng, X; Refetoff, S; Zhang, M Q; Oldfield, E H; Yen, P M

    2001-09-01

    Patients with TSH-secreting pituitary tumors (TSHomas) have high serum TSH levels despite elevated thyroid hormone levels. The mechanism for this defect in the negative regulation of TSH secretion is not known. We performed RT-PCR to detect mutations in TRbeta from a surgically resected TSHoma. Analyses of the RT-PCR products revealed a 135-bp deletion within the sixth exon that encodes the ligand-binding domain of TRbeta2. This deletion was caused by alternative splicing of TRbeta2 mRNA, as near-consensus splice sequences were found at the junction site and no deletion or mutations were detected in the tumoral genomic DNA. This TRbeta variant (TRbeta2spl) lacked thyroid hormone binding and had impaired T3-dependent negative regulation of both TSHbeta and glycoprotein hormone alpha-subunit genes in cotransfection studies. Furthermore, TRbeta2spl showed dominant negative activity against the wild-type TRbeta2. These findings strongly suggest that aberrant alternative splicing of TRbeta2 mRNA generated an abnormal TR protein that accounted for the defective negative regulation of TSH in the TSHoma. This is the first example of aberrant alternative splicing of a nuclear hormone receptor causing hormonal dysregulation. This novel posttranscriptional mechanism for generating abnormal receptors may occur in other hormone-resistant states or tumors in which no receptor mutation is detected in genomic DNA.

  13. Thyroid-pituitary interaction: Feedback regulation of thyrotropin secretion by thyroid hormones

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, P.R.; Bleich, H.L.; Moore, M.J.

    1982-01-07

    Thyroid-hormone regulation of TSH production involves a response to plasma concentrations of T4 and T3. A substantial fraction of intracellular T3 in the pituitary derives from the conversion of T4 to T3, and recent studies indicate that this process is physiologically regulated. Changes in pituitary conversion of T4 to T3 are often the opposite of those that occur in the liver and kidney under similar circumstances. The presence of this pathway for T3 production indicates that the pituitary can respond independently to changes in plasma levels of T4 and T3; in contrast, many tissues appear to be sensitive mainly to the plasma T3 concentration. Recent studies suggest that conversion of T4 to T3 in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum is also important in providing intracellular T3 to these particular tissues. Given these results, it is not suprising that a complete definition of thyroid status requires more than the measurement of the serum concentrations of thyroid hormones. For some tissues, among them the brain and pituitary, the intracellular T3 concentrations may only partly reflect those in the serum. Recognition that the intracellular T3 concentration in each tissue may be subject to local regulation and an understanding of the importance of this process to the regulation of TSH production shoul permit a better appreciation of the limitations of radioimmunoassay serum thyroid hormone and TSH levels. These concepts also provide a physiologic rationale for the use of thyroxine for replacement in hypothyroid patients or for TSH suppression.

  14. The hypothalamic-pituitary response in SLE. Regulation of prolactin, growth hormone and cortisol release.

    PubMed

    Rovenský, J; Blazícková, S; Rauová, L; Jezová, D; Koska, J; Lukác, J; Vigas, M

    1998-01-01

    It has been suggested that neuroendocrine regulation plays an important role in the pathogenesis and activation of autoimmune diseases. The aim of this investigation was to clarify the hypothalamic-pituitary response to a well-defined stimulus under standardised conditions in patients with SLE. Plasma concentrations of prolactin (PRL), growth hormone (GH) and cortisol were determined in venous blood drawn through an indwelling cannula during insulin-induced hypoglycaemia (0.1 U/kg b.w., i.v.) in ten patients and in 12 age-, gender- and weight-matched healthy subjects. Basal PRL concentrations were higher in patients vs healthy controls (12 vs 6 ng/ml, P < 0.01), though still within the physiological range. Insulin-induced plasma PRL and GH were significantly increased both in patients and healthy subjects; however, the increments or areas under the curves were not different in the two groups. Plasma cortisol response showed moderate attenuation in patients. Sensitivity of pituitary lactotrothrops to thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) administration (200 microg, i.v.) was the same in patients and control subjects. In SLE patients with low activity of the disease the sensitivity of pituitary PRL release to TRH administration remained unchanged. The hypothalamic response to stress stimulus (hypoglycaemia) was comparable in patients and healthy subjects.

  15. Pituitary Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... pituitary is the "master control gland" - it makes hormones that affect growth and the functions of other glands in the body. Pituitary tumors are common, but often they don't cause health ... tumor produces hormones and disrupts the balance of hormones in your ...

  16. Pituitary Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... almost always benign (not cancerous), but can cause hormonal imbalances and interfere with the normal function of the pituitary gland. Because the pituitary affects so many functions of the body, ... the tumor mass or hormonal changes (either too much or too little hormone). ...

  17. The influence of pituitary, adrenal, and parathyroid hormones on hemostasis and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Squizzato, Alessandro; Van Zaane, Bregje; Gerdes, Victor E A; Büller, Harry R

    2011-02-01

    Endocrine disorders can influence the hemostatic balance. Abnormal coagulation test results have been observed in patients with abnormal hormone levels. The present review updates the available evidence on the influence of pituitary, adrenal, and parathyroid hormones on the coagulation and the fibrinolytic system, and their possible clinical implications. The literature supports a possible relevant clinical effect of the imbalance between coagulation and fibrinolysis on thrombotic events in endogenous Cushing's syndrome. An effect on markers of coagulation and fibrinolysis has been shown for hyperprolactinemia, growth hormone excess or deficiency, exogenous hypercortisolism, pheochromocytoma, primary hyperaldosteronism, and hyperparathyroidism. However, the clinical relevance is still unproven. Until definitive evidence is available, clinicians should be aware of the possibility that endocrine disorders may be risk factors for thrombotic events.

  18. Cat eye syndrome and growth hormone deficiency with pituitary anomalies: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Melo, Cláudia; Gama-de-Sousa, Susana; Almeida, Filipa; Rendeiro, Paula; Tavares, Purificação; Cardoso, Helena; Carvalho, Sónia

    2013-10-15

    Cat eye syndrome is a rare congenital disease characterized by the existence of a supernumerary chromosome derived from chromosome 22, with a variable phenotype comprising anal atresia, coloboma of the iris and preauricular tags or pits. We report a girl with cat eye syndrome, presenting short stature, with growth hormone deficiency due to posterior pituitary ectopia. Short stature is a common feature of this syndrome, and the association with a structural pituitary anomaly has been described, however growth hormone deficiency and the underlying mechanisms are rarely reported. A review on short stature and growth hormone deficiency in cat eye syndrome is conducted.

  19. ROLE OF THE NEUROHYPOPHYSIAL HORMONE IN THE SECRETION OF ANTERIOR PITUITARY HORMONE.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    while Pitressin a decrease in the enzyme activity of the posterior pituitary. The activity of adenohypophysial acid phosphatase was elevated after...elevation of the enzyme activity, while thyroxine, given in vivo, effectively suppressed. These results suggest a possible relation of adenohypophysial acid...mitochondrial and microsomal fractions. Acid phosphatase of rat adenohypophysis was chromatographically separated into three and that of the anterior

  20. Changes in pituitary growth hormone cells prepared from rats flown on Spacelab 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindeland, R.; Hymer, W. C.; Farrington, M.; Fast, T.; Hayes, C.; Motter, K.; Patil, L.; Vasques, M.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of exposure to microgravity on pituitary gland was investigated by examining cells isolated from anterior pituitaries of rats flown on the 7-day Spacelab 3 mission and, subsequently, cultured for 6 days. Compared with ground controls, flight cells contained more intracellular growth hormone (GH); however, the flight cells released less GH over the 6-day culture period and after implantation into hypophysectomized rats than did the control cells. Compared with control rats, glands from large rats (400 g) contained more somatotrophs (44 percent compared with 37 percent in control rats); small rats (200 g) showed no difference. No major differences were found in the somatotroph ultrastructure (by TEM) or in the pattern of the immunoactive GH variants. However, high-performance liquid chromatography fractionation of culture media indicated that flight cells released much less of a biologically active high-molecular weight GH variant, suggesting that space flight may lead to secretory dysfunction.

  1. Human rhabdomyosarcoma cells express functional pituitary and gonadal sex hormone receptors: Therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    PONIEWIERSKA-BARAN, AGATA; SCHNEIDER, GABRIELA; SUN, WENYUE; ABDELBASET-ISMAIL, AHMED; BARR, FREDERIC G.; RATAJCZAK, MARIUSZ Z.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence has accumulated that sex hormones play an important role in several types of cancer. Because they are also involved in skeletal muscle development and regeneration, we were therefore interested in their potential involvement in the pathogenesis of human rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), a skeletal muscle tumor. In the present study, we employed eight RMS cell lines (three fusion positive and five fusion negative RMS cell lines) and mRNA samples obtained from RMS patients. The expression of sex hormone receptors was evaluated by RT-PCR and their functionality by chemotaxis, adhesion and direct cell proliferation assays. We report here for the first time that follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) receptors are expressed in established human RMS cell lines as well as in primary tumor samples isolated from RMS patients. We also report that human RMS cell lines responded both to pituitary and gonadal sex hormone stimulation by enhanced proliferation, chemotaxis, cell adhesion and phosphorylation of MAPKp42/44 and AKT. In summary, our results indicate that sex hormones are involved in the pathogenesis and progression of RMS, and therefore, their therapeutic application should be avoided in patients that have been diagnosed with RMS. PMID:26983595

  2. Experimental Modification of Rat Pituitary Growth Hormone Cell Function During and After Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.; Salada, T.; Nye, P.; Grossman, E. J.; Lane, P. K.; Grindeland, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    Space-flown rats show a number of flight-induced changes in the structure and function of pituitary Growth Hormone (GH) cells after in vitro postflight testing. To evaluate the possible effects of microgravity on GH cells themselves, freshly dispersed rat anterior pituitary gland cells were seeded into vials containing serum +/- 1 micron HydroCortisone (HC) before flight. Five different cell preparations were used: the entire mixed-cell population of various hormone-producing cell types, cells of density less than 1.071 g/sq cm (band 1), cells of density greater than 1.071 g/sq cm (band 2), and cells prepared from either the dorsal or ventral part of the gland. Relative to ground control samples, bioactive GH released from dense cells during flight was reduced in HC-free medium but was increased in HC-containing medium. Band I and mixed cells usually showed opposite HC-dependent responses. Release of bioactive GH from ventral flight cells was lower; postflight responses to GH-releasing hormone challenge were reduced, and the cytoplasmic area occupied by GH in the dense cells was greater. Collectively, the data show that the chemistry and cellular makeup of the culture system modifies the response of GH cells to microgravity. As such, these cells offer a system to identify gravisensing mechanisms in secretory cells in future microgravity research.

  3. Internalization and recycling of receptor-bound gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist in pituitary gonadotropes

    SciTech Connect

    Schvartz, I.; Hazum, E.

    1987-12-15

    The fate of cell surface gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptors on pituitary cells was studied utilizing lysosomotropic agents and monensin. Labeling of pituitary cells with a photoreactive GnRH derivative, (azidobenzoyl-D-Lys6)GnRH, revealed a specific band of Mr = 60,000. When photoaffinity-labeled cells were exposed to trypsin immediately after completion of the binding, the radioactivity incorporated into the Mr = 60,000 band decreased, with a concomitant appearance of a proteolytic fragment (Mr = 45,000). This fragment reflects cell surface receptors. Following GnRH binding, the hormone-receptor complexes underwent internalization, partial degradation, and recycling. The process of hormone-receptor complex degradation was substantially prevented by lysosomotropic agents, such as chloroquine and methylamine, or the proton ionophore, monensin. Chloroquine and monensin, however, did not affect receptor recycling, since the tryptic fragment of Mr = 45,000 was evident after treatment with these agents. This suggests that recycling of GnRH receptors in gonadotropes occurs whether or not the internal environment is acidic. Based on these findings, we propose a model describing the intracellular pathway of GnRH receptors.

  4. The role of stereotactic radiosurgery in the multimodal management of growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, Christopher J; Liu, Charles Y; Weiss, Martin H

    2010-10-01

    Growth hormone (GH)-secreting pituitary adenomas represent a common source of GH excess in patients with acromegaly. Whereas surgical extirpation of the culprit lesion is considered first-line treatment, as many as 19% of patients develop recurrent symptoms due to regrowth of previously resected adenomatous tissue or to continued growth of the surgically inaccessible tumor. Although medical therapies that suppress GH production can be effective in the management of primary and recurrent acromegaly, these therapies are not curative, and lifelong treatment is required for hormonal control. Stereotactic radiosurgery has emerged as an effective adjunctive treatment modality, and is an appealing alternative to conventional fractionated radiation therapy. The authors reviewed the growing body of literature concerning the role of radiosurgical procedures in the treatment armamentarium of acromegaly, and identified more than 1350 patients across 45 case series. In this review, the authors report that radiosurgery offers true hormonal normalization in 17% to 82% of patients and tumor growth control in 37% to 100% of cases across all series, while minimizing adverse complications. As a result, stereotactic radiosurgery represents a safe and effective treatment option in the multimodal management of primary or recurrent acromegaly secondary to GH-secreting pituitary adenomas.

  5. Elevation of growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor messenger ribonucleic acid expression in growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenoma with Gsalpha protein mutation.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Naoyuki; Kim, Kyongsong; Sanno, Naoko; Yoshida, Daizo; Teramoto, Akira; Shibasaki, Tamotsu

    2008-01-01

    Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) stimulates not only the synthesis and secretion of GH but also the proliferation of normal somatotrophs. The expression of GHRH receptor (GHRHR) is regulated by GHRH, both of which are known to be expressed in human GH-secreting pituitary adenoma cells. Somatic mutations in the subunit of Gsalpha protein (gsp), lead to the constitutive activation of adenylyl cyclase in pituitary adenomas that secrete GH. It has not been examined how gsp mutations influence GHRHR expression in GH-secreting adenomas. We therefore analyzed the expression levels of GHRHR messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) in GH-secreting pituitary adenomas focusing on a gsp mutation. Furthermore, we investigated the effect of GHRH on the expression of GHRHR mRNA in primary cultures of GH-secreting pituitary adenoma cells. GHRHR mRNA expression levels were significantly elevated in gsp mutation-positive GH-secreting adenomas compared with those in gsp mutation-negative ones. In primary-cultured GH-secreting adenoma cells, the increase of GH secretion in response to GHRH was shown in both gsp mutation-positive and -negative adenoma cells with a significantly higher response in the latter adenoma cells. GHRH increased GHRHR mRNA expression level in gsp mutation-negative adenoma cells while it was not influenced by GHRH in gsp mutation-positive adenoma cells. These results suggest that gsp mutations up-regulate GHRHR mRNA expression in GH-secreting pituitary adenoma cells, and that gsp mutations desensitize the adenoma cells to GHRH in terms of their GHRHR mRNA expression probably because of their saturation of GHRH signaling.

  6. In vivo and in vitro effects of chromium VI on anterior pituitary hormone release and cell viability

    SciTech Connect

    Quinteros, Fernanda A.; Poliandri, Ariel H.B.; Machiavelli, Leticia I.; Cabilla, Jimena P.; Duvilanski, Beatriz H. . E-mail: neuroend@ffyb.uba.ar

    2007-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr VI) is a highly toxic metal and an environmental pollutant. Different studies indicate that Cr VI exposure adversely affects reproductive functions. This metal has been shown to affect several tissues and organs but Cr VI effects on pituitary gland have not been reported. Anterior pituitary hormones are central for the body homeostasis and have a fundamental role in reproductive physiology. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Cr VI at the pituitary level both in vivo and in vitro. We showed that Cr VI accumulates in the pituitary and hypothalamus, and decreases serum prolactin levels in vivo but observed no effects on LH levels. In anterior pituitary cells in culture, the effect of Cr VI on hormone secretion followed the same differential pattern. Besides, lactotrophs were more sensitive to the toxicity of the metal. As a result of oxidative stress generation, Cr VI induced apoptosis evidenced by nuclear fragmentation and caspase 3 activation. Our results indicate that the anterior pituitary gland can be a target of Cr VI toxicity in vivo and in vitro, thus producing a negative impact on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and affecting the normal endocrine function.

  7. Does aerobic exercise affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal hormonal response in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Genc, Aysun; Tur, Birkan Sonel; Aytur, Yesim Kurtais; Oztuna, Derya; Erdogan, Murat Faik

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in the etiopathogenesis of fibromyalgia is not clear. This study aimed to analyze the effects of a 6-week aerobic exercise program on the HPA axis in patients with fibromyalgia and to investigate the effects of this program on the disease symptoms, patients’ fitness, disability, and quality of life. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty fibromyalgia patients were randomized to Group 1 (stretching and flexibility exercises at home for 6 weeks) and Group 2 (aerobic exercise three times a week and the same at-home exercises as Group 1 for 6 weeks). Serum levels of cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1, and growth hormone were analyzed at baseline and at the end of, and 1 hr after an exercise stress test. [Results] Group 2 showed better improvement in morning stiffness duration and pain. Growth hormone levels significantly increased after intervention and cortisol levels significantly decreased at time-time interaction in both groups. No significant differences in adrenocorticotropic hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1 were found. [Conclusion] The results of this study seem to support the hypothesis that there is a dysregulation of the HPA axis in patients with FM, and that a six-week exercise program can influence symptoms and affect the HPA axis hormones. PMID:26311959

  8. Hypergravity and estrogen effects on avian anterior pituitary growth hormone and prolactin levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiorindo, R. P.; Negulesco, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    Developing female chicks with fractured right radii were maintained for 14 d at either earth gravity (1 g) or a hypergravity state (2 g). The birds at 1 g were divided into groups which received daily injections of (1) saline, (2) 200 micrograms estrone, and (3) 400 micrograms estrone for 14 d. The 2-g birds were divided into three similarly treated groups. All 2-g birds showed significantly lower body weights than did 1-g birds. Anterior pituitary (AP) glands were excised and analyzed for growth hormone and prolactin content by analytical electrophoresis. The 1-g chicks receiving either dose of daily estrogen showed increased AP growth hormone levels, whereas hypergravity alone did not affect growth hormone content. Chicks exposed to daily estrogen and hypergravity displayed reduced growth hormone levels. AP prolactin levels were slightly increased by the lower daily estrogen dose in 1-g birds, but markedly reduced in birds exposed only to hypergravity. Doubly-treated chicks displayed normal prolactin levels. Reduced growth in 2-g birds might be due, in part, to reduced AP levels of prolactin and/or growth hormone.

  9. Calcitonin: regional distribution of the hormone and its binding sites in the human brain and pituitary.

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, J A; Tobler, P H; Kaufmann, M; Born, W; Henke, H; Cooper, P E; Sagar, S M; Martin, J B

    1981-01-01

    Immunoreactive calcitonin (CT), indistinguishable from human CT-(1-32) and its sulfoxide, has been identified in extracts of the hypothalamus, the pituitary, and the thyroid obtained from human subjects at autopsy. DCT concentrations were highest in a region encompassing the posterior hypothalamus, the median eminence, and the pituitary; intermediate in the substantia nigra, the anterior hypothalamus, the globus pallidus, and the inferior colliculus; and low in the caudate nucleus, the hippocampus, the amygdala, and the cerebral and cerebellar cortices. Specific CT binding measured with 125I-labeled salmon CT was highest in homogenates of the posterior hypothalamus and the median eminence, shown to contain the highest concentrations of endogenous CT in the brain; CT binding was less than 12% of hypothalamic binding in all of the other regions of the brain examined and was negligible in the pituitary. Half-maximal binding was achieved with 0.1 nM nonradioactive salmon CT-(1-32), and the binding was directed to structural or conformational sites, or both, in the COOH-terminal half of salmon CT. The rank order of the inhibition of the binding by CT from different species and analogues of the human hormone was the same as in receptors on a human lymphoid cell line (Moran, J., Hunziker, W. & Fischer, J. A. (1978) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 75, 3984-3988). The functional role of CT and of its binding sites in the brain remains to be elucidated. PMID:6950419

  10. Seasonal changes in expression of genes encoding five types of gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptors and responses to GnRH analog in the pituitary of masu salmon.

    PubMed

    Jodo, Aya; Kitahashi, Takashi; Taniyama, Shinya; Ueda, Hiroshi; Urano, Akihisa; Ando, Hironori

    2005-10-01

    Five types of gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRH-R) genes, designated as msGnRH-R1, R2, R3, R4, and R5, are expressed in the brain and pituitary of masu salmon (Oncorhynchus masou). In the present study, seasonal changes in the expression of these five genes were examined in the pituitary to elucidate their roles in GnRH action during growth and sexual maturation. In addition, the seasonal variation of these genes in response to GnRH was examined in a GnRH analog (GnRHa) implantation experiment. Pituitary samples were collected 1 week after the implantation every month from immaturity through spawning. The absolute amount of GnRH-R mRNA in single pituitaries was determined by real-time PCR assays. Among the five genes, R4 was predominantly expressed in the pituitaries. In the immature fish, the amount of GnRH-R mRNA varied with seasons and subtypes. In the pre-spawning period, R1 and R4 mRNAs in both sexes and R2 and R3 mRNAs in the females increased 4- to 20-fold and then decreased in the spawning season. The effects of GnRHa treatment were significantly different in both sexes. In the females, GnRHa tended to elevate the expression of all the subtypes of GnRH-R genes in various stages during the experimental period, whereas it had almost no apparent effects in the males. These results indicate that the expression of the five GnRH-R genes is seasonally variable and may be related to the responses of the pituitary hormone genes to GnRH, and the regulation of GnRH-R genes by GnRH is different in both sexes.

  11. Sequences of pituitary and placental lactogenic and growth hormones: evolution from a primordial peptide by gene reduplication.

    PubMed

    Niall, H D; Hogan, M L; Sauer, R; Rosenblum, I Y; Greenwood, F C

    1971-04-01

    Human placental lactogen has been found to resemble human pituitary growth hormone very closely in amino acid sequence, about 80% of the residues examined being identical in the two molecules when a revised sequence for growth hormone is used as the basis for comparison. The structural features responsible for the differing biological potency of the two hormones may therefore reside in rather limited regions of primary structure. The observation of internal sequence homologies within the pituitary growth hormone and prolactin and the placental lactogen molecules suggests that these polypeptide hormones may have evolved by genetic reduplication from a smaller common ancestral peptide. This finding directs further attention to subfragments of these molecules as possible possessors of intrinsic somatotrophic and lactogenic activity.

  12. Single-Cell Phenotypic Characterization of Human Pituitary GHomas and Non-Functioning Adenomas Based on Hormone Content and Calcium Responses to Hypothalamic Releasing Hormones

    PubMed Central

    Senovilla, Laura; Núñez, Lucía; de Campos, José María; de Luis, Daniel A.; Romero, Enrique; García-Sancho, Javier; Villalobos, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Human pituitary tumors are generally benign adenomas causing considerable morbidity due to excess hormone secretion, hypopituitarism, and other tumor mass effects. Pituitary tumors are highly heterogeneous and difficult to type, often containing mixed cell phenotypes. We have used calcium imaging followed by multiple immunocytochemistry to type growth hormone secreting (GHomas) and non-functioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs). Individual cells were typed for stored hormones and calcium responses to classic hypothalamic releasing hormones (HRHs). We found that GHomas contained growth hormone cells either lacking responses to HRHs or responding to all four HRHs. However, most GHoma cells were polyhormonal cells responsive to both thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and GH-releasing hormone. NFPAs were also highly heterogeneous. Some of them contained ACTH cells lacking responses to HRHs or polyhormonal gonadotropes responsive to LHRH and TRH. However, most NFPAs were made of cells storing no hormone and responded only to TRH. These results may provide new insights on the ontogeny of GHomas and NFPAs. PMID:26106585

  13. The FGFR4-G388R polymorphism promotes mitochondrial STAT3 serine phosphorylation to facilitate pituitary growth hormone cell tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Tateno, Toru; Asa, Sylvia L; Zheng, Lei; Mayr, Thomas; Ullrich, Axel; Ezzat, Shereen

    2011-12-01

    Pituitary tumors are common intracranial neoplasms, yet few germline abnormalities have been implicated in their pathogenesis. Here we show that a single nucleotide germline polymorphism (SNP) substituting an arginine (R) for glycine (G) in the FGFR4 transmembrane domain can alter pituitary cell growth and hormone production. Compared with FGFR4-G388 mammosomatotroph cells that support prolactin (PRL) production, FGFR4-R388 cells express predominantly growth hormone (GH). Growth promoting effects of FGFR4-R388 as evidenced by enhanced colony formation was ascribed to Src activation and mitochondrial serine phosphorylation of STAT3 (pS-STAT3). In contrast, diminished pY-STAT3 mediated by FGFR4-R388 relieved GH inhibition leading to hormone excess. Using a knock-in mouse model, we demonstrate the ability of FGFR4-R385 to promote GH pituitary tumorigenesis. In patients with acromegaly, pituitary tumor size correlated with hormone excess in the presence of the FGFR4-R388 but not the FGFR4-G388 allele. Our findings establish a new role for the FGFR4-G388R polymorphism in pituitary oncogenesis, providing a rationale for targeting Src and STAT3 in the personalized treatment of associated disorders.

  14. Pituitary tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... enough of its hormones. This condition is called hypopituitarism . The causes of pituitary tumors are unknown. Some ... Cyst Endocrine glands Gigantism Growth hormone test Hyperthyroidism Hypopituitarism Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) I Prolactin blood test ...

  15. Effects of pituitary hormone deficiency on growth and glucose metabolism of the sheep fetus.

    PubMed

    Fowden, A L; Forhead, A J

    2007-10-01

    Pituitary hormones are essential for normal growth and metabolic responsiveness after birth, but their role before birth remains unclear. This study examined the effects of hypophysectomizing fetal sheep on their growth and glucose metabolism during the late normal and extended periods of gestation, and on their metabolic response to maternal fasting for 48 h near term. Fetal hypophysectomy reduced crown rump length (CRL), limb lengths, and body weight but increased ponderal index relative to controls near normal term. It also lowered the daily rate of crown rump length increment uniformly from 35 d before, to 20 d after normal term. Hypophysectomized (HX) fetuses had normal weight-specific rates of umbilical uptake, utilization, and oxidation of glucose but lower rates of umbilical oxygen uptake than controls near term. All these metabolic rates were significantly less in HX fetuses during the extended period of gestation than in HX and intact fetuses near normal term. In contrast to controls, glucogenesis was negligible in HX fetuses during maternal fasting. Consequently, the rate of glucose utilization decreased significantly in fasted HX but not intact fetuses. Conversely, the rate of CO(2) production from glucose carbon decreased in fasted intact but not HX fetuses. Fetal hypophysectomy also prevented the fasting-induced increases in plasma cortisol and norepinephrine concentrations seen in controls. These findings demonstrate that the pituitary hormones are important in regulating the growth rate and adaptive responses of glucose metabolism to undernutrition in fetal sheep. They also suggest that fetal metabolism is altered when gestational length is extended.

  16. Impact of growth hormone replacement therapy on sleep in adult patients with growth hormone deficiency of pituitary origin

    PubMed Central

    Morselli, Lisa L.; Nedeltcheva, Arlet; Leproult, Rachel; Spiegel, Karine; Martino, Enio; Legros, Jean-Jacques; Weiss, Roy E.; Mockel, Jean; Van Cauter, Eve; Copinschi, Georges

    2013-01-01

    Objectives We previously reported that adult patients with GH deficiency (GHD) due to a confirmed or likely pituitary defect, as compared to healthy controls individually matched for age, gender and BMI, have more slow-wave sleep (SWS) and higher delta activity (a marker of SWS intensity). Here we examined the impact of recombinant human GH (rhGH) therapy, compared to placebo, on objective sleep quality in a subset of patients from the same cohort. Design Single-blind randomized cross-over design study. Methods Fourteen patients with untreated GHD of confirmed or likely pituitary origin, aged 22–74 yr, participated in the study. Patients with associated hormonal deficiencies were on appropriate replacement therapy. Polygraphic sleep recordings, with bedtimes individually tailored to habitual sleep times, were performed after 4 months on rhGH or placebo. Results Valid data were obtained in 13 patients. At the end of rhGH treatment period, patients had a shorter sleep period time than at the end of the placebo period (479±11 vs 431±19 min respectively; p=0.005), primarily due to an earlier wake up time, and a decrease in the intensity of SWS (delta activity) (559±125 vs 794±219 μV2, respectively; p=0.048). Conclusions Four months of rhGH replacement therapy partly reversed sleep disturbances previously observed in untreated patients. The decrease in delta activity associated with rhGH treatment adds further evidence to the hypothesis that the excess of high intensity SWS observed in untreated pituitary GHD patients is likely to result from overactivity of the hypothalamic GHRH system due to the lack of negative feedback inhibition by GH. PMID:23447518

  17. Growth hormone releasing factor (GRF) increases free arachidonate levels in the pituitary: a role for lipoxygenase products

    SciTech Connect

    Canonico, P.L.; Speciale, C.; Sortino, M.A.; Cronin, M.J.; MacLeod, R.M.; Scapagnini, U.

    1986-01-20

    GRF, a specific stimulator of GH release, increased in a concentration- and time-dependent manner pituitary (/sup 3/H)-arachidonate levels in vitro. This effect was antagonized by 100 nM somatostatin. Exogenous arachidonate also stimulated GH release in vitro. Quinacrine, a phospholipase A2 inhibitor, reduced both basal and GRF-stimulated free arachidonate levels as well as GH release. The cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin was ineffective, while BW755c, which also inhibits the lipoxygenase pathway, produced a further increase in the levels of the fatty acid stimulated by GRF and potently reduced GH release. These results provide additional evidence for the involvement of arachidonate metabolism in the hormone-releasing effect of GRF at the somatotroph. 14 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  18. Control of thyrotropin glycosylation in normal rat pituitary cells in culture: effect of thyrotropin-releasing hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Ponsin, G.; Mornex, R.

    1983-08-01

    Regulation of glycosylation of TSH was studied in primary cultures of normal rat pituitary cells. (3H)Glucosamine or (3H)proline incorporation into immunoprecipitable TSH and trichloroacetic acid-precipitable proteins was measured after incubation periods ranging from 4-72 h. TSH release was assessed by RIA of TSH in the medium. TRH (30 nM) specifically increased the glycosylation of TSH despite the fact that it did not stimulate (3H)proline incorporation into the hormone even after 72 h of continuous labeling. The TRH-stimulated (3H)glucosamine-labeled TSH was completely recovered in the incubation medium. Effective concentrations of TRH were in the same range as those necessary for stimulation of TSH release (10(-10) - 10(-6) M). Somatostatin (50 nM) and T3 (10 microM) antagonized TRH effects on both TSH release and glycosylation. Stages of TSH glycosylation were discriminated by the addition to the culture medium of tunicamycin (10 micrograms/ml) or monensin (25 microM), which are known to inhibit core and terminal glycosylation of proteins, respectively. Medium (3H)glucosamine-labeled TSH was fully glycosylated, whereas a large part of the intracellular hormone was only core glycosylated. This suggests that terminal glycosylation of TSH could be related to hormone secretion. TRH stimulated essentially only terminal glycosylation of TSH. No alteration of core glycosylation of the hormone was observed after TRH treatment. The stimulating effect of TRH on terminal glycosylation of TSH is probably related to its ability to stimulate hormone release.

  19. A novel thyroid stimulating hormone beta-subunit isoform in human pituitary, peripheral blood leukocytes, and thyroid.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Jeremy S; Klein, John R

    2009-07-01

    Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) is produced by the anterior pituitary and is used to regulate thyroid hormone output, which in turn controls metabolic activity. Currently, the pituitary is believed to be the only source of TSH used by the thyroid. Recent studies in mice from our laboratory have identified a TSHbeta isoform that is expressed in the pituitary, in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL), and in the thyroid. To determine whether a human TSHbeta splice variant exists that is analogous to the mouse TSHbeta splice variant, and whether the pattern of expression of the splice variant is similar to that observed in mice, PCR amplification of RNAs from pituitary, thyroid, PBL, and bone marrow was done by reverse-transcriptase PCR and quantitative realtime PCR. Human pituitary expressed a TSHbeta isoform that is analogous to the mouse TSHbeta splice variant, consisting of a 27 nucleotide portion of intron 2 and all of exon 3, coding for 71.2% of the native human TSHbeta polypeptide. Of particular interest, the TSHbeta splice variant was expressed at significantly higher levels than the native form or TSHbeta in PBL and the thyroid. The TSHalpha gene also was expressed in the pituitary, thyroid, and PBL, but not the BM, suggesting that the TSHbeta polypeptide in the thyroid and PBL may exist as a dimer with TSHalpha. These findings identify an unknown splice variant of human TSHbeta. They also have implications for immune-endocrine interactions in the thyroid and for understanding autoimmune thyroid disease from a new perspective.

  20. Simultaneous measurement of hormone release and secretagogue binding by individual pituitary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.F.; Neill, J.D.

    1987-08-01

    The quantitative relationship between receptor binding and hormone secretion at the single-cell level was investigated in the present study by combining a reverse hemolytic plaque assay for measurement of luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion from individual pituitary cells with an autoradiographic assay of /sup 125/I-labeled gonadontropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist binding to the same cells. In the plaque assay, LH secretion induces complement-mediated lysis of the LH-antibody-coated erythrocytes around the gonadotropes, resulting in areas of lysis (plaques). LH release from individual gonadotropes was quantified by comparing radioimmunoassayable LH release to hemolytic area in similarly treated cohort groups of cells; plaque area was linearly related to the amount of LH secreted. Receptor autoradiography was performed using /sup 125/I-labeled GnRH-A (a superagonist analog of GnRH) both as the ligand and as the stimulant for LH release in the plaque assay. The grains appeared to represent specific and high-affinity receptors for GnRH because (i) no pituitary cells other than gonadotropes bound the labeled ligand and (ii) grain development was progressively inhibited by coincubation with increasing doses of unlabeled GnRH-A. The authors conclude that GnRH receptor number for any individual gonadotrope is a weak determinant of the amount of LH it can secrete; nevertheless, full occupancy of all its GnRH receptors is required for any gonadotrope to reach its full LH-secretory capacity. Apparently the levels of other factors comprising the steps along the secretory pathway determine the secretory capacity of an individual cell.

  1. Characteristics of gsp-positive growth hormone-secreting pituitary tumors in Korean acromegalic patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, I; Park, S; Ryu, M; Woo, J; Kim, S; Kim, J; Kim, Y; Choi, Y

    1996-06-01

    A subset of human growth hormone (GH)-secreting pituitary tumors contains the gsp oncogene that encodes an activation mutation of the alpha-subunit of the stimulatory GTP-binding protein (G(S) alpha). This study was undertaken to investigate the frequency of the gsp oncogene in GH-secreting pituitary tumors in Korean acromegalic patients and to elucidate the clinical characteristics of these patients to endocrine testing. Direct polymerase chain reaction sequencing revealed the gsp oncogene mutation in 9 out of 21 tumors (43%) at amino acid 201 of the G(S) alpha protein. A single nucleotide mutation in the tumors carrying the gsp oncogene was observed, which replaced an arginine (CGT) in the normal protein with cysteine (TGT) in eight tumors and serine (AGT) in one tumor. The patients with the gsp oncogene mutation (group 1) were older (54 +/- 10 vs 41 +/- 11 years, p = 0.0085) than those without the mutation (group 2). Sex, tumor size and grade, basal GH and prolactin levels, the GH response to oral glucose loading, the GH fluctuation and the paradoxical response to thyrotropin-releasing hormone or gonadotropin-releasing hormone did not differ between the groups. The gsp oncogene was found mostly in somatotroph adenomas. The octreotide-induced GH suppression was significantly higher in group 1 than in group 2 (95 +/- 5% vs 81 +/- 17%, p = 0.0335). The GH response to bromocriptine did not differ between the groups. These results suggest that the G(S) alpha mutations of GH-secreting tumor are observed in Korean acromegalic patients with similar frequency to those of western countries. The patients with gsp oncogene are likely to be older than those without the oncogene, and show excellent response of GH suppression to octreotide.

  2. In situ hybridization analysis of anterior pituitary hormone gene expression during fetal mouse development.

    PubMed

    Japón, M A; Rubinstein, M; Low, M J

    1994-08-01

    We used 35S-labeled oligonucleotides and cRNAs (riboprobes) to detect the temporal order and spatial pattern of anterior pituitary hormone gene expression in (B6CBF1 x B6CBF1)F2 fetal mice from embryonic Day 9.5 (E9.5) to postnatal Day 1 (P1). Pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) mRNA was expressed in the basal diencephalon on Day E10.5, in the ventromedial zone of the pars distalis on Day E12.5, and in the pars intermedia on Day E14.5. The common alpha-glycoprotein subunit (alpha-GSU) mRNA first appeared in the anterior wall of Rathke's pouch on Day E11.5 and extended to the pars tuberalis and ventromedial zone of the pars distalis on Day E12.5. Thyroid-stimulating hormone-beta (TSH beta) subunit mRNA was expressed initially in both the pas tuberalis and ventromedial pars distalis on Day E14.5, with an identical spatial distribution to alpha-GSU at the time. In contrast, luteinizing hormone-beta (LH beta) subunit and follicle-stimulating hormone beta (FSH beta) subunit mRNAs were detected initially only in the ventromedial pars distalis on Days E16.5 and E17.5, respectively, in an identical distribution to each other. POMC-, alpha-GSU-, TSH beta, LH beta-, and FSH beta-positive cells within the pars distalis all increased in number and autoradiographic signal with differing degrees of spatial expansion posteriorly, laterally, and dorsally up to Day P1. POMC expression was typically the most intense and extended circumferentially to include the entire lateral and dorsal surfaces of the pars distalis. The expression of both growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) started coincidentally on Day E15.5. However PRL cells localized in the ventromedial area similarly to POMC and the glycoprotein hormone subunits, whereas GH cells were found initially in a more lateral and central distribution within the lobes of the pars distalis. Somatotrophs increased dramatically in number and autoradiographic signal, extending throughout the pars distalis except for the most peripheral layer

  3. Role of calcium in gonadotropin releasing hormone-induced luteinizing hormone secretion from the bovine pituitary

    SciTech Connect

    Kile, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    The hypothesis was tested that GnRH acts to release LH by increasing calcium uptake by gonadotroph which in turn stimulates calcium-calmodulin activity and results in LH release from bovine pituitary cells as it does in the rat. Pituitary glands of calves (4-10 months of age) were enzymatically dispersed (0.2% collagenase) and grown for 5 days to confluency in multiwell plates (3 x 10/sup 5//well). Cells treated with GnRH Ca/sup + +/ ionophore A23187, and ouabain all produced significant releases of LH release in a pronounced all or none fashion, while thorough washing of the cells with 0.5 mM EGTA in Ca/sup + +/-free media prevented the action of GnRH. GnRH caused a rapid efflux of /sup 45/Ca/sup + +/. Both GnRH-stimulated /sup 45/Ca efflux and LH release could be partially blocked by verapamil GnRH-induced LH release could also be blocked by nifedipine and tetrodotoxin, although these agents did not affect /sup 45/Ca efflux. The calmodulin antagonists calmidazolium and W7 were found to block GnRH induced LH release, as well as LH release induced by theophylline, KC PGE/sub 2/ and estradiol. These data indicated that: (1) calcium is required for GnRH action, but extracellular Ca/sup + +/ does not regulate LH release; (2) GnRH elevates intracellular Ca/sup + +/ by opening both voltage sensitive and receptor mediated Ca/sup + +/ channels; (3) activation of calmodulin is one mechanism involved in GnRH-induced LH release.

  4. Effects of corticotropin-releasing hormone and its antagonist on the gene expression of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and GnRH receptor in the hypothalamus and anterior pituitary gland of follicular phase ewes.

    PubMed

    Ciechanowska, Magdalena; Łapot, Magdalena; Malewski, Tadeusz; Mateusiak, Krystyna; Misztal, Tomasz; Przekop, Franciszek

    2011-01-01

    There is no information in the literature regarding the effect of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) on genes encoding gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and the GnRH receptor (GnRHR) in the hypothalamus or on GnRHR gene expression in the pituitary gland in vivo. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate, in follicular phase ewes, the effects of prolonged, intermittent infusion of small doses of CRH or its antagonist (α-helical CRH 9-41; CRH-A) into the third cerebral ventricle on GnRH mRNA and GnRHR mRNA levels in the hypothalamo-pituitary unit and on LH secretion. Stimulation or inhibition of CRH receptors significantly decreased or increased GnRH gene expression in the hypothalamus, respectively, and led to different responses in GnRHR gene expression in discrete hypothalamic areas. For example, CRH increased GnRHR gene expression in the preoptic area, but decreased it in the hypothalamus/stalk median eminence and in the anterior pituitary gland. In addition, CRH decreased LH secretion. Blockade of CRH receptors had the opposite effect on GnRHR gene expression. The results suggest that activation of CRH receptors in the hypothalamus of follicular phase ewes can modulate the biosynthesis and release of GnRH through complex changes in the expression of GnRH and GnRHR genes in the hypothalamo-anterior pituitary unit.

  5. Effect of aging on GHRF-induced growth hormone release from anterior pituitary cells in primary culture

    SciTech Connect

    Spik, K.W.; Boyd, R.L.; Sonntag, W.E.

    1991-03-01

    Five criteria were developed to validate the primary cell culture model for comparison of GRF-induced release of growth hormone in pituitary tissue from aging animals. Pituitaries from young (5-mo), middle-aged (14-mo), and old (24-mo) male Fischer 344 rats were dispersed using either trypsin/trypsin inhibitor or dispase and compared with respect to the number of pituitary cells recovered, cell viability, 3H-leucine incorporation into total protein, time course for recovery of optimal response to GRF, and the dose-relationship for GRF-induced release of growth hormone 2, 4, and 6 days after dispersal. Results indicated that direct comparison of cellular responses between tissues from young, middle-aged, and old rats in primary cell culture is confounded by variations in time for recovery of optimal responses, the effects of the enzymes used for dispersal, and the methods used to express the data.

  6. Microgravity associated changes in pituitary growth hormone (GH) cells prepared from rats flown on Space Lab 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.; Farrington, M.; Hayes, C.; Grindeland, R.; Fast, T.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of microgravity on the release of pituitary growth hormone (GH) in rats is studied. The pituitary glands from six adult rats exposed to microgravity are analyzed for in vitro and in vivo changes in pituitary growth hormone cells. The GH cell functions in the somatotrophs of flight rats are compared to a control group. The two assay procedures employed in the experiment are described. It is observed that intracellular levels of GH are two to three times greater in the flight rats than in the control group; however, the amount of GH released from the somatotrophs is 1.11 + or - 0.4 micrograms for the flight rats and 1.85 + or - 1.3 micrograms for the control rats.

  7. Role of leptin on growth hormone and prolactin secretion by bovine pituitary explants.

    PubMed

    Accorsi, P A; Munno, A; Gamberoni, M; Viggiani, R; De Ambrogi, M; Tamanini, C; Seren, E

    2007-04-01

    Leptin is an important hormone regulating nutritional status in humans and animals. Its most relevant activity is at the hypothalamic level, where it modulates food behavior, thermogenesis, and secretion of several pituitary hormones. The exact mechanisms underlying these processes are unclear. The purpose of this study was to verify whether leptin could modulate growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) secretion acting directly on bovine pituitary cells. Adenohypophyseal explants were cultured with different concentrations of leptin (50, 250, and 500 ng/mL); GH and PRL concentrations in culture media were determined by RIA. On tissues treated with 250 ng/mL of leptin, GH and PRL mRNA, as well as protein content, were estimated by reverse transcription-PCR and Western immunoblotting, respectively. Concentrations of GH in culture media containing 250 and 500 ng/mL of leptin were significantly higher than in controls: 1,063.5 +/- 141.2 (mean +/- SEM) and 1,018.8 +/- 88.4 vs. 748.9 +/- 74.0 ng/mg of tissue, respectively, after 1 h of treatment. Prolactin concentrations were significantly higher in culture media containing 50, 250, and 500 ng/mL of leptin than in controls after 2 h of treatment (547.1 +/- 50.3, 547.5 +/- 58.8, and 577.0 +/- 63.7 vs. 406.8 +/- 43.9 ng/mg of tissue, respectively). Tissues cultured with 250 ng/mL of leptin had significantly higher GH mRNA and lower GH protein content than controls (389.7 +/- 17.9 vs. 289.7 +/- 16.7; 1,601.5 +/- 90.1 vs. 2,212.7 +/- 55.6 arbitrary units, respectively) after 5 h of treatment. In contrast, no significant differences were found for PRL mRNA and protein content, possibly because of a delay in the leptin stimulation of PRL secretion. The results suggest that GH and PRL secretion in bovine pituitary explants can be directly regulated by leptin.

  8. Effect of a calcium channel blocker on pituitary luteinizing hormone secretion in intact and castrated male and female rats

    SciTech Connect

    Babichev, V.N.; Sidneva, L.N.; Ozol', L.Yu.

    1987-08-01

    The authors study the effect of a calcium channel blocker on leuteinizing hormone (LH) secretion through experiments on rats. LH was determined by radioimmunoassay in two or three parallel tests and in two dilutions. The effect of verapamil on the LH level in rat blood serum and the pituitary gland is shown.

  9. Dexamethasone increases growth hormone (GH)-releasing hormone (GRH) receptor mRNA levels in cultured rat anterior pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, M; Sato, M; Matsubara, S; Wada, Y; Takahara, J

    1996-06-01

    To examine the effects of glucocorticoid (GC) on growth hormone (GH)-releasing hormone (GRH) receptor gene expression, a highly-sensitive and quantitative reverse-transcribed polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method was used in this study. Rat anterior pituitary cells were isolated and cultured for 4 days. The cultured cells were treated with dexamethasone for 2, 6, and 24 h. GRH receptor mRNA levels were determined by competitive RT-PCR using a recombinant RNA as the competitor. Dexamethasone significantly increased GRH receptor mRNA levels at 5 nM after 6- and 24 h-incubations, and the maximal effect was found at 25 nM. The GC receptor-specific antagonist, RU 38486 completely eliminated the dexamethasone-induced enhancement of GRH receptor mRNA levels. Dexamethasone did not alter the mRNA levels of beta-actin and prolactin at 5 nM for 24 h, whereas GH mRNA levels were significantly increased by the same treatment. The GH response to GRH was significantly enhanced by the 24-h incubation with 5 nM dexamethasone. These findings suggest that GC stimulates GRH receptor gene expression through the ligand-activated GC receptors in the rat somatotrophs. The direct effects of GC on the GRH receptor gene could explain the enhancement of GRH-induced GH secretion.

  10. Catecholestrogens and release of anterior pituitary gland hormones. I. Luteinizing hormone.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Sierra, J F; Blake, C A

    1982-02-01

    We investigated the effects of peripheral administration of 17 beta-estradiol (E2), estrone (E1), and the catecholestrogens, 2-hydroxyestradiol (2-OHE2) and 2-hydroxyestrone (2-OHE1), on anterior pituitary gland LH release in the prepuberal rat. Steroids in oil were injected sc into 25-day-old female and 35- to 40-day-old male rats. The injection of E2, E1, or 2-OHE2 caused a surge in serum LH levels in female rats 48 h later, during the after hours. Only E1 induced a LH surge 24 h after injection. The positive effects of 2-OHE2 in the females were only observed if a massive dose was administered, the steroid was injected on 2 consecutive days, or E2 or progesterone was given to 2-OHE2-primed rats. The 2-OHE1 was totally ineffective in causing a serum LH surge under a variety of experimental protocols. In male rats, the injection of any one of the four steroids decreased serum LH levels. Even the injection of E2 or 2-OHE2 for 2 days or the injection of E2 in 2-OHE2-primed rats failed to elevate the serum LH concentration in male rats. The results suggest that 2-OHE2 and E1 could play a role in the preovulatory release of LH in the female; 2-OHE2 and 2-OHE1 could play a role in the negative feedback control of LH release in the male.

  11. Combining Cadherin Expression with Molecular Markers Discriminates Invasiveness in Growth Hormone and Prolactin Pituitary Adenomas.

    PubMed

    Chauvet, N; Romanò, N; Meunier, A-C; Galibert, E; Fontanaud, P; Mathieu, M-N; Osterstock, G; Osterstock, P; Baccino, E; Rigau, V; Loiseau, H; Bouillot-Eimer, S; Barlier, A; Mollard, P; Coutry, N

    2016-02-01

    Although growth hormone (GH)- and prolactin (PRL)-secreting pituitary adenomas are considered benign, in many patients, tumour growth and/or invasion constitute a particular challenge. In other tumours, progression relies in part on dysfunction of intercellular adhesion mediated by the large family of cadherins. In the present study, we have explored the contribution of cadherins in GH and PRL adenoma pathogenesis, and evaluated whether this class of adherence molecules was related to tumour invasiveness. We have first established, by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry, the expression profile of classical cadherins in the normal human pituitary gland. We show that the cadherin repertoire is restricted and cell-type specific. Somatotrophs and lactotrophs express mainly E-cadherin and cadherin 18, whereas N-cadherin is present in the other endocrine cell types. This repertoire undergoes major differential modification in GH and PRL tumours: E-cadherin is significantly reduced in invasive GH adenomas, and this loss is associated with a cytoplasmic relocalisation of cadherin 18 and catenins. In invasive prolactinomas, E-cadherin distribution is altered and is accompanied by a mislocalisation of cadherin 18, β-catenin and p120 catenin. Strikingly, de novo expression of N-cadherin is present in a subset of adenomas and cells exhibit a mesenchymal phenotype exclusively in invasive tumours. Binary tree analysis, performed by combining the cadherin repertoire with the expression of a subset of known molecular markers, shows that cadherin/catenin complexes play a significant role in discrimination of tumour invasion.

  12. Irisin inhibition of growth hormone secretion in cultured tilapia pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Lian, Anji; Li, Xin; Jiang, Quan

    2017-01-05

    Irisin, the product of fibronectin type III domain-containing protein 5 (FNDC5) gene, is well-documented to be a regulator of energy metabolism. At present, not much is known about its biological function in non-mammalian species. In this study, a full-length tilapia FDNC5 was cloned and its tissue expression pattern has been confirmed. Based on the sequence obtained, we produced and purified recombinant irisin which could induce uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) gene expression in tilapia hepatocytes. Further, the rabbit polyclonal irisin antiserum was produced and its specificity was confirmed by antiserum preabsorption. In tilapia pituitary cells, irisin inhibited growth hormone (GH) gene expression and secretion and triggered rapid phosphorylation of Akt, Erk1/2, and p38 MAPK. Furthermore, irisin-inhibited GH mRNA expression could be prevented by inhibiting PI3K/Akt, MEK1/2, and p38 MAPK, respectively. Apparently, fish irisin can act directly at the pituitary level to inhibit GH transcript expression via multiple signaling pathways.

  13. [A Case of an Adrenocorticotropic Hormone-Producing Pituitary Adenoma Removed via Electromagnetic-Guided Neuroendoscopy].

    PubMed

    Tomita, Yusuke; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Terasaka, Tomohiro; Inagaki, Kenichi; Otsuka, Fumio; Date, Isao

    2016-06-01

    The use of navigation systems is safe and reliable for neurological surgery. We performed endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery to totally resect an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-producing pituitary adenoma associated with oculomotor nerve palsy. A 70-year-old woman developed right ptosis 4 months before admission. She developed anisocoria 2 months later and was referred to the department of neurology from clinic. Brain magnetic resonance imaging(MRI)showed an intrasellar tumor that partially invaded the right cavernous sinus, and she was then referred to our department. She exhibited a round face ("moon face") and central obesity. Laboratory test results showed a high urinary cortisol level and high serum ACTH level, and neither the serum cortisol nor ACTH level was suppressed by a low-dose dexamethasone test. We performed transsphenoidal surgery using high-dimensional endoscopy under electromagnetic navigation. The tumor invading the cavernous sinus was visualized via endoscopy and confirmed on navigation using a flexible needle probe. Postoperative MRI showed total removal of the tumor, and the serum ACTH level recovered to the normal range. The patient's right oculomotor palsy resolved within 1 week postoperatively. In summary, electromagnetic navigation was useful for total resection of a pituitary tumor invading the cavernous sinus, contributing to normalization of the ACTH level and improvement in neurological symptoms.

  14. Direct effects of catecholamines, thyrotropin-releasing hormone, and somatostatin on growth hormone and prolactin secretion from adenomatous and nonadenomatous human pituitary cells in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, M; Yamaji, T

    1984-01-01

    To determine the mechanism and the site of action of catecholamines as well as hormones including thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH)1 and somatostatin on pituitary hormone release in patients with acromegaly and in normal subjects, the effects of these substances on growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) secretion from adenomatous and nonadenomatous human pituitary cells in culture were examined. When dopamine (0.01-0.1 microM) or bromocriptine (0.01-0.1 microM) was added to the culture media, a significant inhibition of GH and PRL secretion from adenoma cells from acromegalic patients was observed. This inhibition was blocked by D2 receptor blockade with metoclopramide or sulpiride, but not by D1 receptor blockade. Similarly, dopamine suppressed GH and PRL release by nonadenomatous pituitary cells in a dose-dependent manner, which was again blocked by D2 receptor blockade. The minimum effective concentration of dopamine required for a significant inhibition of PRL secretion (0.01 microM) was lower than that for GH release (0.1 microM). Norepinephrine, likewise, caused a suppression of PRL secretion from adenomatous and nonadenomatous pituitary cells. This effect was blocked by sulpiride, phentolamine, however, was ineffective. When TRH was added to the media, both GH and PRL secretion were enhanced in adenoma cells, while only the stimulation of PRL release was observed in nonadenomatous pituitary cells. Coincubation of TRH and dopamine resulted in variable effects on GH and PRL secretion. Somatostatin consistently lowered GH and PRL secretion in both adenomatous and nonadenomatous pituitary cells and completely blocked the TRH-induced stimulation of GH and PRL secretion from adenoma cells. Opioid peptides (1 microM) failed to affect hormone release. These results suggest that no qualitative difference in GH and PRL responses to dopaminergic agonists or to somatostatin exists between adenoma cells of acromegalic patients and normal pituitary cells, and that the

  15. Thyrotropic activity of salmon pituitary glycoprotein hormones in the Hawaiian parrotfish thyroid in vitro.

    PubMed

    Swanson, P; Grau, E G; Helms, L M; Dickhoff, W W

    1988-02-01

    The thyrotropic activities of salmon pituitary extract, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), gonadotropins (GTH), and glycoprotein fractions obtained during purification of salmon TSH and GTH were measured using the parrotfish thyroid culture system. Purified salmon TSH was approximately 1,000 times more potent than bovine TSH in stimulating thyroxine release into the culture medium. Most of the forms of salmon GTH had no thyrotropic activity. One of the forms of salmon GTH (GTH-F) and three chromatofocusing fractions (CF-B, -C, and -E) that were devoid of activity in the coho salmon in vivo had some thyrotropic activity in the parrotfish thyroid culture. Whether the activity of these fractions was due to contamination with TSH, less potent forms of TSH, or inherent thyrotropic activity of a form of GTH is discussed. These results indicate that the parrotfish thyroid culture system can be used to detect thyrotropic activity of fractions obtained during the purification of teleost TSH.

  16. Model of pediatric pituitary hormone deficiency separates the endocrine and neural functions of the LHX3 transcription factor in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Colvin, Stephanie C.; Malik, Raleigh E.; Showalter, Aaron D.; Sloop, Kyle W.; Rhodes, Simon J.

    2011-01-01

    The etiology of most pediatric hormone deficiency diseases is poorly understood. Children with combined pituitary hormone deficiency (CPHD) have insufficient levels of multiple anterior pituitary hormones causing short stature, metabolic disease, pubertal failure, and often have associated nervous system symptoms. Mutations in developmental regulatory genes required for the specification of the hormone-secreting cell types of the pituitary gland underlie severe forms of CPHD. To better understand these diseases, we have created a unique mouse model of CPHD with a targeted knockin mutation (Lhx3 W227ter), which is a model for the human LHX3 W224ter disease. The LHX3 gene encodes a LIM-homeodomain transcription factor, which has essential roles in pituitary and nervous system development in mammals. The introduced premature termination codon results in deletion of the carboxyl terminal region of the LHX3 protein, which is critical for pituitary gene activation. Mice that lack all LHX3 function do not survive beyond birth. By contrast, the homozygous Lhx3 W227ter mice survive, but display marked dwarfism, thyroid disease, and female infertility. Importantly, the Lhx3 W227ter mice have no apparent nervous system deficits. The Lhx3 W227ter mouse model provides a unique array of hormone deficits and facilitates experimental approaches that are not feasible with human patients. These experiments demonstrate that the carboxyl terminus of the LHX3 transcription factor is not required for viability. More broadly, this study reveals that the in vivo actions of a transcription factor in different tissues are molecularly separable. PMID:21149718

  17. In vitro impact of pegvisomant on growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Cuny, Thomas; Zeiller, Caroline; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Défilles, Céline; Roche, Catherine; Blanchard, Marie-Pierre; Theodoropoulou, Marily; Graillon, Thomas; Pertuit, Morgane; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Enjalbert, Alain; Brue, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Pegvisomant (PEG), an antagonist of growth hormone (GH)-receptor (GHR), normalizes insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) oversecretion in most acromegalic patients unresponsive to somatostatin analogs (SSAs) and/or uncontrolled by transsphenoidal surgery. The residual GH-secreting tumor is therefore exposed to the action of circulating PEG. However, the biological effect of PEG at the pituitary level remains unknown. To assess the impact of PEG in vitro on the hormonal secretion (GH and prolactin (PRL)), proliferation and cellular viability of eight human GH-secreting tumors in primary cultures and of the rat somatolactotroph cell line GH4C1. We found that the mRNA expression levels of GHR were characterized in 31 human GH-secreting adenomas (0.086 copy/copy β-Gus) and the GHR was identified by immunocytochemistry staining. In 5/8 adenomas, a dose-dependent inhibition of GH secretion was observed under PEG with a maximum of 38.2±17% at 1μg/mL (P<0.0001 vs control). A dose-dependent inhibition of PRL secretion occurred in three mixed GH/PRL adenomas under PEG with a maximum of 52.8±11.5% at 10μg/mL (P<0.0001 vs control). No impact on proliferation of either human primary tumors or GH4C1 cell line was observed. We conclude that PEG inhibits the secretion of GH and PRL in primary cultures of human GH(/PRL)-secreting pituitary adenomas without effect on cell viability or cell proliferation. PMID:27267119

  18. Multi-responsiveness of single anterior pituitary cells to hypothalamic-releasing hormones: A cellular basis for paradoxical secretion

    PubMed Central

    Villalobos, Carlos; Núñez, Lucía; Frawley, L. Stephen; García-Sancho, Javier; Sánchez, Ana

    1997-01-01

    The classic view for hypothalamic regulation of anterior pituitary (AP) hormone secretion holds that release of each AP hormone is controlled specifically by a corresponding hypothalamic-releasing hormone (HRH). In this scenario, binding of a given HRH (thyrotropin-, growth hormone-, corticotropin-, and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormones) to specific receptors in its target cell increases the concentration of cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i), thereby selectively stimulating the release of the appropriate hormone. However, “paradoxical” responses of AP cells to the four well-established HRHs have been observed repeatedly with both in vivo and in vitro systems, raising the possibility of functional overlap between the different AP cell types. To explore this possibility, we evaluated the effects of HRHs on [Ca2+]i in single AP cells identified immunocytochemically by the hormone they stored. We found that each of the five major AP cell types contained discrete subpopulations that were able to respond to several HRHs. The relative abundance of these multi-responsive cells was 59% for lactotropes, 33% for thyrotropes, and in the range of 47–55% for gonadotropes, corticotropes, and somatotropes. Analysis of prolactin release from single living cells revealed that each of the four HRHs tested were able to induce hormone release from a discrete lactotrope subpopulation, the size of which corresponded closely to that in which [Ca2+]i changes were induced by the same secretagogues. When viewed as a whole, our diverse functional measurements of multi-responsiveness suggest that hypothalamic control of pituitary function is more complicated than previously envisioned. Moreover, they provide a cellular basis for the so-called “paradoxical” behavior of pituitary cells to hypothalamic hypophysiotropic agents. PMID:9391165

  19. Differential regulation of nuclear receptors, neuropeptides and peptide hormones in the hypothalamus and pituitary of food restricted rats.

    PubMed

    Lindblom, Jonas; Haitina, Tatjana; Fredriksson, Robert; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2005-01-05

    Food restriction is associated with a number of endocrine disturbances. We validated the experimental conditions for several house-keeping genes and determined the effects of 12 day 50% food restriction on hypothalamic and pituitary transcription of genes involved in different neuroendocrine systems, using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A total of 7 nuclear receptors and 12 neuropeptides and peptide hormones were investigated in the dorsal and ventral hypothalamus and the pituitary gland in rats. In the hypothalamus, food restriction reduced mRNA levels of estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha), progesterone receptor, glucocorticoid receptor, thyroid hormone receptor alpha and beta, pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), growth hormone-releasing factor (GHRF), corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), thyrotropin-releasing factor (TRF), somatostatin, and increased that of neuropeptide Y (NPY). In the pituitary, the treatment reduced growth hormone (GH), luteinizing hormone beta (LHbeta) and thyrotropin beta, but increased ERalpha mRNA levels. The study provides a map of how food restriction affects the regulation of a number of transcripts involved in neuroendocrine control.

  20. Direct evidence of estrogen modulation of pituitary sensitivity to luteinizing hormone-releasing factor during the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, C F; Yen, S S

    1975-01-01

    To delineate the role of estradiol in the augmented pituitary gonadotropin responsiveness to synthetic luteinizing hormone releasing factor (LRF) seen during high-estrogen phases of the ovulatory cycles (late follicular and midluteal phases), the anti-estrogenic effect of clomiphene citrate (Clomid) on pituitary response to LRF was evaluated during different phases of the ovulatory cycle. Clomid administration (100 mg/day times 5 days) completely negates the augmented gonadotropin responses to LRF (150 mug) during late follicular and midluteal phases observed during the control studies. Thus, a quantitatively and qualitatively similar pituitary sensitivity to LRF during three distinct phases of the menstrual cycle was induced by Clomid treatment that resembles the LRF responsiveness of themale pituitary. The present study demonstrates the pituitary component of the estrogen-induced changes in the sensitivity to LRF. From this and previous data, we conclude that the increases of estradiol secretion associated with the follicular maturation and corpus luteum formation represent a major component of the feedback signal in the modulation of cyclic gonadotropin release occasioned in a large measure by the augmented pituitary sensitivity to LRF. PMID:1088908

  1. In vivo correlation between c-Fos expression and corticotroph stimulation by adrenocorticotrophic hormone secretagogues in rat anterior pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Takigami, Shu; Fujiwara, Ken; Kikuchi, Motoshi; Yashiro, Takashi

    2008-03-01

    In the anterior pituitary gland, c-Fos expression is evoked by various stimuli. However, whether c-Fos expression is directly related to the stimulation of anterior pituitary cells by hypothalamic secretagogues is unclear. To confirm whether the reception of hormone-releasing stimuli evokes c-Fos expression in anterior pituitary cells, we have examined c-Fos expression of anterior pituitary glands in rats administered with synthetic corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) intravenously or subjected to restraint stress. Single intravenous administration of CRH increases the number of c-Fos-expressing cells, and this number does not change even if the dose is increased. Double-immunostaining has revealed that most of the c-Fos-expressing cells contain adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH); corticotrophs that do not express c-Fos in response to CRH have also been found. However, restraint stress evokes c-Fos expression in most of the corticotrophs and in a partial population of lactotrophs. These results suggest that c-Fos expression increases in corticotrophs stimulated by ACTH secretagogues, including CRH. Furthermore, we have found restricted numbers of corticotrophs expressing c-Fos in response to CRH. Although the mechanism underlying the different responses to CRH is not apparent, c-Fos is probably a useful immunohistochemical marker for corticotrophs stimulated by ACTH secretagogues.

  2. [Congestive heart failure caused by the thyroid stimulating hormone(TSH) secreting pituitary adenoma: report of two cases].

    PubMed

    Fujita, K; Yanaka, K; Tomono, Y; Kamezaki, T; Kujiraoka, Y; Nose, T

    2001-08-01

    A 42-year-old man and a 31-year-old man with congestive heart failure caused by the thyroid stimulating hormone(TSH) secreting pituitary adenoma were reported. Heart failure was improved after transsphenoidal resection of the pituitary adenoma in each patient. The syndrome of inappropriate secretion of TSH causes hyperthyroidism. Thyroid hormone acts directly on cardiac muscle to increase the stroke volume. Hyperthyroidism itself reduces the peripheral vascular resistance and an elevated basal metabolism which is the basic physiologic change in hyperthyroidism dilates small vessels and reduces vascular resistance. The reduced vascular resistance contributes to increase stroke volume. Thyroid hormone also acts directly on the cardiac pacemakers to be apt to cause tachycardiac atrial fibrillation. These mechanical changes in hyperthyroidism increase not only the cardiac output but also the venous return. The increased blood volume and the shortened ventricular filling time due to tachycardia result in congestive heart failure. TSH secreting pituitary adenoma is a rare tumor, however heart failure is common disease. TSH secreting pituitary adenoma should be taken into consideration in patients with heart failure. The presented cases were very enlightening to understand the relation between brain tumor and heart disease.

  3. The inflamed axis: the interaction between stress, hormones, and the expression of inflammatory-related genes within key structures comprising the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.

    PubMed

    Hueston, Cara M; Deak, Terrence

    2014-01-30

    Acute stress increases the expression of cytokines and other inflammatory-related factors in the CNS, plasma, and endocrine glands, and activation of inflammatory signaling pathways within the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis may play a key role in later stress sensitization. In addition to providing a summary of stress effects on neuroimmune changes within the CNS, we present a series of experiments that characterize stress effects on members of the interleukin-1β (IL-1) super-family and other inflammatory-related genes in key structures comprising the HPA axis (PVN, pituitary and adrenal glands), followed by a series of experiments examining the impact of exogenous hormone administration (CRH and ACTH) and dexamethasone on the expression of inflammatory-related genes in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. The results demonstrated robust, time-dependent, and asynchronous expression patterns for IL-1 and IL-1R2 in the PVN, with substantial increases in IL-6 and COX-2 in the adrenal glands emerging as key findings. The effects of exogenous CRH and ACTH were predominantly isolated within the adrenals. Finally, pretreatment with dexamethasone severely blunted neuroimmune changes in the adrenal glands, but not in the PVN. These findings provide novel insight into the relationship between stress, the expression of inflammatory signaling factors within key structures comprising the HPA axis, and their interaction with HPA hormones, and provide a foundation for better understanding the role of cytokines as modulators of hypothalamic, pituitary and adrenal sensitivity.

  4. Clinical guidelines for management of diabetes insipidus and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion after pituitary surgery.

    PubMed

    Lamas, Cristina; del Pozo, Carlos; Villabona, Carles

    2014-04-01

    Changes in water metabolism and regulation of vasopressin (AVP) or antidiuretic hormone (ADH) are common complications of pituitary surgery. The scarcity of studies comparing different treatment and monitoring strategies for these disorders and the lack of prior clinical guidelines makes it difficult to provide recommendations following a methodology based on grades of evidence. This study reviews the pathophysiology of diabetes insipidus and inappropriate ADH secretion after pituitary surgery, and is intended to serve as a guide for their diagnosis, differential diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring.

  5. A case of growth-hormone staining pituitary adenoma with renal cyst and hepatic cyst: are they related manifestations of a single disease?

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Liu, Pinan

    2014-01-01

    Growth-hormone staining pituitary adenoma is a popular disease of the central nervous system. We noticed some patients have accompanying cystic disorders. Several cases of concomitant growth-hormone (GH)-staining pituitary adenoma and other cystic changes have been reported but with no further investigation. We report a case of adult growth-hormone staining pituitary adenoma with accompanying polycystic changes of multiple systems, as well as hypertension and nephrolithiasis. Preoperative clinical assessment revealed intrasellar tumor, multinodular thyroid disorder, renal cysts, and hepatic cysts, with increased serum growth-hormone level and normal thyroid hormone level. The total tumor resection was performed via endoscopic transsphenoidal approach. The pathologic analysis reported growth-hormone staining pituitary adenoma. The postoperative course was uneventful. The endocrine testing was normal soon after the operation and the patient remained well for a follow-up period of eight months. This is the fifth report about simultaneous growth-hormone staining pituitary adenoma and polycystic changes of the kidneys and the liver. With review of the literature we speculate that the abnormal growth hormone secretion of the pituitary adenoma may arouse sequential cystic changes of multiple systems through some IGF-I involved pathways.

  6. In vitro conditions modify immunoassayability of bovine pituitary prolactin and growth hormone: insights into their secretory granule storage forms

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenson, M.Y.

    1985-04-01

    The amount of immunoassayable intracellular bovine (b) PRL and GH varies depending on treatment conditions. The present studies were designed to characterize the mechanisms involved and to compare immunoassayability of both hormones under similar conditions. Pituitary homogenate and secretory granule hormones displayed both time- and temperature-dependent increases when incubated at pH 10.5 with reduced glutathione. Changes in immunoassayability seem to reflect conversion from poorly immunoactive tissue hormone oligomers to monomeric hormone. The data indicate that oligomeric bPRL is stabilized primarily by intermolecular disulfide bonds, although it is also susceptible to urea, SDS, and EDTA; granule thiols may also influence the conversion to monomer. The storage form of bGH appears to be stabilized differently. Maneuvers demonstrated in these studies to influence immunoassayability correlate very well with their previously established effects on hormone release and secretion, strengthening the likelihood that a functional link exists between assayability and secretion.

  7. High Prevalence of Chronic Pituitary and Target-Organ Hormone Abnormalities after Blast-Related Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Charles W.; Pagulayan, Kathleen F.; Petrie, Eric C.; Mayer, Cynthia L.; Colasurdo, Elizabeth A.; Shofer, Jane B.; Hart, Kim L.; Hoff, David; Tarabochia, Matthew A.; Peskind, Elaine R.

    2011-01-01

    Studies of traumatic brain injury from all causes have found evidence of chronic hypopituitarism, defined by deficient production of one or more pituitary hormones at least 1 year after injury, in 25–50% of cases. Most studies found the occurrence of posttraumatic hypopituitarism (PTHP) to be unrelated to injury severity. Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) and hypogonadism were reported most frequently. Hypopituitarism, and in particular adult GHD, is associated with symptoms that resemble those of PTSD, including fatigue, anxiety, depression, irritability, insomnia, sexual dysfunction, cognitive deficiencies, and decreased quality of life. However, the prevalence of PTHP after blast-related mild TBI (mTBI), an extremely common injury in modern military operations, has not been characterized. We measured concentrations of 12 pituitary and target-organ hormones in two groups of male US Veterans of combat in Iraq or Afghanistan. One group consisted of participants with blast-related mTBI whose last blast exposure was at least 1 year prior to the study. The other consisted of Veterans with similar military deployment histories but without blast exposure. Eleven of 26, or 42% of participants with blast concussions were found to have abnormal hormone levels in one or more pituitary axes, a prevalence similar to that found in other forms of TBI. Five members of the mTBI group were found with markedly low age-adjusted insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) levels indicative of probable GHD, and three had testosterone and gonadotropin concentrations consistent with hypogonadism. If symptoms characteristic of both PTHP and PTSD can be linked to pituitary dysfunction, they may be amenable to treatment with hormone replacement. Routine screening for chronic hypopituitarism after blast concussion shows promise for appropriately directing diagnostic and therapeutic decisions that otherwise may remain unconsidered and for markedly facilitating recovery and rehabilitation. PMID

  8. Ghrelin increases intracellular Ca²⁺ concentration in the various hormone-producing cell types of the rat pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Mami; Aizawa, Sayaka; Tanaka, Toru; Sakai, Takafumi; Sakata, Ichiro

    2012-09-20

    Ghrelin, isolated from the stomach as an endogenous ligand for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R), has potent growth hormone release ability in vivo and in vitro. Although GHS-R is abundantly expressed in the pituitary gland, there is no direct evidence of a relationship between hormone-producing cells and functional GHS-R in the pituitary gland. The aim of this study was to determine which anterior pituitary cells respond to ghrelin stimulation in male rats. We performed Fura-2 Ca(2+) imaging analysis using isolated pituitary cells, and performed immunocytochemistry to identify the type of pituitary hormone-producing cells. In Fura-2 Ca(2+) imaging analysis, ghrelin administration increased the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in approximately 50% of total isolated anterior pituitary cells, and 20% of these cells strongly responded to ghrelin. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed that 82.9 ± 1.3% of cells that responded to ghrelin stimulation were GH-immunopositive. On the other hand, PRL-, LH-, and ACTH-immunopositive cells constituted 2.0 ± 0.3%, 12.6 ± 0.3%, and 2.5 ± 0.8% of ghrelin-responding pituitary cells, respectively. TSH-immunopositive cells did not respond to ghrelin treatment. These results suggest that ghrelin directly acts not only on somatotrophs, but also on mammotrophs, gonadotrophs, and corticotrophs in the rat pituitary gland.

  9. Pituitary gland imaging and outcome.

    PubMed

    Di Iorgi, Natascia; Morana, Giovanni; Gallizia, Anna Lisa; Maghnie, Mohamad

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows a detailed and precise anatomical study of the pituitary gland by differentiating between the anterior and posterior pituitary lobes. The identification of posterior pituitary hyperintensity, now considered a marker of neurohypophyseal functional integrity, has been the most striking advance for the diagnosis and understanding of anterior and posterior pituitary diseases. The advent of MRI has in fact led to a significant improvement in the understanding of the pathogenesis of disorders that affect the hypothalamo-pituitary area. Today, there is convincing evidence to support the hypothesis that marked MRI differences in pituitary morphology indicate a diverse range of disorders which affect the organogenesis and function of the anterior pituitary gland with different prognoses. Furthermore, the association of extrapituitary malformations accurately defined by MRI has supported a better definition of several conditions linked to pituitary hormone deficiencies and midline defects. MRI is a very informative procedure that should be used to support a diagnosis of hypopituitarism. It is useful in clinical management, because it helps endocrinologists determine which patients to target for further molecular studies and genetic counselling, which ones to screen for additional hormone deficits, and which ones may need growth hormone replacement into adult life.

  10. A FEEDBACK MODEL FOR TESTICULAR-PITUITARY AXIS HORMONE KINETICS AND THEIR EFFECTS ON THE REGULATION OF THE PROSTATE IN ADULT MALE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The testicular-hypothalamic-pituitary axis regulates male reproductive system functions. A model describing the kinetics and dynamics of testosterone (T), dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and luteinizing hormone (LH) was developed based on a model by Barton and Anderson (1997). The mode...

  11. Profiling of adrenocorticotropic hormone and arginine vasopressin in human pituitary gland and tumor thin tissue sections using droplet-based liquid-microjunction surface-sampling-HPLC-ESI-MS-MS.

    PubMed

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Calligaris, David; Feldman, Daniel R; Changelian, Armen; Laws, Edward R; Santagata, Sandro; Agar, Nathalie Y R; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2015-08-01

    Described here are the results from the profiling of the proteins arginine vasopressin (AVP) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) from normal human pituitary gland and pituitary adenoma tissue sections, using a fully automated droplet-based liquid-microjunction surface-sampling-HPLC-ESI-MS-MS system for spatially resolved sampling, HPLC separation, and mass spectrometric detection. Excellent correlation was found between the protein distribution data obtained with this method and data obtained with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) chemical imaging analyses of serial sections of the same tissue. The protein distributions correlated with the visible anatomic pattern of the pituitary gland. AVP was most abundant in the posterior pituitary gland region (neurohypophysis), and ATCH was dominant in the anterior pituitary gland region (adenohypophysis). The relative amounts of AVP and ACTH sampled from a series of ACTH-secreting and non-secreting pituitary adenomas correlated with histopathological evaluation. ACTH was readily detected at significantly higher levels in regions of ACTH-secreting adenomas and in normal anterior adenohypophysis compared with non-secreting adenoma and neurohypophysis. AVP was mostly detected in normal neurohypophysis, as expected. This work reveals that a fully automated droplet-based liquid-microjunction surface-sampling system coupled to HPLC-ESI-MS-MS can be readily used for spatially resolved sampling, separation, detection, and semi-quantitation of physiologically-relevant peptide and protein hormones, including AVP and ACTH, directly from human tissue. In addition, the relative simplicity, rapidity, and specificity of this method support the potential of this basic technology, with further advancement, for assisting surgical decision-making. Graphical Abstract Mass spectrometry based profiling of hormones in human pituitary gland and tumor thin tissue sections.

  12. Development and characterization of five rainbow trout pituitary single-cell clone lines capable of producing pituitary hormones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Five single-cell clone lines (mRTP1B, mRTP1E, mRTP1F, mRTP1K, and mRTP2A) have been developed from adult rainbow trout pituitary glands. These cell lines have been maintained in a CO2-independent medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) for more than 150 passages. At about 150 passages,...

  13. All Hormone-Producing Cell Types of the Pituitary Intermediate and Anterior Lobes Derive From Prop1-Expressing Progenitors.

    PubMed

    Davis, Shannon W; Keisler, Jessica L; Pérez-Millán, María I; Schade, Vanessa; Camper, Sally A

    2016-04-01

    Mutations in PROP1, the most common known cause of combined pituitary hormone deficiency in humans, can result in the progressive loss of all hormones of the pituitary anterior lobe. In mice, Prop1 mutations result in the failure to initiate transcription of Pou1f1 (also known as Pit1) and lack somatotropins, lactotropins, and thyrotropins. The basis for this species difference is unknown. We hypothesized that Prop1 is expressed in a progenitor cell that can develop into all anterior lobe cell types, and not just the somatotropes, thyrotropes, and lactotropes, which are collectively known as the PIT1 lineage. To test this idea, we produced a transgenic Prop1-cre mouse line and conducted lineage-tracing experiments of Prop1-expressing cells. The results reveal that all hormone-secreting cell types of both the anterior and intermediate lobes are descended from Prop1-expressing progenitors. The Prop1-cre mice also provide a valuable genetic reagent with a unique spatial and temporal expression for generating tissue-specific gene rearrangements early in pituitary gland development. We also determined that the minimal essential sequences for reliable Prop1 expression lie within 10 kilobases of the mouse gene and demonstrated that human PROP1 can substitute functionally for mouse Prop1. These studies enhance our understanding of the pathophysiology of disease in patients with PROP1 mutations.

  14. Aurora kinase B activity is modulated by thyroid hormone during transcriptional activation of pituitary genes.

    PubMed

    Tardáguila, Manuel; González-Gugel, Elena; Sánchez-Pacheco, Aurora

    2011-03-01

    Covalent histone modifications clearly play an essential role in ligand-dependent transcriptional regulation by nuclear receptors. One of the predominant mechanisms used by nuclear receptors to activate or repress target-gene transcription is the recruitment of coregulatory factors capable of covalently modify the amino terminal ends of histones. Here we show that the thyroid hormone (T3) produces a rapid increase in histone H3Ser10 phosphorylation (H3Ser10ph) concomitant to the rapid displacement of the heterochromatin protein 1β (HP1β) to the nuclear periphery. Moreover, we found that T3-mediated pituitary gene transcription is associated with an increase in H3Ser10ph. Interestingly, the Aurora kinase B inhibitor ZM443979 abolishes the effect of T3 on H3Ser10ph, blocks HP1β delocalization, and significantly reduces ligand-dependent transactivation. Similar effects were shown when Aurora kinase B expression was abrogated in small interfering RNA assays. In an effort to understand the underlying mechanism by which T3 increases H3Ser10ph, we demonstrate that liganded thyroid hormone receptor directly interacts with Aurora kinase B, increasing its kinase activity. Moreover, using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we have shown that Aurora kinase B participates of a mechanism that displaces HP1β from promoter region, thus preparing the chromatin for the transcriptional activation of T3 regulated genes. Our findings reveal a novel role for Aurora kinase B during transcriptional initiation in GO/G1, apart from its well-known mitotic activity.

  15. Effects of a diet regimen on pituitary and steroid hormones in male ice hockey players.

    PubMed

    Tegelman, R; Aberg, T; Pousette, A; Carlström, K

    1992-07-01

    Serum concentrations of androgens, cortisol, androgen binding proteins, pituitary hormones, together with anthropometric variables and sports performance were studied in two different elite male ice hockey teams. One of the teams (DIF, n = 22) participated in a special dietary program including reduction in fat from approximately 40 per cent of total energy intake (E%) to less than 30 E% and an increase in carbohydrate intake from 45 E% to about 55 E%, while the other (SSK, n = 21) served as a control group and had no special dietary program. The study covered a 7-month period. Basal values of serum testosterone, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), non-SHBG-bound testosterone (NST), cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHAS) and LH did not differ between the two teams. Serum concentrations of testosterone, SHBG, NST and cortisol increased significantly during the study period in the DIF group and were, with the exception of SHBG, significantly higher than in the SSK group at the end of the study (33.0 vs 26.8 nmol/l, p less than 0.05; 22.5 vs 18.3 nmol/l, p less than 0.05; and 548 vs 464 nmol/l, p less than 0.01). The ratio between NST and cortisol which was used as an index of anabolic/catabolic steroid balance did not change in either group during the study. A significant decrease in the serum concentrations of LH during the observation period was found in the SSK group. The endocrine differences between the teams may be explained by a relative negative energy balance in DIF, together with a reduced fat and increased carbohydrate intake.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. The effect of an exteroceptive stimulus on the concentration of melanocyte-stimulating hormone in the pituitary of lactating rats

    PubMed Central

    Deis, R. P.; Orias, R.

    1968-01-01

    1. A study was made of the effect of an exteroceptive stimulus, produced by a team of lactating rats and of litters while suckling, on the pituitary melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH) activity of a group of lactating rats. 2. After being isolated for 9 hr from their litter, one group of lactating rats was killed after being allowed to nurse for 30 min, another group was subjected to the exteroceptive stimulus for 15 min and then killed. Control rats were killed after 9 hr of isolation from the litter without being subjected to either suckling or the exteroceptive stimulus. 3. The group of rats which had suckled their young showed a pituitary MSH activity equal to 35 ± 2·29%, and the group exposed to the exteroceptive stimulus an activity equal to 59·5 ± 3·16% of that in the control animals. 4. When deaf rats were used, only the suckled mother showed a decrease of the pituitary MSH activity which was similar to that obtained with the normal suckled mother, indicating that the exteroceptive stimulus depended on hearing for its effect. 5. A light dose of sodium pentobarbitone was sufficient to block the effect of suckling and the auditory stimuli on the pituitary MSH activity. 6. The role of the central nervous system in this phenomenon and the possibility that MSH is implicated in the process of lactation are discussed. PMID:5691946

  17. Guanine nucleotide regulation of receptor binding of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) in rat brain regions, retina and pituitary.

    PubMed

    Sharif, N A; Burt, D R

    1987-10-29

    Guanine nucleotides inhibited the specific binding of [3H](3-Me-His2)thyrotropin-releasing hormone ([3H]MeTRH) to receptors for TRH in washed homogenates of rat anterior pituitary gland in a dose-related manner. The order of potency (at 100 and 500 microM final) was Gpp(NH)p (a stable analog of GTP) greater than GTP much greater than GDP much greater than cGMP (with the adenine nucleotides being inactive) in the pituitary and various brain regions. Gpp(NH)p at 1 mM caused 17-35% inhibition of [3H]MeTRH binding to different tissues including the pituitary, hypothalamus, retina and nucleus accumbens. A statistically significant nucleotide effect was not observed, however, in the olfactory bulb and medulla/pons membranes. Gpp(NH)p (1 mM) increased the dissociation constants for [3H]MeTRH binding by 1.9- to 2.4-fold in the pituitary, n. accumbens and retinal preparations without altering the apparent binding capacity. These data suggest that TRH receptor binding can be allosterically regulated by guanine nucleotides and provide further evidence for the existence of guanine nucleotide binding protein(s) coupled to the TRH receptor.

  18. Endoscopic approach to a collision tumor of growth hormone-secreting adenoma and gangliocytoma in the pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Tanriover, Necmettin; Aydin, Ovgu; Kucukyuruk, Baris; Abuzayed, Bashar; Guler, Huseyin; Oz, Buge; Gazioglu, Nurperi

    2014-07-01

    The authors share their experience on a collision tumor of growth hormone (GH)-secreting adenoma and gangliocytoma in the pituitary gland, which was reported by few articles in the literature. Also, an intraoperative view of this tumor, operated via endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach, is presented for the first time. A 39-year-old female patient was admitted with clinical manifestation of acromegaly present in a 2-year period. Laboratory investigations revealed high levels of GH and insulinlike growth factor 1. Sellar computed tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging showed a sellar mass diagnosed as a pituitary adenoma. Based on clinical, biochemical, and radiologic evaluations, GH-secreting pituitary adenoma was diagnosed and operated by endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach achieving total removal of the tumor. Histopathologic examination revealed a collision tumor of GH-secreting adenoma and gangliocytoma. Postoperative radiologic and biochemical investigations showed no residual tumor and total remission. The endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach promotes a close intraoperative view of sellar pathologies. We believe that a detailed histopathologic workup is necessary to diagnose collision tumors, because even a close intraoperative view does not facilitate to differentiate these tumors from a regular pituitary adenoma.

  19. Effects of soy consumption on gonadotropin secretion and acute pituitary responses to gonadotropin-releasing hormone in women.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, Jill; Lasley, Bill L; Nakajima, Steven T; Setchell, Kenneth D R; Schneeman, Barbara O

    2002-04-01

    Soy contains the isoflavone phytoestrogens, genistein and daidzein. These isoflavones are partial estrogen agonists in cell and animal models, but effects from dietary soy in humans are unclear. Experiments were conducted in pre- and postmenopausal women to examine whether dietary isoflavones from soy behave as estrogen agonists, antagonists or have no effect on the estrogen-sensitive pituitary. Pituitary sensitivity to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), an estrogen-sensitive endpoint, was measured during GnRH challenge tests administered before, during and after dietary soy consumption. The response to an isoflavone-rich soy food diet was examined in five premenopausal and seven postmenopausal women using transdermal estrogen replacement therapy. Estrogen agonists suppress gonadotropin concentrations and enhance GnRH priming (enhanced gonadotropin secretion in response to repeated doses of GnRH), whereas antagonists elevate gonadotropin concentrations and have no effect on GnRH priming. Each subject consumed 50 g textured soy protein containing 60 mg total isoflavones daily for 10-14 d. Baseline estradiol concentrations were consistent among study periods. In both pre- and postmenopausal women, soy consumption did not affect mean baseline or peak luteinizing hormone (LH) concentrations, indicating a lack of estrogen-like effect at the level of the pituitary. However, in postmenopausal subjects, mean LH secretion decreased after discontinuing soy, suggesting a residual estrogenic effect. In one premenopausal woman, enhanced LH secretion was observed after soy treatment, suggesting there may be subpopulations of women who are highly sensitive to isoflavones.

  20. Expression of the putative gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone receptor, NPFFR1, in the anterior pituitary gland of the gilt is affected by age and sexual maturation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) purportedly suppresses secretion of luteinizing hormone (LH) by acting through a G-protein coupled receptor (NPFFR1) in the anterior pituitary gland and hypothalamus. The objective of these studies was to determine if expression of mRNA for NPFFR1 in the reprod...

  1. Data on the characterization of follicle-stimulating hormone monoclonal antibodies and localization in Japanese eel pituitary.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Jung; Park, Chae-Won; Byambaragchaa, Munkhzaya; Kim, Shin-Kwon; Lee, Bae-Ik; Hwang, Hyung-Kyu; Myeong, Jeong-In; Hong, Sun-Mee; Kang, Myung-Hwa; Min, Kwan-Sik

    2016-09-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were generated against recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone (rec-FSH) from Japanese eel Anguilla japonica; rec-FSH was produced in Escherichia coli and purified using Ni-NTA Sepharose column chromatography. In support of our recent publication, "Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against recombinant tethered follicle-stimulating hormone from Japanese eel Anguilla japonica" [1], it was important to characterize the specificity of eel follicle-stimulating hormone antibodies. Here, the production and ELISA system of these monoclonal antibodies are presented. The affinity-purified monoclonal antibodies specifically detected eel rec-FSH in ELISA and on western blots of rec-FSH produced from CHO cells. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that FSH staining was specifically localized in the eel pituitary.

  2. [Influence of replacement growth hormone therapy (hGH) on pituitary-thyroid and pituitary-adrenal systems in prepubertal children with GH deficiency].

    PubMed

    Vyshnevs'ka, O A; Bol'shova, O V

    2013-06-01

    Today, the most pathogenic therapy of GH deficiency is hGH replacement therapy. Replacement hGH therapy a highly effective method of growth correction in children with GH deficiency, but further investigations are necessary for timely detection of disturbances of other organs and systems. The authors reported that hGH therapy supressed thyroid and adrenal functions. Besides, most patients with GH deficiency have multiple defficiency of pituitary hormones (both TSH and ACTH), so hGH therapy can enhances hypothyroidism and hypoadrenalism. In the Department of Pediatric Endocrinology of the Institute of Endocrinology and Metabolism a great experience was accumulated in the treatment of GH deficiency children and in the study of the efficacy and safety of this treatment.

  3. Hormone levels

    MedlinePlus

    Blood or urine tests can determine the levels of various hormones in the body. This includes reproductive hormones, thyroid hormones, adrenal hormones, pituitary hormones, and many others. For more information, see: ...

  4. Overexpression of the growth-hormone-releasing hormone gene in acromegaly-associated pituitary tumors. An event associated with neoplastic progression and aggressive behavior.

    PubMed Central

    Thapar, K.; Kovacs, K.; Stefaneanu, L.; Scheithauer, B.; Killinger, D. W.; Lioyd, R. V.; Smyth, H. S.; Barr, A.; Thorner, M. O.; Gaylinn, B.; Laws, E. R.

    1997-01-01

    The clinical behavior of growth hormone (GH)-producing pituitary tumors is known to vary greatly; however, the events underlying this variability remain poorly understood. Herein we demonstrate that tumor overexpression of the GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) gene is one prognostically informative event associated with the clinical aggressiveness of somatotroph pituitary tumors. Accumulation of GHRH mRNA transcripts was demonstrated in 91 of a consecutive series of 100 somatotroph tumors by in situ hybridization; these findings were corroborated by Northern analysis and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, and protein translation was confirmed by Western blotting. By comparison, transcript accumulation was absent or negligibly low in 30 normal pituitary glands. GHRH transcripts were found to preferentially accumulate among clinically aggressive tumors. Specifically, GHRH mRNA signal intensity was 1) linearly correlated with Ki-67 tumor growth fractions (r = 0.71; P < 0.001), 2) linearly correlated with preoperative serum GH levels (r = 0.56; p = 0.01), 3) higher among invasive tumors (P < 0.001), and 4) highest in those tumors in which post-operative remission was not achieved (P < 0.001). Using multivariate logistic regression, a model of postoperative remission likelihood was derived wherein remission was defined by the single criterion of suppressibility of GH levels to less than 2 ng/ml during an oral glucose tolerance test. In this outcome model, GHRH mRNA signal intensity proved to be the most important explanatory variable overall, eclipsing any and all conventional clinicopathological predictors as the single most significant predictor of postoperative remission; increases in GHRH mRNA signal were associated with marked declines in remission likelihood. The generalizability of this outcome model was further validated by the model's significant performance in predicting postoperative remission in a random sample of 30 somatotroph tumors treated at

  5. Seasonal changes of responses to gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog in expression of growth hormone/prolactin/somatolactin genes in the pituitary of masu salmon.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Ramji Kumar; Taniyama, Shinya; Kitahashi, Takashi; Ando, Hironori; Yamauchi, Kohei; Zohar, Yonathan; Ueda, Hiroshi; Urano, Akihisa

    2003-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is considered to stimulate secretion of growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), and somatolactin (SL) at particular stages of growth and sexual maturation in teleost fishes. We therefore examined seasonal variation in the pituitary levels of GH/PRL/SL mRNAs, and tried to clarify seasonal changes of responses to GnRH in expression of GH/PRL/SL genes, in the pituitaries of growing and maturing masu salmon (Oncorhynchus masou). Pituitary samples were monthly collected one week after implantation with GnRH analog (GnRHa). The levels of mRNAs encoding GH, PRL, and SL precursors in single pituitaries were determined by a real-time polymerase chain reaction method. The fork lengths and body weights of control and GnRHa-implanted fish of both sexes gradually increased and peaked out in September of 2-year-old (2+) when fish spawned. GnRHa implantation did not stimulate somatic growth, nor elevate gonadosomatic index (GSI) of 1+ and 2+ males, whereas it significantly increased GSI of 2+ females in late August to early September. The GnRHa-implanted 1+ males had higher levels of GH and PRL mRNAs in July, and SL mRNA from June to August than the control males. The levels of GH, PRL, and SL mRNAs in the control and GnRHa-implanted 1+ females, however, did not show any significant changes. Afterward, the PRL mRNA levels elevated in the control 2+ fish of both sexes in spring. GnRHa elevated the GH mRNA levels in both males and females in 2+ winter, and the PRL mRNA levels in females in early spring. Regardless of sex and GnRHa-implantation, the SL mRNA levels increased during sexual maturation. In growing and maturing masu salmon, expression of genes encoding GH, PRL, and SL in the pituitary is thus sensitive to GnRH in particular seasons probably in relation to physiological roles of the hormones.

  6. Isolation of the pituitary gonadotrophic α-subunit hormone of the giant amazonian fish: pirarucu (Arapaima gigas).

    PubMed

    Faria, M T; Carvalho, R F; Sevilhano, T C A; Oliveira, N A J; Silva, C F P; Oliveira, J E; Soares, C R J; Garcez, R; Santo, P R E; Bartolini, P

    2013-06-01

    The cDNAs of the α-subunit of the pituitary gonadotrophic hormones (GTHα) of fish of the order Osteoglossiformes or the superorder Osteoglossomorpha have never been sequenced. For a better understanding the phylogenetic diversity and evolution of PGHα in fish and for future biotechnological synthesis of the gonadotrophic hormones (ag-FSH and ag-LH), of Arapaima gigas, one of the largest freshwater fishes of the world, its GTHα cDNA was synthesized by reverse transcriptase and the polymerase chain reaction starting from total pituitary RNA. The ag-GTHα-subunit was found to be encoded by 348 bp, corresponding to a protein of 115 amino acids, with a putative signal peptide of 24 amino acids and a mature peptide of 91 amino acids. Ten cysteine residues, responsible for forming 5 disulfide linkages, 2 putative N-linked glycosylation sites and 3 proline residues, were found to be conserved on the basis of the known sequences of vertebrate gonadotrophic hormones. Phylogenetic analysis, based on the amino acid sequences of 38 GTHα-subunits, revealed the highest identity of A. gigas with members of the Acipenseriformes, Anguilliformes, Siluriformes and Cypriniformes (87.1-89.5 %) and the lowest with Gadiformes and Cyprinodontiformes (55.0 %). The obtained phylogenetic tree agrees with previous analysis of teleostei, since A. gigas, of the order of Osteoglossiformes, appears as the sister group of Clupeocephala, while Elopomorpha forms the most basal group of all other teleosts.

  7. Receptors for corticotropin-releasing hormone in human pituitary: Binding characteristics and autoradiographic localization to immunocytochemically defined proopiomelanocortin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smets, G.; Vauquelin, G.; Moons, L.; Smitz, J.; Kloeppel, G. )

    1991-08-01

    Using autoradiography combined with immunocytochemistry, the authors demonstrated that the target cells of CRH in the human pituitary were proopiomelanocortin cells. Scatchard analysis of (125I)Tyr0-oCRH saturation binding revealed the presence of one class of saturable, high affinity sites on pituitary tissue homogenate. The equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) for (125I)Tyr0-oCRH ranged from 1.1-1.6 nM, and the receptor density was between 200-350 fmol/mg protein. Fixation of cryostat sections with 4% paraformaldehyde before tracer incubation improved both tissue preservation and localization of the CRH receptor at the cellular level. Additional postfixation with 1% glutaraldehyde inhibited tracer diffusion during subsequent immunocytochemistry and autoradiography. (125I)Tyr0-oCRH was found in cytoplasmic inclusions or at the cell periphery of ACTH/beta-endorphin cells in the anterior pituitary. Single cells of the posterior pituitary were also CRH receptor positive. Cells staining for PRL or GH were CRH receptor negative. They conclude that CRH binds only to high affinity receptors on ACTH/{beta}-endorphin cells in the human pituitary.

  8. Hormonal status modifies renin-angiotensin system-regulating aminopeptidases and vasopressin-degrading activity in the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis of male mice.

    PubMed

    García, María Jesús; Martínez-Martos, José Manuel; Mayas, María Dolores; Carrera, María Pilar; Ramírez-Expósito, María Jesús

    2003-06-20

    Local renin-angiotensin systems (RAS) have been postulated in brain, pituitary and adrenal glands. These local RAS have been implicated, respectively, in the central regulation of the cardiovascular system and body water balance, the secretion of pituitary hormones and the secretion of aldosterone by adrenal glands. By other hand, it is known that the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is involved in blood pressure regulation, and is affected by sex hormones. The aim of the present work is to analyze the influence of testosterone on RAS-regulating aminopeptidase A, B and M activities and vasopressin-degrading activity in the HPA axis, measuring these activities in their soluble and membrane-bound forms in the hypothalamus, pituitary and adrenal glands of orchidectomized males and orchidectomized males treated subcutaneously with several doses of testosterone. The present data suggest that in male mice, testosterone influences the RAS- and vasopressin-degrading activities at all levels of the HPA axis.

  9. Adrenocorticotropic hormone in serial cerebrospinal fluid in man - Subject to acute regulation by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical system?

    PubMed

    Kellner, Michael; Wortmann, Viola; Salzwedel, Cornelie; Kober, Daniel; Petzoldt, Martin; Urbanowicz, Tatiana; Pulic, Mersija; Boelmans, Kai; Yassouridis, Alexander; Wiedemann, Klaus

    2016-05-30

    Acute regulation of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical system has not been investigated in man. In a pilot study in healthy male volunteers we measured ACTH every twenty minutes in serial CSF for three hours after an intravenous placebo, hydrocortisone (100mg) or insulin (2mg/kg) injection. No acute inhibitory or stimulatory effects of these interventions were discovered. Our results corroborate previous findings in rhesus monkeys. The regulation of CSF ACTH and its potential relevance for behavioral alterations in health and disease (e.g. major depression or anorexia nervosa) in humans need further study.

  10. The effects of subchronic acrylamide exposure on gene expression, neurochemistry, hormones, and histopathology in the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis of male Fischer 344 rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bowyer, J.F.; Latendresse, J.R.; Delongchamp, R.R.; Muskhelishvili, L.; Warbritton, A.R.; Thomas, M.; Tareke, E.; McDaniel, L.P.; Doerge, D.R.

    2008-07-15

    Acrylamide (AA) is an important industrial chemical that is neurotoxic in rodents and humans and carcinogenic in rodents. The observation of cancer in endocrine-responsive tissues in Fischer 344 rats has prompted hypotheses of hormonal dysregulation, as opposed to DNA damage, as the mechanism for tumor induction by AA. The current investigation examines possible evidence for disruption of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis from 14 days of repeated exposure of male Fischer 344 rats to doses of AA that range from one that is carcinogenic after lifetime exposure (2.5 mg/kg/d), an intermediate dose (10 mg/kg/d), and a high dose (50 mg/kg/d) that is neurotoxic for this exposure time. The endpoints selected include: serum levels of thyroid and pituitary hormones; target tissue expression of genes involved in hormone synthesis, release, and receptors; neurotransmitters in the CNS that affect hormone homeostasis; and histopathological evaluation of target tissues. These studies showed virtually no evidence for systematic alteration of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis and do not support hormone dysregulation as a plausible mechanism for AA-induced thyroid cancer in the Fischer 344 rat. Specifically, there were no significant changes in: 1) mRNA levels in hypothalamus or pituitary for TRH, TSH, thyroid hormone receptor {alpha} and {beta}, as well 10 other hormones or releasing factors; 2) mRNA levels in thyroid for thyroglobulin, thyroid peroxidase, sodium iodide symporter, or type I deiodinases; 3) serum TSH or T3 levels (T4 was decreased at high dose only); 4) dopaminergic tone in the hypothalamus and pituitary or importantly 5) increased cell proliferation (Mki67 mRNA and Ki-67 protein levels were not increased) in thyroid or pituitary. These negative findings are consistent with a genotoxic mechanism of AA carcinogenicity based on metabolism to glycidamide and DNA adduct formation. Clarification of this mechanistic dichotomy may be useful in human cancer risk

  11. The pituitary-thyroid axis during the parr-smolt transformation of Coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch: quantification of TSH β mRNA, TSH, and thyroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Donald A; Swanson, Penny; Dickhoff, Walton W

    2011-05-01

    The objective of this investigation was to quantify pituitary thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) β mRNA, pituitary and plasma TSH and plasma thyroid hormone levels during the parr-smolt transformation of Coho salmon that occurs in spring from February to May. The status of the pituitary-thyroid axis was assessed using an RNase protection assay for pituitary TSH β mRNA and radioimmunoassays for salmon pituitary and plasma TSH and thyroid hormones. TSH β mRNA was highest during late winter (February) (4.9 pg/μg DNA) and gradually declined during spring (2.3 pg/μg DNA). In contrast, pituitary and plasma TSH levels showed a small, but statistically non-significant change during smoltification. Despite minimal change in plasma TSH levels, characteristically large increases in plasma T4 (January-3.3 ng/ml to April-10.2 ng/ml) and significant, but modest increases in plasma T3 (February-2.4 ng/ml to April-5.8 ng/ml) were observed. Regression analysis showed a significant positive relationship between plasma T4 and T3 and negative relationship between plasma T3 and pituitary TSH β mRNA. However, all other relations were not significant. These data suggest a significant role for peripheral regulation (i.e. T4-T3 conversion, change in tissue sensitivity, hormone degradation rate) as well as evidence of central regulation via negative feedback at the level of the pituitary gland in regulation of thyroid activity in salmon. Furthermore, the increased thyroid sensitivity to TSH (shown previously), in the face of relatively constant plasma TSH levels, may be the major factor responsible for the increased thyroid activity observed during smoltification.

  12. Sex steroid hormones do not enhance the direct stimulatory effect of kisspetin-10 on the secretion of growth hormone from bovine anterior pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Ezzat Ahmed, Ahmed; Saito, Hayato; Sawada, Tatsuru; Yaegashi, Tomoyoshi; Jin, Jin; Sawai, Ken; Yamashita, Tetsuro; Hashizume, Tsutomu

    2011-02-01

    The aims of the present study were to clarify the effect of kisspeptin10 (Kp10) on the secretion of growth hormone (GH) from bovine anterior pituitary (AP) cells, and evaluate the ability of sex steroid hormones to enhance the sensitivity of somatotrophic cells to Kp10. AP cells prepared from 8-11-month-old castrated calves were incubated for 12 h with estradiol (E(2), 10(-8) mol/L),progesterone (P(4), 10(-8) mol/L), testosterone (T, 10(-8) mol/L), or vehicle only (control), and then for 2 h with Kp10. The amount of GH released in the medium was measured by a time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay. Kp10 (10(-6) or 10(-5) mol/L) significantly stimulated the secretion of GH from the AP cells regardless of steroid treatments (P < 0.05), and E(2), P(4), and T had no effect on this response. The GH-releasing response to growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH, 10(-8) mol/L) was significantly greater than that to Kp10 (P < 0.05). The present results suggest that Kp10 directly stimulates the release of GH from somatotrophic cells and sex steroid hormones do not enhance the sensitivity of these cells to Kp10. Furthermore, they suggest that the GH-releasing effect of Kp10 is less potent than that of GHRH.

  13. Release of Multiple Hormones by a Direct Action of Interleukin-1 on Pituitary Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-23

    monolayer culture was investigated. Recombinant human IL-I beta stimulated the secretion of adrenocorticotropic hormone, luteinizing hormone, growth ... hormone , and thyroid-stimulating hormone. Prolactin secretion by the monolayers was inhibited by similar doses. These concentrations of IL-I are within

  14. Negative Feedback Control of Pituitary Thyroid-stimulating Hormone Synthesis and Secretion by Thyroid Hormones during Metamorphosis in Xenopus laevis

    EPA Science Inventory

    A basic understanding of the endocrinology of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis of anuran larvae is necessary for predicting the consequences of HPT perturbation by thyroid-disrupting chemicals (TDCs) on the whole organism. This project examined negative feedback con...

  15. Interaction of growth hormone overexpression and nutritional status on pituitary gland clock gene expression in coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Hyoung; White, Samantha L; Devlin, Robert H

    2015-02-01

    Clock genes are involved in generating a circadian rhythm that is integrated with the metabolic state of an organism and information from the environment. Growth hormone (GH) transgenic coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch, show a large increase in growth rate, but also attenuated seasonal growth modulations, modified timing of physiological transformations (e.g. smoltification) and disruptions in pituitary gene expression compared with wild-type salmon. In several fishes, circadian rhythm gene expression has been found to oscillate in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, as well as in multiple peripheral tissues, but this control system has not been examined in the pituitary gland nor has the effect of transgenic growth modification been examined. Thus, the daily expression of 10 core clock genes has been examined in pituitary glands of GH transgenic (T) and wild-type coho salmon (NT) entrained on a regular photocycle (12L: 12D) and provided either with scheduled feeding or had food withheld for 60 h. Most clock genes in both genotypes showed oscillating patterns of mRNA levels with light and dark cycles. However, T showed different amplitudes and patterns of expression compared with wild salmon, both in fed and starved conditions. The results from this study indicate that constitutive expression of GH is associated with changes in clock gene regulation, which may play a role in the disrupted behavioural and physiological phenotypes observed in growth-modified transgenic strains.

  16. DNA methylation of pituitary growth hormone is involved in male growth superiority of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Zhong, Huan; Xiao, Jun; Chen, Wenzhi; Zhou, Yi; Tang, Zhanyang; Guo, Zhongbao; Luo, Yongju; Lin, Zhengbao; Gan, Xi; Zhang, Ming

    2014-05-01

    Growth hormone (GH) and its receptors are critical regulators of somatic growth and metabolism. It has been shown in mammals that the methylation of cytosines within the GH promoter plays a key role in regulating transcripts expression. In the present study, the GH, GHR1 and GHR2 proximal promoters were identified and the methylation levels of these genes in corresponding tissues were assayed. The results suggested that significant arising of GH putative promoter methylation levels in pituitary was observed in females compared with males. However, no such sex-specific changes were found in GHR1 and GHR2 promoters. The GH mRNA expression also was influenced by GH promoter methylation levels in pituitary, which resulted in the higher growth rate of Nile tilapia males. Meanwhile, the methylation levels of GH putative promoter were negatively correlated with growth rate as well as mRNA expression of GH. Furthermore, the methylation of specific E-Box CpG site is also negatively related to the mRNA expression of GH in pituitary. Taken together, our data provide an epigenetic mechanism of explicating the sex duality in phenotypic plasticity of growth rate in male and female of Nile tilapia.

  17. Dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channel activity related to prolactin, growth hormone, and luteinizing hormone release from anterior pituitary cells in culture: interactions with somatostatin, dopamine, and estrogens

    SciTech Connect

    Drouva, S.V.; Rerat, E.; Bihoreau, C.; Laplante, E.; Rasolonjanahary, R.; Clauser, H.; Kordon, C.

    1988-12-01

    In the present work, we determined the activity of voltage-dependent dihydropyridine (DHP)-sensitive Ca2+ channels related to PRL, GH, and LH secretion in primary cultures of pituitary cells from male or female rats. We investigated their modulation by 17 beta-estradiol (E2) and their involvement in dopamine (DA) and somatostatin (SRIF) inhibition of PRL and GH release. BAY-K-8644 (BAYK), a DHP agonist which increases the opening time of already activated channels, stimulated PRL and GH secretion in a dose-dependent manner. The effect was more pronounced on PRL than on GH release. BAYK-evoked hormone secretion was further amplified by simultaneous application of K+ (30 or 56 mM) to the cell cultures; in parallel, BAYK-induced 45Ca uptake by the cells was potentiated in the presence of depolarizing stimuli. In contrast, BAYK was unable to stimulate LH secretion from male pituitary cells, but it potentiated LHRH- as well as K+-induced LH release; it had only a weak effect on LH secretion from female cell cultures. Basal and BAYK-induced pituitary hormone release were blocked by the Ca2+ channel antagonist nitrendipine. Under no condition did BAYK affect the hydrolysis of phosphoinositides or cAMP formation. Pretreatment of female pituitary cell cultures with E2 (10(-9) M) for 72 h enhanced LH and PRL responses to BAYK, but was ineffective on GH secretion. DA (10(-7) M) inhibited basal and BAYK-induced PRL release from male or female pituitary cells treated or not treated with E2 (10(-9) M). SRIF (10(-9) and 10(-8) M) reversed BAYK-evoked GH release to the same extent in cell cultures derived from male or female animals. It was ineffective on BAYK-induced PRL secretion in the absence of E2, but antagonized it after E2 pretreatment. The effect was dependent upon the time of steroid treatment and was specific, since 17 alpha-estradiol was inactive.

  18. Profiling of adrenocorticotropic hormone and arginine vasopressin in human pituitary gland and tumor thin tissue sections using droplet-based liquid-microjunction surface-sampling-HPLC–ESI-MS–MS

    DOE PAGES

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Calligaris, David; Feldman, Daniel R.; ...

    2015-06-18

    Described here are the results from the profiling of the proteins arginine vasopressin (AVP) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) from normal human pituitary gland and pituitary adenoma tissue sections using a fully automated droplet-based liquid microjunction surface sampling-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS system for spatially resolved sampling, HPLC separation, and mass spectral detection. Excellent correlation was found between the protein distribution data obtained with this droplet-based liquid microjunction surface sampling-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS system and those data obtained with matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) chemical imaging analyses of serial sections of the same tissue. The protein distributions correlated with the visible anatomic pattern of the pituitary gland.more » AVP was most abundant in the posterior pituitary gland region (neurohypophysis) and ATCH was dominant in the anterior pituitary gland region (adenohypophysis). The relative amounts of AVP and ACTH sampled from a series of ACTH secreting and non-secreting pituitary adenomas correlated with histopathological evaluation. ACTH was readily detected at significantly higher levels in regions of ACTH secreting adenomas and in normal anterior adenohypophysis compared to non-secreting adenoma and neurohypophysis. AVP was mostly detected in normal neurohypophysis as anticipated. This work demonstrates that a fully automated droplet-based liquid microjunction surface sampling system coupled to HPLC-ESI-MS/MS can be readily used for spatially resolved sampling, separation, detection, and semi-quantitation of physiologically-relevant peptide and protein hormones, such as AVP and ACTH, directly from human tissue. In addition, the relative simplicity, rapidity and specificity of the current methodology support the potential of this basic technology with further advancement for assisting surgical decision-making.« less

  19. Profiling of adrenocorticotropic hormone and arginine vasopressin in human pituitary gland and tumor thin tissue sections using droplet-based liquid-microjunction surface-sampling-HPLC–ESI-MS–MS

    SciTech Connect

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Calligaris, David; Feldman, Daniel R.; Changelian, Armen; Laws, Edward R.; Santagata, Sandro; Agar, Nathalie Y. R.; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2015-06-18

    Described here are the results from the profiling of the proteins arginine vasopressin (AVP) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) from normal human pituitary gland and pituitary adenoma tissue sections using a fully automated droplet-based liquid microjunction surface sampling-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS system for spatially resolved sampling, HPLC separation, and mass spectral detection. Excellent correlation was found between the protein distribution data obtained with this droplet-based liquid microjunction surface sampling-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS system and those data obtained with matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) chemical imaging analyses of serial sections of the same tissue. The protein distributions correlated with the visible anatomic pattern of the pituitary gland. AVP was most abundant in the posterior pituitary gland region (neurohypophysis) and ATCH was dominant in the anterior pituitary gland region (adenohypophysis). The relative amounts of AVP and ACTH sampled from a series of ACTH secreting and non-secreting pituitary adenomas correlated with histopathological evaluation. ACTH was readily detected at significantly higher levels in regions of ACTH secreting adenomas and in normal anterior adenohypophysis compared to non-secreting adenoma and neurohypophysis. AVP was mostly detected in normal neurohypophysis as anticipated. This work demonstrates that a fully automated droplet-based liquid microjunction surface sampling system coupled to HPLC-ESI-MS/MS can be readily used for spatially resolved sampling, separation, detection, and semi-quantitation of physiologically-relevant peptide and protein hormones, such as AVP and ACTH, directly from human tissue. In addition, the relative simplicity, rapidity and specificity of the current methodology support the potential of this basic technology with further advancement for assisting surgical decision-making.

  20. Leucine-enkephalin-like immunoreactivity is localized in luteinizing hormone-producing cells in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) pituitary.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hirohumi; Yamamoto, Toshiharu

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we used immunohistochemical techniques to determine the cell type of leucine-enkephalin (Leu-ENK)-immunoreactive cells in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) pituitary. Immunoreactive cells were scattered throughout the pars distalis except for the dorso-caudal portion. These cells were immuno-positive for luteinizing hormone (LH), but they were immuno-negative for adrenocorticotrophic, growth, and thyroid-stimulating hormones, as well as prolactin. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated that Leu-ENK-like substance and LH co-localized within the same secretory granules. Leu-ENK secreted from gonadotrophs may participate in LH secretion in an autocrine fashion, and/or may participate in the release of sex steroids together with LH.

  1. The anterior pituitary gland: lessons from livestock.

    PubMed

    Scanes, C G; Jeftinija, S; Glavaski-Joksimovic, A; Proudman, J; Arámburo, C; Anderson, L L

    2005-07-01

    There has been extensive research of the anterior pituitary gland of livestock and poultry due to the economic (agricultural) importance of physiological processes controlled by it including reproduction, growth, lactation and stress. Moreover, farm animals can be biomedical models or useful in evolutionary/ecological research. There are for multiple sites of control of the secretion of anterior pituitary hormones. These include the potential for independent control of proliferation, differentiation, de-differentiation and/or inter-conversion cell death, expression and translation, post-translational modification (potentially generating multiple isoforms with potentially different biological activities), release with or without a specific binding protein and intra-cellular catabolism (proteolysis) of pituitary hormones. Multiple hypothalamic hypophysiotropic peptides (which may also be produced peripherally, e.g. ghrelin) influence the secretion of the anterior pituitary hormones. There is also feedback for hormones from the target endocrine glands. These control mechanisms show broadly a consistency across species and life stages; however, there are some marked differences. Examples from growth hormone, prolactin, follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone will be considered. In addition, attention will be focused on areas that have been neglected including the role of stellate cells, multiple sub-types of the major adenohypophyseal cells, functional zonation within the anterior pituitary and the role of multiple secretagogues for single hormones.

  2. Molecular cloning of pituitary glycoprotein alpha-subunit and follicle stimulating hormone and chorionic gonadotropin beta-subunits from New World squirrel monkey and owl monkey.

    PubMed

    Scammell, Jonathan G; Funkhouser, Jane D; Moyer, Felricia S; Gibson, Susan V; Willis, Donna L

    2008-02-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize the gonadotropins expressed in pituitary glands of the New World squirrel monkey (Saimiri sp.) and owl monkey (Aotus sp.). The various subunits were amplified from total RNA from squirrel monkey and owl monkey pituitary glands by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and the deduced amino acid sequences compared to those of other species. Mature squirrel monkey and owl monkey glycoprotein hormone alpha-polypeptides (96 amino acids in length) were determined to be 80% homologous to the human sequence. The sequences of mature beta subunits of follicle stimulating hormone (FSHbeta) from squirrel monkey and owl monkey (111 amino acids in length) are 92% homologous to human FSHbeta. New World primate glycoprotein hormone alpha-polypeptides and FSHbeta subunits showed conservation of all cysteine residues and consensus N-linked glycosylation sites. Attempts to amplify the beta-subunit of luteinizing hormone from squirrel monkey and owl monkey pituitary glands were unsuccessful. Rather, the beta-subunit of chorionic gonadotropin (CG) was amplified from pituitaries of both New World primates. Squirrel monkey and owl monkey CGbeta are 143 and 144 amino acids in length and 77% homologous with human CGbeta. The greatest divergence is in the C terminus, where all four sites for O-linked glycosylation in human CGbeta, responsible for delayed metabolic clearance, are predicted to be absent in New World primate CGbetas. It is likely that CG secreted from pituitary of New World primates exhibits a relatively short half-life compared to human CG.

  3. Pituitary apoplexy

    PubMed Central

    Ranabir, Salam; Baruah, Manash P.

    2011-01-01

    Pituitary apoplexy is rare endocrine emergency which can occur due to infarction or haemorrhage of pituitary gland. This disorder most often involves a pituitary adenoma. Occasionally it may be the first manifestation of an underlying adenoma. There is conflicting data regarding which type of pituitary adenoma is prone for apoplexy. Some studies showed predominance of non-functional adenomas while some other studies showed a higher prevalence in functioning adenomas amongst which prolactinoma have the highest risk. Although pituitary apoplexy can occur without any precipitating factor in most cases, there are some well recognizable risk factors such as hypertension, medications, major surgeries, coagulopathies either primary or following medications or infection, head injury, radiation or dynamic testing of the pituitary. Patients usually present with headache, vomiting, altered sensorium, visual defect and/or endocrine dysfunction. Hemodynamic instability may be result from adrenocorticotrophic hormone deficiency. Imaging with either CT scan or MRI should be performed in suspected cases. Intravenous fluid and hydrocortisone should be administered after collection of sample for baseline hormonal evaluation. Earlier studies used to advocate urgent decompression of the lesion but more recent studies favor conservative approach for most cases with surgery reserved for those with deteriorating level of consciousness or increasing visual defect. The visual and endocrine outcomes are almost similar with either surgery or conservative management. Once the acute phase is over, patient should be re-evaluated for hormonal deficiencies. PMID:22029023

  4. Regulation of gene expression of vasotocin and corticotropin-releasing hormone receptors in the avian anterior pituitary by corticosterone.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seong W; Kuenzel, Wayne J

    2014-08-01

    The effect of chronic stress (CS) on gene expression of the chicken arginine vasotocin (AVT) and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) receptors [VT2R, VT4R, CRH-R1, and CRH-R2] was examined by measuring receptor mRNA levels in the anterior pituitary gland of the chicken after chronic immobilization stress compared to acute stress (AS). Radioimmunoassay results showed that blood circulating corticosterone (CORT) levels in the CS group were significantly decreased compared to that of birds in the AS group (P<0.05). The VT2R and CRH-R2 mRNA in CS birds were significantly decreased to that of controls. The VT4R mRNA was significantly decreased compared to controls in AC birds and was further decreased in the CS group compared to controls (P<0.05). The CRH-R1 mRNA was significantly decreased in the AS birds compared to controls. However, there was no significant difference of CRH-R1 mRNA between acute stress and chronic stress birds. Using primary anterior pituitary cell cultures, the effect of exogenous CORT on VT/CRH receptor gene expression was examined. Receptor mRNA levels were measured after treatment of CORT followed by AVT/CRH administration. The CORT pretreatment resulted in a dose-dependent decrease of proopiomelanocortin heteronuclear RNA, a molecular marker of a stress-induced anterior pituitary. Without CORT pretreatment of anterior pituitary cell cultures, the VT2R, VT4R and CRH-R1mRNA levels were significantly increased within 15 min and then decreased at 1 h and 6 h by AVT/CRH administration (P<0.05). Pretreatment of CORT in anterior pituitary cells induced a dose-dependent increase of VT2R, VT4R and CRH-R2 mRNA levels, and a significant decrease of CRH-R1 mRNA levels at only the high dose (10 ng/ml) of CORT (P<0.05).Taken together, results suggest a modulatory role of CORT on the regulation of VT/CRH receptor gene expression in the avian anterior pituitary gland dependent upon CORT levels.

  5. Identification of antigenic differences of recombinant and pituitary bovine growth hormone using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Erhard, M H; Kellner, J; Schmidhuber, S; Schams, D; Lösch, U

    1994-02-01

    For characterization and determination of recombinant bovine GH (rbGH) eight monoclonal antibodies (MAb) were produced against rbGH from Monsanto. The various MAb showed different affinities to rbGH, pituitary bovine GH (pbGH), and pituitary ovine GH (poGH). With epitope analysis several MAb were shown to recognize different epitopes of rbGH. The MAb MUC-rbGH-3A11 and MUC-rbGH-1E5 were used to develop a Sandwich ELISA. By checking the specificity of the assay no cross reactivity was found with pituitary porcine GH, pituitary human GH, bovine or ovine prolactin and little cross reactivity with poGH could be found. The Sandwich ELISA detected various rbGH (Monsanto, Elanco, Cyanamid) with different N-terminal amino acids and discriminated between rbGH and pituitary bovine GH by an affinity factor of 2.0. The detection level was 2 ng rbGH per ml PBS buffer. The recovery was about 86% in bovine serum. It might therefore be possible to detect rbGH-treated cows using a Sandwich ELISA, but this would need a field study.

  6. Cysteamine, zinc, and thiols modify detectability of rat pituitary prolactin: a comparison with effects on bovine prolactin suggests differences in hormone storage

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, L.S.; Lorenson, M.Y.

    1986-03-01

    Little is known about the structure of prolactin (PRL) within secretory granules. Evidence from our previous studies in bovine tissue preparations suggests that control of secretion may reside, in part, in the conversion of storage hormone to releasable PRL. The conversion can be monitored by measuring changes in immunodetectability since the oligomeric, storage form is poorly recognized by antisera raised against monomeric PRL. Since many investigators use rats to study the secretory process and changes in detectability of rat pituitary PRL occur during lactation (depletion-transformation), we undertook the present immunodetectability studies to gain insight into the storage structure of rat (r) PRL. Cysteamine and zinc inhibited tissue PRL immunoassayability in male rat pituitary homogenates and also in partially purified secretory granules as they had inhibited bovine (b) PRL; however, zinc inhibited the rodent hormone less potently than the bovine. In vitro incubation of rat tissue samples without additions resulted in increases in rPRL detectability of up to 84% after 180 minutes; such incubation of bovine samples had no significant effect. A striking additional difference between the species was that exposure to reduced glutathione (GSH), cysteine, homocysteine, mercaptoethanol, and dithiothreitol inhibited rPRL by up to 44%. This compared to thiol stimulation of bPRL by as much as 450%. The inhibitory GSH effect on rPRL was abolished when 0.5% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was included; in contrast, the stimulatory GSH effect on bPRL did not change with added SDS. SDS alone had no effect on rat homogenate PRL, and only increased rat granule rPRL by 23% compared to its ability to increase bPRL assayability by 44%.

  7. TPA enhances growth hormone (GH) secretion effect of GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) by human gsp-positive pituitary somatotrophinomas.

    PubMed

    Lei, T; Bai, X; Hu, W; Xue, D; Jiang, X

    1999-01-01

    In recent years, one of the most exciting advances in the researches of pituitary adenomas is the discovery that 30%-40% of human pituitary somatotrophinomas carry somatic mutations of the gene for the alpha-subunit of the stimulatory GTP-binding protein, Gs (Gs alpha). These mutations, termed gsp oncogenes, may play an important role in the tumorigenesis of pituitary adenomas. Of 10 somatotrophinomas examined, 3 (30%) were proved to be gsp positive, as determined by sequence analysis of DNA generated by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). GHRH exerted a significant stimulatory effect on GH secretion in 2 of 3 gsp-positive and 4 of 7 gsp-negative tumors. Moreover, phorbol ester, 1, 2-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), enhanced stimulation of lated the GH secretion effect exerted by GHRH in gsp-positive somatotrophinomas, whereas this effect was not observed in gsp-negative tumors. This result suggests that the protein kinase C signal system as well as adenylyl cyclase-cAMP-protein kinase A intracellular signal transduction system plays a pivotal role in GH secretory control of GHRH, which may work together via a cross-talk mechanism.

  8. Mathematical model describing the thyroids-pituitary axis with distributed time delays in hormone transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neamţu, Mihaela; Stoian, Dana; Navolan, Dan Bogdan

    2014-12-01

    In the present paper we provide a mathematical model that describe the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis in autoimmune (Hashimoto's) thyroiditis. Since there is a spatial separation between thyroid and pituitary gland in the body, time is needed for transportation of thyrotropin and thyroxine between the glands. Thus, the distributed time delays are considered as both weak and Dirac kernels. The delayed model is analyzed regarding the stability and bifurcation behavior. The last part contains some numerical simulations to illustrate the effectiveness of our results and conclusions.

  9. Single or group housing altered hormonal physiology and affected pituitary and interstitial cell kinetics

    EPA Science Inventory

    A significant negative correlation between testicular interstitial cell tumors and pituitary tumors in control male F344 rats has been reported associated with the number of animals per cage. Change in numbers of animals per cage may cause stress and increased serum corticosteroi...

  10. Prenatal development of gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptors in the rat anterior pituitary

    SciTech Connect

    Jennes, L. )

    1990-02-01

    The development of pituitary GnRH receptors was studied in the rat with in vitro and in vivo autoradiography. GnRH receptors were first seen in pituitary primordia of 13-day-old fetuses. The binding was specific and saturable and was abolished in the presence of 10 microM synthetic GnRH. To examine whether GnRH was available to the fetus, amnionic fluid was collected on days E 12-18. RIA analyses showed that GnRH levels in the amnionic fluid were low on days 12 and 13 (0-20 pM/ml) and rose to 225 pM/ml on day E 16 before they declined to 110 pM/ml on fetal day E 18. The highest levels of GnRH in the amnionic fluid on day E 16 coincided with the first appearance of immunoreactive LH cells, as determined by immunohistochemistry. Intravenous injection of 500 microliters amnionic fluid into pentobarbital-anesthetized adult rats caused a transient 40-60% increase in circulating serum LH in the recipient animal. To show that GnRH from the amnionic fluid has access to the developing pituitary, the 125I-labeled GnRH agonist Buserelin was injected into the amnionic fluid of 13-, 14-, and 15-day-old fetuses in the presence or absence of 10 microM unlabeled GnRH. Autoradiographic analysis of the fetal tissue indicated that the labeled GnRH agonist bound to specific receptors in the primordial pituitaries. The results suggest that the pituitary gonadotropes are differentiated before day E 13 because the expression of GnRH receptors is already an indication of cell determination. Since GnRH is present in the amnionic fluid in a biologically active form and can reach the fetal pituitary, it is concluded that GnRH may be an important factor determining the onset LH synthesis, but not the differentiation, of primordial pituitary cells.

  11. Asparagine-linked oligosaccharides on lutropin, follitropin, and thyrotropin: structural elucidation of the sulfated and sialylated oligosaccharides on bovine, ovine, and human pituitary glycoprotein hormones

    SciTech Connect

    Green, E.D.; Baenziger, J.U.

    1988-01-05

    The authors have elucidated the structures of the anionic asparagine-linked oligosaccharides present on the glycoprotein hormones lutropin (luteinizing hormone), follitropin (follicle-stimulating hormone), and thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone). Purified hormones, isolated from bovine, ovine, and human pituitaries, were digested with N-glycanase, and the released oligosaccharides were reduced with NaB(/sup 3/H)/sub 4/. The /sup 3/H-labeled oligosaccharides from each hormone were then fractionated by anion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) into populations differing in the number of sulfate and/or sialic acid moieties. The sulfated, sialylated, and sulfated/sialylated structures, which together comprised 67-90% of the asparagine-linked oligosaccharides on the pituitary glycoprotein hormones, were highly heterogeneous and displayed hormone- as well as animal species-specific features. A previously uncharacterized dibranched oligosaccharide, bearing one residue each of sulfate and sialic acid, was found on all of the hormones except bovine lutropin. In this study, they describe the purification and detailed structural characterizations of the sulfated, sialylated, and sulfated/sialylated oligosaccharides found on lutropin, follitropin, and thyrotropin from several animal species.

  12. Prevalence of pituitary hormone dysfunction, metabolic syndrome, and impaired quality of life in retired professional football players: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Daniel F; Chaloner, Charlene; Evans, Diana; Mathews, Amy; Cohan, Pejman; Wang, Christina; Swerdloff, Ronald; Sim, Myung-Shin; Lee, Jihey; Wright, Mathew J; Kernan, Claudia; Barkhoudarian, Garni; Yuen, Kevin C J; Guskiewicz, Kevin

    2014-07-01

    Hypopituitarism is common after moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Herein, we address the association between mild TBI (mTBI) and pituitary and metabolic function in retired football players. Retirees 30-65 years of age, with one or more years of National Football League (NFL) play and poor quality of life (QoL) based on Short Form 36 (SF-36) Mental Component Score (MCS) were prospectively enrolled. Pituitary hormonal and metabolic syndrome (MetS) testing was performed. Using a glucagon stimulation test, growth hormone deficiency (GHD) was defined with a standard cut point of 3 ng/mL and with a more stringent body mass index (BMI)-adjusted cut point. Subjects with and without hormonal deficiency (HD) were compared in terms of QoL, International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) scores, metabolic parameters, and football career data. Of 74 subjects, 6 were excluded because of significant non-football-related TBIs. Of the remaining 68 subjects (mean age, 47.3±10.2 years; median NFL years, 5; median NFL concussions, 3; mean BMI, 33.8±6.0), 28 (41.2%) were GHD using a peak GH cutoff of <3 ng/mL. However, with a BMI-adjusted definition of GHD, 13 of 68 (19.1%) were GHD. Using this BMI-adjusted definition, overall HD was found in 16 (23.5%) subjects: 10 (14.7%) with isolated GHD; 3 (4.4%) with isolated hypogonadism; and 3 (4.4%) with both GHD and hypogonadism. Subjects with HD had lower mean scores on the IIEF survey (p=0.016) and trended toward lower scores on the SF-36 MCS (p=0.113). MetS was present in 50% of subjects, including 5 of 6 (83%) with hypogonadism, and 29 of 62 (46.8%) without hypogonadism (p=0.087). Age, BMI, median years in NFL, games played, number of concussions, and acknowledged use of performance-enhancing steroids were similar between HD and non-HD groups. In summary, in this cohort of retired NFL players with poor QoL, 23.5% had HD, including 19% with GHD (using a BMI-adjusted definition), 9% with hypogonadism, and 50% had Met

  13. Prevalence of Pituitary Hormone Dysfunction, Metabolic Syndrome, and Impaired Quality of Life in Retired Professional Football Players: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Chaloner, Charlene; Evans, Diana; Mathews, Amy; Cohan, Pejman; Wang, Christina; Swerdloff, Ronald; Sim, Myung-Shin; Lee, Jihey; Wright, Mathew J.; Kernan, Claudia; Barkhoudarian, Garni; Yuen, Kevin C.J.; Guskiewicz, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Hypopituitarism is common after moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Herein, we address the association between mild TBI (mTBI) and pituitary and metabolic function in retired football players. Retirees 30–65 years of age, with one or more years of National Football League (NFL) play and poor quality of life (QoL) based on Short Form 36 (SF-36) Mental Component Score (MCS) were prospectively enrolled. Pituitary hormonal and metabolic syndrome (MetS) testing was performed. Using a glucagon stimulation test, growth hormone deficiency (GHD) was defined with a standard cut point of 3 ng/mL and with a more stringent body mass index (BMI)-adjusted cut point. Subjects with and without hormonal deficiency (HD) were compared in terms of QoL, International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) scores, metabolic parameters, and football career data. Of 74 subjects, 6 were excluded because of significant non-football-related TBIs. Of the remaining 68 subjects (mean age, 47.3±10.2 years; median NFL years, 5; median NFL concussions, 3; mean BMI, 33.8±6.0), 28 (41.2%) were GHD using a peak GH cutoff of <3 ng/mL. However, with a BMI-adjusted definition of GHD, 13 of 68 (19.1%) were GHD. Using this BMI-adjusted definition, overall HD was found in 16 (23.5%) subjects: 10 (14.7%) with isolated GHD; 3 (4.4%) with isolated hypogonadism; and 3 (4.4%) with both GHD and hypogonadism. Subjects with HD had lower mean scores on the IIEF survey (p=0.016) and trended toward lower scores on the SF-36 MCS (p=0.113). MetS was present in 50% of subjects, including 5 of 6 (83%) with hypogonadism, and 29 of 62 (46.8%) without hypogonadism (p=0.087). Age, BMI, median years in NFL, games played, number of concussions, and acknowledged use of performance-enhancing steroids were similar between HD and non-HD groups. In summary, in this cohort of retired NFL players with poor QoL, 23.5% had HD, including 19% with GHD (using a BMI-adjusted definition), 9% with hypogonadism, and

  14. Asparagine-linked oligosaccharides on lutropin, follitropin, and thyrotropin: distributions of sulfated and sialylated oligosaccharides on bovine, ovine, and human pituitary glycoprotein hormones

    SciTech Connect

    Green, E.D.; Baenziger, J.U.

    1988-01-05

    The asparagine-linked oligosaccharides on the pituitary glycoprotein hormones lutropin (LH), follitropin (FSH), and thyrotropin (TSH) consist of a heterogeneous array of neutral, sulfated, sialylated, and sulfated/sialylated structures. In this study, the authors determined the relative quantities of the various asparagine-linked oligosaccharides on LH, FSH, and TSH from these three animal species. The proportions of sulfated versus sialylated oligosaccharides varied markedly among the different hormones. Both hormone- and animal species-specific differences in the types and distributions of sulfated, sialylated, and sulfated/sialylated structures were evident. In particular, LH and FSH, which are synthesized in the same pituitary cell and bear ..cap alpha..-subunits with the identical amino acid sequence, contained significantly different distributions of sulfated and sialylated oligosaccharides. For all three animal species, the ratio of sialylated to sulfated oligosaccharides differed by >10-fold for LH and FSH, with sulfated structures dominating on LH and sialylated structures on FSH. Sialylated oligosaccharides were also heterogeneous with respect to sialic acid linkage (..cap alpha..2,3 versus ..cap alpha..2,6). The differences in oligosaccharide structures among the various pituitary glycoprotein hormones as well as among the various glycosylation sites within a single hormone support the hypothesis that glycosylation may serve important functional roles in the expression and/or regulation of hormone bioactivity.

  15. Regulation of pituitary gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptors by androgens in the male rabbit.

    PubMed

    Limonta, P; Ladizhenskaya, A; Gunsalus, G L; Bardin, C W; Thau, R B

    1986-01-01

    The regulation of pituitary GnRH receptors was studied in adult male rabbits after castration and androgen replacement with testosterone (T) or 7 alpha-methyl-19-nortestosterone acetate (U-15,614; T analog) supplied by Silastic capsules implanted sc. Castration increased pituitary GnRH receptors significantly, from 99.3 to 329.5 fmol/mg protein within 4 weeks, without a change in the equilibrium association constant. Serum LH concentrations increased from 0.45 to maximum levels of 2.6 ng/ml by day 8 after orchiectomy; these levels persisted throughout the 4 weeks of study. Serum FSH reached maximum levels of 33.6 ng/ml 5 days after castration. T replacement with 250, 500, and 1000 micrograms/kg X day, prevented a postcastration rise in both pituitary GnRH receptor concentrations and gonadotropin secretion, while 100 micrograms/kg X day prevented an increase in GnRH receptors, but did not completely inhibit hypersecretion of gonadotropins. Administration of T analog at doses of 6.25 and 12.5 micrograms/kg X day partially suppressed the castration-induced increase in pituitary GnRH receptor concentrations, while 25, 50, and 100 micrograms/kg X day suppressed GnRH-binding sites to the levels found in intact controls in 15 of 16 rabbits. By contrast, none of the T analog doses was able to prevent completely LH and FSH hypersecretion. The fact that both T and T analog induced dose-dependent stimulation of prostate and seminal vesicle weights indicates that there are tissue-specific differences in the sensitivity to androgens. We conclude that in the male rabbit 1) pituitary GnRH receptors significantly increase after castration; 2) this increase may partially mediate the postcastration hypersecretion of LH and FSH; 3) castration-induced effects can be prevented by androgen replacement. These results are similar to those obtained in rats, where castration increases LHRH receptors, but contrast with results in mice and hamsters, where castration either reduces or does not

  16. Pituitary Somatostatin Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Shlomo, Anat; Melmed, Shlomo

    2010-01-01

    Somatostatin (SRIF) is a major regulator of pituitary function, mostly inhibiting hormone secretion and to a lesser extent pituitary cell growth. Five SRIF receptor subtypes (SSTR1–5) are ubiquitously expressed G-protein coupled receptors. In the pituitary, SSTR1, SSTR2, SSTR3 and SSTR5 are expressed, with SSTR2 and SSTR5 predominating. As new SRIF-analogs have recently been introduced for treatment of pituitary disease, we evaluate the current knowledge of cell-specific pituitary SRIF receptor signaling and highlight areas of future research for comprehensive understanding of these mechanisms. Elucidating pituitary SRIF receptor signaling enables understanding of pituitary hormone secretion and cell growth, and also points to future therapeutic development for pituitary disorders. PMID:20149677

  17. Multiple binding sites for nuclear proteins of the anterior pituitary are located in the 5'-flanking region of the porcine follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) beta-subunit gene.

    PubMed

    Kato, Y; Tomizawa, K; Kato, T

    1999-12-20

    Gonadotropins, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and luteinizing hormone (LH), are synthesized specifically in the gonadotropes of the anterior pituitary. The aim of this study was to investigate nuclear factors that bind specifically to the porcine FSH beta-subunit gene. We examined nuclear protein binding to 2.75 kilobase pairs (kbp) of DNA adjacent to the porcine FSH beta-subunit gene: about 2.32 kbp of upstream DNA and 0.43 kbp of downstream DNA. The upstream region contains only TATA box, CACCC element, and some imperfect sequences of cAMP-responsive element, activator protein-1 binding site, and activator protein-2 binding site. Gel mobility shift assay using nuclear proteins extracted from the porcine anterior pituitary revealed that the proteins bound to a limited region of DNA, 107 bp long (designated as Fd2), located about -800 bp upstream from the transcription initiation site. Competitive binding assays demonstrated that the protein binding was sequence specific; the addition of excess amounts of several putative regulatory sequences and plasmid (non-homologous) DNA fragments did not reduce the binding. Furthermore, all five subfragments of Fd2 were also bound by the pituitary nuclear proteins, showing that the entire region of Fd2 is involved in this interaction. Southwestern blotting demonstrated that at least seven protein species of 110, 98, 78, 63, 52, 42, and 35 kDa recognize Fd2. Nuclear proteins from several other porcine tissues were also able to bind to the Fd2 fragment but the gel shift patterns were different and the bindings were weak, although only the cerebellum showed a pattern of binding that was similar to that of the anterior pituitary. These data suggest that multiple proteins of the anterior pituitary recognize a specific region of the porcine FSH beta-subunit gene.

  18. Effects of irradiation and semistarvation on rat thyrotropin beta subunit messenger ribonucleic acid, pituitary thyrotropin content, and thyroid hormone levels

    SciTech Connect

    Litten, R.Z. ); Carr, F.E. ); Fein, H.G.; Smallridge, R.C. )

    1990-01-01

    The effect of radiation-induced anorexia on serum thyrotropin (TSH), pituitary TSH-{beta} mRNA, pituitary TSH content, serum thyroxine (T{sub 4}), and serum 3,5,3{prime}-triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}) was investigated using feed-matched controls. Rats received 10 Gy gamma whole-body irradiation and were examined 1-3 days postirradiation. Feed-matched and untreated controls were also studied. The average food intake of the irradiated and feed-matched groups was approximately 18% of the untreated controls. Over the three day period both the irradiated and feed-matched groups lost a significant amount of body weight. The serum T{sub 4} levels of both the irradiated and feed-matched groups were not significantly different from each other, but were significantly depressed when compared to the untreated control group. The serum TSH and T{sub 3} were, however, significantly greater in the irradiated than the feed-matched groups at day 3 posttreatment. To determine if the difference in the serum TSH level between the two groups was due to a pretranslational alteration in TSH production, we measured the TSH-{beta} mRNA using an RNA blot hybridization assay. We found that the TSH-{beta} mRNA level was the same in the irradiated and feed-matched groups, suggesting that the mechanism responsible for the radiation-induced increase in the serum TSH level is posttranscriptional. Pituitary TSH content in the irradiated rats was significantly less than in pair-fed controls, suggesting that irradiation may permit enhanced secretion of stored hormone.

  19. The corticotropin-releasing hormone network and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis: molecular and cellular mechanisms involved.

    PubMed

    Bonfiglio, Juan José; Inda, Carolina; Refojo, Damián; Holsboer, Florian; Arzt, Eduardo; Silberstein, Susana

    2011-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) plays a key role in adjusting the basal and stress-activated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA). CRH is also widely distributed in extrahypothalamic circuits, where it acts as a neuroregulator to integrate the complex neuroendocrine, autonomic, and behavioral adaptive response to stress. Hyperactive and/or dysregulated CRH circuits are involved in neuroendocrinological disturbances and stress-related mood disorders such as anxiety and depression. This review describes the main physiological features of the CRH network and summarizes recent relevant information concerning the molecular mechanism of CRH action obtained from signal transduction studies using cells and wild-type and transgenic mice lines. Special focus is placed on the MAPK signaling pathways triggered by CRH through the CRH receptor 1 that plays an essential role in CRH action in pituitary corticotrophs and in specific brain structures. Recent findings underpin the concept of specific CRH-signaling pathways restricted to specific anatomical areas. Understanding CRH action at molecular levels will not only provide insight into the precise CRH mechanism of action, but will also be instrumental in identifying novel targets for pharmacological intervention in neuroendocrine tissues and specific brain areas involved in CRH-related disorders.

  20. Lack of growth of a pregnancy-dependent mouse mammary tumor (TPDMT-4) in the absence of pituitary hormones.

    PubMed

    Matsuzawa, A; Yamamoto, T

    1977-04-01

    Mammary tumors of line TPDMT-4, established in DDD mice, were characterized by growth during pregnancy and regression after parturition; this resulted in higher growth peaks in subsequent pregnancies in breeders and no growth in virgins. The effect of hypophysectomy on tumor growth in mice given 17beta-estradiol (E) and progesterone (P) or deoxycorticosterone acetate (DCA) was investigated. Growth of cancers occurred in E+P- and E+DCA-treated virgins, but not in cholesterol-treated virgins. Tumors did not grow to palpable sizes in cholesterol-, E+P-, and E+DCA-treated hypophysectomized virgins; this indicated that pituitary hormones were essential for tumor growth. Impalpable cholesterol-treated, 5 of 10 E+P-treated, and 3 of 6 E+DCA-treated hypophysectomized animals. The neoplasms showed ductal and tubular structures that were lined by a single layer of well-differentiated buoidal epithelium, which suggested that the tumor line might be derived from ductal cells.

  1. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and sex hormones in chronic stress and obesity: pathophysiological and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Pasquali, Renato

    2012-08-01

    Obesity, particularly the abdominal phenotype, has been ascribed to an individual maladaptation to chronic environmental stress exposure mediated by a dysregulation of related neuroendocrine axes. Alterations in the control and action of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis play a major role in this context, with the participation of the sympathetic nervous system. The ability to adapt to chronic stress may differ according to sex, with specific pathophysiological events leading to the development of stress-related chronic diseases. This seems to be influenced by the regulatory effects of sex hormones, particularly androgens. Stress may also disrupt the control of feeding, with some differences according to sex. Finally, the amount of experimental data in both animals and humans may help to shed more light on specific phenotypes of obesity, strictly related to the chronic exposure to stress. This challenge may potentially imply a different pathophysiological perspective and, possibly, a specific treatment.

  2. Immunoreactive neuronal pathways of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GRH) in the brain and pituitary of the teleost Gadus morhua.

    PubMed

    Pan, J X; Lechan, R M; Lin, H D; Jackson, I M

    1985-01-01

    Using an antiserum directed against the C-terminus of hGRH(1-44)NH2 and another recognizing the mid portion to C-terminal of hGRH(1-40)OH, we identify two immunocytochemically distinct GRH-immunoreactive systems in the brain of the codfish, Gadus morhua. The antiserum directed against GRF(1-44)NH2 stains cell bodies exclusively in the rostral pars distalis. The other antiserum immunoreactive with GRF(1-40)OH reacts with a population of parvocellular and magnocellular neuronal cell bodies in the hypothalamus and with two major axonal pathways which project toward the median eminence and terminate primarily in the pars nervosa. These results indicate the presence of at least two forms of hGRH-like peptides in the teleost which may have different roles in the regulation of pituitary function.

  3. Growth hormone releasing hexapeptide (GHRP-6) activates the inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate/diacylglycerol pathway in rat anterior pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Mau, S E; Witt, M R; Bjerrum, O J; Saermark, T; Vilhardt, H

    1995-01-01

    Growth hormone-releasing hexapeptide (GHRP-6) is known to stimulate secretion of growth hormone (GH) in vivo and in vitro in a variety of species. However, the cellular effects of GHRP-6 remain largely unknown. We have tested the influence of GHRP-6 on the inositol phospholipid second messenger system in cultured anterior pituitary cells. Cultured pituitary cells responded upon challenge with GHRP-6 with a dose-dependent release of GH. Moreover, incubation of GHRP-6 with pituitary cell cultures labelled with myo-[3H]inositol resulted in a dose-dependent rise in [3H]inositol phosphates. Brief stimulation of pituitary cells with GHRP-6 increased phosphorylation of MBP4-14, a specific protein kinase C substrate, when incubated with the cytosol- or plasma membrane fraction from the stimulated cells. Furthermore, introduction of MBP4-14 into the cytosol in digitonin permeabilized pituitary cells caused increased phosphorylation of this substrate. GHRP-6 induced a rise in intracellular Ca2+ in individual somatotrophs loaded with the Ca2+ indicator, Fura-2. Preincubation (3 min) with somatostatin (SRIF) diminished the Ca2+ spike elicited by GHRP-6, while no effect of SRIF was observed when added simultaneously with GHRP-6. These results indicate that GHRP-6-stimulated GH-secretion involves the diacylglycerol/inositol(1,4,5)trisphosphate pathway with a resulting rise in cytosolic Ca2+.

  4. Gonadotropin-Releasing hormones in the brain and pituitary of the white sucker

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, T. Craig; Tobet, Stuart A.; Chase, Cindy; Waldron, Travis; Sower, Stacia A.

    2000-01-01

    The present study investigated GnRH forms within the brain of a representative of the order Cypriniformes, the white sucker, Catostomus commersoni, using HPLC, RIA, andimmunocytochemistry. Several immunoreactive (ir) GnRH forms were identified in the brain of the white sucker by chromatography and radioimmunoassay, including ir-salmon GnRH, ir-lamprey GnRH-I and -III, and ir-chicken GnRH-II. Results from immunocytochemical studies were consistent with multiple GnRH forms distributed in different patterns, particularly for fibers. Neuronal perikarya containing ir-salmon GnRH and ir-lamprey-like GnRH were found laterally within the preoptic area and rostralhypothalamus. Cells containing exclusively ir-salmon GnRH appeared slightly more rostrally, but in the same region. Fibers containing ir-salmon GnRH and ir-lamprey-like GnRH were seen throughout the caudal telencephalon and extended into thediencephalon, toward the pituitary. Fibers containing ir-chicken-II-like GnRH were also seen in the caudal telencephalon, but were concentrated more dorsally in the diencephalon. Within the pituitary, fibers containing ir-salmon GnRH and ir-lamprey-like GnRH entered the neurohypophysis, but differed in their destinations. Fibers containing ir-salmon GnRH remained within the neurohypophysis, while fibers containing ir-lamprey-like GnRH targeted adenohypophyseal tissue. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that multiple GnRH forms with multiple functions exist within the brain and pituitary of teleosts and provide further evidence of a lamprey-like GnRH within an early evolved teleost species.

  5. Endogenous hypothalamic somatostatins differentially regulate growth hormone secretion from goldfish pituitary somatotropes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yunker, Warren K; Smith, Sean; Graves, Chad; Davis, Philip J; Unniappan, Surajlal; Rivier, Jean E; Peter, Richard E; Chang, John P

    2003-09-01

    Using Southern blot analysis of RT-PCR products, mRNA for three different somatostatin (SS) precursors (PSS-I, -II, and -III), which encode for SS(14), goldfish brain (gb)SS(28), and [Pro(2)]SS(14), respectively, were detected in goldfish hypothalamus. PSS-I and -II mRNA, but not PSS-III mRNA, were also detected in cultured pituitary cells. We subsequently examined the effects of the mature peptides, SS(14), gbSS(28), and [Pro(2)]SS(14), on somatotrope signaling and GH secretion. The gbSS(28) was more potent than either SS(14) or [Pro(2)]SS(14) in reducing basal GH release but was the least effective in reducing basal cellular cAMP. The ability of SS(14), [Pro(2)]SS(14), and gbSS(28) to attenuate GH responses to GnRH were comparable. However, gbSS(28) was less effective than SS(14) and [Pro(2)]SS(14) in diminishing dopamine- and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide-stimulated GH release, as well as GH release resulting from the activation of their underlying signaling cascades. In contrast, the actions of a different 28-amino-acid SS, mammalian SS(28), were more similar to those of SS(14) and [Pro(2)]SS(14). We conclude that, in goldfish, SSs differentially couple to the intracellular cascades regulating GH secretion from pituitary somatotropes. This raises the possibility that such differences may allow for the selective regulation of various aspects of somatotrope function by different SS peptides.

  6. Effects of spaceflight on hypothalamic peptide systems controlling pituitary growth hormone dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawchenko, P. E.; Arias, C.; Krasnov, I.; Grindeland, R. E.; Vale, W.

    1992-01-01

    Possible effects of reduced gravity on central hypophysiotropic systems controlling growth hormone (GH) secretion were investigated in rats flown on Cosmos 1887 and 2044 biosatellites. Immunohistochemical (IHC)staining for the growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF), somatostatin (SS), and other hypothalamic hormones was performed on hypothalami obtained from rats. IHC analysis was complemented by quantitative in situ assessments of mRNAs encoding the precursors for these hormones. Data obtained suggest that exposure to microgravity causes a preferential reduction in GRF peptide and mRNA levels in hypophysiotropic neurons, which may contribute to impared GH secretion in animals subjected to spaceflight. Effects of weightlessness are not mimicked by hindlimb suspension in this system.

  7. Thyroid hormone status and pituitary function in adult rats given oral doses of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) is widely distributed and persistent in humans and wildlife. Prior toxicological studies have reported decreased total and free thyroid hormones in serum without a major compensatory rise in thyrotropin (TSH) or altered thyroid gland histology. Alt...

  8. Effects of aqueous extract from Asparagus officinalis L. roots on hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis hormone levels and the number of ovarian follicles in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Karimi Jashni, Hojatollah; Kargar Jahromi, Hossein; Ghorbani Ranjbary, Ali; Kargar Jahromi, Zahra; Khabbaz Kherameh, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Asparagus is a plant with high nutritional, pharmaceutical, and industrial values. Objective: The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of aqueous extract of asparagus roots on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis hormones and oogenesis in female rats. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 40 adult female Wistar rats were divided into five groups, which consist 8 rats. Groups included control, sham and three experimental groups receiving different doses (100, 200, 400 mg/kg/bw) of aqueous extract of asparagus roots. All dosages were administered orally for 28 days. Blood samples were taken from rats to evaluate serum levels of Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH), follicular stimulating hormone (FSH), Luteinal hormone (LH), estrogen, and progesterone hormones. The ovaries were removed, weighted, sectioned, and studied by light microscope. Results: Dose-dependent aqueous extract of asparagus roots significantly increased serum levels of GnRH, FSH, LH, estrogen, and progestin hormones compared to control and sham groups. Increase in number of ovarian follicles and corpus luteum in groups treated with asparagus root extract was also observed (p<0.05). Conclusion: Asparagus roots extract stimulates secretion of hypothalamic- pituitary- gonadal axis hormones. This also positively affects oogenesis in female rats. PMID:27200420

  9. Quantifying Pituitary-Adrenal Dynamics and Deconvolution of Concurrent Cortisol and Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Data by Compressed Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Faghih, Rose T.; Dahleh, Munther A.; Adler, Gail K.; Klerman, Elizabeth B.; Brown, Emery N.

    2015-01-01

    Pulsatile release of cortisol from the adrenal glands is governed by pulsatile release of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) from the anterior pituitary. In return, cortisol has a negative feedback effect on ACTH release. Simultaneous recording of ACTH and cortisol is not typical, and determining the number, timing, and amplitudes of pulsatile events from simultaneously recorded data is challenging because of several factors: (I) stimulator ACTH pulse activity, (II) kinematics of ACTH and cortisol, (III) the sampling interval, and (IV) the measurement error. We model ACTH and cortisol secretion simultaneously using a linear differential equations model with Gaussian errors and sparse pulsatile events as inputs to the model. We propose a novel framework for recovering pulses and parameters underlying the interactions between ACTH and cortisol. We recover the timing and amplitudes of pulses using compressed sensing, and employ generalized cross validation for determining the number of pulses. We analyze serum ACTH and cortisol levels sampled at 10-minute intervals over 24 hours from 10 healthy women. We recover physiologically plausible timing and amplitudes for these pulses and model the feedback effect of cortisol. We recover 15 to 18 pulses over 24 hours, which is highly consistent with the results of another cortisol data analysis approach. Modeling the interactions between ACTH and cortisol allows for accurate quantification of pulsatile events, and normal and pathological states. This could lay the basis for a more physiologically-based approach for administering cortisol therapeutically. The proposed approach can be adapted to deconvolve other pairs of hormones with similar interactions. PMID:25935025

  10. Quantifying Pituitary-Adrenal Dynamics and Deconvolution of Concurrent Cortisol and Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Data by Compressed Sensing.

    PubMed

    Faghih, Rose T; Dahleh, Munther A; Adler, Gail K; Klerman, Elizabeth B; Brown, Emery N

    2015-10-01

    Pulsatile release of cortisol from the adrenal glands is governed by pulsatile release of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) from the anterior pituitary. In return, cortisol has a negative feedback effect on ACTH release. Simultaneous recording of ACTH and cortisol is not typical, and determining the number, timing, and amplitudes of pulsatile events from simultaneously recorded data is challenging because of several factors: 1) stimulator ACTH pulse activity, 2) kinematics of ACTH and cortisol, 3) the sampling interval, and 4) the measurement error. We model ACTH and cortisol secretion simultaneously using a linear differential equations model with Gaussian errors and sparse pulsatile events as inputs to the model. We propose a novel framework for recovering pulses and parameters underlying the interactions between ACTH and cortisol. We recover the timing and amplitudes of pulses using compressed sensing and employ generalized cross validation for determining the number of pulses. We analyze serum ACTH and cortisol levels sampled at 10-min intervals over 24 h from ten healthy women. We recover physiologically plausible timing and amplitudes for these pulses and model the feedback effect of cortisol. We recover 15 to 18 pulses over 24 h, which is highly consistent with the results of another cortisol data analysis approach. Modeling the interactions between ACTH and cortisol allows for accurate quantification of pulsatile events, and normal and pathological states. This could lay the basis for a more physiologically-based approach for administering cortisol therapeutically. The proposed approach can be adapted to deconvolve other pairs of hormones with similar interactions.

  11. Somatotroph pituitary tumors in budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus).

    PubMed

    Langohr, I M; Garner, M M; Kiupel, M

    2012-05-01

    A series of 11 pituitary tumors in budgerigars were classified on the basis of their clinical, gross, microscopic, and immunohistochemical characteristics. Affected birds were young to middle-aged. Clinically, neurologic signs--including difficulties flying, ataxia, and blindness--were most commonly reported. Additional clinical signs included weight loss, abnormal feathers or molting, increased respiratory efforts, and exophthalmos. Nine birds were diagnosed with chromophobic pituitary adenomas, and 2 birds had chromophobic pituitary carcinomas. Only 1 tumor was delimited to the pituitary gland; the other 10 variably invaded the brain, skull, and retrobulbar space. Distant metastases were identified in 2 birds. All tumors were immunohistochemically strongly positive for growth hormone, consistent with the diagnosis of somatotroph tumors. The common occurrence and early onset may suggest a genetic predisposition of budgerigars to develop somatotroph pituitary tumors with a high incidence of local invasion and with metastatic potential.

  12. Human pituitary and placental hormones control human insulin-like growth factor II secretion in human granulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ramasharma, K.; Li, C.H.

    1987-05-01

    Human granulosa cells cultured with calf serum actively proliferated for 18-20 generations and secreted progesterone into the medium; progesterone levels appeared to decline with increase in generation number. Cells cultured under serum-free conditions secreted significant amounts of progesterone and insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II). The progesterone secretion was enhanced by the addition of human follitropin, lutropin, and chorionic gonadotropin but not by growth hormone. These cells, when challenged to varying concentrations of human growth hormone, human chorionic somatomammotropin, human prolactin, chorionic gonadotropin, follitropin, and lutropin, secreted IGF-II into the medium as measured by specific IGF-II RIA. Among these human hormones, chorionic gonadotropin, follitropin, and lutropin were most effective in inducing IGF-II secretion from these cells. When synthetic lutropin-releasing hormone and ..cap alpha..-inhibin-92 were tested, only lutropin-releasing hormone was effective in releasing IGF-II. The results described suggest that cultured human granulosa cells can proliferate and actively secrete progesterone and IGF-II into the medium. IGF-II production in human granulosa cells was influenced by a multi-hormonal complex including human growth hormone, human chorionic somatomammotropin, and prolactin.

  13. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis response to acute psychosocial stress: Effects of biological sex and circulating sex hormones.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Mary Ann C; Mahon, Pamela B; McCaul, Mary E; Wand, Gary S

    2016-04-01

    Dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis influences the risk for developing stress-related disorders. Sex-dependent differences in the HPA axis stress response are believed to contribute to the different prevalence rates of stress-related disorders found in men and women. However, studies examining the HPA axis stress response have shown mixed support for sex differences, and the role of endogenous sex hormones on HPA axis response has not been adequately examined in humans. This study utilized the largest sample size to date to analyze the effects of biological sex and sex hormones on HPA axis social stress responses. Healthy, 18- to 30- year-old community volunteers (N=282) completed the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), a widely used and well-validated stress-induction laboratory procedure. All women (n=135) were tested during the follicular phase of their menstrual cycle (when progesterone levels are most similar to men). Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol measures were collected at multiple points throughout pre- and post-TSST. Testosterone and progesterone (in men) and progesterone and estradiol (in women) were determined pre-TSST. Following the TSST, men had greater ACTH and cortisol levels than women. Men had steeper baseline-to-peak and peak-to-end ACTH and cortisol response slopes than women; there was a trend for more cortisol responders among men than women. Testosterone negatively correlated with salivary cortisol response in men, while progesterone negatively correlated with ACTH and cortisol responses in women. These data confirm that men show more robust activation of the HPA axis response to the TSST than do women in the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. Testosterone results suggest an inhibitory effect on HPA axis reactivity in men. Progesterone results suggest an inhibitory effect on HPA axis reactivity in women. Future work is needed to explain why men mount a greater ACTH and cortisol response to the

  14. What Happens After Treatment for Pituitary Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... adenomas. If you had a functional (hormone-making) pituitary adenoma, hormone measurements can often be done within days ... risk. Occasionally, people with large or fast-growing pituitary adenomas may be disabled or have their lives shortened ...

  15. Insulin-like growth factor-I feedback regulation of growth hormone and luteinizing hormone secretion in the pig: Evidence for a pituitary site of action

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ontogeny of IGF-I modulation of GH secretion from the anterior pituitary was studied. In EXP I, serial blood samples were collected from gilts at 90, 150 and 205 days of age, and 24 hr later anterior pituitary glands were collected for expression analysis of GH and pituitary-specific transcrip...

  16. Concentrations of the adrenocorticotropic hormone, corticosterone and sex steroid hormones and the expression of the androgen receptor in the pituitary and adrenal glands of male turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) during growth and development.

    PubMed

    Kiezun, J; Kaminska, B; Jankowski, J; Dusza, L

    2015-01-01

    Androgens take part in the regulation of puberty and promote growth and development. They play their biological role by binding to a specific androgen receptor (AR). The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of AR mRNA and protein in the pituitary and adrenal glands, to localize AR protein in luteinizing hormone (LH)-producing pituitary and adrenocortical cells, to determine plasma concentrations of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone and the concentrations of corticosterone, testosterone (T), androstenedione (A4) and oestradiol (E2) in the adrenal glands of male turkeys at the age of 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24 and 28weeks. The concentrations of hormones and the expression of AR varied during development. The expression of AR mRNA and protein in pituitary increased during the growth. The increase of AR mRNA levels in pituitary occurred earlier than increase of AR protein. The percentage of pituitary cells expressing ARs in the population of LH-secreting cells increased in week 20. It suggests that AR expression in LH-producing pituitary cells is determined by the phase of development. The drop in adrenal AR mRNA and protein expression was accompanied by an increase in the concentrations of adrenal androgens. Those results could point to the presence of a compensatory mechanism that enables turkeys to avoid the potentially detrimental effects of high androgen concentrations. Our results will expand our knowledge of the role of steroids in the development of the reproductive system of turkeys from the first month of age until maturity.

  17. TSH secreting pituitary adenoma.

    PubMed

    Jha, S; Kumar, S

    2009-07-01

    Thyrotropin (TSH) secreting pituitary adenomas are a very rare cause of hyperthyroidism. They typically present with signs and symptoms of hyperthyroidism and rarely can be asymptomatic. TSH secreting tumors account for 1 percent of all pituitary adenoma. They are a rare cause of thyrotoxicosis in which adenomas completely or partially lose feedback regulation of thyroid hormones and lead to sustained stimulation of thyroid gland. The most definitive treatment of thyrotropin (TSH)-secreting pituitary adenomas is transsphenoidal removal of tumor after restoring euthyroidism. We report a case of pituitary adenoma associated with elevated serum free thyroid hormones and non-suppressed TSH levels.

  18. Connecting proximate mechanisms and evolutionary patterns: pituitary gland size and mammalian life history.

    PubMed

    Kamilar, J M; Tecot, S R

    2015-11-01

    At the proximate level, hormones are known to play a critical role in influencing the life history of mammals, including humans. The pituitary gland is directly responsible for producing several hormones, including those related to growth and reproduction. Although we have a basic understanding of how hormones affect life history characteristics, we still have little knowledge of this relationship in an evolutionary context. We used data from 129 mammal species representing 14 orders to investigate the relationship between pituitary gland size and life history variation. Because pituitary gland size should be related to hormone production and action, we predicted that species with relatively large pituitaries should be associated with fast life histories, especially increased foetal and post-natal growth rates. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that total pituitary size and the size of the anterior lobe of the pituitary significantly predicted a life history axis that was correlated with several traits including body mass, and foetal and post-natal growth rates. Additional models directly examining the association between relative pituitary size and growth rates produced concordant results. We also found that relative pituitary size variation across mammals was best explained by an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck model of evolution, suggesting an important role of stabilizing selection. Our results support the idea that the size of the pituitary is linked to life history variation through evolutionary time. This pattern is likely due to mediating hormone levels but additional work is needed. We suggest that future investigations incorporating endocrine gland size may be critical for understanding life history evolution.

  19. Successful Pregnancies and Deliveries in a Patient With Evolving Hypopituitarism due to Pituitary Stalk Transection Syndrome: Role of Growth Hormone Replacement.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Miyako; Ieki, Yasuhiko; Takazakura, Eisuke; Fukuta, Kaori; Hidaka, Takao; Wakasugi, Takanobu; Shimatsu, Akira

    2017-01-01

    We herein report a 31-year-old Japanese woman with evolving hypopituitarism due to pituitary stalk transection syndrome. She had a history of short stature treated with growth hormone (GH) in childhood and had hypothyroidism and primary amenorrhea at 20 years old. Levothyroxine replacement and recombinant follicle stimulating hormone-human chorionic gonadotropin (FSH-hCG) therapy for ovulation induction were started. GH replacement therapy (GHRT) was resumed when she was 26 years old. She developed mild adrenocortical insufficiency at 31 years old. She succeeded in becoming pregnant and delivered twice. GHRT was partially continued during pregnancy and stopped at the end of the second trimester without any complications.

  20. Regulation of beta follicle stimulating hormone subunit RNA by 17-beta estradiol, progesterone, and inhibin in ovine pituitary cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, C.L.

    1987-01-01

    The molecular mechanism by which ovine follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) is negatively regulated by 17-beta estradiol, progesterone, and inhibin was investigated in vitro, using ovine pituitary cells in culture. The effects of these gonadal hormones on beta FSH RNA levels were assayed by dot blot hybridization to a specific radiolabeled cDNA probe for beta FSH RNA. This was compared to concomitant changes in FSH secretion, which were measured by radioimmunoassay, in order to determine if the alterations in beta FSH RNA could account for the changes in FSH secretion.

  1. Ghrelin increases growth hormone production and functional expression of NaV1.1 and Na V1.2 channels in pituitary somatotropes.

    PubMed

    Magdaleno-Méndez, Adasue; Domínguez, Belisario; Rodríguez-Andrade, Araceli; Barrientos-Morales, Manuel; Cervantes-Acosta, Patricia; Hernández-Beltrán, Antonio; González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Felix, Ricardo

    2015-04-01

    A variety of ion channels are expressed in the plasma membrane of somatotropes within the anterior pituitary gland. Modification of these channels is linked to intracellular Ca2+ levels and therefore to hormone secretion. Previous investigations have shown that the gut-derived orexigenic peptide hormone ghrelin and synthetic GH-releasing peptides (GHRPs) stimulate release of growth hormone (GH) and increase the number of functional voltage-gated Ca2+ and Na+ channels in the membrane of clonal GC somatotropes. Here, we reveal that chronic treatment with ghrelin and its synthetic analog GHRP-6 also increases GH release from bovine pituitary somatotropes in culture, and that this action is associated with a significant increase in Na+ macroscopic current. Consistent with this, Na+ current blockade with tetrodotoxin (TTX) abolished the ghrelin- and GHRP-6-induced increase in GH release. Furthermore, semi-quantitative and real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed an upregulation in the transcript levels of GH, as well as of NaV1.1 and NaV1.2, two isoforms of TTX-sensitive Na+ channels expressed in somatotropes, after treatment with ghrelin or GHRP-6. These findings improve our knowledge on (i) the cellular mechanisms involved in the control of GH secretion, (ii) the molecular diversity of Na+ channels in pituitary somatotropes, and (iii) the regulation of GH and Na+ channel gene expression by ghrelin and GHRPs.

  2. Localization of cells producting thyroid stimulating hormone in the pituitary gland of the domestic drake.

    PubMed

    Sharp, P J; Chiasson, R B; El Tounsy, M M; Klandorf, H; Radke, W J

    1979-04-30

    Cells binding anti-bovine TASH beta serum were found exclusively in the rostral lobe of the adenohypophysis of the drake using the peroxidase-antiperoxidase complex unlabelled antibody method. The specificity of the binding of the anti-serum to TSH cells was established by relating the morphology and relative abundance of immunochemically stained cells to the TSH content of the adenohypophysis after experimentally altering the activity of the pituitary-thyroid axis. The TSH activity of the adenohypophysis was assessed indirectly, by the weight of the thyroid glands, and directly, by bioassay. As determined by bioassay, the TSH content of the rostral lobe of the adenohypophysis was much greater than that of the caudal lobe. Compared with control drakes, immunochemically stained cells in birds fed a goitrogen, methimazole, seemed to be enlarged and were closer together, while the stained cells in drakes injected with thyroxine were shrunken and less intensely stained. The TSH content of the adenohypophysis was increased in drakes fed methimazole. Castration did not alter the TSH content of the adenohypophysis or change the morphology of immunochemically stained cells. These observations suggest that in the drake: 1) anti-bovine TSH beta serum binds specifically to TSH cells; 2) the TSH cells occur in the rostral and not in the caudal lobe of the adenohypophysis; and 3) the activity of TSH cells is not inhibited by the feedback effects of gonadal steroids.

  3. Cytoplasmic kinases downstream of GPR30 suppress gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-induced luteinizing hormone secretion from bovine anterior pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Faidiban O; Kadokawa, Hiroya

    2016-01-01

    GPR30 is known as a membrane receptor for picomolar concentrations of estradiol. The GPR30-specific agonist G1 causes a rapid, non-genomic suppression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-induced luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion from bovine anterior pituitary (AP) cells. A few studies have recently clarified that protein kinase A (PKA) and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) might be involved in cytoplasmic signaling pathways of GPR30 in other cells. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that PKA and ERK kinase (MEK) are important cytoplasmic mediators for GPR30-associated non-genomic suppression of GnRH-induced LH secretion from bovine AP cells. Bovine AP cells (n = 8) were cultured for 3 days under steroid-free conditions. The AP cells were previously treated for 30 min with one of the following: 5000 nM of PKA inhibitor (H89), 1000 nM of MEK inhibitor (U0126), or a combination of H89 and U0126. Next, the AP cells were treated with 0.01 nM estradiol for 5 min before GnRH stimulation. Estradiol treatment without inhibitor pretreatment significantly suppressed GnRH-induced LH secretion (P < 0.01). In contrast, estradiol treatment after pretreatment with H89, U0126 or their combination had no suppressive effect on GnRH-induced LH secretion. The inhibitors also inhibited the G1 suppression of GnRH-induced LH secretion. Therefore, these data supported the hypothesis that PKA and MEK (thus, also pERK) are the intracellular mediators downstream of GPR30 that induce the non-genomic suppression of GnRH-induced LH secretion from bovine AP cells by estradiol or G1.

  4. Analysis of pituitary gonadotropin concentration in blood serum and immunolocalization and immunoexpression of follicle stimulating hormone and luteinising hormone receptors in ovaries of postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Brodowska, A; Laszczyńska, M; Brodowski, J; Masiuk, M; Starczewski, A

    2012-02-01

    The participation of gonadotropins in ovarian carcinogenesis is well known and is supported by studies with inhibition of pituitary gonadotropin secretion, which results in a diminished risk of cancer. However, there are few data on localization and expression of Follicle Stimulating Hormone and Luteinising Hormone Receptors (FSHR and LHR) in ovaries of healthy postmenopausal women, and their correlation with FSH and LH concentration in blood serum is unknown. The aim of our study was to analyze gonadotropin concentration in blood serum and the expression of FSHR and LHR in ovaries of 207 postmenopausal women. Patients included in the study were divided into three groups depending on the number of years since menopause. We analyzed the concentration of FSH and LH in blood serum and the expression of FSHR and LHR in ovaries. Ovaries of postmenopausal women showed numerous morphological changes in the cortex and medulla when compared to the structure of ovaries of women at reproductive age. In all groups of patients clefts in the surface epithelium and epithelial inclusion cysts were found. The concentration of FSH and LH in the blood serum of women studied increased significantly with time from menopause. Significant differences between analyzed menopausal groups were found. The highest FSH and LH concentration in blood serum were found in women with the longest period of time from menopause. Quantitatively similar expression of FSHR and LHR was found in ovarian surface epithelial cells, in epithelial inclusion cysts and in the connective tissue cells of ovarian stroma. The intensity of the immunohistochemical reaction decreased with time from menopause and with age.

  5. Hyperpolarization of the Membrane Potential Caused by Somatostatin in Dissociated Human Pituitary Adenoma Cells that Secrete Growth Hormone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Naohide; Shibuya, Naohiko; Ogata, Etsuro

    1986-08-01

    Membrane electrical properties and the response to somatostatin were examined in dissociated human pituitary adenoma cells that secrete growth hormone (GH). Under current clamp condition with a patch electrode, the resting potential was -52.4 ± 8.0 mV, and spontaneous action potentials were observed in 58% of the cells. Under voltage clamp condition an outward K+ current, a tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na+ current, and a Ca2+ current were observed. Cobalt ions suppressed the Ca2+ current. The threshold of Ca2+ current activation was about -60 mV. Somatostatin elicited a membrane hyperpolarization associated with increased membrane permeability in these cells. The reversal potential of somatostatin-induced hyperpolarization was -78.4 ± 4.3 mV in 6 mM K+ medium and -97.2 ± 6.4 mV in 3 mM K+ medium. These reversal potential values and a shift with the external K+ concentration indicated that membrane hyperpolarization was caused by increased permeability to K+. The hyperpolarized membrane potential induced by somatostatin was -63.6 ± 5.9 mV in the standard medium. This level was subthreshold for Ca2+ and Na+ currents and was sufficient to inhibit spontaneous action potentials. Hormone secretion was significantly suppressed by somatostatin and cobalt ions. Therefore, we suggest that Ca2+ entering the cell through voltage-dependent channels are playing an important role for GH secretion and that somatostatin suppresses GH secretion by blocking Ca2+ currents. Finally, we discuss other possibilities for the inhibitory effect of somatostatin on GH secretion.

  6. Combined anterior pituitary function test using CRH, GRH, LH-RH, TRH and vasopressin in patients with non-functioning pituitary tumors.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, K; Makino, S; Hirasawa, R; Takao, T; Kageyama, J; Ogasa, T; Ota, Z

    1990-06-01

    We examined 8 normal subjects and 16 patients with non-functioning pituitary tumors with a combined anterior pituitary test to evaluate the clinical usefulness of the test. Diagnoses included 9 of chromophobe adenoma, 3 of craniopharyngioma, 2 of Rathke's cleft cyst, and 1 each of intrasellar cyst and tuberculum sella meningioma. All subjects received hypothalamic releasing hormones: 1 micrograms/kg corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH), 1 micrograms/kg growth hormone releasing hormone (GRH), 500 micrograms thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), 100 micrograms luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LH-RH), and a relatively small dose (5 mU/kg) of lysine vasopressin (LVP). In the normal subjects, the addition of LVP potentiated the secretion of adenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) induced by CRH, but had no significant effect on the secretion of other anterior pituitary hormones. In the combined test with 5 releasing hormones, the plasma ACTH and cortisol responses were not impaired in the majority of the patients before pituitary surgery. Serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), prolactin (PRL) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) responses were not impaired in 82%, 70% and 67% of the patients, respectively, while the serum LH and GH responses were impaired in 67% and 73% of the patients, respectively. Following pituitary surgery, responses of these hormones to combined testing were similarly impaired in more than 75% of the patients. These results indicate that plasma ACTH, cortisol and serum TSH responses are fairly good before pituitary surgery but are impaired significantly after surgery. No subjects experienced any serious adverse effects related to the testing. These results suggest that combined testing with hypothalamic hormones is a convenient and useful method for evaluating pituitary function.

  7. Effects of Nalbuphine on Anterior Pituitary and Adrenal Hormones and Subjective Responses in Male Cocaine Abusers

    PubMed Central

    Goletiani, Nathalie V.; Mendelson, Jack H.; Sholar, Michelle B.; Siegel, Arthur J.; Skupny, Alicja J.; Mello, Nancy K.

    2007-01-01

    Nalbuphine (Nubain®) is a mixed action mu-kappa agonist used clinically for the management of pain. Nalbuphine and other mu-kappa agonists decreased cocaine self-administration in preclinical models. Cocaine stimulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, but the effects of nalbuphine on the HPA axis are unknown. Analgesic doses (5 and 10 mg/70 kg) of IV nalbuphine were administered to healthy male cocaine abusers, and plasma levels of PRL, ACTH and cortisol were measured before and at 10, 17, 19, 23, 27, 31, 35, 40, 45, 60, 75, 105, 135 min after nalbuphine administration. Subjective effects were measured on a Visual Analog Scale (VAS). Prolactin (PRL) increased significantly within 17 min (P=.04) and reached peak levels of 22.1 ± 7.1 ng/ml and 54.1 ± 11.3 at 60 min after low and high dose nalbuphine administration, respectively. VAS reports of “Sick,” “Bad” and “Dizzy” were significantly higher after 10 mg/70 kg than after 5 mg/70 kg nalbuphine (P=.05−.0001), and were significantly correlated with increases in PRL (P=.05−.0003). However, sedation and emesis were observed only after a 10 mg/70 kg dose of nalbuphine. Interestingly, ACTH and cortisol levels did not change significantly after administration of either dose of nalbuphine. Taken together, these data suggest that nalbuphine had both mu- and kappa-like effects on PRL (PRL increase) but did not increase ACTH and cortisol. PMID:17391744

  8. Habituation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis hormones to repeated homotypic stress and subsequent heterotypic stressor exposure in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Babb, Jessica A; Masini, Cher V; Day, Heidi E W; Campeau, Serge

    2014-05-01

    Understanding potential sex differences in repeated stress-induced hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis habituation could provide insight into the sex-biased prevalence of certain affective disorders such as anxiety and depression. Therefore in these studies, male and female rats were exposed to 30 min of either audiogenic or restraint stress daily for 10 days in order to determine whether sex regulates the extent to which HPA axis hormone release is attenuated upon repeated homotypic stressor presentation. In response to the initial exposure, both stressors robustly increased plasma concentrations of both adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone (CORT) in both sexes. Acutely, females displayed higher ACTH and CORT concentrations following restraint stress, whereas males exhibited higher hormone concentrations following loud noise stress. HPA axis hormone responses to both stressors decreased incrementally over successive days of exposure to each respective stressor. Despite the differential effect of sex on acute hormone responses, the extent to which HPA axis hormone response was attenuated did not differ between male and female animals following either stressor. Furthermore, ACTH and CORT responses to a novel environment were not affected by prior exposure to stress of either modality in either male or female rats. These experiments demonstrate that despite the acute stress response, male and female rats exhibit similar habituation of HPA axis hormones upon repeated homotypic stressor presentations, and that exposure to repeated stress does not produce exaggerated HPA axis hormone responses to a novel environment in either female or male rats.

  9. Suppression of episodic growth hormone secretion in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice: time-course studies on the hypothalamic pituitary axis.

    PubMed

    Murao, S; Sato, M; Tamaki, M; Niimi, M; Ishida, T; Takahara, J

    1995-10-01

    To elucidate the roles of the hypothalamic peptides, GH-releasing hormone (GRH) and somatostatin (SRIH), potentially responsible for altered GH dynamics in diabetes, we studied the time courses of their changes in level associated with altered GH secretion in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. Diabetic mice were used at 4, 7, and 14 days after STZ injection for analyses of 1) GH secretion in vivo, 2) hypothalamic GRH and SRIH messenger RNA (mRNA) levels, 3) pituitary GH mRNA and protein contents, and 4) pituitary GH response to GRH in vitro. GH secretion was completely suppressed 7 and 14 days after STZ injection. The hypothalamic GRH mRNA level was reduced to 59.8%, 61.2%, and 48.5% of control values at 4, 7, and 14 days, respectively. In contrast, the hypothalamic SRIH mRNA level was not altered at all of these time points. Pituitary GH mRNA and protein contents were significantly reduced to 70.2% and 61.5% of those in controls, respectively, only at 14 days. Pituitary GH responses to GRH at three doses (10, 50, and 250 nM) in vitro were remarkably increased at 4, 7, and 14 days. These findings indicate that the diabetic state rapidly and primarily inhibits hypothalamic GRH gene expression without affecting SRIH. A persistent decrease in hypothalamic GRH tone has been suggested to result in inhibition of GH synthesis in the pituitary. Enhancement of GH responsiveness to GRH may be due to the up-regulation of GRH receptors in the pituitary.

  10. Steroid binding sites in liver membranes: interplay between glucocorticoids, sex steroids, and pituitary hormones.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pérez, L; Flores-Morales, A; Chirino-Godoy, R; Díaz-Chico, J C; Díaz-Chico, B N

    2008-04-01

    Steroid hormones activate target cells through specific receptors that discriminate among ligands based upon recognition of distinct structural features. For most known steroids, membrane and nuclear receptors co-exist in many target cells. However, while the structure of the nuclear receptors and their function as transcriptional activators of specific target genes is generally well understood, the identity of the membrane receptors remains elusive. Using pharmacological and biochemical approaches, we are beginning to characterize receptors for glucocorticoids and anabolic-androgenic steroids in male rat liver membranes. Male rat liver endoplasmic reticulum contains two steroid binding sites which are functionally related and associated with a 90-134 kDa oligomeric protein: (1) the low-affinity glucocorticoid binding site (LAGS), composed at least in part of two peptides (37 and 53 kDa) that bind glucocorticoids and (2) the stanozolol binding protein (STBP), composed at least in part of three peptides (22, 31, and 55 kDa) that bind the synthetic androgen stanozolol. These steroid binding proteins have many properties different from those of classical nuclear receptors, with the salient differences being a failure to recognize "classical" ligands for nuclear receptors together with marked differences in biochemical properties and physiological regulation. The mechanism of interaction of glucocorticoids with the LAGS can be clearly distinguished from that with STBP. Moreover, STBP shows an extremely narrow pharmacological profile, being selective for ST and its analog, danazol, among more than 100 steroids and non-steroidal compounds that were assayed, including those that are able to displace glucocorticoids from the LAGS. The level of LAGS activity undergoes dramatic variations following changes from the physiological serum levels of thyroid hormones, glucocorticoids, GH, vitamin A, and E2. However, neither thyroid hormones nor GH have a critical role on STBP

  11. Growth hormone modulates hypothalamic inflammation in long-lived pituitary dwarf mice.

    PubMed

    Sadagurski, Marianna; Landeryou, Taylor; Cady, Gillian; Kopchick, John J; List, Edward O; Berryman, Darlene E; Bartke, Andrzej; Miller, Richard A

    2015-12-01

    Mice in which the genes for growth hormone (GH) or GH receptor (GHR(-/-) ) are disrupted from conception are dwarfs, possess low levels of IGF-1 and insulin, have low rates of cancer and diabetes, and are extremely long-lived. Median longevity is also increased in mice with deletion of hypothalamic GH-releasing hormone (GHRH), which leads to isolated GH deficiency. The remarkable extension of longevity in hypopituitary Ames dwarf mice can be reversed by a 6-week course of GH injections started at the age of 2 weeks. Here, we demonstrate that mutations that interfere with GH production or response, in the Snell dwarf, Ames dwarf, or GHR(-/-) mice lead to reduced formation of both orexigenic agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and anorexigenic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) projections to the main hypothalamic projection areas: the arcuate nucleus (ARH), paraventricular nucleus (PVH), and dorsomedial nucleus (DMH). These mutations also reduce hypothalamic inflammation in 18-month-old mice. GH injections, between 2 and 8 weeks of age, reversed both effects in Ames dwarf mice. Disruption of GHR specifically in liver (LiGHRKO), a mutation that reduces circulating IGF-1 but does not lead to lifespan extension, had no effect on hypothalamic projections or inflammation, suggesting an effect of GH, rather than peripheral IGF-1, on hypothalamic development. Hypothalamic leptin signaling, as monitored by induction of pStat3, is not impaired by GHR deficiency. Together, these results suggest that early-life disruption of GH signaling produces long-term hypothalamic changes that may contribute to the longevity of GH-deficient and GH-resistant mice.

  12. Correlation of scintigraphic results using 123I-methoxybenzamide with hormone levels and tumor size response to quinagolide in patients with pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Ferone, D; Lastoria, S; Colao, A; Varrella, P; Cerbone, G; Acampa, W; Merola, B; Salvatore, M; Lombardi, G

    1998-01-01

    The efficacy of dopaminergic agents in the medical treatment of pituitary adenomas is well known. Quinagolide is a nonergot derivative dopamine agonist, which binds dopamine D2 receptors with high affinity. The treatment with this drug is reported to suppress hormone levels and to cause tumor shrinkage in prolactinomas and in a few GH-secreting pituitary adenomas. In clinically nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFPA), the efficacy of quinagolide treatment is controversial. The scintigraphy of the pituitary region using 123I-methoxybenzamide (123I-IBZM) allows us to visualize in vivo the expression of dopamine D2 receptors on pituitary tumors. In this study, the pituitary scintigraphy with 123I-IBZM was performed in 14 patients with macroadenoma before starting a long-term treatment with quinagolide: 6 NFPA with high circulating alpha-subunit levels, 4 PRL-secreting, and 4 GH-secreting adenomas. A 3-point score was used to grade the ligand accumulation within the pituitary adenomas: 0 = negative, 1 = moderate uptake (equal to that recorded in the cerebral cortex), and 2 = intense uptake (equal to that recorded in the basal nuclei). The treatment with quinagolide was carried out at the dose of 0.3-0.6 mg/day for 6-12 months. Clinical, biochemical and hormonal assessment was repeated monthly during the first 3 months, then quarterly. Sellar magnetic resonance imaging was performed before and after 6 and 12 months of quinagolide treatment, to evaluate tumor shrinkage (> 25% of baseline size). In all 14 patients, a significant positive correlation was found between the degree of 123I-IBZM uptake and the clinical response to quinagolide treatment (r = 0.90; P < 0.001). In particular, the normalization of serum alpha-subunit and PRL levels, respectively, was achieved in 3 patients with NFPA and in 2 patients with prolactinoma, who showed intense 123I-IBZM uptake in the pituitary region. In 4 of these 5 patients with positive scan, a significant tumor shrinkage occurred

  13. The role of sexual steroid hormones in the direct stimulation by Kisspeptin-10 of the secretion of luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone and prolactin from bovine anterior pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Ezzat, A Ahmed; Saito, H; Sawada, T; Yaegashi, T; Goto, Y; Nakajima, Y; Jin, J; Yamashita, T; Sawai, K; Hashizume, T

    2010-09-01

    The aims of the present study were to clarify the effect of Kisspeptin-10 (Kp10) on the secretion of luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and prolactin (PRL) from bovine anterior pituitary (AP) cells and evaluate the ability of sex steroids to enhance the sensitivity of gonadotropic and lactotropic cells to Kp10. AP cells prepared from 7-week-old male calves were incubated for 12h with estradiol (E(2); 10(-8)M), progesterone (P(4); 10(-8)M), testosterone (T; 10(-8)M), or vehicle only (control), and then for 2h with Kp10 (10(-6)M). The amounts of LH, FSH and PRL released into the culture medium after the 2-h incubation period were examined. Kp10 significantly stimulated the secretion of LH from the AP cells treated with E(2) and T (P<0.05), but not from the P(4)-treated cells. In contrast, Kp10 had no effect on the secretion of FSH regardless of the steroid treatment. Kp10 significantly stimulated the secretion of PRL (P<0.05), the sexual steroid hormones having no effect. The LH- or FSH-releasing response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH; 10(-8)M) and PRL-releasing response to thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH; 10(-8)M) were significantly greater than those to Kp10 (P<0.05). The present results suggest that E(2) and T, but not P(4), enhance the sensitivity of gonadotropic cells to the secretion of LH in response to Kp10. However, Kp10 had no stimulatory effect on the secretion of FSH regardless of the effect of sex steroids. Kp10 directly stimulates the secretion of PRL from the pituitary cells, and sex steroids do not enhance the sensitivity of lactotropic cells to Kp10. Furthermore, the LH- and FSH-releasing effect and the PRL-releasing effect of Kp10 are less potent than that of GnRH and TRH, respectively.

  14. [Treatment effects analysis of preoperative long-acting somatostatin analogs combined trans-sphenoidal endoscopic surgery for patients with growth hormone secreting pituitary macroadenomas].

    PubMed

    Zhang, L Y; Deng, K; Zhang, Y; Yao, Y; Zhu, H J; Jin, Z M; Pan, H

    2017-02-07

    Objective: To evaluate the treatment effects of preoperative long-acting somatostatin analogue (SSA) combined trans-sphenoidal endoscopic surgery for patients with growth hormone (GH)-secreting pituitary macroadenomas. Methods: Retrospective analysis was carried out on 20 patients with GH-secreting pituitary macroadenomas who were treated with preoperative SSA and trans-sphenoidal endoscopic surgery in our apartment from January 2010 to January 2016. We also selected 20 patients with only trans-sphenoidal endoscopic surgery treatment and 20 patients with preoperative SSA and non-trans-sphenoidal endoscopic surgery treatment. The changes of tumor imaging, endocrine and blood pressure before and after treatment were analysed. Results: The Gross total resection (GTR) rate of invasive GH-secreting pituitary macroadenomas of preoperative SSA combined trans-sphenoidal endoscopic surgery group (8/13) were higher than that if only trans-sphenoidal endoscopic surgery group (4/16) and preoperative SSA combined non endoscopic surgery group (1/8) (P<0.05). Meanwhile, preoperative SSA combined trans-sphenoidal endoscopic surgery group had significantly improved the GH levels, blood glucose, lipid metabolism and blood pressure levels (P<0.05). Conclusion: The trans-sphenoidal endoscopic surgery on patients with GH-secreting pituitary macroadenomas has a significant improvement on GH levels, blood glucose, lipid metabolism and blood pressure levels. Through the treatment of preoperative long-acting SSA, the gross total resection rate is higher than other two groups.

  15. Cortical ablation induces time-dependent changes in rat pituitary somatotrophs and upregulates growth hormone receptor expression in the injured cortex.

    PubMed

    Lavrnja, Irena; Ajdzanovic, Vladimir; Trifunovic, Svetlana; Savic, Danijela; Milosevic, Verica; Stojiljkovic, Mirjana; Pekovic, Sanja

    2014-10-01

    The pituitary appears to be vulnerable to brain trauma, and its dysfunction is a common feature after traumatic brain injury. The role of pituitary growth hormone (GH) in brain repair after injury has been envisaged, but more studies must be performed to understand completely the importance of GH in these processes. Because some of the neuroprotective effects of GH are mediated directly through the GH receptor (GHR), we examined GHR expression in the rat cerebral cortex after sensorimotor cortex ablation. RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and double immunofluorescence had been performed to analyze the correlation between GHR expression in the injured cortex and activity of GH cells in the pituitary. Our results showed that the volume of GH-immunopositive cells was reduced at days 2 and 7 postsurgery (dps), and volume density of GH cells was significantly decreased at 14 dps, all compared with appropriate sham controls. At 30 dps all investigated parameters had returned to control level. In the injured cortex, GHR expression was transiently upregulated. Increased GHR immunoreactivity was observed in reactive astrocytes at 7 and particularly at 14 dps. In neuronal cells, an increase of GHR immunoreactivity was seen in neuronal cell bodies and well-defined primary dendrites at 14 and especially at 30 dps. The results presented here suggest that, during recovery from brain injury, changes in activity of pituitary GH cells result in upregulation of GHR that may have a role in neuronal arborization and glial proliferation in the injured cortex.

  16. Role of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide in modulating hypothalamus-pituitary neuroendocrine functions in mouse cell models.

    PubMed

    Kanasaki, H; Oride, A; Kyo, S

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) was originally identified as a hypothalamic activator of cyclic adenosine monophosphate production in pituitary cells. PACAP and its receptor are expressed not only in the central nervous system, but also in peripheral organs, and function to stimulate pituitary hormone synthesis and secretion as both a hypothalamic-pituitary-releasing factor and an autocrine-paracrine factor within the pituitary. PACAP stimulates the expression of the gonadotrophin α, luteinising hormone (LH) β and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) β subunits, as well as the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor and its own PACAP type I receptor (PAC1R) in gonadotrophin-secreting pituitary cells. In turn, GnRH, which is known to be a crucial component of gonadotrophin secretion, stimulates the expression of PACAP and PAC1R in gonadotrophs. In addition, PAC1R and PACAP modulate the functions of GnRH-producing neurones in the hypothalamus. This review summarises the current understanding of the possible roles of PACAP and PAC1R in modulating hypothalamus and pituitary neuroendocrine cells in the mouse models.

  17. Effects of 17 beta-estradiol and medroxyprogesterone acetate upon MtTW15 mammosomatotropic pituitary tumor growth and hormone production in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Winneker, R C; Parsons, J A

    1981-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the effects of two functionally diverse steroids, 17 beta-estradiol and medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA), on MtTW15 rat mammosomatotropic pituitary tumor growth and hormone production. Steroid responsiveness, as well as the hormonally autonomous nature of the tumor, was studied by treating both male and female tumor-bearing rats for 7 weeks with weekly injections of either 17 beta-estradiol (600 ng/g body weight/week) or MPA (200 microgram/g body weight/week) and, subsequently, comparing both the tumor weights and the in vivo production of growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) among the treatment groups. Large tumors (6 to 20 gm) were obtained in all treatment groups, indicating hormonal autonomy; however, tumors were markedly smaller, on the average, in untreated males an ovariectomized females. Treatment of such rats with 17 beta-estradiol stimulated tumor growth. Radioimmunoassay of tumor and serum GH and PRL levels in all treatment groups indicated the following: (a) tumors from untreated male or female hosts did not favor the production of one hormone over the other to any great extent; (b) MPA, however, promoted significant increases (p less than 0.05) in GH production in both male and female tumor-bearing rats while having little effect on the production of PRL; and (c) 17 beta-estradiol significantly inhibited (p less than 0.05) GH production and promoted PRL production by tumors borne by either sex. Selected studies utilizing multiple doses of MPA (1 to 500 microgram per gm body weight per week) and 17 beta-estradiol (10 to 800 ng per gm body weight per week) were accomplished and demonstrated that hormone production can be influenced in a dose-related manner. These results indicated that the estrogen-induced MtTW15 rat pituitary tumor is hormonally autonomous, yet divergently responsive to two different classes of steroidal compounds, thus making this tumor line an appropriate model for the study of

  18. Melanin-concentrating hormone: unique peptide neuronal systems in the rat brain and pituitary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Zamir, N.; Skofitsch, G.; Bannon, M.J.; Jacobowitz, D.M.

    1986-03-01

    A unique neuronal system was detected in the rat central nervous system by immunohistochemistry and radioimmunoassay with antibodies to salmon melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH). MCH-like immunoreactive (MCH-LI) cell bodies were confined to the hypothalamus. MCH-LI fibers were found throughout the brain but were most prevalent in hypothalamus, mesencephalon, and pons-medulla regions. High concentrations of MCH-LI were measured in the hypothalamic medial forebrain bundle (MFB), posterior hypothalamic nucleus, and nucleus of the diagonal band. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography of MFB extracts from rat brain indicate that MCH-like peptide from the rat has a different retention time than that of the salmon MCH. An osmotic stimuls (2% NaCl as drinking water for 120 hr) caused a marked increase in MCH-LI concentrations in the lateral hypothalamus and neurointermediate lobe. The present studies establish the presence of MCH-like peptide in the rat brain. The MCH-LI neuronal system is well situated to coordinate complex functions such as regulation of water intake.

  19. Growth hormone producing pituitary adenomas with concomitant hypersecretion of prolactin are particularly sensitive to photon irradiation.

    PubMed

    Werner, S; af Trampe, E; Palacios, P; Lax, I; Hall, K

    1985-09-01

    The effect of photon irradiation (50 Gy with a 3-field technique in fractionated doses) on growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), and somatomedin A (SMA) was studied in 25 patients with acromegaly after previous unsuccessful surgery. In patients with concomitant hypersecretion of PRL, the GH reduction was 70 +/- 22% 1 year and 88 +/- 10% 3 years after radiotherapy. The corresponding reductions in patients with isolated GH hypersecretion were 42 +/- 25% and 60 +/- 22%. The reduction of GH levels was most notable the first year after radiotherapy in 16 patients and during the second year in 7 patients. Serum PRL decreased after radiotherapy in all patients with hyperprolactinemia, whereas PRL in normoprolactinemic patients showed inconsistent changes, including PRL increments in 8/12 patients. The effect of radiotherapy on GH and PRL was not correlated to the irradiation target volume or the cumulative radiation effect. SMA levels decreased after radiotherapy, but became normal only in 3 patients, all with pretreatment GH less than 5 micrograms/l. Radiotherapy, 3 years after treatment, appeared to be equivalent to the primary surgical intervention in reducing GH and SMA in patients with acromegaly due to advanced macroadenomas. Patients with concomitant hyperprolactinemia showed increased sensitivity to radiation compared to normoprolactinemic patients with acromegaly.

  20. Influence of electromagnetic fields emitted by GSM-900 cellular telephones on the circadian patterns of gonadal, adrenal and pituitary hormones in men.

    PubMed

    Djeridane, Yasmina; Touitou, Yvan; de Seze, René

    2008-03-01

    The potential health risks of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF EMFs) emitted by mobile phones are currently of considerable public interest. The present study investigated the effect of exposure to 900 MHz GSM radiofrequency radiation on steroid (cortisol and testosterone) and pituitary (thyroid-stimulating hormone, growth hormone, prolactin and adrenocorticotropin) hormone levels in 20 healthy male volunteers. Each subject was exposed to RF EMFs through the use of a cellular phone for 2 h/day, 5 days/ week, for 4 weeks. Blood samples were collected hourly during the night and every 3 h during the day. Four sampling sessions were performed at 15-day intervals: before the beginning of the exposure period, at the middle and the end of the exposure period, and 15 days later. Parameters evaluated included the maximum serum concentration, the time of this maximum, and the area under the curve for hormone circadian patterns. Each individual's pre-exposure hormone concentration was used as his control. All hormone concentrations remained within normal physiological ranges. The circadian profiles of prolactin, thyroid-stimulating hormone, adrenocorticotropin and testosterone were not disrupted by RF EMFs emitted by mobile phones. For growth hormone and cortisol, there were significant decreases of about 28% and 12%, respectively, in the maximum levels when comparing the 2-week (for growth hormone and cortisol) and 4-week (for growth hormone) exposure periods to the pre-exposure period, but no difference persisted in the postexposure period. Our data show that the 900 MHz EMF exposure, at least under our experimental conditions, does not appear to affect endocrine functions in men.

  1. Effects of low-dose cranial radiation on growth hormone secretory dynamics and hypothalamic-pituitary function

    SciTech Connect

    Costin, G.

    1988-08-01

    Spontaneous growth hormone (GH) secretory dynamics and hypothalamic-pituitary function were studied in 16 long-term survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia who were aged 9 to 15 1/2 years and had been treated with prophylactic central nervous system radiation and combined chemotherapy. At the time of study, the mean height was -1.5 SD score below the mean, less than genetic potential, and significantly less than the mean pretreatment height of -0.25 SD score. Height velocity was subnormal for age and sexual stage in all patients. Two patients had compensated hypothyroidism, and four had evidence of gonadal failure. In 11 patients, the peak GH level after two provocative tests was below 10 micrograms/L, which was consistent with GH deficiency. In ten of 13 patients tested, spontaneous GH secretion determined by a 24-hour GH concentration (GHC), GH pulse amplitude, frequency of GH pulses greater than or equal to 5 micrograms/L, and GH peak during wake and sleep hours was significantly less than in normal height controls. Although in three pubertal patients the 24-hour GHC was within normal limits, the GHC during sleep hours, GH pulse amplitude during 24 hours and sleep hours, and peak GH during wake hours were significantly less than in normal height controls. In all pubertal and in two of the prepubertal patients, the somatomedin C (SmC) level was significantly less than in controls. The 24-hour GHC correlated well with the GHC during sleep, peak-stimulated GH level, gonadal steroid level, and the SmC level, but not with height velocity, dose of radiation, or age at radiation. A significant increase in height velocity and the SmC level was noted in all patients treated with GH. These results indicate that GH deficiency occurs after 18 to 24 Gy of cranial radiation and that the puberty-associated growth spurt may mask the decline in height velocity owing to GH deficiency.

  2. Identification of cis elements necessary for glucocorticoid induction of growth hormone gene expression in chicken embryonic pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Heuck-Knubel, Kristina; Proszkowiec-Weglarz, Monika; Narayana, Jyoti; Ellestad, Laura E; Prakobsaeng, Nattiya; Porter, Tom E

    2012-03-01

    Glucocorticoid (GC) treatment of rat or chicken embryonic pituitary (CEP) cells induces premature production of growth hormone (GH). GC induction of the GH gene requires ongoing protein synthesis, and the GH genes lack a canonical GC response element (GRE). To characterize cis-acting elements and identify trans-acting proteins involved in this process, we characterized the regulation of a luciferase reporter containing a fragment of the chicken GH gene (-1727/+48) in embryonic day 11 CEP cells. Corticosterone (Cort) increased luciferase activity and mRNA expression, and mRNA induction was blocked by protein synthesis inhibition. Through deletion analysis, we identified a GC-responsive region (GCRR) at -1045 to -954. The GCRR includes an ETS-1 binding site and a degenerate GRE (dGRE) half site. Nuclear proteins, including ETS-1, bound to a GCRR probe in electrophoretic mobility shift assays, and Cort regulated protein binding. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we found that ETS-1 and GC receptor (GR) were associated with the GCRR in CEP cells, and Cort increased GR recruitment to the GCRR. Mutation of the ETS-1 site or dGRE site in the -1045/+48 GH reporter abolished Cort responsiveness. We conclude that GC regulation of the GH gene during development requires cis-acting elements in the GCRR and involves ETS-1 and GR binding to these elements. Similar ETS-1 elements/dGREs are located in the 5'-flanking regions of GH genes in mammals, including rodents and humans. This is the first study to demonstrate involvement of ETS-1 in GC regulation of the GH gene during embryonic development in any species, enhancing our understanding of GH regulation in vertebrates.

  3. Effect of Soyabean Isoflavones Exposure on Onset of Puberty, Serum Hormone Concentration and Gene Expression in Hypothalamus, Pituitary Gland and Ovary of Female Bama Miniature Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Juexin; Zhang, Bin; Li, Lili; Xiao, Chaowu; Oladele, Oso Abimbola; Jiang, Guoli; Ding, Hao; Wang, Shengping; Xing, Yueteng; Xiao, Dingfu; Yin, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    This study was to investigate the effect of soyabean isoflavones (SIF) on onset of puberty, serum hormone concentration, and gene expression in hypothalamus, pituitary and ovary of female Bama miniature pigs. Fifty five, 35-days old pigs were randomly assigned into 5 treatment groups consisting of 11 pigs per treatment. Results showed that dietary supplementation of varying dosage (0, 250, 500, and 1,250 mg/kg) of SIF induced puberty delay of the pigs with the age of puberty of pigs fed basal diet supplemented with 1,250 mg/kg SIF was significantly higher (p<0.05) compared to control. Supplementation of SIF or estradiol valerate (EV) reduced (p<0.05) serum gonadotrophin releasing hormone and luteinizing hormone concentration, but increased follicle-stimulating hormone concentration in pigs at 4 months of age. The expression of KiSS-1 metastasis-suppressor (KISS1), steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and 3-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/delta-5-delta-4 isomerase (3β-HSD) was reduced (p<0.01) in SIF-supplemented groups. Expression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor in the pituitary of miniature pigs was reduced (p<0.05) compared to the control when exposed to 250, 1,250 mg/kg SIF and EV. Pigs on 250 mg/kg SIF and EV also showed reduced (p<0.05) expression of cytochrome P450 19A1 compared to the control. Our results indicated that dietary supplementation of SIF induced puberty delay, which may be due to down-regulation of key genes that play vital roles in the synthesis of steroid hormones. PMID:26580281

  4. [Thyrotropin-secreting pituitary adenomas].

    PubMed

    Caron, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    TSH-secreting pituitary adenomas represent 0.5 to 1% of all pituitary adenomas. They are recognized with increasing frequency due to the measurement of TSH level in patients with hyperthyroidism, the ultra sensitive TSH assays and the improvement in pituitary imaging. Patients present mild or moderate signs of hyperthyroidism. Hormonal evaluation shows increased free thyroid hormone concentration with detectable, normal or increased serum TSH level, raising the differential diagnosis with pituitary resistance to thyroid hormone syndrome. Magnetic resonance imaging reveals pituitary adenomas in most patients. Transphenoidal surgery remains the treatment of choice in patients with TSH-secreting pituitary microadenomas, while long-acting somatostatin analogs seem to be an alternative medical treatment to surgery in patients with macroadenomas or invasive pituitary tumors.

  5. Human gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor-activated cellular functions and signaling pathways in extra-pituitary tissues and cancer cells (Review).

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Rojas, Arturo; Huerta-Reyes, Maira

    2009-11-01

    Human gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR) and its natural ligand human gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) were initially described as signaling complexes that play a key role in reproductive functions. By binding to specific receptors present on pituitary gonadotropes, GnRH regulates the sperm and ovum maturation, as well as steroidogenesis within the context of the hypothalamus-hypophysis axis. The expression of GnRH and its receptor has clearly been established in many extra-pituitary organs. Some of them are tumors from non-reproductive tissues such as liver, larynx, pancreas, colon, lymphoma, kidney, skin, blood and brain as well as tissues from reproductive track, for example ovary, endometrium, prostate and breast or tumors derived from these organs. Expression of GnRH and its receptor in these organs has gained much attention and several research groups have established their role during cell proliferation and cell motility. Although the signaling pathways and their effector proteins in these samples remain unclear, the molecular mechanism employed for GnRH and its receptor in extra-pituitary tissues could be related with non-classical GnRHR-signaling pathways. In the present review, we explore the vast literature reported on GnRH and GnRHR principally in tumors, describing how cross-talk between GnRHR and growth factor receptor, the coupling between GnRHR and many G proteins depending on cell context, and the regulation of several proteins associated with cell proliferation and cell motility are employed by GnRHR/GnRH to regulate their extra-pituitary activities.

  6. Growth hormone-secreting macroadenoma of the pituitary gland successfully treated with the radiolabeled somatostatin analog (90)Y-DOTATATE: case report.

    PubMed

    Waligórska-Stachura, Joanna; Gut, Paweł; Sawicka-Gutaj, Nadia; Liebert, Włodzimierz; Gryczyńska, Maria; Baszko-Błaszyk, Daria; Blanco-Gangoo, Al Ricardo; Ruchała, Marek

    2016-08-01

    Pituitary tumors causing acromegaly are usually macroadenomas at the time of diagnosis, and they can grow aggressively, infiltrating surrounding tissues. Difficulty in achieving complete tumor removal at surgery can lead toward a strong tendency for recurrence, making it necessary to consider a means of treatment other than those currently used such as somatostatin analogs (SSAs), growth hormone (GH) receptor antagonist, surgical removal, and radiotherapy. The purpose of this paper is to describe a patient diagnosed with an aggressive, giant GH-secreting tumor refractory to medical therapy but ultimately treated with the radiolabeled somatostatin analog (90)Y-DOTATATE. A 26-year-old male with an invasive macroadenoma of the pituitary gland (5.6 × 2.5 × 3.6 cm) and biochemically confirmed acromegaly underwent 2 partial tumor resections: the first used the transsphenoidal approach and the second used the transcranial method. The patient received SSAs pre- and postoperatively. Because of the progression in pituitary tumor size, he underwent classic irradiation of the tumor (50 Gy). One and a half years later, the patient presented with clinically and biochemically active disease, and the tumor size was still 52 mm in diameter (height). Two neurosurgeons disqualified him from further surgical procedures. After confirming the presence of somatostatin receptors in the pituitary tumor by using (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT, we treated the patient 4 times with an SSA bound with (90)Y-DOTATATE. After this treatment, the patient attained partial biochemical remission and a reduction in the tumor mass for the first time. Treatment with an SSA bound with (90)Y-DOTATATE may be a promising option for some aggressive GH-secreting pituitary adenomas when other methods have failed.

  7. Hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal endocrine system in the hagfish.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Masumi

    2013-12-30

    The hypothalamic-pituitary system is considered to be a seminal event that emerged prior to or during the differentiation of the ancestral agnathans (jawless vertebrates). Hagfishes as one of the only two extant members of the class of agnathans are considered the most primitive vertebrates known, living or extinct. Accordingly, studies on their reproduction are important for understanding the evolution and phylogenetic aspects of the vertebrate reproductive endocrine system. In gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates), the hormones of the hypothalamus and pituitary have been extensively studied and shown to have well-defined roles in the control of reproduction. In hagfish, it was thought that they did not have the same neuroendocrine control of reproduction as gnathostomes, since it was not clear whether the hagfish pituitary gland contained tropic hormones of any kind. This review highlights the recent findings of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal endocrine system in the hagfish. In contrast to gnathostomes that have two gonadotropins (GTH: luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone), only one pituitary GTH has been identified in the hagfish. Immunohistochemical and functional studies confirmed that this hagfish GTH was significantly correlated with the developmental stages of the gonads and showed the presence of a steroid (estradiol) feedback system at the hypothalamic-pituitary levels. Moreover, while the identity of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) has not been determined, immunoreactive (ir) GnRH has been shown in the hagfish brain including seasonal changes of ir-GnRH corresponding to gonadal reproductive stages. In addition, a hagfish PQRFamide peptide was identified and shown to stimulate the expression of hagfish GTHβ mRNA in the hagfish pituitary. These findings provide evidence that there are neuroendocrine-pituitary hormones that share common structure and functional features compared to later evolved vertebrates.

  8. Pituitary sex hormones enhance the pro-metastatic potential of human lung cancer cells by downregulating the intracellular expression of heme oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Abdelbaset-Ismail, Ahmed; Pedziwiatr, Daniel; Schneider, Gabriela; Niklinski, Jacek; Charkiewicz, Radoslaw; Moniuszko, Marcin; Kucia, Magda; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z.

    2017-01-01

    We report that human lung cancer cell lines express functional receptors for pituitary sex hormones (SexHs) and respond to stimulation by follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and prolactin (PRL). Expression of these receptors has also been confirmed in patient lung cancer samples at the mRNA level. Stimulation of human lung cancer cell lines with FSH, LH, or PRL stimulated migration and chemotaxis, and some cell lines responded by enhanced proliferation. Moreover, priming of human lung cancer cells by exposing them to pituitary SexHs resulted in enhanced seeding efficiency of injected human lung cancer cells into bone marrow, liver, and lungs in an immunodeficient mouse model. The chemotaxis of lung cancer cell lines corresponded with the activity of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), as stimulation of these cells by FSH, LH, and PRL downregulated its expression in a p38 MAPK-dependent manner. Moreover, while downregulation of HO-1 by the small-molecule inhibitor tin protoporphyrin (SnPP) promoted migration, upregulation of HO-1 by the small-molecule activator cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) showed the opposite effect. Based on this finding, we propose that pituitary SexHs play a significant role in the pathogenesis of lung cancer, particularly when the blood level of FSH increases due to gonadal dysfunction with advanced age. Finally, we propose that upregulation of HO-1 expression by a small-molecule activator may be effective in controlling SexH-induced cell migration in lung cancer. PMID:27922667

  9. Changes in gene expression for GH/PRL/SL family hormones in the pituitaries of homing chum salmon during ocean migration through upstream migration.

    PubMed

    Onuma, Takeshi A; Ban, Masatoshi; Makino, Keita; Katsumata, Hiroshi; Hu, WeiWei; Ando, Hironori; Fukuwaka, Masa-aki; Azumaya, Tomonori; Urano, Akihisa

    2010-05-01

    Gene expression for growth hormone (GH)/prolactin (PRL)/somatolactin (SL) family hormones in the pituitaries of homing chum salmon were examined, because gene expression for these hormones during ocean-migrating phases remains unclear. Fish were collected in the winter Gulf of Alaska, the summer Bering Sea and along homing pathway in the Ishikari River-Ishikari Bay water system in Hokkaido, Japan in autumn. The oceanic fish included maturing adults, which had developing gonads and left the Bering Sea for the natal river by the end of summer. The absolute amounts of GH, PRL and SL mRNAs in the pituitaries of the maturing adults in the summer Bering Sea were 5- to 20-fold those in the winter Gulf of Alaska. The amount of GH mRNA in the homing adults at the coastal seawater (SW) areas was smaller than that in the Bering fish, while the amount of PRL mRNA remained at the higher level until fish arrived at the Ishikari River. The gill Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity in the coastal SW fish and the plasma Na(+) levels in the brackish water fish at the estuary were lowered to the levels that were comparable to those in the fresh water (FW) fish. In conclusion, gene expression for GH, PRL and SL was elevated in the pituitaries of chum salmon before initiation of homing behavior from the summer Bering Sea. Gene expression for GH is thereafter lowered coincidently with malfunction of SW adaptability in the breeding season, while gene expression for PRL is maintained high until forthcoming FW adaptation.

  10. Effect of growth hormone (GH)-releasing hormone (GRH) on plasma GH in relation to magnitude and duration of GH deficiency in 26 children and adults with isolated GH deficiency or multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies: evidence for hypothalamic GRH deficiency.

    PubMed

    Schriock, E A; Lustig, R H; Rosenthal, S M; Kaplan, S L; Grumbach, M M

    1984-06-01

    Synthetic, amidated, 44 amino acid GH-releasing hormone ( GRH -44) was administered iv at a dose of 5 micrograms/kg to 20 patients with severe GH deficiency (GHD), 6 children and adolescents with partial GHD, and 6 non-GH deficient ( NGHD ) children and adolescents. The 17 patients with severe GHD that responded to GRH -44 had lower peak concentrations of plasma GH than the NGHD individuals (5.0 +/- 1.2 (SEM) vs. 27.2 +/- 3.5 ng/ml; P less than 0.0001). The children and adolescents with severe GHD tended to have higher peak GH responses to GRH -44 than the GHD adults (6.9 +/- 1.7 vs. 2.4 +/- 0.3 ng/ml) although the difference was not significant. The peak GH concentration was attained earlier in the GHD children and adolescents than in the GHD adults (28 +/- 4.7 vs. 69.3 +/- 13 min, P less than 0.004). There was a negative correlation between chronological age and peak plasma GH response to GRH in the children and adolescents with severe GHD (r = -0.758, P less than 0.02). Children and adolescents with partial GHD had a higher mean peak concentration of plasma GH (13. 1 +/- 1.8 ng/ml) than the children, adolescents, and adults with severe GHD (P less than 0.04), but one lower than the NGHD children and adolescents (P less than 0.05). In both severe and partial GHD the GH response to GRH was greater than that elicited by standard pharmacological tests. Serum somatomedin-C did not increase after a single pulse of GRH -44 in the 12 GHD patients studied. PRL increased minimally 30 min after 5 micrograms/kg iv GRH -44 in patients with multiple hypothalamic-pituitary hormone deficiencies but not in patients with isolated GHD or in NGHD individuals. The GH responses to GRH suggest that the majority of patients with isolated GHD as well as those with multiple hypothalamic-pituitary hormone deficiencies have deficiency of hypothalamic GRH . Lack of a GH response to a single pulse of GRH does not exclude GRH deficiency as priming of the somatotrope with multiple pulses of

  11. Negative Glucocorticoid Response-Like Element from the First Intron of the Chicken Growth Hormone Gene Represses Gene Expression in the Rat Pituitary Tumor Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jing-E.; Lang, Qian-Qian; Qiu, Feng-Fang; Zhang, Li; Li, Xiang-Guang; Luo, Wen; Wang, Juan; Wang, Xing; Lin, Xi-Ran; Liu, Wen-Sheng; Nie, Qing-Hua; Zhang, Xi-Quan

    2016-01-01

    The effects of introns, especially the first intron, on the regulation of gene expression remains unclear. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to investigate the transcriptional regulatory function of intron 1 on the chicken growth hormone (cGH) gene in the rat pituitary tumor cell line (GH4-C1). Transient transfection using first-intron-inserted cGH complete coding sequences (CDSs) and non-intron-inserted cGH CDS plasmids, quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and western blot assays were used to detect the expression of cGH. The reporter gene assay was also used to investigate the effect of a series of fragments in the first intron of cGH on gene expression in GH4-C1. All of the results revealed that a 200-bp fragment located in the +485/+684 region of intron 1 was essential for repressing the expression of cGH. Further informatics analysis showed that there was a cluster of 13 transcriptional factor binding sites (TFBSs) in the +485/+684 region of the cGH intron 1. Disruption of a glucocorticoid response-like element (the 19-nucleotide sequence 5′-AGGCTTGACAGTGACCTCC-3′) containing a T-box motif (TGACCT) located within this DNA fragment increased the expression of the reporter gene in GH4-C1. In addition, an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) revealed a glucocorticoid receptor (GR) protein of rat binding to the glucocorticoid response-like element. Together, these results indicate that there is a negative glucocorticoid response-like element (nGRE) located in the +591/+609 region within the first intron of cGH, which is essential for the down-regulation of cGH expression. PMID:27834851

  12. A rare case of type 1 diabetes mellitus with pituitary hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Jostol; Sudeep, K; Venkatesha, B M

    2014-01-01

    Growth failure and pubertal abnormalities are not uncommon in chronic uncontrolled metabolic diseases like diabetes mellitus. We present a young girl with uncontrolled type 1 diabetes mellitus, who presented with short stature and primary amenorrhea, and on evaluation was found to have anterior pituitary hypoplasia. In addition to uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, she presented with early onset growth failure and lack of spontaneous secondary sexual characteristics. She had central hypothyroidism and inappropriately normal gonadotropin levels. However her serum cortisol levels were normal. MRI of the sellar-suprasellar region revealed a small anterior pituitary gland with thinning of the pituitary stalk consistent with pituitary hypoplasia. While uncontrolled type 1 diabetes itself may cause growth retardation and pubertal abnormalities, this girl had coexisting pituitary maldevelopment - a rare co-existence of two major illnesses of unrelated etiologies. The partial pituitary hormonal deficiency, which spared the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis, may be due to a transcription factor defect.

  13. Morphology of the pituitary gland in ferrets (Mustela putorius furo) with hyperadrenocorticism.

    PubMed

    Schoemaker, N J; van der Hage, M H; Flik, G; Lumeij, J T; Rijnberk, A

    2004-05-01

    Pituitary tumours are the cause of hyperadrenocorticism in a variety of species, but the role of the pituitary gland in hyperadrenocorticism in ferrets is not known. In this species, the disease is mediated by the action of excess gonadotrophins on the adrenal cortex and is characterized by an excessive secretion of sex steroids. In this study, the pituitary gland of four healthy control ferrets, intact or neutered, and 10 neutered ferrets with hyperadrenocorticism was examined histologically following immunohistochemical labelling for adrenocorticotrophic hormone, alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, growth hormone, thyroid-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, and prolactin. Immunohistochemistry revealed that somatotrophs, thyrotrophs and lactotrophs were the most abundant cell types of the pars distalis of the pituitary gland in the healthy ferrets. The distribution of corticotrophs was similar to that in the dog and man. In ferrets, as in dogs, the melanotrophic cell was almost the only cell type of the pars intermedia. Gonadotrophs were found in the pars distalis of neutered, but not intact ferrets. All the ferrets with hyperadrenocorticism had unilateral or bilateral alterations of the adrenal gland. In addition, in the pituitary gland of two of these ferrets a tumour was detected. These tumours were not immunolabelled by antibodies against any of the pituitary hormones, and had characteristics of the clinically non-functional gonadotroph tumours seen in man. In some of the other ferrets low pituitary immunoreactivity for gonadotrophic hormones was detected, which may have been due to the feedback of autonomous steroid secretion by the neoplastic transformation of the adrenal cortex. It is concluded that initially high concentrations of gonadotrophins resulting from castration may initiate hyperactivity of the adrenal cortex. The low incidence of pituitary tumours and the low density of gonadotrophin-positive cells in non

  14. Effects of Barium Chloride Exposure on Hormones and Genes of the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Gonad Axis, and Reproduction of Zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Kwon, Bareum; Ha, Nayoung; Jung, Joeun; Kim, Pan-Gyi; Kho, Younglim; Choi, Kyungho; Ji, Kyunghee

    2016-03-01

    Adult zebrafish pairs were exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of BaCl2 for 21 days, and the effects on reproduction, sex steroid hormones, and transcription of the genes belonging to the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonad (HPG) axis were investigated. The adverse effects on performances of F1 generation were further examined with or without subsequent exposure to BaCl2. Egg production was significantly decreased, and parental exposure to BaCl2 resulted in lesser rates of hatching. In males, exposure to BaCl2 resulted in greater concentrations of E2 along with greater mRNA expression of cyp19a. The results demonstrated that BaCl2 could modulate gene transcriptions and hormone production of the HPG axis in a sex-dependent way, which could cause adverse effects on reproduction and the development of offspring.

  15. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor activity modulates prolactin expression in the pituitary

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Tyler B.; Brannick, Katherine E.; Raetzman, Lori T.

    2012-01-01

    Pituitary tumors account for 15% of intracranial neoplasms, however the extent to which environmental toxicants contribute to the proliferation and hormone expression of pituitary cells is unknown. Aryl-hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) interacting protein (AIP) loss of function mutations cause somatotroph and lactotroph adenomas in humans. AIP sequesters AhR and inhibits its transcriptional function. Because of the link between AIP and pituitary tumors, we hypothesize that exposure to dioxins, potent exogenous ligands for AhR that are persistent in the environment, may predispose to pituitary dysfunction through activation of AhR. In the present study, we examined the effect of AhR activation on proliferation and endogenous pituitary hormone expression in the GH3 rat somato-lactotrope tumor cell line and the effect of loss of AhR action in knockout mice. GH3 cells respond to nM doses of the reversible AhR agonist β-naphthoflavone with a robust induction of Cyp1a1. Although mRNA levels of the anti-proliferative signaling cytokine TGFbeta1 are suppressed upon β-naphthoflavone treatment, we did not observe an alteration in cell proliferation. AhR activation with β-naphthoflavone suppresses Ahr expression and impairs expression of prolactin (PRL), but not growth hormone (GH) mRNA in GH3 cells. In mice, loss of Ahr similarly leads to a reduction in Prl mRNA at P3, while Gh is unaffected. Additionally, there is a significant reduction pituitary hormones Lhb and Fshb in the absence of Ahr. Overall, these results demonstrate that AhR is important for pituitary hormone expression and suggests environmental dioxins can exert endocrine disrupting effects at the pituitary. PMID:22975028

  16. Intracellular mechanisms involved in copper-gonadotropin-releasing hormone (Cu-GnRH) complex-induced cAMP/PKA signaling in female rat anterior pituitary cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gajewska, Alina; Zielinska-Gorska, Marlena; Wolinska-Witort, Ewa; Siawrys, Gabriela; Baran, Marta; Kotarba, Grzegorz; Biernacka, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    The copper-gonadotropin-releasing hormone molecule (Cu-GnRH) is a GnRH analog, which preserves its amino acid sequence, but which contains a Cu(2+) ion stably bound to the nitrogen atoms including that of the imidazole ring of Histidine(2). A previous report indicated that Cu-GnRH was able to activate cAMP/PKA signaling in anterior pituitary cells in vitro, but raised the question of which intracellular mechanism(s) mediated the Cu-GnRH-induced cAMP synthesis in gonadotropes. To investigate this mechanism, in the present study, female rat anterior pituitary cells in vitro were pretreated with 0.1 μM antide, a GnRH antagonist; 0.1 μM cetrorelix, a GnRH receptor antagonist; 0.1 μM PACAP6-38, a PAC-1 receptor antagonist; 2 μM GF109203X, a protein kinase C inhibitor; 50 mM PMA, a protein kinase C activator; the protein kinase A inhibitors H89 (30 μM) and KT5720 (60 nM); factors affecting intracellular calcium activity: 2.5 mM EGTA; 2 μM thapsigargin; 5 μM A23187, a Ca(2+) ionophore; or 10 μg/ml cycloheximide, a protein synthesis inhibitor. After one of the above pretreatments, cells were incubated in the presence of 0.1 μM Cu-GnRH for 0.5, 1, and 3 h. Radioimmunoassay analysis of cAMP confirmed the functional link between Cu-GnRH stimulation and cAMP/PKA signal transduction in rat anterior pituitary cells, demonstrating increased intracellular cAMP, which was reduced in the presence of specific PKA inhibitors. The stimulatory effect of Cu-GnRH on cAMP production was partly dependent on GnRH receptor activation. In addition, an indirect and Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism might be involved in intracellular adenylate cyclase stimulation. Neither activation of protein kinase C nor new protein synthesis was involved in the Cu-GnRH-induced increase of cAMP in the rat anterior pituitary primary cultures. Presented data indicate that conformational changes of GnRH molecule resulting from cooper ion coordination affect specific pharmacological properties of Cu

  17. Case-control study on the use of pituitary-derived hormones from sheep as a potential risk factor for the occurrence of atypical scrapie in Great Britain.

    PubMed

    Marier, E; Dawson, M; Simmons, M; Hope, J; Ortiz-Peláez, A

    2017-02-17

    A case-control study was conducted in 2013 to investigate the use of pituitary-derived hormones from sheep as a potential risk factor for the presence of atypical scrapie in Great Britain sheep holdings. One hundred and sixty-five holdings were identified as cases. Two equal sets of controls were selected: no case of scrapie and cases of classical scrapie. A total of 495 holdings were selected for the questionnaire survey, 201 responses were received and 190 (38.3 per cent) were suitable for analysis. The variables 'use-of-heat-synchronisation/superovulation' and 'flock size' were significantly associated with the occurrence of atypical scrapie. Farms with atypical cases were less likely (OR 0.25, 95 per cent CI 0.07 to 0.89) to implement heat synchronisation/superovulation in the flock than the control group. Atypical cases were 3.3 times (95 per cent CI 1.38 to 8.13) more likely to occur in large holdings (>879 sheep) than in small flocks (<164 sheep). If the 'use-of-heat-synchronisation/superovulation' is a proxy for the use of pituitary-derived hormones, the significant negative association between having a case of atypical scrapie and the use of these practices rules out the initial hypothesis that using these drugs is a risk factor for the occurrence of atypical scrapie. Flock size was a significant risk factor for atypical scrapie, consistent with a previous generic case-control study.

  18. Thyroliberin (TRH) induced growth hormone (GH) release: test of maturation of hypothalamo-pituitary axis in postnatal rat.

    PubMed

    Strbák, V; Jurcovicová, J; Vigas, M

    1981-12-01

    Small doses of TRH elicit GH release from rat pituitary provided the pituitary lacks CNS influences (e.g. in vitro or in ectopic pituitaries). We have found previously that hypothalamic regulation of TSH secretion matures between the 5th and 12th postnatal day. Therefore the possibility of TRH induced GH release was investigated in neonatal rats. GH concentration was measured by RIA at 10 min after s.c. TRH administration (4.1 pmol g-1 BW) into female Wistar rats at the age 3, 9, 12, 15, 21, 30 and 100 days. Control animals were injected the same volume (1 microliter g-1 BW) of saline. Serum GH in saline treated animals gradually decreased during postnatal ontogenesis. The TRH induced increase of serum GH level decreased during maturation: the most marked response was found at 3 days, it was somewhat lessened but still significant at 9 days and was absent in 12, 15, 30 days old and adult animals. Surprisingly, in 21 days old animals the increase of GH after TRH administration was again present. We conclude that the ability of TRH to elicit GH release in newborn rats may depend on the maturity of the hypothalamo-pituitary axis. The effect of hypothalamic somatostatin is likely to inhibit such a response at the pituitary level in older rats.

  19. [Impact on human health of hormonal additives used in animal production].

    PubMed

    Larrea, Fernando; Chirinos, Mayel

    2007-01-01

    The establishment of the impact of environmental compounds or additives with hormone-like activity on human health still requires further investigation, as well as a reexamination of biologic models and experimental methodology employed so far. In 1988, the FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives Joint with the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) considered that sexual hormone residues usually present in meat do not represent a risk for human consumption. Nevertheless, this resolution seems to be uncertain since the scientific elements employed for this statement may not be adequate. In this review the principal objections to the evidence used to establish the innocuousness of growth promoter hormones are considered.

  20. Insight into the neuroendocrine site and cellular mechanism by which cortisol suppresses pituitary responsiveness to gonadotropin-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Breen, Kellie M; Davis, Tracy L; Doro, Lisa C; Nett, Terry M; Oakley, Amy E; Padmanabhan, Vasantha; Rispoli, Louisa A; Wagenmaker, Elizabeth R; Karsch, Fred J

    2008-02-01

    Stress-like elevations in plasma glucocorticoids rapidly inhibit pulsatile LH secretion in ovariectomized sheep by reducing pituitary responsiveness to GnRH. This effect can be blocked by a nonspecific antagonist of the type II glucocorticoid receptor (GR) RU486. A series of experiments was conducted to strengthen the evidence for a mediatory role of the type II GR and to investigate the neuroendocrine site and cellular mechanism underlying this inhibitory effect of cortisol. First, we demonstrated that a specific agonist of the type II GR, dexamethasone, mimics the suppressive action of cortisol on pituitary responsiveness to GnRH pulses in ovariectomized ewes. This effect, which became evident within 30 min, documents mediation via the type II GR. We next determined that exposure of cultured ovine pituitary cells to cortisol reduced the LH response to pulse-like delivery of GnRH by 50% within 30 min, indicating a pituitary site of action. Finally, we tested the hypothesis that suppression of pituitary responsiveness to GnRH in ovariectomized ewes is due to reduced tissue concentrations of GnRH receptor. Although cortisol blunted the amplitude of GnRH-induced LH pulses within 1-2 h, the amount of GnRH receptor mRNA or protein was not affected over this time frame. Collectively, these observations provide evidence that cortisol acts via the type II GR within the pituitary gland to elicit a rapid decrease in responsiveness to GnRH, independent of changes in expression of the GnRH receptor.

  1. Coupling of inositol phospholipid hydrolysis to peptide hormone receptors expressed from adrenal and pituitary mRNA in Xenopus laevis oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, R.P.; Catt, K.J.

    1987-12-01

    The expression of several neurotransmitter and drug receptors from injected exogenous mRNA in Xenopus laevis oocytes has been demonstrated by electrophysiological measurements of ion channel activation. The expression of specific receptors for peptide hormones in such a translation system would facilitate studies on the structure and regulation of cell-surface receptors as well as their coupling to membrane transduction mechanisms. The expression of receptors for calcium-mobilizing hormones in Xenopus oocytes was sought by analysis of phospholipid turnover in hormone-stimulated oocytes. For this purpose, Xenopus oocytes were injected with mRNA extracted from bovine adrenal and pituitary glands and incubated with myo-(/sup 3/H)inositol to label plasma-membrane phosphatidylinositol phosphates. The expression of functionally active receptors for angiotensin II (AII) and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) was demonstrated by the stimulation of (/sup 3/H)inositol phosphate production by AII and TRH in the mRNA-injected, (/sup 3/H)inositol-prelabeled oocytes. The ability of AII and TRH to act by way of newly synthesized receptors from mammalian endocrine tissues to stimulate phosphatidylinositol polyphosphate hydrolysis in Xenopus oocytes suggests a generalized and conserved mechanism of receptor coupling to the transduction mechanism responsible for activation of phospholipase C in the plasma membrane.

  2. POTENTIAL ROLE OF TUBERO-INFUNDIBULAR DOPAMINERGIC NEURONS IN THE DISRUPTION OF PITUITARY HORMONE SECRETION BY ATRAZINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previously, we demonstrated that atrazine suppressed the ovulatory surge of luteininzing hormone and disrupted estrous cycles in the female rat. We also reported that this disruption of ovulation is likely the result of atrazine's effect on hypothalamic gonadotropin hormone rele...

  3. Pituitary function following treatment with reproductive toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, R.L.; Goldman, J.M.; Rehnberg, G.L.

    1986-12-01

    Appropriate regulation of reproductive processes are dependent upon the integrity of pituitary function. In this selected review, the authors evaluate the evidence that certain environmental compounds exert their effect on reproductive function via a direct action on the pituitary gland. They also discuss examples of changes in pituitary hormone secretion that occur in response to changes in neuronal or gonadal control of the pituitary. A limited number of studies suggest that measures of pituitary hormone secretion provide an early and sensitive measure of a compound's potential effects on the reproductive system. However, the most striking aspect of this area is the sparse and inconsistent information describing pituitary function following exposure to environmental pollutants.

  4. β-Hydroxybutyric sodium salt inhibition of growth hormone and prolactin secretion via the cAMP/PKA/CREB and AMPK signaling pathways in dairy cow anterior pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Shou-Peng; Wang, Wei; Liu, Bing-Run; Yang, Huan-Min; Ji, Hong; Yang, Zhan-Qing; Guo, Bin; Liu, Ju-Xiong; Wang, Jian-Fa

    2015-02-16

    β-hydroxybutyric acid (BHBA) regulates the synthesis and secretion of growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL), but its mechanism is unknown. In this study, we detected the effects of BHBA on the activities of G protein signaling pathways, AMPK-α activity, GH, and PRL gene transcription, and GH and PRL secretion in dairy cow anterior pituitary cells (DCAPCs). The results showed that BHBA decreased intracellular cAMP levels and a subsequent reduction in protein kinase A (PKA) activity. Inhibition of PKA activity reduced cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation, thereby inhibiting GH and PRL transcription and secretion. The effects of BHBA were attenuated by a specific Gαi inhibitor, pertussis toxin (PTX). In addition, intracellular BHBA uptake mediated by monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) could trigger AMPK signaling and result in the decrease in GH and PRL mRNA translation in DCAPCs cultured under low-glucose and non-glucose condition when compared with the high-glucose group. This study identifies a biochemical mechanism for the regulatory action of BHBA on GH and PRL gene transcription, translation, and secretion in DCAPCs, which may be one of the factors that regulate pituitary function during the transition period in dairy cows.

  5. Regulation of Thyroid-stimulating Hormone Release from the Pituitary by Thyroxine during Metamorphosis in Xenopus laevis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmentally-relevant chemicals such as perchlorate have the ability to disrupt the hypothalamo-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis of exposed individuals. Larval anurans are a particularly suitable model species for studying the effects of thyroid-disrupting chemicals (TDCs) becaus...

  6. Pituitary resistance to thyroid hormone associated with a base mutation in the hormone-binding domain of the human 3, 5,3[prime]-triiodothyronine receptor-[beta

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Shigekazu; Nakamura, Hirotoshi; Tagami, Tetsuya; Miyoshi, Yohzi; Nogimori, Tsuyoshi; Mitsuma, Terunori; Imura, Hiroo )

    1993-05-01

    Point mutations in the human T[sub 3] receptor-[beta] (TR[beta]) gene causing single amino acid substitutions have been identified in several different kindred with generalized resistance to thyroid hormone. Until now, no study has been reported on the TR gene in cases of pituitary resistance (PRTH). In the present study, the authors analyzed the TR[beta] gene in a 30-yr-old Japanese female with PRTH. She exhibited clinical features of hyperthyroidism, elevated serum thyroid hormone levels accompanied by inappropriately increased secretion of TSH, mildly elevated basal metabolic rate, and increased urinary excretion of hydroxyproline. No pituitary tumor was detected. DNA fragments of exons 3-8 of the geonomic TR[beta] gene were generated by the polymerase chain reaction and analyzed by a single stranded conformation polymorphism method. Exon 7 of the patient's TR[beta] gene showed an abnormal band, suggesting the existence of mutation(s). By subcloning and sequencing the DNA, a point mutation was identified in one allele at nucleotide 1297 (C to T), which altered the 333rd amino acid, arginine, to tryptophan. Neither of her apparently normal parents had any mutations of the TR[beta] gene. In vitro translation products of the mutant TR[beta] gene showed remarkably decreased T[sub 3]-binding activity (K[sub a], 2.1 [times] 10[sup 8] M[sup [minus]1]; normal TR[beta] K[sub a], 1.1 [times] 10[sup 10] M[sup [minus]1]). Since the molecular defect detected in a patient with PRTH is similar to that seen in subjects with generalized resistance to thyroid hormone, both types of the syndrome may represent a continuous spectrum of the same etiological defect with variable tissue resistance to thyroid hormone.

  7. Pituitary tumours: inflammatory and granulomatous expansive lesions of the pituitary.

    PubMed

    Carpinteri, R; Patelli, I; Casanueva, F F; Giustina, A

    2009-10-01

    Inflammatory and granulomatous diseases of the pituitary are rare causes of sellar masses. Lymphocytic hypophysitis is the most relevant of these disorders, and it is characterised by autoimmune pathogenesis with focal or diffuse inflammatory infiltration and varying degrees of pituitary gland destruction. Endocrine symptoms may include partial or total hypopituitarism, with adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) deficiency being the earliest and most frequent alteration. Pituitary abscess is a rare but potentially life-threatening disease and, in 30-50% of patients, anterior pituitary hormone deficiencies or central diabetes insipidus (DI) at onset may be observed: the earliest manifestation being growth hormone deficiency (GHD), followed by follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)/luteinising hormone (LH), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and ACTH deficiencies. Fungal infections of the pituitary are also very rare and include aspergillosis and coccidioidomycosis. Concerning pituitary involvement in systemic diseases, in sarcoidosis endocrine complications are rare, but the hypothalamus and pituitary are the glands most commonly affected. DI is reported in approximately 25-33 % of all neurosarcoidosis cases and is the most frequently observed endocrine disorder. Hyperprolactinaemia and anterior pituitary deficiencies may also occur. Rarely, partial or global anterior pituitary dysfunction may be present also in Wegener's granulomatosis, either at onset or in the course of the disease, resulting in deficiency of one or more of the pituitary axes. Other forms of granulomatous pituitary lesions include idiopathic giant cell granulomatous hypophysitis, Takayasu's disease, Cogan's syndrome and Crohn's disease. The hypotalamic-pituitary system is involved mainly in children with Langerhans' cells histiocytosis who develop DI, which is the most common endocrine manifestation. Anterior pituitary dysfunction is found more rarely and is almost invariably associated with DI

  8. Cardiac and metabolic effects of chronic growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor I excess in young adults with pituitary gigantism.

    PubMed

    Bondanelli, Marta; Bonadonna, Stefania; Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria; Doga, Mauro; Gola, Monica; Onofri, Alessandro; Zatelli, Maria Chiara; Giustina, Andrea; degli Uberti, Ettore C

    2005-09-01

    Chronic growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) excess is associated with considerable mortality in acromegaly, but no data are available in pituitary gigantism. The aim of the study was to evaluate the long-term effects of early exposure to GH and IGF-I excess on cardiovascular and metabolic parameters in adult patients with pituitary gigantism. Six adult male patients with newly diagnosed gigantism due to GH secreting pituitary adenoma were studied and compared with 6 age- and sex-matched patients with acromegaly and 10 healthy subjects. Morphologic and functional cardiac parameters were evaluated by Doppler echocardiography. Glucose metabolism was assessed by evaluating glucose tolerance and homeostasis model assessment index. Disease duration was significantly longer (P<.05) in patients with gigantism than in patients with acromegaly, whereas GH and IGF-I concentrations were comparable. Left ventricular mass was increased both in patients with gigantism and in patients with acromegaly, as compared with controls. Left ventricular hypertrophy was detected in 2 of 6 of both patients with gigantism and patients with acromegaly, and isolated intraventricular septum thickening in 1 patient with gigantism. Inadequate diastolic filling (ratio between early and late transmitral flow velocity<1) was detected in 2 of 6 patients with gigantism and 1 of 6 patients with acromegaly. Impaired glucose metabolism occurrence was higher in patients with acromegaly (66%) compared with patients with gigantism (16%). Concentrations of IGF-I were significantly (P<.05) higher in patients with gigantism who have cardiac abnormalities than in those without cardiac abnormalities. In conclusion, our data suggest that GH/IGF-I excess in young adult patients is associated with morphologic and functional cardiac abnormalities that are similar in patients with gigantism and in patients with acromegaly, whereas occurrence of impaired glucose metabolism appears to be higher in

  9. Short-Chain Fatty Acids Inhibit Growth Hormone and Prolactin Gene Transcription via cAMP/PKA/CREB Signaling Pathway in Dairy Cow Anterior Pituitary Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian-Fa; Fu, Shou-Peng; Li, Su-Nan; Hu, Zhong-Ming; Xue, Wen-Jing; Li, Zhi-Qiang; Huang, Bing-Xu; Lv, Qing-Kang; Liu, Ju-Xiong; Wang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) play a key role in altering carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, influence endocrine pancreas activity, and as a precursor of ruminant milk fat. However, the effect and detailed mechanisms by which SCFAs mediate bovine growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) gene transcription remain unclear. In this study, we detected the effects of SCFAs (acetate, propionate, and butyrate) on the activity of the cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling pathway, GH, PRL, and Pit-1 gene transcription in dairy cow anterior pituitary cells (DCAPCs). The results showed that SCFAs decreased intracellular cAMP levels and a subsequent reduction in PKA activity. Inhibition of PKA activity decreased CREB phosphorylation, thereby inhibiting GH and PRL gene transcription. Furthermore, PTX blocked SCFAs- inhibited cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling pathway. These data showed that the inhibition of GH and PRL gene transcription induced by SCFAs is mediated by Gi activation and that propionate is more potent than acetate and butyrate in inhibiting GH and PRL gene transcription. In conclusion, this study identifies a biochemical mechanism for the regulation of SCFAs on bovine GH and PRL gene transcription in DCAPCs, which may serve as one of the factors that regulate pituitary function in accordance with dietary intake. PMID:24177567

  10. Mu-opioid receptor A118G polymorphism in healthy volunteers affects hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis adrenocorticotropic hormone stress response to metyrapone.

    PubMed

    Ducat, Elizabeth; Ray, Brenda; Bart, Gavin; Umemura, Yoshie; Varon, Jack; Ho, Ann; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2013-03-01

    The mu-opioid receptor encoded by the gene OPRM1 plays a primary role in opiate, alcohol, cocaine and nicotine addiction. Studies using opioid antagonists demonstrate that the mu-opioid receptor (MOP-r) also mediates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis stress response. A common polymorphism in exon one of the MOP-r gene, A118G, has been shown to significantly alter receptor function and MOP-r gene expression; therefore, this variant likely affects HPA-axis responsivity. In the current study, we have investigated whether the presence of the 118AG variant genotype affects HPA axis responsivity to the stressor metyrapone, which transiently blocks glucocorticoid production in the adrenal cortex. Forty-eight normal and healthy volunteers (32 men, 16 women) were studied, among whom nine men and seven women had the 118AG genotype. The 118G allele blunted the adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) response to metyrapone. Although there was no difference in basal levels of ACTH, subjects with the 118AG genotype had a more modest rise and resultant significantly lower ACTH levels than those with the prototype 118AA at the 8-hour time point (P < 0.02). We found no significant difference between genders. These findings suggest a relatively greater tonic inhibition at hypothalamic-pituitary sites through the mu-opioid receptor and relatively less cyclical glucocorticoid inhibition in subjects with the 118G allele.

  11. Treatment protocols for growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenomas combined with craniofacial fibrous dysplasia: A case report of atypical McCune-Albright syndrome.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia; Li, Xi; Lv, Chang-Sheng; Chen, Ying; Wang, Meng; Liu, Jian-Feng; Gui, Lai

    2014-09-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is a rare, post-zygotic (non-germline) disorder, characterized by hypersecretory endocrinopathies, fibrous dysplasia of the bone and café-au-lait macules. The most common endocrine dysfunction is gonadal hyperfunction; thus, hypersecretion of growth hormones (GHs) as a manifestation of endocrine hyperfunction in MAS is rarely reported. MAS affects both genders, although the majority of cases have been reported in young females. Atypical presentations of MAS, with only one or two of the classic symptoms, have been previously described, but remain particularly challenging due to the lack of a diagnostic phenotype. In patients with atypical MAS, analysis of mutations in the gene of the α-subunit of the stimulatory G-protein is limited; thus, diagnosis is based on clinical judgment. In the present study, a male with polyostotic fibrous dysplasia and GH-secreting pituitary adenomas, diagnosed with atypical MAS, was reported. The pituitary adenoma was effectively treated with radiotherapy and the patient underwent surgery for the polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, with marked improvements observed in appearance.

  12. From pituitary adenoma to pituitary neuroendocrine tumor (PitNET): an International Pituitary Pathology Club proposal.

    PubMed

    Asa, S L; Casar-Borota, O; Chanson, P; Delgrange, E; Earls, P; Ezzat, S; Grossman, A; Ikeda, H; Inoshita, N; Karavitaki, N; Korbonits, M; Laws, E R; Lopes, M B; Maartens, N; McCutcheon, I E; Mete, O; Nishioka, H; Raverot, G; Roncaroli, F; Saeger, W; Syro, L V; Vasiljevic, A; Villa, C; Wierinckx, A; Trouillas, J

    2017-04-01

    The classification of neoplasms of adenohypophysial cells is misleading because of the simplistic distinction between adenoma and carcinoma, based solely on metastatic spread and the poor reproducibility and predictive value of the definition of atypical adenomas based on the detection of mitoses or expression of Ki-67 or p53. In addition, the current classification of neoplasms of the anterior pituitary does not accurately reflect the clinical spectrum of behavior. Invasion and regrowth of proliferative lesions and persistence of hormone hypersecretion cause significant morbidity and mortality. We propose a new terminology, pituitary neuroendocrine tumor (PitNET), which is consistent with that used for other neuroendocrine neoplasms and which recognizes the highly variable impact of these tumors on patients.

  13. The pituitary hormones arginine vasopressin-neurophysin II and oxytocin-neurophysin I show close linkage with interleukin-1 on mouse chromosome 2

    SciTech Connect

    Marini, J.C.; Nelson, K.K.; Siracusa, L.D. ); Battey, J. )

    1993-01-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) and oxytocin (OXT) are posterior pituitary hormones. AVP is involved in fluid homeostasis, while OXT is involved in lactation and parturition. AVP is derived from a larger precursor, prepro-arginine-vasopressin-neurophysin II (prepro-AVP-NP II; AVP), and is physically linked to prepro-oxytocin-neurophysin I (prepro-OXT-NPI1; OXT). The genes for AVP and OXT are separated by only 12 kb of DNA in humans, whereas in the mouse 3.5 kb of intergenic sequence lies between Avp and Oxt. Interspecific backcross analysis has now been used to map the Avp/Oxt complex to chromosome 2 in the mouse. This map position confirms and extends the known region of linkage conservation between mouse chromosome 2 and human chromosome 20. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Biochemical and pharmacological characterization of the thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) receptor from clonal GH sub 4 C sub 1 pituitary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, W.J.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of drugs with anesthetic properties on the activity of the pituitary thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) receptor was determined in the clonal GH{sub 4}C{sub 1} somatomammotropic cell line. Classic local anesthetics and other drugs with anesthetic activity inhibited binding of ({sup 3}H)methyl-TRH to cell receptors at concentrations known to produce anesthetic effects on the membrane. The inhibition of TRH receptor binding by tetracaine was competitive and temperature and pH dependent. Verapamil and tetracaine inhibited TRH-stimulated prolactin secretion at concentrations that inhibited peptide binding. TRH-stimulated prolactin secretion was equivalent with or without Ca{sup 2+} channel activity. Verapamil and tetracaine also inhibited basal prolactin and secretion stimulated by drugs that bypass membrane receptors, db-cAMP and TPA. These results indicate that inhibition of TRH binding and responses by diverse drugs results from an anesthetic effect on the cell membrane.

  15. Hormonal status modifies renin-angiotensin system-regulating aminopeptidases and vasopressin-degrading activity in the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis of female mice.

    PubMed

    García, María Jesús; Martínez-Martos, José Manuel; Mayas, María Dolores; Carrera, María Pilar; De la Chica, Susana; Cortés, Pedro; Ramírez-Expósito, María Jesús

    2008-07-01

    The hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) participates in the maintenance of cardiovascular functions and in the control of blood pressure. By other hand, it is known that blood pressure regulation and HPA activity are affected by sex hormones. The aim of the present work is to analyze the influence of estradiol and progesterone on renin-angiotensin system (RAS)-regulating aminopeptidase A, aminopeptidase B and aminopeptidase N activities and vasopressin-degrading activity in the HPA axis of ovariectomized mice and ovariectomized mice treated subscutaneously with different doses of estradiol and progesterone. Our data suggest that in female mice, estradiol and progesterone influence RAS-regulating and vasopressin-degrading activities at different levels of the HPA axis.

  16. Testosterone replacement therapy: role of pituitary and thyroid in diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Megan

    2016-01-01

    Crosstalk among hormones characterizes endocrine function, and assessment of the hypogonadal man should take that into consideration. In men for whom testosterone deficiency is a concern, initial evaluation should include a thorough history and physical exam in which other endocrinopathies are being considered. Hypogonadism can be associated with both pituitary and thyroid dysfunction, for which appropriate biochemical evaluation should be undertaken in certain clinical scenarios. If low serum testosterone is confirmed measurement of luteinizing and follicle stimulating hormones (LH and FSH respectively) is essential to establish whether the hypogonadism is primary or secondary. In secondary hypogonadism measurement of prolactin is always necessary, and measurement of other pituitary hormones, along with pituitary imaging, may be indicated. Checking thyroid function may also be enlightening, and can raise additional therapeutic considerations. Correction of other pituitary axes may attenuate the need for testosterone replacement therapy in some cases. PMID:28078216

  17. Ligand-biased regulation of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3-dependent signal transduction in GPCR control of pituitary hormone release.

    PubMed

    Pemberton, Joshua G; Chang, John P

    2016-12-01

    Biased signaling describes the selective activation of signal transduction cascades by structurally-related ligands downstream of shared G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Although class I phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) are important components of GPCR-controlled transduction networks, little is known regarding the potential for biased regulation of class I PI3K-dependent signaling. The full compliment of class I PI3K catalytic subunits (p110α, p110β, p110δ and p110γ) first appear in bony fishes and, despite being associated with distinct cellular functions, all class I PI3Ks produce the lipid second-messenger phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PtdIns(3,4,5)P3). We have previously shown that two endogenous gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRH2 and GnRH3), which both signal through shared Gαq/11-coupled receptors, selectively activate different subsets of class I PI3K isoforms in their control of hormone release from goldfish (Carassius auratus) pituitary cells. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the biased activation of class I PI3K isoforms results in the selective recruitment of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3-sensitive effectors downstream of GnRH-stabilized GPCRs using pharmacological mapping. Our results reveal that distinct PtdIns(3,4,5)P3-sensitive effectors are involved in the differential control of GnRH2- and GnRH3-stimulated, as well as basal, hormone release and implicate the participation of non-canonical PtdIns(3,4,5)P3-sensitive transduction elements. Furthermore, observations using a selective inhibitor of the shared Gβγ-effector interaction surface indicate a role for Gβγ-dependent signaling in the integrated control of pituitary hormone exocytosis. These novel findings add to our understanding of functional selectivity in GPCR signal transduction networks, in general, and reveal the complexity of biased signaling downstream of class I PI3K catalytic activity.

  18. Blood, pituitary, and brain renin-angiotensin systems and regulation of secretion of anterior pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Ganong, W F

    1993-07-01

    In addition to increasing blood pressure, stimulating aldosterone and vasopressin secretion, and increasing water intake, angiotensin II affects the secretion of anterior pituitary hormones. Some of these effects are direct. There are angiotensin II receptors on lactotropes and corticotropes in rats, and there may be receptors on thyrotropes and other secretory cells. Circulating angiotensin II reaches these receptors, but angiotensin II is almost certainly generated locally by the pituitary renin-angiotensin system as well. There are also indirect effects produced by the effects of brain angiotensin II on the secretion of hypophyseotropic hormones. In the anterior pituitary of the rat, the gonadotropes contain renin, angiotensin II, and some angiotensin-converting enzyme. There is debate about whether these cells also contain small amounts of angiotensinogen, but most of the angiotensinogen is produced by a separate population of cells and appears to pass in a paracrine fashion to the gonadotropes. An analogous situation exists in the brain. Neurons contain angiotensin II and probably renin, but most angiotensin-converting enzyme is located elsewhere and angiotensinogen is primarily if not solely produced by astrocytes. Angiotensin II causes secretion of prolactin and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) when added to pituitary cells in vitro. Paracrine regulation of prolactin secretion by angiotensin II from the gonadotropes may occur in vitro under certain circumstances, but the effects of peripheral angiotensin II on ACTH secretion appear to be mediated via the brain and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). In the brain, there is good evidence that locally generated angiotensin II causes release of norepinephrine that in turn stimulates gonadotropin-releasing hormone-secreting neurons, increasing circulating luteinizing hormone. In addition, there is evidence that angiotensin II acts in the arcuate nuclei to increase the secretion of dopamine into the portal

  19. Nutrient Sensing Overrides Somatostatin and Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone to Control Pulsatile Growth Hormone Release.

    PubMed

    Steyn, F J

    2015-07-01

    Pharmacological studies reveal that interactions between hypothalamic inhibitory somatostatin and stimulatory growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) govern pulsatile GH release. However, in vivo analysis of somatostatin and GHRH release into the pituitary portal vasculature and peripheral GH output demonstrates that the withdrawal of somatostatin or the appearance of GHRH into pituitary portal blood does not reliably dictate GH release. Consequently, additional intermediates acting at the level of the hypothalamus and within the anterior pituitary gland are likely to contribute to the release of GH, entraining GH secretory patterns to meet physiological demand. The identification and validation of the actions of such intermediates is particularly important, given that the pattern of GH release defines several of the physiological actions of GH. This review highlights the actions of neuropeptide Y in regulating GH release. It is acknowledged that pulsatile GH release may not occur selectively in response to hypothalamic control of pituitary function. As such, interactions between somatotroph networks, the median eminence and pituitary microvasculature and blood flow, and the emerging role of tanycytes and pericytes as critical regulators of pulsatility are considered. It is argued that collective interactions between the hypothalamus, the median eminence and pituitary vasculature, and structural components within the pituitary gland dictate somatotroph function and thereby pulsatile GH release. These interactions may override hypothalamic somatostatin and GHRH-mediated GH release, and modify pulsatile GH release relative to the peripheral glucose supply, and thereby physiological demand.

  20. Stressor-responsive central nesfatin-1 activates corticotropin-releasing hormone, noradrenaline and serotonin neurons and evokes hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Natsu; Maejima, Yuko; Sedbazar, Udval; Ando, Akihiko; Kurita, Hideharu; Damdindorj, Boldbaatar; Takano, Eisuke; Gantulga, Darambazar; Iwasaki, Yusaku; Kurashina, Tomoyuki; Onaka, Tatsushi; Dezaki, Katsuya; Nakata, Masanori; Mori, Masatomo; Yada, Toshihiko

    2010-01-01

    A recently discovered satiety molecule, nesfatin-1, is localized in neurons of the hypothalamus and brain stem and colocalized with stress-related substances, corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), oxytocin, proopiomelanocortin, noradrenaline (NA) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). Intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of nesfatin-1 produces fear-related behaviors and potentiates stressor-induced increases in plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone levels in rats. These findings suggest a link between nesfatin-1 and stress. In the present study, we aimed to further clarify the neuronal network by which nesfatin-1 could induce stress responses in rats. Restraint stress induced c-Fos expressions in nesfatin-1-immunoreactive neurons in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and supraoptic nucleus (SON) of the hypothalamus, and in the nucleus of solitary tract (NTS), locus coeruleus (LC) and dorsal raphe nucleus (DR) in the brain stem, without altering plasma nesfatin-1 levels. Icv nesfatin-1 induced c-Fos expressions in the PVN, SON, NTS, LC, DR and median raphe nucleus, including PVN-CRH, NTS-NA, LC-NA and DR-5-HT neurons. Nesfatin-1 increased cytosolic Ca2+ concentration in the CRH-immunoreactive neurons isolated from PVN. Icv nesfatin-1 increased plasma ACTH and corticosterone levels. These results indicate that the central nesfatin-1 system is stimulated by stress and activates CRH, NA and 5-HT neurons and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, evoking both central and peripheral stress responses. PMID:20966530

  1. Age-related changes in growth hormone-immunoreactive cells in the anterior pituitary gland of Jcl: Wistar-TgN (ARGHGEN) 1Nts rats (Mini rats).

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yoshiki; Tsukamoto, Yasuhiro; Miki, Takanori; Ogawa, Kazushige; Lee, Kyoung-Youl; Yokoyama, Toshifumi; Satriotomo, Irawan; Li, Hong-Peng; Gu, He; Wang, Zhi-Yu; Karasawa, Shigeru; Ueda, Susumu; Sasaki, Fumihiko; Takeuchi, Yoshiki

    2006-12-01

    Rats of the Jcl: Wistar-TgN (ARGHGEN) 1Nts strain (Mini rats) are transgenic animals carrying an antisense RNA transgene for rat growth hormone (GH); they show poor somatic growth and a low blood GH level compared to age-matched wild-type Wistar (non-Mini) rats. The purpose of the present study was to investigate age-related changes in growth hormone-immunoreactive (GH-IR) cells in the anterior pituitary gland (AP) of Mini rats at four, six, and eight weeks of age. The body weight and size of the GH-IR cells of Mini rats was significantly lower than that of non-Mini rats at six and eight weeks of age; however, this difference was not observed at four weeks of age. The AP volume and the number of GH-IR cells in Mini rats were significantly smaller than those of the age-matched non-Mini rats at the three ages. These results suggest that the abnormal development of GH-IR cells in the AP induced by the GH antisense RNA transgene is responsible for the poor somatic growth and the low blood GH levels in Mini rats.

  2. Pituitary Disorders and Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Jawiarczyk-Przybyłowska, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Various hormonal disorders can influence bone metabolism and cause secondary osteoporosis. The consequence of this is a significant increase of fracture risk. Among pituitary disorders such effects are observed in patients with Cushing's disease, hyperprolactinemia, acromegaly, and hypopituitarism. Severe osteoporosis is the result of the coexistence of some of these disorders and hypogonadism at the same time, which is quite often. PMID:25873948

  3. Effects of lamprey PQRFamide peptides on brain gonadotropin-releasing hormone concentrations and pituitary gonadotropin-β mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Daukss, Dana; Gazda, Kristen; Kosugi, Takayoshi; Osugi, Tomohiro; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi; Sower, Stacia A

    2012-06-01

    Within the RFamide peptide family, PQRFamide peptides that include neuropeptide FF and AF possess a C-terminal Pro-Gln-Arg-Phe-NH(2) motif. We previously identified PQRFamide peptides, lamprey PQRFa, PQRFa-related peptide (RP)-1 and -RP-2 by immunoaffinity purification in the brain of lamprey, one of the most ancient vertebrate species [13]. Lamprey PQRFamide peptide precursor mRNA was expressed in regions predicted to be involved in neuroendocrine regulation in the hypothalamus. However, the putative function(s) of lamprey PQRFamide peptides (PQRFa, PQRFa-RP-1 and PQRFa-RP-2) were not examined nor was the distribution of PQRFamide peptides examined in other tissues besides the brain. The objective of this study was to determine tissue distribution of lamprey PQRFamide peptide precursor mRNA, and to examine the effects of PQRFamide peptides on brain gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-I, -II, and -III protein concentrations, and pituitary gonadotropin (GTH)-β mRNA expression in adult lampreys. Lamprey PQRFamide peptide precursor mRNA was expressed in the eye and the brain. Lamprey PQRFa at 100 μg/kg increased brain concentrations of lamprey GnRH-II compared with controls. PQRFa, PQRFa-RP-1 and PQRFa-RP-2 did not significantly change brain protein concentrations of either lamprey GnRH-I, -III, or lamprey GTH-β mRNA expression in the pituitary. These data suggest that one of the PQRFamide peptides may act as a neuroregulator of at least the lamprey GnRH-II system in adult female lamprey.

  4. GH3 tumor pituitary cell cytoskeleton and plasma membrane arrangement are determined by extracellular matrix proteins: implications on motility, proliferation and hormone secretion

    PubMed Central

    Azorín, Erika; Romero-Pérez, Beatriz; Solano-Agama, Carmen; de la Vega, María T; Toriz, César G; Reyes-Márquez, Blanca; González-Pozos, Sirenia; Rosales-García, Víctor H; del Pliego, Margarita González; Sabanero, Myrna; Mendoza-Garrido, María E

    2014-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) influences different physiological and pathophysiological aspects of the cell. The ECM consists in a complex network of macromolecules with characteristic biochemical properties that allow cells to sense their environments inducing different signals and changing cell behavior. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the participation of different ECM proteins in cell morphology and its implication on motility, proliferation and hormone secretion in GH3 cells, a tumor pituitary cell. GH3 cells were cultured with a defined medium on collagens I/III and IV, fibronectin and laminin. GH3 cells express α2 integrin subunit de novo. The cells responded to the ECM proteins with differentiated cell surface morphologies and membrane protrusions. A rounded shape with small membrane blebs, weak substrate adhesion and high motility was observed in cells on C I/III and fibronectin, while on C IV and laminin cells were viewed elongated and adhered. Differences on actin cytoskeleton, cytoskeletal-associated vinculin and phospho-MLC showed that ECM proteins determine the cytoskeleton organization. Cell proliferation showed dependency on the ECM protein, observing a higher rate in cells on collagen I/III. Prolactin secretion was higher in cells with small blebs, but an unchangeable response to EGF was obtained with the ECM proteins, suggesting is a consequence of cortical actin arrangement. We ascribe the functional differences of the GH3 cells to the cytoskeletal organization. Overall, the data showed that ECM plays a critical role in GH3 cells modulating different cellular comportment and evidenced the importance of the ECM composition of pituitary adenomas. PMID:25057334

  5. GH3 tumor pituitary cell cytoskeleton and plasma membrane arrangement are determined by extracellular matrix proteins: implications on motility, proliferation and hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Azorín, Erika; Romero-Pérez, Beatriz; Solano-Agama, Carmen; de la Vega, María T; Toriz, César G; Reyes-Márquez, Blanca; González-Pozos, Sirenia; Rosales-García, Víctor H; Del Pliego, Margarita González; Sabanero, Myrna; Mendoza-Garrido, María E

    2014-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) influences different physiological and pathophysiological aspects of the cell. The ECM consists in a complex network of macromolecules with characteristic biochemical properties that allow cells to sense their environments inducing different signals and changing cell behavior. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the participation of different ECM proteins in cell morphology and its implication on motility, proliferation and hormone secretion in GH3 cells, a tumor pituitary cell. GH3 cells were cultured with a defined medium on collagens I/III and IV, fibronectin and laminin. GH3 cells express α2 integrin subunit de novo. The cells responded to the ECM proteins with differentiated cell surface morphologies and membrane protrusions. A rounded shape with small membrane blebs, weak substrate adhesion and high motility was observed in cells on C I/III and fibronectin, while on C IV and laminin cells were viewed elongated and adhered. Differences on actin cytoskeleton, cytoskeletal-associated vinculin and phospho-MLC showed that ECM proteins determine the cytoskeleton organization. Cell proliferation showed dependency on the ECM protein, observing a higher rate in cells on collagen I/III. Prolactin secretion was higher in cells with small blebs, but an unchangeable response to EGF was obtained with the ECM proteins, suggesting is a consequence of cortical actin arrangement. We ascribe the functional differences of the GH3 cells to the cytoskeletal organization. Overall, the data showed that ECM plays a critical role in GH3 cells modulating different cellular comportment and evidenced the importance of the ECM composition of pituitary adenomas.

  6. Gene Therapy for Pituitary Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Seilicovich, Adriana; Pisera, Daniel; Sciascia, Sandra A.; Candolfi, Marianela; Puntel, Mariana; Xiong, Weidong; Jaita, Gabriela; Castro, Maria G.

    2009-01-01

    Pituitary tumors are the most common primary intracranial neoplasms. Although most pituitary tumors are considered typically benign, others can cause severe and progressive disease. The principal aims of pituitary tumor treatment are the elimination or reduction of the tumor mass, normalization of hormone secretion and preservation of remaining pituitary function. In spite of major advances in the therapy of pituitary tumors, for some of the most difficult tumors, current therapies that include medical, surgical and radiotherapeutic methods are often unsatisfactory and there is a need to develop new treatment strategies. Gene therapy, which uses nucleic acids as drugs, has emerged as an attractive therapeutic option for the treatment of pituitary tumors that do not respond to classical treatment strategies if the patients become intolerant to the therapy. The development of animal models for pituitary tumors and hormone hypersecretion has proven to be critical for the implementation of novel treatment strategies and gene therapy approaches. Preclinical trials using several gene therapy approaches for the treatment of anterior pituitary diseases have been successfully implemented. Several issues need to be addressed before clinical implementation becomes a reality, including the development of more effective and safer viral vectors, uncovering novel therapeutic targets and development of targeted expression of therapeutic transgenes. With the development of efficient gene delivery vectors allowing long-term transgene expression with minimal toxicity, gene therapy will become one of the most promising approaches for treating pituitary adenomas. PMID:16457646

  7. Pituitary protein 7B2 plasma levels in patients with liver disease: Comparisons with other hormones and neuropeptides

    PubMed Central

    VENETIKOU, MARIA S.; MELEAGROS, LUKE; GHATEI, MOHHAMMAD A.; BLOOM, STEPHEN R.

    2013-01-01

    7B2, a protein initially isolated from the porcine pituitary gland, has been identified in numerous animal and human tissues, with the highest concentrations in the pituitary and hypothalamus. The 7B2 molecule is highly evolutionarily conserved and is considered to be indispensable in the function and regulation of proprotein convertase 2 (PC2). In the present study, the plasma 7B2 immunoreactivity (7B2-IR) of 18 patients with liver disease was studied. Of these patients, seven (three male and four female), aged 37–67 [54.6±13.5 (SD)] years, suffered from liver cirrhosis of cryptogenic (n=2) or alcoholic (n=5) aetiology. The remaining 11 patients (four male and seven female), aged 22–76 [56.1±17.6 (SD)] years, suffered from miscellaneous liver abnormalities. The clinical diagnosis was confirmed in the majority of patients by the histological examination of a percutaneous liver biopsy or by appropriate radiological investigations. Plasma bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase, aspartate aminotransferase, albumin, prothrombin time, electrolytes, urea and creatinine were measured. The plasma 7B2-IR levels were estimated using a sensitive radioimmunoassay (RIA), and the elution position of 7B2-IR was verified by gel chromatography. The mean plasma 7B2-IR concentration in patients with liver disease was 99.44±15.9 pmol/l. In the patients with hepatocellular damage due to metastatic tumours [Ca bronchus, carcinoid (n=6)], the 7B2-IR concentrations were significantly higher [185±36.9 pmol/l, (P<0.05)] compared with the overall subjects with liver damage. The results of the present study demonstrate that 7B2-IR is increased in liver disease, with the highest levels detected in patients with tumourous liver conditions. PMID:24137355

  8. Relative effectiveness of carp pituitary extract, luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analog LHRHa injections and LHRHa implants for producing hybrid catfish fry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adoption of the hybrid catfish (channel catfish, Ictalruus punctatus, female x blue catfish, I. furcatus, male) is increasing in the catfish industry. The most effective way to produce fry is hormone induced spawning of females coupled with hand stripping and in vitro fertilization. The success of...

  9. Leptin and the pituitary.

    PubMed

    Sone, M; Osamura, R Y

    2001-01-01

    -CSF) receptor, and the leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) receptor. The leptin receptor is known to have at least six existing isoforms (Ob-Ra, b, c, d, e, f) from the difference in splicing. (Homozygote Mutation of Leptin and Leptin Receptor :Hormone Secretion Disorders) The point mutation of ob/ob mouse and the splicing mutation of db/db mouse show remarkable obesity and hyperphagia. These obesity models show a reproduction disorder with both the male and the female, and they develop with homozygote. The cause is thought to be the gonadotropin secretory abnormality in pituitary. Three family lines report the cases of this deficiency, and it is considered that the secretory abnormality in pituitary develops into hypogonadotropic. These patients show low value in plasma FSHbeta (follicle stimulating hormone-beta and LHbeta (luteinizing hormone-beta which are produced from pituitary, and the plasma GnRH (gonadotropin releasing hormone) level is also low. Furthermore, the leptin receptor deficient family line was reported in 1998, in which case only the homozygote developed. The plasma leptin concentration of normal human is about 8.0 ng/ml, and this case with leptin receptor deficiency has high value of 500-700 ng/ml, which is the equivalent to the db/db mouse. (Role of Leptin in Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Periphery Function) The role of leptin which regulates pituitary hormones suggests the promotion the GHRH (growth hormone releasing hormone) secretion in hypothalamus-pituitary axis, with the possibility of the rise in secretion of GH (growth hormone) in pituitary, i.e. effects of icv (intracerebroventricular) infusion of leptin has spontaneously stimulated GHRH, which promotes GH secretion in the normal rats. On the other hand, topical treatment of GH3 (derived from a rat pituitary GH-secreting cell line) with leptin directly inhibits cell proliferation. The obesity model animals (ob/ob, db/db, fa/fa) have equally plump body compared to the normal models, which shows signs of

  10. Anatomy, Physiology, and Laboratory Evaluation of the Pituitary Gland.

    PubMed

    Hong, Gregory K; Payne, Spencer C; Jane, John A

    2016-02-01

    The pituitary gland functions prominently in the control of most endocrine systems in the body. Diverse processes such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, and water balance are tightly regulated by the pituitary in conjunction with the hypothalamus and various downstream endocrine organs. Benign tumors of the pituitary gland are the primary cause of pituitary pathology and can result in inappropriate secretion of pituitary hormones or loss of pituitary function. First-line management of clinically significant tumors often involves surgical resection. Understanding of normal pituitary physiology and basic testing strategies to assess for pituitary dysfunction should be familiar to any skull base surgeon.

  11. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Pituitary Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sapochnik, Melanie; Nieto, Leandro Eduardo; Fuertes, Mariana; Arzt, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    During the last years, progress has been made on the identification of mechanisms involved in anterior pituitary cell transformation and tumorigenesis. Oncogene activation, tumor suppressor gene inactivation, epigenetic changes, and microRNAs deregulation contribute to the initiation of pituitary tumors. Despite the high prevalence of pituitary adenomas, they are mostly benign, indicating that intrinsic mechanisms may regulate pituitary cell expansion. Senescence is characterized by an irreversible cell cycle arrest and represents an important protective mechanism against malignancy. Pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG) is an oncogene involved in early stages of pituitary tumor development, and also triggers a senescence response by activating DNA-damage signaling pathway. Cytokines, as well as many other factors, play an important role in pituitary physiology, affecting not only cell proliferation but also hormone secretion. Special interest is focused on interleukin-6 (IL-6) because its dual function of stimulating pituitary tumor cell growth but inhibiting normal pituitary cells proliferation. It has been demonstrated that IL-6 has a key role in promoting and maintenance of the senescence program in tumors. Senescence, triggered by PTTG activation and mediated by IL-6, may be a mechanism for explaining the benign nature of pituitary tumors.

  12. Comparison of effects of estradiol with those of octylmethoxycinnamate and 4-methylbenzylidene camphor on fat tissue, lipids and pituitary hormones

    SciTech Connect

    Seidlova-Wuttke, Dana; Christoffel, Julie; Rimoldi, Guillermo; Jarry, Hubertus; Wuttke, Wolfgang . E-mail: ufkendo@med.uni-goettingen.de

    2006-07-01

    Octylmethoxycinnamate (OMC) and 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4MBC) are commercially used absorbers of ultraviolet (UV) light. In rats, they were shown to exert endocrine disrupting including uterotrophic, i.e. estrogenic effects. Estrogens have also metabolic effects, therefore the impact of oral application of the two UV absorbers at 2 doses for 3 months on lipids and hormones were compared with those of estradiol-17{beta} (E2). E2, OMC and 4MBC reduced weight gain, the size of fat depots and serum leptin, a lipocyte-derived hormone, when compared to the ovariectomized control animals. Serum triglycerides were also reduced by the UV screens but not by E2. On the other hand, E2 and OMC reduced serum cholesterol, low density lipoproteins and high density lipoproteins; this effect was not shared by 4MBC. While E2 inhibited, OMC and 4MBC stimulated serum LH levels. In the uterus, both UV filters had mild stimulatory effects. 4MBC inhibited serum T4 resulting in increased serum TSH levels. It is concluded that OMC and 4MBC have effects on several metabolic parameters such as fat and lipid homeostasis as well as on thyroid hormone production. Many of these effects are not shared by E2. Hence, other than estrogen-receptive mechanisms may be responsible for these effects.

  13. Facilitation or inhibition of the oestradiol-induced gonadotrophin surge in the immature female rat by progesterone: effects on pituitary responsiveness to gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH), GnRH self-priming and pituitary mRNAs for the progesterone receptor A and B isoforms.

    PubMed

    Attardi, B; Scott, R; Pfaff, D; Fink, G

    2007-12-01

    Progesterone can either facilitate or inhibit the oestradiol (E(2))-induced gonadotrophin surge. We have previously developed immature female rat models to characterise and investigate the mechanisms of progesterone inhibition or facilitation. The aim of the present study was to determine the role of pituitary responsiveness to gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and GnRH self-priming under conditions of progesterone-facilitation and progesterone-inhibition, and whether the underlying mechanisms reflect changes in mRNAs encoding the A and B isoforms of the progesterone receptor (PR) in the pituitary gland. Pituitary responsiveness to GnRH, determined by measuring the luteinising hormone (LH) response to one i.v. injection of GnRH, was decreased by 60-80% (P < 0.001) in the progesterone-inhibition model. GnRH self-priming, estimated as the increment in the LH response to the second of two injections of GnRH separated by 60 min, was also significantly reduced (P < 0.05) in this model. In the progesterone-facilitation model, the LH response to GnRH injection was increased 2.5-3-fold (P < 0.05), an effect suppressed by the progesterone receptor antagonist, mifepristone. Progesterone-facilitation of LH release and increased pituitary responsiveness to GnRH were blocked by sheep anti-GnRH serum injected i.v. immediately after insertion of progesterone implants. The PR-B mRNA isoform, measured by solution hybridisation/RNase protection assay, was the predominant form in the pituitary of the immature female rat. PR-B was increased by E(2) and decreased by progesterone in both models. Thus, in immature female rats, progesterone-inhibition of the E(2)-induced LH surge is due to significant reduction in pituitary responsiveness to GnRH as well as in the magnitude of GnRH self-priming. Progesterone-facilitation of the E(2)-induced LH surge is due to increased pituitary responsiveness to GnRH, which is mediated by PR, and depends on endogenous GnRH release. The differences

  14. Induction (or stimulatin) of prolactin and growth hormone production in a rat pituitary tumor cell line by bromodeoxyuridine

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, H.; Andre, J.; Grenot, C.; Guillaumot, P.; Pascal, O.

    1982-02-01

    Under basal conditions, a rat pituitary tumor cell line (C/sub 3/ 11RAP) does not secrete any detectable PRL, FSH, and LH, and secretes only minute amounts of GH (27.1 +/- 0.5 ng/10/sup 6/ cells . 24 h), as evaluated by RIA. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) added to the culture medium induced the accumulation of PRL into cells and medium, increased that of GH, but did not induce that of LH or FSH. The amount of radioimmunoassayable PRL and GH accumulated in the medium, increased after a lag period of 15 days and was drug concentration dependent. Maximal accumulation was 232.9 +/- 36.8 and 493.6 +/- 41.5 ng/10/sup 6/ cells . 24 h for PRL and GH, respectively, at 50 ..mu..g/ml BrdUrd. In the presence of BrdUrd (greater than or equal to20 ..mu..g/ml), the cells grew more slowly and were more strongly attached to the flasks. All of the effects induced by BrdUrd were reversible. PRL and GH were characterized by three methods: 1) radiocompetition with increasing dilution of samples; 2) Sephadex chromatography, followed by RIAs; and 3) sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis done on the immunoprecipitate of the proteins secreted by cells incubated with (/sup 3/H)leucine. Chronic treatment with TRH (3 x 10/sup -6/ M) of cells grown without BrdUrd was unable to increase the production of GH or to induce that of PRL. On the other hand, after the same treatment of cells cultured in the presence of BrdUrd, the amounts of PRL accumulated in the culture medium or cells were increased 2- to 7-fold over unstimulated levels; under the same conditions, GH accumulation in the medium was also increased, but this augmentation was less than that of PRL.

  15. Role of mTOR Inhibitors in Growth Hormone-Producing Pituitary Adenomas Harboring Different FGFR4 Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Jalali, Shahrzad; Monsalves, Eric; Tateno, Toru; Zadeh, Gelareh

    2016-09-01

    Pituitary adenomas (PAs) are common intracranial lesions. Available medical therapies are limited in PAs, and therefore, it is essential to identify treatments that control PA growth when surgery is not an option. Fibroblast growth factor 4 is implicated in PA pathogenesis; therefore, in this study, we used an isogenic mammosomatotroph cell line (GH4C1) harboring different fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR)-4 genotypes to establish and characterize intracranial xenograft mouse models that can be used for preclinical drug testing. We show that proliferating GH4C1 tumors have an average latency of 3 weeks to form. Histological analysis revealed that prototypic FGFR4 (G388) tumors express increased prolactin and less GH, whereas tumors possessing the polymorphic variant of FGFR4 (R388) express increased GH relative to prolactin. All tumors show abundant mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling as confirmed using phosphorylated (p)-S6 and p-4E-binding protein 1 as downstream regulators of this pathway. We subsequently demonstrate that the mTOR inhibitor RAD001 decreases tumor growth rate and reduces p-S6 but not p-4E-binding protein 1 activation, regardless of FGFR4 status. More importantly, GH activity was significantly reduced after mTOR inhibition in the R388 polymorphic variant tumors. This reduction was also associated with a concomitant reduction in serum IGF-1 levels in the R388 group. In summary, we demonstrate that the GH4C1 FGFR polymorphic xenograft is a useful model for examining PAs. Furthermore, we show that RAD001 can efficiently reduce tumor growth rate by a reduction in mTOR signaling and more importantly results in control of GH expression and IGF-1 secretion, providing further support for using mTOR inhibitors in PA patients, in particular GH-producing adenomas.

  16. Reevaluation of the electrophysiological actions of thyrotropin-releasing hormone in a rat pituitary cell line (GH3).

    PubMed

    Simasko, S M

    1991-04-01

    The electrophysiological actions of TRH were examined in the clonal pituitary cell line GH3 with the use of the perforated patch variation of the standard whole cell patch-clamp technique. The action of TRH on spontaneously spiking cells was to cause a brief hyperpolarization (first phase action), followed by a period during which action potential behavior was significantly modified (second phase action). The modifications during second phase action included a reduction in the slope of the up-stroke, a reduced peak potential, an increase in duration, and a depolarizing shift of the after-hyperpolarization. The modification of voltage- and calcium-dependent conductances that underlie these changes were investigated in voltage clamp experiments. During first phase action TRH was found to increase calcium-dependent potassium current. During second phase action TRH was found to significantly reduce the L-type calcium current (35%), with no alteration in the T-type calcium current. The second phase action of TRH on calcium-dependent potassium conductance was complex. First, a decrease was observed. This was followed by an increase that did not become fully manifest until after TRH was washed from the cell. TRH caused no change in voltage-dependent potassium current. These results indicate that the second phase action of TRH on action potential behavior in GH3 cells is mediated by a reduction in L-type calcium current and alterations in the behavior of calcium-dependent potassium currents, but not through changes in voltage-dependent potassium currents.

  17. Pituitary function and morphology in Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Maione, Luigi; Tortora, Fabio; Modica, Roberta; Ramundo, Valeria; Riccio, Eleonora; Daniele, Aurora; Belfiore, Maria Paola; Colao, Annamaria; Pisani, Antonio; Faggiano, Antongiulio

    2015-11-01

    Endocrine abnormalities are known to affect patients with Fabry disease (FD). Pituitary gland theoretically represents an ideal target for FD because of high vascularization and low proliferation rate. We explored pituitary morphology and function in a cohort of FD patients through a prospectic, monocentric study at an Academic Tertiary Center. The study population included 28 FD patients and 42 sex and age-matched normal subjects. The protocol included a contrast enhancement pituitary MRI, the assessment of pituitary hormones, anti-pituitary, and anti-hypothalamus antibodies. At pituitary MRI, an empty sella was found in 11 (39%) FD patients, and in 2 (5%) controls (p < 0.001). Pituitary volume was significantly smaller in FD than in controls (p < 0.001). Determinants of pituitary volume were age and alpha-galactosidase enzyme activity. Both parameters resulted independently correlated at multivariate analysis. Pituitary function was substantially preserved in FD patients. Empty sella is a common finding in patients with FD. The major prevalence in the elderly supports the hypothesis of a progressive pituitary shrinkage overtime. Pituitary function seems not to be impaired in FD. An endocrine workup with pituitary hormone assessment should be periodically performed in FD patients, who are already at risk of cardiovascular complications.

  18. Hypothalamic pituitary disorders expressed by galactorrhea. A dynamic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Perez-Lopez, F R

    1975-11-01

    Physiologic and pathologic production of milk involves complex relations between the mammary glands, hormones, and the central nervous system. In all the galactorrhea syndromes there is a functional or mechanical problem at the pituitary level, with abnormal secretion or reserve of prolactin secretion. Stimulatory agents of prolactin, like thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH), chlorpromazine, amnio acids, and insulin, can be helpful in the study of the hypothalamic pituitary functional reserve, while the osmotic tests seem to provide a clear distinction between functional and tumoral causes. The inhibitory agents of prolactin secretion, L-dopa and CB 154, permit the study of the negative control of the hormone. In addition, CB 154 appears to be an effective treatment for functional galactorrhea. Hyperprolactinemia appears to exert an inhibitory influence on gonadotropins. Clomiphene, acting on the hypothalamus, and LHRH, acting on the gonadotropes, permit the assessment of the gonadotropic hypothalamic-hypophyseal axis.

  19. Reproductive toxicity of inorganic mercury exposure in adult zebrafish: Histological damage, oxidative stress, and alterations of sex hormone and gene expression in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qun-Fang; Li, Ying-Wen; Liu, Zhi-Hao; Chen, Qi-Liang

    2016-08-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a prominent environmental contaminant that causes a variety of adverse effects on aquatic organisms. However, the mechanisms underlying inorganic Hg-induced reproductive impairment in fish remains largely unknown. In this study, adult zebrafish were exposed to 0 (control), 15 and 30μg Hg/l (added as mercuric chloride, HgCl2) for 30days, and the effects on histological structure, antioxidant status and sex hormone levels in the ovary and testis, as well as the mRNA expression of genes involved in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis were analyzed. Exposure to Hg caused pathological lesions in zebrafish gonads, and changed the activities and mRNA levels of antioxidant enzymes (catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx)) as well as the content of glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA). In females, although ovarian 17β-estradiol (E2) content remained relatively stable, significant down-regulation of lhβ, gnrh2, gnrh3, lhr and erα were observed. In males, testosterone (T) levels in the testis significantly decreased after Hg exposure, accompanied by down-regulated expression of gnrh2, gnrh3, fshβ and lhβ in the brain as well as fshr, lhr, ar, cyp17 and cyp11b in the testis. Thus, our study indicated that waterborne inorganic Hg exposure caused histological damage and oxidative stress in the gonads of zebrafish, and altered sex hormone levels by disrupting the transcription of related HPG-axis genes, which could subsequently impair the reproduction of fish. Different response of the antioxidant defense system, sex hormone and HPG-axis genes between females and males exposed to inorganic Hg indicated the gender-specific regulatory effect by Hg. To our knowledge, this is the first time to explore the effects and mechanisms of inorganic Hg exposure on reproduction at the histological, enzymatic and molecular levels, which will greatly extend our understanding on the mechanisms underlying of reproductive

  20. Iatrogenic CJD due to pituitary-derived growth hormone with genetically determined incubation times of up to 40 years

    PubMed Central

    Jaunmuktane, Zane; Adlard, Peter; Bjurstrom, Nina; Caine, Diana; Lowe, Jessica; Norsworthy, Penny; Hummerich, Holger; Druyeh, Ron; Wadsworth, Jonathan D. F.; Brandner, Sebastian; Hyare, Harpreet; Mead, Simon; Collinge, John

    2015-01-01

    Patients with iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease due to administration of cadaver-sourced growth hormone during childhood are still being seen in the UK 30 years after cessation of this treatment. Of the 77 patients who have developed iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, 56 have been genotyped. There has been a marked change in genotype profile at polymorphic codon 129 of the prion protein gene (PRNP) from predominantly valine homozygous to a mixed picture of methionine homozygous and methionine-valine heterozygous over time. The incubation period of iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is significantly different between all three genotypes. This experience is a striking contrast with that in France and the USA, which may relate to contamination of different growth hormone batches with different strains of human prions. We describe the clinical, imaging, molecular and autopsy features in 22 of 24 patients who have developed iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in the UK since 2003. Mean age at onset of symptoms was 42.7 years. Gait ataxia and lower limb dysaesthesiae were the most frequent presenting symptoms. All had cerebellar signs, and the majority had myoclonus and lower limb pyramidal signs, with relatively preserved cognitive function, when first seen. There was a progressive decline in neurological and cognitive function leading to death after 5–32 (mean 14) months. Despite incubation periods approaching 40 years, the clinical duration in methionine homozygote patients appeared to be shorter than that seen in heterozygote patients. MRI showed restricted diffusion in the basal ganglia, thalamus, hippocampus, frontal and the paracentral motor cortex and cerebellar vermis. The electroencephalogram was abnormal in 15 patients and cerebrospinal fluid 14-3-3 protein was positive in half the patients. Neuropathological examination was conducted in nine patients. All but one showed synaptic prion deposition with numerous kuru type plaques in the basal ganglia

  1. Iatrogenic CJD due to pituitary-derived growth hormone with genetically determined incubation times of up to 40 years.

    PubMed

    Rudge, Peter; Jaunmuktane, Zane; Adlard, Peter; Bjurstrom, Nina; Caine, Diana; Lowe, Jessica; Norsworthy, Penny; Hummerich, Holger; Druyeh, Ron; Wadsworth, Jonathan D F; Brandner, Sebastian; Hyare, Harpreet; Mead, Simon; Collinge, John

    2015-11-01

    Patients with iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease due to administration of cadaver-sourced growth hormone during childhood are still being seen in the UK 30 years after cessation of this treatment. Of the 77 patients who have developed iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, 56 have been genotyped. There has been a marked change in genotype profile at polymorphic codon 129 of the prion protein gene (PRNP) from predominantly valine homozygous to a mixed picture of methionine homozygous and methionine-valine heterozygous over time. The incubation period of iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is significantly different between all three genotypes. This experience is a striking contrast with that in France and the USA, which may relate to contamination of different growth hormone batches with different strains of human prions. We describe the clinical, imaging, molecular and autopsy features in 22 of 24 patients who have developed iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in the UK since 2003. Mean age at onset of symptoms was 42.7 years. Gait ataxia and lower limb dysaesthesiae were the most frequent presenting symptoms. All had cerebellar signs, and the majority had myoclonus and lower limb pyramidal signs, with relatively preserved cognitive function, when first seen. There was a progressive decline in neurological and cognitive function leading to death after 5-32 (mean 14) months. Despite incubation periods approaching 40 years, the clinical duration in methionine homozygote patients appeared to be shorter than that seen in heterozygote patients. MRI showed restricted diffusion in the basal ganglia, thalamus, hippocampus, frontal and the paracentral motor cortex and cerebellar vermis. The electroencephalogram was abnormal in 15 patients and cerebrospinal fluid 14-3-3 protein was positive in half the patients. Neuropathological examination was conducted in nine patients. All but one showed synaptic prion deposition with numerous kuru type plaques in the basal ganglia

  2. Pituitary gigantism: Causes and clinical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Rostomyan, Liliya; Daly, Adrian F; Beckers, Albert

    2015-12-01

    Acromegaly and pituitary gigantism are very rare conditions resulting from excessive secretion of growth hormone (GH), usually by a pituitary adenoma. Pituitary gigantism occurs when GH excess overlaps with the period of rapid linear growth during childhood and adolescence. Until recently, its etiology and clinical characteristics have been poorly understood. Genetic and genomic causes have been identified in recent years that explain about half of cases of pituitary gigantism. We describe these recent discoveries and focus on some important settings in which gigantism can occur, including familial isolated pituitary adenomas (FIPA) and the newly described X-linked acrogigantism (X-LAG) syndrome.

  3. [Treatment of pituitary adenomas].

    PubMed

    Mezosi, Emese; Nemes, Orsolya

    2009-09-27

    According to epidemiological studies, the prevalence of pituitary adenomas is 16.5% and the majority of them are "incidentalomas". The symptoms of pituitary disorders are often non-specific; disturbances of pituitary function, compression symptoms, hypophysis apoplexy or accidental findings may help the diagnosis. The hormonal evaluation of pituitary adenomas is different from the algorithm used in the disorders of peripheral endocrine organs. The first-line therapy of prolactinomas are the dopamine agonists, and the aims of the treatment are to normalize the prolactin level, restore fertility in child-bearing age, decrease tumor mass, save or improve the residual pituitary function and inhibit the relapse of the disease. The available dopamine agonists in Hungary are bromocriptine and quinagolide. In case of tumors with good therapeutic response, medical therapy can be withdrawn after 3-5 years; hyperprolactinemia will not recur in 2/3 of these patients. Neurosurgery is the primary therapy of GH-, ACTH-, TSH-producing and inactive adenomas. In the last decades, significant improvement has been reached in surgical procedures, resulting in low mortality rates. Acromegalic patients with unresectable tumors have a great benefit from somatostatin analog treatment. The growth hormone receptor antagonist pegvisomant is the newest modality for the treatment of acromegaly. The medical therapy of Cushing's disease is still based on the inhibition of steroid production. A new, promising somatostatin analog, pasireotide is evaluated in clinical trials. The rare TSH-producing tumor can respond to both dopamine agonist and somatostatin analog therapy. The application of conventional radiotherapy has decreased; radiotherapy is mainly used in the treatment of invasive, incurable or malignant tumors. Further studies are needed to elucidate the exact role of radiosurgery and fractionated stereotaxic irradiation in the treatment of pituitary tumors.

  4. Clinical results of stereotactic helium-ion radiosurgery of the pituitary gland at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, R.P.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Lyman, J.T.; Frankel, K.A.; Phillips, M.H.; Lawrence, J.H.; Tobias, C.A.

    1989-12-01

    The first therapeutic clinical trial using accelerated heavy-charged particles in humans was performed for the treatment of various endocrine and metabolic disorders of the pituitary gland, and as suppressive therapy for adenohypophyseal hormone-responsive carcinomas and diabetic retinopathy. Since then, over 800 patients have received stereotactically-directed plateau-beam heavy-charged particle pituitary irradiation at this institution. In acromegaly, Cushing's disease, Nelson's syndrome and prolactin-secreting tumors, the therapeutic goal in the 433 patients treated has been to destroy or inhibit the growth of the pituitary tumor and control hormonal hypersecretion, while preserving a functional rim of tissue with normal hormone-secreting capacity, and minimizing neurologic injury. An additional group of 34 patients was treated for nonsecreting chromophobe adenomas. This paper discusses the methods and results of these treatments. 11 refs.

  5. Clinical results of stereotactic hellium-ion radiosurgery of the pituitary gland at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, R.P.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Lyman, J.T.; Frankel, K.A.; Phillips, M.H.; Lawrence, J.H.; Tobias, C.A.

    1989-12-01

    The first therapeutic clinical trial using accelerated heavy-charged particles in humans was performed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the treatment of various endocrine and metabolic disorders of the pituitary gland, and as suppressive therapy for adenohypophyseal hormone-responsive carcinomas and diabetic retinopathy. In acromegaly, Cushing's disease, Nelson's syndrome and prolactin-secreting tumors, the therapeutic goal in the 433 patients treated has been to destroy or inhibit the growth of the pituitary tumor and control hormonal hypersecretion, while preserving a functional rim of tissue with normal hormone-secreting capacity, and minimizing neurologic injury. An additional group of 34 patients was treated for nonsecreting chromophobe adenomas. This paper discusses the methods and results of stereotactic helium-ion radiosurgery of the pituitary gland at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. 11 refs.

  6. Male hormonal contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Amory, J K

    2006-06-01

    Efforts are underway to develop additional forms of contraception for men. The most promising approach to male contraceptive development involves the administration of exogenous testosterone (T). When administered to a man, T functions as a contraceptive by suppressing the secretion of luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone from the pituitary, thereby depriving the testes of the signals required for spermatogenesis. After 2-3 months of treatment, low levels of these gonadotropins lead to markedly decreased sperm counts and effective contraception in a majority of men. Hormonal contraception with exogenous T has proven to be free from serious adverse effects and is well tolerated by men. In addition, sperm counts uniformly normalize when the exogenous T is discontinued. Thus, male hormonal is safe, effective and reversible; however, spermatogenesis is not suppressed to zero in all men, meaning that some diminished potential for fertility persists. Because of this recent studies have combined T with progestogens and/or gonadotropin-releasing antagonists to further suppress pituitary gonadotropins and optimize contraceptive efficacy. Current combinations of T and progestogens completely suppress spermatogenesis without severe side effects in 80-90% of men, with significant suppression in the remainder of individuals. Recent trials with newer, long-acting forms of injectable T, which can be administered every 8 weeks, combined with progestogens, administered either orally or by long-acting implant, have yielded promising results and may soon result in the marketing of a safe, reversible and effective hormonal contraceptive for men.

  7. Pituitary cells in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hymer, W. C.; Shellenberger, K.; Grindeland, R.

    1994-08-01

    Cells of the mammalian pituitary gland synthesize and secrete several protein hormones which regulate a number of organ systems throughout the body. These include the musculoskeletal, immune, vascular and endocrine systems. Since changes occur in these tissues as a result of spaceflight, and since pituitary growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) play a role in the control of these systems on earth, we have focused attention over the last 10 years on GH and PRL cell function during and after spaceflight. The cumulative results of 4 spaceflight missions and several mimicked microgravity (μG) experiments establish 1) that production and release of biologically active GH and PRL is repeatedly and significantly attenuated (usually > 50%) and 2) that changes in cell morphology also occur. In this paper we describe our results within the framework of methodologies and approaches frequently used to study pituitary cell function on earth. In so doing we hope to develop future flight experiments aimed at uncovering possible μG ``sensing systems'' within the pituitary cell.

  8. Pituitary cells in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.; Shellenberger, K.; Grindeland, R.

    1994-01-01

    Cells of the mammalian pituitary gland synthesize and secrete several protein hormones which regulate a number of organ systems throughout the body. These include the musculoskeletal, immune, vascular and endocrine systems. Since changes occur in these tissues as a result of spaceflight, and since pituitary growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) play a role in the control of these systems on earth, we have focused attention over the last 10 years on GH and PRL cell function during and after spaceflight. The cumulative results of 4 spaceflight missions and several mimicked microgravity experiments establish 1) that production and release of biologically active GH and PRL is repeatedly and significantly attenuated (usually >50%) and 2) that changes in cell morphology also occur. In this paper we describe our results within the framework of methodologies and approaches frequently used to study pituitary cell function on earth. In so doing we hope to develop future flight experiments aimed at uncovering possible microgravity 'sensing systems' within the pituitary cell.

  9. Heterogeneity in the growth hormone pituitary gland system of rats and humans: Implications to microgravity based research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.; Grindeland, R.; Hayes, C.; Lanham, J. W.; Cleveland, C.; Todd, P.; Morrison, Dennis R.

    1988-01-01

    The cell separation techniques of velocity sedimentation, flow cytometry and continuous flow electrophoresis were used to obtain enriched populations of growth hormone (GH) cells. The goal was to isolate a GH cell subpopulation which releases GH molecules which are very high in biological activity, it was important to use a method which was effective in processing large numbers of cells over a short time span. The techniques based on sedimentation are limited by cell density overlaps and streaming. While flow cytometry is useful in the analytical mode for objectively establishing cell purity, the numbers of cells which can be processed in the sort mode are so small as to make this approach ineffective in terms of the long term goals. It was shown that continuous flow electrophoresis systems (CFES) can separate GH cells from other cell types on the basis of differences in surface charge. The bioreactive producers appear to be more electrophoretically mobile than the low producers. Current ground based CFES efforts are hampered by cell clumping in low ionic strength buffers and poor cell recoveries from the CFES device.

  10. Action of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone: involvement of novel arachidonic acid metabolites.

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, G D; Capdevila, J; Chacos, N; Manna, S; Falck, J R

    1983-01-01

    Anterior pituitary cells were incubated in the presence of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone and one of three inhibitors of arachidonic acid metabolism:indomethacin, an inhibitor of the cyclooxygenase system; nordihydroguaiaretic acid, an antioxidant that inhibits lipoxygenase; and icosatetraynoic acid, an acetylenic analogue of arachidonic acid that blocks all known pathways of arachidonic acid metabolism. Indomethacin was ineffective in blocking luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-stimulated luteinizing hormone secretion. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid was only marginally capable of inhibiting luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-stimulated luteinizing hormone secretion. Icosatetraynoic acid at 10 microM completely inhibited stimulated luteinizing hormone secretion. Addition of several epoxygenated arachidonic acid metabolites to cells in vitro resulted in secretion of luteinizing hormone equal to or greater than that induced by 10 nM luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone. The half-maximal effective dose for these compounds was approximately 50 nM. The 5,6-epoxyicosatrienoic acid was the most potent of the compounds tested. These studies suggest that luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-stimulated luteinizing hormone release is closely coupled with the production of oxidized arachidonic acid metabolites. Moreover, one or more of the epoxygenated arachidonic acid metabolites might be a component of the cascade of reactions initiated by luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone that ultimately results in secretion of luteinizing hormone. PMID:6344087

  11. Concentration Addition, Independent Action and Generalized Concentration Addition Models for Mixture Effect Prediction of Sex Hormone Synthesis In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hadrup, Niels; Taxvig, Camilla; Pedersen, Mikael; Nellemann, Christine; Hass, Ulla; Vinggaard, Anne Marie

    2013-01-01

    Humans are concomitantly exposed to numerous chemicals. An infinite number of combinations and doses thereof can be imagined. For toxicological risk assessment the mathematical prediction of mixture effects, using knowledge on single chemicals, is therefore desirable. We investigated pros and cons of the concentration addition (CA), independent action (IA) and generalized concentration addition (GCA) models. First we measured effects of single chemicals and mixtures thereof on steroid synthesis in H295R cells. Then single chemical data were applied to the models; predictions of mixture effects were calculated and compared to the experimental mixture data. Mixture 1 contained environmental chemicals adjusted in ratio according to human exposure levels. Mixture 2 was a potency adjusted mixture containing five pesticides. Prediction of testosterone effects coincided with the experimental Mixture 1 data. In contrast, antagonism was observed for effects of Mixture 2 on this hormone. The mixtures contained chemicals exerting only limited maximal effects. This hampered prediction by the CA and IA models, whereas the GCA model could be used to predict a full dose response curve. Regarding effects on progesterone and estradiol, some chemicals were having stimulatory effects whereas others had inhibitory effects. The three models were not applicable in this situation and no predictions could be performed. Finally, the expected contributions of single chemicals to the mixture effects were calculated. Prochloraz was the predominant but not sole driver of the mixtures, suggesting that one chemical alone was not responsible for the mixture effects. In conclusion, the GCA model seemed to be superior to the CA and IA models for the prediction of testosterone effects. A situation with chemicals exerting opposing effects, for which the models could not be applied, was identified. In addition, the data indicate that in non-potency adjusted mixtures the effects cannot always be

  12. Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) immunoreactivity in the brain and pituitary of the dogfish Scyliorhinus canicula. Colocalization with alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) in hypothalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Vallarino, M; Andersen, A C; Delbende, C; Ottonello, I; Eberle, A N; Vaudry, H

    1989-01-01

    The distribution of melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) in the central nervous system of the dogfish Scyliorhinus canicula was determined by indirect immunofluorescence and peroxidase-anti-peroxidase techniques, using an antiserum raised against synthetic salmon MCH. Three groups of MCH-positive cell bodies were localized in the posterior hypothalamus. The most prominent cell group was detected in the nucleus sacci vasculosi. Scattered MCH-immunoreactive cells were observed in the nucleus tuberculi posterioris and in the nucleus lateralis tuberis. At the pituitary level, the caudal part of the median lobe of the pars distalis contained strongly MCH-positive perikarya. Some of these cells were liquor-contacting-type. Immunoreactive fibers originating from the hypothalamic perikarya projected throughout the dorsal wall of the posterior hypothalamus. Positive fibers were also detected within the thalamus and the central gray of the mesencephalon. The distribution of MCH-containing neurons was compared to that of alpha-MSH-immunoreactive elements using consecutive, 5-micron thick sections. Both MCH- and alpha-MSH-immunoreactive peptides were found in the same neurons of the nucleus sacci vasculosi. These data suggest that MCH and alpha-MSH, two neuropeptides which exert antagonistic activities on skin melanophores, may also act in a coordinate manner in the central nervous system of cartilaginous fish.

  13. Uptake and ultrastructural localization of a (125I) growth hormone releasing factor agonist in male rat pituitary gland: Evidence for internalization

    SciTech Connect

    Morel, G. )

    1991-09-01

    GRF was isolated from a human tumor of the pancreas and characterized. GRF stimulates the in vivo and in vitro secretion of GH. The present study was designed to find out whether human (h) GRF agonist could be internalized and to determine the subcellular localization of internalized peptide in somatotrophs. Autoradiography was performed on rat anterior pituitary glands removed at specific time intervals (2-60 min) after iv injection of monoradioiodinated (125I) (His1,Nle27) hGRF (1-32) NH2. Administration of an excess of unlabeled hGRF agonist along with the radioiodinated hormone prevented the uptake, indicating the specificity of the reaction. At the ultrastructural level only the somatotrophs appeared to contain silver grains. The main effect of hGRF agonist injection on the cytological aspect of the somatotrophs was a decrease in the area occupied by secretory granules, accompanied inversely, by an increase in that of the Golgi complex. The time course study in somatotrophs showed that five compartments (plasma membrane, secretory granules, cytoplasmic matrix, nuclear membrane, and lysosomes) have distinct marked labeling patterns. Plasma membrane, secretory granules, and nuclear membrane were labeled throughout the time course studied (2-60 min after injection). Cytoplasmic matrix was labeled 5 min post injection and lysosomes 15 and 30 min after injection. The Golgi complex, mitochondria, rough endoplasmic reticulum, and nucleus matrix were not labeled. The findings show the cellular specificity of GRF uptake by somatotrophs and the internalization process from the plasma membrane to the intracellular organelles (secretory granules, lysosomes, and nuclear membrane). Labeling of the secretory granule compartment suggests that granules may bind and protect internalized peptide from lysosomal degradation.

  14. CORTICOTROPIN-RELEASING-HORMONE RECEPTORS IN THE MEDIAL PREFRONTAL CORTEX REGULATE HYPOTHALAMIC-PITUITARY-ADRENAL ACTIVITY AND ANXIETY-RELATED BEHAVIOR REGARDLESS OF PRIOR STRESS EXPERIENCE

    PubMed Central

    Jaferi, Azra; Bhatnagar, Seema

    2007-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis habituates, or gradually decreases its activity, with repeated exposure to the same stressor. During habituation, the HPA axis likely requires input from cortical and limbic regions involved in processing of cognitive information that is important in coping to stress. Brain regions such as the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) are recognized as important in mediating these processes. The mPFC modulates stress-related behavior and some evidence suggests that the mPFC regulates acute and repeated stress-induced HPA responses. Interestingly, corticotropin releasing hormone(CRH)-1 receptors, which integrate neuroendocrine, behavioral and autonomic responses to stress, are localized in the mPFC but have not been specifically examined with respect to HPA regulation. We hypothesized that CRH receptor activity in the mPFC contributes to stress-induced regulation of HPA activity and anxiety-related behavior, and that CRH release in the mPFC may differentially regulate HPA responses in acutely- compared to repeatedly-stressed animals. In the present experiments, we found that blockade of CRH receptors in the mPFC with the non-selective receptor antagonist, D-Phe-CRH (50ng or 100ng) significantly inhibited HPA responses compared to vehicle regardless of whether animals were exposed to a single, acute 30min restraint or to the eighth 30min restraint. We also found that intra-mPFC injections of CRH (20ng) significantly increased anxiety-related behavior in the elevated plus maze in both acutely- and repeatedly-restrained groups compared to vehicle. Together, these results suggest an excitatory influence of CRH in the mPFC on stress-induced HPA activity and anxiety-related behavior regardless of prior stress experience. PMID:18001698

  15. Long-term results of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy with CyberKnife for growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenoma: evaluation by the Cortina consensus.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Hiromitsu; Sato, Kengo; Nomura, Ryutaro; Tabei, Yusuke; Suzuki, Ichiro; Yokota, Naoki; Inoue, Mitsuhiro; Ohta, Seiji; Yamada, Shozo; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the safety and feasibility of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) with CyberKnife for growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenoma (GH-PA). Fifty-two patients with GH-PA were treated with hypofractionated SRT between September 2001 and October 2012. Eight patients had clinically silent GH-PA and 44 were symptomatic. Only 1 patient was inoperable. The other patients had recurrent or postoperative residual tumors on MRI. All patients had received pharmacotherapy prior to SRT with a somatostatin analog, dopamine agonist, and/or GH receptor antagonist. The marginal doses were 17.4-26.8 Gy for the 3-fraction schedule and 20.0-32.0 Gy for the 5-fraction schedule. Endocrinological remission was assessed by the Cortina consensus criteria 2010 (random GH <1 ng/ml or nadir GH after an oral glucose tolerance test <0.4 ng/ml and normalization of age- and sex-adjusted insulin-like growth factor-1). The median follow-up period was 60 months (range 27-137). The 5-year overall survival, local control, and disease-free survival rates were 100, 100, and 96 %, respectively. Nine patients (5 clinically silent and 4 symptomatic patients) satisfied the Cortina criteria without receiving further pharmacotherapy, whereas the remaining 43 patients did not. No post-SRT grade 2 or higher visual disorder occurred. Symptomatic post-SRT hypopituitarism was observed in 1 patient. CyberKnife hypofractionated SRT is safe and effective when judged by imaging findings for GH-PA. However, it may be difficult to satisfy the Cortina consensus criteria in most symptomatic patients with SRT alone. Further investigations of optimal treatments are warranted.

  16. Pituitary function following treatment with reproductive toxins.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, R L; Goldman, J M; Rehnberg, G L

    1986-01-01

    Appropriate regulation of reproductive processes are dependent upon the integrity of pituitary function. In this selected review, we evaluate the evidence that certain environmental compounds exert their effect on reproductive function via a direct action on the pituitary gland. We also discuss examples of changes in pituitary hormone secretion that occur in response to changes in neuronal or gonadal control of the pituitary. A limited number of studies suggest that measures of pituitary hormone secretion provide an early and sensitive measure of a compound's potential effects on the reproductive system. However, the most striking aspect of this area is the sparse and inconsistent information describing pituitary function following exposure to environmental pollutants. PMID:3830104

  17. Effect of Chlorotriazine Pesticides on Gonadotrophin Releasing Hormone in the Neuronal GT1-7 Cell Line and Hypothalamic Explants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulates the release of pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone. These pituitary hormones are necessary for normal reproductive function in both males and females. It is well recognized that disruption of nor...

  18. Thyrotropin-secreting pituitary adenomas: biological and molecular features, diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Losa, M; Fortunato, M; Molteni, L; Peretti, E; Mortini, P

    2008-12-01

    Central hyperthyroidism due to a thyrotropin (TSH)-secreting pituitary adenoma is a rare cause of hyperthyroidism, representing 0.5-1.0% of all pituitary adenomas. The etiopathogenesis of TSH-secreting-adenomas is unknown and no definite role for various oncogenes has been proven. Patients with TSH-secreting adenoma usually present with signs and symptoms of hyperthyroidism milder than those in patients with hyperthyroidism of thyroid origin, in addition to symptoms secondary to mass effects of the pituitary tumour. Mixed pituitary tumours co-secrete growth hormone and prolactin. The characteristic biochemical abnormalities are normal or high serum TSH concentrations in the presence of elevated total and/or free thyroid hormones concentrations. Measurement of markers of peripheral thyroid hormone action and dynamic tests may aid in the differential diagnosis with the syndrome of resistance to thyroid hormone. Neuroimaging is fundamental to visualize the pituitary tumor. Therapy of TSH-secreting adenomas can be accomplished by surgery, radiation therapies, and medical treatment with somatostatin analogs or dopamine agonists. Nowadays, and in contrast with the first reports on this rare disease, most patients are well controlled by current therapies.

  19. Activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and induction of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase 1 (MKP-1) by perifused thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) stimulation in rat pituitary GH3 cells.

    PubMed

    Oride, Aki; Kanasaki, Haruhiko; Mutiara, Sandra; Purwana, Indri Nuryani; Miyazaki, Kohji

    2008-12-16

    We investigated the pattern of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation and the induction of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase 1 (MKP-1) by thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) under various stimulation conditions in pituitary GH3 cells. In static culture, ERK activation by continuous TRH was maximal at 10 min and persisted for up to 60 min, with a return to the basal level by 2h. Stimulation with continuous TRH in perifused cells resulted in a similar level of ERK phosphorylation. MKP-1 was expressed 60 min following either static or perifused, continuous TRH stimulation. When cells were stimulated with pulsatile TRH every 30 min, ERK activation was maximal at 10 min and returned to its baseline level by 30 min. ERK was phosphorylated again with each subsequent pulse. Pulsatile TRH did not induce MKP-1. Prolactin promoter activity following continuous, static TRH stimulation was higher than that following perifused TRH stimulation. TRH at a frequency of one pulse every 30 min increased prolactin promoter activity similar to that of perifused, continuous TRH stimulation. Additionally, changes in pulse frequency resulted in alterations in the level of prolactin promoter. Following static stimulation, a 10 min exposure to TRH was sufficient to obtain full activation of the prolactin promoter. Additionally, a 5-10 min exposure of TRH was sufficient to maintain ERK activation. A single 5-min pulse of TRH stimulation resulted in low activation of the prolactin promoter. ERK activation was necessary for prolactin gene transcription; however, prolactin gene transcription is not entirely determined by the strength or duration of TRH-induced ERK activation.

  20. Pituitary stem cells: where do we stand?

    PubMed

    Vankelecom, Hugo; Chen, Jianghai

    2014-03-25

    Some 5 years ago, the stem cells of the adult pituitary gland were discovered. Subsequent in-depth characterization revealed expression of several stemness markers and embryo-typical factors. Now, the quest is open to decipher their role in the gland. When and how pituitary stem cells differentiate to contribute to the mature hormone-producing cell populations is not known. New research models support their involvement in cell regeneration after injury in the gland, and suggest a possible role in pituitary tumor formation. From their expression phenotype, pituitary stem cells seem to re-use embryonic developmental programs during the creation of new hormonal cells. Here, we will review the latest progression in the domain of pituitary stem cells, including the uncovering of some new molecular flavors and of the first potential functions. Eventually, we will speculate on their differentiation programs towards hormonal cells, with a particular focus on gonadotropes.

  1. Mutation analysis of inhibitory guanine nucleotide binding protein alpha (GNAI) loci in young and familial pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Demir, Hande; Donner, Iikki; Kivipelto, Leena; Kuismin, Outi; Schalin-Jäntti, Camilla; De Menis, Ernesto; Karhu, Auli

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas are neoplasms of the anterior pituitary lobe and account for 15-20% of all intracranial tumors. Although most pituitary tumors are benign they can cause severe symptoms related to tumor size as well as hypopituitarism and/or hypersecretion of one or more pituitary hormones. Most pituitary adenomas are sporadic, but it has been estimated that 5% of patients have a familial background. Germline mutations of the tumor suppressor gene aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) predispose to hereditary pituitary neoplasia. Recently, it has been demonstrated that AIP mutations predispose to pituitary tumorigenesis through defective inhibitory GTP binding protein (Gαi) signaling. This finding prompted us to examine whether germline loss-of-function mutations in inhibitory guanine nucleotide (GTP) binding protein alpha (GNAI) loci are involved in genetic predisposition of pituitary tumors. To our knowledge, this is the first time GNAI genes are sequenced in order to examine the occurrence of inactivating germline mutations. Thus far, only somatic gain-of-function hot-spot mutations have been studied in these loci. Here, we have analyzed the coding regions of GNAI1, GNAI2, and GNAI3 in a set of young sporadic somatotropinoma patients (n = 32; mean age of diagnosis 32 years) and familial index cases (n = 14), thus in patients with a disease phenotype similar to that observed in AIP mutation carriers. In addition, expression of Gαi proteins was studied in human growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting and non-functional pituitary tumors. No pathogenic germline mutations affecting the Gαi proteins were detected. The result suggests that loss-of-function mutations of GNAI loci are rare or nonexistent in familial pituitary adenomas.

  2. Angiotensin II in the brain and pituitary: contrasting roles in the regulation of adenohypophyseal secretion.

    PubMed

    Ganong, W F

    1989-01-01

    Angiotensin II (AII) is present in gonadotropes in rats, and there are AII receptors on lactotropes and corticotropes. AII may be a paracrine mediator that stimulates the secretion of prolactin and adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) at the level of the pituitary, but additional research is needed to define its exact role. Angiotensinogen may also reach the gonadotropes via a paracrine route. On the other hand, there is considerable evidence that brain AII stimulates the secretion of luteinizing hormone (LH) by increasing the secretion of LH-releasing hormone, and that this effect is due to AII-mediated release of norepinephrine from noradrenergic nerve terminals in the preoptic region of the hypothalamus. In addition, brain AII inhibits the secretion of prolactin, probably by increasing the release of dopamine into the portal hypophyseal vessels. Circulating AII stimulates the secretion of a third anterior pituitary hormone, ACTH, by acting on one or more of the circumventricular organs to increase the secretion of corticotropin-releasing hormone.

  3. Insulin and growth hormone-releasing peptide-6 (GHRP-6) have differential beneficial effects on cell turnover in the pituitary, hypothalamus and cerebellum of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Granado, Miriam; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Tuda, María; Frago, Laura M; Chowen, Julie A; Argente, Jesús

    2011-04-30

    Poorly controlled type1 diabetes is associated with hormonal imbalances and increased cell death in different tissues, including the pituitary, hypothalamus and cerebellum. In the pituitary, lactotrophs are the cell population with the greatest increase in cell death, whereas in the hypothalamus and cerebellum astrocytes are most highly affected. Insulin treatment can delay, but does not prevent, diabetic complications. As ghrelin and growth hormone (GH) secretagogues are reported to prevent apoptosis in different tissues, and to modulate glucose homeostasis, a combined hormonal treatment may be beneficial. Hence, we analyzed the effect of insulin and GH-releasing peptide 6 (GHRP-6) on diabetes-induced apoptosis in the pituitary, hypothalamus and cerebellum of diabetic rats. Adult male Wistar rats were made diabetic by streptozotocin injection (65 mg/kg ip) and divided into four groups from diabetes onset: those receiving a daily sc injection of saline (1 ml/kg/day), GHRP-6 (150 μg/kg/day), insulin (1-8U/day) or insulin plus GHRP-6 for 8 weeks. Control non-diabetic rats received saline (1 ml/kg/day). Diabetes increased cell death in the pituitary, hypothalamus and cerebellum (P<0.05). In the pituitary, insulin treatment prevented diabetes-induced apoptosis (P<0.01), as well as the decline in prolactin and GH mRNA levels (P<0.05). In the hypothalamus, neither insulin nor GHRP-6 decreased diabetes-induced cell death. However, the combined treatment of insulin+GHRP-6 prevented the diabetes induced-decrease in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) levels (P<0.05). In the cerebellum, although insulin treatment increased GFAP levels (P<0.01), only the combined treatment of insulin+ GHRP-6 decreased diabetes-induced apoptosis (P<0.05). In conclusion, insulin and GHRP-6 exert tissue specific effects in STZ-diabetic rats and act synergistically on some processes. Indeed, insulin treatment does not seem to be effective on preventing some of the diabetes-induced alterations

  4. Novel Genetic Causes of Pituitary Adenomas.

    PubMed

    Caimari, Francisca; Korbonits, Márta

    2016-10-15

    Recently, a number of novel genetic alterations have been identified that predispose individuals to pituitary adenomas. Clinically relevant pituitary adenomas are relatively common, present in 0.1% of the general population. They are mostly benign monoclonal neoplasms that arise from any of the five hormone-secreting cell types of the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland, and cause disease due to hormonal alterations and local space-occupying effects. The pathomechanism of pituitary adenomas includes alterations in cell-cycle regulation and growth factor signaling, which are mostly due to epigenetic changes; somatic and especially germline mutations occur more rarely. A significant proportion of growth hormone- and adrenocorticotrophin-secreting adenomas have activating somatic mutations in the GNAS and USP8 genes, respectively. Rarely, germline mutations predispose to pituitary tumorigenesis, often in a familial setting. Classical tumor predisposition syndromes include multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) and type 4 (MEN4) syndromes, Carney complex, and McCune-Albright syndrome. Pituitary tumors have also been described in association with neurofibromatosis type 1, DICER1 syndrome, and SDHx mutations. Pituitary adenomas with no other associated tumors have been described as familial isolated pituitary adenomas. Patients with AIP or GPR101 mutations often present with pituitary gigantism either in a familial or simplex setting. GNAS and GPR101 mutations that arise in early embryonic age can lead to somatic mosaicism involving the pituitary gland and resulting in growth hormone excess. Senescence has been suggested as the key mechanism protecting pituitary adenomas turning malignant in the overwhelming majority of cases. Here we briefly summarize the genetic background of pituitary adenomas, with an emphasis on the recent developments in this field. Clin Cancer Res; 22(20); 5030-42. ©2016 AACR SEE ALL ARTICLES IN THIS CCR FOCUS SECTION, "ENDOCRINE CANCERS

  5. Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    ... affect many different processes, including Growth and development Metabolism - how your body gets energy from the foods you eat Sexual function Reproduction Mood Endocrine glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the ...

  6. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor induces prolactin expression in rat pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Satoya; Kurotani, Reiko; Miyano, Yuki; Sakahara, Satoshi; Koike, Kanako; Maruyama, Minoru; Ishikawa, Fumio; Sakatai, Ichiro; Abe, Hiroyuki; Sakai, Takafumi

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the role of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) in the pituitary gland to understand the effect of M-CSF on pituitary hormones and the relationship between the endocrine and immune systems. When we attempted to establish pituitary cell lines from a thyrotropic pituitary tumor (TtT), a macrophage cell line, TtT/M-87, was established. We evaluated M-CSF-like activity in conditioned media (CM) from seven pituitary cell lines using TtT/M-87 cells. TtT/M-87 proliferation significantly increased in the presence of CM from TtT/GF cells, a pituitary folliculostellate (FS) cell line. M-CSF mRNA was detected in TtT/GF and MtT/E cells by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and its expression in TtT/GF cells was increased in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) dose-dependent manner. M-CSF mRNA expression was also increased in rat anterior pituitary glands by LPS. M-CSF receptor (M-CSFR) mRNA was only detected in TtT/ M-87 cells and increased in the LPS-stimulated rat pituitary glands. In rat pituitary glands, M-CSF and M-CSFR were found to be localized in FS cells and prolactin (PRL)-secreting cells, respectively, by immunohistochemistry. The PRL concentration in rat sera was significantly increased at 24 h after M-CSF administration, and mRNA levels significantly increased in primary culture cells of rat anterior pituitary glands. In addition, TNF-α mRNA was increased in the primary culture cells by M-CSF. These results revealed that M-CSF was secreted from FS cells and M-CSF regulated PRL expression in rat pituitary glands.

  7. D-aspartic acid supplementation combined with 28 days of heavy resistance training has no effect on body composition, muscle strength, and serum hormones associated with the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis in resistance-trained men.

    PubMed

    Willoughby, Darryn S; Leutholtz, Brian

    2013-10-01

    It was hypothesized that D-aspartic acid (D-ASP) supplementation would not increase endogenous testosterone levels or improve muscular performance associated with resistance training. Therefore, body composition, muscle strength, and serum hormone levels associated with the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis were studied after 28 days of resistance training and D-ASP supplementation. Resistance-trained men resistance trained 4 times/wk for 28 days while orally ingesting either 3 g of placebo or 3 g of D-ASP. Data were analyzed with 2 × 2 analysis of variance (P < .05). Before and after resistance training and supplementation, body composition and muscle strength, serum gonadal hormones, and serum D-ASP and d-aspartate oxidase (DDO) were determined. Body composition and muscle strength were significantly increased in both groups in response to resistance training (P < .05) but not different from one another (P > .05). Total and free testosterone, luteinizing hormone, gonadotropin-releasing hormone, and estradiol were unchanged with resistance training and D-ASP supplementation (P > .05). For serum D-ASP and DDO, D-ASP resulted in a slight increase compared with baseline levels (P > .05). For the D-ASP group, the levels of serum DDO were significantly increased compared with placebo (P < .05). The gonadal hormones were unaffected by 28 days of D-ASP supplementation and not associated with the observed increases in muscle strength and mass. Therefore, at the dose provided, D-ASP supplementation is ineffective in up-regulating the activity of the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis and has no anabolic or ergogenic effects in skeletal muscle.

  8. Effect of very high dose D-leucine6-gonadotropin-releasing hormone proethylamide on the hypothalamic-pituitary testicular axis in patients with prostatic cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Warner, B; Worgul, T J; Drago, J; Demers, L; Dufau, M; Max, D; Santen, R J

    1983-01-01

    Potent synthetic analogs of gonadotropin-releasing hormone produce parodoxical antireproductive effects when administered chronically. These compounds are minimally toxic and may exhibit no plateau of the dose-response curve even at very high doses. These considerations served as the basis for our systematic evaluation of [D-leucine6-desarginine-glycine-NH2(10)]gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH-A) proethylamide in the very high dose range (i.e., 10-fold larger amounts than previously used). In rats given the analog for 12 wk, prostate, testis, and seminal vesicle weights were suppressed to a greater extent with 200 micrograms q.d. than with 40 micrograms q.d. (P less than 0.01 prostate, less than 0.01 testis, less than 0.01 seminal vesicles), indicating dose-response effects in the very high dose range. 200 micrograms of [D-Leu6-des-Gly-NH2(10]-GnRH-A consistently suppressed leutinizing hormone (LH) values at 6 and 12 wk (basal 71 +/- 9.5; 6 wk 34 +/- 3.8; 12 wk 28 +/- 5 ng/ml) whereas 40 micrograms suppressed LH variably (basal 33 +/- 3.8; 6 wk 17 +/- 3.9; 12 wk 32 +/- 5.2). Testosterone fell to 15 +/- 2.4 and 19 +/- 2.0 ng/100 ml in response to 200 micrograms q.d. and to 27 +/- 6.4 and 22 +/- 7.4 ng/100 ml with the 40-micrograms dose. These findings in the rodent prompted treatment of stage D prostate cancer patients with similarly high doses of [D-Leu6-des-Gly-NH2(10)]-GnRH-A. After treatment for 11 wk with 1,000 or 10,000 micrograms/d of the analog, testosterone and dihydrotestosterone levels transiently rose and then fell into the surgically castrate range (testosterone 19 +/- 4.4 ng/100 ml [D-Leu6-des-Gly-NH2(10)]-GnRH-A vs. surgically castrate 11 +/- 0.9 ng/100 ml, P = NS; dihydrotestosterone 15 +/- 1.7 ng/100 ml GnRH-A vs. surgically castrate 15 +/- 4.1 ng/100 ml. P = NS). However, unlike the chronic stimulatory effect on the pituitary at lower doses, very high dose therapy resulted in profound suppression of plasma and urine LH. Plasma levels fell to

  9. Effects of Gender, Body Weight, and Blood Glucose Dynamics on the Growth Hormone Response to the Glucagon Stimulation Test in Patients with Pituitary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Jessica R.; Utz, Andrea L.; Devin, Jessica K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Body weight blunts the growth hormone (GH) response to provocative stimuli. The appropriate GH cut-off to confirm GH deficiency in obese and overweight patients undergoing the glucagon stimulation test (GST) has recently been questioned. We hypothesized that the peak GH would be inversely related to the nadir blood glucose (BG) after glucagon and that this may be a mechanism influencing peak GH in overweight patients. This retrospective study examined effects of gender, body weight, and BG dynamics on GH response to GST in patients evaluated in our Pituitary Center. Design Adult patients who underwent GST from September 2009–2014 were included. Continuous variable comparisons were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U-test and categorical data by Fisher’s Exact Test. Spearman correlation was used to determine associations between continuous variables. Results 42 patients (N=28, 66.7% female) had sufficient data for analysis. Obese patients (N=26) had a reduced GH response, summarized as GH area under the curve (AUC) (p=0.03 vs. non-obese patients) and higher BG during GST, summarized as AUC (p<0.01 vs. non-obese patients). Obese women (N=19), in particular, stimulated lower (p=0.03 vs. non-obese women) and had a higher nadir BG (p=0.03 vs. non-obese women). While weight correlated with extent (rs=0.35; p=0.02) and timing (rs=0.31; p=0.05) of nadir BG reached, there was no significant correlation between BG dynamics and the GH response in the total population (N=42). Ten patients (7 with pan anterior hypopituitarism, defined as 3 anterior pituitary deficiencies) had a peak GH ≤ 0.1 ng/mL during GST. When these subjects with a negligible peak GH response were excluded from the analysis, weight was associated with GH AUC (rs= −0.45; p=0.01), peak GH response (rs= −0.42; p=0.02) and nadir BG (rs= 0.48; p<0.01). Furthermore, the nadir BG achieved during GST was inversely related to GH AUC (rs= −0.38; p=0.03) and peak GH (rs= −0.37; p=0.04) such that

  10. Contemporary issues in the evaluation and management of pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Pekic, S; Stojanovic, M; Popovic, V

    2015-12-01

    Pituitary adenomas are common benign monoclonal neoplasms accounting for about 15% of intracranial neoplasms. Data from postmortem studies and imaging studies suggest that 1 of 5 individuals in the general population may have pituitary adenoma. Some pituitary adenomas (mainly microadenomas which have a diameter of less than 1 cm) are exceedingly common and are incidentally diagnosed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed for an unrelated reason (headache, vertigo, head trauma). Most microadenomas remain clinically occult and stable in size, without an increase in tumor cells and without local mass effects. However, some pituitary adenomas grow slowly, enlarge by expansion and become demarcated from normal pituitary (macroadenomas have a diameter greater than 1 cm). They may be clinically silent or secrete anterior pituitary hormones in excess such as prolactin, growth hormone (GH), or adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) causing diseases like prolactinoma, acromegaly, Cushing's disease or rarely thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) or gonadotropins (LH, FSH). The incidence of the various subtypes of pituitary adenoma varies but the most common is prolactinoma. Clinically non-functioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs), which do not secrete hormones often cause local mass symptoms and represent one-third of pituitary adenomas. Given the high prevalence of pituitary adenomas and their heterogeneity (different tumor subtypes), it is critical that clinicians have a thorough understanding of the potential abnormalities in pituitary function and prognostic factors for behavior of pituitary adenomas in order to timely implement specific treatment modalities. Regarding pathogenesis of these tumors genetics, epigenetics and signaling pathways are the focus of current research yet our understanding of pituitary tumorigenesis remains incomplete. Although several genes and signaling pathways have been identified as important factors in the development of pituitary tumors, current

  11. Pituitary infarction

    MedlinePlus

    ... body's sex glands produce little or no hormones) Hypothyroidism (thyroid gland does not make enough thyroid hormone) ... other missing hormones are not replaced, symptoms of hypothyroidism and hypogonadism may develop. When to Contact a ...

  12. Pit-1/growth hormone factor 1 splice variant expression in the rhesus monkey pituitary gland and the rhesus and human placenta.

    PubMed

    Schanke, J T; Conwell, C M; Durning, M; Fisher, J M; Golos, T G

    1997-03-01

    We have examined the expression of Pit-1 messenger RNA (mRNA) splice variants in the nonhuman primate pituitary and in rhesus and human placenta. Full-length complementary DNAs (cDNAs) representing Pit-1 and the Pit-1 beta splice variants were cloned from a rhesus monkey pituitary cDNA library and were readily detectable by RT-PCR with rhesus pituitary gland RNA. The Pit-1T variant previously reported in mouse pituitary tumor cell lines was not detectable in normal rhesus pituitary tissue, although two novel splice variants were detected. A cDNA approximating the rat Pit-1 delta 4 variant was cloned but coded for a truncated and presumably nonfunctional protein. Only by using a nested RT-PCR approach were Pit-1 and Pit-1 beta variants consistently detectable in both human and rhesus placental tissue. The Pit-1 beta variant mRNA was not detectable in JEG-3 choriocarcinoma cells unless the cells were stimulated with 8-Br-cAMP. Immunoblot studies with nuclear extracts from primary rhesus syncytiotrophoblast cultures or JEG-3 choriocarcinoma cells indicated that although mRNA levels were very low, Pit-1 protein was detectable in differentiated cytotrophoblasts, and levels increased after treatment with 8-Br-cAMP. Two major species of Pit-1 protein were detected that corresponded to the two major bands in rat pituitary GH3 cell nuclear extracts. Low levels of slightly larger bands also were seen, which may represent Pit-1 beta protein or phosphorylated species. We conclude that Pit-1 splice variants expressed in the primate pituitary gland differ from those in the rodent gland and that the Pit-1 and Pit-1 beta mRNAs expressed in the placenta give rise to a pattern of protein expression similar to that seen in pituitary cells, which is inducible by treatment with 8-Br-cAMP.

  13. A case of pituitary abscess presenting without a source of infection or prior pituitary pathology

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Philip A

    2016-01-01

    Summary Pituitary abscess is a relatively uncommon cause of pituitary hormone deficiencies and/or a suprasellar mass. Risk factors for pituitary abscess include prior surgery, irradiation and/or pathology of the suprasellar region as well as underlying infections. We present the case of a 22-year-old female presenting with a spontaneous pituitary abscess in the absence of risk factors described previously. Her initial presentation included headache, bitemporal hemianopia, polyuria, polydipsia and amenorrhoea. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of her pituitary showed a suprasellar mass. As the patient did not have any risk factors for pituitary abscess or symptoms of infection, the diagnosis was not suspected preoperatively. She underwent transsphenoidal resection and purulent material was seen intraoperatively. Culture of the surgical specimen showed two species of alpha hemolytic Streptococcus, Staphylococcus capitis and Prevotella melaninogenica. Urine and blood cultures, dental radiographs and transthoracic echocardiogram failed to show any source of infection that could have caused the pituitary abscess. The patient was treated with 6weeks of oral metronidazole and intravenous vancomycin. After 6weeks of transsphenoidal resection and just after completion of antibiotic therapy, her headache and bitemporal hemianopsia resolved. However, nocturia and polydipsia from central diabetes insipidus and amenorrhoea from hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism persisted. Learning points Pituitary abscesses typically develop in patients who have other sources of infection or disruption of the normal suprasellar anatomy by either surgery, irradiation or pre-existing pathology; however, they can develop in the absence of known risk factors. Patients with pituitary abscesses typically complain of headache, visual changes and symptoms of pituitary hormone deficiencies. As other pituitary neoplasms present with similar clinical findings, the diagnosis of pituitary abscess is often not

  14. Region-specific expression and hormonal regulation of the first exon variants of rat prolactin receptor mRNA in rat brain and anterior pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Nogami, H; Hoshino, R; Ogasawara, K; Miyamoto, S; Hisano, S

    2007-08-01

    Recent studies have revealed the occurrence of five first exon variants of the rat prolactin receptor mRNA, suggesting that multiple promoters direct prolactin receptor transcription in response to different regulatory factors. In the present study, regional expression of these first exon variants, as well as two prolactin receptor subtypes generated by alternative splicing, was examined in the brains and anterior pituitary glands of female rats. Expression of the long-form was detected in the choroid plexus, hypothalamus, hippocampus, cerebral cortex and anterior pituitary gland, whereas the short form was detected only in the choroid plexus. E1-3 mRNA, a first exon variant, was detected in the choroid plexus, hypothalamus, and anterior pituitary gland, whereas E1-4 was detected only in the choroid plexus. Other variants were not detectable by the polymerase chain reaction protocol employed in this study. Ovariectomy increased the short form in the choroid plexus and the E1-3 expression in the choroid plexus and pituitary gland, but changes in the long-form and E1-4 expression were minimal. Replacement of oestrogens and prolactin suggest that oestrogens down-regulate E1-3 expression in the choroid plexus and pituitary gland, and that the negative effect of oestrogen is mediated by prolactin in the pituitary gland. The present results revealed the region-specific promoter usage in prolactin receptor mRNA transcription, as well as the involvement of oestrogens in the regulation of E1-3 mRNA expression in the brain and pituitary gland.

  15. Pituitary cretinism in two sisters.

    PubMed Central

    Kohno, H; Watanabe, N; Ootsuka, M; Kajiwara, M; Gohya, N

    1980-01-01

    Two sisters with cretinism are reported. Each showed low levels of serum triiodothyronine, thyroxine, and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). In the elder sister, serum TSH did not increase after administration of thyrotropin-releasing hormone. We conclude that cretinism in these 2 sisters was due to TSH deficiency. This is the second report of 'familial' pituitary cretinism (TSH-deficient congenital hypothyroidism). PMID:7436542

  16. The hypothalamic-pituitary axis in men and women with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Holley, Jean L

    2004-10-01

    Although the precise abnormalities that lead to failure of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in men and women with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) remains undefined, evidence exists for defects in both the hypothalamus and the pituitary. The lack of appropriate cyclic release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) by the hypothalamus leads to loss of normal pulsatile luteinizing hormone (LH) release by the pituitary, which results in impaired ovulation in women and reduced testosterone and sperm production in men. The cause of impaired cyclic release of GnRH is unclear, but hyperprolactinemia, elevated endorphins, and high levels of GnRH and LH caused by reduced clearance may contribute. Perturbations of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadaotropin axis in CKD lead to high rates of infertility, dysfunctional uterine bleeding, and impaired puberty in children. Only through additional study of the complex effects of CKD on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis will the precise abnormalities in hormonal control of reproduction be explained.

  17. The role of microRNAs in the pathogenesis of pituitary tumors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiu Juan; Xu, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary tumors, the most common intracranial tumors, lead to serious morbidity through the inappropriate secretion of pituitary hormones. The anomalous expression of microRNAs (miRNAs), which have a crucial status in the development and function of pituitary gland, promotes the tumorigenesis of hypothalamic-pituitary axis-related pituitary tumors. This mainly leads to alterations in the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and hypothalamic-pituitary-growth hormone. In the tumorigenesis of pituitary tumors, miRNAs have complex roles. They can induce cell cycle arrest, inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis via different pathways; however, they also promote the occurrence of pituitary tumors through direct interactions with transcription factors. This review summarizes recent progress in the study of miRNAs on the pathogenesis of pituitary tumors.

  18. Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Fridlyand, Leonid E.; Tamarina, Natalia A.; Schally, Andrew V.; Philipson, Louis H.

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) is produced by the hypothalamus and stimulates growth hormone synthesis and release in the anterior pituitary gland. In addition, GHRH is an important regulator of cellular functions in many cells and organs. Expression of GHRH G-Protein Coupled Receptor (GHRHR) has been demonstrated in different peripheral tissues and cell types, including pancreatic islets. Among the peripheral activities, recent studies demonstrate a novel ability of GHRH analogs to increase and preserve insulin secretion by beta-cells in isolated pancreatic islets, which makes them potentially useful for diabetes treatment. This review considers the role of GHRHR in the beta-cell and addresses the unique engineered GHRH agonists and antagonists for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We discuss the similarity of signaling pathways activated by GHRHR in pituitary somatotrophs and in pancreatic beta-cells and possible ways as to how the GHRHR pathway can interact with glucose and other secretagogues to stimulate insulin secretion. We also consider the hypothesis that novel GHRHR agonists can improve glucose metabolism in Type 2 diabetes by preserving the function and survival of pancreatic beta-cells. Wound healing and cardioprotective action with new GHRH agonists suggest that they may prove useful in ameliorating certain diabetic complications. These findings highlight the future potential therapeutic effectiveness of modulators of GHRHR activity for the development of new therapeutic approaches in diabetes and its complications. PMID:27777568

  19. Growth hormone stimulation test - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The growth hormone (GH) is a protein hormone released from the anterior pituitary gland under the control of the hypothalamus. ... performed on infants and children to identify human growth hormone (hGH) deficiency as a cause of growth retardation. ...

  20. Pituitary Apoplexy.

    PubMed

    Briet, Claire; Salenave, Sylvie; Bonneville, Jean-François; Laws, Edward R; Chanson, Philippe

    2015-12-01

    Pituitary apoplexy, a rare clinical syndrome secondary to abrupt hemorrhage or infarction, complicates 2%-12% of pituitary adenomas, especially nonfunctioning tumors. Headache of sudden and severe onset is the main symptom, sometimes associated with visual disturbances or ocular palsy. Signs of meningeal irritation or altered consciousness may complicate the diagnosis. Precipitating factors (increase in intracranial pressure, arterial hypertension, major surgery, anticoagulant therapy or dynamic testing, etc) may be identified. Corticotropic deficiency with adrenal insufficiency may be life threatening if left untreated. Computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging confirms the diagnosis by revealing a pituitary tumor with hemorrhagic and/or necrotic components. Formerly considered a neurosurgical emergency, pituitary apoplexy always used to be treated surgically. Nowadays, conservative management is increasingly used in selected patients (those without important visual acuity or field defects and with normal consciousness), because successive publications give converging evidence that a wait-and-see approach may also provide excellent outcomes in terms of oculomotor palsy, pituitary function and subsequent tumor growth. However, it must be kept in mind that studies comparing surgical approach and conservative management were retrospective and not controlled.

  1. Low and Normal IGF-1 Levels in Patients with Chronic Medical Disorders (CMD) is Independent of Anterior Pituitary Hormone Deficiencies: Implications for Treating IGF-1 Abnormal Deficiencies with CMD.

    PubMed

    Braverman, E; Oscar-Berman, M; Lohmann, R; Kennedy, R; Kerner, M; Dushaj, K; Blum, K

    2013-02-09

    Over time, based on evidence-based medicine, a number of hormonal test levels including IGF-1 had been raised or lowered to meet new criteria standards. In particular, IGF-1 plasma levels have been shown in several studies to be an independent diagnostic tool in Adult Growth Hormone Deficiency (AGHD). Many endocrinology studies link low IGF-1 plasma levels with low levels of other anterior pituitary hormones (i.e., LH, FSH, and TSH). Low IGF-1 is considered by most to be between 84-100 µ/l and numerous studies recommend that raising IGF-1 to high normal range reverses Chronic Medical Diseases (CMD), improves bone mineral density (BMD), and fibromyalgia. Moreover, some studies suggest that low levels of IGF-1 by itself independent of anterior pituitary deficiencies is sufficient to determine AGHD in humans. In order to determine the relationship of low IGF-1 with that of LH, FSH, and TSH levels in subjects with CMD, we evaluated these levels (± SD) in 944 patients. Patients with IGF-1 below 84 µ/l, 100 µ/l, and 150 µ/l were accessed. 9.22% had less than 84 µ/l (SD ± 12.52); 19.9% had less than 100 µ/l (SD ± 9.54); and 51.6 had less than 150 µ/l (SD ± 26.0). Specifically, the percentages found for low LH, FSH, and TSH were only 4.2%, 4.8%, and 6.5%. We conclude that IGF-1 deficiencies occur independent of comorbid deficiencies of LH, FSH, and TSH. Finally, we propose that based on the present investigation, IGF-1 low levels between the range of 84-100 µ/l may be too low to be considered as an independent diagnostic marker to treat AGHD with CMD.

  2. Low and Normal IGF-1 Levels in Patients with Chronic Medical Disorders (CMD) is Independent of Anterior Pituitary Hormone Deficiencies: Implications for Treating IGF-1 Abnormal Deficiencies with CMD

    PubMed Central

    Braverman, E; Oscar-Berman, M; Lohmann, R; Kennedy, R; Kerner, M; Dushaj, K; Blum, K

    2013-01-01

    Over time, based on evidence–based medicine, a number of hormonal test levels including IGF-1 had been raised or lowered to meet new criteria standards. In particular, IGF-1 plasma levels have been shown in several studies to be an independent diagnostic tool in Adult Growth Hormone Deficiency (AGHD). Many endocrinology studies link low IGF-1 plasma levels with low levels of other anterior pituitary hormones (i.e., LH, FSH, and TSH). Low IGF-1 is considered by most to be between 84–100 µ/l and numerous studies recommend that raising IGF-1 to high normal range reverses Chronic Medical Diseases (CMD), improves bone mineral density (BMD), and fibromyalgia. Moreover, some studies suggest that low levels of IGF-1 by itself independent of anterior pituitary deficiencies is sufficient to determine AGHD in humans. In order to determine the relationship of low IGF-1 with that of LH, FSH, and TSH levels in subjects with CMD, we evaluated these levels (± SD) in 944 patients. Patients with IGF-1 below 84 µ/l, 100 µ/l, and 150 µ/l were accessed. 9.22% had less than 84 µ/l (SD ± 12.52); 19.9% had less than 100 µ/l (SD ± 9.54); and 51.6 had less than 150 µ/l (SD ± 26.0). Specifically, the percentages found for low LH, FSH, and TSH were only 4.2%, 4.8%, and 6.5%. We conclude that IGF-1 deficiencies occur independent of comorbid deficiencies of LH, FSH, and TSH. Finally, we propose that based on the present investigation, IGF-1 low levels between the range of 84–100 µ/l may be too low to be considered as an independent diagnostic marker to treat AGHD with CMD. PMID:23616929

  3. Aryl‐hydrocarbon receptor activity modulates prolactin expression in the pituitary

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, Tyler B.; Brannick, Katherine E.; Raetzman, Lori T.

    2012-11-15

    Pituitary tumors account for 15% of intracranial neoplasms, however the extent to which environmental toxicants contribute to the proliferation and hormone expression of pituitary cells is unknown. Aryl-hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) interacting protein (AIP) loss of function mutations cause somatotrope and lactotrope adenomas in humans. AIP sequesters AhR and inhibits its transcriptional function. Because of the link between AIP and pituitary tumors, we hypothesize that exposure to dioxins, potent exogenous ligands for AhR that are persistent in the environment, may predispose to pituitary dysfunction through activation of AhR. In the present study, we examined the effect of AhR activation on proliferation and endogenous pituitary hormone expression in the GH3 rat somatolactotrope tumor cell line and the effect of loss of AhR action in knockout mice. GH3 cells respond to nM doses of the reversible AhR agonist β-naphthoflavone with a robust induction of Cyp1a1. Although mRNA levels of the anti-proliferative signaling cytokine TGFbeta1 are suppressed upon β-naphthoflavone treatment, we did not observe an alteration in cell proliferation. AhR activation with β-naphthoflavone suppresses Ahr expression and impairs expression of prolactin (PRL), but not growth hormone (GH) mRNA in GH3 cells. In mice, loss of Ahr similarly leads to a reduction in Prl mRNA at P3, while Gh is unaffected. Additionally, there is a significant reduction in pituitary hormones Lhb and Fshb in the absence of Ahr. Overall, these results demonstrate that AhR is important for pituitary hormone expression and suggest that environmental dioxins can exert endocrine disrupting effects at the pituitary. -- Highlights: ► AhR signaling suppresses Prl mRNA expression. ► AhR signaling does not influence pituitary proliferation in culture. ► AhR is necessary for Prl, Lhb and Fshb expression at postnatal day 3.

  4. Transcranial surgery for pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Youssef, A Samy; Agazzi, Siviero; van Loveren, Harry R

    2005-07-01

    Although the transsphenoidal approach is the preferred approach to the vast majority of pituitary tumors with or without suprasellar extension, the transcranial approach remains a vital part of the neurosurgical armamentarium for 1 to 4% of these tumors. The transcranial approach is effective when resection becomes necessary for a portion of a pituitary macroadenoma that is judged to be inaccessible from the transsphenoidal route because of isolation by a narrow waist at the diaphragma sellae, containment within the cavernous sinus lateral to the carotid artery, projection anteriorly onto the planum sphenoidale, or projection laterally into the middle fossa. The application of a transcranial approach in these circumstances may still be mitigated by response to prolactin inhibition of prolactinomas, the frequent lack of necessity to remove asymptomatic nonsecretory adenomas from the cavernous sinus, and the lack of evidence that sustained chemical cures can be reliably achieved by removal of secretory adenomas (adrenocorticotropic hormone, growth hormone) from the cavernous sinus. Cranial base surgical techniques have refined the surgical approach to pituitary adenomas but have had less effect on actual surgical indications than anticipated. Because application of the transcranial approach to pituitary adenomas is and should be rare in clinical practice, it is useful to standardize the technique to a default mode with which the surgical team is most experienced and, therefore, most comfortable. Our default mode for transcranial pituitary surgery is the frontotemporal-orbitozygomatic approach.

  5. Pituitary dysfunction after traumatic brain injury: are there definitive data in children?

    PubMed

    Casano-Sancho, Paula

    2016-11-21

    In the past decade, several studies in adults and children have described the risk of pituitary dysfunction after traumatic brain injury (TBI). As a result, an international consensus statement recommended follow-up on the survivors. This paper reviews published studies regarding hypopituitarism after TBI in children and compares their results. The prevalence of hypopituitarism ranges from 5% to 57%. Growth hormone (GH) and ACTH deficiency are the most common, followed by gonadotropins and thyroid-stimulating hormone. Paediatric studies have failed to identify risk factors for developing hypopituitarism, and therefore we have no tools to restrict screening in severe TBI. In addition, the present review highlights the lack of a unified follow-up and the fact that unrecognised pituitary dysfunction is frequent in paediatric population. The effect of hormonal replacement in patient recovery is important enough to consider baseline screening and reassessment between 6 and 12 months after TBI. Medical community should be aware of the risk of pituitary dysfunction in these patients, given the high prevalence of endocrine dysfunction already reported in the studies. Longer prospective studies are needed to uncover the natural course of pituitary dysfunction, and new studies should be designed to test the benefit of hormonal replacement in metabolic, cognitive and functional outcome in these patients.

  6. Regulation of LH/FSH expression by secretoglobin 3A2 in the mouse pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Miyano, Yuki; Tahara, Shigeyuki; Sakata, Ichiro; Sakai, Takafumi; Abe, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Shioko; Kurotani, Reiko

    2014-04-01

    Secretoglobin (SCGB) 3A2 was originally identified as a downstream target for the homeodomain transcription factor NKX2-1 in the lung. NKX2-1 plays a role in the genesis and expression of genes in the thyroid, lung and ventral forebrain; Nkx2-1-null mice have no thyroid and pituitary and severely hypoplastic lungs and hypothalamus. To demonstrate whether SCGB3A2 plays any role in pituitary hormone production, NKX2-1 and SCGB3A2 expression in the mouse pituitary gland was examined by immunohistochemical analysis and RT-PCR. NKX2-1 was localized in the posterior pituitary lobe, whereas SCGB3A2 was observed in both anterior and posterior lobes as shown by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Expression of CCAAT-enhancer binding proteins (C/EBPs), which regulate mouse Scgb3a2 transcription, was also examined by RT-PCR. C/EBPβ, γ, δ and ζ were expressed in the adult mouse pituitary gland. SCGB3A2 was expressed in the anterior and posterior lobes from postnatal days 1 and 5, respectively and the areas where SCGB3A2 expression was found coincided with the area where FSH-secreting cells were found. Double-staining for SCGB3A2 and pituitary hormones revealed that SCGB3A2 was mainly localized in gonadotrophs in 49 % of FSH-secreting cells and 47 % of LH-secreting cells. In addition, SCGB3A2 dramatically inhibited LH and FSH mRNA expression in rat pituitary primary cell cultures. These results suggest that SCGB3A2 regulates FSH/LH production in the anterior pituitary lobe and that transcription factors other than NKX2-1 may regulate SCGB3A2 expression.

  7. Pituitary cell differentiation from stem cells and other cells: toward restorative therapy for hypopituitarism?

    PubMed

    Willems, Christophe; Vankelecom, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    The pituitary gland, key regulator of our endocrine system, produces multiple hormones that steer essential physiological processes. Hence, deficient pituitary function (hypopituitarism) leads to severe disorders. Hypopituitarism can be caused by defective embryonic development, or by damage through tumor growth/resection and traumatic brain injury. Lifelong hormone replacement is needed but associated with significant side effects. It would be more desirable to restore pituitary tissue and function. Recently, we showed that the adult (mouse) pituitary holds regenerative capacity in which local stem cells are involved. Repair of deficient pituitary may therefore be achieved by activating these resident stem cells. Alternatively, pituitary dysfunction may be mended by cell (replacement) therapy. The hormonal cells to be transplanted could be obtained by (trans-)differentiating various kinds of stem cells or other cells. Here, we summarize the studies on pituitary cell regeneration and on (trans-)differentiation toward hormonal cells, and speculate on restorative therapies for pituitary deficiency.

  8. The pituitary - Aging and spaceflown rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.; Grindeland, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Decrements in growth hormone (GH) release we observed in two spaceflight experiments and four tail-suspended rat studies mimic age-associated changes in the mammalian pituitary GH system seen by Meites and others. The spaceflight data suggest that formation of high molecular weight bioactive disulfide-linked aggregates of the 20 and 22K monomeric GH forms may be reduced in microgravity, thereby, reducing target tissue activity. Correlative studies to confirm spaceflight as a model for pituitary GH system aging should include: (1) investigation of mechanisms of intracellular hormone packaging, (2) consequences to biological activity of the hormone molecule, and (3) study of intracellular microtubule dynamics.

  9. Adverse effects of BDE-47 on in vivo developmental parameters, thyroid hormones, and expression of hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis genes in larvae of the self-fertilizing fish Kryptolebias marmoratus.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hye-Min; Lee, Young Hwan; Kim, Bo-Mi; Kim, Il-Chan; Jeong, Chang-Bum; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2017-02-20

    2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenylether (BDE-47) is known to have the potential to disrupt the thyroid endocrine system in fishes due to its structural similarity to the thyroid hormones triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4). However, the effects of BDE-47 on thyroid function in fishes remain unclear. In this study, abnormal development (e.g. deformity, hemorrhaging) and an imbalance in thyroid hormone (TH) homeostasis was shown in the early developmental stages of the mangrove killifish Kryptolebias marmoratus in response to BDE-47 exposure. To examine the thyroid endocrinal effect of BDE-47 exposure in mangrove killifish K. marmoratus larvae, transcript levels of genes involved in TH homeostasis and hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis-related genes were measured. The expression of thyroid hormone metabolism-related genes (e.g. deiodinases, UGT1ab) and HPT axis-related genes was up-regulated and there were significant changes in TH levels (P < 0.05) in response to BDE-47 exposure. This study provides insights into the regulation of TH homeostasis at the transcriptional level and provides a better understanding on the potential impacts of BDE-47 on the thyroid endocrine system of fishes.

  10. Comparative gene expression of gonadotropins (FSH and LH) and peptide levels of gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRHs) in the pituitary of wild and cultured Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) broodstocks.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, J M; Rubio, M; Ortiz-Delgado, J B; Klenke, U; Kight, K; Cross, I; Sánchez-Ramos, I; Riaza, A; Rebordinos, L; Sarasquete, C; Zohar, Y; Mañanós, E L

    2009-07-01

    The Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) is a valuable flatfish for aquaculture, but it presents important reproductive problems in captivity. Spawning is achieved by wild-caught breeders but cultured broodstocks fail to spawn spontaneously and, when they do, eggs are unfertilized. To gain knowledge on the physiological basis underlying this reproductive dysfunction, this study aimed at analyzing comparative hormone levels between wild and cultured broodstocks at the spawning season. The Senegalese sole gonadotropin (GTH) subunits, FSHbeta, LHbeta and GPalpha, were cloned and qualitative (in situ hybridization) and quantitative (real-time PCR) assays developed to analyze pituitary GTH gene expression. In females, FSHbeta and GPalpha mRNA levels were higher in wild than in cultured broodstocks, whereas in males all three subunits were highest in cultured. By ELISA, three GnRH forms were detected in the pituitary, displaying a relative abundance of GnRH2>GnRH1>GnRH3. All GnRHs were slightly more abundant in wild than cultured females, whereas no differences were observed in males. Plasma levels of vitellogenin and sex steroids were also analyzed. Results showed endocrine differences between wild and cultured broodstocks at the spawning period, which could be related to the endocrine failure of the reproductive axis in cultured breeders.

  11. Localization of amylin-like immunoreactivity in melanocyte-stimulating hormone-containing cells of the pars intermedia but not those of the pars distalis in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) pituitary.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hirohumi; Yamamoto, Toshiharu

    2016-04-01

    Immunohistochemical techniques were employed to investigate the distribution of amylin-like immunoreactivity in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) pituitary. Amylin-immunoreactive cells were observed in the pars intermedia, and these cells were found to be immunoreactive for α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (αMSH) as well. In contrast, αMSH-immunoreactive cells in the pars distalis were immuno-negaitive for amylin. These light microscopic findings were confirmed by immunoelectron microscopy. Amylin-immunoreactive signals were located on the haloes of presumable secretory granules in association with αMSH-immunoreactive signals in the amylin-positive cells. However, in the pars distalis, the αMSH-positive cells did not contain amylin-immunoreactive secretory granules. Western blot analysis of axolotl pituitary extracts revealed the labeling of a protein band at approximately 10.5-kDa by the anti-rat amylin serum, which was not labeled by the anti-αMSH antibody. These findings indicate that amylin secreted from MSH-producing cells in the pars intermedia may modulate MSH secretion in an autocrine fashion and may participate in MSH functions such as fatty homeostasis together with MSH.

  12. Localization of carboxyl ester lipase in human pituitary gland and pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    La Rosa, Stefano; Vigetti, Davide; Placidi, Claudia; Finzi, Giovanna; Uccella, Silvia; Clerici, Moira; Bartolini, Barbara; Carnevali, Ileana; Losa, Marco; Capella, Carlo

    2010-10-01

    Carboxyl ester lipase (CEL) is an enzyme that hydrolyzes a wide variety of lipid substrates, including ceramides, which are known to show inhibitory regulation of pituitary hormone secretion in experimental models. Because no studies on CEL expression in human pituitary and pituitary adenomas have been reported in the literature, we investigated CEL expression in 10 normal pituitary glands and 86 well-characterized pituitary adenomas [12 FSH/LH cell, 17 α-subunit/null cell, 6 TSH cell, 21 ACTH cell, 11 prolactin (PRL) cell, and 19 GH cell adenomas] using IHC, immunoelectron microscopy, Western blotting, and quantitative RT-PCR. In normal adenohypophysis, CEL was localized in GH, ACTH, and TSH cells. In adenomas, it was mainly found in functioning GH, ACTH, and TSH tumors, whereas its expression was poor in the corresponding silent adenomas and was lacking in FSH/LH cell, null cell, and PRL cell adenomas. Ultrastructurally, CEL was localized in secretory granules close to their membranes. This is the first study demonstrating CEL expression in normal human pituitary glands and in functioning GH, ACTH, and TSH adenomas. Considering that CEL hydrolyzes ceramides, inactivating their inhibitory function on pituitary hormone secretion, our findings suggest a possible role of CEL in the regulation of hormone secretion in both normal and adenomatous pituitary cells.

  13. Corticotropin releasing factor stimulates cAMP formation in pituitary corticotropic tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Parenti, M.; Cantalamessa, L.; Catania, A.; Reschini, E.; Mueller, E.E.

    1984-01-23

    Addition of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) to membranes from two ACTH-secreting pituitary tumors strikingly increased in a dose-dependent fashion adenylate cyclase (AC) activity. Stimulation of AC activity by CRF in membranes from non-tumoral tissue adjacent to tumoral corticotrophs was considerably lower, and was lacking in membranes from a growth hormone secreting tumor. These data correlated well with in vivo pre-surgery and post-surgery ACTH responsiveness to CRF of the tumor bearing patients. Basal AC activity was higher in pituitary adenomas than in non-tumoral adjacent tissue.

  14. Delayed puberty due to pituitary stalk dysgenesis and ectopic neurohypophysis.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hye Jin; Choi, Kyung Mook; Ryu, Ohk Hyun; Suh, Sang Il; Kim, Nan Hee; Baik, Sei Hyun; Choi, Dong Seop

    2006-03-01

    Hypopituitarism is not a common cause of delayed puberty. A 22 year old man was referred to our clinic because of the absence of the development of secondary sexual characteristics. The patient had no complaints of physical discomfort. Random serum testosterone and luteinizing hormone level were obtained and found to be low. The combined pituitary function stimulation test revealed a partial hypopituitarism. A pituitary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was obtained and showed decreased pituitary stalk enhancement and ectopic neurohypophysis. Therefore, we conclude that the delayed puberty was a result of hypopituitarism due to pituitary stalk dysgenesis and ectopic neurohypophysis. The patient was started on hormone replacement therapy and gradually developed secondary sexual characteristics.

  15. Pituitary null cell adenoma in a domestic llama (Lama glama).

    PubMed

    Chalkley, M D; Kiupel, M; Draper, A C E

    2014-07-01

    Pituitary gland neoplasia has been reported rarely in camelids. A 12-year-old neutered male llama (Lama glama) presented with lethargy, inappetence and neurological signs. On physical examination, the llama was mentally dull and exhibited compulsive pacing and circling to the left. Complete blood count and serum biochemistry revealed haemoconcentration, mild hypophosphataemia, hyperglycaemia, hypercreatininaemia and hyperalbuminaemia. Humane destruction was elected due to rapid clinical deterioration and poor prognosis. Post-mortem examination revealed a pituitary macroadenoma and bilateral internal hydrocephalus. Microscopically, the pituitary tumour was composed of neoplastic chromophobic pituitary cells. Ultrastructural studies revealed similar neoplastic cells to those previously described in human null cell adenomas. Immunohistochemically, the neoplastic cells were strongly immunoreactive for neuroendocrine markers (synaptophysin and chromogranin A), but did not exhibit immunoreactivity for epithelial, mesenchymal, neuronal and all major pituitary hormone markers (adrenocorticotropic hormone, follicle stimulating hormone, growth hormone, luteinizing hormone, melanocyte-stimulating hormone, prolactin and thyroid stimulating hormone), consistent with the diagnosis of a pituitary null cell adenoma. This is the first report of pituitary neoplasia in a llama.

  16. Use of the metallothionein promoter-human growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) mouse to identify regulatory pathways that suppress pituitary somatotrope hyperplasia and adenoma formation due to GHRH-receptor hyperactivation.

    PubMed

    Luque, Raul M; Soares, Beatriz S; Peng, Xiao-ding; Krishnan, Sonia; Cordoba-Chacon, Jose; Frohman, Lawrence A; Kineman, Rhonda D

    2009-07-01

    Hyperactivation of the GHRH receptor or downstream signaling components is associated with hyperplasia of the pituitary somatotrope population, in which adenomas form relatively late in life, with less than 100% penetrance. Hyperplastic and adenomatous pituitaries of metallothionein promoter-human GHRH transgenic (Tg) mice (4 and > 10 months, respectively) were used to identify mechanisms that may prevent or delay adenoma formation in the presence of excess GHRH. In hyperplastic pituitaries, expression of the late G(1)/G(2) marker Ki67 increased, whereas the proportion of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-labeled cells (S phase marker) did not differ from age-matched controls. These results indicate cell cycle progression is blocked, with further evidence suggesting that enhanced p27 activity may contribute to this process. For adenomas, formation was associated with loss of p27 activity (nuclear localization and mRNA). Increased endogenous somatostatin (SST) tone may also slow the conversion from hyperplastic to adenomatous state because mRNA levels for SST receptors, sst2 and sst5, were elevated in hyperplastic pituitaries, whereas adenomas were associated with a decline in sst1 and sst5 mRNA. Also, SST-knockout Tg pituitaries were larger and adenomas formed earlier compared with those of SST-intact Tg mice. Unexpectedly, these changes were independent of changes in proliferation rate within the hyperplastic tissue, suggesting that endogenous SST controls GHRH-induced adenoma formation primarily via modulation of apoptotic and/or cellular senescence pathways, consistent with the predicted function of some of the most differentially expressed genes (Casp1, MAP2K1, TNFR2) identified by membrane arrays and confirmed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR.

  17. Stem cells in the canine pituitary gland and in pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    van Rijn, Sarah J; Tryfonidou, Marianna A; Hanson, Jeanette M; Penning, Louis C; Meij, Björn P

    2013-12-01

    Cushing's disease (CD) or pituitary-dependent hypercortisolism is a common endocrinopathy in dogs, with an estimated prevalence of 1 or 2 in 1000 dogs per year. It is caused by an adrenocorticotropic hormone secreting adenoma in the pars distalis or pars intermedia of the pituitary gland. The pituitary gland is a small endocrine gland located in the pituitary fossa. In the postnatal individual, the hypothalamus-pituitary axis plays a central role in maintaining homeostatic functions, like control of metabolism, reproduction, and growth. Stem cells are suggested to play a role in the homeostatic adaptations of the adult pituitary gland, such as the rapid specific cell-type expansion in response to pregnancy or lactation. Several cell populations have been suggested as pituitary stem cells, such as Side Population cells and cells expressing Sox2 or Nestin. These cell populations are discussed in this review. Also, stem and progenitor cells are thought to play a role in pituitary tumorigenesis, such as the development of pituitary adenomas in dogs. There are limited reports on the role of stem cells in pituitary adenomas, especially in dogs. Further studies are needed to identify and characterize this cell population and to develop specific cell targeting therapeutic strategies as a new way of treating canine CD.

  18. Cytomorphology of metastatic pituitary carcinoma to the bone.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Christopher M; Lin, Xiaoqi

    2017-03-07

    Metastatic pituitary carcinoma to bone is rare. In this report, we present a case of a 59-year-old female with recurrent pituitary adenoma of the sparsely granulated somatotroph subtype with metastasis to a few bony sites 10 years later. Needle core biopsy (NCB) with touch preparations was performed on a 5 mm lesion in left ilium. Diff-Quik stained NCB touch preparation slides showed a few loosely cohesive epithelial polygonal cells that were arranged in nests or acini, or singly, had scant vacuolated cytoplasm and eccentrically located round nuclei (plasmacytoid) with slight nuclear pleomorphism, fine granular chromatin, conspicuous nucleoli, and smooth nuclear membrane. Trilineage hematopoietic cells of bone marrow were also appreciated in the background. H&E stained core sections showed fragments of bone and bone marrow with nests of bland epithelial cells with similar cytomorphology as seen in NCB touch preparation slides. The tumor cells were immunoreactive for juxtanuclear dot-like staining of pan-cytokeratin (CAM 5.2 and AE1/AE3) (a specific feature), neuroendocrine markers (CD56, synaptophysin, and chromogranin. Additionally, scattered cells were immunoreactive for growth hormone. Molecular test showed that tumor cells were negative for the promoter methylation of O-6-Methylguanine-DNA Methyltransferase (MGMT). Final diagnosis of metastatic pituitary carcinoma was rendered. Morphology of metastatic pituitary carcinoma, its differential, clinical presentation and treatment were discussed. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Three-dimensional magnetic resonance volumetry of the pituitary gland is effective in detecting short stature in children.

    PubMed

    Han, Xue; Xiu, Jianjun; Huang, Zhaoqin; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Zhonghe; Dong, Yin; Yuan, Xianshun; Liu, Qingwei

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to obtain standard reference values for the pituitary gland volumes of healthy children and to analyze the potential diagnostic values of pituitary gland volumetry for growth hormone deficiency (GHD) and idiopathic short stature (ISS). The volume of the pituitary gland was measured using a thin-section three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence of magnetization-prepared rapid gradient echo imaging with a section thickness of 1 mm. A group of 75 healthy children aged between 1 and 19 years were recruited to obtain normal volumetry values of the pituitary gland. These individuals demonstrated no evidence of abnormalities to the central nervous or endocrine systems prior to the study. An additional group of 55 children with GHD (n=32) or ISS (n=23) aged between 0 and 14 years were included in the measurement of pituitary gland volume and height. The Student's t-test was used to evaluate the repetition test, while Pearson's correlation coefficient and regression analyses were performed to examine the correlations between the volume and height of the pituitary glands. Pituitary gland volume and height demonstrated an increasing trend with age in the healthy children. In addition, the pituitary gland volume exhibited a growth spurt in the early teenage years (10-14 years-old), which was more prominent in females. The growth spurt was not observed for pituitary gland height. When compared with the healthy children, 65.6% of the children with GHD and 34.8% of the children with ISS had smaller pituitary gland volumes. Similarly, 37.5% of the children with GHD and 26.1% of the children with ISS had a smaller pituitary gland height compared with the healthy children. The pituitary gland volume performed significantly better compared with height with regard to the detection rate. Therefore, the results indicated that 3D MRI volumetry was useful for understanding the developmental characteristics of the pituitary gland in

  20. Preoperative hyponatremia as a clinical characteristic in elderly patients with large pituitary tumor.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa, S; Yokoyama, T; Yokota, N; Ohta, S

    2000-05-01

    This study investigated the pathophysiology of preoperative hyponatremia in elderly patients with a large pituitary tumor. The tumor size, initial symptoms, and preoperative pituitary hormonal function were analyzed in 96 patients, consisting of 82 younger than 70 years old (mean age 49.7 years) and 14 older than 70 years old (mean age 72.0 years). There was no difference in tumor size between the two age groups. The initial symptom of all younger patients was visual disturbance. Preoperative hormonal evaluations revealed subclinical panhypopituitarism in four patients (4.9%). Five of the 14 older patients had severe hyponatremia (107-117 mEq/l) based on panhypopituitarism, and four of these five patients showed consciousness disturbance as the initial symptom, initiated by physical and/or psychological stress, or occurrence of intratumoral hemorrhage. Preoperative subclinical panhypopituitarism was found in another patient. The overall occurrence rate of preoperative panhypopituitarism in the older patients was 42.9%. The difference in the frequency of preoperative panhypopituitarism was statistically significant between the two groups. Preoperative severe hyponatremia associated with a large pituitary tumor is characteristic of elderly patients. The number of receptors for adrenocorticotropic hormone in the adrenal cortex decreases during the aging process. Additional physical and/or psychological stress prompts pituitary dysfunction in such patients, causing the manifestation of acute symptoms of adrenal insufficiency based on panhypopituitarism. Primary care using high dose hydrocortisone and electrolyte fluid is critical.

  1. Stages of Pituitary Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumors that may spread to bones of the skull or the sinus cavity below the pituitary gland. ... sella (the bone at the base of the skull , where the pituitary gland sits). Recurrent Pituitary Tumors ...

  2. What Are Pituitary Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... testicles. Prolactin causes milk production in the female breast. Its function in men is not known. Posterior pituitary The smaller, back part of the pituitary gland, known as the posterior pituitary, is really an ...

  3. Quantitative evaluation of indium-111 (In-111) octreotide pituitary activity: Comparison in patient with and without pituitary tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, P.; Waxman, A.; Nguyen, K.

    1995-05-01

    Indium 111 Octreotide is known to detect pituitary tumors. Variable low level pituitary activity has been reported in pts. with no demonstrable pituitary tumors. To our knowledge, there have been no studies which quantitatively categorize pituitary activity with respect to distinguishing normal subject from pts. with pituitary tumors. 13 pts. with proven, treated acromegaly were included, as well as 15 pts. with no history of pituitary disorder. Both groups underwent SPECT In-111 scintigraphy 24 hours post-injection Average count per pixel ratios were obtained for the pituitary/calvarium (P/C) and pituitary/brain (P/B) regions. 10 pts. with acromegaly underwent growth hormone (GH) measurements 2 hours post-glucose load. Statistical correlation between growth hormone levels using P/C and P/B ratios were obtained. P/C ratios, as well as P/B ratios demonstrated high correlation with serum GH levels correlation coefficient(r)= .717 for P/C p<0.05, and correlation coefficient(r) = 0.828 for P/B ratios p<0.005. P/C ratios and P/B ratios for controls correlated closely with the upper level of normal predicted by P/C or P/B ratios as a function of serum growth hormone found in patients with acromegaly. Somatostatin receptor SPECT scintigraphy of the pituitary and appropriate quantitation can predict patients with growth hormone secreting tumors.

  4. The Effects of Smoked Nicotine on Measures of Subjective states and Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Hormones in Women during the Follicular and Luteal Phases of the Menstrual Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Goletiani, Nathalie V.; Siegel, Arthur J.; Lukas, Scott E.; Hudson, James I.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the acute effects of cigarette smoking on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) hormones and subjective states as a function of the menstrual cycle in nicotine-dependent women. Methods Seventeen healthy nicotine-dependent women were studied during the follicular and/or luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Due to observation of a possible bimodal distribution of progesterone levels within the luteal phase group, we performed a set of a posteriori analyses. Therefore, we divided the luteal group into a low progesterone and a high progesterone groups. Results Smoked nicotine activated HPA, measured by ACTH, cortisol, and DHEA response and affected subjective states in both follicular and luteal phases, with increased “High”, “Rush”, and decreased “Craving”. The HPA stimulation revealed a blunting of ACTH response. There was only modest evidence for a blunting of subjective state responses in the luteal phase. However upon post hoc analyses, the high progesterone luteal group showed a marked blunting of measures of subjective states and a blunted ACTH response. Examining the association between hormone and measures of subjective states revealed tentative associations of ACTH stimulation with increased “Rush” and “Craving”, and DHEA stimulation with increased “Craving”. Conclusions This pilot study suggests that menstrual cycle phase differences in progesterone levels may attenuate nicotine’s addictive effects via diminution of its reinforcing properties, and augmentation of its aversive effects interfering with the pleasure associated with cigarette smoking. PMID:25783522

  5. Nesfatin-1 regulates the hypothalamo-pituitary-ovarian axis of fish.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Ronald; Shepperd, Erin; Thiruppugazh, Vetri; Lohan, Sneha; Grey, Caleb L; Chang, John P; Unniappan, Suraj

    2012-10-01

    Nesfatin-1 is an anorexigen in goldfish. In the present study, we provide novel data indicating the presence and regulatory effects of nesfatin-1 on the hypothalamo-pituitary-ovarian (HPO) axis of goldfish. Nucleobindin-2 (NUCB2)/nesfatin-1-like immunoreactive (ir) cells are present in the hypothalamus and in the pituitary, suggesting a hypophysiotropic role for nesfatin-1. NUCB2/nesfatin-1-like ir cells colocalize gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in the nucleus lateralis tuberis posterioris and the nucleus anterior tuberis of the goldfish hypothalamus. The presence of nesfatin-1 with GnRH in these two nuclei implicated in pituitary hormone release suggests a role for nesfatin-1 on gonadotropin secretion. A single i.p. injection of synthetic goldfish nesfatin-1 (50 ng/g body wt) resulted in an acute decrease (∼75%) in the expression of hypothalamic chicken GnRH-II and salmon GnRH mRNAs at 15 min postinjection in goldfish. Meanwhile, pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH) beta and follicle-stimulating hormone beta mRNAs were also inhibited (∼80%), but only at 60 min postinjection. Nesfatin-1 administration also resulted in a significant reduction (∼60%) in serum LH levels at 60 min postadministration. Nesfatin-1-like immunoreactivity was also found in the follicle cells, but not the oocytes, in zebrafish and goldfish ovaries. Incubation of zebrafish follicles with nesfatin-1 resulted in a significant reduction in basal germinal vesicle breakdown (∼50%) during the oocyte maturation. In addition, nesfatin-1 also attenuated the stimulatory effects of maturation-inducing hormone on germinal vesicle breakdown. Together, the current results indicate that nesfatin-1 is a metabolic hormone with an inhibitory tone on fish reproduction. Nesfatin-1 appears to elicit this suppressive effect through actions on all three tissues in the fish HPO axis.

  6. Dioxin-induced retardation of development through a reduction in the expression of pituitary hormones and possible involvement of an aryl hydrocarbon receptor in this defect: A comparative study using two strains of mice with different sensitivities to dioxin

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Tomoki; Taura, Junki; Hattori, Yukiko; Ishii, Yuji; Yamada, Hideyuki

    2014-08-01

    We have previously revealed that treating pregnant rats with 2,3,7,8-tetracholorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) reduces the expression of gonadotropins and growth hormone (GH) in the fetal and neonatal pituitary. A change in gonadotropin expression impairs the testicular expression of steroidogenic proteins in perinatal pups, and imprint defects in sexual behavior after reaching maturity. In this study, we examined whether TCDD also affects the expression of gonadotropin and GH in mice using C57BL/6J and DBA/2J strains which express the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr) exhibiting a different affinity for TCDD. When pregnant C57BL/6J mice at gestational day (GD) 12 were given oral TCDD (0.2–20 μg/kg), all doses significantly attenuated the pituitary expression of gonadotropin mRNAs in fetuses at GD18. On the other hand, in DBA/2J mice, a much higher dose of TCDD (20 μg/kg) was needed to produce a significant attenuation. Such reduction in the C57BL/6J strain continued until at least postnatal day (PND) 4. In agreement with this, TCDD reduced the testicular expression of steroidogenic proteins in C57BL/6J neonates at PND2 and 4, although the same did not occur in the fetal testis and ovary. Furthermore, TCDD reduced the perinatal expression of GH, litter size and the body weight of newborn pups only in the C57BL/6J strain. These results suggest that 1) also in mice, maternal exposure to TCDD attenuates gonadotropin-regulated steroidogenesis and GH expression leading to the impairment of pup development and sexual immaturity; and 2) Ahr activation during the late fetal and early postnatal stages is required for these defects. - Highlights: • The effect of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on mouse growth was studied. • TCDD reduced the levels of luteinizing hormone and growth hormone in perinatal pups. • Maternal exposure to TCDD also attenuated testicular steroidogenesis in pups. • The above effects of TCDD were more pronounced in C57BL/6J than in DBA/2J

  7. Pituitary gland

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... women; stimulates sperm production in men Prolactin - stimulates breast tissue in nursing mothers to produce milk ACTH (adrenocorticotropic hormone) - causes the adrenal glands to produce important substances that have properties similar ...

  8. Effects of zinc deficiency on pituitary somatotrophs

    SciTech Connect

    Focht, S.; Fosmire, G.; Hymer, W.C. )

    1991-03-15

    To test whether the growth retardation that accompanies zinc deficiency may involve a direct effect of zinc on pituitary, rats were divided into three groups and fed a Zn deficient diet for 10 days. On day 10 rats were anesthetized and blood, femurs, and pituitaries were collected. Pituitaries from each group were either enzymatically dissociated into individual cells or homogenized and centrifuged into three fractions. Growth retardation was evidenced by decreased body weights and narrower epiphyseal widths in PF and ZD rats. Pituitary weights were also lower in PF and ZD rats. Pituitary zinc per unit tended to be highest in PF and lowest in ZD rats, although this trend was significant only for the 250g pellet fraction. Total cell counts from dissociated pituitaries tended to be highest for AL and lowest for ZD rats. Total growth hormone (HGH) per pituitary also followed this trend, although the amount of GH per somatotroph did not buffer between groups. Interestingly, GH released from dissociated pituitary cells cultured in defined media for 3 days was twice as great from ZD vs PF, AL being intermediate. Serum GH levels did not differ between groups although the trend was ZD > PF >AL.

  9. Thyrotropin secreting pituitary adenoma accompanying a silent somatotropinoma.

    PubMed

    Berker, Dilek; Isik, Serhat; Aydin, Yusuf; Tutuncu, Yasemin; Akdemir, Gokhan; Ozcan, Hatice Nursun; Guler, Serdar

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) secreting pituitary adenomas are rare tumors manifested as hyperthyroidism with goiter in the presence of elevated TSH. We present a case with pituitary adenoma secreting both TSH and growth hormone (GH) with the prominent clinical findings of hyperthyroidism but without clinical findings of acromegaly. Pituitary magnetic resonance imaging revealed a macroadenoma. Transsphenoidal surgery was performed twice. The immunohistochemical staining showed that tumor cells were strongly reactive to GH and relatively mildly reactive to TSH. Control pituitary imaging revealed a residual macroadenoma, and long acting octreotide treatment was administered. After two years of the treatment, tumor size remained the same while thyroid function tests and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I) values returned to normal ranges. In conclusion, we always recommend hormonal examinations for all patients who have pituitary adenoma without signs and symptoms of acromegaly.

  10. A primer on pituitary injury for the obstetrician gynecologist: Simmond's disease, Sheehan's Syndrome, traumatic injury, Dahan's Syndrome, pituitary apoplexy and lymphocytic hypophysitis.

    PubMed

    Dahan, Michael H; Tan, Seang L

    2017-04-01

    The pituitary gland plays a critical role in reproduction. In response to the hypothalamus the anterior pituitary secretes prolactin, thyroid-stimulating hormone, adreno-corticotropic hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone and growth hormone. Dysregulation in these hormones often lead to reproductive failure. Multiple mechanisms of pituitary injury exist. Simmond's disease is atrophy or destruction of the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland resulting in hypopituitarism. Sheehan's syndrome is post-partum pituitary injury due to massive hemorrhage. Traumatic injury resulting in hemorrhage in a non-pregnancy state can also cause partial or complete pituitary failure. Dahan's syndrome is pituitary injury due to severe vasospasm, without significant hemorrhage. Pituitary apoplexy is infarction of a pituitary adenoma and intra-mass hemorrhage with result injury to hormone production by the gland. Lymphocytic infiltration is the most common cause of hypophysitis and the mechanism is often unknown, although it may be autoimmune-related. The mechanism and treatments of each of these pathologies will be discussed in a context of reproduction.

  11. Gamma Knife radiosurgery in pituitary adenomas: Why, who, and how to treat?

    PubMed

    Castinetti, Frederic; Brue, Thierry

    2010-08-01

    Pituitary adenomas are benign tumors that can be either secreting (acromegaly, Cushing's disease, prolactinomas) or non-secreting. Transsphenoidal neurosurgery is the gold standard treatment; however, it is not always effective. Gamma Knife radiosurgery is a specific modality of stereotactic radiosurgery, a precise radiation technique. Several studies reported the efficacy and low risk of adverse effects induced by this technique: in secreting pituitary adenomas, hypersecretion is controlled in about 50% of cases and tumor volume is stabilized or decreased in 80-90% of cases, making Gamma Knife a valuable adjunctive or first-line treatment. As hormone levels decrease progressively, the main drawback is the longer time to remission (12-60 months), requiring an additional treatment during this period. Hypopituitarism is the main side effect, observed in 20-40% cases. Gamma Knife is thus useful in the therapeutic algorithms of pituitary adenomas in well-defined indications, mainly low secreting small lesions well identified on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

  12. Dioxin-induced retardation of development through a reduction in the expression of pituitary hormones and possible involvement of an aryl hydrocarbon receptor in this defect: a comparative study using two strains of mice with different sensitivities to dioxin.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Tomoki; Taura, Junki; Hattori, Yukiko; Ishii, Yuji; Yamada, Hideyuki

    2014-08-01

    We have previously revealed that treating pregnant rats with 2,3,7,8-tetracholorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) reduces the expression of gonadotropins and growth hormone (GH) in the fetal and neonatal pituitary. A change in gonadotropin expression impairs the testicular expression of steroidogenic proteins in perinatal pups, and imprint defects in sexual behavior after reaching maturity. In this study, we examined whether TCDD also affects the expression of gonadotropin and GH in mice using C57BL/6J and DBA/2J strains which express the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr) exhibiting a different affinity for TCDD. When pregnant C57BL/6J mice at gestational day (GD) 12 were given oral TCDD (0.2-20 μg/kg), all doses significantly attenuated the pituitary expression of gonadotropin mRNAs in fetuses at GD18. On the other hand, in DBA/2J mice, a much higher dose of TCDD (20 μg/kg) was needed to produce a significant attenuation. Such reduction in the C57BL/6J strain continued until at least postnatal day (PND) 4. In agreement with this, TCDD reduced the testicular expression of steroidogenic proteins in C57BL/6J neonates at PND2 and 4, although the same did not occur in the fetal testis and ovary. Furthermore, TCDD reduced the perinatal expression of GH, litter size and the body weight of newborn pups only in the C57BL/6J strain. These results suggest that 1) also in mice, maternal exposure to TCDD attenuates gonadotropin-regulated steroidogenesis and GH expression leading to the impairment of pup development and sexual immaturity; and 2) Ahr activation during the late fetal and early postnatal stages is required for these defects.

  13. Pituitary Medicine From Discovery to Patient-Focused Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Context: This perspective traces a pipeline of discovery in pituitary medicine over the past 75 years. Objective: To place in context past advances and predict future changes in understanding pituitary pathophysiology and clinical care. Design: Author's perspective on reports of pituitary advances in the published literature. Setting: Clinical and translational Endocrinology. Outcomes: Discovery of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis and mechanisms for pituitary control, have culminated in exquisite understanding of anterior pituitary cell function and dysfunction. Challenges facing the discipline include fundamental understanding of pituitary adenoma pathogenesis leading to more effective treatments of inexorably growing and debilitating hormone secreting pituitary tumors as well as medical management of non-secreting pituitary adenomas. Newly emerging pituitary syndromes include those associated with immune-targeted cancer therapies and head trauma. Conclusions: Novel diagnostic techniques including imaging genomic, proteomic, and biochemical analyses will yield further knowledge to enable diagnosis of heretofore cryptic syndromes, as well as sub classifications of pituitary syndromes for personalized treatment approaches. Cost effective personalized approaches to precision therapy must demonstrate value, and will be empowered by multidisciplinary approaches to integrating complex subcellular information to identify therapeutic targets for enabling maximal outcomes. These goals will be challenging to attain given the rarity of pituitary disorders and the difficulty in conducting appropriately powered prospective trials. PMID:26908107

  14. Heavy Resistance Training and Supplementation With the Alleged Testosterone Booster Nmda has No Effect on Body Composition, Muscle Performance, and Serum Hormones Associated With the Hypothalamo-Pituitary-Gonadal Axis in Resistance-Trained Males

    PubMed Central

    Willoughby, Darryn S.; Spillane, Mike; Schwarz, Neil

    2014-01-01

    The effects of 28 days of heavy resistance training while ingesting the alleged testosterone-boosting supplement, NMDA, were determined on body composition, muscle strength, serum cortisol, prolactin, and hormones associated with the hypothalamo-pituitary- gonadal (HPG) axis. Twenty resistance-trained males engaged in 28 days of resistance training 4 times/wk while orally ingesting daily either 1.78 g of placebo (PLAC) or NMDA. Data were analyzed with separate 2 x 2 ANOVA (p < 0.05). Criterion measures involved body composition, muscle strength, serum cortisol, prolactin, and gonadal hormone levels [free and total testosterone, luteininzing hormome (LH), gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH), estradiol], and were assessed before (Day 0) and after (Day 29) resistance training and supplementation. No changes were noted for total body water and fat mass in response to resistance training (p > 0.05) or supplementation (p > 0.05). In regard to total body mass and fat-free mass, however, each was significantly increased in both groups in response to resistance training (p < 0.05), but were not affected by supplementation (p > 0.05). In both groups, lower-body muscle strength was significantly increased in response to resistance training (p < 0.05); however, supplementation had no effect (p > 0.05). All serum hormones (total and free testosterone, LH, GnRH, estradiol, cortisol, prolactin) were unaffected by resistance training (p > 0.05) or supplementation (p > 0.05). The gonadal hormones and cortisol and prolactin were unaffected by 28 days of NMDA supplementation and not associated with the observed increases in muscle strength and mass. At the dose provided, NMDA had no effect on HPG axis activity or ergogenic effects in skeletal muscle. Key Points In response to 28 days of heavy resistance training and NMDA supplementation, similar increases in muscle mass and strength in both groups occurred; however, the increases were not different between supplement groups. The

  15. Moebius syndrome associated with pituitary dwarfism and hypoplastic optic disc.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, N; Sakakihara, Y; Miki, Y; Kagawa, J; Egi, S; Kamoshita, S

    1993-04-01

    A 17 year old male patient with Moebius syndrome with pituitary dwarfism and unilateral hypoplastic optic disc is presented. Although there have been several reports of an association of Moebius syndrome and pituitary dysfunction, growth hormone deficiency has not been reported previously. These associations may give some insight into the pathogenesis of Moebius syndrome.

  16. Pituitary-Brain Vascular Relations: A New Paradigm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergland, Richard M.; Page, Robert B.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews the vascular anatomy of the pituitary and discusses a series of 14 questions concerning the functional implications of these anatomical observations. Together these questions attempt to identify whether pituitary hormones are transported directly to the brain to modify brain function. (HM)

  17. Dose response of whey protein isolate in addition to a typical mixed meal on blood amino acids and hormonal concentrations.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Scott C; McCargar, Linda; Jelen, Paul; Bell, Gordon J

    2014-04-01

    The purpose was to investigate the effects of a controlled typical 1-day diet supplemented with two different doses of whey protein isolate on blood amino acid profiles and hormonal concentrations following the final meal. Nine males (age: 29.6 ± 6.3 yrs) completed four conditions in random order: a control (C) condition of a typical mixed diet containing ~10% protein (0.8 g·kg1), 65% carbohydrate, and 25% fat; a placebo (P) condition calorically matched with carbohydrate to the whey protein conditions; a low-dose condition of 0.8 grams of whey protein isolate per kilogram body mass per day (g·kg1·d1; W1) in addition to the typical mixed diet; or a high-dose condition of 1.6 g·kg1·d1 (W2) of supplemental whey protein in addition to the typical mixed diet. Following the final meal, significant (p < .05) increases in total amino acids, essential amino acids (EAA), branch-chained amino acids (BCAA), and leucine were observed in plasma with whey protein supplementation while no changes were observed in the control and placebo conditions. There was no significant group difference for glucose, insulin, testosterone, cortisol, or growth hormone. In conclusion, supplementing a typical daily food intake consisting of 0.8 g of protein·kg1·d1 with a whey protein isolate (an additional 0.8 or 1.6 g·kg1·d1) significantly elevated total amino acids, EAA, BCAA, and leucine but had no effect on glucose, insulin, testosterone, cortisol, or growth hormone following the final meal. Future acute and chronic supplementation research examining the physiological and health outcomes associated with elevated amino acid profiles is warranted.

  18. Acromegaly with negative pituitary MRI and no evidence of ectopic source: the role of transphenoidal pituitary exploration?

    PubMed

    Daud, Sameera; Hamrahian, Amir H; Weil, Robert J; Hamaty, Marwan; Prayson, Richard A; Olansky, Leann

    2011-12-01

    Growth hormone (GH) producing adenomas of the pituitary gland are usually macroadenomas (>10 mm in size). Often these adenomas are locally invasive by the time of diagnosis. Acromegaly secondary to a very small pituitary microadenoma not visualized on pituitary magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is rare. We report a patient with acromegaly and an unremarkable pituitary MR imaging who had negative work up for ectopic growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) or GH secreting tumors. Transsphenoidal pituitary exploration revealed a pituitary adenoma located on the left side of the sella against the medial wall of the cavernous sinus extending posteriorly along the floor of the sella all the way to the right side. The acromegaly was treated with resection of the pituitary adenoma and normalization of serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and GH levels. In a patient with acromegaly and unremarkable pituitary MR imaging, with no evidence of ectopic GH and GHRH production, transsphenoidal pituitary exploration is a reasonable approach and may result in clinical improvement and biochemical cure in the hand of experienced surgeon. This approach may avoid long term medical treatment with its associated cost.

  19. Multiple cytosolic calcium buffers in posterior pituitary nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Shane M; Chang, Che-Wei; Jackson, Meyer B

    2016-03-01

    Cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers bind to a large fraction of Ca(2+) as it enters a cell, shaping Ca(2+) signals both spatially and temporally. In this way, cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers regulate excitation-secretion coupling and short-term plasticity of release. The posterior pituitary is composed of peptidergic nerve terminals, which release oxytocin and vasopressin in response to Ca(2+) entry. Secretion of these hormones exhibits a complex dependence on the frequency and pattern of electrical activity, and the role of cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers in controlling pituitary Ca(2+) signaling is poorly understood. Here, cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers were studied with two-photon imaging in patch-clamped nerve terminals of the rat posterior pituitary. Fluorescence of the Ca(2+) indicator fluo-8 revealed stepwise increases in free Ca(2+) after a series of brief depolarizing pulses in rapid succession. These Ca(2+) increments grew larger as free Ca(2+) rose to saturate the cytosolic buffers and reduce the availability of Ca(2+) binding sites. These titration data revealed two endogenous buffers. All nerve terminals contained a buffer with a Kd of 1.5-4.7 µM, and approximately half contained an additional higher-affinity buffer with a Kd of 340 nM. Western blots identified calretinin and calbindin D28K in the posterior pituitary, and their in vitro binding properties correspond well with our fluorometric analysis. The high-affinity buffer washed out, but at a rate much slower than expected from diffusion; washout of the low-affinity buffer could not be detected. This work has revealed the functional impact of cytosolic Ca(2+) buffers in situ in nerve terminals at a new level of detail. The saturation of these cytosolic buffers will amplify Ca(2+) signals and may contribute to use-dependent facilitation of release. A difference in the buffer compositions of oxytocin and vasopressin nerve terminals could contribute to the differences in release plasticity of these two hormones.

  20. In vitro pituitary and thyroid cell proliferation assays and their relevance as alternatives to animal testing.

    PubMed

    Jomaa, Barae; Aarts, Jac M M J G; de Haan, Laura H J; Peijnenburg, Ad A C M; Bovee, Toine F H; Murk, Albertinka J; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the in vitro effect of eleven thyroid-active compounds known to affect pituitary and/or thyroid weights in vivo, using the proliferation of GH3 rat pituitary cells in the so-called "T-screen," and of FRTL-5 rat thyroid cells in a newly developed test denoted "TSH-screen" to gain insight into the relative value of these in vitro proliferation tests for an integrated testing strategy (ITS) for thyroid activity. Pituitary cell proliferation in the T-screen was stimulated by three out of eleven tested compounds, namely thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH), triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4). Of these three compounds, only T4 causes an increase in relative pituitary weight, and thus T4 was the only compound for which the effect in the in vitro assay correlated with a reported in vivo effect. As to the newly developed TSH-screen, two compounds had an effect, namely, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) induced and T4 antagonized FRTL-5 cell proliferation. These effects correlated with in vivo changes induced by these compounds on thyroid weight. Altogether, the results indicate that most of the selected compounds affect pituitary and thyroid weights by modes of action different from a direct thyroid hormone receptor (THR) or TSH receptor (TSHR)-mediated effect, and point to the need for additional in vitro tests for an ITS. Additional analysis of the T-screen revealed a positive correlation between the THR-mediated effects of the tested compounds in vitro and their effects on relative heart weight in vivo, suggesting that the T-screen may directly predict this THR-mediated in vivo adverse effect.

  1. A history of pituitary pathology.

    PubMed

    Asa, Sylvia L; Mete, Ozgur

    2014-03-01

    The history of pituitary pathology is a long one that dates back to biblical times, but the last 25 years have represented an era of "coming of age." The role of the pituitary in health and disease was the subject of many studies over the last century. With the development of electron microscopy, immunoassays, and immunohistochemistry, the functional alterations associated with pituitary disease have been clarified. The additional information provided by molecular genetic studies has allowed progress in understanding the pathogenesis of pituitary disorders. Nevertheless, many questions remain to be answered. For example, pathologists cannot morphologically distinguish locally aggressive adenomas from carcinomas when tumor is confined to the sella. Sadly, basal cell carcinoma, the most common carcinoma of skin, usually causes less morbidity than pituitary adenomas, which occur in almost 20 % of the general population, can cause significant illness and even death, and yet are still classified as benign. The opportunity to increase awareness of the impact of these common lesions on quality of life is the current challenge for physicians and patients. We anticipate that ongoing multidisciplinary approaches to pituitary disease research will offer new insights into diseases arising from this fascinating organ.

  2. Postpartum pituitary apoplexy with isolated oculomotor nerve palsy: A rare medical emergency

    PubMed Central

    Raina, Sujeet; Jearth, Vaneet; Sharma, Ashish; Sharma, Rajesh; Mistry, Kewal

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary apoplexy is a clinical syndrome characterized by sudden onset headache, visual deficits, ophthalmoplegia, altered mental status, and hormonal dysfunction due to an expanding mass within the sella turcica resulting from hemorrhage or infarction of pituitary gland. We report a case of pituitary apoplexy that developed in postpartum period following postpartum hemorrhage and presented with isolated third cranial nerve palsy. PMID:26752912

  3. Anti-Müllerian Hormone: A Valuable Addition to the Toolbox of the Pediatric Endocrinologist

    PubMed Central

    Josso, Nathalie; Rey, Rodolfo A.; Picard, Jean-Yves

    2013-01-01

    Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH), secreted by immature Sertoli cells, provokes the regression of male fetal Müllerian ducts. FSH stimulates AMH production; during puberty, AMH is downregulated by intratesticular testosterone and meiotic germ cells. In boys, AMH determination is useful in the clinical setting. Serum AMH, which is low in infants with congenital central hypogonadism, increases with FSH treatment. AMH is also low in patients with primary hypogonadism, for instance in Down syndrome, from early postnatal life and in Klinefelter syndrome from midpuberty. In boys with nonpalpable gonads, AMH determination, without the need for a stimulation test, is useful to distinguish between bilaterally abdominal gonads and anorchism. In patients with disorders of sex development (DSD), serum AMH determination helps as a first line test to orientate the etiologic diagnosis: low AMH is indicative of dysgenetic DSD whereas normal AMH is suggestive of androgen synthesis or action defects. Finally, in patients with persistent Müllerian duct syndrome (PMDS), undetectable serum AMH drives the genetic search to mutations in the AMH gene, whereas normal or high AMH is indicative of an end organ defect due to AMH receptor gene defects. PMID:24382961

  4. Social regulation of the brain-pituitary-gonadal axis.

    PubMed Central

    Francis, R C; Soma, K; Fernald, R D

    1993-01-01

    Reproduction in vertebrates is regulated by the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis via neural and hormonal feedback. This axis is also subject to exogenous influences, particularly social signals. In the African cichlid fish Haplochromis burtoni, gonadal development in males is socially regulated. A small fraction of the males, which are brightly colored, maintain territories and aggressively dominate inconspicuously colored nonterritorial males. Here we show through manipulation of the social and endocrine environment that changes in social status and gonadal state are accompanied by soma size changes in a population of gonadotropin-releasing hormone-containing neurons in the ventral forebrain. In territorial males, these cells are significantly larger than in nonterritorial males. When an animal switches from being territorial to nonterritorial through a change in social situation, these cells shrink; in animals that change from nonterritorial to territorial status, the cells enlarge. These gonadotropin-releasing hormone-containing cells project to the pituitary and are ultimately responsible for regulating gonadal growth. This mechanism of socially induced cell size change provides the potential for relatively quick adaptive changes in the neuron-endocrine system without nerve cell addition or death. Since the structure of this regulatory axis is conserved among all vertebrates, other species with socially modulated reproductive physiology may exhibit a similar form of physiological regulation. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8356086

  5. Localization of fertility factor SP22 to specific cell types within the anterior pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Allison M; McCoy, George L; Blake, Charles A

    2005-11-01

    Sperm protein 22 (SP22) was recently identified in the anterior pituitary gland (AP) of male Golden Syrian hamsters using ion trap mass spectrometry. SP22 has been implicated in apoptosis, androgen receptor function, fertility, and ontogeny of early-onset Parkinson's disease. However, the role of SP22 in the pituitary has not been investigated. We cloned the cDNA for full-length SP22 from AP and posterior lobe (posterior pituitary and intermediate lobe) of the pituitary gland in adult male rats and Golden Syrian hamsters, confirming the presence of SP22 mRNA in the AP and posterior lobe. Because gonadal steroids are important regulators of AP function, and SP22 is associated with androgen receptor function, we used Western blots to compare SP22 in the AP of intact and orchidectomized male rats given placebo or a low or high dose of testosterone. SP22 did not differ with treatment, indicating that AP SP22 concentration was not regulated by testosterone. To localize SP22 to specific cells of the AP, mirror-image paraffin sections were labeled against SP22 and either luteinizing hormone (LH)beta, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)beta, prolactin, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), or growth hormone (GH) using peroxidase-conjugated secondary antibody. Additional sections were colabeled with SP22 and one of the AP hormones using fluorescent secondary antibodies. SP22 colocalized in somatotropes and thyrotropes in rat and hamster. We identified SP22 in a small percentage of corticotropes, gonadotropes, and lactotropes. This is the first report that SP22 mRNA is present specifically in the AP, and SP22 is localized primarily in somatotropes and thyrotropes. SP22 may help regulate AP function and be particularly important for the control of GH and TSH secretion.

  6. Protein kinase C is necessary for recovery from the thyrotropin-releasing hormone-induced r-ERG current reduction in GH3 rat anterior pituitary cells

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Varela, David; Giráldez, Teresa; la Peña, Pilar de; Dupuy, Silvia G; García-Manso, Diego; Barros, Francisco

    2003-01-01

    The biochemical cascade linking activation of phospholipase C-coupled thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) receptors to rat ERG (r-ERG) channel modulation was studied in situ using perforated-patch clamped adenohypophysial GH3 cells and pharmacological inhibitors. To check the recent suggestion that Rho kinase is involved in the TRH-induced r-ERG current suppression, the hormonal effects were studied in cells pretreated with the Rho kinase inhibitors Y-27632 and HA-1077. The TRH-induced r-ERG inhibition was not significantly modified in the presence of the inhibitors. Surprisingly, the hormonal effects became irreversible in the presence of HA-1077 but not in the presence of the more potent Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632. Further experiments indicated that the effect of HA-1077 correlated with its ability to inhibit protein kinase C (PKC). The hormonal effects also became irreversible in cells in which PKC activity was selectively impaired with GF109203X, Gö6976 or long-term incubation with phorbol esters. Furthermore, the reversal of the effects of TRH, but not its ability to suppress r-ERG currents, was blocked if diacylglycerol generation was prevented by blocking phospholipase C activity with U-73122. Our results suggest that a pathway involving an as yet unidentified protein kinase is the main cause of r-ERG inhibition in perforated-patch clamped GH3 cells. Furthermore, they demonstrate that although not necessary to trigger the ERG current reductions induced by TRH, an intracellular signal cascade involving phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate hydrolysis by phospholipase C, activation of an α/βII conventional PKC and one or more dephosphorylation steps catalysed by protein phosphatase 2A, mediates recovery of ERG currents following TRH withdrawal. PMID:12562894

  7. Alterations in pituitary gland volume in polycystic ovary syndrome: a structural magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Unlu, Ebru; Unlu, Bekir Serdar; Turamanlar, Ozan; Acay, Mehtap Beker; Kacar, Emre; Yıldız, Yunus; Verim, Ozgur; Okur, Nazan; Balcik, Cinar; Tasgetiren, Suleyman; Yucel, Aylin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this prospectively designed cross-sectional observational study was to evaluate the effect of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) on pituitary gland volume (PGV) under the hypothesis that endocrinologic changes may lead to morphologic changes of the pituitary gland. Twenty-six PCOS patients and 31 control subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the pituitary. Informed consent was obtained from all subjects. PGV was significantly larger in PCOS patients than in control subjects. Luteinizing hormone/follicle-stimulating hormone ratio was the only predictor of PGV. The association between pituitary gland enlargement and PCOS should be kept in mind when pituitary hypertrophy is detected on MRI.

  8. Prospective investigation of pituitary functions in patients with acute infectious meningitis: is acute meningitis induced pituitary dysfunction associated with autoimmunity?

    PubMed

    Tanriverdi, F; De Bellis, A; Teksahin, H; Alp, E; Bizzarro, A; Sinisi, A A; Bellastella, G; Paglionico, V A; Bellastella, A; Unluhizarci, K; Doganay, M; Kelestimur, F

    2012-12-01

    Previous case reports and retrospective studies suggest that pituitary dysfunction may occur after acute bacterial or viral meningitis. In this prospective study we assessed the pituitary functions, lipid profile and anthropometric measures in adults with acute bacterial or viral meningitis. Moreover, in order to investigate whether autoimmune mechanisms could play a role in the pathogenesis of acute meningitis-induced hypopituitarism we also investigated the anti-pituitary antibodies (APA) and anti-hypothalamus antibodies (AHA) prospectively. Sixteen patients (10 males, 6 females; mean ± SD age 40.9 ± 15.9) with acute infectious meningitis were included and the patients were evaluated in the acute phase, and at 6 and 12 months after the acute meningitis. In the acute phase 18.7% of the patients had GH deficiency, 12.5% had ACTH and FSH/LH deficiencies. At 12 months after acute meningitis 6 of 14 patients (42.8%) had GH deficiency, 1 of 14 patients (7.1%) had ACTH and FSH/LH deficiencies. Two of 14 patients (14.3%) had combined hormone deficiencies and four patients (28.6%) had isolated hormone deficiencies at 12 months. Four of 9 (44.4%) hormone deficiencies at 6 months were recovered at 12 months, and 3 of 8 (37.5%) hormone deficiencies at 12 months were new-onset hormone deficiencies. At 12 months there were significant negative correlations between IGF-I level vs. LDL-C, and IGF-I level vs. total cholesterol. The frequency of AHA and APA positivity was substantially high, ranging from 35 to 50% of the patients throughout the 12 months period. However there were no significant correlations between AHA or APA positivity and hypopituitarism. The risk of hypopituitarism, GH deficiency in particular, is substantially high in the acute phase, after 6 and 12 months of the acute infectious meningitis. Moreover we found that 6th month after meningitis is too early to make a decision for pituitary dysfunction and these patients should be screened for at least 12 months

  9. Electrotonic Coupling in the Pituitary Supports the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Gonadal Axis in a Sex Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Göngrich, Christina; García-González, Diego; Le Magueresse, Corentin; Roth, Lena C.; Watanabe, Yasuhito; Burks, Deborah J.; Grinevich, Valery; Monyer, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Gap junctions are present in many cell types throughout the animal kingdom and allow fast intercellular electrical and chemical communication between neighboring cells. Connexin-36 (Cx36), the major neuronal gap junction protein, synchronizes cellular activity in the brain, but also in other organs. Here we identify a sex-specific role for Cx36 within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis at the level of the anterior pituitary gland (AP). We show that Cx36 is expressed in gonadotropes of the AP sustaining their synchronous activity. Cx36 ablation affects the entire downstream HPG axis in females, but not in males. We demonstrate that Cx36-mediated coupling between gonadotropes in the AP supports gonadotropin-releasing hormone-induced secretion of luteinizing hormone. Furthermore, we provide evidence for negative feedback regulation of Cx36 expression in the AP by estradiol. We thus, conclude that hormonally-controlled plasticity of gap junction communication at the level of the AP constitutes an additional mechanism affecting female reproduction. PMID:27587994

  10. Biosynthesis and secretion of follicle-stimulating hormone beta-subunit from ovine pituitary cultures: effect of 17 beta-estradiol treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Whitfield, G.K.; Miller, W.L.

    1984-07-01

    An assay was developed to detect tritium-labeled ovine FSH beta-subunit (( /sup 3/H)oFSH beta) secreted from primary ovine pituitary cultures. This procedure used affinity-enriched antibodies raised against reduced and carbamylmethylated oFSH beta (RCM-oFSH beta) in a two-cycle immunoextraction procedure. A discrete species with an apparent mol wt of 21,000 was detected in sodium dodecyl sulfate electrophoretic patterns of immunoextracts from culture medium. This species was identified as RCM-(/sup 3/H)oFSH beta by its comigration with highly purified RCM-oFSH beta, its reduction in culture media after cultures were treated with 17 beta-estradiol, which normally decreases radioimmunoassayable oFSH; and its displacement from the extracting antibodies by excess unlabeled RCM-oFSH beta. The assay was used in a pulse-chase study to determine that (/sup 3/H)oFSH beta is secreted within 1-2 h of its synthesis. Prior treatment of cultures with 17 beta-estradiol did not change this timing of secretion.

  11. Pituitary tumours: TSH-secreting adenomas.

    PubMed

    Beck-Peccoz, Paolo; Persani, Luca; Mannavola, Deborah; Campi, Irene

    2009-10-01

    Thyrotropin-secreting pituitary adenomas (TSHomas) are a rare cause of hyperthyroidism and account for less than 2% of all pituitary adenomas. In the last years, the diagnosis has been facilitated by the routine use of ultra-sensitive TSH immunometric assays. Failure to recognise the presence of a TSHoma may result in dramatic consequences, such as improper thyroid ablation that may cause the pituitary tumour volume to further expand. The diagnosis mainly rests on dynamic testing, such as T3 suppression tests and TRH, which are useful in differentiating TSHomas from the syndromes of thyroid hormone resistance. The first therapeutical approach to TSHomas is the pituitary neurosurgery. The medical treatment of TSHomas mainly rests on the administration of somatostatin analogues, such as octreotide and lanreotide, which are effective in reducing TSH secretion in more than 90% of patients with consequent normalisation of FT4 and FT3 levels and restoration of the euthyroid state.

  12. Estrogens sensitize anterior pituitary gland to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Pisera, D; Candolfi, M; Navarra, S; Ferraris, J; Zaldivar, V; Jaita, G; Castro, M G; Seilicovich, A

    2004-10-01

    Tissue homeostasis results from a balance between cell proliferation and cell death by apoptosis. Estradiol affects proliferation as well as apoptosis in hormone-dependent tissues. In the present study, we investigated the apoptotic response of the anterior pituitary gland to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in cycling female rats, and the influence of estradiol in this response in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. The OVX rats were chronically estrogenized with implanted Silastic capsules containing 1 mg of 17beta-estradiol (E2). Cycling or OVX and E2-treated rats were injected with LPS (250 microg/rat ip). Apoptosis was determined by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) method in sections of the anterior pituitary gland and spleen. Chronic estrogenization induced apoptosis in the anterior pituitary gland. Acute endotoxemia triggered apoptosis of cells in the anterior pituitary gland of E2-treated rats but not of OVX rats. No differences were observed in the apoptotic response to LPS in spleen between OVX and E2-treated rats. The apoptotic response of the anterior pituitary to LPS was variable along the estrous cycle, being higher at proestrus than at estrus or diestrus I. Approximately 75% of the apoptotic cells were identified as lactotropes by immunofluorescence. In conclusion, our results indicate that estradiol induces apoptosis and enables the proapoptotic action of LPS in the anterior pituitary gland. Also, our study suggests that estrogens may be involved in anterior pituitary cell renewal during the estrous cycle, sensitizing lactotropes to proapoptotic stimuli.

  13. MALDI mass spectrometry imaging analysis of pituitary adenomas for near-real-time tumor delineation

    PubMed Central

    Calligaris, David; Feldman, Daniel R.; Norton, Isaiah; Olubiyi, Olutayo; Changelian, Armen N.; Machaidze, Revaz; Vestal, Matthew L.; Laws, Edward R.; Dunn, Ian F.; Santagata, Sandro; Agar, Nathalie Y. R.

    2015-01-01

    We present a proof of concept study designed to support the clinical development of mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) for the detection of pituitary tumors during surgery. We analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) MSI six nonpathological (NP) human pituitary glands and 45 hormone secreting and nonsecreting (NS) human pituitary adenomas. We show that the distribution of pituitary hormones such as prolactin (PRL), growth hormone (GH), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) in both normal and tumor tissues can be assessed by using this approach. The presence of most of the pituitary hormones was confirmed by using MS/MS and pseudo-MS/MS methods, and subtyping of pituitary adenomas was performed by using principal component analysis (PCA) and support vector machine (SVM). Our proof of concept study demonstrates that MALDI MSI could be used to directly detect excessive hormonal production from functional pituitary adenomas and generally classify pituitary adenomas by using statistical and machine learning analyses. The tissue characterization can be completed in fewer than 30 min and could therefore be applied for the near-real-time detection and delineation of pituitary tumors for intraoperative surgical decision-making. PMID:26216958

  14. Octreotide and pasireotide (dis)similarly inhibit pituitary tumor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Rivero-Cortés, Esther; Vázquez-Borrego, Mari C; Gahete, Manuel D; Jiménez-Reina, Luis; Venegas-Moreno, Eva; de la Riva, Andrés; Arráez, Miguel Ángel; González-Molero, Inmaculada; Schmid, Herbert A; Maraver-Selfa, Silvia; Gavilán-Villarejo, Inmaculada; García-Arnés, Juan Antonio; Japón, Miguel A; Soto-Moreno, Alfonso; Gálvez, María A; Luque, Raúl M; Castaño, Justo P

    2016-11-01

    Somatostatin analogs (SSA) are the mainstay of pharmacological treatment for pituitary adenomas. However, some patients escape from therapy with octreotide, a somatostatin receptor 2 (sst2)-preferring SSA, and pasireotide, a novel multi-sst-preferring SSA, may help to overcome this problem. It has been proposed that correspondence between sst1-sst5 expression pattern and SSA-binding profile could predict patient's response. To explore the cellular/molecular features associated with octreotide/pasireotide response, we performed a parallel comparison of their in vitro effects, evaluating sst1-sst5 expression, intracellular Ca(2+) signaling ([Ca(2+)]i), hormone secretion and cell viability, in a series of 85 pituitary samples. Somatotropinomas expressed sst5>sst2, yet octreotide reduced [Ca(2+)]i more efficiently than pasireotide, while both SSA similarly decreased growth hormone release/expression and viability. Corticotropinomas predominantly expressed sst5, but displayed limited response to pasireotide, while octreotide reduced functional endpoints. Non-functioning adenomas preferentially expressed sst3 but, surprisingly, both SSA increased cell viability. Prolactinomas mainly expressed sst1 but were virtually unresponsive to SSA. Finally, both SSA decreased [Ca(2+)]i in normal pituitaries. In conclusion, both SSA act in vitro on pituitary adenomas exerting both similar and distinct effects; however, no evident correspondence was found with the sst1-sst5 profile. Thus, it seems plausible that additional factors, besides the simple abundance of a given sst, critically influence the SSA response.

  15. ZBTB20 is required for anterior pituitary development and lactotrope specification.

    PubMed

    Cao, Dongmei; Ma, Xianhua; Cai, Jiao; Luan, Jing; Liu, An-Jun; Yang, Rui; Cao, Yi; Zhu, Xiaotong; Zhang, Hai; Chen, Yu-Xia; Shi, Yuguang; Shi, Guang-Xia; Zou, Dajin; Cao, Xuetao; Grusby, Michael J; Xie, Zhifang; Zhang, Weiping J

    2016-04-15

    The anterior pituitary harbours five distinct hormone-producing cell types, and their cellular differentiation is a highly regulated and coordinated process. Here we show that ZBTB20 is essential for anterior pituitary development and lactotrope specification in mice. In anterior pituitary, ZBTB20 is highly expressed by all the mature endocrine cell types, and to some less extent by somatolactotropes, the precursors of prolactin (PRL)-producing lactotropes. Disruption of Zbtb20 leads to anterior pituitary hypoplasia, hypopituitary dwarfism and a complete loss of mature lactotropes. In ZBTB20-null mice, although lactotrope lineage commitment is normally initiated, somatolactotropes exhibit profound defects in lineage specification and expansion. Furthermore, endogenous ZBTB20 protein binds to Prl promoter, and its knockdown decreases PRL expression and secretion in a lactotrope cell line MMQ. In addition, ZBTB20 overexpression enhances the transcriptional activity of Prl promoter in vitro. In conclusion, our findings point to ZBTB20 as a critical regulator of anterior pituitary development and lactotrope specification.

  16. TSH-secreting pituitary adenomas: follow-up of 11 cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ness-Abramof, Rosane; Ishay, Avraham; Harel, Gideon; Sylvetzky, Noa; Baron, Elzbieta; Greenman, Yona; Shimon, Ilan

    2007-01-01

    Thyrotropin (TSH)-secreting pituitary adenomas account for less than 1% of all pituitary tumors. In the last two decades, their clinical management has changed markedly due to technological advances that made earlier diagnosis possible and the introduction of somatostatin analog therapy. We retrieved the data of 11 patients in Israel diagnosed with TSH-secreting pituitary tumors since 1989. There were six men and five women of mean age 44.8 +/- 19.5 years (range 18-80 years). All had elevated thyroxine and triidothyronine levels with nonsuppressed TSH and imaging evidence of a pituitary tumor. In three patients the tumor co-secreted growth hormone. Ten patients had macroadenomas (> or =10 mm) and one patient had a microadenoma (<10 mm). Nine patients underwent surgery, and all had postoperative evidence of residual tumor. Ten patients received long-term somatostatin analog therapy (9 postoperatively, 1 primarily), which controlled the hyperthyroidism in all of them. In addition, three patients showed tumor shrinkage and seven, stabilization of tumor growth.In conclusion, in patients with TSH-secreting pituitary adenomas, somatostatin therapy appears to be highly effective in treating hyperthyroidism and in halting tumor growth or promoting tumor shrinkage.

  17. Electrophoretic separation of kidney and pituitary cells on STS-8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, D. R.; Nachtwey, D. S.; Barlow, G. H.; Cleveland, C.; Lanham, J. W.; Farrington, M. A.; Hatfield, J. M.; Hymer, W. C.; Grindeland, R.; Lewis, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    Specific secretory cells were separated from suspensions of cultured primary human embryonic cells and rat pituitary cells in microgravity conditions, with an objective of isolating the subfractions of kidney cells that produce the largest amount of urakinase, and the subfractions of rat pituitary cells that secrete growth hormones (GH), prolactin (PRL), and other hormones. It is inferred from the experimental observations that the surface charge distributions of the GH-containing cells differ from those of the PRL-containing cells, which is explained by the presence of secretory products on the surface of pituitary cells. For kidney cells, the electrophoretic mobility distributions in flight experiments were spread more than the ground controls.

  18. Persistence of intrasellar trigeminal artery and simultaneous pituitary adenoma: description of two cases and their importance for the differential diagnosis of sellar lesions.

    PubMed

    Machado, Marcio Carlos; Kodaira, Sergio; Musolino, Nina Rosa Castro

    2014-08-01

    Persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) is the most frequent embryonic communication between the carotid and vertebrobasilar systems. However, hormonal changes or the association of PTA with other sellar lesions, such as pituitary adenomas, are extremely rare. The aim of the present study was to report two patients with intrasellar PTA and simultaneous pituitary adenoma in order to emphasize the importance of differential diagnoses for sellar lesions. Case 1. A female patient, 41 years old, was admitted with a history of chronic headache (> 20 years). Pituitary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a rounded lesion in the left portion of the pituitary gland suggestive of adenoma (most likely clinically non-functioning adenoma). In addition to this lesion, the MRI demonstrated ecstasy of the right internal carotid artery and imaging suggestive of an intrasellar artery that was subsequently confirmed by an angio-MRI of the cerebral vessels as PTA. Case 2. A female patient, 42 years old, was admitted with a history of amenorrhea and galactorrhea in 1994. Laboratorial investigation revealed hyperprolactinemia. Pituitary MRI showed a small hyposignal area in the anterior portion of pituitary gland suggestive of a microadenoma initiated by a dopaminergic agonist. Upon follow-up, aside from the first lesion, the MRI showed a well delineated rounded lesion inside the pituitary gland, similar to a vessel. Angio-MRI confirmed a left primitive PTA. Failure to recognize these anomalous vessels within the sella might lead to serious complications during transsphenoidal surgery. Therefore, although their occurrence is uncommon, a working knowledge of vascular lesions in the sella turcica or pituitary gland is important for the differential diagnosis of pituitary lesions, especially pituitary adenomas.

  19. [Macroprolactinemia associated with pituitary macroadenoma: treatment with quinagolide].

    PubMed

    Lakatos, Gergely; Szücs, Nikolette; Kender, Zoltán; Czirják, Sándor; Rácz, Károly

    2010-06-27

    According to current concept, macroprolactin is biologically inactive and, therefore, its accumulation in serum has little, if any, pathological significance. Authors present the history of a 80-year-old man who proved to have, among other associated disorders, an intra- and parasellar pituitary tumor measuring 21x12x12 mm in size which was revealed by pituitary MRI. His hormonal evaluation indicated a marked hyperprolactinemia mainly due to macroprolactinemia (total prolactin, 514 ng/ml; reference range, 1.6-10.7 ng/ml; macroprolactin 436 ng/ml, monomer prolactin 78.2 ng/ml). Tests for function of the pituitary-thyroid axis showed a mild subclinical primary hypothyroidism. The function of the pituitary-adrenal axis was normal, and other hormonal tests revealed low-normal serum gonadotropins and decreased testosterone level, whereas serum insulin-like growth factor I was normal. Although the majority of current guidelines state that dopamine-agonist treatment which is successfully used in prolactin-producing pituitary tumors and in other hyperprolactinemic disorders is unnecessary in patients with macroprolactinemia, the authors introduced a dopamine-agonist, quinagolide. During prolonged treatment, plasma prolactin returned close to the upper limit of normal (12.3 ng/ml) and 9 months after the beginning of treatment pituitary MRI showed a remarkable shrinkage of the pituitary tumor. Authors propose that in this patient the pituitary tumor secreted macroprolactin, and they recommend a treatment trial with dopamine-agonist in pituitary macroadenomas associated with macroprolactinemia.

  20. Pituitary transplantation: cyclosporine enables transplantation across a minor histocompatibility barrier.

    PubMed

    Tulipan, N B; Huang, S; Allen, G S

    1986-03-01

    Pituitary glands from neonatal donors were transplanted to the median eminence of hypophysectomized adult rats. Rats with transplants were then treated for 2 weeks with the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporine. For 5 weeks thereafter, blood was drawn at regular intervals for determination of serum thyroxine, prolactin, and luteinizing hormone. Cyclosporine-treated recipients of grafts with minor histocompatibility differences had normal levels of thyroxine and prolactin, whereas untreated animals did not. In addition, the treated animals responded to oophorectomy with a marked elevation in serum luteinizing hormone. This evidence indicates that cyclosporine enables successful transplantation across a minor histocompatibility barrier. It also suggests that these grafts interact with the hypothalamus. Transplantation across a major histocompatibility barrier was unsuccessful even in the presence of cyclosporine.

  1. Transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary tumours

    PubMed Central

    Massoud, A; Powell, M; Williams, R; Hindmarsh, P; Brook, C

    1997-01-01

    Accepted 29 January 1997
 OBJECTIVES—Transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) is the preferred method for the excision of pituitary microadenomas in adults. This study was carried out to establish the long term efficacy and safety of TSS in children.
STUDY DESIGN—A 14 year retrospective analysis was carried out on 23 children (16 boys and seven girls), all less than 18 years of age, who had undergone TSS at our centre.
RESULTS—Twenty nine transsphenoidal surgical procedures were carried out. The most common diagnosis was an adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) secreting adenoma (14 (61%) patients). The median length of follow up was 8.0 years (range 0.3-14.0 years). Eighteen (78%) patients were cured after the first procedure. No death was related to the operation. The most common postoperative complication was diabetes insipidus, which was transient in most patients. Other complications were headaches in two patients and cerebrospinal fluid leaks in two patients. De novo endocrine deficiencies after TSS in children were as follows: three (14%) patients developed panhypopituitarism, eight (73%) developed growth hormone insufficiency, three (14%) developed secondary hypothyroidism, and four (21%) developed gonadotrophin deficiency. Permanent ACTH deficiency occurred in five (24%) patients, though all patients received postoperative glucocorticoid treatment until dynamic pituitary tests were performed three months after TSS.
CONCLUSIONS—TSS in children is a safe and effective treatment for pituitary tumours, provided it is performed by surgeons with considerable experience and expertise. Surgical complications are minimal. Postoperative endocrine deficit is considerable, but is only permanent in a small proportion of patients.

 • Transsphenoidal surgery is a safe and effective treatment for pituitary tumours in children • Transsphenoidal surgery should be performed by surgeons with considerable experience and expertise • Surgical complications of

  2. 64 kDa protein is a candidate for a thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor in prolactin-producing rat pituitary tumor cells (GH4C1 cells)

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, M.; Hogset, A.; Alestrom, P.; Gautvik, K.M.

    1988-12-30

    A thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) binding protein of 64 kDa has been identified by covalently crosslinking (/sup 3/H)TRH to GH4C1 cells by ultraviolet illumination. The crosslinkage of (/sup 3/H)TRH is UV-dose dependent and is inhibited by an excess of unlabeled TRH. A 64 kDa protein is also detected on immunoblots using an antiserum raised against GH4C1 cell surface epitopes. In a closely related cell line (GH12C1) which does not bind (/sup 3/H)TRH, the 64 kDa protein cannot be demonstrated by (/sup 3/H)TRH crosslinking nor by immunoblotting. These findings indicate that the 64 kDa protein is a candidate for a TRH-receptor protein in GH4C1 cells.

  3. Daily profiles of plasma prolactin (PRL), growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone, and melatonin, and of pituitary PRL mRNA and GH mRNA in male Long Evans rats in acute phase of adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Roman, Olha; Seres, Janette; Herichova, Iveta; Zeman, Michal; Jurcovicova, Jana

    2003-09-01

    We studied the effects of adjuvant arthritis (AA) on the endocrine circadian rhythms of plasma prolactin (PRL), growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone, and melatonin and of pituitary PRL and GH mRNA in male Long Evans rats. Groups of control and AA rats (studied 23 days after AA induction) that were housed under a 12/12 h light/dark cycle (light on at 06:00 h) were killed at 4 h intervals starting at 14:00 h. Cosinor analysis revealed a significant 12 h rhythm in PRL and PRL mRNA (p < 0.001) in controls with peaks at 14:00 h and 02:00 h, respectively. The peak at 02:00 h was abolished in the AA group resulting in a significant 24 h rhythm in parallel with that of PRL (p < 0.05) and PRL mRNA (p < 0.0001). Growth hormone showed no rhythm, but a significant rhythm of GH mRNA was present in both groups (p < 0.0001). Insulin-like growth factor-1 showed a 24 h rhythm in control but not in AA rats. The mean values of GH, GH mRNA, and IGF-1 were significantly reduced in AA. Luteinizing hormone displayed a significant 24 h rhythm (p < 0.01) peaking in the dark period in the control but not AA group. Testosterone showed in phase temporal changes of LH levels with AA abolishing the 02:00 h peak. Melatonin exhibited a significant 24 h rhythm in control (p < 0.001) and AA (p < 0.01) rats with maximum levels during the dark phase; the mesor value was higher in the AA males. These results demonstrate that AA interferes with the rhythms of all the studied hormones except the non-24 h (arrhythmic) GH secretion pattern and the rhythm in melatonin. The persistence of a distinct melatonin rhythm in AA suggests the observed disturbances of hormonal rhythms in this condition do not occur at the level of the pineal gland.

  4. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma in the human pituitary gland: expression and splicing pattern in adenomas versus normal pituitary.

    PubMed

    Occhi, G; Albiger, N; Berlucchi, S; Gardiman, M; Scanarini, M; Scienza, R; Fassina, A; Mantero, F; Scaroni, C

    2007-07-01

    Pituitary adenomas are slow-growing tumours arising within the pituitary gland. If secreting, they give rise to well-known syndromes such as Cushing's disease or acromegaly; when hormonally inactive, they come to clinical attention often with local mass effects or pituitary deficiency. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma), a nuclear hormone receptor with a key role in fat and glucose metabolism, but also involved in several neoplasia, has recently been detected in pituitary adenomas. In the present study, we evaluated the occurrence and splicing profile of PPARgamma in 43 cases of pituitary adenoma of different subtypes and compared it to 12 normal pituitary glands. By real-time polymerase chain reaction, PPARgamma was expressed as much in adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH)-secreting and ACTH-silent adenomas as in controls, with a moderate underexpression in somatotrophinomas and prolactinomas and overexpression in 54% of nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFPA). There was no apparent qualitative change in the splicing profile of pathological pituitary glands, nor was the presence of specific isoforms with dominant negative effects against PPARgamma detected. Western blotting revealed similar expression levels in the different subgroups of pituitary adenomas and normal glands. Immunohistochemistry confirmed PPARgamma expression in approximately one-half of analysed samples. The intra- and intergroup differences observed in pituitary adenomas may represent new elements in the process of understanding the different clinical responses of Cushing's and Nelson patients to PPARgamma-ligand treatment. Moreover, the higher level of PPARgamma expression detected in the NFPA subgroup may suggest its possible role as a molecular target in these pituitary adenomas, paving the way for investigations on the effectiveness of treatment with thiazolidinediones in such patients.

  5. CT of pituitary abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, T.C.; Johns, R.D.; Long, M.; Myles, S.T.

    1985-06-01

    Pituitary abscess is a rare condition, with only 50 cases reported in the literature. Of those, 29 cases were well documented for analysis. Preoperative diagnosis of pituitary abscess is difficult. The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of pituitary abscess was first described in 1983; the abscess was depicted by axial images with coronal reconstruction. The authors recently encountered a case of pituitary abscess documented by direct coronal CT of the sella turcica.

  6. Pituitary lymphoma developing within pituitary adenoma.

    PubMed

    Morita, Ken; Nakamura, Fumihiko; Kamikubo, Yasuhiko; Mizuno, Naoaki; Miyauchi, Masashi; Yamamoto, Go; Nannya, Yasuhito; Ichikawa, Motoshi; Kurokawa, Mineo

    2012-06-01

    Lymphoma occurring in the pituitary gland is an exceedingly infrequent event. Here, we describe a case of pituitary lymphoma complicating recurrent pituitary adenoma. A 56-year-old male with a history of pituitary adenoma was diagnosed with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) of the left ocular adnexa, which was successfully treated by standard chemotherapy and local radiotherapy. Eight months later, he complained of diplopia and bitemporal hemianopia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging detected a suprasellar tumor. Transsphenoidal biopsy of the mass was performed, and histopathological examination revealed DLBCL admixed with pituitary adenoma. On a review of the literature, we found that pituitary lymphoma developing within adenoma is a recurrent phenomenon. The composite tumor is likely to be characterized by suprasellar involvement and presentation of visual disturbances. Moreover, in the present case, the suprasellar tumor remained visible after autologous peripheral stem cell transplant, likely due to the residual pituitary adenoma. We therefore recommend that refractory pituitary lymphoma should be vigorously biopsied in search of possibly underlying adenoma.

  7. The influence of different growth hormone addition protocols to poor ovarian responders on clinical outcomes in controlled ovary stimulation cycles

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue-Li; Wang, Li; Lv, Fang; Huang, Xia-Man; Wang, Li-Ping; Pan, Yu; Zhang, Xiao-Mei

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Growth hormone (GH) is used as an adjuvant therapy in in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF-ET) for poor ovarian responders, but findings for its effects on outcomes of IVF have been conflicting. The aim of the study was to compare IVF-ET outcomes among women with poor ovarian responders, and find which subgroup can benefit from the GH addition. Methods: We searched the databases, using the terms “growth hormone,” “GH,” “IVF,” “in vitro fertilization.” Randomized controlled trials (RCT) were included if they assessed pregnancy rate, live birth rate, collected oocytes, fertilization rate, and implantation rate. Extracted the data from the corresponding articles, Mantel–Haenszel random-effects model, or fixed-effects model was used. Eleven studies were included. Results: Clinical pregnancy rate (RR 1.65, 95% CI 1.23–2.22), live birth rate (RR1.73, 1.25–2.40), collected oocytes number (SMD 1.09, 95% CI 0.54–1.64), MII oocytes number (SMD 1.48, 0.84–2.13), and E2 on human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) day (SMD 1.03, 0.18–1.89) were significantly increased in the GH group. The cancelled cycles rate (RR 0.65, 0.45–0.94) and the dose of gonadotropin (Gn) (SMD –0.83, –1.47, –0.19) were significantly lower in patients who received GH. Subgroup analysis indicated that the GH addition with Gn significantly increased the clinical pregnancy rate (RR 1.76, 1.25–2.48) and the live birth rate (RR 1.91, 1.29–2.83). Conclusion: The GH addition can significantly improve the clinical pregnancy rate and live birth rate. Furthermore, the GH addition time and collocation of medications may affect the pregnancy outcome. PMID:28328856

  8. Addition of crude glycerin to pig diets: sow and litter performance, and metabolic and feed intake regulating hormones.

    PubMed

    Hernández, F; Orengo, J; Villodre, C; Martínez, S; López, M J; Madrid, J

    2016-06-01

    The continued growth in biofuel production has led to a search for alternative value-added applications of its main by-product, crude glycerin. The surplus glycerin production and a higher cost of feedstuffs have increased the emphasis on evaluating its nutritive value for animal feeding. The aim of this research was to evaluate the effect of the dietary addition of crude glycerin on sow and litter performance, and to determine the serum concentrations of hormones related to energy metabolism and feed intake in sows during gestation and lactation. A total of 63 sows were assigned randomly to one of three dietary treatments, containing 0, 3 or 6% crude glycerin (G0, G3 and G6, respectively) added to a barley-soybean meal-based diet. During gestation, none of the dietary treatments had an effect on performance, while during lactation, glycerin-fed sows consumed less feed than those fed the control diet (3.8 v. 4.2kg DM/day; P=0.007). Although lactating sows fed the G3 diet had a higher BW loss than those fed the control diet (���20.6 v. ���8.7 kg; P=0.002), this difference was not reflected in litter performance. In gestation, the inclusion of glycerin did not affect blood concentrations of insulin or cortisol. However, pregnant sows fed diets supplemented with glycerin showed lower concentrations of acyl-ghrelin and higher concentrations of leptin (���55 and +68%, respectively; P<0.001). In lactating sows, there were no differences between dietary treatments for any of the hormones measured. Pre-prandial acyl-ghrelin concentrations were positively correlated with cortisol concentrations during gestation (r=0.81; P=0.001) and lactation (r=0.61; P=0.015). In conclusion, the inclusion of up to 6% crude glycerin did not affect the performance of sows during the gestation period; however it had a negative effect on the feed intake and weight loss of lactating sows. Moreover, further research is needed to elucidate the potential relationship between

  9. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  10. Clinical analysis of infarction in pituitary adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Deyong; Wang, Shousen; Huang, Yinxing; Zhao, Lin; Wei, Liangfeng; Ding, Chenyu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study is to summarize the clinical manifestations, imaging findings, treatment and prognosis of pituitary apoplexy caused by ischemic infarction. Methods: From January 2010 to March 2014, 412 patients with pituitary adenoma were admitted in the Department of Neurosurgery at Fuzhou General Hospital, with 9 cases being diagnosed with ischemic infarction stroke. Imaging examinations were performed, including computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Pituitary adenomas were evaluated according to suprasellar, infrasellar, parasellar, anterior and posterior classification. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemical staining were used for identifying pituitary adenoma. Results: Tumor height was 1.3-3.3 cm, with an average of 2.27 cm. Eight patients had typical clinical stroke symptoms. Preoperatively, high blood growth hormone concentration was presented in 6 cases, full hypopituitarism in 2 cases, dysfunction of corticosteroids and gonads in 4 cases, and single gonadal dysfunction in 2 cases. Ring enhancement was presented in 8 cases on constructed computed tomography or magnetic resonance images, and sellar settlement in 7 cases. Eight patients were conducted with transsphenoidal resection, and secondary transsphenoidal after craniotomy in 1 case. During surgery, poor tumor blood supply was found in 7 cases, cheese-like or tofu-like necrotic tissues in 5 cases, and few dark blood clots in 2 cases. Conclusions: Pituitary ischemic infarction stroke is clinically rare, but can be correctly diagnosed before surgery by imaging examinations. The pathological characteristics of the tumor are necrosis and fibrosis, which are easy for resection. Therefore, pituitary adenoma usually has good prognosis. PMID:26221291

  11. Separation of rat pituitary secretory granules by continuous flow electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, Daniel; Exton, Carrie; Salada, Thomas; Shellenberger, Kathy; Waddle, Jenny; Hymer, W. C.

    1990-01-01

    The separation of growth hormone-containing cytoplasmic secretory granules from the rat pituitary gland by continuous flow electrophoresis is described. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that granule subpopulations can be separated due to differences in surface charge; these, in turn, may be related to the oligomeric state of the hormone.

  12. Neuroprotective Actions of Ghrelin and Growth Hormone Secretagogues

    PubMed Central

    Frago, Laura M.; Baquedano, Eva; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A.

    2011-01-01

    The brain incorporates and coordinates information based on the hormonal environment, receiving information from peripheral tissues through the circulation. Although it was initially thought that hormones only acted on the hypothalamus to perform endocrine functions, it is now known that they in fact exert diverse actions on many different brain regions including the hypothalamus. Ghrelin is a gastric hormone that stimulates growth hormone secretion and food intake to regulate energy homeostasis and body weight by binding to its receptor, growth hormone secretagogues–GH secretagogue-receptor, which is most highly expressed in the pituitary and hypothalamus. In addition, ghrelin has effects on learning and memory, reward and motivation, anxiety, and depression, and could be a potential therapeutic agent in neurodegenerative disorders where excitotoxic neuronal cell death and inflammatory processes are involved. PMID:21994488

  13. Effects of hypophysectomy and administration of pituitary hormones on luteal function and uptake of high density lipoproteins by luteinized ovaries and adrenals of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, B.D.; Rajkumar, K.; McKibbin, P.E.; Macdonald, G.J.; Buhr, M.M.; Grinwich, D.L.

    1985-04-01

    The role of plasma lipoproteins and hypophyseal hormones in the maintenance of progesterone secretion by the rat corpus luteum was investigated. In the first experiment, rats were treated daily from days 1-6 of pregnancy with 5 mg/kg 4-aminopyrozolopyramidine (4APP), a blocker of hepatic lipoprotein secretion, or with 5 mg/kg 4APP and 1 or 2 mg ovine PRL or 0.1 ml 0.5% phosphoric acid (4APP vehicle). The administration of 4APP reduced serum cholesterol and progesterone levels on days 2-6 of pregnancy and ovarian progesterone on day 6. The reduced progesterone secretion had no effect on embryo implantation. PRL, in the doses used, was incapable of abrogating the effects of 4APP on circulating or ovarian progesterone levels. Ovaries and adrenals, but not kidneys, of pseudopregnant rats exhibited specific and saturable uptake of porcine high density lipoprotein (HDL). Time-course studies indicated that the uptake of HDL was rapid in ovaries compared to that in adrenals. Ovaries from rats not only exhibited uptake of porcine HDL, but also were capable of using it for progesterone synthesis. Treatment with 4APP increased the adrenal uptake of HDL, but ovarian uptake was not different from that in the control group. Hypophysectomy reduced both adrenal and ovarian uptake of HDL. In adrenals only ACTH at the dose employed ameliorated reduction of HDL uptake induced by hypophysectomy, while in the ovaries, both PRL and LH reversed the effect of hypophysectomy. The effect of PRL on uptake was specific to (/sup 125/I)HDL and did not alter (/sup 125/I)albumin uptake. It is concluded that: 1) hypophysectomy reduces HDL uptake in the luteinized rat ovary; and 2) PRL and LH replacement therapy maintain ovarian uptake of HDL, suggesting a direct effect of these luteotropins on lipoprotein uptake.

  14. Pituitary stalk interruption syndrome: Case report of three cases with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Gutch, Manish; Kumar, Sukriti; Razi, Syed Mohd; Saran, Sanjay; Gupta, Keshav Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Pickardt syndrome (Pickardt-Fahlbusch syndrome) is a rare congenital syndrome characterized by tertiary hypothyroidism caused by the interruption of the portal veins between hypothalamus and adenohypophysis. Typical features of this syndrome are tertiary hypothyroidism with low thyroid stimulating hormone, hyperprolactinemia and other pituitary hormone deficiencies. Pituitary stalk interruption syndrome is characterized by a triad of thin or interrupted pituitary stalk, aplasia or hypoplasia of the anterior pituitary and absent or ectopic posterior pituitary (EPP) seen on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). It is a congenital anomaly of pituitary whose exact prevalence is unknown. In some cases, it is restricted to EPP or pituitary stalk interruption. We are presenting the case history along with MRI finding of three children's who presented with short stature and delayed puberty. PMID:25250085

  15. Modeling the brain-pituitary-gonad axis in salmon

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jonghan; Hayton, William L.; Schultz, Irv R.

    2006-08-24

    To better understand the complexity of the brain-pituitary-gonad axis (BPG) in fish, we developed a biologically based pharmacodynamic model capable of accurately predicting the normal functioning of the BPG axis in salmon. This first-generation model consisted of a set of 13 equations whose formulation was guided by published values for plasma concentrations of pituitary- (FSH, LH) and ovary- (estradiol, 17a,20b-dihydroxy-4-pregnene-3-one) derived hormones measured in Coho salmon over an annual spawning period. In addition, the model incorporated pertinent features of previously published mammalian models and indirect response pharmacodynamic models. Model-based equations include a description of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) synthesis and release from the hypothalamus, which is controlled by environmental variables such as photoperiod and water temperature. GnRH stimulated the biosynthesis of mRNA for FSH and LH, which were also influenced by estradiol concentration in plasma. The level of estradiol in the plasma was regulated by the oocytes, which moved along a maturation progression. Estradiol was synthesized at a basal rate and as oocytes matured, stimulation of its biosynthesis occurred. The BPG model can be integrated with toxico-genomic, -proteomic data, allowing linkage between molecular based biomarkers and reproduction in fish.

  16. Expression and regulation of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper in the developing anterior pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Ellestad, Laura E; Malkiewicz, Stefanie A; Guthrie, H David; Welch, Glenn R; Porter, Tom E

    2009-02-01

    The expression profile of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) in the anterior pituitary during the second half of embryonic development in the chick is consistent with in vivo regulation by circulating corticosteroids. However, nothing else has been reported about the presence of GILZ in the neuroendocrine system. We sought to characterize expression and regulation of GILZ in the chicken embryonic pituitary gland and determine the effect of GILZ overexpression on anterior pituitary hormone levels. Pituitary GILZ mRNA levels increased during embryogenesis to a maximum on the day of hatch, and decreased through the first week after hatch. GILZ expression was rapidly upregulated by corticosterone in embryonic pituitary cells. To determine whether GILZ regulates hormone gene expression in the developing anterior pituitary, we overexpressed GILZ in embryonic pituitary cells and measured mRNA for the major pituitary hormones. Exogenous GILZ increased prolactin mRNA above basal levels, but not as high as that in corticosterone-treated cells, indicating that GILZ may play a small role in lactotroph differentiation. The largest effect we observed was a twofold increase in FSH beta subunit in cells transfected with GILZ but not treated with corticosterone, suggesting that GILZ may positively regulate gonadotroph development in a manner not involving glucocorticoids. In conclusion, this is the first report to characterize avian GILZ and examine its regulation in the developing neuroendocrine system. We have shown that GILZ is upregulated by glucocorticoids in the embryonic pituitary gland and may regulate expression of several pituitary hormones.

  17. A pediatric case of pituitary macroadenoma presenting with pituitary apoplexy and cranial nerve involvement: case report

    PubMed Central

    Özçetin, Mustafa; Karacı, Mehmet; Toroslu, Ertuğ; Edebali, Nurullah

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas usually arise from the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland and are manifested with hormonal disorders or mass effect. Mass effect usually occurs in nonfunctional tumors. Pituitary adenomas may be manifested with visual field defects or rarely in the form of total oculomotor palsy. Visual field defect is most frequently in the form of bitemporal hemianopsia and superior temporal defect. Sudden loss of vision, papilledema and ophthalmoplegia may be observed. Pituitary apoplexy is defined as an acute clinical syndrome characterized with headache, vomiting, loss of vision, ophthalmoplegia and clouding of consciousness. The problem leading to pituitary apoplexy may be decreased blood supply in the adenoma and hemorrhage following this decrease or hemorrhage alone. In this article, we present a patient who presented with fever, vomiting and sudden loss of vision and limited outward gaze in the left eye following trauma and who was found to have pituitary macroadenoma causing compression of the optic chiasma and optic nerve on the left side on cranial and pituitary magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:27738402

  18. Carbenoxolone Disodium Treatment for Canine Pituitary-Dependent Hyperadrenocorticism

    PubMed Central

    Teshima, Takahiro; Matsumoto, Hirotaka; Okusa, Tomoko; Uchiyama, Rion; Koyama, Hidekazu

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism (PDH) is mainly caused by pituitary corticotroph tumors in dogs. A characteristic feature of corticotroph tumors is their resistance to negative feedback by glucocorticoids. In some animal species, including dogs, the aberrant expression of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11HSD), a cortisol metabolic enzyme, is observed in corticotroph tumors. We previously reported that carbenoxolone (CBX), an inhibitor of 11HSD, suppressed ACTH secretion from the pituitary gland, and decreased cortisol concentrations in healthy dogs. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effects of CBX on dogs with PDH. Six dogs with PDH were treated with 60 to 80 mg/kg/day of CBX for 6 weeks, followed by trilostane, which is a commonly used agent for canine PDH. CBX treatment led to a gradual decrease in both basal and in corticotropic releasing hormone (CRH)-stimulated plasma ACTH concentrations and CRH-stimulated serum cortisol concentrations, without side effects. However, basal and stimulated ACTH and cortisol concentrations remained higher than those of healthy dogs, and clinical symptoms such as polydipsia and polyuria were not ameliorated. After a 2-week wash-out interval, trilostane was administered for 2 weeks. Although basal plasma ACTH concentrations were higher after trilostane treatment than CBX treatment, polydipsia and polyuria resolved in all six dogs. The reason for the lack of improvement in polydipsia and polyuria with CBX treatment is unclear. Other mechanisms, in addition to a partial decrease in ACTH secretion, are likely to be involved. In conclusion, this is the first study to report the in vivo effects of CBX in dogs with PDH. The findings suggest that CBX inhibits ACTH secretion from canine pituitary tumors, resulting in lower cortisol concentrations. PMID:27824928

  19. Pharmacoeconomic aspects of the treatment of pituitary gland tumours

    PubMed Central

    Sowiński, Jerzy; Piątek, Katarzyna; Zybek, Ariadna; Ruchała, Marek

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays physicians are under economic pressure; therefore therapeutic decisions based on safety, efficacy, and the effectiveness of the medication also require economic analysis. The aim of this review is to discuss data concerning the cost-effectiveness of drug therapy in patients with hormonally active pituitary adenomas, namely growth hormone, adrenocorticotropic hormone, thyroid-stimulating hormone-secreting pituitary adenomas, prolactinoma and pituitary incidentaloma. In acromegalic patients using lanreotide is cheaper for health care payers and more convenient for physicians and patients because of the opportunity for self/partner injections, lower clogging risk and possibility of longer intervals between injections, while the efficacy is comparable with octreotide. Patients with prolactinomas should be treated with novel dopamine agonists, such as cabergoline or quinagolide, however, bromocriptine still remains a cheaper and almost as effective alternative. There are no easy methods or algorithms, but in general, extracting the maximum value from the investment in treatment is essential. PMID:23788980

  20. Pharmacoeconomic aspects of the treatment of pituitary gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Sowiński, Jerzy; Sawicka, Nadia; Piątek, Katarzyna; Zybek, Ariadna; Ruchała, Marek

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays physicians are under economic pressure; therefore therapeutic decisions based on safety, efficacy, and the effectiveness of the medication also require economic analysis. The aim of this review is to discuss data concerning the cost-effectiveness of drug therapy in patients with hormonally active pituitary adenomas, namely growth hormone, adrenocorticotropic hormone, thyroid-stimulating hormone-secreting pituitary adenomas, prolactinoma and pituitary incidentaloma. In acromegalic patients using lanreotide is cheaper for health care payers and more convenient for physicians and patients because of the opportunity for self/partner injections, lower clogging risk and possibility of longer intervals between injections, while the efficacy is comparable with octreotide. Patients with prolactinomas should be treated with novel dopamine agonists, such as cabergoline or quinagolide, however, bromocriptine still remains a cheaper and almost as effective alternative. There are no easy methods or algorithms, but in general, extracting the maximum value from the investment in treatment is essential.

  1. Modeling the flux of metabolites in the juvenile hormone biosynthesis pathway using generalized additive models and ordinary differential equations.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Rincón, Raúl O; Rivera-Pérez, Crisalejandra; Diambra, Luis; Noriega, Fernando G

    2017-01-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) regulates development and reproductive maturation in insects. The corpora allata (CA) from female adult mosquitoes synthesize fluctuating levels of JH, which have been linked to the ovarian development and are influenced by nutritional signals. The rate of JH biosynthesis is controlled by the rate of flux of isoprenoids in the pathway, which is the outcome of a complex interplay of changes in precursor pools and enzyme levels. A comprehensive study of the changes in enzymatic activities and precursor pool sizes have been previously reported for the mosquito Aedes aegypti JH biosynthesis pathway. In the present studies, we used two different quantitative approaches to describe and predict how changes in the individual metabolic reactions in the pathway affect JH synthesis. First, we constructed generalized additive models (GAMs) that described the association between changes in specific metabolite concentrations with changes in enzymatic activities and substrate concentrations. Changes in substrate concentrations explained 50% or more of the model deviances in 7 of the 13 metabolic steps analyzed. Addition of information on enzymatic activities almost always improved the fitness of GAMs built solely based on substrate concentrations. GAMs were validated using experimental data that were not included when the model was built. In addition, a system of ordinary differential equations (ODE) was developed to describe the instantaneous changes in metabolites as a function of the levels of enzymatic catalytic activities. The results demonstrated the ability of the models to predict changes in the flux of metabolites in the JH pathway, and can be used in the future to design and validate experimental manipulations of JH synthesis.

  2. Modeling the flux of metabolites in the juvenile hormone biosynthesis pathway using generalized additive models and ordinary differential equations

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Rincón, Raúl O.; Rivera-Pérez, Crisalejandra; Diambra, Luis; Noriega, Fernando G.

    2017-01-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) regulates development and reproductive maturation in insects. The corpora allata (CA) from female adult mosquitoes synthesize fluctuating levels of JH, which have been linked to the ovarian development and are influenced by nutritional signals. The rate of JH biosynthesis is controlled by the rate of flux of isoprenoids in the pathway, which is the outcome of a complex interplay of changes in precursor pools and enzyme levels. A comprehensive study of the changes in enzymatic activities and precursor pool sizes have been previously reported for the mosquito Aedes aegypti JH biosynthesis pathway. In the present studies, we used two different quantitative approaches to describe and predict how changes in the individual metabolic reactions in the pathway affect JH synthesis. First, we constructed generalized additive models (GAMs) that described the association between changes in specific metabolite concentrations with changes in enzymatic activities and substrate concentrations. Changes in substrate concentrations explained 50% or more of the model deviances in 7 of the 13 metabolic steps analyzed. Addition of information on enzymatic activities almost always improved the fitness of GAMs built solely based on substrate concentrations. GAMs were validated using experimental data that were not included when the model was built. In addition, a system of ordinary differential equations (ODE) was developed to describe the instantaneous changes in metabolites as a function of the levels of enzymatic catalytic activities. The results demonstrated the ability of the models to predict changes in the flux of metabolites in the JH pathway, and can be used in the future to design and validate experimental manipulations of JH synthesis. PMID:28158248

  3. Early in vitro induction of rat pituitary GH mRNA by T31.

    PubMed

    Seo, H; Brocas, H; Vassart, G; Refetoff, S

    1978-10-01

    Previous work has shown that thyroid hormone stimulates rat pituitary GH synthesis and GH mRNA activity and concentration. However, the earliest demonstration of increase in GH mRNA activity was 24 hours following T3 addition whereas stimulation of GH synthesis has been observed 2 hours after treatment with T3. Thus, it is unknown whether increase in pituitary GH mRNA is a prerequisite for the stimulation of GH synthesis. In the present investigation in vitro addition of 1.5 x 10(-10) M T3 to pituitaries isolated from hypothyroid rats resulted in a slight but significant increase of GH mRNA activity within 2 hours. Further stimulation of GH mRNA activity was observed over the period of 12 hours. No increase of GH mRNA activity occurred in the absence of T3, and T3 had no effect on the PRL mRNA activity. These findings suggest that increase in GH mRNA may be responsible for the observed induction of GH synthesis, and that at least one of the primary actions of thyroid hormone is at the nuclear level.

  4. Prokaryotic adenylate cyclase toxin stimulates anterior pituitary cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Cronin, M.J.; Evans, W.S.; Rogol, A.D.; Weiss, A.A.; Thorner, M.O.; Orth, D.N.; Nicholson, W.E.; Yasumoto, T.; Hewlett, E.L.

    1986-08-01

    Bordetella pertussis synthesis a variety of virulence factors including a calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase (AC) toxin. Treatment of anterior pituitary cells with this AC toxin resulted in an increase in cellular cAMP levels that was associated with accelerated exocytosis of growth hormone (GH), prolactin, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), and luteinizing hormone (LH). The kinetics of release of these hormones, however, were markedly different; GH and prolactin were rapidly released, while LH and ACTH secretion was more gradually elevated. Neither dopamine agonists nor somatostatin changes the ability of AC toxin to generate cAMP (up to 2 h). Low concentrations of AC toxin amplified the secretory response to hypophysiotrophic hormones. The authors conclude that bacterial AC toxin can rapidly elevate cAMP levels in anterior pituitary cells and that it is the response that explains the subsequent acceleration of hormone release.

  5. Combined Use of Etomidate and Dexmedetomidine Produces an Additive Effect in Inhibiting the Secretion of Human Adrenocortical Hormones.

    PubMed

    Gu, Hongbin; Zhang, Mazhong; Cai, Meihua; Liu, Jinfen

    2015-11-16

    BACKGROUND The direct effects of etomidate were investigated on the secretion of cortisol and its precursors by dispersed cells from the adrenal cortex of human of animals. Dexmedetomidine (DEX) is an anesthetic agent that may interfere with cortisol secretion via an unknown mechanism, such as involving inhibition of 11b-hydroxylase and the cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme system. The aim of this study was to determine whether dexmedetomidine (DEX) has a similar inhibitory effect on adrenocortical function, and whether combined use of etomidate (ETO) and DEX could produce a synergistic action in inhibiting the secretion of human adrenocortical hormones. MATERIAL AND METHODS Human adrenocortical cells were exposed to different concentrations of ETO and DEX. The dose-effect model between the ETO concentration and the mean secretion of cortisone (CORT) and aldosterone (ALDO) per hour was estimated. RESULTS Hill's equation well-described the dose-effect correlation between the ETO concentration and the amount of ALDO and CORT secretion. When the DEX concentration was introduced into the model by using E0 (basal secretion) as the covariate, the goodness of fit of the ETO-CORT dose-effect model was improved significantly and the objective function value was reduced by 4.55 points (P<0.05). The parameters of the final ETO-ALDO pharmacodynamics model were EC50=9.74, Emax=1.20, E0=1.33, and γ=18.5; the parameters of the final ETO-CORT pharmacodynamics model were EC50=9.49, Emax=8.16, E0=8.57, and γ=37.0. In the presence of DEX, E0 was 8.57-0.0247×(CDEX-4.6), and the other parameters remained unchanged. All parameters but γ were natural logarithm conversion values. CONCLUSIONS Combined use of DEX and ETO reduced ETO's inhibitory E0 (basal secretion) of CORT from human adrenocortical cells in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that combined use of ETO and DEX produced an additive effect in inhibiting the secretion of human adrenocortical hormones.

  6. Nonfunctioning giant pituitary adenomas: Invasiveness and recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Landeiro, José Alberto; Fonseca, Elissa Oliveira; Monnerat, Andrea Lima Cruz; Taboada, Giselle Fernandes; Cabral, Gustavo Augusto Porto Sereno; Antunes, Felippe

    2015-01-01

    Background: We report our surgical series of 35 patients with giant nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (GNFPA). We analyzed the rule of Ki-67 antigen expression in predicting recurrence. Methods: Thirty-five patients were operated between 2000 and 2010. Suprassellar extension of the tumors were classified according to Hardy and Mohr based on magnetic resonance (MR) studies. Pituitary endocrine function and MR scans were assessed preoperatively and at 1, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Immunohistochemical studies were based in regard to the expression of the proliferative Ki-67 index and the hormonal receptor for luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone, growth hormone, thyroid stimulating hormone, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and prolactin. Tumors specimens were obtained from 35 patients with GNFPA. Endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery was the approach of choice. Results: Thirty-five patients were submitted to 49 surgeries, 44 (89.8%) were transsphenoidal and 5 (10.2%) were transcranial. The most frequent preoperative complaints were visual acuity impairment and visual field defect in 25 (71.2%) and 23 (65.7%) cases, respectively. Improvement of visual acuitiy and visual field deficit after surgery was seen in 20 (80%) and 17 (73.9%) patients, respectively. Endocrinological deficits were encountered in 20 patients (57.1%). After surgery, 18 patients (51.4%) required hormonal replacement. Three patients had visual symptoms related to pituitary apoplexy and recovered after surgery. The Ki-67 labeling index (LI) ranged from <1% to 4.8%. The rate of recurrence in tumors with Ki-67 <3% was 7.7% (2 patients), Ki-67 >3% was present in 5 patients and the recurrence committed 3 patients. Conclusion: In our series, regardless the improvement of visual function and compressing symptoms, 5 patients with expression of Ki-67 LI more than 3% experienced a recurrence. PMID:26674325

  7. Flow cytometric immunofluorescence of rat anterior pituitary cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfield, J. Michael; Hymer, W. C.

    1985-01-01

    A flow cytometric immunofluorescence technique was developed for the quantification of growth hormone, prolactin, and luteinizing hormone producing cells. The procedure is based on indirect-immunofluorescence of intracellular hormone using an EPICS V cell sorter and can objectively count 50,000 cells in about 3 minutes. It can be used to study the dynamics of pituitary cell populations under various physiological and pharmacological conditions.

  8. Pituitary autoimmunity in patients with Sheehan's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Ravinder; Kochupillai, Narayana; Crock, Patricia A; Jaleel, Abdul; Gupta, Nandita

    2002-09-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is a frequent complication of pregnancy in India. Sheehan's description of postpartum hypopituitarism promoted the belief that PPH leads to necrosis of the enlarged pituitary gland of pregnancy and hypopituitarism. However, slow clinical progression suggests factors other than ischemia in its pathogenesis. Tissue necrosis could release sequestered antigens, triggering autoimmunity of the pituitary and delayed hypopituitarism in Sheehan's syndrome. Twenty-six consecutive patients with postpartum hypopituitarism were studied, 19 with Sheehan's syndrome based on a history of PPH and hormone profile suggesting pituitary failure [mean (SD) age 32.7 +/- 6.4 yr, duration of illness 5.5 +/- 3.1 yr], and seven patients with no history of PPH, categorized as "Other." Pituitary imaging and basal T(4), TSH, cortisol, LH, FSH, 17beta-estradiol, and autoantibodies against pituitary (PitAb) and thyroid (TMA) were evaluated. Controls included 28 healthy females without prior conception (22 +/- 5 yr) and 28 with prior conception (26 +/- 5 yr). Twelve of 19 (63.1%) patients with Sheehan's syndrome and one of seven in the Other group had PitAb against the 49-kDa autoantigen; neuron-specific enolase. Four of 28 (14.2%) controls without prior conception and 5 of 28 (17.8%) controls with prior conception had PitAb positivity (P < 0.001 and <0.01 vs. Sheehan's syndrome, respectively). There was no significant difference in the mean serum hormone values and TMA positivity between patients with Sheehan's syndrome and the Other group as well as patients with or without PitAb positivity. Pituitary autoimmunity may play a role in the cause of hypopituitarism following PPH.

  9. [Genetics and phenogenetics of the hormonal characteristics of animals. VI. Functional activity of certain chemoreceptors connected with the pituitary-adrenal system of silver foxes selected for their behavior].

    PubMed

    Naumenko, E V; Trut, L N; Pavlova, S I; Beliaev, D K

    1980-01-01

    Seasonal differences in the reaction of the pituitary-adrenal system in domesticated and non-domesticated silver foxes of both sexes to substances activating alpha-, beta-adrenoreceptors, and serotonin receptors were studied. It was shown that the reactivity of the pituitary-adrenal system in silver foxes of either type of behaviour is due, at least partially, to seasonal differences in the state of adrenergic and serotoninergic mechanisms. At the same time, in silver foxes selected for behaviour to man the reaction of the pituitary-adrenal system to the injection of substances activating adrenergic and serotoninergic receptors differs, during the year, from the reaction to these compounds in non-selected animals. The conclusion was made, that in the process of domestication changes take place in the state of serotonin- and noradrenaline mechanisms connected with the regulation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal complex.

  10. Ikaros and its interacting partner CtBP target the metalloprotease ADAMTS10 to modulate pituitary cell function.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhongyi; Asa, Sylvia L; Ezzat, Shereen

    2017-01-05

    We have previously described the expression and up-regulation of the C-terminal Binding Protein (CtBP) in response to pituitary hypoxia. This co-repressor interacts with the hematopoietic factor Ikaros to target several components implicated in cellular growth and apoptotic pathways. To identify common transcriptional pituitary targets we performed promoter arrays using Ikaros and CtBP chromatin immunoprecipitated (ChIP) DNA from pituitary AtT20 cells. This approach yielded a finite list of gene targets common to both transcription factors. Of these, the metalloprotease ADAMTS10 emerged as a validated target. We show the ability of Ikaros to bind the ADAMTS10 promoter, influence its transfected activity, and induce endogenous gene expression. ADAMTS10 is expressed in primary pituitary cells and is down-regulated in Ikaros null mice. Further, knockdown of ADAMTS10 in AtT20 cells recapitulates the impact of Ikaros deficiency on POMC/ACTH hormone expression. These results uncover a novel role for the metalloprotease ADAMTS10 in the pituitary. Additionally, they position this metalloprotease as a potential functional integrator of the Ikaros-CtBP chromatin remodeling network.

  11. Immunohistochemical evidence for the presence of glucokinase in the gonadotropes and thyrotropes of the anterior pituitary gland of rat and monkey.

    PubMed

    Sorenson, Robert L; Stout, Laurence E; Brelje, T Clark; Jetton, Thomas L; Matschinsky, Franz M

    2007-06-01

    A recent report provides new evidence for the presence of glucokinase (GK) in the anterior pituitary. In the present study, immunohistochemistry was used to identify the cells containing GK in the pituitary of rats and monkeys. In rats, GK was detected as a generalized cytoplasmic staining in a discrete population of cells in the anterior pituitary. In colocalization experiments, the majority of cells expressing follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) or luteinizing hormone (LH) also contained GK. In addition to the gonadotropes, GK was observed in a subpopulation of corticotropes and thyrotropes. GK was not detected in cells expressing growth hormone or prolactin. In monkeys, GK was also observed in a discrete population of cells. Intracellular distribution differed from the rat in that GK in most cells was concentrated in a perinuclear location that appeared to be associated with the Golgi apparatus. However, similar to rats, colocalization experiments showed that the majority of cells expressing FSH or LH also contained GK. In addition to the gonadotropes, GK was observed in a subpopulation of corticotropes and thyrotropes. In the monkey, only a few cells had generalized cytoplasmic staining for GK. These experiments provide further evidence for the presence of GK in the anterior pituitary. Although some corticotropes and thyrotropes contained GK, the predominant cell type expressing GK was gonadotropes. In view of the generally accepted role of GK as a glucose sensor in a variety of cells including the insulin-producing pancreatic beta-cells as the prototypical example, it is hypothesized that hormone synthesis and/or release in pituitary cells containing GK may be directly influenced by blood glucose.

  12. [Thyrotropin--TSH secreting pituitary tumor].

    PubMed

    Zieliński, Grzegorz; Podgórski, Jan K; Warczyńska, Agnieszka; Koziarski, Andrzej; Zgliczyński, Wojciech

    2002-01-01

    Thyrotropin-releasing pituitary tumors represent 0.9 to 2.8% of all pituitary adenomas. They cause secondary or central hyperthyroidism. The diagnosis of these tumors has been increasing in the past 20 years. It was produced by introduction of the sensitive immunoradio-metric assay of TSH and better radiological imaging (magnetic resonance imaging). TSH--secreting pituitary adenomas are aggressive and invasive neoplasms. Most reports describe a poor outcome after pharmacological therapy, surgery and radiation therapy. Presently the diagnosis of thyrotropin-secreting pituitary tumor is based on the lack of: a. inhibition of TSH levels in the presence of increased free thyroid hormones; b. response of TSH to stimulation with TRH; c. and presence of a abnormal, neoplastic(adenomatous) intrasellar or parasellar mass. Surgical excision (selective adenomectomy) by the transsphenoidal route is the first treatment. Craniotomy should be reserved for parasellar tumors with significant lateral extension. Pharmacological pretreatment with long acting somatostatin analogues is recently a standard before surgery. This medical treatment of the TSH-omas is effective in reducing TSH and free thyroid hormone plasma levels. Administration of the somatostatin analogues causing tumor mass shrinkage and changes consistency. This pretreatment is effective therapy and improves surgical outcome especially in patients harbouring macroadenomas. Radiotherapy is noncurative and produces long term complications (hypopituitarism). Authors present and discuss current cure criteria of TSH-omas with reference to their clinical experience.

  13. Expression of orexin receptors in the pituitary.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, Tadeusz; Smolinska, Nina

    2012-01-01

    Orexin receptors type 1 (OX1R) and type 2 (OX2R) are G protein-coupled receptors whose structure is highly conserved in mammals. OX1R is selective for orexin A, and OX2R binds orexin A and orexin B with similar affinity. Orexin receptor expression was observed in human, rat, porcine, sheep as well as Xenopus laevis pituitaries, both in the adenohypophysis and in the neurohypophysis. The expression level is regulated by gonadal steroid hormones and GnRH. The majority of orexins reaching the pituitary originate from the lateral hypothalamus, but due to the presence of the receptors and the local production of orexins in the pituitary, orexins could deliver an auto/paracrine effect within the gland. Cumulative data indicate that orexins are involved in the regulation of LH, GH, PRL, ACTH, and TSH secretion by pituitary cells, pointing to orexins' effect on the functioning of the endocrine axes. Those hormones may also serve as a signal linking metabolic status with endocrine control of sleep, arousal, and reproduction processes.

  14. General Information about Pituitary Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumors that may spread to bones of the skull or the sinus cavity below the pituitary gland. ... sella (the bone at the base of the skull , where the pituitary gland sits). Recurrent Pituitary Tumors ...

  15. Treatment Option Overview (Pituitary Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumors that may spread to bones of the skull or the sinus cavity below the pituitary gland. ... sella (the bone at the base of the skull , where the pituitary gland sits). Recurrent Pituitary Tumors ...

  16. Treatment Options for Pituitary Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumors that may spread to bones of the skull or the sinus cavity below the pituitary gland. ... sella (the bone at the base of the skull , where the pituitary gland sits). Recurrent Pituitary Tumors ...

  17. Male hormonal contraceptives: current status and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Amory, John K

    2005-01-01

    Because of the shortcomings of currently available methods of male contraception, efforts have been made to develop additional forms of contraception for men. The most promising approach to male contraceptive development involves hormones, and requires the administration of exogenous testosterone. When administered to a healthy man, testosterone functions as a contraceptive by suppressing the secretion of luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone from the pituitary, thereby depriving the testes of the signals required for normal spermatogenesis. After 2-3 months of treatment, low levels of pituitary gonadotropins lead to markedly decreased sperm counts and effective contraception in the majority of men. Treatment with exogenous testosterone has proven not to be associated with serious adverse effects and is well tolerated by men. In addition, sperm counts uniformly normalize when testosterone is discontinued. Thus, male hormonal contraception is safe, effective, and reversible; however, spermatogenesis is not suppressed to zero in all men, meaning that some diminished potential for fertility persists. Because of this, recent studies have combined testosterone with progestogens and/or gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonists to further suppress pituitary gonadotropins and optimize contraceptive efficacy. Current combinations of testosterone and progestogens completely suppress spermatogenesis in 80-90% of men without severe adverse effects, with significant suppression in the remainder of individuals. Recent trials with newer, long-acting forms of injectable testosterone, which can be administered every 8 weeks, combined with progestogens, administered either orally or by long-acting implant, have yielded promising results and may soon result in the marketing of a safe, reversible, and effective hormonal contraceptive for men.

  18. Pituitary follicular cells produce basic fibroblast growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrara, N.; Schweigerer, L.; Neufeld, G.; Mitchell, R.; Gospodarowicz, D.

    1987-08-01

    Cultured monolayers of bovine pituitary follicular cells, which transport ions, contain high amounts of mitogenic activity for endothelial cells which, on the basis of gene expression analysis, heparin-Sepharose elution profile, bioassay, immunoblotting, radioimmunoassay, and radioreceptor assay, has been identified as basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). These data indicate that follicular cells may be a major source of bFGF in the pituitary gland. Considering that bFGF has been proposed to play a role in paracrine regulation of pituitary hormone secretion, the data also suggest that these cells may exert important local regulatory functions.

  19. Early hyponatraemia after pituitary surgery: cerebral salt-wasting syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, R; Pumar, A; Soto, A; Pomares, M A; Palma, S; Mangas, M A; Leal, A; Villamil, F

    2007-06-01

    Hyponatraemia is a common complication in patients undergoing neurosurgery. It can be caused either by the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone or by the cerebral salt-wasting syndrome (CSWS). CSWS frequently occurs in patients suffering from subarachnoid haemorrhage and brain injury, but it is rare after pituitary tumour surgery. However, this diagnostic possibility should be considered as these disorders require specific treatment and have different prognoses. In this article, we present a case of acute and early hyponatraemia caused by CSWS after pituitary tumour surgery. We also revise the aetiology, mechanisms, differential diagnosis and treatment of hyponatraemia after pituitary surgery.

  20. Cabergoline use for pituitary tumors and valvular disorders.

    PubMed

    Auriemma, Renata S; Pivonello, Rosario; Ferreri, Lucia; Priscitelli, Prisco; Colao, Annamaria

    2015-03-01

    Cabergoline (CAB) is widely used for the medical treatment of pituitary tumors, particularly those associated with hormone hypersecretion. Whether treatment with CAB is associated with an increased risk of clinically relevant cardiac valve disease in patients with pituitary tumors is still debated. In most studies, CAB has been found not associated with an increased risk of significant valvulopathy, and no correlation has been shown between valvular abnormalities and CAB duration or cumulative dose. This review provides an overview of the studies reporting on the outcome of CAB in terms of cardiac valve disease in patients with pituitary tumors.

  1. Assessment of hypothalamic pituitary function in endocrine disease

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, F. C.; Landon, J.

    1966-01-01

    The insulin test carried out with adequate safeguards under standardized conditions yields valuable information regarding hypothalamic and pituitary function when plasma levels of sugar, cortisol, and growth hormone are determined. The use of a test based on the plasma cortisol response to the infusion of lysine-vasopressin, a polypeptide with a corticotrophin-releasing action, is also of value as a test of pituitary function. Used in conjunction with the insulin test it enables pituitary disorders to be differentiated from those involving the hypothalamus. PMID:4287115

  2. Preparations of homeostatic thymus hormone consist predominantly of histones 2A and 2B and suggest additional histone functions.

    PubMed Central

    Reichhart, R; Zeppezauer, M; Jörnvall, H

    1985-01-01

    The two major constituents in preparations of the homeostatic thymus hormone (HTH) were purified. Amino acid sequence analysis showed that the components (HTH alpha and HTH beta) are identical to histones H2A and H2B, suggesting the possibility that histones might have hitherto unrecognized occurrence and functions. If the HTH activities are not ascribed to the two histones in the preparation, they could only be derived from minor constituents present in minimal amounts. Therefore, the histone structures were scrutinized for properties of relevance in relation to hormone activities and for similarities with thymic hormones. Similarities between COOH-terminal regions of histones H2A, H2B, and H3 were noticed, as well as some similarities between NH2-terminal regions of histones and parts of recognized thymus hormones and related proteins. Potential signals, resembling cleavage sites in prohormones, are present in the histone structures, and further correlations with recently discovered ubiquitin functions may explain molecular mechanisms for actions of the HTH preparations. None of the observations is significant by itself, but the combined results suggest the hypothesis of different relationships and functions, including hormone-like activities, for some histones. Images PMID:3860828

  3. Pituitary Phenotypes of Mice Lacking the Notch Signalling Ligand Delta-Like 1 Homologue

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, L Y M; Rizzoti, K; Lovell-Badge, R; Tissier, P R

    2013-01-01

    The Notch signalling pathway ligand delta-like 1 homologue (Dlk1, also named Pref1) is expressed throughout the developing pituitary and becomes restricted to mostly growth hormone (GH) cells within the adult gland. We have investigated the role of Dlk1 in pituitary development and function from late embryogenesis to adulthood using a mouse model completely lacking the expression of Dlk1. We confirm that Dlk1-null mice are shorter and weigh less than wild-type littermates from late gestation, at parturition and in adulthood. A loss of Dlk1 leads to significant reduction in GH content throughout life, whereas other pituitary hormones are reduced to varying degrees depending on sex and age. Both the size of the pituitary and the proportion of hormone-producing cell populations are unchanged, suggesting that there is a reduction in hormone content per cell. In vivo challenge of mutant and wild-type littermates with growth hormone-releasing hormone and growth hormone-releasing hexapeptide shows that reduced GH secretion is unlikely to account for the reduced growth of Dlk1 knockout animals. These data suggest that loss of Dlk1 gives rise to minor pituitary defects manifesting as an age- and sex-dependent reduction in pituitary hormone contents. However, Dlk1 expression in other tissue is most likely responsible for the weight and length differences observed in mutant animals. PMID:23279263

  4. Calsyntenins are secretory granule proteins in anterior pituitary gland and pancreatic islet alpha cells.

    PubMed

    Rindler, Michael J; Xu, Chong-Feng; Gumper, Iwona; Cen, Chuan; Sonderegger, Peter; Neubert, Thomas A

    2008-04-01

    Calsyntenins are members of the cadherin superfamily of cell adhesion molecules. They are present in postsynaptic membranes of excitatory neurons and in vesicles in transit to neuronal growth cones. In the current study, calsyntenin-1 (CST-1) and calsyntenin-3 (CST-3) were identified by mass spectrometric analysis (LC-MS/MS) of integral membrane proteins from highly enriched secretory granule preparations from bovine anterior pituitary gland. Immunofluorescence microscopy on thin frozen sections of rat pituitary revealed that CST-1 was present only in gonadotropes where it colocalized with follicle-stimulating hormone in secretory granules. In contrast, CST-3 was present not only in gonadotrope secretory granules but also in those of somatotropes and thyrotropes. Neither protein was detected in mammatropes. In addition, CST-1 was also localized to the glucagon-containing secretory granules of alpha cells in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans. Results indicate that calsyntenins function outside the nervous system and potentially are modulators of endocrine function.

  5. Pituitary function after treatment of intracranial tumours in children.

    PubMed

    Shalet, S M; Beardwell, C G; Morris-Jones, P H; Pearson, D

    1975-07-19

    Pituitary-function tests have been done in twenty-seven patients at various times after treatment in childhood for intracranial tumours not directly involving the hypothalamic-pituitary region. Impaired growth hormone (G.H.) responses to hypoglycaemia and 'Bovril' were found in ten children. There seeems to be progressive impairment in G.H. production with time after treatment. During the first 3 months after neurosurgery no child was found to be G.H. deficient, but the peak G.H. response of this group seemed to be blunted when compared with a control group of children who had been treated for abdominal tumours. The rest of anterior-pituitary function in G.H.-deficient children seems quite normal except for a significantly greater basal thyroid-stimulating hormone (T.S.H.) level and T;S.H. response after thyrotrophin-releasing hormone. Two girls have developed secondary amenorrhoea, and one is G.H. deficient.

  6. The human growth hormone gene is regulated by a multicomponent locus control region

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.; Cooke, N.E.; Liebhaber, S.A.; Monks, B.R.

    1995-12-01

    This article describes research involving the five-member human growth hormone (hGH)/chorionic somatomammotropin (hCS) gene cluster and its expression in the placenta. The results indicate that interactions among multiple elements are required to restrict hGH transcription to the pituitary and generate appropriate levels of expression in the mouse genome. In addition, the results suggest a role for shared and unique regulatory sequences in locus control region-mediated expression of the hGH/hCS gene cluster in the pituitary and possibly the placenta. 67 refs., 9 figs.

  7. Transforming growth factor-beta, transforming growth factor-beta receptor II, and p27Kip1 expression in nontumorous and neoplastic human pituitaries.

    PubMed Central

    Jin, L.; Qian, X.; Kulig, E.; Sanno, N.; Scheithauer, B. W.; Kovacs, K.; Young, W. F.; Lloyd, R. V.

    1997-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta has been implicated in the regulation of normal and neoplastic anterior pituitary cell function. TGF-beta regulates the expression of various proteins, including p27Kip1 (p27), a cell cycle inhibitory protein. We examined TGF-beta, TGF-beta type II receptor (TGF-beta-RII), and p27 expression in normal pituitaries, pituitary adenomas, and carcinomas to analyze the possible roles of these proteins in pituitary tumorigenesis. Normal pituitary, pituitary adenomas, and pituitary carcinomas all expressed TGF-beta and TGF-beta-RII immunoreactivity. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis showed TGF-beta 1, -beta 2, and -beta 3 isoforms and TGF-beta-RII in normal pituitaries and pituitary adenomas. Pituitary adenomas cells cultured for 7 days in defined media showed a biphasic response to TGF-beta with significant inhibition of follicle-stimulating hormone secretion at higher concentrations (10(-9) mol/L) and stimulation of follicle-stimulating hormone secretion at lower concentrations (10(-13) mol/L) of TGF-beta 1 in gonadotroph adenomas. Immunohistochemical analysis for p27 protein expression showed the highest levels in nontumorous pituitaries with decreased immunoreactivity in adenomas and carcinomas. When nontumorous pituitaries and various adenomas were analyzed for p27 and specific hormone production, growth hormone, luteinizing hormone, and thyroid-stimulating hormone cells and tumors had the highest percentages of cells expressing p27, whereas adrenocorticotrophic hormone cells and tumors had the lowest percentages. Immunoblotting analysis showed that adrenocorticotrophic hormone adenomas also had the lowest levels of p27 protein. Semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Northern hybridization analysis did not show significant differences in p27 mRNA expression in the various types of adenomas or in nontumorous pituitaries. In situ hybridization for p27 mRNA showed similar

  8. Pituitary Gland Disorders Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the anterior (front part) of the pituitary gland: Prolactin - Prolactin stimulates breast milk production after childbirth. It also affects sex ... Oxytocin – Oxytocin causes milk to flow from the breasts in breastfeeding women, ... disorder is a pituitary gland tumor. These tumors are fairly common in adults. ...

  9. [New aspects of tumor pathology of the pituitary].

    PubMed

    Saeger, W

    2015-05-01

    Pituitary adenomas have to be studied in detail for structural characteristics, especially regarding the degree of granulation and immunohistochemical hormone expression, such as growth hormone (GH), prolactin, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and proliferation markers (e.g. Ki-67 and p53) for correlation to clinical data and assessment of the prognosis. If histological and immunostaining data do not correlate to the patient data, explanations for the discrepancies must be found. All active adenoma types can also be present as inactive, so-called silent adenomas showing the same features. An increased Ki-67 index (> 3%), significant nuclear expression of protein p53 and mitoses are characteristic of atypical adenomas. Up to now the biological relevance of these atypical adenomas, especially their role as preneoplasms for pituitary carcinomas has not been fully elucidated. The only proof of a pituitary carcinoma is the existence of metastases. Extensive local invasion and a greatly increased Ki-67 index are not sufficient for this diagnosis. Craniopharyngiomas have to be classified into adamantinomatous types (intrasellar and suprasellar) and papillary types (only suprasellar). Regressive changes are found in adamantinomatous types only. Strong regression may lead to difficulties in the differential diagnosis of Rathke's cleft cysts with squamous metaplasia. Demonstration of nuclear expression of beta-catenin in these cases enables the diagnosis of craniopharyngioma. Papillary craniopharyngiomas are characterized by BRAF mutations that may be helpful in the differential diagnosis. All pituicytomas of the neurohypophysis, all spindle cell oncocytomas of the anterior pituitary and all granular cell tumors of the posterior pituitary express thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1) and are thought to be variants of a common uniform spindle cell tumor of the pituitary.

  10. Multiple cytosolic calcium buffers in posterior pituitary nerve terminals

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Shane M.; Chang, Che-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Cytosolic Ca2+ buffers bind to a large fraction of Ca2+ as it enters a cell, shaping Ca2+ signals both spatially and temporally. In this way, cytosolic Ca2+ buffers regulate excitation-secretion coupling and short-term plasticity of release. The posterior pituitary is composed of peptidergic nerve terminals, which release oxytocin and vasopressin in response to Ca2+ entry. Secretion of these hormones exhibits a complex dependence on the frequency and pattern of electrical activity, and the role of cytosolic Ca2+ buffers in controlling pituitary Ca2+ signaling is poorly understood. Here, cytosolic Ca2+ buffers were studied with two-photon imaging in patch-clamped nerve terminals of the rat posterior pituitary. Fluorescence of the Ca2+ indicator fluo-8 revealed stepwise increases in free Ca2+ after a series of brief depolarizing pulses in rapid succession. These Ca2+ increments grew larger as free Ca2+ rose to saturate the cytosolic buffers and reduce the availability of Ca2+ binding sites. These titration data revealed two endogenous buffers. All nerve terminals contained a buffer with a Kd of 1.5–4.7 µM, and approximately half contained an additional higher-affinity buffer with a Kd of 340 nM. Western blots identified calretinin and calbindin D28K in the posterior pituitary, and their in vitro binding properties correspond well with our fluorometric analysis. The high-affinity buffer washed out, but at a rate much slower than expected from diffusion; washout of the low-affinity buffer could not be detected. This work has revealed the functional impact of cytosolic Ca2+ buffers in situ in nerve terminals at a new level of detail. The saturation of these cytosolic buffers will amplify Ca2+ signals and may contribute to use-dependent facilitation of release. A difference in the buffer compositions of oxytocin and vasopressin nerve terminals could contribute to the differences in release plasticity of these two hormones. PMID:26880753

  11. Mobilized adult pituitary stem cells contribute to endocrine regeneration in response to physiological demand.

    PubMed

    Rizzoti, Karine; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Lovell-Badge, Robin

    2013-10-03

    Pituitary hormone deficiencies, with Growth Hormone deficiency being most frequent (1 in 3,500-10,000 births), cause significant morbidity. Regeneration of missing endocrine cells would be a significant improvement over hormone replacement therapies, which incur side effects and do not mimic physiological secretion patterns. Recent in vitro studies have identified a population of adult pituitary progenitors that express the HMG box transcription factors SOX2 and SOX9. Here, we apply cell-lineage tracing analysis to demonstrate that SOX2- and SOX9-expressing progenitors can self-renew and give rise to endocrine cells in vivo, suggesting that they are tissue stem cells. Moreover, we show that they can become mobilized and differentiate into the appropriate endocrine cell types in response to physiological stress. Our results highlight the pituitary